Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00736
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: January 21, 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00736
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text








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Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis

DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 21 MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 21-27, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


44TH PRESIDENT TAKES OVER
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Volunteers answer call to service,

spend a day at Liberty Square


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

More than 500 volunteers,
from children to seniors, spent
Saturday at the Liberty Square
Community Center, answering
President Obama's call to ser-
vice.
At 8:30 am, attendees milled
about the center as Hands on
Miami, a volunteer organiza-
tion aimed at helping those less
fortunate, in conjunction with
Carnival Cruise Lines, prepared
to paint and landscape homes
in the nearby Liberty Square
complex.
. Ramon Rodriguez, 40, an em-
ployee at CITI, cited Obama's
call as one of many reasons he
volunteered for the project.
"It's a national call from our


incoming president," he said.
"When you have a lot, you give
back a lot. You're expected to."
Pat Morris, president of Hands
on Miami, also attributed a
sudden upswing in the number
of volunteers to Obama's call to
service. "We had about 400 peo-
ple signed up, but when Obama
and [Colin] Powell came-together
to talk about service, 250 more
signed up," Morris said.
Morris said the entire project
was made possible by Target
Corporation.
"This is a signature event
we do every year," said Gregg
Zalkin, 37, co-chairman of Car-
nival Cruise Line's Employee
Volunteer Group. "Well be
painting and landscaping in an
effort to re-vitalize the center. It
also gives us an opportunity to


raise awareness."
Gladys Cornelius added, "We
also allow parents to bring their
children, and the children at
least the high school students
- can use their community ser-
vice here toward graduation."
Many high schools require com-
munity service as a part of their
curriculum.
"One staff member," Corne-
lius said, "brought members of
her church."
That staff member, Rashida
West, of South Florida Church
of Christ, 9191 Orange Dr.,
Davie, explained: 'We wanted
to do something different. Usu-
ally well just go to somebody's
house and eat."
"I think community service
is very important," she added.
Please turn to SERVICE 8A


Preserving a piece of history
Former Miami Police Chief Clarence Dickson, with hat, joins other former and present Miami police offi-
cers and leaders at the dedication of the new Black Police Museum and Courthouse in Overtown on Thursday.
See Story Page 9A -Miami Times Photo/Tariq Osborne


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


,)A TIuEIMIAMI TIMA: IAMIApV971-77 9flflI


-AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Welcome, Mr. President
W hen Barack Obama took the oath of office on
Tuesday as the. first Black President of the
United States, he completed journey that began
centuries ago when the first Africans were brought to this
country and held in chains, their blood and sweat going
to build a nation that looked on them as less than human
beings. There is good reason, therefore, for the euphoria
among our people as they witnessed the impossible coming
to pass.
But it is a joy that must be tempered with the reality of
ourtiije, the'knowledge that this first son of our people is
takingbln a task that requires all the'resourcefulness and
resilience that took our forebears through the trials and
tribulations of their day.
President Obama has inherited two wars abroad, an
economic and financial disaster at home and a nation.
that is sorely distressed. More than anything else, he has
to deal with these challenges even as he strives to move
America in a new direction and effect the change ,that was
the hallmark of his campaign for the presidency.
And we shall be with him all the way because we know
that his mere presence in the White House will translate
into better times for us.
No, we do not expect him to be president for Black people,
because he was elected by Americans of different races,
ethnicities, religions and economic circumstances. His
primary obligation is to lead all of America into a better
tomorrow. But we are confident that in doing so, we too
can look forward to a brighter future.
Ours is a nation where the people take their cue from the
leadership and a-Black man in the White House will mean
much better enforcement of civil rights, less exploitation of
the poor, more grace and compassion towards all peoples.
This particular president has shown he embodies those
virtues and his leadership will be imbued with them.
His presidency will be informed by the fundamental
principle that there can be no real progress towards realizing
the America we all want if there "is no acknowledgement
that ours is a nation that is made up of diverse parts, that
Americans pray to God in different ways, that people have
a basic right to pursue their own paths to happiness and
that we rise to a higher plane when we embrace those who
disagree with us, those who do not think like us.
As we saw in his selection of his top aides, such as his
Cabinet members and other senior White House staff, and in
those he chose to play prominent roles in his inauguration
ceremonies, President Obama is not afraid to pursue that
path, to reject the divisiveness that has kept us all for a
long time in fierce, debilitating competition to prove who is
the better American. It will be no surprise if his policies, as
they are implemented, reflect that philosophy, even though
he may displease some of us.
President Obama is a new kind of politician, a new
kind of leader, who sees America's true greatness not in
the unseemly display of petty divisiveness but in an all-
embracing ethic of unity within diversity, as reflected in
our national motto. He will be among the very few American
leaders who have been brave enough to accept and project
that ideal.
For all American people, we can tell you that we could not
have had a better president. For us.as Blacks, we joyously
welcome him as our nation's top leader and we see in him
the realization of one aspect of the dream that another
great leader, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., spoke about not
the fulfillment of the King dream but a vast step forward.
And we salute all who made it possible for America to have
its first Black president, for giving expression to that part
of the King dream that we all be judged not by the color of
our skin but the content of our character.
We have chosen well this time.


(ISSN 0739-0319)
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U


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CREDO OP THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press beBeves that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person, fearing no person, the
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief thai all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back.


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


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President Bush left office

with a mixed record; time

will judge his legacy

As .people near the end of their' term, they
contemplate their life and worry about the here-
after. I have watched this phenomenon with I
regard to church-going in my own family. Aunts ,..,
and uncles who drank hard, partied hard and
never went to church when they were young become avid church-
goers when they reach their golden years.
President George W. Bush, in the last two months of his presi-
dency, suddenly realized that he will be judged by history and he
is worried about his legacy. After eight years in office, it seems, to
me, a little late that someone should worry about his legacy. You
-should worry about your legacy on a day-by-day basis and try to
make each day count.
However, President Bush, like my elderly family members, has
suddenly come to the realization that his term is over. How will
he be judged by history? America seems to have love affairs with
its leaders and then dissects them to lower the esteem with which

Or President Bush will be remembered as the president who led us

into war against Iraq based on the statement that Saddam Hussein
was building weapons of mass destruction. He might also be viewed
as the president who pushed for torture, wire tapping and politicizing of the
judiciary and other departments, particularly the Department of Justice.

they are held.
John F. Kennedy's presidency was referred to as Camelot, af-
ter the legendary kingdom of King Arthur -and the knights of the
roundtable, who went around correcting injustices and lived a
high morale code.. But recent historians refer to Kennedy's pos-
sible ties to the Mob and his affairs.
Martin Luther King Jr. was vilified by, many in this country. Af-
ter his death, he became sanctified. In recent historical accounts,
though, it is pointed out that this man of God had an affair during
the heyday of the Civil Rights Movement.
If one examines the Bush legacy objectively how will he be
judged? His current poll ratings are the lowest during his two
terms, in part due to the unpopularity of the war in Iraq and the
recession.
'President Jimmy Carter also suffered' in populariity due to the
economy and the perceived weak handling of the Iranian hostage
crisis. Recent history has painted him as a moral man, which has
been accentuated by his post-election legacy led. by the popular
Habitat for Humanity program, his peacekeeping efforts and ini-
tiatives to ensure fair elections abroad.
President Bush could be remembered as the 9-11 President
who responded calmly to the crisis and gave the country what it
wanted vengeance against those who attacked us on our own
soil. He could also be remembered as the Republican president
,who appointed the first Black Secretary of State (Colin Powell)
and first Black female National Security Advisor and Secretary
of State (Condoleeza Rice). He is also the first president to show
real concern about the AIDS crisis and has poured millions in aid
into Africa to fight the disease. He should also be respected for
inviting the president-elect to the White House and the joint party
cooperation on the bail-out bill.
Or President Bush will be remembered as the president who
led us into war against Iraq based on the statement that Saddam
Hussein was building weapons of mass destruction. He might also
be viewed as the president who pushed for torture, wire tapping
and politicizing of the judiciary and other departments, particu-
larly the Department of Justice. He might also be remembered for
the disorganized response to Hurricane Katrina, the Abu Ghraib
prison scandal and the $1 billion no-bid contract to Hallibur-
ton.
Time will tell.


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On the campaign trail with Barack Obama


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.com

It began a Saturday after-
noon in late June. I sat in a
chair biting my nails await-
ing the keynote speaker for
the U.S. Mayors Conference
at the Intercontinental Ho-
tel in Downtown Miami.
Then Barack Obama, just
shy of winning the Demo-
cratic presidential nomi-


nation over Hilary Clinton,
arrived to a standing ova-
tion.
Photographers shifted to
the front of the ballroom
to get as many pictures as
they could of the presiden-
tial hopeful. This was my
first time at the mayors'
meeting and it was certain-
ly the first time I was cov-
ering a presidential candi-
date. I didn't know what to


What do you think about Barack Obama becoming president of the United States?


TYRELL TAYLOR, 19
Cook, Miramar

Obama will
make a dif-
ference in the
Black commu- '
nity. More peo- s '
ple will start
to believe in
dreams so they
won't have to
always live a life of mediocrity.
Obama gave us hope so we must
take that hope and apply it to
our everyday life. He gave us the
push but now individually we
have to do the pull. Change in
our economy will not be achieved
for years.

BEN FLINT, 64
Cook, Liberty City


This is the ---
biggest thing .
that has hap- -
pened in ourA
nation. Now,
more jobs will
be produced in
this economy
because there
are a lot of
people in the


country who want to work but
can't find work. It is not fair. We
took eight years of nonsense so
it is time for change.

JODY NAPOLEON, 18
Student, Liberty City

It was a good
idea electing
President Ba-
rack Obama.
He is aman of
character with
a dream to see
a better Amer-
ica. He ful-
filled Dr. King's
dream.

MURAD MURPHY, 32
Student, North Miami

He will make
a difference and
we will see signs
of improvement
in this coun-
try. Obama is a -
smart man with
a vision. Hon-
estly, I think
that it will
take at least
eight years to really see change.


Obama has not fulfilled King's
dream because his dream was
for the people to reunite. Yes, we
have a Black president but the
people are still divided.

ADAM JACKSON, 30
Laborer, Liberty City

I think that it
is a good thing i i
that the coun- "
try decided to
elect. the first ; i
Black presi- .
dent. I hope 1
that he will
be reelected
in four years
again because, the first four
years, he will be fixing another
man's mistakes.

MICHELLE GRIER, 42
Housewife, Miami Gardens

Obama is a
good choice
for President
and a blessing
from God. It is
a lot of jobs be-
ing cut, there '-
is a scarcity of
teachers and


help is needed to improve our
schools. We need the village to
take responsibility of our kids.

RAYMOND PHILLIPS, 47
Truck driver, Miami Gardens

He is going to - -
bring changes
in the coun-
try but he will
be scrutinized
for bringing
awareness of
the three tril-
lion dollar
deficit. This
change that we are all expecting
may not come in four years or
eight years. Locally, -we can do
some work to -help alleviate the
problems in Washington like
helping the homeless, creating
more jobs and fighting to reduce
crimes in our community.



.Subscribe


expect.
"The job of the mayor is
to get things done," Obama
said. "It is the city hall that
we lean and call on to get
us through the hard times.
It is important to work
in the local level to bring
about change."
"Change," said the man
who would be president,
"comes from the bottom
up, not the other way
around. There are so many
mayors who are finding
new ways of strengthening
our communities. Strong
regions are the center for
a strong America. We need
to stop seeing our cities as
problems but as solutions
[and] promote strong cities
as a backbone for regional
growth."
Obama then turned the
spotlight on home foreclo-
sures, unemployment and
violent crime.
At first, he sounded,
to me, like just another
politician trying to collect
votes. But, at the: end of
his speech, I was left with
the impression that he was
talking from the heart, pin-
pointing, and a politician
who knew what America
needed, not wanted.
By the time of Obama's
next visit to the Miami
area in September, when
he drew a crowd of thou-
sands of mostly women at
the University of Miami's
BankUnited Center for a
women's rally, I had some
sense of who this man was
that wanted to become the
first Black president of the
United States.
I listened as he discussed


with equal
ease is-
sues related
to women,
such as
healthcare,
education,
equal pay AIwTE
and abor- CHARITE
tion. I lis-
tened as he put a personal
face on his address, talk-
ing about watching his
mother, who was dying of
cancer, argue with the in-
surance company while
on her death bed. I could
relate to what he was say-
ing because I, too, lost my
mother to breast cancer
and she too had been bat-
tling her insurance com-
pany.
Obama was back a third
time, in late October, when
he addressed an "Early
Vote for Change at Bicen-
tennial Park in downtown
Miami. He and his wife Mi-
chelle urged voters to cast
their ballots early to avoid
the long lines.
Some in the crowd car-
ried signs 'saying "Yes We
Can" and some shouted
"Obama, Obama, Obama."
Then came the mo-
ment I'll always remem-
ber: standing two feet from
Obama, with other jour-
nalists, after the rally as he
discussed the crisis in Haiti
cased by four back-to-back
hurricanes. As someone
with Haitian parentage, I
welcomed the candidate's
comments about the coun-
try at a time when it felt
as though Washington had
abandoned the people in
their time of greatest need.


I


* -








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


4 .mgrHrJhusso IwI m 14 too t S I lv.Sr Fm p.rr ta (euf our .r


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Florida formally elects Barack Obama as president
Miami Times Staff Report


e m a So m


Gov. Chiles names Broward


magistrate to Circuit bench


Florida's 27 presidential
electors gathered in Talla-
hassee on Dec. 15 to formally
cast their votes for Barack
Obama as president.
Some 100 members of the
5000 Role Models of Excel-
lence were among those who
attended the historic ceremo-
ny in which the state joined
with others in endorsing the
first Black person as presi-
dent.
Role Models founder Fred-
erica Wilson, a state senator,
was among those taking part
in the proceedings.
"For years we have preached
to our children to go to school
and church, study hard, obey
your parents and the law and
you can be whatever you
want to be, even president
of the United States. Today's
vote proved us right," Wilson
said in a statement.
Wilson was beaming as she
signed the ballot while the


State Sen. Frederica Wilson casts her vote Dec. 15 as an
elector for President-elect Barack Obama as members of the
5000 Role Models of Excellence look on.


Role Model students looked
on.
The young men also partic-
ipated in a mock Legislative


session and toured the Mu-
seum of Florida History dur-
ing their visit to the state's
capital city.


Miami Times Staff Report


Gov. Charlie Crist has an-
nounced the appointment of
General Magistrate Kenneth L.
Gillespie to the 17th Judicial
Circuit.
The 41-year-old Florida na-
tive and Florida Memorial Uni-
versity graduate has served as
a general magistrate since No-
vember 2004.
He served as a senior trial at-
torney for the U.S. Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity Com-
mission, starting in August
1999 and he was an assistant
state attorney in Broward
County from August 1996 to
August 1999.
Between 1995 and 1996,
Gillespie worked "as a public
school math teacher in Bro-


KEN GILLESPIE
ward County.
He earned a bachelor's de-


gree from then FMC in 1990
and graduated from Texas
Southern University's Thur-
good Marshall School of Law in
1995.
"Ken Gillespie's state and
federal legal experience will
serve him well in his new post
and his work as a general mag-
istrate over the past few years
has given him valuable court-
room experience presiding over
evidentiary hearings," Crist
said in a Jan. 7 statement an-
nouncing the appointment.
"I am confident he will bring
his sound legal judgment, pa-
tience and fairness to the 17th
Judicial Circuit," the governor
said.
Gillespie fills the vacancy
created by the retirement of
Judge Robert L. Andrews.


Do you qualify for

Property Tax Exemptions?


Available exemptions include:
Homestead
Civilian Disability
Widow and Widower
Portability


*Veteran Disability
* Senior Citizen
* and more...


The deadline to apply is March 2, 2009.


Go to miamidade.gov/pa or call 786.331.5321


Broward mayor in talks with Obama team


Veteran local government
leader Stacy Ritter, who was
elected by her colleagues on the
Broward County Commission as
mayor for 2009, spent 24 hours
this past week in Washington,
D.C., on a trip that included talks
with the Obama transition team
on a possible high-level job.
Back home last Wednesday
evening, Ritter told the Sun Sen-
tinel the meeting was a job inter -


view, with a focus on energy and
commerce, areas in which she
developed expertise while serv-
ing in the state House.
Ritter, an early supporter of
Barack Obama, chaired his Bro-
ward County campaign. She said
any appointment was unlikely to
come before four to five months
because of the president-elect's
priority on cabinet appoint-
ments.


According to Ritter's website,
she was first elected to the Bro-
ward commission in 2006, after
spending eight years in Talla-
hassee as a state representative
from Broward.
"I was an early supporter
and campaign person for the
president-elect and developed
close relationships with the new
White House administration,"
she says on the website.


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Rmtmar:l


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


BL.ACKS NAlUST CONTROLOI THFIR OWN DESTINY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


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FREEDOM OF CHOICE FOR GROWN FOLKS


Who Should Make Our Choices?
Recently, some self-appointed activists have
proposed a legislative ban on menthol ciga-
rettes in a misguided effort to force people,
to quit smoking by limiting their choices. So


far, wiser heads have prevailed
and the ban on menthol has not
passed. It could come up again.
It shouldn't.
When government "reforms"
intrude into our lives to the
point of restricting freedom of
individual choices on what we
can enjoy, our basic concept of
liberty is threatened.


that menthol cigarettes increase the known
risks from smoking.The effort to ban menthol
is just another in a long series of attempts
by the politically correct crowd to force


Americans


"Informed grown-
ups who decide
to smoke should
have the freedom
to choose menthol
cigarettes"


to give up their freedom to
choose to smoke a cigarette.

Shouldn't People Keep
Fighting For The Freedom
Of Choice?
The history of African Americans
in this country has been one of
fighting against paternalistic
limitations and for freedoms.
We all agree that children should
not smoke, but grown-ups who


How Should Our Choices Be Made?
In the American tradition, laws restricting
freedom of choice must be based on sound
reasoning, rational public policy and verifi-
able data while allowing for a minimum of
governmental intrusion. Menthol is a matter
of taste and preference. The body of scientific
evidence does not support the conclusion


can and should assess the risks of smoking
should have the freedom to choose whether
to smoke or not. If they choose to smoke,
they should have the freedom to choose to
smoke regular or menthol cigarettes. Please
visit www.mentholchoice.com and learn
more about how you can help prevent this
ban on menthol from being considered.


www.mehtholchoice.corn


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


TO THE COMMUNITY



TO THE COUNTRY



TO THE PLANET


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open happiness"


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


RA "THF MIAMI TIMFS IANIIARY 21-27. 2009


Artist Cairns "Nice" Athouris painted this mural to celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.and Barack Obama's rise
to the presidency. -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra Charite

Haitian artist's mural pays tribute to King and Obama


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

A mural on the corner of North-
west 54th Street and Eighth Av-
enue pays tribute two men with a
dream: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
and President Barack Obama.
It is a reflection of the vision of
another man, Roland Athouris II,
to salute these'two major figures
and the skill of his brother Cairns
to make it reality; both are of Hai-
tian descent.
Roland Athouris, 39, can re-
member the excitement in his
son Roland III's voice when he
announced that he was running
for class president at the newly
opened school Everglades Middle
School. The then seventh grader
won and the victory made him
believe that someday he could be-
come the president of the United


States.
"Martin laid his life down so
that Obama could have the op-
portunity," said Arthouris. "This
is my model for the young people
that dreams do come true."
Arthouris wanted to give ex-
pression to his feelings with a
painting on the outside wall of
his business, Victorious Execu-
tive Office, 800 NW 54th St., for-
merly the Victorious Business
Center, that helps people with
their taxes and insurance for
homes and businesses.
. Arthouris contacted his broth-
er, Cairns, to help him bring life
to his vision.
It took Cairns, 38, almost a
week to paint the mural, "Dreams
Do Come True."
"Obama lived King's dream,"
said Cairns, also known as "Nice."
"I see Obama as a regular Black


man growing in America with a
dream to go above and beyond."
The father of two, said he de-
veloped a love for art at a very
young age, with his two uncles
inspiring him to paint. He grew
up in the Miami Design District
and graduated from Miami Jack-
son High in 1990, then studied
visual arts at the New World
School of Arts in New York City.
He returned to Miami, without
finishing his studies in New York,
to share more of his art with the
community, he said. He helped
design the backdrop for the
Hip hop group The Fugees. He
painted a Black History mural at
Ethiopian Market on Northwest
63rd Street and Seventh Avenue
in Liberty City, portraying "pio-
neers of change" such as King,
Obama, Nelson Mandela, Ser-
ena and Venus Williams. He also


painted the inside walls of the
Chef Creole restaurants at 200
NW 54th St. and at 13105 W. Di-
xie Hwy.
His dreams of owning an art
gallery so he could display his
works.
In his spare time, Cairns turns
to his second love, music. He en-
joys playing the keyboard and
the drums.
"The mural symbolizes that
Dr. King's dream was fulfilled by
Obama. We have come so far as
a people but we must remember
to dream," said Cairns.
He is hoping to meet Obama.
"If he ever comes to Miami, I
hope that he does see this paint-
ing," Cairns said.
Cairns will be designing Black
History T-shirts for Black Histo-
ry Month in February. To contact
him, call 786-454-0432.


Obama says greatness is never given but must be earned


PRESIDENT
continued from 1A

smoke but also a parent's will-
ingness to'nurture a child, that
finally decides our fate."
Qban's ,10 -year- old daugh-
ter, Malia, aimed a camera at.
her father as he spoke. ",iMT-
chelle leaned onto the edge of
her seat, body tensed and brow
knitted.
"Starting today, we must pick
ourselves up, dust'ourselves off
and begin again the work of re-
making America," Obama said.
He alluded to the inability -
or unwillingness of Ameri-
cans to adjust to the passing of
an industrial-based economy.
"Our economy is badly weak-
ened, a consequence of greed
and irresponsibility on the part
of some but also our collective
failure to make hard choices
and prepare the nation for a
new age," he said.
With that, the 47-year-old
former Illinois senator trans-
formed himself from a can-
didate claiming his campaign is
about the voters to a president
promising to put the nation in
the people's hands.
Unlike most predecessors,
Obama takes office with his
agenda in many ways set for
him.
An economy that seems more
foreboding than at any inau-
guration since Franklin D.
Roosevelt took office in 1933,
with some 11 million people
now out of work and trillions
of dollars of stock market in-
" vestments lost. Two wars, one
in Iraq that most of the coun-
try has long wanted over and
another in Afghanistan that is


spiraling downward and needs
an overhaul. The continuing
fear that another calamitous
terrorist attack is not out of the
question.
More inspirational than pre-
scriptive, Obama's inaugural
address only .gjancingly men-
tioned a "'serfe' of' promises
from his campaign: to get the
U.S. out of Iraq, stabilize Af-
ghanistan, create jobs, "restore
science to its rightful place,"
boost the use of alternative en-
ergy, address climate change,
transform schools, manage
government spending wisely
and oversee a more bipartisan,
less-divisive approach to poli-
cy-making.
To world eager for his leader-
ship to replace Bush's, Obama
had welcome words: "We are
ready to lead once more."
The nation has celebrated 55
inaugurations but none like
the one that made a president
out of the son of Kenya and
Kansas, a man who rose to
America's highest office largely
untested at executive leader-
ship, his political experience
encompassing only four years
in the U.S. Senate and eight
in the state legislature of his
home state of Illinois.
Blacks especially powered
the jubilation that was thick
in the hilly air. Even though
Obama didn't give the topic of
race -- his or others -- much
treatment in either his cam-
paign or his inaugural, Blacks
poured into Washington from
all over to watch firsthand as
one of their own at last shat-
tered a painful racial barrier.
Excitement over Obama's
young, camera-ready fam-


ily and the thought of Malia
Obama and her sister, 7-year-
old Sasha, turning the stately
White House into a children's
playroom also figured promi-
nently in the day .....
In a country nearly evenly di-.
\idedi between.. Democrats and
Retiblicas, it'"is '"notable
that protests were nearly un-
seen, a remarkable shift from
the two Bush inaugurations
that were marked by boisterous
demonstrations. One group of
about 20 people from a Baptist
church in Kansas demonstrated
with anti-gay slogans.
.With' his White House cam-
paign and landslide November
victory built in part on his rhe-
torical gifts, Obama sought, to
provide reassurance for the fu-
ture while compelling listeners
to sacrifice.
He articulated eloquently the
deeper effect on the American
psyche of the problems of war
and recession: "a nagging fear
that America's decline is inevita-
ble. and that the next generation
must lower its sights."
Not so, said Obama. But he
cautioned that the effort will re-
quire all citizens, no matter par-
ty, age, skin color, or status, to
get to work.
"The time has come to set aside
childish things," he said, invok-
ing the Bible. "Greatness is nev-
er a given. It must be earned."
Bush, the man who has led
the nation the past eight years,
hosted the Obamas for coffee in
the morning, accompanied them
to the Capitol and sat tightlipped
in the front row for Obama's
swearing-in and speech.
Obama thanked Bush for his
service as president and never


directly criticized him. But he
also repeatedly talked" of the
need to abandon current prac-
tices, whether "the petty griev-
ances and false promises, the
recriminations and worn out
dogmas, that for far too long
have strangled our politics," the
lack of a watchful enough eye
on financial markets, or what
he called a false choice between
safety and ideals a reference
to brutal interrogation practic-
es and other actions taken by
the Bush administration in the
wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, ter-
rorist attacks.
"With hope and virtue, let us
brave once more the icy currents,
and endure what storms may
come," Obama said.


Firefighters pulling unconscious man from burning building.
-Photo courtesy of MDFR

Man rescued from burning house


Miami Times Staff Report

Firefighters from the
county's Fire Station 2 in
Liberty City rescued an
unconscious man from a
burning building Thursday
night.
The man was discovered in
a bedroom in the rear of the
building at Northwest 30t
Avenue and 45t Street.
Firefighters carried him


through a window and he was
taken to hospital in critical
condition.
A Miami-Dade Fire Rescue
statement said 12 nits
responded within minute to
the fire and found the home
engulfed in flames. It took 25
firefighters 20 minutes to put
the blaze out, the statement .
said.
The cause of the fire was
under investigation.


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A Black-owned franchise delivering superior customer servih


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Homes repainted, yards landscaped during project


E
Exp__

E'p____


SERVICE
continued from 1A

"Not everyone has money
necessarily but you can always
give your time."
West has a long history of
community service and was
already familiar with Hands
on Miami. "Before I worked for
Carnival, I was a social work-
er," she said. "I left the field,
but I know all the organiza-
tions. I knew about Hands on
Miami."
Morris called 'the operation
"organized chaos" but when
the painting and landscaping
began it was all very efficient.
The soil had been tilled in ad-
vance and potted plants were


placed on the ground exactly
where their roots were to be
buried.
The group would paint 14
homes and put more than
3,000 plants into the ground.
"This is something I've want-
ed to see for a long time, said
Rosa Hill, a resident.
"I don't know about the rest
of them," said Hill, referring
to the new flowers, "but this
side's gonna be kept."
Parish Thomas, another resi-
dent, echoed Hill's sentiments.
"This is right on time," he said.
"It's what we get when we get
Obama. It's the inside that
counts though" he continued.
"They need to bring some new
appliances."
Elaine Lundy, a four-year


resident, was pleased with the
results. "I think it looks very
good," she said, "it makes the
place feel much more homey."
Alex Ballina, county housing
official, was also pleased. "It's
always important to help out
with the community," he said.
Ballina said the project is a
part of a larger effort. "We're
beautifying all of our prop-
erties," he said. "And, work-
ing with Hands .on Miami, we
can get a nice amount of work
done."
City Commissioner Joe San-
chez of District 3, saw that as
an important step.
"We need to work together to
make this a better place," he
said. "Great cities have great
neighborhoods."


Authorized Signature

Name

Address


City


State


Zip


Phone e-mail


*Includes Florida sales tax


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


UM IIILIII iv TLV rIU IJ


n









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


Black police museum-courthouse dedicated in Overtown


Guest listen to speeches during


the opening of the new Black Police Museum and Courthouse


Overtown on Thursday. -MiamiTimes Photo/Tariq Osbi


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

For Otis Davis and the city of
Miami Retired Police Officers
Community Benevolent Asso-
ciation, Thursday, Jan. 15, was
a day long anticipated.
On that day, they saw near-
ly a decade of effort come to
fruition when residents, city
officials and police officers ac-
tive and retired came together
to celebrate the opening of the
newly renovated Black Police
Precinct and Courthouse Mu-
seum, 1009 NW Fifth Ave. in


Overtown.
The building, the only one of
its kind in the nation, had been
designed exclusively as a sta-
tion house and municipal court
for Blacks decades ago during
the days of segregation.
The celebration had the air of
a family reunion as retired of-,
ficers greeted one another and
active officers, many of whom
they had trained.
Eddie Mitchell, 73, was the
second Black to pass through
the newly integrated, police
academy.
"One of the things I deplored,"


'~-~


said Mitchell "was after go-
ing through the academy they
tell me I'd be going over to the
colored station," Mitchell said
,Thursday. "I was only there for
a year because they integrated
the station in 1964."
Archie McKay, 83, retired
lieutenant, worked at the "col-
ored" station for five years be- ..
fore being transferred to the
main station as a detective.
"This is fabulous," he said of
the day's events. "This is a joy
to my heart. The [Miami Police
Benevolent Association] has
been working on this about


eight years. Today is like a fa-
ther when his son is born.
"This is something that exists
nowhere else in the country,"
said McKay, a Miami Gardens
resident. "A whole lot of sweat,
tears, sacrifices -- and humilia-
tion too -- went into this.
"Never, in the U.S., was there
a police precinct for Blacks with
its own courthouse and judge.
I It's so important that our chil-
dren never forget.
Major Roy Brown, still active
at the North Liberty City sta-
tion, attended the dedication to
honor the people he'd worked
with when he first joined the
:i" police force.
"This was the example,"
he said of McKay and others.
"These are the guys I learned
from."
McKay fondly recalled work-
in ing with Brown: "He was always
orne saying something."
/Assistant Chief Adam Bur-


den also attended to show his
support for the previous gen-
eration's efforts. "It paved the
way for me to enjoy the type
of career that I have today," he
said.
At the start of the ceremony,
Sergeant Angela Chin gave a
powerful rendition of the Na-
tional Anthem.
Mayor Manny Diaz, in a
speech, reminded the crowd of
former President Bill Clinton's
remarks during his visit to Mi-
ami earlier this month. "The
dream," said Diaz "hasn't come
to fruition. It has only been ad-
vanced."
Clinton was speaking at the
Dream Dinner to raise money
for a memorial in Washington,
D.C., to King.
Commissioner Michelle Spen-
ce-Jones expanded on the top-
ic. "The dream," she said, "will
be seen not only by America
but by the rest of the world."


Broward officials help send student to inauguration


Miami Times Staff Report


As part of its mission to
support and prepare the next
generation of Black leaders, .
The Broward Black Elected
Officials organization recently
awarded a special scholarship
to student Dione Reece so
she could join hundreds of
other high school students
in Washington, D.C, for the
Presidential Youth Inaugural
Conference, Jan. 17-21.
Dione, one of a handful

City holding

hearings on

priorities for

federal dollars
Miami Times Staff Report

The city of Miami's Depart-
ment of Community Develop-
ment is holding public hear-
ings to discuss community
needs and establish priorities
for federally funded activities
during a five-year period that
will be part of its Consolidated
Plan 2009-2013.
The department administers
U.S. Department of Housing
and Urban Development funds
for grant programs such as the
Community Development Block
Grant, the Emergency Shelter
Grant, the Home Investment
Partnerships program and the
Housing Opportunities for Per-
sons with AIDS program.
These hearings will take place
in each of the city's five districts
and two county locations. They
will serve to inform the public,
identify the needs of residents
and discuss the distribution
of federal money for fiscal year
2009-2010 that runs from Oct.
1 through Sept. 30.
The city is inviting the public
attend the hearings and offer
comments.
The remaining schedule in-
cludes:
District 1: Commissioner
Angel Gonzalez, 6 p.m., Thurs-
day, Jan. 22,
Allapattah Community Ac-
tion, 2257 NW North River Dr.
District 3: Commissioner
Joe Sanchez, 6 p.m., Tuesday,
Jan. 27,
Manuel Artime Theater, 900
SW First St.
District 4: Commission-
er Tomas Regalado, 5 p.m.,
Wednesday, Jan. 21,
Our Lady of Lebanon Church,
2055 Coral Way
HOPWA CENTRAL: Central
Miami-Dade County; 5 p.m.,
Tuesday, Jan. 27, Joseph Ca-
leb Center, 5400 NW 22nd
Ave., Room 110.


of South Florida students
invited to the gathering, is
a senior at Zion Lutheran
Christian School in .Deerfield
Beach.
She is the daughter of well-
known corhmunity volunteers
David and Sherry Reece.
The grant helps cover
expenses associated with her


trip and she will give a report
to the organization on her
return.
"This goes to the very
core of our mission," said
BBEO President M. Margaret
Bates, a Lauderhill city
commissioner. "We need to
nurture and help prepare
our future leaders."


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The museum's place in that
dream, according to Spence-
Jones, is to bring Overtown
residents and their children "a
new sense of place."
Spence-Jones also hoped the
museum would become one of
many places that help stimu-
late the economy of the area.
The ceremony culminated
in a ribbon-cutting ceremony
in the doorway of the build-
ing, Eugenia Thomas, widow of
Lawson Thomas, Miami-Dade's
first Black judge, who presided
over the opening of the precinct
and courthouse in 1950, was in
attendance. She described the
ceremony as "beautiful" and
"wonderful" and highlighted
the importance of maintaining
the museum and of continuing
toward King's dream at large.
"We need our people to be
able to do for ourselves, so they
can keep it going on and on,"
Thomas said.








The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church opens doors


Sweet Home Missionary Bap-
tist Church officially opened
the doors to its new sanctuary
on the afternoon of Jan. 11 at
10701 SW 184th St. in Per-
rine to a capacity gathering
of members and visitors who
turned out for the ceremonial
ribbon cutting.
"I saw people at the church
that I hadn't seen in years,"
said Ollie Simmons, a member
of Sweet Home for 53 years.
Simmons has seen the
church through many chang-
es, from the time she started
attending Sweet Home in the
original sanctuary at South-
west 103rd Avenue and 172nd
Street in the 1950s to the re-
building of the structure in
1992 after it was destroyed by
Hurricane Andrew to the new
$7 million edifice structure.
"I really like it," Simmons
said. "The church has come a
long way."
The new building is designed
in a semi-circle, with a balco-
ny to accommodate growth.
"This is a service station,
where souls can come in to be
filled," Sweet Home's senior


pastor, the Rev. Dr. Walter T.
Richardson, said in his first
sermon at the new church
which has a membership of
more than 2,000.
"Come to this place where
babies can be healed and
people can say, i was glad to
go to the house of the Lord,'"
Richardson said.
Dignitaries who attended
the service included Miami-
Dade County Commission
Chairman Dennis Moss. Sev-
eral ministers from churches
around South Florida also
attended the event. They in-
cluded Richardson's father,
Bishop Walter H. Richardson,
who is presiding prelate of the
Church of God Tabernacle.
The elder Richardson deliv-
ered the invocation.
Sweet Home's programs and
services remain the same.
Sunday services are at 7:30
and 11 a.m. and Sunday
school classes are at 9:30
a.m.
For more information, call.
the church, 305-251-5753,
or log on to www.sweethome.
org.


The brand new Sweet Home Missionary Baptist Church in Perrine


The Rev. Dr. Walter T. Richardson preaches in the new church


SChurch members and leaders of Sweet Home gather at the old church.


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Visitors stop by the Resource Room during its recent opening.


Parent Resource Center launched to

give parents school choice options


"Copyrighte'd Mateia


Available from Commercial

Available fiom Commrial Nows PrOvide


By, Sylvia Mitchell
Miami Times Writer
The Resource Room at 19715
NW 37th Ave., Miami Gardens,
launched a Parent Resource
Center on Jan. 10 to provide par-
ents with information on school
choice options, such as magnet
schools, virtual schools, home
schooling, charter schools, Mc-
Kay Scholarships for Students
with Disabilities, supplemental
educational services, and op-


portunity scholarships.
Ebony Johnson-Jackson, ex-
ecutive director of The Resource
Room and parent liaison of the
Parent Resource Center, said
the center is among some 12
located around the state, made
possible by a Nova Southeast-
ern University grant.
"The Resource Room is now
in its second cycle as a Parent
Resource Center for Florida
School Choice Options. The
first year was filled with plan-


-ning and organization and now
we have begun the implementa-
tion phase as we educate parent
liaisons how to approach differ-
ent schools," Johnson-Jackson
said.
The opening enabled John-
son-Jackson and her staff to
meet with parents; share infor-
mation and resources; and pro-
mote the new center.
HOT105 radio station was on
hand to provide entertainment
Please turn to SCHOOL 13B










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Each campus will award one scholarship for in-state tuition, fees and books for
the summer or fall term. Refreshments will be served. ,

Who should attend?
* High school students, parents, high school personnel and anyone interested in starting a new career
* Currently enrolled students interested in a Medical Center Campus program
* Students interested in a bachelor's degree in Education, Public Safety Management or Nursing

You will have the opportunity to:
* Learn how you can train for hundreds of in-demand careers Chat with faculty members about prospective majors
including aviation, computers, film and video, health care Learn about student organizations and activities
and tourism. Attend sessions on financial aid, scholarships and admissions
* Meet the students, faculty and staff of Miami Dade College Tour the campus
Reserve your spot now!
To reserve your spot or get more information visit
www.mdc.edu/openhouse or call 305.237.8888
If you have special needs or questions concerning accessibility, call the campus you plan to visit at least three days prior to the event.


Tuesday, January 27, 2009
at 6 p.m.
Medical Center Campus
950 N.W. 20th St.
Miami, FL 33127-4693





.1 -


Wednesday, January 28, 2009. :Thursday, January 29, 2009
at 6 p.m. at 6 p.m.
Homestead Campus Hileah Campus
500 College Terrace 776 W 49th SL
Homestead, FL 33030-6009 algah, FL 33012-2918
North Campus KMIall Campus
11380 N.W. 27th Ave. 1,1di1 S.W. 104th St.
Miami, FL 33167-3495 Miami, FL 33176-3393
Carrie P. Meek West Campus
Entrepreneural Education Ctr. 3800 N.W. 115th Ave.
6300 N.W. Seventh Ave. p al, FL 33178-4856
Miami, FL 33150-4322 o lfson Campus
bM' r3 .E. Second Ave.
Miami, FL 33132-2296


Saturday, January 31, 20
at 10 a.m.
InterAmerican Campus
627 S.W. 27th Ave.
Miami, FL 33135-2966




Miami Dade
College


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11A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


B3LACKS IMUSTs CONT`ROL.THLIR OWYN DEs-rINYI


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Despair and frustration over economic recession grips Detroit


CITY
continued from 6A

time."
A makeshift, wooden movie
screen was erected last sum-
mer for outdoor film nights.
"I'm seeing camaraderie
around here I haven't seen
since I was a little kid," Coving-
ton said. "It's actually starting
to feel like a village again."
He just wishes they had more
help from city leaders.
"I'm proud our downtown is
coming back," Covington said.
"They've put money into the
downtown. We need a down-
town. .... Everybody under-
stands that. But what about the
people that pay for it? I mean,
we pay our taxes. We need city
services. It's the crime and
cleaning up."
"I just don't understand how
they, anybody in the city ... the
mayor's administration, can ride
through the neighborhoods and
see the way it is and not want to
do anything about it."
For all its woes, Detroit has no
shortage of residents offering to
tackle them. There are 15 can-
didates for the Feb'. 24 special
mayoral election necessitated
by the conviction of Kwame Kil-
patrick for trying to cover up an
affair with a former top aide.
The winner of the special elec-
tion only serves out Kilpatrick's
unfinished term and a regular
mayoral election will be held in
November, burdening the city
with a year of political uncer-
tainty and division as it grapples
with staggering problems.
"There are some good candi-
dates; I've never seen a field as
broad and deep," said Steve To-


bocman, who represents a De-
troit district in the state legisla-
ture. "That being said, I don't
think there's a concrete vision
on how to deal with the real
challenges."
Solely in terms of municipal
government, the challenges are
daunting. The City Council's
fiscal analyst recently project-
ed that Detroit's budget deficit
could rise to more than $200
million by June. The Detroit
Public School District faces a
deficit of more than $400 mil-
lion, prompting the state to
declare a financial emergency.
The district's superintendent,
Connie Calloway, was fired Dec.
15.
Several dozen schools have
been closed in the past three
years and civic leaders worry
the system will be incapable of
helping young Detroiters pre-
pare for whatever new types of
jobs might emerge down the
road.
"Most of the middle-class
parents have disengaged, taken
their kids out," said Vann. "We
don't have the parent advocacy
that's necessary to drive re-
form."
The FBI's latest statistics, for-
2007, show Detroit with the
highest violent crime rate of
any major city. Yet Jeriel Heard,
chief of jails and court for De-
troit's Wayne County, said jail
conditions may deteriorate be-
cause of budget-related pres-
sure to eliminate a quarter of
the roughly 800 jail deputy po-
sitions.
Heard confirmed that some
offenders, notably those with-
out homes of their own, were
now expressing reluctance to
leave jail when their sentences


were done.
He also reported that property
crime in some Detroit neighbor-
hoods had stabilized or declined
because targets of opportunity
were fewer now that most re-
maining residents are poor and
many of the homes have been
abandoned and cannibalized.
Trying to combat the blight,
the city has applied for $47 mil-
lion in federal neighborhood sta-
bilization money, with half ear-
marked to tear down more than
2,300 vacant homes. About $8
million would be spent to reha-
bilitate vacant houses and $4
million to construct new hous-
es.
But this effort would make
only a small dent. About 44,000
of the 67,000 homes that have
gone into foreclosure since
2005 remain empty, and it
costs about $10,000 to demol-
ish each vacant house, accord-
ing to Planning and Develop-
ment Department director Doug
Diggs.
Overall, the residential real
estate market is catastrophic,
with the Detroit Board of Real-
tors now pegging the average
price of a home in the city at
$18,513. Some owners can't
find buyers at any price.'
"If you no longer can sell your
property, how can you move
elsewhere?' said Robin Boyle a
professor of urban planning at
Wayne State University. "Some
people just switch out the lights
and leave; property values have
gone so low, walking away is no
longer such a difficult option."
Looking ahead, Detroit civic
leaders express long-term opti-
mism but acknowledge the shift
away from a heavy-manufactur-
ing economy will be painful.


"Up until.the '70s, you could
come to the city without edu-
cation, without speaking Eng-
lish, and get a job in the auto
industry and instantly be in
the middle class, economically
speaking," said Mike Stewart,
director of Wayne State's Wal-
ter P. Reuther Library and an
expert on the auto industry.


"A lot of folks in the city
depended on these jobs for
generations; they don't exist
anymore," he said. "A lot of De-
troiters are unprepared, educa-
tionally and technologically, to
cope."
Another fundamental prob-
lem is the gap between the city's
circumstances and those in the


surrounding region, which in-
cludes many relatively affluent,
predominantly White suburbs.
"The lack of support, the
disparities with the rest of the
region are greater than folks re-
alize," said Tobocman, a Demo-
crat who served as House ma-
jority floor leader. "I'm not sure
the system can sustain itself."


U U


Get fit & healthy!


Explore the ways Miami-Dade County

can help you keep your New Year's resolution.


*Try"Tea &Tai Chi"at one of the County's parks

Take a brisk walk at your neighborhood park

Keep your mind fit, check out your neighborhood library


For more ideas about health and fitness,
go to miamidade.gov and click on "Resident" or call 3-1-1.


Antioch Missionary Bapti- postollc Revival Cente> KrLogos Baptist Church'
Church of Brownsville 6702 N.W 16305 NW 48th Ave.
2799 N.W. 46tfl Street 305-430-93,83
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services New time for T.V. Program
ChurchfSunday School .....830 a.m. FOR HOPE FIOR TODAY Order of S e
Sunday Wotship Service .... 10 a.m VCAU rmAica U.n | com-Ti rc.a 2Sunoay
SMid.Week Service .... Wednesday Sa .9 a.1m.3 ..m. Sunday 3p.m. :. rI ntre Wolslil at 8& 11


irA


Hour of Power-Noon Day Prayer
12inpm.-l p.m.
livening Worship... 7 p.m.


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www frits ipmbcmia.or k,
friciidslippayer@bellsouilhi.nct
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
,-ee Order of mleis
h Te d r, Tr :3 in.
L .i I [.f..lldltd "].utilllp -0 .ni.
% ... ."t n 'l 1, 1 1 J13 a n
I I m
m.,1 i i",'r B.1 %%r1' 7 "; p.m.
F .e.Inpf w'c HanipU c"J'3
W idfsday a....... a, pin,



iMt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sunday
Church Schiool ...j,....,ii,30 a.m.
Wednesday
Bible Study/Prayer Nighit 7; p.m,.
Thursday
Prayer Meeting '7 p.m.
"Tlare is a placefor you'"


Ebenezer United >
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Moming Services
*:: 7:45 a.m. 11:15 am.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332

Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
Sunday School .. 9:30 am,.
Sunday Moming Pria/Worship.. Il a.ni,
First Sunday Evening Worship.. 6 p.m.
Bible Study Munday .. 730 p.m.
SChoir Rehearsal Thursday..7:30 pm.n
I II me annmmI


M.m..rs, Crrs..e 11iaLu
suin Eun t'ucnrap l30mnL
r B,. i5.c -sd) Spiti.


K First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday .......... 7:30 & II a.m.
Sunday School ...........o.... 10
Thursaday..........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
Baplism Thurs. before
Communmion FirstSun........
I730& II am.


SNew Harvest Missionary >
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

OrIdem of Services:
^ .' ,1 n../rp n.-l.ip i-r^ lnl sm
I,. .-lo; -j r rhl p IJ _O) .m
I .. I, r.' .lirI i pi,,
\J^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^a


San lay School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
iHible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


K" Temple Missionary >
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 31 Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 30S-255-8549
order servicess:
Sunday School...........9:45 a.m.,
Sun. Morning Servs......l I a.m.
4" Sun....BTU.... 1:30-2:30 p.m,
Tuesday.....Bible Study
Feeding Ministry...10 a.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer..6:30 p.m.
Thum. Outeach Ministry..6:30p.m


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76th Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays C.hurch School..............10 a.m.
Worship Serfvi ..... ....- .11:15 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Clas-.... 7 p.m. i.
4th Sunlday Evening Wonshlip ...-,6 ip n

\Jllffffljffem^^^BfflKS(m/


.nil.


K'- Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
305-836-9081

H Order orf Services:
.F *..-'ln I iang Services
und) ,. .,.,............. 10 a.m,
\'nrsrep CI,, iw e............II a.nml
'lli.A ly 'I.i.! Study..,....8 pm.'
Thi.-.V, r'.,-Pr Service......8 p.m


( Mt. Calvary Missionary-
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

* Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 am.



f Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services

,Lr I..q -,-N .lhI, 11ln a,
Sj J,. % 1,NTl. IukkLk SI 7 i 5 po

S 'n i ..:tvii hn I. 1 I


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


r93"' Street Community>
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93r Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7.30a.m.lardy Moing Wot nhip
11 am. ..Mornming Worship
Eveanig Worship
1st &3rd Suday....... 6 m.
tuesday Bible Study ..7 pm.
website: cmbe.org



(Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.nlicmimuworshipceiter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
:- Sunday Worship Services
k K. 7 a.m. & 10 am.
3 B adChurch School: & 30a.m.
Wednesday
Pastors Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.



(Jordan Grove Missionary-
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12Ave,
305-751-9323


1 (800) 2S4-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirithbaptistmiamni.org


KSt. John Baptist Church-
1328 N.W. 3" Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
S ---- --TaIrh %Sunday
Smorrun W.rlipl...,.7:30 a.m.
M .undi .' hool ......9:30 a.m.
l mnun, Worship .11 a.m.
P, ,,., n i. IBii ble Study
Mcleting (Tues.) 7 p.m.




K Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School.............9.30 am.n
iMoming Prase'Worslip ..1.1 a.im
f first andThitt Sunday
evening mrship at 6p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
STuesday 7 p.m.
TrS a bnmpor A,4wilable fo3 r l 2dav


K Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School............. 9:45am.
,Vtdip ....11,lam.
Bities.t'riy-bry ...7:30p.n.
You hi liVIsty MIn-Wead.
6 pmi.


(St. Luke Missionary Baptist /(Bib
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322

-. Order of Services:
Early Moming Waship.7:30a.m.
Sunday School..........9:30a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.


/New Shiloh M.B. Church>"
1350 N.W.95'" Street
30S-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
Li..'i. 1I...mn! n irstship 7:30a.m.
S S'n (lhrch School 9:30 a.m.
S1Smr.i t\.orship .....11 a.m.
Ti. Ia'. I-.ble Class 7 p.m.
Titus. lior thie 1st Sun.....7 p.m.
J. -~ ,.ek Worship



/-Liberly City Church \
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning ...........8 a.m.
1 Sunday School...........10 a.m.
iinlay Evening.............6 p.m.
N 1,Miii. Excellence ........7:30 p.m.
i i Bible Clas .........7:30 p.m.
huis. Fellowship......... 10 a.m.
i st Sun. Song Practice ..6 p.m.



St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and I I a.m.
Wolship Service
9:30 a m ........ Sunday School
Tuesday......... p m. Bible Study
8 p.m Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wednesday. Friday
S12 pm .......Day Prayer



KNew Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10"' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
S|Early Sunday Worship ..7:30 am
Sunday school ............9:30 a m.
.]s isK StMcnmig\'its 'hsiip ..- lam
St aiday Evngiervice ...6 p.m.
SRe sdayilayer M,'ecrig. 730 p.m.
ivWednesday Bible Sit, ...730 p-m.
"Not Just a Church But a Movenice "
^~~~~ M~ss~itmw


)le Teaching Seminar-"
8620 N.W 17th Ave.
Miami, FL, 33147
954-735-9393

I Order of Services:
Stmdty Worship 245 p.m.
Free snacks after service
Relum transportation available


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


(






Mw


K Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 SW. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 am
Evening Worship ............ 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. -9 am.
Comcast Channels: 8, 19,21, 22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.pemnbrokeparkclnrcliofchhrist.coin *Email: peinbrokeparkcocstlllsouith.net


k


JEMINIMM Ilmoll -mm"I'm NoWL-11


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


low i-s -&.in I-pa
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Syndicated Content




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Chicago native

AIKIN
contiuned from 10B

After winning ."Sunday Best"
by reinterpreting every tune
thrown at her with deep con-
viction and meaty vocals that
came to define a kind of "Ai-
kin-flair," her album "Crystal
Aikin" lacks cohesiveness. It's
uncertain whether she wants
to showcase her versatility or
just hasn't decided yet which
sound is her favorite.
The bar is, set significantly
high, for the emergency-room


was runner-up

nurse from Tacoma, Wash. She
was justifiably a judge favorite
on "Sunday Best." But when
it comes to drawing new lis-
teners, there's a difference be-
tween offering an album whose
sound is new and one that's a
melange of all the sounds out
there.
"Crystal Aikin" dabbles in
everything from the urban R&B
flow of "Lord You Reign For-
ever" to the modern jazz feel of
"Turn to Him." There's also a
duet with contemporary Chris-
tian artist Natalie Grant on the


in competition

ballad "Breathe on Me."
"The Clouds" injects a glossy
pop tune complete with electric
guitar solo where Aikin's agile
pipes take on the phrasing and
tone of a Moog. Aikin opens the
project with two strong ballads
but the contemporary gospel
tune "He's So Worthy" ends a
little disjointedly and the rest
of the album never quite con-
geals.
Overall, it's a good collection
of songs, with 'no standouts.
Aikin comes off as a great voice
-- and that's about it.


Center is a service of the Resource Room


SCHOOL
continued from 10B

and hand out T-shirts, note-
pads and other items.
Other services offered by
The Resource Room include an
after-school program that helps
students in grades K-8 with
homework, reading, writing,
language arts, math, studying
for the FCAT, karate and life
skills.
It has a lending library for
parents and teaching aids to
promote learning at home.
Through a partnership with
Lindsey Hopkins, it also offers


a free personalized GED pre-
paratory program is designed
to help individuals get ready
for the GED exam at their own
pace.
Also, the Resource Room has
partnered with Miami Carol
City High to help the school's
community involvement spe-
cialists reach out to parents.
The facility offers yet another
service. Johnson-Jackson is
also youth advisor for the Mi-
ami-Dade NAACP Youth Coun-
cil that meets Mondays at the
Resource Room. The council
teaches leadership skills, as
well as the civil rights history of


the nation, and engages youth
in discussions on topics such
as the juvenile justice system,
healthcare, voter registration
and education.
The Parent Resource Center
and other programs are free of
charge.
Volunteers. are always wel-
come and internship place-
ments are available for college
students.
The Resource Room and the
Parent Resource Center are
open 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon-
days-Fridays. For more infor-
mation, call Johnson-Jackson
at 305-621-1929.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IAl TlHl:MIAMI TIMFR IANHARY 21-27 .09 1 I


FUl ori ndinannnis say university tuition too high




Floridians say university tuition too high


TALLAHASSEE A grow-
ing number of Floridians think
the cost of tuition at the state's
public universities and colleges
is too high, according to the
third annual Sunshine State
Survey commissioned by Lead-
ership Florida.
Statewide, 24 percent of sur-
vey respondents described tu-
ition as much too high and an
additional 24 percent said tu-
ition is a little too high. The 48
percent who say tuition is too
high is up from 41 percent in
2007.


"We are seeing another back-
lash from our slumping econo-
my," said Brad Coker of Mason-
Dixon research who conducted
the poll of 1,200 Florida resi-
dents. "Money is tight and citi-
zens are aware that universi-
ties can raise tuition; when you
put the two together, it equals a
greater dissatisfaction towards
spending."
There was no significant dif-
ference in attitude about tu-
ition costs between those who
have a child currently enrolled
in high school (50 percent too


high) and those who do not (48
percent too high). Those with
a child currently enrolled in a
Florida college (58 percent) are,
however, more likely to feel tu-
ition is too high than those who
do not (47 percent).
Florida residents still rate the
states colleges and universi-
ties favorably, but their overall
scores have dropped since last
year. Statewide, 64 percent
rate them as excellent Or good
(down from 71 percent). Those
with some college education (69
percent) and those with a child


enrolled in a Florida college (72
percent) rate them better.
Most Floridians, however, feel
admission standards are about
right or too easy (63 percent)
and only .19 percent feel they
are too difficult.
Those with children in high
school (25 percent) or who
have a child in a Florida col-
lege (23 percent) are more like-
ly to feel admission standards
are too difficult.
Florida residents give their
public schools lower per-
formance ratings this year.
I


Statewide, 42 percent of Flor-
ida citizens rate the quality
of public education in their
local schools as excellent or
good (down seven points from
2007), while 25 percent rate
them as fair and 19 percent
rate them poor. Residents with
children and grandchildren
in public schools give schools
higher marks.
Increasing teacher pay re-
mains the .top priority men-
tioned by most Floridians (30
percent). Teacher pay scores
high among those with chil-


dren enrolled in public school
(34 percent). The other top pri-
orities for the public schools
are improving discipline in the
classroom (15 percent), more
accountability and better man-
agement of financial resources
(15 percent) and improving
test scores (11 percent).
A total of 1,200 Florida resi-
dents were interviewed state-
wide by phone as part of this
third annual survey conducted
Nov. 17-23, 2008 by Mason-
Dixon Polling & Research Inc.
of Washington, D.C.


Florida hate crimes report show 10-year low, report shows


Miami Times Staff Report

Reported hate crimes in the
-state fell last year to their lowest
level since 1998, Attorney Gen-
eral Bill McCollum announced
on Monday
The announcement came with
o the release of the Florida Hate
Crimes Report covering the 2007
-.calendar year.
Since hate crime reporting
began in 1990, Florida law en-
forcement agencies have report-


ed an annual average of 272 re-
ported hate crime incidents, well
above this year's hate crimes to-
tal of 193.
"Preventing hate crimes
should be the goal of every citi-
zen," McCollum. Said in a state-
ment accompanying the release
of the report.
"I am proud of the roles the At-
torney .General's Office and the
citizens of Florida have played in
statewide efforts against hate-
motivated crimes and I know


these efforts will continue."
There are two broad cat-
egories of hate crime offenses:
crimes against persons and
crimes against property. Reports
for 2007 showed a.slightly bigger
share of hate crimes were direct-
ed at persons than in the previ-
ous year, with a slight decrease
' in the share directed at property,
the report said.
Crimes against persons ac-
counted for 66.8 percent of all
incidents reported in 2007, up


from 66 percent in 2006, while
crimes against property ac-
counted for the remaining 33.2
percent, down from 34 percent
in 2006.
The 2007 report also catego-
rizes the offenses by the nature
of the motivating factor. During
2007, hate crimes motivated by
the victim's race represented
.53.9 percent of all reported hate
crimes, followed by crimes moti-
vated by ethnicity/national ori-
gin, at 17.1 percent, and sexual


orientation and religion each,
at 14.5 percent. No hate crimes
were reported under the cat-
egories of disability or advanced
age.
Data in the Hate Crimes Re-
port were submitted by local
law enforcement agencies to the
Florida Department of Law En-
forcement's Audit & Data Collec-
tion Unit of the Criminal Justice
Information Services Program
through the Uniform Crime Re-
porting (UCR) information sys-


tem. Currently, 417 agencies
participate in the UCR system.
The Attorney General's Office
of Civil Rights, which compiles
the report, also conducts hate
crime training for law enforce-
ment throughout Florida and
has developed programs for ele-
mentary, middle and high school
students to teach them how to
recognize hate crimes, how the
law protects victims 'of hate
crimes and how such crimes af-
fect communities.


New First Lady brings Ivy League education and caring spirit to the White House


'By Tariq Osborne
Tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

On Jan. 17, 1964, a couple,
-living on the South Side of Chi-
cago gave birth to their second
child. They settled upon the
,name Michelle.
0% Fraser Robinson, the hus-
[and, was a city pump operator
d Democratic precinct cap-
aimn. He worked and lived with
multiple sclerosis but did not
alter as the family breadwinner
,despite his limp and crutches.
His hard work allowed his wife
.larian to stay home with their
children until they reached high
school. The family lived in aone-
edroom apartment on the top
floe &f a brick bungalow. The
; liv n om converted .with a
divider down the middle served
'as Michelle's bedroom.
Michelle and her elder brother
Craig, now an Ivy League bas-
ketball coach at Brown Univer-
sity, grew up hearing, among


SObama showed

MIXED
-continued from 5B

ing to go nowhere."
Obama eventually became
a senior lecturer, focusing
on constitutional law. But
he wasn't a regular pres-
ence on campus because he
was a legislator at the same
time. Some around the law
school regarded him as aloof
but Baird disagrees. "He's
not someone who wears his
emotions ,on his sleeve and
he's never been that way," he
says. "It's a characteristic, not a
character flaw."
When Obama geared up to
run for U.S. Senate, Baird again
tried to discourage him. Think
of the constant pressure to raise
.money, he warned.
"'You'll spend two years of
,,your life being a telemarketer,
you're -going to be calling total
strangers," Baird recalls say-
ing. "'The best-case scenario is
you'll wake up three weeks be-
fore the primary and there'll be
a couple of people (opponents)
in front of you."
In fact, Obama vaulted to vic-
*tory in the crowded Democratic
primary only after the multimil-
lionaire front-runner imploded
over personal problems.
Baird remembers talking with
Abner Mikva, an Obama men-
tor, former judge and law school
colleague the day after that pri-
mary win. "This is incredible;
three weeks ago, he was run-
ning third," he told Mikva, who,
according to Baird, replied:
"'Douglas, he has one attribute
every successful politician has.
He's lucky."'

THOUGHTFUL TEACHER
Maybe Michael Kang should
have bid on the chance to spend
a day with Barack Obama in
Springfield.
Word around campus was
Obama liked to drive fast and


other tales, the story of their
maternal grandfather.
He was a carpenter whose race
made him ineligible for union
membership. He was shut out of
the city's top construction jobs.
His story, and the work ethic of
their own father taught Michelle
Craig that they could succeed
through hard work, despite the
racial prejudices of the time.
The Robinson children would
skip the second grade.
At Whitney M. Young Magnet
High School in Chicago's West
Loop, from which she graduated
in 1981, Michelle Robinson was
discouraged by her high school
advisors from applying to Princ-
eton. They did.not feel that her,
grades were sufficient. She went
to Princeton anyhow, majoringg
in sociology, with a minor in Af-
rican-American studies.
As one of the very few Black
students attending Princeton at
the time, Michelle also received
an education in issues of race.


She graduated in 1985 with
honors.
She next wanted to apply to
Harvard Law School but Princ-
eton counselors tried to talk her
out of it. She applied and grad-
uated 1988.
Michelle went on to join the
law firm Sidley Austin, where
she specialized in marketing
and intellectual property. In
1988,t she was assigned to men-
tor a summer intern who was
two years her senior, a self-de-
scribed "skinny kid with a funny
name." The intern was Barack
Obama.
That was an acquaintance that
would blossom into love. They
were married on Oct. 18. 1992.
In 1991, the death of her father
from complications related to MS
caused Michelle to re-evaluate her
life. She left corporate law to work
in the. public sector, first as assis-
tant to Chicago Mayor Richard M.
Daly, later as assistant commis-
sioner of planning and develop-


MICHELL UBAMA


ment.
In 1993, Michelle founded
Public Allies Chicago, a young,
diverse, group of "passionate so-
cial change makers who support
community projects in partner-


ship with hundreds of local non-
profit organizations," according
to the organization's website. As
executive director, she headed up
a non-profit named by then Presi-
dent Bill Clinton as a model Ame-


riCorps program.
In 1996, Michelle joined the
University of Chicago as associ-
ate dean of student services and
established the university's first
community service program. She
was named executive director of
community and external affairs
and served in that role until a
2005 appointment at the Univer-
sity of Chicago Medical Center.
Michelle Obama resists terms
such as "feminist" and "liberal"
but is widely recognized as 'out-
spoken 'and strong-willed. She
has simultaneously maintained
marriage, career and family.
She chose to remain in Chicago
and take care of the'family even
after Obama's election to the U.S.
Senat'.' She did. not adjus-tie{r
work schedule until Obama an-
nounced his candidacy for the
presidency in May 2007, when
she cut her hours by 80 percent.
Michelle and Barack Obama
have two daughters, Malia and
Sasha.


early that he was a consensus-builder who rejected traditional divisive politics


was a fun guy, says Kang, re-
calling the fundraising auction
he passed up while, attending
the University of Chicago Law
School.
Instead, Kang's recollections
of the man who will be the 44th
president stem from being a
third-year student in Obama's
"Constitutional Law: Equal
Protection and Due Process"
class.
"I remember him as a good,
thoughtful teacher. Very fair,"
says Kang, who teaches at Em-
ory University School of Law in
Atlanta. "It was very difficult
to tell what he thought about
an issue. He was happy to play
devil's advocate. He wanted to
be really balanced. He made
people comfortable saying what
they thought on politically sen-
sitive issues, such as race or
abortion."
Obama was "friendly and ap-
proachable, but not necessarily
super-outgoing and talkative,"
Kang says. And while some pro-
fessors at Chicago taught with
"a clear viewpoint," he adds,
you wouldn't necessarily know
what his politics were."
Kang remembers one after-
class conversation with Obama
about contentious court deci-
sions involving abortion and
contraceptives. "He was com-
fortable seeing both sides," Kang
says. "On one hand,' he gave a
lot of respect to women's rights.
On the other hand, he under-
stood the process questions
and the role of the courts."
Kang says he figured Obama
was heading somewhere but, in
law school, he was "just an or-
dinary guy ... who didn't take
himself too seriously, wanted to
be reasonable and hear out dif-
ferent perspectives."

TACKLING POLICE
BRUTALITY
With more than a dozen
men on death row in Illinois


wrongly convicted and accusa-
tions that Chicago police had
beaten confessions out of sus-
pects, some state lawmakers
were determined to overhaul
the criminal justice system.
Barack Obama was one.
In 2002, Obama, then a state
senator, sponsored a bill that
would require police to make
audio or videotapes of interro-
gations of murder suspects.
Peter Baroni was Republi-
can legal counsel to the state
Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee at the time, working with
Obama as he tried to develop
a way for police and, prosecu-
tors to find common ground
with defense lawyers and civil
libertarians.
"He was always very pro-
fessional, very forthcoming,"
Baroni recalls. "He was not
really a guy who would ma-
ni'pulate you or play games. ...
He tried to take it (the debate)
out of the political partisan
bickering arena."
Over four or five months,
Obama helped forge a consen-
sus between defense lawyers
wary of police tactics and law
enforcement groups resistant
to recording suspects' state-
ments.
The bill eventually became
law.
"He's a very good negotia-
tor," Baroni says. "He's .an
incredibly at-ease guy. He
never got excited about any-
thing. Everything was low-
key. Nothing ever got to the
point where there was yelling
and screaming. ... He was able
to keep an open dialogue with
both sides. He'd say 'What
are your issues? 'What can
we come up with for a resolu-
tion?' rather than pound the
sand and walk away."
"Some politicians have a
bloated sense of self-impor-
tance," he adds. "He never
had that. He really didn't."


CONVENTION SPEAKER
It was July 2004 and Ba-
rack Obama had been tapped
to be the keynote speaker at
the Democratic National Con-
vention -- an address he knew
could be a make-or-break mo-
ment in his career.
But the Legislature still was
in session because of a bud-
get stalemate, so Obama was
trapped in Springfield. And he
had a speech to write.
He retreated to a distinctly
unglamorous spot -- an ante-
room next to the men's room
behind the Senate gallery
where his colleague, state Sen.
kirk Dillard, noticed him work-
ing away.
"He'd be puffing on a ciga-
rette, sitting there with his le-
gal pad," recalls Dillard, who
would get updates on the
speech when he passed by.
On July 27, 2004, Dillard
watched Obama's debut on
television -- a rousing 17-min-
ute address.
"I thought his speech was
phenomenal," Dillard recalls.
"But it could have been spo-
ken by a Republican or Demo-
crat. He just had the personal
story to go with it."
"I instantly knew it would
be a hit with the media and
the media would make him a
national celebrity," he adds. "I
was not surprised at all he be-
came an instant player ... with
his own skills and being the
only African-American there....
But I never thought the presi-
dency might happen as quickly
as it did."
Dillard credits that July night,
in part. "It's like one great mo-
ment in sports and your ca-
reer is defined," he says. "That
speech will continue to define.
him."
Seizing the moment
Terry Link and Barack Obama
were elected to the state Sen-
ate the same day, became seat


mates and fast friends. Link al-
ways joked Obama would move
on before he did. He wasn't
thinking at the time that it
would be to the White House.
Link and Obama bonded
over golf and Wednesday night
poker games as part of a group
dubbed "The Committee", that
gathered over beer and cigars
in Springfield to while away the
nights when the Legislature
was in session.
A few years ago when the
buzz started about a possible
Obama presidential campaign,
Link was cool to the idea. "I
said, 'Don't do it, don't do it.'
I didn't know if he .was quite
ready.",
But as he saw the grow-
ing crowds and enthusiasm,
Link changed course. When he
asked Obama to attend a cam-
paign event in 2006, he took
him aside, and walking arm
in arm, urged him to seize the
moment.
Last year, Link traveled the
nation, campaigning for his
former poker buddy.
A week after the election,
Obama called Link and left a
message.
"It was kind of funny. He
said 'This is Barack Obama,
your old card-playing friend'
-- like I'm not going to remem-
ber," Link says. Obama left his
new cell phone number and
an admonition NOT to share it
with anyone.
Link returned the call but
missed Obama. When he left a
message, he made sure to ad-
dress him as 'Mr. President,'
not Barack, as he normally
did.
Link has two things he cher-
ishes: a photo of Obama hold-
ing his newborn grandson two
years ago at that 2006 cam-
paign rally -- and that num-
ber.
"'I know if I ever called, he'd
take my call," Link says. "I'm


not looking for a job or any
favors. I've got the cell phone
number of the president in my
pocket. That's all I want."

RIGHT PREDICTION
Loretta Augustine-Herron
still remembers the October
day in 1992 when she attended
the wedding of Barack Obama
and Michelle Robinson.
Several years had passed
since she had first met Obama
when he came to Chicago to
'work as a community organiz-
er for the group she co-found-
ed. On this momentous day,
she approached the beam-
ing groom as he mingled with
guests. She had one request:
When you become the first
African-American president,
I want to be at the inaugural
ball,' she says she told him.
"He said, 'You've got it."
Then he laughed.
Sixteen years later, Augus-
tine-Herron took two of her
grandsons to Grant Park for
Obama's victory celebration.
Standing in the crowd that
unusually warm November
night, she remembered the
young man who drank cof-
fee and smoked cigarettes in
her kitchen, worked 14-hour
days and once boasted he
could "burn" the floor with
his dance moves -- then pro-
ceeded to prove it.
She also remembered her
long-ago prediction.
But when Obama took the
oath, Loretta Augustine-Her-
ron was watching it on televi-
sion with her special educa-
tion students at a South Side
elementary school in Chica-
go.
"The children need to wit-
ness this, to talk about this,"
she says. "You know what?
I always thought I wanted to
be at the inauguration. But I
really want to be with my stu-
dents."





The Miami Times

-ea th


SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 21-27, 2009
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The trouble you may be facing could be


God's way of giving
Here we are in January and
so many are celebrating a New
Year and an opportunity for a
new start--and you might be
hiding out thinking that you
have no reason at all to cele-
brate. You might be saying that
your house is in foreclosure or
your body is aching or you have
lost your job or you are worried
and stressed out.You are not in
a celebratory mood.
Please do hot think that you
have been passed by or forgot-
ten by the Lord, I know that you
have probably read or heard the
scripture in Psalm 30:5 that
says "weeping may endure for
a night, but joy comes in the


Florida International
University will 'hold a Martin
Luther King Youth Forum and
Peace Walk, from 10 a.m.-1,2:30
p.m. this Wednesday at the Wolfe
University Center Ballroom. For
more information, call FIU's
Office of Multicultural Programs,
305-348-2436.

The Women's Park will host
a free lecture at 7 p.m. today
as. part of a series of events at
the park honoring the 2009
winners of the In the Company of
Women Awards that pay tribute
to outstanding local women
in various fields of industry
and backgrounds. 'For more
information, call Park Manager
Lisa Fernandez at 305-480-1717
or via email at lfern@miamidade.
gov.

The Peace of Heart campaign
will set up shop at the Overtown


you a time out
morning."
However your night seems
to be lasting a lot longer than
12 hours and you feel that you
don't even have a glimpse of the
morning, don't be dismayed.
And, believe it or not, good
things can happen in the night,
too.
We always hear about
plants needing lots of sunlight
to grow. But when seeds are
planted, they are planted in the
ground. The seeds'do not see
sunlight until they grow and
become plants. So what hap-
pens to these seeds before they
emerge from the darkness of
the ground? They are not just


Youth Center 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Saturday to provide free Body
Mass Index and cholesterol
health screening and educational
events as part of its national
initiative to fight heart disease
afflicting African Americans,
low-income minority groups and
other medically underserved
communities. For more
information, call Dionne Brown
at 786- 466-4096.

Continental Societies,
Greater Miami Chapter, will host
its annual Gospel brunch at.
Outback Steakhouse from 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m., Sunday. For more
information, call Continental
Societies at 305-233-4594
or email: miacontinentals@
bellsouth.net.

Healthy Start Coalition pof
Miami-Dade invites parents to a
free infant massage instruction


What's happening in our city
February 8, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.
Mt. Claire Holiness Church
7975 N.W. 22 Avenue

There will be an appreciation
program in honor of Evan-


gelist Mother Rosa Shaw,
with singing songs of Zion by
outstanding recording artists,
and great speakers from all
over.
Come and enjoy this tribute
for a great women of prayer.


Sister Virginia Bostic celebrates 63rd singing anniversary
On Sunday, January25, Sister Spirit Ministry is in charge of
Virginia Bostic will celebrate the service. Sons of Gospel, Mt.
her 63 singing anniversary at Hermon Male Chorus and others
New Christ Tabernacle, 8400 will share in the celebration. For
N.W. 25 Avenue at 3:30 p.m. additional information contact
Pastor Avery Jones and Holy V. Bostic, 305-621-8126.


lying in the dirt doing nothing.
A process is taking place in the
dark that allows them to be able
to break forth from the dirt and
become plants.
The farmer doesn't just
throw seeds haphazardly on
the ground. He plants them
carefully in the ground. Jesus
said that in order for a plant to
grow, it must first be hidden in
the ground and die. We must
die in order to live.
Of course, you can't see the
hidden seed but it doesn't mean
that nothing is going on. You
might not be able to see God's
work in you but He is not work-
ing haphazardly on you, either,
and just because you don't see
anything happening it doesn't
mean that it isn't.
Much is made of living
in darkness. Certainly, as dark-
ness relates to sin, it is not a
good thing or a good place to be.
Satan is the prince of darkness
and that is not a title of honor.


series 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m., Jan.
27-29, at its offices. Space
is limited and registration is
required. For more information,
call Amy Olen, 305-541-0210 or
email aolen@hscmd.org.

The Miami-Dade State
Attorney's office will hold a
Sealing and Expungement
Program 4-8 p.m. Wednesday,
Jan. 28, at St. Michaels Church.
For more information, call the
State Attorney's Community
Outreach Division at 305-547-
0724.

The Espionage Dance
Company and Final Destination
will host a dance benefit show,,
"A Brand New Us," at 7 p.m.,
Saturday, Jan. 31, at the
Joseph Caleb Center. For more
information, call 305-807-6087
or 786-315-1656.

The Concerned Citizens
Committee invites you to its
monthly community meeting to
address issues in government
and business, at the Joseph
Caleb Center, 6-7:30 p.m.,


Incarnation Observes Canon Major's Milestone Anniversary


A Service of thanksgiving
.for The Reverend Joseph Ken-
neth Major will take place at
the Church of the Incarnation
Sunday, January 25, begin-
ning at 9 a.m. The service will
commemorate Father Major's
40 years of ministry as a priest.
Canon Major has spent his en-
tire ministry at the Church of
the Incarnation, where he con-
tinues to serve the community
and to be an avid spokesper-
son.
Father Major, the son of im-
migrant parents from Long Is-
land in the Bahamas, is a na-
tive Miamian, who early in
life, envisioned 'for himself a ca-
reer dedicated to enhancing the
lives of serving others through
pastoral care and community
activism.
Father Major graduated
from St. Augustine's College
in Raleigh, North Carolina
and began advanced studies at
Berkeley Divinity School at Yale
University. Prior to comple-
tion of a second degree, Major
moved to New York to accept a
-position as social caseworker
for the New York City Depart-
ment of Social Services. Four
years later, he completed his
degree in theology at Mercer
Seminary in Garden'City, Long
Island, New York. He was or-
dained a deacon at St. Philips
Church, Brooklyn, New York
in 1968 and in 1969 was or-
dained priest at the Church of
the Incarnation.
In July 1968, Bishop Henry
I. Louttit assigned him to assist


THE REVEREND JOSEPH
KENNETH MAJOR
with the pastoral work at the
Church of the Incarnation. His
early years were nothing short
of exciting and provocative.
During the 1968 riots, he had
the task of trying to bring calm
to the Liberty City streets dur-
ing the, day and spent countless
hours at night manning the
county jail to ensure the safe-
ty of those who had been ar-
rested. It was at this time that
Father Major understood that
his true success would come
from offering guidance and as-
sistance to residents within the
community he served as well as
members of his congregation.
His social work career pro-
vided him a unique perspective
on the needs of the black com-
munity. In 1977 he was elected
to serve on the Economic Op-


portunity Family Health Cen-
ter Board of Directors and was
subsequently elected President,
of the board, a position he held
for more than ten years. Dur-
ing his tenure, he successfully
prevented the federal govern-
ment from turning the Fam-
ily Health Center over to the
county government. As a re-
sult, Family Health Center now
thrives as a first class minority
owned community health care
facility which serves as a model
throughout the nation.
The guest preacher for the
service will be The Rever-
end Canon Harold T. Lewis,
Ph.D. He is the rector of Cal-
vary Episcopal Church in
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Fa-
ther Lewis has served congre-
gations in Honduras, England,
Washington, D.C., New Haven,
Conn., and Brooklyn. He spent
11 years at the church's New
York national office as Direc-
tor of Black Ministries. He
was interim rector at St. Mark's
Episcopal Church in Brooklyn
in 1995 when he wowed three
members of a search committee
from Calvary who were inter-
viewing him for their 'parish's
top position.
Lewis, a prolific writer, is also
currently an adjunct professor
in church and society at Pitts-
burgh theological Seminary.
Attendees are invited to re-
main for a reception imme-
diately following the service.
The church is located at 1835
Northwest 54th Street in Mi-
ami.


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Being hidden in a dark place by
the Lord for a season is an op-
portunity to grow. If this is a
time that nothing much seems
to be happening for you, or
what is happening is not great,
ask God if He is hiding you for
such a time as this.
My pastor shared last week
that process is a part of what
Believers must go through to
grow spiritually and to mature.
That process might come in the
way of trials and troubles but it
is still a necessary process for
growth. Without the process
of being hidden in the ground,
the seed that is planted will not
grow. The process is necessary.
It is not a punishment for the
seed.
Consider that God Him-
self has hidden you away for
your own protection. He knows
how much we can bear. Per-
haps you are hidden away to
give you time to recover, to be
renewed and to receive what


Tuesday, Feb. 3. For more
information, call Marva
Lightbourne at 305-758-2292.

The Family Foundation will
have their second annual Sista'
Talk HIV/AIDS Conference
5-9 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 3, at
Bethel Apostolic Temple. For
information, call 305-978-
7100.

Miami Northwestern High
School will hold a Financial Aid
Workshop at 6 p.m., Feb. 11 and
18 in the TOPA auditorium. For
more information, call LaMarc
Anderson at 305-836-0991.

Christian Hill will host
a Charity Golf Tournament
beginning at 12:01 p.m.,
Friday, Feb. 20, at the Miami
Springs Country Club. For more
information, call Larry Mills at
954-554-8335 or email: LM09@
bellsouth.net.

The National College Fair
will be held noon- 4 p.m.,
Sunday, Feb. 22, at the Miami
Mart Airport Hotel. For more


IPkaI


God needs to impart into your
life. If you are feeling lonely at
this time, consider that God has
taken you from what is familiar
or comfortable and has hidden
you away so that you can hear
His voice and instructions. It is
difficult to hear if several people
are all babbling in your ear at
the same time. Maybe God has
removed your "babblers" for the
time being.
I don't know you and do not
know your personal story or
situation. I do not know if what
you are going through is a re-
sult of sin or discipline or dis-
obedience. But I do know God.
I know what His Word says. I
know that He has promised to
never forsake or abandon those
who depend on and trust in
Him.
Use this time that you
are hidden to ask yourself some
hard questions. Ask yourself
and God what it is that you need
to learn at this time. Meditate


information, call 305-995-1739.
********
The fifth annual Carrie P.
Meek Award Ceremony will be
held 6-9 p.m., Thursday, Feb.
26, at the Signature Grand in
Davie. For more information, log
on to www.FischlerSchool.nova.
edu/bhc.

The Haitian Heritage
Museum will hold its fifth
annual Celebration Gala at the
Design District 8 p.m.-midnight,
Saturday, Feb. 28. For more
information, call 305-371-5988.

World Literacy Crusade/Girl
Power Program will present its


Valley Grove MB Church will
be hold its first revival at 7:30
p.m., Jan. 21-23. For more
information, call 305-835-
8316.

Lively Stones For Jesus
Ministries invites you to a
prayer brurich at 9 a.m., Jan. 24
For more information, call 305-
685-7739. Also, Lively Stones
will honor Apostle Thelma B.
Knowles with events slated for
7:30 p.m. Feb. 3-5.
******** -


on the Lord and His Wo
Some months last ye
a time when the Lord ti
me away. I was hidden
much that I was familiar
and had been involved in
many years. God allowed mt
to be removed from me so thz
I could hear Him and Hi
alone. Disheartening situations
forced me to ask myself some
tough questions about me and
He kindly turned my mindset
about some issues in a new and
better and more productive .di-
rection. Could this be what He
is trying to do with you?
Don't resist the Lord.
Don't resist or become impatient
with His nurturing and train-
ing. I have heard that there is a
variety of mushrooms and othe
foods and plants that can gro
only in the dark. Grow now an
know that in God's perfect tim-
ing you will emerge from where
you are a beautiful productive
work of God.


sixth annual "It Takes A Village"
Conference: Improving Our
World One Girl at a Time" 8 a.m.,
Saturday, March 21 at Miami"'
Northwestern High School. For
more information, call 305-756-
5502.

Miami Jackson High class
of 1979 will celebrate its 30th
annual reunion with a week-long
series of events highlighted by a '
trip to Montego Bay, Jamaica.,,n
The festivities will begin Friday,
June 5 and end Sunday, June
14. For more information, call
President Louis Fish at 954-
895-5441 or Secretary Carol
Jones at 786-566-3751.


New Christ Tabernacle MBC
invites you to Virginia Bostic's
63rd singing anniversary and
birthday celebration at 3:30
p.m., Sunday,, Jan. 25. For
more information, call Bostic at
305-621-8126.

Greater Harvest-'
International Ministries will
hold ordination services for its'>
pastor, Gerald T. Ealey, who will
become a bishop, on Sunday,
March. 1. For more information,
call 954-607-0833.


ATTENTION! ATTENTION! ATTENTION!
All WMBM Listeners LOOK!


THE HISTORIC SAINT AGNES' EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1750 Northwest Third Avenue
Overtown
INVITES YOU TO CELEBRATE WITH THEM THE 111 ANNIVERSARY
OF ITS ESTABLISHMENT AND ITS PATRONAL FESTIVAL





























FRIDAY. JANUARY 23.
THE PARISH FAMILY SOCIAL GATHERING/CELEBRATING PRESIDENT OBAMAS INAUGURATION
MAHI SHRINE AUDITORIUM
8:00 P.M.-UNTIL
--















ADMISSION: $20.00

SUNDAY, JANUARY 251
SOLEMN CHORAL EUCHARIST WITH SERMONILY 710:0OO PA.M.

PREACHER
THE VENERABLE BRYAN A. HOBBS, D.MIN.
ARCHDEACON FOR CONGREGATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
DIOCESE OF SOUTHEAST FLORIDA

THE REVEREND CANON RICHARD L MARQUTING PRESS-BARRY D.D.. LH.D.
RECTOR AND PASTOR

THE REVEREND FATHER SAMUELN A. BROWNED, ASSOCIATE
THE REVEREND FATHER BERNARDO D. TOMAS. ASSOCIATE

THE REVEREND SHEDRICK E. GILBERT, DEACON ASSISTANT
THE REVEREND DORIS W. INGRAHAM, DEACON ASSISTANT








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


I. MEI A RiTDA-REEBANCE OBIT


Royal ..
YDELIA ROBERTS, 67, reg-
istered nurse,
died January..
12. Service was
held.





COLIN ANSINE, 49, teacher,
died January 13. Arrangements
are incomplete.

CELESTIAL BAIN, 35, profes-
sional model, died January 8. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

DAVID ELLIS, 90, security
guard, died January 14. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

MAX DORSAINVILLE, 71, taxi
driver, died January 13. Visitation
4 to 9 p.m. Friday. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

LEROY HUNTER, 89, laundry
service employee, died January
14. Visitation 4 to 9 p.m. Wednes-
day. Service 5 p.m., Thursday in
the chapel.

Pax Villa
ANTONINE PIERRE-LOUIS,
74, homemaker, died January 8 in
North Shore Medical center. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

FLORISSANT ALAIN, 54, cook,
died January 15 in North Shore
Medical Center. Arrangements
are incomplete.

Wright & Young
EVOL ANTHONY MCLARTY,
26, cable Install-
er died January
Sin Jackson
morial Hos-
tal. Survivors
clude: son,
saiah Williams;
father, Bar-
rington; mother,
Constance Raffington; siblings,
Kery Raffington, Chanele and
Kelle McDonald; grandparents,
HisI Enright and Walter Raff-
ington, aunts, Corette Raffington,
Alicia Gooden; nephews, Kenneth
ana--Demetry McLean; cousins,
Kerrick, Kiddon Reid; best friends,
Jelani James, Tia Kigler, Jenny Bo-
tex. Visitation 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Church of God New Life
Worship Center (7680 Pembroke
Road.Miramar) Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday.

SANDRA ELAINE DEVEAUX,
57, teacher,
died January
10, in Aventura
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Tiffany
and Moses;
mother, Hazel
Dean Henry;
siblings Charlie, Mildred A., Louise
Ann. Service 1 p.m., Friday, Great-
er Bethel A.M.E Church.

St. Fort
ANDRE GARCON, 69, cook,
died January 13. Final rites and
burial Saturday, in Haiti.

FEVRINA VITAL, 78, home-
maker, died January 13. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, The Church Of
The Visitation Of The Blessed Vir-
gin Mary.

DIEUDONNE THOMAS, 86,
carpenter, died January 10 in Flor-
ida Medical Center. Service was
held.

Gregg L. Mason
JAMES EZELL ANDREWS, 81,
retired backhoe
operator for
Florida Water,
died January 8
at home. Sur-
vivors. include:

Lorene Porter,
Virgie Riley,
Beverly Andrews Edwards and
Ernette Rouse; son, James; broth-
ers and sisters; and a host of other
family members and friends. Ser-


vice was held.



Eric S. George
ELDER "JUNIOR" BRYANT, 82,
self-employed, of West Park, died
January 13. Service was held.


Death Notic


FRANK MARTIN,
gardner, died January
North Shore Hospital.
11 a.m., Saturday,
Baptist Church, 838 N.
St. Service entrusted t
Ferguson-Hewiitt Mort


Death Notic
TERRY TU
Arrangements are incor
Services entrusted to
Ferguson-Hewitt Mortu


Death Notice


Carey Royal Ram nn
SHIRLEY NEWSOME, 60, hotel
housekeeper,
died January
11 in Jackson
North Medical
Center. Service
2 p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.



SAM CHARLES STUBBS, re-
tired, died January 5 in Jackson
North Medical Center. Service
was held.

CARLTON JOHNSON, 72, re-
tired, died January 15 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Hadley
LYANSTON CHRISTOPHER
WILLIAMS, 43,
died January l
13 in Bellglade,
Florida. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day in the cha-
pel.



Grace
ZIONA HALL, 7 months, died
January 8. Ser-
vice was held.







KEONDRA A. JOHNSON, 14,
student, died
January 13.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Chris-
tian Fellowship.




LUZ GARCIA, 45, homemak-
er, died January 9. Service was
held.

DORA, ARMENTERpS,, 72, re-
tired factory worker for National
Freezer, died January 6. Service
was held.
Poitier
EUGENE SWAIN, 48, bus driv-
er for JESCA,
died January 1
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 3 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


GEORGE RAY THOMPSON
JR., 51; con-
struction work-
er, died January
4. Service was
held.




MELISSA GAY HUDSON, 42,
housewife, died
January 1. Ser-
vice was held.


Card of Thanks
In loving memory of,


ROSA LEE JOHNSON would
like to thank everyone for
your many contributions and
support during the home coming
following of our beloved mother.
Be it through your physical
presence, donations, telephone
calls, cards, letters, plants,
flower arrangements or
compassionate thoughts.
May God continue to Bless
each and everyone of you.
We thank you! Anthony,
Alfreda, Glenn and Bruce
Johnson


Death Notice


JONATHAN F. FORD,
'VETO', 51, funeral attendant,
died. January 11. Service 11
a.m., Thursday in Richardson
Mortuary Chapel.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


EDWARD WILLIAMS "TICK"
08/31/25 01/13/09

Wishes to thanks everyone
for their prayers and kindness,
during these trying times.
Special thanks to: Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital,
World Deliverance Missionary
Evangelist Center and
Richardson Mortuary.


Death Noti


ice

k2E
(". -L .L : "<-
. .' "


In Memoriam


PAT FULLER, JR., 79,
died January 16 at Jackson
North Medical Center.
Services Saturday, 11 a.m.
at New 79th St. Word Church
International. Arrangements
entrusted to Carey Royal
Ram'n Mortuary.
Death Notice


SAMUEL MASON
06/16/25 12/08/08


LAWRENCE T. MURRAY
"LARRY"
01/14/46 01/23/08

A year has passed since you
left us. It took a minute.to know
you. It took a lifetime to love
you. It took a second to lose
you.
We love and miss you!
"You were there"
Your loving wife, Jacqueline
and Family

Death Notice

BfBK i


RICHARD ROBERTS, JR.
AKA SNAKE, 65, butcher, died
January 18 at home.
He is survived by his wife of
64 years, Rubell; 10 children;
17 grandchildren and 19 great
grands.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday at
Poitier Funeral Home, 2321
N.W. 62nd Street.


In Memoriam


Throughout his life, Samuel
Mason worked tirelessly to
uplift his beloved African-
American community so
that one day we would have,
a Barack Obama as our
President. I wish he were here
to see it.
Ron Cordon, Esq., Altine

Death Notice


SHALETTE "Pig" SOLOMON
, 39, died on January 18 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Services 2 p.m.,Saturday at
Second Baptist Church, 11111
Pinkston Drive, Richmond
Heights. Arrangements
entrusted to Jay's Funeral
Home, 17420 Homestead
Avenue, Perrine.

Happy Birthday


jMROBERT LEWIS STOREY JR
01/26/65 09/22/80
De
The Storey family wish to honor
.. the life of our dear loved one,
A Robert Lewis Storey Jr. The special
memories that we hold in our
hearts help to keep his loving spirit
alive within us. As we celebrate
these wonderful memories of
life, we celebrate his birthday -
January 26. We remember the
good times, his smile and tha lave
that we shared united as a family.
We are eternally grateful to God
our Heavenly Father that he has
prepared a better place for us.
One day, we will be reunited in
God's glory.
75, With love, The Storey family,
18 in father Robert Lewis Storey Sr,
Service mother, Carolyn Storey Fulger,
Logos sisters Karen Storey-Broderick,
W. 183 Zina Storey-Taylor, brother
to Hall- Randy Storey
uary.
Death Notice
JULIAN R. TOBBS,
:e 34, died January 18 in
RNER. Jackson memorial Hospital.
mplete. Arrangements are incomplete.
Hall- Service entrusted to Hall-
ary Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary.


WILLIE EDWARD HARDY,
SR., 59, Assistant Director of
Public Works died January 16,
2009.
He is survived by his daughters,
Bettye Hardy, and Ramona
Hardy; sons, Willie Hardy Jr.,
and William Lewis Hardy; four
grandchildren; seven sisters; six
brothers, a host other relatives
and friends.
Services will be held Saturday
2 p.m. at Walker's Temple
Church Of God In Christ.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.
Death Notice


-,- .=.-
LUTICHA PERPALL 90, Re-
tired LPN at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital died January 15,
2009.
She is survived by her daugh-
ter, Juanita Gordon; 'grand-
daughter, Luticha Holmes;
grandsons, Richard Johnson,
Michale E. Johnson, Williams S.
Gordon, Robert Gordon, and,
Anthony Gordon; a host of oth-
er relatives and friends.
Services will be held Satur-
day 2 p.m. at St. Paul A.M.E
Church. Arrangements entrust-
ed to Range Funeral Home.


HARVEY CLARK SR.,
AKA (RABBIT), 74, Retired
Exterminator for Metro
Exterminator died January
18, 2009.
He is survived by his
daughter, Anna Kinder,
Irene Murph, Martha Clark-
Davis(Connie); sons, Harvey
Clark Jr., (Stephanie); sister,
Willie Mae Clark; nine
grandchildren; a host of other
relatives and friends.
Services will be held
Saturday 10 a. m. at New
Birth Cathedral of Faith
International Church.
Arrangements entrusted to
Range Funeral Home.


RAYTHON N. CURE
09/17/72 01/21/07


Gone, but not forgotten. Mom
and family.

Death Notice


DEACON JAMES READY,
89, died January 15 in
Pennsgrove, New Jersey.
Viewing, Sunday, January 25,
10 a.m., to 7 p.m., Whitaker
Funeral Home, 419 N. Terrell
St., Metter, Georgia, 912-
685-5158. Service 11 a.m.,
Monday January 26.


EUNICE C. JOHNSON, af-
fectionately known as LaLa,
97, Day Care Owner for many
years in Dade County, died
January 15 at Palm Gardens.
Survivors include: son,
James (Mitch) Johnson (Ro-
setta); daughter, Cassandra
Johnson-Shepherd (Derrick);
grandchildren, and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Family hour will be Friday, 5
p.m. until 6 p.m. Services will
be held Saturday, 11 a.m. at
St. John Institutional MBC.
Entombment: Dade Memo-
rial Park. Funeral Arrange-
ments entrusted to Gregg L.
Mason Funeral Home.


REBECCA ADAMS, 84, retired
teacher's aide, died January 15.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church. Service entrusted to
Richardson Mortuary.


I


- ---


ALBERT L. TIMS, 61, bus
driver for Dade County School
Board, died January 18 in
Veterans Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Liberty City Church of Christ.
Arrangements entrusted to
Wright and Young Funeral
Home
Death Notice








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 81 THE MIAMI TIMES JAN 9


...... . . ... . . . ... ........ ... ...
.. ... ,. . ....








"Copyrig hted Material



lSyndicated Content.


Available from Commercial News Providers"
.m- wo --w ."


Andria Hall Sizemore

was award-winning

journalist and writer
Miami Times Staff Report ,:' .


Emmy Award-winning jour-
nalist and communication spe-
cialist Andria Hall Sizemore
died Jan. 12 after a battle with
breast cancer.
Born in Henderson, N.C.,
Sizemore at age 4 moved with
her family to "Preachers Row"
in Crown Heights, Brooklyn,
N.Y., where she learned early
about motivation as a preacher
and teacher's kid.
Her mother is a retired New
Jersey counselor and educa-
tor and her father, who worked
closely with Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr., served as pastor of the
same church for more than 40
years.
Acareerbroadcaster, Sizemore
inherited the traits of teaching,
counseling and inspiring others
with the Word of God because
of her faith foundation.
She eventually landed on the
CNN/USA news anchor desk
and also worked at the NBC af-
filiate station in New York City.
She also worked as a national
news correspondent with FOX
Network.
Her work earned the indus-
try's prestigious Gabriel and
DuPont awards while she was
based in Boston, Mass.
Sizemore was also president
of SpeakEasy M.E.D.I.A. Inrc. -
a media and public-presenta-
tion consulting firm, based in
Scotch Plains, N.J.
She provided media and com-
munications coaching to two
leaders in the Jamaican gov-
ernment, a candidate who was
in the running to lead the World
Health Organization and the
executive staff of Half Moon re-
sort, a luxury property in Mon-
tego Bay.
Sizemore's company pro-
duced women's conferences
in the Caribbean, promoting
faith tourism, and she was well
loved and respected in the re-
gion. She played a key produc-
tion role in several editions of
Counterpart International's
Caribbean Media Exchange on
Sustainable Tourism, a project


ANDRIA HALL
designed to improve the qual-
ity of media coverage of sus-
tainable tourism in the Carib-
bean.
A writer as well, Sizemore
authored three, books: "This
Far by Faith: How to Put God
First in Everyday Living," "The
Walk at Work: Seven Steps to
Spiritual Success on the Job"
and "The Walk to Wealth: Sev-
en Guiding Principles to Pros-
perity."
Sizemore was also a director
with YTB Travel International,
an Illinois-based online travel
company, and was a board
director of Counterpart Cprib-
bean, a sustainable develop-
ment organization, based in
Barbados.
She also served as execu-
tive producer and host of ra-.
dio programs which she cre-
ated and her broadcasts were
heard on The Sheridan Gospel
Network, WBLS in New York,
and WMCA and Salem Com-
munications in New Jersey.
She also hosted "America at
Worship," which was aired on
the Hallmark Channel.
A former columnist for. Gos-
pel Today magazine, she also
played a supporting role in the
movie "The Good Son."
Sizemore and her husband,
Clayton Sizemore, CNN's man-
ager of Operations, made their
home in New Jersey.


IUYVt0 NURTIHEAST OTH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements






The Miami Times

Li esty les


NF.ntertainment
FASHION Hip Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


rL _AIAXAI TlASCC


MIAMI. FLORIDA, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


SECTION C


"Copyrighted Material

Synd icatoed Content II
Available from CommercialINewsRroviders


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


ByD.RcadStrach-


Chairperson James Fayson
and wife Margie, President
Hosea Butler and wife Dollie.
committee members and the
general membership held the
King of Clubs of Greater -Miami
gala Friday at the downtown
Double Tree Hotel with over
150 in attendance, entertained
by The Psi Phi Band.
Early arrivals for the cocktail
hour included women in stun-
ning gowns, Including Caroline
Adams, Rosalind S. Bonds,
Fifia Jenkins, Alstene McKin-
ney, Sandra B. Powell, Mary
Reeves, Naomi Smith, Euge-
nia Thomas, Dr. Gloria Tuck-
field, Rosetta Vickers and
Carolyn White.
After an hour of cocktail mu-
sic and camaraderie among the
guests, Fayson welcomed every-
one and turned the mike, over
to Butler, who announced that
the King of Clubs is looking for
new members and those invited
should consider talking to the
president for an application.
Jimmy Griffin, a community
activist, indicated he would be
applying for membership.
Dinner was then served and
the guests had a choice of
prime ribs, salmon, chicken or
a vegetable plate. Many ordered
prime ribs and the chicken was
under-ordered. The band enter-'
tained with the songs from the


"good ole da. s."
When an elec- p
tric slide dance
tune was played, -
the fashion show
began with Anita Harrell and
Beverly Johnson cranking up
the dance and the floor became
crowded with men attired in
black tuxedos and bow ties and
the women in glitter and design-
er gowns. John Keith passed
out coupons for door prizes.
An intermission period al-
lowed Butler and Fayson to in-
troduce members and guests at
each table. Based on remarks
from the guests, the night was
not long enough. Rose Ballou,
Laurice Hepburrn and Jerry
*and Mary Miller called for an-
other hour of music after the
9:30 p.m. ending time.
Kudos go out to other mem-
bers in attendance, including
Lawrence Adams, Andre Fay-
son, Milton Hall, Nelson Jen-
kins, Dr. Astrid Mack, James
Maull, Fletcher Paschal III, Dr.
Benny Reeves, Arthur "Jake"
Simms and wife Ruth and Dr.
Jack Tuckfield.
Others who attended includ-
ed Victoria Barry, Burt Bonds,
Evelyn Campbell, Chester
and Ellen Coachman, Lola C.
Cobb, Curley and Merdere B.
Edmonson, James and Giv-
en Erivin, Dr. George L. and


Gladys E. Fayson Sr., Shelia
and George Green, Craig Hall,
Frank Hall, Bea L. Hines,
Adell Ivory, Ernestine Keith,
Sheba Kinsey, Doris.
Also, Harvey Lisker, Eliza-
beth Marshall, Priscilla Mc-
Crary, Kelson McKinney, Ag-
enoria S. Paschal, Dorothy
Patterson, Linda Robinson,
Baljean Smith, Florence Stra-
chan, Dr. Lorraine F. Stra-
chan, Woodard and Lorraine
Vaughn, Zeb Vickers, Gwendo-
lyn H. Welters, Carolyn White
and Barbara and Dick Wilson.


The daughters and grandchil-
dren of Norma C. Mims recent-
ly gave her a surprise birthday
party fit for a queen. The cel-
ebration took place at the home
of her daughter, Ronda. The
main floor and living room were
transformed into a formal din-
. ing area, complete with round
tables, each with seating for 10.
The basement contained the
bar and dance floor and an out-
side patio led, to a tented area
near a lake.
Caribbean-themed decora-
-tions, cuisine, music and drinks
were featured and the menu in-
cluded Bahamian conch fritters,
pork and chicken souse and
fresh baked bread. The main
course was pigeon peas and
rice, stewed conch, fried fish,
roasted chicken, string beans,
cole slaw and potato salad.
The highlight of the evening
was a slide show presentation of
photos from milestones in Nor-
ma's life, family, church and so-


cial events, treasured photos of
her parents, siblings, children
and grandchildren, other family
and friends, spanning the 70-
plus years of her life.
Those in attendance included
her children Rosalyn, Robin,
Regina and Jan,
brother Dwight "Ballie" Wil-
mette and sister Charlene Wil-
mette, Cecilia Hudson,
the Bradwell family, the Kee
family, Paul and Barbara Rob-
erts of Tampa, members of St.
James African Methodist Epis-
copal Church, the Golden Girls,
members of Dorsey High classes
of '48, '53 and '55, members of
Beauticians Unit #55, teachers
from Lillie C. Evan Elementary,
Phillis Wheatley Elementary,
J.R.E. Lee School Charles Had-
ley Park and the Senior Exer-
cise Group.


A special salute goes out to
the National Sorority of Phi
Delta Kappa, of Alpha Delta
Chapter, for its fourth annual
Star Educator Award Luncheon
which was held at the El Pala-
cio Hotel near Calderrace track
in Miami Gardens. Ten people
were recognized for educational
achievements.
The luncheon began with
Mary L. Dunn, chairperson and
mistress of ceremonies, leading
the singing of "Lift Ev'ry Voice
and Sing," followed by Jody
Scavella giving the occasion,
Mary Jackson delivering the
invocation and Regina Bruton,
basileus, extending greetings.
Dunn then introduced


9-year-old Alecsys Turner,
who electrified the audience
with her rendition of "I Believe
I Can Fly" and "Wind Beneath
My Wings." Mary Allen and Iris
Allen gave brief profiles of the
honorees, who included Aisha
Brown, Carlene Cargill, An-
gela Dixon, Isabella Everett,
Mary Graham, Jewel P. Ish-
mael, Barbara Johnson, Ola
Porter, Mary Saunders and
Janeen Scavella.
Iris Allen blessed the food.
Regina Bruton gave remarks
and acknowledgements and
Jackson led the audience
again, singing "We Shall Over-
come."
Dunn recognized the other
sorors, such as Dr. James Ad-
ams, Frederica Brown, Erma
Carter, Patsy Graham, Mar-
tha Howell, Catherine Morri-
son, Gloria Starks and Anna
Wyche.


The Rev. Dr. Joreatha M. Ca-
pers, senior pastor of Ebenezer
United Methodist Church,
mother Helen Brown, grand-
mother Alice Hanna, son Tim
and church members welcomed
Tim Brown back to Miami and
the church from Rutgers Uni-
versity, where he starred in
football and ended the season
with eight touchdowns, rushing
for 83 yards, and caught pass-
es for 681 yards. Asked about
next season, he said he was re-
turning for his last year to im-
press National Football League
scouts so he can be drafted. "I
would go anywhere but I want


to be a Miami Dolphin first," he
said.


Ulysses "Skeeter" Knight
was beloved by family members
and known for his work at Jas-.
per Painting Company and he
is being missed by all, includ-
ing his friends at New Hope
Missionary Baptist Church,
where he was a featured soloist
in the male chorus, the praise
team, the mass choir and the
Voices of New Hope that trav-
eled around the country pro-
moting their CD.
An over flow crowd filled
the church to pay tribute to the
man who painted their homes
with skill. The service began
with the male chorus singing
Knight's favorite song, "I'll Fly
Away," followed by reflections
from Deaconess Clara Edge-
combe and Elder Roy Owens.
The mass choir followed
with the singing of "There Is No
Way I Can .Live Without You."
The Rev. Philip Knight, for-
mer pastor's assistant at the
church, paid tribute to his
brother, singing "I Won't Com-
plain," "Can't Nobody Do Me
Like Jesus" and a medley of
"call and response songs" that
lasted 15 minutes and left the
audience standing
Bishop Randall E. Holts,
senior pastor, eulogized "Skee-
ter" from the topic, "Gone But
Not Forgotten," touching his
family: his wife Joyce, parents
Willie and Susie, 10 children,
three brothers, two sisters and
other relatives and friends.


Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity
received a donation of $100.000
from fraternity brother Edward
W. Brooke III., the first African-
American elected to the U.S.
Senate. when he won election
in Massachusetts in 1966. Dar-
ryl Matthews, the 32nd general
president, accepted the dona-
tion during a private luncheon
at the Four Seasons hotel in


. : .. Sorority ended 2008 on a buzz
S ': and a bang. A candlelight ser-
, .-:.. ... vice was held at Mount Tabor
Baptist Church, with National
President Jean Batchie as the
keynote speaker. Decked out in
Miami. The money red attire were many members
will benefit the fra- ."' from Miami-Dade, Broward and
ternit's charitable P .. E Palm Beach. Also, the chap-
foutndation which ter was a sponsor of the Black
provides scholar- Global Bikers Association's Toy
ships for young males seeking Run parade. The chapter also
careers in education, a field gave donations to United Cere-
that Brooke holds dear. Brooke bral Palsy of South Florida to
lives in Miami. help enhance and expand that
The "Busy Bees" of Alpha organization's adult computer
Gamma Chapter ofEta Phi Beta ab. Michele Wyatt-Sweeting


is the chapter president.
Get-well wishes go out to
Clinton Brown, Doris J. Duty,
Irma Lee Fredricks, Wilma
Gilbert, Denesia B. Harris,
Cynthia Lightbourne-Brown,
Doris Mckinney-Pittman,
Elestine Mckinney-Allen,
Jean Caroll-Morley, Oscar
"Mickey" Morley Jr., Doretha
Payne, Herbert Rhodes Jr.,
Gilford Robinson and Jean
Lee Rolle.
Congratulations to Mary Hop-
kins, 36-year-old Baltimore na-
tive, who, in May, will be the
first Black woman to earn a


doctorate in math from Florida
Atlantic University.
Clemon G. Rogers has joined
the Century 21 Towne & Coun-
try real estate office in Home-,
stead. He specializes in resi-
dential and fine home property-
sales. The Cleveland, Ohio, na-
tive recently completed training
and licensing through The Gold
Coast School of Real Estate.
Wedding anniversary greet-
ings are for Carlton and Mamie
Burse, Jan. 10 (milestone not
stated); and Byron and Freder-
icka W. Smith, Jan. 14, their
25h;, and Leonard and Judith


Wilcox, Jan. 13, their 22nd.
Congratulations and best
wishes go out to Larrye A.
Smith and Kathy S. Jones,
who were married Jan. 10 in
Broward County. Their fabu-
lous reception was held at the
Floridian Ballroom in Pem-
broke Pines. Sylvia Sands is
the mother of the bride. Her
aunt Winifred M. Rogers flew
in from Oklahoma. Dr. Jasmin
Gurier and hubby Ray came
in from Atlanta. Teresa Buliou,
long-time friend, made it down
from Tampa and was one of the
bridesmaids.


Script brings life of controversial rapper to the big screen


MOVIE
continued from 1C

Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, devour
her son.
A pudgy, nerdy youth, Chris
wore thick glasses and at-
tended Catholic school. But
even with eyes at the back
of her head, Voletta couldn't
watch him 24/7.
As an adolescent, Chris
sought the fast life and easy
money. Weekdays, as soon
as his mom turned the cor-
ner after sending him off to
school, Chris would run up
to the roof and change into
street clothes,' big sneakers
and bling to prepare for his
new 9-to-5 as a drug dealer.
Chris fathered a daughter
with his teenage girlfriend,
.Jan, played by Julia *Pace
Mitchell..


Rapping on street corners
thrilled passersby and earned
him a reputation.. Drug-deal-
ing paid the bills-that is, un-
til he got busted.
In lockup, Chris wrote songs
about life, love and the. streets.
Upon his release, a demo tape
of his music reached an ambi-
tious young, marketing-savvy
entrepreneur: Sean "Puffy"
Combs, played by Derek
Luke, who was CEO of Bad
Boy Records. The rest is his-
tory: a million-selling debut
album; an affair with the vola-
tile Kimberly "Lil' Kim" Jones,
played by Naturi Naughton;
a friendship gone awry with
West Coast rapper Tupac
Shakur, played by Anthony
Mackie; a stormy marriage to
singer Faith Evans, played by
Antonique Smith; his death.
If you had read about Biggie


in the newspaper headlines
back in the '90s, the drama
surrounding his life seemed
enigmatic. You'd have known
that it was filled with contro-
versy, violence and messy loVe
affairs. But you still would
have no real feel for the man.
Journalist-turned-screen-
writer Cheo Hodari Coker re-
viewed Biggie's prophetic and
tragically titled "Ready To
Die" album for Rolling Stone
magazine and interviewed
him countless times,, includ-
ing the night before the rap-
per's murder.
Coker's script for the movie
brings Biggie to life in the Fox
Searchlight film.
Aided by co-writer Reggie
Rock Bythewood, Coker offers
the life of a young innocent
man who goes on to face de-
mons, success and death, in


a succinct 119-minute script
with great dramatic arcs and
memorable dialogue: Puffy,
"What doesn't break a nigga,
makes a nigga." Tupac, "We
takin'your money-and buyin'
your bitches with your mon-
ey.",Biggie, "In the beginning,
God gave me a free slate."
With colorful supporting per-
sonalities like Puffy, Biggie,
Lil' Kim, Tupac and the omi-
nous Suge Knight, Notorious's
story sells itself. Director
George Tillman of "Soul Food"
and "Barbershop" gets truth-
ful, emotional performances
from the entire cast. Wheth-
er filming street sequences
or love scenes, live concerts,
drive-bys or funerals, Tillman
exhibits a versatility that's
equally at ease with drama,
romance or, hip-hop culture.
Michael Grady's handheld


Run DMC was first rap act to win wide mainstream success


HALL OF FAME
continued from 1C

Run-DMC joins the heavy met-
al band Metallica, guitarist Jeff
Beck, soul singer Bobby Wom-
ack and doo-wop group Little
Anthony and the Imperials as
this year's inductee class.
Though -Run-DMC wasn't
among the first rap acts, they
were the first to achieve wide-
spread mainstream success,
and the first to notch a plati-
num album. The rapping duo
of Joseph "Run" Simmons
and Darryl "DMC" McDan-
iels plus their DJ, the. late


Jam Master Jay were rap's
first rock stars. They had hits
with songs like "My Adiddas"
and "It's Tricky," but had their
greatest success when they re-
made Aerosmith's "Walk This
Way" with the rock act for a
groundbreaking collaboration.
In an interview Wednesday,
McDaniels called their induc-
tion "inconceivable,"
"I'm a rap dude, I'm an MC
from Hollis (a neighborhood in
New York's borough of Queens),
just rockin' the mic, and to be
in the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame, with the Beatles, and
(Bob) Dylan, and the rock 'n'


roll gods?
It's ridiculous! Ridiculous in
a good way," he said.
He also gave a nod to the
predecessors who paved the
way for the group's success: "I
share this nomination and the
induction and the whole award
with those cats, everyone from'
the Bronx and Harlem who
started this."
Jam Master Jay whose
real name was Jason Mizell -
was shot to death in his record-
ing studio in 2002. McDaniels
doesn't consider the induction
bittersweet "because Jay
isn't here to celebrate doesn't


mean he's not partaking in this
event" but said he couldn't
see the duo, performing during
the April 4 induction ceremony
in Cleveland without him.
"We can't do it without Jay,"
he said. "I want people to re-
member the last time they saw
us together, the three of us."
Like Run-DMC, Metallica
made its debut 25 years ago
with the seminal album "Kill
'Em All," and became pio-
neers in their genre, with their
thrashing metal sound, led
by the frenetic guitar play of
James Hetfield and the drum-
ming of Lars Ulrich.


Oscar winner has been nominated for 4 Grammy Awards


HUDSON
continued from 1C

Feb. 1. El News first reported
Tuesday that Hudson would
perform.
Hudson hasn't made a
public appearance since her
57-year-old mother, Darnell
Hudson Donerson; 29-year-
old brother Jason Hudson;'


and 7-year-old nephew Ju-
lian King were slain in Chica-
go in October. Her estranged'
brother-in-law has been
charged in the killings.
. Hudson, who had released
her self-titled debut album
shortly before the killings, is
also scheduled to sing at the
Grammys' MusiCares event
in Los Angeles a few days lat-


er. She is nominated for four
awards at the Feb. 8 Grammy
Awards.
The 27-yearold Hudson
already has an Oscar to
her credit, a best support-
ing actress win for her role
in "Dreamgirls." The former
"American Idol" contestant's
career was continuing its sky-
rocketing rise, with featured


roles in movies like "Sex and
the City" and "The Secret Life
of Bees," as well as her album
release, when the slaying
occurred.
The Super Bowl is the most
viewed spectacle on televi-
sion. Bruce Springsteen is
scheduled to sing during
halftime of the pro football
championship game.


camera. brings you into the ac-
tion and his exquisite lighting
eroticizes love scenes. Jane
Musky's production design
aptly recreates the '90s. Dirk
Westervelt's editing doesn't
miss a beat. Danny'Elfman's
score perfectly complements
Biggie's music-"Hypnotize,"
"Juicy," "Unbelievable" which
still resonates today.
Brooklyn rapper Woolard
is a natural; he must have
shocked the casting direc-
tor. Woolard looks like, raps
like and talks like Biggie.
His emotional tool bag runs
the gamut; he finds both the
hardness and softness in the
lead character.
Derek Luke captures the
essence of P. Diddy without
caricature. Angel Bassett's


keen maternal instincts serve
her well as the mother who
must bury a son before his
time. Anthony Mackie mani-
fests Tupac's explosive, neu-
rotic mania.
Antonique Smith, who honed
her skills on Broadway in the
musical "Rent," shines as the
vulnerable Faith Evans. Na-
turi Naughton adds pepper to
Lil' Kim. And, with poetic jus-
tice, Biggie's son Christopher
Jordan Wallace portrays him
as a child.
"Notorious" is revealing,
contemplative and compre-
hensive. It artfully-magi-
cally-profiles Biggie Smalls,
manchild in the hip-hop
Promised Land. In com-
parison, "8 Mile" is pale.
"Notorious" is B.I.G.


IT'S A POWERFUL MOVIE!"
Tyler Perry


Claudia Puig, USA Today


NOT10 4W OP7J O



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Soledad O'Brien, CNN


NOW PLAYING
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES


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THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


RIBACKS MIU' CONi- THEIR OWN DLs VINY I


Clear Channel plans to trim 1,850 jobs


By Stephanie Clifford


The parent company of Clear
Channel Communications,
struggling from the advertising
downturn, announced
on Tuesday that it was
eliminating 1,850 positions,
or about 9 percent of its staff.
The dismissals are effective
immediately.
The company, CC Media
Holdings, which owns
billboards and radio stations
under the Clear Channel name,
has been hit hard recently. In


the third quarter, its revenues Communications has more


from radio broadcasting fell 7
percent. Outdoor advertising
had a milder decline -
because of the popularity of
digital billboards, it fell just 1
percent.
"Everyone in our investor
group, on the board, and in
the executive leadership team
remains bullish about the
long-term growth prospects for
Clear Channel," Mark P. Mays,
ClearChannel's chiefexecutive,
wrote in a memorandum to
employees. "Clear- Channel


* resources than any of our
peers. Thle tools are here. The
support is here."
In the memo, Mr. Mays said
that "a significant portion" of
the eliminated jobs came from
sales, though all parts of the
company were affected.
Sales at Clear Channel
radio have not been strong.
Both the number of prime
advertising minutes sold,
and the rates the company
got for those minutes, fell in
the third quarter. And there


was no bright spot: "The
Company's radio revenue
experienced declines across
all different sized markets
and advertising categories
including automotive, retail
and entertainment," Clear
Channel wrote in its third-
quarter earnings statement.
The same pattern is
occurring throughout the
industry: radio advertising
revenue fell 11 percent in the
third quarter compared to a
year earlier, according to the
Radio Advertising Bureau.


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Florida Grand Opera presents
LA CENERENTOLA
Rossini's version of everyone's favorite rags-to-riches classic,
"Cinderella."
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75, $52.75, $81,75 $91.75, $132.75. $178 75
Gold Coast Theatre Company pre-ents
PETER, PETER AND POTTER
"Peter and the Wolf" and "Peter Pan"- both told in a rio of
comedy, song and audience participation for the entire family!
2 & 7 PM Carnival Studio Theater $20

LA CENERENTOLA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75. $52.75,. $31.75. 91i 75. $132.75. S178.75

Concert Association of Florida pr-sents
BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA
Works by Liszt, Brahms, and Sarasate
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $15, $25, $75., $13.
LA CENERENTOLA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75, $52.75, $81.75, $91.75, $132 75. 5178 75

I N NI

MIAMI CITY BALLET AND
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
"SEE THE MUSIC, HEAR THE DANCING GEORGE BALA.NCHINE"
Balanchine's S mphorni in Three Aovements itlh music by Stra3.insk'
and Symphon) in C danced tc. Bizei's stiririn g s,mphon\
7 30 PM Zilt Ballet Opera Hou,.e 19 1 29, S'9 :69. 85. $175
LA CENERENTOLA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75, $52.75, $81 75, $91 75, $132 75 5178 75 $228 75
Musical Arts Associal on ol f.liami, nd Adrienne Arsh. Cenl-r present
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
Wagner's Wesendonck Songs and Shostakovich's "LL-,ringrad"
Symphony, with soprancr Measha Brue.ggeroI-.rima, aid c.n lulted
by Music Director Franz Welser-Mst
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $20, $65 i80, $95, 150

LA CENERENTOLA
8 PM Zin Ballet Opera House
$27 75 $52 75 $81 75:,. $S1 7 ,132 75. 178 7' .'' 7


HoariieD (mill


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THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
8 PM Kniqhl Concert Hall $20 5':0 i 1,105 1- ,

Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays :an, Sr3iurl, y no at roon, tariirn9 .11 Inr 7ii ,n i .rile ,r H .u-e lob,,
No reservations necessary.


Bokyorevn ody Cmie or IM
ORD R OW ntrtanmnt n sunnngsetin wih ..


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AdrienneAr'sht Center
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE lp UNTY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009 1


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Florida Vegetables. .. .......29.........
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or Yellow or Zucchini Squash
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


99

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SAVE UP TO 3.00 LB


Apple Pie.......................... ....399
All American Pie, Choice of Flaky Double Crust or Dutch Apple
With Streusel Topping, From the Publix Bakery, 28 or 34-oz size
SAVE UP TO 1.30


12-Pack
Selected
Coca-Cola Free
Products ........re
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 2.67 ON 3
(Individual 12-Pack, each ... 4.00)


Keebler
Chips
Deluxe
Cookies ........... F ree
Or Sandies Shortbread,
Assorted Varieties,
9.5 to 18-oz pkg.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP Td 4.23


Doritos
Tortilla Free
Chips............... F ee,
Assorted Varieties,
11.75 to 13-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!,
Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.99


18-Pack Assorted 1199
M iller B eer ..................
Or Budweiser or Coors,
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00
(6-Pack Bud Light Lime
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The Mia, i Tii s


Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


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6D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

MIAMI
CommunltyT _
Redevelopinent Agency
SOUTHEfAStOVErOWN,' PARK WEST I OMNI REDEVELOPMENI DISTRICT I MIDTOWN

SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN/PARK WEST & OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that a regular CRA Boards of Commissioners
Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West & Omni Community Redevelop-
ment Agencies will take place on Monday, January 26, 2009 at 5:00 pm, at Club
Space, 34 NE 11th Street, Miami, Florida, 33132. Free parking will be available
in the rear of the building, 11 NE 10th Street.
All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information please con-
tact the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.


(#003203) James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West &
Omni Community Redevelopment Agencies


You Can Own this

Beautiful Home

so why rent.

For only
ff s.. *- ^


For More Information Call
Affordable Housing Programs 305-688-1600
Ask About The Infill Program!!!
on 1 WOO


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT COVERING OPENING QF BIDS

The successful Applicant(s) shall fully comply with the State of Florida's House Bill 1 677 Jessica Lunsford Act" and all related Board
Rules and procedures as applicable. ...........
CONE OF SILENCE NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:
Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212 a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance of the Legal Advertisement end end-
ing upon such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a contract. to teJect all
bids or responses, or otherwise lakes action which ends the solicitation end review process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may
be punishable as provided for under Board Rule 6Gx13- 1.212, In addition to any other penalty provided by law.
Failure to file a protest within the lime prescilbed end in the manner specified In Board Rule 6Gx13. 3C-1 .11, or in accordance with-
with 120.57(3). Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute e waiver at proceedings underCheptar 120, Florida Statutes.
School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/.
Any written communications must be sent to the address listed below and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE
2" Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.
The School Board of Miami-Dede County. Florida, adheres to a polity of non-discrimination in educational programs/activities and
employment arid strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.
Any firm, or individual, whose contract has been te;minated by the Board, with cause, shall no be considered for commission under
this proposal.
Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miam-Oade County, Florida, for the projects listed herein, until 2:00 P.M. local
time, Tuesday, the 17th day of February, 2009 1450 N.E Second Avenue. Room 351 Miami, Florida, following which time and place,
or as soon there after as the Board can attend to the same, the said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the Board
Auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. Award of the
contract will be made to the lowest, pro'quallfied responsible bidder for the actual amount bid considering base bid an accepted
alternatives (It anylas listed In the bidding documents. The Board will award the contract based upon the result of the tabulations as
covered by applicable laws and regulations.
Project No. G-ENWTB-2009-GR/1&2
Project No. G.ENWTB-2009.GR/3&4
Project No. G-ENVITB-2009-GR/5&B
General Environmental Ramnellation
Term Contract (One Year)
Miami-Dade County. FL
The Pre-Bid Conference been scheduled for Thursday February 5th 2009 at 10:00 AM at the Department of asbestos Management
12525 NW 28th Avenue Suite 509 Miami Florida 33167.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS HIGHLY ENCOURAGE.
In an effort to ensure the timely remediation of asbestos and mold containing materials, and the installation of nonasbestos replacement
materials, in Miamt-Dade County Public Schools facilities, the Board has divided the district's six (6 regions into three contracts of two
(2) regions each, In accordance with the standard regional distribution schools established by MDCPS/ School Operations. Awards
will be made to three (3) prime contractors, on the basis of one contractor for each two-region contract. The three contracts will be as-
signed for Regions 1&2, 3&4 and 5&6 respectively. Eligible contractors will be permitted to bid on more that one contract. However, no
contractor will be awarded more than one contract. Assignment of contracts will be made relative to the bid ranking, with the first choice
going to the lowest bidder for each contract.

ALL THREE CONTRACTS ARE OPEN TO ALL BIDDERS THAT HAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. PRIOR TO BIDDING
Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one or two sets of bid and contract documents from the office of the Department of Asbestos Manage-
ment, 12525 NW 28th, Avenue, Miami, FL 33167 (305) 995-4594 on and after January 26, 2009 with deposit of $50.00 per set (call prior
to pick-up (305- 995-4594), (Cashier's Check or Money Order, Payable to The School Board of Miami-Dade County. Florida). Deposits
will be refunded when documents in good condition, no more than 10 days after award or rejection of Bit Deposits will be retained by
The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, if documents are not returned within the above stipulated time an/or condition.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


News Providers"


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I


SECTION D


1u1 N.I.7. trmn ireet
Two and three bdrms, one
bath, from $900, nice and
clean, laundry room, parking.
Section 8 OK! 786-326-7424

101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
WE WORK WITH BAD
CREDIT
One and two bedrooms,
central-air, appliances, tile,
carpet, remodeled, laundry
room, parking, qutet. FREE
WATER. Starting at $595.
Call 786-506-3067

1118 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath, $550. Stove, refrig,
air. 305-642-7080

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrig., A/C. 305-642-
7080.

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath. $575. Stove, re-
frigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144 .

12400 N.E. 11th Court
One bdrm, one bath $700,
Three bdrm, one bath $1000.
Stove, refrigerator, a/c, Sec-
tion 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

1245 N,W 58th :Street
One bed, one.bath, $525
month; All appliances
Included. Free 2Q' Inch flat
S screen,. '
T.V. Calj JOel 786-355-7578.

1261 N.W. 59th Street
One Month To Move In. One
bdrm, one bath, $550.
305-642-7080

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$500 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bedroom, one
bath, with central air, in
quiet area, $700 monthly!
Raciel Cruz 305-213-5013

14100-40 N.W. 24th Court
One bdrm, one bath $675;
Two bdrm, one bath $800.
Washers and dryers on
premises. Call 786-287-0682

1500 N.W. 65th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
room air conditioned,
gated, stove and refrigerator.
Remodeled, tiled, $575 a
month, utilities not included.
Call 786-514-4746.

15201 Memorial Highway
Two bdrms., one bath, $950,
more specials, Section 8 ok!
Call Frank K. Cooper, R.E. at
305-758-7022.


. .O'e..bedroom6, one bath
S-395 mionthy. 'Newly
renovated. Allappliances
SIncluded.Free 200inch flat ,
.screen T.V. all, Joel 786-


1S2 :,; I&t Place
T-reebedroomr t.,
SbathS,775 5i 'nthly; Newly
renovated, all appliances
included. Ftee 20,inch flat,
screen
'TN.V. Call Joel 786-355-7578

1530 N.W 84th Street
Renovated, two bdrm, one
bath, $850, 786-715-1991.

S:1540 N.W. 1st Court
SStudios $450/mth, One'
.', bdrm $525/nith, all appli-
ances inlUdedt Pree 20'
,inch flt,screenTVt Call ,
'.Joei, ,
786-355-7578.,

17050 N.W. 55th Avenue
Two bdrm, one bath, central
air, $850/month, Section 8
ok! Call 954-790-7807.

1718 N.W. 2nd Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-
7,080.

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms, one bath $625.
Stove, refrig, A/C. Free Wa-
ter. 305-642-7080

18550 N.W. 38th Court
One bedroom, one bath, ev-


erything brand new, utilities
and cable included. Call 786-
853-7056 or 305-527-6531.


1990 N.W. 183rd St. #16
Two bdrms, $900 monthly, ef-
ficiency $550. 305-621-1354.

200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

2158 N.W. 5th Avenue
Wynwood Village Apts.
Newly renovated, one bdrm,
one bath. Move In Special
$550/month, first month free,
Section 8 ok! Must have
proof of income! Call David
305-790-5212.

220 N.W. 16th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.'
$550. 305-642-7080

2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $625, newly
renovated appliances includ-
ed. Call Tony 305-213-5013.

2365 N.W. 97th Street Apt
# B Rear
One bedroom, $575 monthly.
First and last moves you in.
Call 305-691-2703.

2493 N.W. 91st Street
One bedroom. $600/month,
first, last to move in, utilities
included. Call 305-691-2703.

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849

3051,N.W. 134th Street
Section 8 welcomed. Newly
remodeled, two bdrms, one
bath, central air, washer and
dryer incl. New kitchen, bath,
and refrig. $995/month.
(954) 557-4567

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Remodeled, one bdrm, one
bath, appliances included.
$600 mthly. MUST SEE!
Mr.Cruz 305-213-5013


48 N.W. 77th Street
Large, one bdrm, $1500/
down, $600/monthly. Call
305-753-7738

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.

5509 N.W. Miami Court
One bedroom, one bath. $650
mthly, first, last, security. 305-
751-6232

561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. One bdrm,
one bath $495. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, new
appliances, $600 monthly,
$1200 moves you in.
Section 8 welcome
Call 305-458-3977.

6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.,
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

7001 N.W. 15th Avenue
.'. ,Move In Special! First
mioth plus half,secUrity
.deposit moves you in,' One
.bedroin $495 monthly. $743
'moves you in. All appli-
,ance inpldded. Free 20 .
incho'flat screen TV. Call
Joel 780-355-7578,

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $550
monthly. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V.
Call Joel: 786-355-7578.

8475 N.E. 2 Avenue
One and two bedroom apart-
ments. Section 8. Call:
305-754-7776

930. N.W. 96th Street
Two bdrm, one bath, tiled,
refrigerator and stove. Call
305-751-2995.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one, two, and four
bdrm. Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665.

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,


two, and three bedrooms, air,
appliances, laundry and gate.
From $400. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.


CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080

Close to Miami Avenue
on N.E. 84th Street
One bedroom and efficiency
for rent. Call 305-970-5574.

COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695.



GOLDEN SQUARE AND
GOLDEN VILLAS
New Rental Community
1325/1415 NW 18th Drive
Pompano Beach
(954)933-4050

Beautiful One, Two, Three
and Four Bedroom Apts.
Starting at $750 monthly
Washer/Dryer Available
Fitness Center
Computer Room
Sparkling Pool and
Children's Playground

*Income restrictions apply
Rent subject to change



GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Rent Special!! All applica-
tions accepted. Easy Qualify.
One bdrm, one bath $495
($745). Two bdrm, one bath
$595 ($895).
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrace Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bdrm. Bring ad for move
in deals & $50 off app. fee.
Call 305-688-8881.

L & G APARTMENTS'
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, ohe bath,
$600/month, $1200 to move
in, first and last. Section 8
ok! 305-244-7606.

MIAMI AREA
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 305-725-5504

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

MOVE IN SPECIAL
1801 N.W. 2 Avenue
1801 N.W. 2 AvenueTwo'
bedrooms, one bath. $600
monthlyl, $900 lo nmiove in.
All appliances included.
Free 20 Inch Flat Screen
TV, '
Call Joel 786,-355-7578

MOVE IN SPECIAL
1801 N.W. 1 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600 monthly, $900 to move
In. all appliances included.
Free 20 inch Flat Screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

MOVE-IN SPECIALll
SECTION 8, $0 DEPOSIT,
$0 WATER. OPA-LOCKA.
Two bedrooms, one bath,


tiled air. $750. One bed-
room, one bath, tiled, air.
$550. 786-367-7024,
786-439-8044.


0
RLI


.NO DEPOSIT with Section 8.
Two and one bedrooms.
786-267-3199

NORTH DADE AREA
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Section 8 o.k. $0
move in for Section 8. 786-
488-5225 or 305-756-0769.

OBAMA COLLECTIBLES!
peopleoffaithforobama.com
www.hip-hopforobama.com
blackhistoryproducts.com
305-407-8083

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
305-769-0146, '/86-521-
7161
OPA LOCKA AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $520/
month, Section 8 welcomed!
Call 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
Move In Special. One bed-
room, one bath, $480-$550.
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144. '

OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $500/
month. Call 786-262-4536.

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
One bedroom, $550 $650
monthly. Two bedrooms.
All appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1770 N.W. 51 Ter.
Three bdrms, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 OK! $1260 mthly. Joe
305-607-1040,

439 N.W. 9th Street
439 N.W. 8th Street
One bedroom, one bath. $450
monthly. $950 to move in.
Three bdrm $735/month.
786-220-3400 or 305-326-
8855.



741 N.'N. 5th Avenue
FT. LAUDERDALE
Storefronts, offices,
'warehouses, storagee, and
garage spaces available.
Free water. WE WORK
WITH BAD CREDIT! 305-
490,1991, TWO MONTHS'
FREE, MOVE IN TODAY!
EXCELLENT LOCATION!.

COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated.. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950'monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


CAROL CITY AREA
19351 N.W. 45th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three and four bdrms,
Section 8 ONLY! Rudy
786-367-6268

Miami Gardens Area
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, fenced, bars, ap-
pliances and more. $1400
monthly. Section 8 Ready.
Call Manny, 305-409-2570

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Two bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 only! 786-566-9569

NORTH MIAMI AREA
'Two bdrm, two bath, $1150.
$200 off first month. Air,
balcony, tiled floors and one
assigned covered parking.
Laundry available. Call Kathy
847-682-0290.


1029 N.W. 95 St
One bedroom, $625 monthly,
first, last and security.
305-962-2666

11254-56 N.W. 22 Ave.
Three bedrooms, central air.
$1195. 786-306-4839

1187 N.W. 63rd Street #2
Two bdrm, one bath, $800/
month, $1600 to move in,
call 305-389-8414.

128 N.W. 61st Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
Vouchers accepted, call:
786-308-6290.

13315 Alexandria Drive
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$925 monthly, washer and
dryer provided. Section 8 ok!
Call 786-378-1482 or 786-
252-4953.


1410 N.W. 38th Street
Two bdrm, one bath, $950/
month incl. water. 305-662-
5505.


1666 N.E. 146TH STREET
Move in special $600! Newly
remodeled, two bdrms,
one bath, central a/c, North
Miami, Section 8 ok!
Call 786-287-0682.

1732 N.W. 41st Street
One bdrm, one bath, appli.
incl., a/c, fenced, private
parking. $600/month. Call
754-581-6302.

1801 N.W. 45th Street
Two bdrms., one bath, $950,
more specials, Section 8 ok!
Call Frank K. Cooper, R.E. at
305-758-7022.

1841 N.W. 74 St.
Two bdrms, one bath, stove,
refrigerator, air, tile through-
out. $850 mthly. Section 8
Ok. Miguel 305-746-1627

230 N.W. 56th Street
Two bedroom, one bathroom,
central air, cable ready, $975
a month, Section 8 OK.
786-543-4579

2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, air, $995 mthly.
No deposit. 786-877-5358.

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

336 N.W. 59th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Section 8 wel-
come. 305-490-7033

45 N.W. 60th Terrace
Newly renovated, two bdrm,
one bath, central air, fenced,
tile, $900/month, first, last,
and sec. deposit needed to
I. move,
305-588-7736.

4628 N.W. 16th Avenue
Large, one and two bdrm,
one bath, $650 and $850/
month, appliances incl. Call
786-493-0686.

4651 N.W. 16 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650. Section 8 OK! 305-638-
5946, 786-512-7622

4714 N.W. 16th Avenue
Four bdrm, one bath,
Call 305 218-1227

5512 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedroom, one bath,
$800/month. Call 305-653-
5206.

5528 .N.W. 4, Ave
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, new appliances. Section 8
OK. 305-720-7067

6244 N.W. 1st Court
Two bdrm, appliances, wall
a/c, $800/mth, 305-945-
2312.

7753 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one Dath
$700 monthly. All appli-
ances included. Central air.
Free 20 inch flat screen
T.V.Call Joel 786-355-7578.

7770 N.W. 9th Avenue
One bdrm, one bath, drive in
entrance, Section 8 only. 305-
761-3232


812 N.W. 61st Street
Two bedrooms, one baths,
air, $850 monthly. NO
Section 8! First, and security.
Call 305-244-6952.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100 monthly, first and last.
786-879-0775


112 St and N.W. 15th Court
Efficiency, $500 mthly, four
bdrms, $1600 mthly. 786-
718-9226


1235 N.W. 77th Terrace
Spacious, available immedi-
ately! $500/month, first, and
sec. dep. required to move.
Call 305-205-2823.


1480 N.W. 195th Street
Fully furnished, air, cable, no
utilities, $575 mthly.
Call 786-317-1804


1541 N.W. 54 St #8
Huge efficiency. $550 mthly,
$200 Security deposit, utili-
ties included. 305-776-6424

243 N.W. 59th Street Rear
Two bdrm, one bath, $725
monthly. Call 305-218-1227.

256 N.E. 77th Street


Includes refrigerator, stove
and air. $465 monthly.
Call 305-469-5093


2971 N.W. 174th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
private entrance, kitchen, air
conditioned, $550 month, call
786-339-0175 or 786-624-
1991.

3153 N.W. 53rd Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Efficiency and two bedrooms.
Call 305-754-7776

EL PORTAL AREA
9401-B N.W. 4 Ave. Air,
bars, private parking, water
included, nice area. $545/
month.
Call 786-514-1771

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Full kitchen, furniture, central
air, cable, parking, util. incl.
305-494-7348

Sanford Apt.
1907 N.W. 2nd Court
Nice one bedroom, air win-
dow shades, appliances.
Free hot water, tenant pays
for cold water. $410 monthly
plus $200 deposit. Call 305-
665-4938, Cell 305-498-8811


1161 N.W. 139th Street
$120/week, $240/move in,
includes cable, central air,
305-310-5272.

13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1338 N.W. 68th Street
Rooms available. Call 305-
693-1017 or 305-298-0388.

1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1775 NW 151 STREET
Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations. Call:
954-678-8996

1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-637-9359 or 305-
303-0156

2365 N.W. 97th Street
Room with air, $85 weekly,
$340 to move it.
.Call 305-691-2703. .

695 N.W. 41st Street
Air, cable, $285/move in, .
$135/wk. Call 305-322-8966.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.

CASTLE MANSION
Best Rooms $112 wkly, plus
Security $150. Efficiency,
fully loaded, $600 mthly plus
$300 Security. Near bus line,
Family Dollar three blocks
North. 720 N.W. 75 St.
786-523-1736.


LITTLE RIVER AREA
A/C, kitchen privilege, $125/,
week, $250 move in. Private
entrance. 305-835-2446.

NORLAND AREA
Quiet room, near bus termi-
nal. 561-574-2792

NORTH DADE AREA
Air, cable, and kitchen privi-
leges. 305-962-8157


NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.


10360 S.W. 173rd Terrace
Four bdrm, one bath, $1350.
Section 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

1144 N.W. 31 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1300 monthly. Section 8.
NuConcept Realty
305-244-0366

1165 N.W. 147 Street
Two bedrooms, $1300, effi-
ciency $600. Utilities includ-
ed. 305-490-9284

12150 S.W. 218th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $650.
305-642-7080

12275 N.W. 10th Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath.
$1100/monthly, $2200 moves
you in. Section 8 ok. Call
David 786-258-3984.

12960 S.W. 267th Street
Three bdrm, two bath, $1300.
Section 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

1345 N.E. 128th Street
Three bdrm, one bath,
$1200/month, No Section 8,
call 305-267-9449.

14002 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedroom, two bath, new
townhouse located in nice


area, Section 8 ok! Only one
month security.
954-826-4013.


e


1491 N.E. 152nd Street
Three bdrms, two bath,
washer and dryer hookup,
Section 8 welcomed, avail-
able now! Call 305-335-2326.

1521 N.W. 63rd Street
Remodel, three bdrm, one
bath. Large fenced yard,
central air, heat. Section 8
ok. $1050/month 305-761-
3998

1530 N.W. 71st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750. 305-642-7080

1761 N.E. 143rd Street
Large, three bdrm, two bath,
Section 8 ok, $750 security
deposit. North Miami Area.
Call 786-287-0682.


1812 N.W. 66th Street
Newly remodeled, three
bdrm, one bath, a/c, tile,
stove and refrig., Sect. 8 ok!
$1200 Call 786-344-9284.

1865 N.W. 45th St
Three bdrms. $1150 mthly.
$1500 move in.
305-751-6720

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
Upstairs one bdrm. $725
mthly. $900 move in. Utilities
included. 305-751-6720

19521 N.W. 37th Court
Four bdrm, two bath, central
air, $1475/month, Section 8
ok! Call 954-790-7807.

2377 NW 93 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
newly renovated. $850
monthly. Call 954-677-7577
or 754-366-6090.

2545 N.W. 167th Street
Three bedrooms, one and
one half bath. $1400 mthly.
Move In Special!
786-277-9378

3098 N.W. 65th Street
One bdrm one bath, air. $675
mthly, first security $1500
move in. 786-344-1879

41 St and N.W. 5 Ave
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776.

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miarhi, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

557 N.W. 22nd Street
Four bedroom, two bath, ren-
ovated, central air, Section"8
ok! $1400/month, 305-751-
8865.

900 N.W. 65th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 305-642-7080.

920 N.W. 89th Street
Remodeled three bdrm, one
bath, safe area, Section 8
OK! $1300 mthly.
786-506-5907.

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Four or five bdrms, two
baths, fenced yard, tile,
Section 8 OK! Call 786-306-
2349.

MIAMI AREA
174 N.E. 78th Street
Newly remodeled, five bed-
rooms, three bathrooms, two
story home, washer, dryer
and central air. Section 8 wel-
come. $1900 a month.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112

N. MIAMI, MIAMI, MIRAMAR
AREA
Efficiency(Miramar),
houses(Miami and N. Miami)
for rent. 305-300-7783

NEAR ALLAPATTAH
MIDDLE
Two bdrms, one bath, large
yard. Section 8 Ok. $1250.
305-685-6795

NEAR MIAMI CENTRAL
HIGH
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, security lights. $1450.
Section 8 OK.305-685-6795

NEAR NORTHWESTERN
HIGH
Two bdrms, one bath,
air.$1250. Fenced. Section 8
OK. 305-685-6795

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five bedrooms and half,
three bathrooms, family,
dining, living, and laundry
room. Section 8 okay! $1950
monthly. Call 305-992-6496.


NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Two homes to choose from,
three bedrooms, two baths,
$1250, air, tile, $3,125.
No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker


- ----- ---------


550 N.W. 214 St. Unit 205
Three bedrooms, two baths,
gated community. $159,000
asking price. 786-202-8550


1210 N.W. 187 Street
Three bedrooms, central air,
den. Try $2900 down and
$975 monthly. FHA.
786-306-4839
1570 N.W. 70 Street
Three bedrooms, air, reno-
vated. Try $500 down and
$699 monthly. FHA. Call for
list. 786-306-4839

1725 N.W. 132nd Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
a perfect "10". Everything up-
dated. Try $1900 down and
$1199 monthly. FHA. Call for
list 786-306-4839.

2301 N.W. 79th Terrace
Large, renovated, four bdrm,
two bath, tv and util. room.
$149K, or best offer. 305-
305-5546.


'ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
"'WITH'"
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
room, two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedroom, two
bath, at an attractive price.
Call 786-859-3772.


Don't Lose Your Home
We Stop Foreclosures Fast!
305-677-2226



A DUN DEAL PAINTING
Interior, exterior, driveways,
and iron gates. Call for free
estimates, toll free 866-655-
1886 or 954-274-1963.

CHARLES ELECTRONIC
REPAIR AND SERVICE
Air-conditidning, big screen
and plasma TV's, and resi-
dential electronic wiring. We
come to you! Call HVAC
Solutions 786-346-8225.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, plastering and addi-
tions. Call 954-980-4231 or
305-892-0315.

INAUGURATION
SPECIAL!!I
Once in a Lifetime. Handy-
man, specializing in carpet,
plumbing, doors, unclog
drains and lawn service.
305-801-5690

Miracles Landscaping and
Complete Lawn Service
New customers 10% off w/
ad, call for free estimates
754-281-0598.

PLUMBING SERVICE
Repairs, Sewer and Drain
Cleaning, Water Heater
Installations. 305-316-1889







CUSTOMER SERVICE
REP.
Allstate Insurance Agency,
440 license needed.
90 NE 54 Street #E
Call 305-759-1316.

DRIVERS WANTED!
For Society Cab Comp.,
Part or Full time, Night or
Day.
Call 305-321-5177.


HAIR STYLIST WANTED
Two booths available for
hair stylist. Call E. Styles at
786-290-6006.

HAIR STYLIST, NAIL
TECH., and BRAIDER
Needed. Miami Hair 305-
757-1222. 1178 NW 54th
Street


INSTRUCTOR NEEDED
For traffic school. Teach
4, 8, 12 hour classes, also
drug and alcohol course,
90 NE 54 Street, 2nd Floor
305-759-1031


305-891-6776
CLASSIFIED

Prime Golden Glades Of- CO N TI N U E
fice 0 N
Space for rent, from $300 to
$500 monthly. 305-681-9600. PAGE 9 D


~n"i~f~


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 21-27, 2009


M









8D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY




MIAM IDADE



ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

PROJECT NAME: MIA BC Infill 3rd & 4th Level Tenant Improvements

PROJECT NO.: B7461 ("Project")

Sealed Bids for the Project designated above will be received for and in behalf of Miami-Dade County, by the Office of the Clerk, in the Stephen P. Clark Center, Suite 17-202, 111 N.W. Ist Street, Miami, Florida, 33128 until 2:00 P.M. Feb-
ruaI._. 2009, or as modified by addendum, at which time all Bids will be taken to a room to be designated by the Clerk of the Board in said Stephen P. Clark Center. Bids are to be submitted in two envelopes. Bids received after the
time and date specified will not be considered. Envelopes A of Bids, containing only the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) will be publicly opened and the names of the Bidders read aloud. Upon notification by the Department of Small Business
Development, bidders may correct defects on the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submission. Envelopes B of Bids, containing all of the remaining bidding documents, from Bidders that have not been
rejected as not responsive will be opened publicly and read aloud forty-eight (48) hours after the bid submission date and non-responsive bids will not be opened. Bidders are invited to be present at each opening. The County reserves the
right to postpone or cancel the bid opening at any time prior to the scheduled opening of bids.

IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES Construction, renovation and remodeling within the Miami International Airport Terminal Building Concourses B-C Infill. Scope of Work includes, but not entirely limited to, providing all Work as outlined
within the Contract Documents and Specifications, as follows:

1. The Project includes new finishes, flooring, lighting, walls and ceilings and all other required changes to comply with the design of the MIA/MDAD Terminal Program, in compliance with applicable and governing Codes and
Regulations, including ADA. Renovation Work includes major demolition such as moving walkways and elevators, and the infill work after demolition.
2. New Work includes stairwells, bathrooms and major office space build-out.
3. Life Safety systems includes both new'and renovated fire suppression systems, smoke evacuation control systems and all other fire-rated construction compliance and egress requirements.
4. The Project calls for Phasing requirements during construction and maintaining health, safety and welfare requirements of the occupant tenants while maintaining the office functions operational, along with main
training life safety systems and indoor environmental quality.
5. All-other MEP items including new, upgraded systems and its interface with existing systems.

BID DOCUMENTS: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will make the Bid Documents available, on January 9th, 2009, for inspection by individuals by'appointment only, on business days during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the
MDAD Bldg. 3030, Central Wing, Conference Room 4.) Interested parties are to schedule an appointment to review the Bid Documents through Barbara Soto, at 305-869-3482. The duration of each appointment will not exceed two (2)
hours. However, the Department may schedule additional time slots (not to run consecutively with the original appointment), if available. At the time of the appointment, and prior to any Bid Document review, interested parties will be required
to present current, government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License, United States Passport), documentation that they are licensed architect, engineer, or contractor who may perform work on, or related to, the Project, and sign
and notarize a Confidentiality Affidavit certifying that'the company and each authorized employee agrees, that in accordance with Florida Statutes 119.071(3)(b) and one or more of the following Florida Statutes, 281.301 and 331.22,
to maintain the information contained in the Bid Documents as being exempt from the provision of Florida Statute 11,9.07(1) and 24(a), Article I of the State Constitution. In addition, interested parties are advised that individuals will be
monitored while reviewing these documents. Interested parties may take notes, however, no photographs and/or copying of the documents will be allowed.

The Bid Documents can be purchased for $1,500. Payment shall consist of:
1. Non-refundable Payment of $500 for each set of Bid Documents
2. Refundable Deposit of $1,000 for each set of Bid Documents

The non-refundable payment shall be by any type of check, or money order, only, and made payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. The refundable deposit must be by Cashier's or' Certified check only, and made payable to the Mi-
ami Dade Aviation Department. Each interested Bidder shall furnish an address, telephone and fax numbers, and email address for the purpose of contact during the bidding process. A business card with all of this information will suffice.

Bid Documents may be purchased in person or by mail. To purchase a set of the Bid Documents in person, each purchaser must present a current

A. copy of government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License)
B. copy of the architect, engineer, or contractor qualifier's license issued by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation for the Bidder making the purchase
C. an original, notarized Confidentiality Affidavit signed by the licensed architect, engineer, or contractor.

Confidentiality Affidavits may be obtained in advance by downloading from www.miami-airport.com/html/bids.html or can be completed at the time the Bid Documents are purchased. Bid Documents may also be purchased by mail by sending
a copy of the requisite identification, license,-original notarized Confidentiality Affidavit, contact information, and checks along with a FedEx or UPS billing account number to the place of purchase indicated above.

The Confidentiality Affidavit, non-refundable payment and refundable deposit shall be delivered in person to Barbara Soto or designee, at Miami International Airport, Building 3030, Central Wing, 2nd Floor between the hours of 9:00AM -
4:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Upon payment and verification of the required identification documents, the verified individual will be authorized to pick up from the printer the number of sets of the Bid Documents for which payment has
been made. The address of the printer will be provided to the purchaser at that time. Only full sets of the Bid Documents will be authorized for pickup.
All Bid Documents, including any copies made, shall be returned to the same location where they were purchased. All Bidders that timely return the Bid Document will have their deposit returned. Those Bidders that purchase Bid Docu-
ments, but elect not to participate in the bidding process are also required to return all copies of the Bid Documents to the location of purchase. Failure to return the Bid Documents and copies made to the location of purchase within five (5)
working days after the Bid Due Date may be reported to a Law Enforcement Investigating Authority and will forfeit the deposit. Furthermore, Bidders that fail to return Bid Documnents shall not be allowed to participate in future Confidential
solicitations until such time that the firm has taken corrective actions that are satisfactory to Miami Dade County. The. purchaser of the Bid Documents shall be required to certify that they have returned all original Bid Documents plus any
copies and they have not retained any copies.

All bids must be submitted as set forth in the Bid Documents. The County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, or to re-advertise the Project. The County,.by choosing to exercise its right of
rejection, does so without the imposition of any liability against the County by any and all bidders.

PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will hold a Pre-Bid Conference and Site Inspection on January 16th, 2009, at 9:00 A.M. in the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Building 5A, Fourth Floor,
Conference Room F, Miami, Florida, for all interested parties. To assist in our planning, Bidders are requested to inform the Contracting Officer of the.number of persons expected to attend the Site Inspection no later than 24 hours before the sched-
uled date. Attendance will be limited to two (2) representatives per firm. No other Site Inspections will be provided by the Miami-Dade Aviation Department. It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to comply with all the requirements of the Americans
'with Disabilities Act (ADA). For sign language, interpreter services, material in accessible format, other special accommodations, or airport-related ADA concerns, please contact the MDAD Office of ADA Coordination at (305) 876-7024.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM
Contract Measures for this Project is (are): 29%

COMMUNITY WORKFORCE PROGRAM
The Community Workforce Goal for this Project is: 10%

BID GUARANTY: Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty of not less than five percent (5%) of the Total Bid in a manner required by the Instructions to Bidders. No Bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for the
receipt of Bids for a period of one-hundred and eighty (180) days. The County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, to reject all bids, or to re-advertise for Bids.

BID IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS AMONG OTHERS:
1) The Miami-Dade County Responsible Wages Ordinance.
2) The Provisions in reference to the timetables for minority and female employment participation, expressed as a percentage, for the Contractor's aggregate work force in each trade on all construction
work in the covered area, as follows:

Timetables Goal for minority Goals for female
Participation for each Particitpation for
From 4/01/81 trade in Miami-dade County each trade
Until further notice 39.5% 6.9%

As used in this Notice, and in the Contract resulting from this solicitation, the "covered area" is Miami-Dade County, Florida. These goals are applicable to all Contractor's construction work (whether or notit is Federal or Federally assisted)
per formed in the covered area.

3) The "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications" as set forth in the Contract Documents.

The Contractor's compliance with the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4 shall be based on its implementation of the Equal Opportunity Clause, specific affirmative action obligations required by the specifications set
forth in 41CFR 60-4.3(a), and its efforts to meet the goals established for the geographical area where the Contract resulting from this solicitation is to be performed. The hours of minority and female employ ment and training must be
substantially uniform throughout the length of the Contract, and in each trade, and the Contractor shall make a good faith effort to employ minorities and women evenly on each of its projects. The transfer of a minority or female employee
or trainee from Contractor to Contractor or from project to project for the sole purpose of meeting the Contractor's goals shall be a violation of the Contract, the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4. Compliance with the
goals will be measured against the total work hours performed.

The Contractor shall provide written notification to the Director of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs within ten (10) working days of award of any construction subcon tract in excess of $10,000 at any tier for construction
work under the Contract resulting from this solicitation. The notification shall list the name, address and telephone number of the Subcon tractor; employer identification number of the Subcontractor; estimated dollar amount of the subcon-
tract; estimated starting and completion dates of the subcontract; and the geographical area in which the Contract is to be performed.

4) Miami-Dade County has enacted an ordinance governing utilization of certified Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE) Subcontractors. Requirements for compliance with this ordinance are contained in the Contract Documents.

5) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t), a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs or bids after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the Board of
County Commissioners or a Notice of Contract Award Recommendation, whichever comes first. The Cone of Silence prohibits communications regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists,
or consultants and the County's professional staff, including but not limited to the County Manager and the County Manager's staff. A Cone of Silence is also imposed between the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and
any member of the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff.


The provisions of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) do not apply to oral communications at pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before selection committees, oral communications with the Contracting Officer, as published by the
Department of Small Business Development in their weekly Cone of Silence Project Information Report, for administering the procurement process, provided the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedures, Contract
negotiations during any duly noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed public meeting or communications in writing at any time unless specifically prohibited by the
applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders or proposers must file a copy of any written communication with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County shall respond in writing and file
a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1 (t) by any bidder or proposer shall render any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of
a violation of this Ordinance shall report such violation to the State Attorney and/or may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders or Proposers should reference the actual Ordinance for further clarification.

6) The County shall not be responsible for any modifications or alterations made to the Bid Documents or to the Contract Documents other than those made by Addendum, Change Order, or Work Order. Any purchase of partial sets of
documents shall be at the purchaser's risk.

7) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2.8-1 (d), a Bidder shall have on file, prior to contract award a duly executed Uniform County Affidavit with the Miami-Dade County Department of Procurement Management (DPM), to be
maintained with the bidders vendors registration file. The Bidder is responsible for obtaining the Vendor Registration Package, including all affidavits by downloading from the DPM website at www.miamidade.gov or from the Vendor Assis-
tance Unit at 111 N.W. 1stStreet, 13th Floor, Miami, Florida 33128, (305) 375-5773.









9D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27,2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


u t I' i. ube the L"i p ollNOIW !rumr1 r S3


-* m i cit e op






Avai abl fiom Commeia i News Providers"


- 4w -- *


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- -~ -


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Shelter your family from the recession


PLAN
continued from 6D

stretched to the limit
and beyond. List your
credit card debt: the.
name of the company,
credit limit, amount
owed, interest rate and
minimum payment. De-
velop a plan to reduce
your credit card debt
by 25 to 50 percent by
year-end. Your ultimate
goal is to have only two
credit cards and to pay
off the balances each
month.
Build an emergen-
cy fund: The purpose
of an emergency fund
is to carry the fam-
ily through short-term
emergencies such as
job loss,- physical dis-
ability and natural di-
saster. An emergency
fund will preclude the
use of high-interest
credit cards. Start with
$50-$100 per month in
a short-term savings
account with the objec-


tive of building the ac-
count to the equivalent
of three to six months
of your expenses.
Reduce energy use:
Because of the global
economic slowdown,
energy prices have
moderated, with the


Department has an
extensive list of energy
saving tips at www.en-
ergy.gov.
If you execute your
2009 financial survival
plan, it should help to
shelter you and your
family from the most


If you execute your 2009 financial
survival plan, it should help to shel-
ter you and your family from the most
severe ravages of the current reces-
sion.


price of gasoline below
$2 per gallon, down
from its summer high
of more than $4. How-
ever, don't be lulled to
sleep, because, over
the medium to long
term, energy prices
will again rise.
Save energy and
money by lowering
your thermostat by two
degrees and wearing a
sweater; weatherize
your home, carpool or
take public transporta-
tion. The U.S. Energy


severe ravages of the
current recession. Ad-
ditionally, if you con-
tinue the practice
you put in place, you
should have a stronger
financial base in the
future.
Finally, there is a
light at the end of the
economic tunnel. The
federal government,
under the leadership
of President Barack
Obama, is committed to
turning the U.S. econo-
my around and putting


* -


Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs

For computer access visit any Miami-Dade County Library or
South Florida Workforce Career Center.
For locations call 311.

EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE TRANSIT
ECONOMIC STIMULUS PLAN (ESP)
DESIGN SERVICES FOR THE PARK AND RIDE FACILITY
AT SW 344TH STREET AND BUSWAY
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-MDT-01 ESP

The County Mayor, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the County
Code Administrative Order 3-39 and Ordinance.08-92, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A/E) services will
be required for the design of the Park and Ride Facility at SW 344th Street and Busway.

This solicitation is one of the projects within the economic stimulus plan as approved by the Board of County Commissioners
,and an expedited solicitation process will be utilized.

The scope of services for this contract is to provide final design, public involvement activities, preparation of a complete set of
biddable construction documents, technical specifications, preparation of the engineer's estimate of probable construction cost,
process plans through the dry run permit process, and provide design services during construction for the Park and Ride Facility. The
scope of the work shall include all the necessary coordination with. all involved agencies and organizations, including but not limited
to, Miami-Dade Transit (MDT), Miami-Dade Public Works Department (MDPWD), Miami-, Dade Parks and Recreation (MDPR),
Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), The City of Florida City, and all appropriate permitting agencies. Elements of the work
include architecture, surveying, right of way needs identification, soils investigation, structures, civil, mechanical, electrical, plumbing,
utility conflict identification, lighting, landscaping, traffic studies, maintenance of traffic, environmental studies and environmental
mitigation plans, as required and any supportive tasks ancillary to the primary scope of services.

The final design shall be developed and implemented to meet the established MDT budget and schedule. The construction
documents shall be developed in conjunction with the MDT Design and Engineering Division.

This project is for one non-exclusive Professional Services Agreement. The term of the contract is for four (4) years. Maximum
compensation is $271,380.00, plus contingency in accordance with Ordinance 00-65.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

The prime must demonstrate experience in the below listed areass. Information regarding the experience-and qualifications
for the prime must be included in OCI Forms 6, as indicated in Section 2.1.


Design a minimum of one (1) completed Parking Lot Facility with at least 150 spaces within the last
five (5) years from the submittal date of this solicitation.


The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's firm. The experience must be demonstrated by
direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a supervisory capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects.
The determination of the individual's qualifications and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at the sole
discretion of the County.




TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

3.01 HIGHWAY SYSTEMS SITE DEVELOPMENT AND PARKING LOT DESIGN (PRIME)


Classified
CONTINUED FROM 7D


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street
Seeking Musician!
Minister of Music/Musiciart
seeking opportunity to grow
in the grace of our Lord
and Saviour, Jesus Christ
and to pioneer the music
department at the fledgling
Emanuel COGIC of Florida,
located at 2762 N.W.
45th Street, Miami, FL.
Contact Pastor Duckworth
at 786-299-7594 or email
emancogic@yahoo.com to
set-up interview.

STYLIST WANTED
Nice, friendly atmosphere.
Call Jolly Madam at
786-285-7185.


Cheap Office Equipment!
iMac's, Computer servers,
JOBS! JOBS! JOBS!
Immediate Positions
Available, Flexible Work
Hours, Part and Full Time
Work, Sales Reps. and
Licensed Mechanic
Needed! Miller's Workforce
LLC.'
99 NW 183rd Street
Suite 116, 305-974-5338
MAINTENANCE HANDY-
MAN/CARETAKER
WANTED
To live in, and take care of
apts. $200 /wk, incl. free
apt., utility. incl. Wynwood
Village Apts. 2158 N.W. 5th
Avenue. 305-790-5212.

modems, ethernet routers,
backup batteries, monitors,
and more. Email cheapcom-
puterequip@yahoo.com.
OBAMA T-SHIRTSI
Obama Inauguration, and
Obama Rhinestone.
www.shop.jamstshirts.com


I ASSEMBLE...
Toys, office equipment, and
more! Call 786-333-2084.

| Subscribe


OPEN CASTING CALL
For performers in Music or
Theater, for DVD series.
Email bemorris@aepan.org
or Call 305-460-2271 ext 1.
THE CHANGE HAS COME!
Twenty-six acres of land
in Sebring, FL. Four lots in
Liberty City. Equity properties
/ for sale. Call for list.
786-506-0155



Single, white male 43,
seeking single blk. male
between 35-50. Brown hair,
brown eyes, 5'11,160, in-
telligent, seeking employed
man that likes good times,
malls, and sports. Serious
calls only: Call Jeff 786-
389-9348.



Be a Security Guard Or
Renew License $601
40 hours $110, G $175 with
concealed $200. Or con-
cealed $150. 786-333-2084.

SECURITY OFFICERS
Two day training and place-
ment, 90 NE 54 Street 2nd
Floor, 305-756-7587.


3.04 Highway Systems Traffic Engineering Studies
3.09 Highway Systems Signing, Pavement Marking,
and Channelization
3.10 Highway Systems Lighting
3.11 Highway Systems Signalization
9.02 Solis, Foundations and Materials Testing Geotechnical
and Materials Engineering Services
10.05 Envirpnmental Engineering Contamination Assessment
and Monitoring
10.06 Environmental Engineering Remedial Action Plan Design


11.00 General Structural Engineering
12.00 General Mechanical Engineering
13.Q00 General Electrical Engineering
d14.00 Architecture
15.01 Surveying and Mapping Land
Surveying
16.00 General Civil Engineering
17.00 Engineering Construction
Management
20.00 Landscape Architecture


A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions (as applicable) may be
obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL
33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will
be forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail address
in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. The NTPC and accompanying
documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Mike Ramos who may be contacted via e-mail at ramosmi@miamidade.gov, fax: (305)
350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-5215.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

1 AGREEMENT 10% DBE MEASURES


A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on January 23, 2009, at 10:00 A.M. in the in the Citizen's Independent
Transportation Trust (CITT) Main Conference Room 10th floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami,
Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is February 18, 2009 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed envelopes and containers
must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite
202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS
RECEIVED AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code,
as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of
Silence.


III WW -


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10D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 21-27, 2009 DLALK MU1 vu l UNIKUT L 1 ,UWN ~w I~~~l


Financial hurdrn rofr home (Incrdhip spread unequall.


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Nearly 79,000 properties


FORECLOSURE
continued from 5D
least one foreclosure
notice, up more than
40 percent from a year
earlier and up 17 per-
cent from November,
according to Real-'
tyTrac.
'Nearly 79,000 prop-
erties were repos-
sessed by lenders in
December, a 61 per-
cent increase over a
year ago.
New state laws, par-
ticularly in Califor-
nia, Massachusetts
and Maryland, that
required giving home-
owners advance notice
of foreclosure proceed-
ings, reduced filings in
several states. But the
effect of those laws has
worn off, and lend-
ers appear to be going
ahead with foreclo-
sure, rather than try-
ing to modify loans.
"If all you're doing is
basically giving a stay
of execution, then the
inevitable will follow,"
said Rick Sharga, Re-
altyTrac's vice presi-
dent for marketing.
Foreclosures would
have been about 10
.percent higher in Cali-
fornia last year, Sharga
said, if it were not for
a law requiring lend-
ers to give borrowers a
30-day warning before
starting the foreclosure
process.
Meanwhile, the pres-
ident of the Federal Re-
serve Bank of Philadel-
phia said Wednesday
he expects the econo-
my to slowly start re-
covering in the second
half of 2009 and infla-
tion to remain below 2
percent over the next
year.
In a speech at the
University of Dela-
ware, Charles Plosser


also said that the un-
employment rate prob-
ably won't drop any-
time soon, but that
he doesn't expect it to
rise to double digits,
as it did during the
recession of the early
1980s.,
"I expect the housing


repossessed

sector will finally hit
bottom in 2009 and
the financial markets
will gradually return
to some semblance of
normalcy," said Ploss-
er, adding that the cur-
rent recession could
be one of the longest
in the post-World War


BUIES ERIE


weeks ,af/iwt
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
Included.
A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St HialJei. FL.
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p 'Pla_ at^"^han fd)

305-824-8816
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Who Cares




What Black People Think




Anyway?

If you think nobody
gives a damn what
Black people think,
think again. Some
people care a lot.
Especially when they
need something from
you..

Take corporations.They want
you to buy their products. And
banks care whether you're going
to give them your money.
Politiclans.They care what you
think when they're looking for
your vote.And TV and radio
stations hope you will pay
attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people
want something from you. And
when people want something
from you, you have got power
over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make
the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes
and your loyalty to people who
deserve it. People who are going
to give you something in return.
People who are doing the most
for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people


think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the
business of communication.
Communicating to you the
power you have and letting you
know how you can use it. For
instance, right now there' are 32
million Black people in this
country and last year we earned
more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


Think about it


Youe Co amu i Nimnce
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923


Phone: 305-694-6210 or see us online at www. Miami Times Online. com


I


I TA V A T- rTr ry Ir o C)YN -P 'TT




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