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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00844
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: August 19, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00844

Full Text






S EK Haiti prepares for

Hurricane season
Decades of deforestation left the
Caribbean island defenseless against last
- ^ year's catastrophic hurricanes


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LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11707
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Tempora Mutan ti
Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


DIST R I B UTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 51 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 19-25, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


JESCA files for bankruptcy protection


Brown insists long-time social service
agency will not close its doors


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
The James E. Scott Commu-
nity Association (JESCA) filed
for bankruptcy protection on
August 5. However, Vincent
Brown, the organization's Ex-
ecutive Director, maintains
that the venerable institution
is in no danger of closing its


doors.
"We did file for bankruptcy
protection on August 5, but
what chapter 11 does is allow
us to reorganize and restruc-
ture our financial obligations to
our creditors. It's nothing dif-
ferent from what General Mo-
tors did, but we don't have the
taxpayers or the county run-
ning to bails us out," he said.


"We're going to
come out of it,"
he added.
Brown cit-
ed a host of
causes for the
bankruptcy
filing. Chief
among them is
the stark drop
in contributions from the com-
munity.
"We used to get from
$500,000 to $750,000 from
contributions," 'Brown said.


"People are blaming cutbacks
on the recession, but even in
hard times, people give mon-
ey for what they want to give
money for."
He continued, "[JESCA] is fi-
nancially in critical condition
and it needs help," Brown said.
"JESCA has been so much; to
so many different people. Pro-
fessionally, politically, and oth-
erwise; people have made ca-
reers through JESCA. We need
these people to come back."
JESCA has seen financially


JESCA's bankruptcy filing lists $3.35 million in liabili-
ties, but $1.7 million in assets. The agency also owes
Miami-Dade County $21,508 in taxes and lists approx-
imately $673,000 in unpaid wages and related costs.


critical conditions before. Last
year, it was discovered that
paychecks had -been delayed
at least 11 times since March
2007, a condition which Attor-
ney Larry Handfield has attrib-


uted to past mismanagement,
a charge that Brown does not
deny.
"The level of competence and
capability was questionable at
Please turn to JESCA 4A


Vi * (11


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FMU president ousted


Thompson selected to lead historic
Florida Memorial University
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


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*.Avow, ___ '04 -


A week before fall semester
classes begin at Florida Memo-
rial University, new leadership
emerges.
Karl S. Wright, who was ap-
pointed as president in 2006,
was replaced by Provost Dr.
Sandra T. Thompson, who is
now the interim president.
After several calls to univer-
sity and Board of Trustees,
Chairman Charles George was
the designated spokesperson
for the University regarding
the matter.
In a statement released by
George about Wright's abrupt
departure through The Wein-
bach Group, Inc, a public rela-
tions firm, he says, "The Board
of Trustees felt there were dif-
ferences between Dr. Wright's


SANDRA T. THOMPSON,
Interim President
priorities and those of the
Board regarding the Univer-
sity's focus and direction, and
therefore, the Board decided to
seek new leadership for the Uni-
versity by conducting a search
for a new president who would


be more in
tune with the
Board's pri-
orities."
Wright, a
Jamaican na-
tive, joined
South Florida
historically
WRIGHT Black uni-
versity with a
mission to transform the uni-
versity from "good" to "great."
He led an institution where an
estimated 1,800 individuals
traveled to receive knowledge
in nine of the academic depart-
ments or take part in the four
offered master's programs.
During the economic down-
turn, like most universities,
FMU took a hit financially.
Wright, however, was deter-
mined to mend the problems
in a budget that was depen-
dent on student enrollment.
Earlier this year, Wright,
joined his colleagues, stu
Please-turn to OUSTED 4A


Health care reform necessary


Local hospital leaders monitor debate


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
President Barack Obama has
taken the position that health.
care reform cannot wait. The
White House recently said that
its rising cost "forces families
to sit around the kitchen table
to make impossible choices be-
tween paying rent and paying
health premiums."
John Copeland III, Public
Health Trust Chairman'agrees.
"The challenge seems to be
everybody recognizes [health


care] needs change but nobody
agrees on how to change it," he
said. He also believes that costs
are skyrocketing, and reform
is imperative. "If the economy
either idles or doesn't pick up;
we've got a pretty big problem.
And it will likely get worse be-
fore it gets better."
According to Copeland, re-
gardless of 'which reform pre-
vails, a greater emphasis must
be placed on primary and pre-
ventative care.
"Improving disease manage-
ment and continuous testing


JOHN COPELAND III
Public Health Trust Chairman


must absolutely be priorities,"
he said. "There are lots of costs
associated with seeing patients
in the Emergency Room," said
Copeland citing ambulances
(and in some cases, helicop-
ters) as an example.
"It's wasteful to do things
on the back end that you can
handle upstream. Addressing
these things before they get
worse would decrease the need
for emergency treatment," he
said.
Dr. Eneida 0. Roldan, presi-
dent and chief executive offi-
cer of Jackson Health System,
agreed.
Please turn to REFORM 4A


INSIDE THIS ISSUE


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMFS AllGlIST 19-25. 2009


Blacks should be more vocal

on health care debate
hough it remains unclear what direction the health
care reform in the United States will take, we al-
ready know what form it will not. There will be no
crackdown on price-gouging drug companies. Predatory in-
surance firms aren't going anyplace.
All but gone is the hope of a "public option," or a gov-
ernment run competitor to the private firms. This means
no one's keeping the insurance companies honest. There
will be no competitive pressure on private insurers. The can
charge whatever they like.
Worse, the "reform" will require that most uninsured
health care providers purchase some form of coverage. In
plain language, this means the old and very ill will be on
government-run Medicare; the very poor will be on Medic-
aid. The rest of us will have to buy private insurance. There
will be no option of a government run plan for these unfor-
tunates.
There is a lesson in this. Opponents of the public option
were not many. As recently as mid-June, an NBC/Wall street
journal poll showed 76 percent of Americans as in favor of a
government option for health care. A concurrent CBS/New
York Times poll had the number at 72 percent. The opposi-
tion was small, but it was loud.
Comprised of insurance company plants and far-right Re-
publicans, determined to deal the Obama administration a
loss crowded town-hall meetings on the issue, and spread
rumors (for example, that the program would euthanize old-
er Americans), in due time public opinion changed. The poll
numbers (and their corresponding votes in Congress) slid to
the point that the administration has all but scrapped the
idea.
While young Hispanics are most likely to be uninsured
(according to a July 27 Gallup poll), Blacks are the ,next
most likely. Where wvere our voices?
Blacks turned out in force to elect Barack Obama Presi-
dent of the United States. He warned us that it would not be
easy; that we would all have to work for change.
It is now time to back him. A good start would be to submit
letters to the editor and e-mails to local media, but perhaps
a better step would be town forums for those who favor pub-
lic health care. Our local officials, acting in our best inter-
ests, should host more forums on the topic-and thistime;
we should attend.


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 541h Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR.. Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 - Six Months $30 00 - Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 * 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race, creed or color his or her human and legal rights Habng no person fearing no person, the
Black Press strives to help every person In the firm belief thai all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back

Ap �^ The Media Audit


I &to w m~uat e'ni w% n .%


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* -




-


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w - -
- 0 -
- . _


% b w P a Proposed County budget will have tremendous effect


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content


* In the next two weeks, the
Miami-Dade Board of County
Commissioners will make' a
S"* number of decisions that will
impact our community in ways
that 'probably many residents
haven't grasped. If the budget is
adopted as written, it will place
a severe strain on the social and
economic strata of Miami-Dade
County.
Many of the programs slated
to be cut back or eliminated
completely are in the social
service sector. Other programs
that are slated to be eliminated
are in the "public support" ar-
Seas. These programs are not
high profile budget ticket items,
like Police, Fire, Arts and Se-
nior Programs. The programs
can best be described as "in the
trench" programs.
The Consumer Services/Mi-


ami-Dade Cooperative Exten-
sion Service cut a wide swath
across Miami-Dade Couhty: .
. . . The 4-H Program is cel-
ebrating 100 years of existence.
The program serves over 9,000
youth in every demographic
segment of Miami-Dade. The


Education Program is part of the
larger, nationwide and state Ex-
tension ,Program,) which is cel-
ebrating 95 years of existence.
The Education Component
provides, 1.) Nutrition Educa-
tion that is designed to assist
families and individuals with


M any of the programs slated to be cut back or eliminated completely
are in the social service sector. Other programs that are slated to
be eliminated are in the "public support" areas. These programs are
not high profile budget ticket items, like Police, Fire, Arts and Senior Programs.


program provides youth leader-
ship development programming,
hands on educational programs
and activities in many schools
and after-school programs. It is
world's largest youth develop-
ment organization.
... The Cooperative Extension


information on how to choose
nutritious food, and how to pre-
pare healthy meals; 2.) Finance
Education that is designed to
assist families and individuals
with information that prevent
mortgage fraud and other types
of consumer abuse; 3.) Home-


owner Education
provides information and semi-
nars to first-time homebuyers
that allow them to be certified
. to purchase a home; and the
Agriculture Program provides
workshops, consultation servic-
es and research information to
Miami-Dade's large agriculture
community.
Interestingly .enough, the ma-
jority of funding for-these pro-
grams come from federal, state
and grant sources. If Miami-
Dade's portion of funding to
these programs are eliminated,
all the federal, state and grant
funding will end immediately.
Residents of Miami-Dade
must let their Commissioners
know that long-standing, high
quality programs that show
measurable results should not
be eliminated.


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Afro-In Books and Cafe will bounce back


- * Dear Editor,


We are responding to your re-
cent front page article regard-
ing the closing of the Afro-In
Books and Cafe. Due to con-
tinuing problems with the roof
of the building that housed
our bookstore and other fac-


�w


tors, we were forced to place
our inventory and furniture
in storage while we research
finding a new location. We are
presently developing a website
from which we can still con-
duct business while we find
another building for the store.
As in years past, we will also


participate in the annual In-
ternational Book Fair held by,
Miami-Dade College from Nov.
13-17 this year. As soon as we
finalize our new location, we,
will inform you and, others in
our community.
The current poor economy
poses major challenges' to


small business in our com-
munity. However, we plan to
re-open the bookstore as soon
as the proper location is iden-
tified and other conditions
permit.

Jamila Y. Capp
Miami


Prime Minister's visit to Miami could have been better


Dear Editor,

As a Haitian-American, I was
extremely happy that The Mi-
ami Times covered the Haitian
Diaspora conference last week.
The conference showed that Hai-


ti is still developing and there
is more work that needs to be
done. However, I was appalled
that the Haitian Prime Minister
Michele Pierre-Louis decided to
speak Creole throughout her
whole speech on Sunday to a


crowd of Haitian-Americans,
Haitians and Americans. Al-
though the crowd consisted of
predominately Haitians, I think
it was very rude for her to only
speak Creole. Honestly, there
were some things that she was


saying in which I, being Hai-
tian-American, could not inter-
pret. Another thing, why wasn't
an interpreter on hand?

Marie Saint-Joseph
North Miami


There is still hope for Black men
Dear Editor, lief that God is raising an army ing the good fight of "No More
of Black men whose freedom is Excuses." As a Black man, I
I am responding to Clark's ar- built on word and deed. Black thank God for Black men who
ticle last week, "A message to men who have experienced the confronted, broke down, taught
the Black man." The article en- pain and horror of self-hatred and cried with me as I pressed
courage and reinforces my be- to become men who are fight- forward to become a productive


Black man. What angers me is
our inability to unite as a col-
lective body of Black men.

Aaron Peoples,
Miami


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


~rmrma~ t0the BLm k wt wnan


Changing the

guard: school board

race heating up


The veteran politician, Doro-
thy Bendross Mindingall has
had her first fundraiser an-
nouncing her candidacy. Dor-
othy Bendross-Mindingall is
a wonderful woman, who has
been a faithful servant to her
community. I think the world
of her.
Dr. Solomon C. Stinson,
Miami-Dade Schools chair-
man, has stated unequivocally
that he is "10,000 percent be-
hind" Ronda Vangates. He an-
nounced at a meeting in his
house that it is time for vet-
eran politicians like himself to
step down and pass the baton
to the new generation. He felt
that Ronda Vangates, an at-
torney, and a person who has
worked at highest echelons of
school system would have the
brains and strength to not only
make policy on that dais, but
handle meetings in such a way
that everyone would know she
was in charge. I have never
seen Stinson so fired up. 'He
states that some candidates
are claiming that he endorses
them, but the only candidate
that he is endorsing is Ronda
Vangates.
Another veteran politician
was in attendance in this meet-
ing - former chairperson of the.
County Commission Barbara
Carey-Shuler. Shuler has also


realized that
it was time to
pass the ba-
ton. She helped County Com-
missioner Audrey Edmonson
and City Commissioner Mi-
chelle Spence-Jones.
Now some may object to the
passing of the baton. I use to
run the 4x100 so I am use to
the concept. Public servants
like former Congresswoman
Carrie Meek, Stinson and Car-
ey-Shuler, who have worked
hard to protect their constitu-
ents want to see their legacy
continue, they want to see
their constituents continue to
be protected. It is hard for good
public servants to just retire
unless they know that someone
will fill the void., Meek passed
the baton to U.S. Congressman
Kendrick Meek. . No one can
argue that he has not done a
-terrific job as a Congressman.
Carey-Shuler groomed Edmon-
son, Spence-Jones and Van-
gates. I watched Edmonson
on the dais and she is tough.
Spence-Jones has shown her
worth to the community by ex-
tracting big. concessions dur-
ing the Marlin deal. Now, Van-
gates has been given the baton
from two esteemed leaders in
our community Stinson and
Carey-Shuler - that is one hell
of an endorsement.


I Sci Sm r # & %,v ---* * "T ** v * o M fE
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CARTOON COIRN4


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What do you think about President Barack Obama's national health care reform plan?


LAMAR HAYWOOD, 53
Construction Worker, North Miami
Beach

National I.
health care is a
very good idea..
Heath . care
costs keep go-
ing up and up.
The average '
family is un-
insured. I think that President
Obama is doing the right thing
to get this in motion and this is
a good time for everybody to get
behind the president. The health
care companies are afraid of the
reform, of course, because right
now they can charge you what-
ever they want.

HARRY BENNETT, 38
Entrepreneur, Miami Shores

Yes, it's a
good thing.
You have a lot -
of Senior Citi-
zens that need ' '
help in the ,"
community,
and a lot of
them can't get
around to go get it. These are
the people the system would


-help. They can't all pay for home
care, even though they need it. I
don't know why there's so much
resistance to the idea either. A
'national health care plan is
something we all should be
pushing for.

KAISHAUNTA BUNTIN, 22
Pharmacy Technician, Liberty City

Yes. It's a very good idea. It's
very important that Obama's.
health care plan goes though as


quickly as pos-
sible. . People
who don't have
health care are
taking a risk
each day they
go without it.
I guess the op-
position comes
from people


who already have health care. I
don't really understand that. I
have health care, but I'd want
the people less fortunate than I
am to get it too.

LESLI GRISSETTE, 42
Student, Liberty City

Of course it's a good idea. Na-
tional health care will benefit us
all. We wouldn't have to worry


about when , -
we're old. If
Obama passes .
this thing; it's ''
a win for all of -
us. All of us r '
should believe
in that idea. I
have no idea
how the op-
position justifies itself on this
one. I think it's about time that
we started working toward this.
We're far behind other coun-
tries where health care is con-
cerned.

FRANK MORTIMER, 52
Hospital "Worker, Miami

Not necessarily. I certainly
think that national health care
should be in place for older peo-
ple; who have paid their dues
and still find
themselves in ,
a tough spot,
but thisyoung-
er generation
- most of .�,
them just take _.
things as a .
joke. Handing
them another
free thing, this health care, will
make things worse. Now me,


I'm from the old school, but
these young people just don't
have the same morals. National
health care should just be for
the older people.

DANA COATES, 30
Miami, Student

Absolutely, we need health
care for the elderly, for veterans
and for people without insur-
ance already. I think national
health coverage will take care of
all these groups. I do see why
some people I
oppose it .
though.
They're
probably
concerned
that some, and people going un-
will find a
way to "work
the system,"
but in this
case, we can't have insurance
companies charging whatever
they like, and people going un-
insured. The benefits outweigh
the potential negatives.


Local residents seeking out and reporting those crooked
diabetes patients' who bribe doctors for referrals and then pay
Medicare patients a kickback to use their Medicare ID. These
scammers have caused federal prosecutors to stay. busy here
cracking down on Miami. Dade's $1.5 billion home health-
care industry. Stay tuned.

Word around County Hall is that County Commissioner
Barbara Jordan'is being encouraged to run for Miami-Dade
mayor in the next election.

And speaking of County, Hall, many people are wondering
just what the story is on audit boss Charles Anderson and
whether or not he is up to the task for his job.

Black and Hispanic Catholics who live in the more
disadvantaged neighborhoods' of Miami-Dade are wrestling
with their faith because of the recession that has hit our
country. The Archdiocese of Miami will close 14 congregations,
.which are slated to merge with existing parishes by Oct. 1. The
archdiocese also closed its youth ministry office and seven
schools. Subsidies have been cut to pregnancy care centers.
It seems that in today's world you have pay to pray.

The cat watching the canary? One of the most closely
watched state offices in the future will be Florida Consumer
Protection Agency which is largely responsible for the financial
failure we find ourselves in today. Gov. Charlie Crist and the
state Cabinet appointed J. Thomas Cardwell on Tuesday to
succeed Don Saxon as commissioner of the Office of Financial
Regulation. Cardwell has served as CEO ofAkerman Senterfitt,
one of the state's largest and most politically connected law
firms.
Saxon resigned in disgrace last September after 30 years
after failing to 'notice the mortgage and security scandals like
Bernard Madoff and Allen Stanford. Stay tuned.

A lot of people are wondering what the real reason was for
the hasty removal of Dr. Karl Wright as president of Florida
Memorial University.
********
Washington has cut a deal with Switzerland settling U.S.
demands for the namesof suspected tax dodgers from a Swiss
bank. The deal has a lot of wealthy Americans with offshore
accounts nervously running to their tax advisers - and the
Internal Revenue Service.

Florida's population has declined for the first time in 63
years, probably another symptom of the recession. The
state's population dropped by 58,000 in the past year. It's the
first decline since large numbers of military personnel left the
state in 1946 after World War II. People are leaving the state
because tax revenue has plunged and jobs are scarce.
********
Dr. Castell Bryant, who in the past few years has served
as interim president of Florida A & M University and vice
president of Bethune-Cookman University, has resigned from
her position at the Daytona school.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Obama dcun


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JESCA has long list of creditors


JESCA
* continued from lA

best," said Brown in a previ-
ous interview. "One of the goals
is to change that, from the op-
erational side, problematic, and
fiscal side."
Miami-Dade County Commis-
sioner Dorrin Rolle, who was
JESCA's president from 1992
until November of last year, de-
clined to comment.
Since taking the helm at
JESCA last November, Brown
has cut positions and staff. The
number of staff has .gone from
60 to 15, and the number of
programs the organization runs
has fallen from eight to three.
The list of creditors in the bank-
ruptcy claiming payment from
JESCA include: Jackson Health
System, $260,869; Greater Mi-
ami Caterers, $174,517; Equi-
table Equi-Vest, $140,021; and
Miami accounting firm Watson
Rice, $45.813. Additionally. Mi-


ami's Emmanuel Hainan Chris-
tian Community Center claims
to be owed $24,000, and Stan-
ton Memorial Baptist Church.
seeks $18,651.
JESCA's -bankruptcy filing
lists $3.85 million in liabilities,
but $1.7 million in assets. The
agency also owes Miami-Dade
County $21,508 in taxes and
lists approximately $1573,600
in unpaid wages and related
costs.
The 84 year-old-nstitutibn
has long administered programs
for infants, teens and seniors in
greater Miami's Black neighbor-
hoods. .1.1
, When asked why JESCA did
not appeal for help sooner,
Brown said that such concerns
miss the point.
"Regardless of how we got
here, what's more important is
that there have been significant
changes to prevent this from
happening in the future," 'he
said. ; -'
*' "',**4#-'!


Discussion nol


REFORM
continued from 1A

"As a physician myself, I be-
lieve we need to encourage more
people to seek regular, routine.
primary care and focus 'on well-
ness initiatives. This will -reduce
overall healthcare costs because
it will encourage early prevention
and treatment of illnesses and
diseases, and decrease the num-
ber of patients who seek emer-
gency care when the conditions
have worsened," she said.
Similar sentiments were voiced
by John C. Johnson, President
and CEO of Mercy Hospital and
Holy Cross hospital.
"As Catholic healthcare min-
istries, Holy Cross and Mercy
hospitals join with the Catholic
Health Association of the United
States in advocating for a health
care system that ensures every-
one will get the health care they
need, when they need it," he said
in an e-mail statement. "Specifi-
cally, we feel reform should en-
sure that health care is available
and accessible to everyone, is
health- and prevention-oriented,
is fully and fairly financed, is
person-centered, and is safe, ef-


t fact-based; says Copeland
fective and designed to. deliver and have productive discourse."
the greatest possible quality," he Copeland, who has been in-
added. volved with the Public Health
Copeland takes a dim view of Trust for nearly eight years, has
the current health care contro- said he would like to see more


versy. .
"We've devolved .
into people having a L .
hissy-fit over things
that people aren't even
proposing," he said.
"The debate seems to N
have taken a life. of
its own.- It's not really.
fact-based. You hear
phrases like 'death
panels' being kicked
around." ROLl
Copeland said that
Jackson Public Health Trust,
which has a considerable stake in
the matter, cannot issue a state-
ment for or against the health
care proposal until one is final-
ized.
,"I definitely don't have a .crys-
tal ball, and there is no current
plan," he said. "During my last
briefing there were six different
groups within the house and sen-
ate putting together proposals,"
adding that we need to "get past
some of the non-productive rhet-
Soric that's being bandied about


fr-. Black involvement in this
. debate, as we are more
*-.' , -" likely to be uninsured.
"Urban communities
-in general," he reasons,
"are probably in a more
under-insured state than
. . .other demographics. We
are an employer based
l7ealth-care system, so
it's goirig to be correlated
to. unemployment rates
.4 and everything else."
The result, he says, is
less medical insurance coverage
.for Blacks and other low-income
groups.
Roldan and. Copeland voiced
agreement on a slew of other
factors they Would like to see--in
any potential health are reforris;
ranging from Graduate Medi-
cal Education reimbursements
to the reduction of Medicare
and Medicaid Disproportionate
Share Hospital payments, which
Roldan believes would lead to
an additional shortfall in fund-
ing.


Thompson with FMU for 30 years


OUSTED
continued from 1A

dents, and community -leaders
and past present including Dr.
Albert E: Smith, in celebrating
the university's 130t anniversa--
ry. There was no indication that
Wright would soon be leaving the
University.
Members of the FMU's Board
of Trustees were instructed to
not speak to the media. In an
email sent to The Miami Times
from Miami Attorney JoLinda
Herring, who is a member of the
board, said "Chairman Charles
George is the only person that is
authorized at the University to
discuss this issue." .
The Times attempted to reach
Karl S. Wright but he did not re-
turn any telephone calls.
Wright's interim succes-
sor, Thompson, is no stranger


to FMU.
Thompson, a Miami native,
began her 30-year career with
FMU as a Professor of Sociology
before advancing to her nine-
year position as Chairperson of
the Division of Social Sciences.
She was later promoted to Insti-
tutional Self-Study Director.
In 2002, Thompson, 61, was
selected to be FMU's first As-
sistant Provost. Two years later,
she was promoted to Associate
Provost. Then in July 2006, she
became Provost.
Thompson holds a bachelor's
degree from Voorhees College
in Denmark, S.C., a master's
degree from Fisk University in
Nashville, T.N., a certificate of
French from the University of
Poitier in LaRochelle, France,
a Ph.D. from the University of
Florida in Gainesville, and a cer-
tificate from Harvard University


Graduate School of Education's
Institute of Educational Man-
agement.
In .a statement released by
Thompson about the future of
FMU on Tuesday to The Times,.
she says, "It is my intention to
uphold the high standards and
traditions that have shaped
Florida Memorial .for the past
130 years and to make sure that
during this transition period, the
University continues its history
of achievement."
"The University plans to con-
tinue its efforts to advance the
opportunities for its students
and faculty. In fact, we're looking
forward to the start of the new
academic year and welcoming
approximately 1,800 new and
returning students to campus in
less than a week," she said.
Fall FMU classes are sched-
uled to resume Aug. 24.


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


BLACKS MUSF~ CONTROL ]I HEIR OW\N IDESI'INY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGU , 2009


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'Clunker' vouchers OK'd
DETROIT - As the 'cash -for-clunkers program finishes its
fourth week, the government is offering a voucher program
that could let consumers take delivery later of new cars that
are unavailable now
The Transportation Department said Thursday that con-
sumers who want to purchase a new car not yet on a dealer
lot can still be eligible for the car rebate program. This helps
C on dealers and automakers who are finding t difficult to keep
- C py rige M ate rial some hot-selling vehicles at the dealerships because of the
popular government incentives.
a----m - -te C n * *eek - "Transportation Secretar Ray LaHood said the changes will
"S y . expand buyers' choices and keep production lines running.
Syndicated Content He calls-it a "wildly successful program "
Before the changes, eligible car buyers could only choose
from vehicles on a dealer car lot. Ford, Toyota and Honda
haveinereased production to meet demand from the clunkers
Available from Commercial News Providers ram.sedprductmeetdemhe
Rep. Candice Miller, R-Mich., and Rep. Fred Upton. R-
Mich.. had asked LaHood to consider allowing consumers to
use vouchers.
Miller says she's heard from many dealers in her district
who say the-yre out of cars that quahfy and that it could be
weeks or more than a month before more cars make it to their
lots
"We want to make sure we re maximizing the program.' she
said before the voucher change was announced. "We're not
asking for any more money, or asking to expand the pro-
Sgram."
Xt the end of July, some carmakers said they were starting
S"to run low on popular models that fit the cash-for-clunkers
program. Miller says it's a good problem to have, but one the
government should be working to address.
S i The program is "exceeding everyone's expectations."' she
said. Depleted inventoried are "a wonderful problem to have.
We haven't have a conversation like that in this area for a
long, long time.
While sales were up in July, Edmunds.com says interest
in the program is beginning to wane. And dealers are getting
angry because many aren't getting reimbursed by the govern-
S ment quickly enough, says Jeremy An yl. CEO of Edmunds.
S - "I think the bubble has kind of burst already," 'Anw 'l said.
Dealer showroom traffic is down 15'"'o since the end of Jul-,
he said


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16 medal redrcipit ermplif 'a life well ted'


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RA TI.Ii MIAMI TIME. AUGUSIT 19-25.9f2009


SII,, , restaurants CEO has tips on surviving recession


Darden Restaurants CEO has tips on surviving recession


Few companies escape recession, especially those selling something consumers can
cut, such as dining out. Restaurant industry sales are down, but sales at Darden Res-
taurants' (DRI) Olive Garden and Red Lobster have held firm. Darden CEO Clarence
Otis, 53, spoke to USA TODAY corporate management reporter Del Jones about gaining
market share as the pie shrinks. Following are excerpts, edited for clarity and space.


Q: How are you holding your
own in a competitive industry
susceptible to recession?
A: People are dining out less,
so the occasion is more dear
when they do. Someone who
may have gone to four or five
places a month may be going
twice. There is a lower tolerance
for service shortfalls, so make
sure you operate better than you
might normally.
Q: Every company should fo-
cus on service?
A: Yeah. A server or a manager,
regardless of what's happening
at home, must walk into a unit
and put on a smile. It's more
important now when people are
experiencing more anxiety than
they might normally.
Q: Have consumers been
changed forever? Will they
stay frugal when things im-
prove?
A: Habits and behaviors
change pretty slowly, so there
won't be a radical change in be-
havior. A lot is temporary. There
will be structural changes. Cred-
it cards will be harder to get, the
limits on credit cards will be
lower; It will take a bigger down
payment to buy a house. Absent
those structural, institutionally
driven changes, I'm not so sure
there would be a lot of change,
but credit will affect how people
behave.
Q: What companies do you
pay close attention to outside
the restaurant industry?
A: Many. I think about Wal-
Mart's support platform and
supply chain. They are innova-
tive and world class. Marriott
has a number of brands that are
positioned differently. They do a
great job as a multibrand opera-
tor, and are focused on sharing
much of the back end, such as
their reservations technology,
without it being obvious to the
customer and muddying the
brands. ' - -
Q: If cost cutting is done so
customers don't notice, does
that mean pressuring suppli-
ers or cutting employee bene-


fits such as health insurance?
A: We tend not to go to benefits
because they are valued by our
people. Our suppliers are long-
term partners. We cut things
like travel. We are automat-
ing key steps. We've centralized
purchasing to take advantage
of scale and qualify for better
terms from suppliers, because
they can count on us for volume.
Companies in more distressed
situations cut to the core, but
we've made sure that we've got
financial flexibility.'
Q: At least it's easy to find
good employees in -times of
high unemployment.
A: We're able to keep our good
people, so turnover is lower.
That's important, because these
are people with basic training,
and you can layer on advanced
training and development.
Q: When competitors lose
market share, they often turn
to coupons and other forms of
discounting. How do you avoid
a race to the bottom?
A: Be prepared for cyclical
downturns by offering a range
from value to premium. When
appropriate, emphasize the val-
ue offerings. The auto compa-
nies that have a range of mod-
els from entry-level to midtier
have held up better. Those un-
prepared had to rely heavily on
discounting.
Q: Do you lose business
when you don't match a com-
petitor's coupon for $2 off
lunch?
A: It has no major impact.
There is a lot of risk to putting
your brand on heavy sales. It
reinforces what it's worth, and
it is challenging to get back nor-
malized pricing after an extend-
ed period of time. You see it in
consumer packaged goods that
get supported by coupons. They
lose their ability to command a
premium.
Q: You must be operating
each restaurant with one few-
er employee?
A: No. That gets to the qual-
ity. When you reduce staffing,


the customer experience gets
eroded. You breach trust at a
time when their restaurant vis-
its are more dear than they've
ever been.
Q: Surely Darden has made
mistakes in this bad economy.
What has failed or backfired?
A: We underestimated last
summer the depth of the slow-
down. Fuel prices were a big
problem, and we didn't see that
coming. We weren't as conserva-
tive as we needed to be.
Q: What is the smartest
thing Darden has done?
A: Work as hard as we can to
protect our people. A lot of com-
panies saw the opportunity to
take reductions. That breaks
the bond with employees, and as
things recover, you can pay.
Q: Did you get rid of weaker
employees and replace them
with good ones?
A: No. Our talent evaluation
process is a good one. We didn't
feel like we had many low per-
formers, because we had been


4000


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pretty disciplined.
Q: Based on your most re-
cent data, what is happening
with the economy now?
A: It's stabilized, but at a low
level.
Q: What should companies
do differently once the econ-


omy turns and consumers
spend more?
A: Companies that will win are
working right now to better po-
sition themselves to serve their
customers, strengthen their of-
fer, improve the business model.
They will be able to move fast-


er. They need to be investing in
people, in the skill set. Look at
the financial services. It's been
under stress, but there are firms
that have taken steps to get
better, and you're seeing them
perform better even before the
economy turns.


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MIAMI-DADE


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
FOR LEASE OF FARMLAND
IN HOMESTEAD GENERAL
AVIATION AIRPORT

1. 433 acres of land are being offered for farming at Homestead General Aviation
Airport. Minimum bid is $350 per acre per year. Annual rent is payable in
advance. The lease is for five years with five one-year extensions, to be
effective thirty (30) days after the completion of the 2009 spring harvest, but
no later than December, 2009.
2. Bids shall be submitted in writing, with the envelope labeled "Homestead
General Aviation Airport Farm Bid" to Mr. John B. O'Neal C. M., GAA Business
Development Coordinator, Miami-Dade Aviation Department, RO. Box 025504,
Miami, Florida 33102-5504 or deliver to the Properties Division Offices,
Concourse E, 6th Floor, Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida 33102.
3. Bids must be accompanied by a non-refundable fee of $100.00 by cashier's
check or money order payable to the Miami-Dade Aviation Department. Clearly
state the name of the corporation/entity submitting the bid. In addition, the bid
must be signed by an official of the entity or corporation authorized-to bind the
corporation/entity to contracts. Include the address, telephone and facsimile
contact number.
4. Bids will be accepted until 2 pm, Thursday, September 17, 2009. At 2 pm
the bids will be taken to a designated place and publicly opened, read and
documented.
5. Copies of the lease to be awarded are available and may be picked up from the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department, Properties Division Offices, Concourse E,
6th Floor, Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida 33102, between the hours
of 9 am to 4:30 pm, Monday to Thursday, beginning August 13, 2009 through
Thursday August 20, 2009, except Federal holidays.
6. Questions must be submitted in writing to the Miami-Dade Aviation Department
by August 27, 2009, in one of the following manners:
By Mail to: Mr. John B. O'Neal C. M., GAA Business Development Coordinator,
Mliami-Dade Aviation Department, PRO. Box 025504, Miami, Florida
33102-5504.
By Facsimile to: Attention: Mr. John B. O'Neal C.M., Aviation GAA Business
Development Coordinator, Miami-Dade Aviation Department, Fax Number
(305) 869-7615.
Deliver to: Mr. John B. O'Neal C.M., GAA Business Development Coordinator,
Miami-Dade Aviation Department, Properties Division, Concourse E, 6th Floor,
Miami Internatinal Airport, Miami, Florida 33102.
7. Awarded respondent must execute the lease with the County and returned it to
the Miami-Dade Aviation Department along with copies of required insurance
certificates, application and questionnaire form, Miami-Dade County Business
Affidavits and three (3) months security deposit by October 29, 2009. The first
year's rental payment shall be due no later than January 7, 2010. In the event
the awarded respondent does not submit required documents and payments
by stated dates, award may be made to the next highest bidder or re-bid, at the
County's discretion.
8. Advance Payment of the first year's rent and security deposit must be made-by
cashier's check.
9. Miami-Dade County and the Miami-Dade Aviation Department assumes no
responsibility or liability for costs incurred by any respondent or awardee in
submitting a bid or executing the resulting lease.


[SOLUDI,


. IN
Fkq











9A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


According to the bible. man rof his church: Sr.
or woman would live 3-s.:ores Master Sgt. Gary _.,.
and 10. consequently. Juan- D. Lawhorn, as a
ita Lane celebrated 4-scores neighbor, Beat-
with a surprise birthday par - riz Sturgis spoke
ty, last Friday, coordinated by on Juanita as a
her husband, George Lane member of the BTW Class of
and son, Dalvin, along with 47; Dr. Lydia Richardson
other members of the family. informed the guests that
Furthermore, the surprise she was also a graduate of
was broken when the hon- Morris Brown College, Class
oree walked into a dark room of '52; and the sons danced
and everyone shouted "sur- with their mother, followed
prise!" as the House Rockers by Jessie Sandiland re-
Band provided the music for flected on how Juanita and
the dancing, shouting and Joyce Knight played cards
escorting the honoree to a regularly with the Jolly
special table draped in . Greens Card Club.
red for the Delta Girl A video presenta-
at De Versailles Ban- tion was shown to
quet Hall. the 200-guests and
Dr. Dalvin R. Lane informed* everyone
began the evening by " how Juanita made
flashing on the screen, an indelible impres-
"Juanita's Octogenar- I sion on the edu-
ian Gala" where he LANE national system of
gave an overview of his Miami-Dade and


mother's years of living,
followed by Elder 'Bernard
Edwards adding the spiritual
side and the band interject-
ing Back Down Memory Lane
by playing some of her favor-
ite songs.
For the gospel side of her
life, Reverend Richard Cle-
ments, Mt. Tabor MBC, sere-
naded her with "I Come to the
Garden Alone", followed by a
fast gospel joined in with the
audience and members from
her church. A liturgical dance
was performed by Dondan-
ae J. Lane, twin daughter of
Dalvin, and a special tribute
by Dr. Richard J. Strachan,
who also interjected a bit of
humor with a "party quiz" to
the delight of the audience.
Others on the program in-
cluded tributes to the hon-
oree coming from George W.
Lane, Jr., Vivian I. Land,
mother-in-law, Donovan
Lane and Karen Bullard-
Jordan, Godmother.
Expressions care from Dr..
Solomon C. Stinson, chair-
man of Miami-Dade County
School Board, who alluded
to the honoree as a principal
for 10-years and a member


Congratulations to Sheila
Miller-London was reelected
president of Iota Omega Chap-
ter of Alpha Kappa Alpha So-
rority. Sheila returned home to
Norfolk, Va. after one week in
Anchorage, Alaska where she
along with 1400 of her Sorors
held their Leadership Confer-
ence. Sheila is the daughter of
the late Nathaniel "Brother"
Miller and Eleanor Lewis.
Happy wedding anniversary
to James B. and Sandra Nairn,
Aug. 12 and their 32nd.
Get well wishes to Claretha
Grant-Lewis, Carmeta Brown-
Russell, Elouise Bain-Far-
rington, David Frederick Da-
vis, Ismae Prescod and Kathy
Day-Thurston.

Jacquelyn Seargeant-Bai-
ley, formerly of Miami now liv-
ing in Orlando was home for a
month to be with her mother,
Claranda Braynon Seargeant
and the Braynon Clan.
Miamians are saddened by
the demise of Zeola Cohen-
Jones. "Ze" as she was affec-
tionately called a graduate of
Booker T. Washington High
School Class of 1945 and a
Bethune-Cookman "Wildcat."
She was loved by many and
will be missed by all. I will nev-
er forget her.
As our young man and wom-
en head off to college, remem-
ber to do your best so that
doors of opportunity will open.
Make your parents and grand-
parents proud.
The Church of the Incarna-
tion Parish Hall is now known
as J. Kenneth Major-Parish
Hall Congratulations, Fr. Ma-
jor!
I thought these topics were
worth our children and young
adults knowing what President
Barack Obama can teach our


influencing the lives
of hundreds of students
under her leadership and
guidance. It was told that
Juanita toiled for 37-years,
beginning as secretary to
the principal of Bunch Park
and Liberty City Elementary
Schools and culminated in
1989 after serving 10-years
at Natural Bridge Elemen-
tary School. Other schools
were Royal Green, Melrose
and Lillie C. Evan.
Some of the guests includ-
ed 30-members of Delta Sig-
ma Theta Sorority,d Inc. that
sang the hymn, Emily Fer-
guson and daughter from
Freeport, Angela Bellamy,
Maude Newbold, Annie
R. Brown, Evelyn Wynn,
Beverly and Lee Johnson,
Jimmy and Anita Harrell,
Dr. Lorraine F. Strachan,
Margaret Saunders, Anna,
Grace Sweeting, Pernella
Burke, Arnold Knight and
guest, Charles Wright,
Aaron Johnson and wife,
Vivian, Jatavia, Jeremy,
Dondanae, Donovan and
Vernaeyah Lanes.


children: 1. For-
giveness- Obama
forgave his father
for leaving him and
his mom when he
was just two-years-
old. 2. Respect-
Obama's mother
and father apparently put their
needs ahead of his, he speaks
of them in mostly affectionate
terms. He finds a way not -to
demean them. 3. Persistence-
Obama decided to fight the
good fight. That is, he got up
when he was knocked down.
For example, in 2000, he lost
his run for Congress in Illi-
nois. He could have given up
and gone into the private sec-
tor where high--salaried jobs
awaited him. But he preferred
public service. Four years
later, he ranagain, this time
winning a U.S. Senate seat.
4. Hardwork- He was smart
enough to lay a foundation
for success. Our Black presi-
dent loves his work. "Work is
very important and will define
our children lives." 5. Barack
Obama, a youngster in Hawaii
without his parents around,
has toughed it out and be-
come one of the history's great
stories, no matter what hap-
pens going forward. What he
has achieved in his 48 years is
simply astounding.
"If Barack Obama can be-

Ar -


A special salute goes out
to Charlie and Dorothy Da-
vis for hosting a Bethune-
Cookmnan University Soiree,
last Saturday, at their pa-
latial home, where over a
hundred supporters of the
university showed up for an
afternoon of camaraderie,
fraternization, story-telling,
and dining on fish, chicken,
BBQ, salad. Pigeon peas
rice and baked beans free of
charge.
When people arrived,
they noticed their sons and
daughters on the front lawn
preparing the feast, but
once on the inside of
the home, Davis, Sr.
had full attention of
the mass of people
orientating them to
the history of BCU
where his daughters
attended and where
his love is. During
his speech, he called LATTI
upon Carol Weath-
erington, president,
and Gwen LeVan, treasure,
to cement everyone to make
a donation of at least $30.00
in support of the marching
band program.
Davis, Sr. did not at-
tend BCU, but he showed
his life membership
clock, as well as his
wife's life member-
ship clock on the
wall in their library
to his church mem-
bers from New Bethel
Baptist Church, Mi-
ami Gardens. Fur-
ther, each church RC
member demonstrat-
ed a Christian love to
these respectable members
and neighbors while arriving
and leaving. They contrib-
ute more than many alumni
of BCU.
Some of the participants
included Vivian Archer,
April L. Asbury, Vivian
Butler, Kimberly Clarke,
Kristina Clarke, Brittany
Clarke, Sandra Clarke,
Larry Coffee,. Nicole Cof-
fee, Nasir Coffee, Antonio
Coffee, Bettie Curry, Chiq-
uUts Davis, David L. Davis,
Chakevia Davis, Charlie
Davis, Jr., Gabrielle De-
laine, Gregory Delaine,
Daniel Griffen, Freqick J.


come the President of the
United States then whatever
dream you may have can hap-
pen in your life." It all depends
on lessons learned.
Juanita Allen-Lane was
pleasantly surprised by her
two sons, Dr. Dalvin Lane and
George Lane, Jr. along with
daughter-in-law Vivian Lane;
grandchildren, nieces and be-
loved nephew Ned "Champs"
Edwards who escorted his
vivacious aunt to her "80th
Birthday Bash" held at the "De
Versailles Banquet Hall" where
schoolmates, church friends,
former co-workers, sorority sis-
ters and "Link Sisters" danced
the night away with Jaunita's
hubby George Lane and Dr.
Richard Strachan headed up
the band. Goddaughters Karen
Bullard-Jordan and Tameka
Caudle Roa were the gracious
hostesses.
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity
recently voted to induct for-
mer President Bill Clinton as
an honorary member during
its 95th Anniversary Conclave
in New Orleans. Their frater-
nity president Paul Griffin,
Jr. said that Clinton is the first
U.S. President to be inducted
into a historically Black frater-
nity. Among some of "Sigma"
outstanding members, Geor-
gia Congressman John Lewis,
A. Phillip Randolph, Atlanta
businessman Herman Rus-
sell, former' U.S. Secretary of
Education Rod Paige, former
NAACP leader James Weldon
Johnson and renowned sci-
entist Dr. George Washington
Carver.


Hemphill, Willie Highto'w-
er, Carolyn Henry, Pearl-
ine Jackson, Marion and
William Kelley, Cherry
Moss, Lillie D. Odom, Ca-
juan Pringle, Tommy Prin.-
gle, III, Tyler Pringle, Terri
L. Pringle, Mertis Pollock,
Eugene Pollock, Pauline
Slater, Cynthia Saunders,
Tania Vix, Travin Vix, Joe
Williams, Samuel C. Wil-
lians, Susie M. Young and
Dr. Lorraine F. Strachan,
The Davis' thanked every-
one for supporting this great
program.


A continued me-
morial for "Uncle Al"
(Alfonzo Moss) who
was a -popular DJ in
Liberty City was held,
last Saturday, but the
venue was switched
from 62nd Street to
MORE 71t on 15th Avenue
to 12th Avenue to 7th
Avenue on 62nd for
the thousands of support-
ers that came out for the
-annual "Peace In Da Hood"
extravaganza. It was a long-
awaited event to give people
an opportunity to give vent
to the hot sun, danced and
more movement from
noon until darkness.
Entertainment was
provided by DJ Ral-
ahd. Trina, Rick
Ross, Trick Da'ddy,
Flokider, DJ, Funk
and almost every
DJ organization in
)SS South Florida that
did not have an as-
signment. The DJ
competition included a 100
speakers aggregation on
7th Avenue facing the West
and the same amount on
12th Avenue facing the East.
And, of course, in between
each blocks from 7th Avenue
to 12th Avenue were DJ's
between two buildings on
either side of the 62nd St.
sending the sounds out to
those who danced until they


were soaking wet from the while the honoree and wife
hot sun. danced to the cha-cha-slide,
Among the massive crowd cupid shuffle, electric slide,
was Grady Muhammad who and with the grands, while
has been selling his "Final the honoree thanked every-
Call" newspapers for several one for his 50th birthday jam
years on 7th Avenue. and 62nd and a suite in the hotel.
Street. He also brought his
infant son, Isaac, to absorb * * * * * * * *
the experience. Muham- Jasmine Lattimore passed
mad also indicated the ad- out letters at the Professional
edition of a Prayer Breakfast and Business Women Associ-
which was' held at ation soliciting funds
Befonte Tacolcy Cen- to attend Stirling Uni-
ter and sponsored by versity. in Scotland
Tracy Alice, director, during the summer.
along with State Rep. She wants to thank ev-
James Bush, Miami eryone for supporting
Commissioner Mi- , her arid to proudly say
chelle Jones-Spence she is back in Miami
and County Commis- preparing to return to
sioner Audrey Ed- SMITH Alabama State Uni-
monson. versity. and continue
on the dean's list.
S* * * * * * * During her seminar, she
J.R. Smith entered the took courses in philosophy,
Grande Promenade Ball- literature, geography and
room at Miami Beach Resort its educational system. She
with his lovely wife, Lartreye indicated her greatest thrill
Smith, who arranged a sur- was hiking in the mountain
prise 50th birthday party on terrain and looking at the
July 25. His mother, Annie town'from a height that will
Rogne, Val Pinder, sister make you dizzy. She and her
and a host of other classmate were the
friends joined the cel- only Black students
ebration. from America, while
The ballroom was the total was 50. and
decorated in choco- she earned an "A" for
late brown and teal her vocal discussion,
with large crystal written assignments,
vases with fresh but and examination.
tropical floral ar- She was also a
rangement designed TRINA BTW winner in the
by Smith, while 150 ACT-SO competition
guests filled, the ball- two years ago and
room with fun and excite- was happy to learn .of the
ment. Further, the dinner 2009 medals recipients that
was served after Homer Wil- participated in New York
liams, St. Paul AME Church, City: Mozel Doucet, Gold,
blessed the baked chicken, Sculpture,New World School
baked, salmon, roast beef, of the Arts; Sophia Wong,
vegetables and a 3-tier cake Gold, Painting, and Pho-
for dining., tography, Silver, New World
After dinner, toasts were School of the Arts; and
given by DJ Tony of Bass Khadijah Rolle, Bronze, Mu-
Unlimited, Aubrey Brunson, sic Vocal, New World School
Annie Rogne, Val Pinder, of the Arts. Pat Daniels,
Homer Williams, Gordon Doris Hart, Carey Hart,
Bain, Valerie Anderson, Pam Emilie Howard, Ernestine
Robinson, Michelei Ozuna, Petit and J.D. Purcell were
Tweety and Johae Brinson, supporters.


-. -~

iViThnllI .Q~ JJJz3~'&JJ .9'*


--- iJ


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


Spence-Jones leads delegation to Haiti


Commissioner delivers solid waste trucks and "Keep Port-au-
Prince Clean)


hurricane emergency ki
City of Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones spear-
headed a delegation to Haiti on
August 19-21, to deliver donated
surplus trucks and equipment to
the City of Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
The 15 member delegation, which
consists of leaders in the public,
private and non-profit sectors, de-
parted from Miami International
Airport early Wednesday morning.
With several hurricanes and


storms looming in the Atlantic, the
delivery of the trucks to Port-au-
Prince could not come at a better
time. The delegation will travel to
the City of Port-au-Prince with the
donated equipment and supplies
as well as provide hurricane emer-
gency care kits.
' The donated trucks and supplies
are part of an educational cam-
paign called "Leve! An Nou Kimbe
Potoprens Pwop !" (Wake Up! Let's


in partnership
with the City of
Miami's Sister
City in Port-au- ~ .p., -
Prince, Haiti
and the Mayor's
Intei-national
Council. .
The initiative
will assist Port- Spence-Jones
au-Prince in
the operations of an efficient and
environment friendly solid waste
system. Also, provide training to


the City's Solid Waste Department
that focuses on operations, ad-
ministration and maintenance.
"The overall objective of the
campaign is to assist and edu-
.cate" residents in Port-au-Prince
on how to keep the environnient
clean," said Spence-Jones "It also
provides training that will pre-
pare them should another disaster
strike Haiti."
The trip will also include the es-
tablishment of an art and cultural
exchange partnership between
Port-au-Prince and the City of Mi-
ami.


Vanessa Woodard Byers enters school board race


The Miami Times Staff Report

The race' to replace long-time
Miami-Dade' School Board mem-
ber Solomon C. Stinson, who will
retire next year, and represent
District 2 on the School Board
is heating up. Vanessa Woodard
Byers has become the most re-
cent entry.
Woodard, who announced her
candidacy on August 10,. has
more than 27 years of experi-


ence in auditing, accounting and
budget management with Miami-
Dade County Public Schools. She
says that this experience is what
prompted her to enter the race.
"As an employee, I was just in
the middle of experiencing what
my fellow employees were. I went
through the tremendous budget
cuts--the stress of what was going
on-with them. My knowledge of
the school district's budget, and
internal auditing, is what I would


bring to the position," she said.
Woodard Byers also addressed
what would set her apart from
previous position-holders.
"Well what I would do in that
seat differently is really bring
the school board and the district
back to the people. From what
I'm hearing from people there's.
a disconnect. The school district
has some wonderful opportu-
nities out there. But all of our
kids aren't always aware of all


of those offerings and those op-
tions. As a result; we continue to
lose our kids to charter schools,"
she said.
"It's really a matter of making
education a priority again," she
said.
Thus far; other contestants in
the race are Miami Dade County
Public Schools District Direc-
tor Ronda Vangates, and former
State Rep. Dorothy Bendross-
Mindingall.


%Ok~4jmtin ~Iw s ~ -Tuui


A'


Homestead Middle School teacher Adewale Alonge,
left, with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.


Homestead teacher to aid

Obama administration


The Miami Times Staff Report

Dr. Adewale Alonge, of
Homestead Middle School,
was one of 13 teachers cho-
sen to collaborate with federal
education officials on national
policy. Alonge, 50 was, chosen
from a pool of more than 1,400
applicants. He will participate
in the Teaching Ambassador
Fellowship program, which
was designed last year with
the aim of improving educa-
tion for students by involving
teachers in national educa-
tion policy.
The year-long fellowship will
allow Alonge and, other teach-
ers to learn about key federal
programs, as well as lend their
hard-wor classroom expertise
to the policymakers.
To gain admission; teach-
ers and instructional special-
ists from across the country


were invited to submit essays
through an open application
process. Ambassadors were
chosen based on a demon-
strated record of leadership,
impact on student achieve-
ment, and insight into educa-
tion policy from their school
and classroom experience.
.. Alonge grew up as a mem-
ber of a poor family in Nigeria.
His parents -- who had no for-
mal schooling themselves --
pushed each of their children
to attend college. After earning
his bachelor's degree in the
science of agriculture from the
University of Nigeria, Nsukka,
Alonge came to the United
States and earned his doctor-
ate in agricultural education
at Iowa State University. '
He will continue to teach
at Homestead Middle school,
consulting with the program
on a part-time basis.


- . 4


Available from Commercial News Providers,
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The Adrienne Arsht Center in association with
Jan Ryan, Robert Fox, and Michael White presents
' THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Musiq and AE District
"With top-class acting, singing ,and dancing, Kerry Michael's superb
production faithfully distils not just the movie's music and characters,
but also, somehow, it's soul" Daily Mail
2 & 8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association wjth
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Musiq and AE District
Accompanied by a killer band of outstanding reggae musicians, the cast
performs more than 20 classic songs from the film soundtrack, including
"By The Rivers of Babylon," the title song, "Higher and Higher," and
"You Can Get It If You Really Want."
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


THE HARDER THEY COME'
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Musiq and AE District)
"The evening is an astonishment in every way; an exhilarating bleeding-
at-the-edges slice of Jamaican life that feels as if life, music and dance
are all one" The Guardian
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00'


THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Musiq and AE District
"Bell (who plays Ivan) sings a melodiously as Jimmy Cliff, giving the
songs edge, sweetness and soul. And the moves in ways that would
make'a street hooker blush" The Standard
2 & 8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


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THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union In association with the *
Adrienne Arsht Center, Contagious Musiq and AE District
"This is a celebration of the film and its music and it's a loud, raucous and
often funny reinterpretation. It's filled with fantastic music an energetic
dancing... heart stopping renditions of some of the films most famous
tracks... a night that is pure unadulterated fun." The Metro
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

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Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


4


Jesse Owens

to be honored

in Berlin
BERLIN - The performance
of Jesse Owens will be honored
in the stadium where he won
four gold medals at the 1936
Olympic Games when the world
championships are held in Ber-
lin this month.
USA Track and Field an-
nounced that the organization,
along with the IAAF and Berlin
*Organizing Committee, will' pay
tribute to Owens on Aug. 22.
His granddaughter, Marlene
Hemphill Dortch, will attend
the ceremony.
The US team plans to wear
a uniform with the initials of
Owens. The organizations also
will honor former German long
jump great Luz Long, who be-
friended Owens at the Berlin'
Games. Dortch and Long's son,
Kai, will present the long jump
medals.


11A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009




PUBLIC HEARING
The Governing Board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO)
for the Miami Urbanized Area will hold a public hearing on Thursday,
September 24, 2009 at 2:00 p.m. in the County Commission
Chambers, Stephen P Clark Center, 111 NW First Street, Miami, Florida.
The Governing Board will consider the .following amendment
to the FY 2010 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP):
1. FY 2010 Roll-Forward Projects
This amendment will add project phases to the 2010 TIP that were originally
scheduled in the 2009 TIP for authorization in the State fiscal year ending June
30, 2009. Since these phases were not obligated by June 30, 2009, they
need to be included in the FY 2010-2014 TIP Additionally, these roll forward
projects have been included into the recently approved FY 2010 state budget.
All interested parties are invited to attend. For copies of the TIP and/or further
information, please contact the MPO Secretariat, Stephen R Clark Center, 111 .NW
First Street, Suite 920, Miami, Florida 33128, phone: (305) 375-4507; e-mail:
mpo@miamidade.gov; website: www.miamidade.gov/mpoo. It is the policy of
Miami-Dade County to comply with all requirements of the Americans with Disability
Act. For sign language interpretation, please call at least five days in advance.


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT
REGARDING REQUEST FOR
PROPOSALS FOR RETAIL
CONCESSIONS PROGRAM 2009
RFP NO. MDAD-04-09
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department is announcing the availability of the above
referenced advertisement, which can be obtained by visiting our Website at
www.mlami-airport.com/html/business opoortunities.html (in order to view
the full Advertisement, please select "Advertisements" link at the bottom of the
Business Opportunities page and then select the respective solicitation).
Copies of the RFP solicitation package can only be obtained through the MDAD,
Contracts Administration Division, in person or via courier at 4200 NW 36th
Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122, or through a mail request to PO.
Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-5504. The cost for each solicitation package is
$50.00 (non-refundable) check or money order payable to: Miami-Dade Aviation
Department
This solicitation is subject.to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with section
2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code.


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SECTION B


The Miami Times





Fai MIAMI, FLORIDA, thAUGUST 19-25, 2009


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


Marriage among Black educated women down


(UPI) -- Researchers say
fewer highly educated Black
women in the United States
are tying the knot and start-
ing a family.
Yale University sociology
Professor Hannah Brueckner,
who co-wrote a study regard-


ing highly educated Black
women, said a growing num-
ber of them have been focus-
ing on education and careers
rather than families and mar-
riage during the last 40 years,
the American Sociology Asso-
ciation reported Saturday.


"In the past nearly four de-
cades, Black women have
made great gains in higher
education rates, yet these
gains appear to have come in-
creasingly at the cost of mar-
riage and family," Brueckner
said.


The study on family forma-
tion and marriage longitu-
dinal trends in the specified
demographic found the mar-
riage gap between highly edu-
cated Black and white women
increased 'dramatically be-
tween the -1970s and recent


years.
In the 1970s the gap was
nine percent, while that gap
climbed to 21 percent in
2000-2007. !
Brueckner said the growing
divide may be due to a lack of
acceptable partners for highly


educated Black women.
"They are less likely than
Black men to marry outside
their race, and, compared to
whites and Black men, they
are least likely to marry a
college-educated spouse," he
suggested.


4
-~
*1
.7>
'5..


PAMELA LUCKETT


Dr. Pamela Luckett

named assistant

dean at Barry

University

Special to the Times

Barry University's School of Adult
and Continuing Education an-
nounced the appointment of Dr.
Pamela Luckett as assistant dean of
regional administration. Luckett's ap-
pointment to.this position is effective
immediately.
As assistant dean of regional ad-
ministration, ILuckett will offer lead-
ership support as it pertains to the
mission and goals of Barry University
by upholding university policies and
procedures relating to students, fac-
ulty, staff and programs. Luckett will
manage the administration of edu-
cational services of the university in
Central Florida.
"This is a special opportunity to
continue to work with outstanding
faculty and staff as we inspire, mo-
tivate, and cultivate the leaders and
innovators of tomorrow," said Luckett
of her appointment. "In partnership
with other entities of the university, I
lobk forward to assisting the dean in
developing and implementing policies.
and procedures that will lead Barry
University's School of Adult and Con-
tinuing Education to greater levels of
excellence."
A graduate of Western Michigan
University and the University of Ar-,
kansas at Pine Bluff, Luckett started
her career at Barry in the late 90's
as an adjunct professor of Informa-
tion Technology and became a full-
time assistant professor in 2000. She
later obtained the responsibility of
assistant academic coordinator for
the Information Technology program
in the central and north Florida re-
gions. Luckett recently completed
her second'four-year-term on the
Technological Research Development
Authority Board of Directors, a posi-
tion she was appointed to by then
Gov. Jeb Bush. She also served as
chairman of the board, and currently
serves the president of Unified Wom-
en of Brevard.


Attorney Lysia H. Bowling/Acting Judge prepares Octavia Noble, Miami Northwestern High School;
Antrinika Mack, Miramar High School and Lumumba Flennory, Miami Jackson, Senior High for the
Annual Miami-Dade County Teen Court Attorney Training Mock Trial presentations.The Attorney and
Court Officer Training has attracted students from Miami-Dade and Broward counties with over 125
students participating in annual summer program. . -PhotobyJoey WaikerMMAP




ABOVE THE LAW.:



Teen court in session

STUDENTS THROUGHOUT MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD PARTICIPATE IN ANNUAL SUMMER -

YOUTH ATTORNEY TRAINING PROGRAM AT ST. THOMAS UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL-


Special to the Times

Miami-Dade County Teen Court Program (M-
DCTC), under the 'administrative leadership of
Metro-Miami Action Plan (MMAP) Trust, trained
a new wive of lawyers, bailiff's, clerks, and ju-
rors during the annual summer Youth Attorney
Training Program. The training sessions were
held at St. Thomas University Law School, Moot
Courtroom, last week.
Close to 100 middle and high school students
throughout Miami-Dade and Broward received
training sanctioned by the program's volun-
teer training guidelines. These sessions helped
to educate and . trained youth volunteers in the
many facets of the judicial process. In addition,
the number of volunteers increased which helps
operate Teen Court throughout the year and pro-
vides valuable information for those interested in
pursuing careers in law and/or criminal justice.
Participating volunteers received training pro-


vided by legal experts in the areas of law termi-
nology and courtroom decorum. These tools will
sharpen their skills for the culminating court-
room mock trial presentations. In the end, par-
ticipants are awarded by receiving 16 hours of
community service for attending the program
and attending the classroom training sessions.
Teen Court was established by MMAP for first-
time juvenile misdemeanor offenders on July 7,
199.8. The mission of the MMAP Juvenile Devel-
opment Division is to, help change the lives of
young people by making a positive impact and
providing Time For A -Second Chance without a
juvenile record by, completing sanctions of the,
M-DCTC program. M-DCTC holds youthful of-
fenders accountable, and participants who suc-
cessfully complete the program are provided
an opportunity to have their record expunged,
whereby a record of charge is removed from pub-
lic viewing thereby providing youth with A Sec-
ond Chance.


Homeschoolers

score higher on

SAT than public

school students
The most comprehensive survey of
homeschoolers in America in more
than a decade found a large gap be-
tween students educated at home
and those educated in public institu-
tions.
In the nationwide study conducted
by Dr. Brian D. Ray of the National
Home Education Research Institute,
homeschoolers were found to have
scored 34-39 percentile points higher
than the norm on standardized
achievement tests. The homeschool
national average ranged from the 84'
percentile for language, math, and
social studies to the 89th percen-
tile for reading, reported the Home
School Legal Defense Association,
which commissioned Ray to conduct
the survey in 2007.
According to HSLDA, anecdotal
evidence of homeschooling's success
has been backed by multiple re-
search studies. However, it has been
at least 10 years since any major
nationwide study of homeschooling
was done.
During that time, the number of.
homeschooled children has grown
from about 850.000 to approxmmatel
: 1.5 million, according'to the National
Cehter'for Educatioh iadstistics.
-Homeschooling is a rapidly grow-
' ing, thriving education movement
that is challenging the conventional
wisdom about the best way to raise
and educate the next generation,"
commented HSLDA president Mi-
chael Smith in his group's announce-
ment of the study Monday.
For the new study, touted as "the
most comprehensive study of home-
school academic achievement ever
completed," Ray surveyed 11.739
homeschooled students from all 50
states, Guam, and Puerto Rico, and
drew from 15 independent testing
services.
Aside from the academic results,
the study found that the achieve-
ment gaps common to public schools
were not found in the homeschool
community.
Homeschooled boys (87" percen- *
tile) and girls (88"' percentile) scored
equally well; the income level of par-
ents did not appreciably affect the
results (household income under
$35,000: 851" percentile - household
income over $70,000: 89"' percen-
tilel, and while parent education
level did have some impact, even
children whose parents did not have
college degrees scored in the 83"
percentile, which is well above the
national average for public school
students.
Homeschooled children whose par-
ents both had college degrees scored
in th'e 90'' percentile.
"These results validate the dedica-
tion of hundreds of thousands of
homeschool parents who are giving
their children tAe best education
possible," commented Smith.


Omarosa enrolls in Seminary classes


(EURweb)--"The Apprentice" and
"The Celebrity Apprentice" star, Oma-
rosa Manigault Stallworth, is looking
forward to a new chapter in her life
that apparently involves the pulpit.
The reality show villain tells Sister 2
Sister magazine that she plans to enter
The United Theological Seminary for
training to become a minister. She's
looking to start classes later this year.
"I feel like God is calling me. He's been
calling me for two years, and .I can't
ignore it," Manigault Stallworth told
S2S.
Manigault Stallworth has dedicated
herself to several community pro-
grams. Most recently she has become


a goodwill ambassador for the Haitian
Support Program. She also works with
Positive Vibrations and the New Image
Emergency Homeless Shelter.
This fall, Manigault Stallworth will
be featured on the TV One series "Life
After," which tells behind-the-scenes
stories of celebrities who have had to
deal with adversity within their pub-
lic lives. Among those featured in the
eight-episode series include hip-hop/
R&B trio Bell Biv Devoe; Star Jones'
ex-husband Al Reynolds; "Family
Matters" star Jaimee Foxworth; actor
Taimak ("The Last Dragon") and "The
John Larroquette Show" star Daryl
"Chill" Mitchell.


OMAROSA MANIGAULT
Reality show star


Third Pastoral anniversary
Second Corinth Missionary
Baptist Church invites you to
celebrate with us our pastor,
Rev. Alvertis Hiltons' third pas- .
toral anniversary.
The celebration will be held
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday,
7:30 p.m. at Second Corinth
6200 N.W. Miami Court.
The celebration will climax 3
p.m., Sunday, August 23 at the
Greater Holy Cross Cross Mis-
sionary Baptist Church 1516
N.W. 93 Terr. The Rev. Pinck-
ney Hilton and Ephesians Mis- REV. ALVERTIS HILTON
sionary Baptist Church family We invite you to come and cel-
will be in charge of this service. ebrate with us.







13B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


The 'mdo

The 'ZJnddlar:'


I)ad, but still ud for bus fare


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* Get a free high-
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Dispose of your

household waste the

RIGHT way!
Illegal dumping is a serious environmental crime. Piles of illegally-
dumped hazardous materials, auto parts, construction debris and old
furniture are often found in neighborhoods and remote areas of the
community.
Residents can do their part by disposing of trash the proper way using
one of these options.
All County residents can:
* Visit a Home Chemical Center for the legal and safe disposal of
household chemicals like paints, pesticides, solvents, fluorescent
bulbs and used electronic waste.
Miami-Dade County Solid Waste customers can:
* Schedule a bulky waste pickup. Call 3-1-1 or go online at
www.miamidade.gov/dswm.
* Visit a Neighborhood Trash & Recycling Center for disposal of
household trash and yard debris.
If you live in a city, contact your municipal solid waste or public works
department for disposal options.
For more information, visit www.miamidade.gov/dswm.
To report illegal dumping, call 3-1-1.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I'4 I IIL IvMlsI I ivv IIbIL.r, r AUUUJIy .U SU

Jennifer Hudson gives birth to baby boy


Singer/Actress Jennifer Hud-
son reportedly gave birth to a
baby boy on Monday night. Ac-
cording to The Hollywood Re-
porter, David Daniel Otunga,
Jr., named after the Oscar-
winning actress/ singer's fi-
ancee, came in at 7 pounds,
14 ounces.
Hudson has not publicly
announced her pregnancy
and, when reached for com-
ment on the reported birth on
Tuesday (August 11), a rep-
resentative for her label said
he, too, could not, confirm
the pregnancy or birth. Ru-
mors be hanh tn circulate that


she was expecting earlier this
year when she appeared to
be showing on her inaugural
tour of the U.S.
The Reporter said that the
proud parents did not find
out the sex of the baby in ad-
* vance, so they were prepared
.with pink and blue clothes
just in case. Hudson report-
edly prepared for the birth
with a baby shower in her na-
tive Chicago in May. Hudson
appeared visibly pregnant last
month when she performed
at the memorial service for
the late Michael Jackson.
A possible reason for the


silence, the Reporter specu-
lated, was partially due to a
desire for privacy, but also
perhaps superstition in the
wake of the family tragedy she
suffered in October, when her
mother, brother and nephe\\
were murdered in Chicago The
child was reportedly conceded
a short time after the -murders
The estranged husband ol
Hudson's sister, Will:am Bal-
four, has been charged in
the murders and is await -
ing trial.,
Jennifer Hudson ,


- . 0 mm 4 � m4b* o b * bIma
- . is~m0 ob- 4* m o 4p-t�
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SCopyrighted Material-



f Syndicated Content



Available.from Commercial News Providers


Trial date set for lawsuit against Freeman


The woman suing Oscar-winning
actor Morgan Freeman over a 2008
car wreck gets her day in court next
year.
Demaris L. Meyer sued Free-
man last February, saying it was
his fault when her car - driven
by Freeman - left the road and
flipped several times near his Mis-
sissippi Delta home on the night of
Aug. 3, 2008. Freeman denies he
was at fault and has said Meyer as-
sumed the risk when she got into
the vehicle.


Meyer, of Memphis, and 'reeman
were seriously injured.
A case management order for the
Northern District of Mississippi set
the case for trial on Aug. 9, 2010,
before Chief Judge Michael P. Mills
in Oxford.
Freeman, 72, won .an Oscar for
his performance in 2004's Million
Dollar Baby and co-starred in last
summer's The Dark Knight. His
screen credits also include Bruce
Almighty,The Shawshank Redemp-
,tion and Driving Miss Dais'.


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Support shelter pets.

Donate online!
The Miami-Dade County Animal Services Trust is now accepting donations on
the web. Your tax-deductible gift helps us to:
* Provide toys, beds and sweaters for cold weather and more!
* Reunite shelter pets with their owners or find them new homes.
* Develop spay/neuter programs.
* Work with over 50 rescue partners to help save as many animals
as possible.
Donating online is secure, convenient and a great way to lend a helping hand.
To donate online, go to www.miamidade.gov or call 3-1-1
for information on other ways to help.


THE REGGAE EVENT OF THE YEAR!


IAR T14F MIAMI TIMR AlIGINT 19-2.9� 2009


I


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NVI AYISYEN

II A I - I A K I I"^


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F E I N MI A MI


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


I 15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


Artist releases sophomore album


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

World renowned saxophonist
Jowee Omicil entertained a crowd
of Haitians, Haitian-Americans
band Americans at the "Haitian
PDiaspora Unity Congress" sev-
eral weeks ago. Now the talented
artist is set to release his second
album called Roots & Grooves.
The album release party will be
eld at the Little Haiti Cultural
complex, from 6 -9 p.m., Satur-
ay, August 29 with admission
by invitation only.
"This album is my favorite
because this is where I am,"
said Omicil. "It has a different
sound which comes from a fresh
place."
Inspired by the late Ameri-
can jazz composer Miles Davis,
Oinicil, 31, featured artists from
around the globe on his new al-
bum; which included Grammy
Award-winning artist Lionel
Loueke (Benin), Downbeat mag-
azine Poll winner- Jeremy Pelt
(USA), jazz drummer Francisco
Mela (Cuba), musician Mawuena
Kodjovi (Togo), artist Kona Kha-
su (Liberia), singer Emeline Mi-
chel (Haiti), artist Val- Inc (Haiti),
singer Nedelka (Panama) and


bassist Patrick Andriantsialoni-
na (Madagascar).
"The album speaks for itself,"
he said. "I meditated a lot in
searching for a sound for the al-
bum."
At 15, the Montreal, Canada
native began playing the Alto
Saxophone in his father's church.
Three years later, Omicil was ac-
cepted to Berklee College of Mu-
sic in Boston and majored in
Music Education. Berklee intro-
duced him to his mentor, Kenny
Garrett, and helped him develop
in his talent to share, a stage with.
greats that include Branford
Marsalis, Richard Bona, Mike.
Stern, Marcus Miller, Pharoah
Sanders, Jeff Tain Wafts, Wyclef
Jean.and Marlon Saunders.
Omicil also served as Musi-
cal Director Assistant at Greater
Love Tabernacle.
Although he loved the church,
he furthered his education and
enrolled in the Thelonius Monk
Institute. He was among 20
"hand-picked" from across the
nation to be later featured on
BET Jazz.
After years of producing and
composing, Omicil released his
first album; Let's Do This, in
2006.


".


OMICIL takes the Jazz

world by storm


FANM plea for the release of Haitians


The Miami Times Staff Report

In a letter addressed to Secre-
tary Napolitano, Marleine Bas-
tien, Executive Director of Fanm
Ayisyenn Miyami (FANM) / Hai-
tian Women of Miami, requested
the release of Chandeline Leon-
ard and Lucsene Augustin, a
couple who have been detained at
the Broward Transitional Center
(BTC) in Pompano Beach since
May 14, when their boat cap-
sized off Palm Beach County wa-
ters. The couple's eight-month-
old; daughter, Luana Augustin,
drowned after the boat capsized.
Almost three months later, little
Luana's lifeless body lies in the
Palm Beach County Morgue
waiting to be laid to rest.
FANM held a press conference


at the Jacque Dessaline Center
in Little Haiti last week to ad-
dress these coricerns and urge
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity to immediately fix this prob-
lem by releasing Leonard arid
Augustin.
"These parents are in need of
immediate intervention in order
to deal with the trauma of los-
ing their baby girl," she said in
a statement. "Thus, as a matter
of human decency, they should
have been released in order to
bury their little baby girl, to deal
with their immigration cases,
and in order to be with their fam-
ily and friends who are prepared
to support them as they begin
the necessary healing process."
.According to FANM, Immigra-
tion and Customs Enforcement


(ICE) along with DHS have failed
to respond to the humanitar-
ian parole request filed in June
2009.
"As a matter of human decency,.
they should have been released
to bury their child," said Bastien
on Tuesday. "They haven't been
able to sleep. They have night-
mares about their baby dying
every night."
Baby Luana and three un-
identified women, who also did
not survive the boat capsizing in
May; remain in the Palm Beach
County Morgue. Unfortunately,
time has run out and the morgue
is being pressured to dispose of
the four bodies without proper
burial.
FANM was founded in '1991
to help immigrant women and


o.


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their family gain access to re-
sources to aid them to progress
in the country. The program has
helped women start their own


business in the community and
assisted them in making the
transition to the new social real-
ity in America.


SIDNEY CHARLES

Charles, political

trailblazer, dies

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The Haitian community is sad-
dened by the death of long-time North
Miami activist Sidney Charles.
After an intense battle with can-
cer, Charles, 54, died Saturday, Au-
gust 8.
"He was a'generous person and
will truly be missed," said long-time
friend Anita Pittman.
Charles, a Haitian-American, be-
gan his education at St. Francis
Xavier Catholic Elementary School
in Nassau, Bahamas and A.F. Ad-
derly High School, in Nassau, Baha-
mas. He furthered his studies with a
La Salle University correspondence
in Chicago, Ill. During. this corre-
spondence he studied psychology
and American History.
A father of four, Charles came to
South Florida and built a name for
himself without forgetting those who
were dear to him.
"Family was extremely important
to him," said daughter, Terica. "He
had a passion for change in his com-
munity that's why he was involved
in politics."
Within his 20 years in North Mi-
ami, Charles served in many posi-
tions, including: board member of
the Mayor Economic Task Force,
Police Department Commurury Liai-
son, Insurance Advisory Committee
Board Member, Miami-Dade County
Community Relations and Black Af-
fairs Board, former State Sen. Wil-
liam Turner's Community Liaison
and former U.S. Sen. Connie Mack
Round Table Advisory Committee
Member.
North Miami Councilman Scott
Galvin, who served as Charles's cam-
paign manager when he ran for City
Council, described Charles as a trail-
blazer for many.
Charles was. "the first-ever Haitian-
American candidate in North Miami's
history to run citywide," said Galvin.
. Charles did not win the 1993 City
Council election, but since then,
many Haitians have climbed North
Miami's political ladder including Joe
Celestin(city's first Haitiafi-American
mayor), Jacques Despinosse (former
Councilman), Marie Erlande-Steril
(Councilman), Jean Monestime (for-
mer Councilman) and Andre Pierre
(newly-elected.mayor).
This past May, Charles along
with, Gustavo Cuervo-Rubio III, De-
spinosse, Beverly Hilton, Pierre and
Frank Wolland campaigned to be-
come the second Haitian mayor in
, North Miami.
Pierre defeated all six 'candidates
but Charles remained a community
activist.
"He wanted to make a difference,"
said Terica.
Charles is survived by his four
children, Dave Beckford, Terica, Sid-
ney Jr. and Joshua.
Attended by family and friends, a
funeral service was held for Charles
last Saturday at the St. Bartho-
lomew Catholic Church in Miramar
Parkway.

Fourth Annual Health
Expo at Emmanuel
Haitian Baptist Church
Miami-Dade County in part-
nership with the Alliance for Ag-
ing will host the Fourth Annual
Elders Community Health and
Resources Fair Expo at the Em-
manuel Haitian Baptist Church,
located at 7321 Northeast Second
Avenue, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. on
August 20.
The community health and re-
source fair will feature free health
screenings, blood pressure and
glucose screenings, health in-
surance enrollment, diabetes
education, glaucoma and cata-
ract screenings, medication and
substance abuse counseling, low
impact fitness activities, osteopo-
rosis screenings, as well as other
free resources and friends."








The Miami Times



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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\WN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


Archdiocese of Miami to close 13 churches


The Miami Times StaffReport ,

In a letter written by the
Archbishop John C. Favalora
in May, he explained that he
would soon have to difficult
decisions that included that
merging of parishes as a result
of economic downturn.
: With over 100 Catholic
churches in Miami-Dade, Bro-
ward and Monroe, pastors
across South Florida had to


read another letter, written by
Favalora, to their parishioners
on Sunday that would confirm
all suspicions--13 churches
would close as early as Oct. 1.
Most of the churches, which
include Overtown's St. Francis
Xavier and Bunche Park's St.
Philip, are in the Black com-
munity.
The Archbishop is encourag-
ing parishioners to merge with
nearby parishes.


"I know that this decision is a
disappointment to the parish-
ioners of merging parishes. It
also is a very difficult decision
for me," the Archbishop stated
in his letter. "The teaching of
the Catholic faith, the preach-
ing of the Gospel, the celebra-
tion of the sacraments and the
life of charity are yours at your
new parishes," the Archbishop
said.


of you my prayers during this
difficult time. Through His
passion and death, the Lord
Jesus redeemed the world.and
by, his resurrection brought
the assurance of eternal life
to those who believe in him.
In a sense, you are now being
asked to share in the suffer-
ings of Christ, but you will also
experience new life as you con-
tinue the life of grace at your


Pre-Appreciation Service


We the members of Mt. Vernon
MBC invite you to come and join
us in our Pre-Appreciation Ser-
vice for our pastor leadership of
18 years.
Reverend Dr. G. Bernard Pope


and Bethel MBC of Dania, Flor-
ida will sender service on Sun-
day, August 23 at 4 p.m.
If further information is need-
ed please contact church at 305-
754-5300 or 305-824-4779.


He continued.. "I assure each new parishes."


Church leaders speak out against greed
(GIN) - Protestant churches cil's commitment to planting one selves and their cronies land.in
in Kenya are warning that greed million trees each year as the our water towers," said Karanja.
is destroying the country's envi- Kenyan government unveiled a At same time, Kenya's newly
ronment, bringing drought, fam- power rationing program for the elected Anglican Archbishop
ine, hunger, malnutrition and forthcoming three months. Eliud Wabukala, in an August
general scarcity. The country has been ration- pastoral letter confessed that
"We are today reaping the fruits ing water due to falling vol- human beings had not always
(of) greed and imprudence sowed umes in dams. This, according allowed the earth and its crea-
in the past," said the Rev. Peter to Karanja, has rendered many tures to flourish.
Karanja, of the National Council businesses useless. "We have too often abused and
of Churches on Aug. 6. He urged "We are incensed ... this out- brought death to the land. We
citizens in the east African coun- come is borne by the politicians confess that we, especially as
try to adopt tree planting as an and political appointees who, be- churches, have often been indif-
act of religious and social resto- cause of greed built on a culture ferent to environmental degra-
ration. >' of impunity, deliberately con- dation and that, as a result, we
Karanja, an Anglican priest, REV. PETER KARANJA tinue to destroy our country's have participated in the destruc-
announced the church coun- National Council of Churches environment by allocating them- tion," said Wabukala. ,


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


& K


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
Wid lri.v'ev'ry Provao
MWll (,.rl II a I
Sun b ,wui,-h,V 7.0p T,,
Tu-, Pid)y. Mwing 130 .
F BbP Siudv P 30 p ,n




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
Order of Services
Sv',day, MoC''.n SeVt;..(
bndo Sihuul Q 45 orr
,B.i~bltMi dy tuesday
Prova Mttla] Tue i bDm


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


'MSNIMA IIII II


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr Marlin lulher King, Jr. Blvd.










St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
slday 31}) and I mI Ct
WiiJip Shhp ernl
9 30 onam Sunday Suhool
lue day i prj a 8p .1 Study
8 p '. Prdayer me lt9




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
ifMliWi$rlliminfllilllB fM!,'i
- Order of Services
S, .d.,iy Sh .l' 44 V,.a
l 'i MiMWiAllj'wrr, II a w
Tu, day , .blrIlldy
I [Fi dni, m ,.' ry u s.7'
Wed hible Judy. l"wyr. 6 l pm
Thur; Ouiuahl , M.i',r, 6" tl Uprr
Rev Dr. le *ry Deeau


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue * Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday Bible Study 9 a m. * Morning Worship 10 a.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.


im.


Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS Comcoat 3 * Saturday- 7:30 a.m.
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Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 IYl. 121h Ay.

- Order of Services


Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.


Order of Services
and il noabid
, I h hop I ow
I (or 1313


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


M5-81-30


Order of Services
SUNDAY Worsh.p Ser~n
/1 0 ll am
(hunh ihool 9 30l am
wEDRiSrAY
Fednig Minsry I? noon
Bile Sidy I p m


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129'N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services
Su'd>y 9thool 9 3 i i
hom.rn rm..e,\Vorst'.p II a ,i
fi.v and l6.d Sunday
e.ri, g wnOrM hp al A p .
P'.y' My eT.ng 8hie Stiu dy
un.day I p a


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
Afl54 n m


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700 �
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


B*isho Vctr.Crr . . ,, eio Pa.


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Services
TU,'dly ',1,,Tudy Wor
Supojgy ,li,)r,1ja, q 45 a -T,
Ihu.,d y v ,bl y l � ,
, I -euI V


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
u,,dI 5.. ' ol 9 l i T,

. ul' ,nr Warhip p inp
Md War lervna . day m
. rhoir ,ide,'rsrj rh,,'day


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W.

S " o ervies'
I', Sunday Sihool 45 a ,,-i
I * Worh p I o'11
Brble Siudy friday / 30 p m
dy Shoih Min.iry
S Mn .Wed 6 pm




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

, Order of Services
toly Sunday Wi .hrii p 6 ip 30arrm
Sunday Sd, ol 9 3i0 am
Sunday Momng Wor.hip II a in
Su,'day ivi n,',, t +r,,e tpm
, lueday Prwoyl r Mw TaI.i1 ppm.T,
SIWedJneday Bibl Siudy 1 3D p mn



Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Surida Mo ,rr'. Ser.'.r
Sumin y i, ho ,l lila m
i Wui"..hS rie 11 a IT.
iuesday B.blIruidy 8pm
.t .huri Pr yo.n ,ei
Pasto Coll e Carper


I - . *


Liberty City Church
of Christ


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue

I Order of Services
Sunday 1730 1 a lm
Sunday $Shool 10 a. m
nu Ilay 7pm Bible
, Study P y, u Mt.ng B I U
,'86pir...T h ,ur, bel'ir
ihrl Sun r pm



Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services
h unh-Suidav Shool 830 o m
Sunday Wor.i.p Serne 10 am
MlW.,weel.Senice Wedle dia,
Hour0 olP0u8,eroonDayProyer
12 pam.1 pm
Iveoang Worship I p m



New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org

Order of Services
[[aty Mo ,,ag worshi 7 30, an
Suni (hurrh Shl 9 30 am
o' Muamnq Woorhp Ia a
lue day B.bl. ar ip m
ue. o, before the lti
Son Ipm
Rev DL.Poel


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
im2330 N.W. 93rd Street

i - Order of Services


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court


AND HE SAID UNTO THEM, GO YE

TOHE \VORLD,
, .1 :. .' ,-ti .+&'.-i. fi.'--:.:- .* '.,,, a sS S SSa ~ i S


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street


ML ------- am
Pastor Douglas


X- -
Rev. Woodrow C. Jenkins, Jr.










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


Keep your dance in the midst of adversity


How many times have you
heard an awesome, anointed,
encouraging message tnlat got
you excited and ready to go
home and kick some devil butt?!
When we listen to the preacher,
and sing along with the praise
team, and shout out loud on the
way home with the gospel CD,
we are totally inspired to let the
devil and his little imps know
that we are not going to be beat-
en up nor beaten down by his
dirty ways. We come home from
church or from that worship
service and conference ready to
battle. Hey, it's just us and the


Lord against
the world! But
that Monday
morning, it's
back to the
. work -place,
and ybur desk
is piled high
with memos
and phone messages. Your co-
worker has just prepared a re-
port based on notes that he
read on your desk, and the boss
thinks that he is a genius!
Later that day, you get a call
from the bank informing you
that they cannot extend the due


date on your loan payment any
longer, and you must pay your
back mortgage or risk foreclo-
sure. You have to put them on
hold because your kid's school
is calling to tell you to pick up
your son and daughter. One is
involved in a fight, and the oth-
er is sick. Your husband texts
you that he is 'working' late
once again. What happened to
that 'high' feeling you were ex-
periencing all day yesterday?
What happened to that 'Xena
warrior' attitude? Where is that
'demon stomping' dance you
were practicing yesterday in
the mirror? And where are the
praise songs that were on your
lips all the way into work just
this morning? Well, you know
what happened? People is what
happened! People always man-
age to ruin your good spirit!
This is nothing new. When
Moses spent those forty days on
the mountaintop with God, his


feet had barely touched ground,
when he saw the PEOPLE danc-
ing and worshipping a golden
calf. That's right - a calf! An in-
animate object! They were wor-
shipping something that could
not talk, could not walk, could
not hear, and could not do a
darn thing for them. Imagine
how upset Moses was. Here he
had spent these last forty days
basking in, the presence of the
Almighty God. Can you even
imagine how awesome an ex-
perience that was?! The Bible
says that Moses was so satu-
rated with the glory of God that
he had to wear a covering for
his face because he was literally
aglow. Wow! And then the first
thing that he sees when he re- ,
turns is this display of idolatry
and perverseness. The people
were also engaging in drunken,
lewd activity.. (Read Exodus
32). Moses was doing just fine
until he saw - the people.


In ExOdus 20, the Israelites
had made camp, and there was
no water for them. They became
angry and irritable with Moses
and his brother Aaron. God'
told Moses to speak to a rock
and water would come forth for
the thirsty travelers. Moses and
Aaron assembled the group, but
Moses became angry and frus-
trated with all of their whining
and complaining, and instead of
speaking to the rock, he struck
it twice. Now this caused God to
become angry with Moses, and
he was punished for his disobe-
dience. Moses was not allowed
to enter the Promised Land.
Why did Moses act so reck-
lessly and without regard for
God's instruction? The people
drove him crazy These whin-
ing, complaining, disrespectful,
unappreciative people were just
too much for this mighty man
of God.
We can allow people to cause


us to miss or delay our bless-
ings.. Notice I didn't say that
the people will cause this, but
we can allow the people to cause
this. It is entirely our choice if
we allow the acts of others to
influence how we worship and
stay focused on the Lord and
His precious promises. Being,
harassed or aggravated is no
fun, and even the best and most
patient of us can become none
too kindhearted or loving. But
take a moment to step back,
and away from the situation
and toward God. The same God
whose presence and anointing
comforted and encouraged you
on Sunday is still with you to-
day. In fact, dqn't just inhale
His holiness yourself but offer
some of the fragrance of His
peace and love to your boss, co-
worker, bank manager, princi-
pal, spouse and kids. We could
all use an influx of the Glory
Cloud of Christ!


Miami-Dade County District
2 Commissioner will hold a com-
munity meeting to discuss ques-
tions or concerns about Miami-
Dade County's proposed 2009-
10 budget at the New Shiloh
Missionary Baptist Church be-
ginning at 6 p.m., Wednesday,
August 19. Commissioner Rolle's
office at 305-375-4833.


Miami-Dade County in part-
nership with the Alliance for Ag-
ing will host the Fourth Annual
Elders Community Health and
Resources Fair Expo at the Em-
manuel- Haitian Baptist Church
from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. on August
20.

******** *
Coconut Creek Elementary
School will host their annual


.hurch
their
ae cel-,
t 7:30
e cele-


Second Corinth M.B. C
invites you to celebrate
pastoral anniversary. Th
ebration will be held a
p.m., Aug. 20 and 21. Th
bration will climax at 3:30
Sunday, Aug. 23 at the G
Holy Cross M.B. Church
691-4564.


Hurst Chapel A.M.E.
you to their summer rev
7:30 p.m., Aug., 20-21.
817-6211.


New St. John Institu
Baptist Church will be
their 10t annual gala
"Things Are Cooking Ove
at the Jungle Island, 6:30
Friday, August 21. 30'
0682.


********Emmanuel M.B. Church will
Emmanuel M.B. Church will


Parent Resource Fair from 11
a.m.-2 p.m., Friday, August 21.
www.browardschools.com


Miami Central Sr. High
School will host a school pic-
nic and a. meet and greet for all
parents, teachers, students and
community members, from 9
a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 22.
305-696-4161.

******** *
Partners for Self Employ-
ment Inc. presents a free work-
shop by Mikhail Hutton (Certi-
fied Business Consultant) for
starting your own small busi-
ness, from 10:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m., August 22. 305-438-1407
ext. 215 or email: cornell@part-
nersforselfemployment.com


be celebrating their mission an-
niversary at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
Aug. 21 and 3 p.m.; Aug. 23.
305-696-6545.


) p.m., ********
greater The Presbyterian Women in-
1. 305- vite you to attend their Women
Racial Ethnic' Dialogue to be,
held at All Nations Presbyterian
Church, from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.,
invites August 22.'
ival at
786- ********
Zion Hope Missionary Bap-
tist Church will have a choir/
usher anniversary to be held at
itional 4 p.m., Aug. 23. 305-635-3703.
having
called ********
rtown" Mt. Vernon MBC invites you
D p.m., to come and join them for their
5-372- pre-appreciation service at 4
p.m., Sunday, Aug. 23. 305-
754-5300.


The City of North Miami
Beach will hold a Budget Work-
shop for FY 2010 at the McDon-
ald Center at 6 p.m., Tuesday,
Aug. 25. 305-948-2900.


Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's Office will have a Sealing
and Expungement at the Igle-
sia Jesucristo El Todo Poderoso
Church, from 5-10 p.m. (Doors
close at 10:00 PM), Tuesday,
August 25. . Office Community
Outreach Division at 305-547-
0724.


The Family Foundation, Inc.
will have their 18t Annual AIDS
Benefit Banquet at the Embassy
Suites at 6:30 p.m., Saturday,
Aug. 29. 305- 978-7100.


Miami Edison Senior High
School Class of 1989 will. cel-
ebrate their 20th reunion Sept.
4-6. Email: redraidersclas-
sofl989@gmail.com.


Jordan Grove will render a
service Friday, August 21 at
Second Chance Baptist Church
and 93r Street Baptist Church
will be the guest for the pastor's
aide at 3 p.m., Sunday, August
23. 305-751-9323.


Ebenezer United Methodist
Church is celebrating its 111th
church anniversary at 11 a.m.,
Sunday, August 30.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invite the com-
munity to their weekly services
on Sunday at 11:15 a.m. and
Bible classes on Thursday night
weekly at 7 p.m.


Faith Christian Center will
celebrate 25 years of ministry,
7:30 p.m. nightly, October 18-
24. Culmination service will
take place at the Doubletree
Hotel at Miami Airport, 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Oct. 24. Church of-
fite, 305-253-6814.
Note: Calendar items must be
submitted before 3:30 p.m. on
Monday.


Older binge drinkers face problems


By Erin Thompson

Binge drinking has become
nearly synonymous with col-
lege students, but a study out
today shows a significant, wor-
risome level of binge drinking
among those age 50 to 64 as
well.
Working with the Nation-
al Survey on Drug Use and
Health, Duke University re-
searchers report that 22% of
men and 9% of women ages 50
to 64 engaged in binge drinking
- five or more drinks at a time
- within the past month of the
survey. The research, based on
a survey of 11,000 men and
women that took place in 2005
and 2006, is reported today in
the American Journal of Psy-
chiatry.
The survey also found that
19% of the men and 13% of the
women had two or more drinks
a day, considered heavy or "at-
risk" drinking under American
Geriatric Society guidelines for


older people.
Dan Blazer, the study's lead
author and a professor of psy-
chiatry and - behavioral sci-
ence at Duke, says that level of
drinking places the older group
at more of a health risk than
younger counterparts. *
"They don't metabolize alco-
hol as quickly, they may be on
medications, or they may have
some health problems that al-
cohol may contribute to," Blaz-
er says. "On average, if a young
person drinks five beers and an
older person drinks five beers,
the older person is almost cer-
tainly going to have more dif-
ficulty."
The survey also found binge
drinking in those over 65: 14/"%
of men and 3% of women.
In the past, binge drinking
has been overlooked by physi-
cians as a health risk because
they have been focused on the
excessive drinking of young
people. But adults in the Baby
Boomer generation could be


putting themselves at a greater
risk of more serious problems
such as stroke, cardiovascular
disease, liver disease, neuro-
logical damage and poor diabe-
tes control, the Duke research
says.
"We typically think of binge
drinking as something that oc-
. curs with young people such as
college students, and here we
have examples of older closet
drinkers," Blazer says. "Because
we don't expect older people to
binge-drink, this can be missed
by a person's doctor because
they are not asking."
The nationally representative
study, Blazer says, also found
that people don't tend to change
such behavior as they get older.
"We may see' some younger
people's patterns continue and
become even more problem-
atic," he says. "You may think
that you are more tolerant 'and
your health is just as good or
better than it was 20 or 30
years ago, but it's not."


Miami-Dade Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners encourages
residents to attend the Septem-
ber Budget Hearings at the BCC
Chambers on the second floor
to hear citizen's concerns about
County cuts. The first bud-
get hearing will be held at 5:01
p.m., Sept. 3 and the second
budget hearing will be at 5:01
p.m., Sept. 17.


The University Galleries in
Florida Atlantic University's
Dorothy F. Schmidt College of
Arts and Letters will present an
exhibition of works from Satur-
day, Sept. 12 through Saturday,
Oct. 31 in both the Schmidt
Center Gallery and the Ritter
Art Gallery on FAU's Boca Raton
campus. 561-297-2595.

**** **** *
Women in Transition's next
Computer Skills Training Class
will begin on Tuesday, Sept. 8.
305-757-0715.


Miami Children's Museum
(MCM), will celebrate its. sixth
birthday with the MCM Family
Carnival at the Watson Island,
1 to 6 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 13.
305-373-5437 ext. 156 or visit
www. miamichildrensmuseum.
* org.

* ********
The City of Coral Gables will
offer an American Heart Asso-
ciation CPR certification course
for those interested in knowing
how to perform life-saving, skills
beginning Monday, Sept. 14.
Subsequent classes will be of-
fered the first Monday of each
month, from 9 a.m. until noon,'
at Fire Station' 3 located in Coral
Gables. Laura Rodriguez, Coral
Gables Fire Department Public
Education' Specialist at 305-
460-5576 or via e-mail at Irodri-
guez2@coralgables.com.

* ****** **
Booker T. Washington Sr.
High Class of 1965 will conduct


a meeting at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center, from
4-5:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 19.
305-621-6412.


South Florida Workforce
(SFW) will be host a Training
Expo at the Miami Beach Con-
vention Center, from 9 a.m. - 4
p.m., September 24.



The City of Miramar is host-
ing a community Arts and Craft
Fair at the Miramar Multi-Ser-
vice Complex on Oct. 3. 954-
889-2744.

*********
Miami Northwestern : Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010 Re-
union., Classmates are urged to
reconnect through the contact
information listed below, provid-
ing your address, phone, cell &
email.
321-733-0958 or 305-299-
5549, reunion6t5@cfl.rr.com


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19B THE MIAMI TIMES. AUGUST 19-25. 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Eric S.Georg


Genesis "
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CANO,
46, carpet in-
staller, died Au-
gust 9 at home.
Service 4 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.



IVY WILLIAMSON, 84, nurse's
aide, died Au- i
gust 7 at Me-
morial Regional
Hospital. View-
ing
9 a.m., Satur-
day. Service 10
a.m., Saturday
in the Chapel t

KEITH TYRONE BROWN, 42,
forklift operator, -v'-
died August 12
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Viewing 5 p.m., ,
Friday. Service .
12 p.m., Sat- 3
urday, Jordan
Grove Church.

ESMILDA BARONA, 90, teach-
er, died August
14 at home..
Viewing 4 p.m.,
Tuesday. Ser-
vice 8 p.m.,
Tuesday in the
chapel.


JOHNNY MARTIN, 60, delivery,
died. August 14
at Holy Cross
Hospital.View-
ing 5 p.m., Fri-
day. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.


MIQUEL AMADOR, 71, factory
workeF, died August 14 at Kendal
Regional Hospital.
Service was held.

AUGUSTINE FARIA, 80, cus-
tomer service. died August 14 at
North Shore Hospital. Service 11
a.m., Friday in the chapel.

ROBERT EVANS,73, graphic
designer, died August 15 at home.
Service was held.

ERASMO HERNANDEZ, 83,
mechanic, died August11 at home.
Service was held.

JIRINA THOMAS, 86, home-
maker, died August 14 at home.
Service was held.

PATRICIA ASCHENDORF, 61,
bookkeeper, died August 8 at Im-
perial Point Hospital. Service was
held.

DAVID FELTNER, 51, demon-
strator, died August 10 at Kindred
Care Hollywood. Service was held.

JULIO FRANCISO FORTEZ DA
LUZ, 49, baker, died August 10 at
North Shore Hospital.
Viewing 11 a.m., Sunday. Service
3 p.m., Sunday in the chapel.n

HEATHER BETTER, 24, nursing
assistant, died August 9 at home.
Service was held.6

ALISON LARSEN, 52, data en-
try, died July 25 at home. Service
was held.

JOSE LUIS MORALES SR., 49,
roofing, died August 8 at home.
Service was held.

JAMES RICHARD LONG, 65,
restaurant owner, died August 11
at Miami VA Hospital. Service was
held.

VIVIAN HERNADEZ, 30, res-
ervation agent, died .August 11 at
Plantation General Hospital.
Viewing 11 a.m., Saturday. Ser-
vice 12 p.m., Saturday, Sunset
Presbyterian Church.,

EILLEEN HALLENBERG, 65,
died August 15 at home.Viewing 10
a.m., Wednesday. Service 11a.m.,
Wednesday, The Church of Ascen-
sion, Miami.


Dwight's
BARRY ELLIS, 52, truck driver,
died August 11 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Service 10 a.m.,
Wednesday (today), Lively Stones
of Jesus.


DIEULEVOI JEAN LOUIS, 53,
died August 16 at home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Richardson�-?,
BARBARA HARTLEY, 69, aide,
died August 15. Service was held.


I


Grace ~A Happy Birthday
DORIS L. BARTON, 86, house- In loving memory of,
wife, died Au-
gust 7 at Me-
morial Regional
South Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Sunday, North .
Miami Seven-
Day Adv6ntist
Church.


HAROLD MITCHELL, 78, died
August 13, Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Thursday, Holy
Family Episco-
pal Church.




LORENZO 0. FELIX, 42, sales-
man, died August 8 at Memorial
Regional Hospital. Service was
held.

ARMENTHA D. BROWN, home-
maker, died August 17 at North
Shore Medical Center. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

CORA MOORE, died August 17
at Hospice by the Sea. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.
Paradise
SUJAYE EVERTON HENRY, 26,
died August 11. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Faith Christian Center.

ALLAN JENKINS, 68, died Au-
gust 11 at South Miami Hospital.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Second
Baptist, Richmond Heights.

Wright and Young
JAMES WESLEY CRAW-
FORD,73, truck
driver, died Au-
gust 13 atAven-
tura Vitas. Sur-
vivors include:
children, John,
Gloria, Doretha,
Sandra, Gwen-
dolyn, Darrius
and Moses Crawford. Service 10
a.m., Friday, in the chapel.

WILLIE MAE HOLIDAY, 66, died
August 16 at
Jackson Memo-
rial North. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Alfon-
so Holiday; son,
Dondrill Epps;
daughters Cyn-
thia Snead and
Denise Dailey. Services 11 a. i.,
Saturday, in the chapel.

Royal
SAMUEL FERGUSON, 47, pro-
moter and pro-
duction compa-
ny owner, died
August 14. Visi-
tation 4-9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
12 p.m., Satur-
day, New Jeru-
salem Primitive
Baptist Church.

THERESA WEST, 56, home-
maker, died Au-
gust 16. Visita-
tion . 4-9 p.m.,
Friday. Service a,
12 p.m., Sat-
urday, Antioch
Missionary Bap-
tist Church . of
Carol City.

CHRISTOPHER BUSH, 58,
baker, died August 14. Final rites
and burial Richmornn Hill, GA.
KENT 'SMITH, 46, mason, died
August 9. Final rites and burial
North Caicos, Turks.

GLADYS LIVINGSTON, 86,
housewife, died August 11. Visi-
tation 4-8 p.m., Saturday. Service
2 p.m., Sunday, Opa-Locka Sev-
enth-Day Church.

ELFREDA WRIGHT, 76, home-
maker, died August 4. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


St. Fort's
VIOLETTE ANTOINE LOUIS,
died August 14 at Sinai Plaza. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Friday, Notre Dame
D'Haiti Catholic Church.

WOILNES" ANTOINE, 72, died
August 2 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Arrangements are in-


LENDEL JOSHUA MORIS-
SAINT, 20, died August 14 at Jack-
son North Medical Center. Service
was held.


CLAUDINE ASHE, 63, domes-
tic, died August 15, Arrangements
are incomplete.

Hall Ferguson Hewitt
WILLIE LEE PARKER, 99,
housekeeper,
died August 15
at home. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




Scurry
JOSIE THORNTON, 82, Miami
Dade College, employee, died
August 12. Visitation 6-9 p.m., Fri-
day., Church of Christ Deliverance,
4215 S. W. 19 Street, Hollywood.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Ca-
thedral of Praise Worship Center,
4035 S.W. 18, Street, Hollywood.

Poitier
SHANITRA WATTS, 26, security
guard, died Au-
gust 11 at North
Sore Medical
Center. Service
12 p.m., Satur-
day, Mt. Carmel
M.B.C.



-SAMUEL COLLINS, 76, solid
waste employ-
ee, died August
12 at home.
Service 3 p.m.,
.Saturday in the
chapel.




PATRICIA MACIAS, 53, nurse's
aide, died August 15 at North
Shore Medical Center. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Historic Mt. Zion
M.B.C.


Care, Royal Ram'n
PATRICIA "PAT" ROGERS
CARTER, 58, pharmacy tech.,
died August 8
at Our Lady Of
Perpetual Care.
Home, GA.
Service 11 a.m,
Saturday in the
chapel.


BEATRICE VALDES, 77, home-
maker, died August 11 at Jackson-
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

Hadley Davis
WAYNE HOPKINS, 56, clerk,
died August 11 .
atJacksongNorth 7 t i t
Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Shawn,
Charquilla,
Wayneshia, Ter-
rica and Stare-
tha; sons, Altera, Derorndell and
Wayne Jr.; mother, Lossie Spann;
father, James Spann. Service 11
a.m, Saturday in the chapel.

DON EVERRETT SAUNDERS,
44, died Augus)t 4 at Osceola Re-
gional Medical Center. Service
was held.

FRANCES LOUISE WILSON,
52, died July 29 at Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital. Service was held.

EDDIED MAE DICKERSON,
55, died August 7 at Jackson North
Hospital. Service was held.

Manker
RONDELL JERMAINE LANI-
ER, 25, died August 5 at home.
Service 3 p.m., Thursday in the
chapel.

PUBLIC NOTICE
As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and d6te,
location, and time of services. Ad-
ditional information and photo
chargeThe deadline is Monday at


COUSENS, 89,


BEULAH L. SANDERS, 93, re-
tired domestic
associate at the
Biltmore Hotel,
died August 15.
Survivors in-
clude: son, Wil-
liam Sanders
(Mary); niece,
Evelyn Jackson-
Dommon (Curtis); 18 Grandchilr
dren, and 3 Great-grandchildren
other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, New Provi-
dence Missionary Baptist Church.

CHARLIE DAVIS, 80, retired
trucker driver,
died August 12.
Survivors in-
clude: sisters,
Mary L Chest- D.
nut, Frankie
Dean and
Marion Macon;
grandchildren,
Turris Davis (Sonia), Patrick Davis
(Jennifer), Nichole Davis, Christo-
pher Davis, Michelle Davis, Shqrly
Hines (Gary), Sabrina Jackson,
Joeatha Davis; 27 Great-grand-
children and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and friends.
Service 2 p.m., Saturday, in the
chapel.

VETA MAUD BARTLEY, 87,
homemaker died August 6. Ser-
vice 10a.m., Saturday, Grace
United Methodist Church.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


FRANK W. COOPER
08/21/34 - 03/08/09

Forever in our hearts and
memories.
Missing you, your loving
wife, Ivory and family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


REDWIN WILCHCOMBE, 56,
entrepreneur,








JESSE H. CEPHUS, 66, su-
perintendent,
died August 11.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, 93rd
Community
Baptist Church.



EDAA. STEPHENS, 82, nurse's
aide, died August 15 at University
of Miami Hospital. Arrangements
are incomplete.

KIRK ANTHONY .SMITH, 33,
died August 3 at Memorial Hospi-
tal Pembroke. Service was held.

GERALD JEAN, 78, self-em-
ployed, died August 4 at Specialty
Hospital. Service was held.



Range


We Miss You!'
Your memory has become
a treasure in all our lives and
'YOU' are held' close in our
hearts.
It has been two. years since
you went away, but we will nev-
er forget you.
You are loved by your family,
brother, Charles, sisters, Katie,
Bessie, Hattie, nephews, nieces
and a host of relatives

E.A. Stevens
LARRY JAMES TUCKER, 62,
heavy duty equipment operator,
died August 7 at home. Service 1
p.m., Friday, BethelApostolic Tem-
ple, Miami.

ESTELLA LADSON, 97, home-
maker,'died August 11. Viewing
4-6 p.m., Wednesday(today), First
Baptist Bunche Park. I

REBECCA G. HARDEMON,
81, homemaker, died August 15
at Hollywood Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service 10 a.m, Satur-
day, Ebenezer Baptist Church,
Hallandale Beach.

LENORIS OWENS, 27, died
August 13 in Gainesville. Service
1 p.m., Saturday, New Jerusalem
Baptist Church, West Park.


' by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


Death Notice


ANNIE SAUNDERS, 72,
retired RN and teacher, died
August 13. Survivors include:
daughters,. Fredricka ' (Cal-
vin) and Angela; grandchil-
dren, Calvin, Erin, Timia and
Tash. Memorial 6 to 7 p.m.,
Wednesday. Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday, Glendale Baptist
Church. Arrangements en-
trusted to Mitchell Funeral
Home.
In Memoriam
In loving memory of our won-
derful mother,


ORA LANIER WILLIAMS
03/28/19 - 08/19/99


"Mother Dear", "Earth has
no sorrow, Heaven cannot heal."
Missing you more and more.
Shirley, Wendell, Henry,
Charles P. Williams and family.


Memorial service


Nancy Boyd Seward
'Fancy Nancy'


Memorial service for the late
Nancy 'Fancy Nancy' Boyd
Seward will be held 11 a.m.,
Saturday at New Birth Faith
Tabernacle C.B. Church, 1026
N.W. 8 Street, Hallandale, FL,
Minister C. J. Kelly officiating.
For those who will be remem-
bering Nancy with flowers, in
lieu of fresh cut, artificial floral
arrangements are preferred.
For additional information
please contact her daughter,
Beverly Seward, 770-853-4805.


EUGENIO J. ROBINSON
11/04/69 -08/17/07


It has been two challeng-
ing years since we've lost you.
You will be remembered and
remain in our hearts forever.
From your loving family and
friends.


3:30 p.m.


Remember to ask

your'funeral home for

your discount coqBon,,,.,.,,1..V..�.'

place your

Card of Thanks

in

The Miami Times,,



N
900 NW 54th Street.'

305-694-6229

COUpon expires in two �veek�-,


ALBERT BRYANT
07/22/40 - 08/19/07


MICHAEL E.
master gard-
ner, died August
10. Service 10
a.m., Saturday.
St. Paul A.M.E.
Church.











20B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 19-25, 2009


6w *- -w w ao______ gmm64hp
- qmw 0 WS. .U m � twom-M


I IIK S-d ,ica- TedCon ten't....



Availablefrom Commercia News. providers


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I-CK MUNTHRWNI


Death Notice


DONNELL ROBINSON, 68.
electrician, private contractor-
FPL. died August 16 at home.
Survivors include: sons.
Rodne', Tony and Donel.I Jr..
and Tabares Thomas; daugh-
ters, Kimberly and Angela: a
host of grandchildren, great
grandchildren, brothers, sis-
ters, life long companion, Ju-
lia Clara Vogt and other rela-
tives and friends.
Memorial Service will be
held on Thursday from 6-8pm
in the chapel. Final rites and
burial in Desoto, GA.
Arrangements entrusted
to Gregg L Mason Funeral
H6me.


Death Notice


f - . ---- W


Miami music

producer killed

on turnpike

The Miami Times Staff Report .

Forty-seven year-old Samuel
Ferguson was shot and killed on
Friday after someone fired shots
at his maroon Chevrolet Impala
and it crashed on the north-
bound lanes of the Turnpike
near Griffin Road. The turnpike
was completely shut down for
hours so that authorities could
investigate the scene.
Detectives reported a group of
people in a black car pulled up
beside the Ferguson's and some-
one in the black car fired shots
at the driver, who was alone in
his car.
"We have an unidentified Black
male deceased, who was traveling
northbound on the Turnpike in
the 5300 Block," explained Davie
Police Major Craig Richards. "All
I can say now is that he was shot
at multiple times. As a result, he
came to rest against the median


SAMUEL FERGUSON
in the northbound lanes."
Ferguson, a North Miami resi-
dent, was a well-known music
producer and club promoter in
the community as P-Man Sam.
He was the president of the
Don Diva Magazine, an urban
lifestyle publication which was
based in New York. Controversy
surrounded Ferguson in 2008
when he revealed that rapper
Rick Ross as being a former cor-
rections officer in Hip-Hop Week-
ly.
The rapper denied all the Fer-
guson's accusations and called
him a "liar."


Condemned Ga.

man wins hearing
By Joan Biskupic

WASHINGTON - In an excep-
tional move Monday, the Supreme
Court ordered a federal court in
Georgia to hear new testimony in
the case of Troy Davis, who was
sentenced to die for killing a po-
lice officer and whose appeal drew
international attention.
The justices said a lower-court
judge should determine whether
fresh evidence "clearly establish-
es" Davis' innocence. Since a jury
convicted him 18 years ago, sev-
en of the prosecution's key wit-
nesses have recanted their tes-
timony about what happened in
a Savannah, Ga., parking lot the
night officer Mark Allen MacPhail
was shot.
The high court rarely intervenes
in death penalty appeals at late
stages and almost never when a
condemned inmate is filing the
kind of special petition that Davis
did. Justices Antonin Scalia and
Clarence Trhorrtiis said in their


TROY DAVIS
dissent that it had been nearly
50 years since the court accepted
such a petition.
Davis' case comes amid growing
questions about the possibility of
innocent convicts on death row
and courts' treatment of evidence
that emerges after a conviction.
His claim of innocence had
won earlier support from former
president Jimmy Carter and Pope
Benedict XVI, and his latest bid
drew "friend of the court" briefs
from the NAACP and former 'con-
gressman Bob Barr, a Republican
from Georgia.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


CHARLIE PARKER, SR.
aka "Pop"
08/24/43 - 07/04/06

To some you are forgotten,
to some you are of the past.
But to us, the ones who
loved and lost you, your mem-
ories will always last.
Your wife, Mamie and fam-


PATRICIA MACIAS, 53.
nurse and corruniunity activist,
died August 15 at North Shore
Medical Center.
Survivors -include: mother,
Bernell; father, David; daugh-
ters, Tiffany and Samantha; sis-
ters, Pamela, Angela and Iris.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
The Historic Mt. Zion Baptist
Church.,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


STEVE MARSHALL
08/20/50 - 08/22/08


by becoming a member of our
Cih aafi'tato


CALL 305-69


94-6210


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, P.A.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home. that cares"
"God cares and we care"









Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL I
"1993 Mortician of the.Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


Call 305-633-0688 Licensed funeral Directors


WALVONWA d� 4NMW 0 - -ROW- -NIMMMOMP dPMW 0 - 0


i








The Miami Times


Education . empowerment


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 19-25, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES

Miami-Dade County Back-To-LSchool survival guide


Tips and resources on students' health and safety,
preparing for college and free and low-cost activities


The summer is quickly
coming to an end as classes for
2009/2010 school year begin
Monday, August 24. During
this grim economy, parents
are quickly searching for cost-
saving back-to-school bargains
for their children. Miami-Dade


County has an online guide at
www.miamidade.gov.
Some resources include:"
Health and safety
The Miami-Dade County
Health Department's Special
Immunizations Program will
be administering free back-


to-school immunizations for
children between the ages of 2
months and 18 years at various
locations.
Make sure to find the right
primary care provider for your
child, as well as information
on insurance options such as


Florida KidCare.
Do your part to make sure
your child arrives at school
safely by learning more about
the importance of car seats,
booster seats and seat belts.
The Miami-Dade Police
Department offers helpful
child safety tips for inside
and outside the home, while
Miami-Dade County Fire
Rescue provides a list to make
sure your child arrives at


school and at home safely.
Preparing for college
It's never too early to start
investing in your child's
college education. Prepay the
cost of college tuition with the
Florida Prepaid College Plan.
Tutoring
From October 3 through
May 15, experienced
educators will be .available
to help children from grades
K-12 reinforce their .school


work in a small group setting
for free. Students must bring
their school assignments,
textbooks, workbooks in
whatever subject they want
extra help on and tutors will
guide them.
Free and low-cost activities
In preparation for the new
school year, children can
receive free book bags and
school supplies prior to Aug. 24
at various locations.


NO


MEDDL


N G


CopyrightedMaterial
Copyrighted Material. -


Pa- rn* Syndicated Contentj I *
.orpf) 4 0*%OI le ft('1C np
Available from Commercial News Providers

Your chuil s teacher


]IE


Serving Students across South Florida available wherever you are! |
EM LO'EN TA *AIAOAV


Colleen Brian picked up pamphlets from the table for student
tutoring at the Miami-Dade back to school rally held at the American
Airlines Arena on Sunday. The MiamiTimes photo/ Sandra J. Charite
Local parents dread spending
money for upcoming school year


CCKO�




By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Colleen Brian is a single parent with two children.
With a new school year fast approaching, Brian, 29, was not
looking forward to the back-to-school shopping. She had little
money to spend.
"It is a difficult time for everyone," she said. "Although we are in
a recession, the prices are not going down."
Unfortunately, it does not get any easier for Brian as she hears
the constant nagging from her children; who constantly ask when
they going school shopping., Brian continues to hope for the best.
"Honestly, I am waiting for a sale," said Brian.
Tracey Hills, a mother of two, is in the same boat.
Hills,- 38, says her biggest challenge is that this year her son
makes the transition from Kelsey L. Pharr Elementary School
to Allapattah Middle; so she must purchase new uniforms.
"I am trying to catch some sales because this is not easy,"
she said.
Indeed, the unemployment rate in South Florida climbed to
11.3 percent in June of this year; doubling from last year's 5.7
percent and exceeding the state's rate of 10.8 percent, accord-
ing to the South Florida Workforce. There were almost 200,000
Please turn to BLUES 2C


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2C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 19-25, 2009 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY




tu Usic helrcopyrigted Materal



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


Back-to-school tips to keep children safe, healthy


Reading, writing and arithme-
tic aren't the only things that
children need to help them pre-
pare for back to school in the
fall.
There several are several
health and safety tips that will
get their year off to a great
start.
Playground safety
Playground accidents are one
of the leading causes of injury to
children in elementary school.
Each year, in the United
States, more than 200,000
children receive emergency de-


apartment care for injuries that
occurred on playground equip-
ment.
Approximately three out of
four playground accidents occur
on public playgrounds, includ-
ing school facilities, as opposed
to backyard play equipment.'
The leading cause of deaths
related to playgrounds and play-
ground equipment is strangula-
tion.
Approximately 15 children per
year die from playground-related
injuries such as strangulatioqr
when a piece of loose clothing


or jewelry gets caught on equip-
ment or the child's head gets
stuck between climbing bars.
For outdoor play, children's
clothing and outerwear should
be free of drawstrings and should
fit snugly to minimize the risk of
getting stuck in a piece of equip-
ment.
Do not allow kids to wear
helmets, necklaces, purses or
scarves on the playground or
engage in any pushing, shoving
or crowding around playground
equipment.
Before school begins, parents


might want to take a look at the
school playground and, if nec-
essary, discuss the Consumer
Product Safety Commission


guidelines with school authori-
ties.
The ground should be covered
12 inches deep with shredded


rubber, hardwood fiber mulch or
fine sand, extending at least six
feet in, all directions around the
equipment.


Ika cd!Mil unmform� r~at ork?














Copyrighted Material

. . .. ..Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Ih,~

-'S


I' M'f
4


KarenAroowt, U areidn




I 1 0Anniversary uaio


Rally drew hundreds of parents


BLUES
continued from 1C
unemployed residents in
the region.
In an effort to save money,
Brian and Hills along with
hundreds of parents attended
the Miami-Dade County Pub-
lic Schools Back to School
Rally. The rally took place at
American Airlines Arena in
Downtown Miami on Sun-
day. The parents hoped that
their children would become
recipients in the book bag
giveaway.
Brian and Hills' children
unfortunately did not receive
book bags. Supplies ran out.
"They ran out quick," said
Hills.
Sponsored by the Super-
intendent of Schools, Na-
tional PTA leaders, the Mi-


ami HEAT, and Miami HEAT
Mascot "Burnie; the rally was
held to bring more parental
involvement in the schools.
Justine Admon, who con-
templated leaving after her
son was denied a book bag,
decided to stay.
"He doesn't have a book
bag for the new school year
and I was hoping that this
would be the opportunity,"
she said.
She walked around to the
different booths picking up
information about tutoring,
homework help and parental
involvement.
"I told myself this year, I was
going to do better to get in-
volved," she said. "So here I
am."
Miami-Dade State Attorney's
Office also attended the event to
give out free fingerprinting.


Opportunity starts here.

_v ..a , , Sj � I L
H U.0 f 0 c 0 f . j I?
For 130 .ear, Florida Memorial ULniversity has given students ihe
opportunity to succeed. As South Florida's only Hisrorically Black University.
we offer our culturally diverse Stiddent bod. 42 undergraduate
and 4 graduate degree programs at our Miami Gardens campus.


f -6 -.1 VIMWwW"M r~


FLO RI DA
MEMORIAL

A PROMISED. A FUTU;RE


1302DO


A . t


Teacher, Language Arts - Reading

Miami Springs Middle

* Education Specialist Degree
* Professor at Miami Dade College, North Campus

* Educational Research and Dissemination Trainer

* Member, United Teachers of Dade


UNITED TEACHERS
OF DADE
The Education Experts
www.UTD.org


I !


tt. ik Pw f % Af










5C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 19-25, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


FREE TUTORING!


Parents, enroll your child in Supplemental
Educational Services (SES)
for the 2009-2010 school year.



Enrollment Period 1

August 24- September 8, 2009 l




Parent Choice Fairs

10:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.


Saturday, August 29, 2009 *
William H. Turner Technical Arts High School
10151 N.W. 19th Avenue, Miami, FL 33147 S .


Saturday, September 5, 2009
Homestead Senior High School
2351 S.E. 12th Avenue, Homestead, FL 33034


If your child meets the eligibility requirements, you may
complete an SES Application and submit it at the Parent "
Choice Fairs, your child's school, via the District's Parent
Portal at http://myportal.dadeschools.net/parent/ or.via fax ,
at 305-995-2540 or 305-523-0144.

For more information call: 305-995-4549


......................................................................I


Title I School


Eligible for Free Tutoring!!


Elementary Schools and K-8 Centers


Middle Schools


Arcola Lake Elementary Lorah Park Elementary
Maya Angelou Elementary T. Louverture Elementary
Dr. Bowman Foster Ashe Elem. Meadowlane Elementary
Auburadale Elementary Melrose Elementary
Avocado Elementary Miami Community Charter
Bel-Aire Elementary Miami Gardens Elementary
Biscayne Gardens Elementary Miami Heights Elementary
Van E. Blanton Elementary Miami Park Elementary
Broadmoor Elementary M.A. Milam K-8 Center
W. J. Bryan Elementary Phyllis R. Miller Elementary
Bunche Park Elementary Momingside Elementary
Campbell Drive Elementary R.R, Moton Elementary
Caribbean Elementary Myrtle Grove Elementary
W, A. Chapman Elementary. Natural Bridge Elementary
Citrus Grove Elementary Norland Elementary
Coconut Palm K-8 Academy North County Elementary
Colonial Drive Elementary North Glade Elementary
- Comstock Elementary North Hialeah Elementary
Coral Terrace Elementary North Miami Elementary 1
Coral Way Bilingual K-8 Center Norwood Elementary
Then C, Crowder Elementary Olinda Elementary
Frederick Douglass Elementary Olympia Heights Elementary
Downtown Miami Charter Dr. Robert B, Ingram/Opa-locka Elem.
Charles R, Drew Elementary Orchard Villa Elementary
Paul L, Dunbar Elementary Palm Springs Elementary
John G, DuPuls Elementary Parkway Elementary
Amelia Earhart Elementary Irving & Beatrice Peskoe Elementary
Earlington Heights Elementary Kelsey L, Pharr Elementary
Edison Park Elementary Pine Lake Elementary
Fienberg/Fisher K-8 Center Pine Villa Elementary
Henry M. Flngler Elementary Poinciana Park Elementary
Florida City Elementary Rainbow Park Elementary
Benjamin Franklin Elementary Redland Elementary
Fulford Elementary Henry E. S. Reeves Elementary
Golden Glades Elementary Ethel F. Beckford/Richmond Elem,
Gratigny Elementary Royal Green Elementary
Gulfstream Elementary G, K. Edelman/Sabal Palm Elem,
Eneida M. Hartner Elementary Santa Clara Elementary
Barbara Hawkins Elementary - Laura C. Saunders Elementary
Hialeah Elementary
Hialeah Gardens Elementary
Holmes Elementary
Zora Neale Hurston Elementary
Kensington Park Elementary
Martin Luther King Elementary
Kinloch Park Elementary
Lake Stevens Elementary
Lakeview Elementary
David Lawrence, Jr. K- 8 Center
Leisure City K-8 Center
Liberty City Elementary
Linda Lentin K-8 Center
Jesse J. McCrary, Jr./Little River Elem, .


Scott Lake Elementary
Shadowlawn Elementary
Shenandoah Elementary
Ben Sheppard Elementary
Hubert 0. Sibley Elementary
Silver Bluff Elementary
Skyway Elementary
Lenora B, Smith Elementary
South Miami Heights Elementary
Tropical Elementary
F. S. Tucker Elementary
Mac M. Walters Elementary
West Homestead Elementary
Dr, Henry Mack/W, Little River Elem,
Sandor Wiener School of Opportunity
Carrie P. Meek/Westview Elementary
Phillis Wheatley Elementary
Dr. Edward L, Whigham Elementary
Nathan B, Young Elementary



High,
Schools
Hialeah Senior
Homestead Senior
Mater Academy Charter,
Miami Senior
Miami Carol City Senior
Miami Central Senior
Milari Edison Senior
Miami Jackson Senior
Miami Northwestern Senior
South Dade Senior
Wmn. H. Turner Technical Arts High
Booker T. Washington Senior


Allapattah Middle '
Aspire Eugenio Maria de Hostos
Aspira N. Youth Leadership Charter
Paul W, Bell Middle
Brownsville Middle
Campbell Drive Middle
Carol City Middle
Centennial Middle
COtrs Grove Middle
Country Club Middle
Cutler Ridge Middle
Ruben Darfo Middle
-Jos6 de Diego Middle
Howani A. Doolin Middle
Charles R, Dtew Middle
Henry Hl, Filer Middle
Florida Int'l Academy Charter
Hlaleah Middle
Homestead Middle
Thomas Jefferson Middle
J, F. Kennedy Middle
Ylinloch P n k Mlddle
Utke Stevens Middle

Alternative
Education
Schools
C.OP.E, Center North
Dorothy M, Wallace Cope Center
Corporate Academy North
Tho 500 Role Models Academy
YWAACD@JRIE Lee Opportunity
YMAACD@MacArthur South
School YWAACD@(tJan Mann Opportuni


Lawrence Academy
Madison Middle
Horace Mann Middle
Jos6 MartfiMiddle
Mays Middle
Howard D, MeMillan Middle
Miami Edison Middle
Miami Lakes Middle
Miami Springs Middle
*Nautilus Middle
Norland Middle
North Dade Middle
North Miami Middle
Palm Springs Middle
Parkway Middle
Ponce do Leon Middle
Redland Middle
Richmond Heights Middle
Riviera Middle
Shenandoah Middle
W, R. Thomas Middle
West Miami Middle
Wostview Middle

Specialized
Centers
Neva King Cooper Ed, Cr,
Ruth Owens Krus6 Ed, tr.
Robert Renick Ed. Ctr.


i,--- M^ H1.-1" ** '.**"***tiir-',""'!! '.*fiwv^wsf-fiwsii-w'ammwiiiwwi **""�' i











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 19-25, 2009


r ^ Miami Edison High School

. - The Mm transforms to a university

1 . .:-o. _^ . '.- !The Miami Times Staff Report


County Commissioner Audrey Edmonson hosts the third annual book
County CommIssioner Audrey EdmIno h--th hrdan


bag giveaway with school supplies for


District 3 at the uOlina rarK on August 1 . --Miami-Dade County photo



Thousands receive book bags



and school supplies in District 3

Special to the Times

The threat of thunderstorms and rain last Saturday did not delay Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson from dis-
tributing more than 2,300 backpacks filled with school supplies to children in District 3 who would be heading to school on Monday,
August 24.
"Knowing the current situation that we are all living under, it is very important for me that children in my district are able to start the
school year fresh. In addition to a brand new backpack, the children found essential school supplies also in their bags," said' Commis-
sioner Edmonson while distributing bags to the children.
The book bags are a relief for parents who for many have been laid-off, facing foreclosure or living paycheck-to-paycheck.
For. this annual event was called appropriately named FunDay, now in its third year, local businesses and companies partnered with
Edmonson and the result was extraordinary.


The graduates of Barrington Irving's nine-week "Discover Aviation" course stand proudly with Barrington (center, in brown flight suit)
and program sponsor representatives from Chevron and City of Miami Parks and Recreation Department at the Miami Executive Aviation
in Opa-locka. -Photo/Jon Ross


Irving speaks at Discover Aviation graduation


Fifty graduates receive $1,000

Chevron Air Academy Scholarships


Special to the Times

Cheers, handshakes and ap-
plause filled the room as 50
middle and high school students
graduated from a nine-week
Discover Aviation program at
the Miami Executive Aviation,
Opa-locka Airport last week.
The program was directed by
Miamians recognized pilot Capt.
Barrington Irving and co-spon-
sored by Chevron and the City
of Miami Parks and Recreation
Department.
Students displayed their avia-
tion and aerospace projects in
the hangar, where the ceremony
took place.'
Irving addressed the students
and Robert Taylor, Branding
and Communication, Manager
at Chevron Global Aviation, pre-
sented a $1,000 scholarship to
Deshorn King for showing ex-
ceptional progress during the
program. The scholarship al-
lows King to attend the 2010 Air
Academy, a one-week 'aviation
education camp experience in


Oshkosh, Wisconsin for youth
ages 16-18.
Last year, Experience Avia-
tion's Build & Soar program
gave Miami high school students
the opportunity to construct an
aircraft that Captain Irving later
piloted on its test flight. This
year, the nine-week program
challenged 50 students to pur-
sue more than 20 different sub-
jects including aviation history,
rocketry, robotics, and social
and resume-writing skills. Five
students with a particular in-
terest in flying also took flight
training courses, studied the
construction and maintenance
of aircraft, and learned weld-
ing and other hands-on skills.
All the students in the program
practiced operating a Microsoft
Flight Simulator and went on,
field trips to local businesses
and aviation facilities. They were
also visited by aviation profes-
sionals, including Kim Morri-
son, Product Integrity Special-
ist at Chevron Global Aviation,
who spoke to students about


her job and her' career path.
"This has been a once-in-a-
lifetime summer for these stu-
dents; not only have they Dis-
covered Aviation but they have
discovered themselves in the
process. This opportunity has
allowed them to soar above pre-
vious 'expectations. We need to
continue to offer engaging pro-
grams and expose the youth in
the City of Miami to role models
like Barrington' Irving, and the
;successful path he has taken,
as an example of what they to
can accomplish," said Mr. Er-
nest Burkeen, Parks Director
in the City of Miami Parks and
Recreation Department.
Chevron's 'Stan Luckoski,
Public Affairs Manrager-East,
said, "Chevron is proud to spon-
sor this community engagement
program that serves as a bridge
between aviation, education,
and industry."
"We are also proud to con-
tinue our longstanding support
of Barrington and his mission,
to educate and inspire youth,"
said Robert J. Taylor, Man-
ager of Branded Programs and
Communications at Chevron
Global Aviation.
Both Build & Soar and Dis-


cover Aviation programs were
designed and directed by Cap-
tain Irving, who became the
youngest person, at 23, and
first black pilot to fly. solo
around the world in 2007. Ir-
ving is president of Experience
Aviation, Inc., a nonprofit or--
ganization he founded in 2005
to motivate youth and address
the shortage of technically
skilled professionals in avia-
tion, aerospace, and related
career fields. In the past four
years, the Experience Aviation
team, together with middle
and high-school educators,
community groups, and cor-
porate partners, has provided
aviation-related summer and
'after-school programs de-
signed to build students' math,
science, reading, and Rroblem-
solving skills.
"The students who partici-
pated in Discover Aviation this
summer were a motivated and
inspiring group," Irving re-
marked. "I'm grateful for the
belief in our students demon-
strated by the strong support
and involvement of the South
Florida community, Chevron
and the City of Miami Parks and
Recreation Department."


A new school year, a new Mi-
ami Edison Senior High.
Edison students will no lon-
ger walk through the halls of
a regular high school, when
classes resume on August 24,
but Edison Edu-Plex, a more
collegiate institution in
which students would become
familiar in the international
and enhanced in the visual
and performing arts.
After receiving it's second
consecutive F, changes were
in the works for Edison. The
Little Haiti school was one
of the eight schools that
struggled last year in Mi-
ami-Dade to improve.
In a previous interview
with The Miami Times, Mi-
ami-Dade .Superintendent
of Schools Alberto Carvalho
said, "Edison High did not
make the necessary gains.
We have to treat this as an
emergency."
Under a state man-
date, it's failing to im-
prove caused the school to
close but Carvalho vowed
that the school would not
close under his watch. In-


i -







, - .

. ,' ,

PABLO ORTIZ

stead, he brought in some
changes for the new school
year make Edison was
one of the best schools in
the state. .Instituting pro-
vost and deans and trans-
forming Edison a commu-
nal school which would, be
open to area students.
Pablo Or~tiz was appointed
as provost of Edison.
Former . Edison principal
Lavette Hunter was moved to
William H. Turner. Technical
Arts Senior High in West Little
River.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY SC THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 19-25, 2009


Publisher to rent textbooks



to college students


By Tamar Levin

In the rapidly evolving college textbook "market,
one of the nation's largest textbook publishers,
Cengage Learning, announced last week it would
start renting books to students this year, at 40 to
70 percent of the sale price.
Students who choose Cengage's rental option
will get immediate access to the first chapter of the
book electronically, in e-book format, and will have
a choice of shipping options for the printed book.
When the rental term - 60, 90 or 130 days - is
over, students can either return the textbook or
buy it.
With the growing competition from online used-
book sales, digital texts and new Internet textbook-
rental businesses like Chegg and BookRenter, other
publishers and college bookstores are also edging
toward rentals. -
Follett Higher Education Group, which manages


more than 850 college bookstores, is starting a pilot
rental program this fall at about a dozen stores.
including those at the State University at Buffalo,
Grand Rapids Community College in Michigan, and
California State Un choose not to buy the printed
book, they can rent it. just as we already offer them
the choice to buy an e-book, or a chapter."
McGraw-Hill is taking a different approach ;into
rentals, through a partnership with Chegg, a fast-
growing online textbook-rental business. Under an
agreement that is to be announced soon, 1IoGraw-
Hill will supply 25 of its books to Chegg, in return
for a portion of the rental revenue. ,
Ed Stanford, the president of McGra.w-Hill Higher
Education, would not disclose what share of each
Chegg rental his company would get.
"It's an opportunity to explore a different model
that we think has some real promise," Mr. Stanford
said. "We're not a retailer of our textbooks, so we're
not trying to play the retail role. But we are also


talking to large college bookstores who are in terested
in rentals as an option. It's of great interest to us
as a way that we could begin to share the revenues
after the first sale."
A few. college bookstores have been offering
rentals for years, and many more are moving in.
that direction.
'There's a changing climate in the industry, with
all the pressures on the costs of higher education,"
said Elio Distaola, of Follett, "The reason we're
doing the rental pilot is just to see the viability of
the program.,'
Barnes: &,. Noble College Booksellers, too, is
starting a pil6t rental program at three of its 624
college bookstores this fall.
"I think it could very well end up being a standard
offering," said Patrick Maloney. the executive vice
president. "We're renting books at 35 percent of
the list price, and it's only for hardcover texts,
because paperbacks would get beaten up too fast.


Valuable tips for incoming college freshman


The Miami Times Staff Report

Parents, it is time. For many
of you, this will be a joyous
occasion but for others the
tears will fill up your eyes
because you are not ready to
let go of your precious child;
in a world where they will be
making their own decisions
and establishing their own
rules of engagement. This
fall, all across the country,
thousands of students will
matriculate as freshman in
college.
"I can't wait. I have been
waiting for this for a very
long time," said Angelina
Robbins, who will be a fresh-
man, in the fall at Bethune-
Cookman University in Day-'
tona Beach.
Often times, the transition
can be a little stressful but
it doesn't have to be so here
are some tips and informa-
tion that every college fresh-
man should know:

DON'T MISS
ORIENTATION.
Orientation is the first
chance for you to meet col-
lege freshman like yourself
and at some colleges you find
your roommate. Orientation
also allows you to explore
the school and see the many
incentives that our offered to
you al a students. Remem-
ber to find out where your li-
brary ,s located because you
will beTspending a lot of time
in that place. You are given
insigh' on the rules and the
essential tools needed to suc-
ceed within your four years.


CONTACT YOUR
ROOMMATE
To avoid clutter, Jasmine
Augusten, a junior at Flori-
da Atlantic University,, con-
tacted her roommate prior to
moving in.
"My roommate helped me
save a lot of money. She had
basically purchased most
of things for our dorm so if
I had brought extra things,
it would have been a lot of
clutter," she said.
Freshman are usually. as-
signed roommates the first
semester of college. It is im-
portant to contact your room-
mate before you even start
packing for school because
you will save a lot of money
and time. Moving in can
be very hectic and frustrat-
ing time. By talking to your
roommate ahead of time, you
can figure out their person-
alities, your commonalities
and what things you might
need to bring.
Don't pack too much things
because your dorm room is
not a ballroom and you will
be sharing space with some-
one else. You don't want to
be in a cramped environment
with unnecessary items tak-
ing up space.

STAY IN SHAPE
I'm sure we have all heard
of the 'freshmen fifteen' so
to avoid that, get and stay
in shape even if you are
not living on campus. Yes,
pizza and coffee can be very
tempting but try to remem-
ber to eat a well-balance


I.


meal and work out regularly
so you can be in your best
shape while in college. Take
advantage of the free gym
offered on campus. Some-
times you can even ride your
bike or walk to class instead
of driving your car. Besides,
have you looked at the price
of gas?

SAVE YOUR MONEY
During these tough eco-
nomic times, every penny
counts. Remember to save
your money. If you did a sum-
mer job, almost 75 percent
of your wages should have
been saved up for school. Do


know. of your bad habits.
Don't spend money on any-
thing not college related es-
-pecially when you putting it
on your parents credit card.

REMEMBER WHY YOU
ARE IN COLLEGE
"Make sure you achieve
the best GPA possible your
freshmen year because it is
extremely hard to pull it up
in your followings years, so
t try. to stay focus: on what you
came to college to do,"- Kevin
"Williams, a senior at Bet-
hune Cookman University.
You will be surprised how
fast four years can go.
"Participate as much as you
can in different college activi-
ties as it gives you exposure
to the different culture of the
. - an .


not spend all your money on
back-to-school items, - save
it. Put yourself oi a budget
because this is the time to
prove to your parents that
you can be responsible and
independent.
In the. midst of the reces-
sion, text books, school sup-
plies, and all the essential
school things are not getting
cheaper. There will be times
when mommy and daddy
cannot bail you out so save
.your money and only spend
when necessary. If your col-
lege has a shopping mall, try
to avoid it as much as pos-
sible especially when you


College students need financial literacy


By Michelle Walbaum

In tlugh economic times,
success in college often
depends on money smarts and
book smarts. Risky financial
behaviors, such as paying
bills late or paying less than
the minimum due, making
out credit cards or taking out
payday loans, for example, can
jeopardize a student's college
career.-
Students who exhibit one or,
more such risky behaviors say
they're iess likely to graduate
than students who don't take
on such risks, according to
a University of Arizona study
published earlier this year..
Poor money management
spills over into other areas
of students' lives, too, say
researchers Joyce Serido and
Soyeon Shim, who surveyed
more tlian 2,000 freshmen at
the university. Money problems
can strain relationships
with family and friends and
negatively affect students'
health and psychological well-
being.
Students heading to college
for the first time in the next few


weeks can start immediately to
keep their.finances fit. Knowing
how much you need to pay
for helps, says Kristy Vienne,
director of the Student Money
Management Center, a personal
finance education resource for
Sam Houston State University
students. Some steps to take:
Your parent or guardian
should be in the loop, says
Lynne Strang, spokeswoman
for American Financial'Services
Association.
Figure out student expenses
per month - from essentials
such as laundry and food, to
entertainment and clothes.
Then determine whether
parents will contribute to the


cause. "Together, go through
that list, and agree upon a set
dollar amount," she says.
The family discussion sets
clear financial limits and ground
rules for who pays what. When
the money's gone, "it's gone,"
Strang says. "You need to pace
yourself."
Students might think a cup
of coffee every morning is not
much. But $2 a day can add up
to more than $700 a year.
Jinhee Kim, an associate
professor teaching a personal
and family finance course at
the University of Maryland,
tells students to record every
purchase. "When students
actually track those expenses,


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they realize how much they are
spending on little items. And
small things add up," she says.


school and the surround-
ings, as well as gives you a
very good chance to expand
your network and net worth,"
said J. Lloyd Allen, a gradu-
ate student at Florida Inter-
national University.
It is good to get involve
on campus like joining so-
rorities, fraternities, student
government, or other social
groups and socialize but your
education should come first,
For example, you don't
need to battle with yourself t
he pros and cons of going to
a party rather than studying
for an upcoming chemistry
exam --study for the exam.
Have fun but remember the
most important reason that
you are in'college is to receive
,an education.


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The Miami Times



Busi ness

SECTION D


I.


I','..


.,


,...,MI, FLORIDA, AUG 19-25, 2009


Commissioner Barbara J.Jordan (right at podium) was joined by fellow Commissioners Dennis C. Moss (center) and Natacha Seijas at her community
meeting on the County's proposed budget. -Photo/Ryan Holloway/Miami-Dade County


Hundreds in Miami Gardens attend


community meeting to discuss County budget


The Miami Times Staff Report


- A packed room with almost 300
residents attended a community
meeting organized by Miami-Dade
Commissioner Barbara J. Jordan
to discuss the County's proposed
2009-10 budget at the North Dade
Regional Library on August 11.
Jordan began the meeting by stat-
ing her desire to hear from her
constituents and their priorities,
and to provide them with accurate


information regarding the' budget
process. County Chairman Dennis
C. Moss and Commissioner Nata-
cha Seijas, who intend to have sim-
ilar meetings in their own. districts,
came out to offer their support.
Due .to the $427 million budget
shortfall, Jordan explained the pos-
sibility of service cuts in the Coun-
ty and stated that the only way to
avoid essential services eliminated
in the proposed budget is to gener-
ate additional revenue or find other


areas to cut.
Several residents expressed their
concerns for any funding cuts for
programs that supported the cul-
tural arts, Head Start, senior as-
sistance, and the Mom and Pop
Small Business Grant. For more
than an hour, Jordan answered
questions from the audience, with
assistance from the County's Office
of Strategic Budget Management,
Commission Auditor, Tax Collec-
tor, Property Appraiser and other


County departments.
"We had a lot of people who were
concerned. A number of employees
were worried about loosing their
jobs," said Jordan on Friday.
"We had a very passionate crowd
which had valid concerns and great
suggestions on how the County can
drum up revenue and other areas
that could be cut to save some vi-
tal programs that help many in our
community," she said.
Please tun to BUDGET 1OD


Unemployed workers flock to COBRA for health coverage


By Sandra Block


A federal subsidy designed to make
health insurance more affordable for laid-
off workers has led to a doubling in the
number of people who have opted to con-
tinue their former employer's coverage.
The coverage, known as COBRA, allows
people who leave their jobs to continue
their former employer's health coverage
for up to 18 months. In the past, they
were. required to pay ;the entire premium,
plus a 2% administrative fee,' making CO-
BRA unaffordable for most unemployed
workers.
But the economic stimulus package
signed into law in February subsidizes
65% of COBRA premiums for some recipi-
ents - workers laid off between Sept. 1,
2008, and the end of this year. That means
the average .family can continue COBRA
coverage for $377 a month, vs. more than
$1,000 a month without the government
subsidies, according to the Kaiser Family
Foundation.
The result has been a doubling of enroll-
ments, according to an analysis by Hewitt
Associates, a human resources consult-
ing firm. From March through June, the
firm found monthly enrollment rates for
eligible workers averaged 38%. It was only
19% for the period from September 2008
through February 2009. The analysis was
based on enrollment rates at 200 large
U.S. companies with 8 million employees.


Unemployment is at a 25-year high, and
more than 14 million people are eligible for
subsidized COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus
Budget Reconciliation Act). If the jobless
rate continues to rise, says Karen Frost,
Hewitt's health and welfare outsourcing
leader, "Employers should expect and pre-
pare for COBRA enrollments to remain at
their inflated levels, particularly since the
subsidy is available to those workers laid
off through the end of 2009."
In the past, the vast majority of laid-off
workers were unable to afford COBRA,
says Ron Pollack, executive director of
Families USA, a health care advocacy
group. Without the subsidy, the average
COBRA family premium consumes 84%
of the average jobless worker's unem-
ployment benefits, according to Families
USA.
* Employers also are seeing an increase
in the number of dependents covered by
COBRA, says Patricia Friedman, a senior
consultant at Watson Wyatt, a human re-
sources consulting firm.
Some employers have raised concerns
that higher COBRA enrollments will in-
crease their health care costs. Individuals
who sign up for COBRA tend to file more
claims than other workers, 'according to
Edward Kaplan, national health practice
leader at The Segal Company, a human
resources consulting firm, because they
want to get as much medical treatment as
possible before their coverage expires.


1 I ~i.saaosu~~aaaasaemanminufl


JOHN MARKS
Tallahassee mayor


Tallahassee mayor

John Marks

leads Florida

League of Cities

Mayor John Marks of Tallahassee was re-
cently named president of the Florida League
of Cities during the organization's 83rd an-
nual conference in Orlando.
In his remarks, Marks presented a 'Five-
Point Plan for Florida's Cities" in which he
shared his vision for his upcoming one-year
term. The plan is designed to strengthen mu-
nicipal governance and enhance the quality
of life for Florida's citizens.
"I am humbled and honored that I have
been selected by my peers, the League mem-
bers," Marks said. "This post gives me an op-
portunity to serve all of the cities and citizens
in our great State of Florida in addition to
serving the people of Tallahassee. I will work
tirelessly to help make the League's 410
member cities stronger and better prepared
for the challenges they face."
I am confident President Marks will con-
tinue the great legacy of our League," said
Carmine Priore, outgoing Florida League of
Cities president and vice mayor of Welling-
ton. 'He is truly a committed public servant
and has an excellent vision for his term as
president."
Marks has been active with the Florida
League of Cities and has served on many
committees and on its board of directors.
He also served as the charter president of
the Florida League of Mayors, a statewide
association of mayors he helped to estab-
lish.
In addition to his duties'as Mayor of Tal-
lahassee, Marks practices law with his son
in the law firm of Marks and Marks LLC.
Appointed by Governor Bob lGraham in
1979, he served eight years on the Florida
Public Service Commission and served as
the Commission's chairman for two years.
"Mayor Marks has dedicated his life to
public service and will be a great asset to our
organization," said Florida League of Cities
Executive Director Mike Sittig. "I am excited
about his leadership and vision for Florida's
cities."
Founded in 1922, Florida League of Cities,
Inc. is the official organization of the state's
municipal governments (cities, towns, vil-
lages); designed and established to meet the
needs of Florida's municipal officials and the
citizens they serve.


Your monr meaterr.: The trunt d6enitonm of The (Good ife'


4b Qb.* Ofi


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


OU I Il MIAMIIt llv I ,iAU 7-ir LU


Retail akI fall unexpectedly. Jobl, claims dimb

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INVITATION TO BID (ITB)

MDX PROCUREMENT/CONTRACT NO.: ITB-10-01

MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: SYSTEMWIDE SIGNING AND PAVEMENT
MARKING IMPROVEMENTS

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) is soliciting Bids from qualified firms to provide
systemwide signing and pavement marking improvements. A Pre-Bid conference .is scheduled for
August 25,2009 at 10:00 A.M., Eastern Time.

For a copy of the ITB with information on the Scope of Services, Pre-qualification and submittal
requirements free of charge, please logon to MDX's Website: www.mdxway.com to download
the documents under "Doing Business with MDX, or call MDX's Procuremeht Department at
305-637-3277 for assistance. Note: In order to download any MDX solicitation, you must first be
registered as a Vendor with MDX. This can only be facilitated through MDX's Website:
www.mdxway.com under "Doing Business with MDX: Vendor Registration".

The deadline for submitting Bids in response to this ITB is September 15, 2009 by 2:00 P.M.,
Eastern Time.


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings.",





RFP 111- INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION
JJ10 9/3/2009 ACT (IDEA) PRIVATE SCHOOL OBLIGATIONS
INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools

Notice of Funding Availability
2009-2010
Community-Based Organizations

On behalf of Jackson Health System, Jackson Memorial Foundation will be accepting applications from
community-based programs seeking funding for healthcare initiatives for uninsured and underinsured pop-
ulations of Miami-Dade County. A total of $250,000 is available for awarding.

The funding availability for the FY 2009-2010 Community-Based Initiative will be awarded to programs who
address the following funding priorities:

Oral Health: This priority will focus on expanding oral health services to unfunded and underfunded popula-
tions in Miami-Dade by providing new services that may not be provided currently or increasing capacity
for services already being provided. :, : -- ..-.

Oncology: This priority will focus on expanding the availability of medical services to cancer patients.

For the priority area chosen, applicants must demonstrate an increase in the number of individuals served if
awarded funding from Jackson Health System. Applicants are encouraged to find opportunities for leverag-
ing other federal, state or private match dollars.

If you are a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and would like an application, please call (305) 355-4741 for
more information.

Applications will be available for pick-up or to be mailed from August 19, 2009, through September 3, 2009,
at Jackson Memorial Foundation, 901 N.W. 17th Street, Suite T, Miami, FL 33136. Applications will also be
made available online at www.jhsmiami.orq.

All application packages must be submitted by hand delivery, Qourier or FedEx no later than Friday, Sep-
tember 4, 2009, at 12 noon. No e-rhail or faxed submissions will be accepted.

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City
Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing
Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement, Telephone No. (305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO.
12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 002070

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City
Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 120086 INVITATION FOR BID FOR SULLAIR AIR COMPRESSOR

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2009

Deadline for Request for Additional Information/Clarification: 8/24/2009 at 3:00 P.M.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing
Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement, Telephone No. (305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO.
12271.

Pedro G. Hemandez
City Manager .~."
AD NO. 008720 ,-,


MIAMFDAD


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT
REGARDING REQUEST FOR
PROPOSALS FOR RETAIL
CONCESSIONS PROGRAM 2009
RFP NO. MDAD-04-09
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department is announcing the availability of the above
referenced advertisement, which can be obtained by visiting our Website at:
Www.miami-airoort.com/html/business.oDpOrtunitles.html (in order to view
the full Advertisement, please select "Advertisements" link at the bottom of the
Business Opportunities page and then. select the respective solicitation).
Copies of the RFP solicitation package can only be.obtained through the MDAD,
Contracts Administration Division, in person or via courier at 4200 NW 36th
Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122, or through a mail request to PO.
Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-5504. The cost for each solicitation package is
$50.00 (non-refundable) check or money order payable to: Miami-Dade Aviation
Department.

This solicitation is subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance With section
2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code.


INVITATION FOR BID FOR VACTOR TRUCK PARTS


IFB NO. 144134


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2009

Deadline for Request for Additional Information/Clarification: 8/24/2009 at 3:00 P.M.


B


.b .


- o


Q


- .


- - - .


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. . -


An T14F MIAMI TIMFR- AUG 19-25.2009















P.11


SECTION D


Apartments





PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT $698.00

APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MOREIII

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505

'Income restrictions, apply,
rents are subject to
change





1212 N.W.1 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE-IN
One bedroom, one bath.
$500, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-
1144

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
* 305-642-7080
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1277 N.W. 58th Street #1
Two bdrms, one bath, appli.
included. Section 8 Wel-
come.
786-277-9925, 305-494-8884

1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080


13655 N.E. 3 COURT
One bedroom, central air,
pool. $695. 305-895-8438

140 N.W. 13 Street
One month to move in. Two
bedrooms, one baln, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

140 S.W. 6 St. HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$500 monthly
Call:305-267-9449

1425 NW 60th Street
One bdrm, one bath. $625
mthly. Includes refrigerator,
stove, central air water $925
to move in. 786-290-5498

1425 NW 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath. $625
monthly. Includes refrigerator,
stove, central air water $1100
to move in.
Call 305-628-2212


1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$625 monthly. Three
bedrooms, two Daths, $725
monthly. All appliances in-
cluded, FREE 19 inch LCD
T.V. Call Joel 786-355-7578

1541 N.W. 1 Place
Rents reduced for short time
only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled, air, stove,
refrigerator. No Deposit for
Section 8!
Call 305-582-5091

1545 NW 8 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
ceramic tile, central air.
carpel, balcony, new
kitchen, appliances, laundry
machine, quiet, parking.
FREE WATER
Move in today!


786-506-3067


Kr,".''

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* '',: A'


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUG 19-25 2009


1556 N.W. 62TERR
Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances and water included.
$650 monthly. $1300 to move
in. 305-620-7923

15600 N.W. 7 AVENUE
Remodeled. one bedroom,
central air, $695.
305-687-1200

1847 N.W. 18 AVE
Remodeled $680, water in-
cluded. 954-226-6325

1955 N.W. 2 COURT
Onel bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080

1969 N.W. 2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air,
free water. 305-642-7080
786-236-1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

2972 N.W. dl Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove.
refrigerator, air. $650.
305-642-7080

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475 monthly, $700 move
in special. Free Wi-Fi, Easy
qualifying. 786-339-4106

458 N.W. 7 Street
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

48 N.W. 77th Street
Large one bedroom, $550
monthly. Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738

50th Street Heights,
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. FreeF
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

5200 NW 26 AVENUE
Two and three bdrms.
Free gift for
Section 8 tenants.
No deposit if qualified!
786-663-8862, 305-634-3545

5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Pemroke Park Area
Two and one half bedrooms,
one bath, with living room and
washer and dryer connection,
$875 monthly,. $1400 move
in. 786-370-0832

585 NE 139 STREET
One bedroom. $680 mthly.
First, last and security. 305-
769-3740

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

621 N.W. 64 STREET
Three bbdrms Special $875
and two bdrms $815, one
bedroom $735 nice and
clean, laundry room, parking.
Section 8 OK! 786-326-7424

6229 NW 2 AVENUE
One bedroom, $525 and up.
786-327-6012 '

731 N.W. 56th Street
One bdrm, one bath.
Call 305-205-1665

8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Ovenown, Liberty City,.
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One. Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tion/specials
www.capitalrentalagency.
corn


DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy qualify Move in
special.
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 ($745), two bedrooms,
one bath, $595 ($895).
Free water!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. �
Call 305-638-3699

LAKEFRONT
APARTMENTS
One and two bedrooms.
Two months free rent.
Now accepting Section 8
305-757-4663

MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms., one bath, cen-
tral air, $1200 and $975. one
bdrm., one bath, central air,
$735. One efficiency, $550.
305-206-1566

MOVE-IN SPECIAL!!!
One Month Free Rent.
SECTION 8. $0 DEPOSIT.
$0 Water. OPA-LOCKA.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
tiled air. $750. One bed-
room one bath $600.
786-236-0214,786-439-
8044
N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


N. MIAMI BEACH AREA
Studio, $700 plus deposit. All
utilities and cable included.
Section 8 ready. Call Irma at:
786-487-7403

NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 welcome! $800
monthly
Also Available:
One bedroom, two baths.
$900 monthly.
Call 954-303-3368 or
954-432-3198.

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome-
with no security deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146

Sanford Apt.
1907 N.W. 2nd Court
Nice, one bdrm, air, window
shades, appliances. Free hot
water. Tenant pays for cold
water. $410 monthly plus
$200 deposit. 305-665-4938
or 305-498-8811.

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
One bdrm, one bath apt.,
$550 per month.
Two bdrms., one bath apt.,
$650 per month.
Two bdrms., one bath
house, $850 per month.
All appliances included.
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578


Business Rentals
KITCHEN FOR RENT
1437 NW 3 AVENUE
$200 weekly plus water bill. *
305-343-7817

Condos/Townhouses
14004 NE 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, two baths
condo. $1100 mthly. Section
8 accepted.
Call Ricky 786-253-7218

15700 N.W. 7 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath.
305-694-0988

1990 NW 4 Court
Three bedrooms, one and
a half bath townhouse,
newly renovated, appli-
ances. Immediate move-
in. $900. For appointment
contact:
305-751-6232

2779 NW 192-TER
Two bedrooms, one and one
half baths, appliances includ-
ed. Central air, washer, dryer.
Close to shopping. Section 8
welcome. $1100 monthly.
305-469-9741

435 NE 121 STREET
One bedroom, one bath, $850
monthly. 954-914-9166

6748 Kingsmoor Way
One story townhouse remod-
eled, three bedrooms, two


baths, wood cabinets, stain-
less steel -appliances, wood
floors, marble bath, large cov-
ered patib. $1700. Available
immediately. 305-725-6222


Miami Gardens Area
Townhouse, two bedrooms,
two baths. 3785 N.W. 213
Terrace. Call 954-442-8198
or 850-321-3798.

MIAMI SHORES AREA
9614 NW 5 AVE UNIT 2
One bedroom, one bath,
fenced yard, like new. $785
monthly. 305-793-0002

Duplex
10201 N.W. 8 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1195. Appliances.
305-642-7080

1050 N.W. 112 St.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, security bars, wa-
ter included. Section 8 OKI
786-879-3312

1076 NW 38 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, re-
cently renovated, new appli-
ances, two parking spaces.
Section 8 accepted.
305-796-7963

1080 NW 100 TERR
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 welcome.
786-315-8491

11051 NE 12 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths,
washer, dryer, fenced yard,
security bars, central air,
heat, water included. Tiled
throughout. $1150 mthly,
$1000 security in two pay-
ments. Close to KMart,
Home Depot, parks,
schools and shopping.
786-709-7436
1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885 Doreen

13315 Alexandria Drive
Two bedrooms, one bath
$775 monthly plus first and
last. Section 8 OK!
252-955-7878, 786-252-4953

1393 N.W. 55 STREET
Brand new, three bedrooms,
two baths. Section 8. $1450
monthly. 786-355-1791

18003 SW 105 STREET
Duplex for rent. Three or four
bedrooms, two baths. Section
8 welcome. $1450 monthly.
305-233-3887,305-281-7091

1871 NW 43 STREET
Clean Two bdrms, one bath,
central air, appliances, tile,
'blinds, security bars.
Call 786-357-5000

1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $1000
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431

2056 Washington Avenue
Two bdrms, Opa-Locka,
$850 monthly. 786-290-7333.

2257 N.W. 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2355 NW 95 Terrace
Two bdrm, one bath, newly
tiled, Section 8.
305-836-4027

2425 N.W. 104 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899

2429 NW 81st Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
appli. included, air, $1000
monthly call 305-694-8706

2585 NW 165 STREET
Near N. Dade Health Clinic.
Two bedrooms,. one bath,
central air and heat. $1100
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-542-0810

281 N.W. 55 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
central air. $900 monthly.
305-609-0642

282NE58TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750 monthly. 954-266-9006

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

3300 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms. $850 month-
ly. Section 8. 786-290-7333

3503 NW 11 AVE
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700 Monthly, $1400 to
move in. 305-282-7953

3633 N.W. 194 TERR
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, tile, fenced yard. Section
8 OK. 305-622-9135

38 N.E. 64 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$650 monthly, includes wa-
ter.
Call 305-267-9449

5803 N. MIAMI AVE
Two bedrooms, one bath
$825 Specials. 305-758-7022
Frank Cooper Real Estate


6250 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bain
$800. Two bedrooms one
bath $1100. Appliances,
Free Water!Electric. 305-
642-7080

6922 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Section 8 wel-
come. 305-490-7033

8083 NW 12 PLACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1090 monthly, $2250 to
move in. Section 8 OK.
954-294-0514

8098 N.W. 4 Ave.
One bdrm, one bath, appli-
ances, free water. First, last
and security. Section 8 OK.
305-621-4383,

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. .Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace

MIAMI AREA
8221 N.E. 1st Avenue #A
Four bedrooms, two baths,
washer and dryer. Section 8
okay. 305-710-3361.

NW-DESIGN DISTRICT
Beautiful, two bedrooms, one
bath with central air. $850
monthly. 305-757-7067
Design Realty


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1140 N. W. 79 Street
One bdrm, one bath, $550.
Free water. Mr. Willie ft 109
305-642-7080
13377 NW 30 AVENUE
$120 weekly, private kitchen,
.bath,.free utilities, appliances.
305-474-818.6,305;691-3486

17500 NW 40 AVE
Free cable, central air, $450
monthly. All utilities included.
786-853-8313

1863B NW 42 Street
Newly remodeled, with air.
786-356-1457

2400A N.W. 61st Street
Section 8. Water, appliances
included. 786-277-9925

2538 N.W. 104th Terrace
Nice area. Water included.
$600 monthly. 786-290-7333

2915 N.W. 156th Street
Private entrance, free cable.
$165 weekly, $600 to move
in. 305-624-3966

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly, 305-751-6232.

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency. Call 305-754-7776

CAROL CITY AREA
Furnished efficiency,
call 305-621-7940.

MIAMI GARDENS
Furnished, utilities .included.
786-267-7018,786-333-3378

NE 82Ter Near 4 Ave
Nice efficiency with utilities.
References required.
305-754-5728

Furnished Rooms
13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free .utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486

15810 N.W. 38 Place
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1600'N.W. 56th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1775 N.W. 151 Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455
or 786-226-5873

1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-303-0156.

1920 N.W. 81 Terrace


Clean rooms, $350 mthly.
Call 786-312-8493 or
305-479-3632


$199 DEPOSITI!
2169 N.W. 49 Street, Free Air
Direct TV, only $105 weekly.
Call NOWI 786-234-5683.

243 N.W. 59th St. Rear
Unfurnished $150 weekly.
Call 786-260-3838

3042 N.W. 44th Street
Big, air, $85 to $115 weekly.
786-262-6744

4712 NW 16 AVE
$85-$150 weekly, utilities,
kitchen, bath, air.
786-260-3838, 305-218-1227

74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $350 moves
you in. 786-306-2349

CHRISTIAN HOME
Rooms for rent, call 10 a.m.
to 10 p.m. 305-759-2889

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean, private entrance, pa-
tio, cable. 305-688-0187

Miramar-Mirabella Area
Near Miami. Furnished rooms
for rent, utilities included.
$125 weekly. 954-305-4713

NICELY FURNISHED
Air, Cable, TV. $125 wkly.
786-290-0946

NORTHWEST AREA
62 Street N.W. First Avenue
$450 monthly $650 move in
Call 305-989-8824

NORTHWEST AREA
LARGE, CLEAN
FURNISHED ROOMS
CALL 305-974-8907
HOURLY DAILY WEEKLY
RATES
SEVERAL LOCATIONS

House
10295 S.W. 175 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. 305-267-9449

1060 N.W. 53 STREET
Two bedrooms one bath.
Large yard. 305-758-1492

10951 SW 222 TERR
CUTLER BAY
Four bedrooms, one and a
half baths. $1000 monthly.
Call 305-267-9449

1122 N.W. 74 Street
Three bedrooms one bath.
$1200-mthly, $2400 -to move
in. 305-632-2426

1285 N.W. 129th Street
Three bedrooms, One bath.
Section 8 OK. $1275 month
786-367-4004, 305-681-2886

13140 NW 18 AVE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-344-9560, 305-688-0600

1370 N.W, 118 Street
Five bedrooms, three baths,
new tile throughout, all new
central air, washer, dryer.
.NeW appliances. Section
8 OK $1750 negotiable.
O.B.O.
FREE 1� inch LCD TV
Call 305-525-1271

14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999, security deposit.
954-826-4013

14911 N.W. South River
Drive
Beautiful four bedrooms, two
baths, two car garages, ex-
tremely large inside and yard.
$2200 mthly. Section 8 Wel-
cqme. 786-262-9965

1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one: bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or
305-992-3653

15750 N.W. 28 COURT
Four bedrooms, two baths,
tile, central air. $1475 month-
ly. 305-662-5505

16010 N.W. 28 Court
Four bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8. Appli. 786-277-9925

1743 N.W. 42 STREET
One bedroom, all tile, air.
$700 monthly all utilities in-
cluded. 786-356-7056

18020 NW 5 AVE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
den. Section 8 Welcome.
786-718-4931,404-861-1965

1861 Wilmington Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
with air. 786-356-1457

191 St N.W. 11 Ave. Area
Four bdrms, two baths.
Section OK. 305-754-7776

2006 York Street
Opa Locla, $850 a month,
two bdrms, 305-303-9585.

2130 Service Road
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OKI 305-624-4395
Pager 305-732-9875 ,

2164 N.W. 83RD Terrace
Two bdrms. $1100 mthly.
Section 8 Ok. Rent with op-
tion to buy. 786-306-2349


e


2324 NW 85 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances included. $1200
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
954-430-6264,305-219-0827

2359 N.W. 56th Street
Four bedrooms, two and half
bath, central air, appliances,
Section 8 okay!
305-343-5700

2443 N.W. 90 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths..
Section 8. 786-290-7333

262 N.W. 51st Street
Three bdrms, two baths.
$1000 mthly. 305-205-1665

284 NW 40 STREET
One bedroom, $700 monthly.
954-914-9166

3028 NW 8 ROAD
Near Ft. Lauderdale, swap
shop. Three bedrooms.,$895.
786-306-4839


31 AVE NW 59 STREET
'Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100 mthly. 305-757-7067.
DESIGN REALTY.

310 N.E. 58 TERRACE
Five bedrooms, three bath.
$1200 monthly. All appli-
ances included. Central air.
Free 19 Inch TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

3221 N.W. 11 CT.
Nice four bedrooms, two
baths, den, garage..HOPWA,
Section 8. Call 954-392-0070

434 N.W. 82 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
561-584-2263

4513 NW 185 STREET
MIAMI GARDENS
Section 8 OK. Three bed-
rooms, one bath with tile
floors and central air. A beau-
ty. $1365 monthly. Call Joe.
954-849-6793

4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 mthly. 305-606-3369

5010 N.W. 21 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths,'
central air, security bars,
refrigerator stoves. $1350
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
.,305-215-8125

651 N.W. Snd Street
Three bdrms, two baths,
$1400 monthly.
305-620-4054, 305-527-8330

7 N.E. 59 TERRACE
MOVE IN SPECIAL ($1350)
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900. Free Water.
305-642-7080

7801 N.W. 2nd Court
Small two bedroom, one
bath, $600 monthly, $1200 to
move in. 305-479-3632

8004 NW 10 COURT
Two bdrms, one bath. $1150
mthly. 954-914-9166

8016 N.W. 9th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
screen porch, security bars,
large yard. No pets, $800
monthly and $700 security.

AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELYI
One, two, three and fdur bed-
rooms. 305-970-1721

AVAILABLE NOW!
One, two, three-and four bed-
rooms. 786-512-6541

Coconut Grove
3464 Frow Avenue
$1350, three bdrm, one
bath, single family,
newly renovated.
Central air, washer,
dryer, new appliances.
Close to Coc6 Walk.
Hurricane Shutters.
Availble Immnediatelyl
954-646-1236 '

COCONUT GROVE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath, liv-
ing room, dining room, air.
786-597-3999

FLORIDA CITY AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced, air, clean. $850
monthly. 305-528-6889

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled, appliances in-
cluded, fenced. Section 8.
$1350 mthly. Call:
786-366-3480,786-319-7226.

MIAMI AREA
Four bdrms, one and half
baths, $1050. Cash back
Section 8. 786-506-3881

S MIAMI GARDENS
Three bdrms, two baths.
$1400 monthly.
305-757-7067 Design Realty

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced .
yard. Section 8 OKI $1150
monthly. 305-388-7477


Near Northwestern High
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
$1150 monthly Fenced Sec-
tion 8 OK 305-685-6795

NORTHWEST AREA
One two and three bdrms.
$650, 750, $995.
305-332-5008

Rent with Option
ATTENTION RENTERS
Receive $8000 credit. Credit
partners available, if you de-
sire a home. 1-800-242-0363
ext 3644

Unfurnished Rooms
755 N.W. 129 STREET
Nice neighborhood.
Unfurnished Rooms.
305-318-9305






4132 N.W. 22nd Court
Tri-plex, two-two bedroom
apts. and one bedroom apt.,
call 305-633-3867 or
786-427-9196

Houses

1245 N-W. 86 STREET
Totally renovated three bed-
rooms, one bath, central air.
No qualifying, owner financ-
ing, low down payment.
Molly 305-541-2855
1250 NW 123 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, fully remodeled.
No Closing Cost!. Get $8000
Tax Credit. $95,000. Call
owner at 305-968-7955.

1740 NW 1.52 STREET
Three bedrooms, two
baths,family room, . large
yard, completely fenced. Ask-
ing $180K. Call Barbara 786-
210-6500

3361 NW 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, central air.
$2900 down and $899 mthly.
Ask about $8000 tax credit
refund check. Completely
Remodeled. Call For List. NDI
Realtors 305-655-1700

*ATTENTION'
Now You Can oQw YourI
Own' Homne Today
"'WITH'"
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
HOLLYWOOD AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fully remodeled, central air,
new kitchen cabinets. No
Closing Cost! Get $8000
Tax Credit! $89,000. Call
owner at 305-968-7955.

NO CREDIT CHECK
OWNER FINANCE
$6900 down. Three and four
bedroom homes Miami Gar-
dens, Miramar, Ft. Lauder-
dale. $8000 back to first time
home buyers.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700

OWNER WILL FINANCE!
1765 NW 40 STREET
Four Bedrooms, two baths.
$79,900. No money needed
to buy If you can qualify or
10% down and owner will
give financing. Call Jack.
954-920-9530

WHY RENT?
- BUYIll
. Two, three and four
,bedroom homes avail-
'able. $1900 - $2900 iownt
payment .580 credit.score
-needed, North.Dade,adi ,
:South.Broward homes-'
available. Ask about,$000,
for first tlmer hbme owners.
Pick up list at office.
NDI Realtors
290 NW 183 Street
Miami Gardens, FL
305-655-1700 *


BART M.WILLIAMS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109



YOUR'AD


COL BE:


ss












BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THF MIAMI TIMES. AUG 19-25, 2009


HBCUs hit hard by recession


By Sandra Endo

Zakiya Williams had
found a perfect fit at
Spelman 'College. But
when the tough econo-
my hit the sophomore
and her family 'hard,
she packed her bags,
ready to drop out.
"I was not able to
get loans, nor were my
parents," she said. "It
became really difficult
because I felt all my
avenues were exhaust-
ed."
It's a familiar story
at colleges across the
country, especially at
historically Black col-
leges. and universities
where, in some cases,
up to 95 percent of
students rely on finan-
cial aid to fund their
education.
President Barack
Obama has increased
Pell Grant funding to
a maximum of $5,500
per student with stimu-
lus and budget funds.
But still, many Black
colleges expect enroll-
ment rates to keep
shrinking as families
and students struggle
in the economic down-
turn.


Zakiya Williams is among the students at historically black colleges and
universities affected by the recession.


"Every college and
university is asking the
question, 'What will
our enrollment be next
year?' not because of a
change in institution,
but because families
are really being hit
by the economy every
day," Spelman College
President Beverly Tat-
um said.
"Many students want


to come, but will they
be able to afford to
come?"
Since, 2004, $238
million in federal
funding has been ear-
marked annually for
historically Black col-
leges. In the last two
years, those institu-
tions benefited from an
extra $85 million each
year under the College


Most pleased by strong turnout


BUDGET
continued from 7D

"I am grateful for the
time these individu-
als took to come out
and voice what was
important to them.
Everything that
was discussed' at
the meeting will be
taken into consider-
ation as I meet with
my colleagues at the
enc of. this month
and in September to
balance the budget."
Moss was sur-
prised but yet
pleased at the turn-'


out of residents in
Miami Gardens.
"I thought, that
there was a desire
from the communi-
ty for services to be
restored," -he said.
"The community
would be in a re-
ally shape if those,
services were elimi-
nated."
At the end of the
meeting, Commis-
signer Jqrd.an asked
the attendees if they
would be willing to
pay a little more
in property taxes
to support a major-


ity of these services.
Overall, the crowd
responded with a re-
sounding "Yes."
The Miami-Dade
County Commission
will .meet through-
out the month of
August in a series of
budget conferences.
The County's official
budget hearings are
scheduled for Sept. 3
and 17.
.Residents, who
did not get a chance
to speak or had ad-
ditional questions,
were encouraged to
call Jordan's hotline.


Classified


Employment


ASSOCIATE
PROJECT
MANAGER:
PBS&J (MIAMI, FL)

Monitor construction com-
pliance, conduct complex
construction document re-
views for projects in South
Florida and international
locations. Contractor over.
sight, construction claims
mitigation, negotiate RCOs,
schedule development,
problem resolution. BS de-
gree in Crvil Engineering or
equivalent with five years
experience with federal and
public agencies. Building
Code requiremenis for
Structural systems and
knowledge ol Primavera
Scheduling Software are
highly prelerrea Travel Is
required. Apply and view
job posting 13161 al
www pbsj.com. EOE


DIRECTOR FOR DAY-
CARE
Also Community .Outreach
worker to counsel pregnant
women. 305-377-1952


Directors and Teachers
with credentials for Sheyes
of Miami Daycare. All inter-
ested call 305-986-8395.

HIRING NOWI!I
Macedonia Missionary Bap-
tist Church of Miami. Inc.
is seeking a professional
church musician skilled in
piaro, organ and choir minr.
istry Apply in person at.
3515 Douglas Rd
(37th Ave)
Coconut Grove
Rev. Rudolph Daniels
Pastor 305-343-4290


Mystery Shoppers /
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

North Miami Preschool
Seeking Teachers, Direc-
tors, mature and experi-
enced. CDA a Must.
305-948-9235

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

Merchandise
MOVING SALE
15922 N.W. 38 Place
Washers, dryers, five
refrigerators, three'dinette
sets, furniture and lotsmore.
Friday and Saturday 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
305-965-4039

Schools
BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Concealed
and Traffic School Services.
786-333-2084.



Services
B.T. EXPRESS
PICKUP AND DELIVERY
Plus property management.
No credit card needed. Call
Bantu at .786-223-7231.


AD VERISE TODAYI'ur


BEST PRICES IN TOWNI!
Now offering Pest Control!
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles. 305-801-5690


EVERTON ELECTRIC
Specializing in all types of
electrical work Commercial
and Residenrial. Licensed
and Insured. Rate as low as
$45 per hour 786-329-0903

GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

HANDYMAN
SERVICES PLUS
Plumbing, painting, sprinkles,
roofing, tile and repairs.
786-348-3235

Fictitious Name

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
TWIGROUPS
900 Brickell Key Blvd.
Unit 1602
Miami, FL 33131
in the city of Miami, FI
Owner: Lourdes Espinal
intends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporation of State,
Tallahassee, FL. Dated this
19th day of August, 2009.


MOBILE WASH
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
ALL-N-ONE- MOBILE
WASH
1116 Rutland Street
Opa Locka, FL 33054
in the city of Opa Locka, FL
Owner: Thomas Andrews
intends to register the said
name with the Division
of Corporation of State,
Tallahassee, FL. Dated this
19th day of August, 2009.


Cost Reduction and
Access Act. When that
program ends in May
2010, the institutions
may feel the squeeze
even more.
"We are under re-
sourced," Clark Atlan-
ta University President
Carlton' Brown said.
"We try to keep our
costs as low as pos-


sible. That means that
our margins are always
very tight."
In the Atlanta area
alone, Morehouse Col-
lege laid off 25 adjunct
professors, Spelman
is eliminating 35 jobs
next year, and Clark
Atlanta University's
budget cuts fell mid-
semester with 70 pro-
fessors and 30 staff
members let'go.


"Some of our sched-
ules got changed, all
in the middle of the se-
mester," said Clark At-
lanta student Demetra
Rochelle. "It was pretty
rough."
The White House bud-
get office says Obama's
proposed budget calls
for a five percent in-
crease in funding for
historically black col-
leges. But many in the


I '


$425 for 13
weeks in print
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


Miami Beach Community Development Corporation
Attention First Time Homebuyers

MBCDC has received funding from the State Initiatives Partnership Program (SHIP) through the City of
' Miami Beach
to provide Financial Assistance to prospective First Time Homebuyers who desire to purchase a
home in the City of Miami Beach.

1. Applicants may not earn more than 120% of area median income.
2. Eligible housing units must be foreclosed and title transferred?
3. Maximum Purchase Price is $386,652
4. Financial Assistance available between $40,000-$60,000.

Applications are accepted beginning August 24, 2009 and ending August 31, 2009, Monday thru Friday
from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Applicants will be selected through a computer lottery system. Please ask for.Julia Martinez or Bianka
Fonseca


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE COVERING OPENING OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be'received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, for the projects listed herein, until 2:00 P.M. local
time. Tuesday, the 22nd day of September 2009. at1450 N.E. Second Ave. Room 351. Miami, Florida, following which time and
place, or as soon there after as the Board can attend to the same, the said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the
Board Auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. Award of
the contract will be made to the lowest, pre-qualified responsible and responsive bidder for the actual amount bid considering base
bid and accepted alternates (if any) as listed in the bidding documents. The Board will award the contract based upon the results of
the tabulations as covered by applicable laws and regulations.

Project No. G-ENV/TB-2009-GR/1&2
Project No. G-ENV/TB-2009-GR/3&4
Project No. G-ENV/TB-2009-GR/5&6 -
GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATIONS
Term Contract
2009
Mianmi-Dade County, Florida.

In an effort to ensure the timely remediation of asbestos and mold containing materials, and the installation of non-asbestos replace-
ment materials, in Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) facilities, the School Board has divided the district's six (6) regions
into three contracts of two (2) regions each, in accordance with the standard regional distribution schools established by M-DCPS/
School Operations. Awards will be made to three (3) prime contractors, on the basis of one contractor for. each two-region contract.
The three contracts will be assigned for Regions 1 & 2, 3 & 4 and 5 & 6 respectively. Eligible contractors will be permitted to bid on
more than one contract. However, no contractor will be.awarded more than one contract. Assignment of contracts will be made rela-
tive to the bid ranking, with the first choice going to the lowest bidder for each contract.

ALL THREE CONTRACTS ARE OPEN TO ALL BIDDERS THAT I;IAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PRIOR TO BIDDING.

Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one CD with the bid and contract documents from the office of the Department of Asbestos Manage-
ment, 12525 N.W. 28th Avenue, Miami, Florida 33167, on or after August 17, 2009., from 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM, (contact person Mr.
Dan Marple at (305) 995-4591). Three printed copies of the Project Manual for General Environmental Rpmediations/Term Contract
2009, will be provided to the successful bidders upon award of Bid.

The Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Thursday, September 3rd 2009 at 10:00 A.M., at the Department.of Asbestos Man-
agement. 12525 N.W. 28th Avenue, Suite 509, Miami, FL 33167

PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS HIGHLY ENCOURAGED.

CONE OF SILENCE:

Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted for this RFP beginning with issuance of the Legal Advertise-
ment and ending upon such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a con-
tract, to reject all bids or responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the
Cone of Silence may be punishable as provided for under Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, in-addition to any ofher penalty provided by
law. All written communications must be sent to the Department of Asbestos Management, 12525 N.W. 28th Avenue, Miami, Florida
33167, (contact person Mr. Dan Marple at (305) 995-4591) and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Av-
enue, Room 268B, Miami, Florida 33132.

NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the planner specified in Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, and in accordance
with � 120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. Any person who
is adversely affected by the agency decision or intended decision shall .file with the agency a notice of protest in writing within 72
hours after the posting of the notice of decision or intended decision. Failure to file a notice of protest or failure to file a formal writ-
ten protest within the time permitted shall constitute a waiver of proceedings. With respect to a protest of the terms, conditions, and
specifications contained in a solicitation, including any provisions governing the methods of ranking bids, bids, or replies, awarding
contracts, reserving rights of further negotiation, or modifying or amending any contract, the notice of protest shall be filpd in writing
within 72 hours after the posting of the solicitation. In either event, the protest must include a bond in accordance with the provisions
of F.S. 255.0516 and Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11. The formal written protest shall be filed within 10 days after the date the notice of
protest isfiled. The formal written protest shall state with particularity the facts and law upon which the protest is based. Saturday,
Sunday, and state holidays shall be excluded in the computation of the 72-hour time periods established herein.

JESSICA LUNSFORD ACT:

The successful Bidder(s) shall fully'comply with the AJessica Lunsford Act@ and all related Board Rules and procedures as appli-
cable.

School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/schoolboard/rules/.

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of'non-discrimination in educational programs/activities and_
employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.

Any firm, or individual, whose contract has been terminated by the Board Awith cause@ within the last three years, shall not be con-
sidered for commission under this proposal.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

Legal Ad to Run: August 19, 2009 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


I











11D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 19-25, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Builder w ner Ubom a jump In expected homw sales

I. ..


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


ELECTION NOTICE
The Miaml-Dade County Canvassing Board will convene at the Office of the Supervisor of
Elections 2700 N. W. 87" Avenue, Miami, Florida. The Canvassing Board is convening on
these dlesto to co the Highland Ranch Estates. Hammock Lakes and Keystone Point
security Guard SaectlTadn Districts Bections to be held on Septetmbeor 1.200G.
DATETIME ACTIVITY
Thursday, 100 1. Logc and Accuracy Test ot the opcal can voting systems
10:00 am. io be used for paper ballots
Monday, 9/1409 1. Pt -count Logic and Accuracy Testof the optical scan
10:00 a.m. through system used for paper ballots
Wednesday. 9/16/09 2. Ballots opening and processing (as needed)
______-,________ 3. Doicatln o batot Ians needed)
Tuesday, 9/15(.9 1. Tabnaaon ott est rts s
7:00 P.m. 2. Unfficiall Results
Wednesday. 9/109 I. Canvassng ao presumed invdbanots
Canvassing: 2. Tabulation of resulted completed
10:00 a.m to completion 3. CertifCation oat S Reauls by the County Canvassing
Board
4. Post-count Logic and Accuracy Teat of lhe optical scan
'system used tor paper t
S. Precincts and question selection for manual post-election
S . Audt process stars t completion
AN proceedings wil be open to the public. For a sIgn language Interpeter or Oiher
accomoodations, please cat 305-49-9405 at least tive days In advance. In accordance with
Section 286&0105, Florida Statutes. a person who appeals any decision by Ihe canvassing board
with respect to any matter considered at a meeting, he or she will need a record. of the
proceedings and therefore win need to ensure that a verbatim record aof the proceedngs Is
made.
Log teutrSola
Supervisor of Elections
M*MIs-ODade County




SISTER LISA
I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL,OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life, such
as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business transac-
tions of all kinds. I never fail to reunite the separated,
cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome enemies,
rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling blocks and
bad luckofall kind.There is no hearts sad so dreary that
I cannot bring sunshine into it. In fact, no matter what
may be your hope, fear or ambition, I guarantee to tell it
before you utter a word to me.-
7615 NW 7TH AVE. MIAMI
305-757-8705


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
E tablished Since 1953 * One of the oldest pediatric Practices
in Dade County Over 50 years of Child Care
WEBSITE
' 11 W www.rozalynhpaschalmd.com
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 * Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 * Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 305-652-6095


*Board Certifiedphysicians
*Sedated Procedures up to 22 weeks'
-.Complete GYN Services
*Serving the community for over 20 years
*Licensed by the state of Florida Department of Health
68-A North east 167st. (Between North MiamiAve. & 1stAve.)
Phone: 305-947-0885 / Phone: 305-947-1268





* Accidents * Arrests
* DUI 8 Tickets * Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense * Wills/Probate
* Personal Injury * Divorce/Custody
I100's of Lawyers Statewide


MIAMI-DADE



ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PROJECT NAME: Gate J17 PLB Modifications for A380
PROJECT NO.: K151A ("Project")

Sealed Bids for the Project designated above will be received for and in be-
half of Miami-Dade County, by the Office of the,Clerk, in the Stephen P. Clark
Center, Suite 17-202, 111 N.W. Ist Street, Miami, Florida, 33128 until 2:00 P.M.
September 14, 2009 or as modified by addendum, at which time all Bids will be
taken to a room to be designated by the Clerk of the Board in said Stephen P.
Clark Center. Bids are to be submitted in two envelopes. Bids received after the
time and date specified! will not be considered. Envelopes A of Bids, containing
only the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) will be publicly opened and the names of
the Bidders' read aloud. Upon notification by the Department of Small Business
Development, bidders may correct defects on the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s)
within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submission. Envelopes B of Bids, contain-
ing all of the remaining bidding documents, from Bidders that have not been re-
jected as not responsive will be opened publicly and read aloud forty-eight (48)
hours after the bid submission date and non-responsive bids will not be opened.
Bidders are invited to be present at each opening. The County reserves the
right to postpone or cancel the bid opening at any time prior to the scheduled
opening of bids.

IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES: Upgrading Gate J17 to accommo-
date A380 aircraft. Work includes passenger loading bridge foundations, bol-
lards, pavement markings, maintenance of traffic, curtainwall modifications, new
automatic sliding door assembly and supporting electrical systems.

BID DOCUMENTS: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will make the Bid
Documents available, on August 14, 2009, for inspection by individuals by ap-
pointment only, on business days during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at
Miami International Airport, Building 5A, Fourth Floor, 4200 N.W. 36 Street,
Miami, Florida. Interested parties are to schedule an appointment to review the
Bid Documents through William C. Murphy at 305-876-0922. The duration of
each appointment will not exceed two (2) hours. However, the Department may
schedule additional time slots (not to run consecutively with the original appoint-
ment), if available. At the time of the appointment, -and prior to any Bid Docu-
ment review, interested parties will be required to present current, government
issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License, United States Passport),
documentation that they are licensed architect, engineer, or contractor who may
perform work on, or related to, the Project, and sign and notarize a Confidential-
ity Affidavit certifying that the company and each authorized employee agrees,
that in accordance with Florida Statutes � 119.071(3)(b) and one or more of the
following Florida Statutes, � 281.301 and � 331.22, to maintain the information
contained in the Bid Documents as being exempt from the provision of Florida
Statute � 119.07(1) and � 24(a), Article I of the State Constitution. In addition,
interested parties are advised that individuals will be monitored while reviewing
these documents. Interested parties may take notes, however, no photographs
and/or copying of the documents will be allowed.

The Bid Documents can be purchased for $1150.00. Payment shall consist of:

1. Non-refundable Payment of $150.00 for each set of Bid Documents
2. Refundable Deposit of $1,000.00 for each set of Bid Documents

The Bid Documents can be purchased for each set for $150.00 non-refundable
payment and shall be by any type of check, or money order, only, and made
payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. The refundable deposit of
$1000.00 must be by Cashier's or Certified check only, and made payable to the
Miami Dade Aviation Department. Refund to be returned upon return of the Bid
Documents to William C. Murphy in Building 5A, fourth floor at 305-876-0922.
Each interested Bidder shall furnish an address, telephone and fax numbers,
and email address for the purpose of contact during the bidding process. A busi-
ness card with all of this information will suffice.

Bid Documents may be purchased in person or by mail. To purchase a set of the
Bid Documents in person, each purchaser.must present a current

A. copy of government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License)
B. copy of the architect, engineer, or contractor qualifier's license issued by
the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation for the
Bidder making the purchase
B. . an original, notarized Confidentiality Affidavit signed by the licensed
architect, engineer, or contractor.

Confidentiality Affidavits may be obtained in advance by downloading from
www.miami-airport.com/html/bids.html. Bid Documents may also be purchased
by mail by sending a copy of the requisite identification, license, original nota-
rized Confidentiality Affidavit, contact information, and checks along with a Fe-
dEx or UPS billing account number to the place of purchase indicated below.

The Confidentiality Affidavit, non-refundable payment and refundable deposit
shall be delivered in person to Elisa Dimitropoulos or.designee, at'TY'Lin Inter-
national / HJ Ross,201 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables, Florida, 33134 between
the hours of 9:00AM - 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Upon payment and
verification, of the required identification documents, the verified individual will
be authorized to pick, up the number of sets of the Bid Dpcuments for which
payment has been made. Only full sets of the Bid Documents will be authorized
for pickup.
All Bid Documents, including any copies made, shall be returned to the same
location where they were purchased. All Bidders that timely return the Bid Docu-
ment will have their deposit returned. Those Bidders that purchase Bid Docu-
ments, but elect not to participate in the bidding process are also required to
return all copies of the Bid Documents to the location of purchase. Failure to re-
turn the Bid Documents and copies made to the location of purchase within five
(5) working days after the Bid Due Date may be reported to a Law Enforcement
Investigating Authority and will forfeit the deposit. Furthermore, Bidders that fail
to return Bid Documents shall not be allowed to participate in future Confidential
solicitations until such time that the firm has taken corrective actions that are
satisfactory to Miami Dade County. The purchaser of the Bid Documents shall
be required to certify that they have returned.all original Bid Documents plus any
copies and they have not retained any copies.

All bids must be submitted as set forth in the Bid Documents. The County re-
serves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities,
or to re-advertise the Project. The County, by choosing to exercise its right of
rejection, does so without the imposition of any liability against the County by
any and all bidders.

PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will hold a
Pre-Bid Conference and Site Inspection on August 29, 2009 from 9:00 am to
12:00 noon at Miami International Airport, Building 5A, 4200 N.W. 36 Street,
Fourth Floor, Conference Room F, for all interested parties. Attendance will
be limited to two (2) representatives per firm. No other Site Inspections will be


provided by the Miami-Dade Aviation Department. It is the policy of Miami-Dade
County to comply with all the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA). For sign language, interpreter services, material in accessible format,
other special accommodations, or airport-related ADA concerns, please contact
the MDAD Office of ADA Coordination at (305) 876-7024.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

Contract Measures for this Project is (are): 19.00%

COMMUNITY WORKFORCE PROGRAM

The Community Workforce Goal for this Project is: 11.50%

BID GUARANTY: Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty of not less
than five percent (5%) of the Total Bid in a manner required by the Instructions
to Bidders. No Bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for the
receipt of Bids for a period of 9ne-hundred and eighty (180) days. The County
reserves the right to reject any .or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregulari-
ties, to reject all bids, or to re-advertise for Bids.

BID IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS AMONG OTHERS:

1) The Miami-Dade County Responsible Wages Ordinance.

2) The Provisions in reference to the timetables for minority and female employ-
ment participation, expressed as a percentage, for the Contractor's aggregate
work force in each trade on all construction work in the covered area, as fol-
lows:

Timetables Goal for minority Goals for female
Participation for each Participation for
From 4/01/81 trade in Miami-DadeCounty each trade
Until further notice 39.5 % 6.9 %


As used in this Notice, and in the Contract resulting from this solicitation, the
"covered area" is Miami-Dade County, Florida. These goals are applicable to
all Contractor's construction work (whether or not it is Federal or Federally as-
sisted) per formed in the covered area.

3) The "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal,Equal Employ-
ment Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications" as set forth in.the Con-
tract Documents.

The Contractor's compliance with the Executive Order and the regulations in
41CFR Part 60-4 shall be based on its implement tion of the Equal Opportunity
Clause, specific affirmative action obligations required by the specifications set
forth in 41CFR 60-4.3(a), and its efforts to meet the goals established for the
geographical area where the Contract resulting from this solicita tion is to be
performed. The hours of minority and female employ ment and training must be
substantially uniform throughout the length of the Contract, and in each trade,
and the Contractor shall make a good faith effort to employ minorities and wom-
en evenly on each of its projects. The transfer of minority or female employee
or trainee from Contractor to Contractor or from project to project for the sole
purpose of meeting the Contractor's goals shall be a violation of the Contract,
the Executive Order and the regUlations in 41CFR Part 60-4. Compli ance with
the goals will be measured against the total work hours performed.

The Contractor shall provide written notification to the Director of the Office of
Federal Contract Compliance Programs within ten (10) working days of award
of any construction subcon tract in excess of $10,000 at any tier for construction
work under the Contract resulting from this solicitation. The notification shall
list the name, address and telephone number of the Subcon tractor; employer
identification number of the Subcontractor; estimated dollar amount of the sub-
contract; estimated starting and completion dates of the subcontract; and the
geographical area in which the Contract is to be performed.

4) Miami-Dade County has enacted an ordinance governing utilization of
certified Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE) Subcontractors. Re-
quirements for compliance with this ordinance are contained in the Contract
Documents.

5) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t), a "Cone of Si-
lence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs or bids after advertisement and termi-
nates at the time the CountyManager issues a written recommendation to the
Board of County Commissioners or a Notice of Contract Award Recommen-
dation, whichever comes first. The Cone of Silence prohibits communications
regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between potential vendors, service providers,
bidders, lobbyists, or consultants and the County's professional staff, includ-
ing.but not limited to the County Manager and the County Manager's staff. A.
Cone of Silence is also imposed between the Mayor, County Commissioners
or their respective staffs and any member of the County's professional staff
including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's
staff.

The provisions of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) do not apply
to oral communications at pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before
selection committees, oral communications with the Contracting Officer, as
published by the Department of Small Business Development in their weekly
Cone of SilenceProject Information Report, for administering the procurement
process, Contract negotiations during any duly noticed public meetings, public
presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly
noticed public meeting or communications in writing at any time unless spe-
cifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders or
proposers must file a copy of any written communication with the Clerk of the
Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County
shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall
be made available to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of Miami-Dade
County Code Section 2-11.1(t) by any bidder or proposer shall render any RFP
award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person having personal knowl-
edge of a violation of this Ordinance shall report such violation to the State
Attorney and/or may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders or
Proposers should reference the actual Ordinance for further clarification.

6) The County shall not be responsible for any modifications or alterations
made to the Bid Documents or to the Contract Documents other.than those
made by Addendum, Change Order, or Work Order. Any purchase of partial
sets of documents shall be at the purchaser's risk.

7) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2.8-1 (d), a Bidder shall
have on file, prior to contract award a duly executed Uniform County Affi-
davit with the Miami-Dade County Department of Procurement Management
(DPM), to be maintained with the bidders vendors registration file. The Bidder
is responsible for obtaining the Vendor Registration Package, including all af-
fidavits by downloading from the DPM website at www.miamidade.gov or from
the Vendor Assistance Unit at 111 N.W. 1st Street, 13thFloor, Miami, Florida
33128, (305) 375-5773.


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