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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00845
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: August 26, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00845

Full Text







CORONER RULES JACKSON'S DEATH A HOMICIDE

512 ~ P


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11707
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 52 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


IRA C. CLARK
Former President
Jackson Health System
1937-2009


JHS honors Ira C. Clark
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
A resolution sponsored by Miami-Dade Commissioners Au-
drey Edmonson and Barbara Jordan helped Jackson Health
System honor their former President and Chief Executive Of-
ficer, Ira C. Clark. The Jackson Diagnostic Treatment Center
was named in memory of the late Clark on Monday.
Notable dignitaries who attended the ceremony included At-
torney Larry Handfield, former chairman of the Public Health
Trust, Miami-Dade Commissioners: Audrey Edmonson, Bar-
bara Jordan, Javier Souto and Chairman Dennis Moss, State
Sen. Frederica S. Wilson, Eneida O. Roldan, President and
Chief Executive Officer of Jackson Health System,
John H. Copeland III, Public Health Trust chairman, Er-,
nesto A. de la F6, former Public Health Trust Chairman and
Nicholas Clark, son of Ira C. Clark. The individuals reflected
on Clark's life and on his contributions to the JHS.
Clark began his career at Jackson in 1987. He arrived with
an immediate plan to find funding for Jackson and expand
the hospital facility. Clark produced results quickly, and
within three years of his arrival, the John H. Peavy Adolescent
Please turn to CLARK 13B




ADMIT program loses

Children's Trust funding
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
Miami's low-income communities have been dealt another
fiscal blow. Cutbacks at the Children's Trust have put the
futures of many programs into jeopardy.
The Alternative Directions Music Industry Training pro-
gram (ADMIT) is a non-profit organi-
zation that focuses on music industry
training and has the aim of developing
economic self sufficiency; social respon-
sibility; life skills; and commitment to
public service among its participants.
The Children's Trust has .ended its
$75,000 contract; As a result, the pro-
gram's after-school facility, in Miami
Gardens, will close. Thomas Demerritte
The program teaches at-risk youth President and CEO
about aspects of the music industry
other than being an artist, and in doing so; kept them from
more high-risk activities according to Th6mas Demerritte,
President and CEO of ADMIT.
"In the past two weeks, we went to a facility on 33rd Street
Please turn to PROGRAM 6A


Copyrighted Mterial


- Syndicated Contentl


Available from Commercial News providers

-I-


-Q eaS_ f


Suspect arrested in Overtown shooting


Search for more suspects ongoing


By Sandra J. Charity
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
While sitting in her living
room in Liberty City Friday
afternoon, Prater was helping
her teenaged daughter prepare
for the new school year; but it
saddened, her that her other
daughter, Michelle Coleman,
would not be returning back to
school.
"I miss her very much," she
said.
According to Prater, the bond
that the two shared could not
described in words. A nursing
student at Florida A & M Uni-
versity in Tallahassee, Cole-
man, 21, dreamed of living her
life to help others.
Coleman had recently
learned that she was to become
a mother; but sadly, on July
6, Coleman's dreams, along
with those of Anthony Smith, a
star of the Booker T. Washing-


ton High football team, would
come to an end.
Three gunmen armed with an


. I


' 4
i".


AK-47 and five pistols opened
fire on July 6 into a .crowd of
more than 200 people gathered
at Northwest Fifth Street and
Fifth Avenue. Twelve people
were shot and one woman was
hit by a car while attuwpting to.
flee the scene.
A month after numerous
candlelight vigils, press con-
ference and town-hall meet-
ings for the Overtown shooting
that left two dead, Miami Police


*'L Andresa Prater sits in her
- - Liberty City home holding


a picture of her daughter,
Michqlle Coleman, who was
shot and killed at a birthday
party in Overtown on July 5.
-Miami Times photo/Sandra J. Charite

have arrested 18-year-old Rod-
ney LaShawn Miller.
Police gave very little infor-
mation believing Miller did not
act alone. Chief John Timoney


l im
RODNEY LASHAWN MILLER
Alleged Shooter
continued to encourage the
public to help in the case.
"We are asking for assistance
in helping to bring to justice a
few other individuals involved,"
said Miami Police Chief John
Timoney at a press conference
on Wednesday at the Miami
Police Headquarters.
Please turn to SHOOTING 6A


Commissioners enraged over mayor's pay raises


Miami Times Staff Report
Led by Commissioners Au-
drey Edmonson, Sally Hey-
man, and Carlos Giminez;
Miami-Dade commissioners
are showing their displeasure
with County Mayor Carlos Al-
varez over his recent pay rais-
es to favored staff members.
Everyone seemed to agree
that the mayor has opened
a can of worms, but its size


is yet to be deter-
mined. Edmonson
has said she would
support cutting the
County. Executive
Office budget by as
much as 45 percent
next year.
Commissioner
Katy Sorenson, who EDMO
chairs the budget'
committee, called for a 15 per-
cent budget cut for Alvarez's


office. She wants
the same cut for the
county commission
offices and county at-
torney's office.
Commissioner Car-
los Giminez is seek-
ing a 25 percent cut.
He criticized Alva-
NSON rez-for misleading the
commission through
his chief of staff and director of
policy in March. Heyman filed


a public-records request in
July seeking raise information,
but the pay hikes were not dis-
closed because they had been
backdated to last year.
The commission will be fac-
ing a horde of angry taxpay-
ers at public hearings starting
next week. They are demand-
ing that the mayor make steep-
er cuts than the 10 percent
reduction he has proposed for
his office.


Stmk the rich? Copyrighted Material h (ta e ader




Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 2 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGUST 26-SEP 9


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Mayor's staff pay

raises are obscene
In the best of times, the high salaries of some city officials
may seem a bit excessive to most. In times of deficits, to
increase these already muscular compensation packages
is nothing short of obscene. Yet this is exactly what Miami-
Dade County Mayor Carlos Alvarez has done.

Last March, Alvarez gave Chief of Staff Denis Morales an
11 percent pay raise, bringing his salary from $185,484 to
$206,783. On the same day he gave a 15 percent raise to his
policy director, Robert Villar, bringing his salary from $95,779
to $109,879. The pair's raises were backdated, which means
that they also received "make up" checks for $17,281 and
$9,747 respectively.

Alvarez also gave a 26 percent raise to his senior advisor,'
Luis Gazitua, through a series of pay hikes ending in November
2008 that pushed his salary to $101,842.
Alvarez has defended the pay hikes. He claims that his
employees are not drawing the same salaries as their city-
employed counterparts.
This may be so, but to increase their wages by such an
amount while asking other county employees to "tighten their
belts" is the height of hypocrisy.
Miami-Dade County is struggling to close a 427 million
budget gap. We have cut valuable children's programs and
services in the process. County wo-kers-1,700 of them at last
count--have been laid off. Many of those remaining have taken
a 5 percent pay cut in the name of balancing the budget.

While the number may be a bit high, Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson was absolutely right to have said-and publicly-
that she would support a cut of the County Executive Office's
budget by as much as 45 percent next year. It will not happen,
of course. But the statement reflects the outrage that we all
should feel.

Take back the land
A truck is no place for a family of twelve to live.
A, This statement should seem obvious, but were it not
S for organizations like Take Back The Land,. the Con-
ley Family, of North Miami Dade could be doing just that.

Last February, a California bank attempted to evict the
Conley family from their home. The large family did not have
the option of moving to a shelter, because in order to do so,
they would have to be separated. The family was moved back
into the home by TBTL, and has lived there undisturbed un-
til this month when they were served with another eviction
notice. Let us make no mistake. The family was living there
illegally. The bank, from a legal standpoint, has every right to
evict them.

But just because one can do something does not mean that
one should.

The fact is - the home sits in an economically depressed
neighborhood where there are many other homes for sale. Its
condition is so poor that Conley was unable to get a reverse
mortgage on the-property. Take back the land was correct in
its assertion that in a depressed housing market, the prop-
erty is unlikely to sell.

The choice then, lies between leaving the home vacant, to
slowly deteriorate, or allowing the family that has lived there
for twenty years to remain there together.


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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster- Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 * 305-694-6210


CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead Ihe world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Haing no person, fearing no person, tne
Black Press strives to help every person In the firm bellel thai all persons are hurt as long as anyone Is held back.

AP The Media AudiAt -
.___---- --------------------------------- ""-~--- ------


Qfe fliamti Oiuuta

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street.
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Slation, Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


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If only all decisions were this simple.


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The mere fact that the family lived there for six months
before the California-based bank chose to act again shows
that the property is no great priority for them. The bank has
repeatedly declined to comment on the issue. It has not re-
sponded to attempts by the family to contact them and work
out equitable terms for rental of the property either.

Take Back the Land has taken the position that housing is
a human right, a position with which few would argue. They
have also taken the position that the Conleys have a greater
need, and right, to the home than big corporations getting bil-
lions of dollars in our money for a bailout. On all these points
the organization is correct.

Families should not be separated and displaced in the name
of corporate profits.
WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


OPINION


LOCAL COMMEN'IARY -- OU)R COMMUNITY VENTS


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


Time to believe


'I recall listening to Barack
Obama speak at the Gusman
Center and making up. my
mind that I would support him
regardless of all the political
'pundits who told-me that he
could not win. I listen now to
the political pundits who said
that Kendrick Meek could not
win a statewide election in the
State of Florida for the vacant
U.S. Senate seat. I am telling
everyone that will listen - it
is time to believe. Kendrick
quickly surpassed the other
democrats and is now clearly
the front runner. He has, the
cash, he has the organization,
he has the ideas, he has the in-
tegrity and he has the energy to
be Florida's next U.S. Senator.
I tell everyone again, it is time
to believe. Kendrick Meek will
win in a head to head election'
with Gov. Charlie Crist.
Crist should be called the
weather vane - he makes deci-
sions based on how the politi-
cal winds are blowing. He tells
everyone during the campaign
that he will support educa-
tion and the proceeds to blud-
geon the education budget. He
supports diversity, and actu-
ally appoints Supreme Justice
Perry, and then bows down
to the ring wing conservatives
and does not support Supreme
Court Justice Sonia Sotomay-


or. He kisses
Obama's butt
to get stimu-
lus money to
the dismay
of staunch
Republicans,'
but then
does not uti-
lize the money quickly in order
to help promote a recovery in
this state. I personally believe
that America is growing up and
that there are more fair minded
people who will, despite race,
pick Kendrick Meek.
Money is one way to judge of a
candidate's strength. Kendrick
is clearly the strongest Demo-
crat running for governor. He
has raised substantially more
money than his candidates.
He needs to raise more money
to beat Crist, so keep sending
those checks. Using the same
barometer, then Fredericka
Wilson has raised almost dou-
ble the amount of money raised
by Shirley Gibson. Frederica
has also raised her money from
people in the District. She has
not used power brokers from
Pinecrest, Coral Gables and Mi-
ami Beach to raise her money.
She has got her money the old
fashion way.by having her sup-
porters in the district, in her
community hold multiple small
fundraisers.


E 8 I( YTELA.EAFS
. , , District'.. ..... ..y w.ho,.. said wa,?



MDCPS District 2 controversy who said what?


In reference to the article writ-
ten by Kathleen McGrory and
David Ovalle in The Miami Her-
ald Political Beat on Aug. 24,
2009. The facts were not re-
ported, based on recent articles
printed in The Miami Times from
June through August 2009 edi-
tions.


He felt that Ronda Vangates, an
attorney and a person who has,
worked at highest echelons of
school system, would have the
brains and strength to not only
make policy on that dais, but to
handle meetings in such a way
that everyone would know she
was in charge. I have never seen


Sased on Stinson and Ronda Vangates words, it was clear that
if Vangates was going to be elected then Stinson would have
to resign. There was no indication that Vangates was going to
challenge him for his seat.

If Miami-Dade School Board Stinson so fired up. He states
Chairman Dr. Solomon C. Stin- that some candidates are claim-
son is running for re-election, ing that he endorses them, but
he needs to not only tell me, the only candidate that he is en-
but he also needs to tell Attor- dorsing is Ronda Vangates."
ney Reginald J. Clyne. In the Stinson also needs to tell
August 19 ,edition of The Mi- those people who are working
ami Times,. Clyne states in his with him in Vangates campaign;
column, Changing the because in my role as
guard: School board a Vangates supporter,
race heating up, "Dr. I acted on information
Solomon C. Stinson, given to me by Van-
Miami-Dade schools gates herself and oth-
chairman, has stated er supporters in the
unequivocally that he camp in distributing
is '10,000 'percent be- the flyers and emails.
hind' Ronda Vangates. It was my understand-
He announced at a ing from Vangates
meeting in his house - (emails documents
that it is time for veter- RONDA VANGATES from June 21- Aug.
an politicians like him School Board Candidate 13, 2009) that Solo-
to step down and pass mon Stinson was sup-
the baton to the new generation. porting her. One evening during


Commissioner Spence-Jones neglected her district


Dear Editor,


City of Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones went
back to. Haiti to do a "Level An
Nou Kimbe Potoprens Pwop
I" (Wake Up! Let's Keep Port-
au-Prince Clean). Is she really
kidding me? When did she do
a Wake Up! Let's Keep Liberty


City or Overtown clean? Go to
Northwest 62nd Street and
18th Avenue and just look at
the trash on the ground (in her
district) and I say again, she
must be kidding!
When will our Black commis-
sioners care about Black' peo-
ple living in this city? She has
trucks and supplies in her pos-


session but she won't use them
in our area first. Charity (love)
begins at home not in Haiti.
Is Haiti the new 51 state, if so
then someone needs to let me
know. Our town is always the
last to get services.
Has Spence-Jones heard of
Hurricane Wilma? This dis-
trict could use some hurricane


supplies too since they have so
much money to spend. I wonder
if people in Haiti would let their
Prime Minister take their money
and send it to our poor areas in
Miami. The people who need to
wake up is Black Miami.

Linda Simmons,
Miami


Parental involvement crucial for a better education


Dear Editor,

Last year, in a study con-
ducted by Johns Hopkins
University, several inner-city
schools in Miami were identi-
fied as a "Dropout Factory,"
which begs the question:
What will be your child's
future in the Miami-Dade
County School System?


This year, many parents
will have to answer that
question one way or the
other. Parent involvement is
a critical component to sav-
ing a child's life. Particularly
if that child is being reared
in Liberty City, Overtown,
Brownsville or Little Haiti. If
that seems extreme then go
down to -the Juvenile Court


and see hpw many young
people are "caught up" in the
system. Most of them will
eventually matriculate .into
the adult system because a
parent essentially turned the
child over to the system due
to their lack of involvement.
The parent is the frontline
or the barrier in this battle to
protect their children against


the outdated teaching strat-
egies that include School
Board politics, -teachers that
don't want to teach or can't
teach and thugs who want to
be your child's mentor..
So parents, go out there and
fight and save your child I

Robert Malone,
Miami


a conversation I had
with Dr. Stinson he
told me "We are going
to have to work hard
to get her elected and
she is going to do a
great job." Based on
that information, I
moved forward to let
the public know that SOLOMON
Vangates was run- School Bc
ning for an open seat
on the School Board
and that Stinson, as he ver-
balized to me, was supporting
her. If Stinson has decided for
some reason not to retire, that
is his decision to make. But the
assumption that The Herald
makes, that I misinformed the
public, is not based on facts. It
is a fact that Solomon Stinson
told me; "We are going to have
to work hard to get her elect-


I STINSON
lard Chair


ed and
she is going to do a
great job." During the
course of that conver-
sation the only thing
we were talking about
was Ronda Vangates
being elected,to the
seat he now holds on
the School Board.
Based on Stinson
and Ronda Vangates


words, it was clear
that if Vangates was going to be
elected then Stinson would have
to resign. There was no indica-
tion that Vangates was going
to challenge him for his seat. I
don't know the reason Stinson
responded to The Herald differ-
ently from the statements that
was made by him in The Times,
but I will not be a part of any-
one's political games.


If you feel the recession is only causing grief to local hom-
eowners, check this out. A subcontractor on the renovation of
the Fontainebleau Miami Beach has filed a $10 million fore-
closure lawsuit against the project and its lender, Bank of
America. The lawsuit is the first of its kind against the famous
Miami Beach hotel, which was reopened in October after a
complete overhaul by developer Turnberry Associates.


Plenty people are complaining about the serious cutbacks
for the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center in Liberty City.
First it was Metro Miami Action Plan (MMAP), then James E.
Scott Community Association (JESCA). Are we going to wait
until they close the AHCAC before we wake up and do some-
thing about it?


Florida Power and Light is getting a good going over this
week before the Public Service Commission about their poor
service and high prices visited upon this state in past years.
FPL is asking permission to raise its rates for basic service
by about 30 percent. Monday's hearing is the first in what is
expected to be weeks of testimony and cross-examination of
the state's largest utility.


Fish fraud continues to be a part of South Florida restau-
rants who sell a lot of catfish claiming it to be grouper. Most
serious fish eaters make a trip to the market and select their
own. Don't trust the restaurants.

**** .**
Heat talent Michael Beasley, 20, has checked into a Hous-
ton rehabilitation center to seek counseling for psychological
issues and apparent drug use. Details emerged after disturb-
ing comments and a controversial photo were posted on his
Twitter account. It is unclear how long he will be in Houston.


The coming Miami-Dade School Board race is becoming a
bit confusing. Who is running for the seat to replace veteran
member, Dr. Solomon
C. Stinson? Will he seek another term? Stay tuned.


JESCA's bankruptcy no surprise


Dear Editor,

Jesca is bankrupt, what else
is new? The agency, geared to
Blacks within the community,
has been struggling for years.
Jesca has no sense of stability
as its administration walks in
and out of'the door. I say shut
it down because it serves no pur-
pose anyways. They don't even
pay their employees.
Lack of stability is a trend in
the Black community. We com-
plain about having no resources


but when the resources are avail-
able, we don't know how to main-
tain it or we put our trust in the
wrong hands (if you know what I
mean, if not, look at your County
Commission). Sorry to be the one
to say it but that is the truth. The
Black community is a ship that
has sunk but we failed to put on
our life vest so now we are await-
ing the rescue' boats to come. We,
have been waiting too long!

Kathleen T. Joseph
Overtown


Stand up for education now


Dear Editor,

I am appalled by the Black
community's silence.
When the state threatened to
shut down Edison High, Cen-
tral High, Liberty City and Hol-
mes Elementary, we brought out
the marching bands, politicians
and "feel good" town-hall meet-
ings that lasted more than three
hours. But now, we are sitting in
silence as we settle for the C's,
D's and F. The only real improve-
ment was Liberty City, jumping
from an F to an A.
Corporate Academy North, 500
Role Model Academy, Little River
Elementary School, Booker T.


Washington, Miami Northwest-
ern High and Miami Jackson
High, all fell in the "F" category
but yet I have seen no pep rally
or press conference. Don't wait
for the state to put another man-
date for the rallies to begin. This
is where it starts, right here
We are a community that is
known for always talking with
very few results to show for our'
words. Since you have chosen
the right to remain silence, please
don't call me about any town-hall
meetings because I am sick of the
same "dead" speech.

Daniel Johnson,
North Miami


Are Miami Dolphins tickets too expensive?


DERRICK LATIMORE, 41
Retired, Liberty City

Not really. I
don't remem-
ber the last
time I've been
to one. I'm just
not a sports
fan though.
They might be
for someone
else. I'm more of a movie fan.
It's mostly a time thing. I have
to take care of my family first.
It's a time thing.

AL CRAWFORD, 49
Construction Worker, Miami

No, they re- -
ally aren't. I'd
probably go if _
they were less
expensive, but
you're look-
ing at around
$40. They re-
ally just aren't
worth that.
I know they're supposed to be


adding some things, and there's
been a lot of advertising, but it's
still too much money.

JAROME EDWARDS, 43
Postal Worker, Miami

No, they
aren't worth it.
It's a shame, * ,
because I'm
a fan of the
team and I'd
.definitely go if
they cost less.
They should
be letting peo-
ple in for free really. They had
$300 million to build the sta-
dium, but want to charge us
these prices to get in. Makes no
sense. I'd probably go more of-
ten if it cost less.

DWIGHT REID, 53
Plumber, Overtown

Yes, they're worth it. I go often.
I try to make every home game.
These changes they're making
will attract more people too, but


I was already
going. I've al-
ways been a
Dolphins fan;
since the Bob
Greise, days.
When they
went 17-0, I
was saying
in Overtown.
People who say they cost too
much need to just save their
money and get there.

WENDELL MOSS, 47
Student, Liberty City

I haven't
been to one, so
I really can't
say. I'd like to
go, but I really
can't afford to.
I'd definitely
go if they were
less expensive,
but they cost
way too much.

GARY SUMMONS, 55
Liberty City, Retired


Yes,they're
worth it. .It
can be ex-
pensive, but
it's some-
thing that
I enjoy; so
I go. I go, to
the Heat's
games too.
They should
maybe take $5 off, or give the
people a free corn dog and a
coke when they go. People would
be there all the time. They look
like they're gonna be good this
year too, so that helps.




FREE
THE

Liberty

City Seven


Li4-'










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGUST 26- 9


African Caribbean Dance Theatre, Inc.
Alachua County Public Schools
ALS Association - Florida Chapter
Baptist Health Foundation
Barry Johnson. Presidenlr Giealer Miami Chamber of Commerce
Bay County Chamber of Commerce
Bethune Cookman University
Black History Committee of Orange County
Boy Scouts of America North Florida Council
Brevard Achievement Center
Bndging the Gap Outreach Inc
CAMACOL Latin Chambei of Commerce
Cathedral Arts Project
Centro Hispano Catolico - Msgr Bryan 0. Walsh Child Care Center
Chamber of the Palm Beaches
Child Care Association of Brevard County
Children s Home Society - Central Florida
City of Miami Beach Tourism & Convention Department
Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida
Cocoa Beach Chamber of Commerce
Coconut Grove Arts Fesrival
Commissioner Betty Wyman .- AFTER SCHOOL ALL STARS
Community Connections
Community Partnership for the Homeless, Inc.
Communities In Schools Jacksonville
Concerned African Women
Consejo PresidiPoico Cubano,
Cuban American National Council
Cysilc Fibrosis Foundation
Davie-Cooper City Chamber of Commerce
Daytona Beach international Festival
Daytona Beach.Halifax Area Chamber of Commerce
Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce
Dennis Jones Memorial Foundation
Derek Bruce - Edge Public Affairs
Dr. Dario Moreno, Director - The Metropolitan Center
Doral Business Council
Dreams Come True
Education Foundation of Palm Beach County - Dwyer Awards
Enterprise Flagler
Faith, Hope.. and Love Ministries, Inc
FCAA-Famlly Christian Association of America
Fernando Figueredo -FIU
Flagler County Chamber of Commerce
Florida Endowment Foundation for Florida s Graduates
Florida Memorial Unlversity
Florida Regional Minority Bu;iness Council
Florlia Sheriffs Youth Ranches
Florida State University - Panama Cty
Friend's of ACT-SO Inc
FrontLine Outreach-Orlando
Gainesvllle Chamber of Commerce
Gainesville Council for Economic Outreach
Gator Bowl Assoclation Chanties
Girl Scouts of Gateway Council
Greater Dania Beach Chamber of Commerce
Greater Deiray Beach Chamber of Commeice
Greater Hernando County Chamber of Commerce
Greater Hollywood Chamber of Commerce
Greater Lake Worth Chamber of Commerce
Greater Plantation Chamber of Commerce
Greater Tampa Chamber of Commerce
Halifax Health Foundation
Heart of Florida United Way
Hialeah Chamber of Commerce & Industries
His House Children's Home
Hispanic Unity of Florida
Human Services Coalition
Indian River County Chamber of Commerce
Invest in Our Youth
Jacksonville Community Council Inc.
Jaclrsonville Council of Hispanic'Organizatioris
Jacksonvlle Marine Charities
Jacob Stuart, President - CENTRAL FLORIDA PARTNERSHIP
Junior Achievement of Central Florida
Junior Achievement - Northwest Florida Eastern District
Kiwanis of Little Havana Foundation
Lakeland Area Chamber of Commerce
Latin Builders Associartion
Latin China Trade Center
LBS Foundation Inc.
Leslie Hielema-Fresident - ORLANDO REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Life Alliance Organ Recovery
Light of the World Clinic
Linking Solutionm, In,
The Education Foundation of MarU n County
MahVati.Washiogtlf, El�oUndatigg.l.,. , * .,,..;, ...;, ...,.,
Martin Luther King Commission - Orlando
Martin Luther King Institute for Non Violence
Melbourne/Palm Bay Chamber of Commerce
Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission
Miami Beach Chamber of Commerce
Miami Gardens Chamber of Commerce
Miami Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival
Miami Overseas China Association
Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce
Michael Dippy, Director -- IDignity
Mike Ketchum, President -BuslnessForce
Mothers in Crisis, Inc.
Museum of Contemporary Art
New Horizons Learning Center - Mentoring Program
North Dade Regional Chamber of Commerce
Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce
North Florida Educational Development Corporation. Inc.
ONYX Magazine
Opa-Locka Communiry Development Corporation
Opa-Locka Chamber of Commerce
Palm Beach County Education Commission
Palm Ciry Chamber of Commerce
Parrnmore KidZone
Puerto Rican Chamber South Florida
PULSE (People United to Lead the Struggle for Equalityl
Quest. Inc -Central Florida
Red Cross - Central Florida
Ron Rogers - 100 Black Men of Orlando
Roy Hester - West Orange Chamber of Commerce-Past Chair
RSVP-Central Florida (Retired Senior Volunteer Progiami
Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida
Seminole Chamber of Commerce
Senior Volunteer Services of Broward
Shelly Lauten-President - myregion org
Sherwood DuBose, CEO - VoA Corp.
Sickle Cell Foundation. Inc.
Space Coast Economic Development Commission
St. Andrew Bay Center
St. Lucie County Chamber of Commerce
St. Lucle County Education Foundation
St.Petersburg Area Chamber Foundation, Inc.
St. Petersburg Area Chamber of Commerce
Stetson University
Stuart/Martin County Chamber of Commerce
The Black Archives
The Broward Alliance
The Education Foundation of Martin Coupty
The Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce
The Greater Sunrise Chamber of Commerce
The Porualt of Empowerment, Inc
The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum
The Florida Orchestra
The Tampa Bay Partnership
Tico Perez - Edge Public Affairs
Titusville Chamber of Commerce
UNCF - United iNegro College Fund
United Council of Negro Women's Reed Educational Campus
United Families of America. Inc.
United Way of Alachua County
United Way of the Big Bend
United Way of Brevard County
United Way of Broward County
United Way of Central Florida
United Way of Collier County
United Way of Escambla County
United Way of Hernando County
United Way of Indian River County
United Way of Manatee County
United Way of Martin County
United Way of Mlami-Dade
United Way of Monroe County
United Way of Northeast Florida
United Way of Northwest Florida
United Way of Okaloosa - Wallon Counties
United Way of Pasco County
United Way of Palm Beach County
United Way of Santa Rosa County


United Way of St. Lucie County, Inc
United Way of Volusia & Flagler County
University of West Florida
Urban League of Palm Beach County. Inc.
VisionQuest - Central Florida
Viva Broward
Volunteers in Medicine
Washington County Chamber of Commerce
Winter Park Chamber of Commerce
Women in Distress of Broward County


We salute AT&T







... for its record of continued

investment in


Florida's communities:




$6.6 million in charitable

contributions in 2008 and


more than 320,000 employee

volunteer hours in 2008,


valued at $6.2 million.







In tough times,


it's good to know that AT&T


believes in our nation's future


and continues to invest and

support our


diverse communities.







By encouraging businesses

to continue to invest


in our neighborhoods,


we are confident we will come through


these difficult times better prepared to

meet the challenges of the future.










Together we can make a


meaningful difference in the

lives of so many.















^.^J^ If ^le


4A I, n 1 MIAIII I VEA UU i I -aL I I ,


_1_ _I _ _ __ , 111 1 -, I - I I - 111~ 1









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CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26- SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST


. A ml










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


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Community Action Agency will not close


PROGRAM
continued from 1A

and 27th Avenue. The kids
made a great positive CD,' he
said.
Demerritte said he and the
ADMIT students went on Aug.
16 to the Turner Guilford
Knight Correctional Center
[7000 Northwest 41 Street],
and "we served those kids by
going out there and took our
recording equipment and key-
boards, they made their own
positive song about non-vio-
lence and crime avoidance."
The program is a popular
one. "This summer we had
a total of 50 kids. About our
average per 12-week period
would be 50-70 kids," said De-
merritte.
"We also do outreach," De-
merritte continued. "Our af-
ter-school program is probably
the most important because it
engaged the kids in a positive
activity instead of what a lot of
the kids are engaged in after
school.
The statistics kind of indi-
cate that the kids are at high-
est risk after-school," Demer-
ritte said.
Demerritte is doing his best


to save the program; with only
partial success.
"We're trying to find funding
as we speak; hoping to find a
corporate sponsor or some-
thing," Demerritte said. "I still
go out and give some of the
services for free. Those kids
are really in need," he said.
"I don't want to close the pro-
gram, because then the kids
have to do without, but we're
really trying to find partners,
rather than just sponsors.
Money is one thing, but money
and visibility, and prestige, are
another," he said.
ADMIT's Liberty City pro-
gram is funded by bemerritte's
production company, Tavette
Entertainment Group, and fa-
cility rental fees. It will remain
open. The program's West Per-
rine facility however, will likely
close.
On equally tenuous ground is
the Portrait of Empowerment,
an Opa-locka based program
founded by Dorothy "Dottie"
Johnson. Portrait of Empower-
ment Inc. seeks to aid at-risk
youth through mentoring, peer
to peer mediation, and tutor-
ing. It will not resume in the
autumn without its $75,000
contract.


Among the organizations ad-
versely affected by budget cuts
was the James E. Scott Com-
munity Association, which
filed for bankruptcy protection
this month. "These cuts fur-
ther complicate the financial
picture for the organization,"
said Vincent Brown, the orga-
nization's Executive Director.
,The Miami-Dade County
Community Action Agency,
which received a grant of
$428,673 will take cuts as well,
but will not close according to
Julie Edwards, the program's
Executive Director.
"The Community Action
Agency is certainly not going
to close because of the Chil-
dren's Trust cuts," she said.
"We will lose 76 slots from our
Early Head Start program, but
that's it. The remaining slots,'
of which there are 318, are
funded by the Department of
Health and Human Services."
Children's Trust officials,
who notified, agency providers
of the cuts in June and July,
say the cuts were unavoidable
and have come as a result of de-
clining property values, which
in turn reduced the amount of
money the Trust took in.


Victim's mother: Violence must stop


SHOOTING
continued from 1A

Coleman, 21, a Florida A&M
nursing student, and Anthony,
17-year-old football star were
shot at the Overtown birthday
party and died days after the
shooting.
Preanna Wilcox, 18; Bran-
don Ware, 17; Trenisha Hodge,
18; Diamond Mobley, 19, An-
quan Broussard, 16; William
Hayward, 28; Tyrell Williams,
19; Rickayla Limonda, 18 and
'Shakevia Bejar, 21 were among
the other victims.
Anthony aspired to play foot-
ball at the University of Califor-
nia, Los Angeles (UCLA) next
year. His family received a letter
two days following his funeral


that he had won a full football
scholarship to UCLA. Members
of the family also made a plea
at the press conference.
"Close your eyes and pretend
it was your grandchild or your
child," pleaded Joann Smith
Monrose, Anthony's .grand-
mother.
Miller, no stranger to the
law, is being charged with two
counts of second degree mur-
der with a deadly weapon.
Prater was out of town when
the Miami Police held a press
conference announcing the ar-
rest of Miller, but she was over-,
joyed to hear the news.
"I am happy with the work
that the police have done," she
said. "One arrest has put. the
"H" and "A" in my happiness."


Prater also congratulated the
community's involvement.
"I am so glad that people are
beginning to talk."
The age of the suspect--and
violence of the attack--troubles
Prater.
"It hurts me to see or he r
that our children are killing
each other," she said. "Those
individuals took away two in-
nocent lives. They are walk-
ing around with guns in their
hands but they can't even
shoot straight."
Detectives seek more tips
and information to find others
involved in the shooting.
Anyone with information is
Urged to call the City of Miami
Police Department's Homicide
Unit at 305-579-6530.


los


- . 4.


Support shelter pets.

Donate online!

The Miami-Dade County Animal Services Trust is now accepting donations on -
the web. Your tax-deductible gift helps us to:
* Provide toys, beds and sweaters for cold weather and more!
* Reunite shelter pets with their owners or find them new homes.
* Develop spay/neuter programs.
* Work with over 50 rescue partners to help save as many animals
as possible.

Donating online is secure, convenient and a great way to lend a helping hand.

To donate online, go to www.miamidade.gov or call 3-1-1
for information on other ways to help.


FREE
THE

,Liberty

City Seven


~


mw w


I


r


o


0 4b


r


0


-Ifiow


&k m* r



















SECTION B


The Miami Times





Faith&Fan


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


As Ramadan nears, Muslims plan to donate


Zakat, or charitable giving, always soars during the holiday


By Cathy Lynn Grossman

Ramadan, the Islamic holy
month of fasting and prayer,
begins at sunset Saturday, and
many believers are already plan-
ning a key observance:. zakat,
one of the five pillars of Islam.
Often translated as "char-


ity," it requires believers to give
2.5% of their cash assets (even
including the value of their jew-
elry or stocks) to the Muslim
needy and poor.
Zakat might be given at any
time in the year, but Ramadan's
focus on compassion and intro-
spection often prompts a great-


er outpouring.
After the attacks ,of Sept.
11, 2001, Muslims in the USA
struggled to be sure the chari-
ties they chose supported hu-
man welfare without financing
violent political efforts.
President Obama pledged
in his address to the Mus-


lim world in
June that the
government
would take
IRS and an-
ti-terrorism
measures to
OBAMA make it eas-
ier to clear
zakat hurdles.
Websites such as Global Giv-
ing, which was created in 2003


to support projects around the
world, will highlight Islamic
charities to make it easier for
Muslims to give to reputable
groups within legal guidelines,
says program officer Saima Za-
'man, who created a Ramadan
portal at the site in 2006..
It directs a small but grow-
ing number of Muslim donors
to 40 suggested charities, such
as organizations that offer clean


drinking water in Morocco,
meals for girls in Burkina Paso,
and education and health ser-
vices for girls in. Afghanistan,
she says.
Ramadan is also when critics
of Islam step up. The website
Middle East Forum features an
essay on the "dark side of zakat"
by associate director Raymond
Ibrahim, who is not Muslim.
Please turn to RAMADAN 15B


Williams

sworn in as

Peace Corps

Director
.Aaron S. Williams was sworn
in Monday as the eighteenth
Director of the Peace Corps.
Williams was nominated by
President Barack Obama on
July 14 and confirmed by the
U.S. Senate on Aug. 7.
"I am deeply honored to be
the Director of the Peace Corps
and I want to thank President
Obama for the trust that he
has placed in me. I look for-
ward to making his call to
public service a reality for more
Americans," said.Williams. "I
am committed to recruiting,
training, and supporting the
next generation of skilled and
enthusiastic volunteers eager
to serve side by side with mem-
bers of Peace Corps host com-
munities around the world."
Williams is the fourth direc-
tor to have served'as a Peace
Corps volunteer. He served as
a volunteer in the Dominican ,
Republic from 1967 to 1970.
Upon completing his service, he
became the coordinator of mi-
nority recruitment and project
evaluation officer for the Peace
Corps in his hometown of Chi-
cago from 1970 to 1971.
Williams has pursued a ca-
reer in the development and
implementation of worldwide
assistance programs. Williams
was a vice president for Inter-
national Business Develop-
ment with RTI International.
He was a senior manager at the
U.S. Agency for International
Development (USAID); where
he attained the rank of Career
Minister in the U.S. Senior For-
eign Service. He also served as
Please turn to DIRECTOR 15B


Marines with Headquarters Company, 7th Marine Regiment, practice room-clearing techniques during the early evening hours here of Aug. 8,
while taking a break from the regiment's pre-deployment training. --Photo byCpl. Zachary . Nola






DEADLY WAR


U.S. deaths make 2009 Afghan

war's deadliest year
By Peter Graff

KABUL (Reuters) - Four U.S. servicemen were killed by a roadside,bomb
in Afghanistan on Tuesday, making 2009 the deadliest year for the growing
contingent of foreign troops since the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001.
The deaths highlighted the steadily worsening violence in the country, which
has been in political limbo since a disputed presidential election last week.
Afghan election authorities were preparing later on Tuesday to publish the
first partial results from the presidential election, but the tiny sample may do
little to resolve a growing war of words on the outcome.
The election has also been a test of President Barack Obama's strategy of
rushing thousands of extra U.S. troops to the country this year in a bid to
reverse Taliban gains.
More than 30,000 extra U.S. troops arrived in Afghanistan this year, most
part of a package of reinforcements ordered by Obama in May. There are now
more than 100,000 Western troops in the country, 63,000 of them Ameri-
cans.
A NATO statement said the four U.S. service members were killed in the
south, the Taliban's heartland, but gave no further details.
That would bring the number of foreign troops who died in Afghanistan this
year to 295, according to website icasualties.org, which compiles official fig-


ures. Last year was the previous deadliest year when 294 were.killed.
" The U.S. reinforcements sent by Obama, along with a British contingent al-
ready deployed in the south of the country, have advanced deep into formerly
Taliban-held territory, taking heavy casualties mainly from roadside bombs.
More Western troops have died since March than in the entire period from
2001-2004.
There are fears that a delay in resolving the dispute over the election could
stoke further instability.
DISPUTE OVER VOTE RESULT
Late on Monday, Finance Minister Hazrat Omar Zakhilwal said figures sup-
plied to him as a member of the cabinet showed president Hamid Karzai lead-
ing with 68 percent of the vote and avoiding a second round.
A spokesman for Karzai's main rival, Abdullah Abdullah, said however that
those figures were false. Abdullah has also claimed to be in the lead, and al-
leges massive fraud on Karzai's behalf.
The ballots were counted immediately after the vote last Thursday and tal-
lies were posted at individual polling stations, but overall totals have not been
released to the public while authorities carry out laborious checks.
Election commission spokesman Noor Mohammad Noor said the results
of about 10 percent of the vote would be published on Tuesday evening. The
overall outcome will not be clear until Sept. 3 when full preliminary results
are due, he added.
Karzai's spokesman, Humayun Hamidzada, said the government would be
ready to prevent any violence that might result from disputes over the poll.
"Afghanistan today has its own entities and will deal with those who break
the law and threaten Afghanistan's stability," he said.


AARON S. WILLIAMS


Crist spends first day of


school at Holmes Elementary


State Governor commends improved
student achievement and increased
learning commended


Special to the Times
Gov. Charlie Crist welcomed
students and staff at Holmes
Elementary in Liberty City on
their first day back to school
and applauded their efforts on
raising their 2008-2009 school
grade from an "F" to a "C."
Last year, Holmes experi-


enced a remarkable turnaround
through collaborative assistance
offered as a part of the state's
new school improvement pro-
gram, Differentiated Account-
ability, which offers targeted
.support for struggling schools.
"Education provides stu-
dents with opportunities to de-
velop their natural ability and


strengthen skills needed to
succeed in life, and* each new
school year offers a fresh start
and new possibilities for achiev-
ing great things," said Crist. "As
we begin this new Achool year, I
look forward to celebrating the
continued efforts of schools like
Holmes Elementary "to ensure
that every student in the state
has access to a quality educa-
tion."
Last week, Crist hosted a Tal-
lahassee Tuesday discussion
with faculty and principals from
Please turn to CRIST 15B


State Gov. sits amongst students in their classroom at Holmes Elementary on their first


day of school.


-Photo/Governor Press Office











"I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES. AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


'First lady' of Opa-locka celebrates 86th birthday


By Sterling Saunders
Special to The Times

Virginia Wilkinson Tresvant,
wife of the first Black mayor of
the City of Opa-locka, Albert
Tresvant, celebrated her 86th
birthday last Sunday at the
home of her daughter and son-
in-law, Portia and Rev. Alphonso
Livingston.
The matriarch of her family,
Tresyant was surrounded by her
daughters, Joy, Priscilla, Portia,
Leslie, son-in-laws and other
family members and friends. The
first lady of Opa-locka was gra-
ciously jubilant and thankful to
God for her many blessings and
the outpouring of love given on
her special day.
Albert, her late husband, over-
whelmingly won several elec-
tions, leading to several success-
ful terms as the first Black may-
or of the City of Opa-locka. He
was responsible for changing the
infrastructure of the city as well
as promoting Blacks to be more
prevalent in city government.
Constituents of Opa-locka recall
the difficult times they faced pri-
or to Albert's administration.
Tresvant, nicknamed The
Mother of Opa-locka,' is well re-
spected in her community and
is called on by politicians for her


views, vision and opinions about
the City.
Current Mayor Joseph Kelley
said, "Mrs. Tresvant has been
a monument in the community
through the years even during























VIRGINIA WILKI

my youth. He continued, "Young
folks were always able to go to
her for advice as she is an ad-
mirable, approachable and sup-
portive person.",
Former Mayor Willie Logan


stated "my parents, were close
friends of The Tresvants for over
60 years and I consider them
family. Mrs. Tresvant has al-
ways been a caring, loving and
nurturing person whose home


NSON TRESVANT


especially her kitchen was al-
ways open to all...to me person-
ally, even her pocket book," as
he chuckled.
An active member of New Way
Missionary Baptist Church,


where she was an organist for
over 30 years. The Mother of
Opa-locka' credits her faith in
God, the support of her closely
knit family, friends and the com-
munity at large for her happi-
ness in life.


Spend 12 wonderful

days. in Cairo, Egypt

and The Holy Land

SDr. and Mrs. G. S. Smith in-
vite you on a trip of a lifetime
to spend 12 wonderful, days in
Cairo, Egypt and The Holy Land,
from June 21 to July 2, 2010.
Space is limited Call Geneva
O. Smith, 305-891-3570, for
your brochure.


Mt. Zion AME celebrates 68 years


Rev. Rogery Adams and the
members'of Mt. Zion A.M.E.
Church will celebrate our 68th
anniversary during the week of
August 25 through August 30
at 7:30 p.m.
Speakers will include: Rev.
Kenton Williams of St. James
Baptist Church on Tuesday; Rev.
Daniel Brown of St. Stephens
A.M.E. Church on Wednesday
and Rev. Robert Jackson, of St.
Paul A.M.E. Church on Thurs-
day.
The anniversary will climax
on Sunday, 7:30 a.m. with Rev.
Conrad Jenkins of Greater Mt.
Zion Church and Rev. Sharan-
da Williams of Greater New Mt.
Zion A.M.E. Church at 11 a.m.
Come join us in celebrating
our 68th anniversary.
Mt. Zion is located at 15250


N.W. 22 Avenue.
For more information call,
305-681-3309.


REV. ROGERY ADAMS


s *Anniversaries * Funerals * Birthdays
r - --S C - --
cou Po N court o N
OFFANYI,
ARRANGEMENT
-------------
CNnlnlnZnjI/NI/


2 '.


Apostolic
Revival Center
26701 N.W.35thSAe. e
: i i
Order of Services
Wed inlmrenory Prye
90m. I?p.
Mrmag Sernle II am.
Sur..L WInnup 130 pm.
lee Prayer Meering 130 pm
Fri Bible 5Idy 1 30 p m




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order of Services
SSunday Momnao Sersaw
145 om.11 15im
Sundayhool - 9 45 aom.
Bible Snudy lue.day
10om .lpm
Player Meetrng Tuer 6 pmn


[i:lllllI~fla tllI#:


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.











St. Mark Missionary -
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
SOrder of Services
Sunday ,130ornd I m
Worchip r..re
S 930�a Sundoy3Saiool
N Vluedrly 7 pr. Bnble SuddyI
H bpm Prayer Meel.n;



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue

SOrder of Services

Slunda M yian d er I 1i o i
-ialuesda 7 ' le S tiS 9udy

Wed Bhi l Sudy Provelo 60 p m
Tem urp , UuMth Missin ry 6 i p
Iun M-rn I.wIa




=M=


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue * Hollywood, FL 33023


Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. * Morning Worship 10 a.m
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
* Wednesday General Bible Sludy 7:30 p.m
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/ComosI 3 * Solurday - :30 a.m
nww pembrokeparkchurcholcbhsil (om * pembiokepaikroc@bellsoulh nel


I


Jordan Grove Missionary
BaptisLburcb .
5946 N.S. thA ve:.


I - - ! rr-I .


- . .--. -I


Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.
\ ___S i __
Order of Services
And no. obade
orit. hooe Ione
IC(or 1313

uI~j\
____ i|
Ut. * ^^]^


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services
S unday School 930 a m
SMonming Praip.'Worsib.p II a nm
FIr and nird Sunday
veen.ng wonhp a 6 p m
Pi-aner Peenng & BlWe SIudy
rueday 7 pm


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Sludy) 6:45p m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254.NBB(
305-685-3700
Fox: 305-685-0705
www.newbiilhbaplisimiumi.org


New Vision. For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
ier ly Sundo0 Worhp / 300 m
Sunday Shool 9 30a on
Su,iday Somang worshp n0 ,n
OSunrbdd veringg o re 6 pmi
Silu.dday Piyei Meesng i30 pm
tWed.iedula Ble Sruud 7 10 p.



Word of Faith
Christion Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Morning Serl e
,.unday School 0I am
Worship lpSilla Iem
luldoi BbleStudy 6 pin
Thursdo Prayemr w.
i rte r


s BaptVistoICurc, . i. Si o a


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
lll' !ltli' ;


Order of Services
SUnddly Mnmig' War
ship aal6l li onm
SLiluy Sli til 9 4aom m
rhurday Bible tludy I p i,
Soairdai Nih 'eri,
*


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
tiVrM,1411lC


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street


Order of Services
Sirly MAhinlg Worship I730 on
unodaoy hool 9 30 am
M..riin Wuihlp 11 o m
WjloNE[,ilAY
Pro'ar M lln'q 130 .p
B.blu ludy 8 p n


Alin.EZB rBMns


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue

-Order of Services
" undy . iJOlll3 am
iii l -lly thool _ . Ia m
SIhrsday . pm Bible
Sdy Ptrayer Mtet'I B 1IU.
Baphtim Ih[bu before
FFrst Su _ I p m.



Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W.46th Street

SOrder of Services
" lnfrrCl/SndPy hool 830am
uday Worship Sen i e10 a0 m
... - M.- tf Servie Wednesla
.12. -1 rl p m
" - s ,n,,a wordip. lp,



New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org

SOrder of Services
. a[rty Meming Worship 130 a m
Sun (hurch School 9 30 am
SMorning Worihip I am
i luesdaoi 6bii (lu, I p m
lusr before, he 1Is
S S I pm


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6:30 a.m. * Early Morning Worship 7 30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. * Morning Wor ship II a.m.
Youth Ministry Study, Wed 7 p m. Prayer/Bible Study, Wed 7 p m.
SNoonday Altar Prayer .(M-F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday........II a.m. l p.m.
- www.ilendshipmbrmia oig * f iendshippiaver@bellsouth.net


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street

SOrder of Services
I10 a m Early Mrring Worhip
II oan MmWorhip
IIs, Jd Sndaoy It m
rluuday Bibl iludy 7 p m
S h rnllO Isrtl Oro


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
iliB -1i rerMoirl-M i i erW i


Order of Services
lordDay Sunday Sihoaol945am
Suhiday Moming Wor\hip II am
S Sunday men B.hbl Sludy ip m
S Sunda ladi, Bibl Sludy 5pm
Sunday .ening Woiiship 6 p m


AND HE SAID UNTO THEM, GO YE

INTO ALL THE WORLD, AN)Q.PR:

L TO EVERY CR



Join the Religious Elite
C. in our Church Directory
Call Karen Franklin at 305-694-6214


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The Miami Times





health


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


'Revolutionary' use for aspirin?,


Colorectal cancer patients benefit in limited study


By Liz Szabo
One of the most promising
treatments for colorectal can-
cer could be sitting in your
medicine cabinet.
A preliminary study sug-
gests that aspirin used for
more than a century and sold
for pennies a pill could find
new life as a weapon against


colorectal cancer.
The study isn't definitive, but
if the results hold up, "it bor-
ders on revolutionary," says
Alfred Neugut of Columbia
University's Mailman School
of Public Health, who wasn't
involved in the study.
Aspirin appears to affect the
growth of one type of colorectal
cancerone that overproduces


the COX-2 enzyme, which pro-
motes both inflammation and
tumor growth, says Andrew
Chan of Massachusetts Gen-
eral Hospital, co-author of a
paper in today's Journal of the
American Medical Association.
Chan and his colleagues fol-
lowed nearly 1,300 patients,
all of whom received standard
therapy for colorectal cancer,


for nearly 12 years.
Among patients whose tu-
mors overproduce COX-2,
those, who began aspirin af-
ter diagnosis had a 61 per-
cent lower risk of dying from
their colorectal cancer and a
38 percent lower risk of dy-
ing from any cause, the study
says. Aspirin appeared to have
no effect on tumors that don't
overproduce COX-2. Aspirin
Please turn to ASPRIN I8B


CDC: Life expectancy



in U.S. has increased

























Copyrighted Material


S ndicatedContent


Available from Commercial News Providers

.40am m P ab ma e a t 4tw mE0.0 M W be M ~- - tOW


Black women's hair

hinders workouts

ByTony Anderson
A government study shows that Black women are 70
percent more likely to be obese than white women. As
intriguing as this statistic seems, the reasons for it are
equally as interesting. Factors including time, money
and even hair contribute to keeping some Black wom-
en out of the gym.
Nikki Kimbrough is a celebrity fitness expert who
says, "The number one excuse is 'what am I going to
do with my hair,' and I can relate because I'm a Black
woman myself and I have the same issue".
In Nikki's fitness class, the women are of a variety of
races and have a range of hair textures. Three Black
women from her class battle with issues about their
hair, but make a consistent effort to get to the gym.
Adrieripe Lynch, one of Nikki's clients, is a Black wom-
an that, in the past, let her hair keep her from going to
the gym.
"When I come and work out, my hair would shrink
down and get all ratty so I didn't want to come work
out, I got some extensions because I can come in,
sweat, throw it up in a pony tail and it doesn't matter,
it dries right out," claims Lynch. . - . -,
Chanelle Blakely vi a Black'ki'oinman that can't take
braids.
"I don't have the patience for the sitting ... I just
structure my wash-and-sets around my exercise class-
es", she says.
Teresa DaLuze, who is biracial, finds her hair is less
of an obstacle. "I have a wash and go type of hairdo,"
she states. DaLuze says when she is working out her
hair is "puffy" but once she washes it, it looks fine.
But even with the "wash and go" hairdo she still en-
counters problems, when she wants to wear her hair
straight.
For a lot of Black women, getting your hair done is
not cheap.
"Even doing my natural hair it's eighty-five dollars
to put in some corn rolls or put in a curly fro," says
Lynch.
Blakely feels that more white women work out be-
cause she feels white men are more attracted to thin
frames and Black men tend to prefer women with a
Please turn to WORKOUT 18B


AM- (A


. B

," * g h�4 *, N 4h * ^


Clinton honors 18 Miami-Dade schools

Edison Park Elementary and Edison Middle among the recipients


- The Miani Times Saff Report

Eighteen , Miami-Dade
County public .,schools
were among the recipi-
ents recognized by former
President Bill Clinton in
New York City for creating
a healthy environment for
students and staff through
the Healthy Schools Pro-
gram. Three of the schools
received silver medals and
15 schools received the
bronze medal.
At Blue Lakes Elemen-
tary, 12 teachers joined to-
gether to start the program
back in January. They re-,
cruited two parents, who
are also personal trainers,
to come out three days a
week after school to 'whip
them into shape." They
all pitched in to cover the
cost.
Rachel Justiano said, "I
look forward to every Mon-
day, Wednesday and Thurs-
day because I get to spend'
time with my fellow cowork-
ers and we do something
good for ourselves. We're so
proud of each other."
Seven schools includ-


ing, Edison Park Elemen- ciation and the William J.
tary School, George Wash- Clinton Foundation - estab-
ington Carver Elementary lished the Healthy Schools
School, Gertrude C. Edle- Program in 2006 to help
man/Sabel Palm Elemen- schools develop and imple-
tary School, Miami Edison ment policies and practices
Middle School, North to promote healthy
Miami Elemen- eating and in-
tary School, i crease physi-
Scott Lake cal activity.
Elementary The Healthy
School and Schools Pro-
Toussaint B Sgram takes
Louverture a compre-
Elementary g't "ord hensive ap-
School, were proach to
awarded by .'Y* helpingschools
the Alliance for create healthier
a Healthier Gen- environments by
eration. working with them to
Meanwhile, George Wash- improve access to healthier
ington Carver Elementary foods; increase physical ac-
School and Miami Edison tivity opportunities before,
Middle School received during and after school;
the Healthy Schools Pro- enhance nutrition educa-
gram National Recognition tion; and establish school
Award. employee wellness pro-
Nearly one in three chil- grams.
dren and adolescents in Healthy Schools are eligi-
the U.S. are obese or over- ble to earn a National Rec-
weight. In response to this ognition Award based on
epidemic, the Alliance for their implementation of a
a Healthier Generation range of healthy eating and
- a joint partnership of physical activity programs
the American Heart Asso- and policies.


i ,4 Syndicated Contentr
Available from Commercial News Providers,


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VI AYISYEN

i, Ar I I A - I I I


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L I r c


MIY


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


ABOVE: Marleine Bastien is surrounded by family and friends on stage pt her


Kick-Off Campaign for the 17th District Con-


gressional seat on Thursday. --TheMiamiTi tes phots/ Sandra J.Charite
LEFT: Marleine Bastien listens her son, Akim, as he gives an introductory speech about her at the Gwen Margolis Center in
North Miami on Thursday.


Bastien announces bid for Congressional seat


Activist vows to become first Haitian-American in Congress


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
In an interview with The Mi-
ami Times in March, Marleine
Bastien, executive director of
FANM Asisyen Nan Miyami, Inc.
FANM Haitian Women of Mi-
ami), announced that she would
join the race for the 17" District
Congressional seat which will
be vacated by Congressman
Kendrick Meek in 2010. Meek
will run for a U.S. Senate seat.
Bastien, 50, was determined
that she-will become the first
Haitian-American in U.S. Con-
gress.
As she stood at the Gwen


Margolis Center on Thursday
evening, she *reiterated the
same words, "I will the first
Haitian-American in the U.S.
Congress."
Surrounded by family, friends
and supporters, Bastien said,
"When you send me to Con-
gress, I will continue the same
work that I have been doing all
these years."
Bastien founded the FANM in
1991 to help immigrant women
and their families have access to
available resources to aid there
to progress in the country. She
helped women start their own
businesses in the community
and assisted them in making


the transition to the new social
reality in America.
In time, 'not only has Bastien
become a voice in the Haitian
community but she has received
many accolades for her willing-
ness to be a servant to others
that include the "Human Rights
Award" from Amnesty Interna-
tional (2000), "MS Women of
the Year Award" (2001), Lead-
ership For a Changing World
Award from the Ford Founda-
-tion (2002), named "One Of The
35 Most Remarkable Women In
The World" by Essence Maga-
zine (2005).
Surprisingly, the mother of
three: Omar, Akim, and Tarik,


considers herself to be a very,
shy, reserved and a quiet per-
son.
But this quiet activist has.
been very vocal in the fight for
the U.S. to grant Haiti -Tem-
porary Protective Status (TPS)
which allows foreign nationals
currently residing to stay tem-


porarily if conditions in their
homelands are recognized by
the U.S. government as being
temporarily unsafe. TPS does
not lead to permanent resident
status and could last up to 18
months.
Other candidates seeking the
17th District Congressional seat


are:
Miami-Dade County teacher
Leroy Adam, former State Rep..
Phillip Brutus, State Rep. James
Bush III, Miami Gardens Mayor
Shirley Gibson, State Rep. Yolly
Roberson, Attorney Roderick D.
Vereen and State Sen. Frederica
Wilson.


Supporters listen as activist Marleine Bastien gives her speech on why she should be elected
to the 17th District Congressional seat at the Gwen Margolis Center in North Miami.


Councilman Marcellus qualified to serve


It seemed fair for Jean Mar-
cellus, who successfully won
the June 2 runoff election for
the North Miami District 3 seat,
to begin his term but there was
a short delay before he could
take office.
While his fellow constituents
took part in the induction cer-
emony held on June 9, Marcel-
lus, 49, had to wait until June
23 to be formally inducted as
a lawsuit was brought against
him by his opponent Michelle
Garcia.
Garcia's lawsuit claimed that
Marcellus had not lived in the
district in which he was run-
ning for, in the requited year's
time before the end of the qual-
ifying period on April 7, 2008.
Garcia alluded to paperwork
that showed that Marcellus
had filed for a seat in the Mira-
mar city government in 2008.


JEAN MARCELLUS


On Friday, a Miami-Dade
judge ruled that Marcellus is
qualified to serve on the North
Miami Council, despite opposi-
tion from Garcia.


"I think that the judge made
the right decision," said Mar-
cellus. "I told them from the
beginning that I lived in North
Miami."
Garcia, on the other hand,
said, "The purpose was to pro-
tect the integrity of the pro-
cess, And to ensure that the
candidates are qualified based
on the rules of the character."
Marcellus, a first-time can-
didate, is an entrepreneur and
owns and operates a few busi-
nesses such as Gold Coast
Traffic School and Gold Coast
School of Technology. He was
also a police officer in West
Miami. Marcellus currently
works with Immigrations and
Customs Enforcement as a de-
tentions officer.
Marcellus is one of two Hai-
tians on the North Miami
Council.


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IN MIAMI


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11B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-AUGUST 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


SunTrust can help you find sure footing.
This year has brought a tot of changes, especially in the way we all think about money, finances and banking.
But it hasn't changed the fact that we're all looking to be treated as more than a number. Which is why, while other
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S- - I


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES AUG 9


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


%I IA 1 -. on %Igfds, iaM tlli





Copyrighted Material




Syndicated Conten


9


Available from Commercial News Providers


Barefoot in
My air conditioner died the
other day, just as an August
heat wave was approaching.
How it knows when it's the
worst possible time to break
down I'm not sure, but it does.
The one thing you can say
about it is it's reliable in its un-
reliability.
I called our repairman, who
amazingly said he could come
in an hour, and the next thing
I know I'm standing with him
up on my roof, looking over the
problem, which I'm happy to
report was easy to fix.
Everything is cool.
But I noticed two things while
up there. My bare feet had to
keep dancing on the hot tin
roof, and the repairman had
two small bare feet tattooed on
his forearm. He said they were


the park,
his baby son's. I'm not a b
fan of tattoos, but you've got
love a guy who would do suc
a thing.
Bare feet are so much a pa
of my life. I still rememb
my first pair of shoes. Bust
Browns. Hated them.
I never wore shoes growir
up. Maybe to church on Su:
day morning and to scho
when fall arrived, but th
was about it. I rode my bik
sprinted up the road, walked
down to the lake, all in n
bare feet.
And while I can. no long
qualify as the "barefoot bo
with cheek of tan," I still we
shoes only when I have to.
am barefoot as I type this se:
tence. I will be barefoot tonig:
at dinner. I will be barefo


in the house, on the
rig when I take the dog out for her . And I'm not sure
to last walk of the night, ten, the Barefoot
ch I read the other day that actually goes bar
Christopher McDougall, au- thousands of us p
Irt thor of Born to Run, runs up including members
er to 50 miles in his bare feet. city for Barefoot L:
er Not only does he run barefoot, footers.org). Yes, th
but he says that's the way it's a thing. Its member
ng supposed to be. He even says be a feisty lot, free
n- the modern running shoe fiercely claim three
lol might actually be a hindrance their website: It is :
at to running. Maybe that's why the law to go ba
:e, barefoot Ethiopians often any kind of establish
ed cross the finish lines first. eluding restaurant!
ny I have a friend who makes against any health
me take my shoes off at her regulation; and it is
er door, but I don't think it's the law to drive bar
)y, done in the true spirit of going Whether this is tr
ar barefoot. She has been known know. I'm just glad
I to vacuum the carpet right be- there, fighting for
n- hind me, just as soon as I've more, important eve
ht made an imprint. She's miss- constitutional righ
ot ing the point here. arms - our right to


job
if Ina Gar-
Contessa,
refoot, but
)roudly do,
s of theSo-
iving (bare-
ere is such
rs appear to
spirits who
e things on
not against
refoot into
shment, in-
s; it is not
departnient
not against
efoot.
rue, I don't
they're out
something
en than our
-t to bear
I bare feet.


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ACT prognosis:
23% could earn C,
at best, in first-year
college courses

By Mary Beth Marklein -

Even as high school gradu-
ates in recent years have grown
increasingly better prepared for
college, too many members of the
-class of 2009 cannot adequately
perform all of the academic skills
they will need to succeed, a re-
port says.
Just 23% of students, up from
22% last year, earned test scores
suggesting they can earn at least
a C in first-year college courses in
English, math, reading and sci-
ence, says the report, released to-
day by the non-profit Iowa-based
testing company ACT. It's based
on scores of 1.48 million 2009
high school graduates who took
the ACT's college entrance exam.
That's up from 1.42 million
test-takers last year and -nearly
1.2 million in 2005. It also rep-.
resents a 42% increase over five
years in black test-takers and a
60% increase in Hispanic test-
takers - -two populations that
tend to earn lower scores on av-
erage.
SMeanwhile, test scores have
remained relatively stable. This
year's national average compos-
ite scores was 21.1, on a scale
of 1 to 36, the same as the past
two years, and up 0.1 point from
2005 and 2006.
. When the number of test-tak-
ers expands to include a more
diverse population, "one would
reasonably expect a drop," says
Cynthia Schmeiser, president of
ACT's education division. "We're
not seeing that, which to us is a
positive indication."
Even so, she says, "I don't want
to overblow it. We've got a lot of
work to do."
For example, the report found:
* 40% of students were not able
to use the correct adverb or ad-
jective form in a sentence, use the
correct preposition in a phrase or
make sure that the subject and
verb agree in a sentence.
* 30% were unable to evaluate
the contribution that significant
details make to a text as a whole.
* Nearly 40% could not solve
multi-step problems involving
fractions and percentages.
* 40% could not predict the re-
sults of an additional trial of a
scientific experiment.
Gene Wilhoit, executive direc-
tor of the Council of Chief State
School Officers, says the results
show "where we need to elevate
state standards.".


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Details on our polies and services: Prices may vary after 8/31/09 if there are market variations. 'as" prices n this advertisement were in effect on 821/09 and may vary based on Low's Eve y Low Price
policy, See store for details regarding product warranties, We reserve the right to limit quantities, *CREDr FINANCING PROMOTION DETAILS Applies to single-receipt Appllance, Flooring, Kic Cabinet or
Countertop purchases of $299 or more made 8/27/09 - 8/31/09 on a Lowe's Consumer Credit Card account. Cannot be combined with other credit related promotional offer N monthly payments will be required and
no finance charges will be assessed on this promotional purchase if you pay the following in full within 12 months: (1) the promotional purchase amount, and (2) any related optional credit insurance/debt cancellation
charges. If you do not, finance charges will be assessed on the promotional balance from the date of the purchase and monthly payments will be required Regular account terms apply to non-promotional purchases.
Standard APR is 22.99%. Delinquency APR is 26.99%. Minimum finance charge is $1.00, Existing cardholders should see their credit card agreement for applcable terms. Offer is subject to credit approval. Excludes
Lowe'se Business Credit Accounts, Lowe's Project Carde Accounts and all Lowe's*VISA Accounts. While Lowes strives to be accurate, unintentional errors may occur. e reserve the right to correct any eror Prices
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END THE INCONVENIENCE OF EMPTY NEWSPAPER BOXES,.
FIGHTING THE WEATHER AND HUNTING DOWN BACK COPIES


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13B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-AUGUST 1, 2009


AKA Sorority members allege

more questionable payments


By Sarah Karush

WASHINGTON - Members of
the nation's oldest black sorority
are alleging m'bre financial mis-
deeds by their president, who is
already accused of spending hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars of
the group's money on question-
able expenses, including a wax
statue of herself.
Eight members of Alpha Kappa
Alpha filed a lawsuit in D.C. Su-
perior Court in June seeking to
remove international president
Barbara McKinzie.
Now they say she received near-
ly $500,000 in questionable pay-
ments from the Chicago-based
sorority over six weeks this sum-
mer, starting June 19, the day be-
fore the lawsuit was filed.
The lawsuit says McKinzie
spent hundreds of thousands of
dollars in AKA money on herself,
some of it to pay for the statue
to be displayed in the National
Great Blacks in Wax Museum in
Baltimore.
It also alleges that McKinzie
bought designer clothing, jewel-
ry and lingerie with the sorority
credit card, then redeemed points
the purchases earned on the card
to buy a big-screen television and
gym equipment.
-The lawsuit questions the le-
gitimacy of $375,000 in compen-
sation that McKinzie received in
2007, saying it was, never ap-
proved by members. Past AKA
presidents have received only
small stipends, said Edward W.
Gray Jr., an attorney for the so-
rority members who are suing.
The latest allegations stem from
copies of checks that Gray said
were sent to the plaintiffs anony-
mously. The checks, for a total of
$499,699, are made out to McK-
inzie by the sorority. The copies
have been posted on a Web site
the plaintiffs set up.
Gray said it's unclear who, if
anyone, approved the payments.
Ledger entries accompanying
them indicate they are for "retire-
merit."


"There's a veil of secrecy over
their financial activities even
though all of their financing
comes from member support,"
Gray said.
The sorority engages in a vari-
ety of charitable and service proj-
ects, and according to the lawsuit
most of its revenue comes from
member dues
and registration
fees for megnber-
ship meetifigs.
S In a letter to so-
� roritylawyers last,
Week, Gray em-
phasized that he
MCKINZIE could not vouch
for the checks'
authenticity, but demanded that
any such payments stop.
Asked whether the checks werd
genuine, AKA spokeswoman Mel-
ody M. McDowell said the sorority
would have no comment beyond
a letter from AKA lawyer Charles
G. Albert. McKinzie has denied
the claims in the lawsuit, call-
ing them "malicious allegations."
A message seeking comment was
left Tuesday at a home number
listed for her.
In the letter, Albert referred to
the check copies sent to Gray's
clients as "the wrongful disclo-
sure of what appears to be the
confidential financial information
of the, Sorority."
"AKA is a nultimillion-dollar
business, and will continue to
conduct its daily business con-
sistent with its policies and pro-
cedures, and all applicable laws
and rules," Albert wrote to Gray.
"Neither you nor the eight plain-
tiffs in this case can prevent the
Sorority from conducting its busi-
ness."
AKA was founded in 1908 at
Howard University in Wash-
ington and boasts a worldwide
membership of 250,000 women,
including prominent black busi-
nesswomen and such luminaries
as author Toni Morrison. Alpha
Kappa Alpha has nearly 56,000
active members, about 10 percent
of them undergraduates.


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John H. Copeland III, Public Health Trust chairman, Eneida 0. Roldan, President and Chief Executive Officer of Jackson
Health System, Georgena D. Ford, R.N., Audrey Edmonson, District 3 Miami-Dade Commissioner, Attorney Larry Handfield,
State Sen. Frederica S. Wilson, Barbara Jordan, District 1 Miami-Dade Commissioner, Javier Souto, District 10 Miami-
Dade Commissioner, Commission Chairman Dennis Moss and Ernesto A. de la Fd, former Public Health Trust Chairman.
-The Miami Times Photo/ Sandra J. Charite


Clark is not forgotten


CLARK
continued from 1A

Health Center opened at Miami
Northwestern Senior High and
Jackson North Maternity Cen-
ter opened in North Dade.
In 1991, Miami-Dade County
residents voted for an extra
half-penny sales tax which
would fund the needed pro-,
grams at the Public Health
Trust.
Then, a $150 million was ap-
proved to build a new mental
health facility.
Prior to coming to Jackson,
Clark, a University of Iowa


alumnus, was a chief executive
officer and regional adminis-
trator for Kings County Hospi-
tal Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. for
almost 11 years. In the early
1970's, he served as associate
director of the Jersey City Med-
ical Center in New Jersey.
In November 2002, Clark was
forced to step down from his
position at Jackson by mem-
bers of the Trust but he vowed
to stay despite his critics. Clark
resigned from Jackson a week
later after signing a three year
$1.2 million contract.
Clark died in February at the
age of 72.


Sandra Sears, Chief Administrative Officer of the Jackson
North Medical Center and Eneida 0. Roldan, President and
Chief Executive Officer of Jackson Health System, unveil a
picture of Ira C. Clark in the lobby of Ira C. Clark Diagnostic
Treatment Center on Monday. -The MiamiTimes Photo/Sandra J. Charite


Local radio stations, particularly those that are minority-owned, play a critical role in reaching African American, Hispanic and other ethnic
communities. But.a bill pending in Congress threatens to silence this voice.


At the urging of the struggling foreign-owned. record labels, some in Congress are pushing to impose a new fee on local radio - one that could
cripple the industry at a time when the economy is already threatening jobs and diversity on the radio.


At least 50% of this "performance tax" fee would go to the record labels, with the rest being divided among musicians. And since three out
of four of the major labels are headquartered abroad, that's money flowing out of your community and overseas.


But a majority of the House of Representatives, including Rep. Meek, are standing up for free local and minority-owned radio by supporting
the Local Radio Freedom Act.


Rep. Meek understands that radio is the voice of the people: A tax on local radio is bad for radio, bad for artists and bad for listeners.







Learn more at NoPerformanceTax.org.AL ASS N
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BROADCASTERS


" 11-~1


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THERl OWN DESTINY


B 41 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGUST 26-SEPT 9


Has Black activism weakened?


a & I,


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Copyrighted Material




Syndicatedi.ontent
0 a -.=.. - *i 0 4 - -


Available from Commercial News Providers-
a me"IN w 0 omuP vi ers.


Phone scams rises despite


national do-not-cal


By Chris Joyner
Complaints about unwanted
phone calls from people regis-
tered on do-not-call lists are on
the rise, and the poor economy
is largely to blame, state offi-
cials say.
"I think it clearly is a symptom
of the economy," says Indiana
Attorney General Greg Zoeller,
who adds that "predatory" tele-
marketers are more bold and
victims more vulnerable in hard
times.
Bogus offers to help with fore-
closure or credit card debt have
become more common, he says.
The Federal Trade Commis-
sion, which handles the Nation-
al Do Not CallRegistry, receives
more than 100,000 complaints
a month, according to statistics
obtained through a Freedom of
Information Act request.
The statistics show com-
plaints for July 2008 through
June 2009 are up 11% over the


prior 12-month period.
Many of the 13 states that op-
erate additional, often stricter,
do-not-call registries - Colora-
do, Florida, Indiana, Louisiana,
Massachusetts, Mississippi,
Missouri, -Oklahoma, Pennsyl-
vania, Tennessee, Texas, Wis-
consin and Wyoming - report
increased complaints, too.
Zoeller says Indiana's comr-
plaints spiked in June with 723
- that's six times the monthly
average for earlier in the year.
Elsewhere:
* Nils' Frederiksen, spokes-
man for Pennsylvania's state
attorney general's office, says
financial scam call complaints
have "doubled from last year."
* The Mississippi Public Ser-
vice Commission logged 3,312
complaints this year through
June compared with 630
through June 2008, says regis-
try administrator Norine Field-
er.
* Texas Public Utilities Com-


Six hours of sleep? It's


By Elizabeth Weise


SAN FRANCISCO - Scientists
have good and bad news for hard-
driving people who boast they need
only six hours of sleep a night.
The good news is a few-may be
right: Researchers at the Univer-
sity of California-San Francisco
have identified a family with a ge-
netic mutation that causes mem-
bers to require only six hours sleep
a night. The bad news? The gene
is vanishingly rare in humans,
found in less than 3% of people.
So almost everyone who says he
needs only six hours' sleep is kid-
ding himself. And the consequenc-
es of chronic sleep deprivation are
serious, says Clete Kushida, pres-
ident of the American Academy
of Sleep Medicine and director of
Stanford University's Sleep Medi-
cine Center. Sleep deprivation
has been linked to an increase in


motor vehicle accidents, deficien-
cies in short-term memory, focus
and attention. It's also tied to de-
pressed mood and a decrease in
the ability to control appetite.
The family members - a mother
and daughter with the gene mu-
tation - were discovered by re-
searchers at UCSF studying cir-
cadian rhythms, the waxing and
waning biochemical cycles that
govern sleep, hunger and activity.
Neither woman needed ifore than
six to 61/2 hours of sleep a night,
and yet both. were well-rested,
'healthy and energetic.
"One of them is over 70, always
traveling internationally and ex-
tremely active. She dances three
or four nights a week," says Ying-
Hui Fu, a professor of neurology
at UCSF.
When scientists examined the
pair's DNA, they found a mu-
tation in a gene called DEC2,


I registry
mission spokesman Terry Had-
ley says complaints are up 10%
this year.
* Florida's complaints are up
18% through July, according
to Terry McElroy of the Florida
Department' of Agriculture and
Consumer Services.
Michael Miller, a photogra-
pher in Corinth, Miss., says
his unwanted calls have picked
up in the down economy. "The
one that always gets me is my
car warranty is running out,"
he said. "I bought a used car.
I know that it ran out before I
bought it."
Sue Geramian, spokeswoman
for the Direct Marketing Asso-
ciation, says most complaints
are generated by "bad actors" in
the industry. DMA's ethics com-
mittees investigate consumer
complaints about unethical or
illegal marketing practices, she
said.
Joyner reports for The Clarion
Ledger in Jackson, Miss.


not enough
which governs cell production
and circadian rhythm.
The mutation seems to result
in people who need much less
than the normal eight to 81/2
hours that most human re-
quire for well-rested functioning,
according to the paper, which
is published in today's edition
of the journal Science. The re-
search by Fu and her colleagues
determined that humans and
mice that carrythe mutation get
more intense sleep, as measured
by slow-wave electrical activity
in the brain, and so they need
less of it.
But Fu estimates that only
about 3% of the population is
likely to have this gene and cau-
tions that most people who ha-
bitually get less than eight hours
sleep a night are only building
up a large, and dangerous, sleep
debt.


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-AUGUST 1,2009


BLACKS MusT CONTRot THElR OWN DESTINY


The Women's Park will host
an opening reception of a stu-
dent exhibit titled Female Firsts
- A Selection of Women Who
Have Broken Barriers in. honor
of Women's Equality Day at 10
a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 26. The
Women's Park, 305-480-1717.
***** ** .
Miami Northwestern Senior
High's Alumni Association will
have a meeting at St. Matthews
Missionary Baptist Church, 7
p.m., Aug. 27: For more infor-
mation, please call 786-285-
0849.


The Family Foundation, Inc.
will have their 18t Annual AIDS
Benefit Banquet at the Embassy
Suites at 6:30 p.m., Saturday,
Aug. 29. 305-978-7100.

The ThyCa Miami support
The ThyCa Miami support


group for thyroid cancer survi-
vors and their relatives will be
held at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital, beginning Sept. 1. The
sessions will be held every Tues-
day, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., in the
Ira C. Clark Diagnostic Treat-
ment Center, 128.0 N.W. 19th St.,
Room 259, Miami, Fl. For more
information, e-mail miami-fl@
thyca.org.
*******
Miami-Dade County and the
South Florida Regional Planning
Council will sponsor two public
informational meetings on FPL's
proposed expansion of the Tur-
key Point nuclear power plant
site. The meeting will be held at
the City of Homestead City Hall
Council Chambers, from 6:30-
9:30 p.m., Monday, August 31
and at the University of Miami
Bank United Center, 6:30- 9:30
p.m., Wednesday, September 2.
305-375-2840.


p * Ge


Miami Edison Senior High
School Class of 1989 will cel-
ebrate their 20th reunion Sept.
4-6. Email: . redraidersclas-
sofl989@gmail.com.
********
Miami-Dade Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners encourages
residents to attend the Septem-
ber Budget Hearings at the BCC
Chambers on the second floor
to hear citizen's concerns about -
County cuts. The first budget
hearing will be held'at 5:01
p.m., Sept. 3 and the second
budget hearing will be at 5:01
p.m., Sept. 17.

********
Booker T. Washington Se-
nior High Class of 1962 will
meet at the African Heritage
Cultural Center at 4 p.m., Sat-
urday, Sept. 5. Helen Tharpes
Boneparte, 305-691-1333 or
Lonzie Nichols, 305-835-6588.

********
Tate Music Group Artist will
perform at the Central Church
of the Nazarene at 7 p.m., Sept.


5. jana@tatepublishing.com
********
The University Galleries in
Florida Atlantic University's
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of
Arts and Letters will present an
exhibition of works from Satur-
day, Sept. 12 through Saturday,
Oct. 31 in both the Schmidt
Center Gallery and the Ritter
Art Gallery on FAU's Boca Raton
campus. 561-297-2595.
********
Women in Transition's next
Computer Skills Training Class
will begin on Tuesday, Sept. 8.
305-757-0715:

********

The North Dade Regional
Chamber Breakfast will be held
from 7:30 - 9 a.m., Thursday,
Sept. 10. 305-690-9123.

********
Miami Children's Museum
(MCM) will celebrate its sixth
birthday with the MCM Family
Carnival at the Watson Island,
1 to 6 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 13.
305-373-5437 ext: 156 or visit


www.miamichildrensmuseum.
org.
*********
The City of Coral Gables will
offer an American Heart Asso-
ciation CPR certification course
for those interested in knowing
how to perform life-saving skills
beginning . Monday, Sept. 14.
Subsequent classes will be of-
fered the first Monday of each
month, from 9 a.m. until noon,
at Fire Station 3 located in Coral
Gables. Laura Rodriguez, Coral
Gables Fire Department Public
Education Specialist at 305-
460-5576 or via e-mail at Irodri-
guez@coralgables.com.
*******
Booker T. Washington Sr.
High Class'of 1965 will conduct
a meeting at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center, from
4-5:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 19.
305-621-6412.

********
South Florida Workforce
(SFW) will be host a Training
.Expo at the Miami Beach Con-
vention Center, from 9 a.m. - 4
p.m., September 24.'


Williams has strong credentials


DIRECTOR
Continued from 7B

executive vice president of the
International Youth Founda-
tion.
As USAID Mission Director
in South Africa, Williams led a
billion dollar foreign assistance
program during President Nel-
son Mandela's administration.
In addition, he has extensive
experience in the design and
management of assistance pro-
grams in Latin America, Africa,
Asia, and the Middle East. He
was awarded the USAID Distin-
guished Career Service Award
and was twice awarded the
Presidential Award for Distin-
guished Service.


S He is a member of the Coun-
cil on Foreign Relations, and
he was a member of the USAID
Advisory Committee on Volun-
-tary Foreign Aid. He served on
the Obama-Biden transition
team, the advisory board of the
Ron Brown Scholar Program,
the board of directors of CARE,
and the boards of the Institute
for Sustainable Communities,
the Pan American Development
Foundation, -and the National
Peace Corps Association.
Williams is fluent in Span-
Sish. He is a graduate of Chi-
cago State University, and has
an MBA from the University of
Wisconsin. Williams met his
wife Rosa during his service as
a volunteer in the Dominican


Crist pleased by school's

CRIST
continued from 7B


five public schools that dra-
matically improved their school
grades as a result, of the Dif-
ferentiated Accountability pro-
gram. In only its first year of
implementation, the majority of
the program's lowest perform-
ing schools showed significant
increases in student perfor-
mance on the Florida Compre-
hensive Assessment Test.
"I'm excited to celebrate Hol-
mes Elementary's success, and
am encouraged by the guid-
ance and support this school.
has received from state and
district staff," said State Board
of Education Chairman T. Wil-
lard Fair. "Through this joint
assistance, the children and
families of this community
are witnessing great changes
within their schools and I have
no doubt they will continue to
keep the momentum going for
years to come."
In recent weeks; Crist high-
lighted the need for increased
awareness about back-to-
school health safety. Along with
State Surgeon General Dr. Ana
Viamonte Ros and Education
Commissioner Dr. Eric Smith,
Crist recently visited schools
in Orlando, Tampa, Fort Myers


Republic. The couple have two
sons, Michael and Steven.
As the agency approaches
its 50th anniversary, the Peace
Corps continues to promote
peace and friendship around
the world. Today, nearly 7,500
Peace Corps volunteers in 74
countries work in a variety
of areas including education,
public health, business and in-
formation technology, environ-
ment, agriculture and youth
and community development.
Since 1961, nearly 200,000
Americans have joined the
Peace Corps in order to help
promote a better understand-
ing between Americans and the
people of the 139 countries in
which they have served.


success


Gov. Charlie Crist speaks to students at Holmes Elementary
as they are welcomed back on their first day. -Photo/Governor ress Office


and Miami to remind Florid-
ians of ways to reduce trans-
mission of H1N1 Swine Flu.
Superintendents statewide also
received information about ad-
dressing parents' concerns
regarding H1N1 Swine Flu.
Floridians can learn more by
visiting www.MyFluSafety.com
or by calling the toll-free H1N1
Swine Flu information line at
877-352-3581.
Crist also recognized eight
elementary schools and eight


middle schools last week as the
2009 winners of the Governor's
Fitness Challenge, an eight-
week school-based program to
help boost children's participa-
tion in physical fitness activi-
ties. Schools have the opportu-
nity to compete for cash prizes
to purchase sports or fitness
equipment. To' participate in
the Governor's Fitness Chal-
lenge or for more information,
please visit the www.Governor-
sFitnessChallenge.com.


Islam faces criticism during Ramadan


RAMADAN
continued from 7B

Though he writes about po-
tential misuse of charity money,
he said in a phone interview, "I
have no doubt there are Ameri-
can Muslims who give zakat for
positive or neutral reasons. I
would even say the majority."
Muslims account for less


than 2% of the U.S. popula-
tion. At the website Charity
Navigator, which helps donors
find philanthropic groups that
meet high operating and ethi-
cal standards, the big rush is
the Thanksgiving-to-Christmas
season.
But, says spokeswoman San-
dra Miniutti, "we do get e-mails
from Muslim givers asking for


giving tips around Ramadan."
Many Muslims choose to
give to concerns close to home.
Fatemeh Fakhraie, founder
'and editor of an international
Muslim women's website, Mus-
limah Media Watch, says, "I
donate to my local food bank
every Ramadan; some people
give (zakat) to the mosque to
distribute.


iCr really hAur


New Life Missionary Baptist
Association will have a ministers
and deacons meeting at the Great-
er St. Adorkor Missionary Baptist
Church in Hollywood from Aug.
26-29. 786-326-1078 or 786-262-
6841.


Metropolitan AME Church in-
vites you to their Annual Women's
Day on Sunday, Aug. 30. Rev.
Ronnie Britton, 305-633-8890.


Miami Northwestern Sr. High
Class of 1965 will meet at the
House of God at 11:45 a.m., Aug.
30. Marguerite Bivins-Mosley,
305-635-8671.


********

Ebenezer United Methodist
Church is celebrating its 11
church anniversary at 11 a.m.,
Sunday, August 30.


Macedonia Missionary Bap-
tist Church will host the South
Dade Male Chorus Union Gospel
presentation, beginning at 3 p.m.,
Sunday, August 30. 305-445-
6459.


New Christ Tabernacle will cel-
ebrate their Youth Service on the
fifth Sunday at 3:30 p.m., Aug. 30.
Virginia Bostic, 305-621-8126.


A Mission With A New Begin-
ning Church along with their
Men's Department are calling all
men to come worship with them
to their weekly services on Sunday
at 11:15 a.m. and Bible classes on
Thursday night weekly at 7,p.m.


Emmanuel Missionary Baptist
Church invites you to their an-
nual revival at 7:30 p.m. nightly,
Aug. 31-Sept. 4. 305-693-7310.


SFaith Christian Center will cel-
ebrate 25 years of ministry, 7:3.0
p.m. nightly, October 18- 24. Cul-
mination service will take place at
the D6ubletree.Hotel at Miami Air-
port, 11 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 24.
Church office, 305-253-6814.
Note: Calendar items must be
submitted before 3:30 p.m. on
Monday.


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********
The City of Miramar is host-
ing a community Arts and Craft
Fair at the Miramar Multi-Ser-
vice Complex on Oct. 3. 954-
889-2744.
********
The City of Miramar will be-
gin registration for its second
session of the D.R.E.A.M Female
Young Adult Recreation Pro-
gram. Registration will run from
Oct. 6 - Jan. 15, 2010 (or until
all spaces are filled). You can
register M-F at Sunset Lakes
Community Center, 8. a.m. - 8
p.m. .or the Fairway Park Com-
munity Center, from 2- 8 p.m.
Patricia Hamilton, Recreation
Leader at 954-967-1611.

********
Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com.


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........ ...............- I I


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SEMITI MAIM AUGUST 26 SEPTEMBER 9


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


WDn I Il IVIIHiIVII I IIIL.J, MUI1U.J I LUILI I LI�ILI I,
I 1~


Serena and Venus Dolphans
Serena and Venus proudly,display their new Dolphins'
jerseys signifying that they are in fact Limited partners in
the Miami Dolphins NFL franchise. They join other high
profile partners as Gloria and Emilio Etsefan, and Jennifer
Lopez and Marc Anthony, and Jimmy Buffett. the girls also
designed their dresses they have on.
The Number 11 worn by Venus signifies her fashion label
known as ELEVEN.
The number 89 worn by Serena signifies the year that one
of her sisters had- died. .-Miami Times photo/Rich ackson


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 26-AUGUST 1, 2009


FRANCISCA ORTIZ, 51, reg-
istered nurse,
died August 22
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Arrangements
are incomplete.


BISHOP HERCULES JONES
SR., 84, minis-
ter, died August
11. Service was
held.





EARL MICHAEL JONES, 48,
died August 16
in Orlando, FL.
Service was
held.





ALMA PERRY, 74, medical
clerk, died Au-
gust 17. Service
-was held.






TAMBA THOMPSON III, infant,
died August 22. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, in the chapel.

Pax Villa O
MICHEL ROSNY, 60, died
August 21 at Jackson Memorial
Hospital. ServiCe 12 p.m., Satur-
day, Notre Dame D'Haiti Catholic
Church.

Genesis �
PAUL ROSCOE CYRUS, 69,
computer programmer, died on
August 17 atAventura Hospital
Service was held.

KEITH DALEY, 79, lab techni-
cian, died August 9 at Select Spe-
cialty Hospital. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

EDWARD HOLAN, 48, graphic
artist, died August 14 at home.
Service was held.

MARTHA GARCIA, 63, health
inspector, died August 17 at Hia-
leah Hospital. Service was held.

ROSA JOSEY, 83, waitress,
died August 19 at North Shore
Hospital. Final rites and burial, Ni-
caragua.

MARIA HERERA, 67, teacher,
died August 21 at home. Service
was held.

EDWARD BURKE, 81, investor,
died August 21, at home. Service
was held.

KATHERINE SOUTHARD, 32;
self employed, died August 20 at
home. Service was held.

LOUIS NEMORIN, 82, laborer,
died August 22 Jackson Care
Center. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

HELEN EARLE, 84, homemak-
er, died August 23 at Hospice by
the Sea. Service was held.

CLEMENT Mc GRATH, 85,
sales, died August.23 at Holy
Cross Hospital: Service was held.

DENNIS REARDON, 61, la-
borer, died August 21 at Home.
Service was held.

MONIQUE FRANCIOS, 44,
cook, died August 24 at Naples
Community Hospital. Final rites
and 15urial, Haiti.


PUBLIC NOTICE

As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and date,
location, and time of services. Ad-
ditional information and photo
may be included for a nominal
charge.The deadline is Monday at
3:30 p.m.


Richardsonal
CLAUDINE ASHE, 63, domes-
tic, died August
15. Service 1
Sp.m., Wednes-
day in the cha-
pel.




CHAD D. BRAZIL, 24, long-
shoreman, died
August 15. Ser-
vice 11 a.m, Fri-
day, New Birth
Faith Taberna-
cle! Hallandale.



EARNEST'JOHNSON JR., 58,
died August 18.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



TODERICK L. WILLIAMS, 36,
air condition
mechanic, died
August 20. Ser-.
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday,,, Holy
Ghost Assembly
Church.


CORA REYNOLDS, 74, died
August 18. Ser-
vice 2 p.m., Sat-
urday, St. Luke
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




HERBERT WALKING, 79, sec-
retary, died August 20. Final rites
and burial Nassau, Bahamas.

CHARLES WRIGHT, 90, labor-
er, died August 21. Arrangements
are incomplete.

DAISY PEOPLE LEWIS, 88,
domestic, died August 17. Service
11 a.m., Saturday in the chapel.


Carey, Royal Ram'n
ANNA R. GRAY, 80, O.R. Tech.,
died August 23
at Kindred Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.




VIRGINIA SHUFORD, 54, psy-
chologist, died August 24 at Cleve-
land Clinic. Service was held.

MAHMOOD HOJABRY, 61, in-
spector, died August 18 at Cleve-
land Clinic. Service was held.




Hadley Davis
CHAVARUS D. CURRY a.k.a.
BeBe, 19, stu-
dent, died Au-
gust 17. Sur-
vivors .include:
mother, Savina
Thomas; father,
Edward (Tan-
isha); broth-
ers, Edward
II, Edward Harris, Edward III and
Jaden; sisters; Kedesia- Folorun-
sho, Quanisha McDuffie, Diamond
and Unique; grandparents, Neomi
Hollimon(Obbie) and Robert (Sue)
and a host of close relatives and
friends. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Logos Baptist Church.

LEVI N. WATERMAN, 68, roof-
er, died August
23 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 12
p.m., Saluraay
in the chapel.



ESTELLA ESKRIDGE, 65, mu-
sician, died August 21 at North
Shore Medical Center. Arrange-


ments are incomplete.

WAYNE HOPKINS, 56, clerk,
died August 11 at Jackson North
Medical Center. Service was held.


Royal
CARNELLA CARTWRIGHT,
61, food service
manager, died
August 22 . Visi-
tation 4-9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
4 p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.


DOUGLAS HAGAN, 53, labor-
er, died August
21. Visitation
4-9 p.m., Fri-
day. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
New Life Baptist
Church.


EARL WRIGHT, 26, FAMU stu-
.dent,, died Au-
gust 20. Visita-
tion 4-9 p.m..,
Litany 6 p.m. Fri-
day in the cha-
pel. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
St. Kevin Epis-
copal Church.

CHARLES CAMPBELL, 77,
longshoreman,
died August 24.
Visitation 4 -9
p.m., Friday.
Service.11 a.m.,
Saturday, Zion
Hope Baptist
Church.

LOUVADA PINCKNEY, 86,
maid, died August 18. Final rites
and burial Jacksonville, FL..

EULALEE DAVIS, 74, janitor,
died August 17. Service was held.

PHYLLIS THOMPSON, 74
nurse's aide, died August 18. Ser-
vice was held.

DWAYNE ROLLE, 50, vehicle
maintenance worker, died August
22. Arrangements are incomplete.
Poitier
WILLIE MOSS JR., 72, nurse,
died August
20 at Memo-
rial Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Thursday in the


chapel.


RONY ETIENNE, 54, died Au-
gust 16 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

JAMES ANDREW MURRAY,
69, caterer, died August 14 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete:

Paradise
OTIS STEWART, 25, died Au-
gust 20 in Tal-
lahassee, FL.
Arrangements
are incomplete.
Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Second Baptist
Church, Rich-
morid Heights.

MARGARET BROWN, 83, died
August 23 at home. Service 11
'a.m., Saturday, Mt. Moriah Church,
Perrine.

Wright and Young
CHAIRLES JOHNSON, 67, died
August 21. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Christiana;
sons, Lucner,
Devince, Dan-
iel, Clermeus,
,and Rochney
Elidor; daugh-
ters Amelia
and Harmana ; bothers, Peter J,
Solomon, Canovil and Dila Jean;
sister, Clothilia Jean. Visitation 9-
6p.m.,in the chapel, and 7 - 9p.m.,
Bethany Baptist Church. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Bethany Bap-
tist Church.

REGINALD V. LEON,, 23, died
August 18. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Rose
Marie Pearson;
sister, Rachelle .. . .
Petion; broth- :
ers, Stevenson
Bellevue, Evens -
and Raymond
Johnson. Services 12 p.m., Satur-
day, St. James Catholic Church.


Grace
ROSA MC DONALD, 83, home-
maker, died Au-
gust 21. Service
11 a.m, Satur-
day, St. James
A.M.E. Church.


JAKARI LEE PICKENS, 5
months, died August 22. Grave-
side service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Vista Memorial Park.

MARIE WILLIAMS, 81, retired,
died August 22 at North Shore
Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.

EDA STEPHENS, 82, retired
nurse's aide, died .August 15 at
University of Miami Hospital. Final
rites and burial St. Elizabeth, Ja-
maica.

ELICIEU LUDES, 69, landscap-
er, died August 21 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Hall Ferguson Hewitt
CHARLES JAMES, 75, sanita-
tion engineer,
died August
19 at Hialeah
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
son, Lorentious;
brother, Nathan-
iel; sister, Marjo-
rie Bellamy and
a host of grand and great grand
children. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Jordan Grove M.B.C.

SHERMAN CLARK, 70, truck
driver, died Au-
gust 20 at Jack-
son North Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Liberty Chris-
tian Disciples of
Christ.

FELIPE SABINO, 74, driver died
August 18 at North Shore Medical
Center Final rites and burial Do-
minican Republic.

WALTER J. BROOKS, 64, died
at home. Service 11 a.m., Thurs-
day in the chapel.

Manker
JESSE HARPER, 60, died Au-
gust 23 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
2 p.m., Salur-
day, Greater
New Macedonia
M. B. Church.


DAVID E. SWASEY, 41, died Au-
gust 23 at home.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, New
Providence M.
B. Church.




ANTONIO LAMONT JOHN-
SON, 21, died August 22. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Pilgrim Rest
M.B. Church.

Nakia Ingraham.
MILAN JOHNSON, infant, died
August 16 at Memorial Hospital.
Service 2 p.m., Friday in the cha-
pel.

HECTOR RIVERA, 63, account
manager, died August 18 at Me-
morial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

BISHNU DASS, 50, handyman,
died August 16 at home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

ROBERT MC LEAN, 64, techni-.
cian, died August 21 at home. Ser-
vice was held.

JUDITH MCDOWELL, 80,
homemaker, died August 22 at
Coconut Creek Nursing Home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

TERESA PALCIO, 82 home-
maker, died August 22 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

DEBORAH LEGETTE, 59,
manager, died August 24 at Me-
morial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.


In loving memory of,
,


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


JAMES E. DIXON SR. ANTHONY E. HENRY 'POOH'
07/23/21-08/26/07 08/27/57 - 04/09/09


Still in our hearts
Your loving wife and family

Range
GEORGE ARNOLD BETH-
EL, 83, retired
salesman, died
August 18. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Meriam
Bethel; daugh-
ters, Cynthia
Cox, Jennifer
L. Taylor (Eric
P.); son, George A Bethel Jr.; four
grandsons, Jonathan Johnson,
Sameul Reed, Derrick Taylor,
and Darrell Taylor; granddaughter
Erica Taylor; a host of other rela-
tives and friends. Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday in the chapel.

PROWARD C. ROLE, 89, re-
tired laborer for
Chrysler, died
August 4. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Margaret
Rolle; daugh-
ter, Anita Rolle;
Son, Dennis
Rolle; sister, El-
len Postell; brother, Nathaniel Da-
vis; many grandchildren; a host of
nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends. Service 1
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.

DAVID FULTON, 43, Banquet
Sdtup for Inter-
Continental Ho-
tel, died August
16.. Survivors
include: mother,
Leona J. Fulton;
aunts, Geor-
giana Bethel;
Edna Williams;
a host of cousins, and other rela-
tives and friends. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday,The Historic Mt. Zion
M.B. Church located at 301 N.W.
9TH Street.

JOHN EDWARD FOSTER, 74,
electrician, died August 19. Sur-
vivors include: mother, Rachel
Long; sister, Achebe Betty Powell;
brother, David Foster Jr.; a host of
other relatives and friends. Service
1 p.m., Thursday, St. Paul A.M.E.
Church.

In Memorial
In loving memory of,


LEVI A. JOHNSON
4/28/36 - 8/23/08

Gone, but not forgotten.
Forever in our hearts .
The Family.


My heart is full of memo-
ries.
Pooh, we've been together so
many years and you've been
gone for four months now.
We've laughed and cried,
seen each other through the
best, the worst and everything
in between but I have a story
that was not seen.
Pooh, they use you when
they can but now God has you
in His unchanging hands.
They never thought to see
your pain because it was only
about what they could gain.
Pooh, I couldn't say that
I wouldn't cry because that
would've been a lie.
All through the night I heard
so many cries but God has all
the eyes.
The peak of the sound of the
whisper of your voice softly
through the night.
All I did as your strong wife
was put my arms around you
and hold you tight.
My love for you will never,
fade because it seems just
like yesterday.
The last days of your life I
thank God for being a beauti-
ful wife.
You had a heart just like
gold.
The morning you left me,
my world went cold.
Don't think God didn't-see-
a thing because nothing that
was done was in vain. I will
treasure each moment and
memories we had because
God said you are the man.
God knew what was best at
6 a.m., April 9, hle said 'Son,
it's time to lay in your nest'.
because God knows what's
best.
So Pooh, now you don't have
any stress.
I don't have to worry about
them calling any more be-
cause God. has closed that
open door.
Pooh, when you smiled at
me you got your way because
when it came to 'Nett', you
knew just what to say.
Now ,that everything has
ceased, I thank God my dear
husband has peace.
I asked God 'Why so many
*tears? God whispered in my
ear and said TDon't complain
my dear. I gave you and An-
thony 37 beautiful years'.
Love Yal
Happy birthday,
Your wife

Eric S. Geo-ie
NATHANIEL WAITERS, 78,
retired, died August 24 at Select
Specialty Hospital. Arrangements
are incomplete.



Honor Your

Loved One With an

In Memoriam

In The Miami Times
i___'










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


SEMITI MAIME AUGUST 26-SEPTEM 9


By Donna Leinwand

The rough economy is inflict-
ing hardship on people even in
death.
Coroners and funeral direc-
tors in several cities say the
number of people seeking gov-
ernment-paid funerals, crema-
tions and burials is spiking.
Most counties and states will
use public money to cremate or
bury people who are too poor to
pay for private services.
"People just aren't in a posi-
tion to pay $7,000 for a private
funeral and burial," says Lt.
David Smith of the Los Angeles
County Coroner's Office, where
the number of people seeking
cotinty burial has nearly dou-
bled since last year.
The percentage of people in
poverty in the USA is climb-
ing, says Gregory Acs, a senior
fellow at The Urban Institute.
When the recession started at
the end of 2007, about 12.5%
of the U.S. population was con-


sidered impoverished, up from
11.7% in 2001, he says.
Among the counties noting a
surge in requests for indigent
burials:
* The Los Angeles County
Coroner's Office' handled 205
indigent deaths in the last six
months of 2007. This year, from
Jan. 1 to June 30, the office
handled 404 indigent deaths
- a 97% increase. "It has put
a major financial strain on this
department," Smith says. "I
need to come up with $12,000 a
month in a budget that's locked
up tight as a drum."
Then in February, the county
crematory notified the coroner
it was overflowing with natural
death cases and couldn't han-
dle cases from the coroner, who
handles accidental deaths,.ho-
micides and unidentified people,
Smith says. "My body count in
my crypt swelled to near capac-
ity," Smith says, as he sought a
crematory to handle the excess
corpses.


Requests for public assistance up

dramatically in some areas


MAIR 0eg )0 J I r t dr aI "&












o Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Fewer people are dying from disease


LIFE
continued from 9B

unclear if it will be a one-year
fluke or not, said Bob Ander-
son, chief of the agency's mor-
tality statistics branch.
The diabetes death rate fell
about 4 percent, allowing Al-
zheimer's disease to surpass di-
abbtes to become the sixth lead-
ing cause of death. Alzheimer's
has been climbing the death-
chart in recent years, though
that may be partly because de-
clines in other causes are en-


WORKOUT
continued from 9B

little more curves.
According to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human
Services, four out of five Black


ASPRIN
continued from 9B

also didn't help patients
who took it before diagnosis,
Chan says. About two-thirds
of all colorectal cancer pa-
tients have tumors that over-
produce COX:2.
Patients who benefited took
the equivalent of one regular
aspirin a day, Chan says.
Yet experts say it's too
early to prescribe aspirin for


abling more people to live long
enough to die from Alzheimer's,
Anderson said.
The nation's infant mortal-
ity rate rose slightly in 2007,
to 6.77 infant deaths per 1,000
births, but the rise was not sta-
tistically significant.,It has been
at about the same level for sev-
eral years.
That's not a shock, some ex-
perts said. Medical care im-
provements can improve infant
survival, but they also mean
that some troubled pregnancies
now make it to infancy before


women are overweight or obese
which increases the risk of dia-
betes, heart disease, cancer and
many other aliments.
In addition to hair and money,
a big .roadblock to hitting the
gym is time. With the economic


colorectal cancer. The study
had limitations: Although
doctors observed patients,
they didn't ask anyone to
change living habits or medi-
cations. So it's possible that
people who chose to take
aspirin after diagnosis were
different in a way that af-
fected their survival. In that
case, aspirin couldn't really
get credit for beating cancer,
Neugut says.
Chan says the only way tb
prove aspirin fights cancer is


death, said Paul Terry, an assis-
tant professor of epidemiology
at Atlanta's Emory Uiniversity.
Another recent CDC report
containing early data for 2008
counted 2.45 million deaths last
year. That's an increase of more
than 29,000 deaths from the
2.42 million deaths in 2007.
CDC data sometimes changes
as more records come in and
researchers eliminate duplicate
reports. But it's likely an in-
crease will hold up because of
the growing number of elderly,
experts said.


downturn, many Black women
have more responsibilities and
finding time to work out is dif-
ficult, but as these four Black
women have shown, you don't
have to put your beauty second
to have your health come first.


to conduct a "gold standard"
trial, in which doctors ran-
domly assign one group of
people to take a drug, then
compare their survival with
that of people randomly as-
signed to a placebo.
Doctors in Singapore are
conducting such a trial, Neu-
gut says.



FREE
THE

Liberty

City Seven


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


* Las Vegas has seen a 22%
increase in indigent cremations
and burials since last year, says
Dan Kulin, a spokesman for
Clark County, Nev. In the bud-
get year that ended June 30,
2008, the county handled 741
indigent deaths. In the same
period ending June this year,
the county handled 904 deaths,
he says.
"It's a sign of the times," Kulin
says.
* Kenton County, Ky., is ex-
pecting a record year of indi-
gent burials. The 29 indigent
burials as of Aug. 13 are more
than double last year's total of
12, says Don Catchen, whose
funeral home has the county
contract for indigent burials.
Catchen offers a minimal pri-
vate funeral and cremation for
$1,400.
"With the economy being-what
it is, some of the lesser-incorne
families ... are barely surviving
and they don't have any money
to pay for even a minimum fu-
neral service," he says.
"I've had the (county) contract
14 years," he says, "and it's
never been like this before."


DARRELL V. OWENS
08/29/64 - 08/21/87


Its has now been 22 years
since a mother lost her child
and a sister lost a big brother,
but just know that you are
still in our hearts.
Love Carolyn, Duane and
Shoney

Death Notice


MARY DAVIS, 62, Miami-
Dade County employee died
August 25. Viewing 4 to 9
p.m. Friday. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist Church. Ser-
vices entrusted to Royal Fu-
neral Home.


Death Notice


JONATHAN L. NELOMS
'Fresh', 25, construction
worker, died August 15.
Service 3 p.m., Saturday,
Mt. Calvary Baptist Church.
Arrangements enrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.


In Memoria m In Memoriam
In loving memory of our
wonderful mother, In loving memory of,


ORA LANIER WILLIAMS EUGENIO J. ROBINSON
03/28/19 - 08/19/99 11/04/69 -08/17/07


"Mother Dear", "Earth has
no sorrow, Heaven cannot
heal." Missing you more and
more.
Shirley, Wendell, Harry,
Charles P. Williams and fam-
ily.

Happy Birthday


DOROTHY WALTE
07/28/44 - 02/18/04

Happy Belated Bi
Mama!
Love Linda and Olg

Death Notic


RAI1


It has been two challeng-
ing years since we've lost you.
You will be remembered and
remain in our hearts forever.
From your loving family and
friends.
Death Notice


Mattle L Miller-Kerson, 62,
RS retired registered nurse for Mt.
Sinai Medial Center, died Au-
gust 23 at Jackson Memorial
birthday Hospital.
Survivors i include: husband,
Allen C; daughter, Sandra M
Miller; sons, Sean D..(Aida) and
Segre M. Miller, Jr.; brothers,
;e Wesley Samuel, Jr.(Gladys) and
Albert Samuel (Peggy); sisters,
Annie Mae Mobley, Ann Pritch-
ett (William), Lillie M Morris and
Lucille Cole; three grandchil-
dren, Britney, Alyssa and Elijah
Miller; and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Family hour 7-9 p.m. Service
noon Saturday, at Mt. Calvary
MBC. Final rites and burial in
Q uitman, GA.
Arrangements entrusted to
Gregg L Mason Funeral Home.

Happy Birthday
S1 , In loving memory of,


GEORGE A. BA ZR,
smoke fish processor, died
August 24 at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
August 29 at St. Peters Afri-
can Orthodox Church.
Arrangements rendered by
Hall-Ferguson Hewitt.


Death Notice


DAVID L. MITCHELL
08/25/49 - 11/01/07


How time flies, I still feel
your presence in my heart.
Love always, wife Linda


Death Notice


REBECCA BENNETT
GRANT, 98, homemaker,
died August 25 at home.
Survivors include: daugh-
ters, Ellen Bentley and Addie
Smith.
Arrangements are incom-
plete.
Services entrusted to Al-
fonso M. Richardson Funeral
Services. 305-625-7177


JOHN H. ASBERRY, 66.
laborer died August 19 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital. Viewing Fri-
day 5 to 9 p.m. Service noon
Saturday at Mitchell Funeral
Home Chapel



Honor Your

Loved One With

An

In Memoriam

In

lbe hMiami Time
*at


IOD I I IVAMIII IVL., MUUUaJI L U-,l. I lIlVlf I, V I


Demand rises for publicly funded burials


SARAH COLLINS-SILER
08/30/55 - 10/15/08

Your family wishes you a
Happy 54th Birthday.
We love you dearly and miss
you.
Not a day goes by without
calling your name, reminisc-
ing all the fun times, your
laughter and funny phrases.
We will neverforget you.
Your loving memories will
forever live in our hearts.
Love always,
From your loving mom,
dad; sisters, Mary and Peggie;
brothers, Cal , Anthony and
Leonard; nephews and grand-
nieces.
The Collins Family

Happy Birthday


Time is biggest impediment to working out


Further research being conducted with asprin


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The Miami Times



Lifestye


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 26- SEPTEMBER 1, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


. .. Spike Lee plans


Birthday bash for


.-... .the'King of Pop'
&'- .*...af ' .. . . ,*...-.; W i a H H f- ., .. >y.*.*


Sanya Richards her gold.medal after a victory win in the 400 meters at the at the IAAF World Track
and Field Championships.



Sanya Richards wins gold

South Florida athlete celebrates win in 400 meters


By Christopher Clarey
Though just one lap, the 400
meters is a brutal race - es-
sentially a long sprint where the
final strides are all about endur-
ing the pain. But Sanya Rich-
ards was grinning even before
she crossed the finish line last
week at the world track and field
championships, and who could
blame her?
It had been a long road to the
gold medal for Richards, the
charismatic American who has
established herself as the world's
leading 400-meter runner but -
because of health problems and
pressure-management problems
- had not been able to estab-
lish herself as a champion until
now.


"It was becoming more and
more of a challenge," Richards
said. "It's like every year, you
go in and think, This is going
to be your year.' And something
else holds you back, so to finally
have that lifted off my shoul-
ders, I think it's" going to be a
lot easier moving forward to be
able to come out and run well at
majors."
Richards, only 24, has won
plenty of 400s on the year-round,
largely Eurocentric circuit full
of one-night meets, appearance
fees and familiar routines. ]ut
despite her big personality, the
biggest events have brought
her consistent disappointment,
above all at last year's Olym-
pics, where she faded to third as
Christine Ohuruogu of Britain


took the gold medal.
There were also losses at the
2005 and 2007 world champion-
ships, and the 2002 world-junior
championships in her first major
meet as a United States citizen.
But this summer, at last, was
different. Richards, who was
born in Kingston, Jamaica, and
moved to the United States with
her family at age 12.
She became a U.S. citizen in
May 2002. Richards played bas-
ketball at St. Thomas Aquinas
High School in Ft. Lauderdale
where she maintained a 4.0
grade point average and par-
ticipated in the National Honor
Society.
Her first 200 meters, accord-
ing to her coach Clyde Hart, was
slightly quicker than planned at


23 seconds. "In the past, if she
had gone out too fast, she would
have been in trouble, but this
time I had confidence she would
do it anyway," he said.
The reward was the chance to
broad jump onto the top step of
the podium and listen to "The
Star-Spangled Banner." "I was
totally choked up," Richards's
mother, Sharon, said. "Because
I had seen that moment so many
times, and it didn't happen."
When Richards was in seventh
grade, Sharon gave her daugh-
ter a bullet to wear as a necklace
- a reference to Sanya's poten-
tial to run like a speeding bullet.
The necklace, damaged but held
together with a safety pin, was
around her neck when she won
the gold.


Jw Jek rrfk roo hI r ro* aI Crt.








Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers
. . .. .. M. W . ....4 A...


Whitney Houston grants TV interview to Winfrey
After a long absence from music, Whitney Houston is staging a
much-hyped career comeback with an appearance on "The Oprah
Winfrey Show."
Houston will be Winfrey's first guest as the talk-show queen
launches her 24th season on Sept. 14. According to her Web site,
Oprah.com, Winfrey calls Houston's appearance "the most antici-
pated music interview of the decade."
The 46-year-old superstar hasn't done a major TV interview
since 2002, wheri she addressed questions about her drug use
from ABC's Diane Sawyer.
Houston is releasing her new album, "I Look to You," on Aug.
31.
She is one of the best-selling artists of all time, but her career . .
stalled as she battled drugs and endured a troubled marriage to WHITNEY HOUSTON OPRAH WINFREY
Bobby Brown. SINGER/ACTRESS TALK SHOW HOST/ACTRESS


The late Michael Jackson would have been 51 on Aug. 29.
To celebrate Jackson's life, filmmaker Spike Lee is throwing a
Brooklyn block party on that day.
"It's going to just be how we do it, Brooklyn-style, I'll leaveit
at that," Lee said. "It's going to be joyous, festive, celebratory
party." And free.
Lee said he's been hit hard by Jackson's death, so he de-
cided to host the birthday party.
"We're of the same era," said Lee, who grew Up following
Jackson's career, including watching Saturday-morning
Jackson 5 cartoons. "I wanted my Afro to be perfectly round
like Michael's, all that stuff."
Years later, the King of Pop and the Oscar-nominated film-
maker collaborated on a music video for "They Don't Care
About Us," shot in Brazil. The two never worked together
again.
Anybody and everybody is invited to attend the party, from
noon to 5 p.m., at Fort Greene Park in the New York borough.
DJ Spinna will spin all things Jackson, from the Jackson 5
to the Jacksons to Michael Jackson. The Brooklyn borough
president reportedly will be on hand to declare Aug. 29 ."Mi-
chael Jackson Day."
"At the end, we'll all sing 'Happy Birthday' to Michael," Lee
said. "We're going to make sure he hears us, too. All over the
world, people are going to be celebrating his birthday. But
he's going to hear Brooklyn; Brooklyn is going to be in the
house. Deep."
Also on Aug. 29, Jackson will be buried at a Los Angeles
cemetery, the New York Daily News reported last week.



Barack Obama to appear

in back-to-school program


President Obama will ap-
pear, in a back-to-school
television special with
singer Kelly Clarkson and
basketball star LeBron
James next month.
Obama is appearing in
a 30-minute documentary
that will air. at 8 p.m. Sept.
8 on BET, MTV, VH 1, CMT,
Comedy Central, Spike TV
and Nickelodeon, all of
them Viacom networks.
Obama also plans to deliv-
er a back-to-school speech
to the nation's students on
the same day.
In the program, the
president says education
is the key to people living
out their dreams.
"So as this new school
year begins, I urge you
to set goals for your own
education: to study hard
and get involved in your
school, to try new things
and find something
you're passionate about,"
Obama says, according to
a release issued Wednes-
day.
"And that's how our
nation will get ahead -
by ensuring that every
American gets a world-
class education, from
preschool to college to a
career," Obama said.
The program marks the
kickoff of an education
initiative by the Bill & Me-
linda Gates Foundation
and Viacom Inc. Called
Get Schooled, the five-
year campaign is aimed at
improving this country's


BARACK OBAMA
U.S. PRESIDENT


dismal high school and
college completion rates.
In the special, Obama,
Clarkson and James
all are shown along-
side behind-the-scenes
colleagues; Obama's is
speechwriter Sarah Hur-
witz, who talks about
her time in school and
current job at the White
House. Also featured are
Clarkson's music direc-
tor, Jason Halbert, and
James' marketer, Latesha
Williams.
Gates official Allan Gol-
ston, president of the
foundation's U.S. Pro-
gram, noted Obama has
made education a top
priority and that schools
got unprecedented morley
from the economic stimu-
lus law earlier this year.


~jPE


0
Inb


enS











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES. AUG 26 - SEPT 1, 2009


The first lady of Opa Locka,
the honorable Virginia Wilkin-
son Tresvant, celebrated her
86th birthday, last Sunday, at
her daughter's, Portia Tres-
vant Livingston, house with
politicians, family members and
friends in attendance.
Tresvant was the epitome
of the Honorable Michelle
Obama, the first lady of Presi-
dent Barack Obama, when her
husband, Honorable Walter
Tresvant, Sr. became Mayor
of Opa-locka in 1972. Virginia
took the rein as the leading fe-
male and involved herself in the
community by organiz-
ing senior groups, avail-
ing herself with commu-
nity projects under the
auspicious of the Mayor,
as well as the Parent
Teachers Association
(PTA)at North Dade High
School, where her chil-
dren attended. She com- CA
pleted her tasks while
being employed as a reg-
istered nurse at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital, Mount Sinai
Hospital, Parkway Hospital and
several more.
Additionally, she served as
minister of music at the First
Baptist Church of Opa-locka
and New Way fellowship Bap-
tist Church for over 50-years.
This part of her history lend it-
self to a golden opportunity for
the grand to become educated
in the area of family pride, dig-
nity and accomplishments of
grandmother.
The cities of Miami Gardens
and Opa-locka recognized the
honoree's accomplishments
by presenting a proclamation
from Opa-locka by Deborah
Sheffield Irby, City Clerk, along


with Mayor Shir-
ley Gibson of Mi-
ami Gardens, and
many gifts from
her children and
grand, including
a moment of remembrance for
the deceased family members,
such as Mayor/Commissioner
Albert Tresvant, Sr., Albert
Tresvant, Jr., Walter Tres-
vant, Alfonso Livingston, Jr.,,
and Michael Tresvant, grand-
son.
Other family members in
attendance included Joyce
Terry, Pricilla shamcett, Les-
lie Osborne, Joyce
Jones, Aunt Willie
Mae Smith, Rhonda,
Kevin, Shayon, Sh-
alya, Rodrick, Orge
Wilkinson, from New
Your City, Byron
Tackett, Edwin Bain,
Johnathan Joy, Jes-
PERS sica, Jaclyn, Virgin-
ia C. Charity, Aaron
Tresvant and many
more.
When Virginia took to the
microphone, tears filled. her
eyes as she thanked her fam-
ily for the.outpouring of love for.
her and the preparation of an
occasion never to be forgotten.
She vows to live as long as God
wants her to live and she would
leave her longevity to him and
enjoy every moment she can
with her family. And, of course,
based on the grand children,
the Tresvant family will grow,
grow, And grow in the future,
while the celebration continued
with much soul food served, DJ
music of oldie goldies, and ca-
maraderie among family mem-
bers and friends.


rs~ATil~ellir~~.~q


According to Dr. Enid
Pinkney, founder and CEO of
the Historic Hampton House
Community Trust, Inc., prog-
ress is still being made after the
ground breaking, recently, on
site with the Hampton House
Band and dignitaries fulfilling
their responsibilities for occu-
pancy in 2010.
Currently, the office on the
seventh floor is buzzing with
Pinkney wheeling and dealing
on' the phone. Everyone is do-
ing their job.
Dr. Larry Capp is correcting
and adding to the feasibility
study and report. Dr.
Edwin T. Demeritte is
finalizing plans to raise
more money to please
the budget office by
equalizing the funding
from the County's office.
Charlayne W. Thomp-
son is staying on top of
correspondences from
the County's office not PINI
to be misguided or late
with pertinent reports.
Finally, Mario Berrios is re-
porting how he is making sure
the funding is being received
and spent for the line items.
Dr. Pinkney alluded to
meetings with decision mak-
ers ensure there will be job op-
portunities for Black certified
workers when the contractors
are ready to begin the process
of demolition or building. She
included that the announce-
ment will be made in plenty of
time for interested persons to
respond and where.
Meanwhile, others are
working in the office like Isa-
bella Rosete, secretary, Mar-
va Lightbourne, Carolyn Bos-
ton, Martha Anderson, Alyce
S. Harrell and R. J. Strachan,
while Kia Green informed the
group of a possible fund raising
in November at the Joseph Ca-
leb Center with a ticket price of


$45.00.each. Committes mem-
bers include Capp, Boston,
Thompkins, Demeritte and
Rev. Preston Marshall.
The next meeting is sched-
uled for the first Tuesday in
September: For more informa-
tion, call 305-638-5800.


Congratulations go out to
Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1963 for tak-
ing the time to worship with
Rev. Dr. Joreatha Capers and
the congregation at Ebenezer
United Methodist Church, last
Sunday. Representing the class
was the impeccably
dressed John Lorenzo
Cheever decked down
in all red with an extra,
long coat.
Cheever, a well-
known air conditioner
repairman, articulated
with pride and dig-
nity why they chose
NEY Ebenezer UMC because
of the profound preach-
ing from Dr. Capers and
the Choraliers Singers provided
the music.
Some of the classmates
in attendance were Margie
Atkins, president, Carolyn
Clear, Camille Floyd, Portia
Hollerman, Willie Mumford,
Jr., Franklin Pinckney, David
Strachan, Willie Smith, Bar-
bara Taley and Everlina Pe-
terson Watson.


Speaking of birthdays, Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan was giv-
en a surprised party by Char-
lene Farington Fox, last Sun-
day, at the home of her mother,
Mary Farrington, with her sis-
ters, grand nieces and nephews
in attendance. Furthermore,
it was a party of balloons, hats
and an abundance of soul food
with ice cream and cake.
Dr. "Suge", as Charlene


called her, suffered a stroke
in 1995 and this was her first
birthday party with her family.
She even sang happy birthday
with everyone including sis-
ters, Jean Glover, Ruth Lew-
is, Jackie Plummer, Charlene
Fox, Regina Farrington, Jas-
mine, her daughter, Dexter,
Tyan, Rowan, Yekerra, War-
ren Cash, Carol Joi Cash,
Ashley, Derek Farrington,
Latoya, and Elle.
Along with ice cream
and cake, the family
enjoyed baked chicken,
Swedish meat balls,
spaghetti, fruit salad,
pigeon peas and rice,
macaroni and cheese
and green beans.

******** CA
Two icons recently
reached their demise,
Addle Tate Williams, a 1946
graduate of Booker T. Washing-
ton and Frances Louise Wil-
son, affectionately known as
"Fannie" and a 1974 graduate
of Miami Senior High.
Williams, a hairologist, for
over 38-years was the owner of
Addie's Artistic Beauty Salon,
located at 1083 Northwest 54th
Street, and continued to serve
special customers and began
a new career in desairology at
Range Funeral Home until she
retired. She received many ac-
colades and honors from the
beauty industry and the Alpha
Chi Omega Sorority. One of her
special customers was Lois H.
Oliver.
Wilson was a 1991 gradu-
ate of Ross Technical Institute
and held jobs in many fields in-
cluding a housekeeper Super-
visor at the Fountainebleu Ho-
tel, Arco Drugs, office manager
at M. Charles Production and
election specialist for the Mi-
ami-Dade County Department
of Elections.
Both icons were eulogized


at Ebenezer United Methodist
Church a month apart. Wil-
liams on the 15" of July and
Wilson on the 15th of August to
a church filled with many fam-
ily members.
Supporting family mem-
bers included Gretchen Ann
Williams, Saundra Gardner,
Natacha Butler Walker, Larry
Cornell Gardner, Jr., Toder-
ick Trumaine Gardner, Cas-
saundra D. Williams,
David J. Williams, Ja-
cynta Williamd, Aus-
tin Lamar Butler, Ka-
mari Kewon Gardner,
Patricia R. Jackson,
Charlie Ross and Rich-
ard Johnson.
While Wilson sup-
porters were daughters,
App Jamila and Latora; son,
Corey, Sr.; who deliv-
ered the eulogy, Corey
Jr., Sarai, Khiry, Priscilla
and Earlene, Gerald Wilson,
JoAnn Brookins, Antonio Kel-
vina, Nichole, Michael, Greg-
ory, Dewan, Fletcher, Lamar,
Felicia, Rashad, Jarrod Heru-
dixie, Adriana, Dvavisia, Ter-
rell, Detrell, Jasmine, Jerne-
ice; 17-riieces, nineteen grand
nieces, Ketron, Greynisha,
Malik, Armard, Shanteria,
Lamartriece, Tatiana, Daisy,
Alexus, Fletcher G., Viincent,
Yahleia, Jarrod, Jr., Lazaro
and Tyler; aunts and uncles,
Anthony Hepburn, Earlene
Thompson, Nassau, Bahamas;
and a host from Nassau, Baha-
mas, while kudos go out to Lisa
Hadley, a new comer in the fu-
neral business.


The Bethune-Cookman U.
Concert Chorale will perform at
Ebenezer UMC, 11 a.m. service
on Sunday, September 13. C.
Weatherington, A. Coakley,
J. Williams, C. Davis, M. Day,
Dr. G. Gilyard and other alum-
ni will be making donations.


' Congratulations:- to--soror
Sandra T. Thompson, who
was selected to be interim
president of Florida Memorial
University. Thompson is the
daughter of Etta Mae Taylor
and the niece of Elry Taylor-
Sands and Selma Taylor-
Ward.
Janice Maycock-Cook was
down from Atlanta, Ga. to
visit her ailing mother Easter
Maycock last week.
Jeffrey Swilley returned
home to pay tribute to his
beloved teacher Zeola Co-
hen-Jones whose funeral
was held last week. Dewey
Knight also paid tribute to,
his beloved sixth grade teach-
er. Zeola taught both of these
fine gentleman. Jeffrey and
his family lives in Fort Wash-
ington, Md. Jeffrey is the son
of Jack and Leona Swilley.
Dewey is the son of the late
Dewey and Clara Browne-
Knight II.
Get well wishes to Claretha
Grant-Lewis, Easter Robin-
son-Troy, Ismae. Prescott,
Althenia Kelly, David F.
Davis, Doris McKinney-
Pittman, Carmetta Brown-
Russell, George Wilkerson
(N.Y.C.) and Grace Heastie-
Patterson.
If you really, really want to
enjoy a vacation go to "Bimini
Key," the most beautiful re-
-sort you would wish to see.
Check it out'! You will like it!
Wedding anniversary greet-
ings go out to Winston S. and
Gloria P. Scavella, August
16, their 29th; George W. and
Cobboril Davis, August 18,
their 56th; Father and Rich-
ard L. (Virla R.) Marquess -
Barry, August 18, their 47th;
Phillip and Joycelyn F. Cru-
miel, August 18, their 41st;
Elston and Lillian E. Davis,
August 19, their 58th; Cyrus
and Demetra Dean-Wash-
ington, August 19, their 37th;
Freddie and (Sharon Dean)
Johnson, August 20, their
42"d and Walter and Clare-
tha Grant-Lewis, August 26,
their 61st.
Congratulations to Laymin-
ister Dr. Gay F. Outler on
her election as daughter of
the king Miami-Dade Deanery
Coordinator. Your Delta so-
rors are happy for you! Con-


-gratulations to my -
former student at
Dunbar Elemen-
tary Jacqueline
Charles who was
honored by the Na-
tional Black Jour-
nalists for her 2008 coverage
of Haiti: A Trail of Grief." Jac-
queline is a 15-year veteran
Miami Herald reported. Jac-
queline was honored for her
compelling and comprehen-
sive coverage of last year's
series of tropical storms
that devastated several cit-
ies throughout Haiti. I knew
you would do extremely well
in your chosen field "Jackie"
I am very happy for you and
your family and certainly
most proud.
This year, Berlin will be the
scene of another international
track meet-the world cham-
pionship at Olympic Stadi-
um the site of Jesse Owens
achievements and Owens will
be, duly honored. The school
children of Germany idolized
Owens despite Hitler's racial
opinions. Jessie won four gold
medals during his 1936.
All returning students of
the 2009-10 from elementary
to college, have a safe school
year. Your skills and intel-
ligence will surely serve you
well. Be respectful and kind
to your teachers. Best wishes
for continued success.
Sorry to have heard about
the demise of Helen Johnson,
wife of Dr. Kenneth John-
son. Helen died in Maryland
and will be buried there. Their
children are Dr. Kenneth
Johnson, Jr. and daughter
Jewel Johnson.
Eugene Cambridge, former
Miamian who lived in New
York City for over 50 years,
expired and was buried there.
He was the brother of the late
Calvin and Marie Cambridge
of Northwest First Place and
the son of the late Georgia
and Samuel Cambridge.. Eu-
gene was 91 years-old.
"The greatest of these is
love" for the handsome cou-
ple, Ingrid and Leonard Stu-
art of Pembroke Pines, who
affirmed their wedding vows of
25 years at Holy Name Cath-
olic Church in Bailey Town,
Bimini, Bahamas on Satur-


day, August 15. Monsignor
Simeon B. Roberts of St.
Cecilia's Catholic Church of-
ficiated the ceremony. Mon-
signor John Johnson of St.
Gregory's Catholic Church
and Donnalee Stuart offe~id
comments and Kevin Davis
played the organ.
Everyone was attired in
summer white except for the
ride and groom who were at-
tired in silver which was quite
fitting for the occasion. Fol-
lowing the inspirational ser-
vice, the guest and wedding
party drove to the Bimini Bay
Resort where they enjoyed the
reception, "Bahamian Style"
with special greetings and
toasts from friends and rela-
tives. On the scene were the
South Florida guests (Miami,
Miramar, Pembroke Pines
and West Palm Beach) that
included Lenville and Akeem
Stuart (sons of the couple),
Kelson Roberts, Caron Mill-
er Greeen, Mable Ferguson
Smith, Walter Stuart, Edwin
Ptrichard, Tatiana Roberts,
Nita A. Thomas, Katherina
Flowers, Valria Screen, Es-
quire, Bill and Hilda James,
Tiffany Robinson, Penny
and Ida Butler.
The Smiths: Richard, Al-
yssia, Mable and Mavis;
Rashad Ashley, Mervin
and Adrienne Ferguson,
Olympic Coach George Wil-
liams (former Miamian) and
wife Olivia (Raleigh, N.C.),
Deanna Christensen and
son, Dylan, Gloria Newbold,
Shirley Funches and grand-
son, Jordan Cannon, Fran-
cena Robinson and Maud P.
Newbold. Other guests came
from Freeport, Nassau and
Washington, D.C. to join the
.25th wedding celebration of
the couple .
.Coconut Grove, "Walk of
Fame" committee honored
residents who have made
contributions to their com-
munity through business,
sports, education, medicine,
the arts and( community ac-
tivism. The honorees are in-
ducted into a Wall of Fame
and represented by a "brick"
with a picture of their like-
ness.
Marshall, who has lived in
Coconut Grove all his life,
wanted a way to honor ex-
ceptional residents. Along
with two friends, Renita
Ross Samuels Dixon and
Dr. Richard Holton, the Co-
conut Grove Wall of Fame
committee was created. This


year's honorees: Lee Brown, erts and Thomas H. Sands
Helen B. Bain for business, for education. Posthumous
Terry Newton for the Arts, awards went to Esther M.
Nathaniel "Trax" Powell Armbrister for community
for sports and Daphne Rob- activism and Helen B. Bent-


ley, a registered nurse and
pioneer activist for medicine.
. Happy birthday wishes to
Flo from Eliane, co-worker
Frontier Lounge.


/AIIA/IIL.SPICE

i Lwve Miami Spice.com

ORGANIZED BY THE GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

This August and September, celebrate the city's passion

for food and life by enjoying special dinner and/or lunch

menus at reduced prices at Miami's finest restaurants.


Lunch $22* FDinner $35*
'3-course meal includes appetizer, entrte and dessert Beverage, tax and gratuity are no induced
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I


K


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R. Dwayne Betts: A mind unconfined by jail


R. Dwayne Betts is having cof-
fee at Busboys and Poets, a cof-
feehouse/bookstore/neighbor-
hood hangout here in the trendy
U Street area. He's talking about
his wife, his 20-month-old baby
boy, his freshly minted degree
from the University of Maryland
and his new book, A Question of
Freedom: A Memoir of Learning,'-
Survival and Coming of Age in
Prison (Avery, $23).
1 At 16, Betts was sent to prison
for nine years. Now 28, he is liv-
ing such a radically different life ,
even he is astonished by how far
he has traveled.
"I still remember my mom cry-
ing in the courtroom when I was
sentenced," he says. "I didn't want
that image to be the only thing I
remembered the rest of my life.".
His memoir takes, the read-


er from the day he made that
30-minute "egregious error' to
his life in five prisons and even-
tual freedom.
Betts wouldn't call his life in
prison a gift, but he quotes what
the judge told him at his sentenc-
ing. "I'm under no 'illusion that
sending you to prison will help
you, but you can get something
out of it."
He did. It was there - often in
solitary confinement because of
his "sassiness" - that he read vo-
raciously, wrote journals and fell
in love with poetry. A collection
of his poems, Shahid Reads His
Own Palm, is due next year.
He was introduced to poetry
when someone, he still does not
know who, slid The Black Poets
by Dudley Randall under his cell
door.


R. Dwayne Betts served nine
years in prison for his role in a
carjacking. During that time, he
became a voracious reader and
writer. -Photo/ H. Darr Belser


Poetry "came to me at a time I
needed to express myself, and I
needed to do it in a way people
,would listen to the whole thing,"
he says. "A poem can say every-
thing you say in a novel in much
less space. They're musical.
People hear the music in poet-
ry." (He is working on his MFA
in poetry, which he expects to
finish next July.)
Betts is drawing attention
for more than just his writing,
however.
"We see this as a searing lit-
erary debut," says Megan, New-
man, publisher of Avery which
bought Betts' memoir, "Dwayne
has an unexpectedly strong aid
mature voice.
"But I was also taken with his
sense of mission and dedication
to juvenile-justice issues. And


Employee accused of assault at.rapper 50 Cent's home


Hartford, Conn. - An employee
of rapper 50 Cent has been
accused of getting into a fight
after a sex-related dispute at the
hip-hop star's mansion land is
facing assault charges.
Dwayne McKenzie works for
the, rappel's company G-Unit
and lives on the sprawling
property, which used to be
owned by boxer Mike Tyson.
Court documents obtained by
the Hartford Courant newspaper
allege McKenzie. requested
oral sex from a woman during
an Aug. 16 gathering at the
50,000-square-foot mansion in
the Hartford metropolitan area
suburb Farmington. "
A friend of the woman took
offense, and a fight ensued,
police said.
Police Lt. William M. Tyler said
50 Cent wasn't at the home,
which has 19 bedrooms and 37
bathrooms and boasts a gym,


DWAYNE MCKENZIE
billiards rooms, racquetball
courts and a disco with stripper
poles.
When the woman and her
friend decided to leave the
mansion, witnesses said, another
woman, Michelle Krzykowski,
ran after them and grabbed the


friend, and McKenzie told her
she was attacking the wrong
person, according to a warrant
for McKenzie's arrest.
Krzykowski hit the woman
with a hard object, leaving a
large gash in her head, police
said. Witnesses told police
McKenzie pinned .the woman to
the ground while Krzykowski hit
her.
McKenzie claims' the
accusation that he urged
Krzykowski to attack the
woman 'is totally false," said his
. lawyer, Gerald Klein, who has
represented him before.
"He's not a celebrity, but he
works for one," Klein said. "So
I guess he can be targeted by
people looking to make hay."
McKenzie, 28, was blasted in
,the eyes with pepper spray during
the fight, Klein said. He faces
several charges stemming from
the incident and is scheduled


Miami Heat star checks into rehab


The Miami Times Report

Miami Heat forward Michael
Beasley has checked into a
Houston rehabilitation facility,
according The Associated Press
on Monday. The 2008 number
2 pick in the NBA draft appar-
ently checked himself in last
week. It is unaware of how long.
he will remain at the facility. Ya-
hoo! Sports first reported Beas-
ley entered a rehab facility.
Comments on Beasley's Twit-
ter page read "Feelin like it's not
worth living!!!!! ! I'm done" and
"I feel like the whole world is
against me I can't win for losin,"


which left many concerned and
were taken down from his page
early Monday afternoon.
In his rookie season, Beasley
was second-,eading scorer in
which he averaged 13.9 points
and 5.4 rebounds.
SLast September, Beasley was
fined $50,000 after security of-
ficers at the NBA's rookie sym-
posium sensed traces of mari-
juana in a hotel room occupied
by Beasley, Mario Chalmers,
Darrell Arthur and two women.
Chalmers and Arthur were fined
$20,000; Beasley received a un-
yielding fine for trying to cover
up from NBA officials.


MICHAEL BEASLEY


Williams sisters part-owners of Miami Dolphins


Stephen M. Ross, Owner and
Managing General Partner of
the Miami Dolphins, announced
Tuesday that Venus and Serena
Williams, who have 18 Grand
Slam singles titles combined
and are residents of Palm Beach
Gardens, are joining the organi-
zation as limited partners of the
franchise.
The Williams sisters are the
first female Blacks to hold an
ownership stake in a NFL fran-
chise and one of the few Blacks
league-wide to hold this unique
distinction.
"We are thrilled to have Venus
and Serena join the Dolphins
as limited partners," said Ross.
"They are among the most ad-
mired athletes in the world and
have become global ambassa-
dots for the game of tennis. Their
addition to our ownership group


further reflects our commitment
to connect with aggressively arid
embrace the great diversity that
makes South Florida a multicul-
tural gem," added Ross.
"I am honored to be a partner
in the Miami Dolphins franchise.
I admire Stephen Ross' vision for
the team and I am thankful to
him for allowing Serena and I to
be part of Miami Dolphins his-
tory," said Venus.
"I am so excited to be part
of such a renowned organiza-
tion. Having spent so much of
my childhood in the area, being
involved with a staple of Miami
culture is a huge honor. We look
forward to many championships
and much success together with
the Miami Dolphins," said Ser-
enaa.
The Williams sisters are
among the top professional


athletes in the world. Between
them, they have 18 Grand Slam
singles titles, nine Grand Slam
doubles titles, 62 Sony Ericsson
WTA Tour titles and three Olym-
pic gold medals. They have been
credited with raising the profile
of their sport and with bringing
the women's tennis game to' a
whole new level of power, ath-
leticism and popularity. In ad-
dition, they are accomplished
businesswomen.
Serena, currently ranked sec-
ond in the world, has 11 Grand
Slam singles titles, including
her third Wimbledon title this
past July, 28 Tour titles and two
Olympic gold medals. She is a
four-time ESPY Award winner,
and in 2002 was named "Fe-
male Athlete of the Year" by the
AP and one of People Magazine's
"25 Most Intriguing People."


to appear Tuesday in Hartford
Superior Court, but his lawyer
is expected to ask for the case to
be continued until Sept. 1.


since I'm in publishing, I adore
being involved in publishing a
.book by a young man who saved
his own life through reading."
Betts is the national spokes-
man for the Campaign for
Youth Justice, speaking out for
juvenile-justice reform. He also
visits detention centers and in-
ner-city schools, talking to at-
Srisk young people.
"It's not a Scared Straight
kind of thing," he says. "It's just
me having a conversation with
them about the importance of
writing and poetry and how it
can change their lives.
"I'm the voice of someone who


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has been there."
In the same vein, he began
YoungMenRead, a book club
in the Washington, D.C., area
where he introduces young
men to his favorite writers:
John Edgar Wideman, James
Baldwin, Toni Morrison, John
Steinbeck.
As for his memoir, Betts says
it's really about going from "one
unexpected thing (his arrest) to
another unexpected thing (his
life as a writer/poet)."
"If all this hadn't happened," he
says, "I'd have played point guard
at Georgia Tech and studied to
be an electrical engineer."
q


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(Utmil 2 Ravos)
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The Adrienne Arsht Center in association with
Jan Ryan, Robert Fox, and Michael White presents
THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Musiq and AE District
"With top-class acting, singing and dancing, Kerry Michael'ssuperb
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but also, somehow, it's soul" The Standard
2 & 8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


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Accompanied by a killer band of outstanding-reggae musicians, the cast
performs more than 20 classic songs from the film soundtrack, including,
"By Thd Rivers of'Babylon," the title song, "Higher and Higher," and
"You Can Get It If You Really Want."
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50,00, $95.00


THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by'Garden Grown and Guerilla Union In association with the
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"The evening is an astonishment in every way; an exhilarating bleeding-
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are all one" The Guardian
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Muslq and AE District
"Bell (who plays Ivan) sings a melodiously as Jimmy Cliff, giving the
songs edge, sweetness and soul. And the moves in ways that would
make a street hooker blush" Daily Mail
2 & 8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


The Harder They Come
' y'


THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Muslq and AE District
"This is a celebration of the film and its music and it's a loud, raucous and
often funny reinterpretation. It's filled with fantastic music an energetic
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\WN DESTINY'


U SUN SEPTEMBER


. 3C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 26 -SEPT 1,2009
















Community youth prepare for back-to-school


New-Birth Church youth revival help students

get ready for upcoming school year


Special to the Times

In a dynamic, fun filled day
of celebration and prepara-
tion the youth of New Birth
Baptist Church Cathedral of
Faith International, under the
leadership of Bishop Victor T.
Curry, were treated to a first
class, one day Back to School
Jam and Youth & Young
Adult Revival. Parents and
bright eyed, excited children
flocked into the Church's
facilities (located 2300, NW
135th Street) as early as 9:30
a.m. to. take advantage of the
immunization, ' fingerprint-
ing, health, screening, school
supply distributions, games
and refreshments, all provid-
ed for. church members and
anyone from the community
free of charge.
Ever mindful of the impor-
tance of properly position-
ing young people for the new
school year, Curry started
tlis program .a number of
years ago, as a holistic mech-
anism by which parents and
students can be prepared
physically, mentally, emo-
tionally and spiritually for
the upcoming school year.
With the help of the Church's
full time youth ministry staff,
scores of volunteers and a
number of corporate spon-
sors including.The Florida
Marlins, State Sen. Frederica
S. Wilson, A+ Markem Tuto-
rial Service and WMBM Ratio
Station, this year's event was
once again an outstanding
success.
In addition to the various
services provided, through-
out the day participants were
also exposed to numerous
youth related vendors, an
educational forum, a power-


packed worship service and a
"slammin" after praise party.
During the very candid
and interactive educational
forum hosted by Elder Viv-
ian Whitehead of New Birth,
parents and students heard
from informed panelists
such as; Dr. Michael Town-
sel, Administrator of Miami
Dade Public Schools(MDPS),
Dannie McMillon, Region 3
coordinator of MDPS Par-
ent Teacher Association, Ev-
elyn Epps, retired counselor
MDPS and Abdul El Amin,
school teacher.
The youth were exposed
to a high level of presenters
that climaxed to the Worship
Service. Thousands of youth
and young adults filled the
sanctuary at New Birth after
7 p.m. to hear from nation-
ally renowned motivational
speaker and author Simon
Bailey and were entertained


by recording artist J. Moss.
Under the theme. "Discover
Your Brilliance". southh \%ere
encouraged to press beyond
their comfort zones and ful-
ly tap into their innate. God
given brilliance.
The festivities closed out
with a bang at an "After


Praise Part-" hosted in the
Church's fellowship hall. Or-
gantzers felt that this would
be a wonderful way to "top
off' the day's events and
send participants off into the
new school year; fresh from a
time of fun, food and fellow-
ship.


Gospel recording artist J. Moss performs at the Back to School
Jam and Youth & Young Adult Revival on Friday night. -Photo/Kevin Moyd


Long lines of parents and students await the distribution of backpacks and school
Supplies. -Photo/Kevin Moyd


2009-2010 SCHOOL YEAR OPEN ENROLLMENT




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A Good Source of Potassium, 5-lb bag
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Breakfast Bread... .... 39
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Assorted Varieties, 1175 to 14.5-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.99
(Assorted Tostitos or Fritos Dip,
15 or 15.75-oz jar ... 2/6.00)


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Public . 99
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18-Pack Assorted 1199
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(12-Pack Bud Light Lime, 12-oz can or bot.
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


o ri N


I


S.-L. _. .. .. . - IJ


C 4 THE MIAMI TIMES AUG 26 - SEPT1, 2009


P�)-;~
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The Miami Times




Business


Sinance


MIAMI, ..., ,DA, AUGUST 26- SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


'Mortgage rates

lowest since May

Average rates on 30-year mort-
gages slid to the lowest levels since
May this week, Freddie Mac said.
The average rate for a 30-year
fixed-rate mortgage was 5.12%,
down from 5.29% last week, Fred-
die Mac said. At this time last year,
the average rate for 30-year fixed-
rate mortgages was 6.47%.
Low mortgage rates can spur
refinance activity and make
home buying more attractive.
The last time rates for 30-year
mortgages were this low was the
week of May 28, when they were
4.91%.
Rates on 30-year mortgages
fell to a record low of 4.78% in
April, but then rose to 5.6% after
yields on long-term government
debt, which are closely tied to
mortgage rates, climbed.
Frank Nothaft, Freddie Mac's
chief economist, said Treasury
bond yields fell nearly a quarter
of a percentage point over the
week, bringing mortgage rates
down.
The yield on the benchmark
10-year Treasury note rose
Thursday to 3.48% from 3.46%
late Wednesday.
Freddie Mac collects mort-
gage rates on Monday through
Wednesday of each week from
lenders around the country.
Rates often fluctuate significant-
ly, even within a given- day.
The average rate on a 15-year
fixed-rate mortgage was 4.56%,
down from 4.68% last week, ac-
cording to Freddie Mac.
Rates on five-year, adjustable-
rate mortgages averaged 4.57%,
down from 4.75%. Rates on one-
year, adjustable-rate mortgages
fell to 4.69 from 4.72%.
The rates do not include add-
on fees known as points. The
nationwide fee averaged 0.7
point last week for 30-year and
15-year mortgages. Fees averaged
0.6 point for five-year adjustable-
rate loans and 0.5 point for one-
year adjustable-rate loans.


Mrs. Russell with students at Windwood Children's center in Gainesville, VA after workshop


on credit cards.


Continuing the Legacy of


Miami educator Carl L.. Hanna


Lifetime educator, re-
tired Dade County School
System Principal, the late
Carl L. Hanna left as his
legacy an enduring spirit
of educational outreach
and service to others.
Since the early 1950s,
the Miami native set out
to change the world by
making a difference in
the lives of young people
through education and


CARL L HANNA


mentorship. This week marks
the seventh anniversary ofhis
death, and we are reminded of
the important role he played
in our community. As an ed-
ucator, he was regarded as a
great father figure and men-
tor to the many students that
crossed his path. As an ac-
tivist, he was best known for
his strides in the community
where he worked as a fund -
raiser to financially assist


those less fortunate than himself.
Now, almost 60 years after Mr. Han-
na began charting paths for future gen-
erations, his youngest granddaughter,
Enica D. Russell of Northern Virginia >
vows to keep his legacy alive. Earlier
this month, Mrs. Russell, the daugh-
ter of Enoch Dukes and Florence Han-
na Dukes, announced the launching
of her company - Financial Inroads,
Inc. - where she is the Founder and
Chief Strategist of the organization.
Please turn to LEGACY 6D


FAMU ranks No. 1 in the Collegiate Licensing Company


Florida A&M University (FAMU)
ranks first among historically
Black colleges and universities
(HBCUs) in selling licensed mer-
chandise, according to informa-
tion released this week by the
Collegiate Licensing Company
(CLC). CLC, founded in 1981, is
a division of global sports and
entertainment company IMG
which represents nearly 200 col-
leges, universities, bowl games,
athletic conferences, the Heis-
man Trophy and the NCAA.
The FAMU licensing program
generated $79,007 in gross roy-
alties during the 2008-2009
fiscal year. This represents the
largest royalty collection in the
history of the FAMU program.
"We are excited to know that
FAMU is at the top of the list in
selling apparel and other mer-
chandise," said Sabrina Thomp-
son, coordinator of licensing at
FAMU. "This is only an indicator


of the success that we can have
with this program. My goal is to
increase sales by 25 percent in
the upcoming year. We hope to
continue to soar and bring rev-
enue to the institution during
these tough economic times."
Royalties from the licensing
program fund athletic scholar-
ships at FAMU.
The primary factor for the in-
crease is due to FAMU's Victoria
Secret Pink Collegiate Collection.
This collection generated $7,764
in royalties for FAMU licensing
program. The FAMU's Pink col-
lection had a significant impact
on the women's apparel category
by growing it 187 percent.
Team Beans, a leading mar-
keter and manufacturer of col-
lectibles, novelty and promo-
tional .products for the sports
industry, also contributed to
FAMU's record year.
Please turn to FAMU 6D


Sabrina Thompson, coordinator of licensing at FAMU, takes a picture in FAMU's bookstore,which
sells an array of licensed FAMU merchandise.


South Florida

unemployment rate

highest in the region

The jobless rate in the South Flori-
da Workforce Region rose to its high-
est recorded level in July 2009. The
unemployment rate for the Region
climbed to an unprecedented 11.4
percent during July 2009, nearly
double the year-ago rate of 5.9 per-
cent. The Region's unemployment
rate was also 0.4 percentage points
higher than the state's unemploy-
ment rate of 11 .'0 percent during July
2009.
In overall numbers, the July 2009
unemployment rates for the two
counties that comprise the South
Florida Workforce Region were 11.6
percent in Miami -Dade County and
6.6 percent in Monroe County. The
unemployment rate in Miami-Dade
County increased 5.7 percentage
points over the year while the unem-
ployment rate in Monroe County in-
creased 2.4 percentage points. Out of
a total labor force of 1,299,110, there
were 148,295 unemployed residents
within the region.
The data also showed that during
the same period, total nonagricultur-
al employment in the Miami-Miami
Beach-Kendall metropolitan division
declined by 33,100 jobs over the year
in the Miami-Miami Beach-Kendall
metropolitan division. Trade, trans-
portation, and utilities (-8,000 jobs)
lost the most jobs, followed by min-
ing, logging, and construction (-7,400
jobs); professional and business ser-
vices (-6,400 jobs); manufacturing
(-3,000 jobs); government (-2,400
jobs); financial activities (-1,700 jobs);
information (-1,400 jobs); other ser-
vices (-1,300 jobs); leisure and hos-
pitality (-1,100); and education and
health services (-400 jobs).


Credit card borrowing

squeezes for minors

By Susan Donaldson James

An average of 84 percent of all col-
lege students have credit cards and
56 percent of them have more than
four, according to a national study by
Sallie Mae.
In 2008, college seniors graduated
with an- average credit-card debt of
$4,700, a 62 percent increase since
2004. Nearly 20 percent of them carry
balances of more than $7,000.
But provisions in the new Credit Card
Accountability Responsibility and Dis-
closure Act of 2009, which will go into
effect in February, seek to rein in that
debt, making it harder for students to
qualify for credit cards.
Credit Card: 'Magic Piece of Plastic'
"It's kind of like this magic piece of
plastic," said Adam Levin, co-founder
and chairman of Credit.com and for-
mer New Jersey state consumer affairs
director.
"You hand it to someone and they
give you something back," he said.
"Then 30 to 40 days later, the ugly con-
sequence shows up."
College graduates should be building
on their financial future, "not digging
themselves out of a hole," said Levin.
"Students think it's their GPA that's
important, but it's their FICA score."


Women entrepreneurs crucial in controversial healthcare debate


By Farrah Gray

Today's women entrepre-
neurs are vital
to the growth
of the nation's
economy em-
ploying over 13
million workers

States. Repre-
senting 38 percent of all pri-
vately held firms, women en-
trepreneurs are at the heart
of any sustainable recovery
for job creation and revenue
growth. And yet, we find mil-
lions of women entrepreneurs
juggling healthcare and child-
care costs while attempting to
maintain a healthy household.
It is safe to say, these modern
day hustlers understand how
to stretch a dollar better than


ever before.
These women entrepreneurs
possess an uncanny sense of
determinauon. Their high tech
savvy and natural social ge-
nius is often superior. Recent
estimates including by the
Center for Women s Business
Research indicate the nation
has over 10 million businesses
owned by women that generate
close to $1.8 trillion in sales.
These extraordinary women
entrepreneurs by necessity al-
ways share one unique quality
in their ability to think outside
the box for creative solutions.
As our nation's healthcare
conversations focus on the
46 million uninsured, many
women entrepreneurs across
the country are already meet-
ing such challenges for their
families. Some have found


health insurance through a year, although there have been
spouse employer, or even by discussions about raising the
joining the American Farmers limit to $500,000 or more (the
Association or American Farm tax would range from I per-
Bureau both offer many self- cent to 5.4 percent of income).
employed business owners ac- Currently, the proposal does
cess to affordable group cover- not include exemptions for S
age. corporations or other small
The controversial U.S. House businesses, many of which
of Representatives healthcare file as individuals for tax pur-

I individually the self-employed woman entrepreneur con-
tinue to struggle with an uphill battle not only with daily
business challenges but also spiraling costs of finding
quality family healthcare coverage.


bill known as the America's
Affordable Health Choices Act
of 2009 due for upcoming vote
in September; proposes that
a surtax on individuals who
make $280,000 or more a


poses. This surtax may affect
the income of half of all small
businesses with 20 to 249 em-
ployees.
Individually the ,self-em-
ployed woman entrepreneur


continue to struggle with an
uphill battle not only with
daily business challenges but
also spiraling costs of finding
quality family healthca~e cov-
erage. Therefore, many hire
part-time workers specifically
to avoid healthcare costs be-
cause no financial incentive
exists for them otherwise.
Today, small business own-
ers face over 5 percent annual
increases in healthcare premi-
ums along with an economic
downturn and rising overhead
expenses. It is unusual to find
self-employed health insur-
ance that reaches the same
levels of coverage offered by
larger company employers.
The primary issue being sta-
tistically the risk of a consis-
tently healthy individual is
generally lower than spread


over a group. This results in
higher expenses for the indi-
vidual seeking the same level
of services.
The first detail a self-em-
ployed person should look for
in health insurance is what
coverage they're actually going
to need. Full comprehensive
health insurance gets very ex-
pensive. For example, raising
deductibles, or accepting that
you don't need certain types
of industrial compensation are
useful ways to trim back costs
and keep the health insurance
affordable.
By talking to local neighbors
about healthcare, friends,
other business owners, or ac-
countants many women entre-
preneurs save a lot of money
by learning from the experi-
ences of others.


SECTION D











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


0 6 THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 26 - SEPT1, 2009


4bSmuo


Edmonson holds budget meetings in District 3


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


- Available from Commercial News Providers
Hundreds of residents in District 3 packed the Joseph Caleb Auditorium as County Commissioner Audrey Available from Commercial News Providers
Edmonson discussed the Proposed 2009/10 County Budget. Miami-Dade County

In efforts to adhere to concerns to the residents in her district in regards to the Proposed 2009/10 County Budget, Miami-
Dade Commissioner Audrey Edmonson, like many of her other constituents, held meetings to discuss the budget. Edmonson
organized three meetings from Aug. 18-20 which were held at American Legion Park, DeHostos-Wynwood Community Center
and Joseph Caleb Center for the Mayor's staff to present the budget proposal to the residents.


Opa-locka program gets stimulus money


Special to the Times

During an interview
scheduled to air in Sep-
tember, on a "Special
'Edition of the Mayor's
Round Table," Interim
City Manager, Bryan K.
Finnie stated that "The
COPS (Community Ori-
ented Policing Services)
grant which was award-
ed to the City from the
Federal Stimulus dol-
lars is providing the re-
sources for higher visi-
bility on the streets and
is allowing our police to
focus on areas such as
Magnolia North," which


is formally known- as
the Triangle, where
there has been a 90-95
percent crime reduction
over the past year.
"With Mayor Kelley
traveling to Washington
D.C. to assure that we
were counted, and U.S.
Congressman Kendrick
Meek securing the Fed-
eral Dollars, Opa-locka
is one of the eight mu-,.
nicipalities in Miami-
Dade County, awarded
funds for the Police pro-
gram," stated Finnie.
He said the COPS
Initiative was "a part
of the total pie, and is


built on our success
with the Community
Empowerment Team'
(CET) program which
is a community base
initiative, linked to the
police department, that
addresses social chal-
lenges to improve the
lives of those who use
the service."
In addition to the
success of the COPS
program and CET, the
City Manager affirmed
to Kelley that the Crime
Watch program on the
East Side, West Side
and in Sailboat Cove
have also been success-


ful, due to the commu-
nity policing, funded by
COPS money and the
direct contributions of
the citizens who have
networked to form
neighborhood phone
trees.
"They have bonded
to support the police
department in com-
bating crime and this
gives the community
an avenue to com-
municate," Finnie re-
marked. He added that
"another slice of the
'vertically integrated
pie,' where we are all
working together for


FAMU battles unlicensed merchandise


FAMU
continued from 5D

They reported $5,721
in royalties for the fis-
cal year.
FAMU currently has
120 licensees.
As part of the
preparations for the
2008 Rattler Football
season, officials at
FAMU, CLC and lo-
cal -law enforcement


made preparations to
rid the marketplace of
counterfeit and unli-
censed merchandise.
Since .August 2008,
CLC, the university
and local law enforce-
ment officials, have
patrolled the Talla-
hassee, marketplace
in search of counter-
feiters selling "knock-
off" merchandise. All
counterfeit merchan-


dise is subject to sei-
zure. FAMU benefits
monetarily from the
sale of licensed mer-
chandise, receiving
7.5 percent of the
purchase price.
"Florida A&M Uni-
versity has been ex-
tremely proactive in
growing its licensing
program, and their
hard work as paid
off," said Brian White,


CLC's vice president
of University Servic-
es. "FAMU's rich tra-
dition, combined with
the innovative licens-
ing programs the Uni-
versity has developed
over the last couple
of years have helped
grow.its retail product
sales among its loyal
constituents across a
variety of product cat-
egories."


Russell credits life of service to husband


LEGACY
continued from 5D

FINANCIAL
SERVICES
For more than 12
years, Mrs. Russell held
progressively challeng-
ing roles in the finan-
cial services industry.
Her responsibilities
included: consulting,
examination and over-
sight, policywriting and
course development on
capital markets issues
affecting financial insti-
tutions for organizations
such as Smith Barney,
the Federal Deposit In-
surance Corporation
(FDIC) and the National
Credit Union Adminis-
tration (NCUA).
Outside of work, she
began using her finance
background to serve her
community at large. She
found that many indi-
viduals and organiza-
tions were not financially
successful because they
lacked a basic under-
standing of finance and
economic principals or
because they set unre-
alistic goals by not lay-
ing out realistic paths
for achieving their goals.
Additionally, her profes-
sional experience in stra-
tegic planning and busi-


ness development led her
into strategic fundraising
to help these same orga-
nizations achieve their
financial goals. Despite
having a successful ca-
reer, she felt more ful-
filled volunteering in her
community.
While Mrs. Russell's
career path initially di-
verged from the tradi-
tional path set out by her
grandfather, she could
not escape the premise
that in order to succeed
in life, you must have a
strong educational foun-
dation. While the com-
pany primarily focuses
on "Creating paths for
financial success", it
broadens Mr. Hanna's
dream and carries it into
the twenty-first century.

PASSING THE
TORCH
Financial Inroads, Inc.
combines Mrs. Rus-
sell's passions with the
work her grandfather
put into place over six
decades ago. The com-
panies' Financial Edu-
cation Division focuses
on individuals and or-
ganizations seeking
knowledge in the areas
of finance, econom-
ics, capital markets
and risk management.
Along with her team of


consultants, the Finan-
cial Education Division
conducts workshops
on topics including ba-
sic financial literacy for
young audiences to ad-
vanced presentations
on current economic
conditions to adult au-
diences.
The Funding Division
focuses on non-profit
organizations :seeking
strategic fundraising in
order to remain viable.
This division consists
of consultants that
manage the fund rais-
ing process including
grant writing, feasibility
studies, special event
planning, production
and execution, annual
campaigns, major gift
campaigns, fundrais-
ing coaching and board
engagement.
Her most rewarding
projects are financial
literacy workshops she
conducts for young au-
diences. Recently, she
conducted a workshop
at her daughter Lo-
gan's school in Gaines-
ville, VA. Her lesson
plan included a discus-
sion about why we save
money, the purpose of
debit/credit cards and
counting and making
change. The students
were tasked with say-


ing money over the
summer. The money
each student accumu-
lates over the summer
will go towards their
very own VISA gift.card.
Mrs. Russell will end
the summer workshop
by accompanying the
students to Toys R Us
to purchase a toy with
their money saved.
Mrs. Russell with
students at Winwood
Children's Center in
Gainesville, VA after
workshop on credit
cards.
Mrs. Russell credits
her loving husband of
'14 years, Jason Rus-
sell, for. encourag-
ing her to follow her
dreams. She notes
that without his sup-
port, both moral and
financial, the organi-
zation would not exist
today. Owning her own
business has given her
the flexibility to manage
her home life better and
select projects that are
of greatest interest to
her.
For more information
regarding how your or-
ganization can benefit
from the services of Fi-
nancial Inroads, Inc.,
visit their website at
http:'//www.financial-
inroadsinc.com.


the same goal on a co-
ordinated bases, is the
newly formed Office of
Community Services
(OCS), housed in the
Office of the City Man-
ager."


v 0


9 MONTH STUDENT SUBSCRIPTION FOR JUST 25

FOR 2009 GRADUATES & COLLEGE STUDENTS



Send your graduate off with


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GRADUATE SUBSCRIPTION OFFER
Send to: The Miami Times
900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


GIVE YOUR STUDENT A GIFE SUBSCRIPTION OF THE TIMES FOR ONLY $25

Sf Yes, send my student the Times. Enclosed is my Check, Money Order, or Credit Card Information
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PSCTILn nD


GREAT NEWSIII

PINNACLE PLAZAAPTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI 33142

ANEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00

APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MOREIII

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIALAREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7,2009
(305) 635- 9505

'Income restnctions apply,
rents are subject to
change



1031 NW 197TERR
One bedroom, one bath.
Call Linton at 786-222-6764

1202 N.W. 61st Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $750 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1205 N.W. 58th Street
One bedroom. All appliances
included. $575 monthly plus
security. 786-277-0632

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667


1229 N.W. 1 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
_.,5-toye, lefrige.ator,,air-
g -7080/73~i .. ,,
.1144

125.00 RW.-r0STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080

140 N.W. 13 Street
One month to move in. Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

140 S.W. 6 St. HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$500 monthly
Call:305-267-9449

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bdrm, one bath.
$625 mthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in. 786-290-
5498

1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$625 monthly. Three
bedrooms, two baths, $725
monthly. All appliances in-
cluded, FREE 19 inch LCD
TV. Call Joel 786-355-7578

1541 N.W. 1 Place
Rents reduced for short time
only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled, air, stove,
refrigerator. No Deposit for
Section 8!
CalK 305-582-5091

15600 N.W. 7th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath.
Call 786-237-1292

1955 N.W. 2 COURT
Onelbedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080

1969 N. W. 2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air,
free water. 305-642-7080
786-236-1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080


2493 NW 91 STREET
One bedroom apt with air.
$550 monthly
786-515-3020,305-691-2703

2565 N.W. 92nd Street
One bedroom, air, stove, re-
'frigerator, nice neighborhood
$640 monthly; $1920 move in
or $320 bi-weekly, $960 move
in 305-624-8820

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$340 bi-weekly, $600 moves
you in. Appliances.
786-389-1686

3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $55d, two
bedrooms $650, stove,
refrigerator, air $650.
.305-642-7080

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

5200 NW 26 AVENUE
Two and three bdrms.
Free gift for
Section 8 tenants.
No deposit if qualified!
786-663-8862, 305-634-3545

5600 N.W. 7th Court
Large one bedroom, ap-
pliances included. $6000
monthly plus security. Sec-
tion 8 welcome. 786-277-
0632

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

621 N.W. 64 STREET
.Three bbdrms Special $875
an d two bdrris $81 5, one
bearoom $735 nice and
clean, laundry room, parking.
Section 8 OK! 786-326-7424

729 N.W. 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath: Call
786-312- 4097. Michael.

7520 NE MIAMI COURT
One bedroom, one bath, free
water. $600 monthly, first and
last. 786-277-0302

8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one, two, and four
bdrms. Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.

BEAUTIFUL
5120 N.W. 23 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, wa-
ter included. $500 monthly.
George 305-283-6804

CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tlonispecials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
corn
DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766

FREE FIRST MONTH
PLUS WATER
Spacious, one, two bdrm.
786-486-2895

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy qualify. Move in
:special.
One bedroom, one bath,
'$495 ($745), two bedrooms.


one bath, $595 ($895).
Free water
Leonard 786-236-1144


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699

MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms., one bath, cen-
tral air, $1200 and $975. one
bdrm., one bath, central air,
.$735. One efficiency, $550.
305-206-1566

N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


N. MIAMI BEACH AREA
Studio, $700 plus deposit. All
utilities and cable'Included.
Section 8 ready. Call Irma at:
786-487-7403

NORTHWEST AREA
One bedroom, one bath, air,
lights, water. 305-968-0892

OPA LOCKA AREA
1110 SESAME STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly.. One bedroom,
one bath, $750 monthly.
954-825-9382

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 185th Street
S1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no secunty deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
One bdrm, one bath apt.,
$550 per month.
Two bdrms., one bath apt.,
$650 per month.
Two bdrms., one bath
house, '$850 per month.
All appliances included.
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV,
Call Joel 786-355-7578



14004 NE 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, two baths
condo. $1100 mthly. Section
8 accepted.
Call Ricky 786-253-7218

18325 NW 44 Court
Large, two bedroom,
two bath, laundry room :Call!
305-975-0711,786-367-3820

1990 NW 4 Court
Three bedrooms, one and
a half bath townhouse,
newly renovated, appli-
ances. Immediate move-
In. $900. For appointment
contact:
305-751-6232

2779 NW 192 TER
Two bedrooms, one and one
half baths, appliances includ-
ed. Central air, washer, dryer.
Close to shopping. Section 8
welcome. $1100 monthly.
305-469-9741

2906 N.W. 195 Lane
Three bdrms., one bath.
Voucher. 786-457-3287

DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Two bedrooms, two baths,
penthouse, ocean view.
$1200 monthly. 1000
square feet.
Section 8 Welcome
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office
www.therriamicondo.com

MIAMI SHORES AREA
9614 NW 5 AVE UNIT 2
One bedroom, one bath,
fenced yard, like new. $785
monthly. 305-793-0002

NEAR DOLPHIN STADIUM
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly. 954-663-3990


1003 NW 38 STREET
One bdrm, one bath, air, tile
floors. Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-326-6105

10201 N.W. 8 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1195. Appliances.
305,642-7080

1050 N.W. 112 St.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, security bars, wa-
ter Included. Section 8 OKI
786-879-3312

1076 NW 38 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, re-
cently renovated, new appli-
ances, two parking spaces.
Section 8 accepted.
305-796-7963

1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885 Doreen

13315 Alexandria Drive
Two bedrooms, one bath
$775 monthly plus first and
last. Section 8 OKI
252-955-7878, 786-252-4953


1401 NW 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$550 mthly, $1500 move in.
786-873-2694

1720 N.E. 148th Street
Two bdrm, one bath, air,
washer. $800. 786-356-6101

1871 NW 43 STREET
Clean Two bdrms, one bath,
central air, appliances, tile,
blinds, security bars.
Call 786-357-5000

2053 ALI BABA AVENUE
Newly renovated, one bdrm,
one bath, tiled floors, new
appliances, central air, $650,
first and security. 786-315-
7358 or 305-332-4426

2257 N.W. 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2355 NW 95 Terrace
Two bdrm, one bath, newly
tiled, Section 8.
305-836-4027

2377 NW 82 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath. $1100.
Section 8 ok. 305-903-2931

2585 NW 165 STREET
Near N. Dade Health Clinic.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air and heat. $1100
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-542-0810

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

5302 N.W. 1 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Fenced yard. $750 monthly.
305-891-5567 from 6-8 p.m.

5420 N.W. 5 Court
Large three bdrms, two baths.
$1200 monthly, $1000 secu-
rity. Call 786-488-2264.

572 N.E. 65th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 monthly, $500 security.
Call 786-488-2264.

5803 N. MIAMI AVE
Two bedrooms, one bath
$825 Specials. 305-758-7022
Frank Cooper Real Estate

6250 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom one bath
$800.-Two-bedrooms one- -
batlaSLQE. Appliances,..,..
Free Water/Electric. 305-
642-7080

68 NW 45 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $850. Four bed-
room also available.
786-431-5520

6922 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Section 8 wel-
come. 305-490-7033

8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom home, water,
bars, tile, air, fence. $750,
$1875 move in. Not Sanc-
tioned Section 8.
Terry Dellerson,, Broker
305-891-6776

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776

8950 N.E. 2 Ave
Three bedrooms, two
baths, appliances, bars,
new kitchen, carpeting and
tile. Section 8 ready $1325
mthly. 305-788-0000

9355 NW 31 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
air, tiled floors, washer, dryer
hook-up, bars. $800 monthly,
first and last. Not Section ap-
proved. 305-625-4515.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace

NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
305-693-9843

Efficiency
I I
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1140 N. W.79 Street
One bdtm, one bath, $550.
Free water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080
12325 N.W. 21st Place
Efficiency available.
Call 954-607-9137

13377 NW 30 AVENUE
$120 weekly, private kitchen,
bath, free utilities, appliances.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486


1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, air, cable, no
utilities, $550 mthly.
786-317-1804

1492 NW 38 St.- Rear
Appliances and utilities in-
cluded. $550 monthly, $1100
moves you in. Call David at:
786-258-3984

1863B NW 42 Street
Newly remodeled, with air.
786.356-1457

2571 East Superior Street
$600 moves you in. Call
786 -389-1686

2915 N.W. 156th Street
Private entrance, free cable.
$165 weekly, $600 to move
in. 305-624-3966

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185,wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency. Call 305-754-7776

MIAMI GARDENS
Furnished, utilities included.
786-267-7018,786-333-3378

Furnished Rooms
13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1775 N.W. 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th Street'
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455
or 786-226-5873

1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-303,0156.

2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-3434,
305-914-4461

2357 N.W. 81 Street
Large rooms, $400 a month
305-300-0544

2365 NW 97 STREET
With air, $100 weekly
or $380 monthly.
'305-691-2703,786-515-3020

2900 N.W. 54th Street
Upstairs, one room, refrig-
erator and air. Call 954-885-
8583 or 954-275-9503.

74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $350 moves
you in. 786-306-2349

CAROL CITY AREA
Clean home with rooms, $125
wkly. Jay 305-215-8585

East Miami Gardens Area
Clean furnished rooms. $425
monthly. Move in, no deposit.
Call 305-621-1017

LIBERTY CITY AREA
$85-$150 weekly, utilities,
kitchen, bath, air.
786-260-3838, 305-218-1227

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Two bedrooms and one bath
in private home. Reasonable
price. References and secu-
rity deposit required.
305-625-5496

NORTHWEST AREA
LARGE, CLEAN
FURNISHED ROOMS
CALL 305-974-8907
HOURLY DAILY WEEKLY'
RATES
SEVERAL LOCATIONS'

House
10295 S.W. 175 STREET
Three bedrooms, onre bath.
$875 monthly. 305-267-9449
10951 SW 222TERR
CUTLER BAY
Four bedrooms, one and a
half baths. $1000 monthly.
Call 305-267-9449

13140 NW 18 AVE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-344-9560, 305-688-0600

1370 N.W. 118 Street
Five bedrooms, three baths.
new tile throughout, all new
central air, washer, dryer.
; New appliances. Section
8 OK $1750 negotiable.
:O.B.O. 1
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV
Call 305-525-1271
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located In
nice area, Section 8 okl Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013


14410 N.W. 21 COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OK. 305-687-6973

14911 N.W. South River
Drive
Beautiful four bedrooms, two
baths, two car garages, ex-
tremely large inside and yard.
$2200 mthly. Section 8 Wel-
come. 786-262-9965

1510 N.E. 154 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 305-944-2101

15310 NW 31 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tile floors, central air, family
room, bars. $1200 monthly,
$3000 move in
Not Section 8 affiliated
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

1861 Wilmington Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
with air. 786-356-1457

191 St N.W.11 Ave. Area
Four bdrms, two baths.
Section OK. 305-754-7776

2130 Service Road
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OKI 305-624-4395
Pager 305-732-9875

2310 W.Bunche Park Dr
Remodeled, three bedrooms,
one bath. $1250 mthly. Sec-
tion 8 ok. Call 305-801-1165.

284 NW 40 STREET
One bedroom, $700 monthly.
954-914-9166

310 N.E. 58TERRACE
Five bedrooms, three bath.
$1200 monthly. All appli-
ances included. Central air.'
Free 19 Inch TV. ''
Call Joel 786-355-7578

3530 N. W. 208 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1200 a month 786-768-
3484

3841 NW 174 STREET
Three bedrooms, one and a
half baths. Security bars, air,
stove and refrigerator. No
pets. Section 8 welcome.
305-992-3681

434 N.W. 82 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
561-584-2263

4513 NW 185 STREET
- MIAMI GARDENS
Section 8 OK. Three bed-
rooms, one bath with tile
floors and central air. A beau-
ty. $1365 monthly. Call Joe.
954-849-6793

5529 NW 30 AVE
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, stove, refrigerator, fenced
yard. Section 8 ok. $1100
monthly. 305-635-0037

5535 N.W. 30 Avenue
Two bedrooms, den, bars,
central air, fence. $850, $2125
move in. Not Sanctioned Sec-.
tion 8. Terry Dellerson
305-891-6776

7 N.E. 59 TERRACE
MOVE IN SPECIAL ($1350).
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900. Free Water.
305-642-7080

7501 N.W. 4th Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$700 monthly. 786-200-1672

770 NW 55 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, wa-
ter included. $850 monthly.
Call 305-237-9449

8004 NW 10 COURT
Two bdrms, one bath. $1150
mthly. 954-914-9166

8373 NW 12 AVENUE
ARCOLA LAKES AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
lakefront property, fenced
yard..$1500 monthly.
305-621-3388, 305-607-1085
924 NW 29 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths.
$1350 monthly. Also avail-
able, two bedrooms, one
bath. Section .8 ok. 786-262-
7313

Coconut Grove
3464 Frow Avenue
$1350, three bdrm, one
bath, single family,
newly renovated.
Central air, washer,
dryer, new appliances.
Close to Coco Walk.
Hurricane Shutters.
Available Immedlatelyl
954-646-1236
LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bdrms, one bath, Florida
room, central air and heat.
786-390-0809

MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, ceiling fan, gran-
ite kitchen top, washer hook-
up. Telephone L. Fields
305-696-4845
SECTION 8 WELCOME

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
A very nice three bedrooms,
one bath, appliances includ-


ed. First, last and security.
Call 305-749-6810


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Remodeled three bedrooms,
one bath on water. $1350.
Section 8 okay. Call 754-244-
6262, Rose.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
central ar, tiled. fenced
yard. Section 8 OK! $1150
monthly. 305-388-7477

Near Northwestern High
Two bedrooms, one bath,'air
$1150 monthly Fenced Sec-
tion 8 OK 305-685-6795

NORTH MIAMI
400 OPA LOCKA BLVD
Two blocks east of 1-95. Two
bedrooms, two baths, tile,
air, new everything. $1200
monthly, $3,000'move in.
Not Section 8 affiliated
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, $800-$900.
No dogs. 305-688-6696

Northwest Area
Three bedrooms, one bath,
bars, fenced, appliances,
carpet and tile. Section 8 OK.
305-836-7531

NW 65 STREET
Newly remodeled, three
bedroom, one bath. $1350
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-926-9273

WALK TO
NORTHWESTERN
Beautiful, three bedrooms,
two baths, Section 8 inspect-
ed. $1150-$1450.
786-269-3100

Rent with Option
DADE AND
,BROWARD AREAS
Three bedrooms, two baths
and four bedrooms, two
baths. $1000 down.
Not Section 8 approved.
702-448-0148


1231 N.W. 178th Terrace
Furniture optional. Large
room, private bath, $450
monthly. 786-344-8601

1815 N.W. 1 Court #4
Two bedrooms and
efficiencies, Marty,
305-576-2388






4132 N.W. 22nd Court
Tri-plex, two-two bedroom
apts. aryd one bedroom apt.,
call 305-633-3867 or
786-427-9196



1245 N.W. 86'STREET,
. Totally renovated three bed:
rooms, one bath, central air.
No qualifying, owner financ-
ing, low down payment.
Molly 305-541-2855
1740 NW 152 STREET
Three bedrooms, two
baths,family, room, large
yard, completely fenced. Ask-
ing $180K. Call Barbara 786-
210-6500

*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
-'WITH*'
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
NEAR NORTHWESTERN
Four bedrooms, two baths,
All renovated. $1125 monthly,
$1900 down. $8000 back.
786-269-3100

NO CREDIT CHECK
OWNER FINANCE
$6900 down. Three and four
bedroom homes Miami Gar-
dens, Miramar, Ft. Lauder-
dale. $8000 back to first time
home buyers.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700,

WHY RENT?.
BUYII
Two, three and four
bedroom homes avail-
able. $1900 - $2900 down
payment. 580 credit score
needed. North Dade and
South Broward homes
available. Ask about $8000
for first time home owners. .
Pick up list at office.
NDI Realtors
290 NW 183 Street
Miami Gardens, FL
305-655-1700


Real Estate Services
SReaEleces

NEED A MORTGAGE?
$8000 tax credit for first time
home buyers. FHA/VA, re-
verse mortgages. 580 score,
105 % loan to value.
754-423-4613

Repairs

Home Repair
We do'it alll Roofing,
additions and bathrooms.
786-277-3434

Childcare
MIZELL KIDDIE KAMPUS
Register Now!. Ages 2-5.
Abeka curriculum, certified
teachers, progress reports,
homework, computers, Black
History, Spanish, Swahili, ex-
tra-curricular, programs, uni-
forms. 7 a.m. - 5:45 p.m.
1910 N.W. 95 Street
305-836-1178




Employment

HIRING NOWIII
Macedonia Missionary Bap-
tist-Church of Miamiilnc.
is seeking a professional
church musician skilled in
piano,-organ and choir min-
istry. Apply in person at:.
3515 Douglas Rd.
(37thiAve) -
- , Coconut.Grove--
Rev. Rudolph Daniels
. Pastor 305-343-429Q


LIVE IN N. DADE AREA'
Caring for the elderly,
786-402-8403

Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

TEACHER NEEDED
With CDA to work in child-
care center. 305-836-1178



GOING OUT OF BUSI-
NESSI
All Fraternity and Sorority
promotional items. Call Mr.
Brown at: 305-586-1422


BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Concealed
and Traffic School Services.
786:333-2084.


BEST PRICES IN TOWNIl
Handyman; carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, lawn service.
305-801-5690

GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

HANDYMAN
SERVICES PLUS
Plumbing, painting, sprinklers,
roofing, tile and repairs.
786-348-3235




NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business.under
the fictitious name of:
RIOS FORMS & MEDIA
12464 S.W. 126th Avenue
Miami, Fl 33186
in the city of Miami, FL
Owner: Maria Sol Rios
intends to register the said
name with the Division
of Corporation of State,
Tallahassee, FL. Dated
this 26th day of August,
2009.


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 26 - SEPTEMBER 1, 2009


PLACE YOUR AD IN THE MIAMI TIMES TODAY


U 305-60 ,2, 10r ,,
ADVERTISE TODAY

CA1 3e5-694-62100E)( 1W8


I~ ~�I_ _�___~ _ _


0119 w�~


0











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 26 - SEPT 1, 2009


How Miami Gardens may punish banks for foreclosures?


It's hard to drive down
a residential street in
Miami Gardens, Fla.,
and not see two, three,
four houses in foreclo-
sure. Some have been
on the auction block
since last year; they
are once handsome,
pastel-colored ranch
houses that are now
surrounded by waist-
high weeds or boarded-
up windows. "The tarp
on that busted roof is
about to disintegrate,
it's been there so long,"
says Andre Williams, a
Harvard-educated real
estate attorney and
Miami Gardens city
councilman, pointing
At one of the houses
and shaking his head
at the state of the solid
middle-class, Africatn-
American community


he grew up in. "We had
a 70% homeownership
rate in this city. We
took a lot of pride in
that."
But, the city of
110,000 people just
north of Miami is star-
ing at another figure
today: a 13% home-
foreclosure rate. That's
the second highest in
Florida, a state that
now has the nation's
highest rate of homes -
23% - either in foreclo-
sure or delinquent on
mortgage payments.
Many of the mortgages
that have collapsed in
Miami Gardens were
subprime; city leaders
'like Williams say they
were ethically ques-
tionable deals pushed
-by banks that too of-
ten knew their clients


were , in over their to help struggling lo- his frustrations some
heads. For that rea- cal homeowners revise legal teeth. Williams
son, Williams believes their loans and hang has proposed a city
those lenders need to on to their houses - ordinance that could
step up and do more and he wants to give penalize 'banks that


fail to offer modifica-
tions before starting
foreclosure proceed-
ings. Local govern-
ments have no formal
legal oversight over
banks, but under Wil-
liams' ordinance, if a
lender's number of
foreclosure actions in
Miami Gardens over
a designated period
exceeds the number
of loan modifications
it offers to financially
burdened or delinquent
homeowners, the city
would pull its accounts
or other business from
that bank. "The tax-'
payers put these banks
back on solid ground
with the bailouts," says
Williams, "and now it's
time the banks did
the right thing them-
selves."


Fees can drain your 401(k) retirement savings


By Christine Dugas

Quick question: How
much are 401(k) fees
removing from your re-
tirement nest egg each
year?
If you are either un-
aware of such fees
or don't know their
amounts, don't worry:
Nearly 83% of Ameri-
cans don't know, either,
according to AARP.
Congress and the De-
partment of Labor are
working on legislation
and regulation that
wbuld require employ-'
ers to disclose more
information about ad-
ministration and man-
agement fees in an un-
derstandable way. And
an independent website,
Brightscope.com, seems
to be gaining traction as
it aims to provide work-
ers with company 401(k)
plan ratings that include
fee information.
More workers are rely-
ing on 401(k) plans for
retirement funding, as
pension plans are fro-
zen or no longer offered.
The recession and stock
market' losses battered
401(k)s over the past
year. But associated
fees - often hidden or
extremely confusing to
find and understand -
haven't helped.
"When money is going
in every month, it's hard
to keep track of the fact
that your account bal-
ance might not really be
growing," says Rebecca
Davis, staff attorney at
the Pension Rights Cen-
ter. "Participants need to
know that they are sav-
ing for their own retire-
ment and not just fund-
ing the income of a third-
party administrator."
The assortment of fees
can suck thousands out
of your 401(k).
Suppose your ac-
count with a balance of



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ers, such as insurance
companies.
"It's a crime that they
are extracting some-
where around 3.5%
to 4.8%, which is the
lion's share of what the


$20,000 earns 7% a year,
with fees equal to 0.5% a
year. Over 20 years, the
balance would be worth
about $70,000, accord-
ing to a report from Con-
gressional Research Ser-
vice. Were the fees 1.5%
a year - near the indus-
try median, according to
the Investment Compa-
ny Institute, or ICI - the
.balance would amount
to $58,000, or 17% less.
All sorts of fees exist,
and it can be hard to de-
termine whether'workers
or employers are pay-
'ing them. Administra-
tive fees pay bookkeep-
ers, trustees and legal
advisers; management
or investment advisory
fees pay those who oper-
ate and invest in mutual'
funds; and distribution
fees, or 12b-1 fees, are
charged by certain mu-
tual funds.
Fee amounts vary
considerably, especially
depending on the plan's
size.
But Fred Reish, an em-
.ployee benefits lawyer,
says it is not uncommon
for fees on a small 401(k)
plan to break down like
this: 0.25% a year for
the plan adviser, 0.25%
a year for the record
keeper and 0.75% a year
for mutual funds, total-


ing 1.25%.
Mafty workers assume
that they pay fees only
for their mutual fund
investments. But even
fund fees can be tricky,
because they may con-
tain other fees, such
as expense and trustee
fees, says Pamela Hess,
director of retirement re-
search at Hewitt Associ-
ates.
More companies are
passing on additional


fees to their workers.
About 58% of plans now
charge participants for
administrative fees, up
from 33% in 2001, ac-
cording to a 2007 Hewitt
survey.
"That has been a steady
trend," Hess says.
Small companies, be-
cause they lack negotiat-
ing power due to the few
employees they have on
staff, often have to rely
on costly plan provid-


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CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF SEPTEMBER 4, 2009
SPECIAL COMMISSION MEETING




Pursuant to Section 2-33 of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida, as amended,
Mayor Manuel Diaz has called a special meeting of the Miami City
Commission on September 4, 2009 at 10:00 AM, at Miami City Hall located
at 3500 Pan American Drive. The purpose of this meeting is to address the First
Reading of ordinances: adopting a new zoning code and atlas known as "Miami
21", amending the Miami Comprehensive Neighborhood Plan, and amending
Chapter 23 of the Code of the City of Miami, entitled "Historic Preservation". No
other business shall be conducted outside of that indicated above.

All interested persons may appear at the meeting with respect to this matter.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including.all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
City Clerk
(#003279)


market returns on in-
vestments," says John
Sullivan, a registered
investment adviser.
"Workers end up giving
away half of their re-
tirement savings."


VC


$425'for 13
weeks in print,
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558


1/15/09



'SISTER LISA
I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS 'FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life, such'
as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business transac-
tions of all kinds. I never fail.to reunite the separated,
cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome enemies,
rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling blocks and
bad luck of all kind.There is no heart so sad so dreary that
I cannot bring sunshine into it. In fact, no matter what
may be your hope, fear or ambition, I guarantee to tell it
before you utter a word to me.
7615 NW T'T AVE. MIAMI
305-757-8765


Project MCC-D-105-B - MIA-Refurbishment of Flamingo & Dolphin Garages Exterior Painting Mike Gomez
Construction is soliciting bids for this project at Miami-Dade Aviation Department.

This project consists of removal & reinstallation of fencing, pressure cleaning and painting of

four parking garages at MIA.. Packages are: Pkg. "A' Pressure Cleaning/Painting (CSBE) and

Pkg. 'B" Fencing (CSBE)

Plans cost: $50.00 Refundable upon return of the plans.

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2009 10:00AM
Bids Due: Wednesday, September 16, 2009 2:00PM
Location: 4200 N.W 36" Street, Bldg. 5A, 4*" Floor, Conf. Room "F".

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 for the following:

PROJECT NAME: "Coral Way Medians Landscaping Project -M-0057"

BID NO: 08-09-071

Scope of Work: The project consists of complete landscaping and electrical maintenance services for the
existing medians along Coral Way (excluding trimming of Banyan trees). The scope of work includes raking,
leaf removal and litter pick up, mowing, trimming foliage, mulching as per plan, reinstalling root guards,
planting shrubbery (1 and 3 gal.), and watering the landscaped areas on a bi-weekly basis. The maintenance
also calls for the installation of all electric appurtenances to maintain a working up-lighting system consisting
of 423 light fixtures along Coral Way between SW 37 Avenue and SW 12 Avenue on a monthly basis. The
median is approximately 13,000 linear feet (2.46 miles) in length and this project would cover approximately
130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of median surface area. The contract term is for a two (2) year period with
the option to renew for three additional - one (1,) year periods.

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor
from the State of Florida or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade.
An Electrical contractor must be used for the electrical maintenance of the work and a minimum of three
(3) years experience is required for the electrical portion of the project. Proof of experience for landscaping
and electrical projects may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complexity,
supported by references within the past three (3) years.

A performance Bond is required for this project.

Location of Work: The project is located along SW 22 Street - Coral Way Median from SW 12 Avenue to SW
37. The medians are approximately 130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of maintenance median surface area.

Receiving Date & Time:. Tuesday, September 15, 2009 @ 11:00 a.m.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request, after August 24, 2009, at the City of Miami,
Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, FL 33.130. Telephone No (305) 416-1200.
There are no construction plans for this maintenance project. Bid packages will be available in hard copy form
and a non-refundable fee of $20.00 will be required. A bid package can also be mailed to bidders upon written
request to the Department, and shall include the appropriate non-refundable fee plus $10 for shipping and
handling using regular U.S. Mail.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate
originals in the envelope provided with the bid package. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly
opened. Any bids or proposals' received after time and date specified will be returned to the bidder
unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and
strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused by mail, courier
service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION
18-74 OF THE CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE No. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager

ADD. No DP-007620


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 * One of the oldest pediatric Practices'
in Dade County * Over 50 years of Child Care
SWEBSITE
www.rozalyhpaschalmd.com
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL 33147 * Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 * Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway MedicalPlaza
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach F 33169 * 305-652-6095


I _












BLACKS MusT CONTRot THElR OwN DESTINY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 26 - SEPT 1, 2009


Twitter h--ru ' ow n-r Int tweeting

SCopyrighted Material





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Burger King profit rises despite sales drop


Burger King Holdings Inc.'s
fiscal fourth-quarter profit
rose despite a drop in sales as
costs fell in the United States,
th-ecomxpany said Tuesday.
The nation's "No. 2 ham-
burger chain earned $58.9
million, or 43 cents per share,
in the three months that end-
ed June 30. That compares
with a profit of $50.6 million,
or 37 cents per share, in the
same period a year earlier.
The earnings beat Wall
Street's estimate of 33 cents
per share.
Revenue fell 2.4 percent to
$629.9 million. Analysts had
expected revenue of $632
million.
Same-store sales, or sales
at locations open at least a
year, slid 2.4 percent in the


quarter.
The profit increase came
even as sales at U.S. and Ca-
nadian restaurants open at
least a year fell 4.5 per-
cent, adjusted for cur-
rency fluctuations,
because of the poor
economy that's
prompting more
people to eat at
home and promo-
tions by competi-
tors.
"Our financial fun-
damentals are solid and
our cash flow continues to be
strong," Chief Financial Offi-
cer Ben Wells said in a state-
ment.
Miami-based Burger King
said it added 115 net new
restaurants during the pe-


riod.
The company also said
margins at its restaurants
in the U.S. and Canada im-
proved to 13.5 percent
From 12.2 percent
a year before.
E For the year,.
Burger King's
profit rose 6
percent to
$200.1 mil-
lion, or $1.46
per share, from
. $189.6 million,
or $1.38 per share,
in 2008. Adjusted 2009
profit of $1.48 per share beat
analysts' forecast of $1.38
per share.
Annual revenue rose 3 per-
cent to $2.54 billion from
$2.45 billion, matching ana-


lyst estimates.
Burger King became a
publicly traded company in
2006. The IPO, which at the
time was one of the largest
for the restaurant sector,
raised nearly $400 million in
net proceeds.
Since then, shares climbed
to more than $30, up from
the IPO price of $17, but
then fell back to near their
original offering price. Mean-
while, its No. 1 rival, Mc-
Donald's Corp., has seen its
share price climb almost 62
percent in the same period
while posting consistently
strong results.
On Tuesday, Burger King
shares climbed $1.67, or 9.5
percent, to $19.33 in morn-
ing trading.


NOTICE OF GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2009,
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTION NO. 09-0177
AND ORDINANCE 13064
FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING THE OFFICES OF THE MAYOR
AND
TWO CITY COMMISSIONERS WHO ARE TO BE ELECTED
FROM SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICTS 3 AND 5

A general municipal election will be held on Tuesday,.November 3, 2009,
from 7:00A.M. until 7:00 P.M., in the City of Miami, Florida, at the polling
places in the several election precincts designated by the Board of County
Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the
qualified electors participating therein will vote for the following municipal
officers: The Mayor and two District Commissioners who are td be elected
from single member Districts 3 and 5. A runoff election, if required, is to.be
held on Tuesday, November 17, 2009.

For additional information please contact the City Clerk's Office at
(305)-250-5360 or visit our website at: www.miamiaov.com/citv clerk/
pages/elections/elections

Priscilla A. Thompson,
City Clerk

#003277


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF SEPTEMBER 4, 2009
SPECIAL COMMISSION MEETING

.PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT at the July 23,2009 Miami City Commission
meeting, the City Commission, per Resolution R-09-0387, scheduled a
Special Miami City Commission meeting to take place on September 4,
2009 at 10:00 AM, at Miami City Hall located at 3500 Pan American Drive,
Miami, Florida. The purpose of the Special City Commission meeting is to fill
the District Four vacancy and appoint Commissioner Tomas Regalado to fil the
vacant seat. . No other business shall be conducted outside of that indicated
above.

All interested persons may appear at the meeting with respect to this matter.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
City Clerk

#003278


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NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BQARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened.and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at httD://Drocurement.dadeschools.net. or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations willbe available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right towaive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone'of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings,"


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.
A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Hialeah. FL.
S (same as 103 St.)
(Please mention ad)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611


NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTIONS
Pwwt to Mmanired CouMy Ruft*m d*tpd bu . MoSfd ofCa wd CwnfutWWb MnIds Coty. Fida, notc bh
vsIV of Spel BKgtton &tUml 1=0m W. V l2O h�W f approval crdupprovlt, dwtoim*,g ~prOpOoit
"eot",l o Npo R4S', ,lfo. S, lo, pa npoPlowg >hisE U, UHtt Wldmn RnSh Ite* a �T.WtouO Spbe I Tedn
R e co w ut" N o, R 4** " ,A d a pdb ti d y A 2 w, S l O m p os oa * g S ta th I e n a aco f * . S o l t al t Glt u ad S p " *ItTa t o bom e ,.ow m a ta
an3fd atobttM dmiontV"CountyO p. N4
ftIetUttO41no 4.i adpaJtd 1,20, pr~po~nlhtgUt otimiflt uraof u'tO iltSnaty Glu~nt SpelatTtlwug 0.01c
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RonI~Ll~~Oln


A pre-bid conference will
be held August 26, 2009
at 9:30am in Maintenance
Operations Budget Confer-
ence Room, 12525 NW 28
005-KK01 9/10/2009 Lift Station Repair ene Room, 1Florda Pre-
Avenue, Miami, Florida. Pre-
Bid Conference attendance
by the bidder or his qualified
representative is recom-
mended for bid acceptance.


109-JJ06 9/10/2009 Air Conditioners, Bard


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