Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00740
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: February 18, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00740
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text






After 100 years NAACP must keep historic mission


By DeWayne Wickham


1)L C --IT R


tory. The telling of both needs
to be improved upon to put the
NAACP's first 100 years into
proper context. History was
important to its founders, who
purposefully declared its cre-
ation on Feb. 12, 1909 the
100th anniversary of Abraham
Lincoln's birth.
In the 20th century, when "the
color line" was America's most


daunting problem, the NAACP
was on the cutting edge of ev-
ery major civil rights battle.
In 1944, it helped overturn a
Texas law that had kept blacks
from voting in primaries, thus
ushering in change across the
nation. (It also made it pos-
sible 64 years later for blacks
to play a key pivotal role in the
selection of Barack Obama as


the Democratic Party's A
presidential nominee.)
Then, in quick suc-
cession, the NAACP (NA
legal team, led by J'
Thurgood Marshall,
won U.S. Supreme
Court rulings striking
down state laws that re-
quired racial segregation on
interstate trains and buses;


outlawing restrictive
covenants that were
meant to keep blacks
lP77\ j from buying homes in
white neighborhoods;
S and chipping away
at school segregation
with high court victories
negating Texas and Oklaho-
ma laws that required separate
Please turn to NAACP 5A


hlhhlh,*,lh,,lh3-DIGIT 326
517 P1
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
PO BOX 11767
CAINESVILLE FL 32611-7067


e fltiami


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamiur In Illis

DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 25 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Stadium plan hits stumbling block

S . ,..... ., ,, i .,


Absent


Spence-Jones


deciding vote on March


holds

12


scharite@miamitimesonline.com

What seemed like a day of
celebration for the two-time
World Series champions the .
Florida Marlins turned into
disappointment Friday when a
deal to build a new stadium was
put on hold by a 2-2 vote at the .
Miami City Commission.
The ballpark with a price of
more than $500 million is being
proposed for the site of the
demolished Orange Bowl. MICHELLE SPENCE-JONES
"I want the Marlins to play in MICHELLE SPENCE-JONES
Little Havana. This is a very good .Cmi
idea but a very bad deal for the city
of Miami," said Commissioner Tomas P. Regalado.
Regalado and Commissioner Marc Sarnoff voted against
the proposal which was supported by Commissioners Angel ,
Gonzalez and Joe M. Sanchez.
With Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones absent on
Please turn to STADIUM 8A Artist rendering of the Florida Marlins ballpark proposed for the site of the now demolished Orange Bowl.


-Image courtesy of the Florida Marlins


Gary dies


at age 62

Served as Miami's
first Black manager
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Howard V. Gary, who made
history as Miami's first Black
city manager, died Sunday af-
ter a five-year battle with can-
cer at age 62.
Gary is credited with help-
ing to re-shape downtown
Miami and the conception of


HOWARD GARY
-Photo By CharlesTrainor Jr/ Miami Herald


the Bayside Marketplace was
credited to his administration.
He also worked to implement
measures that made the city's
power structure more repre-
sentative of its Black and His-
panic residents, according to
associates.
Gary served as city manager
from 1981-1984.
"He was what we often call
a warrior," said his long-time
friend, attorney George Knox,
65. "He was a very, smart per-
son who spoke his mind and
was very effective in his pub-
lic life, in representing the city
Please turn to GARY 6A


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The NAACP turned 100 this
month. The centennial anni-
versary of the civil rights orga-
nization's birth has produced a
rash of news stories that give
short shrift to its contribu-
tions to this nation, and pro-
vide scant understanding of its
roller-coaster ride through his-


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Miami cannot afford a

baseball stadium
T here is a lot of cache to being an area with a lot of
major league sports and stadiums. We already have a
football stadium and a basketball stadium and, a bit
north, there is a hockey stadium even though we do not get
snow and ice. We have knocked down the Orange Bowl and
we have abandoned the Miami Arena. Next comes a baseball
stadium.

Whom do such properties really benefit, though? Certainly
not the ordinary resident without whose support, it is said,
they cannot bt built.

The exception, of course, is Dolphin Stadium, the latest
name for the ball field that Joe Robbie built with private
funds. What happened to those days when it was a source of
pride for a major league sports team owner to go out and raise
capital without having to feed from the public trough?

In too many cities across the nation, the trend is now to
threaten to move the team away unless taxpayers, in one
form or other, are willing to cough up hundreds of millions
of dollars to pay for these shiny structures whose owners
turn around and further enrich themselves. That is what is
happening with the Florida Marlins' request for a stimulus
package to build its stadium, even though the money is not
expected to come directly from taxpayers' pockets.

And it is the irony of the times. While cities crumble for
want of financial help and people are losing their jobs and
their health insurance and their homes, here comes the
Florida Marlins organization asking for tax money that should
be better used go to help pay for a $515 million stadium the
team hopes will arise from the ashes of the Orange Bowl.

It may have the allure of giving us yet another feather in
our stadium cap but it is a bad idea to use public money for
this purpose when there are many other more pressing needs
where it can be better spent. That is what. a groundswell of
voices is saying to the county and city leaders.

It is what Miami Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones
should be hearing. The commissioner, who recently gave birth,
was absent from the Miami city commission meeting last
Friday when the plan came up for a vote and commissioners
deadlocked 2-2. She would have swung the decision either
way. If she has been listening to her District 5 constituents,
who voted her into office to represent them, she would have
had only one choice: to reject the proposal unless there is
substantial reworking of the draft agreement to ensure
taxpayers get a vastly better bang for their bucks.


The meaning of compassion:

A $787 billion economic

stimulus package
rTrhose who believe that having the right person in The
White House does not matter because it does not affect
them need. only to look at the $787 billion economic
stimulus package, as it is called, to understand that it does
matter.

There is a lot of money in the package for Americans who
need it the most: tax breaks for working families and first-time
homebuyers, help with health insurance costs for those who
are laid off, dollars to help states avoid laying off teachers and
for students seeking to go to college, funds for more police
officers, especially the Community Oriented Policing Services,
(COPS) program and what is being called a lifeline for the poor
and the elderly.


M le %iami aimfne

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR.. Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association ol America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press Delie\es Ihat America can besi lead Ihe world from racial ano national antagonism when II accords to
every person, regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal rghls Haling no person leanng no person Ihe
Blacr. Press sinves to help every person in the lrm nelef Ihal all persons are hun as long as anyone is held oacK


Ap I' The Media Audit =


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None of this is happening by chance.


If, as the economists say, the best way to lift the economy is
by stimulating it through injecting huge sums of money into
the system, the-debate becomes a philosophical.one. Should
the money be given away to the rich and to businesses through
tax cuts. Or should much of it be devoted to helping the tens
of millions of Americans whose financial circumstances so they
can, in turn, spend it in the system and provide a consequent
boost.

It should have been a no-brainer. For one thing, the conditions
of many families have become dire precisely because of actions
taken by many of those who would benefit from the large tax
breaks: the banks and other financial institutions that allowed
themselves to fall prey to greed and businesses that did not have
the foresight to anticipate the coming crisis. Yet, until recently,
the inclination has been to bail out those failed supposed
pillars of the economy and leave their victims drowning in a
sea of misfortunes over which they have no control.

The Obama Administration has chosen to take the alternative
approach, believing, correctly, that the economy can be jump-
started at the same time as the casualties of the recession
are thrown a lifeline. That is what having a president like
Barack Obama, a Democrat, in the White House means. It is
not surprising that in this first major test of leadership, it is
the Republicans who have failed. None of the GOP members
in the House voted for the plan and only three Republican
senators joined the Democrats to pass it. Yet, of course, their
constituents will be among the large number of Americans who
will benefit from the infusion of funds, not just Democrats and
Obama supporters.

Compassion can be worked into even high finance when the
right person is guiding the ship of state.


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


Heroes of the Week: Gov. Charlie
Crist and Commissioner Marc Sarnoff


Our local politicians remind me of lemmings, the
small rodents that live near the Artic and, for some
unknown reason, will group en mass and then jump
off a cliff. Our politicians, while not small rodents,
seem to have a similar tendency when it comes to
jumping off cliffs -- the cliffs being large, expensive
construction projects.
We enter into bad deals to build large construction projects where
we invariably lose our shirt; e.g., the American Airlines terminal, the
Miami Arena, the AmericanAirlines Arena and the Performing Arts Cen-
ter. In every instance, taxpayer dollars "invested' in these projects will
never be recouped. Invariably, every project has millions of dollars in
cost overruns, which makes a bad deal worse.

FOLLOWING THE HERD
Like lemmings, our politicians seem to follow the herd right off the
cliff. In the latest instance, the Marlins Stadium is now the lure that
seems to be leading everyone to their death. A majority of the city com-
missioners and County commissioners are going to.vote to pay two-
thirds of the cost of the stadium to be financed by Community reinvest-
ment Act (CRA) dollars and bed tax revenues. In return, we do not know
if our partner, the Florida Marlins, have the financial wherewithal to pay
their portion but they will receive all future revenues from concessions,
parking, naming rights and ticket sales.
In addition, the Marlins organization gets to pick the contractor
but is not responsible for cost overruns. We get to insure that only 10
percent of the people working on this project are local workers and
contractors.
The debt we will incur is calculated to cost $1.8 billion to $1.9 billion
-- a debt our children's children will be paying.

A MAN WHO THINKS
Enter the hero, City Commissioner Marc Sarnoff. He questioned why
the city should pay the cost overruns for the parking garage. He ques-
tioned how the taxpayers would recoup their "investment" if the team is
sold and, say, mdved to Phoenix. He wants more revenue from naming
rights. Thank God for a man who thinks. If we must build a stadium,
then at least let us enter into a good deal where we get some return on
our investment.
The otherhero. of the week, Gov. Charlie Crist, is a little tar-
nished. He promised not to cut educational funding and then he pre-
sided over the largest education budget cut in history. He has thrown
the budgets.of every school district into disarray. However, a light bulb
must have clicked, because he got on the right side of the stimulus
train and took the extraordinary step of supporting President Obama's
stimulus plan, to the chagrin of the entire Republican Party.

LATE FOR WAIVER
His reward for this smart move is that the state of Florida is in line to
receive $12 billion, of which $1.7 billion could have gone to education
if we had not so drastically cut our education budget. U.S. Sen. Mel
Martinez, who lambasted the stimulus plan, is now requesting a waiver.
It would have been smarter for the senator to support the plan and then
ask for a waiver. But, like a lemming, he followed the majority of the
Republicans off the cliff.


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What do you think about the refusal of

shooting witnesses to speak to the police?


ANTHONY BELL, 24
Student, Liberty City

It all de-
pends on the
situation. If it
is hazardous
then people
are not going
to talk but if
it is beneficial
then people
are going to talk. For exam-
ple, the amount of the reward
money can have a big influence
on people. In most situations,
when people are impacted by
the incident then they are will-
ing to snitch or want others to
talk but other than that, their
mouth is sealed. It is sad.

BOBBY BRUCE, 43
Chef, Liberty City

I grew up in
this commu-
nity and the
things that I
see going on
today are real-
ly sad. The two
boys that got
shot in Liberty
City several
weeks ago -- I
know someone
saw something but everyone is
so quiet about it. When some-
thing happens and innocent
people are being killed, there
should not be any silence. But
people are afraid for their lives,
which hinders police investiga-
tion. Most of these crimes would
be solved but no witnesses are
coming forward.


KAMANI MATTHEW, 33
Plumber, Carol City

If people did
help in pro-
viding infor-
mation to the
police, then I
think that it
would be easi-
er to solve a lot
of the crimes
in the neighborhood. However,
people are scared to say any-
thing because they fear for their
lives and their loved ones.

RODNEY CARSWELL, 37
Disabled, Liberty City

I think that r-
it -is danger-
ous for people b Me
to give infor-
mation to the
police about
anything be-
cause you put
people's lives
in danger. Wit-
nesses are afraid to come for-
ward when there is a shooting,
robbery or whatever because
the relationship between law
enforcement and the commu-
nity has never been good and
residents are still hesitant to
trust the cops.

TERRANCE HEPBURN, 42
Entrepreneur, Miami

Sadly, in the Black communi-
ty, when something happens or
affects us personally, we want to
raise hell in the neighborhood.


We are pro-
tecting killers
Sand murders
in our commu-
nity because
of this igno-
rant mentality
that. we have
held on to for
so long. Everyone has a crimi-
nal in their family and we all
know that but we are protect-
ing the very same people that
we complain, about not wanting
in our neighborhoods. Most im-
portantly, when witnesses come
forward, it is not snitching;
that word hinders the process
of keeping our neighborhoods
crime free.


TOMIKA DAVIS, 36
Unemployed, Liberty City


The reason
why people
don't give in-
formation is
because they
are afraid of
what might
happen to
them. People
know what is
going on in
their neighborhood but they
are not going to snitch. Even
though there is witness pro-
tection, people want secu-
rity and they don't want to
constantly be looking over
their shoulder to make sure
that someone is not chas-
ing them. Giving informa-
tion anonymously cannot be
trusted because you never
know who knows who.


p
me


0


"If the lions do not write
their own history, then
the hunters will get all
the credit."
-African Proverb


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


Leia Ambrister, Veronica Faustin and Mikaela Engram finished fifth in the K-5 Unrated Section at the Super State Scholastic
Chess Tournament held this past weekend at the Miami Mart Airport Hotel. Russian chess champion Alexandra Kosteniuk sup-
port them in their victory. -Edison Park Elementary Chess Coach/ Webber Charles

World champion gives students chess tips


By Sandra J. Charite
Chenelle Vasquez is only a
third-grader but she has been
playing chess for almost two
years.
"I like to challenge my op-
ponent," said Chenelle. "When
we play, we are serious."
Chenelle is a member of the
Raider Rooks of Edison Park
Elementary School, which is a
state and co-national champi-
onship team
Now she and her fellow
Raider Rooks are even better
equipped to handle the com-
petition.
World chess champion Al-
exandfa Kosteniuk visited the
nearly all-girls team on Feb.
3 at the school, 500 NW 67th
St., to give the young players


pointers from her experience.
Kosteniuk, 24, a Key Bis-
cayne resident, was intro-
duced to chess at age 5 and
has won several titles down
the years, including the 2008
World Championship.
"You get to compete against
the best players just to see if
you are smarter than them.
I like competition," said Em-
manuela Pierre, a fourth-grad-
er.
Meanwhile, the Raider Rooks
had mixed results at last week-
end's Super State competition
held at the Miami Mart Airport
Hotel.
The K-3 team finished sixth
and the K-5 team ended in
eighth place.
Though fifth-grader Mikaela
Ingram placed ninth, she re-


Fourth-grader Daphne Das, left, and third-grader Tyrone John-
son take part in a game of chess during a visit by world champion
Alexandra Kosteniuk visit on Feb. 3 to Edison Park Elementary
School in Liberty City. -Miami Times photo/Sandra J. Charite
ceived an individual trophy for was presented a book by Ko-
being the top individual in the steniuk at the competition for
K-5 unrated category. being the top girl in the K-5
Fifth-grader Talija Harris U750 category.


A reveler performs during carnival celebrations in Jacmel,
southeast of Port-au-Prince, Sunday, Feb. 15. -AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa


BART M.WILLIAMS,JR. W
Advertising'ConSultanrt
305-694-6210, Ext. 109 Wb ltami 1iue
One Family Serving Since 1923
*':. LARGEST MINORIrY OWD NE NEWSPAPER IN TIHE SOUTHEAST


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The Four Page Glossy Wrap that enclosed the Inaugural Issue


is now on sale at The Miami Times.



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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Black History event salutes


pioneers and up-and-comers


Miami Times Staff Report


A dozen prominent men and
women are featured in the
2009 African American His-
tory Calendar scheduled to be
released this Tuesday night at
the Lyric Theater in Overtown.
AT&T, sponsors of the cal-
endar, and The Miami Herald,
hosted the event at which
another 10 upwardly mobile
young Blacks were recognized
in The Herald's "Voices Rising"
tribute.
Featured in the calendar are
Bishop Victor Curry, the late
William Cooper, Wilhelmenia
Franks-Jennings, Columbus
Lee, Dr. James Wilson, Gloria
Green, the late Yvonne McDon-
ald, Jean Monestime, Gwendo-
lyn Welters, Dr. Nelson Adams,
Cyrus M. Jollivette and the
Rev. Canon Richard Marquess-
Barry.
The men and women in poli-
tics and the profession salut-
ed at the event were Monica
Barnes, in-house trial lawyer;
Oscar Braynon II, state rep-
resentative; Christie Grays,
director of Business Devel-
opment, Florida, Bremner-
Dule Healthcare Real Estate;
Ashanti Johnson, institutional
product specialist, Ortho Bio-


BARRY


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McDONALD MONESTIME
tech; Reginald Mathis, trial at-
torney.
Also, Kionne McGhee, com-
munity prosecutor, Miami-
Dade State Attorney's Office;
Christopher Norwood, director,
Lawyers for Children America;
Newton "Bobby" Sanon, ex-
ecutive director, Opportuni-
ties Industrialization Center


DWPLu


BRAYNON


ZAMOR SANON
of Broward County; Shondelle
Solomon-Miles, fitness profes-
sional and entrepreneur; and
Stanley Zamor, mediator/arbi-
trator, South Florida courts.
These honorees are all under
40, are well-established mem-
bers of their community who
give of their time and effort as
mentors and volunteers.


Rights group is no longer a trailblazer


NAACP
continued from 1A

graduate schools for Black and
white students. In 1954, that
brilliant legal team persuaded
the Supreme Court to end ra-
cial segregation in the nation's
public schools, a victory that
energized the civil rights move-
ment and transformed Ameri-
ca.

HEIGHT OF CIVIL
RIGHTS CLOUT
In the 20th century, no per-
son or organization did more
than the NAACP to make this
country a "more perfect union"
- not just for blacks, but for a
broad array of Americans. This
is the NAACP history that has
been given short shrift.
But as much as we should
celebrate the NAACP's glorious
past, we must also acknowl-
edge its inglorious moments.
"The past is the cause of the
present, and the present will
be the cause of the future,"
Lincoln once said. The NAACP
of today is not the NAACP of
old. It is no longer a trailblaz-
er, no more the "mosteffective,
most consulted, most militant,


most feared" civil rights orga-
nization in the world, as it was
once billed. For much of the
past 25 years, the NAACP has
been mired in an internal pow-
er struggle.
In 1983, this infighting led
the NAACP's board to certify
the election of a dead man in
order to oust Margaret Bush
Wilson, the first black woman
to chair the 64-member board.
While this drawn-out battle
was unfolding, the National Ur-
ban League, Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference
and Jesse Jackson's Operation
PUSH often took the lead in
Championing civil rights.

BATTLES
PLAGUE LEADERSHIP
The NAACP sank deeper into
a bog in the late '90s when two
board members aligned with
Chairman Myrlie Evers-Wil-
liams pleaded guilty to embez-
zling funds from some of the
very people the organization
was created to protect. Investi-
gative committees recommend-
ed that James Ghee and Hazel
Dukes be kicked off the board.
In a May 1997 closed ses-
sion, the minutes of which I


obtained, ,the board defeated a
motion to oust Ghee, who was
serving five years probation at
the time. Seven months later,
faced with criticism that the
NAACP had lost its moral com-
pass, the board voted to un-
seat Dukes. It also rejected an
attempt by Evers-Williams to
let Dukes seek re-election the
following month, Ben Andrews,
the investigative committee
chairman, later told me.
In the past 10 years, the
NAACP has had three men at
its helm. Kweisi Mfume and
Bruce Gordon quit after being
frustrated by a heavy-handed
board. Last year, Ben Jealous,
a 35-year-old former journal-
ist, was named to run day-to-
day operations.
"I think that it's a real affir-
mation that this organization is
willing to invest in the future,
to invest in the ideas and the
leadership of the generation
that is currently raising black
children in this country," Jeal-
ous told the Associated Press.
But as the NAACP celebrates
its 100th birthday, the ques-
tion is whether it can duplicate
the successes and avoid the
pitfalls of its past.


Package seen as lifeline for Americans


BILL
continued from 1A

The setting for the signing
was the Denver Museum of Na-
ture & Science, with solar pan-
els on its roof, underscoring
the investments the new law
will make in "green" energy-
related jobs. Workers in solar,
wind and other renewable-en-
ergy industries joined Obama
and Vice President Joe Biden
at the bill-signing ceremony.
Presidential spokesman Rob-
ert Gibbs told reporters the
White House was open-minded
about another stimulus effort.
But he stressed that there were
no plans in the works for one,
With the economy dominating
Obama's first weeks in office,
the president this Wednesday
will unveil another part of his
recovery effort a $50 billion
plan to help stem foreclosures.
All the activity also is allow-
ing Obama to get away from
Washington, with its intense
partisan wrangling, and be
cheered by people who may
benefit from the huge govern-
ment intervention.
Obama planned to outline
his plan to help struggling ho-
meowners in a speech in Ari-
zona, one of the states hardest
hit by home foreclosures that
are at the center of the nation's
economic woes.
The $50 billion program was
mentioned last week by Trea-


sury Secretary Timothy Geith-
ner as part of a wide-ranging
financial-sector rescue plan
that could send $2 trillion
coursing through the financial
system. But details were not
announced at the time.
Obama's announcement is
expected to include details
about how the administration
plans to prod the mortgage in-
dustry to do more in modify-
ing the terms of home loans so
borrowers have lower monthly
payments.


More than 2.3 million ho-
meowners faced foreclosure
proceedings last year, an 81
percent increase from 2007,
and analysts say that number
could soar as high as 10 mil-
lion in the coming years, de-
pending on the severity of the
recession.
As for Tuesday's stimulus
package, it will pump money
into highway, bridge and other
infrastructure projects, health
care, renewable energy devel-
opment and conservation.


SI


ft


1~r

c


A time to honor


the past and celebrate


the future.




During Black History Month and throughout the year, Winn-Dixie

is proud to celebrate the achievements of African Americans in our

nation and throughout our communities. It's a time to reflect on

how far we've come and look forward to a bright future. It's also

the perfect time to gather with family and friends to embrace our

shared culture and traditions. From our family to yours, may your

heritage bring you pride and joy not only during Black History


Month, but each and every day


WmnnDixie


Getting better all the time.


__ ..___._ ___~


CURRY










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


AA THF MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 18-24. 2009


Absalom Jones and Richard Allen led Black church revolt


Blacks organize free National Society in 1787


Absalom Jones was born a
slave in Sussex County, Dela-
ware in 1746. He taught him-
self to read and write.
In 1762, he was sent to Phila-
delphia, Pennsylvania to work
in his master's. store. In the
evenings he attended school.
In 1786, Jones met Richard Al-
len. They became lay preachers
for the Black members of Saint
George's Methodist Episcopal
Church. As result of their ac-
tive evangelistic and pastoral
efforts, the Black membership
increased more than tenfold.
The Church officials became
alarmed. One Sunday morn-
'ing, the White leaders of the
Church decided that the Black
members must sit in the gal-
lery. Jones and Allen, along
with others Blacks, disagreed
and walked out of the Church.
Blacks saw the request for them
to sit in the gallery as degrad-
ing to them. Most of them were
free. The gallery was always
reserved for slaves throughout
the states.

FREE AFRICAN
SOCIETY FORMED
On April 12, 1787, Jones and
Allen organized the Free African
Society, the first know publicly
organized society among Afro-
Americans. It was both religious
and benevolent. Members met
monthly and paid dues which
were applied to burial expens-
es, sick relief, and for help to
orphans and widows. Members
who drank or disregarded mar-
riage vows were rigorously dis-
ciplined and finally, they were
put out of the society.
On January 1, 1791. Jones
and Allen started having church


services on Sunday. The African
Church was organized on July 7,
1791. Jones and Allen thought
the African Church should be-
come a Methodist Church. They
thought the Methodist religion
was better for Black people.
Most of the members of the
Church disagreed with Jones
and Allen. They did not want to
be Methodist because the White
Methodists had "so violently
persecuted" the Black mem-
bers. Allen withdrew from the
African Society. . Jones reluc-
tantly remained as sole leader.

ALLEN FORMS AME CHURCH
Richard Allen, along with
those who followed him, went
on to found the African Meth-
odist Episcopal Church.
Absalom Jones, with the aid
of Quakers and Episcopalians,
erected the African Church
which was dedicated on July
17, 1794 by two Episcopal pas-
tors. The African Church ap-
plied for membership in the
Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylva-
nia on the following conditions:
(1) that they be received as an
organized body; (2) that they
have control over their local af-
fairs; (3) that Absalom Jones be
licensed as Lay Reader, and if
qualified, be ordained as min-
ister. In October, 1794, it was
admitted as Saint Thomas Afri-
can Episcopal Church. Bishop
White ordained Jones as dea-
con in 1795, and as priest on .
September 21, 1802. Jones nor
his members were permitted
to participate in Diocesan life.
Thus Jones and his followers
once again faced exclusion.
For Absalom Jones, the
Church was riot only for wor-


ship, religious instruction and
education but for mutual aid
and for protest. The founders of
Saint Thomas' stated that they
had organized "For the pur-
pose of advancing our friends
in a true knowledge of God, of
true religion, and the ways and
means to restore our long lost
race to the dignity of men."

FEMALE
BENEVOLENT SOCIETY
Since Blacks were exclud-
ed from the Public Schools of
Pennsylvania, education was a
major need of the Black com-
munity. Absalom Jones-found-
ed a Day School at the Church.
At Saint Thomas' he founded
the Female Benevolent Society.
Absalom Jones and Rich-
ard Allen continued in closed
friendship as co-workers for
uplifting of Afro-Americans.
In 1794, Allen purchased an
old building and dedicated it
as Bethel African Methodist
Episcopal Church. In 1798, a
branch of the African Masonic
Lodge was founded in Philadel-
phia. Jones was elected as the
Worshipful Master and Allen as
the Treasurer. Although both
protested against slavery, Al-
len was much more direct and
vocal in his opposition. Jones
preached a Thanksgiving ser-
mon on the Abolition of the
Slave Trade in 1808. During
the war of 1812, they jointly re-
cruited 3,000 Blacks to form a
"Black Legion' They also found-
ed an insurance, company and
a society for the suppression of
vice and immorality.
In 1816, Jones united with
four Methodist Ministers to
consecrate Allen as Bishop over
the newly formed African Meth-
odist. Episcopal Church. Thus


Gary faced corruption allegations


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Howard Gary, former Miami
city manager and bond dealer
who died on Sunday at age 62
after a five-year battle with can-
cer, had a controversial career
as Miami's first Black city man-
ager and later in the private
sector.
The New York-born Gary,
who grew up in Miami, served
as manager from 1981-84, a
particularly strenuous time in
the city's race relations but his
problems did not originate from
that direction.
Close friends and colleagues
saw him a fine administrator


who brought minorities into
the city's power structure and
laid some of the groundwork
for modern Miami. For some,
though, he was a polarizing fig-
ure. Accusations of corruption
arose'when he was fired by the
City Commission in 1984. In the
tense racial climate of the time,
many Blacks saw his dismissal
as racially motivated. Gary was
seen by many as a martyr for
the cause of Black empower-
ment.
Then Mayor Maurice Ferre,
who cast the deciding vote to
fire Gary, and, later, Mayor Joe
Carollo, would cite Gary's close
relationship with executives at
of a bank that faced allegations


of drug money laundering.
SGary was also accused of us-
ing the city motor pool to make
nearly $9,000 worth of repairs
to his Mercedes, claiming it was
a "city perk." He created a stir
with a 2:45 a.m. call on Jan.
28, 1984, to then Miami Police
Chief Kenneth Harms. The call
was to inform Harms that he
was being demoted.
While in the private sector,
Gary became implicated in two
corruption cases one involv-
ing then Miami Commissioner
Miller Dawkins and the other
involving County Commission-
er James Burke. He was not
charged.
In the Dawkins case, Gary


was overheard on a wire worn
by then city finance director
Manohar Surana helping the
commissioner launder a kick-
back. He then agreed to wear
a listening device in a separate
investigation involving Burke.
'Gary, who initially had been
seen as a rising political star,
tried to break into politics in
2006 when he filed to run for
the Miami-Dade County Com-
mission District 3 seat. The
Miami-Dade County Office of
the Inspector General received
a sworn statement challenging
his qualifications to run and
eventually concluded that Gary
was indeed ineligible because
he lived in Hollywood.


Colleagues hail role in pushing for minority representation


GARY
continued from 1A

of Miami and especially rep-
resenting the interests of
Black people in the city of
Miami."
"People put their trust in
Howard to negotiate on be-
half of Black people," Knox
said.
Jerry Rushin, 61, gener-
al manager of. radio station
WEDR-FM agreed with Knox,
also describing Gary as "a
smart'guy," adding, "but he
didn't rub it in.'
"At some point you recog-
nized it by his deeds. You
figured it out for yourself,"
Rushin said..
Gary was city manager dur-
ing a time Rushin described
as "tumultuous."
"To take that job you had
to be a little bit insane," said
Rushin. "God bless him for
talking it on."
Knox noted it was a time
when two major civil distur-
bances took place.
"One was the famous [Ar-
thur] McDuffie riot. He had to
bring calm to the communi-
ty, and to also negotiate with
the power structure to start


to make the changes neces-
sary to protect Black people
and to create opportunities.,"
Knox said.
McDuffie was a young Black
insurance salesman who was
died after being beaten by
White Miami-Dade police of-
ficers. An up-state trial set
the officers free, triggering a.
violent protest.
Knox, who was Miami's
city attorney when Gary be-
gan working as city manager,
said Gary's reputation pre-
ceded him.
"He had already been tar-
geted as the best and the
brightest," said Knox. "He
would become among the
first African Americans to
take a position of real lead-
ership in the city of Miami.
It's not insignificant that he
became the supervisor of a
large number of non-Black
department heads, includ-
ing the chief of police, and
I think it's a tribute to him
that he was able to navigate
his leadership in a way that
was a source of pride to the
Black community."
"What made him so effec-
tive," Knox continued, "is
,that he had a common touch


and a sense of humor that
helped him to connect eas-
ily with people. He had a very
loud laugh.
Rushin recalls Gary's
laughter as well.
"He was full of life," said
Rushin. "He had a laugh that
was so loud it was infectious.
He would laugh so loud and
hearty you had to hear it to
believe it. He loved to have a
good time, to laugh and tell
jokes."
But, said Knox, Gary was
not all jokes.
"He was a very profession-
al manager who knew more
about local government than
most people in the country,
so it was both very rewarding
and very challenging. He was
always a few steps ahead of
you," said Knox. "I think that
more progress was made dur-
ing his tenure as city manager
than any other comparable
period of time."
Gary was ousted from office
by a majority vote on the city
commission and went into the
private sector as a bond man-
ager. The last time Gary's name
made news was in 2006, when
he filed to run for a seat on
the Miami-Dade County Com-


mission. His bid for the Dis-
trict 3 seat failed after officials
learned he was registered to
vote in Broward County.
Gary was born on January
13, 1947, in New York City.
The family moved to Miami
when Gary was 4, following
the break up of his parents'
marriage. His mother moved
her two sons to Miami, where
her family lived. The family
lived in the James E. Scott
Projects in Liberty City.
Gary, who grew up in Mi-
ami, returned to the city
from the post of budget di-
rector of Newark, N.J., in
1976 when an uncle, politi-
cal activist Charles Hadley,
recommended him to then
Mayor Maurice Ferre.
Gary was hired first as Mi-
ami's budget director and
he quickly rose through the
ranks, becoming city manag-
er in 1981 at the age of 35.
Gary graduated from
Northwestern High School
and Morehouse College,
earning a degree in political
science and business admin-
istration. He went on to earn
a master's degree in public
policy from the University of
Michigan.


CORNER


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-Walmart
Save money. Live better.


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


OLACK, NIUM -UINIKk-11- VINNI,


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 8 THE MIAMI TIMES FEBRUARY 18-24 2 9


Residents say stadium funds needed elsewhere


STADIUM
continued from 1A

maternity leave, the meeting
deadlocked after seven hours.
The commissioners finally sched-
uled another meeting for March
12.
Failure of the Miami commis-
sion to reach agreement put on
hold plans by the Miami-Dade
County Commission to vote on
the issue. County commissioners
and hundreds of residents were
waiting at the Stephen P. Clark
Government Center for the meet-
ing that did not materialize.
Spence-Jones' office said in a
statement Tuesday she would
return to work on March 2 but
gave no indication how she would
vote on the stadium plan. The
statement, released by her aide
Jonelle Adderley, said Spence-
Jones "looks forward to resum-
ing her duties to her constituents
and the residents of the city of
Miami."

A PLACE TO CALL HOME
For more than a decade, the
Marlins baseball organization
has been seeking a place to call
home. The team has been shar-
ing Dolphin Stadium in Miami
Gardens with the Miami Dol-
phins football team.
The $515 million price tag for
the stadium would be paid by a
mix of public and private money.
The Marlins will come up with
$155 million; $50 million would
come from the county's Building
Better Communities General Ob-
ligation Bond funds and another
$297 million from county tour-
ist-tax revenues; and $13 million
will be contributed by the city of
Miami, including the land.
The ballpark, scheduled for the


site of the Orange Bowl, 1501 NW
3rd St., would be completed by
2012. The Orange Bowl was de-
molished in early 2008 to make
room for the new 37,000-seat re-
tractable roof stadium. As part of
the deal, the Marlins organization
has agreed to have and manage a
Major League Baseball franchise
in Miami for at least 35 years.

JOB OPPORTUNITIES
,Residents had mixed feelings
about a decision that could sup-
posedly help allocate jobs in the
county and city.
"We need things for the people.
There are plenty of things that
need to be done in our communi-
ty but the money is just going to
be wasted on the stadium," Ger-
trude Patterson, 70, in an inter-
view in the County Commission
chambers.
Bishop Victor T. Curry, presi-
dent of the Miami-Dade NAACP
branch, said in a phone interview
he didn't have a problem with
building the stadium but Black
businesses should be part of the
stadium after it was built.
With recent reports indicating
the country's unemployment rate
rising to almost eight percent,
the idea that the stadium would
produce jobs created some ex-
citement.
"Right now, there are no jobs in
this city or county and those who
are employed are living from pay-
ing check-to-check. We have an
opportunity to change that, even
though it is not the way that we
want," said Tiffany Andrews, 24.
"Do I agree with the Marlins sta-
dium? No. But do we need jobs?
Yes."

A COMMUNITY LEFT OUT
Others were highly skeptical


that enough jobs would come
from the stadium deal to make
an impact on the employment
situation.
"Unless the Black chamber of
commerce is there to say that
20 percent of these jobs must
go to the Black community then
these jobs will not go to us. Most
of these jobs will go to the His-
panics and if we don't say in the
agreement--if [County Commis-
sioner] Dorrin Rolle or [County
Commissioner] Audrey Edmon-
son don't put it in the agree-
ment then it won't be done," said
Marva Lightbourne, chairwoman
of Concerned Citizens, said in an
interview in the County Commis-
sion chambers.
Nathaniel Wilcox, executive di-
rector of People United to Lead
the Struggle for Equality (PULSE),
said residents were facing tough
times and the jobs anticipated
to come from the stadium would
not be enough.
"We look at jobs at [Dolphin]
Stadium and they are selling pea-
nuts, popcorn and soda. That's
not the type of jobs that we are
looking for that will support a
family or help pay a mortgage,"
Wilcox said.
"I think that they need to be
transparent in exactly how the
stadium is going to help our com-
munity. 'A lot of the jobs will not
be allocated for Blacks because
you don't find many Blacks work-
ing in Little Havana. The jobs will
be for other people," Wilcox said.
The priorities of the local gov-
ernment are what baffle Denise
Perry, executive director of Power
U for Social Change.
"Cities [across the country] are
in a major financial crisis and you
have states claiming that they
can't pay individuals for unem-


(Iil -mmt *r -

b poid oft& ft


- *


City celebrates with parade and festival


STREET
continued from 1A

special because this was the first
time residents of these neighbor-
hoods have had a parade. They have
never had a parade but now some-
thing wonderful has happened.
They can look up at the street sign
and feel proud."
The idea of renaming a street to
honor Obama originated with City
Commissioner Dorothy Johnson,
who joined Mayor Joseph Kelley and
other commissioners in the parade.
"It was awesome to be here and
get the people out to show our ap-
preciation," said Johnson who or-
ganized and. put the event together
in 10 days. "I feel teary. I am over-
whelmed."
"I am so happy and so honored
to be living today," added Commis-
sioner Timothy Holmes. "I never
thought I would live to see the day
that America would elect a Black
president."
Meandering through Ali Baba Av-
enue and Opa-locka Boulevard to
City Hall, the one-hour parade end-
ed in a festival at Sherbondy Park.
The 40 events, including songs,
poems, prayers and speeches, as
well as performances by recording
artists Ace Hood and Revelation
Seed, began at noon.
A mini job fair, along with infor-
mational booths featuring art, com-
munity health awareness and fi-


secure enough to start a family or to
retire. Affiliated with Citigroup, the
company also provides clients with
investment advice. "We want your,
money to be working 24/7 because
you can't," said Long.


nancial advice also were part of the
event.
Saundra G. Long, a personal fi-
nancial analyst at Primerica Fi-
nancial Services, aimed to prepare
those in attendance to be financially


The Historic Hampton House Community Trust, Inc.
Cordially invites you to its first
Oral History Seminar and Reception
In connection with the opening of the Historical Museum of
Southern Florida's exhibition
BLACK CROSSROADS: THE AFRICAN DIASPORA IN MIAMI*
HONORING:
James Anders, Georgia Ayers, Dr. Malcolm Black,
Harcourt Court, Frances DeVeaux, Dr. Anthony Dixon,
Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson, Elliott Flanders, Samuel Harrison.
Dr. Mary Hylor. Dr. Dory Lingo. Rev. Dr. Preston Marshall, Albert I). Moore,
Dave Nuby, Bernadette Pinkney, Frank Pinkney, Dr. Enid C. Pinkney,
Ruby Rayford, Rev. Dr. Walter Richardson. Dr. Richard Strachan,
Eugenia B. Thomas. Patricia Thomas. Ricky Thomas, Timmic Thomas,
Charlayne Thompkins, China Valles, Xavier Vega, Gwendolyn Welters.
DVD Participants and Richard Hcisenbottle, Benefactor
Thursday, March 5, 2009 beginning at 5:00-6:30 P. M.
101 West Flaglcr Street, Miami, Florida
Admission is free but seating is limited
RSVP 305-638-5800
*admission to the exhibition is being offered at S5 for HHCT reception guests
Featuring Dr. Greg Bush. Humanities Scholar. University of Miami,
Dr. Mary Hylor, vocalist who performed at the Hampton House. and
Rodney Baltimore Hot 105
Funding for this program was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities
Council and the National Endowment of the Humanities.


-


ployment. Miami-Dade Schools
is talking about cutting teachers.
The idea that the stadium is go-
ing to be creating jobs -- you can
build a school and that's a job,
you can build a house and that's
a job. So why does it have to be
the stadium that gives us the
jobs when the stadium is useless
to me 300 days in the year?" Per-


Katherine Fernandez Rundle
STATE AI'rORNEY


ry said as she stood in the Coun-
ty Commission chambers while
awaiting news from City Hall.
After hearing city commission-
ers had failed to approve the
deal, the Rev. Dr. Anthony Tate,
chairman of the PULSE's HotSpot
Campaign, welcomed the news.
"As far as I am concerned, the
stadium did not represent the in-


terest of the Black community. It
is important that when we talk
about funds trickling down that
the Black community gets it far
share. Tourist dollars should be
designed to create business op-
portunities for majority of resi-
dents in our community," said
Tate. "We shouldn't be forgot-
ten."


Chairman Dennis C. Moss
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COMMISSION


i. t'


"SECOND CHANCE ONE STOP

SCALING AND EPuNGEMENT PROGRAM

Having a second chance in life is an opportunity not to be missed. That is why the State Attorney's Office is offering this Sealing and
Expungement Program. If you were charged with a crime in Miami-Dade County and the case did not result in a conviction, you may
be eligible to have a single record sealed or expunged.
Have you ever asked yourself:
Can I seal or expunge my criminal record? When am I required to acknowledge sealing or expungement?
Can I restore my right to vote?
We are here to answer these and other questions. For those who qualify we assist with processing the application for submission to the
Florida Department of Law Enforcement. If you do not qualify for Sealing or Expungement, the American Civil Liberties Union will
be present to assist with restoring your civil rights as well. ID Required. Come join us:


WHEN
Friday, February 27, 2009
4:00pm to 8:00pm


WHERE
GOUIDS PARK
11350 SW 216th Street, Goulds, FL.. 33170


PARTICIPATING COMMUNITY AGENCIES:
'Katherine Fernandez Rundle, State Attorney; Office of Chairman Dennis C. Moss; Clerk of the Court, Harvey Ruvin;
American Civil Liberties Union of Florida; Miami-Dade Elections Department and South Florida Workforce
Pre-Register @ www.miamisao.com (not required) or for more information call (305) 547-0724 or (305) 234-4938

Ii


Adopt a shelter pet


and save a life.

* Give a catdog, kitten or puppy a home for life

* Get unconditional love in return

* Save on rabies shots and microchipping


Find out how you can adopt a shelter pet.

Go to miamidade.gov/animals or call 3-1-1.


Train don't chain your best friend

Beginning April 2009, it will be illegal to keep your dog tethered
when you aren't present.


This means it will be unlawful to tie
a dog to any object or structure --
including a house, tree, fence, post,
garage or shed -- by any means, such
as chain, rope, cord, leash or running
line. However, this doesn't mean you
can't use a leash to walk a dog.

That fact is that dogs left tethered
and unattended are deprived of social
interaction, and since they can't run
if they feel threatened, they are 2.8
times more likely to bite. So the
anti-tethering law has been enacted
to improve the safety of residents as
well as the well-being of pets.


Once the law is in effect, illegally
tethering your dog canl result in fines
of $100 or more.

Please remember, train don't chain.


For more information go to miamidade.gov/animals or call 3-1-1.


Coyrighted Materi

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To
.,: -.- +. .


19A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


0I









The Miami Times





Faith


SECTIONl R


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


Bishop: Start being


the human race

North Carolina church leader

addresses St. Agnes congregation

3 'I-";


Canon Richard Marquess-Barry of Saint Agnes Episcopal Church
in Overtown speaks to his congregation the 24th annual celebra-
tion of Absalom Jones at the Historic Saint Agnes Episcopal
Church in Overtown. -MiamiTimes photo/JamesForbes


Bishop Michael Curry of the Episcopal Diocese of North Caro-
lina preaches on the theme of family Saturday during the 24th
annual celebration of Absalom Jones at the Historic Saint Agnes


Episcopal Church in Overtown.

By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

The adage that 11 .a.m.
Sunday is the most segregated
hour of the week comes from
the fact that church services
are, as a rule, highly segre-
gated affairs. Such was not
the case, on Saturday when
Blacks and Whites mingled
easily at St. Agnes's Episcopal
Church, 1750 NW Third Ave.
in Overtown, the Rev. Canon
Richard Marquess-Barry, rec-
tor.
A diverse crowd of about


-MiamiTimes photo/James Forbes

150 gathered for the 24th an-
nual diocesan celebration of
the life of Absalom Jones, the
first Black priest in the Epis-
copal Church of the United
States.
Guest speaker the Rev. Mi-
chael Curry, Bishop of the
Episcopal Diocese of North
Carolina, expressed reluc-
tance to discuss contempo-
rary politics and so he did
not draw any comparisons
between Jones and President
Barack Obama.
Rather, Curry chose family
Please turn to RACE 12B


()bama tries to 'balance' on



a church-state tightrope









-- -^ I."'Copy righted Matetrial- "


Syndicated Content
Available ...from.. .. .Commercial s Proviers"

Available from" Commercial Ne'ws Providers"


S f* e


Knowledge Is Power Program shown as a good urban triumph


By Greg Toppo

The field trip was becoming a
washout.
The fifth-graders from Houston.
had prepared for months, but the
tour guides in Washington, D.C.,
rushed them through the White
House and the U.S. Supreme
Court. Standing on the court-
house steps, they were reduced
to hearing their teachers quiz
them on Doric and Corinthian
columns.
Then, as if in a dream, Justice
Stephen Breyer walked by.
One teacher rushed after him,
saying Breyer had to meet "the
hardest-working kids in the
country." He tried to squeeze by,
but the teacher persisted. Breyer
finally gave the kids a 20-second
audience. Then, as he turned
to leave, a student asked: "Were
you here when the court voted on
Miranda v. Arizona?"
Breyer, stunned, replied, "Why,
no. That was before my time."
Thus began the first of his many
visits with students of the Knowl-
edge Is Power Program, a group
of high-achieving public schools


that has reshaped expectations
about urban education. Out of
one fifth-grade class in 1994,
KIPP has grown to 66 schools in
19 states and the District of Co-
lumbia. It educates more than
16,000 children from preschool
through high school, virtually all
of them low-income.
In addition to Breyer, KIPP
counts among its fans Oprah
Winfrey, Bill Gates and nearly
every researcher who has ever
visited.

CAPTURED IN A BOOK
KIPP's unlikely rise is the
subject of Work Hard. Be Nice.
($14.95, Algonquin Books), a new
book by Washington Post edu-
cation columnist and longtime
reporter Jay Mathews. He spent
two years visiting 31 KIPP schools
and interviewing its two founders,
Dave Levin and Mike Feinberg, as
well as the parents, teachers and
thinkers who influenced them.
The result is a vivid account
of two young men who trans-
form themselves from "terrible"
first-year teachers into visionar-
ies. Early alumni of Teach For


Kari Jackson, 12, one of more than 300 students at KIPP Uji-
ma Village Academy, reads a book while navigating the halls
after lunch. Photo by: Joe Brier


America, Levin and Feinberg beg,
borrow, lie and cajole their way
to success. They win the respect
of master teachers and a cast
of characters worthy of a Coen
brothers movie. They persuade
"Mattress Mack," a fast-talking


Houston bedding tycoon, to buy
them a reading curriculum; later,
searching for room to expand,
Feinberg sits four hours on the
bumper of an Acura belonging to
then-Superintendent Rod Paige,
waiting to enlist his help. (He


does.)
Eventually, Levin and Fein-
berg cobble together a college-
prep program that boasts longer
hours, days, weeks and years -
kids stay in school until 5 p.m.
most days, attend class every
other Saturday and spend weeks
in summer school; it demands
24/7 dedication from parents,
students and teachers but gets
good, replicable results.
Within five years, KIPP is fea-
tured on 60 Minutes and its
founders are persuading the
USA's leading philanthropists to
part with millions to supplement
public funding. Since then, KIPP
has become, for many, the default
model of urban school reform.
Mathews tells the story in short
vignettes that are blessedly free
of edu-speak. The book's title
comes from the schools' motto;
the subtitle -How Two Inspired
Teachers Created America's Best
Schools- betrays Mathews' af-
fection for KIPP. But he does give
critics their due.
A few researchers say KIPP's
no-excuses, bootstrap philoso-
phy gives society a pass on larger


inequity issues, such as chil-
dren's health care and housing.
Others say KIPP's rigid rules and
extended calendar filter out all
but the most dedicated families.
Still others say it "pushes out"
low achievers.
Mathews acknowledges the
critics but says the schools' gains
are "clearly significant," even if
the jury is out on many ques-
tions.

DRUMMING UP INTEREST
In the meantime, the book
is making a splash. Mathews
is speaking to sellout crowds
this week on a 21-city tour; last
month he earned a rare mention
in Gates' annual letter from his
charitable foundation. Keynoting
the annual TED Conference last
week, Gates bought 2,000 cop-
ies enough for everyone in the
hall.
Mathews says the key to KIPP
is simple: It has figured out how
to "harness the power of teach-
ing in a big way ... as fuel for
that flame, you give those grate
teachers more time in the day
to teach."










11B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


In the eyes of God we are


each of us all
As we grow older, we are
encouraged to stop acting as
children. Even little children
are often admonished to
"stop acting like a baby." But,
interestingly enough, the Bible
does encourage us to act as
children. Paul often addressed
the members of the churches
to whom he wrote as his "little
children."
The problem could be that
we' may be confusing acting
as little children with being
iimature. God does not want
us to be immature. Paul,
James, Peter and even Jesus


His children
often admonished the people to
stop acting irresponsibly and
to grow up- and mature in the
Lord.
We are told that we cannot
grow up if we continue to drink
spiritual milk and that we
need to cut 'our teeth on good
spiritual meat. So, then, if we
should grow up, how do we
remain as children?
That's a good question. The
child-like behavior that the
Bible speaks of is our approach
and our relationship to the Lord.
In Psalm 131, David writes that
he is glad to take a backseat to


the wisdom and knowledge of
God. He says that he does not
concern himself with things that
are not his concern. This might
sound mean, irresponsible or
selfish but he means that he
has no problem turning over to
God those things that only God
can take care of. Read verse 2;
he writes that he has "calmed
and quieted himself."
How can you become calm
when all around you is havoc?
We know that David spent
much of his life in turmoil and
betrayal. How could he remain
calm in those circumstances?
He humbled himself before God,
did what God instructed him to
do and gladly allowed God to
take care of the rest.
You can only remain calm
and quiet in the midst of a
storm when you realize Who
is in control of the storm and
Who is protecting and taking
care of you.
I also love the part of this
verse in which David compares


himself to a "weaned child who
no longer cries for its mother's
milk." A child is still the child
of its mother, even when it
is grown. But an adult child
should no longer be fed on
breast milk.
David claims that he is
mature, he has grown up,
he is no longer crying (or
complaining) at his mother's


breast. But he still has a
child-like relationship with his
Parent.
If you have accepted Jesus
Christ as your Savior, then
you are a child of His Father,
God. No matter our age, we
will always be His child. He will
always be our Father.
God never wants to let go of
that relationship with us. He
always wants us to depend on


Him, crawl into His lap, talk to
Him and seek His counsel and
beautiful face. That should
never change, no matter how
old we become in the natural
or the spiritual.
From the time of his youth
to the time of his old age,
David craved yes, craved -
the intimacy of his relationship
with his Holy Father. He


absolutely loved to worship the
Lord in many ways. He prayed,'
he danced, he wrote poems and
songs to his Father.
Going back to verse
1: David tells the Lord that he
is not proud. Kids are simple;
they can take delight in the
simplest things. A little kid
does not worry about how the
electricity bill will be paid. He
or she knows only that when he


or she flips the light switch, it
is no longer dark. Children do
not worry about how to pay the
mortgage. They know only that
have a room and they open the
door and crawl into bed when it
is time to go to sleep.
. They do not stay awake
worrying about the doctor's
report or the uncertainty of
the economy. They do not care
who is president, as long as
their parents are taking care of
things.
We, too, need to have this
attitude. As children of God,
we certainly need to keep our
eyes on Capitol Hill and be
knowledgeable about what is
going on in this world around
us. But when all is said and
done, it is not Capitol Hill that
will rescue us. We must "look to
the hills from whence cometh
our help. My help comes from
the Lord Who made Heaven
and earth."
I am pleased and honored to
be called His child.


Miami-Dade Transit Choir
will be in concert'noon-1 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 18, at Ste-
phen P. Clark Government
Center. 305-375-4606 or www.
miamidade,gov/baab


The Women's Park, in col-
laboration with the Women's
Studies Center of Florida Inter-
national University, will host a
film night, 7 o'clock, Wednes-
day, Feb. 18. Lisa Fernandez,
305-480-1717 or lfern@miam-
idade.gov.

*******
The Willie D. Ferguson, Jr.
Bar Association will host. a
Black History social for men-
tors and mentees, 6:30 p.m.,
Thursday, Feb. 19. 305-372-
1800, can@kttlaw.com

********
Gladeview community
meeting to plan a fire and
safety expo for-June. The plan-
ning session will be at Martin
Luther.King Jr. Park, 5:30-7
p.m., Thursday, Feb. 19. Gar-
ris Nickle, 305-751-5511 ext.
1129.


Palms of Hallandale Beach
Weed and Seed's Neighbor-
hood Restoration Committee
will hold its second annual Hal-
landale Beach reunion on the
theme "Uniting Our.Communi-
ty," Feb 20-22. 954-457-1460.


The African Heritage Cul-
tural Arts Center will host a
Black History Extravaganza 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21.
305-375-4606, www.miami-
dade.gov/baab.


Crusade for Christ Temple will
host Christian film and entertain-
ment nights at 7:30 o'clock Sun-
days. 305-523-5952. Christian
teaching series are held 11 a.m.
Sunday.

** *****
New Jerusalem Prayer Minis-
tries International holds a semi-
nar at 7 p.m. Tuesday on "How
to dd Web Broadcasting, Video
Mail, Conferences and Chat" for
your church or ministry. 305-
303-6759.

********
Christian Hill will host a
charity golf tournament at
12:01 p.m., Friday, Feb. 20,
Miami Springs Country Club.
Larry Mills, 954-554-8335, or
LM09@bellsouth.net.

******* *
A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church's Youth De-
partment will hold a Black His-
tory program at 7:30 p.m., Feb.
20. 305-836-6256. The pastor's
13th anniversary celebration will
be on Feb 25-27 and March 1.

********
Total Change and Empower-
ment Ministries will hold an
anniversary celebration at 7:30


Broward Community Col-
lege will host a College Goal
workshop at the A. Hugh Adams
Central Campus, Building 19, 9
a.m.-1 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 21.
954-201-7619.

S********
Booker T. Washington High
Class of 1962, will be meeting
at the African Heritage Cultural
Arts Center, 6:30 p.m., Satur-
day, Feb. 21. 305-632-6506.


Metro Chapter 28 will pres-
ent its first Black History event,
"Yes We Can," at the Joseph Ca-
leb Center, 7 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 21. 305-331-2383.


Miami Gardens will host its
annual Miss Miami Gardens
Pageant at Florida Memorial
University's Lou Rawls Center,
7-10 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 21.
305-622-8000, www.missmi-
amigardens.com.

*****
The National College Fair
will be held noon-4 p.m., Sun-
day, Feb. 22, at the Miami Mart
Airport Hotel. 305-995-1739.


The Simon Wiesenthal Cen-
ter will screen its newest docu-
mentary, Against the Tide, 7:30
p.m., Monday, Feb. 23, at the
Regal Cinema in Miami Beach.


The City of North Miami
Beach Library will host an eve-
ning with Dr. Enid Pinkney in
"Growing up Black in Miami:
The 1930's, 40's, 50's and More"


p.m. Feb. 20-21, ending at 11
a.m., Sunday, Feb. 22. Sabrina
Burch, 786-566-3739.


Macedonia Church of God
in Christ will have its annual
Dual Day at 3 p.m., Feb. 22.
305-238-4013.


Hurst Chapel AME Church
in Perrine will hear an address
from state Rep. James Bush
III on its Men's Day at 11 a.m.,
Sunday, Feb. 22. 305-253-
0058.

********
SSt. Matthews Free Will Bap-
tist Church will have its Fam-
ily and Friends Day Celebration
on tits Willing Workers anniver-
sary, 11 a.m., Sunday, Feb. 22.
305-751-4251.

********
Mt. Vernon M.B. Church will
salute Black History Month at
11 a.m. on Feb. 22. 305-754-
5300.

********
Saint Agnes Episcopal
Church youth department will
have their Black History pro-
gram at 10 a.m., Sunday, Feb.


from 6:30 7:45 pm, Monday,
Feb. 23. 305-948-2970.


El Portal Joyce A. Davis will
give her State of the Village ad-
dress, 7 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 24
at the Village Hall.

*******
Broward County Public
Schools will hold district pub-
lic hearings on the 2009/10
school year at Plantation High
School Auditorium, 5:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 25, and
Wednesday, March 25. http://
www.browardschools.com/
schoolboundaries

******
Neighborhood Housing
Services' will hold a seminar
on "Incorporating Family into
Leadership Strategies," 5:30-8
pm. Thursday, Feb. 26, open to
the public and free of charge,
at Jefferson Reaves Park, 3090
NW 51st St. Registration is re-
quired. Sharon Williams, 305-
751-5511 ext. 1121.


Sisters: A Celebration of
Human Spirit will be show-
cased at the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center, Feb. 26 -
Mar. 22. 305-638-6771.


The fifth annual Carrie P.
Meek Award Ceremony will be
held 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
26, at the Signature Grand in
Davie. www.FischlerSchool.
nova.edu/bhc.


George Washington Carv-
er alumni will hold a Carver
Alumni Day and BBQ Lun-
cheon, 11 a.m.. Friday, Feb.
27, George Washington Carver
Middle School auditorium. Call
Leona Cooper Baker, 305-445-
6662, by Friday, Feb. 20.


22. 305-573-5330.

*,**x**
Metropolitan AME Church
will observe its Men's Day at
7, 9 :30 and 11 a.m., Sunday,
Feb. 22. 305-691-4572.


Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist
Church will be the venue for
the Performing Entertainment
Through Education's Black His-
tory in the Magic City show, 7:30
p.m., Friday, Feb. 27,. 786-325-
7383.


Now Faith Ministries will
host a gala for, the homeless,
entitled "A Feast is Made for
Laughter," at the Knights of Co-
lumbus banquet hall in Palms
Springs, 7 p.m., Saturday, Feb.
28. 954-802-9570 or vforbe-
straining@hotmail.com.


First Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church's women will
present "100 Women in White,"
4 p.m., Sunday; Mar. 8. 954-
927-8020.
** *** **
Lively Stones for Jesus Min-
istries will be in revival 7:30
p.m. March 11-13. 305-685-
7739.


Please Note: Community calen-
dar events and church notes must be
turned in before noon on Monday.


The Miami-Dade State At-
torney's Office will hold a
Sealing and Expungement Pro-
gram, 4-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27,
Goulds Park, 305-547-0724.


City of Miami Parks and
Recreation will hold a ping
pong tournament 9 a.m.-2
p.m., Feb. 28, at Charles Had-
ley Park. Kim Sands, 305-634-
5791, Bernard C. Poitier, 786-
291-1524.

*********
Miami-Dade Park and Rec-
reation's The Women's Park,
and the Girl Scouts will host
a free reading in the park 1
-4 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28.
http://www. girlscouts. org


The Voter's Council of
North Miami Beach's Wash-
ington Park will hold its an-
nual Black History program at
the Missy Williams Center, 1- 4
p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28. Iola
Crawford will be honored for
her community service. 305-


.v ..i


342-2907.
**** ***
The Haitian Heritage Mu-
seum will hold its fifth annual
Celebration Gala at the Design
District, 8 p.m.-midnight, Sat-
'urday, Feb. 28. 305-371-5988.


The 21st annual In the
Company of Women Awards
Ceremony will be held at the
Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables
on March 4. 305-358-5885.

******
Survivors against Violence
will provide information and
applications for expunging and
sealing of criminal records, 10
a.m. -2 p.m. Saturday, March
7, at Brevton's Market. Eric
Robinson, 954-548-4323, Car-
leen Robinson, 954-549-0474.

****- t
World Literacy Crusade/
Girl Power Program will pres-
ent its sixth annual "It Takes A
Village Conference: Improving
Our World One Girl at a Time,"
8 a.m.-4.-p.m., Saturday-March
21. Amrencan Legion Ha1i 5-


756-5502.


Carol City Middle School
will hold a Youth Crime Watch
Parade at 9:30 a.m., March 27
at the school.


Miami Gardens will host
its fourth annual. "Jazz in the
Gardens" concert Saturday,
March 28, and Sunday, March
29, at Dolphin Stadium. 305-
576-3790.


The Fourth annual 5K
Walk/ Run for Asthma will
take place at Miami MetroZoo,
8 a.m., Saturday, April 18.
305-233-4594.


Miami Jackson High Class
of 1979 will hold its 30th an-
nual reunion with a week of
events highlighted by a trip to
Montego Bay, Jamaica. The
festivities will be June 5-14.
Louis Fish, president, 954-
895-5441; Carol Jones, secre-
ty 786-566-3751.


.......1^J..


The People's President: Portraits of Abraham Lincoln by Wendy Allen
For the past 25 years, artist and historian Wendy Allen has created portraits of
former President Abraham Lincoln. Allen's work, in a vast range of artistic styles
and mediums, is created exclusively with one subject in mind: a man who became
one of America's most beloved presidents.
In observance of the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth, the library collaborated
with Allen to create a site-specific, salon-style installation of her obsessive oeuvre
of Lincoln portraits.


February 7 -April 6
Main Library 1" Floor Exhibition Space
endy Alen101 W. Flagler St. 305.375.2665
Lincoln 25,dy 2007 oil on canvas, Courtesy of the artist
Lincoln 125, 2007, oil on canvas, Courtesy of the artist.


STORYTELLING


Storyteller Temujin Ekunfeo
With an active repertoire of 200 fables, tales, and parables, Temujin Ekunfeo's
stories range from traditional Yoruba to comedian Buddy Hackett. Performing
throughout the country since 1968, Temujin shares his craft by means of audience
participatory storytelling and experiential "playshops" for youths and adults.


Wednesday, February 25,10:30 a.m.
Little River Branch
160 NE 79 St.. 305.751.8689

Baba Lyons
Baba's crazy stori
laugh and learn.
Saturday, Februa
Allapattah Branch
I 1799 NW 35 St. 30


Thursday, February 26,4 p.m. -.A M
California Club Branch
850 Ives Dairy Rd. 305.770.3155
Program made possible by CIT.

es are sure to.engage all audiences. Come prepared to play,

ry 28,2 p.m.

5.638.6086


Tales from the Plantation
Interactive stories, songs and rhythms
from the Caribbean. Performed by the
Jamaican Folk Revue.


Saturday, February 21
Naranja Branch @ 10:30 a.m.
27056 S. Dixie Hwy 305.242.7935
Homestead Branch @ 3 p.m.
700 N. Homestead Blvd. 305.246.0168


WEDR-FM
Sponsorrad t".1. Mea"a rpr,:,oai mbe juiami mime
citi wsvn(


You can only remain calm and quiet in the midst of a
storm when you realize Who is in control of the storm
and Who is protecting and taking care of you.


iCelebrate


r Black History Month @ your

...... Miami-Dade Public Library!
S Don't miss an extraordinary series of special programs featuring
NPAublic Lih,,;'Ss author presentations, exhibitions, storytelling, music and more.


EXHIBITIONS


ARTS & CRAFTS

Artist Brenda Jordan a., E ,
Create a masterpiece with Batik, an ancient African art traditionally used to
decorate clothing. Registration required. Limit 20 participants.
Wednesday, February 25, 10 a.m.
Virrick Park Branch
3255 Plaza St. 305.442.7872
Program made possible by CI.
FOLK TALES & MUSIC.


/










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


19R THF MIAMI TIMFS FFRRIIARY 1R-24 72009


St. Agnes hosts Absalom Jones tribute


RACE
continued from 10B

for his sermon, citing the Gos-
pel of Matthew which begins
with the genealogy of Jesus and
ends with an exhortation to "go
and make disciples, baptizing
them." From this, Curry drew
the conclusion that the entire
world is family and that the way
to change the future is to be-
have as members of a family.
"We need to stop being the
human race, and become the
human family of God," said
Curry, who became the first
Black Episcopal Bishop in the
South in June 2000.
"Jones inherently grasped
that God has made us one fam-
ily," said Curry, so much so that
"I have to worry about you more
than about myself."
Curry cited as evidence of
Jones's conviction the fact that
he paid for the freedom of his
wife before his own.
Jones was born into slavery


President

FAITH
continued from 1OB

have somebody who is not
only religiously knowledgeable,
thoughtful, open and sensi-
tive himself," said Rabbi David
Saperstein, head of the Reli-
gious Action Center of Reform
Judaism and a critic of the
Bush, faith-based office. "You
also have somebody who un-
derstands constitutional law,
who understands the strength
of our system is no establish-
ment of religion. He's going to


Members of the congregation pray during the 24th annual celebration of
Absalom Jones at the Historic Saint Agnes Episcopal Church in Overtown.
Miami Times photo/James Forbes


in Delaware in 1746. At age 16,
he was sold to a storeowner,
Benjamin Wynkoop, in Phila-
delphia. While still Wynkoop's
slave, he married Mary King,
another slave, on Jan. 4, 1770.
By 1778, he had purchased
his wife's freedom so that their
children would be free and in
another seven years he paid
for his own freedom.


develops

work hard to get this balance
right."
Saperstein, a member of the
new advisory board, was among
scores of faith leaders who met
with Obama transition team
members. The 25-member ad-
visory council is to focus on
the office's four priorities: en-
listing faith and community
groups in economic recovery
efforts, reducing abortions,
encouraging responsible fa-
therhood and improving in-
terfaith relations, including in
the Muslim world.


In 1786, Jones met Richard
Allen and the two became lay
preachers for the Black mem-
bers of St. George's Methodist
Episcopal Church. Their efforts
increased the Black member-
ship tenfold, which alarmed
church officials. They issued a
.decree that Blacks must sit in
the gallery, which Jones, Allen
and others saw as degrading.


They walked out of the
church.
In early April 1791, Jones
and Allen organized the Afri-
can Church and started having
Sunday services. They wanted
the Church to be affiliated
with the Methodist denomina-
tion but most of the members
disagreed, due to the Meth-
odist Church's ill treatment
of Blacks. The rift eventu-
ally caused Allen to leave the
church, leaving Jones as its
leader.
With the aid of Quakers and
Episcopalians, Jones built
a sanctuary for the African
Church which was dedicated
by a pair of Episcopal pastors.
The church applied for and
received membership in the
Episcopal Diocese of Penn-
sylvania. Jones's ordination
as a minister was one of the
church's conditions. He was
ordained a deacon in 1795 and
a priest in September 1802.
He died on Feb. 13, 1818.


faith-based office


Of those, the most emotion-
ally charged is abortion reduc-
tion, a cause that emerged
during the campaign as a way
for Democrats to woo religious
voters without compromising
on abortion rights.
Obama has made one sig-
nificant and anticipated -
decision on abortion. On his
fourth day in office, he quietly
ended a ban on U.S. funds for
international groups that per-
form abortions or provide in-
formation on the option.
One of the advisory council's


most conservative members,
former Southern Baptist Con-
vention president Frank Page,
said he will continue to push
for overturning Roe v. Wade,
the 1973 Supreme Court deci-
sion that legalized abortion.
"I have to be a realist," Page
said. "A lot of people like to
paint everything in black and
white. The truth is, we live in a
world where the reality is that
abortions are, in some ways,
legal. That's the way it is right
now. I certainly desire to see
the reduction."


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EDISON FINANCIAL |
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Mllamni, F-L 33127
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Rasool's Plaza (NW 7Th Ave & 62nd St) 305-754-2001
A Black-owned franchise delivering superior customer service


UNITY
The divine presence, rest on all of his peoples, and by com-
manding us to be some help to all. To some extent it is not
so difficult to perform Mitzva, as most of his people are kind
hearted,
But in addition God has taught a much greater art of forgiving.
To forgive one's fellowman, although he acted wrongly towards
him, or "you" have been wronged by another. from the desk of
W. R. Williams.


S The Episcopal Church of
S. The Transfiguration

~ 7305-681-1660


.C Sunday Services
h iN 7:30a.m.and9:30 am.
..' Healing Service
x.'.,U..:. Second Wiednesday 7 p.m.


Antioch Missionary Baptist Apostolic Revival Center
6702 N.W 1.Sth Avenue
Church of Brownsville 305 6122
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services New time for T.V. Program
cl.hncnl. iuKl;1' R;30 Na.n, FOR HOPE FOK TODAY
uSi.r w.'rlF ser ,:r lOa.m .M cuVCca? coMCercaS.
Mid-Week Service .... Wednesday's s..9 ra.m-39 pm.. S.aday 5 p.m.
HOor of Power-Noon Day Prayer Wed Lsnte nay Payer')a.m.s 12 p.m.
H pm min Seite ...p..............II a7.
12lp.m I p.m Su. Eve.,Wohip........... 730 pt
einWship. Pyer Meeli. ..730pm.
Bening Worhdp...7 pm Fn Bib Study ..... ...........7:30 p.m.
I-, -E8k layrMb..730 pis.


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sun# ay
Church rSchool -. .....30.m
Wolra ip Srivia .............11 a.m.
Wednesday
BISlte ftlray er Nlsht 7: pm.
Thursday
Pryer Muetin 7 p.m.
"There is a place for you"


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Serices:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 am. 11:15 am. '
Sunday School 945 a.m
Bible Study Tuesday
0 am.& 7 pm.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.



Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
Suirday School.. ..9:30 a.m.
Sumaliy Worship.... .1 a.m
Fiirt Sunday Evftina Worship
6 p.m.
Mid Week Service ... 7 pIL
Choir KRehearal lhum.xlay
7;30 p nu.


SFirst Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday................7:30 & 11 a.m..
Sunday School............... 10a.m.
Thursday.........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting. B.T.U,
IBaptiasm- Thurs. before
First Sun.,7 p.m.
Coimuniaion ,First Sun.......



New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order ofServices:

[ihw, [ '1 l,; h ., rl,
..* .,.,, n (,t n


Logos Baptist Church"\ /Mt. Calvary Missionary
16305 NW 48th Ave. Baptist Church
305-430-9383 1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528
Order of Services


Sun.1ay
.; I.mlrni~ '-s' i 8& ll11 am.
'.Lu .t I :Il ol 9:45 a.m.
'I thursday
is.L-Ll '*IJ J 7p.m.
Saturday
No Service


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081
S Order of Services:

5 ,il lu 'jch.,lll 10 .I. l
Tueu', I Oil l Selt II I8 I
'nllunla. Pr N er S p


Order of Services:
Mon. tbr Firi. Noon Day Prayra
Bible Stuldy.. nThu 7...aI pIn.
Srmday.'Vtorq~ ... 7-11 am,,
Sunday Sch .In....... 9.30 am.






F rouwnsville ,
Church of Christ
4-561 N,%V. 33rd Court
.3055-1634-485WFaX & Messarss
305-634-6604
Order of Services
L~nu Ll, ckvj J 4 1 n


I~a'.'ls tr...lran 5.0k 1:.,. I in
nIcr.I~i ,~llN'le M W, iI
mL 'IO549911
'T&% L-Lc, Lmokl Sfw. 5 p


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue ollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services I
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ........... 10 a.m. i
Evening Worship ............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday 8:30 am. -9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19,21,22, 23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.pembrokeparkchurchofchrist.com Email: pembrokeparkcoc i'bellsoth.net
L ~IImlRRW~/ ~ ~ Now '


S Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3" Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060t*ax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Sunday School..... .....9:45 a.in
Suin. Morning Scvs..... LI a.IA.
41 Sun ...BTU. ..1:30-2:30 p.m.
Tuesday..... Bible Study
Feeding Miliistly ..10 am.
Wed. Bible StudyiPmycr..630 p.m.
Thlluis. Outreach Ministry... 6,310 p n
\eslwaageaamm/ss


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'h Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

S Order of Services:
Suudayduys clu Schoxl ........... 10 a.nm.
Worship Service ........... 11 15 s, m,
esyuys Bible Class..... .7 pn.
41h Sunlay Evening Worshp .6 p

\ / ^^S^EBSS^


1 (800) 254-NTBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistiniamin.org


93"1 Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"' Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services








Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church-
17800 NWV 25th Ave.
vw m.El3ncMworripcng Wer.orgip




305-621-5067 Faxm 30562g -31W04
Order of Services:
SSunday Worshlip Services.
? a.m. & 10 a.m.
I Chuh School: 8 30 a.m
pN1H, store Noon Day Bible Study
SBible lastitute, 6:30 p.m



Mt. Heron A.ME. Churchip7:30 p.m.
Sunday kWorship Spicmr.




Mid~/ce ~odi~ :30p.m.


St. John Baptist Church / Hosan
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue Ba
305-372-3877 305-371-3821 2171
305-637-44(
Order of Services:
E a'.\ Sunday
m l.I.,uiIui WO.'rslhip .....7:30 a.m.
l lund. aal hi:.l ..........9:30 a.m.
I I l rnu, .-,ship ...11 a.m.
S.-' ,,, r .,. I Bible Study
.l Mnng (Tues.) 7 .m.
I Ii


/ Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 NW. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order or Services:
Sunday School .............930 am
Morning PraiscWorslip ..11 a
Fm. .taindTlhi Sulday
tvenilg worship at 6 p.n
l 1ayer Meeting & Bible Study
ITuesday 7 p.m.
TTrttojjurunwn Atnlall fo S dncoy
ounmg Ihnmp. Call Cl 305-a6.X
\ [EBSTim ESBSni iSS


ina Community
ptist Church
N.W. 56th Street
04 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Siontav School.......... 945 ..
wasl np..,... 11 a.a
Rile Sti.ly. Th~ly ..7.30pii.
Yotlh ~6irmstry Mai-Wnd.
6p.Tn.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist-
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Servicesc
Frily Moninig Worship.7:30a.n.
Sunday School..........9:3an. m
Morning Wotship .....11 am.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
1Bible Sludy .................8 pm.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.9yh Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Eady Moming Wobship 7:30 am.
Si Chtnch School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
STuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Tufes before the 1stS m.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship



-Liberty City Church -\
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
no Suindl Morning ............8 am.
StUa.,y School ............10 a.m.
Sunida Fvening .............6 pm.
\Il.n I scellece ........7:30 p.m.
F']uc Bibtle Class.........7:30 p.m.
Thur, Fellowship ......... 10 a.m.
IA bunL Song Practice ..6 p.m.


St. M
BI
1470
3





a


lark Missionary
iptist Church
N.W. 87th Street
05-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday ":30 and II a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m.......... Sunday School
tuesday ........7 p.m. Bible Study
Sp.m.... ...Prayer Meeting
Monday. Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m.......Day Prayer


New Vision For Christ -
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10* Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
F-rly Sunday Worship .7:30 a.m.
S Sulda School ................ 930 am.
Sixxtay h?, rMg@Vtt. ...ll un






Bible Teaching Seminar
8620 N.W 17th Ave.
Miani, fL. 33147
954-735-9393

Crder of Sernies:
Sunday Wordshidp ...... 45 pm.
lice Bsacks afler service
Return transpoltation available
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The Miami Times



Heath


eCPTINMk a


MIAMI FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


SE% UIWWVUU DS --- --------- --------


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drug'


meuport was The **aumb, el Si**t. **m e*th ****oe
them 's. ,.... .Lpyragbt&deCiatasiaL E *SSS6* thet bread


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More automation, accessibility urged for healthcare


By Sylvia Mitchell
Miami Times Writer
Leadership and manage-
ment guru Peter F. Druck-
er cleverly remarked that
health care is the most
difficult, chaotic, complex
industry to manage today.
A major contributor to the
challenges facing health
care is the absence of con-
version to automation.
The industry is stuck in
the 19th century using pa-
per ins tcad of electronics.
Automation would provide
a means to measure ef-
ficiency, patient satisfac-
tion and outcomes, track
employees and manage in-


ventory.
A blue-ribbon panel of
health care experts from a
broad range of disciplines
convened at St. Thomas
University in Miami Gar-
dens on Feb. 11 to explore
the challenges and oppor-
tunities in health care in
these economic times.
The session was part of
an ongoing Professional
Development seminar se-
ries the Miami Gardens-
based university is offering
to alumni and the profes-
sional community.
Moderated by Terence
Shepherd, multimedia
business editor for The Mi-
ami Herald, panelists ad-


dressed health care acces-
sibility; universal health
care plans and how health
care costs can be reduced.
SThe panel comprised
Randy Kammer, vice presi-
dent for Regulatory Affairs,
BlueCross BlueShield of
Florida; Ray Gonzalez,
CEO, Pacer Healthcare;
Dr. Michael Baxley, senior
market medical executive,
CIGNA; Dr. Manuel Anton,
COO, Mercy Hospital; Pete
Martinez, chief innova-
tion officer, Quantum; Dr.
Sheldon Levy, professor,
University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine; George
Foyo, executive vice presi-
dent/CAO, Baptist Health


South Florida; and Anne
Llewellyn, editor-in-chief,
Dorland Health.
On the issue of mak-
ing health care accessible
to everyone in the world's
richest country, several
points of view were pre-
sented. Just about anyone
can receive last chance or
emergency room services
but the same does not
apply to preventive treat-
ment and health and well-
ness type services, due to
the structure of the in-
dustry. Individuals who
do not have a job, do not
have insurance, Medicare
or Medicaid aren't likely to
Please turn to CARE


Panelists at a St.Thomas health care discussion included, from left, Ray
Gonzalez, Dr. Sheldon Levy, Anne Llewellyn, Dr. Manuel Anton, George Foyo,
Randy Kammer, and Pete Martinez. At the podium is the moderator, Ter-
ence Shepherd. The session took place in the Evelyn and George Gold-
bloom Convocation Hall. -Photo courtesy of St. Thomas University


---- ---- ---------- ------------------------ --------- - -- - --- ------- ---------------------- ---------------~-- -------------~~'"~`'~~~~~-~~~''~~~~-


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"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


Trustee Ministry Day at St. John Baptist


The members of the Trustee
Ministry of the church will ob-
serve their day this Sunday. Our
minister for the youth church,
The Rev. Antonio Bolden will
bring the message for the 11
a.m., service. This anniversary
for the Trustee Ministry will be
extra-memorable because of the
recent homegoing last month of


our former longtime Chairman,
Deacon Winfred Dorsett. Sister
Delores Hills serves as the cur-
rent Chairperson.
The congregation has indeed
been blessed with presenta-
tions focused on Black History
during the month of February.
Rev. Charles Uptgrow is Assis-
tant Pastor.


- O -


- *


BART M.WILLIAMS,JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109

el)b Uitami imef
One Family Serving Since 1923
THE I.,LARERT MINOfRII Y
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Demetria's "Meme" Sweet 16!


Its the sweetest 16th, that you
don't wanna miss. The queen is
Demetria and I know everybody's
wondering who's her Prince!
If your invited and you decide
to show up, well put all your
doubts to rest!
It will be a designer party, from
Gucci to Louie, we will see who
will be dressed the best! The
pre-party will be February 21st,
8 p.m. at Velma's Soul Food (in
the rear), located on 7625 N.W.
22nd Avenue. The official party
will be February 28th, 8 p.m. at
the Miami Police Benevolent, lo-.
cated on 2300 N.W. 14th Street.
Be sure to check these out, be-
cause these extravaganzas will
be talked about all year!
So, tighten up if you're loose,


DEMETRIA BOATWRIGHT
and if your holding back come
clean. Because on the 28th of
February a Princess becomes a
.Queen!


AMWANB celebrates 13th anniversary

service for Bishop Eugene Joyner's


A Missioh with a New Begin-
ning will celebrate the 13th
annual appreciation/anniver-
sary service of Bishop Eugene
Joyner.
On Wednesday, February 25,
the guest speaker will be Bish-
op John H. Taylor, New Be-
ginning Praise Tabernacle.
Thursday, February 26, the
guest speaker will be Pastor
Ronald Johnson, Grace and
Truth Outreach Ministries.
Friday, February 27, Apostle
Otis Kemp, Missionary Evan-
gelist Center, Fort Lauderdale,
7:30 nightly.
Sunday March, 1, at 11:30
a.m., the guest speaker will be,
Pastor, Elder Calvin Joyner Sr,
A Mission with a New Begin-


BISHOP EUGENE JOYNER
ning #2, Georgia.
Our theme 'A Chosen Man
walking in the character of
God.' 1 Timothy 3:1-7


Church of God in Christ workers meeting
The Southern Florida Juris-
diction invites you to its Tenth
Annual Workers Meeting, Feb-
ruary 22-27, at the New Gam-
ble Memorial Church of God in
Christ, 1898 N.W. 43 Street,
Miami, Florida, where ,Bishop
Julian C. Jackson is Senior
Minister and Host Pastor.
The meeting will commence
with a musical extravaganza,
Sunday at 6 p.m. Enrichment
sessions will begin each eve-
ning 6 p.m., and evening wor- BISHOP J N
ship hour at 7:30 p.m., Monday BISHOP JULIAN JACKSON
through Friday night. call 305-821-3692, 305-757-
For additional information 6620.


New water park makes a splash

in your neighborhood.

The Grapeland Park is transformed. Once a collection of dusty sports fields, it's
now a fun four-pool water park!

Grapeland is just one example of more than 400 projects completed thanks to
the Building Better Communities Bond Program.

Check out the new water park at 1550 NW 37 Avenue.

To find Building Better Communities projects in your neighborhood,
go to miamidade.gov or call 3-1-1.


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CBi MEMORIIAM H' APYN BIRHDA REMMBRNCENMDTSTINY BTHE MITUARY-2
*

-I.- ..*-. .. . . ..


Royal
REV. LEROY DANIELS, 99,
minister, died
February 13.
Service 11a.m.,
Thursday, Faith
Temple Com-
munity Church
of Jesus.


REV. RONALD BROWN, 58,
minister, died
February 11, in
Florence, S.C.
Service 1p.m.
Friday, Cooper's
Temple COGIC.



FRANKLIN FRANCIS, 87,
nurse assistant, died february 12.,
Service 10 a.m. Saturday, Visita-
tion Catholic Church.

IRA DOBSON, 89, housewife,
died February 10. Final rites and
bural in Lennox Big Woods, Ja-
maica.

SAM SINGLETARY, 94, laborer,
died February 13. Arrangements
are incomplete.

JASON DIXON, 31 teacher,
died February 13. Service 2 p.m.
Saturday in the chapel.


JOE SUMMERSET, 53, cook,
died February 13. Service 11 a.m.
Thursday, New Way Fellowship
Praise and Worship Center.


MERLINA CARTER, 68, house-
keeper, died February 15, Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Manker _A
JOHN 'PIMP' W. MARSHALL,
63, died Febru-
ary 6, in Mount
Sinai Medical
Center. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day, Wactor
Temple--.-AM E
Z* flrch.


BERYL JOYCE WALTER, 68,
died February 16, Jackson North
Medical Center. Service 2 p.m.,
Wednesday, in the chapel.


Genesis
ANN WEBB, 74, switchboard
operator, died February 15 in Univ-
erisity Hospital. Service was held.

CLYDE MITCHEM, Jr., 83, me-
chanic, died February 15 in Holy
Cross Hospital. Service was held.

CECILIA JOSEPH, 84, home-
maker died February 10 in Pine
Crest Nursing Home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Eric S. George
AZINTA THOMPSON, 69, CAN,
Woodlake Nursing Home, died
February 10, in Delray Medical
Center. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day, Church of God of Prophesy in
West Palm Beach.

PAULINE R. BANKS, 79 retired
LPN, Jackson Memorial Hospi-
tal died February 12, in Aventura
Hospital. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church.

FORREST WELLS 58,
forman,Turnberry Isles, died Feb-
ruary 12, in Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service 1 p.m., Satur-
day, Friendship Missionary Baptist
Church, Hallandale Beach.

DANIEL GORDON, 46, land-
scaper, died February 13, in Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

CORENE HAASAN, 50, of Ath-
ens, GA, formally of Hallandale
Beach died February 16. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Carey Royal Ram'n
GERALDINE MILLER GAITER,
78, home mak-
er, died Febru-
ary 14 at home.
Survivors in-
clude: sons,
Rev. Glenn R.
Miller, Michael T.
Miller and Ken-
neth Jr; daugh-
ters, Joan M. Thomas, Claudette
L. Randle, Lenora M. Miller, Janice
O. -Myers, Jeanette White, Anita
Taylor, Madeline Atwell and Elaine
Moss; sister, Jennifer G. Watson.
Visitation 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Friday,
Brightstar Missionary Baptist
Church. 8201 N.W. 22 Avenue
SService 10 a.m., Saturday, St.
Matthews Freewill Baptist Church
6700 N.W. 2 Avenue.

ARTHURINE DARDEN, 43,
homemak e r,
died February
15 in Kindred
Hospital. Ser-
vice 4 p.m., Sat-
urday, National
Church of God.


ELIZABETH KITSON 89, home-
maker, died February 14 at home.
Service was held.

SARAFINA WILSON, 16, stu-
dent died February 10, at home.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Pem-
broke Park New Testament Church
of God.

Hadley
FRANCES HADLEYWALLACE,
73, nurse died
February 13, in
Houston, Texas.
Service Febru-
ary 21. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.


JOHNNIE L. SHINHOSTER,
70, laborer died
February 13 in
Jackson South.
Services Satur-
'day, St. Mary's
Baptist Church,
Coconut Grove.


FERRON FARRINGTON, 29,
bookkeeper died February 14 in
Miramar Memo- i
rial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Friday, Saint
Steven Catholic
Church.




Hall Ferguson Hewitt
REV. DANIE WEST, JR., 65,
mechanic, died
February 11 in
University of
Miami Hospital.
Service was
held.



SAMUEL DARBY JR., 50
mechanic, died
February 11 in
Jackson North.
Service 1 p.m,
Saturday. in the
chapel.



OLA JORDON, 82, assembly
worker, died
February 12 in
North Shore
Hospice. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.



SHAWN B. RIVERS, 41, house-
keeping, died
February 14 in
Jackson Memo-
rial North. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


Gregg L. Mason
ARLETHA PATTERSON EPHRAM,
71, retired
teacher for
Miami-Dade
County Public
Schools, died
February 12
in Northshore
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
daughters, Anita Oliver and Arle-
tha B Patterson; grandchildren,
Travoce Patterson, Willie Joseph
Oliver, Quinn Patterson and Arcilla
Oliver; brother, Leroy Patterson;
sisters, Alleane Currie, Leola Wil-
liams and Doris Gibbons; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation 2 9 p.m., Wednesday.
Family hour 6 8 p.m. Service 1
p.m, Thursday, Gospel Tabernacle
of Faith Deliverance. Final. rites
and burial Miccosukee, Florida.

MCKOY JORDON CLARKE,
16, student at
Dr. Michael Krop
Sr., High School,
died February
12. Survivors
include: par-
ents, Ann Marie
Campbell and
Dayton George;
step father, Felix Francis; broth-
er, Romaine; sisters; grandpar-
ents, Kathleen Vassell, Cecil and
Lorene Clarke; and a host of oth-
er relatives and friends .Viewing
2-9 p.m. Friday. Service 10 a.m.
Saturday,Pentacostal Tarberancle.

FLORENCE LAFOREST, 48,
register nurse, died February 10 in
Palmetto General Hospital. Wake
Service 7 p.m. Friday. Funeral
Mass will be held Saturday 10 a.m.
at St. James Catholic Church.

Range
MANGO REAVES, 81, retired
supervisor for
United Postal
Services died
February 16.
Survivors in-
clude vife, Con-
stalo Reaves,
dau g h terms,
Marion Wilson,
and Pountious C. Phillips; a host
of other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Saturday, New Way
Fellowship Baptist Church.

ESTELLA DESHAZOR, 80,
homemaker
died February
10. Service was
held.






OZZIE LEE BLACK, 80, retired
truck driver died February 9. Ser-
vice was held.

PEARL BORDEN, 68, retired
baker died February 8. Service
was held.

RANDOLPH MOBLEY, 92, re-
tired laborer died February 10.


E.A. StevensA M-
EDITH CRAWFORD, 100,
homemaker,
died February
14 in Memorial
Hospital South.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Star
of Bethlehem
Baptist Church,
West Park.

ALBERTA CLARK, homemak-
er, died February
14 in St. Peters-
burg. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, Hal-
landale Beach.


CATHERINE WILLIAMS, 73,
homemaker, died February 15 at
home. Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
Ward ChapelAME Church, Hallan-


dale Beach.


Paradise Memorial
LAWRENCE CARTER, arrange-
ment are incomplete.

JEWEK L. VICKS, 87. Service
11a.m., Wednesday, St. JohnAME
Church of South Miami.


JOIN THE

F- sLi go a 4. nL t L
by becoming a member of our
GLutcr z-6cEzato y
CALL 305-694-6210


Richardson-
CARLENE C. BROWN, 41,
dental assistant,
died February 1.
Service 2 p.m.,
Wednesday,
Grace Church of
The First Born.



SHANAVII L. TORRES, 16,
student, died
February 16.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, St.
Kevin Church.




DAWSON TYRE, 60, auto me-
chanic, died
February 13.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Stan-
ton Missionary
Baptist Church.



ANDRE ROBINSON, 25, long-
shoreman, died
february 7. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, St. John
Baptist Church.




LARRY WILLIAMS, 49, land-
scaper,. died
February 14 in
Larkin Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt..
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.
Poitier
KERMIT W. DEZMAL, 76, land-
scaper, died
February 13 at
home. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day in the cha-
"pel.




BETTY YVONNE ROBINSON,
65, environ-
mental services
employee. Died
February 13 in
Jackson North
Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, St
Luke Church,
Ft. Lauderdale.

MARVIN FULSOM, 66, construc-
tion laborer, died
February 14 in1
Westchester
Hospital. View-
ing 2 p.m., Fri-
day. Survivors
include: sisters, .
Patricia, Judy,
Carmetta and
Barbara; broth-
ers, Steven and William and a host
of nieces and nephews. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

BABY REGGIE DELAY JR, 12
months, died February 8 in Jack-
son Memorial Hospital. Service
was held.
Nakia Ingraham
FRANK ROGERS, 42, of Coo-
per City, died February 11 in Me-
morial Hospital. Service noon Sat-
urday in the chapel.

IONIE BAILEY, 95, housekeep-
er, died February 13 in Memorial
Hospital. Final rites and burial Sat-
urday, Brooklyn, New York.

ANN DORMAN, 59, died Febru-
ary 16. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

BRENDA MEKLAS, 59, died
February 16. Arrangements are
incomplete

St Fort


LUCILIA SAILA NEMORIN, 93,
homemaker, died February 9, in
Montreal. Service 10:30 a.m., Sat-
urday, in the chapel.

SAINTFLEUR GERMICE, 53,
machine operator, died February 8
in Jackson Memorial North Hospi-
tal. Service was held.


EDWARD BROOKINS, 51, la-
borer died Feb-
ruary 15, in St.
John Hospital,
Detroit, Michi-
gan .Survivors
include: sons,
Edward Jr, Ben-
zel Karri and
Danasha Etta;
sister, Joann Brookins; brother,
Larry Josey. Services 2:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Tabor M.B. Church.


Wright & Young
BETTY SMITH, 66, homemaker
died February
9, at home. Sur-
vivors include:
children Lisa,
Tammi, Derrick,
Shavon and Mi-
chelle; brother,
Albert Blocker.
Services 10
a.m., Saturday, Tree of Life.


SAMUEL LEONARD SIMON,
Jr." Deak" 59,
record clerk and
deacon at North
Dade Assembly
Christian Cen-
ter died Febru-
ary 13, in Me-
morial Hospital
West. Survivors
include; wife
Paula; children, Kimberly Monique
and Kevin Maurice, step-mother;
Minnie Simon, step-brother; Theo-
dore and James Watkins, aunts;
Mildred Simon-Saxon and Ruthie
Simon-Hicks. Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday, New Birth Cathedral of
Faith.

GREGORY THEODORE DAVIS,
52, supply
technician died
February 15, in
Memorial Hos-
pital Regional.
Survivors in-
clude; wife, Vic-
toria; mother,
Almeater Park-
er; daughter, Anique; brothers;
Ron, Don and. Gerald, sister Ber-
nardette Canty. Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Zion A.M.E Church.


TONNIE L. WRIGHT, 70, custo-
dian died Feb-
ruary 14 in Me-
morial Hospital
Regional. Sur-
vivors include;
wife, Julia; chil-
dren, Clarence,
Israel, James,
Windora, Bar-
bara, Marvin, Eartha, Florence
and Regina; siblings, Annie Craw-
ford, Marilyn, Ethel Lee, Edward
and Joey Wright. Services 1 p.m.,
Saturday, St. City Apostolic Faith.


JIMMY LEE HARRISON, Jr.
26, stocker -
died February
5. Survivors in-
clude; parents,
Emma and Jim-
my. Services 1
p.m., Saturday,
Bethel Apostolic
Temple.


MINISTER RHONDA LAURIE,
46, died Febru-
ary 11 in Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in- .
clude; mother, .
Delose Morgan; :
sister, Wendy
Piece; neph-
ews, Demetrius
and Darren; sister, Gayle Harris.
Services 11 a.m. Saturday, God's
House Outreach Ministries.


LARRY WALTON, 56, mainte-
nance worker
died February
15 in Palmetto
General Hos-
pital. Survivors
include; father,
Norman, Sr.;
siblings, Nor- .
man, Jr., Ruth,
Caren, Marion and Eleanor. Visita-
tion 5 p.m. 8 p.m., Friday, House
of Prayer. Services 1 p.m., Satur-
day, House of Prayer Church.


Happy Birthday


MONA LISA THOMAS
02/18/62 05/11/07


We miss you dearly and will
always love you!
Love, Family and Friends





Honor Your

Loved One

With an

In Memoriam

In The

Miami Times


Jay's
GRANTVILLE BRODERICK, 79
died February 7.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Faith
Christian Cen-
ter.




ETHEL POPE, 101, died Febru-
ary 10 at home.
Service noon,
Sweet Home
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




DOROTHY JAY, 70, died Febru-
ary 11, in Aven-
tura Medical
Center. Service
was held.





CATHERINE MORNING, 71,
died February
12 in Mount
Sinai Medical
Center. Service
11a.m., Satur-
day, National
Church of God,
Perrine.


ERIC WILSON, 39, died Febru-
ary 12 in Bap-
tist Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Baptist
Church.



TESSIE ORTIZ, 72, died Febru-
ary 14 in Jack-
son South Com-
munity Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Friday, Commu-
nity Church of
Christ Written in
Heaven.

MITCHELL ORR, 54,, died
February 15
in Homestead
Hospital Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.




MARY EUSTEY, 75, died Feb-
ruary 11. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day, The Kingdom Hall of Jehovah
Witnesses.

JOHN CHAPMAN, 77, died
February 16. Arrangements are
incomplete.


BLACKSc~ MUST C'oNTROl- THEIR OW'N DESTINY I


I 15B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16R THF MIAMI TIMFS. FEBRUARY 18-24. 2009


T. "AR so,
JJ I E
PY
NIOR I Ot -HA,!)' B


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,

ATHER MAE FRANCIS
Thank you seems inadequate
to express our sincere appre-
ciation for the many gestures of
love, condolences, visitations,
flowers and food. Special thanks
to Pastor Ronnie Britton and
the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church
family and the caring staff of
Gregg L Mason Funeral Home for
services well rendered.
We simply thank God for the
precious gifts of love and friend-
ship which made our burden a
sweet good-bye.
Gwen S. Long and family.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


- FATHER MAE FRANCIS


a








"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Quality care is a challenge


CARE
continued from 13B

have full access to the system.
Persons suffering from psychi-
atric diseases, too, are not likely
to have continuous and afford-
able health care because of un-
der-funding resulting from hav-
ing no one to speak up for them
and not being able speak up for
themselves.
The economic downturn im-
pacts those already struggling
to maintain health care cover-
age as employers pass on more
of the cost of insurance ben-
efits to the employee or elimi-
nate benefits altogether, pan-
elists said. Universal health
care for everyone evens out the
risk, resulting in lower cost,
since resources are not spent
on managing various programs
because everyone would be in
the same program. Creative
and innovative solutions are
needed to connect patients to
resources, as well as ensure
safety net providers remain vi-
able.
The experts were in agree-
ment that it is going to require-
the partnership of the govern-
ment, the private sector, com-
munity-based organizations,
doctors, nurses and consum-
ers to bring about effective re-
form.


To deliver quality care in
these economic times is a big
challenge for hospitals. Bad
debt and un-reimbursed care
result in some hospitals dis-
continuing much needed ser--
vices. The big hospital struc-
ture mainframe of the past is
being replaced with outpatient
centers and clinics in local pla-
zas in order to reduce costs,
increase productivity and
bring health care closer to the
consumer. Complicated pro-
cedures can be referred to the
traditional hospital.
To lower hospital costs, med-
ical records and nurses' docu-
mentation are computerized,
pharmacies use robotics to
increase patient safety and re-
duce errors and employees are
being taught to multi-task and
prioritize.
Consumers can help reduce
health care costs by policing
fraudulent providers, advocat-
ing for physical education to be
placed back into school curric-
ulums and demanding trans-
parency and accountability re-
garding the cost and quality of
their care.
The good news is that health
care has taken center stage
and is now in the forefront
of the new administration in
Washington that is committed
to health care reform.


NATHAN CONEY 'Smurf
wishes to express our sincere
appreciation for your prayers,
visits, cards, phone calls, floral
arrangements, covered dishes
and other deeds of kindness
Sincerely, The Coney and
Brown family

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


In Memoriam


BETTY KEY
01/14/43 02/22/08


You were loving and kind
in all your ways. Jovial and
friendly to the end of your
days.
You were sincere and true
in heart and mind. We cherish
the memories you have left
behind.
Sadly missed.
Amos and Family.

Death Notice


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


'Come unto me, all ye that
labour and are heavy laden
and I will give you rest.'
Lonzie, it has been one year
since you left us. We continue
to feel the pain. The lives you
touched and the memories we
have of you, will always be
treasured. You were a great
and terrific husband, father,
and grandfather. You will
forever live in our hearts. We
miss you!
Your wife, children, grand-
children and great grandchil-
dren

Death Notice


LATSHIA LADYE
ROSE GOODIN


Pastor Lydia Goodin & the
family members of LaTshia La-
dye Rose Goodin would like to
thank all of you for your prayers,
condolences, and acts of kind-
ness during our time of bereave-
ment. Special Appreciation to
Bishop Curry, AM 1490 WMBM,
and the ministries of New Birth
Baptist Church, to Just As I Am
International Ministries, and all
of those far and near who ex-
tended themselves to celebrate
LaTshia's life with us.
Many of you have pledged
your support to the LaTshia
Ladye Rose Goodin Foundation
to help fight for children with
Sickle Cell Anemia.
Forward all pledges to:

The LLRG Foundation
P.O. Box 680143
Miami, FL 33168-0143
AGAPE!

Death Notice


KAREN KENNERLY, 22,
student at Florida State Uni-
versity, died February 16 in
Jackson North Medical Cen-
ter. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Mt. Calvary Missionary Bap-
tist Church. Services entrust-
ed to Poitier Funeral Home.


SDeath Notice


JAHILA HOOKS, 67, pre-
school teacher (Small Frye),
died February 17, at North
Shore Hospital. Service, 2
p.m. Saturday, Peaceful Zion
Baptist Church. Arrange-
ments entrusted to Grace Fu-
neral Home.


MAMIE WELLS EVANS, 86,
retired Miami-Dade County
Public School teacher, died
February 16. Viewing Friday
4 to 9 p.m. Service, Mount
Hermon AME Church, Miami
Gardens. Services entrusted
to Royal Funeral Home.

Death Notice


PAULINE BANKS, 79.
retired nurse, died February
12 in Aventura Hospital.
Viewing Friday, 5 to 7 p.m.
Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church. Service 11
a.m., Saturday.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


HAROLD L. FRANCIS JR
02/15/29 02/22/06

Daddy, its been three years,
we miss your loving smile. You
remain in our hearts forever.
Love, Lolita, Harriet, Angela,
grands and family



Honor Your


Loved One With an


In Memoriam


In The Miami Times


WILLIS EUGENE WOODS
"POP", 60, painter, died Feb-
ruary 12 in Jackson North
Hospital. All services will be
entrusted to Lithgow-Ben-
net-Philbrick Funeral Home,
which is located on 15011
W. Dixie Hwy. Viewing will be
held February 20 from 6-10
p.m., and funeral service will
be held February 21 at 11
a.m.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


PHILLIP WILLIAMS


Two years gone. We love and
miss you. Phyllis, Kimberly,
Tanya, Karl and family


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


You will forever live in our
hearts. We all miss you. You
are irreplaceable to us. We
love you very much and may
God bless you.
Your daughter, Anita,
grandchildren, Nicole,
Zanaba, Donette and Anna.
The Thomas and Mitchell
families.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


BRANDON R. MILLS wishes
to express our sincere appre-
ciation for your prayers, visits,
cards, phone calls, flowers, cov-
ered dishes and other deeds of
kindness.
Sincerely, the Mills family


Estelle Bennett,

member fThe

Ronettes, dies
NEW YORK (AP) Estelle
Bennett, one of the Ronettes, the
singing trio whose 1963 hit "Be
My Baby" epitomized the famed
"wall of sound" technique of its
producer, Phil Spector, has died
at her home in Englewood, New
Jersey. She was 67.
Bennett's brother-in-law,
Jonathan Greenfield, said police
found her dead in her apartment
on Wednesday after relatives
had been unable to contact her.
The time and cause of .death
have not yet been determined.
Greenfield is the manager and
husband of Bennett's sister,
Ronettes lead singer Ronnie
Spector.
The Ronettes were inducted
into the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame in 2007; its Web site hails
the group as "the premier act of
the girl group era." Among their
admirers were the Beatles and
the Rolling Stones; their exotic
hairstyles and makeup are aped
by Amy Winehouse.


BLANCHE C. JOHNSON
LONZIE JOYCE SR 02/23/35 09/09/07
04/04/28 02/16/08


305-694-6210, Ext. 109 btJia imQ m
One Family Serving Since 1923
THE L ' 0,' OWNED 0 : ' i S SOUTHEAST


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE 305-757-
9000 FAX: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements


I I



Pjwirrect Crema~tion With Viewing


1.
c-- _I
II
iii
.-,






The Miami Times


Lifestyles


Entertainment
FASHION HIP HOP MUSiC FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


MIAMI NATIVE RETURNS


IN


'LIBERTY


One-person-show by Yvette
Thompson opens at Arsht center
By Sandra J. Charite
cijltarne(a'linllmllmeo/ll mlellt' 'o
April Yvette Thompson grew up in Allapattah and won
a full scholarship to attend Ransom Everglades School in
Coconut Grove.
Back then, Miami, especially Liberty City, was a different
place, she says.
"You could count the number of Cuban people on one
hand," she said. ""It is rewarding to look back now and see
that people are mixing and living in an area with colored
people, which represents a growth in America. Now.
everyone in Miami is Caribbean."
The daughter of a Bahamian-


CITY


Cuban father and an African-American
mother, Thompson sees Miami as a
melting pot. with different cultures are
coming together.
"I remember a time when Black people
did not even speak to each other," Thompson
said.
In the early '90s, Thompson moved to New"
York City to pursue a career in acting and
landed roles in television shows such as Third
Watch, Law &, Order: Criminal Intent, The
Dave Chappelle Show, Guiding Light. and As
the World Turns.
But Broadway is where Thompson found her
passion.
Inspired by experiences, Thompson co-Trote and will
star in the play Liberty City that depicts her life growing
Please turn to PLAY 2C


April Yvette Thompson shown in scenes from her one-person show 'Libert City'


, - "

-


IS SET FOR SATURDAY


Miami Times Staff Report
Eleven young women with a wide range of interests
will compete in the third annual Miss Miami Gardens
Scholarship Pageant on Saturday for money to attend
college and a shot at going national.
The contestants aged 17 to 24 and attending or
expecting to attend college:
They include Vanessa Charles, who has an interest
in youth empowerment; Tequila Graham, whose aim is
to celebrate the leaders of tomorrow; Jasmine Jackson,
who wants to promote sign language; Rosie Justilien,
an advocate for the rights of the disabled; Santriness
Norman, who would plans to help boost self-esteem among
youths.
Also, Kimberly McDonald, who wants to enhance the
leadership skills of youth; Marie Simon, who has an
interest in mentoring and educating the young; Janey
Tate; who is also interested in mentoring, as well as
volunteering.
Please turn to PAGEANT 2C


SaItrtess 'Norman


SVaessa Charles
. I


-f hicld: tl; A.l Jun


Marie Simo"


yv"









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


97 THF MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 18-24. 2009 1


-- . .. -__ _ _~~ I


BvD.RcardStac


The wedding of Latonia Sey-
mour and Dwight Walker
took place last Saturday at St.
Matthew Missionary Baptist
Church, with the Rev. Warren
J. Clarke presiding.
The females wore red and
white and the males black tux-
edos and red accessories.
Cheryl Smith, mistress of
ceremonies, announced the
entrance of the bridal party,
beginning with Henry and.
Cleomie Armbrister, parents
of the groom; Pleasant George,
grandmother of the bride; and
Mazis and Henry Kerr, parents
of the bride; who all proceeded
to light candles signifying the
uniting of the two families.
Other members of the bridal
party included bridesmaids and
groomsmen Estella Stubbs and
Quentin Faison, Lily Smith
and Jimmy Thomas, Ethlyn
Harvey and Leonard Kelly,
Sheri Moss and Elesson Will-
burn, Rapunzel Nelson and
Kendrick Lightfoot and Mar-
lene George and Bernard Bost-
wick.
Jayann Bostwick was ma-
tron of honor, Gilbert Forbes,
best man, Daejah Walker, flow-
er girl, Bernard Bostwick Jr.,
ring bearer, and Glenn George
Sr., the bride's uncle who es-
corted her down'the aisle.
The bride wore a gown with


a three-foot train, I
crystals accentu-
ated on the bodice
and around the
hem, tiara, dan-
gling earrings and a sparkling
necklace.
Rochelle Lightfoot-Johnson
sang My Funny Valentine, Let
Me Call You Sweetheart and The
Lord's Prayer. Donovan Carey
read the scripture and Rev.
Clarke officiated.
After the presentation of the
newlyweds, they entered an
Escalade limousine, followed
by two other limos, for Violines
Banquet Hall, where Thalia
Armbrister-Charles presided
over the reception and celebra-
tion.
The reception included a "Dol-
lar Dance" allowing for everyone
to contribute to the bride and
groom.
The couple thanked their
parents, as well as Dishon
Carey, Donovan Carey, Thalia
Charles, Natasha Delacruz,
Sasha Delacruz, Deacon Con-
nie James, Brianna Johnson,
Nathaniel Miller and Cheryl
Smith before leaving for their
honeymoon in London, Eng-
land.

**********
The Singing .Angels of Arco-
la Lakes Park were invited by


I


-I


I


Edith Hall, principal, and Mary
Dunn, Black History sponsor,
to present a Black History Pro-
gram, "From Africa to America
Through Music" last Tuesday, in
the Parkview Elementary cafete-
ria. The students demonstrat-
ed their Black History knowl-
edge by answering questions
presented in a role-play ses-
sion in which historical figures
portrayed included Dr. Carter
G. Woodson, founder of Black
History; Rosa Parks, mother of
the Civil Rights Movement; Dr.
Martin L. King Jr, father of the
movement; and Cheyene Webb,
representing the youth of the
movement, who walked from
Selma to Montgomery, Ala. on
"Bloody Sunday".
After a rendition of James
and Rosemond Johnson's Lift
Ev'ry Voice And Sing to a rap
beat, the students were taken
on' a virtual trip to Africa and
informed about African kings
and queens, the pyramids built
by Africans and enslaved Afri-
cans being brought to America.
Members of the Singing An-
gels pointed to inventions by
slaves, such as the broom, mop,
dusting rags, air conditioning,
hot comb, traffic lights, potato
chips, ice cream, filament and
cell phone. They also related a
chronology of King" life.
The finale included a dem-
onstration of jazz, blues, Mo-
town, gospel, and rap that
summarized the program and
the students doing the Popeye
and Marcarena and the Angels
being served soul food by the
Black History Committee.


Happy, Happy Birthday to
two wonderful people: my cous-
in Garth C. iReeves and Alta-
mese Moss-Jarrett, who both
enjoyed their 90th birthdays
with family and parishioners
at the Church of the Incarna-
tion after services last Sunday.
Father J. Kenneth Major and
Father John Jacob Jarrett III
joined in the lovely brunch giv-
en for the honorees... Marjorie
Woods of Coconut Grove also
celebrated her 90t birthday
last Saturday.

********
Wedding anniversary greet-
ings go out to Maxene and


Nikeia Jean, Feb.
10, their 121....
Congratulations to'
LaCory LaRodney-
Patterson and An-
toinette Denise-Washington
who will exchange vows on Sat-
urday, Feb. 28. The reception
will be at The Church of the
Transfiguration.


Elva : Heastie-Gamble-1 and
hubby Vance of the Motor City
are in Miami visiting Elva's
many family members, class-
mates and friends. Welcome
home, God-sister.


Get-well wishes are for Roslyn
Bethel, Carmetta Brown-Rus-
sell, Fredericka M. Bruton,
Elsie Douglas, Denesia "Mis-
sy" Harris, Inez M. Johnson,
Joyce Jones, Elestine McK-
inney Allen, Jean C. Morley,
Timothy 0. Savage, former
band director of BTW, Doretha
Payne, Doris M. Pittman and
Herbert J. Rhodes Jr.

********
So sorry to hear of the death
of Edward Cohen. Ed, as he
was affectionately known, was
the son' of the Late Samuel
GEanneri-and ,Althea CGoheni of
the Goulds area. He was funer-
alized from~his grandfather and
uncle's church, A.M. Cohen
Temple, on Northwest Third
Avenue. Our sympathy to the
Cohen family.


High school seniors may ap-
ply for The Miami Herald Mi-
nority Journalism Scholarship
being awarded in the memory
of Thirlee Smith Jr., one of the
first Black journalists hired by
The Herald who worked on the
newspaper from 1968 to 1969
and died in 2007.

*********
Students in Miami-Dade and
Broward counties who plan to
pursue careers in any aspect
of news operations may apply.
The deadline is March 20.

********
Tennis star Serena Wil-
liams plans to donate comput-
ers to schools in Africa... Our
own Oprah Winfrey talk-
show host, actress, business-


woman and billionaire made
history by becoming the first
Black woman to host a na-
tionally syndicated television
talk show. She is regarded as
the richest woman in televi-
sion and is on the Forbes list
of world billionaires, with a net
worth of $2.5 billion... Thanks,
Alonzo Mourning, for all you
have done and are doing for the
children of Miami. Thanks also
to your wife Tracy for all of her
kindness to the kids, And Hap-
py 39t birthday, Zo.


Song bird Aretha Franklin
did more than just give a'rous-
ing rendition of My Country 'Tis
of Thee during the swearing-in
cereriony for President Barack
Obama on the steps of the U.S.
Capitol. She 'also gave the na-
tion's first Black president


copies of 17 sermons from her
father the late Rev. Dr. C.L.
Franklins' collection of homi-
lies recorded at Detroit's New
Bethel Baptist Church where
he was pastor for 38 years and
rose to national prominence as
a civil-rights leader. The Queen
of Soul also gave the president
.a small Bible engraved with a
personal message and a solid
gold brooch with white dia-
monds to First Lady Michelle
Obama. Aretha's 15-year-old.
grandson Jordan gave First
Daughters Malia and Sasha a
collection. of Gospel/Christian
hip-hop music.

********
May you and your family tru-
ly enjoy all of this year as we
celebrate Black History Month.
We, too, sing My Country 'Tis of
Thee, Sweet land of Liberty.


Miamian has lead role in play showcasing Liberty City


PLAY
continued from 1C

up during the 1970s in Miami
and her family'sjourney through
the Black Power movement.
A blend of experience and
imagination about Liberty City
takes Thompson through race-
relations and activism in the
1960s through the 1980s and
showcase a dynamic generation
dedicated to bringing about
change in the streets of Liberty
City.
"The 1960s were about civil
rights, the 1970s created a
young generation of activists
and the 1980s were about
fighting to bring programs into
the community so that we as
a people could progress," said


Thompson.
Thompson has appeared in
plays such as The Exonerated,
The Antigone Project,
Light Raise the Roof, 365
Plays/365 Days, The Rivals
Macbeth, The Rivals and The
Merry Wives of Windsor. But
Liberty City is especially dear
to her because she has lived
the experiences that will be
dramatized on stage.
Liberty City has been
nominated for the Lucille
Lortel- Award for Outstanding
Off-Broadway Solo Show, and
Thompson was nominated for
Drama Desk and Outer Critics
Circle awards for Outstanding
Solo Performance.
Jessica Blank co-wrote and
directs Liberty City. She also


co-wrote the documentary
play The Exonerated with her
husband Erik Jensen in which
Thompson appeared.
Thompson is scheduled to
appear also in the upcoming
movie The Accidental Husband,
starring Uma Thurman and
Colin Firth, in which she plays
a businesswoman. It will be in
theaters on March 27.
Liberty City will premier at
7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb.18,
at the Carnival Studio Theater
of the Adrienne Arsht Center
for. the Performing Arts in
downtown Miami and run
through March 1.
General admission tickets
cost $40 and $45. For tickets
call 305-949-6722 or log on to
arshtcenter.org.


Contestants will vie for scholarship dollars


PAGEANT
continued from 1C

The other contestants are
Leasshma Grant, Aminah
Lacey and Charita Walker.
The pageant is a franchise
partner of Miss America and
the winner will advance to the
Miss Florida Pageant and, if
she wins, will go on to the na-
tional competition.
Ericka Dunlap, a native
of Orlando and the first Afri-
can American to win the Miss
Florida title, will be among
several guests at the show.
According to a city of Miami
Gardens statement, Dunlap is
hoping that her appearance
will impact the lives of the
contestants in a positive way.
"People may not remember
what you said or did but they
will remember how you made
them feel," Dunlap said.


Actress Tangi Miller, a Miami
gardens native who starred in
Tyler Perry's Madea's Family
Reunion, has been tapped as a
guest judge. Miller found suc-
cess playing the role of Elena
Tyler in the WB hit series Felic-
ity in 1998. She plans to pro-
vide motivational support and
guidance for the competitors.
The publicity statement said
the pageant, with its empha-
sis on the educational goals of
the contestants, "serves as evi-
dence of the city's support of
the future of its young college
bourd women."
"Far from being the typical
beauty pageant, the Miss Mi-
ami Gardens pageant truly fo-
cuses on the essence of schol-
arship," the statement said.
Potential contestants went
through a "rigorous screening
process" in which they had to
show a strong background in


community service and display
public speaking and interview-
ing skills.
The winner will get a $2,500
college scholarship; the first
runner-up, a $1,000 scholar-
ship; and the second runner-
up, a $500 scholarship.
The pageant is slated for 7
p.m. Saturday at Florida Me-
morial University's Lou Rawls
Center for Performing Arts
Center, 15800 NW 42nd Ave.,
Miami Gardens.
Tickets are $10 each and are
available at the city of Miami
Gardens, 1515 NW 167th S.,
Suite 200, and will be avail-
able at the box office on the
night of the show.
For more information about
pageant, call Ula Zucker, 305-
622-8035, or email uzucker@
miamigardens-fl.gov, or log on
to www.missmiamigardens.
com.


I was initially ambivalent
about Phillis Wheatley (1753-
1784) and her poetry. Per-
haps it was a case of reading
too much of the material by
her detractors. The early cnti-
cisms I had read branded her
as either an imitator or a mim-
ic of the English romantics
with no particular originality
to speak about or hailed her
as a "curiosity," a slave genius
who wrote poetry.
It wasn't until I began to
read what Wheatley had writ-
ten and compare it to the
American poetry of the day
that I became convinced that
she was a poet of exceptional
ability and yet another ex-
ample of a pioneering African
American female "first" that I
was pleased to discover, along
the lines of Gwendolyn Brooks.
who, as poet laureate of Illinois


for phillis wheatley
topsy black as cane...

that slaving ship which brought u to these
shores
gave up its name that u might make it yrs --
idyllic country lass whom god adores!

for never did u know the kind of toil
yr kith & kin endured: the lash, the moil.
u furrowed rows in fields of verse, not soil.

heroic like yr couplets, so u snared
the favor of yr mistress who declared
yr prodigy & u were blithely spared,

unlike yr fellow slaves, the menial.
was it her tender heart? were u so genial?
what made her mortal sin seem venial?

what made her let a topsy, black as cain,


.---., '.- : ': -" ? ,.-presented by her mistress into
"the society where the Count-
ess of Huntington moved;" she
was hailed in those circles as
the "sable muse."
I soon got over my sublimi-
IB hnal prejudice -- that Phillis did
(1968-2000), was not suffer much as a slave. In
the first person of fact, she did better as a slave.
color to be a poet She was pampered and tu-
laureate of a major tored and allowed to develop
American city, and, later, Rita her writing skills and thrived
Dove, seventh, youngest and under her slave master's be-
first African American poet nevolence. Her life took a turn
laureate of the United States for the worse when she mar-
(1993-95). ned freedman John Peters
Wheatley was the first Af- in 1778, had three children
rican Amnerican to publish a --none of whom survived her
book of poetry (1773). Poems -- was abandoned by her hus-
on Various Subjects-Religious band and left to die in poor
and Moral, by Phillis Wheat- health, penniless, at 31.
ley, a Negro Girl. This book It took me a while to appreci-
was published in England and ate the enorrmty of her talent
America, 11 editions between and her accomplishments but,
1773 and 1838. Her poetry when I did, as a college junior
was clearly as good as the bet- and frustrated with the rig-
ter efforts of American poetry ors of the neoclassical wanting
of the day. style, I readily included her as
Most American poetry of the an influence that would shape
time was imitative of neoclas- a considerable amount of the
sical poetry of 18th century poetry that was to come from
England, where Wheatley was me.


inspire a darkly moorish gift; retain
that heady, musty breath & entertain

with couplets closed or oft enjambed:
or four-line stanzas deftly crammed
with metered feet & smartly epigrammed?

A lofty soul that cleaved & split in twain,
& filled two bodies may perhaps explain
the spirit bond between u on this plane.

for spirit surely brought u to this land.
& taught yr simple heart to understand
the ways of god inscrutable to man.

& afric's muse did not forgetful prove
but birthed yr book of poetry to move
aside, displace the chattel's pain with love.

.1' Joseph McNair


Centennial birthday celebra-
tions for Amanda Lee Cox
were held at St. James A.M.E.
Church recently. The planning
committee members included
Pastor Benny L. Johnson, Ul-
ysses Johnson, Alonzo Jack-
son and Norma C. Mims.
Mims, the mistress of cere-
monies, told the gathering that
Cox was born to the late Lula
Mae Ingram and Abraham Priri-
foy, on Dec. 30, 1908, in Ever-
green, Ala. She married her
childhood sweetheart, Maximo
Gomez Cox, and they had four
children. They moved to Miami
in 1940 Amanda Cox honoree
joined St. James AME, sup-
porting Orita Pilgrims, a youth
group in the church.
Those gathered fondly around
Cox, aka "Big Momma," includ-
ed family members Homer and
Genett Cox, Jerry and Lula
Cox Simmons, Richard and
Norma Cox Coles, Jonathan
McKinney, Xavier Gathers
and Brandin Hudson, along
with many grandkids and great-
grands. They all sang Happy
Birthday and presented the
family matriarch with a plaque
and red roses.


The Rev. Dr. R. Joaquin Wil-
lis, pastor, Deacons William E.
Clarke III and Frank Pinkney
and other men of The Church
Of The Open Door presented
a program, "Men In God's Ar-
mor," with the Rev. Dr. Henry
E. Green Jr., newly elected


Presiding Elder of the African
Methodist Episcopal Church,
as the keynote speaker.
The Men's Choir sang songs
geared towards Black History
Month. They included Alonzo
Bain, minister of fine arts; Dr.
Nelson Hall, senior minister of
music; and Dr. Bennie Reaves,
soloist. Green thanked Wil-
lis for his leadership and those
who supported his elevation in
the church. He challenged ev-
eryone to put on their "coat of
armor" to resist the temptation
coming after them daily.
Deacon Kervin Clenance was
honored as "Man of the Year
2008" for blazing a trail in the
radio industry, starting with
WINZ in 1976, then moving to
WGBS in 1980, WNWS in 1983,
Love 94 in 1992, WHQT-HOT
105 in 1992 and 1080AM-WTPS
in 2007, besides being owner/
operator of a radio station in his
native U.S. Virgin Island.


A pre-Valentine's Day banquet
was held at the Double Tree
Mart on Sunday to celebrate the
retirees from the International
Longshoremen Association Lo-
cal No. 1416-1416A. It was or-
ganized by Clarence Pittman
Jr., president, Gwendolyn W.
Pittman, executive secretary,
and younger participants, such
as Jeffery Burney and Jakelin
Chapman.
David Butler and Marvin
Taylor, honor guards, stood
at attention as Ellis Canty Sr.
brought greetings. Arlington
Ferguson gave the invocation





I


I


and Allen Davis gave the occa-
sion.
After dinner, the focus was
turned to the retirees such
as Charles Alexander, Irvin
Dukes, Charles Florence, Carl
Frazier, Samuel Higgs, Arthur
Nelson Sr., Moses Ragin Sr.,
Elliot Reed, Central Williams
and Oscar Taylor. Presenters
included Pittman, Willie Hunt-
er, Chapman, Canty, Davis and
members of the Ladies Auxilia-
ry. They received lots of plaques
from companies at the Port of
Miami.
One highlight was the crown-
ing of Mr. ILA selected from
among the retirees. After tab-
ulating the score, the crown
went to Charles Alexander.
Nelson was first runner-up
and Moses Ragin Sr. second
runner-up.
A solemn tribute was paid to
deceased member of the union.
Condolences were extended to
the families of Arthur Bivens,
William Bullard, Samuel Cof-
fee, Simeon Dawkins, Rea-
son Dixon, James Dowling,
Clifton Dukes, Lee Gerow,
Herbert Jones, Prince McK-
night, Carlton Perkins, Otis
W. Player, William Snow,
James Williams and Ulysses
Simmons.
The family members included
Alice Gerow, Virginia Tucker-
Robinson, Mary Tucker-Man-
ning, Calvin Tucker, Bianca
Miller, Mary Simmons, Bev-
erly Johnson, Anita Harrell,
Jimmy Harrell, Lee Johnson,
Dr. Malcolm Black, Bernard
Thomas and Aaron Johnson.


i.4









BI AKS USTCONROLTHER OW DETIN 3CTHEMIAI TIESFEBUAR 1824,200


l wnce lc Festival has much


to celebrate on 15th anniversary


-b 1k.P


"Copyrighted MateriaFl----



Syndicated ContentF



Available from Commercial News- Providers"



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' Florida Grand Opera Presents
LAKMIV-
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$1..i $g2',f, $2 ;,S; $62-7, $81.75, $99.75, $1,12-5, $1,81.5
Adrienne Arsht Center Presents
LIBERTY CITY
2 & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater matinee $45; evening $40
LIBERTY CITY
A tal e f life in Miami dulrino the ihturbule nt '70s and '80s lwhen families


struggled to stay together as their worlds were falling apart.
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $40


i
WED.
FE13 25


FRI





FE 2


Lakme


LAKME
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$13.75, $ $2 $27.75. $62.75, $81.75. $99 75. $1~5. 15, 1 5
LIBERTY CITY
"A definitive example of the solo show!' Village Voce
7:30 PM Carnival Sludlo Theater General Admission $40
LAKME
8 PM Zff Ballei Opera House
$13 75, $2?5, $27.75, $62 75, $81 75. $99.75, $1 5, $S1T5
LIBERTY CITY
"Scorching insight on how history both frees and chains as at the
: same time" Variety
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $40
Adrienne Arsht Center and New York Philharmonic Present
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
In his last season as Music Director, Lorin Maazel conducts America's
oldest orchestra in America's newest concert hall in a program of Berlioz'
Roman Carnival Overture, Tchaikovsky's Suite No. 3, and Mussorgsky's
Pictures at an Exhibition.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $20, $30, $95, $175


LIBERTY CITY
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $45
LAKME
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$22.75, $2/?5, $52.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75, $17';a5, $228?15
LIBERTY CITY
2 & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $45
Adrienne Arsht Center and PerilloMusic Present
FLAMENCO FESTIVAL MIAMI: LOS FARRUCO
"Raw Flamenco, full of power, fire and unbridled masculinity."
Daily Telegraph, London
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $sr$5'$3 f5
LAKME
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75, $5275, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75, $178.75, $?,2~15, $25755


New York Philharmonic:
Lorin Maazel


Flamenco Festival Miami:
Los Farruco


Free Adrienne Arsnt center Tours: Mondays ana daturaays at noon, starting at me alrit allet upera rouse loooy.
No i. rnrvafinnq nprpcevor,


Richard Faison










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I 3C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


BLACKS MUSTr CONTROi, THEIR OWiN DESTINY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


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The Miami Times



Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


How to start a busincs for under $100


"Copyrighted Material


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"Available from Commercial News Providers"'


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Black women say advertisers



don't know how to reach them


Special to The Miami Times

Atlanta, GA (BlackNews.com) -
Some 86 percent of African-Amer-
ican women believe advertisers
need to do a better job of talking
to them, according to the Lattim-
er Communications recently re-
leased study, "A Profile of Today's
Black Woman."
Advertisers need to re-evaluate


with The Bantam Group, a lead-
ing market research agency. It
is the first of its kind to examine
attitudes and consumer behavior
for African-American women in
hope of developing psychographic
profiles.

VOICE FOR WOMEN
"We felt that we needed to finally
give a voice to African-American


The study also found most industries can do a better
job marketing to Black women, especially in categories
such as automotive, banking/financial, travel, health-
care/pharmaceuticals and fast food.


their marketing campaigns tar-
geting this important segment,
the study found.
The study also found most in-
dustries can do a better job mar-
keting to Black women, especially
in categories such as automotive,
banking/financial, travel, health-
care/pharmaceuticals and fast
food.
The national study was devel-
oped and fielded in collaboration


women who have so often been si-
lenced and misrepresented due to
stereotyping and deemed one-di-
mensional," said Sarah Lattimer,
president of Lattimer Communi-
cations.
"Inspired by First Lady Michelle
Obama and the fact that there are
so many other Black women like
her whose stories often go untold,
we wanted to provide research
that would identify profiles of


Black women," Lattimer said.
Through the study, Lattimer
Communications was able to
build six psychographic profiles
of African-American women that
it labeled Achievers, Fledglings,
Tag-A-Longs, Self-Sufficients,
Traditionals and Cynics.
Through the use of these pro-
files, advertisers will be better able
to target marketing campaigns to
those specific Black women who
may be interested in their prod-
uct or service.

NOT ALL WOMEN ARE THE SAME
"These six profiles are proof that
Black women are, in fact, multi-
dimensional. Advertisers cannot
target the African-American fe-
male without determining what
profile she falls into, in order to
determine specific and engaging
marketing strategies," said Lat-
timer. "Advertisers who think that
they can target all Black women
the same way are sorely mis-
taken. Historically, this is what's
been done but, through our re-
search, you can see that this is
not effective."
Lattimer Communications will


launch a blog, "MochaLatti," in
March to continue to engage Afri-
can-American women across the
country. The invitation-only blog
will serve as a place where Black
women can be heard in a society
where they are often misunder-
stood.
The study of African-American
women aged 18 and older was
conducted via focus groups and
an online survey between October
and December 2008.

TWO-PHASE STUDY
The first phase consisted of
four focus groups among women
from the same age group with a
pre-existing relationship during
which they discussed their views
on a range of topics from family
to faith.
The second phase consisted of
1,000 online interviews among
Black women also aged 18 and
older with a household income
of more than $25,000. They were
asked general and industry-spe-
cific attitudinal and behavioral
questions.
For more information on the
study, call 404-526-9321.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


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Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


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1/15/09


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


INVITATION TO BID FOR FLAT RATE REPAIRS
OF MOTOROLA RADIOS


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 11:00 A.M., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, 2009

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1904.

Deadline for Request for Clarification Monday. February 23, 2009 at 4:00 P.M.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 004837


City Of Miami







SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN/PARK WEST & OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that a regular CRA Boards of Commissioners
Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West & Omni Community
Redevelopment Agencies will take place on Monday, February 23, 2009 at
5:00 pm, at The Adrienne Arsht Center For The Performing Arts in the Peacock
Foundation, Inc, Studio, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Florida, 33132.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information please contact
the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.


(#003209) James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West &
Omni Community Redevelopment Agencies


IFB NO. 127095


- C.


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional, Safe& Confldenllal Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
,- Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

S305-621-1399


- *


Who Cares



What Black People Think



Anyway?


If you think nobody
gives a damn what
Black people think,
think again. Some
people care a lot.
Especially when they
need something from
you.
Take corporations.They want
you to buy their products.And
banks care whether you're going
to give them your money.
Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for
your vote. And TV and radio
stations hope you will pay
attention to their shows.
The point is,all these people
want something from you.And
when people want something
from you,you have got power
over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make
the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes
and your loyalty to people who
deserve it. People who are going
to give you something in return.
People who are doing the most
for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people
think? A lot of people do.
The MiamiTimes is about the
business of communication.
Communicating to you the
power you have and letting you
know how you can use it. For
instance, right now there are 32
million Black people in this
country and last year we earned
more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


Think about it




Ie ttiami ZThmeg
Your Community Newspoper Since 1923


Phone: 305-694-6210 or see us online at www. Miami Times Online. com


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on February 26, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. in the City Commission Chambers
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of
waiving the requirements of obtaining sealed bids for the procurement of
maintenance and repair services of Ferno Emergency Ambulance Cots from
Medco Equipment Repair, Inc., d/b/a EMSAR of South Florida, a Miami-Dade/
Non-Minority vendor, located 13047 S.W. 133rd Court, Miami, FL 33186, for the
City of Miami Fire-Rescue Department, on an as needed basis for a one (1)
year period, with the options to extend for two (2) additional one-year periods,
at a first-year cost not to exceed $20,000 with optional annual increases not to
exceed 5%, for each of the option periods.

Funds will be allocated from the various sources of funds of the Department
of Fire-Rescue, subject to availability of funds and budgetary approval at the
time of need.

Inquiries from other potential sources of such a service who feel that they might
be able to satisfy the City's requirement for this service may contact Yusbel
Gonzalez, City of Miami Department of Purchasing, at (305) 416-1958.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003208)


.. .. .. I I


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SECTION D


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101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bdrms, one bath, $950,
nice and clean, laundry room,
parking.
Section 8 OK! 786-326-7424

1118N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath, $500. Stove, refrig-
erator, air. 305-642-7080 or
786-236-1144

11530 N.E. 12th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly, $1450 to
move in. Call 786-256-3174.

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrigerator, air. 305-
642-7080 or 786-236-1144

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath. $550. Stove,
refrigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144

12400 N.E. 12th Court
Newly renovated, one be-
doom, one bath. Laundry
room. Section 8 ok! $675
mthly. No security!
305-498-2266, 954-549-8787

1245 N.W. 58th Street
One bed, one bath, $525
month, All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen
T.V. Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1281 N.W. 61st Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two. bdrms, $725 appliances
*included, 305-747-4552

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

1326 N.W. 1st Place
Very clean, one bedroom,
one bath, $425/month,
786-419-6613.

1331 Sharizard Boulevard
Efficiencies, and one
bedrooms. Section 8 ok! No
deposit for Section 8! 786-
488-5225

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bdrm, one bath,
with air, in quiet area, $700/
month! 305-213-5013

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$625 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath.
$395 month. Newly
renovated. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV. Call Joel 786-
355-7578

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Studio- $450/month, one
bedroom-$525/month, three
bedroom-$775/month. All
appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen T.V. Call
Joel 786-355-7578.

16450 N.W. 2nd Avenue
One bdrm, one bath, all until.
included, $850/month, one
year lease. 786-487-7403

1718 N.W. 2nd Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-
7080.

1744 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator and
air. 305-642-7080

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath
$600 mthly, $900 to move
in. All appliances included.
Free 20 inch flat screen
T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms., one bath $625.
Stove, refrigerator, air. Free
Water. 305-642-7080 or
786-236-1144

1969 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,$550.
Appliances, free water and
gas. 305-642-7080
786-236-1144


200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080.


iSS


e


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


* wS wBT w^ wET w^ '


2141 N.W. 91st Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
private driveway, air. $925
monthly. 786-663-0234

2365 N.W. 97th Street #B
Rear
One bedroom, $475/month,
$200 deposit. First and last
to move. 305-691-2703

247 N. E. 77 Street
1 bedroom, 1 bath, remod-
eled, water, garbage, parking
is free. $790 monthly plus se-
curity deposit. Section 8 wel-
come.Call 786-216-7533.

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849.

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath.-$600
mthly. 305-213-5013


48 N.W. 77th Street
Large, one bdrm, $600
monthly. Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.

5200 N.W. 26th Avenue
Two and three bdrms.. Free
gift for Section 8 tenants.
No deposit if qualified! 786-
663-8862 or 305-634-3545.

5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bdrm, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security.
305-751-6232

561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5629 S.W. Fillmore
Hollywood
Three bedroom, one bath.
$1100 mthly. Move in $1600.
786-256-3174

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6660 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$400/month, call Greg Wright
786-351-8109.

7001 N.W. 15th Avenue
Move In Special! First
month plus half security
deposit moves you in. One
bedroom $495 monthly. $743
moves you in. All appli-
ances included. Free 20
inch, flat screen TV. Call
Joel 786-355-7578.

7517 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
Call 305-669-4320.


8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at: "
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms,
air, appliances, laundry and
gate. From $400. 1601 NW
1st Court. 305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080 '

COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695.


439 N.N. 9th Street
439 N.W. 8th Street


One bedroom, one bath.
$425 monthly for seniors,
$600 to move in. Three
Bdrm $735/month.
786-220-3400 or
305-326-8855


GOLDEN SQUARE AND
GOLDEN VILLAS
New Rental Community
1325/1415 NW 18th Drive
Pompano Beach
(954)933-4050

Beautiful One, Two, Three
and Four Bedroom Apts.
Starting at $750 monthly
Washer/Dryer Available
Fitness Center
Computer Room
Sparkling Pool and
Children's Playground

*Income restrictions apply
Rent subject to change

a




MIAMI Now Pre Leasing

A Rental Community
For Seniors 55 Plus
Friendship Towers Apts.
1550 N.W. 36 Street
Miami, FL 33142

Affordable one, and two
bedrooms. Starting at $633
For leasing information
visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137

Call: 305-573-9201

-Income Restriction Apply

-Prices Suct to Change



GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida, .

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Rent Special!' All appli-
cations accepted. Easy
Qualify. One bdrm, one bath
$495 ($745). Two bdrm,
one bath $595 ($895).
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


N.W. 2 Ave. and 63 St.
Clean, secure, area, one
bdrm, one bath, $500 mthly.
786-393-4764

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Four bdrm, two bath house
and efficiency available.
786-286-2540

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 welcomed! $1000/
month, call 954-303-3368 or
954-432-3198.

NORTHWEST AREA
Apartment and house for
rent! Call 786-277-0439

OPA LOCKA AREA
Special! One bdrm, one bath,
$495 monthly, Section 8 OK!
Call 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN AREA
1613 N.W. 1st Place
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700, One bedroom one
bath $500. 786-439-7808

OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $500/
month. Call 786-262-4536.

SOUTH MIAMI AREA
Three bedroom, one and half
bath, living and dining room,
kitchen, Section 8 welcomed!
305-255-3493

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
Studio $450 mlhly. One
bedroom, $575 $650
monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel 786-355-
7578


8261 N.E. 3rd Avenue
One Bedroom, one bath, all
appliances Included, $500
monthly. Free 20 inch flat screen
T.V. Call Joel: 786-355-7578


UUMMELRUIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors: Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


21325 N.E. 8th Place #8
Three bedrooms, two bath,
gated community, Section 8
welcomed or $1600/month.
305-651-3584

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom condo. Free
water and security gate.
954-266-9328

CAROL CITY AREA
19351 N.W. 45th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three and four bdrms,
Section 8 ONLY! Rudy
786-367-6268

MIRAMAR AREA
12124 St. Andrews Place
Two bdrm, two bath, $1350/
mth, water/cable included.
Section 8 welcomed!
305-732-9875

NORTHWEST AREA
Nice, two bdrm, central air,
two floor, $850/month.
786-488-0599


1190 NW 65 Street
13260 Aswan Road
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
One bedroom, one bath, air
call 305-742-4383

145 N.W. 68 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080

1547 N.W. 53rd Street
Two bedroom, one bath, air
conditioned, new appliances.
305-693-9118 or
305-318-1284.

15803 N.W. 38 Place
Lovely two bedrooms, central
air, fully tiled, bars. Move in
ready. $950 monthly. Section
8 OK! Other locations avail-
able. 305-621-6128

1732 N.W. 41st Street
One bdrm, one bath, ap-
pli. incl., air, fenced, private
parking. $575/month. Call
754-581-6302.

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
One bedroom. $600 mthly.
$700 move in. 305-751-6720

2045 N.W. 41st Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
shutters, central air, tiled,
$1000/month, $800 deposit,
first, last and deposit needed
to move. Call 305-896-4889.

21301 N.W. 37 Ave
Two bedrooms, air. $895
monthly. 786-306-4839

2266 N.W.,75 St. Rear
Two bdrms. Section 8 OK!
954-394-5887

230 N.W. 56th Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
central air, cable ready, $975
monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-543-4579

2439 N.W. 81st Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
appli. included, air, $1000
monthly, No Section 8! Call
305-694-8706.

2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, one, bath, air,
$975 mthly. 786-877-5358.

2480 N.W. 61st Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950/month, call Bryant at
305-343-0908.

255-257-N.E. 58 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath
$595. Two bedrooms,' one
bath $675. 305-642-7080

263 N.E. 58 Ter.
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths; brand new, central
air. All bedrooms with large
walk in closets, laundry room.
$1475 monthly.
Don 305-793-0002

2926 N.W. 94 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
laundry, tile throughout.
Large backyard. $1400
monthly. Call 305-696-8338

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

3376 N.W. 49th Street
Huge upstairs, three bdrm,
one bath, appliances, air,
Section 8 only! $1300/month,
water included, in safe area.
Call Ms. Jay 786-274-3738.

5235 N.W. 26 Ave
One bedroom, air. $500 mth-
ly, $1000 to move in.
305-322-8966


5528 N.W..4th Avenue
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, new appliances, free
water. Section 8 ok!
305-720-7067

577 N.W. 94 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly. 786-263-1590

6998 N.W. 5 Place
One bdrm, one bath. $750
mthly. 786-399-8557

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms, Section 8 okl
Call 305-754-7776

8950 N.E. 2 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances, bars. Reference.
Section 8 Ok! $1300 mthly.
305-621-6128

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

CASTLE MANSION
720 N.W. 75 Street
Best Rooms $224 bi-wkly,
plus security $150. Ef-
ficiency, jacuzzi, $700 plus
$300 security. Near bus line,
grocery store across the
street.
786-523-1736.

NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance, cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.

Sanford Apt.
S1907 N.W. 2nd Court
Nice efficiency, furnished, air,.
window shades, appliances.
Free gas and hot water; $360
monthly plus $200 deposit.
Call 305-665-4938 or
305-498-8811.


13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1506 N.W. 70th Street
$350 monthly. call Ms.
Queenie, 305-693-7727.

1775 N.W. 151st Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air.and
heat. Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

1877 N.W. 59th Street
Clean room, air, tile, half
bath. $400 mthly.
305-720-7067

2010 N.W. 55th Terrace
One room, central air and
appliances, $130 weekly,
$260 down. 786-487-2222

2033 N.W. 43rd Street
Room or apt. nicely furnished
call me now 786-290-0946.

21030 N.W. 39th Avenue
Private bthrm, utilities, house
priv., 305-761-1257.

2352 N.W. 97th Street
Room with air, $90 weekly,
$360 to move in. Private en-
trance. Call 305-691-2703.

2670 N.W. 60th Street
Very clean, two rooms avail-
able in three room house,
$400/month. 786-312-2159.

6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
$250 down and $100 weekly,
air. Call E. Slocum Invest-
ment 305-305-0597 or
786-252-0245.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available. Call
305-754-7776.

CAROL CITY AREA
Furnished rooms for rent.
305-528-3716, 305-625-3081

CLEAN FURNISHED
ROOMS
N.W. Area. $125 weekly.
786-426-6263


HOMESTEAD AREA
Fully furnished, microwave,
air, refrigerator, cable TV and
armoire. 786-285-9611
786-346-8505


Miami Shores/Miami Lakes
Room in nice home. $125
weekly. 786-315-7486

NORTH MIAMI AREA
TV, utilities included, $500
mthly. 305-687-1110

NORTHWEST AREA
$600 to move in, $400 a
month, 305-634-4030 or
786-337-0864.


1125 N.W. 41tn Sireel
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300/month, 305-688-5002

1231 N.W. 178th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
pool, $1425.
Two bedrooms one bath part
of a home, $1050.
Call 786-344-8601

16125 N.W. 22 Avenue
Nice, three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643

16310 N.W. 19th Ave Rd
Two bedroom, one bath,
air and heat,
Section 8 welcomed!
Contact 786-317-1463.

1740 N.W. 66 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700. 305-642-7080

1830 N.W. 69th Terrace
Newly remodeled, two bdrm,
one bath, $750/month, $1600
move in. 305-308-6429

2148 N.W. 85th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
house with efficiency, $1000
mthly, call 305-205-1665.

2261 N.W. 79th Terrace
Newly renovated, three
bedroom, one bath, $1350/
month, Section 8 welcomed!
305-794-0240

2261 N.W. 87 Street
Three bdrms, two baths.
$1600 mthly. 786-399-8557

2330 N.W. 97th St. Rear
One bdrm, $1340 to move in.
Appointment only!'
305-693-0620

2441 N.W. 154 St.
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, tile. $1500 mthly.
305-662-5505

2555 N.W. 158th Street
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Neyyly renovated three bdrrm,
ohe baih, air, near buses,
shops, and schools. $1400
mthly. Section 8 okay!
305-764-8102


262 N.W. 51st Street
Three bdrms, two baths
$1200 mthly, 305-205-1665.

28 Ave. N.W. 204 Lane
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, air. Section 8 and
HOPWA OK. 954-392-0070

41 St and N.W. 5 Ave
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776.

434 N.W. 82 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$950, also available one bed-
room $550. 305-318-5362


4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

7805 N.W. 2nd Court
Small two bedroom, one
bath, $600/month, $1200/
move in. 305-479-3632

799 N.W. 151st Street
Three large bdrms, two bath,
large circular driveway, pool,
great location, on one acre.
Section 8 welcomed!
305-917-3831


8122 N.W. 14th Place
Four bedroom, one bath. For
info call Ms. German.
305-691-4446

COCONUT GROVE AREA
Five bdrms, three bath, Sec-
tion 8 welcomed! Call Keisha
or Wessel Campbell
786-222-3755.


Make Extra Money on Your
Home!
Turn your home into an ALF!
Call Now! 305-756-1765

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three and two bedrooms,
Section 8 is welcome. Call
305-796-5252

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard, carport. Section 8 OK!
$1275 monthly 305-388-
7477


Bonuses! Miller's Workforce
LLC. 99 NW 183rd Street
Suite 116, 305-974-5338


7285 N.W. 17th Court
$400-450/month, first, last
and security to move in.
Central A/C, cable, and all
amenities included. 786-
306-5080 or 786-546-7632

MIAMI AREA
Rooms, efficiency, house for
rent. 305-300-7783

MIAMI GARDENS AND
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms, efficiency, house for
rent. 305-300-7783


500 N.W. 214 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Gated community. Try $1900
down and $751 monthly, FHA.
786-306-4839

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$185K Mortgage Incentives.
Call 786-419-7060.





14622 N.W. 13 Road
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, try $1900 down
and $1299 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839. Call for list.

1725 N.W. 132nd Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
a perfect "10". Everything up-
dated. Try $1900 down and
$1199 monthly. FHA. Call for
list 786-306-4839.


Rent To Own
Three nice homes to choose
from. 1-800-970-5628 press
extension 2.

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305-892-8315
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GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, apple ,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

IF IT'S BROKE, FIX IT!
TV/Stereo Repair, and
Sales plus Accessories.
Bass Electronics
305-835-2747.

PLUMBING SERVICE
Sewer and Drain Cleaning.
Heaters instl. 305-316-1889


Men and Woman All Ages!
Earn up to $500 daily part-
time! Hottest money making
opportunity in America! Write
for FREE report: Dry Tech,
Suite CL5951, 8920 Quartz
Ave, Northridge, CA 91324.






CHILDCARE DIRECTOR,
WORKERS, AND VPK
INSTRUCTORS
Learning center with im-
mediate openings. Must be
certified, professional, and
experienced!
Call 305-456-1261


COLLECTIONS
Strong organization and
communication skills re-
quired to coordinate collec-
tion process, and cash flow.
Two years exp. Fax resume
to 305-758-3617.

COOK and CLEAN
LAUNDRY
Required minimum five
years experience with refer-
ences related to house-
keeping positions. 5.5 days.
Valid driver's license, non-
smoker, drug testing and
background check required.
Call and leave your name
and telephone number.
305-694-6227


JOBS! JOBS! JOBS!
All Types of Positions
Available, Flexible Work
Hours, Part and Full Time
Work, Excellent Pay and


C 0PIE S


305-694-6214


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


STYLISTS AND BAR-
BERS NEEDED!
Clean atmosphere, newly
renovated. Must have
license. Call Ayanna
786-587-0904.

TELEMARKETERS
Part-time positions avail-
able Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday.
Busy newspaper needs
experienced telemarketers,
must generate own clients.
Motivation is the key, quo-
tas must be met weekly and
commission is a plus!
Please fax resume to
305-694-6211 or email to
advertising@miamitimeson-
line.com



FOR SALE
Bedroom furniture $175, liv-
ing room $200 and dining set
$175. Please call for details,
786-288-9856


BIG T's BBQ RIBS AND
CHICKEN
Best ribs in Miami! Open
Sunday and Monday.
1795 Opa-Locka Boulevard
954-699-8444



Single, white male, 43,
seeking single bik. male
between 35-50. I'm brown
hair, brown eyes, 5'11,
160, masculine, intelligent,
seeking employed man that
likes good times, malls, and
sports. Not into bar scene.
Serious calls only. Call Jeff
786-389-9348.



COSMOTOLOGY CLASSES
Attend a one or two day
course, and receive a Cos-
metology hair wrapping or
hair braiding license from the
Department of Business and
Professional Regulation. For
Only $440, includes license
fee. 954-274-2727 Master-
mind of Beauty Salon
3503 N.E. 2nd Avenue

Let Your Taxes Work For You
Can/HHA Training,
ALF Core Training,
CPR-First Aid-Osha-HIV
Arrendell's Training Center
Miami Shores and
Coral Gables Locations
305-756-1765




SECURITY GUARD FOR
$60!
786-333-2084



I'm A MUSICIAN
Looking for Church
to play for. Must Pay$$.
Call 305-421-7602




INJURED???
Personal Injury?
Wrongful Death?
AAA Attorney Referral Svs.
1-800-733-5342 24 Hours


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!

END THE

INCONVENIENCE

OF EM P'T Y

NEWSPAPER

BOXES,

FIGHTING

THE WEATHER

AND HUNTING

DOWN BACK


I









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


Crude ol s getting cheaper

0b


- so why Isn't s?


MIAMI-DADE


INVITATION TO BID

Miami-Dade County
Miami-Dade Park and Recreation Department


Deerwood Bonita Lakes Park Medium Alternate Recreation Center, Parking Lot & Park Lighting
Contract No. 592401-03-001 GOB ESP


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list of bidders may also be obtained at the above listed address.
MDC has scheduled a Pre-Bid Conference at 11:00 A.M. local time on Febru-
ary 25. 2009, at the, 275 N. W. 2nd Street, 3rd Floor Training Room, Miami,
Florida33128. The Pre-Bid Conference is being held to answer any questions
regarding this project.

MDC will receive SEALED Bids at the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, at the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N. W. First Street, Suite 17-
202, Miami, Florida 33128 until 2:00 p.m. local time on March 25. 2009. Bids
received after that time will not be accepted, nor will qualified, segregated and/
or incomplete Bids be accepted. Bids may not be revoked nor withdrawn for
360 days after the bid opening date. The Contract, if awarded, will be awarded
to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Interested parties are invited
to attend.

All bids shall be submitted to the clerk of The Board in two (2) separate sealed
envelopes in the following manner.

Envelope number one shall be in a sealed white envelope containing (1) DBD
form 400 Schedule of Intent for each subcontractor for projects which contain
goals or are "Set-Aside" for CSBE contractors on the project. On the outside of
the envelop place the name of.the bidder, its address, the name of the Contract
for which the bid is submitted, the contract number and the date for opening of
bids.

Envelope number two shall be in a sealed manila envelope containing the re-
quired bid documents. On the outside of the envelope place the name of the bid-
der, its address, the name of the contract for which the bid is submitted. The Bid
Security specified in Article 7 of the Instruction To Bidders shall be enclosed with
the bid. Failure to include the Bid Security shall render the bid non-responsive.

The opening of bids will be as follows:

DBD Staff will open the white envelope and review the DBD form 400 Schedule
of Intent on the bid opening date and time. If the DBD form 400 has correctable
defectss, the bidder will be given a checklist indicating the correctable defectss.
The bidder must submit the corrected DBD form 400 to DBD and the Clerk of
The Board within forty-eight (48) hours of the bid opening date. If the bidder's
DBD form 400 contains non-correctable defectss, DBD will immediately inform
the bidder that the submittal is not responsive and hot approved, and envelope
number two will not be opened.

Envelope number two will be opened forty-eight (48) hours after the bid opening
date. Only the bids that have complied with the DBD form 400 Schedule of Intent
submittal will be opened.

Requests must be accompanied by either a check or money order drawn in fa-
vor of the Board of County Commissioners, Miami-Dade County, Florida. Cash
will not be accepted.

The following is a list of the available Bid Documents and their respective
costs:


Miami-Dade County, hereinafter known as MDC, will receive bids for the Deer-
wood Bonita Lakes Park Medium Alternate Recreation Center, Parking Lot
& Park Lighting, Contract No. 592401-03-001 GOB ESP. The project will be
located'in Miami-Dade County, State of Florida,

This project includes goals for the participation of Community Small Business
Enterprises based on a percentage of the total contract amount, as noted
below and in the Bid Form, in accordance with the Project Manual. Goals for
Community Small Business Enterprises must be fulfilled using construction
contractor/sub-contractor trades to comply with goals requirements pursuant to
this solicitation.

The Contractor must agree to abide by the provisions of the Project Manual
regarding minimum participation goals, proposed below as a percentage of the
total Contract Sum and accepted by MDC and which are established for this
Project as follows:

Community Small Business Enterprise participation: 24%

Locally funded projects of $100,000 and above are also subject to the Equal
Employment Opportunity requirements and Section 2-11.16 of the Code of Met-
ropolitan Dade County (Responsible Wages).

Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended, a
"Cone of Silence" is imposed upon each RFP, RFQ or bid after advertisement
and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommenda-
tion to the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits any
communicationregarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between, among others:

potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the
County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and
the County Manager's staff, the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respec-
tive staffs;
the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs ahd the County's
professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the
County Manager's staff;
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants, any mem-
ber of the County's professional staff, the Mayor, County Commissioners or their
respective staffs and any member of the respective selection committee.

The provisions do not apply to, among other communications:

oral communications with the staff of the Vendor Information Center, the respon-
sible Procurement Agent or Contracting Officer, provided the communication
is limited strictly to matters of process or procedure already contained in the
solicitation document;
the provisions of the Cone of Silence do not apply to oral communications at
pre-proposal or pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before selection com-
mittees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed public meeting, public
presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly
noticed public meeting; or
Communications in writing at any time with any county employee, official or
member" of the Board of County Commissioners unless specifically prohibited
by the applicable RFP, RFQ or bid documents.

Proposers or bidders must file a copy of any written communications with the
Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request.
The County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board,
which shall be made available to any person upon request. Written communi-
cations may be in the form of e-mail, with a copy to the Clerk of the Board at
CLERKBCC)MIAMIDADE.GOV.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the Cone of Si-
lence by any proposer or bidder shall render any RFP award, RFQ award or bid
award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of these
provisions shall report such violation to the State Attorney and/or may file a com-
plaint with Ethics Commission. Proposers or bidders should reference Section
2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code for further clarification.

This language is only a summary of the key provisions of the Cone of Silence.
Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete
and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.

Miami-Dade County will receive bids for the base scope which includes a new
medium alternate recreation center, lighted parking lot, sidewalk extension. Dark
lighting for the existing soccer fields, walkways, and basketball courts. The en-
gineer's cost estimate for the base bid is $3,051,904.76.

Included in the bid shall be the furnishing of all materials, labor, services, super-
visioh, tools and equipment required or incidental to this project. All work shall
be performed as per the Contract Documents. Miami-Dade County, at its sole
discretion may elect to negotiate with the apparent low bidder, if only one bidder
bids.

The County reserves the right to waive any informalities or irregularities in any
bid, or reject any or all bids if deemed to be in the best interest of the County.

As part of this Contract, the County may, at its sole discretion, issue miscel-
laneous changes covering all construction disciplines. The Contractor shall be
capable of expeditiously performing this change work either with its own forces
or with subcontractors. The direct and indirect cost of these changes and time
extensions, if any, will be negotiated at the time the changes are issued and
payment will be made in accordance with Article 36 of the General Conditions.
As the nature or extent of these changes can not be ascertained prior to notice-
to-proceed. the Contractor shall not include an amount in his bid in anticipation
of these changes.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED
IN: As required by Chapter 10 of the Miami-Dade County. Other Certificates of
Competency, if required, shall be provided by subcontractors prior to beginning
of work.

Bid Documents will be available on or about February 18. 2009 and may be pur-
chased from Omara Cuello at the Park and Recreation Department, 4th Floor,
Architecture and Engineering Division, 275 N. W. 2nd Street, Miami, Florida. A


*$50.00 each set


Bid Security must accompany each bid and must be in an amount of not less
than five percent of the highest Total Bid Price. MDC reserves the right to waive
irregularities, to reject bids and/or to extend the bidding period.

Each Contractor, and his subcontractors performing work at the Work site, will
be required to pay Florida sales and use taxes and to pay for licenses and fees
required by the municipalities in which the Work will be located. Each Con-
tractor will be required to furnish a Surety Performance and Payment Bond in
accordance with Article 1.03, Contract Security, of the Supplemental General
Conditions and to furnish Certificates of Insurance in the amounts specified in
the Contract Documents.

The Contractor is hereby advised of Resolution No R-1145-99, Clearinghouse
for Posting Notices of Job Opportunities Resulting from Construction Improve-
ments on County Property. The procedures direct the Contractor to forward a
notice of job vacancy(ies) created as a result of this construction work to the
director of the Employee Relations Department, located atStephen P. Clark
Center, 111 NW 1st Street, suite 2110, Miami, Florida 33H128. The job vacancy
notices should be delivered within ten (10) working days following award of the
contractor. The Director of the Employee Relations Department will in turn dis-
tribute said job announcements to all Miami Dade County facilities participating
in the notification requirements of Resolution No. R-1145-99.

Any firm proposed for use as a CSBE on this contract, must have a valid cer-
tification from the Miami-Dade County Department of Business Development
(DBD), at the time of bid.

It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to provide equal employment opportunity.
Those responding to this RFP/ITB/RFQ shall comply with the provisions of the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and 49 U.S.C. Section 1612 and other
related laws and regulations.

Call (305) 755-7848, to request material in accessible format, information on ac-
cess for persons with disabilities, or sign language interpreter services (7 days
in advance), 305-755-7980 (tdd).

SPANISH TRANSLATION:
Llamar al (305) 755-7848, para obtener information acerca del acceso para
Leisure Access Services personas minusvalidas y para obtener materials en
format accessible. Los interesados en el servicio de interpretes para el idioma
de los sordomudos deben Ilamar con siete dias de antelacion, 305-755-7980
(Servicio telefonico para sordos).


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI-DADE PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT


Harvey Ruvin, Clerk
Kay Sullivan, Deputy Clerk


Contract Drawings (full size) and
Project Manual ------------------
(NONREFUNDABLE)


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 18-24, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


(r~ -rrr in' rma 'a" S.rr -rr rMd -r S
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Available from I


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FAMU gets grant to woo women into IT studies


Special to The Miami Times
TALLAHASSEE -
The Florida A&M Uni-
versity Computer In-
formation Sciences
Program, housed in
the College of Arts and
Sciences, has got a Na-
tional Science Foun-
dation grant valued at
$552,000 dedicated
to recruiting minority
women to computer sci-
ence and information
technology disciplines.
"The numbers are
staggering," said Ja-
son T. Black, assistant
professor. "The latest
data show that, out of
all U.S. entering fresh-
men declaring a major
in computer science,


African-Amer-
ican women
made up only {
3.3 percent.
"The fact is
that women
are not choos-
ing technology and
this is a dangerous
predicament. When
you couple that with
the fact that it is es-
timated that 75 per-
cent of all jobs by the
year 2020 will require
a technology back-
ground, it becomes a
crisis call," Bladk said
in a FAMU statement
announcing the grant.
The four-year pro-
gram, African-Amer-
ican Women in Com-
puter Science, provides


Scholarships
and other as-
sistance to
women who
have a finan-
cial need and
an interest in
computer science or in-
formation technology.
It was created by
Black, who is also the
principal investigator
for the program, and
Edward L. Jones, its
chairman, and will di-
rectly address the low
number of minority
women, particularly
African-Americans,
who pursue degrees in
the field.
Women who apply to
the program will be ac-
cepted based on finan-


Mayor urges residents to sign
February is Go Di- many are getting paper the peace of mind that
rect/Direct Express checks that are vulner- comes from knowing
Month and the city of able to mail delays and their money is secure
Miami announced it financial crimes. and on time, every
is partnering with the In 2008, nearly time. Electronic pay-
U.S. Department of the 70,000 Treasury-is- ments eliminate the
Treasury's campaign to sued checks totaling risk of lost or stolen
encourage recipients of about $64 million checks and help curb
federal benefit checks were stolen or fraudu- identity theft. Money is
to sign up for electron- lently endorsed, ac- accessible on payment
ic payments. cording to a statement day every month, so
Millions of senior, cit- from the office of Mayor recipients don't have
izens, people with dis- Manny Diaz. to wait on the mail or
abilities and veterans Electronic payments take a trip to the bank
receive their checks can give people who to deposit or cash their
each mdnth but too get federal benefits checks.


cial need and will be
awarded a scholarship
of between $3,000 and
$5,000 per semester.
Besides the funding,
.they will participate in
the college's clubs and
organizations, such
as the Association for
Computing Machin-
ery Club, the National
Society of Black En-
gineers and the CIS
Mentoring Organiza-
tion.
They will also be in-
volved in other pro-
grams, such as. the
Florida/Georgia Louis
Stokes Alliance for
Minority Participa-
tion scholarship pro-
gram and the Students
and Technology in


Academia, Research'
and Service Alliance,
both of which are
funded by the NSF.
An added benefit is
that selected program
scholars will be chosen
to attend two national
conferences, paid for
by the grant, each
year, such as the Grace
Hopper Celebration of
Women in Computing
and the National Con-
ference of Women in In-
formation Technology.
The program begins
on July 1 and will run
until June 30, 2012.
Applications may be
requested by calling
Black at 850- 412-
7354 or e-mailing
jblack@cis.famu.edu.


up for direct deposit
Two options are press method, a pre-'
available for electronic paid debit card gives
payments: .people without bank
In direct deposit, peo- accounts an alterna-
ple who have checking tive to. paper checks.
or savings accounts There are no sign-up
can sign up to have fees, monthly fees or
* their payments sent overdraft charges and
directly to their bank the card can be used
accounts. All they to make purchases, get
have to do is call 800- cash and pay bills. To
333-1795 or log on to sign-up, call 877-212-
www.GoDirect.org, or 9991 or log on to www.
visit their local bank or USDirectExpress.com
credit union. or visit their local So-
In the Direct Ex- cial Security office.


Cpw sub .4 406"


MIAMI-ADE

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs

For computer access visit any Miami-Dade County Library or
South Florida Workforce Career Center.
For locations call 311.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
beveriS. Excellc8;ce Every 7ay


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSAL
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office lo-
cated at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
RFP NO. 126090 MAINTENANCE & MANAGEMENT OF "STARS OF
CALLE OCHO"
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., FRIDAY. MARCH 6, 2009
Detailed specifications for this RFP are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamiqov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pete Hernandez
City Manager


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I special. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Public funds and financial
institutions are not eligible.


MIAMIDAD


Public Comment Meeting

U.S. HUD 2009 Super NOFA
(Notice of Funding Availability)
Application Priorities
Homeless Continuum of Care

Annually, the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust invites
comments on priorities for Homeless Services leading up to a
County-wide grant application to the United States Department
of Housing and Urban Development. This notice serves to
announce the following meetings:

Date: February 25, 2009
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Place: Homeless Assistance Center (HAC 2)
28205 S.W. 125th Avenue
Homestead, Florida
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Place: Homeless Assistance Center (HAC 1)
1550 North Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida

For material in alternate format, a sign language
interpreter, or other accommodations, please call
(305) 375-1490.


"Ifthe lions do not write their own
history, then the hunters will get all the
credit." -African Proverb


w








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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* Accidents Arrests
* DUI 8 Tickets Bankruptcy
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* Personal Injury Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide
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ABORTIONS
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Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
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S305-824-8816
305-362-4611



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I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life, such
as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business transac-
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Sibx

MEETING NOTICE

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX)
will hold its monthly meeting Tuesday, February
24, 2009 at 4:00 PM. at the William M. Lehman
MDX Building, 3790 N.W. 21st Street, Miami, FL
33142. Attendance by MDX Board Members or
members of the public may be in person or via
tele-conference (Land line connections only, no
cellular phones). If a person decides to appeal any
decision made by any board, agency or commis-
sion with respect to any matter considered at its
monthly Board meeting, he/she will need to ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal .is based. All MDX meeting locations
comply with applicable requirements of the Ameri-
can with Disabilities Act. Auxiliary aids or services
will be provided upon request with at least five
(5) days notice prior to the proceedings. If hear-
ing impaired, telephone the Florida Relay Service
Numbers (800)955-8771 (TDD) or (800)955-8770
(Voice), for assistance. MDX invites all interested
parties to attend. For further information, including
information on attendance by telephone, please
visit www.mdx-way.com or contact:
Miami-Dade Expressway Authority
Attention: Maria Luisa Navia Lobo
3790 N.W. 21st Street
Miami, Florida 33142
(305) 637-3277


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Miami NICE Announces the Compassion
Capital Fund Demonstration Program
Request for Qualifications (RFQ)


H-Mi4 N!CE


(Miami, Florida) -The City of Miami's Office of Faith-based Initiatives and Community Outreach, as the
lead intermediary organization for the Miami NICE (Network for Integration, Compassion & Empowerment)
partnership, is soliciting Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for non-profit Faith-based and Community
Organizations (FBCOs) interested in applying to receive, (a) free technical assistance grants and (b) become
eligible to apply for a Miami NICE capacity-building sub-award grant. All applicants must attend one of
the mandatory informational sessions noted below.
Miami NICE is a unique public/private partnership comprised of the City of Miami, Miami-Dade County, The
Children's Trust, Center on Nonprofit Effectiveness (C-One), Family and Children Faith Coalition, and the
United Way of Miami-Dade.
Organizations providing services for the community may be eligible for a non-cash award valued at $5,000
or more per recipient. FBCOs selected to receive a Technical Assistance Award will be eligible to compete
for a sub-award grant. Miami NICE will fund sub-award grants for at least 20 organizations serving Miami-
Dade County in one or more of the seven (7) Compassion Capital Fund priority areas, including: Children
and Youth, Ex-offender Re-entry, Homelessness. Rehabilitation Services for Addicts and/or Pnsoners, Elders
in Need, Families Transitioning from Welfare to Work, and Healthy Marriage Initiatives. FBCOs that were
awarded a Compassion Capital Fund Demonstration Program sub-award are not eligible to apply.
Request For Qualification is due no later than 1:00 pm, Friday, March 20, 2009 at City of Miami, City
Hall, Office of the City Clerk, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133.


INFORMATIONAL SESSIONS


Wednesday,
February 18, 2009
9:30 am 12 noon
out'hr Daad
F;e-grnal ULDrar,
107i0 SW 211th Sireei
Miami, FL 33189


Thursday,
February 19. 2009
9:30am 12 noon
Miam. Beach
Pegionr. LbLDrjr,
227 22r,a Slre
%',ami Beacr,, FL 33139


Monday,
February 23, 2009
6:00 pm 8:00 pm
North Dade
Regional Ubrary
2455 NW 183rd Street
Miami, FL 33056


Saturday,
February 28, 2009
9:30am 12 noon
West Dade
Regional Library
9445 Coral Way
Miami, FL 33165


For more information regarding Miami NICE, visit www.miaminice.org or contact Carlyn Jacques,
Project Director, Phone: 305-416-1410, Fax: 305-400-5368, Email: cjacques@miamigov.com
This solicitation is not subject to the City of Miami "Cone of Silence." In accordance with the American
with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations to participate in a session may
contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days pnor to
each meeting, or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior to each meeting.
'- a3 _B


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Project MCC-N-165-B MIA-Building 896 Paint booth -Composite Shop
Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for this project at Miami-Dade Avia-
tion Department.
This project consist of installation of new spray paint booth and -the installation
of new composite shop which will consists of dividing the existing breakroom
into two separate areas. Packages are as follow
Pkg. "A" General (CSBE), Pkg. "B" Structural Steel (CSBE), Pkg. "C" Roofing
Repairs (CSBE), Pkg. "D Painting (CSBE), Pkg. "E" Epoxy Flooring (CSBE),
Pkg. "F" Paint Booth & Accessories (Open), Pkg. "G" HVAC (CSBE). Pkg. "H"
Fire Sprinklers (Open), Pkg. "I" Plumbing (CSBE), Pkg. "J Electrical (CSBE).
Plans cost: $50.00 Refundable upon return of the plans.
Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Wednesday, February 25, 2009 @ 10:00 AM,
Bid Opening: Wednesday, March11, 2009 @ 2:00PM
Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".

For more information, call Ginny Mirabal or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444.


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