Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00734
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: January 7 , 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00734
Source Institution: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text




The Miami Times



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Entertainment
FASHION HI HHoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


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Teenager with a mission hopes to make


a positive impact on other girls


Pageant winner sets program for

business and community service


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Miami Times Staff Report


Jasmine Johnson is a young
woman with a promise of much
to offer the world.
At just 17 years of age, Jas-
mine has already accomplished
so much. Very soon after win-
ning the Junior Miss Black
South Florida 2008 title on
June 28, she competed in the
national championships in ba-
ton twirling, in which she and
her team, the South Florida Su-
per Stars, won the grand prize
and will be traveling to Belgium
for the world championships
this spring.
And, despite a hectic extra-
curricular schedule, Jasmine
ranks in the top 10 percent of
her class, with a 5.0 GPA.
The Everglades High School
student was chosen Best Mar-
keting Student for the 2007-
2008 school year. Jasmine and
her best friend, Jessica, created
their own company called Live.
Breathe. Fashion, specializing
in personal shopping, and im-
age consulting.
Together, the duo has styled
photo shoots and fashion shows
for designers.
Jasmine also finds time to vol-
unteer in her community. As the
junior director of the Glitz and
Glam Foundation, she strives to


help make a difference.
"I only-wish that I could do
more," she said. "My friends,
family, even strangers are so
blessed; even the most minute
effort can make a difference. If
everyone gave a little, the world
would be different," she said.
Jasmine is eldest of seven
children and she says her sib-
lings are her biggest inspira-
tion.
After graduation in June, Jas-
mine hopes to attend the Uni-
versity of South Florida or Flor-
ida State University to double
major in Advertising and Public
Relations, with a minor in Me-
dia Production. She hopes to
become advertising director for
a fashion magazine or a public
relations specialist for a cloth-
ing line.
Jasmine is also planning to
create a non-profit organization,
to be named after her pageant
platform: SOS, which stands for
Saving Our Selves.
Johnson believes that in life
you have to be your own hero,
you have to want to change and
you have to want to make a dif-
ference for yourself. The only
way to do so, she believes, is
through education. And so Jas-
mine plans to educate teens on
sexually transmitted diseases
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Stakes high in Burris battle


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DISTR I B UTED IN MIAMI- D A D E AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 20 MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


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Attention is finally focused on


homeless veteran beaten to death

Downtown rally protests -----------------
killings of 2 men, calls L E V1THLOR V,
for more resources ,
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.comn


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Artist Rodney Royal prepares to teach his new group of stu-
dents at the Overtown Youth Center. He is standing next to his
drawing entitled "L.E.T.S. Draw." -MiamiTimes photo/Sandra J. Charite

Carol City native shares

his talent with youths


Students at Overtown
Center get chance to
improve their skills
- By Sandra J. Charity s ....*
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Carol City native 'Rodney
Royal remembers constantly
getting into trouble in school
for spending more time drawing
rather than paying attention to
his books.
He had developed a passion
for art at a young age and
everywhere he went he was
drawing, sketching or spray-
painting.
Royal was so into art that he
began making designs on his


shirts and he spray painted his
shoes to add a little color.
His artistic abilities began to
pay off when one of the shirts
that he spray-painted with
an image of President-elect
Batack b1am wag 'Ws' pur6haed'-
by an Italian man for $150. The
sale motivated him to design
more shirts.
Royal, 28, now- a resident
of Coconut Grove, is the art
teacher at the Overtown Youth
Center. He has committed
himself to something else:
sharing his talent with youth.
He handpicked 21 students
who attend the after-school art
class at the OYC, 450 NW 14th
St., to help them fulfill their
dream to become artists.
Please turn to CENTER 6A


They will bury Ernest Holman
later this month.
His family members are
unlikely to be present because
nobody seems to know who they
are so they can be notified.
But Holman will not make
his final journey alone.
. Fellow military veterans and
caring community leaders and
others will be on hand for the
last goodbye to the former
soldier who fell on hard times,
sought shelter in a bus stop
and was beaten to death while
he slept on Nov. 17.
If those who admired Holman
for his service to his country
have their way, he will be given
a "state funeral" in Miami on
Jan. 24.
"This man was a hero. We
Please turn to VETERAN 4A


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


Dr. Margaret Pericak-Vance, director of
the University of Miami Institute for Hu-
man Genomics, has faced a rather vexing
problem since January 2007, when her
organization was recruited by the Uni-
versity of Miami from Duke University in
North Carolina.
The problem: Too little research data on
non-Whites, hence not enough informa-
tion to determine treatment and preven-
tion of ailments passed on genetically.


David Chiverton, president/CEO of Miami-Dade Weed and Seed speaks at a protest rally
outside the Stephen P. Clark Government Center in downtown Miami on Dec. 31 against the
killings of homeless veterans. -Miami Times photo/Sandra J. Charite


"Our research focuses on re-
search and genetics. It is on com-
mon disorders; someone in ev-
eryone's family has one of these.
What we try to do is unravel the
-mystery behind these diseases so
we can design better drugs, better
treatment, better methods of pre-
vention," Periack-Vance said in an
interview. ROY
"But most Of the studies done
to date have focused primarily on Cauca-
sian populations. What we've learned is
that there are some ethnic differences un-


derlying genetic predispositions,
etc. There can be differences that
can have an impact on treatment
and prevention" she said.
Then there is another problem:
How to disseminate information
to the Black community about Al-
zheimer's disease, which Periack-
Vance is currently researching,
fSTER and how to attract Blacks for her
study.
Her director of Human Resources would
provide the answer.
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Police seek missing NMB teenager
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@mianitiinesonline.conm Shaunyece

The authorities are seeking information that Darling
could lead to the whereabouts of Shaunyece
Darling.
The 15-year-old girl left her North Mi-
ami Beach home, wearing a black T-
shirt with gray writing and jeans
in the early morning on
Dec. 27 to walk the fam-
ily dog, a white Alaskan
Eskimo, and has not
been seen since.
Her mother, Don-
na Lewis, said she
dozed off when her
daughter went
to walk the dog.
She Please turn
to TEEN 4A


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Researchers launch plan to push awareness

in the community about Alzheimer's disease


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Central High has been hurting
As Miami Central High School gets ready to celebrate
its 50th anniversary, the school is facing a bleak future
as it looks back to a recent past that is scarred by low
achievement on the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test.
Since the state-mandated examination started in 1998,
Central High scored a D-grade in the first five years and then
an F-grade in the last five. So grim is the- school's academic
standing, as determined by the FCAT yardstick, that the
state has placed Central High on the "Intervene" status and
has warned of "serious sanctions" if its performance does not
improve by the end of the current school year.
Just what those sanctions would be is not clear but they could
range from converting Central High into a private institution or
to a charter school to simply shutting it down.
It has been obvious for some time now that the school
desperately needs help. It has been equally obvious that
whatever help Miami-Dade County Public Schools judged to be
needed has not been working. Five principals over the last five
years just did not produce the desired results. It is amazing
that the school district, which is charged with providing quality
education for our children, has been unable to get this school
out of its failing grade in five years.
The silver lining on this dark cloud appeared in December
when Mr. Douglas P. Rodriguez, who was selected the district's
Principal of the Year, among other important achievements,
volunteered to leave Ronald W. Reagan/Doral High in one of
the county's richest cities to take the helm of Central High,
located in one of the poorest neighborhoods, where he started
his career. If he had not asked to be reassigned and be allowed
to embrace this challenge, one must assume, the district would
have just allowed the situation to continue to slide until it
became irreversible.
Now, there is at least a chance that Central High's academic
fortunes could be turned around. Mr. Rodriguez, who started
his teaching career at the school, brings formidable credentials
as an educator. He will have to move swiftly and decisively to
turn the school around, especially given the deadline set by
the state. In that he will need the active support of parents and
teachers, alumni and district officials and all who want to see
the 1,800 students at Central High succeed.

Community lost more than a child
E very time one of our people.dies,.our community.0loses
a piece of itself. When it is a child who dies, the loss is
even greater because that child could have grown up
to become the president of the United States. And when the
child dies from a bullet the pain is even greater.
So it is, once again, with the fatal shooting of 10-month-old;
Derrick Days Jr., who died last month after a bullet allegedly
fired by a teenage gunman at a group of domino players struck
the child. It is a scenario that is becoming all too familiar:
children caught in the line of fire. And the community is left
to grieve over the senselessness of it all.
For a time, the community is outraged. Rallies are planned.
Speeches of indignation over the tragedy are made. Then it is
back to business as usual, until the next time. And the cycle
of violence remains unbroken.
Part of the problem no doubt is that it is inconceivable that
anyone, whatever his motivation, would be so unconscionable
as to deliberately target a child. But therein lies the difficulty
for those who live by the gun: There is no guarantee that the
"innocent" will not be harmed.
Nor is Miami alone in this regard. In Chicago, gunmen fired
at three young men and put an infant at risk. One of the
targets, who was returning from a basketball game, tried to
shield the baby and was struck in the head and body and
died on the street. "I don't know what's gotten into these kids
today," said Jacqueline Dukes as she mourned the death of
her son Sergio.
It is a lament for the times.

Senate must seat Roland Burris
P|hT e United States Senate's outrage and indignation over
Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich is understandable. The
.L governor is being accused of trying to sell to the highest
bidder his appointment of a successor to President-elect Barack
Obama as junior senator from his state. It is no wonder that
the Senate's Democratic leadership said it would not accept the
credentials of anyone named to the vacancy by Blagojevich.
But, in this game of political chess, the governor checkmated
the senators when he gave the job to Roland Burris, one of
Illinois' most distinguished politicians. This was no ordinary
appointment. Mr. Burris has been elected four times to.
statewide office, including attorney general. And there is not
even a hint that he is in any way tainted by the corruption
scandal surrounding the governor.
And he is Black.
Therein lies the problem for the senators, especially the
Democrats who now control both Houses of Congress and will
have to work with a Black president.
Over the past 140 years or so, there have been only five Black
U.S. senators, going back to Mississippi Republicans Hiram
Revels, who served from 1970 to 1971, and Blanche Bruce, who
served from 1875 to 1881. The third was Republican Ed Brooke
of Massachusetts, elected in 1966 and 1972, followed by Illinois
Democrat Carol Moseley Braun in 1992 and then Obama in
2004.
It is no wonder Illinois Congressman Bobby Rush, a former
Black Panther leader, in demanding that Mr. Burris be seated,
called the senate "the last bastion of plantation politics"
and demanded that senators do not "hang and lynch" the
appointee.
Gov. Blagojevich had the legal authority to name Mr. Burris
as part of the everyday duties that he is continuing to perform.
There is no scandal surrounding Mr. Burris. The Senate
desperately needs a Black member.
Whatever the senators' problems with the governor, it should


not be with his appointee. They must seat Mr. Burris.


Lbe iffliami Irimnt

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54tti Sireet,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best leac the world from racial and national antagonism when It accords to
every person, regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal rights. Hating no person., eanng no person, the
Black Press stnves to help every person in the firm belief that all persons are hun as long as anyone is held back.


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-15, 2009


Herald article on Transit distorted my record as the agency's d


This commentary is in re-
sponse to the countless un-
substantiated articles and
misrepresented facts present-
ed in The Miami Herald on dif-
ferent occasions. The most re-
cent article on Dec. 21, 2008,
titled "Gravy Train", by Larry
Lebowitz requires my imme-
diate response because of the
manipulation and twisted in-
formation.
Here are the facts.
The caption under my photo-
graph states, "Roosevelt Brad-
ley cut deal with mechanics,
and hired 1400 new workers".
Nowhere did it state that the re-
classification of the mechanics
started in 1999 as part of the
Transport Workers Union's Oct.
1, 1999 -Sept. 30, 2002, union
contract as detailed in Article
V.31, Bus Technician, page 41.
This was initiated three years
before the surtax -- and three
years before I became director
of Miami-Dade Transit.
As to the two labor agree-
ments, neither bears my signa-
ture.
The first involves the elimi-
nation of the old Paratran-
sit Driver Attendant position
which was restricted to operat-
ing mini-buses. The elimination
of this position and creation of


a single Bus Operator position
provided management maxi-
mum flexibility to assign any
driver, any size vehicle, on any
route, which previously had
been prohibited. This was a
prudent business decision, par-
ticularly given the trend of us-
ing the smaller vehicles on less
congested routes and through-
out local neighborhoods. There
was also a fuel cost savings in
having greater flexibility to uti-
lize smaller vehicles through-
out transit routes.
The second agreement was
actually the result of a compen-
sation review by the County's
Human Resources Department
wherein it was determined
that the former Bus Mechanic
position had evolved to a more
technically advanced position.
The results of which stopped
the migration from Bus to Rail
and the depletion of skilled,
experienced bus mechanics.
This resulted in an approxi-
mately $600,000 annual cost
saving.
All MDT employees were
hired consistent with ap-
plicable, county recruitment
policies and procedures. Ad-
ditionally, prior to employ-
ment, employees are screened
for verification of minimum


job requirements by the Hu-
man Resources Department.
Competitive county recruit-
ments are open to all county
employees and the community
at large. Regardless of an em-
ployee's origin into the county
personnel system, whether
through the pipeline as a re-
sult of a layoff action, or the


nation with the Office of Strate-
gic Budget Management.
It is also important to note
that all prospective employ-
ees are subject to background
screening prior to employment.
Initially the county's back-
ground screening was limited
only to Miami-Dade County.
However, after it was deter-


,All MDT employees were hired consistent with applicable county re-
cruitment policies and procedures. Additionally, prior to employment,
employees are screened for verification of minimum job requirements
by the Human Resources Department. Competitive county recruitments are
open to all county employees and the community at large.


standard recruitment process,
all employees must be vetted
by the Human Resources De-
partment.
The Human Resources De-
partment is also responsible
for administering the county's
compensation system which in-
cludes reclassification actions
and establishment of pay rang-
es. As the MDT director, com-
pensation issues were outside
my administrative purview. Ad-
ditionally, all union contract
negotiations which impact bar-
gaining unit employees must
be approved by the Human Re-
sources Department in coordi-


mined that the limited screen-
ing proved ineffective in re-
vealing employees' criminal
histories, as in the case of the
security supervisor, the county
-elevated 'its background checks
to a national screening level.
At the time of the security su-
pervisor's employment into the
county, background screenings
for temporary employees were
not required. That has since
been changed and all employ-
ees are now subject to the na-
tional screening. However, in
each of the cases identified in
the article, the employees were
given immunity in exchange


for helping authorities pursue
their criminal cases. Therefore,
criminal background screen-
ings would not have revealed.
any information surrounding
these criminal cases.
The article also suggests that
my four distant relatives by
marriage -- which the county
Attorney's Office ruled was not
a nepotism issue -- were hired
through a temporary employ-
ment contract. This is inaccu-
rate and a deliberate manipula-
tion of the facts. Delroy Jaghai
tested for the Bus Maintenance
position and ranked second on
the. list. Candace Jaghai, who
is not a relative but merely has
the same last name, passed a
civil service test for the Bus
Operator position. Bus Opera-
tors are hired in ranking order,
based on test scores.
Overtime and payroll records
are maintained by MDT's Hu-
man Resources Division which
is also charged with identifying
payroll irregularities. Moreover,
for the period of 2003-06, Hu-
man Resources had admin-
istrative oversight of training
and would have also been re-
sponsible for signing the Bus
Operator training instructors'
departmental payroll and atten-
dance records -authorizing their


director
overtime. Training Ws'"dbse-
quently removed from Human
Resources to allow better ad-
ministrative oversight; instruc-
tor work schedules were also
changed to eliminate overtime
abuse.
As to the Family and Friends
Plan, it's interesting to note
that that term was also used to
characterize the hiring practices
of the former police director and
incumbent county mayor. While
a few MDT employees may have
previous work experience with
county officials, it neither guar-
anteed nor disqualified them
from county jobs; each was
hired on his or her own merit
as confirmed by the Human Re-
sources Department through
their required vetting process.
It is important to note that
the written word has a signifi-
cant influence 'on what people
believe. When the information
being 'presented is false and
misleading, its negative impact
also serve to cast an undeserv-
ingly disparaging shadow on my
character and integrity. This is
unacceptable and, I hope, con-
trary to The Herald's standards
of fair and honest reporting.
Roosevelt Bradley is a for-
mer director of the Miami-Dade
Transit Agency.


What are your 2009 resolutions?


No easy solution to the

4,000-year-old Israeli-

Palestinian conflict


The Hamas or some other Palestinian group
has been launching rockets into Israel. Israel,
tiring of this game, bombed Gaza and now has
launched a ground offensive. As of this writing, --..
an estimated 507 Palestinians are dead and
2,600 wounded. Israel has sustained eight civilian and three mili-
tary casualties. The casualties are lopsided, although most of the
U.S. press ignores this issue.
This war is the latest episode in a conflict has been going on for
more than 4,000 years, literally since the days of Moses. Israel
has the right to exist in peace. The Palestinians have the right to
exist in peace. However, with the eye-for-an eye policy, it seems
that everyone will be blind a hundred times, over, and the wounds
continue to be inflicted.
I try to place myself in the heads of civilians of both sides. If I
were an Israeli and someone bombed my house, killing my chil-
dren, I would want their head. Likewise, if I were a Palestinian,
who was simply trying to eke out a living and Israel dropped a
bomb on my apartment complex, killing my family and neighbors,
then I guess that would lead me to want their head.
I asked an Israeli friend what was the long-term gain of this lat-

T his war is the latest episode in a conflict has been going on for

more than 4,000 years, literally since the days of Moses. Israel
has the right to exist in peace. The Palestinians have the right
to exist in peace. However, with the eye-for-an eye policy, it seems that
everyone will be blind a hundred times over, and the wounds continue to
be inflicted.

est attack by Israel. He looked at me and shrugged his'shoulders.
He admitted that it was not going to end terrorism; for that matter,
it was not even going to destroy Hamas. The Palestinians are not
going to blame Hamas for the attack; rather, they are just going to
more vehemently hate Israel.
During this crisis, President George W. Bush has remained
mostly silent. I guess his silence is tacit support for the Israelis.
Perhaps he is keeping quiet because he is a lame duck. Perhaps
he is quiet because he does not want to further enrage the Islamic
world. Perhaps he just doesn't give a damn.
The Islamic world is outraged at what they see as the "unpro-
voked attacks by Israel" and would like a cease-fire. Do they want
a cease-fire so Hamas can regroup? Do they want a cease-fire be-
cause they want to say something constructive and not seem weak
on Israel?
French Prime Minister Nicolas Sarkozy is flying to the area to try
to put a stop to the fighting. I am not sure if he is not just seeking
a spot in the limelight as his term as president of the European
Union comes to a close. Perhaps he is really concerned. To his
credit, at least he is trying to stop the insane violence. It brings to
mind a phrase from the Bible, "Blessed are the peacemakers."
Reginald J. Clyne is an attorney who writes this column for The
Miami Times.


".. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program. you get action . ."
Malcolm X


Here are responses from mem-
bers of the community.

JEROME BOYD, 59
Retired, Liberty City

To get rich and stop being
poor. The gov-
ernment has
to help me be-
cause I am a .. o
veteran. The '
government
has to give us a ~"
more money.

RICHARD BREA, 39
Security Guard, Liberty City

I expect the economy to get
better. It took
me a while to
get a Black
man as presi-
dent. I want
to grow spiri-
tually with my
wife and save
money.

ROBERT GRAHAM, 48
Self-employed, Liberty City

To try to get --- -.-
better in life ."
by finding a
job and saving "
more money in ..
hopes of start- _"
ing my own
business.


DONOVAN MORGAN, 21
Artist, Miami

To make
more money
and be suc-
cessful at
anything I do
through my
marketing g
company, Ur-
ban Relations,
and my hip-
hop group, "D League."

RAYMOND ROUNDTREE, 49
Manager, Liberty City

I got to do
better than the .
way I am doing

find another .
job and have& a. .-'
another place a
to stay. The
way the econo-


my is right now, it is bad.

JAMES DAVID SOLOMON, 61
Disabled, Miami .... ..

To look forward to the new
year with op-
timism and
make it pros-
perous -with
my thoughts,
words, and ac- '
tions. Better '
relationships
with my fami-( ',.
ly, friends and --
associates.
Hopefully, I will be able to give
more money.

JOYCE DAVIS, 65
Mayor, El Portal

I plan on
relaxing and
having a little
down time p
with my family.
Even though it
is the holiday '-
season, I am
preparing to
work on the Seawall project and
a foreclosure program in my
district.

YOLLY ROBERSON, 53
State Representative, District 104

I am hoping
for good health
and a sense of
comfort, with -a -
all the things
that are go-
ing on in this
country. I pray
that we con-
tinually be in good health.

TIMOTHY HOLMES, 65
City Commissioner, Opa-locka

I hope that
2009 will be ,'.
a better year a b
for all of us. I
want all these
kids that are
in the streets
to know that
they have a
new president
in the White House so walking
down with their pants hanging
low is unnecessary. Too many
of our young men are being
killed on the street; the violence
needs to stop.


Miamians mourn the death of Henry King Stanford,
the Georgia-born University of Miami president who did
more to shatter the evils of racial segregation in this city
than anyone else. In his 19 years as president of UM, he
brought about sweeping and meaningful changes that took
the institution from its designation as Suntan U to one of
the country's respected international learning centers.


The sentencing of two South Florida brothers for fraud
and tax evasion is sparking a fight between prosecution and
defense lawyers over how much weight the judge should
give their charitable and civic contributions in deciding
their fate. All we can say is a thief is a thief, is a thief, is a
thief no matter how many letters your friends write saying
otherwise. Let the punishment fit the crime.


Opa-locka City Commissioner Dottie Johnson has
gotten the final okay on her bid to rename a stretch. of
Pervis Avenue as Barack Obama Avenue. They plan to
make it official on President's Day in February. Obama's
representatives declined to comment on the renaming.


The Israeli-Gaza conflict has come to Miami as pro-
Palestinian and pro-Israeli sides hurl insults and vulgar
gestures Sunday afternoon outside the Israeli Consulate
with more than 1,000 people lining both sides of Biscayne
Boulevard.


Miami-Dade County Commissioners are hard pressed
to explain their about-face on the Port tunnel to Dodge
Island. Could it be true that heavyweights like Carnival
Corp.'s Mickey Arrison, Royal Caribbean's Richard Fain
and auto dealer Norman Braman torpedoed the deal with
help from lobbyist and lawmaker Sen. Rudy Garcia? Stay
tuned.


The Republican Party is catching flak about that compact
disc sent to committee members over the holidays. The
song, which first aired on Rush Limbaugh's radio show in
2007, is a parody of "Puff the Magic Dragon." The composer,
conservative satirist Paul Shanklin, performs the tune
with a raspy impersonation of the Rev. Al Sharpton that
sounds about as Black as the two White guys who used to
perform "Amos 'n' Andy" back in the golden age of radio
-and the bad old days of racial segregation.


Christine Beatty, former chief of staff to former
Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, is sentenced today
for obstruction of justice. Kilpatrick, a Democrat, began
serving his 120-day sentence on Oct. 28.


... I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program. and when the people


create a program, you get action ..


- Malcolm X


I









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


Opposition to Burris might blow up on Democrats


By DeWayne Wickham


You have to wonder whether
the Senate Democrats whom
Harry Reid herded to the edge
of. a political cliff will follow
him in leaping off that preci-
pice. Reid, the Senate major-
ity leader, is trying mightily to
keep Roland Burris from as-
suming the Senate seat he was
appointed to by embattled Illi-
nois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.
The selection of Burris, a for-
mer attorney general and the
first Black to win statewide
election in the Prairie State,
might be a cynical act. But it
baits a trap that Reid has fall-
en into.
"We say this without preju-
dice toward Roland Burris'


ability and we
respect his years
of public service.
But this is not
about Mr. Burris;
it is about the in-
tegrity of a gov-
ernor accused
of attempting to WICKHAM
sell this United
States Senate seat. Under
these circumstances, anyone
appointed by Gov. Blagojevich
cannot be an effective repre-
sentative of the people of Illi-
nois and, as we have said, will
not be seated by the Demo-
cratic Caucus," Reid said in a
statement.
Blagojevich, who has neither
been convicted of a crime nor
impeached, had the legal right


Commentary
to appoint Burris. The Sen-
ate's Democratic majority has
no constitutional authority to
reject Burris because of the
legal problems that now en-
gulf Blagojevich, whom federal
prosecutors accuse of political
corruption, including allegedly
scheming to personally benefit
from naming someone to re-
place President-elect Barack
Obama.
As far as we know, Burris
was not a party to the scandal-
ous talk which was reportedly
captured on wiretaps by federal
prosecutors. In fact, Reid said
Sunday on "Meet the Press": "I
don't know a thing wrong with
Mr. Burris." Later he added, "I


think that everyone I've talked
to said Burris is a good guy."
According to the Chica-
go Sun-Times, Reid called
Blagojevich shortly before his
arrest and 'urged the gover-
nor not to appoint Reps. Jesse
Jackson Jr. or Danny Davis
of Illinois, or Illinois Senate
President Emil Jones all of
whom are Black. Instead, he
wanted Illinois Attorney Gen-
eral Lisa Madigan or Tammy
Duckworth, the state's chief of
veterans affairs, named to the
post. Neither woman is Black.
Reid denies this account
of his conversation with
Blagojevich, which also might
have been recorded. Reid cited
his support of Nevada attorney
Johnnie Rawlinson to the fed-


eral bench as proof that he's
not a closet racist.
Ironically, President Bill Clin-
ton nominated Rawlinson to
the federal bench while Clinton
was the target of an investiga-
tion that resulted in the House
approving articles of impeach-
ment against him. Had Repub-
licans adopted Reid's argument
that the Senate can stop a duly
elected official from carrying
out his authorized duties, they
could have refused to approve
Rawlinson's nomination.
As it stands, Reid has got-
ten Senate Democrats to band
together in opposing Burris.
Their sheep-like allegiance
to the Senate majority leader
could be a gift to Republicans,
hurting Democrats in the next


election cycle.
Reid and his followers are
wrong to believe that what they
are doing to Burris won't pro-
duce a Black backlash. It will.
They hope that Obama's sup-
port of their position will give
them cover. It won't.
Democrats can use the Sen-
ate's rules and legal proceed-
ings to bog down Burris' ap-
pointment and keep him from
assuming his rightful place
among them for a long time.
No matter their motivation,
such tactics will leave the Sen-
ate a lily-white body as this
nation enters the new era in
American politics that was
ushered' in'by Obama's elec-
tion,as this nation's first Black
president.


(ik)*emtru kglI pn4km% put Scnjte apj& nt nn In jeiiprd)


"Copyrighted Material



SynldicateadContent



Available from Commercial News Providers"


. w


Sa- -



Search goes on for relatives of man killed in bus shelter


VETERAN
continued from 1A

can't d6 just a military
al with honors. He dese
state funeral just like any
veteran who served this c
even if he was homeless
Charles Buford, preside
VetsUnited.org.
VetsUnited.org and M
Wish Veterans organized
on Dec. 31 outside the St
P.. Clark Government C
111, NW First St. in dow
Miami, to protest the kil
Holman and another ve
former Marine Todd Hil
was slain on Dec. 26 as h
on a bench near the Miar
erfront.
"It is sad that a homeless
would be sleeping on a
and somehow become a t
said Oliver Merritt, who
10 years in the Army Res
VetsUnited.org located
family in Salt Lake City,
where his body was sent
neral services.
Holman's body has rem
with the Miami-Dade C
Medical Examiner's office
NW 10th Ave.
Lonnie Leon Laster, a 3
veteran who served in the
with Holman, does not
about his family.
What Laster, 69, can re
ber of Holman is this: "He


really intelligent man who cared
about the people around him."
Laster also recalls that Hol-
funer- man served in the Army for 10
rves a to 15 years.
y other It is also known that he be-
ountry came an auto mechanic work-
," said ing on junk cars. He fell on hard
ent of
Sof HOW TO DONATE

lake a VetsUnited.org is accepting do-
a rally nations for Ernest Holman's fu-
Cent neral. Donations may be sent to:

town VetsUnited, American Legion Way,
ling of 6445 NE Seventh Ave., Miami, Fl.
veteran, 33138 or www.vetsunited.org. For
1, who
e slept more information call 786-472-

mi Riv- 1913.

ss man
bench times and found himself home-
arget," less on the streets of Miami.
served He was 67 when he was killed.
erve. The U. S. Department of Vet-
Hill's erans Affairs reports on its'web-
Utah, site that homeless veterans are
for fu- mostly men, with only four per-
cent being women. Some veter-
nained ans are single or poor and half
-ounty of them suffer from a mental ill-
1851 ness or have had problems with
substance abuse. Nationally,
2-year one-third of the adult homeless
Army on the streets are veterans.
know About 400 veterans live on the
streets of Miami, said Buford.
emem- Ron Book, chairman of the
was a Trust, told the Dec. 31 gather-


ing of about 60 that re-
sources were available
to homeless veterans. -
"I have available !
beds in my facilities,"
said Book, who added,
"There are other issues
here." ,
Fred Johnson, an Air
Force veteran, said in "
an interview after the


HOLMAN


rally that he was liv-
ing with his daughter. Born and
raised in Miami, he saw himself
as always financially stable until
he suffered a stroke. He could no
longer work since 2000 and had
not received any help from the
VA, he said.
"It is so much paperwork in
receiving your benefits and this
has been going on for years,"
Johnson said.
Johnson believes help is avail-
able for veterans but most of
them do not want a "handout"
because they are "too proud."
David Chiverton, ceo of Miami-
Dade Weed and Seed, a commu-
nity based organization, vowed
at the rally that he too would
become involved in the fight to
make sure that veterans were
treated fairly in Miami.
Merritt hopes, the government
will bring in experts to monitor
the killing of veterans.
Johnson, a member of Make
a Wish Veterans, 6445 NE Sev-
enth Ave., said his organiza-


Mother agonizes over daughter missing for second time


TEEN
continued from 1A
got up at 1 a.m. to see if her
children had washed the dishes
as she had asked to do but they
were still piled up the sink. She
woke up her 12-year-old daugh-
ter, I'yana, and told her to clean
up the kitchen. I'yana went to
wake up her big sister and dis-
covered her missing.
After a search around the
neighborhood, Lewis called the
police.
"I wouldn't know the first place
to look for her because I don't
know any of her friends," Lewis
said in a phone interview.
Lewis, a mother of three, moved
her family to Miami from Oklaho-
ma in June 2007 in search of a
better life for her children. She is
currently unemployed because of
surgery to her right knee. A stu-
dent at Everest University, she


tries to-balance motherhood and
studying.
This is not the first time that
Shaunyce, described as a quiet,
reserved teenager who enjoys
writing, has gone missing. Last
September, she ran away for a
few days after her mother scolded
her for failure to turn in school
assignments and bring home a
letter from school. During her
time away then, Shaunyece lived
with strangers.
Lewis said her daughter, a stu-
dent at John F. Kennedy Middle
School, is suffering from emo-
tional problems due to her fa-
ther's absence from her life but
she has sought counseling..
Lewis posted a message to her
daughter on her MySpace, said
North Miami Beach Police Detec-
tive Edward Hill, but she had not
replied.
"Last time, she took her purse
when she ran away. Nothing was


missing in her room," said Hill
who is assigned to the case.
Hill spent Monday morning at
JFK Middle talking to guidance
counselors and psychologists
who have worked closely with
Shaunyece.
Since her daughter's first dis-
appearance, Lewis said, she
tightened the rules in her house,
not allowing her daughter to go
out after dark unless she accom-
panies her.
Hill said the priority is to re-
unite the girl with her family.
"We want to make sure that we
get this young lady back to her
family and we won't stop search-
ing until we get her home," said
Hill.
If you have information on the
whereabouts of Shaunyece Dar-
ling, you are asked to call Hill
at the North Miami Beach Police
Department's Detective Bureau,
305-949-5500.


tion "adopted" Holman
since they were unable
to locate his relatives.
The group, whose work
includes helping veter-
ans, has been raising
funds to bury him.
VetsUnited.org be-
lieves that the cost "of
the funeral will be be-
tween $15,000-20,000.


Make a Wish Veter-
ans, along with VetsUnited.org,
will come together on Jan. 24 to
bury Holman.
State Rep. James Bush III,
who attended the Dec. 31 rally,
said he too was looking into ar-
ranging a funeral for Holman.
If Holman is buried on Jan. 24,
it will be more than two months
since he was killed.
Buford of VetsUnited.org said
the delay is due to efforts were
being made to give Holman a
state funeral, with the Legis-
lature in session and all eyes
turned to the inauguration of
President-elect Barack Obama.


PUBLIC
MIAMFDE

-I MEETING

As a part of Miami-Dade County's continuing commitment to public
participation in local government, the Park and Recreation Department
invites area residents to attend a public meeting for:

PALM GLADES PARK
22820 SW 112 Avenue
Miami, FL 33170
The meeting will serve as an open house to view and discuss the general
plan for Palm Glades Park As part of the meeting; County staff will answer
questions about planning, development and. operations. Residents are
encouraged to attend and view the plan. The meeting will take place at:

South Dade Government Center
10710 SW 211th Street, Room 203
Miami, Florida 33189
January 15, 2009
7:00PM 9:00PM

For further information, requests for foreign language interpreters, or
questions prior to the meeting please contact:
Alissa Turtletaub, Park Planner
Miami-Dade Park & Recreation Department
Planning & Research Division
305-755-7952

Call 305-755-7848 (V/TDD) for materials in accessible format, information
on access for Persons with Disabilities or sign language interpreters (five
days in advance).
Multiple members of individual community councils may attend.


Miami-Dade Solid Waste customers can give
a gift to the environment by recycling their
Christmas trees in these convenient ways.

Drop it off
Take undecorated trees to one of 14 drop-off
locations from Dec. 26 Jan. 18.

Place it curbside
From Jan. 7 14 only, undecorated trees
will be picked up from your curbside.

Trees collected during these dates will be
turned into mulch.

For more information on tree recycling, mulch
pickup locations or proper tree disposal, call
3-1-1 or click www.miamidade.gov



MIAMID
ISSRSQM


I


9


Il)~;-44







5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


U

In


* School Health Teams: 99,000 children
helped by nurses, social workers and health
aides.
* Health Insurance: 10,000 more children
and parents connected to low cost medical
coverage.
* Home Visiting: 97% of first-time mothers met
the full post-birth care schedule.
* Answering the Call: Nearly 52,000
people who called The Children's
Trust Helpline at 211 were referred
to services.
After-School and Summer
Programs: 45,000 children served.
91% in our after-school programs
improved reading skills. l
TIr


* Children With Special Needs: 91% of children
with disabilities in our after-school programs
improved or maintained appropriate social
skills.
* Teen Programs: 91% of youth improved their
grades or test scores, and learned how to
avoid risky behavior.


ie Children'sTr


* Arts Education: 200,000 children and
families enriched. 98% of children in summer
arts camps improved or maintained creative
thinking skills.
* Child Care Teachers: 2,000 child care staff
gained specialized early childhood training
with Trust scholarships.
* Higher-Quality Child Care: 165 child care
centers signed up to participate in the first
year of Quality Counts, our five-star rating
system. An additional 200 early learning
hIf programs will join us in 2009.
j * Better Management: 95% of small,
community-based organizations
we funded improved fiscal and
administrative management
Ist capabilities.


Because All Children Are Our Children

To read The Children's Trust's complete 2008 annual report go to:
www.thechildrenstrust.org


Created by the voters to improve the lives of

children andies. Reauthorized by 85% of

voters in 2008. Thanyou, Miai-Dad County.


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
David Lawrence Jr., chair
Dr.' Wil J. Blechman, vice chair
Josee Gregoire, secretary
Hon. Isaac Salver, treasurer
Isabel Afanador
Maria A. Alonso
Dr. Miguel Balsera
Hon. Norman S. Gerstein
Dr. Steven E. Marcus
Dr. Judy Schaechter


Board of Directors
BOARD MEMBERS Gina Cortes-Suarez
Alan Abramowitz Bill Diggs
Dr. Nelson Adams Luis Gazitua (for Hon. Carlos Alvarez)
Yvette Aleman Ben Gilbert Jr.
Imran Ali (for George Burgess) Mindy Gould
Karen Aronowitz Charisse Grant
Dr. Kingsley Banya Hon. Barbara Jordan
Hilarie Bass Hon. Dr. Martin Karp
Don Bierman Hon. Lester Langer
Dr. Helen Blanch (for Alberto M. Carvallio) Silvia LaVilla
Tanzania Burnett Pamela Lillard
Dr. Rosa Martin


Sandy Moise (for Dr. Rudy Crew)
Hon. Juan Carlos Planas
Hon. Yolly Roberson
Gerald Schwartz
Evelio Torres
Dr. Jose Vicente
David Williams Jr.
Chet Zerlin
(for Hon. Katherine Fernandez-Rundle)
Modesto E. Abety, president and CEO
County Attorney's Office
Legal Counsel


I


st


h









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


King Memorial dinner


gains big-time sponsors

Fundraiser sets $2.5 million
Target for D.C. tribute

By Tariq GtiOsborne`..I
tosborne@miamitimnesonline.com -


V dicae d oteno it





'Available from Commercial News Providers"














Individual, businesses to benefit from $1 trillion boost


RELIEF
continued from 1A
of this recession."
Obama, who. takes office in
two weeks, has said there can be
only one president at a time -
and he repeated that principle
Monday "when it comes to-for-
eign affairs." But when it comes
to the floundering economy, he
clearly feels he cannot sit by un-
til the swearing-in.
"The reason we are here today
is because the people's business
cannot wait," Obama said as he
arrived on Capitol Hill.
"I expect to be able to sign a
bill shortly after taking office,"
he said. Pressed on the timing,
he said, "By the end of January
or the first of February."
Obama's proposal to stimu-
late the economy includes tax
cuts of up to $300 billion in-
cluding $500 for most individu-
als and $1,000 for couples if one
spouse is employed as well as
more than $100 billion for busi-
nesses, an Obama transition of-
ficial said. The total value of the
tax cuts would be significantly
higher than had been signaled
earlier.


New federal spending, also
aimed at boosting the moribund
economy, could push the over-
all package to the range of $800
billion or so. Some $77 billion
would be used to extend unem-
ployment benefits and to subsi-
dize health care for people who
have lost their jobs.
The rest would go toward job-
creation projects such as roads
and bridges and toward long-
term goals such as alternative
energy programs.
Meeting with Democratic
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi,
Obama set a tone of urgency for
dealing with a financial situa-
tion that he described as "pre-
carious."
He said, "The speaker and her
staff have been extraordinari-
ly helpful in working with our
team so we can shape an eco-
nomic recovery plan and start
putting people back to work."
But he also met with Republi-
cans in an effort to build broad
support for quick action.
"This is not a Republican
problem or a Democratic prob-
lem at this stage," he said. "It is
an American problem and we're
going to all have to chip in and


do' what the American people
expect."
After meeting with Obama,"
House Minority Leader John
Boehner, R-Ohio, said he was
concerned about the plan's
cost.
"This is not a package that's
ever going to be paid for by the
current generation," Boehner
said. "It's being paid for by our
kids and grandkids."
Republican lawmakers want
more details, Boehner said, but
he replied "yes" when asked if
he expected a stimulus plan to
be enacted within six weeks.
Pelosi told Obama on Monday:
"It is a great honor and personal
privilege to welcome you to this
office. Tomorrow we will swear in
a new Congress and we will hit
the ground running on the ini-
tiatives ... to ease the pain being
felt by the American people."
The Obama plan's tax cuts for
individuals and couples would
be a bit different from the re-
bate checks sent out last year
by the bush administration and
Congress in a bid to boost the
slowing economy. The relief this
time around would be awarded
by withholding less from work-


Links program aims at artistically talented young artists


CENTER
continued from 1A

"The same passion that I had
I see it in these kids' faces," said
Royal.
The students were selected -to
participate in an 11-month pro--
gram, Links Educating Talented
Students (L.E.T.S) Draw Arts
Project.
The students range in age from
8 to 17 and attend schools such
as Dunbar Elementary, Frederick
R. Douglass Elementary, Booker
T. Washington High, Design and
Architecture High and Miami
Jackson High.
They got pencils and drawing
and sketching books the first
day, Dec. 13: the class meets ev-
ery Friday:.
Deborah Roberts said she real-
ized her son Justin, 9, had a love
for art but she did not know how
to help him develop his talent.
She was grateful that the OYC of-
fered the program.
DeBorah Breedlove, 15, a soph-
omore at Booker T. Washington
High, was excited to be selected
for the class.
"I like 'drawing shapes. This
class helps me to show my tal-
ent," Breedlove said. "Even
though I can't draw that good, it
shows that I can do something. I
believe that there is more for me
to learn."
Angela Robinson Bellamy,
president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of The Links, said the
L.E.T.S. Draw Arts Project aimed
to "identify artistically talented
youth in our community and ex-
pose them to the many possibili-
ties, both educational and profes-
sional, available to them."
Judy Carter, chairwoman of
The Links, said the program stu-
dents will introduce students to
experts and professionals in the
art field to help them improve
their skills.
"Through this program, we
hope to nurture the artistic abil-


ity that lies within each of the
outstanding students selected to
participate in this year's program
and inspire them to continue the
legacy of our nation's renowned
Black artists," Bellamy said.
The selected students are Regi-
nald Abel, 16, Miami Jackson
High; Aaron Ashe, 10, Paul Lau-
rence Dunbar Elementary; Dei-
trick Beckham, 16, DASH; DeBo-
rah Breedlove, 15, BTW; Domi-
nique Byrd, 12, Miami Springs
Middle; Aesha Coleman, 10,
Frederick R. Douglass Elemen-
tary; Chakeria Cooper, 8, Dun-
bar Elementary); Charles Hayles,
9, Douglass Elementary. Also,


Britney Jean, 14, Miami Springs
High; Keyana Joseph, 8, Doug-
lass Elementary; Khyree Joseph,
13, Jose Diego 'Middle; Tory Mc-
Neal, 10, Douglass Elementary;
Jemima Mejia, 12, Downtown
Miami Charter; Jacari Mullens;
7, Dunbar Elementary; Nathaniel
Pedernera, 10, Phillis Wheatley
Elementary.
Also, Andrew Penn, 17, DASH;
Champion Reese, 13, Diego
Middle; Justin Roberts, 9, Dun-
bar Elementary; Arnell Rodgers,
12, New Life Christian Academy;
Christian Sheperd, 10, Miami
Charter; and Tamia Walyn, 11,
Dunbar Elementary.


AM. MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMInaE NORTH CENTRAL COMMUNITY COUNCIL 8
mm REGULAR NON-ZONING MEETING


January 14, 2009
7:00 PM
Henry Reeves Elementary
2005 NW 111 Street, Miami, Florida

North Central Community Council (8) is holding a
non-zoning meeting on January 14, 2009. The
agenda will include, but is not limited to a discussion
regarding a resolution pertaining to the Liberty City
Chamber of Commerce. In addition, there will be an
election of officers for year 2009.

Multiple Members of individual community councils
may be present. These meetings are free and open
to the public. If you have any questions regarding
these matters or for a complete copy of the agendas,
please call (305) 375-2800. For sign language
interpreter service and materials for accessible
format, call (305) 375-1244 five days in advance. A
person who decides to appeal any decision made by
any board, agency or commission with respect to any
matter considered at this meeting or hearing, will
need a record of the proceedings. Such person may
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, including the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is based.
<-


er paychecks. That provision
would cost about $140 billion to
* $150 billion over two years.
For businesses, the plan
would allow firms incurring
losses last year to take a credit
against profits dating back five
years instead of the two years
currently allowed.
Another provision brought to
the negotiations by the Obama
team would award a one-year
tax credit costing $40 billion to
$50 billion to companies that
hire new workers, and would
provide other incentives for
business investment in new
equipment.
Aides have said the package
Obama has dubbed the Ameri-
can Recovery and Reinvestment
Plan could cost as much as
$775 billion. The president-elect
has refused to put a price tag on
the plan, and some members of
Congress expect it to go higher.


Organizers of a Miami din-
ner to raise funds for the
construction of a monument
to the late civil rights leader
Martin Luther

set a target of I
$2.5 million
for the night.
Similar
events have
taken place in JOHNSON
Atlanta, Phila-
delphia, Houston, and Los
Angeles.
"It was time for us to come
toward warmer weather,"
joked Harry E. Johnson Sr.,
president/CEO of the Memo-
rial Foundation.
Former President Bill Clin-
ton will headline the Miami
Dream Dinner slated for
the Fontainebleau in Miami
Beach this Thursday. Clin-
ton will also receive the Me-
morial Foundation's Human-
itarian Award.
The foundation has so
far raised $102 million for
the memorial which will be
erected on four acres at the
National Mall in Washington,
D.C.'
It hopes to reach its $120
million goal by the end of
2009.
The Miami Heat, Clear
Channel Outdoor, the Uni-
versity of Miami and the
Miami-Dade County School
Board have announced sup-
port for the dinner which is
being held in the Miami area
in honor of the Knight Foun-
dation's recent $20 million
donation to the project.
The John S. and-James L.
Knight Foundation will serve
as the lead dinner sponsor.


KING MEMORIAL DINNER
The Miami Dream Dinner will be
held on Jan. 8 at the Fontaineb-
leau Hotel, 4441 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach. Cocktails will begin at 6 p.m.
and dinner at 7 p.m. Tickets cost
$250 each, with VIP tickets costing
$500 each and corporate sponsor-
ships start at $10,000. Application
for tickets will be accepted until 1
p.m. this Wednesday. For tickets or
more information, call 305-777-1817
or log on to www.miamiforthedream.

org.

"I am excited that so
many institutions, founda-
tions and citizens through
the South Florida commu-
nity have joined together to
help build a lasting memori-
al to Dr. King and the ideals
of hope, democracy, justice
and love for which he stood,"
Johnson said. "He'll be the
first man of peace, the first
man of color in the Mall."


Wiflicirn H. 'Turner Technical1 Arts Adult a Community Educatuion Center

Mkiam, Ftoridt 33147

-Potsecondary Adult VOCvt~oiiai Prolgramns
2009 Z00 W~n rir Te~m.
January 5. 2009 Ap~riP23. Z009


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-15, 2009


BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Holmes distributes gift cards and bikes to Opa-locka's needy families


Miami Times Staff Report

Opa-locka City Commissioner
Timothy Holmes, along with
his helpers, Vice Mayor Myra
Taylor, local business owners
and staff, rode into the city
with cash cards and more than
70 bicycles and tricycles to
distribute to children during
his annual Toy Giveaway on
Dec. 23 at Sherbondy Park, 777
Sharazad Blvd.
Since he began serving on the
commission in 1994, Holmes
has been enlisting the aid of
area businesses for this annual
project. But, unlike previous
years, when two toys where
given to each child, regardless
of the number of children in
a home, this year, due to the
weakening economy, funds
allowed for only two gifts per
household, a statement said.
Holmes decided to use cash
donations for the purchase of
bicycles and $25 gift cards. He
then held a drawing so that
all attendees would have an
equal chance at obtaining the
presents.
"There are so many giving
hearts but not a lot of funds,
so I figured this was the fair
way to do it," Holmes said in


Opa-locka distributes gift cards as Vice Mayor Myra Taylor
pulls names for a bicycle drawing during Holmes' annual Toy
Giveaway on Dec. 23 at Sherbondy park, 777 Sharazad Blvd.


the statement. "Hopefully, the
spirit of giving will translates
into the spirit of sharing among
siblings:"
Explaining why he chose to
spend some of the money to
purchase bicycles, Holmes said,
"Bikes are sturdy and they last
a long time. You want to give a
child something they can enjoy
from one Christmas to the next,
and even pass on."
The gift cards, he said, "will


assist parents in purchasing
a specific item that their child
has requested."
To verify that each present
went directly to a child in Opa-
locka, Holmes asked parents to
bring a utility bill, a photo ID
and the child who would receive
the gift.
Holmes recruited Vice Mayor
Myra Taylor to pull the tickets
in a drawing as he watched
from the sidelines. He said he


A




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Commissioner Timothy Holmes plays Santa to,Opa-locka children by distributing gift cards
during his annual Toy Giveaway on Dec. 23 at Sherbondy Park, 777 Sharazad Blvd.


wanted the children to believe
that the gifts did come from
Santa or their parents "because
it is not about glorifying me, it's
about doing the best I can to
make sure as many of my kids
in Opa-locka wake-up happy on
Christmas morning."


Holmes thanked the donors,
who included Whole Sale Auto
Dealer, Limo King Auto Corp.,
Japanese Engineering Corps.,
UDG III, Dr. David Kramer, A
Bargain Used Auto Parts, Town
Center One, Carib Sales, Delta
Trucking and the city of Opa-


locka.
"Some contributors must
be acknowledged, because
an appreciation letter or an
accommodation just, doesn't
express enough gratitude for
the lives these donors have
touched," Holmes said.


County Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle, back row, with Santa
Claus, is seen with some of the recipients of toys during his
annual Christmas Toy Giveaway held Dec. 23 at Miami Dade
College's North Campus.

Kids get presents at Dorrin

Rolle's annual toy giveaway


Miami Times Staff Report

County Commissioner Dor-
rin D. Rolle, distributed almost
$30,000 worth of gifts to chil-
dren in his district at his annu-
al Christmas Toy Giveaway on
Dec. 23 at Miami-Dade College's
North Campus, Rolle's office re-
ported.
The children, from kindergar-
ten to middle school age, were
all pre-selected on a need-basis
from 23 elementary schools in
District 2 and organizations
that serve disadvantaged fami-
lies.
The commissioner, staff, and
volunteers spent the day in front
of the campus gym handing
out dolls, toy race cars, board
games and other presents.
Prior to the event,. Rolle


handed out toy vouchers to
1,150 children in his district. In
addition to these children, hun-
dreds more from around the
county attended the event and
received toys of their very own.
The children and their fami-
lies were transported to their
own Christmas Wonderland,
enjoying snow-cones, cotton
candy, popcorn, music, bounce
houses and train rides with
Santa Claus as the conductor.
"Not every family has the
means to afford gifts for their
children during the holidays,
especially during a time when
people are trying harder, than
ever to get by," Rolle said in a
statement. "I look forward to
this event every year to bring
miles of smiles to these chil-
dren's faces."


iU emMm~i Will Ii










"If the lions do not write
their own history, then
the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


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The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


Escaping temptation gives us a way to demonstrate our faith


Sometimes we choose to run from the temptation
and, in some cases, we do have to run.


By Sylvia Mitchell
Miami Times Writer

So, you're going through a
test? In the next few moments
we will all be able to see that be-
ing tempted is not an unusual
thing, it is nothing for Chris-
tians to be embarrassed about,
deliverance from temptation is
a simple thing and temptation
has its purpose and rewards.
God does not tempt man
(James 1:13); the tempter is
Satan (Matt.4:1). God does test
us by allowing certain circum-
stances in our lives. Even then,
Satan is restricted as to how
much he can do (Job 1:12). If
not a test, how would God know
if we fully trusted Him? How
would we know if we have truly
learned the lessons God has
been dealing with us about if
we were never faced with mak-
ing choices? Once we accept
Christ, we are automatically an
enemy of the devil and we are
immediately placed on his hit
list. So expect and be prepared
for temptation.
If we chose to look at temp-
tation as more of a stepping-
stone than a stumbling block,
we could better understand
the purpose temptation serves
in the life of a Christian. Each
victory strengthens us for the
next attack, helps to purify
us from a particular lust and


enables us to see the tempter
coming from afar off.
No one is so holy as to be ex-
empt from temptation. Never
think that you cannot fall (Jer-
emiah 17:9; Galatians 6:,1).
Remember, Jesus was tempt-
ed (Matt. 4:1-11) yet He never
yielded and He never sinned.
Jesus used the Word to resist
the tempter.
We overcome by the word of
our testimony; we need to be
filled with the Word because
that is our weapon. Sometimes
we choose to run from the
temptation and, in somecases,
we do have to run. However, if
we flee all the time and never
face the full attack, we never
get a chance to demonstrate
our faith and confidence in
God to bring us through.
We would not be the first to
be faced with temptation and
being tempted is not some-
thing that is uncommon. And,
guess what? Temptation never
ends; the enemy is relentless.
When one temptation is done,
another one comes. If we have
to go to God 100 times a day,
He invites us to do so (Psalm
50:15). He is a very present
help.
It is beneficial to know that
the enemy tempts us in the ar-
eas where we are weak, where
there is lust and desire (James
1:14). The temptation begins


with a little thought. Right
there is where we should re-
buke the thought and mortify
our flesh. For if we do not, the
thought grows into an imagi-
nation and then into satisfac-
tion of the desire. Guard your
eyegate and eargate (Ecclesi-
astes 1:8) and guard against a
wandering mind.
When we are tempted, God
has prepared an escape (ICor-
inthians 10:13). We have to
know that evil cannot stand
up to good. Know that what-
ever we are tempted with; God
has already prepared us to
overcome it because He knows
what we can bear. God's grace
is sufficient in all circumstanc-
es to help us to overcome the
tempter. Resist the devil, and
he will flee from you (James 4:
6-7).
So, you're going through a
test and now you know what
to expect, you know why
you're under attack and you
know how to handle it. All that
remains is what the rewards
of overcoming temptation are.
Through the process of temp-
tation, we are humbled and
purified. We are less likely to
be judgmental of others when
they fail an attack. We' grow
more in the image of Jesus. We
learn not to be ashamed but to
count it a joy when we fall into
divers temptations (James 1:2).
Spiritual maturity, self-control
and the opportunity to do good
are all rewards of overcoming
temptation.


KaeWen h r cuWu bddrra fm hrv .i O. wumma lmr m Tw hir s"dd


4b ft-


"CopyrightedlMateriail



Syndicated Content- -


* S *..


( hurAvailable from Commercial News'Providers'" Feo


0 .- % i 4 ...4w - ..-* ft .. ......


1__ I







BLACKS NMUST CO7N P'RO,-I. HIF1K(OWN 1) 'SI NYi


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


F Habitat for Humanity

i seeks volunteers to build

10 homes in two weeks


Ha I drmnm drwflaM a


"Copyrightid ir


I Syndicaed Coitent





Available from Commercial News


Habitat for Humanity of
Greater Miami announced it has
I stepped up plans and will build
10 new homes in two weeks.
The humanitarian home build-
er said in a statement its Blitz
Build 2009
Will take place Feb. 2-14 in
Homestead's Jordan Commons,
the second largest Habitat com-
munity in the United States.
With help from 200 volunteers
each day, along with sponsors
d and homeowners, the 10 homes
*. ^ are slated to be completed on
Valentine's Day.
The prospective homeowners
include Shuntae Parnell, who
lives in an apartment that has
been broken into several times.
"I want to give my kids a
% I l *sense of security in a stable
environment... a place to call
home," Parnell said in the Habi-
tat statement.
With help from the volun-
:eers, Parnell will build a mod-
st three-bedroom home with a
small yard for her two children
to play in.
"As a parent, I have hopes and
dreams for my kids. At times I
find myself making promises to


them. I hope I don't have to ever
break this one: a dream of hom-
eownership turned into reality."
Construction of the homes is
made possible through dona-
tions from individuals and or-
ganizations with a strong com-
mitment to building affordable
housing.
The 10 Blitz Build homes will
be sponsored by Assurant, Bap-
tist Health South Florida, Bovis
Lend Lease, the Estate of Nis-
han and Lucy Paul, Publix Su-
per Markets Charities, St. John
Neumann Catholic Church, Wal-
Mart, and WSVN.
One home will be co-spon-
sored by Ford Motor Company
Trust and Presbyterian Church
in America.
Another home, designated
Faith House, is being sponsored
by an ecumenical assembly of
several local churches.
Habitat for Humanity is look-
ing for volunteers for the building
blitz. Construction experience is
not needed. All volunteers will be
provided with breakfast, lunch
and a commemorative T-shirt.
To register, call Habitat for
Humanity, 305-634-3628 .or e-
mail carlos.beron@miamihabi-
tat.org.


Serving the Community since 1984


Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA
General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
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* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
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Seminary Degree studies opportunity
Jacksonville Theological Seminary is offering classes through
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Church, 4343 N.W. 17 Avenue, Miami. JTS is a fully accredited
seminary. Various degrees may be earned.
For additional information and registration contact Dr. Arnold
Kelly, 305-633-4369 or 305-638-1789.
Dr. Julius Ringling is, the facilitator.
Classes meet three times monthly and a new course is taught
each month.


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10B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


%Sh6 -keO to ed pI Ha16




"Copyrighted Material




SyndicatedContent,



Available from Commercial News Providers







City provides services for 700 homeless people


Miami Times Staff-Report


The city of Miami, with help
from the Homeless Assistance
Program, marked Miami Cares
Day recently by providing more
than 700 people with services
such as meals, showers, hair-
cuts, medical and legal care
and replacement identification
cards.
This was the fourth consecu-
tive year the city has observed
the occasion "in an effort to
provide services to hundreds of
homeless individuals with the
goal of engaging them in the
continuum of care in an effort to
end homelessness in the city of
Miami," a city release said.
More than 250 volunteers,
community sponsors and part-
ners 'joined in the Dec. 12
event.
"'Miami Cares' is a day we set
aside to show that the 6ity of Mi-
ami cares for the homeless pop-


ulation through catering to the
participants and providing the
tools to get them off the streets
all in one place," Sergio Tor-
res, administrator for the city's
Homeless Assistance Program,
said in the statement.
During thle day, services in-
cluded providing 92 people with
shelter placements, giving 47
haircuts, 136 had showers and
a change of clothes, 18 long dis-
tance phone calls were made
to families, 14 people were re-
united with family members, 12
got substance abuse treatment
placements and 59 got medical
services, 86 were tested for HIV/
hepatitis and 81 got eye care
services.
Also, 40 people received men-
tal health screenings, 15 got
Veterans Affairs counseling, 33
got legal service consultations,
38 were helped with permanent
housing applications, 49 with
food stamps applications.


The volunteers served 513
meals and gave out 396 gift hy-
giene bags and the 80 people
got state-issued identification
cards.
The city said during the event
118 homeless individuals were
taken off the streets and relo-
cated to shelters and residential
treatment centers.
The Miami Homeless Assis-
tance Program is part of Mayor
Manny Diaz 10-year initiative
aimed at breaking the cycle of
homelessness in the city.
Miami Cares is modeled af-
ter the San Francisco's Project
Homeless Connect that has re-
duced that city's street popula-
tion by 30 percent in one year.
Miami Cares Day is celebrated
around National Homeless Con-
nect Day, a project that seeks to
assist the homeless individuals
in a way that persuades them to
accept resources that will pre-
pare them to be self-sufficient.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


slDsCrIDe

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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


iCliwh i ec tor


Anttioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305.634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Church'Sunday School ..... 8:30 a.m.
J Sidiay Worship Service .... I 0a.ni
Mid-Week Service .... Wednesday's
Hour of Power-Ndon Day Prayer
12p.m.- p.m,
Evening Worship ... 7 pan



Friendship Missionary -
Baptist Church
wwm. fr;ed, kipbc m La.or i
frimadipptiayer ibtllsmuth.net
740 N.WM 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
^A Order tarMervk
SHour of Prayt......6:30 a.nm.
Early Morning Woshlip...7:30 an.m.
Sunday School .... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worhip ...1 am.
YouadMi msty Study..We....7 p.m





Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Church Ol ..i ......,30 a.m.
Wornhip Service i.............11 am.
Wednesday
,]ble Stludy/Prayer Night 7: p.m.
Thursday
Prayer Meeting "- p.m.
S "Tre is a place for you"


( Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Senvices
7:45 a.m. 11:15a.m.
'Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 am. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.



/" Cornerstone Bible >
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
Sunday School 930 a.m.
Sunday Moming PfiaserWorship I In a,
Firt Sunday Evening Worship 6 p.11.
Rible Study Monday .. 730 p.m.
SChoir Rehearsal Thumday.. 7:30 p in


Apostolic Revival Center)
6702 N.VW 15th Avenue
305-836-1224,
Order of Services
New time for TV. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
UimetIFIM.ui37l I co CATCLr 2ia
S a9n Am.p.m. : S.nday Sp.m.
Wed ITtercesory Iayer9nt.m.. 12pt.
Morning Service.................I I a.m.
Tuss Pstr Mee ..li.730s p.
Ffi, Bible Study.... 730 p m.



( First Baptist Missionary>
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:


I ~r72,


Sunday...............7:30 & I1 a.m.
Sunday School..............10 am.
Thursday..........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
Baptism Thurs, before
Pirest Sun,.7 p.nL
Coiamanilo Pirt Stim........


SNew Harvest Missionary>
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500


Oiuuer of Ser ices:
N. Ai iie i. 't
".4, su- .Ift.5


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383


Order of Services
Sunday
:. "'dr a Wohial at 8 & 11 a.m
.. 1y School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Hiible Study 7 p.m.


Saturday
No Service


('- Word of Faith >
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 871 Street
305-836-9081
Order of Sen icee:
ri *liy u'.., ., r I'

'U ll','\[I, ,~r d [ ~


( Mt. Calvary Missionary N
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study..Thurs.....7 p.m
Sunday Worship...7- I am,
Sunday School...... 9:30 a.mn



/ Brownsville ,
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services



ur.a a.intlu, i.n .ilh I I .I
05., 34h 4550 I J,05ln eai,.6955 n,


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (BIble Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


K Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954.962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday ,
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 em
Evening Worship ............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19, 21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.penibrokepnrkcluircliofchrist.coin -* Email: penibrokeparkcocsi'bellsouth.nliet


( Temple Missionary -
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 301 Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060OFax 305-255-8549
Order 9f Services:
Sunday School...........9:45 am.
Sun. Morning Serva......11 a.m.
41 Sun. ,.BTU... 1:30-2:30 p.m,
Tuesday......tBible Study
Feeding Miniatry. 10 a.
Wed. Bible Sludy/Prayer..6:30 p.m.
Thurs. Outreach Ministry...6:30 p.m
Na Jll] i n ,,IIlJUB /mI imin,,It;


( New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 761" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sunday.s Church School,...... .......10 a m.
Worship Servie .............. 11:15 a.m.
'Tiicsays Bible Claw....... 7 p.m.
4thi Sunday Evcning Worship .6 p 6 t
em w mu aa ^^^^^^ ^*i^ ^ y


r 93"- Street Community-
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30 a.m. Ealy Moming Wotlmip
11 a.m. ..Morning Worship
Evening Worship
lst & 3rdSunday ........6 pm
Tuesday Bible Stdy ...7 p.m
website: cmbe.org



iMt. Hermon A.ME. Churches
17800 NW 25th Ave.
305-6 w.mt t6eonworshi enter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


H


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services.
7 am. & 10 am.
Church School: 8 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 pimn,


KJordan Grove Missionary'\
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'hAve.
305-751-9323


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.niewbirthbaptlstmniami.oirg


(St. John Baptist Church "
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
--Early Sunday
,nan Woship....7:30 a.m.
m-dnJ School ......9:30 a.m.
"f .,unig Worship .II a.m.
Pi er and Bible Study
l Iccin L ........ (Tues.) 7 p.m.




( Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
SSuclay School .............9:30 a.m.
Moning PraiseVorslhip .. 11 a.m.
FirNs and Klli Sunxry
evening worship at 6pn..
I Prayer Mteeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.m.
Xportoan A 0labl Ifnr Sundan
i ,omi, p Call -5.836.y90.
\mBSa EESSSESSS^


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
W" shlip I........1 ..
Bible qtudy "Many ...7:30 pmn
Yowlh Misizy" Mom.-WNxt.





/St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

SOrder of Services:
Early Moming Woslhip.7:30a.m.
Sunday School ..........9:30a.m.
Morning Worship.....11 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
S Prayer Meeting ...........7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 pum.


/'New Shiloh M.B. Church>
1350 N.W.95t" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
..--.-. Ll M,.,un0iy Worship 7:30 a.m.
11 n. flitra h School 930 a.m.
,J 1I lornt m a ..,irship .....11 a.m.
Tt, .ad., Isible Class 7 p.m.
[it -LIrv'rhL e 1st Sun.....7 p.m.
li td a cek Worship



Liberty City Church -\
of Christ
1263 N.W 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
SS,.nl..n \L,. ing...........8 a.m.
S SunL ti ",.h 1, ............ 10a.m.
bund.i ) E'enim .............6 p.m.
S1 11 I 'xc I e .......7:30 p.m.
T r'le Fili >'.l...... 730 p.m.
1Thu. F 1' ilJShip...10 a.m.
I it *ii s.ng .I practice ..6 p.m.
^v mem^^^^^^B wm m ^^^^f^


St.
B

1470



I


[ark Missionary
iptist Church
N.W. 87th Street
05-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and 11 a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m......... Sunday School
Tuesday........ p.m. Bible Study
8 p. ........Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m.......Day Prayer


('New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10.' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Early Sunday Worship 7:30 a.m
Stuxlay School .......... 9:30 am.
suxd, Mining, lip .. 11am.
Surlay Eveting Servicc .. 6 pm
Tuesday Rlayer Meesng .730 pm
Wdenaoday Bile Siyv 7:?30 pi.
-u Not Jist a Church But a Moviemn"



-Bible Teaching Seminar>*
8620 N.W 17th Ave.
954-735-9393


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship........ 2:45 p.m.
Freive snacks after service
Relui transportation available


1%- -..


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The Miami Times





eat h


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


~air,
- 7-


Shamirka Jonassaint is flanked by Santa volunteers Lawrence Collier, left, and Alexis Evans
at the annual Breakfast with Santa hosted for children with sickle cell disease by the Miami-
Dade County Chapter of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America at the Church of the
Open Door. -James Forbes/Courtesy Of Scdaa


Lajoy Eiflaar, 9, spends time with Santa during the annual Breakfast with Santa hosted for
children with sickle cell disease by the Miami-Dade County Chapter of the Sickle Cell Disease
Association of America at the Church of the Open Door. -James Forbes/CourtesyOfScdaa


Kids get toys at Sickle Cell Association's annual breakfast


Miami Times Staff Report
More than 115 children
were treated to a sumptuous
breakfast, followed by a magic
show, face painting, singing of
Christmas carols -- and a visit
from Santa bringing gifts for
all during the Breakfast with
Santa hosted by the Miami-
Dade County Chapter of the
Sickle Cell Disease Association


of America.
The event, hosted for local
children with sickle cell dis-
ease and their similar-aged
siblings, took place Dec. 20 at
the Church of the Open Door,
6001 NW Eighth Ave. in Liberty
City.
The annual breakfast is one
of several services and events
provided for individuals and
families affected by the disease


by the local SCDAA chapter.
Juanita Kelly,. a longtime
board member of the chapter,
chaired this year's event. Mem-
bers of Top Teens of America, a
subsidiary of Top Ladies of Dis-
tinction, an organization that
has been one of SCDAA's major
partners, provided assistance.
The Top Teens served as
elves and Santa's helpers.
Most of the gifts provided


were donated and collected by
students, teachers, staff and
administration of Herbert Am-
mons Middle School in South
Dade.
It was about eight years ago
that then active chapter board
member Rhonda Carey, who
initiated the breakfast affair,
encouraged the school to col-
lect and donate age-appropri-
ate gifts. They have enthusias-


tically continued this process
through this year, the chapter
said in a statement.
, The SCDAA chapter, which
celebrated its 30th anniver-
sary this September, is an out-
growth of the University of Mi-
ami School of Medicine's Com-
prehensive Sickle Cell Center,
794 NW 18th St., first floor
The center encourages ed-
ucation, testing and genetic


counseling for the community
and at-risk individuals, re-
search for finding a cure and
services to individuals and
families affected by the ail-
ment.
Persons desirous of being
tested and groups wishing in-
formation and education about
sickle cell disease may contact
the chapter or'by calling 305-
324-6219.


Ikaud*i pak)ion%: % hal'sdoninith


dark ("'ld h1w: hd r% %w health


S"Copyrighted Material






Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"


-- -- -
01- 1 -. *

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am.an um n a mo 3- -


Bariatric surgery offers

hope to diabetes patients


By Sylvia Mitchell
Miami Times Writer


Bariatric or gastric bypass
surgery is radically enhancing
the quality of life for Americans.
The number of obese persons
opting for this procedure is
steadily increasing because of
the success, of the surgery and
the development of new tech-
niques that are less invasive.
Well-known celebrities are
having gastric bypasses and are
being open with the public about
this form of surgery which has
increased the acceptance of and
demand for the procedure. ~
The Agency of Healthcare Re-
search and Quality reported in
2007 the number of bariatric
surgeries swelled from 16,000
procedures performed in 1992
to 170,000 in 2005. For people
who have tried every diet or
weight-loss gimmick and still
not achieved any results, bar-
iatric surgery is their miracle-
in-a-bottle.
Within days of having bariat-
ric surgery, 80 percent of Type
2 diabetes patients no longer


have to take their medication
and 90 percent of patients no
longer need hypertension medi-
cation, according to a report in
the December issue of Advance
For Nurses.
The cost to manage the array
of conditions and consequences
that result from diabetes, such
as amputations, renal failure,
heart attack, stroke, blindness,
has the health care industry in
a furious and aggressive initia-
tive to provide preventive edu-
cation and treatment but their
efforts are missing the mark
to keep diabetes from becom-
ing an epidemic. This is where
bariatric surgery is a beacon of
hope and has the potential to
give countless individuals not
only their lives back but also a
good quality of life.
But even with the improved
quality, success and safety of
the procedure, it is not to be
taken lightly. In fact, the Na-
tional Institutes of Health has
three criteria to help evaluate
who is a good candidate for
bariatric surgery. The criteria
Please turn to OBESE 12B


W.


L









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


N ARY 715 2009


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES, JA U I


We are called to accept God's

wishes without question


I know that the Christmas
season is over and most of us are
no longer thinking of those vers-
es of scripture that relate to the
birth of Jesus but I would like to
share with you this week verses
from Luke 1:26-38. This is the
account of the announcement by
the angel Gabriel to an engaged
virgin by the name of Mary that
she was chosen to bear the Son
of God.
I am sure that it was no ordi-
nary custom to be going about


your business and having an an-
gel suddenly appear before you.
The Bible tells us that Mary was
surprised and a bit confused
when the angel told her that God
had chosen her to be the mother
of His .Child. Though I was not
present, I am pretty certain that
the sudden appearance of the
angel, as well as his announce-
ment, was responsible for this
confusion.
The first point that I would like
to share is that the angel told


Mary that she was favored of God
and -personally selected by Him
for this incredible blessing. Why
was Mary favored, of all people?
Yes, she was a virgin but surely
she was not the only virgin in her
town. During those days, it was
not hard pressed to find a virgin.
Most girls entered their marriag-
es as virgins. So, though her vir-
ginity was certainly important, it
could not be the only reason that
she was chosen of God. God saw
something beyond what was ob-
vious.
We know that this happened
many other times in scripture.
God chose men and women in
whom those selected as well as
others saw nothing special or
remarkable. Keep this in mind
when you have similar thoughts
or have listened to the devil or
others and allowed yourself to
believe that you have nothing


to contribute to God's Kingdom
work.
The second point I would like
to share is Mary did not immedi-
ately and completely accept what
the angel told her. She questioned
how this could be accomplished.
She knew that sexual intercourse
was necessary to conceive a child
and, as a virgin, this was impos-
sible. The angel answered that
this would be done by the Holy
Spirit. Now, let's think about this
for a moment. An impossible sit-
uation was presented and it was
acknowledged that God would
take care of it.
It's okay to see a situation
as impossible. There are many
situations that we face that are
impossible, in the natural, and
in our own strength, and using
our own methods. But once God
tells us that this is something He
wants and He will bring it about,


then our response needs to be
as Mary's: "Let it be according to
Your will, Lord."
When Jesus prayed in the
Garden of Gethsemane shortly
before His arrest, He expressed
His desire not to be crucified. He
told God that He preferred not to
go through with what He surely
knew was to come. But His re-
sponse was as Mary's: "Not my
will, Lord, but Yours."
It's really OK not to know and
understand every piece of the
puzzle. In fact, Paul said that
there are some things that we
will never understand until we
get to Heaven and are able to
ask God about them face to face.
Mary was confused and did not
understand fully what was about
to take place but, to paraphrase
her answer, "Hey, I don't quite get
this but if that's what You want,
Lord, I'm all for it!"


Is that your answer when God
gives you responsibilities that
you don't want? Is that your re-
sponse when circumstances that
God brings or allows to happen
are not pleasant? Is that your
answer, faithful saint, when you
know that you have done all that
you can to be the man or woman
that God would have you to be
and you seem to be hit from all
sides one crisis after the other?
This is a New Year. Let us pro-
claim our intentions and desires
to remember that the Bible de-
clares that the Name of Jesus is
above all names. That means the
Name of Jesus is above cancer,
foreclosure, poverty, joblessness,
depression and any and every-
thing else the enemy tries to beat
us down with.
Let our response this year be:
"Let it be according to your will,
Lord."


Sweet Home gets ready to move into new home on Sunday


Miami Times Staff Report

Sweet Home Missionary Bap-
tist Church will open the doors
to its new sanctuary on Sunday
afternoon.
The church, located at 10701
SW 184th St. in Perrine, will
welcome members, visitors and
friends to a ribbon-cutting cer-
emony at the new location at 3
p.m.
"We are blessed to begin.2009
in a new home." said Dr. Walter


Thomas Richardson, the senior
pastor. "This is the culmination
of years of planning to build a
facility that will accommodate
our growing ministry.
"Sweet Home is the church
that is moving up and reaching
out and we look forward to con-
tinuing our mission at the new
church site."
- The final service at the current
site, 17201 SW 103rd Ave., will
be held at 7:30 a.m., followed by
the final Sunday school class at


9:30 a.m.
Sweet Home begari in
February 1952 when
seven deacons and
several area ministers
organized the church.
The founders included
the Revs. Grant, Curry,
and L. R. Ross. Servic-
es were held initially in
"Doc Coleman's" church RICHA
and at R.R. Morton El-
ementary School.
The first church building was


kRDSON


constructed in the latter
part of 1952 at 17201
SW 103rd Ave. with a
capacity for 125 wor-
shipers. Deacon Carey
Russell suggested the
name "Sweet Home"
which was quickly ad-
opted. The Rev. Elzie
King became the first
pastor and served in
that capacity for 22


years.
In fall 1975, the Rev. James


SBrMLh mlwxd ru r iph he cSbms Ias.





Copyrighted Material


Allen was called to be pastor.
Membership increased to the
point where the building had to
be expanded. A dining room, a
kitchen and a large multi-pur-
pose room were added.
In October 1983, the church
-called its third and current pas-
tor, Dr. Walter T. Richardson.
Prior to accepting the appoint-
ment, he was minister of mu-
sic and education at Second
Baptist Church of Richmond


Heights.
The Sweet Home building was
torn down in 1990 to make way
for a new and larger structure
that was completed in' August
1991. But a year later Hurri-
cane Andrew destroyed the new
sanctuary.
Sweet Home became the first
church building to be rebuilt in
the Perrine area after the storm;
it was completed by December
1992.


4 TR


S ndicltid Contetl




Available from Commercial News Providel









Procedure can cost more than $20,000


Jesus Loves Me Ministries
will be host a six-week teaching
series called "Change, Yes You
Can" from 9 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Jan. 10. For more information,
call 305-757-1715.

Mt. Pleasant Missionary
Baptist Church will pay tribute
to selected individuals in the
community on at 4 p.m Sunday,
Jan. 11, at Signature Gardens.
For more information, call 305-
253-2905.

Faith Christian Center will


have a special conference at 7
p.m. Sunday, Jan. 11. For more
information, call 305-253-6814.

Sweet Home Missionary
Baptist Church will hold the
ribbon cutting ceremony of the
new sanctuary on Sunday, Jan.
11 at 3 p.m.

First Bethel Baptist Church
will present a conference on
"Convocation for Salvation,
Consecration and Dedication:
Becoming Christ Centered?' at 7
p.m. Jan. 12-16.


OBESE
continued from 11B

are: 100 pounds or more over
ideal body weight; Body Mass
Index (BMI) of 40 or greater; or
BMI of 35 or greater with two
or more obesity-related com-
plications and failed non-sur-
gical attempts at weight loss.
Potential candidates for this
surgery should seek out hospi-
tals, health centers or clinics
that have received an excellence
designation from the Surgical
Review Corporation and the
American Society for Metabolic
and Bariatric Surgery.


Young Men's Preparatory
Academy will host an open
house from 10 a.m. 1 p.m.
Jan. 10 Come meet the prin-
cipal and hear student testi-
monials in their first year in
an all-male school. For more
information on setting up an
appointment or a campus tour,
call 305-571-1111

Dynamic Women's Demo-
cratic Club of Miami-Dade
County will host a pre-inaugu-
ration forum from 9 a.m. Jan.
10 at the Florida Memorial Uni-
versity Conference Center.

The Miami-Dade County
Health Department Office of
Community Health and Plan-
ning will hold a Cardiovascu-
lar Health and Blood Pressure
Screening from 5 p.m. to 6:30
p.m. Jan. 14 and Cholesterol
Screening on Jan. 15 from 12
p.m. 2 p.m.

Florida International Uni-
versity will host its annual
Martin Luther King Breakfast
from 8 to 10:30 a.m. Jan. 16 at
the Graham University Center
Ballroom at University Park. For


The cost of bariatric surgery
averages between $20,000
and $25,000. Your health
insurance may or not pro-
vide coverage for this type of
surgery. Some plans exclude
weight-loss surgery and any
related care. If your plan
does cover this procedure,
there will be a pre-authori-
zation process which is more
complicated than for normal
medical procedures. If you
are on Medicare some of the
expense of the procedure
may be covered only if you
are obese and suffer from an
obesity-related disease such


more information, call FIU's Of-
fice of Multicultural Programs,
305-348-2436.
******* *
The National Coalition of
100 Black Women's Greater
Miami Chapter will be having
an orientation for its Just Us
Girls Mentoring Program at 11
a.m. Saturday, Jan. 24 at the
Youth Co-Op. For more infor-
mation, call 1-800-658-1292 or
e-mail info@ncbw100miami.
org. The group will host its Teen
Summit from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m..
Saturday, Feb. 7 at the South
Miami Community Center.

You are invited to the Con-
tinental Societies Greater Mi-


as coronary heart disease or
Type 2 diabetes and the sur-
gery has to be performed at a
Medicare-approved facility.
As in any surgery of this
magnitude, one has to weigh
the benefits of the surgery
against the risks involved.
The complications can range
from something as mild as
nausea and food intolerance
to major complications such
as infection and bowel ob-
struction.
Patients need to be knowl-
edgeable about what is going
to happen during and after the
surgery.

ami Chapter's annual Gospel
Brunch at Outback Steakhouse
from at 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 25. For more in-
formation, call 305-233-4594.

Healthy Start Coalition of
Miami-Dade invites parents to
a free infant massage instruc-
tion series from 11:45 a.m. to 1
p.m., Jan. 27-29 at its offices.
Space is limited and registra-
tion is required. For more in-.
formation, call Amy Olen, 305-
541-0210, or e-mail aolen@
hscmd.org.

Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's office will hold a Seal-
ing and Expungement Program
from 4 p.m. 8 p.m Wednesday,
Jan. 28. at the St. Michaels
Church. For more informa-
tion, call the State Attorney's
Community Outreach Division,
305-547-0724.


Cooper Temple 2009 new year revival


Cooper Temple COGIC Up-
per Room Ministries, Elder
Marc Cooper, Pastor, invites
you to a dynamic revival as
Pastor Gail Paterson min-
isters during our 2009 new
year's revival, Sunday,
January 11, 11 a.m. and
7:30 p.m., through Tuesday,


January 13, 7:30 p.m.,
nightly.
You don't want to miss
this, come and be blessed in
these anointed services. The
church is located at 3800
N.W. 199 Street, Miami,
Florida. For details call
305-620-1557


If you think you can can 'spot a

person with HIV, consider this:

Did you even spot the error in the

first six words of this headline?

ANYBODY CAN HAVE HIV. US E PROTECTION.



Right now, AIDS is th(:- leading cause of death

.,)rnong African-Arnericans aged 25 to 44. It

you're having unprotected sex, you7re at risk.

Be smart: Use protection, and c,.,11et tested. For a

testing site near, YOUtext YOUr zip code, to 4477493.






















FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
BUREAU OF HIVIAIDS

1.800.FLA.AIOS I WEMAKETHECHANGE.COM










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Poitier _
Davis & Brice CHARLIE HEATH, 79, construc-
BISMARK DIAZ, 56, retired, tion worker, died I
died December 21. Service was January 5 in
held Jackson North
medical Center.


VELIRA PIERCE, 89, home-
maker, died December 21. Service
was held.

KENNETH NELSON, 43, land-
scaper, died december 26. Ser-
vice was held.

JOHNNY EUBANKS, 76, con-
struction worker, died December
29 at home. Arrangements are in-
complete.

BABY MILES BROWN, new-
born, died December 26. Service
was held.

BENJAMIN PRYBYS, 87, engi-
neer, died December 30 Service
was held.

Hadley_
ISIAH GUICE, 82, loader for









HECTOR LOUIS SOTO, 62,
dispatcher, died December 30 in
Veteran Hospital. Final rites and
burial in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

JANICE MCINTOSH, 61, office
administrator, died December 23
in Jackson Hospital North. Service
was held.

LESTER W. LOUDER JR, 88,
died January 4 in Palmetto Gen-
eral Hospital. Service 11 a.m., Fri-
day, Our Lady of The Lake Catho-
lic Church.

Richardsonr /
KELVESE G. RAHMING, 85,
housekeeper,
died, December
31. Service 11
a.m., Wednes-
day, St. Ag-
nes' Episcopal
Church.


JOHN SMITH, 85, retired po-
lice officer, died
December 31.
Service 11 a.m.,
Thursday, St.
Mary Weslyn.
Mhertch o distt
Church.


Grace
HESSIE MAE MCCLEARY
CREWS, 75,
retired house-
keeper for the.
State of Florida
Hospital, died

31. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.

WALLACE BENNETT, 45, man-
ager, Edison Car
Care Center,
died January 3
in University of
Miami Hospital.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

MARION TIPPINS, 'LARRY
QUINN', 65,
shoemaker for
Green Dream
Shoe Repair
Shop, died Jan-
uary 1 in Bruns-
wick, Georgia.
Arrangements
are incomplete.

St. Fort
KENS NICOLAS, 33, selector,
died January 2 at home. Arrange-


JEAN LACOMBE, 69, importer/

Jackson North Medical Center. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

JACQUES PIERRE, 57, retired,


died January 1 in Florida Medical
Center. Arrangements are incom-
plete.


Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


CARLOS F. MAZZOTTI, 62,
electrical engineer, died January 2
in Memorial Regional Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Royal
ALFRED HILL JR, 62, behav-
ioral specialist,
died Decem-
ber 31. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to
9 p.m. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, First Bap-
tist Church of
Bunche Park.

ULYSSES SKEETERR' KNIGHT,
63, profes-
sional painter,
died December
31. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
New Hope Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

CLAUDIE BRINSON, 78, retired
employee for
City of North Mi-
ami Beach, died
December 24.
Visitation Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Hermon A.M.E.
Church.

MARY HILL, 72, foster grand-
parent, died January 2. Visitation
Thursday 4 to 9.m. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Friendship Baptist
Church.

MARLON BRANCH, 34, handy-
man, died December 31. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

KATHLEEN ADAMSON, 70,
private duty nurse, died January 4.
Visitation Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Sierra Nor-
wood Calvary Baptist Church.

ZION BERRY JR, 73, master
sergeant for US Army, died De-
cember 31. Arrangements are in-
complete.










^
AUDREY THOMPSON, 48,
housekeeper, died December 29.
Arrangements are incomplete.

MOLLY GAYNOR, 72, secre-
tary, died december 29. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Service 1 p.m.,
Holy Sacrament Catholic Church.

Manker
IZORA ROBERTS, 69, medi-
cal assistance,
died January 4
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday ,Fami-
ly Worship Cen-
ter, Miramar,
Florida.
Carey Royal Ram n
BASSIROU SOW, 32, street
peddler, died December 29 at
home. Final rites and burial in Da-
kar Senegal, Africa.

ZEBDE WATKINS, 79, land-
scaper, died January 1 in Hospice
By The Sea of Boca Raton. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday in the cha-
pel.

CYNTHIA BARNES, 43, home-
maker, died January 3 in Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Cremation was
held.

CONSTANCE JONES, 78, re-
tired military, died December 22.
Service was held.

SMITH NELSON, 45, chef, died
December 12 in Jackson North
Medical Center. Service was held.


died January 2 in Jackson North


Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Gregg L. Mason
THE REV. DR. IRVIN ELLIGAN,
JR., 93, minis-
ter, died Janu-
ary 1 in Univer-
sity of Miami
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Rachel
E Clark (Lu-
ther) of Bel Air,
MD, and Irvin Elligan, III of Miami;
brother, James Elligan, Sr. (John-
nie) of Chattanooga, TN; grand-
daughters, Karen and Sara Clark;
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Contributions may be made to Mi-
ami Shores Presbyterian Church.
Final rites and burial in Chattanoo-
ga, TN.

HELEN Y CRAIG-DONALD-
SON, 46, secre-
tary for Mt. Sinai
Medical Center,
died January
4 in Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
Visitation Mon-
day, January
12, 2-9 p.m.
Service 11 a.m., Tuesday, January
13, St. Mark MBC. Interment Dade
Memorial Park.

MARY BELL EADY, 96, house-
wife, died Janu-
ary 3 at home.
Survivors in-
,clude: children,
Dorothy Baker,
Nettle, Evelyn,
Etta Smith,
James, Mary
Bell Eady Mc-
Clain and Mercidien Pinckney;
and a host-of other relatives and
friends. Visitation Friday 2-9 p.m.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday in the
chapel. Interment Southern Me-
morial Park.

CATHERINE JOHNSON, 83,
domestic for
private homes.
died December
26 in Jackson
North Medical
Center. Surv,-
vdrO^" include
Norris. E iLu- .-
cinda) and Larry
E.; daughters, Mercedes Adams-
Charleston (Johnny); and a host of
other relatives and friends. Visita-
tion Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service Satur-
day, 10 a.m., in the chapel. Inter-
ment Dade Memorial Park.

ALLEAN BRADLEY AN-
DREWS, 74,
nurse aide, died
January 4 at
home. Survivors
include: Lorene
Porter, Virgie
Riley, Beverly
Andrews Ed-
wards and Er-
nette Rouse; son, James; brothers
and sisters; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation
Friday, 2-9 p.m. Arrangements are
incomplete.

BLOSSOM GRIFFIN THAWES,
67, certified nurse assistant, died
January 2 at home. Survivors in-
clude: daughters, Denise Fore-
man (Joseph) and Bridget Boothe;
sons, Peter and Paul Griffin; grand-
children, Merrick and Kimberly
Merrick and Joshua Foreman; four
brothers and three sisters, and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Service, 9 a.m., Saturday, Prayer
and Praise International, 6087 NW
17 Avenue.

WILTON JOHNSON, 53, lines-
man for The City of Miami, died
December 26 in Douglas, Georgia.
Memorial Service was held.



Eric S. Georg"-
DEACON JOHN C. HALLMAN,
93 of Laudderhill, retired employ-
ee for Gulfstream Race Track,
died December 31. Service 1 p.m.,
Friday, Greater Ebenezer Mission-
ary Baptist Church, Hallandale
Beach.


LESSIE MAE PETERMAN, 85
of Hollywood, homemaker, died
January 3 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

JAMES A. LIGHTBOURNE, 85,
of Hollywood, died January 3 in
Memorial Regional Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m., Saturday, Sure Foun-
dation Ministries, West Park.


Wright & Younqg
GUSSIE LUE HORNE 73, meat
cutter died De-
cember 30.
Survivors in-
clude: children
Vickie, Carloyn,
Salenna, Ear-
line, Elmer; sib-
lings Christine,
Diane, Gloria
Jean, Cleveland, John Henry,
Jermiah. Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
New Beginning Baptist Church.

DOMINIQUE PAYNE 21, man-
ager died De-
cember 28. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Isarel,
Keyonna; par-
ents, Terry,
Sharia Hilbert;
siblings Ricky,
Tyree, Sharicka
and Sarah Tarver; grandparents,
Sarah and Daniel Hilbert, Sr., Ale-
tha and Alfred Blount, Tony Bass.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday, New
Generation Church.

PHYLLIS D. SIMS 41, cook
died January 2
in North Shore
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Robin
Haymon and
Gerald; par-
ents, Robert
and Effie Lee;
siblings, Dollar Walls, Johnny Mae
Polite, Joann E. Anderson, Idella
F. Farmer, Angela Johnson, Italia
Sweeting, James, Roberts F, Jr
and Fredrick J. Service 2:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church

HERIZONE JACKIE JACK-
SON, 78, car
detailer, died
December 27
in North Shore
Medical Center.
Service was
held.


DOLLIE WILCOX-ADAMS 59,
supervisor died -.
December 28
in University of
Miami Hospital. .
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Antonio God-
frey, Kaytraiba
and Tawanda;
mother, Juanita Wilcox; siblings
Donnie, Udell, Elbert Wilcox and
Charles Cooper. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

CHERRY ANN HILL- MCNAIR
48, environ-
mental tech for
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital
died January 1
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Sandy; children Sandy Jr., La-
kichia Hill, Gabrile Gibson, Vickie
Hill and Tirnea; siblings, Shirley
Hill and Henry Patterson. Service
noon Saturday, 93rd Street Com-
munity Baptist Church.

NATHANIEL ROBERSON 61,
inspector, died
January 1, incd :
Veterans Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:i .
wife, Margaret;
children, Na-
thaniel Bernard,
Parnell, Kimber-
ly Simmons and Yolanda Weath-
erspoon; mother, Lucille; sisters,
Emma Dale Duncan and Juanita
James. Service noon Saturday,
Peace Missionary Baptist Church.

HENRY WALKER 73, ware-
house worker died January 4. Sur-
vivor include:
wife Mildred;

Riles, Sandra
Clinch, Gwen-
dolyn Irvin, Dar-
ris Crawford


and Clara Bell
Smith. Service
1 p.m., Saturday, Mt. Calvary M.B.
Church.
Paradise
MAXINE R. COLES, 82, retired,
died December 30 in Jackson
South Hospital. Service was held.


Hall Ferguson Hewit
RUBY LEE FRENCH ROB-
INSON MAR-
TIN, 90, retired
health care
worker, died
December 31
in North Shore
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Eddie
C., Johnny B Jr, Kelsey Hicks,
Georgia Woods, Alfreda and
Donna McCree; 24 grandchildren
and a host of great grandchildren,
nieces and nephews. Service was
held.

DANIEL ATCHISON, 83, crane
operator, died
January 3 at
home. Service
11 a.m., Fri-
day, Antioch of
Brownsville Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church, 2799
N.W. 46 Street.

ALVIN CONEY, 55, construction
laborer, died
December 29.
Viewing 4 p.m.
to 9 p.m., Friday
in the chapel.





MAZALINE 'BABY' DIXON, 92,
homemaker,
died January 5
at home. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Mis- -
sionary Baptist
Church, 1160
N.W. 62 Street.

LONNIE WRIGHT,, 82, laborer,
died January 4
in University of
Miami Hospital.
Service noon
Saturday, Mill
Rock Holy MBC,
2575 N.W. 65
Street.i1

JAMES BEST, 77, laborer, died
December 30 in Jackson Hospital.
Service was held .

JULIA PRICE, 80, agriculture
engineer, died December 27 in
Grenold N.H. Service was held.
Range
ROGER LEON FORBES, SR.,
58, accoun-
tant died Janu-
ary 2. Service
2 p.m., Friday,
St. Maximilian
Kolbe Catholic
Church, Pem-
broke Pines. E

WILLIS N. MURRAY, 85, re-
tired classroom
teacher for
Dade County
School died De-
cember31. Sur-
vivors include;
daughters Bar-
bara Walker
and Karlar Ar-
thur; Grandson, Terrence Walker;
granddaughter, Raquel Hawkins,
Keshia Arthur and Kara Arthur. Lit-
any service Friday, 6 p.m., Church
of the Incarnation. Funeral Service
11 a.m., Saturday at the church.

EVA LOU BARNUM ORANGE,
89, evangelist,
died December
29. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Gamble Memo-

God In Christ.

DIEGO VIDAL, arrangements
are incomplete.
AGNES E. BOWE, 71, died De-
cember 29. Arrangements are in-
complete.
Wright & Young
ZACHARY MITCHELL, JR. 15,


died December
27. Survivors -.. .
include: mother -
Tisa Bell (Dar -,' "
rell); father,
Zachary Sr (Ar- ';
rena); siblings, .
Antisha, So- '-
phia, Tenisha,
Arzhanae, De'Ondre, Darrell, Jr
and Darius. Service was held.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


SHIRLEY ANN
COCHRAN HARPP
01/09/48 11/11/07


Love always, Sherrianne,
Willie, Shirlenia, Willie, Jr.
and family.

Death Notice


MICHEAL STEINBURG 56,
cook/waiter for Amtrak for
35 years, died December 30,
2008 in Philadelphia.
His remains will be shipped
to Wilson County Mortuary
Funeral Home in Irwinton,
GA.
Arrangements are incom-
plete. For more information,
call 478-946-2231 or 305-
491-2291.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


PANDORA BAILEY
WILLIAMS 'PAN'
01/06/54 01/26/05

It has been almost four
years since you left us. We
want you to know that we will
always love you and cherish
all the memories.
Love, Angie, Larry, 'Pop',
grandchildren, family and
friends


Mitchell =
WILLIE E. BRUNSON, 'Amazing
D', 53, selector,
died January 3.
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


Honor Your



Loved One



With an



In Memoriam



In The



Miami Times


I 13B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009










14B THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


Irvin Elligan Jr. was noted church leader


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Miami Times Staff Report


Dr. Irvin Elligan Jr. blazed a trail in the
civil rights movement and in the Presbyte-
rian Church.
He marched with the late Dr. Martin Lu-
ther King Jr., helped integrate schools and
retail stores in Richmond and stood tall in
his church, becoming the first Black mod-
erator of the Presbytery of the James. Lat-
er, he. pastored a number of churches, in-
cluding New Covenant Presbytery Church
in Miami.


Dr.. Elligan died Jan. 1 after a brief ill-
ness. He was 93.
Born in Chattanooga, Tenn., Dr. Elligan
graduated from Knoxville College and Pitts-
burg Theological Seminary.
He led Presbyterian churches in several
cities besides Miami, including St. Peters-
burg; Norfolk and Richmond, Va. He also
served as moderator of the Presbytery of
the Everglades, representing that parish
and also the James during the reunion
of the Northern and Southern church in
1981.


After retiring, he became parish associ-
ate at Miami Shores Presbyterian Church.
Dr. Elligan was preceded in death by his
wife of 57 years, Florence; a brother and
two sisters. Surviving him are his children
Rachel E. Clark (Luther) of Bel Air, Md.;
and Irvin Elligan III of Miami; also, brother
James Elligan Sr. (Johnnie) of Chattanoo-
ga; granddaughters Karen and Sara Clark
Services were scheduled for this Tues-
day at Miami Shores Presbyterian Church,
with Gregg L. Mason Funeral Home han-
dling the arrangements.


Death Notice


Theodore Taylor was pioneer Broward educator


By Gregory Lewis

FORT LAUDERDALE Theo-
dore Douglas Taylor was a man
of many firsts, including the first
black administrator at Broward
Community College.
Dr. Taylor died Dec. 24 at home
in his sleep. He was 79.-
He grew up in segregated Oc-
ala, during which he helped to
break down racial barriers.
He was an advocate of educa-
tion. In fact, he earned a doctor-
ate in community college admin-
istration from Nova Southeast-
ern University.
His bachelor's degree in biol-
ogy and master's in administra-
tion and supervision came from
Florida A&M University. He also
received a master's from Atlanta


University in guidance counsel-
ing and psychology.
"My daddy was very humor-
ous," said daughter Patricia
Johnson. "He enjoyed life. But
he was no nonsense about each
of his children getting an educa-
tion."
He had six children.
Dr. Taylor was born in Ocala
on March 29, 1929, the seventh
of 11 children. He was class
valedictorian at Howard Acad-
emy and earned a scholarship
to Florida A&M in Tallahassee,
where he tutored football play-
ers, becoming as much a part
of the team as legendary head
coach "Jake Gaither's boys," his
daughter said.
He was honored last year for
his ongoing contribution to the


university's football program.
He was among the first blacks
to integrate the Marine Corps,
where he achieved the rank of
first lieutenant. He served dur-
ing the Korean War in the 2nd
Marine Division as a radar spe-
cialist.
As an employee of the Broward
County School Board, he became
the first black administrator as-
signed to a predominantly white
school, in Deerfield Beach.
In 1970, Dr. Taylor joined the
staff at Broward Community Col-
lege. He retired in 1996 as the
Institutional Test Administrator.
- Dr. Taylor was involved in a
number of civic and professional
organizations, and received nu-
merous honors. He was most
proud of being a member of


Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, which
he credited for much of his suc-
cess, Johnson said.
He is survived by his wife Bob-
bie Taylor; and in addition to Pa-
tricia, daughters Tamila Bynes,
Tonya Keyes and Tiffany Taylor;
sons Theodore N. Taylor and Ce-
dric Taylor. He also is survived
by two sisters and two broth-
ers; 10 grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren.
The funeral will be held at 11
a.m. today at New Mount Olive
Baptist Church, 400 NW Ninth
Ave., Fort Lauderdale.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests donations to the Florida
A&M University Athletic Depart-
ment in care of Attorney T.N.
Taylor, 202 South Collins St.,
Plant City, FL 33563.


Henry King Stanford's legacy includes integrating the University of Miami


Miami Times Staff Report

Dr. Henry King Stanford,
credited with promoting the
integration of the University of
Miami, where he served as the
third president, has died. He
was 92.
"Dr. Stanford was deeply be-
loved by the university com-
munity," Donna E. Shalala,
the current president, said in
a university statement.
"Many alumni and longtime
faculty and staff members told
me about how he would walk
around the campus and greet
everyone, even during times of
student unrest. His enthusi-
asm for the university was in-


fectious," Shalala said.
Stanford is credited with
implementing a wide range of
programs while he headed the
university between 1962 and
1981, including in the areas of
research, campus growth and
expansion and the creation of
a number of centers and insti-
tutes.
He especially made his mark
in the area of diversity on cam-
pus. In 1968, the university
hired its first Black admin-
istrator, Chester Byrd, and a
year later the first Black pro-
fessors were brought on board.
The Black Students organiza-
tion was started during his
tenure.


In athletics, particularly,
Stanford made a big impact,
insisting that a Black player
be recruited for the Hurricanes
football team in the 1960s.
Ray Bellamy, a Bradenton
native who became UM's first
Black student recruited on a
scholarship, played wide re-
ceiver for the Hurricanes from
1969 to 1969.
Bellamy later became a coach
. at Fort Valley, Ga., an hour's
distance from Stanford's home
in Americus, and, according
to a report in The Miami Her-
ald, the two men were in con-
tact almost daily and remained
close.
"I probably wouldn't be where


I am today had it not been for
him," Bellamy said. of Stanford
during a Hurricanes pre-game
celebration in 2007 to mark
the last football game at the
Orange Bowl.
Bill Butler, former vice presi-
dent for student affairs, de-
scribed the recruitment of
Black students under Stanford
as "impressive."
"We grew from just a handful
of Black students enrolled to
over 1,000 within a few short
years," Butler said.
Services will be held in
Americus on Jan. 24, with the
University of Miami scheduling
a memorial service for a date to
be announced.


There's a lot to know about Social Security


When it comes to learning about Social
Security, there is a lot to know so you
may find yourself full of questions.
If you have a question, visit the fre-
quently asked questions page at www.so-
ciaJsecurity.gov.
Just go to the section at the upper-right
portion of the page where it reads. "Ques-
tions?" and use the drop-down menu di-
rectly below it to select the most appro-
priate subject matter, such as "benefits,"
"earnings and employment." or "service to
the public."
Or, just leave the subject blank, select
go. and you'll be directed to the entire list
of frequently asked questions. There are
close to 600 of them. so one of them is


likely to answer any question you may
have.
What kinds of questions? Just about
any Social Security-related questions and
answers you can think of. How can I get
an estimate of my retirement benefits?
Can I apply for retirement benefits on the
Internet? How do I replace my lost Social
Security card? What are the tax, benefit
and earning amounts for 2009? How can I
locate Social Security's regulations?
Answers to these and hundreds ot other
questions await you at www.socialsecu-
rity.gov. The frequently asked questions
page is so popular more than 33 million
questions and answers were viewed over
the past year! While you're online, you may


EVA LOU BARNUM ORANGE

Evangelist Eva Lou Barnum
Orange was born on March 12,
1919, in the small county town
of Americus, Georgia. She was
the first-born and only daugh-
ter, of four children with whose
birth the late Mr. and Mrs. John
Henry and Lucille Barnum were
blessed.
At an early age, her family mi-
grated to Ware County, Georgia,
where she met and married Cleo-
phus Clifford Orange who, after
60 years of blissful marriage,
preceded her in death. To this
glorious union of holy matrimo-
ny, one daughter, Rutha Mae Or-
ange, and two sons, Edward and
Cleophus Orange, were born. All
but one son, Cleophus, preceded
her in death.
Even as a youth, Sister Or-
ange exhibited those manifested
qualities of family values and a
willingness to assist others that
were destined to later blossom
into what eventually became an
enduring commitment of life-"
long devotion of service to God.
Mother Orange, as she was so
affectionately hailed by all who
met and knew her, faithfully de-
voted her entire adult life to the
fulfillment of God's prophecy for
the salvation of man kind. In
the early 1940's, shortly after
having arrived in Miami, Florida,
Sister Orange, along with her
husband and young son, joined
the Fifth Avenue Gamble Memo-
rial Church of God In Christ, in
Overtown Miami, under the pas-
torship of Elder Willie W. Gam-
ble. There, Sister Orange served
diligently in various auxiliary ca-
pacities in her quest to serve the
Lord, assist 'others, and expand
the depths of her knowledge and
understanding of God's Will.
She subsequently followed the
opening and eventual transition
to the New Gamble Church of
God In Christ, pastured by Bish-
op Julian C. Jackson; she also


Happy Birthday


served at Emmanuel Church of
God In Christ, under the pastor-
ship of District Superintendent
Ivory Wilcox and Elder Willie
Duckworth, and at A.M. Cohen
Temple Church of God In Christ,
under the pastorship of Bishop
Jacob Cohen.
In carrying out her ordained
duties, Mother Orange, through
the Grace of God, was blessed to
have been able to achieve many
of her cherished Christian goals
and ideals: She was a certified
Evangelist, on both local and na-
tional levels, whose devout evan-
gelical ministry took her into the
jails and prisons, the highways
and byways, and the street cor-
ners and alleys to administer to
the downfallen. She conducted
a national and local Radio min-
istry whereby she was able to
further advance and broadcast
God's word and his salvation for
mankind. She was a spiritual
Counselor by which she pro-
vided encouraging reassurances
of fortitude and faith. She co-
ordinated a Food Program feed-
ing hundreds of the homeless,
the hungry, and the otherwise
needy and downtrodden. -And in
her early endeavors, not only did
she administer to the elderly, but
also conducted a Purity Class
promoting the virtues of spiritual
self-esteem among the youth.
However, On Monday morn-
ing, December, 29, 2008, Evan-
gelist Eva Lou Barnuin Orange
was called, by the Grace of Our
Lord, from the heavy labors of
her unending toil to the Glory of
almighty God. To Cherish her
precious memory, she leaves to
mourn a son, Cleophus Orange
Jr., and his wife, Sonia Orange;
two grand-daughters, Jacqueline
Barfield(Patrick) and Jeanette
Lee(Gary); four sisters-in-law,
Charlie Mae Orange Jackson,
Lillie Bell Barnum, Alice Orange,
and Maggie Orange; one broth-
er-in-law, Jacob Orange; and a
beloved host of devoted nieces,
nephews, and other relatives,
and friends. And like the en-
trance of an angel, the radiance
of her presence would often fill
the room with joy her departure
now leaves a void of darkness in
our hearts that could only be
filled by the light of our Faith in
God's merciful Promise of Resur-
rection. Surely, Mother Orange
was a virtuous woman of exalted
Christian values Indeed, she
was a loyal servant in whom god
was well pleased. Funeral servic-
es will be .held Saturday, 10:00
AM at Gamble Memorial Church
of God In Christ located at 1898
NW 43rd Street. Range Funeral
Home is conducting services.


Death Notice


Information about your
Social Security

want to check out some of the other popu-
lar features on the website, such as the
new online Retirement Estimator, benefits
planners, benefit eligibility screening tool,
news. publications and more. You can
even watch a brief video about the things
you can do on www.socialsecurity.gov.


r V iwa )cm%4% Sem. M tal Hr. Nb hinwMl

.





"Copyrige Material





.. .. .. .. ..

il-mci e om Death Notice
l ynicated content Parovide





Available from Commercial News Providers" .


D dedicated
A ffirming
D ependable

Thinking of you on your
special day. You're always in
our prayers.
Love Always!


JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our

CALL 305-694-6210


ANNA MCBRIDE GRANT,
60, telemarketer died January
5. Survivors include: daugh-
ter, Shondraya Grant-Leroy
(Prince); son, Terran Bethune;
mother, Emma McBride; sister,
Shirley Presley; brother, Mi-
chael McBride (Judi); aunt Al-
ice Marcelli Benton; uncle, E.J.
Thomas; three grandchildren; a
host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Memorial
wake Saturday 11a.m., to 1
p.m., Range Chapel. Reception
to follow Saturday at Antioch
M. B. Church of Carol City 2 to
4 p.m.,. Memorial service 11
a.m., Monday, New Birth Cathe-
dral of Faith International.
Services entrusted to Range
Funeral Home.


DARRLY ELLIS, 'RED' 45,
entrepreneur, died January 4.
Service hoon Saturday, Mitch-
ell Funeral Home Chapel.


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
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The Miami Times




i festyles


Entertainment
FASHION HI HHoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


DMX
Rapper


-
OPRAH WINFREY
Talk Show Host

Atlanta inner-city

school gets $365K

froim Oprah
By Dorie Turner
Associated Press

ATLANTA A letter from
Oprah Winfrey last week seemed
like the world's best Christmas
present until teacher Ron
Clark noticed an extra piece of
paper flutter out of the enve-
lope.
That's when the Atlanta edu-
cator saw the $365,000 check
for the innovative private school
he opened in one of the city's
poorest neighborhoods in 2007.
It was, quite literally, an answer
to a prayer.
"We teach school all day and
fundraise at night," said Clark,
who finds private donors to pay
most of the $14,000 annual tu-
ition for each student. "To have
an unsolicited gift come like that
is incredible."
Clark surprised his students
with the news of the donation
Wednesday morning in a gather-
ing at the south Atlanta school.
The children, parents and teach-
ers erupted in deafening cheers
when he showed off the check.
Several cried at the news.
'"Everything they learn is en-
hanced because of the teachers'
dedication and creativity," said
a tearful Gloria Nesmith, whose
son, Cameron, is a fifth-grader
at the academy. "And Oprah no-
ticed. I'm just overwhelmed."


Motivated by homeless character, teen


actor makes film to expose reality


Star of 'The Wire' turning the spotlight on real-life teens in the streets


By Pharoh Martin


WASHINGTON (NNPA) The last time
we saw Jermaine Crawford, his hair
was an unkempt mess and his face was
riddled with the pains of a drug-addicted
homeless teenager. That was some 10
months ago when Crawford closed the
storyline for Duquan "Dukie" Weems,
his character in the final season on the
critically acclaimed HBO crime drama
"The Wire."
Crawford has been up to a lot since
the lauded cable show's closing music
followed his fictional character and his
unhappy ending into the darkness of an
alleyway full of junkies.
Today, the lanky 6'1" teen actor is clean
cut. His wide-eyed face tells a different
story. He's hungry. Not having eaten
all day, Crawford buries his face inside
the menu of a hip bohemian restaurant
called Busboys & Poets, in Northwest


Washington, D.C. He's trading menu
suggestions and inside jokes with his
mother, Wanda Crawford, with whom he
has a very close-knit relationship.
They settle on buffalo wings and
Maryland crab cakes before talking about


parents sold his clothes for money..."
After spending The Wire's last two
seasons playing the fictional abandoned
youth named Duquan Weems, Crawford
thought it was time that somebody told
the story of the "real Dukies" of America.
"Teenage and Homeless in America:
Change is Gonna Come" is, as the title


a new documentary film project that has
him working on the opposite side of the
camera lens.
"My character really motivated me,"
Crawford said. "My character was
homeless. No one was really there for him
except for his friend [Michael Lee]. His


suggests, Crawford's documentary about
teenage homelessness. The one-hour
television project will focus on the lives of
five young "sofa surfers"-- kids who live
anywhere they can lay their heads.
"The idea to do a documentary came up
Please turn to ACTOR 3C


Rapper DMX

pleads guilty

to drug, theft

charges

By Terry Tang
A ssciated Press

PHOENIX DLX has
reached a plea deal on multi-
ple drug possession, theft and
animal cruelty charges.
The rapper (real name: Earl
Simmons) pleaded guilty on
Tuesday to one misdemeanor
count of animal cruelty, one
felony count of theft, and one
count each of felony posses-
sion of marijuana and a nar-
cotic drug.
DMX, who appeared in
handcuffs and wearing a
black-and-white striped pris-
on uniform, is expected to re-
ceive a minimum 90-day jail
sentence as well as probation
under terms of a plea agree-
ment. according to the Man-
copa County attorney's office.
He will remain in the count-
jail until his sentencing and
won't be given credit for time
served.
A laricopa County Superior
Court commissioner has set
a sentencing hearing for Jan.
30.
Additional charges will be
dismissed then.
As part of the plea agree-
ment, DMX cannot own any
animals, possess firearms
and must attend an animal
offender treatment program. If
he violates probation, he could
be sentenced to more than 10
years in prison.


Teenager with a mission hopes to make


a positive impact on other girls


Pageant winner sets program for $V

business and community service


h-, 'a, t .


Miami Times Staff Report


Jasmine Johnson is a young
woman with a promise of much
to offer the world.
At just 17 years of age, Jas-
mine has already accomplished
so much. Very soon after win-
ning the Junior Miss Black
South Florida 2008 title on
June 28, she competed in the
national championships in ba-
ton twirling, in which she and
her team, the South Florida Su-
per Stars, won the grand prize
and will be traveling to Belgium
for the world championships
this spring.
And, despite a hectic extra-
curricular schedule, Jasmine
ranks in the top 10 percent of
her class, with a 5.0 GPA.
The Everglades High School
student was chosen Best Mar-
keting Student for the 2007-
2008 school year. Jasmine and
her best friend, Jessica, created
their own company called Live.
Breathe. Fashion, specializing
in personal shopping, and im-
age consulting.
Together, the duo has styled
photo shoots and fashion shows
for designers.
Jasmine also finds time to vol-
unteer in her community. As the
junior director of the Glitz and
Glam Foundation, she strives to


help make a difference.
"I only-wish that I could do
more," she said. "My friends,
family, even strangers are so
blessed; even the most minute
effort can make a difference. If
everyone gave a little, the world
would be different," she said.
Jasmine is eldest of seven
children and she says her sib-
lings are her biggest inspira-
tion.
After graduation in June, Jas-
mine hopes to attend the Uni-
versity of South Florida or Flor-
ida State University to double
major in Advertising and Public
Relations, with a minor in Me-
dia Production. She hopes to
become advertising director for
a fashion magazine or a public
relations specialist for a cloth-
ing line.
Jasmine is also planning to
create a non-profit organization,
to be named after her pageant
platform: SOS, which stands for
Saving Our Selves.
Johnson believes that in life
you have to be your own hero,
you have to want to change and
you have to want to make a dif-
ference for yourself. The only
way to do so, she believes, is
through education. And so Jas-
mine plans to educate teens on
sexually transmitted diseases
Please turn to WINNER 2C


India.Arie to release


next "Testimony"


NEW YORK (Billboard) R&B singer India.Arie's second

volume in her series of "Testimony" albums, "Love &

Politics," will arrive in stores on February 10.

The lead single from the Universal Republic set,

"Chocolate High," features Musiq Soulchild, while second

single "Therapy" features Jamaican roots artist Gramps

Morgan.

"Love & Politics" follows 2006's "Life & Relationship,"

which has sold 689,000 copies in the United States,

according to Nielsen SoundScan.


The National Runaway Switchboard estimates there are between 1.6
million and 2.8 million runaway and homeless youths in America. The non-
profit also estimates that one of every 260 homeless youths will die due to
drug overdose, murder, illness or suicide.


f II









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-15, 2009


Former Basileus Peter Ha-
den, Dr. Andrew Forbes, R.T.
Fisher, Johnny Davis and
Basileus Herman Dorsett gave
high raves to Fred Killings and
the Lamplighters Club for their
presentation of "The Birth of
Jesus Christ" last Saturday in
a stellar performance witnessed
by a capacity-filled Omega Ac-
tivity Center.
A special salute goes out
to the supporting cast of The
Singing Angels of Arcola Lakes
Park, Valarie Thomas, Grace-
lyn Thomas, T. Eilene Martin-
Major, Jasmine Jackson, the
dance ensemble from Ebenezer
UMC and the Psi Phi Band for
providing the accompanying
live music.
The narration was done by
the voices of Killings, Thomas
and yours truly, unseen by the
audience as the Singing Angles
began the Cantata, marching in
singing "0 Come All Ye Faith-,
ful" and then assembled on
stage where they sang Christ-
mas. tunes such as "Jesus is
the Reason for the Season,"
"The Christmas Song," "Happy
Birthday Jesus" and "Angels
We've Heard On High."
The band continued with Lee
Johnson singing "Winter Won-
derland" and "Merry Christmas
Baby," followed by the intro-
duction of the Lamplighters
and their female guests who en-
tered on "This Christmas." Kill-
ings and Thomas announced


their names:
Ail Charles and |
Daschle Barnard,
Aaron Gibbs and
Lachine Bentley,
Marquis Killings and Belinda
Lopez, Benjamin McNairy and
Actinia Mack, Travis Price
and Crystal Pander.
Also, Trevor Price and
Myiah Ransom, Maurice Rob-
inson and Val shay Sullivan,
Tare' Shaq'ur and KaDiedra
Stafford, Samuel Thelemazue
and Destiny Rolle, Jonathan
Randle and Crystal Smith,
Sharaud Roberts and Zabhrya
Tillman.
The boys were dressed in
black on black and the girls
were attired in pastel gowns.
They danced the waltz, two
steps, fox trot, and cha cha
cha, while the narrator gave the
names of the relevant country.
A re-enactment of "The Birth
of Jesus Christ" was the seri-
ous time of the program, when
the lights were dimmed and
performers playing Joseph and
Mary entered as the choir sang
"Silent Night, Holy Night,' fol-
lowed by Lonnie McCartney
singing "0 Holy Night" during
the re-enactment of birth of Je-
sus, followed by the three wise
men who entered to present
their gifts to the new-born.
The play concluded with the
singing of "A New Born King",
with the audience joining in a
sensational finale.


Ifs" iir? 1 01;


Remarks followed from Kill-
ings, who presented gifts to se-
lected Lamplighters; by Valarie,
who did the same for the dance
ensemble; and yours truly com-
plimenting the Singing Angels,
extending a token of apprecia-
tion for their hard work' and
support.
For the finale, the Lamplight-
ers performed various steps
for the crowd and received a
standing ovation for each one,
especially the returning Lamp-
lighters from Edward Waters
College and the FAMU march-
ing band.

Attention Bethune-Cookman
alumni: Recently, Presi-
dent Dr. Trudie Kibbie
Reed announced the
hiring of former FAMU
president Dr. Castell
Bryant to fill the posi-
tion of provost, making
her officially the interim {_
vice president for Aca-
demic Affairs. BR
Bryant, a graduate of
FAMU, served as interim presi-
dent at the university for two-
years, beginning in 2005, and
made many changes dealing
with faculty, student affairs
and the Florida Classic. She
told Reed how honored she was
to work in the rich legacy of Dr.
Mary McLeod Bethune.
Another transfer from FAMU
was Dr.. Rebecca Steele back in
the '60s after the death of con-
cert chorale director 'Thomas
Demps. Dr. Steele's modus ope-
randi motivated the chorale to
move to a higher level. And, of
course, they are still moving.
Incidentally, FAMU beat
Bethune-Cookman in the Flor-


rANT

tion.


Congratulations to
the FAMU Marching
100 for being invited to
the Inauguration Pa-
rade for President-elect
Barack H. Obama. It
will be their second
such visit to Washing-
ton, D.C. The band
also played at President
Bill Clinton's Inaugura-


- Betty Durante left Durham,
N.C., when she was 17 to come
to Miami to do something with
her life. After bouncing around
from one -domestic job to an-
other, she became manager of
the sandwich shop at the MI
Club (the old bowling alley on
75th Street back in the '70s).
Subsequently, Durante found
Bishop J.E. Garner's church
and. began singing in the
church and rose to being an
outstanding gospel singer, as
well as composing gospel songs
that were recorded on cassette
tapes during the '70s. She be-
came popular and began to


ida Classic football game. The
following week, BCU beat FAMU
in basketball.
On a sad note, Bessie Bai-
ley, secretary to Dr. Richard
V. Moore and Dr. Oswald P.
Bronson at Bethune-Cookman
before retiring, died a few days
before Christmas. She had been
keeping herself busy working.
with senior citizens, working
in her garden, and procuring
memories of BCU for her home
library. She is remembered as
a delightful person and an ef-
ficient assistant who helped to
alleviate problems facing stu-
dents and alumni.


sing in West Virginia, Georgia,
North Carolina, Alabama, Mis-
sissippi, Texas and churches in
South Florida.
Durante opened a concert
featuring Bobby Womack in
Atlanta for a scholarship fund
raising. She also was featured
at the NAACP conven-
tion in Atlanta in 2004.
As a result of her suc-
cess, she pursued com-
pleting a CD entitled, ";:
"Betty's Best of Gos-
pels" with three origi-
nals on it.
Now, Durante does
volunteer Bible Stud- RE
ies at the Metro West
Detention Center, along with
teaching singing. She has been
doing so for 27-years and she
loves it. .
Her children are Samatha,
Yolanda and James who is her
drummer when she performs.
"I came to Miami looking for
a future and found it," Durante
said. "I am definitely blessed."
Miami Times readers at Leo's
Barber Shop and the "Tree
of Knowledge" discussed how
President-elect Barack H.
Obama was anointed by God
to change the country. And, of
course, John Carter indicated
how Coach Billy Rolle's ath-
leticism came from his parents
Frankie Rolle, an outstand-
ing basketball player at Carver
High, FAMC,; and back to being
a coach for The Hornets, and
Billy Rolle Sr., who matched
her talent and was also good in
football at Carver and FAMC.
When one reflects on Coco-
nut Grove, Frankie and Billy
Rolle, a band leader of the Gin-
ger Breads back in the day, one


,,,, "i' '


A 2009 List to Live By
The most destructive habit -
Worryn
The greatest joy Giving
The greatest loss Loss of
Self-Respect
The ugliest personality trait -
Selfishness
The most endangered species
- Dedicated Leaders_... ... ..
The greatest natural resource
- Youth
The greatest shot in the arm
- Encouragement
The greatest problem to over-
come Fear
The most effective sleeping
pill Peace of Mind
The most crippling disease -


Excuses
The most po%-
erful force in life -
Love
The most danger-
ous pariah A Gossip Monger
The world's most incredible
computer The Brain
The \worst thing to be without
- H ape -. ,,......-.. ... ....
The deadliest weapon The
Tongue
The two most power-filled
words: I Can,
The greatest asset Faith
The most worthless emotion -
Self-Pity
The most beautiful attire A
Smile


The most prized possession -
Integrity
The most contagious spirit -
Enthusiasm
Remember this year 2009.
Please, no shooting of guns. The
bullets you shoot into the air
must come down. Please think
of the children, the elderly and
your own family members.
Everyone's life is at risk from
such behavior. Think about it
and be involved in what's going
on in your neighborhood.
"-Join-the congregation of St.
Agnes Episcopal Church in cel-
ebrading their annual Patronha
Dance from 8 p.m. Jan. 23 at
the Mahi Shrine Auditorium.
Join them for a fabulous eve-
ning of fun with the Junkanoo
Band and DJ entertainment.
Belated happy wedding anni-
versary wishes to Calvin Cool-
dride (Pauline Brown) McKin-


ney, Dec. 29, their 581.
Get-well wishes to the fol-
lowing people: Dr. Oswald P.
Bronson (former president of
Bethune-Cookman University
who is gravely ill), Sue Fran-
cis, Irma Lee Sands-Fredrick,
Elestine McKinney-Allen,
Doris McKinney-Pittman,
Doretha Payne, Kelyese
Rhaming, Herbert Rhodes
Jr. and Willis Murray.
Ada Mae McKinney-De-
veaux died last Sunday morn-
ing. Sympathy to her children
Jennifer and Pierre and her
brother, attorney Bob.McKin-
ney, her sister, Barbara, and
the grands.
Richard Jonathan Brooks
is in the city visiting his grand-
mother Leome Scavella-Cul-
mer, his aunt Angela Culmer,
uncle James Culmer and oth-
er family members. Jonathan


lives in Vicksburgh, Miss.,
and is a senior in college. He
is the son of the late Francena
Culmer-Brooks. Shelby, Fran-
cena's daughter, has already
finished college and is working
for the government in Mary-
land.
Vivian Rutherford-Johnson
was selected Teacher of the
Year at Emerson Elementary
in Westchester. Vivian will re-
tire in August after 39 years in
the school systern. Congratu-
lations!
.Patrice Lacy-Bryant and
daughter Chantel Bryant were
down from 'their adopted city
Jacksonville to spend Christ-
mas with their family -- the
Spicers, Eves, Gibsons and
Poitiers. Venda Rei Gibson is
in Jacksonville visiting friends
in the Duval County areas.
Tony E. Ferguson recently


qualified for recertification of
the designation of Certified
Funeral Service Practitioner
by the Academy of Professional
Funeral Service Practice. Tony,
a mortician with Hall-Fergu-
son-Hewitt Mortuary, is a life-
time member of the academy.
Happy New Year to all my
readers and friends. Have a
safe year. Judy Scavella en-
tertained her snowbird friends
with a lavish Christmas dinner
and cocktails at her beautiful
home in North Dade.
' Florence Brown welcomed
in the New Year with friends
with a Moet champagne sip
on the beach at her Hollywood
condo on Ocean Drive in Mi-
ami Beach.
The Miami Carats will have a
delayed New Year's Celebration
on Sunday at the home of Rosa
and Joel Nesbitt in Miramar.


Archie McKay, right,

president of the

BTW class of '48,

and Helen Postell

hand out certificates.

of recognition and

commemorative pins

during the class anni-

versary and birthday

celebration at the

home of Dr. James A.

Johnson in Sunrise

on Dec. 13.


.. .'*
bA/U


Dr. James A. John-

son takes time

S; from his birthday

and high school

graduation

anniversary cele-

bration for a photo
1 with his sisters

Leona J. Fulton,

seated, Georgiana

J. Bethel, left, and

Edna J. Williams, at

Johnson's home in

Sunrise on Dec. 13.


Holiday Open House marked birthday, graduation anniversary of Dr. Samuel E. Johnson


Miami Times Staff Report

The recent Christmas fes-
tivities included a "Holiday
Open House" in Sunrise
on Dec. 13 to celebrate the
78th birthday of Dr. James
A. Johnson and the 60th an-
niversary of his graduation
from Booker T. Washington
High School in Overtown.
Guests gathered at John-
son's home and on the lawn
in the Regency Club at Fair-
way Isles for the event com-
prising two programs, each
starting with,a musical pre-
lude by an instrumental en-
semble.
During the graduation an-
niversary segment, members
of the class of 1948 took a
walk down memory lane as
they spoke of personal ex-
periences and events. Cer-
tification of recognition and,
commemorative pins were


presei1ted to Esme Bain,
Johnson, Bertha Martin,
Archie McKay, Douglas
Mckinnon, Ellen R. Postell,
William Thompson, Fran-
ciel W. Tooks, Anna Grace
Sweeting and Dr. Charles
Uptgrow. Certificates were
mailed to those who were
unable to attend. The sing-
ing of the BTW school song
by all guests ended that
segment.
The birthday celebration
provided friends, class-
mates, church members,
medical colleagues and fam-
ily members an opportunity
to share their impressions of
the honoree.
During his remarks, John-
son expressed profound
gratitude to his deceased
parents, Daniel E. and Le-
nora S. Johnson Sr. He
reflected on and acknowl-
edged significant periods


of his life, including his
days at Dillard and Meharry
Medical College; his intern-
ship in Orange County, Ca-
lif.; his tour of duty with the
U.S. Air Force and retire-
ment as a Lt. colonel; and
his private practice in der-
matology in the San Fran-
cisco Bay area.
After Johnson conveyed
his appreciation to his
guests, the gathering sang
the traditional "Happy
Birthday" song.
The afternoon was one of
obvious enjoyment, filled
with an abundance of deli-
cious food and fellowship for
the more than 100 guests.
Program participants in-
cluded the honoree's sisters
Georgiana J. Bethel, Edna
J. Williams and Leona J.
Fulton; his nieces Sharon
D. Williams and Karen R.
Bradford; David Davis, vice


president, BTW Alumni As-
sociation; Archie McKay,
class president; Enid C.
Pinkney; and Ralph M. Ross,
minister of the Historic Mt.
Zion Baptist Church.
Other family members in
attendance included Gerald
A. and Florida F. Williams,


Timothy L. and Derrall K.
Williams, David A. Fulton;
and Leonard Raye.
Special hosts were Dave
Abrams of Oakland, Calif.,
and Hugh L. Blair of Jack-
sonville.
Among the guests were
Bobbie M. McKinney of Bar-


tow, former Northwest Fifth
Court neighbors, Claire and
Sweeting family members,
Henry C. Wood family mem-
bers, extended family mem-
bers and friends, members
of Mt. Zion, Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity members and
medical colleagues.


Junior pageant winner will be Embrace role model


WINNER
continued from 1C

(STDs) and AIDS so they can
safeguard themselves and
their future:
SOS also stands for Sup-
porting Our Sisterhood and, in
this regard, jasmine plans to
give motivational speeches to
young women about becoming
confident in themselves and
active citizens in their com-


munities, through promoting
self-esteem and positive body
image.
"The Jr. Miss Black South
Florida Pageant gave me a
chance to help make a differ-
ence. I have a voice and I want
it to be heard, with the title be-
hind me, I believe my voice will
be heard in volumes through-
out our community," Jasmine
said.
Also as part of her commu-


nity work, Jasmine is joining
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion, an organization geared to
promote a positive view of life
among young girls. She will
hold a workshop with the girls
on Jan. 10 at the North Dade
Regional Library, 2455 NW
183rd St., Miami Gardens.
"I am so excited about work-
ing with the Embrace girls. I
believe I can really make a dif-
ference," she said.


..... ...


is reminded of the outstanding
teams from Carver, as well as
the annual Goombay Festival
organized by them. Because of
Coach Rolle, the family has be-
come honorary Bulls and they
watch him dominate, winning
the state and national champi-
onship.
According to Caleb
Crosby, the cohesive-
ness of the Northwest-
ern players comes from
interaction of parents
L. and their sons following
in their footsteps. Such
as Tammye Holden,
ED class of '08, whose son
is Torrance Dickens;
Kenny Dillard, class of '83,
whose son is Captain Kenneth
Dillard; the Rev. Anthony
Dawkins, class of '82, whose
son is Andrew Dawkins.
Coach Rodney Harris, defen-
sive' coordinator, is the father
of Jacory Harris, quarterback
with the University of Miami
Hurricanes; and Coach Billy
Rolle is the father of B.J. Rolle,
freshman.
Some of the diehard fans
.include Loretta Rolle, wife of
Coach Rolle; Melodie Mitchell,
Tammye Holden, Roslyn Gran-
ville, Earl LeBlanc, Rondie
McCray, Tommy Streeter,
Louis Kadenis, Carnell and
Caran White, Johnnie and
Solemen Sykes, Kimberley
Muhammad, Lee Crowford,
Hector Gray, Jarrod Knight,
Sheba Pollock-Harris, John
Askew, retired AD, Ronald and
Bettye Major, Leroy Lee, Ira
Fluitt, P.O. Oliver, A.D. Wil-
liams, Olrick Elena Johnson
and family, Latonya Davis,
and Rev. Richard P. Dunn Jr.












Many youth just one step from homelessness I .I- ,


ACTOR
continued from 1C
not long after the show ended,"
he said. Crawford said he and
his management were exploring
the young actor's different post-
show opportunities. He thought
it would be interesting to docu-
ment the lives of teens who re-
ally had to go through what was
scripted for his character.
"[Being in Baltimore,] we
were actually filming the show
in a place where a lot of people
go through this sort of thing,"
Crawford said.
Many of the documentary's
subjects, whom they refer to as
"the five heroes", will parallel
Dukie's hard-knocks upbring-
ing. But, unlike the HBO show,
these kids have yet to face the
anecdotal dark alleyway.
'The way we selected our five
[subjects] was when we were lis-
tening to their stories we tried
looking at their hearts," said the
Mitchellville, Md., native "We
just went with the most touch-
ing stories."
In order to find his "five he-
roes" Crawford dug deeper
with his research, starting


with a simple Google search
and ending at the Sasha
Bruce House on Maryland Av-
enue in Northeast Washington.
The Bruce House, which is op-
erated by Sasha Bruce Youth-
work, is a renowned short-term
emergency shelter for homeless
and runaway youth in the D.C.
area. After Jermaine's mother
talked with Youthwork about
what her and her son wanted
to do, they agreed to open their
doors to support the project.
"There was a room full of kids
and we just talked. It was re-
ally powerful stories," Crawford
said about the sorting process.
"It's astounding because people
actually go through these types
of things and The Wire was just
a description of what people go
through."
The five whom Crawford and
his production team selected
include Derek, a 17-year-old
who has dreams of becoming
a fashion designer but abuse
from his schizophrenic moth-
er has driven him to differ-
ent shelters and drugs which
he uses and sells to support
himself. Derek's only escape
has been his art and design.


Stewart, 18, is another young
man being profiled who uses
art to break away from his abu-
sive childhood. Stewart said the
abuse in his household was so
bad that it made him "numb to
emotion". After finally running
away with his younger brother,
Stewart turned to rap as a way
to deal with his pain. He sees
rap as a way to tell his story to
the world.
A third hero is Vincent. With
his father having been murdered
and his mother strung out and
incarcerated, the 16-year-old
lives on the streets because he
has no place permanent to go.
He robbed and sold drugs to
get by but, after getting shot
in a botched car theft, Vincent
wants to become a truck driver
just so he can see the world
beyond his unforgiving streets.
Being 16 himself, Crawford
is able to relate to the teen-
agers he's documenting.
"It's, like, I'm the same age as
these guys," Crawford said.
"All it takes is one mistake,
one slip-up and I could be right
in their position. Kids are one
mistake away. Parents are one
pay check away. It's not impos-


sible to end up in their situation.
And so, I'm just really grateful."
The National Runaway Switch-
board estimates there are be-
tween 1.6 million and 2.8 mil-
lion runaway and homeless
youths in America. The non-
profit also estimates that one of
every 260 homeless youths will
die due to drug overdose, mur-
der, illness or suicide.
Reasons why youth become
homeless vary. But The Young
Adult Guidance Center, an At-
lanta-based outreach organiza-
tion, said the root causes fall
into three distinct yet interre-
lated, categories: family prob-
lems, economic problems and
residential instability.
"Many homeless youth leave
their homes after years of phys-
ical and sexual abuse, strained
relationships, addiction of a
family member and parental ne-
glect," the group's website says.
"When you see somebody and
realize that could've just as
easily been you, it's very hum-
bling," says Crawford. "It's like
a wake-up call. It's, like, That
could have been me. That could
have been my mom or dad on
drugs.'


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
Too much time has passed for you to be
harboring this grudge. No matter what your
feelings are you can't keep dwelling on
what's'over and done with. Let it go and use
the experience to strengthen yourself. Lucky
numbers 3, 20, 43, 11, 4.

TAURUS: APRIL 21- MAY 20
Too much of your Self has been lost to
outer things. None of your plans will work out
if you exclude your spiritual needs. Everything
comes from within. Take time to reflect upon
where you stand with your inner life. Lucky
numbers 6, 42, 10, 44, 3.

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
The thorn in your side may be a pain but
it's there to remind you something needs to
change. Don't be afraid to drop this. Whoever


or whatever you're attached to is no longer
serving your best interests. Lucky numbers
2, 20, 19, 22, 5.

CANCER:JUNE 21-JULY 20
You've fallen for someone who doesn't
deserve you. This is a repetitive pattern. Go
for it if you have to, but don't expect it to be
more than just another chance to review the
extent to which you devalue yourself. Lucky
numbers 4, 40, 9, 14, 5.

LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Family stuff is a big item. Don't get too
involved. You didn't come here to fix what
appears to be someone else's problem.
Taking care of your own needs is far more
important than wasting time on this. Lucky
numbers 5, 54, 44, 30, 20.


0 ~ *'~*
~1I~ ~


At the recommendation of
Gwendolyn Brooks, I started to
read her contemporary, Robert
Hayden, who would soon be-
come one of the important male
voices to influence my own verse.
I entered Gonzaga University in
September 1966. Ironically, in
April that year, Robert Hayden's
"Ballad of Remembrance" won
the- Gran Prix for the best recent
volume of Anglophone Poetry at
the Third World Festival of Ne-
gro Arts in Dakar, Senegal.
According to Brian Conniff:
"In at least some internation-
al literary circles, the prestige
of this award roughly matched
its Olympic title. The first such
event to be held on 'indepen-
dent African soil,' the Festival
was sponsored by Leopold Se-
dar Senghor in conjunction
with UNESCO and the Societe
Africaine de Culture and was
attended by over 10,000 people
from thirty-seven nations (Vail-
lant 323).(1) The other finalists
in the poetry competition were
Derek Walcott's In a Green
Night' and Christopher Okigbo's
'Limits.' Langston Hughes was
one of the judges. (qtd. by Vail-
lant 323)."
Totally oblivious to the events
going on the continent, I came
across Hayden's poem, "Runa-
gate," about that time. I was
figuratively blown away by the
poem. This was writing such as


I had never seen "
before. I felt, like
a grade school
hoopster watch-
ing the college varsity boys in a
pick-up game.
Nearly 40 years later, I was
finally able to pay tribute to
Hayden's poetry and his very .
personal "struggle with episte-
mology and language; its cel-
ebration of African American
oral tradition; its engagement of
history; and finally its aesthet-
ics and form."
hoot-owl calling in the ghost-
ed air,
five times calling to the hants
in the air.
shadow of a face in the scary
leaves, shadow of a voice in the
talking leaves...
from "runagate"

HUSH THAT NOW
(for robert hayden)
connected u were, immediately
& intimately,
to a seductively lyrical mis-
tress, some might
guess cerridwen but most prob-
ably it was isis
oriyami &je given the fragrant
scent of blood
in yr poems; poems well-
wrought, carefully
conceived & painstakingly re-
vised, poems
that moved me to tears, made
my neck hairs


VIRG0: AUG.21 SEPT.20
In the midst of a major transition you are
aware of the need to stay focused. Keep
your eye on the prize and don't let anything
undermine your desire to pull your life
together and stop fooling around. Lucky
numbers 2, 20, 11, 43, 29.

LIBRA: SEPT.21 OCTOBER 20
Being pulled back into someone else's
dysfunction is the last thing you need. You've
been here enough times to know better.
Maybe this time you'll have the wisdom to
see that it's their issue, not yours. Lucky
numbers 27, 4,50, 1, 19.

SCORPIO: OCT.21- NOV.20
You don't need to make this decision right
now. Others are putting the pressure on,
but this is your choice. Before you cave in to
their demands make sure that you want this-
as much as they do. Lucky numbers 3, 20, 44,
28, 17.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV.21 DEC.20
The futility of your situation isn't what it
appears to be. Hanging in there may seem

stand on end, sent shivers
down my spine.
beaten to yr knees & almost
exiled for a time
by critics, u never lost yr vision,
never lost yr
clarion voice that oracle spoke,
a kujlople
from rocky, subterranean
caves, an orunmila
advising thru' ikin & opele ifa,
to a larger
human culture, yr poems, like
u, never
sacrificed themselves, have
lives of their own
grown out of yr life, stripped of
their
selfishness & connected to the
supernatural,
that powerful runagate spirit
force movering
thru' swamp & savannah that
mitigates the
machineries of history.
Joseph McNair

("Cerridwen" is one of the Old
Ones, one of the great megalithic
pre-Christian Goddesses of the
Celtic World. "Iyami aje" is one
of the sacred names of the mys-
terious and divine entity that we
know as feminine power; i.e. the
gender identified as femaleness,
that which entails all the char-
acteristics of femininity. "Ku jlo-
ple" is a Liberian oracle. "Orun-
mila" is the 6ris& of destiny and
prophecy, who is recognized as
"ibi keji Olodumare" (second
only to Olodumare (God)) and
"eleri ipin" (witness to creation).
"Ikin" and "opele ifa" are palm
kernels and the divining chain
used by babalawos to consult
ifa.).


foolish but if you stick around you'll be so glad
that you had the patience to keep the faith
when the going got tough. Lucky numbers 1,
19, 11, 31, 4.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21 JAN.20
Watching your loved ones go through the
mill is only painful until you realize it's their
Karma. You can't fix this. All you can do is
be there for them and trust their ability to
handle it themselves.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21- FEB.20
The process of give and take is always
an issue. What you don't seem to see is that
others are giving as much as they can. You
wouldn't be so Hell bent on making them
do more if you actually appreciated their
efforts.

PISCES: FEBRUARY 21 MARCH 20
Don't try to push this. More pressure will
only make things worse. It would be better
to cut your losses and back off. Your efforts
to make your self right are a waste of time
and will only prove you wrong in the long run.
Lucky numbers 2, 1,8, 5, 6.


TRIMAB PICDRS ProMs A 11, JAKE[ PBMU iiN ASDImm WITH OKE MEDIA
MOIiil CHESTNU 'NOIT iLY BKEN' IA I P. HEINN MA OillAN KEIN HA
WOOD HARRIS A8 JENFER [EWI ,,ALISGN HA[[AND DAYID LOMBARD
M9KDRI FARUHAR FIIfRMORIII CHSNTDI SIEV[N BROWN
inI.D. JAKES iM CHRTIS W1ANE 9" BIL DUKE +B RIAN BIRD e ll DUKE
pPgIPAREtaBtSThON lYCAUTIONEoW.J -'. aa TR3M
IMEiIIArilEMFPwiEFOFl itE, Not EasilyBroken.com -

STARTS FRIDAY JANUARY 9
CHEC, IOCAI ITSTTP.CS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES
: .I i'. 5.. ACCEPTED FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT









TODAY!


Mariah Carey told off by scientists for E=MC2 claims


Scientists have criticized
Mariah Carey's mathematics
skills, after she appropriated
Albert Einstein's mass-energy
equivalence formula for an al-
bum title.
The singer called her recent
album E=MC2, but rather
than reference the famous
equation, she declared the tile
stood for "emancipation equals
Mariah Carey times two".
Mathematician Dr. David
Leslie told BBC News that he
was upset that the singer had
had "misread the algebra."
"The 'two' in the equation


means C squared, not MC
multiplied by two," he ex-
plained. "The correct reading
of the equation is E=MCC, so
perhaps Mariah's re-inter-
pretation should have been
'emancipation equals Mariah
Carey Carey'?"
Carey has not commented on
her slip-up, but she was one
of several celebrities pulled
up by charity Sense About
Science about their mislead-
ing "scientific" claims.
For more on Mariah Car-
ey, check out her NME.com
page.


1 ree Arienne /rsnan sener tours: Monaays ana baluroays at noon, sanrung ai me Lirt caller upera nouse loooy.
1-re ~aienn R~flI enir pors: No reservations necessary.


MARIAH CAREY
Singer


BiAc~s MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I 3C TH~ MIAMI TIMES. JANUARY 7-13. 20D9







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


199

Boneless Skinless
Chicken Breast
Public. All Nalural Grade A
SAvE UP TO 2.50 LB


--1.-


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, "^ ^ .1


Snow Crab 99
C lu sters.... .. ........... ......5 '".ib
Fully-Cooked, Previously Frozen,
Wild Harvested
SAVE UP TO 3.00 L "


Publix 99
Sweet Ham. ......... ...b
Sliced Fresh
11-1 the Publux Deli
SAVE UPTO .09O LE


Italian
Five Grain Bread.......... -27
Choose From White or Wheat,
Contains: Oats, Cracked Wheat, Barley,
Millet, Flaxseed, and Sunflower Seeds,
From the Publix Bakery, 16-..,z loaji
SAVE UP TO .80


Fresh Express / 5-.00
Salad Blend .......
5 to 12-oz bag or Sargento Salad Finishers,
4.66 to 7,44-oz bag,
o. -e ,ui F '. r,t i .. ,.

SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


'f1207. ,


Kellogg's Special K Cereal... .......................
11.4 to 14-oz box or Grab 'N Go, 6-pk. 5.2 or 5.4-oz box,
Assorted Varieties Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.21


549


Folgers Ground Coffee ...
Assorted Varieties, 27.8 to 34.5-oz cnstr.
SAVE UP TO 4.24
(Classic Decaf, 33.9-oz cnstr.... 6.35)


Pringles 5 00.
Potato Crisps. ...... -
Assorted Varieties,
5.13 to 6-oz cnstr.
Limit four deals.
SAVE UP TO 1.65 ON 5


~'1


Nabisco
Chips Ahoy! T 2
Cookies.......... Fr ee
Assorted Varieties,
14to 15.25-oz pkg.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.97


Beringer
Founders' Estate
W in e ....... .........
Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon,
Merlot, or Pinot Noir, 750-ml bot.
SAVE UP TO 1.00


7"9
p9/ -


8-Pack
Selected 500
Pepsi Products ... F
12-oz can
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


Prices effective Thursday, January 8 through Wednesday, January 14, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.


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SECTION D
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MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009
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MIAMDADE

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


PROJECT NAME:
PROJECT NO.: B741F


MVIA p-Extension rCompl9tion
("Project")


Sealed Bids for the Project designated above will be received for and in behalf of Miami-Dade County, by the Office of the Clerk, in the Stephen P. Clark Center,
Suite 17-202, 111 N.W. Ist Street, Miami, Florida, 33128 until 2:00 P.M. January 28, 2009, or as modified by addendum, at which time all Bids will be taken to a
room to be designated by the Clerk of the Board in said Stephen P. Clark Center. Bids are to be submitted in two envelopes. Bids received after the time and date
specified will not be considered. Envelopes A of Bids, containing only the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) will be publicly opened and the names of the Bidders read
aloud. Upon notification by the Department of Small Business Development, bidders may correct defects on the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) within forty-eight (48)
hours after bid submission. Envelopes B of Bids, containing all of the remaining bidding documents, from Bidders that have not been rejected as not responsive
will be opened publicly and read aloud forty-eight (48) hours after the bid submission date and non-responsive bids will not be opened. Bidders are invited to be
present at each opening. The County reserves the right to postpone or cancel the bid opening at any time prior to the scheduled opening of bids.
IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES: The completion of various work items including: the installation of additional fire alarm systems and components;
installation of fire sprinklers; install remote elevators monitoring, glazing; completion of interior finishes; mechanical and electrical installations at the Automated
People Mover (APM) station; ADA improvements; installation of bollards at the ramp level; completion, operational readiness and commissioning of elevators and
escalators; removal of temporary partitions; perform damaged ductwork repairs; install HVAC equipment safety modifications and emergency roof lighting as further
described in the Bid documents. All work at the APM station is of a time sensitive nature and it is included in an interim milestone for completion.
BID DOCUMENTS: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will make the Bid Documents available, on December 18, 2008, for inspection and/or purchase by
appointment only, on business days during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Miami International Airport, Bldg 3030 Central Wing Conference Room
4. Interested parties are to schedule an appointment to review or purchase the Bid Documents through Maria Fernandez at 305-869-3343. The duration of each
Bid Documents review period will not exceed two (2) hours. However, the Department may schedule additional time slots (not to run consecutively with the original
appointment) if available. At the time of the appointment, and prior to any Bid Document review interested parties will be required to present current, government
issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License, United States Passport), documentation that they are licensed architect, engineer, or contractor who may
perform work on, or related to, e project, and sign and notarize a Confidentiality Affidavit certifying that the company and each authorized employee agrees,
that in accordance with Florida Statutes 119.07(3)(b) and one or more of the following Florida Statutes, 281.301 and 331.22, to maintain the information
contained in the Bid Documents as being exempt from the provision of Florida Statute 119.07(1) and 24(a), Article I of the State Constitution. In addition,
interested parties are advised that individuals will be monitored while reviewing these documents. Interested parties may take notes, however, no photographs
and/or copying of the documents will be allowed.
The Bid Documents can be purchased for $1,350. Payment shall consist of:
1. Non-refundable Payment of $350 for each set of Bid Documents
2. Refundable Deposit of $1,000 for each set of Bid Documents
The non-refundable payment shall be by any type of check, or money order, only, and made payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. The refundable
deposit must be by Cashier's or Certified check only, and made payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. Each interested Bidder shall furnish an address,
telephone and fax numbers, and email address for the purpose of contact during the bidding process. A business card with all of this information will suffice.
Bid Documents may be purchased in person or by mail. To purchase a set of the Bid Documents in person, each purchaser must present a current
A. copy of government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License)
B. copy of the architect, engineer, or contractor qualifier's license issued by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation for the Bidder
making the purchase
C. an original, notarized Confidentiality Affidavit signed by the licensed architect, engineer, or contractor.
Confidentiality Affidavits may be obtained in advance by downloading from www.miaMi-airport,rmn/htnml/bids.htmi or can be completed at the time the Bid Documents
are purchased. Bid Documents may also be purchased by mail by sending a copy of the requisite identification, license, original notarized Confidentiality Affidavit,
contact information, and checks along with a FedEx or UPS billing account number to the place of purchase indicated herein.
The Confidentiality Affidavit, non-refundable payment and refundable deposit shall be delivered in person to Maria Fernandez or designee, at Miami International
Airport, Building 3030, Central Wing, 2nd Floor between the hours of 9:00AM 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Upon payment and verification of the required
identification documents, the verified individual will be authorized to pick up he number of sets of the Bid Documents for which payment has been made. Only full
sets of the Bid Documents will be authorized for pickup.
All Bid Documents, including any copies made, shall be returned to the same location where they were purchased. All Bidders that timely return the Bid Document
will have their deposit returned. Those Bidders that purchase Bid Documents, but elect not to participate in the bidding process are also required to return all
copies of the Bid Documents to the location of purchase. Failure to return the Bid Documents and copies made to the location of purchase within five (5) working
days after the Bid Due Date ma be reported to a Law Enforcement Investigating Authority and will forfeit the deposit. Furthermore, Bidders that fail to return Bid
Documents shall not be allowed to participate in future Confidential solicitations until such time that-the firm has taken corrective actions that are satisfactory to
Miami Dade County. The purchaser of the Bid Documents shall be required to certify that they have returned all original Bid Documents plus any copies and they
have not retained any copies.
All bids must be submitted as set forth in the Bid Documents. The County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, or to
re-advertise the Project. The County, by choosing to exercise its right of rejection, does so without the imposition of any liability against the County by any and all
bidders.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will hold a Pre-Bid Conference and Site Inspection on January 9, 2009, from 9:00 am to 12:00
Noon at.the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Building 5A, Fourth Floor, Conference Room F, Miami, Florida, for all interested parties. To
assist in our planning, Bidders are requested to inform the Contracting Officer of the number of persons expected to attend the Pre-Bid and/or the Site Inspection
no later than 24 hours before the scheduled date. Attendance will be limited to two (2) representatives per firm. No other Site Inspections will be provided by the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department. It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to comply with all the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For sign
language, interpreter services, material in accessible format, other special accommodations, or airport-related ADA concerns, please contact the MDAD Office of
ADA Coordination at (305) 876-7024.
COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM
Contract Measures for this Project is (are): 24%

COMMUNITY WORKFORCE PROGRAM
The Community Workforce Goal for this Project is: 10%
BID GUARANTY: Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty of not less than five percent (5%) of the Total Bid in a manner required by the Instructions to
Bidders. No Bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for the receipt of Bids for a period of one-hundred and eighty (180) days. The County reserves
the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, to reject all bids, or to re-advertise for Bids.
BID IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS AMONG OTHERS:
1) The Miami-Dade County Responsible Wages Ordinance.
2) The Provisions in reference to the timetables for minority and female employment participation, expressed as a percentage, for the Contractor's aggregate work
force in each trade on all construction work in the covered area, as follows:

Timetables Goal for minority Goals for female
Participation for each Participation for
From 4/01/81 trade in Miami-Dade County each trade
Until further notice 39.5 % 6.9 %

As used in this Notice, and in the Contract resulting from this solicitation, the "covered area" is Miami-Dade County, Florida. These goals are applicable to all
Contractor's construction work (whether or not it is Federal or Federally assisted) performed in the covered area.
3) The "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications" as set forth in the Contract
Documents.
The Contractor's compliance with the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4 shall be based on its implementation of the Equal Opportunity
Clause, specific affirmative action obligations required by the specifications set forth in 41CFR 60-4.3(a), and its efforts to meet the goals established for the
geographical area where the Contract resulting from this solicitation is to be performed. The hours of minority and female employment and training must be
substantially uniform throughout the length of the Contract, and in each trade, and the Contractor shall make a good faith effort to employ minorities and women
evenly on each of its projects. The transfer of a minority or female employee or trainee from Contractor to Contractor or from project to project for the sole purpose
of meeting the Contractor's goals shall be a violation of the Contract, the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4. Compliance with the goals will
be measured against the total work hours performed.
The Contractor shall provide written notification to the Director of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs within ten(10) working days of award of any
construction subcontract in excess of $10,000 at any tier for construction work under the Contract resulting from this solicitation. The notification shall list the name
address and telephone number of the Subcontractor; employer identification number of the Subcontractor; estimated dollar amount of the subcontract; estimated
starting and completion dates of the subcontract; and the geographical area in which the Contract is to be performed.
4) Miami-Dade County has enacted an ordinance governing utilization of certified Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE) Subcontractors. Requirements
for compliance with this ordinance are contained in the Contract Documents.
5) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t), a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs or bids after advertisement and terminates at the time
the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the Board of County Commissioners or a Notice of Contract Award Recommendation, whichever comes
first. The Cone of Silence prohibits communications regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists, or consultants
and the County's professional staff, including but not limited to the County Manager and the County Manager's staff. A Cone of Silence is also imposed between
the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager
and the County Manager's staff.
The provisions of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) do not apply to oral communications at pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before selection
committees, oral communications with the Contracting Officer, as published by the Department of Small Business Development in their weekly Cone of Silence
Project Information Report, for administering the procurement process, provided the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedures, Contract
negotiations during any duly noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed public meeting
or communications in writing at any time unless specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders or proposers must file a copy of any
written communication with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County shall respond in writing and file a copy
with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request.
In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) by any bidder or proposer shall render any RFP award,
RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of this Ordinance shalf report such violation to the State Attorney and/or
may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders or Proposers should reference the actual Ordinance for further clarification.
6) The County shall not be responsible for any modifications or alterations made to the Bid Documents or to the Contract Documents other than those made by
Addendum, Change Order, or Work Order. Any purchase of partial sets of documents shall be at the purchaser's risk.


7) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2.8-1 (d), a Bidder shall have on file, prior to contract award a duly executed Uniform County Affidavit with the
Miami-Dade County Department of Procurement Management (DPM), to be maintained with the bidders vendors registration file. The Bidder is responsible for
obtaining the Vendor Registration Package, including all affidavits by downloading from the DPM website at www.miamidade.gov or from the Vendor Assistance
Unit at 1-11 N.W. 11 Street, 13th Floor, Miami, Florida 33128, (305) 375-5773.


8














SS


SECTION D


101 N.E. 78th Street
Two and three bdrms, one
bath, from $900, nice and
clean, laundry room, parking.
Section 8 OK! 786-326-7424

101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
WE WORK WITH BAD
CREDIT!
One and two bedrooms,
central air, appliances, tile,
carpet, remodeled, laundry
room, parking, quiet. FREE
WATER. Starting at $595.
Call 786-506-3067

1118 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special-One bdrm,
one bath, $550. Stove, refrig,
air. 305-642-7080

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrig., A/C. 305-642-
7080.

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath. $575. Stove, re-
frigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144

12400 N.E. 11th Court
One bdrm, one bath $700,
Three bdrm, one bath $1000.
Stove, refrigerator, a/c, Sec-
tion 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

12400 N.E. 12th Court #4
Newly renovated, two bdrm,
two bath. Laundry room. Sec-
tion 8 ok! $900 mthly. 305-
498-2266, 954-549-8787
1245 N.W. 58th Street
One bed, one bath, $575/
month, All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen
TV. Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1261 N.W. 59th Street
One Month To Move In. One
bdrm, one bath, $550.
305-642-7080

1277 N.W. 58th Street
Two bdrms, one bath, appli.
included. Section 8 Wel-
come.
786-277-9925, 305-244-2141

1298 N.W. 60th Street
Beautiful one bedroom, ap-
pliances, air, gated, and first
month free! 786-282-8775

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
.ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

150 N.W. 56th Street Rear
One bdrm,,one bath, $550/
month, Section.8 ok! Call
305-215-0508.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $400 per month, all
appliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Three bedrooms, two
baths. $775 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen
T.V. Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1st Court
Studios $450/mth, One bdrm
$525/mth, all appliances
included! Free 20 inch flat
screen TV! Call Joel
786-355-7578.

1718 N.W. 2iid Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-
7080.

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 incl flat
screen TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms, one bath $625.
Stove, refrig, A/C. Free Wa-
ter. 305-642-7080

190 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom. $680 moves
you in, $680 monthly./
786-389-1686

1930 71st Street
Two and three bdrms, $950-
1150, Section 8 ok! Call Nora
at 305-218-1185.

200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

2040 N.E. 168th Street
One and two bedroom,
water included. Section 8
Welcome. 786-277-9925,
305-244-2141.


lj~T~


Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


2141 N.W. 91st Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
private driveway, air. $925
monthly. 786-663-0234

220 N.W. 16th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$550. 305-642-7080

2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $625, newly
renovated appliances includ-
ed. Call Tony 305-213-5013.

2945 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$650. Call 786-412-9343.

3051 N.W. 134th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
washer and dryer included,
new kitcherknew bath, and
central air. $995 monthly,
$1000 to move in.
954-557-4567

3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Remodeled, one bdrm, one
bath. Appli. incl. $600/month.
MUST SEE! Mr.Cruz 305-
213-5013

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.

5200 N.W. 26th Avenue
Two bdrms, Section 8 ok!
$300 deposit, 786-663-8862
or 305-634-3645 Jennie.

55 N.E. 59 Street
Move In Special. Cozy, clean
one bedroom, one bath, air.
$475. 786-985-7791 or 305-
757-8596

561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. One bdrm,
one bath $495. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5755 N.W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, park-
ing. $625 monthly. $1000 to
move in. Call 954-394-7562.

5842 N.W. 12th Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath, wa-
ter included. Section 8 Wel-
come. 786-277-9925, 305-
244-2141.

6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6950 N.W. 8th Avenue
Newly remodeled studio apt.,
$450-500, Section 8 ok! Call
305-675-1740.

7001 N.W. 15th Avenue
Move In Special! First month
plus half'security deposit
moves you ii-One bedromrn
$495 monthly. $743 moves
you in. All appliances includ-
ed. Free 20 inch, flat screen
TV. Call Joel 786-355-7578.

725 1/2 N.W. 100th Street
Near schools and hospital,
two bedrooms, one bath, air,
appliances, wall to wall car-
pet, mini blinds. Credit check,
$640 monthly, $1280 to move
in. $50 Application fee.
305-300-0983

731 N.W. 56th Street
One bdrm, one bath, call
305-205-1665.

741 N.W. 56th Street
One bdrm, one and a half
bath, $550/month, first and
last to move in, water and
garbage incl. 305-441-0040

7517 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
Call 305-669-4320.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one, two, and four
bdrm. Section 8 Welcomed!
Call 786-355-5665.

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
appliances, laundry and gate.
From $400. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY


Remodeled, two bdrm, one
bath, $800/month, first and
last to move in, first month
free. 305-441-0040


COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695.

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy Qualify. One bdrm, one
bath $515. Two bdrm, one
bath $630. FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

HOMESTEAD AREA
140 S.W. 6th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$500 monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084.

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three, one bedroom, one
bath, $600/month, $1200 to
move in, 305-244-7606.

LITTLE HAITI AREA
One bedroom, $425 monthly,
call 305-754-1100.

Located Near 90th Street
and 27nd Avenue
Two bedrooms,, one bath,
light, water, and air included.
Also one bedroom furnished.
Call 305-693-9486.

MIAMI AREA
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 305-725-5504

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable,' one, two, three,
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

NEAR OPA-LOCKA AIR-
PORT
Section 8 tenants...$299
moves you in! Renovated
two and three bedroom
apartments available. Central
air, ceramic tile, appliances
and more. Must see. Move in
incentives available.
Limited time. Call now!!
305-434-7808.

NORTH DADE AREA
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Section 8 o.k. $0
move in for Section 8. 786-
488-5225 or 305-756-0769.

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath
also one bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 welcome, $500
cash back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
Move In Special. One bed-
room, one bath, $480-$550.
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

Section 8 Apartments
South Miami Area, near
Metro Rail. Two bedroom,
three bedroom, four bedroom
apartments for rent.
Call 786-543-3872.
-: ..: ... .

COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


131 N.E. 77th Street


842 N.W. 108th Street
Three bdrm, two bath, a/c,
yard, $1300/month, Section
8 ok! Call 786-487-6597.


18360 N.W. 44th Place
Two bedroom, two bath.
$1200/mth, first and security.
786-348-1288

2743 N.W. 204th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
townhouse like new for sale
or rent. 305-343-0908

2906 N.W. 195 Lane
Three bdrm, one bath,
Section. 8 786-457-3287

550 N.W. 214 St. Unit 205
Three bedrooms, two baths,
gated community. $1300
Monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-202-1424

6113 S.W. 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one and half
bath, one block from Metro-
rail,$1,200 monthly, Section
8 welcome. 786-556-9425 or
786-210-0421.

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom condo. Free
water and security gate. One
month free. 954-266-9328

CAROL CITY AREA
19351 N.W. 45th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three and four bdrms,
Section 8 ONLY! Rudy
786-367-6268

Homestead Area
Brand new four bedrooms,
three baths, fenced yard.
Section 8 Ok. 786-285-8872

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
NW 213 Terrace
Two bdrms, Great Property!
Call 954-243-6447

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrm, two bath, $1150.
$200 off first month. Air,
balcony, tiled floors and one
assigned covered parking.
Laundry available. Call Kathy
847-682-0290.


1079 N.W. 100th Terrace
Two bdrm, one bath, central
air, fenced, $1000/mth, first,
last and sec. to move in.
No Section 8. Call 305-986-
8395.

1187 N.W. 63rd Street #2
Two bdrm, one bath, $850/
month, $1700 to move in,
call 305-389-8414.

1622 NW 111 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1375 mthly. Section 8
Welcome. 305-688-9500

1722 N.E. 148 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air,
$650. 786-356-6101

1732 N.W. 41st Street
One bdrm, one bath, appli.
incl., a/c, fenced, private
parking. $600/month. Call
754-581-6302.

21301 N.W. 37th Avenue
Two bedroom, air, No Sec-
tion 8. 786-306-4839

2266 N.W.. 75 Street Rear
Two bdrms, Section 8 ok!
954-394-5887

2330 N.W. 101 St.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
786-262-3402

2552 N.W. 68th Street
Large two bdrm, $950
monthly, $1600 to move in.
Ask for Ms. Holmes 305-244-
3232.

275 N.W. 51st Street
Large three bdrm, two baths
with huge backyard, ready
to move in, $1400/month,
Section 8 welcome. Call 305-
213-4923 or 305-794-9299.

336 N.W. 59th Street
Two bedroom, one bath, cen-
tral air. Section 8 welcome.
305-490-7033

40 N.E. 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800/month. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

4625 N.W. 15th Court
Two bedrooms, air. No Sec-
tion 8. 786-306-4839

4714 N.W. 16th Avenue
Four bdrm, one bath, call
(305) 218-1227

5657 N.E. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, bars, water,
air. $700. No Section 8. Terry
Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776.

6803 N.W. 6th Court
Two bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 okl Call 305-968-
6218.

7753 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air. Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.Call Joel
786-355-7578.


Fully furnished, refrigerator,
microwave, cable t.v., air and
heat. Two locations. Call:
954-678-8996

18611 N.W. 42 Ct.
Clean room. Private entrance
and bath. 786-486-2920


COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

Large one bedroom, one
bath, free water, and cable.
$700 mthly. Section 8 ok!
305-607-7192.

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bdrm, one bath, call
Jerry at 786-877-4766.

Liberty City Area
One bedroom, one bath,
newly tiled throughout. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-285-8872

MIAMI SHORES AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath. Eff.
also available. 786-286-2540

NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedroom, one bath,
adults only, call 305-693-
9843.

Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances included, central air.
Section 8 welcomed! Call
305-688-7559.


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1101 N.W. 60 Street
Lights and wate included,
$650 monthly, first, last and
security. 786-260-8652

1480 N.W. 195th Street
Small, fully furnished, A/C,
cable, no util., $575/month.
Call 786-317-1804.

1726 N.W. 93 Street
One large furnished efficien-
cy, utilities paid, $650.
Joe 786-385-8326

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$130 weekly, $500 moves
you in. Call 786-389-1686.

19441 N.E.1st Court
One Bedroom
Call 786-333-0024

243 N.W. 59th Street Rear
Two bdrm, one bath, $725/
month, call 305-218-1227.

350 N.W. 45th Street
Furnished efficiency. Utilities
included. $575 monthly. First
and last. 786-493-0686

BISCAYNE GARDENS
AREA
Util. and parking space incl.
Call 786-541-6755.

EL PORTAL AREA
9401-B N.W. 4 Ave. Air,
bars, private parking, water
included, nice area. $545/
month.
Call 786-514-1771

MIAMI LAKES AREA
Studio, 786-301-4368 or
305-558-2249.

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Full kitchen, furniture, central
air, cable, parking, util. incl.
305-494-7348


1211 N.W. 51st Terrace
A/C, private entrance, shared
bathroom. 305-757-2345

13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1341 N.W. 68 Ter
Clean rooms, $125 and $130
weekly, two weeks to move
in. 786-260-8652

1426 N.W. 70th Street
$300-$350 Monthly
305-836-8378

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

15720 N.W. 44th Court
Private entrance, utilities
included. Quiet people only!
No alcohol and drugs! Stop
by for info: 15710 N.W. 44th
Crt between 4pm-7pm.

1721 N.W. 41st Street
One room furnished with cen-
tral air and appliances, $125
weekly, $250 to move in.
Call 786-487-2222.

1765 N.W. 56th Street
Utilities, central air, weekly
rates. Call 305-303-2644.

1775 NW 151 STREET


786-230-6943

2545 N.W. 167th Street
Three bedrooms, one and
half baths. $1400 mthly.
786-319-8184


2967 N.W. 135th Street NW AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath. Brand new home, three bed-
Section 8 OK. 954-704-0094. room, two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
3045 N.W. 68 Street first time home buyer. Also
Three bedrooms, one bath. available, four bedroom, two
Section 8 OK. 954-704-0094 bath, at an attractive price.
Call 786-859-3772.


19620 N.W. 31st Avenue
$120/week, $240 to move
in, air, cable. Call 305-310-
5272.

$199 DEPOSITI!I
2169 N.W. 49 Street, Free Air
Direct TV, only $105 weekly.
Call NOW! 786-234-5683.

2261 N.W. 87th Street
Includes everything! $600/
month. Call 786-399-8557. ,

2900 N.W. 54th Street
Upstairs, one room, refrigera-
tor and air. Call 954-885-8583
or 954-275-9503.

3411 N.W. 173th Terrace
In private home. Call
786-285-2095.

4625 N Miami Avenue
Cable plus utilities.
954-993-5426

695 N.W. 41st Street
Air, cable, $285/move in,
$135/wk. Call 305-322-8966.

LIBERTY CITY/BROWNS-
VILLE AREA
Clean rooms, utilities
included, quiet area.
786-541-5234

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Private entrance, air and light
cooking, use of pool. Call:
305-343-2732

NORTHWEST AREA
CLEAN ROOMS
954-245-1626

NORTHWEST AREA
ROOMS FOR RENT
CALL 786-597-0871

OPA LOCKA AREA
Furnished room with cooking
privileges. 305-681-8326.

Room in Christian home.
Call
Na 305-693-3957.
ROOMMATE WANTED
In three bdrm, tWo bath
house. References needed.
Call 786-389-1346.


1000 N.W 55th Terrace
Three bdrm, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 okl Call 305-206-1172.

1014 N.W. 60th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, Section 88
accepted, 305-216-0901 or
786-229-9488: - -. -

10360 S.W. 173rd Terrace
Four bdrm, one bath, $1350.
Section 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

11220 N.W. 15th Court
Four, three, and two bdrms,
and efficiency $500/month.
786-718-9226.

12150 S.W. 218th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $650.
305-642-7080

12960 S.W. 267th Street
Three bdrm, two bath, $1300.
Section 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

14002 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedroom, two bath, new
townhouse located in nice
area, Section 8 ok! Only one
month security.
954-826-4013.

146 Street 27 Avenue
Four bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, air. Section 8
OK. $1300 monthly.
786-367-4004, 305-681-2886

1530 N.W. 71st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750. 305-642-7080

16000 N.W. 21 Avenue
Three bdrms, family room,
huge yard. Section 8 OK!
954-993-5426

1812 N.W. 66th Street
New three bdrm, one bath,
a/c, tile, stove and refrig.,
Sect. 8 ok! $1200 Call786-
344-9284.

1865 N.W. 45th St
Three bdrms, one bath,
$1175, $1500 to move in and
one bdrm, upstairs rear $695,
lights and water included,
$895 move in. 305-525-0619.

1899 N.W. 87th Street
8122 N.W. 14th Place
For info call Ms. German
305-691-4446

19 Ave. and N.W. 83 St.
Five or four bdrms, three
baths, in-law quarters, dining
room, central air.
954-430-0849.

1931 N.W. 97th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly. 786-357-8885

2000 N.W. 97 STREET
Two bedrooms with air and
appliances. 786-426-6263

2360 N.W. 140th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
first and last. $1200 monthly.
Section 8 welcomed! Curry


NORTHWEST AREA
Large, renovated, three bdrm,
two bath, tv and util. room.
$149K Call 305-305-5546.


WE BUY HOUSES!!!
Any Condition-Any Area!
305-788-8939
ATTENTIONM"
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
-WITH'"
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty




CADILLAC
STEALS
2001 Cadillac DeVille
One owner, very-low mileage,
air conditioning, cassette
CD changer, AM/FM radio.
Custom diamond white
exterior. $6800

2003 Cadillac DeVille
23,000 Miles, one owner,
very low mileage, air condition-
ing
cassette, CD changer, AM/FM
radio. Custom diamond white
exterior. $9500. Serious calls.
305-915-7377


3098 N.W. 65 Street
One bdrm one bath, air. $675
mthly, first security $1500
move in. 786-344-1879

3364 Plaza Street
Five bdrms, three bath, Sec-
tion 8 welcomed! Call Keisha
or Wessel Campbell
786-222-3755.

355 N.W. 19th Street
New, two-story, three bdrms,
two and a half bath with
washer and dryer. Section 8
welcomed! $1400 monthly,
call 786-234-8327.

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

505 N.W. 130th Street
Four bdrms, two bath, Sec-
tion 8 ok! $1500/month. Call
305-904-9421.

651 N.W. 52nd Street
Three bdrm, two baths,
$1300 monthly, Section 8
welcomed! Call 305-620-
4054 or 305-527-8330.

7620 N.W. 2nd Court
Three bdrm, two bath,
$1250/month, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-283-4855.

8150 N.W. 14th Court
Three bdrms, appliances, air.
$900 mthly. 786-426-6263

900 N.W. 65th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 305-642-7080.

Hollywood Area
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled, tiled. Section Ok.
786-285-8872

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Four or five bdrms, two
baths, fenced yard, tile,
Section 8 OK! Call 786-306-
2349.

N. MIAMI, MIAMI, MIRAMAR
AREA
Efficiency(Miramar),
houses(Miami and N. Miami)
for rent. 305-300-7783

NEAR ALLAPATTAH
MIDDLE
Two bdrms, one bath, large
yard. Section 8 Ok. $1250.
305-685-6795

NEAR MIAMI CENTRAL
HIGH
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, security lights. $1450.
Section 8 OK.305-685-6795

NEAR NORTHWESTERN
HIGH
Two bdrms, one bath,
air.$1250. Fenced. Section 8
OK. 305-685-6795

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five bedrooms and den,
three bathrooms, Section 8
okay! $1950 monthly. Call
305-992-6496.

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1000 to $1200, air, bars,
$2200 to $3000.move in. No
Section 8. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776

NW 65 STREET
Newly remodeled, three
bedroom, one bath. $1350
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-926-9273

Section 8
Beautiful and Spacious
Four Bdrm, Two Bath
Located at:
877 NW 73rd Street
Miami, FL 33150

Open House
Saturday and Sunday
Call 786-273-1462

Three bdrm, one bath, large
fenced yard, $1200/mth,
Section 8 ok! Call 786-344-
0750.


2461 N.W. 152nd Street
Miami Gardens home, two
bedrooms, one bath, central
air, fenced yard. First last and
security. No Section 8. $1050
monthly. 305-986-8395


ALL APPLIANLUS SALtIII
$99. We also repair. 7037
N.W. 2nd Ave. 786-512-6541


Men and Woman All Agesl
Earn up to $500 daily part-
time! Hottest money making
opportunity in America! Write
for FREE report:-Dry Tech,
Suite CL5951, 8920 Quartz
Ave, Northridge, CA 91324.







ACCOUNTS PAYABLES
Candidate must have a
working knowledge of
Quickbooks software.
Part-time position, 10 a.m.
1 p.m. Monday, Wednes-
day and Friday. Two years
exp. Fax resume to:
The Miami Times at
305-758-3617.
No Phone Calls


ACCURATE TYPIST
COMPUTER SAVVY
PART-TIME POSITIONS
Join our innovative sales
team. Weekly sales quota
required. Positions avail-
able Monday and Tuesday
9-6 p.m.; Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday 8:30
Sa m.-3"30 p.m. Motivated
individuals should fax
resume to 305-759-0297
or e-mail to advertising@
miamitimesonline com

Circulation Clerk
Experienced, ambitious, go-
gettersl Better than average
oral skills. Distribution sales
experience and familiar with
Dade and Broward counties
a must. Fax resume and
salary history to:
The Miami Times
305-758-3617


CUSTOMER SERVICE
REP.
Allstate Insurance Agency,
440 license needed.
90 NE 54 Street #E
Call 305-759-1316.

EXPERIENCED DETAIL-
ERS
Unique Car Wash
17101 N.W. 27 Avenue
Call Roosevelt
305-621-9387

Hiring Immediately!
WebCam Models (18 +).
We seek outgoing and
open minded models.
Flexible hours and great
payl Compensation: $750+
weekly. Call 954-237-1607.

INSTRUCTOR NEEDED
For traffic school. Teach
4, 8, 12 hour classes, also
drug and alcohol course,
90 NE 54 Street, 2nd Floor
305-759-1031

YOUR AD

COULD BE HERE


CLASSIFIED CONTINUE ON 9D


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


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Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


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DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


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ional Commuter Facility Apron Package 2
("Project")


Sealed Bids for the Project designated above will be received for and in behalf of Miami-Dade County, by the Office of the Clerk, in the Stephen P. Clark Center, Suite
17-202, 111 N.W. Ist Street, Miami, Florida, 33128 until 2:00 P.M., January 28st, 2009,_ or as modified by addendum, at which time all Bids will be taken to a room to be
designated by the Clerk of the Board in said Stephen P. Clark Center. Bids are to be submitted in two envelopes. Bids received after the time and date specified will not
be considered. Envelopes Aof Bids, containing only the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) will be publicly opened and the names of the Bidders read aloud. Upon notification
by the Department of Small Business Development, bidders may correct defects on the Schedule of Intent Affidavit(s) within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submission.
Envelopes B of Bids, containing all of the remaining bidding documents, from Bidders that have not been rejected as not responsive will be opened publicly and read
aloud forty-eight (48) hours after the bid submission date and non-responsive bids will not be opened. Bidders are invited to be present at each opening. The County
reserves the right to postpone or cancel the bid opening at any time prior to the scheduled opening of bids.
IN GENERAL THE WORK COMPRISES: Construction of the MIA Regional Commuter Facility Apron Package 2 at the west end of the North Terminal Development
extension. Generally consisting of concrete and asphalt pavement, underground utilities, aircraft fuel lines, passenger loading bridges foundation, passenger loading
bridges, light pole foundations, airfield lighting and pavement markings.
BID DOCUMENTS: The Miami-Dade Aviation Department will make the Bid Documents available, on December 18th, 2008, for inspection and/or purchase by
appointment only, on business days during the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Miami International Airport, Bldg. 3030, Central Wing, Conference Room
4. Interested parties are to schedule an appointment to review or purchase the Bid Documents through Maria Fernandez at 305-869-3343. The duration of each
Bid Documents review period will not exceed two (2) hours. However, the Department may schedule additional time slots (not to run consecutively with the original
appointment), if available. At the time of the appointment, and prior to any Bid Document review, interested parties will be required to present current, government
issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License, United States Passport), documentation that they are licensed architect, engineer, or contractor who may perform
work on, or related to, the Project, and sign and notarize a Confidentiality Affidavit certifying that the company and each authorized employee agrees, that in accordance
with Florida Statutes 119.071 (3)(b) and one or more of the following Florida Statutes, 281.301 and 331.22, to maintain the information contained in the Bid
Documents as being exempt from the provision of Florida Statute 119.07(1) and 24(a), Article I of the State Constitution. In addition, interested parties are advised
that individuals will be monitored while reviewing these documents. Interested parties may take notes, however, no photographs and/or copying of the documents will
be allowed.
The Bid Documents can be purchased for $1,500. Payment shall consist of:
1. Non-refundable Payment of $500 for each set of Bid Documents
2. Refundable Deposit of $1,000 for each set of Bid Documents
The non-refundable payment shall be by any type of check, or money order, only, and made payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. The refundable deposit
must be by Cashier's or Certified check only, and made payable to the Miami Dade Aviation Department. Each interested Bidder shall furnish an address, telephone and
fax numbers, and email address for the purpose of contact during the bidding process. A business card with all of this information will suffice.
Bid Documents may be purchased in person or by mail. To purchase a set of the Bid Documents in person, each purchaser must present a current
A. copy of government issued, picture identification (e.g., Driver's License)
B. copy of the 'architect, engineer, or contractor qualifier's license issued by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation for the
Bidder making the purchase
C. an original, notarized Confidentiality Affidavit signed by the licensed architect, engineer, or contractor.

Confidentiality Affidavits may be obtained in advance by downloading from www.miami-airport.com/html/bids.html or can be completed at the time the Bid Documents
are purchased. Bid Documents may also be purchased by mail by sending a copy of the requisite identification, license, original notarized Confidentiality Affidavit,
contact information, and checks along with a FedEx or UPS billing account number to the place of purchase indicated herein.

The Confidentiality Affidavit, non-refundable payment and refundable deposit shall be delivered in person to Maria Fernandez or designee, at Miami International Airport,
Building 3030, Central Wing, 2nd Floor between the hours of 9:00AM 4:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Upon payment and verification of the required identification
documents, the verified individual will be authorized to pick up he number of sets of the Bid Documents for-which payment has been made. Only full sets of the Bid
Documents will be authorized for pickup.
All Bid Documents, including any copies made, shall be returned to the same location where they were purchased. All Bidders that timely return the Bid Document will
have their deposit returned. Those Bidders that purchase Bid Documents, but elect not to participate in the bidding process are also required to return all copies of the
Bid Documents to the location of purchase. Failure to return the Bid Documents and copies made to the location of purchase within five (5) working days after the Bid
Due Date may be reported to a Law Enforcement Investigating Authority and will forfeit the deposit. Furthermore, Bidders that fail to return Bid Documents shall not
be allowed to participate in future Confidential solicitations until such time that the firm has taken corrective actions that are satisfactory to Miami Dade County. The
purchaser of the Bid Documents shall be required to certify that they have returned all original Bid Documents plus any copies and they have not retained any copies.
All bids must be submitted as set forth in the Bid Documents. The County reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, or to
re-advertise the Project. The County, by choosing to exercise its right of rejection, does so without the imposition of any liability against the County by any and all
bidders.
PRE-BID CONFERENCE: The'Miami-Dade Aviation Department will hold a Pre-Bid Conference and Site Inspection on January 8, 2009, from 9:00 am to 12:00
Noon at the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Building 5A, Fourth Floor, Conference Room F, Miami, Florida, for all interested parties.
To assist in our planning, Bidders are requested to inform the Contracting Officer of the number of persons expected to attend the Pre-Bid and/or the Site Inspection
no later than 24 hours before the scheduled date. Attendance will be limited to two (2) representatives per firm. No other Site Inspections will be provided by the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department. It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to comply with all the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For sign
language, interpreter services, material in accessible format, other special accommodations, or airport-related ADA concerns, please contact the MDAD Office of ADA
Coordination at (305) 876-7024.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM
Contract Measures for this Project is (are): 21%

COMMUNITY WORKFORCE PROGRAM
The Community Workforce Goal for this Project is: 10%
BID GUARANTY: Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Guaranty of not less than five percent (5%) of the Total Bid in a manner required by the Instructions to
Bidders. No Bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for the receipt of Bids for a period of one-hundred and eighty (180) days. The County reserves the
right to reject any or all Bids, to waive informalities and irregularities, to reject all bids, or to re-advertise for Bids.
BID IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING PROVISIONS AMONG OTHERS:
1) The Miami-Dade County Responsible Wages Ordinance.
2) The Provisions in reference to the timetables for minority and female employment participation, expressed as a percentage, for the Contractor's aggregate work force
in each trade on all construction work in the covered area, as follows:


Timetables Goal for minority Goals for female
Participation for each Participation for
From 4/01/81 trade in Miami-Dade County each trade
Until further notice 39.5 % 6.9 %

As used in this Notice, and in the Contract resulting from this solicitation, the "covered area" is Miami-Dade County, Florida. These goals are applicable to all Contractor's
construction work (whether or not it is Federal or Federally assisted) performed in the covered area.
3) The "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Construction Contract Specifications" as set forth in the Contract
Documents.
The Contractor's compliance with the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4 shall be based on its implementation of the Equal Opportunity Clause,
specific affirmative action obligations required by the specifications set forth in 41CFR 60-4.3(a), and its efforts to meet the goals established for the geographical
area where the Contract resulting from this solicitation is to be performed. The hours of minority and female employment and training must be substantially uniform
throughout the length of the Contract, and in each trade, and the Contractor shall make a good faith effort to employ minorities and women evenly on each of its projects.
The transfer of a minority or female employee or trainee from Contractor to Contractor or from project to project for the sole purpose of meeting the Contractor's goals
shall be a violation of the Contract, the Executive Order and the regulations in 41CFR Part 60-4. Compliance with the goals will be measured against the total work
hours performed.
The Contractor shall provide written notification to the Director of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs within ten (10) working days of award of any
construction subcontract in excess of $10,000 at any tier for construction work under the Contract resulting from this solicitation. The notification shall list the name,
address and telephone number of the Subcontractor; employer identification number of the Subcontractor; estimated dollar amount of the subcontract; estimated
starting and completion dates of the subcontract; and the geographical area in which the Contract is to be performed.
4) Miami-Dade County has enacted an ordinance governing utilization of certified Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE) Subcontractors. Requirements for
compliance with this ordinance are contained in the Contract Documents.
5) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t), a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs or bids after advertisement and terminates at the time
the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the Board of County Commissioners or a Notice of Contract Award Recommendation, whichever comes first.
The Cone of Silence prohibits communications regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists, or consultants and the
County's professional staff, including but not limited to the County Manager and the County Manager's staff. A Cone of Silence is also imposed between the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff.
The provisions of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) do not apply to oral communications at pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before selection committees,
oral communications with the Contracting Officer, as published by the Department of Small Business Development in their weekly Cone of Silence Project Information
Report, for administering the procurement process, provided the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedures, Contract negotiations during any
duly noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed public meeting or communications in writing at
any time unless specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders or proposers must file a copy of any written communication with the Clerk
of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be
made available to any person upon request.
In addition to any other penalties provided bylaw, violation of Miami-Dade County Code Section 2-11.1(t) by any bidder or proposer shall render any RFP award, RFQ
award, or bid award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of this Ordinance shall report such violation to the State Attorney and/or may file a
complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders or Proposers should reference the actual Ordinance for further clarification.
6) The County shall not be responsible for any modifications or alterations made to the Bid Documents or to the Contract Documents other than those made by
Addendum, Change Order, or Work Order. Any purchase of partial sets of documents shall be at the purchaser's risk.


7) Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Code Section 2.8-1 (d), a Bidder shall have on file, prior to contract award a duly executed Uniform County Affidavit with the Miami-
Dade County Department of Procurement Management (DPM), to be maintained with the bidders vendors registration file. The Bidder is responsible for obtaining the
Vendor Registration Package, including all affidavits by downloading from the DPM website at www.miamidade.gov or from the Vendor Assistance Unit at 111 N.W. 11s
Street, 131 Floor, Miami, Florida 33128, (305) 375-5773.


I


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


w '"Copyrighted Material


-. - Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Subscribe


NORTH MIAMI COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE OF
2009 ANNUAL MEETING CALENDAR

Notice is hereby given that the projected
schedule for the Regular Meetings of the
North Miami Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA) Board of Commissioners is
as follows:

Tuesday, January 13, 2009
Tuesday, January 27, 2009
Tuesday, February 10, 2009
Tuesday, February 24, 2009
Tuesday, March 10, 2009
Tuesday, March 24, 2009
Tuesday, April 14, 2009
Tuesday, April 28, 2009
Tuesday, June 9, 2009
Tuesday, June 23; 2009
Tuesday, July 14, 2009
Tuesday, August 25, 2009
Tuesday, September 8, 2009
Tuesday, September 22, 2009
Tuesday, October 13, 2009
Tuesday, October 27, 2009
Tuesday, November 10, 2009
Tuesday, November 24, 2009
Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Meetings shall be held in the City of North Mi-
ami Council Chambers on the Second Floor
of City Hall, 776 N.E. 125th Street, North Mi-
ami, FL 33161. Interested members of the
public are invited to attend, nd participate.
(Note: CRA meetings are subject to change.
Please see website for updated information:
www.NorthMiamiCRA.org


The Housing Authority of the City of Miami Beach (HACMB)
view and comment, its Annual Plan for the Fiscal Year 2009.
proposing to update the following documents:


is placing for public
The HACMB is also


Section 8 HCV Administrative Plan
Admission and Occupancy Plan (A.C.O.P)


The Annual Plan and all other documents listed above Will be placed for public view
and comment for 45 days starting on Thursday, January 8, 2009 through Monday,
February 23, 2009 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. in the HACMB
Executive Office, located at 200 Alton' Road, First Floor, Miami Beach, Florida. All
comments must be submitted in writing and received no later than February 24,
2009 at 9:00 a.m. at the following address:

HACMB Executive Office
Ref: Annual Plan/Plans
200 Alton Road
Miami Beach, FL 33139

There will be a Public Hearing at the HACMB for the purpose of discussing its
Annual Plan, Section 8 HCV Administrative Plan and Admission and Occupancy Plan
(A.C.O.P) for Fiscal Year 2009. The hearing will take place on Tuesday, February 24,
2009 beginning at 10:00 a.m. in the Rebecca Towers North Multi-Purpose Room,
200 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Florida. All interested persons are welcomed to
attend and will be heard.


In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), please contact the Housing Authority
of the City of Miami Beach at (305) 532-6401 one week in advance if special accommodations are
required.


EQUAL. OUSNIT
OPPORTUNITY


Luowm your career ini a re%ardinB.. diverse arnd
chal leng~ing environment full of opportunity.
find yntir nextjf* at
www.miamnidade.gov/jobs

l-or cu pukter AC~ssvis any Mlini-I.)Mde Courity I J r r,- or
Fw il tor~d VI ILKrLL (jCaff 3 11tr

r.7 6 fl'e *I C .'~


City of Miami

PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF MIAMI
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Miscellanpous Surveying Services

RFQ No: 08-09-026
Completed Responses must be delivered to the Office of the City Clerk,
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 by 2:00 PM, on
Friday, January 23, 2009 ("Response Submission Date"). Any Responses
received after the above date and time or delivered to a different address or
location will not be considered.
RFQ documents can only be obtained from the City of Miami Department of
Capital Improvements' webpage at www.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements
on or after January 2, 2009. It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure
the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms periodically
check the CIP webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda.
The City of Miami reserves the right to accept any Responses deemed to be
in the best interest of the City, to waive any minor irregularities, omissions,
and/or technicalities in any Responses, or to reject any or all Responses and
to re-advertise for new Responses, in accordance with the applicable sections
of the City Charter and Code.
THIS REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF
SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE.
Pedro G. Hernandez,
City Manager

DP No.005008


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HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF MIAMI BEACH

PUBLIC COMMENT NOTICE

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, JANUARY 7-13, 2009


b0 "Copyrighted Material-- -




Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami
City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


IFB NO. 106961 CUSTODIAL SERVICES
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 3, 2009

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and site visit


will be held on Thursday, January 15. 2009 at *
0:2 0 pm at the Miami Riverside Center g


444 SW 2nd Avenue. Miami. Florida (Meet at the
Lobby).
The purpose of this conference is to allow poten-
tial Bidders an opportunity to present questions to
staff and obtain clarification of the requirements of
the Bid documents. It is mandatory that a repre-
sentative (s) of the bidder attend in order to qualify
to bid. Detailed specifications for this bid are avail-
able at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department,
website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Tele-
phone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO
THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE
WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74
ORDINANCE NO.12271.


Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


ON

AD NO. 002067


NORTH MIAMI COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

PUBLIC NOTICE OF
2009 ANNUAL MEETING CALENDAR

Notice is hereby given that the projected
schedule for the Regular Meetings of the
North Miami Community Redevelopment
Agency Advisory Committee (CRAAC) is
as follows:

Monday, January 5, 2009
Monday, February 2, 2009
Monday, March 2, 2009
Monday, April 6, 2009
Monday, May 4, 2009
Monday, June 1, 2009
Monday, July 13, 2009
Monday, August 3, 2009
Tuesday, September 1, 2009
Monday, October 5, 2009
Monday, November 2, 2009
Monday, December 7, 2009

Meetings shall be held in the City of North
Miami Council Chambers on the Second
Floor of City Hall, 776 N.E. 125th Street,
North Miami, FL 33161. Interested members
of the public are invited to attend and partic-
ipate. (Note: CRAAC meetings are subject
to change. Please see website for updated
information: www.NorthMiamiCRA.org


IFB NO. 110051


INVITATION FOR BID FOR WASTE OILAND NON
HAZARDOUS PETROLEUM IMPACTED PRODUCTS


OPENING DATE: 2:00 PM, MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2009

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference will be held on Tuesday, January 13, 2008 a
10:00 AM at the General Services Administration, 1390 NW 20 Street, Miami. FL
33142. The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Bidders an opportunity
to present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the requirements of the Bid
documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s) of the bidder attend in order
to qualify to bid.

Deadline for Request for, additional information / clarification 1/16/2009 at
3:00P.M.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO. 12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 007638


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on January 15, 2009 at 9:00 AM at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of considering the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION BY A FOUR-FIFTHS
(4/5THS) AFFIRMATIVE VOTE, AFTER PUBLIC HEARING, PURSUANT
TO SECTION 2-614 OF THE CITY CODE, WAIVING THE CONFLICT OF
INTEREST PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN SECTION 2-612 OF THE CODE
OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, AS AMENDED, TO ENABLE JAY
SOLOWSKY TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT TO TRANSACT BUSINESS
WITH AND FOR THE DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY OF THE
CITY OF MIAMI FORTHE PURPOSE OF REPRESENTING THE DOWNTOWN
DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF MIAMI IN PROCEEDINGS
FILED BY MILAN INVESTMENT GROUP, INC., IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO.: 08-77800 CA
08.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
such proposed waiver and transaction. Should any person desire to appeal
any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made, including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be
based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk




(#003200)

CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 15, 2009 at 9:00 AM at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of considering the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, BY A FOUR-FIFTHS
(4/5THS) AFFIRMATIVE VOTE, AFTER A PUBLIC HEARING, PURSUANT
TO SECTION 2-614 OF THE CITY CODE, WAIVING THE CONFLICT OF
INTEREST PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN SECTION 2-612 OF THE CODE
OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, AS AMENDED, TO ALLOW NITIN
MOTWANI, WHO IS A MEMBER OF THE DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT
AUTHORITY'S BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND ALSO A PRINCIPAL IN THE
MIAMI WORLDCENTER GROUP; RELATED TO PENDING DEVELOPMENT
AGREEMENT (CONTRACT), PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 163, FLORIDA
STATUTES, BETWEEN MIAMI WORLDCENTER GROUP, LLC, AND THE
CITY OF MIAMI.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning such
proposed action. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person
shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all
testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



(#003197) Sa


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on January 15, 2009 at 9:00 AM at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of considering the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, BY A FOUR-FIFTHS
(4/5THS) AFFIRMATIVE VOTE, AFTER A PUBLIC HEARING, PURSUANT
TO SECTION 2-614 OF THE CITY CODE, WAIVING THE CONFLICT OF
INTEREST PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN SECTION 2-612 OF THE CODE OF
THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, AS AMENDED, TO ALLOW JEROME HOLLO,
WHO IS A MEMBER OF THE DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY'S
BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND ALSO A PRINCIPAL IN THE TWJ 1201, LLC;
RELATED TO PENDING LICENSE AGREEMENT(CONTRACT), PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 163, FLORIDA STATUTES, BETWEEN MIAMI TWJ 1201, LLC,
AND THE CITY OF MIAMI.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
such proposed acquisition. Should any person desire to appeal any decision
of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



(#003199)


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 15, 2009 at 9:00 a.m., in the City Commission Chambers at
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of waiving
the requirements of obtaining sealed bids for the sole source purchase of Dual
Band High Powered 30W Filtered Amplifier, a 2100 MHz Converter and an
Amberjack Wideband Direction Finder to upgrade the current cellular tracking
surveillance equipment, known as the StingRay 4-CH and KingFish 1-CH, from
Harris GCSD Wireless Products Group, for the department of police, at an
amount not to exceed $51,500.

Inquiries from other potential sources of such a package who feel that they
might be able to satisfy the City's requirements for this item may contact
Lourdes Rodriguez, Procurement Supervisor, at the City of Miami Purchasing
Department at (305) 416-1904.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning such
proposed acquisition. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of
the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F.S.286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



(#003196)

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
WAIVER OF COMPETITIVE BID REQUIREMENTS
TO PURCHASE ADDITIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL
SERVICES FOR THE GRAPELAND PARK
PROJECT, B-35828


City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida





The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on January 15,
2009 beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best
interest that the City Commission ratify, approve and confirm the City
Manager's findings of an emergency justifying the waiver of competitive
bid procedures and authorizing the, City Manager to approve the
proposals submitted by Bureau Veritas to perform additional work as
required by DERM for the Grapeland Park Project, B-35828, for a total
not to exceed an amount of $38,000, consisting of $34,888 for basic
services and $3,112 for contingency and reimbursable expenses, with
funds allocated from CIP Project No. B-35828.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of January 15, 2009 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida
All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect
to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting,


that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003198)


11




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