Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00741
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: February 25, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00741
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text










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Tempora Miutantur Et Nos Mutanmur In Illis
DISTRIB UTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 26


I :." M. vA- CH 3, 2009


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


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NAACP president: Stadium must



offer more benefits to Blacks


Panel explores government funding for proposed stadium


By Sandra J. Charite"
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The Miami-Dade Branch of the
NAACP is taking a dim view of govern-
ment financial help for the construc-
tion of a baseball field for the Florida
Marlins slated for the site of the for-
mer Orange Bowl Stadium in Little
Havana.
"My main concern -- and I believe


the concern of this branch and the
NAACP -- is that if millions of dollars
are spent in this community, then
people who look like me have to be
at the table," said New Birth Bishop
Victor T. Curry, who is also president
of the Miami-Dade NAACP. "Not only
that, after it is built, they need to be a
part of the operations of the facility. I
want it to represent this community."
. The civil rights group hosted a pan-


el discussion on the topic on Monday
night at New Birth Baptist Church Ca-


thedral of Faith International in Opa-
locka as part of its monthly meeting.
The aim was to address concerns in
the Black community about the build-
ing of the Marlins stadium.
Rhonda Vangates, third vice presi-
dent of the NAACP, moderated a panel
comprising David Samson, president
of the Florida Marlins baseball team;
Bill Perry, chairman of the Economic
Development Committee; Darryl Hol-
sendolph, president of Holsen Inc.;
Bill Diggs, president of the Miami-
Please turn to STADIUM 4A


Protests planned over deportation of Haitians


Leaders across the country
urge temporary stay for
deportees

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Miami's Haitian leaders are join-
ing a chorus of protests over plans
to deport thousands of Haitians who
have been living in the U.S. for several
years.
The protests follow a decision by
U.S. Immigration and Customs En-


forcement (ICE)
that the Haitian
refugees are sub-
ject to final orders
for deportation.
Each refugee
is being afforded
an opportunity to
present his or her
case to a' judge METELLUS
who will determine Sant La
eligibility to remain
in this country, ac-
cording to ICE spokeswoman Nicole
A. Navas.
Then Department of Homeland Se-


curity Secretary Michael Chertoff, in a
letter to Haiti's President Rene Preval
dated Dec. 19, 2008, had indicated
that the deportation of Haitians would
be delayed because of the impact of
hurricanes on Haiti.
Chertoff said at the time citizens of
Haiti did not qualify for Temporary
Protected Status (TPS), which would
allow them to stay legally in the U.S.
A total of 30,299 Haitians are now
subject to deportation, according to
Navas.
Haitian leaders across the U.S. want
the Obama Administration to reverse
that ruling, hence the protests, one of


which is slated for
3 p.m. Saturday at
the Broward Tran-
sitional Center on
Powerline Road in
Pompano Beach.
North Miami
Cou ncilman
Jacques Des-
BRUTUS pinosse. and other
Former State Rep. Haitian leaders
will hold a press
conference at the
Jean-Jacques Dessalines Center,
8325 NE Second Ave, at 10 a.m., this
Please turn to PROTEST 8A


Evicted family back in home

Group defies eviction to help 12 adults and kids


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.comn


Three days after 66-year-old Car-
olyn Conley and her family were
evicted from their North Miami-
Dade home through foreclosure,
they were back in it thanks to a
grassroots organization that took
action to defy the eviction.
Take Back The Land, headed by
Max Rameau, held a "liberation
ceremony" on Monday and moved
the large family back in.
"It is inhumane and immoral to


evict a family of 12 human beings,
who are left to sleep in a truck, and
not even fill the house with another
family but leave it vacant, poten-
tially for years to come," TBTL said
in a statement. "Housing is a hu-
man right which is threatened by
corporate demands to maximize
profits."
Conley's problems started when,
she said, she tried to get a reverse
mortgage for the home in which she
has lived for 20 years this week.
A reverse mortgage, which is
Please turn to EVICTED 8A


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One Family Serving Since 1923

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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


Post cartoon racist,

inflammatory

T hose who were startled by the remark by Mr. Eric Holder,
the first Black U.S. attorney general, that Americans
are a nation of cowards when it comes to matters of
race need only look at the cartoon which ran in the New York
Post on Feb. 18.
The drawing depicts a chimpanzee lying dead from gunshot
wounds inflicted by two police officers, both with guns drawn
and one of them saying, "They'll have to find someone else to
write the next stimulus bill." It was based on the police shooting
of a chimpanzee on Feb. 16 in Stamford, Conn.
The cartoonist, Mr. Sean Delonas, the Post's editor-in-chief,
Mr. Col Allan, and other news executives at the newspaper,
including Post Chairman Rupert Murdoch, must be aware
that the stimulus bill was the first major legislation written
by President Barack Obama. They must be aware of the long-
standing comparison which racists make between Blacks and
monkeys. They must be aware that there are rabid racists
would want nothing better that to see our leader dead just for
being Black. So they must be aware that such a cartoon would
be inflammatory, at the very least, and could be interpreted, as
the NAACP and others have rightly done, as a call to assassinate
the president.
With that background, it is impossible to take seriously the
claim by Mr. Allan that the cartoon was meant to be a satire
of the stimulus bill. It is much easier to see it as a cowardly
attempt to hide their racism under the freedom of the press
banner.
While the United States enjoys, constitutional protection
of the press, it bears repeating that all freedoms come with
responsibility. In a crowded theater, as the saying goes, you do
not shout "Fire!" even though you have freedom of expression.
The cartoon has dug deeply into the racism that is ingrained in
American society and may have inadvertently sparked at least
the start of the dialogue that Mr. Holder would like to see. Mr.
Allan has produced a very lame apology of sorts so far, trying to
divert attention by attacking as publicity seekers people such as
the Rev. Al Sharpton who have rightly denounced the cartoon
and brought it to national attention. He should, instead, hang
his head in shame and issue an unqualified apology not just to
the president and Black people but to all Americans.

Action is what's needed
ov. Charlie Crist took the laudable step on the 100h
anniversary of the National foremost activists, Ms.
Adora Obi Nweze, as Special Advisor to the Governor
on Minority Affairs. If anyone can advise the governor on what
should be done, it will be Ms. Nweze.
But while the step is welcome -- and long overdue -- it should
be noted that a lot can be done at the state level to bring more
of Florida's resources,to bear on the still troubling conditions of
Blacks without the necessity of having an advisor. Once the will
exists, action should easily follow. Gov. Crist seems amenable to
making it happen and so, in addition to Ms. Nweze's appointment,
he should make it clear to all departments and agencies what he
wants to see done and have it done speedily that is, give us a
helping hand up.
This is not the first time in recent years that a Republican
governor has launched an initiative intended to benefit Blacks.
Then Gov. Jeb Bush started his much-vaunted project that was
intended to move Black development and growth to the "front
porch" but down the years very little has been heard about the
program which, locally, is centered in the Opa-locka-North Dade
section of the county. There is little indication that state resources
were pumped into this initiative here and in other parts of the
state to enable it to be an effective catalyst for growth.
Having an advisor is one thing; ensuring that the advice given
is treated seriously and acted on promptly is where the judgment
will be made.


Make Black History

Month meaningful
It has become a regular subject for discourse every February:
Should there be a Black History Month? For some, the
observance is seen as further fragmenting a society that is
sorely in need of cohesiveness. For others, it is a case of the wrong
month. Sometimes, the purpose of the observance is lost in the
debate.
That purpose includes showcasing the contributions that
Blacks have made, and are making, to building the United States
of America in some instances literally to underscore our
inalienable right to American citizenship equal with all others.
And, perhaps even more important, to provide a link to history
and culture so we can see clearly our place in the African Diaspora
and the roots of our existence.
The month was chosen by the founder of the observance, Dr.
Carter G. Woodson, who selected February for "Negro History
Week" in tribute to President Abraham Lincoln and the great
Frederick Douglass who were born in that month. What is needed
now is not to scrap the observance but to expand its basic objective
of ensuring that our story is told and learned year-round, with
Black History Month as the centerpiece.
The socialization process for all Americans, not just Black
children, must include a thorough grounding in the diverse
history and culture of each group in the national rainbow. After
more than 200 years, we are still a nation massively dominated by
the history and culture of Europe and the Whites who became the
vast majority of our citizens and the early oppressors of our race.
Let all our children be exposed to the complete story of America,
as it has been written and as it is being written, and ours will
be a better nation. Black History Month helps to tell part of that
story.


Kb e ftliatm n tine

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Ementus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Slation, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead Ihe world from racial and national antagonism when it accords lo
every person, regardless ol race, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights. Hating no person, feanng no person, th
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all persons are hurl as long as anyone is held back.


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We got your back, Mr. President


Dear Editor,
This is an Open Letter to President Barack Obama:
I am so proud of you for staying above the fray re the offensive
cartoon that appeared in the New York Post on Feb. 18.
Mr. President, you fix the budget, go to Canada, send Secretary
of State Hillary Clinton half-way around the world, you do your
thing, we-got this. It's a street thing. Please stay out of it, Mr.
President.

Skeptical over the stimulus package

Dear Editor,
How can a stimulus package be put together without help for small
firms that hire from within the local community?
They stated that the stimulus package will create jobs but will those
be low-paying, providing very little help for a family of three or more?


After my anger, my first thought was: Let's march. But that's so
Sixties. We can't bomb the Post. That's so Seventies. But a boycott
still does the trick.
And please remember, Mr. President, in situations like this, there
are millions of us who honor, respect, and love you and we got your
back.
Willie Goode
North Miami Beach



How will this package be paid for? It's not free.
This whole thing sounds like taking your small sail boat into the eye
of the hurricane and believing you can fly.
Terry Fernando Newton
South Miami-Dade


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OPINION


BI.ACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\N DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 5, 2009


ist hold EI

im deal
I~ _^"


Some say the Florida Marlins stadium deal is
a done deal. I understand that the owner of the
Marlins will get a stadium. The people of Hialeah
will get a stadium. The politicians representing
the Hialeah/Hispanic community will bring home
the bacon. -- ....
But what do the rest of the taxpayers called upon
to shoulder $1.9 billion in debt get? Are we getting a subsequent ma-
jor construction project in Liberty City, Overtown, Brownsville, Opa-
locka, Perrine, Richmond Heights, Miami Gardens or Homestead?
The owners of the stadium have picked their White general con-
tractor and promised that 10 percent of the construction jobs will go
to locals -- the same locals who pay taxes and go to Marlin games.
Given the nothing that the Black community is getting from the
stadium project, why would any Black commissioner support this
deal? But for the absence of City Commissioner Michelle Spence-
Jones, the deal would have gone through two weeks ago, at least as
far as the city is concerned. But what is the commissioner getting her
community for $1.9 billion in debt? For that matter, what does the
chairman of the County Commission, Dennis Moss, bring to Perrine
and Richmond Heights for this stadium?
I ask the same question of County Commissioners Audrey Ed-
monson, Dorrin Rolle and Barbara Jordan. Maybe there is some oth-
er deal in the making that they are trading votes for now. Perhaps a
Metrorail line from Perrine to Miami Gardens? If so, I wish someone
would tell us, because, right now, it just seems like we are getting
nothing except the joy of paying for the stadium for the next two
generations.


M ichelle Spence-Jones is the swing vote on the Miami city
commission. She can command a lot for her vote. The sta-
dium proponents need her I hope she doesn't just give it up
for nothing except a pat on the head.

If our politicians are delivering nothing to their districts, and the
stadium does not have a general benefit to the community, why is
this a done deal? Why are their votes considered a sure thing?
Our politicians should insure thai they get something for their con-
stituents when all this spending gets done. When Bayside was built,
we got a portion of construction jobs, construction contracts and
concessions. I hear no mention of jobs for Black architects, Black
engineer, Black subcontractors or the promise of future concession
stands that are owned by Black restaurateurs.
Spence-Jones is the swing vote on the Miami city commission.
She can command a lot for her vote. The stadium proponents need
her. I hope she doesn't just give it up for nothing except a pat on
the head. And if the chairman of the county commission and the
other three Black county commissioners do not vote for this fiasco,
guess what? The stadium does not get built. We save $1.9 billion
and could use that money for a lot of other projects in every district
in this county.
In fact, if you divide $1.9 billion by 13 the number of county
districts -- we could have a $146,000,000 project in every commis-
sion district. Now that would be a good and fair deal for everyone. We
could build new schools, civic centers, parks and affordable homes,
fix roads and sewer systems, strengthen our community against fu-
ture hurricanes, hire more police officers and firefighters and even
use some of the money to lure businesses to our districts.
Our politicians have an opportunity to rewrite this bad deal and
get something for their districts and constituents. How about 15
percent of all dollars spent going to Black businesses and 15 per-
cent of all construction jobs going to the Black community?


There must be tra

A couple of months ago, I
came across an article chroni-
cling how tough it was to beat
incumbents in political races
due to the large amount of funds
they've amassed from lobbyists
and special interest groups. We
should be outraged. Why? Just
look around. How much revital-
ization have you seen in your
community over the past few
years?
With the exception of Miami
Gardens and, maybe, North Mi-
ami, name one Black commu-
nity that has shown some type
of expansion over the past 20
years.
What about Overtown, where
millions of dollars has been tar-
geted for revitalization? What
about Liberty City, where mon-
ey has been earmarked for the
Seventh Avenue Corridor for
years? What about Opa-locka,
Richmond Heights, Goulds,
Perrine? Has every, penny tar-
geted for these communities
been spent according to plan? If
not, who's to blame?
Since 1980, in the aftermath
of the death of Arthur McDuff-
ie, millions of dollars has been
poured into the Black commu-
nity to help repair the damage
done due to riots. These funds
were also supposed to help our
community after the few ma-
jor anchor stores we had in
our midst decided they'd had


-"2




nsparency for funds coming into our community
enough. While Black politicians a great deal of love for the whether or not
should be held accountable 'hood and are doing everything the goals and objectives have
fnr not nronerlv overseeing the the specifications of their par- been met.


development of their particu-
lar districts, they by no means
should be the only ones blamed
for the lack of expansion in our
communities.

FAITH-BASED INITIATIVES
Black Miami has its share of
Community Development Cor-


ticular grants require them to
do. However, there are some
among them who don't give a
damn about Black Miami and
are doing what they they've
been doing for several years:
ripping off this community
while lining their own pockets.
During these tough economic


While President Barack Obama is using words such as
'transparency' and 'accountability' on a national scale,
those words should also apply to our local leaders. There
should be a push to let the public know what agency, group or individual
received federal dollars, how much they received, what projects
they received the funds for and whether or not the goals and objectives
have been met.


portions, as well as non-prof-
it organizations. Add to them
the multitude of churches that
have secured federal dollars us-
ing faith-based initiatives as
the calling card. Many are run
by some of the most powerful
Black politicians and religious
figures among us. They have
collected millions of dollars
in the name of advancing the
overall condition of Black Mi-
ami. Yet we have very little to
show for it.
Are they all corrupt? Defi-
nitely not. Many of them have


times, when the majority of our
people need some type of assis-
tance just to get by, our lead-
ers have to be held to a higher
standard. While President Ba-
rack Obama is using words
such as "transparency" and
"accountability" on a nation-
al scale, those words should
also apply to our local leaders.
There should be a push to let
the public know what agency,
group or individual received
federal dollars, how much they
received, what projects they
received the funds for and


MAGIC CITY SAFE ZONE
Also, the public needs to get
more involved in the process of
knowing who is supposed to be
doing what. For starters, there
is a new program that we need
to pay close attention to: the
Magic City Children's Zone.
It is modeled after successful
"safe zones" in New York City
and Orlando. Then state Rep.
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall
was able to secure this pro-
gram for her constituents.
The boundaries for the local
safe zone are Northwest 79th
Street to the north, Northwest
36th Street to the south, North
Miami Avenue to the east and
Northwest 27th Avenue to the
west. It will focus on issues
such as youth support, com-
munity safety, housing and
community development and
adult education, along with
training and jobs.
The 15-member board of di-
rectors reads like a Who's Who
of politicians in Black Miami.
Last we heard, they were upset
at the fact that they could not
get their hands on the $3.5 mil-
lion set aside for the planning of
the safe zone which there are
not entitled to.
Stay tuned.


The challenge ahead is to make our word good
As I look back over this month, ful movement with Martin Lu- "I am as good as you," White quences even
the Black History Month, I ask their King Jr. and got arrested America. quences hurt.
myself what are the challenges to prove our test of courage. What is the challenge today? to admit to a
faced by us all today. What is Some of us became a part of the What do our young people have builds character
our struggle, what is our uniting Black Panther Party to move us to fight for today? low through a
force that moves us forward? forward "by any means neces- The challenge today is to word good.
In the '60s through the '90s, sary." Some of us joined the make your word good. Our new pre,
it was to fighf for equal rights Back-to-Africa Movement, to be For far too long, our young ample. Mr. Obai
under the law. We had a reason done with working so hard to and older folk have tried to he messed up
to fight for rights. We fought for please people who would never take the easy way out or take cabinet appoin
the right to take any seat on be pleased with -our. progress. the shortcuts in life or try to mitted it, offered
the bus, the right to eat at any Some of us followed Elijah Mu- "cut a poor man's deal," only to and then he fc
lunch counter, the right to try hammad and the Nation of Is- find that they continue to face The man made
.on clothes in any department lam to learn a better way for the the same problems. You do the American I
store, the right to swim at any Black person in America. Some not learn from the shortcuts or lic. If we learn
beach, the right to stay in any of us pushed to get into all- the minor so-called success of we travel throu
hotel -- the list goes on and on. White Ivy League colleges and cheating others. You learn from of life, it should
We fought in our own way. suffered ridicule and hatred be- the mistakes you make along word good.
Some of us joined the peace- cause we had the nerve to say the way and you learn from tak-


Should government money be used to help build a stadium for the Marlins?


ROY WILLIAMS, 68
Retired, Liberty City

The econo-
my right now
is really bad.
Yeah, the sta-
dium might
produce jobs ,'
but it won't
be enough to
help those
who are struggling. Besides,
those jobs are not going to
be available to Liberty City,
Brownsville or Allapattah
residents. Ninety-nine per-
cent of Southwest residents
will get the jobs. The govern-
ment funds can be diverted
elsewhere in our community
so we can rebuild ourselves.
I don't think that the sta-
dium is necessary right now
because we are putting our-
selves in a mess.

BOBBY LINDER, 54
Teacher, Liberty City

We are al-
ready in cha-
os with this
economy so
we shouldn't
be building
a Marlins
stadium, es-
pecially with


the government money. We
have so many problems in
our community that we are
losing focus with this ball-
park. With all these people
out of jobs, the county is
making a big mistake donat-
ing those millions of dollars
to the stadium. This will be
a big loss, just like the Mi-
ami Arena that was built for
no reason.

BERNARD RENFRO, 41
Self-employed, Liberty City

I love base-
ball and we
should be
building a
Marlins sta-
dium. If
Black people
go out and
apply for the
available positions that the
Marlins stadium will open
up, then they will get hired.
But I am not looking at this
from a Black or White per-
spective but how will this
benefit everyone.

GWENELL MILLER, 19
Child care, Liberty City

I think that they can use
that money for the stadium
for the schools instead but no


way should
the stadium
benefit when
everyone is
struggling.
The stadium 4
is not a pri- .
ority right
now because
we are in a
recession and there are im-
portant things needed in our
community. The ballpark is
the last thing on everyone's
mind. Even if they bring, in
jobs, it won't be the jobs
with benefits that will help
stabilize a struggling family.

THEN JACOBS, 43
Liberty City

Right
now, we are -:. 7'
in a reces-
sion and
we, can't
afford the
ballpark so
they need
to share
the Dol-
phin Stadi-
um with the Miami Dolphins
team. The stadium will be
good for jobs but if people
don't have money to go to
the game then the stadium
will be useless. The rich


people need to get off their
high horse and put the mon-
ey together for the stadium
instead of using governmen-
tal funds. However, since
they are using tourist-tax
it's okay. Once they build
the stadium and they don't
have the money to keep it
going, because people can't
afford to go to game, it is not
going to affect the rich but
the poor will suffer. Now is
just a bad time..Maybe if it
was built like five years ago
then it wouldn't be much of
a problem but this a reces-
sion.


ROOSEVELT MCCULOUGH, 58
Engineer, Florida City

Let the
baseball
players
pay for the
stadium
because
they get
paid a lot'
of money.
Right now,
it is a bad
time for a stadium. They are
proposing that the stadium
will produce jobs but I don't
think so because the econo-
my is bad.


ing what I call the scenic road
of life.


when the conse-
It takes courage
screw-up but it
;r when you fol-
nd make your

sident is the ex-
na admitted that
with some of his
.tments. He ad-
d another option
allowedd through.
his word good to
people and pub-
nothing else as
igh this journey
I be to make our

There is~~ anecrtfoI


There is an excerpt from a
song that says, -"Here is some-


I f you give your word, back the play. If you cannot do it, admit it, go
back to the table and work a new plan so that you can make your
word good.


Your word should be your
bond. Your word should be bet-
ter than money because, when
it comes down to it, all we have
is our word.
If you say to your child, who
is living with his baby momma,
that you will spend the week-
end with them, make your word
good. If you say, "I commit to do
this job or work in exchange for
some service rendered," make
your word good and do the job.
If you screw up in a relation-
ship, admit it, take the conse-
quence, come back to the table,
talk it out and make your word
good, then move forward.
Yes, it is hard and, yes, it does
take commitment but that is
what being a man or a woman
is all about. It is about taking
responsibility for your actions
and dealing with the conse-


thing that we all should learn/
Respect is something that you
have to earn./So please step
aside when you hear us sing,/
because life is more than just a
Bling, Bling."
The challenge is clear. The
struggle is real. The time is now,
Black Man and Black Woman.
Make your word good and you
will go far in all areas of your
life, whether it be on a job, in
a relationship with family and
friends or a relationship with
our own children. If you make
your word good and are willing
to accept the consequences of
those actions, life will become a
lot easier.
If you give your word, back
the play. If you cannot do it, ad-
mit it, go back to the table and
work a new plan so that you
can make your word good.


Commissioners mu

out for better stadium


Ot e iatmi T0ime

The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries
as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for a healthy
dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point, and may be edited for grammar,
style and clarity. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and
telephone number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street,
Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email: miamiteditorial@bellsouth.
net.









BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


Residents informed about $550 million ballpark


STADIUM
continued from 1A

Dade Chamber of Commerce
and attorney Reginald J. Clyne,
attorney of Clyne & Associates,
P.A.
Some panelists questioned
Samson on the money that would
be used to finance the construc-
tion of the stadium, whether
Black businesses would be in-
volved and whether jobs would
be available for Blacks.
"From your knowledge, is
there any money that's going to
be taken out of the Black com-
munity to help build the sta-
dium?" Diggs asked..
"Absolutely not," Samson
immediately replied.
"I want people to be able
to work in our stadium in all
types of jobs," Samson said.
"I have been very offended by
certain members of a commu-
nity who have said that cer-
tain.jobs are not good enough.
There are thousands of jobs to
run a stadium and all of them
are important."
Samson said financing for
the proposed 37,000-seat re-
tractable roof stadium was
coming from three sources:
professional sports facility
tax, convention development
tax and bed tax, all which he
defined as tourist taxes.
But one resident had harsh


Panelist pictured, Bill Perry, chairman of the Economic Development Committee; Darryl
Holsendolph, president of Holsen Inc.; Bill Diggs, president of the Miami-Dade Chamber of
Commerce; and Reginald J. Clyne, attorney with Clyne & Associates. -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra Charite


words for the Marlins chief.
"The Marlins haven't con-
tributed anything to the black
community," said Carolyn
Boyce. "The Marlins didn't
even respect us. They didn't
even come into our commu-
nity on their own. They were
invited by our [NAACP] presi-
dent."
Curry, though, lauded
Samson's efforts to inform
the Black community when
he could have simply turned
down Curry's request to at-
tend the meeting.
The Miami City Commission
two weeks ago put a hold on
a deal to help build the sta-
dium that would cost about
$550 million, $155 million
coming from the Marlins,
$50 million from Building
Better Communities General


Obligation Bond funds, $297
million from county tourist-
tax revenues and $13 million
from the city.
The commissioners were
deadlocked 2-2, with Commis-
sioner Michelle Spence-Jones,
holding the deciding vote, ab-
sent on maternity leave. The
deadlock affected plans' for a
County Commission meeting
which had to be postponed
pending the city's decision.
The city commission will
meet again on the stadium
now on March 4, instead
of the originally scheduled
March 12. Spence-Jones had
said she would attend the ses-
sion slated for March 12 but
did not indicate how she would
vote. She could not be reached
on whether she will attend the
March 4 meeting.
Black county commissioners


have not yet said how they will
vote when the issue comes be-
fore them.
A spokesperson for County
Commissioner Barbara Jor-
dan said she will wait to hear
the presentation on the sta-
dium before making her deci-
sion. The other commissioners
could not be reached by press
time.
The ballpark is scheduled to
be built at 1501 NW 3rd St.,
with completion set for 2012.
The Orange Bowl was demol-
ished in early 2008 to make
room for the stadium. The
Marlins have agreed to a non-
relocation agreement that re-
quires the team to uphold and
manage a Major League Base-
ball franchise in Miami for at
least 35 years.


Students urged to apply for CBC Spouses scholarships


Miami Times Staff Report

College-bound students who
live in the 17t Congressional
District are being invited to ap-
ply for scholarships being of-
fered by members of the
Congressional Black Caucus
Spouses organization.
Leslie Meek, wife of U.S. Rep.
Kendrick Meek, is encourag-
ing students in her husband's
district parts of north Miami-
Dade and south Broward coun-
ties -- to submit applications."
The CBC Spouses organi-
zation is a component of the
Congressional Black Caucus
Foundation chaired by Con-


gressman Meek.
"I know that South Florida
produces some of the most
talented and intelligent young
people in the country and I en-
courage students to apply for
this coveted scholarship," said
Leslie Meek.
"If you are a student who is
looking to make a significant
contribution to help better your
community, this is an opportu-
nity worth pursuing," she said.
The CBC Spouses.Education
Scholarship, the foundation's
first educational program,
makes awards to academically
talented and highly motivated
students who intend to pursue


or are pursuing full-time un-
dergraduate, graduate, or doc-
toral degrees.
The CBC Spouses also offer
the Cheerios Brand Health Ini-
tiative, Performing Arts, Visual
Arts, and Flexible Education
scholarships.
The CBC Spouses partnered
with the University of Phoe-
nix in 2008 to create the CBC
Spouses Flexible Education
Scholarship, administered
through the foundation. It of-
fers 25 full-tuition scholarships
for students seeking degrees
online and/or on campus.
Students must submit com-
pleted applications to Regina


Serrano, CBCF Scholarships,
7830 Simms St., Hollywood,
FL 33024.
The deadline for applications
is Thursday, Feb. 26, and all
applications must be post-
marked on or before that date.


By Scott Bowles

Tyler Perry scored the larg-
est debut of his career as his
Madea Goes to Jail opened to
a whopping $41.1 million, ac-
cording to studio estimates
from box office tracking firm
Nielsen EDI.
Despite having one of the
best track records in Hol-
lywood, Perry still surprised
many analysts, who had ex-
pected his film to open around


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The strong opening con-
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strength of movies geared to-
ward audiences of faith and
color, films that are typically
made with low budgets. Last
year's faith-based Fireproof
cost just $500,000 but did
$33.5 million. Jail eclipses
Perry's previous best, 2006's
Madea's Family Reunion,
which opened at $30 million
and grossed $63.3 million.


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and save a life.

* Give a cat, dog, kitten or puppy a home for life

* Get unconditional love in return

* Save on rabies shots and microchipping

Find out how you can adopt a shelter pet.

Go to miamidade.gov/animals or call 3-1-1.


Train don't chain your best friend

Beginning April 2009, it will be illegal to keep your dog tethered
when you aren't present.


This means it will be unlawful to tie
a dog to any object or structure --
including a house, tree, fence, post,
garage or shed -- by any means, such
as chain, rope, cord, leash or running
line. However, this doesn't mean you
can't use a leash to walk a dog.

That fact is that dogs left tethered
and unattended are deprived of social
interaction, and since they can't run
if they feel threatened, they are 2.8
times more likely to bite. So the
anti-tethering law has been enacted
to improve the safety of residents as
well as the well-being of pets.


Once the law is in effect, illegally
tethering your dog can result in fines
of $100 or more.

Please remember, train don't chain.


For more information go to miamidade.gov/animals or call 3-1-1.


Perry film tops $41M


THEY 'RE HERE


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enclosed the

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Norland High senior wins Miss Miami Gardens


By Margarita Sweeting
Special to The Miami Timles

Vanessa Charles had a secret wish: She always wanted
to wear a crown.
Charles, 17, got to do just that when she won the third
annual Miss Miami Gardens Pageant held on Saturday
at Florida Memorial University's Lou Rawls Performing
Arts Center in Miami Gardens.
"Actually, it's really not just about the crown. It's about
what the crown gives you the power to do.' Now, I have
the opportunity to do things I might not have been able
to do before," she said.
Charles's prizes include a $2,500 scholarship, a $250
gift certificate from Regalia Magnificent Apparel and a
one-year subscription to Pageantry Magazine. She com-
peted against nine other young women in categories
such as a personal interview, swimsuit wear, fitness, tal-
ent, and evening gown wear.
"Probably the hardest part of the competition for me
was the talent because if you flunk out on that it could
really hurt you," said Charles.
The other contestants included Kimberly McDonald,
Charles's classmate at Miami Norland High, Aminah
Lacy, Ieasshma Grant, Jasmine Jackson, Tequila Gra-
ham and Charita Walker, all students at Miami Carol
City High, and Marie Simon, a student at Florida Memo-
rial University.
The first runner-up was Rosie Justilien, a teacher at
Horace Mann Middle School and the second runner-up
was Janey Tate, a sophomore at Florida International
University, majoring in broadcast journalism
"I was really in shock when they called my name," said
Tate. "It was a very emotional moment for me."


As a franchise partner of the Miss America Pageant
organization, the event is designed to award the contes-
tants with scholarships and a chance to compete for the
Miss Florida title in July, and if she wins there, a shot at
the Miss America crown. Event organizers also hope the
participants learned some life lessons as well.
"I would hope that these young ladies learned that they
have a great talent which can be expressed in a whole-
some environment and receive wholesome adulation. I
want them to take that through their lives," said Miami
Gardens Mayor Shirley Gibson.
Yvette Payne, a guidance counselor at Norland High,
said her students "have grown spiritually. This pageant
has made them much stronger."
Renee Portee said her goddaughter, Tequila Graham,
"has become much more passionate for life. She's more
determined,"
Other award winners were Tate, who won the Miami
Gardens Miracle Award and Justilien, who won the
Overall Interview Award. Charles also won the Overall
Talent Award. Each of these awards came with a $100
scholarship.
All contestants won Perry Ellis swimsuits and tote
bags, along with other prizes.
More than 500 people turned out to watch the pag-
eant which included special performances by the Diva
Arts Dance School, dancers Corey Jackson and Chris
Hernandez, and singers Danielle Mishali and Kourtney
Gallego.
"This has been a life-changing experience for me. It has
encouraged me to be a role model and a better person,"
said Charles. "I want to start working on my platform of
youth empowerment now. I want to motivate my genera-
tion to push past what they think they can't do."


"Copyrighted Material
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BLACKS Muslvr CONTROL TH-EIR OW~N DEST[NY


o


S5A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


BE FREE


Living happily ever after begins with making the right decisions today. If you use tobacco, quitting is your best bet for good health now and in the future, as well as pushing
"till death do us part" off as long as possible. Contact the Quitline today for free counseling, information and tips to help you succeed. BE HEALTHY. BE HAPPY. BE FREE.


Call 1-877-U-CAN-NOW or visit FloridaQuitline.com.


Florida Department ofHealth


BLACKS NILI.S I CON I ROIL -1 HEIROWN 1)1 'I NY


I _









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


Homeowner ran into money problems after refinancing


EVICTED
continued from 1A

guaranteed by the federal gov-
ernment, allows qualified ho-
meowners aged 62 and older to
get a check for the equity in their
homes without having to contin-
ue to pay a mortgage, unless they
sell the property.
Conley said she did not get the
reverse mortgage because of the
condition of her home, conced-
ing, "I've got it put together with
chewing gum."
In recent months, four genera-
tions of people have lived in the
two-bedroom home located in the
area of Northwest 137th street
and Eighth Avenue.
But it was not the condition of
the property that led to Conley's
eviction on Feb. 20. According to
Margaret Grizzle, board member
of Serve the People, a non-profit,
formed to alleviate the impact of
poverty in low-income communi-
ties, Couley was the victim of "ei-
ther fraud or predatory lending
or both."
Conley was paying $1,000 a
month before she attempted to
refinance her home with U.S.


Bank, based in Irvine, Calif.
"When I signed, they told me I'd
only have to pay the taxes," she
said.
A U.S. Bank spokeswoman said
the bank could not comment on
the matter.
Around last Christmas, Conley
said, she started getting notices
that payment was overdue. Judg-
ment for $4,114.72 was awarded
against her on Jan. 10.


call Take Back the Land, which
works with LIFFT, on Fridya just
after the family was evicted.
"This is my mother's house,"
Trody said. "Every family event,
we did it here Thanksgiving,
Christmas, she got married here.
It's a family house."
Trody called Rameau.
"Yes, we moved the family back
in," said Rameau. He said TBTL
believes that moving low-income


they just come and take it back
- and you have gentrification.
Now you have foreclosure."
Miami-Dade police officers were
on the scene Monday but made
no arrest.
"The police didn't say a word to
us," said Rameau. "They didn't
even speak to both parties. They
looked like they were the bank's
personal police."
An officer on the scene declined
to comment.
Conley said the police told her
they would return Tuesday to
pursue relocating the family but
had not shown up as of 5 p.m.
Utility service to the home was
not 'interrupted while the fam-
ily was evicted. Asked where the
family lived for the three days
they were out of the home, Con-
ley gestured toward a van parked
on the street and said, "You see
that truck over there?"
The family lived in the van that
Trody's husband Sylvester Thom-
as drove. They parked it in the lot
of a nearby supermarket, accord-
ing to Grizzle of Serve the People.
"You go to a shelter, they sepa-
rate you," said Conley. "You've
got to keep the family together."


Conley's daughter, Mary Trody,
42, moved into her mother's
house four months ago with her
husband after' he lost his job.
Then Trody's daughter Mia Den-
nis, 23, also moved into the home,
along with her four children, all
under age 10.
Trody has been a member of
Low Income Families Fighting
Together (LIFFT) since Decem-
ber 2007 and knew she could


families back into foreclosed
homes is a matter of conscience.
"The elected officials in the town
don't want to create housing for
poor Black people," Rameau said.
"The problem is that the Black
community doesn't have control
of the land they are set on. What
happens is first they had segrega-
tion, where it was like, 'You have
to live here.' Then if they decide
they want the land Blacks are on,


President Obama being urged to halt the expulsions of more than 30,000


PROTEST
continued from 1A

Wednesday to address the situ-
ation.
"They will not be forgotten,"
said Despinosse.
Gepsie Metellus, executive di-
rector of Sant La Haitian Neigh-
borhood Center, is angry over
the plight of the deportees.
"I don't understand why Hai-
tians seem to be receiving the
shorthand of the stick," she said
in a phone interview Monday.
Marleine Bastien, executive
director of Fanm Ayisyen Nan
Miyami (Haitian Women of Mi-
ami), said Haiti's economic
situation is still at crisis level
and Washington should help
the country rebuild and grant
Haitian refugees TPS designa-
tion.


"Haiti is at its worst. We un-
derstand that President Obama
is focused on the economy but
he should stop the deportation
pending an evaluation of the
Haitian policy," said Bastien.
Bastien has traveled to Wash-
ington to lobby for TPS for Hai-
tians, a designation that allows
foreign nationals currently re-
siding to stay temporarily if
conditions in their homelands
are recognized by the U.S. gov-
ernment as being temporarily
unsafe. TPS does not lead to
permanent resident status and
could last up to18 months, with
extensions.
According to the U.S. Cen-
sus in 2000, 750,000 Haitians
live in the U.S. and more than
a third are in South Florida.
That number is believed to have
greatly increased' since then.


Bastien believes many of the
people making decisions about
immigrants in the U.S. are not
immigrant-friendly.
Former state Rep. Philip Bru-
tus, who is seeking the seat be-
ing vacated by Congressman
Kendrick Meek in 2010, was
shocked and surprised about
ICE's deportation plan.
"They are speeding up the
process quickly. I know that it
is not a priority right now be-
cause people are losing their
homes and jobs are being cut
but all this requires is a simple
signature from the president,"
said Brutus.
Prior to winning the election,
President Barack Obama visit-
ed Miami and took center stage
at the Bicentennial Park in
Downtown Miami for an "Early
Vote for Change" rally then lat-


er spoke to reporters about the
situation in Haiti.
"I think that we have neglect-
ed Haiti for too long. It is impor-
tant for us to not just provide
humanitarian relief but exam-
ine TPS in the context of our
overall policy towards Haiti,"
Obama said at the time. "It is
critically important to under-
stand that Haiti is not just the
function of natural disasters.
We've had a government and an
economy that is riot working."
Metellus is frustrated that the
Obama Administration has not
taken steps to halt the deporta-
tions..
Despinosse, a candidate for
mayor in that city, is optimistic
that the Obama Administration
will address the issue but says
he realizes the president has
his hands full right now.


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CHILDREN SHOULD NOT SMOKE


Maturity is Needed to Make an
Informed Choice
We all agree that children should not smoke.
Until a person has the maturity to understand and
appreciate the consequences of smoking, they should
be discouraged on all fronts. Parents, teachers,
guardians and mentors should talk to young people
about not smoking. Retail
stores must be diligent o%
in carding consumers to
ensure that no one under G. ds pi'a~
the legal age purchases 40% "-
cigarettes. These and
many other preventive 30%
measures some funded _
by the tobacco industry-- "-
are being aggressively 20%
practiced.
10% Af.-
Youth Prevention I^, ,^ n
Measures Are Working
The good news is 0% ;
777 82 '87 '92
that these measures
are working. According to the 2008 Monitoring the
Future study conducted by the National Institute
of Drug Abuse and the University of Michigan, the
teen smoking rates are "at or near record lows."' The
study also reported that the smoking rate for 12th
graders is at its lowest rate since the study started
tracking smoking behavior 33 years ago.
The results in the black community are the most
encouraging. The Monitoring the Future study found
that smoking rates among African American youth
are dramatically lower than that of other race groups.
Specifically, the study of 12th graders showed the
rate of white students who reported using cigarettes
within the prior 30 days of the survey is more than


twice the rate for African American students; and
that the rate for Hispanics is nearly one and one-half
times that for African American students."

Lorillard Markets to Adults
Some claim that there is a conspiracy by the
tobacco industry to target African American youth.
We believe that such a
claim has no. basis.The
people who comprise
Lorillard Tobacco Company
^have families too, and
are concerned about the
health and well-being of
wour children. We represent
Small races and walks of life.
Further, we share a common
set of beliefs: that farmers
. _____A -'-. have a right to make a living
by growing tobacco, as
they have in this country
'.' ' .' since before it was the
*97 '02 '07
United States; that tobacco
companies have a right to
manufacture and market products to adults who
choose to smoke; and that convenience stores and
tobacconists have a right to sell them to adults.

Adults who understand the risks of smoking should
continue to have the right to choose to smoke and to
smoke the brand of cigarettes that they prefer.

To help preserve and protect those rights, visit
www.mentholchoice.com and learn more.
'Johnston, L. D., O'Malley, R M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (December 11, 2008). "More
good news on teen smoking: Rates at or near record lows" University of Michigan News Service: Ann
Arbor. MI, http://www.drugabuse.goviNewsroom/08/MTF2008Tobacco.pdf
"Johnston, L. D. O'Malley, R M.. Bachman, J. G.. & Schulenberg, J. E. (December 11. 2008), "Trends
in 30-Day Prevalence of Use of Cigarettes by Subgroups in Grade 12" University of Michigan News
Service: Ann Arbor, MI, http://monitoringthefuture.org/data/08data/pr08cig8.pdf


www.mentholchoice.com


"The elected officials in the town don't want to create housing for poor
Black people," Rameau said. "The problem is that the Black community
doesn't have control of the land they are set on. What happens is first
they had segregation, where it was like, 'You have to live here.' Then if
they decide they want the land Blacks are on, they just come and take it
back and you have gentrification. Now you have foreclosure."


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I 9A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR 0\V(N DESTfINY I


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The Miami Times
____________ *___


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


Bahamas linking



tourism to faith



activities in 2009


Miami Times Staff Report

The Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism and Aviation has part-
nered with the Bahamas-based
Karazim Ministries and Global
Caribbean Gospel Network to
sponsor the second annual
Worship Week on Grand Baha-
ma Island March 22-28.
The program is intended to
help people relax, recharge their
energies and grow in their rela-
tionship with God.
"Gone Wild for Jesus, Spring
Break" is the theme of the event
which will include workshops,
seminars, concerts, a Junkanoo
festival and prayer and devo-
tion time against the backdrop
of blue skies, turquoise waters
and white sandy beaches of the
tourist island
Headliners will include Dr.
Myles Munroe, Dr. Ron Kenoly
and recording artist and Dove
Award nominee Martha Munizi.
In keeping with the Bahamas
spiritual culture, top gospel art-
ists from Grand Bahama Island
and Nassau, such as Simeon


Outten and the Freedom Band
9, will also perform.
The organizers said they ex-
pect the mothers of NBA su-
perstars Shaquille O'Neal and
Dwyane Wade to be in atten-
dance.
Clear Channel's Miami-based
radio station 103.5-FM, The
Beat, has been tapped as the of-
ficial media sponsor. The radio
station will give away one round
trip for two prior to the event
and will broadcast live during
the festivities.
"Once visitors set foot on
Grand Bahama Island, we feel
confident that they will fully un-
derstand what we mean when
we say 'It's better in the Baha-
mas' because God lives here,"
said Linville Johnson, director
of Religious Markets, Bahamas
Ministry of Tourism and Avia-
tion.
Other sponsors of this year's
event include, Discovery Cruise
Line, Pelican Bay Hotel and Ba-
hamasair.
For more information, log on
to www.worshipweek.com.


Mega-church pastor

says prayer is answer


to nation's troubles


"Prayer is the key to experiencing

God's will for our lives"


Special to The Miami Times

Houston, TX (BlackNews.com)
- Change through prayer is pos-
sible and prayer is the answer to
the nation's current troubles.
That's the message from the
Rev. Suzette Caldwell, board
chairwoman and president of
The Prayer Institute and as-
sociate pastor of Windsor Vil-
lage United Methodist Church,
where her husband, Kirbyjon
Caldwell, is senior pastor.
Today's trying times, reflected
by the troubling economy, envi-
ronmental issues, failing home
mortgages, massive lay-offs, in-
adequate health care and global
political unrest are indicators
there is a need for an answer
for change, she says.
Caldwell has developed a
Model Prayer based on the
Lord's Prayer. She and the
Prayer Institute team, located
in Houston, have seen numer-
ous healings and miraculous
answers to prayer resulting
from Jesus' prayer method
found in the Model Prayer (also
known as the Lord's Prayer),
according to a statement from


her publicist.
"Prayer is the key to experi-
encing God's will for our lives,"
Caldwell says in the statement.
"Praying to change your life will
show you how to produce God's
results to your prayers while
strengthening your relationship
with Him."
Caldwell and The Prayer In-
stitute team conduct prayer
classes that have taught thou-
sands to pray using the Model
Prayer and have received testi-
monies of positive results.
She credits prayer as the cat-
alyst for realizing the 234-acre
Pointe 2.3.4. master-planned,
nonprofit development in
Southwest Houston.
Caldwell also recently spon-
sored a prayer event, "A Day
of O.N.E. (One Nation Empow-
ered)," when congregations
prayed the same prayer in sup-
port of President Obama, his
cabinet and America.
She has written a book, Pray-
ing to Change Your Life, about
the power of prayer, scheduled
to be published on April 7.
For more information, log on
to www.prayerinstitute.com.


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Documentary puts spotlight on Goulds


Miami Times Staff report

The ADMIT music education pro-
gram has produced a documentary on
Goulds, the South Miami-Dade com-
munity, in collaboration with Grace
Church of God, Mays Middle School
and Goulds Park.
The predominantly Black neighbor-
hood dates back to the 1900s and
its story is told in a 10-minute film
capsule pointing to historical events,
landmarks, churches, neighborhoods,
progress and everyday interaction of
residents.
The documentary, funded by Elijah
Network and The Children's Trust,
highlights issues facing youth and re-
counts the stories of the past in hopes


of restoring a sense of pride in the com-
munity through messages from pioneer
residents and youth themselves.
Youths and seniors from Goulds
collaborated in producing the film's
soundtrack in ADMIT's Perrine studio
and giving interviews at Grace of God
Baptist Church.
Copies of the documentary are avail-
able by e-mailingadmirpr@gmail.com.
Meanwhile, ADMIT announced it has
joined forces with Miami-Dade Coun-
ty's Violence Intervention Project and
Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Police Department in an initiative to
help curb violence among the young.
The move comes in the wake of two
shootings that killed an infant and two
teenagers.


The police department will distrib-
ute 15,000 copies of an ADMIT CD that
carry a message of non-violence.
The Real Choice, an album of 16
songs, will be handed out to schools in
early March after FCAT testing.
The songs were written, produced
and recorded by groups of students
participating in the ADMIT program
over the past year. Rappers such as DJ
Khaled, Ace Hood, Pitbull and Billy Blu
added shout-outs and words of encour-
agement on the tracks.
The CD is also available for pick-up or
delivery from the ADMIT Program offic-
es and at community festivals, parades
and other events throughout 2009.
For more information, call 305-835-
8835.










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


God is interested in our humility,

not our wealth or education


Last week, I wrote about
how the Lord loves us to have
a child-like attitude when we
approach Him in prayer and
communication. In Matthew
S18: 1-4, Jesus tells the disciples,
in response to their question
about who is the greatest in
the Kingdom, that the one who
is as humble as a child is the
greatest in the Kingdom.
He also said that if anybody
did not turn from their sins
and become as little children


they would not even get into
the Kingdom. Those are strong
words but they certainly remind
us that Jesus is not looking for
those who are wealthy or well-
educated or powerful but He is
interested in humility.
I read an interesting account
about children that said,
"Children unnerve us with the
impertinence of their questions,
the naturalness of their
proposals, and the irreverence
in their fleeting expressions.


They can be cunning and
manipulative, but aren't the
masters at deception many
adults have grown to become.
Their behavior shows us
a unique way to interpret
reality, while their simple
words ask us how to solve
both everyday problems, as
well as cope with the bigger
issues of life and growing
up. This is because a child is
attracted by the mysteries of
life and the unknown as well;
they are capable of being both
practical and spiritual."
Is that how the Lord wants
us to behave? In essence, He
wants us to ask Him questions
and seek His counsel on not
only spiritual matters but
practical, ordinary, everyday
living ones, as well. We should
be natural when approaching
Him. We need not put on airs
or recite our resume before


praying. We do not need a
theological degree be a church
leader or to have attended
seminars to attract His
attention.
Here are other interesting
comments regarding children:
"Sometimes we reject the
notion of Christ as a child
and prefer the resurrected
God-man that we think we
can relate to better. As long
as here remains an element
of the mysterious in your life
(something that you have not
discovered and conquered),
you will maintain these
childlike qualities that are
essential in translating God's
words in purity."
We do sometimes forget that
Jesus was born a Baby and He
was raised in a Jewish home
with other Jewish children.
(Remember Mary and Joseph
had other sons and daughters.)


When it was discovered that
He was missing on the return
from a Passover celebration,
Mary and Joseph returned to
Jerusalem to search for Him
and found Him instructing the
teachers in the temple. Luke
2:51 reads that He returned
home with them and was
obedient to them. Jesus, the
Son of God, humbled Himself
before His earthly parents and
obeyed them. Can we do less?
One last thought. Children
do not always understand
why they must or must not
do all of the things that they
are told. They do not always
understand the economy or
the world's financial system or
even why unfaithful spouses
will not be true to their
marriage. (These are examples
of the mysterious to which
the second set of comments
are referring.) Some things


are explained to them and
some are not. But whether the
parent gives an explanation
that the child understands or
agrees with or not, he or she is
expected to obey.
God's Word has given us
many instructions that are for
our good. They are not to hold
us back or keep us from having
a good time. They are to teach
and protect us. Obedience
gives us an opportunity to not
only please our Father but
also to place us in a position
to be blessed by Him.
When you speak to your
boss or your children or your
spouse, you should speak
with maturity but, when
you approach your Heavenly
Father, approach Him as a
child who is so grateful for
what Daddy has done and who
can't wait to hear what else
Daddy has to say.


Broward County Schools will
hold district public hearings at
Plantation High School Audito-
rium, 5:30 p.m., Wednesday,
Feb. 25, and Wednesday, March
25. www.browardschools.com/
schoolboundaries

***** *
Neighborhood Housing
Services will hold a seminar
on "Incorporating Family into
Leadership Strategies," 5:30-8
pm. Thursday, Feb. 26, open to
the public and free of charge,
at Jefferson Reaves Park. Reg-
istration is required. Sharon
Williams, 305-751-5511 ext.
1121.


"Sisters: A Celebration of
Human Spirit" will be show-
cased at the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center, Feb. 26 -
March 22. 305-638-6771.


The Liberty City Trust will
conduct its first in a series -of
"Don't Bury Your Head in the
Sand" Foreclosure Preven-
tion and Housing Stabilization
Clinics at Charles Hadley Park
(Purple Room), 6 p.m., Thurs-
day, February 26. 305-635-
2301.


Crusade for Christ Temple
will host Christian film and en-
tertainment nights, 7:30 o'clock
Sunday. 305-523-5952. Chris-
tian teaching series are held 11
a.m. Sunday.


You are cordially invited to
visit facilities of Dwight Funer-
al Home. 305-754-4286.


New Jerusalem Prayer Min-
istries International holds a
seminar at 7 p.m. Tuesday on
"How to do Web Broadcasting,
Video Mail, Conferences and
Chat" for your church or min-
istry. 305-303-6759.


A Mission With a New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to fellowship 7:30
p.m. Feb. 25-27 and Sunday,
March 1 at 11:30 a.m. 305-
836-6256


Second Chance Evange-
listic and Deliverance Min-


The fifth annual Carrie P.
Meek Award Ceremony will be
held 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
26, at the Signature Grand in
Davie. www.FischlerSchool.
nova.edu/bhc.


George Washington Carv-
er alumni will hold a Carver
Alumni Day and BBQ Lun-
cheon, 11 a.m.. Friday, Feb.
27, George Washington Carv-
er Middle School auditorium.
Leona Cooper Baker, 305-445-
6662.

*********
The Miami-Dade State At-
torney's Office will hold a
Sealing and Expungement
Program, 4-8 p.m. Friday, Feb.
27, Goulds Park, 305-547-
0724.

********
City of Miami Parks and
Recreation will hold a ping
pong tournament 9 a.m.-2
p.m., Feb. 28, at Charles Had-
ley Park. Kim Sands, 305-634-
5791, Bernard C. Poitier, 786-
291-1524.

****** *
City of North Miami Beach
is having a free health fair for
all ages, offering flu shots,
breast cancer screening, HIV


istries will host Moments in
Black Biblical History," 7:30
p.m., Feb. 25-27. Pastor Delo-
ris Johnson, 786-355-4388.


Mt. Zion Missionary Bap-
tist Church will be the venue
for the Performing Entertain-
ment Through Education's
Black History in the Magic City
show, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Feb.
27,. 786-325-7383.

*******
Now Faith Ministries will
host a gala for the homeless,
"A Feast is Made for Laughter,"
Knights of Columbus banquet
hall, Palms Springs, 7 p.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 28. 954-802-
9570, vforbestraining@hot-
mail.com.

********
Raina L. Kemp Ministries
will host a prayer brunch,
noon, Saturday, Feb. 28. Mira-
cle Healing Services, 7:30 p.m.,
March 13.


Tyrell & The Tampa Boyz Gospel Explosion!
Come experience a night of Revalation of South Carolina,
gospel celebration, March 8, at Sister's of Faith, The Earth
Greater Holy Cross hosted by Angels, The Annointed Voices,
Tyrell & and The Tampa Boyz!. and Nu Testament of Jackson-
Also performing will be, the ville, FL! Doors open at 3 p.m.


My dear fellow man, strength-
en your brothers and sisters,
and act towards them with
compassion.
When a person acts wrongly
towards you, because of de-
pression, bitterness or bleak-


In His Presence:

ness. Whenever a person sin
(God-forbids), he hides God's
presence from himself. Yet he
should sense the presence of
God, who glory prevails the uni-
verse, and whose is full of loving
kindness and compassion.


testing, blood pressure checks,
nutrition information, general
health screenings, dental lit-
erature and more, Youth En-
richment Services Center and
Silver Auditorium, 9 a.m. 1
p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28. 305-
948-2986.

********
Miami-Dade Park and Rec-
reation's The Women's Park,
and the Girl Scouts will host
a free reading in the park 1
- 4 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28.
http:/ /www.girlscouts.org


The Voter's Council of
North Miami Beach's Wash-
ington Park will hold its an-
nual Black History program at
the Missy Williams Center, 1-
4 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28. Iola
Crawford will be honored for
her community service. 305-
342-2907.

********
The Haitian Heritage Mu-
seum will hold its fifth annual
Celebration Gala in the De-
sign.District, 8 p.m.-midnight,
Saturday, Feb. 28. 305-371-
5988.

** ** *
The .Circle of Brotherhood
will hold a public forum at
the Liberty Square Commu-
nity Center, 6 p.m., Tuesday,
March 3. Brandyss Howard,
305-635-2301.

********
The Miami-Dade Consumer

Memorial Temple Baptist
Church invite you to partici-
pate in a workshop on prayer,
6:30 p.m. 9 p.m., March 2-4.
305-624-2502.

********
First Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church women will
present "100 Women in White,"
4 p.m., Sunday, March 8. 954-
927-8020.


Lively Stones for Jesus
Ministries will be in revival
7:30 p.m. March 11-13. 305-
685-7739.


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church's pastor's aide
ministry will travel to Sarasota
at 4:30 a.m., Marchl4, return-
ing at 8 p.m. Pat Evans, 305-
621-0825.

*****k***
Greater Harvest Interna-
tional Ministries will hold or-
dination services for its pastor,
Gerald T. Ealey, who will be-
come a bishop, Sunday, March
22. 954-607-0833.

Please Note: Community
calendar events and church
notes must be submitted be-
fore noon on Monday.


Admission will be $12 per per-
son and kids 13 and under are
free. For more info, call Lil Rev
at 305-693-9336 or 305-803-
6806. 1555 N.W. 93th Terrace


This is good teaching, that a
person should never despair in
faith, for we can not know what
suffering, problems and trou-
bles he or she may be in.
From the desk of:
W.R. Williams


Services Department is cel-
ebrating National Consumer
Protection Week March 3 5
by presentations on foreclo-
sure rescue fraud and the free
services the department offers.
Presentations will be held 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, March 3, West
Flagler Branch Library in Mi-
ami; Wednesday, March 4,
West Kendall Regional Library;
and Thursday, March 5, North
Dade Regional Library in Mi-
ami Gardens


The 21st annual In the
Company of Women Awards
Ceremony will be held at the
Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables
on March 4. 305-358-5885.


The North Dade Regional
Chamber of Commerce will
hold a breakfast event at the El
Palacio Hotel on County Line
Road, 7:30-9 a.m., Thursday,
March 5. 305-690-9123.


Survivors against Violence
will provide information and
applications for expunging and
sealing of criminal records, 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, March


7, Brewton's Market. Eric Rob-
inson, 954-548-4323, Carleen
Robinson, 954-549-0474.

*** *****
Switchboard of Miami Inc.
will hold its annual gala, "Hoo-
ray for Hollywood," at the Four
Seasons Hotel, 7-11 p.m., Sat-
urday, March 14. 305-358-
1640 ext. 114 or email: pgold-
berg@switchboardmiami.org.

*********
World Literacy Crusade/
Girl Power Program will pres-
ent its sixth annual "It Takes
A Village Conference: Improv-
ing Our World One Girl at a
Time," 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Satur-
day, March 21, American Le-
gion Hall. 305-756-5502.

**** *
Carol City Middle School
will hold a Youth Crime Watch
Parade at 9:30 a.m. March 27
at the school.

********
Miami Gardens will host
its fourth annual "Jazz in the
Gardens" concert Saturday,
March 28, and Sunday, March
29, at Dolphin Stadium. 305-
576-3790.


Services
Primary Care Physician
Laboratory
Gynecology
Diagnostic Ultrasound
EKG Electrocardiogram
ECHO- Echocardiogram
X-Rays
A Comprehensive
Chiropractic Service Center
a r-: Rfln -nn - --A


The fourth annual 5K
Walk/ Run for Asthma will
take place at Miami Metrozoo,
8 a.m., Saturday, April 18.
305-233-4594.

********
Sant La Haitian Neighbor-
hood Center is hosting its
annual dinner and auction
at the Hilton in downtown
Miami, 5:30 p.m., Thursday,
April 23. 305-573-4871, kev-
inb@santla.org.


Miami Jackson High Class
of 1979 will hold its 30th an-
nual reunion with a week of
events highlighted by a trip to
Montego Bay, Jamaica. The
festivities will be June 5-14.
Louis Fish, president, 954-
895-5441; Carol Jones, secre-
tary, 786-566-3751.

********
Miami Northwestern High
Class of 1999 will meet at the
Northwestern library, 10 a.m.,
March 7. The class reunion will
be held Jun. 4-7. 305-788-8196
or email: faridataylor@bell-
south.net.


* Massage Therapy
* Free Concierge Style
Transportation with
Private Vehicle
* Activity Center
* Education
* Exercise Program
* Nutrition
* Free Osteoporosis screenings
for anyone over 60


You Are Cordiall Invied


to the, Gran d O *nCl 0bato of


* rFain iviianait iiigie

Listen to our show on OWBM4 1490o AM. Saturday at 12:30 pm


Call today for more information:


305-403-4003


Health First Medical Center

Maximum Quality Medical Care for our Community

Docto 'rsBndSStafwit yers of Expein


I


I










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1r7 THF MIAMI TIMFS FFRRIIAPRV 2-MARCH 3.200 9 l


ILY IIArIVIklrs I IIillLr I L Ull C UV I Unlc II SV un Iru


Yearbook reports decline in Catholics and Southern Baptists


Special to The Miami Times

The 77th annual edition of
the Yearbook of American & Ca-
nadian Churches, long a highly
regarded chronicler of growth
and financial trends of religious
institutions, records a slight but
startling decline in membership
of the nation's largest Christian
communions.
Membership in the Roman
Catholic Church declined 0.59
percent and the Southern Bap-
tist Convention, declined 0.24
percent, according to the 2009
edition of the Yearbook, edited by
the National Council of Churches
and published by Abingdon.
The figures indicate that the
Catholic church lost 398,000
members since the appearance
of the 2008 Yearbook. Southern
Baptists lost nearly 40,000 mem-
bers.
Both membership figures were
compiled by the churches in 2007
and reported to the Yearbook in
2008.
Neither figure is earth-shatter-
ing, given the sizes of the church-
es. Roman Catholics comprise
the nation's largest church, with
a membership of 67,117,016, and
Southern Baptists rank second,
at 16,266,920.
But this year's reported decline
raises eyebrows because Catholic
and Southern Baptist member-
ship has grown dependably over
the years. Now they join virtually
every mainline church in report-
ing a membership decline.
According to the 2009 Yearbook,
among the 25 largest churches
in the U.S., four are growing:
the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints, up 1.63 per-
cent to 5,873,408; the Assem-
blies of God, up 0.96 percent to


2,863,265; Jehovah's Witnesses,
up 2.12 percent to 1,092,169;
and the Church of God of Cleve-
land, Tenn., up 2.04 percept to
1,053,642.
There are no clear-cut theo-
logical or sociological reasons for
church growth or decline, says
Yearbook Editor Lindner.
"Many churches are feeling the
impact of the lifestyles of younger
generations of church-goers --
the "Gen X'ers" or "Millennials" in
their 20s and 30s who attend and
support local congregations but
resist joining them," said Lindner
But former Southern Baptist
President Frank Page told the As-
sociated Press that the decline in
his denomination was troubling
because of the Southern Baptist
emphasis on winning souls.
Page called on Southern Bap-
tists to "recommit to a life of lov-
ing people and ministering to
people without strings attached
so people will be more open to
hearing the Gospel message."
Lindner writes: "A slowing of the
rate of growth of some churches
and the decline of membership
of others ought to be the focus of
continued research and thought-
ful inquiry."
Churches listed in the Year-
book as experiencing the highest
rate of membership loss are the
United Church of Christ, down
6.01 percent; the African Method-
ist Episcopal Zion Church, down
3.01 percent; the Presbyterian
Church (USA, down 2.79 percent;
the Lutheran Church Missouri
Synod, down 1.44 percent; and
the Evangelical Lutheran Church
in America, down 1.35 percent.
American Baptist. Churches
USA, on the other hand, cut its
previous decline rate of 1.82 per-
cent in half, now reporting a de-


dine of 0.94 percent.
Membership of the top 25
churches in the U.S. totals
146,663,972, down 0.49 per-
cent from last year's total of
147,382,460.
The top 25 churches reported
in the 2009 Yearbook are in or-
der of size: The Roman Catho-
lic Church, 67,117,06 members,
down 0.59 percent.
The Southern Baptist Con-
vention, 16,266,920 members,
down 0.24 percent.
The United Methodist Church,
7,931,733 members, down 0.80
percent.
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints, 5,873,408
members, up 1.63 percent.
The Church of God in Christ,
5,499,875 members, no change
reported.
National Baptist Convention,
U.S.A., Inc., 5,000,000 members,
no change reported.
Evangelical Lutheran Church
in America, 4,709,956 members,
down 1.35 percent.
National Baptist Convention
of America Inc., 3,500,000 mem-
bers, no change reported.
Presbyterian Church (USA),
2,941,412 members, down 2.79
percent
Assemblies of God, 2,863,265
members, up 0.96 percent.
(Ranked 10)
African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 2,500,000 members, no
change reported.
National Missionary Bap-
tist Convention of America,
2,500,000 members, no change
reported
Progressive National Bap-
tist Convention, Inc., 2,500,000
members, no change reported.
The Lutheran Church -'Mis-
souri Synod (LCMS), 2,383,084


members, down 1.44 percent.
The Episcopal Church,
2,116,749 members, down 1.76
percent.
Churches of Christ, 1,639,495
members, no change reported.
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese
of America, 1,500,000 members,
no change reported.
Pentecostal Assemblies of the
World, Inc., 1,500,000 members,


no change reported.
The African Methodist Epis-
copal Zion Church, 1,400,000
members, down 3.01 percent.
American Baptist Churches
in the USA, 1,358,351, down
0.94 percent.
Baptist Bible Fellowship
International, 1,200,000, no
change reported
United Church of Christ,


1,145,281 members, down 6.01
percent.
Jehovah's Witnesses,
1,092,169 members, up 2.12
percent (Ranked 23)
Christian Churches and
Churches of Christ, 1,071,616
members, no change reported.
Church of God (Cleveland,
Tenn.), 1,053,642 members, up
2.04 percent.


0 Miami-b ade Seniors:


Let's get ready NOW!


What Is The Digital TV (DTV) Transition?
Currently, many over-the-air stations are broadcasting in both analog and digital TV formats. After
June 2009, full-power TV stations will broadcast only in digital. The DTV transition will affect those
who watch free over-the-air television (through a rooftop antenna or "rabbit ears"). If you watch
over-the-air programs on an analog TV, you must take action before June 2009. You should
also know that some stations may still switch on February 17th.

What Should I Do to Be Ready? You have three options:
1. Connect your analog TV to a digital-to-analog converter box. Digital-to-analog converter
boxes are in stores and have a one-time cost of $40-$70. To help you pay for the boxes, the U.S.
Government is offering two $40 coupons per household. (Please note that these coupons will expire
90 days after mailing). For more information on the coupons, visit www.DTV2009.gov.Or
2. Buy a digital television (a,TV with a built-in digital tuner). You do not need a High Definition
TV (HDTV) to watch digital broadcast television. You only need a digital TV (or an analog TV con-
nected to a digital-to-analog converter box). Or
3. Subscribe to a paid TV service. If your TV set receives local broadcast stations through a paid
provider such as cable br satellite TV, it is already prepared for the DTV transition. Cable compa-
nies are not required to transition or switch any of their channels to digital. However, if you have an
analog TV that does not receive local broadcast stations through your paid provider, you will need a
digital-to-analog converter box to watch digital broadcasts on that TV.


* ax
.' ~


Should I wait until June to take action?
No! Digital television is available now, so enjoy the benefits now. Benefits include more channels,
better quality picture and sound, menu guides and more. The Alliance for Aging can help you get
started now!
How can the Alliance for Aging Help me? \ /
If you are 60 or older, we can help you in the following ways:
1. We can help you evaluate your need for a converter box. .
2. We can help you apply for a coupon. ..
3. We can delivery your'converter box. e ~f
4. We can install the converter box in your home.

For more information, please call the Elder Helpline a 1-800-963-5337.


- --- The Episcopal Church of
1The Transfiguration
15260 NW 1911 Avenue
305-681-1660
m Church Schedule:
Sunday Services
r 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 am.
Si ~-Healing Senice
Second Wednesday 7 p.m.


Antioch Missionary Baptis
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
C:lnuch 'Suiday Schwo .... 8.30 a.m,
Sunday Worship Sirvie .... 10 a.m
Mid-Week Senvce .... Wvednecday's


Hour of Power-Noon Day Prayer
12 p.m.- p.m.
Evening Wormlip... 7 p.i


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
WW.ffiia & plbcjiaorg
Fri .ndeshipryr ibo h.nCt
740M N.W. 5ti Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875

l- nl, :.l.iiuii, '* u~i-lui. a m.
,' I i- nL.


I ., ir1. 'l, 1 i [ r i. m .



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
,"." Sunday
*: v i Chltrcth Schlooll ..,!,...... .30 a.nl
Wohip ervic ........... .m.
'Tr, i Wednesday
SUible Study[Prayer Night 7 p m
Thursday
"Thre is 1 place for you "



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2(X)1 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order ofServices:
Sunday Morning Senices
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9-45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 am. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.



Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
Srutlaiv Schol ...9 30 an t
SIru1,y Worship. 1 a n
FHstl Suol;iy hvcilnug Warihip
Mid We-k SCriic, ... 7 p. L
Choir Rhllar al hliuralay
7:30 p mi.


/Apostolic Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time for TV. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
UiL ,CLI.C'K3 / CO cA IrCH.
S.9.a.m.3 p.m.i Suday 5 p.m.
SWed Itere iai Praye r9 .m. 12 pi
SMonlin Seivice ..............
Sun Eve. Worship ........30po
Ii Hible Sty ........... c 0 p I.




First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday......... 30& I a.
Sunday School0............... 10 .m.
Thursday....... 7 p.m. Bible Study.
P cray MoCting. B.T.U.
Bapism Thurs. before
First Sun..7 p. n.
SColnuumon First Sun....
S7:30 & 11 a.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
--^n
Order of Services:
S' Morning WorN llip..st & 3rd Sun.
Sri ngy Wll hip ...... o...... 10:0 l. ,
S I sight M inisry....... ......6 p. .
S i" ayer Service................... 7 .0 p.m.
t. W tl Stu dy... ..........................8 p.m.


Temple Missionary -
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060.Fax 305-255-8,54
Order of Services:
Sunday School... .453 a ti
Sun lMoring Ser's. al iiu
4' Sun.. BTU. .1:30-2:30 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study
Fccding MNistly 10o a in
Wed. Bible Study.Playct'..6 30 p .a
Thu r Oilmachl Minit. () 30 p ni


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
SunSayy
. I nu n Worshipat 8 & 11 a.m.
.0 i .y School at 9:45a.im.
SThursday
ible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service



S Word of Faith
Christian Center
S2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081


Order of Services:
J..t lay Morning Services
4'i. Jjy School............. 10 a.m.
WVi'.r hp Service............ I I a.l.
'Tu,.ljy Bible Studly.....,S p.m.
iiwub'd. Prayer Service....... p.m.


2300 NW 135th Stret
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.n
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.nm.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


S New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 761' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Senices:
Sundays- Clmaid Schol........... a.m.
Worship Seviee .......... I 15 a .
'fTsdays Bille Cla. ....7 pu
41 Sunday ireninmg Worshp 6 p m


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Matin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thnus.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-l11 a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 am.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305.6853700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.nlewbirthbaptlstiniami.org


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
---" Ea.r\ Sunday
d hB M.NIlluuigL 'u;-.hip .....7:30 a.m.
I'unJd i hiol ..........9:30 a.m.
N P n'*lu;" %,-rship ...II a.m.
S.. .. I p,-,.. ,,.mnhble Study
MTine (Tules.) 7 p.m.




Zion Hope '\
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order or Services:
iSunday School ........9.30 am.
Moming Prais/Wa~rslip ..11 aa.m
Rst aud Tlirl Satuay
verning wtship at 6p.m.
f., ayer Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 pan.
Trop.,ommo V.I Awilade fir Sundlly
tMormng Warap. OCll 30.5-83-R90.


S93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93" Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
730 ajn. atty Moming Worship
It am. ..Morning Worslip
Evening Worship
Ist &3rdSunday........6 pm
tssday Bible Shy..- 7p ,p
S wdnite: aibcn.rg
\.^^^^^^^^^^^^ _y ,q~~l ]]]iiim]


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

S Eady Morning biship 7:30 am.
S o Chttah School 9:30 am.
S Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
eI l, before the la Sun....? pm.
Mid-week Worship


Brownsville \ /Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church / Liberty City Church
Church of Christ 17800 NW 25th Ave. of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court wwtvw.mthemnonworihdipenler.org 126-3 NAV 67th Street
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages 305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-31042 305 836-55
305-634-6604 Order of Services: 305-836-455
Order of Senrices . Sunday Worship ServicMs O
mL il :;h.vi ...'9:45am 7 am. & 10 a.m. Sunday Moming...........8 am.
aili i...nii. -A.. e' .i ia' It ani. Sinrlti school.............l0 a.
,A* 5-' r n' rg. pan. .-. Chium.h Scl ool a30a.m. .............. 6p.m.
S:aisliir..r LM.oInle naa^...Sp.o. B ..- V edesdav a\, rI [ weleiin 7: -V. Um.
sn.hb Latn:; ro" 5. n.1",'..5 pa aedm o vt \],'qi E\cellendce ........ 7:
.Li :, Ia ic. 'v .b p ....... p.m. Pstor's Noon Day Bible Sniy I 3 BieblI .........7:30p.m
,a ." Nll "t n ....:3O Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m. Thu Fcllowship........ m
mi n ria.i o a..la.tl Cal: Mid week Woaship 7:30 p.m. I Sun Song Practice ..6 p.m.
305g4.1-4S50 ..5t91-69S_


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sivtilay School............9:45 aiin

Vn 51il p.,-.lUIlnn.
I B.li'e1iie` il],tl.'I 7tl I. p
Is b i'niU l ii.p] l'iyM c.-\ju .h
on=; p.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

SE Order of Servic i:
Early Moming Wrasip.7:30an.
Stmday School ..........9:30am.
Moming Worship ...11 am.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ........ P.......8 pm.


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday ":30 and 11 I.m.
Worship Service
i 9;:0 ia.mn......... Slmday School
'lesdny.......7 p.m. Bible Study
Sp.m........Prayer Meeti
I Monday. Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m.a......ly Prayer



New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. If0" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
H-atly Sumday Worship..,7:30 a.mn
Sunday School ................930 am.
s Mxon gAtir'ap 11 am
Sl u'day Fvening Service. 6 pm.
Te utay Payer felting ..30. pmn
tedesday Bible Stly .. 730pm.
"Not Jlt j a liurch Biul a Movement"


Bible Teaching Seminar
8620 N.W 17th Ave.
Miami, FL. 33147
954-735-9393


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship........ 2:45 pm.
live snacks afler service
Return transxltation available


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


SPembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56thAventle Iollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954.962-9327 (Fax) 954962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. **'* Morning Worship .............10 a.m. -
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Stukdy ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcasl Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: wwvw.pembrokoparkclnirchofchrist.com .Email: pembrokeparkcoc@bellsouth.net


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The Miami Times





Hea th


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


Odette Gilpin-Dixon, a nursing student, performs a blood pressure screening on Olga Garcia
during a health fair at Miami Dade College's Medical Center Campus on Feb. 14.


Cholesterol and glucose screening tests were performed during a health fair at Miami Dade
College's Medical Center Campus on Feb. 14.


Residents get free screenings at MDC health fair


By Sylvia Mitchell
Miami Times Writier


, What better way to say "I Love
You" to all the people you care
about on Valentine's Day than
by taking your blood pressure,
or cholesterol screenings to-
gether?
Couples and families turned
out when Miami Dade College's
Medical Center Campus hosted
a free health fair on Feb. 14,
offering services ranging from
health screenings to smoking
cessation information.
The Jessie Trice Community
Health Center, Health Connect
and Borinquen Health Care
Center were among organiza-
tions on hand to provide par-,


ticipants with education and
information in English, Span-
ish and Creole on a variety of
healthcare issues.
Corporate sponsors such as
Aetna and Florida Pharmacy
Association have helped MDC
to accomplish its goal of show-
casing health screening ser-
vices and educational activities
that lead to a healthier lifestyle
and overall well-being for those
who might not otherwise get
regular medical attention.
A unique component of this
year's health fair was that phy-
sicians, pharmacists and other
health care professionals were
on hand to follow-up with those
whose health screening results
raised concerns.


Dr. Karina Baesso and a
team of medical student doc-
tors from Barry University,
which partners with MDC each
year to bring health fairs to the
community, stressed the im-
portance of foot care of diabet-
ics.
"Because diabetics have dif-
ficulty healing and have bad
circulation, it is important for
them to have foot screenings
every two months and to check
their own feet and shoes every
single day," Baesso said. "Feet
should be checked for calluses
and blisters; shoes should be
washed, just in case pebbles
or other hard debris is trapped
in them, which could lead to a
skin injury."


Norman Tomaka, president, along with pharmacy students consultations for health fair
and Bert Martinez, president- from Nova Southeastern Uni- participants regarding their
elect, of the Florida Pharmacy versity and the University of glucose and or cholesterol
Association, also showed up, Florida to provide one-on-one readings.


Report says time is right


to step up AIDS fight


Obama White House is expected to


play a crucial role
Special to The Miami Times

The Black AIDS Institute's
annual report "State of AIDS in
Black America" lays out both
the promise and the peril of this
period.
On one hand, the historic
election of Barack Obama and
a congressional majority that
has been more supportive of the
AIDS fight offer great opportu-
nity. Similarly, Black America is
engaged in the struggle to end
AIDS like never before. Togeth-
er, these two realities could cre-
ate real, lasting change in the
course of this epidemic.
At the same time, 2008 wit-
nessed great setbacks, particu-
larly in the effort to prevent the
virus from spreading spread.
The results of many years of ne-
glect, at both the governmental


against disease
and communal level, are now
being seen.
Meanwhile, in 2008, the U.S.
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention released a study re-
examining the size and depth of
the epidemic.

NEW TECHNOLOGY
Using new technology that al-
lows researchers to learn more
detail about individual HIV in-
fections, the CDC discovered,
among other things:
The epidemic is at least 40
percent bigger than previously
believed and growing by be-
tween 55,000 and 58,000 infec-
tions a year.
Black Americans represent-
ed 45 percent of people newly
infected in 2006, despite being
13 percent of the U.S. popula-
tion.


Men who have sex with men
accounted for 53 percent of
all new infections in 2006 and
young Black men were particu-
larly hard affected.
A racial disparity in AIDS
deaths continued in data re-
leased last year:
In 2006, the latest year for
which data was available,
7,426 Black Americans died
from AIDS. That number rep-
resented a meaningful improve-
ment over the previous year,
reflecting a decline of 1,253
deaths.
But Blacks continued to rep-
resent a far outsized proportion
of deaths each year. In 2006,
Blacks accounted for just over
half of all AIDS deaths.

NOT ENOUGH FUNDING
The study showed federal
commitment to all areas of
AIDS -- prevention, treatment
and research -- had all but dis-
appeared.
Please turn to AIDS 14B


1 in 4 Women


Will Die of


Heart Disease


Don't Let It Be You!


Give us 15 minutes. It could save your life.


* Get a FREE screening and counseling
* Learn from medical, nutrition and fitness experts
* Enjoy raffle prizes and door prizes
* Discover lifestyle changes that matter

Bring your sister, mother, friend and coworker.
Register on-line, www.sistertosister.org or call
305-529-9506.


Carrie R Meek, U.S. Congresswoman (retired)
Co-Chair, Miami Campaign


SISTER To SISTER
The Women's Heart Health Foundation
Helping each other live longer, live better.


South Miami
Heart Center
BAPTIST
HEALTH


BlueCross BlueShield
of Florida
%On44~~t4


MIAMI DE
=-DM


ANA d a Publix. X sir


CURP(I A O N &1 L(


I


I


f lorlda h~eart 0









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


0 TUc rlAIAlMI TIMEC ECDDIIADV LAADCI h 'l; o M


14D IflE IIHIVII 111 ., Irt llU/IK1l D.i-lVinui3i l LUUv




Little Haiti health clinic expands services


Miami Times Staff Report

The Miami Beach Commu-
nity Health Center's clinic
known as the Center for Hai-
tian Studies is expanding to
focus on community needs,
including prenatal care and
chronic disease education,
management, counseling
and testing.
The expansion is made pos-
sible through the support
of The Blue Foundation for
a Healthy Florida, philan-
thropic arm of Blue Cross


and Blue Shield of Florida.
The Miami Beach institution
opened the clinic in August
2007 in response to it said
were soaring poverty rate,
high death rates from AIDS
and tuberculosis and need
for nearby and affordable
health care services in Little
Haiti.
"Prior to this grant, the need
for affordable primary health
services in Little Haiti far ex-
ceeded local resource capac-
ity," said Kathryn Abbate,
chief executive officer of the


This is a view of the Center for Haitian Studies clinic.


Miami Beach Community
Health Center. "We expect
the overall health of this
community to improve now
that there will be increased
access to health care servic-
.es."
"Little Haiti is an extreme-
ly underserved and under-
insured community," said
Susan Towler, executive di-
rector of The Blue Founda-
tion for a Healthy Florida.
"Without access to afford-
able health services, many
community members would


go without care. We're proud
to partner with an organiza-
tion making such a positive
impact on this in-need com-
munity."
The clinic is located at 8260
NE Second Ave., and is open
from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Fridays.
The contact number is 305-
538-8835 ext. 1700.
For more information on the
Miami Beach Community
Health Center, call 305-538-
8835 or log on to www.mia-
mibeachhealth.org.


For cervical cancer disease, knowledge and actions are power


It is a form of cancer that
has taken a devastating toll on
African-American women, and
other women of color. It is of-
ten a slow-growing cancer that
can "sneak" up on its victims
because it does not cause any
symptoms. And, yet, it can be
prevented and cured by early
detection.
It is cervical cancer.
As Cervical Cancer Aware-
ness Month has just come to a
close, African-American women
everywhere are still being en-
couraged to learn more about
the disease and how they can


take action to protect them-
selves.
The first thing you need to
know regarding cervical can-
cer is that the risk of this dis-
ease can be decreased, and
the chances of surviving it in-
creased, through early detec-
tion tests. Without hesitation,
you should take steps to pro-
tect yourself by having regular
screening with the Papanicolau
(Pap) test used to find changes
in cells of the cervix. It can find
problems that can be treated
before they turn into cervical
cancer. A Pap test also can find


cancer early. If cervical can-
cer is found early, it's easier to
treat.
If your Pap test results are
uriclear, your doctor may want
to perform an HPV test. Almost
all cervical cancers are caused
by viruses called HPVs (hu-
man papillomavirus). Having
an HPV test is like having a Pap
test. In fact, the same samples
that are used for the Pap test
can often be used for the HPV
test. If you are age 30 or over,
talk with your doctor to learn if
you should receive regular HPA
tests in addition to your regular


Pap tests.
In addition to having regular
screenings for cervical cancer,
you can take steps to reduce
the chance of getting HPV which
is sexually transmitted, and its
spread can be reduced by con-
doms.
Also, women aged 26 and
younger can now be vaccinated
against two types of
HPV that are known to cause
most cervical cancers, thanks
to a relatively new vaccine, Gar-
dasil.
By taking decisive action to
prevent cervical cancer, many


women have saved their own
lives: mothers, daughters, sis-
ters, aunts, wives, and friends
and neighbors.
Taking preventive action can
make a real difference -- be-
tween life and death. Quite sim-
ply, screening has had a defi-
nite impact on lowering cervical
cancer mortality rates. In the
last 30 years, cervical cancer
incidence and death rates have
dropped by half, including for
African American women. But
African American women still
have a cervical cancer death
rate that is double the White


rate.
If anything should spur
young African American
women into action to protect
themselves against cervi-
cal cancer, it should be the
statistics. There are about
11,000 new'cases and 3,800
deaths from cervical cancer
each year.
To learn more about the Pap
test, log on to www.cancer.
gov/cancertopics/ pap-tests-
things-to-know). To learn more
about the HPV vaccine, log on
to www.cancer.gov/cancertop-
ics/hpv-vaccines.


Health fair will alert women to be wary of heart disease


Special to The Miami Times

You may be surprised to learn
that the leading cause of death
among women in the United
States isn't cancer. It's heart dis-
ease. Each year, nearly twice as
many women die of cardiovascu-
lar disease than from all forms of
cancer combined.
"The bad news is that heart dis-
ease kills one out of three Ameri-
can women," said Carol Biggs,
vice president of the South Miami
Heart Center. "The good news.is
that women can lower their risk of
heart disease by up to 82 percent
by making simple lifestyle changes


James L. Knight Center, 400 SE
2nd Ave. in downtown Miami.
This annual event is presented by
Sister to Sister Foundation and
South Miami Heart Center. It will
once again feature engaging pre-
sentations in English, Spanish
and Creole on medical, nutritional,
fitness and lifestyle topics.
A key step will be the oft-repeated
"Know your numbers." Fair at-


ors from Florida Heart' Research
Institute, Miami Dade College's
Medical Campus. and Florida In-
ternational University will explain
test results and offer suggestions
on what participants can do to
lower risk factors and how to
adopt a heart-healthy lifestyle.
More than 50 exhibitors, raffles
and giveaways add to the fun.
Former Congresswoman Car-


The Women's Heart Health Fair will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
friday, March 6, at the at the James L. Knight Center, 400 SE 2nd
Ave. in downtown Miami. For more information, call 305-529-9507
or log on to sistertosister.org/miami.


such as eating smarter, exercising tendees can be screened and learn rie Meek, who is serving as co-
and not smoking." their cholesterol, triglycerides, chairman of the campaign for the
Women in the Miami area should blood glucose levels, blood pres- fifth year, is enthusiastic about
take 15 minutes to get free screen- sure, BMI (body mass index)-and helping women focus on them-
ings with on-the-spot results at waist circumference and discuss selves. "Women do so much for
the Women's Heart Health Fair set their family health history at the their families and friends. It's
for 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. free screenings. time they take care of their own
Friday, March 6, at the at the Medical screeners and counsel- hearts," Meek said. "Getting a


Abraham Thomas publishes new book


Murderer by Abraham J.
Thomas 'is the latest publica-
tion of the local writer who
gave us the enjoyable series
about Skeeter.
The novel is a thriller packed
with suspense. Its vivid detail
grabs the reader right from
the start. It is compelling, poi-
gnant and reflects sincere car-
ing for the human condition.
Thomas bares his soul in
what is, perhaps, his best of-
fering to date. A writer with
keen ability to communicate
thoughts and feelings to the
reader, Thomas is the author
of several books. Murderer is
dedicated to his late friend,
Lonnie A. Pollack, whose
murder in 1979 remains "un-


solved. pie must stay away from be-
"I think the messages are havior which make them run
clear and relevant," afoul of the criminal
Thomas said of his new justice system.
work. "I hope that a lot "I've witnessed
of people will have the some horrific scenes
opportunity to read at our juvenile and
the book, especially adult courts. I'm dog-
our young people who gedly pushing to get
are, often daily, con- this book into the
fronted by many criti- I schools, into homes
cal issues." and into our lock-
Thomas believes THOMAS up facilities so that
that youth are vulner- people will be guided
able and need fnuch to avoid such hor-
from adults. He says he is al- rors; not only for now but
ways.trying to find new ways throughout their entire lives,"
to impress upon youth that he said.
they must hold on to hope and For information on how to
cherish becoming educated. obtain a copy of Murderer,
He also believes young peo- call 305-621-3013.,


heart screening may be the best
15 minutes they ever spent."
At Sister to Sister Women's Heart
*Health Fairs held .nationwide in
2007, more than 40 percent of
the 9,795 women screened found
out that they had two or more
risk factors for heart disease. A
"significant number" of them had
been unaware of this before the
screening.
The. local presenting partner is
South Miami Heart Center. Gold
Heart partners include Miami-
Dade County and BlueCross
and BlueShield of Florida. Silver
Heart partners are Cruise Indus-
try Charitable Foundation, Carni-
val Corporation, Kellogg's, Pubhx,
SOBeFiT Magazine, Florida Heart
Research Institute and Beckman
Coulter. Bronze heart sponsors
include. United Way, Amadeus,
the city of Miami and Miami Park-
ing Authority.


-p. f ,J b g~ b e' *
V*lArOW rid te ^*

*w I welg 4 0 low







"Copyrighted Material
-Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


28th pastoral anniversary at Christian Fellowship


The members of Chris-
tian Fellowship Missionary
Church, 8100 N.W. 17 Av-
enue, would like to invite you
to the celebration of their Pas-
tor, Reverend Charles E. Cole-
.man's 28th pastoral anniver-
sary.
The celebration is as sched-
uled, on Friday February 27,
Rev. Frazier Arnold, Pas-
tor, Mt. Olive Primitive Bap-
tist Church. Monday, March
2, Rev. Larry Lovett, Pastor,
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville. Tues-
day, March 3, Rev. Gregory
Thompson, Pastor, Greater
New Harvest Baptist Church.
Wednesday, March 4, Rev.
Douglas Cook, Pastor, Jor-


JI.___________________________


Baltimore native set to be first Black math Ph.D. at FAU


Mary Hopkins doesn't see
herself as smart. She says
this even as she finishes a
talk on advanced mathe-
matical principles at Florida
Atlantic University that in-
cludes words such as nu-
merical monoids and finite
polynomials.
Hopkins, 36, will graduate
this school year with a math
doctorate from FAU one of
five math Ph.D.s that are
expected to go to, the larg-
est class of women in the
school's history.


Hopkins is unusual for an-
other reason.
She also will be the first
Black woman to earn a doc-
torate in math from FAU and
only the third among all state
universities since at least
1990.
When told of her pending
place in FAU's record books,
she said she was "kind of
aware of it" a modesty that
extends to her assessment of
her algebraic ability.
"I just had very encourag-
ing teachers," said Hopkins,


MARY HOPKINS


who spent a full hour last
week working out a lengthy
math question in front of her
classmates and professors.
The gathering is a regular
occurrence in FAU's math
department, where cookies
and coffee come with lessons
in cryptography.
FAU awarded its first doc-
torate in math in 1992. Since
then it has given out 15 math
doctorates only three of
them to women.
From the Palm Beach Post
Staff Writer


Killer disease still affects Black men the most


AIDS
continued from 13B

The CDC's annual HIV-pre-
vention budget never -topped
$800 million.
The prevention budget has
been cut by 20 percent in the past
five years, in real dollar terms.
The CDC spent just under


$369 million on Black-specific
prevention and research in fis-
cal year 2008 or 49 percent of
the overall budget.
Between 2004 and 2008,
the discretionary domestic
AIDS budget remained virtu-
ally flat, while global spend-
ing increased by more than
20 percent annually.


The study concluded that
while the challenges were
great, Black America was per-
haps better poised to meet
them today than ever before.
It noted the new Obama ad-
ministration has vowed to
take action on several fronts,
including drafting America's
first comprehensive strategy


to direct the efforts against
AIDS.
It noted also that the Black
community was engaged like
never before, from individu-
als up to traditional organiza-
tions, the idea that this is was
a Black problem for which
Blacks must find the solution
had been accepted.


dan Grove Missionary Bap-
tist Church. Thursday, March
5, Rev. Calvin Davis, Pastor,
Friendship Missionary Baptist
Church of Boca Raton. Friday,
March 6, Rev. Charles Jones,
Pastor, New Jerusalem of Hol-
lywood. Sunday, March 8,
7:30 a.m., Elder Willie Thom-
as, Pastor, Believer's Temple.
Sunday, March 8, 10:45 a.m.,
Rev. Russell Harris, Pastor,
Mt. Olive Missionary Baptist
Church of South Miami. Sun-
day March-8, 4 p.m., Rev. Ran-
dall Holt, Pastor, New Hope
Missionary Baptist Church.
Just choose any night to
hear some dynamic preach-
ing. Again, we invite you to
come out.


I


REV. CHARLES E. COLEMAN


UI RN 11501 NW 27th Ave.
Ph: 305-688-30074I-
COFFEE 6 SMOOTHIE' L
SMOOTHIE &. -'
c SANDWICHX-# '1"



WI TH THIS AD
WIT THIr\D


6807 N. W. 7 AVE.

For personal, caring, affordable and exquisite
service for your loved one, during your
hours of bereavement.

DWIGHT BOOTLE LFD/E 305-754-4286


------------


----------------~









15B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH5, 2009


BLA CKS 51MUST CONT ROL ITIHIEIR OW\N DESTINY


Van Orsdel
CORENE RICHARDSON, 82,
died February -
17. Service 3
p.m. Tuesday,
in the chapel.


Royal -
LORNA HALL, 53, medical
clerk, died February 19. Visitation
Friday, 17, 5 p.m. until 9 p.m., at
church. Service 11 a.m.,Saturday,
North Dade Pentecostal Church.

VIOLET LAMEY, 82, dress
maker, died February 18. Visitation
Friday, 4 p.m. until 9 p.m. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Grace Church
of The First Born.

ANNIE BRANTLEY, 73, house-
keeper, died February 17. Service
11 a.m., Wednesday, Dade Memo-
rial Park, North.

KENNETH HALL, 63, carpen-
ter, died February 17. Visitation
Friday, 4 p.m. until 9 p.m. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Norland United
Methodist Church.

MERLINA CARTER, 68, house-
keeper, died February 16. Visi-
tation Friday, 4 p.m. until 9 p.m.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday in the
chapel.

FELIX OSUJI, 80, biology pro-
fessor, died February 19. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

JOE SUMMERSET JR., 53,
cook, died February 13. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Manker -
VIRGINIA MCCALLISTER, 59,
died February 18 at North Shore
Medical Center. Service 12 p.m.,
Saturday, Mount Olive Fire Baptist
Church.

St Fort
LEGEN FABRE, 87, farmer,
died February 16 at home. Final
rites and burial in Haiti.

RAYMOND PIQUION, 69, radio
host, died February 15 at Brooke
Hospital. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Holy Family Catholic Church.


Mitchell -
KERRY JEROME ROBINSON,
46, cook, died
February 19
at Mount Sinai
Hospital, Sur-
vivors include:
sister, Patre-
"nia Robinson-
Thomas; broth-
ers, Willie,
Samuel and Terry; companion,
Minerva Font. Service 3 p.m. Sat-
urday in the chapel.

Pax Villa-
AKIM SANON, 17, student, died
February 19. Service was held.


Mason
BEN JOSEPH MAZARD, 64,
died February 22, at North Shore
Hospital. Survivors include: wife
Marie; sons, Carl Henry, Bradley
and Nesly Prophete; daughters,
Carline Mazard-Caya (Richard)
and Roseann Mazard-Stallworth
(Gerald); brothers, Ansenio and
Daniel Joseph; sisters, Oxanne
Madeus and Eline Mareus. Wake
7 p.m., Friday in the Chapel. Inter-
ment: South Memorial Park.

Paradise Memorial
LATRECIA GRIFFIN, 35, died
February 18. Service 1 p.m., Sat-
urday in the chapel.

JAMES JONES, 76, died Febru-
ary 21. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Holy Ghost Tabernacle of Deliver-
ance Ministry.


Carey Royal Ram'n
JANET BRUNSON, 67, home-
maker, died February 19 at home.
Service 10 a.m., Thursday in the
chapel.

GREGORY HORACE, 77, re-
tired, died February 23 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Grace
KEVIN T. ROBY, 28, cook,
Shorty's, died
February 21.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the
Chapel.




ETHELINE SANDS, 80, house-
keeper, Fontainebleau Hotel, died
February 7, at North Shore Hospi-
tal. Service was held.

WELLINGTON R. GIBSON, 83,
retired maintenance worker, Wool-
worth, died February 18, at Memo-
rial Regional Hollywood. Service
was held.

YVROSE ST. VICTOR, 56, ma-
chine operator, Flamingo Prod-
ucts, died February 12. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, St. James Catholic
Church.

MATHIEU LOUIS-PIERRE, 66,
food handler, Sky Chef, died Feb-
ruary 19. Service 12 p.m., Satur-
day in the chapel.


Nakia Ingraham
CYNTHIA LLOYD, 51, died
February 18 at Broward General
Medical Center. Service 11 a.m.
Saturday, Antioch Baptist Church.

WILLIE NORIS OWENS, 55,
handyman, died February 18. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Saturday, in the cha-
pel.

MARIA SAENA, 94, died Feb-
ruary 21 at Westside Memorial. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

HELEN MONICA, 80, died Feb-
ruary 23 at Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

THELMA SMITH, 52, died Feb-
ruary 23 at Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Eric S. George
SHANNON HORTON, 47,
caretaker, died
February 18 at
Memorial Hos-
pital Pembroke.
Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday, Mt.
Calvary M. Bap-
tist Church.

DANIEL GORDON,. 46, land-
scaper, died February 12 at Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Service
11 a.m., Friday, Northwest Dade
Church of Christ.

CLEVELLA ALBERTIE, 29,
homemaker, died February 20 at
Memorial Regional Hospital. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Hallandale
Beach Church of Christ.

CORENE HASAN, 50, barber,
died February 16 at Athens Re-
gional Medical Center. Service 1
p.m., Saturday, Ebenezer M. Bap-
tist Church.

Hadleyi
FRANCES WALLACE, 72,
nurse, died Feb-
ruary 13 at West
Houston Hospi-
tal. Service ws
held.




JOHNNIE L. SHINHOSTER, 70,
died February
13 at Jackson
South. Service
was held.





FERRON FARRINGTON, 29,
bookkeeper,
died February
14 at Miramar
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service
was held.


Range
CHARLES F. BELL, 84, retired
truck driver, died February 22.
Viewing Wednesday, 2 p.m. until 7
p.m. Final rites and burial Satur-
day in Camilla, GA.


ruary 19. Sur-
vivors include:
parents, Ella
Buckley and
Joe; children,
Demetrius Jr.,
and Destiny;
siblings, Kath-
erine Gonzalez, Shandra Johnson
and Dominique. Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday in the chapel.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Poitier -
JONNIE MAE INGRAM, 58, died
February 18 at
home. Service
was held.







ALEX MONTGOMERY, 74, car
detailer, died February 19 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Richardson
SARAH WARREN, 74, house-
keeper, died
February 18.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Baptist
Church.



JAMES MINNIS JR., 65, entre-
preneur, died
February 22. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.






Hall Ferguson Hewitt
RUFUS RICHARDSON, 73,
retired truck
driver, died Feb-
ruary 23. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.





OLA JORDON, 82, assembly.
worker, died February 12 at North
Shore Hospice, Services was
held.

JOSH BROWN, 75, construc-
tion laborer, died February 22 at
Coral Hospice Arrangements are
incomplete.
Wright & Young
RONEY FRED JEFFERSON,
55, cook, died
February 19 at
University of
Miami Hospi-
tal. Survivors
include: wife,
Christine; moth-
er, Louise; chil-
dren, Daphne,
Brandy, Chante, LaRhonda, Ra-
shad, Dujauan; siblings, Henry
Jr., Andrew, James Paul, Melvin,
Alice and Cycloria. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, New Providence M. B.
Church.

HUREL S. DUHART A.K.A.
"SIDNEY DU-
HART", 86,
business CEO,
died Febru-
ary 20 at V.A.
Medical Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Sharon Duhart-
Davis, Gwendolyn Mazyck and
Deborah; siblings, Walter, Arthur,
Perry, Minnie, Henrietta, Cheri,
Flora and Aretha. Service 11a.m.,
Saturday, New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church.

ELIZABETH SPIVEY, 64, su-
pervisor, died
February 28
at Villa Maria
Nursing Home.
Survivors in-
clude: hus-
band, Tourist;
children, Larry
Grimes, Geneya
Harrison; grandchildren, Sabrina
Grimes, Cornelius, Larry Jr.; sib-
lings, Ellis McCullough, Jimmy,
Arthur, Robert, Flora McCullough
and Nita; daughter-in-law, Tracey
Coleman. Services 12 p.m., Satur-
day, in the chapel.

DEMETRIUS S. HOOKS, 28, la-
borer, died Feb-


E.A. Stevens .
LASANDRA BAKER, 41 cook,
died February 17 at Westside Re-
gional Hospital. Service was held.

VICTORIA S. SIMMONS, 26,
student, died February 18. Service
12 p.m., Saturday, Jordan Grove
Baptist.


Jay's =
JOE CORNELL, 66, park and
recreation work-
er, died February
20 at Aventura
Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Morn-
ing Star Baptist ,
Church.

ERNEST BYRANT, 64, custo-
dian, MDCPS died February 21 at
Jackson South
Community
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Com-
munity Faith
Church.

JOE SNOW, died February 23.
Arrangements
are incomplete.







ERIYANNA JEFFERSON, 9
months, died February 19 at Mi-
ami Children's Hospital. Service
1 p.m., Saturday, Beautiful Zion
Temple of God.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


QUINTON SCOTT, SR.
08/04/68 -02-20-06


Love always, your mother
Voilean Thurston, sons, sis-
ters and brothers.


In Memoriam


MARSHALL TILLMAN SR.
09/28/30 02/28/08

It has been one long year
since you were plucked from
our lives, but never from our
hearts and minds. Love is
stronger than death, yet death
cannot be stopped from hap-
pening. However, it can't sepa-
rate our love for you, and most
importantly it won't erase our
memories or time spent with
you. You will always hold a
key to our hearts.
Love Always, your wife DD,
and children; Tammy, Debra,
Marcello, and Keith.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


MR. JOHN PRESTON KING
01/07/48 02/25/07

Forever in our hearts, you
will never be forgotten.
Love always, your loving
wife, Patricia and the King
Family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,
~ii~uar-.s


DANIEL J. COX JR.
10/07/68 02/23/01


It has been eight years since
you left us. We love and miss
you!
The Cox Family





Honor Your


Loved One


With an


In Memorial


In The


Miami Times


RODNEY DEON RILEY SR.
02/23/70 02/26/08

Rodney you mean the world
to us. No matter what, you
will always have a part in our
hearts and we will always love
you.
Love your family, kids, Rod-
ney Jr, Deion, Deontae, Rod-
jane, mom, Wanda, sister,
April


Death Notice


.z

GRACE DELORIS JONES,
78, retired teacher, died
February 24. Survivors in-
clude: daughters, Beverly
Jones-Ranson, Cynthia, Daryl
Jones-Smith, and Latasha J.
Wright; son, Robert B.; sis-
ter, Jacqueline Smalls; eight
grandchildren; five great-
grandchildren; a host of other
relatives and friends. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Greater
Bethel A.M.E. Church. Ser-
vices entrusted to Range
Funeral Home.


IRENE GAINES-COPELAND
02/26/29 11/08/08

It's been three months, but
it seems like forever. So, we
took some time to write you
this letter. Nothing could pre-
pare us for the pain we've en-
dured, but we know you're
with God where happiness is
assured. Now, well wrap up
this letter with a few things to
say.
We love you, we miss you
and Happy Birthday!
Your loving family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,
~r i L


SADIE MAE JOHNSON
09/01/1931 02/26/1998


It has been 11 years since
you have been gone. You will
always be in our hearts.
Husband, Rudolph and
Trevin


M 1EII 0 RI ANIHAPP BI RII DA REMMBRANES *,EA-li N-OTICESOBITURIE


MELVIN WHITE, wishes to
express our sincere apprecia-
tion for your prayers, visits,
cards, phone calls, flowers, and
other deeds of kindness.
The White family


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


BETTY J. BERRY
02/28/52 10/04/08

Mommy, it has been five
months since you left our lives.
It seems like yesterday when
we were sitting down laugh-
ing and talking. I still see that
beautiful smile on your face.
But our Father above had
other plans for you in which
I understand. He told you it
was time to come home to a
better place. We will never say
goodbye, only farewell until
we see you again.
Love always, your daugh-
ter, Fermecia, granddaughters,
Vonkevia and Kelis, great
grand, Jani'

Happy Birthday









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


"tQpyrighteCtMat4t1L

available from Commecial News P i r


Available from Commercial News Providers


. ..... ... ,
.. ...


Death Notice


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.. ........ ; ~;

. .. .... *. .....















Family and friends pay



~tribute to Howard Gary
x ; ..... .... ..ag 1X
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~a; ;;;Family* and friends pay


...... .....C
~-::trlobute to* oward Gary


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Friends and family on Fri-
day remembered Miami's
first Black Miami City Man-
ager Howard Gary as a com-
passionate leader who has
left a legacy for many to fol-
low.
Gary, who died Feb. 15 at
age 62 after a battle with
cancer, was eulogized Fri-
day at Mount Zion Baptist
Church in Overtown.
"Howard Gary was one of
the greatest men that have
ever walked this earth," said
Gary's son, Jordan. "I feel
honored to have called my-
self his son."
Gary's eldest son Kito
shared memories of his dad
running down the field dur-
ing his football game, cheer-
ing for him to make a touch-
down.
"My dad didn't say much to
us but he taught us valuable
lessons," said Kito.
Gary moved to Miami from
Harlem with his mom and
brother at age 4. Raised in


r~ y
1:rl,, .l:,r, ... 1, i 'll.. ,.l i. ...i. 11 U .. .: :.ll
HOWARD GARY
Miami's first Black Miami City Manager
Liberty City, he attended
Miami Northwestern High,
where he excelled in aca-
demics and athletics. He
swam in Northwestern's var-
sity swimming team, the first
Black team to compete dur-
ing segregation.
After graduation, he matric-
ulated to Morehouse College,


where he joined his brother
and became a member of the
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity.
He earned a political science
and business administra-
tion degree, then got a mas-
ter's in public policy from the
University of Michigan.
Gary worked in New Jersey
before moving back to Miami
in 1976 as budget and man-
agement director. In 1981,
he was appointed as city
manager.
"He never gave up on his
community," said his broth-
er, William.
Soon after his career as
city manager ended, Gary
started his own company,
Howard Gary and Co., which
financed more than $16 mil-
lion worth of municipal se-
curities financings.
Gary's children, including
Nakia Grimes and Issa, said
they will to miss him.
"The one thing my dad
taught me was to respect
people, no matter who they
were, but when you treat people
with respect you have to de-
mand it back," said Kito.


Joseph watts Sr. was aviation pioneer


Dorsey High School graduate
Joseph Columbia Watts Sr.,
who blazed a trail in aviation,
died at his home in Bedford,
Texas, on Feb. 13. He was 76.
'Watts, a native of Owassa,
Ala., was fifth child of Virgie
and Otis Watts Sr. The fam-
ily relocated to Miami and af-
ter he graduated Salutatorian
from Dorsey High in 1950, he
went to Florida A&M Universi-
ty and, after graduating from
FAMU, he received a commis-
sion as a 2nd lieutenant and
had officer training a Fort
Bliss, Texas.
While at college, Watts met
and married Dorothy Tillman
of Live Oak and they had five
children.
In a pioneering career, Watts
was the first Black U.S. Army
pilot to test Army aircraft after


JOSEPH WATTS SR.


the Army Air Corps was dis-
solved, the first Black aviator
to graduate from the U.S. Air
Force Experimental Test Pi-
lot School, the first formally
educated and trained Black
to graduate from Engineer-
ing Flight Test Pilot School,


the -first formally educated
and trained Black flight test
pilot in the FAA and he first
Black Army aviator, to estab-
lish three world records for
helicopters.
He was also the first Black
Army aviator to apply to the
NASA astronaut program and
is credited with being a role
model for other Black aviators
such as Guion S. Bluford Jr.,
who went on to become an as-
tronaut.
His survivors include his
wife of 55 years, sons Jo-
seph Jr., Ronald, Gregory and
Kevin, daughter Lisa Payton,
siblings Betty Robinson, How-
ard Watts and Vivian Manley,
grandchildren, great-grand-
children and other relatives.
Services were held in Col-
leyville, Texas, on Feb. 17.


Death Notice


ALMA JO ROBINSON, 'Miss
Jo', 54, beautician, died
February 24 at home. Survi-
vors include: children, Pat-
rick, Tanyanneka, Latasha,
Stephanie, Galvin Robinson;
siblings, Patricia Pratt, Otis
(Patricia) Walker, Renalders
(Lorraine) Walker; adopted
daughters, Patrice Gibson
and Tonya Bingle. Service 2
p.m., Saturday, Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church.
Services entrusted to Wright
and Young Funeral Home.


Special


remembrance


FRANCES MAE ALLEN-
HEGWOOD, 66, retired pub-
lix worker, died February 20
at Broward Medical Center.
Survivors include: daughters,
Clara Bell, Pamela Jones (
Marvin), Krista Eberhart and
Ann Watts Streeter (David);
sons, Anthony Allen, Kevin
Hunter and James Hunter III
(Sumita) (CA); father, David
Allen Sr. (GA); sisters, Annie
.Brown (FL), Gertrude Thomp-
son (GA), Renarda T. Hadley
(GA) and Donna Lewis (GA);
brothers, David Jr., Issac,
(GA), Cornelius (Estella) and
Joseph; 23 grand children,
22 great grand children and
a host of other relatives and
friends. Viewing 5 9 p.m.
Friday at funeral home. Ser-
vice 1:00 p.m., Saturday at
Ft. Lauderdale Church of God
In Christ. Services entrusted
to Mc Whites Funeral Home.


service for Sister


Naomi Robinson Brown at A.M. Cohen Temple
The Sunshine Band Depart-
ment of A.M. Cohen Temple
Church of God In Christ is
sponsoring a special service in
remembrance of the late Sister
Naomi Robinson Brown. The
service is scheduled for Sunday,
March 1, 3:00 p.m., 1747 N.W.
3 Ave.
Mrs. Brown was a retired
school teacher for Miami Dade
County C.A.A. Headstart prior
to her retiring in 1997. If your
life was impacted by her and
you would like to share your
experience, meet us for this joy- SISTER NAOMI ROBINSON BROWN
ous occasion.SISTER NAOMI ROBINSON BROWN



I T



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5-2Y RAURBEFSEMITI MAIME HT MARCH 9







The Miami Times


ifesty es


FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


From left, model EMARIE, Kiana St. Louis, Micquel Goins and Felicia Brown are wearing originals from Mahaqni's
summer fashion line during a showing held recently at Jungle Island.

Fashion launch gives Kiana

chance to be model for a night


By Isheka N. Harrison
Special to The Miami Times


Opa-locka based beauty firm Mahaqni Sophis-
ticated Looks launched its "Bold, Hot & Beauti-
ful" fashion line to a packed crowd at Jungle
Island.
The Dec. 20 launch combined fashion with
philanthropy, marking the debut of Mahaqni
SL's adult and kids clothing lines and giving
11-year-old Kianr St. Louis a chance to real-
ize her lifelong dream or being a model.
Kiana, who was diagnosed with sickle cell
anemia before birth, decided years ago that
she wanted to be a model. Her mother, Flau-
re Dubois, wanted to make sure she got that
chance.
After hearing about the Make-A-Wish Foun-
dation from a friend, Dubois called the orga-
nization and put Kiana on the wish list.


"I know how important it was to Kiana to
become a model and I thought that calling
Make-A-Wish would be a great opportunity
to help make her dream come true," Dubois
said.
After waiting for more than two years, Ki-
ana and her family were beginning to think
they might not get the chance. That changed
when Felicia Brown, who started Mahaqni
SL in 2000, decided she wanted her fashion
launch to be about more than clothing.
Brown called Make-A-Wish to see if there
was a child who desired to have a fashion
wish granted. She as told about Kiana and
that she could do a "wish enhancement" if the
family agreed.
"I think it's important to use your gifts to give
back to those who are less fortunate than you,"
Brown said. "I was very glad
Please turn to MODEL 3C


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


........s


The marriage of Tashara and
Nathaniel Maurice Thurston
at The 93rd Street Community
Baptist Church on Feb. 14 was
an event befitting St. Valentine's
Day. The Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson
officiated, assisted by Pastor Lar-
rie Lovett and Andrea Lovett
and Pastor Tracy McCloud and
Sheryl McCloud.
The bride and groom put their
love in a poem, read to the gath-
ering: "Somehow we found each
other, along life's busy way/Des-
tined to be together, for the rest
of our days./I'm glad to say we
share a love/That's based on
care and trust./Together we will
reach our dreams,/just the two
of us."
The processional began with
the pastors taking their places,
followed by daughters De'Onne
Thurston and Dee'Ondra Thur-
ston escorting the groom to the
sounds of I Wanna Be Loved by
Eric Benet. The parents followed,
to the sounds of Because You
Loved Me by Juanita Bynum and
the Williams Brothers, beginning
with Barbara Ann Thurston,
mother of the groom; Tony Ben-
nett, step-father of the groom;
Lloyd Rogers, adoptive father of
the groom; and Andrina Rogers,
adoptive mother of the groom.
As We Must Be In Love by Pure
Soul played, the bridesmaids
and groomsmen entered: Tilnara
Thurston and Timothy Ever-


son, Antoinette
Wright and Dalton
Taylor, Emily Fer-
nandez and Chazz ..
Woodson, Terrici-
ta Brown and Andre Thurston,
Michelle Traylor and Michael
Wilson and Corona Threats.
Count On Me by Whitney Hous-
ton was the song playing as other
wedding party members entered:
Melvia Rogers, matron of hon-
or; Ja'Naye Thurston, maid of
honor; and Onekia Coney, best
woman; Anquivian Jones and
Amonie Hart, flower girls and
former students of the groom;
and Ali'naria Brinson, ring
bearer.
Nathaniel Leslie Thurston,
son of the bride and groom, po-
sitioned himself to escort his
mother down the aisle as Teddy
Pendergrass sang Greatest Inspi-
ration. Her outfit included a silver
tiara with a white mini-veil, a sil-
ver Spider necklace and a ruffle
gown accentuated with crystals
on the bodice and on the three-
foot train.
Upon reaching the wedding
arch, the couple and guests lis-
tened to an invocation by Pas-
tor Johnson and lit candles in
memory of Elizabeth Brown,
grandmother of the groom; Mer-
cedes Campbell, grandmother
of the bride; Nathaniel Smith
Thurston, father of the groom;
Dionne Campbell, mother of the


bride; and Patricia Campbell,
aunt of the bride, to the sounds
of Angels by Richard Smallwood.
Following the memorial prayer,
the couple made their wedding
vows, exchanging rings, and the
proclamation of marriage and as
Kenoly Brothers sang You Are My
Joy
they headed to the limousine
to take them to Violines Banquet
Hall for the reception and celebra-
tion presided over by Gwendolyn
Evans, mistress of ceremonies.
The couple's first dance was
to the sounds of Endless Love
, sung by Luther Vandross and
Mariah Carey.














NATHANIEL & CASHARA

The couple took time to thank
their parents and special persons
such as Sinquista Threats, Re-
shard T. Mills, Mellonasise Jack-
son, Chy'Nita Everson, Henry
Bussey, Tyie Serranoa and Ruth-
ie Turner, as well as My Dream
Printing.

*********
The retired brothers of Omega
Psi Phi Fraternity were excited
when Brother Garth C. Reeves


attended the bi-weekly last
Thursday, and put the trimmings
on the Pre-Valentine's Annual
Luncheon at the Omega Activity
Center in Miami Gardens.
Baljean Smith, president,
asked Reeves to give the message
to the brothers. He rose to the
occasion and commended the
brothers for their attendance.
"Young men," he remarked,
"please take care of yourselves
and avoid the pitfalls of life, es-
pecially in the areas of smok-
ing, drinking, and not going to
church."
The meeting room sported red
and white table clothes, red bows
on the chairs, with a background
of red hearts. Soft jazz played as
the ladies were given a rose each
by Dr. Andre Forhes.
Smith gave the welcoming re-
marks and Chairman Stacy
Jones and Johnny Stepher-
son, emcee, followed him to the
microphone. Stepherson intro-
duced Dr. Herman Pratt, who
gave the prayer. Next, the wid-
ows of deceased brothers were
recognized, including Eugenia
Thomas (Lawson Thomas), Billie
Greer (Tee S. Greer Jr.), Thelma
Gibson (Theodore Gibson) and
Eura Randolph (James B. Ran-
dolph Sr.).
Jones surprised Dr. David
White with ,a plaque and two
resolutions from the city of Opa-
locka and Miami Gardens for
founding the retired brothers
organization, setting up a tele-
phone tree and informing the
membership of brothers who got
sick or died. His wife Tessie was
recognized for her support.
The Psi Phi Band entertained


as the brothers and guests dined,
playing tunes they were once lis-
tened to at Harlem Square, Mary
Elizabeth Lounge, the Sir John
Hotel, the Knight Beat, the Har-
lem Gardens and the Hampton
House. In an especially moving
moment, Harold Mitchell reached
for his wife Mary and they danced
to My Funny Valentine.
Other guests included Barbara
Anders, Mary H. Bannerman,
Nancy Brown, Beverly Burns,
Eleanor B. Day, Alice H. Dan-
iels, Mary Davis, Leonard and
Billye Ivey, Mary Jones, Mary
Jessie, Beverly Johnson, Fran-
cena Koch, Daphne Johnson,
Mildred Marquis, Norma Culmer
Mims, Elizabeth Phillip, Naomi
L. Smith, Roslyn S. Sparks, Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan, Elaine
Symonette, Ruth Sims, Timmy
and Lillie Thomas, Loretta S.
Whittle and Daniel and Sadie
Williams.

******* *
Hosea Butler, president, and
the membership of the King of
Clubs of Greater Miami kicked
off 2009 with a Black and White
Gala under the chairmanship of
James Fayson.
New members introduced
themselves, including Ron But-
ler, Craig Hall, Frank Hall, Mil-
ton Hall II, Ransom Hill and
Leroy Jones. Ron Butler took
over as interim secretary for
Clinton Brown, who was under
the weather, and members of
the Hall family accepted chair-
manship responsibilities for
religious services, school adop-
tion, a community forum, and
an annual scholarship program.


Nelson Jenkins, chairman, said
the Scholarship Banquet will be
held May 3 at the Doubletree
Hotel, from 1 to 4 p.m.


The Arcola Lakes community
is still talking about the Arch-
diocese of Miami and the St.
Martin De. Porres Association's
invitation to The Singing An-
gels to perform in the Peace and
Unity Award Ceremony held
recently, at St. Mary Cathedral
sponsored by Leona H. Cooper,
president/founder, and Marie
Jerkins, director.
The association presented a
plaque to Dr. Julia D. Torres, a
resident of Miami, who received
degrees in Otolaryngology, Head
& Neck Surgery at the Univer-
sity of Miami/Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital in 1983. Torres
was cited for establishing, along
with his wife, Giselle, a medical
mission that has treated more
than 70, 000 patients.
State Sen. Frederica S. Wil-
son, founder, 5000 role Models
of Excellence Project, also got a
plaque for her efforts to help "at
risk" youth aged 9 to 19.


The Episcopal Church of the
Transfiguration honored six
men and women at its "Bridge
Builders: Connecting Yesterday,
Today and Tomorrow" celebra-
tion held Feb. 14 at the Howard
Johnson Plaza Hotel in Hia-
leah. They are Catherine Dan-
iel, Ebenezer Edwards, Alyce
Martin, Clara McKoy, Harold
Mitchell and Anthony E. Si-
mons.


Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.
Beta Beta Lambda Chapter,
honored three of their fraternity
brothers on Feb. 7 at the Sofitel
Hotel in west Miami-Dade. The
honorees were Joseph S. Gay,
Brodes Hartley Jr. and N. Pat-
rick Range. Maurice Hurry is
chapter president.


The Alpha Delta Chapter of the
Phi Delta Kappa Sorority chose
Anna Wyche as its Soror of the
Year. She has served the chap-
ter as basileus and chairwoman
of the Scholarship and Nutrition
committees and the Anthropos.
During her tenure as chairwoman
of the Xinos/Kudos, she became
chairwoman of the Southeast Re-


gional Youth Confer- 0 I
ence held in Miami
in 2008. ..


Abraham Dupree, who runs the
Mail Department of the city of Mi-
ami, is retiring after 36 years with
the city and a farewell luncheon
is slated in his honor at noon this
Wednesday at the Miami River-
side Center in downtown Miami.
Contact Charlotte Bartee, 305-
261-8328 ext. 7776 or Madelin
Brown at 305-416-1981.


Je Rhonda Grace received her
Master of Science in Drug Policy
and Regulation from the Universi-
ty of Florida. She is the daughter


of Regina M. Giles and George
Grace... Julia Gilchrist is enjoy-
ing her new daughter Taylor Ja
Nae who came into the world on
Nov. 24 weighing 8 pounds 10
ounces.


Newly elected Vestry members
of the Historic St. Agnes Episco-
pal Church are Evelina Bestman,
Elston Davis, Harold Meadows,
Audrey Strachen and David Wil-
son.


Wedding anniversary greetings
go out to Hughie J. and Lois M.
Nairn Sr., Feb. 15, their 60th, and
to William and Jessie C. Pinder,
Feb. 20, their 59".



Get-well wishes are for Eles-
tine Allen, Roslyn Bethel, Ra-
chel Culmer-Williams, Thelma


Meadows-Dean, Elsie Douglas,
Wellington Gibson, Denesia
Harris, Yvonne Johnson-Gaitor,
Fredricka Maura-Bruton, Delo-
res J. McCartney, Doris McK-
inney-Pittman, Jean C. Morley,
Doretha Payne, Herbert Rhodes
Jr. and Timothy O'Savage.


Barbara Estivene returned
from South Carolina for the fu-
neral of her sister Pauline Banks.
Services were held last Saturday.
Pauline, of Hallandale, BTW class
of '47, died at Aventura Hospital
on Feb. 12.

******Are hugs the new handshake?
Are hugs the new handshake?


From the White House to the real
world, in the home and on the
job, greetings are getting warm
and fuzzy. The Obama family was
always cuddly on the campaign
trail and last month the presi-
dent bestowed no fewer than nine
hugs on senior male staffers at a
single meeting. The hug is gaining
ground on the handshake.


%4hrk f ie a *s rfr, *


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S"Cpyrighted Ma teril

Syndicated Content

Available from-Commereial News Providers"


D :
A .~Ji


1968. That year, for me, was
the year that was. I became
transfigured and emerged in a
new role as a student activist/
Black power leader. Kaleido-
scopic national and world events
jostled my emerging awareness.
activism and my poetry.
There was the Battle of Khe
Sanh, the most controversial
battle in the Viet Nam War. fol-
lowed nine days later by the TET
offensive. Three college students
were killed in Orangeburg, S.C.,
at a civil rights protest staged at
a White-only bowhng alley. Sing-
er Frankie Lymon was found
dead in Harlem from a heroin
overdose. American troops mas-
sacred civilians at My Lai. U S.
Attorney General Robert Ken-
nedy entered the race for the
presidency of the United States.
Black students at Howard Unm-
versity in Washington, D C.
shut down the university to
protest its ROTC program and
demanded a more Afrocentric
curriculum.


,: : in the Olympic 200-meter run,
S"raised their arms in a Black
J_ L_ _k L_ P....---- ......, Power salute alter winning, re-
spectively, the gold and bronze
medals for Ist and 3rd places.
Republican challenger Rich-
ard NI. Nixon defeated Vice
I organized Gon- President Hubert Humphrey
zaga University's and American Independent Par-
first Black student ty candidate George C. Wallace.
uruon and was Yale University announced that
among a group of student lead- it would begin admitting wom-
ers who led protest marches en. U.S. spacecraft Apollo 8 en-
and events at Gonzaga against tered orbit around the Moon.
the war. President Lyndon B. Astronauts Frank Borman. Jim
Johnson dropped his bid for re- Lovell and William A. Anders
election. Martin Luther King Jr. became the first humans to see
was assassinated at the Lorraine the far side of the moon and
Motel in Memphis, Tenn. Presi- Planet Earth as a whole.
dent Lyndon B. Johnson signed Meanwhile, back in my po-
the Civil Rights Act of 1968. etry woodshed, I was trying to
Robert F. Kennedy was assassi- assimilate the barrage of Black
nated at the Ambassador Hotel protest poetry coming at me
in Los Angeles. Calif. by Strhan from the likes of Amiri Baraka.
Sirhan Chicago Police clashed Larry Neal. Askia Muhammad
with anti-war protesters outside Toure, Ishmael Reed, Sonia
the 1968 Democratic National Sanchez, Carolyn Rodgers and
Convention. Nikki Giovanni. It was pure iro-
Some 150 members of New ny and s:nchronicitv that the
York Radical Women arrived voice of Edna St. Vincent Millay,
in Atlantic City, N.J., and a White woman writing at the
stormed the Miss America Pag- turn of the century, would float
eant, deeming it exploitative of in clear tones above that chorus
women. In Mexico City. Tommie of protest and add more fuel to
Smith and John Carlos, two Af- the flames to my smolderng po-
rican Americans who competed etic diction.


FOR EDNA ST VINCENT MILL4)'
I...a friendly told me of seeing her years ago in
Greenwich Village running around the
corner of
Macdougal Street, flushed &. laughing 'like a
nymph,' with her hair swinging...
Edmund Wilson

vrs was a true voice of Tr generation,
vincent, spoken with feeling rising up
from yr toes, transgressive & traditional.
yet patently postmodern, not unlike the
conflicted contradictions in yr own life.
an anchor for bohemian identity &
unrepentant feminist compass pointing to
emancipated love, u slept with women &
men, a sappho tor those wide-eyed girls


at vassar who came joyously to yr bed.
but then u parked & abandoned yr
lesbianism at graduation to pursue multiple
male sex partners, often several in a day for
the rest of yr life. never truly a lesbian,
but always a thespian, u showed us how
to fling pretty follies aside, how to repel
or embrace murderous emotion, how to
repel or embrace interloping death in
traditional tetrameter, in simple minimalist
couplets containing the profound & the
mystical, in concussive sonnets bursting
with images descriptive of rapture, of
powerful forces, cosmic & soular,
within & without & in collision.
-(., Joseph McNair


K.DscriDe



to t iaftmi wim



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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A wish comes true


.-
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- b o o nm m

qw 4omij w mq41 mm m umoommobgmm ofimmmo mab 00 4 -dw mmwe41


MODEL
continued from 1C

to hear about Kiana because little
girls like her are why I do what I
do. It's not just about me or my
line; it's about setting an exam-
ple for those little girls who look
up to me. I want them to. know
beautiful is more than how you
look, it's who you are."
When the family got the call
about Mahaqni SL's launch,
Dulois said Kiana couldn't be-
lieve it was actually happening.
"She was really excited about
participating in the show. She
kept asking, 'Mommy is this
real? Is this true?' She even
called all her friends the day she
found out and invited them out
to watch her," Dubois said.
Kiana modeled from a collec-
tion of summer dresses for wom-
en and girls. The adult line was
designed by Brown and the kids'
line designed by her 13-year-old
daughter Micquel Goins who also
has a lip gloss line called Quella
Clear.
Brown, a self-described "wom-'
an with curves," said the line was
inspired by her inability to find
nice dresses in her size when she
went shopping.
"I don't believe you have to be
a size zero to be beautiful and
there should be nice clothes for
us to wear. My daughter sketches
better than I do. So of course we


had to do something for the kids.
That's where Kiana came in."
Kiana couldn't have been more
pleased to model Micquel's de-
signs and lip-gloss. She was also
delighted to meet the models, in-
cluding the face of Mahaqni SL,
international model Marie.
"I had a wonderful time and I
thought it was a great experience
because I've been wanting to be-
come a model for a long time.
Now that I've had the chance
I feel like I've succeeded at my
goals," Kiana said.
Though it was Kiana's first
time on the catwalk, Dubois said
her daughter adjusted quickly to
the spotlight.
"She liked the media and she
liked being in the spotlight. She
got over her nerves and even
said she wished she had more
dresses to wear," Dubois said.
Now Kiana is looking forward
to more modeling opportuni-
ties.
"Doing this show was a very
nice chance for me. I feel thank-
ful for the opportunity and look
forward to doing more things
like this in the future so I can
do all the things I've put my
mind to," she said.
That future may be closer
than Kiana's realizes, said
Brown.
"It was such a joy to be able
to work with Kiana and help
her get a taste of her dream.


( h l*, Klr,,,



"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Adrienne rs8 3Center
FOR THEPERFORING ARS OF MIMI-DAD COUNT


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
LIBERTY CITY 1
2 & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater matinee $45, evening $40

New World Scnool of the rts presents
NWSA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Alfred Gershfeld, conductor: Jose Feghali. violin
Tchaikovsky s First Piano Concerto and Brahms' Symphony No 2 W
7.30 PM KNIGHT CONCERT HALL $15. $25
... .. . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . . . ..... .. . . ... .... ... ... . .
Adrienne Arsht Center's Miami Made Festival of New Works
and Miami Light Project present
HERE & NOW: 2009
Three world premieres by South Florida Artists Elizabeth Doud and
Jennylin Duany, Alexey Puig Taran, and Rosie Herrera.
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $20
HERE & NOW: 2009
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $20
Musical Arts Association of Miami and Adrienne Arsht Center presents
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
Kurt Masur, conductor; Louis Lortie, piano
All-Beethoven Concert: "Leonore" Overture No. 3; Piano Concerto
No. 1; and Symphony No. 7.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $20, $45, $65, $80, $95, $150
MIAMI MADE FESTIVAL OF NEW WORKS
TALKING HERE & NOW
Artists and producers discuss the highs and lows of producing
original work.
2 PM Peacock Foundation Studio FREE
INCUBATOR
Selections from works in progress.
3 PM Carnival Studio Theater FREE
OUT LOUD!
Readings of unproduced works.
4 PM Peacock Foundation Studio FREE
HERE & NOW: 2009
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $20

THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $20, $70, $85, $105, $160


The Cleveland Orchestra


Miami Made Festival:
Here and Now: 2009


MIAMI MADE FESTIVAL OF NEW WORKS


TALKING HERE & NOW
2 P.M Peacock Foundation Studio FREE
INCUBATOR
3 PM Car nival Studlo Thealer FREE
OUT LOUD!


Hlrr a .nc.:. ,200j9


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary. I








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3. 2009


199

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'53r L ryr~y~li .~-$


Kellogg's Cereal........................... .....................Free
Assorted Varieties, Smart Start, 14.7 to 17.5-oz,
Raisin Bran, 25.5-oz, Raisin Bran Crunch, 18.2-oz,
or Corn Flakes, 24-oz box Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.43


8-Pack Selected
Pepsi Products ........ .....
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO .98 ON 2


Kraft Deluxe
Macaroni
& Cheese Free
Dinner ...........
Or Kraft Velveeta Shells & Cheese or
Rotini & Cheese, Assorted Varieties,
9.4 to 14-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 2.77


Doritos
Tortilla = T .
Chips......... F ree
Assorted Varieties, 11.75 to 13-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.99


Keebler
Town House
or Club F 1 '
Crackers..... Free
Assorted Varieties, 9 to 16-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.23


18-Pack Assorted 1199
Budweiser Beer.........11
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(18-Pack Busch or Busch Light, 12-oz can
or bot. or Natural Light or Natural Ice Beer,
12-oz can ... 8.99)


Prices effective Thursday, February 26 through Wednesday, March 4, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River.
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.


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Business


SECTION D MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009

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Advanced Gyn iCliC
Professional. Sale & Confidential Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
SIndividual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

-305-621-1399
--~k __.. _. _._ ..


SY426A- /A
weezsl ubrftft
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15109


"James A. Cummings, Inc., General Contractor will
be accepting bids for the Calder Race Course Ra-
cino on March 19,2009 before 12:00 PM. JamesA.
Cummings, Inc. is actively seeking Minority/Wom-
en/Small Business Enterprise (M/W/SBE) subcon-
tractors and suppliers. The work includes all trades
for CSI Divisions 2 thru 16. All subcontractors and
suppliers must be pre-qualified by Cummings. Pre-
qualification Statements are available from Cum-
mings. Bid documents are available through Cum-
mings, Dodge and Reed Construction. For more
information please call Patrick Holland @ James
A. Cummings, Inc. @ 3575 NW 53d Street; Fort
Lauderdale, Florida 33309; Telephone (954) 733-
4211; Fax (954) 485-9686.


SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
CALL 305-694-6214


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY AVIATION DEPARTMENT
UTILITIES MASTER PLAN (WATER)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05B

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1
and 2-10.4 of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional engineering
services will be required for Utilities Master Plan (WATER), for the Miami-Dade Aviation Department
(MDAD):

PLEASE BE ADVISED- THAT THE FOLLOWING OCI PROJECTS WILL BE E-SOLICITED
CONCURRENTLY, AS SEPARATE PROJECTS:

OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05A (DRAINAGE)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05B (WATER)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05C (SANITARY SEWER)

AS A RESULT, FIRMS ELECTING TO SUBMIT AS A PRIME FOR ONE (1) OF THE THREE (3)
PROJECTS LISTED ABOVE WILL BE PRECLUDED FROM PARTICIPATING IN THE REMAINING
TWO (2) PROJECTS, AND MAY NOT PARTICIPATE ON ANY TEAM AS A SUB-CONSULTANT.

FIRMS ELECTING TO SUBMIT AS A SUB-CONSULTANT MAY ONLY PARTICIPATE ON THREE (3)
TEAMS TOTAL FOR ALL THREE (3) PROJECTS.

The project consists of updating and maintaining the water master plans for Miami-Dade Aviation
Department (MDAD) facilities. The services include collecting and reviewing as-built data, field verifying
as-built conditions, updating the utility atlas, updating the existing modeling scenario, re-establish the
future modeling scenarios, update the master plan document, review and update the MDAD design
guidelines, review and update the technical specifications and assist the Department with environmental
permitting issues.

The selected consultant will receive a Professional Services Agreement (PSA) with an estimated contract
term of three (3) years with two (2) one (1) year extensions.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

The prime must demonstrate experience in the below listed areas.

The prime must demonstrate a minimum of five (5) years cumulative experience, from the submittal date,.in
developing and maintaining water master plans and associated computer modeling (WaterCAD preferred)
in airport and municipal water distribution systems of equal size and complexity as Miami International
Airport (MIA).

The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's firm. The experience
must be demonstrated by direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a supervisory capacity at
the project manager level or above in these projects. The determination of the individual's qualifications
and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at the sole discretion of the County.
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

6.01 Water and Sanitary Sewer Systems Water Distribution
and Sanitary Sewage Collection and Transmission Systems.

10.01 Environmental Engineering -
Stormwater Drainage Design Engineering Services

A copy of the Notice to Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation
provisions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural &
Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and
fax respectively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be
forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have
included an e-mail address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have
vendor enrolled on-line. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http:I
www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amelia M. Cordova-Jimenez who may be contacted via
e-mail at ameliac@miamidade.gov, via fax at (305) 350-6265, or via telephone at (305) 375-2036.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement 5% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Measure

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on February 25, 2009, at 10:00 A.M.
in Conference Room 18-2, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. Is Street,
Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to
attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is March 20, 2009 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of
the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order
3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY AVIATION DEPARTMENT
UTILITIES MASTER PLAN (DRAINAGE)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05A

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1
and 2-10.4 of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional engineering
services will be required for Utilities Master Plan (DRAINAGE), for the Miami-Dade Aviation Department
(MDAD):

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THE FOLLOWING OCI PROJECTS WILL BE E-SOLICITED
CONCURRENTLY, AS SEPARATE PROJECTS:

OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05A (DRAINAGE)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05B (WATER)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05C (SANITARY SEWER)

AS A RESULT, FIRMS ELECTING TO SUBMIT AS A PRIME FOR ONE (1) OF THE THREE (3)
PROJECTS LISTED ABOVE WILL BE PRECLUDED FROM PARTICIPATING IN THE REMAINING TWO
(2) PROJECTS, AND MAY NOT PARTICIPATE,QN ANY TEAM AS A SUB-CONSULTANT.

FIRMS ELECTING TO SUBMIT AS A SUB-CONSULTANT MAY ONLY PARTICIPATE ON THREE (3)
TEAMS TOTAL FOR ALL THREE (3) PROJECTS.

The project consists of updating and maintaining the drainage master plans for Miami-Dade Aviation
Department (MDAD) facilities. The services include collecting and reviewing as-built data, field verifying
as-built conditions, updating the utility atlas, updating the existing modeling scenario, re-establish the
future modeling scenarios, update the master plan document, review and update the MDAD design
guidelines, review and update the technical specifications, and assist the Department with environmental
permitting issues.

The selected consultant will receive a Professional Services Agreement (PSA) with an estimated contract
term of three (3) years with two (2) one (1) year extensions.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

The prime must demonstrate experience ih the below listed areas.

The prime must demonstrate a minimum of five (5),years cumulative experience, from the submittal date,
in developing and maintaining drainage master plans and associated computer modeling (SWMM and XP
SWMM preferred) in airport and municipal stormwater management systems of equal size and complexity
as Miami International Airport (MIA).

The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's firm. The
experience must be demonstrated by direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a supervisory
capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects. The determination of the individual's
qualifications and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at the sole discretion
of the County.
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

10.01 Environmental Engineering -
Stormwater Drainage Design Engineering Services (PRIME)

6.01 Water and Sanitary Sewer Systems Water Distribution
and Sanitary Sewage Collection and Transmission Systems.

A copy of the Notice to Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions
(as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit
located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the
unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded electronically to all
consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail address in their
vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. The NTPC and
accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following
link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project isAmelia M. Cordova-Jimenez who may be contacted via e-mail
at ameliac@miamidade.aov. via fax at (305) 350-6265, or via telephone at (305) 375-2036.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement 5% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Measure

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on February 25, 2009, at 10:00 A.M. in
Conference Room 18-2, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami,
Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is March 20, 2009 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED
THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED AFTER THE
ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for
a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


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SECTION D





1118 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath, $500. Stove, refrig-
erator, air. 305-642-7080 or
786-236-1144

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrigerator, air. 305-
642-7080 or 786-236-1144

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath. $550. Stove,
refrigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144

1281 N.W. 61st Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

1326 N.W. 1st Place
Very clean, one bedroom,
one bath, $425/month,
786-419-6613.

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bdrm, one bath,
with air, in quiet area, $700/
month! 305-213-5013

15201 Memorial Highway
One bdrm., one bath, $800,
more specials, Section 8 ok!
Call Frank K. Cooper, R.E. at
305-758-7022.

15600 N.W. 7 Ave
One bedroom, one bath.
786-237-1292

1718 N.W. 2nd Court -
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-
7080.

1744 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator and
air. 305-642-7080

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms., one bath $625.
Stove, refrigerator, air. Free
Water. 305-642-7080 or
786-236-1144

1969 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,$550.
Appliances, free water and
gas. 305-642-7080
786-236-1144

200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

2020 NW 166 STREET
One bdrm, all util. included
$750 first and last.
call 786-319-6577

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances,-free water.
305-642-7080.

247 N. E. 77 Street
1 bedroom, 1 bath, remod-
eled, water, garbage, parking
is free. $775 monthly plus se-
curity deposit. Section 8 wel-
come.Call 786-216-7533.

3051 N.W. 134th Street
Section 8 welcomed. Newly
remodeled, two bdrms, one
bath, central air, washer
and dryer incl. New kitchen,
bath, and refrig. $980/month.
(954) 557-4567

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath. $600
mthly. 305-213-5013

35 N.W. 75th Street
Nice, clean, one bedroom,
one bath, near shopping.
$550/month, Section 8 wel-
comed! 305-742-8679

4651 N.W. 32nd Avenue
Cozy, one bdrm, $470/mth,
no drugs! 305-469-9698 after
5 p.m.



50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.



5509 N.W. Miami Court


One bdrm, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security.
305-751-6232


561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080


6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

7001 N.W. 15th Avenue
Move In Special! First
month plus half security
deposit moves you in One
bedroom $495 monthly. $743
moves you in All appli-
ances included. Free 20
inch, flat screen TV. Call
Joel 786-355-7578.

77 N.W. 77th Street
Two bedrooms, one and half
bath $810. Call 786-306-
4505


830 N.W. 70 St
One bedroom, one bath, $450
mthly. 305-759-1880

8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms,
air, appliances, laundry and
gate. From $400. 1601 NW
1st Court. 305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080

COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695.



GOLDEN SQUARE AND
GOLDEN VILLAS
New Rental Community
1325/1415 NW 18th Drive
Pompano Beach
(954)933-4050

Beautiful One, Two, Three
and Four Bedroom Apts.
Starting at $750 monthly
Washer/Dryer Available
Fitness Center
Computer Room
Sparkling Pool and
Children's Playground

*Income restrictions apply
Rent subject to change







MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
For Seniors 55 Plus
Friendship Towers Apts.
1550 N.W. 36 Street
Miami, FL 33142

Affordable one, and two
bedrooms. Starting at $633
For leasing information
visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137

Call: 305-573-9201

-Income Restriction Apply

-Prices Subject to Change




GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across.the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth


Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida


HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Rent Special!! All appli-
cations accepted. Easy
Qualify One bdrm, one bath
$495 ($745). Two bdrm,
one bath $595 ($895).
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

N. DADE Section 8 OKI
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


N.W. 2 Ave. and 63 St.
Clean, secure, area, one
bdrm, one bath, $500 mthly.
786-393-4764

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 welcomed! $1000/
month, call 954-303-3368 or
954-432-3198.

OPA LOCKA AREA
Special! One bdrm, one bath,
$495 monthly, Section 8 OK!
Call 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN AREA
1613 N.W. 1st Place
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700, One bedroom one
bath $500. 786-439-7808

OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $500/
month. Call 786-262-4536.

Section 8 Apartments
South Miami Area, near
Metro Rail. Two bedroom,
three bedroom, four bedroom
apartments for rent.
Call 786-543-3872.

SOUTH MIAMI AREA
Three bedroom, one and half
bath, living and dining room,
kitchen, Section 8 welcomed!
305-255-3493

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
Studio $450 mthly. One
bedroom, $575 $650
monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel 786-355-
7578



5820 N.W. 12 Ave
Grocery Store and Laundry.
305-785-8489

COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


CALIFORNIA CLUB
Two bdrms, two bath, first
floor corner unit, very nice,
$1000/month. First, last and
security needed to move in.
Section 8 welcomed! Contact
Mrs. Payne 305-625-3957.

CAROL CITY AREA
19351 N.W. 45th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three and four bdrms,
Section 8 ONLY! Rudy
786-367-6268


1144 N.W. 38 St
One bedroom, air and all ap-
pliances. $650 monthly, first,
last and security to move in.
305-624-9022Call after 6p.m.

1190 NW 65 Street
13260 Aswan Road
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
One bedroom, one bath, air
call 305-742-4383

1196 N.W. 98th Street
Two and three bedrooms
with all appliances, water,
central air, 305-305-4665.

145 N.W. 68 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080

1590 N.W. 47 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650. Voucher accepted
305-638-5946

1732 N.W. 41st Street
One bdrm, one bath, ap-
pli. incl., air, fenced, private
parking. $575/month. Call
754-581-6302.

1857 N.W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, two bath,
$850/month, call
305-332-5008

1863B N.W. 42nd Street
Newly remodeled, one bdrm,
one bath, air. 786-356-1457.

2 N.E. 59 Terrace


Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, brand new.
786-237-1292


2045 N.W. 41st Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
shutters, central air, tiled,
$980/month, first and last
needed to move. Call 786-
274-3948.

23 N.E. 58 Street
Two bdrms., one bath, $775,
more specials, Section 8 ok!
Call Frank K. Cooper, R. E.


305-758-7022

2401 N.W. 95 Street, newly
remodeled, one bdrm., one
bath, washer, dryer, central
air, Section 8 welcome.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112

2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, one, bath, air,
$875 mthly. 786-877-5358.

255-257 N.E. 58 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath
$595. Two bedrooms, one
bath $675. 305-642-7080

2935 N.W. 10th Avenue
Two bdrm, one bath, $1450
move in, $850,
786-457-2998.

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

308 N.W. 96th Street
Two bedrooms. Reduced to
$750/month.
Call 954-437-8034.

4911 N.W. 15 Court Rear
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8. 305-343-9930

50 N.E. 56th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$650/month, 786-226-6900.

577 N.W. 94 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly. 786-263-1590

68 N.W. 45th Street
Two bdrms $650-850. 786-
431-5520

7912 N.W. 12 Court.
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
tile and carpet, fenced yard.
Section 8 Welcome. $975,
water included. Others avail-
able. 305-389-4011

7929 N.W. 12th Court
Three bdrms, one bath, $850
monthly. Call 305-757-2632

8291 N.W. 14th Avenue
One bedroom, central air,
tiled throughout, Contact
Angela 305-796-3874

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-754-7776


COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
S3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
newly tiled throughout. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-285-8872

MIRAMAR.AREA
Newly renovated, nice two
bedrooms, one bath. Washer
and dryer, central air. SW
Broward, Section 8 OK.
$1075/month.
NC REALTY 305-710-8915

One bdrm $500 and up
Two bdrms $750 and up
Three bdrms $1367 and up
Four bdrms $1600 monthly
305-757-7067

2926 N.W. 94th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
laundry, tile throughout.
Large backyard. $1400
monthly. Call 305-696-8338

Design Realty


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

13220 Aswan Road
One bedroom, one bath. Call
305-816-6992 or
786-262-4701.

1620 N.W. 64 Street
Efficiency $350. One bed-
room $450. Stove, refrigera-
tor air. Carl Greene Inc.,
305-638-1475

18102 N.W. 8th Avenue
Efficiency for rent. Call 305-
655-1047 or 786-260-2275.

2170 N.W. 91 Street #C
Furnished. $500 monthly,
$1000 to move in.
305-761-6558

2515 N.W. 52 St Rear
Tiled, air, new bathroom,
need stove. 954-522-4645.


mssif ed


2915 N.W. 156th Street 174 N.E. 78th Street
Private entrance, free cable. Newly remodeled, five bdrms,
$160 weekly, $600 to move three baths, two story, washer,
in. 305-624-3966. dryer and central air. Sec-
tion 8 OK! $1900 mthlv.


338 N.E. 82nd Terrace
Nice, efficiency, $525/mth,
util. incl. References req.
Drive-by. 305-754-5728

4131 NW 11th Place
Private room, $150/week,
305-634-5877

N.W. 91 St. and 22 Ave.
Furnished with air. Single
person. 305-693-9486

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AREA
Appliances and air, $595,
utilities included. 786-975-
7376.


1221 N.W. 41st Street
$550 mthly, plus $100 secu-
rity to move in. Utilities includ-
ed, cooking privileges.
305-301-1806, 786-597-8676

13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1448 N.W. 69th Street
$400 monthly, $200 to move
in. 305-934-9327.

1500 N.W. 183rd Street
$135 wkly, $285 to move in.
786-457-2998

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1775 N.W. 151st Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

$199 DEPOSIT!!!
2169 N.W. 49 Street, Free Air
Direct TV, only $105 weekly.
Call NOW! 786-234-5683.

21030 N.W. 39th Avenue
Private bthrm, utilities, house
priv., 305-761-1257.

2381 N.W. 66th Street
$100 weekly and, $350 to
move in. Call 786-426-3982.
2900 N.W. 54th Street
Upstairs, one room, refrig-
erator and air. Call 954-885-
8583 or 954-275-9503.

6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
$250 down and $100 weekly,
air. Call E. Slocum Invest-
ment 305-305-0597 or
786-252-0245.


695 N.W. 41st Street
Big! Air, cable, $250 move in,
$125 wkly. 305-322-8966.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available. Call
305-754-7776.

LIBERTY CITY -
BROWNSVILE AREA
Clean rooms, utilities in-
cluded, quiet area. 786-541 -
5234

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Call Gloria for details,
786-357-3928.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Room in nice home for rent.
305-527-6010

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nicely furnished room with
private entrance. Call 9 a.m.
to 10 p.m. 305-769-4985.

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.


10951 S.W. 222nd Terrace
Four bedrooms, one and half
baths, $1000/month. Call
305-267-9449.


1125 N.W. 74th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1350 mthly. Section 8
Welcome. 305-688-5002

12325 N.W. 21st Place
Three bedrooms, one bath,
also efficiency.
Call 954-607-9137


1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$950 monthly. 786-357-8885
or 305-651-6645

1449 N.W. 68 Ter
Three bdrms, one bath.
$1000 mthly, first and last to
move in. Section 8 Welcome.
305-934-9327


16310 N.W. 19th Ave Rd
Two bedroom, one bath,
air and heat,
Section 8 welcomed!
Contact 786-317-1463.


Call Matthew 954-818-9112


1740 N.W. 66 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700. 305-642-7080

1785 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 monthly. 305-267-9449

1830 N.W. 69th Terrace
Newly remodeled, two bdrm,
one bath, $750/month, $1600
move in. 305-308-6429

1831 Wilmington Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
with air. 786-356-1457.

2148 N.W. 85th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
house with efficiency, $1000
mthly, call 305-205-1665.

2261 N.W. 79th Terrace
Newly renovated, three
bedroom, one bath, $1350/
month, Section 8 welcomed!
305-794-0240

2300 N.W. 153rd Street
Two bedrooms, Florida room,
garage. $1050 monthly.
Call 954-253-9377

2441 N.W. 154 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, tile. $1500 mthly.
305-662-5505

2545 N.W. 167th Street
Three bedrooms, one and
one half bath. Move In Spe-
cial, $1350 mthly.
786-277-9378

262 N.W. 51st Street
Three bdrms, two baths
$1200 mthly, 305-205-1665.

2953 N.W. 192 Ter.
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1300. 786-277-7028

3824 N.W. 213th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly. 305-267-9449

41 St and N.W. 5 Ave
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776.

412 N.W. 59 Street
Nice, three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643

4244 N.W. 201st Street
$1200 First and Last. Call
646-321-1262.

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely-renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

5171 N.W. 19th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly, two months
security required. Call
305-510-7538.

5630 Percival Avenue
Coconut Grove
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1000 mthly. 305-651-
3872

727 N.W. 74th Street
Four or five bdrms, two
baths, fenced yard, tile, Sec-
tion 8 ok! Call 786-306-2349.

775 N.W. 58th Street
MOVE IN SPECIAL!
Three bedroom, two bath,
new kitchen, $1300/month,
305-684-9838 or
305-332-7197.

9410 N.W. 32nd Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250, air, tile, $3125 move
in. No Section 8.
305-891-6776
Terry Dellerson Broker

COCONUT GROVE AREA
Three bedroom, two bath,
two story home,
786-597-3999.

HOLLYWOOD AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled, tiled. Section Ok.
786-285-8872

LOCATION! LOCATION!
LOCATION!
Large, three bedroom, two
bath, with den, in excellent
neighborhood, in very good
condition. Section 8 wel-
comed! Call AMEC Realty
786-853-1903.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
A very nice three bedrooms,
one bath, appliances includ-
ed. First, last and security.
Call 305-749-6810

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Charming two bedrooms,
one bath, large bonus room,
pool centrally located. $1200
monthly. Call 305-319-9830

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedroom, one bath.
$1150 monthly. Call
407-497-8017.


NORTH DADE AREA
Private area, one bdrm, one
bath, $1340 to move in.
305-693-0620

NORTHWEST AREA
Newly remodeled, three
bedroom, one bath, large lot,
central air and heat, $1250/
month, Section 8 ok! Call
305-829-0073.

2791 N.W. 197th Terrace
three bedrooms, two bath, all
appliances, air, $1150/month,
$800/security. 786-200-1686

1640 N.E. 125th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$1050/mth, call 786-285-
0287.



NAIL SALON
8644 N.W. 22nd Avenue
For sale or rent.
786-306-0967


6832 N.W. 5th Place
Studio, $105 weekly, $450 to
move in. Others available in
North Miami. 786-286-2540

MIAMI GARDENS AND
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms, efficiency, house for
rent. 305-300-7783



15978 N.W. 27th Avenue
Great for early morning and
afternoon church services.
Monday thru friday, can be
used for dance rehearsal, ka-
rate, and afternoon classes.
For more info, contact Rev.
William Clark 305-789-6269
or Dea. Paul Spencer
786-412-7203


Oceanfront, six villas in all,
excellent income oppor-
tunity, five two bdrm, one
three bdrm, priced very loW.
Perfect corner for apartment
complex, church, charter
school and more. Call 305-
829-0073


WE BUY HOUSES!!!
Any Condition-Any Area!
305-788-8939


Two acres for sale, located in
upscale neighborhood,
$298,000, in Jensen Beach
CL Darby Mortage Company
SPECIALIZING IN CREDIT
REPAIR/FORECLOSURES,
786-587-4332

*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
***WITH***
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty






GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.


TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.



Men and Woman All Ages!
Earn up to $500 daily part-
time! Hottest money making
opportunity in Americal Write
for FREE report: Dry Tech,
Suite CL5951, 8920 Quartz
Ave, Northridge, CA 91324.

w .


CHILDCARE DIRECTOR,
WORKERS, AND VPK
INSTRUCTORS
Learning center with im-
mediate openings. Must be
certified, professional, and
experienced!
Call 305-456-1261



CNA
Two hours daily. 954-588-
5224


COOK and CLEAN
LAUNDRY
Required minimum five
years experience with refer-
ences related to house-
keeping positions. 5.5 days.
Valid driver's license, non-
smoker, drug testing and
background check required.
Call and leave your name
and telephone number.
305-694-6227


JOBS JOBS JOBS!
All Types of Positions
Available, Flexible Work
Hours, Part and Full Time
Work, Excellent Pay and
Bonuses! Miller's Workforce
LLC. 99 NW 183rd Street
Suite 116, 305-974-5338


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and,
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

TELEMARKETERS
Part-time positions avail-
able Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday.
Busy newspaper needs
experienced telemarketers,
must generate own clients.
Motivation is the key, quo-
tas must be met weekly and
commission is a plus!
Please fax resume to
305-694-6211 or email to
SA0e188pUBSSf ilWBlHrIIH
linelt lour're an excellent
salesperson, willing to make
a small investment, I have
an excellent idea/product!
Together we can soar! Abital
786-274-2016



ENGLISH BULLDOG FOR
SALE
All puppies come with all
papers, health guarantee,
and up to date health check
including shots. Home raised
with kids and other pets.
bullbreeder05@gmail.com

Furnished church available
with central air, kitchen,
office. Seats 95. 305-681-
7652.


We Buy Houses!
Any Area, Any Price or
Condition, Fast Closing. 786-
285-8872


COSMOTOLOGY CLASSES
Attend a one or two day
course, and receive a Cos-
metology hair wrapping or
hair braiding license from the
Department of Business and
Professional Regulation. For
Only $440, includes license
fee. 954-274-2727 Master-
mind of Beauty Salon
3503 N.E. 2nd Avenue

MEDICAL BILLING
COURSE
9 Weeks Saturday Classes.
$965.00 Easy Payment
Plan, includes National
Certification Exam. Call
305-794-3961. Or visit www.
prssonline.com


***ONE LOW FEE***
Hauling and Junk Removal
CALL MR. J, 786-970-8748




SUBSCRIBE


TODAY!


END THE

INCONVENIENCE

OF EMPTY

NEWSPAPER

BOXES,

FIGHTING

THE WEATHER

AND HUNTING

DOWN BACK

COPIES


305-694-6214


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3. 2009


Recession


or not, women


till make hair a priority


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MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY AVIATION DEPARTMENT
UTILITIES MASTER PLAN (SANITARY SEWER)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05C


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The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes,
2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional
engineering services will be required for Utilities Master Plan (SANITARY SEWER), for the Miami-
Dade Aviation Department (MDAD):

PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT THE FOLLOWING OCI PROJECTS WILL BE E-SOLICITED
CONCURRENTLY, AS SEPARATE PROJECTS:

OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05A (DRAINAGE)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05B (WATER)
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDAD-05C (SANITARY SEWER)

AS A RESULT, FIRMS ELECTING TO SUBMIT AS A PRIME FOR ONE (1) OF THE THREE (3)
PROJECTS LISTED ABOVE WILL BE PRECLUDED FROM PARTICIPATING IN THE REMAINING
TWO (2) PROJECTS, AND MAY NOT PARTICIPATE ON ANY TEAM AS A SUB-CONSULTANT.

FIRMS ELECTING TO SUBMIT AS A SUB-CONSULTANT MAY ONLY PARTICIPATE ON THREE (3)
TEAMS TOTAL FOR ALL THREE (3) PROJECTS.

-The project consists of updating and maintaining the sanitary sewer master plan for Miami-Dade
Aviation Department (MDAD) facilities. The services include collecting and reviewing as-built
data, field verifying as-built conditions, updating the utility atlas, updating the existing modeling
scenario, re-establish the future modeling scenarios, update the master plan document, review and
update the MDAD design guidelines, review and update the technical specifications and assist the
Department with environmental permitting issues.

The selected consultant will receive a Professional Services Agreement (PSA) with an estimated
contract term of three (3) years with two (2) one (1) year extensions.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

The prime must demonstrate experience in the below listed areas.

The prime must demonstrate a minimum.of five (5) years cumulative experience, from the submittal
date, in developing and maintaining sanitary sewer master plans and associated computer modeling
(SewerCAD preferred) in airport and municipal sanitary sewer collection and transmission systems of
equal size and complexity as Miami International Airport (MIA).

The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's firm. The
experience must be demonstrated by direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a
supervisory capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects. The determination of
the individual's qualifications and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at
the sole discretion of the County.
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

6.01 Water and Sanitary Sewer Systems Water Distribution
and Sanitary Sewage Collection and Transmission Systems.

10.01 Environmental Engineering -
Stormwater Drainage Design Engineering Services

A copy of the Notice to Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation
provisions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural &
Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and
fax respectively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be
forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have
included an e-mail address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have
vendor enrolled on-line. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://
www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amelia M. Cordova-Jimenez who may be contacted via
e-mail at ameliac@miamidade.gov, via fax at (305) 350-6265, or via telephone at (305) 375-2036.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement 5% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Measure

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on February 25, 2009, at 10:00 A.M.
in Conference Room 18-2, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to
attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is March 20, 2009 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners, 111 NW 1"t Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of
the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order
3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


e Georgia
tch Doctor


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 One of the oldest pediatric Practices
in Dade County Over 50 years of Child Care
& WEBSITE
"I 4 www.rozalynhpaschalmd.com
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 Phone 305-758-0591 IPlantation FL 33317 Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 305-652-6095


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 132088 INVITATION FOR BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF
ONE FIFTH WHEEL CARGO AND PERSONNEL
CARRIER OR APPROVED EQUAL FOR CITY OF
MIAMI POLICE DEPARTMENT

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00P.M., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 2009

Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 3/6/2009 at 3:00 P.M.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
(305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12211.

Pedro G. Hernandez L"*
City Manager :i i

AD NO. 003584


- *
* -


- *


* *


.








9D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


BLACKS MusT CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


ervo

Tctc to stfa formdmrw : Show me the papeork


"Copydg.hted Material


Syndicated Content


'Available from Commercial News Providers"
,= , -M


- .4--o0 -


- ~ -


SBA issues scam alert to small businesses on tax rebate


Miami Times Staff Report
The U.S. Small Busi-
ness Administration in
Washington has issued
a scam alert urging
small businesses not to
respond to letters claim-
ing to have been sent by
the SBA asking for bank
account information in
order to qualify them for
federal tax rebates.


The fraudulent letters
were sent out with what
appears to be an SBA
letterhead to small busi-
nesses across the coun-
try telling addressees
that they may be eligible
for a tax rebate under
the Economic Stimulus
Act and that the SBA
was assessing their
eligibility for such a re-
bate. The letter asks the


business to provide the
name of its bank and ac-
count number.
The SBA makes it clear
it did not send or autho-
rize such letters and has
"strongly advised" busi-
nesses not to respond to
them.
The scheme is similar


in many ways to e-mail
scams often' referred to
as "phishing" that seek
personal data and finan-
cial account information
that enables another
party to access an indi-
vidual's bank accounts
or to engage in identity
theft.


The SBA said it is
working with its Office
of Inspector General
to investigate the mat-
ter. That office is ask-
ing those who receives
the letter to report it
to its Fraud Line, 800-
767-0385, or e-mail
OIGHotline@sba.gov.


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSION MEETING

Pursuant to Section 2-33 of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida, as amended,
Mayor Manuel Diaz has called a special meeting of the Miami City Commission
on March 4, 2009 at 9:00 AM, at Miami City Hall located at 3500 Pan American
Drive. The purpose of this meeting is to deliberate on Proposed Definitive
Agreements among the City, Miami-Dade County and Florida Marlins related
to a Proposed Baseball Stadium and to consider amending the Interlocal
Agreement related to the amount of the Convention Development Tax Funds
(CDT) payable by the County to the City in connection with the development of
Parking Facilities for the Stadium at the former Orange Bowl Site.
At the recent February 13, 2009 Special City Commission meeting, the City
Commission continued the above-referenced items to the City Commissions'
regularly calendared meeting of March 12, 2009. The herein published notice
informs the public that these items will now be considered on March 4, 2009
instead of March 12, 2009. No other business shall be conducted outside of
that indicated above.
All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with
respect to this matter. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F.S. 286.0105).
In accordance with the Americans' with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003211)

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
IFB NO. 126085 WIRELESS POINT-TO-POINTAND
POINT-TO-MULTIPOINT LINK
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00P.M., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2009
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305416-1906.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12211.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 002068 )


MIAMI-DADE
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MIAMI-DADE


REQUEST FOR
APPLICATIONS FOR
HOMELESS OUTREACH
SERVICES FOR
HOMELESS PERSONS

Miami-Dade County Government, through the
Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust, is requesting
applications from qualified public or private non-profit
service providers for a Change of Project Sponsor for
homeless outreach services for homeless individuals
and families.

The County will evaluate all applications to determine
the best qualified service providers) to perform
the outlined scope of services. Interested parties
may pick-up a copy of the Request for Applications
(RFA) beginning February 23, 2009 at the following
address:

Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust
111 NW 1st Street, 27th Floor, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1490
8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

The due date for submission of applications is 4:00
p.m. on March 23, 2009 at the Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners on the 17th Floor, Room 17-
202 of the Stephen P. Clark Center, Miami, Florida.

APre-Appiication Workshop will be held on: February
27,2009 at 2:30 p.m., 111 NW 1st Street, 10th floor
CITT Conference Room, Miami, FL, 33128.

Attendance at the Pre-Application Workshop is
strongly recommended. In order to maintain a
fair and impartial competitive process, the County
can only answer questions at the Pre-Application
Workshop and must avoid private communication with
prospective service providers during the application
preparation and evaluation Ieriod. Miami-Dade
County is not liable for any cost incurred by the
applicant in responding to the RFA, and it reserves
the right to modify or amend the application deadline
schedule if it is deemed necessary or in the interest
of Miami-Dade County. Miami-Dade County provides
equal access and opportunity in employment and
services and does not discriminate on the basis of
handicap. The contact person for purposes of
this RFA is David Raymond, (305) 375-1490.









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 35, 2009 1


Nearly 5 million arr ettin unemploymen beneflttv


-py ril -"Materiai -


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -


Foreclosure is focus of Consumer Protection Week


Miami Times StaffReport

The Miami-Dade
Consumer Servic-
es Department will
mark National Con-
sumer Protection
Week March 3-5 with
presentations on
foreclosure rescue
fraud and the servic-
es it offers free to the
public.


The sessions will
take place at 6:30
p.m. Tuesday, March
3, at the West Fla-
gler Branch Library,
5050 W. Flagler St.,
Miami; Wednesday,
March 4, at the West
Kendall Regional Li-
brary, 10201 Ham-
mocks Blvd. in West
Kendall; and Thurs-
day, March 5, at the


-North Dade Regional
Library, 2455 NW
183rd St., Miami
Gardens.
Representatives
from Miami-Dade
Mayor Carlos Alva-
rez's Mortgage Fraud
Task Force will be
present.
According to the
department, Nation-
al Consumer Protec-


tion Week is a time
to highlight consum-
er education efforts
that help people get
the most for their
money and beaches
them how to tell the
difference between a
real deal and a po-
tential fraud.
The department
is using this year's
theme, "Nuts and


Bolts: Tools for To-
day's Economy," to
focus on mortgage
foreclosure. The pre-
sentations will look
at "the types of fraud-
ulent activities used
by unscrupulous in-
dividuals to prey on
people who are des-
perate to save their
homes." Presenters
will also offer sug-


gestions on how ho-
meowners can protect
oneself and guidance
on how to find legiti-
mate help for related
financial problems.
For more informa-
tion and to RSVP, call
the Consumer Media-
tion Center, 305-375-
3677 or e-mail con-
sumer@miamidade.
gov.


County officials urge action to ensure TV conversion


Miami Times Staff Report

County officials led
by Commission Chair-
man Dennis ,C. Moss
have joined the push
to persuade people
to take steps to en-
sure they can receive
television broadcasts
after the conversion
from analog to digital
signals.
Congress recent-
ly pushed back the


deadline for the DTV
conversion from Feb.
17 to June 12.
Moss and other of-
ficials addressed the
topic during a recent
press conference.
They said the conver-
sion will be relatively
effortless for those
who are prepared for
it.
Moss is urging those
who have analog tele-
vision sets to get con-


verter boxes and to
obtain government-
sponsored coupons to
buy the boxes.
. "We were fortunate
to be given another
opportunity to prepare
for this transition. I
want to make sure
that citizens know
about the resources
available to help them
through this DTV pro-
cess," Moss said.
More than a decade


ago, the Federal Com-
munication Commis-
sion authorized the
digital conversion. In
1996, Congress ap-
proved distribution
of a digital channel
to each broadcast TV
station.
Digital television is
already available, so
people are being en-
couraged to act now.
Households need-
ing help to pay for


the converter boxes
should sign up for
their two coupons and
be placed on National
Telecommunications
and Information Ad-
ministration's wait
listing.
The $40 coupons,
which can be used to-
ward buying converter
boxes, may be ordered
by calling 1-888-388-
2009, sending a fax
to 1-877-388-4632,


logging on to www.
dtv2009.gov or send-
ing a letter to P. O.
Box 2000, Portland,
OR 97208.
The Alliance for Ag-
ing has received a
grant to help those 60
and older to have con-
verter boxes installed.
Arrangements may be
made by calling 1-800-
963-5337 or by logging
on to http://www.alli-
anceforaging.org/.


Fish pedicures not permitted


If your cosmetology
salon is offering to
have live carp clean
your feet, a state
panel overseeing the
business says fish
pedicures are against
the law.
The matter sur-
faced when the Flor-
ida Board of Cosme-
tology, housed in the
Department of Busi-
ness and Professional


Regulation, met in
January.
The use of tiny, live
carp to clean feet vio-
lates two rules, the
agency said.
One rule prohib-
its animals or pets,
excluding animals
trained to assist the
hearing' impaired, vi-
sually impaired, or
the physically dis-
abled, in salons.


The other rule sets
the standards for
pedicure sanitation
requirements.
"If salons are found
performing fish pedi-
cures, the salon and
the cosmetologist may
be subject to citations
and fines," an agency
statement said.
The board compris-
es five cosmetologists
and two consumers.


-TODAY!


, w


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held
by the Transit, Infrastructure & Roads Committee (TIRC) of
the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners
in the Commission Chambers, second floor, 111 N.W.
First Street, Miami, Florida, during a meeting to begin
at approximately 2:00 p.m., on March 11, 2009, where
modifications to existing bus routes will be considered
as follows:
MIAMI-DADE TRANSIT (MDT) PROPOSES
TO MAKE THE FOLLOWING SERVICE
ADJUSTMENTS, ON OR ABOUT MAY 17,2009,
TO THE FOLLOWING ROUTES TO OPERATE
MORE EFFICIENTLY: ROUTE 21,36,41,48,91,
99 L, M, 183RD STREET MAX, 238 EAST-WEST
CONNECTION, 243 SEAPORT CONNECTION,
246 NIGHT OWL, AND THE 344 FLORIDA/
HOMESTEAD CONNECTION. MDT ALSO
PROPOSES TO IMPLEMENT A NEW PREMIUM
LIMITED STOP ROUTE: 79TH STREET MAX.
At the hearing, the Committee will afford an opportunity
for interested persons or agencies to be heard with
respect to the social, economic, and environmental
aspects of this project. Interested persons may submit
orally or in writing evidence and recommendations
with respect to said project.
A person who decides to appeal any decision made
by any board, agency, or commission with respect
to any such matter considered at its meeting or
hearing, will need a record of all proceedings. Such
person may need to insure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, including testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is based.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal
opportunity in employment and does not discriminate
on the basis of disability in its programs or services.
Auxiliary aids and services for communication are
available with advance notice. This form can be
made available in accessible format upon request
(audiotape, Braille, or computer disk). For material in
alternate format, a sign-language interpreter, or other
accommodations, please contact Maud Lizano at
(786) 469-5478. Customers using TDD, please call
through. the Florida Relay Service
1 (800) 955-8771 at least five (5) MIAMIDADE
days in advance. mTIal


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11D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


National push started to help with TV digital conversion


Special to 7he Miami 7mres

Washington, DC
(BlackNews.com) De-
scribing the delay in
the conversion to digi-
tal TV broadcasting
"a call to action" for
communities across
the country, the Lead-
ership Conference on
Civil Rights Education
Fund (LCCREF)and
New America Media
(NAM) have stepped up
their joint campaign
to assist minority and
low-income house-


holds with preparing
for the upcoming con-
version.
Congress recently
approved legislation
that will delay the im-
plementation of digital
only TV signals, origi-
nally set for Feb. 1.7,
to June 12.
Nearly four million
households are on a
waiting list to receive
government coupons
that can off-set the
cost of DTV converter
boxes so that people
can continue watch-


ing analog television
sets.
Working with NAM,
an organization rep-
resenting more than
2,000 ethnic media
outlets, LCCREF has
launched an educa-
tional campaign to
provide Americans
with information on
how to prevent their
televisions from shut-
ting down after the
conversion.
"The delay gives our
communities more
time to prepare but


The Coby DTV-102 ATSC Converter Box con-
verts over-the-air Digital Television signals for
use with older standard definition TVs.


it's very important
that people act now
and apply for the cou-
pon to offset the cost
of the DTV converter
box and set up at least
one digital-ready TV,"


said Wade Henderson,
president of the Lead-
ership Conference on
Civil Rights.
Henderson stressed
that television, partic-
ularly in poor commu-


nities, is a key com-
munication medium
in the event of a natu-
ral disaster or other
catastrophic event.
"We don't want a
situation where 'lives
are at stake because
someone's television
doesn't work and they
miss important pub-
lic safety announce-
ments," Henderson
said.
Recent studies have
indicated that 12.5
percent of African
American households


and 13 percent of His-
panic households are
currently using ana-
log televisions and are
not ready for the con-
version.
Also, households
with annual incomes
of less than $25,000
are five times more
likely to be unpre-
pared for the digi-
tal conversion than
households earning
more than $75,000.
"We need for civic
leaders, organizations
and businesses to pull


together and contrib-
ute to this education
campaign. We to pre-
vent a new digital di-
vide in America," Close
said. "No community
shall be left behind.
But to make that a
reality, preparation
for the digital conver-
sion must be a priority
for everyone. The de-
lay in implementation
will help millions of
people stay connected
to news, information
and public service an-
nouncements."


JC Penney pors 51 peren slide in 4Q profit








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TODAY!
E If D THE
Erio i'E
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CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
PUBLIC NOTICE

As required by Section 255.20, Florida Statutes, and in accordance with the
Section 18-85 (a) of the City Code of the City of Miami, the City Commission
of the City of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida, will conduct a public
hearing in the Commission Chambers of Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida, on Wednesday, March 4, 2009 at 9 a.m., to consider
whether it is practicable or advantageous and in the public's best interest to
waive competitive sealed bids in connection with the construction of public
infrastructure associated with the proposed Florida Marlins ballpark (the "Public
Infrastructure Work") and authorize the award of the Public Infrastructure Work
to Hunt/Moss, a Joint Venture. The Public Infrastructure Work is estimated to
cost $24,000,000 (to be funded by Miami-Dade County and the City of Miami).
The Public Infrastructure Work is located in the vicinity of NW 7 Street and NW
14 Avenue, Miami, Florida (the site area of the former Orange Bowl).

The City Manager will present written findings to the City Commission which
shall contain reasons supporting the conclusion that competitive sealed bidding
is not practicable or advantageous to the City, which finding must be ratified
and the contract award approved by an affirmative vote of four-fifths 4/5th of
the City Commission.

All interested parties may appear and be heard at the time and place
specified.

This waiver of competitive sealed bidding had been previously advertised to
be heard at a hearing which was continued to March 12, 2009. It will now be
considered at the Special Meeting of the Miami City Commission on March 4,
2009 instead of March 12, 2009.

Persons who decide to appeal any decision made by any City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at its meeting or hearing, will need a
record of the proceedings. Such persons may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, including the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.

The City of Miami provides equal access and equal opportunity and does not
discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs or services. For material
in alternate format, a sign language interpreter or other accommodation, please
call (305) 250-5360.


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003210)


Neighborhood Housing Services
of South Florida
Presents:
FREE HOMEBUYER COUNSELING AND
TRAINING IN ENGLISH AND SPANISH
Homebuyer Education: March 7, 2009
To pre-register, call: 305-751-5511

Sponsored by Miami-Dade County


_ ___


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12D THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 3, 2009


New COMTO executive

board installed in office


Miami Times Staff Report

Seraphin W. Bernard
has been installed as
president of the Miami
Chapter of the Confer-
ence of Minority Trans-
portation Officials
(COMTO) for 2008-2010
at a ceremony held at
the Bankers Club of
Miami on Jan. 29.
Kenneth Jones is
the first vice-president
and Derick Gordon is
second vice-president.
Other members of
the executive include
Fitz McLymont, imme-
diate past president;
Veronica Griffin, sec-
retary; Valerie Nelomns,
treasurer; Reynold
Monestine, parliamen-
tary
William Harris,
Rhonda Pinkney-Wim-


berly and Errol Taylor
are at-large members.
County Chairman
Dennis C. Moss, past
COMTO ex-officio
member, was honored
at the installation cer-
emony where County
Commissioner Bruno
A. Barreiro, the chap-
ter's present ex-officio
member, swore in the
new executive board.
COMTO is a national
non-profit transporta-
tion organization with
38 chapters across
the United States and
members encompass-
ing individuals, organi-
zations, transportation
agencies, non-profit
and Historically Under-
utilized Businesses.
For more informa-
tion on COMTO, log on
to www.comto.org.


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MIAMI-ADE



INVITATION TO BID

Miami-Dade County
Miami-Dade Park and Recreation Department

Country Club of Miami Community Center
Contract No. 200200-04-001 GOB ESP

Miami-Dade County, hereinafter known as MDC,-will receive bids for the
Country Club of Miami Community Center, Contract No. 200200-04-001 GOB
ESP. The project will be located in Miami-Dade County, State of Florida.

This project includes goals for the participation of Community Small Business
Enterprises based on a percentage of the total contract amount, as noted below
and in the Bid Form, in accordance with the Project Manual. Goals for Commu-
nity Small Business Enterprises must be fulfilled using construction contractor/
sub-contractor trades to comply with goals requirements pursuant to this solici-
tation.

The Contractor must agree to abide by the provisions of the Project Manual
regarding minimum participation goals, proposed below as a percentage of the
total Contract Sum and accepted by MDC and which are established for this
Project as follows:

Community Small Business Enterprise participation: 21%

Locally funded projects of $100,000 and above are also subject to the Equal
Employment Opportunity requirements and Section 2-11.16 of the Code of Met-
ropolitan Dade County (Responsible Wages).

Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended, a
"Cone of Silence" is imposed upon each RFP, RFQ or bid after advertisement
and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommenda-
tion to the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits any
communication regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between, among others:

potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants
and the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County
Manager and the County Manager's staff, the Mayor, County Commissioners
or their respective staffs;

* the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and the
County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and
the County Manager's staff;

S potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants,
any member of the County's professional staff, the Mayor, County Commis-
sioners or their respective staffs and any member of the respective selection
committee.

The provisions do not apply to, among other communications:

S oral communications with the staff of the Vendor Information Center,
the responsible Procurement Agent or Contracting Officer, provided the commu-
nication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedure already contained
in the solicitation document;

S the provisions of the Cone of Silence do not apply to oral communica-
tions at pre-proposal or pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before selection
committees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed public meeting, public
presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly
noticed public meeting; or

Communications in-writing at any time with any county employee,
official or member of the Board of County Commissioners unless specifically
prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ or bid documents.

Proposers or bidders must file a copy of any written communications with the
Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request.
The County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board,
which shall be made available to any person upon request. Written communi-
cations may be in the form of e-mail, with a copy to the Clerk of the Board at
CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the Cone of Si-
lence by any proposer.or bidder shall render any RFP award, RFQ award or bid
award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of these
provisions shall report such,violation to the State Attorney and/or may file a com-
plaint with Ethics Commission. Proposers or bidders should reference Section
2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code for further clarification.

This language is only a summary of the key provisions of the Cone of Silence.
Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete
and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.

Miami-Dade County will receive bids for the base scope which includes the con-
struction of a new community center, entrance, parking, a new pool building and
pool, a new aquatic play area, new pervious concrete walkway, irrigation and
landscaping. The engineer's cost estimate for the base bid is $5,043,416.12.

Included in the bid shall be the furnishing of all materials, labor, services, su-
pervision, tools and equipment required or incidental to this project. All work
shall be performed as per the Contract Documents. Miami-Dade County, at its
sole discretion may elect to negotiate with the apparent low bidder, if only one
bidder bids;

The County reserves the right to waive any informalities or irregularities in any
bid, or reject any or all bids if deemed to be in the best interest of the County.

As part of this Contract, the County may, at its sole discretion, issue miscel-
laneous changes covering all construction disciplines. The Contractor shall be
capable of expeditiously performing this change work either with its own forces
or with subcontractors. The direct and indirect cost of these changes and time
extensions, if any, will be negotiated at the time the changes are issued and
payment will be made in accordance with Article 36 of the General Conditions.
As the nature or extent of these changes can not be ascertained prior to notice-
to-proceed, the Contractor shall not include an amount in his bid in anticipation
of these changes.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED
IN: As required by Chapter 10 of the Miami-Dade County. Other Certificates of


Competency, if required, shall be provided by subcontractors prior to beginning
of work.


Bid Documents will be available on or about February 25, 2009 and may be pur-
chased from Omara Cuello at the Park and Recreation Department, 4th Floor,
Architecture and Engineering Division, 275 N. W. 2nd Street, Miami, Florida. A
list of bidders may also be obtained at the above listed address.

MDC has scheduled a Pre-Bid Conference at 1:00 P.M. local time on March
4, 2009, at the, 275 N. W. 2nd Street, 3rd Floor Training Room, Miami, Florida
33128. The Pre-Bid Conference is being held to answer any questions regard-
ing this project.

MDC will receive SEALED Bids at the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, at the Stephen P.'Clark Center, 111 N. W. First Street, Suite
17-202, Miami, Florida 33128 until 2:00 p.m. local time on April 1, 2009. Bids
received after that time will not be accepted, nor will qualified, segregated and/
or incomplete Bids be accepted. Bids may not be revoked nor withdrawn for
360 days after the bid opening date. The Contract, if awarded, will be awarded
to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Interested parties are invited
to attend.

All bids shall be submitted to the clerk of The Board in two (2) separate sealed
envelopes in the following manner.

Envelope number one shall be in a sealed white envelope containing (1) DBD
form 400 Schedule of Intent for each subcontractor for projects which contain
goals or are "Set-Aside" for CSBE contractors on the project. On the outside of
the envelop place the name of the bidder, its address, the name of the Contract
for which the bid is submitted, the contract number and the date for opening of
bids.

Envelope number two shall be in a sealed manila envelope containing the re-
quired bid documents. On the outside of the envelope place the name of the bid-
der, its address, the name of the contract for which the bid is submitted. The Bid
Security specified in Article 7 of the Instruction To Bidders shall be enclosed with
the bid. Failure to include the Bid Security shall render the bid non-responsive.

The opening of bids will be as follows:

DBD Staff will open the white envelope and review the DBD form 400 Schedule
of Intent on the bid opening date and time. If the DBD form 400 has correctable
defectss, the bidder will be given a checklist indicating the correctable defectss.
The bidder must submit the corrected DBD form 400 to DBD and the Clerk of
The Board within forty-eight (48) hours of the bid opening date. If the bidder's
DBD form 400 contains non-correctable defectss, DBD will immediately inform
the bidder that the submittal is not responsive and not approved, and envelope
number two will not be opened.

Envelope number two will be opened forty-eight (48) hours after the bid opening
date. Only the bids that have complied with the DBD form 400 Schedule of Intent
submittal will be opened.

Requests must be accompanied by either a check or money order drawn in fa-
vor of the Board of County Commissioners, Miami-Dade County, Florida. Cash
will not be accepted.

The following is a list of the available Bid Documents and their respective
costs:

Contract Drawings (full size) and


Project


Manual --------------------------------------- --


-------------$50.00 each set
(NONREFUNDABLE)


Or

Contract Drawings (full size) with


Project Manual on CD


--, ----------- -- $--$20.00 each set
(NONREFUNDABLE)


Bid Security must accompany each bid and must be in an amount of not less
than five percent of the highest Total Bid Price. MDC reserves the right to waive
irregularities, to reject bids and/or to extend the bidding period.

Each Contractor, and his subcontractors performing work at the Work site, will
be required to pay Florida sales and use taxes and to pay for licenses and fees
required by the municipalities in which the Work will be located. Each Con-
tractor will be required to furnish a Surety Performance and Payment Bond in
accordance with Article 1.03, Contract Security, of the Supplemental General
Conditions and to furnish Certificates of Insurance in the amounts specified in
the Contract Documents.

The Contractor is hereby advised of Resolution No R-1145-99, Clearinghouse
for Posting Notices of Job Opportunities Resulting from Construction Improve-
ments on County Property. The procedures direct the Contractor to forward a
notice of job vacancy(ies) created as a result of this'construction work to the
director of the Employee Relations Department, located at Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 NW 1st Street, suite 2110, Miami, Florida 33128. The job vacancy
notices should be delivered within ten (10) working days following award of the
contractor. The Director of the Employee Relations Department will in turn dis-
tribute said job announcements to all Miami Dade County facilities participating
in the notification requirements of Resolution No. R-1145-99.

Any firm proposed for use as a CSBE on this contract, must have a valid cer-
tification from the Miami-Dade County Department of Business Development
(DBD), at the time of bid.

It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to provide equal employment opportu-
nity.

Those responding to this RFP/ITB/RFQ shall comply with the provisions of the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and 49 U.S.C. Section 1612 and other
related laws and regulations.

Call (305) 755-7848, to request material in accessible format, information on
access for persons with disabilities, or sign language interpreter services (7
days in advance), 305-755-7980 (tdd).

SPANISH TRANSLATION:

Llamar al (305) 755-7848, para obtener information acerca del acceso para
Leisure Access Services personas minusvalidas y para obtener materials en
format accessible. Los interesados en el servicio de interpretes para el idioma
de los sordomudos deben Ilamar con siete dias de antelacion, 305-755-7980
(Servicio telefonico para sordos).


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI-DADE PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

Harvey Ruvin, Clerk
Kay Sullivan, Deputy Clerk


"If the lions do not write their own

history, then the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


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