Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00834
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: June 10, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00834
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text

> DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-.DADE AND O BR WA RD ( U T E O V R 8


HPRE,,RPARN OR


'Ms. Neiman Marcus,l meet 'M~s.Dollar Store'


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CAIHE5VILLE FL 326111111-70071


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Mourners weep over Rev. Gdrard Jean-Juste as his body
is brought into the Notre Dame D'Haiti Catholic Church
in Little Haiti on Saturday. -MiamiTimesPhoto/Sandrad.Charite

Thousands mourn




(en wmed priest
The thunderstorms and cloudy skies did not stop thou-
sands from attending the funeral of the prominent priest,
Rev. G6rard Jean-Juste. The service was held at the Notre
Dame D'Haiti Catholic Church in Little Haiti on Saturday
eeerno-Iste, a champion of Haitian rights, died last month

atAalMia2n wea b sp almanhe age ofr gathered outside
in the rain cuddling underneath tents and umbrellas for
more than three hours, as they listened to the loud speak-
ers of the service proceeding on the inside.
Local elected officials also attended the funeral service.
Immediately following the service, Jean-Juste's closed
casket was carried through the streets of Little Haiti and
finally ending at Veye Yo, located at Northeast 54* Street
and North Miami Avenue.
He will be buried next to his mother in his birth town of
Cavaillon, Haiti.

e
4 theone








C prigahtteeddCMoanteer I

Available from Commercial News Providers ,


By Sandra J. Charit:e
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
"I wasn't prepared," said Bev-
erly Hilton, who recalls the loss
she faced after Hurricane Wil-
ma made landfall almost four
years ago.
Hilton, 65, said her house
was severely damaged by the
storm.
"Water leaked all. Over the
house and there was a hole in
the roof," said Hilton.
The damages to her house in
Liberty City was in the thou-
sands she said.
Jacqueline Blackmon, who
also endured the Category 5
storm, faced problems.
* "My power was off for two


weeks. Neighbors basically had
to help neighbors," she said.
"A lot of the stores increased
their prices on non-perishable
goods."
Like Hilton, Blackmon, 49,
says, this time around, she its
prepared for the storm.
Hilton and Blac on joirked
hundreds of seniors from City
of Miami District 5 for the
fourth annual Seniors First
Expo held at the Jungle Island
last Friday to receive informa-
tion on how to prepare for the
2009 hurricane season.
"We want to 'make sure that
our seiliors are not only pre-
pared for the upcoming hur-
ricane season but are also
Please turn to HURRICANE 6A


Voter turnout shifts
BV Sandra J. Charit;e
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Life for Andre .Pierre is no
longer the same. -
The immigration lawyer
became the second Haitian
North Miami mayor earlier this
month after defeating his op-
ponent Frank Wolland with
more than 300 points in a run-
offelection.
After he received the election
results, Pierre said, "I thanked


ogy in 1994 where he earned
Bachelors Degree in Engineer-
ing.
Pierre traveled to Miami to
continue his' education ob-
tained his law degree from the
University of Miami in 1997. In
that same year, he founded the
Law Office of Andre D. Pierre,
P.A. but later became a partner
with Douthit, Murray & Pierre,
P.A. in 2003.
Pierre reopened the Law Of-
fice of Andre D. Pietre, P.A.
.in 2008 where he practices
Please turn to MAYOR 6A


leadership
God for the opportunity. We
[Haitians] have arrived."
Pierre will be among the four
Haitian leaders in the City of
North Miami which include
Councilman Marie Steril and
newly elected Councilman
Jean Rodrigue Marcellus and
City Clerk Alix Desulme.
Pierre, 40, immigrated from
Haiti in 1983. He attended
high school in Long Island,
New York then matriculated at
New York Institute of Technol-


*..,,,


ANDRE PIERRE


lar Store, Dollar
Tree and Dollar
General.
But like many
other underem-
ployed (or, sad-
ly, unemployed)
KING Americans, I
have been forced
to scout out bar-
gains at "small-box discount-
ers" to buy necessities and
items cast off by pricier retail-


was $18.43; it's now about $30
a share. Meanwhile, my old
stomping grounds Neiman
Marcus reported a 24.6%
drop in same-store sales in
April. Another high-end retail
er, Saks, saw a 32% decrease.
No wonder new dollar stores
are popping up, even as other
companies.are retrenching and
cutting back.
But it's not just about
Please turn to DOLLAR STORE 6A


By Joyce K~ing


ers.
This recession is forcing
many ofus to abandon the ex-
cessive lives that we've been
living and maybe that isn't a
bad thing.
Like the many too-big-to-fail
financial institutions that over-
extended themselves and as
a result, did fail U.S. con-
sumers are regrouping. The
difference, of course, is that
rather than having government


For the first time in my life,
I ventured into a Family Dol-
lar store. That might not sound
like a big deal, until you under-
stand my shopping reputation.
My friends call me "Ms. Neiman
Marcus," as I'm known to gray-
itate toward valet parking, up-
scale shopping and in the op-
posite direction of the discount
craze that brought us My Dol-


accountants and lawyers por-
ing over our books and sizing
up the bailout, we consumers
are often going it alone. And at
the end of this period of self-
discovery is a realization: Fru-


gality is the new norm.
Which brings me back to that
Family Dollar store, where -
I've seen and learned busi-
ness is actually booming. The
company stock's 52-week low


uRSsoAY


One Family -- Serving Since 1923


TECHNOLOGY
APPLE RELEASES

NEW PHONE 3G S
The new
iPhone3G S, is
faster and includes
video camera.
-PhotoscourtesyofApple


STAY IN STEP WITH
YOUR DIABETES
More than 60 percent of non-trau-
matic, lower-limb amputations occur
among people with diabetes. Don't
become one of them-


Local graduate prepares


for West Point Academy
Attorney Cynthia Johnson-Stacks defines her son
as a "curious student" who goes after the things that
interest him.
Michael A. Stacks, Jr., son of and Lt. Col. Mi-
chael A. Stacks, Sr. and Cynthia has been select-
ed for the United States Military Academy at West
Point in New York.
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fl.)and Congressman Mario
Diaz-Balart(R-FL) nominated Michael to attend the pres-
tigious university, following a rigorous application pro- .
cess, including a panel interview and screening. West Point is .
the oldest of the five service academies. The academy has pro-
duced great leaders, including generals Grant and Lee, Pershing
and MacArthur, Eisenhower and Patton, and Schwarzkopf and
Please turn to ACADEMY 6A


SENOR- ITIZ NSRECEl VE


IPSON


North Miami elects second Haitian Imayor


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L


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association

7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Mlaml Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes tatm America can best lead the world from racail and nationsi antagortisn when it accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person, fearing no person, the
Black Press str ves to help every person In the firm belief that all persons are hurt as long as an one Is held back


I _


The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other maternal in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for a
healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, hDwever, be brief and to the point., and may be edited for grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the name,
address and telephone number of the writer for purposes of contirmmg authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The MiamI Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email: miamiteditonaD
bellsouth.net.


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER















. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts thern and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when t.he people
Create a program, you get action . .-
Malcolm X


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY


'111'


amina m as we men =mm w


OPINION


A 2 THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 510-16, 2009.


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
"i:'n"""Com20ami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Ementus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Cnairman


a *
Raising rent on seniors

raises broader concerns
During the best of economic times, in raising some-
one's rent, one may expect to raise their ire as well.
.
But to raise the rent of fixed-income senior citizens,
six months into a one-year lease is reprehensible. Such be-
havior surely must indicate some exceptional need. What
company would resort to that otherwise? An explanation is
certainly in order.
Evidently, the management of the Coral Place Apartments
(1001 Northwest 54th.Street) is inclined to disagree. After
raising the rent, they have been strangely quiet, even with
the tenants, about why. A number of residents (most under
condition of anonymity) have cited various reasons.
One resident was told that her rent was raised because-the
area is so convenient. The building was the last in the area
to go up. The area was as convenient six months ago. An-
other resident was told that his rent had to increase because
the taxes on the building were so high. One would assume
that the building's planners knew what their taxes would be
when they set the previous rates.
It is disturbing-but not necessarily surprising-that the
building's management would be quiet where this issue is
concerned, perhaps hoping no one notices.
What is surprising is that the building's residents are aw-
fully quiet about it as well. Each of the residents have signed
a one-year lease. To increase the rent before that lease ex-
pires is a breach of contract unless periodic rent increases
are specifically included in the lease. Residents have grum-
bled amongst themselves at the additional costs and at the
increase. It is time that more of them spoke out.


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Should seniors on fixed-income I~ve alone?


them around. Having someone
stay with them, or having them
.stay with younger family mem-
bers would really reduce crimes
against the elderly too.
RICARDO RILEY, 42
Sales, Overtown .

That de-
pends on the
individual 1 .. .
and their
family mem- ... -
bers. I mean
they certainly
have a right
to live alone if
they choose.
On the other hand, if they have
a disability or a pacemaker or
anything like that, then they
shouldn't. I think they should
be able to live alone unless
there's a real medical reason
they shouldn't.



i-r becall e


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O~N DESTINY I


Obamas take a night off

and Republicans go crazy


) i )jlir


Hypocrite does not ade-
quately describe some people
who had the nerve to criticize
President Barack Obama for
fulfilling a pledge to his wife
and taking her to a Broadway
show. Obama, after 100 days
in office, took one day off. In
contrast, former U.S. Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan took a
vacation every six days of his
presidency for a total of 436
vacations day. This revered
Republican icon was only
surpassed by former Presi-
dent George W. Bush, who
took 1,020 days of vacation
-or spent approximately 35
percent of his presidency
on vacation. Bush would
have taken 35 days of va-
cation during his first : 100


unfair and
short-sight-
ed for the
"leaders of
the Repub-
lican party".
If the Repubicans ever want
to regain office, they will need
to appeal to a broad swathe
of the American public, not
just angry white men that
enjoy the tirades of Rush
Limbaugh.
I had the pleasure of
speaking with a Puerto Ri-
can Republican, the Presi-
dent of the Puerto Rican
Chamber of Commerce, and
he was thrilled by President
Obama's choice of Sonia So-
tomayor. It quelled the fears
of many Hispanics that a


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.

Copyrighted Material


Sy nd i cated Con tent


Available from Commercial News Providers


days in contrast to President
Obama's date night!
For some reason, Obama
cannot take a night off with
his wife because GM is fac-
ing bankruptcy. GM worked
itself into bankruptcy over
a period of time. Obama did
not cause GM's failure, the
banking meltdown or the
housing crisis. He is just the
guy who has worked tireless-
ly to clean up the mess.

REPUBLICANS ATTACK
SONIA SOTOMAYOR .
Hispanics are the fastest
growing minority group in
America. In states like Tex-
as, California, Arizona, New
Mexico, New York and Florida
- they have become a potent
political bloc. Many Hispan-
ics are Republicans. Their
taste for the Republican par-
ty was somewhat diminished
by the blatant attempts to
stem the tide of Hispanic im-
migration. The recent attacks
on Sonia Sotomayor should
make Hispanics think twice
about their affiliation with
the 'Republican party. The
attacks by Rush Limbaugh
and Newt Gingrich were


Black President would for-
get the other minority group.
He felt that the Republicans
. would not attack her if she
was appointed by Bush, and
was clearly qualified. I ad-
vised that they would not re-
frain froth attacking her. He
felt that if Sonia Sotomayor
was unfairly attacked, then
many Hispanics would leave
the Republican party.
Clearly, some Republicans
believe that attacking a His-
panic, woman is not in the
best interest of the party. The
reaction of Sen. Kay Bailey
Hutchison of Texas showed
that he understands the
power of the Mexican Ameri-
can voting bloc in Texas. He
states that the nomination
process should be "respect-
ful." Clearly, he did not want
to isolate the Hispanic voting
bloc that e will need to win
his proposed bid for Gover _
nor of Texas.
Rush Limbaugh, the lead-
er of the Republican party,
may be the greatest agent of
change for the Democratic
party. The more he speaks,
the stronger the Democratic
party becomes.


People are talking about how members of a prominent lo-
cal church were shocked out of their pews when an attractive
young member of the congregation took the floor and publicly
announced that she was pregnant and expecting a baby for
the pastor of the church who happens to be a married man.
Stay tuned.
AWitkkkkk
Miami-Dade is beginning to catch holy hell for having al-
lowed our local government officials and the state to dump
homeless sex offenders and other felons under the Julia Tuttle
Causeway bridge. The public is declaring this is no way to
protect our children and health and is demanding a better
solution to the problem.

Residents of El Portal are complaining about plans to turn
the former Rader Memorial United Methodist Church building


1-. d f d C 0 s M
students nationwide has five schools in Florida can overcome
thepublicopiposition.

Local politicians were at a loss to explain the recent develop-
ments in the U.S. Senate race to place Republican Mel Mar-
tines who is retiring in 2010. Democratic U.S. Rep. Corrine
Brown of Jacksonville said Tuesday that she is forming an
exploratory committee" that will allow her to raise money and
campaign for the seat that announcement must have knocked
her good friend, former Congresswoman Carrie Meek, out of
her shoes. Meek retired in 2002. Now it looks like a three-way
race in the Democratic primary between Rep. Kendrick Meek,
Rep. Corrie Brown and North Miami mayor Kevin Burns.
*************
Mediators have been assigned to resolve the controversy
over the confederate battle flag flown by the Sons of Confed-
erate Veterans during a Veterans Day parade in Homestead.
The Dade Chapter of National Association for the Advance-
ment of Colored People launched campaign against the city
and the Homestead/Florida City Chamber of Commerce, the
parade's sponsor. The NAACP wants the flag banned from dis-
play in Homestead and at Chamber events. If-no compromise
is found, the parade should be canceled outright and let the
community move forward before the things get out of hand.
*************
Residents are wondering what has happened to the Goom-
bay Festival that in past years drew thousands of people to
Coconut Groove the first weekend in June. It once ranked
along with Calle Ocho as two of the biggest festivals in South
Florida. Maybe our City Commission will do a better job of
promotion next year.


MERCEDES ROBINSON, 21
'
Student, Miami

Sure; if they
can manage
it. It depends
really. They
have apart-
ment buildings
made .for peo- -
ple like that,
like the one .
over on 54th. I
think it's pyptty safe for them.
Those buildings have security
guards and stuff, so it should
be ok. .

ROGER BRUNSON, 22
Sunday School Teacher, Liberty City

No. Not at .. .
the rate hous-
ing is going
and every-
thing. Costs
for everything
are gomg up
and people are
making less
and less mon-


ey. Then on top of that, how can
they possibly pay all those bills
on a fixed income? The cost of
everything keeps going up. A
fixed-income senior could be
left with nothing and no one to
help them.
GERARD TIBERES, 42
Tax Preparer, Miami
,
No. The state,
or the coun- -- :
try, should ,
have sonie W -
programs to -
help them. It's
important to
keep them in-
volved in activ-
ities. The elderly, even ifthey're
not on fixed income, shouldn't
lie left alone. If they're left alone
often, they?1 become sickly and
die early. It's important to help
them live longer,

BENNY APPLETON, 49
Entrepreneur, (iberty City
-
No. They might fall and hurt


themselves,
They could
forget their -
medication. If
they want to
go the to the
store or some-
thing, they
might need we
someone to go
with them or take them. They
could need someone to go with
them to the doctor. Also, with
how crime is today, I don't think
they should be by themselves.
It's not safe really.

MARVIN FORD, 47
Self-Employed, Miami

No. If / P
they're over r .
60 or so, they T.
need care. -
Our elderly
and our dis-
abled need
to get more
attention
and care,
They may need someone to take


OPINION


5 A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE10-16, 2009


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Florida Power & Light
800-40UTAGE (800-468-8243)
7-1-1 (hearing impaired)
AT&T
888-757-6500 / TDD: 305-780-2273
6-1-1 (repolls)
TECO/People's Gas
877-832-6747 / .TDD: 800-462-7585

gold) ftleeds
Emergency Evacuation
Assistance Program
.
3 1mlomidadepariburricane


9-1-1 Emergencies
3-1-1 Government Inforritation
Touces outside Miami-Dode:
888-311-DADE (3233) / TTY/TDD: 305-468-5402
2-1-1 Family social services
T1Y: 305-644-9449

ge an) d Cross
Federal Emergency Management Agency
800-621-3362 / TDD- 800-462-7585
For complete hurricane readiness information including Emergency
Evacuallon Assl5tance Program. evacuallon Zones and Pet-Fnendly
Huracane Sheirers. visit www msamidade.cov/humcane
For detailed information on handling trash debris removal. bulky wasle
pick-up and recycling year-round, visit www mlamidade aovidswm


Ing a Hurricane
e's a right way to watch and wait. Here's how:


If you are in a high-rise, avoid the top floors as wind
speeds are stronger the higher you go.

Get MIami-Dade Alerts sent directly to your phone,
e-mail address or pager. The service is free but your
carrier may charge text messaging fees. To register,
visit www.miamidadeanviburricans.


SBLA\CKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Your Guide to

Hurricane Readiness

The 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Season is from June 1 through Nov. 30.
Although the past few seasons have been relatively quiet, we must
guard against complacency through preparation.

By planning ahead, you ensure that you and your loved ones are
safe and secure. You'll also save yourself time, money and worry.


c-~p~w ~


Carlos Alvarez


Dennis C. Moss


* Make sure your generator, flashlights and radios are
worldng. Gather supplies, including first aid equipment,
batteries, a two-week supply of water, non-perishable
food and medication. Bottle your own water.
* Shelters are available if you have nowhere else to go.
Stay at a friend's home or a hotel instead. If you stay
home, identify a safe room.


* Develop a family disaster plan. Gather important
documents ilke wills and deeds and store them in a
safe place. Check if your insurance policy covers flood
damage. You may need to buy a separate one.
* Sign up now for the Emergency Evacuation Assistance
Program if you require specialized shelter and transpor-
tation. Call 3-1-1 for details,


For more hurricane prep info, visit w miideaolurcr or call 3-1-1.


If you are pre-registered for the Emergency Evacuation
Assistance Program, a county representatlye will
contactyoutor you may call 3-1-1.
For information on changes to normal operations
regarding schools, government offices, airports,
seaports, roads, bridges and other public facilities, call
3-1-1 or visit wwIEmlamidadegov.


Watches 8 Warnings
,when hurricane conditions are possible within the next
is declared when hurricane conditions are expected
# services may be impacted depending on weather
ititijportant do's and don't:

NOlghborhood Trash & Recycling Centers


* Secure your home, inside and out, including windows,
doors, patio areas and boats.
n o: .xv9 cy g n -1 1 eg ->
* If bottling your own water, nbw is the time td start
filling up your containers. Figure one gallon per
person (or pet) per day for at least two weeks;
* Charge all mobile phones and keep a corded phone
handy.


* Withdraw cash froin the bank.
Get gas for your car, generator and other goe
powered equipment.
* Use surge protectors and waterproof coverings to
protect electronics'


*,DO NOT prune trees or dispose of any
bulky waste on the right-of-way. If
you must dispose of tree trimmings
take them to a Neighborhood Trash &
Recycling Center instead
* DO visit www.miamidedepov or call
3-1-1 for updates on county services,
Depending on conditions, bus, rall,
trash and recycling service, as well as


. airport and seaport operations, could
be affected,
* DO secure your garbage and recycling
carts inside a utility room or garage
so that they do not become airborne.
You'll need your carts to ensure that you
get service after the storm.


south Miami Heights


North Dade
21500 NW. 47 Ave
Norwood
19901 N.W; 7 Ave.
Palm Springs North
7870 N.w. 178 St.
Golden Glades
140 N.W. 160 St.


West Little River
1830 N.W:79 St
sunset Kendall
8000 S.W. 107 Ave.
Chapman FIeld
13600 S.W. 60 Ave.
Snapper Creek
2200 S.W. 117 Ave.


Richmond Heights
14050 Boggs Dr
West Penine
16651 S.W. 107 Ave.
Eureka Drive
9401 S.W. 184 St


* Keep children Informed about what is happening and
watch for signs of stress,
* Keep pets in their carriers throughout the storm.
* Tum off circuit breakers, but leave one on so you know
when power is restored and only use the phone for
urgent calls-


* Monitor the radio and other media outlets for weather
updates. Remember, battery powered TYs that are not
receiving a digital signal will not work.
* Do not go outside. Go to your safe room one that is
away from windows until the storm has passed.
* Use flashlights, not candles or kerosene lamps, as a
light source.


~I$:


* Operate generators outside the home, in a well-
ventilated area, away from windows, doors, vents and
other openings.
* Wear protective gear when operating chainsaws and
other power tools.
* Stay away from standing water to avoId contamination
or electric shock. Report downed power lines to Florida
Power & Light. Check "Phone & Web Resources" for
contact information.


* Call 3-1-1, check www.mlomidadeqov or monitor the
news for Information on service resumption, debris
removal, recovery efforts and more,
* Please be patient debris removal can take longer
than usual after a hurricane.
* Take small amounts of debris to a Trash & Recycling


* Don't place debris on vacant lots or on any
commercial property and don't place non-hurricane
trash on the right-of-way.
* Avoid long IInes at disaster relief sites. Visit your
neighborhood grocery to restock on water, ice and
non-perishables. Most now have generators and are
open immediately after a storm.


center. Place large piles on the right-of-way of your
property, away from fences, mailboxes, drains, power To report price gouging call 3-1-1.
fines and low-hanging wires.


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009 1


rniamidade.gov

Act o -* -


Phona 8i Web RIesourcens


utilities


XluL,


Searing Up
ard IIves and property. Use these tips to jumpstart


Trim treesand dispose of all clippings'at a Neighbor-
hood Trash and Recycling Center. Schedule a bulky
waste pick-up onIlne or call 3-1-1.
Make a kit for your pet: medical history, iwo-week supt
ply of medication, food and water. Get pet carriers,
leashes, crates and cages. Register-for a pet-friendly
shelter.


tisr a Hurricane


MIAM







I


5As THE MIAMI TIMESJUNjE10-16, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL~ THEIR OW'(N DESTINY


SBy B~arbara R. Arnwine, Executive Director


in today's increasingly diverse and interconnected society equal access and inclusion ard more vital
than ever.

Since 1963, the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law has strived to ensure that all people,
through the rule of law, receive fair access to housing, employment, education and other rights.
One of our premier corporate allies is Microsoft, this year's redipientpf our prestigious A. Leon
Higginbotham Corporate Leadership Award for advancing diversity abi equal opportunity.
At last week's awards dinner in New York City, Microsoft was recognized for a variety of efforts, includ-
ing its pro bono legal work and a program that encourages law firms to enhance diversity within their
ranks.

What we find most compelling, however, is the company's unambiguous commitment to promoting
diversity and inclusion, even in challenging economic times. At all levels and through its partnerships,
Microsoft demonstrates that fostering a broad range of experiences, perspectives and capabilities is
essential for businesses to remain innovative and relevant.

With the outstanding leadership of partners like Microsoft, we are moving closer to the goal of true
equality for all and the realization of a more perfect union.






Miamoft @
www.microsoft.com/issues


@ 2009 Microsoft Corporation











_~~ ____ ~ ~~~~~ I


BV Sandra J. Charit:e
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Tears, laughter and hugs -
filled the Miami-Dade County
Auditorium last Thursday as
hundreds of seniors graduated
from Miami Carol City Senior
High.School.
A dream fulfilled and a be-
ginning of a new journey.
Tiffany Reed, who was clearly
excited said, "I've been await-
ing this moment my whole
life."





HURRICANE seniors.
continued from 1A The focus of the afternoon
was preventing another Hur-
informed of the topics that af- ricane Wilma. .
fect their lives every day," said Hurricane Wilma damage
Miami Commissioner Michelle overall was estimated at over
Spence-Jones. $29.1 billion and the storm
Representatives from the ranked among the top five
Federal Emergency Manage- expensive hurricanes ever re-
ment Agency (FEMA), Para corded in the Atlantic and the
mount Mobile Health Services, fourth costliest storm in U.S.
City of Miami Corarnunity De history. Over 63 deaths were
velopment Department, City reported as a result of the
of Miami Police Department storm. Many local residents
Seniors Crime 8<, Safety Divi- endt.xred close to two-three
sion and the South Florida months without power as gas
Workforce also attend to pro- prices soared.
vided seniors with informal Federal forecasters said last
tion on health and wellitess, month that they predicted
affordable housing, crime and an average of 9-14 storms
,safety and job programs for including four to seven hur-


Nelson and Diaz-Balart nominate hiZh achiever for West Pointl


ACADEMY
continued from 1A

Petraeus. Admission is based
on an individuals' academic,
physical and leadership poten-
tial is an additional.step follow-
ing nomination by an elected
official.
Michael's nomination and
appointment are high honors,
hichpill afford him a rare op-
portunity to participate in the
academic activities and niili-
tary training offered at the elite


1 j .


Business is booming at the Dollar Store


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


.
MiamI Carol City Senior High
School graduates Tiffany

ReedTanzania Burnett and
Melissa Valle stand o-utside
of the Miami-Dade County
Auditorium after receiving
attending their graduation
and receiving theiridiploma
last Thursday.
- Miamrrimes Photoi sandra a. charite


Reed, 18, will be attending
Howard University Washing-
ton, DC in the fall. She haid
she decided to attend Howard
after taking a trip to DC last
year.
"Besides, .my parents said I
earned where I wanted to go,"
she said.
Reed's fellow graduates will also
embark on a journey in the fall:
Tanzania Burnett will attend
University of Miami and Me-
lissa Valle will study at Florida
InternationalUniversity.


ments in a water prove kit.
. Stay informed during the
storin. Keep a battery operated
radio with you.
Turrr off circuit breakers,
but leave one on so you know
when power is restored.
Use flashlights, not candles
or, kerosene lamps, as your
light source.
Stay in your safe room. .
Be patient. Be. Careful.
Cleanup after a storm cazi
take time.
Miami-Dade Police Depart-
ment will have a Hurricane
Preparedness Workshop at the
Northside Station, located at
2950 Northwest 83rd Street'
From 10 a.m.- 2 p.m., Sature
day, June 27.


ricanes in the 2009 season
that began June 1 and will
end Nov. 30.
Blackroon says she will not
take anymore chalices during
hurricane season,
"I am more prepared than
befcire and I am saving money
In.the event of an emergency,"
she said. "I am also stocking
up on canned goods."
Some helpful tips during
hurricane season provided
Miami-Dade County include:
If you plan on going to a
shelter and you have pets,
nake sure that the shelters
except pets. .
Fill yotir vehicle up before
the storm. .
Keep all important docu-


rC


investments for and in various rare opportunity, and we hope
causes. He is also a member that other minority students
of Jack. and Jill 6f America of will take advantage of this op--
Solith Miami, Inc., an orga- portunity," said his mother.
nization devoted to fostering Michael, who is busily pre-i
awareness of Black culture paring for this next phase in
and providing social, civic and his life, feels that he is ready
recreational activities. Michael to meet the challenges ahead
attends New Covenant Pres- of him. He will report to West
byterian Church, where he is a Point later this month to begin
life long member and the Lib- training.
rty City Church of Christ. I .
"We are extremely proud of
him. We think that he is privi-
leged to have received a very


university. Upon completion of
studies at West Point, the grad-
uates are required to commit
five years in the military.
Michael, 18, is a graduate
of the Palmer Trinity School
in Palmetto Bay, Florida. Dur-
ing high school, Michael was
a team captain of the school's
Track Team, member of the
Debate Team,. bass player in
the String Ensemble, and ars
officer in the School's Club In--
vestment Club, a program that
secures donations and makes


wait a couple of years," he said
but Pierre was not moved but
he stayed focus on the election.
During the campaign, Pierre
was personally targeted.
A racial slur was imprinted on
his campaign sign that left him
- not defeated but focused.
"I had my signs destroyed. I
was called a terrorist on the ra-
dig. I never lost sight in what
I was doing but I continued
to campaign," he said. "I even
had dinner with-families to talk
about the issues that they are
facing."
In the end, the votes spoke as
the results were announced at
the North Miami City Hall on


une 2.
"I was elected by the people of
North Miami," he said.
Pierre received many non-
Haitians votes.
Tuesday night, Pierre will be
sitorn-in at the City Hall as
North Miami Mayor.
Victory for Pierre but his fifst
order of business as mayor is to
take care of the concerns of res-
(idents which include a drown-
Ing water bill that has caused
much debate. Pierre wants to
decrease the gang and criminal
activity withiri the city and pro-
vide programs to help residents
affected by the economic down-
turn.


MAYOR
continued from 1A

in criminal and immigration
law.
Though he was criticized dur-
ing the election for his lack of
experience, Pierre and Wolland
defeated four candidates for the,
majroral seat on May 12.
Pierre commented, "People
had asked me, 'Why am I run
ning for mayor if I know that I
cannot win '"
"Throughout the campaign,
many fold me that I wouldn't
win because I have no name
recognition. They advised me to


DOLLAR STORE
continued from 1A ,

clothing and fashion. Two-
thirds of Americans are cutting
back and trying to save. We're
also eating out less. According
to The NPD Group, a market
research company, business at
fast-food restaurants experi-
enced the first quarterly decline
since 2003. For "full-service res-
taurants" aka, pricier the


losses were steeper. And that $4
latte we were accustomed to?
Well, even Starbucks is touting
cheaper fare. .
But all this savings must be
going somewhere, right? Indeed.
The savings rate among Ameri-
cans has been a global laugh-
ingstock until the downturn.
Now, Americans are socking
away money the rate is up to
5.7% for that inevitable rainy
day.


Make no mistake, the transi-
tion from a credit card lifestyle
to a cash one won't be easy. But
if we working-class Americans
wean ourselves from, a steady
diet of shallow consumption, we
might-be able to hold on to our
leaner financial selves when the
good days return.
Friends can then call me "Ms.
Dollar Store."
Joyce King is a freelance writ-
er in Dallas.


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE10-16, 2009


Carol City graduates celebrate


County offer tips during hurricane season


c ARO ON C Oat


1 4 -

7
COpyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
AVailable from Commercial News Providers


Ci~~p


Mayor Pierre to focus on residents':issues





Southwest Miami Sr. High


American Sr. High


No. Carolina State University


ANTOINETTE ANCRUM


OLA OLAIGBE JR.
Flanigan High School, Pembroke
I will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Christ Apostolic
Church of Miami


ANTOINETTE O. ONALAJA
Dr. Michael Krop Sr.
I yvill instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8
Congratulations, Christ
Apostolic Church of Miami


DANIEL O. INNEH JR.
Everglades High School, Miramar
I will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Christ
Apostolic Church of Miami


RACHEL A. OLAWALE
North Miami Sr. High
I will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Christ
Apostolic Church of Miarni


JASMINE N. BLACKMON





AMBER J. ROLLINS


JOSElPH T. AGiBEYEGBE
Norland Sr. High
I will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Christ
Apostolic Church of Miami.


OLUSOLA DUPE ALLE
American High School
I will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Chnst
Apostolic Church of Miami


OLAMIDE J. AKANGBE
Miramar High School
will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Christ
Apostolic Ghurch of Miami.


LORENZA L. WEAVER

Univ, Of Florida B.A.
Cum Laude, Our Love
To You Mom & Dad


Basic Train~ing. Proud of you!


KENNESSHIA WILLIAMS


KARLA YVETTE COHEN
Miami Northwestern

Congratulations! Wishing
you success.
The Cohens


We are proud of you.


BRITTANY
CHANNEL PRINGLEY
MIAMI NORTHWESTERN


Congrats in your acceptance
of a full scholarship from
Clemson University. We are
so proud of you. To God be
the glory for all the wonder-
ful things He has dong. The
.
entire family, friends and all
those who wish you the best!


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW'N DESTINY


DR. ERIN BANKS PH.D


SHAKIRAH R. SOLOMON


CHRIS QUINN #8 CB


LESLIE P. JOHNSON


BRITTANY V. TAYLOR


Hampton, Geoqrgia


ABIMBOLA T. BHADMUS
Miramar High School
I will instruct, counsel and
watch over you. Psalm 32:8.
Congratulations, Christ
Apostolic Church of Miami


ANTON B. SHINHOSTER


ELIZABETH ROULAND


.,
%ua 618ssed?
Congratulationst
The Rouland family


ANGELICA SPICER


DANA CETEREA DAVIS


SWe are proud of you!


SAMUEL JOHNSON III


KlA JANEE HALL


MANDELIECE COBB


NADIA' NATHAN


JAMES DILLARD


BRITTNEY FRAZIER


DR. JABARI CAPP


We are very proud

of you and wish
you all the best!
.
Love, your family.


DP '

AN RE LEONARDO YOUNG
MIAMI CENTRAL

Congratulations Dre.
Love, your family


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


r~









8A TE MIMI IMES JUN 1016, 009BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


THE~y ACDM OF~ ART &. S


SEntrepreneurship Training


,~Your, ventureA,, waitS


a
P FO pe rHome Ch em scal

M ana g emen t
It's good for the earth, good for the environment!
Household products like oil-based paints, pesticides, fertilizers, solvents, pool chemicals
and fluorescent. light bulbs should never be thrown into the garbage. They contain
chemicals that can harm our environment and pollute our drinking water.
Help protect our environment by bringing your home chemical waste to the Department
of Solid Waste Management's Home Chemical Collection Centers for recycling or proper
disposal.
West Dade 8831 NW 58th Street
South Dade 23707 SW 97 Avenue, Gate B
Centers are open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to.5 p.m.
Call 3-1-1 or click www.miamidade.qov/dswm for a free copy of the
departments home chemical management brochure and for additional
tips on managing your home chemical waste.


REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENTS ON THE PROPOSED
APPLICATION FOR FUNDING FROM THE AMERICAN
RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009 FOR THE
NEIGHBORHOOD STABILIZATION PROGRAM 2 (NSP2).
Pursuant to the Notice of Fund Availability (NOFA) for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program 2 (NSP2) under the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 issued by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Miami-Dade
County is required to make available its proposed application to demonstrate how requested funding would be used based on the
Act.
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provided for funding for NSP2. HUD issued a N0FA for $1.93 billion
for assistance to state, local governments and not-for-profit organizations for the redevelopment of abandoned and foreclosed
homes. Grantees may use the funds for financial mechanisms such as down payment and closing cost assistance to low- to
moderate-income homebuyers; purchase and rehabilitate forecIosed and abandoned homes and residential properties; development
of land banks for future development; demolition of blighted structures; and the redevelopment of vacant land for housing. Miami-
Dade County is requesting $162,000,000 in HUD NSP2funds.
The County's NSP2 Application consists of :
Need/Extent of the Problem
Demonstrated Capacity of the Applicant and Relevant Organizational Staff
Soundness of Approach
Leveraging other Funds or Removal of Substantial Negative Effects
Energy Efficiency Improvement and Sustainable Development Factors.
Neighborhood Transformation and Economic Opportunity
The County la proposing a County wide approach wth eligible activities possible in all census tracts, except the following:
12086004602, 12086007502, 12086007503, 12086007901, 12086007902, 12086008000, 12086010125
Proposed NSP2 Activity Proposed Budget


~ ~5~r ~


c cm, -


*


* *


.


Available from Commercial News Providers-


.*


Math
Reading
FCATTutoring
Leadership Develop- '


Basketball


$15,000,000
$15,000,000
$26,000,000
$27,000,000
$61,000,000
$1,800,000
$16,200,000
$162,000,000


A. Low- or no- interest second mortgages and closing cost assistance to income
eligiblebuyersofferecloseduponhomes.
B. Acquisition of single family residential properties that have been foreclosed
for the purpose of rehabilitation and sale to income eligible buyers,
C. Acquisition and rehab of multi-family residential propertiesto provide affordable
rNenta h us redevelopment of affordable multi-family rental housing on vacant
property. GOB Projects.
E. Neighborhood redevelopment of through multi-family rental housing on vacant property
E Demolition of blighted structures.
Administration (maximum amount available)
Totainequest


The primary objective ofthis-HUD Program is the development of stable urban communities characterized by the provision of decent
housing, a suitable living environment, and expanding economic opportunities for individuals/households having low, moderate and
middle incomes. Because the NSP2 intent is to principally benefit low, moderate and middle income persons, each activity must
specifically address the following National Objective:1) to benefit low, moderate and middle income persons, at or below 120% of
area median income,
The resources, if received, will be allocated to address areas of emphasis in the County within eligible census tracks. The Applica-
tion lists the activities for funding to address areas of emphasis and is available at the Miami Dade County Office of Community and
Economic Development (OCED), located at 701 NW 1st Court, Miami, FL 33136.
The Plan is also available on OCED's web site for the ten (10) day comment period at the following address beginning June 15,
2009: http://www.miamidade.gov/ced/. OCED encourages residents of Miami-Dade County to express their comments regarding
the proposed Plan by writing to Shalley Jones Horn, Director, Miami-Dade County Office of Communty and Economic Development
at 701 NW 1st Court, 14th floor, Overtown Transit Village Building, Miami, Florida 33136. Written comments on the Application
must be received by and will be accepted until Wednesday, June 25, 2009. Two public meetings are scheduled as part of
the comment period on June 16, 2000 at the South Dade Government Center, located at 10710 SW 211 Street 2nd Floor
Conference Room #203 at 6pm and on June 18, 2000 at the Caleb Center, located at 5400 NW 22nd Avenue room 110, also
at 6pm. The purpose of these meetings is to give the public an opportunity.to comment on this proposed NSP2 Application.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunities in employment and does not discriminate against persons with
disabilities in its program or services. For material in an altemate format, a sign-language interpreter or other accommodations,
please call (786) 469-2100, at least five days in advance.


Cop~yriheltra


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C 0 PIEs






9A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE10-16, 2009









To Our Customers,

While a lot is changing at our company today, one thing is not: our commitment to
you, our customers.

We want to assure you that your GM warranty will continue, whether you already
own a GM car or intend to buy a new one. Genuine GM parts will be supplied. GM-
trained Goodwrench technicians will perform service. Simply bring your vehicle to
your GM dealer.and you will receive service.

, If the dealership you usually visit will be closing, we sincerely apologize and regret
that it has affected you. We stand ready to serve with one of the largest dealer
networks in America. Please visit GM.com/vehicles/dealer for information on dealers
in your area. We pledge to make your next GM experience a remarkable one.

At this critical point in our history, we cannot afford to lose your business. Or your
trust. You have our word.

If you are in.the market for a new car, I urge you to shop GM. We are open for
business, with some of the best vehicles; values and financing rates available. When
you come in, I encourage you to be a critical judge of everything from your
experience in our dealership, to the quality of our cars. We owe you nothing but the
best. And we will deliver.

General Motors may look different down the road, but we are here to stay. By
accelerating work that is already underway and making fundamental changes from
top to bottom, GM will be leaner, greener, faster and stronger. We're not just
rebuilding our company. We're reinventing it.

Over the coming days, months and years, we will prove ourselves by being more
transparent, more accountable and, above all, more focused on you, our customer.

I invite you to track our progress at GMreinvention.com. And on behalf of all
the men and women doing the hard work of changing our company for the
better, we look forward to showing you the New GM.

Sincerely,


Frederick A. Henderson
President & Chief Executive Officer, General Motors

















SECTON BMIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 10-16, 2009


"The most important thing I can do while
I'm sitting under the preaching of God's
word is to listen to what God is saying to
me," . "I need to actively engage my
heart and mind to receive:"


Many pastors and church leaders have
nothing against Twittering and .see it as
a useful tool needed in the church. But
when it comes to weekend worship services,
some are telling churchgoers to keep their
thumbs still.
"[Wjhen you are in corporate
worship, Worship!" says


peddled as the fastest growing social net-
working site. Just a year ago, Twitters were
over two million.
Considering the popularity, especially
among young adults and youths, some
churches have embraced the technological
and cultural phenomenon and incorporated
it into their worship services.


-Josh Harris


John Piper, a promi-
nent evangelical
pastor and author.
"There is a differ-
ence between com-
munion with God and
commenting on com-
union with God."
Since' its launch in 2006,
Twitter has gronvt to 32 million users, in-
cluding an active following of pastors and
churchgoers. The microblogging service is


An earlier 77me magazine article cited,
among other churches, Westwinds Commu-
nity Church in Jackson, Mich., where wor-
shippers'Tweets during worship are flashed
on large video screens.
But reports of Twittering in church have
sparked a debate among pastors and Chris-
tians on whether it is appropriate.
"While I personally enjoy Twitter and find
it to be a useful tool for sharing and receiv-
ing information. I'm not excited about en-
Please turn to twitter 128


---Miami Times piloto/5. Caines


a willlligillingle MIMHPille 4 M eligimummale we

allie 411m allinalli alulmile ellie willialAulip undlillin*
g aggy,
gig line


The Miami Times


du ing se vi e.


~Ie ing


ALLOW


RCHE


Christians unite foi'

"Don't Waste Your

Life tour
An evangelical ministry and Christian rap artists have teamed
up for a 25-plus city tour to challenge Christians and concertgo-
ers not to waste their life.
The "Don't Waste Your Life" tour, presented by Reach Records
and Desiring God Ministries, is making stops in major cities
across.the countrjr over the next couple of months, challenging
the younger generation to live passionately for Jesus Christ.
The rhain message: shun seeking worldly joy and instead live
lives dedicated to Christ.
It's a message inspired by evangelical author John Piper's book,
"Don't Waste Your Life." Piper, who leads Desiring God and is a
pastor at Bethlehem Bap-
tist Church in Minneapolis,
Minn., wrote the book for
both Christians and non-
Christians hoping to wake
them up from living a life
focused on comfort and plea-
sure and one that counts for
nothing.
"God created us to liv4 with
a single passion to joyfully
display his supreme excel-
lence in all the spheres of
life," Piper writes in the book. -
"The wasted life is the life
without this passion."
"God.calls us to pray and TRIP LEE
think and dream and plan and Stellar Award nominee
work not to be made much of,
but to make much of him in every part of our lives," he adds.
Piper learned this piece of wisdom early on in his life when he
heard his father preach about an old man who opened his heart
to receive Christ but immediately sobbed and lamented that he
had wasted his entire life.
"The thought of coming to my old age and saying through tears,
Tve wasted itl I've wasted itl' was a fearful and horrible thought
to me," Piper writes.
A prottlinent and passionate minister of the Word of God who
doesn't believe in the popular American concept of retirement,
Piper wants to warn others, especially the younger generation,
not to get caught up in a life that counts for nothing and not to
"coast through life without a passion."
. Helping spread that message is-a lineup of Christian rap art-
1sts, including Dove Award nominee Lecrae, Grammy Award nom-
inee Flame, Stellar Award nominee Trip Lee, as well as Tedashii
and Sho Baraka.
Commenting on the media-heavy culture the younger genera-
tion is growing up in, Trip Lee believes their perception and lives
are being shaped and influenced by MTV, BET, and YouTube:
But anything separated from Jesus Christ is a waste of our
lives, Lee says.
"I think by buying into the lies and pursuing things that are not
of the Lord, pursuing things that don't show him to be glorious,
and pursuing] things that don't help us to know him, it's a waste
of our lives."
The "Don't Waste Your Life" tour kicked off in Memphis, Tenn.,
and Manchester, N.H., last week. In addition to stops in New
York, Atlanta, and Miami, among other cities, the tour will also
hit the country's largest Christian festivals, including Creation
Fest East and West.


Copy rig hted Mate rial .





Stay & Save This Summer
Can't splurge on your suinmer vacation this year? You don't have to.

A library book is free, portable fun! Kids, teens and adults can win prizes
in the Summer Reading Fun for Everyone challenge, June 13 through
July 25.
Vizcaya Museum and Gardens is offering buy one, get one FREE on
weekday admission for Miarni-Dady residents, June 1 through August
3 1 *

Get the Golden Ticket Arts Guide for seniors 62 and over and attend
great cultural events FREE. Available in English and Spanish.
For more Stay & Save choices, visit miamidade.gov or call 3-1-1.
*Restrictions apply. Call or click for details.


I


God does not lie because He
CANNOT lie. He not only does
not want to lie, or does not lie,
He is not able to lie. We some-
times expect humans to do ex-
actly what they have promised
us that they would do. We be-
come upset if a spouse breaks
his or her commitment to the
marriage (as well we should!).
We act as though that person
not only should not have lied,
but we cannot understand how
they did. However, we find it
hard to believe the preacher
(or the Word) when we are told
that our Lord is completely
trustworthy. We easily put our
trust in a fallible man, but not
in an infallible God.
On the other hand, there are
some who refuse to place even
a confidence in man because
they have been hurt and de-
celled. : Now they feel that no


one deserves their trust. This
usually happens because we
mistakenly place our trust in
these people, and we were dis-
appointed or humiliated. This
will never happen with the
Lord.. Psalm 23:1 says that the
Lord is our shepherd. A sheep
trusts the shepherd implicitly.
The sheep follows wherever the
shepherd leads. The sheep
does not wonder if the water
or pasture that the shepherd is
leading him to is fresh or tasty
or nourishing. They just go.
The sheep knows instinctively
that the shepherd wants only
the best for it, and he is quite
content to allow the shepherd
to have his way.
Are you content to place your
trust completely in the Lord?
Do you trust man more, than
you trust the Lord? Perhaps,
it's time for a change.


a good nurturing meal. But he
said, "Don't place your trust in
me. If I fall, then you will fall
with me. Place your trust only
in the Lord."
He was a loving man who
loved his congregation dearly.
I never heard even a whis-
per of him being less than a
Godly shepherd to his flock.
However, I have never forgot-
ten that lesson, and scripture
has proven it to be true. I feel
that I am a dependable per-
son. I take my commitments
seriously and I honor them. If
I tell someone that I am going
to do something, as much as it
is in my power, I do it. I don't
make excuses if I have made a
commitment to do something.
$ut I live in a world of which I
have no control. Things hap-
pen that prevent all ofus from
doing as we might have prom-


ised or intended. A promise
to pick someone up promptly
at 7pm might not be possible
if an accident caused a detour
and a hold up on the highway.
Though your tardiness might
not have been your fault, none-
theless, you were not able to do
as you promised.
Some promises are broken
due to a break up of a rela-
tionship, or sadly, a death.
As much as we love someone,
there are situations that do not
always allow us to be there for
them. This is not the case grith
the Lord. He will always be
there for us. He has promised
us that He will never leave us
or forsake us. We are told that
He is not a man and He will
not lie. No matter how 'great a
person is, we still have a pro-
pensity to lie. We might not lie,
but we are still able to do so.


Living a life without excuses


- the Bible, but it should be the
central theme of every Believ-
er's life.
"It is better to take refuge in
the Lord than to trust in man."
W6w, that's certainly a true
statement! I remember my Pas-
tor at the first church that I
joined. I was a new Christian,
and had a wonderful, loving
Pastor. He told me that he
hoped that I would place my
confidence in him. As my Pas-
.tor, I should have confidence
that he was feeding his sheep


You might have heard it said
that Psalm 118:8 is the cen-
ter verse of the Bible. This
Psalm is tucked in the middle
of the shortest chapter of the
Bible, and the longest chap-
ter of the Bible. There are 594
chapters before Psalm 118 and
594 chapters after this psalm.
And if that information is not
enough to make you sit up and
take notice, then you should
read Psalm 118:8. This little
nugget is the 'center of the cen-
ter.' It riot only isthe center of


Jurie 22-Jtily 24 betireen the
hours of 8:30 a.m to 2:30 p.m. ,
There will be no transportation
provided. 305-681-748 1

*1*1**?*
Zeta Commimity Center
SummerPiogramwillbeginJune
22tand end July 24. Classes will
run from 2-5:30 p.m. (M-F). 3Q5-
836-7060.
******9
Liberty City Community Ac-
tivist wm be having their first
annual Treasure Hunt, from
S:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., on June
27. Verneacha Johnsoix, 305-
751-9377 or 786-985-5224.

***?****
Miami Central Senior High is
planning a triple class reunion of
91, 92 and 93 from uly 31 -Aug
2. Edwin, 305-975-1757.

********
The National Association pf
Black Hotel Owners. Operators
&q Developers will hold its 130,
annual conference at the Doral
Golf Resort & Spa, July 22-25.
954-792-2579.


Aviation Building on the second
Saturday. 305-696-1631.
********
MiamiNorthwesternSr.High
class of 1989 will hp1d its 20* an-
niversaryattheJunglelslandat
8 p.m., Aug.7. Bulls89reunion@
hotmail.com
********
Miami Jackson Senior High
Class of 1969 will be celebrating
its 40* year reunion from July
31 Aug. 2. Sharon Demeritte
Forbes, 305-620-4827. Visit:
www.reunionweb.com or email:
fcreunions@aol.com

********
Youth on the MOVE Summer
training Project is now accepting
applications. 305-576-3333.
,
*******R
TheBeautifulGateyvillhaven
monthly cancer support group at
the Silver Bbre Lakes Missionary
Baptist Church, from 10 a.ril.
12 p.m., every third Sunday
of the month. Pamela Burnett,
305-835-6846 or 786-693-2613.


es. 954-602-3243.
********
The second annual Pos-
ter Fest: "The Power of Positive
Thinking Yotith Su mmi t," will
take place at the Austin Hep-
burn Center in Hallandale, from
9 a.m.-2 p.ra., June 13. 754-
204-5947 or satkins50@aol.com

'
********
National Football League
(NFL) Business will present the
NFL Emerging Business Work-
shop at the Florida. Memorial
University, Lou Rawls Center for
the Performing Arts, from 5-8
ap.m., Jiine 16. Please RSVP by 5
p.m., June 1'2. 305-614-7560 or
305-614-7571.

*,*******
Regional Community Collab-
oration on Violence will have
a meeting at the City .of Miami
Police Department Station at 2
p.m., Thursday, June 18. 786-
360-3027.
********
Booker T. Washington Alum-
ni Class will celebrate their 4?
reunion from June 19-21. Helen
Tharpes Boneparte, 305-691-
1333 or Lonzie Nicols. 305-835-
6588.


********
City of Miami Model City
N.E.T. and Partners \\111 host the
eighth annual Juneteenth Cele-
bi ation at the Historic I.. vr ic T he -
ater at 6 p.m.,.Fi-iday June 19
and at the Virginia Key Beach,
12 p.m., Saturday, June 20.
305-795-2303.
********
Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1961 will spolisor
an "oldie Goldie" dance at the
Cypress Masonic Hall, from 9
p.m.-1 a.m., June 20. 305-685-
8035.
******** ,
Florida Agricultural and Me-
chanical University alumni will
meet for breakfast at the Picca-
dBy's restaurant in North Miama
on June 20. E-thail: golarnu
miamtdaderattlers.org

. ****
Desoto Correctional Insti-
tute \\111 hate a Father's Day
Weekend ori Saturcay, June 20.
Phillip, 786-873-9498.

*****R**
Thomas Jefferson Middle
School is accepting applications
for students in grades 6-8 to at-
tend its surrarner program from


305-467-8397ore-mailksmith@
nfiflorida.com.
********
Next Generation Dance Acad-
emy will present their second
annual Dance Recital at Barry
University in North Miami at
7:30 p.m., June 13 and 3 p.m.,
June 14. 305-685-0037.
********
City of Miami Gardens will
have their fourth annual Hurri-
cane Expo at the Wal-Mart Six-
percenter on 2? Avenue from
10 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday, June
13.

******** ,
The City of Miramar will host
a Home Preservation and Fore-
closure Prevention workshop at
the Miramar Civic Center frony
10 a.m. 2 p.m., Saturday, Jurie
13.. The event will be supported
by financial institutions, hous-
ing counseling agencies, debt/
credit counseling agencies, the
Brolvard County Property Ap-
praiser's office and the Florida
Department of Financial servic-


Magic City Children's Zone
will be hosting its Education of
Children and Youth work group
meeting at the Carrie P. Meek
Recreation Center from 3-4:30
p.m., Wednesday, June 10. 850-
933-4051.
******** .
The Southeast Overtown/
Park West and Omni Commu-
nity Redevelopment Agencies
presents registration for the
"Youth on The Move" program, a
teri-week summer internship de-
signed to provide esumrner jobs
in various industries, and career
development training and skills.
The event is scheduled to take
place at the Overtown Youth
Center from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, Juile 10. Work
America, 305-576-3333 or 305-
679-6809, or send an email 0:
cra@miamigov.com
********
Florida Youth Flag Football
Association (FYFFAl will open
its season at the Amelia Earhart
Parkin Hialeah at 8 a.m., Satur-
day, June 13 Kwame Smith at


********
"****** City of Opa-locka Parks of
Top Ladies of Distinction will Recreation will have their Sum-
hold its monthlymeetingatFlork mer Cap Program until August
ida Memorial University Lehrriarq 7.;305-953-3042.


Baptist Church invites you
to their Mother's Installation
Ceremony at 4 p.m., Sunday,
June 14. 305 836-3513.



. Mt. Vernon M.B.C. cordially
invite you to fellowship with
them at their Pre-Appreciation
Services at 3:30 p.m., Sunday,
June 14. 305-754-5300.

is,,,,,,
The Tabernacle .of 'Ark of
.
Jesus Chnst second annual
camp meeting revival will be
held. 7:30 p.Tix. nightly, un-
til June 14. Anastasia White,
305-608-7877.

use
Antioch M.B.C. of Browns-
ville cordially invites you to
.witness the ordination of min-
isters at 4 p.m., Sunday, June
14. 305-635-8329.



trCho eGnan o sWn
ing their third annual ladies
conference at the north side
of Church of God, 7:30 p.rn.


nightly. June 18-19 and 9:30
a.m., June 20. Pastor Mary
Blount, 786-316-2994 or
Collette Patterson. 786-231-
9614

********
United Christian Commu-
nity Fellowship Center will
have a Gospel Musical Festival
at 7:30 p.m.,.June 20. 786-
470-7990 or 305-910-3535.

********
Second Canaan M.B.C.
Women Ministry will be host-
ing their annual Women Work-
shop, from 8 a.m.-12 part.,
i.uie 27. Sandra Mack, 305-
638-1789.

******** .
Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30
p.m. on Monday.


.
Friends, relatives and class-
mates were in attendance at
Dorothy Hield Saunders, 'Dah
Dah,'s residence on Sun-
day of last week to celebrate
her birthday. Folks, laughed,
danced and reminisced the
evening away.
: .Shirley Saunders Ritchie,
sister-in-law flew in from
Bimini for the occasion and


pleased the guests. with her
delectable dishes including,
conch salad, fritters,. shrimp
and lobster salad, grouper
fingers, stuffed crabs, pigeon
peas and rice and much more.
Great job Shirl!. A good time
was had by all.
.Happjr Birthday 'Dah Dah'
and thanks for your most gra-
cious hospitality.


the entire community to their
Gospel Explosion until June
12. Linda Chislom, 954- 639--
1848

******** .
Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church cordially in-
vites you to fellowship with
them.at their revival, 7:30 p.m.
nightly,. until June 12. 786-
541-3770.
********
Union Grove MissionarY
Baptist? Church will hold a
Gospel Explosion, 7:30 p.m.
until June 12. 305-836-48391-

****T***
New St. James Missionary
Baptist Church, will be cele-

i rmTs da ne
14.786-245-1592.

********


Holy Ghost Faith Deliver-
ance Ministries will have their
summer revival at 7:30 nightly,
June 10-12. Mother Rachel
Ross,.786-413-3639 or Pastor
James 786-,337-5939.

********
New Mt. Pleasant Baptist
Church will be having a youth
revival, ;:30 p.m. nightly. June
10- 2. Rev. Denzel Harris. 305-
694-1782 or 305-965-3450..
.,we..
A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to their anmial
Women's Convention. 7:30 .m.
nightly, June 11-12..A prayer
breakfast will follow at 9 a.m.,

aum. InTa ,service a 1'3 155
836-6256.

********
Union Grove MBC is inviting


OSpel Explosion at Union Grove
On June 9 through 12 at?:30 Rev. Pamela Brooks, Retr. Luis
P-m., nightly,,Union Grare Mis- Gordon, Rev. Thomas Smith
stonary Baptist Church. will and Rev. Linda Chislom.
hold a Gospel Explosion during Come and get enlightened, in-
Our Family and Friends Week. spared and revived..A must see!
. Take a journey through the All are welconie! .Rev.,Marvih
scriptures of Matthew, Mark, McIntyre is Pastor, 2905 N.W.
Luke and .John. Speakers are 62 Street.


Dayspring


/Mis~sionary


- Copyrighted Mat~el~rial


r-i


. .


-
-


. .


SAvailable from Commercial News Providers


The Southern Echoes will host.
a prayer breakfast on June .13,
9 a.m. at Emmanuel Missionary
Baptist Church, 1230 NW 79th
Street. Guest speaker, Prophet-
ess Francina Norman, Dr. J. W.
Carpenter, Pastor. Contact: Sis.
Curly, 786-663-7065.


I11B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


6Dah Dah's' birthday celebration


anm -~C -~ -


Syn dicated Content


Pra er Breakfast












, ~ ,II 1l 1 III IL ~L'


Pastors sa

TWITTER ::
continued from 10B -
*
couraging people to use Twitter
during the Sunday meeting,"
Josh Harris, senior pastor of
Covenant Life Church iri Gaith-
ersburg, Md., wrote in his blog.
One of the reasons why
Harris wort't be encouraging his
congregation to Twitter during
worship is that it will likely be
distracting. T4tterers niay be
tempted to check their e-mail
or read their Twitter feed during
a sermon., Their triind may also
focus on what to Tweet rather
than worshipping. Moreover,
the minutes they take to tweet
take to Tweet would be minutes
in which they weren't actively


Zion Ho
Missionary ptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
3+8-496.4341 ax: aos-ses-2aox
Osvier of Services
Sunday School.............930it.m.
MominghaiswWmisip:.11OJO-
EurandIlliaisandry
enningww.ssipusapair.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday7p.m-




First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
so & 11
xx 0 ni
3 Thursday 7 m 11)e struly
pm a as art
Baptism Thurs, before
FinstStm.,7p.m.
Communion Pirst sun.
7:30 & 11 a.m.


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332


Authorized Signature


Cit 7


Phone emi


_ I


/Apostolic Revival Center
6702 N.W 15th Aseaue
305-836-1224
order or so.-site.
age eq
om can cs cer:m. n
shon orm s,:r. Mrs in
Wed Intercessory Platedam 12 pm
so a F.p /pm
Tuca Ir..yersiterms. )pm
Frt Bible Simly 30 pr


Friendship Missionar
Bap 9 urp-h
'g," "g '2
34 875 -
r or arr-ssm
-. 0
unr.Insp on
tr.s n n
nh 5..1, wed pra
rr .51 "'
F.. .411 Hn .-,




St. John Baptist Church \
1328 N.W 3" Avenue
305-371-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
E adv %rsda
Atoming Hurchip .. 30 a.m.
SamJay School .. .9 30 a m.
. Morning Wonship IT a.m.
Pro... me.? Rable Star'
Alecting (Tues 17 p m.
--------7
\ ammmmmmmmmmm /


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10*.-ivenue
ses-899-7224
Order of Services:
E.irie burnis, R ulup oa n
EIDIA.g htinfli v3.1.HL
surv4Nicarnrq*.*.*rst.p iam.
sonso,,,,,,senia. m.
luesary I'myer Alecung pm.
lierhearbyRibleShely isni




Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 876 Street
ggg4344ggy
Order otServices:
sunda oming services
run. v3 of 11
Ta May Brtic Study ......8 pm
Innviry Pr.ry.-cService.......8pm


(New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-68 I -3500
Order of Ser res:
4 elems..s are s. so an
sasanc w .. r.g. no ro am
,ws so ar.
..u s., ar***
PI...nr. Was I ...


ordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'"Arc'
305-751-9323
Order of Se/skes.
Eadv Worship .. 7 a.m. .
Sunk) Schau l. .. V am.
".. ..... .na."
" 4 p.m.
11i ..an and Hible Plaw
lue day ...6.11. .rn.
Youum Alecung Choir rr carsal


:


oF Faith International '.


Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W 17th Ave
thann, FL 331-0
954-735-9393

Afid now abide
faithhopelove...
I Car 13:13


1
/ Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Holly wood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-961-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday ..
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** lklorning Worship ........ 10 am
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m
Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS/Comcast 3* Satualay 7:30 a.in.
Web page: www.pominokeparkolutreholdarist.com Einnil: penibroiceparkeoc@bollsouth not


New Day "N" Christ 1
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctra 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
hadays Chowis School..............10am.
Worship Service.............ll:lS a.m.
Tuesdays Bible Clus ...........7 p al.
4di Soaday Evening Worship.......6 pe.



New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.996 Street
30s-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:


110nungwkship .lla.m.
** Bi ble CLMS 7 p.m.
1us lx four rix 181 sun.....? p.m.
Mid-neckworship


Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 RW. 34 Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 30S-573,4060*Fax 305455-854
Order of Services:
Stutday School.... 9:45 em
n a
Tuesday ....Bible study
Feeding Ministry..... loa.m
Wed Bible StudyiPrayer .6:30 pa
Thurs. Outmadt Minisity ,6:30 pm


I _


C... 1


\I enur~l,~iL~IRl~nwllRnrr: CL/


I' r~i~pr~nmK*rruw%~a~~upnufirc~~um~rwnrm


Antioch Missionary Bapt'
Church of Brownsyllle
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-434-6721*Fax:305-43 8355
cinventsunday seImor ... ase an
worshi servie .se

Henr of Power Noon oay Pa yer
I 2 p m.-1 p.m
nvening irwaship,. ram
\ /


BLAcKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


es preach
community has always been ings and th
that of a benevolent caregiver, to cushion
she said. (heartbreak
Mohead challenged the mem- Blacks a
bers to practice kindness, yol- percent of
unteer at a nursing home and make up h
become servants to those with diagnoses
AIDS and other disabilities. And cording to
the told them to get tested. ease Contr
Mohead and the Rev. Curtiss The rate- of
Long, pastor of the church, are in 2005 w
still mourning the death of one than that o
of their congregation members, women we
a woman who died of AIDS a than white
year ago. "That dis
Long shook his head sadly his flock, "i
and looked off into the distance needs to be
when recounting the loss. getting wor
"In the Black community, you nity."
learn not to be surprised," he A bill, be
said. "We have (had) so much tional Blac
tragedy, so it's ixot just the church lea
AIDS,. it's the drive-by shoot- more than


\gM cnW~migWWMI mnrenh~


e violence. You learn
yourself for the next
)."
account for only 13
the population, but
alf of the HIV/A'IDS
in the country,. ac-
the Centers for Dis-
ol and Preveiltion.
diagnoses for Black
as 10 times higher
f white adults. Black
re 23 times higher
women.
ease," Favorite told
s certainly.one. that
reckoned with. It's
se in Our commu-

ing pushed by il-
k clergy, may get
ders the funds to do
preach about AIDS.


Black religious leaders across
the country have united to push
forward H.R. 1964, called the
National Black Clergy for the
Elimination of HIV/AIDS Act of
2009. In it, they call for more
than $600 million in funding
for faith-based prevention, test-
ing and outreach.
Programs would totich run-
aways, substance abusers and
prisoners. They'd teach kids
about abstinence and condoms.,
They'd fund family reconcilia-


tion, treatment and the study
of biological and behavioral
factors that lead to increased
prevalence of the disease in the
African-American community.
The bill, introduced this
spring, has been referred to he
House Committee on Energy
and Commerce, its first step m
the legislative process.
Long summed up Sunday's
message in.a few wqrds. "It's-a
health issue," he said. "It's ndt
a sin issue."


For years, members of Black
religious congregations re-
mained in silence about HIV and
died alone with AIDS. Those who
weren't affected thought it was a
gay, white man's disease. Those
who were ill kept quiet, fearing
the stigma.
For years, Black pastors
shunned from bringing talk of
AIDS to the pulpit. But not last
Sunday.
At Beulah Baptist Institution-
al Church in Tampa, dozens as-
sembled for a free afternoon gos-
pel concert to benefit AIDS ini-
tiatives. At the morning service,
grandmothers in fancy hats held
hands and bowed their heads to
pray for prevention.,One of them
was 77-yeai--old Mary Darien.
"We need to stop burying our
heads in the sand," she said.


Her pastor, W. James Favorite,
is head of the Black Leadership
Commission on AIDS of Tampa
Bay and a member of Pastors on
Patrol, a network of more than
100,10cal churches. He called on
clergy all across the bay area to
put AIDS and HIV awareness at
the heart of their sermons.
They responded.
One told the story of Jesus,
healing a woman with disease
in her blood. Another invoked
the Good Samaritan.
In her sermon, titled "Com-
passion Matters," the Rev. Bes-
sie Mohead told her congre-
gation at the New Faith Freb '
Methodist Church in St. Pe-
tersburg that they must fight
the epidemic through proper
education and abstinence. The
role of the church in the Black


\ WWIl MIMW WI/


At. Luke Missionary Baptish
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322
-


Sundatabool 93*.lan
Atommy Worship II .un.
14 EDNI SD.11
Prizerhketing 730p.m.
Bible **Ind) . 8 p.m
\@MWWilfIMIMWHTMIIWW /


Brownsville 1
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Com
30% 4850&ax & Messages


sands. n.unsle .0 0,
sund s in st .us s...3y a.
.ITas n
nar.E. Murnager..Insch ne
rkm penanora nnual le rn
\ /


y there"s a
listening to. the sermon.
1 "The most important thing I
can do while I'm sittirig under
the preaching of God's word is
to listen to what God is saying
to me," Harris, who is also on
the council of The Gospel Cqali-
tion, noted. "I need -to Actively
engage my heart and mind to
receive." -
-Harris believes that he is not
a Twitter hatei: He even en-
courages congregants to Tweet
about the sermon or worship
experience after church and
sees it as a potential witnessing
tool to friends who follow them
on Twitter.,
"But it's alsp a good witness
for them to see that something
so important, so essential, so


holy happens on Sunday ritorn-
ing whenGod's church gathers
that Twitter takes a back seat,
the Gaithersburg pastor stat-
ed.
Backing Harris' points, evan-
gelical pastor Piper of Bethle-
hem Baptist Church in 1 itinb-
apolis, Minn., says churchgoers
should focus only on hearing
and engaging the Word of God.
. "Don't tweet while having sex.
Don't tweet while praying with
the dying. Don't tweet when
your wife is telling you about
the kids. There's a season
for everything," Piper pointed
out. "Multitasking only makes
sense when.none of the tasks
requires heart-engaged, loving
attention."


And even though Twitter may
be a trend in pop culture, that
doesn't give reason to accom-
modate it in worship, the pas-
tors say.
"Lost people, in this world
don't need to see that we're cur-
rent with the latest trend, they
need to hear God's unchanging
truth," Harris said on his blog.
"They need to understand that
God's word makes a demand
on their life.
"And they should see from us
a reverence and holy awe in ihe
presence of God and his word
that points them to the fact that
what happens in a Christian
church is completely different
than anything happening in the
world." .


u CHECK OR MIONEY ORDER ENCLOSED O CHARGE MY CREDIT 6ARD


Exp


StateZ -


Ebenezer United St. Mark Missionary
Methodist Church Baptist Church
2001. N.W 35th Street 1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-635-7413 305-691-8861
Osvier of Services:
nuday Maining 5e.vices Order of Services:
7:-45 a.m 11 15 am sunday ?i30and al e.m
inndmyschool-9:45a.m. worshipservice
. BabicandyTuesday 9:30km.........Sundaysc
10 a.m & 7 p.m. Tue day ..,-,.. ps. Iced
S
PTalfI lecting-TUPS.-6p.m ).1,..Ir. I'.'..Insti F.1


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Service
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:80 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.ni.


1(800) 254-NBBC


Lo~gos Baptist Church


Meratservices
Sun(lay
rd ..Tast Worshill at 8 & 8 a.m.
Sursday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Saidy ? p.m
satm-day
No Service


Order ot Services:
Sunday School.....9130 a.m
Sunday Worship..... 11 a.nt
First Sursday6Evening Worship
Mid Week So ... ? p.m
Chair Rehearsal Tinusday
7:30 pm


Mt. Calvary Missionary Mt. ZIon A.M.E. Church 93"Street Community \
Baptist Church 15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue Missionary Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr Blvd. 305-681-3300 2330 N.W. 93 Street
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528 Order of Services 305-836-0942


Man-thmiti.N Biblo Study...Thurs.....7 p.m. I da sama .*4 at 6 p th
Sunday Wonship...7-t] a.m. Timrsday Tuesday Bible sun y.. pm
SimdaySchool.......9:30s.m. Frayersleens.. .7pm. webre entrarg
"There is place for you"
M \ZWWWWWWWRB /


8 21 THE MIAMI TIMES JUNE 10-16 20 9


about HIV/AIDS


Black churches


time forevrytin


The Episcopal Church of Hosanna Community / Liberty City Church 1
The Transfiguration Baptist Church of Christ
15260 NW 196Avenue .. 2171N.W. 56th Street 1263 N.W. 67th Streel
305-637-4404 yas: ans-r*37-447 305-836-4555
5-631-1660 Order of Services: Order of Services:
CImrch SMaedule: Bunday School.............945am Sud1= A lorning . 8 a.m.
11taship... .11nm- Sunniq 5clirxt. IOa.m.
Sunday Services Biblessly, anneday 730pm Sunday Lsening .. 6 p.m.
7:Sif a.m. and 900 a m. YourmwlitisilylviarvWed A lon. Excellence .. 7 Top.m.
Healing Seavice 6p.m ? Iue Bible Clers 73lp.m.
* Second Wednesday ? p m. Thurs Fellowship 10a.m.
151 Stiu. SOng Praelice b p.m.


.b.


PP


;

















MIAMI, FLORIDAuEEl-, JUE 1-16, 2009~


The Miami Times




eaI

OITCES N B


Overweng~p"o~ighat~ kisae no


________ _


~Services


HEALTH FIRST

MEDICAL CENTER

6405 NW 27th Avenue Miami, Florida
For information or appointments, call:

3o5-4o3-4oo3
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m. 5:oo p.m.

Health First Medical Center
Maximum Quality Medical Care for our Community


sils or adenoids were believed
to cause most sleep-disordered
breathing in children, but the
study found no link between ton-
sil size and disordered breath-
ing, according to a news release
from the American Academy of
Sleep Medicine (AASM).
Instead, obesity may be play-
ing the greater role, said study
author Edward O. Bixler, of
Penn State University College of
Medicine.
"Risk factors for sleep-disor-


Obese children are more
likely to have sleep-disordered
breathing, a condition that's as-
sociated with behavioral prob-
lems, hyperactivity and difficul-
ty staying awake at school, new
research shows.
Researchers tested 700 chil-
dren, in the study, between the
ages of 5 and 12 randomly cho-
sen from 18 public elementary
schools in Pennsylvania. Each
child had a physical exam and
was monitored for nine hours


About 25 percent of children had mild sleep-


at a sleep laboratory using poly-
somnography, which measures
brain electrical activity, heart
activity, airflow, respiration aid
oxygen saturation during sleep.
About 25 percent of chil-
dren had mild sleep-disordered
breathing and 1.2 percent had
moderate sleep-disordered
breathing, defined as five or
= .::*: s pu t
primary snoring, the research-
ers found,
Those with sleep-disordered
breathing tended to have a larg-
er body-mass index and a high-
er waist circumference relative
to their peers. Unlike in adults,
a large neck circumference was
not a predictor of sleep-disor-
dered breathing in children, the
study authors note in their re-
port -in the June issue of Sleep.
Until recently, enlarged ton-


dered breathing in children are
complex and include metabolic,
inflammatory and anatomic
factors," Bixler said in the news
release. Because sleep-disor-
dered' breathing in children is
not just the outcome of ana-
tomical abnormalities, treat-
ment strategies should con-
sider alternative options, such
sw o nd correction of
Sleep-disordered breathing .
can range from mild to severe,
according to information from
the AASM. Mild cases might
be marked by persistent snor-
ing due to nasal anatomic fea-
tures such as chronic sinusitis,
rhinitis and nasal drain. Severe
cases may iiiclude obstruc-
tive sleep apnea, a potentially .
dangerous condition in which
breathing repeatedly starts and
stops throughout the night.


* Complimentary Dental
Services with No Co-Pay
* Primary Care Physicign
* Laboratory
* Gynecology
* Diagnostic Ultrasound
* EKG Electrocardiogram
* ECHO- Echocardiogram
* X-Rays
* A Comprehensive
Chiropractic Service Center


* Free Concierge--Style
Transportation with
Private Vehicle
* Pain Management
* Massage Therapy
*. Activity Center
* Education
* Exercise Program
* Nutrition
* Osteoporosis screenings


ea...w a a
****** * * *


, .,, ,,, . .


t 'l l IIIN Copy rig hted Mate ria Il dit )Of UN


S~ud, ~haw~ AmerkY i?,










, ,~ II ll 1 IL I r-r


Calling all Past Students, Staff, Parents and Friends
New Life Baptist School
New Life Christian Academy
Saturday, June 13, 2009 at 4 p.m.
NEWLIFEBAPTISTCHURCH/SCHOOL
Soog NW 173rd Drive
Call 305-624-3o63
a formoreinformation.
Come and Reflect on the Past .
Celebrate our Present . .
AnticipateourFuture...


"
I
10 GP FIDI
9enera Gosn2elic, 9n2plan/ edis/rf

Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, and AGD


Aposto~lc'andProphetiic


REV. ANTHONY SHINHOSTER
,
MilliSter Ordained
at Antioch
We. the family invite you to
come out and witness the Or-
dination of Rev. Anthony Shin-
hos eir d Re Carlis Jah enh
Missionary BAptist Church of
Brownsville, Sunday, June 14,
4 p.m. Rev. Larrie M. Lovett II,
Pastor.
.


1


DO TRAINING
Obedience
Home & Family Protection
House Breaking
Behavior Modification .
Consultation
Scent Detection

M Call Ken at 305-726-6099


The patient and any other person responsible for payment has the riglyt to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


DR. HENRYL.i PORTER


RED RELL L K


YER


Bishop Page at
Cooper Temple COGIC Up-
per Room Ministries, Superin-
tendent Marc Cooper, Pastor
will host Bishop Liston Page of
Highway Cathedral, Paterson.
New Jersey, for two services,
Sunday, June 14 at 1 1 a.m.
and 7 p.m.

fessSp ahnnu al guesDa'Pro
lowship will mister at 7 p.m.
You don't want to miss these
two powerful.worship services.
The church is located at
3800 N.W. 199th Street, Miami
Gardens, FL. For details contact
the church at 305-620-1557.


cRal Offer a Seilfe 50muil0II..


BISHOP LISTON PAGE


cent.I crown

Implear
owns

Natural owns.I
Improm




Implants can be used to replace
all teeth with a
non-removable bridge


Tree of Life Deliverance and
Bethesda Ministries presents
our fifth annual Apostolic and
Prophetic Conference 2009
hosted by Apostle E. Scott.
The guest speakers will be
Apostle Hester of Chicago,
II., Apostle C. Gadson, Sa-
vannah, GA., Apostle Rick
Daniels of Milwaukee
WA., Prophetess Wrigl;1t, Ft.
Pierce, Fl., Dr. Iris J. Troy,
Miami, Pastor L. Rorie, Ft.
Lauderdale, Apostle E. Scott,
Miami, and many other pas-
tors teaching the school of
knowledge.f Life Deliverance
Ministries is located at 4150
N.W. 7 Avenue, 305-751-
3777. June 15-21, 6:45 p.m.,


Implants iban also be used to


*All other cosmetic and Restorative Dental Services provided

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Insurance Welcome We O//er 92nancia/9Irrangemen/s*
Eaton Premises OFepea-s @&/e1/ou bail
.
Evening appointmentsAvadable


APOSTLE MARLON HESTER
nightly 'School of Knowledge.
8 p.m., General Assembly.
The attire is white, come with
an expectation!


F & "R "f* ?
BART M.WILLIAMS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext.115
gggg gggy
cone am+ serving since w2a
THEWLNARG T Wt OROTY
IN THE SOUTHEAST


www.dentistgrant. net


B 41 THE MIAMI TIMES JUNE 10-16 20 9


CONGRATULATIONS!
We salute Derrell Parker,
2009 graduate from North
Miami Beach Senior High,
who will be attending North
Carolina Central University
with a full scholarship in
baseball in the. Fall. Derrell
was a cum laude graduate
and was the recipient of sev-
eral awards, including the
Judith and Steven A. Fill
Memorial Debate Scholar-
ship Award.
Remember success is a
journey, not a destination!
Love, your family!
PAR


O I Sp


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
. .
Available from Commercial News Providers


Drt dLe rtee The
Westcoast Gospel Chorus will
hosting re val JunWelst

coast South Florida church,
which is located on 4601 N.W.
167th Street. There will be great
preaching and teaching, good
gospel music, and healing and
miracle services You don't want
to miss this1 Rev. Warnell Vick-
ers, pastor.


Cooper Temple


-e'I


m ,A 5


..










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


ALVIN WILSON, carpenter, died
May 30. Visita-
tion 4 p.m. 9
p.m., Friday.
Service 11 a.m.'
Saturday, in the
chapel-




JAMES C. WILSON, (JC), 61,
retired Gen--
eral Manager
for Sears, died
June 7. Visita-
tion 12 p.m. 5
p.m., Wednes-
day. Memorial 6
p.m., Wednes-
day New Way
Fello wship
Praise and Worship .Center. Final
rites and burial Pine Bluff, Arkan-
sas.

ROY KILBY, 54, laborer, died
June 6. Visita-
tion 4 p.m. 9
p.m., Friday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Miami
Gardens Church
of Christ.


.
FLORENCE BROWN, 92, cook,
died June 3. Visitation 5 p.m. 8
p.m., Saturday. Service 4 p.m.,
Saturday, Maranatha Seventh Day
Adventist Church.
.
JAMEL GARNER, 43, laborer,
died May 3. Arrangement are in-
complete.

ESTELLA STEWART-SHAW,
87, nurse assistant, died June 1.
Visitation 4 p.m. 9 p.m., Friday.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Christ
Way Baptist Church. .


GenesisM
DELIA RE 89, teacher, died
June 3 at Palmetto Hospital. Ser-
vice was held

ALICE WILSON, 83, waitress '
died June 4 at home. Service was


OSCAR RENDON, 58, machin-
i dd Jtme 7eatiHosp cre n

lete

Rd al &
MIN. JAMES DAVIS, 46, minis-
ter, died June 4-
Visitation 4 p.m..
- 9 p.m., Friday.
Arrangements
are incomplete.





WILLIE SIMMONS, 79, ware-
house worker
died June 1.
Service 4 prn.,
Saturday in tl)e
chapel.





WII..LIE CLARIDY, 85, retired
teacher, Miami-
Dade County
School Board,
died June 2 .
Final rites and
burial Jasper,
FL.



ANNIE HUNTER, 73, child care
cook, died June
3. Visitation 4
p.m. 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
10 a.m., Sat-
urday, Greater
New Bethel
Baptist Church.


Wright & You
OZELL JOHNSON, 71, chef,

dd JM ra 7R
hab Center. Sur-
.
vivors include.
.

Jr and Greg;
daughters, Kim-

b er Charles, Henry,
Tommy and Ossie Lee; sister,
Estella Gaines. Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

MINERVA HALL, 73, nurses
aid, died June
8 in Miami Gar-
dens. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Nathan-
iel; sons, James
and Mitchell
Lott; daughters,
Alcene Jenkins,
Rhonda Lott, Kim Murphy, Paula
Nelson and Antoinetto Hall; broth-
ers, Hayward Bain, Sr. and Neville
Bain; sister, Shirley Bain Gibson.
Services 11 a.m., Monday (June
15), Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church.

Richardso
ANDREW HEPBURN, 58, cus-
todian, died
June 6. Service
12 noon, Friday,
New. Life Fam-
ily and Worship
Center.




IRENE EDWARDS', 58, teach-
er, died June
1. Memorial 5
p.m Friday,
Myrde Grove
P. Church. Ser-
vice 10 a.m '
Saturday at the
church.
,
CLARA BELL CAREY, 89,


DARNELL McCARTNEY, 59,
teacher for
Miami Dade
County Public
School, died
Jlme 8 at Park
Plaza Nursing
Home. Service ,
10 a.m., Thuts-

dM nryd a ist Church.

DEBORAH AMBROSE, 55,
house wife ,
died May 29 at
home. Service 5
p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.


,

MELVIN NELSON, 41, truck
driver, died June
2 at home. Ser-
vice was held.






SHILO JOHNSON, 84, laborer,
died June 2 at Vitas sPembroke
Pines. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

MARY CONYER, died June 2.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Hall Ferguson
GERALD POSTEMICE, 59,
restaurant chef, <2
died June 3 at
Memorial Re-
giohal Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


DWIGHT A. DRINKS, 58, em-
p .oyee for 9Vinn-
Dixie, died June
2 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-

'heldServic



MURPHY GRIFFIN, 69, insur-
ance agent. Arrangements are in-
complete.

prace
DONNA L. BELTON, 43, stock
person for Winn-
Dixie, died June
2 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Jordan Grove
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

CHRISTOPHER ABRAHAM,
23, cashier for McDonalds, died
June 6 at St. Anthony's Health
Care. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

Eric S. GeorgA
BABY DANIELLE EZRIAH
BETHEL, 2mth/7 days,.died June
2 at Joe Dimaggio, Children's Hos-
pital. Service was held-

JAMES LENARD FLEMING,
59, died June 4 at Hospice by the
Sea. Final rites and burial Pooler,
GA.

LARRY STANTON McMILLIAN,
61, died June 2 at Vitas Hospice.
Service 11 a. m., Friday, Ebenezer
Baptist Church, Hallandale Beach,
FI. .

GEORGE LEE JR., 46, died
June 2 at Hospice by the Sea. Ser-
vice 11 a. m., Saturdby, Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church, Hal-
landale Beach.

PEARLINE GIBSON
BROWDER,78, home maker, died
June 5 at Hollywood Hill Nursing
Home. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Ebenezer Baptist Church, Halian-
dale Beach.


& Oki E
9
by becoming a member of our
ttt itE 80

CALL 305-694-6210


WILLIE FLOYD, 85, died June
3 at Sylvia's
Nursing Home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday (to-
day), First St.
John Baptist
Church.


EZELLA FULLER, 54, social
worker,
June 2 at Bap-
tist Hospital.
Service 1:30
p.m., Wednes-
day (today),
St. Paul Baptist
Church.


RYAN HERRING, 40, died, June
2. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, -
Sweet Home
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




4HANTRELL LYONS, 23, tele-
marketer, died
June 2. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day, Morning-
star Missionary
Baptist Church.



DELOISMcCULLOR,43,home-
maker, died
June 3 at Jack-
son South Com-
munity Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Wedn es da y
(today), Holy
Ghost Taber-
nacle of Deliver-
ance Ministries.

CAROLYN BROWN, 70, home-
maker, died
June 6. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.






ANN MARIE LLEWLLYN, 55,
retired home
supervisor, died
June 6. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete,





EDWARD DAVIS, 80, truck driv-
er, died June 6.
Service 1 p.m., .
Saturday, St.
John Baptist
Church.





ANTHONY TRAVIS, 43, heavy
. equipment op-
erator, died
June 1. Service
was held.






PAUL ROBERTS, 76, died June
6. Arrangements are incomplete.

Pax Villa-Browe
BABY BOY MADIN, died May
30 in Fort Lauderdale. Service 10
a.m., Thursday in the chapel.

DANIEL GABRIEL, 51, carpen-
ter, died May 26 in Lauderdale
Lakes. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Bethanie Baptiste Church, Fort
Lauderdale.

ROSE MARIE MICHEL, 71,
home maker, died May 28. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Eglise Evangel-
ic De Sion, Fort Lauderdale.


Faith


NORMA FAY KING, 67, electrol-


GINO MONTAS, 48, dispatcher,
died May 27 at
Jackson Me-
rnorial Hospital.
Service was
held.


custodian for
Dade County
School, died
May 8 at Aven-
.
tura Hospital-
Service was
held-



tir\NILLif MAE JOSEPH, 90, re-
died June 4-
Survivors in-
clude: son,
Gerald; many
grandchildren;
Including grand-
son, Harold Per-
son..Services 2
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.

JUNELL WASHINGTON, 79,
retired dietician
for Veteran's
Administrative
Hospital, died
June 2. Survi-
vors include;
dau g h ters
Carolyn Martin,
Joyce Ward,
and Patricia Bess; sons, Danny
Bess, Harold and Jerald ; Sister,
Caretha Tarver of .Philadelphia;
brothers, Howard Bess, John
Mack, Ulysses Mack and Joseph
Mack all of Jacksonville, FL; twen-
ty- five grandchildren; and a host
of sorrowing relatives and friends.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday, New
Bethel A.M.E. Church located at
2275 West 5 Way in Hialeah-

MARILYNA. COLLIE,73, home-
maker, died Ji.lne 3. Final rites, and
burial in Nassau, Bahamas-

TANEIL L. RAWLS, 33, owner
of Daycare Center, died June 7 in
Atlanta, GA. Arrangements are in-
complete.


MAGDALENA QUINONES, 89,
home maker,
died, May 28 at
Memorial Hos-
pital Pembroke.
Service was
held.



EDDY GRIBKOFF, 56, mechan-
ic, died May 30
at home. Ser-
vice was held.



.


ANDREA VOYARD, 51, nurses
aid, died June
3 at home. Ar-
rangement are
incomplete.






DOMINGA CAMPOS, 82, home
a died
m ker4 at Kin-

dred Hospital.
Service was
held




GISELE BEAUBRUN, 86, child
care worker, died
June 7 at .Coral
Springs Hospital.
Viewing 8 a.m.,
Saturday. First
I A's $ff teria "rl
church..Margate.
Service 10 a.m:
Saturday at the
church. Burial, Clueer) of Heaken
Cemetery

ELIZABETH ADAMS, 74, security
guard, died May
27 at Cleveland.
Clinic
Service was
held.


MARIE NELSON,


89, retired


housekeeper,
died: June. 6.9
McCLOIJD, 62, Gekice 11 al'dt.
Saturday, Ref-
uge Church of
Our Lord.


Range Coconut Grove
SAM CULLER, 93, retired ten-
nis court atten-
dant for the City
of Coral Gables,
died May 31 at
home. Services
11 a.m., Thurs-
. day in the Cha-,
pel.

VINCENT RYDELL JOHNSON,
SR., 49, died
May 29 in Jack-
sonville. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Gita G.
Johnson; sons,
Vincent R. Jr.
and Giovanni
Michael; daugh-
ter, Sharee Janice Johnson-Peter-
son; brothers, Willie C., Jr., James,
Sr., Prince Albert, Anthony and
Ronald; sisters, Pauline Fuller,
Sandra Tucker, Olive Coley, Alber-
tha and Delisa Griffen; Services 11
a.m., Saturday Greater St. Paul
A.M.E. Church.
.
WENDY KINBERLY SANDERS,
40, mail courier,
died June 8 at
Coral Gables
Hospital. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.



FLORENE THOMAS HAYNES,
64, home maker,
died June 6 at
Larkins Com-
munity Hospi-
tal. Survivors
include: sons,
Morris Leon
Thomas and
Dennis Lamar
Thomas; granddaughter, Marrisa
L. Thomas; sisters, Sailie Walker,
Martha Bogan, Lillie Thomas, Irolla
Cover, and Daisy Bell Thomas;
brothers, John Wesley Thomas, Jr.,
Franklin Thomas, Sr. and Benjamin
Bruce Thomas; Services 10 a.m.
Saturday, St. Mary First Missionary
Baptist Church.

WINDSOR BERNARD NEALY,
63, car rental service agent, died
June 3 at North Shore Hospital and
Medical Center. Services 11 a.m.,
Wednesday, Bethel Baptist Church.


JACQUELYN
paraprofession-
al for Miami-
Dade County
Sh I d
c oo s, die
Joine 3. Visita-
tion 4 p.m. 6
p.m., Wednes-
day (today).
Service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday in
the chapel.


ANITA JOHNSON, 43, loan
specialist, died
June 2. Service
11,a.m., Satur-
day, Christian
Fellowship B-
Church.




VICTOR HENRY CURRY, 89,
supervisor, died
June 2. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day, Ebenezer
U.M. Church.





WILLIE LEE WATSON, SR.,
71, laborer, died
June 5. Service
1 p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.






DEBRA ANN PETERS, 51, toll
attendant, died May 24, Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

4..
Carey Royal Ram'n
CLARENCE WILKERSON, 73.
died June 1 at Adventura Hospital-
Service 11 a.m, Saturday in the
chapel.

MIAH PRODHAN, 23, died June
5 at home. Arrangements are in-
complete

RAQUIBUL MATIN, died, June
7 at Broward General Hospital.
Final rites and burial Dhaka, Ban-
gladesh.

CLARENCE ROBERT MIKE,
22, died June 7. Arrangements are
incomplete.


BRIAN OAKLEY, 52, construction
worker, died May
29 at home. Ser-
vice was held.





HERB J. ROBBINS, 39, dog groom-
er, died May 26 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service wps held.

MARIA RAQUEL COBIAN, 78, sec.
rotary, died May 27 at Broward G9neral
Hospital. Service was held.

DENNIS STEPHENS, 71, advertis-
ing executive, died-May 27 at Impe-
rial Point Hospital. Service was held.

ANTHONY JOHN RUGGERI, 87,
carpenter, died May 28 at Hospice by
the Sea. Service was held.

JAVIER ALVAREZ, 64, chef, died
May 29 at JFK Medical Center. Set-
vice was held .

ELIZABETH MARCY, 82, home
maker, died May 30 at Broward Re-
hab Center. Service was held

SHIRLEY NEl SON, 72, home
maker, died June 1 at home. Service
was held.

LILA MEDINA, 69, rnedical techni-
cian, died June 1 at home. Service
was held.

JAYLENE CANTON, infant, died
June 2 at North Shore Hospital. Ser-
vice was held

JACQUILINENICHOL8,84,home
maker, died June 2 at Florida Med-
ical Center. Service was held.


115B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009











,V ,II 1In IIIVV I r- r


a a



9 yget, Gremail0n With Viewing


HAll.-FERGUSON-HEWilT MORTUARY, P.A.
.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Flonda 33142
hfhmorturory8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
,,God cares.and we care"





MF
M 1

Independently OWned


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY


she helped charter the New


M m Lpsowaes stC udr h
member of the St. Stephens
AME Church, in Wilmington
before declining health com-
pelled her to relocate to Flor-
ida to be near her children.
She was residing in Orlando'
FL, with her youngest daugh-
ter at the time of her death.
Mrs. Phillips leaves to cher-
ish her memory and mourn
her passing seven children'
Polly Hamilton of Pembroke
Pines, FL; Dr. Charles Phil-
lips (Arzenia) of Palmetto Bay'
FL; Corris Phillips of Miami,
FL; Carolyn Blue of Pembroke
Parks, FL; Carlton Phillips of
Orlando, FL; Harriet Green of
Orlando, FL and Debra Moore
(Alexander) of Orlando, FL; 14
grandchildren; 6 great grand-
children; one brother, David

t boh st sPhiladelphiau PA;
of Richmond, VA, and Em'alia
Herrera of Orlando, FL; and a
host of relatives and friends.
Funeral service will take
place on Saturday, June 13
12 p.m., at St. Stevens AME
Church in Wilmington, NC.
Funeral arrangements are
entrusted to Adkins-Drains
Funeral Service, 515 S. 8th
Street, Wilmington, NC 28402
910-763-7117 '

Death Notice


vors include:
parents, Arthur
and Teresa
Bridges; son,
Neiman Mar-
cus; sister, Alyson Pruitt; brother,
Ricardo Hill.; grandmother; and a
host of relatives and friends. View-
ing 2 p.m. 9 p.m., Friday. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, New Beginning,
2398 NW 119 St. Entombment:
Dade Memorial Park.

KATIE MAE SMITH, 58, maid,
died June 1 at Larkin Community
Hospital Sur-
, vivors include-
friends Ralp/
Moore and
Sharon Moore-
a host of other
relatives and
friends. Viewing
2 9-** "O P-M-*
Wednesday (today). Service 11
a.m., Thursday in the chapel. In-
terment; Dade Memorial Park.

ZELLA M. DAVIS, 74, house-
wife, died June 5 at Kindred Hol-
lywood: Survi-
vors include:
daughters, Pa-
mela and Kathy;
sisters, Letha
Lee and Cath-
erine Simmons;
brother Willie
Toston (Love-
nia); grandchildren; and a host of
other relatives .and friends. View-
ing 2 p.m. 9 p.m., Friday. Service
1 p.m., Saturday, Cooper Temple
COGIC. Interment: [')ade Memo-
rial Park'

BATUEL GASTAEN CICERON
72, custodian for Perkco, died
June 6 at home. Visitation' 6 p.m.
-.9 p.'m., Friday. Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, Notre Dame de Haiti
Catholic Church. Entombment:
Southern Memorial Park.


E.A. Stevens
WILLIE DAVIS III, 47, mass
communicator, died June 1 at
North Shore Hospital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Mount Tabor Bap-
tist Church, Miami.

MankerM
JOHN WESLEY SPEAIGHT,
75, died June 2 at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Service was held.

AVOID L. ENGLISH, 44, died
June tat Hialeah Hospital. Service
11 a.m., Saturday in the chapel.

JERRY WILLIAMS, 56, died
May 28 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

Dweght A
OSWALD PATTERSON, 84,
died June 4 at Vitas Hospice, Pem-
broke Pines. Service 12 noon, Sat-
urday, Hope Church, Cooper City.


HATTIE DeVAUGHN PHIL-
LIPS, the mother of forme?
Miami-Dade County Fire Chief
Charles Phillips, died after a
long illness, on Tuesday, June
6 at Health Center South
Hospital in Orlando, FL., she
was 81 years old. Mrs. Phil-
lips was born on June 23,
1927, in Rocky Point, NC.
A long time Miami resident,
Mrs. Phillips trained at Jack-
son Memorial Hospital and
received a degree as a license
practical nurse. She worked
in both Miami, Florida and
Wilmington, North Carolina.
Her career in nursing were
her vehicle to pursuing her life
vocation of caring for those in
need. She was a tireless ad-
vocate for the poor and home-
less and was involved in many
community activities and civic
organizations. In the 1960's

IR MOMOriam
Inlovingmemoryof,


FREDERICK MULKEY


MITCHLL SEPHEN JR.GLAllYS FLOWERS


It's been 21 fears since you
went to heaven, we miss you
so much .
Your wife Gerty, children,
grandchildren and family.
.

in MOMOriam
In loving memory of'


Missing you,
We thought of you with love
today'
But, that is nothing new.
We thought about you yes-
terday, and days before that

to e think of you in silence,
We often speak your name.
Now, all we have is memo-
ries and your picture in a
frame.
Your memory is our keep-
sake, with which well never
pan.
God has you in His keeping,
we have you in our hearts.
A million words would not
bring you back.
We know because, we've
tried.
Neither would a million
tears.
We know because, we've
cried.
Happy Birthday to the great-
est mother and grandmother
in the world.
Love always from. your
daughter, Charolyn; grand-
children, Latricia (Joseph),
Shanreka, Stephene, Rheu-
bin, Hurel; and great grand,
Khaliah, Lailah and Kamai-
yah.



in MOMOFlam
In loving memory of,


Mable Mulkcey, mother and fam-


TRACIE GENEVA ALLEN-COX
01/05/75-06/13/08

We're sending you hugs on
angel wings of gold. Oh so
many for you to hold.
Your memory is our keep-
sake with which we71 never
part'
. God has you in his keeping,
we have you in our hearts.
On June 14, 11 a.m., New
Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist
Church, 5895, NW 23rd Av-
enue, has dedicated Sunday
service in honor of the one year
anniversary of her death.


Death Notice


MOTHER


Sadly missed
Son, Adam Carter, grand-
daughter Kelcina Allen,
grandson, Darryl Carter and
many grandchildren


in MOMOriam
In loving memory of,


. IRENE ACCOUNTED"
ELDER EDWARDS, died
Sunday, May 31, at North
Shore Hospital.
Survivors include: brother,
Eenezer; 4 special cousin,
Irene King; special childhood
friend, Tommy Bruton and
many nephews, nieces, cous-
in and friends.
Viewing at Myrtle Grove
Presbyterian Church, 2961
NW 175 Street on Friday
evening, 4 p.m., followed
by a memorial service. Fu-
neral service Saturday, 10
a.m., at New Shiloh Mission-
ary Baptist Church, 1350
NW 95 Street, with Rev. Dr.
D.L.Powell officiating and the
Richardson Mortuary Staff
directing.
The committal will be at
Miami-Dade Memorial Cem-
etery. The Repast will be at
New Shiloh Missionary Bap-
tist Church afterwards.
She leaves to mourn a
brother, Eenezer Edwards;
a special cousin, Irene King;.
special childhood friend,
Tommy Bruton; and many
nephews,-nieces, cousin and
friends.
In lieu of flowers contri-
butions may be sent to Myrtle
Grove Presbyterian Church
for the Eddie Ebenezer Edu-
cation Scholarship fund.

Nakia Ingraham
JUANCARLOSMALDONADO,
21, of Jacksonville, died June 7.
Arrangements are incomplete.

WILFRED HIGH TOWER, 54, of
Fort Lauderdale, died June 6. ar..
arrangements are incomplete. -

DS CARRE ic6e wa



St Fort
CELINE JEAN PIERRE, 73,
died June 3 at Aventura Hospices,
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Haitian
Baptist Church.
EUGENE JEAN LOUIS, 47
died May 20 at Jackson North, Ar
arrangements are incomplete.


FABIAN 'FABO' BURKS


It's ali-eady been a year bro
and we miss you a lot.
We will always have you in
Our thoughts and prayers.",
Love your sis, Cookie;
brother, Brandon Burks and
famHy.


y a ', .
di\
JAMES 'JAY' ADAMS,
AKA 'Wild' Child, 31, aspir-
ing rapper, died June 1. Sur-
vivors include: sons, James
and Keitron; mother, Ebbie
L.; sisters, YolandaEllis, Ter-
ri Coates and Shira; brother'
Eric and a host of nieces and
nephews. Service wab held in
Ft. Wayne, Indiana.


WILLIAM A. COOPERWATRLMcAIJR


We love you and miss you.
Your children, parents Wal-
ter and Victoria, sister Angela,
Brother Chgistopher. Happy
Fathers Day?


We remember and honor
you on the first anniversary of
you leaving us. We love you.
We miss you.
Your family


L..
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MILTON A. HALL. I


TONY E. FERGUSON


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES JUNE 10-16 20 9


Former Miami-Dade


MARISS LEAI ISALOM, 19






















SETO C MIAMI:~~:~~, FLRID, JN-01,20 H IM IE


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The Miami Times


Scolrsi reiiet eree Yugkn onl c.nl


Representatives from the Ronald McDonald House Charities
and scholarship recipients attend a reception held at Cox
-
Communications last month.

Ronald McDonald House awards
*
Scholarships to high school semors
Miami-Dade and Broward high school seniors were selected to
be the recipients of a $2,000 scholarship towards their college
education.* The students were honored during a reception at 99
Jamziast moilth. These eleven outstanding students were selected
from a pool of over 300 applicants from Miami-Dade, Broward and
Monroe Counties.
The following are the winners of the 2008-2009 Ronald McDonald
House Charities/ Future Achievers Scholarship Awards Reception:
Amir Feroux, Emmanuela Pierre, Ryan Walker, Mercedes Young,
Sean Chinn, Aynesse Geffrard, Robert Nolan, Deborah Napolean,
Marie Ashley Villard and Jodie Mitchell.
hiFu creoAchieveriseof So t da is one of the most prestigious
Since 1981, Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC)O of South
Florida has been dedicated to helping local children live happier,
healthier and more productive lives by supporting health care and
medical research programs, education and the arts, and civic and
social programs. Its cornerstone program, the Ronald McDonald
House, provides a "home away from home" for families with ill
children receiving treatment at nearby pediatric medical facilities
in Miami-Dade and Broward Counties. RMHC of South Florida also
awards grants to local not-for-profit organizations serving children
through a portion of donations from McDonald's customers and
Global Ronald McDonald House Charities matching grants.

Serena falls' in three sets to
Kuznetsova at Roland Garros
Svetlana Kuznetsova squandered a big lead Wednesday but sdH
ended Serena Williams' 18-match Grand Slam winning streak by
winning 7-6 (3), 5-7, 7-5 in'the French Open quarterfinals.
Williams, seeQed second, was seeking her third successive major
title and the 11th of her career. She won her only French Open title
in 2002.
She blamed nerves for her defeat.
"In the third set I had an opportunity and I got really tight, and
I pretty much gave it to her," WEiams said. "It was like, 'Here, do
you want to go to the semis? Because I don't.' She was like, 'OK."'
The No. ?-seeded Kuznetsova faced a set point serving at 5-6 in
the first set but erased it. with a slam and won that set. Williams
rallied three points from defeat to even the match, then took a 3-1
lead in the third.
The seesaw struggle was so close that midway through the third
set, each player had won 100 points
Kuznetsova mounted the final comeback and broke serve in the
last game when a weary Williams committed three unforced errors,
including a backhand pushed wide on match point.
"Honestly, I think I lost because of me, and not because of any-
thing she did," Williams said.
Kuznetsova, the 2004 U.S. Open champion, is seeking her
Please turn to SERENA 4C


dents several times since he
graduated from the New World
School of the Arts in 2004.
"In the piece, 'Awakening,' I
hope the students remember
all their steps," said Ingraham.
"I also hope they remember the
emotions a spirit they felt when
we created the piece."
Please turn to TALENT 3C


By Rashida Bartley
Special to the Times
Hundreds of people anxiously
awaited the curtains to rise at
Charles Drew Middle SchoolAu-
ditorium for the annual spring
concert last month.
While their supporters looked
ovet .their programs, 40 danc-


ers; 40 singers and 10 student
helpers prepared for their rou-
tines backstage.
This year theme Avas, "Change
Has Come."
"I picked the theme after elec-
tion of Obama," said Sylvia Pad-
ron, dance instructor for Charles
Drew. "The election symbolized.
change in America and our


school has gone through a lot of
changes."
To prepare, the dance stu-
dents practice several improvi-
sation pieces evoking the spirit
of change before working with
choreographer Rashad Ingra-
ham.
A former student, Ingraham
has worked with current stu-


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nee ment
FASHION HIP HOP MUSIC FOOD DINING Aa-rs & CULTURE PEOPLE


Charles Drew Middle School dance team displays a combination of dance routines to the audience during the school's annual
spring concert last month. -Photo Courtesy: Charles Drew Middle School


Charls Dre Midle Scool hoir ings selection te schol'sannua sprig cocert ast onth. --Phoo Cortesy Rasida Brtle


COpy rig hted Mate rla I


Syndicated Content

Available from Com mercia I News Provide rs











I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


The Church of the Open Door
and its constituency is com-
mended for providing The Lyr-
ic Theatre with its 41 annual
Pink Tea featuring The Men's
Fellowship Summer Music Se-
ries that consisted of tenor
Samuel J. Eudovique and tap
dancer Marshall Davis, Jr. sa-
luting Sammie Davis, Jr., re-
cently in front of a filled theatre
on the inside and onlookers on
the outside. -
Moreover, Rev. Dr. R. Joaquin
Willis coined the program bibli-
cally from Joshua 6 as "Rais-
I'ng the Bar," with obedience to
God's word and giving to God's
treasury. In 41-years, the Pink
Tea has raised the bar with 76
persons being the chairpersons,
starting from Eura Nesbitt
in 1969 and down to Kervin
Clenance in 1909.
Kudos go out to his cortimit-
tee chairs, such as Elizabeth
Marshall, Erslyn Anders,
Mare Headerson, Alva Man11,
Evolyn Campbell, Jacqueline
H. Clenance, Catherine Cart-
er, Gladys Johnson, Lawrence
Adams, William Clarke, III
and Khary Brayning. Others
are the underwriters includ-
ing Dr. William Campbell, Dr.
Herman Dorsett, Rudolph
and Katherine Levarity, Jer-
ry Miller, Elizabeth Marshall
Thelma Wilson, and William
and Annette Clarke that indi-
cated "People don't care about
how much you know. . . un-
til they know how much you
care."
Vita. of Eudovique stated he
was born in Barbados and came
to Miami where he received his


Gladys Johnson, Dalton Nick-
erson, Annie Otey, Clyde Ste-
phens, Lorraine Vaught, and
Bennie and Carolyn White.
* * * * * *
Historically Black colleges
and universities are the epit-
ome of producing the "pomp
and circumstance" for a com-
prehensive commencement. It
was evident at Florida A & M
University, Edwards College,
Florida Memorial University,
and Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity at.the Ocean Center last
month,. where over 384 gradu-
ated before an audience of over
3,000 people.
The Pomp and Circumstance
included the march in with ev-
eryone in steps, as James Poiti-
er conducted the band, followed
by Director Donovan V.
Wells provided "Garvork-
na Fanfare," Dr. Rebecca
W. Steele conducted the
choir with "Rejoice With
Exceeding Great Joy" and
President Trudie Kibbe
Reed controlled the un-
necessary disturbance at
IS the beginning by warning
to escort 'any one out of
the auditorium. As a re-
sult, no one was ejected.
In the midst of the people were
two outstanding families that
came to support, Xavyance
Lydel Handfield, a Mass Com-
munication major and Herbert
E. Johnson, III., Accounting
niajor.
Supporting Johnson included
grandmother, Rosetta "Rose"
Wright Freeman-Dean, par-
ents, Herbert E. and Brenda
Johnson; grandmother, Inez
McKinney-Johnson; Rodrick,
Brandon and Dorothy Cun-
ningham; Nashawna and Nor-
risha Jackson; Trenise Stir-
rap, Herbert E. Johnson, III


and Tracye S. Hepburn.
Traveling to Daytona Beach to
support Handfield were grand
parents, Alice and Cornelius
Handfield, Johnnie Godbolt,
Dr. Larry and Rose Charles,
Nathaniel and Montress Frazi-
er, Xanda Patterson, Xavyan-
da and ,Xavryon Patterson,
Vance Lovelace, Father, Ty-
nese Cornelius, III, Kenya and
S. Brooks. Further, Xavyance
has enrolled in FullFail College
to work on a master's degree in
communication.
* * * * * *
Speaking of graduation, coor-
dinator T. Eilene Major-Martin
is commended for introduc-
ing the high school and college
graduates, as "pomp and cir-
cumstance" was played dur-
ing the ceremony at Ebenezer
United Methodist Church last
week.
Kudos go out to Nakaya Agar-
rat, Miami Central Se-
nior graduate, daughter
of Lizette Freeman and
granddaughter of Das-
sette Freeman; Karrie
Brookins, Miami Carol
City graduate, son of
Paris Brookins and the
late Edward Brookins
and the nephew of Min. EUD
Joann Brookins; Tray-
el Dixon, Miami Norland Se-
nior graduate, son of Eugene
(Shree) Dixon and grandson of
Eleanor Taylor.
Also, Lawrence Josey, Mi-
ami Northwestern Senior
graduate, sop of Larry Josey
and nephew of Min. Joann
Brookins; Maritza Vereen,
Miami Carol City and the
daughter of Elbert and Heddie
Vereen, Tiffany. Washington,
Miami Northwesteyn Senior,
daughter of \Sharon Wash-
ington and granddaughter of


Doretha Wolf.
Also, Tasha Mobley re-
ceived her Bachelor of Science
in Technical Management at -
Devry University and
will pursue a Master of
Science in ITE at Nova
SoutheasternUniversi-
ty.Mobleyisthedaugh-
ter of James and Rose
Mobley; and Shaquita
Rahming received her
Master of Science in
Public Administration WI
L
at Nova Southeastern
University. She is the
daughter of Lerlean Wade and
niece of Veronica Rahming.
* * * * * * *
A special salute goes out to
the ministers, officers, and
members of Ebenezer United
Methodist Church, especially
coordinators Jill Bethel, Min.
Dr. Pamela Hall-Green, and
David Smith at the edifice last
month. Dr. Green put
the finishing touches
on the altar by deco-
rating the throng for
the Rev. Dr. Joreatha
M. Capers, honoree,
just before she was es-
corted down the aisle
in a lavender three-
VIOUE piece suit to comple-
ment the color for the
afternoon.
After her majestic entrance,
the fruits of her labor followed:
23-ministers enter the edifice,
they were Ministers Alfred. Al-
len, Joann Allen Nayanna
Baptiste, LaToya Beasley,
Elizabeth Bradley, JoAnn
Brookins, Rev. D' Mrtri Cato-
Watson, William Clark, Jr.,
Dr. Pamela Hall-Green, Har-
old Jacobs, Lawrence Josey,
David Larmond, Brdaton Lo-
pes, Eileen Martin-Major,
Eddie Mercado, Earl Rich,


Gregory Robinson, Latina
Robinson, Maurice Robinson,
Reuben Smith, David Staples
and Lillian Thomas. It is a vi-
sion from God passed
on to the honoree.
Dr. Capers interject-
ed her unconditional
thanks to her support-
ers for allowing her to
be at the church for
four years and working
cohesively to improve
LIS the minds, souls, and
-visions of everyone to
allow.God to use them
for a better church.
Kudos go out to the coordi-
nators for a unique program
which included The Singing
*Angels of Arcola Lakes Park,
Ebenezer's Children's Choir,
a poem by Norma Sank,
M.A.S.K. performance, solo by
Bro. Terrance C. Lorrant and
reflections by Rose Morman.
Ebenezer Mass Choir com-
bined with The Singing Angels
that delivered a new sound
at the church singing. "Total
Praise", and keynote speaker
Rev. Dr. Cedrita Siplin Reid an
academic dean from Powder
Springs, Ga. who spoke three-
times and left an impressive
challenge to the listeners.
Other listeners included An-
ton Bell, Letitia Bowden Car-
olyn Frazier, Pearl Graydon,
Mamie Ivery, Daphne John-
son, Mae Etta Lowery, Net-
tie Murphy Lonnie McCart-
ney, Margaret Saunders, Mary
Simmons, Henry Small, Vir-
ginia Smiley, Ammie Smith,
Tillie Stibbins, Dr. Lorraine
Strachan, Valerie Thomas,
Vers Fenton, Walter Johnson,
Hortense Collier, and 10-sup-
porting family members of Dr.
Capers who flew in from St. Pe-
tersburg, FL. for the 2-days of
activities.


high school and
college education
His performances
melude the Palm
Beach Opera. Flor-
ida Opera Ebony,
Atlanta Opera Music, New Jer-
sey Opera, Brooklyn Opera and
Coral Gables, Miami, North Mi-
amiBeachandMiamiLyricOp-
era. Furthermore, he has gone
abroad to study with Maestro
Rafaele Cardone, Italy, and is
also producing and performing
in a "1VIusical Tribute to Sammy
Davis Jr.".
Vita of -Marshall Davis, Jr.
was born in Miami
Beach and began tap
dancing at the age of 10
at the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center,
where his father, Mar-,
shall Davis is director.
At age 11, he was a fi-
nalist in the Philip Mi-
chael Thomas "Rais- DAV
ing Star" Competition;
Florida winner for
the Tri-Star Pictures; worked
with the late Gregory Hines, a
professional tap lance; a Star
Search Winner; and the great-
est performance on "Bring in
Da' Noise, Bring in Da' Funk"
His family tree iriclude great-
grandfather Bishop Randolph
Williams; grandparents, Ral-
phu and Charlotte Williams,
parents, Arnetta Williams
and Marshall Davis, and aunt,
Charlayne Thompkins.
Others in attendance includ-
ed Carolyn Adams, Catherine
Carter, Imani Clenance, Lila
Cobb, Shirley Jacobs, Fifia
Jenkins, Denise Johnson,


__ _:


.

* *


- ~min galul comgetition


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


O


HipHo9 r~ppr rcrl~~r~ LIIik irrrr, b w(l ~b~lllLI


- Copyrighted Material -


Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers .


SATURDAY, JUNE 20T", 2009


me a














Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson honored by El Portal CARES "


Copyrighted Material -



Syndicated Content -


A Available from Commercial News Providers


"Middle school students tell stories through dance"


I I


BLACKS MUST. CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Miami-Dade County Com-
missioner Audrey M. Ed-
monson was praised by El
Portal CARES last month. El
Portal CARES, established in
2004, is a non-profit which
provides social services to
people in El Portal. As for-
mer mayor of El Portal, Ed-
monson developed the pro-
gram through a grant from
the North Dade Medical As-
sociation and since then she
has /continued to support
the group. .
El Portal CARES has
provided hot meals, yoga
classes, transportation, and
deliveries of groceries and
medications to hundreds of
seniors in the community in
the past year. The organiza-
tion has also helped young
residents in the area, pro-
vide 1,040 hours of after-
school tutoring to students,


offering an affordable sum-
mer camp and providing
summer jobs to six high
school students who earned
200-300 volunteer hours
each.
El Portal CARES' last
month included previous
and current students, do-
nors and volunteers who
came together for a first
"class reunion" and fund-
raiser. Edmonson was given
a plaque in appreciation for
her support of the program.
"El Portal CARES is an or-
ganization of which I am tru-
ly honored to be a part," said
Edmonson. "It is incredible
to see how this organization
has grown to helping, hun-
dreds of El Portal citizens. It
is good. to see our residents
watch out for one another
. in order to strengthen our
communities."


,e-.~


Jay-ZexpandsRocaWear
clothing line to China
Mogul Jay-Z and partnering
company Iconix China have
secured an expansion deal fo
bring the Rocawear brand to
China, according to Allhiphop.
com
Tl e deal was .finalized
with Bosideng International
Holdings, who will manufacture
the brand's Spring 2010 lines.
e Additionally, the company has
forecasted a timetable to break
ground on over 300 Rocawear
stores throughout Greater
China by 2012.
As an original founder
of Rocawear, Jay-Z stated
that making the brand an
international 'product was one
of his main goals since selling
the company's rights to Iconix
for $204 million.


brings out the tension and
shows what people go through
in our communities," said Dix-
on. "It shows the anger peo-
ple feel when they don't have
enough money to afford things
they need for their children."
Dixon wants to be a psychiatrist
and help people get through
those hurt feelings brought on
by tough times.
After ten dance performances,
dressed in maroon and yellow
robes, the choirlook the stage.
Made up of majority sixth grad-
ers the choir opened their set
with an a capella version of the
gospel hymn, "Alleluia."
Choir director, Robert C.
Phillips, also worked with his
students all years to .get them
ready for their big moment'
Many of the sixth graders


did not perform in the Christ-
mas concert because they
weren't-ready. I like to prepare
my student for success," said
Phillips.
By springtime Phillips said
his students were ready. They
got over the anxiousness.
"It's one thing to perform in
an empty auditorium but it's
another to do it in front of other


people and let your personality
come out through your voice."
Personalities were shining
through as the choir performed
Season of Love from the Broad-
way hit play Rent.
The choir performed four
more songs before the dance
company closed out the show
and ultimately closed the 2008-
2009 performance season.


TALENT .
continued from 10 ,

Ingraham went on to say- for
first year students like the
sixth graders the dancing is all
about emotions and as they be-
come trained the technique is
just the polishing.
For eighth grader RaiJean
Neloms, this would be her last
performance before heading to
Michael Krop High School.
"I have practiced all year for
the last show" said Neloths.
"When I'm backstage, I'm get_
ting excited. Ask my friends I'm
jumpizig around, getting amped
and ready to go out there."
Seventh grader Rubin Dixon
could not wait to perform the
piece Motherless Child.
"It's a powerful dance. It


SHORTS 4 KIDS!
1 PM Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $17
SIGNATURE SHORTS
3 PM Carnival Studio Theater (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $42
CELIA: THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
3 & 7 PM Knight Concert Half $60, $80, $95, $125
FUERZA BRUTA
7:30 PM Lynn Worson Stage (in the Ziff Ballet Opera House) $63.75


rrt


**


* *





Z


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C-


5 0 THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


ag


Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson (bark) with students awarded by El
.Portal CARES for their academic achievement. From left to right: Al-Jacob Darring, Zalika
Allen, Elijah Jennings, Fermina Destine, and Javens Mompoint. Photo credit* Ryan Holloway/
Miami-Dade County











I (


M |


Russian player bested Williams by taking risks


START'S FRIDAY JJNE 12


I


R"^ces MZusT CONTROL TI-iEIR OW'N DESTINY


Sheryl Troutman, Hildren
Tutien, Dayva Henry, Sylvia
Sands, Raynal Sands, Gall
Goring and Edesha Tutien.

"""""
appa Alpha Sorority who
attended their annual
conference in Myrtle Beach,
S.C. were Betty Bradshaw,
Stephenia ,Willis, Andrea
Robinson, Shelia Hylton,
Rosetta Peterkins, Gloria
Davis, Donna Payne, Emma
Curry, Virginia Washington
Brunson, Constance Gilbert,
Kay Sullivan, vice president,
Lanette Jones, Thelma
Wilson, Nadia Castriota-
Papillion, Sandra Cyril,
Pierrela Jean-Baptiste,
Veronica Rhaming, Ann
Henry, Bertha Milton,
Marilyn Montes-Guillen
arid Deborah Simmons,
president.
**********
Ann Henry, Thelma Wilson
and Emma Curry have
received their silver stars for
thin 35 years of service to
AKA Sorority.

*********
Wedding anniversary
greetings goes to Lorenzo and
Shatetwn Dailey, June 4, their
15th and Horace and Bertha
Johnson, June 6, their 44th.

**********
John Edwin Culmer II


returned home last week to
visit his mother, Leome S.
Calmer, and sister, Attorney
Angela Culmer and his
brother, James Culmer and
the Scavella clan. John and
his family lives in Houston
Texas.

. ""*****
Congratulations to Erinisha
Johnson who graduated from
Saint Joseph Catholic School
in Greenville, Miss. Erinisha
was the salutatorian
of her class. She is the
granddaughter of Joe and
Regina Livingston and the
great--granddaughter of Effle
Robinson-Fortson. Erinisha
will attend the University of
South Mississippi this fall.

***********
Among those receiving
professional degrees: Kendra
Elizabeth Rochelle Clarke,
master's degree; Alexander
Camille Bethel, Bachelor
of Science; Ellen Bethel,
Bachelor of Science; Akela
Blue, Bachelor of Science;
Phoenicia J. Hill, Bachelor of
Science and Keith Lawrence
Rolle, Bachelor of Science.

*******
Gail Moses enjoyed a
fabulous birthday bash at
her Miramar home with her
family and some of her dear
friends. It was a "Taste of the
Topics Affair." Sundresses,


sandals and casual pants
were worn by the guest who
said they really enjoyed
the party being to dress
casually.

***********
Again, congratulations to
all of our high school and
college graduates. All of the


fine teachers who taught
the children daily ,and their
parents who made sure they
attend school, study and turn
in their assignments. Continue
to prepare for the future. You
will need all of the education.
Think about this statement
everyday, "A mind is a terrible
thing to waste."


Miami Lmks attending the
40" Southern Area Conference
in Jacksonville last month were:
president of the Dade County
Chapter Dawye Gibson-
Smith, Vennda Rei Gibson,
Shelain Welters, Shirley
Archie, Dr. Barbara Edwards,
Dolores Washington,
Mercita Wimberly, Beth
Reddick, Carolyn Blake,
Mand Newbold, Christine
Alexander, Betty Ferguson,
Tawnicia Rowan, Jessie
Stinson, Dr. Cynthia Clarke
and Deborah Ally. Greater
Miami Chapter of the
Links were Angela Bellamy,
president, Renee Jones,
Anne Herriott,. Jaunita
Johnson, Gwen Welters,
Martha Welters, Beverly
Nixon and Valda Christian.

********
Get well wishes goes to
E1ouise Bain-Farrington,
Herbert Rhodes, Jr., Sam
Olea 4, Carmetta Bro4n-
Russell, Gary Hepburn,
George Saunders, Sue
Francis, Myrna Range-Lee,
Wendell Stirrup, Timothy
Savage, Doris McKinney-
Pittman, Cleomie Carter-
Bethel, Richard Rolle, Dr.
Oswald Bronson (former
B.C.U. president) and Ines M.


Johnson.
.. 4
"^******
Others \\ho
were on the 13th
annual Scenic
Bus Tour to Tuskegee and
Montgomery, Al., sponsored
by the Daughters of the King
at St. Agnes Episcopal Church
were Leome S. Onlmer,
president, Father Richard
L.M. Barry, priest, Ted
Abraham, Bethany Addison,
Rochelle Allen, Erna
Beckles, Elizabeth Betty and
Joyce Blue, Tywon Bowe,
Cynthia Brown, Frederick
Brown, Janet Brown, Angela
Culmer, James Cuhper,
Sandra Darling, Khambrel
Dawkins, Ardie Edwards,
Ryan Everette, Carolyn
Frazier, Eddrea-Goodmond,
Barbara : .Johnson, Keith
Kelly, Derla Mannings, Helen
McCoy, Florence Moncur,
Margaret Moncur, Robin
Moncur, Alexis Parker,
Darrell Parker, Dennis and
Gloria Parks, Helena Parris,
Marilyn Randall, Veyanna
Reddick, William Robinson,
Winston Scavella, Phillip
Simmons, Maj. Leroy
Smith, Bre Stewart, Sidney
Stewart, Paula Stone, Lindk
Cook-Taylor, Gwen Thomas,


SERENA
continued from 10

second major title. Her op-
ponent Thursday will be Sa-
mantha Stosur .of Australia,
who reached her first major
semifinal by beating Sorana
Cirstea of Romania 6-1, 6-3.
Stosur, 25, has never won
a tour title.
Kuznetsova bounced back
rf om being sent to the court


Kuznetsovawasservingone
point from a 5-2 lead in the
second set when she turned
her right ankle in pursuit of
a shot and fell on her back.
She rose with clay covering
the back of her shirt and- the
length of her right arm. Dirt
was in her hair and even on
her forehead.
She was unhurt and play
quickly resumed, but it took
awhile for Kuznetsova to re-


high-risktenniswhacking
winners into both corners
and sometimes choosing an-
gles that surprised Williams.
Kuznetsova showed lots of
variety, too when she hit
a crosscourt 10b, Williams
staggered helplessly as she
watched the ba111and beyond
her reach. .
Williams was sometimes
betrayed by uncertain foot-
work on the clay, which led to


The men's quarterfinals
Wednesday matched Roger
Federer against Frenchman
Gael Monfils, and Juan Mar-
tin del Potro against Tommy
Robredo.
In the women's semifinals
Thursday, top-ranked Dinara
Safina will face No. 20-seeded
Dominika Cibulkova. Safina
hopes to reach the final for the
third time in the past five ma-
jor events, while Cibulkova is
playing in her first Grand Slam
semifinal.


in a messy spill ""ethtlefthe gain ehr fotng. repate eror on h,~,;,","~:'er or-


Public joins you in celebrating Black Music Month.



Pu blix.
WRERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE@


publix.com


@2008 Publix Asset Managelment Company


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009

















FAMU students embark on


.
MmI k- f *** h*** th t fulas
CO py rig hted Mate r ia I ,
f (WWW S indicated Content pl I4

.
** Available from Commercial News Providers .


Miami-Bada Parks and Recrea







JUN 21, 5 7:30 PM JR. WHEELCHAIR SPORTS CLUB
EVERY SRTURBAY: ECOADVENTURES: KEY BISCAYNE SUNSET 540/Session ages 9 and upl
BOAT TOUR Rotstmg wheelchair sports clinics melude
SAT, 10 AM 1 PM S35/Person basketball tennis, fenetng cyciang and go 1
ECOADVENTURES: HISTORIC OLETA RIVER Board the Pelican Slopper for a sunset boat Camp Matecumbe
CANOE TRIP cruise around the island of Key Biscayne enth our 13811 SW 120 St
528 Person (ages 7 and upt knowledgeable nacuralist staff on a 40-passenger 305) 382-8160 (3051 386 6:30 (TDD
Every Saturday in June, July and August rehve catamaran Enioy breathtaking :news of Biscayne
the neer's histone past with park naturalists The Bay and historical landmarks such at Sultsville and
beauty of the Oleta Faves hey awn man to its shore the Cape Florida Lighthouse Reservations requued
for centunes. E seplore tills natural haven for wadulg Crandon Park MalLOS
birds. osprey. fish. and the endangered West Indian 4000 Cr.sndon Blvd Key Biscavne Tne new vacanon nadinon 19 quickly becomtog
- manatee Reservauons required. (3051365-3015 the stawatson' and Msarru-Dade Parks offers a
Meet at Easr Greynolds Park (Northeast Regional multitude- of -scusnnes to be remove variout gettmg
Dog Park) JUN 27, B PM (gate opens at 7 PM) away EcoAdvenrures MetroZoo Palmetto Mant
16700 Biscayne Blva SUMMER CABARET CONCERT SERIES Golf. Deering Estate at CuUer. Fruit & Space Park.
(3051365-3018 $20 Person concert 5'.5 for the three-concert series beaches and islands. mann is and waterfront restau-
Tue Sumrner Cabaret Concert Series features rants Visit www mlamidade gov, parks for more
., edecuc world music artists in an Inumate setting
clanng the sununer months The June concert wdI '94 g re! @,.1
feature lazz ino Candy Curns & Company I
JUN 33, 10 AM 1 PM Deenag Estate at Cutler
MANGO MANIA 16701 SW 72 Ave JUNE 8 AUG 14
$35 (305) 235-1668 LEARN TO SWIM PROGRAM
Jnstructor: Chris Rollins Classes are taught by c. rrified American Red
Jr's everyttung you want to know about mangos- Cross Water Safety merructors and are offered
now to grow them, meect and disease problems. EE Monday through Friday in two-week sessions at
recipes and theu many rare and domestic vaneties all Parks pools born June 8 through August 14 We
Sample them unal the juice dnps from your elbows For a complete Ust of scovines go to offer evening classes at select locallons through
and taste luscious sucky nee with mango Visit the werw mlamidade gow, parks and click on the link For September Ages 3+ For nsore information contact
150 vanetses grovang m the park. People With Disabilu.es yea nearest pool
Fruit & Space Park
24801 SW 187 Ave. SAT, 11:30 AM 1:30 PM JUN 8 AUG 14, 9 AM 5 PM
(305) 247-5727 FITNESS SWIMMING MIAMI-DADE PARKS SUMMER CAMPS
$3000 session s fages 9 20, Children will participate in held Inps fitness and
JUN 20 & 21, 10 AM 5PM L.ap swimming for han and exercise.= tor and nduals sports activities, Mrs & crafts. ECOAd 'enble nature
REDLAND SUMMER FRUIT FESTIVAL entra physical disat-thrses camps performlng arts camps alumaj e: 56/Person (Chs1cizen under 11 admitted treeJ AD Barnes Pool fishing htking, and more Camps for chlidzen with
Thas annual event showcases local agnculture 3401 SW 72 Ave disatinuties are availacle Ences ..ary Tr; register
and tropical fruits Vendor booths featunag local (300 .282-8160 (205) 385-6230 (TDDI contact the specific pask where you wash yous :hild
wines, yummy foods and rare fruit samphngs wilJ be tc. strend or viser www miamidade gov parks
available SAT, 10 AM 12 PM
Prust & Space Park For the tull Usung of .ent & es go to
21801 SW 187 Ave


It~nas~


BLkCKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW:N DESTINY


Florida A&M University
(FAMU) students will use their
summer vacation to apply skills
learned in the classroom to real
life situations.
Like many college students
across the nation, FAMU se-
nior Georgia Dawkins will have
a summer job working at ABC
News for Good Morning Ameri-
ca and America this Morning.
FAMU graduate student Thad-
deus Payton- is taking his suc-
cess in the agriculture industry.
Payton will study abroad in Vi-
enna this summer.
Emerson Naylor, Janelle Mos-
ley and Larrynnee Holloman, all
students from FAMU School of
Business and Industry (SBI)'
will intern this summer with
the Board of Governors for the
Federal Reserve System.
These FAMU students are
bound to have a summer full of
experiences.
After obtaining a "fellowship
with ABC news last year, Dawk-
ins was offered an entry-level
position with the company for
the summer. In addition to work-
ing at ABC, Dawkins, a senior
broadcast journalism student
from Sebritig, Fla., was recently
named one of the Top 100 Best
and Brightest by UWire: *
"This is a humbling moment,"
Dawkins said. "I am very hon-
ored to have been'selected as
the only representative of an
HBCU on the list. I am fortunate
because the School of Journal-
isin and Graphic Communica-


tion has provided me with mul-
timedia experiences that have
helped me reach this point in
my career."
Other students also look for-
ward to their extraordinary
summer,
As Payton is researching in
Vienna, SBI students Naylor,
100sley and Holloman will be
working for the Board of Gov-
ernors for the Federal Reserve
System in Washington, D.C.
The Federal Reserve is the cen-
tral bank of the United States
and provides the U.S. with a
safe monetary and financial
system.
Naylor is part of the FAMU
team that won the 2009 Ford
HBCU Business Classic com-
petition, while his colleagues,


Mosley and Holloman, have held
respective financial internships
at Delaware River Port Author-
ity and JPMorgan Chase.
Mosley is most excited about
garmag some experience in the
financial industry from more
of a governmental standpoint,
rather than corporate.
"This is such an interesting
time to be part of the financial
industry," Mosley said. "I don't
think I would have had this
opportunity if I did not attend
FAMU, and SBI in specific. SBI
requires students to have three
internships prior to graduating.
The coursework also allows us
to develop our analytical skills,
which is something that I plan
to put into action this summer
during my internship.


RAM-36FM L


T


S C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


sm
Miami-Dade school officials and North Miami Senior High students celebrate their comple-
tion of the Success Academy last month. Photo courtesy: Miami-Dade Public Schools


-- :
,,



Georgia Dawkinsa FAMU senior broadcast journalism student
from SebringFla., is enjoying her summer job at ABC News
for Good Morning America and America this Morning.


Miami-Dade school officials and Miami Central students celebrate their completion of the
Success Academy last month.Photo courtesy: Miami-Dade Public Schools

e
S tud entsrece Iv ese he c k for


completing Success Academy

Miami-dade students from Miami Central Senior High and North Miami Senior High were presented
with an oversized check for their participation in the Superiritendent's Success Academy tutoring ini-
tiative, which helped students in struggling schools prepare for the state exam. The students earned
money for attending each tutoring session. Each student's share will be calculated and put in a bank
account that has been set up for them.
Miami Central was one of the four schools whp faced closure, according to a state mandate, if they
did not improve their five-year "F" spree. The school made impressive gaitis in this year's state-wide
exam, Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT).


1 diCOUnt


















MIAMI~,FLoORIDA, JUNE~.C~-10-16,200


The Miami Times



USlneSS


OITCES N D


--------_


Wal-Mart says it ill rete 22K jobs in 09


FEMA may put storm victims in foreclosed homes


B... - --


of


As Wal-Mart (WMT) opens about 150 new
or expanded stores in the U.S. in 2009, the
company expects to hirevbout 22,000 peo-
ple for new positions.
Those positions include plerity of cashiers
and stock clerks, but the world's largest re-
tailer will also be adding store managers,
pharmacists and personnel workers.
Wal-Mart is holding its annual sharehold-
ers meeting on Friday, and employees from
its stores around the world are spending
the week in Belitonville at company head-
quarters.
Wal-Mart, still the target of criticism from
union-backed groups for its pay and ben-
efits, has improved its health insurance
coverage and opened it to full- and part-
time employees. The company says 94 per-
cent of its employees have health coverage,
either through Wal-Mart or another family


member. medicines. Competitors, such as Kroger
"At Wal-Mart, we offer competitive pay (KR), have matched the price for some
and benefits and real opportunities prescriptions.
for our associates to advance "During this difficult eco-
and build careers," Wal-Mart nornic ume, we're proud
Vice Chairman Eduardo to be able to create qual-
Castro-Wright. said. "Job ity jobs for thousands
creation is just one way in of Americans," Castro-
which we're working hard Wright said.
every day to help people Earlier this year, the
across this country live ., a company shared more
better." than $2 billion with its
Other employee benefits workers through bonds-
include a 401K plan, stock es, profit sharing and
purchase and discounts for payments into the com-
workers making in-store pur- pany 401(k) plan. .
chases. Wal-Mart has more than 2.1
The company has touted its ge- million employees in the U.S. and
neric drugs program in which Wal-Mart is abroad. The company had sales last fiscal
selling $4 prescriptions for many popular year of $401 billion.


President Barack Obama
promised Monday to deliv-
er more than 600,000 jobs
through his $787 billion
stimulus plan this summer,

gabkde sa agen cpun
projects, schools and sum-
mer youth programs.
Obama is ramping up his
stimulus program this week
even as his advisers are slop-
ing down predictions about
when the spending plan will
impinge on the nation's un-
employment.
Many of the stimulus plans
that Obama announced
Monday already were in the
works, including hundreds of
maintenance projects at rnili-
tary bases, about 1,600 state
road and airport improve-
ments, and, federal money
states budgeted for 135,000
teachers, principals and oth-
er school staff.
The administration had al-
ways viewed the summer as a
rise for stimulus spending, as
better weather allowed more
public, works construction
and federal agencies h'ad pro-
cessed requests from states
and others.
But Obama now promises
an accelerated pace of federal
spending over the next few
months to improve the econ-


The federal government is exploring
how to put Florida hurricane evacuees m
foreclosed homes if a Katrina-like storm
devastates the region and shelters, hotels
and other housing options are full.
Officials told the Associated Press on
Tuesday that it is an effort to find some
usefulness in the foreclosure crisis and
keep people close to their homes and
communities instead of scattering them
around the country, which happened when
Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans
and other parts of coastal Louisiana
and Mississippi almost four years ago.
Thousands of victims who lost their homes
in the storm moved to Houston, Atlanta and
other cities, and many never returned-
New Orleans has been slow to recover,
partly because of the lost population.
"When you have a diaspora that leaves
the state it's very hard to get those guys
back. You really want to prevent them from
leaving the state," said Jeff Bryant, the
Federal Emergency Management Agency's
federal coordinating officer for Florida.
"We want to keep them in their same local
community."
The idea is still being developed, but
FEMA would likely contact banks, other
mortgage holders and their representatives
to compile a list of avaiJable homes. The
evacuees would then be assigned homes


we *.* am...me *ammeme aman*mle


am. suImm e


close to their own and FEMA would use a
contractor, acting as its agent, to pay rent
directly to whoever owns the home, said
Jon Arno, FEMA's individual assistance
branch director for Florida. His duties
include finding temporary housing for


disaster victims.
If the idea works in Florida, it could serve
as a model nationally.
In April, there were 278,287 homes
in some stage of foreclosure in Florida,
according to RealtyTrac.


~II


(Iry~


Jigns


Jo


market


slus ~


no )


impes enwat. ntro, areas ctagtnat


Available from Com-mercial News Providers


Obama promises stimulus plan to


BARRACK OBAMA
U.S. PRESIDENT
omy and produce jobs.
"We have a long way to go
on our road to recovery but
we are going the right way,"
Obama said in a writteri
statement prepared for his
public announcement of the
additional summer stimu-
lus activity. "Our measure of
progress is the progress the
Anierican people see in their
own lives. And until that
progress is steady and solid,
we're going to keep moving
forward. We will not grow
coinplacent or rest. Surely
and steadily, we will turn this
economy around," the state-
ment said.





~


OITCE N D


SY


Sub Contractor Bids

Subcontractor Bids
wanted on all disciplines
Bids Due 7/7/09 at 2 P.M.

Owner: Miami Dade
County Public Schools
1450 N. E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33132

Project NoR
00316903

Bud : $400,000.00

Addition / Renovations


2033 N.W. 43rd Street
Rooms. $125 weekly. Nicely
furnished 786-290-0946.

2352 N.W.97th Street
Room with air, $90 weekly,
$360 to move in. Call 305-
691-2703. or 786-515-3020

2400 N.W.162Terrace
Nice room, central air, T.V.,
305-776-0667 or 305-622-
5240

3042 N.W.44th Street
Big, air, $120 weekly, $240 to
move in. 786-262-6744

6233 N.W. 22nd Court
Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $100
weekly, $220 moves you
in.Call 786-277-2693.

6849 N.W.15th Avenue
Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $100
weekly, $200 moves you
in.Call 786-277-2693

695 N.W.41st Street
Bigl Air, cable, $250 move in,
$130 wkly. 305-322-8966.
7110 N. W. 15 Court
$125 weekly, air. Appointment
only. 305-254-6610
74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $450 moves
you in. 786-306-2849
LITTLE RIVER AREA
Air, kitchen privilege, $125/
week, $250 move in. Private
entrance. 305-835-2446

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Cable tv, utilities included,
$600 monthly. 305-687-1110
NORTHWEST AREA
Furnished room for rent in pri-
vate home, light kitchen priivi-
lege, call 305-621-1017.
NORTHWEST AREA
Nice and clean, freq cable,
air, $125 weekly, $200 to
move in. 786-426-6263


1045 N.W. 47 Street
Five bedrooms, two baths,
Of monthly.14ew Home-
No Secunty 786-325-7383

1131 Dunad Ave. Opa Ly@
Three bdrms, one bath, Sic
tion 8 OK. 954-826-5904

1153 N.W. 47 Ter. .
Four bedrooms, three
t2hs.$1200 monthly. 786-

13001 N.W.18th Court
Three bedrooms, two
baths,$1000 monthly.
Call 786-412-1131.
'
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
F.our bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
one month security.
954-826-4013

1515 NW 82 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath-
$1000 mthly. 305-757-2632
1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or
305-992-3653

16430 NW 18 PLACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
stove and refrigerator, wash.
er, and dryer hook up, fenced
yard, storm shutters, security
lights. Section 8 vouchers ac-
cepted.786-262-6011
1785 N.W.43rd Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750 monthly. 305-267-9449
1865 N.W. 45th St
Three bdrms, one bath.
305-525-0619, 305-331-3899

19245 N.W. 24 Avenue
Three bedrooms two baths
Section 8 OK $ 1750 305-
528-1650 or 786-597-6121

20027 N.W. 32nd Place
Three bdrm, one and half
bath, $1400 security deposit
required. Section 8 preferred.
Call 954-547-9011.

2300 N.W.153rd Street
Two bedrooms, Florida room,
garage. $1050 monthly.
Call 954-253-9377

2357 N.W. 81 Street
Large three bedrooms. Lights
and water included. $1150.
305-300-0544

2480 N.W. 59th street
Three bedrooms one bath,
central air, large front yard
and back yard, section 8 Wel-
come (Not in Foreclosure)
954-303-0018 or 305-525-
9237 if interested.

2500 NW 162TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
all appliances. Section 8 ok.
$1200 monthly.
305-450-9476

2525 NW 47 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths'
big yard. Section 8 welcome.
305-693-3550


3221 N.W. 11 CT*
Nice four bedrooms, two
baths. HOPWA, Section 8.
786-285-1197, 786-285-1197

3231 NW 191 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Lakefront property, applianc-
es included. Section 8 with
vouchers. Great neighbor-
hood! Call 305-494-5004.

3530 NW 85 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-277-2693

6705 NW 26 AVENUE
Five bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 or Section 8 ok. Call
305-331-6303, 305-893-2276

? N. E. 59Terrace
MOVOIN SPECIAL ($1350)
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$900. Free Water
305-642-7080

8250 NW 2 COURT
One bedroom.one bath.5600
monthly. 305-267-9449

944 N.W. 81 Street #A
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly, $600 security.
Call 786-488-2264

COCONUT GROVE AREA
Beautiful, spacious three
bedrooms, one bath. Section
8 preferred. 786-301-6002
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Freshly renovated. Section 8
OK! Call 786-366-3480

MIAMI AND SUNRISE
AREAS
Three bedrooms,. one bath
and Two bedrooms, two
baths. 786-506-5511
305-299-3816

MIAMI AREA
Three bedrooms from $1100
monthly. NuConcept Realty
305-244-0366

MIAMI GARDENS
Four bedroom, 3 bath, $1600
monthly. 305-812-7029

MIAMI GARDENS
Three bedroorbs, two baths.
$1400 monthly. Northwest,
three bedrooms, one bath,
starting at $1100 and up.
305-757-7067
Design Realty
N.W.133 St.and 18 Ave
Three dro t baths.

N RMHWAE ET

Three and four bedroom, two
bath homes. Tile floors, cen-
tral air, new baths and kitch-
ens.,$1050 to $1500. Bars,
fenced, $2625 to $3750 move
in. Not Section 8 sanctioned.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

One, two and three bedrooms
available immediately.
Call 305-889-0166.

STOPIII
Behind in Your Rent? 24 Hour
notice Behind in Your Mort-
Gaae? Kathy. 786-326-7916


572 N.E. 65th Street



5927 N. E. 1 Avenue .
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080






6109 S. W. 63d Teurrae
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$65 al305-61-427080






(151re N.W. 367 Avene).
Two bedrooms, one, bath,
ti5.Cled foors air, wasoher hok-
up. $800 m ontl,$10 o
6847 N.W. 2nd Couret




Two bedrooms, one bath,

3095-mnhl.3158-3420.



690NWrt 2im CORT
Hue wo bedrooms, one bah
30-90703 motl.PeirRat



















7341 NW 5ERRAtCE r
T o n b edroomsoebt,
montly 786-312-24097




74 NW.0 Street NE2AeAe
$995inc. Call for ist f oters,
NDI-i Rpecaltors 5
305-65Cal35-717-00 .






8098 N.W 41 AvRe.
One brom, oenea bath appi-
aplancesfewar. $5250 mthly,
8 K 83562-4383 22


Aparterients
101 N.E.78th Street
Two arid three bdrms, from
$835, nice and clean, laun-
dry room, parking. Section
8 OK!
786-326-7424

101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
One and two bedrooms.
We ork with bad credit
Remodeled, ceramic tile,
central air, laundry machine,
appliances, quiet, parking
and FREE WATER.786-
506-3067.
1545 N.W. 8 Avenue
1192 N.W. 65 Street
Large two bdrms. $700
mthly. Section 8 OK. 305-
751-3381

1212 N.W.1 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE-IN
One bedroom, one bath,
$500, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1215 N.W.103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
MOVE II< SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-
1144

1277 N.W.58th Street #1
Two bdrms, one bath, appli.
included. Section 8 Wel-
come.
-786-277-9925, 305-494-8884

1341 NW 52 STREET .
One bedroom, one bath, Air
and appliances, utilities in-
cluded. $525 monthly, first
and last tel move in. By ap- .
intent only. 786-399-


140 N.W.13 Street
One month to move in. Two

m ,1one3 th, 2-525.
7080

140 S.W. 6 St. HOMESTEAD
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$600 monthly
Call:305-267-9449

T 4004e n th
plus family room or fourth
be oCo SEOnlyON989 secu-
rity. 954-826-4013
1490 NW 69 STREET
Three bdrms, one bath, stove
refrigerator, central air. $750
mthly. Mr.1Nashington.
305-632-8750 1

1500 N.W.69Terrace
Beautiful one and two bdrms.
MANY EXTRAS!
786-282-8775

156 N.E.82nd Street
One bdrm $700, Two bdrm
$80Q. 786-325-7383

1745 N.W. 1 Place
Clear apartments. Near bus
and jitney stops. One bed-
room $400 monthly. $800
to move in. Efficiency $875
monthly, $750 to move in.
Call 305-696-2825.

1815 N.W.1 Court #4
Two bedrooms and efficien-
cies, Marty, 305-576-2388
1950 N.W. 2nd Court
One bedroom, very nice. Call ,
305-557-1750

1969 N.W.2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air,
free water.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144

2080 LINCOLN AVENUE
OPA LOCKA
One bedroom, newly renovat-
ed, air. Section 8 welcome.
305-621-0620, 305-989-2112

210 N.W.17 Streets
One bedroom, one bath. $475
305-642-7080

2186 N. W. 38 Street
Newly renovated, one bed-
room, one bath, $725,
appliances, free water.
305-642-7080

2401 N.Wg52 St. #3
Ones bedroom, tiled floors,
central air, new appliances.
$550 mthly and $1100 to
move in. 954-522-4645

2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3669Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two bed-
rooms $650, stove, refrigera-
tor, air. $650.
305-642-7080

423 N.W.9 Street
One bedroom. one bath.
$450 month, $850 move in


special. Easy qualifying*


MacArthur Suh


Young


Architect:

Gili-McGraw Architects
LLP 4960 S.W. 72nd Av-
enue, SuIte 403 Miami, FL
33155

Construction Manager:

Stobs Brothers Construc-
tins Co.
580 N.E. 92nd Street MI-
ami Shores, FL. 33138
305 751 1692
305 757 6564 (fax)
email: joopena2stobs.
com

If interested please con-
tact
Construction Manager for
pre-qualification and in -
structions to bidders.

Joe Pena
Sr. Estimator

Sub-Contractor Bids

Sub-Contractor Bids
wanted on all disciplines
Bids Due 7/17/09 at 2 P.M.

Owner: Miami Dade
County Public Schools
1450 N.E. 2 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33132

Project No.: A01096

Budget: $6,200.000.00

dit oRemodeling /


HIaleah Middle 5987E.7th
Ave. Hialeah, FL. 33013

Amella Earhart 6027 E.7th
Ave. Hialeah, FL. 33013
.
Architect.

Laura M. Perez & Associ-
ates 2401 N. W. 7th Street,
Miami, Florida 33125

Construction Manager:

Stobs Brothers Construc-
tion Co.
580 N. E. 92nd Street Mi-
ami Shores, FL 33138

305 751 1692.
305 757 6564 (fax)
email: joepena@stobs.com

If interested please contact
Construction Manager for
pre-qualification and in-
structions to bidders.

Joe Pena, Sr Estimator


CAOPA OCKAT AREA
Newly renovated, Two e
bedroms, one bath, gated*









applianesadrm water b
inluedspntenden on y

|Call 786-6263-5509



245 A N.W. 135th Sre
Nc two bedroms, central air.
Appliances and wOate i-









cenrluded. Section 8 welome
786-521-71135769-








$475 monthly, Section 8 OK!
Coe all 305-7147-608 .







Thre bedroorts, oen, e aind a

$90 monthly. 305-269563126




18711 N.W. 45t Avenue
Thre bedroms, ton baths
$10.Call 305-521-5184 '


565 N.E. 131 Street


BEST PRICES IN TOWN Itt
Handyman, carpet, clean-
ing, plumbing, hanging
doors, water heaters,
specializing in stoppages.
Call: 305-801-5690

HANDYMAN
Plumbing and Carpentry. 305-
401-9165, 786-423-7233

HANDYMAN
Roof repairs, painting, water

@ all 2 -47 ors,

TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.
,




IN HOUSE SALES REPS.
Highly motivated, profes-
sional customer oriented
Individuals for fast paced
office. Must type 45 words
per minute, organized and
computer savvy with excel-
lent communication skills.
Fax resumes-305-694-6211


y ry opp ste Sh ers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682


Referral Processor
Referral Processor-Dade
County S.W. 152 Street

3+ years experience.
Bil preferred, not required.
Fax resume 305-255-2015
email to: resume@ppmcr.
com

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday only .

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License
t'
ATphpey person a .
ami imes
900 N.W. 54th Street



BANKS AND SON
Lawn Service. Low rates.
Call 305-836-6804, 305-620-
5913

MI IM90US
Don'tThrow Away Your Old
Records!
We Buy Old Records,
Albums, LP's, 45's, or 12"
singles. Soul, Jazz, Blues,
Reggae, Caribbean, Latin,
Disco, Rap or Bass. Also
DJ Collections! Tell Your
Friends!
786-301-4180.


SECURITY OFFICER $60.
Traffic School Service
786-333-2084


NORwooD ana
FT. LAUDERDALE AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1200 monthly.
1-000-242-0363 ext. 3644
.
UnfurniShed RoornS
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
MIRAMAR AREA
Ros effici8n Ictiouse for

305-300-7783,786-277-9369


; .
DU OX
745 N.W.107 St.
Two bedrooms, each side.
Try 3900 down and $1299
monthly. Get $8000 back
from stimulus. One side
rented for $995. Call for list
of others. NDI Realtors
290 N.W. 183 Street
305-655-1700

MIAMI/WYNWOOD AREA
Fourplex for sale. Income
generating property. $450K.
NuConcept Realty.
305-244-0366

HOUSes
13001 N.W.18 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$140K. 786-412-1131
1441 N.W.173Terr.
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Try $3900 down
and $995 monthly. Get $8000
back from stimulus. Call for
list of others.
NDI Realtors
290 N.W. 183 Street
305-655-1700

6859 N.W. 17 Ave.

Oh ed7 ms o aths.
Fully renovated Mortgage
terms of 30 years fixed, six
percent interest rate, sale
price $69.9K. Call Daniel
954-444-6403


SS


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 10-1`6, 2009


*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
**WITH"*
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO 565,000
On Any HomeiAny Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty

, NEW CONSTRUCTIONS
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Three bedrooms, two
baths

Starting from

$70,000

*After grants
and subsidIes
Also subject to
qualification

NO CLOSING COSTS

305-801-5868
,
a


NEED A MORTGAGE?
$8000 tax credit for first time
home buyers. FHA/VA, re-
verse mortgages. 580 score,
105 % Ioan to value. We fi-
nance churches and com-
mercial buildings. Loan modi-
fications or short sales.
754-423-4613


50th Street Heights
cALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

5509 N.W. Miami Court .
One bdrm, one bath. $625
mthly, first, last, security
305-751-6232

5842 N.W. 12th Ave #1
Two bedrooms, one bath, wa-
ter included. Section 8 Wel-
come. 786-277-9925, 305.
494-8884

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win.
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

7155 N.W.17 Avenue ,
One bedroom, one bath. First
and last. $550 rent, $550 de-
posit. Call 305-303-2383
731 N.W. 56th Street
One bdrm, one bath.
Call 305-205-1665

7519 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 81 HOPWA OK.
$600. Call 305-669-4320
7523 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appliances. and
parking. Section 8. HOPWA
OK. $600. Call 305-669-4320

7742 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedrooms one bath cen-
tral air, appliances, washer
and dryer. Newly renovated
$950.00 month 786-287-
9011

'8475 N.E.2nd Avenue.
One nnd8ta b p .6Sec-

924 N.W. 29th Street
Section 8 Special! Two
bedrooms, one bath, tiled
throughout. 786-262-7313

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE ,

One and twSPb Lms, from
$495-$585 mont y. Free
wat r r aras and iron
2681 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, lauridry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
305-642-7080
'Overtown, Liberty City, Opa-
Locka, Brownsville. Apart-
mbnts, Duplexes, Houses.
One, Two and Three Bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For more information/spe-
cials. ,
www.capitairentalagency.
com

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
AII applications accepted.
Easy qualify. Move in special.
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 ($745), two bedrooms,
one bath, $595 ($895).
Free water
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment iri gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.
MIAMI AREA
AFFORDABLE
NEW APARTMENTS
Orie, two and three bedrooms
from $707 monthly.
Section 8 welcome
The Emerald Apartments
Apply at Lafayette
Apartments
150 NE 79 St
305-754-0053
Open Mon Fri 9 to 6
Sat Sun 10 to 5
EHO/ADA

N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

-NORTHWEST AREA


One bedroom, one bath, air

















Small businesses faeling mison pinch


THE SCHOOL BOANRDT FEMTOMBI-DD DRSCOUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- #.9.-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
gQ.-1._131., shall constitute a Waiver of proceedings."


097-JJO2 7/7/2009 Environmentally Friendly Hydrogen Peroxide
Based Cleaner/Degreaser
A pre-bid conference has
been scheduled for June
15, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at
the Maintenance Opera-
Pest Control, Extermination and Removal tions Center, 12525 N.W.
066-JJO6 6/23/2009 Services 2 hAv ac d

Floor Training Room). All
participating vendors are
encouraged to attend.
A pre-bid conference has
been scheduled for June
11, 2009 at 2:00 PM in
HVAC AND CONTROLS: REPAIR, REPLACE, the Maintenance Opera-
052-JJO6 6/23/2009 SUPPLYANDIOR INSTALL .tions Training Room at
12525 N: 28 Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33132. AII
participating vendors are
encouraged to attend.

A (in 2, r n,
ing this bid must be
requested in writing sent
102-JJO3 6/18/2009 Fresh Delivered Pretzel Products by courier, e-rriail, fax

fr mail and received no
ter than 2 p.m. on June
11th, 2009 to M-DCPS
to allow suffici me to

PRE-BID CONFERFER-
ENCE: A pre-bid confer-
ence will be held at 9:00
a.m. on June 11, 2009, in
093-JJO3 6/18/2009 Frozen Ice Cream and Desert Vending Program the Department of Food
and Nut i 4Tra n2
Flagler Street, Miami, FL
33144. For directions to
te pre-eNd confer e
275-0400.
PRE-BID CONFERFER-
ENCE: A pre-bid confer-
ence will be held at 9:00
a.m. on June 11, 2009 in
the Department of Food
036-JJO3 6/18/2009 Milk Vending Program and Nutrition Training
Center at 7042 West
Flagler Street, Miami, FL
3 4p4e-Fb ions teo
site, please call (786)
275-0400.
Outside Agency Qualified to Operate Appren-
RFP103- 6/16/2009 ticeship Training Programs for Post-Secondary
JJ10 Students in Miami-Dade County, Florida

PRE-BID CONFER-
FERENCE: A pre-bid
conference will be held
on June 17, 2009, at 1:00
p.m. in the Procurement
Management Services
092-JJO3 6/25/2009 Beverage Vending of District Athletic Areas Conference Room, 3rd
Floor of the School Board
Administration Building
located at 1450 N.E
2nd Avenue, Miami, FL
33132. For directions to
the pre-bid conference
site, p e 3c I (305)

A pre-bid conference
2 9bea I nJune
Procurement Manage-
ment services confer-
091-JJO3 6/25/2009 Hospitality Services Vending Program tence Roo 3rddF o of

istration Building located
at 1450 N.E. 2nd Avenue,
Miami, FL 33132. For
directions to the pre-bid
conference site, please
call (305) 995-1375.
'HE SCHOOL 30ARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
3y: Mr. Alberto VI. Carvalho
superintendent of Schools


I I I I


FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS ACT 800NI
You may be eligible to receive the $8000 tax
credit if you purchase your home before
December 31.
Please call a team that can help you qualify for
your home loan and find you~ a new home.
600 Fico score is all you need.
Call Denese at 954-294-5219 or
Tawanda at 305-586-9235


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

.
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 for the following:

PROJECT NAME: "Coral Way Medians Landscaping Project M-0038,,

BID NO: 08-09-052

Scope of Work: The project consists of complete landscaping and electrical maintenance services for
the existing medians along Coral Way (excluding trimming of Banyari trees) and the medians along SW 3
Avenue between Coral Way and US-1. The scope.of work includes raking, leaf removal and litter pick up
on a weekly basis and mowing, trimming foliage, mulching as per plan, reinstalling root guards, planting
shrubbery (1 and 3 gal.), and watering the landscaped areas on a bi-weekly basis. The maintenance also
calls for the installation of all electric appurtenancesto maintain a working up-lighting systerb consisting of
423 light fixtures along Coral Way between SW 37 Avenue and SW 12 Avenue on a monthly basis. There
is no electrical work along SW 3 Avenue between Coral Way and US-1. This project covers approximately
138,400 square feet (3.17 acres) of median surface area. The contract term is for a two (2) year period with
the option to renew for three additional one (1) year periods,

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current.certified license as a General Contractor
from the State of Florida or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade.
An Electrical contractor must be used for the electrical maintenance of the work and a minimum of three
(3) years experience is required for the electrical portion of the project. Proof of experience for landscaping
and electrical projects may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complex-
ity, supported by references within the past three (3) years.

A performance Bond is required for this project.

Location of Work: The project is located along SW 22 Street Coral Way Median from SW 12 Avenue to
SW 37 Avenue and along SW 3 Avenue between Coral Way and US-1. The medians are approximately
138,400 square feet (2.96 acres) of maintenance median surface area.

Receiving Date & Time: Thursday, June 25, 2009 at 1:00 p.m.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request, after June 8, 2009, at the City of Miami,
Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, FL 33130. Telephone No (305) 416-
1200. There Are no construction plans for this maintenance project. Bid packages will be available in hard
copy form and a non-refundable fee of $20.00 will be required. A bid package can also be mailed to bidderS
upon written request to the Department, and shall include the appropriate non-refundable fee plus $10 for
shipping and handling using regular U.S. Mail.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in dupli-
cate originals in the envelope provided with the bid package. At the time, date, and place above, bids will
be publicly opened. Any bids or proposals'received after time and date specified will be returned to
the bidder unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is
solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused by
mail, courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH SEC"
TION 18-74 OF THE CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE No. 12271,

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager



ADD. No DP-007017


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


*


" "


* ""


.


- *


* .


*


-
* -


8D. THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


Copyrighted Material-


-Available from Commercial News Providers


-
-
- -
* - - -










I


HIALEAH WOMEN'S CENTER

952East25thaStaeetF(Sam0easN.W79st)

(305)-836-9701 / (305) 558-4440
TERM IN NATIONS
UP TO 22 WEEKS
10% WITH AD
Serving the community over 20 years


100's of Lawyers Statewide






I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life, such
as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business transac-
tions of all kinds. I never fail to reunite the separated,
cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome enemies,
rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling blocks and
bad luck of all kind.There is no heart so sad so dreary that
I cannot bring sunshine into it. In fact, no 111atter what
may be your hope, fear or ambition, I guarantee to tell it
before you utter a word to me.
76zy NW 7TH AVE. MIAMI
305-757-870s


4


--5~fr 1/


1435NE1358LNorthMiami
305-893-4481



FAST CASH SERVICES

701 NE 125st 305-981-1669
6209 NW 18th Ave 305-695-1561


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


~iit~wi~cXra~ab~i


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290AliBaba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
'~


* Accidents


* Arrests


Rates on 30-year
home loans rose more
than five percent
for the first time in
nearly three months
this week as inves-
tors pushed up rates
on long-term govern-
ment debt, which is
closely tied to mort-
gage rates.
Mortgage finance gi-


"caught up to the re-
cent rise in long-term
bond yields this week,"
Frank Nothaft, Fred-
die Mac vice president
and chief economist,
said in a statement.
The jump in rates
came after the yield
on the benchmark 10-
year Treasury note, a
barometer for inter-


est rates on mortgag-
es and other loans,
jumped last week to a
six-month high of3.75
percent. But profit on
long-term Treasury
debt have since edged
back downward fol-
lowing lackluster eco-
nomic reports.
While signs are
building that the bat-


tered U.S. housing
market is beginning
to stabilize, higher
rates could jeopardize
the pending recovery,
since borrowers would
be able to borrow less
money and might de-
cide to hold off on
their purchases. .
Mortgage applica-
tions decreased 35


percent last month,
the Mortgage Bankers
Association said last
week. Applications
to refinance exist-
ing loans, which had
made up about three
quarters of mortgage
applications earlier
this spring, fell to
about. 60 percent of
loan volume.


ant Freddie Mac said
Thursday that aver-
age rates on 30-year
fixed-rate mortgages
climbed 5.29 percent
this week, from an av-
erage of 4.91 percent
a week earlier. It was
the highest weekly
average in nearly six
months.
Mortgage rates


* *


* - **
-* *
--
-
-
-


* -


s)


The U.S. Southeast
regional bank,
SunTrust, on Monday
said it has raised $2.08
billion of equity in the
last month, almost the
entire sum required by
regulators to help the
large bank withstand a
deep recession. .
The Atlanta-based
lender said it sold $1.82
billion of stock, had a
$70 million gain from


selling shares in credit
card network Visa,
yd expects to realize
$190 million relating to
deferred tax assets.
SunTrust was one of
19 large U.S. banks to
endure "stress tests of
their ability to handle
a severe economic
downturn and was
told to create a $2.16
billion buffer. The
bank said it has raised


over 90 percent of that
amount.
Chief Executive
James Wells sitid
SunTrust is "carefully
evaluating our
remaining initiatives
to determine the most
advantageous course
of action to quickly
put the 'stress test'
mandates behind us."
Monday is, the
deadline for SunTrust


and other banks
needing to raise capital
to win regulatory
approval,
Several banks that
underwent stress tests
are also expected this
week to win regulatory
permission to pay back
some or all of the funds
taken from the Troubled
Asset Relief Program.
SunTrust took $4.9
billion of TARP money.


Pt




v sor On Business, Marnage, and Love A
religious Holy Woman Helps The Sick And Al
emove Suffering And Bad Luck From Your Bt
II Call Your Enemies By Name and Tell70u v

epeAw y rn hat0 our E sdSEll IrpH
Has The God Given Power To Help By Praye


*Bill Payment


*Notary Services


*Western Union *oe res/Sap


* * *


U.S. retail sales drop in May


CO fl ghted Material


* Syndicated Content


5 percent in 3 months


Mortgage rates up


Commissioner
Barbara J. Jordan
Miami-Dade County
District 1




inVitOS small business-owners to attend
a m
The N FL Emerga ng Business

Workshop

Learn how your business can take part in next year's.

Super Bowl XLIV in South Florida!

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

5 p.m. 8 p.m.


e .
Florida Memorial University
Lou Rawls Center for the Performing Arts
15800 NW 42 Avenue
Miami Gardens, FL 33054

Attendees must RSVP by 5 p.m. on Friday, June 12, 2009.
E-mail EmergingBusiness@SouthFloridaSuperBowl.com
or call 305-614-7560 or 305-614-7571to confirm your
attendance.


Suntrust meeting challenges of recession


MIAM















Florida receives $1.5M federal grant for seniors


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COmmercial Lease Opportunity

SOUTHEAST OVERTOWNIPARK WEST
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

: Property Address:
271-75 NW 10 Street
268 NW 11 Street

Folio#1: 01-0101-050-1071
1 Follo#2: 01-0101-050-1070
., Zoning: C-1 Restricted
... Commercial

Unit Size: Approximately 400 s.f.

Annual Rent: Approximately $15 per s.f.

The Southeast Overtown/Park West Community Redevelopment Agency
("CRA") is seeking commercial tenants to lease newly rehabbed commercial
storefronts at New Arena Square, 271-75 NW 10#' Street and 268 NW 11'
Street. The storefronts are centrally located in the Overtown neighborhood
within walking distance to downtown Miami and accessible by Miami-Dade
County's Metromover, Metrorail and Metrobus systems. The storefronts are
located within specified target areas including the Solitheast Overtown/Park
West Community Redevelopment Area ("CRA"), the Central Enterprise Zone,
and the North Central Empowerment Zone, that may offer financial incentives
for businesses. The square footage of each unit is approximately 400 square
feet. This is a triple net lease opportunity, which includes a negotiated five-year
.....soosements.

It is .preferred that applicants seeking to lease a commercial storefront have
been in business for a minimum of two (2) years and provide two (2) years of
financial statements for the business. All applicants must provide a detailed
description of the proposed business use, background information on the
proposed management team and expertise, and a list of all persons or entities
with an interest in the business.

Additionally, as part of the submission package, applicants will be required to
complete a grant application and provide the required supporting documents
listed therein. Grant applications are available on the CRA's.website at http11
www.ci.miamifl.us/cra/Programs.htm or can be obtained by contacting the CRA
office. Applicants awarded a lease opportunity will be required to complete a
nine-week business development training program offered by the CRA,

For more information about this commercial leasing opportunity, please contact
CRAAssistant Director, Clarence Woods, at (305) 679-6800.

(#)03252), James H. Villacorta
Executive Director





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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk, at her office located
al City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1958.

Deadlirie for Request for Clarification Wednesday June 17, 2009 at 5:00 P.M.

THIS BID SOLICITATION JS.SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE


Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


ADNO.004751 *







MIAMI-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY *

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

MDX PROCUREMENTICONTRACT NO.: RFP-09-07

MDX WORK PROGRAM NO.: N/A

MDXPROJECT/SERVICETITLE:INSPECTION&
REPORTING SERVICES FOR MDX STRUCTURES

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authdrity is seeking a pool of two (2)
qualified Consultant Firms ("Proposers") with the necessary qualifications
and experience to perform safety inspections of bridges and structures
located within the MDX System which includes State Road 836, State Road
874, State Road 878, State Road 924, State Road 112, and additionally,
structures listed in the MDX inventory. A Pre-Proposal Conference is
scheduled for June 12, 2009 at 10:00 a.m., Eastern Time. Although,
attendance at this meeting is not mandatory, all Proposers are encouraged to
attend. MDX notifies all Proposers and individuals that it encourages
small, minority and women-owned businesses full opportunity to submit a
response to any solicitation issued by MDX. For a copy of the RFP with
information on the Scope of Services, Pre-qualification and submittal
requirements, please logon to MDX's Website: www.mdxway.com to
download the documents under "Doing Business with MDX: Vendor
Login", or call MDX's Procurement Department at 305-637-3277 for
assistance. Note: In order to download any MDX solicitation, you must
first be registered as a Vendor with MDX. This can only be facilitated
through MDX's Website: www.mdxway.com under "Doing Business with
MDX: Vendor Registration". The deadline for submitting a Proposal is
June 30, 2009 by 2:00 P.M. Eastern Time.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


benefit to elders and
many disabled Florid-
ians, but in too many
cases these residents
don'tevenknowthat
they may be able to
receive help paying
their Medicare costs,"
said Elder Affairs
Secretary E. Douglas
.Beach. "These funds
will do much to help
us reach those indi-
viduals and tell them
about the help that's
available."
The funds, from
the federal Medicare
Improvements for
Patients and Provid-
ers Act of 2008, will


provide valuable sup-
port at the state and
community levels
to reach Floridians
who are likely to be
eligible for three dif-
ferent programs: the
Low-Income Subsidy,
Medicare Savings Pro-
grams and the Medi-
care Part D Prescrip-
tion Drug Program.
The outreach efforts
are designed to find
individuals who could
benefit from these
programs but don't
know the assistance is
available or have been
unable to apply for it.
The initiative includes


special targeting ef-
forts aimed at rural
areas of the state.
The local agencies
will work through
partnerships with
commumty-based or-
ganizations. These
partnerships will ex-
pand the reach of ef-
forts to help elders
and those with dis-
abilities on Medicare
learn more about
their health benefits,
receive information on
other services available
and remain indepen-
dent and living in their
communities as long
as possible.


The Department
of Elder Affairs an-
nouncedlastweekthat
Florida has received a
federal0-antofalmost
$1.5 million to help el-
ders, individuals with
disabilities and their
caregivers learn about
and receive special
assistance available
through Medicare.
Florida's award was
the largest among
the 47 states that ap-
plied for a share of the
funding..
The Department re-
ceived notification of
the grant award from
the U.S. Department


of Health and Human
Services, part of $25
million released to
states nationwide for
this program. Elder
Affairs will use a part
- of the grant for out-
reach and assistance
activities by its SHINE
(Serving Health Insur-
ance Needs of Elders)
program, and the rest
will be distributed to
the Area Agencies oil
Aging, Aging Resource
Centers and Aging and
Disability Resource
Centers throughout
the state.
"Medicare programs
are a tremendous


- -* - -


CO py r ig hte dMate r la I - .
'

Syndicated Content -
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Ava la ble from Com me r cla I News Prove de rs


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INVITATION FOR BID FOR


IFB NO. 146110 '


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10D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


~I~I~L















Retired players agree to $26.25 million settlement of lawsuit


The McDonald's
Corporation, the
restaurant chain, said
on Monday that sales
at stores open at least
a year climbed 5. L

rs n 1, ht n
sales, but that growth

U te slowing in the
The company said
sales at stores open
at least a year m
the United States
or same-store sales'
climbed 2.8 percent,
helped by classic
menu items and its
new McCafe espresso-
based coffees. In May
last same-store
year,
sales rose 4.3 percent
in the United States,
McDonald's, with its
dollar menu anavalue
meals, has been able
to keep sales rising
even as its sit-down
restaurant chain
competitors report
declines.
But although the
company was able
to increase its sales
despite the econority
- or perhaps because
of it -- the jump in
same-store sales was
not as high as some
analysts on Wall Street
had expected.
An analyst with
Deutsche Bank North
America, Jason West,
for example, had said
in a note to investors
last; week that he
expected same-store
sales in the United
States to grow 3
percent.
Still, the company
reported strong sales
in virtually every
region of the world.
European same-
store sales surged
7.6 percent on strong
results from France,
Germany, Russia and
Britain, while same-
store sales for Asia


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
REQUEST FOR DESIGN-BUILD SERVICES (RDBS)
MIAMI DADE COUNTY GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION
WEST LOT MULTI-USE FACILITY
OCI PROJECT NO. DBO8-GSA-01 ESP

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1
and 2-10.4 of the Miami-Dade County Code, and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that design-build
services are required for the Miami-Dade General Services Administration (hereinafter "GSA") West Lot
Multi-Use Facility. IVIiami-Dade Courity intends to enter into a design-build contract with a responsive,
qualified Design-builder to provide design and construction services for the new GSA West Lot Multi-Use
Facility, which will be located at 220 NW 3 Street, Miami, FL.

This solicitation is one of the projects within the Economic Stimulus Plan as approved by the
Board of County Commissioners and an expedited solicitation process will be utilized. A Second-
Tier with oral presentations will be required,




Copies of the ddsign-build criteria package in electronic format (CD) may be purchased beginning on
Wednesday June 3, 2009 at 2:00 PM at the offices of General Services Administration, Construction
Administration Section, located at 111 N.W. 1" Street, 24* Floor, Suite 2420, Miami, FL, 33128. The
phone number for General Services Administration is (305).375-3913. The non-refundable fee for each
design-build criteria package is $25.00 and only checks or money orders are acceptable and shall be
made payable to Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners. Copies of the design-build criteria
-package in paper format will be available upon request to the Project Coordinator for a non-refundable fee
of $50.00

PROPOSER'S QUALIFICATIONS REQUIREMENTS

Pursuant to Florida State Statutes 287.055, a Design-Builder is defined as a partnership, corporation, or -
other legal entity that:

a. Is certified under Section 489.119, Florida Statutes, to engage in contracting through a certified
or registered general contractor or a certified or registered building contractor as the qualifying
agent; or

b. Is certified under Section 471.023, Florida Statutes, to practice engineering; certified under
Section 481.219 to practice architecture; or certified under Section 481.319 to practice landscape
architecture.

Those firms submitting as a joint venture must submit documentation for each entity participating in the
joint theent re tooinclIu e he legal name of the companies participating in the joint venture as registered

AlE TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

14.00 Architecture (LEAD A/E CONSULTANT FOR DESIGN TEAM)
18.00 Architectural Construction Management (LEAD A/E CONSULTANT
FOR DESIGN TEAM)


Pacific, the Middle the company said, the services overseas.
East and Afnca rose result of the stronger Excluding the effect
6.4 percent. dollar, which has of the dollar, sales
Overall sales fell O.4 hurt companies that climbed 7 percent over
Decent in the month, sell their goods and all.
CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF VACANCIES IN THE
PLANNING ADVISORY BOARD AND ZONING BOARD

The Miami City Commission seeks to fill vacancies on the planning advisory
and zoning boards. Specific qualifications and eligibility requirements are set
forth in Section 62-124 of the Miami City Code and require that members must
be electors of the City of Miami. Applicants must possess the knowledge,
experience, judgment, background, ability and desire to act in the public
interest. Individuals representing the various social, demographic and
.economic elements of the city are encouraged to apply.
.
Additionally, public, professional or citizen organizations within the area having
interest in and knowledge of the planning and plan implementation process
are encouraged and solicited to submit to the Office of City Clerk, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133, in writing, the names and addresses of
persons and their qualifications for consideration as prospective appointees to
fill present vacancies on said boards.

The City Commission will consider filling existing vacancies at its meeting
of July 9, 2009. The list of interested individuals will be available for public
review at the Office of the City Clerk on Monday, June 29, 2009, following the
scheduled deadline for receipt of said applications on Friday, June 26, 2009
at 4 PM. Application forms will be available from the Office of City Clerk and .
the Clerk's website at httri://miamigov.com/cityclerklPages/BoardlBoard
asp.
.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003254)


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSION MEETING

Pursuant to Section 2-33 of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida, as amended,
Chairman Joe Sanchez has scheduled a special meeting of the Miami City
Commission on June 18, 2009 at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City HalL located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida. The purpose of the meeting is to
address the Department of Community Development's annual funding items.
No other business shall be conducted outside of that for which the special
meeting is called.

An interested persons rnay appear at the meeting and may be heard with
respect to these matters. Should any person desire to appeal any decision
of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this
meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be
based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) noIater than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003248)


To satisfy the technical certification requirements listed.above for the requested services, valid technical
certification in all of the above-specified areas) of work must be held by a firm responding as a sole
respondent, or a team of firms. Teams of firms must designate one of its members as the "prime consultant".
Furthermore, if an individual is providing services that require technical certification by Miami-Dade County,
the individual is required to have the relevant certificationss. Individuals who are not technically certified
will not be "allowed" to perform work for those scopes of work requiring technical certification. Additionally,
firms that list other areas of work as supplements to the required technical certifications must also be
certified for those supplemental areas.

Solicitation notification will be forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-
Dade County and have included an e-mail address in their vendor registration forrri. It will also be e-mailed
to those who have vendor enrolled on-line.

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Faith Samuels who may be contacted via e-mail at fty@
miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-2774.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement
20% Community Business Enterprise Program (CBE) Measures (Design Portion Only)

20% Community Small Business Ente rise Pro ram (CSBE) Measures (Construction Portion Only)

10% Community Workforce Program (CWP) Goal (Construction Portion Only)

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on June 8, 2009, at 10:00 A.M., 111 N.W. 1"
Street, 18* Floor, Conference Room 18-3, Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested
parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is July 10, 2009 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1^ Street, 17* Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED
THAT ANY AND-ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED AFTER THE .
ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE QQf@ipEREp.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for
a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY


released. during a Fri-
day press conference in
Washington. Adderley
and union executive
director DeMaurice
Smith are scheduled
to attend.
The settlement
amount is close to
the $28.1 million the
NFLPA was ordered
to pay after a federal
jury.in San Francisco
ruled in favor of the
players in November.
The jury determined
that the union failed
to include retired
NFL players in deals
with Electronic Arts
Inc., the maker of the
"Madden NFL" video
game, and other com-
panies. >
Adderley filed the
lawsuit in 2007 on
behalf of 2,056 re-


tired players who
contended the union
failed to actively pur-
sue marketing deals
on their behalf with
video games, trad-
ing cards and others
sports products.
TheNFLPAappealed
the ruling in Febru-
ary, a move that fur-
ther angered retired
players, who already
felt disenfranchised
by the union and its
previous executive di-
rector, Gene Uiashaw,
who died in August.
Smith was elected
to take over in March
and called addressing
the rift with retired
players a top priority
-- and just as impor-
tant as opening nego-
tiations with the NFL
on a new labor deal.


The settlement is
the first concrete sign
of a thaw between the
two sides and an in-
dication that Smith
is prepared to chart
a new course for a
union that's entering
a critical juncture.
"Herb and I both
believe that this is an
historic first step in
that direction," said
attorney Ron Katz,
who represented the
retired players.
"(Smith) put his
money where his
mouth is," Katz said.
"We think (the settle--
ment) is consistent
with what 'De' Smith
has been saying,
'One team, one locker
room, one voice.' This
is a real step to a rec-
onciliation."


the union now that
Smith is in control.
"I'm very encour-
aged, because the
other administration
wouldn't return calls
or listen to most of
the retired players,
including myself,"
Adderley said. "Let
this be the precedent
that sets the stage for
all the retired play-
ers to come together,
and hopefully, we
can have the current
players to come in
with us and we have
peace."
Adderley also ex-
pressed hope that
the union's market-
ing arm, Players Inc.,
will begin working to
secure new market-
ing deals in which


former players will be
duly compensated.
Katz said the settle-
ment requires court
approval, though he
doesn't foresee any
obstacles.
Adderley never ex-
pected a settlement
to come so soon, es-
pecially after NFLPA
attorneys threatened
to take the case to the


Supreme Court if nec-
essary.
"We want to seek
justice for all the
guys. And we wanted
to bring some harmo-
ny and peace with the
current and retired
guys," Adderley said.
"And this was the only
way we knew to do it,
was go to court to get
people to listen."


Hall of Fame cor-
nerback Herb Adder-
ley is encouraged that
the NFL Players Asso-
ciation has taken "an
historic first step" in
reconciling its long-
standing rift with the
old guard by settling a
lawsuit with its retired
players Thursday.
In a surprise move,
the NFLPA reversed
course by dropping its
appeal and reaching a
$26.25 million settle-
ment with Adderley
and thousands of oth-
er retired players who
had successfully sued
the union for cutting
them out of lucrative
marketing deals.
NFLPA official George
Atallah confirmed the .
settlement and said
more details would be


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Adderley has noted


Dollar General Corp
reported an increase
in profit on Tuesday,
as cost-consci6us
consumers flocked to
the discount retailer's
stores for bargains in.
the recession.
Dollar General,
which sells most of
its merchandise for
$10 oi- less, said net
income in the first
quarter ended May 1
climbed to $83.0 mil-
lion from $5.9 million


a year earlier. Adjust-
ed earnings before
interest, income tax-
es, depreciation and
amortization rose 59
percent to $291 mil
lion.
As the recession
squeezes household
budgets,' more shop-
persarefrequentlyvis-
iting discount chains
such as Dollar Gen-
eral, Wal-Mart Stores,
Family Dollar Stores
and Dollar Tree.


Dollar General's
quarterly sales rose
15.7 percent to $2.78
billion, while sales at
stores open at least
a year, or same-store
sales, climbed 13.3
percent.
Dollar General
. added that through
May 1, the company
has opened 104 new
. stores and renovated
or relocated 100 more
in the current fiscal
year. Four stores so


far have been closed.
The company said it
plans capital expen-
ditures of about $250
million to $275 mil-
lion, as it opens about
450 more new stores
and remodels or relo-
cates 400 others. *-
The company, which
is owned bjr private
equity group Kohl-
berg Kravis Roberts &
manages more than
8,460 stores in 35 U.S.
states. -


11.00 -General Structural Engineering


17.00 Engineering Construction Management


11D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 10-16, 2009


,
Advanced Gyn CIInic
PatumomI, Sale & Cagh l m
,
9 Telfilliallon (Jp to 22 Weeks
Individual COUnse in Services
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Discount store profits soars as


MWcDonald's Sales Rise, but its U.S. growth slows





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