Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00566
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 8, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00566
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text




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One Family Serving Since 1923




Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 7 MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Parents and teachers meet to discuss our failing schools


Parental involvement

crucial in improving

F schools in Miami-Dade


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@mniamitimesonline.com

The pouring rain did not
stop parents and teachers
throughout Miami-Dade from
meeting on last Saturday at
the City of Miami Gardens
Council Chamber, to discuss
the state of our schools.
Last month, Carol City Se-
nior High School, North Mi-
ami Senior High and Miami
Norland Senior High, who
all obtained F's in the 2008
school performance grades,
received new principals. The
school board followed the
state mandate which said
that if a school received D's
or F's for two years then the
principal would be moved to
another school.


The change in leadership
has caused an uproar among
parents within the commu-
nity which prompted the In-
dependent Parent Council
and Concerned African Wom-
en (CAW) to bring parents,
teachers, and Miami-Dade
school members, Dr. Wilbert
Holloway and Dr. Solomon
C. Stinson, together to dis-
cuss what's going on in our
schools.
Parent Samantha Baker
wondered why the Black
schools have become the
main target of dysfunction
and says that education is
becoming a joke within the
community because there is
no stable leadership in the
schools. She doesn't see how
.Please turn to SCHOOLS 7A


Overtown project questioned


Residents want new development to bring jobs into their community


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn

Downtown Miami and areas in Over-
town are expected to transform into a
magic city. The proposed project, the
Miami Worldcenter, is expected to turn
abandoned building and empty parking
lots into conference and boutique ho-
tels, offices and shops and bringing in
retailers and unique entertainment.


The Worldcenter will be developed
between Northeast Second Avenue on
the East, North Miami Avenue on the
West, Northeast Eleventh Street on the
North and Northeast Sixth Street on
the South.
In addition to the wonderful ame-
nities of the Worldcenter, Clarence
Woods, assistant director of the City of
Miami Community Redevelopment
Agency (CRA), says "More jobs will be


| created. Jobs will be
pouring in for Over-
town residents. Mi-
ami Worldcenter will
bring in additional
,tax increments that
will be reinvested in
Overtown."
Woods believes that
PERRY Overtown residents
will benefit from this
project but residents in Overtown dis
Please turn to OVERTOWN 5A


Simpson jury held strong views on past


By William M. Welch

LAS VEGAS The jurors who con-
victed O.J. Simpson of armed robbery
and kidnapping in a casino hotel had
strong opinions about Simpson's ac-
quittal in his 1995 murder trial, ac-
cording to juror questionnaires.
But they swore to judge him on the
facts in Sin City and disregard their
opinions about Simpson's culpability
in the murder of his ex-wife.


"I think he did it," juror Sherian Sue
Eckart, 55, said in response to a ques-
tionnaire item on the murder of Simp-
son's ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson,
and a friend, Ronald Goldman, outside
her condo in the Brentwood section of
Los Angeles in 1994.
"I don't believe the jury considered)
the facts," Ruth Ann Horschmann, 62,
wrote of the Los Angeles jury.
"I disagree with the verdict. I think the
Please turn to SIMPSON 6A


Rampant Medicare fraud suspected in Miami


By Julie Appleby

Home health care costs charged to
Medicare in the Miami area have risen
20 times the national average in the
past five years, prompting a federal in-
vestigation of suspected fraudulent bill-
ing.
Miami-Dade County is on track to
cost Medicare a projected $1.3 billion
for home health care services this fis-
cal year, up 1,300% in just five years,


government data show.
Investigators suspect that fraud is
helping to drive the increase because
the population of Medicare beneficiaries
in the county grew only 10.2% between
2004 and 2007, the latest government
data show.
"You definitely have a problem down
here," says Randall Culp, an FBI su-
pervisory special agent who oversees a
team that works with a Medicare Fraud
Strike Force in Miami.


In South Florida, investigators say,
some agencies are billing Medicare for
millions of dollars in services that are
unnecessary, overused or not provided
at all.
Investigators elsewhere are paying
attention because South Florida is a
bellwether for scams that later surface
in other large cities, such as Los Ange-
les and Houston. Scams involving fake
AIDS treatments, for example, popped
Please turn to FRAUD 5A


Beyonce shines at Diamond Ball

Beyonce inducted into International

Pediatric Hall of Fame
Beyonce Knowles attended the Miami Children's Hospital's 2008
Diamond Ball on Saturday and was inducted into the International
Pediatric Hall of Fame for her contributions to charity! The event was
held at the American Airlines Arena in Miami, Florida. Good for her!
Beyonce and husband, Jay-Z, are an amazing duo. It was just recent-
ly that Jay accepted a U.N.A award for his work in Africa.
Miami Times Photo/Rich Jackson


7Day
Weather aY
Forecast


WEDNESDAY



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u.J. Simpson was Touna guilty or all
12 counts.







j. '


OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Journalists ready

with racism excuse

e news media have been shamefully stoking the
Side that the only way Barack Obama could possibly
lose the presidential election is if American racists
have their way. Indeed, the fact that Obama isn't leading
in polls by a wide margin "doesn't make sense ... unless it's
race," says CNN's Jack Cafferty.

Slate's Jacob Weisberg says Obama is losing among older
white voters because of the "color ofhis skin." Many journalists
are so committed to the racism-explains-everything line
that they are labeling any effective anti-Obama ad as an
attempt by John McCain to "viciously exacerbate" America's
"racefueled angst," in the words of one magazine writer.

For example, a McCain ad noted that Franklin Raines, the
Clinton-appointed former head of Fannie Mae who helped
bring about the current Wall Street meltdown, advised
the Obama campaign. Time's Karen Tumulty gasped that,
because Raines is black, McCain is playing the race card.

Why, she wants to know, didn't McCain attack Obama's
even stronger ties to the even more culpable former Fannie
Mae chairman, Jim Johnson, who had to resign from
Obama's vice presidential search team because of his sketchy
dealings with mortgage giant Countrywide Financial?

"One reason might be that Johnson is white; Raines is
Black," Tumulty suggests.
Or another reason might be that the McCain campaign was
saving that attack for its next ad, which is what happened.

This spectacle reveals how little the press corps thinks
of the American people and how highly they .think of
themselves ... and Obama. Obama's lack of experience, his
doctrinaire liberalism, his record, his known associations
with Weatherman radical William Ayers and the hate-
mongering Rev. Jeremiah Wright: These cannot possibly be
legitimate motivations to vote against Obama, in this view.

Similarly, McCain's experience, his record of bipartisanship,
his heroism: These too count for nothing. Racism is all there
is. Repeating over and over that voting against Obama is
racist only makes nonracist people embarrassed to admit
that they plan to vote for McCain.

Another rich irony is that the only racists who matter in
this election are the ones in the Democratic Party.
Jonah Goldberg


School Board members,

our children's voice
Dear Editor:

First of all, I would like to say that I applaud Miami-Dade school
board member Wilbert "Tee" Holloway's efforts in trying to improve
the "F schools" in our area. It is not an easy task due with the little
resources that the community has available but these children
deserve the best so we should give them all that we can. I am very
upset with school board member Solomon C. Stinson's silence to
the poor performance grades of our schools. Miami Central Senior
High and Miami Edison Senior High are two of the worst schools
in Miami-Dade and they are in his district. We elected you and you
don't even care about our children. We have only two Blacks on
the school board but Stinson is invisible. I guess when he is up for
reelection then our children will finally matter to him.

Sincerely,
Anna Watson
Miami



fISSN 0739-03191
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., PuDlisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


The catch phrase for this po-
litical season is "change." Vot-
ers want it though they are of-
ten at pains to describe exactly
what that change is. They are
tired of business as usual and
desirous of a new politics in
Washington, an end to partisan
bickering and the beginning of
a new vision and a new political
culture.
The candidates in this year's
presidential election offer a
clear distinction in race, age
and temperament. It is clear as
well which candidate's rhetoric
is more style over substance.
In August, during the saddle-
back civil forum on the presi-
dency, Democratic presidential
candidate Barak Obama was
asked by Pastor Rick Warren:
"Can you give me a good ex-
ample where you went against


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press telletes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person regardless of race. creed or color, his or her human and legal rights. Haling no person, teanng no person, the
Black Press stinves to help every person in the firm belief that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back


Ap L3I. The Media Audit *


E ^BYGEORGE (URFY NN


Taxpayers subsidize America's corporate welfare queens


There is growing evidence that
the Wall Street bailout will defi-
nitely help Wall Street, provide
some token assistance to Main
Street, and totally bypass Dr.
Martin Luther King Drive.
For example, Clinton adminis-
tration Secretary of Labor Robert
B. Reich, now professor of public
policy at the University of Cali-
fornia-Berkeley, thinks the best
way to improve the economy is
by extending unemployment in-
surance, freezing mortgage rates
and passing a stimulus package
that creates more jobs.
Moreover, he feels the bailout
plan didn't travel far enough on
Main Street or Dr. Martin Luther
King Drive.
"Here's Treasury Secretary
Henry Paulson's and Fed Chair-
man Ben Bernanke's logic, made
explicit on Tuesday. There's only
a certain amount of bad debt
on Wall Street's books, left over
from the wild and woolly days of
lax mortgage lending. Once re-
moved from the Street's books,


credit will flow again. And once
credit flows again, Main Street
can breathe a sigh of relief," Re-
ich wrote on his blog.
But there's a problem with that
kind of thinking, Reich notes.
"Paulson and Bernanke failed
to mention that bad debts are
growing even among people re-


while the ocean is rising. Many
of the average taxpayers being
asked to take on Wall Street's
bad loans are the same people
whose incomes are dropping,
which means they're struggling
to pay their debts and poten-
tially creating more bad loans."
What's overlooked in the dis-


O n top of direct and indirect subsidizes, companies receive lib-
eral tax breaks expanded in recent stimulus packages that,
according to Citizens for Tax Justice (CTJ), allows them to pay
little or no taxes.


cently considered good credit
risks. At the end of August, 6.6
percent of mortgages were at
least 30 days past due. That's
up from 5.8 percent at the end of
June. We're also seeing a grow-
ing amount of credit card and
auto payments past due."
Reich concluded, "Bailing out
Wall Street's bad debts when
millions more Americans can't
pay their bills is like bailing out
a rowboat springing more leaks


cussion of the bailout is that
taxpayers subsidize profitable
Fortune 500 companies to the
tune of $92 billion a year. Presi-
dents from Ronald Reagan, who
during his 1976 presidential
campaign spoke of a welfare
queen who purportedly used 80
names and 30 addresses to de-
fraud the system, an assertion
that was never verified, to Bill
Clinton, who proudly boasted
of wanting to "end welfare as


we know it," have picked on
defenseless welfare recipients
while expanding corporate wel-
fare.
In a 2007 report titled, "The
Corporate Welfare State: How
the Federal Government Sub-
sidizes U.S. Businesses," the
Cato Institute reported, "Sup-
porters of corporate welfare
programs often justify them as
remedying some sort of market
failure. Often the market fail-
ures on which these programs
are predicated are either over-
blown or don't exist.
"Yet the federal government
continues to subsidize some of
the biggest companies in Ameri-
ca. Boeing, Xerox, IBM, Motoro-
la, Dow Chemical, General Elec-
tric, and others have received
millions in taxpayer-funded
benefits through programs like
the Advanced Technology Pro-
gram and the Export-Import
Bank. In addition, federal crop
subsidy programs continue to
fund the wealthiest farmers."


Thank you for disabusing me
of such notions..."
Here was Obama's opportu-
nity to display before an eager
audience his actual ability to
do more than talk about roll-
ing up his sleeves and working
with Republicans and the best
example he could come up with
was a lie.
In contrast, according to
analysis conducted by the
Washington Times, "Mr. McCain
has reached across the aisle far
more frequently and with more
members than Mr. Obama... In
fact, by several measures, Mr.
McCain has been more likely to
team up with Democrats than
with members of his own par-
ty." Not great news for conser-
vatives, but sobering for those
truly interested in bi-partisan-
ship.


party loyalty, and maybe even
went against your own best
interest for the good of Amer-
ica?"
Obama responded by of-
fering as an example his
work with John McCain on
the issue of campaign ethics
and finance reform. It turns
out however, that this shin-


in a scathing letter from Mc-
Cain in which he wrote among
other things: "When you ap-
proached me and insisted that
despite your leadership's pref-
erence to use the issue to gain
a political advantage in the
2006 elections, you were per-
sonally committed to achiev-
ing a result that would reflect


t is interesting to note that in 2005, Senator Charles Hagel (R-NE)
introduced the Federal Housing Enterprise Regulatory Reform Act.


ing bi-partisan moment was
anything but. After pledging
to reach across the aisle and
support Senator McCain's ef-
forts, Obama withdrew that
support one week later. The
reneging of support resulted


credit on the entire Senate
and offer the country a bet-
ter example of political lead-
ership, I concluded your pro-
fessed concern for the insti-
tution and the public interest
was genuine and admirable.


:Y JULIANNErMALVEAU NN


Take it Personally: We can get it


I


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s Provides
s~~~ Prvdr


I keep wanting to write some-
thing totally erudite about the
economic crisis that will cause
our country to bail out banks to
the tune of a trillion dollars, but
I cannot.
There is something deep in me
that I want to say about how egre-
gious this bailout is, but words
escape me. Even as I search for
special words I see myself look-
ing. eyeball to eyeball with a stu-
dent whose parent is now unem-
ployed, which means her tuition
and fees will go unpaid.
Or, I see myself having a con-
versation with my financial aid
officer, a phenomenal young
woman named Keisha Ragsdale,
who will tell me how much mon-
ey she needs to keep some of our
highest achieving students en-
rolled. There is something to say
about the way our economy
melting down, about ti-
benefited and those e A
And then there is o else
to say. This is nc al. Bu
each of us need. it per


sonally.
In other words, this is a wake
up call for every American who
has been careless with her
money. T his is a wake up call
for anyone who needs to look at
her portfolio and figure out how
to balance it. T his is a painful


kids have moved home, the
spouse has lost a job. It's a rough
thing, being out there, trying
to figure out how to make ends
met. It is utterly galling that 535
people are rescuing bankers and
nobody is rescuing us. And some
of this crisis is utterly manu-


Most Americans are not millionaires; most of us work hard for
the money. Most of us have issues and challenges, and many
of us struggle with those challenges.


holler for anyone who doesn't
know what she is worth or how
her pension fund is invested. It
is time, for all of us to take this
crisis personally.
Most of the folks who read my
wordWdo not earn seven or eight
figures. Most Americans are not
.millionaires; most of us work
hard for the money. Most of us
have issues and challenges, and
t. many of us struggle with those
e challenges.
ti The mortgage is too high, the
-paycheck is too low, the grown


factured. No matter. We have to
take this nonsense personally
because it affects us.
Now is the time to pick you one
of those personal finance books
and implement a plan. Now is
the time for each of us to be fi-
nancial literacy warriors, push-
ing, focusing, fighting, fighting
to make sure we understand ev-
erything we need to know about
this economy. Put down the met-
ro section of the paper, and pick
up the business section. Now is
the time for us to be as passion-


ate about cash as we once were
about celebrities.
When we take it personally, we
can get it- we can get on program
about the things that we must do
to survive the next two years. Yes,
two year. It is my humble opinion
that it will take that long to turn
the economy around, and that
the new president, whoever he
is, will be shackled by the funk
of this economic crisis for awhile
we don't need a drama king who
suspends campaigns to deal
with something he has no con-
trol over. We need a steady hand
at the rudder. And even with a
steady hand, we need, each, to
take this personally.
Let me be clear. We didn't do
this. Somebody is reading and
chafing and saying why should
I have to bear the burden of
the banks. Why must I take the
weight of irresponsible profi-
teers? If you are a renter, you are
especially aggrieved. You are fi-
nancing a go-go that you didn't
even get to attend.


Talk the talk: Can you walk the walk?


The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial
commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such
feedback makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the
community.
Letters must, however, be bnef and to the point. All letters must be
signed and must include the name, address and telephone number of
the wnTiter for purposes of confirming authorship
Send letters to- Letters to the Editor. The Miami Times. 900 N.W
54th Street, Miami. FL 33127. or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email-
miamiteditoralai bellsouth netr


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Palin is a palid choice


for vice president
-r~~ J I


The American public gets what
it deserves when it elects its lead-
ers. In three campaigns, we have
elected Presidents based on their
folksy charm, and not on their
ideas, intelligence and integrity.
We elected Ronald Reagan, who
was probably suffering through
Alzheimer's during the last years
of his term. He tripled the defi-
cit. We elected our current Presi-
dent Bush, who let's be frank,
had failed at every business
venture, was less than a stellar
student, dodged the draft, and
whose only claim to fame was the
silver spoon in his mouth. He
has taken a budget surplus and
made it into trillions of dollars of
deficit, advocated a useless war,
destroyed our economy and lost


and Governor Pa- g . A
lin, we also can
clearly see an in-
teresting distinction. Senator
Biden received a B.A. in His-
tory and Political Science from
the University of Delaware and
a J.D. from Syracuse 'Univer-
sity College of Law. His edu-
cational background also made
him distinctly qualified to lead a
government. He has served as a
Senator for 36 years.
Governor Palin attended Ha-
waii Pacific University for 1 se-
mester; North Idaho College for
2 semester General Studies;
University of Idaho for 2 semes-
ters journalism; Matanuska
-Susitna College 1 semester;
and finally graduated from the


S enator Obama did not come from a rich heritage and did not
through his family connections buy his way into any school
like George Bush and others.


E BY C, VIRGINIA FIELDS

HIV/AIDS numbers still climbing among
The atmosphere at the 2008 in 2006. AIDS infections is three times
U.S. Conference on AIDS in Ft. The infection rate among the national rate, according to
Lauderdale, which ended Sept. s was seven times the rate a report released in August by
21, was one of doom and gloom, among whites. Hispanics are New York City's Department of
But there is reason for hope. disproportionately affected Health and Mental Hygiene. The
The doom and gloom is for the by HIV, too, representing 18 report found that almost half of
numbers we have seen recently percent of new HIV cases in new AIDS victims in New York
that show the AIDS epidemic as 2006 while making up only 15 during the period studied were


bad as we could have imagined
it. Last month, during the 17th
International Conference on
AIDS, the national Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) issued a highly-
anticipated report on estimates
of new HIV infections in the
United States. The report's
findings were alarming and
totally unacceptable.
The CDC's report indicated
that 56,300 new HIV infections
occurred in the United States in
2006 a 40 percent increase in
the CDC's prior estimates of HIV
infections. Tragically, the CDC
estimates that s, approximately
13 percent of the nation's total
population, account for an
estimated 45 percent nearly
half of all new HIV infections


he CDC's report indicated that 56,300 new HIV infections oc-
curred in the United States in 2006 -a 40 percent increase in
the CDC's prior estimates of HIV infections.


percent of the U.S. population.
Year after year, the U.S.
Department of Health and
Human Services, state, county
and local health departments
across the nation report that
minorities continue to bear the
disproportionate burden of the
nation's HIV/AIDS epidemic on
their shoulders.
In New York City, where
National Black Leadership
Commission on AIDS (NIBLCA)
is based, the rate for HIV/


Black.
New York State and Florida
share an unfortunate reality:
We (along with California) are
among the top three states
in the nation in terms of the
number of AIDS cases. Florida
has more than 1,500 children
living with AIDS and New York
has more than 2,300, according
to CDC data.
So where is the hope? The
hope comes from indications
that we, as a nation, are finally


Blacks
starting to realize
that AIDS is a
public health emergency that
must be addressed immediately.
Just on Wednesday, U.S.
Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton
and U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee
introduced a resolution calling
for a National AIDS Strategy.
This is something NBLCA has
been advocating forcefully for
several months.
And the people are rising
up to demand a solution to
this crisis. As I write this, New
York residents are planning a
demonstration in Brooklynto call
attention to the AIDS scourge,
and others are planning to
demonstrate at the presidential
debate in Mississippi to hold
the candidates' feet to the fire,
as well they should.
A national AIDS strategy
would set goals and timetables
and identify needed resources.
It would make sure the 10
agencies that administer AIDS
programs coordinate and
communicate with one another.


the world wide respect this coun-
try once had.
We now have a stark choice be-
tween McCain-Palin and Obama-
Biden. I believe intelligence is
an issue that we should require
in our Presidents.
Senator Obama did not come
from a rich heritage and did not
through his family connections
buy his way into any school like
George Bush and others. He at-
tended Occidental College in Los
Angeles for two years where he
studied politics and public pol-
icy. He subsequently went to
an Ivy League School, Columbia
University, where he received a
B.A. in Political Science with a
specialization in International
Relations. So far his educa-
tional requirements have geared
him toward leadership in gov-
ernment. Finally, he attended
Harvard University Law School,
the top legal program in our
country, where he graduated at
the top of his class, Magna Cum
Laude. He was also the first
African American editor of the
Harvard Law Review.
In contrast, let us examine
Senator McCain. He comes from
a family where his father and
grandfather were Admirals. He
attended the United States Na-
val Academy. Did family pedi-
gree get him in? His class rank
was 894 of 899. He was at the
bottom of his class.
If we look at Senator Biden


It was an extremely sad day for
those who believe in free enterprise
and the fundamentals ofcapitalism.
Adam Smith, the author of "Wealth
of Nations", who is considered the
Father of Capitalism, must have
been turning in his grave.
Here was the Secretary of the
U.S. Treasury, Secretary Henry
Paulson, aka King Henry, Big
Willie, Iceberg Slim, coming to
Congress on a Saturday morning
requesting $770 billion to be
handed over to his office for
disposal at his discretion without
court or congressional oversight,
i.e. transparency.
He had the audacity to threaten
us by saying give it to me now or
the world economy will go into a
terrible depression immediately.
Congressman Mike Pence
(R-Indiana) would say, "The last
time I heard something like that,
I was standing in a used car lot".
Paulson even had the guts to put it
on a trifling two and one half page
proposal.
The legislative leaders of the free
world were being shaken down by
a very rich hustler.
First of all, Secretary Paulson
has a very big conflict of interest
in all this. He is the former CEO of
Wall St. investment firm Goldman


University of Idaho 3 semesters
with B.A. in journalism. Why
so many schools? Is it because
she did not have the fortitude to
finish any one program? Based
on a degree in journalism, you
would think that she would be
able to handle press interviews,
but her two big interviews with
Gibson and Couric were bombs.
Saturday Night Life made skit
out of her answers by simply
verbatim repeating her state-
ments.
In the debate between Sena-
tor Biden and Governor Palinm,
we had a stark contrast. Sena-
tor Biden had a real knowledge
of facts and issues, he did not
have to cram for a week to learn
some talking points. Governor
Palin, was folksy and cute, and
winked at the audience. She par-
roted a couple of talking points,
but could not substantively an-
swer the questions. In a face of
between Putin and Biden, we
know that intellectually he will
be able to confront this man toe
to toe. In a face of between Pa-
lin and Putin, will a wink and a
hairdo, save +his country?
If American elects McCain-Pa-
lin, then we put a woman who
is quite frankly not that bright,
one heart beat away from a 72
year old President who has had
cancer four times. God help
this country if we go with not so
bright and cute over real intel-
ligence.


Sachs which is a suspect in all this
mess. In 2005, Paulson's personal
value of Goldman Sachs stock was
over $800 million and today it is
valued at around $500 million.
Yes, he is down to his last half a
billion dollars and he wants to turn
that around even if the assistance
comes from American taxpayers.
The fired CEO of AIG Insurance, a
major suspect in this, had a value
of $1.2 billion in his company


BY RON WALTERS, NNPA


Obama hits a triple at the debate, a home run


By all accounts Barack Obama
won the first of the presidential
debates on September 26
over John McCain, who was
widely considered to have more
experience in foreign affairs.
He won by exceeding
expectations, exhibiting that
he had a substantial grasp
of issues and that he was
presidential, while McCain talked
in generalities and showed his
disdain for Obama, not according
him proper acknowledgment by
refusing to look at him.
But whatever advantage McCain
was thought to have over Obama
by his familiarity with various
heads of state and, as he intoned,
having been involved in every
major crisis in foreign policy in
the past 25 years, Obama came
back several times, diminishing
McCain's winning points.
For example, when McCain
alluded to the fact that he had a
bracelet from a woman whose son
had been killed in Iraq, Obama
countered with his own bracelet,
squelching McCain's emotional
point. When McCain charged
that Obama didn't understand
the "Surge," Obama countered
that McCain seemed to think
the war began in 2007, then


dramatically stated since the war
began in 2003, McCain had been
wrong about the reason for its
start, wrong about how American
troops would be received, and
wrong about the tension between
Sunni and Shia factions. And
there were others.
Nevertheless, it was also
somewhat unnerving to hear
him say at least seven time ItHa'.
McCain was right; for him not to'"
counter McCain repeated message
that Obama didn't understand,
to see McCain muscle him out of
responses several times because
Jim Lehrer was not in control of
the debate; to see him not follow
up on several obvious openings
such as his definition of the
"success" of the Surge, McCain's
slavish support of George Bush's
policies, McCain's lack of support
for Veterans, and others.
I understand the problem
he has. On one hand, he can't
feed into the "angry black man"
racial image and turn off some
white voters; on the other, he
has to establish a level of policy
competence and physical ease
that lets him appear presidential.
But I give him a triple because he
could have been much better.
Then next evening, however,








Small businesses
do not have this
luxury of paying off officials through
Political Action Committees,
lobbyists, etc. We sink or swim
based on our own accountability,
business acumen and fate. We are
the true Capitalists in this time and
it is us who provide 70% of all new
jobs in this nation. Big corporations
are the manipulators as opposed
to students of Capitalism. They
must pay for their transgressions.
I know that good government must
step in but it should not be in the
way of super regulation. Heavy
regulation is not the answer as it
can only make things worse. We
should continue to embrace true
Capitalism and, by doing that, we
should prosecute those who abuse
the public trust and embrace greed
versus business acumen.
What Secretary Paulson and his
minions didn't count on was the
fact that Congress has to answer
to the American people. Our
populace is against any kind of
major bailout by the ratio of 50 to
1. Congresspersons and Senators
have an election next month and
they must report on this issue. If
they discount the people and go
for the "big boys" their futures will
be in jeopardy.


when Barack Obama stepped
on the stage to give the keynote
speech at Congressional Black
Caucus annual dinner, that he
was home could be witnessed by
everybody who was on their feet,
rocking to the music of, "Here I
am baby, signed sealed delivered,
I'm yours...."
Obama was given the CBC's
Harold Washington Award,


at CBC

named after the former mayor of
his home City and he proceeded
to acknowledge those who had
paved his way again, leaving
out Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. who
sat at a table in front of him.
But as Obama got into his
speech and began to warm up, he
answered the criticism of me and
others, by dealing' with critical
aspects of the Black Agenda.


Most people feel that President George W. Bush has so
completely screwed up the Republican Party for -the past
eight years that there is very little chance that it will ever
return to prominence. The latest revelations that the Justice
Department found "significant evidence of political partisan
considerations" in the removal of several U.S. attorneys
proved that Bush and his officials in Washington have
nothing but contempt for government. Stay tuned.

Miami officials and developers have dreamed up another
scheme to spend Community Development Block Grant to
help poor neglected people in Overtown in other locations.
This times 'it's the proposed Miami Worldcenter project
around the Arsht Performing Arts Center. Why don't they
build some long promised decent affordable housing that
we desperately need? Overtown residents are asking Denise
Perry of the PowerU Center for Social Change to help with
the protest.

Hispanic evangelical voters are caught a rock and a hard
place trying to break away from their usual Republican
ties. They lean right on abortion and marriage and left on
immigration and the economy. Anti-immigrant rhetoric in the
GOP has estranged many in the fast-growing Latino group
and Democrats are fielding some very attractive candidates
in this election. Stay tuned.

Florida's popular class-size law may be put on ice, thanks
to a weakening economy and a statewide budget crisis.
Despite strong public support, a broad consensus is forming
that the goal of limiting class-size is simply too expensive
during the current economic crunch.

Medicare officials are cracking down hard on fraud in
seven states, focusing on companies that improperly provide
patients with medical equipment such as wheelchairs and
oxygen supplies. Some changes also target home health care
agencies in Miami-Dade. Medicare is on track to pay projected
$1.3 billion this fiscal year for services to homebound
patients--up 1.300% since 2003.

Talk about bad timing, just days before the School Board
was expected to vote on the new Miami-Dade Schools
Superintendent Alberto Cavalho's $275,000 contract,
new emails have surfaced that appear to further implicate
Carvalho in a romantic relationship with a former Miami
Herald reporter.

A lot of people think Gov. Charlie Crist must be losing
his mind if he thinks people are going along with his plan
to lease Alligator Alley, which is a part of Interstate 75, to a
private company. Floridians are right to fear that leasing the
highway to a private company could lead to a sharp increase
in tolls. The plan's supporters say that won't happen because
the state can cap fees. We are betting this item will be on the
Legislature agenda next year.

Look for the presidential campaign to get down and dirty
during the final days. John McCain is falling behind Barack
Obama in the polls and has decided to let it all hang out.
Stay tuned.


need to do is build a couple of new
prisons and send these financial
criminals away. Let's not swat
hands this time. These federal
criminals need to do some serious
time and set the example that
ripping off people, including Black
folks, will get you locked up.
Yes, I am saying a lot of this is
racial. The major component of this
economic meltdown is the mortgage
fraud that was taking place. The


C congress should take its time and sort this serious matter
out. Save the nation from total financial abyss.


stock and today that has shrunk
to less than $50 million.
They are personally in trouble
and are trying to manipulate your
elected officials to further the U.S.
debt and have you, the typical
American taxpayer, make them
whole.
Yes, I used the term "suspects".
The reason for all of this mess is a
wholesale movement of deception,
greed, corruption and simple
felonies.
The FBI currently has at least
26 major investigations going on
in Wall St. The major subject is
mortgage fraud. What we definitely


prime targets of the fraud were
Black and Hispanic families. Sub-
prime mortgages have exploited
minority home owners and they
were the first to suffer.
The whole scheme backfired
on the conspirators because they
never figured the public would
finally realize who was to blame. In
sum, Black net worth in America
has probably fallen 30% due to the
criminal activity of Wall St., Fannie
Mae, Freddie Mac and others.
Thirty years of our wealth building
has collapsed and that will hurt us
for a significant time. We have got
to make them pay!


BY. HARRY C. ALFORD, NNPA


When big capitalists plead for welfare


I --~-------








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Georgia's McKinney running

for president of green party


Despite home ties, third party candidacy is
unlikely to have major impact on Nov. 4 results


By Larry Copeland,

ATLANTA One is a blunt-
spoken former Georgia congress-
man who helped lead the drive
to impeach President Clinton in
1998 and later became a strong
advocate of civil liberties after the
9/11 attacks.
The other is a firebrand former
Georgia congresswoman who filed
articles of impeachment against
President Bush and Vice Presi-
dent Cheney and later became an
impassioned voice for victims of


Georgians Bob Barr


Hurricane Katrina.

50 STATES IN 50 DAYS:
Bob Barr and Cynthia McKin-
ney are two longtime Georgians
who are among the best known
in a flock of independent candi-
dates running for president this
fall as an alternative to Republi-
can candidate John McCain and
Democrat Barack Obama.
Barr, 59, the Libertarian Party
nominee, is on the ballot in Geor-
gia and 45 other states and is
working to get on in three oth-
ers. He is running a campaign


that rails against the financial
policies of both Republicans and
Democrats and the growth of the
federal government. He opposes
the proposed $700 billion res-
cue package for Wall Street and
says the financial industry col-
lapse should be investigated for
fraud.
McKinney, 53, Georgia's first
African American congress-
woman and the nominee of the
Green Party, is on the ballot
in 31 states and the District of
Columbia though not in her


fairs agency Strategic Vision,
doesn't expect Barr to exceed
3% on Nov. 4. "This race is
very close," he says of the na-
tional campaign. "Republicans
who might have basic difficul-
ties with McCain, former Hillary
(Rodham Clinton) supporters
who might have basic difficulties
with Obama, they're not going
to waste a vote on a third-party
candidate."
Some Georgians in Atlanta's
Centennial Olympic Park this
week didn't know about any of
the third-party candidates. "I
wouldn't vote for any of them
even if I could, but I'm glad


and Cynthia McKinney are running for president.


home state. She advocates an
immediate moratorium on home
foreclosures and a full pullout of
all military forces from Iraq.
Despite Barr's home-state
roots, political analysts here say
he is unlikely to have a major
impact on the race between Mc-
Cain and Obama for Georgia's
15 electoral votes.

POOR SHOWINGS
PREDICTED
David Johnson, CEO of the
public relations and public af-


they're on the ballot (in some
states)," says Barb White, 52, a
home health-care worker.
Roderick Smith, 55, a youth-
development counselor, knows
that Barr is on the Georgia bal-
lot and says he would consizto
add issues to their platform that
they would not otherwise have
discussed."
McCain's selection of Alaska
Gov. Sarah Palin as his run-
ning mate broke open what had
been a close race throughout the
summer, boosting him to a dou-
ble-digit lead in Georgia.


( *r tow a I -or

























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In this troubling economy, every dollar counts. What

are you cutting back on in order to save money?


ERNEST ASHE, 55
Retail, Liberty City


I have been
cutting back
on drink-
ing beer and
smoking ciga-
rettes because
they are too
expensive for
me to buy. I
am on a so-called budget and
doing everything I can to save
money. It is hard to invest be-
cause the economy is bad right
now.

TRACY SEYMOUR, 34
Maintenance Man, Miami Gardens

When it
comes to say-
ing, you have
to seriously
disciple ine
yourself. For-
tunately, I saw
this economic
crunch coming about three
years ago so I got a compact car
to save on gas. People are not
living for the future but are liv-
ing day-to-day.


JAMES DEROSIER, 18
Retail. Overtown


I am staying
in more and
not going out
as much as I
use to. I am
also catch-
ing the bus to
save on gas.


MONISHA LANIERE, 18
Body Piercer, Liberty City

I don't buy any .
more of my
MAC cosmet-
ics products. I
have to shop at
stores that are
less expensive
but it's killing
me because I
am not spend-
ing any money on name brand
items.


JERRY WALKER, 58
Retired, Liberty City


Turning off
the lights more
and watching
less television
and reading
more to save
on electric-
ity. When I go
to the grocery
store, I am buying the less ex-
pensive items. I have been rid-
ing the bus for 20 years and I
will continue to ride it because
I am saving a lot of money.

KEYANDRA CROWDER 18
Student, Liberty
City

During this
economic cri-
sis, I am put-
ting more mon-
ey in the bank.
I stopped going
to the club to
keep more money in my pock-
et.


Spain will pay immigrants to leave


Labor Minister Celestino Cor-
bacho said the measure was
approved at a Cabinet meeting
under a fast-track procedure
and will take effect in about a
month after a largely symbolic
passage through Parliament.
The plan targets tens of thou-
sands of non-EU citizens who
have been laid off in Spain and
are entitled to unemployment
benefits. It offers them a lump
sum payment of 40 percent of
that money once they renounce


their work and residency per-
mits, and the remaining 60 per-
cent once they get home.
The program is strictly vol-
untary, and applies to people
from 19 non-EU countries with
which Spain has signed bilat-
eral accords under which social
security benefits accrued in one
nation can be paid out in the
other.
People who sign up for it must
agree not to come back to Spain
for three years, with the prom-


ise they will be able to recover
their work and residency per-
mits after that.
The initiative is the latest
thrust by a government grap-
pling with ever-swelling jobless
ranks in an economy that had
posted more than a decade of
solid growth but is now flirting
with recession. Spanish unem-
ployment is now an EU-high of
10.7 percent, according to the
bloc's statistical agency Eurb-
stat.


Haiti raises storm death toll to nearly 800, and rising


PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI (AP)
- The official death toll from four
storms that ravaged Haiti this
summer has nearly doubled to
some 800 people, authorities
said Friday.
Civil defense director Maria-
Alta Jean Baptiste said in an
interview with The Associated
Press that 793 bodies have been
found so far, and authorities
are still looking for bodies in
the mud that swamped coastal


settlements.
"As we're cleaning, we don't
know what we're going to find,"
she said.
Crews have found 466 bodies
in the hard-hit town of Gonaives
alone, and government workers
are buryingthe dead immediately
to avoid contamination and the
spread of infectious diseases,
she said.
The four tropical storms that
scaick in late August and early


September also wiped out at
least 60 percent of Haitian
agriculture and destroyed
roads, bridges and homes.
The government had
previously said 425 people
died in the storms, which left
thousands homeless.
International aid and food
has poured in, but the U.N.
World Food Program has so far
received only US$1 million of
the US$54 million it requested.


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BLAC\(KS MIusTI CONTROl. IIiIR (0\\N 1)1IrINi


Miami Northwestern exposes students to


High school prepare students for post-secondary education


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@inianimtiinesonline.coin

Most of our future leaders as-
semble in classrooms daily and
educators have the pleasure of
giving them the skills they need
to graduate. By June of next
year, many of them will be walk-
ing across the stage at gradua-
tion. To prepare them, Miami
Northwestern Senior High will
having their annual Fall College
Fair on October 10. The school
will bring in colleges such as
Barry University, Florida Inter-
national University, Miami-Dade
College, Bethune Cookman Uni-
versity and Florida Agricultural


and Mechanical University.
"I would like these kids to re-
ceive a lot of college information.
Hopefully, we will give them an
understanding on how the col-
lege admission process works so
when they are filling out their
college applications, they won't
get frustrated and give up on
college because they don't un-
derstand the questions being
asked to them. I want them
to be exposed and realize that
they are capable of bigger and
better things," said LarMarc
Anderson, a College Adjust-
ment Program (CAP) Advisor
at Northwestern whose goal is
to guide 'students through the


college admission process of
post secondary institutions, vo-
cational education centers or
trade schools.
The current enrollment at
Northwestern is approximately
2,041 students in grades 9-12.
The senior class is estimated to
be approximately 437 students.
Last school year, more than 50
percent (233 students) of the
graduating seniors enrolled in
a college or university. Ander-
son says that this school year's
goal is to get 75 percent of the
graduating class off to college.
College enrollment among
Blacks peaked almost 43 per-
cent between 1993 and 2003.


LarMarc Anderson
(CAP) Advisor


The College Board, which helps
students make the change to
higher education, reported the
number of Blacks who took the
Scholastic Assessment Test
(SAT) increased in 2007.
Anderson says the students
are witnessing the economic
crunch facing the country and
it has helped them realize the
importance of furthering their
education. He says that they
understand that a high school
diploma will not be enough to
make it in the real world.
"The goal for this year is to
show kids in the urban high
schools they can achieve and go
to college. In addition to attend-
ing college, they can obtain col-
lege degrees," said Anderson.
The Journal of Blacks in High-


college

er Education reported that in
2007 approximately four million
Blacks held a bachelor's degree
and of that group 952,000 also
held master's degrees. Almost
166,000 Black have advanced,
earning their professional de-
grees in medicine, business,
engineering and law. Nearly
111,000 Blacks have obtained
their doctorates.
Santa Clara Elementary,
1051 NW 29 Terrace, will also
be participating in the college
fair. The 5000 Role Models will
be exposing the fourth and fifth
graders to colleges and intro-
ducing to them to various pro-
grams offered at Northwestern,
the medical magnet, Performing
and Visual Arts Center (PAVAC)
and the cosmetology center.


Perry says people are leaving Miami, no jobs


OVERTOWN
continued from 1A

agree that jobs would not be gar-
nered by Overtown residents.
"How are we going to build a
Miami if people are leaving be-
cause of no jobs? More people
are moving because they can-
not afford to live in this city any-
more," said Denise Perry, Direc-
tor of the Power U Center for So-
cial Change.
According to the U.S. Department
of Labor, 74472 people in Miami-
Dade were unemployed in August
of this year. The Florida unemploy-
ment rate is at 6.5 percent.


City of Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones said at
the Commission meeting last
month that she believed that the
project would be helpful in gen-
erating jobs in Overtown jobs
and renewing the CRA.
"This project will not ben-
efit Overtown and jobs are not
promised to residents. CRA is
supposed revitalize or rebuild
Overtown but it seems like the
funds will be deferred elsewhere.
In the long run, Overtown resi-
dents won't win. We don't how
much money that will come out
of Overtown but the project will
affect Overtown in a negative


way," Jermaine Banks, a com-
munity organizer with Power U
Center for Social Change. Banks
said that Power U is against the
project.
Woods reassures the commu-
nity that the funds will not be
taking out of Overtown for this
project.
Long-time Overtown resident
Deborah Sinclaire, 84, is am-
biguous about the Worldcenter
project. The focus in building the
project Sinclaire says should be
helping the residents in Overtown
by supplying them with jobs.
"We are in a economic, educa-
tion, and housing crisis but they


want to build Miami Worldcen-
ter," said Perry. She believes the
focus is on building the Miami
Worldcenter but 71,000 people
in Miami-Dade are awaiting af-
fordable housing. She says that
many who have applied do not
have a place to live so why not
build more affordable homes in-
stead of investing in the World-
center and this way Overtown
residents will benefit. "We are
not going to build a sustainable
with part-time retailers. If they
want to make a commitment to
Overtown then take the money
and invest in affordable hous-
ing."


Anti-fraud tactics will target home care agencies Availablefrom Commercial News Providers


FRAUD
continued from 1A
up in Detroit and several other
cities after a crackdown in Mi-
ami, Culp and others say.
"Typically, Miami is ground
zero. Then we see it move to the
other high-fraud areas," says
Suzanne Bradley, an investiga-


tor with the Centers for Medi-
care and Medicaid Service's
field office in Miami.
Home health agencies send
nurses and aides to assist
homebound elderly and dis-
abled beneficiaries. Nation-
ally, Medicare expects to spend
$16.5 billion on home health
care this year, up 65% from


five years ago.
Medicare spent six times
more on home health care ser-
vices in Miami-Dade County
during the first five months of
this year than in Los Angeles
County, where the Medicare
population is three times larg-
er, agency data show.
"It jumps off the page as


out of proportion," says Kirk
Ogrosky, deputy chief in the
Criminal Division's Fraud
Section of the Justice Depart-
ment.
Today, acting Medicare chief
Kerry Weems says he will an-
nounce new anti-fraud efforts,
some targeted 'at home care
agencies in Miami.


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LENOER


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CARROLLTON
SCHOOL OF THE SACRED HEART


_1___1___1____ I I


I


______


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


With credit skintight, governments are in a bind


By Julie Schmit

Despite federal passage of the
financial bailout, state and lo-
cal governments face budget
shortfalls and continued tight
credit.
Numerous states have warned
of trouble ahead and it's unclear
when credit might begin flow-
ing again at acceptable prices,
freeing up money for everything
from payrolls to sewage system
upgrades.
"We're in wait-and-see mode,"


says Amy Resnick, editor of
trade publication The Bond
Buyer.
The weak economy is an
even bigger concern, says Sujit
CanagaRetna, of The Council of
State Governments, Southern
Legislative Conference.
Twenty-nine states bridged
budget shortfalls when they en-
acted budgets for fiscal 2009,
which began July 1 for many.
Since then, new gaps have
opened up in at least 15 states,
CanagaRetna says.


"Small states and big states
are looking at a sea of red ink,"
he says. Some face spending
cuts; others will trim services,
delay maintenance and dip
into rainy-day funds, he says.
One difference now from 2001,
when many state budgets also
suffered, is the credit situa-
tion. Then, states borrowed
big. That's not feasible now, he
says.
"We're looking at a really dif-
ficult two fiscal years," says
Scott Pattison, executive direc-


tor of the National Association
of State Budget Officers.
Local governments will suf-
fer more than states, given less
ability to raise revenue, says
Matt Fong, former state trea-
surer of California. He, too, says
services are likely to decline, as
are benefits for state and local
government workers. "The fat
has been gone, and they're hav-
ing to go now for the bone."
The dire credit situation
notched up last week when
California said it might need


the federal government to buy
$7 billion of debt the state was
unable to sell. California faces
running out of cash by month's
end without the money.
Massachusetts was unable
to raise $68 million to boost
cash reserves. Florida hadn't
been able to borrow money for
almost three weeks, although it
was not in dire need. Typically,
Massachusetts would pay 2%
to borrow. Last week, that was
4% to 6%, says spokeswoman
Francy Ronayne.


Like other states, Minnesota
delayed a bond issue, including
one for $42 million for a 911
communication system. Local
governments also delayed bond
issues, including a sewage proj-
ect in Georgia and water devel-
opment in Kansas City.
California Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger said Friday
that even with the bailout
- credit may remain tight but
that the state will soon begin
seeking loans on the open mar-
ket.


Attorney says Simpson is hopeful of an appeal


SIMPSON
continued from 1A

police/prosecution in the case
made errors," Sharon Ann John-
ston, 36, wrote.
The three jurors were among
the nine women and three men
who convicted Simpson here Fri-
day after 13 hours of delibera-
tion.


He was found guilty of all 12
counts stemming from a Septem-
ber 2007 confrontation in a Las
Vegas casino hotel room in which
Simpson was seeking the return
of his own personal and sports
memorabilia held by collectibles
dealers. Simpson contended he
didn't know that two of the men
whose help he enlisted were car-
rying guns:


Simpson, 61, could receive up
to life in prison when he is sen-
tenced by Judge Jackie Glass on
Dec. 5. Until then, he is being
held at the Clark County Deten-
tion Center.
Attorney Yale Galanter said
Sunday that Simpson is "obvi-
ously a little depressed, melan-
choly" but hopeful of chances on
appeal.


On Saturday, Simpson, ap-
peared far removed from his pre-
vious celebrity as a former college
and professional football star who
went on to a successful career in
movies and TV commercials. Af-
ter the jury made its verdict pub-
lic early Saturday morning. He
was led out of the courtroom in
handcuffs after Glass rejected his
bid to remain free on bond while


Black women more likely to experience domestic violence


VIOLENCE
continued from 1A
Department of Justice
report, 73 percent of victims of
domestic violence are women.
Women account for 84 percent
of spousal abuse victims and
86 percent of victims of abuse
from a boyfriend.
In 2007, the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE) reported
1,389 forcible sex offenses in
Miami-Dade while there were
6,145 forcible rapes statewide.
"Right now, it is not just a
youth problem, it is a man's
problem. We need leadership.
Yes, most of our homes are
being led by women but
there are still hundreds and
thousands of Black men who


lead their family and who
support their daughters and
are not: rapist, thugs, wife
beaters, or slap around their
girlfriend," said Davis-Raiford.
Switchboard of Miami
reported to have received
4,200 calls from victims of
domestic violence in 2004.
Black women were the
highest in domestic violence
cases, according to the U.S.
Department of Justice. Black
women were 35 percent
more likely to face domestic
violence compared to white
women.
Davis-Raiford believes the
statistics and data show that
this issue is circulating in
our neighborhoods and the
crimes being committed by
our Black men and our Black


boys. Sadly, she says these
are young men coming out of
homes with mothers, sisters
and aunties. The Men to Men
conference will bring several
pastors and leaders together
within the community to bring
guidance and understanding
into the lives of these men.


"I want to empower fathers,
uncles, brothers, and nephews
to have a voice. In everything
they do, they will be able to
say violence against women is
not ok," said Davis-Raiford.
For more information please
contact The Carrie Meek Foun-
dation at 305-953-0525.


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awaiting sentencing.
The latest trial attracted little of
the attention that his murder case
did, one where detailed testimony
about the grisly deaths riveted the
nation and became known as
"the trial of the century."


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The Miami Times
would like to congratulate
The 2008 NAACP FREEDOM FUND HONOREES

Dr. Rudy Crew
The Dr. Robert Ingram Wings of Success Award

Honorable Shirley Gibson & The City of Miami Gardens
The Piesident Visionary Award

Family Christian Association of America, Inc.
Adora Obi Nweze Community Service Award

Mr. Garth Reeves .
The Leroy Thompson Pioneer Award

Father Richard L.M. Barry
The Neal Adams-Richard Powell Civil Rights Award

Mr. Michael Putney
The Theodore Gibson Spirit of Excellence Award


----------


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Parents partially responsible Musical Program
at Valley Grove

for our failing schools Musical Program 3 p.m. on
for our faling scs Sunday, October 12 at Valley


SCHOOLS
continued from 1A
the children will have an ef-
fective learning environment,
if the principals are con-
stantly being moved. If these
changes continue, in the long
run, Baker believes that our
children will be hurt.
"Each of these schools has
received an F. We have some
challenges that we need to
face. If we [North Miami, Car-
ol City and Miami Norland] do
not improve by next year we
will be closed. These are the
mandates that come down
from the state of Florida De-
partment of Education, we
have to change the leader-
ship of the schools," said Hol-
loway.
Retired teacher Walter
Denis believes student learn-
ing is being interrupted by
the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test (FCAT).
Denis says that students are
losing their interest in school
learning because the FCAT
is being drilled into their
curriculum but they are not
receiving the proper tools to
prepare them for life after
high school.
"All classes are focusing
on the FCAT. The kids and
teachers are tired. Kids are
just coming to school to pass
the FCAT instead of prepar-
ing for a future," said Denis.
Carolyn "Kiani" Nesbitt,
founder and CEO of CAW,
said the FCAT introduction
to students may be a contrib-
uting factor as to why it has
become a hindrance for many
children. "FCAT did not start
in kindergarten. Many of the
eighth graders who were tak-
ing the FCAT were reading on
a second grade level but they
were being promoted to the


Ed Haynes, chairman of Concerned African Women (CAW),
encourages parents to get more involved in their child's edu-
cation.


next grade level."
Miami Gardens and Opa-
locka have less than a 55
percent graduation rate and
9 percent drop out rate, Ed-
ward Haynes, chairman of
CAW, said that it is easy for
parents to point the finger at
their child's education but
parental involvement is cru-
cial in order for success to
become the ending result.
Parents need to get involved
by monitoring report cards
and homework says Haynes.
He thinks the same enthu-
siasm that parents had for
their child's education in el-
ementary should continue
through high school.
Dr. Lillian Cooper, princi-
pal of Cope Alternative High
School, talked to parents
about monitoring their child's
report card to see if they are
reading at their grade level.
She says that a child reading
below grade level would re-
ceive a D or F on their report
card in reading. The comment
area of the report card should
indicate the child's reading
level which is why Cooper


says that it is important for
parents to carefully pay at-
tention to their child's report
card and the comment area.
Holloway encouraged the
parents to attend the month-
ly school board meetings.
"We have to take ownership
for these challenges that we
have before us. Our students
must motivate themselves
and must find and create a
burning desire to learn. Our
kids come out of the homes
so the homes must take part
in the ownership," says Hollo-
way. "What's going to happen
on the day the grades come
back and they say we have to
close Carol City? Well, every
parent: band or athletic par-
ent and everybody will be at
the school board saying don't
close our schools."
Ava Gilley, a representa-
tive from school board mem-
ber Stinson's office, attended
the forum. After the meeting,
The Miami Times attempted
to contact Stinson about the
failing schools in his district
but he failed to return our
calls.


Grove M.B. Church, 1395 IN.W.
69 St. Featuring The Gospel
Seven of Camilla, Georgia; Wim-
berly Singers, Dynamic Stars,
Rick Jame and the Soul Seek-
ers, Southern Echoes, J Boys
and others.







Subscribe


On Tuesday, October 7, Rev.
Donnel White of Brownsville
M.B. Church and congregation
will render the service. Wednes-
day, October 8, Rev. Harold
Rose of Greater Fellowship M.B.
Church and congregation will
be in charge. Both services be-
gin at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, Oc-
tober 12 at 7 a.m. Rev. Tracey
McCloud of Peace M.B.Church


will be the speaker then at 11
a.m. Rev. Sherman Mungin of
Greater New Macedonia M.B.
Church, is the speaker. Rev Jo-
seph William of St. Mark M.B.
Church and congregation will
close out Fellowship Day at 3
p.m.
Everyone is welcomed to wor-
ship with us. Rev. Albert Jones
is Pastor.


Appreciation service honoring

Pastor Emeritus Della Williams
You are invited to join us, in
honoring 88 year old church
founder, Pastor Emeritus, Della
Williams for 56 years of minis-
try and for numerous years of
community service. Please at-
tend the Love and Appreciation
Service on Saturday, October
18, 7 p.m. at The New Begin-
ning Praise Tabernacle, 2398
N.W. 119 Street, The Right Rev.
John H. Taylor is pastor. For
more information contact, Tony
and Mildred Ferguson at 305- Emeritus Della Williams
751-9739. Pastor


Mt. Calvary welcomes FGBC,
Mt. Calvary Missionary Bap-
tist Church and Rev. Dr. W. L.
Strange, Jr. welcome the presi-
dent of the Florida General Bap-
tist Convention, Inc. on October
12-14.
Come and hear the man of
God, preach the word. Join us
as Rev. James B. Sampson,
brings a word of what thus says
the Lord.
Services will convene nightly
at Mt. Calvary Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 1140 Dr. Martin
Luther Kind, Jr. Blvd. We are
looking forward to having a mag-
nificently high time in the Lord.
We encourage you to come and
feast at he table as Rev. Samp- Rev. Dr. James B. Sampson
son breaks the bread of life, Guest Pastor


Inc. President


Rev. Dr. W. L. Strange, Jr.
Host Pastor


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A Healthy and Convenient Addition to Any Meal,
16-oz bag Quantity rights reserved,
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White Mountain Bread ......................... 229
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30 or 32-oz jar
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SAVE UP TO 5.29


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Nabisco Oreo 2O5 005
C ookies.................... R -
Assorted Varieties, 9.6 to 18-oz pkg.
or Fudgees, 15-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO 2.98 ON 2


New
England
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Assorted Varieties,
9 to 12-oz bag
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5.79


SFree


Kellogg's
S ecia[ K F
real ............ Free
Assorted Varieties, 12 to 14-oz box
or Grab 'N Go Packs, 5.2 or 5.4-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.21




. . . .. . .


Prices effective Thursday, October 9 through Wednesday, October 15, 2008. Only in Miami Dade, Broward, Palm Beach. Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.


Fellowship Day at New Mt. Calvary


~




>a


-a~aa~d- ~h








8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Florida Memorial University celebrates 40 years in Miami


Dr Karl S. Wright promotes vision for future


By Joyce R. Forchion
This year marks Florida Memo-
rial University's fortieth anniver-
sary in South Florida. In 1968 the
school relocated from St. Augus-
tine to its scenic Miami Gardens
campus during the heart of the
Civil Rights Movement. As South
Florida's only Historically Black
College or University (HBCU),
the institution has experienced
many achievements over the
past forty years. Many of the re-
cent successes are attributed to
the administration of its current
president, Dr. Karl S. Wright.
As an economist and native
of Jamaica, Wright is a staunch
advocate of academic excellence.
Before he was appointed presi-
dent by Florida Memorial Univer-
sity's BoArd of Trustees in 2006,
he served as the institution's ex-
ecutive vice president and pro-
vost. The goals and objectives
he championed in his previous
position have continued during
his first two years as president.
Dr. Wright was instrumental in
increasing the size and upgrad-


ing the credentials of the faculty,
ensuring that over seventy-five
percent of the faculty holds a
Ph.D. or terminal degree. He also
led the institution through suc-
cessful accreditation processes
with the Commission on Colleges
of the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools. With his
guidance, Florida Memorial also
received accreditations from the
Association of Collegiate Busi-
ness Schools and Programs,
Council on Social Work Educa-
tion, and National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Educa-
tion. The university recently re-
ceived the distinction as the only
HBCU in the state of Florida to
offer a fully-accredited music
program.
The institution's recent eleva-
tion to graduate-degree status is
largely attributed to his tenacity
in broadening the university's
academic offerings. Due to his
perseverance, the university fam-
ily congratulated its first MBA
program graduates last spring.
The university also offers master
of science degree programs in el-


ementary education, exceptional
student education, and reading.
Due to the strength of its educa-
tion programs, Florida Memorial
University now ranks second in
the state and ninth in the nation
for graduating Black teachers.
To make classes more acces-
sible to prospective and current
students, Wright expanded sig-
nificant external relationships
with the community by offering
courses at satellite locations in
Hialeah, Liberty City, and Lau-
derdale Lakes.
When asked about his vision
for the institution, Wright shared
the following, "Florida Memorial
University is a student-centered
learning community that pro-
vides access to a high-quality
education, promotes cultural
diversity, and encourages global
awareness," he said. "I will con-
tinue to uphold the tradition of
academic excellence among our
students, along with developing
new partnerships on the local,
national and international lev-
els."
Enhancing the university's
global scope is a priority of
Wright's. Under his tenure as
executive vice president and


DR. KARL 5. WRIGHT
FMU President
provost, faculty and students
at the university significantly
increased their global outreach
initiatives. Articulation agree-
ments were signed with several
colleges in the Caribbean, which
led to faculty participation in
programmatic activities in Af-
rica, Latin America, and Asia.
As president, Wright continues
to promote these opportunities
among the campus community,
and encourages students to pur-


sue enriching study abroad and
cultural immersion experiences.
During his administration as
president, several honors stu-
dents traveled to France, Eng-
land, China, and Egypt in prepa-
ration for multinational careers
after graduation.
Wright's active involvement
with scholastic pursuits and civ-
ic affairs has kept him busy over
the years and prepared him for
serving as university president.
Before accepting the position
as president, Wright was select-
ed to be a Kellogg Foundation/
NAFEO leadership fellow. In ad-
dition, the American Association
of State Colleges and Universi-
ties selected him to participate
in the Millennium Presidential
Leadership Fellows Initiative:
Before joining Florida Memorial,
Wright served for seven years as
dean of the school of business at
South Carolina State University
in Orangeburg, South Carolina.
In that role, he was committed
to enhancing the profile of the
business school in the corporate
community and laying the foun-
dation for national accreditation.
During his tenure, the school
of business developed unprec-


edented partnerships with ma-
jor in-state as well as national
corporations while forming im-
portant linkages with prominent
business schools. Prior to spend-
ing time at South Carolina State.
Wright was employed as an as-
sistant professor at North Caro-
lina A & T State University.
Wright holds bachelor's and
master's degrees from the Uni-
versity of Maryland, and a Ph.D.
from Mississippi State. His spe-
cialized academic interests in-
clude economic modeling and
statistical forecasting. His orga-
nizational memberships include
the Greater Miami Chamber of
Commerce, the Beacon Council,
100 Black Men of Fort Lauder-
dale, Inc., and the Miami-Dade
County Investment Advisory
Committee.
Dr. Karl S. Wright and his staff
are committed to upholding Flor-
ida Memorial University's legacy
to serve as a beacon of hope and
opportunity for students seeking
higher education and a brighter
future. To learn more about Dr.
Wright and the university's aca-
demic offerings, contact the Of-
fice of Public Affairs at 305-626-
3624.


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I( LO ) Im a


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- -


I











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


A


I








The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Mothers


Dealing with the ongoing F


challenges of
Motherhood' as I see, is a gift.
It is a calling and a vocation
from God. But, like all gifts, we
have a choice of appreciating
it, accepting it, and cherishing
the responsibilities and joys it
brings, or considering it an en-
cumbrance and just a duty or
even a burden. Our attitude
must be examined.
Motherhood begins at concep-
tion [as does fatherhood] and
so, to ensure the unborn child


motherhood
not go outside the home to work
are also those who can afford
maids, and usually they see less
of their children and the bond-
ing is weaker than those who
may have to work as well as
care for their children. Mothers
who are with their children in a
meaningful way have a greater
impact on their development.
The questions to ask are; How
much time (quantity and qual-
ity) do I spend with my child?


Motherhood is demanding, especially if mother has to work out-

side the home. But it is not impossible to be an effective and caring
parent so long as we get our day organized and gear our children
into a routine or pattern.


is healthy, parents need to live
healthy lives avoiding anything
that may harm themselves and
the unborn child. Motherhood
therefore demands a sense of
responsibility throughout, and
how we carry out our respon-
sibilities towards our children
would naturally vary according
to circumstances.
I have noted with concern
that children whose mothers do


Am I communicating love and
joy as I bathe and feed them?
Do I watch my child with the
loving concern of a mother or
do I just do things for them and
to them? Am I sensitive to their
feelings and am I also develop-
ing a sensitivity towards them?
Are we communicating in an at-
mosphere of love and trust?
Motherhood is demanding,
Please turn to Mothers 11B


How to deal when your family


is having money trouble


Devon, 17, is used to pay-
ing her own cell phone and car
expenses. But lately it's been
harder. The family she babysits
for hasn't been calling as much,
and she couldn't find a job over
the summer. Devon's dad says
it's a sign of the tough econo-
my. He told her he's feeling the
pinch too, and that he had to
dip into her college fund to pay


and other items. Stores add
these higher shipping costs to
the prices they charge, which is
why things are more expensive
these days.
Higher prices aren't the only
problem. Lots of people are hav-
ing a tough time making pay-
ments on some types of home
loans (mortgages) because the
amount they have to pay each


way, you're far from alone. Par-
ents may also be more stressed
out than usual. They might ar-
gue more and worry about how
to pay for things.
Naturally, this can put extra
stress on you, too, especially
because parents' money prob-
lems aren't something you have
any control over. But although
you can't solve family money


4'


- ~ ~-


the mortgage.
These days it's hard to avoid
news about the economy. Turn
on the computer and words like
"recession," "foreclosure," and
"credit crisis" fill the screen. It
can seem a bit scary and some
families are hit really hard.
But as discouraging as things
may seem now, the good news
is that the economy always gets
back on track after a while.

WHAT'S BEHIND
THESE PROBLEMS?
The simplest way to sum up
what's going on is .that things
cost more at a time when lots of
Americans have less money to
spend.
If you drive, you know how
much oil prices have gone up.
High oil prices affect more than
your gas tank, though: Compa-
nies also pay extra to ship food


month has gone up.
Most people still earn the
same amount of money they
did before all these changes.
So families are cutting back on
what they spend.

HOW DOES A DIFFICULT
ECONOMY AFFECT
FAMILIES?
For some people, the slow
economy means eating out less
or staying home instead of go-
ing on vacation. Parents may
not have as much money to
put toward allowances or col-
lege funds. For other families,
though, money problems mean
bigger changes, such as a par-
ent taking on a second job or
the family having to move to a
less expensive house.
When a family has money wor-
ries, it's easy to get frustrated,
and upset and if you feel that


-'a-^^^S


41





troubles, you may find that
contributing in some way helps
you feel better.
Shauna's dad was laid off and
had to take a lower-paying job.
Shauna and her brother decid-
ed to help out by planting their
own vegetable garden. They
soon discovered that the gar-
den was more than just a way
to save money. Shauna's par-
ents found weeding and water-
ing are great ways to relax and
de-stress.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO
MAKE THINGS EASIER?
It's comforting when our lives
and routines feel the same, so
it's natural to feel worried if
things change.
Here are some practical and
emotional survival tips for deal-
ing with a tough economy:
Please turn to FAMILY 12B


Praying for the sick,


can science prove it helps?


SAN DIEGO, United States
- Proving scientifically that
it helps to pray for a sick per-
son is an elusive proposition,
says Dr. Taeed Quddusi, one
of the speakers at the 32nd an-
nual conference of the North
American Association for Baha'i
Studies.
The first problem, he said, is
designing an experiment, given
that we are not sure of the de-
sired result of a prayer.
"Is the point of prayer to pro-


long life?" he said during an in-
terview after the conference.
He proceeded to answer,
based on his understanding
of the Baha'i teachings: "The
point of our existence on this
planet isn't simply a longer life.
The point of our existence is to
know God, to worship God, to
serve God."
What about cases in which
prolonging life would mean
condemning a person to addi-
tional suffering, he asked. Then


what is the desired result of the
prayer?
And if we are not sure what
effect we are seeking when we
pray, how can a scientist assess
the success of a prayer?
"We don't really know what
we are measuring," Dr. Qud-
dusi said.
"The Effects of Prayer on Heal-
ing and Recovery: A Rleview of
the Literature" was the title of
his presentation at one of the
Please turn to PRAY 14B


Several African -American
preachers said they urge
church members to vote -
even offering rides to the
polls and tell them to weigh
spiritual beliefs over party
affiliation. But at a pastors'
conference Wednesday,
they said they stop short of
endorsing candidates from the
pulpit.
About 500 pastors from
across the country, most of
them African-American, have
gathered at Hyatt Regency


DFW hotel for the four-day
Kingdom Agenda Conference.
While the conference
deals with meeting spiritual
and emotional needs of
communities not politics -
some participants took time
out with the Star-Telegram
to talk about next month's
presidential election.
Some also commented on
Pulpit Freedom Sunday, a
national initiative last Sunday
promoted by a group called
the Alliance Defense Fund.


Black preachers offer their take


on the presidential election


t ^.









BLU.,\('Ks lST ('CONROI. 1111R iOWN 1)1SI'IN\


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Knowing the role of a mother


MOTHERS
continued from 10B


especially if mother has to
work outside the home. But it
is not impossible to be an ef-
fective and caring parent so
long as we get our day orga-
nized and gear our children
into a routine or pattern. While
we need to ensure that father
-also plays his role and that
we get his help and support,
mothers should not minima-
lise their responsibilities just
because they also bring home
a pay check. We need to cut
out on non-essentials in order
to make time and space for
our role as mothers. We need
to learn how to relax with our
children so that we do not get
stressed out and what better
way then to enjoy them even
while we care for them and
their needs. Relax together!
Children understand self-
less love, devotion and mean-
ingful discipline. When this is
communicated in a loving and
consistent manner by mother


to child, all the other imperfec-
tions will seem unimportant.
Question: What do you think
of placing children in child-
care centers so mothers can
work?
Answer: Safe, clean, loving
child-care facilities is a neces-
sity in today's culture. They
are especially needed by the
millions of mothers who are
forced to work for financial rea-
sons. They are particularly vi-
tal to the many single parents
who are the sole breadwinners
in their families. Thus, we
need not question the wisdom
of providing well-supervised
centers for children whose
mothers and fathers require
assistance in raising them.
That debate is over.
What can be argued is
whether children fare better in
a child-care facility or at home
with a full-time mom. Person-
ally [and others may disagree],I
don't believe any arrangement
for children can compete with
an intact family where the
mother raises her kids and the


---~


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father is also very involved in
their lives. There are at least
four reasons that are true.
First, children thrive and
learn better when they en-
joy one-on-one relationships
with adults rather than as
members of a group. Second,
you can't pay an employee in
a child-care center enough
to care for children like their
own mothers will do. Children
are a mother's passion, and it
shows. Third, research verifies
that kids at home are healthier
than those who are regularly
exposed to diseases, coughs,
and sneezes from other boys
and girls. Fourth, a bonding is
more likely to occur between
parents and children when the
developmental milestones are
experienced firsthand. Fami-
lies should be there when the
first step is taken and the first
word is spoken and when fears
and anxieties arise. Certainly,
others can substitute for Mom
in those special moments, but
something precious is lost if a
surrogate witnesses them.


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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


II J


-93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942


Order of Services
-~ 0 ,.m F-1aily 6t11ing Waotslip
11 ; I. ..Moniicg, Wuiolhip
Evening Worship
lts & 30id Sunay .. .. ti p ia
Tui'csday liable Siiy ... En'-
w\et);re crotic ari


S Ebenezer United \
Methodist Church
2(X) N.W 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Ser-vices:
Sunday Morning Srvices
7:45 a.m11. It:15 a.m,
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. -7 p.IP.
Prayer Meeting -,t Fes. 6 p.m.




f Cornerstone Bible s n
Fellowship Church
2390 NWV 87 Street
30--694-2.332
Order of Services:












Early .\lornin. Services
( t .ho4 N uheoal I hSin()ay 0 pam




\3Ea ?m 4m mmnila' m7:45 am
Peaceful Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.7 68 Street. Miami, FL 33nu 147
C30)5-573-149 4
Order of Ser-ices:
.arly Morning Setvices
,Jj, S da, e Sc hool .......... 9:45am

orni L ,SetIice . 1 1:00 a n

(T ednesday)7:30 pm



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church


Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 30S-29.-8544
Order of Services:
Stulday -chool 9:4 i in
4"NrlD hun :30-2301pi n
u'ed day .. Hileo Study
IVc Pn,,,gM ncl, I


A itioch Missionar3 Baptist postolic Ret i, al Center
Church of Brownsville 1-12. \ \\ 1 51h A n I
2799 N.W. 46th Street 305-836-1224
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order services New liae for F.V. ProArain
cliurch.Sunday School..... s:.sl a.m. FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
-" Mil Vt S 'ice Wnt'csda's l .'~a,-9 a.,m.-3 p.. SUl)ay 5 p.am.
Hour of Power-Nboon Day prayer l InltcrcoFrayer a.m 12p.m.
S I n mi i c .. ......... a I i
S ycr Mccin ... 7:30i pin
Ev 'ening Woship . p m. m ableS ti.. ....-... 3 im.
\ a ....g...r.... I... \ .........7:0


First Baptist Missionary'N
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Aveniue
305-635-8053 Fax: 3,5-635-i:J26
Order of Services:
:;,,Sunday. ..... . 7:0 & 11 am.
.unday school .. ....10 iam,
S Thursday ... p m. Mble Stundy.
Prlyder Meetiing, 1
baptism Thu, before
Si Comm Sill o n 'i ..




t. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300


Order of Services


, M
e .r


Sunday
('6hlilc Sch il.. .9..I I llt
S mliO Se i ...... .....11 a m,
Wednesday
Oibir 51udyPlayer Nigt. l: p-11I
Thui'sday
MPrayer Maring '7 p
"herI' is a l !a e lor vol ""


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church

Miami. HF,
305-759-8875


M wmiing .'.Ip ... 11 a m.
lloui Ml .Piayi Slu....,6a.....a7pam.







/ New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500


K-
-I1...


Order of Services:
*s>' Momifiig Wofst l &., Is rd I...,
!ol)ili Woihilip....... 10.30 a.l.,
i ic l. st-gll Millisclrv . cp Ir
f'1 r s er v Sc c ... ...... 0
i le Stuty.... ..p ... ....- p m
l r h S l.............. 9 a, m


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services jM.
Sunday '.'
Bible Stdy ............ 9 a.m. Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. (:p.m.
ednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TIV Program lued.i 8:30 a.m.- 9am,
Comeast Channels: 8, 19, 21, 22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
WXvi> p;li wwwprVtlprl k:l:kflclur[,hr'vrist'. l e Fm n.,i plnli's.-erkcoi ns l nlll.el


Faith Evangelistic Praise &\
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
stma. hl l 'tli ch''io l ................. 9. ii .ll.
Suil Monii W.. shi .. ... 11 a.m.
I ITes, Praiyer. 1(p .i
I Silxs l oW im;kLprl .I6 30 p i I


( New Day "N" Christ \
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815


n=s
[ TI


Order of Services:
Ii(Idai -ChlnIurc School .l ...l0I,, m

Tl: f'hi u l .d.y .cn .i.g W si. .... 1 i .


/ Word of Faith '
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 871" Street
305-836-9081
0 Order of Services:
S.y Morning Services
', I School .... 10 a.m
,-p Service ...... -..I a~m.
..y Bible Stdy .. 8 p m
i"h. Prayer Service ......8 p.




Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 NW. 1211 Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of 'Services:
Fau-1. Wnrihip m



1 I I 1 1 .r I




New Shiloh M.B. Church"
1350 N.W.95" Street
3-83 -21Ni, Fax# 3115-696-622o
Church Schedule:
S ,h i.. I i. ip7:30a.m.
-ih.. School 9:30 a.m.
. ],,ill'i r'ship .....11 a.m .
i .Li; L.ble Class 7 p.m .
SI.. I. I, 1 Stln.... 7pan.
-, .,li ek Worship

N 1 .--..--- /


/St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 31 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:

r" -School .......... 9:30 a.m .
',KH o n., pl.aig Worship ...II a.m.
S- er and Bible Sitnd
e (Tues.) 7 p.m.




Zion Hope l \l
Missionary Baptist
5129 NAV.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Slnldy School ....... ...9-30 a m.
TMomingPraise Vcwrship.. I I anm
fir t and'lird Sunday
cveninlj vthip ai t 6 p ni.
P1... rayer Mctiung & Bible Study
WS~~~~~h~ *i4 .>oi.(l 46.,('lli-ai~l ,


Brownsville >
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
.. ..9:45cm
... " ". y. 5pm
I .. . . .. pm

I lI.n.. ... .. .. ...ob n: I
35.634.-486* 05-6391-0958



Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.WX 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
MSos l n'i rnig ..6.am.
'i' I. School.............10 0a.m.
SLundl 1.vening .............6 p.m.
NIi t 'iellence........7:30 p.m.
I Ut ie h aC .I.....7:30 p.m
'f latr' I lC owship ......10 a.1 .


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
wn.rimthermnnnworshiipcelnter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
j Sunday Worship Services:
7aan. & 10 am.
Church School: 8 30 a.m.
Nastii's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30p.m.,
Mid-week Worship '7:30 p.m.



Logos Baptist Chureh
16305 NW 48th -Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
0 jlf^Sunday
Sg!g" N ornoig Worship at 8 & 11 a.m.
S Sunday School at 9:.5 a.m.
Thursday
| Bible Siudy 7 p.m.
L'. fSaturday
NO Service


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 1 1
a.m., 7 pm.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
TucSday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
WNVedncisdy Bible Stiudy
10:15 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W 55th Street
305-696-7322


iEady Monting \oii) p.7:30a.mi.
Simday School..........9:30a.m.
0 Monmi gW oilhip ...I1 a.m.
SPrayr Meetfing ............7:30 p.m.
15ible Suidy ................8pnm.



Hosanna Community "
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 561h Sireet
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
4SlunLyv Schoo( l .. 4 9 45;.i.
klarsip. 11, l an
Se io r istl rly i upni


I (800) 254-NBIC
305.685-3700
Fax: 305.685-0705
www.new birthbaptistUniami.org


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
[ ., Order of Services:
Sunday 730and 11 a.m.
Wowlshp service
'cesday..... 7 p.M Bible Study
8 p.m ....Prayer Meetig
lMonday. WdMndiay. Fiiday




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
arly Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m
SudayVSchol...............9.30alm.
Stdy, Exyeing Servce ..,6 p-m.
Tudlyay "ver w tinlg 7.730 pXm.


I


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


In a violent and abusive world,


do churches offer real safety


DALLAS, Christian News-
wire/ While stories of sex-
ual abuse by priests or others
in authority make headlines,
many instances of abusive be-
havior in the church occur un-
noticed, and the abused rarely
feel free to speak out about
their suffering. In their new
book, Church as a Safe Place
(Authentic), authors Peter R.
Holmes and Susan B. Williams
expose the truth about abuse
in the church, challenging
churches to be the safe places
God has created them to be.
People come to church looking
for a haven from this abuse.
Unfortunately, they often dis-
cover that the church isn't so
different from the rest of the
world, after all.
"Most abuse is not as brazen
as sexual assault. It is much
more subtle, hidden, and sub-
versive. Often it cloaks itself in
the ordinary," Holmes states.
"Unless we proactively choose
to find ways of making churchurch-
es safer places, they will natu-
rally take on the character of
the surrounding environment,
in which abuse is just a part of
life," adds Williams.
What does abuse in the
church look like? Holmes and
Williams contend that "abuse"
includes the many different
ways people mistreat each oth-
er and create an environment
that makes people feel unsafe
and uncomfortable. The au-
thors identify harm and abuse
in the church in five major ar-
eas: verbal, emotional, physi-
cal, sexual, and spiritual. It can


"Most abuse is not as brazen as sexual assault. It is much
more subtle, hidden, and subversive.


happen when church leaders
become "Messiah figures" and
misuse their power or when a
church member lashes out at
someone else in anger even
when portions of Scripture or
the use of the phrase "It's God's
will" are used to inflict addi-
tional pain on someone who is
already suffering.
Church as a Safe Place takes
a comprehensive approach to
confronting, resolving, and min-
imizing abuse in the church.
Drawing from both Scripture
and their many years in thera-
peutic church ministry, the au-


In California,


superior to everyone

Schwarzenegger signs Democrats'

I homosexual-bisexual-transsexual bills


SACRAMENTO, California,
Christian Newswire/ Gov-
ernor Arnold Schwarzenegger
has signed three bills squash-
ing moral values and religious
freedom. By elevating the ho-
mosexual-bisexual-transsexual
agenda above the rights of ev-
eryone else, Schwarzenegger
has confirmed his legacy is
being the most anti-family Re-
publican governor in California
history.
"There is no gay gene, but
religious freedom is a God-giv-
en right enshrined in the U.S.
Constitution. So it's wrong and
unfair to create new laws which
make homosexual-bisexual-
transsexual 'rights' superior
to everyone else's rights," said
Randy Thomasson, president
of Campaign for Children and
Families, a leading West Coast
family issues organization.
"The words 'discrimination,'
'harassment,' and 'tolerance'


thors have set up a framework
for dealing with complaints of
abuse in the church and tak-
ing steps to prevent abuse from
occurring in the first place. The
handbook includes many spe-
cific suggestions for handling
difficult situations and covers
topics ranging from the proper
protocol for individual counsel-
ing sessions to the correct use
of confidentiality. The authors
also devote a chapter to resist-
ing the blame culture, a natu-
ral response many feel when
they begin to recognize that
they have been mistreated.


'gay rights' now


else's rights
ents to train foster children to
support homosexuality, bisex-
uality and transsexuality. The
2000 law upon which AB 3015
is based resulted in homosexu-
al, bisexual and transsexual ac-
tivism on school campuses from
"LGBT" students and teachers.
AB 3015 will do the same for
foster children, many of whom
have already been emotionally
damaged by sexual abuse and
neglect.
Under the new law, morally-
minded foster parents will be
trained to teach children in
their homes what they them-
selves believe is a lie. In addi-
tion, the bill author says AB
3015 will "ensure that foster
youth and their caregivers are
knowledgeable about how to re-
port" foster parents and public
school teachers who cannot and
will not support homosexuality,
bisexuality or transsexuality.
In other words, under AB 3015,
positive and healthy pro-family
values on sexual behavior and
believing in natural gender can
be reported as "harassment."


have been redefined and are
actually resulting in reverse
discrimination and intolerance
against people with moral val-
ues," said Thomasson. "Under
these new laws, foster parents,
nurses, doctors, health insur-
ance plans, city and county
commissions, and court-ap-
pointed children's advocates
must abandon their moral, so-
cial or financial values at the al-
ter of the homosexual-bisexual-
transsexual agenda. This crate
load of homosexual-bisexual-
transsexual laws embodies the
same intolerant spirit of the re-
cent California Supreme Court
ruling that trampled the reli-
gious freedom of doctors at the
behest of homosexual 'rights.'"
Among the "LGBT" bills
-signed by Arnold Schwarzeneg-
ger, after being approved by the
Democrat-controlled Legisla-
ture, are:
AB 3015 forces foster par-


On the sixth day God created your brain: Use it


MEDIA ADVISORY, Christian
Newswire/ -- The next session
of the Athanatos Online Apolo-
getics Academy is coming up.
Courses tackle the threat of the
'new atheists' and give Chris-
tians new insights into the
foundation of their faith.
The website of the academy
is www.academyofapologetics.
com. Courses begin on October
27th, 2008.
In some areas of the church
'faith' is actually warmed over
anti-intellectualism. Historical-
ly, though, Christians have been
on the front lines of learning.
Today, many people are falling
away from Christianity because
they think that to remain Chris-
tian means you have to commit


intellectual suicide. They think
that is 'faith.' Sometimes it is
forgotten that God created us
with our brains... the reason-
able assumption would be that
he intended us to use them.
Executive Director Anthony
Horvath insists that the num-
ber one way to counter the
threat of unbelief, atheism, and
secular humanism is to equip
Christians themselves with the
facts of their faith. He explains,
"The scenario is tried and true:
kid goes to Sunday school, kid
goes to youth group, kid goes to
college, kid gets hammered by
professors, kid falls away from
the faith. The kid might come
back, but often doesn't. Apolo-
getics isn't just about outreach


anymore. Today, it is needed
to keep Christians themselves
from falling away."
The online academy aims to
change that cycle by introduc-
ing Christians to the astounding
width and breadth of Christian
scholarship. Horvath says, "We
try to tie our courses to books
written by top names like Wil-
liam Lane Craig, Gary Haber-
mas, and FF Bruce. We want our
students to see that there are a
lot of smart people with a lot of
smart reasons for being Chris-
tians. We want our students to
become just like them."
The courses are only two to
three weeks long, perfect for the
person who doesn't want to over
commit.


Money problems surface in the family


FAMILY
continued from 10B

Think like an entrepreneur.
Jobs may be hard to find, but
the slow economy can open
up new opportunities. The
couple you babysit for might
cut back on evenings out,
but they could be interested


in hiring you for after-school
care. Perhaps it's.time to hold
a yard sale to get rid of the
old toys and baby gear in the
basement or help your par-
ents sell these items online. If
you're good at navigating on-
line auction sites, you could
charge people a fee to sell
their old stuff.


Prioritize and plan for what
you want. When you want
something, write it down.
Next to it, write how much
you want it on a scale of 1-10.
Keep this list going (items
may move up or down the
scale as you add new ones).
Then figure out a plan to earn
any must-have rewards.


.








When children start school in the fall, is a very stressful time for students.


Are teens getting enough rest?


SLEEP
continued from 13B

same age category with epi-
sodic headache headache
that occurs with less frequency
than chronic daily headache.
In addition to sleep onset de-
lay, sleep problems found
in children studied included
awakening during the night or
too early in the morning, or not
feeling refreshed after sleep.
The investigators do not yet
know which problem comes first
-- sleep problems or headache.
In some children sleep prob-
lems come first, and in others,
headache is first. "They feed
on each other: sleep problems
make the headaches worse,
and the headaches make the
sleep problems worse," says
Dr. Mack. "Also, the worse
the headaches, the more like-
ly children are to have sleep
problems, and vice versa. They
could have a common cause, or
one problem could be an early
sign of the other."
Treatment must be simulta-
neous for both conditions, us-
ing medicine and non-medicine
approaches, says Dr. Mack. "It's
going to be hard to control the
headaches till you get the sleep
problems under control either
with medication or non-medi-


cation treatment," he says.
Key non-medication treat-
ments include attention to
maintaining routine in the
child's schedule and developing
good sleep hygiene, according
to Lenora Lehwald, M.D., Mayo
Clinic neurology resident and
study investigator. "Educating
the patient and family on things
like good sleep habits may in and
of itself help to improve the sleep
quality and thus the headaches
in the long run," she says.
Dr. Lehwald explains that good
sleep hygiene for children in-
volves what seem to be very basic
and simple practices in the eve-
ning routine. "A child should use
his bedroom for just the types of
activities that would be sedating
and relaxing," she says. "TVs,
video games -- things that are
exciting and get the child inter-
ested, motivated and activated
-- should not be in the bedroom.
Also, it's important for children
to have a routine for calming
down and preparing for sleep the
last hour they plan to be awake.
They should choose activities
that make them drowsy, like
readingg"
If a child with both headache
and sleep problems requires
medicine, Dr. Mack prefers mi-
graine medication that also helps
with sleep issues.


Addressing sleep problems
in children who have episodic
headache may also avert the
child's transition to chronic
daily headache, according to Dr.
Lehwald. Children who develop
chronic daily headache typically
have had episodic headache.
Age is one factor that puts
children at risk for headache.
Teenagers have the highest level
of risk, according to Dr. Mack,
which may be partly due to a
higher stress level for teens than
for younger children. He also
notes that a typical teen needs
about 9.5 hours of sleep per
night, more than most teens get.
Family history of headache, time
of year and stress level also ap-
pear to impact headache risk,
say the researchers.
"Fall, when children start
school, is a stressful time for
children, and it's very much a
time when they will experience
more headache," says Dr. Leh-
wald. "As school lets up in the
summer, they seem to have more
headache-free time. So, that's a
good indicator that stress has an
impact on the frequency and se-
verity of children's headaches."
From 10 to 20 percent of chil-
dren have episodic headache.
Chronic daily headache oc-
curs in up to 4 percent of girls
and up to 2 percent of boys.


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The Miami Times






Hea h


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Can reading help kids lose weight?


Doctors say kids should pick up


more activities such as reading


By Alice Park

When doctors urge overweight
kids to pick up more activities,
reading probably isn't what
they have in mind. Yet a new
study by obesity researchers at
Duke University finds that the
simple act of reading depend-
ing on the choice of material -
can spur weight loss in tween-
age girls.
The study's experimental
group included 31 obese girls
aged 9 to 13, who were enrolled
in the Healthy Lifestyles Pro-
gram at Duke Children's Hos-
pital, a comprehensive family-
centered weight loss plan that
addresses patients' medical, di-
etary and behavioral needs. The
girls read a novel called Lake
Rescue, whose protagonist is
an overweight preteen who
struggles with low self-esteem,
feelings of isolation and teasing
because of her size. A group of
33 girls read a different book
called Charlotte in Paris, which
did not have an overweight her-
oine, and another group of 17
girls read neither book.
At the end of the six-month
intervention, all the girls who
read books had lost weight, but
the girls who read Lake Rescue


lost more. They lowered their
body mass index (BMI), a ratio
of weight and height used to
measure obesity, by .71, com-
pared with .33 in the Charlotte
group an average .05 increase
among the nonreaders.
The idea behind the study,
says Dr. Sarah Armstrong, a
pediatrician and director of
Healthy Lifestyles, was to find a
way to motivate the girls with-
out adopting the restrictive and
often authoritative voice of so
many other nutrition and diet
programs. Lake Rescue was
the perfect instrument, says
Armstrong; it presents a likable
character to whom the girls
could relate and whom they
could emulate. As the book pro-
gresses, its heroine learns to
make healthier lifestyle choic-
es and finds a mentor to help
keep her on track, Amstrong
says: "She learns that she can
become healthier, and the self-
efficacy part, the 'I can do it'
feeling resonates with the pre-
teen girls."
"There was some effect of the
book in augmenting what we
were doing in the clinic," she
says. "And not only did it have
a small but significant effect on
BMI, but it also had a positive


effect on the girls' self-esteem."
Although the amount of
weight lost was small, research-
ers say its effect is important
and cumulative. Healthy nine-
to-13-year-old girls typically
have a BMI between 16 and 19;
the BMI of the girls in the study
group was on average between
27 and 28. "If you start with a
preteen with a BMI of 27, and
if she continues to increase her
BMI at her current-rate, in six
months she would probably be
at 28," says Armstrong. "But
instead of going from 27 to 28,
she now goes from 27 to 26.3,
which would put her in the nor-
mal BMI range by time she is
13. [Otherwise], she would have
a BMI of over 30 by the time
she is 13, which would be obese
even by adult standards."
The weight-loss options for
obese pre-adolescents are slim.
The two most effective obesity
medications on the market,
(Orlistat and Meridia) are not
approved for children under
age 15, and surgical treatments
such as gastric bypass are often
too risky for kids. That leaves
lifestyle- and behavior-modi-
fication programs, combined
with counseling, which can be
effective but unpredictable. But


Armstrong's study suggests that
there may be unconventional
and useful ways, like reading,
to teach weight-loss techniques
that researchers may not have
considered.
And that may be the study's
most significant finding, says
Dr. Sandra Hassink, director of
the Weight Management Clinic


. at A.I. Dupont Hospital for Chil-
dren in Wilmington, Del., and
leader of the Obesity Leadership
Group at the American Acad-
emy of Pediatrics. What's more,
instituting a technique such as
reading to promote weight loss
would be fairly easy. Already,
the Reach Out and Read Pro-
gram, a nationwide non-profit


literacy effort begun by pedia-
tricians at the Boston Medical
Center in 1989, encourages
reading by providing books to
preschool children each time
they visit the doctor's office.
Why not piggyback messages
about healthy lifestyle habits
on this existing reading
Please turn to WEIGHT 14B


Are our teens today getting enough rest?


Mayo Clinic researchers have
found that frequent headaches
in children appear to be associ-
ated with sleep problems. More
than two-thirds of children
studied who suffer from chronic
daily headache also experience
sleep disturbance, especially
delay in sleep onset. For chil-
dren with episodic headaches,
one-fifth had sleep problems.
The findings will be presented
this week at the 24th Annual
Conference on Sleep Disorders
in Infancy and Childhood in
Rancho Mirage, Calif.


age of patients with headache
have sleep disturbance," says
Kenneth Mack, M.D., Ph.D.,
pediatric neurologist specializ-
ing in headache and the senior
study investigator. "The number
of patients who have headaches
and also sleep disturbance sur-
prised us. They also have the
same sleep disturbance: a delay
in sleep onset."
The researchers undertook
this study to scientifically study
their observation in the clinic
that many children suffer from
both headaches and sleep prob-


children with headaches are
poor sleepers and that they're
fatigued because they have poor
sleep," says Dr. Mack. "We've
known that when people don't
get enough sleep they get more
headaches, but we'd not appre-
ciated the frequency of sleep
disturbance with chronic daily
headache."
The study involved a retro-
spective chart review of 100
children ages 6 to 17 with
chronic daily headache -- head-
ache present 15 or more days a
month for three months or more


-o htd Matira








Syf.. Coate n .t,


"What's novel in our study is, lems. -- and 100 children in the I ....." I
the finding that a high percent- "We've continually seen that Please turn to SLEEP 12B 1



Microwaved chicken isn't necessarily cooked chicken ..A b .from C0Im. %N r6dm
cooke choice .. *1.


As if there weren't enough rea-
sons to pass on frozen chicken.
This week, the federal govern-
ment announced that 32 people
in 12 states were sickened with
salmonella poisoning after eat-
ing precooked, frozen chicken
dinners. The problem? Many
of the people who got sick ap-
parently did not follow the in-
structions for preparing the
meal, which -called for heating it
in an oven. Those who got sick
popped their meals in micro-
waves instead.
According to the Department
of Agriculture, the dishes in-
cluded breaded or pre-browned


chicken breasts, some of them
stuffed with vegetables or sold
as "chicken Kiev" and "chicken
cordon bleu." The appearance
of the food led people to assume
that the chicken breasts were
thoroughly cooked, even though
they were still raw or under-
cooked inside. The agency said
that some of the sicknesses oc-
curred in Minnesota, but would
not identify the 11 other states
involved in the outbreak.
Minnesota has an unfortunate
track record when it comes to
frozen chicken. Just last year,
Minnesota was one of 31
Please turn COOKED 14B


WAR M-


Taco Bell, KFC, Pizza Hut add new menu item: Calories


In a move certain to rock
the restaurant industry, Yum
Brands (YUM), parent compa-
ny to Taco Bell, KFC and Pizza
Hut, on Wednesday will an-
nounce plans to begin posting
product calorie information on
the indoor menu boards na-
tionwide at company-owned
restaurants.
Calorie information will ap-
pear next to a product's name
and price.
The action comes at a time
when more states and munici-
palities are putting in place -
or are considering require-
ments for restaurant chains
to post consumer nutritional
information.
On Tuesday, Gov. Arnold
Schwarzenegger signed into


law a bill that requires chains
in California with 20 or more
locations to post calorie infor-
mation on menu items by Jan.
1, 2011. A stricter form of nu-
trition labeling went into effect
in New York City last July.
"We're a leader," says Jona-
than Blum, Yum senior vice
president, who spoke with USA
TODAY ahead of Wednesday's
announcement. "We hope all
restaurants, supermarkets
and convenience stores follow
our lead."
About 4,000 of Yum's compa-
ny-owned stores will begin to
post calories on menu boards
now. All 20,000 of the compa-
ny's stores will do so by Jan.
1, 2011, if not before, says
Blum, who coordinates nutri-


7 ri
*"WI~yt-.-

,,~~ a.


LA


"t I


tion policy for all Yum's U.S.
restaurants. Yum also owns
the Long John Silver's and
A&W All American Foods.
Yum also will stop ads on
TV shows aimed at children
younger than 12, Blum says.
The menu board move is
applauded by Jo Ann Hatt-
ner, nutrition instructor at
Stanford University, who
says it will spark the indus-
try to follow. "It's a transpar-
ency that consumers clearly
want to know what's in
their food."
Fast-food critic Michael
Jacobson, executive director
of the Center for Science in
the Public Interest, calls it a
"groundbreaking announce-
ment" and "fabulous news


for health-conscious con-
sumers."
Blum declined to give a
date when every store would
post calorie information. He
said franchisees would be
"encouraged" also to provide
the information on indoor
menu boards.
Drive-through menu
boards will not have calories
due to space, constraints,
Blum says, but will say that
nutritional information is
available on request.
McDonald's (MCD) has
no plans to expand nutri-
tion data on menu boards,
spokeswoman Danya Proud
says. Nor does Wendy's,
(WEN) spokesman Denny
Lynch says.


Young kids in the supermarket reading the ingredients on food lables.


~""~'i~X r


~~"*~'








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


. T, ,',


Give me my heart's desire


I attended a conference
a couple of weeks ago that
featured a speaker who in-
structed us on the impor-
tance of keeping our hearts
strong and healthy. She told
us how in the past, she had
not been wise about eating
and exercising and suffered
problems with her heart be-
cause of this. Obviously,
if our heart is not in good
shape, neither is the rest of
us. An unhealthy heart not
only affects us physically,
but emotionally as well. An


unhealthy heart may mean
that you are not able to work
or participate in other activi-
ties that you might have en-
joyed previously. This may
also mean that you are sad-
dened or depressed about the
limitations imposed on you
because of a weak heart.
Later, I thought of how it
is the same in the spiritual.
Our spiritual hearts affect
us also both physically as
well as emotionally. I be-
gan looking up scriptures
that referred to the heart.


0 QU ~


Miami City Ballet's program
featuring Swan Lake Act II will
display at the Adrienne Arsht
Center on Friday, October 17
at 8 p.m. and Saturday, Octo-
ber 18 at 8 p.m., and Sunday
October 19 at 2 p.m.

The Campaign for Healthy
Weight will be here on Satur-
day; October 11 as part of the
American Heart Association
Start! Heart Walk to help lo-
cal residents change their diet
mindset and elect a new at-
titude toward healthy weight
practices. They will be hosting
a free, interactive event at the
American Heart Association
Start! Heart Walk at Tropical
Park from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Second Saturdays at the Mi-
ami Art Museum' are free for
families between 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. For more information,


Mt. Vernon Missionary
Baptist Church cordially
invites you to join them for
their Minister of Music 17th
anniversary service on Friday,
October 10 at 7:30 p.m. and
ending on Sunday, October


please call 305-375-4073.

Liberty Square will be hav-
ing a community outreach
meeting on Wednesday, Octo-
ber 8 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The
meeting will be focused on the
coordination of the Neighbors
for Safety Peace Rally sched-
uled for October 22. For more
information, please call Bran-
dyss Howard at 305-635-2301
or Eric Thompson at 305-694-
2757.

Miami-Dade State Attor-
ney's office will be having a
Sealing and Expungement
Program on Tuesday, October
28 from 4 p.m. 8 p.m. at the
Lighthouse Church. For more
information, please call the
State Attorney's Community
Outreach Division at 305-547-
0724.


12 at 3:30 p.m. For more
information, please contact
305-754-5300.

Titus Chapel will be
having their annual revival
beginning October 20-24 at


I say, began, because there
were literally hundreds of
scripture that warns us of
the consequences of a cold,
uncaring heart; and the re-
wards of a loving, obedient
heart. When we are hurt in
our spirits, or our emotions
are on edge, we can become
disheartened and in pain as
David proclaimed in Psalm
38. The speaker from the
conference told us how our
hearts become damaged and
weakened when arteries are
clogged or blocked. Our
spiritual hearts will also suf-
fer when we do not allow the
love of God to 'unclog' our
hard hearts.
The Bible tells us quite
frankly that what is in our
hearts will determine our
thoughts and our actions.


The Pleasant City Fam-
ily Reunion committee invites
you and your family to spend
Black Saturday: A Day of Af-
rican Culture, at the Heritage
Gallery on Saturday, November
8 at 10 a.m. For more informa-
tion, please call the Heritage
Gallery at 561-832-9799 or
561-396-5855.

Belafonte Tacolcy Center is
hosting its second annual Save
the Babies Gala & Awards to
pay tribute to those who have
helped the Liberty City Com-
munity on November 8. There
will be a silent auction at 6:30
p.m. and the event will be-
gin at 8 p.m. If you have any
questions regarding this event,
please contact us at 305-751-
1295 or email: rsvp@tacolcy.
org

The Haitian Organization of
Women are sponsoring Lights
On After-School rally on Thurs-
day, Oct. 16 beginning at 5:30
p.m. at 1005 N. Krome Ave. in
i-omestead. Come and show
your support for after-school


7:30 p.m. nightly. For more
information, please contact
sister Houston at 786-295-
5870.

God's WayAssembly Health
Care Ministry will be having
their health fair for National
Breast Cancer Awareness
Month on Saturday, October
25 at 10 a.m. For more
information, please call 305-
685-6855 or 305-332-8311.


Praying for the sick


PRAY
continued from 10B

break-out sessions of the four-
day Association for Baha'i Stud-
ies conference, which wound up
on 1 September in San Diego.
(See article.)
Dr. Quddusi, in his third year
as a resident surgeon in oto-
laryngology at the University of
Manitoba in Canada, says his
review of the literature showed
that studies of the efficacy
of prayer have come up with
mixed results.
But "meta-analysis" where


results are aggregated -
shows no measurable effect, he
states.
Does this mean prayer
doesn't work?
No, he says, because, in ad-
dition to the problem of deter-
mining what to measure, there
are many factors that confuse
the issue factors that don't
necessarily lend themselves to
scientific analysis. For exam-
ple:
Does the fervency of the
prayer matter? If so, how do
you measure it?
Does the number of people


praying for a sick person make
a difference?
What about the worthiness of
the "recipient" of the prayers?
And what role does divine for-
giveness play?
Should you take into account
the seriousness of the illness?
Does the professed religion of
the people involved, or absence
of religion, influence the out-
come?
Is it possible to have a true
control group, given that peo-
ple are always praying for other
people, and the grace of God is
constant and limitless?


1. ,,u,, tkCopyrighted Material




Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers



Reading is good for your health


WEIGHT
continued from 13B

framework? "This study makes
me wonder if we could do


that with older kids as well,"
says Hassink. "We are al-
ready thinking at our hospital
about mixing in positive life-
style books with what the kids


read." It's a win-win situation,
note Armstrong and Hassink.
After all, there are few nega-
tive side effects to encouraging
kids to read.


Asaph cried out in Psalm
73 that those who had cal-
lous hearts were workers of
iniquity and evil. I know
that you have heard people
declare that they are mis-
understood when someone
makes a comment about
their character because 'we
do not know what is in their
heart', so we cannot make an
assessment of who they truly
are. However, Jesus disputes
that thinking in Matthew 15
by declaring that what is in
our heart will manifest itself
in our actions. He said that
our hearts will bring forth
murder, evil thoughts, adul-
tery and other illegal and
ungodly behavior.
In Psalm 37:4, David tells
us to delight in the Lord, and
He will in turn give us our


programs. For information, call
305-245-8158 or email cucki-
ta_how@bellsouth.net.

The first New West Elec-
tronic Arts and Music Orga-
nization (NWEAMO) concert
will take place at Florida Inter-
national University, Wertheim
Performing Arts Center on Oc-
tober 17 at 8:30 p.m. For more
information, please contact
305-348-0496.

Coconut Grove Chamber
of Commerce will be having
a TGIF Networking Lunch Se-
ries on Friday, October 10th at
12 p.m. at the Sammy C'S Res-
taurant/Lounge. For more in-
formation, please call 305 444-
7270 or info@cocon-utgrove.
com.

The popular tale, Sleep-
ing Beauty, will be performed
on Monday, October 27 at 11
a.m. and 1 p.m. at the Parker
Playhouse as part of the Smart
Stage matinee series. The
musical, The Ant and the El-
ephant, will be performed on


heart's desires. Now, I know
that this is exciting news be-
cause we would all love to
receive our hearts desires.
But what is in your heart for
God to give you? Are you
disrespectful and rude? Do
you harbor jealous and petty
feelings against someone?
Is this what you want God to
give you people who treat
you this way?
What your spiritual heart
contains is of great conse-
quence to your eternal life.
Jesus said that we sin just
by what we believe in our
hearts. He said in Matthew
5:28 that we can be guilty of
adultery just by looking lust-
fully at a person to whom we
are not married. Yes, for
those of you who fool your-
selves into thinking that it is


Friday, November 7 at 10 a.m.
and 11:30 a.m. For more infor-
mation, please call 954-462-
0222.

The City of North Miami
Beach will observe the Colum-
bus Day holiday on Monday,
October 13 and the city admin-
istrative offices will be closed.
All normal schedules will re-
sume on Tuesday, October 14.
For more information, please
contact 305-948-2918.

Join neighbors and invited
state legislators to discuss how
you think healthcare should be
improved on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30
p.m. at the Allapattah Neigh-
borhood Center. For more in-
formation, please contact Rox-
anne Paisible at 305-576-5001
ext. 12 or email: roxannep@
hscdade.org

You are invited to participate
in Children's Resource Net-
work's First Walk-A-Thon on
Saturday, Nov. 8. For more in-,
formation, please contact Rob-


okay to look, as long as you
do not touch Jesus said
that it is NOT okay. You
are still guilty of adultery.
Can you ask God as David
did in Psalm 26 to examine
your heart and test it? Even
though we oftentimes forget
this God does know what
is truly in your heart.
I am like Paul when I know
that I have a purpose here
on earth, and I am honored
to have many loving friends,
but I also count it as gain
when I go home to be with
the Lord. But Matthew 5:8
tells me clearly that this will
not happen if my heart is not
pure. Do you live now for
the day that you will one day
look into your Savior's beau-
tiful face? Then make sure
your heart is right now!


in Davis at 786-712-0498 or
email: rdavis@southdadecrn.
org.

Surdna Arts Teachers Fel-
lowship Program supports
art teachers from public arts
high schools, as well as arts-
focused, magnet, and charter
high schools. Through this pro-
gram, grants up to $5,500 are
available for selected teachers
to make art with professionals
in their disciplines. In addition,
a $1,500 grant is awarded to
each teacher's school. Deadline
to apply is Friday, Nov. 14. For
more information, visit www.
surdna.org

The Beautiful Gate, Cancer
Support and Resource Cen-
ter invites the community to
its third annual Breast Cancer
Awareness seminar on Sat-
urday, October 11 at 10:30
a.m. 1:30 p.m. at the Silver
Blue Lakes Missionary Baptist
Church. For more information,
please contact Pamela Burnett
or Martha Curtis at 305-835-
7020.


Frozen chicken dinners can be bad for your health; ,


COOKED
continued from 13B

to states affected by an outbreak
of salmonella caused by Ban-
quet pot pies that sickened
165 people. And since 1998, the
state has been struck by at least
four other outbreaks linked to
pre-browned chicken,. resulting
in part from problems with mi-
crowave instructions.
"The issue is that people think
it's cooked and it just needs to be


heated up," Carlota Medus, an
epidemiologist with the Minneso-
ta Department of Health, told the
New York Times last year. "Micro-
wave cooking for something that
has to be cooked isn't always a
good idea."
Many of those who became ill
in this year's outbreak apparent-
ly did not get that message.
"Although many of these stuffed
chicken entrees were labeled
with instructions identifying the
product was uncooked and did
not include microwave instruc-


tion for preparation," the agency
said in a statement, "individuals
who became ill did not follow the
cooking instructions and report-
edly used a microwave to prepare
the product."
For starters, it's best to stick to
ovens when heating frozen chick-
en. Also be sure that the meat
has reached a minimum inter-
nal temperature of 165 degrees
Fahrenheit the temperature
at which any foodborne bacte-
ria will be killed off- and use a
food thermometer to be certain.


rJ NV 1 A I LIX4

you shouldn't refuse!








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ANT COFFRD


"If the lions do not write their own history,


then the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


I


~


.A









15B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


RT *MEMRANCS ,"E
S *U _ _-- -


Royal _
RODNEY EALY, 50, died Oc-
tober 3. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m.
Friday. Service
10 a.m. Satur-
day, First Bap-
tist Church of
Bunche Park.


CLARENCE HENRY, 20, died
September 29.
Visitation Friday
4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat-
urday, Greater
Holy Cross Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

RUTHIE COACHMAN, 81, died
October 1. Final rites and burial in
Bainbridge, Georgia. Service en-
trusted to Moore Funeral Home.

ROSE GAY, 76, died September
2. Visitation Friday 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice Saturday.

ELIZA HENRY, 83, died sep-
tember 25. Service in St. Ann, Ja-
maica.

CATHERINE NOEL, 84, died
September 30. Final rites and buri-
al in St. George's, Grenada.

ROBERT HESLOP, 43, died
October 2. Arrangements are in-
complete.

GLADSTONE ROBERTS, 62,
died October 3. Service 1 p.m.
Wednesday, Jesus People Minis-
tries Church International.

St. Fort A
THOMAS HAYES, 70, died
September 27 in Hampton Court.
Memorial service Saturday.

KEIHLY TURIN, 31, died Sep-
tember 23 in Delray Medical Cen-
ter. Service in Haiti.

EMILE SULFIN, 52, died Oc-
tober 5 in Jackson North Medica
SC>enler .Arrangements are incom-
plete.
Hadley
DONNIE LEE DAVIS, 91, home-
maker, died Oc-
tober 1 at home.
Survivors in-
clude: son, Jim-
mie;; daughters,
MandyJohnson,
Ruby Nell Ray;
granddaugh-
ter, Josephine
Burssett. Service 10 a.m. Satur-
day, New Hope Missionary Baptis
Church.

RONALD EMMANUEL SMITH
22, died Octo-
ber 1. Survivors
include: father,
Ronald; sisters,
Aries Anderson
and Whitney;
godmother, 6
Sandra Ford. r
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Bunche Park Missionary
Baptist Church.

WILLIE BURNES, 78, mainte-
nance worker, died September 25
in Miami Gardens Care Center
Service was held.

ISAIAH EADY, 60, handyman
died October 5 in Jackson North
Service noon Saturday in the cha-
pel.

Gregg L. Mason
ALLEN EDWARD 'CADILLAC
HARDNETT, 48, chauffeur, Bra-
man Cadillac, died October 3 a
home. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

LOUISAJULIEN, 84, housewife
died September 29, Northshore
Hospital and Medical Center. Visi-
tation Friday, 2 to 9 p.m. Service
noon Saturday, Holy Family Cath-
olic Church. Interment Southerr
Memorial Park.
Davis & BriceL
JOHN CUNNINGHAM, 57, Da


nia Beach, died October 3. Ser
vice 11 a.m. Saturday.

JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our

CALL 305-694-6210


Jay
MARILYN STINSON, 54, died
October 5 in
Jackson South
Co immunity
Hospital. Ser-
vice 5 p.m. Sun-
day, Bethel Full
Gospel.


ROSA LEE REED, 87, Perrine,
died October 4.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Na-
tional Church of
God.




BERTHA COLLIER, 89, Coco-
nut Grove, died
September 30,
Ocean Side
Nursing Center.
Service was
held.



FLOYD CONEY, 72, Miami, died
October 2, Jackson South Com-
munity Hospital. Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at Grace of God.

ROBERTO WALTER, 56, died
October 2, Jackson South Com-
munity Hospital. Final rites in Hon-
duras.

MAE SLAPPEY, 83, Perrine,
died September 9, Jackson South
Community Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DARREN AKINS, 48, Miami,
died October 3. Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Mt. Pleasant Missionary
Baptist Church.

MICHELLE AARON, 42, Home-
stead, died October 5, Homestead
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Wright & Youngi
I RAYMOND NEWTON, 62, re-
tired educator
for MDCPS,
died October
1, Memorial
Regional Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: wife.
Ernestine; sons
Raymond, De-
mertius Ivery; daughter, Angela;
brother, Edward; sister, Joann
Francis. Service 10 a.m. Satur-
day, Peaceful Zion MB Church.

LOUISE JACKSON, 62, clerk for
t All Americans
Semiconduc-
tor, died Octo-
ber 3, Palmetto
General Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: son,
Willie Leanard .

grandchildren, Shirley, Bambataa,
Jeremiah; sisters, Georgia Byrd,
Emily Sanez, Shirley Webb, Gene-
va White; brother, Joseph White.
SViewing Friday, October 10 from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the chapel;
Memorial Temple from 6 p.m. to 8
Sp.m. Service 1 p.m. Saturday, An-
tioch Baptist Church of Carol City.

JOANN SMITH, 45, died Sep-
tember 26,
, Ocala, Florida.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Shermon; sons,
Daris Windon
and Charles
, Woods; daugh-
- ter, Shuntevia
t Windon; sisters, Barbara Fulton,
- Geraldine Howard, Sharon Phil-
pot, Carolyn and Grace Owens;
brothers, Willie Steven, Antonio,
Ray, and Pastor Timothy Owens.
Service 11a.m. Saturday, Church
- of God In Christ A.M. Cohen Tem-


PAMELA BELL, 35, data en-
try clerk, died
September 30,


Mercy Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Marilyn; hus-
band, Billy Wil-
liams Sr; sons,
Billy Jr and Bry-
on Williams; sisters, Ebony and
Lakeitha; cousin Debbie Rolle.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday, St. Mat-
thews MB Church.


I


CLEMON FERGUSON
construction
laborer, died
September 30
, Jackson Me-
morial Hospital
Service was
held.


JR,
KN


BETTY BERRY, 56, died Oc-
tober 4, North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
10 a.m. Satur-
day, Antioch of
Carol City Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

JOAN SWEEPING, Bell South
director assis-
tant, died Oc-
tober 3, Baptist
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Na-
thaniel Sr;
daughter, Con-
tessa S Bryant
(Andrew); sons, Nathaniel Jr and
Jason R; parents, Charlie and
Martha Hicks of White Springs,
FI; grandchildren, N'Maya Bryant,
Najsha, Naelle, Jada, Donovan
Bryant, Nathaniel Ill and Natalie;
in-laws, Jacqueline Saunders,
Bobbie J. Meeks, Gail Meeks,
Kenneth Shuman, Andre Sr and
Lillie, and a host of other relatives
and friends. Viewing Friday from
12 to 3 p.m. in the chapel and 6 to
9 p.m, Bethel Baptist Full Gospel
Church, 14440 Lincoln Boulevard.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday at Bethel
Baptist.

ROYAL MCKINLEY, 86, man-
ager, glass cutter, died October 5,
Aventura Hospital. Service 2 p.m.
Saturday in the chapel.

DAN HARVERY, Jr, 72, welder,
died September 28, Memorial
Hospital Pembroke. Service 1 p.m.
Friday in the chapel.
E.A. Stevens& 2
ANNIE GADSON, 76, Holly-
wood, died October 3 at home.
Service 2 p.m. Saturday, The
Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hallan-
dale.

ADELMIS ROJAS PROZZIE,
32, Hallandale, died October 3,
Memorial Regional Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Saturday, Sure Foun-
dation Church of God of Prophecy
Hollywood.

CATHERINE M. MOSLEY, 66,
Hollywood died October 5, Planta-
tion General Hospital. Service 11
a.m. Saturday.

Pax-Villa
MIREILLE FLEURIMA, 64, died
September 22. Service 11 a.m.
Saturday in the chapel.

MARIE HELENE REMY, 77, died
October 2. Service 11 a.m. Satur-
day, St. Joseph Catholic Church,
Pompano Beach, Florida.

FRITZ JACOB, 41, died Sep-
tember 16. Service noon Satur-
day, Notre Dame D'Haiti Catholic
Church.

ERNST ALTIDOR, 55, died
September 26. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Rock of Agesg
WILLIE FRED MCGRIFF, 61,
longshoreman, .
died Septem-
ber 25, Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m. Saturday. '


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
JUDYETH KALINDA GOLD-
SMITH, 52,
skilled clerical
worker, died on
September 27
at Mercy Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Charles;
mother-in-law,
Jacquelyn Fils (Wally); sister-in-
law, Brenda Sanders-Lewis (Ed-
die); brother-in-law, J. C. Cobbett
Jr. (Vicki); two nieces, Precious
Cobbett and Lauren Sanders;
nephew, Jermal Renny Sanders;
eleven aunts and six uncles. Ser-
vice was held.


a native of Ti-
tusville, Florida
and a resident
of Opa Locka,
died October 4.
Service 11:30
a.m. Saturday,
St. Paul A.M.E..
Church.


Poitier
KWANZA JAMEL RICHARD-
SON JR, 12,
student, died
September
29, St. Mary's
Medical Center
in West Palm
Beach, Florida.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Logos
Baptist Church.

NORIS MORGAN, 84, truck driv-
er, died October
4. Service 11
a.m. Saturday
in the chapel.





CARMAN M. MURRAY, 30,
housewife, died
October 6. Ser-
vice 2 p.m. Sat-
urday, St. Mat-
thew Missionary
Baptist Church.



VINCENT BERNARD SMITH,
58, died Octo-
ber 5. Service
11 a.m. Sat-
urday, Mount
Herman A.M.E.
Church.



GENEVA AVERY, 52, house-
wife, died October 6, Jackson
North Hospital. Arrangements are
incomplete.

RICARDO SUAREZ, 71, laborer,
died October 2, Jackson Memorial
Hospital. Service was held.

MICHAEL .EDWARD JAMES,
53, security captain, died October
1, North Miami Beach. Service 2
p.m. Thursday in the chapel.


Carey Royal Ram'n
JASON TALLY, 92, Miami
Beach, died October 2 at home.
Service was held.

FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, 67.,
New York, died October 4, Cleve-
land Clinic Hospital. Service
Thursday, Unity Funeral Home,
Brooklyn, New York.

VINCENT CARR, 79, Miami,
died October 5, Broward General
Hospital. Service 10 a.m. Friday in
the chapel.

PETER JOSEPH, 40, Miami,
died October 5 at home. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Richardson
WILLIAM R. SMITH, 70, died
September 30.
Service 10:30
a.m. Wednes-
day in the cha-
pql.





DEMETRIUS SHERMAN, 29,
died Sept 26.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist




MAURICE BRYANT JR, 50,
died October 2.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, New "
Birth Baptist
Church. U






Litgow Bennett Philbrick
JOHNNIE MAE WATSON, 87,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Range -
EDMOND PATTERSON, 70,
Retired UPS
driver died Sep-
tember 23. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Gloria;
daughter, Caro-
lyn; sons Glen
(Naia) and Ty-
rone; and a
host of relatives and friends. Ser-
vice was held.

HAROLD SAMPSON, 54, liquid
petroleum driv-
er, died October
1. Survivors
include: wife,
Roseshell Ava;
sons, Omar,
and Maxwell;
mother, Tiny;
sisters, Joyce
Brooks, Edith S. Delancey, Karen,
S. Smith, and Janice; brothers,
James, Michael, Kenneth and
Gregory; a host of nieces, neph-
ews other relatives and friends.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday, Myrtle
Grove Presbyterian Church.

MARTHA L. HAMILTON-
CLARK, 69, re-
tired bank teller,
Peoples Bank,
died October
2. Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Marilyn; son,
Arnold Jr; sis-
ters, Willie Bell
Walden, and Mary Snead; brother
William; grandchildren a host of
nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends. Service 2:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, The Historic Mt. Zion Bap-
tist Church.

WILLIE JERRY FOWLER, 76,
retired me-
chanic diesel
for Metro Dade
Transit System
died October
3. Survivors in-
clude: wife, Dor-
othy J.; sons,
Gerald and Pat-
rick; daughter, Michelle D.; broth-
ers, Robert, Walter (Claudia), and
Eugene; sisters, Minnie Thomas,
Lucille Roberts (Ellis), Mary and
Betty; grandchildren and a host of
other relatives and friends. Service
1 p.m. Saturday, Mt. Calvary M.B.
Church.

RAY AGATHA BAUGH-PER-
RIER, 54, real estate property
manager, died October 3. Final
rites and burial in St. Catherine,
Jamaica.


REGINA BEAUFORD "Fat"
11/22/54- 10/08/07

Regina, it's been a year now
and we are still trying to ease
our pain; but God knows best.
We all have to travel that road
one day!
Love you, sis., Sandra, Han-
nibal, Mom and the rest of the
family and friends.

Van Orsdel &
REBECCA GENEVE AVIN,
79, Miramar,
died October 2.
Service 9 a.m.
Sunday, North
Miami Seventh
Day Adventist
Church.



Eric S. GeorgmY
SHERYL PERRY WOMACK,
46, Hollywood, died September
29. Service was held.


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HERBERT JOSEPH, JR.
October 26, 1926

Happy Birthday from wife and
kids.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


BLACKS MUST (CONTROL IllilIR OW\N I)EVTINY








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 61 THE MIAMI TIMES OCT 2008


The Historic


Saint Agnes' Episcopal Church


Featuring Dr

1750 Norths


The concert features Carl W. Ha\-wood,
a native of Portsmouth, \'irginria is a cum
laude graduate of Norfolk State Universi-
ty and a recipient of the Master of Sacred
Music (organ) and Master of Music (chorale
conducting) degrees from Southeastern
Methodist University. Dr. Haywood was
awarded the Doctor of Musical Arts degree
from the University of Southern Califor-
nia.
He is recognized as a superb choral con-
ductor/organist. Dr. Haywood served as
the Service Music Editor for Lift Every'
Voice and Sing II: An African American
Hymnal published by Church Publishing
Company of the Episcopal Church.
He is also the leading contributor to Won-
der, Love and Praise (supplement to the


Episcopal Hvrmnal I His latest congrega-
tional compositions appear in the followed
hymnals. This Far B\ Faith ILutheran);
"The Faith We Sinrl IMethodistj: African
American Heritage H-\mnal ICatholicl.
"Worsh:p In Song IFriendsl: Sin'g The
Faith" (Presbh terian I Dr. Ha\-vood is one of
the leading church musicians in the field
Dr. Hawood is a member of the Aineric-an
Chorus Directors Association
The American Guild of Organists, The
Association of Anglican Musicians, The
National Association of Negro Musicians,
Kappa Kappa Psi Band Fraternity, P1 Kap-
pa Lambda and the Omega Psi Phi Frater-
nity, Inc. A devoted teacher and friend of
students and young musicians, Dr. Hav-
wood is Director of Choral Activities at NSU


CARL W. HAYWOOD
Conductor, Organist,
Composer, Clinician, Educator


and conducts the NSU
Tickets are $15 for
call 305-573-5330.


Concert Choir.
ticket information


( isil rig(hlt la w rr J.I ( hotlnul Jr. d'










Copyrighted Material





Syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers


Social Security: America's

Life insurance program


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


In Memoriam


By Daniel Bowline


You might worry about
how to protect your family
if something suddenly hap-
pens to you. But you prob-
ably have life insurance
you haven't even thought
about.
If you are working and
paying into Social Securi-
ty, your family may qualify
for Social Security benefits
if you die. You see, some of
the Social Security taxes
you pay go toward survi-
vors insurance. In fact, its
value may be more than
the value of any other life
insurance you may have.
If you die, your fam-
ily could be eligible for
monthly benefits based on
your earnings. Your fam-
ily members who might
qualify include your minor
children and your spouse.
Similarly, if your spouse
is working and dies, you
and your children may
qualify for benefits on your
spouse's record. More than
six million people current-
ly receive Social Security
survivor benefits.
How it works: You can
earn up to four Social Se-
curity credits each year.
In 2008, for example, you
earn one credit for each
$1,050 of wages or self-
employment income. When
you have earned $4,200,
you have earned your four
credits for the year.
The number of credits
you need for your survi-
vors to receive benefits


000..00.0000


hnjon aPublic ifi


Information about your
Social Security

depends on how recently
you worked at the time of
death. For example, if you
have worked for only one
and a half years in the
three years prior to death,
benefits can be paid to
your minor children and
your spouse who is car-
ing for them. No one needs
more than 40 credits (10
years of work) to be eligi-
ble for any Social Security
benefit.
The benefit may be more
than you think. In 2008,
the average survivors ben-
efit for a widowed parent
and two children is $2,243
per month.
The best way to put a
dollar figure on what the
estimated benefit amount
would be for your family
is to go online. At www.
socialsecurity.gov/survi-
vorplan you will find three
different calculators that
will help you estimate how
much your family might be
eligible to receive. You also
will find a detailed expla-
nation of survivor benefits.
To learn more, visit www.
socialsecurity.gov.


BETTY JEAN MCKINZY


wishes to express our
appreciation and gratitude to
the many relatives, church
family, neighbors and friends,
for all the expressions of love
extended to us during our time
of bereavement.
Special thanks to Second
Chance Missionary Baptist
Church, Rev. Ben Wilson,
pastor; St. Paul Primitive
Baptist Church of Miccosukee,
FL, Rev. Kenton Floyd, pastor;
Rev. Carl Jackson pastor of
93rd St. Community Baptist
Church, Rev. Fernie Johnson
of 93rd St. Community Baptist
Church and Manker Funeral
Home staff for their outstanding
service rendered.
Also to those who sent a card,
a dish of food, made a phone
call, said a prayer or even came
by the house, whatever your
part, we thank you very much.
We pray that Betty's memory
will always be a part of us and
all those who loved her.
May God bless each of and for
ever keep you in His care.
The Wilson and McKinzy
Family


EFFIE M. FIELDS
'Peaches'

08/12/39 10/10/06


You were loving and kind
in all your ways, jovial and
friendly to the end of your
days. You were sincere and
true in heart and mind. We
cherish the memories you
have left behind.
Sadly missed, The family


Death Notice


GREGORY LANIER HALL
55, died October 6. Ar-
rangements entrusted to
Richardson Mortuary.


Death Notice In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ETHEL MAE WILLIAMS 91,
homemaker died October 6.
She is survived by her four
daughters, Glenda, Sharron,
Rev. Ethel Anderson, and
Ella; two sons, Frederick and
Richard (Lula-Pearl); eight
grandchildren, fifteen great-
grandchildren; a host of other
relatives and f friends.
Service Saturday 10 a.m. at
St. James AME Church. Ar-
rangements entrusted Range
Funeral Home.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


HAZEL B. MOULTRIE
05/30/51 10/03/07

Mom, you always said what
a difference a day make; 24
little hours.
Well, the days are just
not the same without you
around.
We miss you so much.
Love, LaShawn, Eric and
family.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ROBERT M. WILCOX
"Coach"
05/24/29 10/07/03


ASHAM 'Ace' McKINNEY
JR
05/14/60- 10/08/06

You are not forgotten love one,
nor will you ever be. As long as
life and memory last; we will
remember thee. We miss you
now, our hearts are sore; and
as time goes by, we'll miss you
more. Your loving smile, your
gentle face. No one can ever
fill your special place here in
our hearts.
Love always, Samantha,
Rashard, family and friends



Honor



Your Loved



One



With an In



Memoriam



In The



Miami Times


It has been five years since
you left to go home and not
a day has passed that your
smile, laughter, or words of
wisdom were not remembered
or spoken. .-
We miss you, love you and
will carry you in our thoughts
and hearts forever.
Lovingly you wife, Mary;
children: Sandy, Karen, Bob-
by, grandchildren and great
grandchildren.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


STEVEN RAY
02/09/61 10/09/06


It has been two years since
God called you home. I think
of you always but especially
today. You will never be for-
gotten although you are gone
away. God has you in His
keeping and I have you in my
heart. I cherish the memories
you have left behind. I will
continue to carry you in my
heart.
Your loving wife, Lucy


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth.net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"









Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL. I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


TONY E. FERGUSON
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FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008 THE MIAMI TIMES


-HUTSN


Availablefrom CommerciallNewsRroviders


: s i {{llmlIB ~ ",.
Janet Jackson's performs recently at her 'Rock Witchu' Concert in Vancouver,
British Columbia, Canada.

Jackson released from hospital


NEW YORK Janet Jackson was
released from a Montreal hospital just
two hours after she arrived, a spokes-
woman for the facility said Tuesday,
but it was still not clear why she was
admitted.
The 42-year-old singer became
"suddenly ill" and was taken to Royal
Victoria Hospital on Monday night
shortly before her scheduled concert


in Montreal, which was canceled, ac-
cording to a statement released by
W&W Public Relations.
Jackson was at Royal Victoria but
was released two hours later, said Re-
becca Burns, representative for McGill
University Health Centre, which runs
the hospital. Representatives for Jack-
son would not elaborate on her
Please turn to JACKSON 3C


Beenie Man cleared


of tax evasion
KINGSTON, Jamaica A Jamaican judge has
cleared Grammy-winning musician Beenie Man of
tax-evasion charges, saying the government never
informed him of his .
legal rights.
Jamaican
authorities have said
the singer and rapper
owed nearly US$1
million in overdue
taxes.
But Judge Owen
Parkin threw out the
case Tuesday, ruling
evidence showed the
entertainer was not
informed of his rights it
when auditors issued
their assessment last
year.
The singer's real name is Anthony Moses Davis.
The Kingston native has been one of the biggest
names in dancehall music for a decade. In 2001, he
won a Grammy for his album "Art and Life.

James Earl Jones to get SAG
life achievement award
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) James Earl Jones,
whose booming voice gave the world the villainous
Darth Vader in "Star Wars", will receive the 2008 life
achievement award from the Screen Actors Guild.
The award, given annually to the actor who fosters
the finest ideals of the acting profession, will be
presented to Jones in January when the guild honors
the year's top acting achievements on television and
film, SAG said on Thursday.
Jones' voice is known around the world in roles
such as Mufasa, the king in Disney's "The Lion King",
and in numerous commercials. He also has a long
and distinguished career on Broadway in roles such
as boxer Jack Johnson in "The Great White Hope",
on screen in "Patriot Games" and "Cry the Beloved
Country", and on television, where he played Alex
Hayley in "Roots:The Next Generation."
Ironically, Jones, 77, spent his childhood as
a virtual mute because of a severe stutter that he
overcame only in high school.
SAG president Alan Rosenberg said Jones was
an extraordinary actor whose long and quiet work
off camera as an advocate for literacy and the arts
"deserves our appreciation."
"Growing up, I was mute to the outside world, but
there were hundreds of conversations in my head...
Through a love of reading, I was able to overcome
my muteness and pursue a career in which my voice
would be my most prominent asset," Jones said in a
statement.


gn











2C TE MAMITIMS, CTOER 814,200 BlCKSMu~r CO ~R L HEI OW DLf!N


3 Ia t .I


After days, weeks, and
months of planning Thelma
Valles, executive director,
Keith Valles, president, China
Valles, president emeritus, and
other board members, of the
Sunshine Jazz Organization
celebrated its 20th Anniversary
Dinner and Gala, last Saturday,
at the Colonnade Hotel, Coral
Gables, featuring Jesse Jones,
Brenda Alford and the Israeli
Trio.
. It was also a special evening
set aside to salute some very
important people' and bring
out celebrities, Charlie Austin,
John McMinn, Dr. Preston
Marshall, Col. Al. Ferguson,
Bobbie Scott, Joseph Nichols,
mortgage broker, Ted Davis,
Onoiti Rao, Kenya, Clinton
Brown, Joseph Alford, and The
Honorable Carrie P. Meek.
Len Pace, radio personality,
WLRN, FM radio, had the honor
of being the congenial host after
being introduced by Johnny
Sanders, recording artist. Both
of them brought Sandrell Rivers
to the mic and Keith Valles
for welcome and grettings,
while Rivers presented special
awards to: Honorable Meek,
Ralph Clark, Ginny Crawford,
Commissioner Barbara J.
Jordan, and the Honorable
Harvey Ruvin. All of whom
are considered jazz lovers and
supporters of the organization.
After grace by Bernadette
Bush, all of the guests joined
the buffet line for a delectable
meal consisting of tossed salad,
iris potatoes, green beans,
carrots, fish, turkey, roast beef,
and desserts. Then the jazz


music was on, as
Pace introduced V .-A
the entertainers
for the evening. .....
Kicking it off was
Jesse Jones, Jr, on alto, tenor,
and' English horn with Desi
Misery, organ, Oozie, drums,
and Astif, guitar. The room
became very quiet as everyone
became absorbed in the sounds
coming from Jesse, as well as
his lipping overtone on
certain measures and .
humor to break the
monotony.
Alford then brought .-
a new dimension in A
jazz style when she
opened with At Last '
and ended with Dina I
Washington's On a REE
New Day to a standing
ovation from other board
members, Keith Clarke, J. D.
Mack, Jeannette Tullis, Alhaji
Aye Salvador, Arthur 'Jake'
Simms, Sandra J. Nichols,
and R. Clark.
For the closing, all the
musicians that were present
jammed until the wee, wee,
hours with Rivers as the
leading soloist accompanied by
Mel Dancy, Ben Collier, Ray
Burke, N'Kiana Benjamin,
Austin, McMinn, and Dick.
Strachan.


Congratulations to Dr. Larry
and Cynthia Handfield and
Audley Coakley for inviting Dr.
Trudie Kibbie Reed, president,
Bethune-Cookman College, to
his palatial home for a special
fundraising event, last Friday.


'"


68 year old Tina Turner goes on tour


TURNER
continued from 1C

Location: The Sprint Center
in Kansas City, Mo.
First in line: Connie Steagall
and her friend Marcia Stinnett,
who drove three hours up
from Branson, Mo. Wearing
a Turner jersey purchased
during the singer's last tour,
Stinnett, 56, is incredulous
when asked why she'd come.
"Because Tina's great! At her'
age, still performing ... it's
amazing."
The opening number: Red
velvet curtains part to reveal
Tina in black sequins and
4-inch-high heels, perched
atop a 20-foot steel rod; she
belts out Steamy Windows
as four women in fleshtone
tap pants dance wildly at
her sides. A moment later, to
deafening applause, she tells
the crowd, "I'm glad to be
here, too!"
Explodes on contact: With
the energy of a woman half
her age, Turner tears through
a guitar-heavy version of
Better Be Good to Me before
disappearing backstage amid
pyrotechnics. Then, members
of her dance troupe play-act
a stage crasher's altercation
with "security," allowing the
star a breather and a costume
change.
Standout number: Tina
demands to know What's.
Love Got to Do With It, each
ravaged rasp making plain
that it's got everything to do




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with it, all while moving about
the stage in a red minidress.
Halftime entertainment:
Here and there around the
arena during intermission,
fiftysomething women vogue
and dirty-dance to Aretha
Franklin's Respect blaring
overhead.
The second act: Seated
and backed by piano and
acoustic guitars, Tina brings
it all back home, singing her
blues (Undercover Agent for
the Blues), baring her soul
(Let's Stay Together, I Can't
Stand the Rain), and, plugged
back in, rocking and rolling (a
fierce medley of Rolling Stones


classics). The MTV hits and
big production numbers made
her a superstar, but it's R&B
that still inspires her most
committed vocals.
Closing salvo: .Proud Mary
had Tina spinning and
stepping with more vigor
than she had all evening.
And, astoundingly, she didn't
slow down for the encore:
a 10-minute Nutbush City
Limits, during which she rode
a crane arm a third of the way
out over the floor, and a closing
power ballad, Be Tender With
Me Baby, that found most of
the arena providing her with
backing vocals.


T.,


According to Coakley, South
Florida Booster Chairperson,
pledges that were made last
year toward the field house
had not been redeemed and
this event was a follow-up from
those alumni, as well as new
contributors.
After an evening of soft jazz,
Bahamian live music, buffet
meal and introduction of the
entourage from the college,
Handfield gave Dr. Reed a
check in the amount of$ 175,000
coming from Larry and Cynthia
Handfield, Coakley, John and
Annette Williams, Dr. Nelson
Adams, Tony Lucas, Daytona
Beach, Wayne Davis, Intact
Trucking Co. Dwight
Stevenson, former
I'^ Dolphin and CEO of
Turner Construction Co.
It is people like the above
S that keep B-CC afloat
r and we(alumni) love all of
you. See you in Orlando
S for the Classic, Sat.,
Nov. 18.


The name of Coach Irvin
Baulkman is a household name
in and around Miami Norland,
Miami Central and especially,
Tuskegee University, because
of his athletic prowess since he
graduated from TU.
Baulkman's coaching started
back in '77 and he coached for
27 years at Central and Norland.
During his years, he was "Coach
of the Year" in '77, '78,'80, '82,
'84, '90, Florida "Coach of the
Year" in '78 and '80.
But his greatest thrill was
being inducted to Tuskegee U.
Hall of Fame, recently, along
with Lulu Smith and Pernell
Miller, Miami Northwestern
and Jake Caldwell, Miami
Jackson.
Caldwell was 'Coach of the
Year' four times and won over


Ge ,r w'.ell u dishes t alil off .you'
Mildred McKinney, Olivia
James and Mildred James.
The 109 St[;.,t Snior Citizens
of New York City, headed by
Marva Bouie-Phillips, enjoyed
Magic City and Key West where
they had fun frolicking in the
sand and beaches of these two
great vacation spots. Making
the trip were Evelyn Cofield,
Dottie Burton, Marian Harris,
Gloria Daniels and Mr. and
Mrs. George Smith.
Harold and Maliney Clarke,
along with their daughter
Kendra, son Elton, and his
wife Alesa Clarke; grandfather
Thomas Marshall, his wife


400 games and produced
players like Arthur Collins,
Boston Celtic and Atlanta
Hawks; Michael Thompson,
Portland, Osborn Lockhart,
76's, Charles Tompson, San
Antonia, and Lyden Rose, LA
Lakers.
All of the 'Hall of Famers'
were also recognized by Senator
Frederica S. Wilson,
Commissioner Barbara
Carey-Shuler, Louis
Allen, former principal
of Jackson, while
Baulkman speaks also
of his son, William,
who is a flyer for Delta
Air Lines.
HANI

After years of gang-banging,
robberies, drugs, jail, ect, Lamar
Payne turned his life over to
God. And, of course, with help
from Bernard Poitier, Lamar
joined his church and worked
himself up from member to
Deacon and Sunday School
teacher.
According to Lamar, he
enjoyed his bible training in
the church, as well as his
job with the funeral home.
Unfortunately, after several
years at both positions, he said


Alice traveled .'
to Dans buri,r "
C n n n e c t i t- I- [
t,:- attend the -
wedding of
Harold Christopher and
Andrea Rachael Anderson on
September 19.
Happy wedding anniversary to
one of my former students: Gail
Strachan and Darryl T. Moses,
16 anniversary, October 3.
Stephen C. Newbold, Jr. is
relocating to Washington D.C. to
work at a pubic charter school.
Fredricka Dean-Wanza was
pleasantly surprised by her
two children, Reverend Theta
Wanza-Shipp and James W.


God called him to use his talent
on saving other people caught
up in the drama in the inner
city.
So, he changed his attire from
suits to a marine helmet, t-shirt,
camouflage trousers, and knee-
high boots. He proceeded to go
into the 'inner city' and organized
boys and girls to change their
lives around a discipline
and with the assistance
of his 'drill sergeant
technique.'
As a result, Major
Payne has made an
impactonthe community
training young people.
It was evident when
FIELD CNN, Barbara Walters,
and The Miami Herald
exposed him to the world and
his many positive deeds. Next in
line will be the Oprah Winfrey
Show, where he will take his
program/model for the viewers
to see his successful program.
There are many people Major
Payne feels indebted too, Bubba
Supermarket, Edwin Bentic,
Kayle Amanda, Sgt. Gonzalez,
Snapper Restaurant, True
Worship and Praise Center, and
his wife, Veronica and daughter,
Jade. Now, he's waiting on the
call from the Oprah Winfrey


Wanza II, at the Saint Agnes
Parish Hall after the morning
worship service with family and
friends in attendance. Nancy
Dawkins, a dear friend and
former co-worker, served as
mistress of ceremony. Judge
Karen Francis was also in
attendance.
Congratulations to Benjamin
J.S. McNamee who continues to
be a "knight in shining armor."
McNamee was voted "Mr.
Senior" at Booker T. Washington
Senior High School for the 2008-
2009 school year. McNamee is
the son of Dr. Sharrie Dean
McNamee and grandson of
Cupidine Davis Dean.
We still have some nice young
men who love their parents and
their families. Last week, Javon
Johnson donated one of his
kidneys, which was a perfect
match, to his father Theodore
"Brother" Johnson.


.R ,!jE RITE


i .FO HL
THEATI..OTEN,.. .LECE.ND.ANGAG


S STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 1O 10 I S: -or anowtl es Tex -A.lrn wim your Cr TuuO to 43KERX (4 5m9
CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES I OPWS FVl O T ER 10
SORRY. NO PASSES ACCEPTED FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT | |_ _M_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


DI


Show and developing the minds
of those that are going astray.


Jean Farrington Glover,
superintendent of the Sabbath
School, invited Jerelean T.
Evans, basileus/president,
Lorraine Martin, anti-basileus/
vice president, and other
members of Chi Eta Phi Nursing
Sorority, to celebrate Founder's
Day at Bethany SDA Church,
last Saturday, followed by a
forum at El Palacio Restaurant,
North Dade.
Others members included
Thelma Gibson, Karen Gibson,
Ophelia Washington, Paula
Farrington, Annie Gilbert,
Iva Hendry, Patricia G. Moss,
Emma Walker, Wrylene
Williams, and Jean F. Glover.
After leaving church, the
entourage motored to the
restaurant for a forum on "child
abuse" and an opportunity to
raise funds for their cause and
implement their mission on
education among the nurses
and improving healthcare for
everyone.
Kudos to this group for
keeping up Founder's Day since
its inception back in 1932 in
the month of October.










BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


Black progress concerns whites


As a people, we've had to over-
come slavery, Jim Crow and both
systemic and individual racism.
It has taken generations but
we've met the challenges put be-
fore us and made progress: We
are leaders in corporate Amer-
ica. More and more of us are
graduating from college. Some
of us own homes and business-


es. And a Black
man could very
well be the next
President of the ."""
United States, something many
of us never thought we'd see in
our lifetime. While there is still
much work to be done, we must
acknowledge that we have made
significant steps toward equal-


ity. Many whites have certainly
noticed it. And they don't like it.
So much so that they may let
their fears guide them on Elec-
tion Day.
In a poll conducted by the As-
sociated Press and Yahoo News,
white Americans revealed that,
not only do they still view race
and racism in a very different
way than Blacks, they also think
that Blacks are responsible for
the racial tension in this coun-
try. Nearly 12 percent of whites
polled believe that Blacks have
too much influence in the coun-
try's political process. More
than one-third of whites polled


said "most" or "all" of the racial
tension in the U.S. is created by
Black.
It is ironic that, it has taken
100 years of grassroots, com-
munity and political organizing
for African Americans to gather
the few crumbs we've assem-
bled to date. And, considering
the size and scope of the Ameri-
can pie, all we have are mere
crumbs. Perhaps there are
some whites who'd prefer we'd
take our crumbs and go away
quietly.
It is this belief, which many
whites publicly hide, that could
cause some whites to vote Re-


publican in this November's
election. Scared of what a
Black President could mean for
white privilege, they would vote
against their common sense.
This, despite the fact that Sena-
tor Obama has run his camr-
paign not as a Black man but
as an American committed to
change for all.
It wouldn't be the first time
white voters let fear-guide them:
In 1982, Tom Bradley, a Black
man, lost the California Gover-
nor's race despite a large lead in
the polls. Many whites lied and
tolled posters they'd vote for the
Black candidate but, on Elec-


tion Day, voted for his white op-
ponent.
Many whites believe that Afri-
can Americans use racism as an
excuse to get ahead. Perhaps it
is fairer to say the some whites
use fear as a reason to keep rac-
ism alive and well. Fear of what
will happen to white privilege
once full equality is a reality.
Too much of America's history
is rooted in fear and the country
is in the mess it is now because
we bought into fear. It's time we
rise above our individual and
collective fears, see beyond race
and class and decide what is
best for this country.


Percy Miller shares his vision for the better Black television network


By Dave Walker

New Orleans native Percy
Miller's mid-August announce-
ment that he was founding his
own cable television network in
2009 came as a bit of a bomb-
shell in the TV industry, but it
could have significant implica-
tions for his hometown.
Miller who's forsaken his
hip-hop identity Master P for
the more mogul-like P. Miller -
said in a recent interview that
at least two of the productions


with which he's intending to
populate the fledgling BBTV (or
Better Black Television) network
could be set and shot here.
One would be a sitcom, the
other "Hip-Hop Garage Show,"
described in advance publicity
material as a "Saturday show
that will play nothing but the
hottest new and upcoming art-
ists in their latest music videos
and interviews selected with
content appropriate to BBTV's
mission and standards." Even
the network's cooking show


could have a Crescent City fla-
vor.
"It's about our culture," Miller
said in a recent phone interview
from Los Angeles. "I really want
to be able to show people the
talent. There's so much talent in
New Orleans. I want to be able to
really explore that culture with
people who play instruments,
people who are blues singers,
people who are hip-hop artists.
I want to be able to mix that up
for our culture and show that
diverse culture of New Orleans


and say, 'This is what our city is
all about. This is what our cul-
ture's all about.'
"People around the world
never see (Mardi Gras) Indians,
never see Mardi Gras up close
and personal. Oh, man, even
the food. Our cooking shows
- when you think about New
Orleans, you've got some of the
best chefs in the world."
About those standards: Mill-
er's intention is to captain a
"family friendly" programming
service, one that mirrors his


personal journey away from
the corrosive hip-hop content
on which he made his original
fame and fortune toward a more
wholesome public persona.
No question, the legacy of No
Limits Records artists such as
Mystikal and Soulja Slim was
nowhere in evidence during
Miller's dance-floor turns on
the mainstream prime-time hit
"Dancing with the Stars."
Nor is any gangsta influence
evident in "Gee Gee the Giraffe,"
an educational cartoon charac-


ter for books and TV developed
with his child-star son, Romeo.
"There are so many hip-hop
viewers, but they want respon-
sible hip-hop," said Miller, who
grew up in the Calliope housing
development. "A lot of viewers
out there, they want to be able
to watch a show that's hip-hop
oriented, that's fresh, that has
swagger, that's also educational
enough they can watch it with
their kids and they won't have
to turn the channel when the
kids come in the room.


Jennifer Hudson' return% to her fir\t lI, e


m -


%IngIng


opyrighted Material




Syndicated Content


AvailablefromICommercial News Providers
Avail MEal %f--t_ _- .--r w


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Some Jackson concerts canceled because of illness


JACKSON
continued from 1C

condition Tuesday, simply say-
ing that she was ill and was
"recuperating."
Meanwhile, Jackson's shows
in Boston and Philadelphia on


Wednesday and Thursday were
postponed and she was due to
resume her tour in Greensboro,
N.C. on Saturday. There was
no information on when those
shows would be rescheduled.
Jackson, who is on her first
North American tour in sev-


YORS. FL
-ooco. e S S'fS

By Miev


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
This would be easier if you were in
charge. Having to bow to someone else's
stupidity won't get you anywhere. You
can make your influence felt if you keep
coming up with great innovations and
let them think it's all their idea. Lucky
numbers 5, 40, 2, 22, 43.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
Nothing will change until you stop
feeding into everyone else's issues.
Helping others beyond a certain point
only makes them weaker. If you start
taking care of your self your example will
inspire them to handle their own stuff.
Lucky numbers 5, 50, 43, 22, 4.

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
What you're afraid of is nothing
compared to what it will cost you not to
face it. Reclaiming your power may come
at a high price. Others are bound to freak
out about this. Don't let their hysteria
keep you from doing what's right. Lucky
numbers 7, 3, 23, 40, 55.

CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 20
You have no clue how to work this.
With no certainty all you can do is stay in
the moment and trust that if this is what
you want it's already yours. Keep your
thoughts clear and don't let anyone tell


you that this is impossible. Lucky numbers
1,10, 11, 21,3.
LEO:JULY 21-AUGUST 20
Needing to prove your self is an old
story. Removing your parental trips from
the equation will help you see this for
what it is. Getting love doesn't require
you to be anything but your self. Stop
trying to outdo what's perfect to begin
with. Lucky numbers 5, 4, 6, 17, 19.

VIRGO: AUGUST 21 SEPT. 20
People are manipulating you to the
point where you can't figure out what
you want here. Your needs are too
important to get lost in others' attempts
to micromanage your life. Shut off their
input and listen only to your inner voice.
Lucky numbers 2, 20, 39, 18, 37.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCT. 20
Your love life has taken an interesting
turn. What was a problem before is no
longer there. Now that things are clear
you are free to go deeper into your heart.
Learning more about the true nature of
love is your job right now. Lucky numbers
29, 9, 43, 23, 6.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
Your money concerns are major.
You're so tied up in the system you've
gotten trapped in it. This is all the result


en years, dropped out of her
scheduled "Saturday Night
Live" performance in March be-
cause she had the flu, and her
publicist said at the time that
she went to the hospital for
treatment but was not admit-
ted.

of thinking more is better. It's time to
simplify and go back to basics. Keep only
what you need and sell the rest. Lucky
numbers 7, 9, 10, 31, 4.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
There's so much going on outwardly
your personal issues can't even be
addressed. Maybe this is a blessing, but
sooner or later you'll have to deal with
the fact that you went too far too fast and
wound up forgetting your self.

CAPRICORN: DEC. 21 JAN. 20
A little strategy will save you from
having to hammer your point to death.
Step back and let others think that this
is their choice. Once they see that you
aren't here to force the issue, they will
willingly agree to go along with you.
Lucky numbers 3, 39, 45, 49, 22, 1.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21 FEB. 20
Others are confused by what appears
to be your need for change. What you
wanted a year ago has nothing to do
with what you want now. You might
want to clue people in. Sharing your
true feelings won't jeopardize your
relationship. Lucky numbers 4, 30, 2,
19, 5.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
What you're afraid of losing is causing
you to cling to this. The real question is,
what are you holding on to? There may
be nothing of value here. In settling for
this you could easily close your self off
to real fulfillment. Lucky numbers 9, 8,
7, 39, 20.


Ad,,,erm,r.4r.'rr C nt-' aorai5~.ph. :Fir,? pi .'reni li1,
a ~~~Kniru ni Fnrial,oi, ' nerl &ren"11.
FIREBIRD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Something Old, Something New
Music by Barber, Vivaldi, Telemann and Diamond
7 PM Peacock Foundation Studio $10


Aoir-i- l, ;- r. ill It r, ilC o r a.',r /C P i.. '-. ni
AN EVENING WITH DAVID SEDARIS
Regular conitr'utii to te fn/r-jt 'i,,rker and rMlPR'. "This American
Lie.' Da'i.d Sedans brnas his signature humor to the Center.
Sedaris will be available to sign books at trie event
8 Pi. Knight Conc.rt Hall $35 4S-5. $60

MIAMI CITY BALLET
Program I
Program include, Swan Lake Act I/. The Four Tempeamentrs
and In The Upper Room.
8 PM Ziff Ballel Opera House a $19, $9. *$59, $69., $75. $85

MIAMI CITY BALLET
Program I
8 PM Zif Ballet Opera House $19. $29. $59. $69. $85, $185

MIAMI SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Work- t:'. '?rhost..akov'ci. Brahm-. Rimsk-,-Kor-,akoo and Ravel
5 F'P Knight Concert Hall $20 $50. $65 $75. $150

MIAMI CITY BALLET
Program I
2 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $19, 529 $59. $69. $85 $185

Adriennr, Arr.hl Cenier and American E'pre:-- p'rese-,I
DAN ZANES AND FRIENDS
The ,lars of "Playhouse Disrney" celebrate with songs from the
new album, Nueva 'Iorkt a, well as all .our Dan Zanes favorites
2 PM Knight Concert Hall $20. $25

ino ,-in,': ;-rir h C nr, r .1'i Ic,' .rLr, le'. Ij n r e. 4., Presenr
CELEBRITY CHEF SERIES: GIADA DE LAURENTIIS
'It S not just about the food She has a knockout
personality. loo!' i eo,:...*
Food Nelwork fa'.orite discusses hier personal culnar',' ourne,
and shares rer recipes through, a ii-ely cooking denonsIration.
Want to meet Giada? VIP ticket holders have access to a
post-performance eat-and-greet with the chef as well as
delicious food samplings. Space is limited
SPMri Knight Conceri Hall $25 $45 $55 .85. $125 $150


Dan Zar,.s


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.


ORDER NOW I
305949672 ar 0*ero


MTVan w .. ,""w S .em so... sm ....


511


---


C'a. id SedJrl.-


M.irlm, 'il, E,3llet


99







4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

The M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.

5 '( Bacardi, U.S.A., Inc.
present

,--l e // / (a l

V. tAake /4a/?e Jt _W 1a//









Avai lable from Commercial News Providers







MIAMI MARRIOTT BiSCAYNE BAY HOTEL
1633 North Bayshore Drive, Miami, Florida

-- -- m Ticket Prices: $150, $200 and $300
SProceeds benefit the M. Athalie Range Cultural Arts Foundation, Inc.,
a 501(c)(3) not-heotrr-profit organization.
Cocktail Reception, Dinner, Open Bar, Show

For Information and Reservations: 305-893-5468
yn ica e on I "-".%


















BACARDI, U.S.A., INC. AMERICAN AIRLINES AT&T FPL THE MIAMI HERALD
EDEN Roc RENAISSANCE RESORT & SPA MIAMI MARRIOTT BISCAYNE BAY MACOTE'S
*:;*, THE MIAMI TIMES
This event is made possible by funding from the Miami-Dade County, Florida, Cultural Affairs
SProDepeartment and the Miami-Dade ounge Cultu Board f county Commissioners.
BACARDI, U.S.A., INC. -AMERICAN.AIRLINES-* AT&T, *FPL -"THE.MlAMI HERALD











W ..







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.? ',";"9 :":'"' 74A%


Television viewing habits vary from person to person. Household to household.
City to city. As the TV ratings company, we work hard to accurately measure j i s Ce l I
the differences in television viewership. That's why we recruit people like you
to make sure that every community is fairly represented.
EVERY VIEW COUNTS
To learn more, go to www.nielsencom


C) 2008 The Nielsen Company


All Rights Reserved.





The Miami Tinsil
---*----


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SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


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6D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Financial cri?6 mocl from Wall Stret to the mail








iCopyrihted Material rrbx
oeaMIAMI-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY


C1 0 0 S i REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
di II e o n nMDX PROCUREMENTICONTRACT NO.: RFQ-09-02
MDX PROJECTISERVICE TITLE: PROJECT FINANCE INITIATIVE
ADVISORY (PFIA) SERVICES

A available fro m C o m m ercial The Miami-Dade ExpresswayAuthority is seeking qualified firms to submit Pro-
A valuable from C om m ercia tential Public-Private Partnerships (P3) projects that MDX may consider. MDX
4 ~ 0 0a s a notifies all Proposers and individuals that it requires and encourages small,
d* U f t* minority and women-owned businesses to have full opportunity to submit a
response to any Solicitation Document issued by MDX. For copies of the RFQ
S"with complete information on pre-qualification requirements, the scope of ser-
vices as well as submittal requirements, please log onto our web site 'at www.
mdx-way.com or call MDX Procurement Office at 305-637-3277. Please note:
In order to download any MDX solicitations, you must register as a Vendor.
The Vendor Registration can only be done through MDX's website. The dead-
line for submitting a Proposal is October 28, 2008 by 2:00 P.M., Eastern Time.
A Pre-Proposal Conference is scheduled for October 8, 2008 at 10:00 A.M. ait
the MDX Headquarters Building. Attendance to the Pre-Proposal Confer-
ence is NOT mandatory however, everyone is encouraged to attend.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY SEAPORT DEPARTMENT
PORT OF MIAMI 2035 MASTER PLAN
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-SEA-03

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the County Code and Administrative Order
3-39, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A/E) services will be required for the development of the Port of Miami 2035 Master Plan.
The scope of services consists of the Development of the Port of Miami 2035 Master Plan: The Master Plan is envisioned to update the Port's cargo, cruise
.and ferry capital development plans to create a sustainable and viable business model for the Port of Miami. The Master'Plan must be based on sound market
research, the Port's Economic Impact Study, and the Port's partnering agreements to assist in providing a 5, 15, and 25 year forecast of cruise and cargo traffic
for the Port. It also includes a strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat (SWOT) analysis with other global, regional, and local ports, a business model to
provide the framework to implement the Master Plan, and any supportive task ancillary to the primary scope of services.
The Master Plan must address current and future market demands; security concerns; land-use studies; planning and zoning analyses; berthing analyses and
studies for both cruise and cargo areas; mooring improvements analyses for both cruise and cargo areas; traffic circulations and parking analyses; incorporate
environmental analyses; storm water and climactic change programming analysis; infrastructure improvement analysis; urban sustainability; information
technology analysis; concession/retail analysis; update and incorporate the latest Port of Miami way-finding and landscaping master plan; incorporate input from
stakeholders, customers, and various County and State agencies; as well as any supportive ancillary tasks pertinent to the primary scope of services, including
order of magnitude estimates and preliminary implementation schedules.
This project is for one non-exclusive Professional Services Agreement. The term of the contract is for two (2) years plus two one-year options for a total of four
years. The two one-year options to extend are based solely on the approval of the County Mayor or County Mayor's designee. Maximum compensation is for
one million, one hundred and forty five thousand, four hundred and fifty five dollars, ($1,145,455.00), plus contingency in accordance with Ordinance 00-65. No
minimum amount of work or compensation will be assured to the retained consultant. The County reserves the right to re-use the work products of the retained
*consultant and to retain other consultants to provide the same or similar services at its sole discretion.

0 9 09 EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:
h A The prime and/or sub-consultant(s) must demonstrate experience in the below listed area.
SProfessional planning consultants proposing on this solicitation must have extensive relevant deepwater port experience. A minimum of three (3) comparable
deepwater port master planning projects inclusive of the planning and development of cruise, cargo, and security in ports as impacted by the current and future
market demands being served.
The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's and/or sub-consultant's firm. The experience must be demonstrated by
direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a supervisory capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects. The determination of the
individual's qualifications and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at the sole discretion of the County.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

1.04 Transportation Planning Port and Waterway Systems Planning (PRIME)
3.04 Highway Systems Traffic Engineering Studies
3.12 Highway Systems Underwater Engineering Inspection
5.01 Port and Waterway Systems Engineering Design
5.02 Port and Waterway Systems -Architectural Design
5.05 Port and Waterway Systems Cargo Terminal Design
5.08 Port and Waterway Systems Marine Engineering Design
5.09 Port and Waterway Systems Environmental Design
5.10 Port and Waterway Systems Transportation Systems Design
6.01 Water and Sanitary Sewer Systems Water Distribution and Sanitary
Sewage Collection and Transmission Systems
15.03 Underground Utility Location
20.00 Landscape Architecture
21.00 Land-Use Planning

Miami Beach Community A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital
Development Corporation Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the unit is
(305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County
FREE HELP IS and have included an e-mail address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. Additionally, those pre-
qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notification. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.
AVA LABLE NOW !!! co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."
The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Mike Ramos who may be contacted via e-mail at ramosmi@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305)
Facing Foreclosure?? 375-5215.
We assist you with Loan Work Out, CONTRACT M R REQUIREMENTS
Loan Modification and other Hill) programs. CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS


Need help in purchasing a new home?? We One (1) Agreement 15% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal
assist with credit counseling, Income evaluation
And teach you how to improve your credit scoring.
(Free Breakfast and Lunch provided) Sponsored A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on October 09, 2008, at 2:00 P.M. in the Citizen's Independent Transportation Trust (CITT) Main
by: Miami Dade Housing Agency & Office of Conference Room 10th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties
Community & Economic Development ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.
Call Julia Martinez at 305-538-0090 to register. Deadline for submission of proposals is October 29, 2008 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County,
Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED
PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.
This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's' Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review
EQUAL HOUSING Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.
OPPORTUNITY


















SECTION D


101 N.L. 78tn street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$900 nice and clean, laundry
room, parking Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625 Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1191 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, major appli-
ances included, $525 month,
first, last and security.
Call 305-299-3450

1202 N W 61 Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $800 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1245 N.W. 60 St. #1
Two bedrooms, one bath,
stove and refrigerator, Italian
tiles, bars. 786-210-5644

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6th Street
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors, $600 monthly; One
Month's Rent Move In Special
with restrictions.
Call 305-458-3977


14805 Johnson Street
One bedroom,one bath.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-300-1267

1520 N.W. 61 Street
Section 8 welcome
Renovated one bedroom
apartments. 305-932-4115.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $495 per month, all ap-
pliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $525 monthly,
two bedrooms $625 monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

1950 N.W. 2nd Court
One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

220N.W. 16 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $600.
305-642-7080

2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$675. Call 786-412-9343

421 NW 59 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Studio, $600
One bdrm, $675
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-259-7054

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath. $485
monthly, $750 to move in.
305-326-8855

5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, new
appliances, $575 monthly,
$1150 moves you in.
Section 8 welcome


call 305-458-3977.


50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699



6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6962 N.W. 2ND Court
Two bedrooms,one bath, sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call Mr. Coats 305-345-7833

7104 N.W. 14 Place
Large three bedrooms, two
baths, unit for rent. Central
air, water included. Section
8 Welcome. Call 305-316-
2176.

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV.
Call Joel: 786-355-7578.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air,
appliances, new tile and car-
pet. Starting at $650. 1545
N.W. 8 Avenue. Call 786-506-
3067

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Sta-
tion. On major bus lines. Al-
berta Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

Located Near 90 Street
and 27 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
light, water, and air included.
Also one bedroom furnished.
Call 305-693-9486

NO DEPOSIT with Section 8.
Two and one bedrooms.
786-267-3199

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Efficiency $606 plus, one
bedroom $711, two bedrooms
$881. 305-947-0059

Opa Locka Apartments
One bedroom, $450-$500
Two bedrooms, $575-$600
Free Water. 786-267-1646

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 welcome, $500
cash back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

Wynwood Area Apts.
28 Street and 1st Avenue


One bdrm., one bath from
$550 $650 mthly. Two
bdrms $750 mthly. All appli-
ances. Joel 786-355-7578


COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


2768 N.W. 131st Street
Three bedrooms, two and
half bath, Section 8 welcome,
$35 application fee, 786-546-
5020, Dee.

3786 N.W. 213th Terrace
MIAMI GARDENS TOWN
HOME, QUIET STREET,
three bedrooms, two baths,
enclosed yard, new applianc-
es, tile floor and central air.
Call 954-243-6447

6113 S.W. 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one and half
bath, one block from Metro-
rail,$1,400 monthly, Section 8
welcome. Call 786-556-9425
or 786-210-0421.

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, two new bath-
rooms, free water and secu-
rity gate. 954-266-9328

CAROL CITY AREA
2775 N.W. 193rd Terrace
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

CAROL CITY AREA
2775 N.W. 193rd Terrace
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
4127 N.W. 181st Terrace
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Two bedrooms, two bans,
penthouse ocean view.
$1375 monthly. 1000
square feet.
Section 8 Welcome
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office
www.themiamicondo.com

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
totally renovated, Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-316-2176

North Miami Area
Two bedrooms, two and a
half bath townhouse. 305-
318-5362.

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
One bdrm, one and half bath,
Section 8, 786-277-3688.


1078 NW 100 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $985 monthly, first,
last, security. $2500 to move
in. Call 786-315-8491.

1130 N.W. 88 Street
Completely remodeled, two
and three bedrooms, all ap-
pliances, water and central
air. Call 305-305-4665

11620 N.W. 17th Avenue
Three bedrooms, Section 8
okay, $1200, 305-305-1184.

1601 N.W. 66 Street
Two bedrooms $750 monthly,
$1700 deposit to move in.
786-277-0302

1605 N.W. 51st Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
available immediately, $995
monthly, Section 8 welcome,
305-753-5721.

1610 N.W. 47 STREET
One and two bedrooms. $595
and $675 monthly. 786-973-
3609.

163 N.W. 59th Street


8 only and must have five
bedroom voucher. Call 305-
588-5515.

1722 N.W. 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air
and carpet included. $650
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 305-751-6232.

1782 N.W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 a month. Please call af-
ter 4 p.m. 305-778-3160.

1817 N.W. 41 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$825 monthly. First, last and
$300 security to move in.
Section 8 welcome.
305-634-5794

205 N.W. 96 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
large back yard, security
bars. $900 monthly. Section 8
Welcome. 305-794-9026

2257 N.W. 82 Street


Two 'bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080

2482 N.W. 95 Terrace
Two bedrooms, appliances,
air, water included, extras.
305-948-6913


Classified


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


326 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$950. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

4107 N.W. 7 Avenue
Big one bedroom, air, appli-
ances. $600 monthly. $1000
to move in.305-322-8966

4603 N.W. 15th Avenue
Two bdrms, den. Vouchers
are accepted 305-638-5946
or 305-759-2280.

490 N.W. 97 Street
Section 8 one bedroom, one
bath, 954-430-0849.

4953 N.W. 15 Avenue
Nice area.Two bedrooms,one
bath,Fenced back yard. Sec-
tion 8 only. 954-658-9735.

7024 N.W. 6 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 monthly. Section 8 Wel-
come. 786-256-8836

75 N.E. 186 Street
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths, den, central air. Ev-
erything new. $1350 monthly.
Acceptable credit.
954-392-0070, 305-356-7456

7753 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. All appliances
included. Central air.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at 3737 Charles Ter-
race

Northwest Area
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Starting from $500 to
$1400.
305-757-7067 Design Realty


100 N.W. 14 Street
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN), free lo-
cal and nationwide calling,
property protected by security
camera 24 hours, $185 wkly,
$650 mthly. 305-751-6232

2230 FILLMORE STREET
Refrigerator, stove, ceiling
fan, bath and shower. Call
305-816-6992 or 786-262-
4701.

350 N W 45 Street
Furnished efficiency. Utilities
included. $575 monthly. First
and last. 786-493-0686

5422 N.W. 7 Court
Large efficiency includes
water and electricity. $700
monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449

5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities' and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN. Property
protected by security camera
24 hours, from $185 wkly to
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232.

80 N.W. 53rd STREET
Efficiency with utilities and air.
$600 mthly, $800 to move in.
Call Woody, 305-898-2698.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large one bedroom, air,
cable, utilities included. $325
bi-weekly, $800 to move in.
Very clean, private entrance.
305-335-0429

North East Miami Area
Efficiency, separate kitchen
and bathroom. $650 monthly.
407-383-3946


13377 N.W. 30 Ave
$95 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath,air, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$85 weekly. Free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-474-8188, 305-691-3486.

1845 N.W. 50th Street
$135 weekly with air, $270 to
move in. Call 786-286-7455.

1871 NW 43 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, appliances. Spacious,
freshly painted.
Call 786-357-5000

1879 N.W. 62nd Terrace
Furnished room for rent
305-321-7403

2168 N.W 98 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486


2915 N.W. 156 Street
Large room, private entrance,
free cable. $155 weekly, $620
to move in. 305-624-3966.
3042 N.W. 44 Street
Big, air, $130 weekly, $260 to
move in, 786-262-6744


4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486


6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
E Slocum Investment $250
down and $100 weekly, air.
Call 305-305-0597

741 N.E. 177th Street
Room for rent $400 monthly.
Call 786-226-2374

Miami Gardens Area
Clean room, air, private
entrance. Call 305-628-0162

NORLAND AREA
Quiet room, near bus termi-
nal, 305-766-2055.

NORTH DADE AREA
Share house, $125 a week,
air, call 305-254-6610.

NORTHWEST AREA
ROOMS FOR RENT
CALL 305-244-8676

NW AREA
$90 a week, $180 to move in,
call 786-426-6263.

NW AREA
Rooms with central air and
appliances. 786-487-2222

QUIET AREA, CENTRAL
AIR
Access to kitchen, washer
and dryer. $200 security plus
$475 monthly, $250 bi-weekly,
call for appt. 305-691-4399.

ROOMS FOR RENT
Utilities, weekly rates.
305-303-2644


1014 N.W. 60th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, Section 8 ac-
cepted, 305-216-0901.

10741 SW 150 Ter
Three bedroom, one bath
$1000 monthly. No Section 8.
305-267-9449

1090 N.W. 56 Street
Newly renovated, four bed-
rooms, one bath. $1300
monthly, first and security.
786-356-2848, 305-667-3696

1141 N.W. 111 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$1050 monthly, $2100 to
move in. 305-525-0619

1236 N.W. 69th Street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, Section 8, $1500, call
Tony 954-274-1058.

1256 N.W. 51 Street
Large three bedrooms, one
and a half bath, den, front
and backyard fenced. $1300
monthly, negotiable.
305-788-2605

12690 N.W. 10th Ave
Three bedrooms, 2 bath, cen-
tral air and heat, Section 8
welcome. Call 786-718-2631

1340 N.W. 88th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air and tiled. $1299,
first and last. 786-315-3193

1341 NW 58 Terr.
Three bedroom, one bath-
room $1150. One bedroom,
one bathroom $650. 954-
993-8240.

1520 N.E. 154 Street
Four bedrooms, one bath.
Call 305-944-2101

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750, air. 305-642-7080

15820 N.W. 37 Plaice
Three bdrms, three
baths.$1400 mthly. Section 8
Welcome. 954-663-5263

17220 N.W. 27th Avenue
Three bedroom, two baths,
Section 8 welcome, $1500
monthly, call 305-761-9464.

1856 N.W. 70th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled home, $1300
monthly, $700 security, new
appliances, washer and dry-
er. Section 8 okay.
305-926-2839.

1863NW91 Street
Beautiful one bedroom, can
convert to two bedrooms.
Totally remodeled, all
appliances. $750 monthly,
first and last. 305-801-6496.

18815 N.W.23 Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-790-8606

2040 N.W. 100th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air condition, 305-491-
2489 or 305-757-6160.

20625 N.W. 28th AVENUE
Three Bedrooms, one bath.
$1250 monthly. No section 8.


call 305-624-4395 or page
305-732-9875.

2273 N.W. 65 Street Rear
One bdrm, $700 mthly. $1000
to move in. 305-525-0619
2320 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security.
Call Waymon 305-756-1834


2424 N.W. 43rd Street
Nice, clean, three bedrooms,
two baths, 786-382-8005.

2545 N.W. 167 St.
Three bedrooms, two baths.
No Section 8. $1400 monthly.
Ask about move-in special.
786-319-8184

2970 N.W. 195th Street
Three bdrms, one bath, Sec-
tion 8 welcome, 786-277-
3688.

301 N.W. 189th Street
Section 8 with voucher only,
three bdrms. 305-218-0629.

3182 N.W. 59 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $900 monthly.
305-662-5505

337 N.E. 82 Street
Nice large three bedrooms.
Must see inside. Background
check. $1075 monthly.
Call 305-754-5728

3451 N.W. 174th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
den, fenced, central air, bars,
tile, $1350 a month, first, last
and $700 security. Section 8
okay. Call 305-621-0576.

3774 NW. 209 Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, fenced yard.
Section 8 Welcome. $1200
monthly. Call 305-253-7096

5604 NW 189 Terr
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly, $3500 moves
you in. Call Sharon 305-510-
3388

6225 S.W.59 Place
South Miami
Newly remodeled, two bed-
rooms, one bath, large yard.
First, last and security depos-
it. $1875 to move in. Call N.
Baxter 786-303-3599

790 N.W. 64 Street
Newly remodeled. Three
bedrooms, two baths, central
air, appliances. Corner Lot.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-491-7522

810 NW. 84 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $1200 month-
ly.305-662-5505

8250 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$775 monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

890 N.W. 202 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air and tile. Section
8 Welcome. $1300 monthly,
$3500 to move in.
561-856-6727,

8915 N.W. 10th Avenue
Three bedrooms, Section 8
welcome, call 305-653-0236.

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

Dade and Broward
Special Program
Two, three, four bdrms. From
$900 monthly 305-804-4070.

EL PORTAL AREA
Two bdrms one bath, den
(Third bdrm). $1250 mthly,
$2500 to move in.
305-219-6130

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large four bedrooms, two
baths. $1600 monthly.
718-354-7234


NEWLY RENOVATED
1852 N.W. 43rd Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 per month, Section 8
accepted, call 305-216-0901.

NORTH MIAMI BY 441
Five and a half bedrooms,
three baths, central air, family
dining and laundry room, big
yard, fire place. Section 8 Ok!
$1950 monthly.
Call 305-992-6496

NORTHWEST MIAMI DADE
Six homes to choose from
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1000 to $1300, air, bars,
$3000 to $3900 move in.
No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776


One bdrm, stove, refrigerator,
air. $450 monthly.
305-758-2870


PEMBROKE PINES AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath
$1375 and three bedrooms,
two bath. $1425, first and last
to move in. 1-305-747-0389


PERRINE AREA
Three bdrms, one bath, $1175
mthly, 786-277-7028.


Richmond Heights
Three bdrms, one bath, air,
tile. $900 monthly, first, last
and security. 786-546-1775


Prime Golden
Glades Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly.
Call 305-681-9600



Fourplex Rent To Own
Everything BRAND NEW
Completely remodeled.
Great for investor or rent
unit and live for tree. Four
separate units. Flexible
terms. 305-721-7346.

Miramar/Ft. Lauderdale
Two bdrms, one bath. $1200
monthly. 786-273-6473


3185 N.W. 75 Street
One bedroom, one bath, tiled
floor. Near Rail. $100 weekly.
305-439-2906

Miami-Miramar
Rooms and efficiencies.
305-300-7783


Boarding House
1430 N.W. 68 Street
12 bdrms 2 addlrooms. Great
for Recovery Programs,
Halfway House or Rooming
house. Currently occupied.
Immediate revenue of over
$4000 mthly or $48,000
yearly. 786-351-8109.


1236 N.W. 69th Street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, $160,000, call Tony
954-274-1058

1862 N.W. 185th Terrace
Three bedroom, two baths,
walk-in closets, new roof, new
bathrooms, stamp driveway,
one car garage, new wooden
floors throughout, painted in
and outside. $195,000. Call
786-285-4056.

400 Opa Locka Boulevard
East of 1-95 at N.W. 137 St.
Renovated three bdrms, two
baths, tile, air, family room.
Seller pays FHA closing cost.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

741 N.E. 177th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$256,000, call 786-226-2374

Don't Call Me Unless you're
SERIOUS about Buying a
Home and have been told
NO! Call EB 786-991-4767

FOR SALE
$1000 down, Owner Financ-
ing. Programs for elderly 65
and over only. 305-216-5390

ONLY $7000
DOWN PAYMENT!
NO QUALIFYING
FOUR AND A HALF
PERCENT
OWNER FINANCING
Three bedrooms, two baths.
No red tape. 790 N.W. 64
Street. No closing costs,
no credit check, reduced to
$217,000. Call 305-491-7522

Owner Will Finance!
Or Rent to Own. Must Sell.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard.1855 N.W. 132nd
St. Call EB 786-991-4767

YES'!' YESI!' YES!!!
HERE'S HELP
TO OWN YOUR OWN
HOME NOW!!!
Take Advantage of
THE FREE CASH
GRANTS
UP TO S65,000
On Any Home
Also Available
HUD/VA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP9??
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting soil.
Tony 786-319-0694

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors, cabi-
net and lawn service. Moving
and hauling. 305-801-5690

Tony Roofing
Shingles, re-roofing, leak re-
pairs. 305-491-4515





Earn $1000-$3200 a month
to drive new cars with ads.
www.AdCarJobs.com

MUSICIAN NEEDED
New Mount Calvary M.B.
Church is seeking a musi-
cian that plays keyboard and
organ. If interested, please
contact 305-681-2137


ROUTE DRIVERS
Make Up to $10 an Hour


We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade, Bro-
ward and Miami Dade.
Wednesday Only


You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p..m. Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street






KINSEY LAWN SERVICE
We are not the biggest. Just
the best. No job too large or
small. We are licensed.
Call 305-496-7312


INSTANT ACTION!
LOVE! MONEY! Court
cases
Spiritual. 305-879-3234


Be a Security Guard
786-333-2084
Or renew license $55, 40
hours $100 G and concealed
$150.


Mortgage In Trouble?
Can't Refinance?
Call 786-273-6473

T & J Insurance
Home, Auto and Business.
Free Quote. 305-474-4639


SUBSCRIBE


TODAY!

END THE
INCONVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES,
FIGHTING
THE WEATHER
AND
HUNTING
DOWN BACK
COPIES


CALL

305-694-6214


By Madlen Read
Associated Press

NEW YORK The grip
on the credit markets
loosened just barely
on Tuesday after the
Federal Reserve said it
would buy commercial
paper, the unsecured
short-term debt that
companies sell for their
short-term cash needs.
In the eyes of many
market participants,
the move to grease
the commercial paper
market could do more
to get people lending
again than the $700
billion bailout plan
passed by Congress.


"It's the most effective
move the Fed has done
to date," said Axel Merk,
portfolio manager at
Merk Funds. "When
that market seizes up,
the economy stops
working."
Still, no one is betting
on a quick fix just yet
for the credit markets,
where companies go
to borrow and lend.
Annette Sykora,
chairwoman of the
National Automobile
Dealers Association,
said Tuesday the credit
crunch and economic
problems are likely to
cause 700 auto dealers
to go under this year.


Credit barely eases after

Fed plans to buy paper













Payrolls shrink by 159,000 in September, most in 5 years


By Sue Kirchhoff


WASHINGTON U.S. businesses
slashed 159,000 jobs in September
- the biggest slide in more than five
years the Labor Department said
Friday in a report providing new evi-
dence the economy is tumbling to-
ward recession.
The unemployment rate, calcu-
lated through a separate household
survey, held steady at 6.1%. As has
been the case in recent months,
there were large job losses in con-
struction, manufacturing and retail-
ing, while the health care and gov-
ernment sectors continued to add
workers. But job erosion is widen-
ing with the financial services sec-
tor employment down 172,000 jobs
since its peak in December 2006.
The 159,000 jobs lost in Sep-
tember were the most since March
2003, when the labor market was
still struggling to get back on its feet
after being knocked down by the
2001 recession.
More than 2.2 million Americans
have lost their jobs in the past 12
months, as the unemployment rate
has climbed 1.4 percentage points.
The report follows a chain of dismal
economic news in the past several
weeks, including plummeting auto


Denver police detective Sheri Duran hands out information at a job
fair sponsored by the Colorado state government.
-Photo by John Moore, Getty Images


sales, a drop in factory orders and
slowing in consumer spending,
which makes up about two-thirds
of economic activity. Home prices
continue to fall, and credit markets
worldwide are in severe distress,
limiting consumer and business
borrowing.
"The U.S. economy is shrinking,
and there will be many more awful


reports like this," says Ian Shep-
herdson, chief U.S. economist of
High Frequency Economics, noting
that the job loss was far higher than
economists expected.
He and other economists predict
the Federal Reserve would have to
cut interest rates sharply to try to
spur economic activity. The Fed has
cut a key interest rate to a low 2%.


With credit markets so constricted
in recent days, consumers and busi-
nesses have not felt the benefit of
the rate reductions and are facing
higher costs and limited availability
of credit.
Another report Friday indicates
the sluggish U.S. service sector
barely grew in September.
The Institute for Supply Manage-
ment said its non-manufacturing
index came in at 50.2, slightly below
August's 50.6 in August but in line
with forecasts. A reading above 50
signals expansion.
The report comes as the House
of Representatives prepares to vote
this morning on a $700 billion plan
to rescue the financial sector by
having the Treasury Department
buy impaired mortgage-backed se-
curities and other assets. The leg-
islation cleared the Senate easily on
Wednesday.
The House failed to muster a
majority Monday to pass the mea-
sure, sending stock markets tum-
bling. House leaders are confident
changing the bill to raise the limit
on Federal Deposit Insurance for
savings accounts to $250,000 from
$100,000 will secure the needed
votes for passage. The bill is also at-
tached to package of tax breaks.


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Available from Commercial News Providers


It i% cA'\ t c1 up a rTp% nmni p1 n ,lh ti- IR%

ow


IFB NO. 103058

CLOSING DATE/TIME:


(oeeAt w/ruit
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P.
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 One of/, oldst Ped/.Ic Practices
in Dade County Over 50 Years of Child Care
y www.rozalynhpaschalmd.com

NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave.. Ste 50 660 N State Rd 7. Ste 3A
Miami, FL 33147 Phone. 305-758-0591 Plantation, FL 33317 Phone: 954-880,8399
JACKSON NORTH MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
(formerly Parkway Medical Plaza)
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste 203
N Miami Beach, FL 33169 Phone. 305-652-6095


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional. Sale & Confidential Servl.es

Termination Up 10 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
.... .. Complete GYN Services
,' ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399



HThe Georgia

Witch Doctor

& Root Doctor
"Powerful Magic"
I Remove evil spells, court and jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.

Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown
P.O. Box 50964 Albany GA. 31705


AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM
MAINTENANCE / REPAIR SERVICES
2:00 P.M., MONDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2008


A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and site visit ill be held on Friday October
10, 2008 at 10:30 am at The Manue Artime Community Center, 900 SW 1st
Street Miami Florida. The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Bid-
ders an opportunity to present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the
requirements of the Bid documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s) of
the bidder attend in order to qualify to bid. Detailed specifications for'this bid
are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.
miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SJLENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pete Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 007651 "


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


ELECTION NOTICE
The Miami-Dade County Canvassing Board will convene at the Office of the Supervisor of
Elections, 2700 N. W. 87' Avenue, Miami, Florida. The Canvassing Board is convening on
these dates in preparation to conduct the General Election to be held on November 4, 2008.
DATEITIME ACTIVITYY
Thursday, 10/16/08 1. Logic and accuracy test of the touch screen and optical scan
10:00 a.m. voting systems to be used for early voting, precincts and
paper ballots ... ... .....
Tuesday, 10/28/08 1. Public Inspection of absentee ballots
8:00 to 10:00 a.m. 2. Pre-count logic and accuracy test of the optical scan system
_______________ used for paper ballots
Wednesday, 10/29/08 1. Absentee ballots opening and processing
8:00 a.m. 2. Duplication of ballots
Canvassing 10:00 a.m. 3. Canvassing of presumed invalid absentee ballots
Thursday, 10/30/08 1. Absentee ballots opening and processing (as needed)
through Monday, 11/3/08, 2. Duplication of ballots (as needed)
8:00 a.m. to completion
Canvassing will be
scheduled as needed 3. Canvassing of presumed invalid absentee ballots
Tuesday, 11/4/08 1. Absentee ballots opening and processing (as needed)
2. Duplication of ballots (as needed)
Canvassing: 3. Canvassing of presumed invalid absentee ballots
6:00 p.m. to completion 4. Provisional ballots processing
5. Tabulation of results
6. Certification of Unofficial Results
Thursday, 11/6/08 1. Provisional ballots processing, if needed
Canvassing: 2. Certification of Unofficial Results, including provisionals
4:00 p.m. to completion 3. Post-count logic and accuracy test of the optical scan
system used for absentee and provisional ballots
4. Begin recount (if required)
Friday, 11/14/08 1. Pre-count logic and accuracy test of the optical scan system
Canvassing: for overseas absentee ballots
5:00 p.m. 2. Canvassing of overseas absentee ballots to be counted for
federal offices only
3. Post-count logic and accuracy test of the optical scan
system for overseas absentee ballots
S4 Certification of Official Results
Monday, 11/17/08 1. Race/Question and Precincts Selection for State Audit
Canvassing: 10:00 a.m. 2. Audit Process starts
Monday, 11/17/08 1. Audit process continues until completion
through
Sunday, 11/23/08
8:30 a.m. to completion
All proceedings will be open to the public. For a sign language interpreter or other
accommodations, please call 305-499-8405 at least five days in advance, In accordance with
Section 286.0105, Florida Statutes, a person who appeals any decision by the canvassing board
with respect to any matter considered at a meeting, he or she will need a record of the
proceedings and therefore will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made.
a Lester Sola
S Supervisor of Elections
1 W Miami-Dade County


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
RATIFICATION OF EMERGENCY FINDINGS FOR
WAIVER OF FORMAL BIDS FOR THE PROVISION OF LOBBYING
SERVICES

City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida







The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on October 16, 2008 beginning at 9:00 a.m. to
consider whether it is in the public's best interest that the City Commission ratify, approve and confirm
the Emergency Findings of the City Manager justifying the waiver of competitive bids and the award of an
agreement for State Lobbying Services on behalf of the City of Miami, to Ronald L. Book P.A.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City Commission meeting of
October 16, 2008 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect to the proposed issue.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be
considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
#003167 City Clerk


Subscribe


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008








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Punk grip nword stock markets
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om Commercial News P
mme -C80S


providerss


Pack your coolers along with your bags
And save your cold cash "Saved us a ton of mon- restaurants, says Chad friends call him cheap,
ey." Prosser of South Caro- but he doesn't mind.
By Barbara De Lollis tel at Disney World to Higher-priced gas lina's parks, recreation "We basically had a
save the $!0-a-night re- over the summer forced and tourism depart- home-cooked meal for a
Coolers aren't just for frigerator fee, he says. some Americans to cut ment. fraction of the price."
camping anymore. Donna Bilkey of Im- spending on food and "They trade down," he Booking a kitchen.
Increasingly, U.S. peril, Mo., says she got other incidentals. Tour- says. "They go to West- To save money on din-
travelers are bringing upset when she paid ism officials expect fall ern Sizzler or Bonanza ing out in Hawaii dur-
coolers on road trips $20 for "a few juices travelers to continue instead of Ruth's Chris ing their vacation this
and to hotels and re- and two muffins" for the trend because of the Steakhouse." month, the Ivaniszyn
sorts so they can reduce her family of four at ongoing financial crisis Travelers are stretch- family of Minneapolis
restaurant spending the tony Amelia Island and pre-Election Day ing their vacation dol- skipped the deluxe re;
Bruce Chadwick of Plantation Resort last uncertainty. lars by: sorts and instead have
North Palm Beach, year in Florida. So they "They're still going (on Visiting a super- rented a nearby condo.
brings an electric Cole- went to the nearest Wal- trips), but they're bring- market. The Chadwicks When they land, they'll
man cooler that plugs Mart, bought a dispos- ing their cooler," says bought a rotisserie stop at Costco to stock
into the car's cigarette able Styrofoam cooler John Edman, director chicken and sides at the kitchen, says Steve
lighter on vacations with and filled it with fruit, of Explore Minnesota a market during their Ivaniszyn. The family
his wife and 5-year- cheese and snacks. Tourism. Labor Day trip to Trea- still plans to splurge on
old son. They recently "When we did eat out, When they do eat out, sure Island, Fla. Bruce sunset drinks at their
brought it into their ho- we ate less," she says. they're picking cheaper Chadwick says some favorite resorts.

(~ry' E *ih a .in 601.11 ad mrw


MIAM I-DAD
Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
1tbcnierii Exctel,'C yeryZ

CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on October 16, 2008, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at 3500
Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the following:
A RESOLUTION, OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION AUTHORIZING
THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE THE SECOND AMENDMENT
TO THE TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT AGREEMENT
("AGREEMENT") BETWEEN THE CITY OF MIAMI ("CITY")
AND FLAGSTONE ISLAND GARDENS ("FLAGSTONE"), ON
CITY-OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED AT WATSON ISLAND,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO PROVIDE FOR THE EXPANSION OF
THE EASEMENT AREA OF APPROXIMATELY 10,033 SQUARE
FEET OF SUBMERGED LANDS FOR THE LIMITED PURPOSE
OF PROVIDING INGRESS AND EGRESS TO AND FROM THE
SALES AND CONSTRUCTION OFFICES RELATED TO THE
DEVELOPMENT, AS WELL AS RECONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS
TO THE EXISTING DOCK AND ALL ASSOCIATED WORK, WITH
THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS MORE PARTICULARLY SET
FORTH IN SAID SECOND AMENDMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



#003169


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"If the lions do not write their own
history, then the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


I-


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ki] miii~m


BLACKS MUST CONTROL] llEIR N\\ N -FSIIlNY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 8-14, 2008


('ongrrs% hears I.hnman sought niillions for c tr


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^ ".* =w .... 11. Itar ', ..| ^


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NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a so-
licitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-8C-1.212
apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


BID NUMBER OPENING
.DOWNLOAD DATE


TITLE


PRE-BID CONFERENCE
ADDENDUMS


RFI 027-JJ04 11/6/2008 Request for Information for Telecommunications Service

A pre-bid conference will be
held on wednesday, October 15,
2008 at 1:30pm in Lecture Room
#1 at Information Technology
Services, 13135 SW 26 Street,
018-JJ04 11/4/2008 Network Connectivity Devices Miami, FL 33175. Pre-Bid
Conference attendance by the
bidder or qualified representative
is highly recommended for bid
acceptance.
A pre-bid conference has been
scheduled for october 16, 2008 at
8'30 a.m. in Lecture Room #1
007-JJ11 11/4/2008 On-Site Service for Telephone Equipment at Information Technology
Services, 13135 SW 26 Street,
Miami, FL
33175. All participating vendors
are encouraged to attend.

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent Of Schools


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