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The Miami times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00842
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: August 5, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00842

Full Text

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S11 P1
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Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 49 MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 5-11, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


AFRO-IN BOOKS CLOSES AFTER 30 YEARS


Afro-in Books and Cafr

has hosted such celebrities

as Maya Angelou, Jada

Pinkett Smith, Will Smith,

and Bernadette Stanis . ..

By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


5 5 7 5


NORTHWEST 7TH


D.C. CLARK


The venerable Afro-In bookstore and cafe,
which has been a Liberty City. landmark for more
than 30 years, sits today with a "for rent" sign
on its shuttered doors. The sign ends months
of speculation. The bookstore, for years an
intellectual hub for Blacks in Miami-Dade, has
closed. The property was run by Dr. Larry Capp. CAPP
According to a spokesman for Earl and Ursula Wells, who own
the property, there are no plans to reopen. The spokesman
Please turn to LANDMARK 4A


Railroad Shop:



COLORED EDITION
On August 1. 1947, 35 Black families, resided in a portion of town then referred to as the "Railroad
Shop: Colored Edition" founded in the 1900's by Black workers from the Florida East Coast Railroad.
They were forcibly evicted from their homes after the school board decided it wanted the land for a school
and park for White families. Without prior notice or plans for alternate lodging, police officers knocked on
the doors of the homes in the middle of a rainstorm and told resident they had only two hours to evacuate
or risk imprisonment. When the judge in charge of the proceedings overruled the Black attorney, Lawton
Thomas, who was hastily hired by the families, many had no choice but to flee. They left behind their
possessions and in many cases, carried small children into days and nights of undue hardship.


Atoja Moses of the Atijo Ancient Musicians gives a stunning performance for a crowd 0>
of Liberty City, Brownsville, Allapattah and Overtown residents. --MiamiTimes photos/SandraJ. Charite


Geraldine Kilpatrick-Owens, daughter of Merline and George Kilpatrick, holds a picture ,
of her parents who were the 52nd family evicted from the Railroad Shop. Kilpatrick-Owens' :
is joined by Brandi Kilpatrick, the granddaughter of George Kilpatrick and Marc Paquin, , ,
great grandson of George and Merline Kilpatrick at the memorial of the 35 families
of the "Railroad Shop: Colored Edition" held at the Carrie R Meek Community Center,
Charles Hadley Park on Saturday. SEE STORY ON 7A


Obama pledges $70 billion in n


Veterans to get education and housing


By David Jackson
President Obama on Monday
saluted the extension of GI Bill
education benefits to veterans of
the Iraq and Afghanistan wars,
saying they sacrificed abroad
while others back home sought
to make money or play politics.
"While so many were reaching
for the quick buck, they were
heading out on patrol," Obama


said. "While our discourse often
produced more heat than light,
especially here in Washington,
they have put their very lives on
the line for America. They have
borne the responsibility of war."
During a ceremony at George
Mason University in Fairfax,
Va., Obama said helping veter-
ans who have served since the
9/11 attacks with college tu-
ition and housing is more than


a "moral obligation."
"We do it because these men
and women must now be pre-
pared to lead our nation in the
peaceful pursuit of economic
leadership in the 21st century,"
said Obama, who was joined by-
Vice President Biden and Sen.
Jim Webb, D-Va.
The legislation is expected to
cost more than $70 billion over
the next decade.
President George W. Bush
signed the new GI Bill last year,


w GI Bill
and it took effect Saturday. It
gives financial aid for public
and private schools to veterans
of the two wars and their fami-
lies. The' bill covers reservists
and National Guard members.
The veterans would be eligible
for a monthly housing stipend
and up to $1,000 annually for
books.
"Over the last eight years, they
have endured tour after tour of
duty in dangerous and distant
places," Obama said.


Gregg Fortner, Miami-Dade's new housing director

New Housing Director

embraces new challenge
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Gregg Fortner, after his arrival in Miami-Dade County on
Monday, was all business.
The County Commissioir voted 12-1 last month to hire Fort-
ner, a former San Francisco housing director, as the Miami-
Dade County Housing Agency director.
Fortner, 51, will lead the troubled agency whose previous
director, Jose Cintron, stepped down after three months of
- Please turn to DIRECTOR 5A


Rev. Ike dies in L.A.
Rev. Ike, the flamboyant television evangelist who died in
Los Angeles last week, made Miami Beach his home for the
last 10 years before moving to Los Angeles two years ago.
Rev. Ike and his staff owned a double penthouse apart-
ment in the Palace Condominiums on Collins Avenue. In the
above 2001 file photo Rev. Ike and his wife, Eula, are shown
entertaining friends in his luxurious home.
SEE STORY ON 12B


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES. AUGUST 5-11. 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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WVe Miami inmu

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982

GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 - Six Months $30.00 - Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 * 305-694-6210

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can pest lead the world from racial and national antagonism when It accords to
every person, regardless ol race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person fearing no person, the
Black Press strives to help every person In the firm ballet that all persons are hurt as long as anyone Is held back.


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Proposed pay cuts: Another bad idea from County officials

Dehr Editor, more than someone making over cide how to conserve'that wisely. directors, chiefs, supervisors
All the11un-y1emloyees a-ing -ani so on Ana itinT wan4 t to


This is the same ,as always
the only person that gets hurt
is the poor people. The plan is
that all Miami-Dade County em-
ployees will receive a five per-
cent pay cut. So the employee's
making between $20,000 to
$30,000 would feel the effect far


$100,000. That's like saying you
have ten people five with a buck-
et of chicken and five with three
pieces and you say that you need
to take one piece from everybody.
Now the ones with the bucket
would not even feel the effect but
the one with three will now only
have two. Now they have to de-


All the County employees making
over $100,000 can afford to take
10 percent pay cuts and it would
not affect them. Also, the County
has so many top heavy employ-
ees in management. They can
afford to get rid of some of that
waste at the top starting with all
the unnecessary managers, asst.


and so on. And I don't want to
even mention the ballpark that
they are spending all this money
on and you are talking about a
budget an needing to find ways
to spend less. What a jokell

Vernon Floyd,
Miami


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU

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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


Sometimes good

things happen
My mother always sees the tall odds to
bright side of things. Professor protect and
Gates arrest for effectively being enhance their
in his living room and not be- communities. .
ing subservient to white police I saw Miami- "
officer is .probably a good thing. Dade Commissioner Audrey Ed-
It highlights a daily occurrence monson in action in the Miami
- minorities being stopped and Dade Chamber as she pushed
harassed by police. When I at- through an expanded CRA with
tended Duke University as a law the support of her fellow Black,
student, I drove a 1967 Comet white and Hispanic commission-
with about eight different colors ers. I also saw County Commis-
of paint. I was habitually stopped sioner Barbara Jordan flex her
by campus police and forced to muscles when someone came up
show my identification. Unlike with the bright idea of putting
Professor Gates, I smiled and all the released child molesters'
acted respectful - it is rare that living under the bridge into her
.a civilian can win a battle with a District. That bright idea died
police officer, who has the abil- on the vine - thank God. I also
ity to invent all sorts of crimes, saw all four Black Commission-
write wonderful reports and ers fighting .to protect vendors
most importantly carries a gun who 'lost" bids in somewhat
and badge. Professor Gates ar- strange circumstances. The cdr-
rest sheds light, on this problem rent ordinances have effectively
and fosters debate and hopefully eviscerated the commissioners
sensitivity. It also goes to show powers to change the manager's
that no matter what you do, no recommendation.
matter how high you reach in The Commission needs to re-
your career, a Black man is still vise the bid process, and regain


S sometimes good things happen and no one knows, particu-
larly when it comes to the work of our Black political lead-
ers.


a n------ to some white people.
My secret desire is that Su-
preme Court Justice Clarence
Thomas is arrested with his white
wife while driving in some south-
ern state. I imagine that as he is
being cuffed and kicked',around
and having the n-word shouted
in his ear for being with a white
woman in the wrong part of Ala-
bama that a blinding flash of
light hits him. He looks down at
his hand in the metal cuffs and
realizes that he is Black. Like
Paul, he sees God and begins
to support civil rights cases, af-
firmative action and protections
for criminal defendants. He be-
comes a critical liberal voice on
the Supreme Court which real-
izes that Justice' is more impor-
tant than stare decisis.
Sometimes good things -hap-
pen and no one knows, particu-
larly when it comes to the work
of our Black political leaders. The
mainstream press seems to only
print slander and scandal. How-
ever, in real life our Black com-
missioners are working against


the power to overturn the man-
ager's " recommendation with a
simple majority. The manager
should also be forced to accept
the decision of hearing officer
instead of simply taking it un-
der advisement. As Edmohson
pointed out the County pays
hearing officers to fairly deter-
mine bid protests; and to allow
the manager to restore the deci-
sion that was overturned is sim-
ply a charade.
Superintendent of Schools Al-
berto Carvalho also quietly faced
down the Department of Edu-
cation, which wanted to close
the Merrick Education Center,
which provides schooling to
sick children. The Department
felt that this program should be
closed because for some reason
children dying of cancer were
not doing well on the FCAT.
Sometimes good things happen
and Carvalho was able to reach
someone with a heart that real-
ized helping sick kids, even sick
kids who failed the FCAT, was
still a good idea.


Putting the commune back in Black community
Remember when we lived in tunk, spades and bid whist ters keepers, to not wanting to them with re-
places like Overtown or Scott games? Remember when you have anything, to do with each aspect, now that respect is long
Projects? Remember when it had park leaders like Mr. Cam- other? How did we go from'a gone. The children used to be
was common to go next door bridge, Mr. Wynn, Mrs. Ban- -functional community, to be- our number one priority; their
and borrow a couple of slices of nerman and Sherman Mills? ing nothing more than cave health and safety our number
bread, a stick of butter or a cup Remember when you could buy dwellers, locked .inside of our one concern. But now they
of sugar? Remember when the frozen cups from somebody's own, individual dwellings? are left to raise themselves.
elders of the community could house? Remember when house Have we traded communal- We used to. take pride in the
discipline you if they saw you parties were announced over ism for materialism? Have we community; protect the hood
doing something wrong? Re- from all transgressors. Now we
memberwhen ou could throw an what in the hell happened to us? How did we go from be-. are afra ildto "snitch" after our

aboutgetting shot? Remember ing a tight knit communityto being strangers in the midst? down.
when you could never pass a M How did we go from being our brothers and sisters keepers, Perhaps the initial step of
person walking down.the street t not wanting to have anything to do with each other? solving any problem is first re-
without speaking? Remember ' alizing that you have one. We
when it was okay for your kids spend so much 'time talking
to go to the neighbors house to the radio and people came by . chased a dream to such a de- about what someone else is do-
play? Remember when calling a without knowing who the per- gree that we've forgot our way ing to us, we fail to realize how
girl out of her name meant you son was throwing it? Remem- back home? Have we lost our much damage we are doing to
had to fight your way hom? ber you had an argument with collective soul? . ourselves. No matter how poor
Remember when your kids someone, had a fist fight, and We use to be concerned we were, no matter if we didn't
couldn't wait to go outside to resume your friendship the about one another; use to give have what others had, we had
play kickball, hopscotch, mar- next day? t a damn about one another. the most important thing any
bles, box ball and football in 'Man, what in the hell hap- Now it's every-.man for himself. community could ever have.
the streets? Remember when opened to us? How did we go If one had, we all had. Now we We had each other. Now we've
Friday were fish day and you from being a tight knit com- act like Black bears, hoarding got nice cars, nice homes, good
could smell the aroma of fried munity, to being strangers in stuff, like we are about to hi- paying jobs, access to South
fish coming from every other the midst? How did we go from bernate for the winter. We used Beach and pseudo positions of
crib? Remember the friendly -being our brothers and sis- to love our women and treat power, but look at us now.


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Did the recent police-involved shootings get the attention they deserved?


DR. JERVON SMITH, 30
Pastor, Miami

None of the
police involved
shootings gets
enough cov-
erage. Every
time the police
shoot or even
kill somebody
it gets brushed
off. Or they pull them off the
streets or off patrol and put them
in an office until everything dies
down. The police department
protect themselves too much I
think the media helps to a cer-
tain extent too, because there
should be enough pressure; on
the officers that they can't just be
taken off the street for a month
or so. There's not enough cover-
age on police shootings, and no
one pushes for answers.

PHYLISE SMITH, 37
Teacher, Miami

No. The me-
dia covered
Michael Jack- -
son more than
these murder-
ers. They talk
about it for one
day and that's


it. I feel that police officers are
uniformed murderers. Not one
police officer has ever served the
. death penalty. If they're going to
have a rule of ten to life for hav-
ing a gun and using it, then that
should apply to them as well.
Everybody knew that Shawn
Labeet; that one in Pembroke
Pines, was going to die; His mom
and everybody. We knew that
they would say he pulled out
and they had to take him down.
Everybody knew he was going to
be killed. I feel if they had to face
the same penalties as everyone
else, they wouldn't be so quick to
shoot. They get away with mur-
der and do not serve time for it.

SAMUEL MCNEIL, 45
Entrepreneur, Overtown

I don't i _, - '
think they got .
enough atten- -
tion, but if you '
ask me, they're '.
just murderers ,
with badges.
The investi-
gations after-
wards aren't
strong enough either. If they
were, these cops wouldn't be right
back on the streets. One cop had
two in a few months from what I


understand. If the investigations
were where they're supposed to
be, he would have still been on
desk duty after the first.

JOHNNIE SULLIVAN, 61
Tractor Trailer Operator, Miami

Yes, they get
enough atten-
tion. I mean
everybody ,- '
hears about -
them. But if
you mean does
anyone. do
enough about
them then no.
These police keep killing people,
it really makes no sense. I think
they could shoot them in the leg
or something to stop them some-
times. But getting back to your
question, yes, they're on the
news enough. They get enough
attention. The only way you don't
know about them is if you don't
want to know.

ZACHARY SMITH, 48
Painter, Liberty City

No, I don't think they do. Well
it's on the news enough, but we
don't get the information that
we want. The police always jus-
tify what they do, they may say


they had no
choice; but we
never hear the
whole story. ' '
The problem is
that we don't
get enough
answers as to ..
why it hap-
pened and
whether the officer really was
out of other choices.

JASMINE BROWN, 31 .
Dancer, Miami


tion from
the news.
maybe; but
not enough

from where
it matters. If
it were get-
ting enough
attention
from the department, it wouldn't
still be going on. The cops prob-
ably don't have to do anything
besides a little more paperwork
after they shoot someone. They
need to get stricter about it.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


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Closure due to rent issues


LANDMARK
continued from 1A

declined to give his name,
identifying himself as a close
friend of the family.
' Afro-in Books and Caf6 inc. has
hosted such celebrities as Maya
Angelou, Jada Pinkett Smith, Will
Smith, and Bernadette Stanis,
among others. It has been recog-
nized in Congress by Rep. Ken-
drick Meek for its "years of syn-
onymous quality and exceptional
public service."
The Wells family's spokesperson
has said that there were "rent is-
sues," and that he had it "put up,"
due to these. "It's basically first
come, first serve now," he said,,
speaking of the site's future. He
alleges that Capp did not respond
to telephone calls about the build-
ing. Additionally, the building has
also been cited by'the city for "fail-
ure to have adequate solid waste
contract." The Wells family, who
reside in Tennessee, could not be
reached for comment.
Afro-in Books and Things first
opened in 1978. From its incep-
tion, it has served as a meeting
place for Black intellectuals to
discuss the issues of the day.
Dr. and Mrs. Wells, the found-


ers, are both retired Miami-Dade
public schoolteachers. From the
very beginning, the family made
it a point 'to feature high-quality
books written by people of color.
The Bookstore was also an annu-
al participant in the international
book fair, which the Wells' helped
to develop.
The Bookstore has had several
managers over the years.. From'
1996 to December 2005, the.
operation of Afro-In Books and
Things was managed by William
D.C. Clark and his wife Stephana.
Ms. Clark is the grand-daughter
of Miami pioneer Dr. D.A. Dors-
ey. Under their stewardship, the
bookstore's offerings were signifi-
cantly expanded.
In February of 2006, Afro-In
Books and Things was acquired
by Jamila Capp and her father,
Dr. Larry Capp. The bookstore
was renamed, Afro-In Books and
Cafe, Inc. It was then that the
bookstore was remodeled to in-
clude a cafe, patio dining, and In-
ternet services.
Until its abrupt closure, the
bookstore was known for hosting
lectures, poetry readings, and po-
litical and community meetings.
Dr. Capp did not respond to e-
mails seeking comment.


*MIAMI-DADE


2009 APPLICATION FOR
NOMINATION TO SERVE ON
THE MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY
BOARD

Purpose
The Community Action Agency Board was created to advise the Miami-
Dade County Board of County Commissioners on the development,
planning, implementation and evaluation of the Community Action
Agency Community Services Block Grant programs and other programs
administered by the Community Action Agency; to advise the County
on efforts or mechanisms to facilitate the reduction in poverty, the
revitalization of low income communities and the empowerment of low
income families and individuals to become self-sufficient; to provide for
the oversight df quality services for the children and families served by
the County's Head Strt/Early Head Start program; and to make decisions
related to the design and implementation of the Cointy's Head Start/Eady..
Head Start program on behalf of the Board of County Commissioners.
On May 5, 2009 the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners adopted
the Ordinance creating the Community Action Agency Board.
Twelve members of the Board, designated to represent community interests and
organizations are appointed by the Board of County Commissioners and may perve
a maximum of four consecutive two year telms. The twelve members appointed
to the Board are to be representatives from business, industry, labor, religion, law
enforcement, social welfare and education. Candidates will be screened for any
potential conflict of interest with the responsibilities of a Board member.
Application forms may be obtained from the County Executive Office 111 NW 1st
Street, Suite 2910, or online at www.miamidade.gov. All applications must be
received by Diane Collins, Acting Division Chief, Clerk of the Board, at 111 NW 1st
Street, Suite 17-202, Miami, Florida 33128 no later than Friday. Anaust 7.2009 by
4:00 p.m. Emails r facsirfitles of the application will be accepted and can be sent
to clerkbcc@miamidade.gov or faxed to 305-375-2484. It is the responsibility
of the applicant to ensure electronic receipt of the application by calling the Clerk
of the Board at 305-375-1652.
Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners
- ATTENTION: Diane Collins, Acting Division Chief
111 NW 1st Street, Suite 17-202
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1652 -
Attention Applicants: Background checks will be performed on all applicants
selected for an interview. If selected, members will be required to submit
financial disclosure forms.


Mortgage fraud

rampant in

South Florida
The Miami Times Staff Report

Federal authorities have
charged 41 people in South
Florida with conspiring in a $40
million mortgage-fraud scheme.
The scheme, according to Acting
U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Sloman,
involved a network of purchas-
ers, corrupt mortgage brokers,
and even the cooperation of
bank employees. The scheme ar-
ranged for inflated mortgages.
According to Sloman, the bust
is just the most recent in a series
that began in September of 2007
when several agencies banded
together to create a mortgage
fraud task force.
The task force includes mem-
bers from the U.S. Secret Service,
the Postal Inspection Service, the
FBI, Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp., and the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment. The task force also enlists
the cooperation of state and lo-
cal police agencies. Since its cre-
ation, 218 people in Florida have
been charged with participating
in the creation of nearly $300
million in false mortgage loans.


Th TrnprainTut-M vn owr


The Citizens' Independent Transportation Trust (Trans-
portation Trust) is the-oversight board created as part of
the half-cent sales surtax and the People's Transporta-
tion Plan approved by the voters of Miami-Dade County,
in 2002. Since the passage of the Plan there have been
significant improvements to our public transportation sys-
tem and roadways.
These include the addition of millions of miles of new bus
routes, the purchase of more than 262 new buses and the
funding of 21 municipal shuttle bus systems throughout
the County - from Coral Gables to Aventura to Hialeah.
More than 173,000 senior citizens and veterans ride pub-
lic transportation for free under the Golden Passport and
Patriot Passport programs.
The first leg of the Metrorail system expansion broke
ground in May. This $525 million project - the Miami
Intermodal Center/Earlington Heights Connector - will
bring Metrorail to Miami International Airport. A new fleet of
railcars and Metromover cars are also being purchased.
In the transportation area, more than 390 miles of road-
ways have been improved. A new Advanced Traffic Man-
agement System that will ease traffic congestion through-
out our community is currently being installed. Traffic
circles have been constructed and school safety crossing
zones have been improved.



The Transportation Trust- Moving Forward


Hon. Lind
CITT Cha


Rodney Sanders


Peter L. Forrest Paul J. Schwiep


There is, however, much yet to be done. There has been
great concern over promises made and the ability to fund
those projects. The Trust shares these concerns. The Trust
is also encouraged and applauds the candor, honesty and
quality of the discussion occurring within Miami-Dade
. County and the community. Recent events and dialogue
irperson sponsored by Mayor Carlos Alvarez; Commission Chair
Dennis C. Moss; Transit, Infrastructure and Roads Com-
Smittee Chair Barbara J. Jordan; the entire County Com-
mission and County Manager George M. Burgess are all
positive developments.
The Transportation Trust is an important participant and
Honorable Honorable partner in working with Miami-Dade County and the
Anna Ward, Ph.D. Jorge Rodrguez- community as we produce results - not only to meet
Chomat the current pressing needs of the transit system, but
also to develop creative funding solutions that will con-
tinue the expansion of critically-needed transit corridor
improvements.
The Trust currently has three Board positions available.
We invite interested members of the community to apply
Marilyn Smith Miles Moss for nomination to the Trust so that you can become part of
the solution to our transportation needs. Full information
Scan be found at our website, www.miamidade.gov/citt, or
by calling (305) 375-1357.


Linda Zilber
Chair


David Concepcion


Charles Scurr
Executive Director


am Sancho Hon. James Reeder nannies oSurr
Executive Director


MIAM3MD


ADVERTORIAL


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S5A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


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Former San Francisco housing director to lead MDHA


DIRECTOR
continued from 1A.

working in the department,
saying he wanted to spend
time with his family.
"I have a background of fi-
nancial, organizational and
administrative management,
Fortner said in a Tuesday
interview with The Miami
Times.
Fortner, a part-time come-
dian, has an impressive re-
sume with two decades of
experience public, housing.
The New Orleans native is a
graduate from the University
of Louisiana-Monroe.
Prior to accepting the posi-
tion with Miami-Dade County
last month, Fortner was a
Deputy ExecutiVe Director/
Chief Administrative Offi-
cer for the Oakland Housing
Authority and Executive Di-
rector for the San Francisco
Housing Authority. There he
oversaw the management,
maintenance, modernization,
development and resident
services for public housing as
well as for the administration
and operation- of its Section 8
programs.
Fortner has been credited
for spearheading the effort
to complete several public


housing communities rede-
veloped through the HOPE
VI program. He became San
Francisco's housing director
in 2001 but was ousted and
forced to resign as housing
director last year.
Fortner is now determined to
bring his skills and expertise
to help restore Miami-Dade
Housing Agency., He will man-
age one of the largest housing
agencies in the nation to pre-
vent another U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Devel-
opment take over.
HUD obtained control of
MDHA in 2007, after The
Miami Herald released sev-
eral stories that uncovered
mismanagement within the
department and developers
supplementing their income
by promising to build afford-
able housing but failing to do
so.
Earlier this year, the Coun-
ty regained control of MDHA
from HUD.
"If we have our operation
and administration .team
working then we should not
have any problems. You have
to let people know what their
supposed to do and hold them
accountable to it because
that's what management and
supervision is all about," he


for wi

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said. "Despite what you have
heard about me, one thing is
true is that I never misman-
aged anything."
Fortner says that there is a
lot of work that needs to be
done, especially when there
are thousands of people on
the waiting list for public
housing and the numbers are
growing daily.


As he leads MDHA, Fortner
has been patronized by the
media for being a part-time
comedian. He insists that he
is allowed 'to have a hobby
and that it will not interfere
with his job performance.
"[President Barack] Obama
plays basketball but nobody
calls him a basketball player,"
he said, laughing.


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More retailers say yes to food stamps


By Jayne O'Donnell
and Rachel Huggins

More retailers are accept-
ing food stamps, as a record
number of consumers are
turning to government aid to
pay for groceries.
Nearly 39 million people
received food stamps - now
known as Electronic Benefit
Transfers- in April 2009. up
about 20% over April 2008.
Retailers ranging from some
Costco ICOST) stores - yes.
quarts of capers do qualify -
to 7-Eleven to Target (TGT)
are moving quickly to cater
to cash-strapped customers.
To accept the debit-card-
like EBT cards, stores must
meet at least one of the fol-
lowing conditions:
* They regularly sell at
least three varieties of foods
in each of four categories -
breads/cereals; dairy prod-
ucts; fruits and vegetables;
and meat, fish or poultry -
and at least two of the cat-
egories must include pensh-
able foods.
* Or more than half of to-
tal gross sales must 'be in
"staple foods." which means
no candy, soft drinks or pre-
pared foods.
In its third-quarter earn-


ings report July 8,. Family
Dollar cited EBT as among
the reasons for its success
in this economy. Same-store
sales were up 6.2% for the
quarter, and food and bever-
ages gained the most Food
stamps represent "a sig-
nificant opportunity for us."
said CEO Howard Levine.
EBT spending at Fam-
ily Dollar (FDOI was up 18%
from March 2008 to March
2009. says spokesman Josh
Braverman.
Last month, Target ex-
tended its acceptance of
EBT benefits from its Super
Target and other stores with
expanded food selections
to all 1,700 stores. Costco
this month started testing
its checkout technology at
six New York City locations
to prepare for EBT accep-
tance. Joe Portera, executive
vice president and COO of
Costco's Eastern and Cana-
dian divisions, says Costco
members began asking to
use EBT cards in the last six
months.
"This is the nght thing to
do," says Portera. "We'll ul-
timately need to expand the
program to our other stores,
so right now, we're working
out any bugs in the system."


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IMAKES


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6A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

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PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA,
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BLCSMSiOTO HI w ETN 7ATEMAITMS UUT51,20


Lenora Braynon-Smith, Rosemary Braynon, Fred Johnson and Alexis Smith-Parker, all mem-
bers of the Atine Braynon-Johnson Family. Braynon-Johnson Family was the first family evict-
ed from the Railroad Shop. -Miami Times photo/SandraJ. Charite


"Railroad Shop": A look


back in Allapattah's history

By Sandra J. Charite -
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


De'ann Edwards, 10, and
Kimberly Gilmore, 15, were
not attending summer school
nor preparing for an exam ear-
ly Saturday morning; but the
two had pencil and paper on
hand. The were taking notes
as they learned about Allapat-
tah's "Railroad Shop: Colored
Edition."
"My uncle had us come here
to take some notes so that we
could have some knowledge of
Allapattah," said Kimberly.
Thirty-five Black families
who resided in Allapattah's
"Railroad Shop: Colored Edi-
tion," which was founded in
the 1900's by Black workers
from the Florida East Coast
Railroad, were evicted from
their homes in Aug. 1, 1947,
after the school board decided
it wanted to build a school and
park in that area for White
families . Without prior noti-
fication, White police officers
banged, on doors, in the midst
of extreme weather conditions,
and informed residents that
they had less than three hours
to leave the premises.
Residents fought to keep
their land by hiring a Black
attorney, Lawton Thomas, but
the judged overruled Thomas'
request and families had no
choice but to evacuate their
homes. A hundred and fifty
dollars was later proposed to
several families for their lot by
the government.
Allapattah's "Railroad Shop,"
located between 46th - 50th
Street and 12th - 14th Avenue,
is today a predominately Black
community. The eviction is
still fresh in the minds of resi-
dents and. the descendants of
the evictees.
De'ann and Kimberly joined
residents and elected officials
at a memorial of the 35 fami-
lies of the "Railroad Shop:
Colored Edition" and com-
memorated the 70 year estab-
lishment of the Liberty Square
Housing Projects that borders
the Railroad Shop at the Car-
rie P. Meek Community Cen-
ter, Charles Hadley Park on
Saturday.


De'ann Edwards, 10, and Kimberly Gilmore attend the me-
morial of the 35 Homestead families of the "Railroad Shop:
Colored Edition" held at the Carrie R Meek Community Cen-
ter, Charles Hadley Park on Saturday with their uncle, Steven


Gilmore.


-Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite


The eviction humiliated resi-
dents.
Alexis Smith-Parker, a mem-
ber of the Atine Braynon-John-
son Family who were the first
family evicted from the Rail-
road Shop, shared her senti-
ments on the eviction..
"The stories .that I heard
about the Railroad Shop is it
was a difficult time but fami-
lies came together to help one
another and they were united,"
she said, "which is not like it
is today." , .
Retired Congresswbman Car-
rie P. Meek, who sat amongst a
panel that consisted of State
Rep. Dorothy' Bendross-Mind-
ingall, Community Activist
Georgia Ayers, ,said that the
Railroad Shop should not be
forgotten.
"Keep perpetuating our his-
tory," she told a crowd of local
residents, "because if you don't
tell the story then who can?"
Community Activist Geor-
gia Ayers, who spearheaded
the memorial for the 35 fami-
lies along with the Liberty City
Trust, was presented with a
Proclamation from the City of
Miami Elaine H.,Black, Presi-
dent / CEO of The Trust.


4o?


From left to right: Former State Rep. Dorothy Bendross-
Mindingall, Community Activist Georgia Ayers and Retired
Congresswoman Carrie R Meek have an open dialogue about
the "Railroad Shop: Colored Edition" 70 years later.
-Miami Times photo/ Sandra J. Charite


Veronica Fuchs; who heard
about the event taking place in
Allapattah, decided to stop by.
After hearing about the sto-
ries of the families in the Rail-
road Shop, Fuchs, a White
woman, said to the predomi-
nately Black audience, "I apol-
ogize for what my race did to
you."
Kimberly's uncle, Steven
Gilmore, frustrated by the im-
age depicted of Liberty City in
the media especially the tele-
vision show, "The First 48," is
currently filming a documen-
tary on Liberty City.
"I am so tired of watching our
community depicted in such a
negative way," said the Miami
native. "There are some posi-
tive things in our community."


KENNESHIA WILLIAMS

Miami Times
intern college
bound
Miami Carol City Sr. High
graduate and Miami Times in-
tern, Kenneshia Williams, is
heading to Florida State Univer-
sity where she intends to earn a
degree in Sports Management.
Kenneshia came to work at
The Miami Times under a work-
study program which provides
on the job training for high
school students and has done
an excellent job in her position.
We, at The Miami Times wish
Kenneshia every success in her
future endeavors.


~~\ta.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 8 THE MIAMI TIMES AUGU , 2009


Absentee landlords abandon Opa-locka renters


Is water a basic right?
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@niiamitimesonline.comn

Residents and city officials in
Opa-locka recently declared an
uneasy truce when the city's
commissioners voted to stop a
water and sewer bill increase.
The increase would have taken
place on October 1. At issue is
a three-tiered utility billing sys-
tem created through an ordi-
nance passed by city council in
April 2008.
Homeowners say the system is
unfair to them as it places more
of a financial burden on them
while favoring commercial ac-
counts.
Things could always be worse.
According to Purvi Shah, a
lawyer who has been with Flor-
ida Legal Services' Community
Justice Project for three and a
half years, the foreclosure crisis
has resulted in many Miami-
Dade residents going without
water entirely.
"This is a problem we're see-
ing arise in. low-income neigh-
borhoods where a multi-family
property is in foreclosure," she
said. "The tenants are basically
caught in the crossfire."
According to Shah, a landlord
will sometimes abandon a prop-
erty if they calculate that may
not be able to keep it. As the


property slides into foreclosure,
they simply stop paying utility
bills. The trouble with this situ-
ation is that the tenants are left
with few options. They can at-
tempt to pay the bill, but bills
can run into thousands of dol-
lars.
Or-if the landlord allows
their account with water and
sewer to collapse-they can at-
tempt to open a new one, which
is where the Miami-Dade Water
and Sewer Department becomes
involved.
"The utility company has a
rule that says only the landown-
er can open a utility account on
a multi-family property," said
Shah. "Basically what they're
saying is that if you don't have
property rights in Miami-Dade,
you don't have the right to water
service, even if you're willing to
pay for it."

ONLY LANDLORDS
CAN OPEN ACCOUNTS
Adriana Lamar, chief of public
and governmental affairs for the
Miami Dade Water and Sewer
Department, confirmed that
tenants may not open accounts
for the property on which they
reside. She stipulated that the
rule applies wherever there is a
single meter, as is often the case
in apartment buildings and
condominiums, but declined
to comment further, referring


questions to Diane Camacho,
Assistant Director of finance
for the WASD, and Mara Aus-
tin, Chief of enforcement. The
two responded in a joint e-mail
statement.
"A property owner, their man-
agement company, a court ap-
pointed receiver, or the hom-


PURVI SHAH,


eowner's association acting for
the property owner may open an
accounts) for the property. We
do, not allow tenants of a multi-
unit building to establish ac-
counts as they are not acting for
the property owner," they said.
The statement went on to
state the department's reasons
for this policy, "Since the ten-
ants do not have permission


from the owner, our ability to6
establish and provide new ser-
vice including collecting in full
(the lien process) could be com-
promised and leave the utility
vulnerable to un-collectable bad
debts."

WATER DEPARTMENT
DOES WARN RENTERS
WASD emphasized that they
do take measures to inform ten-
ants before cutting off utilities
for non-payment.
"We notify tenants via door
hangers when a landlord is de-
linquent in order for the tenants
to be advised of the situation
so that they can seek remedies
against the landlord prior to ser-
vice termination," they said.
WASD cited several reasons,
they are all but required to shut
down services in the event of
non payment, including; the
effect on rates for paying cus-
tomers and, the rights of the,
company's bondholders. Cama-
cho and Austin highlighted the
landlord's role.
"Landlords do not shut down
service typically, they simply do
not pay their bills (for any ser-
vices, not just water and sewer)
and the utility cuts off service
for non-payment," they said.
The e-mail went on to cite a
few cases where residents were
able to continue service de-
spite delinquent landlords. "As


of June of this year," they said,
"we had 19 multi-unit cus-
tomers who were past due. Of
those, two have been cut-off for
non-payment. Of the remaining
17, we have successfully inter-
vened to assist three custom-
ers that were to have been cut
off. The remaining 14 custom-
ers were current on their pay-
ment plans. While this may not
seem significant, the three we
worked with were at the point
of being cut off, and now have
developed their own plans for
moving forward to reduce their
outstanding bills and address
through legal means their rights
against non-paying 'residents,"
they said,
Quite apart from the negli-
gence (or outright hostility) of
landlords, the banks play their
role as well.

BANKS CAN PLAYA ROLE
"A lot of residential properties
are being owned by banks. These
can be owned by banks thou-
sands and thousands of niiles
away. Sometimes thl banks just
don't pay utilities," sid Shah.,
The loser in any case, howev-
er, is the tenant. Sh4h cited one
example of a hostile landlord.
"In my last case, I had a land-
lord, living in New Orleans, who
owned a property in Liberty City.
He was in foreclosure and got
into a dispute with his tenants


over rent. His answer was to cut
off water service," said Shah.
According to Shah, despite
the illegality of this measure,
she was forced to go to a judge
before the landlord finally re-
lented. It was a happy ending-
unless you lived on the property.
The property was without water
for 26 days.
On one side. of this property
(it was a duplex), was a family
of four with two small children.
The other housed a 61-year-old
senior living alone. One tenant
was showering in Carol City
when she lived in Liberty City,
Shah said.
The families ,have asked not
to be identified for privacy rea-
sonrs.

RASH OF
FORECLOSURES ADDS FUEL
Shah says she has seen a rash
of these cases following the fore-
closure crisis. Often, they'll be
in Overtown, Liberty City, Wyn-
wood, basically the low-income
neighborhoods.
"I'm sure these issues span
beyond these neighborhoods,
but those are the neighborhoods
I've had the most involvement
with," said Shah.
Commissioner Edmonson,
whose district encompasses
these areas, says she has never
been approached concerning
the issue.


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The Miami Times





Fa i tMIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 511, 2009

MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


C h churches .If
By David Winfrey tearing the negative stereotype
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Meet and Greet

at Holmes

Elementary
The Miami Times Report
A new school year is vastly ap-
proaching and Holmes Elementary,
located at 1175 Northwest 67 Street
in, Liberty City, is ready to 'get the
ball rolling.
Holmes, who recently climbed to
a C after receiving a F the previous
year, will be a hosting a Meet and
Greet with parents and students
from 9 - 11 a.m., August 22.
"One of the more serious, concerns-
I have at Holmes is Parental Involve-
ment, said principal Frank MacBride.
"We have a core group of parents that
always help and participate. The let-
ters home with the students are nbt
making enough of an impact."
Holmes' administration and staff
are looking forward to meeting the
students and parents. All families
are welcome to come and see their-
child's room location and special ar-
eas on the campus. Parent will be
able to purchase Ibiley School Uni-
forms for their children or sign up
for the aftercare.


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GIVING FIRST:The Bible talks
about giving in many ways, including
a tithe, defined in the Old Testament
as 10 percent of earnings.

Bible: The source

of financial advice

in grim economy
Discussing money and religion
can be risky, even as it's more
common. As people turn to a faith-
based view of personal finance,
the number of sources speaking to
them is growing.
Among the most popular might
be get-out-of-debt guru Dave Ram-
sey, who dispenses advice on radio
and TV via Fox Business News.
He ends each radio show saying:
"There's ultimately only one way
to financial peace and that's to
walk daily with the prince of peace,
Christ Jesus."
Crown Financial Ministries and'
Good Sense offer Bible-based fi-
nancial advice at church seminars.
A new book, "Money Strategies
for Tough Times" by Matt Bell re-
lates his advice to the Bible and its
more than 2,000 verses on money
and possessions. "You could say
it's the best-selling personal fi-
nance book of all time," Bell said.
Whether you're religious or not,
biblical notions about money and
spending might provide guidance.
Get the order right: "Once you
have money, there are only a hand-
ful of things you can do with it
-- you can spend it, you can save it
or you can give it away," Bell said.
A more Biblical order is giving, sav-
ing and then building a lifestyle on
what remains, he said. "But it flips
the cultural teaching on its head,"
he said.
Giving first: The Bible talks about
giving in many ways, including a
tithe, defined in the Old Testament
as 10 percent of earnings. "Ulti-
mately it's a heart issue," Bell said.
"Giving is not about God's need for
money. It's a training tool to re-
mind us God is No. 1 in our liess"
Saving and planning: The Bible
repeatedly says you should save
and plan for the future and lean
times. In Proverbs 6:6-8, it uses an
ant's storage habits to admonish
non-savers.
Spending and debt: "Spend less
than you make" is a constant re-
frain of personal finance experts,
and it harkens to the Bible. "I think
sometimes Biblical money manage-
ment gets cast as this obsessive,
frugal life - to save a nickel on ev-
ery can of tuna we buy," Bell said.
"It's not that; it's about being wise."
Money is not evil: One of the
most misquoted Bible verses is
"money is the root of all evil," when
it really says, "the love of money is
the root of all evil."
The Bible "gives so much practi-
cal advice, it's clear God knew we
would need help in this area," Bell
said.


SECTION B











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Mommy's having a baby at Jackson North.

I can't wait to meet my new sister!


Preparing to welcome a baby into the world is an exciting experience. At Jackson North
Medical Center, our experienced maternity ream is ready to help you with preparations
for birth, your labor and delivery, and your child's first days of life. We provide all private
rooms for our patients and offer personalized care, including overnight accommodations
and a complimentary meal for a guest. And, if your baby should require specialized care
after he or she is born, you can take comfort in knowing that Jackson North is home to a
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For a tour of our maternity center or for more information
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11B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009











MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES AUG , 2009


Re%. Ike: Flamlixnant mlniter % no oeII In mono


CopyrightedlMaterialI





Syndicated Content" .





Available from Commercial News Providers





ii-



wp


The principles of the Christian walk


I hope that you have been
blessed by the teachings of
Pastor Stephen Okwokwo of Ni-
geria. He was certainly an im-
mense blessing to our church,
New Life World Outreach, for
the two months that he vis-
ited us. If you ha'.-e not beerL
reading the past l'e\ colttnnis,
then you missed the first seven
Principles of Christian Prosper-
ity as taught by this anointed
Pastor and Teacher. This week,
the eighth principle is the Prin-
ciple of Giving. In Luke 6:38,
Jesus commands us to give.


the amount
we give will
determine the
amount that ,
we receive. .
Personally, I i
think it is ery "
'in'tere st ing g
that Jesus made this statement
after commanding us to forgive
others. Some of us would like
to skip this step, but Jesus did
not. Forgiveness is a command-
ment, not a suggestion. Forgive
others first, and then you can


expect what you give to be giv-
en back to you in abundance.
. Pastor Stephen reminded us
of Proverbs 19:17 and 11: 24
-26. Be generous, not stingy
or cheap. Give especially to the
poor., James tells us that con-
trary to what some believe, true
religion is taking care of widows
and orphans. We must also be
generous to those who labor in
the Gospel. Those who live for
the Gospel should live BY the
Gospel. Many of us minister to
the homeless, and to those who
are incarcerated or who have
abused themselves with drugs
and alcohol. This is admirable,
for the Gospel of Jesus Christ
is for everyone, but Paul told
the church in Galatians 6:10
to remember especially those
in the family of faith. In Philip-
pians 4: 14 - 19, Paul was very
appreciative. to the church at
Philippi for their kind and gen-


erous gifts to him. In Matthew
10: 40 -42, Jesus lets us know
how important it is to take care
of those who minister in the
Name of God.
Principle nine is to be faith-
ful in business. Some who are
successful in business ven-
tures forget why they are suc-
cessful. They attribute their
success to their intelligence, or
their education, or the contacts
that they made in the business
world. But networking with Him
is the best contact that you can
make. As He blesses you, con-
tinue to serve Him, and give
Him credit for your success.
Whether a business owner or
an employee, Pastor Stephen
admonished us to be serious,
punctual, and dedicated. Prov-
erbs 22: 29 reminds us that
those who work hard will excel
and prosper (and don't forget.
those hardworking ants!) Don't


be a cheater in your'business..
Many Christians thifk nothing
of taking paper, .pens, and oth-
er office supplies home. They
never think to ask permission
of their supervisors to use com-
pany equipment or resources.
Business owners and supervi-
sors, Proverbs'20.23.alsb apply
to you. Don't cheat anyone out
of their wages. Don't be dishon-
est. Don't cheat on your taxes!
The Bible tells us to do every-
thing as unto the Lord. Do you
cheat the Lord, or give Him less
than your best?
Well, here we are - the tenth
principle. Pastor Stephen said
that this was the most impor-
tant principle, and he is abso-
lutely right! The last principle
in this teaching is the Principle
of Uprightness or Righteous-
ness. When he said that this is
the most important principle,
this was not his opinion, but


the Word of God. �Read Matthew
6:33. Jesus Himself told the
church to' seek the Kingdom of
God first, and all His righteous-
ness - fir4t riot along.with, but
first. God commands holiness
and righteousness. Yes, we are
an imperfect people, but we
serve a pei-fecthGod, and when
we accept.Himn as our Father,
then we! heed. to strive daily,
not just on Sundays, but daily,
to be like Him, and He is holy.
There is' absolutely no. substi-
tute for righteousness. Educa-
Stion, wealth, social position or
title, business success, looks or
popularity will never substitute
for righteousness. You cannot
buy it, or lie to get.it, or steal
it from someone else. You must
be righteous. Jesus said that
when we seek righteousness,
then, and only then, will all the
other things be added in our
lives.


*


National Lifeguards Cham-
pionships will take place at the
Fort Lauderdale Beach from 10
a.m.- 4 p.m., Aug. 6-8. Donna
Jannine, 212-956-5900 or 631-
334-1019.

The School Board of Bro-
ward County's Supplier Diver-
sity and-Outreach Program Of-
fice will host its annual Minori-
ty/Women Business Expo 2009
at Coral Springs High School,
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Thurs-
day, Aug. 6.

Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1989 will hold
its 201t anniversary at the Jun-
gle Island at 8 p.m., Aug. 7.
Bulls89reunion@hotmail.com

- Embrace Girl Power will have
a Back-to-School Girl Talk, for
girls ages 8-16, at the North
Dade Regional Library from 1-3
p.m., Friday, August 7. 305-
625-6424.


The Beautiful Gate will have
a monthly cancer support group
at the Silver Blue Lakes Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, from
10 a.m. - 12 p.m., every third
Sunday of the month. Pamela
Burnett, 305-835-6846 or 786-
693-2613.

City of Opa-locka Parks of
Recreation will have their Sum-
mer Cap Program until Aug. 7.
305-953-3042.

World Literacy Crusade,
Inc. /Girl Power Program is
looking for a reliable and in-
sured transportation company
to transport girls from the pro-
gram to home. Farah Moreau,
305-756-5502.

Miami-Dade Cooperative
Extension Division will host'
a Rain Barrel Workshop at the
Deering Estate, from 10 a.m. to
12 p.m., Aug. 8. Lize Luna at
305-248-3311, ext. 242.

The City of North Miami


Beach Leisure Services De-
partment will be having a mov-
ie night in which they have a
special showing of the movie
"Night at the Museum 2" at the
Allen Park/DeLeonardis Youth
Center Field, beginning at 9
p.m., Saturday, Aug. 8. 305-
948-2957.
****** *
Miami-Dade County Com-
missioner Barbara Jordan
will host a Community Budget
Meeting at North Dade Region-
al Library, 6 p.m., Tuesday,
August 11. 305-375-1689.

Broward County School
Board Instructional Staffing
Department will host a Critical
Shortage Subject Area Job Fair
at Nova High School in Davie,
from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.,
on Monday, August 10.: Appli-
cants must register online for
-the Critical Shortage Subject
Area Job Fair at (www.bro-
wardschools.com/teacher).

Model City Advisory Board
Community Outreach will
have a board meeting at the
Joseph Caleb Center at 7 p.m.,
Wednesday, Aug. 12. Roy Har-
demon, 786-356-0707.

The Miami Carol City/
North Dade H.S. Class of


1967 Alumni are holding a
"60th Birthday Celebration" at
the Miramar Civic Center Ban-
quet Hall at 7 p.m., Aug. 15.
Cheryl Watts Brown, 305-333-
7613 or Charles Jackson, 305-
336-6293.

Miami-Dade County District
3 will host their third annual
Back to School Fun Day at
Olinda Park from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., Saturday, August 15.
Commissioner Audrey Edmon-
son's district office at 305-636-
2331.

The City of Miramar in con-
junction with Memorial Health-
care will host a "Back to School
Health Fair" for children at the
Miramar Youth Enrichment
Center, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.,
Saturday; Aug. 15.' 954-276-
5985 or 954-704-1631.

The Parent Academy will
join the Miami-Dade County
Public Schools, Parent Teacher
Association, the Miami Heat
and other organizations for a
free "Back to School" rally at
the American Airlines Arena
from 12 - 5 p.m., Sunday, Au-
gust 16. 305-995-2680.

City of Miramar is offering
ballet classes at the Miramar


Multi-Service Complex, from
5:30 -6:30 p.m., every Friday.
954-889-2744.

Married Alive, a play, will
run at the Actors' Playhouse,
Miracle Theatre in Coral Gables
until Aug. 16. 305-444-9293
or go to: www.actorsplayhouse.
org

The Miami-Dade County
Health Department, Special
Immunizations Program will be
providing free Back-to-School
immunizations at the Little
Haiti Health Center, from 8
a.m. - 3 p.m., Monday-Wednes-
day. Clinic will be closed on
Aug. 17-19. Appointments will
be scheduled through July 31.
786-336-1276.

Miami-Dade State Attorney
Office will be holding a Land-
lord & Tenant Workshop at the
Joseph Caleb Center's Meeting
Room from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.,
Tuesday, August 18. Kionne
McGhee, 305-636-2240.

Top .Ladies of Distinction
will hold its monthly meeting
at Florida Memorial University
Lehman Aviation Building on
the second Saturday. 305-696-
1631.
* ** *** * *


The City of North Miami
Beach will hold a Budget Work-
shop for FY2010 at the McDon-
ald Center at 6 p.m., Tuesday,
August 25. 305-948-2900.

The Family Foundation,
Inc. will have their 18th Annual
AIDS Benefit Banquet at the
Embassy Suites at 6:30 p.m.,
Saturday, August 29. 305-
978-7100.
********
Miami-Dade Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners encourages
residents to attend the Sep-
tember Budget Hearings at the
BCC Chambers on the second
floor to hear citizen's concerns
about County cuts. The first
budget, hearing will be held at
5:01 p.m., Sep. 3 and the sec-
ond budget hearing will be at
5:01 p.m., Sep. 17.

Booker T. Washington Se-
nior High Class of 1965 will
conduct a meeting at the Afri-
can Heritage Cultural Arts Cen-
ter, from 4-5:30 p.m., Saturday,
Sept. 5. 305-215-0188, 305-
205-7115 or 305-542-0632.
*. ********
The City of Miramar is host-
ing a community Arts and Craft
Fair at the Miramar Multi-
Service Complex on October 3.'-
954-889-2744.


The four tongues at Soul Sav-
ing M.B. Church invites you to
their program at 7 p.m., Wednes-
day, Aug. 5. 786-318-7047.

First Baptist Church of
Brownsville invites to their
first Men's Conference at 7 p.m.
nightly, Aug. 5-7 and luncheon
at 11 a.m., Aug. 8.
305-635-8053.


Spirit of Christ Center &
Ministries will have 2009 Men
of Destiny: Men and Family
Conference, 7:30 p.m. nightly,
Aug. 5-7 and 10 a.m., Saturday,
August 8.

True Divine Worship Minis-
tries will have a Women's Con-
ference entitled, "Are You His
Woman?" at 7:30 p.m. nightly,
Aug. 5-7.


Christ Crusade Family Cen-
ter Women's Department will
hold weekly auditions on Aug.
7, 8 and 14. '305-525-9883 or
email: drsea@bellsouth.net.

Redemption M.B. Church
is sponsoring a breakfast and
yard sale Aug. 7-8. Pastor Willie
McCrae, 305-793-7388 or 305-
836-1990.
********
New Mt. Zion Missionary
Baptist Church will celebrate
their four year anniversary cel-
ebration with guest Little Boy
Preacher at 3:30 p.m., Sunday,
August 9. 305-691-9784.


New Canaan Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites the family
to our second Sunday worship,
at 11 a.m., August 9. 305-688-
8095.

Greater St. James Mission-
ary Baptist International
Church will have their annual
Women's Day celebration at 11
a.m., Aug. 9. Eloise Washington,
305-688-6588.

Mt. Vernon MBC cordially in-
vite you to fellowship with them
in their pre-pastoral apprecia-
tion service at 3:30 p.m., Sun-
day, August 9. 305-754-5300.


Holy Ghost Faith Deliver-
ance Ministries will be celebrat-
ing their 10th Pastoral Appre-
ciation on Aug. 10-17. Mother
Rachel Moss 786-413-3639 or
786-337-5939.

New Corinth M.B. Church
will be having their revival at
7:30 p.m. nightly, August 10-
14. 305-836-6671.

Liberty Fellowship Church
Of God will have a Praise and
Worship Musical Celebration at
7:30 p.m., Aug. 14.
Golden B**ells 3*****SingingAn-
Golden Bells 31st Singing An-


niversary will take place at the
New Beginning M.B. Church at
7 p.m., August 15 and continue
at the New Covenant Church in
Fort Lauderdale at 3 p.m., Sun-
day, August 16. Sis McQueen,
786-251-2878.

Faith Christian Center will
celebrate 25 years of ministry,
7:30 p.m. nightly, October 18-
24. Culmination service will take
place at the Doubletree Hotel at
Miami Airport, 11 a.m., Satur-
day, October, 24. Church office,
305-253-6814.
Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30 p.m.
on Monday.










The Miami Times




Heath


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


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Enejida 0. RO dan, th ew prsientt and chief executive officer of Jackson
Health System (JHS), visits the Miami Times recently.
" . - � - , " -- MIml Time-F'Pinio 'SandraJ Crzo,,re




Amid new



leadership, JMH


struggles


Could President Obama's healthcare reform save
Jackson hospital from its million-dollar deficit?.


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Jackson Hospital is the place where Dr. Eneida
0. Roldan's fiancee once asked her to marry him.
She never expected that one day she would be
running the facility. Roldan was announced the
president and chief executive officer of Jackson
Health System (JHS) in May, becoming the first
woman to lead the hospital system.
New leadership has not exempted Jackson from
the economic slump the nation faces.
"Jackson Health System is facing many finan-
cial challenges in this lagging economy," said
Roldan. "Jackson's financial challenges can be
attributed to the economic downturn and the
growing number of uninsured people who are
seeking care at our facilities."
Being a County hospital, Jackson is inundat-
ed with uninsured "patients. Each contributes to
Jackson's overwhelming deficit.
The number of underinsured and uninsured
people in need of care at Jackson has skyrock-
eted. In the meantime, funding which includes a
half-penny sales tax and ad valorem taxes (taxes
based upon the value of the product) has dimin-
ished said Roldan.
"We are the primary source of medical care
for the poor, underinsured and uninsured," she
said.
Jackson, Miami's public hospital, is one of
the largest healthcare institutions in the United
States. It is responsible for almost 2,000 beds and
over 11,000 employees throughout the county,
has three hospitals, a trauma center, a women's.
center, a network of mental-health facilities, two
long-term care facilities and twelve primary care
centers.
According to Roldan, the hospital received over
$365 million in county tax support from .the half-
penny sales tax ad valorem taxes. The hospital
later spent more than $500 million in charity
care for Miami-Dade residents. The deficit has
placed Jackson's future in jeopardy.
Roldan predicts that if Jackson does not make


Ir-m f� - -



















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a turnaround then it
could fall.
"A loss of $56 mil-
lion is expected this
year and $168 million
next year," she said.
Roldan-' says as
CEO, she is commit-
ted to finding ways
to cut expenses and
obtain additional rev-
eriue.
"I am meeting with
PRESIDENT OBAMA local, state and fed-
eral leaders to garner
support on alternative funding sources. Since
taking over as the leader of the institution in
June, I have launched my 10,0-day plan, which
focuses on stabilizing the finances of the hospital
system," she said.
With thousands of uninsured residents
throughout the County, Roldan is staying to Pres-
ident Barack Obama's health reform. During the
presidential campaign, Obama made health-care
reform a central theme and pledged to achieve
universal health care and also cut the average
family's health-care costs by almost $3,000.
Obama's health care a debate in Washington
for the months as members of the Republicans
shy away from the plan believing that it is too
costly.
"Healthcare reform plans could change Jack-
son's current funding sources and how it deliv-
ers care, especially the hospital system's primary
and preventative care services," said Roldan. "I
favor a system that improves patient care, with
a focus on quality, cost reduction, and wellness
and prevention."
But she has some reservations about the re-
form. They include the reduction in state and
federal funding, the reexamination of Medicaid
and Medicare reimbursements to make sure pay-
ments cover the cost of care and the possibility
that Medicaid and Medicare "disproportionate
Please turn to ROLDAN 16B


I.

i^


Atoll










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1,11 TIJI MIAMI TIMR. AUIGHIT 5-11. 09fll * l .Il'III'LJ


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers








Women's Day celebration at Greater St. James

Greater St. James M.B. Inter-
national Church will host their
52nd Annual Women's Day.
Prophetess Sharlene Holts will
be our Annual Women's Day
speaker at our 11 a.m. Wor-
ship Services.
The church is located at 4875
N.W. 2nd Avenue. Mrs. Susie
Cooper, Chairperson; Ms. Ida
Chander, Co-Chairperson.
Dr. William H. Washington,
Sr., Pastor. ' nn..uK.1r4e UARI ePi unleq


IIK~UP~I LIbb bMAKELkIUL UILI b


JAMES BUSH III
State Representative

Unity Day at Hurst
On August 9, Hurst Chapel
A.M.E. Church, Perrine, will
host Unity Day.
Speakers are Rep. James
Bush at 11 a.m. and Rev. Sul-
livan, Greater Bethel A.M.E.
Church at 4 p.m.
Rev. Dr. Leeomia W. Kelly,
Pastor, Hurst Chapel A.M.E.
Church.




by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


Discipleship conference at New Harvest


The New Harvest Women's
Ministry is hosting a Dis-
cipleship Conference for the
body of Christ. The dates
are Saturday, August 15
through Wednesday, August
19.
There will be a Prayer
Breakfast Saturday, August
15 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
The breakfast is $10 for
adults and $5 for children
from 3 to 11.
Apostle Michael Thomas
of Bible Teachers Interna-
tional ts the guest speaker
for the Prayer Breakfast and
the Sunday service. Sunday
service start at 10:30 a.m.
the evening sessions start
August 17, Monday through
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
The speaker for the eve-
ning session is Apostle Mary
Banks. She is the founder of.


APOSTLE MICHAEL THOMAS
Mary Banks Global Ministry
and Bible Teachers Interna-
tional. The Renown author of
Lord teach us to. Pray, From
Crack to Christ, and Be Ye
Perfect. 'She is an anointed


Little. Rock celebrates annual meeting
Little Rock Primitive Baptist Van R. Snead of Jacksonville.
Church, 1790 Ali Baba Avenue, Dinner will be served after Sun-
Opa Locka, Elder Richard Austin day services.
of Macon, GA, pastor is having For more information, please
their annual three day meeting call 786-294-8179.
starting August 14-16'at 1'p.m. Come and have a Hallelujah
Guest speaker will be Elder good time.


APOSTLE MARY BANKS
teacher of God.
Please come out and help
us lift up the name of Jesus.
Our theme: "Disciples Walk-
ing in the Manifestation of
God's Love".


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
61,,) W il i ,.:.r iPrayor
9 a T, I" '
MI)Mrrd..',1 ... ' aIm .






Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order of Services
4u'idb ,, Itr6 Sum :.
Pu..dia Soi ll 8 45 .T.

._ PraiyB M,- ri,,y6 iua t mi

M.ethodi . Church


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


i I I


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.










St. Mark Missionary
. Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street



,Bap tist lahu rch ul.1, r.
�v-day &lu'd W, ,, 11p i IIn i ,i





St:eMark Missionary
Baptist Church














1723 N.W. 873rd Aveue -

Order of Services
i ut , ?liPr -IMl,:.lud







T' . P,U, I ,, IlA','


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue * Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday. Bble Sludy 9 a.m. * Morning Worship 10 a m
Evening Worhip 6 p m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 1 30 p m
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS (omcasi 3 * Sauiday 130 a m
- w pembIokepQorkhurrhofhri.; COITi pembrlkupar c,,i'beliurh npi


I


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
546 4A W 19th Ave


7 .


I II


Order of Servies
Early Wd tp "a

Wijri~p 11a 'Wcc'lip 4 p c.
M, - .FlFad M6i
1:11), *. . v io 630j,4 n


Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.


I j I I
Order of Services
And ,o.h . b.
(lad. h ), I.)

Pastor J.D. 1a18


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE




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I l r.uolfh,..l 4 l e lTc

,i...m M.' I y 1 .'.0,0 .
IB.Ible ud i p m


*I*J a * ~ *** I


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a m,
11 aum.. 7p.m
Sunday School 9 30 o.m
Tuesday (Bible Siudy) 6:45p m
Wednesday Bible Study.
10.45 am


=hLosBptistorT.lChurch=feo mahe


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Sevices


Ihur,,do ,bl� ludy I ,.
Sair y Nu


I (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax 305 6850705
www newbilhbaplislmiami org


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services
uirldly ' ool5 q *II) u m
,Sudy Wur,I.p hIum
i.r a ,unday
[ ag it nii W..r.h.lb pm
S Md Wt,,' ,'ni e 7prn
h.. r I~t rf ,u.ul , [hur',diiy


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

Order of Services
SIunday S.h701l q a |T.
SWuF, p I1 am r,
Bble 'iady ihunday 7 0 p m
Mr. n Wed ( p m




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services






Word of Faith


Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street
,I . . '. sgl.>l, ild l
SOrder of Services

W,," ,,i , , I I p.

lutAny, u,ble iM1- r 1p I
2370 N.W. 87th Street






I "Z:r'{ . f"J[.' T '-


IAlvinDanielsJr.,Mini


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Services


4wnday - 0 r,..+, p,
S , ,o l ,, if ,? p ,-iI
lue II.bl, flo : 1 JO p7




First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue










Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
Order of Services
I.u dy haye i 1. ' l I -


' Rev. In h e ,SrITe


Antioch Missionary Ba ptist












New Shiloh M.B.rownsvilhurch
1350 N.W.95th Street


Order of Services
f , M...m,i,,,,ag wi , o / a) a , m






t &, (E . ". ',,, ii W . p'ii m
Rev . i M.-Lo've tt., i 11i II i











SSu,. I|T|
R D.L.uPowell^^^, r.^I:


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6 30 a.m * Early Morning Worchip 7 30 a ni.
Sunday School 9 30 a m * Morning Worship 11 a m.
. Youth Minisrry Sludy. Wed 7 p r, Prayer Bible Study Wed 7 p m
Noonday Altar Prayer (MF)
Feeding ihe Hungry every Wednesday. II a m I p m
- w*w lri.nd'.hipmb Tiirm orq * Ir.nii'hippravyr.1'bIll.uurh .cri


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street


U


Order of Services
7 1Jl.l iTi T , yi Morning Woi hip

I1 & ri d .u',oiy t, p ,7
i ,e ,0 ( , M lt i l' ; p m I p
A.4b.4'r, itb, u,.1


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
jW k-- IOrder of Ser


vicesl


lord bay1 ,'Iiiay *,i,,i oI 1a.
Siody M i~i,p Wq d1& . hyIi arm
v i a. 7. iO, (SIud v ,


AND HE SAID UNTO THEM. GO YE

INTO A L THE WORLD, AND PREAH
STO EVE RYJCR



Join the Religious Elite
in our Church Directory
Call Karen Franklin at 305-694-6214


14D I nl IVIIAIVII I IIVlLa, AUUU,) I U-1 1, LVU7


Pastor Douglas Cook, Sr.


I Rev. Dr. W. Edward Mitchell


Rev. Woodrow C. Jenkins, Jr.


, I


I


I. J M m c.










15B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


_______________________ .................... - o~"*~' '


Richardson2_--,
MARTHA CAVE, 83, custodian,
died July 30 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Service noon,
Friday, Antioch
Missionary Bap-
tist Church of
Brownsville.

BRUCE L. OLIVER, 56, land-
scaper, died July
28 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service
noon, Saturday,
Hossanah Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

RODERICK URIAH HARVEY,
35, rehab.
counselor, died
July 28 at Miami
Hearts. Service
was held.




CHARLES LEROY HUDSON,
90, health care
specialist, died
July 26. Service
was held.





GLORIA LOVETT, 67, educa-
tor, died July
20. Service was,
held.






PAULINE CAMPBELL, 55, cus-
toms officer, died August. 1. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Royal
KIANA LYNCH, 14, student,
died July 25.
Visitation 4-9
p.m., Friday.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Anti-
och Missionary
Baptist Church,
Miami Gardens.

FREDDIE YOUNGBLOOD, 69,
foreman, died
August 1. Visi-
tation 4-9 p.m., I
Friday. Arrange-
ments are in- c
complete.



DOROTHY MIDDLETON, 60,
housewife, died July 30. Visitation
4-9 p.m., Friday. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

RONSON MAYNARD, 52, labor-
er, died August 1. Arrangements
are incomplete.

DOMINIC ILYNN, 38, plaster,
died July 29. Service was held.

JEANNE RAYWOOD, 87, bar-
tender, died August 1. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DERRICK BENNIE, 77, sugar
laborer, died July 28. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DIANE STENNETT, 52, died
August 2. Arrangements are in-
complete.

EDDIE JACKSON, 87, land-
scaper, died July 28. Service was
held. Interment, South Florida VA
Cemetery.

NEVILLE BENT, 69, died August
2. Arrangements are incomplete.

LENWOOD "LYNN" MADDOX,
PBX operator, died July 27. Ser-
vice was held.
Care, Royal Ram n
JASON CARTER, 56, janitor,
died July 30 at home. Arrange-


ments are incomplete.

ERNESTO VALDEZ, 81, retired,
died July 30 at South Miami Hospi-
tal. Service 1 am., Thursday in the
chapel.


Grace e
DUANEN NIGEL DELIFORD,
35, luggage s
support, died
August 2. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Tabor Mission-
ary Baptist
Church.


EDDIE LEE MAJOR, 83, con-
struction labor-
er, died August
2. Viewing 5 - 7
p.m., Friday.
Survivors in-
cluded: Ernest
Major(Susie),
Mildred Wil-
liams, Ulysses
Major (Ora), Final rites and burial,
Monday (10th), South Florida VA
Cemetery Lakeworth.

ROSA LEE LANE, 78, nurse,
died July 28.
Viewing 6 -9
p.m., Friday at
the church. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Mace-
donia Baptist
Church.

MIQUEL MONTALVO, 51, pet
groomer, died July 27. Service
was held.

BABY KEVIN DECASTRO,
died July 27 at South Miami Hos-
pital. Service was held.

Jay's
ELMA BUCHANON, 57, nurse
aide, died July
29 at Kindred,
Hospital.. Ser-
vice noon, Sat-
urday in the
chapel.



MADELINE ALLEN, 81, house-
keeper, died
July 24. Service
10 a.m., Satur-
day in the cha-
pel.




MARY WILDGOOSE, 69, do-
mestic worker,
died July 28 at
Baptist Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, First
St. John Baptist
Church.


CORENE MASON, 75, nurse,
died July 30 at
Jackson South
Community
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Glendale
Baptist Church.


ALBIE EVANS, 46, Chief War-
rant Officer,
died in St. Au-
gustine, FL. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.




FLOYD GRAHAM, 80, died July
31. Arrangements are incomplete.

Nakia Ingraha ,
CECILIA DELORENZO, 56,
died July 28. Service was held.

SARA WINK, 67, died July 29.
Service was held.

CHAROLETTECOOKINGHAM,
65, died July 31. Service was held

MICHAEL FULTON, diedAugust
2. Arrangements are incomplete.-

EULALIA ROLDAN, died Au-
gust 3. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

SAMUEL FORBES, 19, died
July 31. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

RANDY COVINGTON, 57, died
August 2. Arrangements are in-
complete.


* FRANCES L. THOMAS, 77, di-
etician, died , July 30 at Hospice
By the Sea, Hollywood. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Friendship M. Bap-
tist Church, Hallandale Beach.


Hadley Davis
EVELINA BROWN, 47, died
July 27 at Uni-
versity of Mi-
ami Hospital.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Anti-
och Missionary
Baptist Church
of Brownsville.

FRANCES LOUISE WILSON,
52, died July 29 at Mount Sinai
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.

QUENTIN SHEPPARD, 52,
died July 25 at Oceanside Nursing
Home. Service was held.

Wright & Young
EDWIN A. WHITEHEAD, JR.,
16, student/as-
piring musician, .
died July 27,
Survivors in-
clude: parents,
Ayesha Brad-
shaw and Ed-
win Whitehead,
Sr.; twin brother,
Edwuan; grandparents, Rosa But-
ler, Maria Whitehead and Alfred
Bradshaw. Service 2 p.m., Satur-
day, Mt. Herman AME.

LORRAINE HARDAWAY, 51,
died August 2.
Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Kalika Hard-
away; grandchil-
dren Eshia and
Omari Young.
Services 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.

Hall Ferguson Hewitt
ELIZABETH D. HAYES, 72,
clerk for US
Postal Service,
died August 1 at
Aventura Hos-
pice. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.


WINIFRED L. JACKSON, 81,
airport food ser-
vice clerk, died
July 31 at Arch
Plaza. Service
10 a.m., Satur-
day, Christian
Fellowship:

CALVIN A. HOOD, 16, student.
Service 3:30 p.m., Saturday in the
chapel.

Poitier
JOSH CRUMMIE, 32, laborer,
died July 24 at
home. Service 3
p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.





MAYDEE COLLINS, 99, retired
housekeeper,
died August 1
at North Shore
Medical Cen-
,ter. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
New Mt. Cal-

RODERICK KENNEY, SR., 69,
musician, died July 26 at home.
Service was held.

ELAINE THURSTON, 50, print-
er, died July 29 at Lakeland Re-
gional Hospital. Service 2 p.m.,
Friday in the chapel.

THELMA LEE BROWN, 47,
homemaker, died at North Shore
Medical Center. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.


Eric S.Georg
NORMA J. HUDSON, 60, para-
pegal, died July 27 at Kindred
Hospital, Hollywood. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, St. Mark M. Bap-
tist Church.


We miss you very much.
Love always,
Your loving wife, children,
grandchildren and great-
grands.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


BEN NEWSOME, 57, entre-
preneur, died August 3 at Ce-
dar Hospital.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday
at Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Manker Funeral Home.

Faith
JOHN R. BENNETT, 99, died
'July 29 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Card of Thanks
The family of ihe late,


extends a 'sincere thank you
and their appreciation to ey-
eryone for your cards, flowers,
time and many acts of kindness
shown during our time of be-
reavement.
A special thanks to the Range
Funeral Home staff, Yolanda
Proctor, Clara Nickerson, Be-
lueah Johnson, Allison Rodri-
guez, Rev. James Williams, Rev.
Roosevelt Johnson and Rev.
Wilcox.
May God bless each of you for
all that you have done on our
behalf.
The Williams Family




by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210 :


Remember to ask

your funeral home for

your discount coupon

to place your

Card of Thanks

i n

The Miami Times-


u

900 NW 54th Street

305-694-6229

expll-(-� ill two \veclo


T(D)v ill Vq
T�One Family Serv'nq "ince 192'


IRENE TERESA
GAITOR HAMRICK
04/16/50 -08/09/08


We miss and love you so
dearly.
Rest on "Buttercup", well
see you again.
Love,
Your Family.


Gregg L. Maol -
DORA ANN CAIL, 54, environ-
mental special-
ist, Miami VA
Healthcare Sys-
tem, died Julyexander Jr., Aar-
31 atUniversityends. Visitation 2
of Miami Hos-
pital.m., Monday (Aug.Survivors10). Service


tre (Sharon); daughter, Dashawn
Lane; mother, Georgia Ashley; five
grandchildren, SInteharronda James,
Shkyla Moore, Alexander Jr., Aar-
on and Anais; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation 2
-9p.m., Monday (Aug.10). Service
1 p.m., Tuesday (Aug.11), Faith
Community Baptist Church, 10401
NW 81h Avenue. Interment: South
ern Memorhal Park.

E.A.Stevens
CLEVELAND LONE, 55, sani-
tation dept., died July 28 at home.
Service 9:30 a.m., Saturday, Holy
Tabernacle, Ft. Lauderdale.

MERCY McGILL, 64, home
maker, died July 30 at Kindred
Hospital. Service 11 a.m., Thurs-
day, Westside Baptist Church,
Hollywood.

JAMES EDWARDS, 78, heavy-
equipment operator, died August
2 at Aventura Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

RangedA
TEROY NORMAN JOHNSON,
73, environmen-
tal tech for New
York Housing
Authority, died
July 31. Survi-
vors include:
sisters, Thelma
Gordon and Al-
freda Stibbin;
brother, Graham Johnson; a host
of nieces, nephews other relatives
and friends. Services 11 a.m., Fri-
day in the chapel.

ZACHARY L. GRIFFIN, 58, real
estate developer, died July 31. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Genesis -
TROY COX, 88, laborer, died
July 27 at Ft. Lauderdale Rehab
Center. Service was held.

SUSAN SHEPHERD, 67, teach-
er, died July 28 at North Broward
Medical Center. Service was held.

THOMAS McKAY, 70, attorney,
died July 28 at North Broward
Medical Center. Service was held.

GISELLA VELAZQUEZ, 57,
homemaker, died July 30 at home.
Service was held.

DAVID MILLS, 45, laborer, died
July 27 at home. Service was
held.

DOLORES KING, 81, bank tell-
er, died July 30 at Kindred Hospi-
tal.Viewing 1 p.m., Sunday in the
chapel.

RONALD . McDIERMID, 68,
died July 28 at home. Service was
held.

DAVID L. DIETHORN, 59, con-
struction worker, died July 28 at
home. Service was held.

FLOR GONZALEZ, 63, sales
rep., died July 30 atAventura Hos-
pital. Service was held.

LUNA CRUZ, 64, technician,
died July 27 at Homestead Hospi-
tal. Service 8 a.m., Saturday, River
of Life Church.

HORACIO SANCHEZ, 72, sales
rep., died July 31 at Select Hospi-
tal. Service was held..

MICHAEL ROBINSON, 60,
postal worker, died July 30 at Cor-
al Springs Medical Center. Service
was held.

ADRIENNE SWAIN, 62, agent,
died August 1 at Aventura Medical
Center. Service was held.

OMAR CASTRO, 67, electrician,
died August 1 at Hialeah Hospital.
Service was held.

Death Notice


DEARTHUR WILLIAMS


EMERALD EMMA RIGBY

wishes to express their sincere
appreciation to all for your ex-
pressions of sympathy during
our time of bereavement.
Special thanks to Rev. Bar-
bara Baptiste-Williams, Rev.
Dr. Kenneth Sims, Mrs. Blone-
va Taylor, Anthony Simons III,
Kazah Court #117, Opa-Locka
Seniors on the Move, Mayor Jo-
seph Kelly, Commissioner Doro-
thy Johnson, Opa-Locka Police
Dept/Escorts, Ms. Johnnie Mae
Green, The Episcopal Church of
the Transfiguration and Range
-Funeral Home..
Your heartfelt prayers, calls,
visits, words of encouragement,
floral arrangements, food, mon-
etary donations' and thought-
ful deeds really touched our
hearts.
May God bless and keep you
with deep appreciation and
many thanks.
Teresa Rigby and Marsha
(Rigby) Deliard

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


WILLIE M. TAYLOR
05/20/42 - 08/05/08


I m










16B THE MIAMI TIMES, AUGUST 5-11, 2009


tiulht W rxpiwrd latINm lb


Available


Copyrighted Material


,Syndicated Content -


from Commercial News Providers


Jesus, an example for Black men to follow


CHURCHES
continued from 9A

example of Christ and reach
out to other men," Richardson
said.
The male-only environment
allowed attendees the freedom
to worship without many dis-
tractions, leaders said.
"If you think about it, most
men never experience a man-
only worship," Jay Wells, Life-
Way's director of Black church
relations and consulting, said.
Workshops featured speak-
ers on such topics as how
churches can engage today's


masculine culture and ways to
build men's character.
Johnson said churches can
reconnect with men by rebuild-
ing bridges to their communi-
ties, presenting Jesus as the
strong man that He was, pro-
viding authentic and culturally
relevant worship and providing
meaningful mentorship.
"Paul helps Timothy and Ti-
tus, Barnabas helps Paul, but
who helps the young brother
today?" Johnson asked. "The
church has to re-engineer and
revision herself ... to serve this
present age. I think what was
done yesterday was good yes-
terday, but Ii do not believe it's


relevant to the present age."
Brabson said men should
match the character of Je-
sus in terms of their humility,
treatment of women and integ-
rity.
"When we read the life of
Christ, we see He was not in-
terested in people's attention,"
Brabson said. "He was inter-
ested in people. Is who you are
speaking so loud that I can't
hear what you say?"
Noval Mayes, a member of
Greater First Baptist Church
in Lewisburg, Tenn., said the
Be the Man conference rein-
forces obedience to God.
"It means that I'm doing ev-


erything that a man's sup-
posed to do as designed by my
Lord and Savior," Mayes said.
Mayes said he rode more
than five hours with 21 men
from his church because he
has been seeking God's direc-
tion for several issues in his
life. He said the weekend re-
inforced his need to focus on
God's activity.
"Mainly what I came out of it
understanding was I still need
to be patient," Mayes said. Next
year's conference is scheduled
for May 14-15. More informa-
tion is available from the North
Carolina Baptist Convention or
LifeWay Christian Resources.


h a : .i0 : r p


0 *.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR- OWN DESTINY


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


JEFFREY M. NELSON, JR.

wishes to express our deepest
gratitude and heartfelt thank-
fulness for all of your prayers,
floral arrangements and mon-
etary support in our time of sor-
row. '
May God bless each of you,
The Nelson, Palmer- Lingo
Family


Death Notice


ELIZABETH D. HAYES, 72,
U.S. postal clerk, died August
1 at Aventura Hospice. Sur-
vivors include: sister, Betty;
son, Jason; goddaughter,
Nancy Clarke. Viewing 4 to 8
p.m., Friday. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Historical St. John
Baptist Church. Hall Fergu-
son Hewitt Mortuary.


Direct Cremation With Viewing


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwesf 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"








Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL. I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


Call 305633-06u88 Liesdfuea irecor


I' %. ! -U i I .,


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Lifesty es nitertainent
FASHION * Hip HOP * Music * FOOD * DINING * ARTS & CULTURE * PEOPLE

IlI AI MI k AMI Ik -.


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUG 5-11, 2009


Ballet classes are part of the daily routine for campers at AileyCamp at the Adrienne Arsht Center.
-Photo courtesy of the Adrienne Arsht Center/By Mitchell Zachs.


AileyCamp instructor Luctricia Welters with campers at the Adrienne Arsht Center's Peacock Education
Center, where they have been spending the past 4 weeks taking dance, personal development and
creative communications classes. -Photo courtesy of the Adrienne Arsht Center/By Mitchell Zachs.


Miami-Dade youth enjoy the summer of AileyCamp


The Adrienne Arsht Center for
the Performing Arts of Miami-
Dade County and Alvin Alley
Dance Foundation partnered
to bring AileyCamp to South
Florida youth and their fami-
lies for the first time this sum-
mer. During the four-week
program at the Adrienne Arsht


Center, 80 children (ages 11-
14) from all over Miami-Dade
County have participated in a
full scholarship camp where
learned fundamental life skills
through classes in dance, per-
sonal development and cre-
ative communication.
Topics of discussion dur-


ing the personal development
classes include goal setting,
self-government, nutrition,
conflict resolution, career de-
velopment and self-image.
Camp tuition, uniforms, dance
attire, field trips, breakfast and
lunch are provided at no cost
to the families of the campers.


"Through AileyCamp, the
Adrienne Arsht Center is able
to offer children in our com-
munity a completely unique
experience this summer which
will accompany them for the
rest of their lives," said M.
John Richard, president and
CEO of the Adrienne Arsht


Center. "We are grateful for the
swift work on the part of the
Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation
and to Miami-Dade County
leaders for allowing us to bring
this program to the Center this
summer."
AileyCamp will conclude
the summer with a grand fi-


nale performance by the 80
students in the John S. and
James L. Knight Concert Hall
at 78 p.m., Saturday, August
8. The event is open'to the
public. Tickets are free. For
more information, visit www.
arshtcenter.org or call 305-949-
6722.


Michael Jackson's chef recalls doctor's role, final days


By Unda Deutsch
Associated Press

On the day Michael Jackson
died, his personal chef says her
first hint of something amiss
was when his doctor didn't come
downstairs to get the juices and
granola he routinely brought
the King of Pop for breakfast
each morning.
Kai Chase, a professionally
trained chef hired by Jackson
to maintain a healthy food regi-
men, recalled the singer's fi-
nal days in an interview with
The Associated Press. She also
spoke about the role of his per-


sonal physician, Dr. Conrad
Murray, who is now the focus of
a manslaughter investigation.
Chase said Tuesday that she
had gotten used to seeing Mur-
ray coming and going from the
mansion. The doctor usually
arrived about 9 or 9:30 p.m.
and would go upstairs to Jack-
son's room, and she said she
would not see him again before
she left - sometimes late in the
evening - but understood he
was staying the night.
In the morning, when she ar-
rived for work, Chase said she
would see the doctor coming
down the steps carrying oxy-


gen tanks. When Murray didn't
come downstairs the morning
of June 25, "I thought maybe
Mr. Jackson is sleeping late,"
Chase said.
"I started preparing the lunch
and then I looked at my cell-
phone and it was noon. About
12:05 or 12:10 Dr. Murray runs
down the steps and screams, 'Go
get Prince!' He's screaming very
loud. I run into the den where
the kids are playing. Prince
(Jackson's oldest son) runs to
meet Dr. Murray and from that
point on you could feel the en-
ergy in the house change.
"I walked into the hall and


KAI CHASE


I saw the children there. The
daughter was 'crying. I saw
paramedics running up the
stairs."At that point, Chase
said, the small group that was
gathered - the children, their
nanny, a housekeeper and
Chase - held hands and began
to pray. As paramedics raced
up to the room, Chase recalls,
"We were all praying, 'Help Mr.
Jackson be O.K.'
"Then everyone was very
quiet."
At about 1:30 p.m. she said
security guards told her and
other staff to leave the prop-
erty because "Mr. Jackson


was being taken to the hos-
pital."
When she came outside,
she said, ambulances were
in the courtyard and a crowd
had gathered.
Chase, 37, who has cooked
for other celebrities and
comes from a show-business
family, was hired by Jackson
in March, let go in May, then
returned on June 2. She said
the pop star's focus was on
fresh, healthy food for him
and the children.
She said she prepared
meals for the family and oc-
casionally for Murray.


Jay-Z breaks siler


about his marriage

Rumors escalated about the celebrity
power couple relationship, the two tiec
the knot in a private wedding ceremony at
Jay-Z's New York apartment in 2008

Perhaps breaking what Beyonce once said was
an agreement to keep details of their relationship
quiet, Jay-Z is said to be writing about the 'Sasha
Fierce' diva in his upcoming autobiography.
In addition to shedding light on the inspiration
behind many of his hits; the relationships
forged and perhaps broken over the last
decade; Jay-Z could very well explain why he
"put a ring on it".
While details and advance snippets of the
book have not been released, a source who
claims to be close to the deal Jay-Z signed
for the upcoming, page-turner, says he
will have some interesting things to say.
"It's going to cover everything from his
days on the streets as a drug dealer to his
fairytale wedding to Beyonce. He'll also be
revealing his rapping secrets."
A release date for the book has not been
revealed but, it has been speculated that the
first of a three book deal, could arrive in
stores by year's end.
In 2008, Beyonce shed light on their
relationship in an exclusive sit down with
Essence Magazine but has since made only
slight mention of the relationship when
asked.
Jay Z is also due to release a new album
this fall, titled "The Blueprint 3".
Rumors escalated about the celebrity'
power couple relationship, the two tied the
knot in a private wedding ceremony at Jay-
Z's New York apartment in 2008.
The ceremony was followed by a lavish
party at the apartment that was attended
by the couple's families and many
celebrities, and featured DJ Cassidy, one
of Jay's favorites, according to People.
com.


O.F


Listen Up: Fabolous

does it his 'Way' on

his latest album

By Steve Jones

Fabolous bases his latest effort
around themes - ambition, respect,
betrayal - from 1993 gangster film
Carlito's Way. But Loso's Way (*
* * out of four) works less as a
concept album than as a solid,
diverse collection of rhymes.
The Brooklyn rapper has
always been a gifted lyricist,
and here he balances skill-
fully woven street tales with I
his trademark smooth, lady-
pleasing tracks. He cones
out blazing on The Way,
spitting fire at everyone
from the media to haters
to set the tone for what is to
come. Whether he's put-
ting competitors in check
or making his move in the
club, Fab aims to leave i
onlookers either steamed
or envious. He has a knack
for picking pulse-pounding
beats and writing infectious
hooks, and A-list guest stars
such as Jay-Z, Keri Hilson,
The Dream, Jerimih, Ne-Yo, Lil
Wayne and Ryan Leslie all make
welcome contributions.
But it's his collaboration
with Marsha Ambrosius near
the end of the album that is
his most potent. New par-
ent Fabolous contemplates
the responsibilities of father-
hood, and after nearly an
hour of sticking and moving,
the combative rapper lands
his most emotional jab with
Stay.- Steve Jones


THE MIAMI TIMES


mI











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


92 THF MIAMI TIMFS. AlIG 5-11. 2009


Shelly-Ann Starkey and
Julia Gaskins, wedding co-
'ordinators, arrived early to
organize the line of march for
the bridal party as they exited
from the limousines into The
Apostolic Faith Church 'for
the wedding between Lashon
Holliday and Olden Reese,
Jr., last Saturday. Further,
the bride and groom chose
lavender, white and blue col-
ors with, blue gowns for the
bridesmaids, lavender gowns
for the hostesses and white
tuxedos with boutonnieres for
the males.
The ceremony be-
gan with a poem by
Michelle Banton 4
to our beloved mom
and dad, followed by
the entrance of An-
nie Alexander and
Marcia Palmer, liv-
ing Godmothers, Pas-
tor Patty Kemp and MC
Patricia Williams,
spiritual mothers,
Olden Reese, Sr., father of the
groom, Mary Reese, mother
of the groom, Elra and Elisha
Small, parents of the bride.
The bridal party participated
in the candle light ceremony.
Also entering came the'
groom,- .Issac Clayton and
Todd Floyd, best men, and
Pastor Julian Hutchinson,
followed by bridesmaids and
groomsmen Alicia Alexander
and Dennard Fluker, Sherefa
Green and Radhames Hernan-
dez, Pearlie Hart and Dono-
van Kemp, Charity Johnson.
and John Kemp, Tracy Mag-
wood and Lawrence Martin,
Tiarra Mitchell and Lazaro
Perez, Ericka Small and Cal-
vin Randle, Shaunte Small
and Kahdiem Steward, Kala
Stephens and Stephon Wat-
son, Hyacinth Toles and J.C.
Williams, Michelle Watson
and James Williams.


Also, Sha- ' -: -7
ron Hutchin- IV"W
son, matron of _ 1
honor, Monica U
Mitchell, maid of - --,
honor, Deyuana
Quinn, Jr. Bride, Michael
Mortimer, Jr. Groom, Va-
lencia Hutchinson, flower
girl, Terrance Heigler, ring
bearer, and Tomeaka Bailey,
Michelle Banton, Stephanie
Rodas, and Brittany Smith,
hostesses.
The bride entered on the
arm of her father, Elisha
Small. She was radiant in
a sparkling atara,
mini-veil, diamond
necklace, a flowing
gown with a 3-ft.
train, and crystals on
the bodice and hem
of her skirt. She en-
tered a church with
lavender plants on
)SS the 25-pews,near the
aisles, while "Noth-
ing Without You" was
performed by Stacy Johnson
who also sang "I Believe In
You and Me".
After the announcement of
Mr. & Mrs. Olden Reese Jr.,
they led the entourage to Ele-
gant Banquet Hall where Den-
nard Fluker sang "Breathe".
and friends gave a 2-min-
utes tribute, followed by the
throwing of the bouquet and
garter belt and dancing until
early morning.


Mary Simmons, president,
Arcola Lakes Park Senior
Group, and Tillie Stibbins,
president, Arcola Lakes Sing-
ing Angels, met with the se-
nior citizens last Tuesday to
apprise them of the recent
rumor regarding the transfer
of part-time employees, the
shortening of usage of the
park, and the closing of the


L P R c i) orcl St alc I I �-i = M mi


I


I cannot believe what I read
last week. Tell me, it is not
true. I read children, who are
hospitalized and homebound
and not in special education,
must take the Florida Com-
prehensive Assessment Test
(FCAT). Children who are of
sound minds fails this test.
What makes our school admin-
istration believe these children
will pass? My belief has always
been no one test can determine
your identity. Most of us who
graduated from high school
and definitely college made
it quite well through life and
never, ever heard of the FCAT
until 15 years ago. These chil-
dren who are required to take
this test are children diagnose
with cancer, traumatic brain
injuries, systemic lupus and
fibromyalgia.


Former NBA star and Detroit
businessman, Dave Bing,
is new the Mayor of Detroit
and will serve the remaining
months of its former mayor
Kwame Kilpatrick's sec-
ond term. Bing was the No.
2 over all pick'by the Detroit
Pistons in 1966 and is in the
Basketball Hall of Fame. He
plans to seek a full, four-
year term.


Princess Lamb, her daugh-
ter, Aundrea, and son-in-
law, Carl Honoro are now
in their lovely new home on
Williams Avenue in Coconut
Grove. Princess celebrated
her Natal Day with friends
and "Diplomats-1943 Class-
mates" last Saturday. Among
those in attendance: Bes-
sie and Cato (Paul) James
Sands, Ethel Phillips, Eudo-
ra Straughter, Viola Smith,
Claude Marquess, Sylvia
Williams, LaGloria Roberts,
Fred Brown, Thelma Gib-
son, Elnora Boyd, Father
and Mrs. Bernard Griffith,
BranHilda Moore, Barbara
W. Kee, Ivan "Bunkus"
McFord, Syble Hawks


(mother of Christ
Church).

*********
Happy wed-
ding anniversary -,
to Samuel . and
Helen S. Bennett, August
1, their 29th.


Get well wishes to Eloise
Smith-Johnson, Louise H.
Cleare, Carmetta Brown-
Russell, Martha Anderson,
David Davis, Helen Ever-
itt, Zeola Cohen-Jones
and Willie Pearl Gallo-
way. (Glad to see Elouise
Bain-Farrington back out
again.) ,


Grace Heastie Patter-
son, Zeola Cohen-Jones, ,
Herbert Rhodes, Jr., Doris
McKinney-Pittman, Emma
Rigby,, Charles L. Hudson,
David Federick Davis and
Frank Cooney, Jr. Glad to
see Wendell Stirrup, up and
out again.


Kenneth Hamilton, chair-
man of the "Hill Family Re-
union" were held in Coconut
Grove on July 17-20. Their
activities started by gath-
ering and eating at Ocean
Choice Seafood. Restau-
rant, Holiday Inn University
of Miami where the group
dined for breakfast. Their
picnic was held at Elizabeth
Virrick Park and also their
dinner. The dinner dance
was held on Saturday night.
The group worshipped at
Macedonia Baptist with din-
ner followed by a service.
Among those in attendance:
William and Dorothy Lee,
Bertha Hamilton, Antonio
and Brigette Moody, Mark
and Rose Hedgemond and
Kenneth and Geraldine
Hamilton. Relatives came
from many cities and towns
to join. in the happy festive
reunion.


Alonza "Link" and Fran-
ces Johnson were pleasant-
ly surprised by their three
daughters, Teresa, Phyllis
and Tangle Johnson, on
Sunday, July 19 when the
girls gave them and 15 fam-
ily members a lavish dinner.
Tangle, her sons, Chardis
and Devin, along with fian-
cee came down from Mem-
phis, TN to join in and help
celebrate their 50th wedding
anniversary. Happy Anni-
versary to Alonza and Fran-
ces.


Congratulation to our be-
loved priest, the Rev. Canon
Richard L. Marquess-Bar-
ry who was honored by the
Honorable State Sen. Fred-
erica S. Wilson who be-
stowed on him the Florida
Senate Medallion of Excel-
lence.


Booker T. Washington
High School Class of 1949
returned home last Thurs-
day. What a glorious trip to
our Nation's Capitol. Among
those making the trip to
D.C.: Percy Oliver, class
president; Bernard John-
son, Blanche Gross, Albert
Ferguson, Effie Fortson,
Cortel Owens, Portia Oli-
ver, EmmaJean Johnson,
Oliver Gross, Alma Mc-
Cutheon, Moses Jones,
Rosa Jenkins, Elvera Crit-
tendon, Barbara Johnson,
Eloise Cox, Sara Fay Bul-
lard, Brittny Maxwell, Ella
Chipman, Leonard and
Billye Ivy, Mary Banner-
man, Alexaundria Barnes,
Gwendolyn Waters, Melody
Miller, Toya Hollinger, San-
dra Gibson, Mace Lino and
Isiah Hollinger. Happy 60th
Class of 1949 (Tornadoes)!


Fitzhugh Newton-John-
son and Eugene Bradley
Johnson daughter, Dortresia
Bryley-Jane, was married to
Twan Leon Love Jones at The
Historic Saint Agnes Episcopal
Church on Saturday, August
1. The elated grandmother is
Doris McKinney-Pittman.


Historical Culture Arts Cen- mon and Lakeisha Scott,
ter. At the same time, Nor- Sarah Timpkins, Meriam
man Cox, Sr. and Richard Tawuab, Doris Virgil, Min-
J. Strachan attended the nie L. Williams, Regina Wil-
Miami-Dade County Commis- liams, Mattie Waus, Brenda
sioners meeting, where deci- Washington, Richard Wil-
sions were made and ques- liams. They were a proud
tions were answered, along group wearing T-Shirts and
with the participation of deci- praising their pastor among
sion makers and onlookers, the huge. crowd and the news
After three hours into the media. Moss and Rolle spoke
meeting, it was observed that on behalf of the county for
Mayor Carlos Alvarez pro- the new library, while Rolle
posed budget was the meat statement indicated bringing
of the rumors with additional the library to Arcola Lakes is
cuts in other programs. One like bringing the cotton back
of which came from the fire to Harlem.
fighters that brought 150
people attired in T- *********
shirts to protest vo- Rev. Dr. R. Joaquin
cally, but Chairman Willis, pastor, and
Dennis Moss made The Men's Fellowship
an announcement to . ei Summer Music Series
dismiss anyone who .* ended Sunday with
got out of hand and Nicole Henry perfor-
spoke unruly. Some mance at the Historic
of the firefighters in Lyric Theatre in Over-
attendance included town before a capaci-
Travia Bryant, Olivia HENRY ty-filled auditorium.
Clayton, Oneil Gra- Henry was born
ham, Kimberly Ken- in Philadelphia and
nearly, Jamie McArthur, and raised in a musical family
Katrina Coffee, American staring with her mom and
Sr. Everyone also observed sister who also took singing
the approval -of Mayor Al- and ballet and ended up in
verez's selection as Miami- Miami to attend the Univer-
Dade Housing Director, Greg sity of Miami School of Art,
Fortner, who came from San while singing in clubs and
Francisco, CA. churches to help pay her tu-
The Commissioners meet- ition. She also have an envi-
ing ended on Friday, when . able record and a list of spots
Mayor Alvarez, County Corn- from New York to Miami and
missioners, Dennis Moss from Arturo Sandoval, Isaac
and Dorrin G. Rolle, led the Hayes, Jennifer Holiday,
ground-breaking of the Arcola Nicholas Payton to Rober-
Lakes Library on the corner of ta Flack, while duplicating
Northwest 82 Street and Sev- parts of them in performing.
enth Avenue. In attendance Some of the attendees in-
included: Rev. Dr. C. P. Pres- cluded Elsaida Anders, Karol
ton, pastor of Peaceful Zion Brant, Tracy Gibson, Ashan-
MBC and members that in- ti E. Ivery Joy 'Jackson,
cluded Annie Barnes, Mary gladys H. Johnson, Estella
Chester, Roberta Coglin, Jones, Othella Jones, Ruth
Betty Dudley,Kathy Finch, Long, Lt. John Pace, DeW-
Irene Hayes, Lakeisha and ayne J. Marshall, Andrew
Charles Hilbert, Maderia and James Martin, James
Hightower, Gwen Johnson, and Alva Maull, Eugene and
Queen Lawyer, and .Gwen Florence Strachan, William
Marshall. and Cynthia Clarke, Dr.
Also, Fannie Mays, Herman Dorsett,Keith and
Shaniel Milton, Xavier Bonita Levarity, Rudolph
Moss, Dorothy Potter, Ra- and Katherine Levarity,


fdfied


Jerry Miller, Benny White,
Caroline White, Dr. Astrid
Mack, Fifia and Nelson Jen-
kins.


Kudos go out T. Eilene
Martin-Major, the first fe-
male Student Government
Association President at Bet-
hune-Cookman University
and who "departed to serve"
like many graduates
in the community,
churches, and orga-
nizations. Further,
with her position
as President of the
Egelloc Civic and So-
cial Club, a position
for which you start as
a members and move
up through the ranks RO
to be evaluated as Di-
rector of The Men Of
Tomorrow, a fundamental
responsible for the top posi-
tion.
In addition, Major has used
her time to focus on organiz-
ing eleventh-grade boys to
be trained as "Men Of To-
morrow", M.A.S.K., a liturgi-
cal dance group of boys and
girls, training ministers, and
counseling two young ladies
to develop and enhance their
endeavors: her . daughter,
Tia, and her Goddaughter,
Ebony Finley. Major is also
known in the United Method-
ist Conference as President of
the Scholarship Committee
and the job of selecting re-
cipient for the annual schol-
arships. After she served
for a number of years, she
relinquished the position to
her daughter, Tia, a gradu-
ate of William Turner Tech-
nical School, who is following
in her mother's footstep from
Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity by taking the leadership
to keep them together, while
her mother is otherwise busy.
Tia is to be congratulated for
this honorable position and
she may out rein her moth-
er's years of service.
Moreover, Finley is a se-
nior at Miami Carol City Sr.


and was recently elected as
student representative to the
Dade County School Board
for the 2009-10 school year.
Her election came from all
student leaders who meet pe-
riodically to resolve problems
occurring by students and
reported to the school board
for resolution.
Along with her posi-
tion, Finley is active in the
church as a member
of M.A.S.K. and an
escort in the Men Of
Tomorrow formal pre-
sentation. She has
a 3.5 GPA which was
the key to her being
elected and she vows
to follow in her role
model's step.
LLE

A special salute goes
out to Lois Poole Hogan-
Oliver for founding Aerobic
Divas in 2008 at The Church
of the Open Door under the
leadership of Rev. Dr. R.
Joaquin Willis, pastor. Now,
The Divas are celebrating its
first anniversary under the
leadership of LaVerne Boone
and they took an oath to car-
ry the creed: D, Determined,
I, Integrity, V, Visionary, and
a, Affirmation of faith in Je-
sus Christ, Son of God.
, Members are Carolyn Ad-
ams, Mercedes Adderly, El-
saida Anders, Erslyn Anders,
Aqueela AsSalaam, Ver-
mel Brooks, leader,. Evelyn
Campbell, Catherine Carter,
leader, Lila Cobb, Collins
Shirley, Gloria Davis, Helen
Everett, Katherine Hepburn,
Jooann Jackson, Fifia Jen-
kins, leader, Barbara John-
son, Gladys Johnson, Kathy
Levarity, leader, Marteen Le,
variety, Alva Maull, deader,
and Bonita North, leader.
Also, Annie Otey, Enid
Pinkney, Andrea Pratt,
Florenca Strachan, Theola
Thomas, Charlayne Thomp-
kins, Lorraine Vaught, Thel-
ma Wilson, Vera Wyche, Lois
Young, and Marjorie Young.
Colors and gold and blue.


1t










3C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 5-11, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Jackmion' rmom to kerp kidu: Rower gerts station


- wm- so waw-om- mme-4 mb
swm - * 0M ________ OAN -40 mo o - oo

Somb a e o a m 4ama



Copyrighted Material


.. . iSiSyndicated Content i. ahriw




*Available from:Commercial News Providers


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Student ordered to pay $675K

for illegally downloading music


A Boston University' stu-
dent has lbeen ordered to pay
$675,000 to four record labels
for illegally downloading and
sharing music.
Joel Tenenbaum, of Provi-
dence, admitted he download-
ed and distributed 30 songs.
The only issue for the jury to
decide was how much in dam-
ages to award the record la-
bels.
Under federal law, the re-
cording companies were en-
titled to $750 to $30,000 per
infringement. But the law al-
lows as much as $150,000 per


mL



track if the jury finds the in-
fringements were willful. The
maximum jurors could have
awarded in Tenenbaum's case
was $4.5 million.
The case is only the nation's
second music downloading


.ime



case against an individual to
go to trial.
Last month; a federal jury in
Minneapolis ruled a Minneso-
ta woman must pay nearly $2
million for copyright infringe-
ment.


Wayne Brady says, 'Let's Make a Deal'


A new hour-long .version of
the classic game show "Let's
Make a Deal" will air as part of
CBS' daytime lineup beginning
Oct. 5, with comedian Wayne
Brady hosting.
"Let's Make a Deal" will re-
place the daytime drama
"Guiding Light," which will
end a 72-year run on radio
and television on Sept. 18.
Reruns will air in the two
weeks between the end of
"Guiding Light" and the, pre-
miere of "Let's Make a Deal,"
CBS Entertainment President
Nina Tassler said during the
network's presentation at the
summer Television Critics As-
sociation Press tour.
Monty Hall, the show's origi-
nal host, will serve as a cre-


active consultant for the new
version.
The time slot for "Let's Make
a Deal" will vary from market
to market, Tassler said.
"Let's Make a Deal," which
features outrageously dressed
contestants making trades
for various prizes, was cho-
sen from among three game
show pilots shot as potential
replacements for "Guiding
Light," Tassler said.
Barbara Bloom, CBS' se-
nior vice president of day-
time programs, "had been
talking about the viability of
'Let's Make a Deal' for years,
so we're excited we're finally
going to get it up on its feet,"
Tassler said.
Hall hosted versions of "Let's


Make a Deal" that ran in day-
time on NBC from Dec. 30,
1963, to Dec. 27, 1968, and
on ABC from Dec. 30, 1968,
to July 9, 1976; in primetime
on NBC from May 21, 1967,
to Sept. 3, 1967, and on ABC
from Feb. 7, 1969, to Aug. 30,
1971; and in syndication
from Sept. 18, 1971, to May
28, 1977, Sept. 29, 1980, to
July 14, 1981, and Sept. 17,
1984, to Sept. 12, 1986.
A new version ran as part of
NBC's daytime schedule from
July 9, 1990, to Jan. 11, 1991,
initially hosted by Bob Hilton,
who was later replaced by Hall.
A primetime version ran on
NBC in March 2003, hosted by
Billy Bush, with Hall making
appearances.


Adrienne Arsht Center and S2BN Entertainment present
FUERZA BRUTA
"Out of this world!" Univision
The visuals are spectacular! Experience a non-stop collision
of dynamic music, and kinetic aerial imagery that resembles nothing less
than a mash up between aerial theater and a late-night dance party!
Party before and after the show in the G-Lounge by Barton GI
7:30 PM * Lynn Wolfson Stage (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House) * $63.75


Fuerza Bruta


RIsEUP - Florida Premiere Screening
RiseUp is a film journey into the heart of Jamaica - the island that gave
birth to the worldwide cultural phenomenon of Reggae. In a society where
talent abounds and opportunity is scarce, three distinct and courageous
artists fight to rise up from obscurity and write themselves into the pages
of history. With music and appearances by legends Lee "Scratch" Perry,
Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare, and a slew of soon-to-be
superstars, RiseUp follows artists from the dangerous streets, back alleys
and crowded dancehalls of Kingston, to the picturesque countryside.
These artists demonstrate the raw power of hope and courage in a land,
which is largely unseen, but certainly not unsung.
8 PM * Carnival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House)
FREE for Adrienne Arsht Center Members * $10 for non-members


Mos Def presents
THE ECSTATIC TOUR WITH MOS DEF AND JAY ELECTRONIC
produced by Garden Grown and Guerilla Union in association with
The Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, Contagious Musiq and AE District
"There is no better lyricist.(or deliverer of lyrics) in music.
Not hip-hop. Music." Esquire Magazine
Teaming up with Jay Electronica, famed hip hop MC and actor
Mos Def comes to the Adrienne Arsht Center stage with performances
of classic tracks and new material from his album, The Ecstatic.
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $32, $39, $49, $59

RIsEUP - Florida Premiere Screening
There will be a 30 minute Q&A with RiseUp director Luciano Blotta after
each screening. RiseUp just recently won best music documentary at
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The Ecstatic Tour with
Mos Def and Jay Electronica


RISEUP - Florida Premiere Screening
7 PM * Carnival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House) s -
FREE for Adrienne Arsht Center Members * $10 for non-members RiseUp - Screening

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'di.__...__ C e n ter_'.._''._ -''..
FO THE PERFORMING.. ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY: .. :-" .


I


[SUN AUGUST 9


[FRI AUGUST 14-1


[SAT AUGUST 151











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 5-11, 2009


"Back to School Fun Day" in District 3 _ m


Miami-Dade County Commis-
sioner of District 3 Audrey M.
Edmonson will host the third
annual Back-to-School Fun
Day at Olinda Park, located at
2101 Northwest 51 Street, from
10 a.m. to 2'p.m. on Saturday,
August 15.
The event will include an ar-
ray of activities and services.
In preparation of the 2009/10
school year, children will re-
ceive free book bags and school
supplies on a "first come, first
serve" basis, until supplies run
out. In addition, there will also
be free food, kids' activities,
like bounce houses, music,


and other entertainment.
This year's "Fun Day" will
provide parents with many
valuable tools, like free finger-
print identification cards for
kids' safety, done by Miami-
Dade's Department of Correc-
tions. There will also be repre-
sentatives from Miami-Dade
Public Libraries, who will as-
sist attendees in applying for
their own library cards, and
Animal Services will give a pre-
sentation on how to be a good
pet owner. Other local services
scheduled to attend the event
include Miami-Dade's Fire
Rescue Department and The


EDMONSON


Children's Trust. Representa-
tives from Lifeline Assistance
and Link-Up Florida will also
join the event; both organiza-
tions financially help low-in-
come residents of all ages with
acquiring a phone - landline
link-up, land phone, or cell
phone.
"This is a fantastic opportu-
nity for parents and children
alike to kick off the school
year in a safe, healthy and fun
way," said Commissioner Ed-
monson.
For more information, con-
tact Edmonson's district office
at 305-636-2331.


4NOW 41m-


Bob Marley's Best-Of album reaches a milestone
Bob Marley's Best-Of album reaches a milestone


Pretty good chance you ei-
ther own the Bob Marley best-
of compilation,/Legend, or know
someone who does. It's one of
those ubiquitous albums that
feel like it's been around for-
ever - 1984, to be exact, three
years after the reggae pioneer'
passed away.
And now the perfect gateway
album into the amazing musi-
cal legacy of Bob Marley and
the Wailers has just become
17th album to sell over 10 mil-
lion copies.
Legend: The Best of Bob Mar-
ley and the Wailers entered the.
Billboard charts at No. 168 and
peaked at No. 54; the Jamaican


singer-songwriter never had a
top-40 hit, but this terrific col-
lection has sold more copies
since 1991 (when SoundScan
began tracking) than any oth-
er album of the '60s, '70s, or
'80s.
Released by Island records
on May 8, 1984, Legend has
since been reissued with bonus
tracks, but the original has all
the hits any Marley fan needs
for a day at the beach. But I'd be
remiss by not saying that there
is so much more great music
from Bob Marley to be discov-
ered, songs not represented
here, but deserving of attention
nevertheless.


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Naomi Sims, among first black models, dies at 61


Naomi Sims, the barrier-
breaking - African-American
fashion model who in 1968 be-
came the first black model to
appear on the cover of Ladies'
Home Journal, has died. She
was 61.
, Sims, said by some to be the
first black supermodel, died
Saturday of cancer in Newark,
New Jersey, her son Bob Find-
lay told The New York Times. It
had been decades since she left
the runway to become an au-
thor and launch heri- own beau-
ty empire.
Sims attained success at the
same time that the "Black is
Beautiful" movement was tak-
ing hold, and her accomplish-
ments helped pave the way for
the black runway stars of the
1970s, including Pat Cleveland,
Alva Chinn and Beverly John-
son.


SIMMS
Sims often spoke of her diffi-
cult start - as a gangly foster-
care kid in Pittsburgh who tow-
ered over the other children in
her school. In 1966, she came
to New York City to attend the,
Fashion Institute of Technology
on scholarship.


When she began approach-
ing modeling agencies, she was
turned down again and again
- with some telling her that her
sklin was too dark. Instead of
giving up, she pushed forward
and approached photographers
directly.
The approach landed her the
cover of the Times' August 1967
fashion supplement. She used
that photo to market herself di-
rectly to advertising agencies,.
and within a year she was earh-
ing $1,000 a Week and appear-
ing in a national television cam-
paign for AT&T. Before long, she
was modeling for top designers.
Sims gave up modeling af-
ter five years and launched
her own wig-making business
geared toward black women.
She eventually expanded the
multimillion-dollar business to
include beauty salons and cos-


metics, and she wrote All About
Health and Beauty for the Black
Woman and other books.
Sims was born in Oxford, Mis-
sissippi, in 1948. Her parents
divorced soon after she was
born and her mother moved
Sims and her two sisters to
Pittsburgh.
Besides her son, Sims is sur-
vived by a sister, Betty, and a
granddaughter.


H


Composer changed jazz, impacted musicians


George Russell, an innova-
tive and influential jazz com-
poser who created the frame-
work that led to recordings of
the 1950s and 1960s, such as
Miles Davis' Kind of Blue and
John Coltrane's A Love Su-
preme, died Monday in Boston.
He had Alzheimer's disease. He
was 86.
Russell developed the "Lyd-
ian chromatic concept," which
offered liberating and advanced
ideas of harmony and improvi-
sation, and his greatest impact
came in how other musicians
used his ideas to forge a new
style of jazz.
While recovering from tuber-
culosis in 1945 and 1946, Rus-
sell developed his Lydian con-
cept, borrowing the name from
one musical mode of ancient
Greece. He built his concept
around the affinity of the fifth
note of the musical scale with
the base note of the chord.
"The Lydian scale is a ladder
of fifths," Russell told the Bos-
ton Globe in 1999, "and the
fifth is the strongest tone in an
octave."
In the late 1940s, he com-
posed "Cubano Be, Cuba-
no Bop" for trumpeter Dizzy
Gillespie, marking the first
* successful blending of Afro-
Cuban music and jazz. But
he secured his place in music
with his 1953 book The Lydian
Chromatic Concept of Tonal
Organization.
Suddenly, musicians were
free to improvise according to a
'system of linear scales, rather
than relying on a tune's chord
structure. The new concept
of scales allowed for different
harmonic and tonal approach-
es, in which one key could
be superimposed on another
and improvisation would bal-


RUSSELL


j


ance composition. Some critics
scoffed at it as "space music,"
but such leading musicians as
trumpeter Davis, saxophonist
Coltrane and pianist Bill Ev-
ans used Russell's modal ideas
to create works of art.
Russell moved to Europe
in the 1960s and returned to
Boston in 1969 to teach at the
New England Conservatory of
Music, where he stayed until
2004. In 1990, the National
Endowment for the Arts named
him Jazz Master, and he was
honored in 2007 at the Ken-
nedy Center for the Performing
Arts as one of 33 "'living jazz
legends."


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5C THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 5-11, 2009


Our view on crime and punishment:


A second chance for Michael Vick

Reinstatement might serve broader good of curbing animal abuse.' I 3


'Any day now, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell
will likely determine whether Michael Vick gets
back into the league. Sports talk shows, newspa-
pers and blogs have been awash with debate over
whether the one-time star quarterback - now a
bankrupt ex-convict with a record for reprehen-
sible cruelty to dogs - should get another shot at
the big time. ,
Many think he should, and we agree, but ul-
timately not for the reasons usually proffered.
It's true that Vick has served his debt to society.
Compared with other NFL players convicted of
crimes, such as abusing wives or girlfriends, he
has been punished harshly by the justice system.
He served a 23-month sentence after pleading
guilty to federal dogfighting charges. And yes, ev-
erybody has a right to make a living.
But no one has a right to do it in the NFL, which
is far more than just another business. It is a sig-
nificant element of modern American culture,
and, for better or worse, millions of young people
look up to its stars. The crux of the issue should
be how a second chance might serve the broader
good of curbing animal abuse and teaching kids a
worthwhile lesson about life.
The Humane Society of the U.S. thinks that Vick
can help on the first score and is not opposing his
reinstatement. Starting next week,. Vick will be
plugged into a program, underway in Chicago and
Atlanta, where the society works to steer young
people away from dogfighting and into more posi-
tive pursuits with their dogs, often pit bulls.
Vick, 29, has told society President Wayne
Pacelle that he first saw dogfighting as a kid,
came to accept it and then got involved. The quar-
terback, and his story, might just connect with
urban youths.
Of course, there are a lot of ifs here. If Goodell
allows him back in the NFL (perhaps after a sus-
pension of several games to emphasize that the
league takes the crime, and its image, seriously),
Vick, who was released by the Falcons, might not
be picked up by any team. He would be a huge
public relations liability. If Vick is signed, he
might no longer be the player he was. Two years
out of the game is a long time.
And if Vick does become a star again, his need
to redeem himself by working on animal cruelty
issues could get left in the dust. We don't know
how sincere he is. People who abuse animals of-


-f i- -", "


ten exhibit deep-seated psychological problems.
Whatever Goodell decides, the moment is ripe
to take stock of NFL policy on off-the-field con-
duct. Too often, the league has been content to
treat serious offenses as no big deal.
Goodell appears to be changing that. Last
rmionth he suspended Cleveland Browns receiver
Donte Stallworthindefinitely when Stallworth got
just 30 days in jail after pleading guilty to drunk-
en driving in an accident that killed a pedestrian.
The commissioner sent the right message about
that crime.
By giving Vick a chance to play again while us-
ing his NFL platform to curb dogfighting, Goodell
can do the same for the terrible crime of cruelty to
defenseless animals.


Tereatha Brown, James Campbell, Ethel Johnson

Birthday celebration aboard the Royal Caribbean


On June : 27, seventeen
members of the Campbell family
boarded the Royal Caribbean
cruise ship to George Town,
Grand Cayman Island and the
Historic Cozumel, Mexico. This
magnificent cruise ship was
chosen to celebrate the birthday
of the youngest brother, James,
of the original Campbell clan


from Overtown.
The highlight of this exciting
birthday celebration was the
cruise ship itself which provided
five days of family bonding,
entertainment, fun and an over
abundance of delicious cuisine.
Pictured above are James,
Campbell and his devoted
sisters, Tereatha Brown and


Ethel Johnson. Also included
on the cruise were Griselda
Brown, Alvis Brown, Tyrone
Campbell, Bettie Campbell,
Ronald and Makari Vickers,
Yvonne and Daniel Brown,
Sherman and Katina Brown,
Dr. and Mrs. William Campbell,
Faith Campbell and Evelyn
Campbell.


Ex-Idol contestant says that show is rigged


Some ousted season & American
Idol top 36 semi-finalists--includ-
ing Felicia Barton, Kendall Beard,
and Ju'Not Joyner--participated
in an online chat with the Idol
website AI Now today. And during
his frank online conversation with
fans, Ju'Not came right out and,
said that,the TV talent show is in
fact rigged, and that its contracts
are unfair to contestants.
"It's a fixed thing if I ever saw
one," he'boldly declared--much to
the shock of many naive chatters,
who responded with capslocked
interjections and frowny-faced
emoticons.
It was hardly the first time
that AmIdol had been accused
of wrongdoing. A book loosely
based on anonymous former


Idol employees' experiences with
the show, Stage 46, made simi-
lar allegations last year. But few
detractors have ever been as
'brutally honest as Ju'Not was
today.
Ju'Not who by his own account
was labeled a "troublemaker'1 by
Idol producers for questioning
the contract (which he dubbed
a "slavetract") that all audition-
ers are required by Fox/19 to
sign, and was allegedly told by
'Idol bigwig Ken Warwick, "You're
not going to ruin my show"--ex-
plained that he wanted to set the
record straight today. He stated
that he wanted to reveal "truth
of Idol" because "Idol ain't all it
is cracked up to be...It's certainly
not the fairytale most think it is."


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The Miami Times



Business

SECTION D


SInance

,,...MI, FLORIDA, AUG 5-11, 2009


Pierre joins MPO


-Governing Board


Members of the Peaceful Zion Missionary Baptist Church with County Commissioner Dorrin Rolle at the groundbreaking ceremony of the
Arcola Lakes Branch Library on Friday. -Photo/Miami-Dade County


Members of the Peaceful Zion Missionary Baptist Church and area homeowners association members join Library Director Raymond Santiago
and Commissioner Dorrin Rolle at the groundbreaking ceremony of the Arcola Lakes Branch Library on Friday. -Photo/Miami-Dade County


Groundbreaking ceremony for new Arcola


Special to the Times ' . o"
Residents of North Miami-Dade
turned out on Friday, July 24 to
witness a groundbreaking cer-
emony of the future Arcola Lakes
Branch Library, located at 8240
Northwest Seventh Avenue. Join-
ing the event were Miami-Dade
Mayor Carlos Alvarez, Commis-
sion Chairman Dennis Moss,
Commissioner Dorrn-in D. Rolle,.
in whose district the library will
be built, County Manager George


,Burgess 'and Library System Di-
rector Raymond Santiago and
staff.
The 9,670-square-foot library
will occupy two acres, of a 9.25
acre parcel that will also house a
Mianmi-Dade Police Station and a
Community Action Agency Head
-Start facility. The library is bud-
geted at a construction cost of
$2.3 million and is expected to
be completed by the summer of
2011. The new building will in-
corporate an abundance of green


spaces and plenty of windows to
filter in natural lighting. Special-
ly designated areas for children
and young adults will be outfit-
ted with state-of-the-art furnish-
ings and moveable shelving to
accommodate large groups dur-
ing special programs.
In addition to the large num-
ber of materials to be offered,
patrons will have free internet
access through a number of per-
sonal computers and portable
laptops.


Lakes Library
Under the Library System's
Capital Plan, 10 storefront
branches have opened in area
shopping centers and six new-
ly constructed branches have
opened in Golden Glades, Inter-
national Mall, Elizabeth Virrick
Park (Coconut Grove), Kendale
Lakes, Pinecrest, and Naranja.
A new branch in Palmetto Bay
is expected to open this fall, and
the new Hispanic Branch in Little
Havana is slated to open in early
2010.


South Florida police get milllions in stimulus aid


The Miami Times Staff Report


The Obama administration an-
nounced last week that more
than $87 million of Depart-
ment of Justice (DOJ) funding
for the hiring and rehiring of
police officers among sixty-six
counties, cities, and police de-
partments across Florida.
The funding is to be ad-
ministered by the U.S. De-
partment of Justice Office of
Community Oriented Policing
Services (COPS) through the
federal agency's COPS Hiring
Recovery Program (CHRP).
The CHRP grants will pro-
vide 100 percent funding for
approved entry-level salaries
and benefits for three years for


newly-hired, full-time sworn
officer positions (including
filling existing unfunded va-
cancies) or for rehired
officers who have
been laid off, or
are scheduled to
be laid off on a
future date, as
a result of local IenrP
budget cuts.
CHRP provides
funding to ad-
dress the full-time
sworn officer needs
of state, local, and tribal
law enforcement - agencies
nationwide. CHRP grants go
directly to law enforcement
agencies to hire and/or re-
hire career law enforcement


officers in an effort and to
increase their ' community
policing capacity and crime
prevention efforts.'
The City of Miami
Police Department
is expected to re-
ceive more than
$11 million in
|lAte stimulus money
for 50 new offi-
' cers and the city
for three years, in-
cluding salaries and
benefits.
"In these hard econom-
ic times, this is a gift from
heaven," said Miami Police
Chief John F. Timoney at a
news conference.
Other cities* such as Hol-


lywood, Miramar, North Bay
Village, Miami Springs, Mi-
ami Shores, North Miami,
Boynton Beach, West Palm
Beach, Opa-locka, Fort Lau-
derdale and West Palm Beach
will also receive large grants.
Mi'ami-Dade Police Depart-
ment, unfortunately, were
denied apiece of the pot.
The department said in a
statement, "It is unfortunate
to learn today that our agen-
cy was not awarded these
federal . . . dollars."
The department was ap-
proved earlier this year of
almost four million dollars to
prevent job cuts, hire more po-
lice officers and spend pn crime
fighting technology.


Newly-elected North Mi-
ami Mayor Andre D. Pierre
has become the newest
member on the MPO Gov-
erning Board, a twenty-
three member board that
acts as the authority on all
local transportation plan-
ning matters and ensures
that all entities engaging
in transportation-related
activities conform to statu-
tory requirements.
Pierre, a Haitian native,
has served on several City
of North Miami advisory
boards, including the Plan-
ning Commission and the
Charter Review Board. He
has also been an active
member of North Miami's
business community, hav-
ing served on the Execu-
tive Board of the Greater
North Miami Chamber
of Commerce for over six
years. He was also elected
to, and served for one year,
as President of the Cham-
ber's Board. In addition to
adhering to the concerns of
the citizens in North Miami
as mayor, Pierre will also
serve on the MPO Govern-
ing Board..


ANDRE D. PIERRE
North Miami Mayor
The MPO for the Miami
Urbanized Area guides the
transportation planning
process in Miami-Dade
County. The County MPO
was established in 1977
under, Chapter 163 of the
Florida Statutes. The' MPO
approves all federally re-
quired plans for the deploy-
ment of highways, mass,
transit, and other surface
transportation facilities and
services in the metropolitan
area.


-.. ......








.. . . .. ..=..


Huinec, tips: The role money play% in your life



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The Miami Times


Page


AM I TI MES,


AUGUST


-1. 91
.'.I, -
i :


A
Second year wide reciever
Davone Bess cools down
between workouts.

By Rich jackson
Special to the Times

Davie - When you think of
the number 44 as pertaining
to sports, do you immediately[
think of Hall of Famer H amrnmen n
Hank Aaron, Mr. October Reggie
Jackson, the late NBA legend Pis-
tol Pete Marivich, how about NFL
running back leroy KellW'I well.
today in Davie The Miami Dol-
phins officially opened practice
for their franchise 44th season
Expectations are high. and
adding to the immediate adrena-
lin rush were at least 3000 fans
in the bleachers, standing on
balconies, and even behind fenc-
ing that the dolfins had cut back
screens to accommodate the over-
flow. fans showed up in droves
just to gewt a glimpse of the team
that went from a meger 1-15 sea-
son over a year ago to a impres-
sive 11-5 last year that saw the
team make the playoffs for the,
first time in 6 seasons.
Ask any of them why they would
brave soaring 2pm temperatures
to watch a 45 minute practice and
the answer was always the same,
love. The love of the Dolphins,
love of the players, love of the
players's commitment, not only
to the way that they play but also
of their commitment tyo their
community. fans at times seemed
as if they were at an actual game
cheering wilkdly at almost every
completed pass play, handoff,
and any extra effort given by any
player. the players tooknotice as
well. Runningback Ricky Wil-
liams said that the crowd really
seemed to get the guys energized
after a rather sluggish workout
start earlier.

ATTITUDE
"I don't care to hear about
the schedule, or what Vegas
thinks"..."That means nothing."
said Jason Taylor, back after a
free agent stint with the Washing-
ton Redskins. after being named
the NFL defensive Player of the
Year in 2006 Jason has the right
to share his defiance against the


D0L P HI


C A I


IN BEGINS 09 TRA

P WITH HIGH HOP


3p;;


4 e Y













. . . . . ... . -



A Linebacker Joey Porter loosens up before drills.
Coach Sporano serves his played during warmups at training
Scamp 09.
Runningback Ronnie Brown leads the running backs twords O
another drill.
\ ,


oddsmakers. but attitude aside,
it takes trades and talent at vari-
uos key positions to make a true
champion. "People sayinwe'll only
win seven eight games putsa chip
on our shoulder." says guard jus-
tin smiley. "We're the defending,
champs and it all goes through
Miami and it shouldn't be any
other way." reciever greg Cam-
marillo "We'll take the underdog
roll, it gives us motivation and
that's fine with us." said line-


backer channing Crowder "who-
ever Vegas is, tell me to my face
we'll only win seven games." "I'll
let em' have it."

RESPECT
Call it however you choose to
see it but in the end as it is at
the beginning it all boiles down to
respect, respect of self, of team-
mates, of coaches organizations,
and lastly of opponents. being
dissrespected is one thing that


notr only athletes despise but in-
dividuals as well. Respect along
with charity should always begin
at home and perhaps no one on
the field today showed it more
with his words than coach Tony
Sparano.
"This is Chad Pennington's'
team." said coach again on.this
day. Quarterback Chad Penning-
ton has many times over earned
the respect of teammates and
coaches alike by showing veteran


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: : "' ' ' - ... ' 7 :.4-:.- ;;.;'L' Miam""- imes photos R L ich, Jacks


leadreship by example, by his
deeds. The coaches noticed too.
Pennington had an offseason goal
to stay healthy and to improve his
arm strength. "I noticed him mak-
ing throws a little bit easier that
wrer a bit more uncomfortable
last year." said coach Sporano.
For a while Pennington worked
out at a fiedl on Miami Beach and
once had AllPro tight end Jeremy
Shockey assisting hiin. He also
stayed and worked out in south


NG


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5 - 1 1 ,


2009


. ' -:2 -


Florida in July to stay accustomed
to the intense summer heat.
Whenever he'd get tired or twords
the end of an intense workout
Pennington and trainer Charles
Petrone would simply resort to
this motivational phrase "Janu-
ary in Miami," referring to being
a participant in the February 7th
Super Bowl in Miami. This is the
'first time in years that Pennington
has been virtually injury free in th
offseason. "After shoulder sur-
gery, you're just trying to brush
your teeth." Credit Pennington for
the huge crowd as much or more
than any other player here today.
As he signed autograph after au-
tograph along the fence that sepa-
rates the fans from the players.
Earlier in the summer Pennington
sent a note to the players to be at
his house for a barbeque. Given
the logistics of players in the off-
season, every player showed up.
Every one. That is a gester that
shows the testement of how re-
spected the Chad Pennington is
as the captain of the team both on
and off the field. "I'm excited, I'm
very excited about where we are,
but we've got a long way to go."
"We've got a challenge in front of
us."

IMPRESSIONS
All of the talk around the AFC
East is of how Brady-fied New Eng-
land is generatingmore buzz than
the defending conference champs
the Dolphins. You would not no-
tice that sentiment here based
squarely on the fan turnout. The
turnout took several players by
surprise. "Being out there felt like
a spring game during the Fighting
Illini," "It was the most amazing
thing," and perhaps the most tell-
ing quote came from co-captain
linebacker Joey Porter. "That lets
us know out fans have big expec-
tations for us, just like we have
big expectations for ourselves."
The crowd estimated at 3,152 was
loud, proud, enthusiastic and least
of all crazy arrived and left the fa-
cility happy. said linebacker Chan-
ning Crowder, "That was crazy,
that was wild." Said Jason Taylor,
"It's been a long time." "Probably
97-98 somewhere around there.
It's been a long long time." Chants
of "Let's go Dolphins!" could be
heard throughout the stands.
The Dolphins are coming off of
their first playfoo appearance in
six years and confidence if high.
"Winning changes alot of things,
and it's our job to keep the fans
here. we've got to win."










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


County expands CRA boundaries


Finally, Overtown

will change its image


The Miami Times Staff

The City Commission
unanimously, approved
a measure sponsored
by City Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones
for the redevelopment
and expansion of the
slum-blighted com-
munity of Overtown.
The bill was approved
in March, but the ap-
proval of the County
was necessary before it
could proceed.
Miami-Dade County
Commissioners unani-
mously approved last
week all the items re-
lating to the redevelop-
ment of Overtown. The
approval came amid


vociferous debate sur-
rounding the setting of
the mileage rate.
"It gives us hope
that more funding will
come," said Rev. Willie
Williams Sr., owner of
Just Right Barbershop
in Overtown.
The extension of the
Overtown Community
Redevelopment Agency
(CRA) boundaries along
with the Redevelopment
Plan received the full
support of the Board
of County Commis-
sioners. At the county
level, the measure was
sponsored by District 3
Commissioner Audrey
M. Edmonson.
This means the Coun-


A private research
group says Ameri-
cans' mood darkened
in July as concerns
about job losses offset
any enthusiasm about
the stock-market rally
that has helped bol-
ster retirement ac-
counts.
The Conference
Board said last week
its Consumer Confi-
dence Index, which


retreated last month,
fell to 46.6 from 49.3
in June. Economists
were expecting a read-
ing of 49. It would
take a reading above
90 to signal that the
economy is on solid
footing.
The two-month de-
cline follows an up-
swing in confidence
this spring that was
fueled by a stock-'


ty Commission will au-
thorize million of dol-
lars to be earmarked--
and more importantly,
to be used--for the de-
velopment of Overtown.
This has been a long
battle, one that pitted
the city and the county
against each other in
the courts.
Edmonson praised
this vote forthe positive
impact that it will have
on the lives of thousands
.of Overtown residents.
She stated that "the
renewal of Overtown
is important not just
for its residents or the
African-American com-
munity. It is important
for Miami-Dade County
as a whole for it will
bring Overtown back
to its rightful place. For
too long, Overtown resi-
dents have been waiting


market rally.
* Economists closely
monitor confidence
because consumer
spending accounts for
more than 70 percent
of economic activity.
Both components
of the consumer
confidence measure
fell this month. Ac-
cording to the Con-
ference Board, The
Present Situation In-


for promises made but
never fulfilled. Now, the
wait is over."
Other members of the
Board of County Com-
missioners echoed Ed-
monson sentiments and
promised their continu-
ous support for the de-
velopment of Overtown.
With this action, the
city's legal challenge
will be dropped and
both the county and the
city will have final say
on the type of projects
planned for Overtown.
In addition to some proj-
ects already supported
by the city, Edmonson
named a couple that
she feels merit full con-
sideration: Among them
is the.Alonzo Mourning
Charities project, which
was already approved
by the Board of County
Commissioners.


dex, which measures
shoppers' current
assessment of the
economy, declined to
23.4 from 25.0 last
month. The Expec-
tations Index, which
measures shoppers'
outlook over the next
six months, declined
to 62 from 65.5 in
June.
"Consumer confi-
denrce, which had re-


Residents of Over-
town have been waiting
a long-time for the area
to be redeveloped. They
made sure that the
County Commission
heard them as they ex-
pressed their concerns
during a press confer-
ence at Theodore Gib-
son Park in Overtown
on July 22, a day be-
fore the County's meet-
ing.
Emmanuel Wash-
ington, a long-time
Overtown resident
and one of the orga-.
nizers of the press
conference, said he
did not have a prob-
lem with the County's
other projects such
as the Alonzo Mourn-
ing and Mama Hat-
tie's House, so long as
long-neglected Over-
town was taken care


,bounded strongly in
late spring, has fad-
ed," Lynn Franco, di-
rector of The Confer-
ence Board Consumer
Research Center, said
in a statement.
She said the de-
cline in the Present
Situation Index was
caused primarily by
a worsening job mar-
ket. The deteriorating
outlook for- consum-


of first.,
"They need to keep
their promise," said
Washington. "The
promise to rebuild
Overtown that was
divided by 1-95 after
40 years has not hap-
pened."
Williams, a 27-year
resident of Overtown,
truly agrees and de-
sires that his commu-
nity to. be given the
same opportunities
and benefits of South
Beach and other mu-
nicipalities.
"I have watched po-
litical leaders make
promises in the past
and have never have
the promises come.
to fruition," said Wil-
liams. "We have been
in the hole of the donut
for many years, so now,
the hole will be filled."


ers was "more the re-
sult of an increase in
the proportion of con-
sumers expecting no
change in business
and labor market
conditions." However,
Franco said, "More
consumers are pes-
simistic about their
income expectations,
which does not bode
well for spending in
the months ahead."


Fads rpamW skm m to mdi kIsmm







aampdame am

Copyrig htedMaterial



Syndicated Content '

l fmr W

Available from Commercial News providers


Report shows U.S. crunlei decline


RD TJ4F MIAMI TIMFS.AUG1 5-11, 2009


President Obama honors

Camillus House founder

The Miami Times Staff Report

President Barack Obama named 16 people
to receive 2009 Presidential Medal of Freedom
on Thursday. The Medal of Freedom, America's
highest civilian honor, is awarded to individuals
who make an especially meritorious contribution
to the security or national interests of the United
States, world peace, cultural or other significant
public or private endeavors.
Obama said, "These outstanding men and
women represent an incredible diversity of
backgrounds. Their tremendous accomplish-
ments span fields from science to sports, from
fine arts to foreign affairs. Yet they share one
overarching traits Each has been an agent of
change. Each saw an imperfect world and set
about improving it, often overcoming great ob-
stacles along the way."
Among this year's recipients included Miami's
own, Dr. Pedro Jose Greer, the founder of Ca-
millus Health Concern, an agency that provides
care to thousands of homeless people yearly in
the City of Miami. Greer is also a, physician and
the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs at the
Florida International University School of Med-
icine, where he also serves as Chair of the De-
partment of Humanities, Healfih-and Society.
"Humbl1'nieAiihderstated',"'i. Greer-' cares
for others without seeking reward on tribute,"
said U.S. Rep. Kendrick B. Meek (D-FL). "Yet
his selection by President Obama to receive the
Medal of Freedom clearly demonstrates that his
ongoing good deeds have not gone unnoticed."
Greer has previously been recognized by past
presidents,' Clinton, Bush, Sr., and Carter, for
his work in one of Miami's underprivileged com-
munities.
President Obama will present the awards to
the individuals at a ceremony on Wednesday,
August 12.


USPS looking at closing

hundreds of offices
Facing staggering financial losses, the Postal
Service is looking at closing nearly 1,000 of-
fices across the country.
The post office has been struggling with a
sharp decline in mail volume as people and
businesses switch to e-mail both for personal
contact and bill paying. The agency is facing a
nearly $7 billion potential loss this fiscal year
despite a 2-cent increase in the price of stamps
in May, cuts in staff and removal of collection
boxes.
Post officials sent a list of nearly 700 poten-
tial closing candidates to the independent Postal
Regulatory Commission for review. More may be
added, but the current list of candidates can be
viewed at the commission's website.
Postal Vice President Jordan Small told a con-
gressional subcommittee that local managers
will study activities of approximately 3,200 sta-
tions and branches across the country consid-
ering factors such as customer access, service
standards, 'cost savings, impact on employees,
environmental impact, real estate values and
long-term Postal Service needs.
No changes are expected before the end of the
current fiscal year on Sept. 30.
There are 32,741 post offices across the coun-
ty. Of those, the service launched a review of
3,200 for potential candidates for closing.
"We anticipate that out of these 3,200 stations
and branches, under 1,000 offices could be con-
sidered as viable candidates to study further"
for closing, Small said.
Just last week the General Accountability Of-
fice added the Postal Service to its list of trou-
bled agencies, saying there are serious and sig-
nificant structural financial challenges currently
facing the agency.
"Every major postal policy, from employee pay,
to days of delivery, to the closing of postal facili-
ties. must be on the table. Without major change,
the day will soon come when the Postal Service
will be unable to pay its bills," GAO said.
Congress is considering a bill to change the
way the post office funds its retiree health ben-
efits over the next two years that could save it
$2 billion annually.


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News'roviders

















Consumer confidence low in July



















SFCTION D


Apartments for Rent



GREAT NEWS!!l

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI 33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
'APARTMENTS
STARTING AT. $698.00.

APARTMENTS ARE
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MOREl!I

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING JULY 7. 2009
(305) 635- 9505
"Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
,change



1130 N.W. 80 St
One bdrm. living, dining. Adult
Community $375 mthly. 305-
343-6490, 305-720-8222

115 N.E. 78 Street
Three bbdrms Special $875
and two bdrms $815, nice
and clean, laundry room,
parking. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424

1212 N. W. 1 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE-IN
One bedroom, one bath,
$500, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-
1144

1245 N. W. 58 Street
STUDIO- $425 monthly, all
appliances included. Call
Joel 786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525 Free Water.
305-642-7080
1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080

135 N.W. 18 STREET
Two bedrooms,one bath.
$500 monthly. All appli-
ances included Free 19
inch LCD TV. Call Joel 786-
355-7578

140 N.W. 13 Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath. $525
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

140 S.W. 6 St. HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
.$500 monthly
Call:305-267-9449

14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bdrm, one bath,
with air, in quiet area, $700
monthly 305-213-5013

1425 NW 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath. $625
monthly. Includes refrigerator,
stove, central air water $925
to move in:
Call 786-290-5498

1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath $425.
Two bedrooms one bath.
$525. 305-642-7080

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$625 monthly All appli-
ances included, FREE 19
inch LCD TV Call Joel
786-355-7578

156 N.E. 82nd Street
One bdrm $650, Two bdrm
$800. No deposit.
786-325-7383

1905 N.W. 115th Street
Large furnished one bed-
room. Utilities included plus
cable. $800 monthly. Call
305-687-5720.
1927 N.W. 56 STREET


Two bedrooms. $700 mthly,
first and last. Free Water.
786-277-0302


1955 N.W. 2 COURT
Onel bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080

1969 N. W. 2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath.
$550 stove, refrigerator, air,
free water 305-642-7080
786-236-1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. Call 305-642-7080
2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $625, newly
renovated, appliances includ-
ed. Call Tony 305-213-5013

2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 Free Water,
305-642-7080
3119 NW 133 STREET
Large, one bedroom, newly
remodeled. Section 8 OK!.
786-374-6658

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath. $600
mthly. 305-213-5013

3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove,
refrigerator, air $650.
305-642-7080

458 N.W. 7 Street.
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE,
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window'bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490'$580
. monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

519 SW 5 AVENUE
Large three bedrooms, two
baths, terrace, all appliances.
$1100 monthly. Section 8 wel-
come. 305-984-4007

5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Pemroke Park Area
Two and one half bedrooms,
one bath, with living room, and
washer and dryer connection,
$875 monthly, $1400 move
in. 786-256-3174

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

7519 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances, park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.'
$650, half off first month. Call
305-754-7900. 9 am to 7 pm

7520 NE MIAMI COURT
One bedroom, one bath,
free water. $6d0 monthly,
first and last. 786-277-0302


7527 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances, park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
$650, half off first month. Call
305-754-7900. 9 am to 7 pm

77 N.W. 77th Street
Two bedrooms, one and half
bath $760 Section 8 OK!.
Call 786-306-4505

8261 N.E. 3 Ave.
One bedroom, one bath
$550 monthly All appli-
ances included. Joel 786-
355-7578

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699


ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first rfmonths rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.


CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown. Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One. Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval For more informa-
tionlspecials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
corn
DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,


fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766


HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted
Easy quality Move in
special
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 ($745). two bedrooms,
one bath, $595 ($895).
Free water!
Leonard 786-236-1144

LAKEFRONT
APARTMENTS
One and two bedrooms.
One month free rent. Now
accepting Section 8.
Call 305-757-4663

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly, $1100 to move
in, first and last. Section 8
ok! 305-244-7606.

Located Near 90th Street
and 27 Avenue
Furnished one bedroom, one
bath, lights, water, and air
included. Call 305-693-9486

MIAMI AREA
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 305-725-5504

N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
One bdrm, one bath apl..
$550 per month.
Two bdrms. one bath apt.,
$650 per month.
Two bdrms . one bath
house, $850 per month
All appliances included.
FREE 19 Inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578


Condos/Townhouses
12320 N.E. 11 Place
Beautiful large newly reno-
vated two bedrooms in quiet
area. Section 8 Welcome,
305-450-8649

14004 NE 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, fwo baths
condo. $1100 mthly. Section
8 accepted.
Call Ricky 786-253-7218

3060 NW 204 LANE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Great price! 305-652-9393

NEAR DOLPHIN STADIUM
(N.W. 196 Street) Three
bedrooms, one bath. $1300
monthly. 954-663-3123

Duplex
10201 N.W. 8 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1195. Appliances.
305-642-7080

1029 N.W. 95 St #1
One bedroom, $600 monthly,
first, last and security.
305-962-2666

10505 N.W. 10th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
786-237-1292

10515 NW 12 Avenue
Two bdrm, one bath, Section
8 welcome. 305-681-3236

1130 N.W. 88 Street
Completely remodeled, two
and three bedrooms, all ap-
pliances, water and central
air. Call 305-305-4665

14 Ave. and 37 St.
Three bdrms, air. Section 8
OK. $1000 mthly.
305-984-0340

165 NE 65 STREET
Two bdrm, one bath, Section
8 or Miami City welcome!
786-303-2596

1765-1767 NW 41 Street
Two bdrms,one bath.
Jane 305-948-9784

1873 NW 43 Street
Two bdrms, one bath.
walk-in closets, appliances.
central air, bars, freshly
painted. Section 8 OK 786-
357-5000

1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $1000
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431

2257 N.W. 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath
$850. Free Water.
305-642-7080
2283 N.W. 101 STREET
One bedroom, water, air,
bars. Not Sanctioned Section
8. $700. Terry Dellerson Bro-
ker 305-891-6776


ss


MIAMI, FLORIDA, AUG 5-11, 2009


2743 NW 47 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
new kitchen and bath, ce-
ramic tile. central air, $1050
monthly, Section 8 welcome.
786-412-2149,786-337-2658

38 N.E. 64 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$675 monthly, includes water.
Call 305-267-9449
4?3-425 NW 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
'tiled floors. $800 monthly.
First and security.
* 305-216-4844

6250 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath
$800. Two bedrooms one
bath $1100. Appliances.
Free Water/Electric 305-
642-7080

68 N.W. 45th Street
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air $850. 786-431-5520

745 NW 107 STREET
Two bedrooms. $895.
786-306-4839

8098 N.W. 4 Ave.
One bdrm, one bath, appli-
ances, free water. First, last
and security. Section 8 OK.
305-621-4383

9355 NW 31 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
tiled floors throughout. $800
monthly, first and last. Not
Section approved. Call after
11 a:m. 305-625-4515.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace

HOLLYWOOD AREA
SCOTT STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tile flooring, central air, wash-
er, dryer. $1250 monthly.
305-343-7057

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bdrm, one bath, call
Jerry at 786-877- 4766.

MIAMI AREA
8221 N.E. 1st Avenue #A
Four bedrooms, two baths,
washer and dryer. Section 8
okay. 305-710-3361.

NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
By appointment only. Sec-
tion 8 welcome. 786-315-
8491

NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700-$750 monthly.
305-758-3029

NORTHWEST AREA
Two large bedrooms and liv-
ing room, washer, dryer, new
kitchen, appliances and bath-
room. 305-829-7688

Efficiency
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1075 NW 76 ST REAR
' $550 monthly, plus security.
Appliances and air.
305-490-9284

1140 N, W. 79 Street
One bdrm, one bath, $550.
Free water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080
13377 NW 30 AVENUE
$120 weekly, private kitchen,
bath, free utilities, appliances.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486

13377 NW 30 AVENUE
$120 weekly, private kitchen,
bath, free utilities, appliances.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, air, cable, no
utilities, $675 mthly. 786-317-
1804.

2571 East Superior Street
$600 moves you in. Call
786 -389-1686

NE 82 Ter Near 4 Ave
Nice efficiency with utilities.
References required.
305-754-5728

NORLAND AREA
Furnished. $600 monthly.
305-652-1132

NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance , cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.

Furnished Rooms
1600 N.W. 56th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.


1775 N.W. 151st Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable, air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-303-0156.

1920 N.W. 81 Terrace
Clean rooms, $350 mthly.
Call 786-312-8493 or
305-479-3632

2905 N.W. 57 Street
Small, clean $285 monthly.
$670 to move in, kitchen
available. One person only.
305-635-8302,305-989-6989

2981 NW 44 STREET
Kitchen privileges. Serious in-
quiries only. 305-919-6682

3042 N.W. 44th Street
Big, air, $85 to $115 weekly.
786-262-6744

4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

NORLAND AREA
Nice quiet room, near bus ter-
minal. Call 305-766-2055

- House
10951 SW 222 TERR
CUTLER BAY
Four bedrooms, one and a
half baths. $1000 monthly.
Call 305-267-9449

1122 N.W. 74 Street
Three bedrooms one bath.
$1200 mthly, $2400 to move
in. 305-632-2426

1370 N.W. 118 Street
Five bedrooms, three baths,
new tile throughout, all new
central air, washer, dryer,
New appliances. Section
8 OK $1750 negotiable.
O.B.O
FREE 19 inch LCD TV
Call 305-525-1271
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013

14410 N.W. 21 COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OK. 305-687-6973

1645 LAUDERDALE
MANOR
Four bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Fort Lauderdale.
786-263-1590

1880 N.W. 65 St
Three bedrooms, two baths,
huge master bedroom $1000
monthly 786-262-7313

1950 N.W. 60 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8. 786-263-1590

2273 N.W. 65 Street Rear
One bdrm $600 monthly.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899

2310 W. Bunche Park Dr
Three bedrooms, one bath,
305-801-1165

2324 NW 85 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances included. $1200
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
954-430-6264,305-219-0827

2520 NW 162 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $1095 monthly.
* 305-662-5505

2791 N.W. 154 TERRACE
Five bedrooms, two baths,
central air, tile. $1825 mthly.
305-662-5505

2821 N.W. 171 Street
Three bdrm, one bath, $1300
monthly. 305-542-5184

3028 NW 8 ROAD
Near Ft. Lauderdale swap
shop. Three bedrooms.
$895.
786-306-4839

310 N.E. 58 TERRACE
Five bedrooms, three bath.
$1200 monthly. All appli-
ances included. Central air
Free 19 Inch TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578 .

3221 N.W. 11 CT.
Nice four bedrooms, two
baths, den, garage. HOPWA,
Section 8. Call 954-392-0070

434 N.W. 82 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 561-584-2263

4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 mthly. 305-606-3369

563 N.W. 22 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
newly renovated. $950 mthly.
Section 8 OK. 305-751-8865

6717 N.W. 6 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, central air. Section 8
accepted. 786-326-2789


S


U
*


7 N.E. 59 TERRACE
MOVE IN SPECIAL ($1350)
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900. Free Water.
305-642-7080

936 NW 29 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly. Also avail-
able, two bedrooms, one
bath.
Call 786-262-7313

CHARMING RICHMOND
HEIGHTS HOME
Three bedrooms, one bath,
large fenced yard, near shop-
ping and schools. $1350
monthly. Call Now!
1-866-446-8104

MIAMI AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1250 mthly. 786-506-3881

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
A very nice three bedrooms,
one bath,, appliances includ-
ed. First, last and security.
Call 305-749-6810

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Special. 786-286-2540

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, $800-$900.
No dogs. 305-688-6696

NORTHWEST
MIAMI-DADE
Three and four bedroom, two
bath homes. Tile floors, cen-
tral air, new baths and kitch-
ens. $950 to $1300. Bars,
fenced, $2350 to $3250 move
'in. Not Section 8 sanctioned.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 mthly, $1275 to move
in. 305-986-2607

Unfurnished Rooms
20454 N.W. 28th Court
Near Land Shark ,Stadium.
$125 plus weekly, including
utilities 786-586-2058

243 N.W. 59th Street Rear
Unfurnished $150 weekly.
Call 786-260-3838

4712 NW 16 AVE
$85 weekly. utilities, kitchen,
bath, air. 786-260-3838

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms for rent. $500 and up.
Houses for rent. Section 8
welcome. 305-300-7783
786-277-9369



Houses

1245 N.W. 86 STREET
Totally renovated three bed-
rooms, one bath, central air,
No qualifying, owner financ-
ing, low down payment.
Molly 305-541-2855
1725 NW 132 STREET
Great home! Updated and
remodeled. Two master bed-
. rooms, huge family room, ja-
cuzzi bath, hot tub on patio.
Call Sandy
786-306-1597
Linda Marx Realty

1740 NW 152 STREET
Three bedrooms, two
baths,family room, large
yard, completely fenced. Ask-
ing $180K. Call Barbara 786-
210-6500

20452 NW 44 CT
Lovely four bedrooms, two
baths, fenced yard. Excellent
condition. Call Sandy
786-306-1597
Linda Marx Realty

3361 NW 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, central air.
$2900 down and $899 month-
ly. Ask about $8000 tax credit
refund check. Call For List.
NDI Realtors'
305-655-1700

'ATTENTION"
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
"WITH'"
FREE CASH GRANTS
, UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
OWNER WILL FINANCE!
1765 NW 40 STREET
Four Bedrooms, two baths.
$79,900. No money needed
to buy If you can qualify or
10% down and owner will
give financing. Call Jack.
954-920-9530


e


WHY RENT?
BUY Ill
Two, three and four
bedroom homes avail-
able $1900 - $2900 down
payment 580 credit score
needed. North Dade and
South Broward homes
available Ask about $8000
for lirst time home owners.
Pick up list al office
NDI Realtors
290 NW 183 Streer
Miami Gardens, FL
305-655-1700



Repairs
AFFORDABLE REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, roof,
washer, dryer. 786-273-1130

PLUMBING SERVICE
Sewer and Drain Cleaning.
Heaters instl. 305-316-1889

wLM


Employment

COLLECTIONS
Strong organization and
communication skills re-
quired to coordinate collec-
tion process, and cash flow.
Two years exp Fax resume
to 305-758-3617.

Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

PART-TIME
RECEPTIONIST
Part-time position avail-
able Wednesday, Thursday.
Friday and Monday. Busy
newspaper needs experi-
enced receptionist
Please fax resume to,
305-694-6211 or e-mail to
advertising@miamitimeson-
linb corn

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Brd-
ward and Miami-Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



YOU AD


COULD B


Merchandise

LET US BE YOUR GUIDE
TO GREATER PROSPER-
ITYI
Books on how to start or
improve a business.
www.bizsupportmedla.
com


Schools
BE A SECURITY
I OFFICER
Renew $60 G and Concealed
and Traffic School Services.
786-333-2084 �

Services
BEST PRICES IN TOWNI!
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, lawn service.
305-801-5690














i IA





,-- ,U


BART M.WILLIAMS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109

One family - Serving Since 1923
THE LARGEST MINORITY
OWNED NEWSPAPER
IN THE SOUTHEAST


Sophisticated


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Properties




To List

Your Next Property,

Just Call 305-694-6225


The Miami Times

CLASSIFIED


CALL 305-694-6210, Ext. 109









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THF MIAMI TIMES. AUG 5-11. 2009


Another 6,000 workers leave General Motors


This year's second
special attrition pro-
gram, including buy-
outs, has resulted in an-
other 6,000 hourly U.S.
workers leaving General
Motors Co., the Detroit
automaker announced
Monday.
No specific figures
are yet available on the
number of employees


kw


accepting buyouts at
GM's Powertrain trans-
mission plant in Balti-
more.
The attrition program
ended July 31 and was
effective Aug. 1. Since
2006, when the first of
four special attrition
programs for hourly
workers was offered,
about 66,000 U.S. em-


ployees have left the
company.
The number this year
totals 13,000, including
about 7,000 in a previ-
ous program that took
effect April 1.
When the attrition
programs were launched
as a way to shrink the
workforce in line with
falling market share


and sales, GM employed
110,000 hourly work-
ers in the U.S., about
56 percent more than
the current 47,000 to
48,000.
In the troubled U.S.
auto industry, GM, Ford
and Chrysler have all
used. attrition programs
to shrink their workforc-
es, as has GM's main


supplier Delphi Corp.
Of the GM employees
who opted to take the
latest separation agree-
ment, about 40 percent
were skilled trade em-
ployees. Thirty-five per-
cent were buyouts, the
company said.
The results "will help
GM lower its employ-
ment costs and close the


competitive gap," Diana
Tremblay, GM North
America vice president
of" labor relations, said
in a statement.
General Motors re-
cently completed re-
structuring and
emerged from Chapter
11 bankruptcy protec-
tion where it operated
for 40 days.


fin -a szsWe


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SUBSCRIIBE uODAY


OPA-LOCKA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (OLCDC) in
association with Miami Dade Housing Agency offers Housing Counseling Ser-
vices for low to moderate income families. Services include; 1st Time Home-,
buyers Purchasing Assistance includes Down payment and closing cost subsi-
dies, Low interest Rehab Loans Home Rehab Loans, Credit Repair & Budget
Counseling, and Foreclosure Prevention Assistance, HOMEBUYER EDUCA-
TION CLASS For more information you may contact us at (305) 687-3545 ext.
236, visit our website www.oicdc.org or stop by our office at 490 Opa-locka
Blvd., Ste 20, Opa-loc)a, FL 33054. OLCDC is an Equal Housing Lender
and a HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agency

The Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners, through the efforts of Com-
missioner Barbara J. Jordan, has allocated $1.2 million for the rehabilitation of
single-family homes in Opa-locka through the Opa-locka Home Rehabilitation
Program. Homeowners may qualify for up to $30,000 to repair roofs, electrical
and plumbing systems, replace windows, doors, air conditioning units, flooring
and kitchen and bathroom fixtures.
For more information on how to take advantage of this opportunity, contact the
Opa-locka Community Development Corporation at (305) 687-3545 extension
236 or visit our office at 490 Opa-locka Blvd., Suite 20, Opa-locka, FL 33054.


INEXPENSIVE NEWS ADVERTISING T"4 t O S!
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Bart Williams
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* CALL (305) 693-7093 NOW!!


advertising@mymiamitimes.com



Coimunildv .
Redevelopment Agency


PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT a Special CRA Boards of Commissioners
Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West, Omni, and Midtown Community
Redevelopment Agencies will take place on August 6, 2009 at 1:00 PM, at Miami
City Hall located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, 33133.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information, please contact the
CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.

(#003273)


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CITY OF MIAMI. FLORIDA
2010 FISCAL YEAR BUDGET WORKSHOP

The Budget Workshop for the City of Miami will be held on August
14, 2009 at 2:00 p.m., in the City Commission Chambers at City
Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida. The purpose of the
workshop is for City Commission and staff to discuss the budget for
the 2009-2010 fiscal year.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,
persons needing special accommodations to participate in this
proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360
(Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or
at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior
to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003269)


am - ana"s
sa so- snow~


Drive More

Customers

YourLB n


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IUV I[ IL 1111MI-11 I I IIIL�hmwv ---I


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11D THE MIAMI TIMES, AUG 5-11, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROl THEIR OWN DESTINY


Bank Bonus


Tab: $33 Billion


Nine lenders that got government aid paid at least $1 Million to 5,000 Employees


Nine banks that re-
ceived government aid
money paid out bo-
nuses of nearly $33
billion last year -- in-
cluding more than $1
million apiece to near-
ly 5,000 employees
-- despite huge losses
that plunged the U.S.
into economic tur-
moil.
The data, released
Thursday by New
York Attorney Gen-
eral Andrew Cuomo,


provide a rare window
into the pay culture of
Wall Street, where top
employees typically
make 90% or more of
their compensation in
year-end bonuses.
The $32.6 billion in
bonuses is one-third
larger than Califor-
nia's budget deficit.
Six of the nine banks
paid out more in bo-
nuses than they re-
ceived in profit. One in
every 270 employees


at the banks received
more than $1 million.
Overall compensa-
tion and benefits at
the nine banks fell
11%, to $133.5 billion
in 2008 from $149.3
billion in 2007, the
Cuomo report said.
But with net revenues
falling, the percentage
of the firms' revenues
dedicated to compen-
sation rose to 45%
last year from 41% in
2007.


The report reignites
long-simmering an-
ger, on Capitol Hill
and beyond, over big
Wall Street payouts.
The nine firms in
the report had com-
bined 2008 losses of
nearly $100 billion.
That helped push
the financial system
to the brink, leading
the government to in-
ject $175 billion into
the firms through its
Troubled Asset Relief


Pending home sales up

for 5th straight month


Pending sales df pre-
viously ' owned homes
rose at a faster-than-
expected pace in June,
a real estate trade
group said Tuesday,
more evidence the
housing market was
starting to claw out of
a three-year slump.
The National Asso-
ciation of Realtors said
its Pending Home Sales
Index, based on con-
tracts signed in June,
rose 3.6% to 94.6. It
was the fifth straight
month of advance and
the first such streak in
six years, the industry
group said.
Analysts polled by
Reuters had forecast
pending home sales to
rise 0.6% in June.
May's index was re-
vised upward to 91.3
from 90.7, while the
percentage increase
was bumped up to
0.8% from 0.1%.
"Historically low
mortgage interest
rates, affordable home
prices and large selec-
tion are encouraging
buyers who've been
on the sidelines," said
NAR chief economist
Lawrence Yun.
The Pending Homes
Sales Index rose 6.7%
in June from June of
last year. The housing
market's collapse is at
the heart of the longest
U.S. recession since
the Great Depression
and reviving the sector
is critical to healing the
economy.
The Pending Home
Sales Index in the
Northeast rose 0.4% to
81.2 in June and was


5.8% above the same
period last year. In the
Midwest, the index
climbed 0.8% to 89.9.
It was 11.6% higher
than June 2008.
The index in the
South jumped 7.1%
to 100.7 in June and
was 8.9% higher vs. a
year ago. In the West,
the index rose 2.9% to
100.4, but was 0.2%
below June 2008.


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF AUGUST 6, 2009 SPECIAL COMMISSION'MEETING


Pursuant to Section 2-33 of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida, as amended,
Mayor Manuel Diaz has called a special meeting of the Miami City Commission
on August 6, 2009 at 1:45 PM, at Miami City Hall located at 3500 Pan American
Drive. The.purpose of this meeting is to consider the amendment to the Interlocal
Cooperation Agreement executed on March 31, 1983 between the City, Miami-Dade
County and the Southeast Overtown Park West Community Redevelopment Agency
approved by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida,
on July 23, 2009. No other business shall be conducted outside of that indicated
above.

All interested persons may appear at the meeting with respect to this matter. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to
any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence upon which
any appeal may be based.(F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of
the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to
the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than.three (3) business days prior
to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003272)


Program.
The chairman of the
U.S. House investiga-
tive panel, New York
Democrat Edolphus
Towns, called the pay
figures "shocking and
appalling" and an-
nounced a hearing
into compensation
practices at banks.
The White House
was more muted. "The


president continues
to believe that the
American people don't
begrudge people mak-
ing money for what
they do as long as...
we're not basically in-
centivizing wild risk-
taking that somebody.
else picks up the tab
for," said White House
Spokesman Robert
Gibbs.


Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, for the project listed
herein, until 2:00 P.M. local time, Tuesday., the 15i day of September 2009. at 1450 N.E. Second Ave.
Room 351, Miami. Florida, following which time and place, or as soon there after as the Board can attend
to the same, the said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium, Miami-
Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. Award
of the contract will be made to the lowest, pre-qualified responsible and responsive bidder for the actual
amount bid considering base bid and accepted alternates (if any) as listed in the bidding documents. The
Board will award the contract based upon the results of the tabulations as covered by applicable laws and
regulations.

PROJECT NO. 00176800
ADDITIONS, REMODELING, RENOVATIONS AND HISTORICAL RESTORATION AT
MIAMI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA


DAVIS-BACON ACT LABOR STANDARDS:

This Project may be funded in whole or in part under the provisions of .the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act of 2009. Therefore, the Bidder shall comply with all applicable provisions of 40 U.S.C.
�276a-�276a-7, the Davis-Bacon Act, as supplemented by the Department of Labor regulations (29 C.F.R.,
part 5 "Labor Standards Provisions Applicable to Contracts Governing Federally Financed and Assisted
Construction"). Accordingly, the Base Bid and Alternate Bids for this Project shall be in full compliance
with the aforementioned provisions as further described in the Contract Documents and all bids shall be
calculated in compliance with the Davis-Bacon Act wage determination applicable to this Project. Under
the Davis-Bacon Act, contractors are required to pay laborers and mechanics not less than the minimum
wages specified in a wage determination made by the Secretary of Labor, which wage determination will be
attached to ahd incorporated into the Construction Bid documents. The award of a construction contract is
conditioned upon the Bidder accepting the wage determination.

CONE OF SILENCE:

Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance of
the Legal Advertisement and ending at such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written
recommendation to award or approve a contract, to reject all bids or responses, or otherwise takes action
which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as
provided for under Board Rule 6Gx1 3- 8C-1.212, in addition.to any other penalty provided by law. All written
communications must be sent to the Project Architect/Engineer, Zyscovich Architects, 100 N. Biscayne
Blvd., 27th Floor, Miami, FL 33132, and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd
Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.

NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-
1.11, and in accordance with � 120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under
Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. Any person who is adversely affected by the agency decision or intended
decision shall file with the agency a notice of protest in writing within 72 hours after the posting of the notice
of decision or intended decision. Failure to file a notice of protest or failure to file a formal written protest
within the time permitted shall constitute a waiver of proceedings. With respect to a protest of the terms,.
conditions, and specifications contained in a solicitation, including any provisions governing the methods
of ranking bids, bids, or replies, awarding contracts, reserving rights of further negotiation, or modifying
or amending any contract, the notice of protest shall be filed in writing within 72 hours after the posting of
the solicitation. In either event, the protest must include a bond in accordance with the provisions of F.S.
255.0516 and Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11. The formal written protest shall be filed within 10 days after
the date the notice of protest is filed. The formal written protest shall state with particularity the facts and
law upon which the protest is based. Saturday, Sundays, and state holidays shall be excluded in the
computation of the 72-hour time periods established herein.

JESSICA LUNSFORD ACT

The successful Bidder shall fully comply with the Jessica Lunsford Act and all related Board Rules and
procedures as applicable.

M/WBE SUBCONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS

THIS PROJECT IS OPEN ONLY TO THOSE BIDDERS WHICH HAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE
SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA, PRIOR TO BIDDING, AND INCLUDES THE
M/WBE SUBCONTRACTING ASSISTANCE LEVELS OF: AFRICAN-AMERICAN 18%
WOMEN 6%
FOR A TOTAL OF 24%

MANDATORY PRE-BID CONFERENCE

A Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for August 19, 2009 at 10:00 A.M., at the school site, Miami
Senior, 2450 SW 1st Street (Auditorium), Miami, FL 33135. ATTENDANCE OF THE PRE-BID CON-
FERENCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS MANDATORY. Bids will not be
opened or considered from Bidders who are not present after 10:15 AM, at which time meeting proceed-
ings will begin.

Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one or more sets of bid and contract documents from the office of Zys-
covich Architects, 100 N. Biscayne Blvd., 27th Floor, Miami, FL 33132, on or after August 3, 2009, con-
tact no. 305 372-5222 with deposit of $1,000 per set, (Cashier's Check or Money Order, payable to The
School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida). Deposit will be refunded when documents are returned,
in good condition, no more than 10 days after award or rejection of Bid. Deposits will be retained by The
School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, if documents are not returned within the above stipulated
time and/or condition.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA



By: Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE COVERING THE OPENING OF BIDS
MIAMI SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL PROJECT


S MIAMWiOADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY

REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS (RSOQ)

MDX PROCUREMENT/CONTRACT NO.: RFP-10-02
MDX WORK PROGRAM NO(S).: 11211.030
MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: DESIGN-BUILD PROJECT
FOR CENTRAL BOULEVARD WIDENING REALIGNMENT
AND SERVICE LOOP

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority ("MDX" or "Authority"), requires
the services of a qualified Design-Build Firm for the design and
construction of the Central Boulevard Improvements. The Central
Boulevard Widening, Realignment and Service Loop Project provides for
improvements to the inbound and out bound traffic using the Miami
International Airport ("MIA"). MDX notifies all Proposers and individuals
that it encourages small, minority and women-owned businesses full
opportunity to submit a response to any solicitation issued by MDX. For a
copy of the RSOQ with information on the Scope of Services, Pre-
qualification and submittal requirements, please logon to MDX's Website:
www.mdxway.com to download the documents under "Doing Business
with MDX: Vendor Login", or call MDX's Procurement Department at
305-637-3277 for assistance. Note: In order to download any MDX
solicitation, you must first be registered as a Vendor with MDX. This can
only be facilitated through MDX's Website: www.mdxway.com under
"Doing Business with MDX: Vendor Registration". The deadline for
submitting a Statement of Qualifications is August 28,2009 by 2:00 P.M.
Eastern Time.







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