Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00571
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: November 12, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00571
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231
Classification: lcc - Newspaper

Full Text





Special Commemorative Presidential Election Edition


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Martin Luther King, Jr.
Civil Rights Icon


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LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UlIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
GAT,:'SVILLE FL 32611-7007


Barack Obama
President-Elect


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Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutainur In lllis


DI STRIBUTED


IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 12





CHANGE

we must create

What Obama's election will and

won't mean for Black people


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


PAS


OF


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


POWER


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Barack Obama's election to
the United States presidency
will almost certainly help im-
prove race relations in the
United States, but those gains
will come at a price, and some
of Obama's most loyal
supporters are bound
to be disappointed.,
The election of a
Black president
is rightly seen S
as a triumph of I
the Civil Rights q'
Movement, but
the Civil Rights
Movement has
always had loftier
goals than simply elect-
ing a Black president, an ac-
complishment thought out
of reach as recently as a year
ago.
Traditionally, the civil-rights
movement has had two chief
aims; the removal of the axi-
omatic "glass ceiling," and the
redress of past grievances, or
"ensuring the political, social,
and economic equality of all
people," as the NAACP would
have it.
President Obama has shat-
tered the glass ceiling.
His victory, however, will re-
sult in no redress of past griev-
ances. He cannot ask for it and
survive politically and Presi-


dent Obama is a shrewd politi-
cian. To be certain, 95 percent
of Black voters supported him,
but Blacks remain a mere 13.
percent of the electorate.
Blacks can reasonably lay
claim to 13 percent of Presi-
dent Obama's attention.
They will receive less.
Obama will be obliged
to distance himself
from the Black
community early
in his presi-
dency. Any spe-
S 0 cific calls for
redress, any
reference to the
continued so-
cial or economic
disparity between
Blacks and Whites will
elicit charges of favoritism
from Whites.
A more likely path for
Obama, (and one for which he
laid groundwork during his
campaign) will be to link the
suffering of urban Black com-
munities with that of similarly
suffering rural White ones (Ap-
palachia, for example), and ask
Congress for restorative public
policy designed to affect both.
Obama will seek to transition
from "post-racial" candidate to
"post-racial" president.
President Obama will ease
some of the burdens that keep
many Blacks in poverty to be
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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Teachers and parents will

share blame if schools close

Seven of our local schools may face closure as early
as next year if they fail to earn at least a "C" grade
from the state, and improve students' FCAT scores
in reading and mathematics.

The closure of these schools would be an even greater
disservice to our community's youth than the woeful job
they are doing at educating them.

To the school district's credit, they do seem to recognize
that there is a problem at these schools, but they have given
the schools five years to show improvement. This is an overly
generous amount of time. A child could go from grades 1-5
in that time- at a school known to be failing its students.
This is embarrassing.

Now, finally, the School District has provided the schools
with reading, math, and science coaches, and added teacher
training as well. This is a wonderful start, but now that
they've demonstrated that they are willing to spend money
to resolve this issue, why not take the next step and do
so competently? Given the wealth of support the School
District is willing to give our ailing schools; it should be a
fairly simple matter to turn them around.


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IoSSN 0739-0319
Published Weel-Iat, 31 900 ri v'Y Ji Streel
Miamri, Florida 33127-1818
Post Ohice Bc, 270200
Buena Vista Stalion, Miami Florida 33127
Phone 305.694.6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES Founder 192.3-1968
GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Edilc,r 1972 1982
GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Publ.,her Emrenius
RACHEL J. REEVES, Pub.iisher and Chairn,an


I - i s It IV


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rales- One Year $45.00 Six Months $30 00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales lax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O Box 270200
Buena Visla Sialion. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
Tn.? Blac'k Press. Tihee. Ihai America can beaSI lead he word from rac il and national aniago'nism when it accords to
e er*, peron regardless l 0 ace creed or coicTr his or her numan art legal rights Haling no pe-rson leanna no person the
Bieci' Fress siriue, to help every person in Thre ihrm behel hal all persons are hun a. long as anyone is neld bac k.

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Simple, because we already know what works.


The Knowledge is Power Program, or KIPP, is a network
of free, open-enrollment, college preparatory public schools.
Eighty percent of their students are low-income. Ninety
percent are Black or Hispanic. More than 80 percent of KIPP
students go on to college.

Students at KIPP schools attend classes from 7:30 a.m.,
to 5 p.m., and instructors are held directly responsible for
the academic performance of their charges. Of course KIPP
schools are Charter schools, and the School District cannot
replicate their system exactly (there simply aren't enough
teachers), but they can ask that their schools get as close to
this model as possible.

At Larkdale Elementary School (the sole Broward-County
School facing possible closure) the school day was extended
by three hours. Larkdale.is moving in the right direction.

A chief difficulty with our school ratings system, tied in
with the federal No Chil Ji Jt Behyjalaw, is that it measures
schools, but not individual teachers. One idea mentioned
occasionally, but seemingly never acted upon, is merit pay
for teachers. Our instructors are paid to teach. Those who
teach well should be paid well. On the other hand, those
whose students consistently perform poorly on standardized
tests should find work elsewhere. Essentially, we should be
giving our teachers more money, but in return we should
demand more accountability.

These two small changes (the second, being probably the
more difficult to implement) should help our schools hold up
their end of their bargain with the community.

In turn, we need to hold up our end.

A recent study conducted by the New York University Child
Center found that without regard to income, or racial or
cultural background, the single most important factor to a
student's education is a home environment where education
a priority.

According to the study, the children of involved parents
are absent less frequently, behave better while in school,
do better academically, go farther in school, and end up at
better colleges than their schoolmates with less involved
parents.

If we are to (rightfully) demand the best results of our
teachers and our schools, it is imperative that we demand
the best from ourselves as well. No matter how dynamic and
engaging a child's teacher is, that child needs to be present
in class to learn. Further, behavioral problems, that could
be remedied (or prevented entirely) with a bit of discipline
at home slow down entire classrooms. A bit of time spent
with your child can go a long way in this regard. Simple
activities, such as reading aloud with children at an early
age, checking homework daily, or even just discussing the
course material with them for a few minutes a day, can yield
remarkable educational benefits.

Increasing the length of the school day, coupled with
rewarding instructors who do their jobs well (and replacing
those who do not) may turn an "F" school to a "C" school in
a single year, but we want our students to be "A" students.
The schools can only do so much. Parents need to become
more involved.

\'HEN THE NEWS MATTLR.- TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR N1 \'si'PI H1


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Available from Commercial News Providers -


Miami-Dade schools face a potential
$122 million deficit from problems in the
Budget and an expected state requirement
for schools to spend less. Some parents
are complaining that our school board is
run more like a country club than an ef-
ficient school system. They charge an in-
flated central office with too many chiefs
and not enough Indians. Stay tuned.

A lot of people are still unhappy with
that deal that Gov. Charlie Crist has
cooked up to buy the U.S. Sugar Corp
in Clewiston for $1.75 billion. The deal
has now been negotiated for Big Sugar to
keep the mill, a citrus processing plant
and the railroad to slash about $400 mil-
lion off the price. With the economy in the
toilet many people are afraid of all that


debt.


We thought capers like this only hap-
pened in Miami-Dade, but look what's go-
ing on in our nation's capital. Three years
behind schedule and almost $360 million
above budget, the Capitol Visitor Center
prepares to open to millions of tourists
and the public on Dec. 2. The final cost of
the project was $621 million, more than
double the $265 million estimated cost
had the center been completed on sched-
ule in December 2005.

It took 108 years, but the Miami Wom-
an's Club, once the standard for South-
ern code and culture, has finally offered
an apology to African-Americans for dis-
crimination during its long history. Doro-


thy Fields, whose stepfather James McK-
ellar, was the club head caretaker for 50
years accepted the apology. The club ac-
cepted its first Black member in 1995.

City and county commissioners have
gone wild in spending money that we
don't have. There might be some surpris-
es when the next vote on the new base-
ball stadium comes up. Stay tuned.

Friends are happy to see Metro Com-
missioner Audrey Edmondson working to
save the much-needed community orga-
nization of MMAP that seemed to be suf-
fering from poor leadership. Lets hope
she gets something worked out because
Miami-Dade is suffering now from a stag-
nant economy.


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


TOe fiami Ttm
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper.
Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone
number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770;
Email: miamiteditorial(@cbellsouth.net.,


.... ..... .. .


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INSIDE


BLACKS MUST CONTROL T HEIR OWN DESTINY


FRONT


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PAGE


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


Black youth help cinch Obama's

Three local young leaders play a
significant role in making history


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn
When genial Florence Moss,
president of Miami-Dade Young
Democrats, brashly took cen-
ter stage at the District 109
political forum at Miami-Dade
College this past summer,
she was "Fired Up and Ready
To Go." The winsome Moss's
goal was to get as many young
people to the polls as possible,
preventing a repeat of 2004,
when 900,000 young, regis-
tered Floridian failed to vote.
America Votes Voter Access
Network (VAN), which collects
voter data across the state, re-
ported an estimated 700,000
young voters cast or mailed
their ballots in Florida for the
2008 election. Miami-Dade
Elections Department shows,
that, more than 300,000 peo-


ple showed up at the polls for
early voting and close to 70
percent voted compared with
16 percent in the primary elec-
tion.
"Never doubt a man or wom-
an who has vision and integ-
rity. I am on cloud eleven and
I am proud of the young gen-
eration because we did not
forsake our rights," said Moss,
30.
As we continue to celebrate
Barack Obama's historic vic-
tory on November 4, Moss's ef-
forts and those of many other
youth in Miami-Dade contrib-
uted to making Dr. Martin Lu-
ther King's dream come to a
reality.
A SACRIFICE FOR CHANGE
"I am very excited. I am
glad that the country decid-
ed to vote focused on the is-


GRADY WRIGHT


sues and the more qualified
candidate for the job. I am so
proud to be a part of this his-
toric time in history," said Ce-
dric McMinn, a government
relations specialist at Becker
and Poliakoff commercial law
firm.
Determined that this year's


election would have a lasting
impact on his generation, Mc-
Minn, 30, took time off from
his job to travel to Tampa to
help the Obama headquar-
ters with the campaign.
"Because of Obama's win, I
hope that from here on poli-
tics will change. People will


begin to look at who will lead
this country in the right di-
rection rather than use po-
litical tactics to distract from
the issues at hand," said Mc-
Minn, chided by Sen. John
McCain's last minute political
devices against Obama within
the past couple of weeks.


victory
McMinn says that one of
the things that should be at
the top of Obama's agenda is
the economy. With the holi-
days approaching, consum-
ers have come to realize that
they will not be able to spend
as much as they desired.
They will travel less, he says.
He believes that Obama's vic-
tory stems from people vot-
ing based on the economy
and Obama's plan to improve
it. Obama's pick for his eco-
nomic advisor and secretary
of treasurer is crucial within
the coming weeks says Mc-
Minn.
THE SMALL THINGS MATTER
Grady Wright, a legislative
aide for Rep. Dorothy Ben-
dross-Mindingall (D-FL 109),
organized an Early Voters Rally
at Florida Memorial University,
a few weeks before the election.
Although the student turn-
out was low, Wright, 27, man-
aged to gather elected officials
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4A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


What should Barack Obama do first as President?


SAMUEL GAY, 20
Student Miami

We need
jobs and col-
lege kids need
help paying
for tuition and i a, e,
books. Ev- a
ery American
needs afford- .
able health-
care so maybe we can help fight
the diseases that are plaguing
the Black community such as
HIV/AIDS, cancer, diabetes,
and obesity. I am hoping that
Obama will help the economy
by finding resources that can
help benefit our pockets.

SINGISTA THREATS, 20
Student, Liberty City

The war in
Iraq needs to '
end. Too many
of our troops
are dying. An-
other thing for *A.
me is the gov-
ernment as-
sisting college
students like myself in tuition.




OLIVER JACKSON, 39
Security Guard, Liberty City

A Black man
became presi-
dent without
having his
pants hang-
ing down to
his ankles,
using slang,
or grills in his
mouth. Our mentality needs
to change into a better view
for every young Black man in


America. Before we can move
forward, we have to go back
and bring unity among our-
selves so we can help each oth-
er. We are too afraid to be great
so Obama showed us that it is
ok to be great. In order for the
whole world to respect us, we
have to first respect ourselves.
For the past eight years, Bush
has shown us that his policies
do not work for us. This change
that Obama has been talking
about starts with us. Obama
has opened the door but all we
need to do is walk in.

DAVID INGRAHAM, 52
Miami-Dade County, Liberty City

The [George] Bush admin-
istration has --u.
put us in the I
hole and our
problems have
become global.
These big time
politicians
have been
concerned
with their personal gain. I hope
Obama is different. I agree with
Obama that the rich are eating
more than the poor. I am proud
that Obama won but I hope
that his actions will back up his
words. The economy is so bad
that the people who were doing
right are now doing wrong in
order to support their family.

ICE-T AVANT, 49
Entrepreneur, Miami


Healthcareis
a big thing for
me because so
many people
are getting sick
in this coun-
try and since
they are un-
insured, they


don't have access to medica-
tion. Obama should help small
business owners in maintain-
ing their businesses. Education
needs to be a first class ticket
to reform. The teachers need a
raise and the next generation of
corporate America need more
educational resources. Addi-
tionally, bring the boys home
from Iraq. A mother should not
have to bury another child be-
cause of the senseless war. We
need to stop funding something
that we don't believe in and in-
vest the money elsewhere.


BREAN MILLER, 46
Operator, Liberty City

We need
jobs because
there are a
lot of unem-
ployed people
in this coun-
try right now.
Employers are
not willing to
hire anyone
because they are lacking re-
sources. No jobs leads to more
crimes and innocent ones are
suffering. Most importantly,
there need to be some funds
put aside so that banks can
create programs to help people
facing foreclosure. I am expect-
ing great things to happen and
change that we haven't seen in
a long time. We also need pro-
grams to help single mothers
and their kids.


If you would like to suggest a Street
Talk question email Sandra Charite
at scharite@miamitimesonline.com
or
call her at 305-694-6216


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A child shall lead them


By Nirvi Shah

Had it been up to South
Florida public school stu-
dents to decide the winner of
the presidential election, they,
too, would have put Barack
Obama in the White House.
Of about 67,000 students
who cast "ballots" in Bro-
ward, an overwhelming 76


percent chose Obama.
In Miami-Dade, of near-
ly 81,000 kids who voted,
Obama won by an even great-
er margin: 79 percent.
Broward students in gen-
eral favored Democrats in all
the races they voted in, in-
cluding Raul Martinez over
Republican Lincoln Diaz-
Balart for a seat in the U.S.


..House of Representatives.
Voters, however, favored Di-
az-Balart.
Broward voters generally fa-
vored Democrats, too, except
for one notable exception:
Republican Sheriff Al Lam-
berti won a four-year term.
But 57 percent of Broward
students chose his opponent,
Democrat Scott Israel.


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One Black man had to die for another Black man to win
Interesting photo comparison of Michelle Obama watching her husband speak, and Coretta
Scott King at her husband's funeral.The controversial caption is "One Black Man Had To Die
For Another Black Man To Win."


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


Blacks, whiles meet at historic crossroad


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CHANGE
continued from 1A
certain. A fairer tax code and
improved educational systems
will lay the groundwork for the
impoverished to lift themselves
up. Lowering the expense, and
raising the quality of health
care will remove another un-
necessary burden, but poor
Whites and poor Blacks will
benefit equally. Obama cannot
be the Black president and ex-
pect a second term. He must be
the American president.
Expect to hear more of this:
"We've got to transmit that
to the next generation and I
guess the point that I'm
making is that the civil rights
movement wasn't just a fight


against the
oppressor;
it was also a
fight against
the oppres-
sor in each of
us," [March
4, 2007 Sel-
ma, A 1 a -
bama] OBAMA
Barack
Obama has,
by his example, shown Ameri-
ca and the world that while the
path to success is steeper for
some, the United States is, fun-
damentally, a meritocracy. He
has shown us what is possible,
what can be done. His domes-
tic policy will make it easier for
Blacks to do well for ourselves.
But he will not do it for us.










7A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


L 31 icks MusT CONTROL THEIR ESTINY


First town hall meeting for F schools at Carol City


Students, parents and faculty crammed the
auditorium to address the possibility of closure


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Parents, school officials and
students gathered on Monday
night at Miami Carol City Senior
High School, 3422 Northwest
187th Street, not to attend a
PTA meeting or a football game
but a town hall meeting to dis-
cuss the possibility that Carol
City could close down, if they
don't improve by the end of the
school year.
For the past two years, Carol
City High received F's in their
school performance grades.
Miami Gardens Mayor Shir-
ley Gibson, Miami-Dade School
Board member Wilbert "Tee"
Holloway, Jeffery Hernandez,
Florida Department of Educa-
tion along with Dr. Marcos M.
Moran, Region Superintendent
for District 1, and Carolyn "Ki-
ani" Nesbitt, Founder and CEO
of Concerned African Women
convened to address any con-
cerns that the community might
have regarding Carol City cur-
rent status.
In the beginning of 2008-09
school year, Carol City High
principal Kim Cox switched
places with Carol City Middle
principal Nelson Izquierdo. Cox
is the new principal at the mid-
dle school while Izquierdo is the


lead administrator at the high
school. The move was the re-
sult of a state mandate that if
a school received D's or F's for
two consecutive years, then the
principal would be moved to an-
other school due to lack of im-
provement.
"The goal in Miami Gardens is
that our schools will be a B or
better," said Dr. Holloway.
Carol City is 35 points from
receiving a D and 75 points from
receiving a C, according to Hol-
loway. School officials believe
that their goal is attainable.
Currently, Carol City is not an
intervene school because it has
been improving, according to
Hernandez.
"In order for a school to be
placed on intervening status,
it would have to demonstrate a
decrease in state mastery level
in Reading and Mathematics or
having a non-proficiency rate in
Reading and Mathematics by 65
percent or more," said Hernan-
dez. "In addition, it has to be a
school that becomes a chronic F
school or a repeating F status."
Last year, Carol City was la-
beled as one of the 15 "Drop-
out Factories" in Miami-Dade.
"Dropout Factories" are schools
where 60 percent or less of the
students who begin as freshmen
successfully make it to their se-


Concerned parents, students, and faculty of Carol City High
the information given by school officials.


nior year.
The school district has re-
ceived a $6.5 million grant from
the state to assist those schools
with students who are strug-
gling to perform academically.
Since Carol City has not been in
the "school in need of a status"
for more than two years, they
were not part of the grant.
"Accountability belongs to ev-
erybody but if the state contin-
ues to send unfunded mandates
down to the school level and they
continue to cancel electives and
the things that make students
want to come to school, then you
don't give the students a reason


to do better or be motivated out
of their current circumstances,"
said Fedrick Ingram, a mem-
ber of United Teachers of Dade
(UTD).
Even though there was not
a seat available in the packed
auditorium, Mayor Gibson
asked the parents how many
belonged to the Parent Teacher
Association (PTA) and less than
ten hands were raised.
"There are 2048 students
in this school and if you look
around you, at the number of
parents who are members of
the PTA; that should not be. If
we are going to make this hap-


sit in the audience listening to


pen, parents, you have to join
the PTA and the school im-
provement plan. This is going
to require some of your time.
If there are over 2000 students
here and as many parents we
have in this audience, there
were not even ten that said that
they are members of this school
PTA. It is your responsibility to
do so," said Mayor Gibson. "It
is about accountability. If you
don't love them, don't get mad
if no else loves them."
A parent, who abruptly left
during the meeting, confronted
the members of the panel with
allegations that they wanted to


close down the historic Carol
City and rename it, which ac-
cording to some would be dev-
astating to a community filled
with alumni.
Mayor Gibson denied the ru-
mor, saying that there were
no plans to rename Carol City
High. Gibson said that renam-
ing the school was not part of
the agenda for the night, that
the focus is the students' edu-
cation.
"These are our kids. Though
times are rough in our econo-
my, if we lose them now then
we lose them forever. It makes
no sense with all these parents
that came out tonight that we
are not able to get involved,"
said Beverly Johnson, a con-
cerned parent.
The panel will reconvene to-
day at Miami Norland Senior
High, 1050 Northwest 195th
Street, to also discuss with
parents and teachers the clos-
ing of schools. In the mean-
time, Miami-Dade Superinten-
dent of Schools Alberto Car-
valho is also set to meet with
members of community today
at the Joseph Caleb Center
Auditorium, 5400 N.W. 22 Av-
enue, to talk about the four
low-performing schools in the
area. They include Miami Cen-
tral Senior High, Miami Edison
Senior High, Holmes Elemen-
tary and Liberty City. Both
meetings will begin promptly
at 6 p.m.


Commissioner Moss fights to ban cell phone usage in school zones


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Miami-Dade County Com-
missioner Dennis C. Moss is
sponsoring a resolution in the
Florida Legislature to ban the
use of any talking, text mes-
saging, or other wireless com-
munication devices while mo-
torists are driving in school
zones.
"We have to be focused as
adults as drivers. We have pre-
cious students in the particu-
lar school zones so we have to
be careful. We can't afford to


be distracted while driving, es-
pecially in a school zone," said
Moss.
Several weeks ago, Robert
Sanchez, the engineer of a
Southern California commut-
er train, ran a red light and
slammed into a freight train
killing 25 people and injuring
more than 130 others. Authori-
ties reported that the engineer
was text-messaging on his cell
phone when the crash took
place.
Moss was driving through a
school zone with his wife, Mar-
garet, and she brought to his


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attention the number of people
who were riding through the
school zone candidly distracted
on their cell phones. She told
him that something needed to
be done about that. Moss says
that hearing about the com-
muter train crash in Southern
California causes you to be-


come concerned locally.
"You should not be using
your cell phone or text message
while folks are in the school
zones," said Moss.
California, Connecticut, New
Jersey, New York, Washington
and the District of Columbia
and the Virgin Islands all have


laws that prohibit the use of
a handheld cell phone while
operating a \vehicle. Alaska,
California, ,Connecticut, Loui-
siana, Minnesota, New Jersey,
Washington and the District of
Columbia forbid motorist from
text messaging while driving.
Last June, Cellular Telecom-


munications & 'Internet Asso-
ciation reported that close to
300 million people in the U.S.
were wireless subscribers and
at least 75 billion texts were
being sent monthly.
Moss is awaiting the Board
of Commissioners' approval of
the bill.


MIAMI-DADE
=, 12HI


TRANSIT FUTURE


Join County officials at the


People's Transportation Plan Summit


Find out what the People's Transportation Plan (PTP) has accomplished

and what challenges and choices we now face as a community moving
forward. Don't miss this opportunity to share your ideas with us.


Saturday, November 15, 2008
8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Convention Center at the Miami Mart Airport Hotel
711 NW 72 Ave., Miami, FL 33126


Free bus service will be available from the following locations departing at 8 a.m.:
Golden Glades Park & Ride lot
Palmetto Metrorail Station
Florida International University SW 107th Ave. and 16th St.
Dadeland North Metrorail Station
Washington Ave. and Lincoln Rd. in Miami Beach
To take advantage of this free bus service, you must call 786-469-5550
or send an email to mdtoutreach@miamidade.gov.
For additional information, call 311.

A complimentary Continental breakfast and a light lunch will be provided.


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9A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


In


A City


Transformation


With new performance spaces and signature events like Art Basel Miami Beach,
Miami's arts scene is reaching critical mass.


To help transform Miami into a world-class cultural destination, the John S. and
James L. Knight Foundation is investing an additional $40 million in the arts.
This year, we asked for the best ideas for the arts in South Florida and 1,643 were
submitted. Find out the winners on Dec. 1, at www.KnightArts.org.


Join us in supporting our burgeoning local arts scene and building a better South
Florida.

11 John S. and James L.
Knight Foundation
www.knightfoundation.org


The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation promotes journalism excellence worldwide and invests in the vitality of communities
in the United States where the Knight brothers owned newspapers. Knight Foundation invests in ideas and projects that can lead to
transformational change. Find out more at www.knightfoundation.org.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\\N DENIIN


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SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12-18 2008


Extended therapy helps drug addicted teens


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14B THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 12-18. 2008


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Send to: The Miami Times. 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


ectory


Antioch Missionary Baptist Apostolic Revival Center\
Church of Brownsville 6702 N.W. 15hAveue4
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services New timefor TV. Prograni
ChurcWSunday School 8: 30 a.m. FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
SuIIay \vOL lip Sesvice .... 10a.m .I iI" Lf' 2
Mid-Week Seovice ... Wednesday's 5 pm
Hour of Power Noon Day Pniyer ,1 rr, 12 pm u
12 p .m .- I ) 'i ,. i | L
'vn n,, [ 5 ,- '7 p10 11 .
Evening orwhip .. lp. "1 ., ,, 30gm.


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www.fri-nemlsbipmibcimia.or,
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
Hour lof Prayer ....... 6:30 a.m.
Eaily Morning Worship .7:30 a.m.
*- Sunday Schlool..........9:30 al.m.
SMornig Wahi ........ 11a.ini
YoIth Mimitry Study.....Wed... .7p.,
'- ycrBibleStudv... .Wed.....p.m.
Noonday Altar Pmycit:.(M-F)



NIt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sun ay
iChumhl Sch ol 91.30 .ii :
W o hi erie ............
Wednesday
Bible StudyaPrayer Ni1hl 7: p m,
Thursday
"There is a place for youth"


S Ebenezer United -
Methodist Church
2(X)1 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413

Sunday Moming Services
Sunday Schol -9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 &m. & 7 p m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.



F Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332

tOrderof Services:



Suni d Rchca l Tr huday S 3o' Pme
i\Sunmm mmchoom93 / am


First Baptist Missionary -T
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday School ... ...... ... 10 a.m. I
Thuday .........7 p.m. Bible Study, j
.. Prayer Meleting B.T.U.
L ; Baptism Thiirs before
[R 'First Sun. 7 ?.I)m
Communionl Firs Sun...
\ "____ ;':3QS&, 11 & a.mL. 1


/ "New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
Order of Services:
1' ,M ,mingi Worshilp.lstl&3rilSuill.
rslip ....... ... 30 l. l,
S '' Mi -i.ry... .....
S 1 e S dy .................. 8 p.m.
hilllt I Scltoa ............- 9 a,11 1.


Pembroke Park
3707 SW. 56th Avenue
(Office) 954-962-9327


/KLogos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383


Order of Services
4iindma
.1 iurll i-l u l 1 1 i ,* L a.m .
*. j, .< -*.h, .I i s a.U .
I hursdan
i..It .4 -, 1 I
Salum'da3
No Service


Word of Faith "
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081
S"% Order of Services:
.... lay Morning Services
F I'r, i School, ... 10 a.i.1
v ir-h.,, p Service..... ..... 1 i.i
Til.I .y Bible Study. ...8 p.m.
hin.1.l .* Prayer Service ......8 p.m


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon, thru Fri. Noon Daky Payer
Bible Suldy.,,Thurs.....7 pmn




B Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W, 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages


305-634-6604
Order of Services

ia r I l. , ldlic I al: ,
j .4 l is
I L. I ..... .. Spnm
., I ...... I -,,,, 56p1 .I
I "Tr'a, l'; n. 'ni ; ."<'rc .l I


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
RTuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Church of Christ
* Hollywood, FI. 33023
* (Fax) 954-962-3396


Order of Services : .
Sunday '
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. "** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Wormhip.............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday ... i general Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comca.,s Channels: 8,19, 21,22,23,30 & 37/ltocal Channels: 21 & 22
Web pageo: ww is enilrrokcparkclircliofclirist.coin miinail: peilmrokepsrkcoc (ellsoiut.ii nt


/ Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 NW. 3' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-854
Order of Services:
Sim-d y Sci oo!....l ..I 9:43 S II n
1 iiOl'lllg SI 'SI. I 1
M0 illlBTU I 30-2:30 p.ni
TIijesh *ay Biblc Sht1dy
,ii I i : ,i ..c i ayer i :i031 p In
\,I Ts'mwamrl iiai xltm mm/l ....


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76 Street, 33147
Message Ct:r: 305-836-7815

Bg ~ Order of Services:
SIm days Cfitoi ch S .lool 0 .. -10 a ft.
Worship Sevie ... I1.15 ,I iii
Tueslcdays 1hbi Class .. ... 1) m
4th Sulay vFn--llg Wolhip. 6 II n
1 mamemmwH I 11 I l em m/lri Il l 11


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685.0705
viww.ewbirthbaptist inain1.org-


/St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
m I Worship .....7:30 a.m.
M '. School ..........9:30 a.mn
y '.~I..,..m Worship ...11 a.m.
I ,';,: ermul Bible Stiudv
S........ (i N.) 7 p.mn.



Zion Hope "\
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17h Avc.
305-696-4341 Fax: 30--696-2301
Order of Services:
cjjg jaia al-i S ilnhy Sohlu l ........-.-..9_0 a nl.

Setiru WHng )li1) mlt 6 pn i.
li ^ Prayer My'ectinr & ible Sludv
\l 'Tuesday 7 p.mm
\f3SS3ESZSSS3Zr


93' Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93'd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
S30am.l Eadiy t ifMormiig\Voliip
S11 a.m Moming Worship
Evening Worship
Ist,&3rd Studay......6 pm




Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church\
17800 NW 25th Ave.
iwww. nfllernoworshipcenlter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-31.04


M


Order of Services:
Sunday Woiship Services:
7 a m. & 10 a.m.
Chlrch School: 8 30)a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.


Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 121 Ave.
305-751-9323


/ Hosanna Community -
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
S xl y School ......... 45 l.







I u \niui* Wo isi6p... 11 ann.



F 11 1*(kOrder of Services:

N lomling Worship.II 111.
I Ji2er Melkin ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Sludy .. 8 pill.
Piiu \ rioii.73)p.


/"New Shiloh M.B. Church
13.50 N.WW95 Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
.. L t [ '.1I.'rn Worship7:30a.m.
4 ',. I1nIT, Ire School 9:30 a.m.
ime. I rslhip I....11 a.m .
S | t'ic -.i \ olie Class 7 p.m.
I x-'in-' ir astSun....,7p.m.
S. M h ar ek Worship


/ Liberty City Church \
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
SundaJ Morning ... .......8 am.
S Sunda y ch30andl ............10a.m.
SL Stu.L I so er. .........Si .. 6p.m.
I 10l 11'clence ........7:30 pm.
inJ i l ,t.lesa ......... 730 p..udy
Shur, Fello hip m .........10 am.



St. Mark Missionary Christ
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
a Sunday :30 and orhip a.m.
Wosthip Service
S9:30 a Sm ..... ... sunday School
]Tuesday .... "hm. Bible Study i
] ~Jst8 p Cm ....... m a M tcint iK
Monday, Wednesday, Friday



New Vourion FChurch D Christory










MinistriCall Paula James
13650 N.E. 109 Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
idy sunday Worship _30 a1m


Ia y ra.y Meeting .30p m
wea, day Bic .SW -.- .7-30 pm.
"Not Just a Chulth But a MNi emeni l"




Join the

Religious Elite

in our Church Directory

Call Paula James
305-693-7093


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BlCSMS OT~ TERI IETN 5BTEMAITMS NVME 21,20


The word feeds the soul


Before I begin the message
of this column, allow me to
say this to you, my dear read-
ers. You should be reading this
column one week after Barack
Obama was elected President
of the United States. No matter
for whom you voted, no one can
deny that this was truly a mo-


The Liberty City Trust, in
partnership with the Veterans
Employment and Transition
Services, will host a Veteran's
Day Summit on Saturday, No-
vember 15 from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. at Charles Hadley Park.
For more information, please


mentous occasion. The num-
ber of voters alone was record
breaking. So many citizens of
this country took their respon-
sibility and privilege to vote
very seriously. I just want to
take a moment to remind you
that though it is very important
who sits in the White House, it
is even more important that we


contact Charles Cutler at 786-
487-5890 or Brandyss Howard
at 305-635-2301.

Miami-Dade Alumni Chapter
of Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity invites you to travel with
them when the Wildcats take


acknowledge and are mindful
of Who still sits on the throne.
Now, the message this week
is taken from Matthew 13:1-9
and 18-24--the parable of the
Farmer and the Seeds. I love
this parable because it is one
that every believer who spreads
the 'seed' can identify with. It
is also good to remember this
parable when we become dis-
couraged when it appears that
the seed is not producing good
fruit. In this parable, the farm-
er spread the seed, but though
he held the seed in his hand,
and distributed the seed him-
self, it fell on different ground,


on the Rattlers in Orlando on
Nov. 22. For more information,
please call 305-505-1235.

Museum of Contemporary
Art (MOCA) will be screening the
award-winning film Chai Pani,
a satire of contemporary Indian
life, on Saturday, November 15.
The film will be shown at 2 p.m.
at MOCA. Director Manu Rewal
from New Delhi will be available
after the screening for a ques-
tion and answer session.


and what happened to the seed
was different on each ground.
The seeds that fell on a path
were eaten by the birds. Some
fell in soil that was rocky, and
did sprout, but died soon after
growth. Other seed fell among
thorns, and these seeds were
choked by the thorns when
they were very tender. But some
of the seeds fell on the fertile
ground, and they not only grew
to produce a crop, but grew to
produce a bountiful crop.
We know that Jesus used
parables to convey spiritual
truths. Some pastors or theo-
logians can take His teaching



New Saint James Missionary
Church will be having a dinner
and yard sale on November 15
at 10 a.m. For more informa-
tion, please call 786-245-1592.

First annual Soul Bowl Clas-
sic Weekend Extravaganza for
the Miami Northwestern Senior
High Bulls and Miami Jackson
Senior High Generals Alumni
Class of 1972 will be held from
November 13-16. For more in-


New Christ Tabernacle MBC
Shepherd's Care Ministry
invites you to their seventh
anniversary on Sunday,
November 16 at 3:30 p.m.
For more information, please
contact Virginia Bostic at 305-
694-6211.

Love Tabernacle of God
PAWCC will host their annual


methods as examples on how
to impart the Word of God.
There are some speakers who
talk quite a bit, but unfortu-
nately don't say very much!
Jesus used 'stories' that His
audience could identify with to
explain the Kingdom of God.
He used parables that involved
farming, fishing and shepherd-
ing because the people knew
about these activities. This was
how they lived and worked. The
Apostles Paul, Peter and James
also made references to activi-
ties in which the new believ-
ers either were participants or
spectators. When Paul wrote


formation, please call 786-344-
8436 or 954-554-4801.

Concerned African Women
will be having a town hall meet-
ing today at 6 p.m. at Miami
Norland Senior High School Au-
ditorium to discuss the possible
closing of Norland High. For
more information, please call
305-621-3700.

Are you 80 years old or
older? Too many things hap-


Glory Conference from November
17-21, 7:30 p.m. nightly. For
more information, please call
786-406-5729.

Christian Restoration
Ministries International
presents their Fire Conference
starting today. It will run until
Friday, November 14, with,
nightly conferences beginning


about comparing this spiritual
race to Roman "Olympics," they
knew just what he meant.
In verses 19 23, Jesus ex-
plained what these parables
meant, and this explanation
relates to us today. I will write
about this next week, but in the
meantime, remember that the
seed is the Word of God, and
though we may speak it with
authority and power, what hap-
pens to that seed depends on
who receives it, and what they
do with it, not you. But please
keep in mind that a seed has
absolutely no chance of grow-
ing if the seed is not sown.


pen in our communities and
are not documented. Our aim
is to change that. There are
hundreds of octogenarians who
have a story to tell and thou-
sand of others who will want to
read it. If you are interested in
having your story or your rela-
tive's or friend's story told and
memorialized in the book "We
Were There, Back in the Day:"
For more information, please
contact Gigi Tinsley at 305-
798-8195.


at 7 p.m. The conference will
end on November 16 at 10 a.m.
For more information, please
call 305-655-1923.

Greater St. James Baptist
International Church will have
its 49th annual Men's Day on
Sunday, November 16 at 11
a.m. For more information,
please contact 305-693-2627.

A Mission With A New
Beginning Church would like
to establish a fellowship with
the community in their Sunday
services starting at 11:30 a.m.


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers























Broward Blacks supported same-sex vote


By Anthony Man
and John Maines

Black voters in Broward
County provided some of the
strongest support for Amend-
ment 2, which added a ban on
same-sex marriage to the Flor-
ida Constitution.
The amendment passed
statewide this week, winning
62 percent of the vote. Adding
an amendment to the consti-
tution requires a 60 percent
"yes" yote.
Support in liberal Broward
County, which has a large gay
and lesbian population, was
10 percentage points less than
the statewide vote.
Amendment 2 got a 52 per-
cent "yes" in Broward.


A Sun Sentinel analysis of
precinct-by-precinct results
in Broward found that in pre-
cincts where at least half the
registered voters are black, the
amendment got a 64 percent
"yes" vote.
Political scientists and propo-
nents of adding the same-sex
marriage ban to the constitu-
tion predicted before Election
Day that black voters drawn
to the polls in large numbers
by Barack Obama's historic
presidential candidacy would
be socially conservative and
vote for Amendment 2.
Of the 55 precincts where
at least 70 percent of the reg-
istered voters are black, all
but eight gave the proposed
amendment at least 60 per-


cent of the vote.
Of the 688 precincts where
Black voters are less than 50
percent of the registered vot-
ers, 588 gave the amendment
less than 60 percent support.
Support levels varied dra-
matically in the county.
In Wilton Manors, home to a
large gay and lesbian popula-
tion, the amendment received
just 25 percent support, with
75 percent opposed.
Greatest support came in
Sea Ranch Lakes, where 69
percent voted "yes" and 31
percent voted "no." One of
Broward's smallest munici-
palities, it's also one of the
most Republican, with 68
percent of voters registered in
that party.


%4AS m I*~ -b -fw I t0pme


Jewels Baton Twirling Academy


Fall registration is now open for the Jewels Baton Twirling Academy. We
accept children ages 4-18 of all shapes, sizes, and personalities. Classes
are held at the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center 6161 NW 22 Ave. Our
academy accepts non-experienced and experienced twirlers as well. We en-
courage all cheerleaders ending their optimist season to participate. This is
a great way to maintain your flexibility, stunting ability, and your performance
edge.

The Academy is directed by 1st Lady and Minister Tanya Jackson of the
New Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church. Minister Jackson is a youth pas-
tor and former Bethune-Cookrnan cheerleader, Northwestern majorette and
dancer. She is also a Florida Bandmaster's Association State Committee
Member and Judge.

Ms. Tanya has led the Jewels to local, national and International titles. Coach
Princess led the age 4-7 primary team to become state champions. Jewel
Angel McCray ranked 6th in the nation in her age group at Nationals in July
of 2008. We are very proud of our Jewels.

An interest meeting will be held on Thursday November 13th at 6:00 p.m. at
the Cultural Arts Center.


For more information, contact minister Jackson at

786-357-4939


Subscribe


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THlLI R OWN DESTINY


Voters speak out on Obama's victory
Compiled by Sandra J. Charite
scharitei@miiaiitimiiesoniline.com


AUDREY EDMONSON, 55
Miami-Dade Commissioner District 3,
Miami

I think that it is a momentous
occasion. I am in disbelief that
we have Ameri-
can of African
descent as
president. I am
looking for this
nation to be-
coming unified.
When you read
the newspaper
and watch television, he is the
president of the community.
Remember we cannot expect
change overnight. The nation
needs to come together. I am
expecting this economy to get
better and rebuild internation-
ally, bringing unity with other
countries.

TERRY FERNANDO NEWTON
Miami

Being reared around my
great, great grandmother,- Mrs.
Dank Elem Hawes, who lived to
be 117 years old. I learned to
never give up on hope. She lived
to see the civil rights march in
Washington D.C. in 1963. I get
to see the first Black president
elected in the United States.


STACEY BERTIL, 19
Student, Hallandale, Fl

Finally. For so long as African-
Americans, we have been com-
plaining about
the closed doors
of the past still
existing in the
present. Well,
now there is no
excuse. If we
don't advance
or progress into
our destiny, it's because we
chose not to. The White man
can no longer be a reason for
our failures and disappoint-
ments. Lastly, looking at 'the
Obama farmly makes me realize
that Black love still exists, but
we must embrace it. Black men
and women need to respect each
other, teaching our children
how to love a Black woman and
man and breaking away from
all the negatives stereotypes
created about the Black race.
On November 4, Barack Obama
challenged us to greatness. But
the question is, did we accept
the challenge?


RONALD E. FRAZIER

My first thought was endur-
ance and achievement. Blacks
in America have always achieved
against all odds, since being
brought to America from Africa
as slaves. My next thought was
the USA has finally come of age
as we as a people begin to break
the color barrier in the 21st
century. The Obama election
has now become a major mile-
stone in American history, on
par with the founding father's
Declaration of Independence,
"We The People."

Oliver Gilbert III, 36
Councilman, Miami Gardens

I think Barack Obama will
change the way that we look at
each other. I ex-
pect him to be
thoughtful and
contemplative. I
also expect him
to bring an in-
tellectual curi-
osity and smart
sense of leader-
ship that we have been miss-
ing for a while. For too long,
we have had leaders who lead
extensively and with their ideol-
ogy but I hope that he looks at
it from the perspective of "how
do we make the system work for
everybody?"

PATRICIA LOUIS, 26
Detention Deputy Sheriff
Miami

I am thrilled. I never thought
that I would be able to see this
day. My brother voted for the


first time this year. I was glad
that Barack Obama's plan for
the country was realistic in


his speech and -.:
he said that
change was not .-
going to hap- -
pen overnight. -
It is his time so t "l
let's just watch h.
him shine.

JOSEPH A. "JOE" GIBBONS, 60
State Represenative, Hallandale Beach

A Black president is a great
thing for America. It is inspira-
tional to Black
America espe-
cially to our
young people.
Obama fulfills
all the qualifi-
cations which
means the best
person got the
job. I can relate to Obama be-
cause my district is predomi-
nately Jewish and many people
thought that I could not repre-
sent them because I was Black.
For Obama to turn the ship
around, it will take time. I hope
that people don't expect too
much too soon because it is a
promise. I think that he has laid
out some good plans with sup-
port and cooperation change
will come.

MARLON HILL, 37
Attorney, Miami, Fl

I think that his victory will up-
lift the Black community, restor-
ing our place in
this world and
opening a door
for all of us to
lend a voice to
what we want
for America.
Obama chal-
lenges everyone
whose voice or profile has been
overlooked in America. It is a
new sense of consciousness,
for everyone to look forward to
whether you are a pastor or a
homeless person on the street.

BETSYTOUSSAINT, 25
Ps cahologist, Miami

The outcome of the election is
what I expected. God is good and
knows exactly
what he is do-
ing. This coun-
try is blessed
with a wonder-
ful president
full of integrity
and determina-
tion for change.
The U.S. needs to reprioritize in
our decision making and put-
ting the right things first. I am
looking forward to a change in
our economy, change in our
health care system . Just
change, change and change.

FREDERICA WILSON, 60 +
Florida Senator, Miami

I was here during the Civil
Rights Movement and I know
about the segre-
gation. I am ec-
static for many
reasons. I think
that the way
that people look
at this country
will be differ-
ent. The elec-
tion result was not even close.
His gift of eloquence, knowl-
edge and everything about him
was so admirable that people
who never dreamed about vot-
ing for a Black man changed
their minds. I can't wait until
the family moves into the White
House. I think that the way the
world views African-Americans
and Americans view African-
Americans is completely differ-
ent now. He has raised the bar
and it is up to us to reach the
bar.

PHILIPPE JOSEPH, 26
Surgical Assistant/ Surgical tech
Miami

I think that for the people
who had doubts about a Black
man running
the country,
this election I'
shocked them -
and those who "
thought it was


too good to be
true have come ...- .. --.


to realize that all things are
possible. For me personally, I
think that a Black president is
long overdue. We fought for too
long to not be given an oppor-
tunity to be a part of something
that our ancestors helped build.
This is historic and many young
people don't understand as
much as my parents or grand-
parents. His victory is our chal-
lenge to reach above the stars
despite any obstacle that comes
our way.

CHRISTOPHER NORWOOD, 36
Non-profit consultant, Miami

The results of the election are
an example of the new leader-
ship that has --""'
emerged in
this country.
His vision and
message are
positive and
realistic for the .',
young people.
His victory rep-
resents a true change in the
business of America.

ROOSEVELT MCCULLOUGH, 58
Homestead

This is the opportunity that
we have been ,- -... ....
waiting for.
Hopefully 2
Obama can get
the U.S. back
in order, but we
have to remem-
ber that it will
take time.

DADIE LESSAJE, 22
Student, North Miami

I was not surprised because
everyone knew
that he was go-
ing to win. I was
proud that a
Black man ran
for president,
but disappoint-
ed because Ba-
rack Obama is
not ready for the job.

H.T. SMITH, 61
Attorney, Miami

Barack Obama's election as
president of the United States
opens the vault
for African-
Americans.
This election
will begin to de-
construct the
negative stereo-
types that many
Whites have
had toward African-Americans.
Obama's election is a transfor-
mational moment in American
history. In his presidency, I am,
looking forward to what most
Americans are which is change
in the direction of the country.
President elect Obama has the
ability to bring together people
of all nations which unfortu-
nately under [President George
W.] Bush, he ruled by dividing
us and when you are divided
you are made vulnerable.


DAISY BLACK, 60
Community activist, Liberty City

I thought it was the most won-
derful thing that could happen
to this country. -
Iam so glad to
be a part of the
living right now.
I am expect-.
ing a big turn
around in this:
country with
the economy,
education to improve, and good
representation for the people.

NATASHA DESTIN, 18
Student, North Miami Beach

It was time for a change and it
shows that America can pull to-
gether. No one .----
ever thought .
that they would
allow a Black
man to be pres-
ident in this
country. We
pulled together


for the better. I
am expecting him to fix things
and get things back on track.


ALECIA JOHNSON, 49
Reading teacher, Miami

I believe that everything and
anything is possible and Ba-

win was phe-
nomenal and
inspiring to ev-
eryone across
the globe. I am
expecting him
to do the best __ abl I
that he is phys-
ically able to do as president.
He is a Democrat but he needs
everyone because he cannot
do it alone. Like every relation-
ship, there is going to be good
and bad but we must be able to
stay on the wagon to help bring
change to this country.

CARRIE P. MEEK, 82
Retired Congresswoman
Liberty City

I am overwhelmed with joy. I
never thought that I would see
the day where
there would be
a Black presi-
dent. He is
someone who
has knowledge
and experi-
ence. For an
African-Amer-
ican to have this opportunity;
I know that this is God sent.
Now, our children can dream
and believe that they are able to
climb mountains. We have gone
through so much of a struggle
and this makes up for it. We de-
serve every good thing that we
can get. The Black community
was very instrumental in getting
Obama into the presidency. I
am hoping that he will clean up
some of the mess that we are in
like the economy, restoring our
relationship with the rest of the
world and withdrawing troops
from Iraq.

ANTHONY STRACHAN, 46
Liberty Cin

It was worth
the wait. I am
just expecting a
change which I
know is not go-
ing to happen
right away. i-


WARREN MCKINNELLY, 49
Liberty City

I was proud about the out-
come of the election. I cried. All
of the suffer-
ing that Blacks
had to endure
throughout the
years, this is
long overdue. A
Black kid woke
up and there __
was a Black
president. I am so glad that I
lived to see this.

RICHARD DUNN, 47
Reverend, Miami

Obama's victory reminds me
of the song, "Battle Hymn of
the Republic"
by Julia Ward
because at
the end of the
song, it says, i
'Our God is
marching on.'
God allowed
us to see this.
I didn't think that it was pos-
sible in my lifetime to see a
Black president. It is a tre-
mendous feeling. I cried that
Tuesday night. I thought about
my parents and grandpar-
ents who are no longer living
and couldn't experience this
historic moment. I am look-
ing forward to more sensitiv-
ity from the White House as it
relates to people of color but
we must take responsibility on
our part too. His victory takes
away all of our excuses for
not being able to achieve our
dreams. Look at all the things
that Obama had to endure in
order to become president but
he believed that yes he could.
He did what Jackie Robin-
son and Jessie Owens did by


breaking the barrier of limita-
tions. He made progress for us
and we have gained.


SAMUEL MCNEIIL, 44
Liberty City

I think he is going to make a
great president for this coun-
try, not just ]
Black people
but Whites too.
It is time for a
change. I ex-
pect him to be
focused on the
issues in Amer-_1
ica first before
he deals with the problems
overseas.

Gail Jackson, 52
Nurse, Allapatah

I filled with. .. Unity . To-
getherness . A sense of pride
... Dignity...
A sense of fam-
ily. For the first
time in a long
time, it seemed
like the United
States came to-
gether for one
common goal.
I am looking forward to seeing
Obama and his cabinet bring us
back to the place of oneness. A
place where we realized that we
needed one another. The econo-
my needs a turnaround so that
the young people's hope can be
restored in their dreams.

DOROTHY BENDROSS-
MINDINGALL, 40+
State Representative District 3
Liberty City

What a blessing. My mom is
going to be 95 years old next
month and
she told me
that she never
thought she
could see this
day and neither
did I. I believe
that it is time.
I am a firm be-
liever that he has been sent to
bring change. I believe that this
caliber of individual \iUtl get a
lot done, but this is the season
for us to get together and help
America live up to its prom-
ise. It's our season to work. I
am a quite an observer of gifts.
Watching him in Boston four
years ago, he brought a desire
of hope to the American people.
I expect everyone to not look
for a hand out but a hand up.
I expect us as a community to
grow. We need a to-do list as a
community because everyday
we should be progressing. The
time is now.

DEANDRE PEARSON, 32
Author, Liberty

I loved it. I didn't believe that I
was going to see a Black leader
before I died.
I was think-
ing about my
grandmother
because she
passed away
not being able
to experience
this monumen-
tal time with us. I just need the
economy to be straightened
out.

ISRAEL MILTON, 79
Retired County Official

This election has made me
reflect on my life as a Black
79 year-old man. The changes
that have occurred during my
lifetime makes this election
the most unexpected yet wel-
come change that I have experi-
enced. There is hope now for all
Americans especially minority
and poor people. Yes, you can
change for the better for every-
one.

CYNTHIA STAFFORD, 41
Attorney, Liberty City

I think that it was an awe-
some day for America. It was
an historic day-- ------
in America. A .
proud day for
African-Amer- :
icans and ev-
erybody when
he was reelect-
ed. He did a


great job in be-
ing focused and clear. He has


a strategy and a plan. He is a
smart and intelligent with lead-
ership abilities. His victory rep-
resents how far we have come
as a nation. He inspired hope
in America and inspire change.
For little kid to go around say-
ing yes we can and I believe is a
euphoric feeling. He transcend-
ed all boundaries. I am excited
by what lies ahead for America
under his leadership.

GEORGIA AYERS, 80
Miami

This is historic. For me to be
alive and see a Black man as
president gives
me chills. I be-
lieve that we
have overcome.
The young
people have
the right to go
out and to be-
come all that
you were created to be. I have
access to go but I am going to
let the young people take cen-
ter stage at the inauguration in
January. Young people should
continue to carry the torch of
Barack Obama. If Obama can
make it then the young people
can make it too.

DANTE STARKS
Community activist
Miami

This is historic. It was great
but there are false expectations
among Blacks
that all is well.
There are a lot
of barriers that
Blacks still face
in America that
need to be bro-
ken like the
mortgage crisis,
education, and employment. I
think that it he will put some-
thing in place on the federal
level, which will make it easier
Sin the local and state levels.

BARBARA JORDAN. 65
Miami-Dade County Commnissioner

Obama's victory was amazing
and unbelievable. I am happy
that my grand-
children were
here to experi-
ence this with
me. For my
grandchildren
to grow up in
an environ-
ment where
racism will not be prevalent;
words cannot explain. They can
dream of whatever they want to
be and soar into their dreams.
Obama epitomizes hope for the
young people. As president, I
am going to hold him account-
able for his campaign promises.
He recognizes how critical the
economy is to becoming a thriv-
ing community. I think that the
demands are going to be made
and it is not going to be easy.
The Black agenda is no differ-
ent than any other race's agen-
da for Obama.

SHANTRELL M. SCOTT, 24
Shuttle Bus Driver
Carol City

I do feel that history was
made for African-Americans by
having the first..
Black presi-
dent. Obama
may be the key t
to ending the
overwhelming t
debt and the
senseless war.


TRACY SIMON, 57
Government Specialist

On November 4, was a day
that changed me forever. I woke
up the next morning, having to
pinch myself to make sure that
everything that happened yes-
terday was not a dream but
reality. I am alive to witness
the emergence of the first Black
president even when everyone
said it was impossible. Obama
got on the bus and decided
that no matter what happened
he would not sit in the back.


Throughout the election, Obama
preached about change and we
are a part of that change.


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES NOVEMBER 12-18 8


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


On August 24, Phyllis Rhymes-Johnson,ARNP,30 year veteran
for Jackson Health System, certified cardiac device specialist- Hattie Thompson celebrates her
Allied Professional, graduated from Nova Southeastern Univer- 1 00th Birthday!
sity with a degree of Doctor of Health Science.
With love, Dr. Rhymes-Johnson, would like to thank her hus-
band, retired Captain Reggie Johnson, formerly of the City of On November 11, Hattie Thompson turned 100. Happy
Miami Fire Department, mother, Thelma Rhymes, nephew, Ger- Birthday.
aid N. Rhymes and daughter, Jazell Johnson for their support Love always, daughter, Dorothy, grands and great grands
during her academic pursuit.


Shante' Viya Lansey


Mr. and Mrs. Carl and Tena Hatton, Robert Lansey along with
grandparents, Rev. John and Bishop Daisy Williams, Mr. and
Mrs. Louis and Callie Daniels of Enterprise, Alabama would
like to congratulate their daughter, Shante'Viya Lansey on a
job well done.
Shante'Viya graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree
in Criminal Justice. She is a 2004 graduate of Miami Central
Senior High School. She is continuing her studies in Criminal
Law. We are all proud of you. May God continue to bless you.


rek twr uim DAtA t w 11 a Mission Circle #1 Day at St. John
p xi 'I I l h bad e %-i l-t P-_ T4-1- -- n-._ Tv -All +-AA-- 1i- P._ ~i---- Pm Q-41-,


The Iev. rHermain DJavis Jr., wil
serve as guest preacher on this
Sunday morning during the 11
a.m. worship service. The oc-
casion is the Annual Mission
Circle #1 Day at St. John. Rev.
Davis is the Minister of Evan-
gelism at the Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist Church pas-


tUoredU y rev. Uaston SmithL.
Additionally, he is the Director
of Evangelism for The Seaboard
Baptist Association Ministers
and Deacons Union. Sister
Cora McLeod is the President of
the Mission Circle #1 Ministry.
Rev. Charles Uptgrow is Assis-
tant Pastor.


Diabetes Awareness Month
Music For Souls Foundation present 'Skate for Diabetes
Awareness' on Saturday November 15 at Charles Hadley
Park (District 5), 1300 N.W. 50 Street, Miami, Fl. 33142. For
information: www.musicforsouls.com 786-344-0473




qu k- 1W 1me-- ra6-Mi


qft m __mw vb % -b wmmmm


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Direct Creamation, $415.00
Cremation with Viewing
& Funeral service, $912.00
DOES NOT INCLUDE OVERSIZE








BIAC S \ M rS ( ONTROIl TIIEIR OW\\N DESTINY


Royal
HELEN STORR, 54, director
of crime pre-
vention, City of
Opa-locka, died
athomeNovem-
ber 6. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Greater New
Bethel Baptist Church.

ARZELLA MONTGOMERY
84, private duty
nurse, died No-
vember 7 at
home. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, .
St. Mark Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

SARAH ROSSIN, 55, nurse's
hide, died No-
vember 2 in Me-
morial Regional
Hospital. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to
9 p.m. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Kingdom Hall of
Jehovah's Wit-
nesses.

JERRY KING, 45, service atten-
dant, for Elite Limousine Service,
died November 6 in North Shore
Hospital. Final rites and burial in
Haines City, Florida.

ALPHANSO MCMURRINE, 71,
cook, died November 4 in North
Shore Hospital. Visitation Friday 5
to 9 p.m. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Ebenezer Deliverance Temple.

ALDA RUSSELL, 80, restau-
rant owner, died November 9 in
Regents Park Aventura. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

JOHN JAMES, 73, landscape
designer, died November 10 in
Aventura Medical Center. Service
10 a.m.., Saturday, Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, Hallandale.

Litgow-Bennett- P rick
ELIZABETH BAKER, 76, self-
employed, died
November 6 in
Franco's Nurs-
ing and Reha-
bilitation Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: sister,
Carolyn Lee
(William); sister-
in-law, Evelyn Stephen-Jackson.
Service 1 p.m. Saturday in the
chapel.
E.A. Steven&sj
REV. ELBERT L. HARRIS, 53,
custodian, died November 4 in Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Mount Pleasant
AME Church, Hollywood.

MILLAGE GORDON, 68, re-
tired, died November 6 in Memo-
rial Pembroke. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Hallandale Ebenezer
Baptist Church.


St. Fort
SHERLY JANVIER, 32, teach-
er's aide, died October 25 in North
Broward Medical Center. Service
was held.

MARTHE PIERRE LOUIS, 86,
seamstress, died November 2 in
Villa Maria Nursing Center. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Church of
The Nazarene.

MARIE PRUD'HOMME JO-
SEPH, 86, housewife, died No-
vember 6 in Jackson North Medical
Center. Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
St. James Catholic Church.

CAROLE GOURDET, 50, nurse,
died Nov 5 at home. Service 1
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.

NICZSA EDMOND, 27, died
November 8 in Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Eric S. Georg2 -.
Derek Sampson, 47, laborer, of
Orlando, formerly of Hallandale
Beach, died November 8. He was
the son of Groover Jr and Joann
Sampson. Viewing 6 to 9 p.m.,
Friday. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
House of God in Hallandale.


Poitier -
r LUCILLE ROSA KING, 52
seamstress,
died November
9 in North Shore
Medical center.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.



ANNIE LOU GULLATT, 70, do-
mesticengineer,
died Novem-
ber 5 in Select
Specialty Hos-
pital. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Wactor Temple
A.M.E. Church.

MARGARET MACKEY, 74,
laundry worker, died November
3 in Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m., Thursday in the
chapel.

JUSTIN DAVID WEST, 4
months, died November 8 in Me-
morial Regional Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Hall Ferguson Hewitt
ELBERT WILCOX JR., 57, City
of Miami Solid
Waste employ-
ee, died Octo-
ber 9. Grave-
side service 11
a.m., Saturday
at Dade North.



Wright & Young
WILLIAM E. PARKS, 80, one of
Miami's First Af-
rican American
City of Miami
Police Officers,
died November
9 in Harmony
Health Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Michelle, Edward, Clinton Bing-
ham, Larry, Jarrious Washington;
brother, Frederick. Arrangements
are incomplete.

GLENMUND TROSS 22, con-
struction labor- 1
er, died Novem-
ber 3. Survivors
include: mother,
Glendale Ty-
son, father Ed-
mund; siblings,
Sherrlyn, Jonel
Martin, Calvin
William. Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
True Witness of Holiness Church.

ROOSEVELT GUILFORD 69,
cook, died No-
vember 7 at
home. Survi-
vors include:
wife, Ernestine;
children, Chris-
tian, Roosevelt,
Jr; siblings Ben- .,
nie, Nell, Joyce
and Nancy. Service 2:30 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

JUDITH LUCILLE HANNAH,
66, domestic,
died Novem-
ber 1 in North
Beach Reha-
bilitation Center.
Survivors in- i
clude: children,
Robin Jones,

and Darryl Ford; siblings, Cyn-
thia Odom, Johnny and Herman.

chapel.

BELEN BAEZ, 2 months, died
November 1 in Baptist Hospital.
Service was held.

KIMAYA THOMAS, died No-
vember 5 in Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service was held.

RAYNELL PENDLETON, died
October 22 in South Miami Hospi-
tal. Service was held.

LANTHE BROWN 71, died No-
vember 9, North Shore Hospital.


Arrangements are incomplete.


Subscribe


Richardson Jay -In Memoriam In Memoriam
, RUBY KING, 87, teacher, Dade MARIE BENN, 91, beautician, In loving memory of, In loving memory of,
County Schools, died November
died November General Hospi- .
5. Service 11 tal. Service was -..[
a.m., Thursday, held. .
Mt. Zion Baptist hl
Church.


ARTHUR LIVINGSTON, 78,
retired postal
worker, died
November 6.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Jac-
queline; daugh-
ters, Shatawn
Livingston-Dai-
ley, Fla Livings-
ton-Richardson; sons, Arthur and
Terrance Sr; brother, Jessie; and
a host of grandchildren, nieces,
nephews and friends. Litany ser-
vice 7 p.m., Friday, St. Agnes'
Episcopal Church. Service 11
a.m., Saturday at the church.

JAMES ROLLE SR, 86, retired
I.L.A. 1416L -- ,
died Novem-
ber 3. Service
1:30 p.m., Sat-
urday, Greater
St. James Mis-
sionary Baptist -
Church

ALEX M. TILLMAN, 18, student,
died November
4. Service 2:30
p.m., Saturday,
Trinity Church.





MARY BERRY, 70, homemaker,
died November
4. Final rites
and burial in
Montgomery,
Alabama.




FRANKLIN STUART, 69. taxi
driver, died November 5 Final rites
and tinurial in Grand Bahamas


Carey Royal Ram n
IRENE GAINES-COPELAND,
79, retired Dade
County School
Board em-
ployee, died at
home Novem-
ber 7. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, Peaceful
Zion Missionary
Baptist Church.

BERNICE DAMES, 81, home-
maker, died November 9 at home.
Final rites and burial Saturday, in
Union City, Georgia.


NOAH JOSEPH, 76,
died November 10 in
Clinic Hospital. Final
burial in Haiti.


mechanic,
Cleveland
rites and


Hadley .
MOTHER DEACONESS ELIZ-
ABETH FRAZIER, 101, died No-
vember 9 in
North Shore
Medical Center.
Viewing 2 to 8
p.m., Saturday
and Sunday 3
to 6 p.m., in the
church. Service
11 a.m., Mon-
day November 17, The Historic
Mount Zion A.M.E. Church.

TAWANA BROWNLEE, 49,
homemaker, died October 25 in
A.G. Holly Hospital. Service was
held.

DANIEL WHITE JR, 41, laborer
died October 31 in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Service was held.



Grace
MAE BURROW, 93, domestic
worker, died
November 7
in North Shore
Hospital. Ser- .
vice 11 a.m., a 4
Saturday, St.
Peters (Over- .
town). .


EDITH HENRY, 57, died Novem-
ber 4 in Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service was
held.




TAMMY MCFARLANE, 49,
homemaker,
died November
7 in Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service was
held.


CLINTON WILSON, 69, laborer,
died November 8 in Baptist Hos-
pital. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Sweet Home Baptist Church.

Range
JOHN HENRY DANIELS, 72,
retired chem-
ist for Moss
Soap & Chemi-
cal Company,
died November
6. Survivors
include: wife,
Daisy; daugh-
ter, Sonja Mc-
Donald (Hassan Assad); brothers,
James Edward, Samuel B., and
Cleveland; seven grandchildren;
five great-grandchildren; a host of
other relatives and friends. Dona-
tions may be made to First Deliv-
erance Church of God In Christ.
Memorial service 6 p.m., Friday
First Deliverance Church of God In
Christ. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
Cooper Temple Church of God In
Christ.

ESTHER BELL SCOTT,- 95,
homemaker,
died November
9. Survivors
include; son,
Alfred; daugh-
ter, Darlene Wil-
liams (Ernest);
gran ds ons,
Robert Simp-
son, Christian Jeune, Arthur and
Zerick Pedican; granddaughters,
Cecelia Hudson and Darneka Wil-
liams; great-granddaughter, Jas-
mine Lattimore; a host of other
relatives and friends. Service 11
a.m., Saturday St. James A.M.E.
Church.


ELLA C. REDDING, 98, home-
maker, died No-
vember 8. Sur-
vivors include:
nieces, Mary
Frances Child,
Daisy Adside,
and Geneva
Collier; nephew,
but like a son,
Anthony 'MY MAN' Bullard (Bar-
bara); great great-granddaughter,
Saundra C. Bullard; a host of other
nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends. Final Rites and Burial
in Camilla, Georgia 2:30 p.m., Sat-
urday.

Gregg L. MasoP
VIOLA HYACINTH SHAW, 86,
owner, seamstress, died Novem-
ber 6 in Villa Maria. Viewing 5 to
9 p.m., Friday. Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, Sierra Norwood Cal-
vary Baptist Church. Interment
Southern Memorial Park.

E. JANE WHITEHEAD, 86, re-
tired teacher for West-Chester
County Schools, died November 7
in Edgewater Pointe, Boca Raton.
Final rites and burial in Cheyney,
Pennsylvania.

ROSELEE BENNETT, 55, died
November 10 in Memorial Hospital
West. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


ARNOLD INGRAM LEON JAMES, JR.
02/20/54 11/10/07 01/06/50 11/12/04


People will forget what you
said, but people will never
forget how you made them
feel. Although it's been a
year, your memory has not
faded in the least.
Your family loves you.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MICHAEL L. KNIGHT
11/09/86 -11/12/07

For God so loved the world
that he gave his only begotten
son, that whoever believeth
in him should not perish but
have everlasting life.
Gone but not forgotten, we
miss you sadly.
Your 1..ilng fan;,il,


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


JANELLE TAYLOR
'LALA'


Do take this time to express
our gratitude of thanks. Spe-
cial thanks to Rev. Kenneth
McGhee, Pastor of First Baptist
of Brownsville. To the many
friends, neighbors and co-
workers who thought enough
of us in our time of sorrow your
prayers, flora-grams, telephone
calls and all other acts of kind-
ness, was comforting to our
hearts in our sad time more so
than ever we are forever grate-
ful.
The Taylor family


In Memoriam


BRIDGET A. GLENN
08/25/66 03/13/08

Happy Belated Birthday,
we miss you so much.
The Family


It has been four years since
you went ot sleep.
We continue to miss you,
but we know we will see you
in the morning.
Love always,
Your Family



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


SHIRLEY COCHRAN HARPP
01/09/48 11/11/07

It has been one year since
your've been gone from us
and it broke our hearts to
lose you.
The family chain that so
strongly bond us has been
broken.
Love always, Sherrianne,
Willie, Shirlenia, Willie, Jr.
and family.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


1-


L


JESSIE LEE OSEY


Wishes to express our sincere
thanks to the many friends for
your acts of love during our
bereavement. There's nothing
we could do to show how grate-
ful we are for your thoughtful-
ness.
To each of you who reached
out to us in prayers, or any
other generosity of time, talent
or resources, we extend our
profound appreciation. Special
thanks to the Alfonso M. Rich-
ardson Funeral Services and
Mount Tabor Missionary Bap-
tist Church.
As we bow to the will of god and
bid farewell to our beloved, we
pray God will keep you and be-
stow his blessings upon you.


19B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008








BI.ACKS MUST CONTROL li lI.R O\\WN DESTINY

. .,. .. o ', .. l".-7,


20B THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 12-18, 200O


Happy Birthday


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JOHN WESLY WHITE JR.
It's been seven years, but
it seems like yesterday. We
miss you dearly.
Love always, your wife, kids
and grands

Death Notice


GERALENE ROZIER


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


I sawi t 04 o a 11 f*lm l t..1 ,, ,, *. igb ta4a. -, if


51, support service aide, died
November 11 at home. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, Holy
Faith Missionary Baptist
Church, 17001 N.W. 20 Ave.
Service entrusted to Royal
Funeral Home.

Death Notice


j-I



Iti"


JAMES PHILLIPS JR, 16,
student at Miami Northwest-
ern Senior High School, died
November 10. Survivors in-
clude: mother, Deidra Adams;
sisters, Trinea, and Angel.
Service 1 p.m. Saturday, No-
vember 15, Mt. Calvary M.B
Church. Arrangements en-
trusted to Wright & Young Fu-
neral Home.


You


One year one day after Florida laid to rest its first Black Secre-
tary of State and Barack Obama was elected the 44th President
of the United States of America, we remember a man who had
a special love in his heart for Martin Luther King, Jr., and Tiger
Woods. Isn't it strange "



,ggill * * [ < .. ,=- w.,e ", ,,* we -' w* ** -, "


Honor
ur Loved One
With an In
Vemoriam
In The
liami Times


TIMOTHY SMITH
DAVID R. JOHNSON 12/26/45 11/13/06


would like to thank everyone
for the flowers, gifts and cards.
Your support was greatly
needed during our time of be-
reavement.
We thank you so very much.
The Smith and Johnson
Family
In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JOSEPH V. SMITH
11/12/72 11/02-03
It broke our hearts when
God reached down and took
you away. We hurt, weep and
pray. Through it all we learn
to depend upon God's word.
Missing you dearly, your lov-
ing family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


FRISCO GEORGE
BLACKWOOD
01/06/86- 11/12/07
Frisco, words cannot express
the pain that fills our hearts
with a single utterance of
your name. We are left every-
day trying to cope with you
no longer being here. We still
wait for your call and to hear
your voice or wake up and
see that bright and beauti-
ful smile. We hold close to
our hearts the memories we
share. No one can replace
you in our hearts. Life is not
the same without you, but
we thank God for the years
we spent together.
Sadly missed, mother Mai-
zelyn, father, George, sisters,
Diana and Suzette, brother,
Earl, grandparents, nieces,
Dominique, Ilyasah, Jose-
phine, Jacqueline and Olivia,
nephews, Ladarius, Ran-
dolph and Denzel., aunts,
uncles, cousins, friends, Gigi
and neighbors

JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


MARY J. WILLINGHAM
11/15/26- 11/18/96
The beauty of your life is
with us every day.
Twelve years have passed
since our hearts were broken
because of your untimely de-
mise.
Our faith in God has sus-
tained us. One as sweet as
you, and kind as you were
can never be forgotten.
Your loving family, hus-
band, Alphe Sr; sons, How-
ell and Alphe Jr; daughters,
Gail Willingham and Diane
Rashada (Samuel); sister,
Estella B. Deshazor; niece,
Karen Forbes; nephew,
Kurwood Forbes; six grands;
four great-grands, two god-
children and a host of rela-
tives and friends.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DWAYNE RONDELL SMITH
04/27/69 11/14/06
Two years from that day. Two
years filled with pain. One
wish still to say. One prayer
every day. One pain in our
hearts. One angel from the
start. One life that it takes.
One day to see you again.
Your Mom, Annie; Dad,
Winford; Sabrina, Anthony
and your kids.


10936 NORTHEAST TH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements


South


0


* e 4kw agg-w I Nt
U-m -n um












~Onga


We Remember


Jesse J. McCrary, Jr.


U., l l 1 1 I oiut tl 1t 11( 1


Mir i e M AL :* 1 (fit 's .0 1 %(1





The Miami Times

Li estyles


FASHION HIP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008 THE MIAMI TIMES


Available fr


)RTERS WEEP I


Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
om Commercial News Provic
-ii /:m


i ~ i

r a

f I


M6 A
^l^Wi ^r actH^






*^^^ fWiii: aii" *i ..










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


: | i i .


A special salute goes out to
G. Erick Knowles, chairman,
Commissioner Barbara Carey
Shuler, vice chairperson, Dean
Smith Associates (Alonza and
Carmen Jackson), event plan-
ners, and the efficient commit-
tee of The Thirteenth Annual
M. Athalie Range Musical
Celebration of Life Gala, last
Sunday, at the Biscayne Mar-
riott Hotel and Spa. It was an
opulent activity long awaited
by the tuxedo and sequin gown
wearers in South Florida.
Limousines brought many
of the guests to the ballroom
floor and the early arrivals
were kept busy listening to the
Coral Reef Jazz Band perform
music familiar to the jazz lov-
ers, featuring Joshua Walton,
bass, and Julien, pianist, while
Lawrence and Carolyn Ad-
ams, William "Bill" and Cyn-
thia Clarke,*C. Brian and Do-
ris Hart, Frank and Dr. Enid
Pinkney, W. Doris Neal, Fan-
nye Searcy, Katie Williams,
Claudia Slater, Mr. Edwin
and Garth Reaves Anthony
and Mrs. Armbrister, Dalton
W. Nickerson, Jr., Charlayne
Thompkins, Dr. Lorraine F.
Strachan, and Dena Pinckey
cheered them on.
When the 500-guests entered
the ballroom, they were met by
Charlette Seward, director,
and the Miami Northwestern
PAVAC performing hit songs
from Aint Misbehaving, Funny
Girl, and DreamGirl. Also, the
ballroom transformed into a
spectrum of unique lighting,
sound system, huge screens,
picturesque plants, a formal
setting for each guest, and live
flowers as center pieces on
each table.


A voice then an-
nounced Julia
Yarbough, NBC J% -
6 News Anchor
as the mistress of
ceremony. She
appeared live on stage in a
blue designer gown, as well
as the screens on front stage.
Yarbough introduced Commis-
sioner Barbara Carey-Shuler,
Co-Founder and. vice-chair of
M.A.R.C.A.F. who relaxed the
audience and alluded
to "Ma Range" a dear I-
friend and a person
who puts you down
last. She received a
chuckle from those
who comprehended her
statement and gave the
occasion of the event
and why it is held each
year for the kids that
perform each year. YARB
D. Eric Knowles
took to the mic and brought
sponsors, such as Jose' Ar-
gumasilla Bacardi Vice-Presi-
dent and Aurelia Reinhardt,
CCPR, Bacardi USA, followed
by the introduction of honoree
Dr. Dorothy J. Fields for her
founding The Black Archives,
writing historical columns
Re: Black History in Miami,
and serving the community to
maintain historical sites as the
Lyric Theatre.
Maureen S., Bethel was in-
troduced and she appeared in a
stunning red 2-piece gowns to
introduce Dr. Enid C. Pinkney
as an honoree for her commu-
nity service and indefatigable
efforts as President, Dade
Heritage Trust, founder of The
African-American Committee,
The Historical Hampton House
Trust, Church of The Open


' il
. .'.. .. ....


= ** *--- 5


The following people where
honored at the Church of the
Incarcination's annual "States
Tea," November 2;
Gloria Bannister and Mavis
Davis (posthumously) won the
"Lurel Julius" Award, and Ida
Knowles-Engram and Lillian
Bridges were presented with the
President's Award.
Congratulations ladies!
Capturing the prizes: Chair-
man Josephine Davis [New


York, First prize], ]
Agenoria Pashal-
Powell and family
[Vermont, Second "
prize], and Chair-
man Evelyn Davis [Arkansas,
Third prize]. Congratulations to
all of you from Rev. Fr. J. Ken-
neth Major, Rector.

Best wishes to Kendra E.R.
Clarke, who successfully be-
came a certified IRP professional


:, o'
7--


(CIP) in the field of research af-
ter completing her exams. The
CIP designation is held by 1,000
persons internationally. She is
also a certified IRB manager. Ms.
Clarke is the daughter of Harold
and Maliney Clarke Sr.

Get well wishes to all of you!
John Smith, Thomas Hol-
mes, Samuel Cleare, Rev. Mr.
Shedrick Gilbert, Grace Heast-
ie-Patterson, Edna Scavella,
Mae Burrows.

Happy Wedding Anniversary to
the following couples:
Harold and Maliney L. Clarke
Sr., whose 35th anniversary was


Door and too many to record
at this time.
Honoree Clarence Pittman,
president, International Long-
shoremen's Association, Local
1416, was introduced by N.
Patrick Range for his continu-
ous service in the community
and a recent rally held at the
association for President Ba-
rack Obama, while his wife,
Gwendolyn, looked on with
pride and dignity.
Meanwhile, the guests were
served crab cake with jicama
and fennel slaw as an appetiz-
er; a salad of baby spinach w/
frise'e, roasted pear & crum-
bled blue cheese; intermezzo of
lemon sorbet; an entree of a de-
-- lectable New York Strip
w/wine and chocolate
or pineapple coconut
cake, while Knowles
donated a foursome for
the coming Larry Little
Golf Tournament, Dec,
1, and a suite at the
Miami Dolphin Sta-
dium at a se-
OUGH elected football
game. All you
had to do was
purchase raffle tickets :,
and be a winner. Many
tickets were sold and
the winners will be giv-
en next time.
Kudos to scholarship
winners, such as Daryl CAREY
P. Fortson, Krop Sr.,
Kandace C. Treycinct, Krop
Sr., and Jasmine A. Latti-
more, BTW, as well as Boyz II
Men for a spectacular perfor-
mance and others that were re-
sponsible for a sensational gala,
such as Betsy Kaplan, Donald
Butler, Kervin Clenance, Alexis
Harris, Michael Harris, Der-
rick Hart, Ivey Kearson, Saun
Lightbourne, N. patrick Range,
Jr., Esq, Rachel J. Reeves, Bar-
bara E. Anders, and Erslyn F.
Anders.
Also, Treva Burke-Harrell,
Gloria Green, Anne t. Herriott,


Renee Shaw-Jones, Rev. Can-
on J. Kenneth major, Shirley
McKoy, maud Newbold, Myrna
Range, Andrea Robinson, Dr.
Edward Robinson, Gwendolyn
Welters, Adria Harrison-Wiley,
and Willie Williams.


Rev. Franklin R. and Mrs.
Clark, along with Donna
Gray and choir mem- -
bers are commended for
-
celebrating 95-years of
existence, last Sunday,
at Mt. Olivette MBC fea-
turing the Triumphant
Church of Jesus Christ .. .
with Rev. Dr. Kyla Mann -
directing and Jurisa
Lightbourn on the key- PIN
board, along with The
Singing Angels of Arcola Lakes
park and the home-based choir.
According to the response
from the huge crowd, the Trium-
phant Church of Jesus Christ
brought a new dimension with a
unique style of singing released
from the interior of Dr.
Mann's concept of mu-
sic. Stage decorum, vo-
cal pedagogy, enriched
sound and presentation
of splendid uniforms.
Joining them were
the Singing Angels that
performed brilliantly
with Minister Gloria
SHULER Pacely singing Amaz-
ing Grace and Mother
Mamie L. Williams sang the
choir's favorite, Enjoy Jesus
which brought the crowd to
their feet. Furthermore, the
home choir acknowledged the
Heavenly Members including
Arlene Strachan and Winifred
Miller, while the name of Isdo-
ra D. Strachan was mentioned
referencing her being a member
in the early years and a part of
the choir.
The celebration was carried
over to Dawkins-Ward Educa-
tional Building, where everyone
had the pleasure of a whole-



on November 3.
The Clarkes enjoyed a seven-
day cruise to celebrate.
Rashford and Wihelmenia F.
Jennings celebrated their 57th
anniversary on November 7.

Older Miamians will remember
Pearl Lockhart, daughter of the
late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lock-
hart. Pearl went on to become a
doctor (and to wed one). She was
a member of the Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, Inc., and after our
national meeting in Washington
D.C., Dr. Pearl L. Rosser invited
all the Miamians to her home
for a cookout of Bar-B-Cue and
crabs. Bre Blacknell, another


some camaraderie and an invite
to join either chorus with God
in mind.


Annie H. Ross, chairperson
and founder of Northside District
2 Neighborhood Crime Watchers
collaborated with Major Veronica
L. Ferguson, Commander, and
committee members to
-.' provide the community
v the Fourteenth Annual
Citizens' Crime Watch
"Nite Out", at Covenant
Palms Center with The
District Explorer Post
#63 entertainment the
large crowd their mili-
tary-style steps.
KNEY Ross took to the mic
as emcee and called
upon William Booze to give the
invocation, followed by Ofc. Dana
Carter, prayer, Valarie Ander-
son, welcome, and presentation
of colors by Explorers Post #63
with James Smith singing God
Bless America.
Dignitaries present included
Honorable Katherine Fernan-
dez-Randle, Honorable Yolly
Roberson, Rev. Leeomia Kelly,
Honorable Audrey M. Edmon-
son, Commissioner Dorrin D.
Rolle and keynote speaker Rob-
ert Parker, Director, while Khal-
il China, Stachia Mottley, Po-
ris Akins, Aminah Cournegie,
Brittani, Antoine Loar, and
Randen Thomas represented
the Explorers, Carmen Caldwell,
executive director, CCW, passed
out souvenir bags from her office
and staff.


It was 37-years ago when Cen-
tral began playing Miami North-
western, long before the pres-
ent players were born and put
forth great effort to win, but to
no avail. It has been disappoint-
ing for D.C. Clark, president of
The Alumni Association, along
with Kenny Washington, Da-
vid Wiggins, who blew his horn



Delta who lives in Maryland also
joined in our feast. Pearl expired
last week and will be buried in
Maryland beside her parents.

In Miami, a couple of years
ago, Lillian and Elston Davis
entertained Dr. Rosser, her
hubby, and a few friends at their
home. Deepest sympathy to Dr.
Rosser and his son for the loss
of their beloved wife and mother,
my friend and Soror.
******** *
Now that Barack Obama is
our next President, let us all
take a new stand in our lives. Let
us promise ourselves to love our
country more, become better cit-


a f








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throughout the game, Richard
B. Strachan, Jill Bethel and
her co-horts that sell at each
game for the athletic teams.
Last Friday, 10,000 people
showed up at Traz Powell Sta-
dium to witness the game of the
century. And, of course, it be-
gan with Northwestern receiving
the kick-off and running the ball
back to the 50-yard line. Three
plays later, The Bulls scored
and the Central side began to
murmur, "Here we go again".
The score board flashed Miami
Northwestern, 6- Miami Central,
0, and at the end, Central 27.,
Bulls, 25.
Central's Anthony Williams
waited for the kick-off, clutched
the ball and maneuvered to
Northwestern's 48-yard line.
From that point, Jeffery God-
frey, quarterback, took com-
mand and began to commu-
nicate with Brandon Gainer,
RB., Joshua Reese, WR., and
Coach Telly Lockette to score
in 5-plays for a 7-6 lead.
It is also ironic that Lockette
was coaching at Northwestern
last year, as they beat Central at
the Orange Bowl and the alum-
ni put the blame on the coach-
ing staff. Now, he's a hero and
the students and alumni hung
out on 17th Ave and 95th St. af-
ter the game until almost day
break reflecting on the events of
the game including winning the
District 13-6A championship
and may play Northwestern this
week, if they beat Hialeah.
Northwestern lost the game in
the last 45-seconds on Central's
20-yard line when the clock
could not be stopped. However,
kudos go out to Daquan Har-
grett who picked up 161-yards
with his speed and Wayne
Times who used his ingenuity
to keep the game close and the
fans cheering for more, while
the Big Seven are making his-
tory at The University of Miami,
especially Jacory Harris, quar-
terback.



izens, and keep our composure.
Let us show others that we are
good citizens also, and know how
to behave! All age groups! We
have seen something take place
that many, many people, resting
in their graves would never have
dreamed possible. Promise your-
self, I too will change! It's our
time to shine. It's a great time for
Blacks in America.

May I commend our race for
its excellent voting record for
Obama? We really turned out for
our next President!

Barack Obama! Change is on
the way!









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN )DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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for m mu irk .WA& Wr









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Florln a Glandi l ,rip r pnr ,'-irs
LA TRAVIATA
Veri's music enchants in lins new production
8 PM Zill Ballet Opera House S13 75 S27 75 662 75. S81 .5, $9u 75
i".,] le Irr 10l ptfp n c-
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
Pe Mcillael .ivrl in, Cc irir;;,iitd '- Afririerlv Arhl Ciril, i
Tils diicuilleiirary/fantasy.'comedy tells the story 01 Anita Bryant's 1977 crusade
against gay civil rights lending govrnmmentrl records. news stones and underground
avy nmaifetos inio a hilanous carnival of 70s-style politics sex and failr
8 PM CariivaI Studio Theater S35
Adiliienii Aih-.hi Lenrr iier Ser.prnc Fire parent nI ,i t? Fouirndatlin I',nr rl S ni':
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
"A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH"
Bach's Canlata No 82 joins Schuberl's Death and the Mfaiden on a double bill
which examines the struggle. resignation, and peace between this life and ine nexi
8 PM Peacock Studio Thealer $40
LA TRAVIATA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $22 75,S552 75 S81 75. 99.75. $132 75
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
8 PM Carnivl Studio Thedler $35
LA TRAVIATA
8PM Ztif Ballet Upera House $27 75. SS1 75, S99 5 $132 ;5. S173 75
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
2 & F PM Carnival Studio Tne,arer S35
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
**A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH"
3 PM Pa:r:i:I'k SIuUdi Tliealer $40
LA TRAVIATA
2 PM Z7h Billeol Oprn Hiise $22 75, S62 75 581 75 S99 75 S132 75
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
2 PM Carnival Suli0io Tnealer S35F
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
"A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH"
7 FM Peaui:.k Stud(i Tinealer $40
LA TRAVIATA
S PM Zirt Billet Orr House $13. 75 62 75 59'3 75 9 132 75
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
"Wildl ly UIlu y' L. -LOS ii4etle Tliles
All 37 Plays in 97 Miriutes' Satjurday Nighl Live meets a fast-paced romp
tlnouglh the Bard's plays. London's longest-runrnig comedy
7'30 PM Carnival Studii Thealer $45
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
II vou lhke Shl.spe ae ou 11lie Iris srhCirw i1 you nale Shakespear ,vou 11 LOVE
iii-: .noWi -jBC Today Snow
2 P:M $4r,* 30 PM S50 dCariiv.l Sludio Tleater
THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
(ABRIDGED)
"Tihe luiilie'Yt So110w you are likely tO see in your --i.itiri, hlet1me Mo hiu e. CJz f, t,
2 & 7 30 PM Carnmivai lurio Tiieater $r50


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Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby. No reservation]snecessary.

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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Mianl 305-4Mo45 MIat Uaes 3054584"!! Meiw 305-5R-Ml PmbleF Piee$ 80-FANOANGO 204
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CALIFORNIA CLUB S HIALEAH 14 PALACE 18 THE FALLS
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The>IiiviII

Business
SECTION D MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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*- ""NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
SPECIAL PROJECTS CONSULTANT (SPC) FIRMS


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to commission one (1) or more firms for each of the following professional disciplines as
Special Projects Consultant (SPC), in two categories, as noted below:
TIER 1 PROJECTS UP TO $250,000 TIER 2 PROJECTS UP TO $1,000,000
S(Construction Cost): (Construction Cost):
SPC Structural Engineer SPC Structural Engineer
SPC Mechanical engineer
SPC Civil Engineer
These professional services are intended for miscellaneous projects in which construction cost does not exceed the category limits, for study activity for
which the fee does not exceed the statutory limit (currently $50,000), or for work of a specified nature. Successful firms will be commissioned for a period
of four (4) years, with the second, third and fourth years at the option of the Board.
MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE on MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2008, at 1:30PM: The Department of A/E Selection,
Negotiations and Design Management will conduct a mandatory Pre-proposal Conference for Tier 1 and Tier 2 firms and all SPC disciplines at
the South Florida Educational Federal Credit Union, located at 1498 Northeast 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida 33132, 2nd Floor Conference
S* Room. Submittals by firms not represented at the Pre-proposal Conference will not be considered.:

The scope of professional services will consist primarily of the preparation of design and construction contract documents for projects performed by
in-house forces, Job Order Contractor, General Contractors, Construction Manager at-Risk or Term Bid Contractors, and encompass, primarily, single
discipline projects for remodeling, renovations and/or repairs. However, each applicant firm shall submit as a complete professional services team (i.e.
architect and civil, structural, mechanical and electrical engineers). Thorough knowledge of State Requirements for Educational Facilities and the Florida
Building Code is required. Applicants must be capable of producing CAD drawings either in-house or through subcontractors, at no additional costio the
Board.
The Board reserves the right to limit the number of concurrent SPC contracts held by a single firm. The Board does not guarantee any minimum number of
S projects or any specific construction dollar value. Work will be assigned on the basis of each firm's workload, qualifications for the task, and performance
-- on previous assignments.

Successful applicants will be required to sign agreements that contain minimum professional liability insurance coverage of $250,000 for Tier
1 and $1,000,000 for Tier 2. Successful applicants will be required to comply fully with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 "Jessica Lunsford
Act" and all Board Rules and procedures as applicable.
Interested firms may obtain Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) "Procedures for the Selection of Architectural/Engineering Projects
Consultant (APC/EPC)", with all current, pertinent information and required submittal forms at the address listed below, or accessed on the
MDCPS' website at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/default.aspx?id=ae.solicitations.
Firms must submit a Letter of Interest, the most current version of U.S. Government General Services Administration (GSA) Form 254
(with color photographs of sample recent projects) and GSA Form 255, and MDCPS' questionnaires. Incomplete submittals will not be
evaluated and the firm will be disqualified.
Additionally, applicants must submit Form 254 for each prime and sub-consultant in the following disciplines: architecture, landscape
i| architecture, electrical, mechanical, structural and civil engineers. Applicants shall also include a list of any annual (term) professional services
v...: contracts the applicant firm has with public agencies (include type of services provided, beginning and ending dates of each term contract, and
'" the dollar value of each project completed under each term contract) in their Form 254.

City of Miami Applicants for SPC Structural Engineering must select,one of the two categories noted above and clearly state either "Tier 1" or
"Tier 2" on their submittal package cover and in their Letter of Interest. Small businesses are encouraged to apply for the "Tier 1
PUBLIC NOTICE SPC Structural Engineer" Category. SPC-Structural Engineer firms will be evaluated for either Tier 1 or Tier 2 contracts, but not both. It
is the Board's intention to align the anticipated contracts with each firm's capabilities.
CITY OF MIAMI
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS Only one submittal per discipline will be accepted per applicant, either as a single prime firm, or as a part of a joint venture. If the applicant
ARCHITECTURAL & ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint venture agreement must be submitted with the application. Percentage participation fees must
THE ORANGE BOWL SITE PARKING be clearly stated for each joint venture partner in the joint venture agreement.
RFQ No: 08-09-017 Responses to this RFQ, consisting of one (1) original bound submittal and six (6) bound copies of the submittal, must be received at the
Completed Responses must be delivered to the Office of the City Clerk, following address, no later than 4:00 p.m.. Local Time, Tuesday, December 9, 2008:
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 by 2:00 p.m., MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
on Tuesday, December 2, 2008 ("Response Submission Date"). Any Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Responses received after the above date and time or delivered to a different ep.mn
address or location will not be considered. Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A; Administrative Director
School Board Administration Building (SBAB)
RFQ documents may be fully obtained from the Department of Capital 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Improvements' webpage at www.miamigov.com/capitalimprovements only on Miami, Florida 33132
or after November 12, 2008. It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure
the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms periodically Telephone: (305) 995-4500 Facsimile: (305) 995-2050


check the CIP webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda.
The City of Miami reserves the right to accept any Responses deemed to be The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educational programs/activities and employment and
strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all,.
in the best interest of the City, to waive any minor irregularities, omissions, strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.
and/or technicalities in any Responses, or to reject any or all Responses and
to re-advertise for new Responses, in accordance with the applicable sections Any firm or individual whose contract has been terminated by the Board "with cause" will not be considered for commissioning under this RFQ.
of the City Charter and Code. Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted for all Requests for Qualifications beginning with issuance of the
SLegal Advertisement and ending when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a contract, to reject
THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN all responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as
ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY CODE. provided for under the referenced School Board Rule, in addition to any other penalty provided by law.
Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, or in accordance with
Pedrn G. Hernandez7 City Mananpr 120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.


DP No.000791


School Board Rules may be accessed on the web at www.dadeschools.net/board/rules.



















SECTION D


101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$900, nice and clean, laundry
room, parking. Section 8
okay! Call 786-326-7424.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

11530 N.E. 12th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly, $1450 to
move in. Call 786-256-3174.

1202 N.W. 61st Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $800 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1215 N.W. 103rd Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667.

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1281 N.W. 61 Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552 or
786-499-8212

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$625 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $450 per month, all ap-
pliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $525 monthly,
two bedrooms $625 monthly.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch Flat Screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1545 N.W. 8th Avenue
One and two bedrooms air,
appliances, new tile, carpet
and free water. Starting at
$650. 786-506-3067

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

1801 N.W. 1ST CT
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month newly renovated.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air,
free water. 305-642-7080

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

190 N.W. 16st Street
Rents reduced for short time
only! One bedroom, $500,
newly remodeled apts, al/c,
stove, refrigerator, Section 8
okay!, No deposit needed!
Call 305-582-5091.

190 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom. $680 moves
you in, $680 monthly.
786-389-1686

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080


220 N.W. 16 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$550. 305-642-7080

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 12-18,2008


..


2460 N.W. 139th Street
One bdrm, air fenced, $500-
$600 first, last and security.
305-691-7745 after 5 p.m.

2515 N.W. 52 Street #3
One bedroom, tiled, air, no
appliances. $550 monthly.
$1100 to move in.
954-522-4645.


419 N.W. 8th Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
free water and electric for
Section 8 tenants, call
305-299-4312.

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$485 monthly, $900 to move
in. 305-326-8855/56


50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

515 N.E. 150 Street
One and two bedrooms plus
efficiency. Call Gloria
954-437-8034

561 N.W. 6 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$495. Two bedrooms one
bath $595. Free water,
305-642-7080


6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

7001 N.W. 15 Ave
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, $495 monthly.
First month and half security
deposit to move in. all appli-
ances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

725 1/2 N.W. 100 Street
Near schools and hospital
two bedrooms, one bath, air,
appliances, wall to wall car-
pet, mini blinds. Credit check,
$640 monthly, $1280 to move
in. Application fee.
305-300-0983

745 N.W. 58 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, air unit,
appliances, water and gas.
$850 mthly. One bdrm, $625
mthly. 305-401-4674, Mon-
day through Friday 9 to 5.

924 N.W. 29th Street
Section 8 Welcome! Two bed-
rooms, one bath $950 month-
ly. Call 786-262-7313.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699


ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
AREA
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695.
$100 off three months. 305-
528-7766.

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida


HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
One bedroom, one bath $515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

MIAMI -Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Place Apartments
5600 N.E. 4 Ave
Miami, FL 33137
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $633.
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

N. DADE Section 8 OK!
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Security, No Deposit
For Section 8. 786-488-5225

N.W. AREA
Apt and house for rent! Call
786-277-0439.

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath also
one bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 welcome, $500 cash
back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

Sugar Hill Area
Three bedrooms, two baths
and two bedrooms two baths,
central air. 305-984-7857

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
One bedroom, $600 $650
monthly. Two bedrooms,
$750 to $800 monthly. All ap-
pliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


14230 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Brand new unit with two
bedrooms and two baths with
jacuzzi. All new appliances.
$1100 monthly, $2200 to
move in. Section 8 is wel-
comed. Call 954-253-4814.

1985 N.W. 5 Place
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1200 monthly. 786-263-1590

3911 S.W. 52 Ave.
Pembroke Park, three
bedrooms, two and a hajf
baths. Quiet neighborhood.
561-932-4555

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Great Property! Looking for
Great Home Maker! Call
954-243-6447.

North Miami
One bedroom available. $650
monthly. call
786-797-0225

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Rent or own two bdrm., two
bath condo ,$1150. $200
off first month. Air, balcony,
tiled floors and one assigned
covered parking. Laundry
available.Call Kathy 847-682-
0290.

TAMARAC AREA
Brand new; three bdrms., two
baths, playground in back
yard right next to turnpike
behind Tamarac Fire Station,
$1350 monthly, call
305-469-1006


13315 ALEXANDRIA DRIVE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1000 monthly, washer and
dryer provided. Section 8 ok.
Call 305-244-0798 or 786-
252-4953


1332 N.E. 117th Street
Two bedrooms, two bath,
central air, appliances,


$1200/month, $2400/move
in. Call James or Debra at
305-944-9041.


5422 N.W. 7TH COURT
Large efficiency includes
water and electricity. $700
monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449


1450 N.W. 53 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly, first, last, in-
cludes light and water. Call
305-710-1343, 786-506-0272

1610 N.W. 55 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-720-7067

1811 N.W. 84th Street
One bedroom, one bath, den,
tile, a/c, carpet, $475/month +
security. Call 305-389-2765.


1867 N.W. 42nd Street
Newly remodeled, one bdrm,
one bath, air. Mrs. Reynolds
786-356-1457.

21301 N.W. 37th Avenue
Two bedrooms, air.
No Section 8. 786-306-4839.

2257 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080

2395 N.W. 81st Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 preferred, call
Angela 305-796-3874.

2482 N.W. 95 Terrace
Two bedrooms, appliances,
air, water included, extras.
305-948-6913

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

5528 N.W. 4 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, new appliances.
Section 8 Welcome. $1000
monthly. 305-720-7067

577 N.W. 94 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly. 786-263-1590


7753 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

8001 N.W. 24th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
very nice inside, Section 8
welcome, call 305-632-8164.

8143 N.W. 5th Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances, $950
monthly, 305-984-2162.

930 N.W. 29th Terrace
Two bdrm, one bath, a/c,
fenced, $1500 move in,
$885/month, call 786-457-
2998.


93rd STREET N.W. 18th
AVE AREA
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcomed! Call
305-754-7776.


COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bdrm, one bath, call
Jerry at 786-877-4766.

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Large three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643

OPA LOCKA
Large one bedroom, one
bath, free water. $725 mthly.
305-607-7192


OPA LOCKA AREA
One bdrm., one bath, fur-
nished, $775 mthly, 305-607-
7192.

2' ^"Efficiency 1
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$148 weekly, $575 moves
you in. Call 786-389-1686.

2230 Fillmore Street
Refrigerator, stove, ceiling
fan, bath and shower. Call
305-816-6992 or 786-262-
4701.

2915 N.W. 156th Street
Private entrance, free cable.
$165 weekly, $650 to move
in. 305-624-3966.


3153 N.W. 53rd Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232


and dryer, call 954-993-8240
or 786-277-3804.

14002 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedroom, two bath, new
townhouse, located in nice
area, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-528-9964.


5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

7035 N.E. 4 Court
Lights, water and cable in-
clude. $700 monthly.
561-932-4555

86 Street N.E. 2nd Ave Area
Call 305-754-7776

Furnished Studio
North Miami. Private en-
trance. Full Kitchen, air, utili-
ties included. 954-274-4594

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large with kitchen, a/c, free
cable, $550/month, all utilities
included, one or two persons.
Call 786-853-8313.


1430 N.W. 68th Street
Air conditioning $340
monthly Call 786-351-8109

1500 N.W. 183rd Street
$135 wkly, $285 to move in.
786-457-2998

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$90 weekly. Free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-474-8188, 305-691-3486

1887 NW 44 Street
$475 monthly. $600 moves
you in. Private bathroom. 305-
637-9359 or 305-
303-0156

2010 N.W. 55 Terrace
Rooms with central air and
appliances. 786-487-2222

2373 N.W. 95 St.
$90 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-691-3486, 305-474-8186

3121 N.W. 60 Street
$350 to move in. $350 month-
ly. 305-224-2569

53 Street and 14 Ave.
Own entrance, bed, own
bathroom, refrigerator, air
and microwave. $600, first
and last to move in, includes
water and electricity.
305-710-1343, 786-506-0272

6233 N.W. 22 Court
Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $110
weekly, $220 moves you in.
Call 786-277-2693

6849 N.W. 15th Avenue
Nice rooms, different sizes,
quiet area, utilities included,
$105-$130 weekly, $260 to
move in immediately,
Call 786-277-2693

7612 N.W. 2nd Court
$160 plus weekly, central air,
clean, cable all utilities includ-
ed. Call 786-444-7932.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.

Furnished, electric and water
included. $600 monthly.
954-605-1360

LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice rooms, $110 weekly.
Call 305-335-9463

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished rooms, call 954-
557-7629 or 954-445-7629.

NORLAND AREA
Quiet room, near bus termi-
nal. 305-766-2055

NORTH MIAMI AREA
TV, utilities included, $600
mthly. 305-687-1110

NORTHWEST AREA
ROOMS FOR RENT
CALL 561-932-4555

OPA LOCKA AREA
Private entrance, central air,
private bath, washer and
dryer. Call 786-380-7967.
ROOMING HOUSE
8013 N.W. 10th Court
Central air, new bathrooms
and kitchen, security
gates $125 $140 weekly.
Call Kevin 786-443-3302.
Appointment Only!


10741 SW 150 TERRACE
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1000 month, no Section 8,
call 305-267-9449

12525 N.E. Miami Place
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1500. 305-642-7080

1341 N.W. 58th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath $600.
First and deposit. Washer


completely remodeled, new
kitchen and bath granite,
wood floors. $1400 monthly.
Section 8 Accepted
305-725-6222

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.


1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750. 305-642-7080

16015 N.W. 22nd Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
new kitchen, air, tile, Section
8 OK, $1250, 305-409-8113


1811 N.W. 82nd Street
Three bedrooms, central air,
fenced yard, carport, $1000 a
month, first and last. Call 305-
691-7745 after 5 p.m.

1812 N.W. 66th Street
New three bdrm, one bath,
a/c, tile, stove and refrig.,
Sect. 8 ok! $1200 Call 786-
344-9284.

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
Upstairs, one bdrm., $750
mthly utilities included, $850
to move in, 305-525-0619.

20611 NW 23 COURT
Three bdrms, two baths, big
yard, close to Pro Player
Stadium. Available 12/01/08.
$1400 monthly.
305-469-1006

2320 N.W. 55th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security. Call
Waymon 786-877-1046.

2545 N.W. 167 STREET
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1450 mthly. 786-319-
8184

2555 N.W. 158th Street
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Newly renovated three bdrm,
one bth, near buses, shops,
and schools. Section 8 okay!
Call 305-764-8102.

2600 N.W. 88th Street
Three bedrms, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 okay, $1200 monthly,
305-794-9959.

2770 N.W. 153rd Terrace
Three bedrooms, central air,
$1195. No Section 8. Call for
list. 954-274-6944.

2970 N.W. 195th Street
Three bdrms, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 OK!. 786-277-3688


3220 N.W. 135th Street
Spacious two bedroom,
one bath, central a/c, large
yard, $1000/month, Section
8 okay!
Call 786-853-8313.

5650 N.E. Miami Court
Four bedroom, two bath,
$1600, call Joseph Louis
305-632-2428.

74th Street and 7th Ave
Five bedrooms, two baths,
fenced yard, tile, $1750/
month, Section 8 okay! Call
786-306-2349.

7500 N.W. 11th Avenue
Beautiful four bedrooms.
two baths, central air, tile,
appliances, washer and
dryer, vertical blinds, huge
yard and
bars. Call 786-357-5000

8250 NW 2ND COURT
One bedroom, one bath, $700
monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

900 N.W. 65 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 305-642-7080.

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air. 305-984-7857

Dade and Broward
Special Program
Two, three, four bdrms. From
$900 monthly 305-804-4070.


HOMESTEAD AREA
Brand new two bedrms, two
baths, washer/dryer inside.
Secion. 8 OK! 305-720-8222

Large Three Bedroom
House
Three large bdrms, one
bath, tn superb condition
with very large master
bdrm, and oversized lot
Call Jessie-owner/agent
AMEC Realty & Investment
Inc 786-853-1903

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three bdrm, two baths,
$1600 monthly, Section 8
only. Call 305-620-4054 or
305-527-8330.


LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bdrms, one bath, florida
room, central air and heat,
washer and dryer. Efficiency
available, $150 weekly.
Call 786-390-0809.

MIAMI GARDENS
581 N.W.185th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,


14ozz N.w. 13tn hRoau
Four bedrooms, central air,
try $1900 down and $1295
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.

1725 N.W. 132nd Street
Two bedrooms, two baths,
huge den, a perfect "10".
Try $4900 down and $1558
monthly. FHA 786-306-4839.

490 N.W. 80th Street
Affordable Housing!
New construction home for
sale! Three bdrm, two bath,
$179,000, subsidies avail.
Call 786-385-4439.

Lease Options Available
Buyers for house below mar-
ket value. All credit welcome!
Call 786-273-6473.

NO QUALIFYING
NO CREDIT CHECK
Three and four bedrooms
houses. Owner financing.
Only $2900 down.
Call 786-306-4839.

NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
room, two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedroom, two
bath, at an attractive price.
call
786-859-3772

Rent to Own or Owner
Will Finance, Must Sell!
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, 1855 NW 132nd
Street, call 786-488-8617.

YESI!I YESI!l YES!!l
HERE'S HELP
TO OWN YOUR OWN
HOME NOWIII
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
AND
All Foreclosures
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

HANDYMAN
Roof repairs, painting, water
proofing, windows, doors,
floors. Call 786-260-4722


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
786-287-0864 or
786-337-5853.

NEAR MIAMI CENTRAL
HIGH
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, new building.
305-685-6795

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five and a half bedrooms,
three baths, central air, fam-
ily dining and laundry room,
big yard, fire place. Section 8
okay! $1950 monthly.
Call 305-992-6496

NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Three bedroom, one bath,
Section 8 okay! Call Jorge at
786-312-9550.

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Six homes to choose from,
Three and four bedrooms,
two baths, $1000 to $1300,
air, bars, $2500 to $3250
move in. No Section 8. Terry
Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776


3185 N.W. 75th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
tiled floor. Near Tri-Rail. $100
weekly. 305-439-2906

CHEAPER LIVING IN
GEORGIA NEAR
MALL
FREE Moving Ride There
FREE Month
$199 Month Two
FREE Utilities
FREE Direct TV/Cable
FREE Air Conditioning
FREE Heating
FREE Water/Phone
FREE Fishing out back
FREE Ride to GA
Call now 786-234-5683

Miami Gardens
Rooms for rent.
305-300-7783

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$475 month, room can be
furnished or unfurnished
upon request. Call 305-624-
4395 or page 305-732-9875.


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour


We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

WANTED BASS PLAYER
Lead and rhythm guitarists
keyboard player. Male and
female vocalists.
Call 786-380-3218



Church available with central
air, kitchen, office. Seats 85.
Call 305-687-1218

Crack the SAT, Beat the
FCATI
Don't fall behind, call 305-
725-7970 or visit
AlATutors.com
Experienced nurse seeking
position
Certified CNA or HHA, Great
references. Call 954-447-
9941 or 954-494-4482.

Marcel's Cremations
Informed families make wish
decisions, so call Marcel's!
Open to the Public and
Funeral Directors. Direct
cremations & death certifi-
cate only $550, also avail.
refrigeration and a variety of
urns. All major credit cards
accepted! Call
305-953-3600.


INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


Retiree seeking part-time or
full time job cleaning office,
waxing and buffing floors.
Have own equipment and
supplies. 305-621-0578


Be a Security Guard $60
786-333-2084
Or renew license $50 with ad,
40 hours $110 G and con-
cealed.

Be a Security Guard $60
786-333-2084
Or renew license $50 with ad,
40 hours $110 G and con-
cealed.


SUBSCRIBE



TODAY!

ENOD THE

INCO NVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES ,
FIGHT TI NG
THE WEATHER

AND
HUNTING

DOWN BACK
COPIES


CALL

3054694-


LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting soil.
Tony 305-491-4515

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in car-
pet, plumbing, doors, cabinet
moving and lawn service.
305-801-5690

PROFESSIONAL.
HANDYMAN
I do it all!!! Electrical, plumb-
ing, drywall, remodeling,
hurricane shutters, and much
more. Don't believe me call
305-632-7837.

TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.


OWN WIRELESS BUSI-
NESS!
Earn residual income, btxs-
tore.com, call 305-796-6642


-"z 4-"


0








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


rhilaoelphi myo orouliw n drwii lbu l g ad

S -4L


weeA: 6/f4a/lt0
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


-
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-Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers




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Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional. Safe & Conlldenlial Services
Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certifled OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP
305-621-1399


ATT..NTI.ON .F.NIORS
AT T N'I() NNIF.NVI R S
NDl N ', AD 1-. PTS APTS
l2A AND 3r RuI j \-; ;'T

COR4LPL. ICE. fPTS.
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305-759-6350
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Support The Tmes


l CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED Ll BILL MY CREDIT CARD

{3 O Exp

F a Exp_
S- Li Exp__


Authorized Signature

Name

Address


State Zip _


City

Phone


e-mail


includes Florida sales tax


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


f f


YES WE DID!
PRESIDENT-ELECT BARACK OBAMA
INAUGURATION BUS TOUR
Depart Jan. 18, 2009 Return Jan. 21, 2009
$300 and $390 per person inclusive
For More information call: 305-331-1944
email: barackobama8253@bellsouth.net


0 q


Request for Applications
City of Miami
Civilian Investigative Panel
The City of Miami Civilian Investigative Panel (CIP) seeks to fill vacancies on
its volunteer Panel.
The CIP is a citizens' oversight panel comprised of thirteen (13) diverse
members, with the responsibility to oversee the City of Miami Police Department.
Applicants must be willing to commit a significant number of hours annually to
the CIP; be either permanent residents of the City of Miami, own real property,
or work or maintain a business in the City of Miami and have a reputation for
integrity and community service. Applicants cannot have a record of a felony
conviction; nor can applicants be a current or former City of Miami police
officer.
Interested individuals must submit a membership application and include a short
biography or resume. Applications may be downloaded from the CIP website,
www.miamigov.com/cip, obtained from the CIP office at 155 S. Miami Avenue,
PH 1 B, Miami, FL or by calling 305-579-2444. Completed applications must be
received or postmarked no later than 5:00 PM, Monday, December 1, 2008,
addressed to: Shirley E. Richardson, Executive Director, Civilian Investigative
Panel, 155 South Miami Ave. PH-1B, Miami, Florida 33130.
Adv. # 16125


(0 ~


_


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008








BI..ACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

mn ht= pinW fr epoilr m m kS*














S endd. .l-



-. Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


&as& m"so -be& 0 .Wtsond


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


MIAMI-DAD

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference



CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2008
COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2nd FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS. 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH
All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney
NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council with
respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall insure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal may be based (f/5 286.0105): 2) In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk no later than
two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if
hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.


Environmental Assessment Phase
Miami-Dade Transit Park & Ride Facility
Palm Drive (SW 344th St) & NW 2nd Ave
(West of the South Miami-Dade Busway)
You are invited to attend an
INFORMATIONAL SESSION
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2008
7:30 P.M. Commission Meeting
Commission Chambers, City Hall Building, The City of Florida City
404 W. Palm Drive, Florida City, Florida 33304
(North end of building Lower Level)
Find out the latest information about Miami-Dade Transit's Palm Drive/SW 344th St
Busway Park & Ride Facility Environmental Assessment Phase


With Florida City Commissioners:
Eugene D. Berry Sharon Butler R.S. Shiver


MIAMl' 3
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Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in employment and does not discriminate on the basis
of disability in its programs or services Auxiliary aids and services for communication are available with advance notice.
This form can be made available in accessible format upon request (audkioape. Braille, or computer disk). For material in
alternate format, a sign-language interpreter, or other accommodations, please contact Maud Lrzano at 786-469-5478.
Customers using TTr, please call through the Flonda Relay Service 1-800-955-8771 at least five days in advance.


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Wed., Nov. 12, 21008Thurs. Sol., Nov. 15, 2008 2 Draws
To ontnu-ths istngsen oferng
Check r mony ordrSto eter ooper
RO ox 5198 : pal.. a l 305


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Colonial Bank is pleased to provide the greatest available
level of financial security to our customers including
Unlimited FDIC coverage on all personal and but-ine.s
checking deposit accounts that do not earn interest
Increased FDIC coverage from $100,000 to $250.000 per
depositor for deposits other than non-interest bea3rng
accounts*
FDIC coverage up to $250,000 on all retirement deposit
accounts
In effect until Dec. 31,2009.


Colonial has more than 60 offices to sej'.e wou in
South Florida. To find a location near ,ou.
visit www.colonialbank.com or call (877) 502 -'225.

02008 Colonial Bank.Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective as of a-J .i... o 1
subject to change without notice. Minimum opening deposit is $50 1 ... i.
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advertised special. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. Public If... i ... ...
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 12-18, 2008


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AIRPORT
1100 NW 72nd Avenue
305-264-8003
AVENTURA
1'7701 Biscayne Boulevard
305-937-2265
BIRD ROAD (Grand Re-opening)
8311 SW 40th Street
305-554-4800
BRICKELL
1110 Brickell Avenue
305-577-4474


CORAL WAY (Main Office)
2720 Coral Way
305-476-6200
DORAL (Now Open)
8790 NW 25th Street
305-406-9910
DOWNTOWN
21 W Flagler Street
305-372-7500
EAST KENDALL
9300 S Dixie Highway
305-670-2224


HIALEAH
5410 W 16th Avenue
305-512-7601
MEDLEY
7208 NW 72nd Avenue
305-889-0668
NORTH MIAMI
12411 Biscayne Boulevard
305-895-2265
PERRINE PALMETTO BAY
17945 Franjo Road
305-232-4900


www.totalbank.com


QUAIL ROOST
11424 Quail Roost Drive
305-232-4981
WEST KENDALL (Coming Soon)
13400 SW 120th Street


MEMBER "'Annual porcentago yield as of 10/1/08. Minimum deposit $1,000. No institutional or Broker deposits. Early withdrawal penalty applies and could
FDIC l rduce earnings, if applicable. Product offering may be withdrawn by the bank at any time without notice. Fees may reduce earnings on the account.
"On October 3, 2008 the FDIC insurance temporarily increased from $100000 to t250,000 per depositor through December 31, 2009.


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PUBLIC HEARING
The Governing Board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Miami Urbanized Area will hold
a public hearing on Thursday, December 18, 2008, at 2:00 p.m. in the County Commission Chambers,
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW First Street, Miami, Florida.
The Governing Board will consider the following Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) Amendment:
1. FY 2009: SR 5/US 1/Biscayne Boulevard
This amendment will add $5,000,000 for the Flexible Pavement Reconstruction at Biscayne Boulevard from
NE 15th Street to NE 35th Terrace. In addition, this amendment will move $2,604,000 to FY 2010 for the
same project
In addition to the above public hearing, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 6 Tentative
Five-Year Work Program for Fiscal Year 20009/10 2013/14 will be presented to the MPO Goveming Board
for endorsement.
All interested parties are invited to attend. For further information, please contact the MPO Secretariat,
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW First Street, Suite 920, Miami, Florida 33128, phone: (305) 375-4507; e-mail:
mpo@miamidade.gov; website: www.miamidade.govlmpo
It is the policy of Miami Dade County to comply with all of the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities
Act. The facility is accessible. For sign language interpreters, assistive listening devices, or materials in
accessible format, please call 305-375-4507 at least five business days in advance.
MIAM
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