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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00578
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla
Creation Date: December 31, 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
Classification: lcc - Newspaper
System ID: UF00028321:00578

Full Text



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DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 19 MlBA I. FLORIDA, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


County to build hundreds of homes for Scott residents


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@rniamitimesonline.coml
Hundreds of people displaced
from the former Scott/Carver
development will have first
priority for similar affordable


housing under a new plan that
the Miami-Dade Commission
unanimously approved recent-
ly that commits the county to
building 850 homes in what is
being described as an extended
HOPE VI target area.


Under the Dec. 16 resolution,
850 homes will be built in the
expanded area from Northwest
36th to 119th streets and Sev-
enth to 32"'n avenues. Devel-
opers were approved to begin
work on the first 354 homes.
The resolution was spon-
sored by Dorrin D. Rolle and


co-sponsored 'by Commissioner
Audrey Edmonson. Other com-
missioners came to agreement
of the resolution.
Low-income housing advo-
cates welcomed the move.
"After seven years of strug-
gle, we have a document that
legally binds the county for


850 homes to come back into
the community," said Aiyeshia
Hudson, a community orga-
nizer with Liberty City-based
Miami Workers Center that is
home to Low-Income Families
Fighting Together (LIFFT).
Both groups advocate against
disparities that exist in the


Black and Hispanic communi-
ties in areas such as poverty,
racism, and gender oppression.
Along with Take Back the Land,
and other organizations, they
have been in the forefront of
helping to restore housing for
former Scott/Carver residents.
Please turn to RESIDENTS 4A


Mikelle Gayle and Tarre Stanley Jr. were chosen Prince and Princess during the 15th annual Rising
Sons and Star Sisters Pageant held on Saturday at the Joseph Caleb Center. -Miami Times photo/amesForbes


Holiday pageant and fairy tale


captivate audience at the Caleb


By Margarita Sweeting
Special to The Miami Times
The Kwanzaa value of self
determination was the highlight
of a program that featured the
15th Annual Rising Sons and
Star Sisters Pageant, as well as


a musical called "Ashella", on
Saturday at the Joseph Caleb
Center in Liberty City.
Both events set out to showcase
the talents of the African
American community and educate
a new generation of youth about
Black culture


"If you look at Disney, they're
not doing their job. There are no
African princesses. And, the one
time they tried they used Brandy
and Whitney Houston but they put
them in Europe. Why not Africa?"
said Patricia Roberts, founder of
Please turn to PAGEANT 4A


Community service by siblings

brings Miami-Dade recognition


Twins follow grandma's lead

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.coim
When you first meet Vaniecia Scott, the
slim 17-year-old is very quiet and seems
pretty shy. But behind the shyness is a
young woman devoted to serving people.
And she is not alone.
Vaniecia's twin brother, Harold, is just
as committed to community service.
The siblings were recently honored for
their dedication to helping others.
"It started when I was very young. I've
always been interested in helping people
and it excites me when I help someone
else," Vaniecia said in a recent phone
interview.
The siblings are members of the William


H. Turner Technical Arts High School's
debate team, Future Business Leaders of
America and the mentorship program. They
are also active in providing humanitarian
aid for students in Africa, along with being
HIV/AIDS peer educators.
Described by their teachers as being
devoted to serving others, the Scott twins
say it was their grandmother, Josie Poitier,
who exposed them to what community
service is all about.
"My grandmother is my role model
because she is always helping other
people," said Harold.
Poitier, 62, grew up in Overtown and
has been a full-time volunteer for the
Miami police department for more than
40 years.
"I love helping people. It brings joy to my
heart just putting a smile on someone's
Please turn to SIBLINGS 4A


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Advocates win victory after years of struggle


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL-THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2008


Make resolutions meaningful
he end of one year and the beginning of a new one is
usually a time to make resolutions - to set a course
for the next year that would guide one's life, especially
on matters that require some commitment. Regardless of the
motivation, the more demanding the commitment, the greater
the chance the dedication will falter, with some taking refuge
in the belief that resolutions are made to be broken.
But this time around resolutions should not be difficult to
keep. In fact, many people are already keeping resolutions:
not to spend too much money, not to drive their vehicles un-
necessarily, not to put their jobs in jeopardy, to be kinder
to their family members and people generally, to affirm their
faith in God.
It is easy because there is no real alternative.
The question is whether the lifestyle changes that.have been
forced on us will last beyond the economic problems that
caused them.


Remember our youth
When he took the oath of office as the new chair-
man of the Miami-Dade County Commission on
Dec. 18, veteran politician Dennis Moss seemed
to be under no illusion that he was taking on some tough
challenges, many due in large measure to the nation's de-
pressed economy.
But Mr. Moss was willing to pull under his wing some
of the most difficult issues facing our large county in ar-
eas such as housing, jobs, transportation, water and sew-
er, prisons, corrections, fire-rescue, public safety, public
health, the airport and the seaport.
Exactly what the 15-year County Hall insider will be able
to achieve is far from certain. For one thing, almost all of
the items on his list will need money, lots of it, at a time
when there is little of it locally and from the state and the
federal government. It is not unreasonable to expect that
there will have to be even more belt tightening in the imme-
diate future as efforts are made to right the economy under
a Barack Obama administration.
But what Mr. Moss and his colleagues must give priority
to Miami-Dade's human resources, especially the young,
who need more help, not less, in these difficult times when
their families face losing their homes, their parents face
losing their jobs and they all are in danger of losing hope,
as many have probably done already.
A new study out this Monday from Northeastern Univer-
sity points to a direct correlation between a new upswing in
crimes,' especially violent incidents, among the young and a
scaling back of funding for mentoring, sports, after-school
and summer programs.
Criminal Justice professors Alan Fox and Marc Swatt
issued the report. Prof. Fox offered this observation: "We
need to invest much more in the lives of these kids. I know
there's a lot of people who say times are tough and we don't
have the money but we either pay for these programs now
or pray for these victims later because crime doesn't wait
until the economy improves."
It is easy to become caught up in the grand vision and
lose sight of the less glamorous aspects of governing. While
Mr. Moss and his colleagues, along with County Mayor Car-
los Alvarez, push for the grand ticket items on the county
agenda, it will serve all of us well if they also remember
Prof. Fox's warning.



Alvah Chapman will be missed
M iami-Dade lost one of its greatest
community leaders on Christ-
mas Day when the former head
of The Miami Herald newspaper died at the
age of 87.
Alvah H. Chapman Jr. was a great news-
man but this community will always re-
member him as the man who took on the
tough jobs nobody else seemed to want and
made them look easy.
Chapman retired from The Herald in CHAPMAN
1989 but he never stopped working for his
community. Two of his finest programs were
We Will Rebuild after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and the Mi-
ami Coalition for Homeless, now a national model.
The Miami Times publisher-emeritus Garth C. Reeves Sr.
remembers his longtime friend fondly: "Alvah was one of the
few White people in Miami that I trusted implicitly. When he
said he would do something, you knew it was not idle chatter
but a commitment to get the job done."
Chapman was known for his diligence and hard work in
any task he undertook. An unselfish man, he always seemed
to put the good of the community first. Reeves said nobody
could refuse him if he asked you to serve.
Reeves said he started working on committees and boards
with Chapman when Florida International University was
starting up in Miami and had worked with him on the proj-
ects that he headed through the years. Some of these were the
Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce, The New World Action
Committee, the United Way, Miami Citizens Against Crime,
and the Liberty City Revitalization Committee after the riots
in 1980.
Miami-Dade could use more leadership of the caliber of Al-
vah H. Chapman Sr. He will certainly be missed.


he Q-c iami aiime
(ISSN 0739 03191
Published WVeeHly a3 900 NJW 541h Slreel,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Posi Office Bo. 270i200
Buena Vista Slation, Miami Florida 33127
Phone 305-69-.6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder. 1923-19368
GARTH C. REEVES. JR.. Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emerilus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member ol Nalional Newspaper Publisher Associallon
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Buena Visla Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 * 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
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f"l. e,.erv persorn regardless il race creed or colo: his or her human and legal rignis Haling rio person leering n.: person The
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MKit .ffiami tim^e
The Miami Tirres welcomehi.- and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries az well as all oLher material in the newspaper.
Such feedback makes for a health\ dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, howve\er, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone
number of the v.riter for purposes of confirming authorship
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor. The Miami Tines, 900 N.W,. 54th Street. Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770;
Email: n-iamiteditoral,, bellsouth.net.


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OPINION


Bl..\CKS MUST CONTROL -IHEIR OWN DESTINYY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


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Why is it important to celebrate Kwanzaa and how do you observe the festival?


SHIRLEY JACOBS, 68
Retired, Liberty City

I am proud
to celebrate
Kwanzaa be-
cause it is a
Black holi- -
day. How we L _
celebrate . the
holiday is my
family and I
get together
and reminisce about the things
that God has done in our lives
throughout the past year. The
young people have to know
about their lieritage. This holi-
day is an African-American tra-
dition that cannot be forgotten.

NORA REYNOLDS, 55
Entrepreneur, North Miami

I celebrate: -7-
Kwanzaa in
own way by
cooking, play-
ing music,
drinking wine
and spend-
ing time with
my family and
friends. I put N


up my Christmas tree and light
the candles for the holiday.
Even through the holiday, I am
mindful of the birth of Jesus as
the real reason why we come
together.

ROY WILLIAMS, 68
Retired, Liberty City

Christmas to me is everyday.
I don't need a holiday to remem-
ber the birth of Jesus. I don't re-
ally celebrate Kwanzaa but it is


important hol-
iday oDcause
of our Afri-
can -Airer c an
backgr'u nrd.

OZZIE FLAG,
79
Retired. Li,',.,ii
City

I never cel-
ebrated the
holiday and,
frankly, I
don't know
much about
it because I
was born and
raised in Geor-


gia in a Baptist environment. I
believe in Santa Claus and Je-
sus like everyone else but not
Kwanzaa.

MARY THOMPSON, 57
Pastor, Liberty City

I don't cele- - . -
brate Kwanzaa
but Christmas if
is about re-
memberingthe.
birth of Jesus.
I have nothing
against the
people that ,.
do celebrate
Kwanzaa but Jesus is the rea-
son for the season.

A. C. BAUGH, 55
Construction, Liberty City

I don't knov -------
much about .
Kwanzaa to
celebrate it.
I celebrate
Christmas in
the American
tradition with
my family.
Usually, we get


up and allow the kids to open
their presents, then, around the
afternoon time, we have lunch
and think about the goodness
of the Lord. Christmas to me
has always been about being
with family and celebrating the
birth of Jesus.


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AA THE MIAMI TIMES. DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


Meetings scheduled to take input from the community


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


a* *a *


. * .


RESIDENTS
continued from 1A

But not all housing advo-
cates were quick to rejoice.
Max Rameau, founder of
Take Back the Land, took a
cautious position. He said the
county's action was significant
but he was not yet prepared to
embrace it.
"I will believe it when I see
it," Rameau said.
Under a grant by the U.S.
Department of Housing and
Urban Development to the Ho-
meownership Opportunities
for People Everywhere (HOPE
VI) project approved on Oct.
17, 2000, 850 housing units
have been torn down to reduce
the "concentration of poverty
requirements," according a
Miami-Dade Housing Agency
document.
That plan calls for the build-
ings to be replaced by public
housing units, single-family
homes and town homes and
bring in mixed-income into the
community.
The Scott /Carver Public
Housing Complex was built in
the 1950s, originally to serve
as Army barracks. Demolition
of the buildings forced hun-
dreds of families to relocate.
Residents were given a choice
of another public housing op-
tion or taking Section 8 or
owning the homes. The major-
ity opted for Section 8 or public
housing, said Sybrina Fulton,
a community supportive ser-


vice representative for Miami-
Dade Housing Agency.
Over the years, the county
seemed to have lost track of
many residents but Fulton said
they were in fact living in subsi-
dized housing. Some residents
were evicted from Section 8
housing for failure to pay rent
or were hit with court-ordered
evictions from public housing,
leaving no forwarding address,


and that could account for the
"missing" residents. Currently,
many are living in public hous-
ing, Section 8, or are homeown-
ers, said Fulton.
The plan approved by the
County Commission calls for
the construction initially of
354 public housing, townhous-
es and single family homes, s
for wliich former residents of
Scott/Carver will be given pri-
ority in what will be phase 2 of
the HOPE VI project.
A total of 57 homes have been
built between Northwest 68th


and 71st streets on 22"1' Ave-
nue in the first phase for many
former Scott/Carver homes.
Former Scott/ Carver resident
Yvonne Stratford welcomed the
decision to build the second
phase and urged that there
be "no credit checks, no back-
ground checks" as she stood
outside the County Commis-
sion meeting on Dec. 11 when
the issue was first considered.


"Words are not enough. We
need to commit and insure that
Scott residents can return. We
need the rules and criteria to
stay the same," said Stratford
and other former Scott/Carver
residents were among the peo-
ple pushing the project.
But Fulton informed former
residents at a HOPE VI com-
munity meeting held several
weeks ago at the James E.
Scott'Community Center, 2267
NW 72nd St., that background
checks will be performed for
residents who are seeking pub-


lic housing and credit checks
for those seeking home owner-
ship.
Stratford, who said she would
like to get back into one of the
new homes, said while the
commission's decision called
for a celebration, she was wor-
ried that many residents would
not do so even though there
are 71,000 people currently on
a waiting list for the affordable
housing. After almost 10 years,
people got tired of waiting, said
Stratford.
"Dec. 16 was our restora-
tion day," said Stratford, who
attends the monthly HOPE VI
meetings at the James E. Scott
Community Center, which are
sparsely attended.
"We need more people to
participate. It is time for us to
move forward and bring Scott-
Carver homes back into our
neighborhoods," she said.
Fulton encourages former
residents to attend the monthly
HOPE VI meeting every Thurs-
day at 6 p.m. at the James E.
Scott Community Center.
U.S. HUD initially gave $35
million for HOPE VI -Scott/
Carver Homes, of which $18
million has not yet been spent.
Also, according to Fulton,, the
county will provide $8.3 million
in housing replacement funds
and $13.7 million in special ob-
ligation bonds. The developers,
McCormack Baron Salazar De-
velopment, will bring addition-
al funds for the second phase
which is to be built by 2012.


'Ashella' gives Black version of Cinderella tale


PAGEANT
continued from 1A

the African Caribbean American
Performing Artists (ACAPAI),
which sponsored the show.
"I have two daughters and I
want them to see themselves
as beautiful princesses," said
Roberts, who first staged
"Ashella" in 1991.
The play was performed
after the pageant in which
Tarre Stanley, 17, was
chosen prince and Mikelle
Gaye,. 18, princess. Each got
checks for $100, trophies and
certificates.
"Participating in this really
gave me a new understanding
of where we come from and
where we're going," said Tarre,
who impressed judges and the
audience with a saxophone
rendition of "Amazing Grace."
"I would encourage anyone
to give everything a try. You
never know what you might
learn,".Tarre said.
Constance Calaha Ekon, also
known as Queen Mother, a ti-
tle given to her by an African
Chief in Ghana, said creating a
learning experience for teenag-
ers is one of the main reasons
she founded the pageant.
"There were so many prob-
lems with the youth I wanted to
assist in any way I could," said
Ekon. "This pageant gives them
an opportunity to do something
they really enjoy and to show
off their talents."
For Allapattah resident
Juanita Coleman, the event


Prince Jola, played by Aquil Roberts, pick Ashella, played
by Narsha Cummings, to be his wife in the holiday fairy tale
"Ashella" which was staged on Saturday at the Joseph Caleb
Center. -Miami Times photo/James Forbes


achieved its goal. The whole
evening was "very beneficial,"
Coleman said. "It brings about
a sense of unity and gives a feel
of the different cultures and
traditions we have. It's nice
that we can come together and


celebrate like this."
Besides the pageant, the au-
dience got to see "Ashella," the
musical that Roberts describes
as her answer to "The Nut-
cracker" and "Cinderella."
"Ashella", played by Nar-


Girl gets invitation to Obama inauguration


SIBLINGS
continued from 1A

face," Poitier said in an inter-
view as she stood outside of her
home in Allapattah.
The twins stay with Poitier
after school until their mother,
Vandetta, with whom they live
in Miami Gardens, comes to
pick them up.
Their father Harold is a Publix
manager.
They are active members of
New Birth Missionary Baptist
Church.
"They are junior trustees at
the church which is responsible
for the operations of the church
for the youth department. The
two collect the offerings on
youth Sundays, which is the
second Sunday of the month.
The twins are faithful mem-
bers that attend church every
Sunday," said Rejohan Perkins,
youth director at New Birth.


County Commissioner Au-
drey Edmonson of District 3
recently honored Vaniecia and
Harold for outstanding commu-
nity service; Dec. 4 was named
"Vaniecia Scott and Harold
Scott III Day."
In another development,
Vaniecia has been selected to
attend the Jan. 20 inauguration
of Barack Obama as president.
The Washington-based Presi-
dential Youth Inaugural Con-
ference, which selects excep-
tional student leaders to attend
the Inaugural every four years,
picked her for the trip. Poitier
will accompany her to Wash-
ington when she leaves on Jan.
16.
Vaniecia's leadership at Turn-
er Tech, where she and her
brother are juniors, earned her
a spot among 70,000 students
chosen to attend the event, said
Matthew Lim, an admissions
advisor for the Youth Inaugural


Conference.
"I was excited, just being able
to be a part of history," Vaniecia
said.
Poitier herself will receive the
Laudare Medal Community
Service award at Barry Univer-
sity's 2009 Founders Ball on
Jan. 10.
The twins hope to attend
Florida State University. Vanie-
cia, whose favorite subject is
math, wants to pursue a career
in business. Harold wants to
pursue studies in criminal jus-
tice.
"I am very proud of them,"
said Thomas. "They are very
intelligent and determined in-
dividuals. They continue to
challenge themselves daily.
They were very active as kids,
winning spelling bees, and were
placed in Advanced classes.
They might have not been ath-
letic but they were superior in
academics."


sha Cummings, is a young
girl who is forced to work for
her vindictive elder sisters and
stepmother. One day, they are
told that Prince Jola, played by
Aquil Roberts, is looking for a
wife. The girls have to dance for
him and he will choose the best
dancer as his spouse.
Roberts said there is always
a professional dancer in the
show but the rest of the cast
are not.
"With African dance, it de-
pends on the energy, style of
the dancer. So, you never know
what you're going to get. It
changes every year," said Rob-
erts.
One highlight of the play is
the more than dozen women
who then take center stage to
dance before the prince.
"The dance is always so pow-
erful. It takes a lot of endur-
ance and it shows respect for
African dance," said Roberts.
ACAPAI also sponsors sev-
eral programs, such as the
Playhouse Series and Dream
Catchers, a program for at-risk
youth. For more information,
call 786-337-0552.
For more information on Ris-
ing Sons and Star Sisters, in-
cluding participating in next
year's pageant, call 305-693-
9379.


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Christmas trees in these convenient ways:

Drop it off
* Take undecorated trees to one of 14 drop-off
locations from Dec 26 - Jan. 18.

Place it curbside
* From Jan. 7 - 14 only, undecorated trees
will be picked up from your curbside.

Trees collected during these dates will be
turned into mulch.

For more information on tree recycling, mulch
pickup locations or proper tree disposal, call
3-1-1 or click www.miamidade.gov



MIAMI-F


i. , . , - - i - . . . .

The Scott/Carver HOPE VI development team will hold a series
of community meetings and planning sessions to plan for new
housing, community redevelopment and resident services, in-
cluding discussion of the right to return policy for former Scott/
Carver residents. The sessions will take place 9 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Jan. 8 ; 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Jan. 9; and 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Jan. 10,
at the James E. Scott Community Center, 2267 NW 72", St.,
Jan 8.-10. For more information, call 877-330-2979.


_ I- ~-- - ------- --------_---- ---------- ---------------- -- --~1


%4 o m - ib


@Dfo XEgm


ailoa gt5� r-:a IQ









1L.\C Ks MtuSr CONTROL iFiR n OWN DE.sTINY 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 51, 2008-JANUARY 6,2009


Obama most admired man in America by very large margin


President-elect Barack Obama
emerged as the most admired
man in America in a USA TO-
DAY/Gallup Poll that showed
him at 32 percent, outdistanc-
ing George W. Bush, the man
he will succeed on Jan. 20, who
scored five percent.
Rounding out the list were
Obama's former Republican
rival Sen. John McCain with
three percent, and Pope Bene-
dict XVI, the Rev. Billy Graham
and former President Bill Clin-
ton with two percent each.
Meanwhile, Bloomberg news
reported that Obama, 47, spent
$704.6 million-in his campaign,
surpassing the combined
$646.7 million that Bush and
former Democratic presidential
candidate John Kerry spent in
2004.
It also far exceeded the $250
million spent by Obama's Dem-
ocratic rival Sen. Hillary Clinton
and the $228.4 million spent by
McCain.
*Obama'[s achievement is
seen as even more remarkable
in that he was the first nomi-
nee of a major party to reject
federal funding for the general
election.
Candidate reports to the
Federal Election Commission
showed total spending in the

% 4: a&* � -- N � -r


2008 presidential campaign
stood at $1.7 billion, which was
double the amount candidates
spent in 2004.
This was the first time total
spending by all presidential
candidates exceeded $1 billion,
Bloomberg News reported.
The USA TODAY/Gallup Poll


on people Americans
most admire found
Obama's former rival
Sen. Hillary Rodham
Clinton was the favor-
ite, with 20 percent;
she has held the top
spot for 13 of the past
16 years.
Alaska Gov. Sarah
Palin came in second,


OBAMA
OBAMA


with 11 percent, fol-
lowed by television su-
perstar Oprah Winfrey,
eight percent, Secretary
of State Condoleeza
Rice, seven percent, and
Obama's wife Michelle,
three percent.
The very favorable view
of Obama is seen as a
two-edged sword, with


expectations high, on the one
hand, and with some of those
expectations almost certain to
be disappointed, on the other
hand.
But the president-elect will be
taking the oath of office as the
second most admired man in
the history of the survey, after
Bush, who scored 39 percent in
2001, months after the terrorist


attacks.
But Bush's rating has dropped
nearly every year since then and
his five percent this year equals
Harry Truman's low point in
1952.
The survey involved 1,008
adults was done on land lines
and cellphones Dec. 12-14 and
has a margin of error of +-3 per-
centage points.


SEE SOME RED.


i SAVE SOME GREEN.


HURRY, SALE ENDS JAN. 5


u-~m-
- ..- _- -._--.

BETTER STANDARD HIGHWAY GAS MILEAGE THAN TOYOTA COROLLA' EPA EST,

S*15,670 MSRP A
- 1 978 TOTAL RED TAG Lnr :iWY.
1,978 DISAOLUNTAG
13 RED TAG PRICE
S13,69 AFTER ALL OFFERS


-A
I-d-Tht,4..ZA. -- -

BETTER HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY THAN DODGE NITRO AND JEEP LIBERTY3 EPA ST.

$23,650 MSRP .
$6 073 TOTAL RED TAG 'ME I..-V
~- 6,073 DISCOUNT2'

RED TAG PRICE
*17 l I AFTER ALL OFFERS


DR. TARLA TAMIA TOOMER
Tarla TaMia Toomer received
a Doctorate of Philosophy in
Civil Engineering Degree at FIU
on December 15, 2008.
Dr. Toomer was a graduate of
Miami Norland Senior High and
the University of Miami before
matriculating at FIU. While at-
tending FIU, she obtained two
Master's Degrees in Engineer-
ing: 2001 and 2003. Dr. Toom-
er was also inducted into three
national honor societies.
Johnny and Pamela Harris
Toomer are the proud parents
of Dr. Todmer. The entire fam-
ily congratulates Dr. Toomer on
this major accomplishment.

Metropolitan

has a 'face lift'
Come worship with us at Met-
ropolitan AME Church, 1778
N.W. 69th Street, Rev. Ronnie
E. Britton, pastor, in our newly
renovated sanctuary; where
the ministry for God's people is
meaningful.
Pastor Britton has something
new for you every week, and
family communion is adminis-
tered every first Sunday of the
month. Other captions follow
throughout the month for your
spiritual uplift and enlighten-
ing. Church school 9:30 a.m.,
and worship service at 11 a.m.
Remember, there is always a
place for you at Metropolitan.


$28,925 MSRP$ -2. 2 2,990 MSRP
- f10,l04 &TOTAL RED TAG Mnc Hw. 1 3 TOTAL RED TAG MPGM.
- 10004 DISCOUNT2 - 1, 3 DISCOUNT2


EPA ES iT.


MPe aWV.


21 07 RED TAG PRICE
2 107 AFTER ALL OFFERS





..-.. . ....... ' . ." '' ' ,!t



, . ** - . , . . . .-


BETTER HIGHWAY FUEL ECONOMY THAN HONDA PILOT7 EPA EST.

$31,545 MSRP
�2,39 .TOTAL RED TAG MPG HWv,
~ $2,,239 DISCOUNT2

29,306 RED TAG PRICE
0 9O AFTER ALL OFFERS


Chevyvealer.com


See Your Local Chevy Dealer.

AN AMERICAN REVOLUTION


$18 921 RED TAG PRICE
S18,91 AFTER ALL OFFERS






7'', :. ' -.


BETTER HIGHWAY GAS MILEAGE THAN TOYOTA AVALON6

$24,540 MSRP
- 2 609 TOTAL RED TAG
- $2,OyE DISCOUNT _
$21931 RED TAG PRICE
S1,93 AFTER ALL OFFERS


The best coverage in America
100,000 mile/5-year
Whichever homess first. See dealer for details


* Transferable Powertrain
Limited Warranty
* Roadside Assistance Program
* Courtesy Transportation Program


EPA estimated MPG highway: Cobalt XFE 37 vs. Corolla 35.
Includes total cash back.
EPA estimated 2WD MPG highway: Equinox 24 vs. Nitro and Liberty 22.
EPA estimated MPG city/highway (2WD): Silverado (with available 5.3L V8) 15/20 vs. Tundra (with available 5.7L V8) 14/18.
EPA estimated MPG highway (with 4-cylinder engine and 6-speed automatic transmission): Malibu 1LT 33 vs. Camry XLE 31.
EPA estimated MPG highway: Impala LS 29 vs. Avalon 28.
EPA estimated MPG highway: Traverse LT 24 (FWD), 23 (AWD) vs. Pilot 23 (FWD), 22 (AWD).
The names, emblems, slogans, vehicle body designs, and other marks appearing in this document are the trademarks and/or service marks of General Motors Corporation, its subsidiaries, affiliates,
or licensors. @2008 GM Corp. Buckle up, America! 1-800-950-2438 or chevy.com


President-elect also scored big in campaign funding


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers









BIAC(KS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31. 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


. . . . . . . . . .ii i .
::* t s; ,
�. ,- , .-


H )` ()


mI AM I T




YEAR
By Tariq Osborne and Sandra J. Charite

The election oif Ame-rica-'s first Blaick
S president grabbed the spotlight and be-
came the undisputed watershed event
iof the xiear fzor the United States.
The \ear also brought several devel-
. opments locally, Including the retire-
- . ments of WLPG's Dwight Lauderdale.
after .32 \ears at the television station.
- -- and of Jackson Memorial Flospital'.
SMlarvin O'Ouinn after five years as the
president' CEO of Jac kson Health Sys-
i tem. It brought the firing of Opa-lucka
Police Chief James Wright and the hir-
ming of Fort Lauderdale's flist Black po-
- " lice chief in Frank Adderley.
Gasoline prices topped $-la gallon
S and then plunged months later to
around $2.60.
ShMiamuni-Dade schools .saw a low point
S in the closing of Liberty City Charter
S School and a high point in Hilca Thom-
Sas, an assistant principal at HoI\:ard
A. Doolin Middle School. received na-
-J- tional honors. Teachers demonstrated
this year as they were denied prom-
ised pay raises School Supenrnten-
- dent Rudy Crew negotiated a buyout
" of his contract
The 'ear also witnessed the the
death of comedian Bernie Mac. mu-
sic icon Isaac Hayes, rock-and-roll
pioneer Bo Diddlei and singer-acti\ist
Eartha Kitt.
It was a year in which streets were
AF named for the late Athalie Range and
religious and community leader Bish-
op Victor Curry.
The state of Florida formally apolo-
gized to the Black community for slav-
- erv.


Here is a snapshot of the year now
ending-


COACH GETS NATIONAL RECOGNITION
Booker T. Washington High football
coach Tim Ha.rns was named U.SA To-
day's National Coach of the Year.

MARCH AGAINST VIOLENCE
The Miami-Dade Branch of the
NAACP and People United to Lead the
Struggle for Ecquality IPULSEI orga-
nized a "1000 Men and Boys Against
Violence" march held at Miami Carol
Cit- Park. 3201 NW 185th St.. Ni-
amni Gardens Participants marched
through sections of the city and then
gathered at the park for a rally and
demonstration on violence aJnd its ef-
fects on the community.

OFFICER KILLED OFF-DUTY
hMiami Det. James Walker. on the
force since 2:00)0. was shot and killed
in his unmarked police car at 1801 NE
164th St.. North liarni Beach. while
off-duty. Ricardo Ajuste. 21. was later
charged in connection with the shoot-
ing.

MAYOR REFLECTED
Otis Wallace was reelected mayor of
Florida City which he has led for 24
years. He garnered 61 percent of the
votes cast to defeat former \ice IMaor
Israel J. Anderson.

OBAMA GETS MAJOR ENDORSEMENT
Massachlusetts Sen. Edw\\ard Kenne-
dy announced to a crowd of American
University students in \Washington,
D.C.. his support for Illinois Sen. Ba-
rack Obarra for president.

POLICE CHIEF FIRED
Opa-locka Police Chief Jarnees Wright


BURSON AUGUSTIN


IN


\as fired bi C it', Manager Ja-nn: Bev-
eri\ .

BOBBY JONES HONORED
Nliamri-DadL - M aor C.arlos .Al;arez
presented Bobby Jonies, host of BET's
"Bobbl. , _ir nes Gospel," the :ke', to, tlhe
county durii-tI the 50SI- Role MNIodel of
Excellence annual Dir Martin Luther
Kine ,Jr. Unity. S 'iol.r~ ship Brealkfs.t.

FEBR IR)
PARK REOPENED
The once-se \ �trited V irginia K',
Beach Park, 40201 \irlnlia Beach Dr.
along the Ricken:backj, r Cause\.ay. re--
opened The park had closed 26 'ears
earlier.

MELEE BREAKS OUT AT EDISON HIGH
Police were called to MI ami Edi-
son Senior Hi-gh, 6161 N\\' Sixth Ct.,
when a fight broke out after students
objected to the arrest of one of tIheir
peers. The student \\.c,- accused of as-
saulting an assistant principal A to-
tal of 27 students \ere arrested and
faced charges off battery on a police of-
ficers, resisting arrest and :lisorderl'.
conduct. Students organized protests
calling for them to be released

LAUDERDALE
ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT
\WLPG Channel 10 news anchor
Dwight Lauderdale announced that
he would be retiring in la', after 32
years at the station Lauderd.le, 56,.
had been with Channel 10 since 19'76.
starting as a reporter

,II-RCH
FAMU PRESIDENT VISITS
Florida A>A.M Uni.versit.y president
Jlames H. Ammons stopped in Miami
while on an eiaht-citr
tou.ir ac r. ': th . i- :t : ... '.'-n l):'. it
b\ faculty 1nd!-: -tiff to em ph.i:i::r th .
power of ediucatJon, pus)h enrollment
and recreate a better relationship
with South Florida. Ammon s awarded
scholarships to Book.er T. Washington
High students w\ho excelled academi-
callv.

QUINCE NAMED CHIEF JUSTICE
Justice Peggy Quince became the
first Black woman to lead the Florida
Supreme Court and the second Black
and third woman to serve as chief jus-
tice.

SAGGING PANTS IN PUBLIC ATTACKED
Follo\.ing COpa-locka's ban o:n sag-
ging pants. state Sen. Larcenia Bullard
considered propoisiin a similar la\ for,
the entire state. Opa-locka's "no sag-
ging pants" ban proiihbits individuals
from appearing in city-o\nlied facilities
with sagging pants.

CITY HOSTS JAZZ FESTIVAL
The third annual Jazz in the Gar-
derns hosted b, Miami Gardens took
place at Dolphin Stadiu.lrm \ith head-
line acts that includ-ed Chaka Khan.
George Duke, Nanc VWilson. the
O',Jars. along with new. artists such as
Algebra, Chrisette Michele. Elin and
Anthony David.

MAYOR FACES PERJURY CHARGE
Kwarne KilpatrLck. the youngest
elected mayor in Detroit. \was charged
with peljuri. He wvas acculseid of lying
under oath about an iniimate relation-
ship with then chief of staff Christine
Beatty,. He resiLned from his post later
in the ,ear andi pleaded guililty to two.:


E NAUDIMAR HERRERA
E NAUDIMAR HERRERA


C-LiounLt'0 of obstrLuct-,tion ofl justLic"r

TOWN HALL MEETING
The Mllami-Dade Brr-inch of the
N.,ACP hosted a town hall
imeet ltiL .At Ntv-w Birth Baptist
Church.. 2'.i.)0 NW 1.?,5th S..,
Whose t.IlundIer .and leader. "
Bihop Vi \itor T Curry, i
ltl - L L\ l ril1hts -.group's
pre-.idecnt. Thliose who
l:p k:..il the ii -:tin g
NI iitcl:d d Coin ll tV
MltiVlO C >rl'i Al-
\'.L'<:'. and CousntV
Mj.-n aGer George
BLuigesB

PIONEERING CHAR-
TER SCHOOL CLOS-
ES
Libcrt\ C'itN Char- .
ter School, S700 N\V
5"' A.v.. the first charter
school in Florida. entangled
In a firnLncia.l debt of more than
$2 tl\\x million. \\~,s closed by
the School Board water 12 ,ears
lt existence.

APRIL
U.S. HOUSING CHIEF QUITS
,liphons-o Jackson, secretary, of the
Li.S Department of Housiing and Ur-
ban De -elopment, resigned.

GAS PRICES SOAR
GCas prices climb to more than $4 a
palloni

FLORIDA APOLOGIZES FOR SLAVERY
The Florida Legislature issued a for-
mal apology' for its support of slavery
and called for healing and reconcili-
ation throughout the state. The tw\o-
page resolution was passed by both
r~t,. Senr:' . .d r], _ Ho'lni'-s_

EDUCATOR WINS NATIONAL HONOR
Hilca Thomas, an assistant principal
at Howard A Doolin Middle, 5401 SW\
152'' Ave.. was named 200S National
Assistant Principal of the Year She
had been chosen in 2007 as Assistant
Principal of the Year for the state.

FORMER INMATE GETS COMPENSATION
Alan Crotzer. who spent 24 years be-
hind bars for a crime he did not com-
mit. received $1.25 million corripensa-
tion from the state.

CHARGES DROPPED AGAINST STUDENTS
Charges against Miami Edison High
students who participated in a brawl
in Febri an were dropped.

RESIDENTS HELP HAITI FOOD CRISIS
The rising food cost and unemploy-
ment caused a food crisis in Haiti
which resulted in riots and violence
in the streets. The lack of food on the


PATRICK ABRAHAM ROTSCHIND AUGUSTINE


-' " ... Det. James
...... .. , W alker, killed in
',+ ._,> .hiein.:... .


islan-id caused many people to make
nmud pies as a former of nutrition. Mi-
acrn-Dade residents held food drives
and collection to help. Congressman
Kendrick Meek. D-lliami,. made sev-
eral trips to the island to meet with
the government on wa\s to resolve the
situation.

1A)
SECOND MISTRIAL DECLARED
FOR LIBERTY CITY 6
A second mistrial was declared in
the case of the Liberty City 6. accused
in an alleged terrorism plot. Of the
original seven men charged, one had
already been acquitted. They were ar-
rested in 2006 for allegedly plotting
with Al-Qaeda to blow up the Chicago
Sei, r: T-'.,.-r r-and rhe FB! building in
Mtiariu .iur, -ecrton ,-t :, third trial
, e Ds -set t'. be-2in orJn ,i !n 1.3' for Narsea.l
Batiste Patrick Abraham. Stanley
Grant Phanor. Naudimar Herrera.
Burson Agustin and Rotschild Augus-
tine.

METRORAIL NORTH
CORRIDOR GETS MONEY
Congressman Kendrick Meek, D-
NIalmil. and county commissioners an-
inounced that the federal government
will provide $700 million for the ex-
pansion of Metroraul along the North
Corridor.

OBAMA SPEAKS AT LOCAL RALLY
Nearly 20,000 people packed the
Baniktlantic Center, 1 Panther Pkwvy..
Sunrise. to hear a 40-minute speech
by Democratic presidential candidate
Barack Obama. He encouraged them
to make their voices heard on elec-
tion day by casting their ballots and
he discussed his reasons for running


STANLEY GRANT PHANOR


REVIEW


2i.





















f


Melee breaks out at Edison High


Second mistrial declared for Liberty City 6


.h�l~
II'


"U-1U-r~~l ,~PrP~i dlP IYailllll lll I bill MON1(1l1,11,111V I'llPLs~llllIIIYU~Y11~f~B


1


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


BLACKks MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\\N I)IlSINY


4~~~WM


MIAM I


TIMES


YEAR


for president


S-m

'-1


in-


NAACP GETS NEW LEADER
Benrjaliin Todd JealouL, became the
new president ,of the Na-tional Associa-
tion for the .Advaniceiment of Colored
People NA.AC PI.

J \'E
FORT LAUDERDALE GETS BLACK CHIEF
Fort Lauderdale hired first Black po-
lice chief. Frank Adiderley. The 2S-year
veteran of the department got the job
after Bruce Roberts unexpectedly re-
si r-ied

BO DIDDLEY DIES
The fUunding father of Rock-n-Roll.
Bo Diddley, died at 79 of a heart attack
at his homc in Archer. Fla. Diddle,,.
who w\as known for his smashing hit
"I'm a Nlan." had suffered a heart at-
tack and a stroke which impaired his
speech.

MAGIC CITY CHILDREN'S
ZONE MADE LAW
in efforts to improve the family struc-
ture in the inner-city neighborhoods.
House Speaker Marco Rublo. R-Miami.
Sen Larcenia J. Bullard. D-Nliami.
former state Rep Dorothy Bendross-
Mindingall and County Commission-
er Audrey Edmonson pushed a bill
to create the "Mlagic City Children's
Zone" in Mlami. The Children's Zone
was signed into law by Gov. Charlie
Crist. covering neighborhoods such as
Liberty City. Allapattah. \Wynwcood and
Little Haiti.

OBAMA SPEAKS TO MAYORS
Presidential candidate Barack
Obama attended the 76'"' annual U.S.
NMayors Conrference at the Interconti-
nental Hotel in Dow-ntown Miami. He
discu:.5s, 'd the importance of: lead r-
ship on the local level to help lessen
the problems in Washington D.C.

OBAMA LEADS IN FLORIDA POLLS
Democratic presidential candidate
Ba.rack Obama took the lead in polls
in Florida by 16 percent.

JI \E
MIAMI-DADE TEACHERS
DENIED PAY RAISES
School distinct officials backed out
of scheduled pay increases after they
were confronted with a $250 million
short fall -There's a provision in our
contract that says that if the funding
is inadequate we can sit down and
reopen the agreement. which is what
we're doing." said Deput- Superinten-
dent Ofelia San Pedro. The decision
was rrmade b, then School Superinten-
dent Rudv Crrew and sparked demon-
strations; among teachers.

JACKSON MEMORIAL
CELEBRATES 90TH ANNIVERSARY
Jackson Menmorial Hospital celebrat-
ed 90 ,ears of ser.ling the community.
Dr. .Jamnes NM Jackson started the hos-
pital on June 25. 191S. as Miami City,
Hospital 'ith 13 beds that were inn-
mediately filled. After Jackson's death
in 1924. the hospital \as renamed for
him

JIL)
FORUM ADDRESSES
HOUSING DISPARITY
Laura Flanders. host of GRITty,
and \\EDR 99 .Jamz ra-dio person'al-
iti, Cher,i Mlizell moderated a forum
on- housing after Overtomwn residents
complained about high-ri-ses going up
in the neigliborhoud. The new housing
\\as largely uniaffordable for residents.
reipecially those on fixed incomes.

JUDGE SPARES BOY IN
DEATH OF INFANT COUSIN
On Jul. 16. , 12-,'ear-old boy 'v.as
sent' n: ed to 1S Imonrcths in a ju' enile
detention facility , in their bealing death
,,f his. 1 7-monrth-old cousin. Shalohl
Joi--lsph. If the boy had been convicted
as !- an adult, he would have faced life
in pnsun.

F SCHOOLS UNMASKED
FC( A iT result s sho ed 'schoul'-, in ma-
jority Black rieitlhborhiiods' got .m-,i.'


1.t


of the v\ Iorst inI the d(istri-t Miami
Central High s'.c'red an "F" for the fifth
straii'ht year.

FELON VOTING RIGHTS
It was disc:' erCed that SS.O(.0 felons
whose voting righlit- were restored alter
the com-,pletion of their sentences did
not know it. The parole cormis-ision.
understaffed and \without a concrete
plan, attempted to inform as many of
them as possible

CNN SPOTLIGHTS BLACKS
The CNN cable channel aired the
first part of its "Blackl in Amcrica" doc-
lumentairy. The central quslistion was:
"How- far hc-ive ,we come in the 40 ,'years
since the assassination of Mlartin Lu-
ther King Jr.?" The program did not
try to gice answers but it moved' be-
yond statistics and stereotypes to at-
tempt an honest and nuanced portrait
of Black Amtrica.

INCUMBENTS WIN
Miami-Dade's primary election drew
only 15 percent of voters. Incumbents
County Comnmissioners Audrey Ed-
monson, Barbara Jordan and Dennis
Moss easily defeated their opponents.
Out of the nine candidates who vied
for the House District 109 seat vacat-
ed by Dorothy Be ndross-llndingall.
James Bush III. a former state repre-
sentative, was the winner In the race
for the School Board's District 1, in-
cumbent Wilbert T Holloway defeated
Erhabor ighodaro. who served as aide
to the late Robert B. Ingramn

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS VISIT HAITI
Just after devastating hurricanes
and riots in Haiti. hiami-Dade Com-
mission Vice-Chairworman Barbara
Jorda.:n -ind Commismioners Audre''
Edi-lmuIson,':I ;inJ Dc-nni' , M,,. :, ia'.Ll.t d
to the impo"terished nation to see the
situation first-hand. They took along
nearly 20 tons of non-perishable food
to aid the relief effort.

BERNIE MAC AND ISAAC HAYES DIE
Bernie Mac. a comedian and actor.
died on Aug. C of pneumonia in Chica-
go Isaac Hase s. singer, songwriter and
musician suffered a stroke and died in
his Memphis home on Aug. 10.

SEPTEI1BER
RUDY CREW OUT, CARVALHO IN
On Sept. 12, Alberto Carvalho agreed
to take over from Rudy Crew as su-
perintendent of Mlami-Dade County,
Public Schools. The school board dis-
cussed dismissing Crew following a
school budget crisis but. in the end.
offered Crew a buyoout of his contract.

OBAMA ATTENDS WOMEN'S RALLY
Democratic presidential nominee Ba-
rack Oban-a took the stage at the Uni-
versity of Miami, BankUnited Center.
1245 Dauer Dr. for a Women's Rally. A
crowd of over 8.000. comprising most-
Iy- of women, shouted and cheered for
Obama. Though he was interrupted in
the middle of his speech by a group
of protesters who called themselves
"Blacks Against Obama." the candi-
date outlined his plans on womenn is-
sutes such- as equal pay for equal work,
universal healthcare anud abortion.

OCTOBER
MARVIN O'QUINN LEAVES
JMH FOR CALIFORNIA
After five years as president, CEO
of the Jackson Health Sstem. Mar-
vin O'Quinn announced that he was
leaving to become an executive vice
president and chief operating officer of
Catholic Healthcare West. a San Fran-
cisco-based nonprofit that runs 41
hospitals in California. Nevada. aind
Ariziona. O'CQuinn was best known for
improving financial results at Jackson
during most of his tenure. It went from
an $85 million loss in 2004 to a $10
million profit in 2005. His resignation
\\.a.: et to becomlie effective on Dec.
31.

BARRINGTON IRVING SOARS AGAIN
Barrinlrgton Ir ing, the youngest man
to H', solo around the world, broke an-


'On Tuesday,
Nov. 4, Barack
Obama won the
United States
presidential
Election.


other world record when his team of
local high school students built a sin-
gle-engine aircraft in record time. Ir-
Inlg told the Miami Norland High and
Miami Carol City High students that if
the-, kept a summer grade point aver-
age of above a 2.'0, he would fl. their
airplane. The children did and. on
Oct 15. he flew the airplane
around Opa-locka airport.

BOULEVARD NAMED
FOR ATHALIE RANGE
Hundred. of fainil,.
imeinbers and friends
of the late business-
woman and commlu-
nity activist MN. Ath-
alie Range attended ..,.,
a ceremony on the i:.' .
morning of Oct. 24
at St Martha Cath-
olic Church. 9301
Biscayne Blvd.. Mi-
arni Shores. where
the section of the bou-
levard between Northeast 54th and
95th streets was named Ml. Athalie
Range Boulevard. Range who died two
years ago at age 91.

MARCH FOR CHANGE
Presidential hopeful Barack Obama
made several visits to hotly contested
Florida. where he drew increasingly
large crowds in what became a suc-
cessful bid for the presidency. Obama
supporters met at Bicentennial Park
for a March for Change encouraging
voters to vote early.

VOI E.IIBER
OBAMA WINS PRESIDENCY
On Tuesday, Nov. 4, Barack Obama
won the United States presidential
elercion Obama earlier triumphed
u,'.l LiC f.ih idl IC,. le Ui" n[l L,,'l puliusi-al
machine in a grueling primary cam-n
paign and went on to win a decisive
victor,' over Republican Sen. John
McCain of Arizona Obama will be
sworn into office as America's first
Black president.

SCHOOL SAFETY AN ISSUE
AFTER STUDENT KILLING
School safety took center stage af-
ter 15-year-old Teah Wimberly was
arrested in the killing of fellow stu-
dent Amanda Collette at Dillard High
School in Fort Lauderdale. Wimberly
allegedly shot her friend in the hallway
while classes were changing and then
went to a restaurant where she called
police to turn herself in, the authori-
ties reported.

TEENAGER COMMITS SUICIDE ONLINE
Abraham Biggs Jr., 19, of Pembroke
Pines. ingested a lethal mixture of
drugs then blogged about it while a
webcam recorded his dying moments
for viewers around the world to watch.
The teen's friends and family were
stunned and his Myspace page dis-
played an outpouring of grief and sup-
port.

COMMISSIONER MOSS
ELECTED TO CHAIR
On Nov. 20, county commissioners
elected 15-year commission veteran
Dennis C. Moss. of District 9 as the
2009-2010 chairman. Moss takes of-
fice Jan. 1.

HIV ON THE INCREASE
The Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention released yearly statistics
for HIV cases showing that in South
Florida between 50 and 70 percent of
cases were spread by people who did
not know they were infected.

NEW SUPERINTENDENT
HELP F SCHOOLS
Superintendent of Miami-Dade
Schools Alberto Canralho vowed to
save the four failing schools facing
closure for their low-performance
Carialho held town hall meetings \\th
faculty and parents of students \\ho
attend Nliami Central Senior High. hll-
ami Edison Senior I-ligh, Holmes Ele-
menlar, and Liberty City Elementary,
offer ing hope and proposed several
initiatives to help turn these schools


Devastating hurricanes ..
and riots in Haiti

....
1�& '- *


.. ...I. . . i..I . .U. . I. ..


REVIEW


L
pr


around.

OBAMA NAMES FIRST BLACK ATTORNEY
GENERAL
On Nov 17, President-elect Barack
Obama chose Washington attorney
Eric Holder as U.S. attorney general.
Holder, who served as the No. 2 official
in the Justice Department under Pres-
ident Clinton will be the first African-
American to head the department if he
is confirmed by the senate.

DECEMBER
CORAL PLACE FINISHED
Construction ended on Coral Place
Apartments and the senior citizens
rental building began taking lease ap-
plications The apartments, for resi-
dents 55 and older, is located at 1001
NW 4il-h St.

TODDLER'S KILLING
ROCKS THE COMMUNITY
On Dec. 13, 10-month-old Derrick
Days was shot by a masked gunman
in Brownsville. The child's mother.
Shiketa Duberry. 24, called little Der-
rick her "miracle baby" because doc-
tors once told her she would never have
children. Jimmie Bowen and Bernard
NMarel Jones were arrested in connec-
tion with the shooting Pierre Roche,
who was also hit by bullets during the
shooting, died on Dec. 15 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital.

STREET NAMED FOR CURRY
A section of Northwest 135th Street
and Opa-locka Boulevard. between
Northwest 7th and Northwest 27th
avenue was named Bishop Victor T.
Curry Boulevard. Family and friends
turned out to join the popular founder
of New Birth Baptist Cathedral of Faith
international for a ceremony in which
the street name was unveiled

GAS PRICES TUMBLE
The price of gas, which had risen
to more than $4 a gallon, plunged to
around $2.60 as the year ended.


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SECTION B


The Miami Times





Faith am


MIAMI, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


The New Year is a time to arise and shine


For so long we have all been just dreamers; in 2009, it is time to fulfill those dreams.
By Sylvia Mitchell up when you're weighted down see if you are still wrapped up to those who prepare and put not. Trust God to give you the King reminded us the time
Miami Times Writer with the unnecessary baggage in the past with old hurts and forth the effort. Sometimes we grace to handle each challenge now: "We have also come


As we prepare to count down
the remaining hours in 2008
and look back on the year that
was dubbed the year of new be-
ginnings, it is only natural to
assess if we did indeed wipe the
slate clean and whether we left
the past behind as we should
have.
It is too late to cry over spilled
milk. If you find yourself coming
up short in your assessment of
2008, just remember that to-
morrow is a brand new day full
of brand new blessings.
Therefore, arise and shine.
But it is indeed harder to rise


of pride, unforgiveness, and
selfishness. And it is even hard-
er to shine if the chambers of
your heart are chilly, dark and
haunted.
If that describes you in these
final hours of 2008, there is
still time to make a new begin-
ning. God is a very present help
and He is as close as your next
heart beat or your next breath.
Resolve not to take those ghosts
into the new year. No one pours
new wine into old bottles else it
bursts the bottle.
If you're wondering why the
blessings seem to be passing
you by, examine your heart to


old mindsets. If it seems that
your moon is waning and your
sun has set, just look up and
keep looking up until your help
comes.
As we anticipate what 2009
will bring, we can be assured
that God has already brought
amazing things to this country
and to the world. The winds
of change are upon us in this
country; don't get left behind
in 2009.
As we think of the way our
parents used to snatch off the
bedcovers and yell "Rise and
shine!" we realize it is because
they knew that success comes


get contented with just the way
things are or we are contented
with being a follower instead of
a leader. Shake up that mind-
set with the knowledge that
anything is possible.
For so long we have all been
just dreamers; in 2009, it is
time to fulfill those dreams.
Timing is everything. Some-
times we jump the gun and
sometimes we drag our feet.
If you find yourself standing
before an open door of oppor-
tunity step boldly out in faith.
Change can be scary but if you
never try you will never know
if you would have succeeded or


moment by moment and day
by day.
On the other hand, if you
find a door is closed in your
face, wait patiently and wait
with expectation. You have to
have your neck stuck out and
don't be afraid to pull on God.
The more you seek Him, the
more you will find Him.
Martin Luther King Jr.'s
dream took 40 years to be-
come fulfilled. As heirs of the
dream we cannot rest on the
progress that has been made.
His dream still challenges us
to rise up and shine. In his
"I Have A Dream" speech, Dr.


is
to


this hallowed spot to remind
America of the fierce urgency
of Now. This is no time to en-
gage in the luxury of cooling
off or to take the tranquilizing
drug of gradualism. Now is the
time to make real the promises
of democracy. Now is the time
to rise from the dark and deso-
late valley of segregation to the
sunlit path of racial justice.
Now is the time to lift our na-
tion from the. quicksands of ra-
cial injustice to the solid rock
of brotherhood. Now is the time
to make justice a reality for all
of God's children."
Arise and shine in 2009.


blefrom Commercial News. Providers
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9B THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


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Il .A('KS MUST CONTROl. THEIR OWN DESTINY


10B THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY, 2009


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SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


FDA goes on to say that the world's largest beverage maker should "take prompt action to correct these violations."

Coke scolded over labeling of Diet Coke Plus


The Food krin Drug Adminis-
tration has warned The Coca-
Cola Co. that one of its products
has a misleading nutritional la-
bel.
Diet Coke Plus, the no-calorie
soft drink labeled as includ-
ing vitamins and minerals,
has come under fire from fed-


eral-health regulators because
they say the drink fails to meet
the standard for including the
word "plus."
Diet Coke Plus, the FDA wrote
in a letter to Coke officials is
"misbranded ... because the
product makes a nutrient con-
tent claim but does not meet


the criteria to make the claim."
The drink contains added vi-
tamins and nutrients, includ-
ing 15 percent of the FDA-rec-
ommended daily allowance of
vitamin B12 and 10 percent of
magnesium.
Roberta Wagner, director of
the office of compliance at the


Center of Food Safety and Ap-
plied Nutrition wrote in the let-
ter the FDA does not consider
it "appropriate to fortify snack
foods such as carbonated bev-
erages."
FDA goes on to say that the
world's largest beverage maker
should "take prompt action to


correct these violations."
The letter was sent to officials
with Atlanta, Ga.-based Coke
(NYSE: KO) Dec. 10. It.was
released on the FDA Web site
Tuesday.
"We take seriously the is-
sues raised by the FDA in its
letter," Coke spokesman Scott


Williamson said in a prepared
statement. "This does not in-
volve any health or safety is-
sues, and we believe the label
oni Diet Coke Plus complies
with FDA's policies and regula-
tions. We will provide a detailed
response to the FDA in early
January."


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BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9 002YRAUNAJ800215R EB


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES, DEC ,


A year with no worry


Well, it's New Year's Eve!
Have you completed your list
of New Year resolutions? What
is on your list this year? Does
it include a promise to eat less
and exercise more? Will you re-
solve to watch your temper and
try not to get so angry? Perhaps
you might have decided to re-
turn to school, or to increase
your knowledge or skills in a
particular subject. The possi-
bilities and the lists are endless.
There is always something in
our lives that we can stop, begin
or do better. I would like to of-
fer a suggestion for a New Year
resolution that can be used the


entire year through. As a matter
of fact, this is a resolution that
can be included in your daily
lifestyle. I wish that I could take
credit for coming up with this
great idea, but alas, it is scrip-
tural. The idea comes from the
best source of wise sayings and
great ideas - the Bible.
John 6 is a collection of teach-
ings by Jesus on several differ-
ent topics. One of the topics is
our mental well being. Jesus
instructs the people (and that
would include us) not to worry.
I was speaking to a friend re-
cently who told me that she was
suffering from a physical ail-


ment that she knew was the re-
sult of stress.in her life. I made
a 'lame' comment to her to stop
worrying. Her reply was an ex-
pected one - "that's easier said
than done!" Years ago, there
was a slogan that appeared
on clothing, bumper stickers,
and any other place where you
could display it - "Don't worry.
Be happy." It was a cute little
saying, and was intended to put
us in a good mood, and a happy
frame of mind. Well, the ad-
monishment to not worry is also
God's desire for us.
Notice, Jesus did not say that
eating, shelter and clothing
were unimportant. He did not
say that these items were un-
necessary or required. He just
said not to worry about getting
them. He said that these needs
dominate the thoughts and
minds of the unbelievers, but as
believers, they should not domi-


nate our thoughts or minds.
King David had grasped this
knowledge many years before
Jesus proclaimed it to the Jew-
ish people. David declared that
he had lived to be an old man,
and in all of his years of,living,
he had never seen the righteous
forsaken or having to beg for
their meal. Your meal might not
be provided through funds in a
large bank account. Perhaps
your meals might be provided
by a Good Samaritan, or some-
one whom God impressed upon
to help you. A 'ram in the bush'
can come from any number of
sources. God is not limited in
how He is able to bless you, or
who He will decide to use to do
so.
A good friend of mine is just
now recovering from months of
being bedridden due to a severe
bout of shingles. She was so af-
flicted that she was not able to


cook or clean or even leave her
bed without the assistance of
her family. During a conversa-
tion a few weeks ago, she admit-
ted that this attack was brought
on by stress. She shared how
several situations and conflicts
had caused her to worry and
fret. However, her testimony
was that of David - she de-
clared, as David did, that it was
good that she was afflicted. She
said that now she knows that
there is nothing in her life that
she should not allow the Lord
to handle for her. She said that
she would gladly take the advice
of Peter in I Peter 5:7 when he
said to "cast ALL of our anxi-
eties on the Lord, because He
cares for us."
The medical field admits that
stress and worry cause a multi-
tude of both physical and men-
tal ailments. Many diseases and
emotional problems are directly


a result of stress, including, but
not limited to, diabetes, heart
problems, high blood pressure,
strokes, depression and suicidal
thoughts and attempts. I know
that I have said this in previ-
ous columns, but I believe this
bears repeating. A few years
ago, the Lord gave me a sugges-
tion to make my life easier. He
suggested that "I concentrate on
being Pat, and allow Him to be
God." I thought then that was a
great suggestion, and still think
so, and follow that today! I am
quite content to be Pat, and al-
low Him to be Lord of my life!
One other comment before clos-
ing - John 6:33 teaches us to
prioritize our lives. Jesus said
to "seek His Kingdom first and
foremost, live righteously, and
God will give you whatever you
need." Could your lack be the
result of not following this im-
portant commandment?


('an (Ohma girk rralia normal ?


"" ". . . . . .. , ",.�- - ; " , '. :' ..: -.': .. -' ' '
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The Dream Dinner will be
held on Jan. 8 at the Fontaineb-
leau Hotel. Former President Bill
Clinton will headline an event
to benefit the building of the
Washington, D.C., Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. National Memo-
rial. A VIP reception will begin
at 6 p.m. followed by dinner at 7
p.m. For more information, call
305-777-1817.

The Holtz Children's Hos-
pital Beaux Arts Festival of Art
will be held from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Jan. 10-11 at the Lowe Art
Museum. For more information,
call 305-585-7213.

Florida International Uni-
versity will host its annu-
al Dr.Martin Luther King Jr.
breakfast on from 8 to 10:30
a.m. Jan. 16. at the Graham
University Center Ballroom on
the University Park campus. For
more information, call FIU's Of-
fice of Multicultural Programs,


305-348-2436.

Healthy Start Coalition of
Miami-Dade invites parents to
a free infant massage instruc-
tion series from 11:45 a.m. to 1
p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Jan.
27-29, at their offices. Space
is limited and registration is re-
quired. For more information,
call Amy Olen, 305-541-0210
or e-mail aolen(ihscmd.org.
********
The Scott/Carver Hope
VI Development Team for the
redevelopment project invites
the community to participate
in community meetings and
planning sessions to plan for
new housing, community re-
development and resident
services, including discussion
of the right of return policy.
The sessions will take place
at the James E. Scott Com-
munity Center Jan 8.-10. For
more information, call 877-
330-2979.


.-~r''~ A y


Copyrighted Mterial


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers

____ _ 00 af. am -p OM


A Mission With A New
Beginning Church invites
the community to its Watch
Night Service at 10 p.m.
this Wednesday. For more
information, call the church,
305-836-6256.
******
New Beginning Praise
Tabernacle will hold a New
Year's concert at midnight


this Wednesday. For more
information, call 305-681-0119.

New Life Family Worship
Center will hold its Watch
Night Service starting at 9 p.m.
this Wednesday. Also, New
Life Ministry School, will begin
classes at 11 a.m. Jan. 3. For
more information, call 305-623-
0054.


t-l - L'.II , lumft w


Risks: Extra sleep is found to lower a heart risk


One more reason for getting
a good night's sleep: sleeping
an extra hour a night may help
control coronary artery calcifica-
tion, a major risk factor for heart
disease.
The effect, reported in the Dec.
1 issue of The Journal of the
American Medical Association,
was so strong that the research-


ers concluded that one extra
hour of sleep was the equivalent
of lowering systolic blood pres-
sure to a normal 120 from 136.
"While this is an intriguing new
finding, this one study does not
by itself establish a causal rela-
tionship," said Diane Lauderdale,
the senior author and an asso-
ciate professor of epidemiology


at the University of Chicago. "It
may be that there is some other
factor that influences how much
people sleep and independently
influences calcification."
The scientists followed 495
healthy men and women, ages
35 to 47, for five years, measur-
ing their sleep patterns with elec-
tronic monitoring devices and


examining their arteries with CT
scans.
Over all, the group averaged
6.1 hours of sleep a night. But
after controlling for age, blood
pressure, cholesterol and other
factors, those who averaged an
extra hour's sleep every night re-
duced their risk of calcification
by about one-third.


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


I. 14 ' '.
ij ; '81*> 1 ~.~4


Royal
ARDLEY CLARKE, 54, carpen-
ter, died Decem-
ber 23. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to
9 p.m. Service
noon Saturday
in the chapel.



DOLPHUS MILTON, 70, U.S.
Postal Service
employee, died
December 24.
Visitation Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

ALBERT COOMBS, 40, realtor,
died December
24. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Harvest Fire
Worship Center.


ROSENNIS GRANVILLE, 81,
retired Miami-Dade County School
teacher, died December 25. Ser-
vice was held.

RUTH SIMON, 78, housewife,
died December 16. Service was
held.
WILMA HORTON, 60, retired
Miami-Dade County School teach-
er, died December 23. Service
10 a.m., today, Miami Gardens
Church of Christ.
CLAUDIE BRINSON JR, 78, re-
tired employee for the City of North
Miami Beach, died December 24.
Arrangements are incomplete.
ERROL THOMAS, 34, stage
technician, died december 21. Vis-
itation Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.
Eric S. George
BERNICE "BUCK" STUBBS,
died December
26 in Univer-
sity of Miami
Medical Center.
Viewing, Friday
6 to 9 p.m.,
Richardson
Mortuary, Mi-
ami, Service 1
p.m. Saturday, New Providence
Missionary Baptist Church.
HATTIE MAE TERRY, 70, of
Kissimmee, FL, died December
24. Viewing Friday 6 to 9 p.m.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, Ebenezer Baptist
Church, Hallandale.
JOHN HENRY COBB JR., 41,
died December 24. Service, 10
a.m., today in the chapel.
DANALENA EDWARDS, 58,
of Hollywood, died December 28.
Service 2 p.m. Saturday, Ebenezer
Baptist Church, Hallandale.
E.A. StevenBam
WILLIAM WATSON, 87, laborer,
died December 17. Service was
held.

ANN MARIE FABRE, 49, clerk,


Haitian Baptist Church, Dania.

WILBERT MILLS, 58, truck
driver, died December 26 in Me-
morial Regional South. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, Bethlehem Baptist
Church, West Park.

CARLTON LIGHTBOURNE, 50,
sales manager, died December 27
in Hialeah Gardens Nursing Home.
Final rights and burial in Freeport,
Grand Bahamas

VICTORIA MULRAIN, 85,
homemaker, died December 22
in Memorial Pembroke. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

HENRY WARREN, died De-
cember 24 in Memorial Regional
Hollywood. Arrangements are in-
complete.


Pax Villa "
ELUCIA D. PIERRE, 61, cos-
methologist, died December 23 in
Florida Medical Center. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, Greater Fort Lau-
derdale Church of God.


Poitier ..
FLORENCE ROBERTS, 70,
clerk analyst for
Alternative Inc.,
died in Stafford
Virginia. Service
noon, Saturday,
Mt. Hermon
A.M.E. Church.


BONITA PICKARD, 45, unit
secretary for
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital,
died December
27. Service 10
a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.


COURTNEY DARSHAE FER-
RELL, 19, stu-
dent at Ware
County School,
died December
27. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Martin Memorial
A.M.E. Church.


Alfonso Richardson
LOIS SLAUGHTER, 52, home-
maker, died De-
cember 23. Sur-
vivors include:
sons, Alvin,
Curtis and Dem-
etris; daughters,
Jamie, Embony
and Barbara;
mother Rose
Brown; sisters, Mary Johnson,
Margaret Oguona and Barbara
Major. Viewing 4 to 8 p.m., Friday,
Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral
Services, 3790 N.W. 167 Street.
Service noon, Saturday, Greater
Peace Baptist Church, 16801 N.W.
27 Avenue. Service under the di-
rection of Alfonso M. Richardson
Funeral Services, 305-625-7177.

Davis & Brice
ETHEL MAE MILLER, 73, died
December 22
in North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Rock
of Ages Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

RAYMOND WILCOX, 61, former
educator for Miami-Dade County
Public School,
died December
27 in Lakeland,
Florida. Service
11 a.m., Friday,
Mt. Calvary
Baptist Church,
104 S. Douglas
Street, Fitzger-
ald, Ga. Henderson Memorial
Chapel, 229-423-1122

Hall Ferguson ewit
GEORGIA JONES, 62, nurse,
died December
27 in Aventura
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Elbert;
stepsons, Doug-
las and Elber Jr;
stepdaughters,
Tonia and Fa-
miko Murdock; sister, Leola Dixon
Fields,; brothers, Henry, Eddie,
James and Ronald Fields.
Viewing Friday, 5 to 8 p.m.,
Greater Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church, 2601 N.W. 65
Street. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Antioch of Brownsville Missionary
Baptist Church, 2799, N.W. 46
Street.

JOY BROOKINS, 62, operating
roomtechnician,
died December
24 at home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




Hadley ""
JANICE MCINTOSH, 61, office


administrator,
died December
23 in Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Monday,
Faith Commu-
nity Church.


Range
THOMAS OLIVER, 68, cement
finisher, died De- '
cember 25. Sur- i
vivors include:
wife, Mary; I.
sons, Shawn,
Jeffery, and Jo-
seph; daughter,
Miriam Martin;
devoted cousin,
Jannie Mae Felder. Service noon,
Friday, Mt. Carmel M.B. Church.

ADA MCKINNEY-DEVEAUX,
77, retired reg-
istered nurse
for Dade County
Health Depart-
ment, died De-
cember 28. Sur-
vivors include:
son, Pierre Rut-
ledge; dauglh-
ter, Jennifer Robinson (Rodney);
brother, Robert McKinney; sister,
Barbara McKinney; four grand-
children, Corey, Aliah, Shirara and
Safira; nieces and nephews, Erica,
Osborne, Chauncey, Juaron, Con-
stance McKinney; Collie Mae Fer-
guson, and Louis Hart; a host of
other relatives and friends. Litany
service Friday 7 p.m., The Historic
St. Agnes' Episcopal Church. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday.

CAROLYN GRAY, 54, unit secre-
tary for Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital West Wing
12, died Decem-
ber26. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Sherria El-
liot and Renee
Moore; sons,
Richard Howard and Tyrell Tay-
lor; sisters, Jessie Repress (Ed-
gar Rodgers), and Ruby Wilson;
special niece, Cora Williams (Bill);
grandchildren, Terry and Sheter-
ria Elliot, Richard Jr. and Rishard
Parsons; Kani Frederick and Corin-
thian Moore; a host of other rela-
tives and friends. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Antioch M.B. Church of
Brownsville.

LEOLA R. ROSS, 72, Home-
maker died De-
cember 23. Sur-
vivors include:
daughters,
Sheryl, Janine,
Brenda Ross-
Dulan (Gregory),
and Angela; four
grandchildren
and a host of other relatives and
friends. Service was held.

ELSIE GAMBLE COOPER, 83,
retired food server for Jackson Man-
or Nursing Home, died December
25. Service 11 a.m., Wednesday in
the chapel. Final rites and burial in
Hemingway, South Carolina.

GERALD FRANKLIN, 83, facto-
ry worker died December 26. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, St. Francis
Xavier Catholic Church.

EVA BARNUM ORANGE, 89,
Homemaker died December 29.
Survivors include: son, Cleophus
(Sonia); granddaughters, Jacque-
line Barfield and Janet Lee. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

MALAYAH MARSHALL MA-
JOR, Infant, Died December 17.
Final rites, and burial in Nassau,
Bahamas.

JUAN WALKER, 45, security
guard for U.S. Immigration Ser-
vices. Funeral arrangements are
incomplete.

DR. MARY F. BRYANT, 84, Re-
tired Cosmetologist died December
23. Service was held.


Mitchell
JACKIE KEELS JR,
tenance worker,
died December
25. Service 2
p.m., Saturday,
St. Matthew
Freewill Baptist
Church.


44, main-


-II
THELMA ODESSA VINSON,
'MS. SHORTY',
54, community
volunteer, died
December 24 at
home. Service
noon, Saturday
in the chapel.


Wright & Young
LULA MARIE TAYLOR 79,
homemaker,
died December
25 in Jackson
North Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
children, Elaine
and Ronald;
siblings, Boysie
W. Jr, and Geraldine Crawford;
ten grandchildren. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Trinity C.M.E Church.

JOYCE ROBINSON STILLMAN
58, advertising
specialist for the
Miami Herald
and graduate
of Miami North-
western Class
of 1968 died
December 23 ina
Jackson North
Medical Center. Survivors include:
husband, Freddie; sons Tabari and
Tarrel; siblings, Patricia Kellom,
Connie Griffin, Carol and Michael
Morley, grandson Devon. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, January 3, New
Jerusalem P.B Church.

DORETHA BROWN 83, child-
care worker,
died December
26 in Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: children
Alvin, Walter,
Donnie Rogers,
Carson and Ter-
ri, Clara Holton; siblings Julius and
Eugene Sams, Gwenette Dillars,
Earnestine Rembert and Jacque-
line Davis. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day, Rock of Ages Baptist.

IQUISHA DANJAIAL MIDDLE-
TON 31, secu-
rity guard died
December 26
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: parents
Ernest and Al-
vera Johnson;
Son Daquaius Richardson; sib-
lings, Jeremy 'bka' 'Nicole', Ta-
vares, Davard, Ernest Jr., Renee,
Shanell and Erica; grandparents,
Mary Bernadine, Gwendolyn Ashe,
Harrett Reed, Jeff Middleton, Ed-
die Reed. Service 2 p.m. Saturday,
Friendship M.B Church.

HERIZONE JACKIE JACKSON
78, car detailer,
died December
27 in North-
shore Medical
Center. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


BESSIE KEENAN, 95, domes-
tic worker died
December 28 in
Pinecrest Nurs-
ing Home. Ser-
vice was held.




Manker
ANGELA P. GILMORE, 42,
environmental
specialist, died
December 25
in North Shore
Medical center.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Anti-
och Missionary
Baptist Church
of Liberty City.

ROBERT LEE SUMMERSET,
80, landscaper,
died December
23 in Aventura
Medical Cen-
ter. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Church of God
by Faith. "


Faith
ANTWAN BYRD, 20,
cember 28. Ser-
vice 1:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church. I


died De-


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Carey Royal Ran -n"
KIMBERLY GAINES, 27, stu-
dent, died December 25 at home.
Service was held.

TYRONE LANCASTER, 89,
retired construction worker, died
December 27 in Cleveland Clinic
Hospital.
Service was held.

CARTER WRIGHT, 76, retired
accountant, died December 27 at
home. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

BEVERLY CANTOR, 57, custo-
dian, died December 27 in Jack-
son North. Arrangements are in-
complete.
St. Fort
AMARANTE SELON, 80, home-
maker, died December 27 in Jack-
son North Medical Center. Final
rites and burial in Haiti.

SNOPHEN AUGUSTIN, 24, se-
curity officer, died December 24 at
home. Service 10 a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.

CLEMENT CONSTANT, 96,
carpenter, died December 22 in
New York. Graveside service 10
a.m., January 5.
Range Coconut Grove
DOROTHY RUTH EVERETT
MAYCOCK,
mail clerk, 57, of
Coconut Grove,
died Dec. 26 in
Baptist Hospi-
tal. Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Tyrone; sons,
Tyrone Everett
and Kareem; daughters, Wendy
Sanders and Tyra; fifteen grand-
children; father, Willie B. Everett;
mother, Lillian L. Everett; brother,
Benjamin Everett; sister, Lillian Ma-
this; special friend/sister, Gloria Ar-
nold; mother-in-law, Easter; broth-
ers and sisters-law; and a host of
other relatives and friends

EDNA LEE PARRISH-MON-
ROE, 80, long
time resident of .
Goulds, Florida
died December
28. Survivors in-
clude: husband '- .
of 66 years', '
Pastor Moses E.
Monroe Sr; chil-
dren;, Moses Jr., Edna M., Jenette
Holloway, Nathaniel, and Shirley
Monroe-Wright; many grandchil-
dren and great grandchildren. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Saturday, Mt. Nebo
Missionary Baptist Church.


Jay _ .
VERA VIRGIN, 71, dispatcher,
died Decem-
ber 24. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, Bethel Full
Gospel Baptist
Church.



ANNIE HOWARD, 62, died De-
cember 22 in
Jackson South
Community
HospitaL. Ser-
vice 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


FRANKIE PATTERSON, 57,
caretaker, died
December 26 in
Franco Nursing
Home. Service
3 p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.



JAVIUS WASHINGTON, 20,
died December
25 in Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital. ,
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Morn-
ing Star Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.'

JOE KNOX, 61, died December
19. Arrangements are incomplete.
CAULTON DUBLIN, 87, carpen-
ter, died December 22 in St. Anne's
Nursing Center. Service was held.
EZRA JONES, 85, carpenter,
died December 28. Arrangements
are incomplete.
GEORGE FLETCHER, died in
Jackson South Community Hospi-
tal. Service 1 p.m., Wednesday in
the chapel.


St. Fort
AMARANTE SELON, 80, home-
maker, died December 27 in Jack-
son North Medical Center. Final
rites and burial in Haiti.

SNOPHEN AUGUSTIN, 24, se-
curity officer, died December 24 at
home. Service 10 a.m., Saturday
in the chapel.

CLEMENT CONSTANT, 96,
carpenter, died December 22 in
New York. Graveside service 10
a.m., January 5.


Ili w k,< 1' 1:11 I l D\' O Wl








BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY, 2009


Willie Redding spent his life in


service to Richmond Heights


By Tariq Osborne
tosbore@ iiiiiiiiiitiri(e
Richmond Heights lost one of
its pioneers when Willie Redding
died on Dec. 9 after a long ill-
ness. He was 87.
Redding, once described as
"the little mayor of Richmond
Heights" in a Jet Magazine pro-
file, was an indefatigable com-
munity advocate. He was the
first Black to sit on the then
Metropolitan Dade County Wa-
ter and Sewer Board, a position
he held for 14 years, five of them
as chairman; was presented
with a certificate of appreciation
for his efforts on behalf of his
community by then Dade Mayor
Stephen Clark in 1986; and he
was invited to President Lyndon
Johnson's inauguration. Mr.
Redding marched on Washing-
ton with Martin Luther King Jr.
But he did not view these as
his real achievements. To Red-
ding, that all came second to his
service to Richmond Heights.
"My husband was an out-
standing man," said Eddie Red-
ding, 84, his wife of 65 years.
"He was small in stature but he
had a big voice, he was a good
father, a good husband and a
good provider. He was a com-
munity activist and he always
stood for what was right. He
wanted Richmond Heights to
be the best community, to be
the best one in which a person
could live."
Longtime friend the Rev. John
Ferguson described Redding as
"a community person."
"He believed in the communi-
ty where he lived, he believed in
upgrading the community and,
whatever goal and objectives
the community had, he led the
effort to make it come to pass.
Any objections to that effort he
would fight tooth and nails."
Ferguson, 84, grew up in
present-day Coconut Grove -
then considered South Miami -
and met Mr. Redding when he
purchased a home in Richmond
Heights after leaving the Navy.
The two became fast friends. '


"Mr. Redding was an excel-
lent friend," said Ferguson. "He
was transparent, he was 'what
you see is what you get.' Once
he made up his mind, he didn't
particularly care what you think
about his decision. If he thinks
it' right, he's going after it, he's
gonna follow his mindset."
As an example: "There was
a commissioner who was con-
nected to a group of people who
wanted to erect a bar or a club
in Richmond Heights that would
. --. -
4P ,
- m * '' : .
sumemait *'I '.1 --I


.;' -:BIB
WILLIE REDDING
Community Activist


serve drinks. Initially they didn't
consult anybody from Richmond
heights. When [Redding] heard
about it he massed the citizens
of Richmond Heights against it.
And although the building was
built, they never opened it, and
that was because of the efforts
of Mr. Redding, among others.
They thought it was going to be a
done deal but Mr. Redding mar-
shaled those forces who want-
ed to. keep Richmond Heights
kind of alcohol clear, the way it
should be, for our children."
Redding's "big voice" trans-
lated into stern discipline for
his two daughters', Sylvia and
Priscilla.
"When he spoke, the kids lis-
tened," said Eddie Redding. "He
didn't have to speak two times.
During that time the children
respected their parents. They
had a time to study, they had
a time to play, there was a time


( rm e nun me itr I %

dr in Sa r m arnl ai 11 I
























Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


for everything. By 6 o'clock,
when the streetlights came on,
the kids knew they'd better be
in the house."
The couple's harmonious life
informed their parenting style.
"His rules were my rules and my
rules were his rules," she said
But Redding was also persua-
sive man, as well, she said.
"Everything he did he'd say,
'I have to talk it over with my
wife.' I didn't always agree with
him at first, but we'd sit down
and talk it over. In the end, of
course, I'd always agree," said
Eddie Redding, who met her
future husband in 1942 while
they attended then Florida Nor-
mal and Industrial Memorial
College - now Florida Memorial
University. They were married
in June 1943.
She is still unsure what drove
her husband's devotion to his
neighborhood.
"I guess it was just in him,"
she said. "The neighborhood
was more like a family. Anybody
could discipline anybody's child.
You didn't just apply to buy a
house here; you had to interview
with Captain Frank Martin. I've
been in this house 58 years and
most of the neighbors have been
out here that long as well."
Ferguson recalls those days in
Richmond Heights.
"When I first moved here in
1951, there were a few other vet-
erans and it was hard for them
to purchase a home outside of
the real Black community but
they saw and developed this
place and attracted the retired
veterans from the armed forc-
es," he said. "Captain Martin
flew over and saw the place and
wanted to develop the place pri-
marily for Black veterans. And
he wanted people interested in
staying, interested in building a
real neighborhood."
Willie Redding was among
those who made it into a real
neighborhood.
Services were held Dec. 20 at
Second Baptist Church, with
Poitier Funeral Home in charge
of the arrangements.


Death Notice
-- A


LILLIAN MCDOW, 106, died
December 30 in The Miami
Jewish Home For the Aged.
Viewing Monday January 5,
9 a.m. - 11 a.m., Antioch of
Brownsville. Service Monday;
January 5, 11 a.m., Antioch
of Brownsville MBC 2799 N.W.
46 Street. Hall-Ferguson-
Hewitt Mortuary rendering
services.


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"

"God cares and we care"










Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL. I
" 1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


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Death Notice


MARY SAMUELS died qui-
etly on December 17, at her
home in Anchorage, Alaska
where she resided with her
daughter, Shannon Lindsey
for the past eleven years.
Mary was born in Estill,
South Carolina on July 22,
1936. She sat out to make
a positive difference in the
world, and to build a strong
family with rich traditions.
Mary obtained her nursing
degree from Miami Dade
Junior College. She worked
at South Florida State Hos-
pital.
Her love of nursing and
her faith in God enabled her
to lift the spirits, expedite
the healing and console the
heavy hearts of the sick.
Mary cultivated a family
full of direction and deter-
mination, each unique in
their own way, yet bearing a
genuine replication of her.
Her inner strength and
unconditional faith in God
enabled her to care for her
mother with the same un-
selfish love that her mother
had given her as a child.
Her family says, "Her job
here on earth is done. She
has gone on to be with her
father. When you look in
her children's eyes, you will
see that he lives on in each
of us. Thank you Mom for a
job well done."
She leaves her family in
the capable hands of God
to carry on her legacy. She
is survived by: daughter,
Shannon Lindsey of An-
chorage, Alaska; sons, Jo-
seph McDonald of San Di-
ego, California and Gregory
Samuels of Seattle, Wash-
ington; grandchildren,
Mark J. Johnson of Japan,
RJ McDonald and Nickema
McDonald of San Diego,
California; great-grandchil-
dren, Elisha Johnson of San
Antonio, Texas and Briana
Aguilar of Clovis, New Mex-
ico and a host of extended
family,
A visitation will take place
from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. with
a Going Home Celebration
following at 2 p.m. on Jan-
uary 3 at Witzleben Legacy
Funeral Home, 1707 S. Bra-
gaw Street in Anchorage,
Alaska. A reception will
be held afterward at 7065
Crawford Street in Anchor-
age, Alaska. Contact Pear-
ley M. Bingham at (907)
301-9111 for additional in-
formation.


Gregg Mas 'n
JOHN R. THOMAS, 76, laborer
for Belcher Oil Company, died
December 22 at home. Service
was held. Final rites and burial in
Hawkinsville, Georgia.

GERMAINE CHRISTALIN THE-
ODORE, 79, practical nurse, died
December 23 in North Shore Hos-
pital Service was held.

In Memoriam


PATRICE MICHELLE THOMAS
07/11/89 - 01/04/08

Its amazing how time flies,
and you are truly missed.
Love Always, The Thomas
and Stephens family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


REV. WILLIAM E. ROLLE
12/30/55

"God is Love" I John 4:16

You left a legacy and your
footprints in the sands of
"time" that will be etched in
our hearts as words etched in
stone.
We will always love and miss
you. From your wife, Lavances
Wright-Rolle; children, Akilah,
William; and your church
family at God Filled Days
Ministries.

Death Notice

ORELOUS HALL JR, 55,died
December 26 in Jacksonville,
Florida. Survivors include: for-
mer wife, Pauline; sons, Orelous
III and Demetrius; brothers, El-
lie Bobby Jr, Billy James (James
Knight), Leslie Lee Lewis and
Glenn Hall; sister, Brenda Joyce
Johnson; uncle, Norris Brown
and a host of nieces, nephews
and friends. He was a graduate
of Miami Northwestern Class of
1971. Memorial service Satur-
day, Potter's Christian Fellow-
ship Church, 5119 Normandy
Blvd., Jacksonville,. Florida
32205.


Former Miami
Educator Dies


LILLIE RUTH WILLIS


We sadly announce the
passing of former Miami edu-
cator Lillie Ruth Willis, who
died December 18th and was
buried last week in Winter
Garden, Florida.
Upon her graduation from
Florida A&M University, she
moved to Miami where she
spent her entire educational
career. Her career began as
a teacher at Poinciana Park
Elementary School under the
leadership of the late Eliza-
beth Pittman.
Lillie was a master teacher
who used her remarkable
talent to create an exciting
learning environment for the
children under her supervi-
sion. She was selected as a
Project Language Arts Teach-
er (PLATS) at Poinciana and
became a "Teacher-of-Teach-
ers" in the Title 1 Program
in the district. She retired as
the Title 1 Project Coordina-
tor in the Dade County Public
Schools.
Six years ago, she returned
to her birth place in Winter
Garden to be closer .to her
daughter, Angela Torrance,
and sisters, Alberta Middle-
ton, Eunice Brown and En-
nice Donaldson.
In addition to her fam-
ily, she will be sorely missed
her many friends and former
co-workers in. Miami-Dade
County.
May she rest in peace and
let light perpetually shine
upon her.


Death Notice


Annie Mae Jenkins, 93,
retired, died December 29 in
Villa Maria Nursing Home.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
St. Luke Missionary.Baptist
Church. Service entrusted to
Richardson Mortuary.


.............
........... ......... . . . . . . . .......
................................................... .................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........
............................................






The Miami Times

Lifesty es


FASHION * HIP Hop * Music * FOOD * DINING * ARTS & CULTURE * PEOPLE


.-... MIAMI FORIDA. DfECEMBER 31. 2008- JANUARY 6, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


.u


ThF ]. ttled brotht rs ofl-C)m10 a
Psi Phi Friattrn tmi cl nrtci rtillnlic
lthien if% C;. swCe ]th:a.rts. and
sl.nilcant others I i t Thuri--
day at their annual Pre-Christ-
mas Luncheon. Stacy Jones,
the chairman, did a good job.
He also led the brothers in
singing the sweetheart song to
all of the ladies, each of whom
received a red rose upon enter-
ing. The Psi Phi Band played
favorites Christmas tunes.
After greeting the broth-
ers and guests, Jones turned
the program over to Johnny
Stepherson, the emcee. He
warmed the audience up with
a few jokes that put everyone
in the Christmas spirit. Then
came comments from Presi-
dent Baljean Smith, with the
chaplain, Dr. Herman Pratt,
blessing the food.
During the event, the music
enticed many guests to dance
the Popeye, the Electric Slide,
and the Two-Steps.
Gifts brought by the brothers
for their wives were taken from
under the large Christmas tree
and presented to them as the
band played Nat King Cole's
"The Christmas Song." It was
a significant romantic moment
for the brothers, especially
those who were in the dog
house.
Recognitions went out to Eu-
genia Thomas, wife of the late
Judge Lawson Thomas, and


Thelma Gibson. .
.Ai4le of' the lae a Fr. . .? I
Tri'eodLire Gibson.
rn ,annual trib- ..
ute to those ladies
whose husbands remain in the
hearts of Omegas.
Thelma announced she was
celebrating her 82nd birthday
and the band struck up the
song as everyone sang heart-
edly to the first Black nurse to
be employed at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Kudos went out to the event's
organizing committee from
Jones and Smith for a job well
done. They included Earl Dan-
iels, Johnny Davis, Dr. An-
drew Forbes, Henry Mingo,
Harold Mitchell, Pratt, Arthur
Simms, Anthony Simons and.
yours truly.
Others in attendance included
Harcourt Clark, Norman Cox,
Elston Davis, Harry Dawkins,
Rosetta Dean, Dr. Herman
Dorsett, Laurice Hepburn,
Beverly Johnson, Daphane
Johnson, Stacina Jones, Ivy
Leonard, Juanita Matthews,
Richard and Maxine Mitchell,
Elizabeth Phillips, Venetia
and Vincent Powell, Naomi
Smith, Dr. Lorraine F. Stra-
chan, Lillie Thomas, Timmy
Thomas, Joel Turner, Dr. Da-
vid and Tessie White, Loretta
Whittle, John Williams, Sad-
die Williams and Shirley Wil-
liams.


The Cloverleaf Royals held
their Pre-Christmas Luncheon
last Wednesday at the Clover-
leaf Center in Miami Gardens.
Jesse Stubbs, president, Lau-
rice Hepburn, reporter, and a
host of remarkable members
did a fine job.
Everyone came dressed in
Christmas attire' of red-gold-
and-green and extended "Merry
Christmas" greetings to all as
they entered the well-decorated
Hall. After prayers, it was time
to dine on a sumptuous meal,
listen to Christmas carols and
converse quietly.
Those seen enjoying
themselves included
Sara Bullard, Marva
Butler, Bernice Cros-
by, Angelean Fenner-
son, Lauraice Hep-
burn, Azalee E. Hunt,
Helen Jackson, Pa-
trice Jackson, Bertha R(
James, Marion John-
son, Althea M. Jones, Carrie
McLeod, Evelyn Newton, Tyra
Robinson, Rose Simon, Jack-
ie Smith, Elizabeth Wells and
Carol Williams. A special sa-
lute goes out to Hunt for rais-
ing funds to give the needy an
iPod for Christmas. There were
25 on her list and the cost was
beyond what was raised, so
she donated the balance so
those kids would have a happy
Christmas. Stubbs announced
an event at Fairchild Tropical
Garden for Jan. 22 with depar-
ture at noon. For more infor-
mation, call 305-654-8279.


Retirees are taking advan-
tage of activities being spon-
sored at parks, schools, resi-
dential towers and community
centers. Charles Hadley Park
is one of the places where ac-
tivities keep them coming dai-
ly. The latest performance by
the Dance Department was "A
Soulful Christmas" staged on
Dec. 13 in the Black Box The-
atre.
Daphane Johnson and her
dance group electrified the au-
dience. The dancers included
Alijah Joseph, Nyaila New-
bold, Shamari Roberson and
De'Kara Zeigler.
Other performers
included Espionage
Dance Company doing
"The Spirit of Move-
ment" by Kylrin Byron
and James Solomon;
"Silent Night" by Had-
,ley Dance Department,
featuring Antwaneisha
OLLE Edwards, Roneka
Jones, Tiara and Ike-
ria Williams; Real Team Step-
pers, with Flecia Wright; and
the Hadley dancers performing
"Joy To The World" and "Joy-
ful, Joyful," starring Monica
Cruz, Antwaneisha Edwards,
Roneka Jones, Tiana Mc-
Minn, Tiara and Ikeria Wil-
liams.
Special recognition went
out to Ernest Burkeen, Wes-
ley Carroll, Chester Coach-
man, and Lara deSouza, Caro-
lyn Frazier, Antavius Howell,
Donald Lutton, Apon Nichols,
Florene Litthcut Nichols and
Kimberly Sands.


Recipe for a happy new year:
Take 12 months. Clean them
thoroughly of all bitterness,
hate and jealousy.
Arrange each month into 28,
30 or 321 different parts, as the
case maybe, .buLdon't q-make up
the whole batch at once. Pre-
pare it one day at a time out of
these ingredients.
Mix well into each day one part
each of faith, patience, courage,
work, hope, faithfulness, gener-
osity and kindness.
Blend this mixture with a pint
of prayer.


enjoying Christmas in New York
with her sister Evelyn Heild
and family


Get-well wishes to all of you. I
do hope you had a merry Christ-
Season the whole mas and will have a healthy new
with a dash of good year: Elestene M. Allen, Vashti
spirits, a sprinkle of Armbrister, Larcenia Bullard,
fun, a pinch of play 'Samuel Cleare, 'Donald Cun-
and a cupful of good ningham, Sue Francis, Dene-
humor. sia Harris, Grace Heastie-Pat-
Pour this batter into a vessel terson, Thelma Hylor-Dames,
of love and cook thoroughly over Floyd Lewis, Mildred Marquis,
radiant joy. Doris McKinney-Pittman,
When done, serve the day with Dorothea Payne, Princess
a smile in the name of our Sav- Roberts, William Richardson,
ior who fills the new year with Edna Scavella, John Smith
love and joy. and Priscilla Thompson.


Dorothy Da Da** Saunders is
Dorothy "Da Da" Saunders is


Wedding anniversary greetings


to our love birds of the season:
Esmond (Barbara) Joseph, Dec.
21, their 26h; Fletcher C. (Ida)
Young, Dec. 22, their 22nd; and
Michael D. (Davrye G.) Smith
Sr., Dec. 26, their 16",


The Booker T. Washington Se-
nior High School Alumni Asso-
ciation held its Christmas party
at the African Heritage Cultural
Arts Center on 22"d Avenue the
night of Dec. 22. A very good
time was enjoyed by all in at-
tendance. Roberta Daniels and
her committee did a fabulous
job. Roberta is president of the
association.


Fred Adderley is in the na-
tion's capital to attend the fu-


neral of his daughter-in-law's
father.


Dear Billy Rolle, you deserve
congratulations. I am very con-
fident you and your Bulls will
once again rise to the occasion
as state high school football
champions. I want to tell you
how proud I am of you. I am
sure Liberty City will continue
to be impressed when you, your
coaches and team start to make,
a real difference next fall.


Miamians were saddened once
again to hear of the death of Wil-
liam "Billie" Bouie who died in
Los Angeles last Tuesday. Bil-
lie was the brother of Velma B.
Arnold, Gwen B. Thomas and


Marva Bouie of New York City.
Sympathy to the family.


Cynthia Gordon-Williams
and Velma Bell enjoyed a week
of Hawaiian fun last week when
they visited our 50t state that
is also the former home of our
newly elected President Barack
Obama.


According' to newt" reports,
Arab leaders such as the kings
of Jordan and Saudi Arabia
showered outgoing Secretary
of State Condoleeza Rice. with
gem-encrusted baubles valued
at $316,000, making her one of
the top recipients among U.S.
officials of gifts from foreign of-
ficials.


,r �i F '( 1


i started serinusl,, writing
poetry in 1965. pressed bi, an
inspiring. but o.erbeannnr high
school English teacher, Bill
Price, to take a chance and do
something a bit more creative
than play basketball.
Mr. Price also made me write
poetry. He didn't tell me how to
write it, but to write what I felt.
He made me keep a journal and
checked it every week.
I wrote a series of apprentice
narrative pieces about the
Vietnam war, full of all the
cliched wisdom of Dick
Gregory and Malcolm X and
submitted them for grades.
Price, unknown to me, gave
them to a visiting Gwendolyn
Brooks, who came to our high
school that year as some sort
of literary ambassador. To my
horror, she read my poems and
those of three other students
at an all-school assembly and
criticized them as the "raw,
sometimes undisciplined
ratings of a new Black voice
in modern literature."
I thought I had been panned.
I almost gave up writing that
day for good. In an interview
with her a few days later, when
she came to my English class, I
introduced myself as "that raw,
ranting poet." Somehow she
convinced me in that soft, sweet
direct way of hers, that she was
paying me a compliment. She


encouraged me
toi read and read
widely and, most
importantly, to
write. And not to let someone's
criticism discourage me. That
encounter changed my life.
I later struggled through
Brooks' "Annie Allen," her
Pulitzer Prize-winning book
of poetry, not because it was
so hard to understand but
because it was so beautifully
and otherworldly written;
because I had met her and
knew her to be a real flesh-
and-blood person.
She didn't use words like the
romantic lyricists, even though
she took their forms, their
meters and poetic diction and
made them her own; made them
Black and accessible, made
them human. After reading
that book, I mouthed the words
that I would mouth many times
thereafter, especially after peak
experiences with other poets:
Will I ever be able to write like
that?
Many years later I wrote a
Shakespearean sonnet in her
honor:
yemoja culls the deepest ocean
floor
for gwendolyn Brooks

yemoja culls the
deepest ocean floor,
& raises high her waves to


shroud the day,
then gently lays her bounty
on the shore,
we thank you, yeye mi, a dipe!
we thank u for yr mysteries,
sweet womb
of life, omnificent & feminine;
yr magic takes us through the
liquid tomb
to power's source - erewa obinrin.
yr amniotic sorcery's at work
where seekers of the sacred
are conceived;
all female til those hormones
bead & quirk.
the greatest of yr
sorceries achieved,
when out of females lusty
males are made,
& the power of the
feminine displayed.

(Yemoja is an orisha,
originally of the Yoruba religion.
She is the ocean, the essence
of motherhood, and a protector
of children. Yeye mi a duipe
is yoruba for "Thank you my
mother" and Erewa Obinrin
means guardian ofthe character
of women)
Gwendolyn Brooks was a
contributing editor at the time
for Third World Press. Two
years later she would take a
manuscript of mine and submit
it to that publishing house. (Don
L. Lee now Haki Madhubuti
sent me a gentle rejection letter,
encouraging me to continue
writing) In my interview with
her, she recommended that I
read the poets of the Harlem
Renaissance and to particularly
read one of her contemporaries,
Robert Hayden.


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"If the lions do not write their own history, then the

hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


The agony of defeat is what
the Miami Northwestern Bulls
suffered on Dec. 20 after their
loss to Seminole High of Central
Florida. The unexpected 28-21
loss was a big disappointment,
of course, for the 15,000 Bulls
fans who flew, rode buses or
hitched a ride with one of their
home boys.
According to Eugene Stra-
chan, a member of the Tree of
Knowledge, The Bulls started
off in good shape by scoring
on the first play when Michael
Lee Harris took it to the house
on a pass from quarterback
Teddy Bridgewaters, followed
by Wayne Times doing the
same. But, as Strachan re-
marked, "One. play can turn a
game around". It was evident
when Ray Ray Armstrong,
a high school All-American,
broke through the Bulls'
tough defense for a 27-yard
TD. Seminole won the game on
an electrifying steal from the
Bulls safety Tevin McCaskill
in the last few seconds. Andre
Debose and Dyron Dyer, all-
American, players, added to
the agony of defeat.
John Carter took the con-
versation from Strachan and
reflected on the Bulls of yes-
teryear that organized the
strongest defense led by Eddie
J. Strachan, Billy Kechon,
Booker Do, David Davis, Ar-
nold Davis, Joey Davis, Le-
ander "Trixy" Phillips, and
Carlton Fisher. Players such
as Billy Bullard, Harold Mur-
ray, Tommy Bethel, Sylves-
ter Clemons and Calvin Allen
played both ways, too.
That era was the beginning


r


of a strong foundation estab-
lished by Coaches "Breeze"
Brown, Shorty Holton, "Monk"
Silva, Joe Lang Kershaw and
Coach Scott. All of them are
gone now but their legacy lives
on from generation to genera-
tion.
Caleb Crosby, a devout Bull,
indicated how happy he was
over the team's accomplish-
.ments in 2007 and the "big
seven" who were drafted by U
of M with Jacory Harris as the
leader and the "big four" includ-
ing Daquan Hargrett, Dwayne
Times, Conelius Williams and
Teddy Bridgewater.
Frank Pinkney, leader at the
Tree of Knowledge, acknowl-
edged the pain of the defeat ,
as well as the joy of the victory
of teams past that sent play-
ers to the NFL, such as Mel-
vin Bratton, Brett Perriman,
Marvin Jones, Nate Webster
and Vernon Carey.


James Fayson, chairman,
King of Clubs of Greater Miami,
and Hosea Butler, president,
and the membership invite you
to their 12th annual Holiday
Gala starting at 6:30 p.m,. Jan.
9 at the Doubletree Grand Ho-
tel, 1717 N. Bayshore Dr. The
King of Clubs, one of Miami's
oldest social service organiza-
tions, was established in the
1930s by a group of doctors,
lawyers, educators and minis-
ters. The gala allows guests to
mingle, enjoy live music, and
dine on prime rib roast, salmon
or chicken. For more informa-
tion, call Fayson at 305-233-
6865.









3C THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


BLACKS MUSFI CONTROl. THEIR O\VN DlSIFINY


Women who yearn to live out their


fantasies should beware of the bad boy


By Sylvia Mitchell
Mfiami Times Writer

More than likely you know a
few desperate housewives. Of
course, anyone fitting that de-
scription wouldn't come right
out and admit that behind the
expertly woven facade, accept-
able for PTA and Church pic-
nics, lies a woman desperately
seeking the thrill and romance
of a bad boy.
Before settling down with a
nice mama's boy, our sisters,
aunts, and even our mothers, if
asked, could tell you a few wild
stories about their flings with
men who were far from being
marriage material.
It is common knowledge that
prisoners can get anything
on the inside of the joint that
they're accustomed to having
when they were in the free world
and female companionship
is no exception. Prisoners do
pretty well for themselves. Just
look at Drew Peterson, who is
now engaged to what will be his
I


fifth wife and he is a suspect in
both the disappearance of his
fourth wife and the homicide of
his third wife. Just his history
and the circumstances that
surround him should make
him less than an eligible bach-
elor for most women.
There is a phenomenon in our
culture of women being attract-
ed to men in uniform. Women
are attracted to preachers, they
are attracted to celebrities, and
they are attracted to bad boys.
When in relationships with
bad boys, women appear to lose
all sense of good judgment and
take risks they would not ordi-
narily take. Fortunately, after
the fling is over, some predict-
able well-mannered nice guy is
there to pick up the pieces of
her life.
Part of the attraction to bad
guys is the risk-taking and ex-
citement, as well as the power
of romance and good sex. Hol-
lywood glamorizes and makes
heroes out of shooters, wheth-
er they are cops or bad guys.


To some extent women find
murder cool and sexy. Just as
some parents live vicariously
thro�igh their children, some
women who. are not happy and
are insecure in themselves live
vicariously through their bad
boy lovers.
Researchers of this phenom-
enon report that women who
love bad guys, particularly
murderers and serial killers,
were usually abused as chil-
dren and want to act out. But
instead of acting out them-
selves, these women allow their
bad boy companions to act out
for them.
Sheila Isenberg, author of
"Women who love men who kill",
reports women too want their 15
minutes of fame, just as much
as men do. Trying to reason with
someone who is caught up in
this type of relationship is often
futile, since she is in denial and
cannot see the dark side of her
love interest. Often the woman
exonerates her lover by blaming
it on his use of drugs, or saying


friends made him do it or he had
a less than glowing upbringing.
Prisoners really fulfill a lot of
needs women have. The woman
is put on a pedestal, she receives
lots of poems and letters and she
can be pretty secure that her
man is not cheating. She knows
where he is and what he is do-
ing at all times and she decides
when to see him.
Having a fantasy life can be
healthy, as it can help us to es-
tablish goals and motivate us to
achieve those goals. We start to
fantasize as children but some-
where along the way we become
ashamed of our fantasies and
we learn not to share them with
people.
Knowing where to draw the
line between reality and fantasy
is crucial. Rather than living out
your desire for risk-taking and
excitement in a harmful man-
ner, consider other avenues that
provide the same rush such as
race car driving, motorcycling,
scuba diving, parachuting -- or
even becoming an astronaut.


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. .
YOU WE[EKLY�~UL


ARIES: MARCH 21 - APRIL 20
You keep wondering what an old flame is
up to.They think as much about you. Before
you decide to reconnect, try to recall the
circumstances of your breakup and don't
kid yourself about revisiting the past.
lUCKY NUMBERS 5, 40, 33, 20, 1.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 - MAY 20
Fond of doing things the hard way, you
still don't see how it screws you up. Having
to prove that you're Will is stronger than
anything blocks you from the understanding
that life only works when we go with the
flow. Lucky numbers 4, 40, 33, 2, 54.

GEMINI: MAY 21 - JUNE 20
All this gossip makes it hard to separate
truth from lies. Your imaginings have
nothing to do with the way things are. No
one's out to get you, so dump that idea and
ask yourself why someone else always has
to be the bad guy. Lucky numbers 6, 18, 13,
39, 41.

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
Now that you see what went wrong,
don't criticize yourself for not seeing it
sooner. Whoever's making mincemeat out
of your plans is now in the driver's seat
only because you let them take over every
aspect of your life. Lucky numbers 8, 6, 30,
4,33.

LEO: JULY 21 -AUGUST 20
You don't have to fully understand
someone to love them. Your latest flame'
may be a little different but don't try to
change their ways. They have so much to
teach you about yourself. Be open to it.
Lucky numbers 7, 50, 17, 1, 9.

VIRGO:AUG.21- SEPT.20
It's tough to play the heavy in this
situation but being too kind or too trusting
won't work. Hold your ground. Don't worry
about how you come across. Protect your
own interests no matter what. Lucky
numbers 2, 10, 29, 31, 40.










ir feelly h -S


LIBRA: SEPT. 21 - OCT. 20
None of this is as bad as it looks.
Circumstances are crazier than usual,
that's all. As soon as the dust settles
you'll see that what lies at the core of your
relationships is as strong as it ever was.
Lucky numbers 6, 7, 27, 19, 8.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 - NOV.20
You could use more support than you're
getting. Too bad no one seems to care.
It may be better this way. If others have
too much to say about how this goes it'll
limit your ability to remain in control. Lucky
numbers 2, 20, 13, 41, 44.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 - DEC. 20
Things have changed so much you aren't
sure where you stand. If this uncertainty
makes you question recent choices know


that you did the right thing and don't try to
return to what's known and familiar. Lucky
numbers 7, 3, 30, 39, 29.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21 - JAN. 20
You know what needs to happen, but
you can't press this. Time and the actions
of others have a lot to say about how things
unfold. Those who are reluctant at this
point will soon see that you have the right
idea. Lucky numbers 5, 50, 46, 10, 18.

AQUARIUS: JAN.21 - FEB.20
You made! your choices and can do
nothing to change the way others respond
to them. What you did was done to preserve
yourself. Those who fault you for moving on
are too messed up to see that you did the
right thing. Lucky numbers 8, 11, 1, 7, 24.

PISCES: FEB.21 - MARCH 20
It's time to get real. You can't keep
pretending to be what you're not. Living
a lie is far more stressful than telling the
Truth. You know what needs to happen. The
sooner you deal with it the better it will be
for everyone. Lucky numbers 30, 22, 29,
10, 17.


'A GIFT FOR MOVIEGOERS,
the year's most unexpected and profoundly moving love story'
Pete tlammond. HOLLYWOOD.COM


Si



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O4CATS
Andrew Lloyd Webber's CATS returns to enthrall a whole new
generation of theatergoers with its magic, mystery and melodies.
See it for the first time, or see it again-the memory of CATS will
enchant you now and forever
2 PM $26, $37, $47, $61 * 7:30 PM $20, $35, $45, $59
Ziff Ballet Opera House


Miami Ciy Ballet presents
PROGRAM II
The Fox-Trot: Dancing in the Dark - a lively romp through
big-band American ballroom dances and swing music of ihe
forTies. Mercuric Tidings: a whirlwind or motion created by
contemporary master Paul Taylor. Ballet Impenal a large-cast
tribute to the grand style of classical Russian ballet.
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $19, $29, $59, $69, $85, $175

Florida Grand Opera presents
DMITRI HVOROSTOVSKY
Hailed as one of the "heroic" artists of our times, Dmitri
Hvorostovsky will be joined by one of the leading sopranos
of her generation, Ekaterina Siurina, completing the evening
with elegance
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall
$13.75, $28.75, $53 75, $78.75, $103 75. $143.75


Miami City Ballet presents
PROGRAM II
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $19, $29, $59, $69, $85, $175


Miamni Crly Ballie preseris
PROGRAM II
2 PM * Ztff Ballet Opera House * $19, $29, $59, $69. $85, $175


M.iami SvrmlphCorr Orchlestra presents
"AN EVENING IN VIENNA"
A splendid selection of the grandest overtures, waltzes and
dances from the world's most beloved composers. Beethoven,
Brahms and Johann Strauss Francisco Flores, a gold medal
winner, loins as quest artist for this spectacular program!
8 P'I * knight Concert Hall * $20. $50, $65. $75. $120, $150


Proqrarn II


Free AdrIenne Arsht Center Tours: ,ondn, iNd resurs olls- l oinoon. strrlinj itl the Ziti Ballet Opera Ho)Lte loI'by
No reservations necessary.


ORDER NO
30.99,72 - rstcntr^r


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__~~_______


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NOW PLAYING
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES


F�rnglA~n II


I


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I






i I.ACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31, 2008-JANUARY 6, 2009


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Copyrighted Material


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Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 31, 2008 -


JANUARY 6, 2009


Jobless claims surge to 26-year high


aIYrrr In) p a

rrkrc r up i,

WM"il millumN

















WAL*MART
of March 31, the company said in its most
recent 10-K filing with the Securities and
Exchange Commission.
The Bentonville, Ark.-based company
said many of the settled lawsuits were filed
years ago and the allegations are not repre-
sentative of the company Wal-Mart is today.
"Our policy is to pay associates for every
hour worked and to provide rest and meal
breaks," Tom Mars, Wal-Mart's executive
vice president and general counsel, said in
a statement.
The company declined to discuss the
case further. Lawyers for the plaintiffs did
not return calls for comment Tuesday.
Wal-Mart has been working steadily to
rehabilitate its image amid continuing
scrutiny of its labor and business prac-
tices.
Earlier this month, Wal-Mart said it
would pay up to $54.25 million to settle a
class-action lawsuit alleging it cut workers'
break time and didn't prevent employees
from working off the clock in Minnesota.
Last year, Wal-Mart said it would pay
more than $33 million in back wages to
thousands of employees after turning it-
self in to the Labor Department for paying
too little in overtime over the previous five
years. Also last year, a judge in Pennsyl-
vania ruled that Wal-Mart workers in that
state who previously won a $78.5 million
class-action award for working off the clock
will share an additional $62.3 million in
damages.
Under the announced agreement, Wal-
Mart will continue to use various electronic
systems and other measures to ensure its
compliance with wage-and-hour policies
and law.


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NO

MBA NEEDED


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o 40ome *-


With an expected 2.2 million job openings by 2014,
the business world may want you. And you don't
necessarily need a business degree to be a part of this
growing field. The good analytical skills and creativity
found in liberal arts and science degrees can transfer
into the marketable skills you can use in business.
These seven hot jobs in business may be able to
transform your non-business degree into a valuable
asset in the business world. Want more great news?
You can take many of the classes online.
Health Care Manager
If you love the idea of working in the medical field
while being in charge, train to become a health care
manager. Health care managers coordinate and
supervise offices, departments, or entire facilities.
A bachelor's degree in health sciences or a nursing
degree with an emphasis in administration can get
you started. Best yet, health care managers made an
average annual salary of $84,980 in 2007, according
to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Human Resource Manager
Human resource managers act as a liaison between
management and employees. They often recruit and
hire new employees, as well as work with employees
and managers in order to increase productivity
and boost morale. Although some human resource
managers earned a bachelor's degree in business,
others hold a liberal arts degree. Online classes in
social sciences and behavioral sciences as well as
business can help you succeed in this well-paying
career. Human resource managers made an average
annual salary of $99,810 in 2007, according to the
BLS.
Information Systems Manager
Apply your interest in computers and become an
information systems manager. Information systems
managers work with a company's business plan and
research how technology and information systems
might meet those needs and then implement that
technology. An associate's or bachelor's degree in
information technology or management information
systems can get your foot in the door. According to
the BLS, information systems managers made an
Please turn to CAREERS 6D


* 1 .* ? .:, r ,a .I *i*; i


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'Copyrighted Material
y n d i a t e C o n t e nt................. ................. ...........................................................................................................................................


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. careers

Whatever your dreams, the business
world needs people who enjoy their
jobs and want to do them well

By Romy LeClaire Loran


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Taking courses online can boost salary expectations


CAREERS
continued from 5D

annual average salary
of $113,880 in 2007.

Occupational Health
and Safety Specialist
Occupational health
and safety special-
ists look out for the
welfare of the pub-
lic, the environment,
and employees as
they test and monitor
the quality of air, wa-
ter, and soil. You may
find yourself working
in an office, factory,
or mine as you also
conduct inspections
and enforce laws and
regulations. You need


a bachelor's degree in
a field like chemistry,
biology, engineering,
or occupational health
to join this field. These
professionals made an
average annual salary
of $61,310 in 2007,
according to the BLS.

Public Relations
Specialist
The need for public
relations specialists is
expected to grow 18
percent within the next
eight years. If you are
interested in a bache-
lor's degree in commu-
nication studies, why
not then take your
enthusiasm and those
hard won communica-


tion skills and become
a public relations spe-
cialist. You work may
include drafting press
releases and working
with the media, gov-
ernment, and commu-
nity. According to the
BLS, public relations
specialists made an
average annual salary
of $57,100 in 2007.

Web Site Designer
If you want to com-
bine your creative
edge with computer
skills, become a Web
site designer, where
you will work with
computer software in
order to design Web
pages. Graphic design


software can help you
create the look you
want for your clients.
An associate's degree
in graphic design or a
bachelor's of fine arts
degree with an empha-
sis in graphic design
can give you the online
career training you
need for this creative
endeavor. Web de-
signers with between
five and nine years of
experience made an
average of $47,342
in 2008, according to
PayScale, Inc.

Entrepreneur
If you have fanta-
sies of running your
own business one day,


study what you en-
joy most by earning
an online degree that
can provide you with
much-needed career
training. A bachelor's
degree in English, for
example, may be the
perfect fit for a book-
store owner. Love the
great outdoors and
have a sense of adven-
ture? Open a gear shop
or provide adventure
tours after receiving
an associate's degree
in natural science. Al-
though small business
owners' salaries vary
greatly, entrepreneurs
with one to four years
of experience made an
average annual wage


of $57,086 in 2008,
according to PayScale,
Inc.
Whatever your
dreams, the business
world needs people
who enjoy their jobs
and want to do them
-well. Many online
bachelor's' and associ-
ate's degree programs
encourage you to ex-
plore new topics while
you test hypothesis
and question previ-
ously held beliefs --
all while learning new
skills. Expand your
world with an online
associate's or bach-
elor's degree, and ex-
pand your job oppor-
tunities.


( ,. e'* n Copyrighted Material a,, wJ ,r

S . Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


NOTICE TO BIDDERS

Kiddie kop Child Care, Inc.
231 NW 52nd Street, Miami, Florida 33127

Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and
equipment for the Kiddie Kop Child Care, Inc.
project, a one story 1,500 square foot (+/-) child
care center, will be received at 231 NW 52nd Street,
Miami, Florida 33127 until 2:00 PM local time on
January 20, 2009. No bids will be accepted after
2:00 PM.

Bid documents may be obtained at the office of
Kiddie Kop Child Care, Inc. 231 NW 52nd Street,
Miami, Florida 33127starting on December 19,
2008 from 9 AM to 2 PM Monday through Friday.
A pre-bid meeting and visual site inspection will be
held on January 10, 2009 at 10:00AM at Kiddie
Kop Child Care, Inc. 231 NW 52nd Street, Miami,
Florida 33127. Mandatory attendance is required
for all general contractors bidding on this project.

All general contractors bidding on this project must
be licensed and insured. All bids must be submitted
in sealed envelopes bearing on the outside, the
name and address of the bidder, and the name of
the project.

This project is funded with Community Development
Block Grant funds through the City of Miami
Department of Community Development, and
as such bidders must comply with all applicable
federal, state and local ordinances.

Kiddie Kop Child Care, Inc. reserves the right to
reject any or all bids. Bids from any person, firm or
corporation in default upon any agreement with the
City of Miami will be rejected.

No bidder may withdraw his/her bid within ninety
(90) calendar days from the bid submittal. date of
January 6, 2009.


bq r * b


f % . .


INVITATION TO BID
NO. 08-09-025
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall,
1st Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133-5504 for:
North Bayshore Drive Drainage Improvements, B-50658
Bids Due: Friday, January 30, 2009, AT 2:00 PM.

Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary to achieve
the following: The Work includes the installation of a new drainage system to mitigate the flooding,of
North Bayshore Drive. Elements of construction include new positive drainage piping, manholes, inlets,
and drainage wells. Roadway reconstruction will be needed including raising of the existing road to
higher elevations, new pavement, curb and gutter, and sidewalk, landscaping and new tree planting.
Harmonization of construction with some adjacent property owners will also be needed.

CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit which will be held at the
following date, time and location:

Location: MRC Building, 10th Floor City Manager's Main Conference
Room, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Miami, Fl. 33130
Date/Time: January 9, 2009 at 9:30 AM

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Con-
tractor from the State of Florida and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience under its current
business name, in the construction of similar projects including five (5) separate project references of
similar size, scope, and complexity, supported by references within the past five (5) years. The Bidder
must self-perform at least thirty-five percent (35%) of the physical construction work.

The Bid documents including plans can only be obtained on or after December 29, 2008, by visiting
the Department of Capital Improvements Program's website: www.miamiaov.com/Capitallmprovements/
pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp

It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommend-
ed that firms periodically check the CIP webpaae for updates and the issuance of addenda.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in
duplicate originals at the time, date and place above, where bids will be publicly opened. Any bids
received after time and date specified will not be considered. The responsibility for submitting a
bid before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the Bidder. The City is not
responsible for any delay no matter what the cause.

YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF
SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.
DP #008951


C


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


M&d G|


&b * O 4 o f0. ..


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31-JANUARY 6, 2009 1












4n;V ..i,
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MIAMI, FLORIDA, DECEMBER 31, 2008- JANUARY 6, 2009


KIWI


1iu N.E. /tIn street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
from $900, nice and clean,
laundry room, parking.
Section 8 OK! 786-326-7424

1031 N.W. 197th Terrace
Plus furnished room. Call
Linton at 305-652-4763.

1118 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath, $550. Stove, refrig,
air. 305-642-7080

1212 N.W. 1st Avenue
ONE MONTH TO.MQVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $500.
Stove, refrig., A/C. 305-642-
7080.

1229 N.W. 1st Court
Move In Special. One bdrm,
one bath. $575. Stove, re-
frigerator, A/C. 305-642-
7080/786-236-1144

1261 N.W. 59th Street
One Month To Move In. One
bdrm, one bath, $550.
305-642-7080

1281 N.W. 61 Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552

1311 N.W. 2nd Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in, two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080

1718 N.W. 2nd Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath, $425.
Call 786-237-8420/305-642-
7080.

1835 N.W. 2nd Court
Two bdrms, one bath $625.
Stove, refrig, A/C. Free Wa-
ter.
305-642-7080

190 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom. $680 moves
you in, $680 monthly.
786-389-1686

1930 71st Street
Two and three bdrms, $950-
1150, Section 8 ok! Call Nora
at 305-218-1185.

200 N.W. 13th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$425. 305-642-7080.

201 N.W. 77th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
extra large, Section 8 ok! No
deposit for Section 8. Call
786-488-5225.

220 N.W. 16th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$550. 305-642-7080

2365 N.W. 97th Street Apt #
B Rear
One bedroom, $575 monthly.
First and last moves you in.
Call 305-691-2703.


2493 N.W. 91st Street
One bedroom. $600/month,
first, last to move in, utilities
included. Call 305-691-2703.

3051 N.W. 134th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
washer and dryer included,
new kitchen, new bath, and
central air. $995 monthly,
$1500 to move in.
954-557-4567

3376 N.W. 49th Street
Huge upstairs, three bdrm,
one bath, appliances, air,
Section 8 ok! $1300/month
water included, in safe area.
Call Ms. Jay 786-274-3738.

439 N.W. 9th Street
439 N.W. 8th Street
One bedroom one bath
S465 monthly. $950 to
move in. 786-220-3-100
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699.


5200 N.W. 26th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome, $300 deposit, 786-
663-8862 or 305-634-3545
Jennie. '

55 N.E. 59 Street
Move In Special. Cozy, clean
one bedroom, one bath, air.
$475. 786-985-7791 or 305-
757-8596

561 N.W. 6th Street
Move in Special. One bdrm,
one bath $495. Two bdrms
one bath $595. Free water.
305-642-7080

5755 N.W. 7 Avenue
Large one bedroom, parking.
$625 monthly. $1000 to move
in. Call 954-394-7562


6020 N W 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One bed-
room, $485 monthly, window
bars and iron gate doors. Free
water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

725 1/2 N.W. 100th Street
Near schools and hospital,
two bedrooms, one bath, air,
appliances, wall to wall car-
pet, mini blinds. Credit check,
$640 monthly, $1280 to move
in. $50 Application fee.
305-300-0983


7517 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. Reno-
vated, new appli. and park-
ing. Section 8. HOPWA OK.
Call 305-669-4320 or Dick
305-754-7900.

771 N.W. 80 Street
One bedroom
Call 786-295-9961

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free wa-
ter, window bars and iron gate
doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699


CAPITAL RENTAL AGENCY
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses.
One two and three bed-
rooms. Same day approval.
For information/Specials
305-642-7080

COCONUT GROVE AREA
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bdrm $525, Two bdrm
$650, stove, refrigerator, air,
305-642-7080.


DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen, new
tile, fresh paint, secured with
parking, $650-$695. $100 off
three months. 305-528-7766.

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments: Call 305-
638-3699 for move-in special
or visit our Rental Office, 2651'
N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy Qualify: One bdrm, one
bath $515. Two bdrm, one
bath $630. FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call.
305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450,305-717-6084.

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three, one bedroom, one
bath, $600/month, $1200 to
move in, call Sean at 305-
244-7606.

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
, Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-


NORTH DADE AREA
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Section 8 o.k. $0
move in for Section 8. 786-
488-5225 or 305-756-0769.


OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath also
one bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 welcome, $500 cash
back, 305-717-6084.



OVERTOWN APTS.
Move In Special. One bed-
room, one bath, $480-$550.
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950


Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.


Section 8 Apartments
South Miami Area, near
Metro Rail. Two bedroom,
three bedroom, four bedroom
apartments for rent.
Call 786-543-3872.

Business RentalsZ
COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.

FLOWER/FRUIT STAND
High Traffic Area, call 954-
465-8934.

TAKE OUT RESTAURANT
Caribbean and Soul Food
954-465-8934


7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom condo. Free
water and security gate. One
month free. 954-266-9328

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Two bdrm, two bath, central
air, w/d, Dade Cty. Section 8
ok! Call 954-240-2179.


13315 Alexandria Drive
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$925 monthly, washer and
dryer provided. Section 8 ok!
Call 786-252-4953.

1867 N.W. 42nd Street
Newl. remodeled, one
Ddrm. one bath, air Mrs
Reynolds 786-356-1457

1873 NW 43 Street
Beautiful Two bdrms, one
bath. central air, appliances,
Iele. blinds. secunty bars,
closets
Call 786-357-5000

2169 N.W. 71th Street
Newly renovated, one bdrm,
one bath, Section 8 only! Call
305-525-4644.

243 N.W. 59th Street
Two bdrm, one bath, $725/
month, call 305-218-1227.

4520 N.W. 13th Avenue
Completely remodeled, two
bedroom, one bath, Section 8,
ok! Call 786-237-1292.

5657 N.E. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, bars, water,
air. $700. No Section 8. Terry
Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776.

7931 N.W. 12th Court
Two bdrms,-one bath, $700/
monthly. Call 305-757-2632.

8118 N.W. 12th Court
Four bdrm, two bath, $1200/
month. Call 305-218-1227.

842 N.W. 108th Street
Three bdrm, two bath, a/c,
yard, $1300/month, Section 8
ok! Call 786-487-6597.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free local
and nationwide calling, 24
hour security camera, $185
wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$130 weekly, $500 moves
you in. Call 786-389-1686.

3153 N.W. 53rd Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

NORTHWEST AREA
Rooms and Efficiencies. 305-
836-5848 or 305-653-8954.

Sanford Apt.
1907 N.W. 2nd Court
Nice apt., furnished, a/c,
window shades, appliances,
free gas and hot water, $360/
month plus $200 dep. 305-
665-4938 or 305-498-8811.


1341 N.W. o6 ier
Clean rooms, $130 weekly,
two weeks to move in.
305-469-0835

1500 N.W. 74 STREET.
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.


1721 N.W. 41st Street
One room furnished with cen-
tral air and appliances, $125
weekly, $250 to move in.
Call 786-487-2222.

1747 N.W. 77th Street
786-387-9988

1770 N.W. 71st Street #4
Cooking, air, $400. monthly,
call 305-300-5567.

1816 N.W. 62nd Terrace
$125/week, $200/move in.
786-426-6263

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

2033 N.W. 43rd Street
Room or apt. nicely furnished
or unfurnished, apt. two bdrm,
one bath and more, call me
now 786-290-0946.

210 N.W. 43rd Street
Full kitchen, use of whole
house, utilities included. $450
a month, $250 security, $700
to move in, call 305-836-5739
or 305-335-6454.

2365 N.W. 97th Street
Room with air, $85 weekly,
$340 to move in.
Call 305-691-2703.

LITTLE RIVER AREA
Kitchen privileges, utilities in-
cluded. 305-693-9172.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean, private entrance, patio,
cable. 305-688-0187

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished rooms, call 954-
557-7629 or 954-445-7629.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Private entrance, air and light
cooking, use of pool. Call:
305-343-2732

OPA LOCKA AREA
Furnished room with cooking
privileges. 305-681-8326.

Room in Christian home. Call
Na 305-693-3957.


1014 N.W. 60th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, Section 8 ac-
cepted, 305-216-0901 or 786-
229-9488.

10360 S.W. 173rd Terrace
Four bdrm,.one bath,. $1350.
Section 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

11220 N.W. 15th Court
Four bdrms, two bath, central
air, Section 8 welcomed!
786-718-9226.

12150 S.W. 218th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $650.
305-642-7080

12960 S.W. 267th Street
Three bdrm, two bath, $1300.
Section 8 ok! 305-642-7080.

13001 N.W. 18th Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly, no Section 8,
call 786-412-1131.

14002 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedroom, two bath, new
townhouse, located in nice
area, Section 8 ok! $1495
monthly, only one month
security deposit.
Call 954-826-4013.

1500 N.E. 151 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 305-586-8209

1530 N.W. 71st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750. 305-642-7080

15851 N.W. 18th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
half block from school and
bus stops. Section 8 wel-
come. 786-371-3207.

17133 N.W. 49th Place
Four bdrm, two baths, Sec-
tion 8 okl $1700/month, call
Tim 786-255-5998.

1720 N.W. 68th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, game
room, refrigerator, secu-
rity bars, fenced, central air/
heat$900 monthly. Section 8
OK! Call 305-215-8125

17641 N.W. 41st Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 monthly. Section 8
OK! Drive by then call 954-
517-1282..

1812 N.W. 66th Street
Newly remodeled, three
bdrm, one bath, air, tile, Sect.
8 ok! $1200. 786-344-9284

20027 N.W. 32nd Place
Three bdrm, one and half
bath, $1350 security deposit
required. Section 8 preferred.
Call 954-547-9011.

2011 N.W. 152nd Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths,
located near schools, $1550/
month, Section 8 ok!
Call 786-295-0942.

20611 N.W. 23rd Court


Three bdrms, two baths, big
yard, close to Pro Player
Stadium, Section 8 okl $1450
monthly. 305-469-1006.


SECTION D


JBE3pT 33 z


2821 N.W. 171st Street
Three bdrm, one bath, $1300/
monthly. All Points Realty
305-542-5184

434 N.W. 82ND Street
Two bedrooms, one bath $900
monthly call 305-318-5362.

4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.

5650 N.E. Miami Court
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1400, call Joseph Louis
305-632-2426.


900 N.W. 65th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 305-642-7080.

920 N.W. 89th Street
Gorgeous remodeled three
bdrm, one bath, all applianc-
es, very safe and neat area,
huge yard, close to hospital,
Section 8 OK! $1300 mthly,
plus one month security
deposit. Call 786-506-5907.

DADE/BROWARD COUNTY
Two, three, four bdrms. From
$900 monthly. No Section 8.
954-709-2625.

NORTH DADE
Section 8 okay! One, two,
three and five bedrooms..
786-286-6446

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five bedrooms and den,
three bathrooms, Section 8
okay! $1950 monthly. Call
305-992-6496.

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Five homes to choose from,
Three and four bedrooms,
two baths, $1000 to $1200,
air, bars, $2200 to $3000
move in. No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

Section 8
Beautiful and Spacious
Four Bdrm, Two Bath
Located at:
877 NW 73rd Street
Miami, FL 33150

Open House
Saturday and Sunday
Call 786-273-1462


MIAMI GARDENS AND
MIRAMAR AREA
Rooms, efficiency, house for
rent. 305-300-7783






13001 N.W. 18th Court
Three bedrooms, twvo baths,
$198K or best offer, call:
786-412-1131


NORTHWEST AREA
Large, renovated, three bdrm,
two bath, tv and util. room.
$149K Call 305-305-5546.

NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
room, two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedroom, two
bath, at an attractive price.
Call
786-859-3772.


"ATTENTION-
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
-"'WITH""
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65.000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty






Miracles Landscaping and
Complete Lawn Service
New customers 10% off w/
ad, call for free estimates
754-281-0598.


I J40b00bw. w - w -


lb 4 -=.n.- - .m


%M% f Copyrighted Material

,. ,,.� Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Men and Woman All Agest
Earn up to $500 daily part-
time! Hottest money making
opportunity in America! Write
for FREE report: Dry Tech,
Suite CL5951, 8920 Quartz
Ave, Northridge, CA 91324.


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!

END THE

INCONVENIENCE

OF EMPTY

NEWSPAPER

BOXES,

FIGHTING

THE WEATHER
AND

HUNTING

DOWN BACK

COPIES


CALL: 305.


ACCOUNTS PAYABLES
Candidate must hae a
working knowledge of
Ouic kblooks SOftware
Part-lime position 10 am
* 1 p m Monday. Wednes-
day and FridaV Two years
e:xp Fa. resume to:
The Miami Times ai
305-758-3617
No Phone Calls

ACCURATE TYPIST
COMPUTER SAVVY
PART-TIME POSITIONS
Join our innovative sales
team Weekly sales quota
required Positions avail-
able Monday and Tuesday
9-6 p m , Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday 8:30
a m -3 30 p.m Molvated
individuals should fax
resume to 305-759-0297
or e-mail to adverlising@-
miamitimesonline com

Circulation Clerk
Experienced, ambitious, go-
gettersi Better than average
oral skills Distribullon sales
experience and familiar with
Dade and Broward counties
a must Fax resume and
salary history to:
The Miami Times
305-758-3617


Hiring Immediately!
WebCam Models (18 +).
We seek outgoing and
open minded models.
Flexible hours and great
pay! Compensation: $750+
weekly. Call 954-237-1607.

NEW YEAR
NEW CAREER!
CNA, HHA Classes
ALF Core Training
CPR/AED, CEU's
210 N.E. 98th Street,
Miami Shores, FL 33138
CALL 305-756-1765
arrendellstraining.com


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only.'

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $60, 40
hours $110, G $175 with con-
cealed $200. 786-333-2084


Em.


0


i.,.


:' "''
.'�~
gi'''C ~bis


I~i~I~P~








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31-JANUARY 6, 2009


%at ism Ibr r red MowuU r urv p lawm

4b 004 soft


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- to - -dw oo m
=-0
awmba 4m aom


,84269,/f- A 3
wee/ b/f ,,w
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15109


Hoptri Cop irig'hted' Materia'I




I0Syndicated Content




Availale fromKCommercial News Providers


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0 4 0 �t -an
-


� 4


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER







Zitp lamit
~Kw 01)rf tw


North Miami CRA
Affordable Housing Project
Bel House East Aparimem Bulding Rehabilitation
45- Unit Apartment Building
Urban Residential Development Group, LTD. North Miami, Florida
Request for Proposal
Bel House Apartments East Building Project
Responses to this Request for Proposals (REP) will be received from General Contractors at the of-
fices of Urban Residential Development Group, LTD (the Developer) located at 2200 NE 1431d Street,
Suite 100, North Miami, Florida 33181.

*ALL PROPOSERS MUST HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE IN ATTENDANCE AT PRE-SUBMISSION
CONFERENCE, TO BE QUALIFIED TO SUBMIT A RESPONSE TO THE RFP.
Upon receipt and review of the "RFP's" Statement of Qualifications "SOQ'S" Documents, a man-
datory pre-submission conference will be convened with the Selected General Contractors.
Estimated total building construction cost: $850,000 to $1,500,000


Issue SOQ Package:
Deadline for "SOW Submission:
Notice To Selected Contractors To
Provide The "RFP" Response:
Mandatory Pre-Submission Conference:
(PLEASE BRING A FLASHLIGHT)
Issue "RFP" Bid Package:
Receipt of Proposal "RFP" Deadline:
Award of Contract Subject To Price
"GMP" Negotiations


Date: Jan. 5, 2009
Date: Jan. 20, 2009

Date: Jan. 27, 2009
Date: Jan. 30, 2009

Date: Jan. 30, 2009
Date: Feb. 27, 2009


Time: 10:00 a.m.
Time: 10:00 a.m.

Time: 2:00 p.m.
Time: 10:00 a.m.

Time: 10:00 a.m.
Time: 4:00 p.m.


Ask for "Improvements Be! House Apartments East Plans"
PROJECT LOCATION: 13925 NE 6TH AVE. STREET NORTH MIAMI, FL 33161
BID PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE MANDATORY PRE-SUBMISSION
CONFERENCE ON JANUARY 30, 2009. BID PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS "PLANS CAN BE ORDERED
FROM SPOT COLOR ON JANUARY 30. 2009.

PREVAILING WAGES AND LOCAL & SMALL BUSINESS GOALS WILL BE INCLUDED IN THE BID
PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS

Urban Residential Development Group, Ltd. reserves the right to reject any and all Proposals, to waive
informalities and irregularities, to extend any timelines, or to re-advertise for new Proposals.


DEVELOPER: Mr. Joe Guarino, Sr. PM
North Miami Housing aka Urban Residential Developers Group
2200 NE 143d Street North Miami, Florida


0am" I oI


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TRA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2 FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH

All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk * Pareto S. Siegel,, City Attorney

NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council
with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall
insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may he based (f/s 286.0105): 2) In accor-
dance with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the
City Clerk no later than two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305)
787-6001 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305)
948-2909 for assistance.


Phone (786) 428-0608
Fax (305) 792-4899


04 * l w mk V I app a as a* 4 a








B9D THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31-JANUARY 6, 2009


U.S. states consider selling off roads, parks






Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


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A.Vkip l 1. Lavn l ~l m a~& Jmanuarn.y S �.2009- J.mnu.ary , 21009

Carlos A_-rimknZiez
Miatmir.Da3e County Conmm~ siotner G*
)istric 7 .
Mom and Pop Small Business Grant Proqramm
For NIami-Dade County, District I
Gratd iinds a ailable to
quall ing buines s wn onrs
(up to $0,000 )per business)
A pliatiurl; aeailablte for pick up at the followin laiAmins:
111 NUFJ Ft Etret uite. 220 Oistrid 7 O fe, 330 Manor Lan , &itc 100
CGrl Way H ET Qffic, 1300 : i ' I ` Ae. I'; BQAynr CGy Hall, 3 W. Mc.h1NCt Si.
W. Flaler NET OfRce, kA33 W Flagler, #102 SoIith M i C i Hal, 6 r3) 10 nst Driv
NE CoGrxt tw, NET COffi,. 2 28201 M4:.FIat Rd P'.rct Ci, !-ti.. 123 5 Pintrrs.t FliP'y
SWOx~ C ionuIl - NET Ylii. 'I; 2 B Grand 'd i Kendall Te oa MetRo, 11 9O N. KeIral Dr.
Caral Gahlas Cith Hal, 405 Biltnmoe 'Way
Audicai r.e wLdwt �?? swQ b fsi fwfor7 wa3 s st; 1'r *.. i l '1''' F 1: -'I. *ji. (7
Pif4 ii*Tw on 's) i ~ o ;^' ip far Ih.lYk4Ly ,i kJrn rku - |i", i ' 'n'l 'ilr I' 1i1 7 0if ppm.
La Frca kio S. Role '--n". '..:'"ll S, ["l.'.'9 - I--o ., frm 115.
Rc~m I B ritual a!r< 1 6i1^y 1 ti~iicJts) i! Kntmti 'o rrt:*ieiwi mail of'h rcip dtrotrcd b h S:l-26. ".'rLI to
lii: Coaissaiorf r Carid A Gimw4e z. [slrict Mom and Pcp Pwriam I lla M' Fit Sh ot
.F 22P0 Mami, F1.31i'A
For rm.: infc, : nty:1;M Maia klw: ado 305;9-3.41003or
Ms.. L.ans F'n ney a 315-i'. i.- I. fi' I n ll1 ' a.m - 4 ni.
0 iW o PK A jb e s r.fslewc w to u hw w 2 n s. ?eaw m w iv mew.
\ - - - )


MlAM in

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity
Find yur next Job at.
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
Thr Miamin)indr! Curtyr Entplkyre' �Cu wr&'r SUrvt r. Qntr, 140J WVst
Flaglr Strt- will bc dkscd p.rmincntn' a of Friday, No vmbur 7, 2008.
5%WiLr6 QiUfie it tawy alMi.lJ-Dlay' Cou n yI i: rl.Y W
niuthdr Firirl. s^A r Enasr Cwiar.
EOE,/M/ietVera' Preference



CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 12:00 P.M., THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 2009
Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification 1/8/2009 at 5:00 P.M.
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telbphone No.
(305) 416-1958.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO. 12271.
Pedro G. Hemandez
City Manager

AD NO. 003579





S IMt4)Au X "RSS:SWArT AUTNORfT

REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS (RSOQ)

MDX PROCUREMENT/contract NO.: RFP-09-04

MDX WORK PROGRAM NO(S).: 87410.011

MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: PROJECT DEVELOP-
MENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL (PD&E) SERVICES FOR
THE STATE ROAD 874 RAMP CONNECTOR (SR 874/SR
821 HEFT INTERSECTION) TO SW 136TH STREET
AT SW 127TH AVENUE
The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority ("MDX" or "Authority"), is soliciting for
Statement of Qualifications from qualified planning and engineering firms to
provide PD&E Services for its SR 874 Ramp Connector Project, consistent
with guidelines established in the Florida Department of Transportation's PD&E
Manual. The Services shall involve technical analysis of alternatives, commu-
nity and agency input, and shall result in the selection of a final alignment
with an associated environmental document that supports selection of the final
alignment. Please refer to the Solicitation Documents for all prequalification
requirements for this Project. MDX notifies all Proposers and individuals that
it requires and encourages small, minority and women-owned businesses to
have full opportunity to submit a response to any Solicitation Document issued
by MDX. For copies of the RSOQ with information on the Scope of.Services,
as well as submittal requirements, please log onto our Website: www.mdxway.
com or call MDX's Procurement Office at 305-637-3277. Please note: In order
to download any MDX solicitationss, you must register as a Vendor, which can
only be done through MDX's Website. The deadline for submitting a Statement
of Qualifications, with regard to this procurement, is February 2, 2009 by 2:00
P.M., Eastern Time.




SUBSCRIBE TODAY!


INVITATION FOR BID TO PURCHASE, DELIVER
AND UNLOAD TYPE K TEMPORARY
CONCRETE BARRIERS


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IFB NO. 120062


- . w










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


100 THE MIAMI TIMES, DECEMBER 31-JANUARY 6, 2009


t*., th n hl IOf h*umel de1 ,t n h**nw .A The worst predictions about 2008


Applications available from January 5 - 30, 2009

Audrey M. Edmonson
Miami-Dade County Commissioner
District 3


Mom and Pop Small Business Grant Program
For Miami-Dade County, District 3
Grant funds available to
qualifying business owners
(up to $5,000 per business)
Available at for pick up at the following locations:
Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson District Office, Joseph Caleb Community Center 5400 NW 22 Avenue, Ste 701
NAN's office, 180 NW 62 Sreet
or
Applications will also be available for download at: ....,'.. r j,,Ii.i.ie .1.. .iI ;. , i.?
An informational workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, January 20, 2009 from 6:30 p.m. -7:30 p.m. at Joseph Caleb Community
Center 5400 NW22 Avenue, Meeting Room 110. Applicants are encouraged to attend the workshop.
Completed applications will only be accepted between January 21, 2009 - January 30, 2009 5:00 p.m.
For more information, contact Ms. Finney 305-756-060 5.
All businesses must be located in District 3 and meet the following criteria:


* Must have been in business for at least 1 year (include
proof).
* Cannot have more than seven (7) employees (2 part time twill
count as 1 fulltime).
* Must not be a part of a national chain.
* Can not have more than ttwo 2) businesses in district.
* Must have a current Miami-Dade County Occupational Li-
cense or paid receipt and Municipality License at the time of
application. Business name on application must match one on
license (include copy).
* A physical address is required. No P.O Box as mailing ad-
dress allowed.
All application packages willbe subject to


* Must participate in business workshop training.
* Home-based businesses do not qualify.
S.Applications will not be accepted after deadline.
* Must not have delinquent loan viwh Miami-Dade County, a
County Department or County funded agency.
* Businesses funded in the past can apply.
* Non-profit agencies cannot apply.
*Applicaion must be typed or printed only.
SApplicants must sign.and submit all requested documents.
* Must submit outside picture of business location buildingg or
work vehicle).
* Submit 1 original and 1 copy of completed application.
selection committee review and approval.


' Adviior Onr Bu'ine-.s, Mairrage. and Lo,,e Affairs
:A Religious Holy Woman Helps Thi Sick And Aili
.To Renvv. Sufferl, And Bjd LucL- Frirn Your Bod
4She'll II ll I our EnnmiL l 6', jil. .iri nd Tr il ,lio Whd:
3o Keep Aiuiy Fronm Whal I'Our Eye' See, iOur Hea
Musl Believe The Toucr 01 Her Hnnd Will Help YoltP
'She H3S The God Given P F'i:r Th Help By Prvers..

1435 NE 135 St., North Miami

305-893-4481


Two months '
later, the gov-
ernment forced
the mortgage
giants into con-
servatorships
and pledged
to invest up to
$100 billion in CRAMER


By Peter Coy

Here are some of
the worst predictions
that were made about
2008. Savor them - a
crop like this doesn't
come along every year..
1. "A very powerful
and durable rally is in
the works. But it may
need another
couple of days
to lift off. Hold
the fort and
keep the faith!"
- Richard
Band, editor,
Profitable In-
vesting Letter,
Mar. 27, 2008 FRP
At the time
of the prediction, the
Dow Jones industrial
average was at 12,300.
By late December it
was at 8,500.
2. AIG "could have
huge gains in the sec-
ond quarter." - Bi-
jan Moazami, analyst,
Friedman, Billings,
Ramsey, May 9, 2008
AIG wound up losing
$5 billion in that quar-
ter and $25 billion in
the next. It was taken
over in September by
the U.S. government,
which will spend or
lend $150 billion to
keep it afloat.


3. "I think this Dec. 9, 2007
is a case where On Dec. 23,
Freddie Mac and - 2008, the group
Fannie Mae are said Novem-
fundamentally ber sales were
sound. They're running at an
not in danger *. annual rate of
of going under f- 4.5 million --
I think they are PICKENS down 11% from
in good shape a year earlier
going forward." -- in the worst
-- Barney Frank (D- housing slump since
Mass.), House Finan- the Depression.
cial Services Commit- 7. "I think you'll see
tee chairman, July 14, (oil prices at) $150 a
2008 barrel by the end of


the year" -- T.
Boone Pickens,
June 20, 2008
Oil was then
around $135 a
barrel. By late
December it
was below $40.
8. "I expect


each.
4. "The market is
in the process of cor-
recting itself."
- President
George W. Bush,
in a Mar. 14,
2008 speech
For the rest
of the year, the
market kept
ANK correcting and
cbrrecting and
correcting.
5.. "No! No! No! Bear
Stearns is not in
trouble." - Jim
Cramer, CNBC
commentator,
Mar. 11, 2008
Five days lat-
er, JPMorgan
Chase took over
Bear Stearns B
BUS
with govern-
ment help,
nearly wiping out
shareholders.
6. "Existing-Home
Sales to Trend Up in
2008" -- Headline of a
National Association of
Realtors press release,


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there will be
some failures. I don't
anticipate any seri-
ous problems of that
sort among the large
internationally active
banks that make up a
very substantial part
of our banking. sys-
tem." -- Ben Bernanke,
Federal Reserve chair-
man, Feb. 28, 2008
In September, Wash-
ington Mutual became
the largest financial
institution in
U.S. history to
fail. Citigroup
needed an even
bigger rescue in
November.
9. "In today's
regulatory en-
vironment, it's
SH virtually impos-
sible to violate
rules." - Bernard Ma-
doff, money manager,
Oct. 20, 2007
About a year later,
Madoff - who once
headed the Nasdaq
Stock Market -- told
investigators he had
cost his investors $50
billion in an alleged
Ponzi scheme.
10. A Bound Man:
Why We Are Excited
About Obama and
Why He Can't Win,
the title of a book by
conservative commen-
tator Shelby Steele,
published on Dec. 4,
2007.
Mr. Steele, meet
President-elect Barack
Obama.


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