Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00572
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: November 19, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00572
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231
Classification: lcc - Newspaper

Full Text





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IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS

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50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Volume 86 Number 13


Are your kids



safe at school?

The shooting at Dillard High raises questions
about the security of our children on campus

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Last week's school shooting at Dillard High School, 2501
Northwest 11th Street, caused us as a community to ques-
tion the safety of our students on campus.
According to Broward County Public
Schools, Amanda Collette, a 15-year-
old sophomore was shot on the campus .
of Dillard High shortly before 11 a.m. on : -6 ,
Wednesday, after the bell rang for students
to proceed to the next class.
Prior to the shooting, Collette allegedly
received a text message from her friend, COLLETTE
Teah Wimberly, asking her to meet with her
at vending machine. Collette would not make it to her next
class. Police later learned that the suspect was Wimberly
after receiving a call from her from a Captain Crab restau-
rant located at 2431 West Sunrise Boulevard. Police reports
show that a gun was confiscated from Wimberly. The ques-
tion of how Wimberly was able to get a gun onto campus,
remains to be answered.
Surprisingly, Dillard High has hand-held detectors but
unfortunately students are not normally checked upon en-
tering the building.
"School shootings are a parent, educator, policeman, or
community's worst nightmare," said Interim Chief Charles
Please turn to SCHOOLS 4A

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&l iill !rttr lI


AFTER THE


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BATTLE


a owillnfmi 1o .t 4Nw 1: I A l a


Parents and concerned citizens of the community fill the Caleb Center auditorium, seeking solutions from school officials on
ways of keeping the failing schools alive. -Miami Times photosS. Charity


Proof or promises?

Will Carvalho deliver?


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miaimitimesonline.com

The Joseph Caleb Center had a
packed auditorium on last Wednes-
day night as Miami-Dade Superin-
tendent of Schools Alberto Carvalho
held a meeting for parents and com-
munity members about the possibil-
ity of closing down four low-perform-
ing schools.within the area.


"It is our responsibility as educa-
tors, parents and elected officials
to make a contribution to each and
every child in America by providing
him/her with an excellent educa-
tion," said Audrey Edmonson, Mi-
ami-Dade County Commissioner of
District 3.
Miami Central Senior High, Miami
Edison Senior High, Liberty City El
Please turn to PROOF 7A


Miami-Dade Superintendent of Schools Alberto Carvalho
shares his proposed plan at the Caleb Center to improve
the four low-performing F schools in the community.


Smith to get Lifetime Achievement Award


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miiamitiimesonline.com

Miami Attorney H.T. Smith will be
honored at the third annual Holiday
Gala, "Diving into an Ocean of Op-
portunities," on Saturday December
6 at the Hyatt Regency in Downtown
Miami. The Miami-Dade Chamber of
Commerce will host this
event.
"The Miami-Dade
Chamber of Commerce
lifetime achievement
in my name is a sig-
nificant, personal high-
light. I am so humbled.
I will cherish the orga-
nization and the award
for the rest of my life,"
said Smith.
Earlier this year,
Smith received the G.
Kirk Haas Humanitar- H.T
ian Award at the Florida Att,
Bar's Annual Conven-
tion in Boca Raton. Last month, he
received the Legal Legends Award
from the 11lth Judicial Circuit His-
torical Society, which honors indi-
viduals for their contributions to the
South Florida legal system.


Smith, a father of three beautiful
girls, has long been a dedicated at-
torney in the Black community. He
was the first Black Assistant Public
Defender and County Attorney in
Miami. He serves as a member of the
Board of Trustees at the University
of Miami.
In 1981, he began his private prac-
tice, H.T. Smith, P.A.
where he currently
i specializes in wrongful
death, criminal defense
S* and personal injury.
Smith recently repre-
sented former Miami-
Dade Superintendent
of School Dr. Rudy
Crew during his part-
ing with the School
Board.
"He advocated for
the community and
SMITH has had numerous
orney achievements in the
community. The award
is being established in his name
and he is the first recipient. He has
been instrumental in improving the
quality of life for the community at
large," said Aletha Player, co-chair of
Miami-Dade Chamber Gala.


WEDNESDAY


WeaFther
Forecast


70'F 54'F
SCATTERED SHOWERS


THURSDAY



74F 55F
PARTLY CLOUDY


FRIDAY



75'F 601F
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SATURDAY



76'F 63F
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SUNDAY



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MONDAY



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TUESDAY



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'I


OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 2 THE MIAMI TIMES NOVE 8


,l'-"! 1:, r ,a . .


Public school or private,

It's the Obamas' decisi4
Certain things about new presidents are gua
to attract intense attention. One is chc
puppy. Another is choosing a new school.
With Malia Obama, 10, and Sasha Obama, 7, p
move into the White House, curiosity is intense.
Obamas take the symbolically important step of p
public school in Washington, as Jimmy and Rosaly
did for their daughter, Amy? Or will they select
private school, as Bill and Hillary Clinton did for Cl
(Obama kids: Malia, right, and Sasha at Chicag
Monday / Charles Dharapak, AP)
As a Democrat committed to public school reform
skeptical about vouchers, Obama will feel a backlash]
his girls attend a private school. When the Clint(
Chelsea to Sidwell Friends, Carter pronounced him;
disappointed." In his 1976 convention acceptance
Carter had criticized privileged parents who send
to private schools "when the public schools are in
torn by strife."
Not that the Obamas need any advice, but here
Forget about symbolism, politics, pressure from u
"making a statement." The only consideration that
and one familiar to any parent, is finding the sci
best fits the needs of Malia, a fifth-grader, and S
second-grader.
The current betting is the Obamas will choose an
handful of elite schools traditionally picked by Was
insiders. This week, Michelle Obama began research
options, checking out Georgetown Day School and
Either would fit the high-performing mold of the
school the Obama girls now attend in Chicago.
Supporters of the District of Columbia schools, ii
two board members in the space below, argue
Obamas should take a hard look at the public system
to boost reform and get a firsthand look at the No C
Behind law.
That system has long been troubled. Two-thirds o
schools fall into the No Child law's "needs imprc
category, and 26 face restructuring for failing to me
and reading benchmarks for five consecutive yea
week, superintendent Michelle Rhee sacked the pril
a middle school after several teachers had been a
and a 14-year-old had been charged with carrying a
in the school.
Sendingthe Obama girls to public school would undo
be an important endorsement of the impressive tur:
efforts directed by Rhee, who has been mentioned as a
secretary of Education in an Obama administration
attempting what most school executives would co
triple-flip platform dive: simultaneously employing
reforms at high speed.
Washington does indeed have some good pul
charter schools, and they deserve the Obamas' a
But if they .think their daughters would learn mort
safer at a private school, they should ignore the Car
scoldings and guilt trips. For one thing, Washingto
Adrian Fenty sends his own boys to private school
about what's best for the kids. -US


ISSN 0739-0319 1
9P Publsrhed Weekiy al 900 Nr' j5-i, SIreel
e? Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Bo> 270200
Buena Visa Slation, Mivami Florida 33127
Ion Phone 305-6946210 :'
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder 1923-1968
aranteed GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Edilir 1972-.1982 e.
)osing a .
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Ptubisher Erenius ,
poised to RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisrier and Chairman r
Will the


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
Tnie Black Pres D h.'ts Tih Arrern,.:a can j esl l.e Ithe world trom racial and national anlagrnism vhean I accords to10
er, .rr i- n r ,_rii. Il race cibed or :.)cl.o r his or nri-r human arid legal rgni Haling rno person. leaning no person. 1he
I 1ii Pi h lp. c.e, person in irhe firm 'el.e I ina all persors are hurl a. long as anyone is held back.


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Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Parents should

demand safe schools
Dear editor,

I recall when I attended one of the Miami-Dade County School
Board meetings during the budget cut drama. Many of the School
Resource Officers were concerned about losing their jobs. School
Resource Officers are the front line in dealing with potential violent
incidents that can occur in school settings. At the same meeting,
an officer confided in me that many schools can and will have
violent occurrences if the proper structures are not in place.
This letter, however, is not about School Resource Officers.
It is about the suggestion that schools in many of our communities
are not safe. In know about this area because my dissertation dealt
with the issue of school safety. On November 17, 2008, a fifteen-
year-old female Dillard student, who was shot through the heart
by another Dillard student, was laid to rest. A gun was brought
into the school without anyone, allegedly, knowing anything about
it. A 16-year-old Miramar High School student is under arrest and
facing expulsion for allegedly bringing a weapon to campus. There
are many more instances. The safety of students in school settings
is becoming less and less certain. I encourage all the parents to
ask the question, "Are my children safe in school?" and demand
an answer. Work with the school to ensure that your child will not
be a victim or a victimizer.
Robert Malone
Miami

\\ IIEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER
i -MR


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IEbe fliami Cdntje
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper.
Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone
number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770;
Email: miamiteditorial@bellsouth.net.


LM II IL IV[I i I I II IIT]LJjI I I I W- I


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


^, : .... k l eI % ) *= H ,,. .


Who should


manage MMAP?


MMAP arose after the riots of 1980 to spur
economic development in the Black community. "
The Mayor and County Manager want MMAP,
because it has been "mismanaged." Some com-
missioners seemed poise to fight this concept, and well they should.
The County ability's to manage is questionable at best. We have
had scandals at the Port, the Airport, the Miami Dade Housing
Agency, and now the People Transportation Plan. Given its poor
record of running its own organization, what makes the County
qualified to fix MMAP?
Is it the strong control of its own budget? The hundreds of mil-
lions in cost over-runs at the Airport would make a mockery of that
theory. Is it the ability to manage honestly and not waste public
money on insider deals? The scandal at the Miami Dade Hous-
ing Agency seem to destroy that theory. Is it the ability to resist
unnecessary expenditures that aid the rich? The plan to spend
millions on another ballpark instead of building the north corridor
rail line again speak to the weakness of the County's ability in this
regard.
Does the County have a good track record of spurring economic
development in the Black community? If you can find a project
that has spurred economic development in the last four years in
the Black community that was initiated by the Mayor? If you look

If we look at the long promised development of a rail line up the north
corridor, then any promises the County makes about the utilization
of MMAP to continue its mission in the Black community should be
viewed with a jaundiced eye.

at what has happened to the Mayor's Penelas Urban Task Force in
the new administration, many would question if there is any com-
mitment on the part of this Administration to do anything in the
Black community. If we look at the long promised development
of a rail line up the north corridor, then any promises the County
makes about the utilization of MMAP to continue its mission in the
Black community should be viewed with a jaundiced eye.
The Commission should keep MMAP under its control, find an
enlightened management team, reconstitute a new board and then
put more controls in place. MMAP would die under the County
Administration's control. The County has not generated any new
ideas since the departure of Mayor Penelas. Mayor Alvarez wants
power and control, like a child filling up a Halloween bag, but does
not know what to do with the candy he has accumulated. A case
in point, is the take-over of the Department of Transportation.
Well, you got rid of the Black Director, Roosevelt Bradley is gone,
and what have you done with the Department? We lost the federal
funding he obtained. The only person you can blame is your cur-
rent director, current County Manager and current Mayor they
are in control, they got the 'ship and took it to the loss of $300
million.
The Mayor will take MMAP's $6 million and do what with it? Has
he announced any new policy initiatives or will the money just
get sucked into the County budget deficit and never will a penny
reach the Black community. For our community's sake, I hope our
commissioners really fight, and remember they control the funds!
MMAP without $6 million would be a hollow victory for the Mayor.

.I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it. they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action . "
Malcolm X


lOpC o ryr h tCopyrighted Material .....

Syndicated Content

S" ar Available from Commercial News Providers


I
9


I[ o t 1 : i


II.


,,, ..__._____________.-.,__....
Our FIU President has taken his share of criticism over the
years, but the truth is he has done one heluva job.
Florida International University President Modesto Maidique
is retiring after leading the school for 22 years. When Maidique
became head of the school in 1986. FIU had no graduate pro-
grams and was seen as a commuter school. He transformed FIU
into a research powerhouse, secured an endowment of $100
million and added schools of law, medicine and architecture.
After men have done their best, angels can do more.

Florida's pension fund has taken a $40 million hit in the cur-
rent financial meltdown that is causing concern to many retir-
ees.
The state pension fund was worth just more than $100 million
at the end of October, after dropping by nearly $40 million over
13 months. A State Board of Administration spokesman said its
money is invested for the long term to survive market losses. An
annual assessment showed the pension fund with a 7 percent
surplus in June.
There is no question the country is in bad shape due to the fi-
nancial shenanigans of the Wall Street bankers and our friendly
administration who were loath to make and enforce regulations
that would have save us all this grief. Now the Congress is play-
ing deal or no deal with $25 billion of our money and General
Motors, Chrysler and Ford.
Democrats and Republicans alike want to impose stiff condi-
tions on any bailout of the auto industry from limiting execu-
tive compensation and outlawing dividends to demanding union
concessions.
Miami-Dade fans of Florida A&M and Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versities will be heading to Orlando this weekend for the annual
Florida Classic between the Rattlers and the Wildcats. FAMU is
favored by 7, but anything can happen in this heated rivalry.
North Dade residents were the most angry participants in the
Transit Hearing Saturday at the Airport Hotel. Veteran observ-
ers were frustrated because they have been promised the north
extension for 30 years and the county is still stalling on the deal.
They feel shafted because while the north corridor is stalled the
east west extension is two ears ahead of schedule. Stay tuned.

The vote for chairman of the County Commission comes up
soon and we wonder if commissioners will do the right thing by
Commissioner Dennis Moss who has served five terms.
The 2008 election might go down as the year state political
campaigns blossomed into big money undertakings, with every-
one from presidential candidates to statehouse hopefuls spend-
ing like never before.
All told, Florida House and Senate candidates raised $41.6
million for this election up from $24.2 million four years ago,
an analysis of campaign finance records showed. The two state
political parties collected $69.5 million more.


I rim :









BLACKS MUST CONTROL GI'lEIR \OWN DESTINY


Black schools report more criminal incidents


SCHOOLS
continued from 1A

J Hurley of Miami-Dade
School Police Department.

PREVENTING
ANOTHER MASSACRE
Last Friday, a third grader
at Walker Elementary is lo-
cated at 1001 Northwest 4th
Street in Fort Lauderdale, was
charged with one of bringing
a gun to school. The student
had revealed his to one of his
peers earlier that morning
and the classmate notified
the teacher of the gun.
Since the 1999 brutal mas-
sacre at Columbine High
School, that killed 13 people
and wounded 23 others be-
fore the gunmen turned the
guns on themselves; secu-
rity throughout Miami-Dade
schools have been tighter,
with enforced identification
badges, increased security
presence and surveillance
cameras.
According to Miami-Dade


Schools Police, there are 182'
full-time officers and a spe-
cial response team trained
in "school basis incidents."
In the event of such incident,
within seconds school police
could lock down the school
via email and blackberries,
says Hurley. Each school
has its individual emergency
plan. Programs have been
implemented so that kids are
able to report any weapons
seen on the campus anony-
mously.
Hurley also mentioned, "It
is costly to put fixed metal
detectors in a school. It would
cause a bottleneck during.
the rain, a hindrance in the
morning and interfere with
classroom instructions." He
added that instead, random
metal detectors are used in
the schools.

MY SCHOOL ROCKS
"I thank God that there is
no trouble in my school. I deal
with more off campus than on
campus," said Alix Klinsman,


a sophomore at North Miami
Senior High.
"I trust the administrators
and security in my school
to protect me. The security
officers are always on post
throughout our school mak-
ing sure that the students
are safe," said Kimberly Alix,
a shy sixth grader at North
Miami Middle.

BLACK SCHOOLS
SECURITY FAIL
"I don't feel safe at my
school because the security
are never at the most danger-
ous places. There are gates
that are wide open and se-
curity guards are nowhere in
sight, leaving anyone or any-
thing to come in. The guards
are just hanging out around
the school so they can't pro-
tect us," said Marchelle Jean-
Bapiste, .a seventh grader at
John F. Kennedy Middle.
Florida Department of Edu-
cation (FLDOE) released their
2006-07 Florida School Indi-
cators Report showing that


John F. Kennedy Middle had
219 incidents and North Mi-
ami Middle had 248 incidents
of crime and violence through-
out the year, including acts
against persons, property,
fighting, harassment and
weapons possessions.
Other schools with high
numbers of crime incidents:
Henry E. S. Reeves Elemen-
tary School, 145 incidents;
Brownsville Middle School,
212 incidents; Carol City
Middle, 187; Charles R. Drew
Middle School, 231 incidents;
Horace Mann Middle School,
191 incidents; Miami Carol
City Senior High, 227 inci-
dents; Miami Central Senior
High, 272 incidents; Miami
Northwestern Senior High,
401, and Miami Norland Se-
nior High, 313 incidents.
Although mechanisms are
put in place to prevent a Col-
umbine or a Virginia Tech,
"The responsibility of safe-
guarding human life and
property lies with everyone,"
said Hurley.


w


-. Copyrighted Material

S,- Syndicated Content

- Available from Commercial News Providers


- -


- -
* -.~ -


- w


* 0l


Shooting in FMU parking lot


By Sandra J. Charite
schlarite@miamitinesonline.comn

During what was supposed to
be time of celebration, on election
night, a 17 year-old was shot.
The shooting occurred in the
parking lot of Florida Memorial
University, 15800 NW 42nd Ave,
on Wednesday morning.
According to reports, at about
1:25 am on Wednesday, Novem-
ber 5, a fight erupted on campus
between unidentified individu-
als, leaving a young man, who is
not a student at the University,
wounded by an unidentified as-
sailant. The young man was a


taken to a local hospital where he
was treated and later released.
The City of Miami Gardens Po-
lice Department is investigating
this incident. It is believed to be
an isolated event, unrelated to
the election party.
Argenine Williams, NAACP
chapter advisor at FMU, said the
despite the shooting, the party
was intended to celebrate the
historic night of president-elect
Barack Obama's victory.
In a statement released from
the University, "Since the inci-
dent took place, Florida Memorial
University has partnered with the
City of Miami Gardens Police.


Phone: 305-694-6210


C. BRIAN HART INSURANCE
7954 NW 22ND AVE, MIAMI
305-836-5206

MON-FRI 9:OOAM-5:30PM




PROGRESSIVE


Become a Board Member

of The Children's Trust

The Children's Trust is accepting applications
for at large members of its Board of Directors.
The Trust's appointments shall serve a two-year term. Candidates
should have the following knowledge, abilities and skills:
An awareness of the needs of children and families in
Miami-Dade County
The ability to work collaboratively
A dedication to the mission of improving the lives of
children and families
A record of effective advocacy for children
A record of service volunteering and/or on public boards
Must be a resident of Miami-Dade for at least 24 months
Mail your completed application with resume by November 30,
2008 to Muriel Jeanty at The Children's Trust, 3150 SW Third Avenue,
Miami, FL 33129 or via email to muriel@thechildrenstrust.org..

For more information about board
vacancies, additional criteria and
the selection process, go to
www.thechildrenstrust.org


If you think nobody gives a damn what
Black people think, again. Some people
care a lot. Especially when they need
something from you.

Take corporations.They want you to
buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your
money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote. A nyw a ?
And TV and radio stations hope you will
pay attention to their shows.


The point is, all these people want
something from you. And when people
want something from you have got
power over them.We should learn to use '"
that power wisely to make the changes V
we need to make. -


Give your money, your votes and your
loyalty to people who deserve it. People
who are going to give you something in
return. People who are doing the most
for the Black community.

Who cares what Black people think? A
lot of people do.


The Miami Times is about the business
of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting youT
know how you can use it. For instance, F
right now there are 32imillionBlack' h In k ab outl it
people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars. The Miami Times


That's clout.


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- a -


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


lk4J -i ma% hr < tanu % aWlmk rnc% vAl










BlACKS Musr CON YROI THEIR OWN Di SVIN~ 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Is the "Black Grove"


Developer dismantling Village West


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitiinesonline.comn

The Village West, or "Black"
Grove, as it is called by its resi-
dents, was settled in the 1880's
by Bahamian craftsman, sail-
ors, and their families. The area
is one of the most historic of Mi-
ami's neighborhoods, and venue
to the popular Goombay festival,
which celebrates the vibrant Ba-
hamian culture of the enclave's
local inhabitants. For genera-
tions, this historic enclave has
existed between the more afflu-
ent Center Grove, and the even
more affluent Coral Gables. The
Village West's Bahamian culture
has become such a signature
trait of the area, that when the
developers knock six blocks of it
down, the $300 million project
they intend to replace it with will
have Bahamian-themed archi-
tecture.
The Pointe Group Advisors, a
real estate and asset manage-
ment company, have already re-
ceived approval from the City's
Advisory board to, re-zone the
3500 block of Grand Avenue for
commercial use. The ambitious
project is expected to boost home
values in the Village West, which
did not see much of an increase
in values even during the recent
real estate boom.
"Looks like everything's on
hold since the financial crisis.
Pointe Group is still attempting
to purchase the land, they have


determined they will put condos
on the land" according to Dr. Da-
vid White, former president of
the Coconut Grove Village West
Homeowner's and Tenant's As-
sociation.
Riley Smith, a Real Estate Spe-
cialist and 40-year Grove resi-
dent disagrees, stating that any
delays are the normal byproduct
of government "red tape." It's my
understanding that Pointe Group
is very financially strong. They're
moving forward as fast as gov-
ernment process will allow, he


said in a recent interview.
The anecdotal evidence sug-
gests that Mr. Smith is correct,
as several housing units have al-
ready been removed. Mr. Smith
approves of the project.
"They've cleared some land on
Grand avenue already. Word on
the street is that they're getting
close to breaking ground." Smith
expects that over time, the proj-
ect will raise property values in
an area that, in his view, sorely
needs it. "The west grove [Vil-
lage West] has not had the same
growth as the north area. If the
project works, you'd essentially


have a new miracle mile in coco-
nut grove."
A perennial concern, with de-
velopments on this scale, is that
local residents can be priced out
of their communities.
"There've already been people
displaced," according to Smith.
"There's going to be some of
that whenever you have prog-
ress anywhere. They [Pointe
Group] are very conscious of
it. They're working with Pierre
Sands. They're helping people
who are being displaced. In some
cases, the people are finding bet-
ter housing, for less than they
were paying before. In any situa-


tion, not everybody's going to be
thrilled with change, but being
a 40 year resident of the grove,
and working in real estate here, I
think it's going to be a great thing
for the grove," he said in a recent
interview.
Pierre Sands, president of the
Village West Homeowner's and
Tenants Association, took a rath-
er different view of the issue.
"We're not opposed to develop-
ment, but we're opposed to any
development that would precipi-
tously remove a significant his-
torical population from the Grove.
We believe it is the duty of our


being

elected officials to make sure that
that doesn't happen he said."
Jihad S. Rashid, President and
CEO of Coconut Grove Collabora-
tive, an organization dedicated
to improving quality of life in the
Village West, echoed his senti-
ments.
"They want Bahamian archi-
tecture, and Bahamian ameni-
ties but they don't want any
Bahamians," he said in a recent
interview.
Rashid does not deny that
Pointe Group has helped a few
residents find replacement hous-
ing, but adds that this is a com-
mon tactic used by developers
to acquire parcels. According to
Rashid, the developer will of-
fer a parcel they own elsewhere
(presumably at advantageous
terms), in exchange for the ho-
meowner's parcel, where the de-
veloper wants to build. An addi-
tional bonus to this tactic is that
a few homeowners may support
the development, putting person-
al gain ahead of the community's
well-being. "Pointe group has
basically cozied up to the people
who have-and everybody is still
ignoring the have-nots," said
Rashid
According to Rashid's figures,
the project would eliminate at
least 168 units of affordable
housing-building none to re-
place them. Both Rashid and
Pierce, cited this is their primary
concern.
"We would like our commis-
sioner to come out and see these
people, and offer them a solution,
said Pierce."


whitewashed?


. p
7 4N.

,,- 5
4
Artist's rendering of Village West project
...', ', .. ,$ ....


Artist's rendering of Village West project


"What we have is a failure by
our elected representatives to
look out for the well being of
their constituents. They show
more concern for the trees or
the dogs than for the people"
said Rashid. "Coconut grove


is so passionate about its tree
canopy. They'll put up $300,000
to move some trees around in a
minute. They'll build dog parks
for their 4 legged constituents,
but they don't care about their
Please turn to VILLAGE 7A


Miami Woman's Club apologizes for discrimination


Special to The Miami Times

When the front door opened
at The Miami Woman's Club on
Monday, November 10th 2008
Clarence Clear walked through
it for the first time. Formerly a
Black waiter at the Club in the
1950s he was accustomed to
entering through the back door
and being discriminated against
because of race. Now a retired
postal worker he was a guest
invited to a ceremony at which
the officers of the Miami Wom-
an's Club apologized to African
Americans for past injustices.
Organized for White women in
1900, four years after the found-
ing of the City of Miami, the his-
tory of the club parallels the his-
tory and development of the City
of Miami. The White industrial-
ist, Henry Flagler gave the land
on which the historic building
stands near the bay adjacent to
Colored Town/Overtown.
In 1925, James D. McKellar,
a young Black man migrated
from Roland, North Carolina
to Miami and began working at
the club. Hired as the porter,
head waiter and elevator opera-
tor for fifty years he became the
caretaker, the "go to" person re-
sponsible for keeping the club's
building operational. This was
the Jim Crow era when Black
people, by custom and law, were
treated as second class citizens
"in every phase of life."

HURRICANE WATCH
In addition to all of his other
duties during hurricane season
McKellar was required to watch
out for the building. Once hur.-
ricanes were announced he was
expected to leave the safety of
his home in Overtown and later
Brownsville and move into the
club located near the water.
His wife, Dorothy J. McKellar
and step-daughter, Dorothy El-
len Jenkins (Fields) often joined
him. His step-daughter remem-
bers that they slept on cots on
the floor afraid and uncertain
what they would do if a hurri-
canes hit the building. Luckily
none did.
The late James McKellar was
a deacon at Mt. Zion Baptist
Church. At his church and at
others in Overtown he recruited
men and women to work with
him at the club. From Mt. Zion
he recruited the late Mamie Ker-
shaw and the late Remer Cobb.
Cobb encouraged his son the late
Herbet, then a student at Booker
T. Washington High School.
Deacon McKellar requested
the principal at BTW Charles L.
Williams to identify students for
training and employment. From
1940s until the 1960s many stu-
dents participated including the


late Henry McKinney.


SEGREGATED STUDENTS
In the 1940s bi-racial meet-
ings were held at the club with
students from Booker T. Wash-
ington and Miami Senior High
schools. Because of racial
discrimination students from
Booker T. were not allowed to
eat lunch at the club. After the
morning session they were re-
quired to walk back to Overtown
to eat their lunch then walk
several miles back to the club
for the afternoon-session. Two
BTW students who participated
in these activities were Leome
Scavella Culmer and Enid Cur-
tis Pinkney.
Black people could work but
not become members or hold
events at the club in -the early
days. During that Jim -Crow
era Deacon McKellar, the other
employees and their students
learned to stay "in their place"
as Negroes living under fed-
eral, state and local laws that
discriminated against Black
people. Private organizations
such as the club operated under
those conditions, too.
Even after the passage of the
1960s Civil Rights legislation in
1966 Deacon McKellar's engaged
step-daughter, Dorothy Jenkins
(Fields) planned her wedding re-
ception expecting to hold it at
the club. Club members said
no. No explanation was given.
McKellar was very disappointed
that the club refused to grant
his family's wish.

CANDIDATE BARRED IN 1960
Another act of denial includes
the late Kenneth Williams, then
a candidate in the 1960s for the
City of Miami Commission. All
of the candidates were invited
to the club to present their plat-
forms. Evidentially it was not
made known by the organizers
that one of the candidates was
Black. When Williams attempt-
ed to enter he was told to leave.
As late as the 1970s acts of
discrimination continued. Bea
Hines, a Black reporter for
The Miami Herald, was asked
to stand in for a White reporter
who had been invited to speak
at a luncheon at the club. When
Hines arrived she was "allowed"
to speak but was not invited to
stay for lunch and left.
Eventually the club changed
its charter and by-laws to sched-
ule women's organizations with
Black members such as AAUW-
the American Association of Uni-
versity Women and Zonta. Later
Black women were offered club
membership.

FIRST BLACK JOINED IN 1995
In 1986 Beverly E. Nixon, the


first Black woman president of
the Miami Branch of the Ameri-
can Association of University
Women, scheduled meetings at
the club during her tenure. Nix-
on's efforts encouraged partici-
pation of other Black-women.
The first joined in 1995. By the
year 2000 the membership of
the club was greatly decreased.
Several Black women joined
during the club's community
wide membership campaign.
Nearly a year ago under the
current leadership of club pres-
ident Noreen Timoney, the con-
versation of "doing something
to express remorse for past in-
justices" and to increase mem-
bership was discussed. This
was not an easy task, but the
board and focus groups con-
tinued to think through the
process and finally decided on
a formal apology to the Black
community.

PIONEER TEACHERS
REMEMBERED
Deacon McKellar's
step-daughter, Dorothy Fields
was asked to formally accept
the apology from The Miami
Woman's Club. Fields joined
the club in 2001. In considering
their request she thought of the
efforts of teachers at Booker T.
Washington who were pioneers
in establishing Human Rights
classes, the Girl and Boy Sen-
ate, the Christian Youth Coun-
cil and the Intergroup Youth
Council, Miss Marie Roberts
and Mrs. Mamie Williams.
Fields remembered that dur-
ing those days of legal segrega-
tion, the purpose of the youth
groups was to provide opportu-
nities for Black students and
white students to learn to work
together in helping Miami to
become a better community.
Ironically then, by law and by
custom, Black and White peo-
ple were not allowed to assem-
ble in the same room without
threat of arrest.
Fields asked herself this
question: Can the apology the
club offers brings full circle and
fulfill the purpose of the Human
Relations classes at Booker T.
Washington started by Miss
Marie Roberts, Mrs. Mamiie Wil-
liams, and efforts by Mt. Zion's
Rev. Edward T. Graham, Dr.
Max Karl then director of the
National Council of Christians
and Jews (NCCJ) and the fac-
ulty at the University of Miami
including Dr. Baker Hindman?
The ceremony at The Wom-
an's Club Fields answered
by accepting the Resolution
of Apology on behalf of her fa-
ther, other Black employees,
the students and others who
were discriminated against by


club laws which have all been
repealed.
In her acceptance speech she
said, "our community has come
a long way but there is still a
long way to go. All must agree.
that this is the beginning of an
important process. It is not
enough to accept the apology
and just continue the dialogue.


Beyond recent ceremony and
the up coming forum we expect
the club to take the initiative to
develop and implement a proj-
ect to record and distribute the
story of African-Americans as an
integral part of the growth and
development of the club's' his-
tory. The goal is to use the les-
sons learned' to educate school


children and to promote goodwill
throughout the community."
To begin the process a' multi-
cultural forum is planned at the
club, Wed., Nov. 19th, 5:30p.m.,
1731 N. Bayshore Drive (behind
the Omni). Free and open to the
public, on-site parking is avail-
able, 305.374-3389 or RSVP at
www.MiamiWomansClub.org.


Issued by HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA) HSRC Morlgage Corporation (USA) 2008


"They want Bahamian architecture, and
Bahamian amenities but they don't want any
Bahamians..."
Jihad S. Rashid,
President and CEO of Coconut Grove Collaborative


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008









The Miami Times


CEtTlenaM R


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Family problems affect

It is a common belief that
girls tend to internalize their
problems, becoming depressed
or anxious, while boys exter-
nalize their problems, turning
to violence against people or
property..
A new study in the Journal
of Marital and Family Therapy
found that this idea did not -
hold for Black youth who were
in the juvenile justice system. ..
For them, whether they inter- .
nalized or externalized depend-
ed not on gender but on what
was happening within their ..l -"\
families.
Results showed that family
dynamics mediated the rela- '
tionship between gender and
mental health issues for Black ..
court-involved youth. Both girls
and boys showed similar lev-
els of externalizing and inter-
nalizing behavior, once family
dysfunction was taken into ac-
count. Such a relationship was
not found in White families.
In addition, Black girls report
more externalizing, "acting out"
behaviors, than other groups
including Black males, White


Black kids more than other races


males and females.
"Families may matter in a dif-
ferent way for African-Amer-
ican youth than what we're
finding for White youth," the
authors conclude. "We are now
trying to identify exactly what
is different in African-American
families that affects whether
youth internalize or external-
ize problems, and how best to
help them. This means iden-
tifying those family strengths
that buffer against these prob-
lem behaviors as well as focus-
ing on family risk factors that
increase the likelihood of these
difficulties."
Stephen M. Gavazzi of The
Ohio State University, Jenni-
fer M. Bostic and Courtney M.
Yarcheck of the OSU Center for
Family Research, and Ji-Young
Lim of Miami University of
Ohio examined factors related
to gender, race/ethnicity, fam-
ily factors, and mental health
issues is a sample of 2,549
Caucasian and African Ameri-
can youth coming to the atten-
tion of juvenile courts.-Wiley-
Blackwell.


Churches give thanks for Obama ... U


For so many years, people have said to little black boys
and little Black girls, you can be anything you want to be,
even president of the United States


"I want all of us to pray for
him," the Rev. Arthur T. Ger-
ald Jr. told a packed crowd of
worshipers at Twelfth Baptist
Church in Roxbury. "He has a
very tough road to go. The econ-
omy is crumbling in front of us
as I speak. We have two differ-
ent wars. This man of God is go-
ing to be in need of prayers."
Greater Love Tabernacle
Church in Dorchester held
a ceremony last night devot-
ed exclusively to celebrating
Obama's victory Tuesday, while
other churches. mentioned
the president-elect during the
regular services, often prompt-
ing widespread applause and
standing ovations.
At a crowded Morningstar
Baptist Church in Mattapan,
worshipers cheered yester-
day morning when a young
guest preacher asked, almost
apologetically, "You mind if I
talk about Barack?" during
a rousing sermon that other-
wise focused on what the Bible
promises to believers of Jesus
Christ.
"When people doubt there
can be change in our govern-
ment, God can make the dif-
ference," said the Rev. Michael
David Bailey, 23, an associate
minister of First Cathedral in
Bloomfield, Conn.He said he


cried Tuesday when Obama
was elected the nation's first
Black president.
Last night, red, white and


screen featured a picture of
the Obama family along with
the message, "Congratula-
tions, President-elect Barack
Obama."
"This presidential election
is definitely a great historic
milestone for all Americans,
not just Black Americans," the


Paul Williams, daughter Maya, and wife Tyeshia lifted their
voices yesterday at the Greater Love Tabernacle Church in
Dorchester. Photo: Aram Boghosian


blue balloons and the singing
of hymns greeted participants
at Greater Love Tabernacle's
Obama service. A projection


Rev. William E. Dickerson said
in an interview before the ser-
vice.
Dickerson said it was also a


good time to pause and con-
sider the work ahead.
"Nothing's ever magical," he
said. "People who are joyful
and ebullient, they need to be
also realistic as it relates to
what one man can deliver."
During the evening service,
the crowd of 350 people shouted
along during call-and-response
hymns, throwing their hands in
the air and waving paper fans.
Some people wiped away tears
as the projection screen at the
front of the church showed a
slideshow featuring Obama and
the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
"For so many years, people
have said to little Black boys
and little Black girls, you can
be anything you want to be,
even president of the United
States," Dickerson told the
crowd. "Now they can point to
a reality of a Black man becom-
ing president."
"Those of us who said it would
never happen in our lifetime -
guess what? It happened in our
lifetime," he said.
Across the nation, clergy at
many churches urged daily
prayers for Obama to help him
lead the country and the world
out of economic turmoil and
war.
Perhaps nowhere was the
weight of history more pal-
pable yesterday than at Atlan-
ta's Ebenezer Baptist Church,
where King spread his message
of inclusion and near which he
lies entombed.


What does a father feel

about being a father?


While motherhood is univer-
sally lauded, fatherhood does
not receive the same recogni-
tion. But fatherhood is an oner-
ous task with its own share of
emotional upheavals and grati-
fication. Weekend speaks to
three fathers about it.
What does a father feel about
being a father? The mother is
the focal point of a child. A fa-
ther is often relegated to the pe-
riphery. But fatherhood is just
as arduous as motherhood and
is an equally emotionally fulfill-
ing experience.
While a mother openly weeps
with joy at the achievement
of her children or grieves for


their failures and pain, a fa-
ther doesn't enjoy this luxury in
most cultures. But this doesn't
mean he doesn't go through the
rollercoaster of these emotions.
So what does it mean to be a
father? What hopes and aspira-
tions does a father have for their
children? We set out to find out.
We discovered that the emotions
of fatherhood are universal. No
matter which country, culture
or social background they come
from, all fathers feel the same
way. Their hopes fears and as-
pirations for their children are
the same.
Fatherhood a deeply emo-
tional experience.












BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DETINY


7B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Hundreds gather to hear "solutions" for F schools


PROOF
continued from 1A

ementary and Holmes Elemen-
rtary, all face closure. The goal
iis to keep these schools open
and help them to improve to a
D or better within four months
says Carvalho.
"I am designating these four
schools as my personal re-
sponsibility," Carvalho said. He
later stated, "It is time that we
acknowledge the truth about
these the low performing chil-
dren. By the way, all of these
children are poor and children
of color."
Initially, the schools had
to earn at least a C to remain
open but during the meeting
Freddie Woodson, Deputy Su-
perintendent of School Opera-
tions, announced to the audi-


ence that after speaking to the
State Education Commissioner
Eric Smith, they compromised
that the schools could receive a
D and stay open.

THIS IS OUR HOME
Rosalyn Nelson, whose
grandson Keith Askew attends
Holmes Elementary, says she
can't imagine her grandson at-
tending another school.
"It would be sad for me to see
Holmes close down because
Keith transferred from Martin
Luther King Elementary recent-
ly and since then I have seen a
complete turnaround. He is so
excited about going to school
and doing his homework."
Her grandson's excitement
caused Nelson to become a vol-
unteer in the schools' resource
center which is spearheaded by


Dr. Thelma Branch.
Lashandria Edwards, whose
four children also attend Hol-
mes, believed that Holmes
was where her heart was and
she couldn't understand why
the district would rebuild the
school but then possibly shut
it down.
"I would hate to see these
schools close down. There is
something missing in our ed-
ucational system but I can't
seem to point my finger on it,"
said Rhonda Pickney Wimber-
ly, a concerned member of the
community.

THE TRUTH HURTS
During the meeting, Ellen
Wright, newly appointed As-
sistant Superintendent, shared
the devastating data indicating
many students at these schools


test scores are below grade level
in reading, math, and writing.
The scores showed: Sixty-sev-
en percent of students are not
reading at grade level at Liberty
City Elementary. Eighty-nine
percent of children at Holmes
are non-proficient in science.
Eighty-seven percent of stu-
dents at Miami Central are
reading below grade level. More
than half of students at Miami
Edison are non-proficient in
math.
The audience moaned at the
data presented on the screen.
Many became upset.
Candance Igraham, mother
of a freshman student at Miami
Central, said, "Where are the
teachers? They are receiving a
paycheck and the scores are
this low."


THE LAST RESORT
If the school did close, Car-
valho presented four possible
solutions: "The students would
be reassigned to another school
and he would monitor the prog-
ress of the reassigned students,
they could reopen the schools
as a charter school, they could
contract with an outside entity
to run the school [allow it to be
operated privately], or reopen as
a district managed turnaround
school [close down the schools
and change the faculty and staff
then reopen the schools]."

GETTING PAID TO
ATTEND CLASS
It was exciting news for many
students sitting in the auditori-
um to hear that they would re-
ceive bank accounts and money
being deposited into them, if


they attended additional class
sessions held on Saturdays and
during the holiday break.
Several parents in the audi-
ence opposed the initiative.
"I completely disagree with
the superintendent. We have
to pay these kids to attend. No,
it will not work because these
kids are going to have to want
to go to school because these
are their futures. The money
will divert these kids from their
true mission when they walk
those halls every day which is
receiving education. You are
not obligated to attend school
but it is a privilege," said Marie
Julius, who daughter attends
Edison High. "If we want to re-
ward these kids for attending
schools then help them to walk
across that stage on graduation
day."


Edison Park Elementary holds ceremony for new 5000 Role Models


Parents ahd members of
.the Edison 'Park Elementary
Student body gathered in the
cafeteria on Monday for their
second annual Tie Tying Cer-
emony. A ceremony that cel-
lebrated the 23 forth and fifth


graders inducted into the 5000
Role Model of Excellence.
Role Model of Excellence
program is a project founded
by Sen. Frederica S. Wilson
(D-FL 33rd District) in 1993
with the initiative to mentor


the young men in Miami-Dade
Public Schools and instilling
values viable to them becom-
ing a successful individuals
in this society.
Miami-Dade County Com-
missioner Dorrin Rolle, Bar-


rington Irving, Founder of Ex-
perience Aviation and Dono-
van Campbell of WSVN 7 were
among the community lead-
ers and keynote speakers who
stopped by to offer a taste of
wisdom to the young lads.


"In our history a series of
unfortunate events has re-
sulted in young minority
males living in homes with-
out an adequate model of a
man or father, for that mat-
ter. Today, if even for a half


an hour, these students rev-
eled in the mist of male ca-
maraderie with a calm and
reverence rarely expressed in
these children," said Webber
Charles, Site Director of the
5000 Role Model.


Principal Ms. Carla Patrick gathers with the newly inducted 5000
Role Models of Excellence with Mentors. From L to R; Timothy Bostic,
Marcus Sparks, Barrington Irving, Major Roy Brown, Donovan C.

z~~~F ~7


Edison Park's WEPE News Team with Donovan Campbell
during the live morning news cast. From L to R, Principal Car-
la Patrick, Donovan Campbell of WSVN 7, and Media Special-
ist Sharon Simmons.









Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


;Sj~.e. W


Town commission stands by


VILLAGE
continued from 5A


two legged constituents. You
come here and try to move a
tree, or a peacock, you'll get
hurt. But when you move an
historical residence, oh well,
that's life."
The community's attempts
to meet with their commission
have been met with polite sym-
pathy, but no action. Pierce
says that his organization asked
the commissioners to come out,
informally, to see the neighbor-
hood where the development
was to be built. Only one com-
missioner (Joe Sanchez) took
them up on their offer. Pierce
describes Sanchez as having
been "moved" by the magnitude
of the project, and how it will


affect the Village West's com-
munity. Coconut Grove's com-
missioner, Mark Sarnoff, did
not take them up on the offer.
Mr. Rashid says he would like
a compromise to be reached.
Within the new development,
Coconut Grove Collaborative
would like to see 150 units of
affordable housing, and any-
where from 25,000 to 50,000
square feet of retail space for
disadvantaged and minority
businesses. "Then, you'd have
a development the entire com-
munity could be excited bout,"
said Rashid. "They're going to
bring in a 40,000 square foot
supermarket. They want us to
be happy, but we're not going to
be here to shop in it."
Pointe Group Advisors did not
return calls seeking comment.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Who knew? Getting everything together for
a turkey dinner doesn't have to be so complicated.
Use the recipes we've provided, along with this
sequence, to streamline your holiday dinner.
Log on to publix.com for more recipes and ideas.

0


For an 8-12 lb turkey (6-8 servings), preheat oven,
prepare turkey following our recipe
(or package instructions); and begin to roast about
3 1/2 hours before you would like to serve.


0


About forty-five minutes before your
turkey is done roasting, prepare green beans,
mashed potatoes, or other family-favorite
side dishes Prepare Apple Sage Dressing
(recipe included) for baking.

0


EVEN WITH TURKEY TO ROAST AND A PARTY TO HOST,

THANKSGIVING CAN BE ENJOYABLE.


F
-,^. .


Publix 129
Baby Cut and Peeled Carrots 1-
A very good source of vitamin, A and dietary fiber, carrots are actually
members of the parsley family. When you buy baby carrots, all the
work is done for you-just add them Io your fa,,orie recipe. Or just
cook them up and top with a bit of butter and a sonrinkling of brown
sugar Give your Thanksgiving a touch of nature's sweetness. 16-oz bag
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


[ -i


Publix
Young Turkey .69,,,
We have a wide variety of sizes of young, broad-bieasted,
USDA-Inspected, Grade A frozen turkeys so you can choose
the one perfect for your gathering
SAVE UP TO .60 LB


Potato Rolls, 249
12-C o un t .. .......... .... ...
We bake our potato rolls fresh daily in the Publix Bakery so they
have a delicious, rich flavor and soft, dense texture. Enjoy them just
the way they are or warm them in the oven. They're perfect for your
Thanksgiving dinner, 15-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .50


Land 0 Lakes 2 00\
Sweet Cream Butter..... 5O0R
Salted, Light Salted, or Unsalted,
4-sticks or Salted 8-half sticks,
16-oz box
SAVE UP TO 3.18 ON 2


Jimmy Dean 5, 0_
Sausage Roll...............
Or Fully Cooked or Fresh: Links or Patties,
Assorted Varieties, 9.6 to 16-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .98 ON 2


Cool Whip / >- o-
Whipped .opping ........ FOZ-
Assorted Varieties, 8-oz bowl
SAVE UP TO 1.38 ON 2


Swanson Broth ........... Free
Assorted Varieties, 14-oz can
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 1.15



Ocean Spray g r
Cranberry Sauce ....... rFree
Jellied or Whole Berry, 16-oz can
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 1.55


Pepperidge Farm 4 00
Stuffing ....... ...... .... ... FoR 4
Whether you add your family's favorite extras-cooked sausage,
cranberries, mushrooms, and more-or serve it hot from the oven
just as it is, this side dish is always a star. Made from premium
Peppendge Farm breads and a blend of special seasonings.
our stuffing is a gratifying must for your Thanksgiving meal,
14 or 16-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 1.38 ON 2


,. -i

APPLE SAGE DRESSING
Prep and Cook: 40 minutes (Makes 8 servings)

1 lb ground pork sausage with sage
8 oz trinity mix (fresh diced onions,
peppers, celery)
1/2 cup dried berry medley
(berries and raisins)
1 large Granny Smith apple (rinsed)
1 tablespoon flour
1 (14-oz) can reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 (6-oz) box or 2 cups cornbread stuffing mix
cooking spray
1. Preheat oven to 4500F. Preheat large saut6
pan on medium-high 2-3 minutes. Crumble
sausage into pan (wash hands); stir in trinity
mix and berries. Cook 5-7 minutes, stirring
often, until meat is browned and vegetables
are tender. Meanwhile, peel apple; cut into
small pieces.
2. Stir flour into sausage mixture; cook 2 min-
utes, stirring often, until flour is hot and well
blended into mixture.
3. Stir in apple, broth, and stuffing mix. Coat
2-quart baking dish with cooking spray; add
stuffing mixture. Bake 20-25 minutes or until
internal temperature reaches 1650F. Use a
meat thermometer to accurately ensure done-
ness. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.


PUBLIC

WILL BE CLOSED

THANKSGIVING DAY,

NOVEMBER 27

We're taking the day off so our
associates can spend time with
their families and loved ones.
We will be open regular store hours
on Wednesday, November 26
and Friday, November 28.


CARVING THE TURKEY IS EASY WITH THESE EXPERT TIPS.
See the complete video of how to prepare and carve your turkey-even make gravy!-at publix.com.


'1-.


When your turkey is done,
remove it from the oven, cover with foil,
and let it sit for 15-20 minutes before
placing on a clean cutting surface.


Separate the drumsticks from the
thighs by holding the tip of each
drumstick and cutting through the
joint where it meets the thighbone.


Hold each drumstick by the tip,
resting the larger ends on the cutting
board. Slice parallel to the bones until
all meat is sliced.


I


.J.3^^^
^^teuuOfc-'



^-BBP-^
jBg^Bgi.,^^3it.

^




^ T-tP""

.^









BLCSMS OTO TERI IET Y9BTEMAITMS NVME 92,20


Remove your turkey from the oven when your
meat thermometer-inserted into the thickest part
of inner thigh and breast (not touching bone)-
reaches 1650F. After you've removed your turkey,
let it stand 15-20 minutes before carving.

0


Increase oven temperature to 4500F and
bake dressing. Put the final touches on your
side dishes and carve the turkey.


0


Remove dressing from oven and
use the residual heat in the oven
to warm potato rolls for dinner
and pie for dessert. Serve.

0


With help from Publix, your wish for an exceptional holiday can come true.

From meal planning to cooking and carving, we promise simple steps for a

spectacular feast that everyone will be thankful for-especially the chef.


-. ----..-----.--


Celery. ...89
Before the 16th century, celery was used only as a medicinal
herb. It is high in vitamin C, but even better, loaded with
crispy, crunchy taste, perfect for Thanksgiving appetizers,
salads, stuffing, and more Leave the ribs attached to the stalk
until ready to use and wash well before trimming the leaves
and base.
SAVE UP TO .90


Simi Chardonnay 199
W hite W ine... .....
A great wine-and-food combination makes both wine and
food taste better. Here's to a feast with family and friends!
750-ml bot
SAVE UP TO 3.00


Gourmet 49
Apple Raisin Walnut Pie:...... ...9
No need to peel apples, chop walnuts, or roll dough. Just head to
the Publix Bakery and make this stunning sweet one of your favonte
Thanksgiving traditions. Enjoy the delicious taste of fresh Ida Red
apples cooked with sweet raisins and walnuts from California in a
full-top and bottom piecrust made with unbleached flour, 43-oz size
SAVE UP TO 1.20


ONE-PAN TURKEY, VEG ETABLES, AN D GRAVY, Prep and Cook: 3 1/2 hours (Makes 8 servings)


3 medium parsnips (rinsed)
5 medium carrots (rinsed)
4 celery ribs (rinsed)
2 large onions (rinsed)
2 bay leaves


1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
4 oz unsalted butter (1 stick)
1/2 cup flour
2 (14-oz) cans reduced-sodium
.chicken broth


1 (12-1b) turkey (thawed, following
package instructions)
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/2 teaspoon pepper
aluminum foil


1. Preheat oven to 3250F. Peel parsnips and carrots.
Cut parsnips, carrots, and celery into 1-inch-long
pieces. Remove ends and peel skin from onions; cut
both into quarters. Place vegetables, bay leaves, and
1/2 teaspoon of the salt into turkey roasting pan.
2. Place butter in microwave-safe bowl; cover and
microwave on HIGH 30 seconds or. until melted.
Whisk in flour and 1 can of the chicken broth until
i blended. Pour into pan over vegetables. Place wire
roasting rack in pan over vegetables.
3. Remove turkey from packaging (remove giblets
and neck for another use). Sprinkle turkey evenly
with poultry seasoning, pepper, and remaining 1/2
teaspoon salt. Place on roasting rack, breast side
up; (wash hands). Roast turkey about 2 hours.


4. When turkey is golden brown, cover loosely
with foil. Roast 1 more hour or just until internal
temperature reaches 1650F. Use a meat
thermometer to accurately ensure doneness. (Ovens
and size of turkeys vary; adjust time, as much
as 30 minutes, as needed. Refer to packaging to
determine time for larger turkey.) Transfer turkey
to carving board; let stand 15-20 minutes before
carving. Transfer vegetables to serving dish; remove
and discard bay leaves (cover to keep warm).
5. Thin the reserved gravy in the roasting pan,.
if needed, by heating the remaining chicken
broth (up to 1 can) in microwave or on stovetop.
Gradually whisk heated broth into gravy until desired
consistency. Transfer gravy to serving dish. Carve
turkey and serve.


All recipes: Publix Apron'sSirmple Meals


PUBLIC GIFT CARDS


THREE
EASY WAYS
TO BUY.


Make a deep horizontal cut
into the breast meat just
above the wing.


* Stop by your neighborhood Publix
* Call us at 1-800-830-8159
* Buy gift cards online at publix.com/gift


From the outer top edge of each breast,
continue to slice from the top down to the
horizontal cut made during the previous
step. Repeat steps 4-5 on the other side.


Remove wings by cutting
through the joints where the
wing bones and backbone meet.


Not a second to spare?
Pick up Thanksgiving dinner
at the Publix Deli.


Publix Deli A.-99
Turkey Dinner ..... .5
The centerpiece of the traditional holiday
feast is succulent, fully cooked turkey.
It comes with delicious dressing,
mashed potatoes, rich turkey gravy and
cranberry orange relish. Our side dishes
simply require baking before serving.
Turkey must be heated, per instructions
prior to serving. 10-12 lb, serves 7-10
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE




P u blx.







publix.com/ads
Prices effective Thursday,
November 20 through
Wednesday, November 26, 2008.
Only in Miami-Dade. Broward, Palm Beach,
Martin, St. Lude, Indian River, Okeechobee
and Monroe Counties. Prices not effective at
Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market.
Quantity rights reserved.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\VN DESTINY


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 01 THE MIAMI TIMES NOVEMBER 19 8


Reunions are a staple for many Black families


Reunions are a staple for many Black families


By Mary Shedden

At most of these annual gath-
erings, there are a lot of hugs -
plus laughter, music and a whole
lot of food.
"Food's important, especially
to the Smith family," says Eula
Smith, who recently coordinated
her family's reunion in St. Peters-
burg, Fla. "The first thing when
you walk in the house, they'll
ask, 'What do you want to eat?'
It's all about food and laughter."
But Smith also knows that the


wrong amount of some foods can
advance the risk of diseases such
as diabetes and stroke. That's
why her family used this inter-
generational gathering of 160
relatives to talk about preventing
chronic and sometimes deadly
illnesses.
Just before a hearty noontime
barbecue, nearly 50 family mem-
bers spent a half-hour hearing a
pitch from the American Stroke
Association one of several
groups targeting reunions as a
prime health-education oppor-


tunity for Blacks. Among the
participants was Isaac Smith,
63, one of four Smith relatives
to suffer a stroke in the past two
years.
"I didn't think I'd make it
here," says Isaac Smith, who
had his speech and ability to
walk affected by the mild stroke
in July.
The Power to End Stroke pre-
sentation didn't admonish rela-
tives for enjoying the ribs and
chicken and sweets at the re-
union. Instead, it talked about


sharing health histories with
blood relatives and working on
making smarter and healthi-
er day-to-day food and health
choices.
"We're finding that we have
to use whatever means to get
this message out," says Caro-
lyn Swanson, a volunteer with.
the Stroke Association and a
consultant for the 30-member
Churches United for a Healthy
Congregation. "The purpose is
not to spoil the event. ...We want
to see them at the next family


reunion."
Nationwide, stroke affects
700,000 people a year and is
now ranked as the third-leading
cause of death for Americans.
But its impact in the Black
community is startling. The race
is at almost twice the risk of first-
ever strokes when compared to
Whites, according to the Ameri-
can Heart Association's 2005
Heart Disease and Stroke Statis-
tics report. Non-Hispanic Blacks
ages 35-54 have four times the
relative risk for stroke than that


of Whites the same age. And the
incidence of high blood pressure
in Blacks is the highest in the
world.
One of the key targets of the
Power to End Stroke campaign is
food, and in particular the high-
fat, high-calorie soul food com-
mon and extremely popular in
Southern Black cultures. Those
who make a pledge to learn more
about preventing stroke at the
reunion received a copy of the
American Heart Association's
healthy soul-food cookbook.


Ohama's church Ihoicr likI to bhr %crulinierd











Copyrighted Material . ..



IA jk J,.hn... .,fit Ai ..i Syndicated Content,,l ,,im ,,i fk*g, % til%


h aw", b-


Available from Commercial News Providers


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- 7 '- l'.:": g ,'.,,.; ;.a ..F, r' -, ? ;,. < '.' i:-;"-,.,'xl;'S & I





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^ ^ Aa ^ -...,:s ^.,-^ -* -(
.. .. *-):, '; '**-







11B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


lIouisiana court ss Jena 6 caw. broke la%


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Reverend Wright feels ex


Is *- 1 %,a *


or 4


-e q u o ___


a @ 1 a ,


S


wmb
mon0io oow


South Florida woman among


first to name child for Obama


HOLLYWOOD, Florida Ba-
rack Obama may have a "funny
name," as he once said but
it might just catch on among
the nation's newborns.
A Florida couple became
among the country's first to
bestow it on their child, even
before most news outlets had
declared the Illinois senator
the president-elect.
Sanjae Obama Fisher was
born at 8 p.m. local time at
Hollywood's Memorial Re-
gional Hospital to Patrick and
Sasha Hall Fisher.
A hospital spokeswoman
says it was the father's idea.


But mom still got to watch the
election, after 14 hours at the
hospital.
Sanjae has two siblings,
8-year-old sister Shaniah and
4-year-old brother Shane.
In Arkansas, Benjamin Ba-
rack Kimbrough was born at
2:35 p.m. local time on Elec-
tion Day to Walter and Adria
Kimbrough. Walter Kim-
brough is president of Phi-
lander Smith College, a his-
torically black school in Little
Rock.
In Maryland, a mother who
went into labor Tuesday af-
ter voting for Obama named


her newborn daughter for the
Obamas' two girls, 7-year-old
Sasha and Malia, 10.
Lakisha Brown of Joppa
gave birth to Sasha Malia Ann
Taylor at 12:36 a.m. local time
Wednesday at Greater Balti-
more Medical Center.
GBMC spokesman Michael
Schwartzberg said Brown
watched Obama's victory
speech while she was in labor
at the hospital.
She says she was so struck
by the love Obama showed
to his daughters that she de-
cided to name her baby after
them.


Serving the Community since 1984


Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA
General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, AGD


* Teeth Whitening I hour
* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
* Porcelain Veneers
* Cosmetic Bonding


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* Tooth Colored Fillings
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* Root Canal
* Dentures and Partials

SAFETY &.', ','-.:.1
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* Sedation Dentistry
* Steam Sterilization
* State of The Art Facility


35 "SMILE MAKEOVER"
Missing Teeth or Dentures?

652-3001 IMPLANTS are the natural


secure alternative


20215 NW 2nd Ave.
Suite #2
Miami, FL 33169
www.dentistgrant.com

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The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment of be reimbursed for payment for any
other service examination or treatment which is peiforied or as result of and within seventy-two (72) houis of responding to the advertise-
ment for the fee, discounted fee or reduced fee service examination or treatment.


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* Insurance Welcome We Offer Financial Arrangements
Lab On Premises Repairs While You Wait
Evening and Saturday Appointments


BL,.A(K.XS M.lr CONTROL Il EI1R O\\N ESTIINY









12B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY




The real world: Obama

,w.. %-o-w-e*-.-. -c Fill'.


aIlamb a m domH *-


Copyrighted Material -



Syndicated Content -


4llW'


*Ii


Available from Commercial News Providers


irecto


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Church Sunday School 8:30 a.m,
S Suck3ay Wolship Servici 10 a m
Mid Week Seivice... Wednesday's
Hour of Power-Noon Day Prayeri
12pm.- p pin
SEvening Worhip .7 p.m.



-Friendship Missionary -\
Baptist Church
152.50 frNe 2nhindb Aveno e

Mimni, t1
305-759-8875

Ii u- I u- if










Order of "ic a.m.
I ." u1 I 'l "" Um





I i .... .... '.. . 1 t
Wed nesday.....+.11 .-l p




Meth. Zion A.M.E.dist Church
15250(X) N.W. 3225thid Avenue
305-63581-33007413








Suiiday NioningSernices







CornerstonesBible
"Theire is a place for you"


f Ebenezer United \
Methodist Church
2(X)390 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunida Mornig S3 rvices
Sunday Schic1 l 9:45 a.m.

Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.



/ Cornerstone Bible '\
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332





Gtha1 Kchcarsai !Ihusa i' : i m
\ ZWWWMMERW~mA


/Apostolic Revival Center\
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time forT.V. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
I 2F)13 .3HAu c0a 5 3 1 coMe.Ar i'C. 2.

3,:' i te 'ry P*' ayeryc9 .m. 12 p.m
touring Semice ... 111 alm,
S'n Eve. Worship .30 p3na
I -es. Prayer Meetihg......7:30 pm.
FI' Bib1 Study ................. -130 p 33



First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026

Sunday School ......0........ 10 a .
*,Thursday..........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeing. B.T.U.
Baptism Thurs bel'ore
SFiat S in..7 pSl
7:30 & ll a.m.


-New Harvest Missionary '
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

M3oring Worshp Isl & 3rd Sln.1
3' >ing Worship ... .. 10:30. a.
I ,, tn. iahl M inistryi ..............6 p .m .
I l vyer S ce. .... -. O p m
i .ble Study .....S......... 8 p am
\ |l inrci SchOal .................9 a.m I .


Pembroke Park
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue
(Office) 954-962-9327


K Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383


Order of S.S-er ies
Sunday
-lonria g 1 olnle m ;a t & 11 .ni).
Sluitdy School at 9 45 a im.
Thursday
Bible study p.i .
Saturday
No Service


/ Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 871' Street
305-836-9081


Order of Services:
.... l oy Moniing Services
,, School 0a. I m.0 a
\' .i-.h, p SA'vice. I... ... .. I 1 anI .
.1 y Bible Study.......8 p .
1 i ..i.. PIIyei Service .8 p.m


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
NMon, thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Stuidy,*Th,1. ...7 p.man





u day orship... 7-1 L a.m.



4561NW, 33rd Court



Sunda School..,. 31.3,10 a3.m
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Service

1,,IL., I I., I. h I p.' 'l

\ g i ,' t, 'g ,h,, a,. ', I


93 1 Street Community"
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 933d Street
305-836-0942
S Order of Services
-1)1lt3 h Imly Mom3ing3 W0l.'tip
I a.nl .. Morning worship
Evening Worship
ls 3 & 3rd S3day .. 6 pan1
t'Imsday Bible sttdy .. 7 p T3l
w ebsite: ci1lb, org



Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church\
17800 NW 25th Ave.
w3 w.,16t]I fl ionworsltiacdl3tetr.Og [
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623.-3104 I


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 man. & 10 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Nooni Day Bible Study
Bible Ilstitte. 6:30 p.m.
Midweek Worship 7:30 p.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
L i' Moming Worship 7:30 a.m.
I l. Church School 9:30 am.
lomngWorship ...11 amn.
i esday Bible Class 7 p.m.
1. before the ls Smi....7 pm.i
Mid-week Worship



/ Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
S Sunday Morning .........8 a.m.
1u n, lv School ............10 a.m.
i .. i.. Ev ning .............6 p.m.
1 t s Il c le Class ......... 7:30 p .
Thu,- Fellowship .....10 a.m
S|sui Song Practice ..6 p.m.


U'


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Xorslhip 7 -a.m.. 1 1
3a.11., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.ni.
Tstle.day (Bible Study) 6:45p[>.n.
A',h .1 i ,\ Bible Study
10:45 a.,n.


Church of Christ
* Hollywood, FL 33023
* (Fax) 954-962-3396


Order of Services
Sunday
Blible Study ............. 9 a.m. '** Morning Worship ............. 10a.m.
Evening Worship .... .. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m. .
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comc&a Channels: 8, 19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.icnimbrokeparkeclircliofcllrist.co ma pelr(ikiirikcic(ii'ellstt i n1t


Temple Missionary \
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"' Avenue
Church 305-S73-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:

44 -4SIoI n.BTI I 30-2 30 p nm

w.l... .... .. 1. 1


r New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76"' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815


n


Order o' Services:
Ull l~iv 'tnirh .Clio


1i) ,i in


II IS an


it, 911 II its


1 (800) 254-NBBC31
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
ww1.n.ew hi rtIhbaptist mianfi.o'rg


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3"' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
I t arly Sunday
S I ..... Wors.. oiip..3.37.30 a.n.
I ,,, t. School ..........9:30 am,
',1 ,,ing Worship ... I a.m.
SI ... g ....... ( i cgs.) 7 p.i. 3




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Avc.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order oF Services:
SInlim School 9A0;Ia
poI ( oI) '?nr ilV e 'oiN Ip I I ;,
S'ip+i ;W l lht:- ,I II< Sw ih \
ev'lfl, \ Qslg |l)at p6u i


'agr I tI i ,1)MtitHn l


/Jordan Grove Missionary St. Mark Missionary \
Baptist Church Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'4 Ave. 1470 N.W. 87th Street
305.751-9323 305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Early Wolship ..............7 a.11. Order of Services:
.. l..l., School.......... 3Sunday ":30.and I n.
I tship ................ .I1 a.m. Worship Service
S shi .......... 4 p. 930 a.m .... Sunday school
1 a, ,-, e- 1Tuesday ... p.m Bible Study
i J 1Te ay .i 6.( r sp rn i' Prayer l'Meetng
I1 l_. 7. I 1, .11' t'1', p l M on day 7ednesday,P r iday
6 0 1 n 1 p ml .....1. ly Pray2 er
\ 331 11 2 1p l


r Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474


Order of Services:
StuId3. Schxl 45. 9 1 ,
\\s2'2) 1 a.m
Ili'le snlkiy.l'lniBdiyv 1.|) n)
iouuihiRans; Mmi, WIl.
M)31


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order f Sero- ices:
I I'.\ui) n lolingi \\' oshli) .7i :3(tnll.
m loring \owahip .....11 a.m.
er eein ....... 7:30 p.m.
i Stud ............. p.m .


New Vision For Christ -
Ministries
13650 N.1I. '10 Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
U l'm dly Stu ay VWoNt ip ..- 30 a iu
St2Si3.t' School ... 9 30 a.ni
Si SIHf,) y 1 vexcu ig Survice 6 pn.i
I"* '^ Ik y <'r .\-kx'ir Ni .~:. g pi.p ,
Not JIst a i(huch Ihut a M \ 1pcm e eIt"




Join the

Religious Elite

in our Church Directory

Call Paula James
305-693-7093


I I- A-- - I


4DO4w 4


e


tor Aiaoi1lll &,R obrts. Sr.


4th 1 Undly D'" Ci111 Wo hlp In YI










Biv K~ \IVNI CON IROI LIILIR O\\N DL~IlN~ 13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Work on your salvation


If you read last week's col-
umn, then you know that I
began a message about the
parable of the Farmer and the
Seed as told by Jesus in Mat-
thew 13. Jesus told the parable
to the people in verses 3-8. He
explained the parable in verses
19 23. Remember that the
farmer represents those who


'spread' or speak or teach the
Word of God. The seed is the
Word of God. The person who
spread the seed on the footpath
is those who do hear the Word
being taught, but do not un-
derstand what they are being
taught. Because they are not
knowledgeable of the Word, the
enemy who is satan confuses


them and takes what little they
know from them. This can be
avoided by constant and con-
sistent prayer and Bible Study.
Any new believer must imme-
diately secure a Bible and read
and study it. They should at-
tend a Bible believing church,
and listen to the sermons as
well as the music.
This is also why Bible Study
and Sunday School is impor-
tant. Usually a Sunday service
does not give you an opportu-
nity to ask questions if you are
confused or do not understand
what is being taught. In addi-
tion to attending Sunday ser-


vices, Bible classes are also im-
portant. Make a note of passag-
es or scriptures that you do not
understand, and study them
later, or find a small home Bible
Study group, or a wise Believer
who can instruct you. The en-
emy knows that knowledge of
the Word is a dangerous thing
- to him! That is why he works
so hard to discourage new Be-
lievers.
The seed that fell on the rocky
ground that did not last long
represents those who hear the
Word and rejoice. They come
forward for altar call, and are
sincerely joyful to receive the


hope that their lives could be
different and better. But Jesus
said that their roots aren't deep.
As soon as illness attacks, or a
spouse walks out, or they do
not get the job or house that
they want, then they become
discouraged, and turn away.
Again, constant and consistent
prayer and Bible study is re-
quired to maintain the victory
that the Lord has already won
for us. James said that these
people are double minded. They
are like waves that are tossed
back and forth, from one place
to another. They oftentimes al-
low those who do not know the


Word, or are not even saved to
discourage them and fill their
spirits with thoughts of de-
spair and hopelessness. After
a while, you won't see them in
church, and their devotion time
with the Lord usually has taken
a nosedive as well.
Next week, I will finish up
this parable that is a wonderful
reminder and teaching to us to-
day of the importance of speak-
ing, hearing, and following
through with the Word through
constant prayer, Bible Study,
fellowship with other Believers,
and of course, intimate time
with the Lord.


~g


The City of Miami's GIS
Team will host a full day of ac-
tivities in celebration of Geo-
graphic Information System
(GIS) Day. The event will be
held today from 8 a.m. 3 p.m.
at the Miami Riverside Center
Lobby.

Habitat for Humanity and
Wynwood Art District are proud
to present the Art, Design and
Architecture for Habitat for Hu-
manity. The opening ceremony


will take place November 20
from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. and the
unveiling ceremony will be an
Art "Bagel" Brunch to be held on
December 7t from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m. for the presentation of the
completed "stage spaces." For
more information, please con-
tact Henri Almanzar of ChiAlma
LifeStyle at henrialmanzar@
bellsouth.net or Lilly Izaguirre
of Habitat of Humanity at lilly.
izaguirre@miamihabitat.org.


The Camille and Sulette
Merilus Foundation will be
having a special turkey and
food drive on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 25. For more information,
please call Camille Merilus at
305-687-9950.

Miami Heat superstar Alon-
zo Mourning will be signing his
new book on Saturday, Decem-
ber 6 at 2 p.m. at the Books &
Books in Coral Gables. For more
information, please call Debra
Linn at 305-444-9044 or email:
debra@booksandbooks.com.

Kinshasa Taylor Foundation
invites you to attend free weekly
Women's Support Group meet-


ings. The meetings are held ev-
ery Friday Night, 7:30 p.m. at
the United Pentecostal Church.
Topics to be discussed are rela-
tionships, abuse, bereavement,
etiquette and so forth. For
more information, please call
Ann Johnson at 305-505-3145.
*********
The Miami International
Film Festival miffF), pre-
sented by Miami Dade College
(MDC), recently announced its
first Florida-based film com-
petition. Festival organizers
will accept submissions for the
Florida Focus Short Film Com-
petition until December 19. For
more information about the Mi-
ami International Film Festival


or submission details about the
Florida Focus Short Film Com-
petition, visit www.miamifilm-
festival.com, or call 305-237-
3456.

The New Beginning Praise
Tabernacle will have a night
concert on December 31 at 12
a.m. For more information,
please contact 305-681-0119.

Miami-Dade Alumni Chap-
ter of Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity invites you to travel with
them when the Wildcats take on
the Rattlers in Orlando on No-
vember 22. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-505-1235.
*** ****


M.W. Cypress Grand Lodge,
A.F. & A.M. of Florida is spon-
soring its annual Christmas
festival and toy-give-away from
10 a.m. until 12 p.m. on Sat-
urday December 13 at the Ma-
sonic Temple. Toys, food and
soft drinks will be given to over
300 needy children from sev-
eral Miami-Dade County com-
munities. Our hearts rejoice
as we endeavor to brighten the
day and bring Christmas joy to
underprivileged children of our
community. For -more informa-
tion, please contact George E.
Fitts at 305-467-5609 (cell),
704-787-8321 (home) or email:
gfitts@carolina.rr.com


um % WIMOD-&m-l- a a a
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iNew way ellowship praise
and Worship Center will have
its 33rd church convocation
until November 23 nightly
at 7:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please call Carolyn
Banks at 305-625-7246.

Holy Ghost Faith Deliver-
ance Ministries invites the
- community to worship with
them on November 23 at 4
p.m. The special guest will


be Mind Changing Ministries.
For more information, please
call 305-696-5107.

New Hope Missionary Bap-
tist Church will tour the Holy
Land Presentation in Orlando
on Saturday, November 22.
For more information, please
call 305-696-7745.

Mt. Vernon M.B.C. cor-
dially invites you to its 17th


Pastoral Appreciation Cel-
ebration Services on Sunday,
November 23 at 11 a.m. and
3:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call the church at
305-754-5300.
Redemption Missionary
Baptist Church will be having
a family and friend service on
November 23 at 3 p.m. Dinner
will be served after service.
For more information, please
call 305-836-1990 or 305-
793-7388.

Salem Baptist Church will
be celebrating its First Lady's
appreciation program on No-
vember 23 at 3 p.m.


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The value of poetry is like the value of a state of grace
- an end in itself. Dr. Peter J. Stanlis


I started seriously writing
poetry in 1965 pressed by an
inspiring but overbearing high-
school English teacher, Bill
Price, to take a chance and do
something a bit more creative
than play basketball. This was
long before the game changing
artistry of a Michael Jordan,
even before Julius Erying or
Connie Hawkins, all of whom
contributed to elevating basket-
ball to one of the fine arts.
In Price's honors English
class, I became acquainted
with Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe
Shelly, William Blake, Alfred
Lord Tennyson, Henry Wad-
sworth Longfellow and Walt
Whitman. We had to recite the
"Song of Hiawatha" and Oh
Captain, My Captain" and "Ti-
ger, Tiger Burning Bright!" I
remember asking Mr. Price one
day, why don't we read Langs-
ton Hughes or Phyllis Wheatley
or Paul Lawrence Dunbar?
(These were the only black
poets I knew about at the time,
and really hadn't read them.
But that was the way I was at
16.) Price met my challenge
and assigned me the task of re-
searching and writing a report


on all three poets to present to
the class. It was a doorway into
a past I knew nothing about; a
magical doorway into self-dis-
covery.
Mr. Price also made me write
poetry. He didn't tell me how
to write it, but to write what I
felt. He made me keep a jour-
nal and checked it every week.
I wrote a series of apprentice
narrative pieces about the Viet
Nam war, full of all the cliched
wisdom of Dick Gregory, Mal-
colm X and submitted them for
grades. Price, unknown to me,
gave them to a visiting Gwen-
dolyn Brooks, who came our
high school that year as some
sort of literary ambassador.
To my horror, she read my
poems and those of three other
students at an all school assem-
bly and criticized them as the
"raw, sometimes undisciplined
ratings of a new black voice in
modern literature." I thought I
had been panned. I almost gave
up writing that day for good.
In an interview with her a few
days later when she came to my
English class, I introduced my-
self as "that raw, ranting poet."
Somehow she convinced me in


that soft, sweet direct way of
hers, that she was paying me
a complement. She encouraged
me to read and read widely and
most importantly, to write. And
don't let someone's criticism
discourage me. That encounter
changed my life.
So the first person I read (out-
side of Foss, Henley, Welch and
Cushman whom I read at home
or Lord Byron, Percy .Bysshe
Shelly, William Blake, Alfred
Lord Tennyson, Henry Wad-
sworth Longfellow and Walt
Whitman who I read in English
classes, and not seriously, or
Dunbar, Wheatley and Hughes)
was Gwendolyn Brooks her-
self.
I struggled through Annie Al-
len, her Pulitzer prize-winning
book of poetry, not because it
was so hard to understand, but
because it was so beautifully
and otherworldly written; be-
cause I had met her and knew
her to be a real flesh and blood
person. She didn't use words
like the romantic lyricists, even
though she took their forms,
their meters and poetic diction
and made them her own; made
them Black and accessible,
made them human.
After reading that book, I
mouthed the words that I would
mouth many times thereafter,
especially after peak experi-
ences with other poets Will I
ever be able to write like that?
Look for Mc Nairs column
weekly.


to g fiami fgim e



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BLACKS MUiST CONTROL IIIEIR OW\N I)ESTIINY


TIT-- TTT-- In-11- 1- in *--


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S 13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


. .. ... v ....


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL TlIEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


e, e ,, A ** A


()hama now saddled with prreid(Itiial %rcuril
ii*~iiiii :EE


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Thanks to the efforts of Florida Lottery
contributions from Lottery ticket sales
public education across the state.


retailers like these and players like you,
have benefited students in all areas of


The Lottery has:
Transferred $19 ;.I' .. to the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund,
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To learn more about the Lottery's education funding visit flalottery.com
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Florida Lottery
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The Miami Times


ai th


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER


19-25,2008


Experts:


States should fund quit-smoking treatments


Copyrighted Material
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Agency tries to help smokers kick the habit


BY: Michael F. Vinning

Tobacco use remains the sin-
gle largest preventable cause of
disease and premature death
in the U.S. Each year, accord-
ing to the American Cancer
Society, smoking accounts for
an estimated 438,000 prema-
ture deaths, including 38,000
deaths among nonsmokers
as a result of secondhand
smoke.
One national organization
is looking to help Terrebonne
and Lafourche parish smok-
ers put down the nicotine
stick with a series of free re-
sources at your disposal.
Lafourche Parish resident
and mother of two, Renee
Jones, has been considering
quitting for almost a decade,
but Jones said the reason
she wants to quit is "mainly
because of the health-related
issues linked to smoking, but


more recently due to the ris-
ing costs."
The American Cancer Soci-
ety seeks to draw attention to
the habit with its 32nd Great
American Smokeout Thurs-
day.
"The Great American
Smokeout was inaugurated
in 1976 to inspire and en-
courage smokers to quit for at
least one day a year," Cheryl
Fourcade, health-initiative
representative for the Ameri-
can Cancer Society said in
a news release. "Now, 44.2
percent of the 45.3 million
Americans who smoke have
attempted to quit for at least
one day in the past year, and
the Great American Smoke-
out remains a great, yearly
opportunity for Louisianans
to commit to a long-term plan
to quit for good."
She said unfortunately the
statistics alone aren't reason


enough for most smokers to
quit, making recent, nation-
wide litigation and the result-
ing, new laws on smoking, a
critical deterrent and another
important reason why people
should quit.
"The majority of U.S. com-
munities are now covered
by smoke-free laws and 43
states have raised taxes on
tobacco products since the
year 2000," Fourcade said.
"Perhaps the scariest statistic
out there is half of all Ameri-
cans who continue to smoke
will die from a smoking-relat-
ed disease."
Smokers nationwide now
face an average cost of $4.32
for one pack of cigarettes, not
including taxes.
Fourcade said the rising
cost of living also is affecting
smokers, as the cost of ciga-
rettes presents an even great-
er burden.


(Corn mnia tw the main ingrItkint in %our fast r(Hd

















marriagege chtckt Pyr'.Iighted, Vaterial'eent problems

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Available from Commercial News Providers


lligh fa dwi u htA prgate- |w1pudiw ,.-m4 hit.


Brotherhood Anniversary at St. John


The community is invited to
worship with the Brotherhood
Men's Missionary Fellowship
of the Saint John Institutional
Missionary Baptist Church,
Inc., as they celebrate their
Third Anniversary on this com-
ing Sunday evening, November
23rd, beginning at 3:30 p.m.
The guest speaker for the oc-
casion will be the Rev. Toby
T. Philpart, President of the
Florida East Coast Missionary
Baptist Association's District
Congress of Christian Educa-
tion.
For more information, please
contact Rev. Dr. C. L. Brooks,
Jr. at 786-299-9466 or the


Rev. Toby T. Philpart
church 305-372-3877. Rev-
erend Dr. Charles E. Uptgrow
serves as Assistant Pastor.


-- e - o - .... . .

Bishop McKinney
Happy Birthday to Bish-
op Kelson D. McKinney who
celebrated his birthday on
November 18.
The Lord has soughted out
a man after His own heart,
and appointed him leader of
his people. lSamuel 13:14 .
Bishop we are so thankful for
the love and dedication you've
shown in bringing God's heart
to us. It is an honor to know
that His great care has brought
us a gifted man like you.
From First Lady Gwen D.
McKinney and family and
Hope


celebrates birthday


Bishop Kelson D. McKinney
Ministries Int'l. Church. May
God continue to bless you.


Pastor's 17th appreciation service at Mt. Vernon


The members of Mt. Vernon
Missionary Baptist Church fam-
ily cordially invites our many
friends and families in Christ,
to join us for our Pastor's 17th
appreciation celebration ser-
vices to be held at the church,
1323 N.W. 54 Street.
On Sunday November 23,
at 11 a.m. Rev. Ophelia Hayes
Jones, special messenger. At
3:30 p.m. Rev. Vincent Davis
and New Providence MBC in
charge.
For additional information,
please contact the church at


Rev. Wilfred A. Miller Jr


305-754-5300.


Natural News Heart Attacks
By Alexander Williams

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day may reduce your risk of having a sudden attack by 44%.
Cod liver oil helps prevent blood clotting,reduces high triglycer-
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of fibrinogen. Paid Advertisement


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17B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008

,, ;''. ;:-' -' 7 ,"o,;I .:.::-J-_- .-. .:: -=. .' -: ', ;::; l U


Range Coconut grove
REVEREND DR. JUNIOR MOR-

overseer/pastor -
of the House of
God Miracle Re-
vival Fellowship
Church, Inc.,
died November
12 in Baptist
Hospital. Survi-
vors include: wife, Frances; moth-
er, Margaret; sons, Mark Holloway
(Naomi), Anthony (Julie Ann), Der-
rick and Gregory (Renee); daugh-
ters, Tanya, Angela Hurd (Eric)
and Kiesha; brother, Leonard
(Elizabeth); sisters, Doreen Mon-
roe, Emma Hanna (Allison), Florie
Rodriguez and Judy and Esther
Seymour (Daniel); numerous fos-
ter children: a host of grandchil-
dren, one great-grandchild, other
relatives and friends. Memorial
Services will be held Friday 6-8:30
p.m., The House of God Miracle
Revival Fellowship Church, 4111
N.W. 17 Avenue. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, New Jerusalem Primi-
tive Baptist Church, 777 N.W. 85
Street.

CHARLES B. CHRISTIE, 78,
retired director
of Sanitation for

ami, died Nov.
14 in Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors

Myrtle P.; sons,
Kenny Brewer, Michael, Charles
and Kevin; daughter, Ericka; broth-
ers, Donald and Al; sisters, Sandra
Flemings, Paulette Booker and
Gwendolyn Johnson; four grand-
children, two great-grandchildren
and a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins other relatives and friends.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday, St.
James Baptist Church.

SYLVIA L. WALLACE, 57, retied
administrative
assistant with
the City of Coral
Gables, died
November 6 in
g Baptist Hospi-
tal. Survivors in-
clude: husband, I
Roland L.; son,
Sedric Cherry; mother, Margaret
J. Marshall; granddaughter, Bri-
anna Cherry; sisters, Doris King
and Nikki Fishback; brothers, Er-
nest and Gerald Dixon; stepsons,
Minister Roland Jr and Everette.
Service was held.

LOUVERN HOMER, 71, re-
tired dietician
for St. Alban's
Daycare, died
November 9 at
Mercy Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Robert Homer;
sons, Dolphus
A. Brewton and Shannon R. Spiv-
ey; daughter, Kimberley L; bother,
Robert Wooden (Margaret); nine
grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Service was
held.

ADOLPHUS GREEN JR, 33, la-
borer, died October 30 in Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.


maker, died Nov. 17 in Jackson
South Community Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


Richardson
VICTORIA PLUMER, 101, dry
cleaning press-

ber 14 Service
2 p.m., Friday,
First Deliver-
ance Fellowship



MAXWELL CLARK, 73, man-
ager for HUD,
died Nov 14.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Mount
Vernon Baptist


Church.




ENA WHITTAKER, 71, nurse,
died November 10. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Jay
RUTH HAMILTON, 55, home-
maker, died
November 12
in Hialeah Hos-
pital. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.



MOLLIE ADAMS, 74, nurse's
aide, died No-
vember 10 in
Jackson South
Community
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, House of
God Church.

MICHAEL GREEN, 45, clean-
ing service
entrepreneur
died November
10 in Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.

LAURA WASHINGTON, 47,
homemaker, -
died November:
16 in University .
of Miami Hos-
pital. Service 3 -
p.m., Saturday
in the chapel.


LENA PENDLETON, 89, home-
maker, died
November 15
in Jackson
SoUth Com-
munity Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Second Baptist
Church.

Gregg L. Mason

ELOISE OLIVE LIVINGSTON,
93, died No-
vember 17 in
Aventura Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: grand-
son, Phillip
Major; grand
daughter, She-
nique Major;k
sister, Cleora Braker; devoted
niece, Donna Blyden;, daughter
in law, Helen Major; host of other
nieces and nephews. Rosary and
Mass Services Friday, 9:30 a.m.,
St. Philips Neri Catholic Church.
Final rites and burial in Nassau,
Bahamas. In lieu of flowers fam-
ily requests donations made in her
memory to St. Philip Neri Catholic
Church.

JOAN ELAINE WILLIAMS, 65,
clinical psychol-
ogist for Miami-
Dade County
Public Schools,
died November
12 at home. Sur-
vivors include:
T.L., Sylvia W.
Beachman,
(Herbert) and Angelyn (Troutman);
brothers, Curtis W. (Mae) and Har-
ry L and a host of nieces, neph-
ews and other relatives. Memorial
service, 2 p.m., Wednesday in the
chapel.

ELDER ERVIN BUTLER, 80,
pastor, died November 14 at home.
Viewing Friday, 6-8 p.m., But-
ler Temple COGIC, 5701 Flagler
Street, Hollywood, Florida. Ser-
vice Saturday, 11:00 a.m., Cooper
Temple COGIC, 3800 N.W. 199
Street. Interment Southern Memo-


MARIE T. JEUDY, 71, died No-
vember 13 at Aventura Hospital.
Viewing Friday, 6-9pm.Service
Saturday, 10:00am at St. James
Catholic Church. Interment: South-
ern Memorial Park.



Pax Villa
JOCELYN LOUISSAINT, 55,
entrepreneur, died November
12 in Mercy Hospital. Service 10


a.m., Saturday, Good Shepherd
Missionary Baptist Church.

ELUCIA D. PIERRE, 67, home-
maker, died November 7 at home.
Service 1:30 p.m., Saturday, St.
Joseph Catholic Church.


Range 02
AMANDA GRACE COLLETTE,
15, student at
Dillard High
School died No- -
vember 12. Sur-
vivors include: Ly
mother, Joyce;
father Anthony '
Thompson;
brothers, An-
thony, and Aaron; sisters, Kia and
Latoya Thompson; a host of other
relatives and friends. Service was
held Monday at St. Clement's
Catholic Church.

ARLINGTON EDWIN ROB-
ERTS, 38, as-
sembler at
Miami Herald, P
died Novemberm
14. Survivors
include: mother,
Juanita Beard
Walters;sisters,
Shanell P. Ow-
ens, and Camrnisha M. Thomas;
brothers, Ronald Demon(Peggy),
and Frank Demon(Rosalyn);
grandmother, Sammie Lee De-
mon; a host of nieces, nephews
other relatives and friends. Service
11 a.m., Friday in the chapel.

EARL WILLIAMS JONES, 65,
landscaper, died
November 14.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Ve-
ronica; daugh-
ters, Rosa Lee ,
Oliver, Andrea, S
Chanidian; sons
Wade, Richard,
Devin, Achiles and Anquan; sister,
Irma Frances; brother, Marvin and
special friend Cinda Buraussard; a
host of nieces, nephews, and other
relatives and friends. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Tabor Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

ELLA MAE GILMORE, 87, home-
maker died November 12. Survivors
include: niece, Eleanor Palmer; grand
nephew, Frederick Palmer. Grave-
side service 11 a.m., Thursday, Dade
Memorial Park North Cemetery.

ELON JERIMIAH ROBINSON,
59, retail store entrepreneur died No-
vember 13. Final Rites, and Burial in
Montego Bay, Jamaica.
Carey Royal Ramn
RUSSELL ST. CLAIR, 48,
custodian, 'died November '14 at
home. Service 10 a.m. Friday in
the chapel.

CAROLYN BROWN, 82, retired,
died November 16 in Broward
General Medical Center. Service
10 a.m., Thursday in the chapel.

DAVID BURNETT, 84, retired
railroad porter, died November 16
at home. Service Thursday 1 p.m.,
in the chapel.

Hall Fergusono 4,
CURTIS TILLMAN SR, 56, driv-
er died November 11 in AG Hospi-
tal. Service was held.

JOHNNIE LANIER JR, 78 MDT
bus driver, died November 12 in
Miami Heart Institute. Service was
held.

HARRY S. PAYTON III, 51, MD-
CPS paraprofessional, died No-
vember 14 in Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Survivors include: wife, Noger;
mother, Vivian D. Wilkerson. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Word of
Truth, 1755 N.W. 78 Street.


St. Fort -
ELEONORE CYRIUS, 88,
homemaker, died November 12 at
home. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
United Methodist Church.

NICZSA NATALIE EDMOND,
27, cashier, died November 8 in
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

GERARD HEARD, 58, metal
worker, died November 8 in Jack-
son Memorial Hospital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday in the chapel.


JEAN DANIEL CONSTANTIN,
83, died November 16 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

MARIE GOURDET, 70, died
November 16 in Aventura Hospi-
tal. Arrangements are incomplete.


Wright & Young
Dr. Arletta Olivia Young, Ph.E
died, Wednes-
day November.
12. She was a
born in Miami .
Florida on July
12, 1954 and
was a product of
the Miami Dade
County Public
School System. She was an em-
ployee of the MDCPS and worked
at Dorsey Educational Center.
Survivors include: son Troy Jerrod
Lucas; mother, Theresa; sister,
Francis; brother, Rodrick. Service
was held Saturday.

MARIA ELAINE GIBSON 29,
childcare work- -
er, died Novem-
ber 8.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Robert Jr., Wil-
tron, Tommie
III, Ta-Mya; par
ents, Walter and
Ira Williams; siblings, Gregory, La-
ticia and Victoria Williams. Service
1 p.m., Saturday, New Missionary
Baptist Church.

LANTHE BROWN 71, home-
maker, died --
November 9
in North Shore s
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Clau-
dette Grant, Ly-
nette Saunders, -
Denise Brown-
Sims. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Fulford United Methodist Church.

ANDRE LAMONT YATES 31,
supervisor, died
November 13 in
Aventura Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:
grandmother,
Willie Mae Den-
son; siblings,
Antowan, Da-
mon Monroe, John H. Jr. (Angela),
Rhonda, Tammy Rowe. Visitation
Friday 9:00 a.m. until 9 p.m., in
the chapel. Family will receive
friends from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m.
Service 11 a.m., Saturday, New
Hope M.B Church.

WILSON JOHNSON 43, main-
tenance worker,
died November
14. Survivors in-
clude: children,
Wedline and
Jean; mother,
Remarcil; fa-
ther, Peter;
stepmother, Ma-
crulla; brother, Peter; sisterAugus-
tine. Service 2 p.m., Saturday, St.
James Catholic.

VESTA LEE TYSON 90, home-
maker, died
November 15
in Memorial
Regional Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: chil-
dren, Alphonso
(Sandra), Lu-
ther (Annie),
Geneva Cooper (Harvey), Jennie
Rumble (Nilus), Benny (Delores),
Norman (Carolyn) Cynthia Daw-
son (William). Final rites and buri-
al in Starke, Florida. Arrangement


GERALD COOLEY 49, laborer,
died November 15 in North Shore
Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Nakia Ingraham
ABDUL KATIA JR, 23, self-em-
ployed, died November 12 in Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Service
1 p.m., Saturday, St. Clemends.

JANET HUMPHREY, 52, teach-
er's assistant, died November 13
in Memorial Regional Hospital.
Service 11 a.m., Koinonia Worship
Center.

Manker _
KATHERINE BROWN, 92, hair


dresser, died
November 13
in North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, New
Providence Mis- . '
sionary Baptist
Church. --


Poitier
SHELDON WAYNE ROKER JR,
29, Correction's
Officer, died No-
vember 12 at i
home. Survivors V
include: parents,
Beverly and
Sheldon Wayne
Sr; grandmother,
Mary; sister, Tia
M; brother, Devante; several aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins
and devoted friends. A celebratory
gathering will take place immediate-
ly after viewing from 5-10 on Thurs-
day. Service 1 p.m., Friday, New
Way Missionary Baptist Church.

VERNON EDWARD CLARK JR,
20, salesman,
died November
11. Service 2
p.m., Saturday,
Now Faith De-
liverance Taber-
nacle.


ROSCOE EDWARD GIBSON,


72, laborer, died
November 11.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.




ALICE LOUI
ELOW, 74,
nurse, died
November 12.
Service 1 p.m.,
Wednesday,
New Canan
Baptist Church.


Royal
RICHARD LINCOLN, 85, cem-
etery attendant,
died November
15. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
House of God
Miracle Temple.


CHARLES PINCKNEY, 45,
longshoreman,
died November
16 in Brunswick,
Georgia. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Venus
Spivey; daugh-
ters, Latavia, j
Alana, Teoria,
Yamica and Niya; son, Charles Jr.
Visitation Sunday 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Monday, Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.

BRUCE BAIN, 49, maintenance
worker for Dolphin Stadium, died
November 17 in North Shore Med-
ical Center. Arrangements are in-
complete.

IVY MATTIS, 100, cook, died
November 13 in Memorial Re-
gional Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.


M I HERMAN MILLS, 84, security
POLK-BIG- guard, died November 14. Visita-
tion Wednesday 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Thursday in the cha-
pel.


HELEN E. GRIFFIN, 45, house-
wife, died No-
vember 11.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.




ANNIE LOU GULLATT, 70, do-
mestic engineer, died November 6
in Select Specialty Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.
E.A. Stevens-i !
ARTHUR LAMAR ROBINSON,
50, air condition and refrigeration
technician, died November 13 in
Memorial Regional Hospital. Ser-
vice 10 a.m. Saturday, Hallandale
Ebenezer Baptist Church.

KING ANDREW WALKER, 63,
landscaper, died November 10 in
Jackson North. Service was held.


Eric S. Georg ..
SEBRAN LOGAN SR, 63, of
Hollywood, Florida, died Novem-
ber 8. Service 1 p.m., Friday,
Christ's Kingdom Life Center, Int.,
Hollywood.

SARA JANE MCGRIFF, 62, of
Dania, died November 3. Service
11 a.m., Friday in the chapel.

BESSIE FORMAN SIMS, 61,
of West Park, Florida, died No-
vember 15. Service 2 p.m., Fri-
day, New Jerusalem 1st Baptist
Church, Hollywood, Florida.

EVA PROCTOR, 92, died No-
vember 17. Arrangements are in-
complete.



Hadley A
DEACONESS ELIZABETH
FRAZIER, 101, retired, died No-
vember 9. Service was held 11
a.m., Monday, The Historic Mount
Zion Missionary Baptist Church.


Before You Buy A Casket From

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BLACKs MUST CONTROL IHEIR 0\\N DEsTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Florida's number of diabetics triples


November is national diabetes awareness month


By Tariq Osborne
toshorie'@111 ia iitiliesioniliwe. coin0

November, national Diabetes
awareness month, has marked
the release of the most recent
nationwide statistical figures on
the disease. They are grim.
In just one decade, Florida has
gone from having one of lowest
rates of adult diabetes in the
country to cracking the top 10
worst, according to federal health
officials. The number of cases per
thousand people nearly doubled
nationally, but in Florida they
more than tripled between 2005
and 2007 when compared with
10 years earlier, according to
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention. Ten years ago,
Florida was 29th on the list. Last
year (data is collected every two
years, making the next year for
data 2009), Florida was ninth.
In that same span, diabetes al-
most doubled nationally, a stark
increase, but not near as dra-
matic as Florida's. The highest
populations with diabetes, apart
from Florida, were all found in
the Southern States. These in-


clouded Alabama, Georgia, Ken-
tucky, Louisiana, South Caro-
lina, and Texas.
Those figures are troubling,
but worse still, Diabetes afflicts
black more than twice as much
as Whites. According.to Center
for Disease Control estimates,
nearly 12% of black Americans
have diabetes, compared with
10.4% of Hispanics and 6.6% of
whites.
South Florida's Black commu-
nity finds itself as the highest
risk group (with the exception
of Native Americans and Alaska
Natives), in the region of the na-
tion with the highest rate of inci-
dence for diabetes.
Lois Exelbert, administrative
director of diabetes care center
at Baptist Hospital of Miami, a
30-year Miami resident, didn't
need the official figures to know
the number of cases has sky-
rocketed.
"There's an increase all over,
sedentary lifestyles and obesity
play large role," she said in an
interview yesterday.
"Having a lot of African-Amer-
icans, Hispanics, and Native


Americans increases the preva-
lence," she said. "Those ethnici-
ties, by heredity, are affected
more often than Caucasian pop-
ulations."
Exelbert shared several simple
methods of controlling the dis-
ease.
"There's nothing you can do
about the heredity piece, but
staying at the ideal body weight,
being as physically active as you
can and eating high-fiber foods
can help you prevent the onset
[of Diabetes], or forestall it at
least."
"Usually early symptoms are
fatigue, frequent urination, and
thirst" she continued. But usu-
ally by the times those show up,
the individuals have had diabe-
tes for quite a while."
Diabetes, if it goes untreated,
can lead to cardiovascular com-
plications, nerve complications,
amputation, blindness, kidney
failure, and even death.
"Fortunately, Diabetes can
be detected via a routine blood
test," said Exelbert. "People
should know their fasting blood
sugar levels and what their
blood sugar is a couple hours
after eating a meal."


* w.wa a 1am. mo e -e =* *, .- r' i e-a4N *- e .f- -mS : -

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.... in wfu

49 "OU -61USW%Me.a. 0 -


Beloved
Pastor/Overseer and
Community Leader
Rev. Mortimer, Dies


REV. DR. J.MORTIMER


Dr. J. Mortimer was born
in Long Island, Bahamas. He
relocated to Miami, Florida
in February 1959 and later
met and married his wife of
42 years, First Lady Mother
Frances Mortimer. Dr. Mor-
timer received Christ in his
life in 1965 and joined the
House of God Miracle Revival
Fellowship Church under the
leadership of the late Rev.
Mother Sevilla Cook, Founder
and General Overseer.
Dr. Mortimer is the proud
father of six children. He was
ordained a Minister in Sep-
tember 1968. After the death
of Mother Cook in 1983, he
was appointed Pastor and
General Overseer. He is the
Overseer of three churches,
Miami, Florida (Headquarter
Church), West Hollywood, Al-
bany, Georgia.
Because of his dedication
to God, he has been blessed
to achieve many endeavors.
Namely, the completion of
a beautiful fellowship hall
for banquets, meetings, par-
ties, etc. He has an outreach
ministry that provides meals
and clothes for the homeless,
needy individuals and fami-
lies in the community, as well
as offering computer classes
on the first Saturday of each
month.
Dr. Mortimer received a Di-
ploma of Practical Theology in
1999 and a Diploma for Ad-
vanced Level in 2002 from In-
ternational Seminary, A Bach-
elor Degree of Religious Arts in
Christian Education from the
Revelation Message Bible Col-
lege in May 2004, a Masters
Degree in Christian Counsel-
ing form Jacksonville Theologi-
cal Seminary in May 2005.
Dr. Mortimer's vision was to
reach beyond the ways of dying
men and women to convince
them that the love and grace of
God had been made available
to all who will hear, believe and
accept the gospel of Christ. He
envisions ministering to the
whole man, finding their needs
and meeting them.
Memorial Services will be
held Fri. 6-8:30 p.m. at the
House of God Miracle Revival
Fellowship Church, 4111 N.W.
17th Avenue. Homegoing Ser-
vices will be held Sat. 11:00
a.m. at New Jerusalem Primi-
tive Baptist Church, 777 N.W.
85th Street.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,



: "




-1, ,. e-vI"







JAMES NEVILLE FLOWERS
031/01/1940 11/19/94

If love could have saved you,

an thE FNlowrs Family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of the late,


EVANGELIST MARION C. BLUE
11-15-85

It's been another year since
God took our mother home. Our
mother saw a new heaven and a
new earth, for the first heaven and
the first earth was past away and
He carried our mother away in the
spirit to a great and high mountain
and showed her that great city.
Rev. 21:1 and 10.
Sadly missed by her mother
Janie Bell Campbell now 100 years
old, auntie Sara 87, by her daugh-
ters, Carmel Blue Scott, Janie
Blue, Cheryl Blue Robinson, Ne-
vada Blue Washington and grand-
children and great grandchildren.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


a---"


MARIE F. EDGECOMB
04/08/20 11/20/07

One year has passed since
you left us. We miss you very
much.
Love, your husband,
children, grands and great
grands The Edgecomb
family


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Queenesther Denson Bethel
would like to thank everyone
for your prayers and acts of
kindness. Your words of en-
couragement continue to be
a source of strength and con-
solidation during our time of
bereavement. We would like to
express our most sincere grati-
tude to the professional staff
of Poitier Funeral Home, Inc.,
Mildred Moore of Divine Inspi-
ration and reverend Elise Cox
and the congregation of Memo-
rial Temple Baptist Church.
May God continue to bless and
keep you.
Your family


In Memoriam


EDWARD LEE SMITH
"Geech"
11/11/46 -11/23/07


We miss and love you!
Brenda, Chloe, Edward and
Kenya.
Death Notice


ENA RAE WEBSTER-
WHITTAKER died November
10, 2008.
No painter's brush or poet's
pen, injustice to her fame, could
ever reach half high enough to
write my mother's name.
Love eternal, Eboni Ikimba

In Memoriam


TRUDY BELL SIMMONS
09/01/29 11/13/02
You will always be in our
hearts. You are missed.
Your loving family

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,
S-


SHIRLEY ANN DAVIS
11/21/44 07/14/91
I think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which I will never part.
God has you in His keeping;
I have you in my heart.
Love always, Crick.


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"

"God cares and we care"










Independently Owned
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ TONY E.IIIIISI ^FERGUSONIIIIIIII^


MILTON A. HALL. I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


I II'dC8 1l0563 -0 88Icn;dF:nrI 'e-losI I


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The T



Lifestyles


FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD


* DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


Playwright Charles Fuller story about gang

violence takes center stage at the African


Heritage Cultural Arts Center


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Losing a child to gun violence can
be a parent's worst nightmare. In
2006, Miami-Dade County witnessed
a spree of violence occurring among
teenagers. One after the other, bodies
were being buried, leaving parents in
mourning.
Since last month, African-American


Performing Arts Community Theatre
(AAPACT), a non-profit Theatre Com-
pany, has been running, "Zooman
and the Sign" at the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center, 6161 NW 22nd
Avenue, Wendell Narcisse Theatre.
The play features an. outstanding
cast: Carey Hart, Rachel Finley, Larry
Robinson, Teddy
Harrell, Jr., Curtis Holland, La-
mar Swan, Derrick Chiverton, Kevin


Johnson, Catherine A. Williams and
director Andre' L. Gainey.
"Zooman and the Sign" was written
by Charles Fuller. It tells the story of
a Black family in Philadelphia, coping
with the loss of their daughter after
she is killed by a stray bullet while
playing on her front porch. They later
learn that their daughter was killed
by a teenager and despite their loss,
their neighbors turn against them,
unwilling to help them seek justice.
Chiverton gave a stunning per-
formance as the villain who swanks
about his passion to kill and never get
caught.
Hope Ingraham, who has been a
Liberty City resident for twenty years,
said, "It's sad when you see these


young kids in the streets playing one
day and tomorrow they are dead from
something so senseless. The problem
with gang violence is disrupting our
streets and killing our precious chil-
dren."
FBI reports showed that there were
over 8,000 violent crimes in 2007 in
Miami-Dade.
With the increase of violence in the
community, Andre Gainey, who di-
rected the play, said, "In a season of
change, 'Zooman and the Sign' asks
the community, will they be a part of
it and let us return to a pride that de-
fines the community," said Gainey.
Charles Fuller, a Philadelphia native
and winner of 1982 Pulitzer Prize for
Drama, is renowned for "A Soldier's


Play." He won an Obie Award for
Zooman and the Sign in 1980. Fuller's
play has a parallel in the 2006 slaying
of nine year-old Sherdavia Jenkins in
Liberty City. Jenkins was playing on
the front steps of her house when she
was caught in a crossfire that ended
her life.
The Miami Times tried to reach Jen-
kins's family but they were unavail-
able for comment.
Last Sunday, Rev. .Dr. C. P. Pres-
ton Jr., pastor and teacher of Peace-
ful Zion Missionary Baptist Church,
gave 50 underprivileged children the
opportunity to see the play right after
attending church service at Peaceful
Zion.
Please turn to PLAY 4C .


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irt"ft








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


^^n~io r~yp nr'^W lM~fl~r~h i7 '


By Dr. Richard S. .c


On November 1, a beautil'ul
Saturday, Regina Gail Fend-
erson and Rae Oliver Nunes
united in holy matrimony at New\
Hope Baptist Church. Bishop R.
H. Hope, officiated, and family
members, church members and
friends filled the edifice.
The Bridal party emerged from
a 22-passenger Escalade and
a white stretched limousine.
Recorded music was provided
by Party Time Entertainment
Group, Inc. and the decoration
was by Willie Sharpe.
The processional began with
Veronica Wilson and O'Neal
Fenderson, parents of the
groom and bride respectively,
followed by bridesmaids attired
in sleeveless lavender gowns
accentuated with ruffles and a
string of pearls. The grooms-
men wore black tuxedos with
lavender accessories. The party
included Nicole Gomez and
Anthony Joseph, Imana Small
and Terrance Small, Chandra
Robinson and Bert Fenderson,
Charlene Parrish and Quinton
Solmon, and Khadilah Fender-
son and Chauncy Fenderson.
Shariykah Carvin and Sharel
Solomon were the maids of
honor. Neville Grant was the
best man, Quinaya Solomon,
the flower girl, and Terrain
Small, the ring bearer. The
bride entered on the arm of her
father, Mr. Fenderson, in a Vic-
tory Atara, a string of pearls, a
designer gown with embroidery
on the bodice and at the hem, a
3-foot train.
Both of them participated
in a traditional ceremony with
the exchange of two rings, a


C)I


comrmitmc i-t r
mr rrmage. ni iri d
Le'igth, kis. The',
led Ith entocirage
to St. Basil Social
Hall for the recep-
tion and celebration, and began
a long blissful life together.
Back in the days, the founda-
tion of athletics was established
at Booker T. Washington High
School with football players,
such as Booker Ingram, Calvin
Mapp, James Russell, "Nan"


Regina Gail Fenderson and
Rae Oliver Nunes

Brown, Clinton Brown, Traz
Powell, Samuel McPhee, etc.
From that foundation in 1948,
came names such as Percy Oli-
ver, Dan Tullis, Wade Bleu,
Archie McKay, Alkin Hep-
burn, Freddie Jones, Herbert
Watts, Kenneth Dean, Jerry
"Pa-Joe" Parks, Leroy "Cisco"
Anderson, Willie Lamb, Ru-
dolph Florence, and Morris
Conyers. According to Dr. An-
drew Forbes, he requested the
floor to acknowledge that John
Tullis was selected to the BTW
Hall of Fame for his prowess in
football and tennis.
Forbes continued with
Tullis's story. He tried out for


I


the team and made it. From
1949 to 1953, he played on the
first team, never missed a game
or practice, and made all State
Defensive Team and the South
All Star First Team. His record
was so impressive that he was
awarded a full scholarship to
Kentucky State College. He
played outstandingly there and
graduated with honors.
After graduation, he returned
to BTW as a Drivers Education
teacher and was then drafted to
serve his country for 2-years.
Tullis returned to BTW where
he studied under Coaches Ev-
erett, Haley, Wanza and Cecil
Harris, all of whom motivated
him to teach tennis. The result
was winning 29-trophies for the
school and breaking the color
barrier in the process. Further,
he organized the first swimming
team at BTW. His schedule in-
cluded many White schools in
Miami, as BTW was the only
Black swimming team.
When Forbes concluded his
dissertation about Tullis, the
retired brothers gave him a
standing ovation, while Tullis
brushed the tears from his eyes
and thanked them for the expe-
rience. Congrats!
Kudos to Jerry and Mary
Jean Miller, who have retired
from teaching young people to
sing. Now, they spend their time
in the global world absorbing
other countries' culture, folk-
lore, infrastructure, and quality
of life.
Recently, they returned to
America from visits to Russia,
Copenhagen, Finland, England
and Holland. Their most inter-
esting scene was standing in
front of the Russian Cathedral
in St. Petersburg, Russia. A
place they had read about many
times before finally seeing it.
After seeing the globe, Jer-


Kinnon, New Jerusalem
tive Baptist Church, to bi
invocation and prayer, fo
by the audience singin
Every Voice and Sing."
Ashley Allen and T
McCall continued with a
Dance, while Vernessa
warmed up the audience
her unique greetings and
sion, followed by Michel
dan (Faith Olive Ministry


ry indicated a strong lc
America since Senator B
Obama became president
The changes he will imp
will be worth seeing. W
home.
"Lifting Up The name of
was the theme of the piece
together by Mr. Keith La
in appreciation of Fredei
and Mrs. Gloria Allen
Pastor/Teacher. They
were wildly successful
and took place last Sat-
urday, at the Church of
the Open Door Fellow-
ship Banquet Hall.
It was an opportunity
for special families to
display their talents in
a Musical Extravaganza
featuring CD's made by
artists, such as the hc
Frederick C. Allen, Jr
sister Veronica Allen.
Val Kinnon was excel
mistress of ceremonies,
ing her husband Deacon


ove for ing the "Lord's Prayer," Jetty
arrack Oris demonstrating an Inspira-
t-elect. tion Point, and Jasmine Jack-
lement son, "Lifting in Dance".
welcome Darnette Edwards received a
standing ovation for his Mime
Jesus" presentation, as he represent-
ces put ed Word of Truth. The Man-
avarity sion Ministry Praise Dancers
rick C. then paid tribute, along with
1 ,Rev. Anthony Shin-
hoster, Anticoch MBC-
SJ Brownsville. This led to
the open buffet for the
guests.
Others on the pro-
gram included Judy
Barr, The Iron Barr,
Inc. performing a skit,
"Church Stuff". The au-
OBAMA dience greeted this with
laughter, but there were
honoree, serious parts as well. Frederick
r., and C. Allen, Jr. performed "Son to
Father Salute," and Ashley All,
lent as "A Daughter's Tribute".
bring- To close, Karen Henderson
Lester and Vernessa Smith acknowl-
edged the Pastor's Appreciation
Committee. The committee con-
sisted of Susanne Allen, Veroni-
ca (the pastor's mother), Keisha
Cassells, Ms. Henderson, Rob-
ert Reed, 0. Smith, Barbara
Wooten and Ms. Vernessa
Smith.
The reality of Senator Barack
Obama winning the presidency
caused people to cry, console,
Miller and communicate with everyone
feeling proud to be an Ameri-
Primi- can. The question is; how did he
ring the win?
allowed Firstly, he won because he
g, "Lift has the philosophies of Fred-
erick Douglas, W.E.B. Dubois,
'anisha Malcolm X, Thurgood Mar-
Praise shall, and Dr. Martin L. King,
Smith Jr. all wrapped into one. As
ce with Gov. Sarah Palin emphasized,
d occa- Sen. Obama's experience was
le Gor- in organizing neighborhoods in
y) sing- Chicago. She was absolutely


Our ne\vly-elected Vice Presi-
dent's full name is Joseph
Robinette Biden Jr., born in
Scranton, Pennsylvania; on No-
vember 20, 1942. He is of Irish
Catholic heritage. He is th6e first
of four children born to Joe Sr.,
a car salesman, and Jean Biden.
He was raised in Scranton and


moved to Ne\k Cas- .
tie County. Dela-
ware. at age 10. Our -
children especially .
need to know this
information. Please tell them!
Paula Williams-Barry, the
daughter of our beloved prin-
cipal, Charles L. Williams ex-


pired in Washington D.C. She
was cremated and laid to rest
there. Phyllis, their other daugh-
ter, died some years ago.
Oprah Winfrey already wears
the crown as the queen of day-
time talk shows. Now she's
signed on to voice the character
of the mother in Disney's "The
Princess and the Frog."
The movie will feature Dis-
ney's first Black Princess, and is
slated for release in late 2009.
Congratulations to Hon. Os-
car J, (and Melissa F.) Braynon
II. November 9 will be their 2nd


wedding anniversary.
Congratulations to Richard,
(and JoAnn) Rolle, who will cel-
ebrate their 38th anniversary on
November 13.
Old-Time Miamians were sad-
dened to hear of the losses of
Arthur Livingston, class of '48
B.T.W., Ruby King, former teach-
er and sister of Arthur King Sr.,
and Edna King-Clarke, both of
whom are deceased. Sympathy
goes out to their families.
Get well wishes to all of
you! Edna Scavella, Richard
Rolle, DelOne Mathis, Roderic


Knowles, and John Smith.
Eartha Kitt is 81 years old.
During Black History Month
(February), PBS Television will
feature "History Makers," which
is a national nonprofit educa-
tional organization. The organi-
zation is based in Chicago and is
committed to preserving Black
history.
Janet Jackson resumed her
tour after canceling several
dates due to migraine-associat-
ed vertigo.
Barack Obama is our Pres-
ident-Elect. We owe him, and


our country, our support and
respect. Let us, as Black Ameri-
cans, remember to support
and respect our nation always,
but especially for the next four
years. All over America, our be-
havior was super. Let us con-
tinue to do our very best as we
show our country that we know
how to act. Now we can instill
in this generation that they can
be anything they want through
good behavior, hard work, and
staying in school.
P.S., it's time to pull up those
pants, young men!


Te ladies love Usr on hi One Night Stad tour


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correct. He asked that all na-
tionalities come, and they came
willingly.
President-elect Obama built
his skills on strategizing and
trained committees to do the
same things. He formed a com-
mittee consisting of David Azel-
rod, Steve Schale, Paul Tewes,
Steve Hildebrand, Robert
Gibbs, and Linda Douglas that
made an impact on the world.
He organized the nation with
600 people on his payroll and
2-million volunteers working
24-7, especially in swing states
like Florida, Pennsylvania, Ohio,
and South Carolina.
When Sen. Obama began his
campaign, in an office in Chi-
cago, he was almost an un-
known. He began to speak out,
outlining his platform and what
he was going to do to change
America. During the process,
he registered new voters, young
people who had never voted. His
wife Michelle was in tow, and
she joined the FAMU "March-
ing 100" A thousand students
walked from the campus to the
voting booth. They did it again
at Bethune-Cookman U. with
another 1,000 students.
As his message got out, he
became unbeatable. There was
a woman whose husband was
in Hospice, but she had to vote.
While her husband died, she
waited in line. And, of course,
there was Bubber Mack, a
member of the Tree of Knowl-
edge who said, "I am 84-years
old and it's not gonna happen in
my time." I found him last week,
and he cried as he apologized for
his statement. Others who cried
were Jean Perry, Rev. Dr. Jore-
tha Capers, Congressman K.
Meek, Dr. Inez Rowe, Cheryl
Person, Virgina Smiley, Tillie
Stibbins, James and Shelia
Mack and Bishop V. Curry.


Ck"2aL&f^Q%







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Adrienne Arsht Center and Seraphic Fire present The Knight Foundation Concert Series
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
"A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH"
Bach's Cantata No. 82 and Schubert's Death and the Maiden.
7 PM Peacock Foundation Studio $40
Camposition presents
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
By Michael Yawney, Commissioned by Adrienne Arsht Center
This documentary/fantasy/comedy tells the story of Anita Bryant's
1977 crusade against gay civil rights.
2 PM Carnival Studio Theater $35
Florida Grand Opera presents
LA TRAVIATA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $13.75, $62.75, $99.75, $132.75

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
"Wildly funny" -Los Angeles Times
All 37 plays in 97 minutes! "Saturday Night Live" meets a fast-paced
romp through the Bard's plays. London's longest-running comedy.
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $45
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
If you like Shakespeare, you'll like this show. If you hate
Shakespeare, you'll LOVE this show! -NBC's "Today Show"
2 PM $45 7:30 PM $50 Carnival Studio Theater
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
"The funniest show you are .- I., to see in your entire lifetime,"
Montreal Gazette
2 PM & 7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $50
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
"Laugh? I nearly died!" London Daily Mail
2 PM $50 7:30 PM $45 Carnival Studio Theater
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)


ANNIE
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1,000 Homosexuals


Firebird Chamber Orchestra
:.,, : 0




\ _'1. I


i. THF MIAMI TIMFS NOVFMBFR 19-25. 2008


4 G a





BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


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with your


dollars

We can make a difference.
That is, if we vote daily with our dollars.
We urge our readers to think in economic terms and to use the advertising columns of The
Miami Times as a guide when making purchases and/or voting.
Corporations and governmental entities that place advertising in the columns of The Miami
Times are sending the message that they appreciate our patronage and respect us as customers.
Let nobody fool you
Our weekly family of more than 115,000 Miami Times readers holds tremendous economic
clout. Economic clout so great that it determines whether most companies in South Florida
make a profit.
As customers and taxpayers, we should vote with our dollars but only for those businesses
and government jurisdictions that respect rules of fair play from the board room to the
checkout and service counters.
They also should respect and appreciate us and our hard-earned dollars just as they do the
readers of conservative, white-owned media.


Vote daily with your dollars to make a difference.


be *i tamt Sut
We Care About You and South Florida









Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


JOBLESS CLAIMS JUMP TO HIGHEST LEVEL SINCE 11


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6D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008 BlACKS Musr CONI'ROL THEIR O\\'N DESTINY


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City of Miami




Community redevelopment agency

SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN/PARK WEST & OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES
PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that a regular CRA Boards of Commissioners
Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West & Omni Community
Redevelopment Agencies will take place on Monday, November 24, 2008 at
5:00 pm, at Frederick Douglass Elementary, 314 N.W. 12th Street, Miami, FL
33136.
All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information please contact
the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.


(#003185)


James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West &
Omni Community Redevelopment Agencies


m - __


VISTA ALEGRE APARTMENTS
A SUBSIDIZED HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY
Applications are now being accepted for the very low income elderly, 62 years
and over, on a "first come, first serve" basis, to be placed on the waiting list.
Applicants may appear in person, between the hours of 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM, at
2235 SW 8111 Street, Miami, Florida 33135, or request an application by mail
CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD (305) 643-2079
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY




TRUST_

LIBERTY CITY COMMUNITY REVITALIZATION TRUST
"Working Together to Serve You Better"

PUBLIC NOTICE OF MEETING
A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Liberty City Community
Revitalization Trust will be held:
CHARLES HADLEY PARK
Carrie P. Meek Senior Citizen and Cultural Center
1350 NW 50th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
********* Wednesday, November 19, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.**********

Ad No. 13795


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 on the receiving dates referenced below for the following projects:

PROJECT NAME BID NO. ENGINEERING COST OF EACH ADVERTISEMENT RECEIVING RECEIVING
COST ESTIMATE SPECIFICATION BOOKLET. DATE TIME
No plans for these contracts. DATE TIME

District 5 Sidewalk Repair 08-09-013 $50,000 $20 non refundable Monday, Tuesday, 10:00 AM
Project I, B-30377E- November 10, December 23,
2008 2008
District 5 Sidewalk Repair 08-09-014 $50,000 $20 non refundable Monday, Tuesday, 11:00AM
Project II, B-30377E November 10, December 23,
2008 2008
District 5 Sidewalk Repair 08-09-015 $75,000 $20 non refundable Monday, Tuesday, 10:00 AM
Project III, B-30377E November 17, December 30,
2008 2008
District 5 Sidewalk Repair 08-09-016 $75,000 $20 non refundable Monday, Tuesday, 11:00 AM
Project IV, B-30377E November 17, December 30,
2008 2008

Scope of Work: The projects include the removal and replacement of deteriorated, damaged, or unsafe concrete sidewalks and
construction of new concrete sidewalks and handicap ramps for the City's ADA program. Also, the upgrade, replacement and repair of
concrete curbs and curbs and gutters, and reinstallation of water meter boxes or similar utility structures located in the sidewalk area,
2-ft of asphalt pavement restoration for the c&g restoration, and trimming and removal of tree roots, as necessary, in order to prevent
future damage to the new concrete sidewalk, driveway or access ramps, concrete curb and gutter. The proposed improvements are
inclusive to the Commissioner District 5 Area.
A Performance Bond is not required for these projects. A 5% Bid Bond is not required for these projects.
THE PROSPECTIVE BIDDER MUST HAVE A CURRENT CERTIFIED CONTRACTOR'S LICENSE FROM THE STATE OF FLORIDA
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSE BOARD FOR THE CLASS OF WORK TO BE PERFORMED. OR THE APPROPRIATE
CERTIFICATE OF COMPETENCY OR THE STATE'S CONTRACTORS CERTIFICATE OF REGISTRATION AS ISSUED BY
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CODE, WHICH AUTHORIZES THE BIDDER TO PERFORM THE PROPOSED WORK. THE SELECTED
CONTRACTOR SHALL HOLD A MIAMI-DADE COUNTY MUNICIPAL OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE ISSUED BY MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY IN THE APPROPRIATE TRADE (PAVING/ CONCRETE).
Detailed specifications for these bid are available upon request, after the above referenced advertisement dates, at the City of
Miami, Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, Eight Floor, Miami, FL 33130, Telephone No (305) 416-1200. There are no
construction plans for these maintenance projects. Bid packages will be available in hard copy form and a non-refundable fee of $20.00
will be required per project. A bid package can also be mailed to bidders upon written request to the Department, and shall include the
appropriate non-refundable fee plus $10 for shipping and handling using regular U.S. Mail.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate originals in the envelope
provided with the bid package. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly opened. Any bids or proposals received
after time and date specified will be returned to the bidder unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the
stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused by mail,
courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.
Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager
Add. No. DP-004023


YES WE DID!
PRESIDENT-ELECT BARACK OBAMA
INAUGURATION BUS TOUR
Depart Jan. 18, 2009 Return Jan. 21, 2009
$300 and $390 per person inclusive

For More information call: 305-331-1944
email: barackobama8253@bellsouth.net


b4Mcqn4


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


-


. .


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008













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.IL


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SECTION D


101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$900, nice and clean, laundry
room, parking. Section 8
okay! Call 786-326-7424.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

123 N.W. 18 Street
One bedroom. $450 monthly.
Appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1240 N.E. 200 St
One bedroom, rear apart-
ment, unfurnished. $750
monthly, first and last month
required with $300 deposit.
All utilities included.
786-447-6673

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$550 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$625 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $450 per month, all ap-
pliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $525 monthly,
two bedrooms $625 monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1545 N.W. 8th Avenue
One and two bedrooms air,
appliances, new lile, carpet
and free water Starting al
$650 786-506-3067

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

1801 N.W. 1ST CT
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month newly renovated.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air,
free water. 305-642-7080

190 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom. $680 moves
you in, $680 monthly.
786-389-1686

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

220 N.W. 16 Street
Two bedrooms, one. bath
$550. 305-642-7080

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $625, newly
renovated appliances includ-
ed. Call Tony 305-213-5013.

2365 N.W. 97th Street Apt #
b in the rear
One bedroom,$625 monthly.
First and last moves you in.
Call 305-691-2703.'

2493 N.W. 91st St #4
One bedroom with private
parking, air, utilities included,
$700 a month, first and last to
move in. Call 305-691-2703.

3090 NW 134 Street #3
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 monthly, $1300 to move
in. Section 8 Welcome. 786-
512-7643.

3186 N.W. 135th Street
One bdm, one bath, $650
monthly, call 954-704-0094.


338 N.E. 82 Terrace
Nice one bedroom apartment.
Reference required. Drive by.
Call 305-754-5728


423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$485 monthly, $900 to move
in. 305-326-8855/56

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

561 N.W. 6 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$495. Two bedrooms one
bath $595. Free water,
305-642-7080



58 Street 31st Avenue
Small one bedroom, partially
furnished, air, lights and wa-
ter. For one or two people
only. Call 305-693-9486.



6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6251 N.W. 17th AVENUE
Air, tiled floors and new ap-
pliances. very clean. $550
monthly, section 8 preferred.
contact 305-253-8771 or 305-
519-3882. Ask for Mary.

6962 N.W. 2ND Court
Two bedrooms,one bath, sec-
tion 8 welcome. Call:
Mr. Coats 305-345-7833


7001 N.W. 15 Avenue
Move In Special! First month
plus half security deposit
moves you in. One bedroom
$495 monthly. $743 moves
you in. Two bedrooms, $650
monthly. $975 moves you in.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch, flat screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

924 N.W. 29th Street
Section 8 Welcome! Two bed-
rooms, one bath $950 month-
ly. Call 786-262-7313.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

BEAUTIFUL
5120 N.W. 23 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, wa-
ter included. $600 monthly.
George 305-484-7924

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080


DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
AREA
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695.
$100 off three months. 305-
528-7766:

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
All applications accepted.
Easy Qualify. One bdrm, one
bath $515. Two bdrm, one
bath $630. FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144


HOLLYWOOD AREA
Nice location, close to
schools and church. One and
two bedroom with tile, air,
stove and refrigerator, water
included in rent, Section 8
welcome, 305-624-9590.


. t' ; . .'
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MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrace Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bedrooms. Bring this ad
in for $50 off application fee
and move in deals.
Call 305-688-8881

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

LITTLE HAITI
One bedroom. $450 monthly.
786-277-6430 or
954-704-9413

Located Near 90 Street
and 27 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
light, water, and air included.
Also one bedroom furnished.
Call 305-693-9486

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300.N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-92011
-Income Restrictions-

MOVE IN SPECIAL
SECTION 8
$0 DEPOSIT
$0 WATER
OPA LOCKA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
tiled air $750
One bedroom, one bath,
[lied air. $550 786-367-
7024 786-439-8044
N. DADE Section 8 OK!
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Security, No Deposit
For Section 8. 786-488-5225

NW AREA
One and two bedrooms,one
bath. Section 8 welcome. Call
305-688-7559.

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath also
one bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 welcome, $500 cash
back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

WEST BROWARD AREA
Lauderhill; spacious three
bedroom, two bath, section 8
o.k., $1100 monthly:
954-559-5847 .

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
One bedroom, $600 $650
monthly. Two bedrooms,
$150 to $800 monthly. All ap-
pliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578



COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside, lighting.
$950 monthly, $950, Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.



1810 N.W. 119th Street Unit
#204
Very nice two bedrooms, two
baths! Section 8 okay! Call
305-984-8478.

18360 NW 44 PLACE
Two bedroom, two bath town-
house. First and security.
786-348-1288

1985 N.W. 5 Place
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1200 monthly. 786-263-1590

2767 N.W. 198th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one and a
half bath town house. Section
8 o.k.
305-336-3133

6113 S.W. 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one and half
bath, one block from Metro-
rail,$1,400 monthly, Section
8 welcome. 786-556-9425 or
786-210-0421.

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom condo. Pool,
free water and security gate.
$800 monthly. 954-266-9328

902 N.E. 209th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,


$1350 mthly, Section 8 wel-
come, 305-761-0061.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Great Property! Looking for
Great Home Maker! Call
954-243-6447.


1250 N.W. 58 Street
Two bedrooms, appliances.
$850 monthly, first and last.
305-758-3237

142 N.W. 71st Street
Two bedrooms; one bath,
fenced yard, tiled and car-
pet. Security bars, air, $950
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-389-4011 or
305-632-3387


1450 N.W. 53 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly, first, last, in-
cludes light and water. Call
305-710-1343, 786-506-0272

18423 N.E. 1 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, washer and dryer hookup.
$1200 monthly.
305-681-2862


2056 Washington Avenue
Two bedrooms, Opa-Locka,
Section 8 okay, $825 month-
ly.
Call 786-290-7333.

2127 N.W. 66th Street
Two bdms, one bath, laundry,
Section 8 accepted. $925
mthly includes water. Call
954-549-5648.

21301 N.W. 37 Avenue
Two bedrooms. $895 month-
ly. No Section 8.
786-306-4839


2266 N.W. 75 Street Rear
Two bedrooms.954-394-5887

2270 N.W. 95th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, tile
floors, central air, utility room,
security bars, $1000 mthly,
first, last and security. Appli-
cations Sat., 11/22,
10 a.m. 2 p.m.


2310 N.W. 86 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
washer and dryer, appliances
and air. $1350 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-244-7075


2744 N.W. 49th Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, lawn service, and pest
control incl.
Call 786-251-5028.


3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

3315 N.W. 213 Terr
Five bedrooms, three baths,
central air, den. $1695.
786-306-4839

416 N.E. 58th Street
Large one bedroom, water in-
cluded, appliances, and air.
Call 786-426-6263


563 N.W. 96th St (Rear)
Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances, air. $850 monthly,'
first and last 305-244-9959


5657 N.E. 1 Court
Two bedrooms, bars, water,
air. $750. No'Section 8.
Terry Delerson Broker
305-891-6776

577 N.W. 94 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly. 786-263-1590

595 N.W. 65th Street
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, $850 monthly, Section 8
ok! Call 786-543-4579 or
954-260-7457.

6051 N.W. 24th Court
One bedroom, $750 monthly,
water included, Section 8
okay. Call 786-290-7333.

672 Oriental Boulevard
(151 Street) one block east
of N.W. 37 Avenue. Two bed-
rooms, one bath, tiled floors,
air, washer hookup. $800
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. 305-625-4515

6826 N.W. 6 Avenue
Two bedrooms one bath, air,
appliances. $750 monthly.
786-226-6900,305-691-3322


7753 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


8001 N.W. 24th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
very nice inside, Section 8
welcome, call 305-632-8164.


93rd STREET N.W. 18th
AVE AREA
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcomed! Call
305-754-7776.

BARRY COLLEGE AREA
570 NW 113 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
fenced yard, parking,air; pets


o.k. $1100 monthly. First and
last. 786-897-6633


Need help, give us a call. All
are welcome. Brother Ros-
coe, 786-348-3235.

Room in quiet home.
Call Na 305-693-3957


COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

Large one bedroom, one
bath, free water. $725 mthly.
305-607-7192

MIRAMAR
Nice two bedrooms, one bath.
Newly renovated. Washer
and dryer, central air. Section
8 OK.
NC REALTY 305-710-8915

N.W. 76th Street and 2nd
Court
New three bdrm, two bath,
fenced, washer and dryer,
a/c, Section 8 okay!
Call 305-258-6626.

Northwest Area
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100 monthly, first last and
security. 786-879-0775

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Large three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643



13377 NW 30th AVENUE
$110 weekly,private kitchen/
bath,free utilities,appliances.
305-474-8188,305-691-3486

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$148 weekly, $575 moves
you in. Call 786-389-1686.

2170 N.W. 91 Street #C
Furnished. $600 monthly,
$1200 to move in.
305-244-7075

2538 N.W. 104 Ter
Nice area. Water included.
$550 monthly. 786-290-7333

2915 N.W. 156th Street
Private entrance, free cable.,
$165 weekly, $650 to move
in. 305-624-3966.

5422 N.W. 7TH COURT
Large efficiency includes
water and electricity. $600
monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449

8010 N.W. 20th Avenue
Efficiency, utilities included,
$560 a month. 786-316-
2448.

85 N.W. 46 Street
$600 monthly, includes
utilities and cable. 786-326-
7916.

Miami G$ardens
All utilities, free cable, $700
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 786-546-9650


NORTH MIAMI AREA
1128 NW 116 STREET
Private entrance, bath, air,
pet o.k., parking, utilities in-
cluded, one person only. $600
monthly. 786-897-6633

NW AREA
Rooms and Efficiencies. 305-
836-5848/305-653-8954


1341 N.W. 68 Ter
Clean rooms, $130 weekly,
two weeks to move in.
305-469-0835


1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

2010 N.W. 55 Terrace
Rooms with central air and
appliances. 786-487-2222


211 N.W. 12th Street
HOLIDAY SPECIAL
$100 Weekly Moves you in.
Cable, air. 786-286-7651

2365 N.W. 97 Street
Room with air, $380 monthly.
First and last to move in.
Call 305-691-2703

2373 N.W. 95 St.
$90 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-691-3486, 305-474-8186

2381 N.W. 66th Street
$100 weekly and, $350 to
move in. Call 786-426-3982.

3042 N.W. 44 Street
Big, air, $130 weekly, $260 to
move in, 786-262-6744

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Faith Based Ministry has
rooms for rent, $85 per week.


305-632-2428.


12405 N.W. 20 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$750, lights and water includ-
ed. 305-788-3785

1341 N.W. 58th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath $600.
First and deposit. Washer
and dryer, call 954-993-8240
or 786-277-3804.


14002 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedroom, two bath, new
townhouse, located in nice
area, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-528-9964.

1410 NW 195th STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
one car garage. $1300
monthly, no section 8. Call
305-267-9449


1521 N.W. 63 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Remodeled, large fenced
yard, central air, heat. Section
8 Welcome. $1150 monthly.
305-761-3998

1530 N.E. 151 Terrace
Four bdrms, two baths,
$1250, 786-419-5734 or 305-
696-4526.


1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750. 305-642-7080

1534 N.W. 44 St
Two bedrooms, big fenced
yard. Section 8 Only.
786-326-6105


15851 N.W. 18th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
half block from school and
bus stops. 305-613-2976.

16015 N.W. 22nd Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
new kitchen, air, tile, Section
8 OK, $1250, 305-409-8113

17133 N.W. 49th Place
Four bdrm., two baths, Sec-
tion 8, $1800 a month, Tim:
786-255-5998

17641 N.W. 41 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 monthly. Section 8 OK.
Drive by then call
954-517-1282.

1821 WILMINGTON
STREET
Three .bdrms, one bath. First
month half off. 305-496-6914,
305-620-1049, 786-693-2617

19148 N.W. 33 Ave
Four bedrooms, two baths,
huge yard with pool, close to
schools and shopping. Avail-
able 1/1/09. $1725 monthly.
Section 8 OK. 786-355-1637

1942 N.W. 86 Street
Three bedrooms, Florida
room, central air, bars. $950
monthly. 305-904-2676

20625 N.W. 28th AVENUE
No section 8. $1200 monthly
305-732-9875 pager,
305-624-4395

2300 N.W. 64 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
security bars. Section 8 OK.
$1300 mthly. 786-290-7333

2320 N.W. 55th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security. Call
Waymon 786-877-1046.

2360 N.W. 140th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
first and last. $1200 monthly.
Curry 786-985-3074.

2535 N.W. 161 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Section 8 Wel-
come. 305-685-0574


2754 N.W. 169 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, security bars,
air and appliances. $1450
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
305-794-9026

2770 N.W. 153 Terrace
Three bedrooms, central air.
Remodeled. $975
786-306-4839, 954-274-6944

355 N.W. 19th Street
New home, three bedrooms,
two and a half bath with
washer and dryer. Section 8
welcome, $1450 monthly, call
786-663-9585.

41 Street N.W. 5 Avenue
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776

430 N.W. 203 Street
Three bedrooms, two and a
half baths, pool, double car
garage. $1700. 954-704-
0094


504 N.W. 58th Street
One bdrm, one bath, appli-
ances, air, bars, fenced yard.
Call 305-625-8909.

5650 N.E. Miami Court
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1600, call Joseph Louis


112 Marion Road
Miami Gardens. Owner Fi-
nancing-No Credit Check.
Three bedrooms, pool and
more. $2500 down and $1599
monthly. Needs Tender Lov-
ing Care.
786-306-4839


651 N.W. 52nd Street
Three bdrm, two baths,
$1600 monthly, Section 8
only. Call 305-620-4054 or
305-527-8330.

7500 N.W. 11th Avenue
Beauliful tour bedrooms
Iwo bt.alh. ce-rilral air iiie,
appliances, washer and
dryer ertical binds, huge
yard and
Dars Call 786-357-5000

8250 NW 2ND COURT
One bedroom, one bath, $600
monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

8920 N.W. 8 Ave
Four bedrooms, three baths.
Quiet clean street. $1000
monthly. 786-351-8109

900 N.W. 65 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 305-642-7080.

920 N.W. 89th Street
Gorgeous remodeled three
bdrm, one bath, all applianc-
es, very safe and neat area,
huge yard, close to hospital,
Section 8 okay! $1350/month
+ one month sec. dep. Call
786-506-5907.

942 NW 80 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths,
section 8 accepted. $1200
monthly, $2400 to move in
305-758-6133 786-226-5200

Coral Gables Community'
228 Jefferson Drive. Three
bedrooms, two baths. Good
schools other nearby ameni-
ties, available immediately.
$1000 monthly.
305-751-6232

HOMESTEAD AREA
Brand new two bedrms, two
baths, washer/dryer inside.
Secion. 8 OK! 305-720-8222

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bdrms, two baths, 786-
287-0864 or 786-337-5853.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
* Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly. Call 954-798-
6808.

MIAMI LAKES AREA
Spacious four bedrooms,
three baths, central heat, air.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-431-8195

N. Miami Beach
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, washer and dryer,
central air. $1475 Section 8
OK. NCREALTY 305-710-
8915

NEAR MIAMI CENTRAL
HIGH
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, new building.
305-685-6795

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five bedrooms and den,
three bathrooms, central air,
family dining, living and laun-
dry room. Section 8 okay!
$1950 monthly.
Call 305-992-6496

Northwest Area
Large four bedrooms, one
bath, remodeled, central air.
Section 8 Welcome.
786-234-1621

Northwest Area
Two one bdrm., $650 mthly
utilities included, $700 to
move in, 305-525-0619.

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Six homes to choose from,
Three and four bedrooms, .
two baths, $1000 to $1300,
air, bars, $2500 to $3250
move in. No Section 8. Terry
Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

STOP!!!
Behind in Your Rent? 24 Hour
notice Behind in Your Mort-
gage? Kathy. 786-326-7916

Two bedrooms, large Florida
room. Available Friday.
305-751-3498, 305-742-8148


2461 N.W. 152 Street
Cute Miami Gardens home,
two bedrooms, one bath. First
last and security. No Section
8. $1100 monthly.
305-986-8395



54 St N.E. 1 Ave
$150 weekly.
Call 786-287-2942

Miami Gardens
Rooms and efficiency, for
rent.
305-300-7783


900 N.W. 54th Street



CHURCH FURNITURE
Musical items and more for
sale. 786-355-1605.


fir I _'


3211 N.W. 169 Terrace
Owner Financing No Credit
Check. Three bedrooms,
pool, central air. $2500 down
and $1699 monthly. Needs
Tender Loving Care.
786-306-4839

Boarding House
1430 N.W. 68 Street
12 bdrms 2 addlrooms. Great
for Recovery Programs,
Halfway House or Rooming
house. Currently occupied.
Immediate revenue of over
$4000 mthly or $48,000 year-
ly. 786-351-8109.

MIAMI GARDENS BEAUTY
GREAT DEAL $229K
Be in your new home by the
holidays! Over 2,000 sq. ft.,
corner lot, three bedrooms,
two baths, two large family
rooms, well maintained home,
call Sharletta at
954-588-6222

Rent to Own or Owner
Will Finance, Must Sell!
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, 1855 NW 132nd
Street, call 786-488-8617.

Three bedrooms, one bath,
completely renovated, no
closing cost. $2k down, low
monthly payments. Please
Call Daniel 954-444-6403

YES!' YES!I! YES!!i
HERE'S HELP
To Own Your Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65.000
On Any Home
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP??9
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty






GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

HANDYMAN
Roof repairs, painting, water
proofing, windows, doors,
floors. Call 786-260-4722

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in car-
pet, plumbing, doors, cabinet
moving and lawn service.
305-801-5690

PROFESSIONAL
HANDYMAN
I do it all!!! Electrical, plumb-
ing, drywall, remodeling,
hurricane shutters, and much
more. Don't believe me call
305-632-7837.



OWN WIRELESS BUSI
NESS!
Earn residual income, btxs-
tore.com, call 305-796-6642



BABYSITTING
6:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Mon.-Fri.,
infants and up, starting at $50
per week, for more informa-
tion call 305-505-3145.





CEO LEVEL INCOME
Don't Believe It, Don't Look!
ProsperousAndPaid.com

Need a knowledgeable
nurse now?
Experienced CNA with hos-
pital and nursing home exp.
willing to care for sick or el-
derly, night or day, car, and
references, call Patricia 786-
955-6162.

Roofers and Office Staff
New roofing company look-
ing for roofers of all trades
and personnel for office
work. Call 561-716-3018
or email
dove@paradisemgt.com.

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 anHour


We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times







8BLAC KS MUST CONTROL TlI-lR OW\N DESTINY
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Citigroup to cut another 53,1 jobI


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weeAs /thlfint
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(w6st of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


C a sif e d


INCREDIBLE
INCOME OPPTY. FOR
MOTIVATED PEOPLE OVER 55
My company does Reverse
Mortgages and Unsecured
Business Loans. Huge public
demand! Reverse Mortgages
are a blessing to homeowners
over 62, and those trying to
get by on social security. My
loans are $150K + no fees
and no tax returns. Its rela-
tively easy to get for anyone'in
business. WORK YOUR OWN
schedule! NO experience or
license necessary! I teach you
everything at no cost. I also di-
vide my money with you every
week. This is something you
can build a career on. If your
tired of placing your goals on
pause, immediately call Alan
at 863-529-4001.


YARD SALE
736 NW 59 St, Miami
Sat., Nov. 22, 6:30 a.m.-12
noon. Furniture, Crystal,
Bench Press Set.

INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234

Be a Security Guard $60
786-334-2084. Or renew li-
cense $60 with ad, 40 hours
$110, G or concealed $150.

REPAIRS
Commercial, residential inte-
rior and exterior repairs. 24
Hour Service.
On Point Inc. 786-487-4601


- CHASE 0





Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


inAvailable from Commercial News Providers


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Advi,,sr On BuIriines. M rrjn e and L' .'e Affair
Reliiiug H, ly W ,i HiHep, TrI e S,:i l Ari AIlil
D Rem'rove Sut1riri',g Arid Bad Luck Fromrr ', our Bo(
he II Call uur Eriemi BB,, r'ljan rie j Tell ',ouu Wl
o Keep Awav., Fri-Im Wh3l 'i ,ur EEves See. Your Hea
Aust Believe The Touch 01 Her Hand Will Help Yo
;he Has, The God Given Power To Help By Prayers


1435 NE 135 SL, North Miami
305-893-4481


In hu oa8 tsS"r oII4 k' ,mI&tA o - i mil

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Proposals will be received by The Housing Authority of the City of Miami Beach
(HACMB) for RFP #1-2008 for Banking/Investment Services, until Thursday,
December 18, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. The RFP package will be available from
HACMB Executive Office, 200 Alton Road, Miami Beach, FL 33139 starting
on Monday, November 17, 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Questions may be directed in
writing to Matthew Garwick, Operations Manager.

The HACMB reserves the right to accept any proposal deemed to be in the best
interest of the HACMB, to waive any informality in any proposal, to reject any or
all proposals, or to advertise for new proposals. HACMB does not discriminate
on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, or disability.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTION
Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Resolution R-1135-08 adopted on
November 13, 2008, by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade
County, Florida, notice is hereby given of a special run-off election on
December 16, 2008, for the office of Property Appraiser:
PROPERTY APPRAISER
(Vote for One)


Pedro J. Garcia
Gwen Margolis


All qualified electors residing within the boundaries of Miami-Dade County
shall be eligible to vote for these candidates.
The polls shall be open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. on the day of the special
election. This special election shall be conducted in accordance with
applicable provisions of general law relating to special elections and the
provisions of the Miami-Dade County Home Rule Charter.


Lester Sola
Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade County, Florida


MIAMI 3
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ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.
A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Hlaleah. FL.
"u i-ne .As 103 St.)
I'P1 i P Tl t; ii' n11 M) ad

305-824-8816
305-362-4611


SThe Georgia
Witch Doctor
& Root Doctor
Powerful Magic
I Remove evil spells, court and jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.
Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown
P.O. Box 50964 Albany GA. 31705


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008











110 banks have asked for $170B under bailout plan


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


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Oldest private Black university in US cuts jobs


WILBERFORCE,
Ohio The nation's
oldest private, histori-
cally Black university
is cutting jobs and re-
ducing salaries to close
a $2.8 million budget
shortfall.
Wilberforce Univer-
sity interim president
Patricia Hardaway says
private donations, rev-




Subsrb


TODAY!


enue from thd univer-
sity endowment and
tuition have all been
hurt by the deteriorat-
ing economy.
Hardaway says the
school in Wilberforce,
Ohio, will cut six to
eight staff positions
and make $850,000 in
salary cuts.
Wilberforce is also


asking employees who
have not previously
paid into their insur-
ance fund to contrib-
ute a small amount.
The university has
about 800 students.
Its total annual op-
erating budget was
$15.6 million before
the cuts.


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional,. Sale & Conlidenlial Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
" ABORTION START $180 AND UP
305-621-1399


I


I
The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to commission one (1) or more firms for each of the following professional disciplines as
Special Projects Consultant (SPC), in two categories, as noted below:


TIER 1 PROJECTS UP TO $250,000
(Construction Cost):
SPC Structural Engineer


TIER 2 PROJECTS UP TO $1,000,000
(C ostruon Cost):
SPC Structural Engineer
SPC Electrical Engineer
SPC Mechanical Engineer
SPC Civil Engineer


These professional services are intended for miscellaneous projects in which construction cost does not exceed the category limits, for study activity for
which the fee does not exceed the statutory limit (currently $50,000), or for work of a specified nature. Successful firms will be commissioned for a period
of four (4) years, with the second, third and fourth years at the option of the Board.
MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE on MONDAY. DECEMBER 1. 2008. at 1:30PM: The Department of A/E Selection,
Negotiations and Design Management will conduct a mandatory Pre-proposal Conference for Tier 1 and Tier 2 firms and all SPC disciplines at
the South Florida Educational Federal Credit Union, located at 1498 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida 33132, 2nd Floor Conference
Room. Submittals by firms not represented at the Pre-proposal Conference will not be considered.
The scope of professional services will consist primarily of the preparation of design and construction contract documents for projects performed'by
in-house forces, Job Order Contractor, General Contractors, Construction Manager at-Risk or Term Bid Contractors, and encompass, primarily, single
discipline projects for remodeling, renovations and/or repairs. However, each applicant firm shall submit as a complete professional services team (i.e.
architect and civil, structural, mechanical and electrical engineers). Thorough knowledge of State Requirements for Educational Facilities and the Florida
Building Code is required. Applicants must be capable of producing CAD drawings either in-house or through subcontractors, at no additional cost to the
Board.
The Board reserves the right to limit the number of concurrent SPC contracts held by a single firm. The Board does not guarantee any minimum number of
projects or any specific construction dollar value. Work will be assigned on the basis of each firm's workload, qualifications for the task, and performance
on previous assignments.
Successful applicants will be required to sign agreements that contain minimum professional liability insurance coverage of $250,000 for Tier
1 and $1,000,000 for Tier 2. Successful applicants will be required to comply fully with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 "Jessica Lunsford
Act" and all Board Rules and procedures as applicable.
Interested firms may obtain Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) "Procedures for the Selection ofArchitectural/Engineering Projects
Consultant (APC/EPC)", with all current, pertinent information and required submittal forms at the address listed below, or accessed on the
MDCPS' website at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/default.aspx?id=ae.solicitations.
Firms must submit a Letter of Interest, the most current version of U.S. Government General Services Administration (GSA) Form 254
(with color photographs of sample recent projects) and GSA Form 255, and MDCPS' questionnaires. Incomplete submittals will not be
evaluated and the firm will be disqualified.
Additionally, applicants must submit Form 254 for each prime and sub-consultant in the following disciplines: architecture, landscape
architecture, electrical, mechanical, structural and civil engineers. Applicants shall also include a list of any annual (term) professional services
contracts the applicant firm has with public agencies (include type of services provided, beginning and ending dates of each term contract, and
the dollar value of each project completed under each term contract) in their Form 254.
Applicants for SPC Structural Engineering must select one of the two categories noted above and clearly state either "Tier 1" or
"Tier 2" on their submittal package cover and in their Letter of Interest. Small businesses are encouraged to apply for the "Tier 1
SPC Structural Engineer" Category. SPC-Structural Engineer firms will be evaluated for either Tier 1 or Tier 2 contracts, but not both. It
is the Board's intention to align the anticipated contracts with each firm's capabilities.
Only one submittal per discipline will be accepted per applicant, either as a single prime firm, or as a part of a joint venture. If the applicant
is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint venture agreement must be submitted with the application. Percentage participation fees must
be clearly stated for each joint venture partner in the joint venture agreement.
Responses to this RFQ, consisting of one (1) original bound submittal and six (6) bound copies of the submittal, must be received at the
following address, no later than 4:00 p.m..LoctalTimeues, a Decemer 9,2008;
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A, Administrative Director
School Board Administration Building (SBAB)
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132
Telephone: (305) 995-4500 Facsimile: (305) 995-2050

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educational programs/activities and employment and
strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.
Any firm or individual whose contract has been terminated by the Board "with cause" will not be considered for commissioning under this RFQ.
Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted for all Requests for Qualifications beginning with issuance of the
Legal Advertisement and ending when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a contract, to reject
all responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as
provided for under the referenced School Board Rule, in addition to any other penalty provided by law.
Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, or in accordance with
120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.
School Board Rules may be accessed on the web at www.dadeschools.netyboard/rules.


VISTA ALEGRE APARTMENTS
A SUBSIDIZED HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY
Applications are now being accepted for the very low income elderly, 62 years
and over, on a "first come, first serve" basis, to be placed on the waiting list.
Applicants may appear in person, between the hours of 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM, at
2235 SW 8111 Street, Miami, Florida 33135, or request an application by mail
CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD (305) 643-2079
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
SPECIAL PROJECTS CONSULTANT (SPC) FIRMS


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


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10D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 19-25, 2008


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Copyrighted Material...._


" Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


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INVITATION TO BID BID DATE 12/10/08 2:00 P.M.
Scope includes:
The School Board of Broward County, Florida Mirror Lake Elementary
School:
New Food Service Multipurpose Building, Remodeling & Site Improvements
Construct a new one story cafeteria/kitchen/multipurpose building, remodel ex-
isting into music lab and classrooms; demolish building #2 and #3, provide fire
protection for main building #1 and replace fire alarm for entire campus; pro-
vide emergency generator; upgrade/expand chiller plant; provide new bicycle
storage compound; provide new water main crossing adjacent roadway, con-
struct new play courts, propane gas storage, provide new lift station, service
yard and additional parking.
Scopes include selective site demo, earthwork, utilities, paving, fence, side-
walks,' site concrete, landscaping & irrigation, masonry, structural steel, misc.
metals, rough & finish carpentry, roofing, overhead coiling doors, doors, frames
& hardware, glass, drywall, paint, stucco, VCT flooring, ceramic and quarry
tile, acoustical ceiling, specialties, canopy systems, projection screens, folding
panel partitions, signage, equipment, cold storage rooms, food service equip-
ment, plumbing, HVAC and electrical.
Plans are available for qualified subcontractors.
MBE/WBE Participation Goals apply. Level II Security Clearance required per
the Jessica Lunsford Act.
Drawings will be available upon written request to:
Moss & Associates
Construction Managers
Attn. Chris Holzworth
2101 N. Andrews Ave. Suite 300
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33311
Phone: 954.524.5678
Fax: 954.712.5999
Bids are due no later than 12/10/08 2:00 p.m. Faxed copies are accept-
able.
The Construction Manager reserves the right to waive irregularities and to re-
ject any or all proposals for any reason. The Construction Manager will evalu-
ate all proposals and will award the Contract in accordance with the projects
best interest.


til mlk~


Who Cares


What Black People Think


Anyway?

If you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think, think again.Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you.
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote.And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you,you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


Think about it


I




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