Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00738
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: February 4, 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00738
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

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Tempora Mtitantur Et Nos Mutacmur In Illis


DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 23 MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


SERENA WINS 10T" GRAND SLAM


Serena Williams of the United States holds the trophy after beat-
ing Russia's Dinara Safina during the Women's singles final match
against at the Australian Open Tennis Championship in Melbourne,
Australia, Saturday, Jan. 31. -AP Photo/Rick Stevens

Tennis superstar makes

short work of opponent


From staff reports

For the fourth time in
her career, Serena Williams
opened the Grand Slam tour-
nament season with a victory
in the Australian Open. So, for
the fourth time, she faces the
question: Can you win all four
majors this year?
Williams blitzed Dinara Sa-
fina 6-0, 6-3 Saturday to claim
her fourth Australian Open
title a day after she and her
sister Venus won in doubles
- and her 10th career Grand
Slam singles title.
Williams said a calendar-
year Slam certainly is pos-
sible but she has put it out


of her mind because, in years
past, the extra pressure had
undermined her efforts in the
French Open, the year's sec-
ond major.
"I've been asked this ques-
tion for three years 2003,
2005 and again in 2007 and
I haven't been able to do it,"
said, Williams, who returns to
No. 1 when the Sony Ericsson
WTA Tour rankings are re-
leased today. "So this year I'm
taking a different approach.
I'm just like, I'm happy to win
the Australian Open, and I
want to win the next tourna-
ment and do well in the clay-
court season. My goal is to do
better in Paris than last year."


Grocery set to close, seeking bailout


Business asks residents

to push officials for help
By Tariq Osborne
tosborne @miamitimesonline.com

Neighbors Supermarket, located at
621 NW 62nd St., is poised to close its
doors, leaving its 59 employees jobless.
"I expect to close at the end of this
week or early in the next," Assistant
Store Manager Julio Perez, 56, said
Tuesday.
Perez began working with the store in
January 2007, three months before .its
official opening.
"Today is the last day for the people
in the dairy section," Perez said. "There's
only one employee left in the meat
department. A lot of customers are really
unhappy."
According to Perez, residents have good
reason to be unhappy over the imminent
store closure.
"A lot of the people around here maybe


don't have a car. They'll ask, 'Can I take
the cart home and bring it back?' I say,
'No problem.' We offer a high level of
service. And, look around. Do you see a
Publix nearby?"
The company has hired Michael

S. .


Moecker & Associates, a Fort Lauderdale
law firm specializing in bankruptcy
and insolvency issues, to liquidate the
inventory.
Around the store flyers have been
Please turn to GROCERY 4A
. ,- ;.:- .... i~c:- =-. ': -' ,8


This supermarket will close in days unless it gets government money.
-MiamiTimes photo/Tariq Osborne


Community leaders press for solution


to shooting and an end to gun violence

Sandra J. Charite \ l 1
scharite@miaittiinesonline.com R,'.'" .. I


The Jan. 23 shooting that left
two teenagers dead and seven
others injured in what police
have called one of the deadliest
mass shootings in Miami's his-
tory has sparked a large-scale
community call for a crackdown
on youth violence.
Candlelight vigils, rallies,
door-to-door distribution of
Hot-Spot crime-reporting cards,
school assemblies and press
conferences have become fa-
miliar activities in a community
grown weary of the presence of
the gun in everyday life.
The activities brought nation-
al civil rights leader the Rev. Al
Sharpton to a press conference
Please turn to VIOLENCE 6A


Appealing for eyewitness to come forward in the Jan. 23 shooting are, from left, Pastor Gaston
Smith, County Commission Chairman Dennis Moss, victim Derrick Gloster's mom Tangela Gra-
ham and victim Brandon Mills' sister Ciara Mills. They gathered at Friendship Missionary Baptist
Church for a press conference on Jan. 29. -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra Charite


Michael Steele elected first

Black chairman of the GOP


By Alan King

BALTIMORE (NNPA) De-
feating the incumbent party
chief and three other challeng-
ers after six rounds of ballot-
ing, former Maryland Lt. Gov.
Michael Steele won election
Friday to chair the Republican
National Committee (RNC), be-
coming the first African-Ameri-
can to lead the GOP.
Steele takes over a belea-
guered party as Republicans
seek to rebound from back-to-
back defeats in national elec-
tions that gave Democrats con-
trol of Congress and the White
House.
The Washington Post report-
ed that his election came after a


series of ballots that displayed
a level of drama rarely seen in
national politics.
With the historic election of
President Barack Obama as
the first Black president in
America, the Los Angeles Times
reported the move as an inter-
esting play to corral minority
voters who will be crucial to a
Republican comeback.
Two African Americans
campaigned to lead the RNC.
Steele, the first African Ameri-
can to win statewide office in
Maryland, and Kenneth Black-
well, former secretary of state
of Ohio.
A staunch conservative who
believes that the party should
Please turn to STEELE 4A


Sosyete Koukouy performed at the opening of the Little Haiti
Cultural Complex on Jan.28. STORY 6A -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra Charite

INSIDE


Editorials ............................... 2A
Opinions ...................................3A
Faith & Family........................10B
Community Calender.................11B
Church Directory......................12B


Health & Wellness..................13B
Obituraries.............................15B
Lifestyles ................................1C
Business................................. D
Classified..................................7D


One Family Serving Since 1923 WDNSDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY


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8 90158 00100


Michael Steele speaks at the Republican National Conven-
tion in St. Paul, Minn. -AP Photo/Ron Edmonds, File
















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


Temper optimism with reality,
W whatever else may be in short supply in Opa-locka,
it is not optimism. Mayor Joseph L. Kelly, as is his
custom, painted a generally bright picture of the
predominantly Black North Miami-Dade municipality when
he delivered his Jan. 26 State of the City address.
SUsing as his theme "Progress in Motion," the mayor said,
"Progress has been both positive and visible as we close out-
2008 and open up 2009."
Indeed, judging from the mayor's address, there was prog-
ress to report. This includes a $1.6 million increase in the
often troubled water and sewer fund and a plan to spend
$80 million over 10 years for utility upgrade; maintaining an
AAA bond rating; a 94 percent reduction in crime in.Magnolia
North -- the so-called Triangle area; information technology
upgrade; approval of 223 occupational licenses and more than
300 building permits; plans to convert the long-abandoned
water treatment plan into a re-use plant; improvements to
sports facilities; emphasis on youth and education programs;
and street repairs.
The report is encouraging for a city that just a few years ago
was in paralysis brought about by a financial crisis that led
the state to take control of the municipal budget.
There can be little doubt, though, that the need is still great
in Opa-locka, a city known to be beset by poverty and persis-
tent crime. City leaders also have to face the sobering reality
of the economic recession and the financially crushing bur-
den of plunging home prices and its impact on residents and
the municipal budget.
Mayor Kelley and his colleagues seem to be holding their
own in steering the city through" the turbulent economic wa-
ters but they must make residents understand that the op-
timism that he exuded has to be tempered with the reality of
the times.
It will take some time and continued diligence and a lot of fi-
nancial help from a variety of sources but it is possible for Mr.
Kelley's dream to be realized when he said, "I envision a day
in our city when the median income is rising and the cycle of
poverty is declining."
In that hope the people of Opa-locka have the good wishes
of all those who would like to see them start to prosper.


A good antidote to the streets
A t a time when our community is mourning the tragedy
LA of two acts of gun violence that claimed the lives of an
IJL infant boy and two teenagers' and lamenting the deadly
violence among the young, one initiative that is making a dif-
ference in the lives of hundreds of young Black men has been
quietly doing its work and celebrating its success.
The 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project, which started off
with 500 mentors 16 years ago, has groomed more than 1,500
young men, keeping them off the streets, preparing them for
success and rewarding them with money for college. In its lat-
est awards, the program presented the high school seniors with
$2,000 each; some will ghet full two-year awards after an assess-
ment of needs..
The program that now state Sen. Frederica Wilson started in
1993 from her experience as an educator and has shepherded
down the years as her own career has risen, is one of the more
successful initiatives of its kind in the country and has attract-
ed mentors role models and sponsors from across the racial
spectrum.
It is not solving all the ills of our community and cannot be ex-
pected to do so. But to the extent that the Role Models Project is
touching the lives of hundreds of our boys and young men, it has
translated talk into action at a time when that is sorely needed.


Change policies, not people

If it is a good thing to salute all Americans, of whatever race,
for making Barack Obama president, then it is only fair to
commend the hierarchy of the Republican Party for electing
Michael Steele chairman of the Republican National Committee.
But that is where the similarities end.
President Obama heads a party known for inclusiveness -'so
Much so that some observers regard that factor as a negative,
rather than a positive, characteristic of the party. The Repub-
lican Party has come to be known as the party of exclusivity,
making only token attempts to reach out beyond a conservative,
majority White constituency that embraces policies which are in
direct conflict with what, say, African Americans see as our is-
sues, such as affirmative action, enforcement of civil rights and
urban renewal and redevelopment.
It could be argued that the Grand Old Party ceded the Black
and minority vote, generally, and cast its lot with other Americans
because it could not break the stranglehold of the Democratic
Party. But that could not really have been the case, because as
recently as in the 2008 presidential campaign, Republicans lead-
ers clearly pandered to their very narrow, ultra-conservative base
no doubt in the hope that it could catapult itself back into the
White House even though its standard-bearer squandered eight
years in office.
A Black brother moving into a lofty position in national politics
as Mr. Steel has done, and especially given the environment in
which he was able to do it must be' commended. But Mr. Steele
must quickly start to prove that his election to the GOP chair-
manship is much more than yet another ploy by his party to
hoodwink Americans. It will take a fundamental shift in policy for
the Republican Party to demonstrate sincerity in any initiative to
reach out to all Americans. Regardless of Mr. Steele's nice words,
the chances of that happening are very slim.


.. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action ..."
Malcolm X


-me fliami aime

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 MW 54th Slreet.
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press Delieves that Amenca can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Haling no person. leanng no person. the
Black Press sinves to help every person in the lirm belief Ihal all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back

A The Media Aud t


Less talk, more action needed from county commissioners


I read the article in which
County Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson is quoted as calling
for a moratorium on violence
[Page 5A, Jan. 28-Feb. 3, "Com-
missioner Edmonson calls for
moratorium on violence"]. The
call is most commendable but
much too shallow to meet the re-
ality test.
The commissioner has to stop
grandstanding. There can never
be a moratorium on violence un-
til she and other elected and civic
leaders address the cause and
effects of the violence facing our,
communities.
Commissioner Edmonson has
certainly executed her duties as
a commissioner, according to the
status quo, but she has also ne-
glected to serve all the citizens of
Miami-Dade County, specifically
African-Americans. This "bleep"
in her service has in fact greatly
contributed to the violence for
which she seeks a moratorium.
Or take Commissioner Dorrin
Rolle. Look at his entire tenure
as District 2 commissioner, then
ask yourself what has he accom-
plished for his district's African


American citizens, besides host-
ing an occasional block party
where Black folks dance to ri-
diculous rap music and eat bar-
becue. What real, sustainable
accomplishments has this com-
missioner delivered to the peo-
ple, other than voting for empty


15th Avenue, where two African
American youths lost their lives.
This was the result of structur-
al foundation of many years of
cause and effect.
The AK-47 magazine used in
the crime was loaded not with
standard-issue ammo but, rath-


T he AK-47 was loaded with oppression, hopelessness, job-
lessness and hunger, loaded with hate for self and no re-
spect for others, loaded with disrespect for life.


promises of a pharmaceutical
park and HOPE VI housing fail-
ures?
How is it possible for the Em-
powerment Trust to give away
$87,000 to an out-of-town rap
artist for travel expenses but re-
fuse to fund a truly mom-and-
pop community-based business
for a fraction of that cost?
Yes, the individuals respon-
sible for pulling the trigger of
that AK-47 assault rifle must be
brought-to justice and I am sure
they will be (soon) but, make ab-
solutely no mistake about what
occurred on Jan. 23 on tle cor-
ner of Northwest 71st Street and


er, with rounds of economic dis-
crimination, rounds of racism,
rounds of access denied, rounds
of lack of proper education,
rounds of government turning its
back on an entire group of people,
rounds of misappropriated feder-
al dollars. The AK-47 was loaded
with oppression, hopelessness,
joblessness and hunger, loaded
with hate for self and no respect
for others, loaded with disrespect
for the law and disrespect for life,
loaded with third world ideology
in a 21st Century society, loaded
with a void of knowledge of God
or the Son of God.
I have no doubt that those re-


sponsible for mur-
dering and assaulting those indi-
viduals that afternoon will be ap-
prehended by the authorities but
Commissioner Edmonson .must
stop sugar-coating our problems
by calling for a ban on rifles or
calling for a time-out for violence
- until she can cause the movers-
and-shakers of our government
structure to put a moratorium on
economic discrimination. Put a
moratorium on do-nothing com-
missioners; put a stop to a plan to
destroy those remaining African
American communities who are
striving to support others, em-
ploy others, educate those who
are uneducated, feed the hun-
gry, house those who were lied to
by District 2 elected officials and
the Miami-Dade County Housing
Authority.
It would be great if the commis-
sioner request the power struc-
ture of our government to put a
moratorium on lying to people.
She could start with our mayor's
office.
Keith Wilson is a member of
Liberty City-based Team Voters
of Miami.


Picking a Black leader not enough for the GOP


Republicans have just named
an African American, former
Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael Steele,
as party chairman. While I con-
gratulate Steele, I am also aware
that it probably would never have
happened if Barack Obama had
not won the presidency. So now
that he is chairman, the biggest
question he confronts is how to
turn around the strong percep-
tion that Republicans are actively
opposed to Black interests.
Steele himself said just after the
recent election, while campaign-
ing for the chairmanship, that Re-
publican Party officials "just don't
give a damn," that their version
of outreach to minorities is "let's
throw a cocktail party, find some
Black folks and Hispanics and
women, wrap our arms around
them. See, look at us. And then
we go back to the same old,
same old. The party has simply
not understood the importance
of having highly visible Black
Republican operatives... It's not
our message as much as it is our
messengers that are killing us."
I beg to differ with Steele pro-


foundly. The problem with the
Republican Party is not the ab-
sence of high-profile Blacks to
sell the message of the party; it
is the party's president who flies
over the damage of the Katrina
hurricane, leaving Black folks
screaming for help and Black


U.S. Sen. Trent Lott who praised
Strom Thurmond, saying if we
had listened to Thurmond (who
opposed the integration of. the
Democratic Party when he was
in it), things would be better.
Or, take Sen. Conrad Burns of
Montana, who called his house


Even Republicans must understand that part of what Obama's
victory meant is that there is talent of color in the higher
ranks of political life ready to lead.


bodies in the water. This was the
same fellow who began his cam-
paign at Bob Jones University
that would not allow interracial
dating. This was the same fellow
who spoke at an NAACP conven-
tion only once in his eight years.
It is the image of the party
who has a presidential candidate
in 2008 with only one high-level
Black staffer and who headed a
convention with 2,000 delegates,
only 36 of them Black.
It is insensitive comments
by Republican officials such as


painter a "nice little Guatema-
lan man," or former Virginia Sen.
George Allan, whose referred to
a non-White person in his au-
dience as a "Macaca," a kind of
monkey.
Think about the habit of Re-
publicans working hard to pre-
vent Blacks from voting by initi-
ating so-called "ballot security"
programs where they pass laws
requiring government-issued ID
for voting or personally check the
ID of people (generally Blacks) at
the door of the voting station.


The exploits of
the Ohio African American Secre-
taryof State, Ken Blackwell, are
still fresh in the mind from the
2004 election when he did every-
thing possible to prevent Blacks
from voting in big numbers. He
also ran for party chairman but
came in near to last place among
the six candidates, proof that even
Republicans were embarrassed
by his attempt to be a loyal 21st
Century lawn jockey.
Even Republicans must under-
stand that part of what Obama's
victory meant is that there is tal-
ent of color in the higher ranks
of political life ready to lead the
country and they will increasingly
have that opportunity because of
two things: changing demograph-
ics and the bankruptcy of Repub-
lican public policies.
Ron Walters is the Distinguished
Leadership Scholar, director of Af-
rican American Leadership Center
and professor of Government and
Politics at the University of Mary-
land. His latest book is "The Price
of Racial Reconciliation" (Univer-
sity of Michigan Press).


eWho care -about ... t..-..he kids?- .
Who care about the kids?


Dear Editor,

It is no surprise that the School
Board is playing nice now. The
majority of the members put a
flunky in place as the new su-
perintendent and they no longer
have to fight for what they want.
The superintendent was hired
with baggage and is willing to do
what the board wants so as to


keep the peace.
Do not be fooled by the actions
of the legislators either. Some of
them wanted the previous super-
intendent gone due to the situa-
tion with Ralph Arza.
Now everybody wants to blame
the legislators for budget cuts
and they hold rallies, when
the former superintendent, Dr.
Rudy Crew, had been saying the


Coverage to be proud of


Dear Editor,

As a reader of many newspa-
pers across the country, I am
proud to say that The Mi mi
Times had the greatest inaugu-


ral coverage that I witnessed,
including the New York Times
and the Washington Post, etc.
Congratulations on a job well
done.
-Dewey Knight III


same thing.
The School Board and the citi-
zens should be discussing is-
sues such as' no school crossing
guard at Little River Elementary.
I dropped my daughter off one
morning and on the way out of
the school building I overheard
a parent talking about no school
guard with the principal. Then an
SUV goes by at least 30 mph in


the 15 mph zone.
The parent says, "See what I
mean?"
The principal says, "Oh, that is
one of my teachers," like it was OK
for the teacher to speed through
the school zone. That principal
should have been having a fir.
Does anyone care about the
kids anymore?
-Vernon Floyd


ehIe %Uiami Elme
The Afiarm Tlmes welcomes and encourages letters on its editonal commentanes as
well as all other matenal in the newspaper. Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue
among our readership and the community
Lerrers must, however. be bnef and to the point. and may be edited for grammar,
st\'le and larntv All letters must be signed and must include the name. address and
telephone number of the winter for purposes of confirming authorship
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor. The Miami Tumes. 900 N.W 54th Street, Miami.
FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770, Email rriamiteditonaIbellsouth net


M I I IL 11- -l - - -1 -- - I I
















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


35A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


President Obama has the

right prescription for the

nation's economic ills
Immediately prior to the Great Depression,
there was a period of unprecedented wealth
where many became enormously rich. The
wealth was built on deregulation of the stock
market and a government that promoted
the unbridled greed of business titans. With the crash of the
stock market and bank failures, the Roaring Twenties ended
and the Great Depression of the Thirties began.
Millions became unemployed; formerly well-off middle-,
class families became poor. No one could afford to buy any-
thing so every sector of the economy felt the pain.
Franklin Roosevelt, a Democrat, promoted hope through his
New Deal Plan. During his presidency, he advocated helping
the poor and working class: Unemployment Compensation,
Social Security, Workers Compensation laws, secured bank
deposits, and government construction projects were some of
the many programs that he promoted.
History seems to be repeating itself. We just lived through
a Republican administration that promoted deregulation, pro-
vided tax cuts for the rich, cut benefits designed for poor, and
loosened regulations for banking, real estate, and the stock
market. The result has been bank failures, a near stock mar-
ket crash, high unemployment, a downturn in the economy
and a growing sense of hopelessness.
President Obama is, thankfully, an astute student of his-
tory and is now pushing some (5f the same programs that
helped pull this country out of the economic crisis of the Thir-
ties. He is increasing, unemployment compensation benefits,
promoting extension of Medicaid coverage, promoting plan to
decrease the cost of carrying health insurance for the un-
employed and developing government building programs that
will bring jobs.
In response to his attempts at bipartisan cooperation, the
Republican minority in the U.S. House of Representatives
did not vote for President Obama's stimulus package. In con-
trast, Democrats and Republicans voted for then President
George W. Bush's trickle-down stimulus package, which, by
and large, has been abused by investment bankers and bank
executives, who continue-to give themselves outrageous bo-
nuses, buy private jets, decorate their offices to the tune of $1
million and use federal money to buy weaker banks, instead
of giving credit to consumers and businesses.
We can only hope that President Obama has the votes to
pass his trickle-up stimulus package. If history is any indica-
tor, the only way that this country will come out of the reces-
sion is when money is placed in the hands of working people,
who can then buy cars, televisions and homes and stimulate
the economy to grow again.
Reginald J. Clyne is a Coral Gables-based attorney.


Despite Obania's inauguration, a lot of work remains


From a purely idealistic point
of view, Jan. 20, 2009, may
have marked the greatest day
this country has ever witnessed:
Barack Obama became the first
Black President of the United
States.
To every American, regardless
of race, color or creed, Obama's
rise to the White House is sup-
posed to be a testament that
things, in particular race rela-
tions, are going to be different
from this point forward. Yet, just
three days later, in the heart of
Liberty City, this "new reality"
came crashing down with such
force that it made Obama's In-
auguration feel like a distant
memory.
On Friday, Jan. 23t an uniden-
tified gunman sprayed bullets
from an AK 47 into a crowd of
about 50 people who were enjoy-
ing a neighborhood crap game.
The carnage he left behind was
gut- wrenching: 2 dead, seven
injured, a terrified community
and a dream (MLK's Dream) de-
ferred.
Three days after things were
supposed to get better, three
days after all the hell we endured
for 400 years in this country was
supposed to magically disappear
(because of Obama's election),
three days after most of us vowed
to improve our personal lot, the
idea of better days to come mo-
mentarily was engulfed by our
current reality which showed
the world this transition wasn't
going to be as easy as we first
thought.
As the smoke cleared from the
carnage, one thing was abun-
dantly clear: We've still got a lot
of work. to do.
On Monday, Jan. 26, after
hearing the clarion "call to ac-
tion" on the Michael Baisden
radio slow, I visited New Birth
Cathedral of Faith International
to give whatever support I could
as we attempt to exorcise the de-
mons that keep us from becom-


Will meetings and rallies being held after


the latest shooting help reduce crime?


RENEE COOPER, 49
Cook, Liberty City

If they listen s
to what the
people are say-
ing that live in
the neighbor-
hood then it
will help. We
need to give
these kids ac-
tivities so they can stop hang-
ing out in the streets. There is
nothing being offered to these
kids. The single parents can't do
it alone. Hanging out, gambling,
Black-on-Black crime and tak-
ing someone's life are just too
much for anyone to bear. In-
creasing police presence in our
streets is good but they need
to respect us too. The respect
between the residents and law
enforcement is not reciprocal
[yet] you wonder Why residents
cannot put their confidence in
them.

ZARKEYA PEAT, 18
Student, Liberty City

I don't think
that they real-
ly help. We still
have not seen
results. A lot of
pressure has
been put on
President Ba-
rack Obama to
do something
about our problem, when he
just got into office. Before, when
people were getting killed in our
neighborhood, you saw nobody
but now they want to show their
faces. I think that it is all fake
because, after the incident dies


down, you won't see these poli-
ticians and local leaders again
until another killing.

RENITA HOLMES, 46
Entrepreneur, Overtown

No, that
is the. politi-
cal approach.
There is meet-

meeting but
ing after the d e No s t

it leads to no
actions. We
are not just
disfranchised
people but we
have disfranchised leadership.
Everyone is doing their own
thing but nothing is being done.
We are so divided. No solution
was made in these community
gatherings. They don't talk to
the children since they are the
ones that are dying. There
should have been pastors out
there talking to the children
who are traumatized and the
grieving mothers.

JASON CAMBELL, 25
Construction worker, Liberty City

Everything is
for the better.
It is a process.
They have to
show that they
care 'o that
the commu-
nity will care.
However, these
politicians
and local leaders shouldn't be
around 'only when a shooting
occurs.


RALPH DIXON, 39
Grocery Store Butcher, Liberty City

I am a fa-
ther of two
and I am tired.
I think that.
it is a bunch
of people just
talking and
making them-
selves look
good on the
camera. The young are bury-
ing the young. If we don't get
the guns off the streets then we
will not have any future leaders.
There are no resolutions or ac-
tions being done for these kill-
ings, it is just people talking.
Words don't get guns off the
street. They need to enforce a
curfew to get these kids off the
street.

JULIUS ROUNDTREE SR., 38
Maintenance worker, Liberty City

These kids
are killing
each other and
the mothers
are in mourn-
ing wondering
where did they
go wrong. All 7
these meet-
ings are just
talk and photos taken. It's
simple: Take the guns off the
street. Bring more jobs into the
community so that people can
stop robbing each other. We are
lacking so much but yet you ex-
pect so much from us.


ing whole. There were also other
meetings going on throughout
the city which were facilitated
by various political and religious
leaders, such as the one held at
Jordan Grove Missionary Baptist
Church. But New Birth, headed
by the dynamic Bishop Victor T.
Curry, was surely the place to
be, if for no other reason than
Curry's oratorical skills would
surely excite the usually massive
crowd into some type of positive
action.
However, on this night, with
the usual "stars" in attendance,
which included notables such as
Miami-Dade School Superinten-
dent Alberto Carvalho, County
Commissioner Barbara Jordan
and Baisden, a usually fiery
Curry was somewhat subdued.
It wasn't because he wasn't
interested. It wasn't because he
didn't feel the pain that the af-


ders of figures such as Curry.
We do so without realizing that
the inspiration that the Currys
of the world give us, should do
just that: inspire us to go for-
ward in our own individual lives
and do the things we need to do
to make our lives complete.
It's the same strategy that
Obama is urging us to execute
in our daily lives: We shouldn't
depend on our leaders to raise
our children, to teach them
self-respect and to respect their
elders, to pay our bills, to cre-
ate a wholesome environment
in our community. All too often
we use certain people among us
as scapegoats as we place our
problems in their hands and ex-
pect them to work miracles.
We also have become a reac-
tionary community, instead of
being proactive in nature. We
react when violence disrupts


children, the chil- ""A
dren of all of us. If they aren't
our biological children, then
they belong to a sibling, a cous-
in, a neighbor or they attend the
same school as our children. We
need to redevelop the code where
we look at all of the community's
children as our own.
Speaking of codes, we also
need to redevelop various codes
among us that make it perfectly
clear that we never disrespect
our women, have contempt for
our elders and try to make our
kids' education a top priority as
in years past.
We must also begin to break
down the artificial walls that
continue to separate us. Alphas
won't do business with Omegas,
Deltas won't work with AKAs,
one church won't fellowship
with another because they don't
like each other's pastor and the
Bulls can't stand the Rockets
because of a freaking football ri-
valry, Give me a break. Our chil-
dren see us going through this
foolishness and they are quick
to mimic it.
If we want realunity, we must
begin to practice unity on a dai-
ly basis. Even if we don't agree
with one another, we must learn
to practice politics with one an-
other for the sake'of a collective
community.
.And we must stop giving our
kids what we didn't have and
start giving them what we did
have: self-love, self-respect, re-
spect for one another, respect
for our elders and a willingness
to do everything in our power to
elevate our community.
We must make our children
earn their keep, make them re-
alize that things are hard and
they are going to have to devel-
op a plan of action in order to
compete in this world. Giving
our children expensive toys and
designer threads without their
earning them only perpetuates
the myth that collecting mate-
rial things is easy and they don't
have to work hard to obtain
them.
Anything short of this will have
us attending more churches,
listening to more grieving testi-
mony, as we continue to search
for answers that even our most
powerful leaders cannot find.
William "DC" Clark is a fire-
fighter, community activist, au-
thor of the book Lessons from the
Other Side" and president of the
Miami Central High Alumni Asso-
ciation.


fected families, who'd lost their
loved ones, were feeling. Curry
was feeling this way because
he'd seen this picture before. To
him, this scene was a re-run of
a very bad movie. Tonight wasn't
the night for one of his rousing
speeches. Tonight, wasn't the
night where someone was going
to descend from the clouds and
present the answers to all of our
problems on a couple of stone
tablets.
On this night, Curry too, would
spend his time searching for
answers that have eluded this
community for many years.
Curry, his staff and his con-
gregation are used to facilitating
gatherings of this nature for sev-
eral years. New Birth has grown
to such stature that many who
do not even attend the church
often turn to it in times of need.
The church also doubles as the
home of the local branch of the
NAACP. Include in this scenario
is the church-owned WMBM ra-
dio station and it doesn't take a
rocket scientist to figure out that
any burning issue that remotely
affects the community has to go
through New Birth at some point
in time.
Miami's Black community has,
in times past, tried to elevate its
collective lot by using the shoul-


our pseudo harmony instead of
doing the work to prevent such
violence. We make too many ex-
cuses why our children turn out
the way they do without admit-
ting that we have stopped plac-
ing our children at the top of our
proverbial totem pole.
Our children used to be our
number-one priority but now
we've dropped them somewhere
below our rent, utilities, car
note, wardrobe, hair, nails, pedi-
cures and a night out to the strip
club. The only time some of us
visit our schools is to confront
a teacher over some lie that was
spoon-fed to us by little Denzel,
instead of checking on his prog-
ress. Black parents will flock to
a battle of the bands or a foot-
ball game against their favorite
rival but trying to get them to
attend an FCAT meeting is like
pulling teeth.
While too many of our Black
men are missing in action when
it comes to raising our children,
some of our Black women use
the fact that daddy's not around
as an excuse not to teach their
children manners and respect.
At New Birth, most of the
speakers kept referring to those
involved in the shooting as if
they were someone else's chil-
dren. The fact is these are our


Florida Power & Light Company earned
$789 million last year, down from $836
million in 2007. But if you are caught
in the economic downturn and can't pay
your bill on time they will cut off your
power. Customer complaints are piling
up. Late payers can expect a demand
from FPL that they make large deposits,
have payments deducted from their
bank accounts or have a third party
guarantee payment.


The memorable victory of the Pittsburgh
Steelers over the Arizona Cardinals on
Sunday marks their sixth Super Bowl
win. More importantly, it showed the
Steelers' coach Mike Tomlin the
second Black head coach in three years
to win a Super Bowl, after Tony Dungy -
is further proof that if African American
coaches are given a chance they can
succeed at the highest levels. Perhaps
big-time college football where only
one minority head coach runs one of the
66 elite programs guaranteed a crack at
a major bowl game will take note.

*******
Nobody but nobody has ever sung our
National Anthem like Jennifer Hudson
did Sunday in Tampa for Super Bowl
43. The Dreamgirls star and American
Idol beauty wowed the millions of
viewers with a performance never to be


forgotten.


Florida homeowners are in a bind
and trying to decide what to do about
their insurance needs after State Farm
informed us that they are getting out
of the property insurance business in
Florida and are canceling 1.2 million
policies in the state. The irony of the deal
is they still want us to hold on to the
lucrative automobile policies we have.

********
Feelings are running high at Blanche
Ely High School in Pompano Beach after
two students were struck by a Taser
fired by a Broward Sheriffs deputy who
was trying to break up a fight between
two 18-year-old girls. Stay tuned.

******** .
The race for the U.S. Senate seat in
2010 is beginning to shape up as one of
the most interesting and crowded since
Gov. Charlie Crist's name has been
mentioned to replace Mel Martinez
when Martinez steps down. The potential
Republican candidates are watching
and waiting, while Democrats Kendrick
Meek and Dan Gelber have already
started running. U.S. Reps. Connie
Mack and Vern Buchanan, both from
southwest Florida, and former House
Speaker Marco Rubio of Miami have all
expressed interest. Stay tuned.


W while too many of our Black men are missing in action when
it comes to raising our children, some of our Black women
use the fact that daddy's not around as an excuse not to
teach their children manners and respect.









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


Father J. Kenneth Major celebrates 40 *


years at the Church of the Incarnation


Father Harold T. Lewis, Rector, Calvary Episcopal
Church (Pittsburgh, Penn.), Guest Preacher


Store closure will cost 59 jobs


GROCERY
continued from 1A

put up urging customers to
call County Commissioners
Audrey Edmonson and Dorrin
Rolle and City Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones to come
to the rescue of the business.
"What we need is some mon-
ey for survival," said Perez. "If
we receive the help from the
government, then well con-
tinue."
Perez's hope for aid may not
be very farfetched. The city of
Miami Department of Commu-
nity Development dispatched
an employee, George Menson,
to evaluate the situation.
"I came to see exactly what is
going on," Menson said in an
interview at the store Tuesday.


Menson said it was too ear-
ly to know whether the city
will aid Neighbors Supermar-
ket, citing concerns about the
store's sustainability.
"When governments build
something like this, they ex-
pect the business to stay,"
said Menson. "The government
does not want to give money to
a bad business."
Perez predicts dire conse-
quences for the remaining
businesses in the area.
"A lot of traffic comes this
way because of the store," he
said. "Traffic could be reduced
maybe 50 to 60 percent but I'm
100 percent sure it will have
negative effects."
The store's owner, Jorge Car-
bajal, could not be immediately
reached for comment.


Party boss promises a new

direction for country


STEELE
continued from 1A

stand its ground whether
Blacks are attracted to it or
not, Blackwell has been serv-
ing as vice-chairman of the
RNC's platform committee and
was the party's 2006 nominee
for governor of Ohio.
Blackwell and Steele ran
against several White candi-
dates.
They included incumbent
RNC Chairman Mike Duncan;
Saul Anuzsis, chairman of the
Michigan GOP; Katon Dawson,
chairman of South Carolina
Republicans; and Chip Salts-
man, a Tennessee party leader
who was campaign manag-
er for former Arkansas Gov.
Mike Huckabee's presidential
bid and who generated con-
troversy when he sent a CD
titled Barack, the Magic Negro
as a Christmas present to RNC
members.
Blackwell started with 20
votes after the first round of
voting for RNC chairman and
he had 15 votes after four
rounds. He then dropped
his bid and gave an impas-
sioned endorsement of Steele.
Steele won 91 votes out of
a possible 168 in the sixth


round; a simple majority of 85
was needed to win. He bested
Dawson, who had 77 votes.
Promising to bring the party to
"every corner and every group"
in the nation and warning ob-
structionists to "get ready to
get knocked over," Steele said
the party of Abraham Lincoln
is a conservative party and "we
will cede no ground to any-
one on principles...It's time for
something completely different
and we are going to bring it to
them," Steele said after his vic-
tory. 'This is our opportunity. I
cannot do this by myself."
He called his win an op-
portunity to empower and
grow the Republican base.
"It's time for something com-
pletely different...We will make
sure that we work hard to
make sure those principles,
those values that have made
us the party of Lincoln are part
of the issues, are part of the
policies, are part of helping set
a new direction for this coun-
try," Steele said.
"We will cede no ground to
anyone on principles and on
matters that matter to the peo-
ple of this country. So my first
official act as your new chair-
man is to end this speech right
now."


8th ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN EXHIBIT

2009 EXHIBITION THEME

"CITIZENSHIP FORGING CHANGE"


This Ilfick I 1istiory' % (Ion


by dic
BluCk Affairs Ad]ijO1)'y
Board and sAitcS
T'fhe Clted StatES'
first African














MIAMMADE

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i~ '~'n Nlurd:thru friday



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R Lc Cla.(~~rk('C cit%: I
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Sjponwsred by,
Honoioruab lCe CIIrnan Dcenis C. N'loss
Honorabic Commissioner urbart J. Joirdan
Honornabl Coini-nissioner DarriniiD. Rolle
lonoraib N-ianmi-Dadel Cointy Nl) or C(7arlos All
Nienibcrs of the Bloarrd of Couwit Comnnissioni


vritez,
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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


City breaks ground on second phase of


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @niamitimesonline.com

Saying they were motivated
by Barack Obama's call for ac-
tion as he stood on the steps of
Washington after being swore
in as the 44th President of the
United States, a Miami city
leader used the opportunity to
launch the second phase of a
road improvement project that
will cost nearly $2 million.
Miami Commissioner Mi-
chelle Spence-Jones of Dis-
trict 5 led a ground break-
ing ceremony for phase 2 of
Buena Vista Heights Road
Improvements Project, which
is receiving substantial fund-
ing from the Street Bonds and
the Transit Half-Cent Surtax,
with completion expected in
six months.
"That's what this new era
is all about: taking responsi-
bility in cleaning and keeping
our neighborhoods," Spence-
Jones said at a press con-
ference marking the ground
breaking held on Jan. 21 at
Northwest 45t-46th streets
and First Avenue.


lift









Those present at the groundbreaking for phase 2 of Buena Vista Heights included, from left, Bond
Oversight Board Member Mariano Cruz, Capital Improvements Director Ola A. Aluko, Commander
Gary Eugene, Reverend Norward Dean, Little Haiti NET Administrator RaSha Cameau, APAC Group
Representative Faustin Dennis, Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones, Buena Vista Heights Home
Owners Association President Evelyn Andre, and neighborhood residents. -Miami Times photo/andra J. Charity
,- .. .





Owners Association President Evelyn Andre, and neighborhood residents. --MiamiTimesphoto/SandraJ.Charite


road improvements

The first phase of the proj- Avenue to Second Avenue,
ect began in summer 2006 44th Street from North Miami
and was completed in the Avenue to Second Avenue and
fall, improving the section of 45th Street from North Miami
Northwest 38th Street from Avenue to Second Avenue.
North Miami Avenue to North- Also included in the proj-
west Second Avenue; a sec- ect is First Avenue from
tion of Northwest 39th Street 40th to 46th streets, exclud-
from North Miami Avenue to ing the 40th Street and
Second Avenue; a section of 46th Street intersections.
Northwest 40th Street from "This will help out because
North Miami Avenue to North- whenever you drive your car
west Second Avenue; and a on this messed up road, your
section of Northwest First Av- car messes up. People don't
enue from Northwest 38th to have money to be fixing cars,"
40th streets. said resident Linda Ander-
The cost of that phase was son.
estimated at $695,357, with The city of Miami has hired
funding from the Local Option APAC Group with Haitian con-
Gas Tax and Homeland De- tractor Faustin Denis to help
fense Neighborhood Improve- lead,the project.
ment Bond Dollars. Spence-Jones said though
Coming almost three years the city would bring improve-
later, phase 2 will include ments in those areas, it was
street milling and resurfac- up to the community to keep
ing, sidewalk repairs, drain- the neighborhoods clean.
age improvements, street wid- "It is the public and the gov-
ening, a new curb and gutter, ernment working together to
pavement markings and some make sure that the dollars
landscaping in the areas of are available, that the work
41st Street from North Miami actually gets done and that
Avenue to Second Avenue; after it's done we maintain it,"
42nd Street from North Miami Spence-Jones said.


Leading bishop, Heat star mark National Day of Service with food distribution


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Traffic came to a halt on an
Opa-locka street 2300 block
of Northwest 135 Street on
Monday afternoon at the New
Birth Baptist Cathedral of
Faith International.
The senior pastor and
teacher, Bishop Victor T.
Curry, was not preaching. He
was leading a National Day of
Service event, commemorat-
ing the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. holiday, along with
Miami's Heats star Dwayne
Wade.
"Dr. King's ministry was not
confined to a church build-
ing only," said Curry, who has
relatives attends the famed
Ebenezer Baptist Church in
Atlanta, where King preached
his message of nonviolence.
King, once said, "Everybody
can be great, because every-
body can serve."
"His speeches and writings
inspired me to do more," said
Curry.
Wade's World, Foundation,
along with the Oklahoma
City-based Feed The Chil-
dren, partnered with New
Birth to distribute 25 pounds
of non-perishable food and 10
pounds of household goods.
New Birth received 400
vouchers from Feed The Chil-
dren to distribute to the con-
gregation on a first-come-first-
served basis, said New Birth's
Pastor Jeff Murray.
Congregants waited in long
lines to drive up to see Curry
and Wade.
Driving to receive her sup-
plies, Nicole Belton said, "This
is living Dr. King's dream." As
she watched the many volun-
teers greeting the recipients
with a smile, Belton said,
"These people could have been
anywhere on this momentous
day but they chose to be here
to spend their day serving
others. It brings joy to me."
Theresa Gold, 16, was excit-


ed to see Wade. She snapped
pictures of the star, planning
to send them to her friends.
While Wade said that he,
would have liked to be in
Washington, D.C., for the
swearing in of the first Black
president, he was called to do
service and, also, the Heat is
scheduled to play the Boston
Celtics at the AmericanAirlines
Arena today. Still, Wade said,
his long-time friend Alonzo
Mourning was at the inaugu-
ration as his eyes and ears.
Meanwhile, Wade's moth-


er, Jolinda, took part in food
distribution at her Chicago
church, Temple of Praise
Binding and Loosing Ministry
International.
"To be one of the guys, to be
a part of this historic event, we
have done a great job with Feed
The Children in Miami and
Chicago," said Wade, standing
outside of New Birth. "The Feed
Children is something that we
have been wanting to do for a
very long time. My foundation
deals with bettering our kids
and doing what we can to help
.^ L q ,


Miami Heat star Dwayne Wade smiles at New Birth congregants
as they drive up to pick up food and supplies which were donated
by the Wade Foundation and the Feed The Children Foundation for
distribution to church members in Opa-locka.
-Miami Times photo/Sandra J. Charite


Floridians say college tuition too high, pay teachers more


Special to The Miami Times


TALLAHASSEE A grow-
ing number of Floridians
think the cost of tuition at the
state's public universities and
colleges is too high, according
to the recently released third
annual Sunshine State Survey
commissioned by Leadership
Florida.
Statewide, 24 percent of
survey respondents described
tuition as much too high and
an additional 24 percent said
tuition is a little too high. The
48 percent who say tuition is
too high is up from 41 percent
in 2007.
"We are seeing another back-
lash from our slumping econ-
omy," said Brad Coker of Ma-
son-Dixon research who con-
ducted the poll of 1,200 Flor-,
ida residents. "Money is tight
and citizens are aware that
universities can raise tuition;
when you put the two together,


it equals a greater dissatisfac-
tion towards spending."
There was no significant dif-
ference in attitude about tu-
ition costs between those who
have a child currently enrolled
in high school (50 percent too
high) and those who do not
(48 percent too high). Those
with, a child currently en-
rolled in a Florida college (58
percent) are, however, more
likely to feel tuition is too high
than those who do not (47 per-
cent).
Florida residents still rate
the states colleges and uni-
versities favorably, but their
overall scores have dropped
since last year. Statewide, 64
percent rate them as excellent
or good (down from 71 per-
cent). Those with some college
education (69 percent) and
those with a child enrolled in
a Florida college (72 percent)
rate them better.
Most Floridians, however,


feel admission standards are
about right or too easy (63
percent) and 'only 19 percent
feel they are too difficult.
Those with children in high
school (25 percent) or who
have a child in a Florida col-
lege (23 percent) are more
likely to feel admission stan-
dards are too difficult.
Florida residents give their
public schools lower per-
formance ratings this year.
Statewide, 42 percent of Flor-
ida citizens rate the quality
of public education in their
local schools as excellent or
good (down seven points from
2007), while 25 percent rate
them as fair and 19 percent
rate them poor. Residents with
children and grandchildren in
public schools give schools
higher marks.
Increasing teacher pay re-
mains the top priority men-
tioned by most Floridians (30
percent).


further their future."
Nationwide, 18 states took
part in The Feed Children dis-
tribution of goods.
"America is experiencing
economic distress right now,
so there is a great need to help
as many children and fami-
lies as we can," Larry Jones,
founder and president of Feed
The Children, said in a state-
ment.
"Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. had big dreams for a bet-
ter America and we honor his
work. Today, thousands of
families across the U.S. will
walk away from this event
with a brighter outlook on life
knowing that someone will
help them through their tough
times," Jones said.


Publ~),c Uh.~,cnS~en


Bishop Victor T. Curry of New Birth Baptist Church shakes hands
with a congregant as he distributes food and supplies at his church
in Opa-locka on Monday. --MiamiTimes photo/SandraJ. Charite


RNe rawww.mdpls.org

il Celebrate


SBlack History Month @ your

...,. Miami-Dade Public Library!


Don't miss an extraordinary series of special programs featuring
author presentations, exhibitions, storytelling, music and more.


EXHIBITIONS


The People's President: Portraits of Abraham Lincoln by Wendy Allen
For the past 25 years, artist and historian Wendy Allen has created portraits of
former President Abraham Lincoln. Allen's work, in a vast range of artistic styles
and mediums, is created exclusively with one subject in mind: a man who became
one of America's most beloved presidents.
In observance of the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth, the library collaborated
with Allen to create a site-specific, salon-style installation of her obsessive oeuvre
of Lincoln portraits.
February 7 April 6
Main Library 1 Floor Exhibition Space
101 W. Flagler St. 305.375.2665


wenay Allen
Lincoln 125, 2007,
oil on canvas,
Courtesy of the artist.


Compose and They Will Listen: Big Band Jazz with various artists
Discover the Roots of Jazz through film screening, live performance and a
discussion led by artists Howard Moss, Lela Lombardo and Nicole Yarling.
Wednesday, February 11, 6 p.m.
North Dade Regional
2455 NW 183 St. 305.625.6424


Adventures of Anansi
Anansi, the trickster, is one of the most important characters of West African and
Caribbean folklore. He is a spider, but often acts and appears as a man.Audiences
can participate in the performance by using puppets to help tell the tales.
Monday, February 9,3:30 p.m.
North Dade Regional
2455 NW 183 St. 305.625.6424
Program made possible by CITI.

STORYTELLING


Juba This Juba That
A kaleidoscope of tales opens the doorways to African American History
Tuesday, February 10, 3:30 p.m. Thursday, February 12
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Complex opening gives pride of place to the culture of Haiti

City and county provided funds to build the $38 million 'jewel'


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

A vision -- a dream -- has be-
come a reality in the heart of
Little Haiti.
The city of Miami hosted a
grand opening celebration for
the Little Haiti Cultural Com-
plex on Jan. 28.
Elected officials joined mem-
bers of the Haitian community
and other residents for the cel-
ebration that featured perfor-
mances by Haitian dance group
Sosyete Koukouy, the Florida
Memorial University Steel Band,
the Elena Garcia Dance Project,
legendary Haitian singer Farah
Juste, modern dancer Vitolio
Jeune of the New Wprld School
of Arts and street band Rara La-
kay.
The cultural fare was served
up in the Black Box Theater of
the center at 260 NE 59th Terr.
But they were reminded that
the man with the vision was not
present to celebrate with them.
"None of this would have been
possible without the late Arthur
Teele," said Miami City Commis-
sioner Michelle Spence-Jones of
District 5.
Teele, then a city commis-
sioner, shot and killed himself
in 2005 in the lobby of The Mi-
ami Herald building in down-
town Miami as he battled cor-


ruption charges.
Marleine Bastien, executive di-
rector of the organization Fanm
Ayisyen Nan Miyami (Haitian
Women of Miami), said Teele's
dream did not die because of
the efforts of Spence-Jones in
not giving up and pushing for
the development of Little Haiti.
"This is a place where people
can come together to share their
cultures," said Bastien.
Located two blocks away from
each other, the center and the
Little Haiti Soccer Park are part
of a nearly $38 million proj-
ect.. The city of Miami provided
$29.6 million and Miami-Dade
$7.3 million
"This is $38 million-well
spent," said Miami Commis-
sioner Joe Sanchez.
Spence-Jones described the
complex as "a jewel in Little
Haiti." Spence-Jones and Mi-
ami Mayor Manny Diaz agreed
it would be a cultural destina-
tion for many, provide jobs and
enhance businesses.
"People at the local level un-
derstand what it takes to build
the community. These projects
create jobs and bring people
together. The future genera-
tion will benefit from this," said
Diaz.
Children especially will ben-
efit.
The complex will offer dance


ART EXHIBITION

The "Expressions of the
Caribbean" exhibition at
the Little Haiti Cultural Arts
Complex, 260 NE 59" St., will
run though March 28, 10 a.m.-
6 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday.

and drama classes and perfor-
mances will rake place in the
state-of-the-art Black Box The-
ater.
"I view projects like these as
opportunities to pass on a leg-
acy to our children, a perfect
place for an exchange of idea,"
said state Rep. Ronald Brise, D-
Miami.
The grand opening also gave
the community a chance to view
the art exhibition titled "Expres-
sions of the Caribbean," featur-
ing the works of local artists
and curated by Eduard Duval
Carrie and the Haitian Cultural
Arts Alliance.
Francesca Lalanne, 28, said
her art represented the condi-
tions many Haitians are facing
in their country. Four hurri-
canes ripped through the coun-
try last year, severely worsening
conditions for the impoverished
people.
"I bring out sensitivity of the
things going on," said Lalanne


Haitian artist Wildred Daleus stands in front of a mural on Haitian folklore that he painted
on a wall of the Little Haiti Cultural Center., during the center's grand opening celebration on
Jan. 28. --MiamiTimes photo/Sandra J. Charite


who started out in architecture
but fell in love with art at 18. "I
don't need to say it but I show it,
poetically in my art."
The pieces by Wilfred Daleus
in the show portray a different
form of art, focusing on Haitian


folklore.
"There are a lot of Haitians
leaving the Little Haiti neighbor-
hood but when they return they
can have something to reflect
on," said Daleus, a self-taught
artist who painted a mural on


an exterior wall of the nearby
Little Haiti Cultural Center, 225
NE 59th St.
The mural will endure so that
coming generations to remind
people of the .culture of Haiti,
Daleus said.


No-snitching mentality seen as hurdle to solving case


VIOLENCE
continued from 1A

on Jan. 29 that-brought reli-
gious leaders, relatives of the
victims and law enforcement
officials at Friendship Mission-
ary Baptist Church, 740 NW
58th St.
"When you shoot a child in
Liberty City since Nov. 4, 2008,
you may be shooting the next
president of the United States."
Sharpton said in a ref ~e '. to
the election of Barack Obama
to the White House. "You want
to be a thug, you want to be a
gangster, then you go where
thugs and gangsters go you
pay the price in jail."
This wave of activism stems
from the shooting on Jan. 23
that killed Derrick Gloster, 18
and Brandon Mills, 16, and
left seven others aged between
14 and 20 injured after one or
more gunmen opened fire with
an AK-47 assault rifle on a dice
game at the corner of North-
west 70th Street and 15th Ave.
Calls to bring the shooter to
justice are being matched with
a $50,000 reward but so far po-
lice report they have no leads.
During a Circle of Brother-
hood for Change candlelight
vigil on Jan. 27 held at North-
west 71st Street and 15th Av-
enue, a few feet away from the
shooting scene, Utavia Bryant
said she was tired of the vio-
lence.
"We need more for these kids
to do in the streets besides
playing dice," said the Liberty
City resident. "We need more
for this community, so the
leadership needs to step up."
Bryant joined other resi-
dents, city officials and com-


munity activists at the candle-
light vigil to discuss was to end
the violence.
"We are the problem and we
need to look at it," said Terry
Elliot Sr., worshipful master
of the Miami Gardens Masons
Lodge No. 777. "They say it
takes a village but where is the
village? We need to have more
of these politicians out here
not just when something hap-
pens."
Minister Rasul Muhammad
of the Nation of Islam Mosque
29 challenged the men of Lib-
erty City to renew the oath
that was made at the Nation's
Million Man March in 2005 by
organizing the community and
taking care of the women.
Family members of the slain
victims joined in a circle as
leaders prayed for peace in the
community.
Brandon's elder sister, Ciara
Mills, 23, said after the press
conference "she hoped the
shooter would turn himself in
so that another family would
not have to endure her pain.
As of late Tuesday, the case
was actively being investigated
by police, said Miami Police
Deputy Chief Frank Fernan-
dez.
County Commission Chair-
man Dennis Moss announced
at the press conference, some
commissioners, including him-
self, Audrey Edmonson and
Barbara Jordan had contribut-
ed to a reward fund that rose
to $50,000.
With few leads and the large
reward, leaders were saying
the "no-snitching" mentality
-- people refusing to provide
information to the police, must
end.


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Scent Detection

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"If this was a police shooting,
we would have been marching
or upset. Someone in the com-
munity thought the only way to
handle a situation was to kill,"
said Bishop Victor T. Curry, se-
nior pastor of New Birth Bap-
tist Church Cathedral of Faith
International, based in Opa-
locka. "It's not snitching but
.it is being a man. We thought
that President Obama's elec-
tion would change thleihearts
and minds of our children."
Sharpton joined the call for
people with information on the
shooting to step forward.
"You that have information
and are holding that informa-
tion under some sick Black
code are really traitors to our
race and really denigrating
the value of our community,"
Sharpton said.
"We can't get to the promised
land if we are shooting each


other," he added.
Sharpton expressed concern
that there was no ban on as-
sault weapons.
Curry echoed that concern.
"If law enforcement officers
come to find you, and they
know you have an assault
weapon, they're not coming to
talk," Curry said. "We can talk
now but we're not going to be
able to talk then."
- Ralph. Dixon. a father of two,4
said"he 'Was tired of the vib-


lence. He was not impressed
that a week of activities was
held to bring attention to the
issue. He too urged a crack-
down on weapons.
"I think that it is a bunch of
people just talking and making
themselves look good on the
camera. The young are burying
the young. If we don't get the.
guns off the streets, then we
will not have any future lead-
ers. There are no resolutions
or actions being done for these


killings, it is just people talk-
ing. Words don't get guns off
the street. They need to enforce
a curfew to get these kids off
the street," Dixon said.
Brandon's body was laid to
rest last Saturday at Logos
Baptist Church, 16305 N.W.
48th Avenue. Gloster's funeral
is scheduled at noon, Saturday,
Feb. 7, at the Jordan Grove
Missionary Baptist Church
where Rev. Douglas Cook Sr. is
the presiding pastor.


, SOUTH FLORIDA EAST COAST CORRIDOR STUDY


I COME TO A PHASE 2

__ KICK-OFF MEETING!

Your Comments Are, Important
Sus Comentarios Son Importantes
Ou opinyon adj enp6tan

The study seeks to improve mobility with new local and regional passenger
transit service for eastern Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade Counties on
the 85-mile FEC Railway corridor.







CHOOSE THE DATE AND LOCATION BEST FOR YOU!
Meetings begin with a 30 minute open house. View project illustrations and
talk with the study team. A presentation will follow.


RIVIERA BEACH
Thursday, February 5
Riviera Beach City Hall
Council Chamber Room
C202, Second Floor
600 W. Blue Heron Blvd., #1
6-8 p.m.

WEST PALM BEACH
Wednesday, February 4
The Raymond F. Kravis
Center for the
Performing Arts
Cohen Pavilion
701 Okeechobee Blvd.
3:30 5:30 p.m.
OR,6 8 p.m.

DELRAY BEACH
Wednesday, February 11
Delray Beach City Hall
Council Commission
Chamber
100 NW 1st Ave.
6-8 p.m.


POMPANO BEACH
Wednesday, February 18
E. Pat Larkins,
Community Center
Auditorium West side
520 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
6- 8 p.m.

FORT LAUDERDALE
Wednesday, February 25
African American Research
Library & Cultural Center
Auditorium & Michael Bienes
Seminar Room #2
2650 Sistrunk Blvd.
5 7 p.m.

HOLLYWOOD
Tuesday, February 17
Hollywood Central Performing
Arts Center
Auditorium & Cafe
1770 Monroe St.
6-8 p.m.


AVENTURA
Tuesday, February 24
Aventura Community
Recreation Center
Classrooms 1A,
1B and 2
3375 NE 188th St.
6 8 p.m.

MIAMI SHORES
Thursday, February 12
Miami Shores
Country Club
Ballroom
10000 Biscayne Blvd.
6 8 p.m.

MIAMI
Tuesday, February 10
Greater Bethel
AME Church
Lower Auditorium
245 NW 8th St.
3:30 5:30 p.m.
OR 6-8 p.m.


Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex,
religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under
the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of
charge) should contact any of the following at least seven days prior to the meeting:

*Miami-Dade County: Charesse Chester 305-944-7564 x 203
*Broward County: Ali Soule 1-800-330-7444
*Palm Beach County: Denis Eirikis 561-798-9633

Visit www.SFECCstudy.com to lean more.


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


Richard Faison
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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Mom's dream, my achievement

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8A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


Opa-locka mayor: Progress

made but more to be done


By Michael North and Virginia Gil
U/ Miami News Service

In a stirring speech before a
packed commission chamber,
Opa-locka Mayor Joseph L. Kel-
ley told listeners that in his two
terms, the city has accomplished
much in its efforts to stabilize its
finances and fight crime.
"But we cannot become con-
tent," Kelley, 47, told about 200
people who gathered for the may-
or's "State of the City Address"
at the municipal headquarters
in the Town Center Property.
"We must strive for more. There
will be naysayers and opposition
but we will continue to chart a
course. That is progress in mo-
tion."
Progress in Motion, the theme
of the address, focused heavily
on Opa-locka's financial perfor-
mance. "Our assets continue to
exceed our liabilities," the mayor
said in his Jan. 26 speech.
With the help of a higher prop-
erty tax rate, the city's approxi-
mate $34 million budget keeps
the jobs of all its 181 city employ-
ees. The rate for the fiscal year
that began Oct. 1 increased from
$7.58 to $8.20 for every $1,000
of a home's assessed value. That
means in the city of more than
15,000 people, property taxes for
the average homeowner under
the new budget will be $1,552, an
increase from $1,458 in 2008.
The increased revenues will
help finance $80 million in capi-
tal improvements, including
plans to tear down the city's old
water plant and replace it with
a water-use facility that will cut
down on residents' water bills,
Kelley said. Currently, Opa-locka


buys its water from Miami-Dade
County and sends it on to resi-
dents.
Another plan calls for the con-
struction of a city multipurpose
building that would house a pool,
a gym and an area where senior
citizens can gather, Kelley said.
The building also could serve as
a storm shelter since Opa-locka
has no such facility within city
limits.
Another budget area that will
get more money is public safety,
Kelley said, an effort that must
continue to combat crime.
"We arxe still involved in ridding
the streets of deadly weapons,"
the mayor said, referring to an
initiative in which the police de-
partment has acquired new fire-
arms and is training officers to
handle situations involving AK-
47 assault rifles.
Some 340 violent crimes were
. reported in 2007 but that num-
ber decreased to 320 in 2008 and
is projected to decrease further
to 300 in 2009.
Since Kelley's election as may-
or in September 2004, the police
department has added 17 officers
and hired its first crime-scene in-
vestigator, he said, bringing the
total number of officers on the
force to 48, the highest level in
20 years.
The increase in personnel has
impacted the city's grim crime
statistics. The average response
time for calls has dropped from
five and a half minutes to four
minutes. In 2007, two detectives
were assigned an average of 50
cases each per month, with no
cases cleared. With three detec-
tives, the force is solving about
30 percent of the cases.


Mayor Joseph Kelly gives State of the City address.- City of Opa-locka


In December, police nabbed
nearly three dozen gang mem-
bers believed to be involved in
drugs and violence. The raid also
recovered 40 guns.
Getting firearms off the street
was a city priority last year. At
least two gun buyback drives
were held at St. Andrew Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, 15000
NW 27th Ave., in a joint project
between Opa-locka police, the
Florida Highway Patrol and the
church.
And, in keeping with the may-
or's plan to clean up the streets,
the city will implement projects
for youth such as flag football,
cheerleading, basketball and
music classes.
"We want to promote' whole-
some public activity that steers
young men away from the dark
corners that attract them," Kel-
ley said.
Emphasizing family values, the
mayor urged parents to do their
part at home.
"We can tell your kids to keep
their pants up on city property,
but you must tell them to do the
same at home," Kelley said, refer-
ring to a city ordinance that bans
saggy pants on city property.
The Rev. Jimmye Larkin, pas-


tor of New Christian Fellowship
Missionary Baptist Church in
Opa-locka, said she has attend-
ed all five of Kelley's State of the
City addresses and applauds the
mayor's initiatives.
"I am here to let him know
that we appreciate what he has
changed in Opa-locka, such as
crime rates and the overall look
of the city," Larkin said.
Perhaps the most impressive
statistic was a 95 percent re-
duction in Magnolia area crime
in 2008, as reported by Kelley.
Also known as the Triangle, the
Magnolia district is the area with
the highest crime rates in Opa-
locka.
The decrease can be attributed
to a Community Empowerment
Team, a program that began in
Magnolia. It goes beyond just
fighting crime, Kelley said.
"Historically, we just punish,
but that is not the answer. CET
was initiated to address not just
the enforcement side but also the
social service side. It helps people
who are trying to find a job, those
families that need after-school
assistance, and also helps people
with drug problems." Kelley said.
He plans to expand the program
to other parts of the city.


Call to rename schools for Athalie Range and Esther Rolle


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Georgia Ayers is determined
that the injustices done to
Black Miamians in years past
are not forgotten.
At the top of her list is the
forcible eviction of families 62
years ago from the area then
known as Railroad Shop, Col-
ored Addition, now Allapattah.
* Ayers, 80, recall the episode
as if it were yesterday.
Police entered the homes of
the families around 11 a.m.
Aug. 7, 1947, took their be-
longings and placed them on
the street because the county
wanted the land for a school
that would be attended by
Whites. That school is now Al-
lapattah Middle.
Ayers wants Allapattah Mid-
dle, 1331 NW 46t St., named
for perhaps the most famous
evictee from Railroad Shop:
stage and television actress Es-
ter Rolle, perhaps best known
as Florida in the 1970s sitcom
Good Times.
"She had to move to Miami
from Pompano Beach to grad-
uate from Booker T. Washing-
ton High School because they
weren't letting Blacks attend


high school in Pompano," Ayers
said. "She went pn to Califor-
nia to become a movie actress,
but never did she pretend to be
'Miss Rich.' She portrayed the
poor, struggling Black woman.
"That school should be
named for someone who was
evicted from there, and went
on to become famous, but kept
depicting the plight of the poor
and struggling."
Ayers said when she pro-
posed the name change at a
recent School Board meeting,
she ran into opposition from
an unlikely source: students.
I was really set back
when these kids were holler-
ing about 'We don't want our
school changed.' I couldn't get
angry with them, because they
were children, but they don't
know the history. That is not
Allapattah. And that's not their
school, that's our school and
the rest of us who were put
out."
Ayers is pushing for the 're-
naming of yet another school,
Orchard Villa Middle, 5720
NW 13t Ave., for M. Athalie
Range, who was the first Black
to be appointed to state office
when she served as head of
the Department of Community


Affairs. Range is also remem-
bered as a former Miami city
commissioner, staunch com-
munity activist and success-
ful businesswoman, owner of
Range Fureral Home.
."When I get that school
named after her, then Ill leave
it," said Ayers.
Meanwhile, Ayers continues
to push for Rolle's name to go
up on Allapattah Middle. She
says she respects the oppo-
sition from the students but
believes it is the result of not
knowing the history of the
area.
"You have a right to your
opinion, but you don't know
what we went through," she
said. "Colored families were
evicted for that school to be
built for White children... See,
these young children today,
they don't know what we went
through for them to have the
opportunities that they have."
And, she added: "The chil-
dren had never heard of Esther
Rolle."
Ayers believes the history
of the Railroad Shop, Colored
Addition, an area bounded by
Northwest 46m to 501 streets
and Northwest 12t to 14t av-
enues, is being glossed over in


It's not just Black History,


it's our history

Learn about Black cultural heritage and diversity

* Take one of the special bus tours to explore landmarks highlighting the
African-American experience

* Revel in the sights and sounds of Carnaval during this month's JAM at
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schools because it is "ugly his-
tory."
"But they are where they
are because someone dared to
keep history," she said.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Contract is awarded for

Hampton House project


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

A $617,000 contract for the
restoration of the Historic
Hampton House in Browns-
ville has been awarded to OAC
Action Construction Corpora-
tion which submitted the low-
est bid.
Mario A. Berrios, an engi-
neer with the county, made
the announcement during
a meeting of the Hampton
Community Trust at the Jo-
seph Caleb Center on Mon-
day. He said the company
had the most experience in
historic projects.
Dorothy Johnson, who
chairs the trust, had this ad-
vice for the firm: "It is very
important that they reach
back into this community
and hire locally."
Berrios did not anticipate
any difficulties in that regard.
He said the law requires com-
panies provide employment
and contract opportunities
for low-income residents with
regard to such projects and
the county "can strongly sug-
gest" OAC Action Construc-
tion comply with it.
Berrios expected construc-
tion to begin in late February
and take about six months.
At that same meeting, the
trust's board of directors de-


cided that one of the rooms
of the restored building be
named for Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr., despite absence of
hard evidence that the civil
rights hero stayed at the mo-
tel.
"We had the oral history
from the community," said
Johnson. The people who
lived there told us. We just
don't have it in writing."
The group also discussed
an upcoming fundraiser, a
musical tribute to Sammy
Davis Jr., who was often fea-
tured at the Hampton House,
which, during the 1950s and
1960s hosted Black celeb-
rities who could not stay at
the venues where they per-
formed. They would stay at
Hampton House which fea-
tured luxurious accommoda-
tions and often the talents of
jazz greats.
Upon the project's comple-
tion, the building will house
a new Hampton House Com-
munity Center that will con-
tain a learning center and
jazz archives.
According to Charlayne W.
Thompkins; Finance Director
of Historic Hampton House
Community Trust, the orga-
nization has raised $5.5 mil-
lion to date. Completion of
the project will require a total
of $7 million.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 9A THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


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The Miami Times
U ___


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


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11B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


There can be no excuse not

to find time for the Lord


Isaiah 6, verse 1, reads, "It
was in the year King Uzziah
died that I saw the Lord. He
was sitting on a lofty throne,
and the train of His robe filled
the Temple."
King Uzziah was not only
the leader of the Jewish people
at the time of his death, he
was also a relative of Isaiah
the prophet.' A king is a very
overwhelming figure, and when
he is a relative, it certainly
makes a big difference in one's
life.
The scripture says that after


King Uzziah died, Isaiah saw
the Lord in His glory in His
temple. Could it be that Isaiah
was not able to see the Lord
this way until after the death of
the king? Could it be that, prior
to King Uzziah's death, Isaiah
was so focused on the king that
the Lord was not exalted in his
life?
People have confessed to me
on numerous occasions that
they simply do not have time
to read the Bible and to pray
as they know that they should.
Usually the reason the time


spent in other areas.
This is not to say that those
things or people on whom the
time is spent are unimportant.
Certainly it is important to
.work and provide for our
families. A good relationship
with our spouse and children
also requires that we spend
time with them. A hobby or
other activities can also take
up much of our precious time.
However, our time with the Lord
is a priority and should not be
diminished because of other
activities or people that we allow
to consume our time and us.
Unfortunately, many do
not turn to the Lord or seek
intimacy with Him until a
disaster has taken place in
their lives. Do not wait until
someone dies before you
realize how special your time
with the Lord should be in
your daily life.
King Uzziah's death does not


necessarily have to be taken
literally. "Death" could also
mean a realization that there
are people in your life who
no longer belong there. Some
need to "die" to the bondage
that drug, sex or alcohol
addictions bring.
Paul tells us that when
we are in Christ we are new
creations; the old has passed
away. We cannot say that we
have accepted Jesus into our
lives and remain the same.
At times our infatuation and
preoccupation with things
and people compromises what
should be an opportunity to
build and elevate a relationship
with the Lord.
No matter how anointed
anyone is, there is only 24
hours in the day for each of
us. The reality is that if you
are spending six to eight
hours a day sleeping, eight
to 10 hours at work and


additional hours commuting,
performing household chores
and running errands, there is
little time left for family and
even less left for the One Who
is responsible for the life that
you even have.
I usually offer a word of
advice to anybody who seem
not to be able to change a
mindset or lifestyle. I tell
them that they should throw
themselves on the rock and be
broken -- before the rock falls
on them and breaks them.
Think abbut that.
SThe Lord requires all of us
to be broken. However, you
are the one who chooses how
this will occur. If you throw
yourself on a rock, you can
decide to gently place yourself
on that rock so that it does
not hurt you. But if that rock
falls on you, you have lost the
chance to decide how badly it
will hurt you. When that rock


hits you, it's going to hurt.
Spiritually, when we give up
something willingly that we
know we should not have, or
an activity in which we know
that we should not be involved,
then we can prayerfully and
wisely decide how to stop. But
if we persist in continuing a
relationship or activity not
pleasing to God, and He decides
to intervene, then it usually
isn't very pretty.
Remove idols from your life
that include people, places and
things that the Lord does not
like.
You will be surprised how
much clearer His will for your
life will become. You will be
pleasantly surprised at how
much you realize that He loves
you and wants the best for you
and your family. You will also
be surprised at how wonderful
your life will be when you
submit it to the Lord.


The Miami-Dade County
Health Department will hold
classes and screenings noon-2
p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 4, at the
West Perrine Health Center. 305-
278-0442 or 305-668-7344.

Empower U will hold its
third annual "Silence is Death"
Community March on National
Black HIV/AIDS Awareness
Day, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Feb.
6, beginning at the NFL Yet
Center.

Sisters in Sync, a group of
women of color over 40 who
want to come together to share
laughs, sis planning a meeting.
305-934-5122 or 305-725-
5652.
********
Neighborhood Housing
Services of South Florida will
hold free housing orientation,
homebuyer education, and
foreclosure prevention classes
at 300 NW 12th Ave., Feb. 6 -23.
"'/tall 30-. 751-5511.


*********
The National Coalition of
100 Black Women, Greater
Miami Chapter, will hold its
Teen Summit 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 7, at the South
Miami Community Center.
1-800-658-1292 or info@
ncbw 1 Omiami.org.


St. Thomas University will
host its 17th annual Brownbag
Communications Workshop
12:30 p.m., Monday, Feb.
9, in the Evelyn and George
Goldbloom Convocation Hall.
Professionals from South
Florida's communication
industry will participate in a
panel and forum discussing "Is
Profit the Media's Loss?" 305-
474-6880.
********
Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1959 holds its
monthly meeting at the African
heritage Cultural Arts Center at
10:30 a.m. the third Saturday of
the month. Alumni are invited


to attend the planning meeting
for the 15th annual reunion in
June. Also, the school will host
a Financial Aid Workshop at 6
p.m., Feb. 11 and 18 in the TOPA
auditorium. LarMarc Anderson,
305-836-0991.

******** i
Miami-Dade College's North
Campus present Asili Night:
An Old Fashioned Evening of
Poetry and Jazz, featuring poets
Geoffrey Philip, Joseph McNair;
Zarifa Muhiammad-El and
Samantha Cooper, with special
guest jazz artist Charlie Austin
and the Charlie Austin Ensemble,
7 p.m.-10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 13,
at the William Lehman Theater.
305-693-6236.


Top Ladies of Distinction will
meet at 9:30 a.m., Feb. 14, at
Florida Memorial University's
Lehman Aviation Building. 305-
6969-1631.

********
Miami-Dade Transit Choir
will be in concert noon-1 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 18, at the
Stephen P. Clark Government
Center. 305-375-4606 or www.
miamidade,gov/baab


The African Heritage Cultural
Arts Center will host a Black
History Extravaganza 10 a.m.
4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21. 305-
375-4606, www.miamidade.
gov/baab.
********
The city of Miami Gardens will
host its Miss Miami Gardens
Pageant at Florida Memorial
University's Lou Rawls Center,
7-10 p.m., Saturday, Feb.
21. 305-622-8000, www.
missmiamigardens.com.


The National College Fair will
be held noon-4 p.m., Sunday,
Feb. 22, at the Miami Mart
Airport Hotel. 305-995-1739.
******** *
The Simon Wiesenthal
Center will screen its newest
documentary, Against the Tide,
7:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 23
at the Regal Cinema in Miami
Beach.

The fifth annual Carrie P.
Meek Award Ceremony will be
held 6-9 p.m., Thursday, Feb.
26, at the Signature Grand in
Davie. 'www.FischlerSchool.
nova.edu/bhc.


George Washington Carver
alumni will hold a Carver Alumni
Day and BBQ Luncheon, 11
a.m.. Friday, Feb. 27, George
Washington Carver Middle
School auditorium. Call Leona
Cooper Baker by Friday, Feb.
20, 305-445-6662.


The Miami-Dade State
Attorney's Office will hold a
Sealing and Expungement
Program, 4-8 p.m. Friday, Feb.
27, Goulds Park, 305-547-
0724.

A ping pong tournament will
take place 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Feb.
28, Liberty City Optimist Club.
Kim Sands, 305-634-5791,
Bernard C. Poitier 786-291-
1524.


The Haitian Heritage Museum
will hold its fifth annual
Celebration Gala at the Design
District, 8- p.m.-midnight,
Saturday, Feb. 28. 305-371-
5988.


World Literacy Crusade/Girl


Power Program will present
its sixth annual "It Takes A
Village Conference: Improving
Our World One Girl at a Time,"
8 a.m., Saturday, March 21,
Miami Northwestern High
School. 305-756-5502.

********
Carol City Middle School will
present a Youth Crime Watch
Parade at 9:30 a.m., March 27
at the school.

********
Miami Jackson High class of
1979 will hold its 30th annual
reunion, with a week of events,
highlighted by a trip to Montego
Bay, Jamaica. The festivities
will be June 5-14. Louis Fish,
president, 954-895-5441; Carol
Jones, secretary, 786-566-
3751.

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
will hold their "Living Legend"
luncheon at noon, Saturday,
Feb. 7 at the Hotel Sofitel. For
more information, call 305-206-
8269 or 954-612-3659.
Booker T. Washington High
School Class of 1954 will meet at
2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 7 at the
home of Elizabeth Rolle'Thomas
at 18830 NW 44th Ave.


Mt. Calvary MB Church
will host a community forum
on gun violence at 4 p.m.,
I Wednesday, Feb. 4. Tangela
Sears, 786-286-1104.


Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity Concert Chorale will be
in concert 7 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 7, First Baptist Church
Piney Grove. Hattie Harden,
954-735-6289; Ethel Frazier
at 305-836-1317.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church Women's De-
partment invites you to Sun-


day service, 11:30 a.m. 305-
836-6256.


Pastors and Leaders Prayer
Service will be at 7:30 p.m.,
Monday, Feb. 9, Best Western
Hotel on Biscayne Boulevard.
786-273-0294.

********
Apostolic Revival Center will
hold a revival 7:30 p.m. Feb.
10-13. 305-891-3570.

***** *
Greater Harvest Interna-
tional Ministries will hold or-
dination services for its pas-


tor, Gerald T. Ealey, who will
become a bishop, on Sunday,
March. 1. 954-607-0833.

Mt. Zion MBChurch will
sponsor a Valentine's Day
Extravaganza Ball at the Vi-
olines Banquet Hall, 7 p.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 14. 305-632-
8136.

Christian Hill will host a
charity, golf tournament at
12:01 p.m., Friday, Feb. 20,
Miami Springs Country Club.
Larry Mills,. 954-554-8335,
LM09@bellsouth.net.


Performing Entertain-
ment Through Education will
present Black History in the
Magic City, 7:30 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 27, at Mt. Zion Mission-
ary Baptist Church. 786-325-
7383.


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"Copyrighted Material ; "

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Soul Saving 3rd Black History bash


Reverend Jodie and First
Lady Arpie Alexander and the
Soul Saving Missionary Baptist
Church invites you to their 3rd
annual Black History bash on
Sunday, February 8, 3 p.m., at
Jordan Grove Missionary Bap-
tist church, 5946 N.W. 12 Av-
enue.


Brother Willie Copeland and
the Mt. Calvary Young Adult
Strange Choir, Logos Male Cho-
rus, Jordan Grove Male Chorus,
Miami Norland Sr. High School
Precious Pearl Dancers and
special guest, Heaven's Own
and many others will be in at-
tendance.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Revival Time at True Witness


God is a refuge from the
storm! Everyone is invited to
come for Healingl Deliverance!
and Divine Preparation! on
Tuesday February 3 through
Friday February 6, :8 p.m.,
nightly at True Witness Holi-
ness Church, 4303 N.W. 22
Court.
You won't leave, the same.
The revival is under the guid-


ance of the Holy Spirit and the
prophetic work of Prophetess
and Pastor Rosa Witherspoon.
Isa. 25.4
For Thou hast been a strength
to the poor, a strength to the
needy in his distress, a refuge
from the storm, a shadow from
the heat, when the blast of the
terrible ones is a storm against
the wall.


Kchgoai plaij' smimpwtu im k' urn ,m' a 4wCvo an


- a


- "- "The Episcopal Church of

The Transfiguration
S.. --. .. 15260 NW 191 Avenue


tIhi iI c 94 ii. F I* I X;* s Wes ay7305-681-1660
flh v tJvi Church Schedule:
SSunday Services
IL A ; 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 am.
... .-. .-..... .. Healing Service
'' Second Wednesday 7 p.,m',


Antioch Missionary Baptis
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
ahuelt'Sunday Selool ..... 8:30 am.
Sunday Worship Savice.... 10 a.m
Mid-Week Smvice .... Wettdesay's ,
Hour of Power-Noon Day Prayer
12 plm.I; p.m.
v' ening W iraoSp... 7 pm.



Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www.friisipbcaia.org
reindshipys'sellswoth.iet
740 N.W. 5ftStreet
Miai, FL
305-759-8875
Huur Pravr 6 0. i .
E ari r.lS Wuralup 30 a.m.
Smda) School 9 30 a a
jf M..iinfi Vjinp 1i tin.

uocnsia ,Jtr ,a.r (NI m
Frp cLnpthe Hes,) cipm
Ve.inc>eday Ila am .1 i



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
.Sunfay

Wednesday
Bibe StallIPryer Nih7 7: p m,
Thursday
yt Met Metins 7 pm,
"There is apti Mforyou"



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Onler of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 am.
Suday School 945 a.m
Bible Study.Tuesday
10 a.m,. & 7 pn.m.
Prayer Meetiu.- Tues. 6 p.m.



Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
SuwndySiahool.....9:30 a.m
Sunday Worship.... I am
Firtl Suundy Evening W lhip
Mid Week Sevie ... 7 pin.
lOChi RehaCanil huLrslay
7:30p.m.


postolic Revival Center \ Logps Baptist Church Mt. Calvary Missionary
6702 N. 5th Avenme 16305 NW 48th Ave. Baptist Church
05-8 305-430-9383 1140 Dr. Matin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
Order of Services 305-759-8226 Fax:305-759-0528
New ie for TV.V. Pg O___rder of Services


*UHFXA BLE.O3 I7 COMCASTCK

SWed huecaie oly Prayr9n.m.. 12-pm.
MoninE SeNrie ...............S...I ) S m
Sm. E v. Worship ...........730 pm
Tues. PayeT Mefin!...&. 7-0 Rom.




/ First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday................7:30 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School............... 16 a.m.
Thursday ......... 7 .. Bible Study,
SPayw Meeting: B.T.U.
Baptism- Thurs. before
First Sun.7 p.m.
Comiunuliot First Su........
7:30& II a.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500


L;, i. .,lnn ri| w ,:.,hi. L.,'. .',.J 'un
n l.r ori .l.er lIe ie .:
I. r. to ... a r'"
46 PBIN r6 r'
I it o ,


pt


Sunday
.,I.nurqi Worsti at 8 & 11 a.m.
,in.ny School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Lible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No.Service


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
Shr dj' ing services
I ........... 0 .m.
p u. hl[. ttlx 1, ........ .... 11 a.In.
Tuu4 1.) :I.l Study. 8 ..8,p.m.
'rhund. Pr.)o ervice......8 p.m


Order of Services:
Mon, thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible StudyThrs... .....7 p.m.
Simday Worship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 am.


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
inB L v.Li, iui .... D Ie u .'. -pIlI


STlln L, t Ii ..Ne .tli 5 1 p
e- t o uni PIC a .lca
P.1 ii ti l' 10i I 1 I9
BTmm-li"IIiHiuio djulr Ck U
S 3054,W4SO*jj05-i9"-9-j8


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W.56th Avenue Hollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship .......... 1-ia m
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 am. 9 am.
Comcasl Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.pembrokeparkchiirchofchrist.corm Email: pembrokeparkcoc@?bellsouth.net


Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3 Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-854
Order of Servievs:
Sunday School...........9:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning Serve.s..... l a.m.
4 Sun....BTU.... 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Tuesday......Bible Study
Feeding Milistily.....10 a.m
Wed. Bible Study/Pmyer..6:30 p.m.
TIlm. Outreachl Ministry...6:30 p.n
\@WWBEWBBIaMWWIB/


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 761 Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

m Order of Services:
Sundayae Chucl School. I r..... 10a
IWorship Se ic .......... I 15a.m.
I f luTsdsay Bible Cla.s..... .. .
4th Sunday Fvening Worhip ...6 pm.


1(800) 254-NBBC.
305-685.3700
Fax: 305-685.0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiamni.org


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3" Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
SE'ar) Sunday
Sll Mouilug .rship .....7:30 a.m.
l unad.) h.''l ..........9:30 a.m.
l ,oruu; \\.irship ...1 a.m.
1" %I',,,. r ,,dl Bible Study
Selin (Tues.) 7p.m.




/ Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order or Services:
Sunday School ......... ..9:30 a.m.
Moming PraiseWorslip ..11 am.m
SFast and Thd Sn~day
Svening vrship at 6pain
S l'rayer Meeting & Bible Study
STuesday 7 p.m.
STrniynrulo .Iulaurbbib i Sund ay
SMomn wnsip. Cll 305s816- 8390
\cmaWWWEEBSEWMMIa


931 Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93d Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
730 amn. Eary Moming Wa*ip
11tam. ..Moming Worship
Evening Worship
Ilst & 3rdSutnday .. p.m
=r,-.day Bible study.. 7 p.m
weblite: aub.eng


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'1 Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Eady Mnming Wobship 7.30 am.
Sun. aChrch School 930 am.
SMoring Worship .....11 a.m.
STuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
'Iues. before the 1st Sun..... pmi.
l, Mid-week Worship


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church Liberty City Church
17800 NW 25th Ave. of Christ
twww.mfellnnoiworshipcnlter.org 1263 NT.W 67th Street
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104 1263-
305-836-4555
Order of Services:

Sam. & 10 a m. Sunday Morning...........8 am.
Cr SchScl: 30 a.i Snd School.............10 am.
Chuh School 30a.m. rn daEvening .............6 p.m.
Vedles1a1y l| loi Ecellence........7:30p.
lPstore Noon Day Bible Stuy ii c Bible Class.........7:30p.m.
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m. Thur. Fellowship .........10 a
Mid week Worship 7:30 p.m. It sun. Song Practice..6p.m.


/Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 121' Ave.
305-751-9323


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474


Order of Services:
Sin lay Schol .............9.45a .
WaslIip........ll1a.
Ri e Stuty. Thursxhy ..7:.30 pInl
Youth ,xinisty Mcn-Wed.
6p.n.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services
Early Moiniig Worsliip.7-30atm.
Sunday School ..........9:30am.
Mominig Worship.....11 am.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.


- St. I
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ark Missionary
ptist Church
N.W. 87th Street
D5-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and l a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a m.......... Sunday School
lesday......... 7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p.m.......Prayer Meeting
Monday Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m......Day Prayer


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Harly Sunday Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ................930 am.
Srntly Mrminwhlip, .11 am
nTtsday PRyter Meetirn..'?:30 pml.
Wdesv Bble SLdy ..7:30 pn.
"Not Junt a Cburctl Bill aMovcrmcn"



Bible Teaching Seminar
8620 N.W 17th Ave.
Miani, FL. 33147
954-735-9393

Order of Servicesa
Stunay WoNhip 2A45 pm.
live snacks aler service
Retum transpxxtation available


Gospel Extravaganza

All WMBM listeners, the time has come to rejoice with the sing-
ing of songs. It will be held February 8th, the second Sunday at
Mt. Claire Holiness Church, 4 p.m. service, located at 7975 N.W.
22nd Avenue. Cor~e one, come all and sing the songs of praise.
Sponsored by True Grace Spiritual House.


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The Miami Times





Hea th


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


Lyse Deus speaks to a group about safety.


This Injury Free Mobile bus helps advance the cause of safety.


When Lyse Deus talks, paying attention could be a matter of life or death


Safety educator takes message

aboard a special free bus


By Michael R. Malone
Special to The Miami Times

Lyse Deus was teaching the
importance of infant safety in
the bedroom, especially the
drib, as "she conducted' a tour
on 'board the Injun Free Coali-
tion's bus. She noticed a young
medical resident not paying
particular attention.
"Look," the unidentified wom-
an told her, "I just don't think a
little baby's blanket is that big
a deal, I just can't see it as a
safety problem.
Deus wasn't surprised or of-
fended by the woman's remark.
Though she does her best to em-
phasize the importance of safe-
ty in and around the home, she
knows that some people don't
take her message seriously.


A few weeks later, the medi-
cal resident tracked Deus down
and told her that while doing her
medical rounds, she discovered
an infant in her crib had nearly
suffocated in a little blanket.
"I see the dangers now," the
resident told Deus. "Your advice
was so important."
The Injury Free Coalition
hired Deus three years ago as
a safety educator and promot-
ed her in 2007 to lead educa-
tor. She says she enjoys the
challenge of changing peoples'
minds about the need to take
simple precautions around the
home that will save lives, espe-
cially those of children.
For her work promoting safe-
ty, The Children's Trust recent-
ly awarded Deus its Excellence
Award for Public Service. Her


supervisor Gayan6 Stepanian
nominated her.
Deus says she is still a bit
"dumbfounded" by the honor.
"I always felt like I'm just do-
ing my job and I love it. It's hard
work, but you enjoy it," she
said.
Born in Haiti and raised by
her grandparents in the small
provincial town of St. Louis du
Nord, Deus was 10 when she
came to North Miami to live
with her mother, Lizette Isma,
an assistant nurse at a home
for the elderly. After school, she
often came to help.
"I loved coming 'with her,
helping the patients to read
and reading letters about their
lives. I loved their stories," Deus
said.
She also volunteered at
church and in community proj-
ects sponsored by the Key Club
at her school, North Miami High.
After graduation, she wanted to
get away and experience some-
thing different.


LYSE DEUS


Deus joined her elder sis-
ter, Hudelaine, at Liberty Uni-
versity, a Christian college in
Virginia, where she studied
health promotion and minored
in Spanish, a language she had
come to enjoy. She interned at
a nursing home in Lynchburg,
Va., By the time she graduated,
she was ready to come back
home.


Deus got ajob at the Econom-
ic. Opportunity Health Center
in Liberty City, where, for two
years, she educated patients
about heart disease and diabe-
tes.
Her career changed after she
answered an advertisement for
the safety educator position of-
fered by the Injury Free Coali-
tion at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital.
TH1e job description said the
successful candidate would be
required to drive the coalition's
specially outfitted 40-foot bus.
Lyse was hooked.
"I was so excited. I really want-
ed to drive a big bus, though at
the time I thought it was an RV,"
she recalls. "The thought that I
would get a special driver's li-
cense it was scary. But I really
wanted to do it."
Though she had little training
as a safety educator, Deus was
a quick learner. She absorbed
everything she could to under-
stand the accidents and inju-


ries that are the leading cause
of death for children ages 1-12.
"Lyse was willing to do any-
thing to see the program suc-
ceed. Whether it was raining,
Sthe heat, whether there were
mosquitoes, it didn't matter,"
said Stepanian, who is the co-
alition's director of Community
Affairs. "She is so passionate
about her work and is willing
to do whatever it takes to en-
sure that we can save children's
lives." '., '
The coalition, with a national
office in New York, was founded
in Miami in 2000 by Dr. Judy
Schaechter, a pediatrician,
educator and Children's Trust
board member. The Jackson
Health System provided the ini-
tial $150,000 funding for two
full-time staff positions, com-
puters and supplies.
The initial thrust focused on
preventing violent death among
children and youths, mostly as-
sociated with guns, and de
Please turn to LIFE 14B


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


lAR THF MIAMI TIME. FFRRIARY 4-1n 90II f


Parents: Get serious about protecting kids


LIFE
continued from 13B


veloping a reporting system
to track those incidents. In
partnershiip with Harvard Uni-
v\csi \ and 10 sites around the
country, the project evolved
into a national model adopted
by the U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
"As we gained a better picture
of violence in our community,
we realized that a lot of what you
do to prevent violence keeping
kids in supervised programs
that are enriching, making
sure that guns and poisons are
locked up, creating safe-place
spaces such as playgrounds -
also prevents unintentional in-
juries," Stepanian said.
More-and more organizations
in Miami joined the coalition
with a focus on preventing vio-
lent deaths, yet only a hand-
ful continued to explore how to
prevent unintentional injuries
that result in fatalities. The co-
alition spearheaded the effort to
provide awareness and take ac-
tion in that area.
The organization operates on
a budget of about $1.2,million,
funded by national, state and
local grants. The Robert Wood
Johnsori Foundation, the Na-
tional Highway. Traffic Safety
Association and Substance
Abuse and Mental Health Sub-
stance are major funders. The


Jackson Health System and
The Children's Trust provide lo-
cal support.
Deus plays a key role in tak-
ing the message to the com-
munity and every work day is
different. She drives her bus to
health fairs and clinics, schools,
shopping malls, day care cen-
ters, even a baby shower once.
Deus and her team five
health educators in all coordi-
nate to provide the tours. They
may work 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
one day and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
the next, sometimes on Sun-
days.
At each location, Deus gives
hands-on tours, for an average
of four to six hours a day. She
takes groups of five to six peo-
ple on board the bus that was
designed to simulate a home
and she walks visitors through
each "room."
In the kitchen area, she
teaches stove safety, how to
avoid burns, and potential haz-
ards of poisoning and choking.
Upstairs, she talks about pre-
cautions to avoid falling and,
in the bedroom, about crib
safety and the dangers of win-
dow treatment chords. Water
safety is addressed in the pre-
tend bathroom, pool and beach
area. Outside, she teaches the
correct use of infant car seats.
A tour, conducted in English,
Spanish or Creole, normally
takes 20 to 30 minutes but can


last as long as an hour if there
are many questions.
The coalition says its surveys
have shown the initiative is
having an impact.
For child passengers aged up
to 12, the rates of vehicle injury
that would lead to an ER visit,
hospitalization or death have
dropped substantially due to
the coalition's passenger safety
program.
The coalition reports also that
based on surveys done before
and after exposure to its pro-
gram, 80 percent of those sur-
veyed said their awareness and
understanding of safety issues
in the home had increased; 97
percent said their knowledge of
safety matters had increased
wand they would recommend
the tour to others.
Deus says her biggest chal-
lenge is to get parents to un-
derstand the importance of the
safety education the coalition
provides.
"I want them to take it seri-
ously, not to think, 'Oh, it's just
a free car seat.' I want them to
understand and sometimes
it's really hard that it's not a
joke," she says. "In education
you have to be firm with them,
especially the younger parents.
Sometimes they don't really
quite understand they have to
take it seriously."
That young medical resident
certainly does now.


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Syndicated Content

Available fr6m Commercial News Providers"


Pastor's Aide Day at St. John church
The members of the Pastor's Aide
Ministry of St. John Mis-
sionary Baptist Church will
celebrate their day on Sunday,
February 8, starting at 3:30
p.m. The guest minister for this
service will be, The Rev. Frank-
lin Clark and his congregation of
Mount Olihette Baptist Church.
In celebration of Black History
Month, please wear African at-
tire.
Deaconess Ida Adkins serves
as President of The Pastor's Aide
Ministry. Rev. Dr. Charles Upt-
grow is Assistant Pastor. REV. FRANKLIN CLARK


Mount Tabor celebrates 108th anniversary
The Mt. Tabor Baptist Church and Rev. Dr. George E. McRae
Pastor will be celebrating the 108th.church anniversary, Sun-
day, February 8 at 10 a.m.
The guest speaker is Dr. Edward Wheeler, President of Chris-
tian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, Indiana. Dr. Wheeler is a
renown speaker and preacher throughout the United States and
has written numerous books and articles pertaining to the Black
church.
We invite the community to worship and join in this celebration
with us. The church is located at, 1701 N.W. 66 Street, Miami
Florida.


A POWER OF FAITH SERVICE AT 93RD
....


Join Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson
and the 93rd Street Communi-
ty Baptist Church, 2330 N.W.
93rd Street, Miami, Florida
For "A Power of Faith Service"
Tuesday, February 10, 2009 at
7:00 p.m. Guest Preacher will
be the renowned Rev. Jasper
W. Williams Jr. Senior Pastor
of the Salem Bible Church in
Atlanta, Ga.
Everyone is invited to at-
tend! Come out and be blessed
through the word of God from
this awesome man of God.
There is a Word at 93rdl
For more information, please
call the church at 305-836-
0942.


REV. JASPER W. WILLIAMS JR.


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


S7


Carey Royal Ram'n
LADONIE R. BYRD, 33, con-
struction worker, died January 25
in Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

ROGER HANSON, 65, accoun-
tant, died January 28 at home.
Service 11 a.m., Wednesday in
the chapel.


ANDREA GREGORY,
homemaker, died February
Cleveland Clinic Hospital.
rangements are incomplete.


CARL ANDERSON, 74, died
January 31 in North Shore Medi-
cal Center. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Pax Vill
ANITA, VILDOR, 64, house-
keeper, died February 1 in Broward
General Medical Center. Service
10 a.m., Sunday, Sinai Seventh
Day Adventist Church.


Wright & Young
SUSIE WALLACE, 85, domes-
tic, died Janu-
ary 31 in North
Shore Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Paulette De-
laughter and A
Pamela Spann;
sister, Daisy
Phillips. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
New Hope M.B Church.



Eric S. Ge e
PETER F. PALMER, 63, regis-
tered nurse for Vitas Health Care,
died"Ja uary 30 at home. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Apostolic Faith
Rescue Mission.

Hadley

DERRICK GLOSTER "TER-
MITE",1R8, stu-
dent, died Janu-


Forda e- CGr ve
Missionary Batp-
tist Church.



E.A. Stevensf :-
CHESTER SMITH JR., 77, re-
tired teacher, died January 27 in
Florida Medical Center. Service
was held.

ERIC PAUL MENKEN, 48,
plumber, died January 26 in Plan-
tation General Hospital. Service
was held.

DAVID JOHNSON, 63, roofer,
died Jauary 27 in Memorial Hos-
pital South. Service 1 p.m., Satur-
day, Central Baptist Church.

JUAN PEREZ, 76, died Janu-
ary 31 in Hillcrest Nursing Home.
Service 5 p.m., Wednesday in the
chapel.

HAROLD L. POLK, 35, died
January 6 in Las Vegas. Service
6 p.m., Thursday, House of God,
Pompano.

JOHN ROSS III, 29, died Janu-
ary 30 in Ft. Lauderdale. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Antioch Baptist
Church, Pompano.

BABY CODY CLARKE, died
January 11 in Memorial Pembroke.
Service was held.


Grace
JAMES ELLIS, 92, seaman,
died January
27 in Jackson
North Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.



ISAAC WALKER, 59, childcare
worker for the
Juvenile Justice
Department,
died January
28. Service was
held.


Poitier
ALLIE ELLINGTON, 86, nurse,
died January
31. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Mt. Herman
A.M.E. Church.


WILLII
68, chanic,
1 in January
Ar- Service
Saturday
spring


sionary
Church.


E JOHENKINS, 64, me-
died
29.
2 p.m.,
V, Day-
Mis-
Baptist
WSi


SAMMIE BENNERMAN, 46,
manager, died
February 1.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Zion A.M.E.
Church.



ROSALYN RANDOLPH, 53,
laborer, died
January 30.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




WILLIAM HANLEY, 59, cook,
died January
27. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.


Jay's
JANICE WILLIAMS, 52, died
January 31.
Service 11a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Moriah Baptist
Church.




JAVON PAIGE, 38, died Janu-
ary 30. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Sweet Home
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.






JEREMIAH EWAN, 89, died
January 30.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, The
House of God
Church.




SHARON BROWN, 48, MD-
CPS bus driver, died January 26 in
Jackson Hospital South. Service
was held.

MARGARET MATTHEW, 80,
died January 26. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.



Royal
ALMA JOHNSON, 84, do-
mestic worker,


died January
30. Visitation
4 to 9 p.m., Fri-
day. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Nakia Ingraham Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist
TERESA WHITE, 41, Church.
underwriter,of West Park, died
January 28 in Memorial South. OWEN 'WALKER JR., 22, stu-
Service 11a.m., Wednesday, New dent, one of
Macedonia Baptist Church Miramar's fin-
diA
J6I ~N:/5' 6ngi Srotrulon -Jn aJna 24. A
worker, of. Hollywood, died Janu- past student of
ary 29 in Memorial Pembroke. Miramar High
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Friend- School and star
ship Baptist Church. basketball play-
er. He was in
LEONIDE MATHELIER, 94, of his final year at FAMU pursuing a
Pembroke Pines, died January 31 bachelor's degree in Education.
in Memorial Pembroke. Final rites Sadly missed by: father Bishop
and burial in New York. Owen Sr.; mother, Vashti; sisters,
Venessa and Stacey Ann; neph-
JUAN VELEZ, 48, of Miramar, ew, Isaiah; uncles, aunts, cousins,
died January 29. Service 11 a.m., godmother, godfathers, church
Thursday, St. Stevens Catholic family and numerous friends and
Church. co-workers. Visitation 4 to 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
D"-:, ,,, .Monumental Faith Church of God.


clldl ar 3son
WOODROW KING, 75, plumb-
er, died January
27. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
True Believers
Church.




PATRICIA REED, 52, home-
maker, died
January 29.
Service 12:30
p.m., Saturday,
Faith Com-
munity Baptist
Church.


KATIE HICKS, 75, laborer, died
January 28.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Faith
Community
Baptist Church.




CHARLENE C. BROWN, 41,
dental technician, died february 1.
Arrangements are incomplete.


St Fort
ANGELA FERDINAND, 67,
homemaker, died January 29 in
Memorial Hospital. Arrangements
are incomplete.

LUIS FERNANDEZ AREVALO,
35, care giver, died January 27 in
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


EARL JOYCE, 61, cook, died
January 27.
Survived by:
wife, Reather.
Visitation 4 to
9 p.m., Thurs-
day. Service
11 a.m., Friday,
Dade Memo-
rial Park North
Cemetery.

BASIL SENIOR, 57, accountant,
died January 29. Arrangements
are incomplete.

FRANCE LUBIN, 61, seam-
stress, died January 26. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m., Friday. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, North Miami
Church of the Nazarene.

JEAN GABRIEL, 71, cemetery
laborer, died January 26. Visitation
4 to 9 p.m., Friday. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

WILFORD FRASER, 80, lawn
maintenance worker, died January
29. Visitation 4 to 9 p.m., Friday.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, Living
Word Open Bible Church.




Manker 2 .
JOYCE A. KEMP, 61, died
January 29 in
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service noon,
Saturday, New
Beginning Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
JOHN TILLMAN, 73, retired
Eastern Airlines
Employee, died
January 28 in
Kindred Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Mt. Carmel Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

LATSHIA LADYE ROSE GOO-
DIN, 30, WMBM
radio announc-
er, died January
31 in Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1:30 p.m.,
Saturday, New
Birth Cathedral
Baptist Church,
2300 N.W. 135th Street. Survivors
include: mother, Pastor Lydia;
brother, LeMoyne; grandmother,
Reverend E.B. Williams; grand-
mother, Minnie; fiance', Mitchell
Ferguson.

PHILLIP GRAHAM SR., 86,
landscaper,
died February
1 in Aventura
Plaza. Service
2 p.m., Satur-
day, Greater
New Bethel Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

HEAVEN GRAY, newborn, died
January 26 in Jackson North. Ser-
vice Memorial Service 1 to 3 p.m.
Thursday in the chapel.

Range
LELA LEE LEWIS, 86, entrepre-
neur, died Feb-
ruary 1. Sur-
vivors include:
six children and'
a host of other
relatives and
friends. View-
ing 2 to 3 p.m.,
Thursday, An-
tioch M.B. Church of Browns-
ville. Memorial Service 3:30 p.m.,
Thursday. Service 1 p.m., Satur-
day, New Hope Baptist Church,
Register Georgia.

JAYCEE TUCKER JR., 74, re-
tired janitor for
Miami Dade
County Depart-
ment of Correc-
tions died Janu-
ary 27. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, Bible Bap-
tist Church.

MARY LEE WHITE, 81, home-
maker, died January 30 Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

JAMES JENKINS, 87, retired
mechanic, died February 1. Final
Rites and burial Saturday, Edisto
Island, South Carolina.


MINISTER BEVERLY
BENN-LEE, 61, a retired
Miami-Dade bus driver,
died January 28. Memorial
services are to be held at
Trinity CME on February
6 at 6:30 p.m. Trinity CME
is located at 511 N.W. 4th
Street in Miami, FL. Funeral
and burial services will be
held, February 7, 3 p.m., at
Royal Temple FM Church in
Deland, FL. Minister Benn-
Lee is survived by her sons;
Keith Holmes, Torres Holmes,
Keenan Holmes and Travis
Lee; daughter, Candace
Holmes; six grandchildren;
and one son Terrance Smith,
who preceded her in death.
For more info, call 786-380-
0778.


Gregg L. Mason
ULYSEE M KEMP SR., 72, en-
trepreneur, died -
January 27 in
University of Mi-
ami Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Mary
K.; sons, Ulysee
M. Jr. (Debo- -
rah), Maurice
L. (Valerie) and James E. (Vonda);
daughter, Mary A.; sister, Hilda Har-
ris; grandchildren; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation 2 to 9
p.m.,Tuesday. Family hour 5 to 7p.m.
Service 11 a.m.,Wednesday (today),
Antioch Baptist Church of Browns-
ville.

MELVIN WHITE, 61, computer
analysis for GE,
died January 29
in Massachu-
setts. Survivors
include: wife,
Mary E. Bethel;
mother, Ezra;
sons, Jamal and
Vaughn; daugh-
ters, April White Frager (Timothy) and
Ina Hogan (Chris); brothers, James
(Michelle), Calvin (Sheba) and Al-
phonso; sister, Sherrell and a host of
other relatives and friends. Viewing
and Reflections 6 to 9 p.m., Friday
in the chapel.

ATHER FRANCIS, homemaker,
from Opa Locka
died January'31 in
Aventura Hospital.
Survivors include:
nieces, nephews,
cousins and dear
friends. Visitation
2 to 9 p.m., Friday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Metropolitan A.M.E. Church.
Interment: Dade Memorial Park

DELORES J. EDWARD, 77, home
care nurse, died January 31 in Grand
Court. Survivors
include: daugh-
ter, Alexis Virgin
(Lawrence); sons,
Lanair McMurren
and Leon (Anna);
brother, Virgil Al-
bury Jr.; sisters,
Alice McKinney,
Pauline Johnson
(Willard), Donna Murel (John), Diosa
Williams (Timothy) and Denora Al-
bury; nine grandchildren; and a host
of other relatives and friends. Visita-
tion 2 to 9 p.m., Friday. Service 1:30
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.


Dr. Mary Bryant Cosmetolo-
gist extraordinaire, would like
to thank each of you for your
many prayers, cards, telephone
calls, food, floral arrangements,
monetary donations and your
spiritual presence as we cele-
brated her life and home going.
Anita Darlene Bryant and
family


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


CAROL J. TAYLOR
02/03/48 10/06/07


I am truly blessed to have
you as my wife. We miss you.
Lawrence Taylor and
Tiffany Taylor


In Memoriam
In loving memory of


VERA ROBERTSON
07/30/55 02-05-08


Your love and smile is
missed. But we know your
smiling in heaven.
Your loving sons and family

Death Notice


RIGINA SANDS, 40, hospi-
tal worker, died January 27th
at Jackson North Hospital.
Viewing Friday 4-8 p.m. at
Mitchell Funeral Home, 8080
NW 22nd Ave, Miami, FL. Ser-
vices will be held Saturday, 2
p.m. at New Vision For Christ
Ministries, 13650 N.E. 10th
Avenue, Miami, FL.'

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Mary E. Williams would
like to take this opportunity to
thank you for the many phone
calls, beautiful flowers, food,
gifts and visits.
Although this is a sad time
for all of us, we find comfort in
knowing how fortunate we are
to have friends like you.
We would like to extend a
special thank you to Mt. Tabor
Baptist Church, Rev. Dr.
George E. McRae, Pastor, Vita's
Hospice Care, Franco's Rehab
and Nursing Home and Range
Funeral Home.
Your thoughtfulness,
generosity and support during
this difficult time is greatly
appreciated.
Regina Faust and family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MOSES T. RAGIN JR
02/06/69 07/07/06


Today is your birthday and
although you may have left
this world, you will never
leave our hearts. We will never
forget.
Love always, your moth-
er Dorothy, brother, Andre,
daughters, Yasmin, Tori,
Morganne and many more
family and friends


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16R THF MIAMI TIMFS FEBRUARY 4-10. 2009


Rev. Larrie Lovett of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Brownsville leads a state funeral
processional for four homeless veterans outside of American Legion Harvey W. Seeds Post #29 6445
NE Seventh Ave on Jan. 15. -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra J. Charite


Homeless veteran beaten to death


among 4 honored at state funeral


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

They may not have owned
cars, bought houses or af-
forded to travel to Mexico. But
they did risk their lives for their
country.
And so the American Legion,
Make A Wish Veterans Inc.,
VetsUnited.org and Veterans
for Peace held a state funeral
on Jan. 24 at the American Le-
gion Harvey Seeds Post #29 to
recognize four homeless veter-
ans.
The service honored Ernest
Tom Holman Jr., 67; Pedro
Deaguero, 58; John Joseph
Sweet, 66;and Nathaniel Henry
Winger, 75.
"They gave everything but
we fell short. We fell short as
a community to serve those
who gave their all for this com-
munity," said Benjamin John
Chiszar, chairman of the Dade
Democratic Party.
Holman death was especially
troubling. He was beaten to
death in November as he slept
at a bus bench at Northwest
27th Avenue and 62nd Street in
Brownsville. His killer or killers
remain on the loose.
Deaguero, Sweet and Winger
died of natural causes but their
families could not be located
so Make a Wish Veterans and


VetsUnited.org "adopted" the
bodies to honor them in a state
funeral.
"These four men, I'm pretty
sure we hadn't met them but
hopefully we will meet them on
the other side for their works,"
said U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek,
D-Miami, who hurried to the
funeral after arriving from flight
from Tampa. "So many times
we forget those who paid the
sacrifice in war and we forget
about those on our streets. We
can't help but recognize that
more still needs to be done."
Stephen Thompson agreed.
He said he has seen members.
of his family and friends re-
turn from serving the coun-
try abroad and their lives are
turned upside down. Financial
and mental support are two of
the missing elements needed
for many veterans,.he said.
"You have to reactivate your-
self back into the community,"
Thompson said in an interview
after the funeral. "They need
therapy to help heal them from
the trauma that they have ex-
perienced."
Meek and State Rep. James
Bush III said that they would
push for a better deal for veter-
ans in Washington and in Tal-
lahassee.
Robert A. Flanders, a financial
officer at the American Legion,


said an estimated 250 veterans
live on the streets of Miami.
"When you think about this
situation of homelessness not
only in Miami but all across the
nation, this is unacceptable,"
said Charles Buford, president
of the VetsUnited.org.
"Our focus is to get veterans
out of harm's way to prevent
another tragedy," Buford said',
referring to Holman.
Buford called for the Miami-
Dade Homeless Trust to help al-
locate funds to bring programs
for homeless veterans.
Buford said it cost $2,300 to
bury each of the men but Vet-
sUnited.org and Make a Wish
Veterans raised only $4,200.
Currently, they are short
$6,075.
The bodies remain at Poitier
funeral home and Buford is
hopeful that the needed funds
will soon be donated so the vet-
erans can be buried at the Na-
tional Cemetery in Lake Worth.
"Instead of gathering to say
goodbye or farewell, let's leave
today saying no more," said
Chiszar.
VetsUnited.org is accepting
donations to defray the cost of
Holman's funeral. Donations
may be sent to VetsUnited,
American Legion Way, 6445 NE
Seventh Ave., Miami, FL, 33138
or atwww.vetsunited.org.


Lionel C. Barrow, was Howard


Communications dean for 10 years


Lionel C. "Lee" Barrow Jr., who
retired in 1985 after 10 years
as dean of Howard University's
School of Communication, died
Jan. 23 at a Tampa hospice. He
was 82.
Barrow, who had battled pros-
tate cancer, was a respected civil
rights activist who pushed for
more diversity in the media.
Born in New York City, he
served in. the U.S. Army from
1945 to 1947. A 1948 graduate
of Morehouse College and he re-
ceived a master's degree in jour-
nalism in 1958 and a doctorate
in mass communication in 1960,
both from the University of Wis-
consin at Madison..
During the 1960s, Barrow
worked as vice president and
associate director of research for
the large advertising firm Foote,
Cone and Belding.
He became a leader in the.
push for integration of the As-
sociation for Education in Jour-


nalism and Mass Communica-
tion and he chaired committees
advocating an increase in the
number of minority and White
female students in the cominu-
nication field. The association
named a scholarship for him in
1970 and gave him some of its
highest honors.
Barrow's broader civil rights in-
volvement came when he started
raising funds for the movement.
He chaired the public relations
committee of the Unity Demo-
cratic Club which helped start
the careers of politicians such as
Rep. Shirley Chisholm, D-N.Y.
He is survived by his wife of
16 years, Frederica Harrison
Barrow, of Tampa; daughters
Kirsten Barrow of Germantown,
SMd.; and Lia Ward of Emeryville,
Calif.; stepdaughters, Brenda
Feliciano, of North Bergen, N.J.;
Emily Smith, of Washington;
and Laura Harrison, of Atlanta;
seven grandchildren and four


LIONEL BARROW


great-grandchildren.
A memorial service is planned
for 1 p.m. Feb. 8 at Grace Epis-
copal Church in Tampa. A sec-
Sond service will be held in Wash-
ington the week of Feb. 14-15.


In Memoriam in Memoriam


JANISHA POLLOCK
02/05/80 02/08/06


Mama, this day means so
much to us. Love always, Day
Day, India, Jada, Santana
and your sisters!

Death Notice


JUANITA DAVIS, 42,
healthcare provider, died
February 2 in Northshore
Hospital. Survivors include:
mother, Zella Davis; daugh-
ter, Lawanda Burton; sisters,
Pamela and Kathy Davis; and
a host of other relatives and
friends. Visitation Friday 2-9
p.m. Service 1 p.m., Satur-
day, Cooper's Temple COG-
IC. Interment Dade Memorial
Park. Arrangements entrust-
ed to Gregg L Mason Funeral
Home.

Death Notice


GLORIA PRICE, 53, nurse,
-died February 3 in North
Shore Medical Center. Service
1 p.m.; Saturday, Christian
Fellowship Missionary Baptist
Church, 8100 N.W. 17 Ave.


In loving memory of,


HERBERT JOSEPH, JR.
10/08/26 -02/07/08

February 7th, will be one
year, you went home to be
with the Lord.
Love you always, wife
Ellarnora and kids

Death Notice


PASTOR OLIN CHARLES
SMITH, 48, Pastor of House
of Prayer TestatmonialTemple
and fork lift operator,
died February 2. Services
entrusted To Grace Funeral
Home. Arrangements are
incomplete.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


LARRY JEFFERY BLACK
"MUTT"
07/20/51 02/08/06

It's been three years, our
hearts are still heavy and you
are truly missed.
Love your wife, Cherese;
daughters, grandchildren,
family and friends.


In loving memory of,


SGT. JOHNICE
ADDERLY CANADY
02/06/80 11/30/07


A day hasn't gone by when I
feel that you are still here with
me and touching my heart in
ways others are not able to
and never will be.
We had a special bond that
only we could understand.
Our hearts are void in a
special place that was only
filled by your love, warmth,
beauty, precious smile and
most of all your presence.
The world seem to have
changed in countless ways.
The uniqueness of the way
you brought happiness, peace,
tranquility, openess, honesty
and quiet kindred spirit that
was all your own.
That's why this day we
celebrate the day that you
would've been 29 years old.
A day God chose to grace us
with you gentle spirit now
that gift has been returned to
His presence because a gift so
beautiful God can glorify His
kingdom.
Happy Birthday, Doll Baby!
Love, Mom, Janice Chain
and family


Honor


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The Miami T .es



Lifesty es


rH t anme Ht


FASHION HIP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


Hip Hop helped a


dream come true with

....Obama inauguration


Who Is Janelle Monae?


Get to know Bad Boy's

newest rising star

By Isheka Harrison
Special to the Times
Who is Janelle Monae? According to the artist that
Diddy has called possibly the most important signing
of his career, that's actually a hard answer. After in-
terviewing the grammy-nominated songstress, I have
to agree. It's evident that if we thought we knew Bad
Boy's precious jewel, we really had no idea. Monae is
more than just another artist with a pretty face. She's
on a self-proclaimed mission to use her imagination to
inspire nations. On her album, Metropolis: The Chase
Suite, Monae uses her enchanting voice and storytell-
ing ability to give mainstream music something it has
been missing for a long time: genuine originality. With
it she is building a brand all her own without waiting
for anyone's stamp of approval. The versatile beauty
with the quirky sense of humor makes no apologies
for marching to the beat of her own drum. In fact she
thrives on it. It is, after all, her prerogative.


TMT: Who is Janelle Monae?
Janelle Monae: That's actually a hard answer; the
art android.
TMT: What makes her different?
Janelle Monae: I don't really take my cues from any
artists that are out today. I follow my core values that
I've set aside for myself.
TMT: What are those core values?
Janelle Monae: I believe that I'1 always have a re-
sponsibility to my community, especially other young
girls because I know young girls are looking up to me.
I've always believed I was born to lead and that means
leading by example. I also know that I have to main-
tain a responsibility to art in general and make sure
that I'm being an artist over industry. Oh and I have
to make 100 rice crispy treats and always give out to
people.
TMT: How did you come up with the concept of
Cindi Mayweather and Metropolis? (On Metropolis: The
Chase Suite Monae portrays Cindi Mayweather, an an-
droid living in the city of Metropolis in the year 2719
who beaks THE RULES' and falls in love with human
Anthony Greendown. As a result she is sentenced to
immediate disassembly. She flees, the order is given
that she must die and the chase begins.)
Janelle Monae: It came to me. I didn't come to it.
Please turn to SINGER 3C


By Marcus A. Williams
WASHINGTON (NNPA) Rappers,
songwriters, producers and the creative
minds behind the scenes of the hip hop
culture worked overtime to encourage the
youth of America to get out and "Barack
the vote." And, during the inauguration
weekend, they all fashionably flocked
to the nation's capital to celebrate a job
well done.
Music and fashion mogul Russell Sim-
mons, entertainment executive and so-
cial activist Valeisha Butterfield, Benja-
min Chavis president/CEO of the Hip
Hop Summit Action Network were. the
creative forces behind the Hip Hop Inau-
gural Ball held at the prestigious Har-
man Center for the Arts in Washington,
D.C.
"We really thought this would be a great
time and occasion in the nation's capital
to honor those hip-hop artists who were
responsible for generating the largest
youth voter turnout in American histo-
ry," said Chavis. "We think it's important
to highlight the positive attributes of the
hip hop community."
The group of politically savvy hip hop
leaders included industry executives and


RUSSELL SIMMONS
Music and fashion mogul


artists like T.I., LL Cool J, Young Jeezy,
Bow Wow and the creators and organiz-
ers of the Hip-Hop Caucus Respect My
Vote Campaign.
Though hip hop has grown into a
Please turn to HIP HOP 3C


New book tells story of


the greatness of the past


Special to The Miami Times


Many of us know that Black Histor
month is a great opportunity to spend
some quality time to instill key values in
our children. We carefully pick period
cals of significance to read with them.
NuBiAh could be one such book tha
teaches history while estab-
lishing a strong sense of self- -'
worth. The series of spoken
word bedtime stories teaches
about the rich heritage that .: Y
Black people came from.
Before coming to America,
many of us were kings and
queens or members of the
royal family. Through the
tragedy of slavery, we became
victims of psychological war-
fare. With no connection to
our land and people, we lost
our history and became less
knowledgeable about our
greatness as time went on.
NuBiah helps parents em-
power their children about
their rich heritage, while en-
tertaining them, helping to
break the cycle of low self-es- -
teem and inferiority in among
some. It allows for the build-
ing of confidence in children -
while paving a pathway to
success.
NuBiAh is especially de-
signed for parents who want ':


their children to achieve a sustainable
competitive advantage through mental
y development.
d Biblically based, NuBiAh focuses on
n key values and principles such as cour-
-age, dignity, integrity, honor and respect
for fellow human beings. It is filled with
t Please turn to BOOK 3C



NuBiAh*
Land of Aft=.n Mps and Queensw
Bedtcie.itorIes& Coloqng Book
"ULte To The Drum'0


Experts and artists mark


start of Obama presidency

In celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and the inauguration of President Barack
Obama, Pepsi partnered with Spike Lee and Howard University on Jan. 19 for the "Refresh
the World" Symposium to address issues ranging from education, economy, gender, hip hop
and Black America. Experts such as Donna Brazile, Cornel West, Arianna Huffington and
Mellody Hobson gathered to help mark the start of the new presidency.The symposium
also brought together some of the most respected leaders in the entertainment industry to
discuss "refreshing Hip Hop."They included those in this photo, seated, from left, recording
artists Christopher "Ludacris" Bridges, Queen Latifah, Sean "P Diddy" Combs and MC Lyte;
standing, from left, writer Barry Michael Cooper, entrepreneur and marketer Chris Lighty, film
director and actor Lee, entertainment attorney and publisher Londell L. McMillan, and Pepsi-
Cola North America vice president of portfolio brands Frank Cooper.
-Photo by Kea Taylor


. ....









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


aa


Nikki Young, president, and
members of Gamma Alpha
Chapter of Iota Phi Lambda
Sorority, celebrated their an-
nual American Education
Week with an Apple for the
Teacher Luncheon recently at
the Rusty Pelican Restaurant.
Those on the dais included W.
Doris Neal, chairperson, Wini-
fred Beacham, Mary Dunn,
Betty Hicks, Ronrica Mor-
gan, Dr. Ivis Richardson, Dra-
bina Washington and keynote
speaker WPLG Channel 10 Me-
teorologist Geneen Anderson.
Other VIPs included outstand-
ing teachers such as Africa L.
Andrews, JeQuette DeCastro,
Jacquelyn D. Davis, Ebony
Edmonson, Barbara S. Gard-
ner, Renee Gregory, Pamela
G. Jennings, Anita Johnston,
Yakeitha Lawrence, D.Anne
Nixon, Vicki Powell-Williams,
Beverly D. Royals, Merline
Shields, Ethel Singletary-Bru-
ton and Mary Ann Wallace.
The honorees, membership
and guests listened with atten-
tion as Anderson spoke about
her upbringing and credited


her teachers for
her successful ca-
reer in journalism.
She captivated the
packed house with
her intellect, beauty and charm
and was very accommodating,
signing autographs and having
her picture taken with attend-

Another highlight
was the reading of an
essay written by Shar-
rod Stewart, an eight-
grader at Lake Stevens
Middle School, who
wrote on the topic, "Ed-
ucation A Foundation PIN
In Every Child's Suc-
cess." The audience
loudly applauded him.
Jedidah Brown sang "I Be-
live I Can Fly" and Soror Betty
Hicks sang "Wind Beneath My
Wings," dedicated to the honor-
ees.
Young gave warm closing re-
marks, thanking Neal and co-
chairwomen Mary Dunn and
Hattie Burnett and compli-
mented Jedidah on his singing,
saying he sounded like Stevie


I~yDr Richad Staca


Wonder.
The sorority chose Richard-
son as Soror of the Year and
saluted long-serving members
Ann Mitchell, 61-year member,
and Winifred Beachman, 51-
year member, along with Cam-
eron Culmer, Charles Mitchell
and Cleon Moore, men of Iota.
Other guests included mem-
bers of Sigma Gamma Rho
Sorority, National Sorority of
Phi Delta Kappa, Regina Bru-
ton, basileus; Mamie John-
son; Janie Reeves; Maybell
Wilson; and Future Iota Lead-'
ers Aaron Lee, Alicia
Young, Alan Young Jr.
and Annika and Alania
Young.
.Members of Iota Phi
Lambda Sorority pres-
ent included Albertha
Barry, Thelma Bur-
KNEY nett, Effie Culmer,
Vannie Barr-Fisher,
Thomasena Hargrove, JaAnn
Jones, Shauna Lee, Midlred
Moore, Corliss Sellers, Fran-
ciel Tooks and Lillie Wil-
liams.


Enid C. Pinkney, founder of
the Historic Hampton House
Community Trust, member of
the African American Commit-
tee of Dade Heritage Trust; and
a founder of The Church of the


Open Doors, along with com-
mittee members of the trust,
announced a series of activities,
beginning with a reception, to
launch their Oral History DVD
of the Historic Hampton House
and recognize those who were
responsible for making it pos-
sible. It will at 5 p.m. March
5 at the Historical Museum of
South Florida, 101 West Flagler
St.
Dignitaries for the event in-
clude James Anders, Georgia
Ayers, Malcolm Black, Greg
Bush, Harcourt Clark, Fran-
ces Deveaux, Anthony Dixon,
County Commissioner Au-
drey M. Edmonson, Elliott
Flanders, Samuel Har-
rison, Mary Hylor,
Dory Lingo,- Preston
Marshall, Albert D.
Moore, Dave Nuby,
Bernadette "Dee-
na" Pinkney, Frank
Pinkney, the Rev. Dr.
Walter Richardson, EDMC
Eugenia Thomas, Pa-
tricia Thomas, Timmy Thom-
as, Ricky Thomas, Ruby
Thomas, Charlayne Thomp-
kins, China Valles, Xavier
Vega and Gwendolyn Welters.
The history of the Hamp-
ton House will be viewed in
the 30-minute DVD, as well
as the future Hampton House
being remodeled at 4100 NW


27th Ave.
Meanwhile, Pinkney and
script writers Leome and An-
gela Culmer are preparing for
the 10th annual Women's His-
tory Luncheon on'March 16 at
Legion Memorial Park,
6447 N.E. Seventh Ave.
Some women buried in
the City Cemetery life
will be honored, includ-
ing Anna Delia Byrd,
Elizabeth Woods Clark,
Ethel Hamilton Dav-
enport, Marie White
and Viola Farquharson JOH
Wiley. A tribute to these
women will be given by The
Singing Angels Rhonda Gil-
yard, Brenda Hadley,
Mamie Home, Eliza-
beth James, Mary
Simmons and Tillie
Stibbins. For more in-
formation, call Pinkney
at 306-638-5800.

NSON ********
Hats are off to Pres-
ton Marshall and his commit-
tees for a successful and splen-
did Dr. Martin L. King Unity'Pa-
rade on Jan. 19 which began at
Northwest 12" Avenue and 54th
Street and ended at the MLK
park on 32nd Avenue, where
hundreds gathered to party
into the night.
Kudos also go out to Mi-


Brenda Hepburn-Eaddy
and son Rodrick Knowles
were down from Greensboro.
N.C., to visit morn Joyce Ma-
jor-Hepburn and their fam-
ily members and friends...
Jeffrey Young and wife Olga
came down last week to visit
their family and friends. The
Youngs, along with daughters
Ashley and Shannon, now live
in San Antonio, Texas. Jeffrey
is the son of the late Robert
(and Doreen) Reeves.


The vestry and members of
the Transfiguration will host
the "Bridge 'Builders: Con-
necting Yesterday, Today and
Tomorrow" salute to some of


their congregants .
on Feb. 14 at the
Howard Johnson ..
Plaza Hotel in Hia-
leah. Those who
will be honored are Catherine
Daniel, Ebenezer "Scrooge"
Edwards, Alyce Martin, Clara
Kelly-McKoy, Harold Mitch-
ell and Anthony E. Simons.

********
People who traveled to Nas-
sau, Bahamas, on the annual
cruise of St. Agnes Episcopal
Church included Andrea An-
derson, Sharon Anderson,
Elveda Brown, Janet Brown,
Jeannie Brown, Gloria Ch-
isholm, Alesha Clarke, Elton
Clarke, Harold Clarke, Ruth


Clarke, Violet D. Clarke, Car-
olyn Clear, Elsie Coleman.
Also, Karen Cook, Mary
Davis. Rodney DeVoe, Leroy
Forcer, Shirley Funchess,
Yennaret Gibson, Mae Etta
Glover, Arnett Hepburn,
David Hickson, Carmelia
Jones, Mae Helen McCutch-
eon, Ronda Mims, Carolyn
Mond, Barbara Taluy, Reu-
ben Troutman and Jossie
Williams.


The officers and members
of St. Cecelia's Chapter of the
Episcopal Women of St. Ag-
nes invite you to join them on
their 13th annual Scenic Bus
Tour. This year's destinations
are Tuskegee and Montgom-
ery, Ala. It is being planned for
the Memorial Day weekend.


Wedding anniversary greet-


ings go out to Preston D and
Nicole Barres Gilyard, Jan.
30, their first.


Get-well wishes are for Car-
meta Brown-Russell, Elsie
Douglas, Gussie Ervin, Wil-
ma Gilbert, Deloris J. Mc-
Cartney, Elestime McKin-
ney-Allen, Inez McKinney-
Johnson, Bernice S. Mears,
Jean Morley, Oscar Morley
Jr., Doretha Payne, Doris
M. Pittman, Herbert Rho-
des Jr., Priscilla Thompson,
Candy Wilmington and Tra-
ci Young.


As she announced her bid for


reelection on Friday, Miami
City Commissioner Michelle
Spence-Jones was having
contractions and she went
into labor Saturday, delivering
a healthy, six-pound baby
boy named Noah. Spence-
Jones and her husband have
Nathanial Jones have another
son, 4-year-old Nathanial Jr.


Old-time Miamians were
saddened to learn of the pass-
ing of Leola Carey-Robinson
in Norfolk, Va. .She was a
former Miami-Dade teacher
and sister of Luther Carey
and Birdie Carey Thompson.
She finished high school in
the BTW Class of 1937 and


graduated from then Tuskeg-
ee College, where she met
her hubby George Robinson
and went to his hometown
to live... Another native Mi-
amian, Dr. James Johnson,
died in California last week
and was brought home for fi-
nal rites. A graduate of BTW,
class of 1948, Jimmie, as he
was affectionately called dur-
ing his school days, was one
fine gentleman who everyone
knew would go on to bigger
things in life. Even being a
doctor, he remained humble
and loyal to old friends and
classmates. He came home for
all the BTW reunions and took
an active part in the alumni
network.


pa I.; -~in
D ...; -t 3L4,~
Jo, .; ,


John Donne is the type of
poet that only an English
major, would take seriously
or even come in contact with
unless one's professor wrote
his dissertation on that par-
ticular poet. Such was my
fate.
Although I fashioned myself
a poet, I was not an English
major but Dr. John "Jack"
McDermott of Gonzaga Uni-
versity's English Department,
circa 1968-70, was that pro-
fessor. Itook a seminar with
him to get serious about my
poeting. He also had the rep-


utation of being
one of the "hip-
per," more acces-
sible professors in
that great period of student
unrest and activism.
I liked his style. He was
passionate in a manly sort of
way. I liked him and, because
of that, I became interested
in John Donne. Somehow, all
of the pieces seemed to con-
nect.
Embracing his metaphysi-
cal poetry, though; took a
little doing. But get me he
did, with his unconventional


i met john donne thru' jack mcdermott,
rogue professor of english at the small
jesuit college i attended circa 1970 &
struggled thru his vigorous scrutiny
of passionate sexual love.

i didn't get it. that business of love
being the intense & absolute experience,
which isolates the lovers from the real
or makes the lover eschew the life.
led apriori the present lover -

a perfect immortal love which immortalized
the lovers, my guiding love construction,
at the time was love is god is love the
existential pimp which i foolishly penned
in a poem where an innocent child

queries his mother on her relationship
with a self-absorbed, dysfunctional
deity in what i thought to be tame scato-
logical verse, i got my fifteen minutes
of infamy when ole jack mac

published the poem in the all too catholic
student newspaper, there was no good
morrow to my waking soul which watched
out of fear. i was vilified, excoriated,
& almost rusticated

until the college realized it could exploit
the debate engendered; replace lost
conservative coin with 1i" amendment
lucre, for weeks the northwest catholic


metaphors and his eroticism.
There was a lot of sex in his
poems. Most people remem-
ber him for his "No ma n is
an island" or "because I am
Involved in mankind, and
therefore never send to know
for whom the bell tolls; it tolls
for thee..."
But I remembered,
"Off with that girdle, like
heaven's zone glistering/
But a far fairer world en-
compassing:
Unpin that spangled breast-
plate, which you wear
That th'eyes of busy fools
may be stopped there:"
Both Donne and McDer-
mott would play a role in my
poetic development but not
always pleasant or in any
way anticipated by me.


corridor rang with commentary


about that poem. but fool that i am
i made the mistake of equating notoriety
with talent. when i looked to jack to
validate, my verse after i left the college
he pawned me off on a colleague

who saw little merit in my writing,
a vague disembodied voice, he said,
& not as good as some of his better
students. i felt angry & used but not
discouraged. i looked to donne

in those dark days, perversely hoping to
find something to spite jack; to show him *
that i was better than some obscure
marginalized voice providing "found"
poetry for predatory academics.

instead, looking for something else, i
found in donne, imagery, vulgar & sublime.
i found a mixture of beauty & bad taste;
the sensual conjoined with the spirit,
yet all charged with &

pointing to the ineffable. i was suddenly
on familiar ground; i reminisced/regressed
through my experience. i seized, broke up
images, sounds & sound symbols, reassembled
them in abstracted verse -
& claimed my lusty poetic voice.


U


MIAMI CITY BALLET DON QUIXOTE
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $19, $29, $59, $69, $85, $175
Adrienne Arsht Center Presents
DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNiCOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH)
Defendiendo al Cavernicola is like Men are from Mars, Women are
from Venus meets a hilarious stand-up act!
2 & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater matinee $50; evening $45
ST.OLAF CHOIR ANTON ARMSTRONG, DIRECTOR
75 voices from one of the finest college a cappella choirs in the U.S.
3 PM Knight Concert Hall $30, $35, $40
DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNiCOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH)
The Spanish-language version of Broadway's hit play Defending the
Caveman, in its US premiere! Cavemicola is a hilariously insightful play about
the ways men and women relate that has both sexes roaring with laughter!
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $45
DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNICOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH)
"A comic phenomenon" The New York Times
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $45

DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNiCOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH)
"Outrageously funny and surprisingly sweet exploration of the
gender gap". Chicago Sun-Times
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $45


Adrienne Arsht Center and PerriloMusic present Flamenco Festival Miami
Antonio Gades Company in
FLAMENCO FESTIVAL MIAMI: CARMEN
Brilliantly theatrical with colorful costumes and breathtaking dancing.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $35, $55, $75, $95

DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNICOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH)
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $50
FLAMENCO FESTIVAL MIAMI: CARMEN
"Drama of the highest order!"- The 7Tmes, London
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $35, $55, $75, $95

DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNICOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH) Flamenco Festival: Carmen
2 & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $50
DEFENDIENDO AL CAVERNfCOLA
(DEFENDING THE CAVEMAN- IN SPANISH)
2 & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater General Admission $50

Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS Starring Byron Cage a %
A musical celebration with GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM,'Jubilate Inc., Ir
supported by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. With ... VIr
special guest best-selling recording star Byron Cage and featuring
South Florida Mass Choir.
4 PM o Knight Concert Hall e FREE


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.


Joseph McNair


JOHN DONNE & THE GIFT OF VOICE


chelle Simmons and John
Dixon of WLRN-YV who gave
a running commentary on the
parade, and Father Kenneth
C. Major, rector of the Church
of the Incarnation. VIPs in the
parade included state
Rep. James Bush and
his wife Bernadette;
State Attorney Kathy
Rundle Fernandez;
Miami-Dade Commis-
,/ sion Chairman Den-
nis Moss and Com-
missioner Dorrin
ISON G. Rolle; Opa-locka
Mayor Joseph Kelley,
Vice Mayor Myra Taylor and
Commissioner Dorothy "Dot-
tie" Johnson; Hialeah Mayor
Julio Robaina; and Clarence
Pittman of ILA and Gwen Pitt-
man.


William Clarke III, cultural
director at The Church of the
Open Door, and his wife Cyn-
thia announced a special visit
to the church by the Rev. Dr.
Henry Green Jr., former pas-
tor of Mount Herman A.M.E.
Church, who'is the newly elect-
ed presiding elder of Tampa.
He will speak at the 10 a.m.
service Sunday, Feb. 8, on the
topic, "Men In God's Armor."
For more information; call 350-
829-9179.


>I


Adriene~rshtCente

FOR THE ERFORMIN ARTS OFMIAMI-DAE COUNT


I


iN









3C THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Billions will help education


The U.S. House of Represen-
tatives recently passed an $800
plus billion recovery package,
designed to stimulate our coun-
try's flat lining economy. The
bill, which still needs to be ap-
proved by Congress before it
lands on the President's desk,
provides tax cuts and ear-
marks funds for healthcare, en-
ergy and infrastructure repair.


Over $100 million
of the money will
go directly to the
nation's schools,
resulting in the biggest ever
increase in federal funding for
education. It's about time:
Over the years, our nation's
schools have fallen further and
further behind those in other
countries. Our children aren't


learning the basics, let alone
developing skills that will help
them succeed in college or the
workforce. We're now seeing
the results of that decline: our
children's reading and math
scores are often far from im-
pressive, especially in inner cit-
ies, America is no longer the in-'
novator it once was and many of
our major companies must out
source highly skilled technical
positions to other countries be-
cause they can't find qualified
workers here.
After decades of polite re-
quests and outright demands
- for increased education fund-
ing, we finally get an opportunity


Nubiah tells of Black history


BOOK
continued from I1C

examples to aspire to, such as
Queen Asantewa, a strong wom-
an of courage; King Hannibal,
a master strategist; and Queen
Nefertiti, the beautiful one who
not only had a strong moral code
but was even more skilled in pol-
itics and debate.
Because -such information is
not usually taught in schools,
many Blacks remain unsure of
themselves, with no connection
to greatness, no self-worth, di-
rection or self-respect. Many
children have missed being
Taught important keys to human
relations.
The recurring -theme "Listen
to the Drum" guides children to
find passion, respect their fel-


lows and participate in a unity
of purpose.
Royal Graphics Publishing
announced it is donating hun-
dreds of books to help churches
raise funds, such as the Peoples
Baptist Church in Oakland Ca-
lif., whose pastor, the Rev. L.W.
Brice, has welcomed the gesture.
The church will sell the book dur-
ing Black History Month to gen-
erate revenue and donations.
Some 20 percent of all net pro-
ceeds from the sale of the book
will go to the Boys and Girls
Club of America.
For more information, log on
to www.nubiah.com. Churches
and schools wishing more in-
formation on using the book
in fundraising projects should
send their requests to info@nu-
biah.com.


Artists honored for turnout


HIP HOP
continued from 1C

mainstream phenomenon,
there are still many individuals
who know little about the genre
of music and view rappers as
gangsters with no purpose.
It's for that very reason, art-
ists say, this ball was so spe-
cial; it allowed the world to wit-
ness a more humble side of the
honorees.
For rappers Young Jeezy
and_ __T.I. being honored
at the event was surreal.
"Give me a minute to get my
thoughts together. Like Young
Jeezy said, It's not often that
my name is called for doing
something good,' T.I. said in
his acceptance speech.
"This may sound funny but
I want to thank God for me
dropping out of the school, sell-
ing crack, living the street life,
putting fear in my heart, which
made me go out and buy ma-
chine guns to protect myself
and now facing a year in the
penitentiary," he continued. "It


was those things that allowed
me to be able to better talk to
the youth. I lived it all so when
I went out to tell the youth to
vote, they listened because they
know I am just like them and
now look what happened."
"What's happening is beau-
tiful," Simmons said. "When
I stepped off the plane I could
feel it in the air. I felt love and
excitement from everyone about
what is preparing to happen.
And it feels, good to know that
hip hop hadd something to do
with it."
Those artists honored couldn't
restrain themselves from reiter-
ating how happy they were to
be recognized for their efforts
to help what once was a lone
dream of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. manifest into a reality.
In honor of President Obama,
singer and star of "Dancing
With the Stars" Mario per-
formed a moving rendition
of Michael Jackson's "Man
In The Mirror" to echo the
theme of change that pervad-
ed the president's campaign.


Versatile singer Janelle marches to own drumbeat


SINGER
continued from 1C

It was given to me as a gift. As
an artist I've been able to inter-
pret the characters that come to
me. It's a compelling tale and I
hope that it's very inspiring. It's
a tale sent here to help save our
future.
Suites two and three will be
out this year. The concepts con-
tinue to tell the story. Suite Two
is called The Arch Android. In it,
Cindi decides to stop running
and fight back. In fighting back,
she realizes that she's the arch
android and has been sent to
free Metropolis from the Great
Divide an organization cre-
ated by the Wolfmasters to di-
vide and conquer humans and
androids.
Suite Three is called The Great
Divide. It portrays an epic war
between leaders of the Wonder-
ground and the Great Divide,
led by the arch android Cindi
Mayweather.
TMT: Were you worried about
how the public would receive
your style since it is so differ-
ent?
Janelle Monae: Not at all.-
When you have a mission and
a message you don't get-caught
up in that because I believe in
what I'm doing. I believe in the
Wondaland Arts Society and I
believe whole-heartedly in my


gift so there's really nothing
anyone can say to distract me.
TMT: What is your favorite
song off your album?
Janelle Monae: I don't have
a favorite. When you're telling
a story there's a chronological
order to things. They're all very
important and they tell the en-
tire story. You can't have one
without the other.
TMT: Now I remember you
from my college days a't Clark
Atlanta when you first started
out. You would perform around
the Atlanta University Center
along with BOF and then you
dropped The Audition album.
Your sound now is so much dif-
ferent. Why the change? Is Me-
tropolis more true to your per-
sonality?
Janelle Monae: I've always
prayed that I grow and I've
grown. It takes certain stages.
I've always been very in tune
with my gift and I've always
been a lover of art. When I'm
creating music or once I go on
stage to perform, I do it as if
no one is watching. Change is
important, especially if it's con-
tinuing'to inspire and redefine
stereotypes.
TMT: What do you hope to
accomplish with the Metropolis
Suites?
Janelle Monae: I hope peo-
ple can see the parallels in the
life that we live. The point is to


get art out there and have it be
very influential. I hope when
I'm dead and gone, people will
still be inspired. I want it to be
inspiration and influence and
I want to see lots more horses
and bears having babies.
TMT: MTV.com has named
you as a poster child for what
they call the "Afro Punk" Move-
ment. Rolling Stone has placed
you on their Hot 2008 List.
You've been called the female
version of prince and compared
to the likes of Andre 3000 and
Kool Keith. How does that make
you feel?
Janelle Monae: Everyone you
named I'm a supporter of. I be-
lieve in their art and I love what
they've done. They have broken
down doors and made a way
for me to do what I do. While I
know I have so much more to
do and in no way, shape or form
have accomplished as much as
they have, I'm flattered. I take it
as a compliment, but I try not to
let compliments get me too high
or low. I continue to constantly
work on my art and focus on
the mission that I have.
TMT: With all the labels and
the backing of industry greats
like Diddy, Big Boi and others,
do you feel pressured to live up
to the hype?
Janelle Monae: No pressure.
Like I said I don't get too high
and I don't get too low when it
i


comes to opinions.
TMT: Tell me how you felt
when you first learned about
Many Moons' Grammy nomina-
tion for Best Urban/Alternative
Performance.
Janelle Monae: I don't really
focus on accolades so I wasn't
thinking about the Grammy's.
[So when the nomination came]
I was very humbled. As my mis-
sion Statement says "Imagina-
tion inspires nations." I'm just
glad that my imagination in-
spired someone to consider me
in the Urban/Alternative cat-
egory. I'm very appreciative. I'm
just so glad. I feel comfortable
about the song that was nomi-
nated. I'm glad someone' knew I
was trying to shake something
up and they were inspired by
it.
TMT: 100 years from now,
when people look back on your
music, what do you want peo-
ple to remember about Janelle
Monae?
Janelle Monae: I want them
to remember that Janelle Monae
was very fearless and she helped
redefine the kind of music that
people who look like me can
make. I want them to know she
was a wonderful horseback rider
and someone who was strongly
committed to art. And I want
them to remember that I was
the first pompadour wearing,
equestrian riding female.


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to invest more in our children's,
and our nation's, future. The
education dollars earmarked in
the stimulus package will sup-
port the grossly under funded
No Child Left Behind education
plan passed by former President
Bush. Funds are also allocated
for school repair and moderniza-
tion and for state aide to school
districts to prevent cut backs
in key services and to prevent
teacher and administrator lay-
offs. Additionally, money will
be provided to public colleges
and universities, typically more
affordable than private colleges,
to shore up their programs.
Though critics say the plan


is 'too big' and 'won't stimulate
the economy fast enough', this
dramatic increase in education
spending finally shows that
America has leaders who un-
derstand the value of a good ed-
ucation. Indeed, tens of billions
of dollars will and should be
spent on the creation of green
and infrastructure jobs for low-
skill and non-skilled workers.
While these positions are des-
perately needed, they are only
temporary. There won't nec-
essarily be a need for these
types of workers after the na-
tion's infrastructure is repaired
and the greening of America is
complete. An education lasts


a lifetime. If our young people
get the tools they need to suc-
ceed in the global marketplace,
they will be able to successfully
transition as societal and busi-
ness needs change. The only
way to ensure our young people
receive a quality education is to
invest in it.
Often times, our blessings are
disguised and we have to look
hard to recognize them. The
current recession has presented
difficult times for us all. But it
has also opened America's eyes
to its weak spots. From this,
the new education package was
born. And that is truly some-
thing to be thankful for.


Q 8


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0 4 THE MIAMI TIMES FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


For ene dollar r a White n aks,

a Blck man gets 7 nts

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


BUINElE


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Available fro6r
*f


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wtee& iZ/Ait
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


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All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558


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Who Cares



What Black People Think



Anyway?


If you think nobody
gives a damn what
Black people think,
think again. Some
people care a lot.
Especially when they
need something from
you.

Take corporations.They want
you to buy their products. And
banks care whether you're going
to give them your money.
Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for
your vote. And TV and radio
stations hope you will pay
attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people
want something from you. And
when people want something
from you, you have got power
over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make
the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes
and your loyalty to people who
deserve it. People who are going
to give you something in return.
People who are doing the most
for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people
think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the
business of communication.
Communicating to you the
power you have and letting you
know how you can use it. For
instance, right now there are 32
million Black people in this
country and last year we earned
more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


i


Think about it


Youe tCniam i ncme
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923


Phone: 305-694-6210 or see us online at www. Miami Times Online. coam


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.
A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Hialeah. FL.
(same as 103 St.)
(Plc se mt ntliton izri)

S305-824-8816
305-362-4611


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
IFB NO. 126080 DRINKING FOUNTAINS
CLOSLNG DATE/TIME: 1:00P.M., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,2009
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamiaov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.
THIS BID.SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 009550


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Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.
Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown
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SECTION D


-2352 N.W. 97th Street Rear
One bedroom, $475/rhonth.
First and last to move.
305-691-2703


101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
WE WORK WITH BAD
CREDIT
Totally remodeled two
bedrooms apts., starting
at $660, new ceramic tile,
appliances, central air, quite
neighborhood, laundry
machines, new kitchen,
parking. FREE WATER.
1545 N.W. 8 Avenue, Call
786-506-3067

1118 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath, $500. Stove, refrig-
erator, air. 305-642-7080

1205 N.W. 58th Street
One bedroom. All appliances
included. $575 monthly plus
security. 786-277-0632

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrigerator, air. 305-
642-7080.

,1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath.' $550. Stove,
refrigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144'

123 N.W. 18 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$425 monthly. All applianc-
es included. Free 20 Inch,
Fat Screeh'TV.
Call Joel 786355-7578

1257 N.W. 61st Street
MOVE IN SPECIAL! Two
bdrm, one bath, central a/c
in select units, beautifully
landscaped, as low as $700/
month, water included, first
month rent free! Section 8
accepted! Please contact
786-229-6567 for more info.

1281 N.W. 61st Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

1331 Sharizard Boulevard
Efficiencies, and one
bedrooms. Section 8 ok! No
deposit for Section 8! 786-
488-5225

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$500 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bdrm, one bath,
with air, in quiet area, $700/
month! 305-213-5013

1540 N.W. let Court
Studios $450/mth, One
bdrm $525/mth, all appli-
ances included Free 20
inch flat screen TVl Call
S Joel
786-355-7578.

1718 N.W. 2nd Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-'
7080.

1745 N.W. 1st Place
Clean apartments. Near
bus stops. One bdrm, $425
monthly, $1200 to move in.
Efficiency $375 monthly,
$1125 to move in.
Call 305-696-2825.

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms, one bath $625.
Stove, refrigerator, air. Free
Water. 305-642-7080

18550 N.W. 38th Court
One bedroom, one bath, ev-
erything brand new, utilities
and cable included. Call 786-
853-7056 or 305-527-6531.

200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080.

2141 N.W. 91st Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
private driveway, air. $925
monthly. 786-663-0234

2158 N.W. 5th Avenue
Wynwood Village Apts.
Newly renovated, one bdrm,
one bath. Move In Special
$550/month, first month free,
Section 8 ok! Must have
proof of income! Call David
305-790-5212.

220 N.W. 16th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$550. 305-642-7080


268 N.W. 81st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
new blinds, $700/month,
Section 8 welcomed!
305-300-6155

2751 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849.

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath. $600
mthly. 305-213-5013



50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
S Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.

5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bedroom, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security. 305-
751-6232

561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, new
appliances, $600 monthly,
$1200 moves you in.
Section 8 welcome
Call 305-458-3977.

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
Bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and.gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6962 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
section 8 welcome. Call Mr.
Coats at 305-345-7833.

7001 N.W. 15th Avbnue
MoVe In Special! First
montl plus half security.
deposit moves you in, One,
bedrom $495 monthly. $743.;.,
moves you in. All appli-
ances included. Free 20
inch, flat screen TV. Call
Joel 786-355-7578.

721 N.W. 56th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $550/
month, first and last to move
in, water, gas and garbage
incl. 305-441-0040

77 N.W. 77th Street
Two bedrooms, one and half
bath $830. Call 786-306-
4505

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $550
monthly. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V.
Call Joel: 786-355-7578.

8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bdrm apts. Sec-
tion 8. 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two.bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one, two, and four
bdrm. Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665.

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
appliances, laundry and gate.
From $400. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed- '
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080

COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.

439 N.W 9th Street
439 N.W. 8th Street
One Bedroom, one bath.
$425 monthly for seniors,
$600 to move in. Three bdrm
$735 /month. 786-220-3400
or 305-326-8855


Fair Housing Logo


GOLDEN SQUARE AND
GOLDEN VILLAS
New Rental Community
1325/1415 NW 18th Drive
Pompano Beach
(954)933-4050

Beautiful One, Two, Three
and Four Bedroom Apts.
Starting at $750 monthly
Washer/Dryer Available
Fitness Center
Computer Room
Sparkling Pool and
Children's Playground

*Income restrictions apply
Rent subject to change

Handicap Logo
Fair Housing Logo
MIAMI Now Pre Leasing

A Rental Community
For Seniors 55 Plus
Friendship Towers Apts.
1550 N.W. 36 Street
Miami, FL 33142

Affordable one, and two
bedrooms. Starting at $633
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137

Call: 305-573-9201

-Income Restriction Apply

-Prices Subject to Change

Handicap Logo


GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
S Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Rent Special!! All appli-
catinrs accepted. Easy
'Qualify. One bdrm, 'one, bath
.$95 ($745). Two bdrm,
one bath $595 ,. ($895).
S, FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrace Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bdrm. Bring ad for move
in deals & $50 off app. fee.
Call 305-688-8881.

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

S IOVE IN SPECOALI
135 N.W, 18 Street, Two
bedrooms, one bath. $500
m0nthy. $800 to move in, All
appliances included. Free
20 Inch Flat Screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

NORTH DADE AREA
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Section 8 o.k. $0
move in for Section 8. 786-
488-5225 or 305-756-0769.

OBAMA COLLECTIBLES!
peopleoffaithforobama.com
www.hip-hopforobama.com
blackhistoryproducts.com
305-407-8083

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
305-769-0146, 78.6-521 -
7151

OPA LOCKA AREA


One bdrm, one bath, $520/
month, Section 8 welcomed!
Call 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
Move In Special. One bed-
room, one bath, $480-$550.
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650


MIAMI, FLORIDA, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


-ilr
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $500/
month. Call 786-262-4536.

Section 8 Apartments
South Miami Area, near
Metro Rail. Two bedroom,
three bedroom, four bedroom
apartments for rent.
Call 786-543-3872.

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
One bedroom, $550 5650
monthly. All appliances
included..
Call Joel 786-355-7578



COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


1100 N.E. 210th Terrace
Two bedroom, two bathroom
Call 305-694-0988.

131 N.E. 77th Street
Remodeled, two bdrm, one
bath, $800/month, first and
last to move in, first month
free. 305-441-0040

18325 N.W 44th Court
Large, two bedroom, two
bath, laundry room, call
Rodney 305-975-0711.

19572 N.W. 29th Place
Three bdrm, one bath,
screened patio, Applications,
Sat. Feb. 7th 2-5pm.
305-829-2555

2906 N.W. 195 Lane
Three bdrm, one bath,
305-793-7388,786-457-3287

2951 N.W 195th Street
SThree bedrooms, one bath,
$1275/month neg., Section 8
preferred. 786-346-5918

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom condo. Free
water and security gate.
954-266-9328

CAROL CITY AREA
19351 N.W. 45th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three and four bdrms,
Section 8 ONLY! Rudy
786-367-6268

CAROL CITY AREA
Two bedrooms, two bath,
central air, nice condition,
Section 8 ok! 786-251-2744

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
3785 N.W. 213th Terrace
Two bdrms, Great Property!
. Call 954-243-6447.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, fenced, bars, ap-
pliances and more. $1400
monthly. Section 8 ok. Call
Manny, 305-409-2570


1100 N.W. 97 Street
Two and three bedrooms with
all appliances, water, central
air, 305-305-4665.

1128 N.W. 76 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, remod-
eled. 305-316-0681

145 N.W. 68 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080

1483 N.W 51st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850/month, $1700 move
you in! Section 8 okl Call
David 786-258-3984.

1622 NW 111 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1375 mthly. Section 8 wel-
come. 786-709-3707.

1732 N.W. 41st Street
One bdrm, one bath, appli.
incl., a/c, fenced, private
parking. $600/month. Call
754-581-6302.

1857 N.W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, two bath,
$850/month, call
786-493-0686.

2045 N.W. 41 Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
$950 monthly, first and de-
posit. Call 786-274-3948.

21301 N.W. 37 Ave
Two bedrooms, air. $895
monthly. 786-306-4839

220 N.W. 40 Street
Call 305-694-0988.

2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, one, bath, air,
$975 mthly. 786-877-5358.

255-257 N.E. 58 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath
$595. Two bedrooms, one
bath $675. 305-642-7080


3030 N.W. 19th Avenue 1368 N.W. 70th Street 1880 N.W. 65 St
One bedroom, Section 8 wel- $500/month, washer and Three bedrooms, two
come, call 305-754-7776. dryer, cable also available. baths.$1200 mthly, plus $600
Call 305-691-0458. security deposit moves vyou


4425 N.W. 23 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$695. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

45 N.W. 60th Terrace (by
1st Ave)
Two bdrm, one bath, central
air, fenced, tile, everything
new incl. kitchen, $850/
month. 305-588-7736.

5512 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedroom, one bath,
duplex for rent, fenced yard,
central air, $800/month. Call
305-298-5773.

687 Curtis Drive
OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
refrigerator, stove, washer,
central air, Section 8,
HOPWA and New Horizon.
786-506-1245

7770 N.W. 9th Avenue
One bdrm, one bath, drive in
entrance, Section 8 only. 305-
761-3232

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-754-7776

960 N.W. 109th Street
Three bedrooms, two bath,
Section 8 welcomed!
786-499-7692 or
305-335-3860

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Large three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1075 N.W. 76th St Rear
$550/month, plus security.
Appliances and air.
305-490-9284

113 St and N.W. 15th Ave
Large two room efficiency,
$600 mthly, 786-718-9226

1144 N.W. 31 Street
Full kitchen. $700 mthly.
NuConcept Realty
305-244-0366

1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, air, cable, no
utilities, $550 mthly.
Call 786-317-1804

1541 N.W. 54 St #B
Huge efficiency. $550 mthly,
$200 Security deposit, utili-
ties included. 305-332-2117

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$130 weekly, $500 moves
you in. Call 786-389-1686.

18201 N.W. 9th Avenue
Efficiency $600 monthly,
$1200 moves you in. Call
305-467-4651

243 N.W. 59th Street Rear
Two bdrm, one bath, $725
monthly. Call 305-218-1227.

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency and two bedrooms.
Call 305-754-7776

CASTLE MANSION
Best Rooms $112 wkly, plus
Security $150. Efficiencies,
fully loaded, $600 mthly plus
$300, one with jacuzzi $700
plus $300 security.. Near
bus line, Family Dollar three
blocks North. 720 N.W. 75
St. 786-523-1736.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
All utilities, free cable, $700
monthly, first, last and
security. Call 305-917-5492

NORTHWEST AREA
Water, and appliances
included. $575/month.
386-338-5618


1221 N.W. 41st Street
$100/security, $650/rent,
$750/move in, util. included,
cooking and family privileges.
305-301-1806

13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486


1426 N.W. 70th Street
$300-$350 Monthly
305-836-8378

1500 N.W. 183rd Street
$135 wkly, $285 to move in.
786-457-2998

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1765 N.W. 56th Street
Utilities, central air, weekly
rates. Call 305-303-2644.

1775 NW 151 STREET
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations. Call:
954-678-8996

2168 N.W. 98 St
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person:
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

2365 N.W. 97th Street
Room with air, $85 weekly,
$340 to move in.
Call 305-691-2703.

2900 N.W. 54th Street
Upstairs, one room, refrig-
erator and air. Call 954-885-
8583 or 954-275-9503.

2905 N.W. 57 Street
Small, clean $285 monthly.
$670 to move in, kitchen
available. One person only.
305-989-6989

3115 N.W. 58th Street
Free electric, free water. $450
monthly. 305-224-2569

6849 N.W. 15th Avenue
Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $110
weekly, $220 moves you
Sin.Call 786-277-2693.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available. Call
305-754-7776.

CAROL CITY AREA
Reasonable price. 786-308-
5625

Homestead Area
Fully furnished, microwave,'
air, refrigerator, cable TV and,
armoire. 786-285-9611 '
786-346-8505

LIBERTY CITY/BROWNS-
VILLE AREA
Clean rooms, utilities
included, quiet area.
786-541-5234

LITTLE RIVER AREA
Air, kitchen privilege, $125/
week, $250 move in. Private
entrance. 305-835-2446.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Call 305-343-2732

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Rooms starting at $575 to
$700 monthly. 305-319-9830

NORTHWEST AREA
LARGE, CLEAN FUR-
NISHED ROOMS
CALL 786-597-0871

One room furnished with cen-
tral air and appliances, $125
weekly, $250 to move in.
Call 786-487-2222.


1165 N.W. 147th Street
Two bedrooms, $1200,
efficiency $600. Utilities
included. 305-490-9284

1251 N.W. 176 Ter
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1300 monthly. Section
8 OK $1950 down. 305-625-
3526

1345 N.E. 128th Street
Three bdrm, one bath, $1200
month, No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

1530 N.E. 151st Terrace
Three bdrms, two baths,
'$1150, 786-419-5734.

15421 NW 27th PL
Two bedroom, rear, utilities
included. Section 8. Call Low
786-356-0486/G 786-356-
0487

1570 N.W. 123 St
Two bedrooms, two baths,
carport, screened patio, large
yard, fruit trees, fenced, tiled,
appliances. $1250 monthly,
first and security. Section 8
Welcome. 305-318-9315

1740 N.W. 66 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$700. 305-642-7080



1785 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bedrooms, one' bath,
$800 monthly. 305-267-9449

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
One bedroom. $700 mthly.
$900 move in. 305-751-6720


1871 Wilmington Street
Two bedrooms, one bath with
central air. 786-356-1457.


in.
in.


786-262-7313

2015 N. W. 83 Terrace
Two bedroom, one bath,
house. Also available one
and four bedrooms. Call Mr.
Brown at 786-306-2946.

2141 N.W. 96th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
utility room, $1350 monthly,
954-430-0849

2300 N.W. 153 Street
Two bedrooms, Florida room,
garage. $1050 monthly.
Call 954-435-3901

2330 N.W. 97th Street Rear
One bdrm, non-smoker,
$1500 to move.
305-693-0620

3861 N.W. 196 St
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Asking $1600.
786-317-0514

41 St and N.W. 5 Ave
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776.

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

570.N.W. 30th Street
Four bedroom. Section 8 wel-
come. Other properties avail-
able. Call Ted 954-274-6944.

750 N.W. 123 St
Four bdrms, two baths. $1400
mthly. 305-778-7461

81 St. and N.W. 12 Ave.
Three bedroom, two bath,
air, alarm. $1200. 305-625-
7843.

8122 N.W. 14th Place
Four bedroom, one bath. For
info call Ms. German.
305-691-4446

9410 N.W. 32 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1,250, air, tile, $3,125 move
in. No Section 8. Den.
Terry Dellerson Broke
305-891-6776

Hollywood Area
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$900 monthly. Rent
Option. 786-273-6473

Make Extra Money on Your
Home
Turn your home into an ALF!
Call Now! 305-756-1765

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedroom, one bath.
$1175 monthly. Call
407-497-8017.

Miami Gardens Area
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, fenced
yard, carport. Section 8 OK!
$1275 monthly. 305-388-
7477

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five bedrooms and half,
three bathrooms, family,
dining, living, and laundry
room. Section 8 okay! $1950
monthly. Call 305-992-6496.

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Two homes to choose from,
three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250, air, tile, $3,125.
No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

1770 N.W. 51st Terr
Three bdrms, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 OK! $1260 mthly. Joe
305-607-1040


Prime Golden Glades Of-
fice
Space for rent, from $300 to
$500 monthly.
305-681-9600.





MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$185K Mortgage Incentives.
Call 786-419-7060.


14622 N.W. 13 Road
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, try $1900 down
and $1299 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839.

1570 N.W. 70 Street
Three bedrooms, air, renovat-
ed. Try $900 down and $699
monthly. FHA.
Call 786-306-4839

2301 N.W. 79th Terrace
Large, renovated, four bdrm,
two bath, tv and util. room.
$169K, or best offer.
305-305-5546.


INVESTOR DEAL!
2901 N.W. 43 Terr. Two bed-
room, one bath. $50,000.
5700 N.W. 18 Ave. Three
bedroom, one bath. $70,000.
875 N.W. 74 Street. Three
bedroom, one bath. $60,000.
For more detail
Call Nello Davis
305-694-0988

MIAMI GARDENS
OWNER FINANCING. Three
and four bedrooms. No Quali-
fying, No Credit Check. Call
for Details. 786-306-4839

Rent To Own
Three nice homes to choose
from. 1-800-970-5628 press
extension 5.

Rent to Own or Owner
Will Finance, Must Sell!
Three bedrooms, two baths,
15300 N.E. 10th Avenue, call
786-991-4767.

WE BUY HOUSES!I!
Any Condition-Any Area!
305-788-8939

*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
'"WITH'*
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


7900 N.W. 12 Court
Duplex lot for sale or for
rent, sale price $55,000.
5000 square feet.
call 305-318-7878


Evictions- Fast and Cheap!
Filed and Served in 24
Hours.
30 Days Complete Eviction
Mickens Evictions
15005 N.E. 6th Avenue #204
305-956-7997


A DUN DEAL PAINTING
Interior, exterior, driveways,
and iron gates. Call for free
estimates, toll free 866-655-
1886 or 954-274-1963.

BEST PRICES IN TOWN III
Handyman, carpet cleaning
plumbing, hanging doors,
hauling debris or moving,
specializing in lawn service.
305-801-5690

GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

IF IT'S BROKE, FIX IT!
TV/Stereo Repair, and
Sales plus Accessories.
Bass Electronics
305-835-2747.

PLUMBING SERVICE
Repairs, Sewer and Drain
Cleaning, Water Heater
Installations. 305-316-1889

Sheldon Lawn Care
Trees, Edging, Light Hauling,
Residential and Commercial.
Reasonable Prices! Depend-
able! 305-301-1806


87' Mercury Grand Marquis
LS 5.0 Engine. Four door.
Great condition. 305-764-
1561


mww


CASTING CALL
NO JIVE PRODUCTIONS
'His Double Life' Tour,
February 15, Joseph Caleb
Auditorium. By appointment
only call 786-338-3812/
email:
casting@nojiveproductions.
com www.nojiveproduc-
tions.com

COLLECTIONS
Strong organization and
communication skills re-
quired to coordinate collec-
tion process, and cash flow.
Two years exp. Fax resume
to 305-758-3617.




CLASSIFIED

CONTINUE ON

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Available fl-Com 'omemrciaTNews Providers"

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S


FAMU reports progress in putting finances back on track


Miami Times Staff Report

Florida A&M Universi-
ty announced improve-
ment in the school's fi-.
nancial position follow-
ing a state audit.
A FAMU statement
said the school has ad-
opted several new mea-
sures in response to the
findings of the audit.
The findings related to
returned checks receiv-
able, vendor payments,
communication expens-
es, cellular telephones,
contractual services,
insurance coverage and
information technology
security controls, the
statement said.
FAMU said it has
been taking the follow-
ing steps, to address.
concerns raised in the
findings:
Enhancement of the
collection procedures
for returned checks and
implementing a check
verification service.
Implementing a new
imaging system to im-
prove timeliness of pro-
cessing invoices.
Implementing an
Administrative Servic-
es Assistance Program
to serve as liaison be-
tween the Controller's
Office and the various
departments to ensure
timely processing of
payments.
Revising procedures
governing cell phone
use to enable the uni-
versity to report the val-
ue of cell phone services
in the income reported
for the employees with
.assigned cell phones.
Developing a train-
ing program for con-
tract monitoring for the
campus community;
strengthening contract
administration with the
Purchasing Department
to ensure timely pay-
ments to contractors.
Instituting a system


of checks and balances
by adding a reviewer to
ensure accurate and
timely computation and
reporting of insurable
values.
SDeveloping proce-
dures to maintain and
monitor PeopleSoft Fi-
nancial System ac-
cess.
Teresa Hardee, vice
president for Adminis-
trative and Financial
Services, said most of
actions required by the
findings were already in
place, according to the


university statement.
"We are committed to
making sure that these
findings are not re-
peated in our next op-
erational audit," Hardee
said.
FAMU President
James H. Ammons said
when he took office on
July 1, 2007, the audit
had come back with 35
findings, the Commis-
sion on Colleges/ of the
Southern Association,
of Colleges and Schools
had put FAMU on pro-
bation and the Board of
Governors had appoint-
ed a task force to review
the school's financial


operations.
"We are proud of the
work that our staff in
the Division of Admin-
istrative and Financial
Services has done to
reduce the number of
findings in the opera-
tional audit," Ammons
said.
"When you look at the
results, this team did
an extraordinary job in
such a short period of
time," Ammons said. "If
you compare .the seven
findings of the current
operational audit with
other universities in the
State University Sys-
tem, you would agree


OPA-LOCKA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (OLCDC) in
association with Miami Dade Housing Agency offers Housing Counseling Ser-
vices for low to moderate income families. Services include; 1st Time Home-
buyers Purchasing Assistance includes Down payment and closing cost subsi-
dies, Low interest Rehab Loans Home Rehab Loans, Credit Repair & Budget
Counseling, and Foreclosure Prevention Assistance, HOMEBUYER EDUCA-
TION CLASS For more information you may contact us at (305) 687-3545 ext.
236, visit our website www.olcdc.ora or stop by our office at 490 Opa-locka
Blvd., Ste 20,. Opa-locka, FL 33054. OLCDC is an Equal Housing Lender
and a HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agency


Applications available from February 9,2009 February 26,2009
Chainrman Dennis C. Moss
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
District 9
Mom and Pop Small Business Grant Program
For Miami-Dade County, District 9
Grant funds available to
qualifying business owners
(up to $5,000 per business)
Applications available for pick up at the following locations:
District North Office: South Dade Government Center, 10710 SW 211 Street, Suite 206, Miami, FL 33189
District South Office: 1634 NW 6 Avenue, Florida City, FL 33034
Applications will also be available for download at www.miamidade.qov/district09
An mandatory informational workshop is scheduled for Thursday. February 19, 2009 from 6:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.
at the South Dade Government Center 10710 SW 211 Street, Room 203, Miami 33189
Return 1 original and 1 copy completed application between February 19 26, 2009, by 5:00 p.m.
For more information, contact Ms. Finney 305-756-0605.
All businesses must be located in District 9 and meet the following criteria:


* Must have been in business for at least 2 year (include
proof).
* Cannot have more than seven (7) employees (2 part
time will count as 1 fulllime).
* Must not be a part of a national chain.
* Can not have more than two (2) businesses in district.
* Must have a current Miami-Dade County Occupational
License or paid receipt and Municipality License at the
time of application. Business name on application must
match one on license (include copy),
* A physical address is required. No P.O Box as mailing
address allowed.


* Home-based businesses can apply.
* Applications will not be accepted after deadline.
* Must not have delinquent loan with Miami-Dade
County, a County Department or County funded agency
* Businesses funded in the past can not apply.
* Non-profit agencies cannot apply.
SApplication must be typed or printed only.
* Applicants must sign and submit all requested
documents.
*, Must submit outside picture of business location build
ing, home, or work vehicle).
* Submit 1 original and 1 copy completed application.


* Must participate in business workshop training.
All application packages will be subject to selection committee review and approval.


that we did an out-
standing job."
Operational audits
are conducted every two
years by the state audi-
tor general to determine
whether a university's
internal controls pro-
moted and encouraged
compliance with appli-
cable laws, rules, regu-
lations, as well as con-
tract and grant agree-
ments.


The Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners, through the efforts of Com-
missioner Barbara J. Jordan, has allocated $1.2 million for the rehabilitation of
single-family homes in Opa-locka through the Opa-locka Home Rehabilitation
Program. Homeowners may qualify for up to $30,000 to repair roofs, electrical
and plumbing systems, replace windows, doors, air conditioning units, flooring
and kitchen and bathroom fixtures.

For more information on how to take advantage of this opportunity, contact the
Opa-locka Community Development Corporation at (305) 687-3545 extension
236 or visit our office at 490 Opa-locka Blvd., Suite 20, Opa-locka, FL 33054.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 123059 INVITATION FOR BID FOR PRINTER REPAIR
SERVICES, CITYWIDE

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/Drocurement Telephone No.
305-416-1958.

Deadline for Request for Clarification: Tuesday. February 10. 2009 at 5:00P.M.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-14 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 005048


Applications available from February 9,2009 February 27, 2009
Commissioner Katy Sorenson
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
District 8


Mom and Pop Small Business Grant Program
For Miami-Dade County, District 8


Grant funds available to
qualifying business owners
Up to $5,000 for commercial business or
Up to $2,000 for home-based business

Applications available for pick up at the'following locations:

District Office: South Dade Government Center, 10710 SW 211 Street,
Suite 204, Miami, FL 33189
SChamber South, 6410 SW 80 Street, South Miami, FL 33143
Economic Development Council of South Dade (EDC), 900 Perrine Avenue,,
Palmetto Bay, FL 33157
Greater Homestead/Florida City Chamber of Commerce, 212 NW 1st Avenue,
Homestead, FL 33030
Applications will also be available for download at: www.miamidade,ov/district08

Return 1 original and 1 copy completed application by US Mail, or hand deliver
application in person, to one of the above listed locations by February 27, 2009, 5 pm
(We suggest you keep a copy of the completed application for your records)

For more info, contact Commissioner Sorenson's District Office at 305-378-6677 or
Ms. Lawanza Finney at: 305-756-0605 from 10 a.m. -4 p.m.

All applications will be subject to selection committee review.


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Support The Times


* *-MNT


O CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED 0 BILL MY CREDIT CARD


Exp.

Exp_

Exp


Authorized Signature _

Name

Address

' City


State ___ Zip


Phone email


'Includes Florida sales tax


C~bdSMihA8


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


Audit findings drop from 35 to seven


---------


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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8D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009 1








9D THE MIAMI TIMES, FEBRUARY 4-10, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Folding dealers ock car buyer with unpaid lies


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Advisor On Business, Marriage, and Love Affa
Religious Holy Woman Helps The Sick And Ail
Remove Suffering And Bad Luck From Your B(
e'll Call Your Enemies By Name and Tell You V
Keep Away From. Whal Your Eyes See, Your Hi
ist Believe. The Touch 01 Her Hand Will Help \
e Has The God Given Power To Help By Prayei
1435 NE 135 St North Miami
305-893-4481
sjuu m~~~f ~ w -t~


YOUR

AD COULD

BE HERE


SUBSCRIBE
TODAY!
END THE
INCONVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES,
FIG HTING
THE WEATHER
AND HUNTING
DOWN BACK
COPIES
CALL:
305-694-6214


IFB NO. 94050


MIAMDA

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs

For computer access visit any Miami-Dade County Library or
South Florida Workforce Career Center.
For locations call 311.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
2jdtlfVcri Excdellce E-crv aZy


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat,
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


INVITATION FOR BID FOR PLANS REVIEW AND
BUILDING INSPECTION SERVICES


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25,2009
Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 2/13/2009 at 3:00P.M


Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of.Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, websitc at www.miamigov.com/procurement. Telephone No.
(305) 416-1958.
THIS BID SOLICITATION 15 SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO. 12271.
PedroG. Hernandez
City Manager LOGO

AD NO. 007551







I MIAM-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

MDX PROCUREMENT/CONTRACT NO.: RFP-09-05

MDX WORK PROGRAM NO(S).: 92405.030, 87412.030, 87801.030

MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: DESIGN-BUILD PROJECT FOR STATE
ROAD 924 (GRATIGNY PARKWAY), STATE ROAD 874 (DON SHULA
EXPRESSWAY), AND'STATE ROAD 878 (SNAPPER CREEK EXPRESSWAY)
INFRASTRUCTURE MODIFICATIONS FOR OPEN ROAD TOLLING

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority requires the services of a qualified Design-Build
Firm for the design and construction of Open Road Tolling ("ORT") infrastructure
modifications, including gantries, shelters, signage and pavement, required to convert State
Road 924 (Gratigny Parkway), State Road 874 (Don Shula Expressway), and State Road
878 (Snapper Creek Expressway) to Open Road Tolling facilities as well as toll plaza
removal, roadway reconstruction, milling, resurfacing and miscellaneous upgrades on SR
924. The general scope of services required is to convert each of the three (3) MDX
roadways (SR 924, SR 874, and SR 878) to ORT facilities including, but not limited to,
signage necessary to provide warning, guidance, and to notify users of regulations for using
the three (3) newly converted MDX ORT facilities; ORT gantry structures, equipment
shelters, roadway and shoulder pavement needed for installing the ORT Toll System (by
others). MDX notifies all Proposers and individuals that it requires and encourages small,
minority and women-owned businesses to have full opportunity to submit a response to any
Solicitation Document issued by MDX. In accordance with its Small Business Participation
Policy, available on MDX's website, MDX requires satisfaction of fifteen percent (15%)
small business participation requirement in this procurement. For copies of the RFP with
complete information on pre-qualification requirements, the scope of services as well as
submittal requirements, please log onto our web site at www.mdx-way.com or call MDX
Procurement Office at 305-637-3277. Please note: In order to download any MDX
solicitations, you must register as a Vendor. The Vendor Registration can only be done
through MDX's website. The deadline for submitting a Technical Proposal is March 24,
2009 by 2:00 P.M. Eastern Time. A Mandatory Pre-Proposal Conference is scheduled for
February 17, 2009 at 10:00 A.M. at the MDX Headquarters Building. Attendance by
Proposers at this meeting is mandatory in order to be considered a responsive
Proposer.


Business Opportunity for Certified
ACDBE Luggage Cart Concession
at Miami International Airport

Smarte Carte, Inc., the leading provider
of luggage cart rental services in airports
is seeking certified ACDBE companies for
a labor subcontract opportunity at Miami
International Airport. Candidates must be
certified by the Florida Unified Certification
Program (FUCP). The subcontractor will
be required to provide staff and supervi-
sion for luggage cart movement at MIA.

Interested parties should email a letter
of interest to Rhonda Boudewyns, at
boudewyra)martecarte.com

Further information regarding this
opportunity will be provided to interested
parties


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF SPECIAL COMMISSION MEETING
Pursuant to Section 2-33 of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida, as
amended, Mayor Manuel Diaz has called for a special meeting of the Miami
City Commission to be scheduled on February 13, 2009 at 9:00 AM, at Miami
City Hall located at 3500 Pan American Drive. The purpose of this meeting is
to address the Proposed Definitive Agreements with the Florida Marlins and
Miami-Dade -County based on the Baseball Stadium Agreement approved
by the City Commission on February 21, 2008 and to consider an Interlocal
Agreement relating to the use of Convention Development Taxes. No other
business shall be conducted outside that indicated above as the purpose which
the special meeting is called.
All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with
respect to this matter. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F.S. 286.0105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(#003205)


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES. FEBRUARY 4-10. 2009


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continued from 7d


COOK and CLEAN
LAUNDRY
Required minimum five
years experience with refer-
ences related to house-
keeping positions. 5.5 days.
Valid driver's license, non-
smoker, drug testing and
background check required.
Call and leave your name
and telephone number.
305-694-6227

JOBS! JOBS JOBS
All Types of Positions
Available, Flexible Work
Hours, Part and Full Time
Work, Excellent Pay and
Bonuses! Miller's Workforce
LLC. 99 NW 183rd Street
Suite 116, 305-974-5338

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street


Teachers Full and Part-
time
Daycare/Preschool. Must
have 40 hours CDAE.
Call 305-691-6868

TELEMARKETERS
Part-time positions avail-
able Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday.
Busy newspaper needs
experienced telemarketers,
must generate own clients.
Motivation is the key, quo-
tas must be met weekly and
commission is a plus!
Please fax resume to
305-759-0297 or email to
advertising@miamitimeson-
line.com


Don't Throw Away Your Old
Records!
We Buy Old Records,
Albums, LP's, 45's, or 12"
singles. Soul, Jazz, Blues,
Reggae, Caribbean, Latin,
Disco, Rap or Bass. Also
DJ Collections! Tell Your
Friends!
786-301-4180.
OBAMA COLLECTIBLES!
peopleoffaithforobama.com
www.hip-hopforobama.com
blackhistoryproducts.com


INSIAN I AUIlUN!
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234



Be a Security Guard
Or Renew License $60!
786-333-2084

COSMOTOLOGY CLASSES
Attend a one or two day
course, and receive a Cos-
metology hair wrapping or
hair braiding license from the
Department of Business and
Professional Regulation. For
Only $440, includes license
fee. 954-274-2727 Master-
mind of Beauty Salon
3503 N.E. 2nd Avenue


super lean carpet
Cleaning Service
24 Hour Flood Service. Call
Mr. Charles 786-564-7942

YOUR AD

COULD

BE HERE


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!
END IHE
I N C N I E N C E
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES,
FIG HTING
THE WEATHER
AN D HUNTING
DOW N BACK
COPIES.

CALL:

305.694-


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,00 0 -IND
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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Sealed responses will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office lo-
cated at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Fl. 33133 for the following:

RFQ NO. 126077 MUNICIPAL BOND UNDERWRITING SERVICES


2:00 PM, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2009


CLOSING DATE:


Detailed for the Request of Qualifications (RFQ) are at the City of Miami, Pur-
chasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone
No. 305-416-1906.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pete Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 003471

NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."





067-JJ10 2/19/2009 Request For Proposals (RFP): Instant Messaging
And Parent Notification System

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


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