Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00832
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: May 27, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00832
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text






First Black woman heads Fortune 500 company


I..II....I .I.l l.... ..ll,, ll...Ill...11...I ...I I...I .. I.II..I
*********************SCH 3-DICIT 326
Sll P1
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11707
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


ta t


'I


Di STRI BUTED D


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 39 MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Spence-Jones


Cleared of Charges
By Sandra J. Charites
scharite@ymiamitimesonline com
Miami Commissioner Michelle Spence Jones has been
cleared of all charges, according to a memo released Friday
by Miami-Dade prosecutor Joseph Centorino, chief of the.
public corruption unit. .
"This has been a trying time for me and my family and I
am relieved that the investigation is now closed," Spence- .
Jones said in a statement. "I have remained faithful during
this process-and committed to being an honest public
servant." ,
Spence-Jones, who has served as the city's District 5
Commissioner since2005, recently announced her bid for.
reelection, Though charges
have been dropped against
Spenc-Jones, she is t irate w Tony Robinson and Ed Brown stand outside the business they built from the ground up.The company is currently battling
about the allegations that were
brought against her. eviction. -MiamiTimes photo, Tariq Osborne
The 2007 investigation was
prompted by former Miami
City Manager Jose Arriola
who contacted the State
Attorney Office informing
them of payments Spence-
Jones received from the Mercy
Hospital project, also referred MICHELLE-SPENCE JONES
as the Groove Isle Project and Miami Commissioner

me getting any money," said Spence-Jones grateful but yet Potential for billion-dollar lawsuit
furious after being cleared of all charges. AA was a direct competitor to you offer w4ite companies you
During the two-year investigation, Spence-Jones faced Opa-locka Flightline tilleges discrimination OLF. Now the company is their don't offer similarly situated
.... OLF. Now the-company is their don't offer similarly situated
charges including allegations of briberla), illegal kickbacks and landlord as well. Gary called minority company, that's dis-
inappropriate influencing of personnel decisions.- By Tariq Osborne "the giant killer" for winning the county's move "reckless criminatory," she said.
Attorney Richard Alayon, Spence-Jones co-counsel, said tosborne@miamitimesonline.com suits against, such corporate and discriminatoryin a recent Ed Brown, one of four part-
that "There was no incredible evidence she did anything giants Disney and Anheuser- release.'.' ners in the business agrees.
wrong," but he is not surprised that a white City Manager The only Black-owned Fixed Busch. C.K. Hoffier, a partner in "They want to monopolize this
singled-out Spence-Jones. Base Operator in the nation, At issue is Opa-Locka Flight- Gary's firm who is helping airport, he said, "Btit I'm a
And Spence-Jones agreed ...Opa-LockaFlightline, may file a line's (OLF) leasehold inter- handle the case, went into fur- hard-working, proud, ,Black
"There is a double standard in the city and county potential billion-dollar lawsuit est. Gary contends. that dur- their detail. man. I 'refuse to sharecrop
government that if any African-American is.hired then there against Miami Dade County's ing OLF's negotiations for a "When AA took over, they for anybody. I'll sleep under a
is dirty business going on," she said. "This needs to stop." Aviation Department. The five- new lease with the county, the carved out deals for non-mi- bridge first."
The two-year investigation wasted tax-payers money said year-old company has retained county improperly assigned nority companies so that AA Brown alleges that a repre-
Spence-Jones. the services of Willie E. Gary, OLF's lease to a company didn't have to be their land- sentative from AA sent. him
Please tur to CHARGES 5A who has earned the nickname called AA Acquisitions (AA). lord," 'said Hoffler. "Anytime -Please turn to LAWSUIT 5A



Bullard: Bill only way to save funds HISTORIC
MOVE AT XEROX
By Tariq Osborne of the $3.6 million," said Bullard claims she had
tosborne@'mianitimesontine.com Bullard. After cutting her to act quickly to save the A Black woman who grew
vacation short last week funds.
According to State Sen. Larcenia due to illness, Bullard Brise said in an up in public housing became
Bullard, passing the controversial discussed the controversial interview Tuesday that his the first Black woman to lead
House Bill 381 (and by extension bill with The Miami 7Tmes. withdi:awal of the bill was
its Senate companion SB 1276) Bullard says it wvas at the request of the Magic a Fortune 500 company as
was the only way to save the $3.6 called to her attention that City Children's Zone's
million in funding for the what will the Children's Zone would original board, who were CEO. Ursula Burns,
be called the Liberty City Children's need aname change for the dissatisfied with it.
Initiative. The 10-year pilot program 2009 legislative session, so "It was pretty simple," President of Xerox Corp.,
will be entering its second year. Last she sponsored SB 2470. BULLARD said Brise. "The will take over July 1 as
year the program was called the Every bill must have both representative from the
Magic City Children's Zone but it's a house and Senate sponsor, and area [James Bush III] asked that we Chief Executive Officer.
namesake in Harlem owns the rights the house companion (HB 1419) consider taking a second look at it
to the name. was sponsored Rep. Ronald A. Brise. and the board sent us a letter that -SEE STORY ON PAGE 5A
"I simply wanted to avoid the loss When the House bill was withdrawn, Please turn to FUNDS 5A



Northwestern students win Silver Knight Awards
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @mniamitimesonline.com


"I want to be the, President
of the United States," 'said
Ky'Eisha Penn, senior at Miami
Northwestern Senior, High in
Liberty City.
Penn, 18, was one of the 15
Miami-Dade high school stu-
dents to receive a Silver Knights
Award at the James L. Knight
Center last week.
"This means so much to me,"
she said.
Silver Knight Awards was in-
stituted by The Miami Herald in
1959 in which outstanding stu-
dents are recognized in distinct
categories for their academics
and exceptional service to their
school or community. Each in
Please turn to AWARDS 5A


Miami Northwestern High School seniors, Harold Stuart, Jaroda Strapp, Crystal Harrison and Ky'Eisha Penn attended the annual Silver Knight Awards
ceremony with their advisor, Nykeah Cohen (center), where all four seniors were recognized making Northwestern history.


One Family Serving Since 1923


/ 7Da
d. 4.4


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY
Is


FRIDAY


SATURDAY
la^b.
Agarus-al


SUNDAY
OWL


MONDAY
.1


TUESDAY



8 i90158 00100 o


T


: '


----
















OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Boynton Beach tragedy a.

chance to re-evaluate
h fe Coast Guard pulled 27 people out of the waters
| off Boynton Beach on Wednesday, May 13, after a
I1 boat packed with Haitian immigrants capsized and
sank. Or rather, the Coast Guard pulled another 27 people
from the waves. This time, at least 9 were dead.
Since October, the Coast Guard has stopped more than
1300 Haitians from entering the United States, and there
are roughly 30,000 Haitians in the United States currently
facing deportation. The boat's survivors are likely to join this
group. These numbers should give us pause, and so should
this recent tragedy.
These deaths, and they won't stop, are sufficient reason
to re-evaluate our immigration policy toward Haiti, and at
the, very least to place a moratorium on deportations until
conditions in Haiti improve.
The United States of America prides itself on its protection
of human rights, to the extent that the government com-
poses an annual report.on the state of human rights world-
wide.
It is ironic then, that a country that calls nations such as
China and India to task (to name but two) for their human
rights records should be party to such an egregious viola-
tion taking place in our own back yard.
Despite the fact that conditions in Haiti are such that un-
told dozens risk possible death and probable deportation to
escape them, including a woman,who attempted the journey
with her one-year-old child (the child drowned), despite food
shortages and political unrest, we blithely send the ref-u-
gees back into these-conditions. We ignore the fact that once
these people are beyond US' jurisdiction, they remain-in
fact---human. Willfully sending a human being into such
conditions is unconscionable.
Supporters of the current immigration policy often cite
their own moral concerns..They state that is wrong to "re-
ward" the refugees for their breaking of US law with perma-
nent residence. They also cite that.it is unfair to immigrants
who seek to enter the United States legally. There is some
truth in this, but to send them, at gunpoint, back to such
desperate conditions, for the crime of seeking a better life, is
far too harsh a punishment.


Mbje *Iiami time

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weely at 900 NW 54th Streei.
Miami, Flonda 33127-1818
Post Otfice Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami. Florida J3127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45 00 Six Months $30 00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that Amenca can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when ,I accords to
every person. regardless ol race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Haling no person. tearing no person. the
Black Press sirrves to help every person ,n ine firm belief that all persons are hun as long as anyone is held back

Ap S The Media Audit I
L- -4--.


w '4"~ din


i l .A::&


. . Copyrighted Material

.. .. Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers






-------------* m-
... _. * .t 111 I -lf N r-1-* |-- !


y


~m
~
-ii ~ -


l


41 &,O kru| i


*f


Student disappointed by Children Zone board's replacement


Dear Editor,


.......... ......
Al a


I was deeply disappointed
to learn about the passage
of HB 381. This bill reverses
the heart of an innovative pro-
gram, the Magic City Zone. The
Magic City Youth Zone sought
to join parents, students, edu-
cators, service providers and
community leaders, to fight
kW for a healthy, active commu-
nity in Liberty City and Little
Haiti. This bill will remove the
current board and eliminate
* the geographic boundaries of


the zone.
I am one of the student rep-
resentatives of the board. I
am the student government
president at Miami Edison Se-
nior High School. Some people
might not think much of rep-
resenting a school like Edison,
but I am proud to represent
my school and my fellow stu-
dents. If you are not from my
neighborhood and you listen to
the news you probably think I
don't have a chance to succeed
and neither do the students
at my school. I was honored


to receive the invitation to be
on the board of the Magic City
Children's Zone. I had been
on a board of directors before,
and I never thought a stu-
dent would actually be asked
to be on the board. Usually
most programs that are sup-
posed to be for young people
don't actually include our
ideas or feedback. I've seen
a lot of programscome and
go from my school. Many of
them don't relate to our ex-
periences and most students
ignore them and don't really


participate.
If you want to make pro-
grams for students, then why
don't you want to listen to our
voices, to our opinions? We
want to see actual changes in
the community. The Children's
Zone needs to happen here, in
Liberty City and Little Haiti. If
you want the Children's Zone
to work then you need to lis-
ten to the students. Governor
Crist, please veto HB 381.

Rokeshia Ashley
Miami


.-me < 4 0


-illi


















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


~A. *~ I'


&, f 0


Ma = ., sk-' -


m.." "=q *


so ap OM a


Does Caribbean census bill erode Black


Congresswoman Yvette D.
Clarke of New York's 11th Con-
gressional District introduced
a bill that calls for Caribbean
nationals to have their own ori-
gins category on the U.S. Cen-
sus form on April 23. Clarke
and other Caribbean-American
leaders insist the main empha-
sis of creating the bill wasn't a
push for a new racial category
but one for an accurate self-
identifying ancestry category.
The clarification comes in re-
sponse to a number of reports
that states the bill is indeed a
call for a new race category and
therefore a move to divide some
ethnic groupings, particularly
the African-American or Blacks.
You decide.
On the surface, it appears
as if the framers of this bill are
looking out for the best inter-
ests of their people, Caribbean
Nationals here in the U.S. The
framers say it will help boost
the Caribbean census count
while allowing people to accu-
rately self-identify their origin
and race simultaneously. It also
ensures the Caribbean commu-


nity will get an adequate return
on the dollars that comes out
of their community as well as
provide an avenue to address
specific needs that are distinct
from any other ethnic groups,
including African-Americans.
But the flip side of this equa-
tion is the attitude that many in
the Caribbean community have
toward African-Americans.
Many were taught to despise


the white man in America was/
is much more brutal than any-
thing those in the Caribbean
have ever encountered.
Walter Rodney, perhaps one of
the most noted Caribbean writ-
ers of all times addressed this
subject as he chronicled the
difference between the Ameri-
can Black and Blacks from the
Caribbean and Africa. Rodney
states: "The American Black


In the final analysis, while the Caribbean Census bill may benefit
Caribbean Americans in a positive way, it will certainly erode the
economic and political power of Blacks in this country.


the Black man and woman in
America prior to stepping foot on
this soil. Many will go through
great lengths not to identify
themselves as Blacks once they
arrive in the U.S. Many have
taken on the same attitude
that the European in America
has toward Blacks, thinking of
us as a lazy people who lacks
motivation. Many do, not real-
ize that the historical nature of


knows first hand how destruc-
tive and inhumane the Ameri-
can white man can be. It is
because of their personal expe-
rience with him that they do ev-
erything in their power to keep
their distance away from him.
This is the same man who took
away practically everything, in-
cluding their history, heritage
and culture. He even took away
their name, their land, -their


power?

dignity and their drum."
Rodney continues: "However,
Blacks from the Caribbean as
well as from Africa were allowed
to keep most of their culture in-
tact, if for no other reason than
the numerical advantage they
enjoyed over the European,
which ruled them in their land.
They were not treated as harsh-
ly as those Blacks in the states.
Because of this, some have a
more favorable view of the white
man than does Blacks living in
the States. Some are enamored
with the American white man.
They intrinsically feel American
Blacks should be thankful for
the opportunities he has afford-
ed them. They do so without
realizing everything this man
possesses can be attributed to
the mistreatment and abuse
of Blacks in this country and
around the world."
However, Rodney cautioned
American Blacks, that due to
the fact that we instinctively
try to keep a safe distance away
from this white man here in this
land, we must develop an infra-
structure in order to become


Copyrighted Material - -
I J J ---- k ** WR *-iAskl


Syndicated Content


- .a -~ -


Available from Commercial News Providers


.. Z"A


In light of the recent drowning off the coast of Florida, should

the United States rethink its policy toward Haitian refugees?


MISTERLYNE BONNE-ANNEE, 25
Student, Liberty City

Of course,
they should let
them stay, just |
like the Cu-
bans can. The
rules should
be the same
for everybody,
it should all be
equal.

LORENZO GREEN, 46
Unemployed, Liberty City

Yes, itshould
be changed.
They're hu-
mian, and they -
let the Cubans
stay. We all -
bleed .blood. .
It's not fair I
that we let the
Cubans do the
"wet foot-dryfoot" policy and not
the Haitians. EFvervbod\ should


have equal opportunity.

DOMINIQUE THOMAS, 24
Cashier, Liberty City

We should i
start letting t
them stay.
We're all the
same- right?
Why can't they a
stay? If it were
up to me, their
staying here is i
better for them
because of the bad conditions
in Haiti.

LAMOAARUJO, 21
Student, Miami

Yes and the reason is the same
as why we let the Cubans stay.
Haiti's conditions are really bad
right now. The country has had
to deal with a food crisis, hur-
ricanes, schools' collapsing and
who knows what's next? It is
sad to see Haitians traveling


to America for
freedom then
turned away
because of
a ridiculous
policy. What's
worst is when
the parents
are deported _
and the young
kids have to stay, that is a dis-
ruption in their lives. So, espe-
cially the people who have been
here a long time, they should
be able to get papers and stay
legally.

JASMINE BROWN, 31
Dancer, Liberty City

I've always
thought
we should
change,
that. This '
is America
and every-
one deserves
a chance. I


could see making it harder to
get here over the border, but
the ones that are here already
should be able to stay legally.

CHARLIN ST. LOUIS, 18
Cashier, Liberty City

Yes we
should, it's



find jsupposed -or
to be evena free
c ounver there. The US should
And they're.
not going to
be able to
find jobs---or
maybe even food--when they go
back because of how bad things
are over there. The US should
let them stay.


Local lead --e pushing Gov. Charlie Crist to veto the
bill to loosen i irements in the transportation department
that would g ilevelopers a free hand to further destroy
orderly growth] the state. Environmentalists and local gov-
ernments, call IL short-sighted.
*********
Fort Lauderdale has finally called a halt to those' sky-high
overtime bills for their police department that in some cases
ran as high as $70,000 in a single year. Can Miami-Dade be
next?


Medicare and Medicaid fraud continues to flourish here
despite the fact that 800 offenders since 2005 have cost the
government more than $2 billion in false claims. Biggest hits
come from bills for unnecessary HIV infusion therapy, fake
care of diabetic patients and medical equipment and inhala-
tion drugs that never got to patients because doctors never
prescribed them.
*********
Some local School Board members are having a field day
kicking former Superintendent Dr. Rudy ,Crew around for
the mixed reviews given the system's recent evaluation. The
problems are still with us but most people feel Crew did a
pretty good job here.


Miami Dolphin defensive end Randy Starks seemingly got
caught up in the Memorial Day weekend on Ocean Drive
and ended up being arrested and charged with aggravated
battery early Sunday morning after his truck struck a police
officer.


The idea that those 240 detainees now held in the Guan-
Itanamo Bay detention center would be risky to bring terror
suspects to the United States and lock them up here is lu-
dicrous. The argument that there's no place secure enough
to hold these guys is astounding, considering the number of
vicious maniacs and murderous psychos who are currently
behind bars in the United States.


President Barack Obama sent a large wreath and a card
signal simply--The President--to the monument on the 12th
and U streets in Washington on Monday at the African-
American Civil War Membrial. It remar


W49 -'


KA r At A Y'r f I I









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 20091


I~r'i Cam" fturne F anlwmr Pon%


g~ 0 ~

~


, S t


Copyrighted Material .


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Hundreds cram the Joseph Caleb Center meeting room to hear state and local officials discuss the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act.- t.am, .Ti.-,or.o.i s"a"r : Cn


Senator host meeting on the stimulus package


State Sen. Frederica Wilson's
office will be hosting three more
town hall meeting about the
American Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act (stimulus pack-
age)at the following location and
time: North Miami Senior High,
from 5:30 7:30 p.m., Wednes-
day, May 27; Miami Norland Se-
nior High, from 5:30 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday, May '28 and Miami
Edison Middle, from 5:30 7:30
p.m., Thursday, June 4.
"People are struggling," said
Wilson in a statement, "and they
have a right to know what mon-
ies we are receiving and how it
will be used in our communi-
ties."
The $787 billion stimulus
package was signed by Presi-
dent Barack Obama on Feb. 17,
to help rebuild the country dur-
ing this grim economy.
Miami-Dade unemployment
rate was 7.8 percent in March,


according to the South Florida
Workforce; foreclosure num-
bers are continuing to climb
and small businesses are clos-,
ing, makes Wilson to believe,
"The stimulus package impacts
individuals. There were a lot of
college students, business own-
ers and unemployed people who
attended the meeting."
Wilson previously held a stim-
ulus meeting earlier this month
at the Joseph Caleb. Center in
Brownsville where hundreds of
people packed the auditorium
and many were turned away due
to lack of space. The purpose of
the meeting was to give people
an overview on how the stimu-
lus would impact their life.
Kimberly Daniels,, unemployed
and a single parent of two, at-
tended the meeting. Daniels, 29,
is- currently living with her par-
ents in Liberty City, but she is in
need of financial help.


"It is so hard these days espe-
cially for the single parents," she
said outside of the Caleb Center
after attending a town hall meet-
ing on the stimulus package.
Like Daniels, Michael Evans
was curious to knowabout the
stimulus dollars that would be
coming into Miami-Dade Coun-
ty. Evans, an inspired entrepre-
neur and North Miami resident,
is ready to start his business
but is afraid with the state of
the economy.
"I don't want to take a risk, so
I am hoping the stimulus does
help, entrepreneurs like myself,"
he said.
Meanwhile, -City of Miami
Commissioners started making
decisions on' how they would
spend their stimulus dollars.
The Board of Commissioners
voted unanimously last week to
use three million dollars of the
federal stimulus funds on hous-


ing assistance.
Florida is expected to receive
approximately $13 billion in
stimulus money, according to
the Florida Office of Economic
Recovery's website.
So far, Miami-Dade County
has submitted several appli-
cations that equates to almost
$163 million.
"The money started at the top
and trickling down to Miami-
Dade," said Matthew Pinzur,
special assistant to Miami-Dade
County Manager George Bur-
gess.
Wilson said after the meeting.
that there was a lot of informa-
tion distributed to the attendees
but more information needs to
be given. Those who attended
were asked to visit: http://
floridalcir.gov and click on The
American Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act of 2009 presenta-
tion.


r.


An overhead shot of New Orleans after hurricane Katrina in 2005.

New Orleans not quite ready for big one
Interim storm-surge protection ing the, canal required part of
for New Orleans' Industrial Canal the huge structure be in place to


was supposed to be in place by
hurricane season this year, but
won't be finished until 2010, ac-
cording to an Army Corps of En-
gineers official, The Times-Pica-
yune reports.
The paper says that the $695
million corps contract for build-
ing walls and gates to block "100-
year" storm surges from enter-


.provide some protection by mid-
August.,
The paper quotes a senior proj-
ect manager as saying delays
were caused by real estate acqui-
sitions, floodwall design criteria
changes, the environmental eval-
uation process, and months spent
addressing major complaints by
the navigation industry.


AT FLORIDA MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY J


ITINERARY

Field Trips / Martial Arts
Camping / Swim Lessons
Dormitory Lodging
Motivational Speakers


FEATURES

Goal Planning
Life Skills
Character Dev.
Personal Mentoring


DATES

June 8'" June 26"r
(overnight)

Aqe Group


Full course meals And much more... 12 14 years old

Contact: Manhood Youth Dev. Camp & Educational Institute (D. Mincey.
954-274-3234
"Building Character & Transforming Lives" .
www.manhoodyouthcamp.org


MIAMI-DADE

OPENINGS FOR THE BOARD
OF TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC
HEALTH TRUST
Applications are now being accepted for the Board of Trustees of the
Public Heajth Trust of Miami-Dade County, the governing authority
for Jackson Health System. Trustees serve without compensation for
staggered terms of three years. There are five vacancies for the 2009
appointment process. The PHT Nominating Council will contact selected
applicants for interviews. Those applicants selected for interview will
be subject to a background check. The Miami-Dade Board of County
Commissioners, upon recommendation of the Nominating Council, will
make appointments to the Board of Trustees.
Application forms may be obtained from the County Executive Office,
111 NW 1st Street, Suite 2910, or online at www.miamidade.gov.
All applications must be received by Diane Collins, Acting Division
Chief, Clerk of the Board, at 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 17-202,
Miami, Florida, 33128 no later than June 3, 2009 by 4:00pm. Emails
or facsimiles of the application will be accepted and can be sent to
clerkbccf)miamidade.gov or faxed to 305-375-2484. .It is the
responsibility of the applicant to ensure electronic receipt of the
application by calling the Clerk of the Board at 305-375-1652. For
additional information regarding the application process, please call
305-375-5311.


MIAMI.DAD
-rMw11
APPLICATIONS FOR
SPECIAL MAGISTRATES
(ATTORNEY SPECIAL MAGISTRATES & APPRAISER
SPECIAL MAGISTRATES)
Opportunities now exist for appraisers and attorneys who are licensed in the State
of Florida, and meet the following criteria to serve as Appraiser Special Magistrates
or Attorney Special Magistrates for the 2009-2010 Value Adjustment Board.
1. No applicant may be an appointed or elected official or employee of Miami-
Dade County, the State of Florida or any other taxing jurisdiction.
2. Real estate Appraiser Special Magistrates must be state certified general
appraisers. Tangible personal property Appraiser Special Magistrates must be
designated members (i.e. either real or personal property designation) of one
of the following professional organizations:
A. Appraisal Institute'(MAI Sr. only; SRPA & SREA designations)
B. American Society of Appraisers (Fellows & Sr. members only)
C. National Society of Real Estate Appraisers
3. Appraiser Special Magistrates must have at least five (5) years experience in
the area of appraising real property and/or personal property, and over 50%
of their, time must be devoted to appraisal activities. All Appraiser Special
Magistrates must be qualified and willing to hear personal property and/
or all types of real property valuation cases, including income producing
properties. ,
4. Attorney Special Magistrates must be licensed in the State of Florida, must
have practiced law for over five (5) years and must have at least five (5) years
experience in the area of ad valorem taxation. '
5:. All applicants should generallybe computer literate and sufficiently competent
to enter their findings directly into the VAB computer system .(i.e. after a brief
training session).
6. No Special Magistrate may represent a taxpayer before the Board in any tax
year during which he or she serves as a Special Magistrate.
7. Special Magistrates will be paid a flat fee of $700.00 per 8 hour, daily hearing
session.
8. All qualified applicants will be personally interviewed by the Board. Qualified
individuals wishing to serve may obtain an application form and file same on
or before 4:00 p.m., Friday, June 26, 2009, with:

VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD
Stephen P Clark Center
111 N.W. 1st Street, Ste. 1720 '
Miami, FL 33128-1981,
Attn: Roberto Alfaro, Manager
Phone: (305) 375-5641


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER
-- *"' KU^'










5A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Commissioner Jordan urges negotiation


LAWSUIT
continued from lA

a letter asking OLF's manage-
ment to come to work for them.
Anthony Robinson, another
partner (there are four), echoed
Brown's sentiments. "You want
me to come sharecrop for you,
and I've got a multi-million dol-
lar business? No. We're going
to take our rightful spot in this
community," said Robinson.
The pair, along with their other
two partners, husband and wife
team Eric and Linnette Turner,
have' appealed to the County
Commissioners. When asked
what the County Commission
has d6ne to help Robinson re-
sponded "not a damn thing-
next question."
Robinson recounts an October
23 meeting with Commissioner
Barbara Jordan. "She essen-
tially told us that it would be in
our best interests to sign that
lease and accept whatever AA
was willing to give us," he said.
Robinson further alleges that
the commissioner told him that
if he did not accept AA's terms,
that she could not help lhn.
Jordan recalls the meeting,
but offers a more nuanced view
of the day's events.
"When I learned that [Opa-
Locka] Flightline was basically
rejectng the agreement with
AA group, I met with Flightline
for three hours, because to me
they were passing up a golden
opportunity. I just felt that they
were committing professional
suicide," she said. "They refused
to even negotiate with AA Acqui-
sitions. They had not even read
the lease that AA was propos-
ing." Jordan alleges that she
asked them to read the lease
and make a list of their concerns
with it. Instead, they decided to
engage an attorney.
Jordan stressed that she
would like very much to see
the situation resolved. "This to
me is very upsetting, because
more than anything we have
an opportunity to have the first
and only Black-owned FBO out
there. I just wish more than
anything that Flightline would


seriously consider negotiating
the deal that's being offered to
them," she said.
Jordan says that the commis-
sion does not have the power to
give OLF what it wants. Accord-
ing to Jordan, the initial lease was
held by a company called Stage-
coach, which had originally want-
ed to build an
airport on the
land.


in a certain time frame."
Jordan says by taking the
deal, OLF would more than dou-
ble its land base. "I want to see
them succeed, but they need to
be willing to come to the table,"
said Jordan. "I'm afraid it's not
going to end the way I'd like to
see it end."
Jordan expressed concern and
alarm that lawyers have become
involved. "To go the legal route.


business.
The delays have already cost
Opa-Locka Flightline. "We lost
roughly $23.9 million in in-
vestor funds," said Robinson.
"We were partnering to build a
10,000 square foot office com-
plex, a Hotel, two 50,000 square
foot hangars, and a 60,000 gal-
lon fuel farm. And we lost' the
funds because the county would
not move forward the lease," he
said.
Worse still, said Robinson, is
the potential for permanent loss
of those investors. "There's a
credibility issue now,' he said.
Some of these investors I've-
known for years."
In response to the allegations
of discrimination, People United
to Lead the Struggle for Equality
(PULSE), a local civil rights orga-
nization, has made the issue a
priority. Newly-elected president
Rev. Dr. Anthony Tate expects
his organization to take a lead-
ing role in the fight. "The NAACP
may play a role, said Tate, but
PULSE's advantage is that we
can act immediately, while the
NAACP has to get national
permission," he said.
Brown expects the battle to
be a difficult one, but does not
feel that he has another op-
tion. "My children are watch-
ing me and asking what we're
going to do," he ,said. "I say
what do you mean what are
we going to do? We're going to
fight, and we're going to win,"
he said.


WILLIE GARY


"The community went into
an uproar," said Jordan. Stage-
coach then sold their interest in
the lease directly to AA, a move
in which the county has little in-
put. According to Jordan AA now
holds a 50-60 year lease on the
land.
"Flightline wants to hold onto
their agreement with the coun-
ty," said Jordan. She says that,
they cannot.
"I just wish that [Brown] and
his-partners could come to some
sort of realization that the coun-
ty cannot just step in and take
them out of the assignment, es-
pecially when you have 15-20
other businesses out there in
the same situation," said Jor-
dan. "I have a number of His-
panic businesses in the same
situation, but they're sitting
down with [AA Acquisitions] be-
cause they understand that he
now owns the lease.
"Right now," said Jordan,
"Opa-Locka Flightline is sitting
on about six or seven acres,
which are in the center of the
property that AA wishes to de-
velop. What AA has agreed to
do is say 'we won't just let you
have that seven, well give you
15 acres in a prime location, but
you must agree to move and de-
velop it [your new location] with-


doesn't get you where you need
to go in the process for several
years," she said. "In that time,
the new owner can start eviction
procedures because they have
not paid any rent in over a year
on the lease that they have cur-
rently."
According to CK Hoffier, AA
Acquisitions has done exactly
that.
"They've been trying to evict
for a while," said Hoffier. She al-
leges that they have been trying
to evict illegally, and Robinson
says they have put up tow-away
signs near the business's build-
ing in an attempt to drive away


CK HOFFLER


Award winners advise more study to classmates


AWARDS
continued from 1A

dividual received a formal inter-
view from the judges who then
decides on the winners.
Penn made history by becom-
ing the first Silver Knight Social
Science recipient for Northwest-
ern. The ambitious youth, who
maintained a 4.7 grade point
average, said she has always
been driven to be the best that
she can be. The fact that her
mother did, not attend college
pushed her even harder.
"I wanted a better future for
my family," she said. "I try to do


my best."
Penn plans on attending Flor-
ida State University and major
in Nursing, so' her presidency
will have to take a backseat for
now.
Penn was not the only North-
western student who received
an award that night.
For the first time in North-
western's history, after being
picked from 130 applicants in
Miami-Dade, all of the school's
Silver Knight nominees received
recognition that also included
Crystal Harrison, 18, honorable
mention in Mathematics; Jaro-
da Strapp, 18, Music award re-
cipient; and Harold Stuart, 17,


honorable mention in Speech.
As a matter of fact, Harrison,
Strapp and Harold will graduate
in June with a G.P.A. over 5.0.
Nykeah Cohen, an alumna of
Northwestern who serves as an
Advancement Placement Eng-
lish teacher and a Silver Knight
advisor at the school, says she
is extremely proud of her stu-
dents.
"I believe that their accom-
plishments serve as a testament
to the positive results of dedica-
tion, hardwork and humility,"
se said. "They have overcome
obstacles and used the obsta-
cles as stepping stones. If more
youth would take the opportu-


nity to use their lives as positive
motivators then we would see
change in Miami-Dade County."
As Penn moves to further her
education, she advises young
people, "to take life more seri-
ous. In the inner city, we have
to work harder to achieve what
others have received. Even to-
day, young people need to be
aware of the importance of edu-
cation."
Each Silver Knights recipi-
ent will receive $2,000, a Silver
Knight statue and a medallion
presented by American Airlines.
The three Honorable Mentions
are given $500 and an engraved
plaque.


Board changes were needed


FUNDS
continued from 1A

was very clear in their request
that we withdraw it."
The withdrawal of the
bill from the Florida House
left Bullard's bill without a
companion bill in the house.
A bill must be passed in both
houses to become a law.
In order to rescue the funds,
Bullard says she found a
bill that dealt with a similar
subject, and attached the bill's
language to that, then found
the companion bill in the
House and attach the same
language to that companion
bill. The House bill became
HB 381, and the Senate bill
became SB 1276.
There was still further
work to do. Bringing in the
commissioners as members
of the board was done out of
necessity.. Bullard outlined
the reasons for this change.
"The only thing they had
in terms of an organization
was a name," said Bullard.
The state was not going to
take dollars and send them
into any area or program
without their showing some
fiscal responsibility. And no
one seemed to have known
who was going to be the fiscal
agent." According to Bullard,
to receive state funds, an
organization must either have
non-profit status, or be a
governing body.


Bullard described the
removal of the boundaries
as an attempt to expand the
program. She does not expect
the removal of the program's
official boundaries to affect
Liberty City's receipt of the
entire $3.6 million. "They
want to expand it to other
areas, but the $3.6 million
are still earmarked for Liberty
city," said Bullard. "No one at
any time has said that any of
those funds will go outside of
the zone."
"My only objective was to
secure the $3.6 million dollars
that was about to be returned
to general revenue. And they
would have been, had I not
found a vehicle to place that
language-- that vehicle being
SB 1276, and HB 381. I have
17 years of experience, and I'm
telling you that money would
have returned to general
revenue," she said.
Bullard also pointed out
that the State's fiscal year
ends on June 30, making time
a factor.
Bullard expressed regret
that she did not have more
interaction with the previous
board.
"I'venevermetanyoftheboard
members on this particular
issue," she said. "When one is
sponsoring legislation for any
organization, that organization
reaches out tb the senator.
But unfortunately, that did
not happen."


Commissioner holds no grudge


CHARGES
continued from 1A

"I am not upset with the State
Attorney Office because they
have a job to do but the one
who brought the accusations,"
she said.
In a letter to The Miami Times
on Tuesday, Spence Jones.
says that she commends
Centorino and State Attorney
Katherine Fernandez-Rundle
for not being, "persuaded by
gossip, rumor, or innuendo,,
or influenced by political
agendas; instead they based
their investigation on truthful
facts."
Spence-Jones is now moving
forward and seeking possible
reelection by the members in
her district.
As far of allegations that
Spence-Jones was involved
with financial wrongdoings
with Pastor Gaston Smith;
Smith, pastor at Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church
in Liberty City; was charged
with misspending a $25,000
county grant to a nonprofit
in 2008. Spence-Jones said
that "no one has contacted me
from the State Attorney about
this issue."


As a member of Smith's
congregation,, she continues
to support her pastor who is
set for trial this summer.





SUBSCRIBE


TODAY!


END THE

INCONVENIENCE

OF EMPTY

NEWSPAPER

BOXES,
FIGHTING

THE WEATHER
AND

HUNTING

DOWN BACK

COPIES


CALL: 305-694-6214


THE DORRIN ROLLE 7TH ANNUAL BRAIN


2009 SUMMER YOUTH EMPLOYMENT


RECRUITMENT


DRIVES


A HUGE SUCCESS!


MIAMI, FL Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle contin-
ues to bring good things to the people
of District 2.
More than 150 children and com-
munity members cheered on students
from Van E. Blanton and W.J. Bryan
Elementary Schools as they vied for
the championship in Commissioner
Dorrin D. Rolle's 7th Annual Brain
Bowl on Wednesday, May 20 at Van
E. Blanton Elementary School.
W.J. Bryan's team came away as
the victors this year, beating out their
rivals who won last year. Commis-
sioner Rolle presented the winning
check of $5,000 to David Lafontant,
Christian Gonzalez, Serena Brad-
shaw, Faboula Pierre, Joshua Philoc-
tete, and Cynthia Belfleur, to be used
for media supplies or other school-
related supplies. The winning team
also won a trip to Disney World. Van
E. Blanton students Ferjoline Darce-
lin, Jonathan David, Samuel Richard,
Ruth David, MichelAntz-Jean, and Ti-
ana Sconiers did not walk away emp-
ty handed; their school won $1,500
which will also be used for media
supplies or other school-related sup-
plies.


"1 am proud of the accomplishments
of both teams, who studied diligently
for this year's Brain Bowl," said Com-
missioner Rolle. "This event is a great
way for students to not only focus on
subjects they learn in school, but also
understand other important studies
like African,and African American his-
tory."
Commissioner Rolle, along with Ki-
nad, Inc., a non-profit traveling exhibit
promoting African and American his-
tory, organizes the annual Brain Bowl
in an effort to encourage and reward
students for academic achievement.
Additionally, young residents look-
ing for a summer job attended one of
two Employment Recruitment Drives.
On Friday, May 8, 2009, Rolle hosted
the first of two Summer Youth Em-
ployment Recruitment drives, the ini-
tial drive being held at South Florida
Workforce, Northside Career Station,
7900 N.W. 27th Avenue.
On Saturday, May 23, 2009, Com-
missioner Rolle again teamed up with
South Florida Workforce, this time in
conjunction with the Inner City Youth
of South Florida to give students ages
14 24 the opportunity to register with
South Florida Workforce for informa-


tion on job prospects. More than 400
applicants registered during the dual
recruitment drives, in hopes to gain
one of 4,000 positions being offered
by the Workforce.
The employment program seeks to
match youth with a potential employ-
er. The ideal candidate is between
14 24 years of age,. is a resident of
Miami-Dade or Monrop counties, a
citizen or eligible to work in the United
States, and qualifies as low income.
Selected applicants will participate in
an 8 to 10 week program to provide
young adults with summer jobs, work
readiness skills, and an opportunity to
earn a paycheck by working in entry-
level occupations at governmental
agencies, non-profit and for profit
agencies, hospitals and community-
based organizations on a part-time
basis earning $8 to $10 an hour. At
the recruitment drives, interested ap-
plicants inputted their information di-
rectly into South Florida Workforce's
database to see if they qualify to par-
ticipate.
"We have motivated young people
out there who are willing to work hard
to get ahead in life and help their
families," said Commissioner Rolle.


"This is a great opportunity for these
residents to learn useful skills that
will help them with their later careers,
especially in this difficult economic
environment where jobs are hard to
come by."
For more information on any of the
above events, please contact Com-
missioner Rolle's office at 305-375-
A4QQ3


Miami-Dade County Commiss
Dorrin D. Rolle (back row) pre
certificates, as well as a chei
$5,000, to W.J. Bryan Eleme
the winners of the Dorrin D.
7th Annual Brain Bowl, which
held on May 20,


sioner '
sents
ck for L 4
ntary, A Miami-Dade County Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle (left) greets
Rolle a young resident hoping to gain employment through the South
h was Florida Workforce's recruitment drive. Interested applicants were
2009. invited to submit their information into South Florida Workforce's
: database to see if they qualified. -Photos by Ryan Holloway/Miami-DadeCounty


*'"When I learned that [Opa-Locka]
Flightline was basically rejecting the
agreement with AA group, I met with
'M Flightline for three hours, because to
me they were passing up a golden op-
portunity. I just felt that they were committing profes-
sional suicide."
COMMISSIONER BARBARA JORDAN









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 20091


Legacies of war dead endure .,-"_ -

O0 am *si m 'a o(ll#me 'sM 'll -- % --


a sh


- -'Available fr(


Sgrl ?ec =e .--W---




s n nca e onent. .- -





) commercial News, Providers'


OE amosop4peN ON


-


w


a' a-
a ~..-- -a~


*
- ~
a-
- ~.- -
a


~S4m




p


a -
-


- a
a -
a -




a -


im-am-


000 10 0 bmo ain
dab_4w ow41mm
am 4 "M
WAm do 40

40WROW -Milo-

4o- q* w






mo qwqw




-Dd mw -w
am 0


4w-


a



0 -0


-


a --


a..-- - -
-~ -
- a -
a a- -


0 -


- o


%~w~ ~sawh bb
4bm


.


w -
a


* ~- -


- m -emmemm 0 w


-4w


w

-w


-* a


Congratulates Class of 2009


University of Florida
Arantxa Sanchez Randolph Dameus Tavarous Parks
Nancy Flores Daniela Flores Lanie Whittaker
Juan Prado Gerry Marseille Chantelle Nelson
Berthony Jolis Tivia Rouland Jennifer Romero


Bethune Cookman Florida A & M
Michael Joseph Tiana Lawhorn
Quanese McCray Eriel Stirrup
Sandra Belmont Mario Roberts
Benjamin McNamee


University of Miami University of Central Florida
Ingrid Belmont Shalonda Dukes



Johnson & Wales University Hawaii Pacific University
Carine Cadet Weschester Junior



University Of North Florida Alabama State University
Jennifer Morales Anisha Jenkins



"Not the Largest, but the Best!"


"me 0 hm is m immigradm


8.


S 0


O
....m=-


'MEOW -


o














Circle of Brotherhood to make final recommendations to County


Chairwoman proposes a plan to reduce violence


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

The relatively small turnout
at the Circle of Brotherhood's
final public forum allowed for
the clear and rapid exchange of
ideas between police, local resi-
dents, and board members.
An taskforce created to ad-
dress the crime in the Liberty
City community, the Circle of
Brotherhood said at a town-
hall discussion at the Liberty
Square Community Center on
Thursday that will make its rec-
ommendations to the County
Commission in June. The meet-
ing was the last chance for local
community members to raise
any further issues.
One such recommendation
was made by Nathaniel Wilcox,
who chairs the organization's
Security and Safety subcommit-
tee. Wilcox suggested the possi-
bility of parts of Liberty Square.
There was some consternation
at the idea, and he added hast-
ily; "but we want to do it in such
a way that people don't feel like
they live in a prison camp. We


want to do it in such a way that
would be acceptable if we did it
in Adventura.
Wilcox's reasoning; "A lot of
the people committing crimes
here don't live in Liberty
Square."
Thema Campbell, chair-
woman of the organization, ac-
knowledged this during her own
remarks. She was not, how-
ever, inclined to let the Liberty
Square community off the hook
so easily. "Yee, some do come in
to commit crimes, but a lot of
them live right here, and a lot of
us know exactly who they are,"
she said.
Campbell then told of a per-
sonal experience she'd had while
monitoring meetings in other
neighborhoods. Campbell said
she does this to get new ideas.
"In Wynwood they have what's
called the 'Menace to society'
subcommittee. When someone
gets arrested there, they go to
court to advocate to the judge to
keep the criminal in jail."
"I was like wow," she contin-
ued. "Why can't we do that in
Liberty Square?"


Campbell also noted that the
Wynwood community pooled
their funds, and hired their own
24-hour security guard. This
measure, it was pointed out by
Deputy Chief of Police Frank G.
Fernandez, is less necessary in
Liberty Square due to enhanced
police presence in the area.
Carol Rahming, who was born
and raised in the Scott Projects,
was one of few attendees from
the community. For the past
nine months, she has lived in
Liberty Square.
"I came because I want to give
back to my community," she
said. "I want to help it grow and
thrive," she said.
Cheryl Parker, another local
resident, said much the same.
"'My cousins lived in this com-
plex when I was young,"- she
said. "I used to come here to
play with them."
"I came because this is our
future," she continued. "I don't
have any kids, but I still can't
just leave it like this. I'm like
an auntie to all the neighbor-
hood kids, and I don't like to
think about what could become
of them if this crime keeps hap-
pening."


Liberty City Elementary excels in FCAT


New plan delivers new results


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Outside Liberty City Elemen-
tary, located at 1855 Northwest
71st Street, is a sign that says,
"Our students are the great-
est."
Liberty City third graders
lived to that potential after mak-
ing impressive gains in Reading
and Math portionr of the state-
wide exam, Florida Compre-
hensive Assessment Test.
"We read a lot of books and
did a lot of studying on the
weekend which meant less tele-
vision," said third grader Adri-
ana Collier.
Principal Tamme Williams
was extremely proud of her
students who faced increased
pressure due to a state man-
date. The school which received
a F last year irn the School Per-
formance Grades had become
a candidate for closure, if they
did not improve. This year, Lib-
erty City. climbed more than 40
percent in their FCAT scores.
"It was crucial that we help
build their confidence," said


GLENDA LATIMORE
Summa Cum Laude






Proud parents Glenn and
Michelle Latimore are pleased
to announce the graduation of
their daughter, Glenda Latimore
form Miami Norhwestern Senior
High School on June 2, 2009.
She is also a participant of the
Rose Cotillion presented by Sig-
ma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.
Glenda will be attending the
Hampton University Pre-College
Program and will continue on at
Hampton University in the fall,
majoring in nursing.
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville is her
church home.


Williams. "I knew that these
kids could do it but I am glad
that everyone else knows it
now,"
The road to improvement re-
quired a new technique and a
plan to help motivate the chil-
dren to learn said Williams.
Tackling the students' weak-
ness was the first step.
"One of the problems that we
found with the FCAT was the
vocabulary," said third grade
teacher Tyra Griffin, a' six-year
teacher and resident of Liberty
City. "The students were ex-
posed to words that they could
hot understand."
Through a series of hands-on
project, field trips and tutorial
programs, the students vocabu-
lary improved. In the spur of nine
months, Liberty City students
also read up to 10,000 books to
help build their vocabulary.
*,"We did not overbear the stu-


dents with FCAT but we made
learning fun so that they could
become more interested when
they walk through the double
doors," said Griffin.
"The students success re-
quired a new way of learning,"
said Griffin.
With new learning strategies,
instilling confidence and motiva-
tion was a must.
The elementary school is a
couple of blocks from where
the massive shooting in Janu-
ary occurred that resulted in
the death of Brandon Mills and
Derrick Gloster.
A tiny glimmer of hope re-
mains in the community as the
violence continues.
"I find that these kids have
become victims to their sur-
rounding," said Griffin," but we
try to teach them that they are
.mQre.than their surroundings."
She added, "The world -is
so much bigger than Liberty
City."


10 weeks June 15, 2009 thru August 21, 2009

Registration Fee: $75.00 Weekly: $85.00


Time: 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday

This camp will feature the following activities/ classes:

Juanita Walker Modeling and Dress for Success

D. Weatherspoon From Boys to Men

E. Walker Beginning Math

D. Clarke of Bethune Cookman University -Music

K. Walker Field Events, Exercise, Healthy Eating Habits

The camp will also feature guest speakers, field trips, arts

and crafts, etiquette, manners and homework tutoring.










LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE PLEASE ACT FAST!!!


Rahming and Campbell


(~r7Vm~


Miami- bade Elders:


Let's get ready NOW!


What Is The Digital TV (DTV) Transition?
After June 12, 2009, full-power TV stations will broadcast only in digital. The DTV transition will
affect those who watch free over-the-air television (through a rooftop antenna or "rabbit ears"). If you
watch over-the-air programs on an analog TV, you must take action before June 12, 2009.
What Should I Do to Be Ready? You have three options:
1. Connect your analog TV to a digital-to-analog converter box. Digital-to-analog converter
boxes are in stores and have a one-time cost of $40-$70. To help you pay for the boxes, the U.S.
Government is offering two $40 coupons per household. Or
2. Buy a digital television (a TV with a built-in digital tuner). You do not need a High Definition TV
(HDTV) to watch digital broadcast television. You only need a digital TV (or an analog TV connected to a
digital-to-analog converter box). Or

3. Subscribe to a paid TV service. If your TV set receives local broadcast stations through a paid provider
such as cable or satellite TV, it is already prepared for the DTV transition. Cable companies are not required to
transition or switch any of their channels to digital.
Should I wait until June to take action?
No! Digital television is available now, so enjoy the benefits now. Benefits include more channels,
better quality picture and sound, menu guides and more. The Alliance for Aging can help you get
started now!


11 .-


How can the Alliance for Aaing. Inc. help me?
If you are 60 or older, we can help you in


-the following ways:
1. Help you evaluate your need for a
Alliance for Aging. Inc
Through a network of 41 service providers, each year the All
million hours of in-home services such as personal care and
home and not in a nursing honie, and 444,000 trips to doctors' o
Alliance provides health counseling, emergency assistance to vi
and emergency energy assistance payments to those in need. Th
Dade and Monroe county elder population prepare for the DTV


converter box
2. Help you apply for a coupon
3. Deliver your converter box and
4. Install the converter box in your home.

iance delivers over 3 million meals, 1.2
homemaking to help maintain elders at
offices, senior centers, and shopping. The -
ctims of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, w
ie Alliance is pleased to assist the Miami
transition.


For more information, please call the Elder Helpline a 1-00463-5337.





Bigger and Better


"c!: Than Ever...
necN upwfsTmt and Still FREE!


Saturday, May 30 10 AM- 6 PM
Miami-Dade County Fair & Expo Center
Coral Way & SW 112th Avenue


Hundreds of indoor exhibitors showcasing:
* Summer and After-School Programs
* Injury Prevention KidCare Outreach
Vaccination Information Parenting Classes
Pre-K Registration Programs for Children
with Special Needs... and much more.

Family and kid friendly

activities for everyone

to enjoy!

Special appearances
by Nickelodeon's
SpongeBob and Dora.
plus PBS Kids' Arthur.
Clifford
and others.


Cull 211 . t.w. . . . . .or . .h.


-I. rh~ZI ~ tm'- we3-


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


;f^
d .


I 7A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2,2009


stool IN








The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


Black church nlunh1rship iwrrTaet



OFFERINGSDE.,REASE

a .Copyrighted Material
f O Am % f ia o A 4 -am

--- oSyndicated Content -,---.a .

JgllW '40. 00- a-P. 4 ... ..

Available from Commercial News Providers







Black DIemocrats divided over gay marriage
ai Ii- wo am1i1 - 1 -- -4.,,..


,. -1OW -, O


FM W -"qIRCI


WIiSHOQP
PAUL MOlTON
Greater St. Stephen Full
Gsspel Baptist Church,
New Orleans. LA
June 2


DR.
JUANITA BYNUM
luanila Bynurm
Ministries.
Waycross. GA
June 4-5


A[
DR. GARY WILuAMS
Finrs Baspi Church
of Mandatin,
lacksonville. fi
June10


REv. JEFFREY
A. JoHNSoN
Eastern Star Chuia
Indianapoli IN
June 19


Dr. WiLiE RuoD
Fellowship Biblek
Haiplist Church, REV. CALVIN
Warner Robbhhins, C;A M(FAfI)N
June 28 7am Fellowship iible
Ulaplisl Church,
\',irner ghbins, iGA
June 28 11am


BISHOP
JOSEPH WALKER
ML Zimn Baplisl Church
Whiles Creek. TN
June 11
r'V.ff~jgaw-


REV. JOE C.


DR. RALPH WEST
lhe Church
Without IVWils.
Houston, TA
June 12


DR. JACQUELINE
MCCULLOUGH


, JOHNSON Daughterhs orf Rizpah,
GreathrI tw'nvzr Pomonna. NY
MisskMinrv Raptlsr Church June 24-25
Hallandale, fl
June 21 (7pm)


REV.
ROBERT STANIfY
Hopewell Missionary
B'ptist Church,
Pompano liach. f L
June 29


The Kingdom Agenda 2009
HFrom Brokenness to Breakthrough
and Blessings: A Solemn Assembly

. R STH Matthew 6:33; Psalm 51:17; II Chronicles 7:9
DR. RoBERT SMITH
Pro, resof. Been
D inity School at
.amfiord Uni er.stly,
Birmingham, Al'
June 14 (7pm)
June 1 June 1 -5th "From Brokenness to Breakthrough
& Blessings Conference"
June 8-12th Spiritual Warfare Conference
June 15-19th Church Anniversary
June 22-24th Men & Women's Conference
ALPHONs)JACKSON June 25-26th Church Growth & Leadership Conference

June 26
BISHOP VICTOR T. CURRY
Host PASTOR
June 1, 3
June 7 (7am, I lam. 7pmi
June 8, 9
June 14 (?'am& i1am)
June 17 S RuthA Mlissirna, r apItlt ChI'ufth
SJune 21 '7arnm ai lam
June 22, 23
June 28 t7pm,


at 6:44pm and are free. Saturday Wordshops & Worship Services begin at 8:00am


I


-L


All Services Monday Friday begin,













BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 9B TIlE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


Move forward with your faith


Do you remember the stories
of Joseph, Esther and Daniel?
Though they were very differ-
ent people, their stories were
similar. Now, allow me to make
myself clear.' I am talking about
Joseph before he became the
number two man in Egypt; Es-
ther before she became Queen;
and' Daniel before he became
one of the most powerful men inr
Babylon. You see, all of these
people had a 'before' life.
Esther was not always a Per-


sian Queen. She spent a year
in preparation just to be able
to see the King for one night -
perhaps, even a few minutes of
one night! Before that, she was
a young Jewish girl living with
her cousin who had adopted her
after the murder of both of her
parents. Her guardian, Morde-
cai, was a wise Jewish man, well
respected among the Jewish
community. He spent time talk-
ing to and teaching the young
girl whom he was entrusted


to protect.
But in one night yes, in just
one night, Esther was chosen by
the King to become his wife, the
Queen. Those years of prepara-
tion yielded a great reward, but it
happened in just one night. Lat-
er, Esther used her position as
Queen to become instrumental
in preventing an entire nation of
people the Jewish people, from
being completely destroyed. I
love what Mordecai said to Es-
ther after he commanded her
to speak to the King about the
law that declared all Jews must
be killed on a certain day. Es-
ther was understandably afraid
to approach the King. Though
he was her husband, he was
first the king. There was a law
of the land that prevented any-
one from approaching the king
unless he sent for them even


his wife. The penalty for break-
ing this law was death. When
Esther expressed her reluctance
to approach the king uninvited,
in the 4th chapter, and the 14th,
verse, Mordecai asked her if she
had considered that perhaps
she had been placed in her posi-
tion 'for such a time as this.'
Years spent in the wilderness
could be preparing you for such
a time that you do not even re-
alize God has planned for you.
Perhaps you are waiting, ach-
ing, and pregnant with a dream
and a vision. And not just any
vision either, but one that you
know God placed in your spiri-
tual womb. You know this is
something God wants you to do,
but nothing seems to be happen-.
.ing. You wonder if He has even
forgotten that He told you what
to do. No doors are opening. No


networking is happening. No
prospect for a job or new minis-
try is on the horizon. What do
you do? You continue to pray.
You continue to do as you have
been taught to do. You contin-
ue to serve God. You continue
'to tithe and give offerings. You
continue to bloom where you are
planted. Do you have faith in
what is in your spiritual womb?
You might say that you don't
see anything happening. Read
Hebrews 11 'the faith chap-
ter.' If you could see it, then it
wouldn't be faith. Faith is what
you do not see. Hebrews 11:1
says that faith is a substance.
A substance is something that
you can hold on to. Even if you
don't see it, you can hold onto
what God said.
Declare that you will do what
God has commanded or spoken


into your life perhaps through
Godly prophets. After Mordecai
told Esther that she was prob-
ably placed in her position for
just such a time, Esther said
that she would pray and fast,
and have her servant girls pray
and fast with her, and then she
would approach the king. When
you don't see it, and you don't
know how to deal with it, and
you just don't know which way
to turn or what to do pray, fast,
get some Godly men and women
to pray and fast with you, and
approach King Jesus. Tell the
enemy that you are going to do
what you have been told to do.
You are going to hold on to the
vision and instructions given to
you by God. And be ready like
Esther to declare that no matter
what happens, you are going to
go forth. '


C a


Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's Office will hold a Sealing
and Expungement Program at
the Antioch Missionary Bap-
tist Church in Opa-locka, from
5-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May
28. 305-547-0724.


The Miami Edison Ole Tim-
er's Pep Rally will take place
at Edison Senior High gymna-
sium at 6:30 p.m., Friday, May
29. 786-541-1988.


Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1968 will have a
meeting at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center at 2
p.m., Saturday, May 30. 786-
487-0787 or 786-223-1644.


The Richmond Heights
Neighborhood Crime Watch
will celebrate their 60th, an-
niversary of the Richmond
Heights 'community, at Coral


Reef Senior High School, from
11 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday, May
30-31. Deacon Baldwin, 305-
232-2209 or 305-582-6298.


World Literacy Crusade/
Girl Power program will pres-
ent "The End of School Com-
munity Celebration," at the
Carried P. Meek Cultural Center
at 6:30 p.m., Thursday, June
4. 305-756-5502.


Miami Northwestern Senior
High School class of 1964 will
celebrate its 45th anniversary,
June 4-7. For a list of events,
contact Arthur McCarthy, 305-


687-1587; Carolyn Crowell,
305-620-0743; Elizabeth Wells,
305-620-6299; or Harold Dil-.
lard, 786-263-1691.


Florida Youth Flag Football
Association (FYFFA) will open
its season at the Amelia Ear-
hart Park in Hialeah at 8 a.m.,
Saturday, June 13. Kwame
Smith at 305-467-8397 or e-
mail ksmith@nffflorida.com.


Desoto Correctional Insti-
tute will have a Father's Day
Weekend on Saturday, June
20. Phillip, 786-873-9498.


Church of the Incarnation observes 60th Anniversary


The Church of the Incarna- be established as a diocesan jor introduced the idea of joint
tion will celebrate 60 years of mission. A group of dedicated Lenten services among the
ministry and community out- women worked tirelessly to black Episcopal churches in
reach on Sunday, May 31-, be- gain support for the mission Miaru, which continues today.
ginning at 9 a.m. and they canvassed the Lib- In 1977 Father Major was
The Church of the Incarna- erty Square community many elected to serve on the Econom-
tion was established on Whit- nights until the goal of gath- ic Opportunity Family Health
sunday on June 5. 1949. The ering names on a petition was Center Board of Directors and
first service took place at the accomplished. In July, 1949, was subsequently elected Presi-
Liberty' City Community Center the congregation was officially dent of the board, a position he
and was conducted by Deacon named the Church of the Incar- held for more than ten years.
John Jarrett, wholater. becam .-natjon ..... .. During his tenure, he success-

cownati'on camrrt .j a aC 0 U 'Or. taio t frornittrW g.e Fan):
because of the strong determi- next five decades the church ily Health Center over to the
nifion eofagrqp, of Liberty City flourished and expanded. In county government. As a re-
residents who were adamant 1969, The Reverend J. Kenneth suit, Family Health Center now
about an Episcopal church in Major became the seventh vicar thrives as a first class minority
their neighborhood. and, first rector of the parish. owned community health care
J. Hartman Taylor and Wil- Under his guidance, there was facility which serves as a model
liam Hanna "spearheaded the tremendous growth in th e num- throughout the nation.
drive to begin a new church ber of parishioners and many In 1995. there was a grand
and after meeting with Bishop new programs were begun. He celebration for the dedication
Henry I. Loutitt, it was agreed really expanded the role of the and consecration of the current
that a new congregation could church in the community. Ma- church and administration an-


nex. In 2007. the church made
massive renovations to the par-
ish hall, which has been for-
mally named the J. Kenneth
Major Hall.
The guest preacher for the oc-
casion will be the Reverend Can-
on Nelson W. Pinder, immediate
past president of the Union of
Black Episcopalians. Canon
Pinder was ordained a deacon
at Incarnation in 1959 before
Being EOsigned 4o S.-d v
1Baptist Episcopal. .ChW!.a
Orlando. Pinder served in many
different capacities in Orlando.
including working with and for
the bishop. He is known as the
S'street priest," a community
" leader and a very caring per-
son.
The church is located at 1835
Northwest 54th Street in Miami.
The public is most cordiallyin-
vited to attend.


(m=himI Ea(ll 1 WIIL iI ( ....... ,-.

Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers -


Installation of Minister Lavances Wright-Rolle as Pastor
GOD FILLED DAYS MINIS- Thursday, May 28, 7:30 p.m., Church Pastor, Rev. Dr.Tracey
TRIES INC. cordially invites led by God's Word God's Way McCloud.
you to the Installation Service Pastor, Reginald Wilkerson. Both services will be held
for Minister Lavances Wright- Installation' Service Sun- at El Palacio Hotel, (9th floor)
Rolle as Pastor. day, May 31, 4 p.m., led by 21485 N.W. 27th Avenue, Mi-
Pre-installation Service Peace Missionary Baptist ami.


********
Liberty City Community
Activist will be having their
first annual Treasure Hunt,
from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., on
June 27. Verneacha Johnson,
305-751-9377 or 786-985-
5224.
********
Miami Central Senior High
is planning a triple class re-
union of 91, 92 and 93 from
July 31 -Aug 2. Edwin, 305-
975-1757.


The National Association of
Black Hotel Owners, Opera-


tors & Developers will hold its
13th annual conference at the
Doral Golf Resort & Spa, July
22-25. 954-792-2579.


Top Ladies of Distinction
will hold its monthly meeting
at Florida Memorial University
Lehman Aviation Building on
the second Saturday. 305-696-
1631.


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High class of 1989 will hold its
20th anniversary at the Jun-
gle Island at 8 p.m., Aug. 7.
Bulls89reunion@hotmail.com


Westview Baptist Church
family cordially invites you to
their first Gospel. Music Work-
shop and concert, beginning
at 6 p.m., May 28-30 and con-
tinuing Sunday, May 31 with
a worship service. 305-687-
6004.


Sweet Home Missionary
Baptist Church will have a
formal dedication service at 5
p.m., Sunday, May 31. Beverly
C. Rodrigues at 305-235-1328
or bw9821(Agmail.com.


New Christ Tabernacle in-
vites you to their fifth Sunday
Musical Extravaganza at 3:30
p.m., May 31. 305-621-8126.
305-621-8126.


Mt. Vernon M.B.C. family
cordially invites you to their
Fruits of the Spirit Program at
3:30 P.m., Saturday, May 31.
305-824-4779.


Memorial Temple Mission-
ary Baptist Church invites
you to a special worship ser-
vice at 11 a.m., Sunday, June
7. 305-624-2502


The Tabernacle of Ark of
Jesus Christ second annual
camp meeting revival will be
held 7:30 p.m. nightly, June
8-14. Anastasia White, 305-
608-7877.

Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30
p.m. on Monday.


NORTHWEST TRACK

S& FIELD CLASSIC


JUNE 12-14, 2009


Traz Powell Stadium


Speoaored by M A^ -fE
Miami-Dade College ni b1 MIAMDDO3
North Campus 5


TICKETS, ENTRY FORM, EVENT INFO & FEES, call: 305-836-2409 after 9 pm.. fax: 305-691-6390; email: jholt@mnwexprress.com
online registration: http://dlrectathletics.com; application at-firunning.com;
www.mnwexpress.com;

NorthWest Track & Field Classic 1310 NW 90th Street Miami FL 33147


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I 9B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009












10B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


--- Copyrighted Material.






Syndicated Content
y oA


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


0


Available from Commrercial News Providers
4. 10W- WMW Mo


141AL K~k t.hurt hr' luhilvmnK rcv w %vI une.1


-


- S -


Q CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED 0 CHARGE MY CREDIT CARD
, j Exp__


AW
wo Li


Exp__


Exp__


Authorized Signature

Name

Address


City


Phone


State ____ Zip _


email


*Includes Florida sales tax
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymiamitimes.com


/postolic Revival Cenler\ / New Harvest Missionary
6702 NV It.cue .cNneBaptist Church
305-836-1224 Baptist Church
I 1 05- 122 orse,-, 12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
Order os-n -300i
Neu m= for T N Program 305-681-3500


s. S 9 a.a.-3 p.m. SSaday 5 p.m.
Wed. IntemmossiryPayer9am.- -tpm,
S r, .F" g .I 1,
Wille Sh .ly............ 730 prn


S Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
741 N..% % IA Strct
305-759- 875
3,fiD th enlcea
r n o B T .- r 3h" d on

N.,a ) A.'Inct Pr,)' W>. I1 ~ 1 i




St. John Baptist Church-
1328 N.W. 31"Avenue
305-372-4877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Earch Sunday
mtormng Worahip ....7:30 a.m,
Swiday School.......... 9:30 a.m.
,N rJo mng worship ...11 a.m.
Pran S ...t.Bible Studym
|c. clinmg (Tuies.) 7 p.m.


ethod...is l Churc



/"-' Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413

Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m.- 11:15 Iam.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible StudyTucday
10 am. & 7 p-m




"Temple Missionary
Baptist Church p
1723 N.W. 3" Avnnue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-40604Fax 305-255-8549
HOrder of Services:
Sunday School...........9:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning Servs......lI a.m.
4*-Sun...BTU....;30.2:30 p.m.
Tuesday....,Bible Study
Feeding Miistry...... 10 a.m.
Wed. Dible Study/Prayer..6:30 pmi.
Thut. Outrach Minisrliy...6:30p.m
I^^^^^^^^^^^C^


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ........ 10 a m.
Evening Worship ......... 6:p.
Wednesday,...General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m. ,.
TV Program 'lesday, 8:30 a.m..9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.peinbrokeparkclurchofchrist.com Email: pcmnbrokeparkcoc@ bellsouthi.net


f Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305634.4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
S Order of Services
I ^^^.^Bh ,I D, 5 ..l]. l J l'

SS... L, i Euill Sii p
I T .'iL. -l" i .'Ji. p ll
T..al- N. 'l e 6IW'I 3 CIt
B ans fntlkln availdhlu call
0 4 / .-5


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322

! Order of Services:
Early Mo rmc Wmrip7 .30a.m.
NMaming War.up I| I .lm.
VVE )NI SVA a
PFMer N fcreeing 730 p.m.
Ltible blud 8 p.m.,


YJordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave.
305-751-9323
Order f Seri-ces:
S7 EaWorship .. 7an
IlunI y SchooL i am.
N3,nrh d I t1o am
'*,[ 1 3^ .1Mils on and Bibi -lass
mm m poiniiMeenn_.Chni rehearsal



/ St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and 11 a.m.
Worslhip Service
9.30 a............Sunday School
Tuesday ........7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p.m ........Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wethesday, Fliday
12 p.m.. ..Day Prayer


The Episcopal Church of"
The Transfiguration
15260 NW 19'" Avenue
305-681-1660
S Church Schedule:
Sunday Services
7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
Healing Service
Second Wednesday 7 p.m.



Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.
Miami, FL. 33147
954-735-9393

And now abide
faith, hope, love...
I Cor. 13:13


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


/Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634.6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Clhtm lWSundy School .... 8.30 a.m.
Simtday Woesldip Service .. i a.in
fMid-Week Se'icet.... Wtdt.sday's
Hour of Pow"-Noo ) My ay r
12 pmm..I pm. n
H vemng wormtlp .- 7pmI



Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noion Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
StundayWorship...7-11 a.m n
Sunday School.......9:30 a.mn.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Faxs: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptiistmimni.oirg


*1


,7Logos Baptist Church"
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383
Order of Services
Sun ay
S.l..uL.i0 Worship at8 & 11 a.m.
y, ..1J y School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
7800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mthermonworaipcenter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


H


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 am. & 10 a.m.
Chumrc School:8 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute. 6:30 p.m.
Mid week Worship 7:30 p.m.


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School.............930 a.m.
Mouning IraiseWViship .. 11 mn.
i xdTlin nl Snxtay
eveningeship at6p pn.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
1 Tuesday 7 p.m.
Ao, v.,S Ipr /wo. Cal 305.836 S?90.


/ First Baptist Missionary '
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
SSunday...7:30 & 11 am.
Sr.. Sunday School...............10a.m.
T .inusday ........ p Bible Study.
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
i' Baptism Thurs. before
Ssu t Sun..n p.m.
Conuunion First Sun........
7:30 & i am.


Cornerstone Bible \
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
Sunday Scihi. 9.30a&m.
Sunday Worship .. 11 am
flir= Sunday Evening Wo'Ihip
6p.m.
Mid Week Service ... 7 p.m.
Choir Rehearal Tiersday
7:30pm.
\ mlg rgungagganaigem m/I~ln


rMt. Zion A.M.E. Church 93"' Street Community
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue Missionary Baptist Church
305-681-3300 2330 N.W. 93rd Street
Order of Services 305-836-0942
d oSun l a' Order of Services
Worship 5 ce,.... '0 11 .ni -'30i, a.m. -lyM ng Nit ip
Ci)Ui .Sciiol. 0..9:30 am. It annm..%lor gIthitg Wom p
Wednesday
SFe ia.,, y .. 2 Evcning Worship
ibie S-dy ....... "71pm I.&3 nday .... 6 pm
Thursday Tuesday Bible St udy ...7 pm.
p'yer eiing 7.... pm iweiienle: m xe. cg
"There is a place for you"
\1r4!iWWW W,,fi --ll.......... / II)(


/ Hosanna Community 1
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
30.5-6.47-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:.
Sunday School ............9:45 am.
W p .....11.... am
Bil3e txly, I hssd ...7:30 i m






of Christ
1263 NN.. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:








New Vision For Christ
13650 NayM. ot Avenue
305-899-7224
I Order of Services:
*urA ) .'Ll ............ 10 &m.






i,L cIr i eg............k p.m.


,ifi u l tec ......:30 p.m




Tue R 6leh e S. .......I730 p.m.



HBI n looFah '
New Daision For" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 0 N.W 761 Street
30-8-05.836-781 5
Order of Services:
Mon Wo .mip ST ans













Tuesdaiy Bi le r.c ... ... I p.
tWord ofFai thc i Sl..... p.



New Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87, Street
305-836-90816-7




















| F^SIdk. I M .nng V Serslp 7:.0 em.
Morning Worship e.......11 a.m.
'I utWj y bIo he 1st Study ..... p.m.






4th SunMid-weeknig Worship... pm




rit. Moving IWorship --IIa-m.

lid-week Worship


I


"hill Dalliel" Nimister m


j


rm %# %a oft$


I a I ve At 9 t,4@hew


x 1-^^


I.


I










The Miami Times





lea h


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


Norland Middle School student
displays her talent to an audience
of more than three thousand
people at the Hip Hop 4 Health
program held at Jungle Island
earlier this month.
':,'l iCursy C-lre Met FundjiOn


National dance group, High Definition, perform during intermission at the Hip Hop 4
Health program held at Jungle Island earlier this month.


, 4: R' A







a


Students participate at the Hip Hop 4 Health


The Carrie Meek Foundation
attracted more thar 3,000 kids
with annual Hip Hop 4 Health'
program held at Jungle Island
earlier this month.
Who knew doing the dances
"Stanky Legg" and the "Matrix"
were actually effective means of
burning calories.
More than 3,000 middle
school students knew as they
converged for the fourth annual
Hip Hop 4 Health Fair present-
ed by The Carrie Meek Founda-
tion.
Hip Hop 4 Health, sponsored
by AmeriGroup Community
Care, AstraZeneca and The
Children's Trust, incorporates
a dance competition and health
fair featuring valuable health
information and resources from
over thirty community-based
organizations.
The blaring hip hop beats of
popular songs mixed with the
clamor of laughter rang out in
the air. Youth everywhere were
"getting on the good foot" and
"busting a move.'
The event featured dance
teams from 20 middle schools
throughout Miami-Dade Coun-
ty. The groups of 'three from
each school spent months


practicing their moves for the
chance to rank among the top
three 'schools and win trophies
and prizes, including Nintendo
WII Sports games, Dance Dance
Revolution games, Trek moun-
tain bikes and Miami "Summer
Fun" packs filled with premium
tickets to popular local attrac-
tions and events. During the
event the youth and their fami-
lies were able to receive free
cholesterol, glucose and blood
pressure screenings.
"This is without a doubt one
of the foundation's most excit-
ing programs," said Nakia Bowl-
ing, program director for The
Carrie Meek Foundation. "You
get these kids doing something
'they already love and it greatly
benefits their health. It's the
perfect marriage."
Fitness exhibitions were pro-
vided by Equinox Fitness and
dance routines will be per-
formed by the award-winning
Miami Heat .dancers. There
will also be appearances by lo-
cal team mascots including the
Heat's "Burnie".
While the event was fun, the
seriousness of why the event
happens every year is no laugh-
ing matter. Adolescent obesity


occurs in two out four youth
in the U.S. according the Cen-
ter for Disease Control. Black
youth are 20 more times more
likely to be obese than their
white counterparts.
"Youth obesity is a serious is-
sue in our community, Health
in general is a serious issue in
our community," said Bowling.
"This is why more program-,
ming and dollars need to be put
into events such as Hip Hop 4
Health."
The final rumble in the jungle,
was hosted by WEDR-99 Jamz
and radio personality" Loren-
zo "Ice Tea" Thomas. As the
20 schools battled it out only
three could reign supreme. As
guest judges tallied the votes,
hip hop dance group sensation
-High Definition entertained the
crowd.
In the end; the Madison Mid-
dle baseball bat carrying, girl
trio who did a bit to Jazmine
Sullivan's "Bust Your Windows
grabbed first place and the Wii
system; second place went to
Westview Middle who won the
Dance Dance Revolution and
DVD players, and Howard A.
Doolin took third place and the
mountain bikes.


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers









..*..*.... -- .


Three boys from Westview

Middle School in Miami get

down for a healthier lifestyle

at the Hip Hop 4 Health

program held at Jungle

Island earlier this month.-


&wcs : .-*.I.


* Complimentary Dental
Services with No Co-Pay
* Primary Care Physician
* Laboratory
* Gynecology
* Diagnostic Ultrasound
* EKG Electrocardiogram
* ECHQ- Echocardiogram
" X-Rays
" A Comprehensive
Chiropractic Service Center


* Free Concierge-Style
Transportation with
Private Vehicle
* Pain Management
* Massage Therapy
* Activity Center
* Education
* Exercise Program
* Nutrition
* Osteoporosis screenings


HEALTH FIRST

MEDICAL CENTER

6405 NW 27th Avenue Miami, Florida

For information or appointments, call:

305-403-4003

Monday- Friday, 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Health First Medical Center
Maximum Quality Medical Care for our Community










12B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

ducaiatm gap kar' mad alr% at % hiltr lIou| r pnor4" dlidrd


Copyrighted" Materi'al
____ ___ ___0___ V


Syndicated Conten4



Available from Commercial NevwsProviders


REV. DR. SAMUEL A. TRICE
SENIOR PASTOR /TEACHER

Pastor's
appreciation at
Drake Memorial
The appreciation committee and
the membership of the Drake Me-
morial Baptist Church, 5800 N.W.
2 Ave., would like to invite you
and the entire Dade and Broward
County communities to come out
and share with us as we celebrate
our Senior Pastor's second appre-
ciation as pastor of this congrega-
tion.
On Wednesday, June 3 at 7 p.m.,
Bishop James and Patricia Staif-
difer of Pentecostal Church of Je-
sus Inc., will be our opening night
guests speaker. On Thursday, June
4 at 7 p.m., our guest speaker will
be Rev. Fred Cromity of Cathedral
of Faith Baptist Church. On Fri-
day, June 5 at 7 p.m., our guest
speaker will be Rev. Richard P.
Dunn of Faith Community Baptist
Church.
Closing out our program on June
7 at 11 a.m., Sunday morning wor-
ship service will be Associate Pas-
tor Douglas Cook Jr., of Jordan
Grove Baptist Church, Senior
Pastor Rev. Douglas Cook Sr.
We will be godly pleased to have
each of you as our guest at any
given service.


Baccalaureate service at St. John


On Sunday, May 31, at 11
a.m., the Historic St. John In-
stitutional Missionary Baptist
in. Overtown will observe their
annual Marjorie Gillard Rhodes
Baccalaureate service.
The speaker for the occasion
will be CBS 4 News Anchor, Jim
Berry.
Jim Berry moved, to mornings
in June 2008 as the niorning
anchor for 'CBS 4 This Morn-
ing' from 5-7 a.m., weekdays,
and the co-host of 'Jim & Jade
in the Morning' from 7 9 .a.m.
Previously, he had been CBS4's
Sport Director, since August
1996.
Jim has won five Emmys for
news and sports reporting. His
most recent was for a 2004 jin-
gle entitled "The Heat Is Back
.On," which celebrated the Miami
Heat reaching the playoffs. A
native of Chicago, he is a gradu-
ate of Northwestern University's
Medill School of Journalism.


REV. WARREN J. CLARKE


JIM BERRY


The class members of 2009
are: Love Jackson, Justin
Townsel, Nelson L. Adams IV;
Thomas Tommy' Addison,
Daphne Ellington and Karen
Starkes. Degree of higher learn-
ing includes, Shaquila Downing
Small, Shaquanna Lee, Tabitha
Wilcox, Donald Hylor, Jr., Victo-
ria R. Adams, Shamar Robbins
and Rev. Antonio Bolden Sr.
Other 2009 graduates are in-
vited to participate. in this im-
pressive ceremony. Please call
the church at 305-372-3877.


BISHOP DANIEL HARDEN


Rev. Warren Clarke named Associate Pastor


Greater Faith Temple of Fort
Lauderdale, under the leader-
ship of Florida State Prelate and
Pastor Bishop Daniel R. Harden
welcomes Rev. Warren J Clarke
of Pembroke Pines, who will be
fellowshipped into the Church
of Christ Holiness Unto the Lord
Organization as an Associate Pas-
tor, May. 31, at 11 a.m., during
our Fifth Sunday Union Meeting.
The service will be held at Upper


Room Temple, Wabasso, FL.
Rev Warren J. Clarke is ex-
cited to be working directly un-
der Bishop Harden's covering
and accepts the additional spiri-
tual responsibility.. We are full
of anticipation and expectation
for what God is getting ready
to do. Rev. Clarke is the Pastor
and Founder of My Rock and My
Salvation Ministries, 954-612-
0141.


Gamble Memorial Summer Youth
Revival 2009 presents 'The Awesome
Little Man of God'


The New Gamble Memorial
Church of God in Christ and
Bishop Julian C, Pastor, pres-
ents 'The Awesome Little
Man of God', Minister Terry
Durham of Ft. Lauderdale,
in a soul saving youth reviv-
al June 1 thru 5, 7:30 p.m.,
1898 NW 43 Street.
Minister Durham preached,
his first sermon at the age of
four and now at 11, Minister
Durham continues in his gift
and purpose of spreading the
gospel of Jesus Christ.
The community is invited
to come out and share in the
blessings of the Lord through


MINISTER TERRY DURHAM
the ministry of this gifted 'Lit-
tle man of God, Minister Terry
Durham.


Gospel Tabernacle 2009 Women
of Excellence Conference
Gospel Tabernacle of Faith De-
liverance Church will be holding
its 2009 Women of Excellence
Conference beginning Wednesday
June 10, 'Get
Acquainted Session,'7:30 p.m.,
Host Church.
On Thursday, June 11 and
Friday, June 12, at 7:30 p.m,
Sheraton Suites Plantation. On
Sunday June 14, 7 p.m., Host
Church.
Speakers include: Pastor Son-
ja Carter Evangelist LaVerne
Mitchell Pastor Barbara. Brous-
sard. For additional information
call 305-626-9162.
Gospel Tabernacle of Faith
Deliverance Church
3311 N.W. 189 Street PASTOR VIVIAN L. IRVING
Miami, Florida Conference Hostess'


Serving the Community since 1984,


Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA
General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, AGD


305

652-3001

20215 NW 2n' Ave.
Suite #2
Miami, FL 33169
www.dentistgrant.net


COSMETIC DENTISTRY
* Teeth Whitening 1 hour
* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
* Porcelain Veneers
* Cosmetic Bonding

RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY
* Implant Supported
Replacements
* Tooth Colored Fillings
* Gum Therapy
* Root Canal
* Dentures and Partials

SAFETY & COMFORT
* Nitrous Oxide (tranquilizing air)
* Sedation Dentistry
* Steam Sterilization
* State of The Art Facility


"SMILE MAKEOVER"

Missing Teeth or Dentures?
IMPLANTS are the natural
secure alternative

r ---------------r--------------------

IFREE IMPLANT FREE XRAY
CONSULTATION* or (2 Bitewings (00272) I
i L--L-'OULIAI! *i1 or (2 Periaoplcals) (00230) I
I (00110) *New Patients Only II *New Patients Only I
I Expire5/31/09 II Expire 5/31/09 I
Ik--- ., --------- - .------------


Aw A I )* Insurance Welcome We Offer Financial Arrangements
S' 2 Lab On Premises Repairs While You Wait
Evening and Saturday Appointments

The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any
other service examination or treatment which is performed or as result of and within seventy-two (72) hours of responding to the advertise-
ment for the fee, discounted fee or reduced fee service,examination or treatment.


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!


END THE
INC 0 NVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOX ES FIGHTING
THE WEATHER
ANDHUNTING
DOWN BACK COPIES

CALL: 305-694-6214


(


4b amw w qmml-Aw










13B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Eric S. Georg --.
JUSTIN BOILEL, 52, tree trim-
mer, died May 22 in Hallandale
Beach. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Greater Ebenezer Missionary Bap-
tist Church, Hallandale Beach.

CLARENCE ALLEN, 74, horse
groomer, died May 20 in Planta-
tion. Viewing 6 p.m., Thursday in
the chapel.

ALEXANDER COLBERT, 46,
died May:25. Service 2 p.m., Sat-
urday, Friendship Baptist Church,
Hallandale.

KENT S. MICHAEL, 55, died
May 18 at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Hallelujah Worship Center, Holly-
wood.

Pax Villa-Broward
FRITZ GILLES, 55, AC contrac-
tor, died May 16 in Haiti. Service
10 a.m., Saturday St Helen's
Catholic Church, Fort Lauderdale.

JONAS ARCHELUS, 34, con-
struction worker, died May 13 in,
Boynton Beach. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Eglise Eangelic De La
Renissace, Fort Lauderdale.


Pax Villa-
SERAH DEGLACE, 75, welder,
died May 17 at North Shore Medi-
cal Center. Service 12 noon, Sat-
urday, Notre Dame D'Haiti Catho-
lic Church.

LUCKNER LUNDI, 54, musi-
cian, died May 19 at home. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Fraternity
Baptist Church.

St Fort
ADILIA SULLY, 69, died May
19 at Select Hospital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, Stanton Memorial
Baptist Church.

AROSE ADY, 63, died May 15
in Haiti. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

VALERIE K. FADER, 18, died
- May 20 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Nakia Ingraham
SHERNET SMITH, 31, health
care administra-
tor, of North Mi-
ami, died May 8.
Services11a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.



MARY CALDWELL, 84, died
May 8. Services were held.

WALLACE HYMAN, 67, died
May 20. Services were held.

CESAR ASPAUZA,73, arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Paradise ,
ROSEBUD BARRETT, 82, died
May 17 at Baptist Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.

CHARLES L. BYRD, 50, died
May 19 at home. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday Kerr Memorial AME,
Perrine.


Carey Royal Ram'n
PAMELA KIM BROWN, died
May 25 at Jackson North Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

SALIM BAKALI, 50, died May
25 at Jackson North Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.

SWALEHA N. ADAM, died May
23, at South Miami Hospital, Ser-
vice was held.


Hadley
MARICIA FELIX, 78, died May
21, at home.
Viewing 6:30


p.m. 9 p.m.,
Fridayatchurch.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Miami
Shores Chris-
tian Church.


Wright & Younig
SHARON ELLISON, 46, nurs-
ing assistant
died May 21 at
Kindred Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: daugh-
ter, Titania 'Ti'
(Doug) Mc-
Clendon; son,
Brandon Justin;
grandchild, Devinne 'Brina' Justin;
father, Frank; sisters, Mary 'Alma'
(Terry) Moore, Frankie 'Penny'
(Chad) Moorer, Traci (Harvey Lee)
Rivers, Joann Ellison, and Yolanda
Ellison; brother, Calvin. Services 6
p.m., Wednesday, in the chapel.

EVERETTE A. DANIELS, 49,
airfield special-
ist died May 19
at Kindred Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: wife,
Joanne; moth-
er, Luelette;.
Services 12
noon, Saturday,
Friendship MB Church.

SAMUEL J. WATSON, III, 39,
construction
worker died May
24, at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: par-
ents, Samuel &
Louise Watkins;
sons, Jose,
Samuel & Fredrick; stepdaugh-
ters, Victoria & Ayesha; brothers,
Michael T. Williams and Andrew
Williams; nephews, Jamal, Mi-
chael, Alexander Williams; aunts,
Melvina Allen, Heler Gay, Toni
Watkins, Shonda Watkins, Sallie
Williams; uncle, Benny Watkins.
Services 1p.m.,aFriday, New Birth,
MB Church.

HESTER COLSON, 77, environ-
mental service
specialist died
May 20 in Mi-
ami. Survivors
include: son,
Ronald; grand-
son, Michael;
Brother William
Larry. Services
11a.m., Saturday, New Shiloh MB
Church.


Royal ""
DEACON EDDIE LEE WALK-
ER, 75. custo-
dian for Miami-
Dade County
Public Schools,
died May 22.
Visitation 5 p.m
- 8 p.m., Friday
at the Church.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, First
Baptist Church of Bunche Park.

TIWAND TURNER, 35, barber,
died 'May 124.
Visitation 4 p.m
- 9 p.m. Friday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Holy
Temple Mis-
sionary Baptisi
Church.


SHIRLEY RICHARDS, 96, maid,
died May 20. Final rites and burial
Savannah, GA.

ALEXANDER DIXON, 68, train-
ing officer, died May 16. Visitation
4 p.m 9 p.m. Friday. Service 1
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.

KATHLEEN DUNCAN, 90,
housewife, died May 20. Visitation
6 p.m 9 p.m., Saturday. Service
10 a.m., Sunday, Maranatha Sev-
en-Day Adventist Church:

NIGEL GEOHAGAN, 17, stu-
dent, died May 19. Arrangements
are incomplete.

CLIFF LARTEY, 56, electrician,
died May 14. Visitation 4 p.m 9
p.m., Friday Service 12 noon,
Saturday in the chapel.

ESMIE PARKS, 87, housewife,
died May 23. Arrangements are
incomplete.


LILLITH BRYANT, 65, men-
tal technician at Healthcare
Center,died May 25, Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


RUTH LETO, 71, secretary,
died May 9 at Memorial Regional
South. Service was held.

JUAN MEJIA, 96, laborer, died
May 17 at Homestead Hospital.
Service was held.

EARL BOSWELL, 57, insur-
ance agent, died May 19 at home.
Service was held.

MUNERAL RAUL, 54, cab driv-
er, died May 9 at home. Service
was held.

YSIDORO BOFILL, 66, me-
chanic, died May 15 at Aventura
Hospital. Service was held.

THOMAS WATKINS, 85, iron
worker, died May 12 at home.
Service was held.

SARAH COVINGTON-CREWS,
carpet cleaner, died May 9 at
home. Service was held.

MARGARET BULLOCK, 55,
system coordinator, died May 19
at Hospice by The Sea Service
was held.

EVERETTE BEGE, 91, truck
driver, died May 21 at Kindred
Hospital. Service was held.

RUDI JOSIELEWSKI, 79, sales,
died May 22 at Aventura Hospital.
Service was held.

PAUL MALLORY, 56, sales,
died May 22 at Hospice by The
Sea. Service was held.

JAMES ROBERT, 68, postal
worker, died May 5 at home. Ser-
vice was held.


Richardsomn-
ROBIN BROWN, 43, data entry
operator, died
May 22. Service
10 a.m., Satur-
day, Ebenizer
United 'Baptist
Church.





HENRY MITCHELL, 60, laborer,
died May 19.
Final rites and
burial Givhans,
SC.







BARBARA LEE, 73, domes-
tic, died May
20., Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Mt. Calvary MB
Church.






RUTH DEAN, 69, domestic died
May 23. Service
11 a.m., Friday







DAISY LEE BROWN, 86, died
May 24. Service
was held.








ZACKIE JOHNSON WALLACE,
49, educator, ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


GEORGE W. EDWARDS, 64,
mail carrier, died May 21. Service
2: 30 p.m., Saturday in the cha-
pel.


Hall Ferguson-Hewitt
RUBY L. DANIELS, 93, retired
private duty
nurse, died May
20 at Franco
Nursing Home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday,
St. Paul AME.
Church.


ABRAHAM SPAULDING, 59,
construction
company plas-
terer, died May
19 at home. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.,




SEDRICK T. WILLAIIMS, 34,
a construction company worker,
died May 20. Arrangements are
incomplete.

MILDRED DICKS, 79, nursing
assistant, died May 15 at Jackson.
Service was held.
Poitier
LANARD ELKENO SUTHER-
LAND, 8, stu-
dent died May
18 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
St. Mary's Cath-
olic Church.

CORA LEE BARNES, 55, pottery
maker, died May
20 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 1
p.m., Saturday in
the chapel.



PHILISTIN JOSEPH, 72, bag-
gage handler,
died May 19 at
Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.



NAOMI SHERRY, 82, housewife,
died May 20 at
Mercy Hospi-
tal. Service 10
.m., Saturday,
Brownsville
Church of Christ.



HERMAN THOMAS, 69, oped.
tech, died May
23 at Hialeah
Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m., Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.




JOANNE MANUEL, 57, jani-
tor, died May 24
at North Shore
Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: sisters,
Sabrina Col-
lins and Ardean
Culmer; brother,
Samuel Kemp,
Jr. and a host of nieces, nephews
and other family and friends. Service
3 p.m., in the chapel.

WILLIE DAVE DENNIS, JR., 66,
painter, died May 4, at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

SEDRICK WILLIAMS, 33, labor-
er, died May 20 Arrangements are
incomplete.

TIMOTHY ERIC GILCHRIST, 28.
Arrangements are incomplete.

ETHEL' CORINE SPENCER-
JONES, 75, nurse, died May 23 at
St. Catherine Rehab Hospital. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, New Hope
Missionary Baptist Church.


JOIN THE


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


In loving memory of,


--


LEATHIA WILLIAMS
DORSEY

would like to thank all those
who kept us in their .thoughts
and prayers during our time of
bereavement. Whether by flo-
ral arrangement, covered dish,
sympathy card or other tangible
method, we were touched to
know that you cared.
Special thanks to the staff
at Range Funeral Home, the
members of St. John Institu-
tional M.B. Church, Liberty City
Church of Christ and the U.S.
Postal Service Gratigny Branch
for their outstanding effort and
support.
The Bolden family

Death Notice


GWENDOLYN BOLES
GOODMAN, 65, died April 30
at North Shore Medical Cen-
ter. Memorial service will be
held 5- p.m., Sunday, Leba-
non Seventh Day Adventist,
Church, 1491 N.W. 26 Street.
Grace
ABRAHAM McLEROY SR., 77,
automotive de-
tailing, died May
24 at Mercy
Nursing Home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel. x


DONALD ASHLEY
THOMPKINS
07/19/45 05/30/08


On this the first year an-
niversary of your death, we
pause to reflect and to remem-
ber your life as a husband, fa-
ther, grandfather, brother and
uncle.
As we now only have the
memories of times past to
cherish, we will hold them
dear and forever give thanks
to God for the significance of
your life in each of our lives.
With Love, your wife, Olive,
children, Donna, Rachelle
and Ishmael, grandchildren
and siblings


Death Notice


GEORGE WASHINGTON
EDWARDS, 64, U.S. post-
man, died May 20 at home.
Service 2:30 p.m., Saturday,
Richardson Mortuary.



Honor Your

Loved One With an In

Memoriam

In The Miami Times
________________,_-


Copyrighted Material
S Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


gl iou- EiiF
by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


Remember to ask

your funeral home for

your discount coupon

to place your

Card of Thanks

in

The Miami Times,
sv



900 NW 54th Street

305-694-6229
ill Iwo Xvck,




LOne Family Serving Since 1923









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1lA Tu: MIAMI TIMM MAY 97-.IIINF 9 W70Q'


City of Miami Gardens Mayor
Shirley Gibson has announced
her candidacy for Florida's 17th
Congressional District seat. The
election will be held in 2010.
I look forward to this cam-
paign, secure in the knowledge
that I will be able to lead the con-
stituents of District 17 as I have
led the people of Miami Gardens.
My track record in this beautiful
city stands on its own," said Gib-
son in a statement. "Miami Gar-
dens has been a stunning suc-
cess story of self-empowerment
and a testament to what can be
accomplished when government
is close to its people. I will bring
the skills and knowledge I have
gained to the congressional floor
as District 17's representative."


Miami Gardens is one of the
largest Black cities in the South.
Gibson has a diverse back-
ground in the public and non-
profit sector. In 1996, she was
elected to the public offices of
Community Council Three and
Miami-Dade's Democratic Party
Executive Committee. In ad-
dition, she was elected for two
terms to Community Counrcil
Three. Gibson served as chair-
person of the North Dade Mu-
nicipal Advisory Committee and
the Committee to Incorporate
the City of Miami Gardens. A
retired sixteen-year Miami-
Dade Police Officer, Gibson is
the President of the Miami Dade
League of Cities and a previous
business owner for more than


fifteen years.
She is a skilled negotiator, us-
ing a collaborative approach to
incorporate diversity, inclusive-
ness, and responsibility to secure
effective outcomes. For the last
six years Gibson has served as
the first mayor of the third larg-
est municipality of Miami-Dade
County and the largest predomi-
nantly Black city in Florida, the
City of Miami Gardens. She was
reelected for a second term in
2008.
"It is with great pride that I
have led this community and I
look forward to faithfully repre-
senting its people along with the
rest of Florida's 17th Congressio-
nal District in the U.S. House of
Representatives," said Gibson.


Fatal strangulation kills 4-year-old


Gibson vies for Congressional seat in 2010


Mike Tyson's 4-year-old daugh-
ter was taken off life support and
pronounced dead at 11:45 a.m.
Tuesday, one day after she was
discovered hanging from a tread-
mill cable in her family's Phoenix
home, police said.
Exodus Tyson apparently ac-
cidentally hung herself on a cord
dangling from a treadmill in her
modest central Phoenix home.
"Somehow she was playing
on this treadmill, and there's a
cord that hangs under the con-
sole it's kind of a loop," Police
Sgt. Andy Hill said. "Either she
slipped or put her head in the
loop. but it acted like a noose,
and she was obviously unable to
get herself off of it."
Exodus' seven-year-old broth-
er found her Monday and told
their mother, who was in an-
other room. She took Exodus off
the cord, called 911 and tried to
revive her.
Responding officers and fire-


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available fromCommercial News Providers


:<=< -

HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion--
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"

"God cares and we care"


TbI.rm ed4ae e

lb ea


Honor Your
Loved One With an In
Memoriam
In The Miami Times ':
i In The__^


14DU II nE IAMIfI IME I fl'* Al -J"n' L, I


fighters performed CPR on Exo-
dus as they rushed her to a
nearby hospital, where she was
in "extremely critical condition"
and on life support, Hill said.
Hill said former heavyweight
champion Tyson, -42, had been
in Las Vegas but flew to Phoenix
immediately after learning of the
accident.
'The Tyson family would like
to extend our deepest and most
heartfelt thanks for all your
prayers and support, and we ask
that we be allowed our privacy
at this difficult time," the boxer
said in a statement.
Brief footage from local TV sta-
tion KTVK showed Tyson arriving
at the hospital in.a white button-
up and black pants, and looking
around with a frown before going
inside. Hill said everything in the
investigation pointed to a "tragic
accident." adding that calls in-
volving children is an officer's
most difficult duty.


City of Miami Gardens Mayor


HMrtc Ifipm.. I %r .0%,u'4rw


* .- .%w.%w


F13irect, Cremation With Viewing


Call 305-633-0688 Liceused funeral Directors







The Miami Times


Lifesty es


entertainment
FASHION HIP HOP MusIC FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 27 JUNE-2, 2009


THE MIAMI TIMES


~rvta I~eam iwMaerv


Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson, Moise D. Pierre, his proud mother, and Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Carlos A. Gimenez. --photo courtesy Miami-Dade County Commission.


Miami-Dade student wins


"Every Drop Counts" poster contest


County Commissioner Au-
drey M. Edmonson presented
an award to Moise D. Pierre,
a student at Hurbert 0. Sib-
ley Elementary. Moise is one
of 13 winning students of the
Miami-Dade Water-Use Ef-
ficiency Program's (WUEP)
"Every Drop Counts" poster
contest to promote water con-


servation.
One student from each of
Miami-Dade's 13 districts was
selected as a winner and was
honored at the County Com-
missioner meeting earlier this
month. Moise was the winner
from Commissioner Edmon-
son's district.
The "Every Drop Counts"


Poster Contest, which was
open to students in grades
K through 5 in Miami-Dade
County, received more than
1,000 entries from students.
,The success of the contest is
attributed in part to the in-
troduction of a new children's
mascot, "D-rop", who chal-
lenges them to save water.


"I'm very proud of Moise D.
Pierre and all the children who
participated in the contest,"
Commissioner Edmonson
said. "It is very important that
our children learn early about
the importance of conserving
our natural resources and that
each of us has contributions to
make."


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


SAvailable from Commercial News Providers

I 4 hsIit. . rapper


1r. King'"% %tri headed to bir. rwrrtn


I


4w f I










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


A Sojourner Truth salute
goes out to founder Nancy
Dawkins; president, Kathleen
Thurston; chairperson, Jac-
quelyn Glaze; past president,
Martha Day; and Cynthia A.
Stafford, ESQ; for the 31st
annual Founder's Day Lun-
cheon at the Miami Shores
Country Club last Saturday.
The' theme of the event was
"Embracing Change: Paving
the Road to Success" from the
Business and Professional
Women's South Florida Club
was enjoyed by 'a capacity-
filled room of more than 200
people.
In addition, the organiza-
tion took the time to recognize.
Lovette McGill who received
the Sojourner Truth Award;
Lora Manning, humanitar-
ian; Lynda Strachan-Rob-
erts, law enforcement; Craig
McQueen, law enforcement;
John McMinn, music educa-
tion; Theron Clark, educa-
tional administration; Naomi
Smith, club retirement; Ruby
Murphy, medicine; Rev. Rich-
ard Clements, Jr., religion/
musician; Tiffany Cowvins
and Aston Farquharson, stu-
dent scholarship recipients.
Former scholarship recipi-
ents also attended: Cecily S.
Newbold, Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University;
Brittany Miller, University Of
South Florida; Jasmine Lat-
timore, Alabama State; Crys-
tal Goss, University of Flori-
da; and Charles Lattimore,
Hampton University.
Mistress of Ceremonies,
Stafford and Dawkins, kept
the program on task. and
made it interesting, espe-
cially State Rep. James Bush
III, Lona Brown Mathis, and
Kint'isa Hallmon, who were
among the 175 Fr. Theodore


Gibson orators,
recently, Andel-
ique Dawkins,
Miller Dawkins,
Mary McCray,
Regina Francois,
Leona Baker and Nikki Baker.
Hallmon electrified the audi-
ence with a stirring speech.
Concurrently, all of the
recipients spoke with adu-
lation, while the support-
ers stood and cheered their
acceptance. Rev. Clements,
Jr., from Mt. Tabor Baptist
Church brought 30 peo-
ple and Mannings brought
25 people, as Martha Day
beamed with pride of her ac-
complishments.
All of speakers
were outstanding
with their remarks,
especially McGill
who shall always be
remembered as a
nemesis of Sojourner
Truth, as she spoke
with fire, while the JO
-listeners stood as
likened to that of a minister.
Further, other female busi-
nesswomen sold their busi-
ness to the audience, such as
tennis star Kim Sands and
Smokey The Clown, a teacher
who does festivals, parades,
. parties reunions, wedding,
and children games. Finally,
Ann Moormen announced
a similar program in two
weeks. Stay tune for more
information. '
Others in attendance in-
cluded Mercelee Adderly, An-
nie R.. Brown, Lorene Byron,
Joann Jackson, Sylvia Wil-
liams-Garner, Herbert Glaze,
Juanita A. Lane, Cedric, Ga-
briel, John III, Inez, Robert
McMinn Marguerite McK-
ain, Ophelia Mitchell, Robin
Mathis, Baljean Smith, Ann


A


FM
m
ners.

By Dr, Richard Strachan


Strachan and Alice Williams.


Elsie Stewart, a candidate
for Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity Miss Alumni and The
Miami-Dade Chapter spon-
sored a Spring Bliss at the
Omega Activity Center last
Friday. Audley Coakley, vice
president, and John Wil-
liams, past National Alumni
President collaborated to lay
the ground works for this
successful activity. Live en-
tertainment featured The Psi
Phi Band and The All Stars
DJ and Company.
Congratulations go out to
the alumni that arrived before
the doors opened, such as
Dorothy Davis, Charlie Davis,
Chiquita Davis and David L.
Davis I (and, of course, they
are honorary members), Glo-
ria Green, Muriel Hall,
Bonnie N. Stirrup, and
John & Annette Wil-
liams.
The live entertain-
ment took them back
to "the good ole days"
and the crowd was re-
minded about situa-
RIE tions as teenagers and
the band played songs
that correlated on their expe-
riences. John and Annette
demonstrated their feeling
as the band played and Lee
Johnson sang, "Misty". Fur-
thermore, refreshments in-
cluded BYOBand BYOF and
each table provided the both
of them.
Current president Carol
Weatherington took to the
microphone and echoed the
activities coming this fall for
football season, followed by
Coakley and Williams who
do riot miss going to Daytona
Beach each week and they
bridge the gap between the
local alumni and the Univer-
sity.
Some of the others in
attendance included Shar-
manik Blake, Sonya In-


graham-Cleare, Deboroh
Carter, Mary, Chester, Joyce
Chisholm, Renita Chish-
olm, Sandra Clark, Denise
DeLaine,Gregory DeLaine,
Annette and Jimmie Harrell,
Brenda Hawkes, Jai A. Ingra-
ham, Robert Jackson, III, Lee
and Beverly Johnson,
Joe N. Jones. Marion
and William Kelley,
Gwendolyn LaVan,
Helen Lenoir, Judge B
Shirlyon McWhorter,
Evelyn E. Roberts,
Larry Williams and Al-
bertha W. Wright.
D

JoMarie Payton, a
steller star of the hit show,
"Family Matters", and icon,
super actress, and a product
of Miami-Dade School System
via North Dade High and a
graduate of Miami Carol City,
complimented State Sen.
Frederica S. Wilson by fly-
ing in from Hollywood, CA. to
participate in the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence Proj-
ect, "Conquering The Digital
Divide", at Mt. Calvary MBC
last Thursday, where Rev.
Billy Strange is the pastor
and teacher.
It was graduation for the
matriarch and patriarch fam-
ilies that participated in the
"Parents On-Line Computer
Program" for six months and
were trained by the RME staff
where they completed cours-
es on Introduction
to Computer Usage,
Internet Safety, Par-
ents Involvement, and -.
Bench' Mark, Develop-
ment, according to
staffer, Alix Desulme,
newly-elected North
Miami City Council-
man. WI
The reward for par-
ticipating in the class were
brand new computers total-
ing over $35, 000 and under-
written by Payton, also, an
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority


sister to Dr. Wilson. Fur-
thermore, Payton articulated
to the present Role Models of
Excellence and relaxed them
after she received such a
resounding applause. They
smiled when she said her
name is "sugar mama" and
she could be just like
their grandmother,
mother, or sister.
They applauded her
even more when she
walked around them
encouraging them to
improve in life. Her
methodology was
AY well accepted by the
parents who echoed
their acceptance with
an applause.
Other speakers on the
program were Alix Desulme,
Dr. Rick Holton, Lt. Joseph
Schiullaci, and Rev. Strange
who sang, "If I Could Help
Somebody", followed by
benediction and the award-
ing of computers 'to each
family by Melody Delancey
and Pamela Jones.


Dr. Gwendolyn Jennings
Kidney, a former executive
with the Miami-Dade County
Public School System left af-
ter retiring in 2002 and serv-
ing over 30 years. She was
an exemplary employee and
got started as a teacher and
catapulted to a Principal, Di-
rector and Assistant Super-
intendent. She is
still a reader of the
Miami Times and
-- loves it on weekend,
*.-. especially, "Chatter
., That Matters".
According to
Kidney, Tiffany Jen-
nings-Perry, daugh-
ILSON ter of retired Miami-
Dade County Pub-
lic Schools Administrator
Gwendolyn Jennings Kidney
and the late Calvin E. Jen-
nings, recently gave birth to
a beautiful baby girl, Ta'tiana


Television. Mobile. Internet. As media gets more diverse, we should
remember that people are, too. Nielsen's simple, integrated and
open approach to measuring consumers means we're familiar with
communities, cultures and exciting new voices. It's the difference
between measuring people and understanding them.


(b 2009 The Nielsen Company


nielsen



EVERY VIEW COUNTS

To learn more visit
www.nielsen.com


Nichole Rae Perry.
Tiffany and Calvin were
also former administrative
employees of the school sys-
tem. Gwen indicated she has
been visiting with daugh-
ter, son-in-law, and grand-
daughter in Atlanta, GA. for
the past several weeks; and
cannot get enough of her
to return to Florida. Being
a grandmother is the best
thing to ever happen to me.
Looks like this doting grand-
mother will be earning a lot
of frequent flyer miles go-
ing back and forth to visit.
Miami will be included and
with the baby.


Congratulations to the
men of The Church of the
Open Door for their pre-
sentation of its 41st an-
nual Pink Tea, held at the
Lyric Theatre in Overtown
last Sunday in a capacity-
filled auditorium. Founder
Dr. Dorothy J. Fields smiled
from ear to ear to the per-
formance featuring Samuel
Eudovique, great tenor and
Marshall Davis, tap dancer,
paying tribute to Sammie
Davis, Jr.
If you missed that per-
formance, please see John
Hobbs, preacher and vocal-
ist or Nicole Henry, Jazz and
Gospel Artist, at the Lyric
Theatre, beginning at 4
p.m., on June 21 or 4.p.m.,
July 26.
Others in attendance
included Elsaida D. An-
ders, Winston Anders, Ho-
sea and Bonnie Butler, BWA
and Rosalind Bond, Ever-
lyn Campbell, William and
Cynthia Clark, III, James
and Marge Fayson, Dorothy
Graham, Gloria Green, Skelia
and George Green, Nelson and
Fifa Jenkins, Dr. Astrid Mack,
Frank and Dr. Enid Pinkney,
Caroline and Benny White,
Gwendolyn Welters, and Hel-
en Williams.


All Rights Reserved.











BLACS MST ONTOL HEI OWN[DE VIY 3 TH MIMI TMES MA 27JUN 2,200


Rappers face r.ceion, no bllngobllng


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


tW Wwwbm hutMd n MS.., Ge-


Richard Faison










5-0% OFF SALE I
:BEAUTIFUL 16.991
,BERBER Sq. Yd
:Extra heavy Qualiry
Reg. S14 S(I' Yd
L---------------------
50% OFF SALE
WALL-TO WALL CARPET
INSTALLED-FREE PAD
GORGEOUS CARPET 7.99
lREG. S16 5.Y.
40 S.Y WAS -640 no[w S320
S60 S.Y WAS S9s0 now b480
180 S V WAS b I80 now b640
S1l0 S.Y WAS 8 I6. now E799

CA1RPET $49911
WHOLE HOUSE n vi,'rS V,.
6UV RM DIN. -
RM..HLL $v,-,*,. $1991
*\101,S NAMLH BR.ANI).S Al.I. NIW
--- ---------i 1
......LIKE NE.. W .....$"
CARPET SALE o
S*AS NOW
I .: .11 L.:.v lv T.il i II:I S19
li 10 Ricr.I'Bur.url- v 111:1 $19
:,\ i l u ai.iriz r T .i* 11:1 519
r1H u 1j ] ,r, .r, li.i S19
:-12 14 l iuTdilul BIL, i 1: S19
And Many More!

:70% OFFs29!

CARPET 29

LAMINATE 79*0
:TILE 69P!
BAMBOOu cF $1 9
DON BAILEY FLOORS
8300 Bisc. Blvd., Miami 14831 NW 7th Ave., Miami
2208 South State Rd. 7. MIramar
3422 W. Broward Blvd., Ft Laud. 1283 NW 31 Ave.. FL Laud.
FREE SHOP AT HOME
Toll Free 1-866-721-7171


A.iffB


Will Smith to stai
Actor Will Smith will help
bring to life the story of one of
the many heroes of the Hurri-
cane Katrina aftermath. Smith's
production company, Overbrook
Entertainment, and Sony Pic-
tures announced; last week.
The two companies have
earned the film rights to the-
story of former Marine John
Keller, who rescued nearly 244
of his neighbors in New Orleans
in the days that followed one of
the largest natural disaster on
American soil to date.
Keller, who was nicknamed
"The Can Man" by the media,
devised the rescue of his elderly
neighbors from their apartment
building, the American Can
Company in New Orleans' Mid
City neighborhood.
Following the levee breach that
flooded the city and furthered
the damage already caused by
Hurricane winds, American Can
sat in over 11 feet of water.
Keller single-handedly kept
his neighbors calm and con-
trolled while helping them exit
the building.


r in new 'Hurricane Katrina' movie Ac Z" we' um W"
While the announcement from ports that Overbrook executive Tables Chairs BABY SHIOWERSI0ecorations&MOREl J
Overbrook and Sony did not de- Jeff Sommerville has confirmed SUNSHINE PARTY RENTAL INC wIT HENhiSAYOU RRESBWATIONTODAY
tail a production start date or that Smith ,is likely to portray 786-487-0095 CALL NOW!! DATES ARE GOING FASTII
casting, The Times-Picayune re- the 6'7" Keller himself SPE.I. AL. P ..S..0.


lho.: bb ow baj tbm~


iE


' "', '- yu


e e *O


SHORTS 4 KIDS!
rgjn itevntl li fair' i.-d
1 I'M amnival1 Sludio lhreAi-tdl a- t Bal-tl Ope'3 h,.se: 51

CHICAGO
2 & 1 40 iM Pt .all- Oper'a rcre
mannee S3. Sl 1 S mriy e-'inlSr i S I-i 23
'-'f; I' T.''m r. ai ,n .' ",- j -:r ". :.',.-:i. rr,-:z:' t
SIGNATURE SHORTS
So0? .. 1 1t0 0 fi." a .-..',r', ;11 : lin ,-9 1
SPM K Camnk' nl 9TLrdin "Th;aler i, tV 7.H F.tii Opr-. H '-" .r, .
.. '"'l ,'i4.1 l PIh l' nlh'lt :",' I -I )iMp:,"
CELIA: THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
T'e S3aslt Oe Ltr .a tIL-
. 7 30 FTv K.ie"-C rja er l H1al l- 5-E 5395 $ 12 V;P "...t.l iJu:h-
- nci *>r^torric.e ne-t-aio-grat 3,Rd SLnCpr'nila ca rat posrrf.i
CELIA: THE LIFE AND MUS4C OF CELIA CRUZ
/ ?J. :PM Knig- s..-< Wi n -iH l ..I1 9- ..l. }.Hi-'
SHORTS 4 KIDS!
1' AM A 1PM C.i'm'.-a Ji d 'Ti siii isi tr.-n 7;T R,,h .t7IT t I' in I -SI
CELIA: THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF CEUA CRUZ
7 20 PM AN ,; .I L-W,!.- 1H' 1tli t 13L0. SaiO, .95. 12"E.


o*me me


U-


4a AS emMPeS


JUN


a a


a a o a


S me40r,*


a -. e "


a a0 dowe


a r 0 o 0a


a*a w


SIGNATURE SHORTS
S'P. W Carnival Siudo Itheali ,'3: "t- t it Baliel Upe,. H .., S-12


SHORTS 4 KIDS
1" AMAI 1PM *tIm lvri :H.r."fAnr.x:;r.-: 7'R-6iti."r-o H-III *S17T
CELIA: THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
7 0j PM i yR C.'.'.i -lr [ l-iJ ,1-i., -.31, '95. iq.I,

UNDERSHORTS
Adult Knguage and rWrtdy. Not a.wropriete for thusu under 17.
10I"Aa C.3rn-'.l Stud* lhea3er C-d The Jl daat *:-IpeK Hose| l
CELIA. THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
It 'a PM Kng-1 CQruer HjII 9..i1 A1i.i. 9.J'. ;11
SIGNATURt SHORTS
7 PM .:;irrtival Iijiihn T ih-al:- r i; *'I:: 7frf R,,hi.ii m pr rI I ;...;'.i i .
UNDERSHORTS
10 PM C7 f.'n' F'iidr TPr."e .,-'. i'r 7. f .ii SHORTS 4 KIDS!
1 PM Carnival Sludio Theatter ,at ste Zil Ballet Opera Hos.. $17
SIGNATURE SHORTS
3 PM Carnival Studio Theate (at the Ziff Ballet Opera to'ee $42
CELIA: THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
SA ? PM: a An-,il Lc-oc-er Hall $60. 80. $95. $12*


*., '.] a' ': ,.1


Afl. '
ci' V, & MaWz


* me* ,M e


5ff nAflfltnr W JIR msmeIfDJ


ulfWL


asw e- ae0


?aI"-
*a'r;- '.y:t


irftrrs. 3 U L. *I L.ei Vl -.. 1 Ju


AdrienneArsht Center
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
EW HALL CAR 41 VAL tfti* SA u 6#*f


BLACKS MUST CONTROL Tm.-iiz OWN DESTINY I


B


.


*


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009












4C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009 BLA( KS Must CONTROL [hEIR OWN DESTINY


BAarew-


The National Pan-Hellenic
Council honored the following
Greeks for 50 years of service
to their soronres and fraterni-
ties and presented them with
their 50 year pins: Rev. Father
Richard L.M. Barry, Phi Beta
Sigma; Maude Newbold, Sarah
Bullock, Helen Davis, Doro-
thy Davis and Charlie Ann
Richardson (Miami Alumnae
Delta Sigma Theta) Seta Phi
Beta (Beta Tau Zeta) Alberta
Godfrey and Mary Johnson.
(Mu Gamma) Dorothy Thomp-
son, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
Pi Nu Chapter, Arthur Simms
and Henry Mingo. Alpha Kap-
pa Alpha--Gamma Zeta Omega
Chapter, Jessie Stinson and
Alberta Woodberry, Pi Delta
Omega Chapter, May Ola Ellis.


Get-well wishes are for Wen-
dell Stirrup, Dr. Albert Rolle,
Herbert Rhodes, Jr., Ismae
Prescott, Gary Hepburn, Doris
McKinney-Pittman, Elouise B.
Farrington, Myrna Range-Lee,
Grace Heastie-Patterson, Dr.
Oswald Bronson (former Bet-
hune Cookman University pres-


identl, Timothy 0. HOF |-
Savage, Carmetta .,
Brown-Russell,
Marie Miller-De-
veaux and Floyd
Lewis.


Congratulations to Alexan-
dra Bethel who graduated
from Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University (FAMU)
on May 3. Alexandria is the
daughter of Deloris Bethel and
the late Fred Bethel. Among
friends attending Alexandria's
graduation are Sharon Ander-
son, Eddrea Goodmond and
Robin G. Moncur.


Hebert E. Johnson, III grad-
uated from Bethune-Cookman
University on May .9. Herbert
is the son of Herbert Johnson.
Jr. and the grandson of the
Inez McKinnney-Johnson.
******** *
Phoenicia Hill also gradu-
ated from Bethune-Cookman
University. She is the niece of
the late Fred Bethel.


The following high school
seniors were presented with
scholarship awards at the 50
years of service luncheon held
at the Hilton Miami Airport last
week by the Pan Hellenics of
Dade County: Benjamin J. Mc-
Namee, Omega Psi Phi Frater-
nity; Jaroda N. Strapp, Sigma
Gamma Rho Sorority; Roke-
shia R. Ashley, Delta Sigma
Theta-Dade County; Tavarus
Andrews, Phi Beta Sigma Fra-
ternity; Daria T. Jackson, Del-
ta Sigma Theta Sorority, Miami
Alumnae; Michael A. Lovette,
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity; Syl-
vie A. Sylvain, Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority; 'Joey E. Fran-
cois, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraterni-
ty; Precious C. Ferguson, Zeta
Phi Beta Sorority and Victoria
Eshietedoho, Alpha Kappa Al-
pha Sorority.


Congratulations to all of the
2009 graduates. We know that
this is only the beginning and
we are looking forward to hear-
ing and seeing other important
moments.


In 1948, at the age of 17, Bar-
bara Williams-Kee sang at the
NAACP star-studded program
with some of the most infamous


people that included Cab Callo-
way, Ella Fitzgerald and Ralph
Renick, WTVJ news anchor.
Barbara graduated from Book-
er T. Washington High in 1950
and was the first Black woman
to sing in the Dade County au-
ditorium. Professor Charles L.
Williams sung as guest soloist
for the class of 1951 and she
was 20-years-old at the time.
By the way, with her melodious
voice, Barbara can still sing.
******** *
Akela Blue, grand-daughter of
Edward and Betty Blue gradu-
ated from Duquesne University
of Pittsburgh, Pa. on May 9.
The graduation was witnessed
by Betty Blue, Rosalyn Blue-
Parkinson, Sandra Blue Har-
ris, Frank Blue II, Chantrell
Parkinson, Malissa Harmon
and the proud parents Patricia
Chea and Frank Blue.. -Family
and friends celebrated after-
ward at Joe's Crab Shack.


Welcome back to the Miami
Dolphins, Jason Taylor. Many
of us missed you.



Wedding anniversary greet-
ings go out to Dewey Willard
and Sabrina Knight, III, May
18, their 7th; Rev. Woodrow


C. and DaNita J. Jenkins,
Jr., May 20, their 3rd; Ted and
Donna A. Turner, May 22,
their 20t; Alfred and Shree
B. Wheeler, May 23, their 17th
and Thomas and Dyshon R.
White, May 23, their 17th.


Jaylin Amir Butler-Turner,
a seventh grader at Arvida Mid-
dle School, has received a Cer-
tificate of Merit for his partici-
pation in the Duke University
Talent Identification Program.
Jaylin recently took the college
entrance exam, American Col-
lege Testing (ACT) which is a
test designed for college-bound
high school students. Jaylin
scored high on the test and
received numerous letter con-
gratulating him on his achieve-
ment. Of the students tested
state-wide, he was ranked in
the top five percent. Jaylin and
his family were invited to the
Florida Recognition Ceremony
at Florida Atlantic University
in Boca Raton last week where
he was recognized for his scho-
lastic achievement.
Jaylin is the son of Shelby
W. Turner and grandson of M.
Jacquelyn Cambridge Porter
and Doran L. Porter.


Eboni Finley, the daughter
of Eric and Tangela Finley,


was recently selected by the
Miami-Dade School Board to
be the student advisor begin-
ning next fall. A junior at Mi-
ami Carol City Senior High,
Eboni will replace the cur-
rent student advisor, Angel-
ique Gayle, and attend regu-
lar school board meetings in
which she will serve as a liai-
son between the students and
the School Board. A huge task
for the ambitious teen who is
already balancing being a Var-
sity cheerleader, secretary of
Ladies of Distinction and Ecol-
ogy Club, Carol City Law Mag-
net program and maintaining
a 3.8 grade point average.


True Success is ... Not how
much you can count, but how
many fiends you can count on;
Not how well-to-do you are,
but. how. much good you do;
Not lots of lovely possessions,
but possessing lots of love; Not
whether you make a fortune,
but whether you make a differ-
ence.
Enjoy every golden hour' of
your best days (school) as they
come to an end. And get ready
for even better days if you are
planning to attend college.
One request -- S-T-U-D-Y (It
will be over in four years or no
more than five) and will benefit
you forever.


Hip- Hop Caucus goes to Washington


-- Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content-


.Available from Commercial News Providers


-


With 'Dance Flkk,' it's wall-to-wall Wayans


-










Slingr Natalie (Co* hhi a accewul kidney ttranwpant


BLACKS MUST CONTROL 'ri-iEIR OWN DESTINY


o O


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009











The Miami Times



Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 27 JUNE-2, 2009


Local businessman helps c "

historically Black college


John L. Cheever stands in front of his van outside of The
Miami Times


The Miami Times Staff Report

At a time when historically
Black colleges and universities
are struggling to stay float dur-
ing the recession, a local busi-
nessman has donated $15,000
to the TomrnJoyner Foundation
that would provide six schol-
arships worth $2,500 to stu-
dents at Florida Agricultural
and Mechanical University
(FAMU).
"It is all about giving back
into the community so we
can offer a .pathway for the
next generation," said John
L. Cheever, owner of the John
L. Cheever Air Conditioning
Company in Miami. "We have
to let our young people know
that we are care about them
so they can do the same thing
for the next generation."
Historically Black Colleges
and Universitie.s (HBCUs) rely
primarily on tuition for fund-
ing. FAMU trustees board was
told in April that they would
lose three million dollars dur-
ing the spring term due to
the state's economic crisis.
Fifteen percent would be cut
from each of the 11 public
universities in the last quar-
ter of the school year, accord-
ing FAMU's Chief Financial
Officer Teresa Hardee.


But help is said to be on the
way.
President Barack Obama's
stimulus package includes
money that will assist HB-
CUs.
The historically Black col-
leges and universities have
been lhit particularly hard by
the economic times. Many
HBCU leaders said this is no.
time to cut back on programs
that our supporting institu-
tions that play a role an edu-
cating our students.
"We believe it is in the
best interest of our country
to ensure that (HBCUs) are
strong," said John Donohue,
UNCF's executive vice presi-
dent .for development, in a
statement.
In the meantime, Cheever
believes that responsibility of
our children's education lies
in the hand of the parents,
community and those who
have been benefited with a
good education to. come back
and invest into the commu-
nity.
"Families are in drier need
,during this recession," said
Cheever. "Education is taking
too many cuts. We as a people
have to do things ourselves
and not depend on the govern-
ment," said Cheever.


From left to right: Florida A&M University students, Emerson Naylor, Evan Anderson, and interim dean of the FAMU School
of Business and Industry, Shawnta Friday-Stroud, proudly hold a check for $50,000 from Ford Motor Company.
-Photo courtesy--Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University.


FAMU students win Ford competition


Florida Agricultural and Mechanical Uni-
versity (FAMU) students, Emerson Naylor,
School of Business and Industry (SBI) and
Evan Anderson, FAMU-FSU College of En-
gineering, won the 2009 Ford HBCU Busi-
ness Classic Competition. As the grand
prize winner, the student team won $35,000
in personal scholarships and $15,000 for
FAMU.
"This is truly a great win given that Dr.
Colin Benjamin, the team's advisor, passed
in January and was not with them at the
case competition," said Shawnta Friday-
Stroud, interim dean of FAMU's SBI. "This


win is a testament to the character, de-
termination, and academic preparation of
FAMU students."
This is FAMU's second time winning the
business classic competition.
An independent panel of judges, made
up of influential entrepreneurs from the
Black business community picked the win-
ners at the National Association for Equal
Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO)
National Conference in Atlanta. The judges
for the competition included George Fraser,
chairman and CEO of FraserNet/author;
Boris Kodjoe, actor/entrepreneur; Pat Lot-


tier, CEO of Atlanta Tribune; Will Packer,
Chairman and CEO of Rainforest Films/
producer; and Randal Pinkett, Ph.D., chair-
man and CEO of'BCT Partners/author. The
event will be hosted by Kevin Frazier, TV
anchor and entertainment correspondent.
To enter the competition, the student
team, along with a faculty adviser, had to
submit a business plan, which included the
type of business, product or service, pricing
considerations, target market and competi-
tion, and general operations. As a finalist,
FAMU students had 25 minutes to'
Please turn to STUDENT 9D


Miami Norland Senior High students graduate Success Academy


*-- wma IranG-NW %m w *mm 'smo


Miami-Dade School District officials present Miami Norland Senior High students with a check for their completion of the
Success Academy. --Photo/Miami-Dade Schools


Students at Miami Norland Senior helped students in low-performing
High School were surprised on May schools prepare for the state exam,
20 with a gigantic check for their par- Florida Comprehensive Assessment
ticipation in the Superintendent's Suc- Test. The students earned money for
cess Academy tutoring initiative, which attending each tutoring session. The


check for the Norland's total partici-
pation was $96,960. Each student's
share will be calculated and put in a
bank account that has been set up for
them.


Copyrighted Material



A Syndicated Content.



Available from Commercial News Providers


... .11MKNO -











BLkCKS MUST CONTROL U lI -'\OWN Df',slN'


second chance at life


Members of the Miami Rescue Mission's May 17th graduating class.,


4plioto rovidad by (ho M fami l Rowo MI-50on,


Twenty-two formerly homeless
graduate from the Miami Rescue
Mission Regeneration Program


Th@eears 'i' ar'ifd
@ faily and frien
watted 22 fer2mely

from the Miami Reseue


Most of the srad-
i wnha onteed



tw mobi ad to
faeted frogram that


tional, spiritual, emo-








individual six monthsa-
tionas land, phady sto

The Regeneration





complete it. The pro-
gram usually takes an
individual six months


to twoyears to corn-
plete, Often these
men have broken re-
lationships with their
family and friends but
after changing their
lves, they are ready
to restore those rela-
tionships and go back
to eshool or start new

These 22 men grad-
uated in caps and
gowns at a program
and celebration held
in their honor in the
Chapel of the Miami
P'?.. -r Mission's
Center for Menf, Rev=
erend Ronald Brulm
mitt, president of the
Miami Rescue Mission
and Broward Out-
reach Centers said,
"Although we hear
about bad news ev-
eryday, we are proud
to say that here at the
Miami Rescue Mission
we produce plenty
of 'good news' as we


A father graduating from the Miami Rescue Mission's Regeneration Program is
reunited with his young daughter.--photo provided by the Miami Rescue Mission.


see changed lives on
a.daily basis. These
22 men are the latest
in thousands of grad-
uates that we have
had since starting the
Mission in 1922."


For over 70 years,
the Miami Rescue
Mission has served
the needy men, wom-
en, and children of
South Florida. The
Broward Outreach


Center/Hollywood
opened in 1997 and
the Broward Out-
reach Center in Pom-
pano-opened in 2002.
Every day the organi-
zation provides food,


shelter, clothing, edu-
cation, job trair'.iing.
spiritual direction
and long-term reha-
bilitation programs
in Miami, Hollywood
and Pompano.


Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211

41M

- ***d
ss .= .s aU


DARYUS BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Umo Rental
305-796-9558


Chairman Moss recognizes 6A State Champions


Someone once said,
winningig isn't everiy-
thing.'" Try telling that
ito mmbtrs .of the Cor-
all eef Sr. High School
bys" Vbasketbal team
who are msti celebrat-
ig Ilir re ent state
dmclapinship titde,
Miami-Dade Counmty
Cgmssivn Chair-
man Dennis C. Moss
was equality as proud
of Coral dReef Basket-
iball State chmrironsr
and recognized the
winning coach and
team at h,.- Miami-
D,4e B',mrd of C,,i. '
( .'Gz,,ri.,': '.virn chambers


for their outstanding
victory on Thursday,
May 21.
Coral Reef Senoir.
High Barracudas came
from behind and de-
feated Orlando Olym-
pia in Lakeland, Flori-
da with a final score of
69-60 in early March.
In addition, Coral Reef
High boy's basketball
team made history
by becoming the first
school from the south
Miami-Dade area to
win a boys' basketball
championship in 50
years. It appears that
sports is not the only


Coral Reef Sr. High Coach, Gaston "Chachi" Rodriguez; Miami-Dade County
Chairman Dennis C. Moss; Coral Reef "Barracudas" Basketball Team members,
Steven Lopez, Jerron Granberry and Brandon Vickers.
--Photo courtesy: Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners


%Irban% C.... l, inwsih %now kb

-b -GWEN* __________


Copyrighted Material

............ Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


thing Coral Reef Sr.
High prides itself on.
They are also big on
academics.
Second-year coach
Gaston "Chachi" Ro-
driguez said, "It's
amazing how
dedicated they are
both to their basket-
ball and their class
work. I'll have kids
that are getting A's and
B's, and they'll still be
stressing about doing
better."
Only a handful of
teammates from Coral
Reef were able to take


part in the presenta-
tion at the Board of
County Commission
chambers. More than
a dozen had to remain
at school due to final
exams and end of the
year commitments.
Chairman Moss saw
to it that each member
of the team was recog-
nized and given a Cer-
tificate of Appreciation
for their efforts. Chair-
man Moss stated, "I am
proud of these young
men who are commit-
ted to both academics
and athletics.


SUBSCRIBE
TODAY!
END THE
INC O NVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES ,
FIGHTING
THE WEATHER
AND HUNTING
DOWN BACK
CO PIES

CALL:
305-694-


USNES & EVC


ELECTION NOTICE
The Miami-Dade County Canvassing Board will convene at the Office of the
Supervisor of Elections, 2700 N. W. 87"' Avenue, Miami, Florida. The Canvassing
Board is convening on these dates to conduct the Cutler Bay, Doral, Miami Gardens,
Miami Lakes, and Palmetto Bay Special Elections to be held on June 25, 2009.
DATE/TIME ACTIVITY
Wednesday, 6/3/09 1. Logic and Accuracy Test of the optical scan
10:00 a.m. voting systems to be used for paper ballots
Friday, 6/19/09 1. Pre-count Logic and Accuracy Test of the
10:00 a.m. through optical scan system used for paper ballots
Friday, 6/26/09 2. Ballots opening and processing (as needed)
3. Duplication of ballots (as needed)
Tuesday, 6/23/09 1. Canvassing of presumed invalid ballots
Canvassing: 2:00 p.m. (as needed)
Thursday, 6/25/09 1. Tabulation of result. slai,,
7:00 p.m. 2. Unofficial Results
Friday, 6/26/09 1. Canvassing of presumed invalid ballots
Canvassing: 2. Tabulation of results completed
10:00 a.m. to completion 3. Certification of Official Results by the County
Canvassing Board
4. Post-count Logic and Accuracy Test of the
optical scan system used for paper ballots
5. Precincts and race/proposal selection for
manual post-election audit
Tuesday, 6/30/09 1. Audit process starts to completion
10:00 a.m. to completion (scheduled as needed)
All proceedings will be open to the public. For a sign language interpreter or other
accommodations, please call 305-499-8405 at least five days in advance. In
accordance with Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, a person who appeals any
decision by the canvassing board with respect to any matter considered at a meeting,
he or she will need a record of the proceedings and therefore will need to ensure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made.
Lester Sola
Supervisor of Elections
as- Miami-Dade County
















SS


~.0


II


SECTION D


1192 N.W. 65 Street
Large two bdrms. $700
mthly. Section 8 OK. 305-
751-3381

1212 N. W. 1 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE-IN
One bedroom, one bath,
$500,'stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080
1331 Sharizard Blvd.
One bedroom. Section 8 ok!
No deposit for Section 8!
786-488-5225

140 N.W. 13 Street
One month to move in. Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

140 S.W. 6 St. HOMESTEAD
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$625 monthly
Call:305-267-9449

1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors, $600 monthly; One
Month's Rent Move In Spe-
cial with restrictions.
Call 305-458-3977


15 NE 60 STREET
Now available. Three bed-
rooms, 1 bath, fenced yard,
central air. $850 monthly.
305-687-8386

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$725 monthly. All appli-
ances inclLided, FREE 19
inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms. $625 month-
ly. All appliances included,
FREE 19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1969 N. W. 2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air,
free water.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144

2080 LINCOLN AVENUE
OPA LOCKA
One bedroom, newly renovat-
ed, air. Section 8 welcome.
305-621-0620, 305-989-2112

210 N.W. 17 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE
IN. One bedroom, one bath.
$475 305-642-7080

2186 N. W. 38 Street
Newly renovated, one bed-
room, one bath, $725,
appliances, free water.
305-642-7080

2804 N.W. 1st Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750 monthly, appliances
included. Free 19" LCD TV
Joel 786-355-7578

2931 NW 132 TERRACE
One bedroom, one bath, air,
bars. $690 monthly, $1400 to
move in. 305-742-1082 after
7 p.m.


2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath -
$575. Section 8 OK. 786-
412-9343

2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3669 Thomas Avenue
Two bdrms, stove, refrigera-
tor, air. $650. 305-642-7080


423 N.W. 9 Street
For rent: One bedroom, one
bath. $475 monthly, easy
qualifying. 786-339-4106
4651 N.W. 32nd Avenue
Cozy, one bdrm, $470
monthly. 305-469-9698 after
5 p.m.

5550 N.E. Miami Place
One bedroom. $650 monthly,
first and last. 786-277-0302

5629 S.W. Fillmore Street
Hollywood
One large bdrm. $775 mthly.
Lights and water included.
786-370-0832

5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
new appliances, $600 mthly,
$1200 moves you in.
305-458-3977

6964 N.W. 15 Ave.
One bedroom. $400 monthly.
Contact Ms. Queen
305-693-7727


700 NE 86 STREET
One bedroom, Section 8 ok.
786-488-5225

7519 North Miami Avenue


One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
$695 Call 305-669-4320


7523 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
$695. Call 305-669-4320

767 NW 70 STREET
MIAMI
Two bedrooms, one bath,.
central air, $700 monthly.
786-370-0832


8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one, two, and four
bdrms. Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665


CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa-
Locka, Brownsville. Apart-
ments, Duplexes,. Houses.
One, Two and Three Bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For more information/spe-
cials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy qualify. Move in special.
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 ($745), two bedrooms,
one bath, $595 ($895).
Free water!
Leonard 786-236-1144


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.


LIBERTY SQUARE
NO DEPOSIT with Section 8.
Two and one bedroom Apts.
786-267-3199


MIAMI AREA
AFFORDABLE
NEW APARTMENTS
One, two and three bedrooms
from $707 monthly.
Section 8 welcome
The Emerald Apartments
Apply at Lafayette
Apartments
150 NE 79 St
305-754-0053
Open Mon Fri 9 to 6
Sat Sun 10 to 5
EHO/ADA


MOVE-IN SPECIAL!!!
SECTION 8, $0 DEPOSIT
OPA-LOCKA. Two bed-
rooms, one bath, tiled air.
$750
786-236-0214,786-439-
8044

N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


N.W. 2 Ave. and 63 St.
Clean, secure area, one
bdrm, one bath, $575 monthly.
786-393-4764


NORTH MIAMI AREA
Updated one bedroom, cen-
tral air, private, quiet. $695.
305-582-9381

OPA LOCKA AREA
Special One bdrm,.one bath,
$475 monthly, Section 8 OK!
Call 305-717-6084.


SOUTH MIAMI AREA
Three bedroom, one and half
bath, living and dining room,
kitchen, Section 8 welcomed
$900 monthly. 305-253-1246
or 305-255-3493


WYNWOOD AREA
28 STREET NW 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath.
Starting at $575 monthly. All
appliances Included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


NAIL SALON
8644 N.W. 22nd Avenue
For sale or rent
786-306-0967


1503 NW 207 STREET
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$1000 monthly, $1200 to
move in. Section 8 welcome.
305-624-4888


6113 S.W. 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one and half
bath, one block from Metro-
rail,$1,200 monthly, Section 8
welcome. Call 786-556-9425
or 786-210-0421.


CAROL CITY AREA
Newly remodeled, three
bdrms, one bath, central air,
Section 8 okl $1400.
786-251-2744


CAROL CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath-
room, central air, washer and
dryer in unit. $500 to move
in with Section 8 voucher.
Please call
305-525y3540

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
One bedroom, one bath, fully
upgraded, $875 monthly. 900
square feet.
Also available:
Three bedrooms, two baths
plus den, stainless steel ap-
pliances, tiled throughout.
$1600 monthly. 1500 square
feet.
Section 8 Welcome
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office
GUY RAMSEY

Near NW 30 Avenue and
92 street
Large three bedrooms, gran-
ite countertops, stainless
refrigerator. $1350 Section 8
OK. Call 786-277-3036


1050 N.W. 112 St.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, security bars, wa-
ter included. Section 8 OKI
786-879-3312

1080 N.W. 100 Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air. First, last and
security. Section 8 welcome.
786-315-8491.

1128 N.W. 76 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, remod-
eled. 305-316-0681

.1180 NW 64 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $950 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
786-258-1843

1187 N.W. 63 St. #2
Two bdrms, one bath, appli-
ances, air. $800 mthly, $1600
to move in. 305-389-8414

14 Ave. and 37 St.
Three bdrms, air. Section 8
OK. $1100 mthly.
305-984-0340

15722 NW 38 COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly. 305-751-3381

18003 SW 105 STREET
Duplex for rent. Four bed-
rooms, two baths. Section
8 welcome. $1450 monthly.
305-233-3887,305-281-7091

1890 N.W. 89 Terrace
One bedroom,
Call 786-587-3731

2273 N.W. 65 St Rear
One bdrm $725, $1450 to
move in. 305-525-0619

2397 N.W. 104 Street
Three bdrms, two baths. 305-
525-0619, 305-331-3899.
/-

2427 N.W. 104 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899

247 N. E. 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, micro wave,
water, parking. $750 monthly
plus security. Section 8 ok.
786-216-7533

2541 York Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$650, appliances, free water.
305-642-7080

3004 NW 52 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hood. $675 monthly. Water
included. 786-586-3946


3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

3190 N.W. 135th Street
One bedroom, one bath, air
condition, stove, refrigerator,
water included.
Call Marie 786 367-3820.


324 N. E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$925. Call 305-642-7080

412 N.W. 59 Street
Clean two bedrooms, den,
Section 8. 786-269-5643

423-425 NW 82 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
tiled floors. $800 monthly.
First and security.
305-216-4844


5010 N.W. 1 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath,
air, near school and bus line,
fenced. 305-634-3473


542 N.W. 60th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, $1100 monthly,
$600 security. 305-301-1993

5629 S.W. Fillmore Street


Hollywood
Large three bedrooms, one
bath. Lights and water in-
cluded. $1100 mthly. 786-
370-0832


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


5927 N. E. 1 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

6109 S. W. 63 Terrace
Two bedroom, one bath,
$700. Move in special $1013
Call 305-642-7080
670 Oriental Boulevard
(151 Street N.W. 36 Avenue).
Two bedrooms, one bath,
tiled floors, air, washer hook-
up. $800 monthly, $1600 to
move in. 305-625-4515

6998 N.W. 5 Place
One bdrm, one bath. $450
mthly. 786-370-0832

7631 NW 2 COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 to $850. 305-332-5008

798 NW 108 STREET
Spacious, two bedrooms,
two bath, security bars,
tiled floors, laundry room
included. $1100 monthly.
305-751-2150

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776

ALLAPATTAH AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 Welcome.
786-355-5665

Located Near 90th Street
and 27nd Avenue
Furnished one bedroom, one
bath, lights, water, and air
included. Call 305-693-9486


1140 N. W. 79 Street
One bdrm, one bath, $550.
Free water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080

365 N.W. 187 St.
One big efficiency. $600 mth-
ly, $1200 to move in.
305-758-6133, 305-962-1814

5629 Filmore Street
HOLLYWOOD
Efficiency, one bathroom,
small kitchen, private en-
trance, utilities included, $600
monthly. 786-370-0832

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency. Call 305-754-7776

MIAMI GARDENS
Furnished efficiency, 786-
287-0864 or 786-337-5853.

NORTH MIAMI
Efficiency, quiet area,
786-488-5225

NORTHWEST AREA
Nice quiet neighborhood. Air.
305-710-0615

NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.


OPA-LOCKA AREA
Move-In Special! $375
monthly, Call 305-717-6084.


13387 N.W. 30tn Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486


1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.


1816 N.W. 62nd Terrace
$125 weekly, $200 to move
in. 786-426-6263

2033 N.W. 43rd Street
Rooms. $125 weekly. Nicely
furnished 786-290-0946.


2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-3434,
305-914-4461

2371 N.W. 61st Street
Room in rear. 305-693-1017,
305-298-0388.

4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

6585 N.W. 17 Ave.
$300 monthly. Contact Mr.
Johnson 305-300-9764


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean room, private
entrance, patio, cable, 305-
688-0187
NORTH MIAMI AREA
TV, utilities included, $600
monthly. 305-687-1110


NORTHWEST AREA
$600 to move in, $75 weekly,
with air. 786-337-0864


NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.


1U4 N.W. I, 13 t
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, swimming pool.
Section 8 OK. 305-835-9906


1180 Opa Locka Blvd
Northwest 137 Street, four
blocks west 1-95. Three bed-
rooms, two baths, air, garage,
$1300 monthly, $3250 move-
in. No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6766

1285 N.W. 129th Street
Three bedrooms, One bath.
Section 8 OK. $1275 month
786-367-4004, 305-681-2886
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
one month security.
954-826-4013

1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
,$900. 305-235-9514 or
305-992-3653

1542 N.W. 35 Street
Large two bdrms, central air,
houses, townhouses and du-
plexes: $850 monthly.
786-303-7896

1711 N.W. 135 Street
Four -bedrooms, two baths
den, air. $1300. Lakefront.
$3250 move in. No Section
8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776


1785 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$775 monthly. 305-267-9449

1790 N.W. 48 Street
Two bedroom, one bath, $925
monthly. 305-267-9449

1843 N. W. 58 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$950 monthly. Central air.
305-642-7080

1863 N.W. 91st Street
Beautiful one bedroom, total-
ly remodeledall appliances.
$650 monthly, first and last.
305-801-6496

1887 N.W. 68th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
completely remodeled.
$1225.00 per month, section
8 OK. Also available for sale
at $85,000.00.
Call Jake 305-926-2839

1901 NW 91 St.
Three. bedrooms one bath.
Big yard, all tile, air. Section 8
OK. 786-326-2789

1915 N.W. 115 St
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 mthly. 305-992-6252

2157 NW 83 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
family room. 305-968-5938
2273 N.W. 65 St Rear
One bdrm. 305-525-0619,
305-331-3899

2531 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedroom house, stove
,refrigerator, air condition,
security bars, tile and carpet.
Newly renovated, must see
won't last. $1350. First, last
and security.
Call 305-761-6558.

2951 N.W. 164 Street
Three 'bedrooms, new kitch-
en, air, bars, tile and fenced.
$1050 monthly, $2575 move-
in. -No Section 8.,
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776
3221 N.W. 11 CT.
Nice four bedrooms, two
baths, den, garage. HOPWA,
Section 8. Call 954-392-0070

3261 N.W. 132 Ter.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Section 8 OK.
$1100 monthly. 305-332-
5008

649 N.W. 65th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1100 monthly 786-344-
2964
7 N. E. 59 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950. Move in special $1425.
Free Water. 305-642-7080

710 NW 177 Terrace
Three bedrooms two baths
plus large efficiency with
fenced in back yard.
305-987-0272, 786-290-0768

727 N.W. 74th Street
Four or five bdrms, two
baths, fenced yard, tile, Sec-
tion 8 ok! Call 786-306-2349. *

7711 NW 17 PLACE
Large one bedroom with ap-
pliances. $650 monthly. First,
last required. 305-788-5367

944 N.W. 81 Street #A
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950 monthly, $600 security.
Call 786-488-2264

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.


Coconut Grove
3464 Frow Avenue
$1500, three bdrm, one bath,
single family, newly reno-
vated. Central air, washer,
dryer, new appliances. Close
to Coco Walk. Hurricane
Shutters. Available Immedi-
ately 954-646-1236
COCONUT GROVE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath, liv-
ing room, dining room, air.
786-597-3999

House for rent
Three Bedrooms, two baths,
$500 Deposit. Section 8 only.
954-444-6403
N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-754-7776

Northwest Area
Three and four bedrooms.
Section 8'OK. 786-346-9878

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
One, two, three and four bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Sean 305-205-7738

RENT JUST REDUCED
1850 N.W. 55 Street
Three bdrm, two bath, den,
Section 8 OK. 786-344-4407

STOP!!!
Behind in Your Rent? 24 Hour
notice Behind in Your Mort-
gage? Kathy. 786-326-7916


321 N.W. 183rd Street
Four bedroom, two bath,
central air. $1300 mthly, first,
last, and security to move in.
Call 305-986-8395.

HOMESTEAD AREA
Four bdrms, two and a half
baths, two car garage, wash-
er, dryer. Section 8 OK.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112


1595 NE 174 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
everything new. Buy with
$3500 down and $1135
monthly P&I. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700

1745 NW 47 STREET
Two bedrooms, huge den,
central air. Try $2900 down
and $617 monthly P&I to buy.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700

2455 N.W. 87th Street
Handyman Special! Three
bdrm, one bath. Needs some
renovations. $69K. NDI Real-
tors 305-655-1700. ,


2835 NW 210 TERRACE
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Buy with $2900
down and $851 monthly P&I.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700


3029 N.W. 66 Street
New Construction Home for
Sale. Infill program available.
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Also:
685 NW 50 Street (City of
Miami)
Two-story, three bedrooms,
three baths. 786-229-4824

3029 N.W. 66 Street
New Construction Home for
Sale. Infill program available.
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Also:
685 NW 50 Street (City of
Miami)
Two-story, three bedrooms,
three baths. 786-229-4824


*"ATTENTION'
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
"*WITH""
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty

NEW CONSTRUCTIONS
SINGLE FAMILY HOMES
Three bedrooms, two
baths

Starting from

$70,000

*After grants
and subsidies
Also subject to
qualification

NO CLOSING COSTS

305-801-5868

NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
rooms, two baths, $199,000,
as low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedrooms, two
baths at an attractive price.
Call 786-859-3772


WE BUY HOUSESII!
Any Condition-Any Area!
305-788-8939


NEED A MORTGAGE?
$8000 tax credit for first time
home buyers. FHANA, re-
verse mortgages. 580 score,
105 % loan to value. We fi-
nance churches and com-
mercial buildings. Loan modi-
fications or short sales.
754-423-4613



GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.
HANDYMAN
BEST PRICES IN TOWN
Handyman carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
water heaters, specializing
in stoppages 305-801-5690

Plumbing and Carpentry. 305-
401-9165, 786-423-7233

Home Repair
We do it all! Roofing, addi-
tions and bathrooms .
786-277-3434

M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves,
refrigerators, water heaters.
Joel. Cell 305-244-8948 or
305-758-8608.

TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.


MIZELL KIDDIE KAMPUS
Register now for Summer or
Fall. Ages 2-5. Abeka cur-
riculum, certified teachers,
computers, progress reports,
Black History, Spanish, Swa-
hili, extra-curricular programs,
field trips and PTA. 7 a.m, -
5:45 p.m., 1910 N.W. 95 St.,
305-836-1178







CDA TEACHERS NEEDED
Day Care,
305-305-0604

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


Be a Security Guard
Or Renew License $60! Do
G and concealed license.
786-333-2084

SECURITY OFFICER $60.
Don't get those points on li-
cense and youthful course
$25. 786-333-2084


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!

END THE
I N C 0 N V E N I N C E
O F EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
B O X ES,
FIGH TrING
THE WEATHER
AND HUNTING
D 0 W I BACK
C COPIES

305-694-6214


GROW



YOUR

BUSINESS





BART M.WILLIAMS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109

fQ tmfowu%
One Family Serving Since 1923
THE LARGEST MINORITY
OWNED NEWSPAPER
IN THE SOUTHEAST


Pay Pay


20% 920%


More Less
When you place )our dlssifed .r.I.. .... ( ... .... .'
liner aJ on Monday or Tuesday by Spmi n.c. j :, ?.* '.. ... e i Tr...r fr,


CALL TODAY 305-694-6225


Home prices fall a
record 19.1% in year;
declines slowing

NEW YORK (AP) -
Home prices fell at the
sharpest rate ever in the
first quarter compared
to 2008, but the pace
of month-to-month
declines continues to
slow, a closely watched
housing index showed
Tuesday.
The Standard &
Poor's/ Case-Shiller
National Home Price
index reported home
prices were down 19.1%
in the first quarter, the
most in its 21-year
history.
Home prices have
fallen 32.2% since
peaking in the second
quarter of 2006 and
are at levels not
seen since the end of
2002. -
.The 20-city index
fell 18.7% in March
from the year before
and the 10-city
index lost 18.6%.
Those declines were
a bit better than
February's and
marked the second
straight month the
indexes didn't post
record drops.
Still, there are no
signs home prices
have hit bottom.
"We see no evidence
that a recovery in
home prices has
begun," said, David
Blitzer, chairman
of the S&P index
conrmittee.
All 20 cities
showed annual
price declines, with
nine setting annual
records. Fifteen cities
posted double-digit
drops and three cities
'-Phoenix, Las Vegas
and San Francisco-
recorded declines of
more than 30%.
Minneapolis posted
a 6.1% decline from
February to March,
and the biggest
monthly drop on
record for all of the
metro area.
Charlotte and
Denver home
prices had the best
performance in March
over February, both
edging up less than 1%.
Home prices in Dallas
were flat in March.


e









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


Medium A o
White Shrimp ............ :-b
Easy to Peel, Previously Frozen,
Farm-Raised, 41 to 50 per Pound
SAVE UP TO 2.00 LB
(Peeled and Deveined,
51 to 60 per Pound ... Ib 5.99)


8-Piece Hot Mixed c99
Fried Chicken... ..............
2 Breasts, 2 Thighs, 2 Drumsticks
and ,2 Wings, Hand Breaded,
Fried in Transfat Free Oil, each
SAVE UP TO 1.60
(Fresh Chilled, each ... 5.49)


Italian Five Grain 269
B re a d ................... ......... ..........
Choose From Wheat or White, Contains:
Oats, Cracked Wheat, Barley, Millet,
Flaxseed, and Sunflower Seeds,
From the Publix Bakery,
16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .90


Florida 249
Red Potatoes...................
High in Vitamin C
and a Good Source
of Potassium, 5-lb bag
SAVE UP TO 1.50


Capri Sun Drinks......... ,.................. ... ........ Free
Or Roarin' Waters, Assorted Varieties, 10-pk. 6 or 6.75-oz pkg.
(Excluding 100% Juice.)
SAVE UP TO 2.69


Nabisco Chips Ahoy! Cookies............. .........
Assorted Varieties, 14 to 15.25-oz pkg.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.97


Quaker =
Cereal..........F....Free
Assorted Varieties, Cap'N Crunch,
20,7 to 22-oz, Life, 21-oz,
or Squares, 16-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.75


Uncle Ben's
Country Inn Free
Rice..................... gee
Assorted Varieties,
6-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 1.49


Zephyrhills
Natural o l\ 00
Spring Water ....... o9 1U
3-L bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.90 ON 10


18-Pack Assorted 1199
Budweiser Beer.......... 11-
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(12-Pack Miller High Life
or Miller High Life Light Beer,
12-oz can or bot. ... 6.49)


Prices effective Thursday, May 28 through Wednesday, June 3, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucle, Indian River, J .g SA .
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Any Item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix advertised sale price. Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity rights reserved. VISA


227
z~~I


%4.


*.Free


u b l*lx WH ERE SHOPPI NG I S A P L E A S U R E
LP L


nuhlix enm/ad










9D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


The battle of the two retailers
Wal-Mart's low-price ing group Custom- electronics,, 12 percent;
message and emphasis er Growth Partners. apparel, 11 percent; i L
on necessities are help- "Meanwhile, Wal-Mart health and wellness,
ing the world's larg- continues to raise the 10 percent and home,
.est retailer grrab new har." percent.


customers around the
globe' in a recession,
while Target with
greater emphasis on
trendy merchandise -,
has been struggling to
hold on to its shoppers
and is now turning to
groceries for growth.
"Target is clearly
making steps in the
right direction," said
Craig R. Johnson,
president of consult-


According to the
companies' recent an-
nual reports, here's a
breakdown of sales by
merchandise catego-
ries for the latest fiscal
year:
Wal-Mart revenue for
the year which ended
Jan. 31 was $405.6
billion consisting of
groceries, 49 percent;
entertainment, 13 per-
cent; furniture and


Business plans prove viable


STUDENT
continued from 5D

present their business
plans to the judges and
prove that their plan
can be converted into
a viable business strat-
egy.
The finalist competi-
tion will also premiere
as a TV One special
later this month. The
"Ford HBCU Classic
Special" will feature
candid moments with
the -student teams as
they prepare for the
competition, highlights
from each business
plan presentation as
well as the celebrity
judges' selection pro-
cess to determine the
2009 winners.
The Ford HBCU Busi-
ness Classic launched
in the fall of 2004 in re-
sponse to Ford's recog-
nition of a need in the
Black business com-
munity to educate and
develop the next gener-
ation of entrepreneurs.
It was designed to offer
students the oppor-
tunity to apply their
classroom knowledge


to real-world entre-
preneurial experience.
The competition was
opened to Historically
Black Colleges and
Universities (HBCU)
students nationwide,
and received business
plan submissions from
' students from more
than 80 percent of the
nation's HBCUs.


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional, Sale & Confidential Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP,

I 305-621-1399
- . . . -L .... . .. ... .... . .


Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey Edmonson speaks to
the students at Jackson Senior High about the importance of
leadership at their annual Career Day last month.
photo courtesy, Miami-Dade County Board of Commissioners

Edmonson attends Career Day

at Miami Jackson Senior High

- County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson spoke to students at Mi-
ami-Jackson Senior High School during their Career Day held last month.
Recognizing the job responsibilities that would one day lay before them,
Commissioner Edmonson explained that the no matter what career they
chose, each student would need to learn valuable skills on the job, like
leadership.
"Leadership is understanding people and involving them to help you do
a job. That takes integrity, dedication of purpose, selflessness, knowledge,
skill, as well as determination not to accept failure," Commissioner Edmon-
son told the students.. "You will have to get to know your fellow students
and work with all of them no matter their differences in order to accom-
plish your goals."


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at.her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:

IFB NO. 146111 PURCHASE OF POLICE SERVICE DOGS
FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF POLICE
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami,
Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement
Telephone No. 305-416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 003587


Invitation to Prequalify to Bid


Public Infrastructure Work
For
NEW MARLINS BALLPARK
Hunt / Moss Construction Managers

Hunt/Moss Construction in conjunction with the Florida Marlins would like to announce an invitation to
prequalify to bid on the below listed Bid Packages for the construction of the Public Infrastructure Work
for the new Florida Marlins Ballpark.

Firms interested in bidding the bid packages noted below must prequalify in order to submit a bid.
Prequalification forms can be obtained by contacting Michelle Daniels (mdainiels@mossemail.com) at
Hunt/Moss at 954-524-5678. Prequalification forms will be accepted up until the Prequalification Due
Dates listed below.


Rid Pacanoce


Sitework and Utilities
FPL Conduit Ductbank
Concrete Sidewalks
Pavers
Landscape
Electrical
Traffic Signalization
Site Furnishings


June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009
June 15, 2009


Rid PI k Ic1sise


June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009
June 22, 2009


Plans, Bid.Packages and notification of the Prebid Meeting time and location will be made available to all
prequalified Subcontractors.

Contract documents and bid manuals will be available on the date that the Bid Package is to be issued.
Cost will be subject to specific Bid Package issued.


The bid documents can be purchased at:




Sealed bids will be delivered to:


Blue Digital
7920 NW 7th Street, Unit 107
Miami, Fl. 33126
(305) 262-4920

Hunt/Moss Construction Managers
2101 N Andrews Ave
Ft Lauderdale, FL. 33311
Phone 954-524-5678
Fax 954-524-5677


Requirements of the Project and Bid are as follows:


CSBE goal tbd %
SBE goal tbd %
Community Workforce Program minimum of 10% goal
Project must abide by the Responsible Wage and Benefits Code
5% bid bond
100% Payment and Performance Bond
Owner Controlled Insurance Program
County Sales Tax Savings Program


City of Miami
Notice of Bid Solicitation

Title: Job Order Contract
for Horizontal and Vertical Construction Projects
Due Date: Wednesday, June 24, 2009
Pre- Bid Conference: Friday, June 6, 2009, 9:30 AM -12:30 PM
(Non-Mandatory)
ITB No.: 08-09-043

For detailed .information, please visit our Capital Improvements Program web-
page at: www.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements/pages/ProcurementOppor-
tunites/Default.asp.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE.

Pedro G. Hernandez,
P.E., City Manager
DP No. 008954


SMIAMI-Et-O EXPRESSWAY AUTHOrITY

INVITATION TO BID (ITB)

MDX PROCUREMENTICONTRACT NO.T ITB-09-07

MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: STEEL BRIDGE/STRUCTURE PAINTING
AND REPAIRS

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) is soliciting Bids from qualified firms to provide
Painting and Repairs of 19 Steel Bridges. A Pre-Bid conference is scheduled for
June 3,2009 at 10:00 A.M., Eastern Time.

For a copy of the ITB with information on the Scope of Services, Pre-qualification and submittal
requirements free of charge, please logon to 4MDX's Website: w emodxwa.mcom to download
the documents under "Doing Business with MDX, or call MDX's Procurement Department at
305-637-3277 for assistance. Note: In order to download any MDX solicitation, you must first be
registered as a Vendor with MDX. This can only be facilitated through MDX's Website:
www.mdxway.com under "Doing Business with MDX: Vendor Registration".

The deadline for submitting Bids in response to this ITB is June 30,2009 by 2:00 P.M., Eastern
Time.


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the-official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings:"
............................ .......



098-JJ2 6/16/2009 Custodial Supplies

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


DIU r-dL;KdUUb r-IUqUdIIlIUdLIUII L)Ufd DIU rKy. lbbUU


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN IDESTINY


Prm oualifirationn At


9










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


More auto insurers are going to the dogs


By Kathleen Gray

Saikou and Kozette
are as safe as dogs can
be when they go for car
rides. The border collie
and boxer are always
strapped in tight, says
Lonnie Olson, 55, of
St. Helen, Mich.
Still, Olson says,
when she heard that
the auto insurance
policies offered by
Progressive now in-
clude coverage for
pets injured in vehicle
crashes, she decided to
move her business to


the company.
"Any company that
supported animals like
that, I wanted to sup-
port," she says. "I just
hope I never have to
use it."
At least four U.S. auto
insurers have added -
at no extra cost to cus-
tomers coverage of
$500 to $1,000 for pets
injured or killed in car
accidents.
With 196 million li-
censed drivers nation-
wide, according to the
Federal Highway Ad-
ministration, "it's very


competitive," says Lori
Conarton of the Insur-
ance Institute of Michi-
gan. "If other compa-
nies find that people
want this type of cov-
erage, they're going to
want to start offering
it, too."
Progressive, the
third largest auto in-
surer in the nation
with 10.4 million cus-
tomers in all 50 states,
was the first to offer
pet accident coverage
in summer 2007, says
Miriam Deitcher, the
company's director of


marketing.
"We did it because we
know how much our
customers love their
dogs and cats," Dei-
tcher says. "At first we
provided $500 worth of
coverage, but in March,
we increased that to
$1,000, to make sure
we're covering even
more."
Auto-Owners Insur-
ance, which has 4.6
million policyhold-
ers in 25 states, and
Farmers Insurance,
with 10 million auto
customers in 20 states,


also offer coverage for
pets injured in vehicle
crashes.
"We estimate more
than 63% of our cus-
tomers have pets, and
caring for them after
an accident can be ex-
. pensive," says Brian
Dwyer, a Farmers se-
nior vice president..
People whose pets
are injured in a vehi-
cle accident can file a
claim under property
damage if their insur-
ance provider does not
offer specialized, pet
coverage, says Krissy


Posey, a spokeswoman
for Allstate insurance,
which does not offer
pet coverage. What
auto insurance com-
panies consider legiti-
mate property damage
differs from company
to company and state
to state, says Jeanne
Salvatore of the Insur-
ance Information In-
stitute. In traditional
policies, it wouldn't be
unusual for a company
to deny a claim of pet
injuries based on prop-
erty damage liability
limits, she says.


("airn .pu w bu, bNom for m" ,I off

4b-


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Local financial group teaches parents on saving for college


In working with par-
ents who had college-
bound children, Eric
Pettus noticed a pat-
tern, that there were
no funds earmarked
for college.
Pettus, president &
founder of the Pettus
& Dawkins Financial
Group (PDFG), a local
financial planning and
consulting firm, found
that in talking to the
parents that they were
very disciplined in sac-
rificing for the child's
early-age needs (for-
mula, diapers, daycare,
etc.). However, once
the child got older, the
funds that were used
for those products/ser-
vices weren't saved for
the child's future ben-
efit. Then in the next
13-15 years, when the
child was graduating
from high school, the
family would find them-


selves in a panic trying
to finance an entire col-
lege education. It was a
that point that Pettus
realized that there had
to be a. more effective
way to help parents help
their children know the
importance of attending
college.
Recently, the Pettus
& Dawkins Financial
Group launched a di-
vision within the com-
pany to partner with lo-
cal daycares to educate
parents about college
education funding op-
tions.
Lisa & Derrick Wil-
liams, owners of King's
Kids Christian Academy
in Miami Gardens and
Opa-Locka, were one of
the first to embrace the
concept. Williams, hav-
ing a preteen daughter
herself, recognizes the
need to start saving
early.


Lisa Williams, owner of King's Kids Christian Academy, learn about the
different options for college education savings plans with the help of Pettus


& Dawkins Financial Grou
"When they (PDFG)
approached me with the
idea, I knew I wanted
to have my parents in-
volved so they would be
more informed about
their options," she
said. "I only wish I had
someone to help me


years ago to plan for my
daughter."
Amy Dawkins, co-
founder of PDFG, is
excited about the initia-
tive.
"It is critical for peo-
ple to understand that
sending a child to col-


HIALEAH WOMEN'S CENTER

952 East 25th Street (Same as N.W 79st)
Hialeah. Fl. 33013
(305)-836-9701 / (305) 558-4440

TERMINATIONS
UP TO 22 WEEKS
10% WITH AD
Serving the community over 20 years


-Photo courtesy: Lyndale Pettus
lege requires more than
good grades and high
test scores but it also
requires dollars, and
lots of them."
Unfortunately, par-
ents are more con-
cerned with the rising
cost of college educa-


tion and frequently
rely on the hope. that
their child will receive
financial aid and/or
scholarships. The real-
ity is that financial aid
is coming more in the
form of loans and less
in grants.
In addition, the cost
of waiting to borrow
later versus saving now
can cost as much as
four times the amount
that is actually needed.
When asked what
his vision was regard-
ing this effort, Pettus
replied, "Financially
aware parents will
make for financially
aware children and this
will serve to narrow the
financial divide."
For more information
on the Pettus & Dawk-
ins Financial Group,
call 305-778-3636 or
305-905-1450, or visit
www.pdfgi.com.


HOUSE OF


PRAYER


REV. CHAMBERS SPIRITUAL HEALER
and Adviser Has helped thousands with
problems, such as Bad Luck! Evil!! Dark-
ness! Drugs! Alcohol! Depression! Weight
Problems! Court Cases! Specializing in Re-
uniting Separated Lovers. Can also bring
back loved ones. Results in three days!!I

Located in North Miami




FAST CASH SERVICES

701 NE 125st 305-981-1669
6209 NW 18th Ave 305-695-1561


*BiH Payment
*Fla Lottery


*Notary Services
*Fax / Copies


*Western Union *Money Orders / Stamps


IN JAIL NEE



*Immigration *State Federal Bonds
*Transfer *NRA (Instructor)
*Conceal Weapon *And Notary Public
Call: William T. Harris
305-796-00i0l
Private Karate Lesson 1-154 n w 1 7a3e Sule 202
Email LCa rr.uri-,..a.:.i.:.:.rr, .am ,. Fl 33125


SISTER LISA

I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
Wa Ie ALL. OTHEt Ri RADER FAIL
I gi never m Efalig n de upon all rute of life, such
Sl owe ursotnp, uryiage c Divor business transac-
tilons or all td6 I never fal to reunite the separated,
caue speedy and rappy manrrtages, overcome enemies.
Mvals, laers' quarrels, evil I its, srMrlng bocks and
bad luck of all kind. There 15 no heart 5a sad so drerythat
I cannot br INsunshne lIWD IL In 1a, no matter what
r=h eo ur qp, for or nmbllan, I guarantee to tl It
before euy oier a word to no-
761 NW mA vLMum
3o5-57-87o5





* Accidents Arrests
* DUI & Tickets Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense Wills/Probate
* Personal Injury Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide


ADVETIS TOO ~k *il]'


D 01 THE MIAMI TIMES MAY 27-JUNE 2, 200


NOTICE
Allapattah Community Housing is pleased to announce the re-opening of the
waiting list. The facility is currently fully occupied with a waiting list for
residency.
Allapattah Community Housing
1380 NW 24th Ave, Miami, FL 33125
305-633-1161
The facility is a federally subsidized rental apartment building for the low-in-
come elderly (age 62 or older). Applications may be requested and returned at
the above facility during office hours (M-F 9:00-4:00) beginning 7/22/2009. We
reserve the right to close the waiting list at any time. In compliance with ADA,
the TDD phone number for persons with hearing disabilities is 305-633-9951.
Thank you for your interest. -















New jobless claims fall, benefit rolls to 7M


The number of
newly laid-off work-
ers requesting unem-
ployment insurance
dropped slightly last
week after spiking due
to auto layoffs, while
continuing jobless
claims moved closer to
seven million.
Jobs opportunities
are likely to remain
rare through next year
and maybe beyond that
even though the overall
economy seems to be
picking up. Fresh evi-
dence of improvement
came Thursday from'a
private research group.
It said its index of lead-
ing indicators rose in
April for the first time
in seven months.
The Labor Depart-
ment said on Thursday
that preliminary claims


for jobless benefits fell
to a seasonally ad-
justed 631,000, down
from a revised figure
of 643,000' the previ-
ous week. That nearly
matched analysts' pre-
dictions of 630,000
new claims.
Many economists
said that while layoffs
probably are still weak-
ening, they may not be
doing so as fast as had
been hoped. New job-
less claims, plunge to a
14-week low of 605,000
earlier this month, are
seen as a measure of
the pace of layoffs.
Factory shutdowns
by Chrysler LLC and
General Motors Corp.
likely will continue to
raise claim figures un-
til this summer, econo-
mists said. The shut-


downs also could affect
auto suppliers, which
employ roughly three
million workers.
"We expect that the
auto shutdowns will
be lifting claims for the


next couple of months,"
said Dean Maki, an
economist at Barclays
Capital.
Claims leaped two
weeks ago as Chrysler
close its factories after


filing for bankruptcy
protection April 30,
putting up to 27,000
hourly employees
out of work. In addi-
tion, GM is temporar-
ily closing 13 factories


on a rolling basis over
the next two months,
a -move economists
estimate could affect
25,000 workers.
Joseph Lavorgna,
chief U.S. economist at


Deutsche Bank, thinks
the closings could tem-
porarily push claims
to as high as 700,000,
though few other econ-
omists are as bearish.
Tim Stannard, a


United Auto Workers
vice president at a GM
plant in Spring Hill,
Tenn., said the com-
pany will close the
factory for five weeks
beginning June 1.


MIAM 3-DAD


Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs

For computer access visit any Miami-Dade County Library or
South Florida Workforce Career Center.
For locations call 311.

EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
etliverixg ExcdceIuce EYvery Ay


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID

PROJECT NAME: Miami International Airport Fuel Storage Facility
Secondary Containment and Roof Modifications
for Dike Area No. 4 Jet Fuel Storage Tanks


PROJECT NO.: 0155A ("Project")


Sealed Bids for the Project designed above will be received for and in behalf of the Owner, Allied Aviation
Fueling of Miami, Inc. by the Architect/Engineer, H. J. Ross Associates, at the Office of the Clerk of the
Board in the Stephen P., Clark Center, 171h Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida, 33128, until 1:00 P.M. on July
15, 2009, or as modified by addendum at which time all Bids will be opened and read aloud. The Owner
reserves the right to postpone or cancel the bid opening at any time prior to the scheduled opening of bids.
Bidders are invited to be present. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be considered, and
will be returned unopened. Bids are to be submitted in two envelopes. Envelopes A of Bids, containing only
the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) will be publicly opened and the names of the Bidders read aloud. Upon
notification by the Department of Small Business Development, bidders may correct defects on the Schedule-
of Intent Affidavit(s) within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submission. Envelopes B of Bids, containing all
of the remaining bidding documents, from Bidders that have not been rejected as not responsive will be
opened publicly and read aloud forty-eight (48) hours after the bid submission date and non-responsive bids
will not be opened. Bidders are invited to be present at each opening. Bids received after the time and date
specified will not be considered, and will be returned unopened.

.IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES: The Work of this Contract consists of providing secondary
containment under jet fuel storage Tanks No. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, replacing the roofs on Tanks No. 15,
17, and 18, and performing all other work specified in the Bid Documents at the Miami International Airport
(MIA) Fuel Storage Facility. In order to provide secondary containment, the tanks will be lifted from their
concrete ringwall foundation and high density polyethylene liners, leak detection and cathodic protection will
be provided under the tanks. The tanks will be repositioned on their foundation after completion of the work.
Structural and piping modifications will also be made to the tanks, internal floating roof seals will be replaced
and the tanks will be partially re-coated. The work also includes demolition of three existing metal tank roofs
and miscellaneous existing utilities.

BID DOCUMENTS: The Owner will make the Bid Documents available, on June 4. 2009 for inspection
by individuals by appointment only, on business days during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at Allied
Aviation Fueling of Miami, Inc., 4450 NW 201 Street, Suite 201. Miami; Florida 33122. Interested parties are
to schedule an appointment to review the Bid Documents through Thomas E. Doherty, General Manager,
telephone number 305-871-7001. The duration of each appointment will no exceed two (2) hours. However,
the Owner may schedule additional time slots (not to run consecutively with the original appointment), if
available. At the time of the appointment, and prior to any Bid Document review, interested parties will be
required to present current, government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License, United States
Passport), documentation that they are licensed architect, engineer, or contractor who may perform work
on, or related to, the Project, and sign and notarize a Confidentiality Affidavit certifying that the company
and each authorized employee agrees, that in accordance with Florida Statutes 119.071(3)(b) and one
or more of the following Florida Statutes, 281.301 and 331.22, to maintain the information contained in
the Bid Documents as being exempt from the provisions of Florida Statute 119.07(1) and 24(a), Article I
of the State Constitution. In addition, interested parties are advised that individuals will be monitored while,
reviewing these documents. Interested, parties may take notes, however, no photographs and/or copying of
the documents will be allowed.

The Bid Documents can be purchased at Allied Aviation Fueling of Miami. Inc., 4450 NW 201h Street. Suite
201. Miami. Florida 33122, as follows:

1. Non-Refundable Payment of $200 for each set of Bid Documents
2. Refundable Deposit of $1,000 for each set of Bid Documents
The non-refundable payment shall be by any type of check, or money order, only, and made payable to the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department. The refundable deposit must be by Cashier's or Certified check only,
and made payable to Allied Aviation. Each interested Bidder shall furnish an address, telephone and fax
numbers, and email address for the purpose of contact during the bidding process. A business card with all
of this information will suffice.

Bid Documents may be purchased in person or by mail. To purchase a set of the Bid Documents in person,
each purchaser must present a current:

A. copy of government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License)
B. copy of the architect, engineer, or contractor qualifier's license issued by the Florida Department of
Business and Professional Regulation for the Bidder making the purchase
C. an original, notarized Confidentiality Affidavit signed by the licensed architect, engineer, or
contractor.

Confidentiality Affidavits may be obtained in advance by downloading from www.miami-airpbrt.com/html/
bids.html. Bid Documents may also be purchased by mail by sending a copy of the requisite identification,
license, original notarized Confidentiality Affidavit, contact information, and checks along with a FedEx or
'UPS billing account number to the place of purchase indicated above.

All Bid Documents, including any copies made, shall be returned to the same location where they were
purchased. All Bidders that timely return the Bid Document will have their deposit returned. Those Bidders
that purchase Bid Documents, but elect not to participate in the bidding process are also required to return
all copies of the Bid Documents to the location of purchase. Failure to return the Bid Documents and copies
made to the location of purchase within five (5) working days after the Bid Due Date may be reported to a
Law Enforcement Investigating Authority and will forfeit the deposit. Furthermore, Bidders that fail to return
Bid Documents shall not be allowed to participate in future Confidential solicitations until such time that
the firm has taken corrective actions that are satisfactory to Miami Dade County. The purchaser of the Bid
Documents shall be required to certify that they have returned all original Bid Documents plus any copies
and they have not retained any copies.

All bids must be submitted as set forth in the Bid Documents. The Owner reserves the right to reject any
or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, or to re-advertise the Project. The Owner, by choosing
to exercise its right of rejection, does so without the imposition of any liability against the Owner by any and
all bidders.

PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The Owner will hold a Pre-Bid Conference and Site Inspection on June 18, 2009,
from 9:00 AM to 12:00 Noon at Allied Aviation Fueling of Miami, Inc.. 4450 NW 201 Street, Suite 201. Miami.
Florida 33122, for all interested parties. Attendance will be limited to two (2) representatives per firm. No


other Site Inspections will be provided by the Owner.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

Contact Measures for this Project is (are): 16%

COMMUNITY WORKFORCE PROGRAM

The Community Workforce Goal for this Project is: 10%

BID GUARANTY: Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty of not less than five percent (5%)
of the Total Bid in a manner required by the Instructions to Bidders. No Bid may be withdrawn after the
scheduled closing time for the receipt of Bids for a period of one-hundred and eighty (180) days. The Owner
reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, to reject all bids, or to re-
advertise for Bids.



BID IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS AMONG OTHERS:

1) The Miami-Dade County Responsible Wages of Ordinance.

2) The Provisions in reference to the timetables for minority and female employment participation,
expressed as a percentage, for the Contractor's aggregate work force in each trade on all construction work
in the covered area, as follows:



Timetables Goal for minority Goals for female
Participation for each Participation for
From 4/04/81 Trade in Miami-Dade County Each trade
Until further notice 39.5 % 6.9 %

As used in this Notice, and in the Contract resulting from this solicitation, the "covered area" is Miami-Dade
County, Florida. These goals are applicable to all Contractor's construction work (whether or not it is Federal
or Federally assisted) performed in the covered area.

3) The "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construction
Contract Specifications" as set forth in the Contract Department.

The Contractor's compliance with the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4 shall be based
'on its implementation of the Equal Opportunity Clause, specific affirmative action obligations required by the
specifications set forth in 41CFR 60-4.3(a), and its efforts to meet the goals established for the geographical
area where the Contract resulting from this solicitation is to be preformed. The hours of minority and female
employment and training must be substantially uniform throughout the length of the Contract, and in each
trade, and the Contractor shall make a good faith effort to employ minorities and women evenly on each of
its projects. The transfer of a minority or female employee or trainee from Contractor to Contractor or from
project to project for the sole purpose of meeting the Contractor's goals shall be a violation of the Contract,
the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4. Compli-ance with the goals will be measured
against the total work hours performed.

The Contractor shall provide written notification to the Director of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance
Programs within ten (10) working days of award of any construction subcontract in excess of $10,000 at
any tier for construction work under the Contract resulting from this solicitation. The notification shall list
the name, address and telephone number of the Subcontractor; employer identification number of the
Subcontractor; estimated dollar amount of the subcontractor;estimated starting and completion dates of the
subcontractor; ahd the geographical area in which the Contractor is to be performed.

4) Miami-Dade County has enacted an ordinance governing utilization of certified Community Small Business
Enterprises (CSBE) Subcontractors. Requirements for compliance with this ordinance are contained in the
Contract Documents.

5) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1 (t), a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs
or bids after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners or a Notice of Contract Award Recommendation, whichever comes
first. The Cone of Silence prohibits communications regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between potential
vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists, or consultants and the County's professional staff, including
but not limited to the County Manager and the County Manager's staff. A Cone of Silence is also imposed
between the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the County's
professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manger and the County Manger's staff.



The provisions of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) do not apply to oral communications at pre-
bid conferences, oral presentations before selection committees, oral communications with the Contracting
Officer, as published by the Department of Small Business Development in their weekly Cone of Silence
Project Information Report, for administering the procurement process. Contract negotiations during any
duly noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any
duly noticed public meeting or communication's in writing at any time unless specifically prohibited by the
applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders or proposers must file a copy of any written communication
with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County shall
respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person
upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provide by law, violation of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t)
by any bidder or proposer shall render any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person
having personal knowledge or a violation of this Ordinance shall report such violation to the State Attorney
and/or may file a compliant with the Ethic Commission. Bidders or Proposers should reference the actual
Ordinance for further clarification.

6) The Owner shall not be responsible for any modifications or alterations made to the Bid Documents or to
the Contract Documents other than those made by Addendum, Change Order, or Work Order. Any purchase
of partial sets of documents shall be at the purchaser's risk.


12/08 TAC-R 03ADV


MIAMI
Communlitrx,
Redevelopment Agency

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT a SPECIAL CRA Boards of Commissioners
Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West & Omni Community
Redevelopment Agencies will take place on Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 9:00
A.M., or thereafter, at the City of Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive,
Miami, Florida 33133.
All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information, please
contact the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.
(#003249)
James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West & Omni Community
Redevelopment Agencies


BLACKS MUST CONTRoi- THEIR OWN DESTINY I


11D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 27-JUNE 2, 2009











T E C H


NEWS


FROM


MIAMI TIMES


ND THE GLOBE
A ROUND THE GLOBE


)yrigr


al


I 5 1 Syndicated Content

spAvailable from Commercial News


-f f~o


Pants turn to cell
a high-tech ra


40^^^^l^i ^^b^^^mwmMf Am 0*am ommas- w0 0
Hrs^^ "-wol~ dBupB w^^^^
-J^^^^^^ r ^^BBB^^B^I 1.^^^^^l^
^^^^^^^^^ T^ lot^B~.^ o^^^^^^ff% ^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^
a ftwft- 40mo^^^^m


, .1 - -


*mom mo, p4ww-w




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs