Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00570
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: November 5, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00570
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231
Classification: lcc - Newspaper

Full Text












S3-DICIT 326
511 PI
LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UJIIVERSITV OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
CAIHESVILLE FL 32611-7007


SOne Family Serving Since 1923



l thmt Jme% f6
Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties
Tem7pora Muitantur Et Nos Mitamur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 11 4TI, .Om A, NOV i'E 5 11, 200 ; 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)




JESCA fails to Heavy early vote


pay workers confirms first


Social service organization lacks Black President

funding, leaves staff without pay ,Americans went to the polls up. Democrats were confident
Sin record numbers on Tuesday of increasing their 235-199 ma-
By Sandra J. Charite and made the historic selec- jority.
scharite@mamaitimesonline .co tion of the first Black President Eleven states are selecting
of the United States when they governors, with particularly

In this economic crunch the country is facing, chose Democrat Barack Obama tight races in North Carolina
unemployment is not an option for many, so imagine as their leader anI d Washington for seat~. no
working five days a week without receiving a paycheck. You The brilliant and popular lli- held by Democrats. Republi
are not volunteering, but fully employed. Still, they refuseinois Senator teamed with Sena- cans were hoping to trim the
to pay your wages. James E. Scott Community Association tor Joseph Biden of Delaware to Democrats 28-22 edge in go%-
(JESCA) employees have become living witnesses of working defeat Republican John McCain ernors.
without a paycheck for the past three months. and his running mate Governor Voters were deciding 153
"The employees have not been paid because of the funding Sarah Pal of Alaska in the na- ballot measures in 36 states.
issue. JESCA is being funded by grants. If they don't have tional polls. Among them. a ban on same-
the money, they don't the funds. No one is forcing anyone Obama announced the death sex marriage in California and a
to work." said Attorney Larry Handfield, an acting chairman of his grandmother, Madel-n ban on most abortions in South
for JESCA. Dunham. after a battle with Dakota.
JESCA, one of South Florida's oldest social service cancer. He had interrupted Warned of record turnout.
agencies, has been struggling to meet payroll. For over campaigning last month to vis- perhaps as many as 135 million
81 years, JESCA has been serving the community with it her. In a statement with his voters, many took advantage of
programs such as Homeless Primary Care, Mental Health, sister, Obama said, -She was state laws that permit earl.' vt-
Intensive Education and Employment, FLOYD House (a day cornerstone of our family, and ing. More than 29 million Amer-
a woman of extraordinary ac- icans cast early ballots, accord-
"The employees have not been paid because complishment, strength and ing to the U.S. Elections Project
ofThe fund isue JC bein fdd bys humility." at George Mason University.
of the funding issue. JESCA is being funded by Besides deciding control of The top concern among elec-
grants. If they don't have the money, they don't the White House, voters in 33 dion officials is a heavy turn-
the funds. No one is forcing anyone to work." states were electing 35 U.S. out overwhelming some polling
Senators, with Democrats bid- places particularly in states
Attorney Larry Handfield ding to build on their fragile 51- without provisions for mn-per-
SActing Chairman for JESCA :49 voting maj.lority. Much of the son early voting, such as Penn-
Sfight was on GOP turf 23 of sylvania.

treatment and after care program for juveniles) and Housing the seats at stake are held by In North Carolina, 2.6 million
Preservation Program. Republicans, and five of those early ballots were cast. In Ohio.
Earlier this year, twenty-year veteran of the agency Miami- have no incumbent running: 12 a battleground McCain was
Dade County Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle stepped down B rack Ob n are held b,, Democrats. fighting to hold, 1.5 milhon ear-
Dad ContyComisionr Drri D.Roleseppd dwnrack ObdMa. ..
from the position of CEO. Since then, Sylvia Styles has All 435 seats in the U.S. ly ballots were cast, more than
Please turn to JESCA 4A 43 ; SPresident C' .t House of Representauves are twice as many as m 2004.




Why are young Black professionals leaving Miami?

Graduates are slowly moving awayfrom South Florida I the community of the commu- The cost of livingcis extremely
nity-at-large." high. Sadly, the cost of living
Adfnerepl uemci UUL11r 101fn flip iicijitvr~ i-qdn .L S..f_4.e


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

It seems easy: go to college,
obtain your degree and return
to your hometown to share
your skills. So why are more
and more Black professionals
leaving Miami?
"There's no jobs, housing is
too expensive and nothing is
being passed down to the next
generation. Miami .has noth-
ing to offer to us. Besides, I'd
rather go somewhere where
my skills will be appreciated,"


said Beatrice Mullings, a 22
year-old Miami native who is a
majoring in Business Manage-
ment at Miami-Dade College.
Last year, Florida Interna-
tional University, The Metro-
politan Center, released a 30
year old study, titled The Sta-
tus of the Black Community
in the Miami-Dade County, to
the Metro-Miami Action Plan
(MMAP) Trust. MMAP is an
agency in Miami-Dade County
that is "committed to address-
ing the socioeconomic dispar-
ity of Miami-Dade County's


AMY DAWKINS


Black community by advocat-
ing, coordinating initiatives
and programs for the benefit of


The reporLt describes Lt e
Black "Brain Drain" as a rap-
id phenomenon occurring
throughout Miami-Dade Coun-
ty. The "Brain Drain" is defined
as young, talented Black pro-
fessional who express a desire
to leave the County.

LIMITED OPPORTUNITIES
FOR BLACKS
"Young Black professionals
are leaving for many different
reasons. Many young people
are lacking corporate presence
and economic opportunities.


tor tle majorny oi resi enLs
in Miami cannot be adjusted
by the salary," said Amy M.
Dawkins, cofounder of Pettus
& Dawkins Financial Group
(PDFG).
Dawkins is correct, but the
report found other factors on
why Blacks are fleeing the
County such as: increased un-
employment, the misrepresen-
tation of Blacks in the Finance,
Insurance and Real Estate sec-
tors, cost of living is too high
and 28.6 percent of Blacks are
Please turn to MOVING 4A


MARLON A. HILL


Barack Obama: A dream fulfilled for legendary filmmaker


Miami-Dade County Commissioner Barbara Jordan, Rep. Oscar Braynon II (D-FL 103rd), U.S. Rep.
Kendrick B. Meek (D-FL) and filmmaker Spike Lee hold The Miami Times newspaper outside the
North Dade branch library. -Miami Times Photo/Charite


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

On that day in August 28,
1963, civil rights leader Dr.
Martin Luther King Jr. deliv-
ered a compelling speech to
over 250,000 people on the
steps of the Lincoln Memorial
in Washington D.C. called "I
Have a Dream" not knowing
that his dream would be ful-
filled by a young Black man
from Illinois called Barack
Obama.
Fillmaker Spike Lee, who
noted for films like "Inside
Man", "Bamboozled", "He Got
Game" "Jungle Fever" and
"Mo' Better Blues" stopped in
Miami last Friday, while on
the Obama campaign, to visit
various early voting sites.
Miami-Dade County had
326,492 residents that par-
ticipated in early voting.
While at the Joseph Caleb
Center, accompanied by U.S.


Rep. Kendrick B. Meek (D-
FL) and welcomed by Miami-
Dade County Commissioner
Audrey, Edmonson (District
3), Lee briefly spoke to The
Miami Times about Sen.
Obama as president.
"I can honestly say that I
didn't see it coming. Once
[Barack] Obama declared
his candidacy that's when I
started to see things play out
for the election," said Lee.
He says that the election of
Obama means a lot because
it is something that will have
a deep impact on the young
people of this time, Black
or White. The importance
of this election will have a
lasting effect that cannot
be understood for years to
come says Lee. In essence,
Lee believes that this presi-
dency will open the door for
the next generation of young
Black children will believe
that running for the White


House is possible.
"As we move forward, peo-
ple and historians will look
at this event as BB means
Before ,Barack and AB, Af-
ter Barack. This is a distinct
moment in history. When he
becomes president, it will
change everything so every-
thing that happens before
him is one way and every-
thing that happens after he
puts his hand on the bible,
the world is changed."
After the Caleb Center, Lee
toured the city making stops
at Chef Creole in Little Haiti,
Mahogany Grill in Carol City
then proceeded to the North
Dade Branch Library where
he was welcomed and greet-
ed by Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Barbara Jor-
dan (District 1)and Rep. Os-
car Braynon II (D-FL 103rd)
and hundred of voters who
were "Fired up and Ready to
vote."


WForecast
Forecast


WEDNESDAY



82TF 64F
MOSTLY SUNNY


THURSDAY



81TF 67TF
SUNNY


FRIDAY



807F 67TF
PARTLY ClOUDY


SATURDAY

-^

80F 65'F
PARTLY CLOUDY


SUNDAY



78F 65F
SCATTERED SHOWERS


MONDAY



79"F 69TF
SCATTERED SHOWERS


TUESDAY



80'F 70'F
SCATTERED SHOWERS


8 90158 001.00 o

















OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Why you should vote for me
After decades of broken politics in Washington, eight
years of failed policies from George Bush, and 20
months of campaigning we are two days away
from change in America.
When we began this journey, we knew how steep our climb
would be. But I believed that Democrats and Republicans
and Americans of every political stripe were hungry for new
ideas and a new kind of politics that favors common sense
over ideology and focuses on the values and ideals we hold
in common as Americans.
Twenty months later, my faith in the American people has
been vindicated. We've come so far and so close to changing
this country. But we can't let up now. Not when so much
is at stake.
We face the worst economic crisis since the Great De-
pression. 760,000 workers have lost their jobs
this year. Businesses and families can't
get credit. Home values are falling and
pensions are disappearing. Wages are
lower than they've been in a decade,
while the costs of health care and
college have never been higher.
But when it comes to the econ-
omy, my opponent has stood
with President Bush every
step of the way voting for
the Bush tax cuts for the
wealthy he once opposed,
voting for the Bush budgets
that spent us into debt, call-
ing for less regulation 20
times just this year. And
now, after 20 months and
three debates, Sen. John
McCain hasn't been able
to tell the American people
one thing he'd do to sepa-
rate his economy from
George Bush's.
Because it's not change to
give a $700,000 tax cut to the
average Fortune 500 CEO,
or billions to oil companies,
big corporations and the
same Wall Street banks that
got us into this mess. It's not
change to come up with
a tax plan that
doesn't
give a
penny
of relief
to more than 100 million middle-class Americans.
We've tried it their way. This country can't take four more
years of the same old politics and the same failed policies
that got us into this mess. It is time to turn the page.
I believe in rewarding work and the workers who create
it. I'll give a tax break to 95 percent of Americans who work
every day and eliminate income taxes for seniors making
under $50,000. If you make under $250,000 which in-
cludes 98 percent of small business owners you won't
see your taxes increase by a single dime.
Unlike John McCain, I'll end tax breaks for corporations
that send our jobs overseas, and give American businesses
a $3,000 tax credit for every job they create here at home.
I'll eliminate capital gains taxes for small businesses and
start-up companies, the engines of our job creation.
We'll create 2 million new jobs by rebuilding our crumbling
roads, bridges and schools. And I'll invest $15 billion a year
in renewable sources of energy to create 5 million green
jobs over the next decade that pay well, can't be outsourced
and help us end our dependence on Middle East oil.
When it comes to health care, we don't have to choose be-
tween a government-run system and the unaffordable one
we have now. If you already have health insurance, the only
thing that will change under my plan is that we will lower
premiums. If you don't, you'll be able to get the same kind
of health insurance that members of Congress get for them-
selves.
And to guarantee every child a world-class education, I'll
invest in early childhood education and recruit an army of
new teachers. But I'll also demand higher standards and
more accountability. And we'll make a deal with every young
American: If you commit to serving your community or your
country, we will make sure you can afford your tuition.
I won't pretend that any of this will be easy especially
now. But as I've said from the day we began this journey,
the change we need isn't just about new programs and poli-
cies. It's about a new politics that calls on our better an-
gels instead of encouraging our worst instincts; one that
reminds us of the obligations we have to ourselves and one
another.
At this defining moment, I ask you to believe, not just in
my ability to bring about change, but in yours. In two days,
we can come together as one nation, one people, and once
more choose our better history. If you will stand with me,
and give me your vote, I promise you we won't just win
this election.
Together, we will change this country and change the
world. --Barack Obama


a!%e %fliami Eime%
IiSSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 r-IW 54ih Sireet
Miam,, Flornda 33127-18 18
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Slation. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694.6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR.. Edlor 1972- 1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publ,shrer Emenius
RACHEL J. REEVES, Put'lsrier and Chairman


'%"i ~


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Assocation
Member ol Ihe Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates. One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales lax lor Florida residents
Periodicals Posiage Paid ai Miami. Florida
Postmaster Send address changes to The Miami Times, PO. Box 270200
Buena Visia Sialion Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Bla'F Pre,,s believes Thal rrierica Can bes lead the world rrom facial and naliornal antagonism when i accords 0
ever, pe:r:or, r-.aiirdl.. of r3:ce cred ,' or .oi,:r rhis or her human and legal rights Haling no person. earning no person. the
Black' Pr". s .irive]s |,.o help ever perc.n in the rirm belief[ hat all persons are hunrl a long as anyone is held back.


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OPINION


BI.ACKS M'ST CONTROL THEIR OW\\N DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5- 11, 2008


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


K 4 '9 t~. ~f 64?~ L~~O ~


Auto dealerships are crying the blues as new car sales levels
are at their lowest in 25 years. General Motors officials say the
country needs to loosen up credit so we can pull out of this
bleak period. One bright spot: High fuel prices earlier this year
dampened sales, but gasoline has collapsed to less than $2 a
gallon in some spots, and that could help in the months ahead.
********
Most of us are not old enough to remember the Great Depression
and how hard times were in 1929, but by any measure, our
current economic suffering pales in comparison with what the
nation endured from 1929 through 1939. Still, most economists
are predicting a long, difficult period ahead. Could it eventually
become a depression? It's possible but not likely. Stay tuned.
Is it true that the recently dedicated Athalie Range Boulevard
was supposed to extend from 54th to 135th Streets, but was
forced to end at 95th Street because of protests from Miami
Shores officials?
********
Crime takes a holiday. The city had no homicides during
October -- the first month in 42 years no one was slain in Miami.
Through September, the city had been averaging about six
homicides per month and last year averaged seven per month.
There were some close calls in October, authorities said. A man
was shot in both legs and had his femoral arteries pierced, but
trauma room doctors saved him.
The Broward school district has sustained deep budget cuts
over the past few years but preserved most jobs. Not anymore;
Superintendent Jim Notter warned of layoffs and major cuts to
programs next school year in the face of a slumping economy and
looming budget cuts.
Local residents are complaining about the practice of rental
offices in these newly constructed affordable housing .units.
Applicants claim they are charging from $50 to 85 to process an
application. Check it out.
Voting lines continued to draw record crowds on Tuesday just
as they did during the early voting periods. The lines started
forming long before the precincts opened and the average waiting
time was two to three hours. More than 2.6 million Floridians
voted early.
Raises for Miami-Dade school teachers got another setback
this week when school district labor attorney Christopher Kurtz
asked for a delay because the district's budget had "changed
dramatically" over the past few weeks and will likely need to be
amended. Stay tuned.


/


- "I -" -


I


vB:-









BLACKS MUST CONTROL TIIEIR OWN DESTINY


A 4 THE MIAMI TIMES NOVEMBER 5-11 8


Sant La Neighborhood Center wins award


Bank of America gives non-profit organization

help in building the community


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@mtiamiitimiesonline.com

Each year, Bank of America,
together with a selected com-
mittee comprised of commu-
nity members, awards non-
profit organizations for their
strong leadership in building
their community. Last Wednes-
day, Sant La Haitian Neighbor-
hood Center, a nonprofit orga-
nization located in the heart of
Little Haiti, was announced as
a proud recipient of the presti-
gious Neighborhood Excellence
Initiative (NEI) Neighborhood
Builder award. The award is
estimated at $200,000 for over
two years.
"I am excited," said Gepsie
M. Metellus, executive director
of Sant La, who applied for the
program after a Bank of Amer-
ica representative suggested
that she look into the Neighbor-
hood Initiative program. After
several attempts, she came out
victorious.
Sant La was established in
late 2000 with the goal of help-
ing assist the growing immigrant
population within the Little
Haiti neighborhood. The agency
was opened in 2001 with fund-
ing from Kennedy Foundation,
the Knight-Leigh Foundation,
the Fisher Philanthropic Fund,
the North Dade Medical Foun-
dation and the Roblee Founda-
tion. Throughout years, they
have gained partnership with
Department of Juvenile Jus-
tice, Department of Children
and Families and Department
of Human Services.
The organization has been
a resource to Little Haiti. The


GEPSIE METULLUS
Executive Director Sant La
Haitian Neighborhood Center
success of their television pro-
gram, "Teleskopi," has provided
resources and education in the
living rooms of many Haitians
and Haitian-Americans.
Metellus briefly told The Mi-
ami Times what she plans on
doing with the award. "I want
people to establish savings ac-
counts for college and emer-
gency situations. We know that
helping our family in Haiti is
important, so I will urge people
to create accounts for Haiti. I
definitely want to have more fi-
nancial literacy education and
workshops to discuss credit
cards, insurance, mortgage,
self-employment, retirement
funds, budgeting, financial se-
curity and banking products. I
see a bright future for Sant La
and I am mapping a strategy
that will help the members of


the community. "
She believes that with the
increasing number of people
working on an average day, by
expanding her television hours
she will receive more viewers.
"We know that our community
has people who work a lot and
don't have timetime for activities."
As one of the perks of winning,
Metullus will take part in a-lead-
ership development program
sponsored by Bank of America
In Bank of America's fifth year
in running this program, the se-
lection committee consisted of
Maria Alonso, senior vice presi-
dent of Greater Miami Market
Manager; Gene Schaefer, presi-
dent of Miami-Dade and Mon-
roe Counties Market for Bank of
America; Bill Diggs, president of
Miami-Dade Chamber of Com-
merce; Harve Mogul, president
& CEO of United Way of Miami-
Dade; Jimmy Morales, part-
ner of Stearns Weaver Miller
Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson,
P.A.; Carla Penn, executive di-
rector of the Overtown Youth
Center and Penny Shaffer, mar-
ket president of Blue Cross Blue
Shield of Florida.
Senior Vice President Maria
Alonso said that the application
dates run from January to June
and nonprofit organization ap-
plicants can nominate them-
selves.
"Bank of America has long
held the belief that a healthy
community is a healthy place to
do business, and we are com-
mitted to creating real impact
in the Miami community," said
Schaefer. "The Neighborhood
Excellence Initiative under-
scores our belief that investing
in leadership is a sound prac-
tice, whether building the ca-
pacity of our nonprofit organi-
zations, developing current and


As recently reported in The Miami Times, five of our historic high

schools in our community could be closed by the end of the year, if

they don't improve to a D or C. If the schools happen to close, who


would be responsible?

KELLEN GAULDEN, 20
Student, Liberty City

I blame the
teachers be-
cause the
students are
failing so ob-
viously they
are not do-
ing enough
to help these
children meet the necessary
requirements to pass. Also,
the students need to dedicate
themselves to want to get a
passing grade. Every students
score affects the school perfor-
mance overall.

JACINTA TILLMAN, 33
Hairdresser, Liberty City

If the schools
do close, I will
hold the com-
munity re-
sponsible be-
cause these
are our kids
and schools.
We have to
stand up in order for these kids
not to fall. I am a graduate of
Miami Central Senior High
and I don't believe that these
kids should be bus to God
knows where, in order to get to
schools. Our silence, regarding
this matter, will show that we
have no say in the future of our
neighborhood.


STACEY BERTIL, 19
Student, Pembroke Park


There will
be so many
people to
point the fin-
ger at the end
of the year if
these schools
close but we
must look in
the mirror first. Each of us are
accountable for the decisions
made in our community about
our kids. If we stay in silence
and rally at these meetings but
do nothing, it's like we are beg-
ging the people to close down
our schools. The time to talk
has come to an end. The teach-'
ers don't need a diploma any-
more, our children do and the
school board doesn't pay for
our children's college tuition
but the parents do. We are all
in this together. If our children
fail then we fail.

ICE-T AVANT, 49
Entrepreneur, Miami

If these
schools shut
down, I think
that the Mi-
ami-Dade
School Board
would be fully
responsible
because they
decide wheth-
er these schools close or not.


With all the money that they in-
vest in the schools, why would
they give up on them?

ESTELLA BROWN, 42
Mail Carrier, Overtown

The person
that started
the [Florida
Comprehen-
sive Assess-
ment Test]
FCAT will be .
accountable
for the closing -
these schools.
If the teachers can't pass then
how do they expect the kids
to pass it? I don't blame the
students because they are fol-
lowing the curriculum that is
presented to them. There a lot
of kids who are excelling in
their classes but they bomb
the FCAT. Unfortunately, these
schools are being graded on
their FCAT performance and
that is not fair at all.



If you have a Street Talk

question or suggestion,

please call the Editorial

Department at 305-694-

6216 or email: scharite@

miamitimesonline.com


Chairman says employees next paycheck is uncertain


JESCA
continued from 1A

been the Interim President &
CEO. The Miami Times tried
numerous times to reach Styles
about the employees salary but
she never returned our calls.
JESCA's financial woes have
lasted .more than a decade.
Back in 1991, two of the agen-
cy's top executives, the presi-
dent Archie W. Hardwick and
his chief fiscal aide George
Thoroman at the time, were
accused of allegedly cash-
ing checks that they wrote to
themselves which amounted
to over $100,000.
"The last time I got paid was
the last week of August. I am
behind three payments on my
rent and I don't know how I
am going to make it in Novem-


ber. I need my money," said
Kimberly Smith, an employee
of JESCA.
Smith, 46, says she has a
child with autism and two
teenagers who are currently
living .with their father be-
cause she does not have any
money to care of them. Soon,
she believes that she will move
in with her brother because
she has no money.
"I have diabetes and I can't
even pick up my medication
so I am receiving samples from
my doctor. The medication is
too expensive for me to afford
the whole thing. I borrowed
$80 from a friend in order to
fill my heart medication."
Tiffany Singletary, single
mother of four, has worked for
the agency as a site manager
for over a year. She says that


6.00 8.00 pm
LIBERTY CITYIMODEL CITY
Belafonte Tacolcy Center
6161 NW 9th Avenue
Miami FL


JESCA owes her $1700 from
three backed paychecks. Since
she is currently employed at
the agency, Singletary, 33,
cannot file for unemployment
and Department of Children
and Families denied her from
receiving checks to help her
support her children.
"It is not fair that I am be-
ing denied pay. I have to come
here from 8 to 5 and leave ev-
ery two weeks without a pay-
check. They have money to pay
gas for the bus and FPL but
not to pay the employees. It is
sad that I have to get money
from other people in order to
get to work. My car was repos-
sessed and I had to move to
a cheaper place. The holidays
is coming and I cannot even
afford to provide my children
with the essential things that


ma -ni ,
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WYNWOOD
Borinquen Health Clinic
3601 N Federal Highway
Miami, FL


6.00 8.00 pm
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Transit Central
3300 NW 32 Avenue
Miami, FL


they need."
Unfortunately, Smith and
Singletary was one of the few
employees who did not mind
speaking to The Times about
the problem at JESCA. Many
of the employees feared they
would lose their jobs if they
went public about JESCA ac-
tions.
Single parent Tina Andrews,
who didn't want to give her
real name, has been employee
for over a year. Fortunately for
Andrews, her parents are as-
sisting with her three children
until she is able to receive a
paycheck. According to An-
drews, all employees were told
in a meeting last month that
they would not be receiving a
paycheck until December.
Many of the employees do
not want to leave their jobs for


Professionals cite job scarcity as a cause


MOVING
continued from 1A

still living in poverty.
Agency for Workforce Innova-
tion in Florida reported in Sep-
tember that Miami-Dade had a
6 percent unemployment rate
compared to the 6.6 percent
rate statewide. In 2007, a total
of 115,000 jobs statewide were
lost.

SPANISH A HINDRANCE?
U.S. Census Bureau reported
in 2006 half of the nation's Cu-
bans resided Miami-Dade.
"Many employers throughout
South Florida want you to be
bi or trilingual," said Dawkins.
But still, Dawkins believes that
this is one of the main factors
that contribute to the flight of
young professionals. The grow-
ing melting pot in South Florida
is slowly closing the doors of
opportunity for young profes-
sionals. The demand to be flu-
ent in Spanish has increased in
Miami-Dade.
Miami Attorney Marlon Hill,
a partner and cofounder of the
delancyhill Law Firm, doesn't
feel that the being introduced
to a second language should
be a set back but a push for-
ward to help people grow in the
corporate world. "Learn how to
elevate their cultural compe-
tency and raise your awareness
of cultural traditions within the
community. Learning another


language is important because
your boss may speak another
language or be of a different na-
tionality," said he said.

MENTORSHIPA MUST.
Dawkins, who lived in Chi-
cago but was raised in Miami,
admits she never imagined re-
turning to Miami after graduat-
ing college but Miami was the
only place that she could ever
call home. She believes that she
was blessed have people in her


circle to help garner the suc-
cess that has today. She says
that many of her fellow gradu-
ates opted to ditch the sunshine
state for a chance at a north-
ern insight. Overall, Dawkins
thinks that you have to develop
something for yourself, even if
the doors shut in your face and
no one wants to help you.

"What's given to you has to be
reciprocated. Many young peo-
ple are lacking professional mo-


ability and mentoring support.
Young Black professionals need
to be exposed to networking op-
portunities attending network-
ing events," said Hill, who is a
Miami Fellows Initiative (MFI)
alumni. A program created by
the Dade Community Founda-
tion, which has opened doors
for many, gives individuals in
the early phases of their careers
a chance to develop and expand
their community leadership in
Miami.


MIAMI-

November 2008
COMMUNITY MEETING CALENDAR
Public Notice
Be a Part of the Empowerment Zone Decision Making Process
Assist Your Neighborhood In Obtaining Its Share of $3.9 Million Dollars of HUD Funds
"I, --, i ,,- :, n... I ,- ,., ...r,,-1.. .: ..I 0 %, ,uio , n,,1 l _... 6. 1 1. r -.,', I .-. ..% -. ... :. .. i I. :)lI I. .: ,.. ".'. . ".3 r"I.-, f"I ,I '',
from interested residents located within n, rt,,r-v.,..v ,,. .,' ,-, ,,.,,, : i. ,I .. ,, .,,i..[ ..( 11 n, ,1 ,i .. r,,,,I ., , i, r, ji,r ,.. ,- r,, .!i, .,. ins are available
online at miamidadeooviced under the Latest News section and the Oveitown Transit Village OCED office. Applications are due by 5:00 om. December 2008. For additional information please contact
Lor Weldon at loriwtmitamidade Gov or (786) 469-2262.
Duties as a Neighborhood Assembly member will include but not limited to:
Review neighborhood projects that request funding and making recommendations based on your review to the Empowerment Zone Advisory Board (EZAB).
Attend monthly meetings held in respective Empowerment Zone
Boundaries for the Empowerment Zones can be found on Miamidade.gov following the Who's my Commissioner link. The meetings are open to the public.

80T 800pm 8I 800pm~r 6 '0 pin O S I sI r i ipro lI


6.00 8 00 pm
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Duarte Park
1776 NW 281h Street
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6:00 8:00 pm
HOMESTEAD
Phlchol Williams Community Center
951 SW 4th Streel
Homestead FL


6 00 8:00 pm
FLORIDA CrriTY
Florida City Commission Chambers
404 West Palm Drive
FL City. FL


5:30 -7:30 pmn
OVERTOWN
Culmer Center
1600 NW 3 Avenue
Miami, FL


5:30-7.30 pm
EAST LITTLE HAVANA
Miami Dade CAA Accion Center
858 West Flagler Steer
Miami. FL


fear that they would become
unemployed for a long period.
"We know right now with the
economy, the job market is re-
ally bad," said Attorney Hand-
field.
According to State Agency
for Workforce Innovation, un-
employment statewide was 6.6
percent last month. The high-
est it's been in 14 years mean-
ing that more than 600,000
are currently unemployed.
The state has eliminated over
100,000 jobs within the past
month. Miami-Dade was 6
percent up from last year's 4.1
percent.


"I am positive that it will be
turned round," said Attorney
'Handfield'.He" says he is un-
certain when the employees
will get paid.
Ten-year veteran of JESCA,
who preferred to be called
Macy Greenly, says the agen-
cy will not survive this finan-
cial blow and it is time to close
JESCA.
This holiday season while
many of us will be indulging
ourselves in turkey, mashed
potatoes and pumpkin, JES-
CA employees will have little
to nothing to feed their fam-
ily.


AM
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENTS ON THE PROPOSED
SUBSTANTIAL AMENDMENT TO THE 2008 ACTION PLAN WITH
FUNDING FROM TITLE III OF THE HOUSING AND
ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT OF 2008 FOR THE NEIGHBORHOOD
STABILIZATION PROGRAM.
Pursuant to the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 and subsequent regulations
issued by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Miami-Dade
County is required to submit a Substantial Amendment to the 2008 Action Plan (Plan) to
demonstrate how allocated funding would be used based on the Act
Title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 appropriated $3.92 billion for
assistance to state and local governments for the redevelopment of abandoned and
foreclosed homes. State and local governments may use the funds for financial mechanisms
such as down payment and closing cost assistance to low- to moderate-income
homebuyers; purchase and rehabilitate foreclosed and abandoned homes and residential
properties; development of land banks for future development; demolition of blighted
structures; and the redevelopment of vacant land. Miami-Dade County has been allocated
$62,207,200 in HUD Neighborhood Stabilization funds.
This document is required by HUD to use these funds and represents the culmination of a
coordinated planning process with involvement of county departments, local governments,
including entitlement cities, affordable housing partners and the residents of Miami-Dade
County.
The Plan consists of:
*Areas of Greatest Need Public Comments
Distribution and Uses of Funds NSP Information by Activity
Definitions and Descriptions Total Budget
Low Income Targeting Performance Measures
*Acquisitions and Relocations
The Plan Includes Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) funds only. The primary
objective of this HUD Program is the development of stable urban communities
characterized by the provision of decent housing, a suitable living environment, and
expanding economic opportunities for individuals/households having low, moderate and
middle incomes. While the NSP Program's intent is to principally benefit low, moderate and
middle income persons, each activity must specifically address only one of the three (3)
National Objectives: 1) to benefit low, moderate and middle income persons, at or below
120% of area median income.
The resources available will be allocated to address the greatest need in the County within
eligible census tracks and block groups. The Plan lists the activities for funding to address
areas of greatest need and is available at the Miami Dade County Office of Community and
Economic Development (OCED), located at 701 NW 1st Court, Miami, FL 33136 until
November 20, 2008.
The Plan is alsoavailable on OCED's web site at the following address beginning October
29, 2008: http://ww.miamidade.gov/ced/. OCED encourages residents of Miami-Dade
County to express their comments regarding the proposed Plan by writing to Hana Eskra,
Acting Director, Miami-Dade County Office of Community and Economic Development at
701 NW 1st Court, 14th floor, Overtown Transit Village Building, Miami, Florida 33136.
Written comments on the Plan must be received by and will be accepted until Thursday,
November 20, 2008. A public hearing Is scheduled as part of the Board of County
Commissioner's meeting on November 20, 2008 at 9:00 am in the Commission
Chambers, located on the second level of the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW 1st
Street, Miami, FL. The purpose of this meeting Is to give the public an opportunity to
comment on this proposed Plan Amendment.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunities in employment and
does not dismriminate against persons with disabilities in its program or services. For material
in an altemate format, a sign-language interpreter or other accommodations, please call
(786) 469-2100, at least five days in advance.


Miami-Dade County provides equal access and opportunity in employment and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its program or services. For material in
an alternate format, a sign language interpreter or other accommodations, please call the Office of Community and Economic Development at 769-469-2112 least five (5) days in
advance.


, i IIIL IIIfiv vL II V9 -IU %V I ,








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


FMU receives two national awards during annual conference in Detroit


Florida Memorial Univer-
sity's chapter of Public Rela-
tions Student Society of Amer-
ica (PRSSA) won the Dr. F.H.
Teahan Chapter Award for
Chapter Development during
the national PRSSA Confer-
ence Awards Ceremony at the
Detroit Museum of Art in De-
troit, Michigan last month.
The chapter's members, ac-
companied by chapter advisor
Dr. Mary-Angie Salva-Ramirez,
accepted the honor in front of
an attending audience exceed-
ing 1,000 during the ceremo-
nial event on October 27. The
award was given to Florida
Memorial's chapter on the ba-
sis of successfully building
membership, promoting ongo-
ing activities, maintaining and
encouraging active member-


ship involvement, and demon-
strating effort and creativity
in maintaining the chapter.
Dr. Salva-Ramirez and mem-
bers of the chapter received
a $300 monetary award with
a plaque as a token to honor
their achievements.
"This award is really big
news in the world of public
relations," stated Dr. Salva-
Ramirez.
"Though our chapter is so
small, we've had two Gary
Yoshimura winners, a Betsy
Plank Student of the Year win-
ner and now this-a Best Chap-
ter Development award-all in
five years!" Dr. Salva-Ramirez
admitted that finding students
and financial resources to
maintain the chapter are con-
stant struggles, but she also


Members of Florida Memorial University's chapter of Public Relations Student Society of
America. Pictured are the following (from left to right): Tyrone Hall, Gary Yoshimura Scholar-
ship winner, historian and immediate past-president of PRSSA; Deja Wallace, vice president of
PRSSA; Rhonda Mitchell, president of PRSSA; Dr. Mary-Angie Salva-Ramirez, PRSSA chapter
advisor; and,Terrance Davis, PRSSA member.


acknowledged the diligence
that is required in attaining
the chapter's national accom-
plishments.
Also during the awards cer-
emony, PRSSA member and
senior communications ma-
jor Tyrone Hall received the
Gary Yoshimura Scholarship
for his outstanding potential
as a future public relations
practitioner. He succeeds
2007 alumna Esther Fraser in
becoming the second Florida
Memorial University student
to win the $2,400 award and
receive national recognition.
Dr. Salva-Ramirez was also a
nominee for the Outstanding
Faculty Advisor Award during
the conference for motivating
students and educating within
the field.


Parents and school officials meet to discuss F schools


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Miami-Dade Superintendent
of Schools Alberto Carvalho will
meet with parents to discuss
the four low-performing Miami-
Dade Schools in our community
at the Joseph Caleb Center Au-
ditorium, 5400 N.W. 22 Avenue,
on Wednesday, November 12 at
6 p.m.
The low-performing schools
include: Miami Central Senior
High, Miami Edison Senior High,
Holmes Elementary and Liberty
City.
"The reality is that the children
at these schools have been fac-
ing challenges in succeeding for
many years. As Superintendent,
I have made a commitment to





am ttIkw

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raising achievement for all of
the students in this school dis-
trict, including the students at
these low-performing schools.
To do this, I am calling together
parents, community leaders and
concerned citizens to outline a
plan of action and enlist their as-
sistance," said Carvalho.
The school performance
grades released this past sum-
mer showed that Miami Cen-
tral Senior High, Miami Edison
Senior High, Holmes Elemen-
tary and Liberty City Elemen-
tary along with Miami Carol City
High, North Miami Senior High,
and Miami Norland Senior High
all received F's.
In August, North Miami High,
Carol City High, and Norland
High received a change in ad-


4boo4 -


ALBERTO CARVALHO
Miami-Dade Superintendent of Schools
ministration following a state
mandate. Dr. Marcos M. Moran,
region superintendent of District
1 schools, previously told The Mi-
ami Times that if the schools re-


ceived D's or F's for two consecu-
tive years, the principals would
be moved to another school due
to lack of improvement. The
mandate came down from the
state of Florida Department of
Education, according to Miami-
Dade School Board member Wil-
bert Holloway.
Carvalho will be informing par-
ents and members of the com-
munity about the implemented
mandates by the state, and ex-
plain the school district's plan to
raise student achievement to pre-
vent the closing of the schools.
Schools in other districts are
facing the similar problems.
School officials will meet with
those parents whose kids attend
those schools within the coming
weeks.


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008






6A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


%Sim-i )wtt bra. of I awfnio >tum atwatdboM


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indicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


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Young troopers for Obama
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
For most kids, having a day off from school seems like a perfect
day to catch on sleep or watch their favorite television show. But
for two young ladies, Sage Robinson and Angela Clayton, spent
Tuesday traveling to various voting precincts to thank the senior
citizens for enduring the long lines to wait.
Both, Robinson, 7, and Clayton, 5, are students at Frederick
Douglass Elementary in Overtown. They were escorted around
town by their grandmother who is a teacher at North Dade Mid-
dle School. Robinson and Clay rewarded senior citizens waiting
in line to vote with a bag marked, "Thanks for voting," and pad-
ded socks to console their tired feet.
"If I could vote, I would vote for Barack Obama because he is
going to make change for all of us and we will be able to go to the
stores and shop," said Robinson.

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MIAMI-DADE'S


TRANSIT FUTURE

Join County officials at the

People's Transportation Plan Summit

Find out what the People's Transportation Plan (PTP) has accomplished
and what challenges and choices we now face as a community moving
forward. Don't miss this opportunity to share your ideas with us.

Saturday, November 15, 2008
8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Convention Center at the Miami Mart Airport Hotel
711 NW 72 Ave., Miami, FL 33126

Free bus service will be available from the following locations departing at 8 a.m.:
Golden Glades Park & Ride lot
Palmetto Metrorail Station
Florida International University SW 107th Ave. and 16th St.
Dadeland North Metrorail Station
Washington Ave. and Lincoln Rd. in Miami Beach
To take advantage of this free bus service, you must call 786-469-5550
or send an email to mdtoutreach@miamidade.gov.
For additional information, call 311.
A complimentary Continental breakfast and a light lunch will be provided.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


w


. W


*







7A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


S. ,. opy righted Mate
... .. .... Copyrighted Materi


V4


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Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers
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ZZ -- - M I,' 77-M-11. 7-


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\VN DEl'INY


<< : e =. ._-M EM'a: : -: _


. ,








The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


The silent killer in the church


By: Sandra J Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn
October was Domestic Vio-
lence Awareness Month and
the secret is out. The events
that played out between the
Prophetess Juanita Bynum and
her husband Bishop Thomas
Weeks in August 2007 shocked
the church and opened a door
that many tried to keep shut.
Bynum was badly beaten by
her husband in an Atlanta ho-
tel parking lot. Within days and
months, many Christians and
people all over the world won-
dered how domestic violence
could take refuge in the homes
of two servants of God.
Two weeks ago, the Carrie
Meek Foundation organized a
Men to Men Conference at Mi-
ami-Dade College's, North Cam-
pus. The conference was de-
signed to bring a group of men
within the community together
to invoke a dialogue about do-
mestic violence against women.
As domestic violence has in-
vaded the lives of many church-
going people, Bishop Victor T.
Curry of New Birth Missionary
Baptist Church said, "I am re-
minded of the saying that says,
'Hurt people hurt people.' Do-
mestic violence does not dis-
criminate."
National Criminal Justice As-
a A1.howik


sociation (NCJA) reported in an
article, "States, Federal Gov-
ernment Increasing Focus on
Violence Against Women," on
September/October 1990, that
one-third of all female homicide
victims were killed by husbands,
ex-husbands, boyfriends or ex-
boyfriends.
Pastor J.R. Thicklin, CEO of
Destiny By Choice, an organi-
zation that advocates against
family violence, says that the
church is silent on this subject
making the problem harder to
deal with. He believes that the
leaders on the pulpit should be
the mouthpiece because people
are hurting in the church, and
they don't know where to turn
,:to discuss this issue. "The si-
lence is slowly killing the inno-
cence" says Ihicklin.
"It is an issue in this entire
country, in this community and
specifically inthe African-Amer-
ican community. A strong pres-
ence in leadership is needed to
correct this problem," said Di-
rector Robert Parker of the Mi-
Sami-Dade Polkice Department.
According tc Parker, in the
Northwest section of Miami-
Dade County, there has been
an increase in domestic crimes.
-v Florida Department of Law
Enforcement reports in 2007,
there were 11,012 cases of do
Please turn td CHURCH 16B

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\\N DETIINY


Analysis: Religion used to)


divide, mnik in


'08 race


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9A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008

Deacon's Ministry Day at St. John


*





REV. DR. JIMMY BRYANT
The Deacons of St. John
Missionary Baptist Church
will observe their annual day
on Sunday, November 9. The
special guests for the 3 p.m.


service will be Rev. Dr. Jimmy
Bryant and his congregation
of the Antioch Baptist Church
of Liberty City. Deacon Rob-
ert Baker serves as Chairman
of the Deacon's Ministry.
Other activities for the
month are: Mission Circle
# 1 Ministry Day on Sunday,
November 16 and Thanks-
giving Service on November
27. The church mourns the
homegoing of deaconess Nao-
mi Tompkins who diligently
served this congregation un-
til she relocated to Georgia a
few years ago. "Well-done thy
good and faithful servant."
Rev. Charles Uptgrow, Assis-
tant Pastor.


Iota's big 'Apple for the Teacher' luncheon


MACEDONIA MALE
CHORUS ANNIVERSARY

.----


N.
6;'
a-


REV. ALVERTIS HILTON
On Sunday, November 9,
Macedonia MBC Male Chorus
will climax its anniversary at
4 p.m. Rev. Alvertis Hilton of
2nd Corinth M.B. Church
and congregation will render
the service.


Heavenly Lights 4th
On Sunday November 9, the
Heavenly Lites will celebrate
their 4th singing anniversary 4
p.m. at United House of Prayer,
4600 N.W. 2 Avenue. Featuring
The Wimberleys, The Zionettes,


Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc.
Gamma Alpha Chapter cor-
dially invites the community
to their 22nd 'Apple for the
Teacher' luncheon, honoring
outstanding school teachers
on Saturday, November 8, 11
a.m. Rusty Pelican Restau-
rant, Key Biscayne, Florida.
WPLG Channel 10 Meteorolo-
gist/Weather Producer, Ge-
neen Anderson is the keynote
speaker. For ticket informa-
tion call, 305-681-0992.

singing anniversary
Miami Blessed, special guests
Brothers of Harmony of Braden-
ton, Florida, and many others.
Admission $10 in advance, $12
at the door,10 years and under
free. Doors open at 3p.m.


Fellowship with Soul Saving
Soul Saving M.B. Church, Rev. the men the 3:30 p.m. service.
Jodie Alexander, pastor invites We invite you to worship with
you to our Annual Fellowship Day us. For more information contact
November 9th. The women are in Pastor Jodie Alexander at 305-
charge of the 11 a.m. service and 696-3389.


Subscribe


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The Miami Times


leath


SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 5 11 2008
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BLACKS MUS'S CONTROL THEIR OWN DEL'VINi 11B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL TlEIR \OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


He never changes


It is surprising, and disap-
pointing to me that so many
people, including Christians,
believe that the Bible is old
fashioned, and the information
is not current for our situa-
tions and lifestyles of today. It is
amazing to think that God who
knows everything did not know
that societies and cultures
would change. It is amazing to
think that God's Word does not
still hold true for us today. In 2
Kings 7, the Israelites were in a




'f "i n nn)n ..f.


First Annual Classic Fun Day
Jamboree Tournament will be
held on Saturday, November 15
at Gwen Cherry Park from 11
a.m. 4 p.m. Jamboree Tour-
nament is a tackle football tour-
nament for players ages 4 and 5
yrs. old. For more information,
please visit: www.leaguelineup.
com/superpeeweeleague

University of Miami Choral
Studies Program will have a
concert on Sunday, November
9 with "Musical Patchwork" at
Gusman Concert Hall on the
University of Miami campus
in Coral Gables. For more in-
formation, please contact the
Choral Studies Program at 305-
284-4162.



,%- "*1


New Way Fellowship Praise
and Worship Center will have
its 33rd church convocation
until November 23 nightly at
7:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call Carolyn Banks
at 305-625-7246.


situation very similar to what is
happening to us today. There
was a famine, and food and
other necessities were scarce.
I know that we are not in the
midst of a famine today, but I
do believe that we can all agree
that the financial situation in
our country, and in many of our
private lives is not a good one.
Verses 3 11 relates the story
of four lepers who were starving
to death. Because of the famine,
there was little hope of the hand-




s(z


City of Miami Mayor's Office
of Film & Cultural Affairs in-
vites art lovers to the How to Art
Fair III on Saturday, November
8 from 3:30 p.m. 6 p.m., at the
Collins Building, Miami Design
District. For more information,
please contact Carolina 0. Gar-
cia at 305-804-3630 or Kather-
ine Sanoja at 305-860-3823.

Miami-Dade Alumni Chap-
ter of Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity invites you to travel with
them when the Wildcats take on
the Rattlers in Orlando on No-
vember 22. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-505-1235.

The Future Business Lead-


Saint Mary's Wesleyan
Methodist Church will cel-
ebrate its 85th anniversary on
Sunday, November 9 at 10:30
a.m. For more information,
please contact 305-650-9493
or 786-663-0998.


outs that lepers relied on for
food. They decided to surrender
to the Aramean army. Though
these people were their enemies,
they felt that if the army decided
not to take them in, and instead
killed them, they could be in no
worse condition than they were
in already. However, to their
surprise, and shortly their de-
light, they discovered that the
camp was deserted of people,
but all of their supplies includ-
ing food, clothing and valuable
items were present. They took
as much as they were able to
carry, and decided to hide what
they had taken and tell no one
of their unexpected treasure.
After some discussion, they
decided that this would not be
right, and they should inform


ers of America of Miami-Dade
County will be having their
leadership breakfast at the Sig-
nature Gardens Banquet Hall
on November 6 from 9 a.m. -
12 p.m. For more information,
please contact Faasiu Kelly at
305-621-5681.

Diana Lowenstein Fine Arts
is pleased to announce the
opening reception and solo ex-
hibitions of Xawery Wolski and
Vicenta Casafi during the No-
vember Wynwood Art District
second Saturday gallery walk.
The opening reception will take
place on November 8 from 7:30
p.m. -10 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please contact Jose
Diaz at 305.576.1804 or email:
josediaz@dlfinearts.com

The Miami International
Film Festival miffF), pre-
sented by Miami Dade College
(MDC), recently announced its



New Hope Missionary Bap-
tist Church will tour the Holy
Land Presentation in Orlando
on Saturday, November 22. For
more information, please call
305-696-7745.

Put God First Ministries
International presents "Three
Nights Of Release Conference"
beginning on Friday, November
7 9.


their fellow countrymen of their
discovery. They went to the city
gates and announced that the
camp of their enemy was de-
serted and gave the good news
that food, horses, donkeys, and
other things were in the camp
in abundance. After I read these
verses recently, I realized that
this account is a timely mes-
sage for us today. Because of
our current economic condition,
many of our friends, family, and
neighbors are in despair. Many
have lost thousands of dollars
in retirement funds and other
investments, and still others
have lost their homes and jobs.
Some feel hopeless. They do
not know what they are going
to do. They feel that they have
nowhere to turn to change their


first Florida-based film com-
petition. Festival organizers
will accept submissions for the
Florida Focus Short Film Com-
petition until December 19. For
more information about the Mi-
ami International Film Festival
or submission details about the
Florida Focus Short Film Com-
petition, visit www.miamifilm-
festival.com, or call 305-237-
3456.

The Beta Beta Lambda
Chapter of the Alpha Phi Al-
pha Fraternity will meet on
Saturday, November 8 at 7 p.m.
at the Florida Memorial Univer-
sity, Lehman Aviation Building
Auditorium.

The New Beginning Praise
Tabernacle will have a night
concert on December 31 at 12
a.m. For more information,
please contact 305-681-0119.



Mt. Vernon M.B.C. invites
you to come out and join them
as they prepare for their pas-
tor's seventh appreciation ser-
vice on Wednesday night at 7:30
p.m. For more information,
please call 305-754-5300.

Bible Missionary Baptist
Church will be celebrating its
pastor's fifth anniversary from
today until Sunday, November
9. For more information, please
call 305-757-9000.


financial situations. We who
know God need to spread the
Good News. We need to encour-
age each other, and our coun-
trymen. We must remember
that no matter who will sit in
the White House, God still sits
on His Heavenly throne. He is
still listening to His people. He
is our mortgage broker, banker,
financial advisor, and provider.
Nothing is a surprise to Him. In
fact, there are Godly men and
women who warned us years
ago of this economic decline, we
Should not evenbe surprised
at the financial turn of events.
The Bible tells us that God does
nothing, or allows anything to
occur that He does not first re-
veal to His servants, the proph-
ets.


The Camille and Sulette
Merilus Foundation will be
having a special turkey and
food drive on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 25. For more information,
please call Camille Merilus at
305-687-9950.

Faith of Inspiration Deliv-
erance Center will be having
a Gospel Comedy Night Out on
Saturday, November 8 at 5:45
p.m. at the Embassy Suites Ho-
tel, Miami International Airport.
For more information, please
call 305-494-8238.
John Wesley Methodist
Church invites the community
to its Community Health Fair,
which will be held on Saturday,
November 8 from 9 a.m. 12:30
p.m. For more information,
please call 305-693-7417.

Joint Coalition Alumni of
Miami-Dade County will be
having their next meeting on



Miracle Outreach Ministry
will be having its pastor's an-
niversary on November 9 at 4
p.m. For more information,
please call 786-470-7990.

A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to its Women's Day
Service on Sunday at 11:30
a.m.

You are invited to attend


God is still God. He still loves
us. He still has plans for our:
lives. Certainly the unsaved will
be panicked if we who know the
Almighty God are in despair
and depression. Remind your
face that 'the joy of the Lord
is our strength!' Joy is not de-
pendent of circumstances, but
on the Lord. If you believe that
the Lord is the same as He was
when He caused the Armeanian
army to hear noises and fear
that they were being invaded,
flee and leave all that they had
for the Lord's people to recover
- then you must believe that He
is the same God that will make
a way for us today. He is not
JUST a God of yesterday, or the
Old Testament. He is a present
help for today.


November 7 at 4 p.m. at the
African Heritage Cultural Arts
Center. All Miami Northwest-
ern Sr. High, Booker T. Wash-
ington High and North Dade
High alumni are encouraged to
attend. For more information,
please call 305-693-4317.

Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's office will be having a
Sealing and Expungement Pro-
gram on Tuesday, November 18
from 4 p.m. 8 p.m. at the Mt.
Zion AME Church. For more
information, please call the
State Attorney's Community
Outreach Division at 305-547-
0724.

ICABA, multimedia brand for
Black professionals and entre-
preneurs, will have their launch
reception on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 18 at the Ritz-Carlton in
Fort Lauderdale from 6:30 p.m.
- 8:30 p.m.


Mount Olive Primitive Baptist
Church's annual Harvest Re-
vival from November 10 14,
7:30 p.m. nightly. For more in-
formation, please call 305-836-
8554.

Partners In Christ Faith
Ministries International in-
vites you to their Sunday 11
a.m. service and Wednesday
7:30 p.m. service. For more in-
formation, please call 786-317-
1580.


t ARIP qmtdmmd be

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13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Pt w rturniag So I *rria
















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nlioch .ssimonw Baptis poWtolic Revival (cnter /I.oago Baptist (hn-nh MLt CalSIvy M TAionar 93 'Strwt Cornimunil. f'New hihlh M.15. Church
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BLACK S MUST C(ONIROL IllEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


IFling fish Iw icr a wrt'k mnai help dialwlcs paltints


-- MEMO_ -. -,.9. "D,4 t "_ __ *mm-m m,

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Fite wa to hrlp p~,~- .ev. ,,-*- tnl, sumr tIrnage child
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tflT


rIna?, I mia IDOWNOWNmENTISTRY


* COSMETIC & IMPLANT DENTISTRY
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WE ACCEPT ALL
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BOSTON, MASS
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The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the ight to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any
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* Insurance Welcome We Offer Financial Arrangements
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Evening and Saturday Appoinlmenis






15B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


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and Bishop victorr T. CurrN

BAPTIS PCHURCh d m
R..hp11cto rCa, a mm. O 01 1
CATN(ORAL. O d au ma

No\emb& 10-14. 2008

$er'tces begin 7pjm. ni


an


us each nioht for a throwb
il iered by timeless
+ )'* --- ^-


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November 12th & 13th


mnta, GA


Doors ope


And to close us ius...
Novem rl ft


7.--
- .7-- 1


* *. -C .,
* ,, *..


- Chicago; IL


Miami's own Second Chapte and l
n at 5:30p.m. The A-.igh. lou,6


This event is free and open to the public.
"e theplot


2300 NW 135 Street, Miami, FL 33167- For more information, call 305-685-3700.


I h. a


- -
inw~ *


Looking for an EXtraordinary School?
Are you a Teacher or Administrator affected by the recent
layoffs? We are looking for educators in science, reading
and math with a passion for educating children! You must
have experience advancing the lowest 20% of students. We
are looking for an administrator among administrators. Must
have experience as a Principal or Assistant Principal
preferably in an inner-city school. Great Salary and
Benefits Immediate Hire!
Call (305) 635-5482, Fax or e-mail resume to: (305) 636-
2888 or excelchar@bellsouth.net


Join


Nme.. 1 .&
^Nbvemrtfir 10 /


TINYY


BLACKS M iL'ST CO CONTROL THEIR o\\N DE


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H1ad hatitl% tinlrlhute it 'righl aiin throughout ti ak-tge











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES NOVEMBER 5-1 8


The silent killer speaks in the church


CHURCH
continued from 8B
mestic violence in Miami-Dade
County.
Pastor Peggy Carter knows
irsthand. Carter, now 49,
spent 13 years in a relation-
ship plagued by domestic
violence. She was married to
a man who was addicted to
drugs and who was verbally
and physically abusive. "He
would abuse me because I
had gained weight and he said
he didn't want a fat woman
or when he needed money to
purchase drugs." At the time,
Carter was a baby Christian
trying to live a godly life by go-


ing to church praising, shout-
ing, and worshipping every
Sunday; and waking up to the
abuse on Monday. Her exte-
rior could not compare to her
interior because she said she
was hurting on the inside.
"I wore a mask so that no
one would see me."
She admits that she didn't
turn to the church for help
because she didn't feel that
there was anyone to trust.
She feared that she would be
talked about by the congre-
gation. "It is easy to say that
I will pray for you and then
they gossip your business
to the whole church." Carter
said that she did have an is-


sue with pride and was a little
insecure so she cared what
people thought about her. Her
experience has helped her to
open a ministry called Dam-
aged Goods Ministry, which
helps women who have been
victims of violence restore
their self-worth.
According to the Black
Church and Domestic Vio-
lence Institute, domestic vio-
lence is defined as any coer-
cive behavior that one uses to
dominate another in an inti-
mate relationship whether it
be physical (beating), verbal
(threats), sexual (rape), and
psychological (mind games).
Ninety to ninety-five percent


of domestic violence victims
are women, and many of
these women are mostly ac-
tive members in their local
churches.
Lucia Davis-Radford, chair
of Miami-Dade Domestic Vio-
lence Oversight Board and
also a concerned advocate
for the community, encour-
ages faith leaders to discuss
more about domestic violence
in the pulpit. Many pastors
and preachers are advising
victims to seek counseling
with their spouse says Davis-
Radford but domestic violence
is a typically about power and
control. One person wishes to
be dominate over the other.


r. *%A a| elw 1 o am pNWAOUW


Copyrighted Material



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Available from Commercial News Providers


First Baptist M.B.Church Of Brownsville

Celebrates

3rd Pastoral Anniversary Of

Rev. Kenneth & First Lady Clearetha McGee


Pre-Anniversary Services



Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2008
7:30 PM
Rev. Woodrow Jenkins
St. Luke M.B. Church


Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008
7:30 PM
Moderator C.P Preston
Peaceful Zion M.B. Church


Friday, Nov. 7, 2008
7:30 PM
Rev. Emmanuel Whipple
Mt. Nebo M.B. Church


Anniversary Services



f Sunday, Nov. 9, 2008
7:30 AM Service
Rev. Ranzar Thomas
New Generation Baptist Church






Sunday, Nov. 9, 2008
I I :AM Service
Rev. Gaston Smith
a bi Friendship Baptist Church





Sunday, Nov. 9, 2008
4PM Service
Rev. Curtis Thomas
New Covenant M.B. Church


The First Baptist M.B. Church of Brownsville will celebrate the 3rd Pastoral Anniversary of Rev. Kenneth Mcgee. Pre-anniversary services
Wednesday, November 5th through Friday, November 7th. Anniversary services will culminate on Sunday, November 9th with guest
ministers bringing spirit-filled messages at 7:30 am, 11 am and 4 pm. Under Pastor McGee's anointed leadership, First Baptist has developed
numerous new ministries. The church is expanding and everything is moving by the power of God. We invite the community to come and
share in this grand 3rd anniversary celebration of our esteemed Pastor and First Lady. Sis. Stephanie Cooper. 2008 Anniversary Chairperson

For Information 305-635-8053 4600 NW 23rd Ave.


Bible Baptist Church
Celebrates the Fifth Anniversary of
Pastor P. Fitzgerald Readon, Sr.

Special Guest Speakers

November 5th: Wednesday Night- 7:30pm
Rev. Eric Readon. Pastor
New Beginning Missionary Baptist Church of Miami Gardens

November 6th: Thursday Night- 7:30pm
Rev. Kenneth Dukes. Pastor
New Jerusalem Primitive Baptist, Church of Miami

November 7th: Friday Night- 7:30pm
Rev. Ranzer Thomas. Pastor
New Generation Missionary Baptist Church of Miami

November 9th: Sunday Morning- 11:00am
Rev. Dale L. Powell. Pastor
New Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church of Miami

November 9th: Sunday Evening- 4:00pm
Rev. Gaston Smith. Pastor
Friendship Missionary Baptist Church of Miami

9801 NW 24th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33147
(305) 836-7644


NoS5th Substance of unseen things..
Hebrews 11:1
No 6th Without faith it is impossible ...
Hehbrews 11:6
Nov7Ot By faith Abraham obe ed...
Hebrtw 11:8
Nou8th 0%e of little faith?
NMatLhe- 6:30
Nuo9th the just shall lihe by his faith...
Hubakkuk 2:4
No% 10th When Jcs, us a their faith, ...
Mark -2:5
Nox Ilth Where is.,our failh?
Luke 8:25
Novl2th Thi faith hath made thee whole...
I.ukc 8:48


I iuF'


!1 "











17B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


Range
JOSEPH R. NEWBOLD, 66,
stock puller for
A & G Grocery
Store, died Oc-
tober 22. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Caro-
line; sons, Rue-
ben and Steven;
brother, Richard
(Catherine); a host of grandchil-
dren, aunts, uncles, other relatives
and friends. Services was held.

LILLIE MAE WIGGINS, 96, wife
of the late Rev. illm"--'*q a
P.W. Wiggins
former Pastor
of the Antioch
M.B. Church
of Liberty City
died October
27. Survivors
include Neph-
ew, David Denmark of Cleveland,
Ohio; niece, Lillie Mae Thorpe,
and a host of other nieces, neph-
ews, and relatives. Service 11:00
a.m., Saturday, Second Canaan
M.B. Church.

ELIZABETH DELORES
HIGGS, 64, day
care teacher,
died October
31. Survivors
include: sons,
Craig Isaac,
and Corey;
daughter, Karen
1. Brown (Joe);
sisters, Barbara Williams, Cheryl
Fox, and Regina Smith- Fluitt;
aunts, Alva McCloud; and Alice
Knowles; niece, Chaynea Fox-
Sampson, a special friend, Betty
Cooper; eight grandchildren; five
great-grandchildren and a host of
other relatives and friends. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, St. Philip Neri
Catholic Church.

JACK LEE DAVIS, 74, retired
electrician, died
October31. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Brenda;
dau g h ters,
Towana Barker d ..
(Willie M hes),
Lawana -Parrot
(Rev. Behjami)
and Maria Hernandez (Joe); sister,
Margaret Hicks of Wake Forest,
North Carolina; cousins, Eugene,
and Louis Griffin of Wake Forest,
North Carolina; two nieces, Pam
and Kelly Jackson of Wake Forest,
North Carolina; four grandchildren;
one great-grandchild and a host of
other relatives and friends. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Saturday, Christian
Fellowship M.B. Church.

CALLIE PASCAL, 59, secretary,
Miami Dade Community College,
died October 28. Final rites and
burial in Washington, D.C.

FREDERICK DUNLAP, 48, cor-
rection officer died October 28.
Service 1'p.m., Wednesday in the
chapel.

Van Orsdel f
GESSIN "JOE" JOSEPH, 85,
maintenance
technician, died
October 28
This beloved
father, grandra-
ther, and great

embodied Live.
Laugh & Love.
Loved, Admired, & Appreciated by
a plethora of family and friends.
Survivors include: Wife: Bertha;
Children: Dr. Butler Jean Louis,
Lesly Jean-Robert Jean Louis, Mi-
chaelle Vincent, Marc-Arthur Jean
Louis Marie, Berthine Joseph Mer-
rique; 18 Grandchildren, and 4
greatgrandchildren.
Interests: God, range of aca-
demia from linguistics, history,
culture, film, arts, and music. He
was an avid self learner, story-
teller, philosopher, educator, and
counselor.He loved to dance,
travel, and recite poetry, proverbs,
and famous quotes from greats
like Archimedes. Visitation Friday
5-10 p.m. in the chapel, 3333 NE
2 Ave., Miami, 305-573-4310. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, St. James


Catholic Church.


Grace
ELINOR H. BAYARD-MOISE,
84, housewife, died October 28 in
Jackson North. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.


Jay _
GAD MAYS JR, 80, carpenter,
died October
20 in Jackson
South Com-
munity Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Second Baptist
Church.

WILLIE MOTES, 60, laborer,
died October
26 in Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Final rites in Zu-
eblon, Georgia.



AVA ROSE PAUL, 2, died Octo-
ber 26. Service
was held.


JUDITH PAUL 29, dental assis-
tant, died Octo-
ber 26. Service
was held.






RONDEL CAMPBELL, 32,
laborer, died
November 2
in Homestead
Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


JAMES KELLER SR, 70, long-
shoreman, died
October 31 in i
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


BETTY BAKER, 70, customer
service representative, died Oc-
tober 28 in Jackson South Com-
munity Hospital. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Morning Star Missionary
Baptist Church.

Gregg L. Mason
MARIE THERESE LORETTE
VERNA, 79, teacher, of Haiti, died
October 31 in Serenity Gardens.
Viewing Friday 2 to 9 p.m. Service
noon Saturday, St. James Catholic
Church. Interment Dade Memorial
Park.

LEILA H. DUCHESNE, 77,.
singer, songwriter, died November
2 in North Shore Hospital. Visita-
tion, Friday 10 a.m., service 11
a.m., in the chapel.

LOUISE D. DEJARDINE, 83,
executive secretary for Sears,
died October 28 in Jackson North
Medical Center. Service 10 a.m.,
Monday, St. Rose of Lima Catholic
Church. Interment Dade Memorial
Park.

Carey Royal Ram n
IVAN COOPER, 84, retired, died
October 30 at home Service 10
a.m., Friday in the chapel.

DOROTHY WATSON, 45,
homemaker, died October 26 at
home. Service 11 a.m., Thursday
in the chapel

JASON SAWYER, 26, auto
salesman, of West Palm Beach,
died November 1 in Vitas Health-
care System. Final rites and burial
in New Jersey.


Honor

Your Loved One

With an


In Memoriam

In The


Miami Times


Richardson
LAWYER CUFF JR, 69, ma-
chine operator,
died Novem-
ber 1 at home.
Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
St. Matthews
Freewill Baptist
Church.

KATHERINE WILSON, 'SIS-
TER,' 91, retired
cook, died Oc- ..
tober 31. Sur-
vivors include:
daughters, Mil-
dred of Atlanta,
Ga, Dr. Harriette
Wilson-Greene
(James), Dorth-
ea Rolle (Mark), Dorothy Jenkins
(Michael), Natteline Edge of At-
lanta, Ga; adopted son, Daunie
Wilson; 23 grandchildren; 53 great
grandchildren; three great, great
grandchildren. Viewing 1 to 5 p.m.,
Friday. Memorial service 6:30 p.m.
in the chapel. Service noon Satur-
day, Greater Bethel AME Church.

IDA JOHNSON-FRANCIS, 54,
food service -
employee died
october 29. Ser-

Wednesday in
the chapel.



JOSEPH HODGE, 51, construc-
tion laborer, died October 30. Ser-
vice was held.

Eric S. Georg .-
ROBERT LEE THAGGARD, 52,
of Cutler Bay,
formally of Hal-
landale Beach,
died Novem-
ber 2 at home.
Robert was
employed with
the Hallandale
Beach Police
Department for many years and
later with the Miami Dade Police
Department where he retired as a
sergeant. Viewing Sunday 6 to 9
p.m., Friendship Baptist Church,
Hallandale Beach. Service 1 p.m.,
Monday, Greater Ebenezer Baptist
Church, Hallandale Beach.

EUNICE NAOMI BROWN, 76,
homemaker, of Hallandale Beach,
died October 29. Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Ebenezer Mission-
ary Baptist Church., Hallandale,
Beach.
Hadley
(TAWANA BROWNLEE, 49,
homemakN e r,
died october
25 in A.G. Holly
Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m.,
Monday in the
chapel.


DANIEL WHITE JR, 41, laborer,
died October 31
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Viewing Friday
3 to 8 p.m. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.

BARBARA SANDS PEACOCK,
66, bus attendant, died October 25
in Aventura Hospital. Service was
held.

LAURA BUSH, 48, homemaker,
died October 25 in North Shore
Hospital. Service was held.

Rock of Ages?
LOLIES YVETTE LAUGHLIN,
47, housewife,
died Novem-
ber 1 at home.
Service 2 p.m.,

chapel.



St. Fort -
SHERLY JANVER, 32, teach-


her's aide, died October 25 in North
Broward Medical Center. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

MARTHE PIERRE LOUIS, 86,
retired, died November 2 in Villa
Maria Nursing Home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Poitier
MILDRED OLIVER, 79, teach-
er's assistant,
died October 26
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Mis- ,
sionary Baptist
Church.

MARCIA MARIE ANDERSON,
52, homemaker,
died October 28
in North Shore
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.



CALVIN BERNARD BRUTON,
59, mainte-
nance engineer,
died November
1 in Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Greater
New Mount Zion
A.M.E. Church,
Hollywood, Florida.


CHRISTINE COOPER LUCAS,
67, nurse's as-
sistant, died
October 26 in
University of
Miami Hospital,
Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.

SAMUEL RYLAND, 59, laborer,
died October 26.
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service noon
Saturday in the
chapel.



QUEEN BETHEL, 60, nurse,
died October 25. Service was
held.

EARTHA WALKER, 72, cook,
died October 25 in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Service 4 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

JEAN HECTOR, 46, security
guard, died October 27 in North
Shore Vitas. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Manker
FITZ ROY BERESFORD SAM-
UEL, 66, credit
collector, died
October 31 in
North Shore.
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday, in the
chapel.


THOMAS EARL BUCK, 42, la-
borer, died Oc-
tober 30 in North
Shore Hospital..
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, New
Beginning M.B.
Church.


E.A. Stevens
MARCELINE MIOT, 58, of Mi-
ami, died November 1. Service
10 a.m., Friday, Stanton Memorial
Baptist Church, Miami.

Mitchell &
JOYCE G. REYNOLDS SAN-
CHEZ, 70, home
health aide,
died Octbber 30
in Jackson Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Fiona
Clarke, Lavern
Rose Sharon
Yee; sons, Louis Ritch, Dowell and
Delton Yee. Service 1 p.m. Satur-
day, November 15, Church of The
Nazarene.

Nakia Ingraham


ENID PEREZ, 60, self employed,
died November 1 in Jackson Hos-
pital. Service was held.

ADRIENNE GILLINS, 47, griev-
ance specialist, died October 28 at
home. Service 1 p.m., Wednesday,
Koinonia Worship Center.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
MATTIE L HAMILTON, 75,
Miami Dade
County Public
School food ser-
vice manager,
wife of the late
Bishop Charles
Hamilton, de-
voted mother
and grand-
mother, died October 29,at home.
Survivors include: children, Gem-
ma, Delores, Charles Jr. (Mary),
Glassford (Rhonda), Errica
(Floyd); grandchildren, Nichelle,
Quentin, Charles, Jassmine, Har-
old, Vincent, Monica, Angelica,
Patrick, Shenika, Kamarone, LaR-
honya, Kaziah, Ashlyn, Makayla;
10 great-grandchildren. Memorial
and viewing Friday 6 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, St. Barna-
bas Wesleyan Methodist Church,
5871 Northwest 24 Ave.

CORY MCCORD, 38, died No-
vember 2 in
Jackson North.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Liber-
ty Fellowship.




DELORIS "MARY" GLASS,
78, waitress, died October 30, in
Palmetto General. Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday in the chapel.

JEHOVAH MILLER, 94, house-
keeper, died October 28 in Jack-
son North. Service was held.

OSWIN BOWEN, 44, prep cook,
died October 22 in Jackson hospi-
tal. Service was held.

BABY AALIYAH JALISA MA-
CON, newborn, died October 13.
Service was held..

MARGARET BENTLEY, 72,
housekeeper, died October 29 in
North Shore Hospital. Service was
held.

EARNESTINE MCLEROY, 72,
retired nurse, died October 25
in North Shore Hospital. Service
noon Wednesday, Northside SDA
1769 NW 119 Street.


JOIN THE


by becoming a member of our



CALL 305-694-6210


Royal 2
KENNETH DILLARD II, 26, mu-
sic producer,
died October 27.
Visitation Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.
Service noon
Saturday, Anti-
och Missionary
Baptist Church
of Carol City.

CAMISHA MURRAY, 36, police
recordspecialist,
died October 29.
Service 11 a.m.,
Wednesday,
New Way Fel-
lowship Praise
and Worship
Center. Final
rites and burial
Saturday in Camilla, Georgia under
the direction of Thomas and Sons
Funeral Home, Pelham, Georgia.

BOBBYCWASHINGTON, 71, died
October 31. Visi-
tation Friday 4 to
9 p.m. Service 1 N
p.m., Saturday,
New Missionary
Baptist Church.



ORABELL DUNCOMBE, 76,
housewife, died
October 26. Visi-
tation Friday 4 to
9 p.m. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day, Believers
Life Ministries.



GERALD WALKER, 48, chef,
died October 25. Visitation and ser-
vice 2 p.m., Sunday in the chapel.

CATHERINE WATSON, 93,
housewife, died October 27. Visita-
tion 9 a.m. Saturday, Pentecostal
Tabernacle of North Dade. Service
11 a.m., in the church.

MARCIA BATCHELOR, 46,
home health aide, died October 24.
Visitation Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Service
10:30 a.m., Saturday, International
Pentecostal City Mission Church,
6099 Washington Street, Holly-
wood, Florida.

DELROY KERLEW, 52, automo-
bile salesman, died October 31. Fi-
nal rites and burial in Montego Bay,
Jamaica.

SARAH ROSSIN, 55, nurse's
aide died November 2. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Before You Buy A Casket From

A Funeral Home Come See Us Where













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BLACKS MUST CONTROL IlFIR O\\WN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5-11, 2008


- '- . :'-


Death Notice


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


SAMMIE L. KOHN, 61,
Sanitation worker for Waste
Management, died Novem-
ber 3 in Aventura Hospital.
Survivors include: children,
Lucretia Anderson (Michael),
Sammie Jr (Kenetress), Or-
tavis, Colette K. Bell (James);
brothers, William (Ester) and
Aaron (Debra); sisters, Irene
Griffin (Samuel) and Phyllis
Hill (Bennie); Godson, Raul
Gonzalez; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Service
Saturday, 10 a.m., Gregg L..
Mason Funeral Home-Cha-
pel. Interment, Dade Memo-
rial Park.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


THELMA JANE RAHMING LASHANDA HINES
'VELLY' 03/22/78 11/05/07


01/01/22 11/04/07

We think of you always but
especially today. You will nev-
er be forgotten although you
are gone away. Your memory
is a keepsake with which we
never part. God has you in
his keeping, we have you in
our hearts.
The Rahming family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


You left and forgot to tell our
hearts how to live without
you.
Gloria Toote, Albert Jack-
son, Baby Daniel, Lushion
Hines and the Toote and
Hines family


In Memoriam


Copyrighted Material

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I N4% * *v


DAVID LEE TAYLOR
'NASTY DAVE"
11/08/64 12/13/03

Happy B-Day my dear-
est child,son, 'bro', father,
friend. We truly miss you.
Your smile, laughter, your
sweet face and especially
your jokes. You kept us up
when we were down. You're
the piece to this picture that
is missing. Especially now
the holidays are coming. My
heart still hurt from such a
loss. To some you're forgot-
ten, but to us you're always
,near. Love, Martha, Penny,
Annetta, Jackie, Wanda, Mo-
town, K.T., June, Sabrina,
Jeannette, Rein, Cherylann,
Hattieman and your kids. We
love you and truly miss you.
Until we neet again my son,
rest on.
Love your kids and the Tay-
lor family

Death Notice
The family of the late
- & -


a)* in*w*ek *A I *g*


%=. *-d % k,- *-*


BETHANY T. STOKES 44
customer service representa-
tive for A.T& T died November
2, in Jackson North Medical
Center. Service 1 p.m., Satur-
day, Word of Truth Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Wright & Young Funeral
Home, Inc.

Honor
Your Loved
One
With an In
Memoriam
In The
Miami Times


JAMES YOUNG

84, retired Librarian died
November 4, 2008 in Hialeah
Hosptial. Viewing Saturday,
11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the
chapel, 4631 W. Hallandale
Bch. Blvd., Hollywood, FL.
Service Saturday, November
8 at 1 p.m. Arrangements
entrusted to Eric S. George
Funeral Home.


Death Notice


KAREN DENISE KING EPPS,
48, homemaker, died Novem-
ber 3 in Jackson memorial
Hospital. Survivors include:
husband and three daugh-
ters. Service Saturday, time


JOIN THE
2Eriq' ou. IF&E
by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


WILLIE STEWART
WILLIE "K"

07/17/66 11/07/07

To some you are forgotten,
to some you are of the past.
But to us, the ones who
loved and lost you, your
memories will always last.
Your wife, Sharon; chil-
dren, Anthon, Shakayla, Wil-
lie Jr. and the Jones family.



Death Notice


HELEN B. BENTLEY 93,
public health nurse, commu-
nity activist and servant for
the people, died September
25 in East Lansing, Michi-
gan. A memorial service will
be held Sunday, November 9,
6 p.m., at The Helen B. Bent-
ley Family Health Center,
3090 S.W. 37 Avenue, Coco-
nut Grove, Florida. For more
information, please contact
Beverly Hepburn Thompson
at 305-351-1315.


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"









Independently Owned
^^^^^li^^~ii--MTONYIIE.-FERGUSON-


MILTON A. HALL. I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


* I I I


( )limitla.,% r.mil(hI iflir


ruitHits'wri-d t-tt .,lm. .i limltl


ft *b qw.







The Mi.-l. T

Li esty es


FASHION HIP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 5 11, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


... ........


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'


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.Jennifrtr IIudm n's %ra~k Io ill
S.- Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Contentj


Available from Commercial News Providers


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take tinm to heal












2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5 11, 2008 BLACKS MUST CoNtRoL FHEIR OWN DEStINY


Early voting motivated by Sen-
ator Barack Obama, Senator Hil-
lary Clinton and members of the
staff was enbraced by the Black
community in Broward and Dade
Counties starting last Monday.
this energized the voters to ar-
rive at the polls at 4 a.m. for the
7 a.m. openings. The precinct at
North Dade Regional in Miami
Gardens, Lemon City Library,
and Joseph Caleb Library served
the most people of color.
The precincts opened on time
but faced a first-day dilemma of
a person staying in line for four
hours. It was corrected on the
second day. And, of course, the
fourth day found Caleb Library
giving out numbers and allowing
the handicapped to sit in a spe-
cial section with a number. With
that procedure, Clove Tucker,
poll worker, blared out the num-
ber, while Susie. Pound seated
everyone and the officials in the
voting line explained the process
and showed you that your vote
was counted and forwarded to
your regular precinct.
When Joan Lyons stepped
out from the polling booth, she
proudly announced, "I just voted
for Sen. Barack Obama, to be-
come the first Black President of
America." The people applauded,
while Lula Gray Colebrook, a for-
mer majorette for BTW, waited
for her number to be called. She
talked of the reunion she had with
former majorettes at the home of
Peggie Green, Miramar, along
with McEntire and Judy Smith.
Her number was called and she
left to vote with Ella Pratt Coach-,


man. ,
Leo Pender,
Pender Barber-h.'p,
appeared to: cast hi-
'.ote and informed A -
me of the heavy con-
. versation about Governor
Palin, vice presidential cai
from Alaska. According t
tean Jackson, Gwen Ale:
and Rev. Dr. Alonzo B. I
son, President of the An
Baptist Churches of Alas:
a member of The NAACP.
ernor Palin never include
10% Blacks and Asians as
of Alaska. As a matter of fa
has not appointed a Black
committees nor did she
nized "Juneteenth Day" ur
was nominated for Vice Pr
three months after the fac
The Black leaders gave
list of demands back in Ju
she has not found time to a
them, because she never
paigns in .the Black comic
and they feel left out of h
ministration, especially Ja
who has been there 40-yea


Minnie Mickens Jone
husband, Henry, institute
Tenth Anniversary Gala Ev
the Jefferson Reaves Sr.
Center, last Thursday,
Rusty Pelican with Gregor
chairman of the board, ty
the loose ends to recognize
cial people who support th
tence of the health center.r
for State Representative J
son Reaves, a fighter for I
in the Miami and Brownsvi


BDr. R i.hr t .a


Fe


eas during his tenure.
Early arrivals included the fam-
ily of Rep. Reaves, such as Clif-
- ford "Mickey" Reaves, brother,
and wife, Christine Reaves,
John B. Reaves, brother, Darryl
, 1 Reaves, son, and Annete Dur-
,. A* ing, finance, and Zara Reaves,
daughter and son-in-law, Bobbie
jand A.B. Mumford, Regina Trot-
-.... ter, Beatrice Torres, Tennell
Trotter, John A. Smith, Edith
Sarah Robinson, Tiffani Clark, Kay-
ndidate onza Sims, Eldora Sims, and
o, Mon- Candra Wooten.
xander Rodney Baltimore, executive
Patter- producer/ Tom Joyner Morn-
nerican ing Show on Hot 105, was the
ka and dynamic emcee for the evening
SGov and he began by introducing
led the Rev. George Dickens, St. Paul
a part AME to give the Invocation; Yo-
act, she langel Hernandez Suarez, MD,
on her MBA, FACOG to give the Greet-
recog- ings and Gregory Gay, president
until she of the board, to render The Oc-
esident casion, while his family, Jeremy,
t. Braynon and Lataryn beamed
her a with pride.
ne and Baltimore then informed the
addresss guests to join the buffet line, while
cam- the Psi Phi Band provided the
unity entertainment foit their listening
ier ad- and dancing pleasure, with Lee
Lckson Johnson, Arnold Knight, and
Irs. Jimmy Harrell reflected on the
'oldie goldies' and had the crowd
swaying, moving their hands and
s and singing along to At last, Some-
ed the thing's Wrong With My Baby and
vent of more. Then, the band brought ev-
Health eryone on to the floor for the first
at the 'electric slide' dance of the night
y Gay, with Bernard Thomas, Aaron
ing up Johnson, Michael Emmanuel
;e spe- and wives leading the line.
e exis- When the eating and dancing
named subsided, Baltimore brought on
Jeffer- Attorney Robert McKinney to
Blacks acknowledge the honorees and
ille ar- present them with a plaque or


S, ,- "


Thomas Marshall, Chairman.
Freddie 'Jabo' Johnson, Presi-
dent.
On November 1, 2008 at the
Embassy Suites Hotel Booker i.
Washington Athletic Association
will honor the following Stars of
Time Not Long Past at "Not the
Largest, But the Best" Ellis Ay-
ers (Football 1963) Woodrow
Greene (Football and Baseball
1967) Milton "Jack" Hall (Foot-
ball 1954) Catherine Hepburn
(Cheerleader 1963) David Hunt
(Tennis 1963) James Howard
(Football & Track 1961) Samuel
Hutcheson (Football 1960) Lau-
rence Johnson (Trainer 1966)
Gladestone Kemp (Football &
Track 1951) McKenna McHon-
ey (Trainer 1956) Maude New-
bold (Cheerleader 1958) Willie
Robinson (Basketball & Football
1959) Danny Stevens (Foot-
ball & Basketball 1960) Eugene
Strachan (Football 1955) Gwen
Bovie Thomas (Cheerleader
1965) Johnny Tellis (Head Ten-
nis Coach 1962-1967)


Congratulations
T-O-R-.N-A-D-O-E-

Get Well Wishes to
All of u Y.n.
Arthur Livingston, Inez McK-
inney-Johnson, Herbert Rho-
des, Jr., Edith Oden, Doretha
Payne, Annie Ruth Brown, Clif-
fonia Ross, Priscilla Thomp-
son, Yashti Armbrister, Theo-
dore "Brother" Johnson, Edna
Scavella, and Delores Johnson-
McCartney
The Gold Coast Chapter of
Florida A&M University Alumni
Association honored their Alum-
ni of South Florida who gradu-
ated 60 plus years ago. The fol-
lowing Alumni werq honored and
also enjoyed a fabulous lunch.
The honorees were: Garth C.
Reeves, Ruth Bonner, Nancy
Dawkins, Georgiana Johnson-
Bethel, Alma Ford-Collins (Ft.
Lauderdale), Marguerite Miller,
The Honorable Carrie Pittman-
Meek, Elry Taylor-Sands, Mrs.
Willie Pearl Porter, Mildred


Marks, Mamie Johnson, James
Anders, and Dorothy Edwards.
Lynette P. Wims is Alumni Pres-
ident.
Naomi Allen-Adams and Pau-
la Williams-Barry send a big
hello to their longtime friends
and classmates.
The following persons showed
their excellent cooking skills last
Saturday when they prepared
their favorite dishes for all in at-
tendance to taste! This was the
Third Annual Cooking Contest
sponsored by Saint Marie's Chap-
ter of Saint Agnes: Kim Wright,
Khambrel Dawkins, Gail Mo-
ses, Barbara Burrows, Curtis
Holland: Gizelle McPhee is
President of Saint Marie Chapter
of Episcopal Church Women.
Very, very sorry to receive
the sad news of my dear friend
Grace Heastie-Patterson, who
had a severe stroke and is now
immobile. Also get well wishes to
Dr. Pearl Lockhart-Rosser and
Irna Ali-Banks, three hometown
ladies who now live in Washing-
ton D.C., Maryland, and New
Jersey.
Lona Brown-Mathis, Interna-
tional Grand Princess Comman-
dress was honored on November
1 2008 at the Ro-Mont South
Clubhouse where many family
members and friends joined in


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STARTS FRIDAYMoo n WMA
STARS FRIDAY, CALIFORNIA CLUB 6 HIALEAH 14 PALACE 18
N EM D 7 7 Noth Miami Beach 305- 24.2345 -. .n *. 1 .' MI.,i 6C0 FANDANG 0 19,l
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COCOWALK 16 GRAND 18 LEJEUNE CINEMA 6 SOUTHLAND MALL STADIUM 16
CCOnut IGro 305-465-0450 1 ." SaMir 305-529-S 83 Mn 305s251-7440
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MALL OF THE AMERICAS MIAMI LAKES 17 KENDALL VILLAGE 16 WESTFORK PLAZA 13
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SUNSET PLACE 24 FLIPPERS CINEMA 10 OAKWOOD STADIUM 18 INTRACOASTAL 8
Soulh0 im5 30.-,6'2.450 Holyl,,1X MA 954981 5443 *..... 1 Norlh M,n: Beacht 305-94.9-


the grand celebration. Congrats,
Lona, on your new position!
Miami Sorors and Delta Sigma
Theta, Inc. Sorors everywhere
who knew our Beloved Soror
Nettie Cook-Dove were sad-
dened to learn of her death. She
was admired by many and will be
remembered fondly. Nettie was a
former president of the Miami
Alumni Chapter of the Delta Sig-
ma Theta Sorority and the widow


of Joshua Dove, a great "Omega"
man. Nettie will be greatly missed
by all of her friends and Sorors.
Lucille Williams, sister of
Juanita Armbrister and sister
in-law of Anthony is visiting Lu-
cille, who lives in Raleigh, Flor-
ida.
What a glorious time in the
United States of America! O!
How I wish for all of our de-
ceased family members to have


lived to see history unfold in
this country T-U-E-S-D-A-Y, No-
vember 4, 2008 is a day we will
forever remember in our U.S.A.!
May Barack Obama stay in the
Hearts of every American and
keep him in our country forever
night and day in your prayers.
Show President Obama and our
country we love and appreciate
him and above all we know how
to behave.


CARROLLTON
SCHOOL OF THE SACRED HEART


Talent Search Scholarship Entrance Exam


Carrollton is a Pre-K through Grade 12 all girls Catholic

college-preparatory school that admits qualified students of any race,

color, religion, nationality or ethnic origin.
Financial aid available.


flowers. First to be called was
State Rep. Dorothy Bendross
Mindingall, followed by Dr,. Nel-
son Adams, Dr. Robert Swartz,
Barbara Lloyd, Commissioner
Audrey Edmondson, Marvin
0. Quinn (in absentia), Sandy
Sears (in absentia) and Minnie
Mickens Jones.
The evening closed out a high
note with remarks coming from
Kermit Wyche, Gay, Jones and
Dr. Adams. Each one touched on
early voting, contributors to the
Health Center, such as Nurse
Thelma Gibson, Charles John-
son, Fr. Canon Kenneth Major
and wife, James Farrington,
while the dancing prize went out
to Herbert and Grace Humphrey
who slow-dragged all evening like
to the 'good 'ole days.'


Kudos go out to the African
American Performing Arts Com-
munity Theatre, Inc. for their 2nd
successful play: Zooman now on
stage at the African American
Cultural Arts Center. Zooman
will be there until, Sunday, No-
vember 16 with a matinee perfor-
mance at 3 p.m. Other perfor-
mances are Fridays and Satur-
days, beginning at 7:30 p.m.
AAPACT presented a preview
performance, last Wednesday
and Thursday for the public
which was brought raves from
the audience and a must for ev-
eryone to see this play written by
Charles Fuller and directed by
Andra' L. Gainey, featuring Der-
rick Chiverton as Zooman, Carey
Hart, (Rachel Tate), Larry Rob-
inson, (Emmett Tate), Teddy
Harrell, Jr., (Reuben Tate),
Curtis Holland,(Victor Tate),
Lamar Swan, (Russell Adams),
Kevin Johnson, (Donald Jack-
son), Catherine A. Williams,


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5 11, 2008


(Ash Boswell), and Rachel Fin-
ley, (Grace Georges).
The play is a microcosm of
certain neighborhoods where
youngsters are shooting, rob-
bing, and showing disrespect to
elders. It became evident when
a young girl was shot on her own
front porch, and neighbors rose
up against him after the father
confronted the killer with a sign
of his dislike.
Seeing the play should give you
a raw example of the times we
are trying to survive in and avoid
violence in our neighborhoods
and what step to take when the
police are not around or are slow
in coming. Expletive and violence
are used and may not be suitable
for small children.
Some of the people in atten-
dance included Nicole Walker,
Quintavia McKay, Dorothy Mor-
rison, Mickey Walker, Cryeshia
Jimeson, Darlene Jimeson,
Candace Johnson, Dewayne
Johnson, Norman Cox, Sr., Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan, Tavon
T. Stone, Jackson Richardson,
Zachary Williams, Keith Harrell
and the Harrell Family members.
All of the cast members received
a standing ovation. It's a must
to see before Sunday, November
16. For more info. call 305-638-
6771.

******** *
It was 'Round Up Day 2008,'
last Sunday, at St. Mark MBC
under the leadership of Rev. Jo-
seph F. Williams and his com-
mittees consisting of Sisters
Esther Carter, Dolrine Miller,
Deacon Samuel Mustipher,
Mother Ruby Williams and
the Hospitality Committee with
Doris Miller, president, Debbie
Law, Vice, Susie Andrews, Sec-
ty, Carrie Anderson, Jeanette


Gough Maurice Bellamy, Mary
Decimus, Delisa M. Williams,
Deion Gerow, Loren Howard,
Chelsie Buyers, Vernam Prin-
gle, and Betty Leland.
They represented in cowboy
hats, shirts, brass belts, boots,
and red T-shirts with Hospital-
ity 'A Ministery Of Love.' Also
V.B. Thompkins, Patricia A.
Speights, Anthony "Robbie"
Dukes, Jasmine Joseph, Ki-
yara Law, Jamya Stokes, De-
quan Gaye, Janal Collins, Kay-
chelle Grutter, Michael Sweet-
ing, S. Haynes & Shahmad.
Music was provided by The
Spenceraires and invocation,
meditation, and prayer by Sis.
S. Andrew, Daisy L. Jones
and Kiyah and Lathan Adams,
who added an explosive rendi-
tion with guitars of the song The
Devil Went Down To Georgia. It
brought a standing ovation, as
well as the Rev. Williams' ser-
mon that included him running
up and down the aisle and sing-
ing songs that explained his
message.
The highlight of the 'Round
Up' was recognition of the old-
est member and nonmember.
Ruby Williams was the old-
est and Doris Miller brought
21 people followed by Reaves
with 17. After the benediction,
the 'Round Up Gang' lined up
in front of the stable to partake
in the vittles of B-B-Q ribs and
chicken, hot dogs, hamburgers,
salad, assorted drinks. And, of
course, it was done in an ordely
fashion.
Betty Leland announced
coming events: Senior Saints
Luncheon, Sat. 11.8, Meek Cts,
11:30, featuring the Singing An-
gels; Banquet, Sat. 11-22, FME,
6 p.m.; and Mortgage Burning,
Sun. 11-23, 4 p.m


Fm









3C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5 -11, 2008


SMiaI wl orkin uite jus for Interraial nrlatkmship


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The Adrienne Arsht Center's Celebrity Chef Series features
enlightening interviews with renowned chefs who discuss their
personal culinary journey and give a lively and informative cooking
demonstration.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $45, $55, $85, $125,
$150 meet and eat VIP tickets


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Florida Grand Opera presents
LA TRAVIATA
You'll be intoxicated by Verdi's gorgeous music in this new spectacular
production directed by Bliss Hebert and designed by Allen Charles Klein.
Can a courtesan change her life? 'La traviata,' literally translated,
means 'the woman who has gone astray.' Faith, Hope and Love....but
the greatest of these is Love.
7 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $22.75, $51.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75
LA TRAVIATA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $22.75, $51.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75
The Arsht Center for the Performing Arts and Camposition present
By Michael Yawney
Commissioned by The Arsht Center for the Performing Arts
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
This documentary/fantasy/comedy tells the story of Anita Bryant's
1977 crusade against gay civil rights. The play bends documentary
sources such as government records, newspaper stories, and
underground gay manifestos into a hilariously twisted carnival of
70s-style politics, sex and faith.
8 PM Carnival Studio Theater $35
Adrienne Arsht Center and Seraphic Fire present The Knight Foundation Concert Series
A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Bach's Contada No. 82 joins Schubert's Death and the Maiden on a
double bill which examines the struggle, resignation, and peace
between this life and the next.
8 PM Peacock Studio Theater $40
LA TRAVIATA
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $22.75, $51.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
8 PM Carnival Studio Theater $35
LA TRAVIATA
'3 PM Z.tr Ballel Opera House $22 75 S51 75 $81 75. $99 75. $132 75
1,000 HOMOSEXUALS
S& 8 PM Cainuial Sludic' Theater $35
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
8 Pr. Carrnial Sturjo Trealer $35


Anthony Bourdain


La traviata


1,000 Homosexuals


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby. No reservations necessary.


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Green Beans.....................
Southern-Grown Freshness, High in Folate
and a Good Source of Fiber and Magnesium
SAVE UP TO 1.00 LB


..... .991b


< 2.179
Italian Five Grain Bread ............................
Choose From White or Wheat, Contains: Oats, Cracked Wheat, Barley, Millet,
Flaxseed, and Sunflower Seeds, From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .80


Maxwell House /2- 00
Coffee....... ....... ..... FOR3 -
Assorted Varieties, 11 to 13-oz bag
or Yuban, 11 or 12-oz can
(Excluding Instant.)
SAVE UP TO 2,14 ON 2
(Assorted Maxwell House Decaf,
11.5-oz bag ... 2/6.00)


Quaker T
Cereal ....-.. '
Assorted Varieties, Cap'N Crunch,
20.7 to 22-oz, Life, 18.4 or 21-oz,
or Squares, 16-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.75


Doritos
Tortilla
Chips... Free
Assorted Varieties, 12.25 to 13-oz bag
, F .,,-iii.,, Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.79


12-Pack Selected
Coca-Cola /,2- o00
Products ....... O
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 1.78 ON 2


Prices effective Thursday, November 6 through Wednesday, November 12, 2008. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie. Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5 -11, 2008


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Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 5 11, 2008


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THREE MILLION HOMEOWNERS
COULD GET FEDERAL HELP


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6D THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 5 -NOVEMBER 11. 2008 B


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ATTENTION SENIORS
BRAND NEW APTS
1,2 AND 3 BEDROOMS FROM $6374
Section 8 Welcome
CORAL PLACE APTS.
Apply At
Lafayette Apts
150 NE 79th St.
305-759-6350
*income restrictions apply
ADA, EHL


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- CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED J BILL MY CREDIT CARD


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Exp__
Exp__
Exp__


Authorized Signature
Name
Address


City


Phone email

*Includes Florida sales tax

Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


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The Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners, through the efforts of Com-
missioner Barbara J. Jordan, has allocated $1.2 million for the rehabilitation of
single-family homes in Opa-locka through the Opa-locka Home Rehabilitation
Program. Homeowners may qualify for up to $30,000 to repair roofs, electrical
and plumbing systems, replace windows, doors, air conditioning units, flooring
and kitchen and bathroom fixtures.
For more information on how to take advantage of this opportunity, contact the
Opa-locka Community Development Corporation at (305) 687-3545 extension
236 or visit our office at 490 Opa-locka Blvd., Suite 20, Opa-locka, FL 33054.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 5 11, 2008


101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$900 nice and clean, laundry
room, parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1202 N.W. 61st Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $800 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144


123 N.W. 18 Street
One bedroom. $450 monthly.
Appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1231 N.W. 58 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Move in $700. Two
bedrooms, one bath $600.
Move in $900. Others avail-
able.786-975-9099

1243 N.W. 61st Street #4
Two bedrooms, one bath, wa-
ter included, central air, Sec-
tion 8 only, first month free,
786-229-6567

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1281 N.W. 61 Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552 or
786-499-8212

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN.
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

13190 Aswan Road #2
Move in special, one bdrm,
one bath, central air, Sec-
tion 8 only, $800, first month
free,
786-229-6567

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$625 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

1500 N.W. 65th Street
One bedroom, one bath, room
air conditioned, gated, stove
and refrigerator. Remodeled,
tiled, $575 a month, utilities
not included. Call 786-514-
4746.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $495 per month, all ap-
pliances included: Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $525 monthly,
two bedrooms $625 monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air,
free water. 305-642-7080


200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080

220 N.W. 16 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$550. 305-642-7080


220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

2215 Charleston St.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
ready to move in. $825
monthly. Call 305-614-0493


2365 N.W. 97th Street Apt #
b in the rear
One bedroom,$625 monthly.
First and last moves you in.
Call 305-691-2703.

2493 N.W. 91st St #4
One bedroom with private
parking, air, utilities included,
$700 a month, first and last to
move in. Call 305-691-2703.

3090 NW 134 Street #3
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 monthly, $1300 to move
in. 786-512-7643.

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

561 N.W. 6 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$495. Two bedrooms one
bath $595. Free water,
305-642-7080

58 Street 31st Avenue
Small one bedroom, partially
furnished, air, lights and wa-
ter. For one or two people
only. Call 305-693-9486.

6020 N W 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

676 N.W. 48 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 305-681-8473

7001 N.W. 15 Ave
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, $495 monthly.
First month and half security
deposit to move in. all appli-
ances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

701 N.W. 7 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath,
ready to move in. $750
monthly. Call 305-614-0493

729 N.W. 55 Terrace
One bedroom, $635 monthly.
Call 786-312-4097. Michael.

745 N.W. 58 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, air unit,
appliances, water and gas.
$850 mthly. One bdrm, $625
mthly. 305-401-4674, Mon-
day through Friday 9 to 5.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call -
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 NW 1st
-Court. 305-374-4412.

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air,
appliances, new tile and car-
pet. Starting at $650. 1545
N.W. 8 Avenue. 786-506-
3067

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call
305-638-3699 for move-in
special or visit our Rental Of-
fice, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

HOLLYWOOD AREA
Nice location, close to
schools and church. One and
two bedroom with tile, air,
stove and refrigerator, water


included in rent, Section 8
welcome, 305-624-9590.


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

Located Near 90 Street
and 27 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
light, water, and air included.
Also one bedroom furnished.
Call 305-693-9486

MIAMI -Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Place Apartments
5600 N.E. 4Ave
Miami, FL 33137
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $633.
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

N. DADE Section 8 OK!
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Security, No Deposit
For Section 8. 786-488-5225

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
305-769-0146, 786-521-
7151

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath also
one bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 welcome, $500 cash
back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

WYNWOOD AREA APTS.
28 Street and First Avenue.
One bedroom, $600 $650
monthly. Two bedrooms,
$750 to $800 monthly. All ap-
pliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


ATTENTION ALL ARTISTS!
If you want to sell your paint-
ings or sculptures; call Dan-
iel at 305-542-7259. Studio
space available for rent.

COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


2906 N.W. 195 Lane
Three bdrm, one bath, Sect. 8
Ms. Clayton 786-457-3287

CAROL CITY AREA
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

CAROL CITY AREA
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

EAST HOMESTEAD
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, pool. Section 8 Welcome.
$1150.305-254-6610

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Great Property! Looking for
Great Home Maker! Call 954-
243-6447

MIRAMAR AREA
Roommate wanted, by Mira-
mar High School,
954-663-3990

N.W. 213th Street and 38th
Ave
Three bedrooms and two
baths, fenced and everything
newly remodeled, $1300 954-
392-0070


SOUTH MIAMI AREA
Lee Park Condominium
Four bedroom, two bath, two
story, 120 unit complex. Two
blocks from Metro-Rail on
the corner of S.W. 68 St. and
S.W. 62 Ave. If interested call
Michael 786-543-3872


1375 N.W. 58th Terrace
Huge two bedrooms, one
bath, central air, new appli-
ances, indoor laundry room
and tiled. Section 8 welcome!
Call 305-490-7033

1441 N.W. 59 Street
Unit totally remodeled. Two
bedrooms, one bath. Up-
graded, new carpet blinds,
windows, etc Section 8 Wel-
come. Call 786-506-3469.

1666 NE 146TH STREET
Move in special $600! Two
bedrooms, one bath, tiled,
north miami area, Section
8 okay, call 786-287-0682.


1722 N.E. 148 Street
One bed bedroom, one bath,
air, $700. 786-356-6101

1875 N.W. 94th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. Call Stanley
786-663-1962

2257 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080


2283 N.W. 101st Street
One bedroom, bars, water,
fenced, appliances, $650.
NO Section 8. Terry Deller-
son,
Broker, 305-891-6776.


2310 N.W. 86 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
washer and dryer, appliances
and air. $1400 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-244-7075

2395 N.W. 81st Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 preferred, call
Angela 305-796-3874.

245 N.W. 55th Street
Two bedrooms, two baths,
$895 monthly, $1800 to move
in. Call 305-905-4184.

2756 N.W. 44th Street
One bedroom, $575 monthly.
Call 786-312-2159.

4951 N.W. 15 Avenue
Nice area.Two bedrooms,one
bath,Fenced back yard. Sec-
tion 8 only. 954-658-9735.


5511 N.W. 5th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
air, new appliances, new tile,
$750 monthly, $1500 to move
in, after 5:30 305-979-3509.

595 N.W. 65th Street
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, $850 monthly, Section 8
ok! Call 786-543-4579 or
954-260-7457.


7753 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

8392 N.W. 15th Avenue
8915 N.W. 10th Avenue
One, two, and three bed-
rooms. Call 786-290-6333.


,8950 N.E. 2 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances, bars. Reference.
Section 8 Ok! $1325 mthly.
305-621-6128

970 N.E. 133 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances, ceil-
ing fan, new kitchen cabi-
nets. flood light, new dar-
pet, vinyl tile. $750 mthly.
$1700 to move in. Utilities
not included. 786-488-3350.


COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at
3737 Charles Terrace

LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first, and security. Section 8,
HOPWA OK.
305-244-6845


MIAMI AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths
and two bedrooms, one bath,
utilities included. 786-286-
2540


Northwest Area
Two bdrms, one bath $800.
Two bdrms, one bath $950
Three bdrms, one bath
$1000.
Three bdrms, two bath
$1367.


Three bdrms, two baths
$1400.
Four bdrms, two baths $1600
Five bdrms, two baths $1800
305-757-7067
Design Realty


NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Large three bedrooms.
Section 8 OK. 786-269-5643


100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232

1726 N.W. 93 Street
One large furnished efficien-
cy, utilities paid, $650.
Joe 786-385-8326

2170 N.W. 91 Street #C
Furnished. $600 monthly,
$1200 to move in.
305-244-7075

3153 N.W. 53rd Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

5422 N.W. 7TH COURT
Large efficiency includes
water and electricity. $700
monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

N.W. SECTION
Quiet neighborhood, efficien-
cy for rent, utilities included.
305-628-0390

NORTHWEST AREA
Appliances included.
954-245-2528


1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1506 N.W. 70 Street
Furnished room for rent. $350
monthly, call Ms. Queenie,
305-693-7727.

1541 N.W. 69th Terrace
Clean room, $350 a month.
Call 305-479-3632.


1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.


1887 NW 44 Street
$475 monthly. $600 moves
you in. Private bathroom. 305-
637-9359 or 305-
303-0156

2365 N.W. 97 Street
Room with air, $380 monthly.
First and last to move in.
Call 305-691-2703


2373 N.W. 95 St.
$90 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186

2760 N.W. 60th Street
Furnished room for rent.
$300. 786-312-2159.


4744 N.W. 15 Court
Clean rooms $350 mthly.
305-479-3632


BEST ROOMS IN
CASTLE MANSION
$112 weekly, plus $150 Se-
curity. Near bus line, Fam-
ily Dollar three blocks North.
720 N.W. 75 Street. 786-523-
1736.

CHEAPER LIVING IN
GEORGIA NEAR MALL
FREE Moving Ride There
FREE Month
$199 Month Two
FREE Utilities
FREE Direct TV/Cable
FREE Air Conditioning
FREE Heating
FREE Water/Phone
FREE Fishing out back
FREE Ride to GA
Call now 786-234-5683

LIBERTY CITY/BROWNS
VILLE AREA
Clean rooms, utilities
included, quiet neighbor-
hood.
786-541-5234

Miami Gardens Area
Clean room, air, private
entrance. Call 305-628-0162


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished rooms, call 954-
557-7629 or 954-445-7629.

NORTHWEST AREA
CLEAN ROOMS AVAILABLE
954-245-2528

NORTHWEST AREA
ROOMS FOR RENT
CALL 561-932-4555
Northwest Miami Area
Nice room with privileges
like home, responsible per-
son preferred. Call 305-696-
2451,


NW AREA
Rooms with central air and
appliances. 786-487-2222


10741 SW 150 TERRACE
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1000 month, no Section 8,
call 305-267-9449

1083 N.W. 77 St.
Four bedrooms, two and a
half bath. Section 8 Welcome.
Call E. C. Blake.
305-2.19-6295.

1141 NW 111 STREET
Two bedroom, one bath, cen-
tral air. $850 monthly.
786-586-0007

12245 N.W. 18th Court
Spacious, four bedroom, two
bath. $1450 monthly.
786-423-7719

12525 N.E. Miami Place
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1500. 305-642-7080

13301 N.W. 18th Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$800, 305-333-0514

1340 N.W. 82 Street
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath. $1250 mthly, $2500
move in. 305-905-4184

1410 NW 195th STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
one car garage. $1300
monthly, no section 8. Call
305-267-9449

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air.
$750. 305-642-7080

16015 N.W. 22nd Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
new kitchen, a/c, tile, Section
8 ok, $1250, 305-409-8113

1801 N.W. 129th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
pool, 954-801-1032

1821 WILMINGTON
STREET
Three bdrm, one bath. 305-
496-6914 or 305-620-1049.
$1050 deposit required.

1863 NW 91 Street
Beautiful one bedroom, can
convert to two bedrooms.
Totally remodeled, all
appliances. $750 monthly,
first and last. 305-801-6496.

2081 Wilmington Street
Opa Locka Area. Two
bedrooms. $850 monthly.
786-317-1463

2320 N.W. 55th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security. Call
Waymon 786-877-1046.

2439 N.W. 104 St. Rear
One bedroom. $675 monthly.
800-257-1311, 404-861-1965

2738 N.W. 201st Terrance
Three bedrooms, two baths,
appliances included $1150
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
786-260-1856

3148 N.W. 50th Street
Four bdrm, two baths, refrig-
erator, stove, nearby schools,
large yard, central air, Section
8 welcomed, $1400 month,
call Johann 305-651-1179


3421 N.W. 212 St
Brand new, three bedrooms,
two baths, garage. $2000
monthly. Call 305-614-0493

3500 N.W. 203 Street
.Three bedrooms, garage.
Section 8 Welcome.
786-357-8885

3620 N.W. 169 Ter
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-302-2004

3877 N.W. 213th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
with appliances, $1000,
954-963-0336 after 6 p.m.

504 N.W. 58th Street
One bdrm, one bth, appli-
ances, a/c, bars, fenced
yard. Call 305-625-8909.

735 N.W. 49 Street
Two bedrooms in nice neigh-
borhood. Section 8 Wel-
come.
Call 305-696-2825

7500 N.W. 11th Avenue
Beautiful four bedrooms,
two baths, central air, tile,
appliances, washer and
dryer, vertical blinds, huge
yard and
bars. Call 786-357-5000.

8250 NW 2ND COURT
One bedroom, one bath, $700
monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449


900 N.W. 65 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1100. 305-642-7080.
919 N.W. 47 St
Beautiful ready to move in,
three bedrooms, one bath.
$1300 monthly. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-61 4-0493
CAROL CITY AREA


Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$475 month, call 305-624-
4395 or page 305-732-9875






1052 N.W. 67th Street
Four bdrms, two bth, 1600
sqft, $140k, a/c, great deal!
305-476-7415

Large Three Bedroom
House
Three large bdrms, one bath,
in superb condition with very
large master bdrm, and over-
sized lot. Call Jessie-owner/
agent AMEC Realty & Invest-
ment Inc. 786-853-1903

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bdrms, two bath, spa-
cious, like new, big lot, large
family room, and more. Call
Jessie at AMEC Realty & In-
vestment Inc. 786-853-1903

NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
room, two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedroom, two
bath, at an attractive price.
call
786-859-3772

Rent to Own or Owner
Will Finance, Must Sell!
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, 1855 NW 132nd
Street, call 786-488-8617.

YESII' YESl! YESIII
HERE'S HELP
TO OWN YOUR OWN
HOME NOWII
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $S65,000
On Any Home
Also Available
HUD/VA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty



Attention property owners!
Holidays are approaching,
don't continue to lose money
for unpaid rent! Call the Evic-
tion Headquarters at 305-
956-7997. Notices served
within 24 hours. Cases filed
and served within 48 hours.


Attention property owners!
Holidays are approaching,
don't continue to lose money
for unpaid rent! Call the Evic-
tion Headquarters at 305-
956-7997. Notices served
within 24 hours. Cases filed
and served within 48 hours.






Gene and Sons,Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathroom at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, plastering and addi-
tions. Call 954-980-4231 or
305-892-0315


LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
florida room, central air and
heat, washer and dryer.
Efficiency also available for
$165/week.
Call 786-390-0809.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three and four bedroom
houses available. Remodel
ed, air. 305-431-8195.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bdrms, two bath, spa-
cious, like new, big lot, large
family room, and more. Call
Jessie at AMEC Realty & In-
vestment Inc. 786-853-1903

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
786-287-0864,
or 786-337-5853.

NEAR ROOMS TO GO 826
Three bdrms. Central air.
Section 8 OK!. 305-201-4751

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AREA
1520 N.E. 154th Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. Call 305-586-8209

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five and a half bedrooms,
three baths, central air, fam-
ily dining and laundry room,
big yard, fire place. Section 8
Ok! $1950 monthly.
Call 305-992-6496

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Six homes to choose from
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1000 to $1300, air, bars,
$3000 to $3900 move in.
No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776 .


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.
Immediately available for
plumbing and electrical
24 hours, licensed and
insured, 877-633-3828

LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting soil.
Tony 305-491-4515

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors, cabi-
net and lawn service. Moving
and hauling. 305-801-5690
Tony Roofing
Shingles, re-roofing, leak
repairs. 305-491-4515


OWN WIRELESS BUSI-
NESS!
Earn residual income, btxs-
tore.com, call 305-796-6642


Drivers: Quality Hazmat
Teams Needed!
Running FL to PA 2x Wkly.
Full Benefits. 401K.
Bonuses.
Eastern Freight Ways
800-428-6193 x234


ROUTE DRIVERS
,Make Up to $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street

WANTED BASS PLAYER
Lead and rhythm guitarists
keyboard player. Male and
female vocalists.
Call 786-380-3218




Be a Security Guard $50
786-333-2084
Or renew license $60, 40
hours $110 G and concealed
$150.


Jolly Madam Hair Designs
Why pay More? You can save
25 to 50 percent on week day,
Monday to Thursday from 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Special on all
brand name relaxers regu-
larly $45 you pay $30. Hair
weaving $90 now $60, wash
and set $20 regular now
$10. Curly perm $70, now
$50.786-285-7185, 305-681-
6343. Ask for Yolaine.





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TODAY!


END THE
INCONVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES,
FIGHTING
THE WEATHER

AND
HUNTING

DOWN BACK
COPIES

CALL

305-694-6214









8D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5 -NOVEMBER 11, 2008


ThentI prn of honrhuowu) ntr o r


monr to lender than their honmw% worth


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


wee s& i/vflt
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


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All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
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. ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399


OPA-LOCKA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (OLCDC) in
* association with Miami Dade Housing Agency offers Housing Counseling Ser-
vices for low to moderate income families. Services include; 1st Time Home-
buyers Purchasing Assistance includes Down payment and closing cost subsi-
dies, Low interest Rehab Loans Home Rehab Loans, Credit Repair & Budget
Counseling, and Foreclosure Prevention Assistance, HOMEBUYER EDUCA-
TION CLASS For more information you may contact us at (305) 687-3545 ext.
236, visit our website www.olcdc.org or stop by our office at 490 Opa-locka
Blvd., Ste 20, Opa-locka, FL 33054. OLCDC is an Equal Housing Lender
and a HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agency

CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on November 13, 2008 to consider the award of a
contract, in the amount of $86,675, to Belafonte Tacolcy Center, Inc., a Florida not-for-profit corporation,
for the 2008-2009 contract period, with a one (1) year option to renew for the same amount and under the
same terms and conditions, for the provision of all of the sports development programs operated at and
from Belafonte Tacolcy Park, a City of Miami Park, and to consider the City Manager's recommendation
and finding that competitive negotiation methods are not practicable or advantageous regarding these
issues. Inquires regarding this notice may be addressed to Ed Blanco, Department of Parks and Recreation
at (305) 416- 1253.

This action is being considered pursuant to Section 18-86 (services related to educational services and
activities provided by non-profit organizations within city parks) of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida,
as amended. The recommendation and finding to be considered in this matter are set forth in the proposed
resolution and in this Code Section, which are deemed to be incorporated by reference herein and are
available as public records from the City of Miami. The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with
the regularly scheduled City Commission meeting of November 13, 21008 at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida.

All interested individuals are invited to attend this hearing and may comment on the proposed issue. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered
at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all
testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360
(Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



#003176 L


REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

MDX PROCUREMENT/CONTRACT NO.: RFQ-09-03

MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL &
SWAP ADVISORY SERVICES

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority is seeking qualified firms to submit
Proposals to provide Municipal Financial and Swap Advisory Services. The
Services consists of, but is not limited to, on-going services related to the pres-
ent and potential financial affairs of MDX, Swap advisory services or advisory
services related to the issuance of bonds, notes, certificates or other financing
instruments. MDX notifies all Proposers and individuals that it requires and en-
courages small, minority and women-owned businesses to have full opportu-
nity to submit a response to any Solicitation Document issued by MDX. There
is no Small Business participation requirement in this Solicitation. However,
MDX Will assign SB Bonus Points, as detailed in the Solicitation Documents.
For copies of the RFQ with complete information on pre-qualification require-
ments, the scope of services as well as submittal requirements, please log
onto our web site at www.mdx-way.com or call MDX Procurement Office at
305-637-3277. Please note: In order to download any MDX solicitations, you
must register as a Vendor. The Vendor Registration can only be done through
MDX's website. The deadline for submitting a Proposal is December 2, 2008
by 2:00 P.M., Eastern Time.


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


ANYPERSONWHO RECEIVESCOMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OREXPENSES FORCONDUCTING
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR
TO ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND COMMITTEES OR THE
CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF
THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA,
33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE
HELD ON NOVEMBER 13, 2008, AT 9:00 A.M., IN ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN
DRIVE, THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO THE
REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTS,
ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED 1450 BRICKELL, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI,
SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET COMMITTEE
AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING
THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE
CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR
THE RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works Department, Survey and
Land Records Section of the Construction Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular
working hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or represented at this meeting and
are invited to express their views. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S.
286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



#003178


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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MIAMI-DAD

Request for Application (RFA)
2008 Commercial Revitalization Program
The Miami-Dade County Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED) is announcing the availability of
approximately $600,000 in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds for the 2008 Commercial Revitalization
Program. The program is designed to assist in the commercial redevelopment of properties located in Miami-Dade
County's: (1) State Enterprise Zone, (2) Federal Enterprise Community-Empowerment Zone, (3) Neighborhood
Revitalization Strategy Areas (NRSAs) (4) Eligible Block Groups and (5) Designated Targeted Urban Areas. Eligible
recipients are commercial property owners and commercial leaseholders. Awarded recipients can receive grants up to a
maximum of $100,000 per property to improve the facades and open space of commercial facilities located in low and
moderate-income neighborhoods. For projects located within the following entitlement cities and Florida small cities (City
of Miami, City of Hialeah, City of North Miami. City of Miami Beach. City of Miami Gardens, City of Florida City and the
City of Homestead) applicants must submit a copy of the Municipality's roof of funding for the same project with the
completed CRPApplication. For municipality matching percentage, refer to Program Guidelines.
High priority will be given to projects that positively affect the entire neighborhood and would improve commercial activity
in the area. Applicants must meet Federal, State and local requirements. Projects funded within the last five (5) years
will not be considered.
Application packages, program guidelines and instructions will be available for printing only on the OCED web site:
http:llwww.miamidade.govlced
or may be picked up starting Monday, November 3, 2008 until Friday, November 21, 2008 (Monday through Friday)
during working hours (from 8:00 am to 5:00 p.m.) at:
Office of Community and Economic Development
Community and Economic Development Division
701 N.W. 1st Court, 14th Floor
Applicants are encouraged to attend one of the following workshops to learn about the application process and
requirements:


Thursday, November 13, 2008 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.
Overtown Transit Village Building
701 N.W. 1st Court, 1st Floor Training Room
Miami, FL 33136


Tuesday, November 18, 2008 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.
Overtown Transit Village Building
701 N.W. 1st Court, 1st Floor Training Room
Miami, FL 33136


Completed applications must be hand delivered to the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, Stephen P. Clark
Center, 17th Floor, 111 N.W. First Street, Miami, Florida 33128, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m. on or before
Monday, November 24.
Applications must be hand delivered no later than Monday, November 24, 2008. For additional information, please call
OCED at (786) 469-2100.
"INCOMPLETE APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED**
Miami-Dade County provides equal access opportunity in employment, contracting and grant funding and does not
discriminate against persons with disabilities in its programs or services. For material in an alternate format, a sign
language interpreter or other accommodations, please call (786) 469-2100 at least five days in advance.


Advisor On Business, Marriage, and Love Affa
iReligious Holy Woman Helps The Sick And All
Remove Sutlering And Bad Luck From 'tour Bo
e'll Call Your Enemies By Name and Tell You
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e Has The God Given Power To Help Bv Prayer
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305-893-4481


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF COMMISSION MEETING DATE CHANGE

On April 10, 2008 the City Commission per Resolution R-08-0213, changed the
date of its Planning and Zoning meeting for November to be on the same day as
the Regular meeting scheduled for November 13, 2008 in the City Commission
Chambers at City Hall, at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.
The Commission meeting originally scheduled for November 27, 2008 (Planning
and Zoning meeting) will occur on November 13, 2008 at City Hall. The Regular
Commission meeting for the month of November will commence at 9:00 a.m.
and the Planning and Zoning meeting will commence at 10:00 a.m.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


#003181.. .


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 5 -NOVEMBER 11, 2008


MIAM IA E1

a Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
RATIFICATION OF EMERGENCY FINDINGS FOR
WAIVER OF FORMAL BIDS FOR THE ORANGE BOWL
LEGACY GIFT PROJECT / FOOTBALL STADIUM AT CITY OF
MIAMI'S MOORE PARK FOR THE PROVISION OF SEALED
BIDDING FOR PUBLIC WORKS CONSTRUCTION / CCNA
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida




The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on November 13, 2008 beginning
at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest that the City Commission
ratify, approve and confirm the Emergency Findings of the City Manager justifying the
waiver of competitive bids and the award of an agreement for the construction of Orange
Bowl Legacy Gift consisting of a youth sports/high school football stadium between the
City of Miami and the Orange Bowl Committee.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of November 13, 2008 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect
to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person
shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk
at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or
at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
#003177


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Local businesswoman awarded

Mary Kay Pink Cadi lac


Jeraline Long of Miami has
earned the use of the exclusive
Mary Kay 2009 Pearlized pink
Cadillac. The most coveted in-
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6th Mary Kay career car 5 be-
ing caddy's.
Long began her Mary Kay
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JERALINE LONG


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motivation to other Mary Kay
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Jerri sends a special thank you
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NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


TITLE


043-JJ11 12/4/2008 Fire Extinguishers

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


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AIRPORT CORAL WAY (Main Office)
1100 NW 72nd Avenue 2720 Coral Way
305-264-8003 305-476-6200
AVENTURA DORAL (Now Open)
17701 Biscayne Boulevard 8790 NW 25th Street
305-937-2265 305-406-9910
BIRD ROAD (Grand Re- opening) DOWNTOWN
8311 SW 40th Street 21 W Flagler Street
305-554-4800 305-372-7500
BRICKELL EAST KENDALL
1110 Brckell Avenue 9300 S Dixie Highway
305-577-4474 305-670-2224


HIALEAH
5410 W 16th Avenue
305-512-7601
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12411 Biscayne Boulevard
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PERRINE PALMETTO BAY
17945 Franjo Road
305-232-4900


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PRE-BID CONFERENCE
ADDENDUMS


I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY




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