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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00843
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: August 12, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00843

Full Text







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HAITIAN LIFE IN MIAMI


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*********************SCH 3-DICIT
512 P1
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11707
CAIHESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Recession brings seniors back into job market


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
Larry Young is concerned about-Black
seniors, some of whom are re-entering
the workforce during this recession. He
recognizes that many seniors will have
to acquire new job skills if they hope to
compete in today's market.
Young, 57, knows, because he is one
of these seniors, and he credits the Se-
nior Community Service Employment
Program (SCSEP) with getting him back


into the workforce.
Young wishes more
Black seniors would
take advantage, but
thinks he under-
stands why, they _ ,
don't.
"Nobody in the -
Black community Y YOUNG
knows about this," LARRY YOUNG
he said.
SCSEP is a program geared toward
enhancing "employment opportuni-


1*11m!


ties for older Americans and promotes
them as a solution for businesses seek-
ing trained, qualified, and reliable em-
ployees," according to its website. The
program is run by the United States
Department of Labor. It includes both
seminars and classroom instruction.
"It's an outstanding program," says
Young. "Clearly not every senior citizen
can go back in to the workforce, but
it's a great program for those who are
able."
Under the program, participants work
an average of 20 hours a week, and are
Please turn to PROGRAM 4A


Don King visits Belafonte Tacolcy Center
After he read a book to them students crowded around legendary boxing promoter Donald "Don" King at the Bela-
fonte Tacolcy Center on Friday. -MiamiTimes photo/ Sandra J. Charite PAGE 4A


IOi -
A.". T "" " '


-Miami Times Photo/S. Charite
Natalie Vertus alongside founders of Miami's Haitian Heritage
Museum, Serge Rodrigue and Eveline Pierre, at the conference
on Sunday.
Second Annual Haitian
Diaspora Unity Congress
Have you been wondering what's going on in the Haitian commu-
nity? Have you been looking for Haitian news? The Miami Times has
began a weekly new column called the La Vie Ayisyen Nan Miyami
(Haitian Life in Miami) that will consist of news and current events in


the Haitian community and in Haiti.


PAGE 9A


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One Family - Serving Since 1923


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD CO U NTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS
Volume 86 Number 50 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 12-18, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Federal program helps


seniors re-enter work force B


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OPINION


A 2 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGU , 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


LM- I


More Blacks should

consider law enforcement
It is common knowledge that Miami's Black communi-
ties face a multitude of problems.
Gun violence and drugs receive a lot of media atten-
tion. Poverty is another important issue in the Black com-
munity. More important, perhaps, is a pervasive mistrust
of the police. Many Blacks feel that they are targeted by
police unfairly. The case of Henry Louis Gates Jr., the Har-
vard professor, who was arrested from his own home after a
neighbor reported a potential break-in, was not an isolated
one. It is this mistrust that deters people from reporting
crimes to police, thus further encouraging criminals.
How to address this issue? Nothing in life is ever simple-
except when it is.
More Blacks should consider careers in law enforcement.
When a young Black male joins the police force, the im-
pact is at least threefold.
His very presence deters criminal activity in neighbors. If
he was poor, he can expect a rise in his fortunes, as police-
-by most accounts--earn a fair salary.
Most importantly, his neighbors are more likely to trust
someone they've watched grow up. The police department
now has a familiar face.
The mistrust of police officers, inevitably translates into
disdain for Black police officers, but of all places, this should
not be so in Miami.
In Miami, Blacks have a proud history of law enforcement.
The first, and only, Black police precinct in the nation was
established right here in Miami. Lawson E. Thomas, the
first Black Judge in the south since reconstruction presided
right here in Miami as well.
The point is, that wearing the badge of law enforcement is
something that a Black Miamian could justifiably take pride
in. They would be advancing a legacy.
Whether fair or unfair, many Blacks harbor a distrust of
local law enforcement. But if more of us could set aside our
resentments and make the effort to change it from within,
all would benefit.

HIV/AIDS staggering

in the Black community
"Every 91/2 minutes another person in Amer-
ica becomes infected with HIV. That's some-
one's brother, sister, best friend, father or mother."
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the
nation's highly respected public health agency of the U.S.
Department of Health and Human Services, introduced this
message at a kickoff for its new Act Against AIDS campaign.
"This message denotes how deadly the disease can-be," says
Marva Smith Battle-Bey, president qf the National Coalition
of 100 Black Women ,(NCBW). "Since the implementation of
our first HIV/AIDS program in 1990," she said, "HIV/AIDS
cases have been on the rise among Black men and women,
especially the women. We, want to finish what we started, un-
til reduction in HIV/AIDS among Black women has acceler-
ated 'at the desired rate."
Over the years, Coalition chapters across the country have
participated as part of our national program effort to bring
awareness of and attention to this major crisis in �the Black
community. In 2004, for instance, we declared October 3-9
as NCBW HIV/AIDS Awareness Week and decided to continue
our national effort through National Black HIV/AIDS Aware-
ness and Information Day, February 7, 2005. A partnership
followed soon after the latter initiative with the U.S.
Department of'Health and Human Services and the National
Black Leadership Commission in a mobilization effort to en-
courage Black women and girls to get educated, get involved,
get tested and get real about HIV/AIDS. These program ef-
forts served as the catalyst to,exist with the Black AIDS Insti-
tute our first HIV/AIDS conference in December 2005.
With funding and support from CDC in February 2009,
NCBW is continuing its efforts to reduce HIV (human im-
mune deficiency virus) and AIDS (acquired immune deficien-
cy syndrome) in the Black community. We selected 30 NCBW
chapters to participate in the launch of a new CDC program,
the Act Against AIDS Leadership Initiative (AAALI). Guided
by a template developed by the national Program Committee,
24 of them developed their own action plans for the com-
mittee's approval. Of these chapters, 20-Baltimore Metro-
politan, Central Mississippi, Chattanooga, Greater Cleveland,
Delaware, Indianapolis, Long Island, Los Angeles, Manhat-
tan, Memphis, Metropolitan Atlanta, Milwaukee, Greater New
Orleans, Northern Virginia, Oakland Bay Area, Polk Coun-
ty (FL), Sacramento, San Antonio, Suffolk County (NY) and
Tampa - have been approved by the committee and con-
firmed thus far.
The approved plans, most of which target young women
aged 15-35, include workshop activities, evaluation forms,
printed materials on referrals for testing from health depart-
ments and community partners. Project activities will occur
over a six-month period, ending in August 2009, as more
than 100 organizations serve as our community partners.
Workshop topics range from basic facts such as the causes of
HIV and AIDS to conspiracy theories to well-known stigmas.
In addition, diagnostic and treatment experts in the area of
HIV/AIDS discuss such topics as prevention, testing and com-
munity resources. Attendees also view a video of two women
- one living with HIV and one living with AIDS, followed by a
panel discussion that encourages attendees' participation in
an effort to break down barriers.
"One of the strengths of our program," said Michele McNeill-
Emery, former president of the Baltimore Metropolitan Chap-
ter, "is the willingness of chapter members to listen. We asked
our student-attendees whether our program could offer more.


Qfe fI2iami Timtn

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 541h Street
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Otiice Box 270200
Bue.na Vista Sialion Miami Fi.:'nrda 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR.. Editor 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Pubisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member ot National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member ol the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates One Year $45.00 - Six Months $30.00 - Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster. Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O0 Box 270200
Buena Vista Slalion. Miami, FL 33127-0200 * 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes irha America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal ngnts Hating no person hearing no person toe
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief rha all persons are hun as long as anyone is held back

Ap The Media Audit


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* Syndicated Content


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* *


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Black community: The center of Miami-Dade health-c

Dear Editor, expected to lose $56 million my community is the abun-


Miami Dade County has an
astounding 600,000 thousand
uninsured people with an esti-
mated 80 percent who work but
cannot afford health coverage.
A person does not have to be
a rocket scientist to know that
many of the uninsured reside
in Liberty City, Wynwood, Mod-
el City, Brownsville and Little
Haiti. To add to this madness,
the Jackson Health' system is


this year and $168 million next
year. Why? One of the main rea-
sons is the large percentage -of
the 600,000 thousand, mostly
poor, people getting "free care"
in the emergency rooms. Al-
though an initiative launched
by the County and Blue Cross
and Blue Shield of Florida, Mi-
ami Dade Blue, is aimed at ad-
dressing the problem more has
to be done.
One thing I have noticed in


dance of "cardiac arrest cen-
ters" or restaurants that serve
a combination of grease, flour,
and fat masquerading as a
meal. Now over time, an entire
community whose diet includes
these three killers can expect
many trips to the hospital. In
some cases, people will check
in but won't check out. Preven-
tion and intervention will not
only lessen the financial burden
hospitals are feeling but en-


Black people stop complaining, start working


Dear Edito-,

I have lived in this com-
munity for almost 20 years
so when I heard about the
County budget cuts, I was
not upset nor dismayed. One
thing that I learned years ago
is we (the Black community)
need to stop depending on the'


government to build our com-
munity. This is where we live.
Mayor Carlos Alvarez does not
-live here so how can we expect
him to care about what hap-
pens here. The Black commu-
nity is always the one waiting
for the local government to
tend to us but why? We have
to take care of ourselves.


Marlins Stadium not coming


Dear Editor,

I am writing to you about the
article "Coming Together: Mar-
lins Stadium, Where will Black
businesses fit in?" As this Mar-
lin Stadium saga continues,
it has a life of it own now! We
will continue to monitor how to
process is working out against


all odds to build this private
venue from the citizens and
taxpayers of Miami-Dade not
allowed to vote on this 2.4 bil-
lion dollar project. Citizens
outcry were not acknowledged
and the privilege to vote with-
out the backing of our City/
County tone-deaf Commis-
sioners to say so.


"are crisis

chance the overall health of in-
dividuals. How about initiating
a campaign to promote healthy
living through the construction
of fruit and vegetables stands
in many of the parks in Miami-
Dade County? I mean really
promote it like some promoted
the Marlins Stadium. However,
in this case lives are enriched
instead of pockets.

Dr. Robert Malone Jr.
Miami


We complained about the F Center to clo
schools and shut up when the the Black c
failing schools bumped up together anc
to a "D". I don't know about together to h
you but a "D" is still failing tural Center
in my book. We are the loud- too much w
est talkers with very few work job.
to back up our words so what
do you expect? I don't want Reg
the African Heritage Cultural


together for our good
Noir comes the reality . . . for citizens
of what Mr. Samson had said within the Cc
at all these community town- That 10-15
hall meetings in the churches upon for Blac
about "Black business will ,be the Marlins s
inclusive." Our concerns is for and we mus
taxpayers not to be hoodwinked is.
with dipping into the county's
general obligation bonds (rev- M
enue) which is money set aside


ise but why don't
communityy come
I put our money
elp fund the Cul-
. Oh yeah, that's
ork and not our


inald A. Thomas,
Overtown


and emergencies
>unty.
5 percent agreed
:k businesses with
should be honored
,t demand that it


arva Lightbourne,
Miami


5000 Role Models need to do background checks


Dear Editor,

The July 22 issue in The
Miami Times showed a recipi-
ent of the 5000 Role Models
of Excellence scholarship with
his mom, who is a teacher.
Her son had received a $8000
scholarship to attend college. I


thought the 5000 Role Models
was for at-risk young men. The
mother of the young man is a
Special-Ed teacher and she
teaches at a college. She said
herself she could not qualify
at many places due to her in-
come. How is it then that the
5000 Role Models would not


look at her income? At-risk
usually means low-income stu-
dents from bad areas, poverty
and etc. Even if a child has no
father in the home and needs
a role model doesn't mean the
child is poor.
This woman of the winner
I'm sure lives in a decent (nice)


area making good money.
Seems like she could afford to
send her son to college but de-
cided to let 5000 Role Models
do it for her instead which is
wrong.

Linda Simmons,
North Miami


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


' 3A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


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Are police reality shows good or bad for Miami?


MARK TRIMMINGS, 54
Minister, Miami


The fact that
the shows are
filmed here
isn't either
good or bad for
Miami.
It all de-
pends upon
how they de-


pict the story. If it's a one-sided
show, ("Cops," for example, is
very one-sided), then it gives
off a negative image of the com-
munity. If the show just retells
events as they occurred, then
it's good.

ELIJAH GRANT, 23
Student and Archer, Miami


Police real-
ity shows are
bad in any
context. They
distort think-
ing and also
give children a
chance to pick
up bad ideas.
When chil-


dren see people who look like
their friends and neighbors--in
neighborhoods that look like


theirs--being . consistently ar-
rested and always committing
crimes, it tells them that that's
the outcome they can expect for
themselves.
Video games don't help in this
matter either, like "Grand Theft
Auto" for example. It really just
all focuses on negative think-
ing.

JANE ALLEN, 45
Customer Service, Miami

The shows
are a good , .- .
idea. They .
don't make
the city look ' ..
bad, they just
tell the truth.
People watch
them for the
same reasons
that they watch the news. I
think these shows make us
more aware of what's going on,
so it's a good thing really. I know
things like that are controver-
sial, but if we really cared, we'd
make the necessary changes.

REGINALD SIMON, 23
Pharmacy Tech and Student, Miami

Both. They don't really show


the best of the Mb,
neighborhood
outsiders, so _
maybe they
aren't great for
tourism. But _
on the other
hand they . ...
build aware-
ness of the
crime going on here. The crews
also spend money to film here,
so in these times that's a bonus
too.
If you think about it, there's
crime all over the world, so I re-
ally don't see the problem. Again,
we do need the money. So they
might as well shoot here.

ANDRE LOTT, 50
Hospital Worker, Miami

They're bad. They don't make
the commu- ...-* --
nity look good. I
They make
the police look -; 11"4; *'
good at the ex- .
pense of the ' ... c
community.
It's the police L
themselves
who are the
problem. Those shows show the
police speaking to people dis-


respectfully and just .treating
people however they want, but
still make them look like the
good guys.
They show community mem-
bers doing bad things, but they
don't show all the cover ups
when the police themselves do
something wrong.

DARLENE CARMICHAEL, 20
Student, Miami

I don't think the shows make
the city look
bad. The
peoplemake
it look bad.
They don't
show any-
thing that
didn't, hap-
pen, so if
people re-
ally don't
want Miami to look bad, they'd
stop doing the things that get
shown. I personally don't have
a problem with the shows
filming here, and if it both-
ered people as much as they
pretend, they'd behave differ-
ently.


'We don't believe it, but there's a rumor going around town
that Rep. Kendrick Meek is giving second thoughts to his
U.S. Senate run next year. Stay tuned.

And what is this story we are hearing about State Rep'. of
District 109 James Bush III thinking about running for the
Senate seat being vacated by Sen. Frederica S. Wilson, while
Bernadine Bush, wife of Rep. Bush goes after his seat.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton served notice this. week
not,to mess with her husband, Bill. She was clearly irritated
by a question on Monday when a Congolese University stu-
dent asked for her husband's thinking on an international
matter. "My husband is not Secretary of State, I am," Clin-
ton replied.

Florida A & M Rattlers are justifiably proud of Jackson-
ville's Bob Hayes who became a star football player and
track before being drafted as a wide receiver by the Dallas
Cowboys and later played with the San Francisco 49ers. He
was drafted as a future pick by the Cowboys in 1964 (sev-
enth round, 88ft overall). Born: Dec. 20, 1942. Died: Sept.
18, 2002.
Hayes earned the title as the world's fastest human after
winning two gold medals in the 1964 Olympics. For his ca-
reer, Hayes averaged 20 yards a catch and had 71 receiving
touchdowns, which remains a franchise record.

Many older Miamians were sorry to learn Sunday of the
death of former Miami-Dade Schools Superintendent Leon-
ard Britton who died at 78 in Los Angeles. Britton ran the
system efficiently during the toughest years of 1980--1987
when riots forced the schools to close and the Mariel boat-
lifts brought thousands of children all at once to Miami's
shores.

Some residents in Overtown are complaining because
"What's Cooking in Overtown" is being held not in Overtown
but in Jungle Island on Watson Island. They say they will
start a push to stage the August 21 event at the Lyric The-
atre next year.

Too many guns. This fact was vividly portrayed in Opa-
locka this week when Stanley Raphael, 16, was charged with
manslaughter with a firearm for allegedly killing 18-year-old
Caesar Romero Erwin, Jr., with an Al-47 rifle reportedly
borrowed from Raphael's 21-year-old cousin. Stay tuned..









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGU , 2009


- . . I


Many seniors need additional job training


PROGRAM
continued from 1A
paid the highest of Federal,
State or local minimum wage,
or the prevailing wage. They
are placed in a wide variety of
community service activities at
non-profit and public facilities,
including day-care centers, se-
nior centers, schools and hos-
pitals.
According to Terry Somoza
who directs (SCSEP) for Miami-
Dade County, the program is
very popular. "Most days we


have people coming in for it,"
she said. "If you're just look-
ing for work quickly, then the
program isn't for you," she
said. "We offer a broad range, of
training opportunities, and we
pay you $7.25 an hour while
you're being trained," she said.
"We subsidize up to 1300 hours
per year part-time, the goal is
that they eventually find non-
subsidized work," she said.
According to Young, this is
what is unique about the pro-
gram. "It is more than simple
job placement," he said. The


person's pay comes directly
from the federal government,
rather than the employer or
agency. Young believes this is
the program's greatest advan-
tage. "The best thing about the
program is that the participat-
ing employer doesn't have to
pay anything. For those se-
nior citizens who want to build
up their skills, it's a fantastic
program. But I've never heard
anything of it in the Black com-
munity," he said. Applicants
for the program must be unem-
ployed and make less than 125


percent of the government's of-
ficial poverty levels.
Florida currently has 3,399
SCSEP positions, of which 692
are state positions and 2,707
are national positions. Miami-
Dade County has startling
unemployment figures, with a
June 2009 unemployment rate
of 11.3 percent.
Anyone interested in partici-
pating in SCSEP should con-
tact SER Jobs for Progress Inc.
at 305-871-2820, or visit the
office directly at 5600 NW 36th
Street.


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King: You are tomorrow's leaders


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comr

Legendary boxing promoter
Donald "Don" King surprised
a group of the students at the
Belafonte Tacolcy Center in
Liberty City on Friday. Known
for his outrageous hairstyle,
King read the book, "Shop Talk"
to the students after being en-
tertained by the students with
song and dance.
Directed by Alison Austin,
the students are all a part of
the Freedom School Master's
program which provide enrich-
ment and motivation to the.stu-
dents.
"You are tomorrow's leaders,"
he said to the students. "I en-
courage you to stay motivated
in your education and press


forward because the doors are
already open for you."
King was amazed to hear the
students read 80 books for the
summer.
"You are great and unstop-
pable," he said.
King shared with the students
that he .lid attend his great
friend, the late Michael Jack-
son, funeral last month and he
is still mourning his death.
In his lifetime, King has
successfully promoted many
prominent names in the boxing
world that include Muhammed
Ali, Mike Tyson, George Fore-
man, Evander Holyfield, Julio
Cesar -Chavez, Felix Trinidad
and Larry Holmes.
City of Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones also at-
tended the event.


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 15-18, 2009


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


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Senator files bills preventing cell phone use while driving


For the third consecutive
year, State Sen. Frederica
Wilson (D-Miami Gardens) is
filing legislation aimed at re-
stricting cell phone use and
texting by distracted Florida
drivers. Last year's bill SB
172 called Heather's Law pro-
hibited a person operating a
motor vehicle on a state high-
way from texting or talking on
the phone while driving.
"Heather Hurd was a vi-
brant 27-year-old woman on
her way to meet with wedding


planners in 2008, .? heard in the Florida
when a texting trac- Senate this past'ses-
tor trailer driver , sion, on July 7, Wil-
plowed into her car 7 son submitted draft
at a red light tragi- number 33-00095,
cally cutting short /r7 a stand alone text
her life," said Wil-" messaging bill and
son. "While states she resubmitted
across the country I Heather's Law.
pass laws to ad- "This year we hope
dress the growing to make Heather's
numbers of casual- WILSON memory more im-
ties, Florida chooses pact by passing
to hide its head in the sand." this texting bill or by pass-
Since Heather's law was not ing Heather's Law. Since data


Dispose of your

household waste the

RIGHT way!
Illegal dumping is a serious environmental crime. Piles of illegally-
dumped hazardous materials, auto parts, construction debris and old
furniture are often found in neighborhoods and remote areas of the
community.
Residents can do their part by disposing of trash the proper way using
one of these options.
All County residents can:
* Visit a Home Chemical Center for the legal and safe disposal of
household chemicals like paints, pesticides, solvents, fluorescent
bulbs and used electronic waste.
Miami-Dade County Solid Waste customers can:
* Schedule a bulky waste pickup. Call 3-1-1 or go online at
www.miamidade.gov/dswm.
* Visit a Neighborhood Trash & Recycling Center for disposal of
household trash and yard debris.
If you live in a city, contact your municipal solid waste or public works
. department for disposal options.
For more information, visit www.miamidade.gov/dswm.
To report illegal dumping, call 3-1-1.


now proves that texting and
cell phone use by motorists
is as hazardous as drinking
and driving, perhaps we need
to place the phones down and
concentrate on arriving alive,"
said Wilson.
To commemorate Heather's
death during the 2009 legis-
lative session., Senators Dock-
ery and Wilson filed a road


designation to SB 672 that
renamed a portion of Highway
27 in Polk County between
U.S. Highway 192 as "Heath-
er Hurd Memorial Highway."
This is the stretch of highway
where Heather lost her life.
According to CTIA-The Wire-
less Association, the cellular
phone industry's trade group,
the cell phone texting has


At the Adopt-a-Tree Event
Saturday, September 19, 2009
J. C Bermudez Park (Doral)
3100 NW 87th Avenue
9 a.m. to noon

^3 � S


expanded from nearly 10 bil-
lion messages a month in De-
cember 2005 to more than 110
billion in December 2008.
Last month, Democratic
lawmakers called for states to
ban texting while driving or
face cuts in highway funds,
citing the need to reduce driv-
er distraction and potential
highway causalities.


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BLACKS NlUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 15-18, 2009


Local program creates young



environmental activists


Environmental

program to expand
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


Alison Austin, Chief Ex-
ecutive Officer of the Tacolcy
Center encourages the crowd.

District 5 Commissioner Mi-
chelle Spence-Jones congrat-
ulates Georgette Madison,
22, on her completion of The
City of Miami's Teen clean
Program.
-MiamiTimes photos/T. Osborne


Approximately fi
gathered at the Be
colcy Center on Frid
the closing ceremony
annual Teen Clean
The program, run
of Miami's office of
Initiatives, enabled
local youth, aged 1'
come certified outre
ists, providing comic
vice and planning e
tal projects through
neighborhoods.
"The networking
ties were the best
Georgette Madison.
really took advantage
portunity."
Madison, 22, us
portunity to liaison
environmentally a
conscious people,
$4,000 scholarship
instructor who was
of the program's spo
plans to continue
in this vein, taking
Miami Dade Colleg
Meek Entrepreneui


ifty people,
elafonte Ta-
ay to attend
y of the first
n program.
by the City
Sustainable
roughly 30
4-22, to be-
ach special-
munity ser-
nvironmen-
ghout their

opportuni-
part," said


Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones commends Eric Wil-
liams, 17, for his environmental service.


"A few of us tion Center (MEEC).
ge of the op- "The goal of the program was
to show kids responsibility for
ed the op- their community and environ-
with other ment," said Robert Ruano, Di-
nd health rector of Grants and Sustain-
netting a able Initiatives for the City of
from a yoga Miami. "The program encom-'
one of may passed a combination of com-
onsors. She munity events, cleanup, tree
her studies plantings, and field trips."
courses as Students visited a local waste-
e Carrie P. to-energy plant among other
rial Educa- places, said Ruano. The pro-
gram covered Health and Well-
ness, Sustainable Architecture,
Native Landscaping, Green
Jobs, Recycling, and Green
transportation as well.
"We basically hired these chil-
dren for six weeks," said So-
nia Succar, an Environmental
Outreach Liaison with the City
who worked more closely with
the children. The participants
earned $10 per hour. "They
are now all outreach special-
ists. Now they have a mission
in the community to spread this
awareness."
Succar was impressed by the


drive of her charges.
"In the beginning, they were
resistant," she said. "After they
let their guard down a little bit,
they really sought the knowl-
edge."
As part of the closing ceremo-
ny, participants were asked to
name one thing they'd learned
from the program. The question
drew a wide range of responses.
Categories ranged from .local
history, to interpersonal skills,
to ecology and the environ-
ment.
On hand was District 5 City
Commissioner Michelle' Spen-
.ce-Jones, who spearheaded
the program, said she was "ex-
tremely proud" of the youth.
"I wanted to make sure that
the kids from my district had
more to do than just a sum-
mer job," she said. She has
also said that she will seek
to continue the program.
"I'd like to have this happen
throughout the year," she said.
"We want to figure out some way
to keep these types of programs
going."


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8A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


, HnB

TRUMP
Haitian Prime Minister Michele Pierre-Louis addresses
the crowd about the future of Haiti at the "Haitian Diaspio-
ra Unity Congress" conference. -Miami Times photos/Sandra J. Ciarite


Former U.S. President Bill Clinton gives the keynote address
in which he emphasized Haiti's challenges at the Trump Inter-
national Beach Resort in Sunny Isles Beach on Sunday.


Clinton, Pierre-Louis keynote


speakers at Haitian conference


A year after devastating storms, Haiti is still in the rebuilding stages


By Sandra J. Charite
- scharite@miamitimesonline. corn
Less than two months after
being named Special Envoy
for Haiti, former United States
President Bill Clinton shared
his concerns and vision for Hai-
ti at the second annual "Hai-
tian Diaspora Unity Congress"
conference held at the Trump
International Beach Resort in
Sunny Isles Beach on Sunday.
Moderated by local Dr. Ru-
dolph Moise, Chairman of Hai-
tian Diaspora Unity Congress,
the end of the four-day confer-
ence, where Haitian and Hai-
tian-American leaders through-
out the United States gathered
to discuss the Haiti's challenges
and form a unified plan of ac-
tion to help the devastating
country.
"The more involved you are,
the better the odds get, so do
not be deterred," Clinton said. "
If you are doing something now,
try to do more of it."
Last year, Haiti was hit by a


food crisis, back-to-back iur-
ricanes, floods and the collapse
of two schools, resulting in the
deaths of thousands and dev-
astating damage to the nation's
infrastructure.
Clinton said the damage of
the storms consisted of 8Q, per-
cent of the water which is, why
it is crucial that the infrastruc-
ture of Haiti is rebuilt.
"We need to work to help; Haiti
withstand a storm," said Clin-
ton.
He expressed the need for
more jobs to be created in the
country, in turn creates a dom-
ino effect in the crime rate.
"Crime rates dropped when
individuals received jobsi," he
said.
In his 30 years of visiting
Haiti, Clinton believed that now
was the "best chance" to assist
Haiti in their needs before it
was too late.
"Every single day a child is
hungry; a parent comes home
without a job;' a mother, dies in
child-birth, a community is up-


rooted by a storm, the window
of ':pp':.rtLrrit'. '.e have today
close s a little more," Clinton
said.

RESHAPING HAITI'S IMAGE
Haitian Prime Minister Mi-
chele Pierre-Louis also joined
Clinton on stage as a guest
speaker at the conference.
Pierre-Louis spoke to the aiu-
dience, who consisted of pre-
dominately Haitians, in Creole
and shared sentiments on how
Haiti can progress.
Pierre-Louis feels that the
world-including Haitians and
Haitian-Americans-needs to
change its views about Haiti
needed for the country to grow
in unity.
"What do you say when you
talk about Haiti? Do you cat-
egorize your fellow Haitians,"
she asked the audience. "Unity
calls for reflection and action to
change."
With the poverty and devas-
tating conditions, Pierre-Louis'
expressed her concerns for the


many Haitians who are fleeing
,'the country for the states.
"Many have left Haiti search-
ing for opportunity only to lose
their lives," she said.
The most recent tragedy in-
volved 200 Haitians whose boat.
capsized off the Turks and Ca-
icos Islands last month. Close
to .120 people were rescued
but authorities reported locat-
'ing 16 bodies and almost 70
immigrants, who had not been
accounted for, were presumed
drowned.
HELP ON THE WAY
Clinton also announced the
following news:
* The Soros Economic Devel-
opment Fund has began the
Haiti Invest Project, which has
obtained an initial commitment
close to $25 million and hopes
to gain a capitalization of $150
million and considering invest-
ments in manufacture, tour-
ism, agriculture, energy, and
housing.
* James Lee Witt, who trav-
eled with Clinton to Haiti in
July and a former director of
Please turn to CONFERENCE 14B


Protestors held signs and protested against outside the Trump International Beach Resort
in Sunny Isles Beach on Sunday against Justice Minister of Haiti Bernard Gousse.


,5A


Rotary Club


opens new chapter

Haitian-American president sworn in
Special to the Times
As he was recently sworn in as the new president of the Ror
tary Club of Opa-locka, Bob Metelus reminisced about how, as
a young teacher at Miami Norland High School in 2003, a men-
tor, Dr. Benjamin Cowins told him about the Rotary.
"I thought it was for old people," said Metelus to laughter, ad-
dressing more than 50 people who gathered at the Mahogany
Grille in Miami Gardens for the start of his term. The 31-year-
old Opa-locka resident said his mentor explained that the orga-
nization sponsored student exchanges, including to Brazil.
"I said, Brazil? That got my attention," he said. Metelus said
he returned from the trip a changed person, more focused, and
"amazed at what Rotary can do." The professional and service
organization, founded in 1905 in Chicago by a lawyer, Paul P.
Harris as a series of rotating meetings in the homes of club
members, performs charitable service around the world, build-
ing schools and digging fresh water wells in third world coun-
tries, and supplying holiday meals for seniors, and toys, books,


Left to right: Therese Homer, Rotary Fundraising Chair,
Bob Metelus, Miami Gardens Mayor Shirley Gibson, Rotary
6990 District Governor Lee Phares and immediate past
President LaShara Bostic. -Photo/Roger Bowes

reading assistance and other help to children in the U.S. The,
organization claims 1.2 million members and more than 32,000
clubs in 200-plus countries worldwide. It is part of a global
partnership dedicated to eradicating polio around the globe by
distributing vaccine to children.
Metelus, a Haitian-American, becomes the youngest person
to take the helm of the chapter founded by the late Rev. Robert
Ingram, Miami's first Black motorcycle officer, who served as
police chief and mayor of the City of Opa-locka, and then as a
member of the Miami-Dade School Board. Metelus, an account
executive for Clear Channel Outdoor, said his challenge will
be to expand the club and continue its mission with Ingram's
legacy.
Among those on hand for the installation were Ingram's wife
and a daughter, who accepted a plaque in Ingram's honor. Also
on hand: the mayors of Opa-locka and Miami Gardens, Joseph
L. Kelley and Shirley Gibson, respectively. Their attendance
marked another change in the club: a year ago it added Miami
Gardens to the original Opa-locka club. Another change: the
club will now meet at the Black-owned Mahogany Grille restau-
rant, rather than at the El Palacio Hotel in Opa-locka.
Both mayors pledged their support to Metelus.
"I will be there every step of the way, supporting you," Gibson
said.
Kelley pledged his support, along with the support of the
city's commission, adding.that some commissioners had in
the past served as officers of the club. Several members of the
original 1995 club also attended the installation of the new
president, including Ozzie Ritchey, Buster McFadden, who-has
served as sergeant at arms since the club's beginning, Hugh
Bryan and fellow former club president Dorothea Domond, and
the club's elder statesman, long-time Opa-locka resident Dave
Pemberton.
While Metelus hopes to retain its "seasoned" members, his
administration is notable for their youth. Out-going president
LaShara Bostic, 32, will serve as treasurer, while 31-year-old
Webber Charles, who coaches an award-winning chess team at
Edison Park Middle School, is Metelus' vice president. Retired
school principal Gwen Coverson will serve as the club secre-
tary.


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SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


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Bay Area Mentors Summer

Program comes to an end
The boys' and girls' teams from Centennial Middle School came away as the victors of this
year's B.A.M. basketball championship. -Photo/ Miami-Dade County


Young athletes awarded
trophies, team pictures,
plaques and other gifts by
County Commissioners for
their success during the
B.A.M. program
Participants "and contribu-
tors of this year's Bay Area
Mentors (B.A.M.) Summer
Youth Athletic League were
honored by Miami-Dade Mayor
and Commissioners. During
the award ceremony held at
the Palmetto Bay Village Cen-
ter, students, coaches and
supporters of the program re-
ceived trophies, team pictures,
plaques and other gifts while
they enjoyed food and refresh-
ments.
The summer camp was
designed as a mentoring pro-
gram for local youth. From
mid June to late July, 80
participating students would
play basketball twice a week
in eight girls' and boys' teams;
the students attended local
schools Cutler Ridge Middle,
Centennial Middle, Arthur
Mays Middle, and Richmond
Heights Middle. The students
were required to meet certain
criteria in order to participate,
including maintaining a 2.0
grade point average, not miss-
ing more than two games, and
displaying a positive attitude
and sportsman-like conduct
at all times. As they completed
the program they took part in
a play-off tournament where
the girls' and boys' teams from
Centennial Middle School were
crowned champions.
The B.A.M. camp was a col-
laborative effort organized by
Miami-Dade Mayor and Com-
missioners, Miami-Dade Police
Department South District,
Neighborhood Resource Unit,
Cutler Bay Policing Unit, The
Cutler Bay Business Associa-
tion and Dr. Larry Feldman,
School Board Member of
Miami-Dade Public Schools.
The students and their fami-
lies were honored at an award
ceremony. Participating stu-
dents received book bags for
Please turn to PROGRAM 11B


____________________v------------------


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009

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Teamwork and sportsmanship stressed


PROGRAM
continued from 10B
the upcoming school year.
Each winning team also voted
for their "Most Valuable Player"
and was awarded trophies and
sport caps. The teams' coaches


were recognized with team pic-
tures and valuable contributors
to the program were awarded
with plaques and certificates
by Sorenson.
"I'm extremely proud of the
young men and women who
demonstrated not only ath-


letic prowess, but teamwork
and sportsmanship during the
B.A.M. program this summer,"
said Commissioner Sorenson.
"Thank you to the mentors
who took the time to give these
students a fun and productive
summer."


COMMISSIONER DORRIN D. ROLLE
Miami-Dade County
Board of County Commissioners
District 2





WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 19
Community Meeting to Discuss the Proposed County
Budget for 2009--2010
District 2 residents with questions or concerns about Miami-Dade County's proposed
2009-10 budget are urged to attend Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle's community
meeting on Wednesday, August 19, 2009 at New Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church, 1350 NW 95" Street, Miami, beginning at 6:00 p.m. Budget staff will be
present to address issues and concerns regarding items proposed in the budget,
such as cuts in services, increases in property taxes, defunding of cultural arts
programs, and other issues, as well as dispel any rumors regarding the budget.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 22
Book Bag Giveaway & Health Fair
On Saturday, August 22, starting at 10 a.m., Commissioner Rolle will ring in the
school year with his Annual Book Bag Giveaway at Gwen Cherry Park, 7090 NW
22nd Avenue, In Miami. The commissioner will be distributing backpacks and
school supplies to underprivileged children in his district.
This year, Commissioner Rolle will also be promnoting healthy living at this event by
including a health fair. Services include free school health record updates physicals
and immunizations); basic health, dental, and vision screenings; child fingerprinting,
child IDs; CPR/first aid demonstrations; and blood pressure screenings. In addition,
there will be.public safety demonstrations from Miami-Dade Fire Rescue and the
Miami-Dade Police Department Information on other County resources (Adopt-A-
Tree, Adopt-A-Pet, Employment Resources, After School Activities, and Voter
Registration) will also be available. A parent or legal guardian must be present in
order to receive services.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


Are you a Samaritan or a Jew?


. I meditated anew about three
accounts of Samaritans as re-
lated by Jesus in His teachings
to the people. The Samaritans
were a despised group of people
to the Jewish community. The
Samaritans were Jews, but they
had intermarried with other
people, and because they were
considered 'not pure', and their
blood 'tainted', they were os-
tracized by the 'pure' and 'real'
Jews. This sounds a lot like vari-
ous groups in society today who
believe that they are better than


Model City Advisory Board
Community Outreach will have
a board meeting at the Joseph
Caleb Center at 7 p.m., Wednes-
day, Aug. ,12. Roy Hardemon,
786-356-0707.


New Birth Baptist Church &
Abilities of Florida will host a
Job Fair Expo at the New Birth
Enterprise, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.,
Thursday, Aug. 13. 305-757-
2199 or mfreeman@nbbcmiami.
org .
***** ****"
Coca-Cola will be having a
Job Fair at the Community Ac-
tion Agency in Homestead, from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Aug. 13. 305-
254-5804.


The Miami Carol City/North
Dade H.S. Class of 1967 Alum-
ni, are holding a "60th Birthday
Celebration" at the Miramar Civ-
id Center Banquet Hall at 7 p.m.,
Aug. 15. Cheryl Watts Brown,
305-333-7613 or Charles Jack-
son, 305-336-6293.


Holy Ghost Faith Deliver-
ance Ministries will be cel-
ebrating their -10mh Pastoral
Appreciation on Aug. 12-17.
Mother Rachel Moss 786-413-
3639 or 786-337-5939.

New Corinth M.B. Church
will be having their revival at
7:30 p.m. nightly, Aug. 12-14.
305-836-6671.

Liberty Fellowship Church
Of God will have a Praise and
Worship Musical Celebration at
7:30 p.m., Aug. 14.

Revelation Christian Acad-
emy will be having a Back-to-
School Community Prayer Vigil
at the Mt. Pleasant -Sellers
United Methodist Church, from
6-8 p.m., Friday, Aug. 14. 305-
758-5656.

St. Mark Missionary Baptist
Church will be having a Gos-
pel Singing Program at 6 p.m:,
Saturday, August 15. 305-498-
7233.

Golden Bells 31.t, Singing
Anniversary will take place
at the New Beginning M.B.
Church at 7 p.m., Aug. 15 and
continue at the New Covenant
Church in Fort Lauderdale at
3 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 16. Sis
McQueen, 786-251-2878.

The Antioch M.B. Church
of Brownsville will have a yard
sale from 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Aug. 15.' Chandra, 305-
244-2670.

New Canaan Missionary
Baptist Church invites you to
bring your family and friends
to their fellowship service at 11
a.m., Aug. 16. 305-688-8095.
* *******
St. James A.M.E. Church
invites you to join their choir
for songs of worship at 4 p.m.,
Sunday, Aug. 16. 786-663-
8148.

Metropolitan A.M.E invites
you to their program entitled,
"Women in White" at 3:30 p.m.,
August 16. 305-696-4201.
�**�*** 4


other groups
- both cultur-
ally, religious-
ly, financially,
and ethnically.
However, I di-
gress.
The first ac-
count that I
would like to bring to your atten-
tion is the healing of the lepers
as written in Luke 17. Ten lep-
ers begged Jesus to heal them,
and He complied. Later. one re-
turned and fell to his knees and


Miami-Dade County Dis-
trict 3 will host their third an-
nual Back to School Fun Day at
Olinda Park from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m., Saturday, Aug. 15. Com-
missioner Audrey Edmonson's
district office at 305-636-2331.'


The City of Miramar in con-
junction with Memorial Health-
care will host a "Back to School
Health Fair" for children at the
Miramar Youth Enrichment
Center, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Aug. 15. 954-276-
5985 or 954-704-1631.
***** *
The Parent Academy will join
the Miami-Dade County Public
Schools, Parent Teacher Associ-
ation, the Miami Heat and other
organizations for a free "Back
to School" rally at the American
Airlines Arena from 12 - 5 p.m.,
Sunday, Aug. 16. 305-995-
2680.


City of Miramar is offering
ballet classes at the Miramar


New Saint Mark Mission-
ary Baptist Church will have a
Women Day at 3 p.m., Sunday,
Aug. 16..

True Faith M. B. Church
invites families and friends'to
come and help celebrate their
Family and Friends Day, at 4
p.m., Aug. 16. 305-681-0162
or 786-262-6841.

' New Providence M.B.
Church ushers will be cele-
brating their annual anniver-
sary.at 4 p.m., Sunday, Aug.
16. Mary, 305-333-4958.

Kelly's Chapel United Meth-
odist Church will be celebrat-


thanked Jesus for healing him.
(Now remember that there were
TEN lepers who were healed). In
the second account that I would
like 'to bring to your attention,
a woman received salvation at
the feet of Jesus while drawing
water from a well. She promptly
told everyone that she saw that
she had met the Messiah, and
invited them to receive the liv-
ing water that she had received
from this unusual Man. In Luke
10, Jesus tells the parable of
the Good Samaritan. I am sure
that you are well familiar with
these verses of scripture. A Sa-
maritan stopped for an injured
man, mended his wounds, and
put him up at a hotel at his own
expense.
The similarity in all three ac-
counts is that in each case,
someone behaved as least ex-
pected. In the account of the ten


Multi-Service Complex, from
. 5:30 -6:30 p.m.,.every Friday.
954-889-2744.


Married Alive, a play, will run
at the Actors' Playhouse, Mira-
cle Theatre in Coral Gables until
Aug. 16. 305-444-9293 or go to:
www.actorsplayhouse.org


The Miami-Dade County
Health Department, Special
Immunizations Program will be
providing free Back-to-School
immunizations at the Little Hai-
ti Health Center, from 8 a.m. - 3
p.m., Monday-Wednesday. Clin-
ic will be closed on Aug. 17-19.
786-336-1276.1
***** ***
Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney Office will be holding a
Landlord & Tenant Workshop
at the Joseph Caleb Center's
Meeting Room from 11 a.m. - 1
p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 18. Kionne
McGhee, 305-636-2240.


Top Ladies of Distinction
will hold its monthly meeting
at Florida Memorial University
Lehman Aviation Building on
the second Saturday. 305-696-
1631.
*******
Miami-Dade county Dis-

ing "Women in White Faces on
the Journey" at 4 p.m., Sun-
day, Aug. 16. 305-836-4101.

Ebenezer United Methodist
Church will convene for "Hour
of Power Revival," from 6:45 - 8
p.m., Aug. 16-18.

The Presbyterian Women
invite you to attend their Wom-
en Racial Ethnic Dialogue to
be held at All Nations Presby-
terian Church, from 10 a.m. -
1 p.m., August 22.

Faith Christian Center will
celebrate 25 years of ministry,
7:30 p.m. nightly, October 18-
24. Culmination service will
take place at the Doubletree
Hotel at Miami Airport, 11 a.m.,
'Saturday, Oct. 24. Church of-
fice, 305-253-6814.
Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30 p.m.
.on Monday.


"$ 15 ' lO
FOR 12-MONTH . FOR 6-MONTH
* U -RIPTIiuN SUBSCRIPTION

L CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED D CHARGE MY CREDIT CARD

EO Exp__

0.1 _Exp

'" [_xExp__


Authorized Signature

Name

Address


City


* State _ Zip

email


Phone


*Includes Florida sales tax
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. * Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymlanlitlmes.com


lepers, the one who came back
was not a Jew. He was a 'dread-
ed' Samaritan. The Bible does
not say, but perhaps the other
nine were Jews. You would ex-
pect a Jew to thank another
Jew for healing, but certainly
not a Samaritan. You wouldn't
even expect a Jew to bother to
heal a Samaritan. In this case,
the leper nor Jesus behaved as
expected by man. But .they did
two things commanded by God.
Jesus healed the sick, and the
Samaritan praised Him. In the
case of the Samaritan woman
at the well, she was definite-
ly not the type of woman with
whom a good Jewish boy like'
Jesus would bother to associ-
ate, much less, talk to, and of-
fer her salvation. She had three
things going against her accord-
ing to man. She -was a woman,
she was of immoral repute, and


trict 2 Commissioner will hold
a community meeting to dis-
cuss questions of concerns
about Miami-Dade County's'
proposed 2009-10 budget at the
New Shiloh Missionary Baptist
Church beginning at 6 p.m.,
Wednesday, August '19. Corn-,
missioner Rolle's office at 305-
375-4833.


Miami Central Sr. High
School will host a school pic-.
nic and a meet and greet for all'
parents, teachers, students and
community members, from 9
a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 22.
305-696-4161.


The City of -North Miami
Beach will hold a Budget Work-
shop for FY 2010 at the McDori-
ald Center at 6 p.m., Tuesday,
Aug. 25.3'05-948-2900.


The Family Foundation, Inc.
will have their 18th Annua1 AIDS
Benefit Banquet at the Embassy
Suites at 6:30 p.m., Saturday,
Aug. 29. 305- 978-7100.


Miami-Dade' Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners encourages,
residents to attend the Sep-
tember Budget Hearings at the
BCC Chambers on the second


Richard A. Grant, DI
General, Cosmetic, Implant D

Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA,


305


652-3001

20215 NW 2n Ave.

Suite #2

Miami, FL 33169
I www.dentistgrant.net |


she was a Samaritan. No Jew-
ish priest would have dared
even acknowledged her. Jesus
not only acknowledged her, but
He sat with her, and spent some
time in conversation with her.
The woman was so impressed
with Who she realized that Je-
sus was, that she immediately
went to tell. She told everyone
in her town that she had met
the Messiah and invited them to
meet Him too.
Again, both Jesus and the
woman behaved contrary to
what was expected of them by
man. Jesus spent time with
a loose, immoral, Samaritan
woman. This Samaritan wom-
an ran and spread the Gospel.
Once again, societal norms were
broken for the Gospel's sake. In
the parable of the Good Samari-
tan, again, a lowly, unimport-,
ant Samaritan did a good deed.

floor to hear citizen's concerns
about County cuts. The first
budget hearing will be held at
5:01 p.m., Sept. 3 and the sec-
ond budget hearing will be at
5:01 p.m., Sept. 17.


Booker T. Washington Sr.
High Class of 1960 will conduct
a meeting at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center, from
4-5:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 5.
305-621-6412.


The University Galleries in
, Florida Atlantic University's
,'Dorothy F. Schmidt College' of
"Arts and Letters will present an
exhibition of works from Satur-
day, Sept. 12 through Saturday,
Oct. 31 in both the Schmidt
Center Gallery and the Ritter
Art Gallery on FAU's Boca Ra-
ton campus. 561-297-2595.


Women in Transition's next
Computer Skills Training Class
will begin on Tuesday, Sept. 8.
305-757-0715.


Miami Children's Museum
(MCM) will celebrate its sixth
birthday with the MCM Family
Carnival at the Watson Island,
1 to 6 p.m., Sunday, Sept., 13.
305-373-5437 ext. 156 or visit


What is so interesting and won-
derful about his kindness was
that the expected people did not
perform this act of kindness.
The man who was attacked by
robbers and injured was a Jew.
The people who ignored him and
refused to help him were Jews.
The man who stopped, and paid
for his care was a Samaritan.
Again, people acted contrary to
what was expected. You would
expect a Jew (and minister, no
less) to help anyone, especially
a.fellow Jew. You would not ex-
pect a Samaritan to do so.
What's the moral of these sto-
ries? Well, since' my column is
at an end for this week, may I
invite you to wait until next
week to read it? In fact, don't
wait until next week to meditate
and think about what you think
the Lord is saying to us through
these similar accounts.

www.miamichildrensmuseum.
org.


The City of Coral Gables
will offer, an American Heart
Association CPR certification
course for those interested in
knowing how to perform life-
saving skills beginning Mon-
day, Sept. 14., Subsequent
classes will be offered the.first
Monday of each month, from 9
a.m. until noon, at Fire Station
3 located in Coral Gables. Lau-
ra Rodriguez, Coral Gables Fire
Department Public Education
Specialist at 305-460-5576 or
via e-mail at lrodriguez@coral-
gables.com.
* ** * ***.,
The City of Miramar is host-
ing a community Arts and Craft
Fair at the Miramar Multi-Ser-
vice Complex on, Oct. 3. 954-
889-2744.



Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are
urged to reconnect through
the contact information listed
below, providing your address,
phone, cell & email.
321-733-0958 or 305-299-
5549, reunion6t5@cfl.rr.com


COSMETIC DENTISTRY
* Teeth Whitening 1 hour
* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
* Porcelain Veneers
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RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY
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* Nitrous Oxide (tranquilizing air)

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N.W. 2"I * Insurance Welcome * We Offer Financial Arrangements
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The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any
other service examination or treatment which is performed or as result of and within seventy-two (72) hours of responding to the advertise-
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Serving the Community since 1984








The Miami Times



death


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1AR THF MIAMI TIMES. AUGUST 12-18. 2009


Clinton apologizes for America's delay of TPS


CONFERENCE
continued from 9A

the Federal Emergency Man-
agement Administration, has
made a commitment $250,000
to give disaster preparedness
training for women in Haiti.
Witt and his team are sched-
uled to visit Haiti in the next
ten days.
* Desh Deshpande, also
traveled with Clinton, has of-
fered to share technical assis-
tance to expand school feed-
ing in Haiti.
* Rolando Gonzalez Bun-


I


ster of Basic Energy head of
a power company, has offered
to install five windmills in Haiti
which will provide renewable
energy at competitive prices in
the country.
According to Alonzo L. Ful-
gham, acting administrator of
U.S. Agency for International
Development (USAID), the U.S.
government has provided $166
million for relief, recovery and
disaster mitigation programs
in Haiti; also, over $300 million
dollars in assistance to support
the national development priori-
ties recognized by the Govern-


I,~ yiE~


ment of Haiti.


TPS NOT FORGOTTEN
Clinton also discussed the
Temporary Protected Status
(TPS), which would allow Hai-
tians to stay legally in the U.S.,
after a decision by U.S. Immigra-
tion and Customs Enforcement
(ICE) earlier this year in which
over 30,000 undocumented Hai-
tians refugees were given final
orders for deportation.
A decision that has caused
outrage within the Haitian com-r
munity but Clinton urged the


* * i va, 14 I


audience that TPS was not for-
gotten by the President Barack
Obama.
'I'm sorry it's "taking so long
but I have to defend the White
House because I've been there.
I know what's happening," said
Clinton. "My guess is that the
administration will do the right
thing."
He continued, "We all know the
enormous burden on Haiti, if the
30,000 people were sent home."
"I urge you all to keep up the
pressure," Clinton. told his
audience. "Do not do it in a
hostile way."


I II*t


Copyrighted Material



. Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


10th Pastoral anniversary


Soul Saving Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 2170 N.W. i76
Street, invites you to our 10th
Pastoral Anniversary for Pastor
Jodie Alexander and First Lady
Arpie Alexander, August 17 thru
August 21, 7:30 p.m. nightly.
Monday night, Pastor Joseph
Williams and St. Mark Church;
Tuesday night, Pastor Wil-
liam Walker and New Mt. Zion
Church; Wednesday night, Pas-
tor Aaron Jackson and Milrock
Church; Thursday night, Pastor
James Poole and True Believ-
ers Church; Friday night, Pas-
tor Douglas Cook and Jordan
Grove Church.
The anniversary will climax. 4
p.m., Sunday, August 23 with
Pastor Michael Roan. and the
Dayspring Church Family at
Dayspring Church, 2991 N.W.


Prayer Breakfast
On this Saturday, August 15,
at 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. the Pas-
tor's Aide of Emmanuel Mis-,
sionary Baptist will be having a
Prayer Breakfast at'1230 N.W.
79th Street.
This is a Church where you
are always welcome. For more
information 305-696-6545.


PASTOR JODIE ALEXANDER
62 Street.
We invite you to come and cel-
ebrate with us.


Willie E. Gary to
speak at Faith
Community
Famous- attorney Willie E.
Gary will be the speaker at Faith
Community Baptist Church,
10401 N.W.-8 Avenue, this Sun-
day at 10:15 a.m. Reverend
Richard P. Dunn II, Senior Pas-
tor.


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
WedI Imleriroory Prayer
Squ, 2Ipm
MarT.g .erniqie I I o
Su.e i Wohh.p / 10 pm
! I I . Tlu. P.ruiy Mieing /1 p3p
n .! F.B.bleWSudr I 30 p




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
Order of Services
SSundy MorntingTvirny
SudAy Sthool.�9 45 am
' ,ble Sirdy lueday
o .om1 & 0-T.
- Paurver Mewig ues , pm
p �- 'Vw .-=7Ii *l


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


M i 0 l F A U"R i b l t I


3707 S.W.





El


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Lutllier King, Jr. Blvd.

i- Order of Services
MAn thru Fn' Noon DAy Proyer
Bble Siudy Thui o p n ,i
Sundo, Wor,.t.9o IIo ham
:,6Vy,< ihool q 30 afA fi





St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
.rl liday i Amid i la i .
worhrp Senir1
9 30 dm Su.iday i Sd.r l
iesday 7p m BinbleSrud
81p , P i 'aye l Mcing




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue

UOrder of Services

r unMort. * errvr, II d n
itI Wldyiy O.bli Siud
;F d.,',r M,,'.:iry toranC
tWd 1Eb Srudy Poayi 5"t3u pm
nThu O,'unioih ,,mIry 630p n,


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
56th Avenue * Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday: Bible Study 9 a.m. * Morning Worship 10 a.m.
V Evening Worship 6 p.m.
I Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS./omcost 3 * Saturday - 7:30 a.m.
..- . w pDembrokeparkchidho0hrisI (om n* embrokeoarkcoc@bellsouth.net


I


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

i Order of Services
" ldy Worship 7 am
Sunday Sii.0i( ol am
Nil 10 ID Oai m
I IJ..ip am Wordshp 4p.in
I, M.'. ,onr and Bibli
(Im ' s lue:dlay 30D pm

Pastor Doulas CookS.a


Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.


Order of Services

larh hope loe
I (rr 13 1I


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


Order of Services
SUNDAY WornhipServnri
1 30 1&llart,
(hurrh Stha 9 30 a m
' WEDNESDAY
f. ed.ng Mifiilry 172 oIu?
. Bible Srudy I p m



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
l i, I Ol of ServieIt
Order of Services
Sunday Si hool 9 A a in
Morning Pra. w '.or,4..1 II am
i'rs and thhad Sunday
er' e.g worship or 6 pm
F. ayer Mening & Bible Sudy
Twi,,day p .a
Rev.Dr.W. Ewar Mithel


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7pm.
Sunday School 9:30 a m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6-45p m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m '


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685.3700
fox. 305-685-0705
www.newhirthbaplistmiomi.org


I B o.Curry,1 1.,1. S .i.IJ r e h


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Services
So.day Morning Wor.
,,rop ol 8 & IIam .
'hPGI911ar00 ITn
Sunday Soola or , 45 A i
Thu, day B.ble Siody 7 p Ti
SSalurday No ,-mie


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship 11a.m.
F First sunday
i Evening Worship,6 p.m.
Mid Week Service... 7 p.m.
S Choir Rehearsal Thursdlay


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

, Order of Services
, iday Sirtionl 9 45 ao
WorEhip IA m
Bible Study Itrnda 7 130 p n11
&Wu Wah'pn IIa
Youth Min, iry
' Mon -Wed 6 pin




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
Early d',uidOr Wor..rt 7 3 0om
. Suda Sihool 9 30 am
Sunday Moaring Worrah1p 11 arn
* Sunday [.eilrigS nie .tpm
luedaly Prreri Meerrng 7JU pm
4Wed.b.eday i-bl Study I0 pm



Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
,,Sund Mumrno Sernies
Suodayo Si rul ID a m
WJr,hi,p',..�r, II a ITn
,-.day Bble udy 8Bpin
Thur-diy P,'lyri ' il
11 . , Il p0



St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street


Order of Services
r .ly Mornir Worshipo 30am
Sunday Sitral 9 30 am
Moru,,g Wo,,rhrp A ,1a
wDSDAY
Prover Meft.ia 730 pm
ible Srudy ppm


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street





lueFirst Baptist Missio130 parym
Thuans Fellotthip 10 a m



First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
= i iW I lll* liii
- Order of Services
Sundry 73i dy i0I I1am
1 Sunday School 10a r.
1hursday I prm bible
Study .fer Meeign B I U
lapm.� m IIurk beloia
FrNr Sn 1 S p m.



. Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services
I g (hurti, uriday irtool 8310 a
S\Su.da.,worhip Sens1 10 am
k! I n1)e4lSen.i6H y Ady %


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street


lti' MIntffi.WMgW
Order of Services
oay tlomingiWor,lh.p3onam.
Sun (burch Si(al 30 a m
Making Wor:hip II am
luesdoy Bibl ia. 1p m
lue bare 1th4e l
Sbl . 7pT,.
Rev. D.L. Powell___


Alv n ails r. inse


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Hour of Praoyer 6:30 a.m. * Early Morning Worship 7.30 a.m
Sunday School 9:30 a.m. * Morning Worship 11 a.m
Youlh Ministry Study, Wed 7 p m Prayer, Bible Study, Wed 7 pm.
Noonday Altai Proyer (M F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday . II a.m -I p.m.
.....-.riendshipmbcmia oig fi;end.hnpprayei@bellioulh neI


93rd Street Community Brownsville
Missionary Baptist Church Church of Christ
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 4561 N.W. 33rd Court
k I IIS I 'N', , I ' iI


Order of Services
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1 omi Moarrg Wo, p
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- Order of Services
t lord O,y Su",day S(ihul 9 4'5A,
SSJ,,dy Mnrarng Wo1,ar.lp l1am,
' Sunday ML.. d B.bie ud 5S p in
' USnday L1dien Bibn 'rudri p
! Sunday loc,,,i,,lg Wor,.t.,p ( p .T.


AND HE SAID UNTO THEM, GO YE
TOAJ.L.L TH-E \\'ORLD, A.- .E-

LTO EVERYCR



Join the Religious Elite
in our Church Directory
Call Karen Franklin at 305-694-6214


MU I IIL MIMMI I IMLV, nwvw- 1 -1










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


CAROLINE NEWTON, 47,
crossing guard,
died August 5.
Visitation 4 - 9
p.m., . Friday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Holy
Temple , Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

GLORIA PHILLLIPS, 64,
printer,died Au-
gust 7. Visita-
tion 4 - 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
4 p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.



MYRTICE NEWBERRY, 82,
sales clerk, died August 4. Visita-
tion 4 - 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
10 a.m., Satur-
day, Mount Cal-
vary Missionary
Baptist Church.



MEMORY WALTERS, 64, sec-
retary, died August 4. Visitation 4
- 9 p.m., Friday.. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, St. Bernard Clairvaux
Episcopal Church.

NEVILLE BENT, 70, power
house supervisor, died August 2.
Final rites and burial Santa Cruz,
Jamaica.

RONSON MAYNARD, 52,
teacher, died August 1. Service
was held.

BERTHA DAVIS, 82, registered
nurse, died August 7. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DIANE STENNETT, 52, nurse
aide, died August 2. Visitation 4 - 9
p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m., Sat-*
urday, Trinity Lutheran Church.

DERRICK BENNIE, 78, chef,
died July 28. Visitation 4 - 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service 11 a.mn., Satur-
day, Grace United Community
Church.

CARODEAN BENEDICT, 71i,
housewife, died August 8. - Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Gregg L. Mason
CHARLIE MOSLEY, 73, retired
bus driver, Miami-
DadeTransit,
died August 5 at
Northshore Hos-
.pital and Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Mary; son,
Gerald; daugh-
ters, Pamela Copenny and Sonda
Jackson (Clifford); three grandchil-.
dren; sisters, Gussie Travis, Eliza-
beth Weathers (Cole) and Ruby Lee
Mosley; and a host of other relatives
and'friends. Visitation 5 - 9 p.m., Fri-
day. Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Je-
sus Peoples Ministries Church Int'l.
Interment: Dade Memorial Park.

WILLIE MAE CEASOR HIGGS,
88, retired, business owner, master
cosmetologist,
died August 5 at
Miami Shores
Nursing and Re-
hab. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Lucille Hil-
ton, Delores Ed-
wards, A.Casey
Ceasor, and Gwendolyn Goolsby;
sisters, Florice Coleman and Brenda
Patterson; brothers, James, Calvin
and Samuel Stubbs; a host of other
relatives and friends. Service 10
a.m., Wednesday (today), Christian
Fellowship MBC, Interment: South-
ern Memorial Park. Visitation 2-9
p.m. Tuesday.

DR. HILDA B ALLEN, 72, admin-
istrator, RN Prac-
titioner, Owner
and President
ISN Inc DBA In-
ternational Vo-
cational Training
Center, 8213?
Biscayne Blvd,
died July 10 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Visita-
tion 6 - 9 p.m., Friday. Service 10


a.m., Saturday, McArthur Chapel
of the Miami Shores Presbyterian
Church. Interment: Lauderdale Me-
morial Park.


Hadley Davis
DON EVERRETT SAUNDERS,
44, died Au-
gust 4 at Os-
ceola Regional
Medical * Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: sons, '.
Don Jr., Daniel
II, Arsenio and
Daniel; daugh-
ters, Shakira and Amber; Sister,
Valorie Blatch Sutherland. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, First Baptist
Church of Bunche Park.

FRANCES LOUISE WILSON,
52, died July 29
at Mount Sinai
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Ebenezer
United Method-
ist Church.


EDDIE MAE DICKERSON, 55,
died August 7 at
Jackson North
Hospital. Ser-
vice 12 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




CHARLES THEODORE
BROWN, 24,
died August 8
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 3 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


EVELINA BROWN, 47, July 27
at University Hospital. Service was
held.
Genesis
CARMELINA AGUILERA, 93,
embroiderer, died August 2 at Met-
ropolitan Hospital. Service was
held.

OSMAR CASTRO, 67, electri-
cian, died August 1 at Hialeah Hos-
pital. Service was held.

ANNA LOUISSAINT, 60, house-
keeper, died July 25 at Jackson
North. Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
Notre-Dame O'Haiti.

JOAQUIN MARIN, 81, customer
service, died August 4 at Hialeah
Hospital. Service was held.

HELEN GIBALSKI, 83, hoiuse-
keeper, died August 6 at Aventura
Hospital. Service was held.

MIQUEL ANTONIO LOPEZ, 60,
export/import Manager, died Au-
gust 5 at home. Service was held.

MILAGROS SANTIAGO, 79,
counselor, died August 6 at N. Bro-
ward Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m., Friday in the
chapel.

ROBERT RANFT, 40, waiter,
died August 6 at home. Service 4
p.m.,Tuesday in the chapel.

ALICE STOLZ, 86, opera singer,
died August 8 at Broward General
Hospital. Service was held.

WESLEY BROWN,65 cook,died
August 7 at- Jackson Memorial




maker, died August 9 at home. Ser-
vice 4 p.m., Friday in the chapel.
ROBERT PLUSKIS, 71, city
worker, died August 9 at home.
Service was held.

VICTORIA RIVERA, 30, home-
maker, died August 9 at home. Ser-
vice 11a.m., Wednesday(today) in
the chapel.

Care, Royal Ram'n
CLARENCE WEBSTER,
72, died August 8 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

PATRICIA ROGERS CARTER,
"PAT", pharmacytech., diedAugust
8 at Our Lady of Perpetual Care
Home, Atlanta, GA. Arrangements
are incomplete.


EDWARD COLLINS, 65,
janitor, died August 9 at South
Miami Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Jay's
Range NORMAN BARBER, 52, loan
RICHARD MANSFIELD, 68, officer, died Au-
pupervisor of gust 5 at Bap-
Warehouse for
Warehouse for tist Hospital.
Western Electric Service 1 p.m.,
Bellsouth, died .~ Service 1 p.m.,
Bellsouth, died Saturday, MT.
August 7. Sur- Pleasant Bap-
vivors included: tist Church.
wife, Barbara of
36 years; father:


Lester (Chnamp)
Martin; loving children; grandchil-
dren; and great- grandchildren; a
host of other relatives and friends.
Service 11a.m., Thursday in the
chapel.

NATHANIEL COPLIN,. 76, re-
tired supervi-
sor. for Harp-
er's Delivery
Service, died
August 8. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Lillian;
daughters, Na-
nette McHenry
(Theodore), and Karen Cooper;
son, Terry (Wanda); sister, Clar-
etha Belcher and .Claudette Day,
(Elroy); brother, Tyrone Sykes; five
grandchildren; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Service 11
a.m., Friday, Mt. Tabor Baptist
Church.

ERNESTINE THOMAS, 58, do-'
mestic cleaning
service, died
August 5. Sur-
vivors included:
husband, Jerry;
sons, Mitchell
Smith, Brian c
Patrick, Aaron,
Jerrell, Virgils,
Jerry L.; daughters, Lashonda,
Tiesha and Ericka; brother, Jim-
my Smith; sister, Joyce Johnson;
twenty-three grandchildren; a host
of other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday in the cha-
pel.

ZACHARY L. GRIFFIN- 58, real
estate devel-
oper, died July
31. Survivors
include: wife,
Cynihia. ,son,.
Raphael; grand-
son, Raphael
Jr., and Zacha-
ary; , sisters,
Grace Griffin-Nolan, Ernestine
Griffin-Tucker (Marcellis), Valerie
Griffih-Crawley (James); brother,
Carl; aunt Janie Bell Williams; a
host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Service 1
p.m., Saturday, Peaceful Zion M.
B. Church.

ZEOLA COHEN JONES, 83,
retired teacher,
died August
6. Survivors
include: daugh-
ter, Stephanie
Bromfielld-War-
nell; son,Arthur;
brother, Ernest
Oliver; grand-
children, Courtney Bromfield,
Daphne Bromfield, Taylor Warnell,
Arthur Jr., and Reece ; a host of
other relatives and friends. View-
ing 4- 8:30 p.m., Friday, Church of
God in ChristA & M Cohen Tem-
ple. Service 2 p.m., Saturday, Anti-
och M.B. Church of Carol City.

CURTIS L. ROUNDTREE, 62,

struction, died
August 9. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Jose-
phine, Drake;
daughter, Avis
Raines; son, Er-
nest Garlin; sis-
ters, JoAnn Taylor(Arnold), Denise
Wright(Harold), and Maxine Grice;
aunt, Isabelle Mike, and Betty Lue
Kelly; uncle, Jacob Kelly; Fiann-
cee, Cheve Worthy; a host of other
relatives and friends. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, Pilgrim Rest M.B.
Church.

MICHAEL COUSENS, 89, re-
tired master
gardner, died
August 10. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.




VETA MADE BARTLY, 87,

rangements are incomplete.


I


ALDRICH JACKSON, 66, died
August 7. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.;
Saturday, Sun-
set Church' of .
Christ.




KARY COLLINS, 60, died Au-
gust 6 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Sec-
6nd Baptist
Church.


WILLIE THOMPSON, 84, died
August 7 at
Baptist Hospital.
Service 10 a.m.,
Wednesday (to-
day), Bethel Full
Gospel.




BOBBY PRICE, 35, labor, died.
Auguist 7 at
Homestead
Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m., Satl
urday, Home-'
stead Church of.
Christ. '


VONCILE BROWN, 56, house-
wife, died August 8. Viewing 2,-7
p.m., Wednesday (today). Final
rites and burial, Cornbs Funeral
Home, Lake City, FL.

Hall Ferguson ewi
SARAH JONES-CHERRY, 84,
entrepreneur,
died August
8 at St. Cath-
erine's Hospice.
Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Gloria Jones,
Chaney; grand-
sons, Nicholas
Ivory and Seimaj Chaney. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Holy Cross,
M.B.Church. .

ALMA JOHNSON, 78, nurse,
died August 4 at
home. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, "Historical
Mt. Zion.N




ROSE FORBES, 82, died Au-
gust 9 at-Hospice py-the Sea. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Grace
KIRK ANTHONY SMITH, 33,
tuck driver, died August 3. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.
GERARD JEAN, 78, self em-
ployed,-died August 4. Arrange-
ments,are incomplete.
DORIS LOUISE BARTON, 86,
homemaker, died August 7. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


Paradise-
TERELL LEONARD, infant, died
July 27 at Baptist Hospital. Service
was .held.

JOHN EGBERT BURCHELL,
77, died July 28 in Bradenton.
Service was held.

ELEANOR SCOTT, 60, died
August 3 at South Miami Hospital.
Service 12 p.m., Wednesday
(today), Mt. Olive Baptist Church.



Manker
RONDELL JERMAIRE LANI-
ER, 25, died August 5. Service 3
p.m., Thursday in the chapel.

WENDY FELICIA GREENE, 45,
died August 7 at Jackson North
Medical Center. Service was held.


Death Notice


JOYCE WADE, 53, ac-
countant, died August 10 at
home.
Viewing Thursday 6 to 10
p.m., .Poitier Funeral Home.
Memorial service 2 p.m., Fri-
day in the chapel.


e ltgou i'Ef
by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


Richardson =
ISABELLE McMULLEN, 78,
dietitian, died
August 8 at
Frankos Nurs-
ing and Reha-
bilitation 'Cen-
ter. Service 11
a.m., Thursday,
Words of Life
Church.

GERALD DANIELS, JR., 17,
died August 4
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Friday, Words of
Life Church.




WILLIE BELL REESE, 86,
homemak er,
died August 7
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday St
Luke Missionary
Baptist Church.

ELFREDA WRIGHT, 76, seam-
stress, died August 4 at North
Shore Medical Center. Service 11
a.m., Thursday (8/20), Miami Sev-
enth Day Baptist Church.

PAULINE CAMPBELL, 55, cus-
toms officer, died August 1 at Bro-
ward General Hospital. Final rites
and burial, Kingston, Jamaica.

GIA-VAN NARIN, 26,, customers
service rep., died August 3 at Bap-
tist Hospital. Final rites and burial,
Bethel Brothers, Nassau, Baha-
mas.

STANLEY ROGERS,. 52, po-
lice officer, died,August 7 at North.
Shore Medical Center. Final rites
and burial, Jones Funeral Hqme,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Hadley's
WALTER ROLAND ROUND-
TREE, 76, died
August g 9 at
Aventura' Plaza
Nursing Home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, New
Shiloh Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

Pax Villa (Broward)
LOUIS CHARLES, 76, home-
maker, died August 4. Service was
held.

ANNA LUBIN, 68, factory work-
er, died August 2. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Renaissance Evangeli-
cal Baptist Tabernacle, Fort Lau-
derdale.

JOSUE PAUL, 57, ordained rev-
erend, died August 4. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, Westside Baptist
Church, Hollywood.

Range
EVELYN REED, 68, homemak-
er, died August 4. Final rites and
burial, Montego Bay, Jamaica.


Times "


SOPHIA SANDERS, 81, domes-
tic, died August.
6 at Hampton
Court Nursing
Home. Service
11 a.m., Friday
in the chapel.



PATRICIA SPAULDING, 59,
mail carrier,
died July 19
at VA Medical
Center. Service
was held.




VALERIE WOOTEN, 50, en-
viron mental
services, died
July 18 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
was held.



SHIRLEY REYNOLDS, 59, bus
driver, died August 7 at home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

ELAINE D. THURSTON, ar-
rangements are incomplete.

OLUMIDAYAN SANDERS, 28,
died August 9 at Miami Gardens
Care Center. .Arrangements are
incomplete.

Nakia Ingraha
BEVERLY LARSON, died. Ser-
vice was held.

MORAIDA DEL ROSARIO,
died. Service was held.

ARCHIE SMITH, died. Arrange7
ments are incomplete.

LOYDA COLON, died. Arrange-
ments are incomplete

PATRICIA BODEN, died. Ar-
rangements are incomplete

GEORGE PERRY, died. Ar-
rangeiffints are incomplete
Faith a
JOHN R. BENNETT, 99, retired,
died July, 29
at home. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Je-
sus Christ True
Church of Apos-
tolic Faith.



CORA WALKER, 62, child care
worker, died
August 8 at Uni-
versity of Miami.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at Ap-
ostolic Revival
Center.l


Eric S.Georgf
ALLAFAIR CHANDLER, 72,
homemaker, died Friday at Bro-
ward Nursihg and Rehabilitation
Center. Service 11a.rm., Saturday,
New Macedonia Baptist Church,
West Park










Loved One



With an






Memoriam


In The Miami


I 15B THE'MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 12-18, 2009


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


DEACON CLIFFORD
LAVERNE SALTER "BUBBA" BROWN
EDWARDS


12/18/32 - 08/04/08

Our mother and grand-
mother. It has been a year
since you left us and we miss
you dearly. But, we hold on to
the memories which keep you
alive in our hearts always.
Love always, your daugh-
ters, grandchildren and your
special niece


Card of Thanks
The family of,


wishes to express .sincere ap-
preciation to all for your expres-
sions of sympathy during our
time of bereavement.
Your heartfelt prayers, your
thoughtful deeds, your acts of
love touched our hearts in a
special way.
Thanks to Rev. D. L. Powell,
New Shiloh M.B. Church and
Manker Funeral Home.
May God bless all you.
Mrs. A. Brown and daughter,
Elecia.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,

--w "- V 'i. *


In Memoriam


- , , - . .. -

AMMIE TERRELL
08/13/14 - 06-22-04


Your Family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MAYDEE CULLINS


wishes to express our sincere
thanks and appreciation for the
many kindness and expression
of sympathy that exemplify your
love, care and concern during
our time of bereavement.
Special thanks to Rev. Al-
bert Jones and New Mt. Calva-
ry Baptist Church family, Rev.
Michael Roan and Dayspring
M.B. Church family, Elder Ken-
neth Washington of Greater Is-
rael Bethel P.B.. Church, The
Marks family, Edison Sr. High
School and Northwestern Class
of 1959, Rev. Sarah and Deacon
Terry Smith, Rev. J. Alexander
of Soul Saving, Cory Mitchell,
Deaconess Ann Brown, Sister
Betty Thomas and Poitier .Fu-
neral Home.
Thanks for your prayers, calls,
words of encouragement, floral
arrangements, food, monetary
donations, your thoughtful
deeds touched our hearts. Your
kindness has helped to light-
ened our burdens and brighten
our day.
May God bless each of,youl
Many thanks, Mattie,
Roosevelt, Rosa, The Cullins
and Brown family


Death Notice


CEASAR ROMERO ERVIN,
JR, 18, student, Dade Marine
Institute, died August 8.
Survivors include: parents,
Ceasar, Sr, and Deborah; sis-
ter, Alexander; grandfather,
Harry Lee Sr.; aunts, uncles
and cousins and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Visitation Monday, from 5 to
9 p.m. Service 11 a.m., Tues-
day, (August 18) at Antioch of
Carol City, 21311 NW 34th
Avenue. Entombment: Dade
Memorial Park


JOHN VINCENT COOPER
'J-Mo'
08/16/79 - 03/15/08

Sadly missed!
Love always, The Cooper
and Moore family

Death Notice


EDWINA C. PARKER,
12/23/83 - 08/12/08


We think of you always but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten al-
though you've gone away.
God has you in his arms, we
have you in our hearts.
You're sadly missed.
Love,
The Family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Nancy "Fancy Nancy"
Boyd Seward, 58, died at her
summer home in Graham,
Georgia. Service 11 a.m., Au-
gust 15 at Mt. Calvary Baptist
Church, 27 Gitman Street,
Hazelhurst, GA.
The final rites and burial
entrusted to Royal Funeral
Home in Jesup, GA, 912-427-
4254.
For further information con-
tact Beverly Seward 770-853-
4805 or Commissioner Alice
Strong 912-363-7855.


ROBERT LEE BOYKIN, 79,
entrepreneur,, died August
7 at UM Hospital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, New Hope
MBC. Arrangements entrust-
ed to Mitchell Funeral Home.


ELDER HERSCHEL EALEY
06/09/31 - 08/08/08


PASTOR DR. BEATRICE EALEY
06/09/31- 08/08/08

You both left this life a short
time ago but we still miss
you more than you will ever
know.
Your children, Marvin,
Willie, Gwen, Joyce, Gerald,
Mary, Francine, Elaine, Frank
and your grandchildren


Pax Villaf
ELLISE PAUL, 84, homemaker,
died July 28 at Perdue Medical
Center, Service was held.'

GREGORY POUX, 33, died July
23 at Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Service was held.

LEA LA FRANCE, 71, died Au-
gust 6 at Hialeah Hospital. Service
10 a.m, Saturday, Bethel Baptist
Church.

JACQUES BASTIEN, 70, died
August 7 at Jackson North Medi-
cal Center, Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Notre Dame D'Haiti Catholic
Church.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


In loving memory of,


In loving memory of,


Wright And Young
EMILY ANDERSON, 40, secu-
rity officer, died
August 2. Survi-
vors include:
daughter,
Emibrly; mother,
Betty; sisters,
Tammy and
Shondricka,
Michelle Har-
ris and Pamela Evans; brothers,
Michael Evans, Demetrius Troy,
James, Earl and Willie Dixon. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Friday, Mt. Calvary
M.B. Church.

GENEVA F. PAYNE, 55, security
officer at Miami
Northwestern
Sr. High, died
August 9. Sur-
vivors include:
son, Xavier Oli-
ver; daughter,
Evodney Oliver;
brothers, Wyatt
Payne, Jr. and Kenneth Price; sis-
ters, Joann Dunn and Madelene
Payne; grandchildren, Cleveon,
Ebony, Xavier Oliver, Jr., Zadrick,
Zackery, Camari and Zakaria. Ser-
vice 1.1 a.m., Saturday, Friendship
M.B. Church.

MELISSA HILL, 33, bus opera-
tor, died August
5. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Michael;
sons, Michael
W., Michael B.
and Michael M.;
daughters, Alis-
cia M., Mykala,
Tawanda and Melissa A.; par-
ents, Aceey and Viergela Pierre;
brothers, Frantz, Jacques, Phil-
lip, Devaughn, Sidney, Perry and
Andrew, Pierre. Service 2 .p.m.,
Tuesday (8/18) Mt. Calvary M.B.
Church.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,
- - - - - - - -


Death leaves a heartache no
one can heal.
Love leaves a memory no
one can steal.
You will always live in our
hearts.
Love always,
Your wife, children and
family.


Death Notice


You maybe gone, but you're
not forgotten. Thanks for your
friendship and love.
Your love ones and friends.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,

^*^*


JOHN DWRIGHT
FARRINGTON


CHARLES EDWARD
FERGUSON, 85 retired.
general foreman for Florida
East Coast Railroad, died Au-
gust 9 in Atlanta, Ga.
Survivors include: daugh-
ters, Gloria Jean Heard and
Malaya Ferguson-Ellison
(Parrish); son, Oren Edward
(Veronica); a host of other rel-
atives and friends.
Family hour, Thursday,
from 5-7 p.m. Service Friday,
10 a.m. in the chapel. Inter-
ment: Vista Memorial Gar-
dens. Arrangement entrusted
to Gregg L Mason Funeral
Home.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


HENRY SMALL
08/10/46 -05/16/05


You're away from our lives -
but never from our hearts.
Your Family

Happy Birthday
, In loving memory of,







LENWOOD SQUIRE MADDOX
aka "Lynn, Iola, Meima"


MAYDEE CULLINS
08/13/1909 -08/01/2009


Happy 100 Birthday 'Ma
Ma'.
Love, The Cullins and Brown
family

Death Notice

LAUREATIA RAEDARN
WILLIAMS-CARROLL, 57,
died August 4 after a long ill-
ness in Maryland.
Survivors include: mother, El-
oise Vandyke; children, Cec-
ily; Bryant and Terrance; nine
siblings; seven grandchildren
and a host of other family and
friends.
Family will receive friends on
Friday 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at
Snowden Funeral Home, 246
N. Washington Street, Rockville,
MD and Saturday 9 a.m., until
funeral service at 11 a.m., Nor-
beck Community Church, 2631
Norbeck Road, Silver Spring,
MD. Interment Gate of Heaven
Cemetery. Arrangements by
Snowden Funeral Home.


thanks all of you for prayers,
visits and assistance during the
time of their bereavement.
May God bless each of you.
"An angel on earth is now in
heaven".
The Family


expresses sincere thanks and
gratitude for your concern,
prayers, presence, all deeds of
kindness, expressions of love
and generosity shown during
the illness and passing of our
loved one.
May God continue to bless
each of you.
Special thanks to Rev. Jo-
seph Williams and Saint Mark
Church Family, Rev. Sherman
Mungin and Greater New Mace-
donia Church Family, Miami
Northwestern Class of 1966,
Dwight Flowers, Ervin Forbes,
Robert Person and Hall-Fergu-
son-Mortuary.
'Wife Gwendolyn, children,
Kelvin, Katrin'a and Kelli, broth-
ers, sisters, other relatives and
friends


Death Notice


WILLIE* LEE PERRIMAN
'BOBBY', 72, retired truck driv-
er for Dade County Parks and
Recreation, died August 4 in
Madison, GA. Service was held.


SOLOMON MCQUEEN KAREN TARUSE
12/08/38 - 08/12/05 COVENTON-SUGGS
11/19/1958 - 8/17/08


Honor Your Loved One With an In Memoriam
In The Miami Times


Witness the Consecration of

Bishop Elect





,"T.G. Thompson

to the office of Bishop

......... ... . .... . .....


Saturday, August 15,2009
1 1:00(im At (.-,(--)oci News little Rivei Boptist Churc.h
495 NW 77th Street Miami, Ft.
For more infoi-ii-iotion please call


754-245-3900









The Miami Times



i festy les


FASHION Ho te D * DineING * ART & CULnt
FASHION - Hip Hop e Music * FOOD - DINING * ARTS & CULTURE - PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUG 12-18, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


Students give their interpretation of the movie,The Lion King, in dance and song at the Mayor's Heart of Our Parks Summer Recital in
the Little Haiti Cultural Center. - -Photo/ Jorge Perez- City of Miami Photographer.



Miami's final recital


celebrates summer finale


Special to the Times


City of Miami Mayor Mahny
Diaz's Heart of Our Parks (HOP)
Summer Series commemorated'
the end of the season with a mu-
sical recital titled The Circle of
Life, at the Little Haiti Cultural
Center last week. The program,
featured specialty arts camps
including Music, Choral, Dra-
ma and Film; also marked the
inaugural student exhibition of
the Lewis Arts Academy.
Through a generous grant


from the Jonathan Lewis Foun-
dation, children with a demon-
strated interest in the visual
arts worked with master teach-
ers to experience the art in their
neighborhoods, explore career
paths and connect with 'other
students that share their inter-
ests.
More than 300 children, who
participated in the City's Cul-
tural Arts' Camps, showcased.
lessons learned and talents pol-
ished during the summer break.
Performances include CityKids


Choir singing, a musical mon-
tage of hits such as Nants' Ingo-
nyama from The Lion King and
One Short Day from The Wiz;
Drama Campers' production
of The Lion King; Music Camp
renditions of The Lion King;
Visual Arts Camp creation of
The Young King; and the Film
Camp's special premiere of
Dance for a Daisy prepared by
campers, under the guidance of
the Florida Film Institute. .
HOP is an initiative of Diaz
which provides culturally en-


riched educational and enter-
taining programs for City of Mi-
ami residents. During the sum-
mer, HOP places particular em-
phasis on cultivating children's
talents. Additionally, HOP pro-
vides quality year-round enter-
tainment for the entire family-
with events like PJs in the Park,
Shakespeare in the Park, Fresh
Air Flicks, Dive in Movies, and
the Jazz on the Bay concert se-
ries. HOP ensures a steady flow
of entertainment free of charge
for the entire family!


NFL Yet dancers show their variations of dance, taught during summer
camp, as they dance to the pop song, "When I grow up" at the their sixth
annual Dance Recital held at the NFL Yet Center on Friday.
-TheMiami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite


Andralique Byrdsong woos the crowd with her runaway walk
during a fashion show at the NFL Yet Center sixth annual Dance
Recital on Friday. -The Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite

Miami-Dade youth

dance the summer away
Young ladies spent the whole summer participating in various
activities at the NFL Yet Center so they shared with their families
and friends all the things they learned in their dance class in the
sixth annual NFL Yet Dance Recital.
The Miami Times Report
So, you think you can dance?
Well, the ladies at the National Football League Youth
Education Town (NFL YET), located at the Gwen Cherry Park
in Liberty City, proudly answered that question on Friday as
they presented to their families and peers the sixth annual
Dance Recital.
The girls between the ages of 5-17 danced to a combination
of gospel, R&B, pop and Hip-Hop music sharing with the
crowd that consisted of their families and peers what they
learned throughout the summer in dance class.
The YET is a 22,000 square foot facility housing 2 computer
rooms, a large meeting room, Library, Game
Please turn to SUMMER 6C


Zsael Wooding leads her peers in the gospel song, "I'm going to be
ready," at the NFL Yet Center sixth annual Dance Recital on Friday.
-The Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite


Jaquandra Benjamin and Brittany Cooper dance solo performances to
Donnie Mcclurkin gospel hit, "Stand," at the NFL Yet Center sixth annual
Dance Recital on Friday. -The Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite


-"

a


President and first lady

make best dressed list
Barack and Michelle Obama are edging out Hollywood stars
on Vanity Fair's International Best-Dressed List.
The president'makes the list for the first time in issues out
Wednesday, joining his wife, who has been named twice be-
fore.
No longer on the list is Angelina Jolie, although her husband
Brad Pitt remains, based on a poll of fashion insiders. Other
stars getting the hon6r are; Penelope. Cruz, Anne Hathaway,
NBC correspondent Tiki Barber and James Bond star Daniel
Craig.
' The Obamas weren't the , only stylish political dressers
named. French first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy made the list
along with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his com-
panion, Diana Taylor.


~h itoo" g


A-L


4b wamm


Copyrighted Material-
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Available from Commercial News Providers


Rihanna requests less-restrictive

court order against Chris Brown
Rihanna has asked that a restraining or-
der be cancelled against Chris Brown that
requires him not to come within 50 yards
of her.
Brown is due in court today (August 6)
in Los Angeles to face sentencing after
pleading guilty to assaulting h is ex - i
girlfriend in February.
"If asked, we will tell the court
that all that's necessary is a
level-one order: That' Brown
not annoy, molest or harass
her," Rihanna's lawyer
Donald Etra told People.
"No stay-away order was
ever requested by Rihanna,
nor did she ever believe it .
was necessary."
He is expected to get five
years probation and 180
days of community labour.
which he would serve in his
home state of Virginia. Brown will
also be required to undergo do-
mestic violence 'classes for a year. A
charge against him for making crimi-
nal threats will'more than likely be
dropped.


r- -- 4 - -I










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


V, TUE LMIAM4I TIMlEq AN, 19i-l 9flMR


& 1 l11 * - 1 1, , - .1-1 11 - . - ---


The founders. Frank Cole-
man, Oscar J. Cooper, Er-
nest E. Just, and Edgar A.
Love. of Sigma Alpha Chap-
ter of Omega Psi Phi Fraterni-
ty, Inc. would've been proud
of their chapter this year
for their great accomplish-
ments starting with Her-
man Dorsett, II., basileus,
Timothy Belcher, records
and seal, Michael McLeod,
keeper of finance and the
membership for support and
carrying out their duties.
The founders established a
National Achievement week
at Howard University
in 1904 and a time to
conduct a summer re-
treat for the brothers
to plan and strength-
en the chapter in the
areas of 'scholarship,
manhood, persever-
ance, and uplift. Fur-
thermore, the retreat CA
was carried out under
the name of Ulysses
G. Horne, who initiated it by
going to Naples, FL. for sev-
eral years and retiring it at
the Omega Activity Center
to include all of the brothers
and their families.
It kick-off last Friday
with a fish fry sponsored by
the newly elected brothers:
Grady Wright, leader, Chris-
topher Barnes, Anthony
Britt, Leon Clark, Darvin
Johnson, Peter Jenkins,
Gerald Jones,, Oneil Morris,
Ransom Carter, Dr. James
Kelly, ADP. The brothers
began to congregate on the
outside, as well as on the in-
side with wives and children
and everyone complimented
the young brothers for the
task of preparing fish so de-
licious.
Even though the broth-
ers stayed late; it did not
impede their being on time
for the first session of the


retreat the fol '
lowing morning
in the samtue loca-
tion. The theme
of the conference
was, "Friend-
ship is essential to the soul."
Headed by Fred Killings, the
input of the youth group
called "Lamplighters" He
also received a standing ova-
tion for taking the group to
Washington, D.C. for an edu-
cational trip and a visit with
President Barrack Obama.
Now, they are getting ready
for 2009-10.
Since planning is
a maj9r part of the
organization, The
National - Achieve-
ment Week report
was brought to the
table by , Belcher,
Chico Arenas,
Thomas Johnson,
1ERS and Nathaniel Rob-
inson III. The event
is scheduled to be
held at Florida Memorial
Banquet Hall, beginning at
3 p.m., Sunday, November
15. Belcher also urged the
brothers to attend meetings
at 7:30 p.m. nightly every
Tuesday.
Stan Allen interjected
that the scholarship commit-
tee will increase the amount
to $6,000.00 and each grad-
uating Lamp be given a cer-
tificate for $100.00, while the
basileus recognized broth-
ers for performing exclu-
sive, tasks, such as Johnny
Stepherson, Darren Bry-
ant, Derrick Love, Thomas
Snowden, Nathaniel Robin-
son, R. T. Fisher, Antho-
ny Simons, Ernest Sidney,
and Matthew Tisdol who
reminded the brothers that
he was seeking State Rep-
resentative District 104 seat
which is currently being boc-
cupied by Yolly Roberson.


Other brothers includ-
ed Wynton Anders, Bobby
Cheatham, Christopher
Benjamin, Basil Binns II,
Justin Bishop, Theodore
Blue Jr., Harold Braynon',
Rodney Bryant Dwone
Burse, Harcourt Clark Sr.,
Theron Clark, Audley Caok-
ley, Nicholas Coleman,
Norman Cox, Donntay Coo-
per, Elston Davis, Johnny
Davis, Harry Dawkins, Bill
Diggs, Herman Dorsett II,
Leslie Gamble and Peter
Harden.


It was ironic to Har-
court Clark Sr. when
Dr. Andrew Forbes
showed him a picture
of him leading the
FAMU Marching 100
as head drum major
back in the 50's. It
stimulated him to re-
flect on the past his-
tory of Coconut Grove PICI
and an opportunity
to be a pianist, along
with being a drum major.
Clark emphasized on
how he missed the oppor-
tunity and, how each time
someone plays the piano,
he wanted to kick his own
behind. Further, he iter-
ated on Thomas Lesley, a
piano teacher, who rode his
bicycle to visit students in
parts of Miami like Liberty
City, Brownsville and Coco-
nut Grove. And, of course,
when Clark saw Lesley com-
ing down the street towards
his home, he took off and left
the neighborhood. Later, he
would hear his mother, Ma-
rie, calling him back home,
but to no avail. He never an-
swered until he saw Lesley
pass near him on his bicycle
heading back to Miami.
Lesley missed Clark
each time he left Miami for
Coconut Grove, but he had.
the opportunity not to miss
Norman, Sydney, and Win-
ifred Cox, Linda M. De-
meritte and the Demeritte
family, Cassandra Hanna,


Fred Morley, Martha Mor-
ley McKenzie, Gerald Pratt
and his brothers and sisters,
Annie G. Sweating, Ruvel
Smith, Louise, Richard,
Eddie and Inez Strachan-
Rowe.
He was also a discipline
music teacher and wanted
his students to read the mu-
sic and not memorize it. His
eyes stayed closed, but when
you missed a note, he would
hit you on the fingers with
his ruler each time. Further,
he never pumped his bicycle,
he sat on the seat until he
got to his destination and
gave each . student
30-minutes of lesson.
, Other piano teach-
Sers back in the, days
included Mr. Hanna,
Mr. Davis, Lela Wil-
liams, Mabel Dorsett
Glover and Alexan-
der Valentine. Those
and other students
NEY alive are passing their
techniques' on to their
children and grand-
babies.


The City of Miami cele-
brated its 113 birthday with
a huge cake and spectators
boarding a bus to see Miami
as it is now with the infra-
structure bellowing above
the area and many, ques-
tions unanswered, because
the answers are not there.
And, according to Dorothy
Graham, the infrastructure
back in the days consisted of
the Lyric, Ritz, Modern and
the Liberty Theatre in Lib-
erty City. Other entertain-
ment spots were The Harlem
Square, Rockland Palace,
Sir John, Knight Beat, Patio
Club, Fiesta, Booker Terrace,
Hampton House and Gil Spot
in the Grove.
Dr. Enid C. Pinkney,
founder of the African-Amer-
ican Committee of Dade Her-
itage and Historical Hamp-
ton House, attended Booker
T. Washington and is still
known as the first female to


head the Student Govern-
ment Association and invit-
ed Joe Louis, heavy weight
champion of the world, to a
student assembly. Before he
left, she solicited money for
band uniforms and waited
patiently at the hotel to get
same.
Now, she is older, wiser,
and more persuasive in her
endeavor to move both orga-
nizations to .a higher
level. Kudos go out to
her supporters, such
as The Honorable
Dorothy Johnson,
chairperson, Isabelle
Rosete, secretary,
Charlayne Thomp-
son, treasure, Mar-
tha Anderson, Caro-
lyn Boston, Dr. Lar- DIG
ry Capp, Dr. Edwin
T. Demeritte, Eufau-
la Frazier, Alyce S. Harrell,
Penny Lambeth, Marva
Lightbourne, Ruby IRayford
and Eugenia Thomas.


Minister Dr. Pamela H.
Green, Ebenezer United
Methodist Church, is com-
mended for her report of the
Ebenezer Youth attendance
to the 2009 Explosion in
Marietta, Ga., last weekend.
It all began when Ebenezer
youth, youth sponsors Rev.
Dr. Joreatha Capers, Se-
nior Pastor, Min. Jo Ann
Brookins, Min. David Lar-
mond, Berthena Bullard, Jill
Bethel, Rev. Dr. Joreatha
Capers, senior pastor, Val-
erie Bradley, T. Eileen M.
Majors, Gracelyn Thomas
and John Thomas, joined
host Min. Roy Moore and his
wife, Connie, after leaving
Miami at 1 a.m., on Thurs-
day and arriving in Marietta
around 3 p.m. fully ready for
the three-day conference.
Furthermore, Friday
was registered as fun day
and the youth from several
churches got together for a
skating rink party, followed
by a workshop featuring
Yvonne Prater and Karri


L I ItlLMIlAllvBl ioiL.),i'UI alng i.thvsL


Brookins, along 'with syn-
copated rhythms, spiritual
workshops, steppers, rap-
pers, food festivities and
much fun.
"' Entertainment was at
its best when the JB Danc-
ers of Ebenezer took to the
floor. and executed moves
that brought many "Amens"
from the huge crowd. When
M.A.S.K. took to the floor to
perform they execut-
ed dance routines,
along with expres-
S sons, on their faces
unmatched by other
groups..- Further, it
%was a wealth of gifts
and graces expressed
in dance, song, mime,
rap and plain old. fel-
GS lowship. This was
where old truths took,
on new and young-
er faces; you could feel the
Holy Spirit through the
moves that were made and
the songs that were sung,
according to Green.
A special salute goes
out to Min. Roy Moore, for-
merly of Ebenezer UMC% who
started the Youth Explosion
back in 2006 and alternated
between Georgia and Flor-
. ida. Moore also received
his education from the Dade
County School System, in-
cluding Norland Middle and
Senior High. As a teenager,
he was observed as a leader
of the pack and set an ex-
ample among his peers. Af-
ter completing high school
he, himself,' strayed away,
from the straight and narrow
and found Jesus, where he's
taking the message far and
near.
-Next year, the Youth Ex-
plosion will be held in Flori-
da. Please 1egin to pray with
us about God anointing this
event and a greater partici-
pation to' include from 5-10
churches in 2010 and Min-
ister'Moore will be in those
numbers changing the nega-
tive lives of his peers to Je-
sus Christ. More likely at
Ebenezer UMC.


Happy wedding anniversary'
to Lionel A. and (Loisl Fergu-
son, August 6. their 49'- and
Harold and (Paula) Meadows.
August 8, their 39".


Lorna Culmer-Schellbach,
our illustrious soloist returned
to her adopted home of Kassel,
Germany last Thursday. .
Lorna sang at the wedding of
goddaughter Dortresia John-
son who was married last
Saturday to An Twan Jones.
The wedding party of maid of
honor-Francis R. Allen; best
man-Greg Killings and Nceflo
I. Bonaby; Bridesmaid-Britney
Benbow, Ariel Burke, Tenisha
James, Lashawanda Russell
and Shekitra Starke. Grooms-
men: Elijah Armstrong, Elijah
Johnson, Eugene Johnson and
Brandon Bryce Wilson. Parents
of the .bride-Eugene Johnson
and Fitzhugh Johnson and
Parents of the Groom: Herbert
Lee and Doretha Jones.


Get well wishes to Zeola Co-
hen-Jones, Carmeta Brown-
Russell, David F. Davis, Lou-
ise H. Cleare, Elouise Bain-
Farrington, Grace Heastie-
Patterson, George Wilkerson,,
Nathaniel "Mo" Fulmore, Jr.,
Yvonne Johnson-Gaitor, Irna
Ali-Banks, Ismay Prescod and


Athenia Kelley.


Did \ou kno%
there are 17 more
islands in the Baha-
mas excluding Nas-
sau? Thought you might like to
visit some of the others some-
time. Try visiting others you
might like them: They are great
Abaco, Grand Bahama, Bimini,
Berry Islands, Eleuthera, New
Providence, Andros, Exuma
Cays, Cat Island, San Salva-
dor, Great Exuma, Long Island,
Crooked Island, Ragged Island,
Acklins, Maya Guarla and Great
Inagua. Nassau is the capital.


In Washington, D.C., there is
an African-American Civil War
Soldiers Memorial dedicated in
honor of Black soldiers designed
by Ed Hamilton of Louisville;
Ky., and was the first major art
piece by a Black sculptor to be
placed on federal land anywhere
in the District of Columbia. The
wall of honor lists the names of
209,145 United States Colored
Troops who served in the Civil
War. The names also include
the 7,000 white officers who
served with the USCT. ,


Perhaps you're weary of sing-
er Michael Jackson and the


other nut we must give him (a
me-astarl his due.
i'"n" '10 2; "Thriller" made'-him
a megastar' It remains the
world's biggest selling album
of all times with an estimated
28 million records sold in the
United States. His long-time
friend legendary actress Eliz-
abeth Taylor called him the
"King of Pop," an appropriate
title of royalty that stayed with
him for the rest of his career.
Jackson went home with a
record of eight Grammy's for
"Thriller" including Album of
the Year, Record of the Year
(Beat it), Male Pbp Vocal Per-
formance (Thriller) and Best
R&B song, "Billie Jean."
We are out of our joy and
he is out of his pain. Rest in
peace, Michael, we will always
remember your music and
'you. Your talent-is perfect.


Jason Taylor, welcome
back to the "Miami Dolphins"
..Some of us missed you!


Dr. Dalvin and (Mrs. Viv-
ian) Lane and their chil-
dren, brother George Lane,
Jr. nephew Ned "Champ"
Edwards and wife, Syriara.
Goddaughters Karen Bullard-
Jordan and Tameka Caudler
surprised Jaunita Allen-Lane,
with a'birthday surprise bash
long to be' remembered by her
family ..members, friends and
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority So-
rors.
The grand party was held at
DeVersailles Banquet Hall.


ml--
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- ' '












/VIA/V I-SPICE
-- . ._

i Lwve Miami Spice.com

ORGANIZED BY THE GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

This August and September celebrate the city's passion

for food and life by enjoying special dinner and/or lunch

menus at reduced prices at Miami's finest restaurants.



Lunch $22* I Dinner $35*
'3-course meal includes appetizer. entr'e and dessert Beverage, tai and graluily are not included
NOTE: Restaurant participation, days offered and menus vary and are subject to change.

Double your pleasure! Miami Spa Month
has been extended through August 31.

For a list of participating spas and information visit
www.MlamiSpaMoenthxwf.c


By Anna Grace Sweeting
-1 �4
77�7,










3C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 12-18, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Miamian inducted into Hall of Fame


The Miami Times Staff Report "

The late Derrick Thomas,
who became a local football
hero, then pursued a career in
the NFL, was inducted into the
Pro Football Hall of' Fame on
Saturday.
Once a linebacker for the
Kansas City Chiefs, Thomas,
33, lost his life in 2000 after a,
car accident.
Thomas's mother and several
other family members attended


the ceremony held in Canton,
Ohio, where they celebrated his
life.
Derrion Thomas accepted the
induction for this father.
"I can't imagine the sense of
pride that he'd feel as a player
to get this honor," he said.
Thomas was born in Miami.
He started playing football at
the age of three. At an early age,
he lost his father, Robert James
Thomas, during a mission in
the Vietnam War.


Back-to-School jai
Spase Designz, a local market- Bank United Center in Coral
ing and promotions compaAy, Gables but now it has retuned
along with Miami-Dade County to its birthplace.
District 2 Commissioner Dor- "With the historic financial
rin Rolle, The Children's Trust times that we are living in right
and The Tax Doctor will present now, this year like no other this
the "6th Annual All-Star Jam" event means a lot to our com-
at. Miami Northwestern Senior munity " stated the CEO of
School on Sunday, August 16. Spase Designz Jermell Jenkins,
For the last six years, Spase a graduate of Miami Northwest-
Designz have given out over ern High School.
4,000 book bags and school As part of the admission,
supplies at the All-Star so now each student will receive a book
they are back to do it again. The bag with school supplies inside
event was previously held at the while supplies last. Workforce


DERRICK THOMAS
FOOTBALL PLAYER


Thomas later attended South
Miami Senior High School where
he was a star football player.
He pursed his education to the
University of Alabama where he
was chosen as an All-American
in his 1988 season.
In the first round of the 1989
NFL Draft, ,Thomas was signed
to the Chiefs. In a short time,
he was selected as Defensive
Rookie of the Year.
Thomas' life was cut short in
2000 when he and two other,


at Northwestern


mobile units will be on hand-
to assist parents or job seek-
ers. Then, the main event will
follow inside the state-of-the-
art gymnasium with a celebrity
basketball tournament, which
in the past has featured Udo-
nis Haslem, Dwayne Wade and
Alonzo Mourning.
Earlier this year, the members
of Spase Designz were recog-
nized in Washington D.C. at the
BET awards for their philan-
thropy within the community
and also honored with a Proc-


lamation "Spase Designz Day"
by Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos
Alvarez.
"Our company has come far
but we have a lot more people
to assist," stated the Vice Presi-
dent of Spase Designz Gellin
Attis, who also teaches 9th and
10th grade biology at Miami
Northwestern.
Doors for the All-Star event
will open at 3 p.m. and the
game starts at 4 p.m. For more
information, contact 305-986-
3926.


Taylor confirmed guest of honor at FMU gala


Special to the Times
Miami Dolphins linebacker
Jason Taylor will be the special
honoree guest during Florida
Memorial University's 130th An-
niversary Gala which will be
held at the Fontainebleau Miami
Beach Resort at 7 p.m., Friday,


October 2. The fundraiser is the
third annual installment of the
University President's mission
to garner support from corpora-
tions, churches, organizations,
and the community in raising
funds to provide higher educa-
tion to needy students.
Taylor, who recently appeared


as a celebrity finalist on the ABC
show, "Dancing with the Stars,"
will receive the University's Com-
munity Leadership Award for
his commitment to service and
promoting education through
the Jason Taylor Foundation.
"We are pleased to host a
guest of Jason Taylor's caliber


for such an historic event for
the University" stated Karl S.
Wright, Ph.D., President of the
institution. "We hope to form a
long-lasting partnership with
Mr. Taylor and his foundation
to provide educational oppor-
tunities for all prospective stu-
dents."


-psm ktu -l ""


passengers were driving to the
Kansas City International Air-
port during a .snowstorm, in


hopes of catching a flight to
St. Louis. to watch the NFC
Championship game.


- . Peter Trvers


'AWESOME
-DISTRICT 9' SOARS ON THE
IMAGINATION OF ITS CREATORS."


'"DISTRICT 99 WILL
LEAVE YOU BREATHLESS.
ONE OF THE BEST AND
MOST ORIGINAL MOVIES
OF THE YEAR.
...SIMPLY STUNNING!"
Paul Fischer, DarkHonzons.com














STAFrTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 14
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES
sonRY, NO PASSES ACCEPTED FR THIs ENGAGEMENT


ftofe 9h


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"k


RISEUP - Florida Premiere Screening
RiseUp is a film journey into the heart of Jamaica.- the island that gave'
birth to the worldwide cultural phenomenon of reggae. In a society
where talent abounds and opportunity is scarce, three distinct and
courageous artists fight to rise up from obscurity and write themselves
into the pages of history. With music and appearances by legends Lee
"Scratch" Perry, Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare, and a slew of
soon-to-be superstars, RiseUp follows artists from the dangerous
streets, back alleys and crowded dancehallsof Kingston, to the
picturesque countryside. These artists demonstrate the raw power of'
hope and courage in a land which is largely unseen,, but certainly not
unsung.
7 PM * Carnival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House)
FREE for Adrienne Arsht Center Members * $10 for non-members


The Adrienne Arsht Center andithe Miami Carnival Committee present
CARNIVAL ON THE PLAZA
Irin celebration of the reggae musical The Harder They Come, join us for a
full lineup of performances including a junior carnival and junkanoo parade,
kid's activities, a Caribbean village with interactive vendor booths; and
delicious Caribbean snacks by Barton G.
11 AM * Thomson Plaza for the Arts * FREE

The Adrienne Arsht Center In association with
Jan Ryan, Robert Fox, and Michael White presents
THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union In association with the
Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Contagious Musiq and AE District
The reggae event of the year-live on stage Young singer
Ivan Martin heads to Kingston with dreams of becoming a reggae star,
but a corrupt and drug-fueled music industry drives him into a fast and
furious life as Jamaica's most-wanted outlaw,
2 & 8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00


RiseUp - Screening


The Harder They Come


rmamran'


THE HARDER THEY COME
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union itr association with
The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Contagious Musiq and AE District
Accompanied by a killer band of outstanding reggae musicians, the cast
performs more than 20 classic songs from the film soundtrack) including
"By The Rivers of Babylon," the title song, "Higher and Higher," and
"You Can Get It If You Really Want."
2 & 8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $50.00, $95.00 The Harder They Come


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.


AdrienneArsht Center
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
A I i


[SUN AUGU


L�AT AUGU


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 12-18, 2009


Steve Harvey's book headed to big screen,

Filmmaker Will Packer plans to adopt Steve Harvey"s best-selling book "Act Like A Lady, Think Like A Man"
into a feature film.
An official announcement is reportedly pending, but BV's Karu Daniels is reporting that the producer of such
films as "Stomp The Yard" and "Obsessed" have reportedly acquired the film rights to the Amistad/Harper Collins
book, which has been atop the New York Times Best Sellers list for the past six months.
"It's pretty amazing," Harvey, a first-time author, told BlackVoices.com in February about the book's success.
"It really has to be some amount of favor from God, because I have no experience at writing a book."
Officially titled "Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man: What Men Really Think About Love, Relationships, Intimacy,
and Commitment," the book is an extension of a popular segment from Harvey's top rated, nationally syndicated
morning radio show called "Strawberry Letter," in which he and co-host Shirley Strawberry give advice
to people who write in..
In 2007, Packer -- the co-founder and chairman of Rainforest Films - was heralded as one of the "10
Producers' To Watch" by:Variety.


By Gail Mitchell .


LOS ANGELES (Billboard) -
Keri Hilson planned to break into
the music industry as a singer.
Straight from the best-laid-plans
file, however, she encountered'
several hurdles. But she didn't
give up.
Hilson did .put it on layaway
as she sharpened another skill:
songwriting. Not only has, she be-
come a sought-after writer, Hilson
finally broke out earlier this year
as a chart-topping singer with her
aptly titled debut album, "In a
Perfect World."
And her career evolution under-
scores the increasing role pub-
lishing companies are playing in
artist development.
Five years ago, the relatively un-
known songwriter signed a pub-
lishing deal with Universal Music
Publishing Group. At that point,.
Hilson's resume included credits
as the teen lead singer of one-
time Elektra girl group By D'Sign
and. early songwriting efforts on
projects by Kelly Rowland and
Ciara.
"Melody is one ofKeri's strongest
points and she's very clever lyri-
cally," said Ethiopia Habtemar-
iam, the company's New York-
based senior VP/head of urban.
Around that time, Atlanta-
based songwriter/producer Polow
Da Don arranged an introduction
between Hilson and Timbaland.
The producer signed her to his
Interscope-distributed Mosley
Music imprint in 2006.
All the while, Hilson was de-
veloping her songwriting skills.
Stranded in Miami during Hur-
ricane Katrina following a song-
writing retreat, she became a
founding member of the song-
writing/production collective the
Clutch. The five-person team has
churned out such R&B/hip-hop


.and pop hits as Ma'ry J.
Blige's "Take Me As I Am.
Britney Spears' "Gimme
More" and Omarion s
"Ice Box."
Through her con-
nection with Timba-
land and Polow, Hi - .
son got placements
for songs recorded
by the Pussycat
Dolls ("Wait a Min-
ute") and Ludacris
("Runaway Love").
She also wrote
and was featured
on Timbaland's
top five Billboard
Hot 100 hit "The
Way I Are." Then
two years ago she
began to focus
on her dream.
The long gesta-
tion from song-
writer 'to artist
paid off. Hilson's
"In a Perfect World
debuted at No. 4 on
the Billboard 200. Sell-
ing 411,000 copies after
19 weeks, according to
Nielsen SoundScar. the al-
bum has spun off twvo hits:
"Knock You Down" featuring
Kanye West and Ne-Yo and
"Turnin' Me On" featuring Lil
Wayne. A new single. Slow
Dance," is scaling the charts,
as is R. Kelly's "Number One'
featuring Hilson.
Hilson recently returned
, to the studio to begin Twrit-
ing for forthcoming albuLms
by Timbaland and Chns
Brown, as well as her
own next project. Look-
ing back on her song-
writer-to-artist evolu-
tion, she says taking V
the alternate route was
worth it.-


'4,


California Red or White
Seedless Grapes.........................
Or Red and White, A Healthy and Delicious
Afternoon Snack, 2-lb clamshell
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


/-I. ' ' 49
C herry P ie... ........ . ........ ............................... . 5
Flaky Crust filled With Delicious Cherries,
Frorrn he Publi 2 kerr . 34-o l. e
SAVE UP TO 1.80


Kellogg's
. Cereal .........:... ree
Assorted Varieties, Frosted lakes,
Apple Jacks, Corn Pops, or Froot Loops,
14.9 to 17.5-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.63


Capri Sun a 600
D rin k s .......................
Or Roarin' Waters, Assorted Varieties,
10-pk. 6-oz pkg.
(Excluding 100% Juice Items.)
SAVE UP TO 1.17 ON 3


Dasani 3
W ater .....:.......... .......... 39.....
24-pk. .5-L bot.
SAVE UP TO 3.00


18-Pack Assorted
Budweiser Beer..
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(6-Pack Miller Chill Beer,
12-oz bot. ... 5,99)


Prices effective Thursday, August 13 through Wednesday, August 19, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin. St. Lucie, Indian River, . 'll iISA " ,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Any item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix advertised sale price. Prices not effective at Publlx Sabor. I.I�,nIn|t.| 11 e , s.r -aIVISA


I' R&B singer Keri Hilson


: took detour to stardom


1119


L 49
8
.......... 2 ST ..........










The Miami Times


Business

SECTION D


,,...vil, FLORIDA, AUG 12-18, 2009


Copyrighted Materia l


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News


mlf fU .


Providers


0


ImIl


New jobless claims decline more than expected


By Christopher S. Rugaber
The number of newly laid-off work-
ers seeking unemployment benefits
fell last week, the government said'
Thursday, a sign that the job mar-
ket is improving.
Job losses are likely to slow in
coming months, economists said, a
trend that could be reflected in the
government's July unemployment
report to be released Friday.
"We believe the lower claims fig-
ures are an important economic
development and confirmation that
the economy is turning the corner,"
Joseph LaVorgna, chief U.S. econo-
mist at Deutsche Bank, wrote in a
note to clients.
Still, the number of people continu-
ing to claim benefits rose by 69,000
to 6.3 million, after having dropped
for three straight weeks - evidence
that job openings remain scarce and
the unemployed are having difficul-
ty finding new work. The figures for
continuing jobless claims
Please turn to CLAIMS 6D


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; . , .,, ' '
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KELLY-ANN
CARTWRIGHT


MARIYN HOLIFIELD
MARILYN HOLIFIELD


Blacks recognized in The
Best Lawyers in America
The ,,iiami Times Staff Report
Forty-three Holland & Knight lawyers of the
Miami, Ft. Lauderdale and West Palm Beach of-
fices were recently named by their peers to the
2010 edition of The Best Lawyers in America.
Among the recipients receiving the high hon-
ors includes Marilyn J. Holifield who works in
the Miami office and practices in Commercial
Litigation Labor and Employment Law.
"I always honored to be recognized by my
peers." said Holifield. "Your peers are the peo-
ple who know what it takes to be an effective
lawyer so I am extremely honored."
Holifield made history again in 1986 when
she was named a partner with Holland &
Knight, the first Black woman partner with a
major law firm in Florida. She was previously
recognized in the The Best Lawyers in America
in 2006.
Other honoree included University of Flori-
da graduate Kelly-Ann Cartwright, a labor and
employment lawyer also in the Miami office.
Published since 1983, The Best Lawyers
in America is widely regarded as the preemi-
nent referral guide to the legal profession in
the United States. The Best Lawyers lists are
compiled through an exhaustive peer-review
survey in which thousands of top lawyers in
the U.S. confidentially evaluate their profes-
sional peers.

State Governor appoints
Sharpton to State Corporation
State Gov. Charlie
Crist has appointed
business leader De-
nise Sharpton to the
One Church One
Child of Florida State
Board of Directors. In
addition to serving as
marketing director at
Sharpton, Brunson &
Company, P.A., Sharp-
ton is an adjunct pro-
fessor at Johnson &
Wales University and
a Christian Etiquette
writer.
"It is my distinct honor and pleasure to
serve as Gov. Crist's appointee to the board
of directors of One Church One Child. I am
committed to helping the organization fulfill
its mission of increasing children' potential
for placement in a permanent family home,"
Sharpton said.

Commissioner to host several
meetings on County budget
Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey
M. Edmonson will hold three meetings during
the month of August for residents who have
questions or concerns about Miami-Dade
County's 2009-2010 proposed budget. Resi-
dents can attend any of the following sched-
uled meetings to comment on the budget that
take place on: American Legion Park, 6447
Northeast Seventh Avenue, 6 p.m., Tuesday,
August 18; DeHostos-Wynwood Commu-
nity Center, 2902 Northwest Second Avenue,
6 p.m., Wednesday, August 19 and Joseph
Caleb Center, 5400 Northwest 22 Avenue, 6
p.m., Thursday, August 20.


Stusinc lips: (w71ate a i'o~wwww"'o* 'nDWUPolhat ddfinc itcou

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Syndicated Content


4 U


Available from Commercial News Providers










A6 THF MIAMI TIMES. AUG 12-18. 2009


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN' DESTINY


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NOTICE


OF SPECIAL ELECTIONS


Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Resolutions adopted by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County,
Florida, notice is hereby given of Special Elections on September 15, 2009, for the purpose of submitting to the qualified electors
residing in the proposed districts, for their approval ordisapproval, the following proposals:
Resolution No. R-788-09, adopted June 30, 2009, proposing to abolish the Highland Ranch Estates Security Guard
Special Taxing District as provided for in County Ordinance No. 09-61.
Resolution No. R-937-09, adopted July 21, 2009, proposing that the Hammock Lakes Security Guard Special Taxing
District be created and established as provided for in County Ordinance No. 09-63.
Resolution No. R-939-09, adopted July 21, 2009, proposing the amendment of Keystone Point Security Guard Spe-
cial Taxing District as provided for in County Ordinance No. 09-64.
Ballots will be mailed to all registered voters residing within the proposed areas who will be eligible to vote YES or NO for the
proposals. All marked ballots must be received by the MiamiDade County Supervisor of Elections by 7:00 p.m. on the day of the
election.
These special elections will be conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Code of Miami-Dade County and other ap-
plicable provisions of general law relating to special elections.
Lester Sola
SMIAMI Supervisor of Elections
IC "- -Miami-Dade County, Florida


Retail chains still suffering


CLAIMS
continued from 5D
lag behind those
for initial claims by a
week.
First-time ,claims
for jobless benefits
dropped to a seasonally
adjusted 550,000 for
the week ending Aug.
1, down from an up-
wardly' revised figure of
588,000 in the previous
week, the Labor Depart-
ment said.
That was much lower
than analysts' estimates
of 580,000, according
to a survey by Thomson
Reuters. And the four-
week average of claims,
which smoothes out
fluctuations, dropped to
555,250, its lowest point
since late January.
Even so, many retail


chains reported sluggish
July sales Thursday as
consumers proved re-
luctant to spend. Mall-
based chains.'
When emergency ex-
tensions of unemploy-
ment are included, the
total jobless benefit rolls
climbed to a record 9.35
million for the week
ending July 18, the
most recent period for
which figures are avail-
able. .Congress has add-
ed up to 53 extra weeks
of benefits on top of the
26 typically provided by
the states.
Despite the decline
� in new jobless claims,
they remain far above
the 300,000 to 350,000
that analysts say is con-
sistent with a healthy
economy. New claims
last fell below 300,000


in early 2007.
. The recession, which
began in December
2007 and is the longest
since World War II, has
.eliminated a net total
of 6.5 million jobs. The
unemployment rate is
expected to rise to 9.6
percent when the July
figure is reported Fri-
day.
More job cuts were an-
nounced this week. The
publisher of the Milwau-
kee Journal , Sentinel
said it would cut 92 jobs
as the current advertis-
ing slump continues to
ravage the newspaper
business. Elsewhere,
about 6,000 General
Motors Co. blue-collar
workers have taken the
latest round of early
retirement and buyout
offers.


Park named for local icon

SUMMER
continued from 1C
Room, Gymnasium, Multi-purpose room, several offices arid storage
rooms.
2 lighted football fields, a lighted baseball field, softball field, 2 lighted
outdoor basketball courts, 1 lighted 400 meter track, pool medium recreation
building and ample parking sits on 38.5 acres Miami-Dade County Parks
and Recreation land known as Gwen Cherry Park.
Named after the first African-American elected to the Florida Legislature,
the late Mrs. Gwendolyn Sawyer Cherry, the park has been serving the
Liberty City community for decades.
Bobby Johnson is the director of the Yet Center.














MOVE

Open a Certificate of Deposit at
Colonial Bank for guaranteed growth.













12-month CD
I u.geog.....oeoe.

Colonial has more than 60 offices
to serve you in South Florida.
To find a location near you,
visit www.colonialbank.com or
call (877) 502-2265.








COLONPAL RANK
o. like it here.



M b 02009 Colonial Bank.Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective as of August 11,
I 2009, and subject to change without notice. Minimum opening deposit is $500.
This offer cannot be used In conjunction with any other advertised special. Substantial
penalty for early withdrawal. Public funds and financial institutions are not eligible.
Advertised APYs are only available for Colonial Bank local retail markets in Florida.

<,___________________________________________


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Apartments




GREAT NEWS'

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE.
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698 00

APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MORE'!'

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING- JULY 7, 2009
(3051 635- 9505

"Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change


1130 N.W. 80 St
One bdrm. living, dining. Adult
Community $375 mthly. 305-
343-6490, 305-720-8222

115 N.E. 78 Street
Three bbdrms Special $875
and two bdrms $815, nice
and clean, laundry room,
parking. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424

1212 N. W. 1 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE-IN
One bedroom, one bath,
$500, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-
1144

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1277 N.W. 58th Street #1
Two, bdrms, one bath, appli.
included. Section 8 Wel-
come.
786-277-9925, 305-494-8884

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080

140 N.W. 13 Street
One month to move in. Two
bedrooms, one baih, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

140 S.W. 6 St. HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$500 monthly
Call:305-267-9449

1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one' bath.
$525. 305-642-7080

1541 N.W. 1 Place
Rents reduced for short time
only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled, air, stove,
refrigerator. No Deposit for
Section 8!
Call 3058-5825091

1545 NW 8 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath.
ceramic tile, central air,
carpet, balcony, new
kitchen, appliances, laundry
machine, quiet, parking.
FREE WATER
$ Move in tlodayl
786-506-3067
1756 All Baba Avenue
One bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 welcomed! Call
Louis 786-556-9111.

1955 N.W. 2 COURT
Onel bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080

1969 N.W. 2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
tree waler 305-642-7080
786-236-1 144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.


$475. Call 305-642-7080


2493 N.W. 91st Street
One bedroom or apt with air
$550 a month Call 786-515-
3020 or 305-691-2703.

2515 N.W. 52 Street #2
One bedroom, tiled, air, no
appliances. $550 monthly.
$1100 to move in.
954-522-4645.

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bedroom, one balh,
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
301 N.W. 177 STREET
Oversized one bedroom, one
bath, tiled floors, central air
and heat. Call 305-652-9343

3119 NW 133 STREET
Large, one bedroom, newly
remodeled. Section 8 OK!.
786-374-6658

3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$350 bi-weekly, $600 moves
you in. Appliances.
786-389-1686

3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove,
refrigerator. air. $650.
� 305-642-7080

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475 monthly, $700 move
in special. Free Wi-Fi, Easy
qualifying. 786-339-4106

458 N.W. 7 Street
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

4621 N.W. 15th Avenue
$525 monthly, 786-512-7622

48 N.W. 77th Street
Large one bedroom, $550
monthly. Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580-
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

5200 NW 26 AVENUE
Two and three bdrms.
Free gift for
Section 8 tenants.
No deposit if qualified!
786-663-8862, 305-634-3545

585 NE 139 STREET
One bedroom. $680 mthly.
First, last and security. 305-
769-3740

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

6229 NW 2 AVENUE
One and two bedrooms, $525
and up. 786-327-6012

* 729 N.W. 55 Terrace
One and two bedroom. Call
786-312-4097. Michael.

7519 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances, park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
.$650, half off first month. Call
305-754-7900. 9 am to 7 pm

7527 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances, park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
$650, half off first month. Call
305-754-7900. 9 am to 7 pm

7601 N.E. 3 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath. Re-
modeled kitchen new floors,
appliances. $750 monthly,
security negotiable.
Call 305-525-0338

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tion/specials.


www capitalrentalagency
com


DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy quality Move in
special.
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 ($745), two bedrooms,
one bath. $595 ($895').
Free water'
Leonard 786-236-1144
LAKEFRONT
APARTMENTS
One and two bedrooms.
One month free rent. Now
accepting SectioR 8.
Call 305-757-4663
L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly,. $1100 to move
in, first and last. Section 8
ok! 305-244-7606.

MOVE IN SPECIAL
750 N.W. 56 Street. Nice one
and two bedrooms. Gas and
water included. Section 8 OK.
$650-$825. 786-262-6958.

N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 welcome! $800
monthly
Also Available:
One bedroom, two baths.
$900 monthly.
Call 954-303-3368 or
954-432-3198.

Sanford Apt.
1907 N.W. 2nd Court
Nice, two bdrms, air, window
shades, appliances. Free hot
water. Tenant pays for cold
water. $410 monthly plus
$200 deposit. 305-665-4938
or 305-498-8811. '

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
One bdrm, one bath apt.,
$550 per month.
Two bdrms.. one bath apt.,
$650 per month.
Two bdrms., one bath
house, $850 per month.
All appliances included
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578


Business Rentals
KITCHEN FOR RENT
1437 NW 3 AVENUE
$200 weekly plus water bill.
305-343-7817

Church
2683 N.W. 66th Street
For more information
Call 786-277-8988

Condos/Townhouses
14004 NE 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, two baths
condo. $1100 mthly. Section
8 accepted.
Call Ricky 786-253-7218

20380 N.W. 7 Ave
Two bedrooms, two baths.
,Section 8 OK. 786-326-3078

2779 NW 192TER
Two bedrooms, one and one
half baths, appliances includ-
ed. Central air, washer, dryer.
Close to shopping. Section 8
welcome. $1100 monthly.
305-469-9741'

3060 NW 204 LANE
Three bedrooms, one bath.(.
Great price! 305-652-9393

6748 Kingsmoor Way
One story townhouse remod-
eled, three bedrooms, two
baths, wood cabinets, stain-
less steel appliances, wood
floors, marble bath, large cov-
ered patio. $1700. Available
immediately. 305-725-6222

NORTH MIAMI
SECTION 8 OK
Spacious, huge, two bed-
rooms, newly remodeled.
Water and appliances includ-
ed. Peaceful area.
305-450-8649

Duplex
10201 N.W. 8 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1195. Appliances.
305-642-7080

13315 Alexandria Drive
Two bedrooms, one bath
$775 monthly plus first and'
last. Section 8 OK!
252-955-7878, 786-252-4953

1369 N.W. 40th Street
Two bdms, one bath, central
air, tiled floors, Section 8 OK.
786-413-8045


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUG 12-18 2009


1393 N.W. 55 STREET
Brand new, three bedrooms,
two baths. Section 8. $1450
monthly. 786-355-1791

1782 N.W. 55 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. 305-218-1227.

18003 SW 105 STREET
Duplex for rent. Three or four
bedrooms, two baths. Section
8 welcome. $1450 monthly.
305-233-3887,305-281-7091

1820 NW 53 St
Two bedrooms, one bath, tile,
central air, washer/dryer hook
up. Section 8. 786-333-6838

1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $1000
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431

21301 N.W. 37 Avenue
Two bedrooms. $895 mthly.
786-306-4839

2257 N.W. 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2283 N.W. 101 STREET
One bedroom, water, air,
bars. Not Sanctioned Section
8. $700. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776

2401 NW 95 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, central air, Section 8
OK. $1,175 mthly.-
Matthew 954-818-9112

2425 N.W. 104 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899

282 NE 58 TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one 'bath, air.
$750 monthly. 954-266-9006

3633 N.W. 194 TERR
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, tile, fenced yard. Section
8 OK. 305-622-9135

38 N.E. 64 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$675 monthly, includes water.
Call 305-267-9449

423-425 NW 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
tiled floors. $800 monthly.
First and security.
305-216-4844

6250 N,W.1 AVENUE ...,
One bedroom, one bath
"$800. Two bedrooms one
bath $1100. Appliances,
Free Water/Electric. 305-
642-7080

68 N.W. 45th Street
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air $850. 786-431-5520

8083 NW 12 PLACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1090 monthly, $2250 to
move in. Section 8 OK.
954-294-0514

8098 N.W. 4 Ave.
One bdrm, one bath, appli-
ances, free water. First, last
and security. Section 8 OK.
305-621-4383

9355 NW 31 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
tiled floors throughout. $800
monthly, first and last. Not
Section approved. Call after
11 a.m. 305-625-4515.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit; $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace-

HOLLYWOOD AREA
SCOTT STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tile flooring, central air, wash-
er, dryer. $1250 monthly.'
305-343-7057
MIAMI AREA'
8221 N.E. 1st Avenue #A
Four bedrooms, two baths,
washer and dryer. Section 8
okay. 305-710-3361.

NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700-$750 monthly.
305-758-3029

Efficiency

1140 N.W.79 Street
One bdrm, one bath, $550.
Free water. Mr. Willie i 109
305-642-7080
12325 N.W. 21st Place
Efficiency available.
Call 954-607-9137

13377 NW 30 AVENUE
$120 weekly, private kitchen,
bath, free utilities, appliances.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486

1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, air, cable, no
utilities, $550 mthly.
786-317-1804


-jrr

1492 N.W. 38 St.- Rear
Appliances and utilities in-
cluded. $550 monthly, $1100
moves you in. David 786-
258-3984

2400A N.W. 61st Street
Section 8. Water, appliances
included. 786-277-9925

4131 NW 11th Place
Private Room and entrance
$150 weekly. 305-634-5877

MOVE IN SPECIAL
2125 N.W. 36 STREET
Efficiencies and one bed-
rooms. Gas and water
included. Section 8 OK.
$525-$600. 786-262-6958

North Dade
Furnished, first and last.
Call 786-267-7619

Furnished Rooms
15810 N.W. 38 Place
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-81.86, 305-691-3486
1600 N.W. 56th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455
or 786-226-5873 .

2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-3434;
305-914-4461

2365 N.W. 97 Street
With air, $100 a week or $380
a month. Call 305-691-2703
or 786-515-3020.

2981 NW 44 STREET
Kitchen privileges. Serious in-
quiries only. 305-919-6682

4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $350 moves
you in. 786-306-2349

NICELY FURNISHED
Air, Cable, TV. $125 wkly.
786-290-0946

NORLAND AREA
Nice quiet room, near bus ter-
minal. Call 305-766-2055

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Large bedroom, cable,
central air, parking, utilities
included. Call 954-274-4594

NORTHWEST AREA
62 Street N.W. First Avenue
$450 monthly $650 move in"
Call 305-989-8824

NORTHWEST AREA
LARGE, CLEAN
FURNISHED ROOMS
CALL 305-974-8907
HOURLY DAILY WEEKLY
RATES
SEVERAL LOCATIONS

NORTHWEST AREA
Nice and clean, free cable,
air, $100 weekly, $200 to.
move in. 786-426-6263

OPA LOCKA AREA
Move-in special
786-251-2204

Housse=
10295 S. W. 175th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly, 305-267-9449

10951 SW 222 TERR
CUTLER BAY
Four bedrooms, one and a
half baths. $1000 monthly.
Call 305-267-9449

1101 N.E. 153rd Terrace
Three bdrms, two bath, very
clean, spacious florida room
and yard, quiet neighbor-
hood, central air, appliances,

305-947-4232

1122 N.W. 74 Street
Three bedrooms one bath.
$1200 mthly, $2400 to move
in. 305-632-2426

1370 N.W. 118 Street
Five bedrooms, three baths,
new tile rirrughout, all new
central air. washer, dryer.
New appliances. Section
8 OK $1750 negotiable.
O.B.O.
FREE 19 inch LCD TV
Call 305-525-1271

14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 okl Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013

1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or
305-992-3653
16010 N.W. 28 Court


1645 LAUDERDALE
MANOR
Four bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Fort Lauderdale.
786-263-1590

18020 NW 5 AVE,
Two bedrooms, one bath,
den. Section 8 Welcome.
786-718-4931,404-861-1965

1864 NW. 88 TERRACE
Four bedrooms, two new
baths, tile and wood floors
central air, new kitchen roof,
$1150, bars, $$2875 move
in. Not sanctioned Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

1880 N.W. 65 St
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1000 monthly, $0 security
deposit. 786-262-7313

1950 N.W. 60 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8. 786-263-1590

2164 N.W. 83RD Terrace
Two bdrms. $1100 mthly.
Section 8 Ok. Rent with op-
tion to buy. 786-306-2349

2273 N.W. 65 Street Rear
One bdrm $600 monthly.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899

2324 NW 85 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances included. $1200
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
954-430-6264,305-219-0827

2331 N.W. 208th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 a month first and last
to move in. Section 8 Wel-
come. Call 305-343-1988.

2359 N.W. 56th Street
Four bedrooms, two and half
bath, central air, appliances,
Section 8 okay!
305-343-5700

2590 N.W. 166th Street
Three bedrooms, $800
monthly, 305-638-1475

2771 N.W. 209Ter
Four or five bedrooms, two
baths. $1850. Section 8 OK.
786-326-3078.

3028 N.W. 8 Road
Sunrise, Florida. Three bed-
rooms, one bath, renovated.
$895 monthly.
786-306-4839

,3,10 HNE. 58 TEflRACE.
Five bedrooms, three bath.
$1200 monthly. All appli-
ances included. Central air.
Free 19 Inch TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

4513 NW 185 STREET
MIAMI GARDENS
Section 8 OK. Three bed-
rooms, one bath with tile
floors and central air. A beau-
ty. $1365 monthly. Call Joe.
954-849-6793

4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 mthly. 305-606-3369
5010 N.W. 21 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security bars,
refrigerator stoves. $1350
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
305-215-8125

5551 N.W. 9th Avenue
Remodeled two bedrooms,
new kitchen, central air,
$825,
305-687-1200

563 N.W. 22 Street
Three bedrooms, - one bath,
newly renovated. $950 mthly.
Section 8 OK. 305-751-8865

7 N.E. 59 TERRACE
MOVE IN SPECIAL ($1350)
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900. Free Water.
305-642-7080

7706 NW 15 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
newly renovated, big yard.
Section 8 welcome.
786-326-2789

7801 N.W. 2nd Court
Small two bedroom, one
bath, $600 monthly, $1200 to
move in. 305-479-3632

936 NW 29 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly. Also avail-
able, two bedrooms, one
bath.
Call 786-262-7313

CHARMING RICHMOND
HEIGHTS HOME
Three bedrooms, one bath,
large fenced yard, near shop-
ping and schools. $1350
monthly. Call Nowi
1-866-446-8104

FLORIDA CITY AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced, air, clean. $850
monthly. 305-528-6889

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled, appliances in-
cluded, fenced. Section 8.
$1350 mthly. Call:
786-366-3480,786-319-7226.


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Remodeled three bedrooms,
one bath on water. $1350.
Section 8 okay. Call 754-244-
6262, Rose.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Tnree'bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard. Section 8 OKI $1150
monthly. 305-388-7477

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, $800-$900.
No dogs. 305-688-6696

NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
appliances, fenced, new car-
pet, tile, bars, and reversed
air. Section 8. Call'
305-836-7531.

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 mthly, $1275 to move
in. 305-986-2607

Rent with Option
ATTENTION RENTERS
. Receive $8000 credit. Credit
partners available, if you de-
sire a home. 1-800-242-0363
Sext 3644

Unfurnished Rooms
. 4712 NW 16 AVE
$85 weekly, utilities, kitchen,
bath, air. 786-260-3838
305-218-1227

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms for rent. $500 and up.
Houses for rent. Section 8
welcome. 305-300-7783
786-277-9369

Duplex
4132 N.W. 22nd Court
Tri-plex, five bedrooms, three
baths, call 305-633-3867 or
786-427-9196

ALLAPATTAH AREA
- Two bedrooms, one bath and
. one bedroom, one bath, fully
remodeled, central air. No
Closing Cost! Get $8000
Tax Credit! $98,000. Call
owner at 305-968-7955

w.I

Houses
1250 NW 123 STREET
Three bedrooms,-one bath,.
central air, fully remodeled.
No Closing Cost!. Get $8000
Tax Credit. $95,000. Call
owner at 305-968-7955.

1740 NW 152 STREET
Three bedrooms, , two
baths,family room, large
yard, completely fenced. Ask-
ing $180K. Call Barbara 786-
210-6500

HOLLYWOOD AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fully remodeled, central air,
new kitchen cabinets. No
Closing Cost! Get $8000
Tax Credit! $89,000. 'Call
owner at 305-968-7955..

LOOK!!!
DADE AND BROWARD
Why rent? Cheaper To ou9l
Three, four and live bed-
rooms. $1900-$2900 Down
and $312-$995 mlhly. P&I
with new FHA financing,
plus first time buyers get
$8000 in stimulus back.
NDI Group, Inc. Realtors
290 N.W 183 Street
Stop By For List.
305-655-1700 (24 Hrs)

NEW CONSTRUCTIONS
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Three bedrooms,
Two baths

Starting from �

$70,000

'After grants
and subsidies
Also subject to
qualification

NO CLOSING COSTS

305-801-5868

OWNER WILL FINANCE!
1765 NW 40 STREET
Four Bedrooms, two baths.
$79,900. No money needed
to buy If you can qualify or
10% down and owner will
give financing. Call Jack.
954-920-9530

Lots _
LOT FOR SALE,
By owner. 50'x 140'.
305-333-5668



Repairs
AFFORDABLE REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, roof,
washer, dryer. 786-273-1130


ADVERTISE TODAY


I,,,', '1


I.'


CALL 305-694-6210, Ext. 109


ON I I


1%.FlM w


M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves,
refrigerators, water heaters.
Joel. Cell 305-244-8948 or
305-758-8608.

Childcare
MIZELL KIDDIE KAMPUS
Register now for Summer or
Fall. Ages 2-5. Abeka cur-
riculum, certified teachers,
computers, progress reports,
Black History, Spanish, Swa-
hili, extra-curricular programs,
field trips and PTA. 7 a.m. -
5:45 p.m., 1910 N.W. 95 St.,
305-836-1178



Employment


HIRING NOW!!!
Macedonia Missionary Bap-
tist Church ol Miami, Inc.
is seeking a professional
church musician skilled in
piano, organ and choir min-
istry. Apply in person at:
3515 Douglas Rd.
(37In Ave)
Coconut Grove
Rev Rudolph Daniels
Pastor 305-343-4290


LIQUOR STORE
STOCKMAN
Week-end and evenings:
Honest and reliable with
verifiable references. Seri-
ous apply in person at 800
N.W. 183 Street,

Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required..
Call 877-471-5682

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours Of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must' have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver Lense.
.Apply ih person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

Merchandise

LET US BE YOUR GUIDE
To Greater Prosperity
Books on how to start or
Improve a business.
bizsupportmedia.com











Schools
BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Concealed
and Traffic School Services.
786-333-2084

BECOME A
CERTIFIED LIFE OR
BUSINESS COACH
this weekend. Contact me
for more details. Also offering
personal coaching. Call:
Candace 954-889-4995


BEST PRICES INTOWNII1
Now offering Pest Control!
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles. 305-801-5690

EVERTON ELECTRIC
Specializing in all types of
electrical work. Commercial
and Residential. Licensed
and Insured. Rate as low as
$45 per hour. 786-329-0903

GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.
STOP
FORECLOSURE
NOW
Are you about to lose your
home? Are you behind on
Your mortgage payments?
You have alternatives and
options. For a free phone
consultation, call 1-866-446-
8104 or visit on line at:
southfloridarealtortoday.com


Four bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8. Appli. 786-277-9925









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


nn TUr lAIAMI TIACC AII 11Q 9 9IflflO


BU1 IHtIL i1IIII�ILo, nUU IL-IU, a.UUJ


(wmral mon to trS wil)ln nca -ne "


4ba �4MMIO


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers









NOTICE OF GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2009,
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTION NO. 09-0177
AND ORDINANCE 13064
FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING THE OFFICES OF THE MAYOR
AND TWO CITY COMMISSIONERS WHO ARE TO BE ELECTED
FROM SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICTS 3 AND 5
A general municipal election will be held on Tuesday, November 3, 2009, from
7:00A.M. until 7:00 P.M., in the City of Miami, Florida, at the polling places in
the several election precincts designated by the Board of County Commission-
ers of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the qualified electors par-
. ticipating therein will vote for the following municipal officers: The Mayor and
two District Commissioners who are to be elected from single member Districts
3 and 5. A runoff election, if required, is to be held on Tuesday, November 17,
2009.
For additional information please contact the City Clerk's Office at (305)-250-
5360 or visit our website at: www.miamfgov.com/city_clerk/pages/elections/
Selections


r

- a


*


Priscilla A.'Thompson, CMC ,
City Clerk ,
#003275


MIAMI.3


Opportunity to

Rent

A market exists for property owners willing to rent
affordable housing to people classified as sexual
offenders or predators. For information, please
contact the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust at
305-375-1490.


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
ogram and office visit after 14 days


Son


included.
A GYN


DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St., Hilaleah. FL.
(scunca ds 103 St.)
(Please niti'tion i ti)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611


BUINS &SRICE

-SNCTO:


$425 for 13
weeks in print
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S 'BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Alli Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


You already know you love shopping here, we think you'd love working here too. With flexible schedules,friendly faces, a sup-
portive environment, and of course, employee discounts, we've got everything you need to maximize your career potential!
And now that we're right in your neighborhood,T.J. Maxx has the job that fits your life, and the resources to take you to the
next level!


Part-time opportunities exist for:
Jewelry Associate
Merchandising Stock
Fitting Room Receiving
Sales Maintenance
Full-time opportunities exist for:


Store
Management


Loss Prevention
Coordinators


Please apply at our hiring event or
for more information, please call
1-866.TJ MAXX-5 / (1-866-856.2995)


August 17 & 18

10am-7pm
Miami Beach

Botanical Gardens
2000 Convention Center Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33139




www.tjmaxx.com

TjX i ar Equal Opportunity Employer committed to workplace diversity.


Slp "' w i, V TV VI * EI UI EIr
S' Advertising Coordinator
*... .. ur CALL (305) 693-7093 NOW!!


SISTER LISA
I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life, such
as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business transac-
tions of all kinds. I never fail to reunite the separated,
cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome enemies,
rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling blocks and
bad luck of all kind. There is no heart so sad so dreary that
I cannot bring sunshine into it. In fact, no matter what
may be your hope, fear or ambition, I guarantee to tell it
before you utter a word to me.
7615 NW 7TH AVE. MIAMI
305-757-8705


CITY OF MIAMI ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
IFB NO. 114056 INVITATION FOR BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF SCUBA
DIVING EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES, CITYWIDE
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009
Deadline forReauest forAdditional Information/Clarification 8/14/2009 at 3:OOP.M
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing
Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. (305) 416-1913.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY
OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO. 12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez City of Miami
City Manager

AD NO. 002069


QThe Jliami mes
INEXPENSIVE NEWS ADVERTISING



Drive More

Customerst

Your Busi ss
MBifla1rgl^ BroB iIB I '- '4r


Ie r


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items'listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the. scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."
"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."



RE-BID CONFERENCE:
A non-mandatory pre-bid
conference will be held on
Tuesday, August 25, 2009,
081-JJ09 '9/15/2009 Maintenance and Repair Operations (MRO) at 10:00 a.m., in the School
Products (Pre-Qualification of Bidders) Board Administration Build-
ing Auditorium, 1450 N.E.
2nd Avenue, Miami, FL
33132.

108-JJ07 8/25/2009 ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS
REPLACEMENT PARTS AND SERVICE

085-JJ05 8/25/2009 Delivery of Testing Materials

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


advertising@mymiamitimes.com


--


1-11- T- , - - , -
t ." W16 I Ile am q-


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 12-18, 2009


0, ACKN ' I(,\ MU'(COTRLTHEI rR OW\N fDESTINY


IMMiCopyrighte'd!MateriII hM


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


City of Miami

PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF MIAMI
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Miscellaneous Vertical Construction
Observation Services
DUE DATE: ON OR BEFORE MONDAY,
SEPTEMBER 7, 2009 @ 2:00 PM
RFQ No: 08-09-062
For detailed information, please visit our Capital
Improvements Program webpage at:
www.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements/pages/
ProcurementOpportunites/Default.asp .
THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE
"CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
section-18-74 of the city code.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager


DP No. 000707.

Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS

y * WEBSITEE
� ' X W k ,A *,',, . i:.iiririj ,, i-,:iVr, ri),r :,T,d :.'Ti
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 * Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 * Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 * 305-652-6095


A WOMAN'S CARE OB/GYN
', , 'Sonogram
.w Family Planning & Abortion I.U.D
Abortions starting from
$180.00 with this Ad
*Board Certified Physicians
*Sedated Procedures up to 22 weeks
*Complete GYN Services
*Serving the community for over 20 years
*Licensed by the state of Florida Department of Health
68-A North east 167st. (Between North Miami Ave. & 1st Ave.)
Phone: 305-947-0885 / Phone: 305-947-1268




* Accidents * Arrests
* DUI 8 Tickets * Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense * Wills/Probate
* Personal Injury * Divorce/Custody
,100's of Lawyers Statewide




Advanced Gyn Clinic
Prolesslonal S3ie & Conlidential Services

- Termination Up to 22 Weeks
- Individual Counseling Services
- Board Cerified OB GYN's
..... Complete GYN Services
, ABORTION START $180 AND UP
305-621-1399


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by thp City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


IFB NO. 163131

CLOSING DATE/TIME:


COMMERCIAL RECORDS MANAGEMENT
SERVICES, CITYWIDE

2:00 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2009


Detailed scope of work and specifications for this bid are available at the City
of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procure-
ment Telephone No. 305-416-1958.

Deadline for Request for Clarification: Thursday, August 27, 2009 at 5:00 P.M.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager gR

AD NO. 003276 '1-s


City of Miami
Notice of Request for Proposals Solicitation

Title: Design Build Services for the Design and Construction at Gibson
Park Due Date: Friday, September 11, 2009 at 2:00 PM

Pre- Proposal Conference: Thursday, August 20th 2009 - 10:00 AM -12:00 PM
(Non-Mandatory) .
RFP No.: 08-09-046

For detailed information, please visit our Capital Improvements Program
webpage at:

www. miamigov.com/capitalimprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunites/
Default.asp

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE IN ACCOR-
DANCE WITH section 18-74 of the city code.
Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.,
City Manager
DP No. 008961


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE COVERING OPENING OF BIDS


CONE OF SILENCE NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:

Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13-8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted for this RFP beginning with issuance of the Legal Advertisement
and ending upon such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a contract, to
reject all bids or responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the Cone of
Silence may be punishable as provided for under Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, in addition to any other penalty provided by law.

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, and in accordance
with � 120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002) and failure to post the bond or other security required by law in F.S. 255.0516 in a form consistent
with F.A.C. Rule 28-110.005(2) within the time allowed for filing a bond, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120,
Florida Statutes.

School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/schoolboard/rules/. -

Any written communications must be sent to the address listed below and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd
Avenue, Room 268B, Miami, Florida 33132.

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educational programs/activities and employment
and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.

Any firm, or individual, whose contract has been terminated by the Board Awith cause@ within the last three years, shall not be considered
for commission under this proposal.

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, for the projects listed herein, until 2:00 P.M. local time.
Tuesday, the 22nd day of September 2009, atl450 N.E. Second Ave, Room 351, Miami, Florida, following which time and place, or as soon.
there after as the Board can attend to the same, the said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium, Miami-
Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. Award of the contract will be made to the
lowest, pre-qualified responsible bidder for the actual amount bid considering base bid and accepted alternates (if any) as listed in the bidding
documents. The Board will award the contract based upon the results of the tabulations as covered by applicable laws and regulations.

Project No. G-ENV/TB-2009-GR/1&2
Project No. G-ENV/TB-2009-GR/3&4
Project No. G-ENV/TB-2009-GR/5&6
GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATIONS
Term Contract
2009
Miami-Dade County, Florida

The Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Thursday, September 3rd 2009 at 10:00 A.M.. at the Department of Asbestos Management,
12525 N.W. 28�t Avenue, Suite 509, Miami, FL 33167

PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS HIGHLY ENCOURAGED.




In an effort to ensure the timely remediation of asbestos and mold containing materials, and the installation of non-asbestos
replacement materials, in Miami-Dade County Public Schools facilities, the School Board has divided the district's six (6) regions
into three contracts of two (2) regions each, in accordance with the standard regional distribution schools established by M-DCPS/
School Operations. Awards will be made to three (3) prime contractors, on the basis of one contractor for each two-region contract.
The three contracts will be assigned.for Regions 1&2, 3&4 and 5&6 respectively. Eligible contractors will be permitted to bid on
more than one contract. However, no contractor will be awarded more than one contract. Assignment of contracts will be made
relative to the bid ranking, with the first choice going to the lowest bidder for each contract.

ALL THREE CONTRACTS ARE OPEN TO ALL BIDDERS THAT HAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE SCHOOL BOARD
OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA, PRIOR TO BIDDING.

Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one CD with the bid and contract documents from the office of the Department of Asbestos
Management. 12525 N.W. 28tt"Avenue. Miami. Florida, on or after August 17. 2009, from 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM. (contact person
Mr. Dan Marple @a (305) 995-4591). Three printed copies of the Project Manual for General Environmental Remediations/Term
Contract 2009, will be provided to the successful bidders upon award of Bid.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

THE SCHOOL BOARD,OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


[51-ACKN MLJ,')l 11-11


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