Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00851
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 7, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00851
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text





















Tepr Aaatr lNs ftmr nIh


Spence-Jones, Regalado


Skip community debate

By Sandra J. Charity sooner Tomas Regalado shouldn't exempt herself from .
scharite@miamitimesonline.com was greatly needed; the attending these commumty
two were absent from meetings. Who does she think
The aim was a leadership the debates. she is?"
position--as the City of Miami Audience members Fifty-seven-year-old Maurice
mayoral or as District 5 Com- were outraged that Benson agreed.
missioner--when the three can- Spence-Jones would "We are in a recession but it
didates who showed up for the not attend when it is seems like District 5 has been in
Monday night debate met at the crucial to the future of a recession for way too long," he
Mount Sinai Missionary Baptist CHIVERTON District 5. TORAIN said. "I love Spence-Jones but
Church in Liberty. "This is an important we need leadership in this com-
While the presence of District 5 incum- time," said Bernice Woodward, an Alla- unity will be there when we call."
bent Commissioner Michelle Spence- pattah resident. "I understand that she Spence-Jones told The Miami Emes
Jones and mayoral candidate Commis- is the current Commissioner but she Please turn to DEBATE 10A




Jackson Health System needs


more reliable limding.source


JAfflSSHORCial WOCS


tb Or esonline.com
MIAMI TIMESEX CLUSIVE

Jackson Health System has been a
victim of the economic downturn accord-
ing to John Copeland III, who chairs the
Jackson Health Trust. "We have a sys-
tem that is not financially sustainable
right now. I'm very concerned, in fact I
was up at 3 o'clock," he said.
THE PROBLEM
Each year, the three largest contribu-'
tors to Jackson's coffers are Commer-
cial insurance, a portion of the half cent


-Photo by Vaughn Wilson
Ahmad Newbold

FAMU's Head Drum


MRjOr Ahmad Newbold
Special to the Miami Emes
Florida A 85 M University Head Drum Major Ahmad Newbold
will.1ead the "Marching 100" on the Land Shark Stadium field on
Saturday, Oct. 10 during the half-time show when the undefeat-
ed FAMU Rattlers play the University of Miami Hurricanes. The
half-time show will give a special tribute to the late King of Pop,
Michael Jackson under the direction of Dr. Julian White, FAMU
Director of Bands and assisted by Dr. Shelby Chipman, Associate
Director of Bands.
In 2004, after Miami Jackson Senior High's band director un
Please turn to NEWBOLD 4A


The matchup
FAMU (4-0) VS. MIAMI (3-1)

:::::,A n e D
in Miami Gardens, Saturday, October 10 at 7 p.m.


Budget crisis costs community services


RANDT .SHANNON


I


5, 111,, 10 P 11I1111 II 11 1! 11 11, I(TI


II:


i. :~


John Copeland III, Chairman of the Publ~ic Health


sales tax set aside for it by the county,

EaMhe cth eMee streams is dry-
ing up. The number of uninsured pa-
tients served by Jackson Health System
has risen by 22 percent over lakt year,
according to Robert Alonso, Vice Presi-
dent of public relations for the trust.
These uninsured patients still require
care, but they often have no way of pay-
ing for it.
The second revenue source, Natural-
ly; with people spending less an saving
more, and with unemployment on the
rise, revenues from the half-cent sales
tax have declined as well---to the tune of
$25 million.
Please turn to FUNDING 6A


JOHN COPELAND Ill


not been made yet, but Wil-
ne.com helmina Ford, president of
the American Postal Worker's
Edison Union's Miami Dade chapter
n's fu- believes that it has.
It has ."That facility has been there
of more for many years, and when it
closes, people will
miss it. You've got
a school there, sev-
eral churches, and
several small busi-
1 nesses that use it,"
she said. "And I say
'when' because I
believe they're go-
ing to close it."
What disturbs
Ford about the of-
WII.HEl.MINA FORD fice's possible clo-
president of the American sure is the possible
Postal Worker's Union's disruption in ser-
Miami Dode chapter vices for frequent
attendees.
xes. The "Some senior citizens have
. 30. their PO boxes there, where
ion has their checks come. But some-


By Tariq Osborne ,
tosborne @miamitimesonli

Since August, the .
Center Finance station
ture has been shaky.
been placed on a list
than 3,200 post offic-
es through the station
that may close due
to a sharp decline in
mail volume. This de-
cline, brought on by
the rise of email for
both bill-paying and
personal correspondn
dence, has resulted
in a nearly $7 billion
loss for the post of-
fice this fiscal year
despite a two-cent
increase in the price
of stamps in May,
cuts in staff and re
moval of collection bo
fiscal year ended Sept
Officially the decis


Special to The Miami 77mes
After facing four ranked opponents this
season, and claiming victory over three,
the Miami Hurricanes should easily han-
dle Florida A&M's Rattlers. Quite simply;
they cannot afford a loss.
The 11th-ranked Hurricanes, on the
verge ofrejoinifig the nation's elite, would
find the optimism coach Randy Shannon
has helped to build destroyed.
After the team lost its final three
games last season, expectations for
Miami (3-1) weren't high for 2009. The
teatn faced a rough early schedule.
The Hurricanes, though, took three
of four against Top 25 teams. And the
program's defeat of then-No. 8 Oklaho-
ma (21-20) last Saturday, was its most
significant win in several years.
The victory was Miami's first over
a top 10 team since a 27-7 road
win over then-No. 3 Virginia Tech on Nov.
5, 2005.
Coach Shannon is still convinced
Please turn to MATCHUP 4A


.
JOE TAYLOR
FAMU Head Coach


THE EDISON BRANCH post office located at 760 N.W. 62nd Street.


how that's not enough," she
said.
"I think it's terrible because
service is what they preach,
but what they actually go by
is revenue. They don't look at


the need of the community. If
the community is not express-
ing the need through revenue,
they'll close it. The priority is
much more on revenue than
Please turn to BUDGET 6A


TUESDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


SUNDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


Maiamti's owna leads


MONDAY








2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009 1


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rares- One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
P pr cl it e a t ira Id ada
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.0 Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and nadonal antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race. creed or color, ble or herfluman and Iqgal rights. Hating no person feanng no person, the
Black Press strives to help every person in the FIrm belief that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back


* eaug emmae s a aageam


i A


1F


OPINION


ER"?"" at 900 NW 5-Sth Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. MIami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Service cuts are marginalizing
*
Black commumty
It is common sense that some "belt tightening" is alwayS
necessary during difficult economic times, but the county
is taking the wrong approach.
The closing of the government office at the Joseph Caleb Cen-
ter, and the likely closing of the post office's Edison Branch will
save a little money, but at great cost to the Black community.
These are some of the poorest areas of Miami-Dade, yet they
appear to be first on the chopping block.
H. Leigh Toney, Executive Director of Miami-Dade College
North Campus's Meek Entrepreneurial Center, was correct in
pointing out that many of the Edison Branch Post Office's pa-
trons do not have the means to travel five miles to the MLK
Branch. For a service as basic as mail, priority should be placed
on service and area coverage rather than economics,
The same can be said of the North Dade Justice Center and
Joseph Caleb Center offices. In both cases, it seems strange
that those least likely to own a car should be the first obliged
to travel.
People go to the Joseph Caleb Center and the North Dade
Justice Center, among other reasons, to update car tags and
pay taxes. During an economic slump, why is the county mak-
ing it more difficult to give them money?
The insidious thing about these closings is that they represent
a permanent solution to an economic slump widely regarded as
temporary. When the economy recovers, will these offices be re-
opened---or will they remain closed in the name of "efficiency."
Will the Bhick community remain "out of the loop?"
Can citizens of certain parts of Miami-Dade rely on services
the rest of the county enjoys only when times are good?
Unfortunately, the closings of the Caleb Center Government
Branch and it's counterpart at the North Dside Justice Center
have already been decided. But whether the post office closes is
not decided by the County. The Liberty City Neighborhood can
still save the Edison Branch post office.
Post office officials generally notify the community and ask
for feedback in a town-hall type .forum according to Wilhelmi-
na Ford, President of the Miami-Dade Branch of the American
Postal Worker's Union. If this occurs, the community must en-
gage itself. It is apparent that the county will notprotect our
most vulnerable members during this crisis. The community
must prove that in difficult times; its elderly, its handicapped
and infirm,.remain a priority.
To be certain, each neighborhood must sacrifice, but in re-
moving vital services from an already ailing community, the
county asks far too much.


AP.


frruln y )Ir fll 44t (t (W1 f l~


~ir ck~r t in Ih~ ur)un ~\~nnrun~t~


Coprihtd Mteia


rrrrr rn F'r~* ~r.*~~M.


YC* t~rllur Ilrt rrr f* C \Fbi rcl~ i~ rr


~





















I


LOCAL ClOM~lMENTARY -- OUl~R COMMUNlC~ITY VENTIS


BLACKS MusT`CONTROL'THEIR O'N DESTINY


ture among women of color. Even
Our children are not exempt, they
have now become 75 percent of
all its fatal victims.
Finally, we heard that it was
a jail and prison phenomenon,
isolated and too far away to af-


from the Black and Brown com-
munities.
We also have seen the victims
as mainly questionable and un-
worthy moles even though they
are often husbands, fathers,
brothers, sons, and boyfriends,


This terrible and terrifying
creature is called HIV/AIDS and
it has come to our community
and is consuming our life energy
and undermining our future. It
is now the number one killer of
our people between the ages of
22-45. Although we are only 12
percent of the U.S. population,
we are 50 percent of the casual-
ties of this terrible and terrifying
creature in its non-fatal form.
As the casualties mount day after
day through disease and death,
it is urgent and unavoidable that
we as a community come to-
gether, set aside our fears, pho-
bias, misconceptions and costly
silence and actively confront this
horrible threat to our lives and
future as a people.


There is a terrible and terrify-
ing creature stalking the Black
community day and night. Peo-
ple regularly hear reports and
sometimes see the horrible and
constant toll that it's taking on
our lives, but there seems to be
an unannounced agreement not
to talk about it openly and hon-
estly.. Perhaps, there is a desper-
ate hope that if we don't mention
its name and recognize its pres-
will ckly
ea e etlya tawa e.as qui
At first, we saw it as a problem
for people outside our community
because the majority of the vis-
ible victims were white. But now,
the victims are rapidly changing
color and 66 percent of all newly
diagnosed and dying victims are


Today is a sad day in the his-
tory of the South Florida Catho-
lic Church.
Not only is this the last day in
the "Life" of 13 Catholic Church-
es, but two of those churches
were attended by predominately
Black Catholics St. Francis
of Overtown and St. Philip Neri
of Opa-locka / Miami Gardens.
As a member of St. Philip Neri,
I was saddened in May to hear
the letter from the archdiocese
read at Sunday mass announc-
ing my-church (that I attended
for 25 years) was closing. It was
like a life threatening diagno-
sis. You begin to go through the
stages of worry, researching pos-
sible solutions, conferring with
experts and deciding on possible
treatment. When you get to the
bottom line, you-realize that all
is for naught. You are going to
dk. Soth aub gP neros

St.' Philip Neri prepared a 56m
church anniversary banquet.
Everyone looked gorgeous. and
enjoyed the fellowship and the
eveiling. The children of the par-
ish had a fun BBQ afternoon.
The last day of the weekend,
Sunday, Sept. 27, was as upbeat
as possible (keeping hope alive
and well in God's. hands) amid
the smiles, farewells, fears, and
the proverbial question, "Where
are you going?" .
The three, yes, three choirs
the men's choir, the young
adult choir and the adult choir

h&sh hadsc aalongdwk
organ. Feet were tapping and,
hands were clapping. Through
all of this celebration the real-
ization that from May until now
that this was the final hour and
that the "death rattle" was a
sign that the spiritual life of the
parishioners in the home of St.
Philip Neri Catholic Church was,


on its "death bed." The parishio-
ners would have to resume their
spiritual lives in various other
churches and denominations.
The little church behind the
Bunche Park pool, financially
in the Black, paid up diocesan
assessments and bills will no
longer exist as it once did.. It's
only fault among the list cited by
the archbishop was that it was
a single ethnic group church. I
thought that a church is sup-
pose to reflect the comrtiunity.
The residents of Opa-locka are
Black. Thus, you had a church
that reflected that in the 150
families on the roster.
I said all of the above to ask
the question. Is this how the
South Florida Catholic Church
treats its Black members? His-
tory segregated us. We survived
and integrated in all areas of

eeCa 1 C two cTh ur2e
and now there is one.
I hope that the Archbishop
and the Church hierarchy begm
to realize that the church is not
a building and property. It's peo-
ple. You separated my "Church
Family." We're grieving for our
loss. The church building does
not represent money (after sell-
ing) to make up for losses in the
stock market or -payouts for per-
sonnel indiscretions. It is people
who have feelings and who live
and breathe the word of God de-
livered in their church home. Did
the archbishop and the Church
M ashsaif tha The Arch-

been discussed for the past two
years. With whom? How many
parishioners in the 13 closed
parishes knew about it two years
ago? I'm sure we could have
added something to the "pot" of
possible solutions other than the
One decided on that might have
kept our church families intact.


fect us. But it came home with
husbands, fathers, brothers,
boyfriends and sons and is now
wreaking havoc on our women,
children, families and commu-
nity.


played the piano and preached at
ourchurch.,esandsanglovesongs
at our concerts. Now we see new
victims, Black women who are 65
percent of all new casualties from
this terrifying and terrible crea-


Commissioner's Cup


citation, the association must be included about young people. Two years ago,' North-
in discussions of planning activities and/or western played a game in Dallas, TX which
events, and not through "piece of crumbs was also nationally televised. Once again,
off the table." Why would School Boai-d ad- the school received zero dollars for scholar-
ministrators and government leaders spon- ships or any operational money for athletic
sor an event with no economic windfall for needs. We will not support this behavior by
our students? any entity Northwestern, better known as
The leadership at Northwestern has in- the "The West," has served the Liberty City
formed parents of band students that there community proudly for over 53 years and we
is a very small amount of revenue available to won't give in to a feel good moment when our
sponsor the band getting to. football games. young people need financial support.
However, local political leadership is given a
nationally televised game to showcase itself Larry. T. Williams and Nathaniel Miller,
as government leaders who are concerned Miami


Dear Editor '

I am responding to the Sept. 29 article in
The Miami Herald, "Northwestern-Central a
Liberty City rivalry by any other name."
The Commissioner's Cup, the name giv-
en to the upcoming Miami Northwestern/
Central football game, was by no means de-
signed by, nor is it supported by the Miami
Northwestern Alumni Association. The as-
sociation will not support the exploitation
of our students just for the feel good mo-
ment of being on television. If an organiza-
don wants the support of the alumni asso-


able angered me. I am a parent of a student so the budget allows you to prioritize all the
that attends a high school in Miami and I Hispanic and white schools to be protected
have not yet to see a resource officer when I while the Black schools suffer with the "green
pick up my child from school. Matter of fact, shirt" security guard. That is not fair.
I visited two schools in Carol City most re-
cently and they, in fact, also did not have one. Patricia Milton,
Why? I have heard it all before--the budget-- Miami


Dear Editor,

While I am sadden by the lost of the young
man at the Coral Gables High School, I was
appalled to hear that the school had a School
Resource Officer, that was just not on-duty
during the shooting, but they had on avail-


good
show
posit
in do


to bad but for too long we have been
ing the negative, it's time to show the
ive. I welcome Mr. Gilmore attempts
cumenting the real Liberty City.

Henry James,
Liberty City



. President, please focus and not loose
of what is really important to the
rican people and the challenges they
acing.
Jo Marie Ingram
Opa-locka


Tell the real story of Liberty City
Dear Editor, we did not make headlines because of a
shooting or a housing developer scammed
Flipping through The Miami Times last us out of our money. There is so much
week, it was interesting to read the about more and you people need to know about
. the filmmaker making a documentary it
about Liberty City. The real story about I have lived here most of my life, and
Liberty City needs to be told at a time when surely, Liberty City has changed from


Churches of all colors and sizes seem to have problems. The
10,000 member Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Broward
County has shrunk to 2,200 since new pastor, W. Tullian
Tehividjian took over after the death of D. James Kennedy. A
breakaway church group is now worshipping at the Pompano
Beach Ellps Lodge.

The community feels that County Mayor Carlos Alvarez is
making a dangerous move in stripping the $450,000 from the
budget for the County Independent Review Panel. The IRP
serves as a check on citizen complaints of misconduct by po-
lice and other county employees. Volunteers on the IRP have
helped police formulate law enforcement policies that are fair
-- neither racist nor sexist. This adds transparency and ac-
countability to county operations. Phope Commission Chair-
man Dennis C. Moss will help project this very important
budget item.
********
Don't be surprised if the UM-FAMU game at Landshark Sta-
dium Saturday night tops the 61,000 fans that saw the Hurri-
canes upset Qklahoma last week. The Rattlers have come alive
under new -coach, Joe Taylor, and are undefeated but UM is
in another league. Anyway, the 400 member FAMU band al-
ways puts on a good shov\r.
******?*
The selection of Rio de Janeiro to host the 2016 Summer
Games is the latest indication of how wrong the critics were.
Brazil's economy projected, to grow by five percent or more
next year. Its stock market has risen more than 30 percent
this past year while those in most developed nations have fall-
en. And, in addition to the Olympics, it gets the other global
sports spectacle, the WorldCup, in 2014.
********
If you're wondering what has become of former Florida Rep.
James Burke, here's the word going around town. The former
disbarred lawyer is said to have moved back to his home state
and had has entered politics in Macon, Ga. Stay tuned.
********
It took a 3-2 vote to get retiring North Miami City Manager
Clarence Patterson to get a $50,000 parting gift. The 76-year-
old veteran public official who served many years in Miami~
Dade earned $207,000 a year.
********
Florida's powerful trial lawyers lobby has been severely dam-
aged by an ugly race--baiting flier distributed in Jacksonville
during the recent state Senate election. In that contest, Re~
publican John Thrasher, a former Florida House speaker,
overcame a barrage of trial-lawyer attacks to defeat three ri-
vals. The flier also may have damaged the trial bar's reputation
with Black legislators. Said Rep. Joe Gibbons, D-Hallandale
Beach, a former president of the legislative Black caucus: "An
apology won't do."


* 9
Mr. President, where are your priorItIes.
Dear Editor world to pedtion almut the 2016 Summer Mr
> Olympics games to be held in Chicago, Ill. Is sight
Jobless rates have climbed nationwide, our it nie or there something wrong with that? Ame
Black youth are out of control with the guns Not to mention the recent uproar of violence are f
on the street and there are still no decision in Chicago's inner city deserves immediate
niade about the healthcare reform; but, yet attention not the Olympics, even though it
our President has time to travel around the will bring in revenike to the city.


ALFRED MONTGOMERY, 36
Safety Instructor, Liberty City
Oh those are still very im-
portant. The
educators of '
our kids al- .
h
wea pri e to
they aren't get
ting paid right
they won't
want to work.
All their .hard work deserves to
be rewarded. I travel to different
schools for the police depart-
ment to teach about safety, so
I see every day how hard they
viork. We don't want to have
them to ot sc ooledistricts


BRENDA CRAWFORD, 52
Substitute Teacher, Miami

I really do think the teachers
should get their raises. Most
substitute teachers are only
working three days a week if
that, so I know how it is out
there and in the classroom.
It's crazy the way they're
treating the teachers already,


to bring down class sizes too.
Education is the absolute last
place we need to be thinking
about savings.

CATERINAELLISON,37
Unemployed, Miami
I think the .
raises are still '
important .
Teachers have
a hell of a job.
They have to .
put up with ,
a .lot in the
schoolhous-
es. The poor
economy is exactly why teach-

er nshouldhhav a ais Cost of
budget savings should come
from somewhere else; not from
education,

GAIL JENKINS, 52
Retired, Brownsville

There really isn't any excuse.
The raises for teachers still
should happen. The kids need
it. Without the good work that
they do and the raises, where


will our kids be
left? We have
to at least pay
Our teachers
more than the
nearby coun-
ties so a they
don't leave.
They should
make their
budget cuts someplace else,
AVIS If. HOPKINS, 53
Retired, Allapattah

Well from what I understand
they were
already told
they'd get
think e
should get
it, based on
that. They
should be
able to trust
their bosses.
They're the ones who show our
children the way to success.
We're not going to get out of
this crisis-and stay out of it;
by crippling future generations
academically.


Teachers al-
ready pay a lot
of their own
c 1 assroom
ex penises .
Everybody's
frustrated, the
students in-
cluded. They
dori't respect ,
the teachers. Now it's like the
county doesn't respect them ei-
ther. Despite thb budget prob-
lems, teachers need those rais-
es. The county needs to think
about who taught them. Where
would they be if it weren't for
teachers? -

KEITH IANE, 54


[The raises] are important.
Education for the kids is too
important .
They should
definitely get
a raise. It's
what's best
for the kids.
We should re-
ally be adding
more teachers


OPINION


LOCAL


5 A THEMIAMITIMES,0OCTOBER7-15,2009


The cost and causalities of HIV/AIDS in Black America


Opa-locka's predominately
Black Catholic church closes


e mus repair our own se Ives, raise ourselves from the ruins
of disease and oppression, hold ourselves and others re-
sponsible and together build the community and world we
allwantanddeservetolivein.


N~rhweter Almniden supor ofthe


Black schools need School Resource Officers, too


Given the current economic climate; how' high a priority should the teacher raises.be?











I


bke bil1 bG taC ROqeW1 U .


MATCHUP
continued from 1A

the team has more improve-
ments to make, but he is proud
of his players." As far as record-
wise, after the first four games,
I think we achieved a lot of
things, a lot of.goals that most
people didn't expect us to. And
that comes from hard-work by
these football players and this
coaching staff," he said.
Last season, the Hurricanes
finished 7-6 despite a five-game
winning streak in midseason.
This year, hopes are higher. A
loss to Florida A&M of the Mid-
Eastern Athletic Conference at
Land Shark Stadium would be
crushing.
The last time the teams met
Miami handily beat Florida
A&M 51-10 on Sept. 9, 2006..
The Hurricanes lead the series
6-1. .
The Jeattlers (4-0) however
have. finished September per-
fect for the first time in 12
years
Miami's defensive focus Sat-
urday will almost certainly be


on Florida A&M qttartqrback
Curtis Pulley, who is having
an outstanding senior season,
Pulley threw for 315 yards
and two touchdowns to lead
the Rattlers to a 31-12 victory
over Tennessee State on Sept.
26.. He has passed for 846
yards, seven touchdowns and
only one interception while

g g
I I


__IFREE THETY


I ^.CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DE:STIINY


Stanley Newbold, Sr., played
the violin in his early child-
hood in the Bahamas,
Newbold became the fourth
generation to join the Historic
St. Agnes Episcopal Church
where he serves as an acolyte
of St. Vincent's Acolyte Guild
and a member of the Handbell
Choir.
Newbold also joins a list of
native Miamians who excelled
as FAMU Head Drum Majors.
This list includes, Spider Mc-
Coy, Kenneth Harris, Miami
Norland (78-79); Timothy A.
Barber, Miami Central (01-02);


Antonio Drayton, Miami Nor-
land.(03-04); Deon Screen, Mi-
ami. Central (OS); Jorim Reis,
Miami Norland (06); Diron T.
Holloway, Miami .American
(07).and Michael Scott, Miami
Jackson (07-08).
Life as a Head Drum Major
will soon come to an end as
Newbold approaches gradu-
ation at FAMU. Though sev-
eral teaching positions -have
been offered to him, Newbold's
dream is to return to his alma
mater, Miami Jackspn, and the
lead the band as band direc-
tor.


NEWBOLD


expectedly left, Newbold
stepped in to lead the band.
He helped keep morale strong
as they continued to "march
to the beat of the drums" and
demonstrate the spirit of the
Jackson Generals.
Upon graduation, Newbold
received a music scholarship
from FAMU and embarked on a
journey to Tallahassee. Armed
with experience and outstand-
ing leadership skills, he be-
came a member of the well
known "Marching 100" which
is no surprise to his family.
His father, Cecil Stanley New-
bold, Jr. played the trumpet in
the band in the early 60's.
Music is well recognized in
the Newbold family: Ahmad's
granduncle, the late Nathan-
iel "Johnny" Humes, played
the trombone in the Historic
St. Agnes Coronet Band and
his grandfather, the late Cecil


raced 23 yards untouched for
the first Dolphins touchdown
of the second quarter. I might
send this home to my grand-
mother." Davis said. Bills quar-
terback Trent Edwards never
saw Davis closing on the right
sideline before he released a gift
wrapped touchdown for Dolfans
everywhere. Thanks to an early
first quarter field goal the Dol-
phins now owned a 10-0 lead
and were getting a good feeling
of things to come. Davis' in-
terception return was the first
from a Dolphin defensive back
in 53 quarters going back to Will
Allen's 32 yard return at Denver
last year. *

BALANCE
Ronnie Brown rushed for as
many yards as Henne passed
for and that's something that
the coaches didn't mind be-
cause they didn't want Henne
put into too many long yardage
situations. "This was some vali-
dation for us", "You win in your
division and everything takes
care of itself." Said coach Tony
Sporano Henne was in bed by
10: 30 Saturday nite. "When
we play as a team and don't
kill ourselves we've got a good
chance to win." 'We still gave up
a couple of pass we don't want to
give uji but it's a work in prog-
ress." Said safety Yeremiah Bell.
"Everybody made plays." Ev-
erybody deserves credit for this
win." Said Henne. And though
several players made some key
plays, it was still the success
of the running backs Ronnie
Brown and Ricky Williams that
created much of the momen-
tum. The Dolphins running
game pounded the Bills for 250
yards while the Bills only gained
46. Ronnie Brown rushed for
115 yards and two touchdowns,
while Ricky Williams added 85
yards and a touchdown. "Obvi-
ously hoing 0-4 in not a good
situation."'Coach Tony Sporano
said. "Going 0-3 was not a good
situation. We knew that. But to
the teams credit, they just kept
grinding. They had a tremen-
dous week of practice." "It's a


tremendous win for us." "We've
got to do a good job of not eating
the cheese right now because
it's one win, and we got a really
tough team coming in here next
week."

MATH
Sometimes dealing with an
overflow of emotional effort
while deciding the outcome ofa
sporting competition it all still
may come down to the x's and
o's and numbers. Thanks to a
strong ground. game, the Dol-
phins controlled the ball for more
than 37 minutes, gained 250
yards and three touchdowns on
45 carries. Ronnie Brown had
115 yards and two touchdowns
on 20 carries, Ricky Williams
added 85 yards, one touchdown
on 16 carries. "It feels good, but
we've got to keep plugging away
and do that every week." Said
left tackle \Jake Long. "Keep
pounding the ball. We take pride
in that." Despite the numbers
mentioned, only three numbers
really mattered most. ONE: That
this game was Chad Henne's
first game as a starter and was
his first NFL win.
ONE: For rookie cornerback
Vontae Davis, it was his first NFL
interception and his first return
for a touchdown, and perhaps
most importantly, it was the
first win for the Dolphins team
that, along with their fans des-
perately needed one. So the way
that I seeit 1+1+1 equals ONE.

IN THE PINK:
The Dolphins participated
in a league wide observance
of Breast Cancer Awareness
Month. There was a lot of Pink
going on at the stadium from,
the goal posts padded in pink,
to state rep. Debbie Wasserman
Schultz and coach Sporano's
wife Jeanette passing out rib-
bons at the entrances to Jen-
nifer Lopez in pink. Players got
into the act but sporting variet-
ies of Pink on the field via shoes,
towels, wristbands, to Bills re-
ceiver Terrell Owens sporting
pink gloves. Next up for the Dol-
phins the New York Jets.


By Rich Jackson


If you were to tell me that the
2009 version of the Miami Dol-
phins would start week four of
the NFL season 0-3 it wouldn't
take much to convince me. Even
after a previous season of 15-
3, the expectations for 09 were
high yet the execution was not
and thus the large goose egg in
the win column.
In a season so typical of sea-
sons past in the NFL where key
injuries raise their ugly head -
around the league, the Dolphins
were no less palpable of inclu-
sion by way of quarterback-for-
mer starting quarterback and
team captain Chad Pennington,
Pennington's season ending
shoulder injury coming courtesy
of the San Diego Chargers last
Sunday could've all, should've
all but sucked out the air from
a season suddenly spiraling
downward towards an empty
abyss leaving the team and Do-
flfans wondering can this kid do
it? Can this kid do it.
Tpat kid goes by the name
Chad Henne and on a day when
he was thrust head first into the
national spotlight against a Buf-
falo Bills team beset with inju-
ries to key players, also search-
ing for answers to avoid their
own spiraling dark hole hopes
for the future of the franchise
and the season were high and
resting upon the shoulders and
arm of the second year pro. Did
I mention that this was to be
Henne's first NFL start?
.
ANEWPATH
The Dolphins started the
game without their starting
MVP's of last year, linebacker
Joey Porter ( with a hamstring
) and quarterback Chad Pen-
nington ( shoulder ). Yet it took
some effort from some .of the
most unlikely of sources to get
the ensuing party started. En-
ter the defense. Rookie corner-
back Vontae Davis jumped in
front of receiver Lee Evans, for
the first of what would even-
tually be three interceptions,


26 )game; he -eturned ,four
punts for touchdowns in the
two prior contests.
Vann, a defensive back'
made five tackles two for a
loss and returned six kicks
for 90 yards against Tennessee
State. .
Miami, however, is not with-
out its own star quarterback.


leading the team with 291
yards rushing.
Isaac West and Kevin Elliott
are Pulley's favorite targets.
Both receivers have 18 recep-
tions and morethan 250 yards
apiece.
Florida A&M also features -
strong special teams, led by
LeRoy Vann. Before the Sept.


Against a tough .Oklahoma
defense and after falling be-
hind 10-0; sophomore quar-
terback Jacory Harris went on
to throw three touchdowns,
and completed passes to 11
teammates. He has thrown
eight touchdowns and five ini
perceptions in his first season
as a full-time starter.


Police Chief's wife gets nine months
The Miami Times Staff Report ley found out that her husband's
Christmas gift to the other wom-
Eleanor Adderley, wife of Fort . an (a piece of jewelry) had been
Lauderdale Police Chief Frank more expensive than his gift to
Add l tn d i h


er.
Frank Adderley, 48, filed for
divorce lat week and requested
custody of tBeir 16-year-old
son,
Before her sentencing, Adder-
ley expressed remorse and asked
for leniency so that she could
quickly get back to her child.
. Since the shooting, which
took place in July of 2008, the
couple had been ordered to have
no contact. Neither her husband
nor son appeared at the sen-
tencing.


erey, was sene ce to nne
months Broward County Jail for
shooting at her husband. The al-
tercation was over an affair. Po-
lice, say that Adderley used her
husband's gun.and fired a bullet
into the foot of the bed he was
lying on. She also fired two more
shots as he ran to the safety of a
neighbor's house. .
According to court records, Ad-
derley learned of her husband's
infidelity by looking at his cellu-
lar phone bills. When she con-
fronted him with this evidence,


he admitted the affair.


1


4A THE MIAMI TIMES. OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


Ahmad continesprodNewbld musical legacy


Ronnie Brown celebrates his second touchdown of the da--MiamiTimesphotoRichJackson

*

Dolphins experience a day of firsts

MIAMI D 0 LPHINS 3 8 BU FFAL 0 BILLS 1 0


-MiamiTimes photo Rich Jackson
Ricky Williams scores on a controversial play late in the game.The play was reviewed and
officials awarded him with the touchdown.











I _


-
-
. .


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

7 Avenue TRANSIT VILLAGE PROJECT


"Changing the Face of Liberty City"


Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion,
disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the Amencans
with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact
any of the following at least sellen days prior to the meeting:
Miami-Dade County: Charesse Chester 305-944-7564 Info@cchesterpr.com
Broward County: All Soule 1-800-330-7444 info@communikatz.com
Palm Beach County: Denis Eirikis 561-798-9633 eirikis@clearlightpr.com

Visit www.SPECOstudy.com to learn more.


BLACKS MUST CC)NTRO THEIR OwN DESTINY


YL~---~ ----^ --~~


-











it






f"I


p & % 8 $
M *


he saw a 2002 black two-door
Pontiac driving "erratically." Ac-
cording to police, the officer was
trying to stop the car when a
Black male jumped out with an
assault rifle. He began to fire at
the officer. The officer took cover
and, fortunately, was not hurt.,
Though the gunman fled
on foot and the vehicle drove
northbound, police were able
to apprehend both suspects,
Sabian Thomas Godfrey, 18,
and Kevin Glover Rawls, 18,
less than 48 hours later.
The suspects face first-de-
gree attempted murder charg-
es on a po-
lice officer.
They face
additional
/ .' charges as
well.

cRads a

KEVI VER mha f
committing
a felony
and changing the firearm's se-
rial number. Godfrey is charged
as an accessory to the crime.
Still, the access criminals have
to high-powered weapons is
causing havoc in the streets of
Miami. As more people become
victims; yellow tape covers a
community.
Local elected. officials have
supported the reinstatement
of the federal assault weapons
ban, a 10 -year ban passed by
Co ess that came into effect
in 1994. The bill, signed by
President Bill Clinton, forbade
civilians from purchasing cer-
tain semi-a11tomatic or assault
weapons. The ban was not re-
newed by former President
George W. Bush.
Rundle Fernandez said Fri-
day, "We have to get these off
the streets."
"This is a military killing ma-
chine."


Gunman riddles police
officer 's car with bullets
BV Sandra J. Charit:e
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The ban on the use of assault
weapons has shaken up the Ci
of Miami.
As evidenced by the shootings
in Liberty City and Overtown;
shootings that took the lives
of minors, the military-style
weapons have multiplied in the
streets of Miami.
"We need to get these guns off
the street,"
said Chris-
tian Dorsie,
who at 20
has already
seen many

whed oo

h tS MS
weapons ,
such as an
AK-47, can "shoot off 600 rounds
per minute" said State Attorney
Katherine Fernandez Rundle
Friday at a press conference.
Often times, those who have
made the oath to protect us
have fallen prey to these weap-
ons including Miami-Dade Po~
lice Officer Jose Somohano and
City of Miami Police Department
Detective James Walker.
"Bullets from these deadly
killing machines penetrate the
bulletproof vests that most of
our law enforcement officers
wear in the line of duty," she
said. .
Friday's incident was a close-
call as police again became tar-
gets. A gunman riddled a police
car with bullets.
The incident occurred late Frt-
dity. As a marked City of Miami
Police Officer approached the
intersection of North Miami Av-
enue and Northwest 56m Street,


CHOSETH DTE NDLOATON ES FR OU


-



- *

















.


1


. .


.


m


SOUTH FL.ORIDA EAST COAST CORRIDOR STUDY
PARTIOlPATE IN A PUBLIC WORKSHOP!
Your Comments Are important
so. com.nt.co. son smoonant...
Ou opinion adj enp6tant
The stud/seeks to improve mobility with new local and regional
passenger( transit service for Palm Beach, Broward and Miame-
Dade Counties on an 85-mile section of the FEC Railway corridor.


HALLANDALE BEACH
Tuesday, October 13
Haliandale Beach Cultural
Center
Auditorium & Room 107
410 SE 3rd St.
6 8 p.m.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Monday, October 19
McDonald Center
17051 NE 19 Ave.
6 8 p.m.
UPPER EAST SIDE MIAMI
Tuesday, October 27
American Legion Park
6447 NE)7 Ave.

DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Thursday, October 8
Courtyard by Marriott
Royal Ballroom
200 SE 2nd Ave.
3:30 5:30 p.m.

Om6pr n courtyard
garage or take Metromover to
KnightCenterStation.


BOCA RATON
Thursday, October 15
Boca Raton
Community Center
Royal Palm Room
150 Crawford Blvd,
6 8 p.m.
POMPANO BEACH
Wednesday, October 14
E. Pat Larkins
Community Center
Auditorium &
Meeting Room
520 Martin Luther
King Jr., Blvd-
6 8 p.m.
FORT LAUDERDALE
Tuesday, October 20
Holiday Park
Social Center
1150 G. Harold Martin Dr.
3:30 5:30 p.m.
OR 6 8 p.m.


JUPITER
Wednesday, October 28
Jupiter Community Center
ist Floor
200 Military Trail
6 8 p.m.
RIVIERA BEACH
Wednesday, October 21
Wells Recreation Complex
2409 Avenue H West
6 8 p.m.
WEST PALM BEACH
Monday, October 26
Kravis Center for the
Performing Arts
Minfo'"ilf:n**"i*;*'
701 Okeechobee Blvd.
3:30 5:30 p.m.
OR 6 8 p.m.
LANTANA
Thursday, October 29
Finland House
13 1 central Blvd.
6 8 p.m.


5 A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


:City of Miami Police


a en eme e W anim *
agg em a &
le faW"Cam'mFFcIaf Wews P'Fov'Hers


haunts Chkap MM

* * "'


-


TOWN HALL MEETING



Mayor Carlos Alvaret &

COmmiSSIOner Audrey M. Edmonson

DATE: Wednesday, October 14, 2009

TIME: 7:00pm

PLACE: Joseph Caleb Center


B
MIAM
MS


IMieting; Room 110










6A HEMIAI IMS, CTBER7-3,2009


voters will decide. The longer IT
term fix is to right the system, be fair to everyone
and this is our recommenda-
tion on how to do that.
Copeland believes that the
voters would support a new tax
to fund Jackson if it makes it
to the ballot. "I am optimistic B
for a few reasons. If you ask I &
people what they think of Jack- '
son, you'd get like 80 percent
positive reaction." Copeland J
believes Jackson Health Sys- 7
tem's positive contributions to
the community-and the pos-
sibility of their loss would mo-
tivate voters.
"Imagine that there were no
Ryder Trauma Center; or if we
didn't have the neonatal care
that they have; or if the out-
reach centers weren't there,"
he said.
"Now that being said; could I 4.
have picked a worse time to try $ e
NV gdsto the 15hblid fdr tdx8s?
Probatily not," he said.


F RE E The


LIBERTY CITY SEVEN


One family serving this community for 87 consecutive years


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


FUNDING
continued from 1A

This leaves Medicare and
Medicaid payments from the
state, but Copeland has said
that Jackson has had difficulty
collecting those payments from
the state as well.
The drying up of all these
revenue streams at once .has
left Jackson Health System in
dire financial straits.
"Even in a good year, we have
issues, but at the end of the
fiscal year, which ended last
month, the organization had
about enough cash for 24 days
of operation," said Copeland.

WHY THIS MATTERS
"It's not a total red light yet,
but when you get down to the
teens, it's where you might not
be able to cover the next pay
period," Copeland explained.
"What you want to have, if
you're a healthy private com-
pany, is enough for 60 to 90
days of operation. We'd like to
be somewhere north of 35," he
said.
In previous years, Jackson
Health Trust might have relied
upon the county to make up
any such losses, but the tough
economic climate makes this
problematic as well.
"When we turned in our bug-
get to the [County] commis-
sion, certainly no one asked us
what we could do with an extra
$100 million," Copeland joked.
Copeland expects the com-
mission to do their utmost,
but due to the economic crt-
sis, their utmost could still fall
short.
"They recognize the institu-
tion that Jackson is, but from
what I can see, it's a very dif-
ficult seat they're sitting in," he
said.

A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE
Quite apart from Jackson's
immediate financial situation,
Copeland is concerned for
Jackson's future.
"We can't operate like last
year. We don't have the final
numbers, but I don't expect we
broke even," he said.
"The challenges are not ef-
ficiency problems," said Cope-
land. "They're systemic. If
you're spending more than
you're taking in, that that sys-
dunsustainab1 f
support, and what we spend in
care, the numbers don't add
up.
Copeland still strives to make
Jackson more efficient. Jack-
son Health System expects to
make several changes to this
end.
They will outsource the care
they give at corrections facili-
ties to a private company, in


the hopes that the company
will be able to do it more ficiently. They will also close
Perdue long-term care center,
Jackson long-term care center,
Juanita Mann primary care
center, and North Miami Pri-
mary Care center.
"These decisions are not be-
ing taken lightly said Cope-
land. "The board has reviewed
and approved them. This has
been thought out."
The board, according to
Copeland, has even reduced
the salaries. "We've rolled [sal-
aries] back to 2008 levels for
senior leadership," he said.
"Everyone's foregone leader-
ship allowances."
The net result of these cuts
was $1 million in savings.

COMMITMENT TO CARE
Patients from the closing fa-
cilities will be plithd 44 new
ones.
"First and foremost, we don't
g at e :: a way- off D ef en f y
tient outcomes or safety," said
Copeland of the cuts.
Alonso pointed out that while
in the short-term; placing the
Intietytsi g11 en e oo,:*

but the aim is to create a sus-
tainable model. Copeland in-
sists that he must think in the
long term.
To this end, one of Cope-
land's aims is to change the
way Jackson is.funded.
"The longer term solution is
to change to an independent
taxing district," he said. 7f the
commissioners agree, then the


the community for feedback,
and if the community comes
out to voice their input, they71
consider that too, but the best
way for them to express the
need is to use the post office.
Even if they're just sending a
letter to their grandmother; if
they start sending just a letter
now and then, to the troops,
to someone incarcerated, to a
long lost family member, that's
the best way to save the post
office," she said.
While, the fate of the Edison
Branch Post Office is uncer-
tain, there definitely will be
losses in other local services.
Last Wednesday the county an-
nounced that the Joseph Caleb
Center's office, 5400 Northwest
ggnd Avenue, and the North
Dade Justice Center, 15555
Biscayne Blvd., will fall victim
to cuts as well. Both offices act-
ed as quasi government centers
for their neighborhoods. People
who used those locations will
now have to travel to govern-
ment center to complete the
same tasks.


BUDGET
continued from 1A

on service," she said.
One of the local businesses
frecluenting the Edison Branch
is Miami Dade College, North
Campus's Meek Entrepreneur-
ial Education Center. H. Leigh
Toney, its Executive Director,
believes that closing the office
is a poor decision. "Not every-
body has the freedom to walk or
drive from one place to another.
And this is a fairly dense area. I
just think any reduction in re-
sources in the community like
this is not a good thing," she
said..
If the closing occurs, it will
be one of roughly 3,200 na-
tionwide. Last year, mail vol-
ume fell by 9.5 billion pieces to
a total of 203 billion pieces. It
is expected to fall by 28 billion
pieces this year to a total of 175
billion pieces.
Ford says the post office can
still be .saved, if community
members get involved.
"Normally they would notify


EVer yeo reads


More closings to. continue


~Glt; f7-t~ CFE~tlt






7A THE MIAMI TIMES, rrnw oCTBR 71,20


--


_ _


r-


ig gest


esses


to


e ectri c


We don't think that's right.

Today's rate structure makes residential customers and small businesses
subsidize a few very large customers.
We've asked the Florida Public Service Commission to change that.
.Thatt @gbbygg; big businesses are attacking Florida
Power & Light Company's rate proposal.


Here are four facts they don't want you to know:


* FPL's typical residential bill is already the lowest of all 54 utilities
in the state of Florida and below the national average.
* EPL's rate proposal would result in typical bills for residential
customers and small businesses going down, not up.
If fou use 1,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity a month, your
bill would o down about $9. That's because a base rate
increase would be more than offset by lower fuel prices and
gains in fuel efficiency.
* Residential customers and small businesses would stop being
forced to subsidize big businesses.
* A base rate adjustment will allow us to continue to make
investments to make the electrical infrastructure stronger,
smarter, cleaner and rndre efficient and less reliant on any
single source of fuel.
Let's stop playing politics with our energy future and stick to the facts.

Visit www.FPL.com/facts

This advertising is paid for by FPL Group shareholders, not our customers.


* - *


.. .
-
- -



-
. .


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


- - Syndicated Content-

AvailableTrom Commercid NewiPrevidefs


kus n

pay


Florida's b


he p


bi l





^LCKS MUST CONTROL, THEIR OWN DESTINY


use a emm@ e
em *
eumm W

**

IIM


e







*


'Visit suntrust.com/business to learn more about the wealth of online educational
resources available to you, including webinars, advice, business solutions and more.


~II*-IIIXII~XIIL ___..


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


. .... .. . .
e e


- *


. b *


**

eme me
mam a **
* *@ *
* en e. eam eme
e MMMS




M es
a a e

**

We e e


**


- _~


.. ... .


Get back to business faster with SuriTrust Online Payroll and Online 401k.

Save time, money and unnecessary hassles when you get both SunTrust Online Payroll and Online 401k. With
a convenient setup and easy access for you and your employees, your business will have everything it needs
online to manage payroll processing, employee record updates and more. To learn more about how SunTrust
business solutions can help you get back to business, call 866.587.1780 or speak to your SunTrust banker.


.


.


.*


- - -


Cash Management


Financing Solutions


Retirement Solutions


*


Deposit products and services are offered through SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC.
Securities and insurance Products and Services: Are not FDIC or any other Government Agency insured Are not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value
SunTrust Banks, Inc. and its affiliates and the directors, officers, employees and agents of its affiliates (collectively. "SunTrust") are not permitted to give legal or tax advice.
Clients of SunTrust should consult with their legal and tax advisors prior to entering into any financial transaction.
@2009 SunTrust Banks. Inc. Sun Trust and Live Solid. Bank Solid. are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust Online 401k la a service mark of
SunTrust Banks, Inc. Sun Trust Onilne 401k is offered in conjunction with ePlan Services. Inc. ePlan Services Inc. is not an affiliate of SuriTrust Banks. Inc.


IBM ma~rkts, waws~ to Africa r


-- CI


--


Sullas





9A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


Medicare approved HMO plan. Some limitations, restrictions, co-insurance and co payments may apply.
The benefit information provided herein is a brief summary,.but not a comprehensive description of available
benefits. Additional information about benefits is available to assist you in making a decision about your
coverage. This is an advertisement; for more information contact the plan.
H1019-MK-P71-0909


~EIB


C


I


L


: -i


~-


the health

th care.

Everybody's talking about health care these days.
But what are they doing about it?
At CarePlus, we believe the best way to keep costs down
is to keep our members healthy. So we encourage the
kind of lifestyle that keeps you out of the doctor's office,
except for routine visits. The kind of health care that makes
it possible for you to take fewer medications, rather than
more. Health care that puts the focus on prevention
instead of fixing what's wrong.
That's the kind of health care we believe in- the kind that's
better for everyone, because it concentrates on health.


Let's keep


3 l'e lUS
HEALTH PLANS,1Nc.
Keeping the health in health care.
Call us.
1-800-220-8704
TTY: 1-877-245-7930










,


Scheduling conflicts keep two participants from debate


DEBATE
continued from 1A
Tuesday that her absence was
due to a prior engagement. She
atte fed to attend the debate af.
mpds but told that it th
eae was al st over e
Re alado's Chief of Staff Tony
C Jr. too informed The 21mes
or ap esd that it was also a
schedule inflict and the debate
confirmed by the organizers.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


*
*



flai








ews Providers


Availat


-


development of Overtown among
others.
"We have to be wiser in District
5," he said. "It is important for
you to know your community and
know what their needs are.
In these tough times, Torrain
said, "we need a leader that will
put people back to work again.
Both candidates agreed that
District 5 should not continue to
suffer and new leadership was
needed as voters visited the polls
to cast their vote on Nov. 3


5 Commission candidates took Torrain. "I am running to bring
center stage. about change."
Both, David Chiverton, CEO of "Our community suffers the
Miami-Dade Weed and Seed and most because we rely on the ser-
Jeff Torain, former Opa-locka vices for a quality life," he said.
Deputy Chief, were cordial. Chiverton shared similar sen-
Torrain began his speech by timents believing that District
expressing his need to see leader- 5 cannot get caught up in the
ship in District 5 to help out the politicsck" in which they focus
families in District 5. on the popularity of the candi-
"We don't have the current lead- dates and forget the issues at
ership to help out the family. We hand which include affordable
need the leadership to set policies housing, violence affecting the
in place to help the family," said community, unemployment, re-


The debate continued despite
the absence of the two City Com-
missioners.
Moderated by investigative re-
porter of CBS4 News, Jim Defede,
City Commissioner Joe Sanchez
stood alone on the forum as he
appealed to the audience that he
was a better candidate for mayor
then his opponent, Regalado.
"I have a vision for this city,"
said Sanchez, "I want to prevent
this city from going bankrupt,"
referring to the City's $118 mil-


lion budget deficit. "We will go
into bankrupt in a year if we don't
have the proper leadership."
The change in leadership in the
.city government on.Nov. 3 would
also mean a change in city ad-
ministration.
As mayor, Sanchez said "my ad-
ministration will reflect the diver-
sity in the community." Unlike his
opponent, he opted to keep John
F. Timoney as City Police Chief.
Following. Sanchez, who had to
leave early, the remaining District


me lN f aS~byr


AP FINy C .


ownran


*TrnstferblePowrt~rain


1 Only on 20% of vehicles available to dealer as of 9/21/09. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
2 Monthly payment is $13.89 for every $1,000 financed. Average example down payment is10.9%. Some customers will not qualify. Not available with other offers. See dealer for details. Take delivery by 11/2/09.
3 Return between 30 and 60 days with less than 4,000 miles. Not available with some other offers.0ther restrictions apply. Take delivery by 11/30/09.
4 Visit anstar.com for details and systemJimitations.
The names, erablems, slogans, vehicle body designs, and other marks appearing in this document are the trademarks and/or service marks of General Motors, its subsidiaries, affiliates, or IIcensors.
@2009 General Motors. Buckle up, Americal l-800-950-2438 or chevy.com '


511- 2009


10A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER


Share asd (iingrkh team up for ducathe


. FULL-SIZE TRUCKS


I


SOs 7 2


5 6, 00 0


ANNOUNCING THE
DAY
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEE,
. MitchequainfgmiranteefDrditait.


ON TOP OF


PLUS
.
Star
Safetyandserarityof0n5tar -
standanifosthefIrstyea,





S::UBSC~lBE ODAY


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


e *





. *


e






ee


age (a e me e eme alls M


**
e


*


rC, -


Equal housing lender


issued by HSBC Mor`tgage Corporation (USA)@ HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA) 2009


Dus rr Afghan ,oe drese I'.5. to re,sht strateDt


Avila~b.Ied-;roil-~m-~eca Nesoviders


D~ivl


s alte during rrtdr

















1 Faal


SECTION B


D~~ead~si:eteaher ad cho


MIAMI TIMES


~P~-


i. ez


:Men and women must learn to love themselves first and be more
-minded if they want to get married and stay married. This way
e conclusion of experts during a forum on relationships at the ap-
al Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative weekend in
ashington, D.C.
"Love thyself is the first commandment of love, author and family.
therapist Audrey Chapman told the audience at the forum. "Single -
Women, Unmarried Men: What Has Happened to Marriage in the
Black Community" was sponsored by Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton,
D-Washington.
So many relationships are failing because no one is perfecting their
relationship within," said Chapman, host of "The Audrey Chapman
Show" on WHUR-FM. Blacks will never move forward until they heal
baggage of the past, she added.
In a room filled with more than 200 people sitting and standing,
Norton, who is divorced, shared her journey as a married woman /
and how she has observed the decline of Black marriages through f
the past 30 years. Norton noted that during slavery, 80 percent of :
Black children were raised in households with married parents; w
70 percent are raised in single-parent homes. There were often re
questions than answei-s.
"What happened to the knight in shining armor?" asked Chapnian,
who displayed a graph showing that Black men and women have the
highest singleness in the population. Chapman also noted a growing
Please turn to MARRIAGE 18B


';p~


Special to the Miami Times

State Rep. Dwight M. Bullard, D-Miami,
is no stranger to education.
Bullard, a teacher of Coral Reef
Senior High School, will host a panel
discussion, "The Future of Florida's
Public Education Forum," this month to
be held at Coral Reef Senior High, from
6-9 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 13 and South
Dade Senior High School, from 6-9 p.m.,
Wednesday, Oct. 14.
The forum will bring together a broad
array of community leaders, including
educators, students, parents, business
officials, community activists and


other interested citizens for an open
conversation about the future of public
education in our communities.
Participants will include local and state
school board members, principals and
teachers from throughout Miami-Dade.
In addition to the forum, parents and
students are encouraged to participate
in an "Empowerment Hour" program
that that will take place an hour
before each of the two forums. The
Empowerment Hour program seeks to
provide information to students and
parents on how to increase their level of
preparedness for school and their lives
after graduation.


-----
Local students participate in a Youth Panel during Miami's Dropout Prevention Summit.

.
Community youth panel summit
a
addresses dropout prevention


Summit discusses ways to increase high school graduation Rate


dred to several thousand dollars, depending
on tenure.
Some performance pay bonuses will be
given as well, including recruitment bonuses
for teachers at struggling schools.
The agreement also addresses working
conditions. Support staff will now
work 250 days rather than 260.
e The School district was able
to cut costs by dropping
UnitedHealth care as its
provider last month. The
district will now directly
offer its employees vari-
/ ous levels of coverage,
I The entire agreement
/ will cost the district about
$40 million, according to
9 superintendent of Schools
/ Alberto Carvalho. The money
will come from funds Carvalho
put aside in this year's budget to pro-
tect the work force. This year's school's bud-
get is $4.8 billion, about $700 million less
than last year's.
"We're happy that we came to an agree-
ment," said United Teachers of Dade presi-
dent Karen Aronowitz in a statement. "This
has been a very long time coming and it goes
a long way to rebuilding trust."


The Miami 77mes Special Report

Miami-Dade's school district and teachers
umon reached an agreement out an agree-
ment Monday night, ending stalemate that
has lasted more than a year. The teachers
will receive an average 1.8 percent
raise effective in December. ,-
According to the terms of /
the agreement,. at the be-
ginning of each of the next
three years, teacher sala-
ries will be renegotiated
in the hopes of aligning
them more fairly with the
economy. '
The three-year agree-
ment ends a stalemate that
began in June 2008, when **
then-Superintendent Rudy
Crew told the United Teachers
of Dade there wasn't enough money
in the budget to pay for promised salary in-
creases. He then froze salaries for the 2008-
2009 school year. Since then, the county's
22,000 teachers have worked without a con-
tract.
The teachers will now receive the "step"
increases promised to them in a previous
contract. The raises range from a few hun-


nation. That's 1.2 million each
year,, one every 26 seconds or
nearly 7,000 each school day.
"Far too mAny young people
in Miami and across the nation
are dropping out of school, leav-
ing their future and that of our
community at risk," said Miami
Mayor Manny Diaz. "We need
to come together as a commu-
nity like never before to provide
the necessary support to help
our youth graduate from high
school, so they are prepared for
college and have the skills nec-
essary to succeed in life."
Experts agree that the well-
being and prosperity of Miami
and the nation is dependent
upon an educated workforce.
By 2010, two-thirds of all jobs
will require .post-secondary in-
struction. Yet today, millions
enter the workforce lacking even


Special to the Miami Times
Local elected officials, busi-
ness leaders and some of the
most prominent child advocacy
organizations in Miami gath-
ered last month to formulate
a plan to increase area's high
school graduation rate.
A report commissioned by
America's Promise Alliance, the
nation's largest alliance of orga-
nizations working on behalf of
children and youth, found that
only about half of all students
served by the main school sys-
tems in the nation's 50 larg-
est cities graduate from high
school. In Miami-Dade, approx-
imately 35 percent of teens do
not graduate with their class.
Nationwide, nearly one out of
every three public high school
students drop out before grad-


basic skills for success. Young
people who drop out are more
likely to be incarcerated, rely
on public programs and social
services and go without health
insurance than those who grad-
uate from high school. Experts
estimate that dropouts from the
Class of 2006-07 will cost the
U.S. more than $329 billion in
lost wages, taxes and produc-
tivity over their lifetimes.
"Working together, we can
tackle this challenge and help
protect our most vulnerable
students," said Superintendent
of Miami-Dade Schools, Alberto
Carvalho.
Diaz and Carvalho joined rep-
resentatives from the National
Dropout Prevention Center,
America's Promise Alliance,
Miami Coalition for a Safe and
Please turn to DROPOUT 16B


The Miami Times


01


Bullard hosts educational forum









~


S15B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


BLACKS EVluS?. CONTRO1..THEIR OWIN DESTINY I


Victim recovering
in the hospital

By Sandra J. Charity
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Eleven months ago, at the re-
quest of his brother, Marcellino
Hill came from Connecticut to
Miami. After enduring back to
back deaths in his family--his
father, mother and sister had
died within months of each
other in the last few years--Hill
wanted to make sure his older
brother, Theodore was settling
in the Sunshine State and tak-
ing care of himself.
Theodore, an army veteran,

-du e
ray of deaths occurring in his
family.
Hill did not know he'd be re-
turningtoMiankiin 11monthS.
This time, his brother would
be clinging to life after being
hit by a car. Theodore's inju-
ries have left him in a coma at
Jackson Memorial Hospital's
Ryder Trauma Center.
After an emotional plea
for the public's help, Andres
Romero turned himself in to
Miami police on Saturday.
Romero, 23, faces a charge of
leaving the scene of a crash
with serious injury, according
to police- .
According to Miami Police,
Theodore, 51, was coming
home from work at Wet Willie's
Bar on South Beach on Sept.
26 when he was struck by an
unknown vehicle near 1498
Northeast Second Avenue.
Within days, Hill flew down
from Connecticut to be by his


p .
* thumeB M


COpyrighted Material
- Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News
- - *


-The Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite


Providers


brother's side.
Miami traffic homicide Detec-
tiveMargaritaprownwhowas
one of the first on the scene,
said last Wednesday at a press
conference held at the Miami
Police Department headquar-
ters, "It's a very busy area."
The police had very few leads
but they were certain that
someone, had seen something
in an area that housed many
homeless people and several
nightclubs. Nearby surveil-
lance cameras showed a larg9
black vehicle leaving the area
around the time of the accident
but police are unsure whether


not wanting to have to lose an-
other relative-- mother, father
and sister-- in'which he has
tattooed their name on his left
arm. He
doesn't want to add another
name.
"I do not want to have to add
my brother's name," he said in
tears. "It's my only brother, the
only relative I have."
Theodore remains hospital-


ized.
"I'm just
recovery fo
still in the
more hope
yesterday,"


- - .
e -
-


.


.
hoping for a speedy
r my brother. He's .. .
It'U, but we have .
today then we did .
said Hill.


THEODORE HILL
Hit and run victim
that car was involved.
In the meantime, Hill was
concerned about his brother--


C


-copy.riDhteg[VIaterial


. SyndicMiltent

Available from Gomarred News.P*roviders


And getting to work isn't as rnuch work.
Welcome to the world of South FlorIda Commuter Services, where you have many
commuting choices. Allow us to introduce you to better, faster and more economical
ways to get to work.There's carpooling and South Florida Vanpools.We can help with
everything from connecting you to other"poolers'to arrangements for flexible monthly
van leases.There's also Miemi-Dade Transit and Metrorail.We know the best routes,
stops and schedules.

Exploring your best commuting options is FREE! Plusyou'll save money getting to work.
Before you leave for work tomorrowcontact South Florida Commuter Services.


Call now! 1-800-234-RIDE or visit

www.1800234RIDE.com


- *


A free Servlce provided by usle Florida


act surrenders


Hit-and-run sus


AY ~r kr r~rrC ~tlrrl lrr31


Picture a world where


.


SOUTH FLORIDA









. ,





I


A



652-300 1

20215 NW 2red Ave.
Suite #2* Miami, FL33169
WWW.dentistgrant.net


BART M.WILLIAMS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext.109

on. Family serving since 1923
THE LARGEST MINORITY
OWNED NEWSPAPER
IN THE.SOUTHEAST





The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel pa~ymnent or be reimbursed for payment for any


God has not for gotten you


BLACKS MUST CONTROL TH-EIR OWN DESTIINY


What has you shackled and
bound? You cannot be truly re-
stored until it is removed.
In verse 39, the scriptures
state that because Lazarus
had been dead for four days,
he stank. Perhaps your situ-
ation stinks. Maybe you can-
not stand it. Maybe you cannot
stand being around yourself, or
the mess you have made of your
life. Perhaps the 'stink' of your
situation has run away .your
family and friends. Maybe the
people in church are a little ir-
ritated and impatient with you.
They surmise that there is noth-
ing you or anyone else can do,
and you need to move on. Je-
sus is not afraid of your stink.
He is not repulsed or repelled by
the mess that you have gotten
yourself into. He will not run


away and ignore you because
you are sick or broke. He will
not put you down or demean
you because you made some
bad choices that resulted in the
loss of your job or business.
He does not think that you are
hopeless or useless or stupid
or ugly. Let Him draw close
to you. He won't bite, and He
won't pull back. He loves the
opportunity to resurrect what
we believe was dead!
Do you think that your ca-
reer is dead? Do you believe
that your marriage is dead? Do
you .feel that your relationship
with your children is dead? If
you are still living and draw-
ing breath, it is not over. Give
Jesus the chance to make your
situation come alive again and
to make you alive again.


rescue you from your painful
situation. But hang on saintsI
Jesus loved Lazarus, yet He
held back.
Just because He has not come
yet doesn't mean that He doesn't
love you, and it sure doesn't
mean that He's not coming.
In verses 14 and 15, Jesus
Was actually glad that he de-
Tayed, or what was perceived as
a delay or bad timing. He was
actually glad that Lazarus had
already died before He arrived.
Was this because He did not
love Lazarus? Was this because
I-le was not coheerned that. his
sisters would be distraught and
inconsolable? The answers to
both of those questions is 'of
course not.' He cared about
Lazarus, Mary and Martha, and
He cares about you too. So why


did He say that He was glad
that He had riot arrived earlier?
It was because He wanted them
to witness a true miracle.
Verse 17 makes it clear that
Lazarus was really dead. He had
not just died, but had been dead
for four days. Because there
were reports of people not being
dead, but just unconscious, the
deceased were not considered
'really' dead until they had been
dead for three days. After three
days, it was reasoned that if the
person could be revived, they
would have done so within the
three days. At four days, you
were dead, no doubt about it!
In verse 38, Jesus commanded
that the stone be removed from
where Lazarus was buried. He
could not revive and restore him
until the stone was removed.


I love the account of La-
zarus. It is a wonderfully mov-
ing story to remind us that 'it
ain't over until the Lord says
that it's overl' I love especially
John 11: 5-6. It is important to
knoiv that after Jesus received
thk message about Lazarus, He
stayed where He was for two
more days. Is that surprising?
After all, Lazarus was His good
friend. He spent much time with
him and his two sisters, Mary


and Martha.
If you heard
that your
good friend
was in .need,
wotildn't you
leave where
you were and
immediately
go to him or her? And you can
actually look at this personally,
can't you? After all, you are still
waiting for Him to come and


Miami Northwestern senior
High School will hold their 10m
annual College Fair at the Lee
R. Perry Sports Complexyfrom
6 9:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nd#.
4. 305-836-0991.

******
The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take
place at Hard Rock Live at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel &
Casino on Dec. 17-19 Tick-
ets go on sale Friday, Oct. 9 at
noon.

""""
Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com

******
Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
- team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumni Pep Rally. 305- 804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


The "Natural World of Big
Cypress" exhibit opening and
premiere screening will be held
at the Deering Estate at Cutler
at 7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 23. South
Florida National Parks Trust,
305-665-4769 .or info@south-
floridaparks;org.

****^^
Sunshine 81opers' Ski Club
will, have their 20* anniver-
sary dinner dance at the Pol-
ish American Club starting at 7
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 24.
""""
Lifting Young Lions Foun-
dation of Excellence (LYLFOE)
is hosting its Fpurth Annual
Scholarship Awards Program
for scholarship recipients at
Florida Memorial University on
Saturday, Oct. 24. Dr. George
Davis, Jr., 305-790-7196.

""****
Jackson Health System will
host its third annual Small
Business Vendor Day Workshop
at the Ira C. Clark Diagnostic
Treatment Center, from 8:30
a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Thursday,
Oct. 29.

*****


Walker,


305-635-2301,


Era" from 8:15 a.m. 3 p.m.,
Friday, Oct. 16. 305-350-0631.

*****
Eagle Care Productions
present "Crunk for Christ Unity
Explosion" at the IBB Church
Conference Center Facility at 7
p.m., Friday, Oct. 16. 786-346-
0021.

****** -
Susan G. Komen Race for
the Cure will be held at the Bay-
front Park in Downtown Miami,
starting at 7:30 a.m., Saturday,
Oct. 17. Visit: www.komenmi-
aftLorg

""****
The Booker T. Washington
Class of 1965 will conduct a
meeting at the African Heritage
Cultural Center, from 4 5:30
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 17. 305-
213-0188 or 305-205-7115.

""***
Miami-Dade State Attorney
Office will present their Seal-
ing and Expungement Program
at the Bethel Apostolic Church,
from 4- 7 p.m., Thursday, Oct.
22. Call 305-547-0724.


'M.


*
iami Northwestern Senior
h Class of 1980 will meet at
0 Northwest 146 Street at 3
., Oct. 10. 305-835-2025.
******
he fourth annual South
ida Theatre Festival will
place Oct. 12-26. 954-765-
1.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation, is asking for all class
president of their respective Re-
union Organizing Committees
to attend a special meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 7, at 6:30 p.m.
at Miami Jackson Senior High
School. For more information
call 786-256-2609, or 786-419-
5805.

********
Office of Community and
Economic Development will
have an Open House to be held
at 701 Northwest First Court,
from 4:30 6 p.m., Thursday,
Oct. 8. LidiaAlmanza, lalman2@
miamidade.gov or Lonnie Wal-
cott, lowal@miamidade.gov
****** -'
Beneby Family will have
their reunion at the Sheraton
Suites in Plantation from Oct.
9-11. Althea Beneby-Duren,
305-981-8664 or Fred Beneby,
386-788-4881.


Miami-Dade County De-
partment of Human Services
(DHS) will host their annual T
Domestic Violence Awareness Flor
Walk and Expo at the Gwed take
Margolis Amphitheatre in North 583
Miami Beach, Saturday, Oct
10. Registration begins at 7/15


a.m. Renee Darden, 305-948- The Children's Home Soci-
2940. ety of Florida (CHS) will hold
its ninth annual Claws for a
""**** Cause dinner at the Joe's Stone
Miramar Cultural Center Crab on South Beach at 7 p.m.,
will present "U Got Me Bent & Wednesday, Oct. 14. Call 305-
Twisted," a Gospel stage play 755-6500 or visit www.chsfl.org
speaks to the perpetual cycle
of domestic violence while pro """"
hiding an electrifying, spirittial City of Hialeah will host the
and uplifting comedy, at 8 pm. North Miami-Dade Career Re-
Saturday, Oct. 10. Call. 954 sources Expo at the Florida Na-
602-4500 or visit: www.Mifa tinal College from 10 a.m. to
marCulturalCenter.org @ 2 p.m., Friday, Oct. 16.


""""
There will be a free first-time
Homebuyers Workshop held
at the Believers Life Ministries
on Saturday,'Oct. 10. Rachel


""""
University of Miami School
of Communication will host
a "Principled Journalism and
Government Relations in a New


Second Chapter and The
Peace M.B.C. Mass Choir.
The culminating activity is
scheduled for Saturday at 2
p.m. with the "Youth Expo"
showcasing the talents of our
yotiths in Gospel Rap, Double
ITutch and Step. Call 305-
681-4681.

ownns
The Revelation Christian
Academy is open for regis-
tration. After-care is from 3-6
p.m. Call 305-758-5656 or
786-281-8098'

*****
A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellow-
ship at 11:15 a.m., on Sun-


Serving the community


Mount Hope Fellowship
will host its Fall Revival from
Oct. 7-9. 305-493-9635.

******
Holy. Ghost Faith Deliver"
ance Ministries will have a
revival, 7:30 p.m. nightly, un-
til Oct. 8. 305-696-5107.

******
Now Faith Ministries pres-
ents a week of revival at 8
p.m. nightly until Oct. 9.

""""
The A.M. Cohen Temple
Church of God in Christ and
the Eastern Florida Jurisdic-
tion will celebrate their 50s
pastoral anniversary at 4
p.m., Sunday, Oct. 11. 305-
573-2924.

""****
Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church is celebrating
its 114* Church Anniversary
this Sunday. Connie Cason-
Hamm, 305-384-8478.


Neva King Cooper Edu"
national Center will be cel-
ebrating its 25m anniversary
on Oct. 16. 305-910-7819.

*****
Pembroke Park Church
of Christ will hold a job fair,
from 9 a.m. 12 p.m., Satur,
day, Oct. 17. 954-962-9327.
""""
Faith Christian Centier
will celebrate 25 years of


COSMETIC DENTRISTY
* Teeth Whitenin 1 hour
* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
* Porcelain Veneers
Cosmetic Bonding


RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

* Implant Supported Replacements
* Tooth Colored Fillings
* Gum Therapy
* Root Canal
* Dentures and Partials


ministry, 7:30 p.m. nightly, days and Bible class weekly
October 18- 24. Culmination At 7 p.m., Thursdays. .
service will take place at the
Doubletree Hotel at Miami nowns
Airport, 11 a.m., Saturday Redemption M.B. .Church
Oct. 24. Church office, 305 is sponsoring a fundraising
253-6814. Breakfast and yard sale on
Friday and Saturday. Pastor
"""" WEie McCrae, 305-793-7388
Peace Missionary Baptist or 305-836-1990.
Church will present The ote: Calendar items must
Power of Vision Conference: be submitted before 3:30 p.m.
Empowering the Saints While on)kfonday.
Changing the World" from
Oct. 21-24. Friday night's
Gospel Concert will feature


The Fellowship of Christ Faith
Ministries, 4210 N.w. 22 Av-
enue, observe October to cel-
ebrate 22 years of ministry, 4
p.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m., all
Other services.
Services are as follows:
Sunday, October -1. Pastor Da-
vid Fleming. Chnst Interna-
tional Church; Friday October
9, Pastor Elease Thomas. Solid
Rock Divinity, Sunday. Octo-
ber 11, Royce L. Ross- Bennett
of Denver will minister in a
special Healing and Delivering
Service; Friday, October 16,
Pastor Alberta Williams, First
Missionary Baptist Church;
Sunday, October 18, Elder Wil-
lie L. Coley, Tree of Life Minis-
tries; Wednesday, October 21,
Pastor Wellington Curtis, Silver
Blue Lakes Mission B tist
Church; Thursday, October 22,


1-95


.,@

ELDER ROY U. ROSS
Pastors Willie and Marge Stall-
worth, Living Word'of God and
climaxing Sunday, October 28,
Pastors James and Peggy Ste-
phens, Full Gospel Christian
Center, Fort Lauderdale.
The theme is Taking the king-
dom by force.


B 41 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 7-15 9


since 1984


SAFETY & COMFORT
Nitrous Oxide (tran uilizin air)
Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA Sedation Dentistry
General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentis State of The Art Facility
Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, AGD


"SMIL M***K*O*=**


22nd Anniversary Observance


.
a TAKE
,g 11
AND IMPLANT
a off any procedure II 0 0 I
0
1000 on-, ..........
at. .. .. :. or rno2 a e. . - - - - a
-- -- -- n --s.---------=r----- -

Insurance Welcome
We offer Financial Arrangements
Lab On Premises Repairs While You Wait

Evening and Saturday Appointments


"o
a










I


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 7-'13, 2009


The Miami Times


SECTION B


me~~~~- Iew a nl





Most~~~nrr U..adlsdont a


Sr


Available from Commercial Ne s Providers


( 1: Famr milikm ps sm tils drugs
Agil 1811! ill


Ir --- *1


_~S indicated Content


Bkrem camwr Icathl rates C~~reath t brrUm





, V


- -


U


KLACKCS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9 0021


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15,


For a testing site near you,


.*

Copynghted Material


*


__ _


Syndicated Conterit
amon w h


*


__II


I


**


:,I


me


**


Millions in frand, dnag abumc clolgs Mcdlaid


aCv l~s


PROTECT" YOUR FAMIILY.


c'


barsaget U(gsat keyw~ kh M ad~
















I


___llllllyl_______~ -Y I


'-


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR~OWN DESTINY I


indicted for 2006 massive shooting


four members of the Haitian
gang, 68* Street Boys, have
been indicted. Robert Altmad
Shaw, 31, brothers: Emmanu-
el Cadillon, 28,' Samuel Cadil-
lion, 25 and Junior Sylvin, 27
have been charged with three
counts of first degree murder,
one count of attempted first .
degree murder and several
lesser charges. All four men
are currently in jail or prison


BV Sandra J. Charit:e
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
In a case that shocked the
City of Miami, three men, Edwin
Terma, 21; Lamar Atron Kelly,
20 and Luckson Branel, 19,
were driving when their mini-
van was cut off and stopped in
broad daylight. Gunmen wear-
ing ski masks and dressed in
black riddled the mini-van


--Miami Times Photo/ Sandra J. Charite


Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Rundle-Fernandez


der. Law enforcement is com-


"None of us here today will


muiy"she said. "However,


shooting, according to police.
Months prior to the shooting,
Emmanuel's 18-month-old
son, Zykarious Cadillon, was
shot and killed at his Little
River home which prompted
Emmanuel Cadillon's retalia-
tion on that sunny afternoon
in July 2006.
Emmanuel Cadillon had
been incarcerated since 2006,
for reasons unrelated to the
shooting, after an all-night
standoff with police in Mira-
mar.
Though the case did take
three years for police to solve,
Timoney warns gang members
to be aware because the City
will not tolerate this form of
violence in the community.
"The message is pretty clear.
The gang members should
keep looking over their shoul-


on unrelated charges.
Rundle-Fernandez displayed
photos of the incident at the
press conference and said the
shooting captured "nationwide
attention."
"If you look at it, more than
60 shots were fired. They
didn't stand a chance. Look at
the pictures of this van," said
Rundle-Fernandez."The condi-
tion of the targeted mini-van;
no one was intended to get out
alive.n
Emmanuel Cadillon, who
is currently serving time for
possession of ammunition by
a convicted felon, is believed
to be the mastermind of the


4with more than 50 shots from
an-easault weapon, according
to the Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney Katherine Rundle-Fernan-
dez.
The incident occurred on
Northwest 396 Street and 11*
Avenue. None of the victims
survived.
Miami Police Chief John Ti-
money recalls the crime scene.
"I was on the scene that day.
When the detectives got togeth-
er, it didn't look promising," he
said about the case at a press
conference Friday in the E. R.
Graham building. "This case
was extremely difficult."
After more than three years,


~Y~ pb Vlr bor b Hlt~


J


,,,,,ar~Syn~dic~at,~ed Co~~ententi


the JRami Wime


~IrY


NAN 1


HAIT


IAN


LIF


F~our Haitian gang members


-- Copyri


.
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923


Ou


Ot


Ou


kom


nate


m a t y











81 ,


CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY-MIAMI NO. 1














Banquet Adult Ticket(s) $60 each
Children Ages 4-11-Ticket(s) $40 each.

Reservations should be accompanied by check made payable to:
Church of God of Prophecy-Miami No.1
4528 Northwest'lst Avenue Miami, Florida 33127

Checks receive4before November 10; tickets will be sent by mail to the
address of the requester. Checks received after November 10;
tickets must be picked up at the door on the event date.

For further Information call
305-576-4992, 305-685-3295
or 305-450-2441; Fax: 305-576-8840

I

SU 8 SCRIBET 0 DA Y !
END THEINC 0 NVENIENCE 0 EMPTY NE WSPAPER B 0 X E S,
FIGHTING THE WEATHER AND HUNTING DOWN BACK COPIES


Black Archives chairman passes


to be unappreciative of women,
and the ratio of men to women is
so uneven that men are living a
more polygamous lifestyle.
. Perrault urges women to ele-
vate and appreciate men because
without a strong woman, no man
will be the strong and successful
mate that she hopes for. But it is
a struggle that both parties must
be willing to fight.
During the question and an-
swer period, Chapman and Per-
rault said that having a great
friendship first is an important
ingredient of a successful rela-
tionship and that it enables cou-
ples to get to know each other
through the good times and the
bad.


MT. Zi0N A.M.E. (HUR(H
15250 N.W.22ND AVENUE

mmmmmarmwirmamma
Order oi Services
Stili0AY: Worship 5ervke
7:30 & 11 e.m.


Hos

2171
mTilWME


Mt. calvaryy Missionary
Baptist (burch
1140 Dr. Martin I.uther King, Jr. Blvd.


Jordan Grove Missionary
Boptist (hurch
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.
mmmmmmunimmmm


St. Mark Missionori
Baptist (burch
1470 N.W. 87th Sweet

Order of Services








Temple Missionary
Baptist (hurch
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
gggggggyggggagg ggg
Order of Services

$un M0m uti brts 11 om
Tu. as5ble adv

ar. Quiron h timerry 6 30 pm


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Ave.nue

Order of Services




edne de Bible Srud 130 pm



word of Faith
Christian center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday $rhool 10 on
we an I n





Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Ministry International
21485 N.W. 27 Ave.

Order oi5ervices
Sunday Worsh.p tom
Bale study wednesday 80 pm
r.n. andnmeandhoratrim on


Antioch Missionary Baptist
(hurch of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services




Evenaq Washp lp rn
0 *^

New shiloh M.Ii. Church
. 1350 N.w.95th street
wriw.nshilohmbc.org

Order of Services

Meming Worhip II am
Tuesday ableassIpm





A pha Agape SDA (hurch
8400 N.W.25th Ave.


Order of Services
Subborh 5shool 9 30 am (501
Deane Wonhap II am (Sail
fourh floor unry scrunior
I hour belose Sunsed
ashPrayersernanowed


New Birth Baptist lb Irch, The (athedral of Faith International


Liberty (ity (hurch
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Moming 8 e.m.
Sunday School 10 e.m.


Apostolic
Revival (enter
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order oi Servi es
ed I..ier wary Pro or
9 am li am


B LAhCKS MUSTI CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I ~


a struggling mate. The audience
was silent.
He went on to stress that men
and women don't respect, love
and trust each other enough to
be married. However, getting
married is not the problem, he
said. "It's staying married that's
so difficult."
Dialog indicated a civil war
brewing in Black communities
and single-parent families rais-
ing children who don't under-
stand the importance of mar-
riage. Another perspective was
that parents are raising young
girls to be more independent,
out of fear that they will never
find a mate anyway. Dr. Perrault
said they are raising young men


MARRIAGE *
continued from 12B

gap between Black women, who
are more educated and success-
ful, and Black men, who are go-
ing to college less frequently, but
are regular inhabitants in the
prison system.
The more educated the wom-
an is, the less likely she will be
able to find a mate of the same
status, making it harder for her
to marry. There are many good
Black men out there,. Chapman
said, but women just have to
look beyond the eye's view.
Shane Perrault, Ph.D., psy
ecologist, coach and founder of
African-American Counseling
Services in Silver Spring, Md.
Perrault opened by asking the
women in- the audience to de
scribe African-American men.

fa si etnt, r -
educated "no class "gay" and
"lazy" among other terms.
Perrault then flipped the script
and .asked the men to describe
Black women. Men described
women as being "gold diggers,"
"harsh," "nagging" and "belit-
tling Dr. Perrault asked the
men if they think Black women
havetoomuchattitude.Themen
agreed that thist statement is ab-


mTimittisinmilimmium


Bible Teaching Seminor
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.
Miami
mmmmmmmmmmm
Order oi5ervices


absolutely true. If a woman is too
strong and unapproachable, of
course the man is going to seem
lazy, said Dr. Perrault.
A woman should look beyond
what a man has at the mo-
ment, Perrault said. Instead, she
should investigate and take no-
tice of his goals and envision his
gro ex- me the example
of First Lady Michelle Obama.
The Cibaritas have been mar-
ried for 10 years. When Barack
picked up Michelle up for their
first date, she could see a hole
through the bottom of his car.
She didn't look at his status at
that time; she looked past, it to
his drive and determination for
the future. She was the bread-
winner of their family for years*
Perraultaskedthewomenofthe
audience how many would be
willing to support a family with


tion and active in the
Theodore R. Gibson
Memorial Foundation.
She is survived by
two sons, Percy and
Paul Brown, and their
families.
She was a member
of Christ Episcopal
Church. Funeral ar-
METTA arrangements are in-
RUSSELL complete. *Call Range
FuneralHomeforup-
dated information,


Long-time Coconut
Grove resident Car- .
metta Cash Russell
died Thursday after
a lengthy illness. She
was 92.
Daughter. of Coco-
nut Grove business
pioneers, Miriam and
George Cash, Sr., the
retired educator was CAR
chairman of the bound CASH
of the Black Archives
History and Research Founda-


s ei vreSf or edrO



P r Mee ag lu 6 pm


~l;#rY#~;l~licT~);#l1#~:~!


I (800) 254-NBBC


b


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood FI 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 0.m. Morning Wor ship 10 a.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7.30 p.m.


m.


(ornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church .
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
hadne sshool 9 30...
slendo, worshis 11 am
nn, sunday
Evening Wonhip 6 pm
undweaser.ne 7pm
thour Pehoursal (hunday


Order obervice
unday name war
. .l., or 8 8 11 am
goday theos or 9 44,.
Thurday Bible Study Ipm
swordeposer,,,


TeleviSiGH ifOgium SUre FOUnilOlion
My33WBFS/(omrost3 5aluiday-l:30o.m.
www pembrokeporkthurchokhrbl com pembrokepodror@bellsouth nel



Friendship Missionary Baptist (burch
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6.30 a.m. Early Morning Worship 7:30 c.m.
Sunday School 9 30 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.
Youlb Minisily Study, Wed 7 pm Prayer/Bible51udy. Wed 7 p.m.
Noonday Allar Prayer .(M-F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday.....11 omlpm
m..fr..mkhanmbeminarn franelshmnsmardl&nilanthnni


IKR~I~T~I~Y


anna communityy
Baptist (hurch
N.W. 56th Street
DIEWWT&WFBEMM
Order of Services
Sunday 5thool 9 45 om
Worsh.p 11 am


AND HE SA4ID UNTO THEMI GO YEE


B THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 7-13 2 9


Great friendship is the key to a great marriage


k


Ebenezer United


2300 NW 135th Stree
Order of Services
Sunday worship 7 a.m.,

Sunday 5dlool 9:30 a.m.
tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p m


Logos Baptist Church


























ROBERT "JOSH" JENKINS,
. 55, case worker'
died Septem-
ber 30 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, Mt. Tabor
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

Rang


05/24/29 10/07/03

It has been six years since you
left to go home and not a day has
passed that your smile, laugh-
ter, or words of wisdom were not
remembered or spoken.
We miss you, love you and will
carry you in our thoughts and
hearts forever.
Lovingly your wife, Mary; chil-
dren: Sandy, Karen, Bobby,
grandchildren and great grand-
h'1dren.

PUBLIC NOTICE
As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami TYrnes prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and date,
location, and time of services. Ad-
ditional information and photo
may be eluded for a normal
charge.The deadline is Monday at
3:30 p.m.


Honor Your Loved One W~ith


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


JERRY WILLIAMS, 27, food
server, died
September 30.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


LOUISE ELAINE WILSON, 50,
cashier, died
September 30.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Ap-
ostolic Revival
Center




mL.OUISEdDURANT, 74, home-

tlo0ber 2nSe ate
urday, a Greater
Is I P. B
rae
Church.



TOMMY LEWIS HARVEY, 53,
died September
30. Service 11
a.m., Thursday
in the chapel.





DOROTHY ROBERTS, 84, died
October 3. Arrangements are in-
complete.

INFANT MANDELL CURRY, 3
months, died October 1st. Service
was held.

BISHOP LV ROBERTSON, 91,
bishop, died October 5. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Eric S. George
ELLEN KIMBLE LOVETT, 79,
homemak e r,
died October 3
at Vistas Hos-
pice. View-
ing '7-8 p.m.,
Wednesday y,
4631 West Hal- ~
landale Beach
Blvd. Service 11
a.m., Thursday, Ebenezer Mission-
ary Baptist Church, 816 N.W. 1st
Avenue, Hallandale Beach, FL.
y,
St. Fort's
JEFF B. ClLIEN, 27, died Sep-
tember 28. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Fraternity Church-

QIEUSEUL NORVIUS, 44, died
October 1 at Aventura Hospital.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Holy
Cross Lutheran Church.

FRANCOIS H. SAINT
PHILIPPE, 57, died September
28 at home. Arrangements are in-
complete.

DAPHNE EDMOND, 29, died
October 3 at Jackson North Medi-
cal Center. Final rites and burial
Bahamas

Pax Villa (Br )
ISMENIE BELIDOR, 85, seam-
stress, died, September 16 at
home. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Bethel Baptist Church, Fort Lau-
derdale, FL.

MARIE EMILE, 69, homemaker,
died September 25 at University
Hospital. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Eglise Baptiste De La Recon-
ciliation, Margate, FL.

ELZA SYLVAIN, 66, homemak-
er, died September 25 at Brovyard
General Medical Center. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Berean Church
of God. Fort Lauderdale, FL.

KUBLAIN JEAN, 26, manager,
died October 1 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Saint Ebenezer Catholic
Church, Pompano Beach, FL.

THIERRY POITEVIEN, 48, busi-
ness man, died October 3. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, St. Bartholom-
ew Catholic Church. Miramar, FL-

SILPHIDE DUCASSE, 53,


homemaker, died October 1st at


Gregg L. Mason
EDDIE LEE FINCH, SR., 73,
pastry chef,
Dorville Hotel,
died September
29. Survivors in-
clude: sons, Ed-
die Lee Jr. and -..
IIie re F ch -;

N Finch-Davis


DEACON EDGAR PROCTOR,
70, skycap,
died October 3 t
in Tallahassee,
FL. Visitation
4 9 p.m., Fri-
day. Please call
Royal for further .
we
details 305-625-
6818.

MAMIE WILSON, 67, house-
wife, died September 29. Visita-
tion 4 9 p.m., Friday. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Memorial Temple
Baptist Church.

SAUL BROWN, 55, truck driver,
died October 1st. Visitation 4 9
p.m.,Wednesday. Service 12 p.m.,
Thursday, New Way Fellowship
Praise and Worship Center.

PRESTON GREEN, 25, painter
died September 21. Service was
held.

MILTON MUCKETT, 49, labor-
er, died October 2. Final rites and
burial Frenches, St.Vincent-

PEARLINE CLARKE, 89, seam-
stress, died October 1st. Service
was held.
.4
Nakia Ingra am

SeEpVANbG 15NaE HyOPttr 6 e led
Center. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Revival Temple of Miami.

MAJORIE BURTON, 58, CNA,
died October 3 at Ocala Hospital.
Service 9 a.m, Saturday, New Life
Fellowship Center. (

JOSE BARRAZA,31, died Oc-
tober 1st at home. Final rites and
burial El Salvador, Mexico.

JUAN CRUZ JAIMAN 67
salesman, died October 4 at Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Service
12 p.m. Thursday, Graveside-
Hollywood Memorial Garden

E. A. Stev s
VENSTON CARTER, 48, secu-
rity guard, died September 29 at
Memorial Regional Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.

DAISY GAVIN, 97, died Sep-
tember 30 in Winter Haven, FL.
Arrangements are incomplete.

CRYSTAL TELESFORD, 24
student, died October 1st in Chi-
cago, IL. Service 12 p.m., Satur-
day, National Church of God, Fort
Lauderdale -

VIOLA MUNNERLYN, 81, died
October 4 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.

CARRIE WASHINGTON, 72,
died October 4 at home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


ROBERT TAVER, SR., 81, main-
tenance worker,
died September
30. Service 11
a.m. Saturday
'
Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist Church '


FRANK STOGLIN, JR., 23'
laborer, died
September 23
at University of
Miams Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. 1
Herman A.M.E.
Church.

ALICE STRONG, 60, cook,
died September ,
29 at Morton
Plant Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Second Baptist
Church


LORENZO DYE, 60, contrac-
tor, died September 29 at Jack-
son South Hospital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Mt. Moriah Baptist
Church.

EDDIE PORTER, 58, latorer,

thS m ty Ho pitaa ,
vice 11 a.m., Saturday in the cha
pel.

Poit ier


and Ouedia Finch
Finch-Davis, and
relatives and frien
held.

ALEXANDER
"aka" Lil Bit,
51, died Octo-


MOTHER IVAL
DOROTHY HEPBURN SCOTT

acknowledges with deepest
appreciation and gratitude. the
many comforting messages, floral
tributes, prayers and other ex-
pressions of kindness evidenced
in thoughts and deeds during
Our hours of grief and sorrow.
Special thanks to Bishop Nor-
wood Dean and the #1 Church
of God of Prophecy, Suffrogan
BishoperE dl O MTh Fl

Southern Diocese of Church of
Our Lord Jesus Christ of the
Apostolic Faith, President Oph-
elia Morrison and Rev. Charles
Jones of Seaboard Baptist As-
sociation, Rev. Charles Mitchell
and True Vine M.B.C. Family,
Elder Daryl Clarke, Aba's House
COGOP, Washington D.C. and
Bishop Johnny Davis, Jr. for his
comforting encouraging eulogis-
tic.message.
Our sincere thanks to Richard-
son Mortuary staff for their effi-
cient and caring services.
We pray God's blessing on each
of u.Hepburn, Messer, Bostic,

Thomas and Scott Families.
In Memorial
In loving memory of,


; sister, Maxie GENE A. HITCHENS, 61, com-
a host of other unity liaison for
Dade County
ds. Service was
Office of Com-
munity Rela-
B. DANIELS tions, died Octo- :4
ter 4 Servi --

Christ The King


.
Roman Catholic
Church.

ANDRE' F. VOLCY, 60, journal-
ist, died October 1st. Service 12
p.m., Saturday, St. Marys Cathe-
dral

Wright and Young
ANTHONY E. SAWYER 58
died October
3 S v rs
include uryw fe
Angela Saw-

rle t>roth

ks
dolyn) and Dar-
nell Mobley; sisters: Cynthia West,
Joann Mobley, Alfreda Feltoh
(Melvin) and Diane Banks; step-
other, LE ran tinearCunn

uncles: Jerry Sawyer (Mattie) and
Carlton Sawyer (Dethra). Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Peaceful Zion
MB Church.

ALFRED ALEXANDER PAR-
RIS, 57 truck
driver died
September 29.
Survivors in-
cludi- mother
Henrietta Parris;
five sisters: lona
Parris-Vanter-
ool (Roy), Lor-
9 .
raine Paris, Loretta Parris, Linda
Parris and idaline Parris. Service
was held

BRUNO A DELTORO, 71, died
October 1st IdCatholic Hospice.
service was

Mitchell
INFANT AH'MIYAH A. HOW-
ARD, 9 months,
died September
30 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service
lo a.m.. sat-
urday, Liberty
City Church of
Christ.



Alfonso M. Richaen
LEE ROY CLARK, died Octo-
ber 1st in Kin-
dred Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, An-
nie J.; children,
Tarrie, Kevin,
Lee Roy Jr.,
Larry, Nelson
Dean(Latonya),
KhalilArmani(Wanda) and April Mi-
chelle; brothers, Joe Louis(Cheryl)
and Burnett(Shirley). Viewing 3 8
p.m., Thursday. Service 10 a.m.,
Friday, Mount Herman A.M.E.
Church, 17800 N.W. 25 Avenue.

.
Bann-Range@A
ALLEN CARL SMITH aka
"Tater", 60, of
Perrine, died
October 3 at
home. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day, Glendale
Baptist Church. 4,


ber 4 at home.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Ar-
lene; son, Mau-
rice (Tamaka);
daughter, Tif-
fany; parents'
Alexander Daniels (Lori) and Betty
Nance; brothers and sister; and a
host of other relatives and fnends.
Visitation 2-9 lim., Friday. Fam-
ily hour 5-7pm. Service 12 p.m.,
Saturday, Gospel Tabernacle,
3311 NW 189th Street. Interment:
South Florida National Cemetery.

RONALD M. LOPEZ, 66, retired
park manager'
City of Miami,

eSurviO o r
clude: daughter,
Makeda; former
wife, Bonnie A
Lopez, and a
host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation
2-9 p.m., Friday. Service 11a.m.,
Saturday, Faith CommunitysBap-
tist Church. Interment: Southern
Memorial Park.
11--
Hadley Daves
GLORIA TAFALKER, 56, beauti-
cian, died Sep-
tember 26 at
Aventura Hos-
pital. Service 1
Saturday
p1m.*
First Bapti
Church of North
Miami.


INFANT JAVON J. MARSHALL,
7 nionths, died
September 28
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital
Service 11 a.m
Saturday in th
chapel-


Paradise JEA
ANTWANN LEON WILSON,
33, died October 2 at Westchester
Hospital. Service 12 p.m., Wednes-
day (today), Mt Olive, South Mi-
ami, FL.
Grace .
CHARLES WRIGHT, 78, retired
truck driver,
died October 3.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, 93rd
Community
Baptist Church,



CAROLE DIANE REESE, 49,
hair stylist, died October 1 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Friday, North-side
Seven Day Adventist Church.
ai th
SHAWN MIRVILLE, 17, stu-
dent, died September 25 at Citrus
Health Network. Arrangements are
incomplete.

JEROME BOYD, 59, environ-
mental service, died September
25 at VA Hospital. Arrangement
are incomplete.

CIRILO GARCIA, 55, laborer,
died September 27 at VA Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.


ALPHONSO
87, store owner,
died Septem-
ber 27 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
was held.


WALKER, S.


GEORGIA LEE WASHINGTON.
75, doniestic

en nbe r,1stdiqd
Charlotte, N.C.
Service 1 p.m.'
Saturday, St
Luke Missionary
C h
Baptist hurc .


ELAINE DELORES THUR-
STON, 50, printer, died July 299tt
Lakeland Regional Hospital. $er-
vice 11 a.m., in the chapel.

SHAbNDA JOHNSON, 33'
home health provider, died Sep-
tember 25 at Jackson Memorial
Hospital. Service 1, p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.

gain th e-Jafigous ffth
by becoming a member of our
('24,44# 11xubsty '
CALL 305-694-6210


- a team
ROBERT M. WILCOX
"Coach"


S19B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


H TI t., .. ..". Jays Royal Card of Thanks
Maker MAMIE OLIVER, 68 died Sep- The family of the late,
WILLIE L. ALLEN, 74, died LIZZIE MAE SMITH, 53, super- member 27 at CHARLIE BAKER, 79, truck
October 3 at visor, died Octo- Sylvester Com- driver, died Sep-
Jackson Me- ber 1 at Jackson prehensive member 28. Ser-
morial Hospi- Memorial Hos- Cancer Center. vice was held.
tal. Service 10 pital. Service 11 I Service 1 p.m.,
a.m.,Saturday, a.m., Saturday' Saturday, Morn-
Jordan Grove in the chapel. ingstar Mis-
Missionary Bap- sionary Baptist
tist Church. Church.










, ,


Drugs saving Africans lives


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1


BRUCE GRAVES, 37, Mi-
ami-Dade County Transit bus
operator, died October 3.
Survivors include: daugh-
ter, Acura; father, Rev, John;
mother, Myrtye and brother
Eric (Sabrina).
Viewing 2 to 4 p.g., Friday,
Alfonso M. Richardson Fu
neral Services, 3790 N.W. 167
Street, Miami Gardens and
5 to 8 p.m., Salem Baptist
Church, 2945 N.W. 62 Street.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Christian Fellowship Baptist
Church, 8100 N.W. 17 Av-
enue.
Services under' the direction
of Alfonso M. Rchardson Fu-
neral Services, 305-625-7177
----- -----

Honor Your


Loved One With an


18 MemOrialR




The Miami Times


ypq~rl


PATSY GAUSE


GLORIA ANN SMITH


HERBERT JOSEPH, JR.
10/08/26- 02/07/08

. We will never stop loving
you!
from your wife and kids

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,
. ..
: '- *


PHEIAMI OLLIFF


It's been a year since you
went to glory and it still feels
like yesterday.
We want you to know our
hearts are grieving and at the
same time rejoicing because
we know you made it in.
We love you, .
The Gause Family


Your mother, daughter, son,
brother, sister and family. We
love you.


in Memorial
In loving memory of,


Gone, but not forgotten,
you're greatly missed and
your memories will forever
be in our hearts and mind.
Thank you for showing us so
much love and how to love.
We feel your spirit and en-
ergy around us every day and
miss you more than words
can say.
Your loving husband,
daughters, son, grandchildren
and great grandchildren.

in MOMOriam
In loving memory of,


It's been six years since
you've been gone, but we
think of you always, especial-
ly today.
You will never be forgotten,
although we don't see your
smiling face.
Your memory is a keepsake,
with which we will never'part.
We have hopes of seeing you
in the resurrection-
We love you always,
Mom, Dad and famly-

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


JOSEPH S. HILL


EZELL FINKLEA SR 'Buddy'

wishes to express our sincere
thanks to relatives and friends
who extended their kindness
during our bereavement.
The Finklea family


For God so loved the world
that He gave His only begotten
Son, that whoever believeth in
Him should not perish but have
everlasting life.
Gone but not forgotten
Your loving family


A wonderful husband, fa-
ther and good friend.
Gone but not forgotten. May
your soul rest in peace.
The Hill family


ASHAM McKINNEY JR
"ACE"
05/14/60 10/08/06

You are not- forgotten love
one, nor will you ever be. As
long ps life and memory last;
we will remember thee. We
miss you now, our hearts are
sore; and as time goes by,
we'll miss you more. Your lov-
ing smile, your gentle face. No
one can ever fill your special
place here in our hearts.
Love always, Samantha,
Rashard, family and friends.


MRS. ANDEL W. MICKINS

we would like to say thank
you for the many cards, flow-
ers, covered dishes, prayers,
and other gestures of support
in the home going of our sister,
mother, and grandmother.
May God bless and may
heaven smile up on you.
The Mickins Family


nity spent nearly $9 billion on
AIDS. For every dollar spent on
public health, AIDS gets aboxit
23 cents. It causes about four
percent of deaths globally.
Guerma said the numbers of
people who need AIDS drugs
might double by the end of the
year, as WHO is considering re-
vismg its treatment guidelines.
Several studies have suggested
AIDS patients could live longer if
they started taking drugs soon-
er. If WHO changes its thresh-
old for when patients should get
the drugs, which.Guerma said
could happen later this year, the
numbers of people who qualify
for the treatment could double.
Now that millions of AIDS pa-
tients are ori treatment, some
experts said it is time for the
U.N. to focus on other strate-
gies for stopping the outbreak.
"We really need to do some-
thing about preventing HIV
because there are more peo-
ple getting infected every year
than there are being put on
treatment," said David Ross,
an AIDS expert at the London
School of Hygiene and Tropical
Medicine.


DRUGS
continued from 15B

some difference." .
In 2008, officials estimated
more than four million people
were on-AIDS drugs in low- and
middle-income countries, a 10-
fold jump in five years. The big
gest increase was in sub-Saha-
ran Africa, where nearly three
million people are now on the
drugs.
Overall, about 44 percent of
people with HIV in sub-Saharan
Africa who need AIDS drugs are
now taking them.
"It's actually not radically less
coverage than you would get in
Europe or the U.S.," Halperin
said. In the U.S., about 71 per-
cent of patients who need the
AIDS drugs are taking them, ac-
cording to 2003 data- from the
Center for Disease Control and
Prevention,
"We have invested a lot of funds
into HIV/AIDS, but it has been a
worthwhile investment because
we have saved lives," said Dr.
Teguest Guerma, WHO's acting
AIDS director.
Last year, the global commu


B 02 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 7-15 9


In Memoiam inMemoria DeathNoticein MemoriamHapBitdyapyBrh y





e Mi.

Ies e


tem r-= es"m hecJ I k


48testta~


"Il


salanilB MI~


salm walitigislHIS Milllliggillb


Available from Commercial News Providers

) or therre thrpherd therry to rr ela at Mrs takes


Y ~


n


)I W heap r-t a~c dY


' Co Meia












__ ________~~~~~~~~__ I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


st jing after the Olympics, then
th flew back to Miami and joined
nd The Singing Angles. They also
ks presented Dr. Strachan with a
tle T-Shirt from Beijing- much to
ce his surprise.
c-
nd * * * * *
Frank Pinkney and his men
under the tree of knowl-
edge are constantly an-
me alyzing football games
r- at the high school, col-
n- lege, and professional
nd levels. Whenever the
th Miami Dolphins .are
me mentioned, the con-
nd census is the.same; "all
es fanfare" and no defense WI
ot or big plays. Howev-
ut er, there is hope they
its could still win the super bowl
pe to be played at Land Shark
Stadium. Black universities
a- have conie into the mix and
is- the FAMU graduates
as boasted with pride
Ti- and dignity when the
nd football games result
of stated FAMU is 4-0
an and Bethune-Cook-
an man U. is 0-4.
of At the high school
at level, Miami Central,
r- Miami Northwestern, BAR
and Booker T. Wash-
a- ington football teams
he headed the debate
nd with Coach Telly Lockette
so and Jeffrey Godfrey, quar-
nd .terback, who is leading in his
pt position since he won the Ac-
ht curacy Throwing Award dur-
ing the summer and
threw 7-touchdowit
passes thus far this
season against Miami
Springs in a 70-24
springing,
Following close be-
hind is Teddy Bridge-
water, Northwest-
ROLLE ern quarterback who
threw 7-totichdown
passes against HML,
y- as Billy Rolle, head coach
g a beamed with pride. Jeremiah
nd Hay, quarterback, BTW, is also
ey breaking records with 4-td's
ei- against Coral Gables.


Eugene Strachan, stalwart
star, indicated that Bookey
Ingram ran at least 4-touch-
downs a game including Dors-
ey High and 8-td's against
Industrial High against WPB.
The debate will continue week
after week at the tree.
* * * * *
The death of David
"Freddy" Davis rever-
berated throughout
the Tree of Knowledge,
barber shops, the bail
bond circle, and family.
His popularity stemmed
from' how he lived his
LLIS life. This was evident
when hundreds of peo-
ple filled The Historical
St. John MBC to pay their last
respect to a man whose .foun-
dation was built at BTW as
class president and treasure
back in the 60's.
Men of the clergy
complemented his leg-
acy, such as Rev. An-
tonio Bolden, Elder
Oliver Gordon,.Sr., the
Rev. Canon Richard L.
M. Barry, Rector, The
Historic St. Agnes' Epis-
RY copal Church, Deacon
Walter Preston, and
Richard Strachan and
the Progressive Band
playing the family in and out
of the service. Special tributes
came from sons: Devin and
Daren, Leonard Davis, broth-
er, Deloris Davis-Hills, Rudy
Mack and Jimmy Knowles,
classmate, along with Rober-
ta Daniels, alumni president,
and Daneesha, daughter, who
made him proud when she was
an exchange student to Eu-
rope and likewise housing an
exchange from Norway.
Davis's life was complete
with his wife, Eunice Davis,
for over 40-years and who re-
tired as principal at North Dade
Junior, along with Cassandra,
Terrance, Devin Jr., and Ty-
Kevis, Cupidine Davis-Dean,
Bernice M. Carey, and Nor-
man W. Davis.


prelate, Dr. Dorothy Jackson
Young, supervisor of mis-
sions, Mrs. Melvin Morgan,
Episcopal WMS President,
Sandra Burke, YPD Director,
Jon Ingraham, director, Hel-
en Alvert, Conference WMS
President, Elaine Wise, YPD
Director, Leonard H. Mobley,
II, YPD President, Reverend
John L. Bodison, host pre-
siding elder, Reverends Jim-
my Thompson and Vincent
F. Mitchell, former pastor,
Donna D. Johnson, choreog-
rapher, Ann Knowles, coordi-
nator, and Mary Sim-
mons,-trouble shooter.
The morning ses-
sion was led by Leon-
ard H. Mobley, Litur-
gist/YPD President. He
began with doxology
andcalleduponJama-
rya Roger to handle
the Hymn of Praise
which was "To God DA
Be The Glory." Jynne
Robinson led the after-
noon prayer, while the South
Conference Youth Choir pro
vided the music. Joining them
were Master Pa'tron Gillium,
Master Nicholas Cooper and
Anthony Grooms from Ines
D. Anderson/Jeanette Kelly
area. .
Others on the afternoon
program included Chandrae
Bethea and Kenisha F6rrell
from the Melvin Morgan/Helen
Stebbins Area. Awards went
to several youth who were
outstanding and impressive
to the leading Bishop, such
as Alyson Johnson, Amber
Brunson, Chris Dunymer and
a scholarship to be presented
to a youth selected by the host
committee.
The meat of the conference
included remarks/acknowl-
edgements coming from Elaine
Wise, Helen Albert, Jon In-
graham, Sandra Burke, Mel-
vb Morgan, Dr. Young, and
Bishop McKinley Young, 11th
Episcopal District. The guests
and members of Saint Paul
AME Church left Mianki with a


great feeling, because the ho
church provided them wi
spiritual, informational, a
social changes. These per
included meals, and shut
transportation from distant
parking to the activities a
cording to Mary Simmons a
staff.
* * * * *
As 300 AME members ca
to Miami for the weekend, Ca
olyn Frazier, Marilyn Ra
dall, Jaunita Matthews, a
Nicey Rahming, along wi
36-others took the ti
to leave Miami a
travel across.countri
to Beijing, China, n
for the Olympics, b
for their usual vis
to countries in Euro
andAsia.
According to Fr
sier, they saw the h
VIS toric wonders, such
the Forbidden City,
ananmen Square, a
walked along the Great Wall
China.LatertheyflewtoXi
where they visited the Day
Pogodo and saw an exhibit
the Terracotta Warriors th
guarded China's first empe
or's tombs.
They then flew to Hanz
hora where they explored t
Pagoda of Six Harmonies a
Linyyin Temple. '1'hey al
viewed of silk production a
elegant embroidery. They sle
in a different hotel each nig
and saw sights during
the day. One of those
days included riding a
motor coach to Shangi
hai, one of the most pop-
ular cities in China.
Their experiences
included Eastern Chi-
nese food daily, a per-
formance at the Peking
Opera, rickshaw rides
through Beijing, a cruise
on the West Lake, a "Tang D
nasty" dinner show, enjoying
boat ride on the old canal a
taking in the museums. Th
studied the remnants of B


I[~lri~i~BSeA(llrrJrrrm~


lace and a bodice
and gown cov-
ered with sequins.
She was given to
her husband and
participated in
scripture reading, exchange
of marriage vows, message on
marriage, communion, and the
singing of "The Lord's Prayer."
The couple was then presented
to the audience as Mr. and Mrs.
Craig Anthony Walde.
The newlyweds led the re-
cessional to the banquet room
for the reception and celebra-
tion and use their favorite tune,
."IfThis World Was Mine" by
Luther Vandross, to have
their first dance. During the
celebration, the newlyweds
thanked their parents, grand-
parents, and guests who had
traveled. from far and wide.
They took time to remember
loved ones gone on to heaven,
such as; Clifton Earl Jordan,
Sr. grandfather of the
bride, and Augustus
Joyner, granduncle
of the bride. They took
tl e time to honeymoon
in New York City.
.
* * * * *
DROSS congrat ul nations
to Reverend Robert
Jackson, III, and the
group of colleagues who joined
him to make the South Con-
ference a success. The confer-
ence took place last Saturday>
at Saint Paul African Method-
ist Episcopal Church. Included
were the Eleventh Episcopal
District, Young People's and
Children's Division, Women'
Missionary Society and Annual
Youth Day Celebration under
the theme "Our Inheritance:
Promises for Generations to
Come."
Credit also goes to Bishop
McKinley Young, presiding


Since Keith Lavarity became
manager of community activi-
ties, he has procured activities
weekly at the Church of the
Open Door Banquet Room. His
recent activity was the opulent
wedding between Cheryl Re-
nee' Jordan and Craig Antho-
ny, Waide last Saturday, Sep-
tember 19. The two were nied
before family members, church
members, and friends.
The processional began with
the entrance of Estella Jor-
dan and Hazel Lynch Joyner,
grandmothers of the bride, fol-
lowed by Myrtle Daley, mother
ofthegroom.Theorganistplayed
The Tribute. Joining-them were
Dr. R. Joaquin Willis, officiant,
Waide, and Wayne Wilson, best
man. The grandmothers and
mother of the bride performed
the unity candle ceremony be-
foretakihgtheirseats.
As "Wind Beneath My Wings"
filled the edifice, bridesmaids
and groomsmen entered.
The bridesmaids wore
red powdery chiffon
golyns and the men wore
black tuxedos, accented
with red ties, bouton-
nieres, and handker-
chiefs The children wore
white dresses and white VAN
tuxedos. They were: Ae-
sha Duval and Chris-
topher Odiari, Ashley Jordan
and Darnell Odiari, Brittany
Jordan and Imani McKinney,
Sharyl Rider and Lloyd Daley,
Twana Harris and Sean Leece,
Kamren North, ring bearer,
and Faith Shelton, flower girl.
It was to the strains of "Rib-
bon in the Sky," that the bride
emerged from her white stretch
limousine with assistance from
Lorenzo Lynch who escorted
her down the aisle. She wore a
ruffled white gown accentuated
by a silver tiara, dangling ear-
rings, two string of pearls neck-


C


Church Family Quilt. Who can
participate? All members of
the church, past and present.
J>eadline; Allaquareamust be
purchased and designs com-
pleted by Nov. 1. Call Juanita
Armbrister, 954-538-0498 or
Anna Grace, 305-635-8532.
Happy wedding anniversary
greetings to Darryl and Gail
Moses Sr., Oct. 3, their 17*.
Congratulations go out to
Arnett Clark Hepburn, who
was elected by acclamation
to the Executive Board of the
Diocese of Southeast Florida
at the Fall Convocation of the
North Dade Deanery held at
All Souls Parish Miami Beach.
She is a representative on the
Board from the North Dade
Deanery.
The Inaugural 100 Celebrity
Men Who Cook: Broward and
Miami-Dade Alpha Kappa Al-
pha and Delta Sigma Theta


mer Charite and Marvens
Jean Paul, Miami Central Se-
nior High.
Deepest sympathy to the
"Ward" family in the loss of
Rev. Cleo Albury.
Rev. Albury, a B.T.W. gradu-
ate, was the gi-andson ofVicto-
ria Ward, nephew of Shaddie
Ward, Cleomie Ward-Bloom-
field and Mable Ward-Daniels
and founder of Bible Baptist
Church.. Did you know that an
image of the Ten Command-
ments is engraved in Bronze
on the floor of the National Ar-
chives, where the Declaration
of Independence and the U.S.
Constitution are displayed?
"Praise be to God" is inscribed
in the capstone of the Wash-
ington Monument or is "In God
We Trust" is written over the
southern entrance of our U.S.
Capitol? -
Norissa E. Morris, who spent


20 years as a human resourc-
es person at Ford Motor Com-
pany, has been named vice
president of human resources
at The University of Miami.
Former director dfthe Pankey
Dental Foundatioh, Victoria
Champion has been appointed
director of major gifts at Itarry
University.
Rayfield M. McGhee Jr. has
been elected chairman of the
board of The Banker's Club,
a private club located on the
14* floor of One Biscayne Tow-
er. The managing partner of
McGhee & Associates, the at-
torney has been a member of
the club since 2002 and has
been a member of the board
since 2005.
Friends are sorry to learn
that Pamela Walton, youngest
daughter of Margaret McCrary,
is seriously ill and are praying
for her recovery.


Sororities present "The Inau-
gural 100 Celebrity Men Who
Cook" benefiting United Negro
College Fund to be held at the
IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame and
Museum, from 6-9 p.m., Oct.
18. The attire is casual.
President Regina M. Gilesi,
AKA Upsilon XI Omega Basile-
us Lisa George and Dade
County Alumnae Chapter
president Janis Hapton.
Kay Dawson will serve on
the Chaplain's Council for
2009-2011 biennium for Delta
Sigma Theta, Sorority.
The Brother of the Beta Beta
Lambda Chapter of Alpha
Phi Alpha Fraternity recently
awarded scholarship assis-
tance to the following young
men: Harold Stuart, Mitche
Dalberiste, Kenny Parker,
Miami Northwestern Senior
High; Joery Francois, North
Miami Sr. High and McLud-


Sympathy to his
wife and family of
Richmond Heights.
Get wishes to Roslyn Jack-
son, Vashti Armbrister, Julle
Clarke, Freddie "Jabbo" John-
son, Carmetta Brown-Russell,
Doreatha Payne, Mary E. Dor-
saint, Claretha Grant-Lewis,
Margarett Flowers, Mack
Barkley, Marie-Kelly Devoe,
Thelma Hylor-Dames, An-
drew Turner, Helen McKoy,
Minerva Bain and Renee
Dozier.
The ladies of Saint Agnes'
. Guild invites you to partici-
pate in the construction of a
Historic Saint Agnes Episcopal


Congratulations to Trac-
ey and Alonso Mourning on
the birth of their third, Alijah
(pronounced "Elijah") Harden
Mourning, two weeks ago. Alon-
so, a former Miami Heat player,
has a front office position with
Heat organization as Vice Presi-
dent of Player Programs.
Welcome. home to Marilyn
Randall who just returned
from "China." Carolyn Frazier,
Juanita Matthews and Nicey
Rahming also attended the
trip. The Booker T. Washington
Senior High Class of 1948 was
sadden by the demise of their
classmate, Douglas McKinnon.


I r* (r


C 2 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-13, 2009


)uanwr Wedr ter rasrrvce~d


"t rlnrJl~raw~i ~le crlwr~~e~nrd It~ ~r, I I

















Autopsy shocker: Jackson was healthy


Christopher 'Kid' Reid explores lifeafter music fame


PRELUDE IlEW1
Opena0ctober23.
ALg ArHITH 6722


BLACKS MusT CONritoL THEIR OW:N DESTINY


*I


autopsy report for the AP. "The
results are within normal limits."
Kain was not involved in the
autopsy. The full autopsy report
has not been released publicly,
but the AP obtained a copy.
Jackson died at his rented Los
Angeles mansion June 25 af-
ter his personal physician, Dr.
Conrad Murray, administered
the anesthetic propofol and two
other sedatives to get the chronic
insomniac to sleep, court docu-
ments state. Propofol, normally
a surgical anesthetic used in
operating rooms, acts as a respi-
ratory depressant and requires
constant monitoring, .
Murray told police he left the
room to use the bathroom and


phone records show he also
made calls for 47 minutes around
the time Jackson encountered
problems. When Murray real-
ized Jackson was unresponsive,
he began frantic efforts to revive
him, but Jackson never regained
consciousness and was declared
dead at the University of Califor-
nia, Los Angeles Medical Center.
The coroner's office announced
last.month that Jackson's death
was a homicide caused by "acute
propofo1 intoxication," with the
other sedatives listed as a con-
tributing factor. They said the
standard of care for administer-
ing propofo1 was not met and the
recommended equipment for pa-
tient monitoring, precision dos-


ing and resuscitation was miss-
ing.
Murray is the target of what
Los Angeles police term a man-
slaughter investigation. The de-
cision on criminal charges will
come from the Los Angeles Coun-
ty district attorney's office. Mur-
ray has been mterviewed twice
by police,
. Except for a brief video post-
ed to YouTube, Murray has not
spoken publicly since Jackson's
death. In the video, he said: "I
told the truth and I have faith the
truth will prevail." Murray's at-
torney, Edward Chernoff, pre-
viously has said nothing Mur-
ray gave Jackson "should have
killed him.


and most other major organs
were normal.
Still, Jackson had health is-
sues: arthritis in the lower spine
and some fingers, and mild plaque
buildup in his leg arteries. Most
serious was his lungs, which the
autopsy report said were chroni-
cally inflamed and had reduced
capacity that might have left him
short of breath,
However, according to the doc-
ument, the lung condition was
not serious enough to be a direct
or contributing cause of death,
. "His overall health was fine,"
said Dr. Zeev Kain, chairman of
the anesthesiology department
at the University of California, Ir-
vine, who reviewed a copy of the


By Thomas Wat:kins
Associated Press
-
Michael Jackson's arms were
covered with punctures, his face
and neck were scarred and he
had tattooed eyebrows and lips,
but he wasn't the sickly skeleton
of a man portrayed by tabloids,
according to his autopsy re-
port obtained by The Associated
Press
In fact, the Los Angeles County
coroner's report shows Jackson
was a fairly healthy 50-year-old
before he died of an overdose. His
136 pounds were in the accept-
able range for a 5-foot-9 man. His
heart was strong with no sign of
plaque'buildup. And his kidneys


7~Wll~r~H~~7:rR


. Am


MICHAEL JACKSON


tory at North Carolina Central
University. .
Reid, however, stuck around
on the Hollywood scene, pop-
ping up on TV shows, includ-
ing "Martin" and "Sister, Sis-
ter." Probably the last memory
of Kid or was he going by his
real name by then? was his
stints hosting "It's Showtime
at the Apollo" and "Your Big
Break." He wrote the theme
song for "Real Time with Bill
Maher" and appeared on
VH1's reality magician game
show, "Celebracadabra."
Reid is among the cadre of
Black celebrities being fea-
tured in the new TV One series,
"Life After," which explores the
lives of once-successful enter-
tainment figures after their 15
minutes of fame came to an
end. Following episodes with
reality show star Omarosa
Manigault-Stallworth and ac-
tor Darryl "Chill" Mitchell, Reid
opens up on "Life After" to an-
swer the question that every-
one is dying to know: Why did
Kid 'n Play really break up?


,He insists that there was
no big blow up; just that they
eventually grew apart. Now on
Reid's menu: Stand-up com-
edy and some potential TV
projects of his own.
"Shot a talk show pilot a
couple months ago for Tel-
epictures. You know, the
people, that do the 'Ellen (De-
Generes)' show and 'The Tyra
Banks Show,'" he told EUR-
web.com last month, "to try
to update the Maury/Montel
kind of vibe because there's
not any young guys on day-
time television. And also new
music. Me and my collabora-
tors got a music video that'll
probably be out by the end of
this month. We're also talking
about a couple things, like a
new Kid 'N' Play movie project
and even a Kid 'N' Play real-
ity show that might be coming
out on MTV."
Pending "Life After" episodes
on TV One feature Jamiee Fox-
worth ("Family Matters"), Bell
Biv Devoe, Taimak ("The Last
Dragon") and others.


Free Adrienne Araht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.


BV: Guia Guerisma

In the late 80's, rap duo Kid 'n
Play was part of the Hurby "Luy
Bug" Azor movement from
New York City that introduced
the rest of the nation to hip-
hop music. The synthesizer,
percussion, and, of course,
those undeniable horns that
made everyone bust into that
familiar shuffle called the Kid
'n Play, was at the forefront of
party rap.
"The tramp and the broth-
er with the high-top fade"
known as Christopher "Play"
Martin and Christopher "Kid"
Reid respectively commanded
the scene with their albums,
dance moves, fashion sense
and hit "House Party" movies,
But as stars like the Notorious
B.I.G. began to steal the liine-
light in the mid-1990s, Kid 'n
Play faded into obscurity.
Martin retreated from the
limelight, becoming a born-
again Christian and later
becoming an "artist-in-resi-
dence," teaching hip hop his-


By Alicia Guarles

Oprah Winfrey was so taken
by Sapphire's novel "Push"
that she read it more than
once.
Yet even though the talk-
show host has made best-
sellers of unknown books,
Winfrey didn't think even her
staggering influence could
make "Push" the story of
an obese, illiterate black teen
who suffers abuse something that mil-
lions would want to read.
"I would never even think
of presenting that book as a
book club selection because
people would think I had lost
my mind," Winfrey said in a
recent interview.
So when Winfrey heard pro-


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
OUS MOSI NKY SETTING.
AN EVENING WITH SERIES RENE SCOTT
An intimate evening in the perfect cabaret setting, featuring signature Barton
G drinks and bottle service. Series Rene Scott, star of Dirty Rotten
Scoundrels. The Little Mermaid, and Aida, makes her cabaret debut at the

7 kt s M Show
Carnival Studio Theater in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $45


AO tVmla war


ducer and director Lee Dan-
iels had adapted Sapphire's
book into the acclaimed mov-
ie "Precious," with an all-star
cast including Mo'Nique, Ma-
riah Carey, Lenny Kravitz and


others, she, was so impressed
that she decided to lend her
coveted endorsement to the
film by signing on as its ex-
ecutive producer, along with
hit filmmaker Tyler Perry.


Ad nn Ars tC e to son & Wales University present
INGRID HOFFMANN & DAISY MARTINEZ
HOSTED BY LORENA GARCIA
Host Chef Lorena Garcia talks to two star Latina chefs about their food and
lifestyle secrets to success
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $55, $85, $125, VIP Package $200
VIP ticket holders get to meet and take a photo with the celebrity chefs during a post-
show cocktail party.
CABARET & COCkTAILS
a SHE COTT
7:30 PM Cocktails 8 PM Show
Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $45


there a few months ago. Going forward
will require you to let go of every expec-
tation. Lucky numbers 12, 17, 19, 32, 40

SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21- DEC 20
You'd be happier about this if you
didn't feel like you were pushed into it.
As much as you aren't sure why you're
here, you can trust the fact that whether
you see it or not, something incredible
will come from it. Lucky numbers 11, 16,
21, 18, 32

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
As things level off you've become
clearer about what you need to do to
cover yourself. Things look simpler now
that you understand where to keep the
emphasis. Let others cover themselves;
you've got work to do; Lucky numbers 15,
19, 21, 33, 38

AQUARIUS: JAN 21 FEB 20
The last time you were here it looked
a little different.The second time around
you're amazed at hdw much wiser you
are and how stupid you were to get
sucked in. Thank God you know better
than to do it again. Lucky numbers 7, 10,
13, 19, 35

PIECES: FEB 21- MARCH 20
Whatever this is, don't make the mis-
take of thinking that you didn't do the
right thing. The rightness or wrongness
of things is always relative and other
people's values rarely apply to any of our
choices. Lucky numbers 12, 15, 19, 25, 30


LE0:JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Your need to keep the focus on your-
self would be easier to take if your ego
knew its place. Efforts to shine will suc-
ceed, but only to the extent that what you
have to share does as much for others
as it does f or you. Lucky numbers 11, 15,
19, 26, 32

VIRG0: AUGUST 21 SEP 20
Too many things are about to come
together for you to be getting cold feet.
What's in front of you wouldn't be there
if you couldn't deal with it. Right now that
means telling the truth and taking one
step at a time. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25,
30, 35

LIBRA: SEPT 21- OCT 20
How did this get-to be all about you?
The give and take factor is always an
issue with you. If your definition of fair
comes down to what's mine is mine and
what's yours is mine, it's time for a re-
view session. Lucky numbers 5, 12, 18,
25, 29

SCORPIO:0CT 21- NOV20
Too many ifs, ands, or buts are screw-
ing up your ability to enter into this with
the same level of confidence that was


ARIES: MARCH 21- APRIL 20
Too much has come to light for you to
worry about who knows what. It wasn't
your intention to stir up trouble.This is no
time to get weak in the knees. Get behind
the idea that you came here to change
things. Lucky numbers 8, 12, 15, 16, 21

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
No one expects you to do anything but
what you love. It's you who drives your-
self nuts with responsibility. Playing the
martyr has got to be getting old. Can you
picture yourself taking on a new role?
Lucky numbers 10, 13, 16, 21, 30

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
What you didn't think would take off is
going over the top. Part of you is carried
away, but beware: being prone to ex-
tretnes, you'd be wise to ride the fine line
between the thrill of it all, and the reality
of it. Lucky numbers 15, 19, 25, 28, 32

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
Maybe it's time for a reality check.
Whatever isn't working is due to break-
down; if you're aware of this, deal with
it sooner rather than later. Nothing will
grow until you stop long enough to nur-
ture it. Lucky numbers 16, 17, 21, 24, 32


Sing, Miamil


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAY
A MUSICAL CELEBRATION WITH GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM AND JUBILATE, INC.
Back by popular demand, this series of free concerts is in glorious celebration
of our community's best and brightest gospel choirs and soloists.
With featured guest. CeCe Winans, Cooper Temple Church of God in Christ
Mass Choir and the Free Gospel Sundays Mass Choir. Performance is
"sold-out,'' but there will be a first-come, first-serve line for walk-ups the
day of performance-
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE


coce unans


No reservations n y.


13C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


Winfrey, Perry promote Precious'


OPRAH WIFRY YLRERY


CABARET & COCKTAILS
DELICIOUS MUSIC.SWANKY SETTING.
AN EVENING WITH SHERIE RENE SCOTT
5:30 & 8:30 PM Show Cocktails half hour before shows
Carnival Studio Theater (in the ZIff Ballet Opera House) $45
Adrienne Arsht Center pnasants
SING, MIAMI!
AUDIENCE SING ALONG WITH MIAMI CHILDREN'S CHORUS
A fun, free, family hour of singing popular, folk and traditional songs, led by
Music Director Timothy A. Sharp.
11:30 AM-12:30 PM Peacock Foundation Studio FREE










I \ I ~


A~lvail~a~iblfrm~ Gormercial News Providers


)__I


UDIIX.COmlaa


Goldl Potatoes.................... ...:......... .. 2.


Multi ain Bread .. ...289
. Healthy Blend of Whole Grains. Handmade Throughout the Day,
From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .70


~~~~~~~~_~~~~......~................._..


__~_1______1~~1____1___1__1_111___


:r~f~Blbllsa-l~i .


B LACK(S MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


9


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 200


Akron's-~ little drib rs--- wh bgsh


LI?


,Gatorade
I'hirst 9500
Quencher.. ....
Or G2 Low Calorie Beverage,
Assorted Varieties, 32-oz bot.
* SAVE UP TO 1.25 ON 6


Lay's
Potato F
Chips ............ CO
Assorted Varieties, 10.5 to 25-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, ahd Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAW UP To 1.99
(Assorted Lay's Dip,
15-oz jar ... 2/6.00)


18-Pack Assorted 1 99
Budweiser Beer.........1L-
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 3.00
(12-Pack Assorted Yuengling Beer or Lager*
12-oz can or bot. ... 8.99)


12-Pack
Selected a 00
Pepsi Products. 912-
12-or can
SAVE UP TO 2137 ON 3


Prices effective Thursday, October 1 through Wednesday, .October 7, 2009. pnly Ih Miami-Dade! Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St Lucie, Indian River, Okeechrobsee


Syndicated.Content





4 511 1 5** en


Special to the Times
Florida A&M University
(FAMU) Board of Trustee
Member and alum Rich-
ard Dent will be honored
at the Black Retail Action
Group (BRAG) 39th Annu-
al Scholarship and Awards
Gala in New York City on
Friday, Oct. 23.
Dent is receiving the
award for his accomplish-
ments at Victoria Secret
PINK and his work to ben-
efit historically black col-
leges and universities.


The M


iami Ti.imes


lSS


D


MnIAMIB, F~LORDhAB, OCTOBER 7 1 3, 2009


STHE MIAMf' TIMES


OITCES N D


Other honorees include
Magic Johnson; CEO Mag-
ic Johnson Enterprises;
Brian Dunn, president
and COO of Best Buy;
Steve Sadove, chairman
and CEO of Saks 5th Ave;
Constance White, style di-
rector/spokesperson for
E-Bay and Shawn Outer,
GVP Multicultural Mer-
chandising and Vendor
Development, Macy's Inc.
"This is a very presti-
gious group and I am very
honored to be a part of this
group," said Dent.


Dent is the senior vice
president, chief operating
officer and co-leader for
Victoria Secret PINK, a Di-
vision of Limited Brands,
Inc. He received both bach-
elor's and master's degrees
in business administration
from FAMU and has more
than 15 years of corporate
finance experience with
Fortune 500 companies.
His previously has held an
array of positions at Bath
and Body Works, Volvo
Trucks North America and
Ford Motor Company.


I A at*

RICHARD DENT


T


F~A1MU Board member honored


Johle~M rate hitcr 9.) pe~rwrot. sab3K jobhr rat


Syndicat


ste nt


A~va-i ab e from -Com


Providers


Tlh* nation's unemploy-ment situartkmn 1ttting worw







^l~CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTl~INY

Ways toa control


SPONSORED BY CATHOLIC HEALTH SERVICES


15 p licaion illty beueen ditibcuted o t.M c
Gardens, In. loctedats 342 NW 189 Street
M. iamig Fnaloritda Thcoe-2,0 faclt a ly conist of 8
mrobiiy maie and 22,5 rlesanl for the visually and/o

3. the ability to care for yourself and your apartment


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-13, 2009


a &#


Available from Commercial News Providers


There is a preference for City of Mliami


wood is 4


r is-


--~ ---~.-~y ~3 ~1 ~ Jll)rr


=
g^ (fgg





SECTION D


*9


Looking For
Compassionate Teachers
40 hours, CDA, First Aid,
CPR. Apply: 7600 NW 7
Ave, 1pm 4pm, Monday
through Friday.



EarnMups 1 un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

SEEKING TEACHERS
With three years or more
exp. Call 305-812-2723

n *


FREE RENT!
MIAMI LAKES AREA
Looking for two
female roommates
to share house.
By appointment only.
305-588-1182

INSTANT ACTION
LOVEl MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234



BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
R $60 G dC
enew an on-
cealed.Traffic School, four
hours, $28.786-333-2084



BEST PRICES INTOWNIII
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
Laying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690
GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
k nsb p oloms at
Call 305-685-3565.


1595 NE 174 STREET

m3od m9 Oc laa
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
1718 N.W. 67 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath
new roof. CBS. Land Value
Only $40,999. 305-694-0988
Twol7b dNoWm7 STR Tden,
central air. Try $1900 down
and $595 monthly. FHA. Get
list from 290 N.W. 183 St.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
3361 N.W. 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, central air,
remodeled. $1900 down
$828 monthly. FHA. Get list
at 290 N.W. 183 Street.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700



3284 N.W. 53rd Street
Corner lot, 75 x 108
305-636-4346 or
786-525-8156
"

TONY ROOFING

nildng s e-roohnI
305-49 4515.

,


BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a m.
and 1 p.m Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
curre Drr r License

The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


Apartments




GREAT NEWSIll
PINNACLE P APTS
Miami, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00
APARTMENTS ARE.
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFI LEU APO9EAANNCDES.


PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREAl
LOCATED AT
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FORNMORE LEARNING
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
1305) 635- 9505
"Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change .


1205 N.W.58th Street
One bedroom. All appliances
included. $575 monthly plus
security. 786-277-0632


dl2 N3hwe u0e
stove, ref ri rator, air
305 42-7080

1229 N.W.1 Court
$550 MOVE INI One
bedroom, one bath, $550,

4 0 6 36-
1144

1245 N.W. 58 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 per month, all applI-
ances included. Free 19
Inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

1260 N.W. 60 STREET -
One Dedroom, one bal
$525. Free Waler
305-642-7080
1257 N.W. 61 St
Renovated, two bdrm., one
bath, water included, $600
mthly, m78v6e 9-p6e5c '

O o E
$550. Free Water,
305-642-7080
1298 N.W. 60th Street
Beautiful one and two bdrms,
air, gated. 786-486-2895
1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
#1
786-2901438
1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080
1390 Aswan Road
Renovated, one bdrm., one
bath, $800 mthly, move in
special, 786-229-6567.
140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN. Two bed-
room. one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642- .
7080
140 S.W. 6 St.
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$500 monthly
Call:305-267-9449
14100.N.W.6th Court
Huh i e re a ,
monthly! 305-213-5013
1450 N.W.1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080 .
1525 N.W. 1 Place
Move In SpecraI! Three
bedrooms, two Daths. $725 ..
monthly. 51100 to move in.
Central air. All appliances
included. Free 19 Inch LCD
TV. Call Joel 786-355-75/8




1


1521-25 N.W. 41 ST.




1590 N.W.475 Street
TOn bedrooms, one bath,ar.

ceTw a bir th, ane
Section 8 Welcome.
305-720-7067
1782 N.W. 55 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. 786-260-3838






1875 NW. 43 STRET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
mntly. SrecWtio elcoe
305-331,-2431
2101 NW. 92 STREET
T o n bedroomswtr i,






O bdom e tin r wl
coe al305-891-6776















2130 N.W 37 AVRENE
Two bedrooms, air.
786-306-4839















2257 N.W. 821 ST n
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$830. FeeWtelyremdld c

786-877-5358


LIBERTY CITY AREA

and security. 305-244-6845
MIAMI SHORES AREA
9614 NW 5 AVE
One bedroom, one bath,
fenced yard, like new. $735
monthly. 305-793-0002






















3100 N.W.14thd Street
burnished, utiitielst and cbe

scrt 305-751-6232
Onel N. W. 79 SUtr 0
Frluee water Mr. Wiletie #109
360mnhy 05-6 2-7080 9
12325 N.W.21st Pae u
Called 954-67-913 $0
$120weely, pri mvae kitchn
30547-816305-6091-46
$20 wklyt $60 move i.Air,
Efcabe reuiiies.y Cal5786-2876-


745786-366-4464












18263 N.W. 42 Street
Beauiful $60 monthly, tl-
tis nlued 836-8356147
19711 N.W. 40t OUReT
$600 monthly, $600 to move
entac. 305-625-4854


2175 N.W. 156t Street
Pir watew Ofle r cable

$42 moth. First loast and





s10 euriy. 305-751-6232
5422 N.W.71 COUT
$600 monthly. 305-267-9449
7090 N.W.1 Avenu SR

orvt 0300 nc $600 e
Effiieny. all30575-76

Furnishedl, f utilities icue.

Furished, private penraonc.

30547;-992,3-691381


4744 N.W.15 Court
Clean rooms $350 mthly.
305-479-3632
74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili.
ties included. $200 moves
you in.786-306-2349
8013 N.W. 10th Court

195 a$ 0 e .r s
Kevin 954-691-8866
Appointment Only!
8275 N.W.18th Avenue
Clean rooms available. Call
305-754-7776.
Miami Gardens Area
Clean room, air, private
entrance. Call 305-454-9877
NICELY FURNISHED
Air, Cable, TV. $125 wkly.
786-290-0946
NORTHWEST AREA
CLEAN ROOMS


Houses
10295 S.W.175 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath-
$825 monthly. 305-267-9449
1122 N.W.74 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1200 mthly, $2400 to move
in. 305-632-2426
1301 N.E.110 TERR.
One bedroom, one bath. $650
mthly. 786-486-1661
14410 N.W.21 COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OK. 305-687-6973
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$995. Central Air.
305-642-7080
1861 Wilmington Street
Move in Special. Three bed-
rooms two baths, with air.


F191b N.W.11bAv Area
,Section OK. 305-754-7776
1953 N.W.155 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, washer, dryer con-
nection. $1300 mthly Section
8 Welco9 4Cla84M hew

Two2 rioNWs, r achE ap-
pliances. 786-356-1686
20420 NW 24 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, tile, bars. $1200
monthly, $300() to move in,
Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776
2324 NW 85 STREET .
Threp bedrooms, twg bags,
appliances included. $1200
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
954-430-6264, 305-219-0827
2359 N.W.56th Street
Four bedrooms, two and half
baths, central air, appliances,
Section 8 okay!

241 N5W3 ROEET
Four2 rmsntwo newob hs,
move in. Not Section 8 offili-
ated. Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
2441 N.W.104 ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 404-861-1965
247 NW 46 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances included. Section 8
welcome. $700 monthly. First
and last to move in. Call:
305-687-7290
2478 NW 43 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, many upgrades
throughout. $1500 monthly-
Section 8 welcome
305-331-2431
25872 S.W.133rd Place
Three bdrms, two baths, one
car garage, air, tiled, Section
8 welcome. 786-258-3130
3028 NW 8th Road
Broward. Three bedrooms'
one bath.8 -3068- 39

3062 NW 185 STREET
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath, central air, bars,
.fenced backyard. Appliances
included. $1300 monthly.
Sect n382welm6me.


Rem det d h hree
bedrooms, two baths, central
air, hurricane shutters. Sec-
tion 8 Not Sanctioned. $1000
monthly. 305-562-3257
3480 N.W. 209TER
Four bedrooms, two baths,
air. Section 8. 305-751-6426,
305-624-9300
37 NW 47TERRACE
Back house for rent in Mid
Town Miami area. Two bed-
rooms, one bath. $800
monthly, water included.
305-915-9944
4513 NW 185 STREET

Secti IVIIAMIOGKARTDh eS bed-
ft s n cent hair. ea
ty. $1365 monthly. Call Joe.
954-849-6793


4900 N.W.26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,

& e Ct a t
26 3N .3500th St8M3iar FL
505 N.W.130th Street
Four bdrms, two baths, Sec
tion 8 ok! $1500 mthly. Call
305-904-9421.
788 NW 80 STREET
Two homes available. Three
bedrooms, two baths. $1250
mthly.786-344-2336
8016 N.W. 9th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
screened porch, security
fe e yardd $N7000pets,
curi y.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA

er gebr
and back yard. Section 8 OK!
305-467-0717 -
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100 monthly. Call
407-497-8017.
N.W.133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-754-7776
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two and three bdrms, $900-
$995. 305-688-6696
NW 65 STREET .
Newly remodeled, three
bedroom, one bath. $1250
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-926-9278
Rent with Option

DADE AND
BROWARD AREA$
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1000 down. Not Section 8
approved. 954-517-9484 or
702-448-0148

Unfurnished RoomS
1815 N.W.1 Court #4
Two bedrooms and efficien-
cies, Marty, 305-576-2388
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms for rent. $500 and up.
Houses (9< rent., Section 8
welcome 305-300-7783
78 2 3369


CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
.
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and

dh pBp e

www.caplialrentalagency.
com

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, $595. Free
water
Leonard 786-236-114,4


C AOR MEN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
moorntr it7andmuesjtir negated
Call 305'638-3699
LIBERTY SQUARE
One and two bedrooms, tiled
786-267-3199 -
mi
One bedr am, o ebaath. $595
mthly. 786-286-2540
MIAMI BEACH
Large one bdrm. Short walk
to beach. Must see inside.
$825 mthly. 305-887-2973
MIAMI-LITTLE RIVER
One bdrm, one bath, $650.
Remodeled, gated, parking.
N.E. 78 St. 305-776-7863,
N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


Act sRToHm 6A3 t A Hne
bedroom, one bath. Section 8
Only. 786-344-4386
NORTHWEST AREA
One bedroom, one bath, air,
lights, water. 305-968-0892
OPA LOCKA AREA .

1 oNt.h R Etho ad
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146;

OVERTOWN AND
NORTH MIA II AREA.
One an two bedroom proper-
ties in Overtown and North
Miami Area. 305-970-1721

WYNWOOD AREA APTS
28 Street and 1 Ave.
Studio, $425 per month
One bdrm, $525 per morith.
Two bdrms., 5625 per mo.

Al aEpEpl nces inclua
Call Joel 786-355-7578 .


Churches
2683 N.W. 66th Street
For more information
Call 786-277-8988
Condos/TownhouseS
1501 NW 81 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, newly
renovated with appliances.
$850 mthly. 954-962-6810
20600 NW 7 AVE #202
One bedroom, one bath,
appliances included. $900
monthly plus security deposit-
786-273-1462
3 AVE. N.W.177 ST.
Across from Walmart.Two
bedrooms, o bath, jacuzzi'
new re oed eecus rocuen
tral air, tiled. $1200 mthly,
first month to move in, water
included. Pets allowed.
' 786-348-4230
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Spacious, two bedrooms,
twofullbathsdouble
balcony, kitchen newly
renovated, all appliances
included. $1100 monthly.
305-947-7755
-
DuplexOS
10072N.W.12Avenue
Two .bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 786-277-8287
1023 N.W. 47 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath.
$1300. Studio one bath
$700. Appliances, free wa-
ter/electric. 305-642-7080
1081 N.W. 100th Terrace
rof 00b t lye tral
last and3 .in. Call

1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath-
$800. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080


.



,s

RALPH MANRESA
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext.109

one ami serving since 1923
THE LAnast amonut
spgA ETR


ss


e


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 7 '13, 2009


1540 N.W. 1st Court
MOVE IN SPECIALt! .
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly, $775 move in
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly, $975 to
move in. Three bedrooms
two bathsm$725 monI py

prances cluded.VFree 19
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1541 N.W.1 Place
Rents reduced for short time
only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled, air, stove,
refrigerator. No Deposit for
Section 81
Call 305-582-5091
1803 N. W. 1st Court
I

Mo0ve- n-S to o bdrm,
pliances included. Free
19 Inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1955 N.W. 2 Court
$450 MOVE INI One bed-
room, one bath, $450. 305-
642-7080
1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, 5550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-286-
1144

2020 N.W.166 Street
One bdrm, all utilities and ap-
pliances included $750, first
and last. Call 786-319-6577
210 N.W.17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.

$4725 Call 30156642-70E0
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600. Appliances-
305-642-7080
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
.$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

Lar Md o ,e e
bath, SS 6Free Water.

3330 N.W. 48thTerrace
One bdrm, one bath. $600
rnthly. 305-213-5013
3669Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650 sloLe re-
- Ingerator, air. 305-642-7080
411 N.W. 37 STREET
Studios, $450 monthly. AII
appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
448 N.W.7 Street
One bdrm, nice. $425 mtlhy.
305-557-1750
50th Street H ghts

IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
Smr tt Ca 3 5 t9h9
5600 N.W.7th Court
I..arge one bedroom, appli-
ances included. $600 month-
itlus s ur y. ectd 28
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win.
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move-in special One bed-
room, one bath. $399 per
month. $600 to move in AII
appliances included. Free
19 Inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

7155N.W.17Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
F"irsto d st.3$060 t, $600

8261 N.E. 3 Ave.
One bedroom. One bath.
$550 monthly AII appil-
ances included Joel 786-
355-7578
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Onetand8two bd 4a7p .6Sec-
ion
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from

r, 5dowm nd
2 5d1 A0p r t or call
305-638-3699
ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one and two bdrms
Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665










__~~~~~~~~ __________ __


,,/


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
$425 for 13
weddings parties etc.
Weeks in print 1290 All Baba
Call: 305-694-6210 (west of 27th Ave.) Lirno Rental
Fax: 305-694-6211 305-796-9558
1/15/@



M *CADE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held
by the Transk, Infrastructure & Roads Committee (TIRC) of
the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners
in the Commission Chambers, second floor, 111 N.W
First Sireet, Miami, Florida, dunng a meeting to begin at
approximately 2:00 p.m., on October 14, 2009, where
the 20091iansit Development Plan will be presented and
considered for approval.
TRANSIT DEVELOPMENT PLANS (TDPS) ARE
REQUIRED FOR SURE BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM
RECIPIENTS SUCH AS MIAMI-DADE TRANSff
(MDT), AS DESCRIBED IN SECTION 341.052, F.S.
A TDP SHALL BE 114E PROVIDER'S PlANNING,
DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERAnONAl. GUIDANCE
DOCUMENT. A TDP OR AN ANNUAL UPDATE E
USED IN DEVELOPING THE DEPARTMENTS TEN-
YEAR WORK PROGRAM, THE TRANSPORTATION
IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM, AND THE
DEPARTMENPSPROGRAMANDRESOURCEPIAN.
PUBLIC TRANSir FUNDS WII.I. BE CONSIDERED
BY THE SIAFE ON THE BASIS0F PUBUC TRANSIT
NEEDS AS IDENDRED IN TDP'S.
At the hearing, the Committee will afford an opportunity
for interested persons or agencies to be heard with
respect to the social, economic, and environmental
aspects of this project. Interested persons may submit
orally or in writing evidence and recommendations
with respect to said project.
A person who decides to appeal any decision made
by any board, agency, or commission with respect
to any such matter considered at its meeting or
hearing, will need a record of all proceedings. Such

7 .",:.":,ds re Hu ed nonrec
evidence upon which the appeal is based.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal
opportunity in employment and does not discriminate
on the basis of disability in its programs or services.
Auxiliary aids and services for communication are
available wth advance notice. This form can be
made available in accessible format upon request
(audiotape, Braille, or computer disk). For material in
anomateromat a sion-lan,.age anteesteroorne,
accommodations, please contact Maud Lizano at
(786) 469-5478. Customers using TDD, please call
through the Florida Relay Service (1-800-955-8771)
at least five (5) days in advance.


MIAM)
B
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the 1YansR, Infmstructure &
Roads Committee (TIRC) of the Miaml-Dade County Board of County Commissioners in the
Commission Chambels, second floor,111 N.W. RIst Street, Miami, Florida, during a meeting to
begin at approximately 2:00 pm, on October 14, 2009, where modifications to existing bus
mutes and the Schedule of Tmnsit Fares, Rates and Charges will be considered as follows:
MIAMI-DADE TRANSIT (MDT) PROPOSES TO MAKE SERVICE ADJUSTMENTS, ON
OR ABOUT DECEMBER13,2000, TO THE FOLLOWING ROUTES TO OPERATE MORE
EFFICIENTLY: ROUTES 1, 3, 7, 28, 42, 62, 75, 95 EXPRESS, E, G, H, J, 120 BEACH
MAX, 202 LITTLE HAITI CONNECTION, 211 OVER TOWN CIRCULATOR, NORTHEAST
LIFELINE AND LIFE LINES.
MDT ALSO PROPOSES TO IMPLEMENT TWO NEW ROUTES- AIRPORT-BEACH '
EXPRESS, 1-95 DOWNTOWN MIAMI/BROWARD EXPRESS, AND CREATE THREE
DTHER NEW ROUTES BY RESTRUCTURING EXISTING ROUTES' 19, 115 MID-
BEACH CONNECTION, AND 135.
SEVERAL ROUTES WILL BE COMBINED AS FOLLOWS:
ROUTES24 AND 224 CORAL WAY MAX;
ROUTES 40 AND 240 BIRD ROAD MAX;
ROUTES 54 AND 282 HIALEAH GARDENS CONNECTION;
ROUTES 83 AND 183 STREET MAX;
ROUTES 91 AND 99 .
ROUTES 65 AND 136;
ROUTES 71 AND 212 SWEET WAfER CIRCUlATOR;
ROUTES ?$ AND 267 LUDLAM ROAD MAX; AND
ROUTES K AND R INTO A NEW ROUTE 115 MID-BEACH CONNECTION.
AS PART OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ABOVE SERVICE ADJUSTMENTS, THE
MIAMI-DADETRANSITSCHEDULEQFTRANSITFARESRATESANDCHARGESWILL
BE MODIFIED BY DISCONTINUING THE CHARGE FOR BUS-TO-BUS TRANSFERS.
At the hearing, the Committee will afford an opportunity for interested persons or
agencies to be heard with respect to the social, economic, and environmental aspects
of this project interested persons may submit orally or in writing evidence and
recommendations with respectto said project,
A person who decides to appeal any decision made by any board, agency, or
commission with respect to any such matter considered at its meeting or hearing, will
need a record of all proceedings. Such person may need to insure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is based.
Miaml-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in employment and
does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs or services. Auxiliary aids
and services for communication are available with advance notice. This form can be
made available in accessible format ugion request (audiotape, Braille, or computer disk).
For material in alternate format, a sign-language interpreter, or other accommodations,
please contact Maud Lizano at (786) 469-5478. Customers using TDD, please call
through the Florida Relay Service (1-800-955-8771) at leak five (5) days in advance.


Published weeTy t O W. 54th 8tmet
Miaml-Dade County. Florida 33127-1818
August 1, 2007
en asrn we use--
2 Pub tion No. is 34 4340
., 2. ""
no ann 82
com ss on anown oms or emusms., 000 s.w.sses street.
a an on 18ofHeadquartersdGeneralBusinessOffice:
a ",".'".1 "" ""in mon ad wanaging editor are
usu.ur, mana sea"""
10 me ownew are emanat e. nerves and aware assu.aseves,
900 N.W. 54th Street. Miami Florida 38127-1818.
11. Known bondholders. mortgagee and other accurity holders owning or holding
Coor more one sounsmanat orsons.anonwagem or our amous are:
"ws qowe d so qnear "' "'-
M Msue Date Mr Circubdon: Odober 7, 2000
15 thtent and Nature of Cfeculation
gy;g,, "gg';*
Eaddamass fune
During Published
erseeing morest wo
sa ants, ensue out.
"'" ""i',arcope 23,87, 20mas
Edamar or na t othdo Man $UD 608
*;g -
n?1"w soampson, are so
on a wmarsessmana
ouse nrousness.neours.,,a 22.;oo save
omers, sween vendor.. counter saw..
..a on son.uses sau mortancon
as one, am...mean usonse
mo uses
es ggr2nguse canon susco some
"".Y'i'ilitu 'ana onson.,,
0 0..usne-comas surea on varonia is 12
2) In-County a Stated on Form 3fi41 38 20
obg none gones uses o
care.
""
","; a 20am
o,'ll ao., a
as on"
masse so"
16. Publication elatement of Ownership: We will be printed in the 08/01107 issue
("g'^ "juomatements unde by me above are corard and complete.
KrunnFramWn. Operadans Managr





Accidents Arrests
DUI 8 Ticketa Bankruptcy
Crhainal Defense Wills/Probate
Personal Ingry Everce/Custally
100's of Lawyers Statewide




ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonograzn and office visit after 14 days
Included-
A GYN DIAoNosac CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Hialcah. FL
(same as 103 St.]
e-enson,

4 305-824-8816
305-362-4611


MIAMI e

Community A

RolleveloDmont Agencl


PUBLIC HOME
TWIN LAKES APARTMENTS
, A SUBSIDIZED HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY

Applications now are being accepted for the elderly, 62 years and over, on a
"first come, first serve" basis, to be placed on the waiting list. Applicants must
appear in person, between the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM, at 1007 N.W.
. 155 Ifil-, Miami, Fl. 33169, or request an application by mail
CNC Management Inc. (305)642-3634/TDD (305)643-2079 ""
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY "
"""""'"

NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2!00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procuremerit.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitatiort to written recommendation of award. AII provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- SC-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


SCOPE OF" SERVICES
The CRA is seeking proposals for sidewalk pressure cleaning services; including the removal of dirt, mold,
mildew, and gum from sidewalks on N.W. 3rd Avenue, from N.W, 8th Street to N.W. 14th Street, Miami, FL.
The work will be performed on an as needed basis at the request of the CRA. Proposals must provide the
price for cleaning both sides of a typical city block, good for a period of one year. The CRA reserves the
right to add or remove blocks, as necessary.
The selected contractor shall furnish all labor, materials, and permits necessary to perform pressure clean-
ing services. The selected contractor shall provide for the protection of pedestrians and public and private
properties while performing the work. The work will be evaluated by CRA personnel for quality control pur-
poses before any payment request is approved. The CRA retains the right to terminate the contract if it is
not satisfied with the performance of the selected contractor.

The proposal must be accompanied by current proof of workers' compensation and employers' liability
insurance, commercial general liability insurance, and auto liability insurance. The proposal must also pro-
vide a current copy of proposer's contractor's license, list of five recent jobs (within the last year), current
list of personnel expected to work at the jobsites, and an IRS W-9 Form. Bidders should affix an envelope
to the outside of any boxes or packages containing samples, back-up documents, etc. The envelope should
include all required documents undel- the RFS and should be clearly marked on the outside to read, "CRA
pressure cleaning services RFS No. 09-03.'' The proposal must be submitted in a sealed envelope no
later than Tuesday, October 20, 2009, at 3:00pm at the City of Miami City Clerk's Office, 3500 Pan Ameri-
can Drive, Miami, Florida 33133. The proposals will be evaluated by CRA staff and the selected contractor
will be notified by mail and phone. If you have any questions, please contact Mr. Clarence Woods, Assistant
Director, at (305) 679-6800 during regular business hours (Monday Friday, 8:00am 5:00pm).

The CRA reserves the right to accept any proposal deemed to be in the public interest and in furtherance of
the purposes of Florida's Community Redevelopment Act of 1969, to waive any irregularities in any propos-
al, to cancel this Request for Service, to reject any or all proposals, and/or to re-advertise for proposals.

(#003298)




g**Ft*Magage.g- IMEWSMV2 FFTISAUG T'Hsitr WICapacsF
Bart Williams
**hs
CAll. 305-693-7093 1DDAYl I
adversesfugensterniumesonisne.mn


Diesel Fuel #2 For Schools North of Flagler St., Tank
014-KKO7 10/22/2009 Wagon Delivery .

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho -
Superintendent of Schools


^LCKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


or = =
Copyrighted Matenal -
,

Syndicated Content .-
.

Available from Commercial News Providers
- -
- -


REQUEST FOR SERVICE


Request Date:


October 6, 2009


D S THE MIAMI TIMES QCTO 09


W




M


I 1 (rakn 1. waveslll he, tleay *r s**





:..


MIAMI e

COMMUHill 4

RedeveloDment Agencl
sournusrovenowsPAuwest a onwanevacewarmrm a worows

REQUEST FOR SERVICE
RFS No. 09-01


ADVERTISED RM U LIFICATIONS

Sealed responses will be received at the City of Miam'i, City Clerk office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, and Fl., 33133 for the following:


_I


"
1. 1034 NE 2nd Ave 01-0101-090-1030 / 01-0101-080-1011 / 01-0101-070-1011
'2 224 NW 12th Street 01-3136-037-0500
3. 1141 NW 3rd Avenue 01-3136-037-0540
"4 1163 NW 3rd Avenue 01-3136-037-0530
'5 901 NW 3rd Avenue 01-0102-060-1270
'6 915 NW 3rd Avenue 01-0102-060-1190
'7 909 NW 2nd Court 01-0102-060-1220
8 910 NW 2nd Court 01-0102-060-1230
9 919 NW 2nd Avenue 01-0102-050-1060'
10. 160 NW 7th Street 01-0105-060-1010
11. 249 263 NW 6th Street 01-0105-050-1120
12. 916 NW 2nd Court 01-0102-060-1180
13. 229 247 N\N 12th Street 01-3136-037 / 01-3136-3037-0440 / 01-3136-037-0450
14. 119 NW 11th Street 01-3137-031-Q090
15. 345 NW 10th Street 01-0101-040-1160
16. 250 262 NW 10th Street 01-0102-060-1030 / 01-0102-060-1040
17. 249 255 NW 9th Street 01-0102-060-1250
18. 276 NW 9th Street 01-0103-050-1100
19. 316 NW 11th Street 01-0101-040-1040
20. 324 NW 11th Street 01-0101-040-1050
21. 334 NW 11th Street 01-0101-040-1060
22. 1016 NW 3rd Avenue 01-0101-040-1210
23. NW 9th Street Pedestrian Mall Between FEC tracks and NW 3rd Avenue and under the Metro
Rail between NW 8th Street and NW 10th Street
24. North side of the Right of Way along N.E. 14th Street, between N Bayshore Drive and N.E. 2nd Ave
25. South side of Right of Way along N.E. 13th Street, between N Bayshore Drive and N.E. 2nd Ave

(#003296)


I


DERDER

- =2







---

CMPETSME 19
int? ImelyTeal 5100 $19
1(P Rich Surgundy $500 819
1H11' Decorativelin $100 $19
EX11' Spanish Red $100 $19
2718 Beautifululon $170 $19



CAPET
LAMINATE 79ti
TILE 69*!
aAmooo-- *19
DON BAILEY FLOORS
83008tec.81vil.,Miami
1483t flW7thAveMiaml
nossouthstasoneeraIramar
1283NW3t Are.,R,1aud.
FREE SHOP AT HOME
Tell Free 1-866-721-7171


Available fronr mritercaal kews Providers


e
-


- *


. -- -


- ,


- *


1


L


PRE-QUALIFICATION OF BUILDING/SPECIALTY TRADE CONTRACT


RFQ NO. 184144


October 6, 2009
James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Miscellaneous CRA landscaping maintenance services


Request Date:


Detailed for the Request of Qualifications (RFQ) are at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, web-


SCOPE OF SERVICES
The CRA is seeking proposals for landscaping maintenance services for CRA lots and properties. Please
see attached list of property addresses and folio numbers. Please submit pricing on a per lot basis. The
work consists of a maintenance visit every two weeks for a period of one year with the option to renew the
service for two (2) additional one year periods.
The selected landscape contractor will be expected to keep the areas in a safe and clean condition, includ-
mg:
* cutting of grass, including trimming edges of grass for a dean appearance;
* clearing weeds and filling flower beds and tree pits with soil and mulch, as needed;
* fertilizing as needed, to keep plants and grass in good condition;
* trimming of bushes, trees, and shrubs;
* spraying paved areas and curbs (if applicable) with approved chemicals to prevent growth of weeds;
* spraying the grass and trees with approved pest control products to prevent infection; and
* preventing the accumulation of debris, trash, paper, stagnant water, dense vines and underbrush,
including removal of fallen branches.
The selected landscape contractor will also verify the status of sprinkler heads, timers, andlor rain sensors
to ensure that irrigation systems are fully operational. The work will be evaluated by CRA personnel for
quality control purposes before any payment request is approved. The CRA retains the right to terminate
the contract if it is not satisfied with the performance of the selected contractor.
The proposal must be accompanied by current proof of workers' compensation and employers' liability
insurance, commercial general liability insurance, and auto liability insurance. The proposal must include a
current copy of proposer's contractor's license, list of five recent jobs (within the last year), list of personnel
expected to work at the jobsites, an IRS W-9 Form, and a detailed per property budget. Additionally, the pro-
posal must include the hourly rate for one (1) foreman and two (2) crew members for miscellaneous work.
Bidders should affix an envelope to the outside of any boxes or packages containing samples, back-up
documents, etc. The envelope should include all required documents under the RFS and should be clearly
marked on the outside to read, "CRA landscaping maintenance services RFS No. 09-01." The proposal
must be submitted in a sealed envelope no later than Tuesday, October 20, 2009, at 3:00pm at the City of
Miami City Clerk's Office at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133. The proposals will be evalu-
ated by CRA staff and the selected contractor will be notified by mail and phone. If you have any questions,
please contact Mr. Clarence Woods, Assistant Director, at (305) 679-6800 during regular business hours
(Monday Friday, 8:00am 5:00pm).
.
The CRA reserves the right to accept any proposal deemed to be in the public mterest and in furtherance of
the purposes of Florida's Community Redevelopment Act of 1969, to waive ahy irregularities in any propos-
al, to cancel this Request for Service, to reject any or all proposals, and/or to re-advertise for proposals.
LIST OF PROPERTIES


Al iNO. 002077


Request Date:


MIAMI
.
0 HIMO HH

RedevelaDment Agencl

REQUEST FOR SERVICE
RFS No. 09-02

October 6, 2009
James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Miscellaneous cleaning of CRA parking lots


SCOPE OF SERVICES
The CRA is seeking proposals for cleaning services (pick-up and disposal of all trash) for CRA parking lots
(see attached list'of properties) on a daily basis for a period of one year with the with the option to renew
the service for two (2) additional one year periods,
The work consists of one maintenance visit per day to keep the lots in a safe and clean condition; not al-
lowing the accumulation of debris, fallen vegetation, trash, plastic bags, cans or papers on any of the CRA
parking lots described in the attachment. The work will be evaluated by CRA personnel for quality control
.
purposes before any payment request is approved. The CRA retains the right to terminate the contract if it
is not satisfied with the performance of the selected contractor.

The proposal must be accompanied by current proof of workers' compensation and employers' liability
insurance, commercial general liability insurance, and auto liability insurance. The proposal must include a
current copy of proposer's contractor's license, list of five recent jobs (within the last year), list of personnel
expected to work at the jobsites, an IRS W-9 Form, and a detailed per property budget. Bidders should
affix an envelope to the outside of any boxes or packages containing samples, back-up documents, etc.
The envelope should include all required documents under the RFS and should be clearly marked on the
outside to read, "Cleaning of CRA parking lots RFS No. 09-02." The proposal must be submitted in a
sealed envelope no later than Tuesday, October 20, 2009, at 3:00pm at the City of Miami City Clerk's Of-
fice at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133. The proposals will be evaluated by CRA staff and
the selected contractor will be notified by mail and phone. If you have any questions, please contact Mr.
Clarence Woods, Assistant Director, at (305) 679-6800 during regular business hours (Monday Friday,
8:00am 5:00pm).
.
The CRA reserves the right to accept any proposal deemed to be in the public interest and in furtherance of
the purposes of Florida's Community Redevelopment Act of 1969, to waive any irregularities in any propos-
al, to cancel this Request for Service, to reject any or all proposals, and/or to re-advertise for proposals.
LIST OF PROPERTIES


ADDRESS/LOCATIO :


Q LOF NO -


FOLIO NO.:
01-3136-037-0430
01-3136-037-0440
01-3136-037-0450
01-0101-040-1160
01-0102-060-1030
01-0102-060-1040


Parking Lot No.:


ADDRESS:


247 NW 12th Street
231 NW 12th Street
229 NVV 12th Street
345 NW 10th Street
250 NW 10th Street
262 NW 10th Street


(#003297)


S9D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 7-15, 2009


WVill et all holiday sales be up,


.Cop~yrighted Material


Advanced Gyn Clinic


..:::nates
Board GertifiEd GB SYN s

.";;2; ",,

305-621-1390


Pete G. Hernandez
City Manager











, ,


FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 6 12, 2009















T USS LES
Albany State Sports Photo
AT TH E McKENNA: SIAC passing

OPT leader leads Albany State
into battle with IWiles..

TOP TEAMS PLAY FOR LEADS IN CIAA, SIAC;
W-SALEM STATE ACCEPTED BACK INTO CIAA


.I-~I ~---------------------------


Kutztown35,Cheyney21
Lagrange College 20. Lincoln (MO) 7
Langs n 37 SWAsse8mbliesbofeGod 10

& 2 a 700kman 13
NC A&T 23, NC Central 17, 20T
N G n M E 02
saint Paurs 13, virginia Union 9
Shaw42, Saint Augustine's 32
South Carolina 38, SC State 14
Tennessee State 23, SE Mo. St 17
Virginia St. 23, Efeabeth City St. 10
West Virginia St. 23, Seton Hill 17


UNDER TH E BANN ER
WHATS GOING ON IN AND AROUND BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS

SHAKE-UP AT FLORIDA A&M:
The Tallahassee Democrat reported Saturday resigna-
tions of Florida A& M athletic
director Bill Hayes and the ter-
mination of assistant ADs Alvin
Hollins and Bob McBee
In a story written by St.
Clair Murraine, Hayes resigned
Friday (Oct 2) afternoon, just
short of his two year anniversary
at the school. His final day at
FAMU will be December 31'
There has been speculation
FAMU Sports Photo that Hayes could become ath-
HAYES: Headed back letic director at Winston-Salem
to WSSU? State University and he did not
deny that possibility.
The termination of Hollins and McBee was confirmed
by FAMU President Dr. James Ammons. Both men were
-
given the option of workmg until December 28.
Hollins' firing comes almost 30 years to the date that
he was bired as sports information director, a title that has
since changed to associate athletic director of media rela-
tions. McBee was hired in January as associate Athletic
director for marketing.
Hollins said he received a written notice of the admin-
istration's intent on Thursday saying "management wanted
to goin another direction." He was still at work Friday and
acknowledged that December 28 would be his last day on
the job.
"After much deliberation and thought, I have decided
to move in a different direction with the FAMU athletic
program," McBee said in a brief news release Friday eve-
rung. -
Hollins, a FAMU Hall of Famer, was named MEAC
SID of the Year in 2005. He has already had.his replace-
ment named butAmmons didn't indicate when the replace-
ment, Vaughn Wilson, ivould begin work.

NEW AD AT TUSKEG E E:
PresidentBeqjaminEPaytonof'AskegeeUniversity
announced last week the appoint--
ment of Anthony Hollothan as
Director of Athletics, effective
immediately. Holloman succeedS
Stacy Danley who joined the
University in April 2008'
Holloman most recently served
the University as Associate
Vice President for University
Advancement over the last five
years. In his new role he will
Yuskegee Sports Photo TOpOrt to.the President and "pro-
HOLLOMAN: Moves vide the critical leadership to
up toAD at Tuskegee. Continue the forward movement
of a distinctive and noted program," said Payton.
Holloman is a graduate of Johnson C. Smith
University, where he received the B.A. degree
in Communications with a rninor in English. He has
also completed the Master of Science degree m Sports
Administration from the United States Sports Academy, as
well as a certificate in fundraising management from the
Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University. Holloman
has served as a track, football and basketball coach in the
Charlotte, North Carolina Mecklenburg School District.
Prior to coming to Tuskegee, Holloman served as
fissistapt vice president for development at Tennessee
State University. He has also served as Director of
Development at N. C. A & T State University and
.
as Director of Planned Giving and Donor Relations at
JCSU.

Q AZEEZ Communications, Inc. Vol. XVI, No. 10


LUT WILLIAMS

BCS ber of critical games involving teams
at the top of the SIAC and CIAA standings are on
tap this weekend as the Div. 11 conferences enter
the final five and four weeks respectively of their
regular seasons.

SIAC
In the SIAC, current league leader Albany
State (5-0, 4-0 SIAC), one of only two undefeated
black college teams (the MEAC's Florida A&M
is the other), heads into the meat of its schedule
beginning with Saturday's 6 p.m. date at Miles (3-3,
3-2).
The Miles game begins a season-ending five-
game stretch where James "Mike" White's Rams
will play, in succession, the five teams pursuing
them (Miles, Clark Atlanta, Tuskegee, Morehouse
and Fort Valley State). The Rams have already
dismissed, by an average 34-3 score, the four
SIAC teams at the bottom of the SIAC standings
- Kentucky State, Stillman, Benedict and Lane.
Albany State comes in withthe league's top
scoring offense (34.6 ppg.), its best passer, senior
A. J. McKenna, who has completed 56% of his
passes (60 of 107) for 12 touchdowns and just one
interception, and top point producer in senior run-
ningbackDemetriusJohnsonwhohasbeeneffec-
tive both running and catching the ball. Johnson's
averaging 4.2 yards on 59 carries with six touch-
downs and 18.2 yards on 18 receptions with five
TDs. His 11 touchdowns make him the SIAC and
black college scoring leader.
Billy Joe's Miles Golden Bears started with
a bang getting a 23-16 .upset of SIAC kingpin
Tuskegee in their second game. But they have
struggled since.
Last week's 36-12 loss to Fort Valley State was
their third loss in four games. They did however get
starting quarterback Carlton Hill back last week
after he went out with a separated shoulder midway
thru a 31-12 loss at Samford three weeks ago and
then sat out the Bears 6-0 win over Clark Atlanta
on Sept. 26. Hill completed just 12 of 34 passes in
Satualay's loss.
Albany State, up to No. 5 in the BCSP ank-
ings, has a one-game lead over'Ibskegee (4-2, 4-1)
and Morehouse (4-1, 3-1), who meet in Columbus,
Ga. Saturday (2 p.m.) for the 74th game of their
storied rivalry.
The teams are about evenly matched as they
are right next to each other in eight SIAC statisti-
cal categories. Morehouse Averages 30.4 points per
game, fourth in the league, Tuskegee is fifth at 24.3.



1. FLORIDA A&M (4-0) Idle. NEXT: At Miami
2. SOUTH CAROLINA STATE (3-1) Fell to Div. I South Carolina, 38--
14.NEXT:AtNorfolkState.
3. PRAIRIE VIEW A&M (2-1) Knocked off defending SWAC champ
Grambling, 35-32. NEXt At Alabama State.
4. GRAMBLING STATE (2-3) Upended by Prairie View A&M, 35-32.
NgXt Hosting Alabama A&M.
5. ALBANY STATE (5-0) Shut out Lane, 20-0. NES: At Miles.
6. ALABAMA A&M (4.1) Subdued Tuskegee, 35-15. NEXt At
Grambilog. ;
7. SHAW (5-1) Knocked off crossiown rival, St. Augustine's, 42-32.
NEXt CIAA West showdown at Fayetteville State.
8 DELAWARE STATE (1-2) Idle. NEXT: Hosting Bethune-Cookman
a sOUTHERN (2-2) Upset by Jackson State, 22-14. NEXt idle-
10. TUSKEGEE (4-2) Lost in Indianapolls to Alabama A&M, 35-15
NEXT: Morehouse in Columbus, Ga.


___I_


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


SIAC "mi"8 m:?"
CONF ALL
W L W L
Albany State 4 0 5 0
Tuskegee 4 1 4 2
Morehouse 3 1 4 1
Fort Valley State 3 2 4 2
Miles 3 2 3 3
Clark Atlanta 3 3 2 3
Kentucky State 2 3 3 3
Benedict 1 3 3 3
Stillman 0 4 1 3
Lane 0 4 0 5
SIAC PLAYERS OF THS WEEK
OFFENSE Jerrell Noland, So., QB, KSU Hit
on 15 of 23 passes for 235 yards and 3 TDs in
Win over CAU.
DEFENSE Marlo Fuller, Jr.,,DB, ASU -8 tackles
4 solos, 1 S for losses, 1 Interception, 1 sad, 2
W E Wa r. LBU 14
8 ados, 25 foHosses, 1 fumUe recovery
sPECIAL TEAMS Jamer Rodriguez, WIWR,
MHC 8elumed 3 kicks total of 162 yards, include.
I a 91-yard KO retum for a TD vs Stillman.
unth King, So, P. FVSU 5 punts for

FS 97 LIN Flowenal, Sr., OL,


SWAC AT NCE
OW ALL
E.DIVISION W L W L
Alabama A&M 1 0 4 1
Jackson State 1 0 1 3
Miss Valley SL 1 1 2 2 .
Alabama State 0 1 3 1
AlcomState 0 1 0 3
W. DIVISION
Prairie View A&M 2 0 2 1
Southem 1 1 3 2
Ark. Pine Bluff 1 1 2 2
ambidy e 1 2 3
SWACPLAYERSOFTHS WEEK
OFFENSE K. J. Black, Jr, QB, PV A&M -
Completed19DI26passes for 184 yards, 2TDs
(8 52), rusited it times for ?5yards and 2TDs
(4 48) in win over Grambling State
DaE NSE Maddo Sr.,
Tutony John Jr., DB,
JSU 2 tackles, 1 Interception, 3 break-ups
vs. Southem. '
SPECIAL TEAMS Eric Perri, Sr., PK, JSU
on 2 of 3 PATs and 3 fled goats 03.


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 5 1
Concordia 3 3
Tennessee State 2 3
W. Va State 2 3
Savannah State 1 3
NC.Central .0 5
Lincoln (Mo.) 0 5
Edward Waters 0 5
Central State 0 5
Texas Colege 0 5
Cheyney 0 6
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Calvin McNairl, OS, Tenn.
State-20Carriestor 122yardsand2scores
(7. 11), hit on 10 ofi5 passes for 95 yards
and l TD va SE Missourt Dardon Lewis,
QB, LANGSTON Completed 15 d 21
eas1 177R an 8vs W

ceptTa d7 1 4 1
SPECIAL TEAMS Robert Vipond, PK,
Tenn. State Kicked a 41-yard field goal vs.
SE Mo State


MEAC AH NE


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10

to it iss e aAe if I in MontgoameMSAL 1
Elizabeth City State vt Bowie State in Elizabeth City, NC. 1
Norfolk State vs. SC State in Norfolk, VA 1
West Liberty vs. West Virginia State in West Liberty, WV 1
Saint Augustine's vs. Johnson C. Smith in Raleigh, NC 1:30
Bacone vs. Texas College in Muskagee, OK 2
Concordia vs. Texas-Arlington in Selma, AL 2
NW Oklahoma State vs. Langston in Alva, OK 2
Benedict vs. Lane in Columbia, SC 2
Grambling State vs. Alabama A&M in Grambling, LA 3
Appalachian State vs. NC Central in Boone, NC 3:30
Rutg Nw 3:30
E. Kentucky vs. Tenn. State in Richmond, KY 5
Webber Int'I vs. Edward Waters its Lake Wales, FL 5
Miles vs.Albany State in Fairlield, AL 6
Hamptonvs.HowardinHamptonVA. 6
sta a thPu8 in over, DE 6
Fort Valley State vs. Stillman in Fort Valley, G 7
Miami vs. FloridaA&M in Miami, FL 7
HOMECOMING$
Cheyney vs. Milksvilk in Cheyney, PA 1
coln (PA)bys \ftNCmia Union inMWest Grove, PA 1

Central State vs. Kentucky State in Wilberforce, OH 1:30
Livingstone vs. Chowan in Salisbury, NC 1:30
Lincoln (MO) vs. Peru State in Jefferson City, MO 2
TV GAMES
CIAATVNetwork
Fa e b Statsys.shaw n Fayetteville, NC 1

74th Tustragee-Morehouse classic
Tuskegee vs. Morehouse in Columbus, GA 2
--- -------- -- -- --- -- -

next week's (Oct 17) showdown at home vs.
Florida A&M with both teams undefeated in con-
ference play.
Howard (2-2, 0-1) rides a two-game win-
ning streak into Hampton (2-2, 1-1) Saturday (6
p.m.) for their annual HU vs. HU battle. Morgan
State (3-1, 1-0) has homecoming in Baltimore (1
p.m.) vs. North Carolina A&T (3-2, 1-1). After a
week-off, Delaware State (1-2, 1-1) hosts winless
Bethune-Cookman (0-4, 0-3) in a 7 p.m. start.

SWAC
Prairie View's milestone 35-32 win over
Grambling State Saturday, the first for the
Panthers over the G-Men in 22 meetings, puts
Henry Frazier's squad in the driver's seat in the
SWAC West. The Panthers (2-1, 2-0) travel to
Montgomery, Ala., Saturday and try to keep the
momentum going in a date (1 p.m.) at Alabama
State (3-1, 0-1).
in an Eastern Divisiott match-up, Alcorn
State (0-3, 0-1) hosts Mississippi Valley State (2-
2, 1-1).
Grambling (2-3. 0-1) will try to rebuild
against an Alabama A&M (4-1, 1-0) team that is
currently tied with Jackson State atop the SWAC
East. AA&MU QB Kevin Atkins is hitting on
58.8% (67 of 114) of his passes with7 TDs and just
interceptions and leads the league m passing effi-
clency (141.3). A&M running back Ulysses Banks
is the SWAC's top rusher at 116 yards per game,
Wideout Thomas Harris averages 15.1 yArds on
his 24 receptions and has scored 4 TDs.
JSU (1-3, 1-0), who knocked off Southern
22-14 last week, hosts Arkansas-Pine Bluff (2-2,
1-1) 'lkras Southern (1-3, 0-1) has a date at BCS
and Big East member Rutgers (3-1).
Southern is off this week.


DIVISION
Bowle State
Eld. CRy State
VirgInia Union
Virginks State
StPaufs
W. DIVISION
Shaw
Fayetteville State
J. C. Smith
St. Augustines
Chowan


Florida A&M
SC State
Morgan State
NC A&T State
Hampton
Norfolk State
Delaware State
Howard
Bethune Cookman
# W-Salem State
a Not el gatae for In"
MEAC PLAYERS OF THE


WEEK
s Er 08 NC A&T .
.v aineces r.y s car.]
a jr a 1,
in win over BCU
2F HO A se
r Scored, PK MSU
J., LT, NC A&T -0


Y' FENZE Canton Fear
CIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFF LINEMAN Dillon Kestner, Jr., C, FSU F i.:4.a.e m.a t W
RECEIVER Brian Berry Jr., WR, VSU 5 rec., 7 .0 .
F A Son, .Ir., QB, VSU tackles 13 solos or oss
-01E2 MU I and 2 W. U 800 at Ke thr
-asassinwinove coowan passes wasu
LB Joseph Brown Sr., FSU 10 tackles. 1.5 SPECI AMS Kerme
TFL, 2bleak-upsys Chowan -4ya goal.
a 0tQ c eH
Ps E R Ds hid6
SPECIAL TEAMS Marton Buchanon, Jr, P,


Ark. O mSt0Ppd.

Al be a M 35, Tuskegee 16
e ,L InO(PA) 20
Ch n Southem 47, Savannah St. 10
Concordia 7 NewCOldeans
I st Mik 2n
Howard 7, Winston-Salem State 3
Jackson St.22, Southem 14
Johnson C. Smith 30, Livingstone 15
3 Clark Atlanta 13
s n Central St. 30, 20T


HILL RODRIGUEZ ATKINS

They are fourth and fifth in scoring defense
(MHC 19.4 ppg., TU 20.5), third and fourth
in total defense (MHC 263.4 ypg., TU 272.5),
second and fourth in total offense (MHC 352.2
ypg., TU 331.2), second and fourth in rushing
offense (MHC 158.8 ypg., TU 144.8) and third
and fourth in passing offense (MHC 193.4
ypg., TU 186.3).
,Morehouse QB William Brack (158.8
ypg.)and his TU counterpart Jeremy Willimns
(154.4) are third and fourth in passing yards
per game. The teams also have two of the best
playmakers in the SIAC in Morehouse WR/
KR Jamar Rodriguez and TU counterpart
Antoin Mitchell. Rodriguez had three receiv-
ing touchdowns and a 91-yard kickoff return
TD last week against Stillman. Brack left the
Stillman game with a shoulder injury and was
replaced by back-up QB Dajuan Thigpen.
who three all three TD tosses to Rodriguez.
Brack is questionable for Satinday's game.
In other SIAC contests, Benedict hosts
Lane and Fort Valley State bosts Stillman.

CIAA.
The teams at the top of both the CIAA
, East and West Divisions have showdowns
this weekend as the league begins its stretch
drive. The last four weeks of the regular season
involve games between division foese
In the East, Bowie State (4-2, 3-0 CIAA),
the only team to defeat two-time defending
conference champ Shaw, travels for at p.m.
date facing the Vikings of Elizabeth City
State (4-2, 2-1). ECSU is currently tied with
Virginia State (4-2, 2-1) and Virginia Union
(3-3, 2-1) a half-game behind BSU.
' BSU QB Tyrae Reid threw for three
scores in last week's 51-20 win over Lincoln.
Virginia State, coming off a big 23-10 win
over ECSU last week, hosts St PauPs (2-3,
1-2) in a 6 p.m. start Saturday. Virgillia Union
plays at Lincoln's homecoming (1 p.m.).
in the West, division leader Shaw (5-1,-2-
1) goes on the mad to face Fayetteville State
(3-3, 2-1) in a featured game to be televised
on the CIAA TV Network, FSU is tied whh
Johnson C. Smith (3-3,. 2-1), a half-game
behind Shaw. In another key West Division
battle, JCSU travels to Raleigh for a 1:30
meeting with St Augustine's (1-5, 1-2).

NIEAC
A week after defending MEAC champion
South Camlina State (3-1, 1-0 MEAC) got
its first loss, 38-14 to BCS and SEC inember
South Carolina, the conference's other top
team, undefeated Florida A&M (4-0, 2-0), is
Likely in for the same Saturday (7 p.m.) against
nationally-ranked, #11 Miami (3-1).
SC State returns to conference action
Saturday witha big 1 p.m.match-up at Norfolk
State (2-2, 1-1). If the Bulldogs emerge with
a victory Saturday over NSU, they will enter


"The CIAA has a great history with WSSU and we are excited
about their return," says Leon Kerry, CIAA Commissioner. "Even
when the initial decision was made to leave the CIAA, we contin-
ued to treat WSSU alumni as a part of the CIAA family; because.
once you are a part of the CIAA you are "'CIAA For Life.'"
The university's intercollegiate athletic program will compete at
the NCAA Division II level, effective with the 2010/11 season.
WSSU currently sponsors 15 sports programs, each of which are in
line with championship offerings of the CIAA.
RRY In an official letter to the CIAA, Chancellor Dr. Donald Jullan
Reeves of WSSU said, "We would certainly welcome the opportu-
nity to reconnect with the rich tradition and legacy of the CIAA and will
work aggressively and stategically to ensure that all NCAA Division II
requirements are met by the fall of 2010."
The NCAA membership committee will conduct a campus audit to
confirm the university is in compliance with Division II regulations.


Winston-Salem State voted
and welcomed back into CIAA
The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association's (CIAA)
Board of Directors voted Friday to reinstate Winston Salem
State University (WSSU) as a member of the Division II
Conference-
"The CIAA Board of Directors voted unanimously to fully
reinstate WSSU into the conference," stated Dr. Jimmy R.
Jenkins, Sr., President CIAA Board of Directors. "We're expe- K
E
tiencing exciting times as our membership continues to grow."
Even after a brief departure, the conference still celebrated their
great history together. WSSU's legendary coach, Clarence "Big House"
Gaines, put the CIAA on the map as one of the all-time winning coaches
in college basketball history. In April of 2005, the CIAA named the Men's
Basketball Championship trophy after the basketball legend-


D 01 THE MIAMI TIMES O 9


CIAA rt'"su


Leaders battle in SIAC, CIAA


BCS Noe




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs