Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00830
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: May 13, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00830
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text



S12 Pi
PO BOX '117D7
GANEWEVL IE F1 l. 21-7007


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Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamnur In Illis


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DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 37 MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 13-19, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Florida gets $1.8B

in stimulus funds
A special government waiver has made it pos-
sible for Florida to receive additional stimulus
dollars for education that will possibly stave off
deep cuts in our under funded education sys- Sandra Charity
tem.
scharite @miamitimesonline.com
The waiver was applied for two weeks ago and
qualifies the state to receive $1.8 billion as part The streets of Miami have been
of the largest boost in education funding in re-o
cent history. overwhelmed with gun violence
Florida can now utilize these funds to save that has resulted in the death of
jobs and lay the ground work for education re- young people under the age of
form. 20 and left many wounded and
Although the money is expected to plug holes scarred.
in school-district budgets to save jobs, South In efforts to keep guns off the
Florida's school districts might still see layoffs. streets, City of Miami Police De-
In Miami-Dade, the stimulus money may help apartment performed a two-month
avoid or minimize layoffs, but it won't cure all drug sweep called, "Operation:
of it. Overtown Getters," in which they
"It'll go a long way toward solving the problem, arrested 50 suspected drug deal-
but it won't cure all of it," he said. ers and violent criminals in the
School districts won't be getting the funds heart of Overtown.
Please turn to FUNDS 6A "A vast majority of the homi-


Five found guilty of

the 'Liberty City Six'
The Miami Times Staff Report

A Miami jury convicted five men on Tuesday of
plotting to destroy Chicago's Sears Tower and bomb
FBI offices.
Narseal Batiste, 34, Patrick Abraham, 28, Roth-
schild Augustin, 24, Burson Augustin, 23, Naudi-
mar Herrera, 24, and Stanley Grant Phanor, 32, and
Lyglenson Lemorin, 32 were arrested in June 2006
and charged in a federal indictment with conspiring
with al-Qaeda to wage war against the United States
by committing acts of violence including a plan to
blow up Chicago's Sears Tower and destroy a federal
building in Miami.
The first trial ended in a mistrial in December 2007
when jurors could not come to a unanimous deci-
sion for the then "Liberty City Seven." Lemorin was
acquitted at that trial.
A second trial of the remaining six men also ended
in mistrial last April after the jurors
were again undecided on a verdict.
Batiste, the supposed ringlead-
er, was convicted of all four ter-
rorism-related conspiracy counts
and, could face up to 70 years in
prison., Abraham, Phanor, Au-
gustine- and Augustin were con-
victed on two counts each. Herrera
was found not guilty.






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... .. Syndicated Content t
Available from Commercial News Providers


* 0...- -


Activist Rameau revisits Umoja Village


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

It's been more than two years
since the Umoja Village burned
down in a fire which has yet to
be fully explained, the lot, located
on the corner of 62nd St. and NW
17th Ave, stands empty.
"There's not much there to see,"
said, Max Rameau, who heads
Take Back the Land, the organiza-
tion that erected the shanty town
in October of 2006, "except that


that corner lot
is fenced in. I
know there's
a lot interest
in develop-
ing there, but
it's just sitting
empty."
' Umoja Vil-
lage, named
for the Swa- RAMEAU
hili word for
"unity," came about as a reaction
to the encroachment of developers


into the neighborhood, according
to Rameau.
"Gentrification is absolutely dec-
imating our neighborhoods," he
said. "And we understood that the
land was going to be given for free
to a developer if they would build
something quickly. It was going to
be condos."
Rather than allowing this to hap-
pen, Take Back the Land seized
control of the lot erecting several
tents and then built wood-frame.
shanties in order to provide hous-


ing for otherwise homeless people
in the area. By the end of Decem-
ber, Umoja Village housed approx-
imately 50 people.
Residents ran the Village, vot-
ing to build, distribute donations,
move in new residents and evict
others. Umoja Village enjoyed
broad support in the community,
and, due to the Landmark Potting-
er Settlement, was able to legally
repel the numerous attempts that
were made to shut it down.
Please turn to VILLAGE 4A


Miami-Dade student to meet


President Obama in D.C. B


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Ernest Baker II, in his senior year at
Carol City Senior High, carries a 3.2
GPA.
In addition to dancing with the Miami-
based "Live in Color Dance Collective," he
is already an accomplished choreogra-
pher, stylist, and model. But on Monday,
May 6, Baker was inducted into an even
more exclusive club.
Ernest, 17, is among the four Florida
students and 141 students nationwide
- being honored this year as Presiden-
tial Scholars.
The Miami-Dade teenagers will accept
their medallions on June 20, at a cere-


mony in Washington, D.C. The trip will
last for four days, and will bring them
to the White House for a meeting with
Obama.
Baker was nominated by the National
Foundation for Advancement in the Arts.
"I found this out last Monday," said
Baker. "It was unbelievable, I was on
cloud nine. I'm so proud to be performing
at the Kennedy Center for the Performing
Arts. It's such a prestigious theatre. I've
had different performances elsewhere,
but this is something I'm definitely proud
of.
Baker's pride is entirely warranted. For
a high school senior, there are few greater
honors than the presidential scholarship.
Please turn to STUDENT 4A


Ernest Baker II, a Carol City student among four of
Florida students chosen to meet President Obama.


Black schools woes discussed in town hall meeting


Turnout very low among parents


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Sharon Williams, a single
mother of four, is a member
of Miami Jackson Senior High
School's class of 1980. She is
a current member of the Unit-
ed Teachers of Dade executive
board. Three of her children


are in, or have completed col-
lege. The youngest will gradu-
ate this year, eighth in his
class.
At the town hall meeting,
held Friday, May 8 in the au-
ditorium of Jackson High, Wil-
liams revealed her secret: All of
her children attended private
school.


".. Our parents drop out at the

fourth grade, so our children

now struggle..."
-WilburT. Holloway

"This [Jackson] would be said Williams. "The sad thing
their home school if I didn't is that I work for Dade County,
send them [to a private school]," and have to send my children


to private school to get a good
education."
The meeting, moderated
by CBS 4' Jim Defede, drew
roughly 45 people, most of
whom were teachers or em-
ployees of Miami Dade County
Public Schools.
The low number of parents
attending the meeting was in-
dicative of a greater lack of
parental involvement in the
public schools, according


to Williams.
"Look around," she said.
"This room should be stand-
ing room only, and not just
with parents, but with the kids
too."
One notable exception was
Ms. Caprice Brown, who at-
tended the meeting to voice
concerns for her three chil-
dren. Two of her children at-
tend public schools (Miami
Please turn to FIGHT 4A


One Family Serving Since 1923


8 90158 00100 o


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WEDNESDAY


870 760
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THURSDAY
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SCMFDED IVON












OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Whi~ ear if-s .r~ub%


Qe %Uismi imea
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street.
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person. regardless or race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person, learning no person. the
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all persons are hun as long as anyone is held back

Ap ,I The Media Audit -


%I%3?1II% II 1411ti I C k (I)l t It-, Q%


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SbSyorndicatedciontent.s


Available from Commercial News Providers


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WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


Ut"Oe fliami mi.
The Afrtmi Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for a
healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point, and may be edited for grammar, style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the name,
address and telephone number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miumi, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email. miamiteditorial.
bellsouth.net.


"m"

















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 19-19, 2009


Another unfair attack

on a Black person in

the spotlight

The School Board of Miami- his commu-
Dade County is on the verge of nity. Instead
making history as it selects one of applaud-
of two Black finalists for the ing the fact ""* """"
open School Board Attorney that the screening committee
seat. The screening committee picked four highly qualified
had 52 applicants, which they candidates, the press launch-
narrowed down to seven. They es an insidious attack on two
interviewed the seven and have minorities the highly ranked
selected four finalists: Walter Black candidate, and a mi-
Harvey, Simone Marstiller, Mi- nority school board member,
chael Hunt, and Robert Tisch- Renier Diaz de La Portilla. I
enkel. sometimes think that the press
The process was handled qui- purposefully tries to drum up
etly and with very little political conflict in this town in order to
overtones until it was revealed keep Cubans and Blacks from
that the number one ranked working together.
candidate by the screening So why have an article slam-
committee was a quiet; Black ming a highly qualified minor-
attorney by the name of Wal- ity candidate? Is it because the
ter Harvey. Then like an un- candidate is Black and just
seen missile, the press strikes one interview away from the

he attacks on Black public figures seems to go on and on, year
after year. The press taints by innuendo any Black person who
rises to prominence. I know that it has made many potentially
good political leaders decide not to run for office, and caused some office
holders to wonder if they should continue their public service.


- claiming that School Board
member Renier Diaz De La Por-
tilla somehow did something
unethical, because the screen-
ing committee of which he was
not a sitting member picked
Harvey. There was a claim of
a conflict of interest, which is
ludicrous because Mr. Diaz de
La Portilla has not even voted
yet!! The reporter also mis-
takenly stated that Mr.. Har-
vey and Mr. Diaz de La Portilla
sit on the board of the Public
Health Trust together, which
is untrue. Mr. Diaz de La Por-
tilla is not on the board. The
problem with the missile at-
tack was the reporter had his
facts wrong, and tried to create
a scandal where none existed.
To me, it proves that no matter
how honest, trustworthy, intel-
ligent and just plain good you
are in this town the press will
throw-mud at you if you are a
minority in a position of pow-
er.
Walter Harvey is a partner at
GrayRobinson, who would be,
taking a pay cut if he is selected
as the School Board Attorney.
He is a graduate of Harvard
University, General Counsel
to the Children's Trust and a
member of the Public HFealth
Trust. He is bright, hardwork-
ing, honest, and gives back to


School Board Attorney's posi-
tion? In my jaded mind, in this
town, that is the only reason
to write a spurious article on
Walter Harvey. I know Walter
well, and he does not deserve
this mistreatment. The shame
is that the none scandal, be-
cause it appears in the press
may negatively impact his can-
didacy. It would be the School
Board's loss, because he would
make an excellent School
Board attorney. He is the only
candidate with educational law
experience, he has dealt with
cantankerous multi-cultural
boards, he understands the
politics of Miami-Dade County,
he is brilliant, and most impor-
tantly of all he will give sound
legal advice not tainted with fa-
voritism or politics.
The attacks on Black public
figures seems to go on and on,
year after year. The press taints
by innuendo any Black person
who rises to prominence. I know
that it has made many potential-
ly good political leaders decide
not to run for office, and caused
some office holders to wonder. if
they should continue their public
service. It is difficult for a pub-
lic figure to fight back, because
the press has all the power. This
community needs to fight back
on behalf of our leadership:


I Au 111 A 1 rti urult E






Copyrighted Material

o Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers

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With a second juror now removed from the Liberty City Six case,

are the six men accused getting a fair trial?


MARLO JACKSON, 32
Graphic Designer, Liberty City

It is what it is. Whether they're
getting a fair
trial or not,
they need to
look at the de-
cisions they've
made to get
to this point.
They messed
up, and now \
they're paying the consequenc-
es. If they stay strong and hold
on to their faith, it's going to
work out for the best.

JOHNNY COOPER, 47
Master's Student, Liberty City

I think -- '
they're getting ,
a fair trial.,
There have r
been setbacks,
but they're
trying to give
them a legal


trial by jury. All the basics are
there. It's legal and fair. It's not
like they're initiating the patriot
act and sending them to prison
without a trial.

JAKE BRANCH, 50
Construction Worker, Overtown

No, I don't ,
think they're
getting a fair
trial. I think
they keep try- ..
ing them be- p
cause they,
don't have
concrete evi-
dence. They're
just trying to take the focus off
of the big picture, they couldn't
catch Bin Laden, so they got
somebody. It's sad what they're
doing.

ALPHONSO FLOYD, 47
Unemployed, Miami

No, they aren't getting a fair


trial. How can
they be terror-
ists? I think'
this is led by
racism. It's
like; they're
going to keep -
taking jurors
out that dis- -
agree until
they get a 'guilty' verdict.


VANIA RAY, 19
Student Liberty City

"Yes, I --.
think they're
getting a fair
trial. Replac-
ing a juror
that won't
deliberate w,
is the right
thing to do,
they need
to consid-
er the evidence and not ha
their minds already made up
haven't been following the tri


- but it does seem like they are
getting a fair one. There've just
been some technicalities."

- KATERIA SIMMONS, 26
Student/Waitress, Liberty City

No, but the
courts are
making cor-
rections that 'f .
have to be
made. Every-
body should
have a fair

think they're
terrorists, but they were prob-
ably running their mouths or
said something out of anger.
Nowadays you can't just say
stuff like that.


I
ive
a. I
al,


.G AO

wt-vac~) h-rS


04 %:


Black spending ways

face Judgment Day


We knew this day was com-
ing the reckoning, the day
when Black folks would have
to settle their accounts. Like
sermons in the Black church
that foretold of Judgment
Day, we were urged to spend
less, save more and stop bor-
rowing so much. But many of
us like the rest of America,
really didn't listen.
Now, we're faced with this:
In the "State of the Dream
2009: The Silent Depression"
report, the non-profit group
United for a Fair Economy
cited the growing .wealth gap
between Blacks and whites.
Nearly 30% of Blacks have
zero or negative worth vs.
15% of whites.
Only 18% of people of col-
or have retirement accounts
compared with 43.4% of their
white counterparts.
And the numbers get
worse.
According to a 2009 Con-
sumer Financial Literacy
Survey by the National Foun-'
dation for Credit Counsel-
ing, 26% of Americans admit
to not paying all their bills
on time. Among Blacks, it's
51%.
Eighty-four percent of
black households carry credit
card debt, compared with 54%
of white households, accord-
ing to Demos, a public policy
research organization. More
than 90% of black families
earning $10,000 to $24,999 a
year had credit card debt.
In March, the rate of un-


employment for ': j
blacks stood at
13.3%, compared with 11.4%
for Hispanics and 7.9% for
whites.
But the problems African
Americans face cannot just be
told in economic statistics; it
is also about social behavior
and financial ignorance and
irresponsibility. James Bald-
win's essay "The Price of the
Ticket" describes a concept
in the black church known as
"revisiting one's first works"
- which means re-examining
the choices you've made, the
counsel you've kept, the road
you've traveled. There's no
question that this economic
crisis was fed by greed on
Wall Street and among home
lenders, but it is also true
that many of us bought frivo-
lous things that we couldn't
afford.
Many Americans are bank-
ing on the Negro spiritual
that says, "Trouble don't last
always." Yes, the nation will
recover from this slump. And
legislators are trying to help
by challenging credit card
company practices, going af-
ter predatory lenders, and
trying to prevent home fore-
closures. But what about per-
sonal responsibility? Church-
es and non-profits continue to
preach fiscal responsibility.
Hopefully, we're listening this
time. If not, God help us.
Yolanda Young is the found-
er of www.onbeingablacklaw-
yer.com.


. I


^















Spence-Jones delivers 'State of the District Address'


Little Haiti small businesses remodeled


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimnesonline.comn

Four years ago, Michelle
Spence-Jones made history by
becoming the first Black wom-
an to be elected to the City of
Miami Commission in forty
years. Representing Model City,
Overtown, Spring Garden, Lit-
tle Haiti/ Historic Lemon City,
Wynwood, Buena Vista East
and West, Buena Vista Heights
and Oakland Grove, Spence-
Jones has made a mark in the
district.
Last month's Marlins vote,
Spence-Jones became extreme-
ly vocal about the revitalization
of Overtown that needed to take
place before she could agree
upon the building of the Mar-
lins stadium. Through much
negotiations, $500 million was
secured for the redevelopment
of Overtown.
A victory for Spence-Jones
but still more- work needed to
be done.
As she approaches the end
of her term, Spence-Jones an-
nounced that she would seek


reelection.
"It has been an honor and
pleasure to have served you this
past four years. I look forward
to continuing to make District 5
the best place to live, work, play
and learn," said Spence-Jones
at the State of the District Ad-
dress at the Little Haiti Cultural
Complex on Thursday, April
30.
Surrounded by, her fam-
ily and constituents, Spence-
Jones looked back at her first
four years in office.
"District 5 is transforming,"
she said.
Spence-Jones evidence of
transformation included pro-
viding small business own-
ers with grants, transforming
vacant lots into residential
homes, the emergence of art
galleries in Wynwood and the
Miami Design District, the
broadening of culture from the
opening of restaurants to the
development of the Cultural
Complex and Manno Sanon
Soccer Stadium at the Little
Haiti Park.
However, crime, housing,


jobs, seniors and youth servic-
es are all problems that con-
tinue to affect the residents in
District 5.
"My responsibility as your
elected servant is to find solu-
tions to issues that are plagu-
ing our community," she said.
Spence-Jones then shared,
her visions and dreams for
District 5 in which residents,
in a community that has for
too long been forgotten, would
benefit but she reminded the
residents that the responsibil-
ity did not only fall on the local.
government.
"We need to change the way
we think, the way we act, and
only then can we transform our
neighborhoods," said Spen-
ce-Jones. "Transforming our
neighborhoods into communi-
ties that provide real jobs, af-
fordable housing, improved
infrastructure improvements,
safe streets, activities culture
in our parks and support for
our small businesses has al-
ways been my mission our
mission destination."
Spence-Jones followed with


a press conference on Friday to
kick off Haitian Heritage Month
by celebrating the completion of
the Little Haiti Commercial Fa-
cade Project. A project, that in-
cluded the exterior remodeling
of three buildings that housed
five businesses, was funded by
Community Block Grant funds
that amounted to $275,315.
Located along Northeast Sec-
ond Avenue between 59th Ter-
race and 59th Street, the build-


ings were painted with tropical
colors that resembled the is-
land of Haiti.
"We didn't want to just paint
buildings because there is
enough paintings going on but
we wanted to make sure that
we saw constructional changes.
We wanted to make sure that
if a hurricane came through
then the windows would not be
broken. We implemented sig-
nage on the wall that would at-


tract tourists in the area," said
Spence-Jones.
Local business owner Jan
Mapou congratulated Spence-
Jones on her efforts.
"Transformation transferred
into changing the look of our
businesses, neighborhoods and
our lives into the most beautiful
connection," he said. "We must
continue to work together for a
better tomorrow, our children
and the next generation."
Spence-Jones also an-
nounced that the City of Miami
would donate solid waste truck
to his sister city, Port-au-Prince
Haiti. Spence-Jones said that a
trip to Haiti would be in the up-
coming future.
She announced that the city
would host a series of events in
the Little Haiti and Lemon City
area to commemorate Haitian
Heritage Month.
The city continues to aid
Haiti, after four back-to-back
hurricanes damaged the island
last year.
Mayor Manny Diaz and
Spence-Jones will host "Have
a Heart for Haiti," fundraising
to benefit "Operation Hope for
Haiti" at the Hilton Bentley Ho-
tel in Miami Beach on'May 14.


The fear of a "revolving door" in Overtown


OPERATION
continued from 1A

During the raid, police con-
fiscated two AK-47, a 9-mm
Glock and a military style pro-
tective vest.
"An AK-47 is not designed for
the streets," said Nathaniel Wil-
cox, executive director of Peo-
ple United to Lead the Struggle
for Equality (P.U.L.S.E).
Miami Commissioner Mi-
chelle Spence-Jones of District
5 agreed with Wilcox.
"Too many of our children are
dying because of these guns,"
she said.
An AK-47 was used in the
Liberty City massive shooting
that led to the death of Bran-
don Mills and Derrick Gloster
in January but seven others
injured. Since then, AK-47's
have been linked to several
shootings throughout the city
and the county.
Timoney said that getting the
guns off the streets was essen-
tial is helping Miami's slum-
blighted area and also shutting
down potential drug dealers.
"These are the people who
control the blocks, that deal on
the corners, which create an


environment where turf battles
ensue, as a result shootings
result from that," he said. Ti-
money said Thursday that the
Overtown crime was down five
percent.
He commended the Hot Spot
Campaign that aided the op-
eration with tips. Spearheaded
by Spence-Jones and Wilcox,
.the campaign allows individu-
als to report illegal activities
with the "HotSpot" card and
remain anonymous.
Since then, it has been ad-
opted by County Commission-
er Audrey Edmonson. Miami
Gardens and Opa-locka are in
the process of also launching
the program said Wilcox. ,
"People are not. willing to
come out physically but they
wish` to remain anonymous.
When we give the card to the
police, we hold them respon-
sible."
So far, Wilcox says that
he has received thousands
of cards from the Overtown,
Liberty City and Brownsville
neighborhood since the pro-
gram began.
Overtown resident Kelsey
Moore, a mother of two, wor-
ries that although the 50 indi-


viduals were arrested they will
soon be back in the streets.
"It's a revolving door. Every-
one here is scared and you
can't even let your kids go out-
side to play because you don't
know what will happen," she
said.
Wilcox says that the laws
definitely should be tougher for
habitual criminals who con-
tinue to invade the residential
neighborhoods.
"We know the need but it is
going to take our Legislature to
make sure that these guys are
not in this revolving door," he
said. s
Wilcox said that he is meet-
ing with the U.S. attorney for
the Southern District of Flori-
da, Alexander Acosta, 'so that
the individuals with the drugs
and high-powered weapons will
be charged federally increasing
their time in jail.
While Spence-Jones was
proud of the success of the op-
eration, she reiterated that the
community support is gravely
needed to keep the streets
clean.
Since Thursday, one-third of
the arrested individuals were
released from jail.


After graduation, Baker plans to Eugene Lang College


STUDENT
continued from 1A

The process involved penning a
number of essays, in which they
describe their experiences and as-
pirations.
Students must be invited to ap-
ply. They can qualify by having
an exceptional score on the SAT
or ACT, or through a nomination
by the National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts. Baker
is among the 20 students recog-
nized as Presidential Scholars in
the Arts. '
"It was a couple of vigorous es-
says, they were very long. One of


the essays was about the teacher
I invited to D.C., Zedric Bembry
II, because I had to mention who
inspired me," said Baker. Bembry
will accompany Baker to Wash-
ington this June.
"Another essay was about com-
munity service," he continued. "I
teach inner-city students at Mi-
ami Carol City High for annual
performances. I instruct them in
dance."
The top students are selected
by the Commission on Presiden-
tial Scholars based on academics,
community service, leadership
and commitment to high ideals.
Baker, who was turned on to


dance by an older cousin at age 9,
now practices four times a week.
In addition to dancing, Baker has
two black belts, one in jujitsu and
the other in goju-ryu.
He plans on attending Eugene
Lang College at the New School for
Liberal Arts.
When asked what he's going to
say to Obama when the two meet,
Baker said; "I'll say 'take one of
my classes'. I'm sure he can get
down."
A second local student, Priscilla
Aleman, of Design and Architec-
ture Senior High School was rec-
ognized as a Presidential scholar
as well.


Weakening economy leaves Umoja Village just an empty lot


VILLAGE
continued from 1A

In 1996, after years of arrest-
ing homeless people, the City of
Miami was sued by the Miami
ACLU. The eventual settlement
stipulated that homeless people
could not be arrested if; the in-
dividual is situated on public
land, there were no beds avail-
able at homeless shelters in
the city; and the individual is
engaged in "life sustaining con-
duct," such as eating, sleeping,
bathing, "responding to calls
of nature," congregating and
building "temporary structures"
to protect oneself from the ele-
ments.
Under the protection of this
ruling, Umoja Village was able
to flourish, as of April 26 of
2007.
Rameau recalls that night.
"It was a little bit after mid-


night when I got the call, and
it startled me awake, I used to
spend nights there, but it had
been several months since I
had. Jugg, one of the residents
who was really operating, as
a property .manager said the
shantytown was on fire."
"When I got close to the prop-
erty, it was all cordoned off by
the police," he continued. "I was
immediately concerned about
the people, but every single per-
son was accounted for except for
the person in whose room the
fire started."
Within 12 hours, the city bull-
dozed the property, and erected
a fence around it. Anyone who'd
left belongings behind lost them
according to Rameau. Eleven
people, including Rameau, were
arrested.
.Today, Rameau does not be-
lieve that the current financial
crisis will weaken the power of


developers in the area.
"Most people think the real ob-
jective of government is to defend
the interest of wealthy people
and corporations, and the pur-
pose of housing is to operate as
profit centers for these develop-
ers not to house human beings
and help the people who need
it. No one ever got rich building
low-income housing, and that's
not going to change just because
of this crisis," he said.
Rameau believes the deci-
sion about what to build on the
property should be made locally.
"Personally, I think it should be
very low-income housing on that
property, but the people who live
in this neighborhood should have
a chance to get together and de-
cide what they want to happen
there. It should be a community-
driven process. I'd like to see the
will of the community win out,"
he said.


Thousands of Miami-Dade fail the 2009 FCAT


FIGHT
continued from 1A

Northwestern Senior High
School and Miami Edison
Middle School.) The third at-


FCAT.
Many of the teachers in
attendance at the meeting
shared Brown's concerns
about the FCAT and other re-
strictions on methods hand-


that 75 percent of the teach-
ing staff in low-performing
schools have five or more
years of classroom experi-
ence in their subject area.
She also suggested that


tends a private school., ed down from Tallahassee. teachers be given greater au-
"[ took him out [of pub- "The people doing the man- tonomy where curriculum is
lic school] because he failed dating seldom know much of concerned.
the third grade," she said. the students they're mandat- Miami Northwestern Se-
Brown's son was so nervous ing for," said Dr. Lisa Delpit, nior High alumni and Dade
about taking the test again a panelist at the meeting School Board member, Mr.
that it interfered with his and Knight Eminent Schol- Wilbur T. Holloway also at-
studies, said Brown. "I re- ar. 'We need to connect with tended the meeting.
fuse to let the FCAT keep my their culture. The reality is 'The school board is not
son from going to college," that non-readers would read your enemy," he told the as-
she said. Malcolm X, because it was sembled teachers and par-
The meeting came a day something that connected to ents.
after the Florida Department them," she said. 'One kind Holloway shared many of
of Education announced that of instruction does not fit all the concerns the teachers
nearly six-thousand South.' students." '-d **-t+. .. .. id,. most notably his-cha-
Florida high school seniors. C'eresta Smith. a national grin wAh the lack of parental
could possibly not grad m. bpard certified teacher said involvement-, "Our parents
ate this year after failing to that inexperienced school drop out at the fourth grade,"
pass the state mandated administrators and teach- he said, "so our children now
test, Florida Comprehensive ers often end up in the Black struggle."
Assessment Test. In Miami- community, and suggested Holloway also suggested
Dade County, nearly 4,000 that reforms could begin that high schools begin to
high school seniors failed with giving principals a five- offer vocational training for
either the reading or math year commitment in fail- students who will not attend
sections of the tenth grade ing schools, and mandating college.




MIAMI-ADE



REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS

THE HOMELESS PREVENTION AND RAPID

RE-HOUSING PROGRAM
Miami-Dade County has applied to U.S. HUD for $7,468,222 under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act of 2009 for communities to provide financial assistance and services to either prevent individuals and families from
becoming homeless or help those who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly re-housed and stabilized. Funds
can provide short and medium term rental assistance not to exceed 18 months and housing relocation and stabilization
services, as well as data collection and administrative costs. In anticipation of this funding award, Miami-Dade County,
through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust, is requesting Applications for a designated lead entity ("Lead Applicant")
which must be an active 501(c) (3) not-for-profit corporation. The Lead Applicant will provide a full array of services via
a county-wide network of providers to enhance collaboration, reduce duplication, streamline grant management and build
upon current programming. The Lead Agency will be selected partly based on its management capacity and its ability to
demonstrate how it will work with a county-wide network of community service providers. The Request for Applications
(RFA) Process will require the Lead Applicant to demonstrate this management capacity and to name the members of the
network and describe how each community service provider will work to provide the County with the best and most efficient
use of the grant funds Funding under this RFA Is contingent upon the award of funds to the County under the County's
application to U.S.HUD. All parties interested in applying may pick up a copy of the-application package beginning May
19, 2009 at:
Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust
111 N.W. 1st Street, 27th Floor, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1490
Contact Person: David Raymond
Two Pre-Application Workshops will be held as listed below:
May 20, 2009 2PM Homeless Assistance Center
1550 North Miami Avenue Worship Center

May 27, 2009 2PM, Kendale Lakes Library
15205 SW 88 Street (Kendall Drive)
Attendance at one of the Pre-Application Workshops is strongly recommended. In order to maintain a fair and impartial
competitive process, the County can only answer questions at the Pre-Application Workshops and must avoid private
communications with prospective applicants during the application preparation and evaluation process.
The deadline for submission of applications is June 26, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
Miami-Dade County is not liable for any cost incurred by the applicant in responding to the Request for Applications, and we
reserve the right to modify or amend the application deadline schedule if it is deemed necessary or in the interest of Miami-
Dade County. Miami-Dade County also reserves the right to accept or reject any and all applications, to waive technicalities
or irregularities, and to accept applications that are in the best interest of Miami-Dade County. Miami-Dade County provides
equal access and equal opportunity in employment and services and does not discriminate on the basis of handicap. THIS
RFA IS SUBJECT TO THE CONE OF SILENCE, COUNTY ORDINANCE 98-106
PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU ARE SEEKING AFFORDABLE HOUSING, PLEASE GO TO THE MIAMI DADE COUNTY
HOMELESS TRUST WEBSITE: www.miamidade.gov/homeless


I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19,2009 1











...KSMUT.ONTOLTHIROW DS IN5ATEMMIIESMY1-9,20


Shadowlawn Elementary competes for $2,500 prize


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Amidst school budget woes,
Shadowlawn Elementary
school, located at 149 North-
west 49th Street, has rediscov-
ered an effective method of
raising funds and improving
the school; by partnering with
local businesses, in this case,
the Doubletree Grand Hotel.
Last year, the hotel planted a
row of trees outside the school
that still stands.
"They've adopted us," said
Shadowlawn principal Cath-
leen McGinnis.
The unlikely relationship
between the hotel and the el-
ementary school was on full
display at Shadowlawn's audi-
torium on Friday, May 1, where
the two gathered to celebrate
their joint recycling initiative.
Shadowlawn's roughly 350 stu-
dents and 50 volunteers from
Doubletree Hotel gathered for
a 'morning, of songs, presenta-
tions, and skits.
"This is part of Doubletree
Hotel's 'teaching kids to care'
program," said Robert Macle, a
Doubletree spokesman.
"This year's theme is recy-
cling," he added.
The day's message was not
lost on Deja Webster, 11-year-
old fifth grader.
"The most important part to
remember is that you can recy-


cle food. It's good for the earth
and it helps fight global warm-
ing. I will recycle for the rest of
my.life," she said.
Serena Dean, 11, another
fifth grader agreed.
"We should continue recy-
cling and help the future. If we
don't the earth's going be bad,
so we should keep reducing,
reusing, and recycling," she
said.
Wylisha Bataille, a 12-year-
old fifth grader, further out-
lined the consequences of fail-
ing to recycle.
"If I don't recycle," she said,
"the world's going to turn into
a big garbage can."
Maria Rodriguez, last year's
Shadowlawn Elementary
School Teacher of the Year, re-
started the school's recycling
program about a year ago.
"A lot of the students, and
even some of the teachers,
didn't know what can go into
the bins," she said.
Now the school has the oppo-
site problem. "Now the bins are
too heavy for the children to
lift," she said. "Maybe if we win,
we can buy some smaller recy-
cling bins," Rodriguez joked.
Rodriguez's jest referred to
the $2,500 prize that Double-
tree Hotels across the United
States offer to the five schools
that collect the most cans and
bottles. The 'funds can then
be used toward items of the


Maria Rodriguez's Drama class, which includes students from the third fourth, and fifth grades, entertained Shadowlawn
Elementary School with a skit about the importance of recycling.Top row (left to right): Elicia Estine 10, Angie Mahotiere 10,
Neldwine Jeannot 11, Sofony Senelus 11, Wylisha Bataille 12, Serena Dean 11; Bottom row (left to right): Deja Webster 11,
Cachet Peterson 10, Claude Joseph 11,Wanuke Theoc 9, Jerry Pierce 10 and Leann Gunthier 11.


school's choice, such as' sci-
ence books, art supplies, or.
recreational equipment. In ad-
dition, each school keeps the
money raised from its own re-
cyclable materials.


Were Shadowlawn to win,
McGinnis would buy comput-'
ers.
"I'd put it into technology,"
she said. "It's on the forefront.
It would give the kids an oppor-


tunity to utilize some of that
technology, with the aim of ad-
vancing student achievement."
"Teachers have the desire,"
said McGinnis, "but they don't
always have the means." Shad-


owlawn Elementary School will
compete against more than 150
Schools nationwide. The con-
test ended May 4. The Double-
tree Hotel expects to announce
the winners early next week.


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Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey Edmonson; The Honorable Ana E. Ward, Ph.D.,
CITT Member; County Commissioner Javier Soto; District 6 secretary Gus Pego; Miami-Dade
Transit Director Harpal Kapoor; County Chairman Dennis C. Moss; County Commissioners, Bar-
bara Jordan and Katy Sorenson; County Mayor Carlos Alvarez; County Commissioners, Rebecca
Sosa, Bruno Barreiro and Sally Heyman; and Miami-Dade County Manager George Burgess.

County officials move forward in metro-rail airport project


Miami-Dade 'County Mayor
Carlos Alvarez, Chairman
Dennis C. Moss anrd members
of the Board of County Com-
missioners, along with the
Citizens Independent Trans-
portation Trust and Florida
Department of Transporta-
tion broke ground on the 2.4-
mile Metrorail extension from
the Earlington Heights station
to the Miami 'Intermodal Cen-
ter (MIC), which is currently


under construction next to
Miami International Airport.
"The MIC-Earlington Heights
connector will transform Mi-
ami-Dade County, allowing
residents and tourists to travel
between Downtowp Miami and
Miami International Airport
with ease," said Miami-Dade
County Mayor Carlos Alva-
rez. "The project is the first
major expansion of Metrorail
in more than 20 years. I'm


committed to getting the proj-
ect done on time and under
budget."
The project is largely fund-
ed by'the People's Transpor-
tation Tax (PTP), passed by
voters in 2002. The PTP has
also delivered new rail cars,
bus improvements, road con-
struction, neighborhood im-
provements, and ongoing
countywide traffic synchroni-
zation efforts.


S -


our Property Taxes ,P


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Your property is one of your most valuable-assets and the Miami-Dade County Tax Collector's Office wants to help you under-
stand the consequences of not paying your property taxes.
Please realize the failure to pay your property taxes will result in a lien being placed on your property and additional charges
and interest will be applied to your tax bill.
Property taxes became delinquent on April 1st.
If your taxes remain unpaid on June 1st, your taxes will be sold at auction as a tax certificate and a lien will be
assessed on your property.
When a certificate is sold on your property, the buyer of the certificate pays the taxes you owe and eams interest, which
you will have to pay in addition to the taxes you owe.
If your taxes remain unpaid for a period of two years after a certificate has been issued on your property, you could lose
your property.
Please remember, if you are the current property owner, it is your responsibility to ensure your property taxes are paid.
To avoid additional charges and interest, and the potential risk of losing your property, the Miami-Dade County Tax Collector's
Office wants to remind you that your payment must be in our office by May 31, 2009. Postmarks will not be honored for delin-
quent taxes. Taxes must be paid by cashier's chbck, money order or certified funds.
You may also pay in person at one of the following locations:
Downtown Miami South Dade Government Center
140 West Flagler Street Room 101 or 10710 SW 211th Street Room 104
Miami, Florida 33130 Miami, Florida 33189
For your convenience, our Downtown and South Dade offices will open on Saturday, May 30th, 2009 and
Sunday, May 31st, 2009 from 9 am to 2 pm. E-checking is also available at www.miamidade.9ov through
May 31st, 2009 or for additional information, please call 305-270-4916.

,,, I M i Q iT~~fiiiiiiiii 1


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES MAY 15-19 2009


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Florida gets $1.8 billion in stimulus funds


FUNDS
continued from 1A

rectly from Washington. Florida
lawmakers, confident the state
would get the money, allocated
funds to shore up the education
portion of the 2009-10 budget
the Legislature approved last
week. That meant legislators


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C


could tout a small increase in
per-student spending in Flori-
da. But they reshuffled -- and
reduced -- other pots of edu-
cation money to do so, leaving
school districts with less money
than they had last year.
In addition to the $1.8 billion
in so-called state stabilization
funds, Florida has received al-


most $600 billion in education
stimulus dollars -- including
about half the money the fed-
eral government designated for
low-income schools, programs
for disadvantaged students and
other grants.
Another $891 million in sta-
bilization money will also be-
come available this fall.


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The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 13-19, 2009


Obama issues National Prayer Day proclamation


President Barack Obama is-
sued a proclamation recognizing
Thursday as the National Day of
Prayer. Asking the American peo-
ple to come together in a moment
of "peace and goodwill," Obama
stated. "I call upon Americans to
pray in thanksgiving for our free-
doms and blessings and to ask for
God's continued guidance, grace,
and protection for this land that
we love."
The proclamation was released
as members of Congress, minis-
ters and the National Day of Prayer
Task Force gathered on Capitol
Hill to observe the annual day.
Unlike previous years, task force
chair Shirley Dobson and her hus-
band, 'Dr. James Dobson, did not
begin the day with a visit to the
White House.


Former President George W.
Bush had traditionally held formal
White House observances for the
National Day of Prayer with the
Dobson's but this year, Obama
ended the tradition, choosing in-
stead to only sign a proclamation
and pray privately.
Moreover, for the first time in
nearly two decades, no represen-
tative from the White House was
sent to attend the Capitol Hill
event, as reported by The Wash-
ington Post.
"The national day of prayer is
important for people all across the
country and I think the president
missed a wonderful opportunity,"
Rep. J. Randy Forbes (R-Va.) told
the local publication. "Not only did
he not have any ceremony himself,
he did not send any representa-


tives from the White House to this
event."
Despite the no-show, James
Dobson commented to the local
post that he just wants the coun-
try to "remember its foundation"
and honor it.
And many have.
Rep. Mike Pence, (R-Ind.) hon-
ored the 58th annual celebration of
the National Day of Prayer on the
floor of the U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives.
"Since the first call to prayer in
1775 when the Continental Con-
gress asked the colonies to pray
for wisdom forming the nation,
prayer has been. at the center of
our national life," Pence said.
"During this National Day of
Prayer, during these challenging
times, let it be said again: 'we are


a nation of prayer.'"
Many are honoring the prayer
day on the internet. Local events
are also being held across the
country at state capitols, city halls
and churches.
Obama also acknowledges in
his proclamation how prayer has
played a vital role throughout
American history.
"Throughout our Nation's histo-
ry, Americans have come together
in moments of great challenge and
uncertainty to humble themselves
in prayer.
"It is in that spirit of unity and
reflection that we once again des-
ignate the first Thursday in May
as the National Day of Prayer."
The proclamation further reads,
"As we observe this day of prayer,
we remember the one law that


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REV. ROGERY ADAMS


BISHOP MCKINLEY YOUNG


Unity Day Program at Mt. Zion


Rev. Rogery Adams and the
members of Mt. Zion A.M.E.
Church will celebrate its annu-
al Unity Day Program, Sunday,
May 17th at 7:30 a.m. and 11
a.m. services.
The 7:30 a.m. speaker, Pre-
siding Elder Raymond G. Hastie
and the 11 a.m. speaker, the


illustrious Bishop Mckinley
Young, Presiding Prelate of the
11th Episcopal District of Flori-
da and the Bahamas.
Everyone is welcome to cel-
ebrate with us on this grand oc-
casion. The church is located at
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue, Mi-
ami Gardens.











I~I MKS Mi's] CONTROL [HEIR OWN DESTINY 9B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


You reap what you sow in God's time


Most of us are familiar with
Galatians*6: 7 9. These vers-
es speak about reaping and
sowing. As you probably know,
Paul and especially Jesus,
spoke to the church many times
using farming terms. Because
many of .their audience were
farmers, they understood fully
the principle of reaping and
sowing. They understood that
they could not reap a harvest


Miami-Dade Community Ac-
tion Agency (CAA) will hold
two Community Resource and
Job Fairs that will take place
at the South Dade Government
Center in Cutler Bay, from 10
a.m.- 2 p.m., Thursday, May 1'4
and at the Joseph Caleb Center
in Brownsville, from 10 a.m.-2
p.m., Tuesday, May 19. 786-469-
4600.


Miami-Dade Alumni Chapter
of Bethune-Cookman University'
will host its annual scholarship
at the Omega Activity Center in
Opa-locka, from 8 p.m.-1 a.m.,
Friday, May 15. 305-505-1235.


The Rotary Club of Opa-
locka/Miami Gardens will pres-
ent its first Kings and Queens
Youth Chess Exhibition Fund-
raiser at the Jesus People Minis-
tries Church International'in Mi-
ami Gardens, 9:30 a.m., Satur-
day, May 16. Webber J. Charles,
786-269-4337 or charli2foto@
yahoo.com .


North Miami Pioneer Hall of
Fame will hold its second induc-
tion ceremony at the Don.,Shu-.
.Wifotel. and Restaurant at,9:3Q.,
&3.; May 16.


of corn if they had not planted
corn seeds. So when Paul told
the Galatians church that if
they sowed seeds to please their
physical nature, they would
reap seeds of destruction; and
seeds planted to please God
would reap eternal life, they got
it! They understood because
they knew that they could not
plant apple seeds and expect to
harvest pomegranates. It is the


Unity on the Bay presents a
free community resource fair at
411 Northwest 21 Street, from 10
a.m.-4 p.m., on May 16. Visit:
www.unityonthebay.org



People United to Lead the
Struggle for Equality (PULSE)
will be having their 28th annual
convention at the Faith Commu-
nity Baptist Church on Saturday,
May 16. 305- 576-7590.


Pembroke Park Church of
Christ will host a Health Walk at
7 a.m. and a Community Health
Fair and Festival, 10 a.m.-3
p.m., Saturday, May 16. 954-
962-9327.


City of North Miami Beach
Public Library will sponsor free
legal clinic from 6-7:30 p.m.,
Monday, May 18. 305-948-2970.


Florida Youth Flag Football
Association (FYFFA) is accepting
online registration for boys and
girls aged 4 16 to play flag foot-
ball. Registration will continue
through May 18. The season will


Inner-city youth complete Healthy


The Miami Police Athletic
League, Inc. (PAL) will host a
special reception and awards
ceremony for the inner-city
youth of Liberty City and Little
Haiti; bringing to conclusion
a six-week program entitled,
H.A.P.P.Y. (Healthy Alterna-
tives for Positive Promising
Youth).
The event will be held at the
City of Miami Police Depart-
ment Central Station, locat-
.ed at 400 N.W. 2nd Avenue in
Miami on Thursday, May 14.
Special quests will include:
NBA Player Udonis Haslem of
the Miami Heat; TARGET rep-
resentatives,' City of Miami
Chief of Police John F. Timoney
and staff; Spoken Word Artist/
Poet, MECCA; and many oth-
ers. Special prizes and awards
will be given to participants
and families, courtesy of TAR-
GET and Miami PAL.
"In urban, low-income com-
munities such as Liberty City
and Little Haiti, we are seeing
an increased rate of child obe-
sity, diabetes, high blood pres-
sure and other heart-related
health issues; as well as ex-
treme gun and gang violence,
drugs, and alcohol abuse;"
explains Ashaala S. Jenkins,
Miami PAL Coordinator, "Dur-
ing the last six weeks, the


H.A.P.P.Y. Program was able to
present and provide a plethora
of resources, information, edu-
cation, and healthy alternatives
to both the inner-city youth as
well as their families."
The preface of the H.A.P.P.Y
Program (Healthy Alternatives
for Positive Promising Youth)
is geared towards inner-
city youth in the communi-
ties of Liberty City and Little
Haiti. During the six weeks
the innovative program intro-
duced a specialized curricu-
lum focused oh teenage boys
and girls in making healthy
choices; supplemented with
healthy snacks during each
session. Throughout the pro-
gram, City of Miami Police Of-
ficers, in conjunction with Mi-
ami PAL's Youth Counselors,
aided and provided counsel
for the H.A.P.P.Y. Program. In
addition, a, variety of special
speakers, guests, trainers,
and health care professionals
were invited to come out and
present to the Miami PAL kids
offering different topics and
information that allowed them
to make knowledgeable deci-
sions when faced with adoles-
cent challenges. They learned
about exercise, good nutrition,
conflict resolution, teenage
pregnancy, HIV/AIDS/STDs


plan of God that every seed re-
produces after its own kind.
Another thing for us to keep in
mind about seeds is that not all
produce during the same time
period. You can plant tomatoes
and expect to have them for
your salad in a relatively short
time, but you will not have
mangoes for your fruit salad in
the same amount of time. It
takes a lot longer to harvest
mangoes than tomatoes. You
might learn of a friend whose
plans seem to be falling into
place very quickly and without
a whole lot of effort on his part.
However, your vision seems to
be a bit blurry, and is not tak-
ing shape very well at all'. Don't
despair. I could not presume
to tell you why this is so in a

open at the Amelia Earhart Park
in Hialeah at 8 a.m., Saturday,
June 13. Kwame Smith at 305-
467-8397 or e-mail ksmith@nfl-
florida.com.


The ninth annual Oscar
Thomas Memorial People's Art
Exhibition is on display at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts
Center's Amadlozi Gallery until
May 21. 305-638-6771.


The Richmond Heights Re-
source Center will be having
their Memorial Day Community.
Fair at the Promenade Shopping
Plaza, 1100 S W 152 Street,
frbm 10 a.m. 7 p.m., on May
22. Vaughn Marshall or Sharon
Cordy, (305)235-7731 or email
us at rimondheightsrc@yahoo.
corn


Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's Office will hold a Sealing
and Expungement Program at
the Antioch Missionary Bap-
tist Church in Opa-locka, from
5-7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 28.
305-547-0724. 1 ,


Miami Jackson High Class
of 1979 will hold its 30th annual
reunion with a week of events
highlighted by a trip to Montego
Bay, Jamaica. The festivities
will be from June 5-14. Louis
Fish, president, 954-895-5441;.
Carol Jones, secretary, 786-


Liberty City and Little

Haiti students of the

Miami Police Athletic

League, City of Miami

Police staff, South Flor-

ida Youth Foundation,

former 99 Jamz Radio

Personality Supa Cindy

and a Target represen-

tative attend the kick-

off for the H.A.RRY.

program at the Liberty

City Square Community

Center in March.

Choices Program
prevention, and the avoidance
of alcohol, drugs, gangs, and
gun violence. Furthermore,
Miami PAL youth explored so-
cial choices, and decision mak-
ing which helped develop and
sustain positive relationships;
appropriately expressing their
emotions and managing peer
pressure stress.
Special guests included: Thad
McMullen, Target representa-
tive; The Washington Foreign
Press Center; Horatio Gordon,
medical doctor of the Gordon
,Health Care Solutions; John F.
Timoney, City of Miami Chief
of Police; The City of Miami
Police staff; Supa Cindy, for-
mer 99 Jamz Radio Personal-
ity; Alexis Desir, World Martial
Arts Champion; Sensei Wayne
Times, PAL Karate Instructor;
Lieutenant Joseph Schillaci,
A&E's "First 48"; and many
others. Special prizes such as
Target gift cards, iPods, per-
fumes, colognes, games, toys,
t-shirts, school supplies, and
other awards were given cour-
tesy of Target and Karen Fryd
from the South Florida Youth
Foundation, to both kids and
parents respectively. For more
information, please contact
Ashaala S. Jenkins at (305)
603-6088 or miamipall@aol.
com.


newspaper column. There are
a number of reasons why some
things take longer than others.
Some are because of the per-
sons involved, and some are
because of external circum-
stances, but I can tell you who
knows exactly the reason for
the delay, and that is the One
to Whom you need to seek for
information and guidance and
that of course, is our Almighty
God. ,
You may plant seeds that may
take years to produce, but do
not despair or give up. I read
a story a few weeks ago about
a nephew of Corrie ten Boom,
who was also instrumental in
saving Jewish children from be-
ing killed or imprisoned by Nazi
soldiers. In later years, Peter

566-3751.


Miami Northwestern Senior
High School class of 1964 will
celebrate its 45th anniversary,
June 4-7. For a list of events,
contact Arthur McCarthy, 305-
687-1587; Carolyn Crowell,
305-620-0743; Elizabeth Wells,
305-620-6299; or Harold Dil-
lard, 786-263-1691.

Liberty** City C**ommunity A
Liberty City Community Ac-


Apostolic Revival Temple
Ministry invites the commu-
nity to celebrate their pastor
and church's 13th anniversary,
at 7:30 p.m. nightly, May 13-15
and continuing at 4 p.m., Sun-
day, May 17. 305-372-0612.


- Harvest Ministries Inter-
national Men and Women Bi-
ble Focus will meet from 7-9 .
p.m., Thursday, May 14. NMin.
Jacquelyn Beckford, 305-467-
1333.


Trinity C.M.E. Church will
be celebrating their Unit, Day
art m". y' 17. .


ten Boom became ill, and in im-
mediate need of heart surgery. A
very famous cardiologist visited
Peter the evening before his sur-
gery and asked if he was related
to the ten Booms of Holland. Pe-
ter answered that they were his
family, and the cardiologist told
him that he was one of the ba-
bies that his family had saved.
The next day, the cardiologist
performed life saving surgery
on Peter. The man whose life he
helped to save forty years pre-
viously had helped to save his
life. Peter sowed seeds of life
and safety in that young boy's
life, and he reaped seeds of life
when he needed them most. He
reaped what he sowed.
Did you really read what
I just wrote? He reaped the

tivist will be having their first
annual Treasure Hunt, from
8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., June 27.
Verneacha Johnson, 305-751-
9377 or 786-985-5224.


Miami Central Senior High is
planning a triple class reunion
of 91, 92 and 93 from July 31
-Aug 2. Edwin, 305-975-1757.


The National Association of
Black Hotel Owners, Operators


305-373-7162.


Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church invites you
to attend their annual "Four
gospel Writers" program on
Sunday, May .17. 305-445-
6459.


Country Village Church of
Christ will be having an evan-
gelizing event at the Miami
Carol City Park, from 12-4:15
p.m., Sunday, May 17. 786-
512-7643. .


The Freewill Christian


seeds forty years later not the
next day, or next week or the
next month or even the next
year, but forty years later. Paul
encouraged the church (and
that includes us today) in Ga-
latians 6:9 not to become wea-
ry in well doing. Some of the
people to whom you minister or
give help might not only seem
to not change, but some even
act as if they do not appreciate
or want your help. If God has
placed you in each other's lives,
then He certainly knows what
He is doing. We rarely see or
know the big picture, but God
always does. Be patient, don't
faint or lose heart, and accord-
ing to Paul, you will reap a har-
vest and what God produces
is Good!

& Developers will hold its 13th
annual conference at the Doral
Golf Resort & Spa, July 22-25.
954-792-2579.


Top Ladies of Distinction
will hold its monthly meeting
at Florida Memorial University
Lehman Aviation Building on
the second Saturday. 305-696-
1631.


Center cordially invites you
to celebrate their 16th annual
pastoral anniversary. The ser-
vices will be held 7:30 p.m.
nightly, May 20-21 with a
grand finale at 11 a.m., Sun-
day, May 24. Pastor Kendrick
Ferguson at 305-766-8694.


Mt. Zion Holiness Deliver-
ance Church will be having
a revival at 7:30 p.m. nightly
until May 22. 786-523-3778.



New Vision for Christ Min-
istries will have their annual
Mother and Daughter Break-
fast at the Don Shula's Hotel
in Miami Lakes, from
9 a.m.-' 12 p.m., Saturday,
May 23. 305-899-7224,
Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before -30i0
p.m. on Monday. ,.


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
BpUREAcU OF HI V/AnIDS


BI ACKS MUST CONTROLrHEIR OWN DESTINY I


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009









10B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY15-19, 2009BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

t'S. c r diqmmc e pected lo hike 45 perrnt bO 2130



-- Copyrighted Material






Syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers


B.~ofd


Abb 4. -. v


- a - a


. -


4 -


Gospel concert at Church of God of Prophecy No. 1


The public is invited to at-
teAd the 24th annual gospel
concert on Saturday, may
16 at 7:30 p.m, featuring
the Bahamas Public Officers
Choir and' the Rolle Sisters
of Nassau, Bahamas, Silent
Praise Worshippers Mime
Ministry, the Miami No. 1


Praise Angels, conquerors
of Perrine, Key to Praise and
more under the theme: 'Holy
Spirit Fill This House!'
Come, bring your Shout-
ing 'Shoes and Hallelujah
Praise. There will also be
a special program on Sun-
day, May 17, at the Church


of God! of Prophecy, Miami
No. 1 located at 4528 N.W.
1 Avenue. Service will begin
at 11 a.m., and 3:30 p.m.
Bishop Noward E. C. Dean,
Pastor.
For more information call
305-576-4992 or 305-685-
3295.


Appreciation celebration
at New Fellowship
Come celebrate with us in
divine intervention for the ap-
preciation and ordination for
our Pastor Jimmye Finch-Lar-
kin and Minister Garry V. Lar--
kin on Friday, May 15 at 7:30
p.m., at New Fellowship Chris-
tian Center, 240 Bahman Ave.,
Opa-Locka Florida, 33054.


U CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED U CHARGE MY CREDIT CARD
S2j Exp_


Exp_

Exp


Authorized Signature

Name

Address


City


State Zip


Phone email
*Includes Florida sales tax
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymlamitimes.com


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
........ ... 2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:

R,l~e 'a 1hanr-,,..- I ,p1I.
~~~r,, .


6702 N.W 15th .\venue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
SNew ime for T V. Program
FOR HOPE 'KOR TOD N

Wei lnrissmorsPr.e.'ai. p m
K t -1 1
Ma F, 5' W h. ." ,
S'I .e, Meetng. 'jiOi m



Friendship Missionary
SBaptist Church
fnrdJr..p,-iv t r .'hiL 1.,h n,
710 q V. 51th Sthtci
Mfimi. FL
305-759-8875
O n. .- I O r n. E rios-
ow -,l i ,Ir .C t30an
| r So P.Ire~r1 .J g.ch^ ip .
I Mor .h IIriI
I N.xl Ail"Pn rr It n
-e, i ljioedii hIam 1 i, ,
V. --e-i.-.- .n.e. /



St. John Baptist ChurchT
1328 N.W. 3 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
Early Stmunday
Mlormng Worship 7.30 a n
Stmla) School 9 30am
N mioing Worship II .am
S nProveu 1 Hie.) 7 pmj
\Meelug (Ine.s.) 7 prm


/ New Harvest Missionary "
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order.of Servcp es:
t-j. rDgO Wo mp .JO i m
3M -rr Icwr,. S ri ,n
5 t l I a I


rJordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N W. 12'hAve.
305-751-9323
Order of Sernices:
Ead Worlup 7 aii
S S ta3 St-h 9l 0 am
I NBC .. .. Ifl00 m I
SWorship ...... I1 am
rs p .... 4p.m.
\ a lMI on and Bible Class
TTuedday.. 6 30pn
Youth Mleenngp Chnr rehrca
'.'>rda (fTBHHB0^^HB|R


Ebenezer United St. Mark Missionary Bit
Methodist Church Baptist Church 86

305-635-7413 305-691-8861
Orer of Servifces:
Sunday tomiug Ser Sices Order ofServices:
7:45 am II 1 m. Smiunday 7:30 and II ant,
Sunday School 9:45 am. Worship Service
Bible Study Tusdad 9:30 am.......... Sunday School
II am & 7pant.9 a Tueda "pr anb hIdy -
P ra) c rN le f c n g -7T u s .-b6 p n l S p Prym.ew .'u)'.
l l~ oi .D ',r. ),-n


Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 31 Avenue
Church 305 573-3714
Fax 305-S73-4060*Fax 305-255-854S
EOrder of Services:
Smuduy School...........9:45 a.m.
Smn. tforning vs...... Ia.m.
SH i F, iTIIi I T, 1 i':, pia,
S Tuesdl [iile Slud)
Trc da g MirubU1) 10 i i
Wed. Bible Study/PPraye..6:30 pi
Thms, Outuach Minisuy....6:30 p.m


- Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 SW. 56th Avenue Hollywood. FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ....... 10 a.m.
Evening Worship ........... 6:p.m. .
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 am.. -9 am.
Comcast Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local channels: 21 &22
.Web page: wEww.pembrokeparkc chofchristtom *' Email: pembrokeparkcoc@bclsoMl Loet


S Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305434-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services


ST lni Murittr 1a.b es, ,m
Sns .rlan Lon Oirdc had -.I .n 0
\4.6M-U!.0 /.691 \flH^^^^^^ffiH9^Hf


,St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services :
Pady Moning Wwsip.730am.
Sunday School ......... 9:30a.m.
NfMoamingWorship .....11 am.
S...DNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ...........730 pan.
Bible Study-................ 8 p.m.


The Episcopal Church ofr
The Transfiguration
15260 NW 19" Avenue
305-681-1660
(ChurebI Sclhedele:
SSulnday Services
'7:30 a.m. and 9:30 am.
I Healing Service
Second Wednesday 7 p.m.


)le Teaching Seminar
1 0 8620 N W'. 17th Ave.
Miami, FL. 33147
954-735-9393


And now abide
faith, hope, love...
I Cor. 13:13


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International.


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Antoch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Ser vices
ChuwSuliuoay School..... 8.30 si.
S Iday Wolsbjp Sevj c ... 10a.11

Hour of Poiwer-Noon Day Prayer
I2 p.M,- p.m.
haven\ing Worahip... 7 p.m.



Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr.. Martin Luther King. Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru 1ri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs...7 p.m.
Sunday Wruship...7- I l am.
Sunday School. 9:30 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NIMIC
305-685-.37(H)
Mmg :305-685-0)70$
wwvw.newhirlhbnshiptistmi~anit.iwrg


.C


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Sunday
Morning Worshil at 8 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School lt 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
l l Bible Study p.m .
Saturday
No Service


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
A Order of Services
Wom p Serce .... & 11 .m
Chluarh ScWIool........30.. am.
Wednesday
FCCing hkl y 12 O.tm
Thursday
Praye r Meal ns.. .7 p.m
"Thre is a place for yo"


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church"
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mtiermonworashipcenter:ortg
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday ,btship Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Chuch Sch:oo8 a30am.
Pastor Noon Day Bible Study
'Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
| Mi ,. c' \. W.,r ip" 3' p ,p



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School ............930a.
Morning fPaiseWotrslip ..11 an.
Fust and' hipl Sunday
eveanpwnsihipar p na.
I I. Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
maL 'j ^ Tuesday 7 p.m.




First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-6354.053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday.......... 7:30 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School...............10 am.
[ Thluisday.,........ 7p m Bible Sttudy,
Prayer Mooing, B.T.U.
Baptism Thus. before
Frest Sun..7 p.m.
Cominrunion Fist Suon........
7:30 & 11am.


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
Sunday School...9.30gmn.
Sunday Worship... 11 a,.

Mid Week Service ... 7 p.mn
Choir Rebear al Thluday
7:30 pm


93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7I a.m ..Meorning Worship
Evening Worship
ls & 3rd Sunlay 6 .. pm.
Tuesday Bible Study...7 Pm.
welole: cnebceig


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-&36-4555
Order of Servnices:







7, d M .irl n ala ri. W ..........i .&m.
Sunday Schoo. l ............10& .
\Mou Excelleuce 7 30 p n
Tue Bible ( r.las r. 7.11 pm
Thuin Felo' swl, 101a u[






a I;s, bu. Song Praice s p.m
New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10 StrAvenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
D.rly 'u 5 s '.- lup "-a'Jsth
-ibr. n- %71 3 ., 1 J 1L.
: jirma } r 1 .= r ..r.. . I. I .ai
Ti,..'xal t A cr e..... .1 p nlm.













Iy c luhJa.ic bc *l S ......1.0. p i.m
Word of Faith
Christian Center
1370 N.W. 87* Street
305-836-908 I
Order of Services:

.oriJ p S ............t a.m.
t rsday Feib y3eservis ...... p.m.



-New Day "N" Christ

30.55 N.W. 76* Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Sermices:
Sundays- C urch School........... lO .m.
aorhip Seoreite ..........11 15a.nm.
Tuesday Bible Classi 7 pm
4th SMnday Evening Worship.-.6 P.



rNew Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.9.5' Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 30S-696-6220



Morning Worship ....,II a.m.
Tuesday Bible aass 7 p.m.


-Ypeum ipwf'W% m


--wool


\GNUMMMMIL."


- - o
















SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 13-19, 2009


The Miami Times




eaIth


Racism could pois *fihh fet kids' mental health
.- Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Maternal depression
Women battling postpartum depression are more
likely to have infants with significant sleep issues
who run a higher risk of having early-onset depres-
sion during childhood, a new study says.
In' the first six months of life, babies born to de-
pressed mothers took a longer time to fall asleep at
night, slept in shorter bursts and less soundly than
infants born to mothers not experiencing depres-
sion. These high-risk infants also had more frequent
but much shorter periods of sleep during the day,
according to the findings published in the May 1 is-
sue of Sleep.
Though unsure of the cause of these disruptive
sleep patterns, the researchers said they believe the.
condition and its consequences could be reversed in
the child.
"We do think that we could develop a behavioral
and environmental intervention to improve entrain-
ment of sleep and circadian rhythms in the high-
risk infants," study lead author Roseanne Armitage,
director of the Sleep and Chronophysiology Labora-
tory at the University of Michigan Depression Cen-
ter, said in an American Academy of Sleep Medicine
news release. "They may still be modifiable, since
brain regulation is very plastic and responsive in
childhood."
Past studies suggest that cortisol, a stress hor-
mone produced in greater amounts by depressed
women during pregnancy and after delivery, may af-
fect the infant's ability to sleep.
If infant sleep problems are not discussed, they


affects infant's sleep
can become long-term issues that can affect not only
the child's mental and physical health, but also the
mother's, past studies have shown. This is a partic-
ular issue among people with maternal depression.
The mother's health could further deteriorate if her
child's sleep issues also cause her to lose valuable
rest time.
Over six months starting at two weeks following
birth, the researchers monitored the sleep of 18 full-
term born children and their mothers for periods of
seven consecutive days once a month. The mothers
-- some of whom had no personal or family history of
depression and others who had been diagnosed with
depression or elevated depres- s i o n
symptoms -- also kept jour-
nals about daily sleeping
and waking patterns.
The researchers said
they think future studies
should examine whether
infant sleep patterns can
be modified and what are
the best conditions for
nighttime sleep. -


hue *l wFw r. b-% b-. vi


16 go v O*0


b -


* Complimentary Dental
Services with No Co-Pay
* Primary Care Physician
* Laboratory
* Gynecology
* Diagnostic Ultrasound
* EKG Electrocardiogram
* ECHO- Echocardiogram
* X-Rays
* A Comprehensive
Chiropractic Service Center


* Free Concierge-Style
Transportation with
Private Vehicle
* Pain Management
* Massage Therapy
* Activity Center
* Education
* Exercise Program
* Nutrition
* Osteoporosis screenings


HEALTH FIRST

MEDICAL CENTER

6405 NW 27th Avenue Miami, Florida
For information or appointments, call:

305-403-4003
Monday Friday, 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Health First Medical Center
Maximum Quality Medical Care for our Community


Services


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY13-19, 2009


Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority annual Nationwide Youth Symposium


Gamma Delta Sigma -Chap-
ter of Sigma Gamma Rho So-
rority Inc. continues to pro-
mote with "Greater Service,
Greater Progress" at its 12th
'annual National Youth Sym-
posium scheduled simulta-
neously in local communities
across the nation. This year's
theme is "H3: It's All About
Me; Healthy Choices, Healthy
Living, Healthy Generations."
The event was held at the Holy
Redeemer Catholic Church in
the M. Athalie Range Hall on
March 14 with about 80 teen-,
agers participated in the sym-


posium.
With Ms. Linda Lloyd-Ste-
vens, presiding, greetings were
brought by Claudia Slater,
president. The proclamation
from City of Miami Commis-
sioner Michelle Spence-Jones
was read by Attorney La' Trese
K. McPhee.
Workshop topics addressed
were: Self-esteem; presenter,
Dr. Deborah L. Jones-Allen, a
board certified Christian coun-
selor and founder of Daugh-
ters of Siyyon, Education;
presenter, Thomas Demeritte,
president of Alternative Direc-


tions Music Industry Training,
and Safety and Security (the
internet); presenter, Myhosis
"Josie" Ashton, an advocate
for the Child Predator Cyber-
space Unit from the Office of
the Attorney General.
Among the youth panelists
were Jessica Harris, a senior
from Krop High School; Gene-
vieve Carvil, a senior from the
University of Miami; Adrien
Alexander, a graduate of the
University of Miami who is the
new owner and operator of "A
Styles Boutique"; Rev. Yvonne
Strachan, an Associate Minis-


ter and Evangelist and Loren-
zo Palmer, a senior from the
Florida Memorial University.
Nicole Jackson, director of
"Anointed Praise," a dance
ministry of Bible Missionary
Baptist Church, provided the
entertainment.
In culminating the event,
rapper/recording artist PM
(stage name) of Walking Money
Entertainment, a well-known
recording artist in South Flor-
ida engaged the audience in
interesting dialogue about the
pros and cons of rappers. In
sharing his own life story, the


artist conveyed a clear mes-
sage about the importance
of healthy living and making
healthy choices. Local record-
ing artist Tommy Trouble and
Tori "Rockmaster" Newkirk
were in attendance and in-
strumental in launching the
rap/song contest segment of
the symposium.
All participants received cer-
tificates and lovely gifts pre-
sented by Terriceda Newkirk,
Linda Tartt and Julia Myers.
The symposium was adjourned
in closing prayer rendered by
Pastor Phillip Readon of Bible


Missionary Baptist Church.
Wilma Council, chairperson,
Terriceda Newkirk, co-chair-
person and committee mem-
bers thanked the sponsors
that included: Lillian Davis,
Catherine Gibson, Paulette
McPhee, Enid Pickney, Lloyd
Stevens, Linda Tartt, Mar-
cia Carter-Wright and Katie
L. Williams. Wal-Mart Super
Center Store # 1590, Acti-
bo Sports Wear, CVS Phar-
macy, Onyx Book Club, The
A.D.M.I.T. Program, CR Trad-
ing/Jean City and Publix Su-
permarket.


Bishop Victor T.
Curry 18th Pastoral
anniversary
Yes it's time for Bishop Victor
T. Curry's 18th Pastoral Anni-
versary Celebration!
Come one... Come all to cel-
ebrate God's manservant, Bish-
op Victor T. Curry on his 18th
Pastoral anniversary f Join us
as we salute Bishop Curry be-
ginning at 7 p.m. on May 12th
and 13th with an anointed
Word by Dr. H. Beecher Hicks
of Metropolitan Baptist Church
of Washington DC and on May
15th with an uplifting Word
from Reverend Ben Carroll of
Greater Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church of West Palm
Beach. On Sunday, May 17th-
beginning at 7 a.m., the honor-
ee, Bishop Victor T. Curry will
deliver a special message. Dr.
Wayne G. Thompspn of First
Baptist Institutional Church St.
Petersburg, Florida will deliver
an encouraging Word at the 11
a.m. service and at 6 p.m., the
Celebration culminates with
an inspiring Word from Bishop
Curry's spiritual father, Pastor
Joe C. Johnson of the Greater
Ebenezer Missionary .Baptist
Church of Hollywood Florida.
All services will take place at
The Cathedral, 2300 NW 135th
Street and are open to-the entire
community. For more informa-
tion call 305-685-3700 arnd be
there!


St. John kicks off 103rd year anniversary


On Sunday, May 17, at 11
a.m., St. John Institutional
Missionary Baptist Church will
kickoff its 103rd year anniver-
sary. Reverend Dr. Darlene
Day returns to St. John as the
speaker.
Dr. Day is Pastor'of Admiris-
tration at the Pentecostal House
of Prayer For All People, Inc.
and the International Pastor
for Emmanuel Church of God,
in Brooklyn, New York. She has
'preached and taught the Gos-
pel of Jesus Christ for many
years, throughout the United
States and the Bahamas.
Reverend Day has an in-
tense hunger and determina-
tion to teach and train the peo-
ple of God everywhere she goes
to know the WORD, the WAYS
and the WILL OF GOD., She
.is truly a woman of God called
and chosen for such a time as
this. ..
Please mark your calendar


REV. JOSEPH F. WILLIAMS


and come celebrate with us and
hear this Woman of God. The
church mourns the homegoing
of two of its pioneer members,
Sister Mary Thompson, services
this Friday and Sister Leathia
Dorsey whose services will be
held on this Saturday. Rev. Dr.
Charles E. Uptgrow, Sr., is As-
sistant Pastor.


REV. CHARLIE BARFIELD


Revival at St. Mark
On Wednesday Friday, May p.m., nightly.
13-15, the St. Mark Mission- Our honored and esteemed
ary Baptist' Church under the revivalist will be Rev. Charles
leadership of Rev. Joseph F. Barfield of Pineland Baptist
Williams will be in revival at 7 Church of Madison, FL.


Serving the Community since 1984


COSMETIC DENTISTRY
* Teeth Whitening 1 hour
* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
* Porcelain Veneers
* Cosmetic Bonding

RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY
* Implant Supported
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* Tooth Colored Fillings
* Gum Therapy
* Root Canal
* Dentures and Partials

SAFETY & COMFORT
* Nitrous Oxide (tranquilizing air)
* Sedation Dentistry
* Steam Sterilization
* State of The Art Facility


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(4 4r) Insurance Welcome We Offer Financial Arrangements
Lab On Premises Repairs While You Wait
Evening and Saturday Appointments

The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any
other service examination or treatment which is performed or as result of and within seventy-two (72) hours of responding to the advertise-
ment for the fee, discounted fee or reduced fee service,examination or treatment.


COME ONE COME ALL Let's celebrate!!!


Swis op Victor T. Currp'g

18t Paftoral lnnibergarp


I May 12th & 1 3

Dr. H. Beecher Hicks, Jr.
Metropolitan Baptist Church
Washington, D.C.
All weekday servic s
S I| th I begin at 7p.m.


Reverend Benjamin Carroll, Jr.
Greater Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church, West Palm Beach, FL


On Sunday, May 17"h, join us for the culmination service with
a special meinage from our honoree, Bishop Victor T. Curry
at 7a.m., and words of encouragement for our honoree by
Dr. Wayne G. Thompson at 11 a.m. and Rev, Joe C, Johnson


ac New Birth Baptist Church
Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th Street, Miami, FL

For more Information, please call 305-685-3700,


Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA
General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry


-Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, AGD


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652-3001

20215 NW 2nd Ave.
Suite #2
Miami, FL 33169
www.dentistgrant.net


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13B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


St Fort
CILIANISE A. LA FRANCE, 79,
died May 1, at Rand Memorial;.
Service 10. a.m., Saturday,
Ebeneezer Baptist Church.

YOLANDE PIERRE, 51, died May
3 at North Shore Hospital. Service
2 p.m., Saturday in the Chapel.

WILLIAM BOISROND, died May
5 at Catholic Hospice. Service 10
a. m., Saturday, Notre Damme
Catholic Church.

KHIRI RICHARDS, 29, died May
5 at Memorial West. Service 12
noon, Saturday in the Chapel.

JACQUELINE D. CAMILUS, 63,
died May 7 at Jackson South. Final
rites and burial in Haiti.

VIXAMAR ROCK, 60, died May 9
at Kindred Hospital. Arrangements
are incomplete.

Grace
JOHN W. PUGH, 61, dispatcher,,
Miami-Dadei
Community
College, died'
May3a Veterans
Administration
Hospital. Service
was held.


PERTH R. ROBINSON, 73, in-
surance agent,
died May 9 at
St. Catherine's
West Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
Chapel.


THOMAS "TOMMY" FLUEL-
LEN, 96, died May 8 at Veterans
Administration Hospital. Service 9
a.m., Friday in the Chapel.

ALBERT WESLEY TAYLOR,
58, self employed Caterer. died
May 9. Final rites and burial, Green
Cove Springs, FL.

FLORA GREEN, 67, died May 2.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Royal
DOROTHY BURTS, 89, domestic
worker, died May
9. Visitation 4 -
9 p.m., Friday.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
Chapel.


STEVEN MEEHAN,
automobile
mechanic, died
MORGAN BRYANT, JR., May 6. Visitation
landscaper, died 5-9 p.m., Friday.
May 10 at Mt. Service 4 p.m.
Sinai Hospital Saturday in the
Service 12 Chapel.
noon, Saturday,
First Baptist of
Bunche Park.


BABY PRINCESS & PRINCE
ALEXANDER, died May 6 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Service
was held.

SERGE FORTUNE, 77, self
employed, Jewelry Designer, died
May 8. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Interdenominational I Church

BABY ANGEL FOSTER, died.
Service was held .
Eric S. Georgg-!
JOANN WILMA RUTHERFORD,
68, died May 2.
Service 11a.m.,
Saturday, New
Birth Baptist
Church.




JOSHUA E. SHEELY, infant,
of Hollywood, died April 30.
Arrangements are incomplete.

RAYFIELD SALTER, 71, died
May 6. Service was held.

ROLAND MILLER, 56, of West
Park died May 8. Service 1 p.m.,
Friday, Gethsemane Baptist
Church,'West Park.

Pax Villa Brow-ard
YOLETTE THERE' JEAN-
LOUIS, 72, homemaker, died May
3 in Deerfield Beach. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, St. Joseph Catholic
Church, Pompano Beach.

AUGUST JANVIER, JR., 26,
homemaker, died May 4 in Boynton
Beach. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Bethlehem Baptist Church, West
Palm Beach.

VICKY VALCIN, 29, security
guard, died April 29 in Fort
Lauderdale. Final rites and burial
Cap- Haitien, Haiti.

MARIE JEANETTE PAUL, 78,
homemaker, died May 5 in Naples.
Service. 11 a.m., Saturday, First
Haitian Baptist Church of Fort
Myers.


Range Coconut Grove
DEACONESSS CORINE B. SIM-
MONS, 89, of
Coconut Grove,
died May 9 at
home. Wake 6-'
8 p.m., Friday,
St. Matthews
Community Mis- .
sionary Baptist
Church, 3636
Day Avenue. Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday at the Church. Interment
will follow at the Historical Coconut
Grove Cemetery. (Franklin Avenue
& Douglas Road)


YVONNE RICHARDS, 58, nurse
assistant, died
,,May 5. Visitation
4-9p.m., Friday.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday Revival
Tabernacle
Church.



OSMOND WOOD, 74, laborer,
died May 6. Visitation 4 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service 6 p.m., Saturday in
the Chapel. Final rites and 'burial,
Jamaica.

ALBERT BOSTON, 76,
supervisor, US Agricultural
Department, died May 7, Service
11 a.m., Wednesday, Trinity CME
Church. Final rites and burial,
Gainsville, FL.

HAROLD JAME, 46, laborer,
died May 4. Service was held.

Nakia Ingraham
IDA SCOTT, 59, municipal
associate of
Hallandale, died
May 4. Service
was held. -






ROSA QUISPE, 73, home
maker, died. Arrangements are
incomplete.
Poitier _
WILLIE DAVE DENNIS, JR., 66,
painter, died May ....








JAMES THOMAS, 74, bus driver
for Metro Tran-
sit, died May 7
at Kendrick Hos-
pital. Service 5
p.m., Wednes-
day in the Cha-
pel.


ALLEN V. SCOTT, JR., 63, laborer,
died May 4 at University of Miami Medi-
cal Center. Service 2 p.m., Wednesday
in the Chapel.

FANNIE JORDAN, 76, home aid




ELIGA HUNTER, 72, truck driver, died
May 7 at Palm Gardens Nursing Home.

IRVING CEASAR, 53, died May 5 at
North Shore Medical Center. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Gregg L. Mason
GARY W. JACKSON, 59, died
April 27 at home.
Survivors in-
clude: sisters,
Joyce Brown,
Willa Frost, Bar-
bara Wilks, An-
nette Ellington,
Merdis Jack-
son and Nadine
Jackson; brother,
Lloyd Jackson; and a host of other
family members and friends. Servic-
es were held.

MAE BELLE BENTHONE CLARK
89, Teacher, Mi-
ami-Dade Public
Schools, died
May 4 at Aventu-
ra Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
sons, Joseph
Benjamin Clark;
daughters, Em-
erald B Tiggett, Louise Clark Young
(Edward), Ellen M Clark and Flor-
ence Walton, grandchildren, Sherry
Tiggett, Edward Young Ill, Dormain
Young and Arcolia Tiggett; special
grandchildren, Tamela Burgess and
Eugene Walton; sister, Elizabeth
Samuel; special friend, Inez Young.
Services were held

GRETTA NAOMI ALEXANDER,
76, patient
care technician,
Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital, died
May 9 at North
Shore Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Paul; sons,
O'Connell, Den-
zil and Douglas Wyre; stepchildren,
Patricia Joseph, Pamela and Pe-
ter, Paula Delpech, Philma and Mi-
chael; sisters, Fernella Thomas,
Jean Hughes and Vencilla Horsford;
and a host of other family members
and friends. Visitation Friday, from
2-9pm. Services 11 a.m., Saturday,
Apostolic Revival Center, 6702 NW
15th Avenue. Interment: Dade Memo-
rial Park.

ISAIAH TAYLOR, JR., 68, Teacher,
Miami-Dade Pub-
lic Schools, died
May 9 at Memo-
rial Pembroke.
Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Karen; broth-
ers, Edward El-
lis (Margaret),
James Taylor
(Betty) and Samuel "Chuck" (Rev.
Spavarie); sisters, Thelma Ellis Lock-
hart and Elizabeth Ellis Phillips; and
a host of other family members and
friends. Viewing Friday from 6-9pm
at church and Kappa services will
be held at St. James AME Church.
Service 2p.m., Saturday, St. James
'AME Church. 1845 NW 65th Street.
Final Rites and burial in Charleston,
South Carolina.

CEOLA SCOTT, "DUKE"; 85,
Housewife, died
May 10 at home.
Survivors in-
clude: sons, Wil-
lie O. (Doris) add
Patrick ( Sonja);,
daughters, Cyn-
thia Scott-Morri-
son, Theresa and
Rozz; daughter in
law, Ezzie; brothers, Carnell Golden
( Juanita), Leroy Golden (Beverly),
Willie Barney ( Tina) and Larry B
Golden; sisters, Lalar Franklin, Ma-
mie Golden, Vera Barney and Daisy
Barney. Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Greater
Israel Primitive Baptist Church. Inter-
ment; Dade Memorial Park.

MEDGTH G. EUGENE, 41, so-
cial worker, Dept
of Children and
Families, died
May 1 at Memori-
al Hospital .Pem-
broke. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Edrique;
sons, Edrique Jr.
and Johnathan
Eugene; daughter, Nia S Eugene; fa-
ther, Pierre Exavier; brothers, Daniel
Exavier, Fritzner, Emmanuel, Roger,
and Fitzgerald St. Louis; sister, Is-
lande Exavier; and a host of other
family members and friends. Servic-
es were held.


Range Homestead
HARVEY Z. GILMORE, laborer,
72, of Florida City, died May 8 at
Homestead Hospital. Services
2 p.m., Saturday, Trinity Faith
Tabernacle Center..


Range
WADE LEE JOHNSON, 38, sani-
tation worker,
died May 6.
Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Mattie; special
mother, Annie
Mae Johnson;
sisters, Victoria
(John Styles),
Christine, Towanda Lowes (Em-
manuel), Latesia, Annie, Michelle,
and Alice; brothers, Joseph Tate;
son, Julwade ; a host of nieces,
nephews, other relatives' and
friends. Service 11 a.m., Wednes-
day in the Chapel.

EARL LIVINGSTON JOHN-
SON, 77, retired
pressed opera-
tor for The Mi-
ami Herald died
May 5. Sur-
vivor include:

Marilyn VaJlle,
and Tangela


Shakira Valle, and Tianna Knight;
grandsons, Trevon and Tristan Earl
Knight; three great-grandsons; sis-
ters, Evangelist Isabelle Rolle, Mon-
ica Hart, Elzora Lee Forde, Shirley
McCloud, and Barbara Coleman;
brothers, Arthur and David; a host
of nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, New Bethel M.B. Church.

LEATHIA DORSEY, 103, home-
maker, died May
6u. Survivors
include: son,
Robert Bolden
(Dorothy); elev-
en grandchil-
dren; two great-
grandchildren;
and many great
greatgrands; a
host of other relatives and friends.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday, St. John
Institutional Baptist Church.'

BRENDA JOYCE BAIN, 61,
word proces-
sor at Holland
& Knight Law
Firm died May
8 at University.
of Miami Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: sons,
Raynard Dean,
Terrence Dean,
and Omair; brother, Dr. Philip
Rahming, M.D.(Emberly); sisters,
Bernadette Cunningham, Elaine
Rahming; granddaughters, Can-
dice Dean, Courtney Dean; cousins
Marjorie Cook, Ardis Wells and Au-
drey Winters; a host of other rela-
tives and friends. Service 3 p.m.,
Saturday in the Chapel.

HELEN REAVES, 88, homemak-
er, died May
9. Survivors
include: sons,
Melvin Brayer
(Cynthia), david
Jr.,(Jeroline),
Samuel, An-
thony Bernard
(Tonya); daugh-
ters, Dr. Juanita
Yvonne; fourteen grandchildren,
niece; Carsie Lee Roby; three god
daughters; a host of other relatives
and friends. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day, St. Paul A.M.E. Church.

FREDERICKA M. BRUTON,
former educa-
tor at Hialeah
Miami Lakes
Sr. High School,
died May 11.
Survivors in-
clude: daugh-
ter, Kathye;
nieces, Rosylyn
Haynes, Lauret-
ta Hall and LaVerne Thomas; neph-
ews, Vernal Rolle, Frederick Gilbert
and Johnny Hall; a host of other rel-
atives and friends. Arrangements
are incomplete.

BISHOP ROOSEVELT WALK-
ER, 75, retired Pastor of House of
God Nazarene, died April 28. Ser-
vice was held.

CHARLTON PINDER, 28, labor-
er, died May. Final rites and burial
Nassau, Bahamas.

Paradise "


Wright & Young
CORETTA JOHNSON BROWN,
78, screen mak-
er, died May 10
at Miramar Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Mary, Glenda,
Ralph, Ricky,
Vickie, Danny,
Kevin and Queen. Services 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Friendship M.B Church.

FREDERICK BETHEL, 59, archi-
tect, died May 9
at North Shore
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Geneva;
children, Freder-
ick U., Shanetta

Tavares May-
weather, Kieta Bennett, Renee,
Clifford, Shanetel; mother, Marga-
ret Allen; siblings, Charles, Win-
ston, Carolyn Austin and Anthenisia
Jackson. Visitation 10 a.m., Satur-
day at Miami Sores Baptist Church.
Services 10 a.m., Saturday, Miami
Shores Baptist Church.

PETER TOBIAS, 81, masonry,
died May 6 at
Kindred Hospital
South Florida.
Services were
held.


BRENDA YOUNG, 51, pharma-
cist technician,
die May 6 at me-
morial Regional
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, David;
children, Sheni-
ka Sapp, Faisha
and Kareem
Gray, Jarrika Dozier, Tevin White
(Jeffery Johnson, Jr.); mother, Betty
(Remy) Francois. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Calvary M.B Church.

E.A. Stevens
SAMMIE LEE FRAZIER, 71,
laborer, died at Hollywood Memorial
Hospital. Service was held.

CATHLEEN HORTON, 50,
maintenance, died Hollywood
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

HAZEL FOSTER, 86, cook,
died May 4 at Hollywood Memorial
South. Service 12 noon, Friday ,
New Hope Church, Hollywood.

WILLIE PEARL WARE, 77,
homemaker, died May 7 at
Hollywood Memorial South. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Friendship
Baptist Church, Hallandale.

JENNIFER PARKER, 47, cook,
died May 8 in Waverly, GA. Service
1 p.m., Saturday in the Chapel.

ANTONIO SMITH OWEN, 48,
died May 1 in Raleigh, NC. Service
2 p.m., Saturday, Church of God of
Prophecy, Hallandale.

BEVERLY BRANNON, died
May 9 in Stone Mountain, GA.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Dwight's
WILLIE JAMES CLARK, 54,
died May 2 at Hialeah Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.


TALES DIEUJUSTE, 59, died
May 4 at North Shore Medical Cen-
ter. Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Mi-
ami Shores Christian Church.

ANNIE FERN MCNEIL, 46, died
May 4 at Jackson Memorial Hospi-
tal. Service was held.

THEODORA ELAINE YEAR-
WOOD, 63, of Trinidad, died May
3 at University of Miami Hospital.
Final rites and burial, Trinidad.

SHAHIDUR RAHMAN, 64, died
May 1 at Bethesda Memorial Hos-
pital. Service was held.


Genesis
VIRGINIA EUNICE KELLY, 75,
homemaker,
died May 3 at
Broward General
Hospital.
Service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday in
the Chapel.



PETRA ROMAN,87, homemaker,
died May 5 at
Homestead
Hospital. Service
was held.





VIVEK RAJ KAKARIA, 50,
sales, died May
3 at Aventura 10
Hospital. Service
was held.


KYLE DISHMAN, 24, technician,
died April 26 in West Palm Beach.
Service was held.

DORA COTE, 89, homemaker,
died May 5 at Imperial Club. Service
was held.

CORDE HANKS, infant, died May
5 at Memorial, Regional Pembroke.
Service was held.

MICHELLE WAYNE, 72, hair
dresser, died May 6 at Holy C[oss
Hospital. Service was held.

LEONA JURY, 76, homemaker,
died May 8 at Memorial Regional
South. Service was held.

JOHN LAPORTE, 37, chef, died
on May 3 at home. Service was
held.

TOMMIE MONK, 76, tailor, died
May 10 at Plantation Key Center.
Service was held.

ALFREDO PADILLA, 89,
security guard, died May 10
at Jackson Memorial Hospital.,
Service was held.

Richardson
BRENDA KING, 45, medical
clerk, died May
9. Service 10
a. m., Friday in
the Memorial
Chapel.


LORRETTAJOYNERSHOOTES,
48, died April 30 .at Jackson South.
Service was held.

LENDER MAINES, 55, died May
2 at home. Service was held.









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY13-19, 2009


L-A-ma, oIr d-r-


aftrr kning prinuar








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INmiMOIM -1)P fu-im),REENBRNES DEA l N~rcis OBTURS'


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


Death Notice


REV. ARTIS PERKINS ex-'
tends a sincere thank you to ev-
eryone for your cards, flowers,
time, prayers and many acts of
kindness.
Special thanks to Rev. John
Robinson and Valley Grove MBC
family, Rev. Dale Powell and
New Shiloh MBC, Rev. Dr. Al-
phonso Jackson, Moderator of
Seaboard, Rev. Gaston Smith,
President of Baptist Ministers
Council, Rev. Carl Johnson and
93rd Street Virtuous Dancers,
Tangela and Rosa Anderson,
RETCO and PULSE, Browns-
ville Lodge #510, Mitchell Fu-
neral Home Staff, to all of our
loving family, neighbors, friends
and all the other ministers. May
God bless you all.
Love, wife, Julia Perkins,
Sherel Gay, Annie Cox and fam-
ily

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


WILLIAM EARL DENNIS ex-
tends their heartfelt gratitude
to Bishop Isaiah and Dr. Gloria
WilliAms and the Jesus People
Ministries Church Internation-
al family, loving relatives, dear
friends and co-workers for every
act of kindness and deep con-
cern shown during the time of
our bereavement.
We also thank Royal Funeral
Services and Mr. Leon Bland for
handling the services with un-
.derstanding and care.
Card of Thanks
The family of the late


DIANNE STEPHENS JOHN WESLEY WILLIAMS SR
09/04/46 05/06/04 05/12/31 04/14/06


It's been five years since
the Lord called you home,
a day doesn't go by that we
don't miss you and love you
more than ever. We will al-
ways remember your love and.
friendship for your family and
friends.
Your loving family

In loving memory of,


Happy Birthday, 'Jay' we
love you so much and miss
you dearly.
Your entire family

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


HENRY FREDERICK
05/13/27 12/09/07


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


ATHENIA STACKS MUMFORD
would like to express our sin-
cere appreciation for the many
friends, associates, co-workers
and relatives for the many kind
words of encouragement, floral
arrangements; cards, letters and
most of all your prayers during
our time of bereavement.
Special thanks to Rev. P.
Fitzgerald Readon, Rev. Cleo
Albury and the entire Bible
Baptist Church family, Apostle
Johnny L. Kemp, Pastor Pattly
L. Kemp of M.E.C. Ministries
and all other ministers"'of the
gospel of Jesus Christ.
Special thanks also to Gregg
L. Mason Funeral Home and
Staff, Saint Maria Court #59,
neighborhood of 59 Street and
neighborhood of 32 Court, Mi-
ami Gardens, Miami Northwest-
ern Senior High Class of 1960,
1963, 1965, 2000 and Booker T.
Washington class of 1952.
May God continue to bless
you all is our prayer.
The Mumford family


EVELYN D. MORGAN, 82,
retired beautician, died May
12 at North Shore Hospi-
tal. Service 2 p.m., Saturday
at Extended Hand Minis-
tries Inc., 1602 N.W. 95 St.
Arrangements entrusted to
Grace Funeral Home.

Death Notice


MARY BELL THOMPSON,
76, certified nurse assistant
for Jackson Heights Nurs-
ing Home, died, May 10 at
home. Survivors include:
sons, Glenn (Gail), John III
(Peggy) and Stanley (Kilaun);
daughters, Martha : Jack-
son ( Ron), Lois McCollough
(Paul), Janice, Arlean Tillman
( Greg) and Jacquline McCo-
llough ( Brantley); brothers,
Teddie Roosevelt and Charlie
Rhymes; sisters, Carol Price,
Lorraine Williams(John), Ber-
nice Bolden and Alean Knight;
and a host of other family
members and friends.
Visitation Thursday, from
3-9 p.m. Family hour from
7-8:30 p.m. Service Friday, 1
p.m: at St. John Institutional
Baptist Church. Interment:
Dade Memorial Park. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Gregg L
Mason Funeral Home.


BENJAMIN F. JOHNSON wish-
es to extend a sincere thanks for
your cards, flowers and many
acts of kindness shown to our
family in our time of bereave-
ment.
A special thanks to Pas-
tor Dukes and New Jerusalem
Primitive Baptist Church and
Wright-Young Funeral Home.
May God bless youl

Death Notice
. -- ,N & .. I


GLENN DALE NOTTAGE,
50, mechanic for Greyhound
Bus, died .May 5 in U.M. Syl-
vester Hospital. Service 3
p.m., Saturday, St. Paul
A.M.E. Church.


Death Notice


Death Notice


DEACON CHARLIE E. REID
SR, 73, retired truck driver,
died May 11 at Jackson North
Hospital. Viewing 6 to 8 p.m.,
Friday, Jordan Grove M.B.
Church. Service noon Satur-
day at Jordan Grove.


PAUL DIXON, 88, mainte-
nance man, died May 12 at
VA Medical Center. Survivors
include: wife, Albertha; step-
children, Warren and Jacque-
lyn Williams, Shequeta Blake
and Shevetta Smith. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, St. James
A.M.E. Church. Arrangements
entrusted, to Poitier Funeral
Home.


CALVIN BUTLER
09/09/44 05/13/08


Michael E. Braynon wishes
to express their appreciation
and thanks to the Rev. Samu-
el E. Sullivan and the Greater
Bethel A.M.E. Church family
and the staff of Florida Club
Care Center and all loving fam-
ily and friends that made con-
tributions to the MS Society and
extended your condolences and
kind deeds to us.
May God bless each of you.
The Braynon family


Death Notice


GRACIE L. THOMPSON,
79, retired Dade County Pub-
lic School Food Service De-
partment employee, died May
8. -
Survivors include: husband,
Bradley Sr; sons, Bradley Jr,
Albert and Travis;" daughter,
Yauvaline Fulger; six grand-
children, and nine great
grandchildren. Viewing 4 to 9
p.m., Friday, Mitchell Funeral.
Home. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Jordan Grove
Missionary Baptist Church.


Happy Birthday'


MYRTLE MAE GREEN
FULTON 'Tippy'
05/13/42 12/29/08


Daddy, it's been a year
and it seems like yesterday..
I thought of you with love to-
day but that's nothing new. I
thought about your hands so
warm, your voice so clear. I
still remember your laughter.
I miss your words of encour-
agemenit, words that kept me
hanging on, now you're gone
the tears keep flowing, only
hoping that one day the pain
would fade.
Daddy, why you had to go
away, I love you and I miss
you, I know I will see you
again someday.
Daddy's little girl Michelle
and your sister Andrea


Honor

Your Loved One

With an


In Memoriam

In The

Miami Times


Gone but not forgotten.
Your wife, Bessie and The
Frederick family

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


DERRICK LAMONT
GLOSTER JR 'TERMITE'
05/17/90 01/23/09

It's been almost four months
since God called for you.
We truly indeed miss you so
much. You have touched the
hearts of so many people in
so many ways. The memories
you left with us we will con-
tinue to cherish. You are gone,
but will never be forgotten. We
love you dearly, but God loves
you the best.
Love always, your mom,
sisters, grandmothers and
family.


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, P.A.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"









Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


Your loving baby girl, Dee
Dee and kids


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The Miami Times


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SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 13-19, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES

Northwestern's PAVAC program brings "High School Musical" to Little Haiti


Miami Northwestern Senior
High Performing and Visual
Arts Center (PAVAC) students
gave an outstanding perfor-
mance at the annual State
of the District Address host-
ed by Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones. The
"event was held at the Little
Haiti Cultural Complex au-
ditorium on Thursday, April
.30.
The group of talented stu-
dents mixed a combination of
dance, theater and singing.
PAVAC gave a theatrical de-
piction of the struggles in the
Civil Rights Movement then
fast forwarded to the inau-
guration of President Barack
Obama in January, which
portrayed how far we have
come together as a country.
The students captivated the


audience in the packed au-
ditorium with a magnificent
dance performance of the
song, "We're All In This To-'
gether" from the hit movie, I '
"High School Musical."
PAVAC is a program that
began in the 70's by Mar-
cy Sarimento. Throughout
the years, the program has (1 A
helped gifted students in
the performing arts expand
into various professions
that include starring on
Broadway, box-office films,
dancing with the Alvin Alley
Dance Company or work-
ing in the music industry.
Approximately, 50 percent
of students pursue a career
in theatre said Charlette
Seward. Today, PAVAC is led
by Seward who has been the
lead teacher since 1995.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 15-19, 2009


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BDrRichr arca


The celebration of the mar-
riage between Knecole Sha-
nique Bradley and Brandon
Michael Stroman, former "Man
of Tomorrow", took place at the
Mt. Hermon A.M.E. Church on
Saturday, April 25, before fam-
ily members, church members
and friends from both sides
with Rev. John J. White II and
Pastor Mack C. Allen. Further,
the bride and groom chose col-


ors of brown, green and
white with Karen Hil-
ton, wedding planner,
and soloist and music
provided by Wallace
Jefferson.
The processional be-
gan with the entrance
of the grandparents of
the groom, Lillie Mae
Porter and Mary Stro-
man; grandparents of the
Laura Bradley; parents
groom, James and Sylvi
man; and parents of.the
Carl and Sharon Smith
music "Because You Lbv
and followed by the l
of 'the candles led by S
Smith and Sylvia Strom
The bridle party enter
church beginning with g
men and bridesmaids, U
Brown and Tracey T. C
Cimnamon Key and Roo
Francois, Valarie Wits
Hendel Cerphy, and
Carpenter and James
man, Jr., to the mus
"Everlove.".
Also best men, Chris
Stroman and Daniel


cios; flower girls,
Mijah Allen and
Nyla Walker, ring
bearer, Jonathan
T. Hilton, Jr.,
ushers, Comilla
Towns and Maurice Johnson,
and hostesses, Marjorie Alex-
andre and Susan Franc.
With the playing of "Giving
Myself", the bride entered with
her father attired in a white


flair gown with a three-
foot train accentuated
with a sparkling tiara,
a string of pearls and
floral designs on the
.bodice and skirt.of the
gown. An exchange of
the rings and commu-
PINKNEY nion followed, while
PINKNEY "The Lord's Prayer" was
sung by Hilton.
e bride, Followed by the bride and
of the groom lighting the candles to
a Stro- the music, "I Know Who Holds
bride, Tomorrow", followed by the
; to the pronouncement of man and
ed Me" wife, as the newly weds led the
fighting' processional to the banquet
Sharon hall for the reception and cel-
ian. ebration.
red the At the reception, Knecole
rooms- and Brandon passed out a flyer
Jlissha stating: "There are no words
Carter, that can express the love we
sevelt feel from your presence as we
ell and both celebrate a new milestone
Kenia in our lives. We would like to
Stro- thank all of our family and
ic was friends for their love, support,
and prayers. We would also like
topher to thank our extended family
Fran- and friends for sharing in this


special day. We will continue to
feed on your love."

********
Hosea Butler, president,
Nelson Jenkins, chairman
and other members of the King
of Clubs of Greater Miami pro-
vided the community with an
afternoon consisting of a mild
summer breeze, a panoram-
ic view of boats adding to the
scenery for the 23rd an-
nual scholarship and
awards banquet at the
Doubletree Grand Hotel
Biscayne Bay.
When the guests ar-
rived they were treated
with music of jazz, Rock
& Roll and Pop from the
Psi Phi Band and mem-
bers were attired in a PAS<
formal white coat ac-
centuated with a black & white
chest ribbon,. black trousers
and an appearance of pride and
dignity. The men were joined by
their lovely wives, sweethearts,
and significant others as every-
one dined on a choice of fish,
chicken, and/or prime rib roast
with German chocolate cake.
In addition, as an annual tra-
dition, the afternoon focused
on selected students who re-
ceived scholarships for college.
This year, the Dr. T.S. Greet
Memorial Scholarships went
to Stephanie David, a student
from North Miami Beach Senior
High who invested her time in
community service and actively
involved in her school's extra-
curricular activities, including
the marching band with an
overall grade point average of
4.17.
Monica Black also received
the Dr. T.S. Greer Memorial


Scholarship for her Miami Po-
lice Department Explorers Post
162 service and acquiring over
800 hours of community ser-
vice, serving as a tutor at Mi-
ami Dade College's Community
Technology Center in Liberty
City. Her goal is to pursue
a career in criminal justice,
maintain a GPA of 4.12 and
represent Miami Edison Senior
High.
Michael Lovette re-
ceived his award for
maintaining a GPA of
4.12 while he displayed
winning activities in
athletic at Homestead
Senior High, while pro-
ducing the school's tele-
vision station. He is also
captain of the Wrestling
HAL Team, past president of
the Drug Free Program,
assist in the College Assistance
Program, and will major in
Communications when he goes
to college. No name was men-
tioned.
Two scholarships were
given by Dr. Rozalyn
Hester Paschal, M.D.
and husband, Fletcher
Paschal, Jr., to Victoria
Eshietodono and Leon
ard Thompson, respec-
tively. Victoria is also W1
one of the top county-
wide track and field run-
ners and active in the National
Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta,
Junior Trustee Board of Lord's
Kitchen Ministry and a GPA of
4.7 at American Senior High
School.
Leonard Thompson brought,
with him a scholarship award
from The Egelloc Civic and So-
cial Club, recently, and his re-
cord of being a member of the


National Honor Society, Youth
Advisory of Miami Children's
Trust, student intern with the
Black 'History Tours, Student
Government Association, Big
Brothers and Silver Knight
Award nominee. Thompson
will pursue a degree in law.
The most serious part of the
afternoon was the power point
tribute to the late Clinton E.
Brown presented by Butler.
Brown was a secretary for the
organization who gave us more
than 100 percent in keeping
the books. He shall be missed
for his love and dedication to
the organization.
Kudos go out to members of
the organization and support-
ers that include Stan and Sar-
ah Allen, Chico Arenas, Mabel
Brown, Vanessa Byres, Margie
Fayson, Rhonda Gilyard, Mil-
ton and Josephine Hall, Anita
Harrell, Beverly Johnson, Fr.
and Mrs. Kenneth C. Major,
Alva Maull, Bonnie North,
Sandra Powell, Dr.
Herman and Edna
N Pratt, Mary Simmons,
Tillie Stibbins, Ruth
Simms, Dr. Lorraine
F. Strachan, Carolyn
White, Bennie White
and Mary Woodard.
ILSON

The colors of pink
and green were prevalent in the
state capital, last week, as Al-
pha Kappa Alpha sisters from
across Florida converged upon
the legislature to register their
demands. Leading the sorority
sisters were Florida Sen. Fred-
erica S. Wilson, D-Miami and
Emma Curry,, chairperson,
Gamma Zeta Omega Chapter
of South Florida.


Some of the issues addressed
include human trafficking,
medicaid assistance for breast
and cervical cancer treatment,
FCAT testing, minority busi-
ness recertification, teachers
concerns, and accepting the
stimulus package of President
Barrack Obama.
Some of the members in at-
tendance were Dr. Charlie
Albury, Verna Edington, Dr.
Brenda Edwards, Evelyn Ev-
ans Roberts, Ann Henry,
Sheila Hylton DeToro Forlen-
za, Bertha Milton, M. Dolores
Richardson, Norma Stiles,
Katie Turner and Albertha
Wright.


Speaking of Sen. Wilson,
founder of the 5000 Role Mod-
els of Excellence Project and
according to Melodie Delancy,
staff member, stated how the
month of May will be extremely
busy for the organization, role
models and parents.
The parents will be recog-
nized for participating in a
special program of bonding
with their families and will re-
ceive a brand-new computer at
Mt. Calvary MBC, beginning at
5:30 p.m., Thursday, May 14.
Special role models of excel-
lence will meet at the School
Board building, beginning at
7:30 a.m., Tuesday, May 19.
And, of course, recipients for
the scholarship awards will
meet at the Adrienne Arsht
Center for the Performing Arts
at 5:30 p.m., Friday, May 22.All
adult role models are requested
to attend each activity and be
prepared to carry out the tra-
dition of tie-tying, hand shake,
and the bonding hug.


The ladies of St. Agnes'
Guild cordially invite you to
join us as we celebrate our
37"' Feminine Emphasis Day
at 10:45 a.m., May 17. The
speaker will be Rev. Youlon-
da Godbolt from, the Banks
United Methodist Church in
Archer, Fl. Juanita Armbris-
ter, chair; Julie Edwards,
co-chair; and Anna Grace
Sweeting, president, are the
officers of St. Agnes' Guild.
Congratulations to Dr. Nel-
son L. Adams, his wife, and
grandmother, Naomi A. Ad-
ams who; witnessed their
daughter and granddaugh-
ter graduation from Loyola
University in Louisiana last
weekend.
The Adams' son, Nelson
III, will be graduating from
Coral Gables Senior High in
June.
Get-well wishes to Rev.
Charles Uptgrow, Myrna
Range-Lee, Doris McK-
inney-Pittman, Elouise
Farrington, Marie Kelly-
DeVoe, Wendell Stirrup,
Herbert Rhodes, Jr., Car-
metta Brown-Russell, Mary
E. Dorsaint, Cynthia Pea-
cock, .Mildred Marquis,
Vashti Armbrister, Dor-
eatha Payne, Edward Blue,
Jr., Dr. Albert Rolle, Ismae
Prescott and Grace Heastie-
Patterson.
Congratulations to the
Shorter-Meares families
whose daughter, Krystal
Louise Shorter Meares,
graduated with a Masters
Degree in Educational Psy-
chology from New York State
University on May 11. Krys-
tal will pursue her PhD in
Counseling at the Univer-
sity of Georgia in Athens,
Ga. in August.
Vernita Nelson is now
the Assistant City Man-
ager for the City of Miami
Gardens.
The Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority Incorporated will
have their regional con-
vention in Huntsville, Al.
from June 24-27.
Congratulations goes out
to Richard L. M. Barry II,'
a freshman at Maritime
and Science Technology
High School (MAST Acade-
my), who was recently pro-
moted to Seaman Appren-
tice E-2 in the only United
States Coast Guard Junior
Reserve Officers Training


Corp. (JROTC)
program in the
nation. Rich-
ard is the son
of Ronald E.
and Diana Fra-
zier III and the grandson
of Rev. Canon and Mrs.
Richard L.M. Barry.
Also, Richard has been
selected as a Student
Ambassador by. People to
People Program which was
established in 1956 by
former President Dwight
David Eisenhower. This
summer, Richard will
spend three weeks trav-
eling through England,
France, Germany, Bel-
gium, Switzerland and the
Netherlands.
Throughout our city, the
classes of "1949"will be-


gin to observe their "60th"
class reunion. Our beloved
Booker T. Washington,
Percy Oliver, president
and Whittinton Bernard
Johnson is the chair-
man of their activities. On
their agenda are some of
the following: a trip to the
nation's capital, parties,
worship services and pic-
nics. A pre-Mother's Day
service and luncheon were
held at Billy Thompson-
Ivy. Prior to the event,
the worshipped at North-
west Seven-Day Adventist
Church.
The best career advice to
the young: Find out what
you like doing best and
get someone to pay you
for doing it.
Maude Newbold would
like for native Miamians to
get in touch with her.' She
has a plan for all of us and
believes the community
will love it. Please give her
a call.
Seemingly, we have ar-


Registration Fee: $75.00 Weekly: $85.00
Time: 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday
This camp will feature the following activities/ classes:
Juanita Walker Modeling and Dress for Success
D. Weatherspoon From Boys to Men
E. Walker Beginning Math
D. Clarke of Bethune Cookman University -Music
K. Walker Field Events, Exercise, Healthy Eating Habits
The camp will also feature guest speakers, field trips, arts
and crafts, etiquette and manners

Sheye's of Miami Learning Center D.B.A Gilbert's Angels
3038 NW 48", Terr Miami, Fl 33142
Phone: 305-634-6268 305-986-8395 .305-758-7167

LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE PLEASE ACT FASTI!











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


%.u~j S.' mrr'aflirrcr~ilimmu toilk too h i"*%.fr


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Former child star Jaleel White gives a second chance to small-screen


This time, though, the ac-
tor -- renowned for playing
the character Steve Urkel
on the 1980s sitcom 'Fam-
ily Matters' -- will star in the
web-based series 'Road to
the Altar,' premiering online
June 15.
According to a rep, 'Road'
is a mockumentary that taps
into the humor and insanity
inherent in the oldest and
most sacred of human tradi-
tions: the wedding.
The 'series follows one
couple's comical journey
through the wedding pro-
cess over the course of 10
four-minute episodes.
The series, which will in-
clude a smorgasbord of in-
tegrated marketing com-


ponents (code for product
placements), will also star
'As the World Turns' actress
Leyna Juliet Weber.
One episode will be filmed
at a Pier 1 branch in Los
Angeles, where the future
groom, Simon, uses the lo-
cation as a fitting room and
the bride to be, Rochelle,
goes shopping for' gifts.
Pier 1 is supplying all of
the merchandise for use as
props and set decoration.
The items will be donated to
charity after completion of
principal photography.
Other brands, such as
Panda Express, Blackberry
and iRobot, have donated
their products for set deck
usage.


Richard Faison










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Products......... F ree
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 9.57
(Individual 12-Pack, each ... 3.33)


Doritos
Tortilla F
Chips.................* F ee
Assorted Varieties, 11.75 to 14.5-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.99
(Assorted Tostitos Salsa or Sauce,
15.5 or 16-oz jar ... 2/5.00)


18-Pack Assorted 1199
Miller Beer ................ 11-
Or Coors, 12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(12-Pack Bud Light Lime, 12-oz can or bot.
or Budweiser American Ale, 12-oz bot. ... 9.99)


Prices effective Thursday, May 14 through Wednesday, May 20, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee and
Monroe Counries. AnV item carried by Publiy GreenWice Marxel will be at the Publx advertised sale price. Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity rights reserved.


Breyers i.
Ice Cream..... Free
Assorted Varieties, 48-oz ctn.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5.27




T .i W1' VISA -


499


'ad


I BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


In -J


I i


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY I 3-19,20091










Sulne Miaio Tmes



Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 13-19, 2009


Miami-Dade County Commission Chairman Dennis C. Moss and media director Veronica Carey Buie (right-center) with the
students from Miami Southridge Senior High School preparing for National Organization of Black County Officials (NOBCO)
Future Leaders Scholarship Conference and Luncheon on April 30. -Pictured provided by the Miami-Dade County Commission.


County Chairman .and local youth


attend NOBCO scholarship luncheon


More than 100 students through-
out Miami-Dade County convened at
the Mayfair Hotel in Coconut Grove
to help launch the 25th annual Eco-
nomic Development Conference of the
National Organization of Black County
Officials' (NOBCO) Youth Future Lead-
ers Scholarship Luncheon with special
guest, former Miami Heat player Alonzo
Mourning, on April 30.


During the luncheon, Mourning
shared with the students the signifi-
cance of giving back and serving your
community. Mourning joined Miami-
Dade County Commission Chairman
Dennis C. Moss,, NOBCO's Chairman
Webster J. Guillory and other County
Commissioners: Barbara Jordan, Dor-
rin D. Rolle and Audrey Edmonson, in
awarding over $12,000 worth of schol-


arships to five well-deserving high
school students in districts one, two,
three and nine.
Chairman Moss stated, "I can't think
of a better way for these young men
and women to get a taste of leader-
ship than to attend this conference and
meet the actual people who are leaders
and county officials in their own com-
munities."


Miami-Dade County Commission Chairman Dennis C. Moss (center) and that graduates of Greater Miami Service Corps in the
Board of County Commission Chambers on April 24. -provided by the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commission

200 Miami-Dade students graduate from the Greater Miami Service Corp


In a room packed with students, par-
ents, administrators, Miami-Dade Coun-
ty officials and agency representatives,
one by one, in their satin-green caps
and gowns, graduates of the Greater Mi-
ami Service Corps (GMSC) each proudly
marched in and took their seats. Miami-
Dade County Commission Chairman
Dennis C. Moss, keynote speaker of the
GMSC Commencement Ceremony, in-
spired nearly 200 youth in the Board
of County Commission Chambers on
Friday, April 24. He delivered a timely,
motivating and challenging message to
a packed room of aspiring young men
and women.


during the ceremony, Deborah
Dorsett, executive director of the GMSC,
presented service awards to both Chair-
man Moss and Commissioner Jordan for
their continued support and commit-
ment to the organization over the years.
Other special guests present were GMSC
board member, Honorable Wilbert "Tee"
Holloway; GMSC board representative,
Steve Applebaum; Community Action
Agency's board chairman, Dr. Bill Zub-
koff; Community Action Agency's execu-
tive director, Julie Edwards; Assistant
State Attorney, Kionne McGhee; and
GMSC'vice chair and former news an-
chor, Jill Beach, who served as mistress


of ceremony.
The mission of the Greater Miami Ser-
vice Corps is to enhance the
employability and self-esteem of young
adults ages 18-23, utilizing
public/private ventures to provide
tangible community improvements and
develop a skilled workforce.
"I am extremely proud today of these
young men and women. I believe that
their future is bright and I trust they
will grasp the many great opportuni-
ties that have been afforded them", says
Chairman Moss. The GMSC slogan is
"Developing a Sense of Work Ethic and
Community Spirit."


A group of local professionals take part in Orchard Villa El-
ementary Career Day on April 29.
-Photo courtesy/ Orchard Villa Elementary

Local Miami professionals

participate in Career Day
Orchard Villa Elementary School, located in Liberty City,
held their annual Career Day on April 29 in which members
of the community met with students and discussed their pro-
fessions.
Participants included Scott .Galvin, Paul Lewis, Melvin Da-
vis, Carol Graines, Basil Binns, Javier Namen, Nastasha Her-
nandez, N. Patrick Range, Jr., Gregory Gay, Ike Woods, Larry
Spring, Tyrone English, Steven H. Johnson, SFC Anguita,
Dr. Fred Morley, Noel Johnson, Ryan LaSane, Angel Diaz,
Brian LaSane, Linda Nelson, Aulide Edouard, Fredericka
Fisher, Nancy Yates, Edward Fernandez, Tracy Moore, An-
gela Reyes, Mayren Franco, Stephanie Sylvester, Dr. Venita
Timpson, Mitiz Thorpe, SFC Wiggan, Phyllis Logan, Roxanne
Vargas, Glenda Foster, Patricia Chestang Duncan, Ja'Shdn
and Shirley Perry.
Orchard Villa was established in 1938 and was one of the
schools in Florida to experience desegregation.


Patricia Braynon,executive director of Miami-Dade County
Housing Finance Authority and County Commissioner
Audrey M. Edmonson outside of the foreclosure seminar
held at the American Legion Post 29, Saturday, May 2.
S-.photo courteSvy O Miami-Dade County Commission

County Commissioner provides
legal services for foreclosed homes
Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmon-
son teamed up with the county's Housing Authority and
Affordable Housing to sponsor a free
foreclosure legal clinic at the American Legion Post 29,
Saturday, May 2. Residents with foreclosure problems
were-able to find out what legal
options were available to them in order t6 protect their
homes.
"We cannot remain idle and watch our neighborhoods
deteriorate. We are all in it together and it is by helping
one another that we will be able to keep our most precious
assets, our homes," said Commissioner Edmonson.
Foreclosures impact families in all facets of their lives.
From the sentiment of failure to relocation to changing
schools, everything is disrupted. Studies have shown that
people who succumb to foreclosures are most likely to see
their marital status altered if not completely destroyed. In
addition, other emotions often leave the individuals feeling
letdown, disappointment, shame.
These numbers are staggering, countrywide: 9,814 in
2006 26,391 in 2007 56,656 in 2008. The first quar-
ter of 2009, 19,049 (January March) foreclosures have
taken place.


41 It- MV b 4


Copyrighted Material .


Syndicated Content ih- -:


Available from Commercial News Providers...
Available from Commercial News Providers











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Al THF MIAMI TIMES. MAY 13-19. 2009


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BUIES SEVC


eeA&w it
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15J 9


Miami-Dade Community Action
Agency holds Resource Fair


During the month
of May, Miami-
Dade's Community
Action Agency (CAA)
as part of its obser-
vance of National
Community Action
Month will be hold-
ing two Resource
and Job Fairs.
The Fairs will take
place at the South
Dade Government
Center, located
10710 Southwest
211 th Street in Cut-
ler Bay, from 10
a.m.-2 p.m., Thurs-
day, May 14 and at
the Joseph Caleb
Center, 2200 North-
west 54th Street in
Brownsville, from 10
a.m.-2 p.m., Tues-
day, May 19.
The purpose of the
Fairs is to assist res-
idents with employ-
ment and identifying
resources available
in the community
to help individuals


and families who are
struggling through
these tough econom-
ic times.
Over 80 providers
will meet at each lo-
cation that will in-
clude health care
providers, county
departments, state
agencies, federal
agencies, schools,
social service orga-
nizations, commu-
nity based organiza-
tions and churches.
Among the providers
will include a num-
ber of employers that
will include -Miami-
Dade, the Broward
Sherriff's Office and
South Florida Work-
force.
For additional in-
formation regarding
the Resource Fair
or to find out more
about the programs
and services provid-
ed by CAA, call 786-
469-4600.


Regional airlines hit by

less Americans traveling


U.S. regional airlines,
ExpressJet Holdings
Incorporated(XJT.N)
and SkyWest
Incorporated(SKYW. 0)
said last week their
first-quarter results
were weakened by de-
creasing travel demand
in the recession.
ExpressJet, which
provides regional
flights for Continental
Airlines (CAL.N), said
its first-quarter net
loss shrank to $11.4
million, or 67 cents
per share, from a
$35.7 million loss, or
$6.96 a share, a year
ago. Excluding items,
the company posted
a loss of 62 cents per
share. Revenue fell
62.1 percent to $1.7
billion.
ExpressJet operates
more than 87 percent
of its fleet through
Houston-based Conti-
nental.
SkyWest, which
flies for Delta Air
Lines (DAL.N) and
UAL Corp's (UAUA.O)


United Airlines, post-
ed a smaller quarterly
profit, hurt by falling
travel demand, anx
the grounding of some
flight at its Atlanta
hub.
The company report-
ed net income of $9.4
million or 16 cents per
share, compared with
a profit of $29.1 mil-
lion or 47 cents per
share a year ago.
Revenue dropped 22
percent to $673 mil-
lion.
The carrier warned
last month that results
would trail expecta-
tions after its Atlantic
Southeast Airlines unit
grounded '60 jets for
engine inspections.
The unit also expe-
rienced "significant"
weather-related can-
cellations in Atlanta,
the company said.
ExpressJet shares
were up 12 cents to
$1.84 on the New York
Stock Exchange, while
SkyWest shares were
up 43 cents to $13.29.


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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSALS

Sealed Proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the follow-
ing:

RFP NO. 126088 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR
CAMERA SYSTEM UPGRADE AND EXPANSION (CCTV)

OPENING DATE: 2:00 PM, MONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009

A MANDATORY pre-proposal conference will be held on Friday. May 22. 2009
at 10:00 AM at the Miami Police Department, 400 NW 2nd Avenue Miami, FL
33128. The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Proposers an op-
portunity to present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the require-
ments of the proposal documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s) of
the proposer attend in order to qualify to submit a proposal.

Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification 5/29/2009 at 4:00 P.M.

Detailed for this Proposal (RFP) is available upon the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. is
(305) 416-1904.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pete Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 003581


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ss


SECTION D


101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
One and two bedrooms.
We work with bad credit.
Remodeled, ceramic tile,
central air, laundry machine,
appliances, quiet, parking
and FREE WATER 786-
506-3067.
1545 N.W. 8 Avenue

1212 N. W. 1 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE-IN
One bedroom, one bath,
$500, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.


1229 N.W. 1 COURT
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one
bath, $550, stove,
refrigerator, air, 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144



1278 N.W. 44th Street
One bdrm, one bath, water
included. $550 monthly
Call 786-299-6765.

1281 N.W. 61st Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552

13130 N.W. 30th Avenue
Newly remodeled, spacious,
one bdrm, one bath, washer
and dryer, tiled. Section 8
welcomed. $700 monthly.
Call 954-557-4567

140 N.W. 13 Street
One month to move in. Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

140 SW 6 STREET HOME-
STEAD
Three bedrooms, one bath
$625 monthly. Call:
305-267-9449

14100-40 N.W. 24 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL- First
Month Free
Security only! One bedroom,
pne bath $650, two bed-
rooms, one bath $775.
Call 786-287-0682

1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors, $600 monthly; One
Month's Rent Move In Spe-
cial with restrictions.
Call 305-458-3977


1490 NW 69 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
stove refrigerator, central air
included. $800 monthly. Mr.
Washington, 305-632-8750

156 N.E. 82nd Street
One bdrm $700, Two bdrm
$800. 786-325-7383

180 NW 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath. Qui-
et. $550 monthly.
786-282-6322

180 NW 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath. Qui-
et. $550 monthly.
786-282-6322

1887 NW 44 STREET
One bedroom, one bath. $575
monthly, $800 moves you in.
305-637-9359
305-303-0156

190 N.W. 68 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath,
electricity and water included!
$850 monthly. 786-282-6322

1950 N.W. 2nd Court
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

1955 N. W. 2 Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath,
$450. 305-642-7080

1969 N. W. 2 Court
MOVE-IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air,
free water.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE
IN. One bedroom, one bath.
$475 305-642-7080


2186 N. W. 38 Street
Newly renovated, one bed-
room, one bath, $800,
appliances, free water.,
305-642-7080

2804 N.W. 1st Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath,.
$750 monthly, appliances
included. Free 19" LCD TV.
Joel 786-355-7578

2945 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$575 monthly. Section 8 OK.
Call 786-412-9343


2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3186 N.W. 135th Street
One bdm, one bath, $650
monthly, call 954-704-0094.

3669 Thomas Avenue
Two bdrms, stove, refrigera-
tor, air. $650. 305-642-7080

415 N.W. 9 ST.
55 and Over Special! One
bedroom one bath. $425 mth-
ly. 786-339-4106

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bdrm, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security.
305-751-6232

5629 S.W. Fillmore
Hollywood
One large bdrm. $795 mthly.
Move in $1590.
786-370-0832

5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
new appliances, $600 mthly,
$1200 moves you in.
305-458-3977

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

621 N. W. 64 Street
Two bdrms, from $835, nice
and clean, laundry room,
parking. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424

725 1/2 N.W. 100th Street
Near schools and hospital,
two bedrooms, one bath, air,
appliances, wall to wall car-
pet, mini blinds. Credit check,
$640 monthly, $1280 to move
in. $50 Application fee.
305-300-0983

8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699


ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one, two, and four
bdrms. Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
305-642-7080 ,
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa-
Locka, Brownsville. Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One, Two and Three Bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For more information/spe-
cials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com

Close to Miami Avenue
on N.E. 84th Street
-One bedroom and efficiency
for rent. Call 305-970-5574

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All .applications accepted.
Easy qualify. Move in special.
One bedroom, one bath,
$495 ($745), two bedrooms,
one bath, $595 ($895).
Free water!
Leonard 786-236-1144

Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrace Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bdrms. Bring ad for move
in deals & $50 off app. fee.
Call 305-688-8881.


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699


MIAMI LAKES AREA
Studio, Section 8 welcome,
305-558-2249 or
786-301-4368.


MOVE-IN SPECIAL
1801 NW 2 AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath.
$600 monthly, $900 to
move in All appliances
included Free 19 inch LCD
TV Call Joel 786-355-7578

N. DADE Section 8 OK!


One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedroom, one bath.
$1145. Premier Realty Team
786-301-2171



5651 NW 17 AVENUE
Great location for your busi-
ness Ready to rent. Busy
area. Lots of parking in rear.
$1200 monthly. First and
last required. 305-494-4398
COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside .lighting.
$750 monthly, $750 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699



13215 NE 6 AVENUE #309
One bedroom, one bath,
central air and heat, appli-
ances and water included.
$700 monthly. 305-218,
1227
19387 N.W. 29th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath.
1200 monthly, Section 8 wel-
comed! Call 305-968-5452

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
17934 NW 40th COURT
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly.
All Points Realty
Patrick 305-542-5184

MIAMI LAKES AREA
One bdrm, one bath. Gated.
Amenities. $1000 mthly.
Section 8 OK. 305-527-0875


1187 N.W. 63 St. #2
Two bdrms, one bath, appli-
ances, air. $800 mthly, $1600
to move in. 305-389,8414

1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885 Doreen

13415 NW 31 Ave
Newly remodeled one bed-
room, one bath, tiled floor,
washer, dryer access. $650
mthly, water included. $1000
move in. 954-557-4567

1401 N. W. 55 TERRACE
Two bedroom, one bath, ap-
plicances, Section 8 OK!- call
305-761-7443

18423 N.E. 1st Court
Three bdrms, two baths, air,
washer and dryer hookup.
$1200 monthly.
305-681-2862

1890 N.W. 89 Terrace
One bedroom. 786-587-
3731


2242A N.W. 82 St
One bedroom, one bath,
newly remodeled, central air.
$650 monthly. 786-299-4093

2427 N.W. 104 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899

2466-B N.W. 44th Street
One bedroom, air, $500
monthly. 786-877-5358

247 N. E. 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, micro wave,
water, parking. $750 monthly
plus security. Section 8 ok.
786-216-7533.

2541 York Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$650, appliances, free water.
305-642-7080


3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

324 N. E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$925. Call 305-642-7080

4135 N.W. 24 Ave.
Two bedrooms, appliances,
central air and heat. $900
mthly. Section 8 OK.
305-687-7649


430-432 NW 59 TERRACE
Spacious two bdrms, one
bath, completely renovated.
Section 8 ok. 305-318-3664

4643 NW 16 AVENUE
One bedroom. $650 monthly.
Vouchers accepted.
305-638-5946

4651 N.W. 16 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650. Section 8 OK! 305-638-
5946, 786-512-7622

5629 S.W. Fillmore
Hollywood
Large two bedrooms, one
bath. $1000 mthly. Move in
$2000. 786-370-0832

565 N.E. 131 Street
One bedroom, in rear,, tile
floors, nice and clean. $750.


Section 8 ok. 786-326-7424
5927 N. E. 1 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800, stove, refrigerator, air.


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 13-19, 2009


305-642-7080
6109 S. W. 63 Terrace
Two bedroom, one bath,
$700. Call 305-642-7080

670 Oriental Boulevard
(151 Street N.W. 36 Avenue).
Two bedrooms, one bath,
tiled floors, air, washer hook-
up. $800 monthly, $1600 to
move in. 305-625-4515

6847 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air/heat, $1000/mth,
Section 8 welcomed! Call
305-318-3420.

711 S.W. 10 St. Dania
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 mthly, $425 Deposit.
Section 8 OK. 305-213-5673

720-724 S.W. 7 St. Dania
Two bdrms, one bath. $850
mthly plus $425 deposit.
Section 8 OK. 305-213-5673

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776

874 N.W. 70th Street
New three bedrooms, two
baths, Section 8 $1300. Call
786-285-9611, 786-346-8505

ALLAPATTAH AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 Welcome.

224 N.W. 63rd Street
Two bdrms, one bath,
central air, Section 8 ok!
Call 786-797-7878


786-355-5665
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in. Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace


1140 N. W. 79 Street
Efficiency, 'one bath, $450.
One bdrm, one bath, $550.
Free water. Mr. Willie #109

1747 NW 82 STREET
Efficiency for rent. First, last.
and security. 305-710-7388
or 305-303-8128

2571 East Superior St.
$600 moves you in. Call
786 389-1686

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $210 wkly to
.$720 monthly. 305-751-6232.

8010 NW 20 Avenue
Spacious, furnished efficien-
cy, utilities included, $575
mthly. 786-216-2448

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency. Call 305-754-7776 "

MIAMliGARDENS
Furnished efficiency, 786-
287-0864 or 786-337-5853.

MIAMI GARDENS
Furnished. $650 monthly.
305-652-1132

NORLAND AREA.
Close to public transporta-
tion, $475 monthly, 305-770-
0120

NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance cable; a/c.
Call 305-758-6013.


1161 N.W. 139 Street
$120 weekly, $240 to move
in, includes cable, central air.
305-310-5272

13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486


1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1775 N.W. 151st Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996


1845 N.W. 50th Street
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-637-9359
305-303-0156

2010 NW 55 TERRACE
One room, central air and
appliances. $125 weekly.
786-487-2222

2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,


$476 monthly. 786-277-3434,
305-914-4461


W235


2340 NW 53 STREET
Nice rooms near metrorail.
305-984-3733

2911 NW 70 TERRACE
Newly renovated, utilities in-
cluded, free cable connection.
$120 weekly. $350 to move
in. Call Lola at 786-877-7150
or Charles at
786-287-3872

3177 NW 42 STREET
Call 305-904-7837 "

3185 N.W. 75th Street
Roommate needed. Access
to entire house. Near Tri-Rail.
$100 weekly. 305-439-2906

4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

CAROL CITY AREA
Own bathroom.
305-621-7940


HOMESTEAD AREA
Fully furnished, microwave,
air, refrigerator, cable TV and
armoire. 786-285-9611
786-346-8505

Large furnished bedroom for
rent. $700 monthly, utilities in-
cluded. Call 754-423-3714

LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice rooms, $110 weekly.
Call 305-335-9463

Miramar-Mirabella Area
Near Miami. Furnished rooms
for rent, utilities included.
$135 weekly. 954-305-4713

NORTH DADE AREA
$125 weekly, $15, additional
person, air. 305-254-6610

NORTH MIAMI
Nicely furnished room with
private entrance.
786-312-5781

NORTHWEST AREA
CLEAN ROOMS
954-245-1626

NORTHWEST AREA
Furnished room for rent in pri-
vate home, light kitchen priivi-
lege, call 305-621-1017.

NW AREA
Cable and air included. $125
weekly, $500 to move in.
Ms. Thomas 786-308-5024



1045 N.W. 47 Street
Five bedrooms, two baths,
$1750 monthly. New Home.
No Security. 786-325-7383

1087 N.W. 73 St.
Two bdrms, two baths. Section
8 welcome.305-345-7833

1101 N. W. 58 Street
Four bdrm, two baths, Sec-
tion 8 ok. Call 352-321-1709.

14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
one month security.
954-826-4013

1480 N.W. 154 St.
Miami Gardens
Renovated four bedrooms,
one bath. Section 8 OK.
305-965-0671

1535 NW 70 STREET
Two bdrms one bath, Sec-
tion 8 ok. central air, washer,
dryer, laundry room, stove,
refrigerator, fence, secu-
rity doors and windows, front
porch, back porch. $1250
mthly. Rent -305-283-3412
Sale 305-206-5000

1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or
305-992-3653

1785 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$775 monthly. 305-267-9449

1790 N.W. 48 Street
Two bedroom, one bath, $925
monthly. 305-267-9449

1821 NW 63 STREET
Totally remodeled, large, one
bedroom home. $725 month-
ly. Section 8 ok.
305-984-3733

1843 N. W. 58 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$950 monthly. Central air.
305-642-7080

1850 N.W. 55 Street
Three bdrm, two bath, den,
Section 8 OK. 786-344-4407

1901 Rutland Street
Opa- Locka
Renovated two bedrooms,
one bath. Section 8 OK.
305-965-0671


20430 N.W. 26th Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1475 Section 8 welcome.
Dorothy 954-437-7166

2045 N.W. 98 St
Nice, two bdrms, townhouses/
duplexes, central air, $850/


month. 786-303-7896


2246 Rutland Street
Nicely renovated, two bdrms,
one bath, tile/carpet, air,
fence. $1025 monthly, Section
8 OK! Kenny 540-729-6634.

2273 N.W. 65 St Rear
One bdrm $725, $1450 to
move in. 305-525-0619

228 NW 44 STREET
Two bedroom house for rent.
305-970-5573

2300 N.W. 67th Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, Section 8 welcome.
Ready to move in.
786-274-0909

2330 N.W. 97th St. Rear
One bdrm. house, $750
monthly 305-693-0620

2359 N.W. 56th Street
, Four bedrooms, two and half
bath, central air, appliances,
Section 8 okay!
305-343-5700

2380 N. W. 100 Street
Three bedroom, one bath,
$1300 monthly, utilities
included. 786- 346-0702

2535 N.W. 120 St.
Three bdrms, one and a half
bath. New kitchen, central air.
Section 8 OK. 954-296-4428

3045 N.W. 68th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Ok. 954-704-0094

4115 NW 11 PLACE
Four bedrooms, two baths,
newly remodeled. Section 8
ok. 305-978-9472

412 N.W. 59 Street
Two.bdrms, den, Section 8.
786-269-5643

7 N. E. 59 Terrace'
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950. Free Water.
305-642-7080

7711 NW 17 PLACE
Large one bedroom with ap-
pliances. $650r monthly. First
and last required.
305-788-5367

96 St. N.W. 15 Ave
One bedroom, one bath,
back house. 305-691-2529

BUNCHE PARK AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 Ok. 305-625-7706

DADE COUNTY
Special program, change from
rent to own. Three and four
bedrooms available. $1500
down payment. Must have
Fair credit. 305-804-4070.

Four bdrms, two baths, air.
Section 8 OK. $500 to move
in. Morris 305-525-3540

HOUSE FOR RENT
Three and four bedroom
house for rent in Miami Gar-
dens. Call 754-423-3714

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Very large family room. Ex-
cellent condition, excellent
neighborhood. call owner/
agent 786-853-1903

N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-754-7776

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms, one bath. $850
mthly.
954-663-3990

NORTHWEST AREA
Four large bdrms,huge living
room two baths. 786-286-
2540

NW Area
Two bdrms., one bath, den,
gated, washer, dryer, $1000
mthly, Call Delores
786-217-8833; 305-685-4427

One, two and three bedrooms
available immediately. Call
305-885-0777.

OPA LOCKA AND
HIALEAH AREA
305-749-6749 or 305-510-
6465.

STOP!!!
Behind in Your Rent? 24 Hour
notice Behind in Your Mort-
gage? Kathy. 786-326-7916


321 N.W. 183rdStreet
Four bedroom, two bath,
central air. $1300 mthly, first,
last, and security to move in.
Call 305-986-8395.


1575 NE 174 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
everything new. Buy with
$3500 down and $1135
monthly P&I. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700

1830 NW 194 STREET
Four bedrooms, three baths,
two story, pool, garage. Need
TLC. Buy with $8900 down
and $1589 monthly P&I. NDI
Realtors 305-655-1700


Il;r


2301 N.W. 79th Terrace
Large, renovated, four
bdrms, two baths, TV and
utilities room. $ best offer.
305-305-5546

3825 NW 210 TERRACE
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Buy with $2900
down and $851 monthly P&I.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700

*ATTENTION'
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
""WITH"'
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
NWAREA
Brand new home, three bed-
rooms, two baths, $199,000,
as low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedrooms, two
baths at an attractive price.
Call 786-859-3772


NECU A MUOH I UAIGCE.
$8000 tax credit for first time
home buyers. FHA/VA, re-
verse mortgages. 580 score,
105 % loan to value. We fi-
nance churches and com-
mercial buildings. Loan modi-
fications or short sales.
754-423-4613





AFFORDABLE REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, roof,
washer, dryer. 786-273-1130

CHARLES ELECTRONIC
REPAIR AND SERVICE
Big screen and plasma TV's,
commercial and residential
air-conditioning. We come to
you! 260 N.E. 79 St.
Call 786-346-8225

GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

HANDYMAN
For Hire! No money down.
Pay as work is done to your
satisfaction. Carpentry, tiling,
painting and more.
George 786-547-2292

HANDYMAN
Plumbing and Carpentry. 305-
401-9165, 786-423-7233

JIM REPAIR
No service charge with repair.
All makes and models central
air, a/c units and big screen
TV's. Call 305-469-0835,
10947 NW 27 Ave.





MIZELL KIDDIE KAMPUS
Register now for Summer or
Fall. Abeka curriculum, cer-
tified teachers, computers,
progress reports, Black His-
tory, Spanish, Swahili, extra-
curricular programs, field trips
and PTA. Ages 2-5, 7 a.m. -
5:45 p.m., 1910 N.W. 95 St.,
305-836-1178



BOOTH RENTAL
Garden Beauty Salon,
305-893-4411 $80 a week

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

TEACHER NEEDED
with CDA to work in child-
care center. 305-836-1178



CUSTOM MADE
Barack Obama Back Packs
For Sale! Various Colors.
Limited Supply. Call, Secure
Yours Today, 954-822-4774.


NEED TO PURCHASE
HOME
Four bdrm, two bath, with own-
er financing. 305-621-3711


- I


INSTANI AUIIUNI
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


Medical Billing and Coding
Course
9 Weeks only $950.00 -
Easy Payment Plan
Class Start May 30, 2009
PRSS, Inc. 305-794-3961
www.prssonline.com



U.


..


GROW



YOUR

BUSINESS





BART M. WILLIAMS, JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109

c.- ., ...'-.' Since 1923
-IN NLARGST MINORITY
,;E'. S NEWSPAPER
IN THE SI UrTHEST


PLACE



YOUR



NEXT



AD



HERE


CALL TODAY 305-694-6225


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fl~ffllm6iiL., E^ e ', '


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8D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


FAMU Master's student interns at the White House


This summer, Flor-
ida Agricultural and
Mechanical University
(FAMU) student An-
drea Turk will intern
at the White House
for the Department of
Management and Ad-
ministrative Services.
"This internship will
provide valuable and
relevant work experi-
ence, validity and an
enhanced exclamation
point to my resume,"
Turk said. "I will have
the opportunity to
represent historically
black colleges and
universities (HBCU),
and show the nation
that FAMU and other
HBCUs produce top-
tier students. I want to
show that FAMU pro-


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duces individuals that
have the potential to
affect and implement
effective policies on lo-
cal, state, and national
levels of government."
Turk is a master's of
applied social science
with a concentration in
public administration
student from Gaines-
ville, Fla. She is ex-
pecting to graduate at
the August 2009 com-
mencement ceremony.
Turk enrolled at
FAMU in 1987 as a
student in the School
of Business and Indus-
try. Unfortunately, af-
ter five years of school,
her lack of passion for
the curriculum left her
with a 1.9 GPA and
no desire to remain in


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Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional. Sale & Confidential Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
-,-_. Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP
S-621-1399



NOTICE OF
INTENT TO DISSOLVE

TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES:

Minorities Overcoming the Virus through Edu-
cation, Responsibility and Spirituality, Inc.
(MOVERS, Inc.), a Florida not for profit organi-
zation hereby, notifies all interested parties, for-
mer clients and others who have been served
by MOVERS' of its intent to dissolve the corpo-
ration. All administrative functions of the corpo-
ration ceased on March 1, 2009. The Medical
Clinic ceased operations on October 1, 2008.
Copies of all MOVERS records shall be available
by contacting Connie West at 786-344-0007.


City of Miami
PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF MIAMI REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Architectural Services for Dinner Key Marina Dockmaster Building, B-60464


RFQ NO: 08-09-050
Completed Responses must be delivered to the Office of the City Clerk,
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 by 2:00 PM, on
Wednesday, June 3, 2009 ("Response Submission Date"). Any Responses
received after the above date and time or delivered to a different address or
location will not be considered.


-- '


RFQ documents may be obtained on or after May 13, 2009, from the City of
Miami, Capital Improvements Program (CIP) webpage at www.miamiaov.com/
capitalimprovements. It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure the re-
ceipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms periodically check the
CIP webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda.

The City of Miami reserves the right to accept any Responses deemed to be in
the best interest of the City, to waive any minor irregularities, omissions, and/
or technicalities in any Responses, or to reject any or all Responses and to re-
advertise for new Responses, in accordance with the applicable sections of the
City Charter and Code.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE IN ACCOR-
DANCE WITH SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE.

Pedro G. Hernandez, City Manager

DP No.005011


school.
After obtaining em-
ployment as finance
and accounting di-
rector with the State
of Florida and earn-
ing close to $55,000 a
year, without a degree,
Turk decided to return
to FAMU with a new
major and a determi-
nation to finish her col-
lege education.
"One of the things
I admire most about
FAMU is the great mix
of professors at FAMU,"
she said. "There are
professors from their
20s to their 70s in age,
and professors from
all kinds of racial and
ethnic backgrounds.
This brings a wealth
of knowledge from all


ANDREA TURK

types of personal and
professional perspec-
tives."
Upon the completion
of a bachelor's degree


in political science
with a minor in pub-
lic administration, she
decided to pursue a
master's degree.
After applying for
the summer intern-
ship at the White
House, Turk received
a call from the direc-
tor of the Department
of Management and
Administrative Ser-
vices. According to
Turk, an internship
team of profession-
als went through the
packets that were
submitted and pulled
information from
the applicants that
were best suited for
the different White
House internship of-
ferings. During her


initial phone inter-.
view, Turk was told
that her packet was
hand delivered to the
director of the
Department of Man-
agement and Admin-
istrative Services.
The Department
of Management and


Administrative Ser-
vices is responsible
for 'communications,
correspondences,
reference checks,
and security checks
for White House em-
ployees as well as
those persons calling,
entering and leaving


the White House for
business or personal
reasons.
After graduating,
Turk would like to
work'as an administra-
tor in the public sector
or as a college profes-
sor teaching public ad-
ministration.


MIAMI .

Community_

Redevelopment Agency


PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT a Regular CRA Boards of
Commissioners Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West
& Omni Community Redevelopment Agencies will take place
on Monday, May 18, 2009 at 5:00 PM, at Frederick Douglass
Elementary School in the Cafeteria, 314 N.W. 12th Street,
Miami, Florida, 33136

All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information,
please contact the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.


James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West &
Omni Community Redevelopment Agencies


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


IFB No 123083 INVITATION FOR BID FOR PURCHASE OF TWO
(2) CHIP/DUMP BODY TRUCKS

CLOSING DATE/TIME: Monday, June 1st, 2009

Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification is 5/20/2009 at
3:00 p.m.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami Purchas-
ing Department. Website at www.miamicov.com/procurement. Telephone No.
(305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO. 12271.

Pedro Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 8719 "

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
WAIVER OF FORMAL BIDS FOR THE AWARD OF
A CONTRACT FOR CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
FOR SIMPSON PARK, B-39910G


City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida






The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on May
28, 2009 beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the
public's best interest that the City Commission ratify, approve
and confirm the recommendation of the City Manager justifying
the waiver of competitive bids to award a contract for Simpson
Park to Larqcon Group, Inc.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly
scheduled City Commission meeting of May 28, 2009 at:

MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be
heard with respect to the proposed issue. Should any person
desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that
person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made including all testimony, and evidence upon which any
appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,
persons needing special accommodations to participate in this
proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305)
250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to
the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three
(3) business days prior to the proceeding.

(#003247)
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003246)


.- Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers

* - *


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


New jobless claims unexpectedly fall to 601 K









Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



PrAvailable'from Commercial News'Providers


N Iud, hns Sf 1 r S (**.h incar

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Who Cares


What Black People Think


Anyway?


If you think nobody gives a damn what
Black people think, think again. Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need
something from you.
Take corporations.They wani
you to buy their products. And
banks care whether you're going
to give them your money.
Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for
your vote. And TV and radio
stations hope you will pay
attention to their shows.
The point is, all these peojole
want something from you.
And when people want
something from you, you
have got power over
them.We should learn
to use that power
wisely to make the
changes we need to
make.
Give your money, your
votes and your loyalty to
people who deserve it. People.
who are going to give you
something in return. People who
are doing the most for the Black
community.
Who cares what Black people
think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the
business of communication.
Communicating to you the
power you have and letting you
know how you can use it. For
instance, right now there are 32
million Black people in this
country and last year we earned
more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


I


ink about it



Te j #liami ilmie
One Family Serving Since 1923


0


Phone:305-694-6210 or see us online at www. MiamiTimesOnline.com


M


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*


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


inn THF MIAMI TIMES. MAY 13-19. 2009 I


sald umirmh t tto *t o ua s federal program


Copyrighted Material



S- Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers

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*~yb ian u ovmnaqo kf






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SINGLE FAMILY HOMES 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths

7 0,P000

*After grants & Subsidies
and subject to qualification
NO CLOSING COSTS 305-801-5868 t



* Accidents Arrests
* DUI 8 Tickets Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense J* Wills/Probate
* Personal Injury Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide


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KWEBSITE
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 305-652-6095


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HOUSE OF

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11D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 13-19, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


()bama budget cuts funds for


abtl nenconly sx education

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MIAMIDAD

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs

For computer access visit any Miami-Dade County Library or
South Florida Workfoice Career Center.
For locations call 311.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
25lh''crix Excc/Icence Every Zoy


Local home sales jump


72


percent in first-quarter


* Miami saw big gains
in home sales in the
first quarter of the year
in a tentative sign of re-
covery in a city hit hard
by the recession and
the U.S. housing crisis,
a local realtors' group
said on Tuesday.
The Realtor Asso-
ciation of Greater Mi-
ami and the Beaches
(RAMB) said single-


family home sales
jumped 72 percent in
the first quarter over
the same period a year
earlier, making it the
hottest single-family
home market in any
major metropolitan
area in the state.
Sales of existing con-
dominiums soared 51
percent at a time when
statewide sales of ex-


isting condos rose just
19 percent.
"Miami has been one
of the strongest come-
back markets in the
state of Florida," said
Chairman Rick Burch
in a statement, citing
"rock-bottom prices"
and buyers from Eu-
rope, Brazil and Ven-
ezuela among factors
behind the upswing.


U.S. Postal stampS gto up again


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LEGAL NOTICE
Request For Bids
Construction of twoSingle Family Homes
(Scattered Sites)
Habitat For Humanity of Greater Miami, Inc. is requesting sealed bids for the
construction of Two Single Family Residential Units in Miami-Dade County
through the Disaster Relief Initiative Program. A Scope of Services and Ap-
plication for the bids can be provided to applicants via email at luis.azan@
miamihabitat.org or at, 3800 NW 22nd Ave, Miami, FI 33142. Bids are to be
received no later than 12 Noon, May 25, 2009. Funding for this project include
public funds from Miami Dade Office of Community Development.
Selection of contractors will be made based on price, contractor's qualifica-
tions, experience, references, the ability to meet schedule, budget, licensing,
and insurance requirements. HFHGM reserves the right to waive any informali-
ties or minor irregulations; reject any and all bids/proposals which are incom-
plete, conditional, obscure, or which contain additions not allowed for; accept
or reject any proposal in whole or in part with or without cause; and accept the
proposals which best serves HFHGM and community residents.

Q W i -......








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