Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00568
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 22, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00568
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

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One Family Serving Since 1923



Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties

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DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 9 MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)



OBAMA TAKES CENTER STAGE



FOR CHANGE IN MIAMI

See Story on page 4A































-Miami Times Photo/S Charite

*** Athalie Range leaves

Irving flies the InspirationII ss

Hundreds watch the bird to be remembered
fly at the Opa-locka Airport on our Streets
By Sandra J. Chariteho
scharite@miamitimesonline.com P I n e o or d .

going to summer camps, watching television
or surfing the internet, a group of students B is c ayne B o le ar
throughout Miami-Dade high schools spent
their summer days building a plane. By Sandra J. Charite

gram led by Cap. Barrington Irving's non-profit When the 5000 Role Models of Excellence, spearheaded by
Experience Aviation Inc. incollaboration it Sen. Frederica S. Wilson (D-FL 33rd), held their Martin Luther
Experience Aviation Inc. in collaboration with King Jr. Breakfast in 2006, they announced that they want-
the George T. Baker Aviation School. The pro- "g T ed to honor the late M. Athalie Rnge. The group was over-
gram is designed to encourage inner-city kids, ., ed to honor the late M. Athalie Range. The group was over-
gram is designed t o make mor e of their li nnercity kids whelmed with suggestions and ideas on how to honor Range,
to make more of their lives and dreams. but after careful consideration they decided to name a Boule-
A project that would typically take a year to vard after Athalie Range.
construct, the students were able to build the The Miami-Dade County Commissioners began a resolution
plane in 10 weeks. A plane for Irving, 24, to in March 2007, urging the Florida Legislature to designate
fly. On Wednesday morning, hundreds Barrington prepares to test fly Inspiration II built by students participating in Biscayne Boulevard from Northeast 54th Street to Northeast
Please turn to IRVING 4A the Build and Soar program. -Miami Times Photo/S Charite Please turn to RANGE 8A



Race for the Cure makes it a 'Pink Day'


Miami to help fight breast cancer A4 .


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Whether you were a mother,
sister, daughter, aunt, or
grandmother, you might have
been one of many people who
crowded Bayfront Park in
Downtown Miami on Saturday
morning to participate in the
thirteenth annual Susan G.
Komen Race for the Cure, an
organization helping to fight
against breast cancer.
The Kunien Foundation


reported that an estimated
182,460 new cases of breast
cancer are expected to occur
among women in the United
States in 2008 and close to
41,000 women will die from
breast cancer. In 2007, over
19,000 new cases of breast
cancer and almost 6,000
deaths occurred among Black
women.
A survivor of breast cancer,
Maureen Phillips said, "I have
been participating in the race
Please turn to CANCER 4A


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Powell endorsement wi


ll, NIVAK1IM


mean more in years ahead
When you think about it, Colin Powell's endorsement
of Barack Obama should come as no surprise. Not
because, as some small minds reason, the former
secretary of State and Democratic presidential candidate are
both African-American. Nor did Powell, a Republican, do it
to get even with the Bush administration he once served for
making him the foil for its rush to war in Iraq.
There was nothing petty about the choice Powell announced
Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press. It is a logical extension of his
view of America's role as the world's dominant force for good.
In telling moderator Tom Brokaw that Obama is his choice
for president, the man who was the most respected member of
the Bush administration laid out a domestic "Powell doctrine."
The next president, he said, should be someone who has the
ability to inspire and reach out to all Americans, and has the
rhetorical ability and the substance to lead the nation and the
world during troubled times.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE
Powell's endorsement of Obama amounts to a prescription
for civilian leadership at a critical time that complements the
first Powell doctrine, which he articulated after the United
States went to war in 1991 to oust Iraqi forces from Kuwait.
While serving as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Pow-
ell said this country should send its troops into combat only
when America's vital interests are at stake. And in such a situ-
ation, he said, we should use decisive force to achieve a clearly
defined victory and exit strategy.
Back then, Powell wanted to win a war. Now he wants to
secure the future of our nation. He sees Obama as "a trans-
formational figure" among a new generation of world leaders
who, more than John McCain, can lead America at the critical
juncture in our history. And so the more important question
isn't why Powell endorsed Obama, but whether his endorse-
ment will have a significant impact, coming as it did slightly
more than two weeks before Election Day.

A DECIDED COUNTRY
I don't think so. The die is cast in this contest. While the
outcome might not appear certain, I suspect that the vast ma-
jority of Americans even those who claim to remain uncom-
mitted have decided how they'll vote Nov. 4.
If we can believe what people are telling pollsters, Obama
already enjoys the backing of nearly every black voter, and he
has a 14 percentage point lead over McCain among women and
a 5 point edge with men. He also leads McCain among voters
of every age category and education level, according a recent
Gallup Poll. McCain has a 4 point lead over Obama with white
voters but trails Obama by 10 points among independents.
By endorsing Obama at this late point in the campaign, Pow-
ell has just thrown some red meat to the news media's chat-
tering class too many of whom cover the presidential race
like the hapless band of newsmen who reported on an African
war in Scoop, Evelyn Waugh's satirical novel about the jour-
nalism profession. For them, Powell's endorsement is a big
story, but in truth it will have more historical importance than
political impact,
From a political perspective, the Obama train had already
left the station and was hurtling toward the finish line when
Powell got onboard. But as a matter of history, his decision
to back Obama could make the second Powell doctrine as an
important a prescription as the first.
By DeWayne Wickham


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Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Sireet,
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H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder 1923 1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Edilor 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES. SR., Pulishner Emerius
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


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BY GEORGE E, CURRY, NNPA


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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press5 believes thaT America can besi lead the word trorm racial and national aniagoni.r,-m hen it accord I0
ever~, person, regardless ol race creed or color is, or her riuman and leial righiS Hai.n rio personr leaning no peron [he
Blacl Pres- sinves to help every person in t-e lirm biiell trial all persons are hun as long a- anyone i held arck
Ap "--- N
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re them

pletely reassure the fretters
Looking back, some observers
say pollsters got it wrong with
Bradley not because White vot-
ers lied to pollsters, but because
they failed to factor in the absen-
tee ballots. Whatever the reason,
some researchers think that's
less likely to happen today.
According to the New York
Times: "In a new study, Daniel
J. Hopkins, a postdoctoral fellow
at Harvard, considered 133 elec-
tions between 1989 and 2006
and found that Blacks running
for office before 1996 suffered a
median Bradley effect of 3 per-
centage points. Blacks running
after 1996, however, performed
about 3 percentage points better
than their polls predicted."
As the debate continues about
whether the Bradley effect is val-
id, the McCain camp continues
to exploit the issue of race.
When Obama's name has been
mentioned at McCain-Palin ral-
lies, there have been cries of "Kill
him!" and "Off with his head!"


Obama does great in polls but don't believe


According to the polls, Barack
Obama is steadily widening his
lead over Republican rival John
McCain to become the next
president of the United States. A
Washington Post-ABC News poll
released Monday shows Obama
with a 53 percent to 43 percent
lead among likely voters.
There is only one problem -
don't believe the polls.
As the Washington Post not-
ed in a story on its poll, at this
stage in 1992, Bill Clinton held
a 14-point lead over President
George H.W. Bush yet he won
by only 6 percent. In mid-Oc-
tober 1976, Jimmy Carter held
a 13-point lead over incumbent
Gerald Ford but won by only two
points.
When the issue of race is
added to the mix, conventional
wisdom which is often neither
conventional nor wise goes out
of the window.
Uppermost in the minds of
African-Americans is the Brad-
ley effect, named after former


Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley,
who sought to become governor
of California in 1982. Even last-
minute polls showed him lead-
ing by a wide margin of victory.
Yet, Bradley narrowly lost the
election to Republican George
Deukmejian. Many say it was
because White voters lied to
pollsters about their willingness


of people questioning the prem-
ise of the Bradley effect.
In a story headlined, "Do Polls
Lie About Race?" New York
Times reporter Kate Zernike
wrote: "But pollsters and politi-
cal scientists say concern about
a Bradley effect some call it
a Wilder effect or a Dinkins ef-
fect, and plenty call it a theory in


s there still enough racism in America to prevent a black man
from being elected president no matter what?


to vote for an African-American.
But it wasn't just, as John Mc-
Cain would say, that one.
Pre-election poll also over-
stated the margin of victory for
Harold Washington in Chicago,
David Dinkins in New York City
and Doug Wilder in Virginia.
But Bradley's race predated
the Internet and cell phones and
before Black music did more to
erase racial barriers than any
presidential speech. In fact,
there are an increasing number


search of data is misplaced. It
obscures what they argue is the
more important point: there are
plenty of ways that race compli-
cates polling.
"Considered alone or in com-
bination, these factors could
produce an unforeseen Obama
landslide with surprise victo-
ries in the South, a stunningly
large Obama loss, or a recount-
thin margin. In a year that has
already turned expectations
upside down, it is hard to com-


BY RON:WALTEBSNNr N .-
- .--.- ~ ~~ : .; :. .


_ f -_
-, 4


Understanding the Bradley effect and its


As the election has drawn near-
er, there has been an inevitable
debate about the way in which
race will play out, even spoil the
result, and in that respect the so-
called "Bradley Effect" Whites
saying they will vote for a Black
candidate to pollsters, but not do-
ing so when they go to vote may
play a role.
I have been in the camp which
says that the Bradley Effect may
determine the election, to the
point that I doubted Michele
Obama who told Larry King on his
TV show recently that if there was
a Bradley Effect, Barack Obama
would not have won the primary
election. Trying to reconcile vari-
ous stains of this complex issue,
the primary elections do stand as
something of a refutation that is
a Bradley Effect at play, but look-
ing deeper, there are other things
as well.


I think there is a unique emo-
tional content in this election that
is driving it beyond the normal
cues we use to determine the out-
come of elections. In fact, I have
used the term "landslide" several
time out of respect for what I have
seen on almost every indicator to


this time.
Then there is the "fed-up" vote,
those who are just tired of Repub-
licans screwing up the country and
are ready for to vote for a change
of course. Finally, there are the
latecomers to Obama, made fear-
ful of how the Republicans have


ace is present in this election to the point that every survey this
year has told us that whites and blacks still see things very dif-
ferently in society


determine the result of this one.
The emotional content I am sug-
gesting consists of several factors.
There is the historic possibility
that Barack Obama will become
the first Black President of the
United States, a fact that will drive
his numbers up from the 87% giv-
en John Kerry into the 95% range


mis-managed the economy to the
point that their lives are in finan-
cial jeopardy.
So, I now feel that most certainly
there will be a Bradley Effect, but
that it will be overwhelmed by sev-
eral factors.
First, the emotional content of
the campaign showed up in the


BY BILL FLETCHER JR, NNPA


results W

primary election po:'ling In those
states that were over 25 percent
Black such as Maryland, Ala-
bama, South Carolina, Georgia,
the polling underestimated the ac-
tual turnout of Black voters. This
makes me conclude that in those
states under 25 percent, pollsters
did not accurately sample the
smaller Black populations.
Second, the Democratic registra-
tion advantage that I have alluded to
previously is large and growing, and
the only question is whether this
advantage will be reflected in the
turnout. I suggest that the unique
emotional quality of this election
will propel people to the polls such
that this advantage will be reflected
in the turnout.
Third, the huge Democratic regis-
tration advantage is comprised of a
large proportion of young voters who
could set records for the manner in
which they turnout in this election.


.5
~'~':


Frank talk at election time, a discussion on race


I work for a union called
the American Federation of
Government Employees (AFGE).
It represents more than 600,000
Federal government employees. It
is a racially diverse union, and is
also diverse when it comes to the
political views of the members.
In the current presidential
debate, it is on record supporting
the candidacy of Senator Obama.
That is the good news.
The not-so-good news is that
there are a considerable number
of White members and non-
members (though represented by
the union) who are unenthusiastic
about the Obama candidacy.
Despite the fact that Senator
McCain has a horrible voting
record on veterans' issues (which
affect many of our members) and
the fact that McCain is ready to
privatize anything that he can
touch, there are White union
members who believe that they
share something special with the
Senator from Arizona.
The president of AFGE is a


White man named John Gage. He
is an enthusiastic supporter of
Senator Obama. It is interesting
to see that sort of support from
a White man. He is fit to be tied
that any union members would
vote from a mindset affected by
prejudice be it racial, gender


is largely addressed toward the
ugly head of prejudice rearing its
head and workers being crushed
by the policies that we have
experienced under the last eight
years of Bush.
This is a courageous step and
I say that not because I work for


Regardless of who wins the Presidential elections this November, the
reality is that a discussion on race and the history of race and other
forms of prejudice in the USA has been forced upon this country.


based or "other".
What is interesting about
Gage is that he does not beat
around the bushes: as far as he
is concerned, the ugly head of
prejudice has been reared and
there are those workers, and not
just or mainly in AFGE, who are
prepared to vote with their fears
rather than their hopes.
So, the other day I received a
call from President Gage. He read
me a statement that he is going
to release on radio stations. It
is a powerful statement and it


this union. The reality is that too
many unions for too many years
ignored the existence of racism
and sexism within their ranks.
Leaving aside the unions that
until 1964 kept workers of color
outside of their ranks, there has
been an intense fear by many,
if not most White male union
leaders that any discussion of
race or gender bias would prove
to be divisive.
The result? Absolute denial of
the fact that workers are already
divided and that the key question


a7t


is what steps can be taken to
address that divide and build
long-term unity.
In the midst of the 2008
Presidential election, growing
numbers of White union leaders,
such as John Gage, are actually
speaking out on the question of
racism, sexism and every other
"ism".
As many AFGE leaders have
opined, there are many good
reasons to vote FOR Senator
Obama, while there is one very
bad reason to vote against him:
race. Yet for me, as a Black man,
for all that is positive in White
union leaders taking these steps,
we must acknowledge that the
union movement would probably
be in a very different place if
it had not attempted to hide
from discussions of race, not to
mention, hiding from carrying
out consistent anti-racist work
to overcome structural, systemic
discrimination that has kept
workers of color all too often in a
second class status.


'I


















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


BYR.INAlMLYNE


McCain finally finds

a use for Sarah Palin


In the midst of' two wars,
the worse economic decline in
decades, banking crisis, ris-
ing unemployment, and host
of other problems, John Mc-
Cain has finally found a suit-
able job for his running mate
- she is going to be a-come-
dian on Saturday Night Live.
Come on, it's perfect. She is
given a script, she can wear
her hairdo, and it does not
require too much thinking.
During the Last Great De-
pression, McCain pointed out
the American people needed
laughs and comedians were
an important part of our cul-
ture.
In stark contrast, lifelong


to have her 'run-
ning around the
Whitehouse winking at him
during Cabinet meetings.
While I try to make light of
a serious situation. It is now
time for us to take the crisis
that we are facing seriously.
Bush won the Presidency by
winning Florida by 600 votes.
That number of votes is small-
er than the first service of
most good size Black church-
es. In order to avoid a repeat
of the Bush fiasco, we need to
vote early, bring our neighbor-
hoods, children, grandmother,
prayer group, PTA, fraternity,
sorority, church family and
even our stupid cousin to the


W while I try to make light of a serious situation. It is
now time for us to take the crisis that we are fac-
ing seriously.


SBY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA


Breast cancer: Black women more likely to die


October is Breast Cancer
Awareness Month. Millions of
women are sporting pink ribbon
pins in support of a month when
organizations like the Susan G.
Komen Foundation fundraise
and galvanize people around the
quest for a cure for breast cancer.
They are right to raise awareness
- more than 184,000 women will
be diagnosed with breast cancer
in the United States in 2008, and
more than 40,000 will die from
breast cancer.
While Black women are less
likely than White women to get
breast cancer, we are more likely to
die from it. The morbidity rate for
White women is 9.4 per 100,000,
compared to 15.4 per 100,000 for
Black women.
Additionally, Black women
often are diagnosed with breast
cancer when they are younger,
and when Black women under 55
are diagnosed with breast cancer;
it is more likely to have deadlier
effects. Researchers are studying
the reasons why Black women
are so much more vulnerable
than other women are to breast


cancer. But the findings make it
important for Black women to get
regular mammograms and to deal
with other aspects of our health.
Whenever there are health
awareness weeks or months,
whether they are for breast
cancer, muscular dystrophy,


and the higher incidence of other
diseases in our community.
Black women are more likely
than any other population, in
2008, to be diagnosed with HIV/
AIDS. When another population
was most likely to be diagnosed,
HIV/AIDS awareness garnered


It is important to note that for all the challenges women face
with breast cancer in the United States, health care access is
even more limited in developing countries.


diabetes, or another cause, I crave
attention to the broader issue of
health care and health access. We
can take a slice out of the health
care challenge by focusing, in
October, on breast cancer, but the
fact is that part of Black women's
increased vulnerability to breast
cancer is a result of differential
access to health care and health
services.
Too many Blacks lack health
insurance. Too many wear the
stress of racism in poor eating
and living habits, and it shows up
with obesity, high blood pressure,


headlines. Now, too many are silent
about this disease, unless they are
talking about the international
incidence of HIV/AIDS.
It is not clear why our nation
has not galvanized around the
health care issue. To be sure, both
presidential candidates have ideas
about health insurance and health
care; their plans are divergent.
In my humble opinion, Hillary
Rodham Clinton had one of the
best health care plans we've seen
in a long time, reflective of the work
she has spent on health care since
she worked on it as First Lady in


from it

the Clinton Administration.
Senators Obama and McCain
would be advised to review her
plan and incorporate aspects of
it into their own work. Somehow,
every American must have access
to preventive health care, and
protection from bankruptcy when
they are diagnosed with expensive
diseases. And somehow, as we
raise awareness bout breast
cancer, we must also raise
awareness about the ways breast
cancer incidence is intertwined
with the status of our health care
system.
Breast cancer awareness has
an international dimension. Hala
Moddelmog, President of the
Susan G. Komen for the Cure,
indicates that 10 million people
will die in the next 25 years absent
intervention around breast cancer.
Last year, the Komen organization
held a global advocacy summit in
Hungary, and announced pilot
programs in Eastern Europe,
Latin America, Africa, and the
Middle East. This month, they
sent delegations to Ghana and
Tanzania.


Republican, General Colin
Powell, a friend of John Mc-
Cain for 25 years, endors-
es Senator Barack Obama.
One of Powell's concerns
was the poor judgment Mc-
Cain showed in choosing Pa-
lin and McCains see-sawing
policy initiatives on how to fix
the economic crisis. McCain
noted that one of the flaws of
General Powell was that he
was too intelligent, and took
the choice of Vice President
- way too seriously. McCain
personally likes .her hairstyle
and thinks it would be cute


polls. If the Afr
turns out in force
tor Obama has
sibility of winning
vote early so yc
any last minute
prevent you frorn
time to change tl
this country, so
the Second Grea
it is time to chat
tion of this co
more young Am(
a useless war, a:
time to send Sa
to Alaska, where
back to Moose c


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ican diaspora
:e, then Sena-
the real pos-
ig Florida. So
)u don't have
nrnhlems that


BY MARC H. MORAL, NNPA


No voter meltdown on historical election day


voting. It is In recent years, the American
he direction of people have endured all man-
we can avoid ner of natural and man-made
it Depression, disasters, including hurricanes,
nge the direc- tornados, floods, droughts, fires
e, and now an economic meltdown
untry, so no
ericans die in of epic proportions.
rid finally it is While some damage from
ra Pal back these events is inevitable, the
ra Palin back
e she can go lack of government and citizen
eg. preparedness has increased the
ing devastation caused by these ca-
lamities.
The $700 billion bail-out
package that was signed into
law last week will hopefully fix
some of the damage caused by
Wall Street greed and lax gov-
ernment oversight. That bill
was better than the Administra-
tion's original plan, but it is far
from perfect and still does not
do enough in our view to pro-
tect homeowners who are facing
foreclosure. With the presiden-
tial election of 2008 less than a
month away, voters must ask
S 1 themselves two important ques-
Stions: First, which candidate
has the best long-term solution
OIVlIIVl tfor fixing our economy and help-
ing American families and hom-
eowners get back on their feet.


And second, are we prepared as
citizens on November 4 to make
our voices heard, stand up for
our rights and make sure every
vote is counted.
With foreclosures continuing
to pile up and the loss of anoth-
er 159,000 jobs in September,
our country is facing the worst
economic crisis since the Great
Depression.
Wall Street may be breath-
ing a sigh of relief because of
the bailout package, but Main
Street is still waiting to exhale.
We will to have our say on No-
vember 4th.
That's why the National Ur-
ban League is launching an un-
precedented "Vote to Empower"
campaign focusing on the ur-
gent need for voter education,
increased participation and the
prevention of the kind of vote
suppression that has occurred
in the last two presidential
elections.
We are demanding that all
election officials uphold their
duties and do what is necessary
now and all the way to Election
Day to prevent any infringe-
ments on voting rights.


1 BY HARRY C. ALFORD, NNPA


For continued progress, we must continued the fight


The Great abolitionist and orator
Frederick Douglas made it clear
to us, "Power concedes nothing
without a demand... There must
be a struggle." Such is the way of
the world. Even the Biblical hero
David understood this when he was
confronted by the giant Goliath. The
12-year-old Black child didn't flinch
and plead for mercy. He popped a
rock upside the giant's head and
the rest was history.
Any positive "sea change" in the
status of Blacks in this world has
come from some type of noticeable
struggle. Columbus discovered the
new world for White Europeans in
1492. By 1525, slavery of Africans
and their trafficking to the new
world was in full swing. It continued
until we finally decided to fight it
and endure the struggles through
that vile slavery, Jim Crow and
apartheid. We had to fight to end it.
It is now 2008 and that formula has
not changed.
I make it very clear to white
conservatives who question the
motives of the National Black
Chamber of Commerce. Our
mission is to temporarily level the
playing field for progress whenever
the opportunity presents itself. I
guess I could scare the mess out of
them if I were to say, "We are going


to tilt the playing field our way for
the next 500 years like you have
done to us and then we can call it
even".
But no, instead I say, "Whenever
the playing field is level we succeed,
not only succeed but excel just
like we do on a basketball court
or football field. People of African
descent are the most resilient


that our people won't end up on the
"menu". I finally got my opportunity
to visit President George W. Bush at
the White House about the situation
and I looked him in his eyes and
said, "Sir, what has happened with
this procurement is wrong, terribly
wrong and has blocked my business
owners from any opportunity. Mr.
President, we can't sit by and take..."


Any positive "sea change" in the status of Blacks in this world
has come from some type of noticeable struggle.


human beings on earth history
shows it." I enjoy doing this at every
opportunity because it is true and
it irks them so. They are actually
afraid of us. This is why an "angry
Black man" is the most feared but
effective status in cultural America?
Muhammad Ali is the best example
of that.
Something that I will proudly
discuss with my grandchildren
will be the Katrina Recovery.
The government issued No Bid
Contracts to the "fat cats" and left
Black businesses in the cold.
I remembered my mentor, Parren
J. Mitchell, teaching me that we
must get to the "table" and when we
do make sure you REPRESENT so


(My voice increasing in passion). He
interrupted me and said, "Harry, I
agree, it is wrong, and I encourage
your business owners to go back to
those holding these big contracts
and they will see a different attitude.
They will also see a different FEMA
and HUD will respond accordingly.
Let me know if they don't."
What we saw in the next several
months was over $2 billion dollars
in contracting to Black firms
working the Gulf Coast Recovery. It
was a very, very sweet victory. Let
me also give credit to Congressman
Bennie Thompson who finally said
"Enough!" and used his position
as Chair of the House Homeland
Security Committee. HUD Secretary


Alphonso Jackson "
was perhaps the
Most Valuable Player in what he
forced the Governors of Mississippi
and Louisiana to do with HUD
funding in terms of diversity in
contracting. For this, the backlash
was immense and he was pushed
out of HUD not for malfeasance
but for doing the right thing. Yes,
in any battle some good "warriors"
will fall. But the most important
thing is that we win the majority of
battles and the culmination of the
war.
So now here we are with the
Economic Bailout and the same
jive is happening right before us.
Thus, we are going to fight again -
oh yes! We must fight. The Bailout
allows for No Bid Contracts just
like Katrina (can you believe that?).
There will be no Black businesses
getting contracts if we allow the
status quo.
This was done with the majority
of the Congressional Black
Caucus's approval. The NBCC is
putting together a "War Plan" and
will initiate it within the next few
weeks. Hold on for the ride because
we are not going to be subtle. The
CBC will be a good ally in the end as
they become aware of the facts we
are getting ripped off once again.


We are calling on governors
to verify that they have contin-
gency plans for all foreseeable
problems associated with the
predicted massive turnout. And
we are urging the President and
both political campaigns to an-
nounce a zero-tolerance for vot-
er suppression.
The National Urban League is
ready to do its part. As a start,


we are spotlighting areas of
concern and issuing our first
in a series of alerts and recom-
mendations for citizen action.
For example, in Michigan al-
legations have been made that
foreclosure lists will be used to
prevent citizens from voting. If
true, this means that victims of
foreclosure will lose their voting
rights.


Coconut Grove residents proved to developers and Mercy
Hospital that they still carry a lot of clout in Miami by forcing
the hospital to back off from that unsightly condo project called
300 Grove Bay Residences. Maybe the City Commission will
now cease to violate its own zoning rules

The brothers who owned the clinic involved in an $11 million
Medicare scam fled to Cuba and a doctor and nurse who worked
in the clinic were convicted of fraud here this week. So people are
wondering why Medicare has continued to allow the outdated
HIV infusion services and to pay hundreds of millions of dollars
yearly for the treatments because the agency still considers
them "reasonable and necessary" despite the fact they've
been rendered obsolete by antiretrovial drugs taken orally.
More than a dozen of the Benitez brothers' conspirators -
medical doctors, physician's assistants, clinic administrators,
billing operators have been convicted of defrauding the
federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled.
Is somebody being paid? Stay tuned.

We could be wrong, especially if the State of Florida is involved
in the final decision,, but the scene at early voting precincts
Monday reinforced a growing sense these last few months that
there's something profoundly different about this election,
could be history in the making?

This will no doubt be a record election. On Monday some
waited for up to three hours to vote and brought lawn chairs,
books and umbrellas with them. Election officials expect a
record number of people to vote early at 17 locations as both
presidential campaigns make major pushes to encourage
people to vote before November 4.

Gas prices continue to fall. On Monday, the statewide average
was $2.95 down three cents from Sunday and almost 36
cents since last week, according to the American Automobile
Association. The average pump price for regular hasn't been
this low since November when it was $2.98 a gallon.

Two of the principal players in the Miami-Dade fuel-farm
scandal that has been hanging since 2000 were sentenced last
week. Evens Thermilus was sentenced, Thursday to six months
of community control and two ears of probation, and required
to perform 500 hours of community service with Habitat for
Humanity.
Last week, Antonio Junior got the same deal, minus
the community service, for his guilty plea to one charge of
commercial bribery. His sentencing will be after the trial of the
last remaining defendants next month.
*********
Its long overdue so Florida's Attorney General said Wednesday,
he's going to wipe out debt-relief companies that are defrauding
Floridians in financial distress out of millions of dollars in fees
and charges. Bill McCollum warned consumers to beware of
companies that promise to dramatically reduce or eliminate
debt obligations. His office's economic crimes division has
taken legal action against five firms and has issued subpoenas
to more than two dozen more.










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


Obama discusses TPS for Haitians at Miami rally


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.corn

Sen. Barack Obama was wel-
comed to Miami at a "Early Vote
for Change" rally by a crowd
of thousands on Tuesday af-
ternoon, at the Bicentennial
Park in Downtown Miami. Sen.
Obama and his wife, Michelle,
urged voters to vote early.
"For the first time, people
have the opportunity to make
change in a way that we have
not seen for a very long time
and certainly I haven't seen in
my lifetime. We have early vot-
ing where people are coming
out in record numbers. I have
no doubt that we will win Flor-
ida but the key is to go out and
vote early," said Sen. Obama.
After the rally, Sen. Obama
briefly spoke to the media an-
swering questions on whether
he would grant Temporary Pro-
tective Status (TPS) to Haitians,
if he did in fact become the next
president of the United States.
During the summer, four hur-
ricanes: Faye, Gustav, Hanna
and Ike ravished the island of


Sen. Obama speaks to Miami Times Writer Sandra Charite outside Bicentennial Park in Down-
town Miami. -MiamiTimes Photo/S charite


Miami March for Change at rally on Saturday


The community is invited to
an Early Vote Rally and March
for Change on this Saturday,
October 25th, from 9 am to 1 pm
at the Joseph Caleb Community
Center, 2200 NW 54 Street. You
can early vote, be inspired and
have fun.
A parade of high school bands,
cars, elected officials and orga-
nizations will line up at 8 -am at
Charles R. Drew Middle School,
1801 NW 60th Street. Persons
interested in participating can
just show up and be a part of
the parade.
The parade begins at 10 am
along NW 60th from NW 19th
Avenue going west to NW 22nd


EDMONSON MINDINGALL
Avenue, then north to NW 54th
Street to the Caleb Center for
the big rally.
The rally will consist of free
refreshments, live music, com-
munity DJ's, National and local
speakers, line dancing and step-
pin', karaoke, and other enter-
tainment.


All organizations, marching
groups, girl and boy scouts,
unions, churches, businesses
and everyone of all ages are
urged to participate. For the
parade, you can march along,
drive your decorated car or just
watch.
To participate, interested per-
sons should contact Lt. John
Pace with the Federation of Black
Employees at 305-785-5137.
Invited officials include State
Rep. Dorothy Bendross-Mindin-
gall, County Commissioner Au-
drey Edmonson, other elected
officials, police and firefighters
associations, S.E.I.U., Miami
Fury and many more.


Haiti killing hundreds of people
and leaving many destitute on
the island. Sen. Obama said
that many Haitians are flee-
ing from the country because
the island lacks safety and op-
portunities to help individuals
progress. Many of Haiti's prob-
lems are economic and politi-
cal -- not just the natural di-
sasters, said Sen. Obama.
"I think that we have ne-
glected Haiti for too long. It is
important for us to not just
provide humanitarian relief
but examine TPS in the context
of our ,overall policy towards
Haiti. It is critically important
to understand that Haiti is not
just the function of natural di-
sasters. They have had a gov-
ernment and an economy that
is not working," said Obama.
"We need to work effectively
with the Haitian government to
create a better governance and
provide a better economic de-
velopment opportunity for the
island as a whole which will
help relieve some of the suf-
fering even when there is not a
hurricane."


Sen. Barack Obama embraces his wife Michelle at the early
voter rally in Miami on Tuesday.


Colin Powell
Retired Secretary of State


Obama


garners


Powell's


support

By Kathy Kiely

Barack Obama scored two
campaign coups Sunday: a re-
cord-shattering month of fund-
raising and the backing of for-
mer Republican Secretary of
State Colin Powell.
The long-anticipated endorse-
ment, which came with praise
for Republican John McCain
but harsh criticism of his neg-
ative attacks, gave Democrat
Obama perhaps the campaign's
most coveted endorsement.
"I think he is a transforma-
tional figure," Powell said of
Obama, vying to become the
nation's first black president,
on NBC's Meet the Press. "He's
crossing lines ethnic lines,
racial lines, intergenerational
lines."
Powell, who supported the
Iraq war despite misgivings,
acknowledged Obama's thin r6-
sum6. But "he is surrounding
Please turn to SUPPORT 5A


Sheniqua

Wallace

says breast

cancer has

changed her


Students at North Dade Middle
I A A School participate in PINK Week
I A SURVI VO in observance of Breast
Cancer Awareness Mopth'

Survivors share their stories "

at North Dade Middle School
By Sandra J. Charite *
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Sheniqua Wallace, a probation officer for the state of
life for Florida, was surfing through her television channels
one morning trying to find something to watch.
-the good. Although she usually watched the CBS Early Show,
she had come to realize many of the Black people had
Please turn SURVIVOR 9A


Barrington's students help


IRVING
continued from 1A

of people gathered at Opa-locka
Airport to watch Irving set out
to test fly the experimental
plane.
"I am so excited that he is
flying our plane," said Bacarri
Johnson, 16 who helped build
the plane.
At 23, Irving made history by
becoming the youngest and first
Black pilot to fly solo around the
world in 2007. The Jamaican
born and Miami Northwestern
alumni turned down a football
scholarship to pursue a career


in aviation.
The student's plane, Zenith
XL aircraft, was named Inspi-
ration II to honor the single-
engine Columbia 400 aircraft,
called Inspiration, helped Irving
complete his 30,000-mile flight.
"I flew around the world to show
other youth that anyone with a
dream who is willing to work
hard can achieve what others
consider impossible. With Build
& Soar, I wanted to give Miami
high school students a chance
to show the world what they
can do," said Irving.
Irving admitted that he was
a bit nervous before flying


tim soar again
the plane but he believed in
the work of his students. The
forced winds caused a delay for
Irving so he waited to receive
clearance from air traffic con-
trollers. Finally, he fastened his
seat belt and started the engine
to find himself at a halt due to
a loosened canopy. Irving tried
a second time and the bird was
in the air flying a thousand feet
around the Opa-locka Airport.
"This program has inspired
so many students, look at all of
these children who are out here
right now," said Barbara J. Jor-
dan, Miami-Dade Commission-
er of District 1, while awaiting


19,000 attend cancer cure "Pink Day"


CANCER
continued from 1A

for the past eight years and
hopes a cure for breast cancer
is in the near future." Wearing
her pink survivor shirt, Phillips
was one of the 700 survivors
that participated in the Walk.
The experience of watching
her aunt fight breast cancer,
Latoya Smith, 31, decided to


spend her Saturday to walk
for her aunt who is a survivor.
Smith .says that she will be
attending checkups with her
doctor to make sure that she
stays healthy. American Cancer
Society recommends clinical
breast exam should be part of
a periodic health exam for an
estimated three years for women
in their 20s and 30s, and every
year for women 40 and older.


Close to 19,000 people
attended the event in Bayfront
Park with their fathers,
husbands, sons, friends and
neighbors. Melvin Good believes
that breast cancer is not just
a woman's problem but it is
an issue that affects everyone
because almost everyone has
lost someone they know and
love to breast cancer. The fight
continues.


their own history, then

the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
Bringing the Kingdom of Heaven Down to Earth

Ji u m, J T. I nnie. n 1, l'r, P l.rna mi




Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 2008 Legal Clinic

As you well know, the foundation of our world revolves around societal expectations and limitations called LAWS.
A goal of this clinic is to get a comprehensive look into how municipal and county ordinances, state statutes and
federal laws are created and eventually affect our everyday lives from legislators at each level.
We will also provide information, insight and strategy to clarify and resolve many of the most prevalent issues and
ongoing questions in our community through seminars and Q&A in areas including:


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H111 IA N('(II
W 11.1. '1BE'iOVI l"lD )!!!
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Guest speakers include:
CongressLom3n Carrie P. Meek. former U.5 House Representative
Senator Fredenca S I D/son
Mi-mi-Dade County Court Judge Rodney Smith
Attorney Marion A. Hill of delancyhill, P A
Assistant State Attorney Kionee McGhee
Attorney Marva L. Wiley of Nar-3 L wIley, P.A.
Attorney Thomas G, Bowman of Thomas G Bowmnan, P.A.
Attorney C/a,re _ubran or L;t ye-s for Chdldren America


Come join us! Bring your family and friends.

Kymberlee Curry Smith, Esq.-Chairperson


t













Four years later, it still hurts when breast cancer hits home


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

For most of us, we remember
21 as being an age of freedom
in which we were legally able
to purchase alcohol but I re-
member 21 as a significant time
in my life when I lost my best
friend, my mom to breast can-
cer.
The death rate among Black
women with breast cancer are
41% higher than among white
women according to the Health
Council of South Florida in a
2008 report .
I can go back two years before
her diagnosis, I was a senior
in high school trying to get as
far away from Miami as best I
could by applying to colleges
like North Carolina University,
Georgia State University or even
New York University but she al-
ways told me, "you are not leav-


ing Florida." During the coming
months as graduation loomed,
she persuaded me to stay at
home for a year but I refused.
Miami was going to become a
closed chapter in my life but the
farthest I could go away from
home was Boca Raton.

LEAVING A
NURTURING MOTHER
My mother was always nur-
turing other kids and being her
last baby I didn't mind. I was in
college and living on campus my
freshman year. Knowing that
many college students some-
times struggle to have three
meals a day, niy mom would
cook then take the long drive to
my school, Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity, on the weekend with my
sister to distribute the food to
me and my roommates. The food
would not last one day because
she knew our heart's desire.


Hearing about her diagnose in
my sophomore year of college,
startled me, I was in denial. I
pretended that this was some-
thing that she concocted in
her mind. But why would she?
In time, she started to lose her
hair, her fingers turned dark,
she was always tired and con-
stantly vomiting. All were symp-
toms my aunt endured before
she died of cancer, when I was
eight years old. Even though my
mom was sick, she remained
beautiful and radiant.
I left school in October 2003.
Home did not feel like home be-
cause my mom was the bread-
winner and her spirit filled every
room in the house. But her ill-
ness drained her energy. My sis-
ter and I divvied up the chores
and took turns going with her
to the chemotherapy treatments
and radiation.
I actually enjoyed the Tuesday


and Wednesday train ride to the
Sylvester Comprehensive Can-
cer Center. I met the nurses and
other patients who were also di-
agnosed. It was an experience
that humbled and helped me
move out of the stage of denial
but into reality just realizing
that we were not the only family
going through this.

CANCER DOESN'T
UNDERSTAND COLLEGE
I returned to school in the
Spring of 2004, after making a
deal with my mom that I no lon-
ger regret because everything
happens for a reason. She went
back to work but I called her
everyday. I became her phone
stalker making sure that she
was alright. My attachment to
her helped our relationship grow
stronger than I ever expected.
She was no longer just my mom
but she was my friend,


I found myself home during
the summer of 2004 watching
my mother's body slowly dete-
riorate. Doctor after doctor and
nurse after nurse, she was not
getting better and once again I
visited the planet of denial. This
was untrue. I was trapped on
another world and it was time
for me to go home, but no . I
was home.
Finally, the doctor sat my
sister down and basically said
that there was nothing else
that could be done because the
cancer had spread throughout
her body. The chemotherapy
and radiation would no longer
work.

CANCER AND HOSPICE CARE
The doctor recommended
that my mom be put in Hospice
Care, it helps patients accept
death as the final stage of life.
The news would devastate my


family because my mom kept
her illness hidden from the rest
of the family so my sister had to
be the one to drop the bomb.
After a week of Hospice, my
mom died with me standing
next to her hoping that she
would wake up once again like
they do in the movies. I was en-
gulfed with anger and sadness
just knowing that the two year
battle had finally come to an
end.
Fours years later, memories
keep me afloat. Breast cancer
has taken the lives of many
women in my life. My task is to
keep myself tested and make
sure that I am healthy for all.
August 20, 2004 is a day that
I will never forget. I didn't see
my favorite movie, hear my fa-
vorite song played on the ra-
dio or win a trip to Europe but
I watched my mother die from
breast cancer.


Obama thanks Powell for endorsement


SUPPORT
continued from 4A

himself with people who will be
able to give him the expertise
that he at the moment does not
have," Powell said.
He criticized McCain's chang-
ing positions on the economy,
his choice of Alaska Gov. Sarah
Palin as his running mate, and
a negative campaign against
Obama that Powell said "goes
too far."
Obama called Powell to thank
him for the endorsement. In
his speech here, he said Powell
"knows, as we do, that this is
a moment where we all need to
come together as one nation."
McCain reacted stoically to
the announcement from Pow-
ell, the first African American to
lead the State Department and
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. "This
doesn't come as a surprise,"
he said on Fox News Sunday,
adding that he continues "to


respect and admire Secretary
Powell."
Obama's campaign said Sun-
day it raised $150 million in
September and added 632,000
donors. His fundraising total is
$604 million, breaking all pres-
idential campaign records. He
has received contributions from
more than 3.1 million people.
McCain, relying on public fi-
nancing that Obama spurned,
had raised $240 million
through August, about half of
Obama's total. He is limited to
$84.1 million for the general
election.
He criticized Obama for
backing away from a pledge to
accept taxpayer funds. "His-
tory shows us where unlim-
ited amounts of money are in
political campaigns, it leads to
scandal," McCain said.
In a sign of confidence,
Obama is trying to expand
his battlefield in the final two
weeks. His visit here was in a


county won by Bush in 2004
by about 3,400 votes. He plans
stops this week in Florida, Vir-
ginia, Iowa and Ohio all won
by Bush in 2004.
Speaking to a North Caro-
lina crowd of about 10,000 at
a hockey arena, Obama com-
plained about negative attacks
from Republicans. "They will
try to hoodwink you, to bam-
boozle you," he said.
He ran into resistance in
Fayetteville at Cape Fear
BBQ and Chicken, where he
stopped to shake hands with
a mostly older, white crowd
enjoying lunch after church
services. "Socialist, socialist,
socialist!" shouted Diane Fan-
ning, 54, until other custom-
ers shushed her.
Others were more friendly.
"You're doing a great job," Betty
Waylett, 76, told Obama. Way-
lett said she plans to vote for
him even though she is a Re-
publican.


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 2008 legal clinic


The foundation of our world
revolves around societal expec-
tations and limitations called
laws. And as the fast ap-
proaching presidential election
becomes nearer and dearer to
us, it is essential that people
know the consequences of vot-
ing or not voting. That includes
not only who they vote for, but
also what laws will be enacted by
their candidate and how those
votes will eventually affect their
daily lives.
We at Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
in Miami Gardens, on Saturday,
October 25, 2008 from 10 a.m.-
1:30 p.m., are planning a 'legal
clinic to provide information to
understand those laws. Very sim-
ply, we want to first give people of
our community a comprehensive
look into how local ordinances,
state statutes and national laws
are made and affect their every-
day lives by having legislators
such as Congresswoman Carrie
P. Meek and Senator Frederica S.
Wilson from these various arenas


present to explain this process.
We also want to provide insight
and strategies to resolve many of
the most prevalent issues and on-
going questions in our community.
We will have Miami-Dade County
Court Judge Rodney Smith and
notable attorneys such as Marlon
Hill, Marva Wiley, Thomas Bow-
man, Kionne McGhee and Kym-
berlee Curry Smith, as well as
attorneys from Lawyers for Chil-
dren America, the American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU), and Legal
Services of Greater Miami present
to discuss subjects such as mort-
gages/foreclosures, real estate,
immigration, litigation, child de-
pendency, probate, code enforce-
ment and reinstatement of civil
rights by having seminars and
question and answer sessions.
Your attendance will be tremen-
dously appreciated at this grass
roots effort to equip members of
our community with the informa-
tion that so often escapes us.
Please come share in Christian
fellowship with us and have fun


Kymberlee Curry Smith
Assistant City Attorney
learning how the legal fabric of
our community is shaped. Our
address is 15250 N.W. 185 St.,
Miami Gardens. Rev. Rogery B.
Adams is Pastor. There is some-
thing for everyone in the fam-
ily. Lunch will be provided! We
thank you in advance for joining
us.
Please contact the event chair-
person, Kymberlee Curry Smith,
Esq. with any questions at kcur-
ryesq@aol.com.


Admitted to the Florida Bar

Years Practicing Law

Miami-Dade County
Bar Association Rating

Practicing Experience



Work Experience


STEPHENT. MILLAN
May 2,1991

Over 17 years

65.45% Exceptionally
Qualified or Qualified

Federal & State Court
Criminal Defense Law Bankruptcy Law
Immigration Law Family & Probate Law

Assistant State Attorney for 7 years
prosecuting in the divisions of:
Career Criminal/Robbery
Narcotics DUI/Traffic Felony Trial

Married with 5 children


YVONNE COLODNY
Sept. 23, 1999

Only Lo years

39.71% Unqualified


State Court only



Only worked in the
Public Defenders Office



Single


Honors and Awards
John Edward Smith Child Advocacy Award on behalf of Battered, Abused & Neglected Children
Lawyers for Children
Pro Bono Service Award "Put Something Back" Program
Distinguished President FL District of Kiwanis International


Stephen T. Millan has been Endorsed by:


Rev. Dr. Willie Sims State Senator Larcenia Bullard
Pastor Christopher Francois State Representative Ed Bullard
Pastor Wilner Charles State Representative Yolly Robersol
Pastor Jean Jean Pierre Georgia Ayers
Rev. Bishop Jean Mercilus N. Patrick Range II
Pastor Thomas Denis Michael Chavies (retired judge)
Rev. Emy Etienne South AFL-CIO












MILLAN
for Circuit Court Judge

MillanForJudge.com


n


United Teachers of Dade
Christian Family Coalition
Roderick Vereen, Esq. and
Walter Harvey, Esq.
(past presidents of Wilkie D.
Ferguson Bar Association)


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Paid Political Advertisement. Paid for and approved by Stephen Millan, Non-Partisan, for Circuit Court Judge, Group 19.


MWR


11th Judicial Circuit of Florida ip. .
Run-Off Election /
November 4,2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THE1R OWN DESTINY


i


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28,2008


1


I










IATEMAITMS COER2-8I08BAK ur OTO HI W ETN


Is race an invisible issue not discussed

in the presidential election?


LONNETTE HILTON, 49
Student, Liberty City

l3ace is all
over this pres-
idential elec-
tion. Because
it is the first
time in his-
tory a Black
man is run-
ning for presi-
dent, many white people are
uncomfortable with having a
Black man in the White House.
Although Barack Obama is
Black, he is seeking change for
all Americans not just Blacks
but people don't see it because
they are focused on his skin
color.

LOUIS CASIMIR, 20
Self-employed Little Haiti

I think more
people are
focused on
which candi-
date will bring
the biggest
change into
the economy.
The race is
there but change is what people
are looking for. There are Black
people who are voting for Sen.
John McCain and white people
voting for Sen. Barack Obama.


SHARON JORDAN, 43
Student, North Miami

I admire
Obama for
making his-
tory, being
the first Black
man to run
for the presi-
dent office. o a
Throughout
this election, Obama has been
addressing the disparities that
the Black community has been
facing such as poverty, unem-
ployment and healthcare while
McCain on the other hand .
. never mind. Obviously, race
has not been silent in this elec-
tion.

ANTHONY BELL, 24
Entrepreneur, Liberty City

Race is truly -. .. .
evident in this
election and I
think that both
candidates are .
smart enough-
to know that
it would be
unwise to put
race on table.
They are both being very strate-
gic in their words and actions.
It would benefit [Sen. John] Mc-
Cain more if he used the race
card because [Sen. Barack]


Obama is already Black.

MAURICE STRANGE, 33
Dry Cleaner, Liberty City

Race is not
invisible in our
everyday life
so the election
should not be
any different.
It is so obvi-
ous because .
Obama is a
Black man. As a presidential
candidate, he has been ostra-
cized and often criticized and
compared to animals but he
has overcome. The harder the
test, the better the reward.

BEVERLY BAKER, 49
Miami-Dade College Employee
Coral Springs

In the be-

the election,
race was in-
visible but it
seems to be
coming out
more in the
election. The
comments
and remarks that have been
used demonstrates what is tru-
ly on the heart of man. Person-
ally, I think that Obama would
benefit more by using the race.


Convicted felons listed on voter rolls


TALLAHASSEE Florida's
attorney general said Tuesday
there is "no excuse" for the
state's failure to purge tens of
thousands of convicted felons
from the voter rolls in time for
Election Day.
"I cannot imagine why, in
this day and age of modern
technology ... that we can't get
it right," Bill McCollum said.
"We should be able to easily
identify who a convicted felon
is. ... I don't understand why
we're having this problem."
McCollum commentedafter a
morning Cabinet meeting that
focused on Florida's prepared-
ness for Nov. 4. At the center of
the debate: A Sun Sentinel in-
vestigation published Sunday
that found more than 30,000
felons don't have the right to
vote, but remain on Florida's
voter registration rolls.
The newspaper compared
state databases listing regis-
tered voters, convicted felons


and felons who have
been granted clem-
ency, which restores
their right to vote. *.
No, they gave up their
rights when they de-
cided to become crimi-
nals.Yes, but only on
a case-by-case basis.
Yes, if they've finished
their sentences. McCO
They should never
lose their voting rights.
Should felons who have
been stripped of their right
to vote remain eligible to cast
ballots?
It's public information that
blacks greatly outnumber
whites in prison. "Blacks in the
United States are imprisoned
at more than five times the
rate of whites, and Hispanics
are locked up at nearly double
the white rate, according to a
study released Wednesday by a
criminal justice policy group."
Why jump on the "racism"


bandwagon again? Are
you saying that most
felons are one color or
.e the other? Depends on
-~ a lot. Ask the victims of
T these felons about how
the felons respected
their rights when they
killed, assaulted and
raped them.
ILLUM Felons who have
served their time and
paid their debt to society
should have their rights re-
stored immediately upon re-
lease like 47 of the other 50
states. This law is antiquated
and should be stricken from
the books. It smacks of rac-
ism.
The findings could pose legal
problems for Florida, which is
once again under scrutiny in a
close, fiercely fought presiden-
tial race. State officials noted
that the campaigns are "truck-
ing in attorneys" to pounce on
any problems.


Obama sets record, raising $150 million


Barack Obama raised a stag-
gering $150 million in Sep-
tember, shattering all previous
fundraising records and dwarf-
ing the amount raised by John
McCain.
Obama on Sunday reported
raising more than double his pre-
vious record total of $62 million in
August.
McCain criticized Obama's de-
cision not to accept the limits of
public campaign financing and his
"new flood of spending." Obama
raised money last month at the
rate of $5 million per day.


"The American people should
know where every penny came
from," McCain said on FOX News
Sunday. "They know where every
penny of my campaign contribu-
tions came from."
Since the start of his presiden-
tial campaign, Obama has raised
more than $600 million, a stun-
ning amount in historical terms
and in relationship to his Republi-
can opponent's campaign.
McCain's decision to take public
financing in the general election
limits his spending to $84 million
for the fall, while Obama is ex-


pected to spend more than $300
million on the general election.
Speaking to Chris Wallace on
the FOX show, McCain com-
plained that Obama won't have
to detail the sources of small
donations.
"There's $200 million of
those campaign contributions,
there's no record," McCain said.
"They're not reported. You can
report online now ... $200 mil-
lion that we don't know where
the money came from. A lot of
strange things [are] going on in
this campaign."


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008






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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


~--cLI"


l Mp-


le14


,







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


Johnson says, "early detection is the best protection"


SURVIVOR
continued from 4A
to departed from the show so
she decided. to watch Good
Morning America since anchor
Robin Roberts was a regular
on the show. Wallace was
inspired by Roberts story about
her personal breast cancer
experience and the segments
that she had on the show
about breast cancer so it made
Wallace pay more attention to
her breast.
Within time, Wallace
discovered a lump in her breast
but she did not run to the doctor,
she thought maybe it was
normal during her menstrual
cycle. She waited awhile hoping
the lump would go away--but it
did not. After two months, she
made an appointment with her
doctor to get a mammogram.
After running test, Wallace's
doctor told her nothing was
wrong with her breast but she
decided to get a second opinion
from another doctor.
She had biopsy the Monday
before Thanksgiving last
year but Wallace received
the dreadful news that she
was in fact diagnosed with
breast cancer, the day after


Thanksgiving.
"The cancer has brought me
closer to my faith. I had a close
nit family before but the cancer
has made us even closer.
Everyone has been there for
me," said Wallace.
After receiving the results,
Wallace admits that she cried
one time but she said that
she would put the battle in


God's hand because it was not
hers to fight. She has endured
months of testing to find out
the stage the cancer was in
and radiation. This past July,
Wallace began biotherapy in
which she will continue until
July of next year.
Wallace was invited to
speak at North Dade Middle
School's PINK Week, a week in
observance of Breast Cancer
Awareness Month. The campus


First Black woman commissioner


RANGE
continued from 1A

95th Street as M. Athalie Range
Boulevard.
"The street is just a start but
in the future we might consid-
er naming a building after her.
She opened the doors for us
[commissioners] to believe we
can represent the people in our
district" said Miami-Dade Com-
missioner Dor-in D. Rolle.
Athalie Range was born Mary
Athalie Wilkinson on November
7, 1915 in Key West. In her early
childhood, she moved to Miami
with her parents. An alumni
of Booker T. Washington High
School, Athalie married Oscar
Range in 1937 and had four
beautiful children: Myrna, Pat-
rick, Oscar and Gary. The cou-
ple and their children resided
in the Liberty Square Housing
Project. In 1953, Oscar Range
opened the Range Funeral Home
in Liberty City and shortly after
he died of a sudden heart at-
tack in 1960, leaving Athalie a
widow with four children.
She attended New England
Institute of Anatomy and Em-
balming in Boston, Massachu-
setts to become a certified fu-
neral director so that she could
operate her husband's busi-
ness. Throughout the years,
Range Funeral has been suc-


cessful spanning in three differ-
ent locations.
Senator Wilson, whose moth-
er went to school with Athalie,
remembers asking Range for
advice when she decided to run
for the School Board District 1
seat. She says that Range told
her, before she could run, she
had to think of everything that
she had done in the past that
she didn't want anyone to know
because Range said everything
in the dark would come to light
in politics.
In 1965, at a time of racial
divide between Blacks and
Whites, Range became the first
African-American woman to
be elected to the City of Miami
Board of Commissioners cre-
ating county-wide regulations
that resulted in strict handgun
law, efficient fire codes, moni-
toring the selling of glue to mi-
nors, and the building parks
and play areas.
Range was selected by Gover-
nor Reuben Askew to serve as
Secretary of the Department of
Community Affairs in the 70's.
She was the first Black woman
to become the head of a Flori-
da state agency. She reopened
and turned the once segregated
Virginia Key Beach into a mu-
seum. Athalie passed away in
2006 at 91.
Wilson said that when Ath-


was decorated in pink and the
students were able to get out of
their uniforms and wear their
pink shirts. The faculty and
staff also participated in PINK
Week in which they helped
create a five-minute PINK
ribbon on the school field.
Last year, the school raised
$1500 for the American Cancer
Society and currently they are


collecting Yoplait lids to remind
the students the' importance,
even at their age, of taking care
of their health.
Alecia Johnson, a teacher
at North Dade Middle School,
is a three-year breast cancer
survivor.
"I am a living proof that
early detection is the best
protection." She said since
she was fortunate to catch
the cancer early, she was able


sets roadmap for
alie Range would visit the boys
of the 5000 Role Models of Ex-
cellence Project, she would tell
them that she was going to see
them now or when she was
preparing their casket at the
funeral home. According to Wil-
son, it was a form of scared tac-
tic that Athalie used to remind
*the boys, in her time, she has
buried many young Black men
so they were not invisible and
their actions would determine
their destiny.
"Athalie Range was a special
person. She was a leader for all
of us who are in politics. We are
standing at her shoulder. This
was a way of keeping her name
alive so that the future genera-
tion will know of her," said Wil-
son. Initially, Wilson said the
boulevard was supposed to run
into 135th Street but the City of
Miami Shores was not on board
with the project because Miami
Shores would soon be honoring
someone else in that area.
Former Congresswoman Car-
rie P. Meek, who referred to
Range as "Mama Range," re-
members Range for her sense
of humor. "She exuded a love
for African-Americans and the
underprivileged and to me that
was a big accomplishment. She
inspired people to try but she
didn't just talk about it, she
exhibited it in her daily walk.


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
Bringing the Kingdom of Heaven Down to Earth
IIl ll M,. h s nl- I, g. t1ir l. i I, l h, ,t


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church 2008 Legal Clinic

As you well know, the foundation of our world revolves around societal expectations and limitations called LAWS.
A goal of this clinic is to get a comprehensive look Into how municipal and county ordinances, state statutes and
federal laws are created and eventually affect our everyday lives from legislators at each level.
We will also provide information, insight and strategy to clarify and resolve many of the most prevalent issues and
ongoing questions in our community through seminars and Q&A in areas including:


0 Small claimss Litigoiarn
0 ImmigroTionn
0 Probate Including WillI sTriii nd [.toie
[ Real Estate
SReilliation of Civil Right,


SMorgages.foreiIlo'ure.
S(Chdd Dependenty
S(ode Einforicemen
[i] Irminal Law
Sc it)Iaion of Ciil RI qht


Guest speakers include:
Congresswoman Came P. Meek, former U 5. House Representatve
Senator Fredernca S 1 V1son
Miami-Dade County Court Judge Rodney Smith
Attorney Marion A. Hill of delancyd/il, P. 4.
Assistant State Attorney Kionee McGhee
Attorney Marva L. Wde of Maria L WIdey. P A.
Attorney Thomas G. Bowman of Thomas G Bon-msn, P.A.
Attorney Claire Subran of Lawyers for Children Amenca


10 AI.M. 1:30 RM.


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lI. Zii ni .\. 1. ( hi 'n i


.l i. ,,,i ( ;i h.,i.. I'. I !.' .MI;()
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l";,\: (305.) ) l4 -;lS(P)
n .l /I r II nil .ll all dii il hili ll .' lill



I '. I ,I \ ( '1
\\I IBI'E I'lt()%\ I ) EI !!
@p


Come join us! Bring your family and friends.


Kymberlee Curry Smith, Esq.-Chairperson


to have 28 weeks of radiation
then put on the medication,
Tamoxifen, an estrogen blocker.
Johnson believes Black people
are afraid to get themselves
checked out because "the fear
of the unknown." She has a
twenty-one year old daughter
who she does encourage to get
checked out.
Charlotte County Health
Department reports that Black
women under the age of 40 are
more likely to be diagnosed
with breast cancer rather than
Black women over 40.
American Cancer Society
found in 2007 that breast cancer
is most common among Black
women. A 2008 report prepared
by the Health Council of South
Florida breast cancer death
rates among Black women are
41% higher than among white
women, and 64% higher than
rates among Hispanic women
in Miami-Dade County.
The fight continues for both
Johnson and Wallace.
Wallace, the first person in
her family to be diagnosed
believes that her greatest test is
the cancer's attack on her hair
and skin. "Black women and
our hair is a big thing. Actually
all women but especially Black


others to follow
In all of her speeches, Mama
Range encouraged Black people
to stand up for themselves."
Meek says at the end of the day,
Range had a community spirit
by changing codes in the city,
urging people to vote and fight-
ing for justice at the School
Board.
"It is an honor to have
my mother recognized. I am
pleased with the thought. When
there was a job that needed to
be done or a need to be filled,
she stepped up to the plate. I
am trying to live up to her ideas
and her motivation to do that .
. not selfishly but for others,"
said Patrick Range Sr., M. Ath-
alie Range's son.


women because it takes so
long for us to grow it. For me
to have long hair and then go
to not having any at all, was
a big thing," said Wallace.
"Chemotherapy takes away
your femininity from you." She


recently began an non-profit
organization called Giving
Beauty which collects wigs and
scarves for cancer patients.
Johnson participated this
past Saturday at the Susan G.
Komen Race for the Cure.


Cele/ at-e
40 Years In Ministry


Apostle Johnny L Kemp
OBn/
October 25, 2008


Toi ReceptioT Palace
00-(W. 68thb Wet

Tieked$50
Call; (305) 693-1534
SFo More Iformation


Honoring our Senior Pastor,
1'ft' Patty L. Ke*V
October 20-26, 2008

SServices Nightly
at 7:30 P.M.


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Rev. Dr. Waiter T. Rkhardson The Ho. "Cart P.JWeek
Senior Pusor CongrsswomanI (et)
Sweet Home lissionan ::
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AfIamt'JJ~de~
of Comm~zte


Voting YES will not


cost you one penny.


Amendment 8 provides a
process for local communities
to impact the future of their
community colleges.


#140 on Nov. 4
Pol. adv. sponsored and paid for by Friends of Your C.:I.T...., ,' ll;,,.- '


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BlAKSMus CNIRI IILR \\NI)S~l~ A TE IAM TMES OTOBR 2-2, 00


i n' "7_-_--
REV. JOHNNY L BARBER ANGELA SHELLMAN LISA FITZPATRICK

St. John's Unity Family and Friends Day


The St. John Missionary Bap-
tist Church family will observe
its annual Unity Day and Fam-
ily and Friends Day on this
Sunday. The guest speaker for
the 7: 30 a.m. service will be
Sis. Angelia Shellman who is
the beloved First Lady of St.
Ruth MBC, pastored by Rev.
T.T. Shellman in Dania Beach.
She is also the President of The
Woman's Convention-Auxilary
to The Florida East Coast Mis-


sionary Baptist Association.
The spirit of unity continues
during the 11 a.m. worship as
the esteemed Pastor of Miami's
Mt. Sinai Missionary Baptist
Church, Rev. Johnny L. Bar-
ber II, delivers the message to
a waiting congregation. In ad-
dition to his many responsibili-
ties, Pastor Barber is the Presi-
dent of The Southern Division
Minister's and Deacon's Union
of The Florida East Coast Mis-


T-shirts rock-the-vote for Obama
Young South Florida residents display Obama T-shirts at
early voting rally in Downtown Miami. Thousands showed up
to show their continued support for the Obama/Biden team.


sionary Baptist Association.
The theme for the day is 'Unit-
ing in Christian Love'. The colors
are shades of blue. Recognition
will be given to the largest fam-
ily present. Birthday Captains
are expecting your support.
Sister Lisa Fitzpatrick is Gen-
eral Chairperson of Unity Day.
Rev. Charles Uptgrow is Assis-
tant Pastor. You may contact
the church at 305-372-3877 for
additional information.


Rev.Joseph F. Williams
Round Up Day 2008
at St. Mark
'Honoring our past, rejoicing
in the present and rededicating
ourselves for the future.'
Gidde'up on over for a foot
stomping good time. Sunday,
October 26, 11 a.m. 1470 N.W.
87 Street.


--v







t Ine Supernatural outpouring of God's
. ... -.. .,.'. : I" - .,- ..- '.7-,j A noint.in- R e .i. al -, the ke, to resto-
_- S ~---., -"; ;a- ,:. ration and po -.er in this season of change. The
Hol\ Anointing is fresh, the word of God is

.. E,- vangelist Felecia Hines is a .oman whom
God has assigned to gi\e the body of Christ
: .an insight to His hidden scripture, to enlighten
.-a 'ou. empow er \-ou and heal ou! E angelist
S Hines has tratheled across the country to his Di-


Jerome Noble
ous slates and in diners churches, back-
sliders were snatched out of the hands of
satan, the sick healed and the depressed
made free!
As the host of this cit% w ide re\ i\ al I
extend to \ou an imitation of blessings.
healing,. know ledge and salvation!
God will gi\e \ou just what \ou need!
And that', a fact!. Make plans no\\ to at-
tend!


Evangelist Felecia Hines


What do Congressman Kendrick Meek, TV Judge Karen Mille-Francis


and Attorney Larry Hanfield have in common?


The belief that Yvonne Colodny has the sensitivity, intelligence,


tolerance and work ethic to be a fine Judge., .


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Yvonne Colodny, non-partisan election, for Circuit Court Judge, Group 19.


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OCTOBER 29-31, 7 PA NIGHT

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL TH.IIEIR OWN D)ESTINYI


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008






The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


Religion affects willingness to



vote for non-White candidate








Copyrighted Material



Syndicated ontent


Available from Commercial News Providers












*' Praer It'lead s toi ork disputes


, ::


- a a a4m. ft_


:.& -0 &


Working Dad: Our financial crisis is

another chance for parents to teach


Bad economic news mount-
ed like a never-ending panic
attack in recent weeks --
stock markets crashing and
credit freezing harder than
a TV dinner -- and now that
fear is seeping into our par-
enting.
A failing economy can
erode parents' skills, creat-
ing depression and anxiety
that strip away their patience,
self-confidence and time, and
fracturing their marriages.
Whether the nation is on
the brink of a dark recession,
a depression or just in a basic
downturn, family therapists
are concerned.
"We are seeing a level of eco-
nomic anxiety that we have
never seen in all the years I
have been practicing," said
Aaron Cooper, a family thera-
pist for the past 30 years and


staff member at Northwestern talk to them about what's
University's Family Institute. happening, without detailing
As Wall Street gasps for the entire financial drama,
breath, parents want to pro- Cooper said.
tect children from their eco- "They need to hear some
nomic woes -- but they should slice of the real pie. 'Things
reconsider, are hard everywhere right
Kids know a lot more than now. ... But we have things
we think, and parents should under control.' said Cooper,


co-author of "I Just Want My
Kids To Be Happyl Why You
Shouldn't Say It."
Even if you don't have
things under control, children
need affirmation that you're
in charge, said Deborah Carr,
associate professor of sociol-
ogy at Rutgers University and
co-author of "Making Up With
Mom."
"For children, stability and
predictability are very, very
important," Carr said. "Most
of the research shows that
parents' economic distress is
distressing for children."
Of course, it depends on
their age. Toddlers need
general reassurances, while
teenagers often are ready to
help, pitching in with baby-
sitting or lawn-mowing
money, according to
Please turn to WORKING 11B


I


As I


0 1" #








Bl~~sMUS CNIRI ii IRO\N ILslN li TE MAM TIES OTOBR 2-2, 00


Clinton helps Obama launch fight for Florida *** '*- -i'
_______---________ ---_--________ .4___* *


By Kathy Kiely

ORLANDO Barack Obama
and Hillary Rodham Clinton,
whose history-making presi-
dential campaigns divided the
Democratic Party, joined forces
Monday for an exuberant out-
door rally in what Clinton called
"the battleground of the battle-
grounds."
Making their first joint ap-
pearance since July, the former
political rivals walked on stage
here with their arms wrapped
around each other's waists.
Obama led the crowd esti-
mated at 50,000 by the Orlando
Fire Department in chanting
"Hil-lar-y."
Clinton, who asked during the
primary why Obama couldn't
close the deal with voters, trans-
formed the line to work in his
favor: "Now is the time to close
the. deal for Barack Obama."
The New York senator took a
shot at Republican presidential
candidate John McCain's run-
ning mate, Sarah Palin, who
has sought to appeal to Clin-
ton's supporters. Mocking the
Alaska governor's frequent ex-
hortation to "Drill, baby, drill,"
Clinton said Democrats have "a
new slogan."
"Jobs, baby, jobs," she said.
"That's what we're for."
Clinton, who won this state's
primary, appeared with Obama
as he kicked off a two-day swing
here on the first day of early vot-


oft 0%f


Hillary Rodham Clinton joins Barack Obama at a rally Monday in Orlando. About 50,000
people attended. -By Joe Raedle, Getty Images


ing statewide. Obama and Mc-
Cain are in a closely fought con-
test for the state's 27 electoral
votes, which made George Bush
president in 2000 and helped
elect him again in 2004.
Obama urges his supporters
to take advantage of the oppor-
tunity to avoid the lines being
predicted on Election Day.
"Go vote," he said. "You don't
know what will happen Nov.
4."
Florida is one of six states
where polling places opened
Monday for voters who want to


cast their ballots before Elec-
tion Day. Three other states will
open early voting this week.
The early vote is a key factor
in Florida, where 36% of the
ballots in the 2004 presidential
election were cast early, accord-
ing to Steve Schale, who directs
Obama's campaign in the state.
The GOP also is working to
turn out early voters.
"It's going to be very close in
Florida," state GOP Chairman
Jim Greer said in a phone inter-
view Monday as he barnstormed
with the state's Republican gov-


ernor, Charlie Crist.
Greer said he's not concerned
about statistics showing Demo-
crats widening their lead among
registered voters in Florida this
year. "Democrats are just regis-
tering anything that breathes,"
Greer said. He said Democrats
out-registered Republicans in
2004, yet Bush won the state.
"Republicans in Florida have
the best voter-turnout opera-
tion in the nation," Greer said.
One barometer: 100,000 more
Republicans than Democrats
have cast absentee ballots.


a\ivn r .4g fn Iup a'uc%

.,-. Copyrighted Material




Syndicated Content I




Available from Commercial News Providers


Financial crisis is another chance for parents


WORKING
continued from 10B

Stephanie Coontz, Olympia-
based head of research for
the Council on Contemporary
Families in Chicago.
Now is an excellent time to
review your stress manage-
ment, because the worst may
be yet to come. Turmoil is
flowing through Wall Street,
but those failures and losses
will ripple through the nation
in the coming months, taxing
already strained middle-class


families.
"Some of the very stressors
the poor have felt are actual-
ly now going to be felt by the
working class, middle class and
even the upper-middle class,"
Carr said. "I think most of us
agree, in the financial crisis we
are just seeing the tip of the
iceberg."
The problem is parents may
not notice when their family
hits that iceberg. As bills mount
and jobs disappear, dads and
moms may become grouchier,
less sympathetic and have less


'rI.


Barbara J. Jordan

Miami-Dade County Commissioner
District 1


FLU VACCINATION CLINIC

FOR RESIDENTS IN DISTRICT

1


Tuesday, October 28, 2008
9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

North Dade Regional Library
2455 NW 183rd Street

Flu shots are on a first come, first served basis.
FREE for residents up to 18 years of age and 65 years or
older. For residents between the ages of 19 and 64,
flu shots are $30 and pneumonia shots are $35.

For-information, call 305-474-3011.


SMELL GAS? ACT FAST.
Natural gas is a colorless, odorless fuel, but for safety reasons, a
chemical odorant sometimes described as a "rotten egg" smell is
added, making the presence of gas detectable.

IF YOU SMELL THIS ODOR:
* Alert others and leave the area immediately.
* Leave the door open as you exit.
* Do not operate electric lights, appliances or other equipment such as telephones,
cell phones, or flashlights.
* Go to a phone away from the area and call Florida City Gas.

Natural gas odors should be reported right away. Do not try to
locate the source of the smell.

If you smell natural gas, call Florida City Gas at 888-352-5325.



Florida City Gas"
An AGL Resources Company


BLACKS MUSTi( CONTROL THEIR OW'N DESTINY


9


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES OCT 8


Your lifestyle represents God


You don't need to be a stu-
dent of the Bible to know
how important your speech
is. Many kids have gotten
into trouble for speaking out
in less than respectful tones
to parents or other author-
ity figures. Many an irate em-
ployee has been discharged
from their jobs because of an-
gry conversations with their
bosses. Also, how many young


men have carelessly uttered
those three important words,
and had them repeated back
to them by a lovestruck young
woman? Much attention and
many scriptures are given over
to the speech in the Bible.
James said that a huge ship
could be controlled easier than
man's tongue. There are several
reasons why we need to watch
our speech. One reason is that


there is power in our speech.
We can have what we say and
what we believe (Job 22:28).
So what is it that you are say-
ing about your marriage, your
children, your career, your
health and your finances? An-
other reason that your speech
is important is that others and
we can be encouraged by what
we say. Paul admonishes the
Ephesian church in chapter
4, verse 29 to not use foul and
abusive language.. Let your
speech by good and helpful.
I have met so many wonder-
ful people, both adults and
children whose self-esteem
and spirits were destroyed
because of cruel, demeaning


words spoken over them, and
to them. An eighteen year old
young man once told me that
his life was doomed to impris-
onment because he had always
been told that he was just like
his daddy, and his daddy was
a no good criminal who would
always be arrested and spend
his life in jail. Sadly, he had
been told this so much during
his entire young life that he
believed this.
I also know many Christians
who do not feel that they are
very helpful in the ministry
because they do not preach,
teach or sing. But so many of
them have lifted me up more
times than they could ever


know by their encouraging,
kind speech to me.
A third reason why it is so
important to be mindful of our
speech is that others are lis-
tening to what you say. Don't
think that people are only lis-
tening when you are teach-
ing or making a speech. Don't
think that people are only lis-
tening when you make a point
of having a conversation with
them about the Lord. They are
listening to you when you yell
at your spouse and children.
They are listening to you when
you talk about your supervi-
sor. They are listening to you
when you make plans to cheat
on your taxes, and they are lis-


tening to you when you speak
discouragement and despair.
In Mark 14:70, when Peter
continued to deny that he was
one of Jesus' disciples, a ser-
vant girl rebuked him and in-
sisted that he was one of the
Man's followers because she
could tell by his speech. Can
people tell by your speech that
you are a follower of Jesus
Christ, or do you sound just
like the world? Is your speech
profane and peppered with
'dirty' jokes and backbiting?
Or is your speech uplifting,
encouraging, and most im-
portantly does it glorify the
One whom you say that you
serve?


Miami Northwestern Senior
High class of 1972 will fellow-
ship together at Mt. Olive P.B.
Church on Sunday, October 26
at 11 a.m. For more information,
please contact Deacon Charles
Wade at 305-696-3656.

Edison Center Merchants for
Obama will be handing out gift
certificates to early voters from
October 22 November 2.
******


The Broward County Cham-
ber of Commerce is hosting a
Pre-Expo Exhibitor Appreciation
Party on Thursday, October 23
at Charley's Crab from 5 p.m. to
8:30 p.m.

Miami-Dade State Attorney's
office will be having a Sealing
and Expungement Program on
Tuesday, October 28 from 4
p.m. 8 p.m. at the Lighthouse
Church. For more information,


~. .1 ~' ,~


St. Mark Missionary Baptist
Church invites everyone to gear
up and come on over for a foot
stomping good time to our 2008
Round Up Day on October 26
at the 11 a.m. service. For more
information, please call Esther
Carter at 305-625-5624.

Valley Grove Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites you to fellow-
ship with them as they celebrate
their Deacons and Deaconesses'
anniversary Valley Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist on Sunday, Oc-
tober 26 at 3:30 p.m. For more
information, please call 954-430-
9227.


Faith of Inspiration Deliver-
ance Center will be having their
Men and Women's Conference on
November 5-8. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-494-8238 or
305-693-4201.

Mount Olive Primitive Bap-
tist Church invites you to come
and worship during their annual
Fellowship Day on Sunday, Oc-
tober 26 at 7:30 a.m., 11 a.m.
and 4 p.m. For more information,
please call 305-836-8554.

John Wesley Methodist
Church invites the community


please call the State Attorney's
Community Outreach Division
at 305-547-0724.

American Hospital Associa-
tion (ASA) will hold a commu-
nity forum today at 9:30 a.m. at
the University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine. For more in-
formation, please call 305-243-
4853.

Miami Dade College, North
Campus, will have a Homeown-
er Informational Forum on Sat-
urday, October 25 at 10 a.m.
For more information, please
call Congressman Meek's office
at 305-690-5905.

to its annual Prayer Breakfast on
Saturday, October 25 at 9 a.m. at
the Arcola Lakes Park Communi-
ty Center. For more information,
please call 305-633-3806 or 305-
297-7046.

Faith Christian Center will
celebrate their pastor's apprecia-
tion on November 3 at 7:30 p.m.
For more information, please call
305-246-4084.

Antioch MB Church of
Brownsville invites you to their
annual Senior Saints' Day on
Sunday, October 26 at 10 a.m.

Mt. Vernon Missionary Bap-
tist Church invites you to their
annual resurrection celebration
services on October 24 at 7:30
p.m. For more information, please
contact 305-754-5300.


-( sr b Sr 4


Available from Commercial News Providers


Women's Day at
Greater New Macedonia
Greater New Macedonia M.B.
Church Annual Women's Day,
Sunday, October 26.
The 7 a.m. speaker, Sis. O1-
lie WilsonTurner of Mt. Pis-
gah M.B. Church and 11 a.m.
speaker, Min. Twila Payne of
Second Baptist M.B. Church.
Please join us at 2741 N.W.
49th Street. Rev. Sherman
Mungin is the pastor.


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City of Opa-locka invites you
to their Adult 70's Soul & Salsa
/ Children's Disney Costume
Ball on Friday, October 31 from
6 p.m. 10 p.m. For more in-
formation, please call 305-953-
2821.

The community is invited to
an Early Vote Rally and March
for Change on Saturday, Octo-
ber 25 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Joseph Caleb Community
Center.
Sister in Sync, a group of
women of color over 40, will meet
every second and fourth Satur-
day of the month. For more in-


formation, please call 305-934-
5122 or email: dorotheamyrick(,
sistersinsync.org
The Liberty City Trust, in
partnership with the City of Mi-
ami Police Department, Model
City Net Office, and the Miami-
Dade Police Department pres-
ents the Neighbors for Safety
rally today at 6 p.m. at the Lib-
erty Square Community Center.
For more information, please
call 305-635-2301.

Brighter Future Empower-
ment presents their second
annual Awards Banquet on No-
vember 19 from 6 p.m. 10 p.m.
For more information, please


call 954-678-8825.

The Barbara Seniors Hawkins
Foundation is sponsoring the
College Workshop: The Inside
Scoop on Applying to College.
The workshop will be held on
November 1 from 1 p.m. 3 p.m.
at the Phicol Williams Commu-
nity Center. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-258-1629.

Miami-Dade Alumni Chapter
of Bethune-Cookman University
invites you to travel with them
when the Wildcats take on the
Rattlers in Orlando on Novem-
ber 22. For more information,
please call 305-505-1235.


Food vigilance is key to keeping weight off


By Nanci Hellmich

PHOENIX People who
have lost a significant amount
of weight and keep it off for
years are constantly vigilant
about what they consume,
rarely overeat for emotional
reasons and do about an hour
a day of exercise, a new study
shows.
"They are doing the behav-
iors that we know work, and
they are doing them every day.
They don't give up," says Su-
zanne Phelan, assistant pro-
fessor of kinesiology at Cali-


fornia Polytechnic State Uni-
versity-San Luis Obispo. She
presented her findings here
at the recent meeting of the
Obesity Society, an organiza-
tion of weight-loss research-
ers and professionals.
Phelan examined the habits
of 167 long-term successful
dieters. They had dropped an
average of 66 pounds, reached
a healthy weight and main-
tained it for an average of 14
years.
She compared them with
about 300 obese people who
had tried and failed to shed


weight. She found that suc-
cessful dieters:
Are physically active for
about an hour a day, burning
about 2,600 calories a week
with exercise.
Do high-intensity activ-
ity, such as jogging, aerobics,
biking, for about 70 minutes
a week.
Are highly restrained eat-
ers who are always aware of
calories.
Are less likely to binge or
overeat for emotional or envi-
ronmental reasons than obese
people.


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13B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


Suit against God thrown out for lack of address


LINCOLN, Neb. -A judge has
thrown out a Nebraska legisla-
tor's lawsuit against God, say-
ing the Almighty wasn't prop-
erly served due to his unlisted
home address. State Sen. Ernie
Chambers filed the lawsuit last
year seeking a permanent in-


junction against God.
He said God has made terror-
istic threats against the senator
and his constituents in Omaha,
inspired fear and caused "wide-
spread death, destruction and
terrorization of millions upon
millions of the Earth's inhabit-


ants."
Chambers has said he filed the
lawsuit to make the point that
everyone should have access to
the courts regardless of whether
they're rich or poor.
On Tuesday, however, Doug-
las County District Court Judge


Marlon Polk ruled that under
state law a plaintiff must have
access to the defendant for a
lawsuit to move forward.
"Given that this court finds
that there can never be service
effectuated on the named defen-
. dant this action will be dismissed


with prejudice," Polk wrote.
Chambers, who graduated
from law school but never took
the bar exam, thinks he's found
a hole in the judge's ruling.
"The court itself acknowledges
the existence of God," Chambers
said Wednesday. "A consequence


of that acknowledgment is a rec-
ognition of God's omniscience."
Therefore, Chambers said,
"Since God knows everything,
God has notice of this lawsuit."
Chambers has 30 days to de-
cide whether to appeal. He said
he hasn't decided yet.


Social Security recipients to get raise


Average retiress's check to go up by $63 a month


By Christine Dugas

Finally, there's some good
news for retirees.
More than 50 million seniors
will see their Social Security
benefits increase 5.8% next
year, the biggest cost-of-
living increase in more than
25 years, the Social Security
Administration said Thursday.
The cost-of-living increase
will boost the average retiree's
benefit check by $63 a month.
The average retired couple
will see an increase of $103 a
month.
The increase comes as many
retirees are struggling with
higher prices for health care,
low interest rates on their bank
savings accounts and a sharp
decline in the value of their
investments.
In the past 15 months, the
meltdown in the financial
markets has wiped out $2
trillion of Americans' retirement
savings, according to the
Congressional Budget Office.
"With 401(k)s being battered
in today's catastrophic economy,
this shows that Social Security


is the one program that retirees
can depend on to provide them
with a reliable foundation of
income," says Karen Friedman,
policy director at the Pension
Rights Center, an advocacy
group.
The increase, which is more
than double the 2.3% cost-of-
living increase for 2008, reflects
changes in the consumer price
index from the third quarter of
2007 through the third quarter
of this year.
During that period, prices for
gas and food rose sharply.
While the increase looks
dramatic, "They're going to
give retirees just enough to
compensate for what inflation
is doing to them anyway," says
Jack VanDerhei, a fellow at the
Employee Benefit Research
Institute.
Still, even a $63 increase
in monthly benefits could
make a big difference to
millions of seniors, says
Barbara Kennelly, president
of the National Committee to
Preserve Social Security and
Medicare.
Social Security is the only


source of retirement income
for 21% of seniors, Kennelly
says. Social Security "is all
they have, and they count

Retiree benefits
Percentage of retiree income
from Social Security benefits

100% of income.
-21%

90&-99%
-13%

50%-89%
31%

Less than 50%
35%


every penny," she says.
Social Security also
announced Thursday that the
maximum amount of earnings
subject to Social Security tax
will increase to $106,800 from
$102,000 in 2009.
Of the estimated 164 million
workers who will pay Social
Security taxes next year,
about 11 million will pay
higher taxes as a result of the
increase, Social Security said.


Florida church burns X-rated film reels


Members of Christ Church
Anglican in Jacksonville, Fla.,
unravel X-rated films and
gather them in a pornography-
burning ceremony Sunday.
The aim, says pastor Mark El-
dredge, was to move land the
church recently bought from
" 'unholy to holy." Courtesy


Christ Church Anglican
All Things Considered, Oc-
tober 20, 2008 Members of
Christ Church Anglican in
Jacksonville, Fla., gathered
Sunday for an unusual reli-
gious ceremony that involved
torching X-rated old movies in
a fire pit.


The 300-member congrega-
tion recently bought the former
Playtime Drive-In movie the-
ater to develop as their meeting
place, and it held a bit of a sur-
prise for staff members when
they closed on the sale: cases
and cases of pornography from
the 1970s and 1980s.


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/93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93,d Street
305-836-0942
OrderofServices
10am. Eur'y omiirngWxslp
11 m. Moni WAs1ip
oFf r Evaeing Worship
l1t&3rd8wunday .....p.am
nTues'ay Bilge Study -.7 pnt.
vweb'itte: cmxttc.oa

\ ZW^^^^^WWWW^^^^^fl /


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'" Street
3015-835-8280 FaxI 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
F Faui Moming Wbrship 7:30 am.
S.. ClinChh School 9.30 a.m.
Mming Worship .....11 a.m.
1 ueoday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Tajk- w beore he l.l Sun.....7pm.
Mid-week Worslip


Antioch Missionary Baptist /postolic Revival Cente
Church of Brom sville 6702 NW. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order otServices New tnime for 1.V. Pog a g
Chih, Stmday School ..... S:30 a.m. FOR HOPE F.OR TODAY
ttt. snila W nhii> sl i vici .. Io iln t-CA5lPi ca rs |o .c T5 21 .'
Houa 1r P.wr .N o P'r -y K .. Wd.t- Itile'cent)O Pycr9a. .-i 12 pI in
eawero Nit Ot) l Sayc .a m ..m... sesa.M. 11 a.m.
12 i~. I pittr'" Satir. Ea 'Womslip 11.. pt
Tues, PrayerMeeing....... 7:30 p.m.
Evening Wor' hip' .. 7 p.m. Fri. Bible Sativ .................7:30 p.m.
L wmw \dWWRWWWWWR /ia1U \ \


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
305-836-9081


I )rdrr .,I Services:
I,.l I .''ling Services
,,,I ,', ii ,'*I ............ 10 a.m .
S... ,, ii itudy.... 8ptm.
- I i ., SeVic ......8 p.nl


f Brownsville '\
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services




Joust34-4a55 3us-.91-6b9 5y
-3eaanm/


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church\ Liberty Cit) Church -
17800 NW 25th Ave. of Christ
Twwwhlenonwor.. ipe nhi er.nrg 1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
S Staiday Worship Servics Order of Services:
S7 a.m. & 10 a.m. Sunday Morning...........8 am.
Cuch School: 3a. Sunday School.............10 am.
SCRwid. 1venilng ............. 6p.m.
"V d sda' \ h ,, t ellence ........7:30 p.m.
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study. TTit' .itle Class ........7:30 p.m.
Bible Inslilnte, 6:30 p.m. B'1 lhts, Iellowship.........10a.m.
Mid-week Worslhip 7:30 p.m. I i .mUl t Song Practice .6 p.m.


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
". ni' ',\ .q'5ih 'il.i[
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
flour I i,,;rI.- r '. 1', ,
I ty M . ...,. .. ,
Sunday Schwl, .. 9:30 a m
M mui .......... a.m.
.otNhMinisay Sudy Wd. ...p.m.
Pnye'11 "Study Wad .7pm
1, i t. .., .
. 1 . U .



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order ot Se-vices:
Sunday Momrning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday Sch(xl 9:45 a.m.
Bi le Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.



Cornerstone Bible '
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332




Ch.cii li -t a lI .i 3 6, pn i
\'on a Lmm hoy .l3


/ First Baptist Missionary '\
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 NW. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
tunday................ 7:30 & 11 Ia.n.
S. sunday School............... 10 a.m.
Thm'sdy .........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting, D.T.U.
Baptismt Thurs. before
S ir;'st Sut..? p.m..
Conmiunlioln Fi\ Sti.......
\ /a


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sunday

Wednesday
bilic StlynP ycNigh t7:pmn
Thursday
"Them is a placefor yo


( Pembroke Park Church of Christ "
3707 8.W.56th Avenue Hollywood. I.33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954.962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *"" Morning Worship .... ... 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m. -
TV Program Tuesday. 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels; 8,19. 21, 22,23, 30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: www.I)pembrokeparkclnirclhofchtist.coin Ftmail: pemblrokeparkcocC(bells'outh.net
,IIllllrli/II~NO R/


f Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 NW. 3'i Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 30S.573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Sunday School 9. 945a atm
Stun Mornling Seivs .. It a 1
4' Sun BTU.. 1 30-2:30p i.
Tuesday Bible Sludy
Fe ending mnisntty '10 tII
Wed Bible Sudy.Praycr6 .30 p.m
S"'Thui Ontrechi Ministn'i,. 1'30 [)inli


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 766 Street, 33.147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

S Order of Services:
*eday Ctvl Chd 'Schol I oam.
W thip ice ........1 I 15 a.m.
I t' sdays -aBIe Cla, 7' p 1I .
\lh nduay Ivm. Wmhp .6 p m


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
tMorning Worship ...... too30a i
Tue si. Il sight Ministry........... 6 p.m.
pn ,y cr Scr m i; .... '.A... :.. 0 p.m .
___ Chuch School..................9 .



/St. John Baptist Church'\
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
s HEarly Sunday
I', 1, n'. Worslhip ,....7:30 a.m.
3und School ..........9:30 a.m.
S ironilg Worship ...11 a.m.
PJ^ -, 't. ,,-or.ra ilb.t5' Su y
y.lfir_ ....... (Tues.) 7 p.m.




/ Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order or Services:
Sunday cl ..S... 930 a III
Morning Praise Wo,.lip .11 a .t
ii f Firsts atl Tlitl Stainlay
ev ling \w.athip i 6 l)li-
SPratr 'Meeting & Bible Studl>
'lue au 7 p.m.
Warv:.,,lf l7l up, C'aill A05, RAh-. A90.
IgBHMTRit.I~~lc


2300 NW 135ti Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:,5p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School ......... 9:45 a m.
Woishp. I1 amn
Btie Studiy .'lisday ...":30pm.
xh lMinfistn (kxi -mVI
6p rm


I (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirlhbaptistm lami.org


Li
.5


New Vision For Christ 1
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10'" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
SjL ., .tday Woship,.l 30 a Im.
*Ir ,I ..... ...slii ... 930 am

',, L.. velingService i pm.
I C 't.' ayer l Meetmg )30pm
tty^tltlcstitsss 'tOpm


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


/jordan Grove Missionary \ St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12" Ave. 1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-751-9323 305-691-8861
Order of Services:
I ariy Woraip..............7 a.m. Order of Services-,
Nt II k. n, Sunday 7:30 and l I a.m.
", h~ I I n 9.i0 W worship Service
S\' ,rh rQ 9.3 a0 i .......... S tiday School
ml Iir.i.n n Tuesday...... p.. Bible Study
I U-IJ) Sit p 8 p m....... Prayer Meeting
t n.,,t M d",.. y. 1 o d y ednesday. Friday
I, r.Ja .' m12 t in. Duy Pt ycr


SIe.ra rPastor


Dr. Freeman T. Wyche /


NA


-r I'slor Alle, Caler /


I Ilf~~~am~~nmYtla~p~L~RBll~t]V~fi~i~wurxr~


\


/








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


'Pornography Awareness Week' Oct. 26-Nov.


Surveys: Nearly 60 percent of Christian men
and 37 percent of pastors admit to struggling
with pornography. Thirty-five percent of
women also admit to the addiction


NASHVILLE Christian
Newswire Steve Siler, pro-
ducer-of the recently released
Somebody's Daughter: A Jour-
ney to Freedom from Pornogra-
phy.
According to recent surveys,
nearly 60 percent of Christian
men and 37 percent of pastors
admit to struggling with por-
nography. Thirty-five percent
of women also admit to the ad-
diction.
Somebody's Daughter was
produced to shed light on how
the $13.3 billion pornography
industry is plaguing those who
profess Christianity, and to pro-
mote healing and deliverance
from the growing epidemic.
Michael Leahy, president of


Bravehearts and author of Porn
Nation, said, "I've seen every-
thing that's out there on the
issue of sexual addiction, and
nothing comes close to this.
A real gem. Ideally suited for
church."
Somebody's Daughter fea-
tures a television documentary
detailing the lives of three men
and one couple active in Chris-
tian ministry who struggle with
and overcome addiction to por-
nography. Produced by Music
for the Soul, a not-for-profit
Christian ministry commit-
ted to providing life-changing
healing through music and
song, the release also includes
compelling and therapeutic
songs, illustrative music vid-


eos and personal vignettes.
Study guide curriculum for
individuals, counselors and
churches also is available.
The concept for Somebody's
Daughter was born from a
song of the same name written
by Mandeville and Siler, found-
er and director of music for the
soul, after Mandeville revealed
to Siler his struggles with por-


nography. After attending a
meeting for sex addicts, the
two men wrote the song to il-
lustrate that women should be
viewed as a creation of a Holy
God, and as a starting point for
Mandeville's healing.
Somebody's Daughter, re-
cently won a Redemptive Sto-
ryteller Award at the 2008 Re-
demptive Film Festival.
Somebody's Daughter is
scheduled to air Nov. 30 and
Dec. 7 on the ION Television
Network (formerly PAX TV).
The documentary also is slat-
ed to air on INSP, Faith TV and
It's Time for Herman & Shar-
ron.
Siler has had more than
400 of his songs recorded in
the Christian market and won
the 2000 Dove Award for In-
spirational Song of the Year
with I Will Follow Christ. His
best known songs are Circle of
Friends and Not Too Far From
Here.


More families seek aid in face of financial crisis


By Wendy Koch

More families with children
are becoming homeless as
they face mounting economic
pressures, including mortgage
foreclosures, according to a USA
TODAY survey of a dozen of the
largest cities in the nation.
Local authorities say the
number of families seeking help
has risen in Atlanta, Boston,
Denver, Minneapolis, New York,
Phoenix, Portland, Seattle and
Washington.
"Everywhere I go, I hear there
is an increase" in the need
for housing aid, especially for
families, says Philip Mangano,
executive director of the
U.S. Interagency Council
-on Homelessness, which
coordinates federal programs.
He says the main causes are
job losses and foreclosures.
Other factors have been
/


-i


,w!


----- -- =- -
higher food and fuel prices
hitting families with "no
cushion," says Nan Roman of
the National Alliance to End
Homelessness.
Many mayors have 10-year
plans to end homelessness and
had reported progress until this
year. The most recent official
count, in January 2007, found
671,888 people living on U.S.


streets or in shelters, down
12% from January 2005.
"We saw family homelessness
began to increase last winter,"
says Sally Erickson, Portland's
homeless program manager.
"There's definitely a spike in the
last six months." The number of
requests for emergency shelter
doubled from fiscal year 2007
to fiscal 2008, which ended


in June.
Darlene Newsom, who runs
United Methodist Outreach
Ministries' New Day Centers,
which provide shelter programs
for families in Phoenix, says
the number of requests is
"alarming." She says families
who never sought help before
are calling.
USA TODAY found:
In New York City, 2,747
families applied for shelter
in September 2008, up from
2,087 in September 2007.
In Hennepin County,
including Minneapolis, 880
families were in shelters from
January through August
2008, up from 698 in that
period last year. At least 10%
this year came from foreclosed
properties where most had
been renters, says Cathy ten
Broeke, county coordinator to
end homelessness.


Copyrighted Material




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As a FREE Community Service Program by North Shore Medical Center,

we are pleased to offer the following informative event:


Join us as we celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month


With New Technology and Treatment Options


1L
tr0


Susan Baker, M.D.
Pathologist


Gershwin Blyden, M.D.
Hematology


Hakan Charles-Harris, M.D.
Breast Surgeon


Jaime Lozano, M.D.
Radiation Oncologist


Dessert with the Doctor

Thursday, October 23, 2008 6:30 p.m.- 8:00 p.m.



North Shore Medical Center Auditorium


I NORTH SHORE

Medical Center

Once you know, it's where to go.


1100 N.W. 95 Street, Miami

3 Blocks West of 1-95

www.northshoremedical.com


Call 1-800-984-3434
Refreshments served Reservations Required Seating Limited


1 (


D










The Miami Times





ea fIth


CrTIlONt R


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28 2008


Your iPod and BlackBerry can hurt your health


Several recent reports shed light on health


concerns tied to hand-held devices


The way you use your
personal electronics may be
hazardous to your health, as a
couple of recent reports remind
us. Here's how to avoid short-
or long-term health problems.
Turn down the volume. The
European Union warned this
week that users of MP3 players
risk permanent hearing loss if
they listen to these devices for
too long at maximum volume
levels. Between 2.5 million
and 10 million Europeans,
the EU estimated, are at risk
for hearing loss if they listen
to MP3 players at a volume of
more than 89 decibels for more
than five hours per week for at
least five years. As Bernadine
Healy wrote in a column last


year, "the hairlike, specialized
nerve endings that are lined up
inside a coiled, fluid-filled com-
partment of the inner ear can
be shaken to death by loud-
ness they were not designed to
handle."
Don't multitask while you
send text messages. It goes
without saying-or should-
that driving a car while texting
your friends or boss (or scroll-
ing through your iPod playlist)
can be deadly. The recent train
crash in California served as
a reminder, if one was needed.
National Transportation Safety
Board investigators found
that an engineer operating a
Metrolink train on September
12 was sending and receiving


text messages while on duty
that day, including seconds
before the crash. Six states-
Alaska, California, Louisiana,
Minnesota, New Jersey, and


Washington and Washing-
ton, D.C., ban text messaging
for all drivers, according to the
National Conference of State
Please turn to HEALTH 18B


:rowp rrkras%


find ings on
94 ,t-


Available,


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-Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



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Good health, coffee, a connection?


By Harvard Heart Letter
Some coffee drinkers worry
that theirs is a bad habit not
nearly on a par with smoking
but in that general direction.
Those worries are groundless.
In the past few years, coffee
drinking has been shown to
be safe for heart attack sur-
vivors. It offers some protec-
tion against type 2 diabetes
and gallstones. It is not linked
to the development of heart
disease.
Now, in the largest, longest
and most comprehensive study
to date, overall death rates
among nonsmoking coffee
drinkers were no higher than
they were among nonsmokers
who didn't drink coffee, and
may even have been a touch
lower (Annals of Internal Medi-
cine, June 17, 2008).
When drunk black and bitter,
coffee is a calorie-free beverage
brimming with antioxidants. It
eases artery-damaging inflam-
mation and delivers a host of
substances that help the body
regulate blood sugar and dis-
solve gallstones.
Of course, coffee isn't a
health food. The caffeine it
contains is addictive. In some
people, it causes the occasional
missed or extra heartbeat or a
speedup in the heart's rhythm.
I


Study: Examines the link between

sleep and cognitive functioning


By Rick Nauert, Ph.D.
A landmark study shows
that Black seniors who have
trouble falling asleep are at
risk for having memory prob-
lems.
Nevertheless, the discovery
raises the possibility that
identifying and treating sleep
difficulties in the elderly may
help preserve their cognitive
functioning.
The study is the first to ex-
amine the link between sleep
and cognitive functioning in
older Blacks.
The study, led by NC State
psychology Ph.D. student Al-
yssa A. Gamaldo, shows that
older Blacks who reported
having trouble falling asleep
tended to do much worse
on memory tests than those


study participants who did not
have trouble falling asleep.
Gamaldo says that the
difference was particularly
apparent in tests related to
"working memory," which is
the ability to multitask or do
two things at once. The study
examined 174 subjects be-
tween the ages of 65 and 90.
Gamaldo says the findings
raise additional questions,
which will have to be ad-
dressed in future research.
For example, Gamaldo says,
"it is not clear if lack of sleep
is the issue. Is it the quantity
of sleep, the quality of sleep,
or something else altogether?"
The study raises questions
for future research on both
sleep and cognitive function-
ing in the elderly. The find-
ings indicate that sleep may


need to be accounted for as a
confounding variable in cogni-
tion studies targeting seniors.
In addition, the findings show
that sleep research may need
to increase its focus on older
adults in order to fully explore
the impacts of sleep problems
on cognition in seniors.
"If we can better understand
how sleep quantity, as well
as quality, influences general
cognitive functioning, per-
haps we could better maintain
memory throughout life in-
cluding later in life," Gamaldo
says.
The study, "The Relationship
Between Reported Problems
Falling Asleep and Cognition
Among African American El-
derly," will be published in the
November issue of Research
on Aging.


s Providers


/ y -~K~t(^ ,te .









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


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*vF
'. WS,
AYREREMBRANCES IES
Rh R-1.
6N ME JRTHD INN


Royalty
EARL WILLIAMS, 83, died Oc-
tober 19. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m.
Friday. Service
1 p.m. Saturday,
Abundant Life
Ministries.


WILLIE ROBERTSON, 69,
died October
17. Visitation 4
to 8 p.m. Sat-
urday. Service
2 p.m. Sunday,
New Jerusalem
Primitive Baptist
Church.

SELVIN DALLAS, 43, died Oc-
tober 12. Visita-
tion Thursday

17701 N.W. 57
Ave. Service 11
a.m. Saturday
at Greater Mi-
ami Church of -
God.

RUTH JACKSON, 80, died Oc-
tober 7. Service
was held.







LEILA SCOTT, 88, died October
10. Final rites and burial in Jamai-
ca, New York.

ERICKA SAVAGE, 34, died Oc-
tober 15. Service was held.

Davis & Bricow
CHARLIE T. WILLIAMS, 82,
truck driver, died October 18 in
Dania, Florida. Service 11 a.m.
Thursday, Bethel 'Baptist Church,
Dania.

JESSIE JAMES, 79, car sales-
mandied October 15 in Jackson
Memorial North. Arrangements
ara incomplete.

Pax-Villa
CLAUDE DORCEUS, 50, cook,
died October 17 at home. Service
10 a.m. Saturday in the Broward
chapel.

EXANTUS DELORME, 52,
cook, died October 13 in Univer-
sity Hospital. Service 10 a.m. Sat-
urday, Bethel Baptist Church.

St. Fort
MARIE SIMEON, 44, died Oc-
tober 12 in Aventura Hospital and
Medical Center. Service Saturday
in the chapel.

MILISE PETIT, 53, died October
13. Service 10 a.m. Saturday, Eg-
lise dunazareen Church.

Maecene Milien, 45, died Octo-
ber 14 in Vitas Health Care Aven-
tura. Service was held.

LUCINA PIERRILUS, 63, died
October 13. Service in Haiti.

BERNARD ST. FLEURIDOR,
54, died October 14. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

YVROSE DIVERS, 60, died Oc-
tober 17 in North Shore Hospital
and Medical Center. Service 1
p.m. Saturday.

MENARD ANTONINE, 84, died
October 17 in Select Specialty
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Manker
SHARON ANN KEATON, 60,
Miami, died
October 7, Uni-
versity of Miami
Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, House ,
of God Church.
Remains will be
shipped toArca-
dia, Florida for final rites.

Grace
STEVE J. MILLER, 86, retired
World War II postal worker, U.S.
Postal Service, died October 13,
Aventura Hospital. Service was
held.


Hadley -
MICHAEL ASH, 49, laborer,
died October
18 in North
Shore Hospital.
Service 2 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.



MARILINE BONEFANT, 22,
secretary, died
October 13 at
home. Service
10 p.m. Satur-
day.




JARKEVIS LARMONT AL-
LEN, 13 months, died October 10
in Jackson Hospital. Service was
held.

Hall Ferguson Hewitt
LILLIE MAE SIMMS, 80,
dietician,died
October 15 in
University of
Miami Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at An-
tioch Missionary
Baptist Church
of Brownsville,
2799 N.W. 46 Street, Miami, Flor-
ida.

ELBERT WILCOX, 57, City of
Miami Solid
Waste, died Oc-
tober 9. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day in the cha-
pel.



TOMMIE PERTEE, died October
13 in Jackson
North. Service
was held.


I MAW
Richardson
YVONNE 0. FRANCIS, died
October 19. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


CHRISTINA JACKSON,
died October -
20. Service Sat-
urday.


THOMAS L. FRANCIS BALLLI,
died October
20. Service 2
p.m. Saturday
in the chapel.





E.A. STEVENS
WILLIE MAE CHILDERS, 96.
of 733 N.W.
5 Street, Hal- -
landale Beach,
died October
19 at home.
Viewing 5 to 9
p.m. Thursday,
Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, Hal-
landale. Service 11 a.m. Friday, at
the church.

WILLIE MUNNERLYN, of Da-
nia, died October 18. Service 11
a.m. Saturday at Mt. Pleasant
AME Church in Hollywood.

Eric S. GeorgRy2
CORALEE BLACK, 66, Miami,
died October 14 at North Shore
Medical Center. Service Saturday
in San Salvador, Bahamas.

CAMARI MINER of Hollywood
died October 12 at Memorial Re-
gional Hospital. Service was held.

GREGORY CARTER, 26 of Hol-
lywood died October 15. Arrange-
ments are complete.


Jay
CORNELIUS CALVIN, 31, labor-
er, died October
15. Service 1
p.m. Saturday,
House of God
Church.




RUBY MILLS, 77, housewife,
died October 19
in Baptist Hos-
pital. Service 1 el
p.m. Saturday,
Morning Star
Missionary Bap-
tist Church. ,


'WILKES KEMP, 75, teacher,
died October
19 in Baptist
Hospital. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.





Nakia Ingraham
ALBERTINA DEL VALLE, 72,
of Pembroke Pines. Died October
16. Service was held.

GERALDINE HUGHES, 68, of
Miramar, died October 20. Service
was held.

Carey Royal Ram'n
ERIC MASSEY, 34, of Miami
died October 15 at home. Service
was held.

NELSON THOMPSON, 19, of
Miami, died October 15 in Cleve-
land Clinic Hospital. Service
Thursday in the chapel.

ARTHUR BRAXTON 83, of
Pembroke Pines, died October 18
in Memorial Pembroke. Service
was held.

Alfonso M. Richardson
JESSIE L. OSEY, 94, died Oc-
tober 17 in North Shore Medical
Center. Survivors include: daugh-
ter, Lula Atkins; grandsons, Glenn
and Victor; great grandchildren,
Ferrell, Kia, Antaeus, Cadice and
Jalin. Viewing 4 to 8 p.m. Friday in
the chapel, 3790 N.W. 167 Street,
Miami Gardens. Service noon Sat-
urday at Mt. Tabor Baptist Church,
1701 N.W. 66 Street.

Gregg L. Maso 2-
ELDER LLOYD B. FERGUSON,
82, golf course superintendent,
died October 17 in Mt. Sinai Hos-
pital. Memorial Service 2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Kingdom Hall, Jehovah
Witnesses, Miami Shores.

Range Coconut rove
YVONNE M. MCDONALD,
commissioner's
aide, 57, OF
Coconut Grove,
died October 14
at home. Ser-
vice was held. r



George C. Davenport 65, of
Coconut Grove, died October 17
at Mt. Sinai Hospital.. Service was
held

MARY LEE WILSON, 65, retired
University of Miami employee, died
October 17 at Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Service was held.

EUGIA MAE ZEIGLER, 86, re-
tired nurse, of Homestead, died
October 14 at University of Miami
Hospital.



Honor

Your Loved


One

With an In


Poitier
RICHARD JACKSON WIL-
LIAMS, 16,
student, died.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


KENRICK W.
penter, died
October 19 in
Mount Sinai
Plaza Nursing
Home. Service
11 a.m. in the


In Memoriam


In loving


memory of,


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


BILLEY, 86, car-


VINELLA DARLENE, 52, peer
specialist, died October 13. Ser-
vice was held.

CAROLYN GARCIA LOWE, 56,
domestic engineer, died October
11 in Berkshire Manor Nursing
Home.

ALBERT PHINIZY, 58, died Oc-
tober 19 in Miami Jewish Home
For The Age. Service 2 p.m. Sat-
urday in the chapel.



Range
BERNARD NORMAN DYER,
75, commu-
nity activist and
entrepreneur,
died October
15. Survivors
include: five
children; eleven
grandchildren;
one sister; three
nephews and a host of other rela-
tives and friends. Service 11 a.m.
Saturday, New Birth Baptist Church
Cathedral of Faith International.

JOSEPH LAWRENCE, 75, ma-
sonry laborer,
75, died Octo-
ber 6. Survivors
include: wife,
Daphne; son,
Allan Shaw;
daughter, Patri-
cia Bouyer and
a a host of oth-
er relatives and friends. Service
10 a.m. Saturday, Grace United
Methodist Church.

ROLAND NAVARRO HEP-
BURN, 70, por-
ter and counter
Clerk for Grey-
hound, died Oc-
tober 14. Ser-
vice was held.



ESSIE M. SMALL, 70, adminis-
trator, for Miami Dade Community
College, died October 13. Survi-
vors include: son, Pastor Carlton
(Vicki), and Dexter B.; daughter,
Yolanda M. Hunt (Leroy) and a
host of other relatives and friends.
Service was held.



Wright & Young2^R
SARAH COLLINS-SILER 53,
administrative
representative
for Devry Uni-
versity, died
October 15 in
Sylvester Com-
prehensive
Cancer Center.
Survivors in-
clude: parents, Wiley and Alfredia
Collins; siblings Mary,Peggie, Cal,
and Leonard Anthony. Service 11
a.m. Saturday, Mt. Hermon A.M.E.
Church.

DEREK R. JOHNSON AKA
"TORO, 33,
entertainer died
October 18.
Survivors in-
clude: siblings,
Diondre Bald-
win, Dwight and .
Dwayne; grand-
mother Addie
Baldwin. Service 1 p.m. Saturday,
Bethel Apostolic Temple.

LENNOX D.W. EVANS 42 cook
for Goldie's Restaurant, died Oc-
tober 19 in Broward General Hos-
pital. Memorial service 6 p.m.
Monday, October 27, Goldie's
Restaurant 11275 NW 27 Ave.


JUAN ANTONIO
DELVILLA
10/26/53 07/09/08

To our beloved brother,to
some you are forgotten, to
some you are of the past. But
to us, the ones who loved and
lost you, your memories will
always last.
Delvilla and Cordona family


Death Notice
MRS. WILHELMENA
ROSS PAGE

93, charter member of Beta
Tau Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi
Beta Sorority, Inc. died Octo-
ber 14, 2008 at the home of
her daughter, Patricia Page
Williams in Washington, D.C.
Service October 22nd in
D.C. Rest in peace. MHS.


Death Notice
The family of the late


MAVIS NEAL


87, died October 20 at home.
Service 2 p.m. Wednesday,
October 29, New Generation
Baptist Church. Service en-
trusted to Hadley's Funeral
Home.


NED LAMBERT, JR.
"Man"

wishes to express appreciation
and gratitude to the many rela-
tives, friends, and neighbors for
all acts of kindness in our time
of sorrow.
We extend special thanks to
Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist
Church, Rev. Billy Strange, Jr.,
pastor, The Deacon Board, Male
Chorus and Number 1 Usher
Board.
We would also like to thank
Manker Funeral Home staff, for
the professionalism displayed
during our grief.
In addition, our heartfelt ap-
preciation to each and everyone
who visited, called, cooked, sev-
ered, cleaned, gave and prayed.
Continue to keep the family in
your prayers.
May God bless you.
The Lambert Family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ERNEST CUTLER


On this seventh year an-
niversary, memories of a won-
derful husband, father, and
grandfather will be in in our
hearts forever.
We love and miss you.
Love, your wife,
Mamie L. Cutler and family.


Before You Buy A Casket From

A Funeral Home Come See Us Where

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Memoriam

In The

Miami Times


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 81 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 22-28 2 8


The Four Tops' Levi Stubbs dies at 72

By Steve Jones and Jim mained loyal and usually le
-Chung other members do most of the
-talking in interviews. When
The soul of Levi Stubbs ran Motown chief Berry Gordy of
deep, and you could hear it in fered Stubbsthe role of Loui
every note he sang. In a Mo- i McKay (ultimately played by
town stable renowned for its Billy Dee Williams) opposite
smooth crooners, Levi's rich Diana Ross as Billie Holiday in
baritone was raw, passionate 1972's Lady Sings the Blues
and distinctive. Stubbs turned it down out o
And while the harmonious loyalty to his bandmates.
Four Tops exuded class and "He could have easily gon
sophistication, their music also off on his own when the Fou
brimmed with emotion, thanks Tops were at their peak," Fa
to him. Whether he was be- kir, the lone survivor, told US
moaning "empty nights echo TODAY in 1997 before receive


your name" on Baby I Need
Your Loving, offering reas-
surance when "your world
around is crumbling down"
on Reach Out I'll Be There, or
cooing sweetly to his "sugar
pie, honey bunch" on I Can't
Help Myself, it had such feel-
ing you never doubted that he
meant it.
Stubbs, 72, who suffered a
stroke in 2000 and had bat-
tled cancer since 1995, died
Friday at his home in De-
troit.
He was a rarity at a label
where the lead singers of such
legendary groups as The Su-
premes, The Miracles and The
Vandellas had their names
in lights. Stubbs steadfastly
refused to distinguish him-
self from his three friends
- Renaldo "Obie" Benson,
Lawrence Payton and Abdul
"Duke" Fakir that he began
singing with in high school in
1954. The group remained in-
tact until Payton died in 1997;
Benson died in 2005.
Together, they charted with
more than 50 hits, and many


Ipods, Blackberry may
HEALTH
contiuned from 15B
Legislatures. (Six states-
California, Connecticut, New
Jersey, New York, Utah, and
Washington-and Washing-
ton, D.C., have laws that pro-
hibit driving while talking on
hand-held phones-though
using a hands-free device is
usually permitted.)
The risks can be consider-
able off the road, too. Emer-
gency room physicians report
a spike in cases of people in-
jured while texting and simul-
taneously walking, biking, and
rollerblading. As a result, the
American College of Emergen-
cy Physicians issued a state-
ment this summer warning of
the dangers of text messaging
while engaged in other activi-
ties. One illustration cited by
the group: A young woman


of them, including Berna-
dette, Standing in the Shad-
ows of Love and Shake Me,
Wake Me (When It's Over), are
essential to the Motown can-


f 1, .


cause health problems
who was walking and texting
when she stepped off the curb
was hit by a pickup truck and
died in the emergency room
Most people can walk and
talk, says Linda Lawrence,
president of the ACEP, but
"when you text and walk,
it's essentially like walking
blind."
Take a break from texting,
and do exercises. One in 6
young people 16 to 24 years old
surveyed by the Chartered So-
ciety of Physiotherapy reported
feeling discomfort in his or her
hands while texting, according
to a report released in July. A
2006 Virgin Mobile survey re-
ported that cellphones cause
about 3.8 million repetitive
strain injuries per year. Some
frequent cellphone users com-
plain of sore thumbs and wrists
associated with too much tex-
ting, Virgin Mobile reports.


band's star on the
Reuters file photo


on. The group was inducted
into the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame in 1990.
Despite numerous offers
for a solo career, Stubbs re-


#' i


LUCILLE WALKER
10/20/1902 08/15/88

Your loving family, daughter
Bertha Glover, grands, Jack-
ie and Valeria, great grands,
Eric, Jawana and RuNaia.
Pets, Star Muffin and Hud-
son


Death Notice

ALTERMEASE SMITH

95, Domestic died October 21,
2008. She is survived by her
two daughters, betty Thur-
man, and Delores Coach-
man; one son. Harold; a host
of grandchildren; and a host
of relatives and friends. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.
range Funeral home is con-
ducting the services.




Honor

Your Loved

One

With an In

Memoriam

In The

Miami Times


t
e
n

s

e
n
S,
Df

e
r
-
A
V-


ing the Rhythm & Blues Foun-
dation's lifetime achievement
award. "And I'm sure he could
have gone and done great
things for himself. It says a lot
about the man because not too
many guys would have with-
stood the pressures and stuck
around to split it four ways."
Stubbs remained humble af-
ter years of accolades. On the
few occasions when he did talk
about himself, he was self-
Sdeprecating.
"Well, I'm rather loud and
raw," Stubbs told the Los An-
geles Times in 1994. "I don't
really even have a style; I just
come by the way I sing natu-
rally. When I learn a song, I try
to live it as best I can."
His few forays outside the
group included voicing Aubrey
II, the man-eating plant in the
1986 film Little Shop of Hor-
rors, and Mother Brain in the
1989 TV cartoon Captain N:
The Game Master. Stubbs' last
public appearance with the
Tops was the group's 50th an-
niversary concert in Detroit in
July 2004.


.1 j : as 'F :


WILTON HOPKINS
"Butch"


One year has passed since
you left us. You are truly
missed by family and friends.
Your loving memories will live
on in our hearts forever.
Love, Avis, the Hopkins-
Ruffin family.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


HILMA JANET CLEAR


wishes to express our sin-
cere thanks and appreciation
for your kind expressions of
sympathy during our bereave-
ment.
Special thanks to the Rev.
Canon Richard L. Marquess-
Barry, for a remarkable service,
St. Agnes' members and assis-
tants, family and friends.
Thanks to Mr. Dwight Jack-
son and the staff of Richardson
Mortuary for their excellent
service.
The Clear Family


Happy Birthday in Memoriam
In loving memory of, In loving memory of,
EEPP' -7-,7


EMMA Y. LELAND
'TEENIE'
10/27/63 08-19-06

It has been two years since
you left us. Our hearts still
hurt, but your memories are
still so sweet in our minds.
We think of you everyday and
miss you so much.
Love always, Mom, Dad, Val,
Lisa and your nieces


Death Notice


JERRY L. WILLIAMS


45, building engineer died
October 16, 2008 in
Jackson Hospital North.
Viewing 4-8 p.m.,
Friday, October 24 at
Mitchell Funeral Home,
8080 N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday
at Mt. Calvary Baptist Church,
1140 N.W. 62nd Street.

Card of Thanks


VINELLA D. MANN

wishes to express our apprecia-
tion and gratitude to the many
relatives and friends for all the
love and support shown during
our time of bereavement.
Special thanks to Pastor
Walter Gibbons Jr (Faith Tem-
ple Community of Jesus Christ,
Rev. Lloyd Cheever and Poitier
Funeral Home for their services
given. A special thanks to Patri-
cia Barber and all of the friends
in Carol City.
May God bestow many bless-
ings upon you.
Sincerely, Tanya Crosson,
daughter


TODD J. SMITH
10/23/64 06/01/08


If we wish the gloomy clouds
away and pray for sunshine
instead, then raise our eyes
to heaven, well find rainbows
overhead.
Lovingly, we miss you, The
Young and Tullis families and
dear friend, Twilla

Happy Birthday


WILLAMAE JACKSON
"Billie"

10/25/25 10/05/01

Words cannot express how
much we miss you. You will
always be forever in our
hearts.
Your loving family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


HOUSTON MARSHALL, JR.

Seven years has gone by
and nothing has changed.
Memories of you still remain
the same.
You're in our hearts from
day to day. . forever always,
that's where you'll stay.
Missing you, love always,
your wife, Hattie Marshall
and family.


JOIN THE

cN= U',9oU. ELfItE
by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth. net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"


Levi Stubbs during the unveiin unlng of the
Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1997.


K d' -'. 1 i.


Copyrighted Mat erial ....





Available from Commeryndical News Pronviders



Available from Commercial News Providers


,. ,


1I VL


Call 305-633-0688 Licensed Funerai oirectors






The Miami Times

Li"esty es


I .. inI meant
FASHION HIP HoP MUSic FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


THE MANY FACES OF ,

Martin Luther King, Jr.
Everyone has a different vision of what Martin Luther King, Jr. meant to the world. King was a
philosopher, a preacher, a man of peace and a risk taker. He was strong, thoughtful, intelligent
and direct in his mission to spread hope, justice and democracy for all.


kr lrad%
mrri an
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iW mCitim"


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LSyndicated Content


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


B Dr R -c.. ..
, 1. a o a .e -. . . 7


As New Birth Cathedral
Baptist Church stands
out as one of the popular
churches to be joined in
holy matrimony, it was evi-
dent that Vanessa Joseph
and Jahvon Thompson per-
ceived the same and wanted
an opulent appearance for
family members and guests.
When the guests arrived,
they were occupied with a
video of historical pictures
of the bride and groom
from birth to the engage-
ment parties shown on the
huge screen, while 3-stretch
limousines including a
22-passenger Escalade -
brought the bridal party
and took over the front of
the church. The males worn
white on white tuxedos and
the females wore gold chif-
fon gowns with no sleeves
with solos sung by Waseme
Berry and Apostle Rufus
Troup, officiant.
Members of the bridal
party included Deliverance
and Elva Joseph, parents
of the bride, Cassamo and
Andrew Thompson, par-
ents of the groom, followed
by bridesmaids and grooms-
men Stacy St. Cyr and Bar-
ry Pinder, Patricia St. Cyr
and Bryant Louis, Isabelle
Colas and Jordany Tous-
saint, Gelda Drosier and
Andrew Thompson; Barry
Pinder and Bryant Louis,
best men; Louise Joseph,
maid of honor, Deliverance
Joseph, matron of honor;
Nylah Gervais, ring bearer;
Princess Janeah T. Joseph
and Nachaly Duverger,


flower girls: and
Rae'quel Wil-
son, bible hold-
er.


for scholarships for local
high school students.
Nadine Roach captured
the audience with her beau-
tiful voice as she sang a
song of praise. There was
not a dry eye in the house as
prayers were led by Leomie
Smith, of New Way, with her
prayer for prosperity, while
Mary Dunn, chaplain, added
prayer for families, and Di-
rector J.D. Patterson added
prayer for the universe. The
both of them electrified the
audience and the spirit of
the Lord was in the place.
0. Leanne Smith had
the honor of blessing the
meal and everyone enjoyed
themselves, followed by
Hattie Burnett introducing
Minister David Ramjohn,
Youth Director, New Way P
& W Center. His topic was "I
Know What Prayer Can Do"
which motivated the people
and gave them a spiritually
uplift and the opportunity to
display their thankfulness
and appreciation for what
God had done for them. The
place was on fire and it was
evident that everyone came
to have church and they got
what came for.
Young, president of Gam-
ma Alpha Chapter, gave
closing remarks as she
thanked Richardson, chair-
person, and all program par-
ticipants for their continued
support, especially on a Sat-
urday morning. Others in
attendance included Brenda
Williams, Vincent McBee,
Loretta Pieze, Clarence
Dunn, Claretha Davis, and
the Pattersons.
Also, Drabina Washing-
ton, Winifred Beacham,
Effie Culmer, Ronrica Mor-
gan, Vannie D. Barr-Fish-
er, Thelma Burnett, Lillian
Mitchell, Helen Reed, Corl-


iss, Sellers, Lillie Williams,
Dawn Roach, and Valerie
McGraw.

Speaking of organizations,
Chairperson Cecilia Stew-
art and the "new" Overtown
Community Oversight Board
(OCOB) are meeting the
needs of people in the com-
munity, as well as forging
ahead with visionary ideas
that will perpetuate the in-
terest of everyone.
More importantly, Stewart
is putting together a calen-
dar for 2009 which would
display historical sites and
landmarks in the commu-
nity, such as The Historical
St. Agnes Episcopal Church,
Culmer Center, Chapman
House, The Dorsey Library,
St. John Community Devel-
opment Enterprise, etc. This
calendar may include Presi-
dent Barack Obama super-
imposed upon pictures of
historical sites.
Stewart continues to do a
commendable job with the
volunteers assisting, espe-
cially Vincent Holland, a se-
curity guard at New Birth Ca-
thedral B/C., as well as her
parents. And, of course, dur-
ing her spare time, she mows
her own lawn and generates
new ideas for the people as
she mows from row to row.
***** *
Baljean Smith, chairman,
retired brothers of Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity, Inc. conduct-
ed a meeting, last Thursday,
at the Omega Activity Center
and the brothers displayed
a strong interest to meet
continuously after Dr. Ed.
Braynon spoke on unity.
Two important issues were
brought to the table: Thanks-
giving dinner and Christmas
dinner for the selected senior


citizens. Smith announced a
change for the Thanksgiving
dinner, because the commit-
tee consisting of John Wil-
liams, Dr. Herman Pratt, R.
J. Strachan and Oscar Jesse
voted to collaborate with The
City of Miami Gardens and
take the program to them,-
rather than having them
bused to the center during
this gas crisis, as well as the
Christmas Program.
Some of the other broth-
ers in attendance included
Johnny Davis, Jim Tullis,
Harry Dawkins, Andrew Ro-
bison, Arthur 'Jake' Simms,
John Shaw, Harcourt Clark,
Peter Harden, Norman Cox,
Earl Daniels, Elston Davis,
Johnny Stepherson and
Ted Blue.


"When a man is determined,
what can stop him", is a fa-
mous quote Coach Rudolph
'Bunky' Matthew used to
motivate his football players
at Bethune Cookman. Now,
Misnere Cedieu, a Haitian
student is the product of it.
Cedieu remembered liv-
ing in Port-au-Prince with
his mother and six brothers
and sisters and eating rare-
ly until his mother decided
to send him to his father in
North Port, Florida at the age
of 10. His life became better,
instantly, while pondered his
future of finishing school and
going to college. Unfortu-
nately, his father and sister
had a serious argument and
to avoid being punished, she
ran in her room and locked
her door. She refused to open
it upon several requests from
her father.
So, her father got a knife to
open the door and Cedieu be-
came frighten and called the
police. This step angered the


father and he told Cedieu he
had to leave his house. He
was 17 and had no where to
go, so, he lived on the street,
but stayed in school and
never missed a day despite
his situation. He begged for
school supplies, accepted
taunts from classmates, and
slept in an empty house every
night.
His life engendered a bright
light when a white man gave
him 5-dollars in from of a
Publix market. Cedieu was
prompted to play Fantasy
Five and won $5,000. To him
it was a blessing, because he
had enough money to pay his
graduation fees and those he
borrowed from.
More importantly, he grad-
uated with honors and cried
as he saw his father and sis-
ter in the audience. After he
received his diploma, his fa-
ther cried and congratulated
him for his effort to succeed.
His sister was also proud of
him and asked him what col-
lege he plans to attend. He
remarked," Bethune Cook-
man U.
Today, he is a freshman with
a major in physical education
and a determination to join
the track team and continue
his prowess in the 100m dash
and 4X100m relay as he did
in the State meet last year in
high school. Even though he's
at BCU, financial help is still
needed. If interested, please
contact the university.
Finally, they are many more
Cedieus in Haiti trying to
come to America to broaden
their horizon. And, of course,
they need your help. So, con-
tact your representative re-
garding this case. This is a ne-
cessity, while Cedieu plans to
write a book about his expe-
rience and his road to mini-
success.


~ ~'r~"~ -
.::
o jiDjjj~~i 'r~ ~. : ~
'-irA ~,


Put on your red dress or eve-
ning gown to help support high-
er educationM v.hen Miami Alum,-
nae Chapter of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority present their an-
nual "Poinsetta Ball" on Decem-
ber 20 from 9 p.m. 1 a.m. at


the Shearton Mart.
Regina Giles is the
pre :ident Drrt r
forget the date
Congrats to Car-
lester Chaney who received her
doctorate degree.


Wedding anniversary greet-
ings to the following: Frank and
Shirley D. Cooney, Jr., 23rd
anniversary, October 12; H.
Malcolm and Diane N. Davis,
17th anniversary, October 12.
Get well wishes to Nettie Dove,
Edith Oden, Mildred Washing-
ton, Vashti Armbrister, Edna
Scavella and Theodore John-
son.
A few facts about our predict-
ed First Lady (I hope and pray)


Michelle Obama. Her greatest
gift is her ability to relate to the
average American. Even though
she's taller, fitter and well-ed-
ucated than most of us, she is
completely and totally believable
as a person who lives in the same
world we do, who consumes the
same pop culture and shops at
the same stores. She struggles
with most of the same personal
and professional juggling acts.
For part of their marriage, Mi-


chelle Obama had a higher in-
come than her husband.
October is Breast Cancer
Awareness Month, please re-
member your annual mammo-
gram or self-examination. It is
a simple exercise but a very
important one. Take the time to
take care of you.
Larry and Patrice Ingraham


and their son Trent were in
the city last weekend as guest
of his brother and sister-in-
law, Tellis and Doris Ingra-
ham of Miami Gardens. Larry
and his family live in New York
City. Trent hopes to enroll at
the University of Miami or Nova
Southeastern University in the
fall of 2009.


Hip LStan'rk swi "a


W1 t m WP emm -m s- ill


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FEATURING
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I


The bride was
escorted by Evan
Joseph, brother-, and was
attired with an atara, mini-
earrings, sparkling neck-
lace, a sequin white purse,
and a mini-train. She and
her husband participated in
a traditional service with the
singing of the "Lord's Prayer,"
declaration and blessing of
the marriage, recessional
and to the Seduction Ball-
room for the reception and
celebration with Louise Jo-
seph, wedding planner, and.
coordinator.


According to Nikki Young,
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority,
Inc., Gamma Alpha Chapter
recently kicked off their new
season with their Annual
Ann B. Smith Scholarship
Prayer Breakfast at Florida
Memorial University with
Leola Adams, mistress of
ceremony.
Adams began the program
with the introduction of the
opening praise team of Dea-
cons David West and Mel-
vin Williams of Greater Love
Full gospel Baptist Church,
while invocation was led
by Dr. Ivis Richardson fol-
lowed by the reading of
scripture by Doris Neal and
Albertha Barry gave a very
warm welcome followed by a
brief history of the sorority
and how proceeds from the
prayer breakfast are used









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\VN DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


0~Th~k~


Get ready for voting obstacles


November 4 is Election Day.
Based on public and media in-
terest in this year's hotly con-
test presidential race, analysts
are expecting record voter turn
out. As you prepare to raise
your voice and cast your ballot
for our country's next President,
also prepare for obstacles. Let's
learn from the mistakes and re-
ported fraudulent activities of the
2000 and 2004 elections. Show-


ing up to the polls
informed will help
ensure that your
right to vote will not
be denied.
President George W. Bush won
the 2000 election by the narrow-
est margins. On election night,
and in the days that followed,
claims of voter fraud and voter
disenfranchisement surfaced
in the media. Charges that the


ballots were overly complicated,
confusing voters were made.
Several media outlets reported
on missing ballots. When Bush
was re-elected in 2004, his mar-
gin of victory was greater but re-
ports of election fraud were once
again brought to the forefront.
In both elections, voter stories of
being turned away for not hav-
ing proper identification and the
like were reported by the media.
Some experts say that the pos-
sibility for election irregularities
and voter disenfranchisement is
greater this year than it was in
2000 or 2004, while others say
it shouldn't be an issue. Know-
ing what we know about the Re-
publican Party and their desire


for power, I say we should expect
the worse and prepare ourselves
for it. Two things to keep in mind
on Election Day:
Do not wear Obama apparel.
Each state has different rules on
what is considered electioneer-
ing, or trying to influence voters.
To avoid trouble, do not wear any
candidate apparel.
Bring additional identification.
lost states only require voters
to bring their voter identification
card. To be on the safe side, bring
a picture I.D. card, along with
your voter's card. If you don't
have a picture I.D. card and are
asked for one at the polls, call
your local election office from the
polling place to find out if this is


a legal request.
The Voters Unite website has
a list of phone numbers for elec-
tion commissions in each state.
You can call your local office to
verify the identification and elec-
tion rules for your state. Visit the
site at http://www.votersunite.
org/ info/ Reglnfo.asp.
For some, it is not too late to
register to vote, if you haven't al-
ready. In Wisconsin you can reg-
ister in person on Election Day; in
Alabama, you have until October
24 to register. Visit http://www.
votersunite.org/info/RegInfo.asp
to learn your state's voter regis-
tration deadline.
If you are an ex-felon, know
that you may be able to vote, de-


pending on which state you live
in. There are only 14 states in
the U.S. that prevent an ex-of-
fender from voting once he/she
has completed parole. Call your
local election office to learn your
rights.
This year's election has been
called the election of our life-
time. Preparing ourselves for
what could possibly be some of
the most wide-spread voter dis-
enfranchisement in recent elec-
toral history could ensure that
we don't fall victim to four more
years of the same wasteful gov-
ernment spending and lack of at-
tention to the needs of the Amer-
ican people that has forced our
country into a downward spiral.


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50 couldn't resist creating own reality show


Mogul 50 Cent is set to share
his entrepreneurial skills next
month with the debut of The
Money and the Power, his first
MTV reality series. The show
will feature 14 aspiring moguls
living together in a Brooklyn
warehouse dubbed "Camp Cur-
tis." From there, the contestants
must work together through
a myriad of innovative chal-
lenges in hopes of honing their
business acumen. Each week,


50 will eliminate a contestant
based on how much knowledge
they retained from the previous
challenge. Viewers will also get
to see the contestants interact
with other music stars, as spe-
cial appearances from LL Cool
J, Aubry O'Day of Danity Kane,
Lloyd Banks, and blogger Miss
Info are highlights of the series.
50's right hand man Tony Yayo
will serve as the show's "Under-
boss," making sure the show's


YOUR WEEKLY~.U
Horscope


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
Domesticity has a way of ruining
relationships. A little more spark is
needed here. Who were you before you
settled down? Take off for a while and
get back to your self. When you return
your partner will see you in a whole new
light. Lucky numbers 4, 30, 22, 19, 40.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
How this goes depends on how well
you've treated people in the past. If
you've been straight with them you'll
have all the support you need. If you've
ripped them off don't expect anything.
As the saying goes, we get what we
give. Lucky numbers 2, 20, 43, 29, 1.

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
Other people's judgments have hurt
you deeply. Trying to prove that your
integrity is above question will take
time. If others cast you as selfish it's
their issue. You know who you are. Don't
knock your self out kissing up to them.
Lucky numbers 8, 40, 17, 43, 7.

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
You've gone overboard with
something. It's great to let it rip but
going too far too fast usually backfires.
Before you proceed, check things out
a little more. This may not be what you
think it is. Let caution reign over impulse.


Lucky numbers 39, 54, 30, 11, 2.

LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Others are demanding and you're in
no mood to be pressed. In your mind
they're nuts to be forcing the issue.
You'll have to live with this until they
wake up and see that what they want
so badly is totally out of the question.
Lucky numbers 14, 38, 33, 20, 34.

VIRGO: AUG. 21 SEPT. 20
Working double time is getting to
you. While you aren't exactly up for this,
you need to know that it will be more
than worth it. Discipline is the price of
freedom my dear. Buckle down. What
you put out now will set you free. Lucky
numbers 19, 10, 34, 7, 5.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCT. 20
Others are in over their heads. If you
keep reminding them of this they'll get
defensive. Step back and let them see
for them selves that what they're trying
to do will happen sooner if they lose
the need to have it all at once. Lucky
numbers 5, 50, 46, 55, 2.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
Life keeps reminding you that
you've had it. The voice in your head is
screaming for change. You could speak
up and hope that someone will listen


contestants remain in line and
focused on the tasks at hand.
Even with the television's wide
variety of reality shows, 50 is
confident that his series will
transcend most shows and illu-
minate the hard work and sac-
rifice required to make in it the
music business. "If it was just
my image, I wouldn't have made
this much money," 50 stated
bluntly of his business acumen
and taste.


but before you can do that you need to
trust that it won't ruin everything. Lucky
numbers 18, 39, 20, 11, 4.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
Waiting for someone to return could
take forever. Has it occurred to you
that you're better off without them?
Pining away is usually a sign that we're
stuck. Stop crying over this. Accepting
your loss is the key to moving beyond it.
Lucky numbers 6, 50, 49, 53, 17.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21 JAN.20
You're good at talking about how
abundance comes from within; funny
how you're freaking out about money.
The gap between your philosophy and
your behavior is huge. Get a grip. It's
time to put your money where your
mouth is. Lucky numbers 21, 10, 31, 4,
5.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21- FEB. 20
Traveling is on the menu. What
happens when we're away from the
nest shifts us out of normal far enough
to see life and our place in it from a
totally different perspective. New sights
and people will do much to change your
tune. Lucky numbers 8, 7, 45, 49, 33.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
Spacing out about things is a great
way to avoid them. Lucky for you there's
someone there who takes care of what
you can't handle. How would you ground
yourself without them? Think about
that. Better yet, try dealing with your
own stuff. Lucky numbers 5, 50, 23, 11,
15, 5.


Adrienne Arsht Center and Broadway Across America present
THE WIZARD OF OZ
"Brilliant!" UK Theatre Network
Travel with Dorothy and Toto down the yellow brick road to a
glittering art deco Oz, complete with munchkins and flying
monkeys. There are lavish special effects and those classic
songs guaranteed to send you over the rainbow!l
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $20, $35, $45, $59

THE WIZARD OF OZ
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $20, $35, $45, $59

THE WIZARD OF OZ
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $20, $35, $45, $59

THE WIZARD OF OZ
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $26, $37, $47, $61


THU


FAMILY FEST
Activities for the entire family!
11:30 AM 1:30 PM Thomson Plaza for the Arts FREE
THE WIZARD OF OZ
2 and 8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $26, $37, $47, $61
Adrienne Arsht Center and Day 1 Entertainment present
EVA AYLLON
"A Peruvian superstar!" The Washington Post
Ayll6n is the top interpreter of the elegant and lively
m6sica criolla and Afro-Peruvian pop.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $35, $45, $60

THE WIZARD OF OZ
2 and 7:30 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $20, $35, $45, $59

Concert Association of Florida presents
KIROV ORCHESTRA
"Valery Gergiev conducted a performance of bounding panache."
The Times
One of the oldest musical institutions in Russia featuring Maestro
Gergiev, the Principal Conductor of the London Symphony
Orchestra.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $15, $25, $75, $135

Adcrienne Arenl Cenier and Larry Rosen present
LEGENDS OF JAZZ
Legendary jazz pianist and composer Dave Brubeck is joined b'y
the Cuban-born Grammy-winning jazz great Paquito D'Rivera
and the world's premier contemporary lazz all-star group
Fourplay, featuring Bob James. Larry Carllon. Nathan East, and
Harvey Mason
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25, $45, $55. $85, $125


Eva Ayllon


Dave Br.uL.Be:


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.


I I - -- -- -


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!






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Honoraw, the 0ii. tan, ling Lifetime
.4 hiceVOI.-mL' a//CH Conmributions of
* Dr. Dorothr Jenkins Fields
* Dr. Enid Curtis Pinikney
* The International Longshoremen's
Association Local 1416 ______


WShIDAY


p W^%v NoV.2,2CCs
LAp 4<:CC0 p.m.
MIAMI MARRIOTT BISCAYNE BAY HOTEL
1633 North Bayshore Drive, Miami, Florida
Ticket Prices: $150, $200 and $300
Proceeds benefit the M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.,
a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Cocktail Reception, Dinner, Open Bar, Show
For Information and Reservations: 305-893-5468
( .,,M ,.,.,lwf// .o
BACARDI, U.S.A., INC. AMERICAN AI.lINE- AT&T FPL THE MIAMI HERALD
EDEN Roc RENAISSANCE RESORT & SrA M"IAMI NMARRIOTT BISCAYNE BAY MACY'S
THi: IIAMI TIMES
This event is made possible by fi,.nli fromt the Miiami-Duade Counti: Florida, Cultural Afftirs
Department and the Miami-Dade (>County Board of Con(oy Comnnissiolners.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


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Tr he Mikinfimi Ti ne:s .-

Business
SECTION D MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


Jesse Jackson says financial crisis threatens U.S. superpower status


By George E Curry

EVIAN, France Jesse Jack-
son told an international gather-
ing of world leaders this week that
the turbulence on Wall Street is
symptomatic of deeper financial
problems that may threaten the
United States' ability to function
as an effective world leader.
He made his comments on a
panel Monday in this southeast
France resort city best known for
its export of bottled water. Jack-
son told delegates to the first
World Policy Conference, "It's
not just a banking crisis [in the
U.S.], it's a profound economic
crisis."
He noted, "GM (General Mo-
tors) 20 years ago was the larg-
est employer in America. Now,
it's Wal-Mart. GM was paying
$20 an hour with health ben-
efits. Wal-Mart is paying $7 an


hour without health benefits and
with products mostly made in
China. The Big 3 in Detroit used
to mean GM, Ford and Chrysler.
Now, it means three gambling
casinos."
Because of increased foreign
competition and the U.S. au-
tomobile industry's slowness
to build more durable and gas-
efficient vehicles and now
topped by a severe credit crunch
- Jackson said automakers are
engaged in an uphill struggle to
remain solvent.
"Last week, while we focused
on the bailout we tried to sta-
bilize the credit markets GM,
Ford and Chrysler were appeal-
ing for a $25 billion loan with
below-market interest so that
they can compete with Germa-
ny, Korea and the Japanese. Is
that a decline or is that a state of
transition?"


/I


,



Rev. Jesse Jackson in Evian, France
-Photo by George E. Curry


The answer, Jackson suggest-
ed, will become evident in future
years.
In a conference dominated by
heads of states and prime min-
isters, Jackson was the most
prominent non-office holder to
attend the conference. The con-
ference, which ran from Monday
through Thursday, was orga-
nized by the French Institute for
International Relations, a pres-
tigious public policy think tank
based in Paris.
According to the institute, the
conference was designed to ad-
dress three questions: What is
the state of the world? Where is
the world going? What can be
done to better governance in the
world?
Those in attendance included
the heads of states from France,
Russia, Senegal, Estonia, Mon-
golia, Croatia, Serbia and prime


ministers or foreign ministers of
Kenya, Algeria and Luxembourg.
Other high-profile officials in-
cluded the secretary-general of
NATO, the president of the Swiss
Confederation, the director-gen-
eral of the World Trade Organi-
zation and the president of the
European Central Bank. No top-
ranking official from the United
States attended the conference.
In his presentation, Jesse
Jackson said tremors in the fi-
nancial services sector of the
U.S. economy have been com-
pounded by the loss of faith in
those who were supposed to pro-
tect consumers from a financial
calamity.
"The U.S. is in a profound civi-
lization crisis," Jackson said.
"We're now moving from arro-
gance and conceit almost to the
seeds of self-doubt. Today, there
Please turn to STATUS 8D


IMI% N Ia Mf VII t






*


















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I n j 1 P% c rftul p4 aL


.-- NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT-RISK FIRM



The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to select one (1) Construction Management (CM) at-risk firm for the
following project:
NEW ADDITIONS & LIMITED RENOVATIONS
at
MIAMI SENIOR HIGH
2450 SW 1st Street, Miami, Florida 33135
Preliminary Estimated Construction Cost: $50 million
Project No. 00176800

The scope includes, but is not limited to, new construction, limited renovations, repairs and demolition at the existing fully
operating school campus, as follows:

New three-story classroom /central power plant building (approx. 100,000 sf), two new two-story classroom buildings
(approx.56,000 sf) at north parcel including two new parking lots. New three-level parking garage (approx. 94,424
sf), remodeling of weight room into an automotive vocational area, renovation of the East wing only (cafeteria and
limited media center work), modifications to the West parking lot, new entry plaza, hardcourts, drop-offs and all
on-site and off-site improvements and landscaping. Demolition of the existing chiller building, portables, selective
buildings and driver's education range.

Due to the complex nature, this project may include phases, pull-out packages and alternates. Existing school campus
operations must be maintained during the construction phases and extensive coordination/cooperation with the A/E of Record,
consultants, school administrators and district offices will be required.

Firms or companies desiring to participate in the CM at-risk selection process shall submit an original qualification proposal
and eight (8) copies by no later than 4:00 p.m.. local time. Thursday, November 20, 2008, to the attention of:

Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A., Administrative Director
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132

The Procedures for Selection of CM at-risk (with all pertinent information and forms) as referenced in School Board
Rule 6Gx13- 7B-1.021 can be accessed on line at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/ae solicitations/sp/CM.pdf or
picked up at the above address. Applicants must submit in the format and forms prescribed in the procedures in
order to be considered. Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) reserves the right to request clarification of
information submitted and to request additional information of one or more proposers.

MANDATORY PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: A pre-proposal conference will be held at The South Florida
Educational Federal Credit Union, 1498 N.E. 2nd Avenue, 2nd Floor Conference Room on, Thursday. November 6.
2008 at 9:30 a.m. Proposals submitted by firms not represented at the Mandatory Pre-Proposal Conference will not
be considered.

If the applicant is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint venture agreement must be submitted with the application.
Percentages of participation of fees must be clearly stated for each joint venture partner. Only one submittal will be accepted
per applicant, either as a single prime firm or as part of a joint venture.

Applicants desiring to participate in this contract must be pre-qualified by the Board prior to submitting their proposal
in response to this solicitation. Contact the Office of Contractor Pre-Qualification, at (305) 995-1420, for information
regarding Contractors' Pre-Qualification procedures. Applicants must have an active Contractors' Pre-Qualification
certificate with a single dollar construction value of no less than $50 million in order to be eligible.

M-DCPS reserves the right to utilize an alternate delivery method other than CM at-risk. M-DCPS does not guarantee
any specific project or dollar value.

M-DCPS strongly encourages the participation of certified M/WBE firms either as a prime proposer or as part of a
consulting/supporting team. The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination
in educational programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.

Any firm or individual, whose contract has been terminated by the Board, with cause, within the last three years, shall
not be considered under this Request for Qualifications.

The successful Applicant(s) shall fully comply with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 "Jessica Lunsford Act" and
all related Board Rules and procedures as applicable.

Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance of the Legal
Advertisement and ending when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to commission
or otherwise takes action that would end the solicitation. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as
provided for under the referenced School Board Rule, in addition to any other penalty provided by law. All written
communications must be sent to the address above and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE
2nd Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.
Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11,
or in accordance with Section 120.57(3), Florida Statutes (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under
Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.

School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/. This solicitation
can be accessed at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/default.asgxpid=ae solicitations


















SECTION D






101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$900 nice and clean, laundry
room, parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625 Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

11530 N.E. 12th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly, $1400 to move
in. Call 786-256-3174.

1156 Sesame Street
One bedroom, one bath $600
monthly, $1400 down.
786-287-1080

1202 N W 61 Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $800 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1243 N.W. 61st St #4
Two bedrooms, one bath, wa-
ter included, central air, Sec-
tion 8 accepted,
786-229-6567

1245 N.W. 60 St. #1
Two bedrooms, one bath,
stove and refrigerator, Italian
tiles, bars. 786-210-5644

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1277 N.W. 58 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, ap-
pli. included. Section 8 Wel-
come.
786-277-9925, 305-244-2141

1281 N.W. 61 Street
One Month's FREE rent!
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552 or
786-499-8212

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

13190 Aswan Road #2
Move in special, one bed-
room, one bath, central air,
Section 8 accepted, $800,
786-229-6567

13966 N.E. 2 Court
One bedroom, second floor.
$800 monthly, $1200 move
in. 305-299-4312 or
305-326-8855

140 S.W. 6th Street
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

14100-40 N.W. 24 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL $500
Security only! One bedroom,
one bath $675, two bed-
rooms, one bath $800.
Call 786-287-0682

1461 N.E. 169 Street
One bedroom, one bath, up-
dated kitchen and bath, pool,
gym. 786-402-4403.

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

1950 N.W. 2nd Court
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

220N.W. 16 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $600.
305-642-7080

2515 N.W. 52 St #3
One bedroom, tiled, air, no
appliances. $550 monthly.
$1100 to move in. 954-522-
4645.

2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$650. Call 786-412-9343

3090 NW 134 Street #3
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 monthly, $1300 to move
Sin. 786-512-7643.

421 NW 59 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Studio, $600
One bdrm, $675


Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-259-7054

439 N.W. 9th Street
Move in $900 with applianc-
es, monthly rent $475, only
three units at this price,
305-326-8855


O


S
U


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

5629 S.W. Fillmore
Hollywood
One large bdrm. $800 mthly.
Move in $1475.
786-256-3174

5755 N.W. 7 Avenue
Large one bedroom, park-
ing. $625 monthly. $1000 to
move in. Call 954-394-7562

58 Street 31 st Avenue
Small one bedroom, partially
furnished, air, lights and wa-
ter. For one or two people
only. Call 305-693-9486.

6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6251 N.W. 17th AVENUE
Air, tiled floors and new ap-
pliances. very clean. $550
monthly, section 8 preferred.
contact 305-253-8771 or 305-
519-3882. Ask for Mary.

676 N.W. 48 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8. For information call
305-681-8473 after 5 p.m.

7526 N.E. Miami Court
One bedroom. $650 monthly,
free water. $1500 to move
in.786-277-0302

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

Downtown Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen, new
tile, fresh paint, secured with
parking, $650-$695. $100 off
three months. 305-931-8616

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Sta-
tion. On major bus lines. Al-
berta Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida


GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144


HOLLYWOOD AREA
Nice location, close to
schools and church. One and
two bedroom with tile, air,
stove and refrigerator, water
included in rent, Section 8
welcome, 305-624-9590.


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084


Located Near 90 Street
and 27 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,


light, water, and air included.
Also one bedroom furnished.
Call 305-693-9486


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
One bdrm, one bath, marble
tile, utilities included. $695
monthly, $1390 to move in.
Efficiency available, $595
monthly, $1190 to move in.
305-621-1334
NO DEPOSIT with Section 8.
Two and one bedrooms.
786-267-3199

Opa Locka Apartments
One bedroom, $450-$500
Two bedrooms, $575-$600
Free Water. 786-267-1646

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W 135Ih Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air
Appliances and water in-
cluded Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
305-769-01146 786-521-
7151

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 welcome, $500
cash back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.


4520 N.W. 27th Avenue
$750 monthly, $2,250 to move
in, call 305-781-0959.

COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


2767 N.W. 198th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one and a
half bath town house, $1200
monthly, 305-336-3133.

3786 N.W. 213th Terrace
MIAMI GARDENS TOWN
HOME, QUIET STREET,
three bedrooms, two baths,
enclosed yard, new applianc-
es, tile floor and central air.
Call 305-573-4443

6701 S.W. 116th CT.
Condo for rent. two bdrm.,
Stwo bath, $1300 monthly, first
and security. 786-399-8557.

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, two new bath-
rooms, free water and secu-
rity gate. 954-266-9328

Miami Gardens Area
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, fenced, bars, ap-
pliances and more. $1400
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Manny, 305-409-2570

NEW TOWNHOMES
FOR RENT!!
ANGIETOWNHOMES
720 NW 61 STREET
One, two, and three bed-
rooms units starting at $950
UNITS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
SECTION 8 PROGRAM
WELCOMED
Olde Towne
International Realty
305-819-2979

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Rent or own two bdrm., two
bath condo ,$1150. $200
off first month. Air, balcony,
tiled floors and one assigned
covered parking. Laundry
available. Approved section
8 housing. Please contact
Kathy at
847-682-0290.

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
One bdrm, one and half bath,
Section 8. 786-277-3688.


11107 N.E. 11 Place #A
Spacious two bedrooms,
one bath, large closet space.
No Section 8, No pets. $975
monthly, $1950 to move in.
786-253-1659

11275 N.W. 17Ave
Large three bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 OK. 786-269-5643

11620 N.W. 17th Avenue
Three bedrooms, Section 8
okay, $1200, 305-305-1184.

1415 N.W 58th Terrace
One bdrm, one bath, air, wa-
ter included, $700 mthly, Sec-
tion 8 OK! 305-733-1466 or
305-525-7221.

142 N.W. 71st Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, tiled and car-
pet. Security bars, air, $950
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-389-4011 or
305-632-3387


1601 N.W. 66 Street
Two bedrooms $750 monthly,
$1700 deposit to move in.
786-277-0302


1722 N.W. 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air
and carpet included. $650
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 305-751-6232.

1762 N.W. 50th Street
Totally remodeled, two bed-
rooms, one bath, central air,
$825 monthly, call 786-290-
4625.

1832 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bdrms, one bath, $750
monthly, first and security to
move in. Call 305-638-5332.

1871-73 NW 43 Street
Clean Two bdrms, one bath,
central air, appliances tile.
blinds, security bars
Call 786-357-5000

1944 N.W. 93 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call Molly 305-541-2855

2053 ALI BABA AVENUE
Two units available,newly
renovated one bedroom, one
bath, tiled floors, new appli-
ances, central air, $600, first
and security. 786-315-7358
or 305-332-4426

2257 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080

2415 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly, $2200 to move
in. 305-634-5794

245 N.W. 55th Street
Two bedrooms, two baths,
$895 monthly, $1800 to move
in. Call 305-905-4184.

2545 B York Street
Opa Locka
One bedroom, refrigerator,
stove, air, 305-653-6784 or
954-736-9005.

265 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
Call Ray 786-541-3179

3189 N.W. 59th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled. $800 monthly.
Call Marie 786-367-3820.

326 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$950. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

3503 N.W. 11 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly, $1500 to move
in. 305-282-7953

4603 N.W. 15th Avenue
Two bdrms, den. Vouchers
are accepted 305-638-5946
or 305-759-2280.

515 N.E 150 Street
One or two bdrm. or efficiency.
Call Gloria 954-437-8034.

563 N.W. 96th St (Rear)
Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances, air, 305-244-9959,
call after 4 p.m.

5701 N.E. 1st Court
Three bedrooms, two baths
central air, tile throughout,
Section 8 welcome, call 954-
609-5043 or 305-219-4121.

650 Oriental Blvd
(151 Street Opa Locka)
Two bedrooms, refrigerator,
stove, air, 305-653-6784 or
954-736-9005.

6811 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call Molly 305-541-2855

7017 N W 4 Court
Remodeled two bedrooms,
one bath duplex. Central air,
tiled. $875 monthly, water in-
cluded. First, last, security.
Call 786-556-9644

ALLAPATTAH AREA
Two bdrm, two bath, air, tile,
fence. $925. 305-979-5178

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at 3737 Charles Ter-
race

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Move in special $600! Two
bedrooms, one bath, tiled,
central air, private backyard,
Section 8 okay, call 786-287-
0682.


100 N.W. 14 Street
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN), free lo-
cal and nationwide calling,
property protected by security
camera 24 hours, $185 wkly,
$650 mthly. 305-751-6232

2480 N.W. 92nd Street


$500 a month, $1000 to move
in, all utilities paid,
786-277-0302


2915 N.W. 156 Street
Private entrance, free cable.
$165 weekly, $650 to move
in. 305-624-3966.

3153 N.W. 53 Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

5422 N.W. 7 Court
Large efficiency includes
water and electricity. $700
monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN. Property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

85 N.W. 46 Street
$600 monthly, includes
utilities and cable. 786-326-
7916.

9290 NW 22 Avenue
Upstairs, efficiency, and
rooms for rent, air, water
and utilities included in price.
For appointment, please
call Walter 786-356-3673,
Mike 786-290-4366, or office
305-691-6340.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$525 Monthly
786-306-8786

North Miami Area
Great location, near 1-95.
Call 305-502-7835


1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

210 N.W. 43rd Street
Full kitchen, use of whole
house, utilities included. $450
a month, $250 security, $700
to move in, call 305-836-5739
or 305-335-6454.

2373 N.W. 95 St.
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276

LIBERTY CITY/BROWVILLE
Clean rooms, utilities includ-
ed, quiet neighborhood, 786-
541-5234

NORTHWEST AREA
Furnished room for rent in pri-
vate home, light kitchen priivi-
lege, call 305-621-1017.

NW AREA
Rooms with central air and
appliances. 786-487-2222

OPA LOCKA AREA
Private entrance, central air,
private bath, washer and dry-
er. Call 786-380-7967

OPA LOCKA AREA
Furnished room with cooking
privileges. 305-681-8326.


1014 N.W. 60th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, Section 8 ac-
cepted, 305-216-0901.

10740 SW 149th TERR.
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950 monthly. No section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

1141 N.W. 111 St
Two bdrm, $1000 mthly.$1900
move in.305-525-0619

12245 N.W. 18th Ct.
Spacious, four bedroom, two
bath house. $1450 monthly.
786-423-7719

12405 N.W. 20 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two
baths,$1400 and one bed-
room, one bath, $800, lights
and water included. 305-788-
3785

1256 N.W. 51 Street
Large three bedrooms, one
and a half bath, den, front
and backyard fenced. $1100
monthly. 305-788-2605.

13001 N.W. 18th Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly, no Section 8,
call 786-412-1131.

1327 NW 40 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
954-663-5263

1340 N.W. 88th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air and tiled. $1299,
first and last. 786-315-3193

1341 NW 58 Terr.
Three bedroom, one bath-
room $1150. One bedroom,
one bathroom $650. 954-
993-8240.

1410 NW 195th STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
one car garage. $1300
monthly, no section 8. Call
305-267-9449

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750, air. 305-642-7080


1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or 305-
992-3653.


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


8200 N.W. 14th Avenue
Three bedrooms, central air,
$1195. 786-306-4839.


i7gRP


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Nice three bedroom, two
baths, one car garage, $1000
per month, 786-273-6473.


Miami uaraens
Rooms for rent.
305-300-7783


15730 NW 27 COURT
Four bdrm, two bath, fenced
yard. Others available.
702-448-0148.

17401 NW 37th COURT
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1200 monthly, no section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
Upstairs, one bdrm., $750
mthly utilities included, $950
to move in, 305-525-0619.

20625 N.W. 28th AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
all tile, central air. Available
in November. 305-732-9875
pager, 305-624-4395

2320 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security.
Call Waymon 786-877-1046.

2360 N.W. 140th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
first and last. $1200 monthly.
Curry 786-985-3074.

2424 N.W. 43rd Street
Affordable rent, three bdrms,
two baths, 786-382-8005.

2545 N.W. 167 St.
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1450 monthly. Ask
about move-in special.
786-319-8184

2770 N.W. 153rd Terrace
Three bedrooms, central air,
$1195. No Section 8. Call for
list. 786-306-4839.

2970 N.W. 195th Street
Three bdrms, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 OK!. 786-277-3688

3251 NW 212 STREET
Section 8 o.k.; Four bed-
rooms, two baths, $1500.
305-785-5703.

3315 N.W. 49 Street
Four bedrooms, central air,
$1395. No Section 8. Call for
list, 786-306-4839.

3451 N.W. 174th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
den, fenced, central air, bars,
tile, $1350 a month, first, last
and $700 security. Section 8
okay. Call 305-621-0576.

3500 N.W. 203 Street
Three bedrooms, garage.
Section 8 Welcome.
786-357-8885

7709 N.W. 21 AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath, air,
fenced yard, water included.
305-331-5399

810 N.W. 84th Street
Three bdrm., one bath, cen-
tral air, tile. $1200 monthly.
305-662-5505.

8250 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$775 monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

Behind in Your Rent or Mort-
gage? Kathy. 786-326-7916

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

Dade and Broward
Special Program
Two, three, four bdrms. From
$900 monthly 305-804-4070.

LIBERTY CITY
Three bdrm, two baths, $1600
monthly, Section 8 only. Call
305-620-4054,305-527-8330

MIAMI GARDENS
Four bedrooms, two and a
half bath, single family home.
$1650 monthly.
305-962-6970

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three and four bedroom
houses available. Remod-
eled, air. 305-431-8195.

MIRAMAR AREA
Three bdrm, one bath. Clean
and quiet. 954-864-5889

North Miami Area
One Four Bedrooms, No
Sect 8 Broker: 305-624-
1688.

Northwest Miami Area
One, two, three and four
bdrms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Sean 305-205-7738

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Five homes to choose from,
three bedrooms, two baths,
$1000 to $1300, air, bars,
$3000 to $3900 moves you
in. No Section 8. T. Dellerson,
Broker 305-891-6776

PERRINE AREA
Three bdrms, one bath, $1175
mthly, 786-277-7028.

SOUTH, Richmond Heights
Two bedrooms, one newly
renovated bath, large kitchen,
family room and dining area,
$1000 monthly, no Section 8,
Call 305-205-0482


1041 N.W. 74th Street
Calling All Investors! Motivat-
ed Seller! Three bdrm, one
bath. Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101

13001 N.W. 18th Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$21 OK or best offer, call:
786-412-1131

14622 NW 13 Road
Four bedrooms, central air,
try $1900 down and $1295
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.

1725 NW 132 Street
Two bedrooms, two baths,
huge den, a perfect "10".
Try $4900 down and $1558
monthly-FHA 786-306-4839.

1951 N.W. 94th Street
Three bdrm., two bath, cozy
home with huge yard.
Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101

400 Opa Locka Boulevard
East of 1-95 N.W. 137 St.
Renovated three bdrms, two
baths, tile, air, family room.
Seller pays FHA closing cost.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

7935 N.W. 16th Avenue
Three bedrooms, central air,
everything new. Try $1900
down, $1195 monthly, FHA,
call for list. 786-306-4839

HOW TO BUY
any of our homes with zero
down payment- Even if you
can afford to pay all cash.
Call 786-488-8617.

NO QUALIFYING
NO CREDIT CHECK
Three and four bedrooms
houses. Owner financing.
Only $2900 down.
786-306-4839

NW AREA
Brand new home, three bed-
room,,two bath; $199,000, as
low as $175,000 if qualified
first time home buyer. Also
available, four bedroom, two
bath, at an attractive price.
call
786-859-3772

Owner Will Financel
Or Rent to Own. Must Sell.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard.1855 N.W. 132nd
St. Call EB 786-991-4767


YESI!! YES!!! YES!!!
HERE'S HELP
TO OWN YOUR OWN
HOME NOWI!!
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also Available
HUD/VA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


z212 N.W. u4 itreet
Ready to build, 4176 square
feet. Water and electric
ready. 786-201-0101





Gene and Sons,Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathroom at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting soil.
Tony 305-491-4515

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors, cabi-
net and lawn service. Moving
and hauling. 305-801-5690


Tony Roofing
Shingles, re-roofing, leak re-
pairs. 305-491-4515


TIMESHARING ORLANDO
One bedroom. $5000 plus
maintenance fee. Call 305-
769-3556 or 1-800-890-1940.


- Vir


SS


SHOP TO EARN
A home base business go
to website; shoptoearn.net/
dianadavis. Click on box
above name Diana Davis-
click on OVERVIEW







COOK and CLEAN
LAUNDRY
Required minimum five
years experience with
references related to house-
keeping positions. 5.5 days.
Valid driver's license, non-
smoker, drug testing and
background check required.
Call and leave your name
and telephone number.
305-694-6227


NURSING ASSISTANT
Seeking live-in to care
for elderly handicapped
patient. Must be skilled in
patient care and mobility.
786-277-8988

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour


We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street



Bar-Restaurant Equipment
Used tables, chairs, bar stool,
coolers, ice machines, stove
hood. 305-343-7817

Furniture Liquidation Sale
Everything must go. Dresses
couches, tables and more.
305-644-9000.





INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court
cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


Be a Security Guard
786-333-2084
Or renew license $60, 40
hours $100 G and concealed
$150.




SUBSCRIBE


TODAY!


END THE

INCONVENIENCE

OF EMPTY

NEWSPAPER

BOXES,

FIGHTING

THE WEATHER

AND

HUNTING

DOWN BACK

COPIES


CALL

305-694-6214




YOUR




'AD


COULD BE




HERE


--










8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


80" iha mlad ilW Oftison


yAvailable fmndicatmerc New rovid



Available from Commercial News Providers


Jackson: The U.S. is in a profound civilization crisis


STATUS
continued from 6D
is a crisis of trust.,
Americans do not trust
their president. The
more he talks, the less
Americans believe what
he says or want to hear
what he has to say.
"America is more dis-
trusting of Congress,
which has been com-
plicit with the presi-
dent. Executive powers
and Congressional pow-
ers have been molded
into one, it seems. And
they are distrustful of
Wall Street, which they
see as greedy and ex-
cessive."
Jackson said that
distrust comes on the
heel of the American
public feeling betrayed
by President Bush's in-
vasion of Iraq.
"There is a strong
sense that we remain a
great world power. But
today, some of the reck-
less use of our power


put us in an awesome
dilemma," he said.
Jackson said one
conference participant's
evaluation of America's
position in the world
stands out in his mind.
"He said the 21st
century did not start
with the calendar year
2000," Jackson re-
called. "It started with
the Iraq war and Wall
Street that began the
21st century."
To remain a world
power, Jackson said,
the United States has
to make a major deci-
sion.
"The decision we have
to make is whether we
lead by power or the
power of our example,"
he said. "I heard some-
one put it that way.
That's a big decision."
There was tremen--
dous interest among
government leaders
and academicians in
the U.S. presidential
election.


I


"We are looking .at
your elections," said
another panelist, Domi-
nique Moisi, a founder
and senior adviser at
the French Institute for
International Relations.
"You wouldn't be sur-
prised to learn that 85
percent of the French
[want Obama to win],
which is a huge major-
ity."
He said the United
State's decision to in-
vade Iraq without con-
sulting with its Euro-
pean allies, strained
many relationships.
Obama, moreso than
John McCain could
heal the wounds cre-
ated by what many
consider American ar-
rogance.
He said, "It's a feeling
in Europe that history
will start from scratch
again if and when we
see the beaming, smil-
ing, charismatic face of
Obama on our tdlevi-
sion screens."


owI a4*-0


an s Center of Hollywood


3829 UNIT-D
WEST HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD

954-964-9528
4,-']. ,.,m i 1-


B L IT


wee4 i, /tvit
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional. Safe & Confidential Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
i- individual Counseling Services
Board Cerlilied OB GYN's
S- Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399

Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P.
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 One of I i old#et Peditlic Practices
in Dade County Over 50 Years of Child Car,
WEBSITE
1 www.rozalynhpaschalmd.com

NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave.. Ste 50 660 N. State Rd. 7. Ste 3A
Miami, FL 33147 Phone: 305-758-0591 Plantation, FL 33317 Phone: 954-880-8399
JACKSON NORTH MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
(formerly Parkway Medical Plaza)
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste. 203
N Miami Beach. FL 33169 Phone: 305-652-6095

ATTENTION SENIORS
BRAND NEW APTS
1,2 AND 3 BEDROOMS FROM $637*
Section 8 Welcome
CORAL PLACE APTS.
Apply At
Lafayette Apts
150 NE 79th St.

305-759-6350
*income restrictions apply
ADA, EHL


INVITATION TO BID NO. 08-09-004

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 1st Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
Florida 33133-5504 for:

GENERAL ROADWAY AND DRAINAGE CONSTRUCTION
Bids Due: Monday, November 17, 2008, AT 3:00 P.M.
Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary to construct the Project(s) as described
below for a complete and functional Project. Close coordination with other contractors) who are responsible for the installation of
storm sewer collection systems associated with this Project may be required. Work specified in this bid consists of furnishing all labor,
machinery, tools, means of transportation, supplies, equipment, materials, and services necessary for the repair, maintenance, and
installation of roadway systems on an as-needed basis, including but not limited to; paving, milling, resurfacing, drainage, sidewalks,
curbs and gutters.
The completed Work will provide other incidental work in connection therewith all as indicated on drawings. The Contractor shall
furnish all required materials, labor and equipment for Work to be performed under this Contract.
This Solicitation is for Projects that have an estimated construction cost of less than $250,000, as well as for Projects that will equal or
exceed this threshold. The following Projects are anticipated to exceed $250,000:

Civic Center Roadway Project Flagami Roadway Project
Allapattah West Roadway Project West Little Havana Roadway Project
Allapattah East Roadway Project Shenandoah West Roadway Project
Grapeland Roadway Project Little Haiti Roadway Project
Downtown Roadway Project Model City Roadway Project
Venetian Causeway Roadway Project Overtown Roadway Project
Upper East Side Roadway Project NW 1st Street Roadway Project
Coconut Grove Roadway Project NW 2nd Street Roadway Project
North Citrus Grove Roadway Project SW 5th Street Roadway Project
South Citrus Grove Roadway Project SW 16th Avenue/23rd Street Roadway Project
The Roads Roadway Project NW 14th Terrace Roadway Project
Shenandoah East Roadway Project SW 11th Street Roadway Project
East Little Havana Roadway Project NW 15th Street Roadway Project

CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference which will be held at the following date, time and location:
Location: City of Miami-City Hall-Commission Chambers
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133
Date: Tuesday, October 28, 2008 Time: 10:00 AM

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor or General Engineering
Contractor from the State of Florida or Certification from Miami-Dade County and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience in
the items being bid on by the Bidder. The City may consider other Certifications or Licenses from the State of Florida or Miami-Dade
County at its sole discretion. The Bidder must self-perform all single trade work and thirty percent (30%) of multiple trade work.
Bid packages/forms are available on or after, October 20. 2008, from the City of Miami Department of Capital Improvements
Program webpage:
http://www.miamigov.com/Capitallmprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp
It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms periodically
check the CIP webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly
opened. Any bids or proposals received after time and date specified will not be considered. The responsibility for submitting a
bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/Bidder. The City is not responsible for
delays caused by courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE
WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E. City Manager
DP# 000793


L -- -- -, -


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


OWN DESTINY


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Copyrighted Material .




Syndicated Content w-




Available from Commercial News Providers


Three tips for a successful internship


By Sarah Baranowski
This summer I came
inches away from
foregoing the traditional
internship route. I had
decided that a few good
but physically distant
opportunities would
put too much stress
on my young children.
And I was uninterested
in many opportunities
that would have
sounded great to
me eight or 10 years
ago. I was weighing
my nonconventional
options, mainlyprobono
work and new business
development, when
the right traditional
opportunity came
along. In the final weeks
of spring semester, I
accepted a strategic
planning project for a
local biotech company.
I spent the summer
working on product
launch strategies,
operations planning,
and business model
development for a new


technology. It turned
out to be a lot of fun,
and a great learning
experience to boot.
But first things first. It
was not exactly smooth
sailing the whole way
through. Halfway
into the summer, the
company was acquired.
As the result of a new,
narrower focus, my
project was canceled
two weeks before my


scheduled departure.
My team was disbanded,
and our plans were
shelved. Of course I am
disappointed that I don't
get to see my work put
to immediate action,
but I cannot discount
the learning experience.
Nor can I find fault in
the decision to put the
project on hold; better
to secure success on
one project than to


risk failure on five -
especially in the midst
of a big transition.
No matter the bumpy
landing, it was a great
ride. Why? Three
reasons:
I did something
different.
I learned something
about myself.
I have a compelling


story to tell to these
specific characteristics
thatmade this internship
a good and worthwhile
experience. I hope these
thoughts translate into
some useful advice
about what to look for
in an MBA internship,
if you happen to have
the So now I will turn
Please turn to TIPS 10D


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MIAMI-DAD

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
idiverhgi Excellence Every 'a



PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given of the following polling place changes. These
changes have been made by the Supervisor of Elections pursuant to
Section 101.71, Florida Statutes.
Permanent Polling Place Changes
Precinct # New Location
217 Hotel Roma Golden Glades
217 16805 NW 12th Avenue
2361313 Kalar Banquet Hall
2361313 1100 Opa-Locka Boulevard
Miami Lakes K-8 Center
308 14250 NW 67th Avenue
nLester Sola
MIAM Supervisor of Elections
WB Miami-Dade County, Florida


PUBLIC

MIAMI-DADE PUBLIC
m MEETING

As a part of Miami-Dade County's continuing commitment to
public participation in local government, the Park and
Recreation Department invites area residents to attend a public
meeting regarding:

KENDALL INDIAN HAMMOCKS PARK
11395 SW 79 Street, Miami, FL 33173
As part of the meeting, staff will make a presentation and
answer questions about planning, development and
operations. Residents are encouraged to attend and comment
on planning for Kendall Indian Hammocks Park. The meeting
will take place:

TROPICAL ESTATES PARK
RECREATION CENTER
10201 SW 48 Street, Miami, FL 33165
Thursday, October 30, 2008 7 9 PM
For further information, requests for foreign language
interpreters, or questions prior to the meeting please contact:
Andy McCall, Park Planner
Miami-Dade County Park and Recreation Department
iamccal@miamidade.qov or 305-755-7993
Call 305-755-7848 (V/TDD) for materials in accessible format,
information on access for Persons with Disabilities or sign
language interpreters (five days in advance).
Multiple members of individual community councils may attend.



JO]IDIE:~INI OUR&BUSINESSHI SER ICE CONNECTION


REVISED
INVITATION FOR BIDS
Bids will be received by The Housing Authority of the City of Miami Beach
(HACMB) for IFB #3-08 for the Substantial Rehabilitation of 328 Jefferson Av-
enue, Miami Beach, Florida 33139, until December 1, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. The
IFB package will be available from HACMB Executive Office, 200 Alton Road,
Miami Beach, FL 33139 starting on October 15, 2008 at 10:00 a.m. A non-
refundable fee of $100.00 in the form of a check, cashier's check or money
order made payable to HACMB will be required to obtain a bid package. A
mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on October 28, 2008 at 11:00 a.m.
at Rebecca Towers North, Multi-Purpose Room, 200 Alton Road, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139, and a site visit will be conducted at the conclusion of the pre-bid
conference. Questions may be directed in writing to Matthew Garwick, Opera-
tions Manager.
The HACMB reserves the right to accept any proposal deemed to be in the best
interest of the HACMB, to waive any informality in any proposal, to reject any or
all proposals, or to advertise for new proposals. HACMB does not discriminate
on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, or disability.


I


RI ACKS MUST CONTROL FH-EIR









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 22-28, 2008


Three tips for a successful internship


TIPS
continued from 9D

luxury of selectivity. (And
do be selective if you have
the option. It is worth the
effort!)

Do Something Different
Someone with an es-
tablished career rarely
has the opportunity to
try something completely
different. That's what re-
turning to school is all
about, and I discovered
that's what an internship
can do as well. At my
stage of career develop-
ment, it's not about get-
ting a foot in the door; it's
about diversifying. For
me, it meant working in
a different industry -- in
this case, biotech and
medical devices. It meant
sitting in the sales and
marketing department,
rather than partnering
with them. And it meant
leading business plan de-
velopment, rather than
managing an existing
business model and an
established team.
Given a full range of
roles to choose from, I
might not have picked
marketing. Historically
in my consulting man-
agement roles, I de-
veloped close ties with
sales and marketing
functions, but I never
reported into them. In
hindsight, I wonder why
I had not considered
marketing, especial-
ly strategic planning,
more seriously before
this summer.
With this experience
in mind, my best ad-
vice to first-year MBA
students hunting for
the perfect internship is
this: Do something dif-
ferent with your sum-
mer. Target your search
at roles that you do not
intend to pursue after
graduation. Diversify
your portfolio. Will I ever
sit in a marketing de-
partment again? Maybe,
maybe not. But by do-
ing something slightly
outside of expectations,
I have opened my op-
tions.

Learn Something
About Yourself
About a month into
my role as a strategic
planner, I began to rec-
ognize a long-stand-
ing strength of mine
for aligning strategies
across functional areas.
For a few years now,
I have struggled with
my elevator pitch, my
30-second response to
"So, what do you do ex-
actly?" Tough question to
answer for someone who
does not have a widely
understood job title. By
shifting perspective this
summer, I finally was


able to put it into words.
I realized that I had been
too focused on where I sit
in the org structure: "I
specialize in ops manage-
ment; no wait, it's proj-
ect management. Or is
it process improvement?
Supply chain? Well, it's
one of those things, I'm
pretty sure." Hardly the
right message to send. In
my role this summer, I fi-
nally saw my blind spot.
Forget my job function;
that's temporary. What
really matters is that I
connect functions. I con-
nect sales, marketing,
operations, and fulfill-
ment -- what it takes to
sell and what it takes to
deliver as promised. I sit
at the interface between
these areas, make sure
that they understand one
another, and make sure
that their strategies are
aligned. It means being
cross-functional by na-
ture, and it means build-
ing a cross-functional
team that cuts open the
silo walls. That's me.
That's what I do. Light-
bulb moment!
Build a Compelling
Story
Earlier in my career, I
enjoyed a jump-start into
management by choos-
ing to work for a startup
rather than a big estab-
lished company. At the
time it was not a career
development strategy; I
simply followed my in-
terests. But in hindsight,
I can see what it did for
me. I wore more hats,
and I wore them earlier
than I might have other-
wise. Perhaps as a result,
this summer I did not shy
away from the uncertain-
ty of a smallish company
rich in intellectual prop-
erty and ripe for acquisi-


tion.
Combine that company
profile with a manager
who did not treat me like
an "intern" but rather
wanted me involved in an-
swering hard questions,
sought my advice on
strategy, and encouraged
me to reach out to people
across the organization
and to customers and
partners. The result was
an internship experience
that gave me a wide-
ranging perspective on
a complex company in a


very short time. I really
had the opportunity to
work with all of those
functions that I men-


tioned earlier, and I con-
nected with people from
executive management
on down.


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CALL OR COME IN FOR ADVICE
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PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given of the following temporary polling place changes.
These changes have been made by the Supervisor of Elections
pursuant to Section 101.71, Florida Statutes.
Temporary Polling Place Changes

Precinct # New Location
016Harambam Congregation, Inc.
7800 Hispanola Avenue
The Savoy Hotel
044 425 Ocean Drive
First Church of North Miami
1411175 1200 NE 135th Street
33636 Hialeah Opa-Locka Masonic Lodge #391
3361386 150 W 20t Street
34 All Angels Episcopal Church
1801 Ludlam Road
45 Chinese Baptist Church of Miami
415 595 SW 124th Avenue
Centro Cristiano de Amor y Fe
425 5859 SW 16th Street
55Mall of the Americas
7827 W Flagler Street
745 3 Riverside Baptist Church
745783 10775 SW 104 Street


Lester Sola
Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade County, Florida


Are you low-income? Would you like
to be a homeowner in the City of
Miami? Homeownership is possible!

Join the City of Miami's Dept. of Community
Development for a HOMEOWNERSHIP FAIR
Saturday, October 25, 2008 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Villas Godoy, Ground Floor
1475 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL 33135

















Learn more about Villas Godoy condominiums and
other homeownership developments in the City of
Miami that have received federal and state funding
to provide homeownership opportunities for
low-income* persons.

To R.S.V.P., please call 305-416-2016


Confirm if your family is
eligible for government
subsidies available for first-
time homebuyers. Consult
with local banks and non-
profit housing organizations.


.AD PUBLIC
MIAMI-DAD
aa MEETING

As a part of Miami-Dade County's continuing commitment to
public participation in local government, the Park and
Recreation Department invites area residents to attend a public
meeting regarding:

MATHESON HAMMOCK PARK WEST
9610 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, FL 33156
As part of the meeting, County staff will make a presentation
and answer questions about planned enhancements to the
west side of the park. Residents are encouraged to attend and
comment on planning for the western half of Matheson
Hammock Park. The meeting will take place:

Fairchild Tropical Garden
Auditorium
10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables, FL 33156
Tuesday, October 28, 2008 7:00 9:00 PM

For further information, requests for foreign language
interpreters, or questions prior to the meeting please contact:

Andy McCall, Park Planner
Miami-Dade County Park and Recreation Department
iamccal(&@miamidade.gov or 305-755-7993

Call 305-755-7848 (V/TDD) for materials in accessible format,
information on access for Persons with Disabilities or sign
language interpreters (five days in advance).

Multiple members of individual community councils may attend.


EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


*80% Average Median Income or Below for Miami, as defined by
the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD).


MIAM 3
j^ SBlP"


INVITATION TO BID NO. 07-08-021

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, Ist
Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133-5504 for:

MiaMarina Pier No. 5 Repairs, B-30325
and
Dinner Key Marina Pier No. 3 Repairs. B-60474A

Bids Due: Thursday, November 20, 2008, AT 2:00 P.M.
Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary to
achieve the following:
Miamarina Pier No. 5 Repairs:
Demolition of approximately 330 linear feet of existing wood decking, associated utilities and
timber mooring pilings. Construction of approximately 330 linear feet of concrete decking with
fiberglass grating, electrical systems, CATV, telephone, and water service for approximately 15
boat slips.
Dinner Key Marina Pier No 3 Repairs:
Demolition of approximately 780 square foot existing damaged dock structure, including support
pilings. Installation of new concrete support piles and cast-in-place concrete caps to support a
concrete deck timber fender piles with marine hardware, including cleats and ladders. Fiberglass
grating, supplied by the City, will form the utility chase. Marina utilities will be replaced, shore
power electrical service, with pedestals supplied by the City. Installation of approximately 140
linear feet of dock fire and domestic water lines with a single hose cabinet, provided by the City.
Installation of approximately 70 linear feet of sanitary sewer dock line with a hydrant for connection
to the existing sewage pump-out system. Removal and replacement 1 luminair, 1 marine power
unit, and all associated power, lighting, and communications circuits. Reconnection of existing
power module.
CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit which will be held at the
following date, time and location:
Location: MRC, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida 33130
10th Floor City Manager's Main Conference Room
Date/Time: Thursday, October 30, 2008 at 10:00 AM
Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General
Contractor from the State of Florida and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience in the
construction of similar projects including five (5) separate project references of similar size, scope,
and complexity, supported by references within the past seven (7) years. The Bidder must self-perform
at least twenty percent (20%) of the physical construction work.
The Bid documents may be obtained by visiting the Department of Capital Improvements Program's
website at http://www.miamigov.com/Capitallmprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.
asp on or after October 20, 2008. It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure the receipt
of any addendum and it is recommended that firms periodically check the CIP webpage for
updates and the issuance of addenda.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. At the time, date, and place
above, bids will be publicly opened. Any bids received after time and date specified will not be
considered. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely
and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/Bidder. The City is not responsible for any no matter what
the cause. YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE
"CONE OF SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."
l ie .."."-- .,-. .,PRE-BID CONFERENCE
r ... .,_.....-. -ADDENDUMS

035-JJ05 11/4/2008 Marker Boards Unframed

014-JJ06 11/4/2008 HVAC-R Parts and Supplies,
Manufacturers Discount
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


JOIN OUR


BUSINESS& SERVICE CONNECTION




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