• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Section A
 Section B
 Section C
 Section D














Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00850
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: September 30, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00850
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 2-8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
        Page B 11
        Page B 12
        Page B 13
        Page B 14
    Section C
        Page C 1
        Page C 2
        Page C 3
        Page C 4
    Section D
        Page D 1
        Page D 2-5
        Page D 6
        Page D 7
        Page D 8
        Page D 9
        Page D 10
Full Text






Miami police cut

salaries; save jobs
Compromise will save the
jobs of 106 sworn officers




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L05 SO A ONIVERSITV OF FLORIDA
PO BO 117007
CAINESVILLE FL 3261.1-7007


Andel W.
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S'" Reverend
Cleo Albury, Jr.
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Bringing awareness to

Black men about HIV



MAN UP
Liberty City and Overtown numbers increasing







tmeSt


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
DISTRIB UTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD C COUNTIES FOR OVER 87 YEARS


Volume 87 Number 4


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


PULSE alleges poor county leadership


By Tariq Osborne
toshbornefl @miuitiflmonline.com

The People United to Lead the
Struggle for Equality (PULSE)
rally in front of the offices of
the City Council on Thursday,
Sept. 24, was just the first
of many, according to Rev.
Dr. Anthony 'Tate, PULSE's
President. Many issues were
addressed at the rally, ranging
from the county budget, to the
raises given out to some county
staffer in PULSE's view at the
expense of the public.
"This is the beginning of a
movement that has been long
needed in our community
we are calling on our leaders
and on the community itself
to stand behind the PULSE
organization.
Other organizations already


.-'.
I,




Representatives from several organizations and their supporters rallied downtown on Thursday,
September 24 against county leaders, who they allege aid in the marginalization of the Black business
community. From left to right; Eduardo Becerra, PULSE, Willie Pouncy, AFSCME, Rev. Dr. Anthony
Tate, President; PULSE, Nathaniel Wilcox, Executive Director; PULSE, Ed Brown, Partner; Opa-locka
Flightline, Rev. John Taylor, Pastor Craig Weaver Sr. -Maiam rimes photo/TariqOsbome


begin to respond.
Sharon Allen, of the United
Postal Worker's Union, decried
the impending closing of Edison
Branch Post office. Allen said
she understands that there


must be budget cuts, but feels
that the Edison Branch should
not be one of them. "It's just
that in the Black neighborhood
that post office serves, the
people don't necessarily have


access to transportation," she
said. Allen feels that a service
as basic as the post office
should not be run simply for
financial gain. "It should be
Please turn to PULSE 4A


Trial begins in Sherdavia

Senseless killings in Liberty City


continue three years later

By Sandra J. Charity erty City housing project. The
schaurl itenu,;amIin:iucvnW.wom well-knownl honor student and
chess player at Lillie C. Evans
On a hot summer day in July Elementary School would soon
2006, nine-year-old Sherda- be fighting for her life after be-
via Jenkins sat in front of her ing stuck by a stray bullet. She
porch in Liberty City playing would lose the struggle. Sher-
with her dolls. Minutes later, a davia's wound proved fatal.
gun battle erupted in the Lib- The murder ripped the neigh-


SHERDAVIA


Jenkins killing
borhood. Meeting after meet-
ings, the community became
outraged as it asked why this
senseless act of violence could
occur in their neighborhoods.
"That poor child who was
Filled with so many dreams and
aspirations lost her life. That
was sad," said Andrea Lock-
hart, a Liberty Square resident.
"I can't imagine the pain that
family continues go through
JENKINS daily just knowing that their
Please turn to TRIAL 4A


NBA great dedicates Hadley Park expansion

New concession stand expected O m


to generate revenue
By Tariq Osborne
toshorne@miianmitimesonline.com

NBA Hall of Famer turned
Florida International Universi-
ty (FIU) Head Basketball coach
Isiah Thomas was on hand at
the groundbreaking ceremo-
ny for expansions at Charles
Hadley Park Friday. In a long-
awaited addition, Hadley Park
will be receiving a field house
and concession building.
According to Ola Aluko, di-
rector of the City of Miami's
capital improvements depart-


ment, the process has been in
the works for at least four or
five years. "We will be break-
ing ground within the next
two weeks," he said. "Mark my
words, we will guarantee you a
concession stand, a field house,
and new restrooms within the
next eight or nine months.
Herschel Haynes, Chairman
of the Hadley Park/Model City
Homeowner's Association, was
relieved to hear it.
"This is a situation we've
been trying to fix for almost a
Please turn to PARK 4A


--Miami Times photo/ anq Osonme
NBA Hall of Fame inductee Isiah Thomas describes the new
facilities being constructed at Charles Hadley Park to an eager
crowd on Friday, Sept. 25.



Homestead soldier

killed in Afghanistan
Th11e Aiami 71ires StffRprtaf R'port


I

Xerox CEO Ursula Burns (left) and ACS President and CEO
Lynn Blodgett on Monday discuss Xerox's acquisition of ACS.

Xerox CEO in $6.4B deal
SEE STORY PAGE 5A


J,
,fe1'-.,


7Day
We their
Forecast
Weaselr.con,


WEDNESDAY


87 72"
SCATIIRID I-STORMS


THURSDAY


87 75"
ISOIAT I STORMSS


rOIDAY


87 76"
ISOlll5 1 STORMS


SATURDAY


87" 76"
IsOIAIIP I SIORMS


SUNDAY

.
87" 77"
Is01lI I I-SIIRMS


Family and friends are mourn-
ing the loss of a South Florida sol-
dier who was killed while fighting
in Afghanistan.
Edward Bernard Smith. 30, died
Thursday when his vehicle was hit
by an explosive device in the City
of Omar Zai. Tvo other American
soldiers were also killed.
Smith's family described him as
a loving person who died fighting
for his country.
Smith lived in Homestead and
was deployed to Afghanistan in
July.


MONDAY

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87 76"
ISOAlill I -S11OIM


TUESI


87" 7
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EDWARD BERNARD SMITH

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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 50 OCTOBER 6, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONIROl. [HEIIR OWN DESIINY


Shbje ftiami aimnu
K eIe up hSSN 0739-0319)
p up the Publilhed WeeHly at 900 N W 54th Streel
Miami. Florida 33127-1818
Posi Otlice Box 270200O
arrests in schools Bun V. sta Sation i Fori .7
Phone 305-69-16210
T he community is pulling together. The clearest evi-
dence of this has, ironically, been the recent arrests H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES Founder 1923-1968
of students attempting to bring weapons to school. GARTH C. REEVES, JR.. E ,itor 1972-19-2
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Puliish-r Emertiu
The many parents, clergy, and government officials who RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman
are upset about the recent arrests (nine and counting) are
overlooking something important.
The students were caught.
The arrests are a good thing. At the very least, they mean
that nine fewer weapons have made it into schools in the
last two weeks.


Member cf INational Newspaper Publisher Association
Member ol the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Slaiion, Miami, FL 33127-0200 *305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Blac k Pres tFic .esa i nral merica can tesi Iead I-he worldd from racial ar.nd rIa ,ion3l ani5gr.nism nirin I .3a: Iordl 10
..er', perc.r. regardle -' oi ra:e .:reed cr col' rin r rer rtuman ar a legslr ngri l lr, H i.in r:. pers larng nr. prs.:r tire
Biac.l Prei, : ltr<,eia to nAlp e er/ r per.cn ,n t ir Irm beihel h ,al ail person'h vr hurl a., ic,,' a rrj.r, .i haid DaCip

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More importantly, the arrests mean that the tragic Sep-
tember 15 stabbing in Coral Gables helped students over-
come, at least temporarily, their aversion to turning one an-
other in.
The arrests also mean that police are taking the issue seri-
ously. With the amount of drug activity and adult-level vio-
lence that takes place in Miami-Dade County; it would be
easy for a juvenile, a first offender, in possession of a box
cutter not to seem very important. Arresting officers must
know that the sentence will be light. They could be tempted
to just confiscate the weapon and release the child. But this
is not how lessons are taught. The community should con-
gratulate its police force for taking this issue as seriously as
it has been.
Parents are clearly doing their part. Karen Brown, presi-
dent of the Florida Parent Teacher Association (PTA), was
correct last week to give "kudos" to a father who called the
police on his own son (the son was bringing a knife to school
and was arrested en-route.)
"It's a hard.decision, and it's called tough love," she said.
The most disturbing aspect of the arrests is that so many
students should want to bring weapons to school. It is up-
setting that so many young people wish to harm themselves
or others. But in addressing this, it is important to acknowl-
edge this: The fact that so many are being arrested means
that police, parents, school officials, and even fellow stu-
dents are working together they way they are supposed to.
This is a positive thing. It is how communities work.


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


%a h' % rn I*rr o


LOC)(AL cO('()MM1N APY jFR (YOv.U, I.I 53A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30- OCTOBER 6, 2009


Commissioner Jordan: "No, your mama!"


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he WCpyr lighted Material 1



SSyndicated Content r


Available from Commercial News Providers


Commissioner Jordan re-
sponds to Miami Herald's Fred
Grimm article, "Despite the
cost, lobbying is Meek, weak
and bleak" that was published
Sept. 21.
You would think that Miami
Herald Columnist Fred Grimm
would have learned a lesson
from the outburst of Rep. Joe
Wilson, (D-S.C.). The lesson:
racism is not easy to disguise
as fair comment when. one's
outburst is expressed with a
tone so uncivil and rude that
is difficult to explain it any
other way.
Perhaps, as Rep. Wilson
wishes us to understand
about his need to shout liar
at President Barack Obama in
the Chambers of the U.S. Con-
gress, Mr. Grimm would like
us to believe that his dispar-
aging and personally insult-
ing characterizations of former
Congresswoman Carrie Meek
and her son U.S. Represen-
tative Kendrick Meek are not
motivated by bigotry but by
his deep passion about the is-
sues.
Are we to believe that Mr.
Grimm felt it furthered his
argument about lobbyist pay
to ask why Congresswoman


Meek, now an 83-year-old
grandmother, needed to "haul
her tired old bones to Washing-
ton"? Mr. Grimm also sneer-
ingly concluded that most
South Floridians must believe
their congressional delega-
tion, Congressman Kendrick
Meek being the only one men-
tioned by name, are "dither-


For anyone who is not aware,
Mrs. Carrie Meek represented
Florida's 17t District in the
U.S. Congress for ten years,
1993-2003, and was the first
Black elected to Congress in
Florida since Reconstruction.
She was first elected to the
Florida House of Representa-
tives in 1978, served until 1983


ut another way: when you insult somebody's mama, people
wonder what you are really trying to say and why. That, Grimm,
is a lesson that your mama should have taught you.


ing incompetents." Mr. Grimm
goes on to opine that if "U.S.
Rep. Kendrick Meek was doing
his job, there'd be no need to
hire his momma...." In his fit
of passion, Mr. Grimm failed
.to mention that the relatives
of other legislators, including
several South Florida Cuban-
Americans, Anglos and others
also currently serve as lobby-
ist for local governments in
Washington D.C. and in Tal-
lahassee along with several
former legislators who are also
not Black.


and was the first Black female
elected to the Florida State
Senate. This granddaughter of
slaves and daughter of share-
croppers, graduated from Flor-
ida A and M University, got her
masters degree from the Uni-
versity of Michigan and served
as a teacher at Bethune-Cook-
man University and an admin-
istrator at Miami-Dade Com-
munity College. Meek is now
a much beloved icon of this
community. She possesses ex-
traordinary experience with a
variety of critical issues along


with many productive and im-
portant relationships among
our diverse ethnic, racial, and
socio-economic populations
here and in the U.S. Capitol.
In my opinion, Miami-Dade
County has much to gain by
hiring Mrs. Meek to represent
our interests in Washington.
As to Grimm's insinuations
about the competence, or
lack thereof, of South Flori-
da's congressional delegation,
(only Congressman Meek was
named), I will have to leave my
comments for another forum.
This is because of another les-
son.that Grimm failed to learn
from the unfortunate expe-
rience of Rep. Wilson. That
lesson: once people begin to
believe that your reactions to
public policy issues are not
based on logic or on heartfelt
concern for the community
good, but that what you say
is based on something more
primal, insidious and ugly, it
is then that people truly stop
listening. Put another way:
when you insult, somebody's
mama, people wonder what
you are really trying to say and
why. That, Grimm, is a lesson
that your mama should have
taught you.


Teaching our children to love


Some attendees at the Black Caucus Weekend shindig
in Washington last week were surprised to see no mention
of President Barack Obama in the souvenir program or the
banquet program Saturday night when Barack and wife,
Michelle, were the honored guests and the president was the
speaker. Was it an oversight or maybe they couldn't see the
woods for the trees?


The war in Afghanistan came a lot closer to home this week
with the announcement that South Dade Senior High 2002
graduate Edward Bernard Smith and two fellow soldiers of
the 23rd Infantry Regiment died when their vehicle was hit by
roadside bomb on Thursday.

*********
Independent filmmaker Joe Cadona gave us a startling
picture of our hometown this week when he outlined the
position that we find ourselves in today, says Joe: South
Floridians live a quaint form of civic escapism. Spurned on
by decades of corruption scandals involving elected officials,
police chiefs, members of the School Board, union heads and
politically appointed administrators at the airport and port of
Miami to name a few Miamians have forfeited their stake
in local affairs.

********
This is not news anymore but we will pass it along for what
its worth. South Florida has another corruption scandal.
Three Broward County public figures two office holders
and one former elected official are charged with engaging in
fraudulent acts, apparently with such minuscule rewards that
it makes you wonder: When will it end? Stay tuned.


Is it true that Channel 10 (WPLG)'s Michael Putney returned
his award from the NAACP last year because he was ticked off
by the fiery rhetoric of guest speaker Michael Eric Dyson?
Stay tuned.


As quiet as it is kept, there will be a lot of people losing their
jobs next week when the true picture of our screwed up city and
county government tell it like it is. Black and Hispanic agencies
will take a beating, but guess who will be the hardest hit?


Florida Power & Light has been feasting on the public for
years and now they are seeking a hike in rates to fund the
purchase of a corporate jet and it refuses to release the annual
salary of its executives. FPL has the Public Service Commission
in its pocket so it will be very interesting to see how the vote
goes. Stay tuned.


Recently our community ex-
perienced a heartbreaking trag-
edy--violence among children
which led to the senseless kill-
ing of a 17-year-old student.
Nothing can be more sobering
than having to face the reality
that an innocent child's life and
future tragically have been cut
short. And for the families who
must suffer the loss, the pain is
deep and all-consuming..
In the wake of the traumatic
incident that occurred at one of
our high schools, it's important
that we, as a community, renew
our commitment to children and
refocus our efforts on working
together to ensure their safety
and well-being. As a member of
Miami-Dade School Board but
more importantly as a parent
and concerned resident of the
community, I know that our col-
lective efforts are far more effec-
tive and lasting than any indi-
vidual mark we make. It takes
every member of a community
bound by a common cause to
effect change and impact lives
especially the lives of young and


impressionable children.
We all know the often-quoted
African proverb, "It takes a vil-
lage to raise a child." Now, more
than any other time, we must
transform this adage into more
thanjust words, but a daily prac-
tice. We must live it and teach
the substance of its meaning to
the generations of.children that


are coming behind us.
The School Board, along with
Superintendent of Schools Al-
berto Carvalho, his administra-
tive team and every employee
of the District, are committed
to Miami-Dade County Public
Schools' nearly 340,000 stu-
dents. Last year, the District
allocated $30 million td pro-
tect our youth, the allocation


of security monitors to schools
has remained constant, and we
have one of the few uninformed
school police departments in
the state. All of this is a testa-
ment to the priority we place on
the safety of our students and
employees.
Through the Superintendent's
initiatives and partnerships with


community organizations, chil-
dren are learning important life
lessons like violence prevention
and conflict resolution, in ad-
dition to the classroom lessons
of reading, writing and arith-
metic. Our dedicated teachers
and school site administrators
are preparing students to thrive
both professionally and person-
ally so that they lead productive


lives and are able to make sig-
nificant contributions to their
communities and our world.
Community partners such as
the Peace Education Founda-
tion, the Martin Luther King
Center for Non-Violence, the Is-
lands Institute and many others
have joined with the District,
providing resources and servic-
es to help eradicate violent be-
havior among youth in schools
and neighborhoods.
The call to action for our com-
munity is clear teach chil-
dren love, tolerance and respect
for human life. Be an example
for them, demonstrating that
disagreements do not have to
end in violence and death. In
my opinion, this is the only way
to ensure that our children do
not mimic the violent behavior
and brutal images they see all
around them every day. Sim-
ply stated, we parents, faith-
based leaders, neighbors, edu-
cators and community leaders -
all of us together must continue
to teach our children to love in
loving ways.


Who will you support in the City of Miami mayoral race Sanchez or Regalado?


MURIEL WALKER, 68
Retired, Liberty City

Sanchez is
a very outspo-
ken person.
When I go to
the meetings
do wntown w
(with Curley's
House), he's
the one that's
going to say what's on his mind
and call people out when he
needs to. So there really isn't
any question about it for me.
Sanchez is my man. He doesn't
hesitate.

DARLENE GRIMETT, 50
Student, Miami

I don't nor-
mally vote
other than in
presidential
elections. I'm
not going out
of my way to -
vote for ei-
ther of them.
It's just that we don't see them
enough. They might pass by


in a van with a megaphone or
something a few days before
the election, but that doesn't do
much. They don't really talk to
us, so to be honest I'm probably
not voting for either.

OLIVER JACKSON, 40
Hotel Attendant, Liberty City

Well politi-
cians are al-
ways going to
be politicians. I
I know a lot
about Regala-
do though,
and I think
I'm leaning his
way. I don't
like to get into race a lot, but
I think of the two, he's the one
who will do more for the Black
community. I have personal
friends in the Hispanic commu-
nity, but on a larger scale we're
all still very separate. I think he
could bring the communities
together. Creating jobs is the
most important thing, but all of
us getting along together is im-
portant too.


KATIANA GUE, 19
Student,.Miami

I'm not sure.
I haven't heard
much from or
about either
candidate. I
hope to hear
more from
them as the i
election gets
closer so I can
make up my mind. Ill be inter-
ested to know which one has
more interest in helping this
community.

SHYNTAYA HUNTER, 18
Miami, Student

I'm not very
political, so I A.e
don't know. I -.
don't expect
that I'll vote
in the may-
oral election.
But if one can-
didate really
impresses me
between now and November, I
will. I'd need to see a candidate


whose overall aim is to help all
of us, and not just certain parts
of the population. If I do; they'll
get my vote. The situation is re-
ally bad right now, and we can't
afford a candidate who will do
any less.

JOHN GRIFFIN, 21
Student Miami

I'm not
sure. I'm not
a very politi-
cal person.
I voted for
Obama of
course. I vote
for the major
offices, but I
don't always
bother with
the local elections. I may change
my mind before the election,
but I probably won't end up vot-
ing for either of them.



Subscribe


he call to action for our community is clear teach children
love, tolerance and respect for human life. Be an example for
them, demonstrating that disagreements do not have to end in
violence and death.


I
















4A TE MAMITIMS, EPTEBER30 OCOBE 6, 009BLAKS ustCO~tOL HEI OW DETIN


-Miami Times photo/Tariq Osborne
ISIAH THOMAS OBSERVES the unveiling of an'artist's rendition of the new facilities to
be added to Charles Hadley Park.Thomas was on hand to participate in the groundbreaking
ceremony for the project.


Park additions were long overdue


PARK
continued from 1A

decade," he said. According to
Haynes, Charles Hadley Park
is one of the largest park in
the city, and its usage has
increased dramatically. The
chief trouble, according to
Haynes, was the lack of con-
venient public restrooms. "We
had kids doing their thing on
the edge of the park," he said.
"For reasons like that; it's long
overdue."
Ron Sands, a member
of the Hadley Park Senior
Program, believes the most
important part of the new
development is -the conces-
sion stands. When whether
it would not be cheaper to
simply have vendors come in
during events, Sands point-
ed out his issue with this
proposition. "The concession
stand will help sustainabil-
ity. Most of the parks have
them and it helps. When the


money comes into [the con-
cession stand], we know that
money will stay in our com-
munity. You can't guarantee
that with outside vendors,"
he said.
On hand also was Rev. Dr.
Anthony Tate, president of
People United to Lead the
Struggle for Equality (PULSE).
When asked what PULSE's
interest in the facility was,
Tate responded, "It's another
place where our children can
be safe. It' gives them a sense
of community and keeps
them out of trouble."
City of Miami Police. Com-
mander Bernard Johnson con-
firmed this. "The kids involved
here are not the kids we see on
the streets," he said. "They're
the kids we don't worry about.
They're the ones that are go-
ing to school, because the pro-
gram follows up to make sure
they have the grades."
The star of the day, of course,
was NBA Hall of Famer Isiah


Thomas, who said his desire
to help the children of Miami
comes from his own disad-
vantaged childhood. Thomas
was raised by a single mother,
with six brothers and two sis-
ters. "You know the poverty
line? Well; we were below that
line," he said gesturing down-
ward to general laughter.
Thomas recalled a time dur-
ing his own youth, waiting in
line to get food for his family
from a Jesse Jackson led Op-
eration Breadbasket, when an
older gentleman, a stranger,
laid a hand on his shoulder
and said, "you're gonna be all
right."
"That was all I needed for
that day," he said. Thomas
went on to say that sort of
thing is what our children
need today.
It was Pastor Vincent Da-
vis who summed up the feel-
ings of the crowd. "We feel the
community has gained some
respect," he said.


Miamians attend Black Caucus Weekend

Miami-Dade County was well-repre-
sented last week in Washington, D.C.
when the Black Caucus Foundation
held its annual weekend celebration. "'~ '
Among the business and political
leaders attending were State Sen. Fred-
ericka Wilson, Miami Gardens May-
or Shirley Gibson, State Rep. Oscar
Braynon, Miami Gardens-Councilman GIBSON HOLLOWAY WILSON
Melvin Bratton, School Board member
Wilbert T. Holloway, former Congress-
woman Carrie P. Meek and U.S. Repre-
sentatives Kendrick Meek.
Also Karen Moore, Aaron Campbell, (
Pinky Sands, Dr. Nelson Adams, Dr.
Larry Capp, Debra Owens, Opal Jones,
William Diggs, Janelle Braynon, Al and
Carmen Jackson, Yolanda Cash-Jack-
son, Barbara Edwards, Linda Holloway ADAMS CAPP BRAYNON
and David Alexander.



Street violence has not slowed down


TRIAL
continued from 1A

daughter is no longer here."
More than three
years later, opening
statements began
on Tuesday in the
trial of a young man
accused of fatally
wounding Sherda-
via.
Damon Darling,
24, is being charged
with second-degree
murder. Another DAR
man, Leroy La-
rose, 31, pleaded
guilty earlier this month. The
two men were involved in the
crossfire that killed Sherda-
via. Larose will testify against
Darling and serve seven years
in prison followed by 10 years
of probation. If Darling is con-
victed, he could face life in
prison.
The Miami Times tried to
contact the Jenkins fam-
ily about the trial but no calls


LI


were returned.
Inner-city violence since
then has soared; leaving doz-
ens children dead. Too many
T-shirts display pic-
tures of young peo-
ple caught in cross-
fire and the plight of
the "Pork 'n Beans"
remains an issue in
the community. ,
"It is really sad
because for most
people, they think
that since it is the
ING 'Pork n Beans,' the
violence ,
is the
way of life," said
Evan Dorsett, a
Liberty City resi-
dent. "The violence
is destroying homes
and dreams but it
seems like everyone
has become im-
mune to it."
Sherdavia's moth-
er, Sherrone Jen- LAI
kins, told The Times


1R


in a previous interview, "Every
time you turn around, we are
losing another kid to senseless
violence on the street."
The continuous violence in
the community had caused
her to almost give up hope she
said but she knew she had
to keep going because for her
daughter, Sherdavia.
At a rally earlier this year,
activist Queen Brown, who
also lost a child to violence in
the streets, said, "What we are
seeing on the streets where
children are being murdered
is only a symptom
of greater illnesses
that is happening in
our communities."
She continued,
"When we deal with
the issues of home-
lessness, poverty,
S disfranchisement,
and lack of educa-
tion or healthcare
then we can begin
OSE to see our commu-
nity healed."


Is the County corrupt


PULSE
continued from 1A

about service. They should
think about the impact," she
said.
Willie Pouncy, of the
American Federation of
State, County, and Municipal
Employees, echoed the same
theme of impact. "I'm here to
speak on behalf of Jackson
Public Health Trust," he
said. "We need to raise the
social consciousness."
Pouncy's address
addressed rising health
costs and their effects on
single parents, but he went
on to touch upon a theme
that ran through nearly all
the speeches; dissatisfaction
with local leadership. Pouncy
was particularly critical of
Chairman Dennis Moss,
whom he claims "talked
down" to city workers in
August. "Does anyone have
a money tree? Does anyone
have a treasure map?
These are not appropriate
questions and not ways to
speak to your constituents
and employees," he said,
adding; "Our leaders; period;
are not doing as well as they
could.
Rev. Dr. Tate was emphatic
on this issue. "When it comes
to the low or moderate income
citizens ofDade County, they
aren't getting enough focus,"
he said.
When he raised this point
during his own address; the
crowd-including some of its
captive members, who were
merely waiting for buses
applauded.


-Miami Times photo/Tariq Osborne


Sharon Allen of The United Postal Workers' Union and Rev-
erend Anthony Tate, President of PULSE, protest at Govern-
ment Center against poor county leadership.


"I'm very impressed, said
Gail Northington, a woman
who had simply happened
by the rally on her way to
work.
"Ivon Peterkin, a 53-year-
old Miami native, said the
same thing, adding; "How
could I not be on their side?
This is long overdue. We are
a very corrupt city."
Nathaniel Wilcox, Executive
Director of PULSE, discussed
what he referred to as
"economic racism." Wilcox
cited the businesses that
will definitely receive funding
from the county. These
are: Fairchild Tropical and
Botanic Gardens, Historical
Museum of Southern
Florida, Miami Art Museum,


Miami Science Museum, the
Zoological Society (which
operates Miami MetroZoo),
and the Miami-Dade Sports
Commission.
He then pointed out a
common element. "None of
these are in my zip code,"
he said. "The funds are all
going to people who do not
look like me."
Therehadbeen expectations
that the crowd of twenty or
so people would be larger;
but Gary Johnson, of Clergy
for Change is undeterred.
"You don't need a whole lot
of people to stand up for
what is right, you need a few
people," he said.




FRE


ATIOS STAND
O OMIC RACISM"

Joining PULSE in its downtown rally against "economic rac-
ism" were representatives from the American Federation
of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), The
United Postal Workers' Union, Opa-Locka Flightline, and
Clergy for Change.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009
Black C"E(Copyrighted Material n gamble

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6A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


DCF employee arrested for fraud


The Miami Times Staff Report

Lysette Hernandez, a 15 year
employee of the Department of
Children and Families (DCF),
was arrested for falsifying food
stamp and Refugee Assistance
Program records which allowed
her to steal thousands of dol-
lars from the program over a
two-year period.
Hernanandez, 50, was a
Quality Assurance employee for
the state agency. She allegedly
created numerous fake appli-
cations using fictitious names,
dates of birth and social secu-
rity numbers in order to pro-
duce Electronic Benefit Trans-
fer (EBT) cards for her own per-
sonal use. Hernandez somehow
manipulated program records
and had the EBT cards sent to
an acquaintance's house. The
EBT cards were used by Her-
nandez to purchase groceries
from various supermarkets and
to withdraw money from ATM


machines. Surveillance moni-
tors show Hernandez using the
money and food stamp benefits
from the EBT cards at a Publix
Supermarket near her home.
"Ms. Hernandez, whose job is
to ensure that refugee program
money is properly spent, instead
is charged with stealing from
the very people she was hired to
assist", said Miami-Dade State
Attorney Katherine Fernandez
Rundle. "We can never tolerate
fraud and theft by anyone, par-
ticularly by trusted public em-
ployees upon whom our com-
munity depends. Such thefts
are ultimate acts of betrayal."
A West Kendall resident, Her-
nandez was arrested by Miami-
Dade Police on Friday and was
taken to the Miami-Dade Coun-
ty Pre-Trial Detention Center for
processing. She is being charged
with 31 counts of Grand Theft,
23 counts of Official Miscon-
duct, and 1 count of Public As-
sistance Fraud by Official.


Miami police cut salaries; save jobs


The Miami Times Staff Report

Fraternal Order of Police mem-
bers voted 512-62 to defer a
three percent pay raise for six
months. The raise was to be-
gin in October. This was one of
a host of concessions designed
to help commissioners set the
$511.4 million budget. This
measure could save the jobs
of 106 sworn-in police officers.
Further concessions included:
giving up new uniforms, physi-
cals, and cashing in unused va-
cation time for at least a year.
These measures could save
Miami close to $9 million. Vot-
ing against the plan might have
cost the department 177 posi-
tions in total. The vote ended
tense negotiations between the
union and city officials.
The controversy began when
Miami Mayor Manny Diaz for-
warded his budget proposal to
commissioners with a $118 mil-
lion gap in early Sept. His pro-
posal called for the city's three
main unions to give in to about
$28 million worth of conces-
sions. Failing to do so would
mean the loss of about 500- (of
3,500) jobs.
Diaz further proposed tiered
salary reductions for non-union
members. His proposal includ-
ed measures for department
cuts and some layoffs as well.
The idea was to fill the remain-
ing budget gap of $90 million.


A hiring and purchasing freeze
was already in effect. Car allow-
ances and city cell phones have
been reduced or taken away.
The police union objected to
salary cuts for police officers;
with the rationale that officers
would leave the city and join
neighboring departments to
retain their salaries. The new,
lower salaries would discourage
new recruits as well.
The city commission could
have voted to lay off the union
employees last Thursday. They
chose, rather, to delay the fi-
nal vote until Tuesday, giv-
ing union officials more time
to strike deals with the city.
On Tuesday, the International
Association of Firefighters will
vote on an agreement that in-
cludes pay reductions and giv-
ing up a pay raise in October.
The deal would save the city
more than $10 million. The As-
sociation's 600 members voted
Tuesday.
Miami's American Federation
of State, County and Municipal
Employees has a tentative agree-
ment in place as well. Theirs
includes a temporary early-re-
tirement plan that would save
the city roughly $8 million if
implemented. The AFSCME has
nearly 2,000 members and fills
civilian positions in police and
fire, and serve mainly in public
works and parks.


Broward County

The Miami Times Staff Report ami through the Bahamian ac-
count into an account controlled


Broward County Commis-
sioner Josephus Eggelletion
Jr., School Board member Bev-
erly Gallagher, former Miramar
Commissioner Fitzroy
Salesman, Bahamian
attorney Sidney Cam-
bridge and South Flor-
ida businessmen Joel
Williams and Ronald
Owens were all arrest-
ed last week. The long-
term investigation led
by the FBI resulted in
a series of charges that SALE
included bribery, fraud
and money laundering
of more than $40,000 in payoffs
from undercover FBI agents.
Eggelletion allegedly intro-
duced Ronald Owens and Joel
Williams to undercover agents
in February 2007 in which they
developed plans to "hide as-
sets" in Bahamas with the help
of Bahamian attorney Sidney
Cambridge, according to FBI re-
,ports.
11In a series of wire transfers
from March 23, 2007 through
November 23, 2007, the de-
fendants laundered almost
$900,000 from an account in Mi-


by the FBI in St. Croix. Addition-
ally, agents talked about an ad-
ditional $200,000 and $500,000
transfer with Eggelletion and


Owens, but the plans
never came through.
The defendants re-
ceived a total of seven
percent of the money
laundered through the
Bahamian account and
Eggelletion received ap-
proximately $23,000.
Eggelletion, Williams,
Owens, and Cambridge


SMAN


.were charged with
conspiracy to commit.
money laundering which is a vi-
olation of Title 18, United States
Code, Section 1956(h).
The arrest is not the first for
Salesman.
Salesman, .59, had been sus-
pended from the Commission
seat for waving a handgun in a
supermarket in 2007. A judge
sentenced him to 30 days of jail
and a year of probation.
Salesman was also arrested in
2005 for driving under the in-
fluence. A Breathalyzer showed
that he was driving twice the le-
gal limit.


officials arrested


Now, Salesman is accused of Our w(
"committing mail fraud by de- will con
priving the citizens of his hon- said Ac
est services, extortion under frey H.
color of official right, and brib- SimilE
ery in programs receiving more mar, A
than $10,000 in federal
funds" while he was
a Miramar Commis-
sioner. Salesman sup-
posedly received a total
of $3,340 as Miramar
Commissioner in ex-
change for his influence
to steer contracts.
Broward School
Board member Beverly EGGELLETION
Gallagher was charged
of alleged wire fraud,
extortion under color of official elected
right and bribery in connection break t
with a program receiving more is and
than $10,000 in federal funds, for the
according to the FBI. Docu- Thou
mented meetings, emails, and gelletio
phone calls showed Gallagher $200,0
agreeing to maneuver School $100,0
Board business to undercover release
agents in return for cash pay- Christ
ments. and Ga
"As a community, we must do The g
all that we can to ensure that someoi
our public officials do not give chargeE
into the temptation to betray them
their public trust for quick cash. lagher


ork in Broward County
Ltinue; we are not done,",
acting U.S. Attorney Jef-
Sloman.
early, Michael J. Fol-
.cting Special Agent in
Charge of the FBI's
Miami Office, stated,
"Communities have
a right to expect that
their elected leaders be
ethical, trustworthy,
and responsible, only
representing the best
interests of their con-
stituents. The FBI and
its law enforcement
partners will continue
to investigate those
officials who choose to
he law. Public corruption
will remain a top priority
FBI."
gh bail was set for Eg-
n and Salesman at
00 and for Gallagher at
00, all defendants were
d last week. Gov. Charlie
suspended Eggelletion
tllagher from their seats.
governor must appoint
ne in their seats until
s are dropped against
or Eggelletion and Gal-
resign from office.


Forum seeks answers for the youth


By Michael Malone
The Children's Trust


.Imagine the deafening si-
lence after
a cell door
slams shut
behind -you.
Now imagine
that you're a
teenager, a
child even. -
With youth -.
violence on MALONE
the rise,
more and more young people,
especially African Americans,
are having their hopes for an
education and a future dashed
to .instead wind up spiraling
through the juvenile justice
and criminal justice system.
Seeking effective strategies
to reverse this crisis, a wide
cross-section of community
leaders, youth advocates, law
enforcement representatives,
parents, educators and activ-
ists will attend the Miami-Dade
Cradle to Prison Pipeline Com-
munity Forum on Friday, Oct.
2. Organizers of the forum, the
Circuit 11 Juvenile Justice
Board, are reaching out to the
community to encourage in-
volvement, ideas and action.
"The goal of this forum is to
make a commitment to dis-
mantle the cradle to prison
pipeline," said Diana Ragbeer,
director of Public Policy and
Communications for The Chil-
dren's Trust. "Marian Wright
Edelman inspired us with her
vision, and this is the first
time that we will have poli-
cymakers, experts, advocates
and the community all the
stakeholders in one room
together on this issue. This is
an opportunity to make a real


commitment and decide our
action steps."
Blacks and other children
of color are disproportionately
targeted by programs such as
"zero tolerance." One in three
Black boys born in 2001,
for example, will wind up in
prison at some point in their
lives.
"We've had this crisis, this is
not a new crisis," said Adora
,Obi Nweze, keynote speaker
for the upcoming forum, "but
there is renewed focus on chil-
dren and how they're faring
within the education system
and the criminal justice sys-
tem, which includes juvenile
justice."
Obi Nweze, since 2000 the
president of the Florida State
Conference NAACP, has for
many years railed against the
issue she believes causes the
single most concern, anxiety
and outrage in the Black com-
munity: the mistreatment of
Black youth.
"We have to be the ones who
reach out. We have to build
the kind of campaign that will
inform and involve more folks
in the community," Obi Nweze
said.
George Ellis, the chair of the
Circuit 11 Juvenile Justice
Board, one of the forum orga-
nizers, noted that while over-
all crime has not increased,
violent acts among youth
have. Due to the severity of
their crimes, more and more
youths are ending up facing
sentencing in adult courts.
Ellis said the board's wide
representation from the com-
munity the courts, law en-
forcement, advocacy groups,
The Children's Trust provide
a strong foundation for ac-
tion.


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I












The Miami Times


Fait


10


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


MIAMI TIMES


Truenell Roberts Hill

celebrates 98th birthday
Special to The Miami Times

Surrounded by fam- P .
ily and friends, Truenell
Roberts Hill celebrated her
98h birthday on Sept. 19.
Since 1951, the Geor-
gia native has resided .
in Miami. Upon moving
to Miami, she moved to
Ebenezer United Method-
ist Church where Hill is
an active member and en-
joys attending service ev-
ery Sunday. Reverend Dr.
Joretha Capers is the lead TRUENELL ROBERTS HILL
pastor of Ebenezer.
Years of being rooted and grounded in the word, Hill says her fa-
vorite scripture is Matthew 7:12 which states: "Therefore all things
whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to
them; for this is the law and the prophets, we often hear say. Do
unto others as you would have them do unto you." Her loved ones
believe that her life is an example of those words.
For years, Hill believes that it is through prayer and her faith in
God that has allowed her to make it this far. Her family is truly
blessed to have been taught, nourished and provided by her in all
these years.
Hill has two daughters, Lena Hill Smalls (Newark, NJ) and Marva
Hill; three grandchildren, Jill Bethel, Karen Ford and Jason Smalls
(Newark, NJ); two great-grandchildren, Keisha Williams (Atlanta,
Ga.) and Malachi Smalls (Newark, NJ).


; -* .. :',,i ^ ', '
, :, /,.'."" .





; .' -q " - ' i* "' '
. .. . .

. '. ,- -' "
.. I -.y' I;i.
I" , ''" r

'-4I iI ' -
i,:,.., .'; i


-Photo/ Miami-Dade County
Caleb Harmon, 16, a South Miami Senior High student, shares his Jamaican project with his
classmates.


Miami-Dade 4-H program


introduces youth to the world


While many students may have spent
their summer playing videogames, the
Miami-Dade 4-H Youth Program was
busy engaging 155 youths in activities
focused on enhancing their geography
knowledge in a fun and exciting way.
The 4-H program developed an inno-
vative geography curriculum and part-
nered with after-school programs at the
YMCA of Greater Miami, South Florida
Urban Ministries and area schools to
reach out to students hungry for some
summer stimulation.
Students in the program took part in
hands-on activities, such as collabo-


rating on a mural drawing of a world
map. They formed groups to research
individual countries and learned about
different cultures, social and health is-
sues, as well as other current events
affecting nations. In addition, they
learned about logistics concerning the
production, management and move-
ment of food, goods and resources,
including energy and people, across
borders. At the end of the program,
they had an opportunity to put their
knowledge to the test and compete
with each other in a "Geobee" by giv-
ing presentations.


As a result of the 4-H program, stu-
dents gained multicultural awareness,
learned the benefits of teamwork and
polished their presentation skills. Ad-
ditionally, it provided an opportunity
for 4-H to bring a fun and innovative
program to its institutional partners.
This program has been so successful
that the University of Florida has ap-
proved the training of other Coopera-
tive Extension professionals through-
out Florida to implement similar pro-
grams in their areas. Another 465
youths are expected to participate
statewide.


-The Miami Times/ Sandra J. Charite.
UTD President Karen Aronowitz and Secretary/Treasurer Fedrick
Ingram, in their visit to The Miami Times last month, discuss United
Teachers of Dade fight to ensure teachers receive their promised
raises.


Will teachers


get their raises?

ARONOWITZ: SCHOOL DISTRICT
MUST VALUE OUR EDUCATORS
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.com
Miami-Dade students receiving quality ed-
ucation and fair wages for individuals who
sacrifice their time at least nine months out
of the year in the classroom are what United
Teachers of Dade is all about.
After a slew of battles with the district for
failed teacher raises, UTD returned for an-
other school year determined to keep educa-
tion as a priority and for teachers to receive
what's rightfully due to them.
UTD represents an estimated 2800 teachers in Miami-Dade.
"We are in negotiations," said UTD President Karen Aronowitz in an inter-
view with The Miami Times last month.
Accompanied by UTD Secretary/Treasurer Fedrick Ingram, Aronowitz
insists that the fight is not over for the teacher raises even in these tough
economic times.
"The School Board granted the new superintendent and the new attorney
a huge salary so I am sure they will honor our teachers," she said. "The
school district must value our educators."
Under the leadership of then Superintendent Rudy Crew, budget woes
prevented teachers from receiving their promised raises last year. Meetings
after meetings and the failure of the district to honor teachers' contracts
caused Aronowitz to go so far as to urge teachers to seek employment out-
side the district.
Since then, there has been hope of a possible negotiation with the new
superintendent, Alberto Carvalho.
"We are optimistic that we will be able to finalize contracts during the
school year which will bring a positive morale for everyone," said Aronow-
itz.
Why the sudden change of morale?
"Mr. Carvalho is more willing to talk with folks," she said. "He has a more
working relationship with the community, School Board and UTD."
Broward Schools faced a similar situation last school year but came to
a resolution between the teachers and district. Ingram said: "Miami-Dade
Please turn to UTD 1OB


L


The Miami-Dade 4-H Youth Program engaged 155 youths in an innovative geography program over the summer.
Students collaborated on a mural of the world and shared their expertise about other countries.


I %\hrr dkmalr $1 millNin II hdip




Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


.... .:: *


i:











The Miami Times




Heath


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


Brings

awareness to

Black men

about HIV


Rirlh ratr dii

d uri n : rMna o


-Miami limes photo/ Sandra J. Charite.


Miami-Dade County numbers
highest in the state; Liberty City and
Overtown numbers increasing
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@mniamitiimesonline.com
The annual Florida State Conference of the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) held earlier this
month brought light to the prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the Black
community.
"By addressing these disparities, we take a major step towards
improving our nation's overall health," stated Marsha Ellison,
president of the Fort Lauderdale branch of the NAACP.
The conference released a report done by The Florida Depart-
ment of Health (DOH) entitled, "Man Up: The Crisis of HIV/AIDS
among Florida's Men." The report showed an alarming statistics:
One in 44 Black men in Florida is living with HIV/AIDS while 1
in 29 Black males in Miami-Dade County are infected with HIV/
AIDS. Men account for the majority of HIV/AIDS in Florida. In
2008, 32 percent of Black men who have sex with other men
(MSM) in Miami-Dade County were infected with HIV/AIDS.
"Miami-Dade County is the highest in the state. Liberty City
and Overtown have increased," said Florence Greer, Regional
Minority AIDS Coordinator of Miami-Dade County Health Depart-
ment.
Experts agreed that it was crucial the community become in-
formed about the numbers that are climbing in the Black com-
munity.
Is that enough?
Ronald Henderson, statewide minority AIDS coordinator, be-
lieves that men need to become accountable and responsible
Please turn to AWARENESS 14B


Darryl Auberry, an educator/ trainer of the Abstinence Be-
tween Strong Teens, takes notes about HIV/AIDS at a Health
Summit held at the Hyatt Regency in Downtown Miami.


SECTION B


~i:N


N
>~
1-
1~N~7~AJ






Pages
Missing
or
Unavailable













BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


-- -: ---- -----
M E E I -----1s- .----



Stop feeding the giants


Stop feeding the giants


Goliath wasn't always a gi-
ant. He was born a baby 'like
any other baby. Perhaps he
was a little bit bigger than most
newborns, but he was a baby
nonetheless. He was fed and
weaned at his mother's breast,
and had to learn to crawl, walk
and talk just as any other baby.
Now you might be wondering
why I am giving you this little
biographic sketch about Goli-
ath. I want you to consider that


Goliath wasn't
always a gi-
ant. He was
weaned and
fed and nur-
tured, and he
grew up to be-
come a giant. 'I
The problems
that you might be encounter-.
ing at this time may seem to be
insurmountable, but it was not
always so. They probably did
not come to you full blown and


ready to drive you crazy. They
were fed and nurtured until
they became giants.
If you have been reading the
newspaper and listening to the
news as I have, you are aware of
the murders and kidnapping
of many women by men who ap-
peared as if they just suddenly
snapped and assaulted these
women. However, when police
and news officials began an, in-
vestigation of these men, they
discovered that there were pri-
or incidents that warned of the
tendencies for violence. Former
lovers, relatives, neighbors and
co-workers seem to come out of
the woodwork with examples of
odd or strange behavior. They
seem to remember when the
person became quite agitated
when a girlfriend broke up with
.them, and how he stalked them


for months and threatened to
harm them. Now, they recall
these incidents. The perpetra-
tor did not simply walk down
the street and 'snap'. This be-
havior was growing and fester-
ing for years.

NO SURPRISE,
STOP FEEDING
This behavior was fed by
anger, feelings of low self-es-
teem, abandonment, perceived
situations of offense and mis-
treatment. These feelings were
rooted and grounded in the
heart, and nurtured until they
became violent, dangerous acts
that injured themselves and
others. I am simply sending
a sincere warning to all of us
to not feed our giants Do not
feed those bad habits or sins.


We know when our thoughts,
words or deeds are not what
they should be, and when that
happens, starve them Do not
feed them by justifying them.
Do not coddle them with
sympathy. Do not nurture
them by believing that the per-
sons who received the blunt
end of your anger deserved it.
Starve these thoughts, words
and actions with the Word of
God. Cut them off while they
are still small plants with
prayer and wise counsel. In-
stead of thinking and devising
means to 'get someone back',
do as Paul suggested in Phi-
lippians 4:8 "think on what
is pure, right, honorable, love-
ly and admirable. Starve those
thoughts of pride and offense.
And if your sins and bad
habits have become a full


grown tree, it's still never
too late. Take an ax to the
root, and bring it down to
the ground! No job (or sin or
habit) is too big or too tall for
the Holy Spirit. Do not give
place to the enemy by believ-
ing that you are too far gone to
come back to the cross. Talk
to God. Just talk to Him. You
don't need a seminary degree
or to be an ordained minister
or church leader just to talk
to Our Father in loving sin-
cerity. Admit that you have
gone way off the path that you
know that you should be on.
Ask Him to tell you how to get
back on the right path. Yes,
seek the counsel of wise, God-
ly men and women. Yes, read
the Word diligently, but talk
to God. You can do it. Talk to
him and starve those giants!


I


The Independent Parent
Council will host a series town-
hall meetings:
Miamni Norland Sr. High, 6
p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 30;
North Miami Sr. High, 6 p.m.,
Tuesday, Oct. 6 and Miami Car-
ol City Sr. High, 6 p.m., Thurs-
day, Oct. 8. Michelle Johnson,
305-621-3700.


There will be a town-hall
meeting, "Community Em-
powerment Taking Back our
Neighborhoods" at Mt. Hermon
A.M.E. Church, from 6:30 9
p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 30.
305-621- 5067.


The North Dade Regional
Chamber Breakfast Network-
ing event at the El Palacio on
Countyline Road, from 7:30 9
a.m., Thursday, Oct. 1. 305-
690-9123.


WDNA-FM 88.9 Public Radio
presents their 13th Miami Jazz
Film Festival to be held at the
Tower Theateri-'from'Oct. 1-4.
305-662-8889 : .


The Children's Trust and
the University of Miami Medical
School will host, "The Miami-
Dade Cradle to Prison Pipeline
Community Forum," at Uni-
versity of Miami Medical Cam-
pus Clinical Research Building,
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Friday,
Oct. 2. Info: www.thechildren-
strust.org


Miami Jackson Generals
football team will travel to Apo-
pka, Fla. To play football Fri-
day, Oct 2. All alumni and com-
munity members are invited to
attend. Phillip, 786-873-9498.

********-
Florida Memorial University
will hold their 130" Anniversary
Gala "Keeping the Promise" at
the Fontainebleau Miami Beach
Resort at 7 p.m., Oct. 2. Joan
Redd, 305-626-3607.


The City of Miramar is host-
ing a community Arts and Craft
Fair at the Miramar Multi-Ser-
vice Complex on Oct. 3. 954-
889-2744.


Karen Peterson and Dancers


will perform for the first time in
Miami Beach at the Byron Car-
lyle Theater on Saturday, Oct.
3 at a 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. show.'
800-745-3000.


The Elk Foundation's Ev-
erglades Chapter will hold its
annual big-game banquet Oct.
3 at the Miami Showman's As-
sociation in Ft. Lauderdale.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. The
event features food, fun, games,
prizes and an auction. For res-
ervations, call Shelly at 954-
953-5312 or register online at
www.rmef.org.

**** ***
Mt. Sinai MB Church will
host a District 5 candidate fo-
rum entitled "Informed Voters
are .Intelligent Voters" for the
City of Miami Mayors and Com-
missioners at 6 p.m., Monday,
Oct. 5.


The City of Miramar will be-
gin registration for its second
session of the D.R.E.A.M. Fe-
male Young Adult Recreation
Program. Registration will run
from Oct. 6 Jan. 15, 2010
(or until all spaces are filled).
You can register M-F at Sun-
set Lakes Community Center,
8 a.m. 8 p.m. or the Fairway
Park Community Center, from
2- 8 p.m. Patricia' Hamilton,
Recreation Leader at 954-967-
1611.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation, is asking for all class
president of their respective Re-
union Organizing Committees
to attend a special meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 7, at 6:30 p.m.
at Miami Jackson Senior High
School. For more information
call 786-256-2609, or 786-419-
5805.

*.***** *
Beneby Family will have
their reunion at the Sheraton
Suites in Plantation from Oct.
9-11. Althea Beneby-Duren,
305-981-8664 or Fred Beneby,
386-788-4881.

****** *
There will be a free first-time
Homebuyers Workshop held
at the Believers Life Ministries
on Saturday, Oct. 10. Rachel
Walker, 305-635-2301, ext.
374.

********
Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1980 will meet at
7520 Northwest 14th Street at 3
p.m., Oct. 10. 305-835-2025.


The fourth annual South


Florida Theatre Festival will
take place Oct. 12-26. 954-765-
5831.

e**'k***'

University of Miami School
of Communication will host
a "Principled Journalism and
Government Relations in a New
Era" from 8:15 a.m. 3 p.m.,
Friday, Oct. 16. 305-350-0631.

**Xk***
The Booker T. Washington
Class of 1965 will conduct a
meeting at the African Heritage
Cultural Center, from 4 5:30
p.m., Saturday, Oct. 17. 305-
213-0188 or 305-205-7115.

*****
Sunshine Slopers' Ski Club
will have their 20th anniversary.
dinner dance at the Polish Amer-
ican Club starting at 7 p.m., Sat-
urday, Oct. 24.


Lifting Young Lions Foun-
dation of Excellence (LYLFOE)
is hosting its Fourth Annual
Scholarship Awards Program for
scholarship recipients at Florida
Memorial University on Satur-
day, Oct. 24. Dr. George Davis,
Jr., 305-790-7196.


******
Jackson Health System will
host its third annual Small Busi-
ness Vendor Day Workshop at
the Ira C. Clark Diagnostic Treat-
ment Center, from 8:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 29.


Miami Northwestern Senior
High School will hold their 101
annual.College Fair at the Lee R.
Perry Sports Complex, from 6 -
9:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 4.
305-836-0991.


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July .8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumni Pep Rally. 305- 804-
.5371 or 786-256-2609.


Mt. Vernon Missionary
Baptist Church invites ev-
eryone to attend the 19t an-
niversary of their Minister of
Music at Jordan Grove MBC,
beginning at 7:30 p.m.,' Fri-
day, Oct. 2. 305-753-5400.


Universal Truth Center
for Better Living will hold a
community celebration called
"Powerfest" to bring together
family and friends, from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday,
Oct. 3. 305-624-4991.


New Life Missionary Bap-
tist Association will have a
fundraiser prayer breakfast
for the Congress of Chris-
tian Education at 8:30 a.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 3. Pastor Mc-
Crae, 305-770-7064 or 305-
793-7388.


Now Faith Ministries
presents a week of revival at
8 p.m., Oct. 5-9.


Holy Ghost Faith Deliv-
erance Ministries will have
a revival, 7:30 p.m. nightly,
Oct. 6-8. 305-696-5107.

********

Neva King Cooper Edu-
cational Center will be cel-
ebrating its 25th anniversary
on-Oct. 16. 305-910-7819.

********
Pembroke Park Church
of Christ will hold a job
fair, from 9 a.m. 12 p.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 17. 954-962-
9327.


Faith Christian Center
will celebrate 25 years of
ministry, 7:30 p,m. nightly,
October 18- 24. Culmination
service will take place at the
Doubletree Hotel at Miami
Airport, 11 a.m., Saturday,
Oct. 24. Church office, 305-
253-6814.

**** *
The Revelation Christian
Academy is open for regis-
tration. After-care is from


Soul Saving Revivd
Soul Saving M.B. Church,
Rev. Jodie Alexander, pastor
invites you to our fall revival.
Our services will be held at Jor-
dan Grove M.B. Church, 5946
N.W. 12 Ave. Our evangelist for
the week is Rev. E. Charles Co-
chran, pastor of Floyd Chapel
Baptist Church of Stockbridge,
Georgia. Beginning October 5
thru 9 at 7:30 p.m. nightly.
There will be local choirs from
the city rendering our song ser-
vice. On Friday night, Pastor
Cochran and his congregation
from Floyd Chapel Church of
Stockbridge, Georgia will be
in charge of the services. We
invite you to worship with us.


3-6 p.m. Call 305-758-5656
or 786-281-8098.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the.
community to come fellow-
ship at 11:15 a.m., on .Sun-
days and Bible class weekly
at 7 p.m., Thursdays.


Redemption M.B. Church
is sponsoring a fundraising
breakfast and yard sale on
Friday and Saturday. Pastor
Willie McCrae, 305-793-7388
or 305-836-1990.

Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30p.m.
on Monday.


305



652-3001

20215 N.W. 2nd Ave.

Suite #2

Miami, Fl 33169


For more information contact
pastor Jodie Alexander at 305-
696-3389


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I


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 50 OCTOBER 6, 2009












10B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY



Education requires

everyone's involvement


GN-





Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


UTD
continued from 7B
is unlike Broward because the
sacrifice made by the employees
is in their paychecks." Teachers
are also being affected by this re-
cession.
Aronowitz, who has been out-
going president since 2005, does
not place all of the blame on the
district, but includes the state as
well for allocating less money for
education.
"We need to make sure that
Tallahassee appropriately funds
education," she said.


COMMUNITY ACTION WORKS.
"Community Action Agency (CAA)
caters to those who are in need, they
believe in helping people, people like
me. If it was riot for CAA, I would not
be the man you see today, in a
position to reach back, and give back
to my community. That is why I say
Community Action works, because it
worked for me."

Prfoud membof the Coaminit AciontPa enip.


Aronowitz and thousands of
other traveled to Tallahassee
earlier this year for "Rally for
Tally" in which they protested in
the state capital for legislators to
invest more money in education.
As for the students who make
half of the next generation of ed-
ucators; Aronowitz wants to en-
sure that they receive a quality
education.
"We have high expectations for
our students but you can't meet
high expectations without pro-
viding the resources they need,"
she said. "The district must care
for their teachers."


Kionne McGhee
Assistant State Attorney, Author
and afonnerCAAdclient.


0


Snt enteresrea in graaes o, I ana .. .

Wednesday, October 14
3:30 pm
Ransom Everglades Upper School Campus
S3575 Main Highway in Coconut Grove
RSVP required by Monday,; October 12
.. to /0I5. 2h5. 652W. .,7-
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N 'ulh mn% hac


%iUSKkkr Inlp.t


Issued by HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA) HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA) 2009


- 4


- -


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r, r


* *


o o










vI AYIS YEN


NAN


HAITIAN LIFE IN MIAMI


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 23-29, 2009


Haitian mist pa Copyrig ted Material


MIfGM IwOtsoa Conte
Syndicated Conten
*d I *^ 4r ra . Im Am ap -41NO i


Available fro m Cbmmercial NewslPIrovid er


alln .a


Danticat


speaks at FIU
The Miami Times Staff Report
Award-winning author Edwidge Danticat will speak to
a group of students of the Florida International Univer-
sity (FIU) Honors College at the Mary Ann Wolfe Theater
on the Biscayne Bay Campus, 5:30 p.m., Wednesday,
Sept. 30.
FIU Honors College and Tau Sigma Alpha (TSA), the
Honors College Honors Society, present "A Conversa-
tion with Edwidge Danticat," at which the author will
discuss her work, which focuses primarily on Haiti and
Haitian culture.
Danticat, 40, is the recipient of the John D. and Cath-
erine T. MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Award' in which
she received $500,000, a "no strings attached" grant to
individuals who have exemplified outstanding creativity
in their work.


IYA


















Rev. Cleo Albury Jr. was Tuskegee Airman Andel Mickins a life-long educator


Funeral services for pioneer-
ing Miami pastor Rev. Cleo O.
Albury Jr. will be held Satur-
day morning at Bible Baptist
Church. The prominent Miami
native died September 24 at the
age of 86.
The first son of Cleo and Lilla
Albury was born on December
10, 1924 and attended Flori-
da A&M College. He was cho-
sen to attend cadet training at
Tuskegee and was one of the
first Black Floridians to solo
an aircraft in the United States
Air Force. After World War II, he
met and married Alberta Shaw
of Valdosta, Georgia.
In June of 1956 he was called
to the ministry. He served at
several churches in South
Florida and was the pastor of
Mount Sinai Baptist Church
from 1968-1973. In February of
1973, he was called as pastor of
Bible Baptist Church where he
served until September 1999.
Under his leadership, a $1.5
million dollar sanctuary was
built and Bible Baptist sup-


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

SOrder of Services
Wed !rillerte y Plraeri
9aT p rm
Morrq W ert I I a ,






Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Moaig Sir.-,
Suedo Sct,66l 9 4i a e.
Bible Sludy iuesdae
Prater Mer,,d iue6 6pm


Irltlll/ltI -- =!IL


. -** _

REV. CLEO ALBURY JR.
ported 17 local and 4 foreign
ministries.
One of his accomplishments
was organizing Bible Baptist
Christian Academy to provide
children in Pre-K through 5S
grade, an opportunity to learn
and excel in a spiritually full
environment.
Rev. Albury was very active
in religious and community


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

Order of Services
Man. thru Fi. oon Day Prayer
Bible Study, Thurs 7 p.m.
Sunday Worship 7-11 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 oa.m.





St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Su,'du, 1 iOand II m


v .oPrd a rMiF. i .li ramn




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue

Order of Services
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sun.oming Servs 11 o.m.
esday Biblestudy
ing Ministry.....10 a.m.
ed. Bible Study/Proyu.6:30 p.m.
u Ourrea6c Ministry....6:30 p.m.
Rev. r. Glnroy pve m.


activities. He was a member
of the Evangelism Task Force
for Southern Baptist Conven-
tion; former board member of
the Direct Action and Research
Training Center (D.A.R.T.); for-
mer board member of P.U.L.S.E.
(People United to Lead the
Struggle of Equality) and led a
missionary teaching and minis-
try program for the churches in
Ghana, West Africa. On Decem-
ber 18, 2002, 981 Street was
renamed as Rev. Cleo Albury
Street as a salute to a living
legend.
Celebrating his memory: a
wife, Alberta Shaw Albury of
52 years; son, Kenneth Cash
(Hester); sister, Cleora Rawls
(Gaddy); brother, Rodney Al-
bury (Vinnie); grandchildren,
Kendra, Kenneth, Jr. and Kath-
erine and dear friend, Destiny
Lewis.
A memorial service will be
held at Bible Baptist Church,
from 4 -8 p.m., Friday, Oct. 2
following the funeral at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 3.


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

Order of Services
undily Wo .l 1 9 a T
iSund n Sictl i u m
r li j 0 O an
II i W,,9, 41,i i a
'l i. l ill hb i,




Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.
Miami
$I! ll tI


Order of Services
Sunday 8ble SI.l 81 rar
Il.'r.lll Woi.h., 4 U .T.
undr.a, .n.mlj t p 1T. lapidy
aoi paiuolall i(unsel.nig
Ida Bi6 6eM',,in p t,


Mrs. Andel W. Mickins, wife
of the late Rev. I. C. Mickins
died Sunday afternoon from
complications due to Alzheim-
er's disease. Mrs. Mickins was
a prominent figure in social
and religious circles in the
Black community. She was
also an educator in the South
Florida community for over
40 years. She was born Andel
Adafrances Watkins in 1924
to the late Ernest and Estelle
Watkins in Central South
Carolina. Learning at an early
age the value of a good edu-
cation, she began her pursuit
of knowledge. She graduated
Valedictorian of her class
at Anderson County High
School in Pendleton. South
Carolina.
She went on to receive a
Bachelor of Science Degree
from Tuskegee University,
Tuskegee Alabama, Master
of Arts Columbia Universi-
ty, New York City, Advanced
Study from Iowa State Uni-
versity. Ames, Iowa. Univer-


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


Order of Services

WUi a[UIN I $
1huVh h n ,0a






Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
l(i I+'Iil RTWli/tmlfl


Order of Services
'uida Sidorl 9 0 Iom
Momug PF'0l,,I VoIrhp 11 d m
lr'- oand ni.d Sudiy
.',,' or'.lip a1 p m
Plurrr McruIfl & BIbl.6, ,luil
iu,'.diy 9 p 'ra


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 alm.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


sity Miami, Coral Gables.
She was a home economic
teacher at Holmes Elementa-
ry School, An assistant prin-
cipal at Liberty City Elemen-
tary School, principal at R. R.


... : I



MRS. ANDEL W. MICKINS
Moton Elementary School in
Perrine and principal at Rain-
bow Park Elementary School
in Opa-locka where she re-
tired from in 1983.
After retiring from the
school system, along with her
husband Rev. Mickins, she


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Sh..ol 41a5 a om
Wortlhp 11 ama
SBible Slidy iThr.dayv Iu pm
H ^YL.ulh MooIfIrI
M.1" Wretpm




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
iatl, iunday Wiahip i il n
Surda, Stiol i ilam
s 5ui'dly moeIgWrIbIp II a T
Sunday [iv rir g r.r, bli
lUr.dr Pedr MW lqg I iU pTr
Wede.d. llli| B ,blr SijdyJ 7 i) pm



Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
,'daOy Marr 'er.a,
.Su.o,' ool m 10
w .p ,e j I aon,
iueday ioble trud 8 gm
i ,,,dayr Prye r
,11111111T =i4n.


founded the Early Childhood
Education Center at Memorial
Temple Baptist Church. After
the illness and death of her
husband, she became active
once again. She was president
of the Woman's Auxiliary of
the Florida East Coast Mis-
sionary Baptist Association,
while simultaneously hold-
ing the title of Basleius of the
Gamma Zata Omega Chapter
of Alpha Kappa Alpha Soror-
ity Inc. She held on to these
titles until her health forced
her to relinquish them. She
had many other affiliations
and she was the recipient of
countless awards and hon-
ors.
She was a loving, wife,
mother and grandmother.
A lady of who represented
elegance, class and finer
womanhood. She leaves to
mourn one sister, one son,
one daughter-in-law, five
grandchildren and a host of
relatives and friends. She will
surely be missed.


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Services
ul"lday M'i.il.g Ij ,Tr
Sun dayp t &..,.l II a 1
1Suday .I ST r.






First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue

Order of Services
Sunday S I 0 a II0

Rev. Kenneh,l,'e, ,S ,r.lba t,',r/ t





Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
imwil iRtRYPYRiAm1, mRIUaltE


Order of Services

oilni WuiI ,fI.p ',i' Huul ul ,I l r Nu,,,, L,, try P
I,,n i lll l i
t.r,9 w r hpp r.


Vcr. Curr1Ii. ,SnoPso..


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
SWednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Comcast 3 Saturday 7:30 a.m.
.ww.pembrokeparkchurchofthrist.com pembrokeparkcoc@bellsouth.net


I


.i. R.


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6:30 a.m. Early Morning Worship 7 30 a.m
Sunday School 9 30 a m Morning Worship 11 a m
You' h Ministry Study. Wed 7 p m Prayer Bible Sludy Wed 7 p m
Noonday Altar Prayer (M-F)
S Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday I a m p m
i Frinduh;nmhrmin nrn fr,.'ndlhnnrnvwnihPklna,,ih nel


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Services
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93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
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Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street



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New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org

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Brownsville
Church of Christ AND HE SAID UNTO THEM, GO YE
4561N.W. 33rd Court INTO ALL THE \\ORLD. AND PREACH

Oider of Serves ..-THE GOSPEL TO EVERY CREATURE.
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in our Church Directory
Call Karen Franklin at 305-694-6214


"IF THE LIONS DO NOT WRITE THEIR OWN HISTORY,


THEN THE HUNTERS WILL GET ALL THE CREDIT.ricanProverb
--African Proverb


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


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13B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


Royal -- Carey Royal Ram'n


ROY KING, 68, died September
23 at Jackson North Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

CATHY DANIELS, 51, house-
wife, died September 23. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

LEANORA BROWN, 72, house-
wife, died September 27. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

FABIAN BANTON, 75, welder,
died September 16. Visitation
4-9 p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Sixth Avenue Church of
God.

NORMA MANDERSON, 77, reg-
istered nurse, died September 24.
Visitation 4-8 p.m., Saturday. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Sunday, New Hope
Seven Day Adventist Church, Fort
Lauderdale.



Range_.
REVEREND CLEO O. ALBURY
JR., 84, Pas-
tor Emeritus at
Bible Baptist
Church, died
September 24.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Al-
berta Shaw Al- A .-
bury; son, Ken-
neth Cash (Hester); sister, Cleora
Rawls (Gaddy); brother, Rodney
Albury (Vinnie); grandchildren,
Kendra, Kenneth, Jr., Katherine;
and a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins other relatives and friends.
Visitation 4-8 p.m., Friday, Bible
Baptist Church. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Bible Baptist Church.

ANDEL WATKINS .MICKENS,
84, retired, Dade ...,m
County. Public
School Educa-
tor, an active .
member of the
National Baptist
Women's As-
sociation and
Alpha Kappa Al-
pha Sorority, died September 27.
Survivors included: son, Isaac C.
Mickens II; sister, Theatrice Patter-
son; grandchildren, Patrice, Isaac
III, Rebecca, Samuel and Theiry;
and a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins other relatives and friends.
Visitations 6-9 p.m., Friday, Me-
morial Temple Baptist Church.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Susie
C. Holly Religious Center, Florida
Memorial University.

JOSEPHINE SINGLETON
JONES, (Tudy),
48, nursing as-
sistant, died
September 25.
Survivor in-
clude: husband,
Melvin Jones;
daughter, Cha-
sity Moore; sis-
ters, Henrietta Dixon and Rose-
mary Everette; aunt, Mattie Shen-
ett; six grandchildren and a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends. Services
4:00 p.m., Saturday, New 79th
Street Word Church International,
2285 N.W. 79h Street.

FREDERICK WILLIAMS, 66,
longshoreman, -
died September .' .
22. Survivors
include: brother,
Richard Wil-
liams; sisters,
Glenda E. Wil-
son, Sharron G.
Williams, Rev.
Ethel M. Anderson and Ella M. Wil-
liams; aunts, Cora L. Williams and
Julia Guyton; and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, other relatives
and friends. Service were held.

HELEN HEWYLE ZIEFLER
JOHNSON,died
August 12. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Dr.
James K. John-
son, Sr.; mother,
Jewyll J. Alabi
Wilson (Larry)
and James K.
Johnson, Jr. D.D.S. (Carolyn); five
grandchildren; one great grand-
daughter. Final rites and burial
Maryland.


ESTHER AKUA WIREDU, 22,
student, died September 22. Final
rites and burial Washington, DC.


LEMUEL G. MC KENZIE, 54, re-
pairman for Mi-
ami Dade Water
and Sewer, died
September 23 at
home. Reposing
6 p.m., Friday,
6740 NW 3rd
Avenue. Service f
11 a.m, Satur-
day, Temple Baptist Church.

ANDREW LAMAR FOSTER,
50, hotel environmentalist, died
September 25 at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

ADAM MICHAEL PIERCE, in-
fant, died September 22 at Memo-
rial Hospital West. Service was
held.

Bain Range
OVELLA SANDERS SCIPPIO,
75, homemaker,
died Sept. 24thl
at South Miami
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
daughters, Jan-
ice, Gail and
Latishia Scip-
pio; sons, Brain,
Adam and Barry
Scippio; Viewing 6-8 p.m., Friday,
Macedonia Baptist Church. Ser-
vice 11 a.m, Saturday, Macedonia
Baptist Church.

Gregg L. Ma n
DENISE YVONNE ALLEN-
CARR, 54, .
teacher, Miami-
Dade County
Public Schools,
died September
25. Survivors
include: hus- -
band, Johnnie
Carr, Jr.; son,
Johnnie IV; parents, Eddie and
Mildred Allen; brothers, Eddie Al-
len, Jr. (Cheryl), Jeffery and Shel-
don Allen; sisters, Kathelia Ware
and Felicia Slaymon; and a host of
other relative and friends. Visita-
tion 2-9 p.m., fPmily hour 6-9 p.m.
Friday. Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
New Jerusalem Primitive Baptist
Church. Interment: Dade Memo-
rial Park.

Lithgrow-Bennett-Bh rick
CHRISTINE PICKETT, 80, nurs-
ing. assistant, .-

25 at Aventura
Plaza Rehabi-
lation Center.
Viewing 6-9
p.m., Friday,
Oakgrove Bap --. -.
tist Church. Ser- -- .
vice 1 p.m. Saturday, Oakgrove
Baptist Church.

Hadley Davis
MATTIE P. LEWIS, 81, home-
maker, died September 17 at Kin-
dred Hospital. Service was held.

CHARLES LIVINGSTON, 44,
construction worker, died Sep-
tember 19 at Unity Nursing Home.
Service was held.

Manker
WILLIE MAE GIBBONS, 54,
died September 19 at North Shore
Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Paradise -_
PETER GIORGIONE, 64, died
September 16 at Hialeah Hospital.
Service was held.


Pax Villa./
ELMAS PIERRE, 24, operator,
died September 13 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

MAGALY ALBERT-LOMAX, 32,
accountant, died September 27
at home. Service 9:30 a.m., Sat-
urday, Stanton Memorial Baptist
Church.
St. Fort's =.O
ANDRIS VIVIENS, 76, security
guard, died September 24 at North
Shore Medical Center. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, L'eglise Baptiste
Adonai.


GRACIA JEAN BAPTISTE, 52,
mechanic, died September 24 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Final
rites and burial Haiti.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
BETTY J. WILLIAMS, 66,
homemaker,
died Septem-
ber 24 at St.
Emanuel Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: mother,
Julia Mincey;
daughters,
Lisha Dukes,
Elizabeth, Vanise and Sonja Wil-
liams. Service 12 p.m., Saturday,
Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church.

SYLVIA R. NEWKIRK, 88, res-
taurant owner, -
died September
22 at Jackson
Plaza Nursing
Rehabilitation
Center. Survi-
vors include:
children, Ann
Nicholson, Wil-
lie Lee Newkirk, James P. Newkirk,
Gail Newkirk, Randy D. Newkirk,
Lewis Smith and Michael Smith.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday, Mt. Cal-
vary Missionary Baptist Church.

DAVID F. DAVIS, 69, bails
bondsman, died September 22 at
home. Service was held.

CHARLIE HARRIS, 88, mainte-
nance engineer, died September
21 at North Shore Medical Center.
Service was held.

JACOB DUNNOM, SR., 73,
sanitation worker, died September
21 at Miami Heart Institution. Ser-
vice was held.

SLYVANIA MOISE, 23, house-
keeper, died September 23 at
Homestead Hospital. Service was
held.

ETHELDER HENRY, 78, house-
wife, died September 18 at North
Shore Medical Center. Service
was held.

RichardsonjY~r-
MILDRED EVANS, 96, home-
maker, died
September 27.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, New
Generation.




NIAS HAMMETT, died Septem-
ber 22. Service
10 a.m., Satur-
day, Mt Calvary
Baptist Church.





NATHANIEL JOHNSON, JR.,
91, security
guard. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, New Shiloh
baptist Church.





CHARLEY DENNIS, 82, land-
scaper, died
September 22.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, St.
John Baptist
Church. -.



JUANITA MAJOR, 74, died
September 27.
Service 1:30
p.m., Saturday,
Word of Truth.






DEBRA FLOWERS, 57, home-
maker, died
September 23.
Service 3p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Baptist
Church.


by becoming a member of our
CA(iutc '5bi96cLo'
CALL 305-694-6210


Jays -
FRANK STOGLIN, JR., 23, la-
bor, died Sep-
tember 23 at
University of
Miami Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Herman African
Methodist Epis-
copal Church. -

ALVIN HARRIS, 78, died Sep-
tember 26 at I
Coral Reef
Nursing and Re-
habilitation Cen- i
ter. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.


JAMES SIMMONS, JR., 35,
laborer, died
Se member
22. Service .12 ,
p.m., Saturday,
Sweet Home
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.



COLETTE BLAZE, 62, died
September 26
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Monday (Octo-
ber 5), Second
Baptist Church.



MAMIE OLIVER, 68, died Sep-
tember 27 at Sylvester Compre-
hensive Cancer Center. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DOROTHY BODEK, 80, died
September 26. Service was held.


Wright and Young
TONI LOUISE HART, 50, died
September 22
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Katrina Hart, .
James Cooper,
III, Tohende
Hart, Otha Hart
and Marquisha Hart; father, Cleve-
land Hart; brothers, Abraham
West, Derek West, Toby West,
Keith Mitchell and Eric Mitchell;
sisters, Valarie Mitchell, Cleandria
Hart, Crystal Hart and Chauntrece
Hart. Service 11 a.m., Wednesday,
Mt. Tabor MB Church.

SAMUEL BROKER, 60, died
September 23.
Survivors in-
clude: brothers,
James She-
fall, Roosevelt
Brooker and
Moses Brooker;
sisters, Rosa
Mathis and Mary
Brooker Smith. Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday, National Cemetery.

FRANK DOYLE, 82, landscaper,
died September
23 at Aventura
Plaza. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Gwendolyn
Kearson, Pame-
la Kearson and
Barbara Doyle;
sons, Gary Ev-
ans, Shapiro Doyle, Christopher
Doyle, Israel Doyle and Frankie
Doyle, Jr. Service 11a.m., Satur-
day, io the chapel.


770 Norrhwesr I 19th Street
Miami, Florida 33168
Phone (305) 688-6388 Fax (305) 688-6885
www.gracefuneralhome.com


Poitier
REV. EDDIE B. ENGRAM,
former pas-I
tor, Dayspring
M.B.C., died
September 17
in Washington,
D.C., Service
was held.


DERRICK JACKSON, 18, died
September 22
at Jackson Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: mother,
Sheila Mond;
father, Major
Jackson; and a
host of sisters,
brothers, niec-
es, nephews, and a very special
friend, Kendra. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday'in the chapel.


ROBERT DANIELS,
mored truck
driver, died
September 24
at home. Ser-
vice 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


77, ar-


ALPHONSO WALKER SR., 87,
store owner, died September 27 at
North Shore Medical Center. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.,

MICHAEL DALSGUARD, died
September 28. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Grace A
DELLITA I. RAWLINGS, 66, re-
tailer, died September 22 at Aven-
tura Hospital. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday in the chapel.

LEO LITTLE, 68, cook, died
September 22. Service was held.

SELONDIEU BERNAR, 62,
maintenance worker, died Septem-
ber 25. Service 11 a.m., Wednes-
day (today), in the chapel.

James C. Boyd
HORACE P. MC KENZIE. 52,
security officer,
died September
23 at Broward
General Hos-
pital. Service 2
p.m., Saturday,
15th Avenue
Church of God.


Faith
SHAWN MIRVILLE, 17, stu-
dent, died September 25 at Citrus
Health Network. Arrangements are
incomplete.

JEROME BOYD, 59, environ-
mental service, died September
25 at VA Hospital. Arrangement
are incomplete.

CIRILO GARCIA, 55, laborer,
died September 27 at VA Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

PUBLIC NOTICE
As a public service to our com -
munity, -The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes atno
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age,
place of death, employment,
and date, location, and time of
services. Additional nformauon
and photo may be included for
a nominal charge.The deadline
is Monday at 3:30 p.m.


Death Notice


ETHEL M. NANCE, 73, for-
mer resident of Miami, died
September 23 in Green Cove
Springs, FL. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, First African Baptist
Church, Green Cove Springs.
Arrangements entrusted to
Leo C. Chase & Sons Funeral
Home, St. Augustine.

Death Notice


DOUGLAS McKINNON, 81,
died Septemer 22.
A native of Mount Vernon,
GA and long time resident of
Miami, Florida.
Doug was a man of many
accomplishments. He was
a teacher for Miami Dade-
County Schools for 27 years.
He retired from Arthur and
Polly Mays Junior-Senior
High School. Mr. McKinnon
was general contractor-owner
of McKinnon Construction,
a life time member of Kappa
Alpha PSI Fraternity, Morris
Borwn College Alumni, Booker
T. Washington Alumni (Class
of 48), Miami Collegiate's, Al-
lied Minority Contractor's As-
sociation, Richmond Heights
Chapter of the Veteran's of
Foreign Wars, and Martin Me-
morial A.M.E. Church Stewart
Protem.
He is survived by his lov-
ing wife, Diana; son, Philip;
daughter, Karen (David);
step-daughter, Tamara (Ty-
rone); step-son, Calvin III;
three grandchildren, Jeremi-
ah (Marcia), Jared, Jessica;
step-grandchildren: Tyleah
and Tyanna, Calvin IV; great
granddaughter, Destinae;
brother, Lonnie T., and a host
of nieces, nephews other rela-
tives and friends.
Viewing 6 p.m., October 2.
Funeral 11 a.m., October 3. All
services will be held at Martin
Memorial African Methodist
Episcopal Church, 14700 Lin-
coln Blvd., Richmond Heights,
305-251-6232.
Services entrusted to
Dwight's Funeral Home.

Pax Villa (Broard)
ANDRE LOUIS, 63, welder, died
September 21 at Kindred Hospital.
Service 12 p.m., Saturday, 1st Fort
Lauderdale Haitian Missionary
Baptist Church.

MARIE EDOUARD, 46, home-
maker, died September 24 Bro-
ward General Medical Center.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Saint
Elizabeth Catholic Church, Pom-
pano Beach.


Honor Your Loved One With


an In Memoriam

In The Miami Times




TaCEuE za
,-.,~L~ ....... Z a


C :r7T onE


By His magnificent te we are beto

Ssve you in your howU of nceeand fifll your







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"A Service of Evc-lence"


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY














BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES SEPTEMBER 50 OCTO 9


Prisoner donates book to Liberty Square library


Library encourages young people to read


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

When Eric Thompson, who
volunteers at the Liberty
Square Community Center,.
saw a package from the Fed-
eral Correctional Complex in
Coleman, Fla. sitting on his
desk, he was understandably
concerned.
"I walk in, and there's the
package on my desk. I thought
what is in this package, who
sent this?," he asked. Thomp-
son, after all, did not know
anyone in the prison. After
asking some of his staff, he
did the reasonable thing; and
opened it.
The package contained a let-
ter from Rod Strachan, who
was raised in the area. Stra-
chan had read a story about
the Liberty Square Communi-
ty Center's new library. He had
sent a book to donate, and en-
closed a letter congratulating
Thompson on his work with
the neighborhood children. "I
read a wonderful article about
you in The Miami Times," said
the letter. "I admire what you're
doing. Keep it up Eric. I am in
a federal prison, and am from
the Miami area, a graduate of
Miami Northwestern Class of
1984, so I've love for the young
kids coming up in our commu-
nity." Enclosed was a copy of
"It's Not Over Until You Win,"
by Miami native, Les Brown.


The gesture brought some of
Thompson's staff to tears.
Mark Irvin, who volunteers
in the community Center's
computer laboratory, knew
Strachan personally.
"He and I played football
both at Miami Northwestern,
and at Bethune-Cookman Col-


was closing, we would all get
together, and he would always
give us words of encourage-
ment."
"I hadn't spoken to Rod in
years," he continued. "That's
why it was so mind boggling.
I said 'Eric, I know this guy.
Please write him back."
Thompson did, enclosing
a copy of Barack Obama's


I lI, ,,I I JIIle U, rpt at iq ,O UUIb e
Eric Thompson, director of the Liberty Square Community
Center, shelves books in the building's library.


lege, [now Bethune-Cookman
University]" Irvin explained.
"It was mind-boggling to hear
from him again," he added.
Irvin is not surprised that
Strachan would make such a
gesture. "He was always con-
scious of the importance of
reading," said Irvin. 'I can recall
at Northwestern, when practice


"Dreams from My Father."
SThompson hopes to keep
Strachan involved with the li-
brary, and has asked him to
pen an open letter to the li-
brary's youth, describing pris-
on life in an effort to keep them
from repeating his mistakes.
Irvin says the letter inspired
Thompson to continue his ef-
forts on behalf of the commu-


nity's youth. "If you'd been in
here to see Eric's glow; for him
to receive that letter, it has
given Eric more energy to con-
tinue to do what he's currently
doing."
Strachan's letter also gave
Thompson an idea. He would
like to begin soliciting local
prisoners to write open letters
to be later read to the chil-
dren.
"The purpose of the library for
me was just to encourage kids
to read. But now we can use
it as a tool to prevent crime,"
said Thompson. Strachan's
letter would almost certainly
find its audience, as Thomp-
son says the library has been
surprisingly busy. "We have a
good turnout, especially from
the kids in the neighborhood.
But not just from people in Lib-
erty Square, we get people from
all over Liberty City," he said.
According to Thompson, the
library's check-out list already
has between 50 and 60 names
on it.
"We have seniors who use the
religious section a lot, but the
young people are using it more
than the adults, which was the
goal," he said.
The Liberty Square Commu-
nity Center's library was created
in July. Community members
donated nearly 3,000 books.
Shelving was donated by the
Murai Wald Biondo & Moreno
law firm in Coral Gables.
Strachan will be released
from prison in December of
2013.


Happy Birthday In Memoriam
In loving memory of, In loving memory of,


ROBERT STEVENS 'RL' SGT. ERNEST
10/02/32 03/08/07 'BULL' BULLARD, JR
01/07/53- 10-01-06


Especially today, brings
many special thoughts and
memories of our father. We
will always love and miss him.
His spirit lives in our hearts.
We love you Daddy!
Your children



Happy Birthday


I '.& 11 li h It n ii mi tt ,I I ) r ith


CLARENCE JACKSON JR.
"BUCK"
10/02/49 07/03/09

If tears could wash away
our pain,
We would not feel such hurt
again,
The heartbreak felt since
you've been gone,
We wouldn't wish on any-
one,
But it is your birthday,
So well have to be brave
And accept God's taken
what first He gave.
Love,
Your daughters: Misty,
Monik, Symonne, & Jazmin


"Memories of your love"
We shared life and love to-
gether. Many others tried, but
like you said,"it wouldn't and
didn't matter," lying next to
you that morning, that day
you passed away. So sad I
cried especially, but to my
God I pray. Still hearing you
say I love you Brent But know
that you're in heaven, our love
will still be forever. When we
see each other again...Brenda
Daddy, we love you and we
miss you, deeply sadden our
hearts hold true. You cared
and gave us so much love, we
know you still love us too...
Earnest(B.J III), Ernesto,
Ernesha, Redd, Trevin, Sha-
kia and Zina; grandchildren,
your friend John Harris and
the family.


Death Notice


r I f



TORIANO A. YOUNG-
BLOOD, aka Tito, 30, died
September 24 at home. Ser-
vices 3 p.m., Saturday at Car-
ey Royal Ram'n Chapel.


Copyrighted Material-





Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


HIV is serious, no more excuses, man up!


AWARENESS
continued from 8B

about their sexual status.
"You need to fulfill your
responsibility as a man," he
said. "It is important that
men take personal responsi-
bility towards their health."
Henderson introduced
a statewide mobilization
to bring awareness to the
men. Like the "Man Up" re-
port, Henderson seeks to


encourage men to take re-
sponsibility for their sex-
ual behaviors, not only for
themselves but also for
their partners.
"We are doing all we can to
help reduce the number of
HIV infections," he said.
Darryl Auberry, an educa-
tor/ trainer of the Abstinence
Between Strong Teens, at-
tended the HIV/AIDS con-
ference. While he welcomed
the mobilization project, he


believes that to decrease the
number of HIV/AIDS cases in
men, especially in the Black
community, the mindset has
to change.
"At a very early age, men
are taught to be predators
and women as the prey,"
said Auberry. "As men, we
have to empower men to
have self-control. Men are
not dogs, they are men; but
it is the mindset."
Auberry, a former Deputy


Sheriff, says that men need
to be taught at a very young
age about sex because for
most men, "it is not about
being responsible but receiv-
ing pleasure. If you get HIV or
Herpes in the process, that's
just a part of the game."
"Men are not taught to see
their body as valuable but as
something to be used," says
Auberry, "but what they fail
to realize is that HIV is no
joke."


INFRM


fL .4


Special Direct ONLY
Cremation $45000
Oversized extra charge All Work Done on Site
2111I'M, 1,39 Street ,P#8,I3


.-- v,


t
---- -- - ---I



















Lifesty e


nter


ainmen


5ECT1,EiON. C \ ] AMI TI'MS


Alonzo Mourning
named vice president
of Player Programs


-- iami-Dade County Photo / Armando Rodriguez
Miami-Dade Comm Barbara J.Jordan with the Golden Glades
Panthers, winners of her third annual Barbara Jordan Bowl.


,&,


t. 'iL *" ir, .. ----
-Miami-Dade County Photo / Armando Rodriguez
The Lake Stevens Cardinals (red uniforms) give it their all against the Golden Glades Panthers
at the third annual Barbara Jordan Bowl.


Let's play football


Third annual bowl brings camaraderie, sportsmanship to local youth


Special to the Times

Miami-Dade County Commis-
sioner Barbara J. Jordan hosted the
third annual Barbara Jordan Bowl
at Lake Stevens Elementary located
in Miami Gardens. The annual event
pits Optimist football teams, ages 5
- 15, together in matches. The Lake
Stevens Cardinals and the Golden
Glades Panthers faced off in a high-
ly-anticipated seven-game series.
The teams received a huge amount
of support from the crowds, includ-


ing several University of Miami Hur-
ricane football players. Defensive
back Ryan Hill, kicker Alex Uribe,
and Assistant Coach Tim Harris
joined Jordan in canvassing the
football field to meet and greet the
fans.
Various service providers were
also present at the game to assist
the community with helpful infor-
mation and tips, including The Jes-
sie Trice Community Health Mobile,
State Attorney's Office, Health Op-
portunities Technical Center, Link-


Up Lifeline, and Helping Hands Se-
niors Resource Center.
At halftime, both the Cardinals
and Panthers presented Jordan
with a plaque to recognize her com-
munity leadership and hosting of
the third annual Barbara Jordan
Bowl. She was also recognized by
the Orange Bowl Committee, Blitz
Youth Football Media Group and
Generation Nexxt Media for her role
in organizing the event. The Golden
Panthers defeated their opponent
by winning best out of seven games,


but the commissioner donated $500
to the Panthers and Cardinals for
their participation in the event.
"Community leaders and resi-
dents need to continue to support
youth activities, like sports and
other interests, so that our children
can have positive and productive in-
fluences in their lives," said Jordan.
"I'm looking forward to next year's
bowl and having the community ral-
ly together to cheer on these wonder-
ful young men who exemplify hard
work and sportsmanship."


Local filmmaker captures Liberty City in documentary


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@imiamitimesonline.com

Riots and hate divided a whole
community in Miami. Fighting
the injustice; the 1980 Liberty
City riots resulted in the deaths
of 18 people (including 8 whites
and 10 Blacks), and the arrest
of hundreds.
The riot broke out following a
verdict in a 1979 case of police
brutality involving white cops
and a Black man. The five white
cops were acquitted of the bru-
tal death of an unarmed Black
motorist, Arthur McDuffie.
"I knew McDuffie personal-
ly. He should have pulled over
when they stopped them," said


community activist Georgia Ay-
ers.
The verdict sparked outrage
as Liberty City became the cen-
ter of attention nationwide.
In the end, Liberty City would
never be the same again.
Almost 30 years later, Stephen
Gilmore wants to bring the Lib-
erty City riots back to life in a
documentary entitled, "City of
Liberty: 30 years after the Arthur
McDuffie Riot."
"The goal of the film is to tell
the history of Liberty City," said
Gilmore. "A lot of young and old
people live in Liberty City but
they don't know the story."
The idea emerged for Gilmore
while watching an episode of the


A&E show, First 48. Gilmore was
baffled at the negative depiction
that the show portrayed of Mi-
ami's urban community.
"That is not the total picture of
Liberty City," said Gilmore.
The 40-year-old Liberty City
native grew up in Flamingo Vil-
lage. He attended Arcola Lakes
Elementary, Horace Mann Middle
School and Miami Central Senior
High. Gilmore pursued an educa-
tion at Miami Dade Community
College (now Miami Dade College)
for a career in journalism.
But Gilmore's passion for film
took him to Howard University
where he studied film. For seven
years, he traveled across America
working on various productions


STEPHEN GILMORE
FIlM MAKER


and plays.
To Gilmore, "Miami is home
and has always been home."
With the help of Liberty City
icons such as Ayers, Miami
Commissioner Michelle Spen-
ce-Jones, Historian Dr. Marvin
Dunn, Archivist Dr. Dorothy Jen-
kins Fields, Gilmore will bring to
life, life after the McDuffie riots.
"We have a wonderful rich his-
tory in Liberty City. The movie
will capture our oral history so
that generations will come to un-
derstand our rich history," said
Gilmore.
The young filmmaker says he is
amazed at the tremendous sup-
port he has received in shooting
the documentary.


Timothy A. Barber, Executive
Director of the Black Archives,
welcomes
the Gilmore's efforts to bring
the truth about Liberty City.
"If Mr. Gilmore is able to bring
to light to the issues that oc-
curred during that time then
let the lions tell the story," said
Barber. "There was a level of op-
pression that was happening
that brought opposition the cli-
mate of the people. It was more
than Arthur McDuffie that lit the
candle."
Gilmore began production last
month. He hopes to debut the
movie in 2010 in commemora-
tion of the 30-year anniversary
of the Arthur McDuffie Riots.


Take Back the Land hosts movie screening
Special to the Times


Copyrighted Material

in ~ indicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
L


Take Back the Land, a Miami-
based organization committed to
re-housing homeless people in
foreclosed homes, is inviting all so-
cial justice organizations and their
members to an advance screen-
ing of the new Michael Moore film,
Capitalism: A Love Story.
While the movie opens nation-
wide on Friday, Oct. 2, filmmaker
Michael Moore has arranged for
Take Back the Land to host an
advanced screening at the Sun-
rise Intracoastal Theatre, located
at 3701 Northeast 163rd Street in
North Miami Beach, at 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday, Oct. 1.
The film will be followed by a
brief discussion of social justice
work in Miami-Dade County.
Tickets are free but you must re-
serve them in advance. For tickets,
contact Jackie Lieby, from the Law
Offices of Chavez and de Leon, at
jliebyvchavez-deleon.com.


- .1
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Max Rameau, Executive


Director of Take Back the Land


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University leads in its rivalry
with Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity. FAMU's record at this writ-
ing is 3-0. It has wins over Dela-
ware State, Winston Salem, and
Howard U. BCU, on the other
hand, has lost to Shaw U and
'South Carolina St. This is in
the area of football. However, in
the area of education, BCU was
named one of the top Histori-
cally Black Colleges and Uni-
versities (HBCUs) nationwide
this year. They were ranked by
US News & World Report as well
as the Amsterdam News in New
York City.
Dr. Trudie Kibbe Reed be-
came excited by the ranking and
credited the alumni association
for breathing fresh air into the
student body, beginning with
Malik Dujuste, admissions
counselor at B-CU. She went on
to commend other alumni em-
ployed by the school. She also
credits Audley Coakley, Gwen
LeVan, Larry Hand-
field, Everlyn Walker,
National Alumni, Presi-
dent, Carol Weathering-
ton, Miami-Dade Coun- :
ty president, and John .'
Williams,. past National
.Alumni President for la-
boring on the outside for R
the university.
Reed said these
rankings are testimony to the
work of our admissions teams
and public relations depart-
ment. They are in proud keep-
ing with the standards imple-
mented by our proud founder,
Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune. We
want not only t6 maintain these
standards but to exceed them.
Dajuste, a 29-year old from
Haiti, is a 2005 B-CU alum and
is an example of the family at-
mosphere at the school. He also
collaborates with other alumni
on campus to enhance and
develop more pride. Thus far;


B-CU has moved
up to the top tier
list for 2009 and '
2010.
Institutions
are rated based
on a specialized HBCU peer
survey combined with statisti-
cal data including graduation
and retention rates, faculty
resources, student selectivity,
financial resources and alum-
ni giving. Speaking of alumni
giving; it was evident last Sun-
day when the alumni raised
over $4,000 for the concert
chorale in their performance
at Ebenezer UMC and recruit-
ed over 25-freshmen. The ef-
forts mean even more in a bad
economy when Black students
are going elsewhere.
Other alumni working out-
side of the box include Lisa
Braye, Pernella Burke, Char-
lie and Dorothy Davis, Ever-
lyn Davis, Martha Day, Dr.
Geraline Gilyard, T.
Eileen Martin-Major,
Dr. Lorraine F. Stra-
chan, and Francena
H. Scott, a graduate
of Clark College.


ED It was a summer
day when Rev. Ken-
neth McGee, senior
pastor/teacher joined Frank
Coney, best man, and took
their rightful place in front
of the altar while the prelude
music filled Antioch First Bap-
tist Church of Brownsville.
Parents, church members and
supporters waited patiently
for the entrance of Scarlett
Gonzalez, bride, and Daemon
Covington, groom.
As the music changed'
to "The Tribute: (To 'God Be
the Glory), Bessie Frederick,
grandmother of the groom,
entered. She was followed by


Marlen Gonzalez, mother of
the bride. The bride was as-
sisted from her Mercedes
Benz by her husband's un-
cle and given to her father,
Samuel Gonzalez, who had
the honor of escorting his
gorgeous daughter down the
aisle. The aisle was decorat-
ed with bouquets of flowers.
The back pew of guests stood
in honor of the bride as she
matched gait with her father
until she reached her soon-to-
be husband. She wore a spar-
kling tiara, a mini veil, mini
earrings, a sparkling
necklace, and a wed-
ding gown accentuated
with crystals on the
bodice and around the
hem line.
When she joined
the groom, they par-
ticipated in the sacred
vows and committed
themselves with an ex- PAS(
change of rings. There
was the declaration of
marriage, and they were pre-
sented to the people as man
and wife. They then led the
bridal party to the Rusty Peli-
can for the celebration and
reception and enjoyed a tradi-
tional reception "Musiq" pro-
viding the first dance, followed
by toasts from the best man
and the father of the bride.
.Some of the guests were:
Angela Covington, Amber
Covington, Nancy Coving-
ton, aunt, and Willie M. Rob-
inson, cousin. The newly weds
then engaged in the tossing of
the bouquet and garter belt.
They took the time to thank
their families and friends for
making their wedding one
of the happiest in the world,
while they ducked the rice
being thrown, as they left of
their honeymoon to Naples for
a week of fun and frolic.


Kudos to Retha S. Boone,
director of the Black Affairs
. Advisory Board/Planning
Committee, which consists


of: Shirley Ellison, Patricia
Fadell (co-chair), Helen Gar-
rett, Robin Mims, Carolyn
McKenzie, Melissa Rolle-
Scott, LaWanda Scott, Regi-
na Smith (co-chair), Patricia
Thomas, and Lisa Young, for
the 2009 Pillars Awards, last
Saturday, at the Biscayne Bay
Marriott before a filled house
of supporters and guests of
the Advisory Board. Calvin
Hughes, an Emmy Award-
winning newscaster and an-
chor at WPLG-TV Local 10
News, acted as emcee.
After everyone had
eaten enough of the
S nourishing chicken
wings as an appetiz-
er, Boone took to the
mic and brought on
S D. J. Fabien, Chair,
whto brought on Edgar
S. Wright, who brought
on Hughes. Then
HAL Hughes brought on
Irelene King-Allen
who gave, the invoca-
tion & blessing of the food for
those who had not begun to
partake.
Meanwhile, a silent auction
was going on at the display ta-
ble with items donated by the
Willis McGahee Foundation,
Black Divas on Wheels Motor-
cycle Club and the Lighthouse
Garden Center which donated
colorful vases with a plant for
the tables' center pieces. En-
dorsements .came from Mayor
Carlos Alvarez, County Com-
missioner -Chairman
Dennis C. Moss, Vice
Chair Jose' "Pepe"
Diaz and the other com-
missioners.
Then, the meat of
the program got every-
one's attention. when
Dr. Lester Brown was
given the Pillar Award WIL
for Public Service. This
Kappa Alpha Psi man
opening line ceased the chat-
tering with a poem as he re-
flected on his childhood from
Delhi, Louisiana, and ended
up with the poem,. "Invictus"


by saying, "I'm the Master of
my Faith; I'm the Captain of
My Soul" to a standing ova-
tion.
Other recipients included
Dr. Rozalyn Paschal schol-
arships given to Christina
Graham, FMU, and Ky'Eisha
Penn, FSU, followed by Young
Pillars Scholarship re-
cipients including Sha-
kimah Blake, Saint
Augustine's College,
Zyheart Bess, FAMU,
Jha-Kari Selver, USF,
and Richard Way, III,
FMU.
But the best was
saved for last. The BO
DME band entertained
with gospel music fea-
turing Quantarra Anderson,
Tanish Cauley and Warren
King, vocalizing. It also fea-
tured a tight band consisting
of Marc Dor, key-
board, Darryal Gal-
lons, fender bass,
and Ernest Stewart, ",
a dynamic drummer.
These Northwestern t
Bulls and Edison "
Raiders are worth
hearing. If interested,
call King at 305-896- HUGI
4168. Kudos go out
to Sharon Lovette
and Renita John-
son, hostesses for the event.
They joined other well dressed
guests, such as Toni James,
Deloris Barr-Fisher, and Dr.
L. F. Strachan.


A special salute
goes out to The Mi-
ami Times-Chatter
That Matters read-
ers in Atlanta, Ga.,
especially Wanda B.
Hewitt who took the
LSON time to communicate
good news, thusly.
Recently trans-
planted Miamian Shirley P.
Fields celebrated her 70th
birthday on Sept. 5 at her pa-
latial home in Conyers, Ga.
The celebration was hosted by


her children: Victor, Candice
and Melissa who grew-up in
Miami. Other Miami trans-
plants enjoying the celebra-
tion were Wilbert and Jan
Barrett, Mary Roomes, Al
Starke, Nina Fields, Gerard
Johnson and Mabel Claring-
ton.
Other magic
city residents in at-
tendance included
Randolph, Corey
and Courtney Fields,
Wanda Hewitt, Delo-
res Lockett, Erslyn
Anders and 50 guests
from in and around
INE Atlanta, Ga. Fields
was enthralled over
her birthday party,
because the atmosphere was
Miami, as well as the taste of
the soul food. One event that
took place was the Electric
Slide Miami style and
the Electric Slide At-
lanta, GA. style. Both
Groups ended up fall-
ing in love with the Mi-
ami style, while every-
one concluded singing
"Happy Birthday" to the
honoree who could not
IES hold back tears of joy.


Marva Lightburn,
advocate, has been spend-
ing her time attending budget
meetings for the Miami-Dade
County, as well as the City
of Miami to ensure mainte-
nance of the budgets for Af-
rican Heritage Cultural Arts
Center, City firefighters and
retention of employment. Her
effort has been commendable.
and her support should help
soften the hearts of the deci-
sion makers.
Lightburn is also credited
for spearheading the burial of
Phil Harris, a renowned en-
tertainer from New York City
who brought his show talent
to Miami, especially the mock
weddings 6f men in the club
and who played to a full house
each year.


By nna* -- *eei6


Congratulations go out to
Omega Man Chester Fair who
was nominated and elected Sec-
retary at the Florida Statewide
Organization's Keeper of Re-
cords and Seal held at the Doral
Golf Resort and Spa. Rick Bea-
sley was elected Keeper of Fi-
nance. Both of these men serve
in Pi Nu Chapter of Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity.
Inez McKinney Johnson'
family gave her a 90t birthday
blast in the Parish Hall of her


beloved Saint Agnes I
Episcopal Church.
Family and many a
friends joined in the happy cel-
ebration. Among some of Inez
guest included Doris Hylor,
Winsome Love, Rose Marie,
Gooding, Dr. Mary L. Hylor,
Gwen Johnson, Queen Hall,
Callie Bradwell, Edna Clear,
Rose Harden, Branhilda
Moore,. Ignator Nottage and
many more friends.
Happy 60t birthday to Bar-


bara Ann Dames.
Get well wishes and our
prayers go out to Claretha
. Grant-Lewis, Julie Clark,
Jaquan Jordan Cannon, Is-
mae Prescott, Thelma Hylor
- Dames (whose is in hospice
at the home of her sister Dr.
Mary Hylor home in Pem-
broke Pines), Freddy "Jabbo"
Johnson, Carmetta Brown-
Russell, Mary E. Dorsaint,
Vashti Armbrister, Doretha
Payne, Carolyn Dunnell, Mar-
ian Shannon, ,Ismae Prescott
and Timothy Savage.
Jaunita and Anthony Arm-
brister were elated to have her
two sisters visit with her, Lu-
cille Williams from Williston,
Fla. and Eura Lee Moore from


Gainesville, Fla., and travel
with them. Jaunita is from a
family of seven girls. Welcome
to Dade and Broward Coun-
ties.
Happy belated wedding anni-
versary to David and Jewyll D.
Wyman, Aug. 30, their first.
The fall meeting of Episcopal
Church Women the North Dade
Deanery will be held at The
Historic Saint Agnes Episcopal
Church at 9 a.m., Saturday,
Oct. 17. We are encouraging all
ladies of our Episcopal Faith to
support us.
Ten years ago, the United
States had the highest per-
centage worldwide of adults
with colleges.
Fredericka Dean-Wanza


celebrated her 91st birthday at
the Rusty Pelican. Her daugh-
ter, Theta Wanza Shipp, and
her son, James Wanza III,
along with their children,
grandchildren, great grand-
children, family members and
dear friends were present and
took part in the celebration on
Sept. 26. Happy Birthday to a
former majorette and teacher
at her alma mater Booker T.
Washington, where she taught
Physical Education.
Easter Robinson-Troy
would like for her friends to
know she is on the road to
recovery and thanks for your
concerns.
Booker T. Washington Tor-
nadoes were all sadden by the


demise of David Fedrick Da-
vis. David died Tuesday, Sept.
22. Sympathy to Eurnice Da-
vis, his beloved wife, his sis-
ters, Cupidine and Deloris
and all family members and
classmates. David was the
president of his beloved class
of 1960 at B.T. W. High School
for many years.
At the Daughters of the King
annual Breakfast held in the
Parish Hall of St. Agnes Epis-
copal Church on Saturday,
Sept. 19, Theodore "Brother"
Johnson delivered a powerful
.message on his illness and re-
covery when his son; Javon,
shared one of his "kidneys" with
his father in order for him to
have a longer life.


Community enhances Overtown garden


Special to the Times

City of Miami Commission-
er Michelle Spence-Jones
joined employees from Coca-
Cola Enterprises and vol-
unteers from the Overtown
Youth Center, to enhance a
local community garden that
grows fresh vegetables for
residents in the Overtown
area on Saturday.
The vegetable garden is
part of a series 6f community
gardens that were created
by Roots in the City, a local
community-based organiza-
tion dedicated to the beau-


tification of Miami's inner-
city. Throughout the day, the
group volunteered their time
planting trees and creating
the "Minute Maid Orange
Grove" with the planting of
nine new orange trees that
will provide nutritious fruit
for the local community to
enjoy. The garden is located
on the corner of Northwest
Third Avenue between North-
west 9th and 10th Street.
"I am excited about this
great day of service taking
place in my district and ap-
plaud Coca-Cola Enterprises
for their support and commit-


ment to our community" said
City of Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones.
This event is part of Co-
ca-Cola Enterprises (NYSE:
CCE) global, company-wide
initiative called "CRS. in Ac-
tion Week," taking place
from September 26-Oct. 2.
Through this global initiative,
many of CCE's 73,000 em-
.ployees will be participating
in local community events to
demonstrate the company's
commitment to local neigh-
borhoods and Corporate Re-
sponsibility and Sustainabil-
ity (CRS).


Michael


Miami Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones along with Coca-Cola Enterprises and volunteers from
the Overtown Youth Center celebrate the completion of the community garden in Overtown.
-Photo: Jorge R. Perez/City of Miami.




* !" *^ :M Yards Total


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2C THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


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Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT
MARIONETASDE LA ESQUINA
Mexico's.Marionetas de la Esquina makes its Miami debut with its unique
blend of puppetry and storytelling. Recommended for ages 3 to 8.
11 AM & 5 PM (English) and 2 PM (Spanish)
Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet.Opera House) $15

Adrienne Arsht Center presents
CABARET & COCKTAILS
AN EVENING WITH SHERIE RENE SCOTT
An intimate evening in the perfect cabaret setting, featuring signature Barton
0 drinks and bottle service. Sherie Rene Scott, star of Dirty Rotten
Scoundrels, The Little Mermaid, and Aida, makes her cabaret debut at the
Adrienne Arsht Center.
7 PM Cocktails 7:30 PM Show
Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $45


- SRIOTOE.1


Adrienne Arsht Center and Johnson & Wales University present
CELEBRITY CHEF SERIES
INGRID HOFFMANN & DAISY MARTINEZ
Two star Latina chefs share their food and lifestyle secrets to success!
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $55, $85, $125, VIP Package $200
VIP ticket holders get to meet and take a photo with the celebrity chefs during a post-
show cocktail party.
CABARET & COCKTAILS
AN EVENING WITH SHERIE RENE SCOTT
7:30 PM Cocktails 8 PM Show
Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $45


A OC E17i


CABARET & COCKTAILS
AN EVENING WITH SHERIE RENE SCOTT
5:30 & 8:30 PM Show Cocktails half hour before shows
Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $45
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
SING, MIAMI!
ADRIENNE ARSHT CENTER SINGS WITH MIAMI CHILDREN'S CHORUS
A fun, free, family hour of singing popular, folk and traditional songs, led by
Music Director Timothy A. Sharp.
11:30 AM-12:30 PM Peacock Foundation Studio FREE
4EEEEEMM~~.~~t:


CABARET & COCKTAILS
AN EVENING WITH SHERIE RENE SCOTT
3:30 PM Cocktails 4 PM Show
Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $45
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS
A MUSICAL CELEBRATION WITH GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM AND JUBILATE, INC.
Back by popular demand! A joyous celebration of our community's best and
brightest gospel choirs, featuring special guest, the multi-award winning
recording artist, CeCe Winans.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE


. .


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Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.


B2E NOW B :
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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 50 OCTOBER 6, 2009


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6D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009

























SECTION D


ss


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


. r ---- -----



GREAT NEWSII!

PINNACLE PLAZAAPTS
3650 NW 36th St
Miami, Fl 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00

APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MORE!!!

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
.LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505


*Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change


"PRODUCTION:Dummy
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1031 NW 197TERR
One bedroom, one bath.
Call Linton at 786-222-6764
115 N.E. 78 Street
Three bdrms Special $875,
two bdrms $815 and 1 bdrm,
$700. nice and clean, park-
ing. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424
1212 N.W.1 Avenue
$550 MOVE IN One
bedroom, one batn, $500.
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1229 N.W. 1 Court
$550 MOVE IN' One
bedroom, one oath. $550.
slove, refrigerator air
305-642-7080. 786.236.
1144

1245 N.W. 58 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 per month all appli-
ances included Free 19
Inch LCD TV Call Joel:
786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525 Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
1 305-642-7080
1298 N.W. 60th Street
Beautiful one and two bdrms,
air, gated. 786-486-2895
1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
#1
786-2901438
1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080
13655 N.E. 3 COURT
One bedroom, central air,
pool. $695. 305-895-8438
140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN. Two bed-
room, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080
140 S.W. 6 St.
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$500 monthly
Call:305-267-9449
14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bdrm, one bath,
with air, in quiet area, $700
monthly! 305-213-5013
1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bdrm, one bath.
$600 mthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in.
786-290-5498
1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080
1540 N.W. 1st Court
Studio $425 monthly
One bedroom $525
monthly
Two bedrooms $595
monthly
Three bedrooms, two baths
$695 monthly
All appliances included
Free 20 inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


1541 N.W. 1 Place
Rents reduced for short time


only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled, air, stove,
refrigerator. No Deposit for
Section 8!
Call 305-582-5091


1545 NW 8 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
ceramic tile, central air.
carpel, balcony, new
kitchen, appliances, laundry
machine, quiet, parking
FREE WATER
Move in today!
786-506-3067

1803 N. W.1st Court
Two bdrm, one barh. $600
per month All appliances
included Free 19 inch LCD
T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1835 N.W. 2 Ct
two bedrooms, one bath,
$550 moves you in. No secu-
rity deposit, a/c, refrigerator
and stove. 786-286-7651
1905 N.W. 115th Street
Large furnished one bed-
room. Utilities included plus
cable. $800 monthly. Call
215-424-1404.
19305 NE 2 AVE
ON THE LAKE
One bedroom, one bath
786-237-1292
1955 N.W. 2 Court
,$450 MOVE IN! One bed-
room, one bath, $450. 305-
642-7080
1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

210 N.W.17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080
220 N.W. 16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances.
305-642-7080
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849
2972 N W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath. $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath. $700
moves you in. Appliances in-
cluded. 786-389-1686
3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath. $600
mthly. 305-213-5013
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedroomrrs 1650. Slove ie-
frigeraror, air 305-642-7080

411 N.W. 37 STREET
Studios. $495 monitily All
appliances include.1
Call Joel 786-355-7578
423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly, $600 move
in special. Free Wi-Fi, Easy
qualifying. 786-339-4106
448 N.W. 7 Street
One bdrm, nice. $425 mtlhy.
305-557-1750
48 N.W. 77th Street
Large one bedroom, $550
monthly. Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move-in special! One bed-
room, one bath. $399 per
month, $600 to move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

725 1/2 N.W. 100th Street
Near schools and hospital,
two bedrooms, one bath, air,
appliances, wall to wall car-
pet, mini blinds. Credit check,
$640 monthly, $1280 to move
in. $50 Application fee.
305-300-0983
729 N.W. 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath. Call
786-312- 4097. Michael.
7525 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances, park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
$700, half off first month. Call
305-754-7900. 9 a.m. to 7
pm
8261 N.E. 3 Ave.
One bedroom, one bath.
$550 monthly. All appli-
ances included. Joel 786-
355-7578
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL


One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699


ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one and two bdrms.
Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-6-12-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same
day approval. For more
information/specials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com
CORAL SPRINGS AREA
Two bedrooms, two baths,
appliances, water included.
786-301-4368,305-558-2249
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, $595. Free
water!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY SUARE
One and two bedrooms, tiled.
786-267-3199
Located Near 90th Street
and 27 Avenue
One unfurnished apt. and one
furnished one bedroom, one
bath, lights, water, and air in-
cluded. Call 305-693-9486.
MIAMI AREA
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms., one bath, cen-
tral air, $1050 and $975. One
bdrm., one bath, central air,
$735. 305-206-1566
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
One bedroom, utilities includ-
ed. Stove and refrigerator.
305-219-0135
MIAMI-LITTLE RIVER
One bdrm, one bath, $650.
Remodeled, gated, parking.
N.E. 78 St. 305-776-7863.
N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Across from 163 St. Mall. One
bedroom, one bath. Section 8
Only. 786-344-4386
North Miami Beach Area
One bedroom, one bath.
786-286-2540
NORTHWEST AREA
One and two bedrooms.
305-970-1721
OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N W 135th Street
1'2 Monih FREE, one and
two bedrooms central air
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposis.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and 1 Ave.
Studio, $425 per month
One bdrm, $525 per month.
Two bdrms., $625 per mo.
All appliances included
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578



2683 N.W. 66th Street
For more information
Call 786-277-8988



1501 NW 81 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, newly
renovated with appliances.
$850 mthly. 954-962-6810
1503 NW 207 STREET
(enter gate off 441)
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$900 monthly, $1400 to move
in. Section 8 welcome.
305-987-6706
409 N.W. 6 STREET
Three bdrm townhouse, two
baths, tile, central air. $1250
mthly. 305-662-5505
Miami Gardens Area
Townhouse, three bedrooms,
two baths. 3778 N.W. 213
Terrace. Call 954-442-8198


1023 N.W. 47 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath.
$1300. Studio one bath
$700. Appliances, free wa-
ter/electric. 305-642-7080
1076 NW 38 STREET
AVAILABLE AGAIN!
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly. 305-796-7963
1078 N.W. 113th Terrace
One bedroom, air, applianc-
es, $700 monthly, S1300 to
move in. Section 8 OK.
Call: 305-681-3236


1081 N.W. 100th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, fenced, $900 mthly, first,
last and sec. to move in. Call
305-986-8395.
1150 N.W. 100 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, cen-
tral air, den. $1000 monthly,
954-430-0849.
1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885 Doreen
1272 N.W. 46 Street
Two bedrooms one bath
Section 8 OK
Call 305-331-6289
130 N.E. 66 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly, fenced yard,
newly renovated. First, last
and security. 786-308-0436
1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1521-25 N.W. 41 ST.
One bdrm, one bath. Appli-
ances, tiled, bars, air. $700
mthly, security. 305-490-9284
1590 N.W. 47 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650. Voucher accepted
305-638-5946 or 759-2280
1744 N.W. 48th Street
One bedroom, tiled, air,
security bars $730 monthly,
water included. First, last
and security $300. First two
weeks free. 305-688-7209
1782 N.W. 55 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. 786-260-3838
180 NW 53 STREET
FRONT
Four bedrooms, two baths,
Only three years old. refrig-
erator, stove, microwave.
,$1550 monthly. First and se-
curity. Section 8 preferred.
305-975-5596
18565 N.E. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly.
305-681-2862
1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $1000
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431
2 NE 59 TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. 786-237-1292
2101 NW 92 STREET
Two bedrooms, water, air,
bars. $850 monthly, $2125
move in. Not Section 8 Affili-
ated. Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
21301 N.W. 37 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, air. $895.
786-306-4839
2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$830. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2267 N.W. 102 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath, wa-
ter. $925. 305-332-5008
2395 N.W. 95 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! 786-200-8833
2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, one bath,
central air, $850 mth-
ly.786-877-5358.
247 N. E. 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, microwave,
water, parking. $700 monthly
plus security. Section 8 ok.
786-216-7533
2552 N.W. 68th Street
Large two bdrm, $900 mthly.
Ask for Mr. Johnson.
786-380-6278
3026 NW 52 STREET
Two bedrooms, air. $750
monthly. Ask for Mr. Johnson.
786-380-6278
36 Street, NW 8 Ave.
two bedrooms, one bath, cen-
tral air, tile floor, ready to oc-
cupy, section 8 preferred.
305-301- 4347
3633 N.W. 194 TERR
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, tile, fenced yard. Section
8 OK. 305-622-9135
6250 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath
$800.Two bedrooms one
bath $1100. Appliances.
Free Water/Eleclric.
305-642-7080
7017 NW4 Court
Remodeled two bedrooms,
one bath duplex. Central air,
tiled. $875 monthly. First, last,
security.
Call 786-556-9644
747 NW 107 STREET
Two bedrooms, air. $895.
786-306-4839
760-62 N.W. 55 TERR.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
under $800 and Three bed-
rooms, one bath, under $900.
Efficiencies also available un-
der $600. Section 8 ok.
305-456-4961
7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080
8098 N.W. 4 Ave.
One bdrm, one bath, appli-
ances, free water. First, last
and security. Section 8 OK.
305-621-4383
8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, air, tile. $750, Not
Section 8 affiliated. $1875


move in. Terry Dellerson, Bro-
ker. 305-891-6776


COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrms one bath, first,
and security. 305-244-6845



100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1140 N.W. 79 Street
One bdrm one bath, $550.
Free waier Mr WilIe #109
305-642-7080
1168 N.W. 51 STREET
Large efficiency, partly fur-
nished, light water. $675
monthly, plus security.
305-633-1157
13377 NW 30 AVENUE
$120 weekly, private kitchen,
bath, free utilities, appliances.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1492 NW 38 St.- Rear
Appliances and utilities in-
cluded. $550 monthly, $1100
moves you in. Call David at:
786-258-3984
1756 N.W. 85th Street
$130 weekly, $500 moves
you in. Call 786-389-1686.
3153 N.W. 53rd Street
$420 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232
5422 N.W. 7 COURT
Includes water and electricity.
$600 monthly. 305-267-9449
5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN),from
$185 wkly to $650 monthly.
305-751-6232.
8010 NW 20 Avenue
Spacious, furnished efficien-
cy, utilities included, $575
mthly. First, last required.
786-316-2448
98 St. N.W. 30 Ave
Spacious, with bath, com-
pletely furnished, pantry area
and appliances, secure doors
and windows, ceramic tile
throughout. Utilities and cable
included. $525 monthly.
305-836-8359
CUTLER RIDGE
Nice neighborhood.
786-301-4368,305-558-2249.
MIAMI GARDENS
Furnished, private entrance.
786-287-0864
SANFORD APARTMENTS
1907 N.W. 2 CT.
Nice efficiency apartment,
air, window shades,
appliances. Free gas. $360
monthly plus $200 deposit.
305-665-4938, Cell.
305-498-8811



1010 N.W. 180 TERR
Free cable, air and use of
kitchen. 305-835-2728
1338 N.W. 68th Street
Rooms available. Call 305-
693-1017 or 305-298-0388.
13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1368 N.W. 70th Street
$500 rnlhly, wasner and
driver, kitchen access air,
cable available.
Call 305-691-0458
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
1845 N.W. 50th Street
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455
or 305-720-4049
1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-303-0156.
211 N.W. 12th Street
Move In Special! $100 Wkly
moves you in. Free, cable,
air. 786-286-7651
2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-3434,
305-914-4461
2365 NW 97 STREET
With air, $100 weekly
or $380 monthly.
305-691-2703,786-515-3020
2371 N.W. 61st Street
Room in rear. 305-693-1017,
305-298-0388.
3042 N.W. 44th Street
Big, air, $85 to $115 weekly.
786-262-6744
3177 NW 42 STREET
Call 305-904-7837
4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.


305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
4712 NW 16 AVENUE
$100-S150 weekly. utilities,
kitchen, bath, air.
786-260-3838


74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $200 moves
you in. 786-306-2349
9200 N.W. 25 Avenue
$80 weekly. 305-691-2703 or
786-515-3020
East Miami Gardens Area
Clean furnished rooms. $425
monthly. Move in, no deposit.
Call 305-621-1017
NICELY FURNISHED'
Air, Cable, TV. $125 wkly.
786-290-0946
NORLAND AREA
$450 monthly. First and last to
move in. Background check.
Call Pam.
305-332-3133
NORTH MIAMI AREA
King size bed, air. $125 week-
ly, $250 to move in.
305-691-5582
NORTHWEST AREA
With air. $500 to move in,
$300 monthly, $75 weekly.
786-337-0864
OPA LOCKA AREA
Air and cable free. $500 mth-
ly. No deposit.
786-357-1395



1020 NW 120 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath. $1200
monthly. 786-344-2336
10295 S.W. 175 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly..305-267-9449
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013
14410 N.W. 21 COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OK. 305-687-6973
1500 N.E. 151 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 305-944-2101
1619 N.W. 38th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
air, $850 mthly, 305-642-7080
1750 NW 112TERRACE
Four bedrooms, two baths,
tile, central air. $1495 month-
ly. 305-662-5505
1785 N.W. 67 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly. Section 8
Welcome. 786-277-3434
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$995. Central Air.
305-642-7080
1863 N.W. 91st Street
Beautiful one bedroom, total-
ly remodeled,all appliances.
$650 monthly, first and last.
305-746-4551
20420 NW 24 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, tile, bars. $1200
monthly, $3000 to move in.
Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776
20501 N.W. 28th Avenue
Five bdrm. two baths, $1800,
954-704-0094.
2320 NW 68 STREET
Three bedrooms, central air,
bars, $975 monthly.
305-687-1200
2359 N.W. 56th Street
Four bedrooms, two and half
baths, central air, appliances,
Section 8 okay!
305-343-5700
2441 N.W. 104 ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 404-861-1965
2445 NW 92 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
security bars. 305-978-7039
290 N. W.48 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, all
tile floors, nice carport. call
786-237-1292
2934 NW 57 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1200 monthly, Section 8 OK.
305-331-6303,305-893-2276
3062 NW 185 STREET
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath, central air, bars,
fenced backyard. Appliances
included. $1300 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
305-624-1566
3221 N.W. 11 CT.
Nice four bedrooms, two
baths, den, garage. HOPWA,
Section 8. Call 954-392-0070
3251 NW 212 STREET
MIAMI GARDENS Section 8
OK! Four bedrooms, two baths
Newly remodeled. $1300.
305-785-5703
3900 NW 170 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths,
$1400 mthly. Section 8 ok.
305-299-3142
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-conditioned
and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn
service. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.
4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
S1400 mthly. 305-606-3369
505 N.W. 130th Street
Four bdrms. two baths, Sec-
tion 8 ok! $1500 mthly. Call
305-904-9421.


5519 NW 4 AVENUE
Remodeled, three bedrooms,
two baths, central air, fenced.
$1100 monthly.
305-687-1200
586 N.W. 83rd Street #A
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly, $600 security.
786-488-2264
8830 NW 22 COURT
Three bedrooms, two baths,
one year old. Section 8 ok.
786-859-3772
936 NW 29 STREET
SECTION 8 SPECIAL!
Three bdrms, two baths.
$1350 monthly. Also avail-
able, two bedrooms, one bath
$950. 786-262-7313
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard. Section 8 OK! $1150
monthly. 305-388-7477
N.W. 65th Street
Three bdrms, two baths,
wood floors throughout, ev-
erything new, big backyard,
Section 8 welcome!
Immaculate! 305-321-4077
Near Northwestern High
For Rent or Sale. Two bed-
rooms, one bath, air $1050
monthly Fenced Section 8
OK 305-685-6795
NEAR ROOMS TO GO 826
Three bdrms. Central air.
Section 8 OK!. 305-201-4751
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, $800-$900.
No dogs. 305-688-6696
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
appliances, fenced, new
carpet, tile, bars, dining
room, large roofed patio and
reversed air. Section 8. Call
305-836-7531.
OPA LOCKA AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
carport, fenced. near schools.
Section 8. 786-462-7957
STOP!!!
Behind in Your Rent? 24 Hour
notice Behind in Your Mort-
gage? Kathy 786-326-7916
Turn Down for Mortgage
Loan?
Credit Partners Available!
Call 1-800-242-0363
Extension 3644


LIBERTY CITY AREA
$1000 down, $800 monthly,
Recently remodeled. Three
bedrooms, one bath. Call
David 305-216-5390
... \- ,.~ '" .. A, *


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
ROOM FOR RENT
$125 Weekly, 786-768-0579
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms for rent. $500 and up.
Houses for rent. Section 8
welcome. 305-300-7783
786-277-9369


:.. .7


2231 NW 59 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Updated and and
remodeled. $2900 down and
$575 monthly FHA.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
*ATTENTION*
'Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
***WITH**
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
WHY RENT?
BUY!!!
Two, three and four
bedroom homes avail-
able. $1900 $2900 down
payment. 580 credit score
needed. North Dade and
South Broward homes
available. Ask about $8000
for first time home owners.
Pick up list at office.
NDI Realtors
290 NW 183 Street
Miami Gardens, FL
305-655-1700



Child Home Care
$65-$70. 6 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
954-687-5618



BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

Must have reliable, insured
vehicle and current Driver
License.
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


.1 .
gw"


S


I):


Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

SALES! CLOSER!
Second language a plus.
Write your own check. Come
10 a.m., 15992 N.W. 27th
Ave. and start immediately.



FREE RENT!
MIAMI LAKES AREA
Looking for two
female roommates
to share house.
By appointment only.
305-588-1182

INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234



BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Con-
cealed.Traffic School, four
hours, $28. 786-333-2084



BEST PRICES IN TOWN!!!
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690
GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.






NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desir-
ing to engage in business
under the fictitious name of:
AUTO ELECTRIC SERVICE
3270 N.W. 54th Street, Mi-
ami, FL 33142 in the city of
Miami, FL
Owner: Michael Steven
Watts intends to register the
said name with the Division
of Corporation of State, Tal-
lahassee, FL. Dated this
30th day of September,
2009.




ATTENTION HOMEOWNERS
Facing Foreclosure? Need
Help? 1-800-242-0363
Extension 3644



TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.














Oil prices climb above $66 el M


$425 for 13
weeks in print
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


."', "Co pyrighted Material r".rat f
S -*lm,


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers







S


)( 'Y~U~~ rh~k rLrrew


Drive More

Customers

Your Businiess

TQDA^-


T!,I3 6993-7093 TODAY!!
advertising@miamitimesonline.com


\I" I


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
LIBERTY CITY COMMUNITY REVITALIZATION TRUST
BOARD OF DIRECTORS APPOINTMENTS

In compliance with Chapter 2, Article XI, Sec. 2-1052(d.) of the City of Miami
Code, not earlier than thirty (30) days from this day, the City Manager and
Commissioner of City of Miami District 5 shall appoint two (2) board members
to the Liberty City Community Revitalization Trust ("Liberty City Trust").
With the exception of the youth board member, the member appointed to the
Liberty City Trust Board must be eighteen (18) years of age, and reflect the
diversity of the community and share technical, professional expertise or expe-
riential knowledge and interest in the following areas: residential construction,
development, architecture and engineering, planning, zoning and land use law,
economic development, historic preservation and restoration, administration,
fiscal management and community involvement. Reside in the Overtown Area;
The public and professional or citizen organizations having interest in and
knowledge of the Liberty City area are encouraged to solicit and to submit to
the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida,
33133, a completed nomination form indicating the name, address and quali-
fications of persons for consideration as prospective appointees to the Liberty
City Trust Board of Directors. Official nomination forms are available at the
Liberty City Trust, 4800 NW 12th Avenue, Miami, Florida 33127.
All nominations must be received by Friday, November 6, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
The names and qualifications of persons submitted to the City Clerk, together
with any names and qualifications submitted by the District 5 commissioner
and the Liberty City Trust will be available for public review in the Office of
the City Clerk on November 16, 2009. The city commission will consider the
confirmation of the appointments at the city commission meeting presently
scheduled for December 17, 2009.
For further information you may contact Elaine Black, President/CEO, 4800
NW 12th Avenue, Miami, Florida 33127; Telephone: (305) 635-2301 ext. 375.
(Adv. No. 13798)


CITY OF MIAMI
-ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan Ameri-
can Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
IFB NO. 181141 INVITATION TO BID FOR THE DISPOSAL OF BIO-HAZARDOUS WASTE
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M. MONDAY OCTOBER, 19, 2009
Detailed scope of work and specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Depart-
ment, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1904.
Deadline for Request for Clarification: Friday, October 9, 2009 at 4:00 P.M.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF
MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.,
City Manager
AD NO. 008105


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


The Georgia
Witch Doctor
& Root Doctor
"Powerful Magic"
I Remove evil spells, court and jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.
Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown
P.O. Box 50964 Albany GA. 31705


MIAMI-A

REQUEST FOR
APPLICATIONS
U.S. HUD NOTICE OF FUNDING AVAILABILITY
FOR HOMELESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
Miami-Dade County, through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust is
requesting applications from homeless providers and other qualified entities
interested in participating in a consolidated application for funding from the United
States Department of Housing and Urban Development (U.S. HUD) through its
Super Notice of Funding Availability for homeless assistance programs: the
Supportive Housing Program and the Shelter Plus Care Program. U.S. HUD
homeless project renewals with funding expiring in 2010 must be a part of this
competitive process. Renewal applications will be extremely streamlined. All
parties interested In participating in the consolidated application process may
pick up a copy of the local/federal application package beginning October 2,
2009 at
Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust
111 N.W. 1st Street, 27th Floor, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1490
Email: dray@miamldade.gov
Contact Person: David Raymond
A Pre-ApplicationrWorkshop will be held on October 8, 2009, beginning at 10:00
a.m. at Stephen R Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, Florida, 19th Floor,
Main Conference Room. Attendance at the Pre-Application Workshop is strongly
recommended. In orderto maintain a fair and impartial competitive process, the
County can only answer questions at the Pre-Application Workshop and must
avoid private communications with prospective applicants during the application
preparation and evaluation process. The deadline for submission of applications
is October 19, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
Miami-Dade County is not liable for any cost incurred by the applicant in
responding to the Request for Applications, and we reserve the right to modify
or amend the application deadline schedule if it is deemed necessary or in the
interest of Miami-Dade County. Miami-Dade County also reserves the right to
accept or reject any and all applications, to waive technicalities or irregularities,
and to accept applications that are in the best interest of Miami-Dade County.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in employment
and services and does not discriminate on the basis of handicap. THIS RFA IS
SUBJECT TO THE CONE OF SILENCE, COUNTY ORDINANCE 98-106.
PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU ARE SEEKING AFFORDABLE HOUSING, PLEASE GO
TO OUR WEBSITE: www mlamidade nov/homeless.


City of Miami
Notice of Bid Solicitation

Title: Environmental Assessment & Remediation
of Virginia Key Landfill
Due Date: 10/30/09 at 2:00 p.m.
MANDATORY Pre- Bid Conference:
Friday, October 9, 2009 at 10:00 a.m.
RFP No.: 08-09-074
For detailed information, please visit our Capi-
tal Improvements Program webpage at:
http://ww.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements/
pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp.
THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE
"CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.,
/ City Manager

DP No.009071 ,





Accidents Arrests
DU 8 Tickets Bankruptcy
Crhiinal Defense Wills/Probate
Personal Injury Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide
1-0-3-EA alfe


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional, Safe & Conlidenlial Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified 0B GYN's
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r ABORTION START $180 AND UP

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ADVERTISE
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. I


I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


*- *


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009 1











S9D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


small buCopyrighted'MaterialPy Iml' p n




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Available from Commercial News Providers


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Bathroom Kitchen Plumbing Leak'
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CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commis-
sion of the City of Miami, Florida, on October 8, 2009 at
9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for
the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, AU-
THORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO ACCEPT FROM THE
MIAMI WOMAN'S CLUB ("CLUB"), IN PERPETUITY, AP-
PROXIMATELY TWENTY-THREE (23) FOOT WIDE BAY-
WALK EASEMENT OF THE PROPERTY LOCATED AT 1737
NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, FOR THE
CONSTRUCTION OF THE BAYWALK TO BE USED AS A
PERMANENT PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE WATERFRONT.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in.this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC

(#003290)


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida,
on October 8, 2009 at 9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER
TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF EASEMENT ON CITY-
OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED AT ELIZABETH STEELE
PARK AT 3525 E. FAIRVIEW STREET, MIAMI, FLORIDA,
TO FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY, A FLORIDA
CORPORATION ("FPL"), OF A TEN (10) FOOT WIDE
STRIP BY APPROXIMATELY FOUR-HUNDRED TWO (402)
FEET LONG, TO CONSTRUCT, OPERATE AND MAINTAIN
UNDERGROUND ELECTRIC UTILITY FACILITIES, WITH
THE RIGHT TO RECONSTRUCT, IMPROVE, CHANGE AND
REMOVE ALL OR ANY OF THE FACILITIES WITHIN THE
EASEMENT.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC


(#003293)


ADVERTISE
TODAY


r


Bids which were to be received September 29, 2009, by The School Board of Miami-
Dade County, Florida, for the project listed herein, have been postponed and will now
be received Friday, until 2:00 P.M. local time, October 2, 2009 at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33132

PROJECT NO. 00176800
ADDITION, REMODELING, RENOVATIONS AND
HISTORICAL RESTORATION AT
MIAMI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Alberto M. Carvalho,
Superintendent of Schools


CALL PATRCIA TOD"


m


`


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public Iearing will be held by the City Commis-
sion of the City of Miami, Florida, on October 8, 2009 at
9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for
the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, AU-
THORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT
OF EASEMENT ON CITY OF MIAMI OWNED PROPERTY
LOCATED AT VIRGINIA KEY ADJACENT TO ARTHUR LAMB
JR ROAD, MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO MIAMI-DADE COUNTY WA-
TERAND SEWER DEPARTMENT, OFAN APPROXIMATELY
FIFTEEN (15) FOOT WIDE PERPETUAL NON-EXCLUSIVE
SEWER EASEMENT, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, OPERA-
TION AND MAINTENANCE OF UNDERGROUND SEWER
FACILITIES, WITH THE RIGHT TO RECONSTRUCT, IM-
PROVE, CHANGE AND REMOVE ALL OR ANY OF THE FA-
CILITIES WITHIN THE EASEMENT.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal.may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC'


(#003291)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
PROPOSED INSTALLATION OF A TRAFFIC CIRCLE IN COCONUT
GROVE, AT THE INTERSECTION OF MATILDA ST. AND DAY AVE.
City Hall 3500 Pan-American Drive
Miami, Florida



The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Oct 8, 2009 begin-
ning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest that the
City Commission approve the installation of a traffic circle in Coconut Grove at
the intersection of Matilda St. and Day Ave., requesting the Miami-Dade County
Traffic Engineering Division approve implementation of the project.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of Oct 8, 2009 at:

MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with re-
spect to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision
of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this
meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be
based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#003292)


o



















10D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 30 OCTOBER 6, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


FOR THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 29 OCTOBER 5, 2009


CCIAA CFTRALA IMTERCO.LLEGIArT
SAi iHEfr AssocIATION


E. DIVISION
Eliz. City Slate
Bowie State
Virginia Union
Virginia State
St. Paul's
W. DIVISION
Shaw
Fayelleville State
J. C. Smith
St. Augustine's
Chowan
Livingstone


PV A&M Sports Photo
FRAZIER: Fifth-year
Prairie View A&M coach
looking to run off with first
victory over Grambling
Saturday.


I GRIDION STATS LEADERS; GRAMBLING GETS
NEW HOOPS COACH; MURRAY BACK IN NC





THE STAT CORNER

WHO ARE THE BEST PERFORMERS IN BLACK COLLEGE SPORTS


INDIVIDUAL STATISTICAL LEADERS


DIV
W L
2 0
2 0
2 0
I 1
0 2

1 1
1 1
1 1
1 I

0 2
0 2


CIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFF. LINEMAN Ricky Rodrigune, Jr.,C, SAC
RECEIVER Jone' Hars, Jr., TE,SAC-3 rc.. 108
yards 2 TDs (43,34)s. ECSU.
OFF BACK Rodney Web, Jr., RB, BSU 29
ca es, 174ids. 2 TDs 147.2) i n c over Shaw.
DEF. LINEMAN Larry Jon, So., DL, ECSU 3
sacks for- 18 yards. 6 tackles ,s. SAC..
LB Delano Johnson, So, BSU 8 racklc 5 solos, I
sack, 2 5 TFLininoserShao .
DEF. BACK Alfred Ngaja, So., VSU 95 d. fumb.
re. forTD I int..83- ard KO renum
ROOKIE Emmanuel Yeager, Fr., QB, BSU 15-of-
22 for 128 yds., 2TDs in inm oer Shaw.
SPECIAL. TEAMS Gregory Jackson, Fr., WR, BSU
- 5 tackles, all solos i s. Shaw


MEAC f MID EASTER
ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
CONF ALL
W L W L
ForidaA&M 2 0 4 0
SCState 1 0 3 0
Hampton 1 2 2
Norfolk State I 2 2
NCA&TState 1 1 2 2
Delaware State I 1 2
Morgan State 0 0 2 1
Howard 0 1 1 2
Bethune-Cookman 0 2 0 3
# W-Salem State 0 0 0 3
# Not eligible for title

MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Chris Bell, r-Jr., WR, NSU 9 receptions,
213 yards, 2 TDs vs. Bethune-Cookman.
DEFENSE Wil Croner, Sr., DE, HOWARD 6
tackles, 3 solos, 2 sacks. I interception is, G'lown.
George Howard, Sr, LB, MSU 18 tackles, 9 solos,
I forced fumble in win overToowson
ROOKIE Tahrte McQueen, r-So., RB, DSU 21
carries 102 yards, 3 rec 25 yards ,s. Hampton.
SPECIAL TEAMS Nick Lochner, Sr, P, DSU 6
puns, 264 yards, 2 foro er 50 yards. I over 60
LINEMAN Robert Okeafor, Sr., T, FAMU 94%
grade, 3 pancakes


SIAC SOmRN TRCOEGIA
ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


Albany Slate
Tuskegee
Miles
Morehouse
Clark Atlanta
Fort Valley State
Benedict
Kentucky Stale
Slillman
Lane


CONF ALL
W L W L
3 0 4 0
4 1 4 1
3 1 3 2
2 1 3 1
3 2 2 2
2 2 3 2
1 3 2 3
1 3 2 3
0 3 1 2
0 3 0 4


SIAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE AJ. McKenna,Sr,QB,ASU 15 of24for
252 yards. 3 TDs in win over Benedict.
DEFENSE Corey Robinson,So., LB, MC- 12 tackles,
4 solos, 2TFL. I recover vs. CAU
NEWCOMER Reginld Virges, Fr, LB, MC 12
tackles, 5 solos, I for loss, I fumble recovery, break-
up is. CSI
SPECIAL TEAMS Marquette King, So., P, FVSU 6
punts for 39 yard average.
OFFENSIVE LINE Michael Mavromichais, So., OL,
ASU-


SWAC snw ...
ATHLETIC CONIRIRENCE
DIV ALL
E.DIVISION W L W L
Alabama A&M 1 0 3 1
Miss. Valley S. I 1 1 2
Alabama State 0 1 3 1
Alcorn State 0 1 0 3
Jackson State 0 0 0 3
W. DIVISION
Southern I 0 3 1
Prairie View A&M 1 0 1 1
Ark. Pine Bluff 1 1 2 2
Grambling Stale 0 0 2 2
Texas Southern 0 1 1 3

SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Tim Buckley, Sr., QB, ALCORN
STATE Completed 25 of 40 passes for 408 yards
and 5 TDs (73,20,31. 14,1), 18 carries. 52 yards
in loss ot Southern
DEFENSE Steven Williams, Jr., DE, SU 5 tackles,
3 solos, 1.5 sacks vs. Alcom State.
NEWCOMER Arell Nelson, Jr., QB, TSU -
Completed 31 of 47 passes for 325 yards vs. Texas
Stale.
SPECIALTEAMS Bryan Williams, So., RB, SU -
Averaged 37.8 yards on four KO returns including a
91-yarderforaTD


INDEPENDENTS
W L
Langston 4 1
Concordia 2 3
Savannah State 1 3
Tennessee State 1 3
W. Va. State 1 3
N.C. Central 0 4
Lincoln (Mo.) 0 4
Edward Waters 0 4
Central State 0 4
Texas College 0 4
Cheyney 0 5

PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
OFFENSE Carlos Ross, So., RB, LANGSTON
- 28 carries for 164 yards and I TD, 3 receptions
for 53 yards in win over UIW.
DEFENSE Greg Brooks,So., S, LANGSTON-
I forced fumble, 2 interceptions vs. UIW.
SPECIAL TEAMS Landon Thayer, PK,
WSSU Kicked a 41-yard field goal and added
a PAT vs. SC State.


SWAC West titans meet in Dallas


RUSHING YARDS CL
THOMPSON,Winston-CAU SO
WEBB,Rodney-BSU JR
BANKS,Ulysses-AAMU SR
QOKER,LaMarcus-HAM SR
WARREN,Frank-GSU JR
WILLIAMS,R.-SHAW FR
RILEY,Pat-BENEDICT JR
ROSS, Carlos-LANGST SO
FRIESON,Shannon-KSU SO
McNAIRL, Calvin-TNST SO
TRAYLOR,Rahmod-ALST SR
FORD,William-SCSU SR
BOYKINS,Anthony-KSU JR
CARTER,Ryan-JCSU JR
TINSLEY-SPC JR
PULLEY,Curtis-FAMU SR
BABERS,Donald-PVAM JR


PASSING YARDS
WESTLER, C.-CU
LEE,Bryant-SU
ATKINS,Kevin-AAMU
MITCHELL,ClIris-ALST
PULLEY,Curtis-FAMU
WILLIAMS,B.-FSU
POWELL,C-ECSU
BUCKLEY, Tim-ALCN
O'BRIEN-Kevin-WVSU
MCKENNA,A.J.-ALBN
Brack,William-MHC


CL G
SR 5
SR 4
JR 4
SR 4
SR 4
JR 5
FR 5
SR 3
SR 3
SR 4
JR 4


COM -ATT-INT
118-204-9
76 122 3
63 103 2
57-108-4
64-96- 1
82-145-4
55-115-8
40 75 3
53-84-3
47-78- 1
64-110-5


RECEPTIONS CL G
STEWART,Juamorr-SU SR 4
HOLLAND, R.-CU FR 5
YOUNG,Tre-SCSU SR 3
DOE,Kendon-FSU SR 4
HARRIS,Thomas-AAM SR 4
SINGLETON, R.-ALCN JR 3
JACKSON,D.-DSU SO 3
FRANKLIN,J-JCSU JR 4
HENDJE,Achille-MHC SR 3
ANDREWS,Nich.-ALST SO 4
KING, Jermaine-WVSU 4
BELL,Chris-NSU JR 4
WILLIS, Richard-FVSU SR 5

RECEIVING YARDS CL G
HOLLAND, R.-CU FR 5
STEWART,Juamorr-SU SR 4
ANDREWS,Nich.-ALST SO 4
HARRIS,Thomas-AAM SR 4
BELL,Chris-NSU JR 4
MITCHELL,A.-TUSK JR 5
WEST,Isaac-FAMU JR 4
FRANKLIN,J.-JCSU JR 4
YOUNG,Tre-SCSU SR 3
JOHNSON,Dem.-ALBN SR 4
DOE,Kendon-FSU SR 4
MANLEY,D.-ECSU JR 5
HARRIS,Jone'-SAC FR 5


TOTAL OFFENSE
WESTLER, C.-CU
PULLEY,Curtis-FAMU
LEE,Bryant-SU
ATKINS,Kevin-AAMU
MITCHELL,Chris-ALST
POWELL,C.-ECSU
BROWN,Dennis-NSU
BUCKLEY, Tim-ALCN
CARTER,Ryan-JCSU
MCKENNA,A.J.-ALBN
WILLIAMS,B.-FSU
GLAUD,A.-DSU
BRACK,William-MHC


CL G
SR 5
SR 4
SR 4
JR 4
SR 4
FR 5
SR 4
SR 3
JR 5
SR 4
JR 5
JR 3
JR 4


ALL PURPOSE CL G
BANKS,Ulys.-AAMU SR 4
COKER,LaMarcus-HAM SR 4
PORTER, Quinn-SC SR 3
VANN,LeRoy-FAMU SR 4
WILLIAMS.R.-Shaw FR 5
JOHNSON,D.-ALBST SR 4
YOUNG,Tre-SCSU SR 3
MAYHEW,Mike-NCAT SO 4
FRANKLIN,J.-JCS JR 4
THOMPSON.W.-CAU SO 4

SCORING CL G
JOHNSON,Dem.-ALBN SR 4
WILLIAMS,R.-SHAW FR 5
WEBB,Rodney-BSU JR 5
STEWART,Juamorr-SU SR 4
TURNER, Austin-FSU SO 5
Mullen,lan-MHC JR 4
McNEILL,D.-ECSU FR 5
BRANCHE,D.-NSU JR 4
HARRIS,Jone'-SAC FR 5
Pascley,John-TUSK JR 5

KICKOFF RETURNS CL G
FRANKLIN,Jer.-JCS JR 4
YOUNG,Tre-SCSU SR 3
PROCTOR,James-BSJ SO 5
BOONERich.-SAC FR 5
GORDON,Jam.-KSU JR 5
VANN,LeRoy-FAMU SR 4
BANKS,Ulys.-AAMU SR 4
RODRIGUEZ,Jam-MHC JR 4
WILLIAMS,R.-SHAW JR 5
ADDISON-SPC JR 4
WASHINGTON,J.-VUU 5


PUNT RETURNS
VANN,Leroy-FAMU
BUDD,Clifton-BSU
WEEDEN,Ant.-PVAM
LONG,Quay-NCAT
HAWKINS,Chas.-SU


PCT YDS TDS
57.8 1433 13
62.3 977 10
61.2 871 7
52.8 849 7
66.7 846 7
56.6 1042 6
47.8 1039 6
53.3 591 5
63.1 583 4
60.3 776 11
58.2 751 3


YPC YDSIG
12.1 106.0
14.9 107.0
12.9 81.7
12.7 73.0
16.3 93.8
8.3 47.0
10.8 61.3
15.2 83.5
11.8 63.0
18.6 97.5
12.1 60.2
18.1 86.0
9.2 42.4

YPC YDSIG
14.9 107.0
12.1 106.0
18.6 97.5
16.3 93.8
18.1 86.0
22.6 85.8
19.0 85.5
15.2 83.5
12.9 81.7
19.8 79.0
12.7 73.0
32.7 72.0
20.9 71.0


AVG/G
286.6
244.2
217.8
212.2
211.5
208.4
207.8
197.0
194.3
194.0
187.8

RECIG
8.8
7.2
6.3
5.8
5.8
5.7
5.7
5.5
5.3
5.2
5.0
4.8
4.6


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BCSP Notes


Q& ,, Kiii,..,i i


RUSH PASS PLAYS YDS AVGIG
106 1433 284 1539 307.8
291 846 143 1137 284.2
52 977 151 1029 257.2
118 871 140 989 247.2
134 849 139 983 245.8
55 1039 140 1094 218.8
172 698 149 870 217.5
61 591 112 652 217.3
406 670 179 1076 215.2
54 776 100 830 207.5
-13 1042 180 1029 205.8
57 546 128 603 201.0
52 751 138 803 200.8


Rush Rec
476 121
428 118
293 29
0 0
489 14
176 316
0 245
270 54
0 334
544 33


A*lMM -wrl ..iiii .,'40ail. *


PAT PTS
0 60
0 54
0 48
0 36
14 44
13 34
0 42
0 .30
0 36
0 36


4 ..,,,,..4


CL G
SR 4
SO 5
SR 2
SO 4
FR 4


0 AZEEZ Communications. Inc. Vol XVI. No. 9


SWAC

DUEL IN

DALLAS


TDS AVGIG
1 136.0
8 124.6
3 119.0
2 107.0
2 104.2
8 97.8
4 96.5
6 95.2
3 91.0
2 89.7
1 85.5
2 83.7
2 81.4
4 81.2
0 76.0
1 72.8
0 70.0


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BLACS MUT COTROLTHEI OWNDESIN


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