Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00567
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 15, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00567
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text







The invisible issue in this election: Race


Neither candidate should be allowed to avoid giving specific
answers to specific questions about the problems that afflict Blacks


By DeWayne Wickham

Like the protagonist in Ralph Elli-
son's Invisible Man, the issue of race
is largely unacknowledged by the
presidential nominees who are hur-
tling toward the Election Day finish
line.
In the opening page of Ellison's nov-
el, the main character -an unnamed
Black man explains that he's invis-
ible not because he is a ghostly cre-
ation of Edgar Allen Poe or Hollywood
filmmakers. He is unseen, he says,
because people have chosen to ignore
his existence.
And so it is in the current presiden-


tial contest with the matter of race.
Neither John McCain nor Barack
Obama has shown a willingness to
address the peculiar effects of this
nation's lingering racism, except for
the Philadelphia address Obama was
pressured into giving to distance him-
self from his former pastor's scandal-
ous talk.

POLITICAL CONCERNS
Each man, for vastly different rea-
sons, has treated race as an invis-
ible issue -McCain because Repub-
licans effectively severed their ties to
blacks in 1968 when they embraced
a Southern strategy that pandered to


SEN. BARACK OBAMA
Democratic Presidential Candidate


the rear guard of the Dixiecrat move-
ment; Obama because his political
handlers fear that as the first Black
to win the presidential nomination of
a major party, he cannot risk being
pigeonholed as a "Black politician."
And so it could be left to Bob Schi-
effer, the moderator of Wednesday's
final presidential debate, to force
Obama and McCain to talk about
race. Getting presidential candidates
to do this is not uncharted ground for
Schieffer, the chief Washington corre-
spondent for CBS News and host of
Face the Nation.
Four years ago, he was the only
presidential debate moderator to put
a race question to President Bush
and Sen. John Kerry. "Do you see a
need for affirmative action programs,
Please turn to RACE 6A


SEN. JOHN MCCAIN
Republican Presidential Candidate


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Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES


FOR OVER 85 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 8 MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1 5-21, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


CASH INFUSION HALTS LOSING STEAK





Stocks rocket up 936 points


By Matt Krantz

Investors got a $1.2 trillion re-
minder on Monday that stocks
can rise, too.
Thanks largely to an unprec-
edented global plan to inject cash
into the financial system, stocks
snapped a brutal eight-day losing
streak that has shaken faith in
the stock market and wiped out


$5,6 trillion in wealth this year.
The Dow Jones industrial av-
erage rocketed 936.42 points, or
11.1%, to 9387.61. That was the
Dow's largest point gain ever, big-
gest percentage gain since 1933
and fifth-largest percentage gain
in history. "It's the greatest rally
I've ever seen," says Robert Malt-
bie of Singular Research.
The rally provided much-needed
relief for investors who last week


saw the value of their portfolios
drop 40.3% below the level when
the market hit its high a year ago.
Monday's rally restored $1.2 tril-
lion in stock value, according to
DJ Wilshire.
Investors are hopeful that gov-
ernment moves to restore credit
markets will kick in. The U.S.
Treasury plans to inject money
into banks as part of a globally
coordinated effort, which includes


taking equity stakes in financial
institutions. Also, leading Euro-
pean nations are pushing trillions
into the financial system with di-
rect taxpayer aid and guarantees
-- news that helped trigger Mon-
day's global rally.
The U.S. bond market was
closed for the Columbus Day holi-
day, so the credit market's reac-
tion won't be known until today,
Please turn to STOCKS 6A


School Board approves contract, district moves forward


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@maimitimesonline.comn

A month after being chosen to
lead Miami-Dade schools as su-
perintendent, Alberto Carvalho's
contract was finally approved by
the School Board with a 6-3 vote
on Friday. The board made a mi-
nor adjustment in the contract
by decreasing his previously ne-
gotiated three year contract to a


two-year contract with a salary of
$275,000 yearly.
The decision comes a week af-
ter the Ethics Advisory Commit-
tee announced that the School
Board had violated principles by
hiring Carvalho, 43, so soon after
the departure of Dr. Rudy Crew.
And the email scandal involving
a The Miami Herald reporter has
questioned the credibility of the
superintendent.


ALBERTO CARVALHO
Miami-Dade School Superintendent


"The public was not afforded
the opportunity to speak and
I -also think that you have an
ethical obligation to interview all
possible candidates," said Fred-
erick (Buck) F. Thornburg, Esq.,
a member of Ethics Committee.
Thornburg believes that there
was no formal selection process
for the superintendent position.
The committee can make recom
Please turn to CONTRACT 6A


MARVIN O'QUINN
Chief executive of Jackson Health System


O'Quinn


leaves JMH


for California

The head of Jackson Health System
steps down from his position

Very few Black men in the deep South get the
opportunity to walk away from a city that pays
$826,967 a year. But Marvin 0' Quinn resigned
from Jackson Memorial Hospital last week to
become a top executive at a hospital group in
California.
The chief executive of Jackson Health System
accepted the top job with Catholic Healthcare
West, a system of more than 40 hospitals based
in San Francisco that operates in California,
Arizona, and Nevada.
"This was not an easy decision for me. I truly
love Jackson and I feel it has given me far more
than I could have ever expected," said O'Quinn,
56, in a letter written to his staff.
The community will certainly miss the brilliant
Please turn to O'QUINN 6A


Florida Kidcare and DCF play a game of blame

Insurance problems leave many children without coverage ; ,

By Sandra J. Charite The 2008 .- -


scharite @maimitimesonline.com

Florida KidCare's problems with the Department of
Children and Families (DCF) and Third Party Admin-
istrators (TPA) are leaving children throughout Florida
uninsured.
"Health Insurance is the last thing that families
should be thinking about," said Fred Knapp, chief
operating officer of Florida Healthy Kids Corporation
(FHKC).
Kidcare, the state health insurance program for
low-income children under the age of 19, contains
several components including Medicaid for children,
Children's Medical Services (for children with special
health needs), Medikids (for children aged 1-4), and
Healthy Kids (for those aged 5-18). Kidcare receives
both state and federal funding. The federal funds come
Please turn to BLAME 7A


KidCare annual

report showed that

almost two-thirds of

Florida's uninsured

children have been

uninsured for an

extended period


i -


Linda Merrell, Fay Maturah, Patricia Iboyi and Xiomara Pavillion gather to discuss the problems in the
Florida Kidcare program.


WEDNESDAY


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Weather a
Forecast


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THURSDAY



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FRIDAY SATURDAY



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PARTLY CLOUDY PARTY CLOUDY


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82"F 71WF
SCATTERED SHOWERS


MONDAY



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TUESDAY



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fIW SHOWERS 8 90 158 00100b


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I o WORD-FORWORD


The rich get richer

Everybody in the world today must be agonizing over a
solution to the terrible financial position we find ourselves in
at this time, maybe we will eventually find a method for the
average taxpayer to survive without allowing the rich to get
richer at the expense of those not as fortunate, An editorial
in USA TODAY gives us food for thought.


IN WAYS LARGE AND SMALL,

WASHINGTON CODDLES RICH


Last week, voters were so in-
furiated by the idea of spend-
ing $700 billion dollars to bail
out rich Wall Street bankers
that Congress nearly killed the
plan. Given the impact on Main
Street, it was a dangerous tar-
get to strike. But the anger was
well placed, and Washington is
a target-rich environment.
Taxpayers subsidize Wall
Street and other moneyed in-
terests in literally thousands
of ways, with all sorts of out-
rageous consequences. We
couldn't list them all if we
filled this space 10 times over,
so you'll find below a sampling
of just four that lend a sense of
just how ridiculous the situa-
tion is. We picked them based
on a simple premise: Average
taxpayers should not be asked
to send money to people of
much greater means. If Barack
Obama or John McCain really
wants, as promised, to trans-
form Washington one budget
line at a time, any of these four
would be a good place to start.
A fed up public would cheer
the new president on.

1. YOU'RE SUBSIDIZING
MILLION-DOLLAR SALARIES
To quiet the anger over the
bailout package, Congress
tried to limit compensation
for executives at participat-
ing companies. Most "golden
parachutes" were banned and
tax deductions for compensa-
tion of more than $500,000
were removed. Good. But why
on earth are taxpayers sub-
sidizing pay over $500,000
in the first place? Not only is
this unfair, it encourages the
absurd benefit packages and
other largesse that so infuri-
ate people.
Last year, New York's major
security firms collectively paid
$33 billion in bonuses an
average of $180,000 per em-
ployee even as they were
heading into a tailspin from
years of risky behavior and
selfindulgence.
In fact, top corporate execu-
tives have demonstrated an
ability to extract ever-larger
pay packages at the expense
of shareholders and rank-
and-file employees. Compliant
boards and disenfranchised
shareholders have been ideal
tools for insider self-enrich-
ment.
No, the government shouldn't
determine what companies pay
their top talent. That should
be left to shareholders, with
the help of rules giving them
a greater say. But taxpayers
shouldn't be expected to sub-
sidize outsized pay packages
to the tune of more than $5
billion a year.

2. YOU'RE GIVING
BILLIONAIRES
A TAX BREAK
In 2007, the top 50 manag-
ers of hedge funds and private
equity firms earned an average
of $558 million, according to
Alpha magazine. (Really. That's
not a typo.) Despite having in-
comes equal to the output of
some small countries, many
of them paid a lower tax rate


than middle-class Americans.
How can this be? Through a
complex sleight of hand known
as "carried interest," they pay
just 15% by masquerading
their income as capital gains.
That some super wealthy
money managers are launder-
ing their income as a capital
gain cries out for an immedi-
ate fix. It also suggests that the
rates for investment income
and earned income should be
closer together to prevent peo-
ple from coming up with an-
other ruse.
In the past several decades,
wealth concentration in the
USA has risen to levels not
seen since the 19th century. In
1982, the average CEO made
42 times the salary of the low-
est paid person at his or her
company. Last year, he or she
made 411 times the salary
of the lowest paid employee.
That's an unhealthy gap even
when times are good. When, as
now, the economy turns sour,
it's a recipe for social discon-
tent and demagoguery.

3. YOU'RE HELPING TO
FINANCE MCMANSIONS
The deduction for mortgage
interest is one of the most pop-
ular breaks in the tax code. But
allowing it on homes of up to $1
million borders on insanity.
Not only does the high cap
give a break to very affluent
people, it was a significant con-
tributor to the housing bubble.
The deduction is an enormous
potential source of revenue to
fund other tax cuts or eliminate
deficits. Taxpayers deducted a
staggering $443 billion in mort-
gage interest deductions in
2006, according to the IRS.
While curbing this deduction
during a housing bust might
not be a good idea in the short
term, scaling it back gradually
to $500,000 or less would help
prevent future bubbles and re-
turn the deduction to its tradi-
tional role of encouraging mid-
dle-class families to own their
homes.

4. YOU'RE PAYING FOR
EXECUTIVES' SKYBOXES
One of the small but annoy-
ing tax breaks that benefit the
wealthy is the full deductibil-
ity of business-related enter-
tainment expenses. While this
might seem trivial, it is cata-
lyzing a sea change in Ameri-
can sports the surging price
of tickets as teams build ex-
pensive stadiums designed to
maximize revenue from luxury
boxes and premium seating.
Around the USA, perfectly
good stadiums with reasonable
pricing and great sight lines are
being replaced by billion-dol-
lar-plus palaces geared toward
capturing the upscale market
and taxpayer-subsidized "cli-
ent entertainment."
The only consolation for the
average fan could be that, if
the economy continues to fal-
ter, teams might have a hard
time selling premium tickets.
Perhaps, one day, an irate
taxpayer could even encoun-
ter a fallen Wall Street titan in
what's left of the cheap seats.


Qe fhliami Titna

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54 Mi Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210

H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES. JR.. Editor, 1972 1982

GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emenrilus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Pubtlisher and Chairman


The devastating water from
Hurricane Katrina subsided
three years ago. Yet there is still
water in the eyes of displaced
residents who lost property, rel-
atives, and their peace of mind.
Actor and activist Danny Glover
has produced a documentary en-
titled Trouble the Water, filmed
by a resident of New Orleans' 9th
Ward. I encourage all to find the
documentary in a theatre near
you.
Kimberly Rivers Roberts and
her husband, Scott, brilliantly
provide a chronicle of resident's
preparation for the storm; de-
spair after the storm; and re-
silience in returning to their
beloved Crescent City. Kim, an
aspiring rap artist by the stage
name of "Kold Medina", with no
formal training, takes the viewer
on a first-hand view of the trag-
edies and triumphs of a national
disaster. The documentary opens
through the lens of Kim's camera
as she introduces viewers to her
neighbor of the 9th Ward who,


We may be about to witness ers see the ro
what political scientists call a sure from wt
"critical election" which promotes Barack Obar
a realignment of American politics size persona
- in this case, from Republican to I am just as
Democrat. stands the d<
But more important than that, ment in mak
it may signal a realignment from nities exist t
the conservative politics that has
gripped this country for the past he
30 years to a more liberal version
going forward. For the racially the
disadvantaged and economical- ma
ly needy, who need government portant" iSSL
most, it may signal a return to
policies that emphasize invest-
ment in human development exercise it.
since the evidence is that the lack McCain, h
of such investment has been the an ideology
major factor in the fading middle government
class. of a role in th
This signals that if there is a dif- try to exerci;
ference in the previous adminis- sponsibility
tration and what is coming, it will ceed tough.
be measured by how the new lead- While"that


SBY A, PETER BAILEY, NNPA


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association ol America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210

CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes That America can best lead The world from racial and national antagonism awhin ii accords to
every person, regardless of race creed or color his or her human and legal rights Haling no person, teanng no person the
BlacK Press tirives to help every person in the lirm relief Thai all persons are hurl as long as anyone is held oack.


Ap


S"lThe Media Audit M


without transportation and fi-
nancial resources have little re-
course but to remain in harms
way as the massive Category 5
hurricane approaches. We meet
little children who proudly ex-
claim their fearlessness for the
storm. We meet Kim's inebri-
ated uncle who seems oblivious
to impending danger and death.


We meet elderly men and wom-
en whose faith is all they armed
themselves with in the hours pri-
or to Katrina's landfall. We meet
the innocent souls who are left
behind by their government at
all levels to fend for themselves.
As the rain and wind intensify,
Kim reaches out to three genera-
tions of neighbors and provides
her home, food, and blankets
to all who need her assistance.
Kim's basic survival kit: prayer,
plan for food supply, cell phone,


ole of government. I'm
hat he has said, that
ma wants to empha-
l responsibility, but
sure that he under-
ecisive role of govern-
ing sure the opportu-
hat enable people to


humongous cost of the war of
choice in Iraq. Yet none of the'
politicians, including Senators
Obama and McCain are focusing
on that. It's all the fault of naive
middle income and working class
folks who are the basic cause of
this problem. Thus the question
again; will middle income and
working class Whites once again
choose their racial prejudices
over their economic interests?
After watching and reading
about the reaction of many
Whites to Michelle Obama, I


camera, and a never-give-up
spirit. Following the suspicious
breech of the Industrial Canal
Levee the entire 9th Ward?the
lowest area of New Orleans' is
submerged under 10-foot waters.
As Kim records water pouring
through a second-story window,
she and Scott take their family
of neighbors to the attic.' In the


attic Kim's jovial banter helps to
alieve tension of the group dur-
ing the storm. Meanwhile, Scott's
friend fashions a flotation device
out of a boxer's punching bad a
literally wades in the troubled
waters to rescue neighbors who
are stranded in their houses by
carrying them on his back to the
safety of Kim?s attic.
Following the storm, Kim,
Scott and the group petition
United States Navy officers to
allow them safe harbor in the


been a weapon begun by Ronald
Reagan, blunt the force of the
Civil Rights movement and to re-
turn to the unchallenged suprem-
acy of whites to the racial hierar-
chy, the record shows that it has
also damaged whites, especially,
white middle class enormously.


difference between the political parties on issues has favored
e Democrats during this election season by an average of as
'ny as 10-15 points on what Americans regard as "most im-


ies war in Iraq,



however, has followed
which suggests that
does not have much
is, that people should
se their personal re-
and if they don't suc-

I ideology may have


So, the issue becomes what kind
of change voters really want and
which of the candidates they be-
lieve can produce it.
If Barack Obama wins, it will
undoubtedly be an historic event
because of his race and because it
may create in some, the idea that
America has moved beyond racial


I am' even more convinced
of this after reading a feature
article in The Washington Post
about Michelle's ancestors. She
is descended from those strong
Black folks my grandfather and
his friends used to describe as
race men and race women. This
was the highest compliment
they could pay to someone.
Unfortunately, it is a concept that
too many Blacks in this country
have abandoned. Michelle Obama
is a race woman. Many Whites
sense this; that's why they don't


unused portion of a local Na\)
base only to face rebuff via load-
ed M-16 rifles pointed at them.
Scott secures a cargo truck after
learning Kim has an uncle with
uninhabited property in Lafay-
ette, Louisiana.
Kim gathers 25 neighbors and
the group drives to higher ground
as they past the inhumane con-
ditions of the New Orleans Super
Dome with throngs of the living
and the dead, suffering in the
brutal heat and humidity with
no food or water.
Before attending the funeral
services of her grandmother who
died in Mercy Hospital after be-
ing left behind by hospital offi-
cials, Kim bails out her younger
brother who was incarcerated for
a misdemeanor. As the storm wa-
ters rose, he and fellow prisoners
were left in waist-high water and
abandoned by prison officials.
His ringing words typify the
treatment of most Black Katrina
victims: "They did not treat us
right"


-......_- -'_ -". ':=-, "^ ..

:. -: ::- .--^ -.::--' ::>';-i-='i :-


r looses

evaluations in its determination
of what things are important. But
race has not always been the de-
termining factor, for if it had, Clar-
ence Thomas would not be sitting
on the highest court in the land.
Those who sponsored him did
so not only because he was black
in succeeding Justice Thurgood
Marshall, but moir6 importantly
because he believed in the same
things and they could trust him
to deliver policy based on that be-
lief.
Obama's win would signal a
generational change, departing
from the influence of the "baby
boomer" generation moving into
post modern America, an Ameri-
ca more at ease with race, more
comfortable with global culture
and the electronic and visual
technologies that unites it. Will he
be post-racial in his leadership of
public policy?


- ,-


Will working class whites choose racial prejudices over economic interests


The only question that
really remains about the 2008
presidential election is whether
working class and middle income
Whites in the electorate, as they
have done consistently since the
country was founded, choose
their racial prejudice over their
economic interests in another
election.
For a couple of centuries, the
people with the big money, nearly
always in the South and more
than often than not in the North,
have directly and indirectly told
working class and middle income
Whites that "you may be poor,
you may be barely surviving; you
may be struggling to take care of
yourself and your family but you
are superior to any Black man or
woman because you are White."
And the recipients of this con
game, in election after election,
have listened to the big money
boys and voted accordingly. And
who's to say they won't do it again
in 2008, despite the obvious
financial rip-off currently on view


for all to see. Common sense
says that it wasn't subprime
mortgages held by working class
and middle class home renters
that is the foundation for the
current economic mess, as the
politicians and pundits keep
repeating day after day, but the


am convinced that they are
more afraid of her than of her
husband. If he were married to a
grateful, safe Negro such as Star
Parker, Condoleezza Rice or Amy
Holmes, he would probably be
much more acceptable to many
Whites.


want her inrthe White House.
Before the Palin-Biden"debate,"
I told Obama supporters that
they shouldn't count on Palin
being as dim-witted as she
sounded during recent television
interviews. "No one could be
that stupid and accomplish as
much politically as this woman
has," I insisted, "This is a woman
whose high school classmates
nicknamed "Barracuda".
She is a skillful, calculating,
ambitious, ruthless, one-track
minded political pro, more similar
to Senator Obama than Senator
McCain or Senator Biden. She
demonstrated that in the "debate."
She was not trying to connect to
the electorate in places like New
York City, Washington, Boston,
San Francisco and Los Angeles
but to those who voted for Bush
in two elections and to those
White women, who despite her
flaws see her as a glass-ceiling
shatterer.
A. Peter Bailey can be reached
at apeterb@verizon.net


BY GARY L, FLOWERS, NNPA -


We must trouble the water and press forward


imberly Rivers Roberts and her husband, Scott, brilliantly
provide a chronicle of resident's preparation for the storm


BY RON WALTERS, NNPA
: :_ : _


2008 election: Historic, whether Obama wins o


after watching and reading about the reaction of many
Whites to Michelle Obama, I am convinced that they are
more afraid of her than of her husband

















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


BY REGINALD CLYNE


Time for some trickle up


AIG is given $90 billion, then
another $38 billion about two
weeks later. The $128 billion
will not ultimately make a dif-
ference, because AIG is simply
using it to continue its opera-
tions for a few weeks more. It
is good to be a big corporate gi-
ant that screwed up its invest-
ment portfolio. We have to save
poor AIG. However, if you are a
person who lived the American
Dream and bought a house
financed by a big bank, well -
just lose your life savings, have
your credit destroyed, end up
homeless, because you should
not have invested in such an
expensive house that has now
lost its value.
The theory since Reagan has
been to treat the rich better, and
then some of their enormous


ecutives. Now, we
are giving those
still very rich cor-
porate executives .-.
more money to
spend so that the credit crunch
will ease. This is just plain
stupid. It is like giving a crack
addict, more crack to ease the
cravings. Ultimately, you are
just wasting your money.
What if we focused $750 bil-
lion on the poor and middle
class. Write down the homes
people are living in to their
current market value. The
banks will lose some money
on the write-down. They de-
serve to lose money. People
will stay in their homes if they
can. Most sensible people do
not want to pay a $300,000
mortgage for a home val-


What if we focused $750 billion on the poor and
middle class. Write down the homes people are
living in to their current market value. The banks
will lose some money on the write-down


SBY GEORGE E. CURRY, NNPA


New York governor represents a refreshing change


Al Sharpton likes to say from
time to time that Democrats treat
Black voters as if we are their
mistress. Party officials don't
mind seeing us at night, but shy
away from stepping out with us
during daylight. The same can be
said for some Black politicians
who shy away from associating
with Sharpton.
No one can say that about
New York Gov. David Patterson.
I heard him speak in New York
at Sharpton's National Action
Network conference last week.
The fact that he was there was
itself a statement. But he made
even more telling statements
during a 17-minute speech.
Not only did he regularly attend
Sharpton rallies while serving as
a state senator and lieutenant
governor, Patterson ticked off
a list of things he first learned
at Sharpton-sponsored events.
He said he first learned about
predatory lending in 1994 or
1995; holistic medicine in 1998,
alternatives in education in 1999


and alternative energy in 2002.
Patterson said that he,
Sharpton and Congressman
Gregory Meeks of New York were
"Brown Babies." He explained,
"In addition to color, we were
born in the year of Brown v. the
Board of Education decision."


"Many of them wouldn't come
by the National Action Network
because they thought they were
beyond that I'm working or
Merrill Lynch.'" The governor
said, "It's just a spiritual lesson
for us: The more you put people
down, the more you're putting


atterson referred to Barack Obama as "our candidate," adding,
"If Senator Obama was not from the neighborhood, Senator
Obama would be 15 points ahead


Patterson noted that the
landmark decision was handed
down on Monday, May 17, 1954.
"I was born that Thursday but
they didn't think I could handle
it by myself, so they sent Rev.
Sharpton and Greg Meeks a
couple of months later," he said.
Patterson showed no sign of not
being able to handle anything in
his speech, calling out African-
Americans who felt they were too
good to attend civil rights rallies.


yourself down."
He noted the irony of poor
people having a role in the decline
of some of America's largest and
most influential financial services
institution.
"The same individuals who had
bilked, hoodwinked and cajoled
people who had less than them
or knew less than them found out
that there's a flood rising," the
governor said. "It has overtaken
Merrill Lynch, Bear Stearns,


Lehman Brothers, AIG the list
goes on and on. And now they're
asking for $700 billion that's
called a bailout. I remember when
we used to call that welfare."
Speaking before the House had
approved the bailout, Patterson
made it clear that he opposed the
plan.
"Do you know how much it
would cost to bail out every
foreclosed homeowner in this
country? One hundred billion.
Boy that sounds like a deal."
He said he was using mid-2007
figures and the total amount now
would be in the neighborhood of
$144 to $150 billion.
"That's a steal," he said. "I
should go down to Washington
and tell them I have a deal to
bailout all homeowners and we
can do it for $150 billion."
Listening to Gov. Patterson, I
thought how refreshing it was to
hear him address the Wall Street
fiasco so openly and honestly. He
obviously wasn't saying things
for any political advantage.


BY HARRY C. ALFORD, NNPA


wealth will trickle down. Well,
I have been waiting 20 years to
see some trickle down, and to
me the poor are getting poorer
and 1% of Americans are get-
ting enormously wealthy. The
trickle down theory has been
utilized by the rich and pow-
erful for centuries. Most fa-
mously, by Marie Antoinette
and the French Aristocracy,
who starved their people until
they revolted.
We have now decided to
spend $750 billion on finan-
cial institutions. We are go-
ing to use taxpayer dollars to
prop up institutions that cre-
ated financing mechanisms
that were doomed for failure,
because they put people in
houses they could not afford.
The banks made billions dur-
ing the boom period. Those bil-
lions went into the pockets of
ea few, very rich corporate ex-


ued at $200,000. Once the
homes are readjusted to mar-
ket value, then give low inter-
est, long-term loans so people
can keep their homes. Ex-
tend the time period to pay
off a home from 30 years to
40 years. All of a sudden the
flood of foreclosures stops,
banks stop losing money
and people stop losing their
homes. Neighborhoods which
are getting flooded with more
and more empty homes sta-
bilize. The investment port-
folios of banks stabilize, and
the economy begins to right
itself.
When the economy stabiliz-
es poor and middleclass peo-
ple can save money in banks
and the stock market that will
trickle up to the rich or bet-
ter yet just stay with the poor
and middleclass who earned
it. What a concept.


Wall Street gets the money and the contracts too


P.T. Barnum once said that
there is a "sucker born every
5 minutes". Well, the famous
hustler would have been proud
of the Wall St. lobbyists and
Treasury Secretary Paulson
as they shook down over 300
million suckers the American
taxpayers.
Not only did they get the $700
billion of quick money, but the
opportunistic Congress decided
to take the opportunity to pull
out their wish list and add 16
earmarks to the Bailout for an
additional $140 billion dollars.
That's right, the Bailout or
should we say Rip Off totals
$840 billion.
That is $2300 for every man,
woman and child living in this
nation. That equates to a family
of four now increasing their
debt by $9,200. Congress could
have been more productive
just passing that money out
to the citizens of America and
letting Wall St. pay for its own
sins. Even "anti-earmark Sen.
John McCain" went along with
all of this pork. The lobby is
too strong and the perks for
the cooperating legislators is
too sweet. Our Congress was
bought and sold.


Now, they have the money
and the world is still in the same
predicament. The economy is
in the tank as much now as it
was before the giveaway. They
played the stock market to
scare and fake out Congress.
After the Bailout was passed
many assumed the market
would increase. Silly folks -
the stock market dropped over
400 points from a plus 250 to
a minus 156. We are still in the
fix but only about $1 trillion
deeper in debt.
They have the money and
now they must steal all of the
big contracts that will come as
a result of the supreme hustle.
They will do this through No
Bid Contracts. This form of
deception was created in the
early days of Iraq and perfected
during the Hurricane Katrina
recovery.
No Bids and severely inflated
dollar amounts for work they
will find someone else to do at
predatory rates. This is done
by declaring an emergency
and waiving contracting law -
Federal Acquisition Regulation,
the FAR, thus eliminating
affirmative action and minority
participation requirements.


BY MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN, NNPA


Judging the candidates on their records is crucial


During nearly two years of
presidential campaigning, the
candidates have made claims
and promises on how they would
perform if they are elected to the
White House. Some of the criteria
we might use to judge a candidate's
fitness and temperament for
leadership are difficult to quantify.
But. one concrete and objective
way to assess how candidates
measure up on crucial issues is by
examining their voting records.
In this election year, when three
of the four nominees for President
and Vice President are sitting U.S.
Senators-Barack Obama (D-IL),
John McCain (R-AZ) and Joe Biden
(D-DE)-each has a record of roll
call votes cast in Congress. Each
year; through its Nonpartisan
Congressional Scorecard, the
Children's Defense Fund Action
Council selects congressional roll
call votes to illustrate how the
Members of the U.S. Senate and
House of Representatives voted on
key issues affecting children and
families.
The Scorecard is a tool to help
voters determine whether their
lawmakers in Congress have voted
in their interests so citizens can
hold them accountable when they
go to the polls on Election Day.


I learned the passage, "By their
works ye shall know them," in
Sunday School a long time ago.
And a look at the voting records
of the candidates, as reflected
in the Scorecard, clearly reveals
who among them is working for
children and who isn't.
Over the last three years, the
Scorecard has shown that Sens.


The measure would have extended
health coverage to more than one-
third (3.2 million) of America's
nine million uninsured children.
Sens. Obama and Biden supported
the legislation while Sen. McCain
voted "no." CDF strongly urged
coverage for all children. Yet even
this modest proposal could not
win enough Republican support,


n November 4, we will not only consider the candidacy of
three U.S. Senators who are running for President and Vice
President at the top of the ballot, but 28 incumbent Senators


and nearly 400 House Members

Obama and Biden voted with the
CDF Action Council's position on
major legislation an overwhelming
majority of the time-better than
85' percent. In contrast, Sen.
McCain consistently scored under
30 percent.
One of the measures the
Scorecard included was a bill
reauthorizing the State Children's
Health Insurance Program (SCHIP)
for five years and increasing
funding for SCHIP and Medicaid by
nearly $35 billion over that period.
The cost of the expansion would
have been funded by a 61 cent a
pack federal cigarette tax increase.


including Senator McCain's, to
override a White House veto.
Senators Obama and Biden
voted with the CDF Action,
Council on most other legislative
initiatives including support for
federal budget priorities such as
increasing funding for education
and home heating assistance,
increasing the minimum wage
and stopping cuts to the Medicaid
program. They opposed legislation
to give the gun industry immunity
from lawsuits filed by victims
of gun violence. Senator John
McCain voted on the other side of
each of these measures.


Senator Obama's "
cumulative score
over three years is 87 percent;
Senator Biden's since 1981 is 85
percent; and Senator McCain's
since 1983 is 28 percent. The
scores for the candidates on the
2005' Scorecard were: Obama,
100 percent; Biden, 89 percent;
and McCain, 22 percent. In 2006,
it was Obama and Biden each
with scores of 100 percent while
McCain's score was 10 percent.
(Since Republican Vice Presidential
nominee Governor Sarah Palin
(Alaska) did not serve in Congress,
she has no comparable record.)
In 2007, all of the Senators
were traveling on the campaign
trail and had lower scores than
in past years due to absences.
Senator McCain, however, had the
lowest score on children's issues
in the entire Senate-with only 10
percent.
On November 4, we will not only
consider the candidacy of three
U.S. Senators who are running for
President and Vice President at the
top of the ballot, but 28 incumbent
Senators and nearly 400 House
Members who are running for re-
election-all with congressional
voting records contained in the
CDF Action Council Scorecard.


The Procurement Director for
the Office of Management and
Budget (OMB) declared a waiver
after Katrina for 90 days.
Ninety days was all they needed
to set all the inflated contracts
for the political favorites all of
whom were white. Corruption
was rampant and even the
OMB Director eventually went
to jail for favors he did for the '
infamous Jack Abramoff who is
also currently in jail.
Section 107 of the Bailout
allows for this: "For purposes of
this Act, the Secretary may waive
specific provisions of the Federal
Acquisition Regulation upon
a determination that urgent
and compelling circumstances
make compliance with such
provisions contrary to the
public interest". Public interest
hell it is special interest such
as good old white boys. It fakes


out the Congressional Blac
Caucus and others by further
stating: "In any solicitation or
contract where the Secretary
has, pursuant to subsection
(a), waived any provision of the
Federal Acquisition Regulation
pertaining to minority
contracting, the Secretary
shall develop and implement
standards and procedures to
ensure, to the maximum extent
practicable, the inclusion and
utilization of minorities".
If you believe this, then I
have a bridge in Florida t6 sell
you. In the end, like Katrina
and Iraq, there will be some
fronting going on and some fake
contracts but no true Black
business participation.
They will find a few Alaska
Native Corporations who will
sign contracts as minorities but
then flip all of it to white firms.


WORD-FOR-WORD


Will Florida ever get it right

Another election is at hand and our state will again be
embarrassed by our behavior at the polls. The Sun-Sentinel
calls it "an embarrassment."

You probably figured the voting situation in Florida couldn't
be any more of an embarrassment. Wrong.
On top of Florida's well-chronicled history of voting foul-
ups, we now have the specter of more than 30,000 felons
still registered to vote, even though they should have been
stripped of that right by law.
And when told about the findings of a Sun Sentinel
investigation, Secretary of State Kurt Browning appeared
blase, saying his staff hasn't removed thousands of ineligible
felons from the rolls because of a shortage of workers, and a
crush of new registrations.
That doesn't cut it. This problem didn't happen overnight.
The Division of Elections, according to the report, has a
backlog of more than 108,000 possible felons who have
registered to vote since 2006 that it hasn't had the time or
staff to verify.
Also in 2006, the Auditor General recommended the
Division of Elections check all registered voters against lists
of convicted felons. Browning said the state hasn't done that
yet.
Where was the planning, Mr. Browning? Where were the
high-profile and repeated demands to Gov. Charlie Crist
for more manpower? And where was Crist? Shouldn't he
be doing what is necessary to make sure there is adequate
funding and manpower?
The ultimate irony is Florida is now enforcing the "No
Match, No Vote" law, under which a voter whose driver's
license or Social Security number doesn't match government
records would be rejected until the discrepancy is cleared
up. There is concern that new voters might not have their
ballots counted.
So thousands of felons who shouldn't be voting on Nov.
4 might. And other voters, who for whatever reason can't
immediately pass the "No Match, No Vote" test, won't have
a voice.
After Florida's voting debacles, you would think getting
it right would be a top priority for Crist and Browning. Yet
there surely will be legal challenges if the election is close
again. At least we'll know who to blame if there is another
embarrassment.


PC e Oiami T(mi
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Independent groups spend more

than candidates in some contests. *


By Fredreka Schouten


WASHINGTON Spend-
ing by ,independent political
groups in congressional races
is surging in the final weeks
before Election Day, in some
cases surpassing what candi-
dates themselves are pumping
into close contests.
Since Sept. 1, nine groups
have spent more than $1 mil-
lion each in House and Senate
races, including $11.3 million
by an organization bankrolled
by drug companies that is run-
ning ads featuring 26 members
of Congress from both major
parties.
Outside money is also pour-
ing into the Colorado battle be-
tween Republican Rep. Marilyn
Musgrave and Democrat Betsy
Markey. The Defenders of Wild-
life and others have pumped
in nearly $2 million to defeat
Musgrave, who spent less than
$700,000 by July 1.
The environmental group.
plans to spend $500,000 this
week on a TV ad criticizing
Musgrave for accepting oil-


industry contributions. She
is a top target because of her
votes opposing higher fuel-effi-
ciency standards and other is-
sues, said Rodger Schlickeisen,
president of the group's action
fund.
The spending hurts Musgrave,
said her campaign manager Ja-
son Thielman. "She just held
a fundraising coffee where 30
people donated about $75 each,"
he said. "But someone can just
write a check for $1 million to
run a campaign against her."
Independent groups have
mushroomed since a 2002 law
banned unlimited money in
federal campaigns. This elec-
tion, the groups can run issue
ads mentioning a candidate by
name right up until Nov. 4. Pre-
viously, such ads were banned
60 days before the general elec-
tion.
"The public doesn't know who
the people are behind some of
these independent groups," said
Steve Weissman of the non-
partisan Campaign Finance In-
stitute. "Yet the concentrated
weight of their money can make
a big difference in a close race."


OTHER EXAMPLES:
The National Association of
Realtors' political action com-
mittee last week spent nearly
$190,000 in mailings to help
Rep. Paul Kanjorski, D-Pa., in
his race against Republican
Lou Barletta. Kanjorski is the
No. 2 Democrat on the panel
overseeing the industry.
Barletta spent about
$102,000 on his entire cam-
paign by July 1. Kanjorski "is
not influenced by outside ac-
tors," spokesman Ed Mitchell
said.
Patriot Majority, a group
bankrolled by labor unions,
spent $550,000 Wednesday
on a TV ad attacking Rep. Lin-
coln Diaz-Balart, R-Fla. That's
three times what the congress-
man spent on his race from
April 1 to June 30.
America's Agenda: Health
Care for Kids spent $11.3
million on TV ads last month
praising 26 senators and
House members for support-
ing the State Children's Health
Insurance Program. The drug
industry's lobbying arm paid
for the ads.


I la. wrwU h Ubtt a ia Ha
-b 0_ __v -


What would you do if you had free health

insurance with zero co-pay and free prescriptions?


JAMES HENDERSON, 50
Longshoreman, Miramar

I would ben- .....
efit from hav-
ing free health
insurance be- ~
cause I would
schedule more
doctorappoint-
ments and be
more involved
in my health. I would also visit
the nutritionist to receive tips
on how to live a healthier life-
style. Contrary to what statis-
tics are saying, I think Black
people have insurance but in
order for us to be healthy, we
have to watch what we eat and
definitely exercise more.

TERRANCE STURRUP, 22
Student, Liberty City

Free insur-
ance equals
free doctor
appointments
with no stress
about paying
for co-pays,
that most of
us can't even
afford. If I had
free insurance, I would take
care of myself by going to a
nutritionist and definitely visit
the dentist and take care of my
mouth.

b- -


Copyrighted Material




Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


ERIK ARNOLD, 20
Security Guard, Carol City

It's free, I
would not
complIain
about that at
all but take
advantage of
my insurance
coverage and -
see the doc-
tor as much as I can. By going
to the doctor, I would be more
aware of any health problems.


RODNEY SMITH, 64
Retired, Liberty City

I have health
insurancenow.
Of course, if
it was free, I
would attend
more of my:
doctor's ap-
pointments.


LOUIS CAMBRIDGE, 49
Unemployed, Liberty City

I have insur-
ance now but
if I had free
insurance,
I would go
more often. I
would do more
check-ups
with the doc-
tor to make sure my health is
on point. As men, we are afraid
of going to the hospital because
we are afraid of what the doctor
might say.

SHERLY FLEURANTIN, 18
Student, Liberty City

Thank
God, I do
have insur-
ance be-
cause I get
sick a lot.
Having free
insurance, I ,
would defi-
nitely benefit
by not having to pay for co-pays
at the doctor's office or hospi-


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You can wear

buttons to vote
Squelch one rumor: Contrary
to what's being claimed, voters
are allowed to wear campaign
t-shirts, buttons and similar
paraphernalia when they go to
vote, either during early voting
or in their neighborhood pre-
cincts on Election Day.
That doesn't count as illegal
electioneering at the polls.
What they can't do is cam-
paign, or attempt to sway other
voters, while they're within the
100-foot no campaigning zones
around the entrance to the poll-
ing place.
They can wear parapherna-
lia," so long as you go into the
polling place and leave.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


4 1 0 w W -o q w _











5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


ap


- - - - -









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES OC 8


UMixed felis a t C, time to m e on ad f s on te child


Mixed feelings about Carvalho, time to move on and focus on the children


CONTRACT
continued from 1A
mendations to the board but
cannot force the board to do
anything.
The process of hiring the su-
perintendent was not done the
right way said Marva Lightburn
of the Concerned Citizens.
Tangela Sears, president of
the Coalition of Concerned Par-
ents, agreed with the advisory
board. She said that she was in
favor of Carvalho but hiring him
was unethical because the pub-
lic was not informed in a deci-
sion that affects Miami-Dade
students.
Board, member Marta Perez


proposed that the board allow.
Carvalho to stay as an interim
superintendent or give him a
one year contract to allow other
candidates to apply for the posi-
tion.
The focus right now for resi-
dent Ethel Pruett is making sure
that the children of Miami-Dade
needs our met by someone who
is well qualified for the job in
this midst of the budget woes.

EMAIL SCANDAL:
THE CENTER OF ATTENTION
Carvalho, an 18-year veteran
of the school district and a for-
mer science teacher at Miami
Jackson Senior High, passed
over the superintendent posi-


tion in Pinellas County last
month to take the Miami-Dade
position. A few weeks later re-
ports of an alleged relationship
via email with a former Herald
reporter Tania deLuzuriaga was
ripped through the media. The
scandal caused deLuzuriaga to
lose her job.
At Friday's special board
meeting, Carvallo, who has been
quiet on that matter, said, "I did
speak with our chief auditor and
I asked him if it would be appro-
priate for me to have this issue
[the email scandal] reviewed by
the IG [Office of Inspector Gen-
eral] and he had told me that
he had spoken to the IG office
and they did not have interest


in looking into the matter," said
Carvalho.

REMEMBER OUR CHILDREN
Despite the controversy and
the ethics committee decision,
many people like Danny Mc-
Millan, Title 1 district advisor
chair, believes that it is time for
the district to move forward. The
dismissal of Dr. Crew and the ar-
rival of Carvalho has distracted
the district and they have for-
gotten there is a budget deficit
with more cuts to come said Mc-
Millan. She says that the board
needs to put everything behind
them and look ahead.
Board member Dr. Wilbert
Holloway also agreed that it was


time for the district to change
focus to Miami-Dade students.
"We have to build this com-
munity because there is a crisis
with our most precious com-
modity and that's our children,"
said Dante Starks, an executive
board member of NAACP- Mi-
ami-Dade.
Carvalho requested the board
amend his contract by adding:
"If the workforce cannot afford
an increase then I should not
get one myself."
Chair Agustin J. Barrera clar-
ified Carvalho's request to the
audience and the board that "if
the employees do not receive a
raise then the superintendent
would not either."


After several weeks of being ill,
Evelyn Langlieb Greer, who lost
her seat in the Aug. 26 primary
to former principal Larry Feld-
man, attended the meeting.
Miami-Dade was recently an-
nounced as one of the five dis-
trict finalist for the 2008 Broad
Prize, a n award that honors ur-
ban school districts that show
the most improvement in stu-
dent achievement. The winning
district, Brownsville Indepen-
dent School District in Texas,
will be given $1 million in col-
lege scholarships and Miami-
Dade County Public Schools
will receive $250,000 also for
scholarships for 2009 graduat-
ing seniors.


JMH has been struggling due to the increase of uninsured patients


O'QUINN
continued from 1A


administrator who came here
five years ago when the annual
loss at Jackson was $85 million.
O'Quinn finished 2005 with
a $10 million surplus, and in
2006, he purchased Parkway
Regional Medical Center which
became Jackson North.
Prior to coming to Jackson,
O'Quinn held a position as
an executive vice president
of operations for the Atlantic
Health System in New Jersey.
Twenty-five years ago, he
started his career as an orderly
and throughout the years he
has advanced to take on top
positions in New York and New
Jersey hospitals. He has worked


in states such as Oregon,
California, and Washington.
O'Quinn holds a bachelor's
degree in Biology and a master's
in Health Administration from
the University of Washington in
Seattle.
At Jackson, O'Quinn has been
responsible for almost 2,000
beds, over 11,000 employees
throughout the county, three
hospitals, a trauma center, a
women's center, two long-term
care facilities and twelve primary
care centers.
"Miami-Dade County loses a
great leader, one who cares deeply
about Jackson Health System
and this community. Marvin
is a man of great integrity who
always put Jackson first. While
we had hoped this day would


never come, the public can rest
assured that plans are in place
to ensure a smooth transition,"
said Ernesto de la Fe, Chairman
of the Public Health Trust Board
of Trustees.
The number of residents
uninsured in Miami-Dade
increased, to almost 30 percent
in 2004 which was more than
the national average, according
to Florida Health Insurance
Survey. With nearly 600,000
Miami-Dade residents currently
without insurance, Jackson has
taken a blow financially. .
"The greatest challenge
facing Jackson Health System
is addressing the needs of the
uninsured. Jackson has a long
history of caring for all residents
of Miami-Dade County. With


the number of uninsured and
under-insured patients rising
rapidly, this responsibility has
become all the more difficult.
Despite the challenges, the
mission of Jackson Health
System is serving all of our
residents," said O'Quinn when
he previously spoke to The
Miami Times in August of this
year. "Jackson is much more
than a job. I really love what I
do."
He will remain at Jackson until
the end of December and begin
his new position in January.
O'Quinn, a popular and well-
respected citizen of this area,
told The Times he hated to leave
Jackson, but he and his wife
look forward to being closer to
their family who live out West.


Investors are hoping for change in the stock market crisis


STOCKS
continued from 1A
says Steve Foresti, head of in-
vestment research at Wilshire
Consulting. "It's a full court
press on the credit crisis. We'll
see if it hits where it needs to,"
he says.
While market watchers aren't
ready to call a bottom, the fact
that buyers are starting to pick
up battered stocks is encour-


aging. "We haven't had a posi-
tive in a long time," says Todd
Leone, trader at Cowen & Co.
"People are taking this as a pos-
itive."
Investors hope last week's
violent sell-off finally shook out
the remaining nervous stock-
holders. "It's a good buying
opportunity when there's mas-
sive capitulation and panic in
the streets," says Kevin Lane
at market research firm Fusion


Analytics.
Still, there are problems for
markets to overcome. The Dow
is still deep in a bear market,
33.7% below its high. And
stocks typically retest their
lows before they hold. For in-
stance, investors hoped stocks
had hit bottom on Oct. 1, 2002,
after the Dow surged 4.6%.' It
dropped 8.2% the following six
trading days before the market
finally bottomed. "You usually


get a test in a month or two or
three," Maltbie says.
While investors think credit
markets will heal, it's unclear
how badly the credit crunch
will hurt corporate earnings,
Foresti says. And governments
still need to execute their plans,
says Bob Doll of investment
management firm BlackRock:
"Policymakers need to come
through with some things to
validate the rally."


SIs race an issue in this election?


RACE
continued from 1A

or have we moved far enough
along that we no longer need
to use race and gender as a
factor in school admissions
and federal and state con-
tracts and so on?" he asked.

EIGHT YEARS AGO
During the 2000 debates, it
was an audience member who
kept the presidential candi-
dates from ducking a pub-
lic discussion of race with a
question for then-Texas gover-
nor George W. Bush and Vice
President Gore: "How will your
administration address diver-
sity, inclusiveness, and what
role will affirmative action
play in your overall plan?"
No, neither of these ques-
tions was a deep probe of
America's long-running race
problems, but they kept the
issue visible.
This time, Schieffer can ac-
complish more. By asking the
nominees what they would do
to close the yawning unem-
ployment gap between blacks
and whites, Schieffer can
make these problems visible


to many Americans. By press-
ing them to talk about the
wide disparities in medical
treatment that leave blacks
far less likely than whites to
receive recommended care, or
asking what they'd do to close
the achievement gap between
black and white public school
students, he can force them
to address these troubling
matters.
Unless these long-standing
ills are addressed, no solu-
tion to our ailing economy will
produce a result that's fair to
all its citizens. Sure, the cam-
paign isn't just about race,
but this nation's continuing
racial problems ought to be a
serious part of the dialogue.
"When one is invisible he
finds such problems as good
and evil, honesty and dishon-
esty, of such shifting shapes
that he confuses one with the
other, depending upon who
happens to be looking through
him at the time," Ellison wrote
in the Invisible Man.
Neither candidate should be
allowed to avoid giving spe-
cific answers to specific ques-
tions about the problems that
afflict Blacks.


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School board goes to mediation with board attorney


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@maimitimesonline.com


Last month, the Miami-Dade School
Board had to pay Dr. Rudy Crew
$368,000 as part of his buyout pack-
age. Seeking counsel from Attorney
Murray A. Greenberg at the Friday
special board meeting, the School
Board decided to part ways with their
attorney, JulieAnn Rico, now another
buyout package is in the works.
Ricco has been scrutinized for
abusing her relocation package which
was given to her by the board back
in 2006. After receiving a $15,000


moving package, she never moved to
Miami-Dade as intended.
Greenberg said that there were doc-
umentation showing that Ricco at-
tempted to move to Miami-Dade but
the slump of housing market caused
her to not move. Rico gave back the
money to the district in July.
In deciding what direction the board
should take with Ricco, board member
Dr. Solomon C. Stinson opted not to
spend anymore money. "I think that
mediation is a speedy way to resolve
the matter. For us to go out and hire
an attorney to defend us in this man-
ner, will cost more, in my opinion.


Preparing for trial will not be cheap.
In this case, money matters the most
to me. I support the mediation so that
we can move on to bigger and better
things that we have to deal with in the
district," said Stinson.
"You are not a sure winner in court,"
said Greenberg. He believes by going
to litigation, the board would have to
pay a lot of money. However, by decid-
ing to settle the matter in mediation,
it will not take long but it will cost
money. He said Ricco has presented
to her attorney a proposal of receiving
a one-year salary with benefits as a
settlement from the board but Green-


berg did not recommend it.
Board member Marta Perez argued
that Ricco has been on paid leave for
four months and there was no need to
pay her anymore money. She asked
for Ricco's resignation or the board
terminate her employment.
"She is sitting at home collecting
money. Our teachers don't do that
and no one in the school district does
that. Frankly, we should have put her
on unpaid leave not paid leave," said
Perez.
The decision to pay Ricco for un-
paid leave was made by the School
Board, according to Chair Agustin J.


Barrera.
"You can ask for her resignation
but are you going to get it? But if the'
board instructs me to ask by majority
vote then I'll do it," said Greenberg.
Vice-Chair Perla Tabares Hantman
also agreed that the idea of continu-
ing to pay Ricco for being at home was
unnecessary. Ricco has thirteen more
months left on her contract.
After speaking with Rico's attorney,
Greenberg said he would report back
to the board. Although Luis Garcia is
the acting board attorney, there are
no details on who will take Ricco's seat
as attorney for the School Board.


Jefferson Reaves Health Center celebrates 10 years


The Jefferson Reaves Sr.
Health Center in Miami's Over-
town will celebrate its 10th an-
niversary on Thursday, October
23rd, announced the Center's
Board of Directors chaired by
Gregory Gay.
A major healthcare facility,
the center provides the highest
quality care to Overtown and
surrounding neighborhoods. It
offers a comprehensive array of
primary and specialized medi-
cal care services, as well as
preventive medical care in re-
ducing the burden of disease in
families to one of the nation's
most challenged communities.
This Jackson Health Sys-
tem's comprehensive primary
health care center is named in
memory of State Rep. Jefferson
Reaves Sr., who suffered an
untimely death after his eight
year tenure in the legislature
(1991). Rep. Reaves was a com-
mon man who was concerned


about common persons in his
legislative district, stretching
from Overtown to Brownsville
and throughout the commu-
nity.
For eight years during his
time in the Florida Legislature,
the words "State Representa-
tive" preceded the name Jef-
ferson Reaves, Sr. For Reaves
it was just a title, because the
position was an opportunity for
him to serve the people of his
legislative district with remark-
able vigilance and an unyield-
ing commitment to bring jobs,
money and services back home
to his community. In fact, it
was during his last few months
of life that he constantly fought
to make sure his 1990 Bill es-
tablishing the Overtown Health
Center was enacted and signed
by the Governor. Everyday he
would ask, "did they (the State
of Florida) get the money (fund-
ed) yet?"


Jefferson Reaves Sr. Health
Center is a focal point for
healthcare with services rang-
ing from pediatric and mater-
nity to dental and elderly care.
The center is committed to the
dignity, social well-being and
health of the community and its
patients who are served there.
Medical care and treatment
are provided in three different


languages including English,
Spanish and Creole..
The center provides invalu-
able opportunity to implement
innovative programs such as
group education for chronic ill-
nesses specialty clinics within
the center and the ability to
address the health status in-
dicators of the Overtown com-
munity. The facility has been
recognized as a "Center of Ex-
cellence" within the Jackson
Health System.
The Center was officially ded-
icated in October 1998. It is lo-
cated at 1009 NW 5th Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33136.
For more information on
the celebration honoring Rep.
Reaves and recognizing the ac-
complishments of the health
center, interested persons
should contact the Center's
Board Member-Event Coordi-
nator Mrs. Minnie Mickens at
305-691-5775.


Uninsured children in Miami-Dade have increased


BLAME
continued from 1A

from Medicaid, an entitlement
program mandated by Title
XIX of the Social Security Act,
in which the state must cover
all persons who meet the eli-
gibility requirements, and the
State Children's Health Insur-
ance Program (SCHIP), a non-
entitlement program mandated
by Title XXI of the Social Secu-
rity Act, which allows the state
to reduce enrollment based on
availability of funds.
The Campaign for Children's
Health 2006 report showed
that an estimated 718,603
children were uninsured in
Florida and 70-75 percent of
these children were eligible for
KidCare. Twenty-eight percent
of the children enrolled in the
Florida KidCare program in
2007 were Black.
One of the main problems
that KidCare is facing is that
TPA employees lack proper
training. According to Knapp,
there is miscommunication
between TPA and families, and
errors are being made on fami-
lies' accounts. With the conver-
sion to a new system, TPA em-
ployees are receiving additional
training from their supervisors
on Saturday in adhering to
customer needs.
"No matter how well you train
the staff, they are still learning
the program," said Knapp.
Another problem in the Kid-
Care program is that families
are waiting longer for coverage.
Knapp said that in the past
it took a family close to four
weeks to receive insurance
coverage, but now it is tak-
ing families 6-8 weeks. "Once
things stabilize, it will take 2-4
weeks for a child to get into the
program," said Knapp.

THE BLAME GAME
"Why are there so many chil-
dren in DCF without Medicaid
but are unable to obtain cov-
erage from KidCare?" Fay Mat-
urah, a representative of Jack-
son Health Systems, asked
Knapp.
The 2008 KidCare annual re-
port showed that almost two-
thirds of Florida's uninsured
children have been uninsured
for an extended period. In
the 2005-2006 Children and
Families Budget and Resource
Allocation report, one of ev-
ery five people in Miami-Dade
county was found to be unin-
sured. Twenty-seven percent


of children were found to be
uninsured. Of these, children
aged 0-9 represented 21.2 per-
cent. Enrollment in KidCare
decreased by 55 percent be-
tween April of 2004 and Janu-
ary of 2006. Almost 13 percent
of children were uninsured in
2007, according to the Florida
Children's Health Survey.
"DCF is not entering the
families information into the
system correctly," said Knapp.
Patricia Iboyi, a DCF repre-
sentative, disagreed, counter-
ing that the correct data is be-
ing entered into customer files.
DCF answers all KidCare com-
plaints and verifies eligibility
for Medicaid. They then send
information on children re-
leased from Medicaid because
their families exceed the in-
come requirements to FHKC.
Julietita Romano, a mother
of four whose children cur-
rently have KidCare coverage,
believes that KidCare blam-
ing DCF, and DCF blaming
KidCare does not resolve the
problems in the program that
is affecting thousands of fami-
lies.


MORE PROBLEMS
In June, the Third Party Ad-
ministrators sent out the can-
cellation and non-payment let-
ters late, so KidCare made them
cover the families for an extra
month. According to Knapp,
the TPA had to pay $161,000
in premiums so that families
would not lose their coverage.
Additionally, 80 percent of
callers to TPA are encountering
wait times in excess of 10 min-
utes due to high call volume.
These calls were normally an-
swered in 30 seconds or less.
Knapp believes that the system
will soon improve, decreasing
this wait time for families.
At a town hall meeting held
earlier this month on Devel-
oping Partnerships for Florida
KidCare Legislation, Oscar
Cambronero, Health Services
Coordinator at the Miami-Dade
Community Action Agency
said, "In order to improve Kid-
Care for our Children, I think
we need more representation
from parents."
Within the next couple of
weeks, KidCare will be reach-
ing out to families who have


left the program. They will be
sending out postcards with an
800 number on the back. Fam-
ilies who call this number will
receive one-on-one instruction
on re-entering the program.


TO-.


Saturday, October 18, 2008

Miami Dade College North Campus

William Lehman Theatre

9 a.m. -.12 Noon


We don't talk about it but we know that it
occurs and because we don't talk about
,it we allow it to continue.The issue is
violence against women and girls and the
time to begin the conversation is now.


BUTTERBUGS ENTERTAINMENT
NOW SEEKING CONTESTANTS

Miss Black South Florida
Ages 18-29

Jr. Miss Black South Florida
Ages 13-17

Black South Florida Princess
Ages 3-12

















Download Applications Online at www.bentertain.com
Or Call 954.793.9073 For More Information
40% OFF ENTRY FEE NOW THRU OCTOBER 31ST


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008







8ETI


HQ4USE.


'ml 6&1v


.r......n. V


Ihewn1hi 14


Copyrighted Material
.........ndicated .

Syndicated Cont:ent


Available from CommercialiN ewslrviders


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2-

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T-Bone or
Porterhouse Steaks


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Idaho Potatoes ... ...................... ...... .791b
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Okeechobee and Monroe Counties Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


' m -i


~p-


s= -- Zd m








The Miami Times


SECTION B MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Hugs,


Prayer


and


Hope


Valley's homeless get help finding

jobs, housing and other services


By Lynnette Curtis
Gloria Gordon, right, presi-
dent of outreach ministries
for Greater St. Paul Cathedral
Church, hugs Jackie Cum-
mings on Wednesday at the
"prayer booth" at Project Home-
less Connect, a daylong event at
Cashman Center aimed at help-
ing the valley's homeless.
It was a busy Wednesday
morning at the "prayer booth,"
where volunteers from a local
church had settled in for a long
day of nonstop calling on the
Lord.
When you're praying for the
homeless, you've got a lot to ask
for.
"We pray for whatever they
need," said the tireless Gloria
Gordon, president of outreach
ministries for Greater St. Paul
Cathedral Church, who was
manning the booth at Project
Homeless Connect with two oth-
er volunteers. "We ask to heal
their bodies, minds and souls,
and to help them find housing
and jobs."


Nc MIII


NeHi


a gKrt'n


Gordon's was one of dozens of
booths set up at Cashman Cen-
ter for the large-scale biannual
event, which aims to help thou-
sands of the valley's homeless
find housing, jobs and other
services.
In Gordon's case, those ser-
vices included granting a few
words of support, a comforting
hug and lots of prayers.
"She prayed for God to help
us with housing and food," said
45-year-old Laura Rowe, who
traveled to the event from the
Shade Tree shelter with her 16-
and 11-year-old children.
Like many of the more than
2,000 who were expected to at-
tend the event, Rowe became
homeless with her children af-
ter losing her job. The family
has been staying in the shelter
for two months.
Gesturing toward Gordon's
prayer booth, Rowe said: "At
this point, I need all the help I
can get."
After a few minutes in a prayer
circle, Rowe and her children
Please turn to HOPE 12B


ble ha%

' theme"


I ,


Copyrighted Material



GSyndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


*-tuft w

... *. . a -. . **>* => :M .


CRkIN il


r


Gloria Gordon, right, president of outreach ministries for Greater St. Paul Cathedral Church, hugs Jackie Cummings on Wednesday at the
"prayer booth" at Project Homeless Connect, a daylong event at Cashman Center aimed at helping the valley's homeless.
Photo by John Locher


Bishop TD Jakes:

Change is coming


BISHOP TD JAKES


More than 100,000 Chris-
tians from South Africa and
beyond gathered in Johan-
nesburg this weekend to hear
Charismatic American preach-
er Bishop TD Jakes deliver the
Word of God and join together
in what he promised to be an
"explosive and powerful en-
counter" with God.
In the first ever MegaFest to
be held outside the US, Jakes
borrowed the popular rhetoric
of US presidential candidates
Barack Obama and John Mc-
Cain, as he assured the crowds
that change was coming.
"A change is coming. Ev-
eryone is talking change. Ba-
rack Obama is talking about
change. Now John McCain is
talking about change.
"The change is coming, but
it is not coming from govern-
ment, it is not coming from
the White House, it is coming
from the church house," said
Jakes, the pastor of The Pot-
ter's House megachurch in
Dallas, according to The Times


of South Africa.
The two-day family-friendly
festival kicked off on Saturday
with performances by South Af-
rica's own multi-award-winning
ensemble Joyous Celebration
and Grammy Award-winning
artist Yolanda Adams.
Since its inception in Atlanta
four years ago, MegaFest has
continued year-on-year to draw
thousands of people to Jakes'
soul-stirring, sermons. The re-
sponse so far indicates that the
2008 MegaFest is no let-down.
"It was marvellous," Johan-
nesburg local Junia Makgoba
said of Jakes' message, accord-
ing to The Times. "It made you
want to have more of this festi-
val. It was inspiring and moti-
vating."
Vanessa Rivers, from New
Jersey in the US, said she was
inspired by the message of
change.
"The service was great," Riv-
ers. said. "It goes right in the
flow of change. That's what God
Please turn to CHANGE 13B


Religion is good for your health
N_1._In ancient times, priests and healers were one and the same. The
first hospitals were in monasteries founded by physicians who
were monks. Today, numerous studies show that religious involve-
ment promotes good health by influencing healthy behaviors and
beliefs about illness. Prayer can mobilize one's healing, so the in-
-, quiry has shifted from whether prayer works to how prayer works.


Prayer can be communal,
public or private and continues
to be used in times of difficulty
and illness. For some, prayer is
-a state of being and a thought
of the heart. For others, prayer
is silence, knowing God is God.
Throughout history, people
have relied upon a divine being
to sustain them. People often
ask during a counseling ses-
sion, "How can I experience God
more fully?" Below, I've listed
ways not only to get closer to
God but to promote good health
and mental well-being as well.
Meditation brings about a
physiological calm, peaceful-
ness, releasing tension and
clearing of the mind. This low-
ers your heart and metabolic
rates, decreases respiration


and slows brain waves but en-
hances the immunity system.
A healthy lifestyle is the sec-
ond way to promote good health,
through hygiene and avoiding
tobacco, alcohol, drugs, com-
mercial salt, enriched flour, caf-
feine, partially hydrogenated oil
and sugar. In a society where a
doctor's visit usually results in
a prescription, I can hear you
asking: "How can I stop tak-
ing drugs?" The solution is to
healthily feed your God-given
immunity system, strengthen-
ing it to fight disease naturally.
Participating in a worship ser-
vice physically, cognitively and
spiritually evokes a sense of
peace in body, mind and spirit.
Visiting a house of worship can
Please turn to HEALTH 14B









10B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


45th Singing Anniversary concert


Rev. Julius and Susie Da-
vis, along with Company
Choir invites you to its 45th
singing anniversary con-
cert on Friday, October 17,
7 p.m. at Jordan Grove MBC.
Rev. Douglas Cook is pastor.
The theme is There Is Not
A Friend No Not One'. Con-
clude on 3 p.m. Sunday, The
New Christ Tabernacle MBC,
8400 N.W. 25 Ave, Miami,
Rev. Aaron Jackson and the
Milrock Holy MBC in charge.
Rev. Harold Marsh, Pastor.


-

-
Rev. Julius and Susie Davis

Rev. Julius and Susie Davis


Harvest gathering Pre-Unity Day at St. John
The Pastor's Aide Ministry
of St. John Missionary Baptist
Church will present its very
popular Annual Harvest Gath-
ering on this Friday starting at
7 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall.
Devotion will be conducted by
Deacon Ira Davis of Logos Bap-
tist Church. The theme for the
program is "The Power of the
Mighty Right Hand."
Please come and hear the
ministers of St. John power-
fully deliver what each finger on
the right hand biblically repre-
sents. Rev. Calvin Davis
Deaconess Ida Adkins serves president of the Northern Divi-
as president of the Pastor's Aide sion of the Ministers and Dea-
Ministry. cons Union of the Florida East
This Sunday will be Pre-Uni- Coast Association.
ty Day starting at 11 a.m. The Unity Day will be held at the
message will be brought by Pas- church on Sunday, October 26.
tor Calvin Davis of the Friend- Sis. Lisa Fitzpatrick is chairper-
ship Missionary Baptist Church son and the Rev. Dr. Charles
in Boca Raton. Uptgrow is the Assistant Pas-
Rev. Davis also serves as tor.

66th Pastor's Aide Anniversary at St. Matthews
Bishop Abe Randall, Pas-
tor and members of St.
Matthews Free Will Baptist
Church cordially invites the
public to the celebration
of their 66th anniversary,
Sunday, October 19, during
the 11 a.m. Worship Service.
Evangelist Gayle Kimble
Sread of new Hope Mission-
ary Baptist Church is the
speaker. The community is
welcome. .. .


Dunn going to Faith Community


This Sunday, October 19
at 10:15 a.m. Rev. Richard P.
Dunn II and members from
Cathedral of Hope will be of-
ficially going to Faith Commu-
nIity Baptist Church.
Pastor Lester Ward has been


called to do Missions in Georgia
and the Caribbean. Rev. Dunn
will become the Senior Pastor/
Teacher. The church is located
at 10401 N.W. 8th Avenue.
The community is invited to
join in with us.


DOTTIE PEOPLES


Saturday, October 25th at 7 p.m.
in celebration of our 47th Church Anniversary
2330 N.W. 93RD STREET, MIAMI FLORIDA
Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson, Senior Pastor/Teacher
Tickets in advance $30 At the Door $40 VIP Tickets $40
Don't miss the Songbird of the South!

"He's an On Time God Yes He is"
FOR TICKETS
93rd Street Community Baptist Church 2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Pages of Life Book Store 13747 N.W. 7th Avenue
Miami, Florida 305-688-5712


14 -r ,e st
A


Revival at Dayspring
Dayspring Missionary Baptist
Church, 2991 N.W. 62 Street, is
holding a revival on Wednes-
day, October 15 and Thursday,
October 16, 7:30 p.m. nightly.
Rev. James 'JD' Upshaw from
Union Spring, Alabama, retired
bus driver for Metro Transit
Authority, is the revivalist.


Rev. James 'JD' Upshaw


40 Years In Ministry
wat
Apostle Johnny L Kemp
Ons
)iv October 25, 2008

Tony's Reception Palace
1800 W. 68th Street

Tickets: $50
Call: (305) 693-1534
For More Information


Honoring our Senior Pastor,
Pasor Patty L. Kemp
October 20-26, 2008


Services Nightly
at 8:00 P.M.


SPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Yvonne Colodny, non-partisan election, for Circuit Court Judge, Group 19.


I ~ __ I


~lkrl


77N..











FMU names Sumner Hutcheson Vice President for Institutional Advancement


Sumner Hutcheson, III, has
been named vice president for
institutional advancement of
Florida Memorial University,
it was recently announced by
University President Dr. Karl
S. Wright.
Mr. Hutcheson will be re-
sponsible for all fund raising
and development activities of
Florida Memorial, including
establishing fund raising goals
and strategies; identifying and
developing relationships with
funding sources such as foun-
dations, alumni and other do-
nors; increasing the Universi-
ty's endowment; and planning
for a comprehensive capital
campaign.
In announcing Mr.
Hutcheson's appointment, Dr.
Wright said, "We are delighted


that Sumner Hutcheson has
joined the professional staff of
Florida Memorial University.
He has a proven record of suc-
cess in fund raising and devel-
opment for higher education
and in the private charities
sector. We are confident that
his experience and expertise
will contribute significantly to
Florida Memorial's continuing
growth and development."
Mr. Hutcheson has more
than 25 years of experience in
professional fund raising, in-
cluding senior executive posi-
tions with two major universi-
ties and a national, non-profit
organization. Prior to joining
Florida Memorial, he served
in vice president posts for ad-
vancement and development
with Florida International


I


SUMNER HUTCHESON, III
vice president for institutional advance-
ment of Florida Memorial University
University and with Bethune-
Cookman University. Before
that, he held increasingly


Stimulus legislation targets middle class


Economic package could cost $150B


From wire reports

Congress will consider after
the Nov. 4 election an economic
stimulus package targeted at
the middle class, which may
include extending jobless ben-
efits, money for food stamps,
new road and bridge projects
and a tax rebate.
House Financial Services
Committee Chairman Barney
Frank, D-Mass., said on ABC's
This Week on Sunday that law-
makers will convene to provide
a stimulus for "the average
citizen" after providing a $700
billion rescue package to Wall
Street.
The bill's total cost could reach
$150 billion, House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told re-
porters in Denver last week.
"I certainly will work on a
stimulus package that makes
sense," House Minority Whip
Roy Blunt of Missouri, the No. 2
House Republican leader, said
on ABC. "But let's not use the
stimulus package as an excuse


to do what Democrats have
wanted to do from Day 1 of this
Congress, which is a huge pub-
lic works plan."
In the Senate, Majority Leader
Harry Reid of Nevada has an-
nounced a post-election session
beginning Nov. 17 to consider
public lands legislation. The
Democrat's spokesman, Jim
Manley, issued a written state-
ment saying "recent develop-
ments only reinforce the need
for additional action to reinvigo-
rate the economy."
Bill Burton, a spokesman for
Democratic presidential nomi-
nee Barack Obama, said the
campaign is monitoring the sit-
uation. Republican John McCa-
in generally supports tax cuts
'.: boost the economy.
Obama has said he favors $25
billion to help states meet their
own needs, another $25 billion
for roads, bridges and other in-
frastructure, and $65 billion for
tax rebates paid for by a tax on
oil companies' profits.
Speaking in Ohio on Friday,


ftqbf tq elm=


the Illinois senator also said,
"We should extend expiring un-
employment benefits to those
Americans who've lost their jobs
and can't find new ones."
The House passed a $61 bil-
lion economic stimulus package
before lawmakers adjourned for
the elections, but Senate Re-
publicans had already thwarted
efforts to pass a companion
measure.
The House package called for
up to 13 additional weeks of job-
less benents in states with the
highest unemployment a $6
billion proposal. An additional
$14.7 billion was ticketed to
help states cover costs of Med-
icaid, the health care program
for the poor. The measure also
included funds for road and
bridge construction.
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-
iN.i., cnairmani of Congiess
Joint Economic Committee,
said on CNN on Sunday that
any new plan would also require :i
money for states trying to avoid
tax increases and job cuts. "A '
stimulus package aimed at
Main Street makes real sense,"
Schumer said.

-W-G -.


Copyrighted Miterial


Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers


responsible executive and
management positions with
the American Red Cross from
1972 to 2002.
His professional organiza-
tion activities include serving
on the Board of Directors of
the Association of Fundrais-
ing Professionals and the Na-
tional Steering Committee of
the National Association of
Black Social Workers, as well
as membership in the Coun-
cil for the Advancement and
Support of Education (CASE)
and the Grant Writing Net-
work.
Mr. Hutcheson earned his
Master of Social Work (Admin-
istration) degree from Barry


University after graduating
Cum Laude with a Bachelor
of Arts degree from Bethune-
Cookman University.
In his new position, he suc-
ceeds Dr. Barbara, Edwards,
who has been appointed ex-
ecutive assistant to the Presi-
dent of the University.
Florida Memorial University
is a private University offering
41 undergraduate degree pro-
grams and four graduate de-
gree programs to a culturally
diverse student body. Found-
ed in 1879, Florida Memorial,
which is South Florida's only
Historically Black University,
is currently celebrating its
40th anniversary in South


Florida and will be celebrat-
ing its 130th anniversary in
the state of Florida next year.
Throughout its history, it has
provided thousands of young
people with educational and
career opportunities that may
have otherwise been closed to
them. Widely recognized as
the birthplace of the Negro
National Anthem, "Lift Ev'ry
Voice and Sing," the Univer-
sity ranks second in the state
and ninth in the nation for
graduating African-American
teachers. For more informa-
tion, please contact the Office
of Public Affairs at 305-626-
3624 or visit www.fmuniv.
edu.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROl_ TIEIR \OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


r 'Fmmitt Till' b'a to mw cule child rights ra crime

Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers Novelist Charles Wriht dies at 76
StNovelist Charles Wrght dies at 76


Nevada homeless receive hep finding jobs

































Nevada homeless receive help finding jobs


HOPE
continued from 9B

headed off to look for donated
clothes and lunch.
The daylong Project Homeless
Connect, organized by the Ne-
vada Homeless Alliance, brings
together dozens of city, county
and social service agencies that
help the homeless.
Those who attend can get free
food and clothing, haircuts,
housing referrals, job place-
ment assistance, and dental
and medical screenings. Judges
are on site to hear misdemeanor
cases and process warrants to
help the homeless deal with le-
- gal issues.
Hundreds of volunteers help
set up, take down and work the
event.
An estimated 11,500 people
are homeless in Southern Ne-
vada on any given day.
Despite continuing grim eco-
nomic news, those who work
with the valley's less fortunate
weren't necessarily expecting
an increase in homelessness,
said Shannon West, regional
homeless services coordinator
for Clark County. That's be-
cause service providers have
been working to help people be-
fore things get to that point.
"The safety net we have in
place is catching these folks
before they fall into homeless-
ness," West said in a recent in-
terview.
Local shelters, food banks and
assistance programs have been
reporting increases in requests
for help because of higher food
and gasoline prices and layoffs.
Clark County has seen an in-


-African Proverb


crease in the number of people
needing rental vouchers, West
said.
But "it's much less expensive
to keep someone in a home than
to get them off the streets," she
said.
For Timothy, 49, "home" is hard
to remember. He's been without
one for about 11 years.
"I'm falling apart at the seams,"
he said while limping toward a
makeshift clinic at Project Home-
less Connect. "I can't support my-
self. It's been going on for years."
Timothy said he suffers from
severe arthritis, spinal pain and
other health problems, and haul-'
ing his "60-pound backpack"
around the streets of Las Vegas
isn't helping.
Linda Lera-Randle El, director
of the Straight from the Streets
homeless outreach program, was


steering Timothy toward the clin-
ic.
"You see so many people these
days for whom the days turn into
years," Lera-Randle El said. "All
of a sudden you look around and
you're in your 40s, still staying at
a shelter."
Sica, 36, was hoping to get off
the streets before it becomes a
way of life. She became home-
less only recently, she said, after
the disability payments she re-
ceived for mental health issues
stopped.
Sica, who is now living at
Shade Tree, also attended Proj-
ect Homeless Connect looking
for help.
She was one of more than 70
people who had stopped by the
prayer booth by midday, asking
to pray with Gordon or other
volunteers.


What's about to become


Florida history?

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So play these great games now while there are still
prizes to win. But remember, any winning tickets must be
redeemed by Friday, December 19, 2008. Prizes less than
$600 may be redeemed at any Florida Lottery retailer.
Prizes $600 and over must be claimed at a Florida Lottery
office. (For the office nearest you call 850-487-7777.)
Thanks for playing these and the many other games of the
Florida Lottery.
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- U
Fn- 11

Florida Lottery,
Ilalointvucol


"I asked for God to remove my
weaknesses, to help me with
temptation," she said.
As Sica moved along, Gordon
turned with a smile to the next
person and asked: "What would
you like the Lord to do for you
today?"


By Bruce Weber

Charles Wright. who wrote
three autobiographical novels
about Black street life in New
York City between 1963 and
1973 that seemed to herald the
rise of an important literary tal-
ent but who vanished into alco-
holism and despair and never
published another book,
died on Oct. 1 in Man-
hattan. He was 76 and
lived in the East Village.
The cause was heart
failure, said Jan Hoden-
field, one of Mr. Wright's
former editors; earlier
in the year, he said,
Mr. Wright had learned WR
that alcohol had eroded
his liver. From the mid-1970s
through the mid-1990s, Mr.
Wright lied itn- the spare room of
the Brooklyn apartment of Mr.
Hodenfield and his family.
Mr. Wright's three books were
"The Messenger" (19631, "The
Wig" 19661 and "Absolutely
Nothing to Get Alarmed About"
(19731, all published by Farrar,
Straus & Giroux. Together they
describe a loner's life on the
fringes of New York society, his
protagonists stand-ins for him-
self, working at low-level jobs,
living in low-rent apartments.
hanging out with low life person-
alities.
"The Messenger" was the best
received of the three, perhaps
because it told a more universal
tale about being an outsider.
"The Wig" is a far angrier ef-
fort. "Malevolent, bitter, glitter-
ing," the critic Conrad Knicker-
bocker wrote in The New York


Times, adding that Mr. Wright's
style was "as mean and vicious a
weapon as a rusty hacksaw," and
that he wielded it against blacks
as well as whites. The book is an
occasionally surreal, comic por-
trait of a black man, Lester Jef-
ferson. who feels he must hide
his blackness to achieve the ac-
ceptance and material rewards
he thinks he deserves.
"Absolutely Nothing,"
most of which had been
previously published in
columns that Mr Wright
wrote for The Village
Voice, is a chronicle of
seed', adventures -
as a dishwasher arid
IGHT porter, as a lover, as a
drunk that some crit-
ics questioned as self-hating,
though others found it evocative
and disturbing. The three books
were republished in a single vol-
ume by, HarperColhns in 1993.
Charles Stevenson Wright
was born June 4, 1932. in New
Franklin. Mo His mother died
when he was 4, and his father, a
railroad porter, sent him to live
with his maternal grandmother.
When he was 14, they moved to
another central Missouri town,
Sedalia.
By that age. Charles was an
avid reader and knew he wished
to be a v.riter: he dropped out of
high school and spent his days
in the library, and according to
one story he told the Hodenfield
family, he would read maga-
zines in their bound stacks at
the railroad station because he
knew that once they got to the
local drugstore, he wouldn't be
allowed in to look at them.


"If the lions


do not write


their own


history, then


the hunters


will get all


the credit."













official : 3,OCopyrighted Material raq's Nosul


4bsiwa0mm


indicated Content


Availablefrom Commercial News Providers


-w4


- S
4no S am _______m- a-=nb -w -4


TD Jakes is making changes


CHANGE
continued from 9B

is doing... we're changing to
be spiritually-minded and we're
stepping up to do what we're
supposed to do on the earth.
"Holding MegaFest in South
Africa is an example of what
God is doing bringing cultures
together, creating unity."
On Saturday, more than 500


South African participants took
up the opportunity to have gen-
eral medical check-ups and HIV
screenings at the MegaCARE
Health Fair.
TD Jakes Ministries have ini-
tiated a number of philanthrop-
ic initiatives in South Africa
over the past few years, includ-
ing clean water projects, and
the construction of homes and
a centre for children. Students


from Clay Academy, the private
Christian school affiliated with
The Potter's House, have previ-
ously participated in an educa-
tional exchange with South Af-
rican students.
Sunday's programme for
MegaFest includes appearances
from Pastor Paula White, Bish-
op Noel Jones and Bishop John
Francis, as well as a closing ser-
vice from Jakes.


S UIDC s ri


to aft 1*iami imet



Support The Times


-I.S~. 9.


J CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED 1 BILL MY CREDIT CARD


ML


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Authorized Signature

Name

Address


City


Phone


Antioch Missionary Baptist\
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
cla Civl'Sudiiay School..... 8:30 a.m.
AMj [ Sur aly Worship Service... 10 al.ti
S Mid-Week Service .... Wednesday's
-. Hour of Power Noon Day Prayer
12pm.M.1pm.
B Evcning Worshbip ... 7 p.m


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church

i,.un, i 1
305-759-8875
Hour (i Praye.......6:30 n.m.
Early Morniiig Worin.liip,...7:30 a.m.
SI rd In
Youdi Miniy Stdy'....ed..7 p.m
Feeding the Hunfy evycr,
Wcdnesday..., ..11 a.m.-l pm


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Stmday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Sttvdy Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting -'rTues. 6 p.m,



Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Setrvices:
Sunday Morfning Servics5
SundaySchool 9:30 ami.

,i I .. I. T. s 1 ,. -. :3.,0. ..i
ChMir Rehealal Thursday 7:30 p.m
\ a al--i isi m /


Apostolic Revival Cente / Word of Faith \ / Brownsville \ Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
6702 N.XV 15th Avenue Christian Center Church of Christ 17800 NW 25th Ave.
305-836-1224 2370 N.W. 871 Street 4561 N.W 33rd Cour3 www.mlhernortworshipcinler.org
Order of Services 305-836-9081 305-634-4850/Fax & Messages 305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
New time for T.V Program 305-634-6604 Order of Services:
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY ....- 63-. . .ofSr .e orServices:
ala rAuLECI 3; rOM 1(1H 3 Order of Services: Order of'Serices. Slday Worsip Servces.
Su+90 m.. p ur. Sunday 5 pum. 7,,,,t,0. I 1 .111. & IS 1 .l...
tlay Momills services Church School: 8& 30 ani.
WVed T rce y.rlac r9;m.. 12 p.il ,1 SllOoL.. 10 a.i I1 I J I "
M.n.ere Ia.m. [S.ervice aIn ,. .',.I. ,, Wednesday
Sun. Eve. Worshlip .... 730 i un y Bible St.dy, 8, p.ll Paslori sNoon Day Bible Sludy
e P yr Mee.liup..- 73 p. i Prayer S vice s pm m., .. Bible Insit1te, 6:30 p.m.
put i S..y. i. p ........ ,n. n an Midw ekWorship7:30p.m.


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sundy .............. '0& I a.m.
Sunday SdCIool.............. 10 am
TIusday .......... 7 p.m. Bible Stuly,
Prayer Meeing, 1B.T.U.
Inpl)man iThis before
0Fint Sim..7 p.m.
CoInnmmliol First Sim ........
, "*7:30& II a.m.
...... .. .....ImBB l^


Pembroke Park
3707 SW. 56th Avenue
(Office) 954-962-9327


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
.... ... Order of Services
Slil ---


a Chrch School ...I. ...9:0 a.m.
WairsIp Service ... ........it awin
w P Wednesday
^ dBile lt dy;PraycrNight '?: p,
S T Thur'sday


Church of Christ
* Hlollywood, FL 33023
* (Fax) 954-962-3396


Order of Services
Sunday A
Bible Study ............ 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............10 m ,
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study .... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8, 19,21,22, 23, 30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Wel> page: www.lxeinbrokep)arkchurchofchrist.coni* iEmail: pemibrokcparkc

/I Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3" Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 30S-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order or Services:
Sunday School. .... .9:45 a.m.
Sun.Mloming Servs I1 a.m
4' Sun. .BTU...130.2 30 1in.
Tuosdy Bible Stuldy
Feeding MJnistlry I0 a nm.
WTeus .. a-
\iHIWAu ngaem /


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 761 Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
.l Sunalys, (hiC h hSchool ...I... 10 I i
WorshiSp S1 5r i I Sa... i5 m
Tueasdays BibIc CIlsa-. 7 p.m


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
Order of Services:
a.. u .Mornilg WoSlsip. .h.t &3rd Sun.
". ming W i'orshtp ............. 0:30a.n
S T., ,. l siglt i sr .. .......6 pm.
i y r S meici ........ ...... .30 p.in
S St .dy ...... ....... ... ....... pin.
'hur Sclool ..... .. 9 .



St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
---- T',ly Sunday
I RI.' hip .....7:30 a.m.
cu h-;, t..,.I ..........;9:30 a.m .
Iininirnr W.,rship...l a.m.
I1,, ',Pt, BibleStiylv I
rues.) 7 p.m.




f Zion Hope "
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W 17th Ave.
30-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
SSamly School .............9:30 a,.m.
IImlomlilg PniseWVorship ..II a.m.
SHfistai llnliS;inSanxay
| W'r evening ihip at 6 p.m
| Prayer Meeting &< Bible Study
"| ltcsdahy 7 pi.
| ilus9orSti ,t'lid u f ir swriy
L /__ ^ __ fmigIisii al35JK SW


/ Liberty City Church "1
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning ...........8 a.m.
SIuday School...........10 am.
S, L. It, i nl C I ( p.Im .
T ,w. ri' lltem .Ill p.m.


S New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International

2300 NW 135th Street
order of Services i
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11 1 (800) 254-NBBC : "


305-685O-,3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


a.m., 7 pi.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Jordan Grove Missionary-
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Eady Worship ..............7 arm.n
SSunday School............. 9 a.m.
NBC ............................10:05 a'm '.
W orship......... .............. 11 a.m.
^^ i-- [l SI'nIit ald Bible Cls
"Tuesday ...............6:30 p.m.
B Youlh Meelin,"Choir reliearsal



Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunrlay Schcool .945iai
Wahip ...i all
H)Uie Scudly 'llimlay ...7:30 pm n
Yotth. -inisry Mn \ NdI
I1 )TiiL


/ St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7"30 and 11 a.m.
Worship Service
9l:30 a.m.......... Sunday School
STuesday........' p nm. Bible Study
i 8 Prayer Meeling
Mowlay Wednesday. liday
12 p.m.. -Day Prayer


New Vision For Christ '
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Fairly Sunday Worslaup ..7:30 amin
Sunday School ...9.........930 a-m
Suday i' kningEb -slup Ilam.
Siruiaveling Service 6 pm
Tiusday rayerkectinrg.,.7 30 pim.
W(xschy lBtdble S'Llt ...7:30 pn.
.Not Just aI Church Butl a Moementn


State Zip


email


*Includes Florida sales tax


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


11 Im i


o


MW- -i


Rev.Rogry dam, psto


x


BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Ilishop Vitorl'. Cury, D.Nlin, D.D, senm, flastor11'eaclie


i91?


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


i j


i 1








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Bible puMbrmr g .h Uo t 0 a rad

4 ----" Copyrighted Material. -


* -


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


w


Environmentalist push towards 'green' theme
BIBLE Rarely does even one hand go studies expert Stephen Scharp-
contiuned from 9B up." er and anthropologist Hilary
Environmentalism faces Cunningham, has no green ink
stewardship. Also, evangeli- hurdles among evangelicals, but has the same intentions.
cal Protestants were consis- Cizik says, citing suspicions It intertwines ecology and
tently less likely to agree on that it is "liberal-leftist" or ecumenism by drawing quotes
any of the environmental is- "witchy-pagan," or that it leans from a wide range of sacred
sues than other Christian to government regulation, texts, saints, poets and sci-
groups. Another hurdle: "Dominion- entists, says Scharper, who
"We need a Bible like this," ism the idea that God gave teaches on social movements
says Rev. Richard Cizik, vice this to us and we can do what in the University of Toronto's
president of the National As- we darn well please. Centre for Environment.
sociation of Evangelicals, "When people tell me, Jesus "We wanted to address the
who has led the group into never talked about the envi- tension between Biblically
environmental activism. "I've ronment, I say, God says, 'Love based Christians and envi-
traveled the country for two your neighbor,' not drown him ronmentally based Christians
years now speaking at college in melting sea ice," Cizik says. and to show the corresponding
chapel services. I ask, 'Has However, this newest Green views of other faith and hu-
anyone here ever heard a ser- Bible is not the first. A 1993 manist traditions with quotes
mon at their home church on book also called The Green from the Dalai Lama, Gandhi
the stewardship of creation?' Bible, co-authored by religious and others," says Scharper.


Religious lifestyle promotes healthy living


4 w m S e
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HEALTH
continued from 9B

give you a sense of reassurance,
harmony and balance when you
see the stained-glass windows,
religious architecture, smell flo-
ral arrangements and incense,
and hear sacred music. Reli-
gious rituals give people a sense
of security.
Harboring guilt and bitter-
ness can make one literally sick.
Therefore, confessing your sins,


repentance and forgiveness are
powerful wellness methods. A
10-year study has shown that
people who had social interac-
tion with others of shared beliefs
transformed their attitudes and
emotions and were less likely to
die earlier than' their counter-
parts.
Turning your life over to God
acknowledges that no human
has total control. During a time
of illness, the expectation of help
from God not only provides a


sense of hope but can work like
medicine. An important remedy
for promoting health is find-
ing your life purpose, and good
health enables you to serve your
purpose. The first step I take
with life-coaching clients is to
find their purpose.
The last remedy for health in
this article is to "love your neigh-
bor as yourself' (Leviticus 19:18).
When people love and help oth-
ers, they often experience better
health than those who do not.


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The Miami Times

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SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 15-21 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES OCTOBER 15-21 2 8


Open your heart to givi

Open your heart to givi


This week, the husband of a
friend explained that he was
a member of a group of men
known as the Christian Men
Breakfast Fellowship that is
composed of retired men from
various churches and denomi-
nations who have been meet-
ing together for 8 years. He
described their fellowship as
'iron sharpening iron.' He said
that they regularly organize
and participate in charitable
events, and this year they are
assisting Hope For Haiti. This


ministry is collecting cl
food, money and other
for the poor and display
that country.
I was so excited to he
share about this won
ministry who is not only
'good' things, but Godly t
Everything that he men
is scriptural. Christia
lowship is very impc
Perhaps you enjoy havii
with family. I know tha
Perhaps you have co-w
with whom you enjoy I


-.- lunch and even meeting after
work. That's great. However,
IMC nothing can take the place of
fellowship with other believ-
ers. Paul cautioned us to not
neglect the fellowship of other
believers. It is so important
ing to come together with people
who can advise you and will
clothes, be able to encourage you dur-
items ing low times. Those who are
ced in not familiar with the Word
may not understand that your
ar him situation is not necessarily a
iderful result of sin, but as a result of
'doing God doing something marvel-
things. ous in your life that you just
itioned do not see at this time..
an fel- We all know the parable of
ortant. the Good Samaritan in Luke
ng fun 10: 30 -37. Many of us find
it I do. it difficult to help those whom
workers we do not know. But in this
having parable, Jesus tells us that we


are to help our neighbors, and
as He explained, our neigh-
bors can even be strangers.
Anyone in need is a neighbor.
By participating in this char-
ity, these Godly men are help-
ing their neighbors a Godly
instruction.
One of the things that we
discussed was that because
of so many economic prob-
lems besetting our nation,
some ministries and charities
are suffering. Unfortunately,
so many are losing their jobs
and their homes, and just do
not give as they once did. Of
course, if you do not have the
money, then you don't have
money to give. But even in
that case, you can still donate
your time and your talents.
You have more time for prayer
for these ministries. James


1:27 reads that "pure and
genuine religion in the sight
of God the Father means car-
ing for orphans and widows in
their distress and refusing to
let the world corrupt you."
Don't allow the terror and
fear of the world make you
afraid to give. It is our duty
and responsibility as believ-
ers to do so. It is not a sug-
gestion to give when you have
extra money, or have received
a raise or windfall. It is a com-
mandment to give at all times.
My friend's husband also re-
minded me that these men not
only give because they know
that they should, but they give
joyfully, thanking God for the
opportunity to be able to bless'
others. This is an excellent
reminder that our attitude is
important as we give; because


the Bible tells us that God
does love us in 2 Corinthians
9:7 to give cheerfully, and not
grudgingly.
I am always so honored and
humbled to hear about those
who take seriously the com-
mandment to "love your neigh-
bor', and do so with Christian
action, and not just words.
There are many ministries
that you can assist by donat-
ing time, money and talent.
Perhaps your church is even
involved in some of these wor-
thy causes. If you like, please
feel free to contact Brother
LaRue Ford at 305 621-2701.
Consider also the idea of get-
ting together with other believ-
ers to not only do good works,
but just to have a laugh and a
good meal. Work Godly, and
play Godly!


" .. ... -' ... .


5000 Role Models of Excel-
lence will honor the achieve-
ments of the late Athalie Range
in a road designation ceremony
on Wednesday, October 22 at
10 a.m. at the St. Martha Cath-
olic Church.

The North Beach for Obama
will be having a huge music
festival on October 26 from 12
p.m. 6 p.m. at the Bandshell.
For more information, please


contact Cora Smith at 305-
758-5870.

Please support the hurricane
victims of Texas by dropping
off all non-perishable items to
Mt. Tabor Missionary Baptist
Church. The deadline is Octo-
ber 21.

Miami-Dade Alumni Chap-
ter of Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity invites you to travel


with them when the Wildcats
take on the Rattlers in Orlando
on November 22. For more in-
formation,, please call 305-505-
1235.

Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami,
Inc. (FANM) cordially invites
you to its membership drive
launch event. The Launch pro-
gram is scheduled for today
from 5 p.m. 8 p.m. at the Jean
Jacques Dessalines Center.
This will be a great opportunity
to support programs aimed at
sustaining business develop-
ment. Please be there we count
on your presence and support
for this great event.


Miami Edison Senior High
School will hold their first an-
nual Alumni Career Day on
October 22. All Miami Edison
alumna /alumnus are invited
to attend. For more informa-
tion, please contact Mr. Ever-
ette, Director of Student Activi-
ties, 305- 751-7337, ext. 2271.

The Historically Black Col-
leges and Universities (HBCU)
shuttle provides direct service
home for students. Reserva-
tions for Thanksgiving and
Christmas for students attend-
ing the HBCU's schools can be
made on the website: www.hb-


cucollegeshuttle.com The shut-
tle will be available November
25-26. The reservation dead-
line is October 27. For more in-
formation, Miranda Y. Albury,
786-318-4439.

Treasured Pearls invites you
to join them for a weekly meet-
ing every Friday from 7 p.m. -
8:30 p.m. at the Literary Cafe
and Poetry Lounge. For more
information, please call Sabri-
na at 786-295-0105.

Broward County public
schools will host a Town Hall
meeting today at Piper High
School beginning at 6:30 p.m.


For more information, please
visit www.browardschools.com

Join the Belafonte Talcolcy
Center for their second annual
Save the Babies Gala on Satur-
day, November 8 at 8 p.m. For
more information, please con-
tact 305-751-1295.

Mt Hermon African Method-
ist Episcopal Church invites
you to their annual Caribbean
Day on Sunday, October 19 at
10 a.m. The Caribbean Festival
will begin immediately after the
service with Caribbean music
and delicious food dishes from
the Caribbean Islands.


SC church gets bell after nearly century without


By Mary Jo Balasco


ROCK HILL, S.C. (AP) For
nearly a century, a church bell
tower in downtown Rock Hill
has stood silent never actually
holding a bell. That changed Oct.
6 when a 1,000-pound brass bell
was hoisted into the tower of The
Episcopal Church of Our Sav-
iour.
A small crowd of church mem-
bers attended the bell-raising on
the sidewalk at the intersection
of Caldwell and White streets. :,
Colin Okey, 2, the son and
grandson of members, was the
first to strike the bell with a met-
al striker while it sat on the side-
walk before it was raised.


After -Colin, several 3- and
4-year-olds from the church's
day school class took turns strik-
ing the bell with wooden spoons.
Purchase and installation of
the bell is part of the 700-mem-
ber church's million-dollar res-
toration project, which began in
January.
The church, built in 1872,
originally had a smaller, wood-
framed tower that, according to
historic photographs, contained
a small bell, said Marsha Millar,
head of the restoration commit-
tee.
The existing brick tower, built
in the early 1900s, did not con-
tain a bell, Millar said.
"There is no evidence in the


tower itself that a bell was hung
there," said church member
Hugh Rock, 67. "There was no
hardware or brackets, no sup-
port. We had to build support
into the tower."
The bell was cast in Annecy _
a town in the French Alps just
south of Geneva. It arrived at the
church about two weeks ago. "It
is an A-3 bell, which means it
has a mellow, deep tone," Millar
said.
The bell will be rung by an
electronic striker controlled from
within the church. The tower
would not support a swinging'
bell, Millar said.
Planning for the restoration
began more than two years ago,


Burgp Copyrighted Material, s h



e Syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers


Zion Hope M.B. Church
invites everyone to come cele-
brate the pastor's third church
anniversary on October 19
-26.

Jefferson Reaves, Sr.


Health Center will be holding
their tenth anniversary gala
celebration on Thursday, Oc-
tober 23 at the Rusty Pelican
Ballroom. For more informa-
tion, please call Minnie Mick-
ens-Jones at 305-691-5775.


The retiring of The Stars of Harmony
Brother Robert L. Summerset will celebrate the retiring of The Stars of Harmony after 65 years of
gospel singing. This will be Sunday, October 19th. 3:30 PM at the Church of God, by faith. Dona-
tions $10 at the door. 16969 N.W. 23rd Ave. Elder W. Brazial, Pastor, Brother Robert L. Summerset,
Manager. Looking to see you there.


Millar said. The goal was to re-
store the church to its original
Carpenter Gothic Style, which
incorporates Gothic features
such as towers and pointed
arches.
Church restoration focused on
essential renovations such as
new heating, wiring, floors and
walls, Rock said.
"The bell was an extra, but we
were able to get them all," Rock
said. "I am really pleased."
Member Diane Rudulph, 54,
is excited the church will finally
have a bell. It will get its first ring
in the tower on Oct. 19, during a
dedication ceremony.
"The people in this church will
really love it," Rudulph said.


I -A s m I


38th pastoral appreciation at

Apostolic revival center


The congregation of the Ap-
ostolic Revival Center invites
you to praise God with them
as they show their apprecia-
tion to a man and woman of
God during their 38th pasto-
ral appreciation services. The
theme will be 'Here by Di-
vine Appointment, Chosen by
God.' Services begin October
21-26, 7:30 p.m. nightly.
We are praising God for his
special out poring of the Holy
Ghost on this ministry. God
has blessed Dr. Smith in his
evangelistic endeavors to es-
tablish a fellowship of nearly
200 churches on three con-
tinents. They include, North,
South and Central America,
the Caribbean Islands and
East Africa.
This year we are espe-
cially thankful that God has
blessed us to bring the gospel
to the Maasai, the indigenous


people of Kenya. The water
wells have redefined life and
brought prosperity to both
the churches and schools.
We will continue the cele-
bration on Saturday, October
25 with a dinner at the Hyatt
Hotel. For reservation please
call 954-558-8444.


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I











OR".
OTICE OB.ITUAR'l E S
B RA N C ES", D'EATH N6
AE it
D


Grace
DARRYL DELOATCH, 20, ca-
shier, died Oc-
tober 8 in North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
10 a.m. Satur-
day, House of
God Miracle
Temple.

EUNICE MELTON, 89, domestic
worker, died October 7 in Jackson
South. Service was held.

GARY CLARKE, 47, mechanic,
died October 7 in University Hos-
pital. Service was held.

Royals
RUTH JACKSON, 80, died Oc-
tober 7. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m.
Wed nesday.
Service 11 a.m.
Thursday in the
chapel.



JERRY KING, 55, died October
8. Visitation Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at
St. Mary's Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


LEILA SCOTT, 88, died Octo-
ber 11. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.







ANTHONY LORENZO CO-
LEY, 45, insur- _
ance agent for
American Gen-
eral Insurance,
died October
11. Memorial
_ service Frida 5
to 9 p.m., Tree
of Life, 16321
N.W. 47 Ave. Service 10 a.m. Sat-
urday, Bethel Apostolic Temple,
1855 N.W. 199 Street.


GLORIA ROZIER, 60, died Oc-
tober 7. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

St. Fort
EMIL SULFIN, 52, died October
5. Service was held.

ALDO MARTINEZ, 81, died Oc-
tober 8 at home. Memorial Service,
2 p.m. Sunday in the chapel.

MARIE SIMEON, 44, died Octo-
ber 12 in Aventura Hospital Medi-
cal Center. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Hadley

JARKEVIS LARMONT ALLEN,
13 months,
died October
10 in Jackson .
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: moth-
er, Delshonna
Dunkley, father,
Jarvis, grand-
mothers, Patricia Wagstaffe and
Shelia Dunkley. Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Mount Tabor Missionary
Baptist Church.

RONALD EMMANUEL SMITH,
22, 2760 N.W. 168 Terrace, died
October 1. Service was held.

ISIAH CLIFTON EADY JR. 60,
died October 5 in Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Service was held.

DONNIE LEE DAVIS, 91, 2950
N.W. 166 Street, died October 1 at
home. Service was held.

Jay
ANNIE MAE JONES, 90,


Goulds, died
October 9 in
Jackson South
Community
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, Morning-
star Missionary w
Baptist Church.


Faith _-,
RENA PATTERSON, 89, Home-
stead, housewife, died October 3
in Hialeah Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m. Saturday,
New Mt. Moriah
Baptist Church.






Wright & Youngi!2
HATTIE R. 'BROWN A.K.A
LADY B 65,
Nurse died Oc-

at Palmetto


clude husband
Edward, mother
Agnes Walker,
children Roy Pitts, James Claridy,
Jackie Pitts, Rickey Pitts, sister
Bertha Johnson, 10 grandchildren.
Services will be held Saturday,
October 18th at Koinonia Worship
Center at 11 a.m.

GEORGE SANDY HINES, Jr,
76, mechanic,
died October 12,
in North Shore
Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: wife,
Ruth; children,
Blondell, Don-
nell, Levette,
and 15 grandchildren. Service 1
p.m. Saturday, Pilgrim Rest Bap-
tist Church.


BANKS, 91,
clerk, died
October 8, at
home. Survi-
vors include:
wife, Ruth; chil-
dren, William Jr
(Kathy), Michael
(Sharon), Debra
Banks-Lane and Douglas; 14
grandchildren and 14 great grand-
children. Service 11 a.m. Thurs-
day, Little Rock Primitive Baptist
Church.

ANDRE R. SIMPSON JR, 4,
died October
3 in Memorial
Regional Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: par-
ents, Andre and
Carman; sib-
lings, Dreana,
Andrew; grand-
parents, Charmaine.and Otis Hud-
son Sr., Sandra Gentles and Louis
Forbes. Service 10 a.m. Saturday,
Love Fellowship Ministries.

ZAH-ZIREE DARIEN, five
months, died October 7. Survivors
include: mother, Sabrina. Service
11 a.m. Friday, Rock of Ages Bap-
tist Church.


E.A. Steven BA ,
SHARON ANN KEATON, 60,
Miami, died
October 7, Uni-
versity of Miami
Hospital. Ser-
vice 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, House
of God Church.
Remains will be
shipped to Arca-
dia, Florida for final rites.


Honor



Your Loved


One


With an In


Memoriam


In The


Miami Times


Richardson .,
CHRISTIAN PIERRE GANTT,
31, died Octo--
ber 10. Service
12 Friday at The
Church of The
Open Door.




KENYA JANELLE CURTIS, 15,
died October
9. Service 10
a.m. Saturday,
Church of God
of Prophecy #1.




RICHARD JACKSON WIL-
LIAMS, 16, died
October 11.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



DARKESHIA WALKER, 27,
died October 9.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday, Faith
Co mm unity
Church.




JOSEPH S. HILL, AKA JOE
HILL, 83, died
October 9. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Joyce;
children, Corine,
Allen, donald,
Vernon, Annette
and Odetta;
sister, Lucille
Thomas. Viewing 6 to 8 p.m. Fri-
day, St. Luke Missionary Baptist
Church. Service 12 Saturday at
the church.

OLIVIA JONES, 45, died Octo-
ber 13. Service
1:30 p.m. Satur-
day, St. James
Church.






Nakia Ingraham
LYNN UPBIN, 53, Pembroke
Pines, died October 11. Service
was held.

LAURA GRUMBLY, 47, Pem-
broke Pines, died October 13. Ser-
vice was held.

BALANCE ORRIELA, 55, Hol-
lywood, died October 1. Service
was held.

Pax-Villa
EMMANUEL DESTIN, 68, died
October 7. Service Saturday, Be-
rean Church of God, Fort Lauder-
dale.

JEANNE RAMPART, 61, died
October 7. Service Saturday, First
Haitian Church of God.

MARIE-NICOLE CELESTIN,
50, died October 5. Service Satur-
day in the Broward chapel.


Alfonso M. Richardson
MARIA J. ROMELUS, 34, died
October 8. Sur-
vivors include:
father, Lucien;
sisters, Lucette
and Jennnifer.
Viewing Friday
4 to 8 p.m., Al-
fonso M. Rich-
ardson Funeral
Services, 3790 N.W. 167 Street,
Miami Gardens. Service 12:30
p.m. Saturday, Antioch Baptist
Church of Carol City.


Mitchell -B
JANELLE 'LALA' TAYLOR,


died October
12 at home. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


Poitier ,
GENEVA AVERY, 52, house-
wife, died Octo-
ber 6 in Jackson
North Medical
Center. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day, St. Luke
AME Church. "


PAMELA REAVES WILLIAMS,
administrative ...
secretary, died "
October 3 in
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service satur-
day at Liberty
City Church of
God.

ARTHUR LAWRENCE MANN,
41, laborer, died
October. 12.
Service 4 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel. .




PAULETTA MOORMAN
MITCHELL, 56,
died October
11 in Kindred
Hospital, Hol-
lywood. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day, Ebenezer
United Method-
ist Church.

HILDA MELINDA CULLER, 92,
teacher, died October 9 in Memo-
rial Regional Hospital.- -

VINELLA D. MANN, 52, died
October 13. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Gregg L. Mason
MARGUERITE C. GEFRARD,
58, certified
nurse assistant
for Watercrest
Nursing Home,
died October 10
in North Shore
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
sons, Markelito
and Maxwell Mathurin; daughter,
Markelita Mathurin; sister, Marie
Rose Jeanty; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Visitation
Friday, 5-9 p. m., Eglise Theophile
in Christ, 15201 N.W. 7 Avenue.
church. Service Saturday, 12:00 at
the church. Entombment: South-
ern Memorial

ALBERT HOLMES, 74, truck
driver for Winn
Dixie, died Octo-
ber 8, Miami VA
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
sons, Torine and
Lawrence Albert
Jones; daugh-
ters, Vanessa
Burke (Donnell), Verneta Hooper,
Charmaine Jones and Sabrina;
and a host of other relatives and
friends. Viewing Friday 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday, 11:00 a.m. in
the chapel. Interment: Southern
Memorial Park.

CARRIE FUNCHES VICKERS,
90, housewife,
died October
12. Survivors
include: daugh-
ter Doreen, Bar-
ham and a host
of nieces, neph-
ews and close
friends. Viewing
Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service Saturday
at New Shiloh MBC. Interment:
Vista Memorial Gardens.

ALLEN EDWARD HARDNETT
"AKA" CADILLAC, 48, Chauffer
for Braman Cadillac, died October
3 at home. Survivors include: wife,
Mary; sons, Allen Jr. and Allen Ill;
daughters, Tonisha, Erika McKin-
ney and Lakwanza Nelson; broth-
ers, Ernest (Corinthia) and Larry;
sister, Donella Turner; mother-in-
law, Judith Walker; father-in-law,
Leroy Walker; sister-in-law, Debo-
rah; and a host of other relatives


and friends. Services were held.

JOIN THE
,=P\-ig 0ou iEfitE
by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


Range
VERONICA LOUISE FLOYD ,
61, teacher at
Flamingo Ele-
mentary School,
died October
10. Survivors
include: daugh-
ter, Vanessa;
son, Joseph II;
sisters, Brenda
and Patsy Anderson; brothers,
Paris and Patrick Anderson (Me-
lissa); Sigma Gamma Rho family;
and her Holy Redeemer Church
Family. Rosary will be held Thurs-
day 7:00 p.m. at Holy Redeemer
Catholic Church. Service 10 a.m.
Friday at the Church.

PATSY JEAN GAUSE, 49, court
clerk died Oc-
tober 7. Sur-
vivors include:
dau g h ter s,
Monique and
Kristine Gause;
mother, Gertie;
sisters, Marilyn
Kelly, and Bev-
erly Henry; brothers, Jeffrey and
Robie; nephew, Rev. Derrick M.
Kelly; grandchildren, Briana Bry-
ant, and Arianna Scipp; a host of
nieces, nephews other relatives
and friends. Service 11 a.m. Fri-
day at First Baptist M B. Church
of Brownsville.

SUSIE BARNHILL, 91, home-
maker, died
October 10.
Survivors in-
clude: daugh-
ter, Scherry 1
Barnhill; care-
takers, Queenie '-.....
Monks, Edras .
Jones, Nat Hol-
mes, and Rev. Thomas L. Smith.
Service 2:30 p.m. Friday, Union
Grove M.B. Church.

DEACON KENNETH LEON
ROLE, 54,
school resource
specialist, Dade
County School
Board, died Oc-
tober 10. Sur- 10:00
vivors include:
wife, Gale; sons, -
Jamaal and
Rashard; mother, Dorothy Holmes;
brother, Nathaniel S.; sister, Linda
Rolle Atkinson (Morris); a host of
aunts, uncles nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends. Me-

6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., New Birth
Baptist Church Cathedral of Faith
International. Service 12:00 Sat-
urday at the church.

LILLIE GRACE HARRIS, 90,
retired domes-
tic worker, died
October 6. Sur-
vivors include:
daughter, Gilda
Lewis; grand-
daughters, Sa-
brina Hepburn,
Johnisha Lewis;
grandsons, Cedric Hepburn; and
Nakia Stanley; great-grandsons,
Cedric Hepburn Jr, and Isaac Rol-
lins III; a host of other relatives and
friends.
Service 10 a.m. Saturday 10:00
in the chapel.

RUTH HYSMITH, 96, homemak-
er, died October
9. Survivors in-
clude: son, Alvin
Taylor(Helen);

James and Al-
vin Taylor Jr;
granddaugh-
ters, Kathi and
Joyce Taylor; nine great-grand-
children; four great great-grand-
children; a host of other relatives
and friends. Service 10:00 a.m.,
Greater Bethel AME Church.

JOSEPH LAWRENCE, 75, ma-
sonry laborer, died October 6. Ser-
vice 10 a.m. Saturday, October 25,
Grace United Community Church.



Death Notice


DANNY FRAZIER, JR. 23,
died October 10. Survivors in-
cludes mother, Frankie Camp-
bell; father, Danny; brother,
Steven; two sisters, Shalicia
and Chanel; grandparents,
Barbara and George King and
Azie Lee Holley.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
GLORIA ANN 'PEGGY' SMITH,
66, retired as-
sistant manager
for Dade County
Public Schools,
died October 8
at home. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Lionel
J.; daughters,
Brenda S. Francois (Antoine), De-
lores Johnson (Aubrey); son, Lio-
nel J. Smith and a host of grand-
children, great-grandchildren and
family members. Viewing 3 to 9
p.m. Friday in the chapel. Service
noon Saturday at St. Marks Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.

BETTY MCMILLIAN, 71, house-
wife, died Octo-
ber 9. Service 1.
p.m. Saturday
in the chapel.





YOLANDA WHITE-DEAN, 40
hostess, died
October 12 in
Jackson North
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m.
Saturday, Total
Change and
Empowerment
Church.

DIANE JORDAN-CARTER,
57, nurse, died
October 10 in
Memorial Re-
gional Hospital.
Service 10 a.m.
Monday at Oa-
sis Church.


JIMMIE LEE HALL, 71, retired,
died October
10. Survivors in-
clude husband;
children, Cas-
sandra Smith,
Phyllis, Lisa
and Carlos.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday, New
Generation Baptist Church, Opa
Locka.

ELBERT WILLIAMS, JR., 61,
entrepreneur, died October 6 in
Aventura Hospital. Service was
held.



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Alonzo 'Chico' B. Gilbert
03/17/47 10/13/03

It has been five years since
you went to your eternal
home. We are glad you came
our way. Memories of you stay
close to us, keeping our hearts
company. Although, your
passing leaves a void that can
never be filled, we know there
is peace where you are.
Widow, Cecelia, children,
Janice, Lori (Damon), Lonnie
and Priscilla. Grandchildren,
Shua, Nyah, Devin, Alana,
Donavan, family, friends and
employees at Sheyes of Mi-
ami/Gilbert's Angels Learning
Center



Carey Royal Ram'n
CONSTANCE THOMAS, 34, Mi-
ami, died October 8 in Cleveland
Clinic Hospital. Service was held.

VIVIAN COXS, 79, died October
12 at home. Service was held.

ESTABAN MAROSI, 83, died
October 11 in Memorial Pembroke.
Service was held.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL. THEIR OWN DESTINY


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


s guid'lint to sty in shaIph

-




Copyrighted Material





Syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers


Many cancer patients avoid treatment because of cost


By Liz Szabo

At a time when they're already
fighting for their lives, more cancer
patients are now struggling to pay
for their medicines.
One in eight people with ad-
vanced cancer turned down rec-
ommended care because of the
cost, according to a new analysis
from Thomson Reuters, which
provides news and business infor-
mation. Among patients with in-
comes under $40,000, one in four
in advanced stages of the disease
refused treatment.
Of late-stage colon cancer pa-
tients, 12% spent more than
$25,000 out of pocket, according to
the survey, in which 1,767 people
answered an online questionnaire.
This type of survey isn't considered


scientifically rigorous, because
it didn't use a random sample of
people. But its findings are similar
to a 2006 study in Cancer, which
found that cost caused more than
20% of all cancer survivors not
just those with advanced cases -
to delay or miss needed care.
Nearly 20% of Americans have
problems paying their medical
bills, according to a report in Sep-
tember from the Center for Study-
ing Health System Change.
One in four cancer patients or
their families said they used up
all or most of their savings to pay
for treatment, according to a 2006
survey of nearly 1,000 survivors
and their families by USA TODAY,
the Kaiser Family Foundation
and the Harvard School of Public
Health.


One in 10 in that survey said
they were unable to pay for basic
necessities, such as food, heat and
housing.
Many of the medical advances
that allow cancer patients to live
longer come at a high cost, says
Joseph Singer of HealthCore, a
Delaware-based health research
company.
As costs rise, insurers are shift-
ing a greater share to patients,
says Neal Meropol of Philadel-
phia's Fox-Chase Cancer Center.
Many plans now require patients
to pay for 20% of their health care
- a heavy burden in the case of
drugs such as Erbitux, which
costs $10,000 a month.


Charities that assist cancer pa-
tients say they're straining to keep
up with the demand.
At CancerCare, a national group
that provides social work and
small grants for transportation
expenses, requests for financial
help increased 30% this summer
compared with last, says executive
director Diane Blum.
David Johnson, director of he-
matology and oncology at Nash-
ville's Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer
Center, says some of his patients
have opted to stop treatment part-
ly because of the cost. His own
brother-in-law, a truck driver,
turned down Erbitux when he was
facing colon cancer four years ago.


U ,


I


In Memoriam Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


LESLIE MILLER
10/18/97- 12/23/06

We think of you always, but
especially today! You will nev-
er be forgotten although you
are gone away! Your memory
is a keepsake, with which we
will never part. God has you
in His keeping, we have you in
our hearts.
Love! Wesley, Tangie, Tandra
and Amanda


If you're like millions of
Americans, you spent two
exciting weeks in August
cheering on the United
States at the 2008 Summer
Olympics in Beijing as U.S.
athletes brought home more
medals than any other na-
tion in the world a full 110
of them!
In fact, Michael Phelps
himself brought home more
gold medals than anyone in
the history of the Olympics.
If Phelps were a country,
he'd be tied in tenth place
with France, Ukraine, and
Netherlands for the most
gold medals won -- quite a
force to be reckoned with.
Now, consider this: If there
was an Olympics for web-
sites, www.socialsecurity.
gov would be the Michael
Phelps of that competition.
Over the years, Social Secu-


rity's website has been not
only among the best in gov-
ernment, but the best in all
industries.
For example, Social Secu-
rity's Multilanguage Gate-
way, our website that pro-
vides important information
to people in 15 languages,
received the Standard of Ex-
cellence WebAward in the
government category from
the 2007 Web Marketing As-
sociation competition. The
2007 WebAwards named the
best websites in 96 industry
categories. Nominations for
best website came from in-
teractive agencies and web-
site marketing departments
in more than 33 countries
from around the world.
Just recently, in the second
quarter of 2008, Social Secu-
rity's Website brought home
the Gold, Silver, and Bronze!


. h r


DR. LORETTA ROBINSON

It. has been more than a year
since you've been gone from
us and it broke our hearts
to lose you. The family chain
that so strongly bond us has
been broken by your absence.
We miss your lovely smile,
your crazy sense of humor,
your generous spirit and your
true love of family.
Well always love you and
you will forever live in our
hearts.
Missing you, Mom and fam-


The American Customer Sat-
isfaction Index (ACSI) tracks
customer satisfaction and
rates websites for their per-
formance. ACSI rated three
of Social Security's websites
as the three top sites in gov-
ernment. The websites cited
were the Social Security's
online application for extra
help with Medicare prescrip-
tion drug coverage, the on-
line application for Social Se-
curity benefits and Business
Services Online. We expect to
take home the medals again -
current scores show that our
new online Retirement Esti-
mator is scoring even higher
than those three winners.
Microsoft Corp, with Gov-
ernment Technology's Pub-
lic CIO Magazine, awarded
Social Security the Microsoft
Government Solutions Award
in the Government to Citizen


---- --a



Information about your
Social Security

category. This award is for e-
initiatives aiming to enhance
government-to-government
or government-to-citizen in-
teraction, transactions, and/
or services and was given to
recognize the Internet Social
Security Benefit Application.
Whether you want to plan
your retirement or apply for
it, look into other benefits
available or learn about the
history of the program, you
can do it all at Social Se-
curity's website. Visit the
Olympian of websites: www.
socialsecurity.gov.


In Memoriam Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


LEON FIELDER JR
JAMAAL GAINER 10/19/57- 10/14/06
11/23/81 10/14/07


Forget me not
for I am near.
I ride the wind ...
sign in your ear.
You see me, Jamal
in the morning dew.
Forget me not ...
I am with you.
Dedicated to Jamaal Gainer
aka BL.
Love, Mama, family

Death Notice
The family of the late


Days has past and two years
has come since we've said
goodbye to our fallen loved
one. Know that a day. does
not go by without us think-
ing about you. We will always
miss you and always love
you. You will always be in our
hearts.
Happy Birthday! Your loving
family and friends



In Memoriam


-- ,-J


REBECCA HICKS-JONES,
died September 23, 2008.
Service was held in College
Park Georgia.
The family and friends.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JAMAAL GAINER
bka B. L

J = The Joy you brought to
me.
A = Allowing me to be your
big sister.
M = Missing you so, so much
A = Admiring your swag
A = Affection that I feel for
you.
L = Loving you for ever.
Love always, Leavy


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JAMAAL GAINER
"Jamaal"


The love of my life. I miss
you and I will always love you.
Tiffany and my three sons.
R.I.P.


Death Notice


DERRICK J. ROZIER,
34 died October 13. Service 1
p.m. Saturday, Holy Faith
Missionary Baptist Church,
17001 N.W. 20 Avenue.


One year has gone by and
nothing has changed. You're
in our hearts forever and
memories of you still remain
the same. We miss you and
love you.
We thank Range Funer-
al Home, church family and
friends for your caring love
and support. May God bless
you.
The Hamnm family


10936 NORTHEAST OTH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements


Social Security: The olympian of websites M U M
000-00-0000 i


I


I


r





The Miami Times
ifesty es


SECTION C
L j


FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE
MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008 THE MIAMI TIMES
FSQUIRI
Halle Berry
'sexiest
woman alive'


Honoree Slick Rick performs onstage during the 2008 Vhl Hip Hop Honors at Hammerstein Ballroom
on October 2, in New York City. -Photo by Frank Micelotta/Getty Images for Vhl
Old School rapper honored
at 2008 VH1 Hip Hop Honors
a fw Q ....... f


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A fit' N it, t i ,Um",

a m i -IIIIIIIIII e s










2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


.~.


BDlrRIc*hardStra


Happy 50th Birthday for
Church of the Open Door/
United Church of Christ which
was celebrated, last Saturday,
at the Doral Hotel and Spa
with the participation of over
300 people that attended the
luncheon whose history of the
church reflected the triumphs
and struggles of its existence
and a determination to take the
church to a higher level for the
next 50-years, according to Dr.
Dory Lingo, general chair.
Kudos to Dr. Enid C. Pinkney,
Marie Faulkner Brown and
others for founding the edifice
and Evelyn Campbell, chair,
and Summer Hutcheson, III, for
publication of a journal filled
with historical data and their
committee members, as well as
Shirley Archie and Florence
Strachan for chairing the spe-
cifics for the Celebration Lun-
cheon.
Leaders of the church began
with Rev. Dr. Henry C. Mc-
Dowell, followed by Rev. Har-
old D. Long, Rev. Dr. James
E. Fouther, Jr., and currently,
Rev. Dr. R. Joaquin Willis,
along with interim pastors: Rev.
Ernest Hamlin and Rev. Greg-
ory Seeber. Other deceased
founders were Nathan Ezell,
Clifford Matthews, Sr., An-
nette McNeal, Kelsey Pharr,
Rose Stewart, Ellen Tuck-
er, Frances Tucker, Dolores
Turner, and Hazel Wright.
In addition, congratulatory
remarks came from Congress-
man Kendrick Meek, Governor
Charlie Crist, Commissioner
Audrey M. Edmonson, Dr.
Rudolph F. Crew, former su-
perintendent of Dade Schools,
Rev. Dr. Henry T. Simmons,
Sr. Minister, The St. Albans


Congregational '": -'4"
Church, New York, ..
Rev. Dr. James
E. Fouther, Jr.,
United Church of
Montbello, and
past and present moderators:
Walter Anders, James B.
Randolph, David Mann, Bob
Simms, Dr. Astrid Mack, Atty.
Robert G. Beatty, and Deacon
Denise Johnson.
According to Dr. Lingo, the
finale of the 50th Church An-
niversary will be the Rededi-
cation Ceremony and
Time Capsule Burial,
Sunday, December 28,
2008. The program will
be open to the public.
So stay tune.
Speaking of a Time
Capsule Burial, it will
behoove all adults to
empower the young PINK
adults to perpetuate
the objectives of the
church and be a part of the
next 50-years. Such as the Wal-
ter Anders and grandchildren:
Chucky and Duke Owens that
were the first to be baptized in
1960; Winona Scott, Vaughn,
Constance, and Roland Price,
members of the Rev. Dr. Willis'
family; Gabrielle Bishop and
Faith Shelton; grandchildren
of Marie Brown to include Gala
Munnings, Corine and Ash-
li Munnings, Will, Lourdes,
John III, Malcolm and Ranee,
Jr.; and William and Cynthia
Clarke III, their son and daugh-
ter-in-law Brian, Kymberli,
Christian and Bryson Clarke.
The Church of the Open Door
has established a great past.
And, of course, it will contin-
ue to have an enviable future
with the many programs being


implemented to keep the mem-
bership spiritually involved
with the children of Evelyn
Campbell that will join the oth-
ers, such as Kimberley, Faye,
Angela, Faith and grands Ver-
non, Angie and William.


Speaking of Dr. Enid C.
Pinkney, she initiated the
first meeting of the African
American Committee of Dade
Heritage Trust, last Monday,
at Jefferson Reaves Park to
begin planning for the 2008-
09 year. Further, according to
the membership and reduction
of participants for the annual
commemorative service, revisi-
tation of the activity was placed
on the table for a revi-
,, sion.
Ruby Rayford inter-
jected showcasing the
youth in a talent display,
along with the essay
contest at The Histori-
cal St. Agnes Episcopal
Church and eliminate
:NEY the outdoor parade from
St. Agnes to the cem-
etery. 'After a lengthy
discussion from Leome Cul-
mer, Ernestine Williams, Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan, and Dr.
Pinkney with sanction from
the membership the essay
winners would read their essay,
along with a display of their tal-
ent inside of the church. Lona
Brown Mathis, a member of
St. Agnes, will coordinate this
project, while Anita McGruder
will administer the essay con-
testant.
On the other side of the coin,
recognition of persons buried
in the City Cemetary are need-
ed by families having a knowl-
edge of those services. So, if
you do, please call 305-638-
5800 HHHT or Leome Culmer
at 305-696-7386 for more de-
tailed info.
Iri addition, Women's His-


she is also the presi-
dent and the membership is
still the same.
CD's have been produced for
distribution to the community
re: The History of the Hampton
House, a documentary of its
past, present and future usage
that will be processed by the
membership and men from the
Tree of Knowledge.


Elizabeth A. Williams, ex-
ecutive director, The Black
Archives, History & Research
Foundation of South Florida,
Inc. collaborated with Dr. Gay
Outler, Maude Newbold, and
Leome Culmer to fine tune the
Charter Day Honors Luncheon
scheduled for Sunday, Novem-
ber 9, 2008 at the Hilton Miami
Downtown (formerly The Omni,
1601 Biscayne Blvd and fea-
ture the early police officers.
Newbold made it crystal
clear that citizens should re-
cord special events and dates
in the legendary Book of Life
by filling out the application of
events celebrating milestones
for years ending in "8's" or
"3's", Monday, October 20, by
noon in order to be recognized,


tory Luncheon will go as usual
and pioneer women are need-
ed to be recognized by family
members that would forward a
bio to Culmer or call either of
the numbers. The committee
would be very appreciative of
your input.
Other issues involved Gwen
Welters, Gloria Green, and
Dr. Gwendolyn J. Robinson
to set up the logis-
tics for receiving the
guests and properly
sitting them at respec-
tive tables, along with |
Frank Pinkeny and
his -men from the Tree
of Knowledge, while
Dr. Pinkney alluded
to the HHHT, where NEWI


Sunday, November 9, 2008.
For example, 50 or more years
of marriage, birthdays or his-
torical moments within the
family, etc.
For more information please
call 305-636-2390, especially
for tickets to the activity. Oth-
ers in attendance included
Gwendolyn Welters, Doro-
thy Graham, Sandra Powell,
Juanita Johnson, Dr.
Enid C. Pinkney, Dr.
Preston Marshall, Bon-
nie Newbold Stirrup,
Gloria Green, May Le-
roy Smith, Josephine
D. Rolle, Evelyn Wynn,
and Al. Jackson.

)LD ********
The football season is
into high gear and Liberty City
is very quiet because The Bulls
are still winning and Coach Bil-
ly Rolle and staff are building
a championship team as good
or better than last year.
So good was the team
until The Unrestricted
Sports Magazine fea-
tured the team and
the magnificent play-
ers from Northwestern
that chose to take their
talent to Coach Randy
Shannon.
It is disheartening RC
when U of M loses in
the score, but Pro Player Stadi-
um is packed with the 10,000
fans that follow Northwestern
to support Aldarius Johnson,
4,WR, Jacory Harris, 2, QB,
Sean Spense, 31, LB, Ben
Jones, 52, OL, Xavier Shan-
non, 55, OL and the coaches's
son, and Chris Barney, 79,
OT.
Also, Tommie Streeter,
(RS because of injury), Khalil
Jones, 87, WR, Marcus For-
ston, 96, LB. Other players
on the team from Booker T.
Washington are Davon John-
son, 81, WR, Brandon Harris,


Ii. --W




George and Beatrice Davis
have returned home after
attendingtheirgrand-daughter
Tiera Alisa Williams Whire
Coat Ceremnon',. Nledical
College in Agus a, Georgia
on September 20. T.A. and
Sherry Williams are the
parents of Tiera. Tiera will
receive her medical degree in
2012.
Happy belated birthday to
Mrs. Willie Pearl-Porter, who
celebrated her 97th birthday


M. John Richard, a perform-
ing arts industry veteran who
has been a driving force in the
development and success of
the New Jersey Performing Arts
Center (NJPAC) for the past two
decades, has been selected as
the new president and chief ex-
ecutive officer of the Adrienne
Arsht Center for the Perform-
ing Arts of Miami-Dade County.
Lawrence J. Wilker has served
as interim president and CEO of
the Adrienne Arsht Center since
November 2007.
The announcement was made
today by J. Ricky Arriola, chair-
man of the Performing Arts Cen-
ter Trust Board of Directors.
"Throughout his career, John
has played a key role in a num-
ber of institutional success sto-
ries, and I have no doubt that
hell be a great fit for the Adri-
enne Arsht Center and our com-
munity," said Mr. Arriola. "As
we reflect on a year highlighted
by strong fiscal performance
and record-levels of attendance,
it's becoming clear that Miami is
home to one of the nation's most
exciting performing arts cen-
ters. I'm confident that in John,
we've chosen a leader who will
help elevate the Adrienne Arsht
Center to the next level, as one
of the most prosperous and im-
portant centers in the world."
From the time NJPAC opened
its doors in downtown Newark,
New Jersey in 1997, Mr. Rich-
ard has helped the Center earn
international recognition for its
diversity in programming and
community participation, a goal
he hopes to pursue as president
and CEO of the Adrienne Arsht
Center. In his dual roles as the
organization's chief operating
officer and executive vice presi-


on October 5. W
Get well wishes _%
to Rosa Belle Fair,
Cecilia Hunter,
Fred Adderley, .....
Renata Ward and
Elsie Herout-Phillips
The Nigerian-American
Foundation is dedicated to the
economic, social and political
empowerment of the Nigerian
and Black communities.
This group is geared toward
improving the quality of life


dent, he was responsible for
overseeing several departments,
including operations, fundrais-
.ing, marketing, and
public affairs. He also
spearheaded a number
of successful initiatives,
including the organiza-
tion's initial $187 mil-
lion capital campaign,
recruitment of its
board of directors, and
its $100 million endow-
ment campaign.
Additionally, he was RICI
instrumental in de-
veloping the nation's
fourth-largest arts education
program, which offers in-school
and on-site residencies, profes-
sional development and teacher
training programs, and artist
training in music, dance, the-
ater, and poetry.
"After nineteen years at NJ-
PAC, my decision to leave New
Jersey was a difficult one, but
I'm enthusiastic about tak-
ing on a new challenge at the
Adrienne Arsht Center. Miami
is the cultural crossroads for
North America, South America,
and the Caribbean, and I'm a
big believer in the Center's po-
tential as a magnet for bringing
people together. As we work to
unite Miami's diverse popula-
tion through the performing
arts, the Adrienne Arsht Center
will continue to move toward its
goal of becoming the premier
performing arts center of the
twenty-first century," said Mr.
Richard.
When he first joined NJPAC in
1989, Mr. Richard was only the
second professional hired to get
the new Center off the ground.
One of his earliest achievements
was the recruitment of a strong


for all Blacks and for 48
years they have been helping
others. The president of the
foundation is Chief (Dr.)
Celestine Izunoe.
North Dade Deanery will
be having their fall Deanery
meeting on October 18 at the
Church of the Transfiguration.
Gayle Sweeting-Duncombe is
the president of the Deanery.
Happy birthday to my
former 15th Street neighbor
Ernestine Ross-Collins
whose children gave her a
lovely birthday bash at the
Silver Shores Clubhouse
in Miramar on October 11.
Also, happy birthday Regina
Jollivette-Frazier. As long


and corporate executives. Soon,
this coalition earned high marks
from non-profit organizations
throughout the north-
east United States.
During his tenure, Mr.
Richard implemented
a number of programs
designed to strengthen
the Center's commu-
nity ties, including the
Alternate Routes se-
ries, which spotlights
various ethnicities
HARD and their Diasporas;
Chase Sounds of the
City, a free summer
concert series; community ad-
visory councils; and a volunteer
corps that reflects the region's
diversity.
"Miami's gain is a tough loss
for New Jersey," said Governor
Jon S. Corzine of New Jersey.
"John Richard is a man of ex-
traordinary integrity, with a
remarkable insight into the hu-
man condition and a deep and
abiding commitment to mak-
ing a difference in this world.
His skillful engineering of the
original capital campaign to
build NJPAC, his responsible
oversight of twelve years of op-
erations, and his core belief that
the arts center and its commu-
nities are intrinsically linked
have made New Jersey a better
place to live. Miami is extremely
lucky to get him."
Before joining NJPAC, Mr.
Richard served as president and
CEO of the Children's Special-
ized Hospital Foundation, the
fundraising arm of one of the
nation's leading pediatric reha-
bilitation hospitals. In this role,
he arranged the hospital's part-
nership with Children's Miracle
Please turn to PRESIDENT 4C


as you keep up your great
work, you'll reach many more
milestones in your future.
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
traveled to Daytona Beach
for relaxation, fellowship to
support a Sisterhood and
Wellness Workshop headed
by Dr. Gay Outler, Dolores
Washington, Marian Davis,


Carla Adams and Martha Lue
Stewart. Regional Director
Christine Dixon was also in
attendance. Miami alumnae
members making the trip:
Regina Giles, president,
Brenda Bryant, Helen Gay,
Lois Ashley, Patricia Daniels,
Lois Alexander, Clarinda
Anyamele, Karin Gibson,


Chandra Burgess, Linda
Rogers, Sherrilyn Norwood,
Kay Williams-Dawson,
Barbara Harris, Merdochey
Lafrance, Alice Johnson,
Johnnie Lowery, Cynthia
Peacock, Roslyn Jackson,
Maude Newbold, Shirley
Funchess, Gloria Newbold
and Dorothy H. Saunders.


"THE BUZZ IS OUT,

'The Secret Life of Bees' is SMART, SASSY
and deliciously sweet."
Prairie Miller,.WBAI RADIO


"A JOYFUL film that will leave
,, a lump in your throat.
".. ." \ i It's ALTOGETHER
WONDERFUL, and you'll

want to bring a friend."
.. Jeff Craig, SIXTY SECOND PREVIEW


FEATURING
AN ALL-STAR CAST

A QUEEN
SLATI FAH


DAKOTA

FANNING
JENNIFER


rHUDSON


II!E ALICIA

KEYS


SOPHIE
OKONEDO








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"A; MA;AL lAi ,i iflwww.foxsearchlight.com

STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17 CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FORTHEATRES AND SHOWTIMES ,


John Richard named president and


CEO of the Adrienne Arsht Center

Industry veteran previously served as COO and executive board of directors comprised of
community activists, philan-
vice president of the New Jersey Performing Arts Center thropists, foundation directors,


I ~


01, DB, Antonio Dixon, 96,
DL, Wayne Fraquson, 82, WR,
Homestead high.
According to Caleb Crosby,
The former Bulls stood out,
last Saturday, when the Miami
Classic (former. Orange Blos-
som Classic) pitted Howard U.
against Savannah State at Traz
Powell Stadium in a thrilling
game that had the football fans.
screaming, stomping and clap-
ping throughout the game.
For Howard U. was Mario
Alexander, aka 'Super. Mario'
who brought 200 family mem-
bers to see him play. And, of
course, he scored when he
hauled in a 39-yard pass to put
the game out of reach. Bran-
don Drayton was outstand-
ing, as well as John Mendoza,
kicker, Miami Central who
kicked several field goals and
points after the touchdowns
and Martin Decembert from
Homestead Sr. Hats off to all
of the coaches for pre-
paring the players for a
lucrative future.


Kudos to The Arcola
Lakes Park Singing An-
gels for performing their
civic duties, such as
singing at The Church
LLE of Jesus Christ's 8th
Anniversary, where
Tillie Stibbins is president
and Rhonda Gilyard is mu-
sic director. Raves went out to
the church and everyone had a
spiritual good, time.
Other Angels, such as Mary
Fussell, is registering citizens
for the Sen. Barrack Obama
campaign, as well as inform-
ing them to vote, while Stib-
bins and Virginia Smiley are
constantly filling the huge can
with clothing, non-perishable
can: good, and money to be sent
to Haiti. Audley Coakley has
been doing the same thing for
years. Hats off to all of them.


BC










OOT


ifrmdvite2


Home foreclosures must stop


The federal government
recenth, bailed Wall Street's
failing financial insututions,
using more than $700 billion in
tax payer dollars to do so. The
bailout does nothing to assist
the millions of Americans who
are facing home foreclosures.
Tired of waiting on help from


WiVashingtOi-,i. sorer i
states t':i)-,k matter-
into their owv.n
hands, seeking legal
against the nation's
predatory mortgage
Those actions are pa3
Finally, buyers at risk
their homes have some


Led by Illinois and California
Attorney General's Lisa Madigan
and Jerry Brown, 11 states filed
ni lawsuits against Countrywide
Financial, the country's largest
mortgage lender. Though
the lender didn't admit any
wrongdoing, it did settle the suit
and created the largest home
loan modification program ever.
$8.4 billion will be divided among
Arizona, California, Connecticut,
action Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan,
largest North Carolina, Ohio, Texas and
lender. Washington. The money will
ying off. provide loan relief to roughly
of losing 400,000 homeowners across the
support. country. The program will waive


nearly $140 million in late fees
and prepayment penalties while
also suspending foreclosures
on delinquent borrowers.
Additional funds will be set aside
to help those who've already
been foreclosed on to find and
move into new housing.
The Countrywide program
is a strong model that should
be expanded. Not only is it
mandatory, unlike programs
supported by the federal
government, it will also be
monitored by state officials. It is
a viable program that serves to
not only support families duped
into risky mortgages but to also


create some financial stability
for hundreds of thousands of
Americans.
This country has searched for
answers to the mortgage crisis
for over a year. As more and more
Americans lost their homes, it
seemed federal efforts to offer
a solution were nonexistent.
Thankfully, leaders at the state
level took matters into their own
hands. Because of their work,
we now have a foundation onto
which we can build a mortgage
relief program that serves the
entire country.
Write and call your attorney
general's office. Find out if


they are planning legal actions
similar to those taken in the
California and Illinois. If they
are, learn which lenders they
are targeting. If not, demand
that they go after the mortgage
companies that are foreclosing
on homes during this crisis.
Our federal leaders have made
it 'clear, with the passage of
the financial industry bailout
package, that the well-being
of the average American is not
their first priority. Instead of
looking to them for assistance,
it is time we turn to our local
lawmakers and ask that they
work on our behalf.


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T.I.,


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ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
You would be happier about this if
you didn't feel so manipulated. Others
are trying to whip you into shape. Your
efforts to please them are well meant,
but this ain't you, and you can't keep
it up without a pile of compromises.
Lucky numbers 3, 20, 43, 55, 1.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
After a long, stressful stretch you find
it hard to locate your self. This identity
crisis will continue to confuse you
before it heals you. Not knowing who
you are happens in cycles. Falling apart
is always a precursor to new growth.
Lucky numbers 6, 50, 4, 32, 12.

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
You are dealing with people who
aren't being straight with you. Their
efforts to spare your feelings have
resulted in a lot of conflict. If the truth
were known you wouldn't even be
here. Root it out before this situation
gets worse. Lucky numbers 12, 29, 3,
42,21.

CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 20
You have to make some adjustments.
This won't keep going if you're too
stubborn to let a few things slide.
Recent ultimatums have left you with a
hard choice. What matters now is your


ability to display the strength to make
it. Lucky numbers 4, 30, 54, 32, 11.

LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
You swore off relationships after the
last go round. Your fear of connecting
will stunt your growth. Nobody said
love would be easy. It looks like you
have a chance to go for it again. Don't
let old disappointments dictate the
future. Lucky numbers 5, 40, 3, 19, 11.

VIRGO: AUG. 21 SEPT. 20
If you can stay centered and keep
your focus this will all work out well.
Avoid every distraction and don't let
people con you into taking on their
stuff. What you're up against is huge.
Thank God you're big enough to handle
it. Lucky numbers 4, 30, 26, 7, 8.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCT.20
Your best qualities get trashed in
your relationships because you don't
understand how they work. Conscious,
equal partnership is a 2-way trail. Your
rights need to be respected here too.
Love isn't about being a doormat. Lucky
numbers 13, 1, 10, 35, 7.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
Too much conflict has you wondering
what you're doing here. Work, love,
everything is off kilter. You think it


will change if you just bear down arid
endure it. On the other hand, maybe all
of this is a sign that it's time to leave.
Lucky numbers 8, 40, 31, 18, 33.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
Something took the wind out of
your sails. Feelings of disillusionment
are so strong you're whipped. Keep
the faith, my dear. New dreams will be
born as soon as you see that the old
ones weren't real enough to hold on to.
Lucky numbers 19, 42, 38, 11, 24,

CAPRICORN: DEC. 21 JAN.20
Pressing your case won't work.
Others are too touchy to hear it. For
some reason they don't trust you
enough to be open. This will clear up
if you spend less time talking and use
your actions to show them that your
intentions are pure. Lucky numbers 5,
40, 39, 49, 21.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21 FEB. 20
You have good reason to be upset,
but you won't get very far if you hold
this grudge. It may be time to forgive
someone for whatever they did.
Underneath it all there's plenty of love
here. Don't let your anger keep it at
bay. Lucky numbers 5, 40, 39, 28, 11.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
Love isn't something we can do from
our heads. Don't try to understand this
and don't try to turn it into something
that it isn't. Relationships get ruined
when we try to control them and forget
that we're just here to enjoy them.
Lucky numbers 7, 40, 33, 29, 1.


September's top 10 most popular dating sites


Montreal, Canada (PRWEB)
- CupidsReviews.com released
the 10 most popular dating sites
listed during September 2008.
The most notable change in the
rankings has Wealthy Men tak-
ing over first place from long-
time leader, Match.com. BBW
Personals Plus also makes its
first appearance in the top 10
while Lavalife drops out.
The top ten scoring sites are
as follows:


Wealthy Men
Match
Yahoo Personals
Friend Finder
Date
American Singles
Black Singles
Perfect Match
BBW Personals Plus
Amigos
Scores are based on set cri-
teria that outline the overall
experience a user will have in-


teracting with a dating site. The
criteria answers key questions
such as how many people use
the site, can non-members view
profiles in their entirety and
can you use search features
to determine who is online be-
fore you join. Answers to these
questions should be readily
available yet some dating sites
insist on hiding certain aspects,
giving, in many cases, a false
sense of value.


ut MIAMI CITY BALLET
Program I
Progtra includesRSwan Lahe Act I. The Four Temperaent_
........Bndin The Upper Room.
....... 2 PM ' Ziff Ballet Opera House $19 $29, $59. $,5. $175


U


Anri,,iiie .ArMl-S.I C h i>r .r ,r"tii'j ]i r;r.a,. r_-.ir - p [ .rj -1-,' ft
DAN ZANES AND FRIENDS
The stars ol "Playhouse Disney" celebrate 'ith songs from the
new album, Nueva 'rrl:, as well as all your Dan Zanes favorilts!
2 PM Knight Concert Hall $20, $25

NEW WORLD SYMPHONY
America's Orchestral Academy
R. Siraus. Also sprach Zarathustra
Beetho.'en Sbmphon.' No 3 "'Eroica'
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $36 50. S52 50

AdJr.rii,, Art lit Center anrij br.ad. ",,, ....: ', e r' ..a pr-. -.:nl
THE WIZARD OF OZ
"Brilliant!" L.N rneale *.ev CrA
The Broadway season begins .il h a brand new producr.ionn of
The Wizard of Oz. Travel with Dorothy and ToIo do.-.n th, elio,...
brick road to a glittering art deco Oz, complete w.th m-ur-runc.hki;r,
and Ilying rnonkeys. There are lIrvih,li sp-ci;ia eiect' anid \irj,,:
classic songs introd iced in the beloved MGM mn-o'.'re are
guaranteed to send you over the rainbow'
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $20, $35. $ 15 $59

THE WIZARD OF OZ
8 PM Zit Balletl Opera House $20. $35 $-45 ,59

THE WIZARD OF OZ
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $20 $35 $45 $5'9

THE WIZARD OF OZ
SPP.1 Zif Ballei Opera Hou.e $26 $37. -7 $61

FAMILY FEST
Activities for the entire family'
11:30 AM 1 30 PM Thomson Plaza ior the Arts FREE
THE WIZARD OF OZ
2 and 8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $26. $37. $47 $61
Adrierr., Ar hl Ceril r air ,d 03,, 1 Fn' .r ri,,rr.,m ri pr -.- !
EVA AYLLON
"A Peruvian superstar!' rT ua, ...-i.. '. P:
Ayllon is the top interpreter of ire elegant and li'..el,
music crio113
8 PM Knight Concert Hail $3. 145 }1i0


YOUR WEEKLYiis~


vi,
r I.:l. ,n".i r, '.,lh-ifi


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours. Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby
No reservations necessary.


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


lftw Lo I I so lk 9 *wow,%









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Davis biopic 'The Express' doesn't fumble % l'


By Mike Clark


or rwf i


The Express recalls a bit-
tersweet fantasy that football
fans of a certain age have never
forgotten: For a brief moment,
Syracuse University superstars
Ernie Davis and Jim Brown
were set to play in the same
Cleveland Browns backfield.
But Davis died at 23 of leuke-
mia in 1963, a year after the ra-
cially dunderheaded Washing-
ton Redskins dealt him, their
No. 1 draft pick and the first
black player to win the Heis-
man Trophy, to the Browns.
The ending isn't unique to the
"disease" subgenre of sports
movies. The Express, though,
has more on its mind.
It's an entertaining race-laced
contest of wills between Davis
(a solid Rob Brown) and coach
Ben Schwartzwalder (Dennis
Quaid) just after Brown's grad-
uation.
On balance, the movie por-
trays Schwartzwalder as ami-
cable toward Brown (Darrin De-
witt Henson, whose portrayal is
not intimidating enough). But
the coach also has to deal with
Brown's dating of white wom-
en, a big deal in the late 1950s.
Though Schwartzwalder wasn't
a racist, he was old-school.
What he found in Davis was
a running back akin to Jackie
Robinson: a straight arrow de-
termined to stand up for him-


1./


I


Rob Brown stars as Ernie Davis in the Express


self.
Quaid is lean and grouchy in
a showy role: In one scene, he
barks to his team that he's not
prepping them to play the New
York City Ballet Company.
Despite appealing perfor-
mances and kinetic football
scenes, the storytelling is
mostly conventional, except
for two outstanding set pieces.


One is a 1959 Syracuse-West
Virginia contest in which Mor-
gantown fans rain debris from
the stands. Another is the ugly
1960 Cotton Bowl against Texas
for the national championship,
in which late hits, crooked refs
and a brawl were the apparent
order of the day.
I met Davis in 1962, when
I was 14, and I still have his


autograph, so I was probably
more keen than many to see
this movie. But The Express is
being promoted the way stu-
dios do when they think they
have a crowd-pleaser, and cer-
tainly it's a better family mov-
ie than a lot of junk hyped as
such. It would be nice to see a
kinescope of that Cotton Bowl
game on DVD.


Are people finally getting sick of Kanye West?


By Leslie Gornstein

Los Angeles (E! Online) I
hear Kanye's HBO show is
in trouble. Are people finally
getting tired of his egomaniacal
behavior? Is he the next Diddy,
a rapper known for antics
rather than music?
-Carlton, Edison, N.J.
Not likely. Yes, Kanye West is
his own Jesus, Lord and Savior.
He made his fans wait for
hours at the Bonnaroo festival.
He threw, a tantrum after last
year's .c VMAs. ,The poor -folks
who work ork for hii probably
entertati suicide fantasies' fiilep
their boss blogs about lighting
fixtures and mulls new ways to
enrage 50 Cent. But Kanye is


also one of the biggest,
most respected names
in hip-hop.
"Love Lockdown" is
tied for the second-
highest chart debut of
2008, and his Glow in
the Dark concert tour
was seen as one of the


KANYE WEST


highlights of 2008-and of his
career so far.
But is Kanye having trouble
expanding his empire into
television? Maybe...
For those not in the loop:
West has partnered with Curb
Your Enthusiasm producer
Lai+ 'Charles to create a nbew
Larry David-type show for
HBO. At least, he had. Charles
recently did an interview with


ComingSoon, in which
he speaks of the show
in the past tense.
"It was really good,
but...I think it was too
hard-core for HBO,"
says Charles, who
also directed the Borat
movie. "HBO doesn't


have a good track record when
it comes to Black shows, and
I felt like that may have had
something to do with it also...
it seems to be on the shelf right
lnow "
When I contacted HBO thi,-4
morning, a rep told ine dthe
netor-ietel" rr,.. Tifrt t- onr ,
shows still in developirenut.
Take that tas ,,:u '. ll.
Whatever happen- with the


Adrienne Arsht Center has new president


PRESIDENT
continued from 2C

Network and implemented a $15
million campaign for annual,
capital, and endowment fund-
ing.
Mr. Richard is a founder of
the Partnership in Philanthropy
of New Jersey, an organization
that encourages and mentors
small non-profits throughout
the State. He is active in the Per-
forming Arts Center Consortium
of North America and has served
as a trustee for the Newark, New
Jersey YMWCA. He is also a
member of the advisory commit-
tee for the Philharmonic Orches-
tra of New Jersey.
He earned his bachelor's de-
gree from Midland Lutheran
College in Fremont, Nebraska,
where he studied behavioral sci-
ence.
John Richard and his wife
Lynne have two children, Rachel
and Aaron.
Adrienne Arsht Center for the
Performing Arts of Miami-Dade
County is made possible by the
public support of the Miami-
Dade County Mayor and the
Board of County Commission-
ers, the Miami-Dade County
Department of Cultural Affairs
and the Cultural Affairs Coun-
cil, and the Miami-Dade County
Tourist Development Council.
Education & Outreach is funded
in part by The Children's Trust.

I I 4'6 1t 1


The Adrienne Arsht Center also
receives generous support from
private and corporate contribu-
tions to the Performing Arts Cen-
ter Foundation of Greater Miami
through its Membership Pro-
gram; City of Miami Omni Com-
munity Redevelopment Agency;
Dade Community Foundation;
The MAP-Fund, a program of
Creative Capital, supported
by the Doris Duke Charitable
Foundation and the Rockefeller
Foundation; The Andy Warhol
Foundation for the Visual Arts;
the State of Florida, Department
of State, Division of Cultural Af-
fairs; the Florida Arts Council;
the National Endowment for


the Aits, and The John S a.nd
Jame-. L Knlhtr Foundtriion, |
Adri-enne Arsht Creniter for the
PerfOrrninrni A\rts of: Manmi-Dade,
Count-, i-. one of the \.%orld'z.
leading perfformine airtc organi-
zation. ar,:l ,' enue After open-
Ing its door: in 210.i06. the A\dri-
ernne Ar-ht Centerhas emerged
a .- a cornerstone for the ongoing
re,. italization of downtown Mi-
a.mi'si urbah core
Powered b-, a \ rine-, of theat-
rical. musical and educ:atrionia
prograrrs. the Center offers
world-clas-s entertainment al-
most e'.er da', f the w'eek For
more information. ''sit \-k'xv a.r-
shtcenter ,:,r,


6 am


I NOW PLAYING
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show, it probably will have
nothingto do with West's massive
personality. Apparently, it's one
of his biggest assets with fans.
"His honesty and penchant
for tantrums are actually very
appealing to his fans," says
Maura Johnston, editor of pop
music blog Idolator.com. "It's
a weird thing. He's put himself
out there so much that it has
actually endeared fans to him."
No wonder I'm so popular,
too.


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Syndicate nl e


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amsnmen
am I s


Judge sentences rap music fan to Bach, Beethoven


BURBANA, Ohio A defen-
dant had a hard time facing the
music. Andrew Vactor was fac-
ing a $150 fine for playing rap
music too loudly on his car ste-
reo in July. But a judge offered
to reduce that to $35 if Vactor
spent 20 hours listening to clas-
sical music by the likes of Bach,
Beethoven and Chopin.
Vactor, 24, lasted only about
15 minutes, a probation officer
said.
It wasn't the music, Vac-
tor said, he just needed to be
at practice with the rest of the
Urbana University basketball
team.
"I didn't have the time to deal
with that," he said. "I just de-


cided to pay the fine."
Champaign County Munici-
pal Court Judge Susan Fornof-
Lippencott says the idea was to
force Vactor to listen to some-
thing he might not prefer, just
as other people had no choice
but to listen to his loud rap mu-
sic.
"I think a lot of people don't
like to be forced to listen to mu-
sic," she said.
She's also taped TV shows
for defendants in other cases to
watch on topics such as finan-
cial responsibility. As she sees
it, they get the chance to have
their fine reduced "and at the
same time broaden their hori-
zons."


r --I~IIY






The Miami Times

Business


SECTION D


rIcwa 'b


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Wh in coin


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\%\orlI capitalize % on great idea%


Small business
survival strategies
Global financial panic, credit freeze, consumers
running for cover. What's a small business to do?
By Jonathan N. Crawford
Keeping your business afloat in these severely choppy
economic waters won't be easy, but it can be done. Here's
a checklist of useful tactics for riding out the storm:
Plan for the Worst, Hope for the Best Prepare for an
extended downturn so that you're ready for the worst of
scenarios. Don't make hasty decisions based on a short-
term time frame; consider what may be best for your
business six months to two years down the road.
TRIM THE FAT
The first thing is to cut costs sharply. Cut back on
Please turn to SURVIVAL 6D


RHrrak out ofr the rctnonomlk hokrhold
a *.& 0 & -


0


S


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


r MjW GM shares fall to lowest level since 1950


Pvid. in tiv f cto t tiely t
Provide incentives for customers to make timely payments


SURVIVAL your need for capital.
continued from 5D


purchases and negotiate more
favorable payment terms with
your vendors and your land-
lord. Be insistent, but polite.
If your business has valu-
able assets, you may want to
consider selling them. Think
about leasing equipment, in-
stead of borrowing money to
make purchases. Take a look
at your labor costs -- this may
be a good time to institute a
pay for performance system,
pay commissions instead of
flat salaries and even let go of
noncritical employees, if need
be.

HOLD ON TO EVERY PENNY
OF YOUR CASH LIKE IT'S
YOUR LAST
Fine-tune the timing of
your payables. Take advan-
tage of the maximum allow-
able time to pay your vendors
and suppliers. Pay at the end
of the month instead of the
beginning. Extend less credit
to your customers to reduce


OPTIMIZE CASH FLOW
Provide incentives for cus-
tomers to make timely pay-
ments by offering them dis-
counts. For customers who
cannot make payments, think
about discounting their over-
due balance. Going through
a collections agency is more
costly, and it may never suc-
ceed in obtaining the receiv-
ables. If you are billing cus-
tomers for time, consider bill-
ing twice a month instead of
once. Don't delay sending out
invoices. Billing promptly on
the 1st and 15th of the month
speeds up immediate cash
flow. But avoid appearing des-
perate for cash; it could send
a bad signal to your clients.

MONITOR YOUR FINANCES
When times were good, it
was easy enough to simply
work your way out of debt.
But in a calamitous climate,
small businesses need to look
at their cash flow and debt
load more frequently, keep-


ing the balance sheet in order.
Pay your credit card bills on
time and keep balances low to
prevent a rate hike. Resist the
temptation of balance trans-
fers. Transferring your bal-
ance to get a lower rate will
likely pull your credit score
down.

NETWORK WITH OTHER
SMALL BUSINESSES TO
FIND THE RIGHT BANK
Find out where other simi-
larly situated small business-
es bank. Do they get good ser-
vice from their bank? Get their
perspective on the lending cli-
mate in your area. One way
firms can network with other
firms is through their local
or regional chamber of com-
merce. Don't limit yourself to
one bank; identify about 10
banks that might be in a po-
sition to help you. When call-
ing a bank, ask to speak to a
vice president or someone else
high up in the pecking order.

KNOW YOUR BUSINESS PLAN
AND NUMBERS COLD


Once you identify a potential
lender, take the time to pre-
pare yourself. Make sure you
understand what is driving
your business and be ready to
explain it clearly to a lender.
Demonstrate your ability to
repay the loan. Be prepared to
show the banker a contingen-
cy plan in the event that sales
unexpectedly slump. Have all
your financial statements in
order, and prepare to show
bank officials evidence that
you are in good standing.

HAVE A PLAN B
Try negotiating with your
suppliers to get more trade
credit. Consider peer-to-peer
lenders or micro lenders. As
a last resort, only if circum-
stances warrant, look into get-
ting a loan by using your re-
ceivables as collateral, known
as factoring; selling your
equipment and leasing it back;
or borrowing funds against fu-
ture credit card and debit card
sales, known as a merchant
account cash advance. But
beware of exorbitant rates.


HLak' k mu' c*ish %.rrAdIIc ^ a a j% afAt% M


S- Copyrighted Material





Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers


t


DETROIT (Reuters)
- General Motors Corp
(GM.N) ,shares fell as
much as 21.6 percent
to their lowest level
since 1950 on Thurs-
day amid financial
market turmoil and
the car maker's report
of European sales de-
clines through the first
nine months of 2008.
GM, whose shares
fell as low as $5.42 on
the New York Stock
Exchange, blamed the
credit crisis and infla-
tion for hurting con-
sumer confidence in
Europe, where its sales
have declined 1.9 per-
cent in 2008 through
September.
GM, the largest U.S.-
based automaker,
posted a $15.5 billion
net loss in the second
quarter and announced


plans in July to cut
costs by about $10 bil-
lion. The company has
been restructuring in
North America to meet
increasing demand for
more fuel-efficient ve-
hicles.
An investment bank-
er who declined to be
identified attributed
the share decline to
elimination of short-
selling restrictions on
the shares that had put
the equity value out of
balance with bond and
credit-default swaps
values.
"It all has to rebalance
now," the banker said.
The stock decline
comes as influential
industry forecasters
J.D. Power and Asso-
ciates and Global In-
sight lower auto sector
expectations for 2008


and predict a slow re-
covery.
"While the global au-
tomotive industry is
clearly experiencing
a slowdown in 2008,
the global market in
2009 may experience
an outright collapse,"
said Jeff Schuster,
J.D. Power's executive
director of automotive
forecasting, in a state-
ment.
J.D. Power cut its
2008 U.S. light vehicle
sales forecast to 13.6
million units and said
it expects sales to fall
to 13.2 million units
in 2009. Global Insight
on Wednesday cut its
2008 U.S. auto sales
outlook and warned
that a recovery toward
more normal levels
may not occur until
2013.


City of Miami
PUBLIC NOTICE

CITY OF MIAMI
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
MISCELLANEOUS ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES
RFQ NO: 08-09-001

Completed Responses must be delivered to the Office of the
City Clerk, City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
33133 by 2:00 P.M., on Monday, November 17, 2008 ("Response
Submission Date"). Any Responses received after the above date
and time or delivered to a different address or location will not be
considered.
RFQ documents may be fully obtained from the Department
of Capital Improvements' webpage at www.miamigov.com/
Capitallmprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp
only on or after October 16, 2008. It is the sole responsibility of all
firms to ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended
that firms periodically check the CIP webpage for updates and the
issuance of addenda.
The City of Miami reserves the right to accept any Responses
deemed to be in the best interest of the City, to waive any minor
irregularities in any Responses, or to reject any or all Responses
and to re-advertise for new Responses, in accordance with the
applicable sections of the City Charter and Code.
THIS REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS IS SUBJECT TO THE
"CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 18-74
OF THE CITY CODE.
Pedro G. Hernandez,
City Manager
DP No.000790



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penalty for early withdrawal. Public funds and financial institutions are not eligible.


MIAMFDADE


PUBLIC NOTICE
A meeting of the Value Adjustment Board (the "VAB") will be held on
Wednesday, October 22, 2008, 2:00 p.m., Commission Chambers,
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, to consider the
following:
I. Convene the 2008 VAB and approve administrative
procedures for the ensuing tax year.
I1. Such other business as may properly come before the
Board.
A list maintained by the Prqperty Appraiser of all applicants for
exemption who have had their applications for exemption either (a)
denied or (b) wholly or partially approved, is available for inspection by
the public at the Department of Property Appraisal, Suite 710, 111 N.W.
1st Street, Miami, Florida, during regular business hours (i.e. from 8
A.M. to 5 P.M. weekdays). The types of exemptions included in the list
are: homestead, Sr. Citizen, widow(er), disability, educational, literary,
religious, charitable, governmental, health and care facilities,
renewable energy source devices, historic properties, homes for the
aged, low-income housing properties, labor organization properties,
community centers, and economic development (enterprise zone)
properties.
A person who decides to appeal any decision made by any board,
agency or commission with respect to any matter considered at its
meeting or hearing will need a record of the proceedings. Such person
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990
Anyone with a disability needing a special accommodation to
participate in these proceedings should call (305)375-5641. TOD
users may contact us via the Florida Relay Service at 1-800-955-8771.
Note: Sign language interpreter services must be requested at least
five (5) days prior to an appointment date. Transportation is not
provided by the Clerk's office.
HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK


4.25
"Tc~jAPY















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SECTION D






101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$900 nice and clean, laundry
room, parking Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.

11075 N.E. 13th Avenue
One bedroom and efficiency,
786-306-2946.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625 Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1202 N W 61 Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $800 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1205 N.W. 58 Street
One bedroom. All appliances
included. $575 monthly plus
security. 786-277-0632

1215 N.W. 103 Lane "
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1298 N.W. 60th Street
Beautiful one and two bed-
rooms, appliances, air, gated,
and first month free!
786-282-8775

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

14100-40 N.W. 24 Court
MOVE IN SPECIAL $500
Security only! One bedroom,
one bath $675, two bed-
rooms, one bath $800.
Call 786-287-0682

1461 N.E. 169 Street
One bedroom, one bath, up-
dated kitchen and bath, pool,
gym. 786-402-4403.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one, bdrm.
apt., $495 per month, all ap-
pliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $525 monthly,
two bedrooms $625 monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1612 N.W. 51 Terrace
One bedroom. $600 move in.
$148 weekly. Appliances and
utilities are included. 786-
389-1686

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

176 N.E 60 Street
One bedroom. $400 monthly.
954-266-9208 for Creole,
954-704-9413 for English.

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1815 N.W. 1 Court #4
Two bedrooms and efficien-
cies, Marty, 305-576-2388

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

1950 N.W. 2nd Court
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

2040 N.E. 168 Street
One and two bedroom, water
included. Section 8 Welcome.
786-277-9925, 305-244-2141

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080

2158 N.W. 5 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, utili-
ties included. Section 8 Zero
deposit. 954-628-2955

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

220N.W. 16 Street


Two bdrms, one bath $600.
305-642-7080


2375 N.W. 97th St #B
One bedroom, $625 a month,
first, last and no security.
Call 305-691-2703.


2460 N.W. 139th Street
One bdrm, air, fenced, $500-
$600 first, last and security.
305-691-7745 after 5 p.m.

2493 N.W. 91st St #4
One bedroom with private
parking, air, utilities included,
$675 a month, first and last to
move in. Call 305-691-2703.

2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$650. Call 786-412-9343

3220 N.W. 135th STREET
Duplex one bedroom, one
bath, air, private yard, remod-
eled. $700 monthly, all utilities
included. 786-853-8313..

3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$350 bi-weekly, $700 moves
you in. Appliances and utili-
ties included. 786-389-1686

421 NW 59 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Studio, $600
One bdrm, $675
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-259-7054

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$485 monthly, $750 to move
in. 305-326-8855

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

5767 N.W. 29th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, nice,
clean, tile, air, $650 monthly,
$1300 down. Arlene 305-835-
6281 or 786-252-4271.

5842 N.W. 12 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath, wa-
ter included. Section 8 Wel-
come. 786-277-9925, 305-
244-2141

6020 N W 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6962 N.W. 2ND Court
Two bedrooms,one bath, sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call Mr. Coats 305-345-7833

7527 N.W. 22 Avenue
Spacious upstairs two bdrms,
appliances, air, tiled floor, wa-
ter included. 305-331-5399

781 N.W. 80th Street
One bedroom, one bath. Call
786- 295-9961

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V.
Call Joel: 786-355-7578.

924 N.W. 29TH Street
Section 8 Welcome. Two bed-
rooms, one bath $950 month-
ly. Call 786-262-7313.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
dry and gate. 1601 NW 1st
Court. 305-374-4412.

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air,
appliances, new tile and car-
pet. Starting at $650. 1545
N.W. 8 Avenue. Call 786-506-
3067


GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Alberta
Heights Apartments. Call 305-
638-3699 for move-in special
or visit our Rental Office, 2651
N.W. 50 Street, Miami, Florida


GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008

=w g I


HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

NO DEPOSIT with Section 8.
Two and one bedrooms.
786-267-3199

NORTHWEST AREA
One bedroom, one bath, air,
free cable, lights and water.
305-968-0892, 786-273-6504

NW AREA
One and two bedrooms,one
bath. Section 8 welcome. Call
305-688-7559.

Opa Locka Apartments
One bedroom, $450-$500
Two bedrooms, $575-$600
Free Water. 786-267-1646

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded. Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
305-769-0146. 786-521-
7151

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 welcome, $500
cash back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

OVERTOWN AREA
1613 N.W. 1 Place
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700, one bedroom one bath
$550. Call 305-519-1622

Section 8 OK!
SOUTH MIAMI
Four bedrooms, two baths,
one block from South Miami
Metro Rail Station. 6011 S.W.
69 Street. 786-543-3872

Wynwood Area Apts.
28 Street and 1st Avenue
One bdrm., one bath from
$550 $650 mthly. Two
bdrms $750 mthly. All appli-
ances. Joel 786-355-7578


COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


17331 N.W. 7 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two and a
half bath, appliances, gated
community. 305-613-3574

3786 N.W. 213th Terrace
MIAMI GARDENS TOWN
HOME, QUIET STREET,
three bedrooms, two baths,
enclosed yard, new applianc-
es, tile floor and central air.
Call 305-573-4443

CAROL CITY AREA
2775 N.W. 193rd Terrace
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

CAROL CITY AREA
2775 N.W. 193rd Terrace
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Two bedrooms, two baths.
penthouse, ocean vew
$1375 monthly 1000
square feet.
Section 8 Welcome
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office
www.themiamicondo.com
MIAMI GARDENS RENTAL
Townhouse, Great Property.
Looking for Great Home Mak-
er. Call 954-243-6447


10072 N.W. 12 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 786-277-8287


11107 N.E. 11 Place #A
Spacious two bedrooms,
one bath, large closet space.
No Section 8, No pets. $975
monthly, $1950 to move in.


786-253-1659
1458 N.W. 60 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
786-356-2585

1817 N.W. 41 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$825 monthly. First, last and
$300 security to move in.
Section 8 welcome.
305-634-5794

1865 N.W. 42nd Street
Newly remodeled, one bdrm,
one bath, air. Mrs. Reynolds
786-356-1457.

1871-73 NW 43 Street
Big Two bdrms, one bath,
central air, appliances, tile,
blinds, security bars.
Call 786-357-5000

1875 N.W. 94 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly.
Call Stanley 786-663-1962

1944 N.W. 93 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call Molly 305-541-2855

2257 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080

228-230 N.W. 59 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
and appliances included. First
and security to move in. Call
Mrs. Williams 305-613-3574

3105 N.W. 133th Street
Huge one bedroom, one bath,
newly remodeled, Section 8
welcome. 786-797-7878

3189 N.W. 59th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled. $800 monthly.
Call Marie 786-367-3820.

326 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$950. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

4603 N.W. 15th Avenue
Two bdrms, den. Vouchers
are accepted 305-638-5946
or 305-759-2280.

594 N.W. 67 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1702 monthly, $1200 depos-
it. Section 8 only. Call 305-
757-3709 or 561-699-9679.

6734 N.W. 4 Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1200 deposit, $1702 month-
ly, Section 8 only. Call 561-
699-9679, 786-262-6884.

6811 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call Molly 305-541-2855

685 Curtis Drive
Opa Locka
Two bedrooms, one bath, re-
frigerator, stove, washer, cen-
tral air, Section 8, HOPWA
and New Horizon.
786-506-1245

7753 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

843 N.W. 110th STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath with
appliances and central air.
$850 monthly, section 8 wel-
come. call 786-873-2694.

911 N.W. 42nd Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 month, first, last and de-
posit, $500, 305-757-2234.

93rd St. NW 18th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.

BROWNSVILLE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath
Call 786-586-0629

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two -bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at 3737 Charles Ter-
race

LITTLE RIVER AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1375 monthly, Section 8
Welcome. 305-298-9166.


100 N.W. 14 Street
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN), free lo-
cal and nationwide calling,
property protected by security
camera 24 hours, $185 wkly,
$650 mthly. 305-751-6232

27 Avenue and 95 Street
Small efficiency, kitchen, full
bath, utilities. $450 month-
ly.786-553-6802

2915 N.W. 156 Street
Private entrance, free cable.
$175 weekly, $700 to move
in. 305-624-3966.


3153 N.W. 53 Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232
5541 N.W. Miami Court


Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN. Property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

86 St. N.E. 2nd Ave Area
Call 305-754-7776

CAROL CITY AREA
Private entry, utilities includ-
ed, $650 monthly, first and
last required.
4915 N.W. 182nd Street
Call 305-308-0223
between 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

NW AREA
Rooms and Efficiencies. 305-
836-5848/305-653-8954

SANFORD APARTMENTS
1907 N.W. 2 COURT
Nice furnished efficiency
apartment, air, window
shades, appliances. Free
gas. $350 monthly plus $200
deposit. 305-665-4938. Cell
305-498-8811


13377 N.W. 30 Ave
$95 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath,air, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1338 N.W, 68th Street
One room available. Call 305-
693-1017 or 305-298-0388.

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1542 N.W. 62nd Terrace
Clean room, $350 a month.
Call 305-479-3632.

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

1887 NW 44 Street
$475 monthly. $600 moves
you in. Private bathroom. 305-
637-9359 or 305-
303-0156

$200 security plus
$475 monthly $250 bi-weekly,
call 305-691-4399.

210 N.W. 43rd Street
Full kitchen, use of whole
house, $500 a month, $200
security, $700 to move in, call
305-836-5739 or 305-335-
6454.

2168 N.W 98 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

2365 N.W. 97 Street
Room with air and private
entrance, $380 monthly. First
and last to move in.
Call 305-691-2703

2373 N.W. 95 St.
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-915-6276

2381 N.W. 66th Street
$125 weekly and, $375 to
move in. Call 786-426-3982.

2831 N.W. 159 Street
Nice clean room in quiet
neighborhood. 754-214-4761

2900 N.W. 54th Street
Upstairs, one room, refrigera-
tor and air. Call 954-885-8583
or 954-275-9503.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.

LIBERTY CITY/BROWNS.
VILLE
Clean rooms, utilities includ-
ed, quiet neighborhood, 786-
541-5234

Little River Drive
Room with air and kitchen
privilege, $125 weekly, $250
to move in. Private entrance.
Call 305-835-2446

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Rooms for rent. $125 to $160
weekly. Call 305-940-9377.

NORTHWEST AREA
62 Street N.W. First Av-
enue,$625 to move in, $425
monthly and $200 security.
Call 305-989-8824

NORTHWEST AREA
Furnished room for rent in pri-
vate home, light kitchen priivi-
lege, call 305-621-1017.

Northwest Miami-Dade
In private home. Call
305-652-3404 after 6 p.m.
786-356-1574 Anytime.

NW AREA
Furnished room in private
home, 786-970-1853.

OPA LOCKA AREA
Furnished room with cooking
privileges. 305-681-8326.


ROOMING HOUSE
8013 N.W. 10th Court
Central air, new bathrooms
and kitchen, security
gates $125 $150 weekly.


Call Kevin 786-443-3302.
Appointment Only!


1014 N.W. 60th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, Section 8 ac-
cepted, 305-216-0901.

1236 N.W. 69th Street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, Section 8, $1500, call
Tony 954-274-1058.

1256 N.W. 51 Street
Large three bedrooms, one
and a half bath, den, front
and backyard fenced. $1300
monthly. 305-788-2605.

1341 NW 58 Terr.
Three bedroom, one bath-
room $1150. One bedroom,
one bathroom $650. 954-
993-8240.

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750, air. 305-642-7080

1540 N.W. 63rd Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$900. 305-235-9514 or 305-
992-3653.

15630 N.W. 159 St Road
Beautiful three bedrooms,
one bath, air, tile, $1180
monthly, huge yard.
Call 305-934-3589.

1811 N.W. 82nd Street
Three bedrooms, central air,
fenced yard, carport, $1000 a
month, first and last. Call 305-
691-7745 after 5 p.m.

1835 N.W. 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
newly remodeled. Gated
yard. $900 monthly. First and
security. 786-348-1288.

1861 N.W. 166 Street
Three bedrooms, air, $1195.
No Section 8. Call for list,
786-306-4839.

1863 NW 91 Street
Beautiful one bedroom, can
convert to two bedrooms.
Totally remodeled, all
appliances. $750 monthly,
first and last. 305-801-6496.

1865 N.W. 45th St Rear
Upstairs, one bdrm., $750
mthly utilities included, $950
to move in, 305-525-0619.

19950 N.W. 39 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Welcome.
954-663-5263

20625 N.W. 28th AVENUE
Three Bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly. No section 8.
call 305-624-4395 or page
305-732-9875.

2273 N.W. 65 St Rear
One bdrm, $650 mthly. $900
to move in. 305-525-0619

2320 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security.
Call Waymon 305-756-1834

2424 N.W. 43rd Street
Nice, clean, three bedrooms,
two baths, 786-382-8005.

2439 N.W. 104 St. Rear
One bedroom. $675 monthly.
C>800-257-1311


2590 N.W. 166 Street
Three bdrm, one bath

1765 N.W. 66th Street
Three bdrm., one bath

2193 N.W. 57 Street
Three bdrm., one bath

2525 N.W. 50th Sreet
Three bdrm., two baths
Call 305-638-1475

2770 N.W. 153rd Terrace
Three bedrooms, central air,
$1195. No Section 8. 954-
274-6944.

288 N.W. 51 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1000 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air. Call Joel
786-355-7578

3315 N.W. 49 Street
Three bedrooms, central air,
$1395. No Section 8. Call for
list, 786-306-4839.

3451 N.W. 174th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
den, fenced, central air, bars,
tile, $1350 a month, first, last
and $700 security. Section 8
okay. Call 305-621-0576.

3461 NW 207th ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly. Call 954-798-
6808.

41 Street N.W. 5 Avenue
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776

430 N.W. 203 Street
Three bedrooms, two and a
half baths, pool, double car
garage. $1700. 954-704-
0094

4400 N.W. 179 Street
Three bedrooms, den, two
baths. $1500. 954-704-0094


4444 NW 23 Ave.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$980 monthly.
Call Joanne 786-277-8872
630 NW 186th ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 OK $1250. Call
305-624-4395 or Page 305-
732-9875
645 N.W. 65 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1200 deposit. $1702 month-
ly. Section 8 only. .305-757-
3709 or 561-699-5679.

7709 N.W. 21 AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath, air,
fenced yard, water included.
305-331-5399

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

EL PORTAL AREA
Two bdrms one bath, den
(Third bdrm). $1250 mthly,
$2500 to move in.
305-219-6130

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large four bedrooms, two
baths. $1500 monthly.
718-354-7234

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300, 786-294-7164.

NEWLY RENOVATED
1852 N.W. 43rd Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 per month, Section 8
accepted, call 305-216-0901.

PERRINE AREA
Three bdrms, one bath, $1175
mthly, 786-277-7028.


Prime Golden Glades Of
fice
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly.
Call 305-681-9600


Northwest Area
One person. Private entrance
786-343-4781


BEMT-


1236 N.W. b9tn street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, $160,000, call Tony
954-274-1058

14622 NW 13 Road
Four bedrooms, central air,
try $1900 down and $1295
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.

7935 N.W. 16th Avenue
Three bedrooms, central air,
everything new. Try $1900
down, $1195 monthly, FHA,
call for list. 786-306-4839

BROWARD AND DADE
FORECLOSURES
Three and four bedrooms,
priced from the $100's. $7500
tax credit and seller pays
closing costs.
Dorothea Domond
305-542-3353
Re/Max Partners

Don't Call Me Unless you're
SERIOUS about Buying a
Home and have been told
NO! Call EB 786-991-4767

NO QUALIFYING
NO CREDIT CHECK
Three and four bedrooms,
and duplexes. Owner financ-
ing. Only $2900 down.
786-306-4839

Owner Will Finance!
Or Rent to Own. Must Sell.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard.1855 N.W. 132nd
St. Call EB 786-991-4767

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Also Available
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Need HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty



SAVE FORECLOSURE
And Credit, with Senior
Reverse Mortgage.
786-222-6621






Gene and Sons,Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathroom at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, paint-
ing, tiling, plastering and
additions. Call 954-980-
4231 or 305-892-0315


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting soil.
Tony 305-491-4515

LAY Residential Plumbing
Specializing in repairs and
installation. With this ad get
35% to 50% off. All work is
guaranteed for 30 days. 24
hour service. Leslie, 305-384-
8645.

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors, cabi-
net and lawn service. Moving
and hauling. 305-801-5690

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors, cabi-
net and lawn service. Moving
and hauling. 305-801-5690

Tony Roofing
Shingles, re-roofing, leak re-
pairs. 305-491-4515






COOK and CLEAN
LAUNDRY
Required minimum five
years experience with
references related to house-
keeping positions. 5.5 days.
Valid driver's license, non-
smoker, drug testing and
background check required.
Call and leave your name
and telephone number.
305-694-6227
Earn $1000-$3200 a month
to drive new cars with ads.
www.AdCarJobs.com

ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour


We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street
I maaI ggIF


INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court
cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


Be a Security Guard
786-333-2084
Or renew license $60, 40
hours $100 G and concealed
$150.

Vickie's Learning Center
2775 N.W. 46 Street
Now enrolling infant to four
years old! Slow Economy
Special! No registration fee
with this ad! For more infor-
mation call 305-637-7799



T & J Insurance
Home, Auto and Business.
Free Quote. 305-474-4639


PepsiCo to cut

3,300 jobs

By Vinnee Tong
Associated Press

NEW YORK Pep-
siCo Inc. is cutting jobs
and closing factories to
give it some "breathing
room" to navigate the
volatility that has per-
meated all corners of
the global economy.
The maker of Pepsi-
Cola, Doritos and Sun
Chips said Tuesday it
plans to eliminate 3,300
jobs and shutter six
plants in an effort to
save $1.2 billion over
three years. It plans to
use the savings primar-
ily to revive lagging U.S.
soft drink sales.
"This will enable our
competitiveness and
give us breathing room
to respond," Chief Ex-
ecutive Indra Nooyi said
on a conference call.
"It is no news to you
the economy is turbu-
lent and there are un-
certainties and volatil-
ity inr every part of the
environment."









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Wells Fargo to get Wachovia as Citigroup walks away 0 1l
c5 C? ' ** *'^^^^ta~d~ffh^^EMNU^^^EbE"~f


By Edward Iwata

The merger throw-down over trou-
bled Wachovia took another star-
tling turn Thursday when Citigroup
walked away from the fight, leaving
Wells Fargo to claim victory and de-
clare it will move ahead with its orig-
inal merger offer.
Wells Fargo Chairman Dick Kova-
cevich called the merger "simply an
incredible fit," while Wachovia CEO
Robert Steel said the deal would cre-
ate "one of the strongest financial
firms in the world."
The Federal Reserve, which tried to
broker a deal among all three banks,
said it would immediately begin the
approval process.


If approved by regulators, a Wells
Fargo-Wachovia banking behemoth
would rival Bank of America, the
largest U.S. bank. The new bank
would boast $787 billion in depos-
its, 280,000 employees and 48 mil-
lion customers.
In a statement, Citigroup said that
"dramatic differences in the parties'
transaction structures" and "their
views of the risks involved" make a
deal for Wachovia impossible at this
stage.
The Citigroup retreat comes after
a week-long legal fight over t Wacho-
via, one of the largest U.S. banks
beset by mortgage-related losses.
Citigroup had offered $2.1 billion
last week to buy Wachovia's retail,


corporate and other operations, with
the U.S. government absorbing some
of Wachovia's losses. But Wachovia's
board got a better offer last Friday
from Wells Fargo, which agreed to
acquire all of Wachovia for stock.
Wells Fargo's all-stock bid was
originally valued at $15 billion, but
its stock price has fallen since the
offer was announced.
. Citigroup said it will cease legal
action blocking a Wells Fargo-Wa-
chovia merger but will continue to
sue Wachovia and Wells Fargo for
alleged breach of contract and inter-
ference with the contract.
In a statement, Citigroup said,
"Our shareholders have been unjust-
ly and illegally deprived of the oppor-


tunity the transaction created."
Robert Patten, managing direc-
tor at Morgan Keegan & Co., says
Citigroup's decision to not thwart
the merger is "the right thing to do
for Wachovia and a banking system
that's crippled with a lack of trust
and confidence."
The upside of a Wells Fargo-Wa-
chovia merger, according to Patten:
San Francisco-based Wells Fargo
and Wachovia of Charlotte make a
strong geographic match.
The downside: Wells Fargo's earn-
ings would suffer over the next few
quarters as the bank absorbs more
than $40 billion in Wachovia's mort-
gage and commercial real estate
losses.


One hurdle down, many more to go for the economy


By David J. Lynch

The extraordinary $700 billion fi-
nancial rescue plan that President
Bush signed into law Friday will be-
gin the process of healing a battered
financial system. But it's only the
start of a journey that grows longer
and more difficult with every turn in
the road.
"This measure is an important
step, but there is a possibility it may
not be enough," says Frederic Mish-
kin, a former Federal Reserve Board
governor.
The Emergency Economic Stabili-
zation Act makes the Treasury De-
partment the buyer of last resort for
unwanted assets sullying financial
institution balance sheets. The aim
is to take the investment debris off
the banks' hands, thereby freeing
them to resume normal lending.
To free-market purists, it's an
unpalatable step. But the need for
action is unmistakable. Last week,
credit channels were so impaired
that even blue-chip companies such
as General Electric found it difficult
or unusually costly to raise short-
term cash. Even the legislation's
supporters acknowledge it isn't a
cure-all for what ails the American
economy. Too much damage has
been done, and growth is likely to be
either non-existent or anemic until
2010.
Despite widespread unease over
the use of taxpayer money to salve
Wall Street's wounds, it also seems
virtually certain that lawmakers will
in coming months confront anew de-
mands for even greater government
activism. Critics say the new federal
legislation just won't do enough to
resolve the banks' chief problem: a
crippling shortage of capital.
Already, prominent economists
across the political spectrum are
floating proposals that envision
mammoth government spending
beyond the $700 billion bailout.
Among them: shuttering insolvent


.


. .


All that negative news made it c
up two weeks ago.

banks and providing taxpayer cash
to those that can be saved; a tem-
porary unlimited government guar-
antee of all bank deposits; or even
direct financial aid to individual ho-
meowners to ward off foreclosure.
"This act alone is not really going
to resolve anything. Eventually, the
government is going to have to do
more," says George Magnus, senior
economic adviser to UBS in Lon-
don.
As the Treasury Department pre-
pares for its first purchases of trou-
bled assets, the economic outlook is
darkening appreciably. Employers
cut 159,000 jobs in September, the
ninth consecutive month of payroll
shrinkage, the Bureau of Labor Sta-
tistics said Friday. So far this year,
the economy has shed 760,000 jobs
- more than the population of El
Paso.
That news came one day after the
Commerce Department said factory
orders fell by an unexpectedly large
4% in August. And that, in turn, fol-
lowed word that consumer spending
had flatlined. The drumbeat of bad
news persuaded Morgan Stanley to
lower its estimate of third-quarter
gross domestic product and predict


-1.
--'I


tM
..

lear the economy was in distress even before the credit markets seized


the economy had shrunk by 0.6%
for the three months just ended.
"We're in a recession," said Ken-
neth Rogoff, former chief econo-
mist for the International Monetary
Fund. He is among those predicting
that the economy won't resume even
mild growth until 2010.

MORE EXPECT FED RATE CUT
All that negative news made it
clear the economy was in distress
even before the credit markets seized
up two weeks ago. The accelerating
decline is stoking expectations that
the Federal Reserve will cut interest
rates, perhaps by half a percent-
age point, this month. The Fed next
meets Oct. 28, but it doesn't have to
wait that long to act.
If a new IMF study can be believed,
the U.S. has a long way to go be-
fore it puts the current episode be-
hind it. Researchers examined 113
periods of "financial stress" in 17
advanced economies over the past
three decades, comparing those
that involved widespread banking-
sector problems like the current
U.S. crisis with those involving
only financial markets dips.
Unsustainable housing price in-


creases, massive expansion of credit,
and heavy borrowing by consumers
and businesses tend to exacerbate
subsequent downturns. "Episodes
of financial turmoil characterized by
banking distress are more often as-
sociated with severe and protracted
downturns," the study conclud-
ed. Compared with earlier crises
- such as the collapse of Japan's
1980s bubble economy "the cur-
rent episode seems to have the wid-
est impact," the IMF said.
The malady that the Treasury
plan is aimed at alleviating was il-
lustrated by word that frozen credit
markets may drive the state of Cali-
fornia to request a short-term fed-
eral loan of $7 billion.

GETTING READY TO BUY
Officials from the Fed and Trea-
sury already are mapping out plans
to hire asset managers and begin
making deals in four to six weeks.
While the focus has been on mort-
gage-backed securities, the legisla-
tion gives Treasury broad power to
purchase an array of financial as-
sets.
Indeed, even as the House debated
Please turn to ECONOMY 10D


,,V42eafl ASY

Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


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NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
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%son't %omAve our economy cri%&


Europe also suffering from high prices, slowing economies


By Jeffrey Stinson

LONDON Ameri-
cans aren't the only
ones hurting. Across
Europe, the effects of
the U.S. financial cri-
sis, credit crunch and
high food and energy
prices are taking their
toll and not just on
bankers and finan-
ciers.
In France, cafe and
restaurant receipts are
down 20% and nearly
3,000 have closed this
year, French credit in-
surer Euler Hermes
SFAC says.
In Italy, consumer
groups led a one-day
boycott of bread re-
cently to protest a
30% price increase
this year. The num-
ber of Britons drawing
unemployment was at
a nine-year high last
month, the govern-
ment here reports.
Ireland recently de-
clared itself in reces-
sion, with the gov-
ernment's statistics
office saying the once-
ferocious "Celtic tiger"
economy had shrunk
for the second straight
quarter in June. Den-
mark was in recession
at the end of March.
The European Com-
mission says Britain,
Germany and Spain
could be before the
year is out.
"It's global," How-
ard Archer, chief Eu-
ropean economist
for the analysis firm
Global Insight in Lon-
don, says of economic
woes. "There are some
of the same problems
(as in the USA) in ev-
ery country."
The U.S. government
on Friday issued a re-
port saying the domes-
tic economy grew 2.8%
in the quarter ended
June 30. Though
the U.S. has thus far
avoided slipping into
a recession as tradi-
tionally defined two
consecutive quarters
of decreasing gross
domestic product -
economists disagree
on whether the cur-


A sign displays headlines in London on Wednesday. Britain's economy over the second quar-
ter had the weakest performance of the last 16 years. -AFP/Getty images


rent sluggishness will
eventually be called a
recession.
Many of the same
factors causing Amer-
icans pain are behind
the growing agony on
this side of the Atlan-
tic: depressed housing
values, inflation fed
by oil and food pric-
es, and the extended
credit crunch.
The meltdown of
U.S. banks includ-
ing the failure last
week of savings and
loan giant Washington
Mutual and a con-
current downturn in
stock markets the last
two weeks has only
exacerbated the sense
of economic gloom in
Europe.
Germany's finance
minister, Peer Stein-
brueck, blames a cul-
ture of greed and a
drive for ever-higher
profits for the U.S. fi-
nancial crisis that is
helping sink econo-
mies, including his
own, Europe's big-
gest.
"This system, which
is to a large degree
insufficiently regulat-
ed, is now collapsing
- with far-reaching
consequences for the
U.S. financial mar-
ket and considerable
contagion effects for
the rest of the world,"
Steinbrueck said last
week.


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Crisis brings anguish across nation


By Denise Gellene


A man who murdered
his family Monday and
then killed himself as he
faced financial ruin is the
latest and most extreme
case of a wave of distress
washing over the Ameri-
can psyche.
Karthik Rajaram, an
unemployed financial
adviser, left behind a
suicide note saying that
his financial state left
him few options but to
kill his wife, three chil-
dren and mother-in-law.
Los Angeles Police De-
partment Deputy Chief


Michel Moore described
Rajaram, 45, as a man
stuck in a rabbit hole of
despair.
The Rajaram family
case is at the bleakest
edge of the economic
turmoil that is rattling
Americans' emotion-
al well-being. Worries
about home foreclo-
sures, job losses and
plunging stock prices
have sparked a surge in
mental-health problems.
"The closest I have
seen to this in the last 10
to 20 years is the spike
after 9-11," said Richard
Chaifetz, chief executive


of ComPsych Corp., a
Chicago-based company
that coordinates mental
health referrals for em-
ployers. "But this is more
geographically dispersed
and is not going to get
better in a month."
Rajaram, his wife, 39,
his 69-year-old mother-
in-law, and three sons,
ages 7, 12 and 19, ap-
peared to be a typical
suburban family, al-
though one former busi-
ness associate said, "He
had some behavioral
problems. ... He was not
an emotionally stable
person."


MIAMI-ADEI

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
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CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF VACANCY ON THE
PLANNING ADVISORY BOARD

The Miami City Commission seeks to fill a vacancy on the planning advisory
board. Specific qualifications and eligibility requirements are set forth in Section
62-124 of the Miami City Code and require that members must be electors
of the City of Miami. Applicants must possess the knowledge, experience,
judgment, background, ability and desire to act in the public interest. Individuals
representing the various social, demographic and economic elements of the
city are encouraged to apply.

Additionally, public, professional or citizen organizations within the area having
interest in and knowledge of the planning and plan implementation process
are encouraged and solicited to submit to the Office of City Clerk, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133, in writing, the names and addresses of
persons and their qualifications for consideration as prospective appointees to
fill present vacancies on said boards.

The City Commission will considerfilling the vacancy at its meeting of November
13, 2008. The list of interested individuals will be available for public review at
the Office of the City Clerk on Friday, October 31, 2008, following the scheduled
deadline for receipt of said applications on Thursday, October 30, 2008 at 4
PM. Application forms will be available from the Office of City Clerk's and
the Clerk's website at http://miamiaov.com/city clerk/Pages/Board/Board.
asp.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



#003171


NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTION
Pursuant to Miami-Dade County Resolutions R-877-08, R-873-08, R-876-08, R-874-08, and
R-875-08 adopted on July 18, 2008 and R-959-08 adopted on September 4, 2008, by the Board of
County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, notice is hereby given of a special election
on November 4, 2008, for the purpose of submitting to the qualified electors in Miami-Dade
County, for their approval or disapproval, the following proposals:
Home Rule Charter Amendment
Regarding the Offices of Manager and Mayor
Shall the Charter be amended to transfer the powers, duties, and responsibilities of the County
Manager to the County Mayor and provide that the County Manager shall assist the Mayor in the
administration of county government only to the extent directed by the Mayor?
YES 143
NO 144
Home Rule Charter Amendment
Relating to Salaries and Service of County Commissioners
Shall the Charter be amended to provide that County Commissioners shall:
* Devote full-time service to the office of Commissioner and hold no other employment; and
* No longer receive the $6,000 annual salary established in 1957, but receive instead the salary
provided by state statutory formula, adjusted annually by the county's population (currently
approximately $91,995), used by other Florida counties, including Broward County?
YES 146
NO 147
Charter Amendment Providing Alternative
Process to Qualify for Office of County Commissioner or Mayor
Shall the Charter be amended to permit candidates for the office of County Commissioner or
Mayor to qualify for office by either submitting a petition signed by specified number of registered
voters or paying a qualifying fee?
YES 149
NO 150
Home Rule Charter Amendment
on Ordinance Initiative Petitions Requiring
Clerk Form Approval and Public Hearings
Shall the Charter be amended to provide that the Clerk, not the Board, shall approve initiative
petitions proposing passage or repeal of an ordinance as to form and require the County
Commission to hold a public hearing on any such petition at the next County Commission meeting
subsequent to the Clerk's approval of the petition?
YES 152
NO 153
Charter Amendment Relating to
Approval as to Form of Initiative Petitions
Shall the Charter be amended to provide that the Clerk of the Circuit Court, rather than the Board
of County Commissioners, approve citizen initiative petitions as to form?
YES 155
NO 156
County Charter Amendment
Creating Uniform Countywide Fire and Rescue
Service and Preserving Existing City Service
Shall the Charter be amended to require that the Board of County Commissioners provide a
uniform, countywide system of fire protection and rescue services for all incorporated and
unincorporated areas of the County with the exception of the cities of Miami, Miami Beach,
Hialeah, Coral Gables, and Key Biscayne which may provide for fire and rescue protection
services in those cities?
YES 158
NO 159
All qualified electors residing within the boundaries of Miami-Dade County shall be eligible to
vote YES or NO for these proposals.
The polls shall be open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. on the day of the special election. This special
election shall be conducted in accordance with applicable provisions of general law relating to
special elections and the provisions of the Miami-Dade County Home Rule Charter.
Lester Sola
MIAMM Supervisor of Elections
Miami-Dade County, Florida


,q









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 15-21, 2008


Are aid plans doing enough

By Anna Bahney


Housing experts and economists are asking if ho-
meowner assistance programs are doing enough to
help the ailing housing market in addition to indi-
vidual borrowers.
Programs already in place:
Provisions in the $700 billion rescue Congress
passed last week could help homeowners stay in
their homes through loan modification.
The Hope for Homeowners program included in
this summer's housing bill gets distressed borrow-
ers who meet certain criteria into fixed-rate, federally
insured loans.
A settlement announced Monday by Bank of
America allows 400,000 Countrywide borrowers to
modify loans.
But experts say these programs lack the teeth, ef-
ficiency and breadth to bring a significant number of
loan modifications.
"None of these things by themselves are going to
solve the problem," says Kathleen Day of the Cen-
ter for Responsible Lending. "Every one of them is
an incremental step in the right direction." A major
concern, she says, is that for lenders these plans are
voluntary.
Some type of foreclosure notice went to 303,879
properties during August, a 27% increase from Au-


q
.


.


gust 2007, according to RealtyTrac.
Others are proposing plans that attempt to ad-
dress a larger number of home loans.
Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., presented a plan in
Tuesday's presidential debate that would buy bad
mortgages and put those homeowners into loans
they could afford.


Secrets to building a healthy business


Magic Johnson Enterprises, Aetna seminar
features entrepreneurs, health specialists


WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.,
PRNewswire/ Entrepreneurs
and health specialists will be fea-
tured speakers at a free seminar,
"Secrets to Building a Healthy
Business" on Tuesday, Oct. 14 at
the Reginald F. Lewis Museum,
830 East Pratt Street in Balti-
more, Md Reservations for the
5:30 p.m. networking reception
and program must be made by
phone at the toll-free number,
866-341-5283.
Sponsored by Aetna Insurance
and Magic Jothns ri Enternri-'s,
the pariel discuss on will L ;. om
6:15 to 7:30 p.m. Entrepreneurs
include Ackneil M. Muldrow,
CEO of P, rkerMulirow & Associ-
ates a smtil, business consulting
group aind Maria Desenna Lopes,
preside nt and CEO of Integrated
Business managementt Services,
a small business consult. g fi n.
Entrepreneur and h -alth special-
ist Virginic W. Kello1 g, found r of
the Kehogg Stress Institute and
Max Maurice, a clinical social


(MJE) was founded by the Nation-
al Basketball Association (NBA)
legend, Earvin "Magic" Johnson.
He has been a leader in revitaliz-


worker for the District of Colum- ing urban communities through
bia Public School System and high quality business ventures
health enthusiast are also pan- including entertainment and


elists.
Moderating the panel
will be Sandra Mi:ler
Jones, founding chair
of Segmented Marketing1
Services Inc. (SMSi) e ndi
Lafayette Jones, presi-
dent and CEO of Urban
Call publications. The
two enterprises have a
25-plus year track re-
cord of doing business
in urban communities


MAGIC JC


and serving leading Fortune 50
companies and brands. "Since
its founding, our company has
helped major companies and or-
ganizations better serve ethnic
consumers," noted Sandra Miller
Jones. "We have distributed free
product samples and custom
publications to 10s of 1000s of
multicultural consumers," noted
Lafayette Jones.
Magic Johnson Enterprises


other products and ser-
vices. He will share tips
on building a healthy
business in an inspira-
tional video. The semi-
nar will cover marketing
a business and growing
a client base, managing
personal and business
finance, health and self-
>HNSON care and the importance
of health insurance.
Many Americans do not
have health insurance and are
too young for Medicare. Aetna
Insurance has developed an alli-
ance with MJE to help reduce the
number of uninsured, particular-
ly among entrepreneurial urban
business owners. "We want to
improve racial and ethnic equal-
ity in health care," noted Ronald
A. Williams, Aetna chairman and
CEO in an Urban Call Healthy
Living Every Day! edition.


Growth is likely to be either non-existent or anemic until 2010


ECONOMY
continued from 8D

the $700 billion rescue Friday,
Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich.,
urged the Fed to lend money to
auto financing companies such
as Detroit-based General Mo-
tors Acceptance Corp. Slowing
car sales and credit market dis-
ruptions have battered GMAC
for much of this year. In July,
it blamed a $2.5 billion second-
quarter loss in part on "contin-
ued volatility in the mortgage
and credit markets."
Brian Bethune, a Global In-
sight economist, says prices for
mortgage-backed securities that
have been languishing without
buyers "should rise immediately
in secondary markets in antici-
pation of these purchases."
The good news is that a vast
majority of mortgages are being
paid on time and the owners of
the related securities are collect-
ing the interest payments, says
James Sarni of investment firm
Payden & Rygel. These securities


have value, but buyers have been
reluctant to bid on them because
they're afraid another troubled
financial institution may try to
raise cash by dumping similar
securities on the market. That
would depress values for all.
Now, knowing that the govern-
ment has the resources to hold
the securities and sell in an or-
derly way, buyers will be more
willing to buy. "It's like oil has
been injected into a motor that's
rusted," he says.
Tentative signs of progress
could be seen Friday in the bond
market. One measure of how
wo ried bond investors are about
getting their money back from
U.S. companies with the highest
credit ratings fell nearly 2% as
investors grew more sanguine.
Still, Credit Derivatives Re-
search's CDR Investment Grade
index remains elevated; it's up
7% the past week and up a stag-
gering 289% this year.
Showing how reluctant inves-
tors are to lend, debt securities of
the most highly rated U.S. com-


panies Friday set a record yield
at 4.91 percentage points more
than Treasury securities with
similar maturities, according to
the Merrill Lynch U.S. Corporate
index. A year ago, it was 1.48
percentage points.

JUST A BEGINNING
So even with the rescue plan,
the U.S. has a long road to travel
before it reaches financial nor-
malcy. House Democratic leaders
plan hearings in coming weeks
to examine how the markets got
into this mess. House Financial
Services Committee Chairman
Barney Frank, D-Mass., says
Congress next year will have to
write some of the most impor-
tarit financial legislation since
the Depression.
Until then, shell-shocked in-
vestors will be left to ponder
an essential truth, says Marc
Chandler, senior vice president
at Brown Bros. Harriman. "The
power of the U.S. government ei-
ther can resolve this crisis," he
says, "or it can't."


Dozens of countries come together for Global Entrepreneurship Week


IDEAS
continued from 5D

million for operating
companies and up to
$100 million for REITs or
other Investment Funds.
CCA has invested hun-
dreds of thousands of
dollars in the legal, ac-
counting and investment
banking work product,
just to license it to its us-
ers and to enable them
to have a shot at their
dream.
They have taken one
of the most complex,
arduous and expensive
processes and reduced it
to a simple, easy and in-
expensive system. They
have borne 90 percent of
the cost and have done
90 percent of the work.
It's simply up to the en-
trepreneur to close the
gap and finish the pro-
cess of capitalizing one's
company and make their
great ideas a reality.


You can get started by
reading the abridged ver-
sion of the e-book "The
Secrets of Wall Street,"


the most comprehen-
sive guide to the world
of raising capital. To
download your per-


sonal copy, visit www.
CommonwealthCapi-
tal.com and enter pro-
motional code 1492.


for struggling
It would use authority already granted by Con-
gress to modify loans through the conservatorship of
Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae as well as through the
Federal Housing Administration.
Last week, Christopher Mayer and R. Glenn Hub-
bard of Columbia Business School released a plan
that would let all homeowners refinance their pri-
mary residence into a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage
at 5.25% with an agreement that it could not be refi-
nanced to a lower rate. It was published as an opin-
ion piece in The Wall Street Journal.
"I think there has been, from a policy perspective,
too much focus on foreclosures," Mayer says. "We


homeowners?
could stop every single foreclosure today, and house
prices would continue to fall."
"The government has to modify the loans directly,"
Mayer says. "They can't rely on the servicess"
But others have had enough of policy interven-
tion.
"I'm not sure more policy can drive further change,"
says Marty Frame, general manager of Cyberhomes.
com, a Web portal offering real estate information
from Fidelity National Financial. "Policy can set the
boundaries, but the supply and demand will become
the two poles. This can't be done from policy per-
spective, only from a market perspective."


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR EXPENSES FOR
CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE
CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND
COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. ACOPY OF THEAPPLICABLE ORDINANCE ISAVAILABLE
IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE
HELD ON OCTOBER 23, 2008, AT 9:00 A.M., IN ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN
DRIVE, THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO THE
REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTS,
ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED STADIUM PLAT, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI,
SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET COMMITTEE
AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY CODE SECTION 55-8, ANDACCEPTING
THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE
CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR
THE RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works Department, Survey and
Land Records Section of the Construction Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular
working hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or represented at this meeting and
are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special
accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-
5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later
than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



#003172



NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available,on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a so-
licitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-8C-1.212
apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


TITLE


PRE-BID CONFERENCE
ADDENDUMS


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent Of Schools


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


032-JJ11 11/18/2008 Studio Lighting and Stage Equipment

026-JJ02 11/13/2008 Germicidal Detergent

031-JJ04 11/13/2008 District Software Licensing and Special Purchasing Agreement
A pre-bid conference will be held.
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 at
1:30pm in the lecture room #1 at
Information Technology Services,
021-JJ04 11/6/2008 Wireless Networks, Telecommunication (Furnish and Install) 13135 SW26 Street, Miami F
33175. Pre-Bid Conference
attendance by the bidder or his
qualified representative is
recommended for bid acceptance
Awalk through will be conducted
at two school sites on Wednesday,
October 22, 2008 at 9:00am
Blueprints may be picked up at
1450 NE 2nd Ave, Room 351. A
Wiring, Telecomunication (Furnish and Install) pre-bid conference will be held
020-JJ04 11/6/2008 in, Wednesday, October 29, 2008 at
Voice and Data 8:30 AM in Lecture Room #1 at
Information Technology Services,
13135 SW26 Street, Miami, FL
33175. Pre-Bid Conference
attendance by the bidder or
qualified representative is highly
recommended for bid acceptance.

016-JJ10 11/4/2008 State Legislative Consultant

028-JJ10 10/28/2008 Commercial Leasing of the Paved Parking
028-JJ 10 10/28/2008 Facilities at South Pointe Elementary School

TEENAGE PARENT PROGRAM (TAPP)
RFP 017-JJ10 10/28/2008 CHILD-CARE SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WHO MEET
LEGISLATIVE ELIGIBILITY FOR THE 2008-2009 SCHOOL YEAR

011-JJ05 10/28/2008 Art & Specialty Paper

011-JJ05 10/28/2008 Carbonless & Specialty Paper


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2008

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2 FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS,
7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH

All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.

Solomon Odenz City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Coun-
cil with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall
insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (f/s 286(1105); 2) In accor-
dance with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office
of the City Clerk no later than two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone
(305) 787-6001 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line ai
(305) 948-2909 for assistance.


_ ~I ___ ___~___ ~




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