Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00739
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: February 11, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00739
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text




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Volume 86 Number 24


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1-95 signals headache for local commuters


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne @miamitimesonline.com
Motorists are divided in
their opinions over the acti-
vation of traffic lights at eight
northbound entrances to In-
terstate 95 in areas that are
predominantly Black.
The Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT) said
the plan is to ease congestion
caused by traffic entering the
expressway from the ramps.
Ricardo Debora and Mary
Collins, who were stopped
at the Northwest 62nd Street
light on Friday aftei-noon,
both said they saw an im-
provement in the flow of traf-
fic.
"I drove down 95 today and
it's much better than usual,"
said Debora, who uses 1-95
every morning during his
commute.
Collins agreed. "I drive this


way every day and I noticed
it's much easier getting on
the freeway," she said. "It
wasn't as backed up."
But Stephen Jones and Ja-
son Parrish, who were also
stopped at that light, were
critical of the plan.
"It's hell since they put up
these new lights," said Jones.
"They say it's to clear up
the freeways but it's making
more local traffic. It's block-
ing intersections."
Parrish added, "I hate com-
ing down here now. If I didn't
have to come down, I wouldn't
come."
The ramp signals are lo-
cated at the 1-95 entrances
from 62nd Street, 69th Street,
82nd Street, 95th Street, 103rd
Street, 125th Street, 135th
Street and 167t Street/
Northeast Second Avenue.
The signals alternate be
Please turn to SIGNALS 4A


,- :


BI-o rI* "o


&< at 62nd Street


Motorists stop at 1-95 ramp signal at Northwest 62nd Street on Tuesday afternoon. -MiamiTimes photo/SandraJ.Charite


AIDS: A grim reality

Liberty City has nine '
percent of the county's _, -
population but more than
20 percent of the reported -
AIDS cases and more than ..
17 percent of the reported
HIV cases, making it the
area with the highest num-
ber of AIDS and HIV cases
in Miami-Dade.
Miami-Dade County
Health Department

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com.


Quintara Lane has been
HIV-positive since her birth 22
years ago, contracting the dis-
ease from her mother, who died
in 1995. The virus developed
into AIDS when she was 13.
Lane has also been taken
medications her whole life to
fight the disease, preventing
her from the enjoying her teen-
age years.
Please turn to AIDS 9A


Members of the Miami-Dade County Health Department take part in the third annual "Silence
is Death" community march on Northwest 22nd Avenue on Feb. 6 a day before the observance of
National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra J. Charite


Ira Clark led Jackson

during major expansion
By Sandra Jd. Charite _ _ _
scharite @miamitimesonline.com


For Sandy Sears, it seems
like just yesterday when, as
director of the ambulatory
services, she gave Ira Clark
a tour of Jackson Memorial
Hospital. The New Yorker
was looking into becom-
ing president of the Public
Health Trust and CEO of
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Sure enough, Clark got the
job, staying on for 15 years
and leading the institution
through some of its biggest
changes.
Clark, 72, died on Satur-
day, Feb. 7, from Alzheimer's
disease.
"The best thing about him
was his demonstrated re-
spect and admiration for
common, ordinary people
and his belief that all were
equal regardless of status.
In this regard, not only did
he talk the talk, he walked
the walk," said Sears, who


IRA C. CLARK
Former JMH CEO


became a good friend..
Clark joined Jackson in
1987, leading the second
largest and hospital system
in the country. He came with
a plan to boost funding for
Jackson and expand its ser-
vices.
Within three years of his
arrival, the John H. Peavy
Adolescent Health Center
Please turn to CLARK 6A


)Impkrrs a p'pnkm' at \liami (;ardrn al-I\arlr s
"Copyrighted Material


Sy intent

Available from Commercial News Providers"


,*. *ll.


.,:! 4 Gun violence panel splits

on the role for parents


Luther Campbell, rap pioneer and founder of the National Youth Football League, moderates a community forum on youth violence
at Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church on Feb. 4. Panelists include, from left, radio host Queen Brown, self-proclaimed recovering
addict Michael Carpenter, Brothers of the Same Mind executive director Brian Denis, self-proclaimed recovering addict Vandilla
McClendon, violence victim Maurice Strange and ex-felon Brindley Marshall. --MiamiTimes photo/Sandra J.Charite


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitirnesonline.comn
Queen Brown grew up in the
Brownsville and Liberty City
area and she began to raise her
children in her neighborhood.
But she realized that the
area had changed since her
time. Wanting to get her kids
away from the violent streets,
she moved to North Miami-
Dade County. But it was not
enough.
Brown received a call on Oct.
26, 2006, telling her one of her
children had fallen victim to
the same street violence she


tried to shield them from.
Brown's son, Eviton, 24, was
shot and killed when the car
he was sitting in was peppered
with bullets. The former Miami
Norland High School star
athlete had enrolled at Florida
A&M University. Instead of
going to college, he became the
200th homicide in Miami-Dade
County in 2006.
"We have to learn to protect
our community," Brown, a
radio host and community
activist, told a forum at Mt.
Calvary Missionary Baptist
Church on Feb. 4.
Please turn to VIOLENCE 7A


WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY S
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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


A lifetime devoted to service
T here is a dwindling group of Miamians to whom much
is owed because of their courage in tackling head-
on the racism of their day, making it possible for
all citizens to be able to enjoy the ability to live full lives as
equals. They did so when there was no particular individual
benefit to them but because it was the right thing to do and
they unhesitatingly answered the call to action.
Garth Coleridge Reeves is one of those Miamians and he is
celebrating nine decades of life.
From the time he returned in the mid-
1940s from 46 months serving his country
as a member of the U.S. Army with service in
the European and Pacific theatres in World
War II, Mr. Reeves began to embark on a
course that would put him face-to-face with
the racist policies of the day.
The son of Henry E.S. Reeves, founder of '
The Miami Times, and Rachel Reeves, Garth REEVES
moved into journalism and over the years led this newspaper
on what was nothing short of a crusade against those who
were denying Black people their rightful place as equals
among all men and women. The newspaper became the voice
of the community, speaking out against police brutality, unfair
distribution of government funds and segregation of schools
and public facilities.
But he was not satisfied with just leading an advocacy
newspaper. Mr. Reeves also led by example.
Along with other like-minded activists, he led campaigns
that desegregated the then city of Miami golf course and also
struck a blow to racial discrimination when he joined with
other stalwarts such as the Rev. Theodore Gibson, Dr. John O.
Brown and Oscar Range to defy the racist ban against Blacks'
swimming at any public beaches. .They walked through a
police line down to the water and swam.
Mr. Reeves also has played an important role in the wider
world of the Black Press, serving at different times as president
of National Newspaper Publishers Association umbrella
of the Black Press and of the Amalgamated Publishers
representing 110 Black newspapers nationwide. He served
twice as a Pulitzer Prize juror.
Mr. Reeves also played a role in the local banking scene,
serving as chairman of the board of National Industrial Bank,
the first integrated bank in Florida, and he played a role in
ensuring People's National Bank remained Black-owned.
And Mr. Reeves is known for his support for education,
serving many years on the Board of Trustees for Miami Dade
College, where a building is named for him on the North
Campus.
These days, Mr. Reeves is retired and his daughter, Rachel
Reeves, is carrying on his legacy at The Times. He also has a
surviving sibling, Frances Chambers, and a grandson, Garth
Basil Reeves.
As Mr. Reeves gets set to observe his 90h birthday this
Thursday, it is a time when he can continue to look back on a
lifetime of service to his beloved community,

A people-oriented administrator
M iami-Dade County is a better place because of Ira
Clement Clark.
The top-notch hospital administrator brought
to his job not just a burning desire to ensure the financial
stability of Jackson Memorial Hospital and its expansion to
meet the health-care needs of the community. He also brought
a deep sense of respect and appreciation for all people, a
characteristic that informed his commitment to seeing that
health care was available to all, regardless of ability to pay.
Mr. Clark died on Saturday at age 72.
During his 15-year tenure, residents of Miami-Dade were
persuaded to vote for a half-penny sales tax that provides
nearly $200 million in dedicated funds annually to the Jackson
Health System. The highly rated Ryder Trauma Center came
into being, along with burn, breast cancer and neonatal care
centers.
That Mr. Clark was more than just an able administrator
there could be no doubt. But those who knew him well also
had nothing but praise for the relationship he developed
with ordinary people and his passion for making health care
available to all, including high school students.
When he was forced to resign in November 2002, Mr. Clark
had blazed a trail at the hospital, which by then had become
one of the best in the nation. As he said in a piece he wrote
for The Times after he resigned, this first Black head of
Jackson brought with him from New York "an unquestionable
passion and commitment to a single standard of care." That
philosophy led to a better Jackson Health System, a legacy
that will live on.


A snub to our community

Whatever may be said about the eight entrance ramps
to Interstate 95 have led to a better flow of traffic
on the expressway, this much is known: The Black
community, which is the one directly affected by the use of
the traffic signal to direct the traffic, was not given adequate
notification by the Florida Department of Transportation
in the form of notices in the Black Press the one that our
community turns to for information. Yet, such notices did run
in the mainstream media.
For that matter, our community was also left in the dark, so
to speak, over the introduction of the two 95 Express lanes
which, like the ramp signals, are intended to ease congestion
during rush hours.
While it is true that all motorists, regardless of race, are
impacted by these developments, it is also true that they have
taken place in our community and as such special efforts


should have been made to keep our people abreast of them.


be liami CTime

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Ementus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The BlacK Press Delieves that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal rights. Having no person, tearing no person the
Black Press stnves to help every person in the irm belief that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back.


AP The Media Audit "r


Obama Administration must prioritize change for Haitian immigrants


The Bush Administration left
several messes to clean up and
each and every cabinet member
of the new Obama Administration
has his or her work cut out.
Former Arizona Gov. Janet
Napolitano, our new Secretary
of Homeland Security, has her
hands full. Her first priorities
must include a just and fair policy
towards Haitian refugees.
In Administration after Admin-
istration, one of our most cynical
and hypocritical policies is our
policy towards Haitian refugees
who reach our shores. The policy.
towards Haiti has always been
brutal. For fear that Haiti's 1804
revolution would embolden slave
uprisings in the U.S., the U.S.
government sided with France
and our own "oppressor" Great
Britain in shunning Haiti from
the world community. Eventually,
Haiti was forced to pay France for
the loss of "land. and slaves," thus
forcing former slaves to pay for
their freedom.
Today, the children of Haiti
continue to pay for that debt in
political and economic ways. Hai-
ti remains the poorest country in
the Western Hemisphere and is
forced 'to divert $58 million an-
nually to pay off odious debt. The
international food criiss has only
worsened conditions for everyone
in Haiti, including professionals


and the ever shrinking middle
class.
There have been 32 coup d'etats
in Haiti's history. In recent years,
the U.S. government has been di-
rectly involved in the overthrow of
democratic governments in Haiti,
only to turn a blind eye to the suf-
fering and chaos that ensues. Be-
cause of the political destabiliza-
tion and the lack of political will
on the part of the international
community, Haiti's infrastruc-
ture is neglected. Now even a mild
tropical storm can cause massive
flooding and devastation, which


pire or came to the U.S. undocu-
mented are deported. Many times
they are deported despite the fact
that they have minor children or
spouses.
In 2008, Haiti's President Rene
Preval requested Temporary Pro-
tected Status (TPS) be extended to
Haitians living in the U.S. to allow
the country to recover from four
devastating hurricanes without
the additional burden of deport-
ees.
This was not special treatment.
TPS had been granted to coun-
tries such as Nicaragua and Hon-


A// the Vulture Funds see are dollar signs. They use pressure and
threats of litigation to extort money and resources from African
countries such as Zambia and Congo Brazzaville, most of which
are saddled with debt from previous regimes.


only compounds the hardship
and misery that so many Haitians
live under on a consistent basis.
Yet, with so many people, there
is a disconnect between our for-
eign policy towards Haiti and our
immigration policy towards Hai-
tians. The policies completely dis-
regard the misery and desperation
so many in Haiti experience when
Haitians arrive undocumented
in the U.S. Even contributing
members of our society who have
allowed their documents to ex-


duras for natural disasters. Why
not Haiti?
In typical form, then-Secretary
Michael Chertoff denied President
Preval's request for TPS, saying
that Haiti "does not warrant a TPS
designation".
"Does not warrant?" Today in
Haiti people are eating mud pies
to survive and are going without
basic medical care. As the world
economic system continues to
crash, the poorest of the poor in
Haiti continue to die from pre-


ventable causes. "L J
Clearly, Chert-
offs decision was not motivated
by the evidence but from the view
that Haitian lives lack value. The
only purpose for denial of TPS is
to serve as a deterrent to Haitians
who want to escape crippling pov-
erty and come to the U.S.
. Yet, according to Florida Immi-
grant Advocacy Center, in a let-
ter to Secretary Napolitano, there
is no evidence that granting TPS
would have any impact on the
influx and would rather speed in
recovery to allow Haitians already
in the U.S. to send remittances
home to aid their families and
communities. In addition, TPS
allows the.Haitian government to
spend its internal resources on
rebuilding and strengthening its
economy.
For far too long our adverse im-
migration policies towards Haiti
have illustrated the U.S.'s histori-
cal indifference for Haitian lives.
In keeping with themes of change
and progress, Secretary Napoli-
tano can demonstrate the change
we can believe by granting TPS
for Haitians living in the U.S.
The, Administration must go
even further and set a just im-
migration standard ttqwards
Haiti as the first step towards
a more just, equitable and sus-
tainable relationship.


Don't let stimulus money be used to push us out of our neighborhoods


Whenever there is big money
that comes down the pike, there
will be lobbyists and hustlers
swarming around like lions dur-
ing a wildebeest migration on
the plains of Africa. The oppor-
tunity becomes immense and the
wildebeest are the downtrodden
and economically challenged
who have no strong voice politi-
cally no matter how many Black
legislators. we send to the state
house or capitol buildings. They
will pounce and we become the
prey over and over again. They
have made big, long-term mon-
ey off Black folks since the days
of Reconstruction.
As a matter of fact, they made
big money off Black folks dur-
ing slavery. Sometimes it seems
that we were put on this conti-
nent to make money for Euro-
centric interests. The tradition
continues but in a high-tech
fashion.
Remember when they put in
the national interstate system?
They came right through our
neighborhoods and business
districts via eminent domain.
They "bought" our land and


businesses at dirt-cheap rates
and made billions from the jobs
and contracts derived from the
construction of freeways. It's
funny how now they are look-
ing at the upcoming Interstate
69 project.
It will run from 'Indiana


class. CBS' 60 Minutes exposed
this process as it was happen-
ing in Cincinnati during the late
1980s.
You see it in near Southside
Chicago, Hunter's Point San
Francisco and practically ev-
ery city in the United States.


he tax credits, breaks and incentives don't go to us and they,
in fact, target us forgentrification. Our tax money being used
against us is a very tragic exercise.


through Tennessee, Missis-
sippi, Arkansas, Louisiana and
Texas. The biggest stall is how
to figure out how they can get a
lot of this property from Black
folks at dirt-cheap rates and
manipulate it into treasure for
the developers, hustlers and
lobbyists. There is just no way
a major project like this is going
to benefit Black folks en masse.
It is like it's un-American.
Gentrification is the economic
social engineering of pushing
out a group of people in favor of
other people based on race and


The best example is the former
"Chocolate City," Washington,
D.C., the capital of this nation.
When I moved to D.C. in 1994,
the city was 80 percent-plus
Black. Today, it is 55 percent
Black and dropping. The City
Council is now ruled by Whites
and some of the most tradition-
al neighborhoods are heavily
populated with new condomini-
ums, town homes and retrofit-
ted classic abodes housing yup-
pies from Virginia and Mary-
land and various Whites from
all over the nation.


* They have used
big federal programs such as
the Empowerment Zones, En-
terprise Zones, Community
Reinvestment Act and, of late,
New Markets Tax Credits to
provide investment into de-
pressed urban neighborhoods
and, at the same time, push-
ing out the traditional residents
and replacing them with upper-
middle-class residents. They
will level poor establishments
and replace them with upscale
housing. They, in fact, will build
and retrofit existing homes with
inflated-priced homes in order
to jack up the comparable rates
on home prices. Why? They, the
developers, can sell them at in-
flated prices.
Also, they are running up the
property values that will cause
the existing inhabitants to not
afford new property tax bills.
In essence, people who lived
in neighborhoods for multiple
generations are now faced with
foreclosure, eviction and ruin.
The Yuppies and others move
in with their high salaries and
bankable credit.


Our community needs a multi-purpose homeless shelter


Dear Editor:


I applaud The Miami Times for
printing Keith Wilson's article
last week titled "Less talk, more
action needed from county com-
missioners."
As a resident of Liberty City,
it's evident that they have overly
debated the historic condition of
our once proud and vibrant in-
ner-city community.
Liberty City has been system-
atically excluded from the Ameri-
can dream, not only by politicians


but also by churches and church
members singing praises to God
and to each other, preaching and
teaching God's Word to one an-
other, however never reaching
outside their walls to the poor in
spirit.
Mr. Wilson's article need not be
re-written; it must be examined.
The writer's belief is that action
is needed within the inner city
which will provide desired re-
sults.
The list includes a homeless
shelter that will provide social


services ranging from substance
abuse treatment to mental, medi-
cal and domestic violence issues.
Clients will also receive housing
assistance.
Our shelter would provide a safe
environment for men and women
to rebuild shattered lives, renew
hope and regain the discipline
needed to fulfill life's journey.
This challenge/dream would
be the cornerstone that will draw
businesses to out neighbor-
hoods.
The lost and voiceless cry out


not for contirfued finger-pointing.
There's enough blame and lack of
community to reach the ocean's
deepest depths.
With the required effort from
our inner-city commissioners
,and out religious-minded broth-
ers and sisters willing to teach
transgressors God's Ways, let's
work together and improve the
quality of life for all.
May God bless this dream/
challenge/reality.

-Aaron Peoples


I

















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


North Corridor rail line:

another broken promise

I observe with some amusement at the attempts
by the various Department of Transportation engi-
neers' plans to fix the Interstate 95 traffic conges-
tion problem. We have implemented a special Sun
Pass lane for commuters and now we have red lights
for on-ramps.
Ultimately, these measures do not add much re-
lief, though they may relieve the congestion by a few minutes for some
select commuters. What everyone fails to see is that we have more
commuters attempting to travel on 1-95, Northwest 27th Avenue, US 1
and other north-south roadways and the roads have been beautified,
express laned, red lighted and everything but enlarged. Absent mak-
ing 1-95 a 10-lane highway, the congestion on this road will continue
unabated.
In the not so distant past, there were promises and plans to
expand the train line east and west and north so that commuters could
ride the train and not have to use their cars. The east-west extension
is still on the drawing boards, even though it includes an underwater
tunnel that will be expensive and perhaps not even engineering-wise
sound.
It was also envisioned that individuals who did not have cars would be
able to ride the train into downtown from North Miami-Dade. It would
be a connector from homes to jobs. That would aid the Black communi-
ty, commuters from Broward, students attending Miami Dade College,
residents of Opa-locka, Miami Gardens everyday folk.
Somehow, the everyday folk were forgotten in the talk of
building a stadium for multi-millionaire baseball owners. If we had good
public policy, we would weigh the cost and benefits. Another stadium
will benefit a few thousand citizens who attend the games, the multi-
millionaire owners and the politicians who put the deal together.
The stadium will provide some concession jobs on, a part-time basis
during baseball season. It will provide some construction jobs. It will
not aid the hundreds of thousands of people who commute along 1-95,
27th Avenue, and U.S. 1.
A rail line that goes north-south will also bring construction jobs and
it will spur development around each train station. This development
would include restaurants, office buildings, apartment complexes, dry
cleaners, banks and other businesses that can provide everyday benefit
to commuters. Those businesses would employ people seven days a
week, in contrast to the temporary jobs provided by a baseball conces-
sionaire.
The rail line could have used federal dollars, instead of taking Com-
munity Reinvestment Act money designed for poor people, our tax dol-
lars and a little money from the baseball franchise owner to build an
estimated $600 million stadium.
The Black community has been forgotten. We were promised an ex-
tension of the north line and we agreed to back a tax to support this
proposal. For some reason, our community is quiet on this issue, when
it should be raising hell.
Every unemployed, under-employed citizen, every Black-owned con-
struction company, every Black restaurateur, every church, every ac-
tivist and, most important, all of our politicians should be throwing in
their two cents. If promises are not going to be kept, then we should not
just lie back and take it.


No time to stay silent and no more assault weapons on our streets


The recent bloody rampage in
the Model City area is not just a
snapshot of the darkness within
the heart and soul of a murder-
ous criminal but also a horrific
portrait of the destruction an
assault weapon can levy in just
a few seconds. Approximately
100 bullet casings littered the
scene where nine people had
been shot, two of them fatally.
While the Miami police
search for the information and
clues that will bring the killer
to justice, as a community we
need to focus on the easy avail-
ability of assault weapons like
the AK-47 that made such a
murderous barrage possible.
Truly, no one can be safe when
weapons like this are freely
available.
The AK-47 is a powerful kill-
ing machine which American
soldiers face every day on the
battlefields of Iraq and Afghani-
*stan. Assault weapons, like the
AK-47, can actually shoot off
600 rounds per minute, even
having the capacity to pene-
trate bulletproof vests. I have
been told that these weap-


ons can be purchased on our
streets for less than $100. As
we saw in the Jan. 23 shooting,
a gunman will spray a stream
of high-powered bullets to hit
a target, unconcerned about
anyone else who may be in the
way.
The Rev. Jerome Staring
called the shooting "a sick situ-
ation" in a recent newspaper
article. He is absolutely cor-
rect. This type of violence can


the first step. We will all rest
easier when the shooter is off
our streets.
Then we must work to make
our voices heard on the nation-
al level to reinstate the Federal
assault weapons ban. I am
one who believes that the ban
seemed to have limited the flow
of these weapons from the for-
eign government stockpiles to
our own streets. We need to
stand up and make a change


Detective James
Walker and Miami-Dade Police
Officer Jose Somohano were
both killed by offenders using
these weapons. Miami-Dade
police officer Keenya Hubert
almost died in a hail of bullets
from an assault rifle during a
routine traffic stop. Officer Hu-
bert has needed 22 operations
to recover from the extensive
damage done by the AK-47.
So we know that the survivors
of the Friday night attack still
have many painful moments
ahead of them. If we wish to
ease their pain, then we need to
get the public's help in tracking
the gunman down.
Miami Homicide Lt. John
Buhrmaster was quoted as say-
ing, "I was taken aback by the
fact that so many people got
shot and not one person has
come forward to say anything."
This is. a situation good peo-
ple can solve with a little good
information. I am publicly urg-
ing anyone in our community
who knows any information
about this horrific crime to do
the right thing.


only be solved if the people of
Miami-Dade County and the
community organizations of
Miami-Dade County work to-
gether to solve it. Together, we
must unite to stare the prob-
lem straight in the eye and act
to solve this crime. Tips called
into Crimestoppers (305-471-
8477 or 305-471-TIPS) can be


in the current way weapons are
flooding our communities leav-
ing only death and destruction
as their calling cards: This is
what the assault weapon was
manufactured to do and it does
it very well.
Your police officers support
getting these weapons off our
streets. After all, city of Miami


Young people offering serivces to the community
I recently attended my CERT I mentioned City-Year Miami I was impressed to learn that least with a col-
- Community Emergency Re- and I got the chance to have some young people are listen- lege grad you know he or she
sponse Team -- meeting in North a first-hand talk with a young ing and getting involved and has had the stick-to-itiveness
Miami, through Trinity Church. person who was willing to give making good choices, to receive a degree.
CERT is a Homeland Security up a year of his life giving ser- Imagine, having a college grad- This is a great time for public
project to prepare residents for and private businesses to take
disasters of any type. The train- advantage of bright, intelligent
ing is free of charge and the his is a great time for public and private businesses to take young people who have proven
equipment issued after complet- advantage of bright, intelligent young people who have proven themselves and want to work.
ing the course is invaluable. That is much different from
While at the meeting, I met a themselves and want to work those who are not really ready
young man, Phillip, who was for the work world.
from AmeriCorps. He was a It is one thing to say what oth-
college graduate with a major vice to others. uate working for you at no cost ers should do and quite anoth-
in seminary studies. He was I asked Phillip why he had to you or your company. We all er to follow your own advice. I
from South Carolina and was joined and he responded by know recent high school grad- will be bringing on board vol-
here for one year as a volunteer saying if he completed the year uates are too inexperienced to unteers from one of these sec-
working with Andrea Fletcher of service his college loans be of much help when they are tors, I encourage you to do the
of Trinity Church. would be forgiven, still wet behind the ears. At same.


What do you think about the debate in the

Senate about the economic stimulus package?


ANDRI WILLIAMS, 41
City Councilman, Miami Gardens

Congress
has to act on
the stimulus
package. The
country--and
South Flori-
da--are hurt-
ing. According
to the United
States Department of Labor, 98
percent of the nation's metro-
politan areas are seeing higher
rates of job losses than last year
and the Miami area is ranked
the 275th worst out of 369 ar-
eas. It's time for Washington to
get its eye on the ball and start
helping regular Americans.

JOSEPH A. "JOE" GIBBONS,60
State Representative, District 105,
Hallandale Beach

We need
immediate
money circu-
lating into the
system. If too
much is put in
other things,
then it won't
work. Presi-
dent Obama is
trying to make sure that money
goes into programs and we have
existing programs that can use
the money right away.

CARRIE P. MEEK, 82
Retired Congresswoman, Liberty City

I do agree with the Democrat-
ic approach. We need as much
as we can get to stimulate the


economy. Un-
less the gov-
ernment fills
in the gap
that only gov-
ernment can,
then we will
be 'in a bind.
We have been
losing a lot of
jobs. With the cutbacks and job
losses, the impact will be worse
in our community.

JOYCE DAVIS, 65
Mayor, El Portal

I don't know
all about the
stimulus pack-
age but I don't
know why the
Republicans
are adamant
about not mov-
ing forward
with the pack-
age. I actually think that it will
help or jumpstart the economy
by getting more job opportuni-
ties for Americans. We have to
start from somewhere..

DWIGHT BULLARD, 32
State Representative, District 118,
Richmond Heights

I think that it
should be eas-
ier to pass the
bill for the eco-
nomic stimu-
lus package.
We are talking
about job loss-
es and stag-
nated hous-


ing markets that are affecting
Americans. We should not be
hesitant to create growth or
economic development. I think
that the stimulus package will
pass but the important thing
with the bill when it passes is
we monitor where the money is
going.

DENNIS MOSS, 56
County Commission Chairman, South
Dade

I am little
disappoint-
ment not more
of the eco-
nomic stimu-
lus package
is providing
funding for lo-
cal minority
businesses. It
is unfortunate that we took care
of Wall Street so we should try to
help Main Street also and those
on the Back Street. I don't want
homeowners to be excluded
from the package. The stimulus
package should do more for the
average American. However, the
package is not going to be what
everyone is expecting. The mon-
ey that is needed will be mean-
ingful and helpful but it will not
solve the problem in the com-
munity like building the North
Corridor [Metrorail extension].


Subscribe


Obama gets warm welcome
Miami Times Staff Report

President Barack Obama
had an unlikely ally as he
visited Ft. Myers Tuesday on
another leg of his tour around
the country to push his $838
billion stimulus bill.
Florida's Republican Gov.
Charlie Crist introduced
Obama to the crowd estimat-
ed at 1,500.
Crist's support, like that of
several other Republican gov-
ernors, came as GOP mem-
bers of the U.S. House and
Senate put up stiff resistance PRESIDENT OBAMA
to the bill. nor who has broken with other
All Republican House mem- Florida GOP leaders to support
bers voted against the mea- the Obama plan. Governors,
sure and on Tuesday only the president said, "under-
three GOP senators crossed stand our economic crisis in
the line to support it. a way that maybe sometimes
Obama announced Senate folks a little more removed
passage as he spoke in Ft. don't understand. They are on
Myers. the front lines dealing with the
"This issue of helping out economy every single day."
country is about helping "Gov. Crist shares my con-
our country," Crist told the viction that creating jobs and
crowd. turning this economy around
Obama welcomed' the sup- is a mission that transcends
port from the popular gover- party," Obama said. "And


in Ft. Myers
when the town is burning, you
don't check party labels. Ev-
erybody needs to grab a hose
- and that's what Charlie Crist
is doing right here today."
News reports from Ft. My-
ers said the crowd welcomed
Obama with shouts of "Yes We
Can," echoing the president's
campaign slogan.
Someone in the crowd shout-
ed out "eight," referring to the
likelihood of Obama's serv-
ing two terms, and the shout
brought forth cheers.
Obama was candid about his
prospects for a second term,
saying it could depend on how
well he does on the economic
front.
"I'm not going to make any
excuses," Obama said at the
town hall meeting. "If stuff
hasn't worked, if people don't
feel like I've led then country in
the right direction, then you'll
have a new president."
But he said Americans also
understand the enormity of
the challenge he faces and
know that economic recovery
could take years.


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


We need to stand up and make a change in the current way
weapons are flooding our communities leaving only death
and destruction as their calling cards. This is what the as-
sault weapon was manufactured to do and it does it very well


I


_r


~










r'


THEY'RE


HERE


The Four Page Glossy Wrap that enclosed the Inaugural Issue


is now on sale at The Miami Times.



AS MANY AS YOU WANT!









Traffic lights activated at eight

ramp entrances to the highway


SIGNALS
continued from 1A
tween red and green lights "to
ensure vehicles enter the high-
way in a spaced and controlled
manner," FDOT said in a state-
ment announcing the start of
the ramp signals plan.
"They are designed to improve
the merging process by ensuring
there are enough gaps available
for each car," FDOT said. "Ramp
signals operate based on traffic
demand and allow cars onto the




L 3' -4


stationed at each light.
"All the troopers realize there's
a learning curve and the goal
right now is to help people un-
derstand how to deal with the
ramp signals."
Santangelo said Monday the
lights system was working "very
well," with 1-95 averaging 55
to 60 miles per hour at 4 p.m.
Monday.
"Ordinarily, you're down to
about 30 miles per hour at this
time of day. The average speed
dramatically increased right


that "there is an adjustment
time period probably."
Asked whether the signals
would be active only during rush
hour, Rick responded, "Right
now it's in the peak travel times,
which used to be called rush
hour but rush hour has now
morphed into rush hours."
Asked why FDOT did not ad-
vertise the ramp signals plan in
advance in the Black media, Rick
said that was an oversight on
the part of the public relations
company the Beber Silverstein
1, -


Motorists stop at 1-95 ramp signal at Northwest 62nd Street on Tuesday afternoon.
-MiamiTimes photo/Sandra J. Charite


interstate in response to real-
time traffic conditions.
"This helps break up the
groups of merging vehicles,
which reduces disruptions and
regulates the flow of traffic onto
the mainline, especially during
periods of heavy use."
What this means is that,
whereas in the past a motor-
ist using the entrance ramp
would drive straight onto the ex-
pressway and try to merge into
northbound traffic. Now that
driver will find a traffic light at
the head of the ramp and may
proceed only if the light turns
green.
A motorist who ignores the
lights is subject to a fine of $160
and three points on his or her
license.
Florida Highway Patrol Lt. Pat
Santangelo said while the FHP
was "not publicizing" any grace
period, no tickets had so far
been issued, though a trooper is


from the first day," he said.
Brian Rick, Public Outreach
and Media Specialist with FDOT,
told The Times Friday.
That was the overall purpose
of the department's strategy to
reduce traffic congestion on 1-95
in Miami Dade County.
"It's a work in progress to re-
duce traffic congestion 'and to
improve commute times for mo-
torists," he said.
Rick said he has personal ex-
perience that it works.
"This has been proven effec-
tive in other parts of the country,
such as Minneapolis," he said. "I
can say that because I actually
visited in 2004 and I saw that it
worked and it worked very well."
Rick said ground sensors on
the entrance ramps detect if
there is a backup and if there is,
FDOT can accelerate the ramp
signal cycle.
He said complaints against the
system may be due to the fact


Group, which, he said, went for
"maximum circulation."
The hours of operation for the
signals are roughly 3 to 7 p.m.
but they may also activate in
case of a traffic accident or for
special events that may affect
regular expressway operations,
such as a sporting event.
The Ramp Signaling Program
is part of a Plan by FDOT to re-
lieve congestion on 1-95 that
also includes the relatively new
95 Express lanes implemented
in December in which motor-
ists coming out of the down-
town area and headed north
can avoid heavy traffic and use
two specially designated lanes -
for a fee which depends on the
volume of 1-95 traffic and could
range from 25 cents when traffic
light to $1.50. Vehicles carrying
three or more people are allowed
to use these lanes free of charge
once they are registered as car
pools.


Our differences

are what unite us.


Comcast proudly honors
Black History Month.
Join us as we celebrate the accomplishments
of so many during Black History Month...
and every month.

Learn more at www-comcas. com/diversity.

View our special presentation of
South Florida's Black History,
exclusively on Comcast On Demand
under "Get Local."


comcast.


Mlaiut gjI


MASSES

AT THE MONUMENT


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009 1







5A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


RI ACKS hIMUS CONTROL FFIEIR OWN DESTINY


~t~-^-*"...


MIAMI'S COLORED WEEKLY


Is Black HIsorm Mtonth no


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CHILDREN SHOULD NOT SMOKE


Maturity is Needed to Make an
Informed Choice
We all agree that children should not smoke.
Until a person has the maturity to understand and
appreciate the consequences of smoking, they should
be discouraged on all fronts. Parents, teachers,
guardians and mentors should talk to young people-
about not smoking. Retail
stores must be diligent 60%
in carding consumers to
ensure that no one under _. m om_ ,. r
the legal age purchases 40% --
cigarettes. These and
many other preventive 30%
measures some funded \ .
by the tobacco industry-- '*
are being aggressively % 2-
practiced. / 0.
10% -----"-'s
.\lncAo ,.\.mer 'lj '"4
Youth Prevention mCr,,
Measures Are Working
The good newsis 0%7 '8 '92
that these measures
are working. According to the 2008 Monitoring the
Future study conducted by the National Institute
of Drug Abuse and the University of Michigan, the
teen smoking rates are "at or near record lows." The
study also reported that the smoking rate for 12th
graders is at its lowest rate since the study started
tracking smoking behavior 33 years ago.
The results in the black community are the most'
encouraging. The Monitoring the Future study found
that smoking rates among African American youth
are dramatically lower than that of other race groups.
Specifically, the study of 12th graders showed the
rate of white students who reported using cigarettes
within the prior 30 days of the survey is more than


twice the rate for African American students; and
that the rate for Hispanics is nearly one and one-half
times that for African American students."

Lorillard Markets to Adults
Some claim that there is a conspiracy by the
tobacco industry to target African American youth.
We believe that such a
claim has no basis.The
people who comprise
LorillardTobacco Company
have families too, and
are concerned about the
health and well-being of
,,--- our children. We represent
all races and walks of life.
*.- Further, we share a common
-.. *- set of beliefs: that farmers
S_____have a right to make a living
by growing tobacco, as
they have in this country
S '2 since before it was the
*87 '02 *07
United States; that tobacco
companies have a right to
manufacture and market products to adults who
choose to smoke; and that convenience stores and
tobacconists have a right to sell them to adults.
Adults who understand the risks of smoking should
continue to have the right to choose to smoke and to
smoke the brand of cigarettes that they prefer.
To help preserve and protect those rights, visit
www.mentholchoice.com and learn more.
'Johnston, L. 0., O'Malley, R M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (December 11, 2008). "More
good news on teen smoking: Rates at or near record lows." University of Michigan News Service: Ann
Arbor, MI, http://www.drugabuse.gov/Newsroom/08/MTF2008Tobacco.pdf
"Johnston. L. D., O'Malley, P M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (December 11. 2008). "Trends
in 30-Day Prevalence of Use of Cigarettes by Subgroups in Grade 12" University of Michigan News
Service: Ann Arbor, MI, http://monitoringthefuture.org/data/08datalpr08cig8.pdf


../ TOBACCO COMPANY


www.mentholchoice.com


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


Some North Miami re,

By Aiyana Baida Street, the Biscayne Landing
U/Miami News Service project is mostly unfinished.
"Why should we the taxpay-


A group of North Miami resi-
dents is protesting the city's
$118 million comprehensive
water plan which already is
adding about $14 a month to
the average homeowner's bill.
The most controversial part
of the plan approved by the
City Council in 2006 is a $87.3
million "reverse osmosis wa-
ter plant" that was proposed
to address the water needs of
Biscayne Landing, a 193-acre
development that was sup-
posed to create 12,000 homes,
a hotel, shopping and office
space.
"We adopted this policy in a
time when there was a differ-
ent reality, in the midst of the
housing bubble,"'said longtime
resident Maureen Hartwitz.
"But the reality now is the
housing market has imploded
and there is no need for a re-
verse osmosis plant."
Located on the Intracoastal
Waterway from 137t to 151st


ers have to pay for a new water
plant for Biscayne 'Landing?
The developers should bear
that burden," said Judy Feld-
man, who has lived in the city
since 1964.
Feldman and Hartwitz
were among about 30 resi-
dents who showed up at the
Jan. 27 council meeting.
David Levine, former vice
chairman of the North Miami
Code Enforcement Board, said
the city's low-income residents
are being given an unneces-
sary burden.
"I can pay my water bill but
I am here to advocate for those
residents that can't -- the ones
whose water will be turned off
and have to pay a reconnec-
tion fee," Levine said, suggest-
ing the city offer assistance to
those residents.
In addition to building the
new water plant under the
comprehensive water plan,
North Miami would rehabili-


Jackson icon died Feb. 7 at


CLARK
continued from 6A

opened at Miami Northwestern
High and Jackson North Ma-
ternity Center opened in North
Miami-Dade.
In 1991, mainly through
Clark's advocacy, county resi-
dents voted for a half-penny
sales tax dedicated to programs
overseen by the Public Health
Trust.
Then, $150 million was ap-
proved to build a new mental
health facility.
Sears, now chief administra-
tive officer for Jackson North
Medical Center, described Clark
as "a real champion among
champions in advocating for
and ensuring excellence and
the, highest quality of health
care services, including dignity
and respect, for all, regardless


of ability to pay, a leader with
the 'human touch' with unpar-
alleled compassion, dedication,
and commitment to improving
the lives of the unserved and
the under-served.".
Under Clark, the Jackson
health network expanded to
12 primary care centers, two
medical long-term. facilities,
two school-based clinics, a ma-
ternity hospital and Jackson
South Community Hospital.
Prior to coming to Jackson,
Clark, a University of Iowa
alumnus, was chief executive
officer and regional administra-
tor for Kings County Hospital
Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. for al-
most 11 years. In the early '70s,
he served as associate director
of the Jersey City Medical Cen-
ter in New Jersey.
In November 2002, Clark was
forced to step down from Jack-


for scrapping of new water plan

has been neglected," the mayor city's efforts at water efficiency, council already has approved
said. "We have to update our which would take the financial the plan and the city is nego-
water plant regardless of Bis- weight off residents. tiating engineering and archi-
cayne Landing." While mayor and council tecture details with Hazen and
City Councilwoman Marie members listened to residents' Sawyer, a New York environ-
Erlande Steril said she op- pleas to stop the reverse osmo- mental engineering firm that
nosed the water plant when the sis water plant, Burns said the has a branch in South Florida.


sidents call

tate the 46-year-old Winson
Water Plant at a cost of about
$28 million and replace all of
the city's water lines at a cost
of about $3 million.
Currently, North Miami buys
about six million gallons of wa-
ter from Miami-Dade County at
$1.47 per 1,000 gallons. The
city charges residents $1.07
per 1,000 gallons and $1.91
per 1,000 gallons to business-
es. In addition to the six million
gallons supplied by the county,
the Winson Water Plant, which
pumps water out of the Bis-
cayne aquifer, supplies up to
9.3 million gallons a day to the
city as well as to some other ar-
eas of unincorporated.
With the reverse osmosis wa-
ter plant, the city would no lon-
ger have to buy water from the
county. The new plant would
clean salt water from the Flori-
da Aquifer, making it drinkable,
usable water for residents.
Mayor Kevin Burns said the
reverse osmosis plant is needed
for the city to be self-sufficient.
"We have a water plant that


age 72

son by members of the Trust. He
resigned after signing a three-
year $1.2 million contract.
He is remembered fondly.
Sears remembers him as
"a charismatic and visionary
leader who leaves as a legacy a
foundation and framework that
will enable the Jackson Health
System to survive and thrive as
one of the community's most
treasured resources for years
to come."
Clark is survived by sons
Nicholas, Zachary of Engle-
wood, N.J., and eight grand-
children.
Viewing will be from 5 to 11
p.m. Friday, Feb. 13 at Cabal-
lero Rivero Woodlawn/Kendall,
11655 SW 117t Ave. Services
will be held at New Birth Ca-
thedral of Faith International,
2300 NW 135th Street, Opa-
locka at 11 a.m. Saturday.


New water park makes a splash

in your neighborhood.


The Grapeland Park is transformed. Ohce a collection of dusty sports fields, it's
now a fun four-pool water park!

Grapeland is just one example of more than 400 projects completed thanks to
the Building Better Communities Bond Program.

Check out the new water park at 1550 NW 37 Avenue.

To find Building Better Communities projects in your neighborhood,
go to miamidade.gov or call 3-1-1.


-' J' 1 1 -


Discover more. nordstrom.com Village of Merrick Park, Coral Gables, 4310 Ponce de Leon Blvd., 786.999.1313. Town Center at Boca Raton, 5820 Glades Road, 561.620.5555. Dadeland Mall, 7239 N. Kendall Drive, 786.709.4100.
Aventura, 19507 Biscayne Blvd., 305.356.6900. Shipping charges may apply.


~


council voted on it in Decem-
ber 2006.
"I don't think it is an expense
we can implement. now," she
said. "We should renovate the
one that we have."
Council members Jacques
Despinosse and Michael R.
Blynn, who voted for the com-
prehensive plan, offered new
suggestions that would meet
residents half-way.
Despinosse said he hopes
lobbyists can get the federal
government to supplement the









R, Ar-vSi NTii Cir'rrp'i, THIEIIIRO ()W\N DFSTIMt


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


International (' il Rights Walk of Faun inducts 13






"Chiid

SAvaile

Available front iBi.


-N -. m'G o*a wa


Shooting deaths spark forum as community deals with tragedy


VIOLENCE
continued from 1A

Now a Jan. 23 shooting that
killed two teenagers and wound-
ed seven others at a dice game
in Liberty City and the shooting
death of a 10-month-old appear
to have galvanized the commu-
nity once again over youth vio-
lence.
Brandon Mills, 16, and Der-
rick Gloster, 18, died in a hail
of bullets after one or more
gunmen opened fire with an
AK-47 assault rifle at the cor-
ner of Northwest 70th Street
and 15th Avenue. Derrick Days
Jr. was killed at the corner of
Northwest 59t Street and 22nd
Avenue on Dec. 13.
Police arrested two teenag-
ers in the killing of the toddler
but have been stymied in their


probe of the deaths of Mills and
Gloster because witnesses have
been reluctant to come for-
ward.
A $50,000 reward is being of-
fered for information leading
to the arrest of the shooter or
shooters.
The forum at Mt. Calvary,
1140 NW 62nd St., brought to-
gether activists, residents and
law enforcement officials as part
of a stepped-up community cam-
paign to find the killer or killers
and crack down on guns.
Tangela Sears, president of
the Coalition of Concerned Par-
ents, and Mt. Calvary's pastor, .
the Rev. Billy W.L. Strange Jr.,
organized the session.
The format differed from sev-
eral that had been held since the
shooting.
The panelists included a


youthful offender, a radio host
and victims of violence who were
born or raised in Liberty City
and could provide insights on
how to solve the problem.
"Stop letting individuals who
have their own personal agen-
da dictate what happens in our
community," said panelist Bri-
an Denis, executive director of
Brothers of the Same Mind.


The general consensus was
that parents must take charge
in their homes.
"These kids come from our
homes. We need to get back to
the place where we can com-
municate with our children,
show them love -- and tough
love," said Maurice Strange, 33,
brother of the pastor, who was
shot nearly 10 years ago outside


a convenient store.
Strange's remarks found favor
among some panelists.
"Stop cursing at them and
putting them down. Be a police
in your own home," said Van-
dilla McClendon, a self-avowed
recovering drug addict.
An increase in the number of
single mothers, lack of commu-
nity unity and a need for lead-


ership and programs and op-
portunities for the children were
seen as persistent problems that
must change.
"Times like these is when elect-
ed officials should find ways to
revitalize the community," said
Sears.
Another meeting is slated for
1 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 12 at Mt.
Calvary.


pvL. r rnb 411 ~


.....I. ...... .


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NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT (FONSI)
The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has reviewed the Supplemental Environmental
Assessment (SEA) for the Orange Line Phase 2: North Corridor Metrorail Extension, located
in Miami, Florida, In accordance with 23 CFR 771.119, it was the finding of-FTA that
there are no significant impacts on the environment associated with the development and
operation of this project. On November 7, 2008 the Federal Transit Administration approved
and signed the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the following project:
FOOT Financial Project Number: 421043-1 94 01/02
Federal Aid Project Number: Not Available
MDT Project No.: CIP002
E04-MDT-01, PTP (former project number)
Project Name: Orange Line Phase 2: North Corridor Metrorail Extension
FCSC: PM18.4
Description: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Supplemental Environmental
Assessment(SEA)forPost-Record of Decision (ROD) Design Modifications
North Corridor Metrorail Extension along NW 27th Avenue from NW
76th Street to NW 215th Street Miami-Dade County, Florida
Contract No. TRO4-PTP1
Copies of the SEA and FONSI are available on a CD, upon request, Any further comments
or requests should be addressed to:
Michelle Simmons
Public Involvement Manager
Miami-Dade Transit
701 NW First Court, Suite 1700
Miami, Florida 33136 MIAMI-
(T) 786-469-5467 M'


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


COIN(l

.qbl


Jacqui Colyer named regional director for DCF


Miami Times Staff Report

Florida Department of
Children and Families Sec-
retary George Sheldon today
announced the appointment
of Jacquetta "Jacqui" B. Co-
lyer as the new director for
the DCF's Southern Region
covering Miami-Dade- and
Monroe counties and serving
around 2.4 million people.
Colyer will be responsible
for planning and directing
the operations for the region
to further the department's
mission and goals.
"I'm confident that her
well-rooted ties in the com-
munity, experience, history
of volunteerism and dedica-
tion to improving the quality
of life for our families will be
a great asset to the depart-


ment and our clients," Shel-
don said in a statement an-
nouncing the appointment.
Colyer is a social services
veteran with more than 25
years of experience. Prior to
joining the DCF, she worked
to help foster care children
by improving adoptions
and permanency initiatives
for Our Kids, assisting the
agency to develop programs
and strategies to reduce the
number of children removed
from their homes by imple-
menting diversion and pre-
vention programs.
"It is an honor to be asked
by Secretary Sheldon to
serve in a role with the abil-
ity to touch so many lives
and seize opportunities to do
so much good in our com-
munity," Colyer said in the


JACQUETTA B. COLYER
DCF Regional Director

statement.
Prior to her work with Our
Kids, Coyler managed The
Colyer Group.


She taught college level
courses at Barry University,
Miami Dade College and the
University of Miami.
Colyer is a doctoral candi-
date at the University of Mi-
ami. She has a master's in
Social Work and Social Work
Education from Barry. Her
bachelor's in Social Science
Education and Social Work
is from Winthrop University
in Rock Hill, S.C.
Her community service
includes membership in or-
ganizations such as the Hu-
man Services Coalition, the
Overtown Advisory Board,
the Women's Chamber of
Commerce, Hands on Mi-
ami, the Peace Education
Foundation, and the League
of Women Voters Children's
Museum.


Grand Jury suggests doubling of half-penny transportation tax


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

The Spring Term Miami-
Dade County Grand Jury has
suggested that the half-penny
transportation tax be raised to
a full penny.
In its final report, "The Peo-
ple's Transportation Plan: Mov-
ing from Progress to Reality,"
The Grand Jury concluded
that funds from the tax have re-
sulted in improvements for the
county's transportation system
but the county and the Citi-
zen's Independent Transporta-
tion Trust performed poorly at
alerting the public to the im-
provements.
"It is apparent to us that the


half-penny sales tax was never
going to be enough to imple-
ment all the grand proposals
set forth in the [People's Trans-
portation Plan],:" the jurors
said, stopping short of recom-
mending a doubling of the tax
but suggesting that step be
taken.
"The problem for our elected
officials with such a proposal,"
the report warns "is voters will
remember the unfulfilled,prom-
ises of the past."
"The reality is that voters will
probably not vote in favor of any
such increase until they first
believe that our elected officials
will remain true to the modified
proposals and that they will be
held accountable if they fail to


do so," the report continued.
The report explicitly suggests
that funds collected from the
tax be managed by an "inde-
pendent body of citizens who
are free of political and person-
al interest" that the CITT be
strengthened and made more
independent.
The report, released Monday,
makes specific suggestions on
aspects of the transportation
plan, including charging for
the currently free Patriot Pass-
port and Golden Passport on a
sliding scale based on income,
charging -- also on a sliding
scale -- for the Special Trans-
portation Services Program and
re-instating a charge for riding
the Metromover of at least 50


cents.
The Grand Jury expressed
approval of the new High Oc-
cupancy Toll lanes and recom-
mends pressing forward with
the design of a reversible' lane
on Northwest Seventh Avenue
to help alleviate congestion
during peak traffic times.
The report notes that most of
the avenue has a center lane
used by northbound and south
bound traffic for turning. The
proposal is that when traffic
is heavy in the morning, the
center lane would be used by
motorists heading into the city
of Miami. For the evening rush
hour, the lane would be used
for traffic heading to the Golden
Glades.


Shooting survivor is on mission to spread a message against guns


By Sandra J. Charite '
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Robert L. Bozeman Jr. counts
his blessing as a Black man liv-
ing in Miami.
And hearing about youth vio-
lence plaguing the community
serves only to reinforce that
feeling.
Four years ago, Bozeman
himself became a victim of the
same violence but, unlike some
others, he survived.
"Too many young people are
dying and it makes no sense to
me at all," he says.
Bozeman, 25, a third year
Journalism student at Miami
Dade College, was shot on. Feb.
28, 2005, outside a nightclub
during an altercation and left
on the side of the road.
The bullet tore through Boze-
man's head and for three years
he lived without a quarter of his
skull.


"I'd wear hats to
cover the missing
piece of the skull."
he says, This is when
his campaign to be a
"messenger" calling
for an end to violence
began.
Last September. he
underwent surgery
to fill the hole in his
skull with titanium. BOZ
"My goal this year is
to cover all Dade and
Broward schools, talking about
violence," he says.
The campaign started after
Bozeman was shot and began
to realize that young Black men
were losing their lives to gun
violence.
In one year, Bozeman lost
three of his friends.
His childhood friend was
killed on Christmas Day sup-
posedly over a girl.
Another friend was killed over


what Bozeman be-
lieved was a "sense-
less" reason.
The death of his
friend Bryan Pata
I pushed his anti-vio-
lence campaign fur-
ther.
Pata, 22-year-old
defensive lineman
with the University
EMAN of Miami Hurricanes
was shot and killed
outside his Colony
Apartment complex in Kendall.
His death was ruled a homi-
cide and the case remains un-
solved.
Bozeman has been speaking
at Broward detention centers
and rallies about .the increased
violence among young people.
More recently, he addressed
a crowd of teenagers during a
"Stop the Violence" Community
Rally at the Belafonte TACOL-
CY Center in Liberty City on


b Wvk C..e


UIre &


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Jan. 31.
"I got shot in the head and
the guy who shot me is still
out there," Bozeman told the
youths. "I had to re-learn how
to walk and talk. I don't want to
see another person get killed."
The shooting deaths of Der-
rick Gloster, 18, and Brandon
Mills, 16, Derrick Days Jr., 10
months, and Amanda Collette,
15, within three months are
a big cause for concern, says
Bozeman.
Not only is he speaking at
gatherings; he is also express-
ing himself in music and writ-
ing.


to Ufse tliami


Su


pport The Tmes


. CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED L BILL MY CREDIT CARD

Exp_

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L- Q Exp_


Authorized Signature

Name

Address


City


State Zip


Phone e-mail



*Includes Florida sales tax


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami. FL 33127-1818


RA THF MIAMI TIMF FFRRIIARY 11-17 72009


0 -411


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AIDS
continued from 1A

"I could not go to sleepovers
because I had a lot of medica-
tions and grandmother did not
want my friends to know. I could
not be out in the sun too long
because of the medications,"
said Lane.
Lane is now a peer educator
for the University of Miami's Di-
vision of Adolescent Medicine.
She travels around the country
telling her story so that more
people will be informed about
the disease that is devastating
communities and households.
Her fight against HIV/AIDS is
not just about her, she said.
"My younger cousins, I want
to see them go to prom and
graduate from high school," she
said.
AIDS -- Acquired Immunode-
ficiency Syndrome -- is the final
stage of the human immuno-
deficiency virus (HIV) infection.
The virus can be contracted
through sexual intercourse
with someone infected with the
virus, through sharing needles
or syringes or through the ex-
posure of an infant or fetus by
breast feeding fromn an infected
mother.
\According to the Black Coali-
tion on AIDS, the disease ac-
counts for one in three deaths
among Black men aged 25 to
40.
The Miami-Dade County
Health Department'reports that
AIDS is the third leading cause
of death among Black men and
women, after heart disease and
cancer.
"No one is exempted from the
disease," said Naomi Woods, a
deacon at Bethel Apostolic Tem-
ple, site of the second annual
Sista Talk HIV/AIDS conference
held Feb. 3 and sponsored by
The Family Foundation.
Liberty City, categorized as
Zone IV, has 6,251 adult AIDS
cases and 1,983 adult HIV
cases, according to the health
department. The community
represents nine percent of the
county's population but more
than 20 percent of the report-
ed AIDS cases and more than
17 percent of the reported HIV
cases, making it the area with
the highest number of AIDS and
HIV cases in Miami-Dade.
SNorth Central Dade, Zone
V, which includes Little Haiti,
Brownsville a and a section of
Liberty City, has the second
largest number of AIDS cases in
the county, 4,314, and the third
highest number of HIV cases,
1,360.
Zone VI, Little Havana and
Overtown, has 3,935 adult
AIDS cases and 1,229 adult HIV
cases.
"There is no excuse why
people are not informed about
HIV. There is so much informa-
tion out there about the virus,"
Metris Batts, prevention pro-
gram manager of Empower "U",
said outside the NFL Yet Center,
7090 NW 22nd Ave, moments
before a "Silence is Death" com-
munity march began on Feb. 6.
Across the country, many
Americans observed National
Black HIV/AIDS Awareness
Day on Feb. 7, a time set aside
to inform Blacks to get tested,
educated and know their *HIV
status. This year's theme was
"Black Life is Worth Saving."
The Awareness Day came just
in time for The Family Founda-
tion, a non-profit organization,
to host its second annual Sista'
Talk HIV/AIDS Conference at
Bethel Apostolic Temple, 1855
NW 119th St. on Feb. 3


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


BLArK.S MUiST CONT'JROl THEIR OWN DESTINY


LR LcJ\rf Ln KTr .... ... ..... .... I


AIDS third leading killer of Black men


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Rev. Darryl K. Baxter, president
of the foundation, started the or-
ganization after losing his brother
to AIDS.
"HIV/AIDS is the killer in the
Black community. The problem
is not going away. The informa-
tion is not new but the disease is
still spreading," Evangelist Maver-
lyn Johnson told the gathering at
Bethel.
AIDS activist Devin T. Robinson,
25, joined hundreds of people at,
the Joseph Caleb Center, 5400
NW 22nd Ave., in Brownsville, af-
ter the march, for a health fair.
He gave a performance from his
one-man show, God Did Not Give,


Me HIV.
Robinson said in an interview
information about the disease was
not new and the same things were
being said over and over to a new
generation. Television commer-
cials and billboards ads need to
find a new approach to inform the
youth about HIV/AIDS, he said.
"We have so much to remind
people about sex but not safe
sex. There are no packed health
fairs unless there is free food or
a celebrity appearance," Robin-
son said. "If we don't adhere to
change then one day the major-
ity of the population will be in-
fected with HIV/AIDS."


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Q Miami-bade Seniors:


i, Let's get ready NOW!

What Is The Digital TV (DTV) Transition?
SCurrently, many over-the-air stations are broadcasting in both analog and digital TV formats. After
S June 2009, full-power TV stations will broadcast only in digital. The DTV transition will affect those
who watch free over-the-air television (through a rooftop antenna or "rabbit ears"). If you watch
over-the-air programs on an analog TV, you must take action before June 2009. You should
also know that some stations may still switch on February 17th.
What Should I Do to Be Ready? You have three options:
1. Connect your analog TV to a digital-to-analog converter box. Digital-to-analog converter
boxes are in stores and have a one-time cost of $40-$70. To help you pay for the boxes, the U.S.
Government is offering two $40 coupons per household. (Please note that these coupons will expire
90 days after mailing). For more information on the coupons, visit www.DTV2009.gov.Or
2. Buy a digital television (a TV with a built-in digital tuner). You do not need a High Definition
TV.(HDTV) to watch digital broadcast television. You only need a digital TV (or an analog TV con-
nected to a digital-to-analog converter box). Or
3. Subscribe to a paid TV service. If your TV set receives local broadcast stations through a paid
provider such as cable or satellite TV, it is already prepared for the DTV transition. Cable compa-
nies are not required to transition or switch any of their channels to digital. However, if you have an
analog TV that does not receive local broadcast stations through your paid provider, you will need a
digital-to-analog converter box to watch digital broadcasts on that TV.
SShould I wait until June to take action?
No! Digital television is available now, so enjoy the benefits now. Benefits include more channels,
better quality picture and sound, menu guides and more. The Alliance for Aging can help you get
started now!
How can the Alliance for Aging Help me? ,
If you are 60 or older, we can help you in the following ways: .
1. We can help you evaluate your need for a converter box. .
2. We can help you apply for a coupon.
3. We can delivery your converter box.
4. We can install the converter box in your home.

For more information, please call the Elder Helpline a 1-800-963-5337.


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The Miami Times
___- - -U


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


Obama to create faith-based office







.. ... . . ....
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Cage to headline Gospel concert at Knight Center
Miami Times Staff Report in partnership with radio Billboard Gospel Top Ten. South Florida.


GRAMMY-nominated gos-
pel star Byron Cage will
headline a free Gospel Sun-
days concert starting at 4
p.m. Feb. 15 at in the John S.
and James L. Knight Concert
Hall in downtown Miami.
The concert is part the
Black History Month cel-
ebration of the Adrienne Ar-
sht Center for the Performing
Arts and is being sponsored


station GOSPEL AM 1490
WMBM and the music group
Jubilate.
South Florida Mass Choir
and the Voices of Praise
.Mass Choir of The Fountain,
under the direction of Nelson
Hall and Antonia Wilson will
also be featured.
Cage, the "Prince of Praise,"
is also a Stellar Award win-
ner with worship and praise
albums that have risen to the


He is currently the praise
and worship leader at New
Birth Cathedral in Atlanta,
Ga., and at mega church
Ebenezer African Method-
ist Episcopal Church in Ft.
Washington, Md.
The Free Gospel Sundays
series received a $100,000
grant from the Knight Foun-
dation grant as part of a
community-wide contest to
fund the best art ideas in


By supporting this series,
the Knight Foundation con-
tinues to
Free tickets may be re-
served in advance by calling
the Arsht Center box office,
305-949-6722, or at www.
arshtcenter.org.
Tickets will also be avail-
able on performance days
in the Knight Concert Hall
starting at noon, depending
on availability.


Young executive and minister offers plan for churches to survive the recession


Special to The Miami Times

Tithes and offerings have
been the earthly economic
fuel for the Christian church
for nearly 2000 years. With
the current economic forecast
the dimmest it has been since
the Great Depression, many
churches and religious insti-
tutions are finding themselves
hit the hardest as parishio-
ners are forced to cut back
on giving due to diminishing
resources. These days, many
churches are finding them-
selves needing a bailout.
Now, a young executive
is offering a plan to combat
the recession with socially
responsible wealth manage-
ment strategies that churches
can use to survive and expand


and grow, even during these
hard times.
Ephren Taylor II, regarded as
probably the youngest African
American CEO of a publicly
traded company, City Capital
Corporation, who is offering


Taylor calls his "stimulus
package for the religious com-
munity."
According to a press release
from his publicist, Taylor built
a multi-million-dollar national
company by age 17 after cre-


Young executive is offering a plan to combat the recession with
socially responsible wealth management strategies that churches
can use to survive and expand and grow


the plan, is also a minister
and his website, Steward-
shipcrisis.com, is dedicated
to helping churches increase
their stewardship amid the
current economic crisis.
"Christians Helping Chris-
tians Don't Bury Your Tal-
ents Financial Model" is what


ating a 3-D videogame at age
12. He is an author and he
owns dozens of companies,
oversees a venture capital
fund and is a popular lecturer
on the seminar, church and
college circuit.
Now 26, Taylor's commit-
ment to the church communi-


ty is part of a new concept to
empower local communities
with profitable and socially-
conscious investing and de-
velopment.
Through Taylor's "Chris-
tians Helping Christians" pro-
gram, City Capital is offering
guidance to churches seeking
to increase their capacity in
the area of economic develop-
ment.
"The typical approach is
identifying opportunities that
will help churches generate
additional income beyond
tithes and offerings, while be-
ing socially responsible and
embracing members of the
congregation or leadership,"
the release said.
"While the needs of each con-
gregation are different, City


EPHREN TAYLOR II
CEO / MINISTER


Capital will lead the church
through a process to acquire
income producing businesses
such as real estate, dry clean-
ers and day care centers," the
release added
City Capital is also offering
a stewardship seminar that
focuses on Christian con-
scious investing by using "The
Celerity Plan," a self-directed
IRA model that is used as the
means to increase wealth and
financial capacity.
This model allows con-
gregants to increase their per-
sonal wealth and their capac-
ity to give to the ministry.
For more information on
Taylor and his project, call
Raoul Davis at 1-336-575-
3594 or e-mail bookings@as-
cendantstrategy.net.
0


- - -I









11B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Show your love for God

through your service to others


Saturday is Valentine's Day. I
know that this observance does
not have spiritual roots, but
love certainly does. Before St.
Valentine and Cupid, there was
the author of love: Father God.
John 3:16 says it all. God gave
up His only begotten Son so that
we may live. God not only gave
up what He had but all that He
had. I won't even bother to ask
if any of us would be willing to
give up our only child but are
you willing to give up your only
anything?
I can remember that there


was a time when I was unwilling
to give up the last of a food
item that I was eating or the
last of something that was in
the refrigerator or to give up
something I valued. I can even
.hear myself saying, "Don't lose
that pen; it's my only one."
I am reluctant to admit that I
have guarded selfishly my "last"
o- "only" of something.
Thank God He is not like
mel God's love is an agape love.
You probably know that
there are several kinds of love
including a brotherly love and


a romantic love. We love our
friends and families. Many of
us even use the word "love"
to describe sensations or
emotions. Love is used to
describe our favorite foods or
cars or clothing. It can be used
to describe our favorite color or
a hair style. Often it is used
so loosely or overly much that
when someone says he or she
loves something or someone, it
does not receive the emphasis
that it deserves.
Love is also an action word.
.When you love something or
someone, it should not just be
a flighty emotion but should
entail action.
I can remember a father
insisting that he loved his
children but was negligent in
providing financial or emotional
support for them. I told him that
when his ex-wife went shopping
for those children, the cashier
would not accept the mother's


recitation of how much their
father loved them. She or he
would insist on cold, hard cash
to pay for the items, not their
father's love. God proved His
love for us by His actions; He
gave up something.
Let me share what God's love
is with you. It is all inclusive.
You might not like certain
people, but God loves them.


His love is all powerful.
Think what we can accomplish
when we know that we are
unconditionally loved by the
Creator of all creation.
Let me share what God's
love is not. It is not limited.
There is nothing that God's
love cannot accomplish. His
love is not exclusive. He does
not refuse to love someone


Love is also an action word. When you love something or someone, it
should not just be a flighty emotion but should entail action


Even when He does not love
what we do (because the Bible
tells us clearly that God does
not love sin), He still loves us.
God's love is unconditional.
This is the meaning of agape
love. It is not based on what we
do or who we are. We cannot
earn it or lose it. It does not go
away even if we fail to love.


because of his or her color,
ethnicity, culture, educational
background or social status.
Sadly, not everyone, including
some Christians, can say this.
During these next few days
leading up to Valentine's Day,
show your love for special people
in your life with candy, flowers,
dinner and little gifts that you


know they will appreciate. But
don't stop there. Show your love
for the Father of love through
your service to others. It doesn't
hurt to give a piece of candy and
a flower to someone who would
not expect this kindness.
Do you know an elderly person
who would be thrilled by a meal
out or even a visit? Give the gift
of time alone or an evening out
to a single mom or dad. And I
bet even that crotchety boss
would be pleased to receive a
card or small token.
Remember, however, no one
can ever love you like the Lord
loves you. If you are alone
during this time, don't think for
a moment that you are unloved
because there is not a spouse
or partner in your life. I can say
with all sincerity that I love you
in Jesus' name and I know that
He loves you much more.
Happy Valentine's Day to all
of you.


Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1959 meets at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts
Center at 10:30 a.m. the third
Saturday of the month. Alumni
are invited to the planning meet-
ing for the 15t annual reunion
in June. Also, the school will
host a Financial Aid Workshop
at 6 p.m. Feb. 11 and 18 in the
TOPA auditorium. LarMarc An-
derson, 305-836-0991.


The Liberty City Trust will
hold a Community Outreach
Committee meeting at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 11, at Liberty
Square. Brandyss Howard, 305-
635-2301 ext. 373.


A representativefrom Hamp-
ton University will be available
to answer questions about the
school's admission process 4- 8
p.m. Wednesday, Feb 11, at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts
Center and 4-'8 p.rm. Thursday,
Feb. 12,-. at Swept Home Mis-
sionary, Baptist'Church. Mi-
chele, 305-338-2321.


Miami-Dade College's North
Campus will present Asili Night:
An Old Fashioned. Evening of
Poetry and Jazz, featuring po-
ets Geoffrey Philip, Joseph Mc-
Nair; Zarifa Muhammad-El and
Samantha Cooper, with special
guest jazz artist Charlie Aus-
tin and the Charlie Austin En-
semble, 7 p.m.-10 p.m., Friday,
Feb. 13, at the William Lehman
Theater. 305-693-6236.


Miami Dade College will host


Mt: Zion MB Church will
sponsor a Valentine's Day Ex-
travaganza Ball at the Violines
Banquet Hall, 7 p.m., Satur-
day, Feb. 14. 305-632-8136.


Mt. Calvary MBC will have a
Black History program at 11
a.m., Sunday, Feb. 15, with
Les Brown as speaker. 305-
759-8226.


Mt. Vernon MBC will hold
an Old Fashion Day worship
service at 11 a.m., Sunday,
Feb. 15. 305-824-4779.


Christian Hill will host a


a free community health fair
9 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 14, at the
Medical Center .Campus. Made-
line Pumariega, 305-237-4212.


Top Ladies of Distinction
will meet at 9:30 a.m. Feb. 14
at Florida Memorial University's
Lehman Aviation Building. 305-
6969-163-1.


Celebrate Valentine's Day
at the 10th annual "Moon-
light & Music" Valentine's Day
concert at Deering. Estate, 8
p.m., Saturday, Feb. 14. www.
deeringestate.org.


SMiami-Dade Animal Servic-
es Shelter invites you to their
adoption event 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 15. www.miami-
dade.gov/animals.


Pi Delta Omega Chapter of
Alpha- Kappa,- Alpha: Sorority
will celebrate its Founders' Day
with an afternoon of music in
a program, entitled "Artists of
the African Diaspora: A Reviv-
al," 4 p.m., Feb. 15, at Glendale
Missionary Baptist Church
in Richmond Heights. Cheryl
Mattox Berry, 305-259-9303.


The Circle of Brotherhood
task Force will hold sub-
committee meetings at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 17, at Apostolic
Revival Center. 305-635-2301.


Miami-Dade Transit Choir
will be in concert noon-1 p.m.


charity golf tournament at
12:01 p.m., Friday, Feb. 20,
Miami Springs Country Club.
Larry Mills, 954-554-8335, or
LM09@bellsouth.net.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church's Women's
Department will hold a Black
History program at 7:30 p.m.,
Feb. 20. 305-836-6256.

***** *
Now Faith Ministries will
host a gala for the homeless,
entitled "A Feast is Made for
Laughter" at the Knights of
Columbus banquet hall in
Palms Springs, 7 p.m., Satur-
day, Feb. 28. 954-802-9570


0 9 *


The Co. is made up of industry's best talent


SOLO
continued from 8B

Jason Nelson and Latrice
Pace of the Anointed Pace Sis-
ters. The group is rounded out
with Lisa Jones, Tobbi White-
Darks, Tommie White, Dawn
Jordan, Blanche McAllister-
Dykes, Anita Wilson, Michael
Smith, and Floyd Wilkinson.
The Co. is comprised of
some of the industry's best
singers that Lawrence has
met since moving to Chicago


in 2001 and those he's known
since his days in North Caro-
lina. The Charlotte native was
raised by a church-going aunt
in Gastonia where he sang in
the Mills Chapel Fire Baptized
Holiness Church's choir. He
grew up on the music of gos-
pel icons like Thomas Whit-
field..
A self taught pianist and or-
ganist, Lawrence began writing
songs at the age of sixteen. He
put himself through the Cin-
cinnati Conservatory of Music


and was staging plays such
as "Sing Hallelujah" (which
opened at New York's storied
Village Gate) when R&B star
Stephanie Mils tapped him as
her music director circa 1989.
Aside from his duties with
Mills, he was a member of an
inspirational R&B group, The
Company. Their single "An-
gel" was an R&B hit in 1993,
the same year that Lawrence
produced the first Tri-City
Singers album, From A Song-
writer's Point of View.


7:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 23,
at the Regal Cinema in Miami
Beach.

********
Neighborhood Housing Ser-
vices will hold a seminar, "In-
corporating Family into Lead-
ership Strategies," 5:30-8 pm.
Thursday, Feb. 26, open to the
public and free of charge, at
Jefferson Reaves Park, 3090
NW 51st St. Registration is re-
quired. Sharon Williams, 305-
751-5511 ext. 1121.


The fifth annual Carrie P.
Meek Award Ceremony will be
held 6-9 p.m. Thursday,' Feb.
26, at the Signature Grand in
Davie. www.FischlerSchool.
nova.edu/bhc.


George Washington Carv-
er alumni will hold a Carver
Alumni Day and BBQ Lun-
cheon, 11 a.m.. Friday, Feb.
27, George Washington Carver
Middle School auditorium. Call
Leona Cooper Baker, 305-445-
6662, by Friday, Feb. 20.


****** **
The Miami-Dade State At-
torney's Office .will hold a
Sealing and Expungement Pro-
gram, 4-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27,
Goulds Park, 305-547-0724.


A ping pong tournament
will take place 9 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Feb. 28, at Liberty City Opti-
mist Club. Kim Sands, 305-
634-5791, Bernard C. Poitier,
786-291-1524.


The Haitian Heritage Mu-
seum will hold its fifth annual
Celebration Gala at the De-
sign District, 8 p.m.-midnight,
Saturday, Feb. 28. 305-371-
5988.


Survivors against Violence
will have information and ap-
plications available for expung-
ing and sealing of criminal
records, 10 a.m. -2 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 7, at Brewton's
Market. Eric Robinson, 954-
548-4323, or Carleen Robin-
son, 954-549-0474.


World Literacy Crusade/
Girl Power Program will pres-
ent its sixth annual "It Takes
A Village Conference: Improv-
ing Our World One Girl at a
Time," 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Satur-
day, March 21, American Le-
gion Hall. 305-756-5502.


Carol City Middle School
will present a Youth Crime
Watch Parade at 9:30 a.m.,
March 27 at the school.


The City of Miami Gardens
will host its' fourth annual
"Jazz in the Gardens" Satur-
day, March 28, and Sunday,
March 29, at the Dolphin Sta-
dium. 305-576-3790.


Miami Jackson High Class
of, 1979 will hold its 30th an-
nual reunion, with a week of
events highlighted by a trip to
Montego Bay, Jamaica. The
festivities will be June 5-14.
Louis Fish, president, 954-
895-5441; Carol Jones, secre-
tary, 786-566-3751.


,iWednesday, Feb. 18, at Ste-
phen P. Clark Government
Center. 305-375-4606 or www.
miamidade,gov/baab

*******
The Women's Park, in col-
laboration with the Women's
Studies Center of Florida Inter-
national University, will host a
film night, 7 o'clock, Wednes-
day, Feb. 18. Lisa Fernandez,
305-480-1717 or lfern@miam-
idade.gov.


Gladeview residents and
community leaders are plan-
ning a community meeting to
plan a Fire and Safety event
that will be held in June. The
planning session will be at
Martin Luther King Jr. Park,
5:30-7 p.m., Thursday, Feb.
19, to help plan and provide
take input. Garris Nickle, 305-
751-5511 ext. 1129.


The African Heritage Cul-
tural Arts Center will host a
Black History Extravaganza 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21.
305-375-4606, www.miami-
dade,gov/baab.
S. .. .. ********
V -
The city of Miami Gardens
will host its Miss Miami Gar-
dens Pageant at Florida Me-
morial University's Lou Rawls
Center, 7-10 p.m., Saturday,
Feb. 21. 305-622-8000, www.
mnissmiamigardens.com.


The National College Fair
will be held noon-4 p.m., Sun-
day, Feb. 22, at the Miami Mart
Airport Hotel. 305-995-1739.


The Simon Wiesenthal
Center will screen its newest
documentary, Against the Tide,

or vforbestraining@hotmail.
com.

******** *
Performing Entertainment
Through Education will pres-
ent Black History in the Magic
City, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb.
27, Mt. Zion Missionary Bap-
tist Church. 786-325-7383.

********
New Changing Life Deliver-
ance Church will have a birth-
day celebration for Bishop
Bobby Wellons at noon, Sat-
urday, Feb. 15. 305-493-2686
or 786-316-8889.



Total Change and Empow-
erment Ministries will hold
an anniversary celebration
at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 20-21, end-
ing at 11 a.m., Sunday, Feb.
,22. Sabrina Burch, 786-566-
3739.


www.mdpls.org

Celebrate


Black History Month @ your

Miami-Dade Public Library!

S Don't miss an extraordinary series of special programs featuring
oPubInbCc ubbr author presentations, exhibitions, storytelling, music and more.


EXHIBITIONS

Asser Saint-Val: The Melanin Project
Melanin is the biological pigment that gives human skin and hair its color.Asser
Saint-Val, interested in the way science and biology have been used to justify
false perceptions about people of color, made a study of "the phenomenon of
melanin" and the role it plays in people of all races. His findings became a series
of paintings of imaginary embodiments made with a suggestive mixed media
.that includes acrylic paint, coffee, shoe polish, flour, and food coloring.
Through May 3
Asser Saint-Val, North Dade Regional
Tomita, Y., Fukushima, M. 2455 NW 183 St. 305.625,6424
and Tagami, H. (1986),,
2008, mixed media on masonite, coffee, sugar, shoe polish, flour. MEET THE AUTHOR

Geoffrey Philp
Geoffrey Philp, author of Benjamin, My Son and other works, shares how his
Caribbean roots inspire him to write novels for children. His latest work Grandpa
Sydney's Anancy Stories, draws on the rich oral tradition of Anancy tales that are
told and re-told in West Africa, Jamaica and the Caribbean.
Tuesday, February 17,4 p.m.
California Club Branch
JAZZ 850 Ives Dairy Rd. 305.770.3155

From Jazz to Hip Hop with Artist Nicole Yarling
Words can be used to express love and gratitude. Words can also be used as
weapons. Join jazz artist Nicole Yarling and students from Florida Memorial,
University as they explore the use of words through rap, poetry and song. Aspiring
young writers, rappers and poets will be invited to perform their own works.
Saturday, February 21,3:30 p.m. Monday, February 23,3:30 p.m.
Miami Lakes Branch North Dade Regional
6699 Windmill Gate Rd.. 305.822.6520 2455 NW 183 St.. 305.625.6424
STORYTELLING

Storyteller Temujin Ekunfeo
With an active repertoire of 200 fables, tales, and parables, Temujin Ekunfeo's
stories range from traditional Yoruba to comedian Buddy Hackett. Performing
throughout the country since 1968, Temujin shares his craft by means of audience
participatory storytelling and experiential "playshops" for youths and adults.
Thursday, February 19, 11 a.m.
Miami Lakes Branch
6699 Windmill Gate Rd. 305.822.6520
Program made possible by the
Town of Miami Lakes Educational Advisory Board.
Madafo Lloyd Wilson
Told in the spirit of the "Griot," the African Tribal Storyteller, Madafo's storytelling
breathes life into the age old art form and speaks from the African experience
in America.
Thursday, February 19, 7 p.m.
SKendale Lakes Branch
S15205 SW 88 St. 305.388.0326
-- Program made possible by CITI.


Sponsored b; Mpdia Lpo iaminsors Gi f fJ1b I7$
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- -


N.C. bishop to preach at Absalom Jones service


Miami Times Staff Report

The Historic St. Agnes Episco-
pal Church in Overtown will hold
its 24h annual Absalom Jones
.Service at 10 a.m. Saturday,
with the Rt. Rev. Michael Bruce
Curry, bishop of the Diocese of
North Carolina delivering the
guest sermon.
Curry received a bachelor's
degree with honors from Hobart
College, a master's in Divinity
from Yale University and doctor-
ates in Divinity from the Uni-
versity of the South and Berkley
Divinity School at Yale.
He was elected bishop in 2000
on the first ballot in a diocese


with few small Black congrega-
tions and is regarded as a gifted
speaker.
Absalom Jones and Richard
Allen were trained in the minis-
try at the hands of the Quakers.
They parted ways when Allen
went on to establish the African
Methodist Episcopal Church and
Jones became affiliated with the
Episcopal Church, becoming the
first person of African descent to
be ordained to the priesthood in
the American Episcopal Church.
The two men remained friends
throughout their lifetime and
together did much to uplift the
race.
Jones in'particular embraced


I MICHAEL B. CURKK
Guest preacher


the belief that the church should
also pursue social action as a
matter of faith and he founded
schools, helped those in need
and gave them his support in
their struggle against oppres-
sion. He also helped start an in-
surance company. He died at his
home in Philadelphia on Feb. 13,
1818.
St. Agnes is inviting the pub-
lic to worship with them on this
special occasion and to attend
the luncheon following the wor-
ship service. Tickets for the lun-
cheon are $30 each. To reserve
tickets or for more information,
call the Parish Office at 305-573-
5330.


DOG TRAINING
Obedience
Home & Family Protection
House Breaking
Behavior Modification
Consultation
Scent Detection

Call Ken at 305-726-6099


Subscribe


IKTDAY!UI


S /The Episcopal Church of
S1The Transfiguration
-,15260 NW 19'h Avenue
I 305-681-1660
I Church Schedule:
.'ftWe' IAI7CCLOIy Sunday Services
7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
Healing Service
"'.. "' Second Wednesday 7 p.m.


ntioch Missionary Baptit postolic Revival Center
6702 N.W I -th venue
Church of Brownsville 67305-836-12
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services N New time for T.V. Program
ClrctueclSuday Stbnl ..... 8:3 a.m. FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
Sunday Wonship Service .... IO a.m UHoAiVuinLE t I cohWCArTC ra
li Md-Week Service .... Wednesday's Sl.9 a.I.4A pt.. Sinahy Sp.m.
Hour of Power-Noon Day Pryer yWed emleing y Perr'9e ..2a.m 12,
I MsiBil SeieeI ...............I &1m.
12 p. pm. Sn e, W ship 73...........0 pm
Tuc. Prayer Meetig. .... 7:30 pm.
E rening Womsip,., 7 p.mi i -Bible Sti ly ..........7....... i pIl


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www.friaunchh ipmbcmia.or
friendshipprayer@bcllsoulI nct
740 N.W. 58li Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
Hour o Prayer........6:30 a.m.
T, I Ma tn 'icW.et up 30 a.m.
S, ll'.i .irlI ^,'.,h, iA k"lm..


We dcesday......... a.m.- p.m.



M't. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services

'7 Cl--' nW ip Sl, io .., -.9
So hip S c .............11 a.m.
Wednesday
Sible StutPrayer Night 7: p m.
Thursday
C AFH Prayer MNeting 7 pm.
"Ttere is a place for you


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2(X)1 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order ofServices:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. l1:15 am.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 k,. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.


Cornerstone Bible'
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
Suhtniy School.....9:30 a, u
StumltayWortip. II nt
Fstil Sunldy Evcning Wonihip

Choir Reheusral liurm ay
7:30 p,.m.


/ First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026


4W


Order of Services:
Sunday................7:30 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School..........10 ant.
ThIusday.........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meting. BT U.
Baptism i- Thurs. before
First Sun.,7 p.m.
Cotmnunion First Sun........
"7't0 A t I .in


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

( rder of Sers ite.


L _l rr.' r, ,-,,


/ Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Sunday School ...........9:45 a an
Sun. IMlorning Scrvs. .11 a.in
4 Sun....BTU. 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Tuesday......Bible Study
FeOding Milistry. .10 am
Wed. Bible Study/Pmaya..6:30 p.m
Thulrl. Outreach Ministry..:30 l)p.n
\sagagagau a aUIiMs .,


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383
Order of Services
Sun ay
.9-.: y -. ".-. n.y School at ):45 a.m.
'ible Studily 7 p.m..
Saturday
No Service


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081


Order of Services:
*....lay Morning Services
:iinJiy School,............10 a.m.
Wurliup Servie........ .... 1 u.m.,
Ttti.-I iy Bible Study,.....8 p.m. ,
'liar,.L,. Payer Serice....... 8 p.m


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 1 I
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistminami.oir


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
EAiI Sunday
K Moruiiin or llip.....7:30 a.m.
'und i thu .... .......9:30 a.m.
/.I.loruui' "nrship ...II a.m.
I ,,I ...r ,,,dw Bible Studyv
N 1. clIn fCues.) 7 p.m.



SZion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School ............. 0 an
NMoming PraiwWs slip.. 11 ant.
ist anThllild SInWay
evening w ship at 6p l.n
S prayerr Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.n.
7r l Trunsr A lun.4 AIhle fr SIn a
bonung W orshp. Call 305.-8613960.
\mSmEmanErlSB5


S New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
SWorship servicc.......... I 15 a.m.
u'llsdurs Bible Cla ....... 7 p n.
4th Sunlay Evening Wolshl p ..6 p m


S93"1 Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93" Street
305-836-0942
Ordner of Services
30 am Eatdy Mtoring Warship
a t ain. ..Monitg Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd Sunday ........6 pm
Iy idulay Bible Study. 7 p
wrbltsiv: abc.tX,



Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
30 www.5- mitennmworshiltr.org5
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


U


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Church ScIool: 8 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor Noon Day Bible Study
Bible lkstitute, 6:30 pnm.
Mid.weak Worship 7:30 p.m.


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12' Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Eauly Wgotlup ..................7 a.m.
Sunday School........... 9a.m.
WhB ..........1..... .......15 a.m.
Wo hi ............. I am.
Ml.sson and Bible Class
Tuesday ..........6:30pan,
Yonuthd MeeingCoir0 rehearsal
Monday ..................... 6:30 p.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'1 Street
305-8358280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
SEady Momring Wrship 7:30 am.
S Su. Church School 9:30 a.m.
.- I Mlorning Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
TIes. before the 1 st Sun.....7 pm.
rMid-week Worship



SLiberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order ofServces:
Sunday Morning..........8 a&m.
S miui.v School.............l0 a.m.
SUIKtiv Evening ............:6 p.m.
|il,-l rxeetlene .......7:30pm
'T'c Bible Class.............. 30 p.m.
Thurs Fellowship......... 0 am,
Ist Sun. Song Practice ..6 p.m.



/ St. Mark Missionary '
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
30S-691-8861


I


Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and It a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m......... Sunday School
Tunesday...... pm. Bible Study
S p.m........Prayer Meeting
Monday. Wednesday, Fnriday-
12 p.m...... Day Prayer


-i


Baptist Church Ministries
2171 N.W. 56th Street 13650 N.E. 10'' Avenue
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474 305-899-7224
Order of Services: Order of Services:
SIu a School..........9:45 a; I early Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m
S\tsl ........ llal. Su y Sdioo ................930 a.m.
Pl i[e Slty "unlt iy .<_30b pin MnBnp l gl' li. 1 ;un
Yo ith hiristry Mm--kbl. Sntr tly L'vening Service 6pm.
6 ipin. n' e Tay Ti ayer\ etingi ..m.30 Im.
'WeVesday Bible saidx...7"30 pm.
"Not Justl a Chlurchl Buil a ovenL"


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Servicce
Enaly Motming Worship.7:30a.n.
Sunday School ..........:30.m.
S Mominig Worship .....11 aim.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Slidy ..................8 pm.


Bible Teaching Seminar-
8620 N.W. 17th Ave.
Mimni, FL. 33147
954-735-9393

S ChOrder of Services:
Sunday iip........ 2:45 pm.
live snacls after service
Return tnrtsxmration available


/Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King,.Jr. Blvd.










t"f Brownsville -
Church of Christ
4561 N.W, 33rd Court
305-75934-4850226 Fax: 305-759-0528& Messages







305-634-6604
Order of Servites
Mhon thirui ri. Noon Day Prayer
Sund31'ay Wosi. .i i, ..i
Sunday School.......9:30 am.



/ Brownsville
Church of Christ

305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Serhi es

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30-r.(,44850 "5-91-69m


P Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study .............9 a.m. Mornin Worship ............. 10 a.m. -
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 am. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19,21, 22, 23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.pembrokeparkchhrchofchrist.conm Email: pembrokeparkcoc @bellsouth.net


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The Miami Times





Heath


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


Honors employees for outstanding achievement


t


The award-winning Jackson North Medical Center Med-Surg Unit team includes Sandy Sears,
chief administrative officer, Jackson North Medical Center; Heidi Utech, R.N., associate director
of nursing; Jean Earle, patient care technician;Tracilyn Urruela, associate chief of Rehab Services;
and Dorothy Fleming, R.N. They are seen in the Diagnostic Treatment Center prior to the Public
Health Trust Board of Trustees meeting in October. Photo courtesy of Jackson Health System


Members of the Jackson Heath System's award-winning Radiology Department include Yamilet
Lopez, ER/Trauma Radiology supervisor; Tometra Meadows, program manger of the School of
Radiology; and Alexis Cardona, supervisor of the MRI Department,They are seen in the Diagnostic
Treatment Center prior to the Public Health Trust Board of Trustee meeting in November.
Photo courtesy of Jackson Health System


Miami Times Staff Report

The Jackson Health Sys-
tem has handed out its latest
batch of monthly awards to
employees and departments
that best exemplify the public
health network's values of ser-
vice excellence.
Marvin O'Quinn, president/
CEO, and Ernesto de la F6,
chairman, Public Health Trust
Board of Trustees, presented
the awards during meetings of


the board.
One individual and a team
were recognized for healthcare
excellence in October, two em-
ployees were honored for No-
vember and an employee and
a team were recognized for De-
cember.
The winners are selected
from among the. Jackson
Health System's 11,500 em-
ployees.
For October, the Jackson
North Medical Center Med-


Surg Unit took the honors for
Service Excellence and Qual-
ity. A patient nominated the
unit, citing compassion, ser-
vice excellence and quality.
The patient, who was not
identified, said she started to
receive excellent care as soon
as she arrived at the unit for
treatment of a sickle cell crisis.
She said she was "greeted with
a smile and warmth that filled
the room," by her nurse, the
rest of the nursing staff, nurs-


ing assistants, charge nurse,
physical therapist, dietitian
and even the environmental
service representative.
"The staff was so warm and
loving; they took their time to
see about me even when they
were busy," the patient said,
according to a release from
Jackson. "They took time to
give me my medicine, bring
me food, make my bed and
clean my floor. They introduce
themselves, explained to me


very calmly with a smile what
was going on with me and
what medicine they were giv-
ing me."
For December, members
of the Radiology Department
at Jackson Memorial Hospi-
tal won recognition: Tometra
Meadows, program manger of
the School of Radiology; Yami-
let Lopez, ER/Trauma Radi-
ology supervisor; and Alexis
Cardona, supervisor of the
MRI Department.


They were recognized for ser-
vice excellence and quality by
a Jackson Health System em-
ployee after being nominated
for their efforts coordinating
activities for the entire Radiol-
ogy Department to mark Imag-
ing Week.
Despite a "limited" budget,
the trio packed the week with
activities, culminating in a
party at the cafeteria featur-
ing prizes, food and entertain-
ment.


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Florida A&M University President James H. Ammons, second from right, holds one of the defibrillators that
FAMU is installing on campus. Others at a press conference announcing the coming of the equipment are, from
left, Errick Farmer, Office for Academic Affairs; Cynthia Hughes Harris, Provost; Michael Castleman, Cardiac
Science;Jorge Olaves, Division of Health, PE and Recreation; Mary Simmons, School of Allied Health; and Helen
Michel, director of health and safety service, American Red Cross. -Photo courtesy of FAMU


FAMU installs 114 defibrillators


in 70 buildings around campus


Miami Times Staff Report

TALLAHASSEE Florida
A&M University announced it
has installed 114 defibrillators
to serve its nearly 12,000 stu-
dents and 3,000 employees.
University officials said the
installation in the 70 build-
ings across the campus makes
FAMU a leader nationwide in
the number of devices in place
at a single college campus to
treat victims of cardiac arrest.
"As women all over this coun-
try join forces tomorrow with
the American Red' Cross to bring
attention to the fight against
heart disease through National
Wear Red Day, we are confident


in knowing FAMU has launched
an initiative that has the poten-
tial to save lives," FAMU Presi-
dent James H. Ammons said in
a statement.
"Our thinking was to be ef-
fective. Students, faculty and
staff must have easy access to
a defibrillator wherever they are
on campus. That is the situa-
tion that we have now created:
a defibrillator in every occupied
campus building," Ammons
said.
According to the FAMU state-
ment, research shows that early
defibrillation is critical in sud-
den cardiac arrest: For every
minute without defibrillation,
the odds of survival drop seven


to 10 percent.
Cynthia Hughes Harris, FA-
MU's provost and vice president
for Academic Affairs, said it was
also important to have person-
nel trained to use the devices.
"If we are forced to use them,
that means an unfortunate cri-
sis has occurred," said Harris.
"The true objective is to create a
campus climate that focuses on
our own health and the health
of our hearts, a campus climate
that is focused on prevention
through healthy lifestyles and
behaviors."
The installation of the defi-
brillators marked the start of a
campus-wide initiative to
Please turn to FAMU 14B


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IAR THF MIAMI TIMF. FFRRlHARY 11-17.9L 2I9


Edward Cohen, local activist, loses battle with cancer


Miami Times Staff Report

Edward Joseph Cohen, a
technical writer, former teach-
er and columnist for The Mi-
ami Times, died on Feb. 6 after
losing a battle with cancer. He
was 63.
Cohen, a Miami native, was
son of Samuel OTanner Cohen
and Althea Elizabeth Day.
He graduated from Mays
High School in 1964 and at-
tended Florida A&M Universi-


ty, where he graduated in 1968
the first from this area to get
a degree in Physics. He was a
member of the FAMU Marching
100 Band.
After graduation, Cohen en-
listed in the U.S. Air Force as a
Communications Officer, rising
to the rank of captain.
Pursuing a career in the civil-
ian sector, he became a techni-
cal writer with defense contrac-
tor Northrop Grumman, writ-
ing and proofreading technical


manuals while living in New
York.
On a trip to Miami to visit
family, Cohen met the woman
who would become the love of
his life, Linda Mchenry, a Mi-
ami-Dade police officer. They
married after knowing each
other three months and their
marriage lasted 22 years.
Cohen moved back to Miami,
where he became an educator,
following in the footsteps of his
parents. He taught at several


schools, including a school for
expectant mothers and a mag-
net high school. Meanwhile, he
continued to write, producing
a small music newsletter, the
Jazz Rag.
He had a strong desire to pro-
duce a newspaper that would
be a champion for downtrodden
people of south Florida, bring-
ing to light citizen complaints
against city and county govern-
ment. He went on to produce
The South Florida Brick.


Cohen also was a columnist
for The Miami Times, express-
ing strong opinions on what he
saw as persistent discrimina-
tion against Blacks.
Cohen and his wife retired to
Lakeland.
Besides his wife, he is sur-
vived by his step-son and
wife, Vincent and Nicole Jack-
son; daughter, Lydina Nunn;
grandsons Davon and Edward
Charles Nunn; sister, Lajuana
Cohen; nephews, Johjuan Co-


hen-Withers and Khori Cohen-
Welch; nieces, Charlotte Ann
Hayes and Linda Hayes Dailey;
and many other relatives. His
brother Samuel Cohen Jr. pre-
ceded him in death.
Viewing will be from 4 to 8
p.m. Friday, Feb. 13, at Bran-
am Funeral Home, 809 North
Krome Ave Homestead .The
funeral will be at 10 a.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 14, at AM Cohen
Temple, 1747 NW Third Ave.,
Miami.


Embrace program is seeking girls for Little Miss Princess pageant


Miami Times Staff Report

Participants are being
sought for the new Little
Miss Princess Pageant for
girls in three age categories:
Princess Daisies, 4 to 6 years
old; 7-9 Princess Lilies, 7-9;
and Princess Sun Flowers,
10-12.
The pageant is intended to
be a non-competitive event
"focusing on sisterhood and
friendship," according to
Velma Lawrence, executive
director of the Embrace Girls


Foundation which is spon-
soring the show.
Prizes will include scholar-
ship awards and a meet-and-
greet opportunity with teen
actress Keke Palmer, star of
Nickelodeon Channel's True
Jackson, VP television show.
"Our objective is to
reach girls throughout Palm
Beach, Miami-Dade and Bro-
ward counties early on in
their social-developmental
years to promote positive
self-esteem and self-image,
embrace a sense of self-mas-


tery and to encourage each A series of events is being
contestant to live a healthy planned leading up to the
lifestyle, serve her commu- pageant, including a work-

'Our objective is to reach girls early on in their social-devel-
opmental years to promote positive self-esteem and self-im-
age, embrace a sense of self-mastery and to encourage each
contestant to live a healthy lifestyle.'
-Velma Lawrence
Embrace Director


nity and work collaborative-
ly to build more meaning-
ful mentoring relationships
thus, embracing their natu-
ral beauty," Lawrence said.


shop and luncheon where
contestants will hear profes-.
sionals speak on topics deal-
ing with Internet safety, fi-
nance, education, and health


and fitness.
They will also take part in
a course on beauty, a Day of
Fun at an amusement park
and a Community Service
Day.
Also being planned is a
Princess Parade at the Mi-
ami-Dade County Youth Fair
and Exhibition site in west
Miami-Dade and a Royal
Grand Tea Party where they
will get tips for the pageant.
Open registration for the
pageant will take place from
5:30 to 8 p.m. this Wednes-


day, Feb. 11, at Boomer's,
1700 NW First St., Dania
Beach. Those who cannot at-
tend will be able to enter on
line at www.littlemissprin-
cesspageant.org.
Deadline to submit appli-
cations is Tuesday, Feb. 17
and applicants will be noti-
fied on Friday, Feb. 20, about
acceptance. A welcome meet-
ing will be held on Sunday,
Feb. 22.
The pageant will be held on
May 30th at the North Miami
Beach Performing Arts Theater.


Applications being taken from residents needing light bill help


Miami Times Staff Report

The Miami-Dade Commu-
nity Action Agency's Low In-
come Home Energy Assistance
Program is taking applications
from low-income income eligible
residents who need help paying
their electricity or gas bills.
The assistance is provided in
the form of credit towards the
bill. To be eligible, an appli-
cant's income must not exceed
150 percent of the poverty in-
come guideline and assistance
is offered on a first come-first
served basis, twice annually,
during winter and summer.
Application may be made in


person at CAA Service Centers
Monday through Fridays. Ap-
plication forms may also be
'downloaded from the county's
website, www.miamidade.gov/
caa/liheap.asp.
The CAA centers are:
Accion Service Center
858 W. Flagler St.
305-547-4892
Culmer Service Center
1600 NW Third Ave.
305- 438-4161
Edison Service Center
150 NW 79th St.
305-756-4147
Florida City/Homestead
Service Center
1600 NW Sixth Ct.


305-247-2068
* Frankie Shannon Rolle
Service Center
3750 S. Dixie Hwy
305-446-3311
* Goulds Service Center
21300 SW 122nd Ave.
305- 233-2121
* Hialeah Service Center
300 E. First Ave.
305-885-7514
* Joseph Caleb Service
Center, 3rd Floor
5400 NW 22nd Ave.
305-636-2200
* Miami Gardens
Service Center
Room 102
16405 NW 25th Ave.


305-623-6500
Perrine Service Center
17801 Homestead Ave.
305- 254-5804
South Beach Service
Center
833 Sixth St.
305-672-1705
Sweetwater Service
Center
250 SW 114th Ave.
305-207-5377
Wynwood Service Center
2905 NW Second Ave.
305-438-8614.
For more information on the
LIHEAP program or other pro-
grams available through CAA,
call 786- 469-4600.


University aims for Heart Safe Campus Community


FAMU
continued from 13B

improve the, overall health of
students, faculty and staff on
campus through a "Heart Safe
Campus Community Initiative,"
the FAMU statement said.
The project involves using
health as a means of strength-
ening the FAMU community.


The campaign will also focus
on proper screening, such as
blood pressure test because
high blood pressure can be an
indicator for cardiac arrest.
"Through these initiatives
and campaigns, we will become
a Heart Safe Campus Commu-
nity," said Harris. "As proud as
we are to have the security of
defibrillators on our campus,


we will be more proud that we
will never have to use them."
The university will begin to
offer training classes in using
the defibrillators this week,
along with CPR training cam-
pus-wide.
FAMU Police and parking
services vehicles also have
defibrillators. In addition, the
university has installed defi-


brillators at the College of Law
and plans are underway to in-
stall them at the Panama City
campus.
SThis project was supported
by a $1.5 million grant the uni-
versity received in 2003 from
the Health Resources and Ser-
vices Administration under the
U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services.


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Congratulations!

-Westview Baptist Church
will be installing its new pas-
tor, Rev. Antwane D. Lenoir,
Sr.
Service will be held Feb. 15,
4 pm at the church, which is
located on 13301 N.W. 24th
Avenue, Miami, FL, 33167.
Officiating this service, will
be Moderator Alphonso Jack-
son of the Second Baptist
Chuch. All are welcome to at-
tend.


Kev. Antwane U. Lenoir, r.


Bishop birthday celebration and

banquet at New Changing Life
New Changing Life Deliver-
ance Church, located at 6942
N.W. 15 Avenue, Miami, Flor-
ida, joyfully invites you to join
us as we celebrate Bishop Bob-
by Wellons' birthday.
The celebration honoring
the Man of God will be held
February 17 20 beginning at
8 p.m., nightly.
Our celebration concludes
with our annual birthday ban-
quet on Saturday, February
21, 7 p.m., at The Salvation
Army, 6703 N.W. 3 Avenue.
The theme for this blessed BISHOP BOBBY WELLONS
event is 'It's Time to Live Holy.'
Come out and see God's information call 305-493-2686
goodness in action. For more or 786-316-8889.


Winter revival 2009 at New Harvest


Reverend Gregory D. Thomp-
son Jr, and New Harvest Bap-
tist Church family invites you
to its Winter Revival 2009, Feb-
ruary 16, 17 and 18 at 7 p.m.,
nightly. Revivalist Rev. Emman-
uel Whipple, Pastor Mt. Nebo
Missionary Baptist Church of


South Miami is the speaker.
The church is located at
12145 N.W. 27 Avenue, Miami,
Florida.
Come one come all!! Be re-
vived through excellent preach-
ing, teaching, praise and wor-
ship!!!


To the "ONE" I Love, Here's a message for you:
To tell you how I feel, to tell you that I'm true.

I love you now, I loved you then.
In other words, my love never ends.

You are the best, you are the one.
To make my life complete, to make my life fun.

I'm always here for you, as you will see.
I will never leave you, because you mean so much to me!

I LOVE YOU ZONIE!


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth. net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"

()I j G()"l Is 1-() Sat-A^y 1-V(HI- 1-011^lH
Wit'll III FulM^^ er'd ^scr ^^^


Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL. I
" 1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


I Call 305-633-0688 icesdFnrlorcosI


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - -- - - -- - - - - - --- - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - -


--------------- -----------~~


O .








15B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Carey Royal Ram'n
SHERRYLAN COLEMAN-HILL,
33, homemaker, died February
2 in Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Service was held. Final rites and
burial, Honduras.

NANCY EVANS, 65, home-
maker, died February 5 at home.
Service 1p.m., Wednesday in the
chapel.

ABDUL HARRON, 60, retired,
died February 9 at home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Eric S. Geog
LARRY G. MCGILL, 50, truck
driver, died February 5 in Memo-
rial Regional Hospital South. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, St. Ruth
Missionary Baptist Church, Dania
Beach, Florida .

LEO COLEMAN, 67, retired
public worker for the City of Hal-
landale Beach, died in Mt Vernon,
Georgia. Service 11a.m., Satur-
day, Mt. Zion AME Church in West
Park, Florida.

Manker
ADELL LEE, 92, died February
3 in Westchester
Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m.,
Wednesday, An-
tioch Missionary
Baptist Church
of Brownsville.


JOHN "PIMP" MARSHALL, 63,
died February 6 in Mount Sinai
Medical Center. Arrangements
are incomplete.

ROSE MARIE NORWOOD KY-
LER, 89, died February 2 in Villa
Maria Nursing Center. Final rites
and burial, Tallahassee.
Royal
HAROLD COLLEY JR., 42,
job placement
counselor, died
February 7.

9 p m. riF day
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


MELVIN COLLINS, 34, laborer
for Wal- Mart,
died February
6. Visitation 4
to 9 p.m., Fri-
day. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day, Church of
the Kingdom of
God.

MARGIE MCKINNEY, 79, retired
teacher, Miami
Carol City High
School, died
February 7.


Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, First
Baptist Church
of Bunche Park.

LEONARD BRYANT JR., 60,
officer in the U.S. Army, died Feb-
ruary 4. Final rites and burial,
Fitzgerald, Georgia.

BASIL SENIOR, 51, accountant,
died January 29. Visitation 4 to 9
p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, Calvary Chapel; Plantation.

LYN MCKENZIE, 74, house-
wife, died February 5. Visitation
4 to 9 p.m., Friday. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, St. Kevin Episco-
pal Church.

Paradise
JESTINE ELAINE JOHNSON,
49, died February 2 in Jackson
Hospital South. Service 11 a.m.;,
Saturday, Community Church of
Christ Written in Heaven.


St Fort
ANGELA FERDINAND, 67,
homemaker, died January 29 in


Memorial Hospital Pembroke.
Service was held.

LUIS FERNANDEZ, 35, care
giver, died January 27 in Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.


Jay's
JOSEPH B. NELSON, 60, la-
borer, died Feb-
ruary 4 in Unity
Health Rehabili-
tation Center.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


WAYNE CAMPBELL, 44, died
February 8 in Jackson South Com-
munity Hospital. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

JOANNE KLIMEKOSKI, 68,
housewife, died February 7 in
Jackson South Community Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
Splete.

GRANVILLE BRODERICK, 79,
laborer, died February 7. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Hadley _
DIANA THERESA MARTIN,
55, died Febru-
ary 4 at home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




GREGORY MARS JOHNSON,
61, died Feb-
ruary 5 in Vet-
eran's Hospital.
Service 3 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




Grace
DOROTHY SIMPKINS, 63,
teacher for Mi-
ami Dade Pub-
lic Schools,
died February
7 in Palmetto
Hospital. Final
rites and burial,
McRee, Geor-
gia.

EHELINE SANDS, died Febru-
ary 8 in North Shore Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.
E.A. Steven -
PERCY LEE GOINS, 88, car-
penter, died February 8 in Berna-
dett'sACLF. Service 10 a.m., Sat-
urday, Ebenezer Baptist Church,
Hallandale Beach.

CONSUELO WHITE, 30, ca-
shier, died February 6 in Broward
General Medical Center. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Bibleway Bap-
tist Church, Dania.


Genesis
MICHAEL WALKER, 52, con-
struction worker, died February
4 in Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Service noon, Saturday, Greater
St. Paul AME Church..

BEATRICE ROCK-BUTLER,
32, homemaker, died February
3 in Memorial Regional Hospital.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday, Haitian
Evangelical Church.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
JOHNNIE MAE STROZIER,
74, died Febru-
ary 2 in Mount
Sinai Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Pil-
grim Rest Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

SAMUEL H. BURROUGHS,
60, painter, died
February 6 in
Unity Health
and Rehabilita-
tion. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
St. Paul AME
Church.

DANNY MOSS, 51, laborer,


died February
4 in Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service
noon, Satur-
day, Triumph
the Church and
Kingdom of God
in Christ.


Nakia Ingraham
RAFAEL CASTRO, 42, died
February 8. Arrangements are in-
complete.

JULIANNA SINNOTT, 87, died
February 8. Arrangements are in-
complete.

SHERYL LEE FAGIN, 53, died
February 5. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Gregg L. Mason
ERNEST BANKS, Sr. 56, ware-
house super-
visor for Winn
Dixie, died
January 26 in
Jackson North
Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Marlene
Mitton (Rommel), Glorianna, An-
gie Mauricette (Jimmy) and Julia;
son, Ernest Jr.; five grandchildren;
three brothers; one sister; and a
host of other family members and
friends. Service was held.

PHILLIP JOSE DORSEY,"
AKA" HOZAY,
52, business
owner, tile/car-
pet laborer, died
February 6 in
Aventura Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: wife,
Diane; sons,
Baron (Pamella) and Andre II;
daughters, Sylvia Mungin (Brian)
and Yvonne; brothers, Lafayette
Adams (Jane), Andre (Geneva),
Kenneth (Kibra) and John (Syl-
via) and William "Sonny" ( Diane);
sisters, Gwendolyn Muhammad,
Gwendolyn Sauls (Jay) and Mar-
garet porsey- Jackson (William);
eight grandchildren; mother in law,
Sarah Redmon; and a host of oth-
er relatives and friends. Visitation
2 to 9 p.m., Friday. Memorial Trib-
ute 6 p.m., Friday. Service noon,
Saturday in the chapel. Interment:
Southern Memorial Park.

Richardson
MARGARET CLARK, 55,
homemaker,
died February
4. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.




LOUISE H. BOYKINS, 79, la-
borer, died Feb-
ruary 4. Ser-
vice 12:30 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




'BERNESTINE DOWING-
WYCHE, 45, re-
altor, died Feb-
ruary 6. Service
1 p.m., Satur-
day, St. John
Baptist Church.



CARLENE CORDELLA
BROWN,. 41,
dental assistant,
died February 1.
Service noon,
Wednesday,
February 18,
Grace Church
of the Firstborn.

CARLENE EVA STRONG, 97,
domestic work-
er, died Febru-
ary 8. View-
ing 1 to 7 p.m.,
Thursday in the
chapel.




ANDRE TRA-
VON ROBIN-
SON, 25, long-
shoreman, died
February 7. Ar-


rangements are
incomplete.

JOIN T HE
by becoming a member of our
CALL 305-694-6210


Range
CLARENCE MILLS, 68, retired
truck driver,
died February
6. Survivors
include: wife,
Frankie Mae;
mother, Lou-
ise; sons, Rich-
ard R., Willie
Lee, Gregory
Davis, and Tyrone Taylor; daugh-
ter, Sabrina Davis; four sisters,
Cassie Mae Thaggard, Amy Dean
(George), Mary Francis, Gayle
Sirims, Naomi Pierce; brother,
Royce Smith; many grandchildren,
nieces, nephews and other rela-
tives and friends. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Greater Israel Primitive
Baptist Church.

JAMES BOWE, 80, retired mail
carrier, died
February 6.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Dor-
othy Mae Pitts;
daughter, Carol
Claridy, and
Janice; sons,
Henry T. Brown;
sister, Juanita Kemp; nieces, Cyn-
thia Ferguson and Queen Tericita
Bowden; a host of nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and friends.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday Valley
Grove Missionary Baptist Church.

EVA DELL SCALES, 76, su-
pervisor for
Goodwill Inc.,
died February
6. Survivors in-
clude: son, An-
dre; daughter,
Latasha; neph-
ew, Charles Fa-
bian; a host of
other relatives and friends. Service
6 p.m.,Thursday, New Mt. Moriah
Missionary Baptist Church.


MAE VIVIAN JOHNSON, 86,
homemaker,
died February
5. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Constance
Petty, Edna
(Pepper) Mae
and Betty Grif-
fin; brothers,
Frank Ash, Fred Ash and Kenneth
Ash; sisters, Ida Symonette AKA
Teddy, Eva Simmons and Cynthia
Cooper. Service 10 a.m., Satur-
day in the chapel.

PEARL BORDEN, 68, retired
baker, died February 8. Survi-
vors include; daughters, Tracey,
and Paula Arterta; son, Wallace;
sister, Ruth Webster; brother,
Marvin Koonce, Ralph Koonce,
and Robert Koonce; seven grand-
children; one great-grandson; a
host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Service 11
a.m., Thursday, February 19 in the
chapel.

WILSON LOCKETT, 84, retired
roofer, died February 6. Survivors
include: daughter, Joan Lewis;
grandchildren, great-grandchil-
,dren, a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice 3 p.m., Saturday, Glendale
Baptist Church of Brownsville.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


'c --- -

MARSHALL BURKE
09/13/1913- 02/17/06


Three years ago God called
you home a void remains that
will never be filled. Survived
by: daughters, Glenise, Jean,
Rose and a host of grandchil-
dren and great grandchildren,
very dear and special friends,
Corine, Mamie, Runette, Van
and Willie


Wright & Young
DR. MORRIS R. JOHNSON, 64,
Miami Dade Col-
lege professor,
died February 5
in North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Miami
Dade College in
the Theater Au-
ditorium.

ANTHONY LEROY FARMER,
46, laborer, died
February 1 in
Jackson Me-
morial Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
daughter, Tren-
ice; siblings,
Bertha Marshall,
Gladys, Margaretta Cooper, Laura
Ann, Rovenia, Shirley Gordon,
Robert Jr., James. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Tabor M.B Church.

CHERRYSH BRINSON, died
February 6 in Memorial Hospital
Miramar. Survivors include: par-
ents, Freddie and Shatteena. Ser-
vice was held.

Poitier
NORMA FLOWERS, 61, home-
maker, died
January 30 in
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 3 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


JAMIE GRACE WEEKS, 70,
died February 8
at home. 'Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Olivette Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


WILLIE EARL GARDNER, 29,
laborer, died
February 6 at
home. Service
11-a.m., Satur-
day, Apostolic
Revival Center.



MARVIN MCDONALD, 52,
landscaper,
died February 6
at home. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.



BRENDA MELTON, 57, operator
for Bell South,
died February
8 in Memorial
Regional Hos-
pital. Service
10:30 a.m., Sat-
urday, Fulford
United Method-
ist Church.

ERNEST MCINTYRE, 59, labor-
er, died February 2. Service was
held.



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


TORA D. SHEELY would like to
thank everyone for their many
prayers, cards, telephone calls,
food, floral arrangements, and
monetary donations.
We would also like to extend
a special thanks to: Mt. Calva-
ry Missionary Baptist Church,
Town Park Villiage #1, Jackson
North Hospital staff and Dietary
Dept., and 14th Street Moore
Grocery Store.
May God Bless Each of You,
The Doris and Akiliah Family

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


ROBERT JACOB JR wishes to
express our sincere appreciation
for your prayers, visits, cards,
phone calls, flowers, covered
dishes and other deeds of
kindness.
Specialthanks to Rev. Rogery
Adams and the congregation of
Mt. Zion AME Church, the staff
at Wright and Young Funeral
Home and to the City of Qpa
Locka officials for providing
support and services.
Sincerely, The Jacobs family

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


DEACONESS
CEOLA BELL WALKER
02/10/08 01/02/05


We miss you dearly!
Love, Your Children and
Grandchildren


Death Notice


JIMMY LEE HARRISON,
26, stocker for Costco Whole-
sale, died February 5 at home.
RUTH M. JACKSON Arrangements are incomplete.
08/22/17- 02/13/03 Services entrusted to Wright
Young Funeral Home.


We will never forget you as
we reflect on the things that
you taught us and because
your love still radiates around
us today.
The Scales, Mays, Brown
and Clifton families


Honor Your

Loved One With an

In Memoriam

In The Miami Times


r


I M MRIM9 fpiYBlRI'l )AY MMB AN S DE-i OICS OBTARE


k









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\N DESTINY


MIAMI TIMFC FFRRIIARY 11-17 70090


GUSSIE L. HORNE
02/15/35 -12/30/08
Happy Birthday! You will
always be in our hearts.
There will never be another
mother like you!
Love, Vickie and the Family.


S CHRIS QUINN
We luv u. #8 CB. Southwest Sr.
Signing Day College Purdue
Univ.


Happy Birthday and Valentine's
Day.
Love, The Carr family.


HAILE "VALENTINE" SLATER
02/14/74 12/01/93

Happy Birthday!
From The Hobes and the
entire Slater Families


VALERIE D. WILLIAMS


Happy Birthday and Valentines
We love and miss you!
The family


CHERLENE POLLObK'
Happy Valentine's!

Our hugs and kisses goes out
to you Mama!


"JAY"
02/05/80- 02/08/06
Happy Valentines!


We miss you, showing much
love on this day.


MARION


AND CATHERINE FINCH


Happy Birthday Grandad!
Words can't express how much
we miss both of you!
Love, The Finch, Davis, and Evans Families


Happy Valentine Day!
ANNIE B. JOYNER
12/13/1941 1/27/09
Home going Celebration Febru-
ary 5th, in Madison, FL.
We love you and miss you.
The Everett and Bevel Family.


CLINTON DUPREE
07/21/76 02/14/08


I miss you so much Lil Bro!
Love always, Nikki


I ..... I -I


Happy Birthday
and
Happy Valentines!

RONNIE ROGERS
02/10/58- 03/14/08

We miss you and our
hearts are still broken
from your absent!
Love you, Cory,
Mom and family.


Death Notice


DOROTHY WALTER
07/28/44 02/18/04


Your love and legacy
lives on in us.
Love, Olga, Linda and family


Death Notice Death Notice


ANNIE P. PEMBERTON,
77, retired, died February 9
at home. Survivors include:
husband, Robert L.; three
daughters, Patricia, Rida and
Roberta, grand and great
grandchildren, and a host of
nieces and nephews.
Viewing 4 p.m., Friday in
the chapel of Royal Funeral
Home.


WILLIAM GRIFFIN JR.
'BIG WILL' 38, DJ for WEDR
99 Jamz, died February 8,
in Mt. Sinai Medical Center.
Survivors include: daughter,
Ra'Niya; father, William
Sr; brother, Aaron (Karla).
Visitation Monday, February
16, Wright & Young Funeral
Home, 15332 NW 7 Ave. from
9 a.m. until 9 p.m. Service 11
a.m.,Tuesday, February 17,
Friendship M.B Church.


OZZIE LEE BLACK SR., 80,
retired truck driver for Harry
Rich Rug Co. died February 9.
Survivors include: wife, Jessie
Clark- Black; son, Ozzie Jr.;
two daughters, Marjorie
and Shirley Black; sister,
Gertrude Jennings; sister-in-
law, Ida M. Clark of Atlanta,
Ga.; four grandchildren;
Lashon, Jessica, Ozzie Leon,
and Keith. Service 12 noon
Monday, Zion Hope M. B.
Church. Service entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.


DAVID MITCHELL
08/25/49 -11/01/07


Your love for me is still
etched in my heart.
With all m love,your wife, Linda


Range Coconut Grove
LUCILLE ROLLE MCNEAR,
80, homemaker, died February 7
in Coral Gables
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
daughters,
Georgia Monroe
Emile, Michelle
Denise Vilme,
Lasheema Or-
tiz and Regina
Ortiz-Payne; sons, Lonnie Bethea,
Steve Roberts, Ricky Monroe and
Gary Monroe; Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Macedonia Baptist
Church.

WILLIE B. EVERETT, 72, re-
tired maintenance worker for the
University of Miami, died Febru-
ary 9 at home. Arrangements are
incomplete.

JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


DR. MORRIS JOHNSON,
64, retired Miami Dade Col-
lege professor for forty years,
died February 5 in North
Shore Medical Center.
Survivors include: aunts,
Juanita Wilson, Dorothy
Anderson; brothers, Jerome,
Lawrence, Harry and Howard;
sister, Rev. Joyce Ann Johnson
Henderson; nieces, Nashoane,
Kimberly and Hicie; Nephews,
Patrick, Roderick and Bobby,
an incredible circle of friends
including: Mashundu Mills
of Johannesburg, South Af-
rica and a wealth of students
throughout the Diaspora who
benefited from his legacy of
love and generosity.
Services entrusted to Wright
and Young Funeral Home.


Range Homestead
JIMMIE LEE MELVIN, JR., 51,
laborer, died February 6. Service
1:30 p.m., Saturday, Greater Wil-
liams Chapel F.W.B. Church.

GLORIA ANN BALLARD-
FEARON, 61, retired civil service
telephone operator, died February
4 in Homestead Hospital. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, Covenant Bap-
tist Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


CLINTON DUPREE
07/21/76 02/14/08


It's been one year since you
have been gone, but I swear it
seems like yesterday and the
pain is as if we've just lost you.
We know that you made it in
by His grace and mercy and
you are watching over us. We
love you with everything we
have on the inside and you will
never ever be forgotten. Happy
Valentines Day Sweetheart!
Love,Mom (Christine), Dad
(Fred), daughter (Clinque) and
sister (Nichole)





Honor Your


Loved One With an


In Memoriam


In The Miami Times


m-m.1i








The Miami Times



if esty es


entertainmentt
FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE
* -' ,'- .. "'


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


I M MIAMI IIMtb


History-making aviator Barrington Irving, right, poses with Horace Hord, left, and G. Eric
Knowles during the 16th annual Unity Scholarship Breakfast hosted by the 5000 Role Models
of Excellence Project on Jan. 19 at Jungle Island.


Role Models Project hands out



college awards to 53 students



during Unity Breakfast


Black male pride goes on show at

annual program saluting King Day


Miami Times Staff Report


A program geared toward
helping young men stay off the
streets and pursue higher edu-
cation has awarded its latest
batch of college scholarships to
53 graduating high school se-
niors.
The awards were presented
during the 16th annual Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Scholarship
Unity Breakfast sponsored by
the 5000 Role Models of Excel-
lence Project at Jungle Island
on Jan. 19 honoring King Day.
The ceremony also acknowl-
edged the achievement of Bar-
rington Irving, the youngest
person and the first African-
American to fly solo around the


world.
The lavish event filled with
pomp and pride showcased
some of the top Black men in
the area, most of them Role
Models who volunteer their time
to help guide the male youths
in the Project founded by state
Sen. Frederica Wilson.
Several had roles during the
Breakfast at which the inaugu-
ration of Barack Obama as 441
president was seen as a high
point for any Black male.
U.S. District Judge Donald
Graham reflected on the signifi-
cance of Obama's ascendancy
in national politics.
Judges Antonio Arzola, Eric
Hendon and William Thomas
helped their colleague Jerald


Bagley in the induction of Flor-
ida Senate President Jeff Atwa-
ter.
Atwater, in turn, saluted and
made a special presentation of
the Unsung Heroes award to
Baljean Smith and Thurman
MacNeal.
Greetings came from state
Rep. Juan C. Zapata, Florida
Commissioner of Education Eric
J. Smith, Miami-Dade Mayor
Carlos Alvarez, School Board
Chairman Solomon Stinson,
Vice-Chairman Marta Perez,
Board Member Wilbert T. Hol-
loway and Superintendent Al-
berto Carvalho.
A Unity Ceremony to pray for
peace and unity in the commu-
nity and around the world was
led by Bishop Joseph Watson,
Minister Clinton Engram and
the Rev. Carl Johnson, along
with state Rep. Luis Garcia,
Clerk of the Courts Harvey Ru-


vin and Holloway.
Horace Hord and G. Eric
Knowles served as toastmasters
at the Breakfast which opened
with a performance by the
North Miami Beach High School
Marching Band under James
Lockhart. The Call to Colors was
led by the school's JROTC un-
der Major Michael Roundtree.
This program closed with a
performance by a Junkanoo
band directed by Langston Lon-
gley.
"The program extends thanks
to the numerous organizations,
religious institutions, schools,
elected officials and role models
who attended the event," Fred-
erica Wilson said in a state-
ment.
"The Unity Scholarship
Breakfast brought our multi-
cultural and multi-ethnic com-
munity together to pay homage
Please turn to AWARDS 3C


State Sen. Frederica Wilson and her son Paul stand in front
of a portrait of President Barack Obama during the 16th
annual Unity Scholarship Breakfast hosted by the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence Project on Jan. 19 at Jungle Island.
The senator is founder of the Project.


These students were among several who attended the 16th annual Unity Scholarship Break-
fast hosted by the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project on Jan. 19 at Jungle Island.
-Photo courtesy of 5000 Role Models


ir k Al A A, Al "i Art,









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


"", a, "'AI .
By D. Rihar Strcha


Artlyn Johnson, daughter of
Art and Hyacinth Johnson. be-
gan buildingupa"fund olknowl-
edge" at Miami North\western
High and her educational quest
took her to Tuskegee University,
where she pursued her interest
in architecture, graduated and
began working in Atlanta and,
subsequently, became a fash-
ion designer and merchandiser
in San Francisco -- as well as
a member of the KaUa Tuahine
Polynesian Dance Company
competing in Hawaii, New Zea-
land and Tahiti.
Meanwhile, Tae Kim was
born to Mr. and Mrs. Sang-Hy-
on Kim and brought to America
at age 10. He spent his forma-
tive years in upstate New York,
where his parents still live and
operate a family-owned busi-
ness in clothing and design.
Tae graduated from a school
in upstate New York and be-
came an account executive for
Setanta Sports, which took him
to San Francisco. There he met
Artlyn through a mutual friend
and a strong bond developed.
Artlyn sister, Wilma "Cook-
ie" Strong, said the friend-
ship deepened over five years,
until the question was asked,


I 1


"What are \ou '*'-
waiting for. Tae?".
He responded. "1
am waiting until
Barack Obama is
elected president". That was the
cue for Cookie, Art an Hyacinth,
godparents Petro and Winifred
Beacham, and Dr. Art and Mary
Woodard to begin planning for
one of Miami's biggest weddings
that took place Jan. 17, with
classmate Fr. Kenneth C. Major
officiating, at the Church of the
Incarnation.
The wedding planners put to-
gether The Wedding Bell News/
Special Commemorative Issue to
gather and disseminate informa-
tion on matters such as the lo-
cations of wedding participants,
rehearsals, bridal registry stores,
telephone contacts, directions
around the city, and location of
the church and of the parents'
home.
More than 400 people filled the
church as the Rev. Fred W. Fleis-
cher, organist, played pre-nup-
tial music such as The Prayer,
This Day, and 'For Always and
the traditional Wedding March.
The main bridal party entered,
including the parents of the cou-
ple, as well as the Beachams and


the Woodards.
The mothers were given two
vessels of sand to be placed on
the altar to symbolize the coming
joining of the two families; at the.
end of the ceremony, the sand
was poured into a single bottle.
Other members of the bridal
party included "Cookie" Strong,
of Powder Springs, Ga., matron
of honor; Towan Kim, Berkeley,
Calif., best man; Hannah Brown,
Leeah Mena and Maya Missoud-


r ipr


Artlyn Johnson and Tae Kim
were married at the Church of
the Incarnation on Jan. 17.

en, flower girls; hostesses Emma
Burnside, Mara Burnside and
Kyle Chan, of San Francisco,
Carol Deliford, Kandance John-
son and Sarita Lynn Johnson,


Lr Pll&


Congratulations to Joyce
Rolle-WiUiams. who wrote the
must-see book Chns's Stojr -A
Family i Votg Secret Re'ealed.
The book is about a boy's quest
to discover how the president
is elected. He learns about the
electoral process and, as the
name says, the family's voting
secret.


Jeffrey Swilley, now living in
Maryland, returned last week
on a business trip to Key West.


Ai:I~~~j~f


While in the area,
he visited his Mom
and Dad. Leona ..
and Jack Swil-
ley, and his sister,
Leah Watts, and other family
members.

********
The Theodore R. Gibson
Chapter of the Union of Black
Episcopalians cordially invites
you to the annual Absalom
Jones Observance and Lun-
cheon, Saturday, Feb. .14, at


Saint Agnes Episcopal Church.
The whole event starts at 10
a.m. and luncheon and a fash-
ion show will be in Blackett
Hall following worship services.
Interested persons should con-
tact Flora Brown, Cupidine
Davis Dean, Janelle Hall, Ar-
nett Hepburn, Carolyn Mond
or Fr. Richard Marquess-Bar-
ry.


That Saint Agnes cruise to
Nassau on the Carnival Imagi-
nation was handled by One
World Cruises and Travel. And,
besides those listed previously
the happy band also included
Madeline Atwell, Deborah
Clarke-Jones, Gretchen Lou-


ise Cleare, Cobboril Davis,
Joyce Hepburn, Mary Hilton,
Chanel Jackson, Paulette
Johnson, Rosa Mae Johnson,
Draghwon Kelly, Joyce Kelly,
Cornelius Levarity, Jacque-
line Livingston,
Bonita Jones Peabody.
Also, Christine McKinney,
Margaret Moncur, Robin
Moncur, Agnes Morton, Glad-
ys Moss, Calvina Parks, Bar-
bara Patterson, Lula Roberts,
Samuel Rolle,
Sheila Rolle. Sylvia Rolle,
Ronal Sands, Sylvia Sands,
Audrey Strachan, Dorothy
Thompson, Harriet Thomas,
Netter Wallace and Phillip
Wallace.


Get-well wishes go out to
Gladys Braynon, Louise H.
Cleare, Elsie Douglas, Inez
M. Johnson, Doris McKinney-
Pittman, Elestine McKinney-
Allen, Jean Morley, Doreatha
Payne, Herbert Rhodes Jr.
and Carmetta C. Russell.

********
Dr. James A. Johnson was
funeralized from Mount Zion
Baptist Church Jan. 31 and
laid to rest in City Cemetery
last Tuesday. ... Inez Turner-
Haley, former home economics
teacher and Booker T. Wash-
ington High and wife of the late
William "Moon" Haley, died in
Tallahassee and was laid to


rest there. Sympathy from all
Washingtonians.

********
Happy Valentine's Day!
This is the month of love. No
matter what happens or how
bad you feel today, life goes
on and will be better tomor-
row. People love a warm hug or
just a friendly pat on the back.
People will forget what you did
most times but they will never
forget how you made them feel.
I've learned that whenever I
decide something with an open
heart, I usually make the right
decisions for myself.
My deepest love to all my
readers. I love you all. Have a
love-filled day on Feb. 14.


Rapper Corey Ferguson, better known as Suthun Boy, center, who plays the role of Koke, waits for the ar-
rival of the police in a scene from 'Bloodline.'


Hopes high for 'Bloodline' sequel


to have impact on gun violence


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Kenny Bodie and Ishmael Rolle
are disturbed by what they see as
a dramatic increase in gun Kio-
lence and they are hoping to play
a part in reducing such crimes.
"If we don't put our foot down,
we're going to lose more lives,"
said Bodie. "It's worse than it's
ever been. 'We're scared to go
to the grocery store because we
might die getting a loaf of bread."
For Bodie and Rolle, the best
way of curbing gun violence is
education and they hope a new
film, Bloodline 2, will call atten-
tion to its consequences.
The film is planned as a sequel
to Bloodline, released in 2005, in
which two brothers, separated
while young, grow up to discover
they are on opposite sides of the
law. The film was rated "R" and
some critics said it was too vio-
lent.
Rolle was an actor in Bloodline
and will return for the sequel.
Bodie says he believes in the proj-


ect and is promoting it for free.
Violent films do not necessarily
glamorize violence but such films
have a responsibility to show the
consequences, Bodie says.
"This movie here is a positive
movie that shows young people
that this is not the road to take,"
Bodie said about Bloodline. They
know that we've been there and
done that. It says, 'We used to be
like this, but we're not anymore,'

"We're trying to say, 'Don't go
back, go forward; going to college
and being productive is what's in
now,' added Rolle, who will play
a character named "Smoke" in
the sequel.
Bodie, 33 and Rolle, 35, Miami
natives, have lost friends to gun
violence.
"That's why we came together
and did this movie with the city
of Miami police department," said
Rolle.
Three months ago, Bodie said,
a close friend was shot and left
paralyzed; the case remains un-
der investigation.


"I have a son, he's 8, and I
don't want him paralyzed," said
Bodie.
Bloodline 2, the original, is set
in Miami and will feature local
and actors and other personnel..
"We're trying to focus on local
engineers, producers, photogra-
phers, artists -- anything that has
anything to do with film," Bodie
said. "We want to feed from our
own community instead of going
to the other places."
Rapper and actor Corey Fer-
guson, better known as "Suthun
Boy," will reprise his 2005 role as
"Koke." Local comic Larry Dogg
also has a role in the film.
The movie will begin filming in
July and will wrap in the first
quarter of 2010. The filmmakers
are still looking for actors and ex-
tras. Interested persons should
log on to http://www.iconzon-
line.com.
The film's production compa-
ny, Iconz Music and Films, es-
tablished in 1993, and based in
Miami, produced the first Blood-
line.


.. .. .a

.... .. .... : c... .. . . ,
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flalottery.com
2009 nI ,'ionda lo,,'r


-- I


of Orlando, Mona Madry, of Vic-
torville, Calif., and Nelle Strong
of Powder Springs.
Ushers were Lloyd Bethel,
Otto Burnside, Evan Strong,
Lt. Col. Noah K. Strong, of Pow-
der Springs, and members of the
KaUa Tuahine Dance Company:
Meridith Aki, of Berkeley; Ke-
hinde Apara, of Oakland, Calif.;
Melanie Chan, of San Francisco;
and Gabrielle Soria, of Oakland.
Following the ceremony, an
opulent reception was held at the
Eden Roc Hotel and Spa where a
white Rolls Royce took the bride
and groom and two Hummer lim-
ousines took the bridal party. A
post-wedding highpoint was the
plan by the families to
attend the inauguration
of President Obama.
The newlyweds gave
special thanks to Cheryl
Mizell, mistress of cer-
emonies; Carl Burnside,
pianist; Nakele Obleton,
violinist; Tracey Harris,
soloist; and Carmen D. TAY
Jackson.


As Opa-locka Mayor Josqph L.
Kelley listened to the inaugura-
tion speech of President Obama,
on Jan. 20, he became motivated
by what he heard as he prepared
to deliver his State of the City
address on Jan. 26.
For that event, City Clerk
Deborah Sheffield Irby and
her staff arranged for a first-


class banquet, with Mary Alice
Brown hosting the evening and
introducing the elected officials,
including Kelley, Vice Mayor
Myra Taylor and Commission-
ers Timothy Holmes, Dorothy
Johnson and Rose Tydus, as
well as Interim City Manager
Bryan K. Finnie and City Attor-
ney Burnadette Norris-Weeks.
Irby took to the mike and rec-
ognized Mayor Shirley Gibson
of Miami Gardens and Council-
men Oliver Gilbert and Melvin
Bratton, as well as community
activist Johnnie M. Green and
Virginia Tresvant, widow of the
first Black mayor of Opa-locka.
Catering services weie provid-
ed by Berry's Fine Food
Catering and its efficient
staff of young people. The
Psi Phi Band entertained
with the "oldie goldies"
especially for the senior
citizens and then struck
up "Hail To The Chief'
after Brown delivered a
.OR lengthy introduction of
Kelley.


Mary Dunn, president, and T.
Eilene Martin-Major, director,
Men of Tomorrow, and the mem-
bership announced the officers
for 2009 last Thursday at the
group's regular meeting at the
Joseph Caleb Center.
The officers 'are Christopher
Scarlett, president; Gregory
George, vice-president; Alex


Diaz and Jeremy Dixon, record-
ers; and Johnathan Ragoo,
chaplain
Other officers are Cora Solo-
mon Johnson, historian; Debo-
rah Carter, first vice-president;
Stephenia Willis, secretary;
Vera Purcell, corresponding
secretary; Constance Carter, fi-
nancial secretary; Gloria Claus-
en, chairwoman, and Kameelah
Brown, assistant chairwoman,
Black History committee.
The parent officers are Cathy
Lewis, president; Edward Mur-
ray, vice-president; Gina White,
secretary; Tracey Scarlett, as-
sistant secretary; and Marlene
George, treasurer.
Martin-Major gave an update
on auditioning for the talent show,
Feb.19, the essay competition,
with the topic, "How Participating
in Men of Tomorrow will Enhance
My Future Endeavors," and wor-
ship service at the Church of the
Incarnation.

*********
The 347 members of the
Bethune-Cookman University
Marching Band, under Dono-
von Wells, band director, gave
a stellar performance at the Su-
per Bowl 43 in Tampa on Feb.
1. They thrilled the crowd in
the pre-game performance and
left the field smoking for Bruce
SSpringsteen's half-time extrava-
ganza. Joining the band were 24
flag-bearers and 14 carat danc-
ers.


I










3C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Volunteers spruce up Olinda, build a special bench to mark King Day


Miami Times Staff Report

Olinda Elementary School now
has a Seat For Social Justice.
It is just a bench but one with
a difference, created by volun-
teers arid placed in an area where
many students pass by through-
out the day.
The bench is painted light blue
and has two child handprints on
each end. On the rear is a quote
from Martin Luther King Jr.: "Ev-
eryone is great, Because every-
one can serve."
The bench is used to commem-
orate King Day and to underline
his call to service.
And its creation resulted from
a response to that call, when


volunteers, led by the non-profit
Christian-centered Hosanna
Community Foundation, under-
took the Olinda Beautification
Project on Jan. 17, two days be-
fore the observance of King Day.
The organizers coupled vol-
unteerism with environmental
awareness, spending a few hours
that chilly Saturday morning at
the school, 5536 NW 21" Ave.,
where they were welcomed by
Principal Adrian Montes.
"We strongly believe that this
project will serve to strengthen
the school's continuous effort of
introducing and developing pos-
itive character education skills
among our students," Montes
said in a statement welcoming


Volunteers plant a tree at Olinda Elementary during King Day.


the project.
By the time it was over, they
had planted 20 trees alongside
the rear wall and others at other
locations on the campus, paint-
ed two wall murals and mulched
several trees.
It was all part of the Olinda
Beautification Project.
Some volunteers cleared rub-
bish from the school grounds,
raked up leaves and found oth-
er tasks to do before lunch.
After lunch, students were led
to the Art building to discuss
their involvement in the project
and its impact on their school
and community, as well as the
importance of conserving the
environment.


The discussions were led by
STEP Kids (Student Empow-
erment Project) and included
some 200 students aged 13 and
up, many of whom signed up
for the project for community
service hours credit.
Hosanna Community Founda-
tion, a service of Hosanna Com-
munity Baptist Church, 2171
NW 56th St., the Rev. Charles
Dinkins, pastor, got help for
the project from sources that
included the Public Works De-
partment, Gorgy/All American
Recycling, Plants capes Inc.,
Gardner's Way, the city of Mi-
ami, STEP Kids, teachers from
Olinda Elementary and Service
For Peace.


Opa-locka City Commissioner Dorothy "Dottie" Johnson takes time for a photo with visiting
members of the Florida A&M University Marching 100 band who gave a surprise performance
on Jan. 14 for fourth and fifth-graders at Nathan B.Young Elementary preparing to take the


-Photo courtesy of City of Opa-locka


Music a way to draw children's attention


FAMU
continued from 1C

and education is the key to that
development. We must use all
methods available to gain the
awareness and respect of our
children and one way to cap-
ture their attention is by reach-
ing into areas where they are
drawn... like music," Johnson
said.
Students and administrators
alike were tapping to the sounds
of the Marching 100, who, for
this performance, brought only
10 percussionists from the
450-member band. "When it
was originally formed, they were
called the Marching 100 and that
name stuck to become interna-


tionally recognizable," said head
Drum Major Michael Scott.
Commissioner 'told the stu-
dents: "This was just a sample,
if you liked what you saw and
heard, imagine what the full ex-
perience will be like when you
graduate from high school and
attend Florida A&M University."
According to Nathan B.
Young's lead teacher Raman
Raiford, music could indeed
motivate students "to perform
on a comfortable level."
"We thought this would be an
excellent way to kick-off 'crunch
time,"' Raiford said, referring to
a study program used as mo-
tivation for FCAT assessment
test. "This spontaneous visit is
a treat for students who do bet-


ter in writing, math and science
'when exposed early to music;
as well, it enhances their overall
performance and appreciation
for music."
It seemed to be working.
Fourth-grader Donovan San-
tiago, 10, told lead drum major
Scott after the performance that
he was now thinking about join-
ing the school band "because
this was an interesting experi-
ence, and maybe one day I can
fall into your steps."
Briana McCray, 11, who will
head to middle school next
year, the visit was a welcome
break from the "violence, shoot-
ings ruining innocent lives" be
cause of the positive image it
portrayed.


1500 students have received scholarships


AWARDS
continued from 1C

to those who have broken barri-
ers in order to make this world a
better place," Wilson said.
The program has awarded col-
lege money to some 1,500 stu-
dents, valued at some $5 million,
since it started doing so in 1994,
the year after it was started, ac-
cording to a Role Models Project
spokeswoman.
Miami High School, with 21
awardees, topped the list of
schools whose students received
the scholarships. They are:
Booker T. Washington High:
Mario Roberts
Coral Reef: Stanley Hardy IV
Design & Architecture: Jamel
Moss


G. Holmes Braddock: Abra-
ham Jean-Baptiste, Barry Lau-
rent, Christopher Montoya, Da-
vid Odio
Hialeah: Ryan King
*.Homestead: Malcolm Terry
MAST Academy: Yousef
Ahmed, Gonzalo Iribarne, Nico-
las Maltagliati, Seward Paul, Ri-
cardo Rendel, Bernard Selesky,
Jordan Wilson, Benny Zaragoza
Miami High: Maxwell Cart-
wright, Rafael DeLaTorre IV,
David Donaldson, Brandon Eck-
ford, Mackenly Etienne, Fritz
Fenelon, Justin Griffin, Douglas
Guerrero, Jean Hyppolite, Mat-
thew Jean-Juste, Andreu Jo-
seph, Joel Moya, Rony Remilien,
Wandy Saintilien, Mae'n Sheha-
deh, Tedy Soler, Nelson Tejeda,
Jonathan Tisdol, Joseph Urrea,


Julian Vasquez, Christopher
White
Miami Carol City: Matthew
Williams
Miami Central: Marvens
Jean-Paul
Miami Jackson: James
Starks
Miami Northwestern: Renard
Dugue, KaRon Green, Harold
Stuart
North Miami: Gladstone Ed-
wards
North Miami Beach: Josue
Luscar
School for Applied Technol-
ogy:. Zachary Camacho, Derrick
Cortes, Omar Foster, Yasmani
Gonzalez
South Miami: Shannon Larkin,
Danny Vazquez, Mitchell Zuriar-
rain.






m o


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"C d hted Material

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 1


1-17, 2009


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


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"Copyrighted Material





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Republicans fail to force deep cuts on stimulus bill


TAX
continued from 5D

Democratic leaders
have pledged to have
legislation ready for
Obama's signature by
the end of next week.
While they concede
privately they will have
to accept some spend-
ing reductions along
the way, conservative
Republicans' failed in
their initial attempts to
force deep cuts in the
bill.
On another conten-
tious issue, the Senate
softened alabor-backed
provision requiring that
only U.S.-made iron or
steel used in construc-
tion projects paid for in
the bill. A move by Sen.
John McCain to de-
lete the so-called Buy
American requirement
failed, 31-65.
But with Obama voic-
ing concern about the
provision, the require-
ment was changed to
specify that U.S. inter-
national trade agree-
ments not to be vio-
lated.
Democrats also pre-
served a key priority for
Obama, a break of up
to $1,000 for couples
who pay payroll taxes
but whose earnings are
so low they do not pay
income tax.
Sen. Johnny Isakson,
R-Ga., who advanced
the. homebuyers tax
break, said it was in-
tended to help revive
the housing industry,
which has virtually col-
lapsed in the wake of a
credit crisis that began
last fall.
The proposal would
allow a tax credit of
10% of the value of new
or existing residences,
up to a $15,000 limit.
Current law provides
for a $7,500 tax break
but only for first-time
homebuyers.
Isakson's office said



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INCONVENIENCE

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NEWSPAPER

BOXES,

FIGHTING

THE WEATHER

AND HUNTING

DOWN BACK

COPIES


CALL:
305-694-


the proposal would
cost the government an
estimated $19 billion.'
Democrats readily
agreed to the propos-
al, although it may be
changed or even de-
leted as the stimulus
measure makes its way
through Congress over
the next 10 days or so.
Other GOP attempts
to change the mea-
sure went down to de-
feat. The most sweep-
ing of them, by Sen.
Jim DeMint failed on a
mostly party-line vote
of 36-61. It would have
replaced the White
House-backed legisla-
tion with a series of
tax cuts on personal
and business income
and capital gains at
the same time it made
cuts passed during the
Bush administration
permanent.


"This bill needs to
be cut down," Repub-
lican Mitch McConnell
of Kentucky said on
the Senate floor. He
cited $524 million for
a State Department
program that he said
envisions creating 388
jobs. "That comes to
$1.35 million per job,"
he added.
After days of absorb-
ing rhetorical attacks,
Obama and Senate
Democrats mounted
a counteroffensive
against Republicans
who say tax cuts alone
can cure the economy.
Obama said the criti-
cisms he has heard
"echo the very same
failed economic theo-
ries that led us into
this crisis in the first
place, the notion that
tax cuts alone will solve
all our problems."


"I reject those theo-
ries and so did the
American people when
they went to the polls
in November and vot-
ed resoundingly for
change," said the pres-
ident, who was elected
with an Electoral Col-
lege landslide last fall
and enjoys high public
approval ratings at the
outset of his term.
Obama did not men-
tion any Republicans
by name, and most
have signaled their
support for varying
amounts of new spend-
ing.
Even so, the presi-
dent repeated his re-
tort word for word in
late afternoon, yet
softened the partisan
impact of his com-
ments by meeting at
the White House with
senators often willing


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the '
following:

IFB NO. 1270 INVITATIONAL TO BID TO PURCHASE PET
WASTE BAGS AND DISPENSER BOXES

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2009

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami,
Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

Deadline for Request for Clarification: Thursday February 19.2009 at 5:00
P.M

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
N0.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 009501


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF VACANCIES IN THE
PLANNING ADVISORY BOARD AND ZONING BOARD

The Miami City Commission seeks members and alternate members of the
planning advisory and zoning boards. Specific qualifications and eligibility
requirements for each board are set forth in Section 62-124 of the Miami City
Code and require that members must be electors of the City of Miami. Applicants
must possess the knowledge, experience, judgment, background, ability and
desire to act in the public interest. Individuals representing the various social,
demographic and economic elements of the city are encouraged to apply.

Additionally, public, professional or citizen organizations within the area having
interest in and knowledge of the planning and plan implementation process
are encouraged and solicited to submit to the Office of City Clerk, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133, in writing, the names and addresses of
persons and their qualifications for consideration as prospective appointees to
fill present vacancies on said boards.

The City Commission will consider filling existing vacancies at its meeting of
March 12, 2009. The list of interested individuals will be available for public
review at the Office of the City Clerk on Friday, February 27, 2009, following
the scheduled deadline for receipt of said applications on Thursday, February
26, 2009 at 4 PM. Application forms will be available from the Office of City
Clerk's and the Clerk's website at httD://miamiaov.com/citv clerk/Paaes/
Board/Board.aso.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



(#003207)


to cross party lines.
His first visitor was
Sen. Olympia Snowe a
moderate Republican
lawmaker. Later he
met with Sens. Susan
Collins and Ben Nel-
son.
"I .gave him a list of
provisions" for pos-
sible deletion from
the bill, Collins told
reporters outside the
White House. Among
them were $8 billion to
upgrade facilities and
information technolo-
gy at the State Depart-


ment and funds for
combatting a possible
outbreak of pandemic
flu and promoting cy-
ber-security. The lat-
ter two items, she said,
are "near and dear to
her," but belong in rou-
tine legislation and not
an economic stimulus
measure.
Collins and Nelson
have been working
on a list of possible
spending cuts totaling
roughly $50 billion, al-
though they have yet
to make details public.


Subscribe


If you think nobody
gives a damn what
Black people think,
think again. Some
people care a lot.
Especially when they
need something from
you.
Take corporations.They want
you to buy their products.And
banks care whetheryou're going
to give them your money.
Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for
your vote. And TV and radio
stations hope you will pay
attention to their shows.
The point is.all these people
want something from you.And
when people want something
from you,you have got power
over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make
the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes
and your loyalty to people who
deserve it. People who are going
to give you something in return.
People who are doing the most
for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people
think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the
business of communication.
Communicating to you the
power you have and letting you
know how you can use it. For
instance, right now there are 32
million Black people in this
country and last year we earned
more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


s-1oQfit/ /,y
tweeA/m t/ /iwt
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


4

........


Think about it





Zube ftiami ZTmes.
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923
Phone: 305-694-6210 or see us online at www. Miami Times Online. com


DARYLS BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


Publix among firms that

never laid workers off


Supermarket giant
Publix is listed among
companies that have
never laid off workers.
A listing in CNNMon-
ey.com says Publix,
which is 100 percent
employee-owned, has
not had a layoff dur-
ing its 79 years in ex-
istence, following the
motto, "owners never
want to lay off other
owners."
After the company


acquired 49 stores that
rival Albertson's close,
Publix hired more
than 1,500 Albertson's
employees at those
stores.
Nearly 6,000 Publix
employees referred to
as "associates" have
made a career with the
company, working for
20 years or more.
Publix ranked 88
among the 100 best
companies to work for.


Consultants find investors


CAPITAL
continued from 5D
will also help business
owners file Form D
with the SEC 15 days
after accepting their
first investor check
and comply with all
state security laws.
Professional consul-
tants can also help en-
.trepreneurs target the
investors most likely to
support their specific
type of business. "You
need to be, introduced


to the correct inves-
tors who are interested
and qualified for your
type of offering," says
Brette. "This takes ex-
pertise and connection
that most business
owners lack. That is
why 90 percent of pri-
vate deals never raise
any capital outside of
their friends and fam-
ily, and go out of busi-
ness."
For more informa-
tion, visit www.mbcap-
ital.net.


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PUBLIC NOTICE
LAKESHORE APARTMENTS A SUBSIDIZED
HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED

Applications are now being accepted for the elder-
ly, 62 years and over, or handicapped, on a "first
come", "first serve" basis, to be placed on the wait-
ing list. Applicants may appear in person between
the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM at 21269 SW 85
Avenue, Miami, Florida, or request an application
by mail.

CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD (305)
643-2079
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Who Cares



What Black People Think



Anyway?


I


TODAY!


I


















SECTION D


101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
WE WORK WITH BAD
CREDIT!
Totally remodeled two
bedrooms apts., starting
at $660, new ceramic tile,
appliances, central air, quite
neighborhood, laundry
machines, new kitchen.
parking. FREE WATER.
1545 N.W. 8 Avenue, Call
786-506-3067

1118 N.W. 1st Court
SMove In Special. One bdrm,
one bath, $500. Stove, refrig-
erator, air. 305-642-7080 or
786-236-1144

12105 NE 6 Ave #304
One bdrm, air and appli.
Section 8. $900 to move-in,
$800 monthly. Call before 3
p.m. 305-479-4042

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrigerator, air. 305-
642-7080 or 786-236-1144

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath. $550. Stove,
refrigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144

1281 N.W. 61st Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

1326 N.W. 1st Place
Very clean, one bedroom,
one bath, 786-419-6613.

1331 Sharizard Boulevard'
Efficiencies, and one
bedrooms. Section 8 ok! No
deposit for Section 8! 786-
488-5225

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$500 monthly.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1400 N.W. 61 St
One bedroom, clean with car-
pet, appliances, free water
and gas. Section 8 Ok.
305-758-3979

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$625 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

15201 Memorial Highway
One bdrm., one bath, $800,
more specials, Section 8 ok!
Call Frank K. Cooper, R.E. at
'305-758-7022.

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Studio- $450/month, one
bedroom-$525/monlh, three
bedroom-$775/month. All
appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen T.V. Call
Joel 786-355-7678.

1718 N.W. 2nd Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-
7080.


1744 N.W. 1 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator and
air. 305-642-7080

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms., one bath $625.
Stove, refrigerator, air. Free
Water. 305-642-7080 or
786-236-1144

1905 N.W. 115th Street
Large one bedroom. Utilities
included plus cable. $750
monthly. Call 305-681-9174.

1969 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,$550.
Appliances, free water and
gas. 305-642-7080
786-236-1144


200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080.

2141 N.W. 91st Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
private driveway, air. $925
monthly. 786-663-0234


247 N. E. 77 Street
1 bedroom, 1 bath, remod-
eled, water, garbage, parking
is free. $790 monthly plus se-
curity deposit. Section 8 wel-
come.Call 786-216-7533.

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849.


48 N.W. 77th Street
Large, one bdrm, $600
monthly. Call after 6 p.m.
305-753-7738

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthlyl2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.

5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bedroom, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security. 305-
751-6232

561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, new
appliances, $600 monthly,
one month's rent moves you
in. Section 8 welcome. Call
305-458-3977.

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6660 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$400/month, call Greg Wright
786-351-8109.

7001 N.W. 15th Avenue
Move In Speciall First
month plus half security
deposit moves you in. One
bedroom $495 monthly. $743
moves you in. All appli-
ances included. Free 20
Inch, flat screen TV. Call
Joel 786,355-7578.
7526 N.E. Miami Court
One bedroom. $625 monthly,
free water. $1600 to move
in.786-277-0302

820 N.W. 70 Street
One bedroom, one bath $450.
Move in $750.
305-759-1880, 786-975-9099


ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
appliances, laundry and gate.
From $400. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080

COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.



GOLDEN SQUARE AND
GOLDEN VILLAS
New Rental Community
1325/1415 NW 18th Drive
Pompano Beach
(954)933-4050

Beautiful One, Two, Three
and Four Bedroom Apts.
Starting at $750 monthly
Washer/Dryer Available
Fitness Center
Computer Room
Sparkling Pool and
Children's Playground

'Income restrictions apply
Rent subject to change

U


439 NW 9 Street
439 NW 8 Street
One Bedroom, One Bath. $425
Monthly for Seniors, $600 to
move in, Three Bedroom $735
monthly. Call 786-220-3400 or
305-326-8555


MIAMI Now Pre Leasing

A Rental Community
For Seniors 55 Plus
Friendship Towers Apts.
1550 N.W. 36 Street
Miami, FL 33142

Affordable one, and two
bedrooms. Starting at $633
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137

Call: 305-573-9201

-Income Restriction Apply

-Prices Subject to Change




GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?,
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Rent Special!! All appli-
cations accepted Easy
Qualify. One bdrm, one bath
$495 ($745). Two bdrm,
one bath $595 ($895).
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrace Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bdrm. Bring ad for move
in deals & $50 off app. fee.
Call 305-688-8881.

8261 N.E. 3rd Avenue
One bedrm, one bath, all appli-
ances included, $550 monthly.
Free 20 inch flat screen T.V
Call Joel: 786-355-7578

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.

Located Near 90th Street
and 27nd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
light, water, and air included.
Also one bedroom furnished.
Call 305-693-9486.

N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De- -
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225


OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no secunty deposits.
305-769-0146, 786-521-
7151

OPA LOCKA AREA
Special! One bdrm, one bath,
$495 monthly, Section 8 OK!
Call 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN AREA
1613 N.W. 1st Place
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700, One bedroom one
bath $500. 7862439-7808

OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $500/
month. Call 786-262-4536.

Section 8 Apartments
South Miami Area, near
Metro Rail. Two bedroom,
three bedroom, four bedroom
apartments for rent.
Call 786-543-3872.

SOUTH MIAMI AREA
Three bedroom, one and half
bath, living and dining room,
kitchen, Section 8 welcomed!
305-255-3493

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
One bedroom, $550 $650
monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel
786-355-7578.


RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


15978 N.W. 27th Avenue
Great for early morning and
afternoon church services.
Monday thru Friday, can be
used for dance rehearsal, ka-
rate, and afternoon classes.
For more info, contact Rev.
William Clark 305-789-6269
or Dea. Paul Spencer
786-412-7203


7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom condo. 'Free
water and security gate.
954-266-9328

CAROL CITY AREA
19351 N.W. 45th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three and four bdrms,
Section 8 ONLY! Rudy
786-367-6268

North Miami.
One bedroom available. $650
monthly. 786-797-0225


1144 N.W. 38 St
One bedroom, air and all ap-
pliances. $650 monthly, first,
last and security to move in.
305-624-9022Call after 6p.m.

125 N.W. 73rd Street
Newly renovated, three
bedrooms, one bath, Section
8 preferred. 305-751-4241 or
305-934-0023.

13315 Alexandria Drive
Three bedrooms, two
baths,$875 monthly, washer
and dryer provided. Section
8 ok! 786-378-1482,786-252-
4953

145 N.W. 68 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080

15803 N.W. 38 Place
Lovely two bedrooms, central
air, fully tiled, bars. Move in
ready. $950 monthly. Section
8 OK! Other locations avail-
able. 305-621-6128

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
One bedroom. $600 mthly.
$700 move in. 305-751-6720

2242A N.W. 82 St
Two bedrooms, one bath,
newly remodeled, central air.
$900 monthly. 786-299-4093

2266 N.W. 75 St. Rear
Two bdrms. Section 8 OK!
954-394-5887

2439 NW 81st Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
appli. included, air, $1000
monthly call 305-694-8706

2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, one, bath, air,
$975 mthly. 786-877-5358.

255-257 N.E. 58 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath
$595. Two bedrooms, one
bath $675. 305-642-7080

263 N.E. 58 Ter.
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths, brand new, central
air. All bedrooms with large
walk in closets, laundry room.
$1475 monthly.
Don 305-793-0002

2653 N.W. 79th Terrace
Three bdrm, two bath, secu-
rity. Section 8 only, $1500/
month. Call 305-479-7184
between 12-8pm.

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

643 N.W. 48 Street
Two bdrms., one bath, $950,
more specials, Section 8 ok!
Call Frank K. Cooper, R.E. at
305-758-7022

6847 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air/heat, $1000/mth,
Section 8 welcomed! Call
305-318-3420.

7770 N.W. 9th Avenue
One bdrm, one bath, drive in
entrance, Section 8 only. 305-
761-3232

7929 N.W. 12th Court
Three bdrms, one bath, $900
monthly. Call 305-757-2632

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

MIAMI AREA
2401 N.W. 95 Street, newly
remodeled, one bdrm., one
bath, washer and dryer, cen-
tral air, Section 8 welcome.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112

NORTHWEST MIAMI
Duplex large two bedrooms,
one bath, air, appli. $950
monthly 305-962-2666


SECTION 8 SPECIAL!
594 N.W. 67th Street
Four bdrms, two baths, will
accept three or four bdrm
voucher. $1500/deposit. Call
305-757-3709
or 561-699-9679.


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, air, cable, no
utilities, $550 mthly.
Call 786-317-1804

1541 N.W. 54 St #B
Huge efficiency. $550 mthly,
first, last plus $200 Security
deposit, utilities included.
305-332-2117

20530 N.W. 20 Court
One small bdrm, $600 month-
ly, util. included, free cable,
$600 monthly, $1300 move-in
786-715-7814 or 305-474-
0498.

2478 N.W. 92nd Street
$450 a month, $1300 to move
in, all utilities paid,
786-277-0302

MIAMI AREA
Spacious, air, appliances,
cable. 786-260-1613

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$800 monthly, utilities includ-
ed. 786-897-4629

MIAMI LAKES AREA'
Studio, Section 8 welcome.
786-301-4368, 305-558-2249

NORLAND AREA
Close to public transporta-
tion, $475/month, 305-770-
0120

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Spacious, nice, clean, utili-
ties included, $620/month.
Looking for mature tenant.
786-357-7607

NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance, cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.

SENIORS MOVE IN SPE-
CIAL
2125 N.W. 36 Street
Efficiencies and one bed-
room. Gas, and water includ-
ed. Gated parking. $525-$600
monthly. 786-274-2409

SENIORS MOVE IN SPE-
CIAL
750 N.W. 56 Street
One and two bdrms, gas and
water included. $700-$895
monthly. 786-274-2409


1221 N.W. 41st Street
$100/security, $650/rent,
$750/move in, util. included,
cooking and family privileges.
305-301-1806

13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly; free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1506 N.W. 70th Street
$350 monthly, call Ms.
Queenie, 305-693-7727.

1775 N.W. 151st Street
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations. Call:
954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

2010 N.W. 55 Terrace
One room, central air and ap-
pliances, $125 weekly, $250
down 786-487-2222.

2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-3434,
786-227-0666

HOMESTEAD AREA
Fully furnished, microwave,
air, refrigerator, cable TV and
armoire. 786-285-9611
786-346-8505

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished rooms, call 954-
557-7629 or 305-763-3239.

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.


1231 N.W. 68 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, eat-in kitchen, applianc-
es, carport. $1550 monthly,
first, last and security.
305-336-3717


1740 N.W. 66 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700. 305-642-7080


1871 Wilmington Street
Two bedrooms, one bath with
central air. 786-356-1457.

2011 N.W. 152nd Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths,
located near schools, $1400/
month, Section 8 ok!
Call 786-295-0942.

2141 N.W. 96th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
utility room, $1350 monthly,
954-430-0849

2300 N.W. 153rd Street
Two bedrooms, Florida room,
garage. $1050 monthly.
Call 954-435-3901

2330 N.W. 97th St. Rear
One bdrm, $1500 to move in.
Appointment only!
305-693-0620

2555 N.W. 158th Street
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Newly renovated three bdrm,
one bath, air, near buses,
shops, and schools. $1400
mthly. Section 8 okay!
305-764-8102

28 Ave. N.W. 204 Lane
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, air. Section 8 and
HOPWA OK. 954-392-0070

3045 N.W. 68 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1456. 954-704-0094

3824 N.W. 213 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly. 305-267-9449

3879 N.W. 207th St/Road
Four bedroom, two baths,
Section 8 welcomed!
786-586-4597

4390 N.W. 174 Drive
Three bedrooms, two
baths,$1350, air, tile, $3375
move in. No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville ,
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors.
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

8122 N.W. 14th Place
Four bedroom, one bath. For
info call Ms. German.
305-691-4446

9410 N.W. 32 Court
Three bedrooms, two
baths,$1250, air, tile, $3125
move in. No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

DADE/BROWARD COUNTY
Two, three, four bdrms. From
$900 monthly.
954-709-2625.

HOLLYWOOD AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
short-term, call Calvin at
786-443-8222.

LITTLE RIVER AREA
Five bedrooms, two bath,
Section 8 welcomed!
305-693-9172.

Make Extra Money on Your
Home!
Turn your home into an ALF!
Call Now! 305-756-1765

MIAMI AREA
174 N.E. 78th Street
Newly remodeled, five bed-
rooms, three bathrooms, two
story home, washer, dryer
and central air. Section 8 wel-
come. $1900 a month.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
17555 N.W. 29 Court
Newly remodeled, four
bdrms., two baths, central
air, tile, washer and dryer.
Section 8 welcome, call
Matthew
954-818-9112

Miami Gardens Area
Charming two bedrooms, one
bath, large bonus room, pool
centrally located. $1200
monthly. Call 305-319-9830

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three and two bedrooms,
Section 8 is welcome. Call
305-796-5252

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard, carport. Section 8 OKI
$1275 monthly. 305-388-
7477

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five bedrooms and half,
three bathrooms, family,
dining, living, and laundry
room. Section 8 okay! $1950
monthly. Call 305-992-6496.

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice, three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643


U_


e


NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Two bedroom, one bath,
$650/month, available im-
mediately. 305-889-0166

Scott Lake Area
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly. $3900 down.
305-622-7562


wE?^


SHELDON LAWN CARE
Trees, Edging, Light Hauling,
Residential and Commercial.
Reasonable Prices! Depend-
able! 305-301-1806


I EYL


2445 N.W. 162nd StreetCOLLECTIONS
Two bdrm, one bath, den,
central air, $950/month, first, Strong organization and
last, and security required for communication skills re-
move in. Rent with option to quired to coordinate collec-
buy. For more info: call 305- tion process, and cash flow.
216-2824 or 305-924-3787. Two years exp. Fax resume
to 305-758-3617.


7285 N.W. 17th Court
$400-450/month, first, last
and security to move in.
Central A/C, cable, and all
amenities included. 786-
306-5080 or 786-546-7632

MIAMI GARDENS AND
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms, efficiency, house for
rent. 305-300-7783


550 N.W. 214 St. Unit 205
Three bedrooms, two baths,
gated community. $130,000
asking price. Willing to share
closing cost. 786-202-1424

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$185K Mortgage Incentives.
Call 786-419-7060.


,14622 N.W. 13 Road
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, try $1900 down
and $1299 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839. Call for list.

1680 N.W. 191 Terrace
Rolling Oaks. Three bed-
rooms, two baths, garage.. A
perfect '10'. 786-306-4839

1725 N.W. 132nd Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
a perfect "10". Everything up-
dated. Try $1900 down and
$1199 monthly. FHA. Call for
list 786-306-4839.

18000 N.W. 2 Place
Two bedrooms, updated. Try
$900 down and $995 month-
ly. FHA. 786-306-4839.
Call for List.

2301 N.W. 79th Terrace
Large, renovated, four bdrm,
two bath, tv and util. room.
$169K, or best offer.
305-305-5546.


FORT LAUDERDALE AREA
SW 41 STREET 21 AVENUE
Four bedrooms, three baths.
$150,000. Owner agent.
954-663-5263

Rent to Own
Four bedrooms, three baths,
15300 N.E. 10th Avenue.
786-991-4767

Rent To Own
Three nice homes to choose
from. 1-800-970-5628 press
extension 2.

WE BUY HOUSES!!!
Any Condition-Any Area!
305-788-8939

*ATTENTION*
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
""WITH"'
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


BEST PRICES IN TOWN Ill
Handyman, carpet cleaning
,plumbing, hanging doors,
hauling debris or moving,
specializing in lawn service
305-801-5690
C & F Decorating Services
Painting, Fencing, Flooring,
305-757-4840.


GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.


IF IT'S BROKE, FIX IT!
TV/Stereo Repair, and
Sales plus Accessories.
Bass Electronics
305-835-2747.


COOK and CLEAN
LAUNDRY
Required minimum five
years experience with refer-
ences related to house-
keeping positions. 5.5 days.
Valid driver's license, non-
smoker, drug testing and
background check required.
Call and leave your name
and telephone number.
305-694-6227


JOBS! JOBS! JOBS
All Types of Positions
Available, Flexible Work
Hours, Part and Full Time
Work, Excellent Pay and
Bonuses! Miller's Workforce
LLC. 99 NW 183rd Street
Suite 116, 305-974-5338


Needed VPK/CDA
Teachers immediately great
pay! 305-751-2684,
305-984-0185

RECEPTIONIST
Responsible for all front
office duties, preparation of
board/committee meetings,
staff support.
Fax resumes:305-960-4620
Attention: Mr. A.Taylor

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


STYLISTS AND BAR-
BERS NEEDED!
Clean atmosphere, newly
renovated. Must have
license. Call Ayanna
786-587-0904.

TELEMARKETERS
Part-time positions avail-
able Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday.
Busy newspaper needs
experienced telemarketers,
must generate own clients.
Motivation is the key, quo-
tas must be met weekly and
commission is a plus!
Please fax resume to
305-759-0297 or email to
advertising@miamitimeson-
line.com




CADILLAC
STEALS
2001 Cadillac Deville
One owner, very low
mileage, air conditioning,
cassette CD changer, Am /
FM radio. Custom diamond
white exterior. $6800

2003 Cadillac Deville
23,000 Miles, one owner,
very low mileage, air con-
ditioning, cassette, CD
changer, AM/FM radio.
Custom diamond white ex-
terior. $9500. Serious calls,
305-915-7377


2009 Essence Music
Festival
Bus trip to New Orleans
from Ft. Lauderdale, 7/2
to 7/7, includes 3-night
hotel stay(sharing a room
in quad occupancy) in
New Orleans and bus
transportation. Prices start-
ing at $475 per person,
until Mar 1, payment plans
available. Contact Kevin
Mitchell at (954)604-4339 or
visit: mitchellglobalservices.
eventbrite.com
BIG T's BBQ RIBS AND
CHICKEN
Best ribs in Miami! Open
Sunday and Monday.
1795 Opa-Locka Boulevard
954-699-8444


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THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE COVERING THE OPENING OF BIDS

JOB ORDER CONTRACT FOR MDCPS MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS
FOR


1) JOB ORDER CONTRACT/09-CENTRAL 1
for all Regions of the MDCPS Maintenance Operations
Contract # JOC09-C1


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:


IFB NO. 123103

CLOSING DATE/TIME:


HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ACCESS
SERVICES
1:00 P.M., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2009


Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami,
Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 002163


Si~ QI tfb ^B SS pig l~lr~ M
ined from page 7Dssed
continued from page 7D


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Wrongful Death?
AAA Attorney Referral Svs.
1-800-733-5342 24 Hours
Miscellaneous No. 1517568
UNDER THE REGISTRA-
TION OF TITLES LAW
OFFICE OF TITLES
P.O. BOX 494
KINGSTON
June 26, 2008
WHEREAS I have been satis-
fied by Statutory Declaration
that the duplicate Certificate
of Title for ALL THAT parcel
of land part of MAVERLY now
called QUEENSBOROUGH
GARDENS in the parish of
Saint Andrew being the Lot
numbered ONE HUNDRED
AND EIGHT-EIGHT on the
plan of part of Maverly now
called Queensborough Gar-
dens aforesaid deposited
in the Office of Titles on the
28th day of January, 1976 of
the shape and dimensions
and butting as appears by
the said plan and being the
land registered at Volume
1124 Folio 693 of the Regis-
ter Book of Titles in the name
of SELVIN FOSTER-HAS
BEEN LOST.



YOUR AD


COULD


BE HERE


I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE
that I intend at or after the ex-
piration of fourteen days after
the last appearance of this
advertisement to DISPENSE
with the production of the du-
plicate Certificate of Title and
to ENDORSE on the original
a Transmission No. 1517566
whereby DEBBY FOSTER
acquires the estate and inter-
est of the abovenamed SEL-
VIN FOSTER and a Transfer
No. 1517567 from the above-
named DEBBY FOSTER to
TREVOR MILLER of ALL the
land comprised n this Cer-
tificate 'of Title and thereafter
to cancel the said Certificate
of Title and to register a new
Certificate in duplicate in
place thereof.
J. Walker
Senior Deputy
Registrar of Titles


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!

END THE
INC N V E N I E N C E
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES,
FIG HTING
THE WEATHER
AND HUNTING
DOWN BACK
COPIES

CALL: 305-


2) JOB ORDER CONTRACT/09-CENTRAL 2
for all Regions of the MDCPS Maintenance Operations
Contract # JOC09-C2


These contracts are only open to those bidders which have been pre-qualified as General Contractors by The School Board of Miami-Dade
County. Florida.
Cone of Silence: A Cone of Silence is applicable to this competitive solicitation. Any inquiry, clarification or information regarding this bid must
be requested in writing by FAX or e-mail to:

Mr. Francis Hoar, District Director
Maintenance Operations
FAX #305-995-7964
E-mail: fhoar@dadeschools.net

This rule can be found at http://www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/.

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, (hereinafter called the "Board") from bidders for the contracts
hereinafter set forth at and until 2:00 P.M. local time according to the following schedule:


Description
Job Order Contract


Set Aside


Contract #


Open with Assistance Levels JOC09-C1


Day
Tuesday


Date
03/17/2009


Job Order Contact Open with Assistance Levels JOC09-C2 Tuesday 03/17/2009
Bids shall be received at 1450 N.E. Second Avenue, Room 351, Miami, Florida, following which time and place, or as soon thereafter as the
Board can attend to same, the said bids will be publicly opened and read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium, Miami-Dade County School
.Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. The Board will thereafter make one or more awards of the
contract, based upon the result of the tabulations as covered by applicable laws and regulations.
This advertisement is for the award of two (2) Job Order Contracts (hereinafter called "JOC"). A JOC is a competitively bid, firm fixed priced
indefinite quantity contract. It includes a collection of detailed repair and construction tasks with specifications that have established unit
prices. It is placed with a Contractor for the accomplishment of repair, alteration, modernization, maintenance, rehabilitation, construction,
etc., of buildings, structures, or other real property. Ordering is accomplished by means of issuance of individual Lump Sum Work Orders
against the Contract.
Under the JOC concept, the Contractor furnishes all management, professional design services as required, labor, materials and equipment
needed to perform the work.
The JOC awarded under this solicitation will have a minimum value of $50,000 and a maximum initial value of $2,000,000 with two (2)
possible extensions of $2,000,000 each within each term. The term of the contract will be for Twelve (12) Months and may include two
(2) renewal options for one (1) additional year each. It is the current intention of the Board to award two (2) Job Order Contracts under
this solicitation. The Bidders will hold their adjustment factors for one hundred eighty (180) days and the Board reserves the right to make
additional awards under this solicitation for a period of one hundred eighty (180) days after the opening of bids.
Some projects) may be subject to the Davis Bacon Act, 40 U.S.C. Sec. 276a and the regulations at 29 CFR Parts 1,3,5,6 and 7 as well as
other provisions of federal law and regulation.

The Board reserves the right to limit the total number of concurrent Job Order Contracts to be held by or awarded to a single bidder.

The Job Order Contracts are limited to those bidders which have been pre-qualified as a General Contractor by the School Board of Miami-
Dade County, Florida, prior to bidding, and include the M/WBE subcontracting assistance levels of:


Contract No.
JOC09-C1
JOC09-C2


African American
18%
18%


Women


Total Participation


These contracts are for MDCPS Maintenance Operations for work occurring in all areas of the Miami-Dade County Public School District.
The Board reserves the right to award and use multiple Job Order Contracts within the same region.
Intending bidders must attend a mandatory Pre-Bid conference to be held at the Miami Dade County School Maintenance Operations
Building in Room 215 2nd Floor Training Room at 12525 N.W.28th Avenue Miami, Florida, beginning promptly at 9:00 a.m. local time on
Tuesday, February 24th, 2009 for the purpose of discussing the JOC concept and documents, answering questions and discussing
JOC from the contractor's perspective. Note that persons arriving after 9:15 a.m. will not be admitted to the meeting and will be
considered non-responsive for bidding.
Each bidder must submit two Adjustment Factors to be considered responsive. These same Adjustment Factors must apply to all the work
tasks listed in the contract documents. The first Adjustment Factor will be applied to that work which the construction is anticipated to be
accomplished during normal business hours. The second Adjustment Factor will be applied to that work which the construction is anticipated
to be accomplished on an overtime basis.
The estimated percentage of work by category is as follows: normal hours construction 75% and overtime construction 25%.

Intending Bidders may obtain one set of the bid and contract documents on CD-ROM, February 9th thru February 24th, 2009 at 12525 NW
28th Avenue, Miami, FL 33167 2nd Floor, Maintenance Operations or at the Pre-Bid Conference at no cost.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Alberto M. Carvalho, Superintendent of Schools


An TIF MIAMI TIME .FRRERARY 11-17. 2009 1


INVITATION FOR BIDS

Bids will be received by The Housing Authority of the City of Miami Beach
(HACMB) for IFB #1-2009 for the New Construction of Affordable Housing
at 321-327 Michigan Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida 33139, until March 27,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. The IFB package will be available from HACMB Executive
Office, 200 Alton Road, Miami Beach, FL 33139 starting Monday, February
9, 2009. A non-refundable fee of $500.00 in the form of a check, cashier's
check or money order made payable to HACMB will be required to obtain a
bid package. A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on. February 24,
2009 at 10:00 a.m. at Rebecca Towers North, Multi-Purpose Room, 200 Alton
Road, Miami Beach, Florida 33139, and a site visit will be conducted at the
conclusion of the pre-bid conference. Questions may be directed in writing to
Matthew Garwick, Operations Manager.

The HACMB reserves the right to accept any proposal deemed to be in the
best interest of the HACMB, to waive any informality in any proposal, to reject
any or all proposals, or to advertise for new proposals. HACMB does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, or
disability.



EQUAL HousN
OPPORTUNITY


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Wal-Mart throws corporate weight behind Black History observance


Retailer says every day is good

day to learn Black history


Miami Times Staff Report

Arkansas-based
Wal-Mart Stores
is encouraging its
employees and
customers to celebrate
Black History every day
and not just during
February.
"Every day is a good
day to learn Black
History," the giant
retailer says in a series
of radio and television
ads, along with in-store
and online educational
material designed to
promote awareness of
Black History.
This year's Black
History Month theme
is "The Quest for Black
Citizenship in the
Americas.
"This year's Black
History Month


theme encourages
our associates and
customers to honor the
positive impact African
Americans have
made throughout our
nation's history," said
Esther Silver-Parker,
senior vice president of
Corporate Affairs.
"Our company
continues to be
committed to the
communities it serves
through education,
opportunity and
celebration and
our campaign to
celebrate Black History
throughout the year
is perfectly aligned
with this commitment.
We proudly engage in
initiatives to celebrate
Black History and,
we encourage our
customers to join us


in making this a year-
round observance,"
Silver-Parker said in a
press release.
Wal-Mart customers
can pick up free
"Profiles and Pride"
and "Black History
Timeline" pamphlets at
some stores.
The pamphlets
provide Black History
informationsuitablefor
schools, organizations
and individuals.
This year's "Profiles
in Pride," produced
in partnership with
Kraft, features African-
American heritage and
cultural events that
take place throughout
the country.
Featured events
include the National
Black Arts Festival in
Atlanta, the Gullah
Festival in South
Carolina and the Pan-
African Film Festival in
LosAngeles. Organizers


of the highlighted
events will also share
their insights on how
black history can be
celebrated throughout
the year.
Also, in light of the
historic election of
Barack Obama as the
nation's first Black
president, Wal-Mart's
"Black History Month
Timeline," produced
in conjunction with
Colgate-Palmolive,
features African-
American firsts and
milestones from the
1900s to the present.

To help parents and
children increase their
knowledge of Black
History, select stores
and Walmart.com
feature the GEEBEE
Black Heritage Series
games and puzzles.
The offerings include
an African counting
game, a game about


The Underground
Railroad, Black
History trivia games
and puzzles.
In an effort to stay
connected to its
African-American
customers, the
company's "Our
Voice" website 'offers
resource information
for families to use year -


round. The website,
www.wmourvoice.
com, provides an
online platform
for reinforcing the
company's Black
History message
through games and
information.
Wal-Mart said it
has also established
a partnership with


ancestry.com that
allows that website to
offer an interface on
the site to aid users
in tracing their family
genealogy.
The company said
it employs more than
251,000 African
Americans and its
commitment to the
Black community
extends to a variety
of partnerships and
corporate, programs
for customers.
These include:
Serving, as
presenting sponsor of
Tavis Smiley's America
I AM: The African
American Imprint, a
mobile and museum
exhibit that celebrates
the impact African
Americans have had
on nearly 500 years of
American history. The
exhibit will travel to
major cities across the
country until 2012.


*In 2008, the Wal-
Mart Foundation
provided a $12.5
million letter of credit
to the Martin Luther
King Jr. National
Memorial Project
Foundation that
will allow it to begin
construction of the
Martin Luther King
Jr. National Memorial
in Washington, D.C.
Also, in 2008,
Wal-Mart employees
- called associates
-- and the Wal-
Mart Foundation
contributed more
than $300,000 in
charitable donations
to the United Negro
College Fund, in
addition to a $1
million grant by the
foundation to support
the UNCF's Institute
for Capacity Building
Fiscal and Strategic
Technical Assistance
Program.


State official warns against staged accidents to get insurance money


Miami Times Staff Report

TALLAHASSEE -
With the economy
down, staged accidents
may be on the rise
as some Floridians
are tempted by fraud
scams promising extra
bucks.
But Florida's Chief
Financial Officer Alex
Sink, who oversees
the Department of
Financial Services
and the Division of
Insurance Fraud,
warns that planning or
participatingin a staged
accident can cost you
more than you bargain
for: a minimum two-
year prison sentence
for starters.
Sink on Friday
reminded Floridians
that they can earn
more money reporting
these scams -than
participating in them.
"Ifyouareapproached
to participate in a staged
accident, think before
you act and then call
us," said Sink. "Fraud
drives up the cost of
insurance for all of us
and Florida's families


don't need any extra
financial burdens."
According to Sink,
information leading
to an arrest and
conviction could yield
up to $25,000.
The department is
offering a reward of up
$25,000, based on how
much was or could
have been stolen in a
reported scheme -- if
the' information leads
directly to an arrest
and conviction.
Since the reward
program started in
1999, $201,000 has
been paid in rewards,
more than half of it
for reported Personal
Injury Protection fraud
schemes involving
$10.5 million in
potential insurance
losses.
A typical scheme
involves staging an
accident to send
'"patients" to medical
clinics in order to
collect PIP payments
from insurance
companies. The
Division of Insurance
Fraud, a statewide law
enforcement agency,


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has made nearly 1,500
PIP fraud-related
arrests since 2003
and won nearly 1,000
convictions, according
to a department
statement.
In late January, four
Palm Beach County
men were arrested on
eight counts each of
insurance fraud, eight
counts of third-degree
grand theft and one
count of staging an
accident -- a second-
degree felony.
According to the
department, Nidal
Jaber rented a U-Haul
and is accused of
enlisting three other
men for a 2006 staged


accident. Jaber was
charged last. Dec. 12
at the Miami-Dade
County Jail, where
he was already in
custody.
DFS Detective Vista
Beasley arrested the
other alleged scam
artists, Charles
Camacho, on Jan. 22,
William Resnick, on
Jan. 26, and Alexander
Garcia, on Jan. 27.
More than $38,500
in insurance payments
was. made on the
fraudulent claims, the
department said.
If convicted on all
charges, the accused
men each face between
two and 15 years in


prison.
Investigation is
continuing into other
accidents Jaber
allegedly organized, the
department said.
Also late last month,
DFS detectives arrested
Gerardo Melenez
for allegedly being
involved in a 2006
staged accident. The
paralegal worked with
a clinic owner who
recruited participants
for a staged accident,
the department said.
Melenez is accused of
directing participants
on how to discuss
their injuries with the
insurance company
and clinic.


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2 FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 7:30
PM LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH

All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Darcee S. Sigel, City Attorney

NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council
with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall
insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may he based (f/s 286.0105): 2) In accor-
dance with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the
City Clerk no later than two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305)
787-6001 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305)
948-2909 for assistance.


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
PUBLIC NOTICE

As required by Section 255.20, Florida Statutes, and in accordance with the
Section 18-85 (a) of the City Code of the City of Miami, the City Commission
of the City of Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida, will conduct a public
hearing in the Commission Chambers of Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida, on Friday, February 13, 2009 at 9 a.m., to consider
whether it is practicable or advantageous and in the public's best interest to
waive competitive sealed bids in connection with the construction of public
infrastructure associated with the proposed Florida Marlins ballpark (the "Public
Infrastructure Work") and authorize the award of the Public Infrastructure Work
to Hunt/Moss, a Joint Venture. The Public Infrastructure Work is estimated to
cost $24,000,000 (to be funded by Miami-Dade County and the City of Miami).
The Public Infrastructure Work is located in the vicinity of NW 7 Street and NW
14 Avenue, Miami, Florida (the site area of the former Orange Bowl).

The City Manager will present written findings to the City Commission which
shall contain reasons supporting the conclusion that competitive sealed bidding
is not practicable or advantageous to the City, which-finding must be ratified
and the contract award approved by an affirmative vote of four-fifths 4/5th of
the City Commission.

All interested parties may appear and be heard at the time and place speci-
fied.

Persons who decide to appeal any decision made by any City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at its meeting or hearing, will need a record
of the proceedings. Such persons may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, including the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.

The City of Miami provides equal access and equal opportunity and does not
discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs or services. For material
in alternate format, a sign language interpreter or other accommodation, please
call (305) 250-5360.


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003204)
(#003204) '^**- '


MIAMIDDE
-sw -

Grow your career,in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs

For computer access visit any Miami-Dade County Library or
South Florida Workforce Career Center.
For locations call 311.

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


inn THF MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 11-17. 2009


THEY'RE


HERE


MASSES
AT THEMONUMENT
l / '


~umwrnIIwmuwi I


The Four Page Glossy Wrap that enclosed the Inaugural


is now on sale at


AS MANY


Issue


The Miami Times.


AS YOU WANT


*be liami imrn t


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