Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00569
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 29, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00569
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text





..........SCH3-DIGfl 326
S11 P1I
UBRARFl OF FLA. HIS'IOR
PD BOX 117D7
GAINESVILLE Fl f3211-7W07


One Family Serving Since 1923


Urbe lrM.am. E tn.me%( __ie
Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties
Tempora Murantur Et Nos Mutaimur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 86 YEARS


Volume 86 Numberl0


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


s in Broward)


Athalie Range Boulevard becomes official

Friends and family gather
to honor Miami's pioneer in
a dedication ceremony
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimnesonline.com
Literature critic Charles Du
Bos once said, The important
thing is this: to be able at any
moment to sacrifice what we
are, for what we could become.
The late and long-time Miami
activist, M. Athalie Range,
probably didn't realize that she
would become an icon, let alone
a matriarch in the community,
even after she passed away in
2006 at 91, but Range is still
being remembered today.
Family, friends, elected
officials, and members of the
community came together last
Wednesday at the St. Martha
Catholic Church, 9301 Biscayne
Blvd. in Miami Shores, to honor
the late M. Athalie Range in a
road designation ceremony. A
stretch of Biscayne Boulevard,
which begins at Northeast 54th The elected officials, family and friends marvel at the street named after Athalie Range.
Please turn to RANGE 5A


Caleb Center holds "March for Change"


Members of the community
hit the streets to encourage
residents to vote
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
The scorching heat did not stop
hundreds from marching through the.
streets of Liberty City last Saturday,
encouraging people to "Get out and
Vote."
The March for Change Parade start-
ed at the Charles Drew Elementary
School located at 1775 Northwest
60th Street and ended at the Joseph
Caleb Community Center, 2200 NW
54 Street proceeding to an Early Vote
Rally.
"The purpose is to enhance early
voting. We are voting for the future of
our children," said Lt. John Pace with
the Federation of Black Employees.
Please turn to VOTING 8A


Florence Moss, president of Miami-Dade Young Democrats, leads Miami-Dade County Commis-
sioner Audrey Edmonson, Rep. Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall (D-FI 109), County Commissioner
Barbara Jordan, newly elected State Representative James Bush of District 109, Myra Taylor, can-
didate for Opa-locka Commissioner and supporters to the rally.


Actress Alfre Woodard encourages

residents to "Get Out and Vote"


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
For 14 months, Actress Alfre
Woodard has been campaigning for
Sen. Barack Obama, traveling from
state to state encouraging voters
to show up at the polls early or in
November.
Woodard, an Oscar nominee,
has starred in movies like "Love
and Basketball, "Take the Lead",
"Remember My Name", "Star Trek:
First Contact", "Down in the Delta",
"Follow Me Home", and this year's
box office hit, "Tyler Perry's: The


Family That Preys." She also starred
in ABC's legal drama, "The Practice"
as well as "Hill Street Blues", "L.A.
Law" and recently "Desperate
Housewives."
While at the March for Change Rally
at Joseph Caleb Center on Saturday,
Woodard sat down to talk to The
Miami Times about the election.
"I see the elderly waiting in line
to vote but what about the young
people? If they can wait in line to get
into a club then they can stand in
line to vote. You have the power to
set this country on a new course,"
Please turn to WOODARD 5A


Iluclud bm Ir-onile, V'I.'4 i

-Copyrighted Material




Syndicated Content'




Available from Commercia News Providers


America needs


Barack Obama
America is at its crossroads and this country
faces the most critical election in its history on
November 4 when Senators John McClain and
Barack Obama will contend for the leadership
of this nation for the next four years.
Our country is in a mess. The administration
of President George W. Bush has resulted in a
disaster for the past eight years. The culmina-
tion was the collapse of the financial system led
for the past 18 years by the disgraced Federal
Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan who testi-
fied to Congress that he was "shocked" at its
discovery.
A litany of miseries in our country includes
a bleak economic picture, a national debt of
ten trillion dollars and more than five million
people unemployed. Millions of people are with-
out health insurance, the credit market needs
a rescue and serious attention must be paid to
our health care system, our environment and our
physical, educational and industrial infrastruc-
ture.
At the same time, we have 150,000 American
troops in Iraq and 33,000 more in Afghanistan
that have cost us $600 billion so far and more
than 4,000 American lives and untold thousands
of Iraqi deaths.
It's time for a change. A major change. We think
that change can come %\ith the election of Barack
Obama as president of the United States of Amer-
ica on November 4, 2008.
In the 86 year history of The Miami Times we
have never experienced the political interest and
participation as we have seen in the past few
months. The multicultural makeup of South Flor-
ida has brought out the display of a needed di-
versity in our thinking and attitudes toward other
peoples.
Barack Obama brings a lot of positives to the
table. He is first a politician with the potential
of becoming a statesman. Educated in corporate
law at Harvard University and on the streets of
Chicago's racial cauldron stamp him as a leader
with smarts. His immersion into diverse environ-
ments as Hawaii, Kansas and Indonesia give him
the kind of perspective necessary for international
leadership today.
The long campaign of the past two years has
demonstrated that Obama has the intelligence
and steady temperament needed for this task. His
campaign has been marked by patience, plan-
ning, discipline and organization. When crisis
struck, as it did when the divisive antics of his
ex-pastor threatened to bring down his campaign,
he proved equal to the moment, rescuing himself
with a speech that not only drew the poison but
also demonstrated a profound respect for the elec-
torate.
Criticized by some for his verbosity, Obama's
speeches have been the center of his campaign
and has returned eloquence to it essential place
in politics.
Obama is a man of mixed ethnicity and many
White Americans seem to have a problem with the
thought of a Black man in charge of one of the
most powerful nations in the world.
The founder of this newspaper adopted its motto
in 1923 and its words ring true until this day -
"The times are changed and we are changed with
them." So be it.
These are troubled times. America is suffering
from economic failure, international perplexity
and a seriously battered morale. America needs
uplift, realism and change. It needs a leader with
intelligence and a temperament that is emotionally
attuned to our rapidly changing times. Get over it
America and choose Barack Obama as our leader.

Garth C. Reeves
Publisher Emeritus


OBAMA AT BANK ATLANTIC CENTER TODAY I

DOORS OPEN AT 4:30 P.M. 1 i o156 .


l,,llh,,, ll,,,i ,,lt ,l llh,,l l in 1 ,h ,lll ,,, ,l,
















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE, MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


The Miami Times Recommendation
October 28, 2008.
Section: A2
Photos:

U.S. PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT
Barack Obama and Joe Biden

SENATE
District 29: Christopher "Chris" Smith
District 35: Dan Gelber

U.S. HOUSE
District 20: Debbie Wasserman-Shultz
District 21: Raul Martinez
District 23: Alcee Hastings
District 25: Joe Garcia

STATE HOUSE
District 120: Ron Saunders

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
Yes on numbers: 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
No on number 2

CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
Harvey Ruvin

THIRD DISTRICT COURT OF APPEAL
Yes to all

CIRCUIT COURT GROUP 19
Yvonne Colodny

PROPERTY MARGOLIS
Gwen Margolis

COUNTY QUESTIONS
Yes on all


Hurricane Wilma

remembered 3 years later


Friday marked the third anniversary of Hurricane
Wilma that produced one of the most controversial
headlines' in this newspapers history.. ome of .'our
readers protested our front page banner that read "Wilma
Was A Bitch." We apologized to those readers for our poor
choice of words, but they were exactly the way most people
were referring to Wilma's damages and inconveniences she
caused.

Not many of us will soon forget living in the dark for weeks,
the long gas lines or the mountains of debris that it left.
Our neighborhoods have long since recovered from October
24, 2005, but there are still some blue tarps on damaged roofs
in some areas.

In all, Wilma left five people dead in Florida and $20.6 billion
in damage, the National Hurricane Center in Miami-Dade
County said. It was the most destructive hurricane to hit
South Florida since Hurricane Andrew in 1992. While in the
Caribbean, it became the most intense Category 5 hurricane on
record. It Struck Southwest Florida as a Category 3 storm.

Keep your fingers crossed. Hurricane season is not over
until November 1.


Righting a wrong

after 63 years

Its never too late to do good. Here's another one of the
atrocities directed against soldiers of color in world War II.
Samuel Snow was one of 28 African-American soldiers
railroaded to a conviction in 1944. They were imprisoned
and dishonorably discharged for something they did not do.
In October 2007 63 years later the Army admitted its
mistake. In July, it gave Mr. Snow, a Florida resident, an
honorable discharge and an apology. Mr. Snow, 84, died the
very same day.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and rep. Jim McDermott, D-Wash., filed
legislation to compel the military to award interest on any back
pay owed Mr. Snow and any others in similar circumstances
who have convictions overturned. Mr. Snow's widow, Margaret,
will receive $27,580 in back pay and interest that her husband
was unfairly denied.

Sen. Nelson and rep. ,McDermott are to be commended for
helping to bring about a just conclusion to a tragic story. Their
diligence helped to secure back pay for the widow of a World War
II soldier wrongly convicted and imprisoned for participating in
a riot during which an Italian prisoner was killed.




The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial
commentaries as well as all other maternal inm the newspaper Such
feedback makes for a health,, dialogue a.:ong our readership and the
communifi'
Letters must. however, be brief and to the point All letters must be
signed and must include the name. address and telephone number of
the writer for purposes of confirming authorship
Send letters to. Letters to the Editor. The Miami Times 900 N W
54th Street. Miami, FL 33127. or fax them to .'35- .7 -5 770.:, Email
miamiteditorial,'b, llsouth net


Rje ffiami Tim

IISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 5-th Sireei.
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Oftice Box 270200
Buena Vista Siation, Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder. 1923-
GARTH C. REEVES, JR.. Editor 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emerilu
RACHEL J. REEVES, Pubiisner and Crairmrr


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates. One Year $45 00 Six Months $30 00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax lor Florida residents


Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmasler: Send address changes to The Miami Times, PO. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
1968 The BlacK Press Delheves thai Am erica can De t lead the world trom racial and national antagonism when it accords to
I e&,er. person r-gardle.s of race. creed cr color his or Per human and legal rights Haling no person, learning no person the
Blacl- Press sinvas to help eveer person in the Irm beielf that all persons are hurl as long as anyone is held back.
us


-_-..: .:: ...-- . "


BY GARY L, FLOWERS, NNPA


Our fight for voting rights


Not long ago, widespread rumors
reverberated in the Black commu-
nity that somehow African-Ameri-
cans could lose their right to vote
in America. Not true. American
citizens who are Black cannot lose
their right to vote based on race.
However, how we were granted
the right to vote; systemic and his-
toric challenges to voter status;
and current barriers are worth
reviewing. Immediately following
the destructive American Civil War
and the emancipation of African-
Americans in 1865, the United
States Federal government set to
reconstruct the nation, in part, by
amending the U.S. Constitution to
free, grant citizenship, and convey
voting rights to newly-freed Black
people (1865-13th Amendment;
1868-14th Amendment; 1870-15th
Amendment).
Although Black people in Amer-
ica gained their right to vote in
1870, from that year until 1965,
people of color, particularly Blacks,
were denied the right to vote by
"dirty tricks" such as literacy tests,


requiring ownership of property,
and physical injury or death.
For 95 years, citizens of color
by the millions were denied their
Constitutional right to vote by sup-
pression schemes, which excluded
people on the basis of skin color.
The' Voting Rights Act of 1965
made good the 1870 promise of
the 15th Amendment that all citi-


years, the fight is long over.
For example, if the United States
Department of Justice does not
enforce the Voting Rights Act; if
the Supreme Court reinterprets
the Act; or if states are allowed to
enact barriers such as voter iden-
tification cards, the right to vote in
America could be set back to pre-
1865 lows of race-driven barriers


She American electoral system should be unitary one voting
machine and one ballot for the Constitutional offices of presi-
dent, vice president, and Congressional members.


zens, regardless of race, could vote
in their states. In 2006, with a co-
alition of committed organizations
such as the Black Leadership Fo-
rum and the Leadership Confer-
ence on Civil Rights influenced the
extension of the expiring provisions
of the Voting Rights Act Section
5 (Federal Pre-Clearance of voting
plans) and Section 203 (Language
Assistance)- were authorized for 25
years until 2032. Although Con-
gress extended the expiring por-
tions of the Civil Rights Act for 25


to voting.
In light of the most recent efforts
to renew provisions of the Voting
Rights Act, four questions come to
mind:
1) Why does the "right to vote"
have to be reauthorized periodi-
cally? .
2) Why does the Voting Rights
Act only apply to certain states or
jurisdictions?
3) Why do states control federal
elections?
4) How can a more permanent


right to vote be guaranteed?
The answer to the first ques-
tion rests in the fact that the en-
forcement provisions of the Voting
Rights Act are temporary. Sections
5 and 203 are in effect for 25 years.
In order for Congress to provide
race-conscious remedies (and the
Supreme Court to approve these
remedies), periodic review of a leg-
islative record must support the
need for such remedies.
In other words, if there is no re-
cord that shows people of color are
continuing to be denied equal ac-
cess to the polls, in theory the fed-
eral courts could conceivably rule
race conscious remedies are no
longer needed.
And, in light of Supreme Court
decisions, the end of race-con-
scious remedies may indeed be-
come a reality. Secondly, not all
states or jurisdictions have poor
records on racial discrimination
in voting. Currently all or portions,
of 11 sates are subject to Section
5 and Section 203 of the Voting
Rights Act of 1965.


Vi,*


BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA


Obsession -

A dangerous little DVD was in-
serted into newspapers in 70 dif-
ferent cities last month. Titled,
Obsession: Radical Islam's War
Against the West, it is a delib-
erately and distortedly frighten-
ing view of "radical Islam" that
is designed to incite fear into the
hearts and souls of Americans.
Imagine these Americans now
going to a Palin rally and hearing
Barack Obama's middle name
spat out. These cannot be coin-
cidences.
To be sure, the Obsession film
begins with.a disclaimer that the
majority of Muslims are peace-
ful. But then, a series of frighten-
ing and violent images are high-
lighted as example of Islam's war
against the West. The hour-long
film makes it appear that Islamic
forces attack the west, without
context. How many of these at-
tacks, no matter how reprehen-


- The campaign contribution


sible, have we provoked?
To be sure, the perpetrators of
September 11, 2001, were be-
yond reprehensible. Instead of
apprehending them, though, we
decided to go to another country
and start a war that is now cost-
ing us about a trillion dollars.


The Clarion Fund, which pro-
duced and distributed Obses-
sion, spent millions of advertis-
ing dollars so that newspapers
around the country would in-
clude their DVD as a paid insert.
In Denver and Dayton, Portland
and Philadelphia, Las Vegas and


R radical Islam does not have to attack the west We've done
ourselves, and our economy; damage enough


Radical Islam does not have to
attack the west. We've done our-
selves, and our economy; dam-
age enough with a war that has
caused us to lose esteem, and
allies, all over the world. While
most of the world embraces a
war against terrorism, the link
between Saddam Hussein and
Obama bin Ladin has yet to be
established.


BY HARRY C, ALFORD, NNPA


Lansing, readers were treated to
a DVD that sells for $12.95 on
the Internet.
It costs $4.95 to review the DVD
online. And the Clarion Fund
claims that 28 million were dis-
tributed. If the DVDs wholesale
at $5 apiece, the Clarion Fund
made a $140 million campaign
contribution to those who would
connect Obama with "radical Is-


lam."
Couldn't they just be pushing a
cause? There is the adage, "tim-
ing is everything."
You have got to question the
timing of this 'distribution in an
election that appears to be closer
than it ought to be if we simply
went on the merits of the candi-
dates. Obsession injects fear and
apprehension into a campaign
that is already full of irrationality
and emotion from the women
who were supposed to be swayed
by the addition of Sarah Palin to
the McCain ticket, to the people
who hesitate to vote for Obama
because he is of African descent.
Now, there is the fear monger-
ing over radical Islam and a film
designed to incite both fear and
anger. At a time when we ought
to be building bridges, Obsession
builds barriers between Muslims
and others.


.........
. .". '. .....
. ...... .


Dealing with minority front companies


One of the sleaziest operations
going on today is that of a Front
Company. This is a company that
claims to be of minority ownership
when actually it is a White company
or a minority person falsely claim-
ing ownership to an activity that is
for minority business credit.
It is intended to fool the public
and those who support the use of
minority business. This practice
has no shame. You will see front
companies on the covers of cer-
tain magazines and on lists of top
minority businesses and actively
participating in minority business
associations.
I encouraged former Attorney
General Janet Reno to make ex-
amples of some. She did during
the first Clinton Administration.
She sent some of the rascals to
prison and severely fined some of
the white co-conspirators such as
Peter Kiewit Inc. (owned by Warren
Buffet).
I am going to encourage the next
Attorney General to do the same as
the fronts keep coming.


My first experience at dealing
with fronts came during my early
years of activism in Indiana. The
new Indiana State Office Building
was being built and on the minor-
ity participation reports was the
name Thomas Construction doing
$2 million plus in work.


it to me. The file was completely
blank absolutely blank and I im-
mediately concluded that a scheme
was in play.
Thus, we decided to go and see
Mr. Thomas, an elderly man of lit-
tle means. Mr. Thomas was cocky
and arrogant and wouldn't an-


ne of the sleaziest operations going on today is that of a
Front Company. This is a company that claims to be of
minority ownership when actually it is a White company


I thought this was quite strange
as no Black contractor living in
Indianapolis at the time could do
such work. An investigation was
started. I went to the Indiana De-
partment of Public Works and,
under the Freedom of Information
Act, requested a physical look at
the prequalification file of Thomas
Construction.
Any business doing more than
$100 thousand in construction
must be prequalified and have an
active record on file. The secretary
retrieved the file and presented


swer any of my questions. I didn't
show my frustration with him as I
knew there was a way to get at the
truth.
I wrote to the Internal Revenue
Service, IRS, as a whistle blower
citizen. I told them that this man's
company is listed as making more
than $2 million dollars last year
and I doubted if he'd reported
the earnings to them. Within a
few weeks an IRS agent (criminal
division) came to see me. She in-
formed me that Mr. Thomas was in
the middle of a scheme and never


made anything close to the amount
of money listed on the State Re-
ports. She also said that I should
go and see him again and he would
give me some interesting evidence
for my investigation.
It was amazing! He was apolo-
getic and shared with us written
evidence of the conspiracy. Huber,
Hunt and Nichols who was the
Construction Manager of the proj-
ect wrote a script of front activity
for Mr. Thomas and his son. They
would pay them to walk around the
site during rush hours as if they
were doing some kind of work.
They would pay them in checks
and escort them to the bank where
they would deposit the checks and
immediately transfer the funds to
Huber, Hunt and Nichols.
It was an absolute conspiracy
written in black and white. The
construction manager was sus-
pended from state projects for 5
years. Mr. Thomas would have
gone to jail if we had pushed for
prosecution but we let-up as our
point was made to all.


.- ,


e

















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


S BY NICOLE LEE, NNPA


U.S. election and the

African world


This election has been an ex-
tremely long process. The Global
War on Terror and the econom-
ic crisis will uniquely affect the
African world, but I didn't hear
substantial discussion about is-
sues surrounding Haiti, Congo,
and Liberia from either candi-
date. During this last adminis-
tration, we have seen the demo-
cratically elected government in
Haiti removed, the Global War on
Terror spread to the African con-
tinent, and decreasing opportu-
nity for voices on the ground in
Africa and in the Diaspora to be
heard.
Even with victories on debt re-
lief for poor countries, Vulture
Funds hedge funds that prey
on the debt of the world's poorest
countries threaten the impor-


Don't throw the
with the bath water:
Administration put i
mechanisms to corn
AIDS, although the r
tive methods for corn
pandemic fell victim t
pandering to conserv.
es.
These initiatives sho
scrapped, but must b
to gain the greatest 1
the least amount of fur
holes to benefit pharr
companies or beltwa
must be closed. The
ment of success mus
saved. Period.
Energy alternatives
come at the cost of ti
World: In the pursuit
vation and a holistic


he outcome of this election affects the six bill
outside of the G-8 countries, many of whom live
poverty


tant gains we have achieved.
The outcome of this election
affects the six billion people out-
side of the G-8 countries, many
of whom live in abject poverty,
and I have some food for thought
for our president-elect and his
transition team.
The world can't wait: Eight
years of war and pillaging have
left the African World wondering
when common sense and diplo-
macy will return to U.S. foreign
policy. Double speak has cost
time and lives in Darfur and
Congo, and we have essentially
stated that the lives of Americans
are worth more than the lives of
people around the world.
Respect sovereign nations
and return to multilateralism:
Iraq is not the only country that
has paid with blood in the name
of the "Global War on Terror".
Over the past three years, the
United States has indiscrimi-
nately bombed Somali refugee
camps looking for two or three
suspected Al-Qaeda operatives.
The next administration must
work with other nations in an
effort to get away from the pat-
tern of unilaterally invading an-
other country's borders for our
own interests. We truly are the
company we keep, and to be
respected and multilateral, the
United States cannot continue
to be friendly with dictator-led
regimes at the expense of demo-
cratically elected ones.


to the world's ener


BY GEORGE E CURRY, NNPA


j iRepublicans
.-.... o far, lacking an "October Sur-
baby out prise" tQat will dramatically turn the
The Bush election in their favor, Republicans
.nto place are gradually shifting their attention
.bat HIV/ from William Ayers, "an old washed
host effec- up terrorist in the 1960s, to the
bating the Association of Community Organiza-
to political tions for Reform Now, better known
ative forc- as ACORN.
At the GOP national convention in
)uld not be St, Paul, former presidential candi-
e tweaked date Rudy Giuliani and Vice Presi-
benefit for dential nominee Sarah Palin took
rids. Loop- delight in mocking Barack Obama
maceutical as a "community organizer." Trailing
y bandits in most major polls and connected
measure- to George W. Bush like Velcro, John
st be lives McCain has stepped up the attack in
the final presidential debate by link-
must not ing Obama to ACORN.
he African McCain claimed that ACORN "is
of conser- now on the verge of maybe perpe-
approach treating one of the greatest frauds in
voter history in this country, maybe
destroying the fabric of democracy."
on people In an attempt to tarnish ACORN,
'in abject McCain and his GOP allies are hop-
ing that we will not be able to see the
forest for the acorns. But ACORN is
no stranger to poor people or African-
needs.o w Americans.


must work to ensure that the
African World does not fall vic-
tim to poor planning and short-
term thinking.
Secretary Rice has called
President Nguema Mbasogo of
Equitorial Guinea a "friend of
the US". This "friendship" is
certainly not based on his gov-
ernment's abysmal human rights
record, but more about the coun-
try's proximity to untapped oil
reserves in the Gulf of Guinea.
The last thing the people of Afri-
ca need is the further placating of
dictators to serve U.S. interests.
Moreover, the production of oil
alternatives is a burden carried
by much of the African World to
the detriment of local needs. Jat-
ropha and Palm oil, highly touted
alternatives, are destroying wet
lands and forest in Latin America
and are not providing the indus-
try promised in Mozambique.
Biofuels are promoted as a new
opportunity for African agricul-
tural business, but this untested
market will leave local farmers
holding the bag.
Many of these plants make
cultivation of other crops, even
years later, very difficult. Ex-
perts say that the move toward
bio fuels may deepen the world
wide food crisis. The next Admin-
istration must be more thought-
ful than the last when it comes
to the long term implications of
our policies.


can't see the forest for the ACORN


As Maude Hurd the African-
American president of ACORN not-
ed: "ACORN has been building orga-
nizations and developing leadership
among low- and moderate-income
residents in neighborhoods through-
out the United States for 38 years."
The independent FactCheck.org


'Elvis Presley'vote," he said at a press
conference called to support ACORN.
"But surely some partisans believe
that they can prevent qualified voters
from registering or casting their le-
gitimate votes, that they can frighten
voters away from the polls, and that
they can win elections through their


n an attempt to'tarnish ACORN, McCain and his GOP allies are hoping
that we will not be able to see the forest for the acorns.


noted, "Neither ACORN nor its em-
ployees have been found guilty of, or
even charged with, casting fraudu-
lent votes. What a McCain-Palin Web
ad calls 'voter fraud' is actually voter
registration fraud. Several ACORN
canvassers have been found guilty
of faking registration forms and oth-
ers are being investigated. But the
evidence that has surfaced so far
shows they faked forms to get paid
for work they didn't do, not to stuff
ballot boxes."
Julian Bond, chairman of the
NAACP, was even more pointed.
"No one believes registration au-
thorities will let 'Mickey Mouse' or


own fraud and deceit and trickery."
Bond added, "We think the Ameri-
can people are too smart for that."
ACORN makes its own case on its
Web site, www.acorn.org:
Among the "key facts" listed by
ACORN:
In order to help 1.3 million people
register to vote, we hired more than
13,000 registration assistance work-
ers. As with any business or agency
that operates at this scale, there are
always some people who want to get
paid without really doing the job, or
who aim to defraud their employer.
Any large voter registration oper-
ation will have a small percentage of


workers who turn in bogus registra-
tion forms. Their goal clearly is not to
cast a fraudulent vote. It is simply to
defraud their employer, ACORN, by
getting a paycheck without earning
it. ACORN is the victim of this fraud
- not the perpetrator.
In nearly every case that has been
reported it was ACORN that discov-
ered the bad forms, and called them
to the attention of election authori-
ties, putting the forms in a package
that identified them in writing as
suspicious, encouraging election of-
ficials to investigate, and offering to
help with prosecutions.
This has nothing to do with 'vot-
er fraud' nothing at all to do with
anyone trying to cast an extra vote.
There has never been a single report-
ed instance in which bogus registra-
tion forms have led to anyone voting
improperly. To do that, they would
have to show up at the polls, prove
their identity as all first-time regis-
trants must, and risk jail. The people
who turned in these forms did so not
because they wanted an extra vote,
but because they didn't care enough
to make sure eligible people got to
vote at all.


BY RON WALTERS, NNPA


W "Al


and delivered and what those
ideas contain.
IHands down, Barack Obama
demonstrated, in effect, that
he was and is head and
shoulders intellectually supe-
rior to John Mc Cain.


The debates are a. forum
where the candidates are test-
ed to put forth their ideas in a
manner that is not only mea-
sured by the stylistic compe-
tence of verbal combat, but by
how the ideas are formulated


The Movers Program that Mt. Tabor Baptist Church
minister George McRae into a strong community social
service organization serving HIV patients seems to have been
closed leaving a lot of people out of jobs. William Perry Jr. was
chairman of the board and Connie West -- executive director.

Proud Miamians are waiting for the street signs for Biscayne
Boulevard between 54th Street and 95th Street to be changed
so that we might drive down Athalie Range Boulevard. A great
tribute to a great woman.

Former Miami City Manager Howard Gary is reported living
in the Panama Canal Zone with his wife.

The only political battles more nasty than the Obama-McCain
presidential contest are the Congressional races between
Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart and challenger Raul Martinez
for District 21, and the District 25 congressional candidates
Mario Diaz-Balart and Joe Garcia. A lot of people feel the
Republican stranglehold on Miami-Dade will be broken by the
Democrats. Stay tuned.

The 900 homeowners facing foreclosure are praising the
North Miami City Council last week approved a measure that
would encourage the Miami-Dade County court system to
create a mortgage-foreclosure diversion pilot program. The gist
of he program would be 120-day moratorium on foreclosures
to help people keep their homes.

Seat belt usage is only 82 percent and troopers are trying
to urge everyone to use the life saving device. The horrible
accident on Florida's Turnpike south of South Boulevard last
weekend when five people died in the crash brought home
again the necessity to buckle up.

With John McCain battling to keep his campaign hopes
alive, Monday was not a good day for Senate's longest serving
Republican being found guilty on all seven felony charges ,of
lying about a bonanza of home renovation gifts and favor he
received from a millionaire oil contractor.

With 40 percent of the $107 million donors have contributed
or pledged, the U.N. humanitarian chief appealed to donor
countries Monday for more than $60 million to help Haiti
recover from storms that killed hundreds of people and heavily
damaged the Caribbean nation's agricultural base.

The Fort Lauderdale Police Department is suffering a black
eye after it was discovered that the city requires officers to
arrest by quota. Stay tuned.

Many people are accusing the medical and pharmaceutical
companies of conspiracy because diabetes drug costs in the
United States have almost doubled in six years to $12.5
billion as more people are diagnosed with the condition.
Minority patients are being prescribed newer, more expensive
treatments such as Merck's Januvia and Eli Lilly's Byetta.
Stay tuned.


This is not an endorsement,
it is an analysis. At the end of
the three presidential debates
featuring Barack Obama and
John McCain, the judgment of
the American people was that
Obama had won all three.
Thinking about it, I must
admit that I missed the signif-
icance of that conclusion on
their part, but it says some-
thing profound that has not
been fully grasped.
Americans are saying that
they need Barack Obama at
this point in their history, and
not just because he repre-
sents their desire for change.
It was apparent in the debates
that he also has the stature
and intelligence to lead the
country, if there was even any
doubt.
I did hear some criticism
from a few well placed observ-
ers that Barack was too "cool"
that he didn't show emotion,
that it seemed to be business
as usual.
My first thought was that
this was a racial stereotype
which suggested that a Black
man could not possibly think


his way through the crisis
represented by the morass of
complex issues that were put
to him without going off the
deep end and cussing some-
body out. Yes, Barack was
cool, but that was not the
cool of a cultural style, it was
the cool of deep reflection, a
necessary ingredient to con-
ceptualizing a problem and
coming up with a substantive
conclusion.
By contrast, John McCain
was undisciplined, emotion
showed in his face, reveal-
ing an inner turmoil and in-
ability to add subtlety to his
thoughts, but to rely on well-
worn cliches and ideology as
the stuff of his substance.
For example, I listened to
McCain's tired attempt to
paint Obama as a "big-spend-
ing Liberal" at a time when it
seems that a majority of the
American people are saying
they are not afraid of the "L"
word any more, that they care
more about current circum-
stances than ideology. So, he
continued to drive them to-
ward the past, not the future.


BY MARC H. MORAL, NNPA


Minorities are not to blame for the subprime


n the last few weeks, I have
undertaken an aggressive
campaign directed at the na-
tion's financial leaders to dis-
pel the dangerous and growing
myth that minority borrowers
are primarily responsible for
our country's current econom-
ic crisis. In letters to Treasury
Secretary Henry Paulson and
Federal Reserve Chairman,
Benjamin Bernanke, I have
asked that they both publicly
refute claims by some conser-
vative pundits and politicians
that most of the defaulted sub-
prime loans at the root of the
crisis were made to Blacks,
Hispanics and other so-called
"unproductive borrowers."
As the New York Times
pointed out in an August 3rd
article, Subprime Loans' Wide
Reach, "While subprime loans
deeply penetrated low-income
and minority groups, a new
study suggests that more
upper-income borrowers and
more Whites took out such
loans than any other groups."
It is becoming clearer ev-
eryday that a large number
of people who ended up with
subprime loans could have
qualified for a prime loan.


That's where the abuse lies.
In the face of these facts,
we have heard conservatives -
from Fox News commentator,
Neil Cavuto to ABC News ana-
lyst George Will to Washington
Post columnist Charles Kraut-
hammer say that government
efforts to increase homeown-
ership "put people in homes


King Boulevard who are most
victimized by their excesses.
I have taken up this issue
for several reasons. First, now
more than ever, America needs
unity and real solutions to fix
the economic mess that has
engulfed our country.
Instead of having a healthy
debate on what must be done


t is becoming clearer everyday that a large number of
people who ended up with subprime loans could have
qualified for a prime loan.


they could not afford" and are
"at the root of our current ca-
lamity."
Rep. Michele Bachman (R-
Minn) added Congressional
weight to this myth when she
quoted an Investor's Business
Daily article from the floor of
the House that said banks
made loans "on the basis of
race and little else."
In my view, this blatant
scapegoating is an ugly at-
tempt by the rich and power-
ful to shift the blame for this
crisis from Wall Street and
Washington, where it belongs,
onto middle-class families on
Main Street and Martin Luther


to curb too much Wall Street
greed and too little Washing-
ton oversight, too many are
willing to waste precious time
and energy blaming the vic-
tims.
Second, history provides
too many lessons about the
consequences of singling out
only certain segments of the
population as culprits for a
country's woes. On the basis
of hearsay, rumors and misin-


mess

formation, seeds .
of division are
being sown all across the Unit-
ed States in a volatile political
environment where Americans
are terrified by the economic
situation.
That is why I have called on
both Secretary Paulson and
Chairman Bernanke to quell
this false and unnecessary
tempest. I will take my con-
cerns directly to Congress on
October 16th at a special hear-
ing on this issue before the
Senate Banking Committee.
The National Urban League is
also once again calling on the
major broadcast and cable TV
networks to increase racial di-
versity in their newsrooms as
a way to prevent the dissemi-
nation of this and other dan-
gerous myths by certain com-
mentators and politicians.
Marc Morial is President and
CEO of the National Urban
League


". . I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
-understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
-produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action ..."
Malcolm X


America needs Barack Obama for change now








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Thirteenth annual Range Gala honors local history makers
When the super-popular trio of the region's Black heritage re- ami) Dorsey House Church of Christ (Congregation- fort to save the historic Hampton
Boyz II Men graces the stage of the awakened dramatically years ago, The Archives and Chapman al), as for her many outstanding House hotel in Miami's Browns-
Miami Marriott Biscayne Bay Ho- when a colleague of hers, speak- have become House, and, efforts to preserve Miami's histor- ville district, made famous by such
tel (1633 North Bayshore Drive, in ing about the lack of attention or an invaluable mostnotably, the ic landmarks, and not only those guests as Joe Louis, Muhammad
the Omni area) for the Thirteenth importance that the Black com- resource for re- Lyric Theater, which have Black significance. Ali and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Annual M. Athalie Range Musical munity seemed to give to its his- searchers, stu- built in 1913, Indeed, it was she who, as the As if not busy enough with those
Celebration of Life Gala, on Sun- tory, commented, "I guess those dents and others among several first Black president of the vener- projects, Mrs. Pinkney has been
day, November 4, they will be part people just don't care." Know- who are inter- other preserva- able Dade Heritage Trust, played an inspirational presence both
of a very special tribute indeed, as ing that only actions, not words, ested in the fas- PINKNEY FIELDS tion projects. A a leading role in the difficult but in her church denomination and
the occasion honors three distin- could respond to such a percep- cinating, often proud mother of successful struggle to save the through her College affiliation,
guished pioneers for their decades tion, she set about the business of inspiring, yet little known, history two highly-accomplished daugh- Miami Circle, the 2000-year- .both of which trace their history
of dedicated community ser- establishing the Black Archives, of the many essential Black con- ters, and a grandmother, Dr. .old Tequesta Indian site at the back to the famous Amistad in-
vice. Dr. Dorothy Jenkins Fields, as a repository for documents, tributions to the building of Mi- Fields still remains active in her mouth of the Miami River. She cident of 1839, in which African
Founder of the Black Archives; photographs and other materials ami, or of the thriving community efforts to ensure that the legacy of subsequently became one of the captives aboard a schooner carry-
Historic Preservationist Enid Cur- which tell and preserve the story that once was, in spite of segrega- past generations is not lost. most eloquent advocates for sav- ing them to enslavement in Cuba
tis Pinkney, and the International of Black Miami, from the earliest tion and discrimination. In short Dr. Enid Curtis Pinkney, is an ing and restoring Historic Virginia revolted and won their freedom in
Longshoremen's Association Local Bahamian settlers and Black rail- order, Dr. Fields' vision would equally iconic figure on ,the Mi- Key Beach Park, and now serves the United States. For all of her
1416, are this year's honorees. road builders to the present time. expand from the Archives to the ami historic preservation scene, as Vice Chair of the City of Miami efforts, Mrs. Pinkney was awarded
Dr. Fields, a lifelong educator (This includes the Black men who creation of the Historic Overtown as much known for her extensive Virginia Key Beach Park Trust. At a much-deserved honorary Doctor
with Miami-Dade Public Schools, comprised more than one -third Folk Life Village, with the resto- work with the Talladega College almost the same time, she also of Humane Letters degree by St.
had her passion for preserving of the Founders of the City of. Mi- ration of such landmarks as the Alumni Association and United took a leadership role in the ef- Thomas University.


-S
,--Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers


Do you support Congressman Kendrick Meek's decision to threaten
to file a lawsuit to have additional voting machines put in place due
to the excessive lines for early voting?


PHILIPPE DEROSE, 55
North Miami Beach Councilman
North Miami Beach

I agree with
him. Every-
where in Mi-
ami-Dade and
Broward, there
are very long
lines. This is
something
that should
be taken care
of before November 4. We need
more voting machines so people
can vote. There are not enough
polling places to vote and I be-
lieve on the election day it will
be much better. This is what
needs to done.


GEPSIE METTELLUS, 48
Executive Director of the Sant La Hai-
tian Neighborhood Center
Miami Shores


If the threat
is going to re-
solve the state
or the gov-
ernment to
receive more
resources
to buy more
then it's not a
problem.


VAL SCREEN, 43
Development Director for Virginia
Key Beach Trust
Miami

I think that
whatever .
Congress-
man Kendrick .
Meek or any of "
our represen- ..
tatives do to '
make it easier
for citizens to f '
vote, even with
a lawsuit, is reasonable. People
have to have exercise their right
vote.


DOROTHY BENDROSS-MINDIN-
GALL
Representative for District 109
Miami

If that is
what it takes
to move our
directors aind
supervisors
to make sure
that our con-
stituents are
allowed to use
their constitutional rights in a
manner that does not require
them to stand in the long line.
It is fair what the congressman
is doing in order to ease the cit-
izen frustration in the lines.


DENISE PERRY, 47
Director of the Power U Center for
Social Change
Miami

Anything
that helps es-
tablish a de-
mocracy in
which people
are given a
right to vote
should be
done. If it
means going to court then so
be it.



Subscribe


to


The Times


Nearly 1 in 4 of state's students drop out


Nearly one in four of the
state's approximate 6 million
students drop out of school,
according to the most accu-
rate-ever analysis of dropout
data released Wednesday by
the state Department of Edu-
cation.
The four-year derived drop-
out rate, based on the 2006-
07 school year, is an estimated
24.2 percent. More than 67
percent of the state's public


school eligible students gradu-
ated eight percent of students
- such as those who seek
high-school equivalency diplo-
mas - are considered neither
dropouts nor graduates.
San Mateo County fared bet-
ter with a 15.6 percent drop-
out rate.
The high dropout rates in
the state report Wednesday
didn't surprise Cabrillo Uni-
fied School District Superin-


tendent Robert Gaskill in Half
Moon Bay.
Educators have long sus-
pected the dropout numbers
reported in years past were ac-
tually higher, Gaskill said.
In previous years, the drop-
out data was calculated using
less- than-accurate methods.
Now the data is derived based
on a system that tracks stu-
dents moving in and out of
schools statewide.


SGWEN


1FOR PROPERTY APPRAISER


m zu1imnPpIehintak CtypiaIMU


'. .y -." : ; *.,; Y "1.":.


.:;.1. -







S5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


* --


Copyrighted MaterialP




Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers
















Woodard urges voters to let their ballots speak for them


WOODARD
continued from 1A

said Woodard. "For the first
time in history, we have a
politician who says we have
more rather than less in
common."
Woodard believes the economy
will be the main concern for
the man who will sit in the
White House for the next four
years. "The economic crisis is
a dire situation." She defines
the economy as the existing


problems such as foreclosure
and unemployment. Woodard
believes that Obama will be able
to bring the change that this
country needs.
"Obama is a thinker and he
attracts the most brilliant minds.
The grace that his mother has
taught him and his experiences
have lifted him. Never before
have a working class man and
woman made such an impact
on the White House.
With eight years in the
White House and a war in


Iraq considered unnecessary
by many, Woodard says that
President George Bush has
broken this country and Obama
is the most qualified candidate
to fix the situation, beginning
with the withdrawal of troops
from Iraq.
According to the Iraq Coalition
Causalty Count, more than
4000 U.S. servicemen have
been killed in Iraq as a result
of the war. In their book, The
Three Trillion Dollar War, Nobel
Prize winner Joseph E. Stiglitz


and Harvard professor Linda
J. Bilmes estimate the total
financial cost of the war at $3
trillion.
Woodard encourages voters to
stop talking and let their voices
be heard at the polls by casting
their ballots.
"Push ahead for who we said
we aspire to be as a nation. All
we have to do is walk down the
street and vote. Tell your boss
that you will be late to work or
you are not coming in because
you are standing in line to vote.


Former Congresswoman Carrie R Meek, Sen. Frederica S.
Wilson, Miami-Dade County Commissioner Dennis Moss,
School Board member Dr.Wilbert Holloway, County Commis-
sioners, Audrey Edmonson, Barbara J. Jordan and Garth C.
Reeves, Publisher Emeritus of The Miami Times.

Athalie Range's continued legacy


RANGE
continued from 1A

Street and extends to Northeast
95th Street has been officially
named for her.
As the rain slowly began to
pour, Athalie's daughter, Myrna
Range, said that her mother
was smiling as she watched the
dedication.
Sen. Frederica Wilson, who'
spearheaded the dedication
to Athalie, defined her as, "A
woman of giant ambitions,
whose objectives were never
about her and hers, but about
what is fair and just for people
of all stripes and creeds."
"She was so important to
the community. She had very
much to do with shaping the
city by becoming a community
icon and matriarch who
never underestimated her
importance," said Gene Tinnie,
chair of the Board of Trustees
in the Virginia Key Beach Park
Trust.
Athalie was the first Black-
City of Miami commissioner.
Throughout her tenure, she
enforced tougher handgun
laws, community outreach
encouraging voters to show
up at the polls, and vocally
confronted the School Board
about injustice in the schools.
After witnessing the
overcrowding and the
mistreatment of the Black


students at Liberty City
Elementary, Range piloted 125
Black parents to have a meeting
with the School Board to present
their recommendations for
improvements. The hoard agreed
to make the improvements.
Currently, a park with an
Olympic Swimming Complex is
named after Range in Liberty
City.
"Having the boulevard named
after my grandmother speaks to
all of the hard work, dedication
and commitment that she has
had for this community. She
was never the one to boast
about herself but she always
took the opportunity to give
glory to God first. It is our hope
that this boulevard naming will
be a symbol for the community
for years to come," said N.
Patrick Range II, the grandson
of Athalie. "She has big shoes
to fill. I know that I or anyone
could not fill them but certainly
her works are not in vain."
The thirteenth annual M.
Athalie Range Cultural Arts
Foundation gala will be held
on November 2 at the Miami
Marriott Biscayne Bay Hotel,
1633 N. Bayshore Dr. at 6 p.m.
The Cultural Arts Foundation
was formed to provide
scholarships for young people
who are pursuing a career in the
performing arts. Athalie Range
would have celebrated her 93rd
birthday on November 7.


with your




dollars



We can make a difference.

That is, if we vote daily with our dollars.

We urge our readers to think in economic terms and to use the advertising columns of The
Miami Times as a guide when making purchases and/or voting.

Corporations and governmental entities that place advertising in the columns of The Miami
Times are sending the message that they appreciate our patronage and respect us as customers.

Let nobody fool you

Our weekly family of more than 115,000 Miami Times readers holds tremendous economic
clout. Economic clout so great that it determines whether most companies in South Florida
make a profit.

As customers and taxpayers, we should vote with our dollars but only for those businesses
and government jurisdictions that respect rules of fair play from the board room to the
checkout and service counters.

They also should respect and appreciate us and our hard-earned dollars just as they do the
readers of conservative, white-owned media.


Vote daily with your dollars to make a difference.


Wte uta nd Sth Flia
We Care About You and South Florida


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


............. a







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Florida Memorial University students win $1000 scholarship


On June 21 and August 9,
Florida Memorial University
opened its campus to potential
and incoming students for its
first Open House events held on
the Miami Gardens and Lauder-
dale Lakes campuses.
The purpose of the Open House
events was to increase student
enrollment and awareness of the
University's academic programs.
To encourage attendance and
participation, FMU's Office of
Admissions added an extra in-
centive, awarding two students
who met a set of requirements
"On-The-Spot" academic schol-
arships during each Open House
Event in the amount of $1,000.
Angelica Pearson of Miami Gar-
dens and William Paulk of Fort


Lauderdale, both 18, were this
year's lucky recipients. "We an-
ticipated a number, and we ex-
ceeded it! So, for it being the
first time, it was a good effort,"
said Peggy Martin, Director of
Admissions. "I would really like
to thank the campus commu-
nity for contributing their efforts
in making this event a success."
Angelica Pearson was the
scholarship winner during the
Open House in Miami Gardens
on June 21. She is a graduate of
Turner Tech High School where
she was a national achiever and
flagette for the school band.
Pearson prides herself in having
perfect attendance from kinder-
garten through high school, a
legacy which she plans on con-


tinuing through grad-
uation from Florida
Memorial University.
Presently, she volun-
teers at Cedars Medi-
cal Center assisting
with the transporta-
tion of patients.
Pearson is seeking


a dual degree in Biol-
ogy and Nursing. Prior
to attending college, Pearson
knew that she wanted to go to
an institution of higher learning
where she would not be seen as
a number, but where the profes-
sors knew her by name. Since
she wanted to remain local,
FMU became a natural choice.
As an on-campus student, she
acknowledges the huge respon-


sibilities that
come from tran-
sitioning from
high school to
college life, but
she finds the
changes to be
j very liberating.
PAULK "This scholar-


PEARSON


ship has made it
possible for me to be. an
on-campus student, so I really
feel as if I am getting the full col-
lege experience," said Pearson,
who is excited about becoming
active in the different organiza-
tions at the University.
William Paulk was the schol-
' arship recipient during the
Lauderdale Lakes Open House
on August 9. He is a graduate


of Coconut Creek High
School and is enthused
to join the FMU fam-
ily. Paulk decided to
attend FMU because
his grandmother heard
great reviews about the
school and advised him
to do so. Paulk went to


the Open House ses-
sion to get a feel for the school,
and was delighted to be award-
ed the scholarship. "This schol-
arship will assist me greatly,
especially this year; my family
and I were in need of some ex-
tra assistance," said Paulk. The
transition from high school to
college life was a different but
good experience for Paulk. He
intends on majoring in Sports


Business Administration and
believes that Florida Memorial
is providing him with the nec-
essary tools to excel; his pro-
fessors take the time to get to
know him and clarify'any mis-
understandings. Also, the Bro-
ward campus is convenient for
his lifestyle; it allows him to re-
main in Fort Lauderdale where
he not only lives but also works
part-time.
William and Angelica are
looking forward to experiencing
exciting times as Florida4 Memo-
rial University students. Both
are grateful for receiving a mon-
etary award that enabled them
to pursue their educational
dreams, and they are driven to
exceed expectations.


Teen gets life for homeless murder


By Tony Alanez

A life sentence was harsher
than Samuel Gaynor antici-
pated for the man who clubbed
his sleeping son to death on a
Fort Lauderdale bench.
"It touched me when she
said 'life,'" Gaynor said about
hearing Broward Circuit
Judge Cynthia Imperato sen-
tence Thomas Daugherty, 19,
on Thursday. "Such a short
word, such a long time."
At his trial last month,
Daugherty was shown on vid-
eotape repeatedly walloping a
defenseless man with a base-
ball bat.
That attack on Jacques
Pierre at the Las Olas Bou-
levard campus of Florida At-
lantic University was the first
of three attacks on homeless
men in the early morning
hours of Jan. 12, 2006.
Pierre, 60, survived. So did
the third victim, Raymond
Perez, 52. Norris Gaynor, 45,
did not.
On Sept. 19, Broward Coun-
ty jurors convicted Daugherty


and Brian Hooks, 21, both of
Plantation, of second-degree
murder and attempted mur-
der for the string of unpro-
voked attacks.
Hooks' sentencing hearing
is scheduled for 1:30 p.m.
today.
Daugherty tearfully apolo-
gized to Gaynor's family, say-
ing he had "failed as a hu-
man being."
"I wasted a human life," he
said, fighting sobs. "I treated
him less than a human be-
ing. ... It's sick what hap-
pened that night. It was de-
mented."
Norris Gaynor's mother,
Georgia, said Daugherty's
apology felt sincere.
"God bless him and go with
him," she said. "And even
though they failed him, he
has people that love him."
And those who failed him,
Daugherty's parents, Thom-
as and Bridget, admitted it
Thursday.
In an effort to persuade
the judge to give their son a
second chance, they detailed


his dysfunctional,
neglectful upbring-
ing. He shuttled be-
tween his father's
home in Plantation
and his mother's in
Tennessee, where ."
she introduced him '
to crystal metham- '
phetamine when he GAYN
was 16.
More committed to hard
drinking and drugs, Bridget
Daugherty abandoned her
son at 2, Thomas Daugherty


Sr. said, only to.,re-
appear throughout
his life, campaign
for him to live with
her and fill his head
with "false fantasies
of a good life togeth-
er."
"He put her on a
IOR pedestal to make
up for all her short-
comings," Daugherty Sr. said.
"I will never be able to under-
stand what happens to a child
abandoned by his mother."


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MON., 0111h6








Bi AC K~ NIUSI CONTROL [HEIR OWN DESTINY 7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


w -z-J


V1


BLACKS MUlSIT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


-~. I








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


The Gaithers celebrate 65


years of marriage Oct. 24


Rudy and Thelma Gaither cel-
ebrated 65 years of endless love
as they toast each other during
a surprise celebration.
The spectacular party was co-
ordinated by their goddaughter
jacqulyn sparks and held at the
beautiful home of their nephew
and niece david and nancy dow-
son.
The gaithers were pleasantly
surprised as they were sur-
rounded by family and friends,
not only from Miami but Nash-
ville, TN Phoenix, AZ; Warner
Robin, Perry and Atlanta, Geor-
gia.
This very quiet couple met
each other in Winnsburg, South
Carolina an~d said "1 do" on Sep-
tember 27, 1943 subsequently
relocating in Miami.
Mr. Rudy retired as a veteran
jitney driver in and around mi-


ami as thelma
was employed by the state for
many years.
The couple resides in Bunche
park (Miami,Gardens) and are
faithful members of St. John


missionary baptist church in
overtown.
Congratulations and may god
continue to bless your marriage
with
Peace, Love and Happiness!!


Florida cannot repeat history again ...


VOTING
continued from 1A

The March assembled orga-
nizations and elected officials
throughout the community
like the Miami Fury: Miami's
Tackle Football Team, Liber-
ty City Democratic Club, Rep.
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall
(D-FL 109), Junkanoo danc-
ers, Miami-Dade County
Commissioners: Barbara Jor-
dan and Audrey Edmonson
, Young Democrats of Amer-
ica, James Bush III, newly
elected State Representative
for District 109, Myra Taylor,
candidate for Opa-locka Com-
missioner, Miami-Dade Police
Department Dir. Robert Park-
er and Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones.
Miami-Dade Commissioner
Audrey Edmonson, who rep-
resents District 3, moderated


the rally with active support-
ers shouting for "Get out and
vote."
The races between Bush
and Al Gore (2000),.and Bush
and John Kerry in 2004 have
kept Florida considered a
swing state.
In 2004, approximately
500,000 Black Floridians
were registered to vote, and
were absent from the polls.
Their votes would have prob-
ably prevented President
George W. Bush from defeat-
ing John Kerry by 381,000
votes. Almost one million
registered young Floridians
didn't vote in 2004. In Miami-
Dade, roughly 53 percent of
people voted for the Demo-
cratic candidate and approx-
imately 47 percent voted for
the Republican in the 2004
presidential election.
"We are all standing on


someone's shoulder. Cast
your vote and cast them in
a proper fashion," said Ben-
dross-Mindingall.
This year's election is his-
toric. For the first time in
history, a Black man is run-
ning for president of the
United States. Sen. Barack
Obama signs waived all over
the Caleb Center as support-
ers shouted "Change Now."
"Not only is Barack Obama
a serious candidate but he is
the qualified candidate." said
Commissioner Jordan. "If
[Barack] Obama can run for
president then my grandchil-
dren can do the same."
Oscar nominated Actress
Alfre Woodard stopped by
from the Obama-Biden cam-
paign. She took a couple of
pictures with the crowd. "We
have a chance to make a
change now."


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.. De Ta. a.. .io.. C m ti.....e and by QOL3 af...America.. 1


Obama'08


~----~----~~-~







9A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I',l,% apart: Rreulh% ar' bas-d on quriH(nn. parltipalkm


*. ::-* . .


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


Governor Crist extends early voting hours


Governor Charlie Crist today
signed an executive order
extending the hours for early
voting during the current
General Election. Effective
immediately, early voting sites
will be open from 7:00 a.m.
to 7:00 p.m., through Friday,
October 31, 2008, and for a
total of 12 hours between 7:00
a.m. on Saturday, November
1, and 7:00 p.m. on Sunday,
November 2, 2008.


"I have spoken with the
Secretary of State and members
of the Florida Legislature
and have concluded that it is
always the right thing to do to
give voters every opportunity to
cast a ballot," Governor Crist
said.
"I have a responsibility to the
voters of our state to ensure
that the maximum number of
citizens can participate in the
electoral process, and that


every person can exercise the
right to vote."
Prior to the 2008 General
Election, Florida has seen
historic numbers of Floridians
registering to vote for the
first time. In addition, record
numbers of voters have chosen
to cast a ballot during early
voting.
Early voting began on October
20 and runs through November
2. Current Florida law allows


for early voting to be conducted
for eight hours per day on each
weekday, and for a total of eight
hours during both weekends
during the early voting period.
Floridians" can contact their
county's Supervisor of Elections
for dates, times and locations
of early voting.
Florida voters can also
request absentee ballots to be
mailed to them until October
29.


1'_


Why do Congressman Kendrick Meek, TV Judge Karen Mills-Francis

and Attorney Larry Hanfield ENDORSE YVONNE COLODNY?


Because they have confidence that Yvonne Colodny will treat all 4

who appear in her court with dignity and respect. -


Yvonne is also endorsed by:
The Miami Times

American Federation of State & Municipal Employees


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Yvonne Colodny, non-partisan election, for Circuit Court Judge, Group 19.


"If the lions do not write their

own history, then the hunters

will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


I








The Miami Times


Fai


SECTION B


th

MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Putting family first is hard work


Facing death and keeping the faith


Twice, Davis has said goodbye to loved ones but had
his life spared. Now, he faces execution a third time.


They come out of the corridor
all dressed up, with perfectly
ironed white suits with blue col-
lars and tennis shoes, a white
smile upon their shaved faces.
It is visiting day, and they have
been waiting for it since last
week.
They lean in a line against


Jackson, Ga. He was convicted
for the murder of a police officer
when he was 20 years old. He
has always said he is innocent.
Davis has been sitting on
Georgia's death row for 17
years, charged with the assault
of Larry Young, a homeless
man, and the murder of police



UEON"=


Troy Davis with his family during a


the yellow painted gates with
their arms straight out, waiting
for the warden to release their
handcuffs, and then they dis-
solve in the crowded room filled
with kids and antsy wives who
offer them prepackaged foods
just purchased from the vend-
ing machines in the hall -- their
gourmet lunch for the day.
But Troy Davis is not allowed
into the visitation room with
the rest of them because he is
a death row inmate. Visitors
see him in a separate room, two
gates away from where others
greet guests.
Inside the prison, he is known
by the number 657378, since
the day he was confined to cell
79 on the top floor of the G-
house in the Georgia Diagnos-
tic and Classification Prison in


officer Mark Allen MacPhail in
the parking lot of a Burger King
in Savannah, Ga. on August 19,
1989. Seven of the nine eyewit-
nesses who testified that Davis
was present at the shooting
have recanted their testimony,
saying police pressured them
into making false statements.
Their recantations have never
been heard in court. No weapon
has ever been found, and no
physical evidence connects Da-
vis to the crime.
After years of litigation, Da-
vis exhausted his appeals to
the Georgia Supreme Court in
March 2008 when the court de-
nied him an evidentiary hear-
ing. He was denied clemency
from the Georgia Pardons and
Paroles Board on Sept. 8, 2008.
His appeal to the U.S. Supreme


Court was not considered until
Sept. 23, when the court con-
vened an emergency session
and gave Davis a stay less than
two hours before his scheduled
execution, due to the abun-
dance of incongruent evidence
in favor of his innocence.
The stay gave Davis and his
many supporters new hope. But
on Oct. 14, the U.S. Supreme
Court declined to give Davis's
case a full hearing, leaving the


























visitation

lower court verdict intact. A
new death warrant was issued
few days later and a third ex-
ecution date is scheduled for
Oct. 27 at 7pm.
I met Davis inside the walls
of the prison for the first time,
when, after a two-month cor-
respondence, I decided to fly to
Jackson to talk to him in per-
son. I wanted to know for my-
self how someone could sleep
at night, knowing that death
might soon be whispering in his
ears for a crime he says he did-
not commit.
The answer was more power-
ful than I had expected.
"My faith has taught me that if
you give all your worries to God
he will carryyour burdens, "Davis
wrote in a letter to me sent
Please turn to FAITH 11B


What if my family

doesn't believe in Jesus?


By; Wonderzone

You might think that every-
one wants to believe in Jesus,
but not everyone does. Maybe
you're the only one in your
family who does. Perhaps
your parents are angry that
you've become a Christian.
Maybe your brothei-s and sis-
ters make fun of you. It's hard
when your family doesn't un-
derstand.
Pray for your family every day.
Ask God to help them see that


they need to trust Christ, too.
If you behave in a kind and
obedient way, your family will
see God's love in you. God can
give you strength to be kind
even when they are not.
Also, you can ask God to help
you tell your family about the
Lord Jesus. Let God give you
the right words to say at the
right time. You can't -make
your family believe, but God
may use your words, spoken
in a gentle way, to help them
understand.


Teens have 'feel-good type of faith

Teens have 'feel-good' type of faith


Most teens say they pray, but it's
usually when they want something

By Carrie A. Moore

The majority of American
teens have embraced an in-
formal, "feel good" view of God
and religion that not only em-
phasizes personal happiness
as the central goal of life but
has become something of a
new religion in and of itself.
That is according to re-
searchers examining teens
over an 11-year time span
as part of the National Study
of Youth and Religion. In ex-


plaining the study's findings
on Friday, Holli M.H. Eaton of
Azusa Pacific University told
members of the Association
of Mormon Counselors and
Psychotherapists that the
"feel good" view of faith has
five identifiable character-
istics and has been dubbed
"Moralistic Therapeutic De-
ism."
Its "tenets" are as follows:
There is a God who created
human life and watches over
human beings.
God wants people to be
kind, caring and good.
The central goal of life is


to be happy and to feel good
about one's self.
God doesn't need to be in-
volved in one's life except
when needed to solve a prob-
lem -- "kind of a heavenly
butler."
Good people go to heaven
when they die.
Beyond these generaliza-
tions, teens in general "can't
verbalize the basics of their
faith," Eaton said, noting there
are exceptions but that the
majority are unable to do so.
"When you ask about grace,
they automaticallythinkyou're
Please turn to TEENS 11B








BI c~ NusV ONIRI HIROW D~ N lB TE IAI IMSOCOBR 9-OVMBR 00


Making decisions between working jobs and your family


FAMILY
continued from 1OB


Obama's case, the two-day hia-
tus came in the homestretch of
vying for the most powerful job
in the free world.
But being at the bedside of the
woman "who poured her heart
and soul into me" loomed larger
than the swing states of Wis-
consin and Iowa. It's a choice
that's likely to resonate with the
nearly 22 million Americans in
the labor force who are respon-
sible for elderly loved ones.
"He loves his grandmother,
wants to be with her, so good
for him," said Jack Pitney, a po-
litical science professor at Cla-
remont McKenna College and a
Republican analyst.
It's not the first time juggling
family obligations has sur-
faced in this election. Sarah
Palin's brood, especially her
special-needs infant and preg-
nant daughter, became a hot
topic when she became John
McCain's running mate. Joe
Biden talked about commuting
between Wilmington and Wash-
ington as a widowed father dur-
ing his years in the Senate.
Despite all the personal tales,
there has been surprisingly lit-
tle public discourse about the
nominees' policies surround-
ing employment and the home
front, said Ellen Galinsky, pres-


ident of the. non-partisan Fami-
lies and Work Institute in New
York.
"But by doing this . he's us-
ing a megaphone to express
that he has the same everyday
concerns as many Americans,"
Galinsky said of Obama. "It's
not you're either serious about
your job or you're not."
Recently, the institute hosted a
conference call with senior ad-
visers from the campaigns and
corporate executives for what
she called "the first-ever presi-
dential platform on work-family
issues." Questions focused on
workplace flexibility, the expan-
sion of the Family and Medical
Leave Act and other proposals
to help caregivers.
In short, Obama sees an ex-
panded role for government
while McCain would prefer to
let employers decide.
This is no longer the sole prov-
ince of mothers and daughters.
The institute's survey shows
men have the same amount of
stress around work/life issues
as women, a striking change in
30 years of research.
For Lopes, his desire to be a
top-notch surgeon-but also a
full participant in the lives of
his two children, ages 4 and
7-means slipping back into
the family milieu as quickly as
possible after work. Coming off
the adrenaline rush of saving
a life often makes transform-


Barack Obama gets a hug from his grandmother Madelyn as his grandfather Stanley beams


ing back "to Dad, regular guy"
a challenge.
"At work, I have a team of peo-
ple who follow everything I say,
but at home it's not like that,"
he said. "You're home now . .
and you're going to wash the
dishes."
Leslie Brodie, 60, general man-
ager of the Skolke Valley Sym-


phony Orchestra, understands
competing demands. She has
been shuttling between Los
Angeles and her Evanston
home since June 2007, when
her 87-year-old mother had a
heart attack.
"It's been brutal," she said
by phone from UCLA Medical
Center-on her third trip in


eight weeks where she's jug-
gling her mother's care, finaliz-
ing details for a Nov. 2 concert,
and preparing for 1,300 stu-
dents arriving for a program
the following day.
"But you do what you have to
do . it's the ultimate family
value," Brodie said.
Brodie's employer has given


her a lot of flexibility, which is
vital for long-distance caregiv-
ers.
Diane Wilson, a Chicago-ar-
ea career consultant, recom-
mends: "Be direct. Ask for
what you need, but also be
prepared to reciprocate, reaf-
firm your commitment to the
organization and support your
boss. It doesn't have to be ad-
versarial."
Galinsky suggests appealing to
employers by making "a busi-
ness case."
"Connect to a real problem the
employer has," she said. "Sug-
gest several ways that you can
make it work for the employ-
er."
But sometimes there are no
solutions. Philadelphia Phillies
manager Charlie Manuel was
in the dugout last week de-
spite the death of his mother
two days before. It was the Na-
tional League Championship
Series, and, "I know she would
definitely want me to finish the
season," Manuel said.
Attorney Robert Kleinman, 61,
recalls being faced with a simi-
lar dilemma in December 1987.
He was scrambling to wrap up
some major transactions by
year's end when his mother-in-
law died of a massive heart at-
tack. He closed the deals, then
flew to New York, but missed
the funeral-a marital wound
even two decades later.


Troy Davis, facing death and continuing to keep faith


FAITH
continued from 10B


the day after my visit. "It's God
that carried me through death's
valley and took my worries
away."
For Davis, faith is the door to
freedom. Having faith makes you
stronger than your family and
able to support them more than
they are supporting you, he said,
because they are the ones who
will be left behind once you are
gone and you have to show them
you are not afraid to die.
"Sometimes all of this seems
like it's happening to some-
one else. I sometimes dream to
be free, but in each dream my
family is 18-and-a-half years
younger, and my father is still
alive," said Davis during an in-
person interview in April 2008. "I
am disappointed at the system,
but refuse to become bitter and
angry, because I still have a lot
of fight left in me ... I have too
much to live for to give up, to give


up on myself means I have given
up on my family as well, but we
are in this together and I cannot
give up now."
Meeting Davis not only
changed the person I am today,
it changed the way I perceived
death, and prison, and the smell
of prepackaged food.
Walking though the prison's
metal gates in the early hours of
that April day, I felt sick to my
stomach. Standing in line with
mothers, daughters and wives
of inmates, I felt out of place
and inappropriate. I had not
lost anyone dear to the prison's
walls; I was just a cocky journal-
ist in search of a scoop. But my
feeling of regret soon vanished
once I saw the smile on Davis's
face, and perceived how much
my interest in his case changed
his day.
I was not allowed to bring a
recorder in to my interview with
Davis. I wasn't even allowed pen
and paper. Eight hours after
I sat down with him, my head
filled with interesting thoughts


and minus $10 in prepackaged
food later, I left his cell to pour
my thoughts on paper.
Six months have passed since
that.day. I've tried to start writ-
ing this article ten times, trying
different structures and voices
and perspectives. I'm finally
ready to explore my chat with-
Davis that foggy afternoon..of
late April. -
.Why now? Because much has
charged since that weekend
when I talked to him in person.
I think it is time for others to
know what I found in that cell
that so captured my attention,
especially now that Davis is fac-
ing his third and final execution
date on Oct 27.
Before prison, Davis was a big
brother to his siblings. He took
night classes to get .his high
school diploma so he would have
time to take care of his younger.
sister Kimberly when she be-
came paralyzed. He would drop
her off and pick her up from
school since their parents were
separated. Their oldest sister


Martina was in the army, and
their mom worked the day shift,
he said. After he graduated from
high school, Davis worked for his
father's construction company.


Every week, he took $50 from
his paycheck and snuck the
cash into his mother's room to
help her pay the bills, he said.
It never crossed his mind that


hanging out with the wrong peo-
ple on a summer night in 1989
could have cost him his life as
a free man, or that an innocent
man -- which he insists he,is --
could be slated to die under the
American justice system.
"For an innocent man like me
the justice system continues
to fail me. Why is that so hard
to admit they made a mistake?
What kind of person knows he
coerced false evidence to con-
vict an innocent man and still
refuses to right the wrong? Who
is more barbaric then, them or
the people they put in prison?"
he asked in a letter dated April
27. "I would like to ask soci-
ety how long would you remain
quiet while innocent people suf-
fer, while we remain on death
row and unjustly get convict-
ed? When is it that enough is
enough? When will you speak
up and fight to stop injustice
everywhere? Or will you wait
until someone you love be-
comes a victim to the system,
too?"


Good faith in teens


TEENS
continued from 10B

talking about 'Will and Grace,"'
a TV sitcom that is popular with
teens and young adults. "When
you talk about honor (in reli-
gious terms), they think of hon-
ors classes at school."
When hundreds of teens were
interviewed at length about the
principles of their faith, none
mentioned self-discipline, "but
feeling happy was mentioned
more than 2,000 times," Eaton
said.
"Moralistic Therapeutic Deism
is a new religion in researchers'
view. It's taking over in kids'
lives."
The study, conducted by soci-
ologist Christian Smith, began
in 2000 based out of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill. Smith addressed students
and faculty at Brigham Young
University earlier this year to
share his findings, which also
include data showing that LDS
teens are the most highly re-
ligious by denomination of all
the groups in the study, with
71 percent saying they attend a
religious service at least once a
week.
While Latter-day Saint teens
see their faith as central to their
lives, the majority of American
teens see it as highly dispens-
able, Eaton said. "It's the first
thing many teens are willing to
let go when there are compet-
ing demands in their lives," she
said. "Nearly all American youth
are profoundly individualistic,
and they think that 'what I think


is right is right for everybody."'
She said most share the view
that "it's okay to be somewhat
religious, but it's important not
to be too religious. They don't
want to talk about specific be-
liefs. That's too religious," she
said.
"Most teens say they pray,
but it's usually when they want
something. Very few read the
Bible and even fewer engage in
other religious practices."
Marilyn S. Wright, a psycholo-
gist at Pepperdine University,
said the vast majority of teens
are "incredibly inarticulate"
about their own faith, even as
they mature into young adults.
The initial survey of more than
3,300 teens in 2000 has been
followed by subsequent phases
of questioning for 10 percent of
those studied, and age doesn't
change the ability to express
their feelings about faith, she
said.
Yet teens whose parents put
religion at the center of their
lives differ from the overall sur-
vey group in significant ways,
mirroring the religious attitudes
and practices of their parents,
she said -- something that is en-
couraging to parents who often
believe peer influence is more
powerful.
She said LDS teens are "more
involved in youth groups for
more years and are more likely
to claim to be youth leaders in
their groups" than other teens.
The survey also showed LDS
teens are "the most Bible-believ-
ing and the least likely to believe
in the occult."


F DR. FREDERICK FERGUSON MD


100 NW 170 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169

Family Medicine Doctor

Graduate of Meharry Medical College
and University
of Florida Family Medicine Residency Pro
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Board Certified in Family Medicine

12 years of Medical experience

Insurances Accepted: Amerigroup,
Avmed, Cigna, Humana, Tricare,
Medicaid and Medicare

Receive a FREE MEDICAL
visit with presentation of this Ad
( Laboratory and Radiology Studies are not included).


TROY DAVIS AND HIS MOM


Oct 9th Your train receiving gifts...
Psalms 68:18


Oct 10th Know how to give good gifts.........
NMatthew 7:11


Oct llth For the gifts and the calling ......
Roman 11:29


Oct 12th Having gifts that differ ......
Roman 12:6


Oct 13th Concerning spiritual gifts ......
1 Corinthians 12:1


Oct 14th Desire the spiritual gifts .........
1 Corinthians 14:1


Oct 15th And he gave gifts ... ...
Esphesians 4:8


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


'''" I
fr- ,.J


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


The power of the tongue


If you read this column last
week, then you know that I
wrote about the importance
of watching your speech. This
week, I would like to contin-
ue that theme by giving you
yet another reason why what
you say can have very posi-
tive consequences too. One
of the gifts that was given to
the Church was the office of
evangelist. We are not all giv-
en that gift of evangelism, but
we are all called to go into the


world, and make disciples of
all people. This is the Great
Commission given by Jesus
Christ in Matthew 28: 18-20.
So we all have the responsi-
bility of taking the Good News
that Jesus is Lord to all.
Of course, this is accom-
plished in various ways. We
can speak this Good News on
our jobs. Many believers feel
that they can only serve God
through working in the Min-
istry. They leave their jobs to


r


begin churches or other good
ministry work, but we should
remember that we can do
great ministry work also in
the workplace. You need not
have to begin a Bible Study or
prayer group on the job. Just
the way that you live, and by
the things that you do NOT do
will point many to the Savior.
One very important point
that I want you to keep in
mind is one that I have said
in the past, and it still bears
repeating people are con-
stantly watching you. Even
when you do not realize that
they are watching, they are,
and they are also listening to
what you say. A few months
ago, I saw a woman and her
daughter who had attended
the same church as I several


years ago. We all exclaimed
with delight how wonderful it
was to see each other again.
The woman briefed me on
what she and her daughter
had been doing since last we
saw each other. The mother's
next comment surprised me
greatly. She said, "Sister Pat,
my daughter talks about you
all of the time. She still re-
members the little gifts and
cards that you used to give
to the young people, and how
you also remembered their
birthdays and special holi-
days."
I was more than a little as-
tonished because I did not
have a particularly close rela-
tionship with her daughter. I
ministered to her as I did the
rest of the congregation, but


I cannot even remember that
she and I had a one-on-one
conversation at any time. But
yet, she was always watching.
She was watching, and she was
listening. Thank God, what
she heard and what she saw
obviously was a good thing. If
my speech or my behavior had
been less than honorable or
edifying, she would have seen
and heard that as well.
I am sure that you have
heard toddlers just beginning
to talk and repeating words or
phrases that they have heard.
We thought that this was 'so
cute', and laughed at how the
little ones attempted to say
what they heard. These same
little ones grow up, and when
they continue to act and re-
peat what they hear, we don't


Sundari Foundation, Inc.
and Martin Z. Margulies Family
Foundation will host their fourth
annual Contemporary Art Auc-
tion to benefit the Lotus House
Women's Shelter on November
8 at the Margulies Warehouse.
For more information, please
call 305-365-2478.

Fifth Annual Fall Family
Festival will take place on Fri-
day, October 31 from 6 p.m. 10
p.m. at the Dolphin Stadium.
******** *
The Pleasant City Family
Reunion committee invites you


and your family to spend Black
Saturday: A Day of African Cul-
ture, at the Heritage Gallery
on Saturday, November 8 at
10 a.m. For more information,
please call the Heritage Gallery
at 561-832-9799 or 561-396-
5855.

Women Grow Strong, a non-
profit company created to help
empower women to live their
lives to the fullest, is hosting
a business basics workshop
called Boardroom Basics on
Saturday, November 8 from 10
a.m. 2 p.m. at the Sonshine


S:- 1 -. : .' : ?.


Glory Temple COGIC
invites you to its second
annual Women's Conference


Theme: Women of God Excel
in their Calling from October
29-31 at 7:45 p.m. For more


Communications. For more in-
formation, please call 305-948-
8063.
******** *
The Barbara Seniors Hawkins
Foundation .is sponsoring the
College Workshop: The Inside
Scoop on Applying to College.
The workshop will be held on
November 1 from 1 p.m. 3 p.m.
at the Phicol Williams Commu-
nity Center. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-258-1629.

The Alliance for Aging will
host a "Forum on Transportation
and Mobility Options" on Mon-
day, November 17 from 9 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. at the Miami-Dade
County Commission Chambers.

Festival Miami will celebrate
its 25th gala season on Sunday,

information, please call 754-
244-8677.

The Greater New Bethel
M.B. Church invites the
community to its annual
health fair on Saturday,
November 1 from 9 a.m. 1
p.m. For more information,


November 2 at 8 p.m. and Mon-
day, November 3 at 8 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-284-4940.

City of Opa-locka invites you
to their Adult 70's Soul & Salsa
/ Children's Disney Costume
Ball on Friday, October 31 from
6 p.m. 10 p.m. For more in-
formation, please call 305-953-
2821.
******** *
The Historically Black Col-
leges and Universities (HBCU)
shuttle provides direct service
home for students. Reserva-
tions for Thanksgiving and
Christmas for students attend-
ing the HBCU's schools can be
made on the website: www.hb-
cucollegeshuttle.com The shut-
tle will be available November

please contact Annette Role
at 305-308-0972.

A Mission With A New
Beginning Church welcomes
the community to come
and fellowship with us
every Sunday at 11:30 a.m.-
service.


25-26. The reservation dead-
line is October 27. For more in-
formation, please call Miranda
Y. Albury, 786-318-4439.

Miami-Dade Alumni Chap-
ter of Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity invites you to travel
with them when the Wildcats
take on the Rattlers in Orlando
on November 22. For more in-
formation, please call 305-505-
1235.

Brighter Future Empower-
ment presents their second
annual Awards Banquet on
November 19 from 6 p.m. 10


p.m. For more information,
please call 954-678-8825.

The City of Miami will be
hosting Bike Miami, a free and
family friendly event for cyclists,
skaters and walkers to explore
the city in a whole new way on
Sunday, November 9 from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Children's Trust will
present its 2008 Champions for
Children Award on Thursday,
November 6 at the Jungle Is-
land Treetop Ballroom from 12
p.m. 2 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-571-5700.


Incarnation celebrates annual All States Tea


The Church of The Incarna-
tion will host its 52nd annual
All States Tea this Sunday, No-
vember 2. This yearly women's
event will feature locally re-
nowned singing sensation Ca-
fidia Stuart.
Cafidia has been singing
since the tender age of five. She
signs, acts, models and plays
piano with a spellbinding tal-
ent, vitality and charisma. Stu-
art has performed locally and
nationally including, the Tyra


Banks Show with Grammy
award-winning vocalist John
Legend and for Miami Mayor
Manny Diaz. In addition to the
gifted Stuart, the program will
also include a dramatic perfor-
mance by Reinaldo Torres.
A reception will follow the
States tea in the parish hall.
The Church of The Incarna-
tion is located at 1835 N.W. 54
Street. The event gets under
way at 4 p.m. and admission is
free.


Public Notice: For The Record

Mrs. Dorothy R. Thompson of Miami, mother of the late Cor-
lette D. Floyd, would like to correct the ERROR that was made
in The Miami Herald's, Saturday, October 18, 2008 edition, that
her youngest daughter WAS NOT A 'Bahamian Woman', but was
born Corlette Denise Thompson, September 18, 1960 in Mount
Sinai Hospital, Miami Beach, Florida.
This is a paid announcement


Tr brt bi Ctmwow ictcMk IT





Copyrighted Material




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The M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.
_and


Bacardi, U.S.A., Inc.

present







., -Honorin hMe Out.stan/ding Lifetime
.4chievemennt and Contributions of
Dr. Dorothy Jenkins Fields
Dr. Enid Curtis Pinkney


The International Longshoremen's
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SUNDAY


NCV. 2, 2CCS8
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MIAMI MARRIOTT BISCAYNE BAY HOTEL

1633 North Bayshore Drive, Miami, Florida
Ticket Prices: $150, $200 and $300
Proceeds benefit the M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.,
a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.

Cocktail Reception, Dinner, Open Bar, Show

For Information and Reservations: 305-893-5468


BACARDI, U.S.A., INC. AMERICAN AIRLINES AT&T FPL THE MIAMI HERALD
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Vl


Don't forget

to


VOTE


I


always view these phrases or
this behavior as cute! It be-
gins as a seed that is planted.
Good seeds produce a good
fruit. Bad seeds will not pro-
duce a good harvest. Watch
what you say! There is a say-
ing that I think is a good one.
It encourages us to listen
twice, and speak once.' When
you speak to someone, keep
in mind that what you say
can either lift up or encour-
age someone, or bring them
crashing to the ground. Even
when it is necessary to rebuke
and discipline, as is neces-
sary at times, it should be
done with words that will still
build up the person, and not
make them think their plight
is hopeless.
Watch your speech!











Early HIV treatment radically boosts survival I


Patients are

less likely to


70%

die


By Steve Sternberg

WASHINGTON A new analy-
sis of the best time to begin HIV
treatment found that starting
early sharply improves odds of
survival, doctors said Sunday.
Doctors say the new evidence is
certain to prompt many doctors
to change the way they treat
patients, and to prompt health
officials to begin examining the
evidence underlying guidelines
for treating the AIDS virus.
The study of 8,374 patients in
the United States and Canada
showed that those treated later
in the course of HIV infection
are 70% more likely to die than
patients treated sooner, says
lead researcher Mari Kitahata
of the University of Washing-


ton-Seattle.
What makes the finding so
striking, Kitahata says, is the
"magnitude" of the survival dif-
ference between the two study
groups.
"Seventy percent is a signifi-
cant and substantial increase
in the risk of death," she says.
The finding surfaced from the
biggest comparison of the two
treatment strategies ever car-
ried out. The data were drawn
from 22 studies conducted
from 1996 to 2006 in an at-
tempt to answer a decade-old
question about when to begin
HIV treatment.
"The guidelines committees
are certainly going to look hard
at these data next time they
meet," says Anthony Fauci, di-
rector of the National Institute
of Allergy and Infectious Dis-
eases, which sponsored the
research.


Current guidelines say that
patients should begin treat-
ment only when their levels of
a type of white blood cell called
CD4 T-cells fall below 350 per
cubic millimeter. The AIDS vi-
rus targets these cells, which
in healthy people throttle up
the immune response. But
the guidelines have never ad-
equately been tested, Kitahata
says.
The new research found that
patients fare better when they
begin treatment when their
CD4 counts are much higher,
between 350 and 500 cells per
cubic millimeter.
"There's reason to believe you
would have even better surviv-
al using drugs available now,"
she says.
Early treatment, however, de-
pends on awareness. Studies
show that fewer than four in
10 U.S. adults have been test-


Sex abuse victims often stay silent


Fear, guilt keep youth
from reporting crime

By Rafael A. Olmeda

The older daughter was the first
to speak up.
Her mother, Michelle, struggled
to process what the girl was
saying. Was the 15-year-old
misinterpreting her father's af-
fectionate behavior? Was this
the product of an overactive
imagination?
Then Michelle thought about
her younger daughter. She
was only 9. And Michelle's ex-
husband had a scheduled visit
coming up with her. Michelle
called the Department of Chil-
dren & Families to report her


suspicion that the girls were
being sexually abused by their
father.
It may seem natural for a teen-
ager to disclose when she's
being sexually abused by a
parent or another authority
figure, but the reality is that
many stay silent out of fear or
misplaced guilt.
Boca Raton psychologist Den-
nison Reed said child molest-
ers are skilled at "seducing"
their victims and persuading
them to keep quiet.
They say things like, "If you
tell, it will kill your mother," or
"no one will believe you," Reed
said. According to one study
Reed cites, more than 65 per-
cent of adults who experienced
abuse as children did not re-


port it during their childhood.
Michelle and her older daugh-
ter did the right thing by speak-
ing up, said Sgt. Ed McCardle,
who heads the Broward Sher-
iffs Office Sex Crimes Unit.
His advice to other victims:
"Tell someone in 'confidence.
Notify a school counselor, a
teacher, a friend. Tell law en-
forcement."
Any of those options is bet-
ter than allowing the abuse to
continue.
"These children are groomed
since they're very young,"
said Michelle, who said her
husband began the incestu-
ous behavior when their older
daughter was 9. "You would
never think this kind of thing
goes on in your own house."


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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


/Antioch Missionary Baptist\
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
(mwC'iurSutiiam y Schooi i ,... 8:;30 a.m.
Surxit8 y Worship Service .... 10 a.m
Mid-Week Service .... Veidnreday's
l. Hr of Power-Noon Dky Pray'er
2pI W r. I pm.




Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
,mww.fioiotfilambcalta.oi,
I'jn Ii .,',i" .. I
Mfiani, FL
305-759-8875

n
... ... ,ti. 1-, I il i l.
1,0n. S 1ii,, , 5 a ,, tm t 7 pm





tl. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services:
S I Sundav
SChurch Schiool...i ...."..... .
Worsnhip So ner' vice .............
l$l Studyi t ayer Night 7: p m.
Thursday
Prayer MPvimrag "s p m.
nre "Tlire is a place ftr you"



S Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2(X)1 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order oL Services:
Sunday Moming Scrices
7:45 am. I I:15Sam.
Sunday School- 45a.m.
P Bible Study Tuesday
10 am. & 7 p..
Prayer Mfeeting Tues. 6 p.m.



S Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332


SundaySchool.. 9:30 a ,
F:mst :undays Eve,,ig Worship f p m.6
RAble St dy Monday. 7-'Wf p mn
ChoirRchea alT, s~uy 730pin.
\ mewatlamisurm NuM/I


postolic Revival Center /Logos Baptist Church / Mt. Calvary Missionary 93" Street Community New Shiloh M.B. Church
305-836-1224 b 16305 NW 48th Ave. Baptist Church Missionary Baptist Church 1350 N.W.9511 Street
'0 8 3 er224 305-430-9383 1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. 2330 N.W. 93,' Street 305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Order of Services 305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528 305-836-0942
New time for T.V. iT,:.-rn, Church Schedule:
FOR HOPE OR 1 \ -'. Order of aServices Order of Services n30
o <* 'e -K wO. rn J > UHSuay Order of Servces: 730 a.mnyMomng\Woship E-ut Mming Wrsp 7:30 a.m.
-. .. 5p. ..,,Wolsiial8&lla.m. t11 an. ..MomnilgWostlip un. Cishurch School 93Oa.m.


T .. i t a. i
;*.l i i i .. .*.> .-1,. i0p.,m .
I,-. L,, '...I :0 i.m.
F-, bl, ',r,.I. .0ii.pet.


ii


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: .105-35-0112f>
Order of Services:
'" Suinday ...... ... 7:30 & I Ia.m.
sunday School ..... .... .... n.
i Tiusday ........ .7p t.u Bible Study,
:' i. J Pray.er Meeting. B.T.U.
Baptism- Thurs. before
First Sun. .7 ) m,
i 71J Coilnunioli First Sun.......
,i 730 & I| a.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

s Order of Services:
r. MorningWorship..,lt & 3rd Sun.
5 1" rnint.Wms- ip- ........... ... i. .a.m.
r Y- r rSc vi,.....p-.............73 0 P.(,
S . Ic Study ..........-............ ...8 pIm,
l .- R1School............ 9an


....." y school at 9:45 A.m..
Thursday
[:ible Study 7 p.m
Saturday
No Service


/" Word of Faith \
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-908 I

IjI Order of Services.:
V- ..... i [ay M -ing Servicesu i

I lion 1.,' Prayer Service .... ...8 p.m.


Mion.thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
uBible St,..Thrs.7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7- 11a.m.




/ Brownsville '1
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services

i.^I ,ii.di *ia i 1 .t
L. .. L t n ',


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 1
a.mn.. 7 p.m.
Suiiday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


' Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue IIHollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services .
Sunday
Bible Study ........... 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship..............6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday. 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcasl Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.pemnbrokeparkchurchofchrist.com Email: pemlbrokeparkcoc4lbellsoulth.net


f Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W 3'IAvenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 30S-573-4060<*Fax 305-255-8549
Order ofSerices:
Sunday School .. .9.45 aum.
Sun. Morning SierIvS ..1 Ii 1.
4' Sun. BTU . 30 2 30 p aI
Tudeay ,. Bible St dy
Feeding" u M i t .. 0 111
W I. Bible StudyiPrayc '. O p.30 l

\iiasa islaimsMaa B


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

fOrder of Services:
Sunday,- CIOch Scdhool .. .... lai
w % yrship F m n ..... ..t.i 65a-m.
Sf la 4th \ unday }-.vening Warrhip 6

1 (800) 254-NBTBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
wwss.newibirthbaptlstminiainl.oirg


f,1


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
as, 'hip- ...7:30 a.m.
S .h. ..........9:30 a.m.
.li. Inu ,. '.-ship ...11 a.m.
.' '** Bible Stidy
leri 'L (Ties.) 7 p.m.




/ Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order or Services:
Sunday School ...........-9.30 arn.
lingeRMornin. iuwstip .it a l iia
evnig wa nhip at 6 p.m.
P raver Meetingl & Bible Study
Tuc sdii\ 7 p.m.
^SMBSESmSEESSS


Evening Worship
St & 3rds, iy..6pm J
%wibtvi ciaoK oxg



Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church-
17800 NW 25th Ave.
wwmtvnllennraworshipctienl.r.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-31(04
Order of Services:
,a. ,) t : \\ '"Jl 'k ..
&7 am. & 10 a.m.
Churvh School: R 30 a.m.
SWednesday
Ia stoli's Noon Day Bible o Study
Bible lIstite, 6:30 pm.
... .- Mid.week Worship 7:30 p.m.


/Jordan Grove Missionary\
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'1 Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Serviees:
E.Tl" II .lu' I d
\ T I:I I,; I n I

Alion and til I. Cla,.
SI Ie a ,p
\&mmm I= Umrm I


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W 561h Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Stlam y School............9:45 a t.
ulslip 1.......1 aa
RBleSlxlynpmtly...7.: pnim
sYouh inistt" MCT.-\ l.





St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322


.I, n k r .F h ii4 s.

i av i '~a ,i, On li ii It 'I.
I' ..i 1,.I'' t I'i) pm
Ir! i 1. 1 ,cl i .,,c h l p. .
l| ____ Ii *'lnl.t %1.I "p m.n


Slniming Worship ....11 a.mI
I1 ,uesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
I ut. before the lita Sun....7 pm.
Mid-week Worship



/dLiberty City Churchn
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555

Sunday Morning ......8 apm.
Sunday School .............10 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6 p.m.
S Mot.01 ExceLlence .....7:30 p.m.
I ti' Bil'lk Class ......... 7:30 p.m.
Thujt Fdllowship......... 10 am.



/ St. Mark Missionary 1
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
r Order of Services:
sunday 7:30 and II a.m.
Worship S n.ice
'esday...l .. 7 p.m. Bible Study
12 !2 p.m....l,ay Pmayer


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:




V. Ail 730p.il.





Join the

Religious Elite

in our Church Directory

Call Paula James
305-693-7093
_:, '


.4


'00 -%


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


BishopNictolT. Cury, D.fin.. .D, Snior iastoraachel


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


17 ,r


k





BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 41 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


iC i Op. nv Obama
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The Miami Times

Heath


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Study: Food allergies on the rise in kids


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Voter 'anger' has I)m e wt fohr big gains in ('ongres



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'Bike Miami' coming to downtown


Join Mayor of the City of Mi-
ami Manny Diaz for Bike Mi-
ami, a free and family friendly
event for cyclists, skaters and
walkers to explore the city in
a whole new way on Sunday,
November 9 from 10 am to 3
pm.
Bike Miami is an initiative
by Mayor Diaz to promote bi-
cycling, livable streets and
the growing urban neighbor-
hood of Downtown Miami.
The event will close Flagler
Street from the Courthouse
to Bayfront Park, as well as
South Miami Avenue from
10th Street (Mary Brickell
Village) to SE 4th Street and
then north on 1st Ave to Fla-
gler for pedestrians, bicyclists
and skaters. This way, the
public can explore downtown
in a fun, safe and completely
free way.
Stores, restaurants, parks
and cafes will be open for the
public to enjoy. There will
also be many free activities
for the whole family, includ-
ing a free yoga class at 1 pm,
bicycle safety workshops and
The Moving Wall, a travelling
replica of the Vietnam Veter-
an's Memorial, both in Bay-
front Park.
Mayor Diaz also invites the
public to join him for a special
rally at 11 am on the corner
of Biscayne Boulevard and
Flagler Street.
Bring your bike and Metro-
rail and Metrobus will be free
on November 9. Metromover


is always free, and you can
bring your bike. The public
can also carpool and park in


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Village for $3.


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BLACKS MUST CON FROL [HEIR OWN DESTINY 11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


CA MMOIA* H mm y IRTDY I IBACs ETH OICS.*-.OBTA0~j


Gregg L. Mason
DOROTHY DEWEESE WYNN-
WILDER, 71,
retired teacher
for Miami-Dade
County Schodls,
died October 24
in University of
Miami Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Vernon; sons, Vernon Jr., (San-
dra), Rodney, and Mark (Brenda);
daughters, Donna Wilder-Rawls
(Wilford) and Faith Walden (John-
ny); sister, Shirley Allen; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Viewing Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. in
the chapel. Service Thursday, 11
a.m., St. James AME Church.

LARRY HARDNETT, 55,
handyman, died
October 26 in
Jackson North
Medical. Sur-
vivors include:
sister, Donella
Turner; brother,
Ernest (Corin-
thia); and ai
host of other relatives and friends.
Viewing Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service
Saturday 11 a.m., Second Canaan
MB Church.

RANDY A LUMPKIN, 55, Pho-
to Lab Technician, died October
25 in Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
Survivors a in-
clude: devoted
friend, James
Thomas Davis,
Jr., brothers,
Ron and Homer
II; grandson,
Jaden Micah/Jaha Watts; and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Memorial Service, Wednesday,
Nov. 5 at 4 p.m. in the chapel.


St. Fort
MENARD ANTONINE, 84, re-
tired exporter, died October 19
in Select Specialty Hospital. Ar-
- ....angements are incomplete.

JOANES ELIE, 61, cook, died
October 22 in University of Miami
Hospital. Service 10 a.m. Satur-
day, United Haitian Baptist Church,
West Palm Beach.



Carey Royal Ram'n
HELEN MCKINZY, 79 home-
maker, died October 22 in Uni-
versity of Mi-
ami Hospital.
Service 10:30
a.m. Saturday,
St. Mary Wes-
leyan Methodist
Church.


PHILLIP CALLOWAY, 57, en-
trepreneur, of Hollywood, died
October 24 in Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service was held.

DOROTHYWATSON, 45, home-
maker, died October 26 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

REGENO WALLACE, 79, died
October 27 in North Shore Medi-
cal Center. Arrangements are in-
complete.

MALAK ALl AYOUB, 46, entre-
preneur, died October 25 in Kend-
all Regional Medical Center. Final
rites and burial in Beirut, Leba-
non.
Card of Thanks


RODNEY JOHNSON
'KWELI"


wishes to express their thanks
for your prayers, floral arrange-
ments and other acts of kind-
ness.
The Kweli family


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
OSWIN BOWEN, 44, prep cook,
died October 22 in Jackson Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

EARNESTINE MCLEROY, 72,
retired nurse, died October 25 in
North Shore Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


GWENDA
RICK, 46,
etician,
October 24
Jackson He
tal. Service
a.m. Satur
Peaceful
Missionary F
tist Church.


Royal
GLORIA RUFF, 62, died Octo-
ber 25 at home.
Visitation Friday
4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, Shekinah
Glory Deliver-
ance Church In-
ternational.


EDWARD JOHNSON, 86, died
Grace October 22 in
Aventura Hos- '
LUSTER KEND- pital. Visita-
di- tion Friday 4 to
died 9 p.m. Service
4 in noon Saturday
ospi- in the chapel.


11
rday,
Zion
Bap-


Van Orsdel
JOHNNY LUBIN, 36, cook, died
October 19 in Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Wright & Young _
ESTHER MAE NEWTON 95,
cook at New-
ton Restaurant
died October
26, in Kindred
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
stepson, Ber-
nard Thomas,
nephews James
and Edward, niece Joann Newton
Francis. Service 11 a.m. Saturday,
Liberty Christian Church.

TERRY DOUGLAS BLACK 52,
secretary for
the I.R.S died
October 26, at
her home. Sur-
vivors include:
parents Hol-
lis and Cleona
Douglas, Sr.,
siblings; Hollis,
Jr., Stephanie Black and April Jen-
kins. Service 11 a.m. Saturday,
Mt. Zion A.M. E Church.

EVELYN AVANT 80, supervisor,
died October
in North Shore
Medical Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children
Anthony, and
Melody Brown,
16 grandchil-
dren. Service
10a.m. Saturday, Mt. Calvary M.B
Church.

Pax-Villa
GILBERT FELIX, 54, mechanic,
died October 16 at home. Service
10 a.m. Saturday, Holy Family
Catholic Church.

PAUL LEVASSEUR, 32, securi-
ty officer, died October 17 in Jack-
son North Medical Center. Service
10 a.m. Saturday, Emmanuel Bap-
tist Church.

Pax-Villa Broward
VOGUEL ENDNER PIERRE,
72, housekeeper, died October 25
in Fort Lauderdale Health and Re-
hab Center. Service 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Berean Baptist Church.

EXANTUS DELORME, 63, com-
munity outreach personnel for the
City of North Miami, died October
25 in Aventura Hospital. Service
12 p.m. Saturday, Notre Dame
Haitian Catholic Church.


Range Coconutr
NETTLE E.C. DOVE, retired
educator, 58,
of Richmond
Heights, died
Oct. 23 in Bap-
tist Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: daugh-
ters, Ingrid B.
and Beverly
Dove-Ross (Leo); son, Joshua
Kenneth III (Nancy); sister, Laura
Lee Cook; brother, Rychard S.
Cook II; a host of grandchildren
and great grandchildren, other
relatives and friends. Memorial
Service, 7 p.m. Thursday, Second
Baptist Church, 11111 Pinkston
Drive, Richmond Heights. Funeral
Mass Friday at St. John Neumann
Catholic Church, 12125 S.W.
107th Avenue, Kendall.


EDDIE GILBERT, 76, died Octo-
ber 25 in Miami
Jewish Home.
Visitation 4 to
9 p.m. Friday.
Service 10
a.m. Saturday,
Greater New
Bethel Baptist
Church.

MATTIE 0. HUNTER, 84, died
October 21 in Aventura Hospital.
Service was held.

INELL PARKER, 85, died Oc-
tober 24 in Miami Jewish Home.
Visitation Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 2 p.m. Saturday, Holy Temple
M.B. Church.

MARCIA BATCHELOR, 46,
died October 24 in Memorial Re-
gional Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

ORABELL DUNCOMBE,. 76,
died October 26 in Aventura Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
plete.
Hadley .
LAURA BUSH, 48, homemaker,
died October 25 Q
in North Shore I.
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Saturday at
First Baptist of
Bunche Park.


BARBARA S. PEACOCK, 66,
bus attendant,
died October
25 in Aventura
Hospital. View-
ing 3 to 8:30
p.m.,ce riday.
Service 2:30
p.m. Saturday
at First Baptist
of Brownsville.

MAVIS NEAL, 87, homemaker,
died October 20 at home. Service
2 p.m. Wednes-
day, October 29,
New Generation
Baptist Church.





MARILINE BONENFANT, 22,
secretary, died October 13. Ser-
vice was held.

MICHEALASH, 50, laborer, died
October 18. Service was held.
Eric S. Georgm ..
EULA ASH, 85, homemaker,
died October 26 in Memorial West.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday, St. Ann's
Episcopal Church.

JAMES MARTIN, 75, retired,
died October 22 in Memorial Re-
gional South. Service 12 p.m. Sat-
urday, Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church.

Nakia Ingraham
MICHAEL STRUNK, 63, of Hal-
landale, died October 25. Service
Thursday at Saint Stephens Catho-
lic Church.

JOHN BAUM, 40, of Davie, died
October 18. Memorial service Fri-
day in the chapel.

DANIEL JONES, 22, of West
Park, died October 21. Service 1
p.m. Saturday, New Macedonia
Baptist Church.

HAROLD GIBBARD, 76, of Fort
Lauderdale, died October 23. Ser-
vice was held.

BABYANYIAH KING, one month,
of Hollywood, died October 21. Ser-
vice was held.


Poitier
ALBERT JIMMY PHINIZY, 58,
laborer, died October 19 in Miami
Jewish Home. Service 2 p.m. Sat-
urday in the chapel.

DAVID R. JOHNSON, 55, por-
ter, died Octo--
ber 21. Service
noon Saturday,
Church of God
by Faith.




QUEEN BETHEL, 60, nurse,
died October 25.
Service 1 p.m.
Monday, Memo-
rial Temple Bap-
tist Church.




CUTHEREOUS DON ALLEN,
58, porter died
October 23 in
Palmetto Gen-
eral Hospital.
Service Satur-
day November
8, Mt. Tabor
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

EARTH WALKER, 72, cook,
died October 25
in Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Arrangements
are incomplete.




SAMUEL RYLAND, 59, died in
Jackson Memorial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

JACQUES H. AVIN, 81, car-
penter, died October 23. Service
10 a.m. Saturday, St. Bathelemy
Church.
Jay
GAD MAYS JR, 80, died Octo-
ber 20 in Jack-
son South Com-
munity Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Sec-
ond Baptist
Church.



MARILYN WARREN-EARLE,

died October
24 in Jackson
South Com-
munity Hospi-
tal Service 1
p.m. Saturday,
Mt. Pleasant
Church.


ANNIE ROBINSON, 103, se-
nior companion,
died October 24
in North Shore
Vitas Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Wednesday,
Shiloh Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


LELIA SKINNER, 79, restau-
rant owner, died
October 22.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday, St.
Paul Missionary
Baptist Church.




ANNIE M. HUMBLES, 69, home-
maker, died October 24 in Jackson
South Community Hospital. Final
rites in Hammond, Louisiana.


SAH'QUIRIA WATSON, eight
months, died October 21 in Miami
Children's Hospital. Service 2 p.m.
Saturday in the chapel.

WILLIE MOTES, 60, laborer
died October 26 in Jackson South


Community Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Subscribe


Richardson -W
STEPHEN HASKINS, 45, died
October 21.
Service 11 a.m.
Thursday in the i
chapel. -."





CHRISTINE JACKSON, 83,
homemaker,
died October 20
in Jackson Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m. Friday in
the chapel.



YVONNE OPHELIA FRANCIS,
66, died Octo-
ber 19 in Palm
Beach. Service
.11 a.m. Satur-
day, Ebenezer
United Method-
ist Church.


NERO ANTHONY SWEET-
ING, 50, park
and recreation
worker, died
October 27 in
Mercy Hospital.
Viewing in the
chapel 1 to 6
p.m. Friday, Me-
morial service
17 to 9 p.m. Friendship Mission-
ary Baptist Church. Service 1 p.m.
Saturday at the church.

LARRY RODGERS SR, 27, con-
struction labor-
er, died October
22. Service 2
p.m. Saturday,
Now Faith Tab-
ernacle Church.



JAMES PAUL WALKER, 69,
died October 27
in North Shore
Hospital. Re-
mains shipped
to Jackson, Mis-
sissippi for final
rites and burial.



Mitchell
BOBBY COOKS SR., 69, firstAf-
rican American
tree surgeon in
Dade County,
died October
23 in Memorial
Pembroke Park.
Viewing Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church.

ERIC L. JONES, 41, construc-
tion worker, died
October17. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Heather;
children, Eb-
onie, Eric Jr.,
Erica, Brittney,
Matrese; grand-
child, Keitron,
mother, Dorothy; father, Sam; sis-
ters, brothers, nephews, nieces,
cousins and friends. Funeral 2 p.m.
Saturday, Butler Temple Church of
God in Christ, 5701 Flagler Street,
Hollywood.

THOMAS LOCKETT SR., 59,
longshoreman, died October 26
in North Hospital Hospice. Service
11:30 a.m. Saturday in the chapel.


Range
ALTERMEASE SMITH, 95,
homemaker,
died October
21. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Betty Thur-
man, and Delo-
ris Coachman;
son, Harold;
eight grandchil-
dren and many great grandchil-
dren. Service 10 a.m. Saturday,
Greater Bethel A.M.E Church.


FREDDIE LEE
FOUNTAIN JR.
44, carpenter,
died October
22. Service 10
a.m. Saturday,
North Miami
Church of God,
14250 North Mi-
ami Avenue.


FRANKLIN-


RUDOLPH S. KING, 83, re-
tired mailroom
clerk for Florida
Power & Light
Company, died
October21. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Castella
L.; daughter, Ari-
mentha Harvey;
grandson, Tyrone; granddaughter,
Grace Harvey; one sister, Daisy
Ivory; an adopted son, Paul Pur-
nell; a host of other relatives and
friends. Viewing 4 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day. Service 2 p.m. Saturday in
the chapel.

JOSEPH R. NEWBOLD, 66,
stock puller at A & G Grocery
Store, died October 22. Survivors
include: mother, Caroline; sons,
Ruben and Steven ; brother, Rich-
ard (Catherine); a host of grand-
children, aunts, uncles, other rela-
tives and friends. Service 2 p.m.
Saturday, Temple M.B. Church.

MRS. LILLIE MAE WIGGINS,
96, homemaker died October 27.
Arrangements are incomplete.


in Memoriam
In loving memory of,


GEORGE REESE JR.
11/03/38 10/27/07

One year has passed since
you left us. We miss your
big smile, your laugh, your
ribs, your words of wisdom,
your love and your kindness.
There hasn't been one day
that has gone by without a
memory or a tear shed. All of
our memories of you are still
vivid in our hearts, but we
know you are watching us.
You are forever loved.
Your loving wife, Sadie,
daughter, Claretha, grand-
daughter, Lamisha, great
granddaughter, Kimora,
brother, William, sisters, Cly-
die, Martha and your entire
family


JOIN THE


by becoming a member of our



CALL 305-694-621 0



Poitier Funeral Home

Ph: 305-638-5030

Direct Creamation, $535.00

Cremation with Viewing

& Funeral service, $1362.00

DOES NOT INCLUDE OVERSIZE


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Miami says goodbye to an activist

By Sandra J. Charite Luther King Jr. caused an up- his family." Dyer-Major, recalls
scharite@miamitimesonline.com roar in Miami and afterwards that last year just days before
-. ..... .. ...^^K 1-- J 1sa- -sB ^ -J i . i ... . ..1._ ____ - 1 --*__, L_ L_ _i _ ... n __ *


Friends and families gath-
ered at the New Birth Cathe-
dral, 2300 NW 135th St., to
say farewell to a Liberty City
icon, Bernie Dyer, last Satur-
day. Dyer died on October 15
of multiple organ failure in
Kentucky.
Eleven months ago, Dyer, 75,
went into coma after suffering
brain trauma and a broken eye
socket from an incident with
Miami Beach Police Depart-
ment. On November 23, 2007,
police officers were called to
Normandy Isle apartments
where Dyer had apparently
shuttered himself in his unit.
Reports show that Dyer alleg-
edly threatened to shoot po-
lice. Police SWAT officers fired
tear gas into Dyer's apartment
to get him out. The events that
occurred between Dyer and the
police remain ambiguous. An
investigation is still pending.
Altine, who only goes by a first
name, worked close to Dyer at
his Miami Weekly newspaper
and says that his life resembled


,,






BERNIE DYER
Community Activists
that of Marcus Garvey because
of his vision for Liberty City.
"He was a wonderful to know.
He envisioned the conversion
of Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd
into an outdoor art museum."
In the late 1960's, Dyer
moved to Miami with a mission
to bring change to the Black
community. The assassination
of civil rights activist Martin


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S. , "" .


\\ HLN THE NEL\ S MATTERS TO YOU


d
-


- KIS] IJil'6U


Dyer worKea nard to restore
Liberty City. He started his
newspaper, The Miami Weekly
and managed a flea market. He
also helped found the Martin
Luther King Economic Devel-
opment Corporation in Liberty
City.
Ethelda Dyer-Major, Dyer's
daughter, said that her father
lived for his community. "He
gave so much to Liberty City
but he forgot about himself.
He should have concentrated
more on giving to himself and


her wedding, her father new in
to visit her. "I wanted him to
stay to walk me down aisle but
he said he had to get back to
Miami for he had meetings to
go to and things to do. He gave
so much to this community."
She defines her father as a
man full of humor and very
courageous. Dyer-Major says
that she is trying to walk in her
father's shoes. She is currently
working with low-income moth-
ers as a family support special-
ist in Alabama.


In MemoriamIn Memoriam
In Memorlam


In loving memory of,


GLORIA ANN SMITH


extends heartfelt apprecia-
tion to St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church, Pastor Joseph
Williams, for your enlightening
words of comfort.
Special thanks is directed
to Jabdul and Latavia Pow-
ell, Hall, Ferguson and Hewitt
Staff, for the professional-
ism and support shown dur-
ing our time of bereavement,
God's Calling Gospel Holiness
Church, under the leadership
of Apostle & Lady Elect W. J.
Jones, Greater Love Full Gos-
pel Baptist Church, Pastor D.
Richardson, City Manager, Mr.
& Mrs. Clarence
Patterson, Word of ALive
Ministries, Pastor E. Telefair
Pickett, III from Lakeland Fl, El
Shaddia Worship Center, Bish-
op L. Nash from Wooster, Ohio,
St. Mary's Community Church,
United Cerebral Palsy and the
Support Living Staff, Juanita
Mann/Liberty City Health Ser-
vice Center, North Miami Beach
Sr. School Cafeteria staff, Clau-
dette Rahmings,
City of Miami Police Depart-
ment Motor Enforcement Unit,
Heavenly Palm Gand Chapter,
O.E.S., Brothers & Daughters
at Greater Miami Elks Club
#1113, we extend special ap-
preciation for your kindness to
Mariana Moreno, Janette Her-
nandez, Adelis Ayarza, Butlin
Alphonse, our friends, Church
members, co-workers and ev-
eryone in the community who
stood by us with their acts of
condolence, expressions of
love, comfort and support dur-
ing our time of bereavement.
Your prayers, telephone calls,
floral arrangements, and other
expressions of sympathy will
forever linger in our hearts.

The Smith Family, Lionel Sr.,
Brenda, Deloris and Lionel Jr.


In loving memory of,


ALBERT VICTOR STURRUP III
'HOLLYWOOD'
10/31/72 12/06/07

Albert, we love you so much.
You will forever be in our
hearts.
Love Mother, Doreen Bar-
ham, Father, Albert Victor
Sturrup Jr, your children and
a host of family and friends



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ADRIAN DENNIS JONES
11/18/55 10/30/07

God saw you getting tired
and a cure was not to be so
he put his arms around you
and whispered, come to me.
With tearful eyes we watch
you and saw you pass away
and although we loved you
dearly we could not make you
stay. A golden heart stopped
beating hard working hands
at rest. God broke our hearts
to prove us He only takes the
best.
Love always, Whitney,
Erin, Brenda, Laura, Angela,
Adonis and Ronald.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Card of Thanks


LOUISE JACKSON


wishes to thank all the minis-
ters, friends and churches for
your prayers and gestures of
sympathy.
God bless you, The Jackson
family


DAVID L. MITCHELL
08/25/49 11/01/07

David, true love is everlast-
ing. Our love has challenged
me to find myself. It seems
like only yesterday I heard
your soft voice and felt your
gentle touch. I miss you like
no one can imagine. Baby I
know I have to go on but it
is rough. But God is good. I
know you want me to go on.
So this one is for you baby.
Forever yours, Linda


Happy Birthday In Memoriam
I--- In loving memory of,


ORENTHAL SMITH SR.
'O.J.'
10/29/74 03/11/05

You remain in our thoughts,
and will always have a place
in our hearts. Anyone with
information about the mur-
der of 'O.J.' please call Detec-
tive Romagni 305-471-2400
or Crime Stoppers Reward
offered at 305-471-8477.
You will remain anonymous.
'O.J." you are not forgotten.
In God We Trust.
The family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


EVITON ELIJAH BROWN
10/17/82 10/26/06


The family


RUBY MONTGOMERY
08/18/33 10/28/02

The stage was set. The
curtain went up and a star
was born. Out stepped Ruby
Montgomery and did she
give a performance, one that
would be remembered a life-
time. Ruby was a humble,
loving, kind hearted person
with a great love for human-
ity, putting God first. She
loved singing and enjoyed
coming home singing with
her mother and sister. Fam-
ily meant a lot to her. She
got great joy out of attending
family reunions, and going
to church. She would always
sing at both of them and
could she sing.
She married Oliver Mont-
gomery Jr and they were
parents to six biological chil-
dren. She raised four grand-
children and helped with an-
other. Because of her love for
- humanity, she adopted two
little girls who were in need
and raised them too. Many
children, friends of her chil-
dren, have lived in her home
for months some times years
at a time. She was a strong
believer that all children de-
served a God given chance at
life. Therefore as humble as
she was, she did everything
in her power to help. She
was blessed with a wonde-. ...
ful, supportive husband. For
without him, she would not
have done all that she did so
successfully. All the children
are adults now.
The performance is over.
The curtain has closed, but it
was a performance that will
be talked about for a life time
by neighbors, church mem-
bers and in the work world,
by all who knew her. Six
years ago, God decided that
she needed a rest and called
her home. She will always be
loved and missed by her fam-
ily and everyone who knew
her.
Sharinette Montgomery
and Bettye Williams Mayfield


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


KALVIN L. DASSAW
'SPEEDY'
01/03/78 11/01/03

It's been five years since you
left' us to be with the Lord. I
miss you so much, DADDY,
words cannot explain. Un-
til we meet again, REST IN
PEACE.
Loving you always, Kalvina

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DEBROAH ANN FRAZIER
12/27/70 10/29/07

Daughter, sister, niece,
aunt and friend. Debbie, it
has been a year since you
departed our lives to go home
to be with the Lord. You are
greatly missed and not a
day goes by without think-
ing about you and thanking
God for the short time that
He allowed you to be with us.
We will forever cherish your
memories of being the pa-
tient, sweet, kind, thought-
ful and beautiful person that
you were. You touched all of
our lives and made an im-
pressionable impact.
Love always, your Mom,
family and a host of relatives
and friends


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
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MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


Prince contq'i t" 4Iaenilt
4bl--Copyrghtedateria


Syndicated Conten


n course


Available from Commercial Newsl.roviders


THE BARD IS


BACK!
The complete works of
William Shakespeare to
premiere atArsht Center
Following a season that de-
livered such record-breaking
theatrical successes as Sla-
va's Snowshow and Forbidden
Broadway, theater buffs, be they
square or sophisticated, are in
for a major comedy treat with
the premiere of the internation-
ally acclaimed Reduced Shake-
speare Company (RSC) and its
famed "The Complete Works of
William Shakespeare (abridged)
[revised]" at the Adrienne Ar-
sht Center for the Performing
Arts of Miami-Dade County.
The production will play an ex-
tended run from November 26,
2008 through January 18, 2009
in the Center's Carnival Studio
Theater.
A smash hit in London and
Please turn to CENTER 3C


Mahaqni SL spokesmodel laughs it up

Mahaqni SL

searches for

its new face
Miami Miami-based beauty
empire Mahaqni Sophisticated Looks
has kicked off a search for their next
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launch, marketing campaign and
fashion line debut, they are on a
mission to find the girl who embodies
their slogan: "Mahaqni SL: Bold, Hot
and Beautiful."
Already known for their hair care
and cosmetics, Mahaqni SL has been
expanding at an enormous rate since
the introduction of the Mahaqni
CoctailT, the popular line of Mahaqni
Hair Coctail Greases and the kick-
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Add to that their upcoming fashion
launch and Mahaqni Founder
Felicia Brown thought it was time to
reintroduce themselves to the masses
with a new look and a fresh face.
"Our products have gotten such a
great response from our clients and
consumers. With the rave reviews,
positive testimonials and pending
introduction of our fashion line, we
thought it was time to go national. We
want to find that model with the right
attitude to grow with us, catch our
vision and help bring it to pass," Brown
said.
The open casting call will be held
November 1st from 12 4 p.m. at the
Mahaqni salon in Miami's plush Design
District at 3503 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami,
Florida, 33127. They will be seeking
ambitious young ladies of all ethnic
backgrounds, ranging in age from 8
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of print, runway and spokesperson
models.
Models who think they have what it
takes to represent the emerging beauty
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and read a script.
For more information on how to
become the new face of Mahaqni
SL, please contact Mahaqni's PR
department at 786-285-0849.


fin








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


A-6 SY5M


The lona %wvaited I -vears'
Reaffirmation NI-lrriaee between
Harold Rolle .Jr and Xavia
Rolle took place. Saturday', Oc-
tober 18, at Ebenezer United
Methodist Church with Rev.
Willie Cubbage, officiant, and
Shamekia Bowick, wedding
planner. The wedded couple
chose cocoa brown sleeveless
gowns accentuated with a mint
green sash around the knee
length of the gown, while the
men wore brown tuxedos with
mint green accessories and the
children likewise.
A 22-passenger white Escalade
brought the bride and groom fol-
lowed by a stretched limousines
for the remaining bridal party,
along with hostesses and hosts
Yuri Davis, Diarrah Boyer, Na-
jee Boyer and Ashley Roberts,
Danny Snipes and Whiteney
Roberts and Ashanti Mat-
thews.
With the playing of recorded
music from the musical shows
on Broadway, such as New York,
New York, Cleomie McKenzie,
grandparent of the groom en-
tered, followed by Dewitt Hall,
Avery Hall, grandparents of the
bride, Mr. & Mrs. Harold Rolle
Sr., parents of the groom, and
Kathy Cubbage, Calsin & Re-
dina Hall, parents of the bride,
followed by the officiant, groom,
and Shawin Ford and Aubtrey
Rolle, best men.
On cue came bridesmaids and
groomsmen Tamara Davis and
Patrick Alexandre, Letavia
Johnson and Joshua Cubbage,
Pheadra Roberts and Ran-
dell Gaitor, Shaina Davis and
Triston Roberts, Jacquelyn


Linnear and Ron-
ald Gaitor, Marie-
zela Cubbage and
Charlie Cubbage ..... ,
Zanetta Davis
and Trevor Roberts, Danielle
Snipes and Trevis Roberts; Jr.
Brides included Destini Rolle,
Dajah Rolle, Dasani Rolle, and
Shamaris Armstrong.
Also, Juston Bowick Jr., ring
bearer, Rashad Gaitor and Jar-
rod Rolle Jr., Jr. Groomsmen:
and Diamante Francis flower
girl; Veronica Simpson, matron
of honor, Janaye Hall, Selena
Roberts, maids of honor, and
the father of the bride who es-
corted her down the aisle for the
second time.
The bride entered wearing an
atara on her forehead, mini-ear-
rings and a white ruffle gown to
join her husband who was wait-
ing. The both of them participat-
ed in reaffirmation of marriage
vows, prayer, 'lighting of the
unity candles, announcements
of 10-years of marriage, presen-
tation of the wedded couple and
the recessional down the aisle
to the awaiting automobiles for
a celebration and reception with
Veronica Simpson as mistress of
ceremonies.
Following an evening of enjoy-
ment, the married couple took
the time to acknowledge the re-
membrance of Anita Hall, Aunt,
and thanked everyone for mak-
ing their reaffirmation one to be
remembered, while they plan for
#20 years.

Vice mayor Dorothy 'Dottie'
Johnson celebrated her retire-
ment from the United States


TMi h


Postal Service, after 35 interest-
ing years of mail deliveries to ex-
ecutive assignments, last Satur-
day, October 11, at the Marriott
Biscayne Bay Spa and Resort,
downtown Miami, before a huge
crowd of family members, well-
wishers and friends.
Guests arriving early took ad-
vantage of the hors d'oeuvre,
open bar, and jazz provided by
The Psi Phi Band featuring Lee
Johnson and Jimmy Harrell
until the reception was conclud-
ed, while the honoree moved
around to ensure everyone was
in place and the 50-volunteers
were on task seating everyone
properly.
Bridget Edwards was given
the honories of being mistress of
ceremony, along with Denovilee
Smith by announcing the hon-
oree and her family members
including Mr. & Mrs Woodrow
Conner & family, Evangelistic
Annette Williams, God Mother,
Alfonozo Smith, uncle, Delo-
res Smith, stepmother, Alvin E.
Smith, father, Jessie Shannon,
mother, Alvenia J. Banks, sister,
Woodbine, GA., Nisaiah Cason,
grandson, Edward 'Josua' Phil-
lips, grandson, Tamika Shari
Johnson and Roilanda LaRita
Johnson, daughters, and Roy
Johnson, husband escorting the
honoree to her special seat.
The evening was filled with trib-
utes coming from mentors as The
Honorable Congresswoman Car-
rie P. Meek, Woodrow Conner,
USPS, Georgia Jones Ayers,
James Brown, JoAnn Feindt,
Ron McDowell, Vickye Byron,
Captain David Cinalli, with
Congressional Recording spon-
sored by Congressman Kendrick
B. Meek, Commissioner Bar-
bara J. Jordan, The GRFPC of
Opa-locka, and the Miami-Dade
County Joint Alumni Coalition,
Inc.
Other organizations included


.


CHRISTOPHER AND JAMAL MACK


******** *
Despite some personal prob-
lems with David Smith; was not
prevented from orchestrating a
top-notch Family and Friends
Day at Ebenezer UMC with Rev.
Dr. Joretha Capers, Sr. Pastor,
and the Choraliers choir featur-
ing Jill Bethel, Valarie Thom-
as, Donny Fabien and guest
keyboardist, Dessaline Ford, a
former musician for the church.
Smith got many families and
friends to show up by setting up
a telephone tree to invite each
person formally. As a result,
Smith had each family matri-
arch or patriarch introduce fam-
ily members. Heads began to
turn and applause followed from
Tim Smith and family, Mt. Cal-
vary MBC, Jean Petty and fami-
ly, Elisah Knowles, Ivan Thom-
as, Dr. Gerald Gillard Norman
Cox, Rebuen Smith, Walter
and Williams Clark. The Brad-


Jesus People Ministries linter-
national, The Children's Trust,
Family & Children Faith Coali-
tion, Miami-Dade County Public
Schools, The City of Opa-locka,
The Carrie P Meek Foundation,
The Miami Times, NANAY, The
Historic Hampton House Trust,
Inc. and Miami Gardens YPPC.
Now, the retiree will continue to
be active with her Charter School,
HHHT, Inc. Church, the citizens
of Opa-locka and her family. May
God continue to bless you.


ley Family, Gibson and Jack-
son families, Bertha Martin and
Family, Hanna, Brown, Smith,
and Johnson families, and Wil-
lie M. Johnson and Antonette,
along with Richard B. Strachan,
percussion.
In addition to family members,
friends came together from the
Improved Benevolent Protective
Order of Elks of the World for
their annual church visitation.
They were invited by Eloise S.
Johnson, counselor, as well as
Edwina Prime, president, Ber-
tha Langforth, secty, Shirley
Cravette, DD, Lorretta Hol-
land, Beatrice Bynum, Lorretta
Coleman, Shirley Ralph, Carol
Collie, Archie Langforth, presi-
dent, Bernard Stewart, DD, and
Robert Bennett. It was a FF day
well used and a repase for those
who stayed around fraternizing
and meeting families in person.


Congratulations go out to
the sponsors of the Educa-
tion Foundation For Children's
Care, Inc. held recently at the
Signature Grand Ballroom,
Davie, with Steve Higgins,
emcee; Dr. Gerry Gallimore,
keynote speaker; and Leon
Wellington, president. Joe
and Shelia Mack were there
to support their sons Christo-
pher and Jamal Mack who re-
ceived the Exceptional Service
Award for excelling at New Fel-
lowship Christian Center and
the community.
Kudos go out to the other
youth such as Bryan Cheddar,
Eliatha SDA, Denise Nicholas,
Antigua & Barbuda Assoc.;
Sharisse Stewart, NW Dade
SDA; and Akil Walker, Kendall
SDA, while their parents stood
and cheered with pride.


The Egelloc Civic and Social


Congr3atulationE to Spellman
College in Atlanta, Ga The col-
lege received a $17 million iltr
to expand its international Pro-
grams. Students will come from
Africa to study and graduate
from the college. The money was
given to the college by an anony-
mous donor. Happy birthday to
Mrs. Vera Lee who will celebrate
her 97th birthday on October
30.
Happy wedding anniversary
greetings to William and Delo-
res Pinder III; 28th anniversary;
October 25.
Darryl T. Moses, Jr. has
been selected to participate at


lowing church members were
honored with plaques: Florence
Scavella-Moncur, Elizabeth
Betty-Blue, Cynthia Trout-
man Brown, Velma B. Arnold,
Donna A. Turner, Thomas Mar-
shall, Deacon Doris Ingraham,
the Miramrar Middle and Mrs. Winnie Holiday.
School Spelling Bee Lunch was served to all pa-
alo-i'nglith 120, theirr rishioners in our Parish Hall
.:lhi grader: ii thj ..... .......... after service. Their president is
Somerset Academy. Antionette Gordon.
He is the son of Darryl T. (Gail) Voting for president of the
Moses, Sr. United States is the most im-
Get well wishes to Shirley Ann portant vote we can ever make.
Duncan, Dr. Pearl Lockhart- We're deciding whom we want in
Rosser and Grace Heastie-Pat- our living rooms for the next four
terson. years. If you don't vote, you don't
Special presentations were count. By the way, Bob Brown,
made by Virla R. Barry on Oc- an up incoming hip-hop artist,
tober 19 when Saint Theresa's has created the Obama Dance,
Chapter of Episcopal Women pre- a two step that has become the
sented their nineteenth annual latest dance craze on YouTube.
presentation of the Miriam Kemp Brown said, "I created a dance
Stirrup Beacon Awards. The fol- that any one can do." Whether


you are old, young, male, female
and no matter your background,
you will enjoy doing the Obama.
On November 9, the Black
Achieves History and Research
Foundation presents a salute
to Miami's Black Law Enforce-
ment Officers and the following
awards: The chair award will be
presented to the family of the
late William Cooper; Family
Community Longevity award will
be presented to Wilhelmenia
Franks Jennings representing
her family the Ward-Franks fam-
ily; Founder's award: The family
of the late Edwards Gaylorde-
Kimal; Lifetime Achievement
award will go to James Wilson-
Bridges, M.D.; Public Service
Advocate Award: the honorable
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall.
Accolades will be given to loyal
members Jaunita B. Johnson,
Columbus Lee, Yvonne Mc-


Donald, Andel Mickens, Bob
Simms, Major Leroy Smith,
and Rachel Culmer Williams.
This affair will take place at the
Hilton in Downtown Miami.
Halloween is approaching.
Parents please go with your chil-
dren when they go out to Trick-
or- Treat. Halloween can be safe
for children if parents get to-
gether and have block parties in
their neighborhoods. Remember
Halloween can be a lot of fun.
Congratulations to Adibbe
and Mary McDowell who cele-
brated their wedding anniversa-
ry on October 26 with an appre-
ciation dinner at the Signature
Grand in Davie.
Former Miami Judge Donald
Wheeler Jones, who is now a
law professor at the Coastal Law
School in Jacksonville, paid a
visit to the city last week.
Former Miami-Dade teacher


and FAMU booster Davis "Cap-
tain" Curry is confined to the
assisted living facility at Miami
Gardens Care Center, 305-651-
9690. Another Rattler, Samuel
Cleare is in Villa Maria Nursing
Home.
People are wondering if there
are any Black Republicans left
in South Florida. None have
been seen during the recent vis-
its of John McCain, Sarah Palin
or Charlie Crist.
Congratulations to Doris Jor-
dan Duty who will celebrate her
80th birthday on November 1
when she is honored with a par-
ty at Tony's Reception Palace in
Hialeah.
The Gold Coast Chapter of
Florida A & M Alumni Associa-
tion honored its "Sixty Plus/
Graduates" with a luncheon on
October 25 at Hadley Park, Car-
rie Meek Center.


Legend goes uptempo on new album 'Evolver'


By Hillary Crosley

NEW YORK (Billboard) Sit-
ting on a couch in the New York
offices of Columbia Records,
John Legend is surrounded by
walls displaying framed por-
traits of Frank Sinatra and
Billie Holiday. It's an appropri-
ate setting for Legend, whose
2004 debut, "Get Lifted," was
a collection of urban-tinged
midtempo songs, and whose
"Once Again" in 2006 featured
'60s-ihnspired tracks with lush
instrumentation.
But as he spoons out Celes-
tial Seasonings tea from a small
white cup, Legend, sporting a
V-neck T-shirt, dark jeans and
high-top sneakers, looks any-
thing but retro. And the music
on "Evolver," his album slated
for release October 28, is any-
thing but nostalgic.
"This album doesn't sound
like me," he said. "The tempo is
faster than I've done before. It


will be different for people, be-
cause 'Evolver' has a bit more
instrumentation than I've used
before. But it's not like you
won't recognize the artist -- it's
still me."
After selling more than 3
million records in the United
States, according to Nielsen
SoundScan, Legend is banking
that fans will embrace his new
sound.
From its bouncy introduc-
tion, it's clear that Legend's
first single, "Green Light,"
which features Andre 3000
(of OutKast), isn't in his tradi-
tional style. The track boasts
a galactic spin with electronic
keys and shooting-star sound
effects over a quick two-step
drum beat.
"Good Morning," in which the
singer begs a lover for one last
roll in the hay before she starts
her morning commute, is Leg-
end's favorite "Evolver" cut.
An instrumental of the track


o orn Iur't


f da


opens the album, and the full
cut closes it.
"My songs are always about
love and devotion," Legend said.
" 'Good Morning' is about sex
more explicitly than I've written
about before. Sooner or later I
had to go R. Kelly on my fans ...
without going all the way."
Legend has been busy on
nonmusical fronts as well. He
recently returned from Africa,
where his nonprofit organiza-
tion Show Me is working to sta-
bilize several villages in Tanza-
nia. "I just got back from a clus-
ter of villages called the Mbola
cluster," Legend said. "We were
able to see new buildings, the
school's increased attendance,
an increase in crops from this
last year to this year as well as
new health centers."
As for his musical transition,
Legend is taking it in stride.
Call his new smooth sound
electronic or pop -- just don't
call it adult contemporary.


'Bnr~


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Club began it's Fortieth Year
of existence under the leader-
ship of Mary Dunn, president,
and Eileen Martin-Major, di-
rector of the Men of Tomorrow
for the year of 2009, last Sun-
day, at Ebenezer UMC, where
the eleventh grade young men
and parents attended a work-
shop with Ofc. Delrish Moss as
speaker. He outlined 9-steps
for the young men to follow to
be successful in life. And, of
course, he received a standing
ovation upon completion of his
speech.
Other members in attendance
included Cora Solomon John-
son, historian, Deborah Cart-
er, 1st vice, Constance Carter,
financial secty, Kameelah
Brown, asst. chair, workshops,
Gloria Clauseu, Black History
Chair, Stephenia Willis, sec-
ty, Vera Purcell, corres. Secty,
and Dr. Richard J. Strachan,
choreographer.
Major announced orienta-
tion for the young each first
and third Sunday, beginning
at 3 p.m. at Ebenezer UMC,
activities will include preparing
Thanksgiving basket for the
needy; Christmas basket; and
carolling at the senior centers.
Some of the young men in
attendance included Har-
old Scott, Jonathan Moses,
Keith Takeh, Charles Taheh,
Derrick Beal, Devante Lowe,
Alan Young, Larren Meller-
son, Nathan Murray, Greg-
ory F. George, Marc Smith,
Aaron Killings, Ryan Jack-
son, Norris E. Johnson, Ja-
mal Williams, Terry Thomas,
Gerald Coney, Jr., Lorenzo
Smith, Charlie Thomas, De-
rion Pittman, Jeremy Dixon,
Jonathan White, Donovan
Carey, Chad Lewis, Jerry
Doe, Emanuel Oliver, Chad
L. Elois, and Christopher
Scarlet.


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BlIACKS NMuisT CONTROL THIIR OWN DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


?rt~xO


Obama has already made history


Senator Barack Obama broke
new ground when he became the
first Black major-party presi-
dential candidate. The histori-
cal significance of his candidacy
has given hope to voters young
and old and inspired an interest
in the political process for mil-
lions of Americans from all walks
of life. But Obama's campaign


transcends race.
His efforts to mo-
bilize and energize
voters have, liter- """
ally and figuratively, changed the
face of politics.
The Obama campaign raised a
record $150 million in September
2008. Overall, the Senator and
would-be president has raised


an unprecedented $600 million.
This number almost equals the
combined amount George Bush
and John Kerry raised during the
2004 presidential campaign.
For years, political fundrais-
ing focused on expensive din-
ners that catered to the elite. The
crowds at these shindigs were
highly educated, well-connected
and, to be blunt mostly white.
Obama took a different approach
to fundraising. According to his
campaign, the average donation
for their record-breaking Sep-
tember was under $100.
He has not relied on a small
contingent of wealthy donors


to fund his efforts. Indeed, the
campaign has several high-lev-
el, high profile donors. But it's
those contributions from the av-
erage American students, retir-
ees, single mothers that have
fed Obama's coffers. More than
three-million donors have con-
tributed to the campaign, many
of them giving just $10 or $15.
Most of the campaign's dona-
tions are made via the internet,
another tool that Obama has
used to his advantage. While
he is certainly not the first can-
didate to embrace the internet
as a fundraising mechanism,
Obama's approach sending


regular emails to subscribers,
debunking rumors spread by
his competition, uploading first
look campaign videos, announc-
ing his VP choice has certainly
changed the game.
Much of the funds Obama has
raised has been spent on adver-
tising. And though he has invest-
ed heavily in traditional media -
television and radio ads Obama
has, once again, stepped outside
of the box, buying ads in video
games and on the sidelines at
sporting events. This untradi-
tional approach to ad spending
has reached voters who have, in
the past, been overlooked.


The election is less than two
weeks away. And, if the polls
can be trusted, it seems that
Obama's innovation has paid off.
He's leading his opponent in sev-
eral key states and is picking up
new undecided voters everyday.
It appears that America is set
to elect its first black president.
While the election is far from over
and your support is critical dur-
ing this final stretch, one thing
is certain: Years from now, presi-
dential candidates hoping to fol-
low in his footsteps, will borrow
from the Obama playbook and
hope that some of his strategic
brilliance rubs off on them.


Philly singer/songwriter makes


'Fearless' debut


A setback in her teens brings her to a better place


By Steve Jones

RISK TAKER
Jazmine Sullivan had never
sung over a reggae beat, but
when you call your debut al-
bum Fearless, you can't be
afraid to take chances. The
song, Need U Bad, produced by
and featuring Missy Elliott, is
No. 7 on USA TODAY's urban
chart and No. 24 on the rhyth-
mic chart. "I was a bit skeptical
at first," says the 21-year-old
Philadelphian, whose album
made its debut at No. 6 on the
Billboard album chart. "But
once Missy played the track for
me, I was able to write over it.
Then she brought in Pepa (of
Salt-N-Pepa fame) to do the pa-
tois at the beginning and end,
and it all worked out really
well." The song is a plaintive
plea for an ex-lover to come
back, but she's hardly a cloy-
ing diva. On other songs, she
vividly portrays taking a crow-
bar to a straying lover's car,
contemplating a violent end
for an abusive guy, and- toying
with swapping boyfriends on a
double date. *

AN EARLY START


Sullivan started singing in
church when she was 5 and
was soon doing solos and par-
ticipating in talent competi-
tions. When she was 12, she
landed a spot on Showtime
at the Apollo, where she per-
formed the hymn Accept What
God Allows. It was about that
time that her interests turned
to R&B. She began performing
in the mid-'90s at Philadel-
phia's Black Lily the launch-
ing pad for such acts as Jill
Scott, Floetry and Kindred.

WONDERFUL EXPERIENCE
Sullivan found willing men-
tors at Black Lily, especially
the husband-wife duo Kindred
(Fatin Dantzler and Aja Gray-
don). When she was 13, she
tagged along with them to a
birthday party for Stevie Won-
der's grandson and wound up
singing with him. "I just kind
of snuck in there and I sang
some, then he started playing
These Three Words, and we
started trading riffs," Sullivan
says.

BLESSING IN DISGUISE
It wasn't long before she
started attracting the interest


of record labels, and she even-
tually signed with Jive Records.
But as with many young sing-
ers, she struggled to find her
niche and never released an al-
bum. The silver lining was that


just a baby. It hurt when they
dropped me. But I'm now in a
much better position. I wrote
everything on my album, and
I'm co-executive producer."
DON'T BOX ME IN


--.. "



F
Jazin.Suliane se wa d ped fe r
., -: ,


Jazmine Sullivan was 15 when she was dropped from jive records


it prompted her to work hard
honing her songwriting skills.
"I was very young when I was
at Jive, 15 going on 16," she
says. "I didn't know who I was,
so I couldn't tell them. I had
this huge voice, but I was really


Man sues Oprah over arrest on extortion charge


NEW ORLEANS A Loui-
siana man has filed a lawsuit
against Oprah Winfrey, claim-
ing she and an attorney made
false statements that led the
FBI to arrest him on charges
that he tried to extort the talk-
show host.
Keifer Bonvillain, who had
the charges dismissed, seeks
damages of $180 million from
Winfrey, her attorney and the
FBI in the federal lawsuit filed
Tuesday.
Bonvillain, of Houma, La., was
arrested in December 2006 after
he allegedly recorded telephone
conversations with an employee
of Winfrey's production com-
pany and told a company as-
sociate he wanted to publish a
book based on the recordings.
The FBI said he claimed to have


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
You can't complain. You wanted this.
Now that you have it, how will it change
things? If you thought this would
be what it takes to make everything
perfect, you're about to find out that it
requires too much baloney to even be
worth it. Lucky numbers 20, 29, 11, 3,
8.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
You've been hoodwinked by someone
who saw you coming. At the moment
this feels pretty good; but love is blind
and boy, are you asleep to what's going
on here. I'd tell you to smarten up but
you're so spellbound it'd be futile. Lucky
numbers 2, 20, 13, 4, 54.

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
Between what you've been through
and what's hitting you now, you're ready
to throw in the towel. With too much
tying you down you'll have to figure out
how to lighten your load before you can
think of breaking free from this. Lucky
numbers 2, 10, 32, 44, 5.

CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 20
Don't try to explain yourself. Whoever
doesn't get it wants to catch you in a lie.
If you have that conversation it won't
help the situation. Let them think what
they want about this. If they don't trust


offers from publishers and tab-
loids ranging from $500,000 to
$3 million.
The FBI arrested Bonvillain
when another company associ-
ate agreed to pay him $1.5 mil-
lion, wired him $3,000 and ar-
ranged to meet him. Bonvillain
claims in the lawsuit that he did
everything he could to avoid do-
ing anything illegal.
"There was substantial dam-
age done to my name and rep-
utation on a world level," he
wrote. "The extent of my dam-
ages is vast."
Federal officials agreed to dis-
miss the charges last year on
the condition that Bonvillain
perform 50 hours of communi-
ty service, undergo drug testing
and pay $3,000 in restitution.
Chip Babcock, a lawyer for


you, it's their problem. Lucky numbers
9, 65, 4, 17, 8.

LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
People don't understand how hard
it is for you to be there for them. Even
though you care, your own issues are
too intense to cater to their needs. If
they weren't so self involved they'd see
that you're the one who needs help.
Lucky numbers 7, 5, 49, 3, 5.

VIRGO: AUG. 21- SEPT. 20
You're starting to wonder if you can
handle this. Too much to do has turned
your life into a chore. Decide what the
main priority is and use your energy
to focus on that. The rest of it can be
delegated, or even dumped if need be.
Lucky numbers 5, 40, 3, 22, 3.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCTOBER 20
Others have come around in ways
that are astounding. Part of you is
delighted but on the other hand you're
wondering if it's all an act. Keep an eye
on their behavior. What they do will
show you if this transformation is for
real. Lucky numbers 2, 10, 4, 40, 22.

SCORPIO: OCT.21 NOV.20
Waking up to the truth will show you
more than you want to see. Something
tells you this was a mistake but you're


OPRAH WINFREY
Talk Show Host
Winfrey's Harpo Productions,
denied the allegations in Bon-
villain's suit.
"And we know that this whole
episode started when the plain-
tiff wiretapped a Harpo em-
ployee in California," he said.


so mesmerized by whatever keeps you
here your eyes are wide shut to the
idea that you've been played for a fool.
Lucky numbers 11, 10, 50, 12, 4.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
You're totally fed up with someone's
behavior. Unfortunately your feelings
for each other are so strong you have
to put up with it. Does tolerance ever
reach a limit? How far do you think you
need to go with this? Lucky numbers 9,
53, 20, 12, 34.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21 JAN. 20
Things are going so well you can't
figure out why you're bored. What most
of us don't know is; bliss is boring. A
problem or two would remedy this
state of affairs. You feel much more
comfortable when you have something
to fix. Lucky numbers 2, 21, 19, 6, 7.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21 FEB. 20
From a distance everything looks
fine.Your ability to remain philosophical
about others has helped you accept
what you can't change. This is good.
From that perspective it will be easier
for you to come to terms with your own
issues. Lucky numbers 9, 6, 40, 18, 3.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
Digging your self deeper into this
hole won't make it right. You're at the
point where cutting your losses seems
to make sense. There's so much to lose
here. All you can do is make a choice
between the lesser of two evils. Lucky
numbers 30, 29, 12, 33, 4.


Though her Black Lily experi-
ence was invaluable to her, she
says she doesn't want to be pi-
geonrholed as a neo-soul sing-
er. The diversity of her album
- the flamenco-flavored Bust
Your Windows (No. 9 on the


urban chart), the quirky Lions,
Tigers & Bears, the harrow-
ing Call Me Guilty, the spare
In Love With Another Man, the
playful Switch attests to her
artistic fearlessness.

TAKING TO THE ROAD
Though she has been on
stage for much of her life, Sul-
livan looks forward to touring


for the first time, opening for
Maxwell on his 27-date outing.
The singer's first tour in six
years ends Nov. 21 in Philadel-
phia. "I was excited to be going
out with somebody who hasn't
been out for a while," she says.
"Then a friend ran into Max-
well, and he said that he was
excited about going out with
me."


William Shakespeare story reborn

at the Adrienne Arsht Center


CENTER
continued from 1C

across the United States, Shake-
speare (abridged) is an irrever-
ent 97-minute race through the
Bard's 37 plays performed by
just 3 brilliantly versatile actors
- including Austin Tichenor
and Reed Martin, the Managing
Partners of the Reduced Shake-
speare Company. Designed to
thrill Shakespeare fans and
phobics alike, "The Today Show"
reported that "if you like Shake-
speare, you'll like this show; if
you HATE Shakespeare, you'll
LOVE this show." The Miami
production will feature the very
latest updates to the script that
were incorporated in a London
revival last year.


UC Berkeley college buddies,
Tichenor and Martin launched
Reduced Shakespeare Com-
pany when they re-connected
in 1992 in London. In addition
to Shakespeare (abridged), the
RSC has created The Complete
History of America (abridged),
The Bible: The Complete Works
of God (abridged), Western Civi-
lization: The Complete Musi-
cal (abridged), All the Great
Books (abridged), and their
latest, Completely Hollywood
(abridged). The company's first
three shows ran for nine years
at the Criterion Theatre in Pic-
cadilly Circus where they be-
came London's longest-running
comedies with- more shows run-
ning in the West End than An-
drew Lloyd Webber.


.. ,rn A r 01 .. r ,n ,, ... .,. n .- ... .. .

THE WIZARD OF OZ
'Bnr lianr,!" 'uLt,. .',. t.e f ., .n -.
Travel with Doroth-, and Told down the. vello,. brick load 10 .- -
glittering a3i deco Oz, complete with munchkins and flying
monkeys. There are lavish special effects and those classic.
songs guaranteed to send you over the rainbow'A
2 PM Zin Ballet Opera House $26, $37 $47. $61
7:30 PM $20, $35, $45, 559


':.o -:n l .. ,O1CL'r. n oC Fl.:r,, pr .'nl::
KIROV ORCHESTRA
'"alery Gerglec conducted a performanceot bounding panacihei'
i I i I ,'ii j ,r
One of [he oldest musical inslitutions in Russia perlc'rins
Wagner, Beerno.en and Prot,,fiev
PM Knight Concert Hall 615. $25. $75 $135

A ni- nrine .Ar:I '.,-- rr jd Li .rr, .., .. p.e. .
LEGENDS OF JAZZ
Legendary jazz pianist and composer Da..'e Brubeck i'7 joined by
Cuban-born Granmmny/-winning Lazz great Paquito D'Rivria arind
the world's premier conlernporar9 jazz all-star group Fourplay
featuring Bob James Larr-) Carlton, Nath'ian East, and Harve',
Mas-ni
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25. i-15, $55, .85'. $125

F l rl,' r ,Jt. c fI. l r i -,. L t r i r r l .p1 /. 1 ; C 3 J e L l l .i- r '. rrW :
MIAMI BOOK FAIR INTERNATIONAL- 2008
P. per-iorrrianc- f c eri. ball-1. [helalr. po-ir.. rd ridrrodrnr dJiace
,a':crripnied b-, 3 s', mphon-, orchestra, launch the -'Stri edilicor of
the T.liamni Buoo Fair '.itr appearanc.-c b., Ce'lebriies:, digniiaries;,
anr.d lierar. fiurei'
8 PM Knighl Concerl Hall FREE

Adrienne Arahi C r,[Ce r arid Jo:hn ,c.r. S 'l- LIr,,. i r-:,r p,' rir
CELEBRITY CHEF SERIES: ANTHONY BOURDAIN
The globe-trorting star of [te Travel Chiannel i
"No Reservations," Bourdain is equally aell-krnowr' for
writing best-selling memoirs and essays and judging
Bravo's 'Top Cnef
The Adrienne Arsht Center'-s Celebrt,y Chef Ser, s featurea-,
enrlighienring interview s with' ren, .rired c.lh s who dc u'-,:u s 1heir
personal culinary journey arid gi..'e a li.el, and informative cooking
demonristrationc
8 PM Knight Concert Hall 3145i, S515 ':.S !.1125'


I I


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.


H YOUR W, EEKLY
oroscope geft

By Minerva


C-..->, lBr.L., l


,nin .ri, [.,,-ur,,.ir,







4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008 BLACKS Musf CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


-der E 'odw buS. pWp u ws


Copyrighted Materia



Syndicated'Content



from CommerciaNew


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


publix.coevads








The Miami Times



Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Suriei: BlaclCopyrighted Material tirement plans




Syndicated Content-'----: z



Available from Commercial News Providers .


Mortgage

applications

sink to 8-year

record

By Lynn Adler
NEW YORK Demand for applicationss
to buy homes and refinance mortgages
sank to the lowest level in nearly eight
years in the most recent week, a trade
group said Wednesday.
The Mortgage Bankers Association's
seasonally adjusted index of mortgage
applications, which includes both pur-
chase and refinance loans, slid 16.6% to
408.1 last week, it's lowest reading since
December 2000.
Potential buyers are in many cases
paralyzed by tumbling stocks, a two-year
home price slump that still has room to
run, mortgage rates close to the year's
peak and higher downpayments required
by lenders making it harder to get a mort-
gage.
,Job insecurity is also increasing as a
recessionary economy means unemploy-
ment will rise from its five-year high,
many analysts say.
"A lot of individuals are just not think-
ing about buying a house now," says
Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC
Financial Services Group in Pittsburgh.
"They're uncertain, their confidence isn't
high, they're feeling that they might not
qualify for a loan anyway so why even
bother to apply."
Many consumers are holding out for
lower mortgage rates and signs house
prices are stabilizing.
"For most people, they don't feel this is
the right time to be buying a house, ei-
ther because the price is going to come
down or they can't get a mortgage or they
don't feel real secure about their job fu-
ture or income prospects," Hoffman said.
Please turn to MORTGAGE 8D


Raiding 40ok is not smart


But what if you have no choice?
With the tough economic times, a lot of you
may be tempted to raid your retirement accounts.
We've told you many times that financial experts
say that is not a good idea. But, if you think you
have no other options, here is what you need to
know to be money smart.
Raiding your 401k piggy bank early can be
tempting. But, the consequences are steep. We
found some valuable information from one of
CNN's financial experts.
You'll probably have to pay a ten-percent
penalty AND pay income taxes. The bottom line
is that about 40 percent of your distribution is
going right back to Uncle Sam. So, you have to
ask yourself if it's worth it.


You can also take a loan out of your 401k and
pay it back to yourself without having to pay a
penalty or taxes. Generally, you have five years
to repay it. But, if you are fired or quit your
job, that could accelerate to only two or three
months.
Again, ask yourself if you could do that.
If that is not motivation enough to keep your
retirement money in play, consider the long term
investment growth you'll be missing out on.
To calculate the growth of your own 401k, visit
http: / /www.bankrate.com/usn/ calculators/
retirement/401kretirement calculator.asp.
And, always consult with your financial adviser
before taking any money out of your retirement
account.


Don't












the 401K b





The Employee Benefit Research

Institute reports that about 30

percent of workers in the united

states have 401ks where they con-

tribute to their own accounts and

their employers match a small ,.

percentage.


beforI the
hnfe



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MBlDlma


Express yourself! Los Angeles


Remember Charles Wright
and the Watts 103rd Street
Rhythm Band's song, Express
Yourself? Younger folks are
more familiar with N.W.A.'s ver-
sion on their famous "album,"
Straight Outta Compton. Be-
cause it originated in L.A., I
thought it appropriate to draw
a business analogy.
Why is it so difficult for us to
accept that Black businesses
are the backbone of our neigh-
borhoods? Can't you see it in
the comparative statistics on


wealth and fam-
ily net worth?
Can't you see
it where you
live, where oth-
ers own the .......
businesses that
you support? Can't you see it
in the eyes of your children, as
they sit on stoops and stand
on corners, their lives wasting
away?
Not only do we need more
business ownership, we need
to grow our Black businesses


to where they can provide jobs
for our children.
I read an article that stated,
"...30% of all Koreans living
in the U.S. work for other Ko-
reans." Thomas Boston, in his
book, Affirmative Action and
Black Entrepreneurship, sug-
gests a plan called, "20 by 10,"
which calls for Black business-
es being able to hire 20 percent
of the Black workforce by the
year 2010.
Looks like we will miss that
milestone because we are too
busy allowing (Yes, I said "al-
lowing") many of our busi-
nesses to close due to lack of
support. Because of our neglect
and sometimes outright refusal
to patronize our brothers and
sisters, we are missing out on
the benefits of ownership and


control of the neighborhoods
and communities in which we
live.
You had better believe the
Korean people are not missing
the opportunity. Can you say
"Black Hair Care Products"?


In my hometown of Cincinna-
ti, Ohio, Hudson Brothers Dry
Cleaners is a 65 year-old Black
owned business operated by
two sisters whose father passed
it on to them. The sisters have


reached the age for retirement
and are, understandably, ready
to see the world and enjoy the
rest of their lives while they are
physically able to do so.
As a long time customer, I
stopped in one day to pick up


my clothes and they told me
they were closing on October
31, 2008. My immediate re-
action was, "NO, you can't do
that; you can't walk away from
this business, which has been


an icon in Cincinnati for six de-
cades."
Sound selfish? Not at all.
While I understood their de-
sire to retire, and supported
their decision to do so, I knew
we could not afford-to lose an-
other Black business, especial-
ly one that has served the com-
munity, not merely by clean-
ing clothes but also by being a
voice, a supporter, a neighbor-
hood rallying point, and one of
the "Drums" through which in-
formation was passed along to
Black people.
It's really more like a barber-
shop than a dry cleaner.
I asked the sisters if they
knew the Black owner of two
dry cleaners across town, to
which they answered, "No." I
Please turn to CLINGMAN 6D


Prrparr


D r. Rosie's business is being adversely affected by the current
economic situation and a lack of support by Black folks. Her
bookstore is among the few Black owned stores still standing
in this country.


----i


*....r iip


O"f


MON.-p A








6D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


JPMorgan profit sinks as credit deteriorates


By Madlen Read
Associated Press

NEW YORK JPMorgan
Chase & Co.'s profit tumbled
84 percent in the third quar-
ter after it took big hits from
souring mortgage invest-
ments, leveraged loans and
home loans.
Profit at the New York-
based bank, considered one
of the stronger players in the
current financial meltdown,
came in better than Wall
Street anticipated. But the
deterioration seen in all types
of loans from home equity
loans to prime mortgages to
credit cards bodes badly
for a banking industry that
is requiring unprecedented
investment from the federal
government.
CEO Jamie Dimon said
during a conference call that
he expects market condi-


tions to improve from its
heightened turbulence after
recent moves by the govern-
ment, and that JPMorgan is
still offering loans. But the
bank, like others, is lend-
ing at more old-fashioned,
disciplined standards in an-
ticipation of an even weaker
economy and accelerating
loan losses.
"If you're not fearful, you're
crazy," Dimon said.
The company, which
bought Washington Mutu-
al Inc. late last month and
Bear Stearns Cos. in March,
earned $527 million, or 11
cents per share. That was
down from $3.4 billion, or
97 cents per share, a year
earlier.
Analysts polled by Thom-
son Reuters had predicted a
loss of 21 cents per share.
Shares fell 44 cents to
$40.27 in morning trading.


Still, revenue fell below ex-
pectations, dropping nearly
20 percent to $14.74 billion
from $18.40 billion in the
third quarter of 2007. Ana-
lysts predicted revenue of
$16.01 billion.
JPMorgan's investment
bank wrote down $3.6 billion
from its mortgage invest-
ments and leveraged lend-
ing exposures, due largely to
the troubled assets at Bear
Stearns. It also boosted loan
loss reserves by $1.3 'billion
to $15.3 billion, or $19 billion
including Washington Mutu-
al, to prepare for a worsening
environment for lending.
Home equity loans con-
tinue to deteriorate_ charge-
offs rose to $663 million from
$511 million in the previous
quarter and $150 million a
year ago. They're expected to
rise to as much as $800 mil-
lion in the next several quar-


ters, the bank said.
Subprime and prime mort-
gage trends are worsening,
too. Subprime charge-offs
rose to $273 million from
$192 million in the second
quarter and $40 million a
year ago, while prime mort-
gage charge-offs rose to $177
million from $104 million in
the second quarter and $9
million a year ago. JPMorgan
anticipates subprime charge-
offs to rise to as much as
$425 million by early 2009,
and prime charge-offs to rise
to $300 million by that time.
And more customers failed
to make their credit card
payments. The card charge-
off rate edged up to 5 percent
from 4.98 percent in the sec-
ond quarter and from 3.64
percent a year ago. JPMorgan
expects this rate to rise to 6
percent early next year, and
to 7 percent late next year.


Black u tIng for rlrtmenl plan


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Black businesses are good for our generation


CLINGMAN
continued from 5A

asked them to allow me
to contact him to see if
he would consider tak-
ing over their business
via some kind of con-
tractual relationship.
They agreed; after all,
they were simply clos-
ing and discontinuing
their business income.
One good thing though:
They own their build-
ing free and clear.
The sisters are now
transitioning their
business rather than
closing it. Their cus-
tomers will not lose the
convenience of the lo-
cation and the service
to which they are ac-
customed; the neigh-
borhood maintains its
continuity; and the
new owner grows his
business. Instead of
mourning the death


of a Black business,
we are celebrating the
expansion of a Black
business.
How does this apply
to Los Angeles? Well,
there is a business on
Manchester Av., Ex-
press Yourself Books,
owned and operated
by Dr. Rosie Milligan, a
sister who would prob-
ably give her right arm
for her people Black
people.
Rosie has made tre-
mendous sacrifices for
the folks in Los Ange-
les; she is an icon as
well in L.A.
She has offered her
store for various meet-
ings, a distribution
point for Black manu-
factured products, a
venue for lectures and
book signing, and as
a place where folks can
come and purchase
other things in addi-


tion to books, such
as health products,
household items, and
copy/fax services.
Express Yourself
Books is just like
Hudson Brothers Dry
Cleaners in Cincinnati;
it serves as a "Drum"
for Black folks in L.A.
Now Dr. Rosie's busi-
ness is being adversely
affected by the current
economic situation
and a lack of support
by Black folks. Her


bookstore is among
the few Black owned
stores still standing
in this country. Will
L.A. "express" itself in
a positive manner by
rallying to save it, or
will L.A. "allow" anoth-
er Black business to
close? The name of the
business says it all:
"Express Yourself."
I am calling on Black
Los Angeles to express
yourself by show-
ing some love to Dr.


Rosie's business. Ex-
press yourself, L.A.,
by individually com-
mitting to buy at least
one item, one book,
one bottle of vitamins,
some herbal remedies
- just buy something
and make it habit to
do so at least once a
month. There is some-
thing you need in your
home every month
that is sold at Express
Yourself Books. Please
buy it there.


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O 2008 Colonial Bank. 'Requires a 5100 opening balance with a $25 monthly service charge. 1,000 free processed
items, d charge of 50.30 per item over 1,000 is assessed pet month. Processed items include in-bound ACH, checks
paid, deposit tickets and checks deposited. No service charge if an average collected balance of $15.000 is main-
ENDi-ra tdined in the Business Select Checd... ..,.. e-, ,yi... i jr.,rj,- tuilr..-ir bii,... of ^*',000 in combined
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resentative for details. Original coupon must be presented to receive rebate. No duplicates will be accepted. Coupon expires 30
days after issuance. *"Check Card has no annual fee. Transactions at non-Colonial ATMs subject to activity fees. Additional
charges may be imposed by non-Colonial financial institutions or ATM operators. A $10 per-card fee will be assessed for custom
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provided by Infinity Business Group, Inc. By opening a Colonial Business Select account, you are enrolled automatically in the
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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 108059 INVITATION TO BID FOR ON-SITE MOBILE
SHREDDING SERVICES, CITYWIDE

CLOSING DATE/TIIME: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Pur-
chasing Department, website at www.miamigov/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1904.

Deadline for Request for Clarification: November 3, 2008 at 4:00 P.M

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

N.O.0 '.

AD NO. 005042 -.1l
'. .si-. ^


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.

A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St., Hialeah, FL.
(same as 103 St.)
(Please mention ad)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611


"If the lions do not write their own

history, then the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


I


o-
















SECTION D


ss


n


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$900 nice and clean, laundry
room, parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.

1031 N.W. 197 Ter
Plus furnished room. Call Lin-
ton 305-652-4763

1039 N.W. 119 STREET
Beautiful two bedrooms, one
and a half bath, loft 'style
apartment. Section 8 Wel-
come. 305-696-8488

11075 N.E. 13th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, all
housing assistance programs
welcomed, call 786-306-
2946.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625 Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1281 N.W. 61 Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552 or
786-499-8212

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 S.W. 6TH STREET
HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$625 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

1461 N.E. 169 Street
One bedroom, one bath, up-
dated kitchen and bath, pool,
gym. 786-402-4403.

1500 N.W. 65th Street
One bedroom, one bath, room
air conditioned, gated, stove
and refrigerator. Remodeled,
tiled, $575 a month, utilities
not included. Call 786-514-
4746.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $495 per month, all ap-
pliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $525 monthly,
two bedrooms $625 monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1813B N.W. 3rd Avenue
One bedroom $400.
Call 786-351-8109

1818 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom. $425.. Free
gas, refrigerator, stove, air.
Capital Rental Agency
305-642-7080

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

190 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom. $680 moves
you in, $680 monthly.
786-389-1686

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

220N.W. 16 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $600.
305-642-7080


2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $625, newly
renovated appliances includ-
ed. Call Tony 305-213-5013.



2371 NW 61ST STREET


Two bedroom, one bath, rear
apartment, please call 305-
693-1017 or 305-298-0388.


2751 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$600 monthly. 954-430-0849

2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$650. Call 786-412-9343

S090 NW 134 Street #3
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 monthly, $1300 to move
in. 786-512-7643.

3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$340 bi-weekly, $650 moves
you in. Appliances and utili-
ties included. 786-389-1686

421 NW 59 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Studio, $600
One bdrm, $675
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-259-7054

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!,
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

5545 North Miami Avenue
One bdrm, one bath. $550
monthly, $1100 to move in.
305-962-1814, 305-758-6133

6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

7090 N.W. 17 Ave #6
One bedroom. $600 month-
ly$1200 move in.
305-300-5567

7527 N.W. 22 Avenue
Spacious upstairs two bdrms,
water included. 305-331-
5399

800 N.W. 67 Street
Two bedrooms, utilities in-
cluded, $365 bi-weekly
monthly. 786-389-1686

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V.
Call Joel: 786-355-7578.

8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

BISCAYNE GARDENS
APTS.
15201 Memorial Highway
One and two bedroom apts.,
cash and Section 8 preferred,
call Frank K. Cooper, R.E. at
305-758-7022


Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080


CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air,
appliances, new tile and car-
pet. Starting at $650. 1545
N.W. 8 Avenue. 786-506-
3067


GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Sta-
tion. On major bus lines. Al-
berta Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida


GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida


HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

MIAMI -Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Place Apartments
5800 N.E. 4 Ave
Miami, FL 33137
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $633.
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
225 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

MIAMI Now Pre Leasing
A Rental Community
Pinnacle Square Apts.
8300 N.E. 1 Place
Miami, FL 33138
Affordable, one, two, three
bedrooms. Starting at $632
For leasing information visit:
Pinnacle View Apartment
825 N.E. 23 Street
Miami, FL 33137
Call: 305-573-9201
-Income Restrictions-

N. DADE Section 8 OK!
Efficiency, one and two
bdrms. Security, No Deposit
For Section 8. 786-488-5225

Opa Locka Apartments
One bedroom, $450-$500
Two bedrooms, $575-$600
Free Water. 786-267-1646

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N W. 135th Street
1/2 Moni FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
wilh no security deposits
305-769-0146. 786-521-
7151

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath also
one bedroom, one bath. Sec-
tion 8 welcome, $500 cash
back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

Wynwood Area Apts.
28 Street and 1st Avenue
One bdrm., one bath from
$550 $650 mthly. Two
bdrms $750 mthly. All appli-'
ances. Joel 786-355-7578


4520 N.W. 27th Avenue
$750 monthly, $2,250 to move
in, call 305-781-0959.

COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.




1920 N.W. 119th Street
Two bedrooms, two baths,
first, last and security. $1200
a month. 305-542-8810.

2767 N.W. 198th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one and a
half bath town house, $1200
monthly, Section 8 o.k.
305-336-3133

6113 S.W. 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one and half
bath, one block from Metro-
rail,$1,400 monthly, Section
8 welcome. 786-556-9425 or
786-210-0421.

CAROL CITY AREA
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268



YOUR AD

COULD BE HERE

MIRAMAR AREA
Two bedrooms, one and a
half bath bath. 954-864-5889


NORTH MIAMI AREA
Rent or own two bdrm., two
bath condo ,$1150. $200
off first month. Air, balcony,
tiled floors and one assigned
covered parking. Laundry
available. Approved section


8 housing. Please contact
Kathy at
847-682-0290.



11275 N.W. 17 Ave
Large three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643


1175 N.W. 61st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 preferred. Call:
Frank K. Cooper, R.E.
at 305-758-7022

1274 N.W. 55 Street
One bedroom, free water,
stove, refrigerator and air.
$525 monthly. 305-642-7080

1521 N.W 70 Street
Five bedrooms, appliances,
air. $825 monthly.
Call 305-642-7080

1610 N.W. 47 STREET
One and two bedrooms. $550
and $625 monthly.
786-493-0686

1722 N.W. 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air
and carpet included. $650
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 305-751-6232.

1832 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bdrms, one bath, $750
monthly, first and security to
move in. Call 305-638-5332.

1871-73 NW 43 Street
Clean Two bdrms. one barn.
central air, appliances, ile,
blinds, security bars.
Call 786-357-5000

19201 N.W. 34th Court
Three bedrooms, one and
half baths, central air and
heat. 786-506-5380

1944 N.W. 93 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call Molly 305-541-2855

21301 N.W. 37th Avenue
Two bedrooms, air. No Sec-
tion 8. 786-306-4839.

224 SW 10TH STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
florida room, hallandale area,
call 305-935-2481.

2257 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080

2395 N.W. 81st Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 preferred, call Syl-
vester 954-275-0436.

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8 wel-
come, call 305-754-7776.

326 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$950. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

4245 N.W. 24th Ave #B
A newly remodeled two bed-
rooms, one bath, Section 8
welcome, 786-357-3958.

5420 N.W. 5 Court
Large three bdrms, two baths.
$1200 monthly, $1000 secu-
rity. Call 786-488-2264

5511 N.W. 5th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
air, new appliances, new tile,
$750 monthly, $1500 to move
in, after 5:30 305-979-3509.


5912 N.W. 21 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, near schools and
public transportation. Section
8 Welcome. $900 monthly.
786-295-0942

6325 N.W. 22 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OK. 305-751-3381


6811 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call Molly 305-541-2855

7710 N.W. 3 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly, first and last.
305-634-1455

7753 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

843 N.W. 110th STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath with
appliances and .central air.
$850 monthly, section 8 wel-
come. call 786-873-2694.

93rd St. NW 18th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.

970 N.E. 133 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances, ceil-
ing fan, new kitchen cabinets.
flood light, new carpet, vinyl
tile. $750 mthly. $1700 to
move in. Utilities not includ-
ed. 786-488-3350.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595


security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at 3737 Charles Ter-
race

DANIA AREA
Two bedroom, one bath, $900
month, call 786-273-6473


LIBERTY CITY AREA LIBERTY CITY/BROWNS 5173 N.W. 19 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath, VILLE Two bedrooms, one bath.
first, and security. Section 8, Clean rooms, utilities includ- $950 monthly, two months
HOPWA OK. ed, quiet neighborhood. security required.
305-244-6845 786-541-5234 Call 305-510-7538


Miami Area
Three bedrooms two
baths, two bedrooms, one
bath,utilities included. 786-
286-2540


1612 N.W. 51 Terrace
Utilities included. $550 moves
you in, $280 bi-weekly.
786-389-1686

210 N.W. 43rd Street
Utilities included, $450
monthly, Security $250, $700
to move in. 305-836-5739,
305-335-6454

2971 NW 174th STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
private entrance, kitchen,
air conditioned, cable, $550,
month, call 786-339-0175 or
786-624-1991

3153 N.W. 53 Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

5422 N.W. 7TH COURT
Large efficiency includes
water and electricity. $700
monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449


5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN. Property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

6741 N.W. 6 Court
Water and lights included.
305-968-6218

7602 N.E. 3 Court
Large efficiency, $500 month-
ly, $500 security, $1000 to
move in. Call Mr. Blocker
305-496-0561

86 St. N.E. 2nd Ave Area
Call 305-754-7776

CAROL CITY AREA
Furnished efficiency, call 305-
621-7940

Miami Area
$550 mthly, utilities included.
786-286-2540


Miami Gardens
All utilities, free cable, $700
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 786-546-9650


1338 N.W. 68TH STREET
One room available. Call 305-
693-1017 or 305-298-0388.

1448 N.W. 69TH STREET
$400 monthly, $400 to move
in. 305-934-9327.

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1506 N.W. 70 Street
Furnished room for rent. $350
monthly. call Ms. Queenie,
305-693-7727.

1541 N.W. 69th Terrace
Clean room, $350 a month.
Call 305-479-3632.

1542 N.W. 62nd Terrace
Clean room, $350 a month.
Call 305-479-3632.

15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$95 weekly. Free utilities,
kitchen, air,one person.
305-474-8188, 305-691-3486

1770 N.W. 71 Street #6
Air, cooking. $400 monthly.
305-300-5567

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

1887 NW 44 Street
$475 monthly. $600 moves
you in. Private bathroom. 305-
637-9359 or 305-
303-0156

2373 N.W. 95 St.
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276, 305-474-8186


8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.


CHEAPER LIVING IN
GA NEAR MALL
FREE Moving Ride There
FREE Month
$199 Month Two
FREE Utilizes
FREE Direct TV/Cable
FREE Air Conditioning
FREE Heating
FREE Water/Phone
FREE Fishing out back
FREE Ride to GA
See Website Photos
Call now 786-234-5683

HOLIDAY SPECIAL
$100 Weekly Moves you in.
Cable, air. 786-286-7651


North Miami Area
In private home.
Call 305-638-4421

ROOMS FOR RENT
Utilities, weekly rates.
305-303-2644


$1000 MOVE IN SPECIAL
1,2,3,4 Bedrooms available,
please call 786-326-8280

10741 SW 150 TERRACE
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1000 month, no Section 8,
call 305-267-9449

12617 SW 211 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1100 monthly. Section 8 wel-
come. 305-685-6305

12920 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
security bars, spacious yard,
ceiling fans, stove, refrigera-
tor, asking $1000, first, last
and security. Call 786-312-
0882 or 305-685-9581.

13001 N.W. 18th Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,'
$1300 monthly, no Section 8,
call 786-412-1131.

1340 N.W. 88th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air and tiled. $1299,
first and last. 786-315-3193

1341 NW 58 Terr.
Three bedroom, one bath-
room $1150. One bedroom,
one bathroom $650. 954-
993-8240.

1410 NW 195th STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
one car garage. $1300
monthly, no section 8. Call
305-267-9449

151 St NW 18 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
FL room, utility room, central
air, Section 8 welcome, Sales
Alvin, Inc. 954-430-0849.

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750, air. 305-642-7080

15720 N.W. 28th Place
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, $1295. No Section
8. 954-274-6944.

17328 NW 62ND PLACE
Four bedrooms, two and half
baths, new kitchen, spacious,
gated community, call 786-
543-3695

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
Upstairs, one bdrm., $750
mthly utilities included, $950
to move in, 305-525-0619.

2081 Wilmington Street
Opa Locka Area. Two
bedrooms. $850 monthly.
786-317-1463

2320 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security.
Call Waymon'786-877-1046.

2360 N.W. 140th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
first and last. $1200 monthly.
Curry 786-985-3074.

2424 N.W. 43rd Street
Affordable rent, three bdrms,
two baths, 786-382-8005.

253 NW 46th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath and
porch, $750 monthly, $1500
to move in.
Call 305-687-7290

2545 N.W. 167 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1450 monthly. 786-319-
8184

2770 N.W. 153rd Terrace
Three bedrooms, central air,
$1195. No Section 8. Call for
list. 954-274-6944.

288 N.W. 51 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1000 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air. Call Joel
786-355-7578

3150 N.W. 43 St
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, air. Section 8
OK! 786-256-2275

337 N.E. 82 Street
Nice large three bedrooms.
Must see inside. Background
check. $1075 monthly.
Call 305-754-5728

344 N.W. 53RD STREET
Two bedrooms,central air,
$695, Call 786-431-5520

3500 N.W. 203 Street
Three bedrooms, garage.
Section 8 Welcome.
786-357-8885

3620 N.W. 169 Ter
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-302-2004

41 Street N.W. 5 Avenue
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776


8250 NW 2ND COURT
One bedroom, one bath, $700
monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

HOMESTEAD AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced in house, large patio,
Section 8 accepted. Call 305-
431-7548

MIAMI GARDENS
Four bedrooms, two and a
half bath, single family home.
$1550 monthly.
305-962-6970

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly. Call 954-798-
6808.

MIRAMAR
Section 8 Welcome
2948 Tarpon Drive
Three bedrooms, two baths,
pool, garage. $1500 monthly.
Call Patrick
All Points Realty
305-542-5184

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five and a half bedrooms,
three baths, central air, family
dining and laundry room, big
yard, fire place. Section 8 Ok!
$1950 monthly.
Call 305-992-6496

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Six homes to choose from
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1000 to $1300, air, bars,
$3000 to $3900 move in.
No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

SOUTH, Richmond Heights
Two bedrooms, one newly
renovated bath, large kitchen,
family room and dining area,
$1000 monthly, no Section 8,
Call 305-205-0482

TALLAHASSEE
Furnished house for short
time stay. 305-318-6939.


WE SPECIALIZE IN
SECTION 8 HOUSING
Two and three bedrooms
. available lor immediate oc-
cupancy 702-448-0148






1041 N.W. 74TH STREET
Calling All Investors! Motivat-
ed Seller! Three bdrm, one
bath. Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101

13001 N.W. 18th Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$21 OK or best offer, call:
786-412-1131

14622 NW 13 Road
Four bedrooms, central air,
try $1900 down and $1295
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.

1725 NW 132 Street
Two bedrooms, two baths,
huge den, a perfect "10".
Try $4900 down and $1558
monthly-FHA 786-306-4839.

1951 N.W. 94TH STREET
Three bdrm., two bath, cozy
home with huge yard.
Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101

400 Opa Locka Boulevard
East of 1-95 N.W. 137 St.
Renovated three bdrms, two
baths, tile, air, family room.
Seller pays FHA closing cost.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

Don't Call Me
Unless you're SERIOUS
about buying a home and
have been told NO! Call EB
786-991-4767

NO QUALIFYING
NO CREDIT CHECK
Three and four bedrooms
houses. Owner financing.
Only $2900 down.
786-306-4839

NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
room, two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedroom, two
bath, at an attractive price.
call
786-859-3772

Rent to Own or
Owner Will Finance
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, 1855 NW 132nd
Street, call 786-488-8617.


UNIVERSITY PARK
MIRAMAR
Two bedrooms, two baths,
two car garage plus office
Oversized master. 2200 sq.
ft. Near shopping, highways,
$190K, 305-992-7792.


YES!!! YES!l YES!!!
HERE'S HELP
TO OWN YOUR OWN
HOME NOWIII
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65.000
On Any Home
Also Available
HUD/VA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty



2162 N.W. 84 STREET
Ready to build, 4176 square
feet. Water and electric
ready. 786-201-0101






A/C AND HEAT
Great service, fast install, best
prices, call 305-969-2890 or
954-543-4021

Gene and Sons,Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathroom at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, apple ,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

HOME RENOVATIONS
Remodeling everything out-
side and inside your home,
call 305-969-2890

LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting soil.
Tony 305-491-4515

LOCAL ARCHITECT
Plans and permits, call 786-
276-8770

Minor's Car Care Center
808 N.W. 71 Street
Miami, Florida
Where Service is the Best!
Specializing in All Automotive
Needs, Auto Body Repairs
and Frame Straightening.
Walk In or Appointments.
Lenford 786-488-4370,
Patrick 786-506-5936

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors, cabi-
net and lawn service. Moving
and hauling. 305-801-5690

Tony Roofing
Shingles, re-roofing, leak
repairs. 305-491-4515







Drivers: Quality Hazmat
Teams Needed!
Running FL to PA 2x Wkly.
Full Benefits. 401K.
Bonuses.
Eastern Freight Ways
800-428-6193 x234

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour


We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



Bar-Restaurant Equipment
Used tables, chairs, bar stool,
coolers, ice machines, stove
hood. 305-343-7817

LIVE LAUGH AND LOVE
Non-stop action, drama,
laughter, just send $12 to
Great Authors 1835 E. Hal-
landale Bch Blvd #580 Hal-
landale, FL 33099


INDIAN READINGS!!
Help on all problems,
relationships and mar-
nages. Help and advice on
fall problems Fast results
Ali the Indian Spiritualist.
removes bad luck from you
and your family. Call for
mini reading 305-621-9112,
305-788-0406- II




Be a Security Guard
786-333-2084
Or renew license $60, 40
hours $110 G and concealed
$150.


e








8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Reading thereality in your 401k statement


By Pam Cunningham

The .stock market took another
nose dive as the Dow Jones Indus-
trial average lost more than 500
points on Wednesday.
And more people are seeing it af-
fect their savings for retirement.
Third quarter earning reports for
many 401K plans are sitting in
your mailbox and many of you don't
want to open up that envelope.
IT business analyst, Marcy Boen
says, "It's just bleak right now, I'd
rather not look right now."
Book editor Meagan Lane says, "I
know that the stock market hasn't
been really healthy and I haven't
checked it yet. I've been a little bit
scared to check it."
People who are brave enough


to look are seeing losses as much
as 30 percent. But financial advi-
sors say this is part of investing in
stocks.
Portfolio Manager at Northwest
Bank & Trust Co., Dan Zude says,
"We know the market is going to go
up and down sharply right now,
but this happens about every ten
years."
While Wall Street is negative on
West 2nd Street in Davenport peo-
ple are staying positive.
34-year-old Lee Curry says, "Yeah,
I'm not worried I've got a long time
to go, I'm not worried about my in-
vestments at all."
Tim Buikema, 38, says, "Yes, I will
keep putting money in to the extent
it's allowed because it's part of my
long term investing strategy."


But time is not on everyone's
side.
Debbie Friederichs who works for
MidAmerican says, "I would like to
retire within the next 5 years, but I
probably won't be able to regardless
of what the market does."
Zude says he has been getting a
lot of concerned phone calls. And
he has advice based on when you
will need that money.
"I wouldn't be in favor of selling
out of stocks right now, but you
know if you're within 5 years of re-
tirement you might want to begin to
move some out of stocks and into
fixed income items."
For younger investors he says
maybe start looking at re-balancing
your 401k investments between
stocks and bonds-- maybe 60 per-


cent stocks, 40 percent bonds.
"Because it's the investments
that you make now that will pay off
sooner than the ones that you made
when the market was at it's peak
and everyone was happy."
Buikema says, "I'm not in a hurry
to get back into the market because
every time I think it's going to go
back up it goes back down, we'll see
what happens."
Zude says it is best to buy low
and sell high, but if you are over-
whelmed or not sure what to do at a
minimum it's better to do nothing.
The Employee Benefit Research
Institute reports that about 30 per-
cent of workers in the united states
have 401ks where they contribute
to their own accounts and their em-
ployers match a small percentage.


('rim could rigrr ig pubik trnmt I. wml%














Co pyrighte Material




Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers


Sd: ( ap rit r rkk.


* -*


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


IFB NO. 108049
CLOSING DATE/TIME:


FILM PROCESSING SERVICE
12:00 P.M., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008


Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.

Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 003571


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!
END THE INCONHVElIjErICE
OF EM. PTi [JEWVSFAf'ER
B ES, E F ijGHTirJC
THE WEATHER. AND
HuhlTilrc DuWN BACO.
COPIES
CALL
305-004-8214


$425 for 13 -
weeks in print
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


Mortgage applications sinking


MORTGAGE
continued from 5D

"They aren't willing to
make what usually for
most families is one
of the biggest ever fi-
nancial commitments
they're going to make."
The exceptions, he
says, are in markets
where home prices are
drastically reduced,
luring bargain hunt-
ers.
The Mortgage Bank-
ers Associations's pur-
chase applications in-
dex fell 10.9% to 279.3
the week ending Oct.
17, while its refinanc-
ing gauge tumbled
23.5% to 1,158.8.
A drop in the 30-year
mortgage rate of 19
basis points to an av-
erage 6.28% failed to
stem the slide in appli-
cations. This fixed rate
had jumped almost
half a percentage point
the prior week, in what
the MBA said was the
biggest one-week in-
crease in more than
five years.
The 30-year home


loan fixed rate this year
was as high as 6.59%
during the summer
and as low as 5.49% in
January, according to
the MBA.
The latest applica-
tions results include an
adjustment to account
for the Columbus Day
holiday Oct. 13.
The trade group says
the economy is in a re-
cession that will per-
sist until the middle of
next year.
"We expect, residen-
tial investment to de-
cline further through
the first half of 2009,
due to the excess of
supply of houses and
weakened demand
from the recession,"
Jay Brinkmann, the
MBA's chief economist,
said at the group's an-
nual convention in San
Francisco.
The housing sector
has more pain to en-
dure, Brinkmann said,
with the worst down-
turn in new home sales
and construction still
ahead and the foreclo-
sure rate set to rise.


ATTENTION SENIORS
BRAND NEW APTS
1.2 AND 3 BEDROOMS FROM $637*
Section 8 Welcome
CORAL PLACE APTS.
Apply At
Lafayette Apts
150 NE 79th St.
305-759-6350
*income restrictions apply
ADA, EHL


MIAM

2008 TAX ROLL OPEN FOR COLLECTION
Tc 2M0t8 lax rdcl f 'i-.-:,'3lc .'.int,' row wen or ,i::.i-T'cr
i-.r"I a ses as 5 e f J tkmaIanory 1!:!,mxl- Dectsr 31 bmmmO
.4We 00 e&wt, 1,
Earlf Payment Dirownts;
,4A It po l ,1 'r r*i ." ur'. r31, 2 1M
I'I paid by Janrary 31, 2OJ9
i",", :!:, c oD .Et.'ar2 2,200
.i'cc. i :`': j ki Mgrch
Propwy tiwes ibeconr O., inq"erfl ort Apfri l
Failure tn pay property taxes iwill rsut I addit ra Iitfrest, fees,
and penalties ando eoaTd sult in sos of pmopety,
h dt disoun[i period ords vn a Salupim'. sunday er asil Hioday.
-,.*-.-i~.'; -,m~t b1 mr n inf person to Ihe Ta< Co xs' Oi ice by th rnest

Payme tcan ber made
4 Onlhe tby E-cherk a l- y awriidpdvq-p
- !y al dteouniteos of urev laes aif deletmsiftsd Lty l3 dale
Sh Persn at eqtheer do^ ur Iwo lccslakan.


Main office
Tax Ce.:. clr:- a31 Office
140 Miest Rager Street,
a1-rI FL 1
?Mi-te FL -5,tl 30


South olce
Tax Cole1.r i B&-rch "rf:e
10710 &W. 211 Street
Room 104
F FL a31,


OAce -Hoi:urs: &00 a.m. 500J p.m. (excuding legal Holdsl
Make tcai:s payabte to Miatmi-Dade County Tax C lleclor
"l, *,',-" Fla.]fr Ei.'.=+
iari, FFork-da 33130
IPayment .ti ~a e in U.S. lunIs deat Ih.In a U.S. Bank)
To vYw amount due or make paymer *4a E-,'i.'.ing vsil tAf tcktS
w&bster .l: ww.miankiade.Qgv
for Fr rcqL.'. Tax formnaion call: 305-27.-1i"6 or vist
,w, rriarn- i -7 ,; .j-C.-t=C.n tr

Fefnando Casanayot
Tax Collector
Miarni-Dade County


i Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P.
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Edslathdined Sfi 1S53 Onle at I: olrl P.adillr Pra cfe
Ao OrM e Courlf ror w reant f ch;d CIaCirl
9. w ow.rolynhpaschairnd con

NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. Statc Rd 7. Ste 3A
M.Rma. FL 33747. Phcle 305. ,58-0591 Plantalion FL 33317 Phone: 954-880-8399

JACKSON NORTH MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
i1ormc'r, Prkway'i Medical Pl tti
16800 0N.W 2 Ave S' ?703
N Mllili Pi.I Fi H 331i9 *Ptrlnie: 30S-652-6095








BLACKS Musr CON FROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 9D THE MIAMI lIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


Tight limc booh s puNk col
- .. *


[Copyrighted Material!l



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers

(MI falh bM U2 to I7.mo th kow


emos doe.*maso.0 w N *o
em b
Q e


Is your money safe?


Not a dime in bank
deposits under the
Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp. Itmits
has ever been lost
since the FDIC got
going in 1934. But if
you're still uncertain,
here are a few steps to
take:
Find out more:
Get information on
your bank's financial
situation, if you own
shares in the bank and


are concerned about
your investment. You
can get a free report
on any bank or thrift's
financial health at
bauerfinancial.com.
Or, ask your bank
Your bank may be
more wiling to provide
it,, to combat rumors
that are circulating
about its health.
The rule for safety:
Keep your accounts
below the FDIC


minimum of $250,000
per depositor.
Remember to leave a
little room for interest
that might be paid that
would put you over the
limit.Then split your
money up and make
deposits at several
banks below the FDIC
limit. You can pick the
best deals, then link
your accounts online
to transfer money
easily


Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www. m iam idad e.gov/jobs
'TMv M i -a adc 0ur" :rmp' Try i-i cji i 'rS-vw m i QmtcT, 14)? Wi-;t
Ftagter Str~c, will be. clk~d permnrnt as of Friday, Nouvrmbr 7, 21i.1i.
..gSe .f L6tvi(.w jdjrr,.,II' dr ri I-.' ,iji'A. Ck'w itr Ir w
.L.utlh Flixfrilt Wiko-l n I r. C"f-- Crt-i..r
EOE/~I/DfVteramr' Pre-rfcce



CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENTFOR PROPOSALS
Sealed Proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive. Miami, FL 33133 for the follow-
ing:
RFP NO. 107050 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR CAMERA
SYSTEM UPGRADE AND EXPANSION
CLOSING DATE: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2008
(Deadline for Request for additional-information/clarification: 11/21/2008, at
2:00 P.M.)
A MANDATORY pre-proposal conference will be held on Friday, November 14.
2008 at 10:00 A.M. at the Miami Police Department, 400 N.W. 2nd Avenue,
Miami. FL 33128. The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Propos-
ers an opportunity to present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the
requirements of the proposal documents. It is mandatory that a representative
(s) of the proposer attend in order to qualify to submit a proposal.
Details of this Request for Proposal (RFP) is available on the City of Miami,
Purchasing Department, website at www.miamiqov.com/procurement. Tele-
phone No. is (305) 416-1904.
THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pete Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 003570 .


JOIN' .OUR'
BUSINESS&SERVICE ONNECTIO


* i -


There's this bank you


can rely


on, with rates


you can thrive on.


Our :,aiit" ril tlrii'e Ri.,>"iurli 1 all Tirws .0, u
f.-.n'i '.11 ,.h.- t ref'lly Timall<.'t. Re.'wardin You[!
J 1 !! 1 C ., rIl.., i' .. (Ji' .

C l'-i l Bar k i pIlea se to pr',id-le the .i-grate'. a'.'alable
le'el of firn -cial s.-Ec r t,' to our *-,:u5tomer i 1 cl ding:
SUln m ted FDIC P c.',eage or al personal and business
ri'-. r:r'1 i 'r-.:orT ar,,-curt% Tha. no not earn irtpr-.t
l-,-res FI-:IC .- e,.3ge from -1 ,U.i'0 r. 5J'-U -.,Li per
dpi,.-.'il,' for depaoits other than non-inter- isl earingl
accounts'
FDIC coverage upto S25 L,0,"', on all retireniEnt cepJsit
accounts
'k i ,!tuiJ! 1r1.n ;PKM


(col ::,i i.al has more "h-, I60 :Of ics o Serve you in
Suii,, Florida. To find a location near' you,
v ,,.;..... ..r..,., ::,i.,....i r aC ll (877) 50 2- 22 65.


!.ti% ? Kl f2 I. o f : illmiaT I Th .i tffwt i wvn f'U f i l.fM,,t lim,,v .s i tl %vW0 l Airt olffllh t
idwrtliwilt _'iA-*i,,.al tliiij ;vaL-,{r ut iwily v, ilh- rd u,., Paisiz. tFund uih d i'r-a
c W Ai Mal mi AAgAil *Jm d ti r ,


Colonial s Great CDL) Rates:





4.30 APY

13-month CD)
,. ,1 . , 4 Y





4.50 %AP Y


4-mnonth CD
, a i vl al aI .i at i I i 6 5l 6 6l ,q


I )L(O)NL-, RALNK
S* ,'t like it here.
-V in hi' a. **i- k-.,! F Mrin fr l


t I


kbctes


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008









2 MuO


Available"


Copyri




0 Syndii




from Co


S rrasur btwgins dishing


out financial rewur fund%



ghted Material




cated Content ..




mmercial News Providers.


Srvey fis 9ewatoiu diueferces


I" .;; Ir


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!

END THE
INCONVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
8 0 OX ES ,
FI G HTING
THE WEATHER
AND
HUNTING
DOWN BACK
COPIES


CALL
305-694-6214


- -
-* .


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2008


COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2ND FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS. 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E.-19AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH.

All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council
with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall
insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may he based (f/s 286.0105): 2) In accor-
dance with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the
City Clerk no later than two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305)
787-6001 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305)
948-2909 for assistance.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 97050 INVITATION FOR BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF
SAILING BOATS, EQUIPMENT AND TRAILERS
FOR THE CITY OF MIAMI SAILING CAMP

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement, Telephone No.
(305) 416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO. 12271.

Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager LOGO


AD NO. 002343


Your pension may be in trouble


While millions of
Americans agonize over
retirement investments
in stocks that have
dropped 40 percent or
more over the past year,
workers with seemingly
safer defined-benefit
pensions promised by
their employers also
have growing reason
to be concerned. More
and more companies
are falling behind in
the investments needed
to keep those pension
promises, and more and
more are considering the
option of terminating
their pension programs
to save money.
Congressional actions
needed to help preserve
employees' pensions by
changing rules to allow
companies to offer plans
that are easier to fund.
Otherwise, agrimerosion


in traditional plans is
likely to accelerate. In
2004, about 20.6 million
workers participated in
traditional retirement
plans, down from
30.1 million in 1980,
according to the
Employee Benefit
Research Institute.
Many companies
have replaced their
traditional plans with
defined-contribution
plans, in which they
match their workers'
contributions to 401(k)
market investments.
There is no promise of
retirement income with
defined contributions.
The costs for
corporations to fund
traditional pensions
in the face of plunging
market values are
awesome. Last week,
Lockheed Martin Corp.,


the Maryland-based
defense giant, cut its
earnings forecast,
blaming a 25 percent
drop in retirement
investments this year.


Boeing Co. estimated its
pension fund was down
20 percent this year,
likely forcing it to cough
up $100 million more
to meet its obligations.


MIAM 3

Community Meeting Calendar
Public Notice
Neighborhood Stabilization Program
Title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 appropriated $3.92
billion for assistance to state and local governments for the redevelopment of
abandoned and foreclosed homes. State and local governments may use the funds
to purchase, redevelop or demolish foreclosed and abandoned homes and
property. The funds can also be used to offer down payment and dosing cost
assistance to low- to moderate-income homebuyers, State and local governments
will also have the ability to create "land banks" to assemble, temporarily manage,
and dispose of vacant land to encourage re-use or development of property.
Miami-Dade County has been allocated $62,207,200.
Pursuant to the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 and subsequent
regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
(HUD), Miami-Dade County is required to submit a Substantial Amendment to the
2008 Action Plan to demonstrate how allocated funding would be used based on
the Act,
The Miami-Dade County Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED)
is holding two community meetings to obtain comments and input on the County's
proposed Substantial Amendment to the 2008 Action Plan as it relates to the
Neighborhood Stabilization Program.
October 30
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
South Dade Government Center, Conference Room 203,
10820 SW 211 Street
November 6th
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Joseph Caleb Center
5400 N.W 22Avenue # 110
Multiple members of individual Community Councils may be present. Miami-Dade
County provides equal access and opportunity in employment and does
not discriminate on the basis of disability in its program or services. For material
in an alternate format, a sign language interpreter or other accommodations, please
call the Office of Community and Economic Development at 769-469-2112 least
five (5) days in advance.


The Georgia
Witch Doctor
& Root Doctor
"Powerful Magic"
I Remove evil spells, court and jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.
Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown
P.O. Box 50964 Albany GA. 31705


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The-Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


. ". .. .... DDE U I


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


029-JJ11 11/18/2008 Fire Suppression System Retrofit
and Additional Services

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 29-NOVEMBER 4, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


T:




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