Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00828
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: April 29, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00828
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text




Obama impressive in first 100 days


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Volume 86 Number 35 MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


A mother's plea:


"Stop the violence"


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com
The red flashing lights of police cruisers, and the yellow
tape investigators leave behind are seen all too frequently in
Liberty City.
At five years of age, Espere Alexander has become one of
many recent victims of the current spate of gun violence in
the community. Espere, now six, a student at Shadowlawn
Elementary, is making a slow recovery after being shot
during an egg hunt on Easter Sunday.
"Right now, he's in a rehabilitation center. He has his foot
inside a little cast, but it's dangling from the bed," said his
mother, Andrea Alexander in a Miami Times interview on
Monday. "The bullet went through and it broke the bone."
Alexander, 23 and a student at Brown Mackie College,
recalls receiving a frantic telephone call from her sister's
boyfriend after the shooting.
Please turn to PLEA 4A


ANDREA ALEXANDER
Mother of Espere


Students at Edison Park Elementary in Liberty City participate in a "Stop the Violence
Day" march on April 22. -MiamiTimesphoto/Tariq Osborne


Visitor dies
of Meningitis
British school '
teacher Jade ,
Thomas died
April 7 at Mt.
Sinai Medical
Center in
Miami Beach.
After arriving THOMAS
in Miami earlier this month
on vacation from Nottingham,
England. She fell ill and went
to the emergency room at Mt.
Sinai.
Thomas thought she might
have had food poisoning and
doctors diagnosed her with
pneumonia. About a week
later, authorities reportedly
told her relatives she had died
of meningitis.


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly ai 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Ementus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member'ol Ihe Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless ol race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person. leanng no person, the
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all persons are hurl as long as anyone is held back.

A, '0 The Media Audit N==


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TPS only for Haitians?


Dear editor:


The Miami-Dade County Commissioners
S '- sent a letter to President Barack Obama
urging him' to grant Temporary Protected
Status (TPS) to Haitians immigrants cur-
* rently in the United States. The letter says
for Obama to "act now and grant fair treat-
Sment for all immigrants in our community"
but the letter is leaving out a whole lot of
other immigrants in this country. Why is
that? We have people here in Miami that
are Germans, Russians, Hispanics (for
many countries), Indiafis, Asians, French,
Canadians, Arabs, Italians and others. .
Will this TPS also be for them or is this a
o way to grant special status to the Haitians
So- like the Cubans have right now? I do not
believe in the 'wet foot dry foot law' because


it makes no sense. What country can I go
to and tell them I am going to stay since
my foot is on their soil and then tell them I
want cash and food stamps and free Med-
icaid? Nonel What we need in this country
is one immigration policy for all. The com-
missioners seem to be trying to be the new
United Nations yet only concerned with the
Haitians. Let the UN deal with countries
that need help around the world.
The County Commissioners were not
elected to set immigration policy but they
were chosen to take care of Miami-Dade
County policies. Do you know that yes, we
are in a recession, and I have not heard any-
thing the Black County Commissioners are
planning or doing to help our communities.
They sent 20 tons of food to Haiti but like
a lady said at my job, that sure could have


helped a whole lot of people in Overtown but
when have they ever had a food drive in our
community. The summer is coming up and
I know for a fact last summer these kids
had limited food items because they did not
get free lunch. When school was out, many
were walking around hungry. But who care
about that? We need a food drive in Miami,
every weekend.
No our hunger is not like those in Hai-
ti-we do not eat mud pies-but we do go
to bed hungry. We need to take care of the
people in Miami now because you know if
temporary status is granted the flood gates
will be open to come. But as I said earlier,
let all come or none at all.

Linda Simmons
North Miami


SA new plan needed to rebuild Liberty City


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WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER




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. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action . ."
Malcolm X


Dear editor:

On the night of April 20, 2009 in Liberty
City, four teenagers were victims of a drive-
by shooting. All four are expected to survive
their injuries. A couple of months ago, nine
teenagers were shot in Liberty City where
two died and seven others were wounded.
In recent years, the number of deaths asso-
ciated with assault weapons has increased
in Miami. What do I attribute these tragic
acts to? The economic and social founda-
tions in Miami Dade County's inner-cities


CAP


are imploding. Unfortunately, this is not a
recent problem but an issue that has exist-
ed since I was a young teenager. There has
always been an "underground" economy,
drug dealing, that brought with it quick
money and unmerciful violence to many of
the economically depressed communities
in Miami. So what has been done you ask?
Not much!! There has been a tremendous
amount of marching, arguing, finger point-
ing, and scapegoating. The elected officials
are reactionary iA their decision-making,
the adults are apathetic, and the young


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people are with without any direction. I
want to challenge all interested parties to
devise a plan to rescue, yes rescue, Liberty
City and other similar communities from
destruction. This plan should underscore
the importance of attracting industries for
jobs, financially supporting a park system
that protects our children from the traps of
the street and a comprehensive overhaul of
our failing schools.

Dr. Robert Malone Jr.
Miami


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


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JOHN GRIFFITH, 21
Student, North Miami

What 'Miss
California said
was true. God
created mnian
and woman for
a reason. She
lost because of
that question, P
and what Perez Hilton said was
true. I agree with her.


LEON COBBS, 23
Graphic Designer, Liberty City

S h e
shouldn't have
done that.
Something as
prestigious
as the Miss
America Pag-
eant isn't the
place to bring
up personal
opinions. It wasn't the place or


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GABRIEL BRITT, 47
Unemployed, Liberty City

What we
need to re-
member is
that we live in
a free country.
I don't think
she should be
against gay
marriage, but
I don't think
she should have lost because
she is either.

MICHELLE MILLER, 41
Entrepreneur, Miami

I don't see
anything
wrong with
gay marriage.
Everybody
has their own 9
preferences. If .'"
they can get


along, that's all right with me.
I don't have anything against
what she said though either,
that shouldn't have cost her the
pageant.

RHONDA GILLIARD, 46
Front Desk Clerk, Liberty City

She spoke
how she felt "
and she didn't
compromise. If
it did cost her
the pageant;
it's America's
loss-not hers.
She stood on a -
principle, and
America needs to stand on a
principle. ,,

LAURA LEZIN, 16
Student, North Miami

It shouldn't have cost her the
crown. We all have our opinions.
It isn't as though she said she
hated gay people, which would


be different.
She just said
she's against
gay mar-
riage.


". . I for one believe
that if you give people a
thorough understanding
of what confronts them
and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create
their own program, and
when the people create
a program, you get
action ..."
Malcolm X


Everyone in the country is trying to guess who the -mysterious
donor is, who is giving away $68 million to at least a dozen colleges
led by women. Many people say it sounds like something billionaire
Oprah Winfrey or a group of successful business women would do.
Only Black School mentioned so far is Norfolk State University in
Virginia. Stay tuned.

If you think the spring breakers, or lack thereof presented a dis-
mal March for South Florida hotels, where discounts rule, wait
until Memorial Day weekend to see the real effect of the slowdown.
Room rates dropped 20 percent in March but occupancy was still
flat. A new report predicts a quick turnaround, with the tourism
decline bottoming out this year and Miami Dade's room rates grow-
ing a healthy 7 percent in 2010.

State lawmakers appeared headed for overtime as they began,
the final week of the regular legislative session. Leaders of both
chambers remained deadlocked Monday on key budget issues in-
cluding taxes, fees, spending cuts and Seminole Indian gambling.
The deadline for setting all budget issues was midnight Tuesday to
get an on-time Friday.

High school sports came under the gun this week as the Legis-
lature battled with the massive budget shortfall. So far the plan
has included wage freezes and likely furloughs, scaled down sum-
mer school programs and cuts in transportation, the Florida High
School Athletic Association's board of directors voted to reduce var-
sity games by 20 percent and sub-varsity (JV and freshman) games
by 40 percent the next two school years.

Secret accounts may not be so. When the Internal Revenue Ser-
vice, widening its investigation of off shore private banking beyond
Swiss giant UBS AG is preparing to take action against other off-
shore banks in a bid to force them to identify U.S. taxpayers with
undisclosed foreign accounts.

Ham, pork chops and pig feet may be getting cheaper at the meat
market, but the current spread of Swine Flu has put a damper on
the sale of the pig. Not to worry, most of us can't do without these
items.

The Seminole Tribes is waving a $1.1 billion check under the
noses of Florida lawmakers to entice them to support their gam-
bling deal that gives the tribe a monopoly to run blackjack tables at
their Hard Rock Casinos, plus five other tribe sites. Florida needs
the money, but Gov. Charlie Crist isn't getting enough for what he
gives up. Stay tuned.

Florida Power & Light is really ticking off environmentalist and
national park managers for strong arming the rock mining approv-
al from the county. Opponents of the plan say the Turkey Point
operation will put supplies of fresh water at risk. Stay tuned.

Greed destroys. County Commissioner Dennis Moss is trying to
convince his colleagues that they should use a little more restraint
in putting their hands in the public cookie jar. During the next
election voters should raise that paltry $6,000 annual salary to
$100,000, of course the commissioners are not on poverty row.
Each commissioner gets more than $700,000 per year to spend
or distribute with little oversight, including a $24,000 expense ac-
count, $10,000 executive account and the $9,600 car allowance.


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Was it right for Miss California to have voiced her opinion that

she was against gay marriage at the Miss America pageant?


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AA THF MIAMI TIMFS. APRIL 29-MAY 5. 2009


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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APRIL 2: Obama attends the


Community forum to address

increased violence on May 19


PLEA,
continued from 1A

"He said, 'Get over here fast.
somebody just came and they
shot up the house, your son is
bleeding to death,"' she said.
"I was in disbelief," Alexander
continued. "I didn't have a car
at the time to go over either.
I pounded on my neighbor's
door crying."
Alexander was at his aunt's
home, when police say two
gunmen, dressed in black,
fired bullets through the door
and windows as the children
played inside.
Since then, the shootings in
Liberty City have continued.
Last Sunday, five young men
were shot outside the former
home of Brandon Mills, a
16-year-old who was himself
slain in a January shooting
that led to the death of Derrick
Gloster and wounded seven
other teens.
Another incident occurred on
April 20 when four teenagers
were shot in a drive-by shooting
near the Liberty Square
Housing Complex, located on
Northwest 13th Avenue and
63rd Street.
These examples, and a litany
qf others, highlight a disturbing
trend toward violence in the
Liberty City community.
Edison Park Elementary
School's students have had
enough.
The school's second annual,
"Stop the, Violence March,"
which took place on April 22nd,
had the noble aim of addressing
this issue.
"We want to bring awareness,
that we are standing united
. and will not accept any more
violence in our community,'
said Edison's principal Carla
Patrick, who led the parade.
Despite the sad reasons for
the parade, the children were


in high spirits as they circled
the 500 block of Northwest
67'- Street. Their return was
greeted by cheers from the
remaining students.
Talented young drummers
set the cadence for the affair,
in which participants dressed
mostly in the black, white, and
red, that has come to symbolize
the presence of the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence. The 5000
Role Models, however, were far
from the only organization in
attendance. Other participants
included 'Sylvan ., Learning
Center, Youth-Crime Watch,
and Breakthrough Miami.
Neighbors also came out of
homes along the parade route
upon hearing the drums, and
cheered the youths on.
Moses Logan, who has lived
across from the school since
2004, was one such resident.
"I think it's wonderful," he
said, "Especially because of
what they're marching for."
Vivian Dixon, a 21-year
resident of the neighborhood,
also attended the parade.
Her own daughter, Ebony,
attended -Edison Park
Elementary school before going
on to graduate from North
Miami High School, and attend
Notre Dame College, where
she is currently a doctoral
student.
"I think it's nice that all the
young kids are getting out,
getting involved, and expressing
their views," she said.
The Circle of Brotherhood, a
task force in Liberty City geared
to address the violence in the
community, will host a public
forum at the Liberty Square
Community Center, located
at 6304 NW 14th Avenue on
May 19. For more information
on the Circle of Brotherhood,
please contact the Liberty City
Community Revitalization
Trust at 305-635-2301.


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for the rest of the 2009 bud-
get year. He calls the measure
"imperfect" because it includes


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Transit,
Infrastructure & Roads Committee (TIRC) of the Miami-Dade County Board
of County Commissioners in the Commission Chambers, second floor, 111
N.W. First Street, Miami, Florida, during a meeting to begin at approximately
2:00 p.m., on May 13, 2009, where modifications to existing bus routes will
be considered as follows:
MIAMI-DADE TRANSIT (MDT) PROPOSES TO MAKE THE FOLLOWING
SERVICE ADJUSTMENTS, ON OR ABOUT JUNE 14, 2009, TO THE
FOLLOWING ROUTES TO OPERATE MORE EFFICIENTLY: ROUTE
21, 36, 41, 48, 91, 99, L, M, 183rd STREET MAX, 238,EAST-WEST.
CONNECTION, 243 SEAPORT CONNECTION, 246 NIGHT OWL,
AND THE 344 FLORIDA/HOMESTEAD CONNECTION. MDT ALSO
PROPOSES TO IMPLEMENT A NEW PREMIUM LIMITED-STOP
ROUTE: 79th STREET MAX
At the hearing, the Committee will afford an opportunity for interested
persons or agencies to be heard with respect to the social, economic, and
environmental aspects of this project. Interested persons may submit orally
or in writing evidence and recommendations with respect to said project.
A person who decides to appeal any decision made by any board, agency,
or commission with respect to any such matter considered at its meeting
or hearing, will need a record of all proceedings. Such person may need
to insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in
employment and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its
programs or services. Auxiliary aids and services for communication are
available with advance notice. This form can be made available in accessible
format upon request (audiotape, Braille, or computer disk). For material in
alternate format, a sign-language interpreter, or other accommodations,
please contact Maud Lizano at 786-469-5478. Customers
using TDD, please call through the Florida Relay Service MIAMIH M
1-800-955-8771 at least five (5) days in advance. ElrOn.


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40


MIAMI-AD

PUBLIC NOTICE
The Public is advised that a Public Hearing will be held on Tuesday, May 5,
2009 at 9:30 A.M., by the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners
(BCC) in the Commission Chambers located on the Second Floor of the Miami-
Dade Stephen R Clark Center, 111 N.W. First Street, Miami, Florida, at which
time the BCC will consider:
A Resolution declaring the NW 79th Street Corridor to be a slum and
blighted area, declaring the rebuilding, rehabilitation, conservation,
and redevelopment of the area to be in the interest of the public health,
safety, morals and welfare of the residents of Miami-Dade County, and
directing the County Mayor or his designee to competitively select a
consultant to prepare a community redevelopment plan for the NW 79th
Street Corridor.
The NW 79th Street Corridor.Area is generally described as being bounded on
the east by NW 7th Avenue, on the west by NW 37th Avenue, on the north by
NW 87th Street, and on the south by NW 62nd Street.
All interested parties may appear and be heard at the time and place specified
above. Copies of the resolution may be obtained from the Clerk, Board of
'County Commissioners, 17th Floor of the Miami-Dade County Stephen P Clark
Center.
A person who decides to appeal any decision made by the Board, Agency or
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this meeting or healing will need
a record of the proceedings. Such person may need to ensure a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, including the testimony and evidence upon which appeal is
to be based. Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in the
employment and services and does not discriminate on the basis of handicap. Sign
Language Interpreters are available upon request.


MIAMI3DAD

Driver's Education

Safety Trust Fund
Miami-Dade County is announcing the availability of FY 2007-2008 Driver's
Education Safety Trust Funds for eligible organizations and activities. The
-.County j. seeking letters of interest front a public 'school system or not-for-
profit private schools, located in Miami-Dade County, that offer the opportunity
to learn to. drive. Private driving schools established principally for the purpose
of driver education are not eligible
Additional grant requirements include: 1) curriculum must include behind the
wheel experience; 2) the driver's education must be offered to private as well
as public school students in Miami-Dade County; 3) funds must not be used for
administrative/overhead expenses; and 4) the grantee(s) must agree to provide
appropriate accountability/reporting.
The deadline for submission of letters of interest is 1:00 PM., Friday, May 15,
2009, at the Miami-Dade County Office of Grants Coordination, 111 NW 1st
Street, 22nd Floor, Miami, Florida 33128.
The contact person for the Driver's Education Safety Trust Fund, Daniel
T. Wall, Director, Office of Grants Coordination, may be reached at
305-375-4742.
Miami-Dade County is not liable for any cost incurred by the applicant in
responding to this solicitation, and it reserves the right to modify or amend the
deadline schedule for letters of interest if it is deemed necessary and in the best
interest of Miami-Dade County. The County also reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all applications, to waive any miror technicalities or irregularities,
and to award grants in the best interest of Miami-Dade County.
Miami-Dade County is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate
based on age, gender, race, or disability.









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"These shoes are made for walking"


The Honorable Mayor Carlos Alvarez,
Commissioner Audrey Edmonson,
District 3, and Miami-Dade Parks
present

Calabash Visual
Arts Festival
Saturday, May 9 11 am -6 pm
FREE
African Heritage Cultural Arts Center
6161 NW 22nd Avenue
For more information: 305.638.6771


Battle of the Bands
Miami-Dade Parks Jazz Ensemble v.
Broward College Jazz Ensemble
with special guest artists
Monday, May 11 8 pm
FREE
Joseph Caleb Auditorium 5400 NW 22nd Avenue
For more information: 305.636.2350


I I


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSIONER


AUDREY EDMONSON, DISTRICT 3




FREE

FORECLOSURE LEGAL SEMINAR

Meet with an attorney one on one to discuss homeowners' rights.


Saturday, May 2, 2009


9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Free Parking

American Legion Post 29
6445 NE 7th Ave
Miami, Fl 33138
This event is sponsored by Miami-Dade County District 3 Commissioner Audrey Edmonson, Miami-Dade Housing Finance Author-
ity, and Miami-Dade Affordable H6using Foundation Inc.


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 22-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


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Industry Forum
Doing Business with Miami-Dade County: Architecture, Engineering, Construction
Thursday, May 21, 2009 8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.
Port of Miami, Terminal D, Dodge Island
If you are an architect, engineer or a contractor, you know the severe impact the housing market and
ongoing recession has had on the building industry nationwide. Miami-Dade County is committed to
working with its partners in the building trades and professions to get work out on the street as quickly
as possible. On behalf of Mayor Carlos Alvarez, Chairman Dennis C. Moss, and the Board of County
Commissioners you are cordially invited to a workshop to discuss new initiatives and how we can work
better with you.
The Office of Capital Improvements and the County's major capital departments will provide an update
on future projects and contracting opportunities.


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 22-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY I


General Lloyd Austin is No. 2 U.S. commander in Iraq


A hero you should know


By Michael O'Hanlon

An unsung hero and great
soldier by the name of Lloyd
Austin has just finished his
tour in Iraq as the No. 2 U.S.
commander. The lieutenant
general's story deserves atten-
tion to honor his service, to un-
derstand the situation in Iraq
today, and not least to garner
key lessons for Afghanistan
about the importance of lead-
ership and the need for strong
command structures.
Perhaps the best place to be-
gin the story of Austin is early
in his tour as operational com-
mander in February 2008. The
surge had begun to decrease vi-
olence in much of the country,
and the Sunni Awakening as
well as key U.S.-Iraqi military
operations had transformed
former allied death traps such,
as Fallujah and Ramadi. But
much of Baghdad, the key oil
town of Basra and other crucial
regions of the country remained
anarchic, with militia extrem-
ists -most of-them Shiite and
most supported by Iran rul-
ing the streets. Knowing that
this had to end, Lt. Gen. Aus-
tin and' commanding Gen. Da-
vid Petraeus who now heads
the U.S.. Central Command
and who, in great admiration
for Austin, kindly agreed to be
interviewed for this column -
started planning a summer of-
fensive in Basra and elsewhere.


But then Iraqi Prime Minister
Nouri al-Maliki asked Petraeus
to come see him in late March,
and in their Sunday morning
meeting he announced that the
battle of Basra would begin the
next day. All the best-laid plans
to first establish strongholds,
checkpoints, communications,
webs and support capabilities
were discarded. With plenty of
chutzpah, but not much else,
Iraqi forces were essentially
thrust into the city with little
on-the-ground intelligence and
little backup.
As you might expect, the of-
fensive was initially a catastro-
phe. Iraqi police melted away;
the newly formed 52nd brigade
of the Iraqi army, just out of
basic training and without any
embedded coalition mentoring
teams, got bogged down in seri-
ous fighting. It appeared at
the price of being indebted to
Iran's Quds force thereafter.
Meanwhile "special groups" in
Sadr City began their most in-)
tense barrage ever of Baghdad's
Green Zone, driving embassy
personnel from their trailers
and back onto cots inside forti-
fied buildings.
American commanders re-
ally thought the battle might be
lost.

TAKING CONTROL
Into this mess stepped Lt.,
Gen. Austin. Within 48 hours
of the start of the battle of Bas-


ra, when even the city's airfield
was being pounded, Austin flew
in from Baghdad. He promptly
established a tactical opera-
tions center of some 100 people
to gather intelligence, direct air
strikes and team up with Iraqi
units on the scene. He autho-
rized Marines based in Anbar
province to deploy southward
with the Iraqi units they were
advising. He helped Iraqi lead-
ers modify their previously
impulsive battle plan. Within
about two weeks, the tide had
turned because of a battlefield
victory rather than a submis-
sive appeal to Tehran.
Things took longer in Sadr
City, involving more U.S ground
forces and, subsequently, more
American casualties. Block by
block, however, Iraqi/American
security units cleared the part
of Sadr City closest to Bagh-
dad's center and built a huge
concrete wall to seal it off.from
the rest of the militia strong-
holds (which were later cleared,
too). But as I can attest, having
visited Baghdad barely a month
later, the turnaround was dra-
matic.
It's not an overstatement to
say that these battles provided
a make-or-break moment for
the U.S.-led surge of troops into
Iraq. In the ensuing months,
and even today, Gen. Petraeus
has been correctly hailed as
the man who led our soldiers
back from the brink. Yet as op-
erational commander, Lt. Gen.
Austin even more than Petra-
eus was responsible for the
detailed decisions necessary to


Lloyd Austin is back from Iraq, where he was the No. 2 U.S.
commander. His successful tenure says plenty about him -
and a bit about Afghanistan.


pacify Basra and Sadr City. His
vision proved crucial.
As Petraeus put it, Austin was
"calm, courageous,, decisive,
and resolute even in some
very difficult situations."
Why does this matter today?
Because of the work of Austin
and others like him, al-Qaeda
is on its heels in Iraq, Muqta-


da al-Sadr's violent followers
are largely defeated and Iraq's
major cities are under govern-
ment control (with the partial
exception of Mosul in the north)
for the first time since Saddani
Hussein was ousted. There is
much work left, to be sure, but
Iraq's most perilous moments
are probably behind us.


LOOKING TO AFGHANISTAN
Austin's story also provides
critical lessons for the grow-
ing war in Afghanistan. The
Iraq experience gives reason
for hope that our new focus
on protecting the popula-
tion, while building up indig-
enous security forces, could
be the key to success there,
too. As important, of course,
is the critical role of human
decision-making and leader-
ship in war. This means that
though the basic principles
might be right, we still need
to execute as well as Petra-
eus, Gen. Ray Odierno, Aus-
tin and many Iraqis did in
their country. 4
Finally, we now know un-
equivocally that with a chal-
lenge as daunting as pre-
surge Iraq, or Afghanistan
today, the No. 2 person is as
critical to operational suc-
cess as the person in charge.
In Iraq during the surge, first
Odierno and then Austin
played crucial roles as opera-
tional commanders. No such
person, no such command,
exists in Afghanistan today.
As effective as Petraeus is, he
needed a strong No. 2 to suc-
ceed. And as good as Gen. Da-
vid McKiernan is today in Af-
ghanistan, he is being asked
to do too much himself. He
needs a similar operational.
commander and soon.
Michael O'Hanlon, who has
been to Iraq four times since
the wqr began, is a senior fel-
low at the Brookings Institu-
tion in Washington.


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Jamaica hijacking foiled,
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) A
disoriented young man with a gun
forced his way past security and
barged onto a jetliner destined for
Cuba, taking the crew hostage, fir-
ing a bullet that grazed the co-pi-
lot's face and demanding to be flown
off the island, witnesses and police
said Monday.
After eight hours of fruitless ne-
gotiations, soldiers stormed the
plane and arrested the man without
further injury, but authorities were
deeply embarrassed about the secu-
rity breach at Montego Bay's airport,
a major Caribbean tourist hub.
"There was quite clearly a breach
of security at the airport, and I've
asked for an investigation to be
done immediately," said Prime Min-
ister Bruce Golding, who arrived on
the scene overnight to oversee talks
with the hijacker.
The gunman was identified as


but what about security?
Stephen Fray, a 20-year-old Jamai-
can described by police as "mentally
challenged." Showing the gun, he
forced his way past several secu-
rity checkpoints. At least two peo-
ple chased him, but failed to stop
him from reaching the tarmac and
boarding CanJet Airlines Flight 918
about. 10:20 p.m. local time Sun-
day.
Jamaican Information Minister
Daryl'Vaz told The Associated Press
that Fray demanded to be flown to
Cuba. The flight's next stop was
Santa Clara, Cuba. But witnesses
said the gunman wanted to reach
America.
"He said 'You are not going to stop
me. I'm going to the U.S.," Jacques
Poulin, a passenger from Glace Bay,
Nova Scotia, told The Toronto Star.
"There were two people chasing
him but he managed to get into the
plane."


After mounting pressure from
the international community.
Afghan President Hamad Karzai
says that the Shi'ia Personal
Status Law has be sent back
to the Justice Depart-
ment for review. 3
Last week, I wrote an*
opinion piece on what :
was then believed to be A
a newly enacted Per- -
sonal Status Law in Af-
ghanistan that among
other things, effectively
legalized rape within _P
the confines of mar- KA
riage.
Some of the more
damaging excerpts from the law
that have been published in the
media: "unless the wife is ill or
has any kind of illness that in-
tercourse could aggravate, the
wife is bound to give a positive
response to the sexual desires
of her husband" and "as long as
the husband is not travelling,
he has the right to have sexual
intercourse with his wife every


fourth night "
In the past week, there have
been several positive develop-
ments in regard to this law.
Afghanistan's Justice Minister
Sarwesh Danesh has
said that he expects
the review of the law
to be completed within
two to three months;
La"wTence Cannon,
Canada's Foreign Af-
fairs Minister, said
his Afghan counter-
part, Rangeen Dadfar
RkZAI Spanta, told him the


contentious


"will be removed"; and
the media are reporting that the
law will not be enforced while
the judicial and clerical review
is being undertaken.
In 1993, the UN established
marital rape as a human rights
violation. In Canada, spousal
sexual assault became a crime
in 1983 and marital rape is con-
sidered a crime in most Western
countries.


Afghanistan's marital

rape law under review


I


clauses








The Miami Times


SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009



May 7th: Christians rededicate America to God


Christian Newswire/ Chris-
tians across the nation are re-
dedicating the United States of
America to God and His Son Je-
sus Christ on May 7th, the na-
tional day of prayer. "Rededicat-
ing the USA to God has brought
tears to some already", as one
participant in California said.
This rededication is being done
to strengthen America and find
God's help for the national crisis.
"As the people of the USA cry out'


to God, God will come and help
get us outof our crisis God is
faithful",, says pastor Steve Kro-
toski of Pray Daily America, a
national Christian ministry re-
storing God's love and truth in
.the USA.
Pray Daily America is provid-
ing the free printable rededica-
tion prayer and a four step plan
for Christians to pray daily for
our nation. These free resources
are for all denominations and


can be downloaded at: www.
praydailyamerica.com/rededi-
cate.html.
Churches across the USA are
putting on their own special
programs and TV broadcasts
rededicating the USA to God.
Pray Daily America will also
have a special half hour online
rededication service available
on its. web site May 7th. Please
help get the word out so as
many people can participate in


the historic event.
Participants will be sharing
the rededication prayer and
praying on the Internet, and at
churches, homes and City Hall.
At some places their will also be
live singing..
Many are fasting on Wednes-
days, and then on Thursday the
week of May 7th for the USA
to follow, as a nation, what Je-
sus said in the Bible, the most
popular book of all time. This


fasting is also to attain a shift in
the hearts of Americans to put
their trust in God and not peo-
ple or other things. Then, God
will bring the nation out of the
crisis.
PrayDailyAmerica.com has
many interesting facts about the
USA as a Christian nation, free
graphics and includes quotes
from. our founders, presidents
and the Bible. There are many
helpful resources for churches,


schools, government servants
and individuals.
Pastor Krotoski adds,. "God
desires each person in the USA
to dedicate our nation to Him
and follow His ways in the Holy
Bible. God loves every American.
Following Jesus is what made
America the number one nation
in the world before and by seek-
ing God today, God will give His
grace and mercy to our nation
again."


Avilable fFromCommercial News Providers


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Mother and Daughter Tea at St. John

The Annual Mother/Daughter Tea will
be held on this Friday in the Fellowship
Hall of the church. This beautiful and in-
spiring program will celebrate mothers,
grandmothers, aunts and god-mothers.
The honorees for the event are Deacon-
ess Inez Wilcox and her daughter Noel
Wilcox.
The speaker will be Rev. Dr. Lolita
Dobbs. This tea is sponsored by the Red
Circle ad Young Matrons ministries. Rev.
Dr. Charles Uptgrow is the Assistant Pas-
tor. DEACONESS INEZ WILCOX


Left to right: Becky Roper, executive director of Dade Heritage Trust; the Rev.Jesse Martin; Dr. Enid
Pinkney, African-American Committee of the Dade Heritage Trust; Audrey Edmonson, Miami-Dade
County (District 3) Commissioner; ar', Dr. Preston Marshall unveiling a commemorative gravestone
of Samuel Jones at the City of Miam. Jstoric Cemetery on Sunday, April 26.

Edmonson pays tribute to pioneers


Samuel Jones and Ruth Smith Sands


William Brickell sold a 10-acre
piece of land to the City of Miami,
for $750 which became the mu-"
nicipal cemetery in 1897.' The
first burial, not recorded, was of
an elderly Black man on July 14,
1.897.
Miami-Dade County Commis-
sioner Audrey Edmonson paid
tribute to that unknown Black
man and the hundreds of other
Black Miami pioneers on Sunday,
April 26, at the Dade Heritage
Trust's sixteenth annual Com-
memorative ,Service and Youth
Talent on Patade.
Commissioner Edmonson and
the Trust's African-American
Committee paid special homage
to two Miami pioneers, -the late
Samuel Jones and Ruth Smith
Sands.
"We come here today to remem-
ber City of Miami incorporator
Samuel Jones as a true pioneer of
Miami and unveil 'a headstone at
his gravesite in his honor. Today,
we also honor the life of someone
who contributed to the growth
and prosperity of our community,
Ruth Smith Sands. Both Samuel
Jones and Ruth Smith Sands de-
serve to be remembered as vital


and important chapters of the
City of Miami's story," Commis-
sioner Edmonson said.
From its inception, the-historic
cemetery -was dilidec-with whites'
on the east end and the Black
population on the west end. In
1915, the Beth David congrega-
tion began a Jewish section. The
cemetery, then located one half.
mile north of the city limits on a
narrow wagon track county road,
was created in 1897, a year after
the City of Miami was incorporat-
ed by 100 men. Blacks and Black
Bahamians made up 'one-third of
the City's incorporators.
Blacks provided the primary
labor force for the building of Mi-
ami but were confined by clauses
in land deeds to the northwest
section of Miami, now known as
Overtown. Samuel M. Jones and
his son, Samuel Jones, were two
of those laborers. The 1910 cen-
sus listed the Jones household at
639 5th Street in Overtown and
included daughters, sons, neph-
ews, grandchildren and a boarder
named Mary F. Stephens.
Ruth Smith Sands was born in
1920 in Overtown. The daugh-
ter of Bishop J.R. and Evangelist


Olive B. Smith of the Church of
God of Prophecy, Ms. Sands was a
graduate of Booker T. Washington?
High School and Florida Agricul-
tur'al"and Mechanical University
and became a teacher m the Dade
County Public Schools.
During her lifetime, she pio-
neered many firsts:, she owned
and operated the first Black flo-
rist shop in Opa-locka, known as
La Vogue's Florist; hers was one of
the first Black families to integrate
and area now known as Miami
Gardens and she was one of the
first to integrate the 19th Avenue
Church of God of Prophecy where
she was active in many auxiliaries
of the church. She died Septem-
ber 12, 2008 at the age of 88.
Commissioner Edmonson,
joined by Dr. Enid Pinkney anrd
the Progressive Cornet Band, led
the 16th annual Commemora-
tive Service and Procession from
the historic St. Agnes Episcopal
Church in Overtown to the cem-
etery service where participants
enjoyed a showcase of talents
from young people in the commu-
nity. It included an essay contest
entitled "Why I Am Proud of My
Heritage. "


Smokie Norful Live


riding high on the charts

CD released April 7
Gospel Album chart this week-his second #1 CD
debut and third #1 record. The project's lead single,
"Justified" continues to grow at Urban Gospel radio,
coming in this week at # 1.4 with a bullet on R&R.
Recorded live in front of a standing room audience
at The Cannon Center in Memphis, the 10-track CD
was produced by Norful and Jason Tyson, and in-
cludes guest performances by Tony Award winning
artist, Heather Headley and Stellar Award winner
Tye Tribbett.
"Smokie's hard work, talent and commitment to.
the ministry shine through on his new album," states
Ken Pennell, President of EMI Gospel. "We could not .
have asked for a betterproject to launch our new
joint venture with him." 0
In a recent "Critics' Choice" review of "Smokie
Norful Live" New York Time music critic Ben Rat-
liff writes:. "Gospel may be the last remaining pop
genre in which live albums make sense and mean
something, because it operates on a built-in con- -
text of real time. Even a slick concert recording like
this one refers to the tension-and-release patterns
of a church service, and the vamps, transitions and
intermittent sermons are part of its strength...The
ballad "Dear God," with Mr. Norful singing and play-
ing piano, accompanied at first only by strings and
chorus, moves into flyaway magic." I


I


*ma













Applications being accepted for CBCF scholarship


Miami Times Staff Report

The Congressional Black Cau-
cus Foundation announced that
it is accepting applications for
the 2009 CBCF/Wal-Mart schol-
arship, Strive for Excellence.
The announcement came from
the CBCF chairman, U.S. Rep.
Kendrick B. Meek, D-Fla., who


is encouraging students living
in his 17th Congressional Dis-
trict, which includes northern
Miami-Dade and southern Bro-
ward Counties, to submit appli-
cations.
Applicants must be prepar-
ing to pursue an undergraduate
degree full-time or be a current
full-time student in good aca-


demic standing at an accredited
college or university.
Also, applicants must live or
attend school in the 17th Con-
gressional District. To find out
if you live in the district, log on
to www.house.gov and enter
your nine-digit zip code on the
upper-left side of the website.
The Strive for Excellence


scholarship was established in
2006 with a donation from Wal-
Mart Stores to expand the foun-
dation's scholarship and intern-
ship programs.
"There is no greater legacy we
can leave behind than what we
do for our youth and this schol-
arship can be a key source of
funding for young people who


are currently pursuing higher
education," Meek said.
"I know that South Florida
produces some of the most tal-
ented and intelligent young
people in the country, and I en-
courage all interested students
to apply for these beneficial and
coveted scholarships," he said.
Prospective applicants should


call Meek's district office at 305-
690-5905 to obtain an applica-
tion form.
Completed applications, in-
cluding all supporting materi-
als, should be mailed to Shirlee
Lafleur, CBCF Scholarships,
1010 SW 86th Ave., Pembroke
Pines, FL 33025.
The deadline is April 28.


St. Kitts-Nevis group offers scholarship


Miami Times Staff Report

The St. Kitts and Nevis As-
sociation of Florida is inviting
applications for a scholarship
valued at $1,000 from students
who are St. Kittian/Nevisian by
parentage or birth.
A scholarship committee will
review applications ,and the
winner will be announced on
the night of the organization's
Independence Dinner and Ball
in September.


Criteria include a 3.5 GPA or
higher, the official transcript in
any field of study, enrollment in
a college or university in Flor-
ida, proof of involvement and
leadership in college or .univer-
sity life and/or the community.
Applications, including sup-
porting documents, should be
mailed to: Florida Scholarship
Award 2009, c/o St. Kitts and
Nevis Association of Florida,
Inc., P.O. Box 310236, Miami,
FL 33231-0236.


The deadline is June 19.
The not-for-profit St. Kitts
and Nevis Association of Flori-
da seeks to strengthen the St.
Kitts and Nevis community in
the state, establish cooperative
partnerships with other groups
and communities and further
the development and interna-
tional awareness of the two-
island federation through pro-
grams that focus on healthcare,
education, sports, entertain-
ment and culture.


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Q CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED i BILL MY CREDIT CARD

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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.miamitimesonline.com


SHosanna Community

S' ...-....... ..... 2171 N.W. 56th Street





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Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church Liberty City Church "\
17800 NW 25th Ave. of Christ
nw.mthennworsvipccnMer.org 1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worslip Services: Order of Services:
7 am. & 10 am. Sday Moring ..........8 a.m.
S& 10 .mL 10 am.
CuchSchol: 830a.m. Sunday. Frmn.g 6 p.m.
Wednesday Morn. wleileke. 7 30p.m.
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study Tue. Ribhlc('la.s- 73i) p.m.
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m. Thurs.- ellwhip 10a.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m. 1st Sun Song Pratacc 6p.m.


Friendship Missionary "
Baptist Church
7-1) N \W 5 rh 'Arcd
Nbainj. FL
305-759-8875
I m I l Wat r 1- -a of
S l o 30.i
l k'i mj W- 0Jup 0 m
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St. John Baptist Church-
1328 N.W, 3" Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Serices:
F-ai Sunday
gg f r Morning Worsip 30 a m,
Sunday svchool..........9:30 a.m.
l Monunyg Arship II am
I ,'r.-n r iii nd i hL ',rudi.
M eling Iiue..) 7 p in.
-. ". I l


/ Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
OdMtm- f S q.rjim


Ls'A, Dv glgd. rinl.., a 4-Ina
Hi d Sn. 1i .in0g 1.5niW, i an
S1"['1,ii.l~ M k L'l'ijl.' &11l .p I n'
nl.u.d,' EllLw 'A.'lqJlp v i 1
:| T .-, N'IrgI E',bl,. mS'lu. .Cpn
Tr0n5pnl4on -*dbirbl t'a.ll
305634^W5Q 30-56691-6M5


__Srmma/ \______l__ B/


- Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.\VW 35th Street.
305-635-7413
Ornder of Senries:

7:45 amL I:I 5 .i& m
Sunid' School 945 a.nm.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m &7p.m.
Prayer Mecdng Tius.. p M.


/- Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N W 3 Avennue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060WFax 305-2S5-8545
Order of Services
5m.lay Scbhool 45 a.xi,
S/,"nu 3 5Im e I Ia.m.
41 Sun. .,f[U IU 130'Z"sp I[,
Tuesday jible Study
IFetdihu"Muoan'L I t'i10a t
iWed DbleStiJd) Pam C 630parii
Thll O,'rut :lLMiluSir) b.kJpPnil
\gam...a..a.aa ...aB.


/SL Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322

Oider of Services:
EatN nlomng Womihp7 30aIm.
Stmda hSchoul 4 30a.m.
Morning Worship .I .1 im.

FrPaTcr lectmg 7T30 p.m.
Bibleb Slud). 8 pan.


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7;30 andI 11 a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 am.;...... Sunday School
T t. i"Bi" ble ,whdy
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m......Day Prayer


/ Bible Teaching Seminar
8610/8620 N\V 17lhAve.
Miami, FL. 33147
954-735-9393


And now abide
* faith, hope, love..,
I Cor. 13:13


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International

2300 NW 135th Street


Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m. ,


dAntloch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634.6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
chbure/unaay school .... 830 a in
%Sunday Wo1*1lip Scilvic 0 a i
C. Mjt ivd-Week Scevice .... Wcdi~sday's
Hour of Power-Noon Day Prayer
12 p.m.-I p.m.
Evening Wohip .. 7 p.m.



SMt. Calvary Missionary '-
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru ri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Woship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday School...9:30 aam.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305.685.3700
Fax: 305-685--0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


I''!*


f Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW, 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
\Suni"ay
Monling Worslli at a & II a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
I i f- Thiursday
i Bible Study '7 p.m
Saturday
No Service


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
'305-681-3300
Order of Services
tmeSunoay 90
W-orship Service l... 11 am
Wednesday
Mife StudyiPrayer jigh 7: |n).
Thursday
Prayer Meetlli 7 p.m.
There is a place for you


/ Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
ii Smday School .............930 tin.
I1o Mom1Pais ewoasn.. an
I e l eriistanlhinlSiunday
evening woN pat6 p.m I
I Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
Ii| 1 Tuesday 7 p.m




First Baptist Missionary \
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
S Sunday............7:30 & 11 am.
,. Sund. ay School...............10 am.
Thursday ..........7p.m. Bible Study,
; Prayer Meeting, BT.U.
iBaptis Thms. before
First Smu.7p.min
Countum lon-Fut Su .......
7:30& l a.m.


/ Cornerstone Bible -
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
SIuday School. 930 s oin
Sunday Worsip.1. I m.

Mid Week Seice ... 7 p.nt
Choir Relearsal Thursday
7:30 pm



/ 93 Street Community -
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:-) a.m. Eafly Morning Worship
1. am.I MorumngWor4shp
Evening Worship
Iv &3 -d Suwday ....6 p.
Tuesday Bible Swdy l in.
websitc; an org

\M /^^^^^^^^^^^f ^


New Vision For Christ \
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10P Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
-- r, I iu.W"i f -3I.Lin.


iant., l h m r%~ *a .ic n q rpin
W. I. dr,ti 1kP.! 1 3 pNI


Word of Faith
Christian Center
1370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
su, lay Moning Services
ia.L y School............. 10 a.m.
ip Serevie........... I I am.
Tue,'Ijy Bible Stiudy....... p.m.
I harndj-, Prayer Service.......8 p.m


/ New Day "N" Christ '
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 7611 Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
i Sii ayrs- u rlm SellooL.............10am.a .
W o rhip ce ............. 11:15 am.
4th Saoday Evening WorAip .6... p.m.



New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'1 Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
; E'ly Moming Waship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9".30 a.m.
Moming Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
c fore the 1stun.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship

^HBSEEMfH~


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56lhAenue Hollywood, FL3303-
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Sludi 9 a rr. "" l Morning Worship . 10 am
LEvening Worship . O'p M
I\edueedav....Ceneral BiblelStudy. 730 pm m
IV Pnigram Tueiday, 8:30 a.m.- 9 a.m.
Comca5s Channels. 8, 19,21,22.23, 30 & 37/Loral Channel: 21 & 22
Web page. www.pombrokeparkchurchofchrist.com Enmail: pombxokeparkcoc@bellsouth.nt


I


I


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OL l~oPastor DllnLl CoolSr. Y


Dr .,ilt/ P~o


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


\ ~ra~~RII~Ulr~i L


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V.


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 01 THE MIAMI TIMES APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


Let your light shine in and out of church


I recently read a devotional by
a Youth Pastor who had under-
taken the awesome task of chap-
eroning a group of teenagers on
a missionary concert tour. The
group traveled to several for-
eign cities ministering to a total
of thousands in songs of wor-
ship and praise. They felt that
they had succeeded in reaching
many, but they had no idea of
the true impact of their minis-


try until at the very end of their
journey, when their bus driver,
who was not a Christian, told the
Youth Pastor how impressed he
was with the attitudes and be-
havior of the young people. He
had been a bus driver for many
years, and never before had he
witnessed such polite, respect-
ful teenagers. Later, when the
Youth Group was returned home
to their own church, the bus


driver emailed the Youth Pastor,
again commending the young
people. The Pastor continued
this cyber-writing with the bus
driver until finally he received
an email that the bus driver
had accepted the Lord as Savior.
The bus driver joyfully admit-
ted that it was the time that he
spent with the American teenag-
ers that started him pondering
about giving his life to Jesus.
Wowl What an awesome testi-
monyl This group went halfway
around the world, and one of
the persons whom they reached
was someone whom they did
not even minister to directly. In
fact, they had never' thought of
inviting the bus driver inside to
any of their concerts. He always
waited in the bus for them un-


til their service was completed.
But as beautiful as the worship
music must have been, it was
not the joyful strains of praise
music that impacted his life. It
was the simplicity of their Chris-
tian lives. Their lack of the use
of profane and vulgar language
caught the attention of the un-
saved bus driver. The kindness
and genuine concern expressed
by the group to each other and
others made him sit up and take
notice.
So many times we may think
that it is a great oratory skill or
our theological intelligence that
impresses the crowd and sends
them jumping up and down in
excitement. We often fail to con-
sider that it is the way that we
act when we are preparing for a


special church event that is the
most impressive.
Perhaps the new member no-
ticed how irritable and upset
some of the other members act-
ed when a delivery did not arrive
on time. Perhaps they noticed
that one of the members be-
came angry and started scream-
ing at her husband because
he dropped one of the ceramic
vases that were slated for the
garage sale. These actions may
speak a lot louder than a beau-
tifully sung solo, or an enthu-
siastic sermon. We also need
to remember that God not only
never makes mistakes, but He
knows the whole plan of things
from beginning to end. An en-
counter that you might think is
a chance meetirig or coincidence


could be a divine appointment.
The salesperson to whom you
spoke rudely might have been
an angel in disguise.
We should never fail to real-
ize that our day-to-day contact
with people is often what makes
the biggest impression on peo-
ple especially the unsaved.
Have you ever heard the expres-
sion "don't just talk the talk, but
walk the walk?" We are not all
Pastors or ministers or Sunday
school teachers. However, we
can all teach the truth and re-
ality of the Gospel message in
simply living. I like what was
written at the bottom of the
page of the devotion that I read
- "Witnessing is not just some-
thing a Christian does, but what
he is."


The Citizens' Independent
Transportation Trust (CITT)
will convene at the Stephen P.
Clark Center, 6 p.m., Thursday,
April 30. Visit www.miamidade.
gov/citt.
**********
Miami-Dade County's May-
or Office, is hosting the fourth
annual Haitian Labor Day Ca-
reer and Resource Fair togeth-
er with Miami-Dade Transit,
and South Florida. Workforce.
The event will take place at the
Notre Dame D' Haiti Catholic
Church, from 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.,
on May 1. 305-375-5071. '

The Booker T. Washington
class of 1964 will be having a
meeting at the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center at 6:30


p.m., May 2. Booker T. will also
be having their Triangle Dance,
from 9 p.m. 1 a.m., on May 8.
G. Hunter, 305-632-6506.
*********
SMiami Dade College Hospi-
tality Institute will have a train-
ing session at Greater Bethel
A.M.E. Church, from 9 a.m.- 4
p.m., on May 4 5. A gradu-
ation and job fair will follow,
from 9 a.m. 2 p.m.,.on May 7.
Jeanne Westphal at 305-329-
2845 or at vetshospitality@bell-
south.net

Helen L. Miller Center, host-
ed by the Opa-locka mayor, will
have their Unity Prayer Break-
fast at 8:30 a.m., Thursday,
May 7. 305-953-2801.


******** *
The second annual Women's
Spa & Wellness Day will take
place at the Belafonte TACOLCY
Center, from 8:30 a.m. 1:30
p.m., Saturday, May 9. Pamela
Robinson, 305-751-1295 ext.
101.
********
Momentum Dance Com-
pany will hold its sixth annual
Miami Dance Festival with per-
formances at Colony Theater,
Miami Beach Cinematheque,
the Manuel Artime Theater,
the Byron Carlyle Theatre and
Performing Arts Network, until
May 10. 305-858-7002 or www.
momentumdance.cbm

Miami-Dade Alumni Chap-
ter of Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity will host its annual
scholarship at the Omega Ac-
tivity Center in Opa-locka, from
8 p.m.-1 a.m., Friday, May 15.
305-505-1235.


The Rotary Club of Opa-
locka/Miami Gardens will
present its first Kings and
Queens Youth Chess Exhibition
Fundraiser at the Jesus People
Ministries Church Interna-
tional in Miami Gardens, 9:30
a.m., Saturday, May 16. Web-
ber J. Charles, 786-269-4337
or charli2foto@yahoo.com

North Miami Pioneer Hall of
Fame will hold its second in-
duction ceremony at the Don
Shula's Hotel and Restaurant
at 9:30 a.m., May 16.

People United to Lead the
Struggle for Equality (PULSE)
will be having their 28th annual
convention at the Faith Com-
munity Baptist Church on Sat-
urday, May 16. 305- 576-7590.


Pembroke- Park Church of
Christ will host a Health Walk


at 7 a.m. and a Community
Health Fair and Festival, 10
a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday, May 16.
954-962--9327.

The ninth annual Oscar
Thomas Memorial People's Art
Exhibition is on display at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts
Center's Amadlozi Gallery until,
May 21. 305-638-6771.

The Richmond Heights Re-
source Center will be having
their Memorial Day Community
Fair at the Promenade Shopping
Plaza, 1100 S W 152 Street,
from 10 a.m. 7 p.m., on May
22. Vaughn Marshall or Sharon
Cordy, (305)235-7731 or email
us at rimondheightsrc@yahoo.
corm

Miami Jackson High Class
of 1979 will hold its 30th an-
nual reunion with a week of
events highlighted by a trip to
Montego Bay, Jamaica. The fes-


tivities will be on June 5-14.
Louis Fish, president, 954-895-
,5441; Carol Jones, secretary,
786-566-3751.
********
Liberty City Community Ac-
tivist will be having their first
annual Treasure Hunt, from
8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., June 27.
Verneacha Johnson, 305-751-
9377 or 786-985-5224.

The National Association of
Black Hotel Owners, Operators
& Developers will hold its 131
annual conference at the Doral
Golf Resort &. Spa, July 22-25.
954-792-2579. ,

Miami 'Northwestern High
Class of 1959 meets at the Af-
rican Heritage Cultural Arts
Center 10:30 a.m. the third
Saturday of the month. 305-
688-2093. The Class of 1959
will hold its 20th anniversary
reunion Aug. 6-9. Bulls89re-
union@hotmail.com


Skin color matters in the vitamin D debate


For BlackAmericans, the Sun is part of a revolving debate


By Kim Painter


Can dark skin be a health
hazard? It might be if you
are a dark-skinned person who
lives far from the equator, gets
little sun exposure and con-
sumes little \itamin D.
That describes many Blacks
and helps explain why studies
find that average African-Amer-
ican children and adults have
much lower blood levels of the
vitamin than white Americans
do. Vitamin D is produced in
response to sun exposure in
a process that works most ef-
ficiently in pale skin. It's also
in fortified dairy products and
fatty fish, but few Americans -
of/ any skin color consume
enough of those foods to meet
recommendations.
Just how much vitamin D
Americans need and how they'
should get it is under debate.
Scientists also are debating
evidence that vitamin D, best
known for building bones, can
lower the risk of cancer, diabe-
tes, heart disease and other ail-
ments.
And they are asking this in-
triguing question: Could vary-
ing vitamin D levels contribute
to the health gap between black
and white Americans?
Boston University professor
Michael Holick, a leading vita-
min D researcher, says yes: "We
think it's why African Ameri-
cans develop more prostate
cancer, breast cancer and colon
cancer and get more aggressive
forms of those cancers."
' John Flack, principal inves-
tigator at 'the Center for Urban
and African American Health at
Wayne State University, Detroit,
says: "I think it's potentially a


very important explanation for
some of the differences, from
hypertension to cancer to heart
failure.' The actual proof is not
there, but it's plausible."


. ,
-- ;.


Milk is an excellent source
of vitamin D
But Flack adds that many fac-
tors contribute to African Amer-
icans' poorer health. Studies
suggest those factors include
reduced access to health care,
pervasive barriers to healthful
living (for example, neighbor-
lioods that lack fresh grocer-
ies), differences in income and
education and the stress of ra-
cial inequality itself.
Solving those problems will
be difficult, he says. Closing the
vitamin D gap could be easier.
It won't be as' easy as recom-
mending more sun exposure,
however. Though someone in
Boston with pale skin can get
adequate vitamin D by ex-
posing their arms and legs to
the sun for 10 to 15 minutes
twice a week in the summer,.


-0 -oEs"
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someone with the darkest skin
might need two hours of expo-
sure each time, Holick says.
"It's impractical," he says, and
it also darkens -skin, which
many people find cosmetically
unacceptable.
Dermatologists also warn
that sun exposure increas-
es the risk of skin cancer
and wrinkling, even in dark-
skinned people.
How much is enough?
Holick endorses "sensible,
limited sun exposure" but says
it's also time to recommend
that everyone, regardless of
skin color, take a daily vitamin
D' supplement of at least 1,000
international units (IU).
Not, all scientists agree, but
an expert panel at the non-
profit Institute of. Medicine is
reviewing recommended dai-
ly intakes, now at 200 IU for
people up to age 50, 400 IU for
people ages 51 to 70 and 600
IU for those over age 70. An
8-ounce glass of fortified milk
contains 100 IU.
"All Americans, but particu-
larly people with darker skin,
should pay attention" to new
guidelines due next year, says
Adit Ginde, a researcher at the
University of Colorado Denver
School of Medicine. Ginde led
a recent study, published in
the Archives of Internal Medi-
cine, that found that vitamin
D levels are falling in all racial
groups but are especially low
in African Americans.


One True Path
The Holy Scripture is often
misunderstood, behind every
word of scripture lies a spiritual
encounter with God. Conscious-
ness the human consciousness.
grasps and contains what it
seeks to know, we must walk
with God and have a relation-
ship and in sharing His love, for
He is transcendent and infinite
in all things.
Willie Ray Williams

Mothers Day

gospel program
Dade and Broward come to-
gether to celebrate Mothers Day
Sunday May 10 at Holy Cross
MB Church, 1555 N.W. 93 Ter-
race at 3 p.m.
The event is sponsored by The
Wimberly Sisters Outreach As-
sociation. Appearing on the pro-
gram are The Wimberly Sisters,
South Florida Singers, Smiley
Jubiliars, Soul seekers, Dynam-
ic Stars, Southern Echoes and
others.
All groups are invited, there
will be free food.


Greater New Macedonia
Missionary Baptist Church
annual revival will be held 7:30
p.m. nightly, April 29 -May 1.
Bobbie Jones-Wilfork, 305-332-
4353.

The Spirit of the. Lord
Christian Center presents their
miracle revival at First Baptist
Church of Bunche Park, at 7:30
p.m. nightly, until May 1. 786-
355-1605.

Valley Grove Missionary
Baptist Church will be hosting


their pastor's pre-anniversary
.Gospel Concert at 7:30 p.i.,,
Saturday, May 2. 305-835-
8316.
.. ******** '. *'. 1 '
Bible Baptist Church
Healthc'are Ministry '' is
sponsoring an Educational
Program and Health Screenings,
from 10 a.m. 2 p.m., Saturday,
May 2. 305-836-7644.

New Beginnings Baptist
Church of South Miami Music
Ministry will be having their
annual Spring musical at Mt.


Olive Missionary Baptist Church
at 4:01 p.m. on May 3. Deacon
Truesdell, 305-303-2805.

.Metropolitan AME Church
will present Alice Day in concert
at 4 p.m., May 10. 305-691-
4572 or 305-633-8890.

A Mission With A New,
Beginning. Church invites the
community to their Mother's
Day program at 11:30 a.m., on
May 10. 305-836-6256.

Trinity C.M.E. Church will
be celebrating their Unity Day
starting at 9 a.m., on May 17.
305-373-7162.

Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30 p.m.
on Monday.


THEY'RE HERE I
























r-








The Four Page Glossy Wrap that

enclosed the Inaugural Issue



is now on sale at The Miami Times.




AS MANY AS YOU WANT!


TO jfiami me


I UW I I I L ITIIPIvl I I I iwlIwr "I .- I


----------








The Miami Times





Hea h


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


Online campaign seeks to boost STD awareness and treatment


Miami-Dade reported 10,796 cases in 2008


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


The Florida Department of
Health estimates in 2008 more
than 10,796 cases of sexually
transmitted diseases were re-
ported in Miami-Dade.
And Kalenthia Nunnally, ex-
ecutive director of the Teen
Pregnancy Prevention Center
in Allapattah, says the num-
bers are especially high in the
15-24 age group.
Nunnally said a large num-


ber of teenage girls are test-
ing positive for common STDs
such as chlamydia, gonorrhea
and trichomoniasis.
In 2008, 44 males tested pos-
itive for one of those three dis-
eases, from among 66 tested.
Of the 307 non-pregnant womn-
en tested, 94 were positive; 39
of the 131 pregnant teenagers
also tested positive.
"The numbers are high be-
cause young people are sexual-
ly active and having sex. They
are not having safe sex and not


getting the proper screening,"
Nunnally said. "The informa-
tion is available but they are
rejecting it."
That could change.
In observance of STD Aware-
ness Month, observed in April,
MTV, Planned Parenthood Fed-
eration of America and the Kai-
ser Family Foundation have
launched the GYT "Get Your-
self Tested" online campaign
to inform young people about
sexually transmitted diseases
and encourage them to be test-
ed and treated as needed.
MTV videos for the campaign
have streamed more than


250,000 times, since the cam-
paign launch on April 1 and
features celebrities such as
Perez Hilton, Joy Bryant, Jo-
anna Garcia and Soulja Boy.
Congressman Alcee L. Hast-
ings, D-Miramar, welcomed the
initiative.
"MTV's GYT campaign sends
our young people an important
message in a language they can
understand and relate to: STDs
and HIV/AIDS are real and can
happen to anyone," Hastings
said in a statement.
"Stigmas surrounding sex,
STDs and STD testing too often
keep young people from talking


openly about sexual health and
getting tested. However, know-
ing your status is half the bat-
tie in protecting yourself from
infection or receiving proper
treatment and getting yourself
tested is the only way to know
it for sure," Hastings said.
The Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention estimate
nearly 19 million new STD
cases occur each year in the
United States, with about half
of them among people aged 15
to 24.
More than 266 cases are re-
ported every day 11 every
hour and more than one every


5.42 minute, according 2008
Florida Department of Health
data. Sixty-six percent of the
cases reported are among peo-
ple aged 15-24.
The state health department
will launch its own their 3T's
campaign in an effort to halt
the spread of STDs. The name
stands for talk, test and treat:
Talk: Talk to your partner
and your doctor about safer
sex, risk factors, and testing.
Test: schedule an appoint-
ment for STD testing.
Treat: Get treated for the
disease and avoid additional
health problems.


FDA to allow 'morning-after'


pl


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2007 shows the packaging for the "Plan B" pill.


Inc. Aug. 22,


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Meningitis outbreak in South Florida


Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial illness
that affects all age groups. Meningitis is an'infection
of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord.
Meningococcal infections can be treated with drugs
such as penicillin.
After the virus has claimed the life of an 85-year-
old man, a 21-year-old, a 5-year-old in Miami-Dade,
and a Broward adult who worked in a Miami-Dade
children's day-care center and has left Miami-Dade
County Health Department on high alert and advis-
ing South Floridians to get the meningococcal vac-
cine.
A dose of the vaccine, which is usually adminis-
tered to 11 and 12-years-old during a routine visit,
recommended for children and teens between 11-18
years of age.
Meningococcal vaccine is also recommended for
other people at increased risk for meningococcal dis-


ease: college freshmen living in dormitories;
microbiologists who are routinely exposed to
meningococcal bacteria;
U.S. military recruits; anyone traveling to, or living
in, a part of the world where meningococcal disease
is common, such as parts of Africa;
anyone who has a damaged spleen, or whose
spleen has been removed;
anyone who has terminal complement component
deficiency (an immune system disorder); and people
who might have been exposed to meningitis during
an outbreak.
An estimated 2,600 people are infected each year
with meningitis, according to the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
For more information, please contact County
Health Department Special Immunization Program
at 786-845-0550.


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* Primary Care Physician
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* Gynecology
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* Pain Management
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES APRIL 29-MAY 5 2 9


Swine flu: questions and answers


Q: WHAT IS SWINE FLU? perts have long worried
A: It's a respiratory disease in a pig would catch, a
pigs. Most human cases involve strain of the flu and
people in close contact with the virus would mutate
pigs. side the pig to a form
also could infect people
Q: HOW IS THIS SWINE That may be what
FLU VIRUS DIFFERENT? happened here.
A: This strain appears to be a
subtype not seen before in hu- Q: CAN YOU CATCH
mans or pigs, with genetic mate- SWINE FLU FROM
rial from pigs, bird and humans, EATING PORK?
according to World Health Or- A: No, according to
ganization (WHO). Unlike most WHO. Cooking kills
cases of swine flu, this one can the virus.
spread from person to person,
said Richard Besser, the acting Q: IS THERE A VAC-
director of the Centers for Dis- CINE AGAINST
ease Control and Prevention, at SWINE FLU?
a White House press conference A: No, but govern-
Sunday. One of the confirmed ment scientists could
cases in the USA caught swine try to create one, ac-
flu from a spouse, who had been cording to the CDC.
to Mexico. "Should we decide to
manufacture a vac-
Q: WERE PIGS THE CARRI- cine, we can work
ERS OF THIS VIRUS? toward that goal very
A: They,were likely the "mix- quickly," said Besser.
ing bowl" for this new virus. Ex-


-, ..- ,,-50Th...










4. R0,,, ... ^ '

-E, -





A: Sta3


Q: WHAT ABOUT
ANTIVIRALS?
A: This strain of
swine flu does appear
sensitive to the anti-
viral drugs Relen-
za and Tami-
Sflu, but not to
amantadine,
or Symmetrel,
and rimanta-
". dine, or Flu-
r | madine, Besser
Ssaid. With nor-
mal seasonal
flus, if taken
within the first
48 hours after
symptoms ap-
pear, antiviral
can help people
recover a day or
two sooner.
S Q: WHAT
SHOULD YOU
DO IF YOU HAVE
THESE SYMPTOMS?
y home from work or


school, to avoid spreading your
illness to other people, Besser
said. Don't get on an airplane.
People should call their doctors
to ask about the best treat-
ment, but should not simply
show up at a clinic or hospital
that is unprepared for their ar-
rival.

Q: HOW CAN PEOPLE PRO-
TECT THEMSELVES?
A: As always, people should
wash their hands frequently,
Besser said. In the past, the
CDC has said there isn't con-
clusive evidence to support us-
ing face masks. Although surgi-
cal masks are designed to pre-
vent the wearer from spreading
germs, they also may catch
large respiratory droplets if
someone sneezes nearby. N95
respirator masks filter out 95
percent of particles to prevent
the wearer from breathing them
in. The CDC lists approved N95
, respirators on its website, cdc.
gov.


Pills can be purchased at the pharmacy counter with ID


PILL
continued from 1ilB

"It's a good indication that the
agency will move expeditiously
to ensure its policy on Plan B
is based solely on science," said
Nancy Northup, president of the
Center for Reproductive Rights,
which filed the lawsuit.
Conservatives said .politics
drove the decision.
"Parents should be furious at
the FDA's complete disregard of,
, rental rights and the safety
of minors," said Wendy Wright,
president of Concerned Women
for America.
'Plan B is emergency contra-
ception that contains a high
dose of birth control drugs and
will not interfere with an estab-
lished pregnancy. It works by.
preventing ovulation or fertil-
ization. In medical terms, preg-
nancy begins when a fertilized
egg attaches itself to the wall of
the uterus.
If taken within 72 hours of
unprotected sex, it can reduce a
woman's chances of pregnancy


by as much as 89 percent.
Critics of the contraceptive
say Plan B is the equivalent of
an abortion pill because it can
prevent a.fertilized egg from at-
taching to the uterus. Recent
research suggests that's pos-
sible but not likely.
The battle over access to Plan
B has dragged on for the better
part of a decade, through the
terms of three FDA conmmission-
ers. Among many in the medical
community, it came to symbol-
ize the decline of science at the
agency because top FDA man-
agers refused to go along with
the recommendations of scien-
tific staff and outside advisers
that the drug be made available
with no age restrictions.
"The FDA got caught up in
a saga, it got caught up in a
drama," said Susan Wood, who
served as the agency's top wom-
en's health official and resigned
in 2005 over delays in issuing a
decision. "This issue served as a
clear example of the agency be-
ing taken off track, and it high-
lighted the problems FDA was ,


facing in many other areas."
The treatment consists of two
pills and sells for $35 to $60.
Women must ask for Plan B
at the pharmacy counter and
show identification with their
date of birth. The drug is made
by a subsidiary of Teva Phar-
maceutical Industries, an Israe-
li company. It does not prevent
sexually transmitted infections,
such as HIV/AIDS.
Supporters of broader access
argued that Plan B is safe and
effective in preventing unwant-
ed pregnancy and could help re-
duce the number of abortions.
Opponents, irfcluding promi-
nent conservatives, counter that
it,would encourage promiscuity
and might even become ,.a tool
for, criminals running prostitu-
tion rings, as well as for sexual
predators.
Early in the Bush adminis-
tration, more than 60 organi-
zations petitioned, the FDA to
allow sales without a prescrip-
tion. But according to court
documents, the issue quickly
became politicized.


Type 2 diabetics more susceptible to dementia


By Mary Brophy Marcus

People with diabetes who ha
low-blood sugar episodes serio
enough to land them in the h(
pital have a higher risk of bei
diagnosed with dementia later
life, new research suggests.
Kaiser Permanente research
ers evaluated the health record
of more than 16,000. people w
type 2 diabetes, tracking episode
of severe hypoglycemia l
blood sugar over a 22-year I
riod. They then followed patier
for four more years to track dit
noses of dementia.
Compared with patients w
no hypoglycemia, patients w:
one severe hypoglycemic episo
had a 26% increased risk of d
mentia; those with two episoc
had an 80% increased risk; a

Medicare chanj
(HealthDay News) Bla
kidney patients may have mc
difficulty getting dialysis unc
a new Medicare payment police
researchers warn.
The Centers for Medicare
Medicaid Services will make
single payment to dialysis un
to cover both dialysis and inje,
able medications. These service
were previously reimbursed se
arately.
Because Black kidney patier
more often experience anen
i (low hemoglobin) than wh
patients, they're more likely


people who had had three or
more episodes had nearly double
ive the risk, the authors reported in
us today's Journal of the American
os- Medical Association.
ng A large body of research sug-
in gests diabetics are more at risk
for dementia, but 'the reason is
:h- unclear. Diabetes drugs that in-
*ds duce hypoglycemia may cause
ith brain-cell death in older people,
[es the authors suggest.
ow The research was one of a col-
pe- election of studies and commen-
its taries in the journal, which this
ag- week was focused entirely on dia-
betes.
ith "We have in the United States
ith 1.6 million new cases of type 2
*de diabetes a year," said JAMA edi-
de- tor in chief Catherine DeAngelis,
les at a press briefing in Washing-,
nd ton, D.C.; on Tuesday. "We're in


trouble."
In another study in the medical,
journal, Yale University School
of Medicine researchers exam-
ined whether early screening for
'cardiovascular disease in adults
with type 2 diabetes would affect
their cardiovascular health long-
term.
"Coroniary artery disease is a
major health concern and the
leading cause of death in individ-
uals with type 2'diabetes," said
author Frans Wackers, 'senior re-
search scientist in the section of
cardiovascular medicine at Yale.
The study included 1,123 par-
ticipants with type. 2 diabetes.
About 'half were randomly as-
signed to be screened for heart
disease, and about half were not
screened. The average follow-up
was nearly five years.


Ir 2003, a panel of outside ad-
visers voted 23-4 to recommend
over-the-counter sales without
age restrictions. But top FDA
officials told their subordinates
that no approval could be is-
sued at the time, and the deci-
sion would be made at a higher
level. That's considered highly
unusual, since the FDA usually
has the last word on drug deci-
sions.
In his ruling, Korman said
that FDA staffers were told the
White House had been involved
in the decision on Plan B. The
government said in court papers
that politics played no role.
In 2005, the Center for Repro-
ductive Rights and other orga-
nizations sued in federal court
to force an FDA decision.
The following year, the FDA
allowed Plan B to be sold with-
out a prescription to adults.


Ai cardf. 9ran2 2
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i


require' more treatment with ex-
pensive erythropoiesis stimulat-
,ing agents (ESAs) to boost their
hemoglobin levels, noted Dr.
Areef Ishani, of the University of
Minnesota.
For example, an analysis of
12,000 dialysis patients revealed
that black patients required
an 11 percent higher average
dose of ESAs over the first two
months on dialysis than white
patients do.
Since Medicare will no longer
reimburse dialysis centers for
higher ESA doses, the new pol-


icy could create a "financial dis-
incentive" for centers to accept
black patients, said Ishani and
colleagues.
"The CMS has suggested that
the new reimbursement scheme
will adjust for a variety of factors.
If race is not included as a pay-
ment adjuster, African-American
patients could be disadvantaged
by this policy change," the re-
searchers concluded.
The study was expected to be
published in an upcoming issue
of the Journal of the American
Society of Nephrology.


-C -.. Copyrighted Material --


. Syndicated Content


_ Available from Commercial News Providers


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Wright & Young
EUVON GRACE, 68, admin-
istrative assis-
tant, died April
23 at Jackson
North Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Marvin, Stepha-
nie, Kevin, So-
nya and Venita
Grace; siblings,
Eunice Rivera,
Joey and Hector Machadp, Mi-
chael Rivas. Services 2 p. m., Sat-
urday, Jordan Grove M.B Church.


PEARL SMITH,
died April 23 at
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Angela Griffin,
Charlotte, Olga ,
Shantae Kevin
and Corey. Ser-
vices 2:30 p.m.,
Saturday, in the
chapel.


Genesis- Royal
LUZ PINEDA, 48, designer, died SUSIE DAVIS, 69
April 20 at Bro- worker,. Miami-
ward General Dade County
Hospital. Ser- Public Schools,
vice was held. died April 24.


EMILIA ANDINO, 57, nanny,
.died April 19 at
home. 'Service
was held. |


72, cashier,


DOROTHY MAE CARSWELL,
70, auto tag
technician,
died April 20 at
Aventura Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:
son, David;
daughter in law,
Brenda; grand-
son, Dwight Wil-
liams, Jr., David
II, and Allen; sisters, Josephine
Young, Louella French. Service 11"
a.m.,Saturday, New Hope Baptist
Church.

MURKEL BRUCE COPPINS,
63, marketing .
director, Tools
for Change,
died April 26 at
his residence.


lie Washington;
children. Murkel
T.;' Christopher
B., and Randell
B. Brown. Visitation Friday 9 a.m.
until 4p.m., Wright & Young Funer-
al Home and 5p.m.
until 8 p.m., Friendship M B
Church. Services 12 noon, Satur-
day, Friendship M.B Church.

MICHAEL GOMEZ, 21, laborer,
died April 26.
Survivors in-
clude: parents,
Cynthia and
Timothy Owens;
siblings, Felix,
Anthony, Timo--
thy and Destiny.
Services 10
a.m., Saturday,
Peaceful Zion
CM.B Church.


Pax Villa Broward
WOODY SIMEON, 42, chef,
died April, 21. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Hallandale Haitian
United Methodist Mission.

CARLINE DUROSIER, 31,
cashier, died April 24. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Divine Mercy
Catholic Church, Fort Lauderdale.


Carey Royal am'n
ANGEL GUTIERREZ, 59, driver,
died April 21 at Baptist Hospital.
Service was held.

MERLYN ROBERTS, 61, nurse,
died April 24 at Aventura Hospital.
Service was held.

JOSE BELTRAN, 63, plumbing,
died April 27 at Aventura Hospital.
Service was held.


Nakia Ingraham
WILLIE DAVIS,. 67, longshore-
man, died
April 21. Ser-
vice 11a.m.,
Wednesday in
the chapel.






RUTH EDWARD, 53, died April
26. Services 10 a.m., Friday in the
Chapel.

WILLIAM SLUSHER, 56. died
April 24. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

EMILY PATTERSON, 87, died
April 26. Arrangements are incom-


HECTOR MARIN, 80, butcher,
died April 23
at Holy Cross
Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.






MICHAEL FRAZIER, 28, se-
curity tech.,
died April 19 at
home. Service
Saturday in the
chapel.


DENNIS DRIES JR., 40, con-
struction work- [
er, died April
22. Service was
held.


LINDA BARRETT, 47, sales
person, died April 27 at University
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.

ANNA MELKONIAN, 79, home-
maker,, died April 20 at Westside,
Regional Medical Center. Service
was held.

LUZ SERRANO, 75, home mak-
er, died April 22 at Memorial Hos-
pital Pembroke. Service was held.

INEZ BRAVO, 92, beautician,
died April 22 at Memorial Hospital
Pembroke. Service was held.

DORIS SARTORI, 86, factory
worker, died April 16 at Jupiter
Medical Center. Service was held.

HERBERT KNAUF, 82, fire
fighter, died April 22 at home. Ser-
vice was held.
-
Range Coconut Grove
JAMES THOMAS EDMOND,
JR., 79, of Richmond Heights,
died April 22 at 'Jackson South
Community Hospital. Services 10
a.m, Saturday, The Church of the
Ascension.

Range
EDWARD EUGENE BUTLER,
79, adminis-
trator, Dade
County School
Board died April
27. 1Survivors'
included: wife,
Alethea Cash-
Butler; son,
Warren Butler;
daughter, Lau-
ren Butler; grandson, Jordan B.
Butler; sister, Edna Davis a host of
other relatives and friends.. Ser-
vices 11 a.m., Friday, St. Francis
Xavier Catholic Church.

GEORGE SMITH, JR., 52, la-
borer died April 23. Service was
held.


Richardson
ALICE LONG JONES, 86,
homemaker,
died april 25.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Zion
Hope Baptist
Church.





JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our

CALL 305-694-6210


Visitation 4 p.m.
- 9 p.m., Fri-
day. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
New Shiloh Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

BERNADETTE
54, registered
nurse, died
April 22. Visita-
tion 4 p.m. 9
p.m., Friday.
Service 11a.m.,
Saturday, North
Miami Avenue
Church of God.


Gregg L. Mason Jay's


9, cafeteria WILLIE L. BENEFIELD, 68,
retired nutrition
worker, Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital, died April
22 at home.;
Survivors in-
clude: sons, Jo-
seph and Julian
Cobb; daughter,
Theresa Cobb;
brother, Willie Frank Marshall,
Jr.; sister, Mary Ingram; grand-
PHILBERT, children, devoted loving niece,
Twanna R Ingram; best friend,
Bobbie Evans; and a host of other
family members and friends. Visi-
tation 2 p.m.-9 p.m., Friday. Ser-
vice 11a.m., Saturday, Liberty City
Church of God.


LOLA GRIFFIN, 94,, laundry
folder, died April
19. Visitation 4 A
p.m. 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
2 p.m., Satur-
day, New Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


KENNETH SANFORD, 48, dis-
able veteran,
died April 24.
Visitation 4
p.m. 9 p.m.,
W'e dnesday.
Service 10 a.m.,
Thursday in the
chapel.


PRISCILLA HIGGS, 65, caf-
eteria worker,
Miami-Dade
County Public
Schools, died
April 22. in Or-
lando. Visitation
.4 p.m. 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service
12 noon, Satur-
day, First Bap-
tist Church of Bunche Park:

NORMAN BENNETT, 76, con-
struction work-
er, died April 20.
.,Visitation 4 p.m.
9 p.m.. Friday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


CARL OMAR FISHER-PITTER
AKA STUNNAMAN, 21, airport
screener, died
April 24. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.





BARBARA BATTEAST, 72,
laundry presser, died April 11.Visi-
tation 4 p.m. 9 p.m., Friday.
Service 4 p.m., Saturday in the
chapel.

MYRTLE SCOTT, 89, house-
wife, died April 23. Arrangements
are incomplete.
Eric S. Georg ..2--
DANIEL EDDIE LEE BROOKS,
JR., 83 of St. Lucie, died April 26.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, Mt.
Bethel Worship Center, Ft.Pierce.

ROYSHAUN CLEMMONS, 1
years old, of Fort Lauderdale, died
of April 25. Arrangements are in-
,complete.
Poitier
DAWN LEE, 33, student,died
April 13 at Bro-
ward General
Medical Center.
Service was
held.





CLINTON HUDSON, JR., 86,
custodian, MD-
CPS, died April
26 at North
Shore Medi-
cal Center. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


MEGAN ROBERTS, 73, entre-
preneur, died April 13 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

SYLVIA JOSEPH, 68, house-
wife, died April 21 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.


DOUGLAS WAYNE SMITH,
60, metro bus
operator, Metro
Transit, -died
April 22 at Jack-
son North Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Minnie
A.; daughters,
Dawn, Desiree
ahd Clarissa Navarro; a host of
other family members and friends.
Visitation 5 p.m.-7 p.m. Wednes-
day. Service 1 p.m., Thursday,
Miami Bethany Seventh Day Ad-
ventist. Interment: Hollywood Me-
morial Gardens North.

ATHENIA S. MUMFORD, 91,
retired certified
nursing assis-
tant, Jackson
Memorial Park,
died April 20 at
Mt. Sinai Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:
sons, Herman
Stacks, David
(Pauline), Earl (Betty), Willie, Jr.,
Alonzo (Bobbie Jean), Pastor Tad-
erryl and Rodney; daughters, Mary
McClain, Ernestine Rachel (Willie)
and Doretha Parker; and a host of
other family members and friends.
Services were held.
HENRY A THOMAS, SR., 84,
retired custodi-
an, Miami-Dade
North Cam-
pus College,
died April 26
at Northshore
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
special compan-
ion, Mary Ford,
son, Henry, Jr., (April); daughters,
Brenda Jackson (Benny), Vivian
Kemp (Pastor Otis), Betty Ford
and Pollie Daniels (Sylvester); sis-
ters, Carolyn and Rowanna Ma-
this. Final rites and burial, Monday,
May 4. Arrangements entrusted to
Trawick Funeral Home, 1048 M.L.
King Jr., Avenue, Ozark, Alabama,
36360. 334-774-8374.


Hall Ferguson-Hewitt
JOHN PARKER, 37, construc-
tion. laborer, died April 18. Service
was held.



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MRS. GRADY LOWMAN
WILLIAMS
04/01/21 05/01/04

Loving and kind in all your
ways.
Upright and just to the end
of your days.
Sincere and true in your
heart and mind.
A beautiful memory you left
behind.
You had a nature one could
not help loving.
A heart that was purer than
gold;
And to those who knew you
and loved you,
Your memory will never
grow old.
Love, McQueen and Wil-
liams families


r"


DA'MAURI ROBINSON
07/30/98 04/28/08

Thank you for helping me
in class and hope you're hav-
ing a good time in Heaven.
Through your spirit we're do-
ing great things!
Love, Sugar Mama 'and Alex
and Jerome


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ORILLA LABORN, 72, home-
maker, diedApril
25 at Ocean
Side Extended
Care. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.



SAZZIE CORNELL, 82, home-
maker, died
April 25 at Bap-
tist Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at Mt.
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


SALLIE McLAUGLIN, 56, died
April 23 at Bap-
tist Hospital.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Morn-
ingstar Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.




LEROY GODBOLT, 22, stock-
man, died April
23. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




MARTHA BODIE, died April 26.
Arrangements
are incomplete.









In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


CONNIE HOLMES-HALL
In NMeniOriam In would like to thank you for your
kindness in our time of bereave-
ment.
The Miami Times Mother Clara Adams and fam-
ily
















Re-e ber o as


ELDER ISAAC S. COHEN
03-04-30 04-11-08

Founder / Pastor of First
Deliverance Church Of God In
Christ. Pastor of South Miami
COGIC and Founder/ Pastor
of Davis Temple of Gifford,
FL.
Elder Cohen is highly missed
by his family and those whose
life he touched. The love we
had for him will forever
live in our hearts. Our lives
are richer because of what he
shared of himself.
Karla Cohen and Family

Death Notice


EUGENE JOHNSON 80,
died April 22 at Health Cen-
tral Park Nursing Home in
Winter Garden, Orlando. Sur-
vivors include: wife, Melviln;
daughters, Cassandra, Bev-
erly, Sharon, Patricia, Jackie
and Pamela; sons, Eugene Jr.,
David, and Gregory; brothers,
Rudolph, Carl and Gladston;
sister, Maxine, of Nassau.
Service 1 p.m., Thursday, St.
Matthew's Missionary Bap-
tist Church. 6100 N.W. 24th
Ave. Arrangements entrusted
to Marvin C., Zanders Funeral
Home., Opopka, FL.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


lhmibt rSi 4e ,MW IV


I.


SCopyrighted Material --


SSyndicated Content





A*=
, : lit


4* 1w


. *F


Death Notice


MARY ELIZABETH
ANDERSON, 74, homemaker
and long time member of
Antioch Baptist Church of
Carol City, died April 27 at
Memorial Regional Hospital.
Survivors include: siblings,
Frankie Mae McClain, Es-
sie Mae Mays and Katie Mae
Tillman. Visitation 5 p.m., to
8 p.m.,Friday, Antioch Baptist
Church of Carol City. Service
2 p.m., Saturday, Antioch
Baptist Church of Carol City.
Arrangements entrusted to
Wright and Young Funeral
Home.


Happy Birthday
Iri loving memory of,


La'Keith L. Postell 'Luchee'
04/30/96 07/15/00

Although you are gone you
will never be forgotten. We
love and miss you dearly.
Your Mommie and family


Honor Your Loved

One With an

In Memoriam In

The Miami Times


lJi


SAMUEL LEROY BULLARD,
85, retired Pan Am Airline work-
er, died April 22 at
Florida Hospital in Orlando.
Viewing Friday at Mitchell Fu-
neral Home chapel.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
93rd Street Community Bap-
tist Church. Family receiving
friends Friday evening at 1951
Wilmington Street, Opa Locka.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


BOBBY L. JACKSON
wishes to express their appre-
ciation and thanks to the staff
at the VA Hospital, Richardson
Funeral Home, Rev. Woodrow
C. Jenkins Jr and church fam-
ily, the neighbors of 57 Street
and loving friends and family
for your condolences and deeds
extended to us.
May God bless each of you for
all that you have done on our
behalf.
The Jackson, Davis and Rolle
family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DR. ETHEL E. JOHNSO14
10/19/52 05/04/08

Gone but Never Forgotten!
Your loving daughter, Brandy
and the Johnson family


rThfa of the la
The family of the late


IDA L. SIMMONS, 59, Li-
censed Funeral Director, a for-
mer resident of West Perrine,
died April 27th in Macon,
GA, due to an automobile ac-
cident. Surviviors include: son,
Vetrimyer Miller (Fenika); four
grandchildren; brothers, Leroy
Mullins, Vernell Mullins, Larry
Mullins, Charles Herring, Cal-
vin Herring and Ryan Herring;
aunt, Mrs. Viola Kerr; a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins,
other relatives and friends.
Services 11 a.m, Tuesday,
Second' Baptist Church (Rich-
mond Heights). Range Funeral
Home, Directing.


Death Notice


REV. MARVELLE SCREEN
CHEEVER
would like to express their sin-
cere appreciation for the many
friend, associates, co-workers
and relatives for the many kind
words of encouragement, floral
arrangements, cards and let-
ters and most of all your prayes
during our tinie of bereavement.
Special thanks to Pastor Samuel
Sullivan and the entire Greater
Bethel A.M.E. Church family.
To Bishop John F. White, Rev.
Milton Broomfield, Rev. .Rogery
Adams, Bishop Victor T. Curry
and all the other ministers of
the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
Special thanks also to the
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, The North
Dade Senior High School class
of 1966, The Miami Northwest-
ern Senior High School class
of 1963 and the Praise Teams
of New Vision for Christ Minis-
tries, New Birth Baptist Church
Cathedral of Faith International
and the Greator Bethel A.M.E.
Choir.
May God continue to Bless
you all is our prayer.
The Cheever and Screen fami-
lies


Death Notice


ELDER JOEL G. EVERETT,
45, of Miami, Florida died Sun-
day April 26 at Memorial West
Hospital Broward. Funeral
will be held 2 p.m., Saturday
at Koinonia Worship Center
and Village, 4900 W. Hallan-
dale Beach Blvd, Pembroke
Park, Florida.
Survivors include: wife,
Gail; three children, Lanea,
Crystal and Gabriel; mother,
Mary Benton; grandmother,
-Beatrice Reid; five brothers,
one sister and a host of fam-
ily members. Services entrust-
ed to Mitchell Funeral Home.



JOIN THE


by becoming a member of our



CALL 305-694-6210


BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
JOHNSON, 79, retired
mechanic died April 26, North
Shore Hospital. Survivors
include: six adoring children,
Robbie J. Lester (Johnny),
Carolyn J. Christian, Jerry
L.,. Annette, Perry L. Johnson
and Joohn Spivey (Blossom);
two loving siblings, Lucille J.
Bentlry (Roy) of Atlanta, GA,
and William Johnson (Bernice)
of Detroit, MI a host of grands,
greatgrands, nieces and
nephews. Viewing Friday, 9
a.m., until 9 p.m., at Wright &
Young Fung Funeral Home. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, May 2 at
New Jerusalem P.B Church.


COY WESLEY MOTEN JR
'SUGAR BEAR'
05/02/07

Missing you my husband,
our hearts are heavy with
sorrow and grief, but as days
turn to months we find sweet
relief in knowing Coy, you are
not far away, but with us in
spirit every hour of the day.
Loving you, Dora Williams-
Moten and family

Card of Thanks
The family of the late


GLENN MCINTYRE


Extends a sincere thank you
to everyone for your cards, flow-
ers, time and many acts of kind-
ness shown to our family during
the bereavement of our son.
A special thanks to all clergy-
men, mothers and the deacon-
ess' of Pilgrim Rest.
Rev. Marvin and Robbie McIn-
tyre and family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


REV. LARRY V. JONES
1954 2007

You are gone but not forgot-
ten. We miss your smiles'and
you ability to encourage oth-
ers.
The family


4'1


w


- w
i .8 :


I


Direct Cremation With Viewing





The Miami Times

Lifestyles


entertainment
FASHION HIP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 27-MAY 5, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5. 2009


Love was in the air as 2
guests witnessed the union
Michelle Thompson and A
thony Holloway in holy me
rimony at the Violines Banqu
Hall in Hialeah on Saturd
April 11, 2009,
The wedding was coordine
ed by Wedding Planners fro
Lifestyles Entertaining, Da
County's top mother & daug
ter, Rine Bryant and Loleat
White. Further, the cer-
emony was performed
by Rev. Dr. Willie Sims
of Peaceful Zion Baptist
Church.
The ceremony began
with the sister of the
groom, Majorie Spann,
and the mother of the
bride, Rosalie Thomp-
son, each lighting the.
family candles before
being seated.
The procession began wi
the entrance of the groomsme
Demarreio Batts and Grego
Hill, Sr., best men, Keith M
Cray and Hamilton Proff a
the groom, Anthony Hollows
to John Legend's "So High".
Followed by the bridesmaid
Alteasha Ervin and Chris
Pratt, maid of honor, Parthen
Levell, matron of honor, Vale
ie Williams, Jr., bride, Qems
Thompson and Jr. groom, Sh
mar Bonds, the brides' son, A
ari Marshall who served as t
ringbearer and then the flow
girls, Shemya Balom and Lys
Levell, walking in with Luth
Vandross's "So Amazing".
The usher, Robert Hollows
unrolled the aisle Carpet
preparation for the bride's e
trance. The bride's arrival w
announced by the bell ring
Chenniya Thompson, as t
bride was escorted, down t
aisle by her sister, Celes
Levell to the soulful sound


00 Johnny Gill She
of was attired from
In- top to bottom \vith
at- a shinning Atara
jet that included mini-
ay earrings, a string
of pearls, and a train accentu-
at-. ated with floral designs.
)m As part of the ceremony, the
de couple included the unity can-
;h- dle ceremony, which symbol-
ha ized their joining together as
one. As the couple was
pronounced husband
.and wife, the broom
bearer, Gregory Hill,
Jr., placed the broom as
they jumped the broom
into holy matrimony.
The wedding was fol-
lowed by the reception,
MAJOR where after a sit down
dinner and tossing the
bouquet and removal
and tossing of the garter, the
ith newly weds joined their guests
en, as they partied into the wee
)ry hours of the morning.
Ic-
d ************
*y, The fortieth annual presenta-
tion of the Eleven Graders "Men
ds, Of Tomorrow" to the commu-
ity nity was provided by members
Lia of the Egelloc Civic, and Social
er- Club, Inc. This organization
ari was the vision of Jane D. Lew-
ie- is, Cleomie W. Bloomfield,
iv- Christina M. Eve, Julia' W.
he Hepburn, Wilhelmenia Page,
ver and Eddie Lee Wilson, back in
sis 1970. Now, new leadership has
ler taken over with Mary L. Dunn
as president, and T. Eileen
Ey, Martin-Major, president-elect
in and director of the "Men Of To-
n- morrow."
*as When the history book is writ-
er, ten for the "Men Of Tomorrow"
he presentation that occurred on
he Sunday, April 19, the 30 elev-
te enth graders that performed
of at the James L. Knight Center


L~y D. Ricard Sracha


Bknn Ga "


Marian. Cunningham of-
ficially retired from. the world
of work, on Dec. 19, 2008, af-
ter 16 years as a school cross-'
ing guard for the Miami-Dade
County Schools.
Crossing the burning sands
into greekdom on April 18 are the
following new members of Delta,
Sigma Theta Sorority: Leola Ad-
ams, Diane Alexander, Ebonie
Battle, 'Keva Boone, Felicia
Bowles, Aisha Brooks, Marcia
Brown, Tiffany Brown-How-


ard, Vivian Burns,
Mesha Campbell-
McLemore, Linette
Coleman, Court-
ney Collier, Aqui-
nas Collins, Cutari .,
Copeland, Desiree
Culpepper, Crystal .
Cunningham, Dar-
ra Demps, Leslie Dennis, Iris
Elijah,. Erica Evans, Unethia
Fox, Kanika Frazier, Rhonda
Gai nes, Inez Gilliard, Amelia
Gowdy, Suvetta Green, Val-


erie Hall, Tarsha Hill, Gaile
Holland, Janai Huston, Adri-
anne Jackson, Kanika John-
son, Stephanye Johnson,
Alicia Jones and Lisa Lewis
(mrrore names will be added next
week).
The following are the most in-
fluential Blacks this year, which
are all first-time office holders.
The spotlight is on the top
Blacks in President Barack
Obama's administration in-
cluding Attorney General Eric
Holder, Senior Adviser Valer-
ie Jarrett, White House social
security Desiree Rogers and
United States Ambassador
to the United Nations Susan
Rice. Will we see this again? I


don't know but I do hope it will
happen again in this country,
"The Land of the Free and the
Home of the Brave."
Frank and (Antionette Sil-
va) Simmons are over from
Houston, Texas to attend the
wedding of long-time friends,
Gregory Bellamy, son of
Gregory Sr. and Angela Bel-
lamy.
Get-well wishes are for Gary
Hepburn, Ann Johnson-
Dyes, Carmetta Brown-Rus-
sell, Edward Blue, Jr., Ismae
Prescott, Roslyn Bethel,
Herbert Rhodes, Jr., Doris
McKinney-Pittman, Cecil
Stanley Newbold, III; Rev.
Charles Uptgrow and Erma


Carey-Armstrong. Armbrister, April 25, their
Wedding anniversary greet- 40mh; and Edwin and Gaile M.
ings go out /to Gregory and Holland, April 25, their 22nd.
Shelly S. Powers, April 21, To achieve anything worth-
their 19th; Anthony and Lake- while in life, we need to work
sia .R. Taylor, April 25, their hard, stay focus and use com-
5th; Anthony and Jaunita W. mon sense.








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Lil Rounds says her goodbyes: 'Isang my little heart out'


By Kim Thai

Q: It seems as if the judges
were being a bit tough on you
the past few weeks. You were one
of the favorites in the beginning.
What happened? Do you think
you were scorned by one of the
judges?
A: The judges 'gave their
critiques (based on how) they
felt the performances went. They
gave me constructive criticism
to help me improve. In the end,
I'm going to take everything
they gave me to help me push
forward.
Everything they gave (me
is going to make .me a great
success.
Q: How. do you feel about
,the constant remarks from the
judges that you should take each
song and "make it your own"?
A: I did do that vocally; I guess
they wanted me to -do more to
the music. I felt that I did know
who I was as an artist.
Q: What did you learn from
your experience on Idol?
A: To keep your head up. I
came back each week and sang
my little heart out, just because
I love to do that. American Idol
gave me a great platform. It's
been a blessing.
Q: You (were) always quiet (in
front of the judges) and said "I'll
do better." Last week, you kind
of stood up and said something.
Why was that?
A: When the judges gave me
their critiques, it started going
back and forth. Sometimes, the
same thing they told me the
week before, they flipped it. I was
kind of like "Eeee, which way do
I go?" If in any way I didn't give


watch the show. I did explain to
them I was getting to go home.
They're still so very proud of
their mommy. They've been
great:in this whole thing.,
Q: Was there a, special
exchange between you and
Allison (Iraheta, who was also
in the bottom three), since she's
the last woman standing?
.A: I gave Allison the biggest


Lil Rounds said Thursday that
she had suspected she was
near the end of the road: "I
kind of had a feeling it might
be time to go, so I started
coping with it before the
show." -Photo Michael Becker, Fox
my vibe, I didn't want that. I do
know what I want to do as an
artist, and that's why I did Bette
Midler's The Rose.
Q: Do you think that affected
the viewers?
A: I'm -not exactly sure.
America's been keeping me in
for a while. I felt that America
got the message and the judges
are great and I let themsee my
dreams.
Q: What did you say to
your children when you were
eliminated?
A: I haven't gotten a chance to
see the babies yet, but they,did


~$ .


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1,1


hug I could possibly give her
- that's my baby. I told her to
keep her head up and continue
being Allison. She's such a
phenomenal singer.
Q: Did you sense before the
results show that you might be
leaving?
A: I kind of had a feeling it
might be time to go, so I started
coping with it before the show.


Commissioner
Barbara J. Jordan
Miamni-Dade County, District 1
Presents

An Evening of Jazz
Featuring

The Andrew Atkinson Quartet
Vocalist Yvonne Brown
World renowned Steel Pan Virtuoso,
Othello Molineaux
Paulette Dozier

Friday, May 1, 2009 7 p.m. 10 p.m.
Miami Carol City Park
3201 NW 184 Street in Miami Gardens


This event is FREE


Bring your blankets and your
lawn chairs and come enjoy
an incredible evening of music.


For more information, please call 305-375-5694.


I NUW PL.AYI/ U I
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES
I SORRY, NO PASSES ACCEPTED FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT I


I


~l"f~bit


will be noted down as the best
performance. The paparazzi,
Lee Photographer and Charles
Douglas, from Ebenezer United
Methodist Church were on hand
to record the event.
The atmosphere was estab-
lished by the 10-piece Psi Phi
Band as the guests arrived and
the young boys waited behind
the balloon, decorated stage
for the theme song to engender
their. entrance. After Martin-
Major voice permeated
the packed auditorium .
by including the theme:
"Celebrating Our Heri-
tage and Fulfilling the
Dream" for thirty young
men, the extravaganza
had begun.
The Young Men ap-
peared in white-on-
white tuxedos, white WH
bow ties and shoes, as
the theme song was played.
The audience applauded their
entrance as they demonstrated
military movements marching
to their seats and being seated
individually with the music.
President Dunn continued with
the occasion by alluding to the
presidency of Barack Obama
and an assured opportunity for
the young men's dream of be-
coming the 44th President of the
United States would not fail.
Martin-Major followed with co-
ordinators of the Showcase of
Talent, Black Heritage Awards,
essay, souvenir journal, certifi-
cates to the Men Of Tomorrow,
and three scholarship awards.
Top winners were Donovan
Carey, Larren Mellerson, Jor-
dan A.W. Powell, Chad Lewis,
Gerald Coney,' Jr., while pre-
senters included Wilma M.
Rogers, Kameelah B. Brown,
Marietta Bullard, Cora S.
Johnson, Josephine Davis-
Rolle, Vera Purcell, and Ste-
phenia Willis.
Also, Gloria Clausell, Barba-
ra Golphin, Bertha Milton, W.
Doris Neal, and Mary G. Sal-
ary, Constance Carter, Lau-
rice Hepburn, and entrepre-


neurship awardees as Veron
ca Rahming. Deborah Carte
Constance Carter, Glori
Clausell, Mary L. Dunn, Ste
phenie Fredericks, and Mar
W. Saunders.
For the closing of that portion
of the program, The Christin
M. Eve Scholarship Awards wa
announced by Martin-Maj
who has been approved for a
annually remembrance. Recir
ients are Derrell Parker, Nort
*- Miami Beach Sr., BenjE
Smin McNamee, Booki
T. Washington Sr., an
Leonard Thompson, M
ami Carol City Sr...
The highlight of th
program included Rc
chelle Lightfoot Johl
son and Danita Jacl
son-Jenkins, modern
YMS tors, who presented th
young men and fema
guests that complemented th
young men attired in pastel cc
or gowns, beginning with Chri
'topher Scarlett and Shakeri
Smith and continuing
Gregory George and
Cindy Innocent, Alex
Diaz and Alanna For-
tune, Jeremy Dixon and
Chelsie Young, Ryan
Jackson and Shaniqua
Bradley, Donovan Carey
and Brianna Johnson,
Alan Young and Eboni
Finley, Charles Takeh
and Patricia Royer.
Also, Jordan A. Powell an
Jasmine Smith, Keith Taki
and Annorika Jackson, Ma
quez Davis and Kadeja Henr
Gerald Coney and Stephan
Jefferson, Larren Mellersc
and Choicey Delacruz, Jam
Williams and Kristina Taylo
Jonathan White and Tiffan
Hall, Chad Lewis and Ebon
Robinson, Norris Johnson an
Aspen Larkins, Nathan Murrs
and Daphine Mingo, Jonatha
Moses and Ra'Anna Pickin
Lorenzo Smith and Domi
ique foster, Harold Scott an
Aqueeleh Mitchell.
.Also Craig Porter, Jr. ai


i- Brittany Porter, Marc Smith
r, and Chelsa Graham, Henry
La Crespo, Jr. and Katie Douglas,
e- Johnny Mobley and Latia Mc-
y Craw, Devante Lowe
and Adrienne Gillard,
>n Shayon Jackson and
ia Safiayyah Edmonson,
is Dione Francis and
or Charny Desrosiipts,
n and Jonathan Ragoo
p- and Ashante Thurston,
:h and Kenneth Walker
a- and Quantavia Love. DUI
er The young men en-
id tered on the theme
Ii- song and positioned themselves
in four rows and demonstrated
ie The Cane Routine, followed by
o- a routine to Marvin Sapp's "I
n- Never Would Have Made It" and
k- a tribute to Duke Ellington's
a- "Satin Doll", while the cotillion
ie dance with their female guests.
de They were taken on a trip to New
ie York, England, Spain, France,
)l- and Miami that included the
s- waltz, two-step, 'one-step, fast-
ia step, cha cha and tango to a
standing ovation. Ev-
eryone including "The
Singing Angels" was
pleased with the three-
hour extravaganza.
Eileen (as she is
called), emulated a
closing likened to that
of an academy awards
BROWN event by impacting
the young men with
the saga of President Barack
2d Obama to follow. As she pre-
er sented each one with a gold
tr- watch to time themselves for
y, their future dreams, "A Change,
ie Is Gonna Come" filled the au-
in ditorium.
al
r,- * * ** *'** ** *
ay According to Erma Baker,
Ly Alexander Whyms, Sr. saw
id the sunrise, June 7, 1921, and
ay the sun set upon his .life, Sat-
an urday, April 18, 2009. Baker,
,s, a foster daughter, indicated
n- that during the, course of life,
id Whyms, Sr. met and married
Ruth Rowan, in January 22,
id 1943, and recently celebrated


their 67 years of marriage.
And, of course, upon his re-
turn from the World War II, the
couple had seven sons: Alex-
ander Jr., Sterling,
Ellsworth, Dwight,
Andrew, Kelsey and
Kevin.
Willie Ray Dan-
iels, Whyms grand-
son, added much to
the "home going" when
he .electrified the filled
IN Ebenezer United Meth-
odist Church by sing-
ing "I Won't Complain".
Followed by Minister JoAnn
Brookins, Keith Butler, Mi-
chele Lopez, Sharon Lavari-
ty-Jones performed a liturgi-
cal dance, Joan Leggette sung
"Blessed Assurance" and Anna
Sanders along with Whyms's
grandsons, Dwain and Kelsey
Whyms, all paid tribute to
him.
Whyms worked for Inter-
national Longshoremen's
Association Local 1416 for
40-years William H. Thomas
and Allen Davis, David But-.
ler, Damien Davis, Key Ja-
mison, Clarence Pittman,
president, and Marvin Tay-
lor, all members of the honor
guards paid a special tribute
him, while the ILA presented
a golden bible and flag to his
wife, Ruth.
The Whyms's carried an
"open house" tradition of let-
ting everyone in for food, shel-
ter, clothing, or some place to
stay. The house accommodat-
ed as much as 26 people who
became their foster children,
along with their parents at no
cost. Les Brown, noted moti-
vational speaker, was a party
of the household.
The late Dr. Aaron Hall,
pastor of Ebenezer United
Methodist Church was their
spiritual leader for as many
years. And, of course, he sang
in the choirs and was one of the
-Brothers of Ebenezer. He will be
missed terribly for his genuine
smile and benevolence.


8


"







3C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 25-MAY 5, 2009


AL KSMS CNRL HI oOcN. DETN


se *


"derlniltr wanl Broadwa roleo


Rappr tone down sprkle but not .w


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-- 11 ol -.- -11- - l I


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ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
Your partner's problems are out of con-
trol. Way too much time has been spent
babysitting. Expanding your own possi-
bilities should take precedence over what
you think you need to do for others right
now. Lucky numbers 9, 13, 21, 35, 42

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
Others have been giving you a hard
time. Don't waste your energy feeding into.
it. It's exhausting to have to justify every-
thing you do, especially to someone who'd
do better to take a good look in the mirror!
Lucky numbers 12, 18, 25, 38, 40

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
Someone is fed up with your refusal to
come to grips with things. Their frustra-
tion has you wondering what you need
to do. This would be easier if both of you
could accept the fact that things of this
nature take time. Lucky numbers 15, 19,
25, 35, 38

CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 20
Too many old issues have you feel-
ing fragmented and scattered. There will
be no peace of mind until you come to
terms with the past. Sometimes the cure
is geographical. Think about moving if that


seems doable. Lucky numbers 10, 15, 28,
32, 45

LEO: JULY 21 -AUGUST 20
If you knew what you wanted this would
be easier. Others have been badgering you
to see it their way. Their way may not be
your way so get clear before you fall in
line with a plan that could be very hard to
live with. Lucky numbers 7, 15, 21, 32, 42

VIRGO. AUGUST 21- SEP 20
Whoever's challenging you to take a
wider view of things is doing you a fa-
vor. Don't write off either their advice or
their needs. Creative changes are close
at hand but to make them real you need
to act quickly. Lucky numbers 12, 16, 18,
24, 32

LIBRA: SEPT 21 OCT 20
If you're feeling out of the loop, don't
get too down on. yourself. When we're
lost, there's a good chance we're about
to find ourselves. There's light at the end
of the tunnel. Feel your way through this.
Lucky numbers 18, 22, 32, 40, 48.

SCORPIO: OCT 21- NOV 20
If others have written you off it's be-
cause they're just too shallow. Don't lose


sleep over this one. There's plenty of fish
in the sea; too many for you to bother
with people who aren't on the same
wavelength. Lucky numbers 12, 18, 28,
35, 45

SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21 DEC 20
After a long period of questioning and
doubt your relationship has opened up to
deeper levels of trust. Coming out of the
fog you're clear about the fact that love
always involves taking the good with the
bad. Lucky numbers 6, 19, 24, 32, 42

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 JAN 20
Old issues are clogging things up.To get
through this stretch you'll have to take off
your mask and get real. You can't expect
people to accept you for who you are, if
you keep trying to be something you're
not. Lucky numbers 11, 21, 32, 35, 48

AQUARIUS: JAN 21 FEB 20
Decisions are pending that will affect
your future. Don't panic. This emergency
will last about 5-6 months. You've got
about that long to decide where you want
to go from here. Don't let your ego get in
the way. Lucky numbers 14, 19, 22, 28, 35

PISCES: FEB21 MARCH 20
Nobody can tell you you're nuts because
nothing in the world could change your
mind right now. If you're right about this,
consider it a fortunate gamble. If you're
wrong about it, there'll be Hell to pay.
Lucky numbers 11, 15, 22, 32, 38


N


Florida Grand Opera presents
MADAMA BUTTERFLY
For him it was a moment of euphoric pleasure. For her it meant a
lifetime of love and devotion. Family, fortune and honor-poor Butterfly
forsakes them all for the officer who was no gentleman.
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$1,?$, $2r25, $2-7 $V-71S, $0.-7$, $e9-7t, $132-7t, $1;8.5
New World Symphony, America's Orchestral Academy presents
ALL-TCHAIKOVSKY CONCERT
Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor; Vladimir Feltsman, piano
Piaho Concerto No. 1; Symphony No. 5
8 PM Knight Concert Hall .
$1e65, $33.25, $46.25, $67.25, $87.25, $129.25

PIANO SLAM THE MUSIC SPEAKS
Dade County student poets will rap their award winning poems to two-piano
music performed by acclaimed Dutch artjpts Jeroen and Maarten van
Veen-winners of the 1993 Dranoff International Two Piano Competition.
7:30 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE
MADAMA BUTTERFLY
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$13.. $2;2,?, $27.7, $62, 7, $81,- $9,$75, $1325, $17,R7S

HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE
An intimate, mJlti-media evening with three-time GRAMMY-winning
engineer/producer Geoff Emerick, who discusses his book Here, There &
Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of THE BEATLES moderated
by music journalist and co-author Howard Massey.
7 PM Carnival Studio Theater $45
OUT FOR LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW
Join us for ar, evening ot laughs wili twAo of toda~ hoes n tal lesobiar
coiTics Erin Fole., and Glori3 Bigelowl
8 PM Carnival Studio Theaier $27.25
MADAMA BUTTERFLY
S PP.M Zit Balilet Opera House
$22 75, $. 7.S $52 75. $81.75, 99 75, $13.2.75 $178 75,. $2M.5

MADAMA BUTTERFLY
8 PM Zitl Bailei Opera House
$27.75, $ $81 75. $99 7$1, 2 75, 178 75, $2 8 7i

RRA Broadway Acros.s Arnenca Miamin and Adrienne Arshl Center pres nl
CIRQUE DREAMS JUNGLE FANTASY
Don't miss the opening nigri, lr "[ire granaest circus spectacle east
of Vegas'" Ne Yorrk M.sgazine


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


Medium 99
White Shrimp ............ 4 -b
Easy to Peel, Farm-Raised,
Previously Frozen,
to 50 per Pound' .
SAVE UP TO 2,00 LB,
(Peeled and Deveined ...
51 to 60 per Pound ... Ib 5.99)


Chachies Fr
Salsa .................ee
Assorted Varieties, For Fast Service,
Grab & Go!, Located in the Publix Deli
Pre-Packaged Section, 16-oz cont.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 2.99 .


White Mountain 49
B read .................. ...............
Handmade in Our Bakery,
Baked Fresr,- Tlirougihoul the- D
-Frc.m In.- Puibib Ba-er,' 1. -o, loaf,
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Yellow Corn ......... 200
Or Bi-Color or White, each
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


Whn iat


Thins |


Aquafina Pure Water ......... .............. ..............399
24-pk. 16.9-oz bot. .
SAVE UP TO .00


Nabisco Baked Snack Crackers.................. ..................
Or Wheat.Crackers, Assorted Varieties, 7 to 10-oz box
SAVE UP TO 1.78 ON 2
(Nabisco Easy Cheese, 8-oz can ... 2/6.00)


General
Mills
Cereal ...........F ree
Honey Nut Cheerios, 17-oz, Lucky Charms,
16-oz, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, 24.9-oz,
Reese's Puffs, 18-oz, or Cookie Crisp,
15.6-oz box
SAVE UP TO 4.99 ON 3


12-Pack Selected
Coca-Cola /- 00
Products.... ... 001
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 2.67 ON 3


Keebler
Sandies
Shortbread Fe
Cookies.... .... ... e
Or Vienna Fingers or Oatmeal,
Assorted Varieties, 9.5 to 16-oz pkg.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.23


18-Pack 1199
Bud Light Beer ...........11
Or Budweiser or Budweiser Select,
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(12-Pack Assorted Yuengling Beer or Lager,
12-oz bot. ... 8.99)


Prices effective Thursday, April 30 through Wednesday, May 6, 2009. Only In Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee
and Monroe Counties Any item carried by Publix GreenVWise Market will be at the Publix advertised sale price. Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity rights reserved.


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5C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 25-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


,: -.77 7 : _


-







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


Heritage Trust to honor incorporator Samuel Jones and educator Ruth Sands


Samuel Jones, one of the in-
corporators of the city of Miami,
and Ruth Smith Sands, educa-
tor, entrepreneur, church lead-
er and community activist, will
be honored when the African
American Committee of Dade
Heritage Trust hosts its 16h an-
nual Commemorative Service,
Youth Talent on Parade, and
Procession on April 26.
The procession will line up at
2:30 p.m. in front of the Histor-
ic St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
1750 NW Third Ave. in Over-
town and march Biscayne Park


at Northwest First Avenue and
19th Street, led by the Progres-
sive Cornet Band.
The program will showcase
youth talent and the winners on
an essay contest on the "Why I
Am Proud of My Heritage" will
be announced.
Jones, a laborer, and his fa-
ther Samuel M. Jones, a farm-
er, were born in South Carolina
and lived at 639 Fifth Street
in Overtown with other family
members.
The 1910 Census listed the
Samuel M. Jones household


as including his brother, Bry-
ant R. Jones; sons, Samuel,
Israel, Jease, Robert and Ertie;
daughters, Nancy and Sarah;
nephews, John, Mene and En-
gine; granddaughter, Bertha
Jones; and a boarder, Mary F.
Stephens..
Jones was born in 1890 and
died in 1920 at age 30 from a
gunshot wound. A headstone
will be unveiled in the City
Cemetery at his gravesite in
honor of role as an incorpora-


tor of Miami.
Sands was born Aug. 7,
1920, in Overtown and died
Sept. 12, 2008, at 88. She was
the daughter of Bishop J.R.
Smith and Evangelist Olive B.
Smith of the Church of God of
Prophecy. She graduated from
Booker T.
Washington High School in
1938 and from Florida A&M
University and became a teach-
er a Miami-Dade public school
teacher.


She married Coast Guard
Lieutenant Robert Sands in
1945 and they had three chil-
dren, Winifred, Carlos and Wil-
liam.
Smith owned and oper-
ated the first Black. florist
shop in Opa-locka, known as
La Vogue's Florist. Hers was
among the first Black families
to integrate then Sunny Isles
- the area that became known
as Miami Gardens and was
one of the first to integrate the


19th Avenue Church of God of
Prophecy, where she was ac-
tive in many auxiliaries.
of the church such as Pastor
Booster, Trustee, choir direc-
tor, Tuesday Smith was also
founder of the Fruits of the
Saints, comprised of former
members of the Church of God
of Prophecy.
The committee is encourag-
ing people of all faiths to attend
the event. For more informa-
tion, call 305-638-5800.


Television. Mobile. Internet. As media gets more diverse, we should
remember that people are, too. Nielsen's simple, integrated and
open approach to measuring consumers means we're familiar with
communities, cultures and exciting new voices. It's the difference
between measuring people and understanding them.


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MAN'STREASURE


All Rights Reserved.







The Miami Times



Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


Projects worth $335M taking


shape at the Opa-locka airport


Meek Foundation
among five tenants

Miami Times Staff Report
After years of stalled develop-
ment and declining aircraft op-
erations, development is taking
off at Opa-locka Executive Air-
port.
A number of developers have
signed off on projects for the air-
port valued at more than $300
million, according to County
Commissioner Barbara Jordan.
The latest tenant is the Car-
rie Meek Foundation which
signed an agreement to develop
121 acres of the airport's 1,810
acres, with an investment of at
least $110 million within nine
years.
The airport recently celebrat-
ed the completion of the first
two facilities on a 180-acre plot
under development by invest-
ment firm AVE LLC.
The company completed a
* 478,000-square-foot mail sort-
ing facility for the U.S. Postal
Service and a 151,000-square-
foot aircraft warehouse with
space available for lease.
"Speaking during a celebration
of the projects, Jordan said the
facilities marked the start of a
new era for the airport.
Jordan, in 2005, helped cre-
ate the Opa-locka Executive
Airport Task Force that spear-
headed the termination of non-


' ,',


A view of the 151,000-square-foot aircraft warehouse construct
Executive Airport.


performing lease agreements at
the airport.
"Miami-Dade County has
entered into five lease agree-
ments at Opa-locka Executive
since 2005 that will generate
$355 million of investment
in the next 15 years," Jordan
said.
"These projects will turn
under-utilized airport prop-
erty into a bustling, mixed-use
area that includes new indus-
trial, retail, warehouse and


aeronautical facilities, bringing
with them additional revenue
and jobs to our community,"
she said.
The Carrie Meek Foundation
lease was signed in July 2008
and the agency is in the pro-
cess of identifying a develop-
ment partner, said its executive
director, Anthony Williams.
Once a partner is selected,
work will start on the infra-
structure and selection of ten-
ants. Williams said Tuesday


cted by AVE LLC at Opa-locka
-Miami-Dade Aviation Department/Nick Garcia Studios
the foundation had hoped to
begin work on the ground by
mid-2010 but the economic
recession could force a delay
until the end of 2010, "all de-
pending on how the economy
rebounds," he said.
According to Miami-Dade
Aviation Department, the
county entered into a 55-year
development lease agreement
with AVE for development in
February 2007 for a 180-acre
tract that requires the com-


Commissioner Barbara J. Jordan congratulates AVE devel-
oper Ernie Cambo at the launch of his facilities at Opa-locka.
Executive Airport. -Miami-Dade Aviation Department/Nick Garcia Studios


pany to invest $187 million
in development funds 'over
the next 10 years.
One-third of the develop-
ment will comprise aeronau-
tical-related facilities and
the rest industrial and retail
space.
. The county signed another
lease in March 2007, a 55-
year agreement with AA Ac-
quisitions for the develop-
ment of 181 acres and an
investment of $162.9 million
over the next 15 years.
In a third agreement, a 25-


year lease was signed in Au-
gust 2007 with Biscayne Cap-
ital for one acre and a mini-
mum investment of $220,000
for a private hangar.
Miami Executive Aviation,
a tenant at Opa-locka Execu-
tive since 1996, entered into
a 35-year lease in 2005 for
its existing 16-acre site and
an additional aircraft stor-
age and maintenance hangar
on four acres of land with an
investment of $4.2 million.
Construction was completed
in 2008.


New jobless claims are rising


more than expected to 640K


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


an THF MIAMI TIMES. APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


Insurance premiums are on the way up


By Kathy Chu
and Sandra Block

The cost of a typical
auto insurance policy.
will rise '4 percent to
$875 this year, on top
of a 3 percent increase
last year, according to
the Insurance Informa-
tion Institute, a trade
group. Consumers also
will pay more for ho-
meowners insurance:
The average policy


will jump 3 percent to
$841. And term life in-
surance rates are ris-
ing after several years
of declines.
The price increases
come as consumers
struggle the un-
employment rate has
reached 8.5 percent,
and household wealth
has plunged with in-
vestment portfolios
and home prices.
In this economy,


"Anything that costs
more is difficult for
consumers," says J.
Robert Hunter, direc-
tor of insurance for the
Consumer Federation
of America.
The industry's profits
come' from insurance
policies and investment
returns, says Terri
Vaughan, chief execu-
tive of the National As-
sociation of Insurance
Commissioners. That's


why, "If your expecta-
tions for future invest-
ment income are lower,
that's going to affect
premiums."
Insurers collect pre-
miums from 'consum-
ers and invest the
majority in bonds, the
rest in stocks. Their
portfolios have been
under pressure amid
volatile stock and bond
returns.
For instance, yields


on ultra-safe Trea- weakens, insurance
sury securities in rates could climb fur-
high demand amid their. Insurers "cannot
the economic turmoil assume that inter-
- plunged in 2008. est rates will be much
Meanwhile, the Dow higher and stock re-
Jones industrial aver- turns much better in
age is down 43 percent the foreseeable future,"
from its all-time high says Robert Hartwig,
of 14,165 on Oct. 9, president of the Insur-
2007. Treasury secu- ance Information Insti-
rities and stocks have tute.
regained some ground In the life insurance
recently, however, industry, weak profits,
As the economy higher reserve require-


ments and increased
capital costs are re-
versing a more than
decade-long trend of
falling term life pric-
es, says Byron Udell,
chief executive of Ac-
cuQuote, an online in-
surance broker.
Udell predicts aver-
age term life rates will
be 5 percent to 10 per-
cent higher at this time
next year."
Banner Life Insur-


ance raised rates this
year, he says. ,Pruden-
tial and ING have noti-
fied AccuQuote they'll
raise rates in coming
weeks.
The rate increases
- typically 2 percent
to 6 percent are sig-
nificant because these
three insurers are ma-
jor players that fre-
quently offer lower pre-
miums than their com-
petitors, Udell says.


Blk dMu31Copyrighted Materiale i rate


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New program offers help to kids traumatized by violence


Operation Guiding Light

to be unveiled Saturday,


Children who are
traumatized after wit-
nessing violence will
now get speedy men-
tal health counseling,
thanks: to a partner-:
ship of an anti-violence
program, police, a state
agency and a mental
health facility.
"Operation Guiding
Light," as the program
is called, was intro-
duced to the commu-
inity -during. -a.--Neigh- .
'borhood Resource Fair
held. Saturday, April.
18 in Liberty City.
The tRegional Com-
Smunity Collaboration


on Violence has linked
up with a group of
agencies forming The
Family Safety Net
First Response Ser-
vice Partnership to
launch the program,
a pilot being. funded
initially for a year
with $800,000 from
The Children's Trust.
The campaign hopes
to help children in
Brownsville, Liberty
City and--- Overtown
who witness a loved
one being beaten or
killed and thus have
to bear "invisible psy-
chological scars."


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"Our children are
the innocent bystand-
ers to community and
domestic violence.
When occurring in the
home, a supposedly
safe place, domestic
-violence robs children
of the foundation for
their sense of safe-
ty," said Jeff Gorley,
administrator of the
Regional Community
Collaboration on Vio-.
lence (RCCV).
The partnership
comprises the Miami
and Miami-Dade po-
lice 'departments, the
-state- Department of.
Children &8 Families
and New Horizons'
Community Mental
Health Center.
Current estimates


indicate that nation-
wide as many as 10
million children per
year may witness or
*be-victims--of-violence
in their homes or
broader community,
Gorley said.
"These youngest
members of society


Housing crisis a top priority


RATES
continued from 7D

week.
The big unknown for
the coming months
is President Barack
Obama's plan to help
up to 9 million borrow-
ers avoid foreclosure
through refinanced
mortgages or modified


loans.
The Obama admin-
istration expects it to
make a big dent in the
foreclosure crisis. But
it remains to be seen
whether the lending
'industry will fully em-
brace the efforts, de-
spite a promise of $75
billion in incentive pay-
ments.


Highest losses in 25 years


WORK
continued from 7D

by a week.
The high level of con-
tinuing claims is a
sign that many laid-
off workers are having
difficulty finding new
jobs.
Employers have cut
5.1 million jobs since
the recession began in
December 2007 in an
effort to slash costs as
consumers and busi-
nesses have sharply
reduced spending. The
department said ear-
lier .this month that
companies cut a net
total of 663,000 jobs
in March, sending the
unemployment rate to
8.5 percent, the high-
est in 25 years.
The cuts reflect the
depth of the downturn,
which has been global
in scope.
"The world economy
is goirig through the
most severe crisis in
generations," Treasury
Secretary Timothy
Geithner said Wednes-
day.
The Obama adminis-


tration is counting on
its $787 billion. stimu-
lus package, enacted
in February, to "save
or create" 3.5 million
jobs.
More. job losses
were announced this
week. Yahoo Inc. said
it would layoff 700
employees, the third
round of mass layoffs
this year. And oilfield
services provider Hal-
liburton Co. said it has
cut 2,000 positions in
the first three months
of the year.
Among the states,
Florida saw the larg-
est increase in claims,
with 9,303 for the
week ending April 11,
which it attributed
to more layoffs in the
construction, service
. and manufacturing
industries. The next
largest increases were
in Pennsylvania, Cali-
fornia, Wisconsin and
New York.
Michigan saw the
largest drop in claims
with 12,566, which it
said was due to fewer
layoffs in the automo-
bile industry.


see and experience
violence at alarm-
ingly high rate which
clearly creates a pub-
lic health problem of
tremendous propor-
tions. Childhood ex-'
posure to violence
has a devastating'im-
pact on their social
development, physi-
cal and psychologi-
cal health and school
performance," Gorley
said.
Operation Guid-
ing Light will work
*this way: member


organizations of the
Family Safety Net
First Response Ser-
vice Partnership will
step in when a law
enforcr'nent official
sends it a call that
a child was victim-
ized or traumatized
by witnessing vio-
lence in the homes,
school or the broader
community, serious
accidents, sudden
deaths, fires or ani-
mal attacks.
Personnel from the
partnership, espe-


cially from New Hori-
zons, will respond as
a team to the call for
help and resources
available round-the-
clock will be provided
to the child and 'the
family to ensure the
child's mental health
is, protected. .
The child could re-
ceive immediate care,
be referred to psychi-
atric emergency ser-
vice or to the DCF.
Police supervisors
in Operation Guid-
ing Light will have an


opportunity to take a
three-day course on
child development,
also sponsored by
The Children's Trust.
The Neighborhood
Resource Fair is free
and open to the pub-
lic. Social service pro-
viders will have an
opportunity to show-
case their services.
For more informa-
tion on the fair, or
how to participate,
call Officer Simmons
or Officer Pile at 305-
795-2300.


S.A.V.E.S. Program & Financial Aid Available


w -


William H. Turner Technical Arts Adult '& Coimunity Education Center
10151 N.W. 19th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33147
(305) 691-8324
Postsecondary Adult Vocational Programs
2009 2010 Spring Term
April 27, 2009 July 29, 2009

Hours
Course Time Days (To Complete) Cost

Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration & Heating 5:00-10:00 MR 1350 $ 491.00
Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration & Heating 5:00-10:00 M/W 1350 $ 246.00
Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration & Heating 5:00-10:00 T/R 1350 $ 246.00
Barbering 5:00-10:00 M~R 1200 $ 491.00
Barbering 5:00-10:00 M/W 1200 $ 246.00
Barbering 5:00-10:00 T/R 1200 $ 246.00
Carpentry 5:00-10:00 M~R 1200 $491.00
Carpentry 5:00-10:00 M/W 1200 $ 246.00
Carpentry 5:00-10:00 T/R 1200 $ 246.00
Plumbing 5:00-10:00 M~R 960 $491.00
Plumbing 5:00-10:00 M/W 960 $246.00
Plumbing 5:00-10:00 T/R 960 $ 246.00
Electricity : 5:00-10:00 M-R 1200 $ 491.00
Electricity 5:00-10:00 ,M/W 1200 $ 246.00
Electricity 5:00-10:00 T/R 1200 $246.00
Welding 5:00-10:00 M~R 1170 $491.00
Welding 5:00-10:00 M/W 1170 $246.00
Welding 5:00-10:00 T/R 1170 $246.00
Cosmetology 5:00-10:00 T/R 1200 $ 246.00
Medical Coder 5:00-9:00 MTW 1. 000 $246.00
3:00-6:00 or M/W or
High School Completion 3:0-6:0 Free
C6:15-9:15 T/R
ESOL 6:00-9:00 MTW Free
ABE/GED 6:00-9:00 MTW Free
Citizenship 6:00-9:00 R Free
M/W or
Senior Learners: Computers, Exercise 5:00-8:00 T/R Free

A $5.00 Photo I.D. Is Required Additional $15.00 Registration Fee to be added for NEW
Vocational Students

LEGEND: M=Mon. T=Tues. W=Wed. R=Thurs.


FRozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 One of the oldest pediatric Practices
S in Dade County Over 50 years of Child Care
WEBSITE
www.rozalynhpaschalmd.com
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 305-652-6095


SUBSCRIBEITODAY


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Home prices in March fall 12% from '08


By Stephanie Armour

Home prices contin-
ued to slide last month
as foreclosed and other
distressed properties
drew first-time buyers
and bargain hunters
into the market.
Although prices
rose from February to
March, the national
median existing-home
price for all housing
types was $175,200,


down 12.4% from
March 2008, the Na-
tional Association of
Realtors (NAR) report-
ed Thursday.
Sales of distressed
homes made up about
half of all sales, and
about two-thirds of
those were foreclo-
sures. Distressed
homes also include
short sales, in which
properties are sold for
less than the balance


owed on the mort-
gage.
March sales fell 3%
from February to a
seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 4.57
million properties.
The February rate
was revised downward
to 4.71 million. Last
month's sales were 7%
lower than -in March
2008.
Sales are largely be-
ing driven by first-time


home buyers, who now
make up more than
half of transactions.
Meanwhile, sales of
higher-priced homes
have almost entirely
stalled, in part because
of the higher interest
rates that accompany
so-called jumbo mort-
gage loans.
Lawrence Yun, NAR's
chief economist, says
that the more modest
ups and downs seen


in home sales in re-
cent months suggest
the market appears to
be stabilizing.
"We still need to see
a consistent increase,
and that's not hap-
pening now," he says.
"Hopefully, by early
this summer."
A tax credit of up to
$8,000 for first-time
home buyers and low
interest rates are help-
ing lure some buyers


into the market. The
average interest rate
on a 30-year fixed
mortgage is 4.80%,
down from 4.82% last
week, Freddie Mac
said Thursday.
Home sales were
higher than a year
ago in Minneapolis,
Northern Virginia, Las
Vegas, Phoenix and
most areas of Califor-
nia and Florida, where
prices have taken


large hits.
And in one promis-
ing sign, the inventory
of unsold homes is be-
ginning to shrink. To-
tal housing inventory
at the end of March
fell 1.6% to 3.74 mil-
lion existing homes
available for sale.
Much of that inven-
tory must be absorbed
before prices will sta-
bilize.
"Over the past five


months, home sales
haven't changed all
that much. They
haven't seen much
life," says Patrick
Newport at IHS Global
Insight.
"Lower prices aren't
stimulating sales. We
still have a big prob-
lem in the credit mar-
ket. The money banks
are lending is going
to refinancing, not to
home purchases."


Rial dbspiCbpyrighted Materialer-paylngob


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Available from Commercial News Providers


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Coke changes fountain options at McDonald's


The Coca-Cola Co.
will add a new selec-
tion of flavors to its
fountain machines at
McDonald's Corp.'s
14,000 restaurants in
the United States.
-Beginning this year,
the core fountain
line-up will include
Coca-Cola, Diet Coke,
Sprite, and Hi-C Or-
ange." Coca-Cola's
Dasani will remain a


national core bottle
beverage and now
Powerade Mountain
'Blast and vitaminwa-


ter XXX, will be made
available as regional
bottle options.
Plus, Coca-Cola
brands such as Pow-
erade, Sprite Zero,
Fanta Grape, Fanta
Strawberry, Caf-
feine Free Diet Coke,
Barq's Root. Beer,
Minute Maid Lemon-
ade and Minute Maid
Lemonade. Light, will
be available as re-


gional fountain op-
tions at McDonald's
restaurants.
Coke Zero will also
be offered in a num-
ber of restaurants as
part of McDonald's
ongoing beverage de-
velopment.
Atlanta-based Co-
ca-Cola (NYSE: KO)
has a 54-year rela-
tionship with the fast
food chain.


- -w
-- w


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION-OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."





RFP 071-JJ10 5/21/2009 DISTRICT HEALTHCARE BENEFIT PROGRAM


RFP 070-JJ10 5/19/2009 GROUP TERM LIFE INSURANCE AND FLEXIBLE BENEFITS PROGRAM


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


*1


INVITATION TO BID NO. 08-09-046
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Sealed bids will be received by the:
City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall,. 1"t Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
33133-5504 for:
Dinner Key Maintenance Dredging
Bid No.:. 08-09-046
Bids Due Date: Friday, May 29, 2009, at 2:00 P.M.
Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary for Shoreline
stabilization of Spoil Islands B and D located near Dinner Key Marina, Section 21, 22, 23, 26, 27 and 35,
Township 54 South, Range 41 East, on Biscayne Bay, in Miami-Dade County Florida.
The proposed work includes the stabilization of approximately 490 linear feet of shoreline along the eastern side
of Spoil Island B and approximately 500 linear feet of shoreline along the northern side of the Spoil Island D. The
work consists of installing limestone riprap in compliance with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit dated
July 14, 2008 and the modified permit from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection dated February
15, 2008 specifically, the underlined text for Spoil Island B, Spoil Island D and E and Specific Conditions No.
12 and 13 within the project description paragraphs of this modified permit.

The limestone riprap installation includes the site preparation and placement of filter fabric prior to riprap placement
along the shoreline slope as depicted in the construction documents. After placement of the riprap, the fabric shall
be secured with the end stones by wrapping with the overlapping seam in accordance with the construction docu-
ments.
CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit which will be held at the following
date, time and location:
Location: The City of Miami
444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 10th Floor
City Manager's Conference Room
Miami, FI 33130
Date/Time: Wednesday, May 6, 2009 at 10:00 a.m.
Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor from the State bf Florida or a
General Engineering license from Miami-Dade County, and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience,
under its current business name, in mitigation projects of a similar size, scope, and complexity, supported by
references for three (3) projects within the past five (5) years. Additional minimum requirements may be found in
Article 2, Supplemental Terms and Conditions. The Bidder must self-perform at least seventy five percent (75%)
of the physical construction work.
The Bid may only be obtained by visiting Capital Improvements Program's website at http://www.miamigov.com/
Capitallmprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp It is the sole responsibility of all firms to
ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that bidders periodically check the CIP webpaae
for updates
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate
originals in the envelopes provided. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly opened. Any bids
received after time and date specified will not be considered. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal
before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/Bidder. The City is not responsible
for any no matter what the cause.'

YOU ARE HEREBYADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE,"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.
DP#


INVITATION TO BID NO. 08-09-047
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Sealed bids will be received by the
City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 1st Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
33133-5504 for:
Dinner Key Mitigation
Bids Due: May 29, 2009, AT 3:00 P.M.
Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary for Shoreline
stabilization of Spoil Islands B and D located near Dinner Key Marina, Section 21, 22, 23, 26, 27 and 35, Township 54
South, Range 41 East, on Biscayne Bay, in Miami-Dade County Florida.

The proposed work includes the stabilization of approximately 490 linear feet of shoreline along the eastern side of
Spoil Island B and approximately 500 linear feet of shoreline along the northern side of the Spoil Island D. The work
consists of installing limestone riprap in compliance with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit dated July 14, 2008
and the modified permit from the.Florida Department of Environmental Protection dated February 15, 2008 specifi-
cally, the underlined text for Spoil Island B, Spoil Island D and E and Specific Conditions No. 12 and 13 within the
project description paragraphs of this modified permit.
The limestone riprap installation includes the site preparation and placement of filter fabric prior to riprap placement
along the shoreline slope as depicted in the construction documents. After placement of the riprap, the fabric shall be
secured with the end stones by wrapping with the overlapping seam in accordance with the construction documents.
CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit which will be held at the following date,
time and location:
Location: The City of Miami
444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 10t' Floor
City Manager's Conference Room
Miami, FI 33130
Date/Time: Wednesday, May 6, 2009 at 11:00 a.m.
Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor from the State of Florida or a General
Engineering license from Miami-Dade County, and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience, under its current
business name, in mitigation projects of a similar size, scope, and complexity, supported by references for three (3)
projects within the past five (5) years. Additional minimum requirements may be found in Article 2, Supplemental Terms
and Conditions. The Bidder must self-perform at least seventy five percent (75%) of the physical construction work.
The Bid may' only be obtained by visiting Capital Improvements Program's website at http://www.miamigov.com/
Capitallmprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp It is the sole responsibility of all firms to
ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that bidders periodically check the CIP webpaae
for updates
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate originals
in the envelopes provided. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly opened. Any bids received after
time and date specified will not be considered. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated
time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/Bidder. The City is not responsible for any no matter
what the cause.

YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE," IN
ACCORDANCE WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Dnf TUE MAIAMI TIMES APRIL 29-MAY 9Ifl


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INVITATION TO BID BID DATE 12/10/08 2:00 P.M.
Scope includes:

The School Board of Broward County, Florida Mirror Lake Elementary
School:

New Food Service Multipurpose Building, Remodeling & Site Improvements

Construct a new one story cafeteria/kitchen/multipurpose building, remodel ex-
isting into music lab and classrooms; demolish building #2 and #3, provide fire
protection for main building #1 and replace fire alarm for entire campus; pro-
vide emergency generator; upgrade/expand chiller plant; provide new bicycle
storage compound; provide new water main crossing adjacent roadway, con-
struct new play courts, propane gas storage, provide new lift station, service
yard and additional parking.
Scopes include selective site demo, earthwork, utilities, paving, fence, side-
walks, site concrete, landscaping & irrigation, masonry, structural steel, misc.
metals, rough & finish carpentry, roofing, overhead coiling doors, doors, frames
& hardware, glass, drywall, paint, stucco, VCT flooring, ceramic and quarry
tile, acoustical ceiling, specialties, canopy systems, projection screens, folding
panel partitions, signage, equipment, cold storage rooms, food service equip-
ment, plumbing, HVAC and electrical.

Plans are available for qualified subcontractors.
MBE/WBE Participation Goals apply. Level II Security Clearance required per
the Jessica Lunsford Act.

Drawings will. be available upon written request to:
Moss & Associates
Construction Managers
Attn. Chris Holzworth
2101 N. Andrews Ave. Suite 300
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33311
Phone: 954.524.5678
Fax: 954.712.5999

Bids are due no later than 12/10108 2:00 p.m. Faxed copies are accept-
able.

The Construction Manager reserves the right to waive irregularities and to re-
ject any or all proposals for any reason. The Construction Manager will evalu-
ate all proposals and will award the Contract in accordance with the projects
best interest.


PUBLIC NOTICE
SUBSIDIZED ELDERLY HOUSING
LA PALMA APARTMENTS

For the low income elderly over 62 years of age. The selection of applicants
for this project will be through a lottery system.

Open Application Period; From May 4 to May 15, 20Q9
Place to pick-up and drop-off application: La PalmaApts. 1040 SW-1,t:-'
Street, Miami. Interested applicant must appear in person.
Time to pick-up and drop-off completed applications; Monday thru Friday
between 9:00 AM and 3:30 PM
Applications for admission will not be accepted after 3:30 PM on Friday
May 15 2009
The lottery process will be supervised by an independent party.
The drawing of applicants will be conducted on May 18, 2009 at 11:00 AM
at 1040 SW 1 Street, Miami, Florida.
All media and the public at large is invited to witness the drawing.
The process of adjudication of apartments will be as follows:

1.350 applicants will be drawn on the date selected and placed, in an
ascending order, on a waiting list
2. The first 90 eligible applicants on the waiting list will be granted an
apartment.
3. The balance of the 350 applicants will remain on the waiting list for
future occupancy as apartments become available.
4. Applications not selected in the drawing of 350 will be discarded.
5. Once the waiting, list is below 50 applicants, the application process
will be re-opened and adverti:;ed.

CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD (305) 643-2079
EQUAL ROUSING OPPORTUNITY
i usJ


IUU IIL li


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 142105 WIRELESS POINT-TO-POINT
AND POINT-TO-MULTIPOINT LINKS
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, MAY 11, 2009

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 001921


BAbilitieSof Florida

Part of the ServiceSource Network


JOB FAIR





The Projects with Industry Program

Will be having a Job Fair at the


JOSEPH CALEB CENTER

5400NW 22 Ave.

For Information, please ask for Cathy or James 305-591-0961 ext 26 or i
E-mails us at Crabbito@ourpeoplework.org & Jjohnson@.ourpeoplework.org L

BRING YOUR RESUME! DRESS FOR SUCCESS! THU RSDAY
COME MEET EMPLOYERS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN MEETING YOU!

Upon request, appropriate auxiliary aids and services will be provided, including qualified sign- lan-
guage interpreters and conversion of printed materials to accessible formats.
Request for these services should be made to Cathy Rabbito at least 72 hours before the event. Call F ROA | 3M. 3 R .
305-591-0961 ext 26 to request the aid or services you need ;( BO ,A

The contents of this publication were developed under a grant from the Department of Education. However, those contents do not necessarily repre-
sent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.


I I I V ,


ft









ELM


0


BSEr


Apartments
101 N.E. 78th Street
Two and three bdrms, from
$850, nice and clean, laun-
dry roorb, parking. Section
8 OKI
786-326-7424

'101-A CIVIC CENTER
:; . AREA.
One and two bedrooms.
We work with bad credit.
Remodeled, ceramic tile,
central air, laundry 'machine,
appliances, quiet, parking
and FREE WATER. 786-
'508-3067.
1545 N.W. 8 Avenue
1150 N.W. 1 Place
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

.,'1229 N.W. 1st Court
'ove In Special. One bdrm,
9fln',ath, stove, refrigerator,;
75'. 305,642-7080
",' 78_-236-1144

"i-4S N.W .,th Street
Op'e'bd, one bath, $525
inmonth, All appliances
included. Free 20 inch LCD
T 1.all'Joel 786-355-7578..

1281 N.W. 61st Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
One bdrm, one bath -$425.
305-642-7080

1325 NW 31 STREET
e.wly :rerpvated,, located
';1' qulet neighborhood, '
iilu1es water, ; enclosed '
'aiirg.One 'rn6fthi security'
,ruired.: Contact 1G'Real
Estate: . .
305-992-0392


2972 N.W. 61 Street
One bdrm, one bath. $550.
Free Water. 305-642-7080

3119 NW 133 STREET
Large, one bedroom, newly
remodeled. Section 8 wel-
come. 786-374-6658

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath. $600
mthly. 305-213-5013

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699

5755 N.W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, pqrk-
ing. $625 monthly. $1000 to
move in. Call 954-394-7562.

580 N.E. 127 St. #20
Two bedrooms, two baths,
gated parking, Section 8 pre-
ferred, $1150 monthly, $1150
to move in, 954-547-9011.

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at;
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699

0t001 NW 15 AVENUE :
'Move-in special! one ,
! bedroom, one bath. $426,
* m6nthly- $638 to move'In.'
SAll appliances included,,- -
Free 19 inch LCD TV. Call-,
JoeQI
* 786.355-7578 .

7519 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
Call 305-669-4320

7523 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
'Call 305-669-4320


77 N.W. 77th Street
7 .Iwo..euro-r -1ric wr


Two bDedrooms, one and halt
1326 N.W. 1st Place bath $830. Section 8 wel-
Very lean,; one bedf6njm,-1fp, i'corrie Call 786-306--4505 ,'.
one ba hth $425/mnonth ...... .


786-419-6613.

13480 N.E. 6th Avenue
One bedroom available. Call:
786-797-0225

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in,, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

140 SW 6 STREET HOME-
STEAD
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$650 monthly. Call:
305-267-9449

14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bdrm, one bath,
with air, in quiet area, $700
monthly! 305-213-5013

1540 NW' 1 COURT
.Three bedrQoms, two7
.baths. $750 monthly. All :
-appliances included. Free '
19' inch LCD TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578 *,

1558 N.W. 1 Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath. $650.
Appliances. 305-642-7080

18550 N.W. 38th Court
Very beautiful spacious stu-
dio, brand new refrigerator
and stove, utilities and cable
included.' Private entrance.
Section 8 Ok.
786-853-7056

1950 N.W. 2nd Court
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

1955 N.W. 2 Cou rt
ONE MONTH TO MOVE
IN. One bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080

1969 N.W. 2 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, one bath,$550.
Stove refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath $475.
305-642-7080

2186 N.W. 38 Street
Newly renovated, one bdrm,
one bath. $800. Appliances,
free water. 305-642-7080

'2804 N.W, lst Avenue,
TWO bedroom, one bath, *
$750.,monthlly, appliances -,
in'1luded. Free .19",LCD TV.
,:Joel ,8-35..757

2945 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$625 monthly. Two bed-
rooms one bath $800. Sec-
tion 8 OK.
Call 786-412-9343


8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

8955 N.E. 2nd AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two bath-
rooms, $1000 monthly, se-
curity bars, air. Section 8
welcome.
305-663-9353

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms,
air, appliances, laundry and
gate. From $400. 1601 NW
1st Court. 305-374-4412.

"'-APITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
Overtown, 'Liberty.City, Opa',.
Locka, Broiyrsville Apa, i.
'ments, DpIlexes, Hous'.i
Onet~6a d; tiree'bdrn ,4
Same day approval. Fdr',"
S:lnfo. Specials 305-6424660' i'
www.capitalientalageridy, ;
corn
COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525,two bdrms,
$650. Stove, refrigerator, air,
free water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

HAMPTON HOUSE '
.APARTMENTS
Rent Speciall! All applik-
. cations accepted. Easy
Qualify. Ohe bdrm, one bath
$495 ($745), Two bdfrti,.
one bath $595 ($895).':
FREE WATER
Leonard 786-236-1144

Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrace Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bdrms. Bring ad for move
in deals & $50 off app. fee.
Call 305-688-8881.
L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.


Mr


Church
NORTHWEST AREA
,.2100 square fori building. for
cnurcn or business Any rea-
sonable offer, 786-390-5286,
305-623-5076

Condos/Townhouses


'132,1i.-NE6 A E
Onbdbd t f n ,
dcen.ral -r 0tdhat; af.pi1'
*.s 'ratr inc luped
$70.b 'monthly. O05,9i.13
,'," 1227 :V
14004 NE 2 COURT
Two bedroom, two bath con-
do. $1100 monthly. Section 8
accepted. Call Ricky
786-253-7218

15600 N.W. 7 AVENUE
Nice extra large one bed-
room, one bath. Quiet, gated
community. $675 mthly. First,
last and security plus applica-
tion fee. 786-470-0406

4574 NW 185 Street Town-
house For Rent
Four bedrooms, two baths,
air. Section 8 welcome.
Call Joe 305-607-1040

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
17934 NW 40th COURT
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly.
All Points Realty
Patrick 305-642-5184

Duplex
100 Street N.W. 22 Ave.
Near Central High. Three
bedrooms, one bath, central
air, washer and dryer. $875
mthly. First, Last and Secu-
rity. 305-970-5733

1341 N.W. 55 St.
Newly remodeled, one bdrm,
one bath, new appliances,
bars, and spacious yard.
$780 mthly. Section 8 OK!
305-884-1176, 305-546-5185

1857 N.W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750 monthly and up.
305-332-5008

1890 N.W. 89 Terrace
One bedroom, appliances.
$640 monthly, $1350 to move
in. Call 786-587-3731

2401 N.W. 95 Street Two
bdrms, one bath, washer,
dryer, central air, Section 8
OK. $1,175 mthly.
Matthew 954-818-9112

2432 NW 79 TERRACE
Two bedroom, one bath. Call
Angela Anderson
305-796-3874

2466-B N.W. 44th Street
One bedroom, air, $575
monthly. 786-877-5358


MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information
visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-


MOVE-IN SPECIAL
1801 NW 2 AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath.
$600 monthly, $900 to.,
,move iK; All appliances
included. Free 19 Inch LCD
T.V, Call Joel 786-356,7S78

N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


NO DEPOSIT with Section 8.
Two and one bedroom Apts.
786-267-3199

OPA LOCKA AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $495.
Section 8 OK! 305-717-6084

WYNWOODAREA
28 $TREETNW 1 AVENUE.
One bedroom', one bath..,
Starting at.$575 monthly.
SAll applianc6sincludefi
.0all Joel- '. .
S '786-35,-75,78

Business Rentals
COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
. Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$750 monthly, $750 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699


Huge three bedrooms, two
baths; Super Clean! Central
AC, $1425 monthly, 305-793v
0002


247 N. E. 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, micro wave,
water, parking. $750 monthly
plus security. Section 8 ok.
786-216-7533.

265 N.E. 150 St.
Two bdrms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, all appliances. $950
mthly, $1600 to move in.
Section 8 OK. 786-417-4668

2950 N.W. 47 Street
Two r bedroom, central air,
water, $1200, Section 8 wel-
come. Call Tony 305-213-
5013

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

324 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$925. 305-642-7080 /

3323 N.W. 11 Ave.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850. More Specials.
Frank Cooper
Real Estate
305-758-7022

4438 N.W. 23rd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath
Call 786-586-0629

4643 NW 16 AVENUE
One bedroom. $650 monthly.
Vouchers accepted.
305-638-5946

4651 N.W. 1(6 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650. Section 8 OK! 305-638-
5946, 786-512-7622

466 NW 82 TERRACE
The perfect 10. One and two
bedrooms, one bath, appli-*
ances, tiled throughout.
786-282-8775

5420 N.W. 7th Court
One bdrm, one bath, $750
mthly, water and electric
included. Call 305-267-9449

5629 S.W. Fillmore
Hollywood
Three bedroom, one bath.
$1050 mthly. Move in $1650.
786-256-3174

6109 S.W. 63 Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath. $700.
305-642-7080

670 Oriental Boulevard
(151 Street N.W. 36 Avenue).
Two bedrooms, one bath,
tiled floors, air, washer hook-
up., $825 monthly, $1700 to
move in. 305-625-4515

6998 N.W. 5 Place
One bdrm, one bath. $650
mthly. 786-399-8557

7013 NW 21 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
spacious rooms, appliances,
air, security bars. Water in-
cluded. Call 786-299-1838

733 N.W.6 Street
Hallandale. Two bdrms, one
bath, appliances. $800.
305-642-7080

7912 N.W. 12 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
tile and carpet,fenced yard.
Section 8 Welcome. $950,
water included. Others avail-
able. 305-389-4011

798 NW 108 STREET
Spacious, two bedrooms,
two baths, security bars, tiled
floors, laundry room included.
$1100 monthly.
305-751-2150

8083 N.W. 12th Place
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1200 monthly, $2600 to
move in. 954-294-0514

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776

874 N.W. 70th Street
New three bedrooms, two
baths, Section 8 $1300. Call
786-285-9611, 786-346-8505
8950 N.E. 2 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances, bars. Reference.
Section 8 Ok! $1300 mthly.
305-788-0000

9890 N. W. 21 Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath, com-
pletely remodeled, call
786-237-1292

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737 Charles Terrace

Hialeah Heights
Three bdrms, two bath,
$1,460 monthly, $1,000 de-
posit, Section 8 OK. 561-703-
.8097

N.E. MID-MIAMI


17220 N.W. 45th COURT
Three bedrooms, 'two baths,
family room, near schools.
305-510-2841, 305-829-5271


I Efficiency
1015 N.W. 106th STREET
$750 monthly. All utilities in-
cluded. Section 8 OK. Drive
by then call: 305-681-3236

1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, A/C, cable,
no util., $650/month. Call
786-317-1804.

19441 N.E.lst Court
One Bedroom.
Call 786-333-0024

2515 N.W. 52nd St. Rear
Tiled, air, new bathroom,
need stove. $450 mthly, $9000
move in. 954-522-4645..

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency. Call 305-754-7776

Furnished Rooms
13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person:
305-691-3486

183l'N,W. 70th Streqt
11500 'nthiy, washer and
,dryer, kkldhen ccess, air,
qabl' available.
Call ,3p5-691-0458

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1770 N.W. 71 St #5
Cooking, air, $400 monthly.
Call 305-300-5567

1775 N.W. 151st Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

1877 N.W. 59 Street
Clean room, air, tile, half bath.
$400 mthly.
305-720-7067

2033 N.W. 43rd Street
Rooms. $125 weekly. Nicely
furnished 786-290-0946.

2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-3434,
305-914-4461
73450 NW 169 TERRACE
Large room, bath, 'utilities..
$450 monthly, Deposit $200.
786-357-1899

4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-691-3486

53 Street and 14 Ave.
Own entrance; bed, own bath-
room, refrigerator, air and mi-
crowave. $600, first and $300
Security to move in, includes
water and electricity.
305-710-1343, 786-486-6613

6849 N.W. 15th Avenue
Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $100
weekly, $200 moves you
in.Call 786-277-2693

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available. Call
305-754-7776.

HOMESTEAD AREA
Fully furnished, microwave,
air, refrigerator, cable TV and
armoire. 786-285-9611
786-346-8505

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean room, private
entrance, patio, cable
305-688-0187


NORTH MIAMI
Nicely furnished room with
private entrance, $150 wkly.
786-312-5781

NORTHWEST AREA
LARGE, CLEAN
FURNISHED ROOMS
CALL 561-666-0165
HOURLY DAILY WEEKLY
RATES
SEVERAL LOCATIONS

OPA LOCKA AREA
Move-in special.
786-251-2204

OPA LOCKA AREA
Furnished room with cooking
privileges. 305-681-8326

House
.1014 N.W. 60 St
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, heat, all applianc-
es, washer and dryer. $1200
mthly. Section 8 Welcome.
786-229-9488

1087 N.W. 73 St.
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! 305-345-7833

12325 N.W. 21st Place
Three.bdrmss, one bath, also
efficiency. 954-607-9137


COCONUT GROVE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath, liv-
ing room, dining room, air.
786-597-3999


14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
40 N.W. 166 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
one month security.
954-826-4013.

1480 N.W. 154 St.
Miami Gardens
Renovated four bedrooms,
one bath. Section 8 OK.
305-965-0671

15750 N.W. 28th Court
Four bdrm, two bath, tiled,
central air. $1500 monthly.
305-662-5505

16130 NW 18 PLACE
15620 NW 27 PLACE
Section 8 available too.
Princess 305-409-9940

1785 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 monthly. 305-267-9449

1790 N.W. 48 Street
Two bedroom, one bath, $950
monthly. 305-267-9449

1901 Rutland.Street
Opa- Locka
Renovated two bedrooms,
one bath. Section 8 OK.
305-965-0671

21425 S.W. 119 Ave.
SECTION 8, S. Miami, three
bdrms, one bath $1100
monthly, $1000 deposit. 305-
628-3806

2297 Rutland Street
Newly remodeled, two bed-
rooms, one bath with bonus
area. Section 8 OK.
321-303-2507

2330 N.W. 97th St. Rear
One bdrm, private area,
$1360 to move.
305-693-0620

2485 N.W. 55th TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath, se-
curity bars, new kitchen, new
bathroom, tiled floors. $975
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-663-9353

2511 N.W. 55 St.
Three bdrms, one bath, air.
Section 8 OK. 305-624-3806

2725 N.W. 53 Street
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1200. Central air,
garage.305-642-7080

2791 NW 197 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
all appliances, air. $1150
monthly, $800 security.
786-200-1686

290 N. W. 48 Street
Two bedroom, one bath, all
tile floors, nice carport. call
786-237-1292

3045 N.W. 68th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Ok. 954-704-0094

3811 N.W. 197 Ter.
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Also two bed-
rooms, one and a half bath.
Call Mr. Brown
786-306-2946

4115 NW 11 PLACE
Four bedrooms, two baths,
newly remodeled. Section 8
ok. 305-978-9472

565 N.E. 131 Street
One bedroom, in rear, tile
floors, nice and clean. $750.
Section 8 ok. 786-326-7424

632b NW 21 AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bathroom
house with large yard, new
refrigerator and stove.$500
special per month.
754-273-0596

7 N.E. 59 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$950. Free Water.
305-642-7080

727 N.W. 74th Street
Four or five bdrms, two
baths, fenced yard, tile, Sec-
tion 8 ok! Call 786-306-2349.
740 N.W. 141 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-694-0988

7620 N.W. 2nd Court
Three bdrm, two bath,
$1250/month, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-283-4855.

7961 N.W. 12 Place
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly, $3000 to move
in. 954-294-0514

97 N.W. 27 Street
1 Avenue and 27 Street
Three bedrooms, one balh,
$900 mthly. All appliances
included. Free 19" LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

COCONUT GROVE AREA
Spacious three bedrooms,
two baths. Section 8 OK.
786-301-6002


Houses
1745 NW 47 STREET
Two bedrooms, huge den,
central air. Try $2900 down
and $617 monthly P&l to buy.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700

2111 YORK STREET
Two bedrooms, den, central
air. Try $1900 down and $697
monthly P&I to buy. NDI Real-
tors 305-655-1700.

3740 NW 195 STREET
Four bedrooms, three baths,
two master bedrooms. Try
$3900 down and $995 month-
ly P& 1Ito buy. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700

4401 NW 171 STREET
Five bedrooms, four baths,
renovated. Try $3900 down
and $995 monthly P&l NDI
Realtors 305-655-1700

*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
""WITH"
FREE CASH GRANTS ,
-UP TO'$65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
N.W. 194 St. and 16th
Avenue
Rolling Oaks. Four bedrooms,
three baths. Two story. 4000
Square Feet. $279,000.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700




Repairs
AFFORDABLE REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, roof,
washer, dryer. 786-273-1130

Everton Electric
Specializing in all types of
electrical work. Commercial
and Residential. Licensed
and Insured. Rate as low as
$25 per hour. 786-329-1818


HOMESTEAD AREA
Four bdrms, two and a half
baths, two car garage, wash-
er, dryer. Section 8 OK.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112

MIAMI GARDENS
Four bedroom, 3 bath, $1600
monthly. 305-812-7029

N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-754-7776
Near Allapattah Middle
Two bdrms, one bath, large
yard. Section- 8 OK. $1150.
One near Northwestern.
305-685-6795

North Dade Area
Two, three and four bedroom
houses for rent. Call for List
and Prices. NDI Realtors 290
NW 183rd Street
305-655-1700
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Four bdrm, two bath. Utilities
included. 786-286-2540

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Three bdrms, two bath
house. Water and electricity
included. 786-286-2540

6PA LOCKA AREA
Four bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 ok. 305-691-0826

PERRINE MOVE-IN
SPECIAL!
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1075 mthly. 786-277-7028.

Quiet Street, four bdrms, two
baths, central air. Section 8
OK. Morris 305-525-3540

RICHMOND HEIGHTS
AREA
10935 Perry Drive. Three
bdrmms, one bath. Section 8
OK. '$1350. 305-528-3570

Rent with Option
10230 S.W. 194 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Near mall, school and gro-
cery stores. Must See!
Contact Mary, 786-728-5152
1641 N.W. 118 St.
Three bdrms, two baths, two
car garage. $1600 mthly.
Section 8 OK. 786-399-8557

321 N.W. 183rd Street
Four bedroom, two bath,
central air. $1500 mthly, first,
last, and security to move in.
.Call 305-986-8395

NORWOOD AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1200 monthly.
1-800-242-0363 ext. 3644

Unfurnished Rooms "

LIBERTY CITY AREA
$375 monthly, $700 moves
you in, includes, water, air,
electricity. 305-303-6757


BE


HERE


SECTION D


GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
.Call 305-685-3565.

HANDYMAN
Plumbing and Carpentry. 305-
401-9165, 786-423-7233

Childcare

AT HOME CHILD CARE
Ms. Don 305-877-9812




Employment


Booth Rental
Garden Beauty Salon,
Call 305-893-4411

Labor for
Cleaning Services
Commercial cleaning pro-
fessionals needed ASAP.
Please fax resume and
contact information to
305-766-5088

PROGRESSIVE LEARN-
ING CENTER
Teachers. 305-496-9338


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured- vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

St. John Institutional
Missionary Baptist
Church
in Overtown

Currently searching for a
Senior Pastor

To Apply

,:Qualified applicants must
,submit the following:

A current resume

Verification of educational
background (may include
an unofficial transcript,
copy of degree or other
documentation)

Verification of religious
seminary training

Copy of ministerial license,.
ordination and training
DVD, CD, or cassette
recording of a previous
sermon at least
10 minutes in length

Additional documenta-
tion will be required of
finalists, but will not be
accepted at this time.

Application packets and
supporting data will not
be returned and must be
postmarked no later than
May 3, 2009. Submit
completed application
package to:
Attention: Pastoral Search
Committee
P.O. Box 010630
Miami, Florida 33101


Lawn & Garden
Excellent Lawn Service
We do lawns, tree service
and landscaping, all at
discount prices. Call Doug at:
786-277-1327

Miscellaneous
Furnished church available,
air. Seats 35. 305-681-7652.

Money to Lend
MINORITY BUSINESS
Government Contract, helps
your company grow!
786-273-6473

Schools
Be a Security Guard
Or Renew License $60! Do
G and concealed license.
786-333-2084



YOUR

AD

COULD


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


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College-educated Blacks hardest hit by unemployment


By Algernon Austin

Fifteen months into
a deep recession, col-
lege-educated white
workers still had a
relatively low unem-
ployment rate of 3.8
percent in March of
this year. The same
could not be said for
Blacks with four-year


degrees. The March
2009 unemployment
rate for college-ed-
ucated Blacks was
7.2 percent-almost
twice as high as the
white rate-and up
4.5 percentage points
from March 2007,
before the start of the
current recession.
Hispanics and Asian


Americans with col-
lege degrees were in
between, both with
March 2009 unem-
ployment rates of 5
percent.
Some argue that the
problem of jobless-
ness among Blacks
can be solved by edu-
cation alone, but at
every education level


the unemployment
rate for Blacks ex-
ceeds- that of whites.
The disparities among
the college-educated
and other evidence
strongly suggest that
even if the Black edu-
cational attainment
distribution was ex-
actly the same as the
white distribution,


Blacks would still
have a higher unem-
ployment rate than
whites. Without a re-
newed commitment
to anti-discrimina-
tion in employment
and job creation in
Black communities,
high rates of black
joblessness will likely
persist.


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S13D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 29-MAY 5, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O NY


U.S. pledges to make up for lost time in climate fi ght
U.S. pledges to make up for lost time in climate-fight
uman ne -Ai n Tegsi-o-4 a-1-;- -


By Deborah Zabaren-
ko and Jeff Mason

WASHINGTON (Re-
uters) The United
States pledged to make
up for lost time on Mon-
day at a meeting of the
biggest greenhouse gas
polluters, as the world
works toward sealing a
U.N. pact in December
to curb global warm-
ing.
"Climate change is a
clear and present dan-.
ger "'to our world that
demands immediate
attention," U.S. Sec-
retary of State Hillary
Clinton told delegates
from 16 major econo-
mies, the European
Union and United Na-
tions.
"The United States
is fully engaged and
ready to lead and de-


termined to make up
for lost time both at
home and abroad."
The two-day meeting
is meant to jump-start
climate talks before
an international meet-
ing in Copenhagen in
December to find a
follow-up agreement
to the Kyoto Protocol,,
which limits climate-
warming greenhouse
emissions and expires
in 2012.
President Barack
Obama called the
Washington forum last
month,, re-launching
a process that began
under his predecessor,
President George W.
Bush, whose initiative
drew skepticism from
participants out of fear
that it would circum-
vent the U.N. process.
Bush opposed the


Kyoto Protocol and any
other across-the-board
limits on emissions of
the greenhouse gas
carbon dioxide, saying
the agreement unfair-
ly exempted quickly
growing economies
such as China and In-
dia and would hurt the
U.S. economy.
Obama, in office since
January, has been vo-
cal in his commitment
to dealing with climate
change, and on Mon-
day told the National
Academy of Sciences:
"Our future on this
planet depends on our
willingness to address
the challenge posed by
carbon pollution."
Obama, who aims to
cut U.S. carbon emis-
sions by more than
80 percent by 2050,
announced a new sci-


entific program called
the Advanced Re-
search Projects Agen-
cy for Energy, modeled
on the U.S. push to
succeed in the 1950s
space race.

ADMITTING
U.S. MISTAKES
Clinton touched on a
major sticking point in
international talks --
the role that big devel-
oping countries should
play -- by admitting
U.S. mistakes in al-
lowing its own emis-
sions to skyrocket.
"As I have told my
counterparts from
China and India, we
want your economies
to grow... We just hope
we can work togeth-
er in a way to avoid
the mistakes that we
made that have cre-


ated a large part of the
problem," she said.
Environmentalists
and others see a U.S.
commitment to fight-
ing climate change as
essential to any glob-
al pact and welcome
Obama's commitment
to lead.after what they
view as eight years of
lost time under Bush.
, The major econo-
mies represented at
the .meeting include
Australia, Brazil, Brit-
ain, Canada, China,
the European Union,
France, Germany, In-
dia, Indonesia, Italy,
Japan, Korea, Mexico,'
Russia, South Africa
and the United States.
Obama alms to cut
U.S. emissions by
about 15 percent by
2020, back to 1990
levels. The European


Union and many en-
vironmentalists want
the United States to go.
further.
The Obama team has
pushed for action on
climate change, most
recently by declaring
that carbon dioxide
emissions endanger


human health and
welfare, which means
the U.S. Environmen-
tal Protection Agency
can regulate them as
pollutants. No regula-
tions have been put in
place, and Obama pre-
fers legislation to regu-
lation on this issue.


Legislaution is al-
ready being' debated
in the U.S. House of
Representatives En-
ergy and Commerce
Committee.
Delegates at Mon-
day's meeting hoped it
would set the stage for
success in Denmark.


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T.G.I. Friday's joins the

bargain dining $5-meal club


The recession that
brought back $2 gaso-
line is about to bring
back to casual din-,
ing another retro price
point: $5 meals.
On Monday,' T.G.I.
Friday's which, like
most casual-dining
chains, has taken a hit
during the recession -
will unveil plans to sell
all salads and sand-
wiches for $5 all day
.in May. The move fol-
lows a~recent rollout by
Chili's of 10 entrees for
less than $7.
A $5 price tag at
sit-down restaurants
hasn't been seen in
quite awhile. "It's a
magic number," says
Malcolm Knapp, a. re-
searcher who 'tracks
the $75 billion casual-
dining industry, which
saw same-store sales
drop 4.9% in March.
The $5 meal, he says,
"is affordable, to' every-
one."
The question: Can
Friday's afford it? A
steak sandwich that
usually fetches $11.75
will go for $5, as will a
pecan-crusted chicken
salad, normally $9.69.
All are full-size por-
tions. The chain hasn't
had such low prices
on its menu since it
opened in 1965.
Friday's ,executives
insist that beyond be-
ing a recession re-
sponse, the $5 menu is
a way to drum up inter-
est in nine new salads
and sandwiches. "The
consumer needs some-
thing that gives them
permission to experi-
ment and this is it,"
says Andrew Jordan,
marketing chief at Fri-
day's USA.
The move comes a
year after Subway rolled
out $5' foot-long subs,
an industry game-
changer viewed as one
of fast-food's most suc-
cessful promos.
Friday's $5 move


comes as consum-
ers continue to aban-
don casual dining for
cheaper spots such as
Panera Bread, Wing- ,
stop and Subway.
The restaurant in-
dustry has seen same-
store sales decline
for nine consecutive
months, with casual
dining taking the big-
gest hit. While some
chains project signs
of better times ahead,
most are still mired in
the doldrums.


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M.AM PUBLIC WORKSHOP

As a part of Miami-Dade County's continuing
commitment to public participation in local government, the Park and
Recreation Department Invites area residents to attend a public
workshop:
BICYCLE BOULEVARD PLANNING STUDY
NW 87 St. to NW 41 St. I NW 11 Av. to NW 32 Av
The meeting is designed for the public to learn about opportunities
and constraints to improve bicycle safety and circulation within the
study area and share ideas and discussion on 'potential
improvements. As part of the meeting, the consultant and County
staff will answer questions about the concept of bicycle boulevards
and creating a network of low-traffic bicycle routes that are easy to
use, sfe and healthy for users of all ages, abilities and modes, and
have low traffic speeds and volumes. Residents are encouraged to
attend and comment on the study. The meeting will take place at:
African Heritage Cultural Arts Center
Music Room -
2166 NW 62 St., Miami, FL 33142
May 6, 2009 7-00 9:00 PM
For further information, requests for foreign language interpreters,
or questions prior to the meeting please contact:
Mark Heinlcke, Park Planner
MIami-Dade County Park and Recreation Department
305.755-7811
Call 305-755-7848 (V//TDD) for materials in accessible format,
information on access for Persons with Disabilities or sign language
interpreters (five days'in advance).

Multiple members of Individual community councils may attend. '


MIAMFDA


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for
contract opportunities, which can be obtained through the Department of
Procurement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.miamidade.aovl
Mdm. Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, free of
charge, from our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is
available at all branches.of the Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended
that vendors visit our Website'on a daily basis to view newly posted solicitations,
addendums, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be
subject to change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW t Street, 1-3*floor,
Miami, FL 33128.
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the
bid package through the United States Postal Service.


These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.

Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids
and proposals by requiring vendor affidavits only once at the time of
vendor registration.

Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavits one
time, instead of each time they submit a bid or proposal. Solicitations advertised
after June 1at will require that all vendors complete the new Vendor Registration
Package before they can be awarded a new County contract. Obtain the Vendor
Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.


NOTICE


REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR

BUILDING COMMISSIONING AGENT


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to select one (1) or more firm(s) for providing
services to the Board as:


BUILDING COMMISSIONING AGENT (CxA)

The firm(s) will be contracted.for a period of four (4) years, with the second, third and fourth years at the
Board's option. Work will be assigned based on the firm's workload, qualifications for the task, and per-
formance on previous assignments. The Board'does not guarantee any minimum number of projects or
any specific dollar value. The Board reserves the right to limit the number of concurrent contracts held by
a single firm.

Firms desiring to provide Building CxA Services shall submit an original, bound, qualifications proposal, five
(5) bound copies and six (6) Compact Disks (CDs) containing a sample of a Final Commissioning Plan and
Commissioning Specifications. The CD shall contain a single PDF document with all required information
and data, no later than 4:00 p.m.. local time. Tuesday May 26. 2009 to the attention of:


Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS)
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A., Administrative Director
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132


Telephone: 305-995-4500; Facsimile: 305-995-2050

Building Commissioning Services include, but are not limited to, comprehensive building commissioning
services on new construction, major renovation projects, and existing facilities to ensure the building sys-
tems are designed and built to operate as efficiently as possible. This includes retro-commissioning. and
re-commissioning services. Requirements of energy efficient buildings certification rating programs such as
LEED may be included in the services. Required services are further detailed in the Request'for Qualifica-
tions (RFQ).

The complete RFQ package with all pertinent information and forms will be available at the above address
after April. 27, 2009. This solicitation and RFQ can also be accessed on the M-DCPS website at:
http://facilities.dadeschools.net/default.aspx?id=ae_solicitations

A MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE will be held at the School Board Administration Build-
ing, located at 1450 NE 2nd Ave, Miami, Florida, in Conference Room 321 on Thursday, May 14, 2009 at
10:00 a.m. local time (sign-in period10:00 a.m. to 10:05 a.m.). Proposers arriving after the five (5) minute
sign-in period will not be allowed to participate in this solicitation. Proposals submitted by firms not repre-
sented at the Pre-proposal conference will not be considered.

Only one submittal will be accepted per proposer, either as a single prime firm or as part of a joint venture.
Proposers must have been in business for a period of no less than five (5) years. Proposers submitting as
a joint venture must be licensed and authorized by the Florida Department of Business and Professional
Regulation, and comply with section 489.119(2)(c) of the Florida statutes. Proof of authorization, licenses)
and an executed copy of the joint venture agreement must be submitted with the response. Percentage
participation of fees must be clearly stated for each joint venture partner.
All proposers must submit proof of currently held Professional Liability in the amount of no less than
$1,000,000, Commercial General Liability Insurance and Business Auto Insurance ($500,000 combined
single limit for both coverages), and Workers' Compensation Insurance. Successful firm(s) shall fully com-
ply with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 "Jessica Lunsford Act" and all Board rules and procedures
as applicable.

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educational
programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.

Any firm or individual whose contract has been terminated by the Board "with cause" will not be considered
under this RFQ.

Proposers must submit in the format and forms prescribed in the RFQ package in order to be considered.
M-DCPS reserves the right to request clarification of information submitted and to request additional infor-
mation of one or more proposers.

Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance
of the Legal Advertisement and ending when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommen-
dation to commission. Any violation of the cone of silence may be punishable as provided for under the
referenced School Board rule, in addition to any other penalty provided by law. All written communications
must be sent to the address above and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd
Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1 .11, and/or in accordance with Section 120.57(3), Florida Statutes or failure to post the bond or other
securities required by law within the time allowed for filing a bond shall constitute a waiver of proceedings
under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.

School Board rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at http://www.dadeschools.net/schoolboard/
rules/





MIAMI TIMES

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Pirate Bay lawyer demands retrial


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