Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00565
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: October 1, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00565
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

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nssr OIPSl HET BAILOUT. BALL
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.........*...C 3-DIGI)7 326
S11 PI
LIBRARY OF FLA HISTORY
PO BOX 117W07
GAINESV1LLE FL 32611-7D07


SOne Family Serving.Since 1923



Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties
Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI-DADE A ND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER


85 YEARS


Volume 86 Number 6 MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Available from Commercial News Providers







I- -W -w w :. bAft *' # RA W W B w -p 3






Stocks lose $1.2 trillion as


economy gets more grim


By David J. Lynch

The House vote Monday to reject a $700 billion financial
rescue drew a swift and pointed reaction from Wall Street: the
largest one-day point loss ever in the Dow Jones industrial
average.
The Dow's historic 778-point cry for help followed the
stunning 228-205 vote against passage. In percentage terms,
Monday's 7% drop didn't even make the Dow's all-time top 10.
(It was the 17th worst ever.) But the 8.8% battering absorbed
by the broader Standard & Poor's 500 index was its worst since
the "Crash Monday" carnage in 1987. The tech-heavy Nasdaq
dropped 9.1%.


"This is an extremely worrisome situation," says Lyle Gramley,
a former Fed governor now at Stanford Financial Group. "We
are going to go through a significant recession even if the bill
passes. Without it, we could have the worst recession" since
World War II.
With markets in retreat and official Washington at a loss to
craft an effective response, fears of a deeper financial crisis
were multiplying. Credit markets indicated banks are reluctant
to lend even to other banks, threatening an eventual credit
drought for scores of businesses. "There is a generalized loss of
confidence in financial markets and financial institutions that
no policy action seem to be able to control," former White House
Please turn to ECONOMY 8A


Candidates John McCain and Barack Obama at their first
2008 presidential debates.

Debate boosts Obama in polls


By Jill Lawrence

WASHINGTON The two
presidential candidates head
into another politically perilous
week after a first debate that
polls suggest helped Democrat
Barack Obama slightly expand
his support.


A majority of debate watch-
ers in a USA TODAY/Gallup Poll
taken Saturday picked Obama
over Republican John McCain
when asked which candidate
offered the best proposals to
solve the country's problems,
52%-35%. They said Obama
Please turn to DEBATE 7A


Your cash is safe in

Washington Mutual and Wachovia
Two of the most popular banks in the Liberty City area
changed hands in the past week, but depositors need not worry
about the safety of their funds.
Concerns about bank safety and soundness have been
exacerbated by the recent downfall of two of the nation's largest
financial institutions. Thursday, the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp. seized Washington Mutual, the nation's largest savings
and loan, and brokered a sale to JPMorgan Chase (JPM) for
$1.9 billion. On Monday, Citigroup (C) said it will
Please turn to BANKS 7A


ABORTION


A woman's right to choose
I ,. , .........2-- 1. ,. nant. Many


Local women discuss their views on abortion


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Shaun Peyton was nineteen
years old when she became
pregnant with her second
child. The pressure from her
mother to abort her five month
old fetus was a terrible strain
on her but it was her mother's
request. The guilt and shame
still lives with Peyton who is


now twenty-five years old.
"When you have an abortion,
you are not giving the child a
chance." Peyton says that los-
ing her child will be a life long
memory but she boldly con-
fesses that she is pro-life and
will never have an abortion
again.
With less than 50 days until
the election, Democratic presi-
dential nominee Barack Obama


have praised


NOEL BAXIN
stands firm on the issue of
pro-choice, women being able
to decide what they want to do
with their own bodies, in the
event that they become preg-


Obama for be-
A ing pro-choice
|but many local
women do not
agree that a
woman should
PEYTON be able to
choose to abort
a baby, if she gets pregnant.
"I don't believe in abor-
tion. I believe that a child is
Please turn to ABORTION 8A


Rolle helps hurricane victims in Haiti


More than 8,000 residents attended
Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle's "Help
for Haiti" concert on Saturday, Sep-
tember 27 at Oak Grove Park. The free
event, sponsored by Nopin Long Dis-
tance/Sweet Micky and Bakery Caf6
called on residents to donate food and
other goods to be shipped to the island,
which has been battered by several
devastating storms. Donations of food,
clothing, and money poured in from at-
tendees.
"A big thank you goes out to everyone
who attended the event and gave what
they could to go to a country in dire need
of humanitarian aid," said Commission-
er Rolle. "I am eager to get these supplies
into the hands of Haitian citizens who
Please turn to HAITI 6A


Commissioner Dorrin Rolle
the truck.


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Weather
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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


* WORD-FOR-WORD


Florida lowest in treating

mental illness

Below is a report fromt the State Rep. Joe Gibbons, chair offlorida Black
Caucus, District 105, Hallandale beach who describe florida's woefid neglect in
dealing with the rising toll of mental illness in our Black communities


Although Floridians live in
the fourth-largest state, per
capital funding for mental
health is 48th in the nation.
While there have been
strong advocacy efforts to
improve Florida's mental
healthcare system during
the past 10 years, there has
been a significant lack of
participation by the African-
American community.
Mental illness is a serious
ailment facing the black
community. Although rarely
talked about, we must provide
resources and care that lead
to healthier lives.
About one in every four
Americans suffers from some


weakness rather than a
medical disorder. In contrast,
only 54 percent of the general
population felt this way.
Furthermore, 70 percent
of the general population
reported that they would
take medicine prescribed by
a doctor for depression, but
only about a third of African
Americans said they would
do the same. Additional
barriers include lack of
access to appropriate mental
healthcare, mistrust of
medical health professionals
and the misdiagnoses of
illnesses.
The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services


form of mental disorder, and
only a third of them ever seek
treatment. Although mental
illness affects all races and
ethnicities at about the same
rate, African Americans face
tougher obstacles to tackling
mental-health issues.
Florida lacks information
on the number of African
Americans living with mental
illness. And we don't have
many local initiatives to
reach affected communities.
Therefore, educating
ourselves is the first hurdle
to overcome.
Perhaps the biggest
barrier in African-American
communities is the cultural
stigma associated with
mental illness. Many African
Americans refuse to admit
they may have a problem. They
don't talk about it with family
or friends for fear of labels
or lack of support, and they
don't seek the help of medical
professionals. Ignoring or
hiding these problems has
a disastrous effect on our
communities.
A survey by the National
Mental Health Association
(now MHA, Mental Health
America) in 1996 revealed
that about 63 percent of
African Americans believed
depression was a personal


reports that almost one in
four African Americans is
uninsured compared to 16
percent of the overall U.S.
population. Rates ofemployer -
based health coverage are just
over 50 percent for African
Americans, compared to over
70 percent for employed non-
Hispanic whites. Medicaid
covers nearly 21 percent of
African Americans.
Under-diagnoses and
misdiagnoses also add to
the problem. According to
the U.S. Surgeon General,
African Americans tend to be
diagnosed more frequently
with schizophrenia and less
frequently with affective
disorders than whites who
exhibit the same symptoms.
On Oct. 3, Miami will be
part of the annual Mental
Health Conference hosted by
the National Black Caucus
of State Legislators. The
conference will broadcast
from Indianapolis via satellite
to Miami and Detroit, allowing
open dialogue. E-mail
mentalhealth@nbcsl.org to
register or learn more.
We can break down the
barriers of mental illness
for African Americans
and become stronger and
healthier as a community.
Our lives depend on it.


CORNER


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eIe fliami EaMint

ilSSN 0739-03191
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54ih Sireet,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box. 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR.. Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press Delieves that Amenca can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords ro
every person, regardless ol race. creed or color. his or her human and legal rights Haling no person, feanng no person. the
Black Press sinves to help every person in the firm belief ihat all persons are hun as long as anyone is held back.

AP The Media Audit ==


0 BY BARBARA REYNOLDS, NNPA


McCain will keep bushwhacking everyone but the very


For eight horrible years under
President George Bush, an oil
war, corporate greed- and tax
cuts for the rich have drained
billions out of the U.S. economy.
Another eight years of the same
under John McCain promises
economic pain, punishment and
misery for families, students,
workers -all but the very rich.
It would be most unfortunate
if some of America's obsession
with racism would rob the
nation of the much-deserved
opportunity to climb out of this
sinking ship through new and
ethical leadership.
In a fair and enlightened
world, the race for the White
House between Senators Barack
Obama and John McCain would
not be close.
The GOP has been miserable
stewards of the economy
and; world affairs. President
Bush has turned the surplus
President Clinton left behind
in the national treasury into a
$400 billion deficit.


Deregulation policies
championed by Bush, McCain
& Company coupled with
corporate greed have helped
create an economic meltdown
not seen since the Great
Depression, where taxpayers
will have to foot a $700 + billion
bailout. McCain cannot square


used to repair our disgracefully
shabby schools, a sagging
infrastructure and a toxic health
care. McCain would expand
the oil war, while at the same
time giving huge tax breaks to
oil companies who are reaping
shameful profits while ordinary
people can hardly afford gas to


The depth of racism is not surprising. Yet it is tragic to watch
the white working class seemingly locking themselves into the
historic role of bigotry to the detriment of their own self-preser-
vation and survival.


his long history of advocating
the kind of loose regulation
controls responsible for the
turmoil on Wall Street with
being the savior of the American
economy.
In addition, an oil war based
on the lies of weapons of mass
destruction has cost more than
4,000 U.S lives and the lives
of tens of thousands of Iraqis,
plus at least $20 billion drained
monthly that could better be


get to work, if they are fortunate
enough to have a job.
What about McCain is there to
like? Certainly his contribution
to this country as a war hero
should be respected. But he
did not respect the service
to this country of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr., preferring to
turn thumbs down on a bill in
Arizona to honor the martyred
hero with a national holiday.
The door should be slammed in


Wealthy

his face as easily as he slammed
the door on Dr. King.
Many White Democratic and
independent voters are steering
clear of Obama because of the
color of his skin, according to
a new poll that shows racial
prejudice is more widespread
and critical to the election than
commonly thought.
"Deep-seated racial misgivings
could cost Obama the White
House if the election is close,
according to an AP-Yahoo
News poll that found one-third
of white Democrats harbor
negative views toward blacks
- many calling them "lazy,
violent, responsible for their
own troubles".
The poll, conducted with
Stanford University, suggests
that the percentage of voters
who may turn away from
Obama because of his race
could easily be larger than the
final difference between the
candidates in 2004 about two
and one-half percentage points.


BY MARC H. MORIAL, NNPA


Government: Fix the levees in New Orleans now!


In recent weeks, tropical storm
Hanna and Hurricane Gustav
have hit the U.S. mainland,
luckily without causing wide-
spread damage.
But as of this writing, a much
larger and more dangerous
storm, Hurricane Ike, is racing
towards the United States with
its eye firmly fixed on Texas and
the Gulf Coast. As the former
mayor of New Orleans, I take
more than a passing interest in
these storms.
I was an early and ardent
critic of the federal response
to Hurricane Katrina three
years ago. I have taken every
opportunity since then to urge
the federal government and
the Army Corps of Engineers
to upgrade the nation's flood
control and levee systems,
especially in New Orleans
and throughout Southeastern
Louisiana.
Since Katrina, there has
been significant improvement
in the performance of both the
flood protection and emergency


response infrastructures in the
Gulf Coast region.
Government officials deserve
high marks for their speedy and
efficient response to Hurricane
Gustav, the largest hurricane
to hit the region since Katrina.
Two million people were quickly
evacuated, there was no loss of
life, and, as the Army Corps of


only a glancing blow to New
Orleans. But even that relatively
minor punch taught us another
set of lessons that need to be
heeded if we are going to ensure
that what happened with
Katrina never happens again.
What caught my eye with
Gustav was that even as a
category 2 storm, water was at


y all accounts, New Orleans dodged a bullet. Gustav, which had
been forecast as a much larger storm, wound up making land-
fall as a category 2...


Engineers stated, "the pumps
pumped and the system held."
But, it would be a big mistake
to assume that because New
Orleans emerged relatively
unscathed in the wake of Gustav
that the city is completely
secure.
By all accounts, New Orleans
dodged a bullet. Gustav, which
had been forecast as a much
larger storm, wound up making
landfall as a category 2, landing


the very top of the levees in the
industrial canal. Those levees
must be completely raised
because that canal is subject to
storm surge from both the river
and the lake, and is a continuing
risk for the region.
The Army Corps of Engineers
has secured about $15 billion
for a comprehensive repair and
upgrade of the New Orleans
region flood control system.
I believe that is a necessary


investment. Southeastern
Louisiana has the largest
concentration of domestic oil
and gas production facilities
anywhere in the world.
It is also the conduit through
which most of the imported oil
and gas comes in. The economic
and human consequences
not only for the region but for
the nation of not providing an
adequate flood control system
are too great to ignore.
I urge the Army Corps to step
up the pace of its work. We must
raise the height of the levees
as well as strengthen them as
quickly as possible. We must
also be mindful of nature's own
hurricane protection system
and work to rapidly restore our
nation's wetlands.
We should all be grateful that
Hurricane Gustav did not live
up to its predictions. But, rather
than making this a celebratory
moment, we should heed the
lessons of the past so we can
prevent a Katrina-like disaster
in the future.


BY NICOLE C. LEE, NNPA


Free Trade Agreement: A campaign of deception?


Recently, a group of
Colombian officials were on
Capitol Hill lobbying your
congressional members to pass
the U.S.-Colombia Free Trade
Agreement.
They extolled the virtues of
free trade and the relationship
between Colombia and the
U.S., promising that free trade
will help our communities here
and abroad. Afro-Colombian
communities make up 26
percent of the population of
Colombia, and receive far
too little attention in the
mainstream imagination. But
the truth behind this free trade
agreement is a grim reality for
black folks both here and in
Colombia.
Free trade is short hand for a
global system where the interest
of capitalism is a priority with


the notion that competition will
produce the best products at
the lowest market cost. Nations
have supported this system
by opening up the borders of
the signing countries to each
others' exports. Corporate
America uses words like "higher


while outsourcing millions of
domestic manufacturing jobs.
What free trade has meant
to the U.S. working class is
a loss of jobs and declining
economic stability. While U.S.
based mega-corporations have
benefited from these deals,


he administration of Colombian President Alvaro Uribe has ig-
nored the Colombian Constitution, as well as national and inter-
national laws pertaining to Afro-Colombians.


productivity" and "efficiency"
to disguise their desired end:
access to the world's cheapest
labor in the chase for the lowest
bottom line.
The U.S. middle class is
being deprived of millions of
jobs as a result of opening
the world's richest consumer
market to foreign competitors


these benefits have not trickled
down to the average American
worker.
Colombia, on the other hand,
is the most dangerous country
in which to be a unionized
worker. According to the AFL-
CIO, approximately 4,000 trade
unionists have been killed in
Colombia in the last twenty


years.
In Buenaventura, a port
city comprised almost entirely
of Afro-Colombians, workers
operate in deplorable conditions,
are forced to work overtime
withoutadequate compensation,
and are subjected to terror and
violence.
In Buenaventura alone,
over 50 trade unionists and
their leaders have died from
causes ranging from employer
health and safety violations to
paramilitary assassinations.
The violence in Colombia has
disproportionately affected
Afro-Colombians resulting in
several massacres and the
displacement of thousands.
Colombia's internal
displacement rate is second only
to Sudan and is an unvoiced
blight in our Hemisphere.


". . 63 percent of African-Americans believe that depression is a

personal weakness rather than a medical disorder."


I ~


Is_


: i
















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


0 BY JULIANNE MALVEAUX, NNPA


Financing the go-go


BY BILL FLETCHER JR., NNPA


SMake sure the presidential election is not stolen


IA THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Every time Treasury Secre-
tary Henry Paulson opens up
his mouth, I stagger. First he
said he was willing to bail out
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to
the tune of about $100 billion
apiece. Then he said that AIG
needed an $85 billion bailout.
The latest? The Bush adminis-
tration is asking for $700 billion
to bail out investment bankers.
If you add it up, it's $985 bil-
lion, or nearly a trillion dollars.
We are increasing our national
debt at a time when it is already
bloated from the war in Iraq
and from the bloated spending
policies of the Bush Administra-
tion. We are increasing debt and
skirting trouble at a time when
there are political operatives de-
scribing the economy as healthy
and robust.
It is amazing how quickly lead-
ers have turned on a dime. One


those who talked about the hor-
rible things that might happen
to our economy if the insured
Treasury does not step in.She
is right, but she is also wrong.
Right. If no one steps in, it is
likely that we will have cata-
strophic consequences. But she
is among those not thinking this
matter fully through. Shouldn't
those who gained from the go-go
of crazy finances now pay for it?
Or will they walk away with their
profits, leaving taxpayers hold-
ing the bag! Why should highly
paid banking execs get the mon-
ey they are "entitled" to, while
millions of taxpayers shoulder
the burden and pay up.
The past decade has been a
financial go-go for profit takers.
They have enjoyed the benefit of
relaxed regulation, and now, all
of us are paying for it. They have
developed new financial instru-


E everyone says they want to look forward, and that's
because looking backwards is more than painful.


The other day a friend passed
me an article that was written
by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.
back in 2006. It concerned
election "irregularities" in the
2004 Presidential elections.
While I knew something about
what had taken place, I was
stunned by the information that
Kennedy revealed concerning
the widespread efforts, in states
such as Ohio, to throw the vote
in favor of the Republicans.
Much like the notorious 2000
Presidential election, settled
by the US Supreme Court in
favor of George Bush, it is more
than likely that the Democratic
candidate-in 2004 that was
Senator John Kerry-won
the election. Nevertheless the
antics carried out read as if
from a novel. Voting machines
that automatically indicated
a vote for George Bush even if
the voter indicated John Kerry
(which could be corrected
if caught); a county that
declared a "terror threat" in
order to ensure that the vote


count was done in secrecy; a
complete mismatch in terms
of numbers of voting machines
where heavily populated areas
(largely Democratic) received
fewer machines, whereas less
populated and more suburban
areas (and largely Republican)


com/news/story/10432334/
was_the_2 004_election_
stolen#.As we quickly approach
the November 2008 election, I
highly recommend that you take
a look at it because there is no
reason to believe that election
theft is off the table.


n the aftermath of the 2000 election, for example, the main-
stream media pushed Senator Gore to give up his quest for
the White House and concede the election,


received more machines.
Adding to this list from infamy
was the purging of voting
rolls, including, as described
by journalist Greg Palast in a
separate piece, the purging of
the names of deployed Black
servicemen if they did not
respond to letters sent to them
by Republican operatives.
The article, "Was the 2004
election stolen?" published in
Rolling Stone magazine can be
readathttp:/ /www.rollingstone.


Understanding that our last
two Presidential elections were
stolen really reshapes how
one understands the politics
of the last eight years. Right-
wing Republicans have been
prepared to take whatever steps
necessary in order to guarantee
their continued dominance.
While it is absolutely the
case that election theft is not
a new phenomenon in the USA
(with both the South and the
Southwest notorious for years


of racially-based J
electoral theft
especially from the mid 19th
century through the mid-to-
late 1960s), it is significant
that what we witnessed in 2000
and 2004 was so blatant in the
post-Watergate era where the
electoral system was supposedly
cleaned up.
Right-wing Republicans have
been insistent in pressing
their irrational and dangerous
agenda, and they have done
this through a doggedness and
determination that contrasts
with a willingness by so many
Democrats to cave.
The terrorist attacks of 11
September 2001 certainly
provided the conditions for
advancing this agenda, but
the right-wing wished to take
no chances. Thus, and often
in apparent cooperation with
Republican State Secretaries
(responsible for elections in
each state), they set out to lay
the conditions for Republican
victories in flawed elections.


wonders if the timing of this is
connected with a need for Trea-
sury Secretary Paulson to make
sure that his colleagues are ad-
equately compensated as we
move ahead. To be sure, the new
President, McCain or Obama,
will have his hands full because
of this chicanery that represents
little more than "chickens com-
ing home to roost".
Is there a choice? I am hoping
that Democratic legislators will
view the Bush proposals most
critically. There ought always
be a choice.The financial guru
Suze Orman was on Larry King
saying this is the best thing that
happened to America.
She asked why the interven-
tion had taken so long. Someone
who needs a job might ask the
same question. Why does inter-
vention take so long? Someone
whose mortgage in foreclosure,
who is still not clearly helped
by the proposed Bush bailout,
might also ask why it has taken
so long. Some folk have already
lost homes and been displaced,
and there is no relief for them.
A man called Suze Orman
while she was on Larry King to
say he'd been fiscally responsi-
ble, so why should his tax dol-
lars bail out banks. She chided
him, telling him that we have
to bail out these banks to avoid
a depression. She was among


BY RON WALTERS, NNPA


ments, derivatives, adjustable
mortgages, and anything that
allowed them to strip excess
profits from the process, and
their exploitation of systems has
pushed stock prices upwards.
They have targeted lower in-
come markets, including mi-
nority markets, and sparked
a financial literacy movement
with their flagrant disregard
for differences in financial acu-
men. And they've chuckled to
the bank all the way. Now, with
markets on the verge of collapse,
they are putting their hands out
and asking all of us to finance
the go-go. And we are willing to
do it.
Everyone says they want to
look forward, and that's because
looking backwards is more than
painful. If we look back, we will
find that there are a few who will
lose some dollars this year and
next, but they were paid enough
to float through this crisis.
Meanwhile, there are millions
of Americans with as many as
3.5 million slated for foreclosure
- who dr 't hLave the go-go cush-
ion many have.We may need to
bail out economic bad actors,
but must we also finance the go-
go? At the very minimum, those
who led bankrupt institutions
should forfeit pay in the name
of the millions who will never be
made whole.


Economic crisis lifts Barack Obama's campaign


The ideology of de-regulation
of financial institutions has
essentially been the cause of
the current economic crisis.
Letting the market regulate
itself has been a stock and trade
of Republican politics, letting
financial institutions make
money any way they can, even
at the expense of consumers.
It is this ideology that must be
changed and it is this possibility
that Barack Obama represents.
Although the economic crisis
that has seized Wall Street and
suddenly put at risk the bank
accounts and investments of
millions of Americans is about a
week old, it has been known for
some time, that former Sen. Phil
Gramm (R-Texas), John McCain's
principal economic adviser was
the key player on the Banking
Committee that in 1999 repealed
a banking regulation, enacted
after the Great Depression of the
1930s, to limit the involvement
of banks in using accounts for
investment purposes.
This law, the Gramm-Leach-
Bliley Act, in effect destroyed
the 'firewall" between the
banking industry and potential
risky investment, such as the
instruments that spiraled out


of control and led to the home
foreclosure crisis.
So, Barack Obama is correct
in his claim that this act of
de-regulation contributed
significantly to today's economic
turmoil.
Lobbying records show that
Gramm led a $300 million
lobbying effort that, once the
act was passed, resulted in the
merger between Swiss Bank
UBS and investment house
Paine Weber and two years
later, Gramm ended up as Vice
Chairman of the investment
division of UBS.
A year after the Gramm-
Leach-Bliley Act repealed the old
regulations, Swiss Bank UBS
gobbled up brokerage house Paine
Weber. Two years later, Gramm
settled in as a vice chairman of
UBS's new investment banking
arm. In the current crisis, UBS
has written down more than $18
billion in exposure to subprime
loans and other risky securities
that will eliminate 8,000 jobs.
Obama's view is that John
McCain does not represent
change or is in any position to
lead America out of this crisis
because, lobbying records
indicate that out of 177 contacts


BY GARY L. FLOWERS, NNPA


Wall Street: Grab of greedy; neglect of


The fall season of 2008 began
this week simultaneously with
the fall of major investment
banks on Wall Street in New
York. On Sunday, September 14,
the television network, MSNBC,
described the day of fallen
institutions Lehman Brothers
among them with the phrase,
"Bloody Sunday".
Wait a minute: The phrase
"Bloody Sunday" was coined
in 1965 relating to the bloody
beating of peaceful civil rights
marchers on the Edmund
Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.,
who were attempting to march
from Selma to the capital city
of Montgomery, Ala. in order to
secure federal protection in the
right of African-Americans and
all citizens of color in America to
vote. Reeling from the historically
phony phrase, I mused: who are
the bloody in the United States of
America, the greedy or the needy?
And how did Lehman Brothers
rise and fall? I researched the
origin of the Lehman brothers in
the book, Complicity: How the
North Promoted and Prolonged
and Profited from Slavery, (in
particular the Triangle Trade of
molasses, rum, and enslaved
Africans between England, The


West Indies, and America) by
Anne Farrow and Joel Lang. In
1844, Henry Lehman moved
from Bavaria (Germany) to
Montgomery, Ala. and opened a
general store that accepted cotton
from local farmers in exchange
for their bill in the store. Later,
his brothers, Emmanuel and
Mayer, joined Henry. The Lehman
brothers quickly profited from the
labor of economically exploited


by increasing the money supply
while cutting short-term interest
rates. In other words, large banks
and the federal government -
White House, Congress, and the
Courts have neglected the needy
and protected the greedy. In 1999,
in order to "globally compete"
with foreign banks, which own
brokerage firms, Congress
repealed the 1933 Glass-Steagall
Act, which banned banks from


ince 2006, financial analysts cite a 20 percent drop in
housing prices, which may well lead to a drop in housing
values totaling 4 trillion dollars.


enslaved people of color who
picked cotton, and moved their
offices to New York City (near
Wall Street) and the newly formed
Commodities Exchange. There,
Lehman Brothers Brokerage was
formed and became until last
week a global financial fixture
of institutional assets.
With the prospect of raw riches,
Wall Street banks have for years
have acted as vultures on the
vulnerable by not regulating the
banking industry with existing
consumer-protection laws, and
by creating foolish fiscal policy


selling stocks and bonds. In
its place, Congress passed the
Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, giving
banks the option to take risks
with our money, at will (named
for Congressman Phil Gramm of
Florida, Jim Leach of Iowa, and
Thomas Bliley of Virginia. Never
in the last 10 years has either the
moneychangers or policy makers
considered ethics for ethnicities;
transparency for the tricksters;
or conscientiousness for the
common people.
In fact, evidence indicates that
African Americans and Latino


needy
home shoppers
were deliberately
steered to sub-prime (higher
interest rate) loans when they,
in many cases, qualified for
conventional, 30-year fixed home
loans.The result of the mortgage
mess is that not only have innocent
homebuyers been bloodied, but
also innocent employees in the
financial services industry will
lose their jobs, retirement, and
perhaps their homes.
Since 2006, financial analysts
cite a 20 percent drop in housing
prices, which may well lead to a
drop in housing values totaling 4
trillion dollars. Also, Wall Street
buyouts and mergers translate to
less competition among banks,
and more expensive financial
products offered by banks.
Moreover, with former investment
bankers (money changers)
working for traditional banks,
the wolves in the woods are now
in our proverbial quiet and stable
back yards (commercial banks).
Watch out. This week, the Bush
Administration announced a
$700 billion plan to provide a
billion-dollar band-aid to the
American financial industry,
while the cuts to the common
people continue to bleed.


members of his staff has made,
17 of them are related to the
Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
Therefore, although a McCain
political ad has attempted to tie
Obama to Fannie Mae, through
it's former African American
director, Franklin Raines, in
fact, the McCain contacts have
been far more robust in trying to
loosen the relationship between


home mortgage and the bans.
The issue here in resolving this
crisis is whether the fix of the
Bush administration will just
bail out financial institutions
like AIG, Bear Sterns, Fannie
Mae and Freddie Mac, or
whether the financial assets
such as bank accounts, IRAs,
401Ks of ordinary people will be
protected.


-

Local wags in the financial area are saying the reason Goldman
Sachs analysts are confident that the Burger King chain can
continue to grow in sales is because so many people who have
been eating in the higher end restaurants are switching over to
the whopper and fries and maybe a milkshake instead of dinner
and a cocktail.

Now that the U.S. taxpayers are realizing that they may be on
the hook for $700 billion they are beginning to see how the Wall
Street CEOs were lining their pockets with millions of dollars in
severance packages. Many feel that it might be a good thing to
see Wall Street take the hit and go down the drain.

It's too bad the country had to lose $1.2 trillion before Congress
heeded the warning of the economists that it was necessary
to pass the bailout package to stem the flow of stocks fleeing,
the market. The ship was sinking, but nobody launched the
lifeboats.

Miami taxpayers are about to be screwed again in a deal
orchestrated by our commissioner and the Miami Heat. The deal
the commissioners are pondering is whether Parcel B, a county-
owned property next to downtown's American Airlines Arena,
should be turned into a Bay of Pigs museum. Critics see the plan
as a giveaway to the Miami Heat because the museum would
be joined by a large new parking garage tailor-made for use by
basketball fans.
The Heat won voter approval to build the publicly subsidized
arena in the 1990s, and the team's sales pitch to voters included
a promise of Parcel B becoming "a safe new waterfront park for all
our families." More than a decade later, the athletic fields pitched
to voters still haven't materialized. Stay tuned.

Home schooling will take on new meaning when local parents
can keep their kids at home. Starting next school year, the first
generation of Florida students can earn a diploma from their
public schools entirely "online" without ever setting foot in a
classroom from kindergarten through 12th grade.

The big voter registration rally at Florida A&M University on
Saturday merged two key components of the Obama campaign's
strategy, to draw more black voters to the polls by capitalizing on
the enthusiasm over the historic prospect of electing the nation's
first black president and targeting young voters who have either
never registered or have little voting history.

Citizens of this area are hoping that the murder convictions of
those two white youths who beat a black homeless man to death
sent a strong signal that we have zero tolerance for barbaric acts
of that nature in our community.

Look for a lot of complaints from Black and Hispanic voters
in the November election because of the new ID-matching law.
Using the empty argument that it wanted to curb the fraudulent
voting, the Legislature in 2005 adopted a law that requires a
voter's identification to match state files or federal records before
voting. If a driver's license, state-identification card or last four
digits of a Social Security number don't match, the voter must
use a provisional ballot and has two days to prove his or her
identity.


I - -I - - -








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Miami-Dade police officer


receives special recognition


The Miami-Dade Police De-
partment (MDPD) is pleased to
announce that Lt. Andrianne
Byrd has been awarded the De-
partmental Exceptional Service
Award and selected as distin-
guished Officer of the Month
for September. Byrd has been
a member of this department
since 1994 and is currently as-
signed to the Personnel Man-
agement Bureau.
In April 2008, Byrd observed
a white minivan and a green
pickup truck run a red light at
Northwest 25 Street and 112
Avenue and continue south on
Northwest 112 Avenue. She
followed the vehicles as they
entered and drove through
the Dolphin Mall parking lot.
Meanwhile, a BOLO (be on the
lookout) was issued for a white
minivan identifying the occu-
pants as the subjects of a home
invasion robbery. They were be-
ing followed by the victim driv-
ing a green pick-up truck.
Byrd got on the air and ad-


vised of the location o
hicle and the current
stances. As the miniver


LT. ANDRIANNE

up to the entrance of
two of the occupants


)f the ve- out. Giving their description
circum- and location, Byrd pursed the
an pulled subjects into the mall and into
the Old Navy store. As she fol-
lowed them through the store,
one of the subjects began to
run. Byrd chased him on foot
as he ran out of the mall, where
additional units had arrived,
and placed him under arrest.
She then returned to the store
with the other officers and saw
that the second subject was still
in the store. He was quickly ap-
prehended.
.. Byrd initial actions of fol-
lowing both vehicles and then
the two subjects into the mall
Resulted in removing not only
-- the two dangerous subjects
she apprehended, but also led
/' / to the arrest of the two addi-
tional subjects. Although she
f Jis assigned to an administra-
tive function, she was quick to
BYRD follow her suspicions. She is a
credit to the department and to
the mall, the entire law enforcement pro-
s jumped fession.


Michelle Obama and Jill Biden


draw 8,000 to FAMU voter rally


By Steve Bousquet

TALLAHASSEE Michelle
Obama wrapped up a two-week
nationwide voter registration
push Saturday with a large, en-
thusiastic rally on the campus
of Florida A&M University.
An estimated 8,000 fired-
up Barack Obama supporters,
many of them college students,
stood for two hours under a
cloudless sky as Jill Biden, the
wife of vice presidential nomi-
nee Joe Biden, introduced Mrs.
Obama. She received a thun-
derous ovation on the campus
of the nation's largest histori-
cally black university.
"Let's hear it for the Rattlers!"
Mrs. Obama shouted.
Dozens of people with arms
outstretched aimed their cell
phones to catch a picture of
the candidates' wives, 75 yards
away. Young mothers hoisted
children on their shoulders
as Obama campaign workers


worked the crowd, distributing
forms to volunteers.
After rattling off a list of is-
sues from a "broken" health
care system to a costly war in
Iraq to high fuel and food pric-
es, Mrs. Obama asked: "Isn't
it time that we have new solu-
tions, that we put the old ways
aside? Shouldn't we have lead-
ers who get it?"
She spoke of her husband's
background as the child of a
teenage single mother who died
of ovarian cancer at 53, and
who couldn't obtain health in-
surance because her cancer
was a "pre-existing condition."
Mrs. Obama spoke at length
about why all college students
should be registered to vote,
claiming 600,000 African-
American adults in Florida still
aren't registered more than
enough, she said, to decide an
election's outcome.
"Many believe that so goes
Florida, so goes the rest of the


country. So people are going to
watch what happens here," Mrs.
Obama said. "You have a chance
to make change, but you can't if
you're not registered."
As Mrs. Obama finished her
25-minute speech, a booming
sound system cranked out Ste-
vie Wonder's Signed, Sealed and
Delivered.
At a card table with a "Voter
Registration" sign on it, vol-
unteer Cheryl Williams urged
students who are already reg-
istered to vote elsewhere to re-
register in Leon County so they
don't have to request absentee
ballots.
Ion Sancho, the Leon County
supervisor of elections, said in
a telephone interview that he
encourages students to register
in the capital city's county. He
said that while the voter regis-
tration deadline is Oct. 6, vot-
ers have until Election Day to
transfer their address to Leon
County.


Do you trust your bank with your money

considering the financial meltdown?


DOMAR DYRD, 29
Driver, Liberty City

Banks and
stock mar-

ing. I rather
see my money
at home in
my own bank
without the in-
terest. I don't
have a bank account right now
but I won't get one until the
banks straighten themselves
out. They need stability.

STACEY BERTIL, 19
Student, North Miami

We cannot ...-... _
continue to
live in panic in
this country.
Every time we
hear fire, we
have a tenden-
cy to run to the
nearest exit. --
Yes, we know
that the economy is in a crisis
and in a crisis things happen,
so these are one of the things.
I do have a bank account and I
will keep my money in the bank
despite what's going in. Things


will get better but we also have
to get better in our consump-
tion. We can't buy everything
that we see.

WENDELL LOVETT, 39
Restaurant employee, Liberty City

I have an
account with .
Washington .
Mutual Bank.
Although the
banks are
currently in a
crisis, Ibelieve c
that things
will get better by next year. I
am not going to lose hope in
the banks. Besides, I need the
bank because I want to start
my business so the bank defi-
nitely cannot crash.


MAURICE STRANGE, 33
Dry cleaner, Liberty City

The way the
system is
set up with
the comput-
ers, if the
computers
crash then
I don't have '
any money.


I think that it is important to
keep some money in the bank
but the best bank is at home.

DERRICK GARNER, 34
Construction Worker, Miami

With the
bank foreclos-
ing right now,
it is best for
you to save
the money
yourself. I do
have a bank
account but I
prefer not having my money in
the bank.

LASHAUMBA RANDOLPH, 31
Entrepreneur, Liberty City

I have a checking account to
pay only my
bills online.
I can do my
own saving. I
don't trust the
banks at all. j

iI


dq












Southeastern U.S. service stations, such as this Circle K station in Columbia, S.C., have had to
deal with gas shortages for weeks. -Photo by Mary Ann Chastain


Gas shortage enters third week


By Larry Copeland

ATLANTA A storm-related
gas shortage in the Southeast
that has left some places bone-
dry and others with two-hour
gas lines is expected to continue
for at least another two weeks,
energy experts and industry of-
ficials say.
The shortage began two weeks
after Hurricane Gustav hit the
oil-refining regions of the Gulf
Coast on Sept. 1. Operations
that shut down before that
storm were just coming back
online when Hurricane Ike hit,
forcing another shutdown. The
gas shortage, now in its third


week, is particularly acute here
in sprawling Atlanta, in Nash-
ville in parts of the Carolinas
and in Anniston, Ala.
"I don't go anywhere once I
find some and get my tank filled
up," says Alicia Woods, 32, who
waited 45 minutes to fill up
Sunday morning at a QuikTrip
in Cobb County, Ga. "Going out,
visiting friends, all that just has
to wait. I have to keep my gas for
getting back and forth to work."
Long gas lines continued to
plague the Charlotte area over
the weekend. Asheville, N.C.,
shut down some government of-
fices Friday.
"Things were pretty severe to


the point gas stations did not
have gas, and the ones that did
have gas had an hour to two-
hour wait," said city spokes-
woman Trisha Hardin.
The pipelines that supply the
region are operating at less than
normal, capacity, due largely to
storm-related power outages at
Texas refineries, said Kenneth
Medlock, energy fellow at the
Baker Institute, a non-partisan
public policy think tank at Rice
University in Houston.
The Southeast, the only region
of the nation that has no oil re-
fining or major gasoline storage
capacity, pumps all of its gaso-
line in by pipeline, he said.


Pahokee prep player shot to death


By Jim Halley

Pahokee, football player
Norman Griffith, 18, was shot
to death early Saturday morning
in Belle Glade, Fla., just hours
after his team's homecoming 34-
10 win against Jupiter. Griffith
had attended a dance at the
Bill Bailey Community Center
in Belle Glade after the game
and got into a confrontation
with a group that didn't like


his school colors, the Palm
Beach Sheriffs Office said. As
he was leaving the center in
his Dodge Durango truck, he
was shot in the head.
Pahokee decided to play
its game Friday at Byrnes
(Duncan, S.C.), the top team
in USA TODAY's Super 25 high
school football rankings, after
finding out the funeral would
not be held until Oct. 11.
"Our concentration right


now is on Norman's family,"
Pahokee coachBlazeThompson
said Sunday. "If the game is to
happen, God willing, we'll be
going to Byrnes. We're going
to plan as if we're going, but
right now, there are no funeral
arrangements."
Thompson said the Blue
Devils, the defending Florida
2B champions, would play
only if it meant not missing
Griffith's funeral.


REGISTER TO VOTE

at the offices of


The Miami Times

DEADLINE OCTOBER 6


_ I ~~~__













After four storms, Haiti struggles to rebuild


Local leaders: Island needs plan

before moving forward


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitirnesonline.com
A busy hurricane season has
resulted in four hurricanes:
Faye, Gustav, Hanna and Ike
rippling through the island of
Haiti in less than two months.
According to the United Na-
tions, hundreds of
people have died and
thousands are await-
ing aid.
With over 200,000
Haitians currently
residing in South
Florida, the call to
help Haiti has been
answered by the
community in set-
ting up drives to col-
lect non-perishable BE
food, clothing, and
water. There are
more storms to come, accord-
ing to National Weather Service,


who have predicted over fifteen
storms for this season. Before
moving forward, Marliene Bas-
tien, executive director of Fanm
Ayisyen Nan Miyami/ Haitian
Women of Miami (FANM), says
Haiti needs a plan.
"It is not a matter of just send-
ing money but fully investing
into the country. We
need a strategic plan
on how to move for-
ward with Haiti," said
Bastien. "We need to
organize ourselves as
a country."
President Preval
has asked for more
help in fighting drug
traffickers, a trade
bill by the U.S. Con-
SE gress to assist in cre-
ating more employ-
ment and Temporary
Protective Status (TPS) for un-
documented Haitians currently


residing in the United States.
He previously requested $60
million from the U.S.
government to assist .
in funding the pur-
chase of rice, flour,
and cooking oil.
Tracy Lozam, a
representative from
City of Miami Com-
missioner Michelle j
Spence-Jones (Dis-
trict 5), visited Haiti
with Commissioner BAS
Spence Jones recent-
ly. Lozam said that
the morale of the people in the
country are very low.
"Right now, Haiti needs strong
and sustained support. This
will be essential for addressing
the structural and institutional
foundations that are helpful to
long-term economic and social
development. Haiti needs help
to improve their infrastructure.
They have agriculture needs
where the farmers need to have
the means to revive their crops.
Haiti's government is doing ev-
erything that they can but has


few resources to help. Food
supplies and water are scarce
and the price of the
food that's left is ris-
ing," said Lozam.
Many people on
the island live on less
than $2 a day. People
need jobs says Rep.
Ronald Brise (D-FL).
Brise, who visited
Haiti last June, said
that due to the in-
rIEN frastructure, people
cannot evacuate be-
fore the storms. The
country has no proper infra-
structure. The country needs
improvement.
Brise believes the country
must consider what products
can be exported and what
can be home grown. The four
storms wiped out almost 60
percent of Haiti's agriculture.
Much of Haiti's once productive
farmland has been deserted as
farmers struggle to produce
crops in soil destroyed by de-
forestation, erosion, flooding,
and tropical storms.


Brise says immigration still occurred in the flooded region
remains a huge problem for of Gonaives and Hurricane Ike
Haitians. Marliene has only increased
Bastien, who has these numbers. Go-
traveled to Wash- 'naives has been al-
ington lobbying for most entirely cut off
Temporary Protect- by Hanna's floodwa-
ed Status (TPS) for. ters as virtual lakes
Haitians, previously have formed over ev-
told The Miami Times ery road ... I am con-
that, "We need an im- cerned that the flow
mediate TPS for Hai- of humanitarian food
tians who have been aid is being dramati-
living here since the DESPINOSSE cally hindered by the
1990's, working, lack of infrastructure
paying taxes and resulting from the
contributing to this country's storm."
economy. Haiti is still recov- Two weeks ago, Immigration
ering from the worse natural and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
and political disasters, and we made the decision to temporar-
need to keep the 1.23 billion a ily suspend the deportation of
year in remittances flowing, if Haitians in the U.S.
we want to keep the Haitians Vice mayor of the City of North
at home and not risking their Miami Jacques Despinosse vis-
lives in rickety boats to get to ited Haiti earlier this year and
Florida." said that, "While I was in Haiti,
Congressman Kendrick Meek I was able to receive my own
wrote a letter to President perceptive of things. I can hon-
George Bush earlier this month, estly say that Haiti needs help
in which he states, "Eighty of from the U.S. There is a enough
the deaths attributed to Hanna of us here to help Haiti."


Obama's wife MNIchI-e wws the women

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Jo THIRD TE ll!


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


RI


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


ST










BLACKS MUST CONTROl THEIR OWN,;bESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Congress gives $100 Million in emergency aid for Haiti


U.S. Representatives Alcee
L. Hastings (D-Miramar) and
Kendrick B. Meek (D-Miami)
applauded the inclusion of
$100 million for hurricane relief
and reconstruction assistance
to Haiti and other Caribbean
nations in H.R. 2638, the
Consolidated Security, Disaster
Assistance and Continuing
Appropriations Act, which funds
the federal government through
March 6, 2009. The House of
Representatives approved this
bill on September 24.
"Though this funding is
only a small fraction of what
will be necessary to rebuild
this devastated nation, I am
encouraged by this Congress'
commitment to helping the
Haitian people recover from
the tragic events of this
past month," Representative


*(I to r) U.S. Reps. Alcee Hastings (D-FL), Kendrick B. Meek (D-FL) and Maxine Waters (D-CA) confer before
the Congressional hearing to discuss the ongoing crisis in Haiti.


Hastings stated. "Haiti and the
United States are inextricably
tied by our geographic
proximity and historical
relationship. It is not only our
country's moral obligation to
help Haiti, but it is also in our
own self-interest to ensure the
long-term development of our
Hemisphere's poorest country."
"The US Congress and the
American public stand shoulder
to shoulderwith the international
community in providing needed
humanitarian assistance to the
Haitian people. This emergency
funding is a good start for Haiti,
but more needs to be done,"
said Representative Kendrick
B. Meek. "Haitians 'overqualify'
for Temporary Protected Status
and the drumbeat of support
continues throughout the nation
and in the halls of Congress to


grant Haitians TPS." '
As Co-Chairmen of the
Congressional Black Caucus'
Haiti Working Group,
Representatives Hastings) and
Meek have been leaders in the
fight to increase U.S. assistance
to Haiti and to end double-
standard immigration policies
by granting Temporary Protected
Status to Haitians currently
residing in the United States.
They have worked with several
Members of Congress, including
Representatives John Conyers
(D-MI), Yvette Clarke (D-NY),
Charles Rangel (D-NY), Maxine
Waters (D-CA), Eliot Engel (D-
NY), and Barbara Lee (D-CA), to.
ensure that the United States
provides sustained, responsible
assistance to support Haiti's
long-term recovery and
redevelopment.


Women rule the roost, and that's OK with men


Study measures key domestic areas


By Sharon Jayson

Around the house, women
rule. And men aren't putting up
a fight about it, according to a
study from the Pew Research
Center that examines how gen-
der and power play out at home
and in the community.
Of 1,260 individuals surveyed
this summer- either married or
living together women wield
more decision-making power at
home. In 43% of couples, women
made more decisions almost
twice as many as men in the
four areas Pew surveyed: plan-
ning weekend activities, house-
hold finances, major home pur-
chases and TV watching.
The survey also found 43% of
men don't have the final say in
any of those decisions; they ei-
ther share decision-making or
defer to their partners.
"Across all decision-making
realms, it tilts to the woman,"says
Rich Morin, lead author of the
study, being released today.
"I was surprised by the per-
centage of men who made none
of the decisions in any of the
areas. A significant percentage
were just bystanders."
Such responses run counter


to societal beliefs, says Melinda
Forthofer, director of the Insti-
tute for Families in Society at
the University of South Caroli-
na-Columbia.
"Despite the fact that in our
society, we have had this no-
tion of males as heads of house-
holds, we have seen the pattern
that women tend to really be the
managers of the home."
And men don't seem to mind,
she says: "When they're not in
the workplace, they're content to
follow their partner's lead."
As for household finances, the
Pew study found that couples
disagree on who has the great-
er say. About 45% of women
surveyed said they manage the
family's money; 37% of men said
they manage it.
The survey didn't ask couples
whether they shared decision-
making, but 31% volunteered
that they do.
"It's encouraging how many
decisions couples are making
together," says Ellen Galinsky,
president of the Families and
Work Institute, a non-partisan
research organization.
Older couples are more likely
than younger couples to make
decisions together, the study


found. More than a third of those
65 or older said they share deci-
sion-making in at least three of
the four areas; in couples under
30, 42% said they don't share
any of those decisions. Just
8% of couples overall said they
make decisions together in all
four areas.
"We'd all like to believe we're
moving toward gender equal-
ity not just in the workplace
but in the home," Morinsays.


Hastings' anti-Palin remarks labeled racist


LOS ANGELES/Christian
Newswire/ Lase Wednesday,
Florida Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-
Fla.) speaking to the National
Jewish Democratic Council,
warned Black and Jewish vot-
ers to be wary of Sarah Palin
because "anybody toting guns
and stripping moose don't care
too much about what they do
with Jews and Blacks." Hast-
ings is a former federal judge
who was impeached and re-
moved from the bench in 1989
for perjury and corruption.
He's been in Congress since
1992. Rev. Jesse Lee Peter-
son, Founder and President of
Bond Action, Inc., repudiated
his remarks. The following is
Rev. Peterson's statement on
this issue:
"Alcee Hastings' deplorable
comments about Sarah Palin
are elitist, racially divisive and
should be repudiated by Sen.
Obama and The Congressional


ALCEE HASTINGS (D-FLA.)
Black Caucus. I would also like
to know who Hastings is refer-
ring to when he says 'what they
do to Black and Jews.' Who are
'they'?
"We're seeing an increasing
trend of race and class warfare
being used by Obama and his
surrogates during this election.


To hear Rep. Hastings and
Sen. Obama's condescending
attitudes towards mainstream
Americans with traditional val-
ues is disturbing.
"Earlier this year, Michelle
Obama said 'for the first time
in my adult life, I am proud of
my country.' In April, Barack
Obama showed his true col-
ors when he described small
town Americans as 'bitter' and
that they 'cling to guns or re-
ligion or antipathy to people
who aren't like them.' To the
contrary Mr. Obama, it's you
and your socialist friends who
have shown antipathy towards
hard-working Americans.
"My fellow Americans, it's
crystal clear that the Obama's
and their supporters in The
Congressional Black Caucus
are out of touch and don't
much care for the core values
and the good people that make
this great country work."


Commissioner plans to hold more food drives


HAITI
continued from 1A

will receive the most use from
them."
An entire 40-foot container
was filled with donations by
the end of the event, which
Commissioner Rolle will per-
sonally deliver to Haiti with
help from Food For The Poor.
Nopin Long Distance donated
10 percent of their recharged
minutes from September 8 to
September 27 to the relief ef-
fort, and Bakery Cafe contrib-
uted 10 percent of their food
sales, totaling approximately


$9,000. The Jackson Health
Trust also donated $25,000
worth of medical supplies to go
to the island. Haiti Shipping
Lines will ship the containers
with the donations to Haiti.
Popular local and Haitian re-
cording artists performed live
at the event, including Sweet
Micky, Brisco, DJ Prince
Markie Dee, Hangout, Gabel,
Misty Jean, Robert Martino,
Ball Greezy, Bizzle, Cuttaman
and DJ Rhyma, Suave, Suave,
DJ Red Eyes, and Pistache
Grye and Kiko (who moved
the audience by waving the
Haitian flag on stage during


their performance). Franky
Mixalot, DJ K-9, and DJ Kool
G also kept the crowd hyped
with great music. Comedians
Aubry Blague and Larry Dogg,
and radio personalities Ed Lo-
zama and Piment Bouc joined
Commissioner Rolle, motivat-
ing guests to contribute to
Haiti.
HELP FOR HAITI's me-
dia partners included WMIB
103.5 The Beat, with special
thanks also going to 99 Jamz
and 1020 Radio Mega. Com-
missioner Rolle plans to hold
more food drives for Haiti on a
continual basis.


"There's evidence that men are
doing more around the house
these days, but when it comes
to absolute equality in decision-
making, it's the exception,not
the rule, in the typical American
couple."


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NEW TRANSIT FARES




EFFECTIVE OCT. 1,2008

Fares have not kept pace with rising operating, maintenance and fuel costs. To keep up with rising operating
costs, Miami-Dade Transit will increase its fares on October 1, 2008. Although adjustments will continue to be
made to operate more efficiently, the fare increase will enable MDT to provide the highest level of service pos-
sible to our valued transit customers.


Metrobus
Express Bus
Shuttle Bus
Metrorail
Metrorail reduced-fare permit
Metrorail daily parking fee
Metrorail monthly parking permit
Metromover
Special Transportation Service (STS)
Bus-to-Bus Transfer
Bus-to-Express Bus Transfer
Bus-to-Rail Transfer
Rail-to-Bus Transfer
Metropass
Discount Metropass
Metropass Group Discount 5-99 passes


Fare
$2 (or one token)


Reduced Fare*


$2.35 (or one token + 250) $1.15


$2
Not applicable
$4
$10
Free
$3
500
500 transfer + 35s
500
50
$100
$50
$90


Metropass Group Discount 100 or more passes $85


College Metropass
7-Day Visitor Passport
Golden Passport and Patriot Passport
One Roll of 10 Tokens


$42.50
$26
Free
$19.50


100
$1
650 per month
Not applicable
Not applicable
Free
Not applicable
250
25t transfer + 150
250
250
Not applicable
Not applicable
Not applicable
Not applicable
Not applicable
$13
Free
Not applicable


Golden Passport and Patriot Passport users will continue to ride free. Metromover service continues to be free for
everyone. Transfer rates will remain the same.
Today's record-high gas prices make using transit the best bargain. Not only do commuters save at the pump, but also
benefit from less stress and less wear and tear on their vehicles.
When businesses join the Corporate Discount Program, employees pay less for their monthly Metropass and
parking at Metrorail stations. Find out how easy it is to join our program. For complete details, send an email to
ccelestin@miamidade.gov or call 786-469-5558.

*Reduced fare for Medicare recipients, most people with disabilities, and local students (grades 1-12) anytime with valid pemiit/VD.


Customer Services: 305-770-3131. Toll free south of SW 216 St: 305-891-3131.
TTY (deaf or with hearing impairments): 305-499-8971.


MIAMIDAD3
EmHEl


www.miamidade.gov/transit


DUI/License Suspension
Seal Records


Who makes more decisions at home?


43%


Source Pew Research Center, based on questions
about chcos4ng shared weekenden d act-.ies tbuinqg
tilNs for the honr deading vhat to w'.at zh on TV and
mai3r in househdd finances The martin of error for
the 1,260 indhiiduzis es 3 perccrtage points
By Julie Snider USA TOOAY


"If the lions do not write their own
history, then the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


I


I


r]FO"A'Y!
I E-1


''


mmorl-







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


r' 34 % feel Obama can fix economy


E --x "



Some of the guests pictured above: Fredericka D. Wanza, Theta Wanza Shipp, Anna Grace Sweeting,
Nancy Dawkins, Tammy Saffold, Jonathan, Allen and Mildred Meeks, Cynthia Hollinger, Ophelia Ward,
James W.Wanza III, Robert Malone, Dawn Palmer, Audrey Hadley and Carol Hadley

90th birthday celebration for Fredericka Wanza


Fredericka Dean Wanza cel-
ebrated her 90th birthday at
the Historic St. Agnes Episco-
pal Church and parish hall in
Overtown. Mrs. Wanza was sur-
prised when family and friends
gathered to worship with her on
Sunday, September 28, at the 9
a.m. service. Everyone attended
a luncheon where she received
two proclamations from Miami-
Dade County declaring Sunday,
September 28, 2008 as Freder-
ick D. Wanza Day. Mayor Shirley
Gibson also sent a proclamation


of commendation for her years
of service in the field of educa-
tion and for being an outstand-
ing business leader in the City
of Miami Gardens. She was
also recognized by school board
members Dr. Wilbert T. Hollo-
way and Dr. Solomon Stinson
along with Bishop Isaiah S. Wil-
liams of Jesus People Ministries
International.
State Senator Arthenia Joyner
sent a birthday letter to her
godmother (Mrs. Wanza) thank-
ing her for her contributions


to education. Mrs. Wanza had
family members from Jackson-
ville, Tampa, Ft. Lauderdale
and Homestead at her birthday
party luncheon with more that
150 people attending.
Also in attendance was Judge
Karen Francis, Mrs. Marva
Pieze Duhart and husband,
Mrs. Nancy Dawkins, members
of the Transfiguration Episco-
pal Church, guests from Christ
Episcopal Church and Betty
Young White of Alpha Kappa Al-
pha Sorority.


Children's museums grow out, not up


By Kitty Bean Yancey


Museums for kids keep getting
bigger and better.
The Brooklyn Children's Mu-
seum just reopened in a newly
expanded, daffodil-yellow build-
ing that's about double its previ-
ous size. The museum in Crown
Heights was closed for a year dur-
ing the $80 million expansion.
Kids can play in a giant sand-
box, get a bug's-eye view of a log,
harvest toy vegetables in a gar-
den and touch a 20-foot albino
python.
Museum entrance will be free
from 5 to 8 Friday nights, through
Oct. 24. Special opening admis-
sion rates are $5 for adults and
kids before Dec. 1; $7.50 a per-
son after that. Information: 718-
735-4400; brooklynkids.org.
Meanwhile, Philadelphia's


y. ,-q ~


Brooklyn Children's Museum: Sakura Bellamy, left, 8, and Sirius Sha-
baka, 4, splash and learn. -Photo by Diane Bondareff, Brooklyn Children's Museum


Please Touch Museum opens
renovated and enlarged quarters
in Fairmount Park on Oct. 18.
Young visitors can design their
fantasy car, make and launch


flying machines and build race
boats. Admission is $15 for
adults and children 1 and old-
er. Information: 215-581-3181;
pleasetouchmuseum.org.


DEBATE
continued from 1A

Several indicators showed
did better overall than McCain,
46%-34%.
Last week, McCain tried to
delay the debate because of the
Wall Street crisis. This week also
promises to be fast-moving for
the two senators as the bailout
plan comes to the Senate floor
midweek and vice presiden-
tial candidates Sarah Palin,
a Republican, and Joe Biden,
a Democrat, debate Thursday
night in St. Louis.
Obama strengthening his po-
sition:
Obama was the only leader
or institution with a net positive
rating on handling the crisis in
a USA Today/Gallup Poll taken
Friday and Saturday 46%
approved, 43% disapproved.
For McCain, the numbers were
37% approve, 58% disapprove.
Democratic and GOP congres-
sional leaders, Treasury Secre-
tary Henry Paulson and Presi-
dent Bush also did poorly.
Four national polls Sun-
day showed Obama with leads
of 5 to 8 percentage points.
The Gallup Poll had the larg-
est margin, 50%-42%. All four
polls are based on three-night
averages, so Sunday's results
were the first to have post-de-
bate interviews.


Independent analyst Charlie
Cook says Obama was in po-
sition to benefit more because
he was "the greater unknown
factor. To the extent that the
debate ... allowed more people
to feel more comfortable with
him."
The debate had a positive
impact for Obama on handling
the economy; 34% said they
had more confidence in him to
fix economic problems; 26%
had less. For McCain, 37%
said they had less confidence;
23% had more.
Women gave Obama a
20-point edge on doing a bet-
ter job in the debate. Men,
more evenly divided, tilted
slightly toward McCain. Inde-
pendents said Obama did bet-
ter, 43%-33%.
Obama's advantage was
much narrower than the 57%
who said Democrat John
Kerry did better than Presi-
dent Bush in their first de-
bate in 2004 (25% said Bush
did better). Mark Mellman,
Kerry's pollster in 2004, says
the underlying trends favor-
ing Democrats this year are
probably more important than
the debates. His evidence:
Polls showed that Kerry won
all three against Bush. "If de-
bates were decisive, John Ker-
ry would be campaigning for
his second term," he says.


FDIC insured makes you money safe


BANKS
continued from 1A

acquire Wachovia's (WB)
banking business, a deal that
was also negotiated by the
FDIC.
The FDIC emphasized that
Wachovia didn't fail and that
all depositors were protected.
Likewise, none of Washington


Mutual's depositors lost any
money, and customers have
experienced no disruption in
service.
No one has ever lost a dime
of FDIC-insured deposits.
Still, the prospect of a bank
failure unnerves a lot of
people, particularly in light of
ongoing mayhem in the stock
market.


KEV. E. ICIAKLS LULHMKAN
Soul Saving Revival
Soul Saving M.B. Church,
Rev. Jodie Alexander, pastor
invites you to our fall revival.
Our services will be held at Jor-
dan Grove M.B. Church, 5946
N.W. 12 Ave. Our evangelist for
the week is Rev. E. Charles Co-
chran, pastor of Floyd Chapel
Baptist Church of Stockbridge,
Georgia. Beginning October 7
thru 10 at 7:30 p.m. nightly.
There will be local choirs from
the city rendering our song ser-
vice. We invite you to worship
with us. For more information
contact Pastor Jodie Alexander
at 305-696-3389.

True Grace in Revival
True Grace will be in ser-
vice Friday, October 3 at 7:30
p.m. There will be many guests.
Come one, come all to see signs
and wonders at Mt. Claire Holi-
ness Church, 7975 N.W. 22nd
Avenue.

Gospel Lyrics
celebration reunion

Sunday, October 5 at 4 p.m.
The Gospel Lyrics celebration re-
union at Greater Holy Cross M B
Church. Special guests include,
Smiling Jubilees, Southern
Echoes, Wimberly Sisters, The
Carnations, Holy Ghost Faith
Deliverance Choir and others.
The church is located at 1555
N.W. 93 Terrace, Rev. Dr. Willie
L. Strange Sr, Pastor. For more
information, call Mother Rachel
Ross 786-413-3639


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L~d-







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Statistic shows that abortion is higher among Black women


ABORTION
continued from 1A

a blessing, even if the mother
is raped. There are people who
are unable to have children
so people who have abortions
are very selfish to me. It is re-
ally easy--if you don't want a
child then don't have sex, but
if you do have sex, use protec-
tion," said 25 year- old Sandra
Jean-Pierre.
Dr. Nelson L. Adams, a gyne-
cologist at North Shore Medi-
cal Center, says the medical
definition of abortion is "the
termination of a pregnancy
that occurs prior to viabil-
ity [an early stage pregnancy
usually ranging from 20-27
weeks]. Different states have
different laws."
Florida statutes prohibit the
termination of a child in the


third trimester (the third tri-
mester is defined by the state
as weeks of pregnancy after
the 24th week of pregnancy)
unless "Two physicians certify
in writing to the fact that, to
a reasonable degree of medical
probability, the termination of
pregnancy is necessary to save
the life or preserve the health
of the pregnant woman; or the
physician certifies in writing
to the medical necessity for
legitimate emergency medical
procedures for termination
of pregnancy in the third tri-
mester, and another physician
is not available for consulta-
tion."
Earlier this year, Florida
legislators attempted to pass
an abortion-ultrasound bill
which would offer women a
chance to see an ultrasound of
their unborn baby before hav-


ing an abortion, the bill
was failed by the Flor-
ida Senate. The House
passed the bill on a
70-45 vote but the bill
was tossed out by the
Senate.
Planned Parenthood JEAN-
estimates that more
than 1 out of 3 women
in the U.S. will have an abor-
tion before they are 45. In
'2004, there were 91,710 re-
ported legal abortions in Flor-
ida, according to the Henry
J. Kaiser Foundation. Florida
was ranked number two in
abortions in that same year.
Alexandra Gaspard, a 24
year-old student, says abor-
tion and murder are equal be-
cause a life is taken away. If a
woman is raped or molested,
under these conditions, abor-
tion would be justified.


F


The Guttmacher In-
stitute reported that 50
percent of U.S. women
obtaining abortions are
under the age of 25.
Thirty-three (33) per-
cent consist of women
PIERRE between 20-24 and 17
percent were teenagers.
The National Abortion
Federation (NAF) reports that
approximately 13,000 women
have an abortion each year
because they are pregnant as
a result of rape or incest.
"Abortion has been played
into politics for years now
and, in my opinion, the gov-
ernment should not decide
whether a woman can or can
not keep a child. The decision
should be left to the woman,"
said Rachelle Noel, a 25 year-
old student at Florida Memo-
rial University.


Ingrid Bazin, 34 year-old
single parent, says she doesn't
understand why people would
even consider abortion when
there are alternatives to child-
birth and pregnancy -- adop-
tion. Bazin believes that in the
case of rape or incest a woman
has a choice to decide whether
to keep the child or not. She
says that women who already
have too many children do not
need anymore.
According to Guttmacher In-
stitute research in July 2008,
69 percent of Black women
had unplanned pregnancies
that led to an abortion. Black
women accounted for 37 per-
cent of abortions. Eight per-
cent of women who had abor-
tions never used birth control.
The nonuse of birth control
was greater among Hispanics
and Blacks. Sixty percent of


women (of all races), who ob-
tained an abortion, had one or
more children.
Dr. Adams says that women
who have repeated abortions
could possibly have problems
in getting pregnant because
the cervix will be weakened
due to multiple abortions.
"Women who are on drugs or
mentally unstable do not need
to have anymore children. An
unhappy parent cannot raise
healthy children. There is an
emotional toll that pregnancy
causes on a healthy, mar-
ried woman. Let alone a sin-
gle, raped, molested and un-
healthy woman is irreversible,"
said Bazin. Overall, she says
that "What a woman chooses
to do with her body should be
her sole concern and her fam-
ily. No man, judge or jury, can
force me to have a child."


Police say that crime rate has increased in the area


GARLAND
continued from 1A

and 18th Avenue when he was
approached by what appears to
be onesuspect who intended to
rob him. Garland was shot in
the back and died on his way
to the hospital, according to the
family.
Howell says her son had a
meek spirit and was a quiet man
who never bothered anyone. An
average day for Garland was
going to work, spending the day
with his son and working out
at the gym. Howell is frustrated
that no witnesses have come
forward because she believes
that someone saw something.
"People said that they heard
gun shots and called 911 but
somebody had to have seen
something."
Williams believes that this is
a senseless crime. She says the
community must stick together
in times like these because they


cannot allow criminals to take
over the streets.
"Unfortunately, there has
been a spree of violent crimes
in the area," said Detective
Juan Segovia from the Miami-
Dade Police Department. In
a 2006 survey by the Morgan
Quitno Press, Miami Gardens
was named as one of the most
dangerous cities to live in the
United States.
Miami Gardens Chief of
Police Matthew Boyd said the
statistical report from August
2007-08 showed that crimes in
Miami Gardens have decreased
by 19 percent.
According to FBI statistics,
violent crime has decreased
1.4 percent nationwide but
has increased in almost every
South Florida city with more
than 100,000 residents. Miami
Gardens had close to 2,000
violent crimes in 2007. Violent
crimes have increased in Miami
from 5,931 to 6120.


- Al
|


Victim Michael Garland on recent vacation with his family in Orlando.


"The hardest part is that he
was not only my dad but he was
my friend who taught me how to
play basketball," said 24 year-
old Michael Garland Jr. He is
Garland's oldest son.
The family is seeking donations
so that they can increase the
reward money in hopes that
someone will come forward to
bring justice to this case. The
reward money is currently
$1000.


Miami-Dade police are
currently handling the
investigation (they handle Miami
Gardens homicide cases) and
together with the Miami Gardens
Police Department, they have
been distributing flyers to
residents and canvassing the
neighborhood looking for clues
and answers to this crime. "So
far, there are no suspects but we
are pursuing some leads," said
Segovia.


It's an 'extremely worrisome situation'


ECONOMY
continued from 1A

economist Nouriel Roubini
wrote on his influential blog.
Monday's damage wasn't
limited to U.S. stocks. In
Brazil, trading was suspended
after stocks sank 13.8%.
Germany, Iceland and the
United Kingdom moved to
save several threatened
banks. And today in Tokyo,
the Nikkei index was down
4.6% by afternoon trading.
The market bloodbath
capped an extraordinary
day in the USA's citadels of
finance and politics. Earlier
Monday, the Federal Reserve
announced it had acted along
with nine foreign central banks
to address a "shortfall" of U.S.
dollars in world markets,
effectively making available a
total of $620 billion.
In a deal midwived by the


Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp., Citigroup announced
plans to acquire Wachovia's
banking operations in a $2.1
billion all-stock transaction.
It was the latest in a flurry
of recent deals that have
reshaped the U.S. banking
industry.
Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson, in the White House
driveway, said he was "very
disappointed" with the House
vote. "We need to work as
quickly as possible. We need
to get something done,"
Paulson said.
Presidential rivals traded
potshots while urging renewed
dealmaking. "One of the
messages I have to Congress
is: Get this done," said
Democrat Barack Obama.
Said Republican John McCain:
"Now it's time for all members
of Congress to go back to the
drawing board."


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._ Thanks to your support,



Iam now in a run-off on November 4th.



Your continued help would be



greatly appreciated. -Yvonne







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The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


The Historic Saint Agnes' Episcopal Church

PRESENTS A 2008 CALENDAR TEA BENEFIT ORGAN CONCERT

Featuring Dr Carl W. Haywood, Sunday, October 12 v uui
1750 Northwest Third Avenue S -


The concert features Carl W. Hay-
wood, a native of Portsmouth, Virgin-
ia is a cum laude graduate of Norfolk
State University and a recipient of the
Master of Sacred Music (organ) and
Master of Music (chorale conducting)
degrees from Southeastern Methodist
University. Dr. Haywood was awarded
the Doctor of Musical Arts degree from
the University of Southern California.
He is recognized as a superb cho-
ral conductor/organist. Dr. Haywood
served as the Service Music Editor for
Lift Every' Voice and Sing II: An Afri-
can American Hymnal published by
Church Publishing Company of the
Episcopal Church.
He is also the leading contributor to
Wonder, Love and Praise (supplement
to the Episcopal Hymnal.) His latest
congregational compositions appear
in the following hymnals: "This Far


By Faith" (Lutheran); "The Faith We
Sing" (Methodist); "African American
Heritage Hymnal" (Catholic); "Wor-
ship In Song" (Friends); "Sing The
Faith" (Presbyterian.) Dr. Haywood is
one of the leading church musician s
in the field. Dr. Hawood is a member
of the American Chorus Directors As-
sociation.
The American Guild of Organists.
The Association of Anglican Musi-
cians, The National Association of
Negro Musicians, Kappa Kappa Psi
Band Fraternity, P1 Kappa Lambda
and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,
Inc. A devoted teacher and friend of
students and young musicians, Dr.
Havwood is Director of Choral Activi-
ties at NSU and conducts the NSU
Concert Choir.
Tickets are $15 for ticket informa-
tion call 305-573-5330.


CAR L W-. H V OOD
Conductor, Organist,
Composer, Clinician, Educator


New bishop stresses power of prayer


An array of colored choir
robes, each representing differ-
ent United Methodist churches
across the upstate New York
region, served as the backdrop
at Asbury First United Method-
ist Church on Sunday during
the welcoming ceremony for the
New York West Area's newly as-
signed bishop.
More than 500 people attend-
ed Sunday's service to listen
to and meet the new Episco-
pal leader for the area, Bishop
Marcus Matthews, who was
recently reassigned from the
Philadelphia area to replace
retired Bishop Violet L. Fish-
er. Matthews will oversee 261
churches in the Western New
York Conference and 400 in the
North Central New York Confer-
ence.
Matthews, 62, is originally
from Florence, S.C., and was
first elected bishop in 2004
during the Northeast Juris-
dictional Conference in Syra-
cuse, where he was assigned
to the Philadelphia Episcopal
Area of the United Methodist
Church. Bishops within the
United Methodist Church usu-
ally serve two four-year terms,
said spokeswoman Marilyn J.
Kasperek.
The area's newly assigned
bishop began his new four-year
term in the area Sep. 1, and
while addressing the church
crowd Sunday, Matthews said
he was pleased with the hos-
pitality that he and his fam-
ily have received from church
members from upstate New
York ministries.


k 0 f,


1%


I ~'4


Bishop Marcus Matthews, at left, Bishop Woodie White, at right, and
the Rev.W. Mark Rails, at back, go over last-minute preparations before
celebration of Matthews' assignment as the area's new bishop Sunday.


"So many acts of kindness,
even the vegetarian soup," he
said.
During the two-hour instal-
lation ceremony, several clergy
leaders spoke. Matthews was
presented with "signs of the
Episcopal Ministry" items
that had specific symbolisms
for the bishop's office. The
signs included a lamp, which
symbolized studying and
teaching, and a towel and ba-
sin, which symbolized service.
Nathaniel Bishop, who has
known Matthews for almost 25
years, said Matthews is one of
the most spiritual individuals
he knows. His self-discipline
guides and leads him, allow-
ing him to create and main-


tain effective ministries, said
Bishop.
If there is one thing Mat-
thews wants the New York
West church members take
away from him, he said, is
that they start each morning
with a prayer.
"I would not be standing
here if it was not for the power
of prayer," he said.
Positive thinking was anoth-
er item he discussed at length
with anecdotes.
"Friends, surround yourself
with people who are positive,"
Matthews told the gather-
ing, adding that roadblocks
in life should be seen as op-
portunities and not stumbling
blocks.


Copyrighted Material


Syndiatied C Wtent






Available from Commercial News Providers


Tyler Perry at the 16th Annual NAACP Theatre Awards in Beverly Hills California in
2006. -Photo by Clinton H.Wallace


Tyler Perry reminiscences on his past


ATLANTA Tyler Perry is
standing in the middle of what
was once a life on the brink.
It's a postage stamp of a
room. A 200-square-foot stu-
dio apartment that's more
heap than home: a broken tele-
vision set; a stained mattress
piled with broken end tables
and torn couch cushions; an
overflowing toilet caked with
waste.
Others stayed here after Per-
ry moved out years ago. "But
this is pretty much how I was
living," the director says, step-
ping over newspapers and a
roach trap. "This was my place,
and I was glad to have it."
The apartment building,
which sits near downtown
Atlanta off historic Peachtree
Street, is to be torn down this
month. But Perry, 38, wants a


final look at the place he called
home before he became the
most influential black film-
maker in the business today.
Letting go, Perry is the first
to concede, is not his strong
suit.
"I never want to forget how
close I came to losing every-
thing," he says. "My bed was
there. My stove was there -
mainly Ramen noodles. That
little corner there, that's where
my computer sat. That's where
I ran from my fears."
Those fears materialized in
the form of journals and short
plays, which Perry, on the ad-
vice of an episode of Oprah
Winfrey, wrote to come to terms
with a childhood of abuse and
poverty in New Orleans.
Perry is still running, still
remembering, still tapping out


dread on a computer screen.
Now, though, he makes mil-
lions doing it. Even among
Hollywood's elite, Perry has a
track record worth envying.
He has had four No. 1 films.
He has sold more than 11
million DVDs of his films and
videotaped stage plays. TBS
airs his half-hour show House
of Payne and has ordered up
a new one, Meet the Browns,
based on his film characters.
His movies cost about $10 mil-
lion; they take in, on average,
$47 million.

AUDIENCES TRUST HIM
He has found success by ca-
tering to audiences Hollywood
either doesn't get or doesn't
care about: moviegoers of faith
and color. Long before Mel
Please turn to PAST 11B


J[


f -

.. .: : '' ', V I' "^i .



,. ^" ; -:l


- my


Riat m t- |d sastik ,t,,,f d t i 1 1 10|%











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Holding on to the past


HOLDING ON
Continued From 10B

Gibson introduced the main-
stream to the clout of the de-
vout with Passion of the Christ,
Perry was commuting church to
church in a Geo Metro that brief-
ly doubled as his home, hawking
his one-man plays about faith
and family.
"We trust him," says Tenisha
Hart, 45, an Atlanta mother
of two who has never missed a
Perry film or play. "It's not about
being black though it's nice to
see yourself in a Hollywood mov-
ie once in a while. I know I can
take my kids. I know there will
be a good message. Critics can
say whatever they want; he's the
only one making movies about
people trying to live right."
But for all the success, some
doubt remains in the back of
Perry's mind. "I guess I'm still
running," he says. "Maybe not as
fast as I used to. But I still worry
I won't be able to say all I have
to say."
His latest movie, The Family
That Preys, examines the corro-
sive effects of wealth on friends
and family something Perry
has learned as he has become a
Hollywood force.
"Ever since I've been blessed
with success, I've struggled a
little with anonymity and even
Familyy" he says. "I've had people
calling asking for money, and I
have to ask them first, 'Are you

working? Have you been trying
to help yourself?'' Then I feel like


I can help. I don't want to be any
different than I was when I first
moved here."
He could only imagine his life
now when he drove to Atlanta
in 1992 in a Hyundai Excel that
leaked so much transmission
fluid into the passenger floor-
board that he had to stop every
two hours to siphon the fluid
back into the engine.
He was fleeing New Orleans to
escape a father he says routinely
came home drunk and violent.
The father, with whom Perry
says he has reconciled, could not
be reached for comment.
"You just never knew what
hell you were going to get Friday
or Saturday night," Perry says.
"But no matter what, my mother
got me up early Sunday morn-
ing. Nothing was going to stop us
from going to church. That faith
is was what kept us grounded."
But it didn't do much for Per-
ry's early career. In 1998, he
scraped together $12,000 to put
on his first play, I Know I've Been
Changed, about adults forgiving
their abusers. He rented a 1,200-
seat theater in downtown At-
lanta, certain he'd end the night
with $20,000 in his pocket.
Instead, 30 people showed up.
Fewer the next night. Within the
week, Perry was broke and living
on the street.
He kept peddling the play
through church appearances.
He saved more money as a con-
struction worker and a used-
car salesman. He got what he
considered the play's final shot
at Atlanta's House of Blues.


What he hadn't done in all
this, though, was practiced
what his play preached. Be-
fore the House of Blues show,
he called his father. They had
the first of what became regular
conversations. More important,
Perry says, "I forgave him."
The House of Blues show sold
out. "Maybe I visited the right
churches," he says. "Maybe I
finally got the word out. But
until I die, I'll believe that when
I finally forgave my father, the
Lord blessed the play."
The show became a hit.
Soon it was playing in Hous-
ton, Birmingham, Ala., even
New York.
Now Perry had a name. Now
he had some money. Now he
could make a movie.
The first film he wrote, Di-
ary of a Mad Black Woman,
brought a few things to Per-
ry's life. About $56 million in
ticket sales. A green light for
another movie. A condo in Los
Angeles. He rarely visits the
condo, though.
He can't make a studio
pitch, he says, without some
studio executive asking if he
can drop at least some refer-
ences to Jesus.
"These stars can make all the
references in the world to Kab-
balah or Scientology, and that's
just fine," he says. "But men-
tion Jesus Christ, and they
don't want to deal with you."
He has stopped reading the
entertainment sections of
newspapers (and the largely
critical reviews of his movies).


su scri e


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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


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Wrm hDirecto


93.V Street Conununity
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7i0 i.m. Riiy Moling Wobaaip
11 ai.m- .Mouing Wonuhip
Evening Wor~hip
T siay Bible I.y ,.7 i.
web.ite' enmxc org



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
t Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sumlay School- 9:45ailr
Bible .,1 Tuesdk"
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.




Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street
305-694-2332
Order of Services:



',,,,,,1 ":"",',', ,,J ',,'"'1i1 ay 7 :30i



Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. Street, Miami, FL33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
(2. ;4,5' Sua) 8:00 am
Fax 3or46 a g 3 service
...... I y School .......... 9:45 am
'.l..Iing Sen'ice .....11:00 am,
SbeiorIe Sday) 7:30nm
1Ir,i er MeetingfBible Study
w m Wednslay.) 7:30 pm



S Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W\ 3 Avenue
Church 3)05-73-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-295-8544

l 0nday School.. .9:45 a i
4'" Sun. BTI1'k .:30 2:30 p in,
I' uesday.....HibleStldy
Feeedmg Min itry. 10 a


rAntioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order or Services
Churth;Siiuday School..... 8:30 a.m.
IN OSunnday Worship Service ..,, 10 ai.m
Mid Week Sevioicc... WVcd1ay'
SHour of Plower Noon Day Prtayer

Evening Worship ... ,7 p.m.




/ -First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday................. 0 & ilam
S sunday School ........... 10 am
rsday ........ p Bible Study.
*. *"---'-- I yer Me' ting, B TI'.u.
Lam 1 -:."-11 KBaptism Thurs .before
pintc S1i..7 p III
communion Fir .......
7 i`*0 & I I m.



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
h- Order of Services
Sunday
ScM4Wl .. a
| i ofhip Se ic. ........... ,1 am
S Wednesday
1ibl t tdy a)tr Night a : pm.,
Thursday
Mrvyer Meetng 7 p.m.
"[here is a pa!'ce jbr voi n "


/postolic Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New lime for TV. Procraiin
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
lura clur. CcAUi co c(A ic .n

f ,c -,,, sso. ayc; r9& 12 rupii,
it I-'ny7c M 3ing 00 p m
i ble S y ................ 7:30 im.



/Frendship Missionary
Baptisi Church
74. "',' "P :
Miami, H,
305-759-8875

.- I i nI







New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 NW. 27th Avenue
M d .. i . i q P .





i o r .. ...... .. .
miui i. 1 p.m.

305-681i3500



.i cr Sericein....... 7:.0 !> I,


I" Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 SW. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962.3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. ** or ing Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m. \
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19, 21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
We, igo" o vvw w tiirlhokrprl.cintchriclciisit.ion Fnil peici uo prke c Chilionliit


aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Suil Momini cWraip... .....11 u. iii.
tluesl I yer p. p
Sle.uling&DElivelancBSv..7:30;pX' I
ed wi S.ct. Ma.urtrl(taaye). ..5;m. i,
ur1yl yonuh] igl. .t p .


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815


Order of Services:
unm ay -,iC llcl chol ... .. 0
Worship Sm cc e ....... 11 15 a in
Tiueoa) r. hsitlec las -7 iln
4th Sunday Evcning Woshbip ... .. p m


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 NW. 87' Shtreet
305-836-9081
I Order of Services:
i lay Momin0g Services
A y i,,. c St S udy .8 p i.m.
li 1."lp aSevc .. 8p in


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
SOrder of Services
II ord HDay Sm(llday School .. .945aml
i SS"^ SlUtlay M'onrilug pWoi'.hip ..0.3n ; O.
ijp .. y Slda Mn'i) .i iblic Srnwy .5pia.
Stsi ayl.adi j Ni Ri ble Study ...5 ip.m
| S m ay Evenitg W'orship ....6..0 p.m.
i!aPdil y Nigh1 Al:lle Study .... :X0nn
SThrsday Moniung Bible (ass I 1 am.
Trans rtatio avcaiunabe ca.u:
I .KtS 4-4550tSO' a05.400l1.695


Jordan Grove Missionary Liberit City Church
Baptist Church of Chri m
5946 N,.1. 12 Ave. 1263 N.W 67th Street
305-751-9323 305-836-4555
Order of Services: Order of Services:
I ,-, -.*i,, *i,, mSunday Morning ...........8 a.m.
S. '.,.' i ,i. ,, S tuday School.............10 a.m.
i, n .r.lay Evening .............6 p.m.
S ." l 4 p 1 Fxcellence ........7:30 p.m.
X.| i allnl "I 414 [., Bible Class .......7:30 p.m.
I.l 1 1 r i,. '. p ii i iliums. tFellowship ...... 10 a ,n.
Iwimbn. Song Practice ..6 punl.


New Shiloh M.B. Church"
1350 N.W.95" Strect
305-835-8280 Fax# .1-4.y,96-f-221)
Church Schedule:
tialy Moming Witslhilp7:30 a m.
S M Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
,r Morning Worship .....1 a.m.
i, -if... a ITuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
ST ,ues. before the 1l Sun....7pan.
Mid-week Worship




/St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue
305-373-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
,' EaliIfrly Sunday
110 11 h ', M ,,, ;W o!-ship,...,7:30 ai.m .
Q^ '1,' school l ......... 9:30 a.mn .
p ',* ,i,,, g Worship ...11 a.nm
S- t t',,erand Bible Studv
1.w ', l. ... ........ (T ues.) 7 1 .1 ..


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
i^ S 'nday Sihoi ......... 930 iA rm
SMomini Piraise worshipp .1i a.n.
| V I i+ ......nl'nlliird Snay
I eve linlt nslip atil 6 p
SAN -, PaI\I Mct\ cting, Bible Study I
S; IT Tuic.d 7 um
.w....... .. \i ; o)-(A
\ /~aEi~a


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday WVoruhip 7 a.mi., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tilsdav ( Blibh: Study) 6: 15p.m.
Wcdlinsdayv BiblA Study
10:-15 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W, 55th Street
305-696-7322

-I . Order of Services:
aJ| iN ltfarly Morning Woihip.7:30a.in.
S Sunday School..........9:30a.m.
oming Woi i .shp..... .11 a.m.
pay(Ier f MS ting............7:30 p.m.
Bible S .ldy i ................. pm .


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
wwwn.ihirmonworshalienier.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 aaoi. & l0 1m.
CburchuSch ol: 8 30 a.m.
We\dneday
Tasto rs NooniDay Bible Study
Bible institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week WVorship 7:30 p.m.



Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Sunday
Morning Worship' at 8 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
"1Thhursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
\jSaturday
%-o Service
I[ l Ik m~ I l +m P nm' 'v .


I (800) 254-NBWC
305.685-3700
Fax: 305.685.0705
www. new birthbaptistmiami.org


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
1 Order of Services:
Siuday 7:30 and II au.m.
Worship Service
I9-30 .lt.. .. s ita School
"lHllesday. p.m Bible Study
s pm.......Praycr Mectiug
Monday. WC(hlsday. Friday
12 p in .. Iay Prayer


Hosanna Community New Vision For Christ
Baptist Church Ministries
2171 N.W. 56th Street 13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474 305-899-7224
Order of Services: Order of Services:
-Sl ,tLl9.\ 5clI1, l 934 5 t s'Iyrly "undlay 'W orship..'7:30 a nm.
} 11t in i r )n 'snuxay school ................ 9 30am.
Youllh 1Ministny 'kli 'W A S ulvhy Evsenmug Sermice ..6 pom.
Spe Iiavil iR blyrMeeii" ...730u pmlI
W1di krc Wf ibic Sriydy ...730 pam.
gg Not Just i Church iui a M vcniment


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


I ~


w


~s i


\Dr. Fivemaan T. Wyeb Sit


r Msho Viclr'r. Crry, .D, Stitor asiorlrache


MLildh~"


Revn. ( Let Dinki -H'NI a


\ ast I Aaron ll mm.m, i R, I S


zF


I~T~f~iz~rg


G-


I










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Galveston residents return home to see Ike


By Oren Dorell

Traffic was backed up for
10 miles going into Galves-
ton on Wednesday for the first
full day that residents were
allowed back in to the beach
city lashed by Hurricane Ike.
Galveston called in 500 ad-
ditional police officers to direct
the traffic from people who
, have not seen their homes
on this island since Ike pum-
meled it Sept. 12-13.
The opening was "running
smoothly," said Mary Jo Na-
schke, spokeswoman for
' Mayor Lyda Ann Thomas. Ike
blasted the city of 57,000peo-


ple with 110 mph winds and
a 12-foot storm surge that
washed away homes, cars
and refrigerators, and cut off
power, water and natural gas
lines.
Water flooded the first floors
of most homes and business-
es. The deaths of seven people
have been confirmed. Forty
people are missing county-
wide, Naschke said.
Natural gas has yet to be re-
stored, but 60% of the city has
power, 75% has running wa-
ter and crews have removed
much of the debris from city
streets, Naschke said.
Now it's time for residents


A workman steps through debris brought ashore by Hurricane
Ike's tidal surge on Galveston


and storeowners to start their
own cleanup from 8 feet of wa-
ter inside their homes and 12
feet in downtown stores, Na-
schke said.
"When you come back it's not
going to be the same Galves-
ton Island you left," Mayor Pro
Tern Danny Weber had said.
Patricia Davis had to wave
away mosquitoes as she sur-
veyed the remains of her
apartment. Its entrance was
blocked by collapsed walls,
wrecked furniture and sodden
clothing.
"I wasn't prepared for this.
It's like a war zone," said Da-
vis, 53, a taxi driver.


damage
Galveston officials first let
people into the city Sept. 16
but that lasted only a few
hours after traffic backups
kept recovery workers from
entering the city.
Diane and Eddie Howard
were trying to sell one house
on Galveston Island and had
just bought another one when
Ike struck. Their newly bought
house burned down during
the storm.
"I've been through all kinds
of hurricanes," said Eddie
Howard, who was born on the
island 77 years ago. "This is
the worst one."


Hundreds of Black men recreate famous '68 photo for MoCADA exhibit


By Joyce Shelby


The painting "I AM (with son)"
by artist Charly Palmer.
It was the ultimate Kodak mo-
ment.
Two hundred men and boys of
African descent standing tall on
the steps of the Hanson Place
7th Day Adventist Church in Fort
Greene . all looking straight
ahead . all wearing T-shirts
proclaiming, "I Am A Man" . to
recreate a famous 1968 photo,
and celebrate at the opening re-
ception of the "I Am a Man" ex-
hibit at the Museum of Contem-
porary African Diasporan Arts
(MoCADA).
The original "I Am a Man" pho-


to was taken in Memphis, Tenn.,
during a strike by black sanita-
tion workers, who held signs de-
claring they were men, not boys
or buzzards. The men were de-
manding union recognition, plus
better wages and benefits.
The late Ernest Withers, a
Memphis photojournalist who
documented much of the Civil
Rights movement, took the 1968
photo. New York Times photo-
journalist and Brooklyn resident
Chester Higgins Jr., did Thurs-
day's re-creation.
"It was good to pay homage to
the photographer and the pho-
tograph," Higgins said. "It was
that cause that caused Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. to visit Mem-


phis, where he met his 'untimely
death."
In August, MoCADA issued a
call for men who wanted to be in
the picture, and men of every de-
scription answered.
James Milton, 51, said he had
to be there. A New York City sani-
tation man for 15 years, he said,
"Back in the day, my grandma
had a picture of those men in the
back of one of their trucks to stay
out of the rain."
Otto Neals, 77 and one of Brook-
lyn's most beloved artists, said, "I
was in the March on Washington.
This brings back memories."
David Loftis, 43, of Crown
Heights, brought his son, Amir,
8, "to be part of history, especial-


Hundreds of men of all ages some of whom brought their sons wore
T-shirts emblazoned with "I Am A Man" for the photo.


ly at this time, with the election
coming up."
Saevone Brown, 15, of Boys and
Girls High, and his classmates
wanted to learn more about the
exhibit and MoCADA.
Clutching his skateboard, Lo-
gan Clodd-Blount, 6, stood tall,
with his dad, Jamell Blount, a
graphic designer from Bedford-
Stuyvesant.
"I wanted (the skateboard) in
the picture," the boy explained.
MoCADA selected 12 artists to
interpret the "I Am a Man" theme
for the exhibit, which will be on
view until Jan. 18th. The muse-
um is at 80 Hanson Place.
Visit www.mocada.org for de-
tails.


Dave Hollister releases new gospel album


New York, NY Dave Hollis-
ter is one of the most renowned
voices in urban music and on
his upcoming sophomore gos-
pel CD, Witness Protection,
that voice gives soulful praise
and true encouragement to
provide a musical salve for
hearts, minds and souls.
A former member of the
multi-platinum selling vocal
group BlackStreet and a Gold-
selling solo artist, Dave's debut
gospel CD entered Billboard's
Top Gospel Albums chart at
#1, and also landed on the
R&B and Top 200 charts. That
CD- 'The Book Of David: Tran-
sition" also earned Hollister a
Stellar Award nomination.
On Witness Protection, his
second gospel project, Dave
Hollister demonstrates enor-
mous musical and vocal
range, as well as heartening
personal and spiritual growth.
With potent lyrics, brilliant


Legalization of
same-sex marriage
will increase
homosexuality

SAN DIEGO Calif. Christian
Newswire Voters in several
U.S. states soon will decide
whether same-sex marriage will
be permitted in their state. How-
ever, most voters are unaware
of scientific research which re-
veals that social endorsement
of homosexuality, as would be
the case with the legalization
of same-sex marriage, will lead
more individuals into a homo-
sexual lifestyle.
Trayce L. Hansen, Ph.D., a
licensed psychologist, recently
reviewed extensive worldwide
research on the origins of homo-
sexuality and the impact social
endorsement has on the rate of
homosexual behavior.
Dr. Hansen's findings are re-
ported in a newly released ar-
ticle entitled, "Legalizing Same-
Sex Marriage Will Increase
Prevalence of Homosexuality:
Research Provides Significant
Evidence." This latest piece is
the author's third in a series of
articles concerning same-sex
marriage, homosexuality, and
children. The previous articles
in the series are entitled, "Love
Isn't Enough: Five Reasons Why
Same-Sex Marriage Will Harm
Children" and "Pro-Homosexual
Researchers Conceal Findings:
Children Raised by Openly Ho-
mosexual Parents More Likely
To Engage in Homosexuality."
All three articles, as well as oth-
er background information and
research references, are avail-
able on her website at http://
www. drtraycehansen.com.


Ai

DAVE HOLLISTER
production, and impressive
vocal virtuosity, the 16 track
CD will definitely have listen-
ers pressing their repeat but-
tons.
Striving, the lively first sin-
gle, finds Hollister encourag-
ing listeners to move forward
in life "no matter what the


obstacle, no matter what the
test," over a spunky track
that deftly blends a tradi-
tional Sunday morning flavor
with bouncy contemporary
rhythms. "You Are," is a gor-
geous showing of worship that
is simply breathtaking while
Hollister's urban leanings
shine brightly on the magnet-
ic- Gl'i'.-; the beautiful ballad
TPie Greatest and the flawless-
ly soulful Don't Stop. In fact,
each track offers an auditory
delight and an appeal to a va-
riety of musical tastes.
"I'm really happy with what
we've done on the album," says
Hollister. "I always write and re-
cord music that reflects where I
am in life, and on this project I
was drawn towards a theme of
persevering through adversity
- which we all have to do from
time to time and giving God
glory for and also through these
situations because we know the


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testing of our faith produces pa-
tience.
"More than anything, the CD
shows the depth of my heart for
God by offering more songs of
worship. I want people to be en-
couraged in their faith through
this project, and I hope it will
help people who may have lost
their way find the path back to
God." .-


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The Miami Times




Hea h


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


New study warns concerns about caffeinated energy drinks


The Canadian Press


Caffeinated energy drinks are
a growing concern and doctors
need to be familiar with poten-
tial health consequences for
their patients, researchers at
Johns Hopkins University in
Baltimore say in a new study.
There are increasing reports
of caffeine intoxication from en-
ergy drinks, they say, and prob-
lems with caffeine dependence
and withdrawal are expected to
increase.
"Considering the variable
and sometimes very high caf-


feine content of energy drinks,
in combination with the ag-
gressive marketing to youthful
and inexperienced consumers,
it would be prudent to require
full disclosure of the amount of
caffeine and other ingredients
in energy drinks on the prod-
uct labelling," says the study by
Chad Reissig, Eric Strain and
Roland Griffiths of the univer-
sity's School of Medicine.
The researchers note that 41
cases of caffeine abuse from
caffeine-enhanced beverages
were reported to a U.S. poison
control centre from 2002 to


2004. And another centre re-
ported nine adverse reactions
to the energy drink Redline
from January 2004 to March
2006; eight of the nine patients
were male, and the youngest
was 13.
Various symptoms includ-
ed nausea and vomiting, fast
heartbeat, hypertension, trem-
ors, dizziness, chest pain and
numbness.
"Product label warnings
about the risks when used
alone and in combination with
alcohol would also be appropri-
ate," says the study, published


Wednesday in the journal Drug
and Alcohol Dependence.
"Restrictions on advertising
and the aggressive marketing of
energy drinks to youthful and
inexperienced users should
also be considered."
According to the Health Can-
ada website, "energy drinks are
meant to supply mental and
physical stimulation for a short
period of time," and usually con-
tain caffeine, taurine (an amino
acid, one of the building blocks
of protein) and glucuronolac-
tone, a carbohydrate.
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14B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008 BLACKS MUST CON FROL EHEIR OWN I)LSJINY


The new man within


I love the story of Jesus healing
the blind man as it is related in
John 9. As the disciples passed
the blind man, they asked Je-
sus what was the cause of the
man's blindness. Two things
stood out to me in that simple
question. One was that their
initial interest was in the why,
instead of the what an oppor-
tunity for his healing! The sec-
ond observation was that they
were quick to draw conclusions
- either his sin or his parents'
sin was the reason. It is inter-


testing that the reason had to be
because of sin. It is sad that
even now, we oftentimes believe
that an illness or misadventure
is caused by sin.
Jesus answered them by tell-
ing the disciples that sin had
nothing to do with this man's
condition. It was so that God
could be glorified. This might
be a hard pill to swallow for
some to think that we endure
certain situations, or are in cer-
tain circumstances because of
an opportunity to glorify God. I


remember years ago that I was
going through a very difficult
situation. I remember stand-
ing in my bathroom looking in
my mirror and wondering how
I would ever be able to get out
of that mess. The Holy Spirit
spoke to me clearly and said
that what I was going through
would be for a testimony.
In disbelief, I thought how I
was enduring this horrible trial
for other people! Not even for
myself, or for blessings for me
and my family, but for someone
else! I was so disappointed.
Thank God He paid no atten-
tion to my antics and my tem-
per tantrum, and allowed His
perfect will to be done in my
life. Yes, I did go through that
trial, and endured the heart-
ache; but guess what I made
it through! I survived, and


am alive to tell the story! As
God ordained it, that situation
resulted in a testimony that I
have shared over the years to
encourage others. That testi-
mony allowed so many weak
and dejected believers to real-
ize that if God, Who is no re-
specter of persons, could bring
me through and out, then
surely He would do the same
for them. I made it, and so
could they.
Yes, surely we are in the
midst of some situations be-
cause of sin. When that hap-
pens, we need to repent, and
turn away from this behav-
ior. Seek Godly counsel and
prayer, and make things right.
But every trial and tribulation
is not caused by our sin and
disobedience as Jesus pointed
out when questioned about


this man's affliction. I further
love the man's response to the
questioning of the Pharisees
about his healing. The man
answered that he did not know
all of the details, he knew that
this Man spit on the ground
and covered his eyes with the
mud, and instructed him to
wash in the Pool of Siloam, and
that is what he did.
Notice the man did not argue,
or refuse to comply until he had
called a church meeting. Je-
sus spoke it, and he did it at
that time. He didn't try to fig-
ure out why mud, and why not
something else that was clean-
er. He didn't waste time think-
ing that it was a stupid idea to
put mud on his eyes and then
go wash in a pool. He obeyed
Jesus. He shared simply what
the Man did to him, and what


the Man said to him; and his
obedience. The bottom line for
the man was I was blind, but
now I can see. This was what
he told all who asked I was
blind, but now I am not.
Do you share with others
what God has done for you?
There might be some details
that you do not want to share
with everyone, and that's okay.
You don't have to try to make
everyone understand your
background and your victory.
Take a hint from the blind
man. Let them know that you
were once a thief, murderer,
rapist, abuser, liar but now,
through God's healing you're
not. And if He did it for you,
surely He will do the same for
them if they ask in faith and
are willing to be obedient to His
instructions.


The City of Miramar Social
Services Department presents
their annual Health & Wellness
Expo. This free event will be
held on October 17 from 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Mira-
mar Civic Center. The Expo
will offer health screenings,
aging information, community
resources, refreshments, and
giveaways. For more informa-
tion, please Marva Graham at
954-967-1605.

Miami Edison Senior High
School will hold their 1st an-
nual Alumni Career Day on
Wednesday, October 22. All
alumni of Miami Edison Senior
High School are invited to at-
tend. For more information,
please contact Mr. Everette,
Director of Student Activities,


at 305- 751-7337 ext 2271.

National Alliance to Nur-
ture the Aged and the Youth
(NANAY) Community Cen-
ter will be offering flu shots
on Friday, October 3 from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. Various insur-
ances will be accepted. Due
to limited supply vaccinations
will only be given to those who
have make reservations. For
more information, please call
305-981-3232.

The University of Miami
Miller School of Medicine in-
vites you to the 6th annual Pe-
diatric Brain and SCI Confer-
ence on Monday and Tuesday,
November 10 and 11 at the Ritz
Carlton Hotel. For more infor-
mation, please contact Bonnie


Shinkle at 305-243-3994.

Miami Dade College (MDC)
Medical Center Campus will be
having a major announcement
on Tuesday, October 7 at 10
a.m. in Room 1175. For more
information, please call 305-
237-7611.

Miami Book Fair Interna-
tional and the Florida Center
for the Literary Arts at Miami
Dade College will host a cele-
bration of the life and work of
comic book legend Will Eisner
on Wednesday, November 12 at
6 p.m. at the Miami Dade Col-
lege's Centre Gallery at Wolfson
Campus.

Miami Jackson Senior High
Class of 1973 will be having a
picnic on Saturday, October
11 at the McDonald Park from
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more in-
formation, please contact Gail
Jackson or Margaret Moncur at
305-323-1335.


Florida International Uni-
versity (FIU) will be hosting
a two-day conference, Digital
Pulse in Architecture, coordi-
nated by FIU Architecture As-
sistant Professor Eric Goldem-
berg. The conference will take
place on Friday, November 14
at 4:00 p.m. and Saturday, No-
vember 15 all day in the Paul
L. Cejas School of Architecture
Building, room 135. Admission
for the conference is free and
open to the public.

National Black Caucus of
State Legislators will be hav-
ing their 2008 Mental Health
Conference on October 3 from
8 a.m. 4 p.m. at the Hyatt Re-
gency in Downtown Miami. For
the first time, the conference
will be broadcast from India-
napolis via satellite to Miami.

City Of North Miami Beach
will be having their 1st annual
Domestic Violence Awareness


Walk/Expo on Saturday, Octo-
ber 4 at the Gwen Margolis Am-
phitheater. Registration begins
at 7:15 a.m. For more infor-
mation, please contact Renee
Darden at 305-948-2940.
********
Fort Valley's Homecoming
Bus invites you to attend this
year's Homecoming Festivities
and game against the Benedict
Tigers of South Carolina. The
bus will depart Coconut Grove
on Thursday, October 16 at 8
p.m. All interesting persons
may call for additional informa-
tion at 305-444-3132. Please
call before 10 p.m. The dead-
line for the trip is October 6.

Zeta Community Center
Afterschool Program will hold
its 8th annual Lights on After-
school Dinner/Rally on Thurs-
day, October 16 at 5 p.m. For
more information, please call
Rosetta J. Vickers at 305-836-
7060.


The National Grassroots will
have a media tour in Miami on
Friday, October 10 at 7 p.m. -
9 p.m. and Saturday, October
11 at 1 p.m. 5 p.m at the Mi-
ami Workers Center.

There will be a Voter Educa-
tion Fair on October 4 at 9:30
a.m. at the African Heritage
Cultural Center. The event is
free and open to all U.S. citizens
who are 18 and older. Those
who will be 18 by November 4
also are eligible to register. For
more information, please call
954-465-7441.

St. Thomas University is
proud to announce the open-
ing of the Archbishop John C.
Favalora Archive & Museum at
the University Library Thurs-
day, October 2 at 7:00 p.m.
The inaugural reception and
dedication launches the new
archive, museum and research
center at the Archdiocesan
University.


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Available from Commercial News Providers


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A House of Prayer for all
People, Inc. will be having an
intercessory prayer service on
Sunday, October 5 at 10 a.m.
For information, please, call
305-474-7430.

The Bible Baptist Church
Healthcare Ministry is
sponsoring an Educational
Program for the public in
support of Breast Cancer
Awareness Month on Tuesday,
October 14 at 7:15 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-836-7644.


Put God First Ministries,
International will be having a
revival, Taking Back the Power,
from October 2-4 at 7 p.m.
nightly. Everyone is welcome to
attend.

Spirit of Christ Center and
Ministries Inc. will be having
their 25th anniversary on
October 10 from 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. For more information,
please call 305-935-5001 or
email: socc(asoccam.org.

Ebenezer United Methodist
Church will be having their


5th annual HIV/AIDS Concert
on December 6 at 4:30 p.m.
The first meeting will be held
on October 2 at 6:30 p.m. at
Ebenezer and rehearsals will
be every Thursday at 6:30 p.m.
Ebenzer will also be having
their Family and Friends Day
on Sunday, October 12 at 11
a.m. For more information,
please contact David Smith at
786-587-4048.

True Grace will be sponsoring
the October 3 service at 7:30
p.m. at the Mt. Claire Holiness
Church.

A Mission With A New
Beginning youth department
invites you to come fellowship
with them on Sundays at 11:30
a.m.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008









Bv___ -- -- --- -- -5B HE IA I TMES OCOBR 17 00


Royal E.A. Stevens-_
SAMUEL BURNS, 62, died Sep- RONALD BAIN, 66, Da
tember 22. Visi- .T- i ,,. died September 24. Service
station Friday4to a.m. Saturday, United Metho
9 p.m. Service 1 Church.
p.mni Saturday Rock of Ages
at Union Grove
Missionary Bap- CINDY CYPRIANNA KING,
tist Church. front desk clerk,
died Septem-
ber 17 in Me-
morial Miramar
ELLA ROBINSON, 95, died Medical Center.
September 27. '. Service 11 a.m.
Visitation Fri- Saturday, Anti-
day 4 to 9 p.m. och Missionary
Service 11 a.m. Baptist Church
Saturday, First of Carol City.
Baptist Church
of Bunche Park. WILIE FRED MCGRIFF,
t .- longshoreman,
died September
OTIS JOHNSON, 76, died Sep- 25 in Jackson
tember 27. Visi- Memorial Hos-
tation Friday4to pital. Service 11
9 p.m. Service .. .- a.m. Saturday
noon Saturday, October 11.
Holy Hill of Zion
Church.
FRANCES SERVING MC
:r v- v TOSH, 55, homemaker, died S
tember 25 in University Med
VICTOR FORBES, 67, died Center. Service Saturday Octc
September 23. Final rites and 4.
burial in North Caicos, Turks and Pax-Villa
Caicos Islands. Pax-Villa
Westly Pierre, 63, died Sept
KEINO MOBLEY, 37, died Sep- ber 24. Service 10 a.m. Fri(
tember 19. Visitation Friday 4 to Fraternity Baptist Church.
9 p.m. Service 11 a.m. Saturday,
Christ Community Church. Moisilia Joseph-St.Louis,
died September 24. Service
ELIZA HENRY, 83, died Sep- a.m. Saturday, Notre Dame D'I-
tember 25. Arrangements are in- Catholic Church.
complete.
Grace _
RICHARD NELSON III, 63, died JOHNNY DIXON, 4, stud
September 22. Memorial service died September 24. Service
10 a.m. Saturday at Miami Gar- a.m. Saturday, October 4 at N
dens Church of Christ. Birth Baptist.

WILLIE MAE RICE, 82, died ROBERT FRAZIER, 50, labor
September 22. Arrangements are died September 22. Service
incomplete. a.m. Thursday, October 2 at Gr
er Saint Paul A.M.E. Church.
ROSE GAY, 76, died September
2. Arrangements are incomplete. Faith _
MALKESSE FULCHER,
St. Fort J died September 13. Service
KENLY DOCFEUR, 29, died held.
September-18. Service was held
on Saturday, September 27. JOHN LADSON, 26, died S
tember 22. Service was held.
LEON S. GELIN, 96, died Sep-
tember 19 in North Shore Hospital FRITZ G. JACOB, 41, died S
and Medical Center. Service noon tember 16. Arrangements are
October 4, Haitian Evangelical complete.
Church. Eric S. GeorgeA

CLARENCE MORRISON, 80, ALBERT DOC COLLINS
died September 22. Final rites and died Septem-
burial in Jamaica. ber 24. Viewing
October 3, 5 to
KETHLY TURIN, 31, died Sep- 8 p.m. at Mag-
tember 23 in Delray Medical Cen- nolia Baptist
ter. Arrangements are incomplete. Church, Miami.
Family to re-
THOMAS HAYES, 70, died ceive friends at
September 27 in Hampton Court. 16140 N.W. 18
Arrangements are incomplete. Place, Opa Locka. Service 11
October 4 at the church.
Hadley
WILLIE RUTH HAM, 74,
WILLIE BURNES, 72, mainte- WILLIE RUTH HAM, 74,
nance worker, Lauderdale, died September
nance worker, Service October, House of
died September Miracle Temple. in West Park, F
in Miami Gar-ida.
dens Care Cen-
ter. Service 11
a.m Saturday, Manker _
Second Caanan NED 'MAN' LAMBERT, 60,
Missionary Bap- tired fork lift
tist Church. operator, Car-

CONNIE SIMMONS, 50, food ton Sales and
service for Dade County Schools, anu fcuin
died September 16 in North Shore Company, died
e. vic wa e. September 25
Hospital. Service was held. in North Shore

BABY BOY HIGGS, died Sep- vice 10 a.m.-
tember 13 in Jackson Memorial Saturday, Mount Calvary Miss
Hospital. Service was held. ary Baptist Church.

LUCILLE HARPER, 84,
Davis & Brice. September 23 in Jackson N
BUTLER DAVIS, 73, Fort Lau- Medical Center. Service was h
derdale, died September 26.
Service 11 a.m. Thursday, New
Jerusalem Baptist Church of Hol- Gregg L. Maso
lywood. IDENA MADIANA HENRY,


bridal consultant, died Septerr
WARREN NEWMAN, 29, North 22 in Memorial Hospital. W
Lauderdale, died September 14. Visitation Friday 2 to 9 p.m.
Service 10 a.m. Saturday, Unity vice noon Saturday, North Mi
New Testament Church of God In Church of God.
Christ of Lauderdale Lakes.


; I, '


' Jay

nia, PEGGY EULINE, 76, died Sep-
11 tember 24. Ser-
dist vice 1 p.m. Sat-
urday at Mount
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.
37,



Hall Ferguson Hewitt
JUDYETH KALINDA GOLD-
SMITH, 52, cler-
ical worker, died
September 27
in Mercy Hospi-
tal. Survivors in-
61 clude: husband,
SCharles Greg-
ory; mother-in-
law, Jacquelyn
Fills (Wally); sister-in-law, Brenda
Sanders-Lewis (Eddie); brother-
in-law, J.C. Cobbett Jr., (Vicki);
nieces, Precious Cobbett and Lau-
ren; nephew, Jermal Renny; elev-
en aunts and six uncles. Viewing
IN- 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday October
3ep- 3 in the chapel. Family will receive
lical friends in the chapel from 5 p.m. to
iber 7 p.m. Service noon Wednesday
in the chapel

WILLIAM CHARLES SAND-
em- ERS, JR, 26, -
day, died September
27. Survivors
include: mother, 'r
47, Sally, father,
10 William; broth- -
Haiti ers, Christopher
and Donta Top-
pin. Arrange-
^ i ments are incomplete.
ent, VINCENT ALVIN HARTLEY
III, newborn, died September 26
ew in Memorial Healthcare System.
Service noon Wednesday in the
rer, chapel.
11 MARIE L. GADSON, 81, died
eat- September 27 in North Shore
Medical Center. Service 3 p.m.
. Saturday, in the chapel.
19. Nakia IngrahaA -!
was
DAVID KUFNOWSKI, 71, of
Fort Lauderdale, died September
3ep- 23. Service was held.

FLORENCE YUHASZ, 85, of
ep- Hollywood, died September 23.
3 in- Final rites and burial Friday, Clo-
verleaf Cemetery in Newark, New
^ Jersey.

84, MARY CHONG, 71,of Boynton
Beach, died September 25. Ser-
vice 10 a.m. Saturday, St. Bartho-
lomew Catholic Church.

TATIKA ROBERTS, 29, of Mira-
mar, died September 25. Service
10 a.m. Saturday, Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church of Hallandale.

a.m. BETTY JONES, 50, of West
Park, died September 22. Service
11 a.m. Saturday, Emanuel First
Ft. Born Church.
23.
God RENA POLITE, 73, of Miramar,
:lor- died September 23. Service 2 p.m.
Saturday, Holy Tabernacle of Fort
Lauderdale.

DONNA CAPLAN, 49, of Pem-
re- broke Pines, died September 26.
.j Arrangements are incomplete.

Range &
MARY LIZZIE CROWLEY, 86,
homemaker,
died September
22. Service 2
p.m. Saturday,
The Church of
ion- the Open Door. U


died
orth CURTIS CARTWRIGHT, 78,
eld. chef, died September 21. Final
rites and burial in in Nassau, Ba-
hamas.
CHARLES ERIC CORDY, 59,
54, landscaper, died September 11.
nber Service was held.
/est.
Ser- KEISAMONALISA U. HANNA,
ami 37, preschool administrator, died
September 24. Final rites and buri-


al in Nassau, Bahamas.


Poitier
JAMES HOPKINS, 82, laborer,
died Septem-
ber 22 Service J
1 p.m. today
(Wednesday), .
in the chapel. .




MAURICE WILLIAMS, 45, la-
borer, died
September 27
in Unity Health
and Rehabili-
tation Center.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, St.
James A.M.E.
Church.


BESSIE FOSTER SEARCH, 78,
social worker,
died September
28 in Park Pla-
za Retirement
Center. Service
2 p.m., Peaceful
Zion Missionary
Baptist Church.


CLARENCE WILLIAMS, 56,
environmental
specialist, died
September 7 in
Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


ROBERT JAMES WILLIAMS,
60, died September 28 in Univer-
sity of Miami Hospital. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

WILLIS ANTHONY PATTER-
SON, 49, laborer, died September
21 in Jackson North Medical Cen-
ter. Service was held.

JANIS MARIE DAVIS, 42,
nurse, died September 4 in Unity
Rehabilitation Center. Service
11:30 a.m. Saturday in the chapel.


Richardson
RUBY MARIA BENNETT GIB-
SON, 88, ed-
ucator, died
September 27.
Service 2 p.m.
today in the .
chapel. 1 4'



KEVIN GRISSOM, 41, died
September 16. 0 .1-,-
Service 11 a.m. M
Friday in the
chapel.





ORA LEE HALL, 73, died Sep-
tember 26. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.
Saturday, Mira-
cle Valley.





EUGENE SMITH, 79, died Sep-
tember 26. Service was held.


Wright & YoungiY
RODNEY'ATIIM KWELI' JOHN-
SON, 53, drama

the Cultural Art
Center died
September 22
at Kindred Hos-
pital. Service 2
p.m. Saturday,
Unity on the
Bay Church.

ESTER LANE, died Septem-
ber 29 in South
Miami Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Nathan; chil-
dren, Denelda
gKniK Gloria ,


Eugene, Chris-
topher, Vincent,
Shawn and Ursharla Reed; sisters,
Sophenia Wilkerson and Zelma
Dawsen. Service 3 p.m. Saturday,
First United Methodist Church of
South Miami.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Sgt. ERNEST 'BULL'
BULLARD JR
01/07/53 10-01-06


Two years of remember-
ing you, the care and the
love you gave us. The care
and the love we gave you.
The care and the love we all
gave each other as family
"for God is love."
Forever, Brenda, Ernest
'BJ', Ernesto, Ernesha,
Redd, Trev, Shakia, Zina
and your grandchildren,
mother, Ruth and the Bul-
lard family

Card of Thanks
The family of the late


JAMES ROOSEVELT MC-
GEE wishes to express our
sincere appreciation and grat-
itude to the many relatives,
church family,neighbors and
friends, for all the expressions
of love extended to us during
our time of bereavement.
Special thanks to First Bap-
tist M.B. Church of Browns-
ville, Rev. Kenneth McGee,
pastor; New Providence M.B.
Church, Rev. Vincent Da-
vis, pastor; Mt. Vermon
M.B. Church, Rev. Wilfred
Miller, pastor; Friendship
M.B. Church, Rev. Gaston
Smith, pastor; St. James
M.B. Church, Rev. John Ad-
ams, pastor; New Beginning
Church of Lakeland, GA,
Rev. Willie Roberson, pastor;
Rev. Willie Flowers, Valdosta,
GA; Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson and the Manker
Funeral Home staff for out-
standing services rendered.
Also, to those who sent a
card, a dish of food, made
a phone call, said a kind
word, said a prayer, or even
came by the house, whatever
your part, we thank you very
much.
May God bless each of you.
The McGee and Gunning
Family.



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ROBERT 'RL' STEVENS
10/02/1932 03/08/2007

To our loving father Today
especially brings many spe-
cial thoughts and memories
of you. Its been a year and a
half since you left to go home
and each and every day you
are missed and forever loved.
We thank God for having a fa-
ther like you. You are physi-
cally gone but your spirit lives
on in each of us.
We love you Daddy! Your
children


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Thomas S. "Sonny"
Armbrister Jr. wishes to
acknowledge with deep
appreciation the many
expressions of love, concern and
kindness shown to us during
this difficult time. We pray that
Sonny's memory will always be
a part of us and all those who
loved him. May God bless each
of you and forever keep you in
His care.
The Armbrister Family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MICHAEL KNIGHT
"Tee-Berry"
05/01/57 10/03/07

If tears could build a
stairway, and memories build
a lane,
I'd walk right up to heaven
and bring you home again.
Your loving wife,
Mrs. Beverly "Dee Dee"
Knight


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JAMES C. JONES, .SR.
05/28/12 09/24/91

The family


Death Notice
The family of the late


MARY LEE DINGLE 76,
Laundry Worker for Miami
Laundry, died September 27
at Kindred Hospital.
Survivors include: sons, Vo-
lome Ali (Jeanne) and David,
Sr.; daughters, Jill Dobson
and Frizelle Jackson; brother,
John Allen Stukes (Hattie);
sisters, Gertrude McDonald,
Catherine Stukes, Azalee
Dingle and Earline Stukes;
grandchildren; and a host of
other family members and
friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday, 11 a>am. at
Greater Bethel AME Church.
Arrangements entrusted
to Gregg L. Mason Funeral
Home.


Honor Your Loved One With an In Memoriam

In The Miami Times


s~Z


BLACK\s Ml'.V (CONTROL IIIIIR \OW'N DESTINY


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES. OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


I ml q mime I or.% i h i


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A great playbook equal success in football, retirement

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DRINKS
continued from 13B

They should not be confused
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states.
Red Bull Energy Drink is
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what "play options" might be
successful in any given situ-
ation.
For example, how much can
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Security? How much more
could you get if you worked a
year longer? Two years? What
about your spouse, if you
are married? And how much
should you be saving in ad-
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Security benefits?
All of these questions can
be answered simply by visit-
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gov. It's like training camp
for financial planning. There
you will find several finan-


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Information about your
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until age 70.
Interested in other play
options, such as what would
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you want to stop work at a
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The Miami Times



Lifesty es


FASHION Hip Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008 IMES


Black


country


singers


a rarity


By Brian Mansfield


Before this week, only two Black
singers had topped the country
singles charts: Ray Charles and
Charley Pride.
Now, Hootie & the Blowfish
frontman Darius Rucker joins that
exclusive list, as his Don't Think
I Don't Think About It goes No. 1
on USA TODAY's country singles
airplay chart.
Charles was the last Black artist
to have a No. 1 country single. His
Seven Spanish Angels duet with
Willie Nelson topped the charts
in March 1985. Pride, a Country
Music Hall of Famer, had more than
two dozen No. 1 hits. His last, Night
Games, reached the top slot 25
years ago this week.
"It's awesome, and I can't believe .
it's happening, but I didn't make
the record for that stuff," says
Rucker, 42, whose Learn to Live
album is expected to land atop the
country albums chart this week,
as well. "I just wanted to make a
record that people wanted to listen
to."
Rucker grew up in South Carolina
listening to a broad range of music,
including country. He says demos
of the hits he wrote for Hootie often
had a country feel.
Hootie & the Blowfish sold 16
million copies of 1994 debut'album
Cracked Rear View. Hits like Hold
My Hand and Let Her Cry, along
with Sheryl Crow's early singles,
often were credited with luring fans
away from country stations and
ending a long boom period for the
country format. "Those two artists
put the pop back into pop radio,"
says Capitol Nashville president/
CEO Mike Dungan.
Rucker's history as part of a pop
act could have proved a bigger
Please turn to RUCKER 2C


Models like Naomi Campbell (above)
and Iman once dominated the runway.


NEW YORK (Reuters) A dearth of
Black models strutting the catwalks is a
persistent issue in the fashion world and
while the numbers have improved, there
are still too few, fashion observers say.
At New York's semi-annual Fashion
Week ending on Friday, many designers
used two or three Black models; in the
more than 30 shows attended by Reuters
reporters. Several only used one, and
some had none. Most of the shows fea-
tured between 12 and 25 models.
Labels Tracy Reese, DKNY and Diane
von Furstenberg displayed a high num-
ber of Black models this season while
others, such as Vivienne Tam, did not
use any.
Too few industry types are following the
Please turn to MODELS 3C


SCopyrighIted Mat erial

SyndicatedCotn







Available from Commercial News Provders






T.I. ordered to pay more


child support
By Janelle Griffith
Atlanta rapper T.I. has been
ordered to increase monthly
child support payments to the
mother of two of his children,
LaShon Dixon.
According to the Associated
Press, Superior Court Judge
Bensonetta Tipton Lane said
the self-proclaimed "King of the
South" must pay Dixon a little
over $3,000 a month instead of
the $2,000 he was previously
providing.
Dixon recently filed the lawsuit
against T.I. hoping a court would
order a stipend equal to the


CLIFFORD 'T.I.' HARRISON
rapper's success.
As part of the judge's orders,
T.I. must continue to fund the
private school expenses, medical
Please turn to SUPPORT 2C


I







2C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


. ~, -. ~


A special salute to Sylvia
D. Williams-Garner, presi-
dent, Senior Citizens Concern
Care Group, Inc. for the an-
nual Grandparents Luncheon,
last Saturday, Sep. 13, at the
Church of the Open Door ban-
quet room. Recognition of Dea-
con James Copeland, Earnes-
tine Bellamy, Vernell Wil-
liams, Arthur Carswell, Albert
D. Moore Sr., and Prescola
Beneby before a capacity-filled
banquet room with Attorney
Keith Laverity preparing the
room for the 200 guests.
The program began with the
Psi Phi Band providing gospel,
secular, jazz, rhythm & blues,
and swing music for the variety
of personalities in attendance
that walked into a room well
decorated to receive the special
people from Mr. Tabor Baptist
Church, Ward Towers, Pepper
Towers, The Singing Angels,
Bishop Norward Dean and his
Church Of God Of Prophesy
members, and the Williams-
Garner family.
More importantly, family
members made their entrance
with Jimmie Williams Jr.
leading, followed by Nina Don-
ald, Tavarick Wym, Sylvester
Sanders, Jamal, Leita, Sierra,
Jamao, Jamyla, Sylvia, Ted


Garner, and Rosa V. ..'
Daniels, 92 year
old grandmother.
They took their
respective places
at the head tables, while Her-
bert Glaze gave the invocation
and the lunch was supervised
by Shirley Day Worthy and
served by the youth of Alpha
Gamma Eta Phi Beta Sorority,
Inc.
In addition, credit goes out
to Portia Kelly, Willie
Williams, Mary Rob-
bins, advisors, and
Barbara Golphin, co-
ordinator. Some of the
fast servers included
Lenise Roberts, Tra-
lycia Young, Corneli-
ous Williams, Britt-
ny Samuels, James HAND
Brown, Erika Fryer,
Bionde Blewton,
Connley Fryer, Birton Legice,
Deion Lewis, Ladymond
Shepard, Patrick Boyton,
Daija Bastian, Roneeka Walk-
er, Paris Donkiey, Rosa Bello,
Trenice Morgan Kiona and
Keion Jackson, and Carioti-
un Legree.
After lunch, Worthy intro-
duced the honorees and gave a
brief bio of each one and their
contributions to the communi-


:3


Congratulations to National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People (NAACPI presi-
dent Bishop Victor T. Curry At
the organization's annual Free-
dom Fund Gala on Saturday,
October 11, the following will be
honored: Family Christian As-
sociation of America, Inc., Garth
C. Reeves, Father Richard L.
M. Barry, Dr. Rudy Crew, Hon-
orable Shirley Gibson, and Mi-
chael Putney.
Happy wedding anniversary to
Gregory L. and Janelle Gilbert
Hall, 25th anniversary, Septem-
ber 24.
Marguerite Miller: Happy be-
lated Birthday on September 23
and Happy Wedding anniversary
to you and Maxie who celebrated
your 63rd anniversary on Sep-
tember 24.
Get well wishes to all of you!
Samuel Cleare, Carmetta
Brown-Russell, Herbert Rho-


Jackson shines as

power-hungry cop

MOVIE
continued from 1C

a huge blow-up between the two
men after Turner has someone
break into the house and Lisa
gets assaulted.
This movie is like most movies
about crazy cops who've gone
mad with power, although it is
a bit more captivating. Turner
irritates everyone with his ar-
rogant can't-touch-me attitude,
and it grasps the audience and
makes it impossible to look
away.
Director Neil LaBute did an
amazing casting job. The part
of Turner would not have been
an easy one to cast or play, but
Jackson does a phenomenal job
making his character the favor-
ite as well as the most hated by
the audience.


des, Arthur Liv- -
ingston, Freddie
"Jabo" Johnson, '"
Prince Gordon, .-....'-"-
Elsie Douglas, Do-
ris M. Pittman, William Lee,
Cliffornia Ross and Jaunita
Humes.
Jeffrey Swilley, son of Jack
and Leona Swilley who now lives
in Fort Washington, MD was in
the city to visit his family and to
attend his alma mater, Univer-
sity of Miami football game. His
sister, Leah, was also very elated
to see him home.
Raslyn Blue-Parkinson of Ra-
leigh, N.C. returned home last
week to visit her mother and
father, Edward and Elizabeth
"Betty Blue." Their other daugh-
ter Sandra Clue-Harris of Kern-
ersville, N.C. also returned home
to visit her parents. Roslyn,
was one of the speakers at the
Daughters of the King Breakfast


ByDr. Richardr c-a-


at Saint Agnes Episcopal Church
last Saturday. The sisters were
very happy to see many of their
friends, they grew up with.
Congratulations to Miami Car-
ol City Senior High student Chaz
I Wright who was chosen Student
of the Week for his outstanding
leadership and academic excel-
lence. Chaz will be honored on
Sunday, October 5 at the Dol-
phins vs. San Diego Chargers
football game. Chaz is the son of
Ronald and Kim B. Wright and
the grandson of Barbara Bur-
row.
Hats and caps off to John H.
Gibson who was honored by his
church family at the Cathedral of
Saint Mary Catholic Church last
Sunday, September 28. He re-
ceived the Primum Regnum Dei
award from Archbishop Favalora
of Miami's Diocese. John and
Marjorie Young are the only two
from Saint Mary's. Bernadette
Poitier was also honored. She is
a member of Saint Francis Xavi-
er Catholic Church. Congrats
Soror!
When you're given some pen-
nies with your change next year,
don't throw them away thinking


Patrick Wilson and Samuel L. Jackson stars in Lakeview Terrace.


Patrick Wilson also does a
great job in this movie. He
makes the audience understand
what he is dealing with while
also making people think about
what they would do if they were
in his shoes.
There are not many special ef-
fects in the movie, but the foot-
age of the wildfires is great, even
if it is more likely footage of the
wildfires out in California this
past summer than any studio-
created fire.
All in all, the movie was pretty


Rucker shows his country side


RUCKER
continued from 1C
stumbling block to country
success than his race.
Jewel and Jessica Simpson
have found only moderate
radio success with recent
country singles. And Bon Jovi,
which had a chart-topper in
Who Says You Can't Go Home
with Sugarland singer Jennifer
Nettles, faltered with its own
country singles.
To move Don't Think up the
charts, Rucker had to win over
skeptical programmers.
When Rucker visited WQYK-


FM in Tampa, program
director Mike Culotta expected
an aloof rock star, "somebody
who would have entitlement."
Instead, he says, "Darius
engaged everybody."
"He's doing what he always
wanted to do. There's no way
listeners don't hear that."
Rucker says he'll continue
to perform with Hootie, "but
as far as gigs and touring, I'm
concentrating on this."
At some point, Hootie will
record another album, "and I'm
down for that, if the timing's
right. But I'm a country singer.
That's what I am now."


good. Not great, but worth see-
ing at least once.


a great affair.


I


T""t',.I


ty. Copeland was an efficient
electrician; Bellamy organized
the first catering business;
Williams worked for Mt. Tabor
MBC and the first to ride her
bicycle all over Liberty City;
Carswell was an active com-
munity servant, along with his
wife, Bertha; Moore founded
CORE and spend his youthful
days protesting for justice; and
Beneby used her time evange-
lizing from her church.
Meanwhile, an additional
tribute was paid to Carswell,
Copeland, Moore, and Beneby
through music, poetry, while
Worthy added the frosting on
the cake with her glib presen-
tation of articulating each one
contributions.
SSylvia took to the mic
and gave special thanks
to Miami Northwestern's
class of '65, Jacqueline
Smith and Marguerite
Bivins-Mosley for pro-
viding the gifts to the
seniors; Dianne Wil-
'1ELD lams for coordinating
the raffle tickets; her
children and grand chil-
dren, especially Jimmie, Mitzi
and Jamal for transporting the
seniors to the event, along with
Rodney, Officer Cherie Bry-
ant, husband, Ted and those
who will celebrate later at a
special luncheon.
And, of course, after all of
the efforts Sylvia exerted, she
had energy to get on the floor
and do the electric slide, while
planning for next year. It was


Dr. Larry Handfield, trust-
ee, Audley Coakley, trustee,
John Williams, past national
president, and Carol Weath-
erington, president, empow-
ered themselves to bring the
Bethune-Cookman U. alumni
together to receive
specifics on the build-
ing program at the
university, last Friday,
at the Omega Activity
Center.
To get the alumni
and supporters ready
for the evening were
musicians Arnold ROL
Knight, Curly, Lee
Johnson, Bernard
Thomas, Aaron Johnson,
Dr. Malcolm Black, and Dick
Strachan of the Psi Phi Band,
while Charlie, Dorothy, Chiq-
uita, and David Davis pre-
pared the food to munch on
and Larry Williams and wife
did the bartending.
Dr. Handfield was intro-
duced to give an overview of the
building program and began by
stating how the enrollment has
risen beyond expectation and
upper class persons are living
on South Beach in Daytona or
other area for housing. Coak-
ley showed displays of the new
dormitory, field house, and
other buildings, while Israel
Melton raised a few pertinent
questions re: who will be re-
sponsible? Alumni or Trustee.


it's play money. In 2009, our U.S.
Mint will be getting not just one
new look but four. The one- cent
coin will have the first changes to
the penny coin in 50 years. The
new designs were unveiled dur-
ing a ceremony last Monday at
the Lincoln Memorial. Abraham
Lincoln's birthday next year will
be the 200th anniversary. Lin-


Trial for torture in Liberia begins


By Vanessa Blum


An American citizen raised
in Florida led a Liberian para-
military squad that beheaded
men, burned their flesh and
committed other acts of illegal
torture, a prosecutor told ju-
rors Monday in Miami federal
court.
Charles McArthur Emmanu-
el, 31, also known as Chuckie
Taylor, ordered the execution
and abuse of prisoners as head
of his West African nation's
dreaded Demon Forces, pros-
ecutor Christopher Graveline
said in an opening statement.


Emmanuel, who has pleaded
not guilty, is the son of former
Liberian president Charles
Taylor. The case marks the first
prosecution under a 14-year-
old law criminalizing acts of
torture committed outside U.S.
borders. If convicted, Emman-
uel faces life in prison.
Graveline said Emmanuel
used torture to intimidate his
father's political enemies and
keep the regime in power.
"There are men who live today
with the scars this man left on
their bodies," Graveline said.
Defense lawyer John Wylie
said the witnesses accusing


T.I's kids to receive more money


SUPPORT
continued from 1C

insurance and extracurricular
activities of the boys, ages
7 and 8. Though Dixon was
granted primary custody, T.I.
will share joint custody of his
sons.
Dixon's attorney, Randy
Kessler said that while his


client is grateful to receive
more child support she is
still unsatisfied with the new
amount.
"Every little bit helps,"
Kessler told the AP. "She
was just getting by with the
children, while they lived a
different life with their father.
It can't be complete opposites
on the other side."


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Emmanuel of such atrocities
made up their stories to escape
lives of desperation, disease
and poverty in Liberia. "We're
going to prove to you that Mr.
Emmanuel did not do these
things," Wylie said.
U.S. agents arrested Em-
manuel in March 2006 at Mi-
ami International Airport.
Elise Keppler, a senior lawyer
with Human Rights Watch, said
his trial sends an important
message: "The United States
will not be a refuge for those
who commit torture abroad."

Richard Faison













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LL


Coakley took to the mic and
informed the alumni of the
importance of giving more to
the university and passed out
forms to indicate how much
each person could give for
the next 5-years. As a result,
$123,000 was reported which
included Earl Daniels, Israel
Milton, Dr. Lorraine F. Stra-
chan, Marion W. Kel-
ley, William Clarke, III
plunking down 50% of
their share, as the Psi
Phi Band played on.
Some of the other
alumni and supporters
in attendance included
Gwen LaVan Dlena Per-
LE aza, Catherine Green
Dorothy Thomas, John
W. Miller, William Kel-
ly, Latisa Nelson, Yvonne Ed-
wards, Cherry Banks Moss,
Annette Rolle, Vivian But-
ler, Charlene Curry, T. Ei-
leen Martin-Major, Elspe A.
Steward, Wayne Davis, Judge
Shirlyon McWhorter, Andre
Turner, Joe Jones, George
Green Shelia Geathers, Mae
Brooks, Lorenzo Akins,
Murlyn Johnson, Evelyn
Hugher, Thomasena Wilson,
Vera Purchell and Stephenie
Mills.
The highlight of the evening
was the presentation of Ebony
Kennedy, a recent graduate
who made an impact by gradu-
ating summa cum laude work-
ing in the President's office and
being sponsored by Coakley
and Strachan. She received


coln's picture will remain on one
side of the coin and the Lincoln
Memorial will be replaced on the
other side by the new images,
with a different one being intro-
duced every three months.
Congratulations to David Wy-
man and Jewyll Dumonay who
were married on Saturday, Au-
gust 30 in Fort Lauderdale.


a standing ovation for being in
attendance, while Weathering-
ton and Coakley are planning
another Round Up. Stay tune
for the venue and date.


Congratulations go out Com-
mission Dorrin D. Rolle (Dis-
trict 2) for continuing to "bring
government closer to the peo-
ple" in his annual monogram
produced by his office and dis-
seminated through mail to the
people living in his district.


Elizabeth Williams, execu-
tive director, Black Archives,
prepared for the membership
to attend the first meeting after
a summer vacation in the exec-
utive room of BAF. Gwen Wel-
ters brought the meeting to at-
tention, while Dr. Gay Outler,
Maude Newbold, and Leome
Culmer passed out info. to the
committee.
More importantly, The Char-
ter Day Honors Luncheon will
be held, Sunday, November 9,
at the Hilton Miami (former-
ly The Omni), beginning at 1
p.m. Traditionally, the mile-
stones achieved by members
of Miami-Dade County's Black
Community will be saluted at
this event for years ending in
'08's or "03's. All interested
parties should call 305-636-
2391 for explicit information,
Especially, chairpersons of
each sub-committee. More to
come next time.


Cierra Rucker and her god-
mother Dr. Evalina Bestman
left for China last week.
Wade Scott is now living in
Daytona Beach where he is at-
tending Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity and purchased his own
home there. His mother, Audrey
E. Strachan, is a Wildcat also.
Congrats Wade!


AF
DFI








BLACKS MUNLIT CONTROl THEIR OW\N I)I\rEs N


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


Save college grants

For more than 30 years, federal dollar shortfall in
Pell Grants have helped mostly next year's funding
needy students pay for college; for the grant. To
without it many would not be balance the department's budget,
able to further their education. Congress will either have to
Over the last year, more students approve $6 billion in new funds
applied for a Pell grant than ever or cut back on the program.
before. The high demand for Scaling back is not an option.
these funds has put a strain on Just as Wall Street received
the program; the Department and continues to receive -
of Education faces a $6 billion federal bailouts, so too should


the Pell Grant program. In this
instance, at least the taxpayer
funds would be put towards
something that has a positive
impact on the country's long
term health.
Pell Grants are usually
awarded to students 90
percent of them low income -
working toward their first college
degree, whether they are recent
graduates or older students.
The funds do not have to be
repaid. The most any student
can receive each a school under
the program is just over $4700.
That's enough to fully fund a
year at a community college. At
more expensive schools, the Pell
Grants forms the foundation


for a financial aid package that
includes other grants and, often,
student loans. Without a Pell
Grant, students may have to
either reduce their courseload or
take on more loan debt. Congress
set aside $14 billion for the
grants for the current year, but
a failing economy and stagnant
job market pushed many
Americans, more than expected,
to return to the classroom. The
increased demand, combined
with a build up of shortfalls from
previous years, the Education
Department is now faced with
this huge budget deficit in the
Pell program.
Finding the money to save
the program shouldn't be that


difficult. After all, President
Bush recently asked the
American people to get behind
a $700 billion bailout for the
financial industry. The Federal
Reserve didn't seem to flinch
when it dipped into its coffers
and found an extra $85 million
to loan financially strapped
insurance giant AIG. Nor did it
seem to have a problem giving
million dollars to several other
similarly troubled corporations
over the last few months.
At least the use of taxpayer
funds to support the Pell Grant
program would make sense: a
well-educated workforce drives
the economy. America's heavily
outsourced job market needs


educated, qualified candidates.
Sustaining the Pell Grant
program would help ensure
there is are trained workers who
would help the country compete
in a global marketplace. This
competition would create jobs
and America as a whole will
benefit.
Congress needs to act quickly
and assure students that there
will be no cuts in the Pell Grant
program. If the government is
able to give what will total $1
trillion to corporations whose
bad business practices and
greed created the problems
they currently face, surely they
can find a mere $6 billion for
students in need.


Si"'"' olkr, IrcrkJd to %j no) )unf involved



Copyrighted Material





Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers












Modeling agencies urged to recommend more Black models


MODELS
continued from 1C

lead of former Vogue editor
Grace Mirabella, the first to use
a Black model on the magazine's
cover, said Tim Gunn, creative
director at Liz Claiborne and
co-host of Bravo television's
"Project Runway."
Some designers consider cul-
tural and ethnic diversity on
the runway, "but there are not
enough," he said.
While the issue was once left
to pioneering Black models
Iman and Naomi Campbell to
note, attention has grown re-
cently.
This year, Vogue Italia's first
"Black Issue," with more than
20 Black models, created world-
wide buzz and sold out.
The Council of Fashion De-
signers of America, the U.S.
industry trade group, has said
it is up to the designers to es-
tablish ethnic diversity. This
season, the group's president,
Diane von Furstenberg, urged
them to seek a diversity of mod-
els.
Blacks make up about 13
percent of the U.S. population,
according to census data.
Some insiders said fashion


still discriminates.
"Visually on the runways, it
has improved," said Bethann
Hardison, a 1970s Black run-
way model. "But the results are
still racist. You choose the same
white and you never go towards
the brown or the dark."



J .


Designer Tracy Reese said
the question of diversity on the
runway --eds to be brought
up again and again to ensure
change.
"If it's too exclusionary, it
puts me off," she said.

CLOTHES COME FIRST
More than three decades af-
ter Yves Saint Laurent hired


YOURWEEh
Horoscope-,^^^^^HH~H^^H& "

By MinervaKji


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
You've changed enough to see that
certain things don't matter anymore. You
are so over this you've lost the desire
to maintain it. Others think they can fix
what is beyond repair. Don't let them
con you into helping them out. Lucky
numbers 4, 30, 42, 12, 33.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
You're missing too much to be able
to figure this out. All the facts aren't in
and you aren't working with a full deck
to begin with. Remedying this situation
will only succeed if you are 100% willing
to hear all of the gory details. Lucky
numbers 3, 20, 13, 35, 5.

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
If you keep blaming others for not
being there when you need them, you'll
keep replicating the experience just to
be right about it. None of this would
be happening if you could just get over
needing to constantly play the victim.
Lucky numbers 20, 6, 50, 42, 11.

CANCER: JUNE 21- JULY 20
Waiting for others to come through
could take forever. They may very well
want to be there for you but they're
afraid of what that implies. If you want
this, you need to make it clear that
they're freedom won't be jeopardized by


love. Lucky numbers 23, 30, 42, 11, 3.

LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
You can't keep running away from
this. Others see what it's doing to you.
If you were half as aware of how much
you need to make some changes you
wouldn't even be here. Nothing will
improve until you learn how to be true
to your self. Lucky numbers 22, 32, 14,
5,7.

VIRGO: AUG. 21- SEPT. 20
Whoever or whatever you're overly
attached to will do everything in their
power to keep you here. If this isn't in
your best interests, only you can do
something about it. You may not know
it but you don't need to hang on to this.
Lucky numbers 7, 17, 30, 23, 42.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCT. 20
You want to make a change without
going from the frying pan to the fire.This
is a delicate situation. Weighing your
options, it looks like a choice between
preserving yourself, or preserving
things that mean very little to you. Lucky
numbers 12, 19, 2, 43, 4.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
This frustration would disappear if
you realized you aren't obligated to
anyone. What you think others expect


the first Black model for his
collection, many designers say
it's their right to cast models
regardless of race.
Rubin Singer, who said he
was criticized for "going too eth-
nic" by using a high number of
Black models last season, said
his choice always depends on
the designs and what sells.
"I'm dressing women here,"
he said. "I'm building a busi-
ness and building my customer
base."
Designer Michael Angel said:
"I don't ever think about color,
nor do I think of race. That
is the most backward way to
think."
Other designers blamed the
modeling agencies.
"It's very hard to find them,"
said Adriano lodice. "If you ask
an agency to send 25 compos-
ites of models, only two or three
of them will be Black."
IMG Models did not return
calls for comment. Neal Hamil,
of Elite Model Management,
said his agency was "stepping
in the right direction" and he
sees progress.
"I believe the fashion industry
has taken note on this serious
issue. The greater number of
ethnic models seen on the run-


has you trying to fit their mold. Just be
yourself. Trying too hard to please them
is creating more trouble than it's worth.
Lucky numbers 55, 52, 24, 51, 2.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
Your original intent was clean and
pure but success has changed all that.
You've lost the thread that connects you
to what matters most. More is not better
and it isn't what you really want. Now
that you know this, keep it simple. Lucky
numbers 4, 30, 9, 43, 22.

CAPRICORN: DEC. 21 JAN. 20
Riding two horses at once has
weakened your effectiveness. You've
already got a good thing going and need
to put your energy into making it better.
There's too much at stake for you to even
dream of playing both ends to the middle.
Lucky numbers 7, 30, 23, 55, 3.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21 FEB. 20
The feelings you once had were quite
strong. Too much time and waiting has
made it difficult to maintain them. As you
fade into indifference your thoughts have
made you wonder if it's worth it to keep
hoping that others will ever reciprocate.
Lucky numbers 8, 54, 34, 22, 1.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
You've been so patient with others, at
this point you're getting jerked around.
They keep going back and forth and you
keep being understanding. If you have
a nutcase on your hands, what makes
you think they're your dream come true?
Lucky numbers 32, 10, 29, 54, 5.


way is apparent," he said.
Others said discussions of
the issue and media attention
had stirred the industry's con-
sciousness.
"There has been a definite
surge, to use the military term,
of much diversity, particularly
more Black girls," said Andre
Leon Talley, editor-at-large at


Vogue. "There's been a series of
conversations. It's a fresh mo-
ment."
A spotlight on race due to
Barack Obama's presidential
nomination could spill into
fashion, commentators said.
"It is my hope because of Mi-
chelle Obama that fashion will
grasp it and redefine beauty,"


said fashion author Kathryn
Finney, referring to the Demo-
cratic candidate's wife.
Gunn added that not just the
runways need to change.
"I would like to see more di-
versity among fashion design-
ers," he said. "With more sup-
port for designers of color, that
can help this issue as well."


FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC FOU'MDATION
Pm.sorn tand Pltws
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DAN ZANESA CnD FRIENDS.

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kRun-DMC up for


rock hall of fame


Zakiva Randall wins

against adult men
Atlanta, GA (BlackNews.com)
- Zakiya Randall, a 17-year-
old teen golf star, fondly .
known by fans as "Z" makes
history by becoming the only
and youngest female to win
on the Golf Channel Georgia
Tour. After already qualifying
for the Georgia Golf Channel ..-..,-
Championship by placing in
the top percentile on the most
difficult level of play on the
Golf Tour, she goes on to win
the final tournament of the
season on September 7, 2008
at Arbor Springs Golf & Resort
Club also known as the Coweta
Club in Newnan, Georgia.
* "I am excited to be able to win
on one of the most challenging
golf courses in Georgia against
some of the best adult men
amateur players on the Georgia
Golf Tour," Randall said. "I
have been working on some
swing mechanics for further
improvements, so this win on
the tour in the final tournament Zakiya Randall, Fondly Known by Fans as "Z" Ma
of the season is really special." and Becomes the Only and Youngest Female to
The field included Georgia Golf Amateur Tour.



I am aO ld .a. n %.. 10 on: #I pop%V


makes History
Win on the



Ibg 4


Copyright d Material


Available from Commercial News Provders


DMX's rushed to hospital after stroke scare


By Cyrus Langhorne

After reporting yesterday
that troubled rapper DMX
was rushed to an emergency
room in Florida due to an al-
leged fear of having a stroke,
X's lawyer, Bradford Cohen,
has detailed his condition.
According to Billboard, while
Cohen confirmed the former
Def Jam artist's unexpected
check-in to an Aventura hos-
pital, he did not say why. "It


was serious enough at the
time but ultimately he should
be OK," he told Billboard.
"It was serious enough for
him to be brought and taken
into a treatment facility."
As previously reported by
SOHH, X was taken to a hospi-
tal on Monday (September 22)
one day before he was sched-
uled to appear in an Arizona
court. X, who was recently
extradited from Florida to Ari-
zona, faces several charges in


the state including numerous
traffic violations, animal cru-
elty accusations and defraud-
ing a hospital with an invalid
Social Security number and
name.
"He spent the night [at the
hospital] and he will prob-
ably spend [Wednesday night]
there as well," Cohen said of
X's absence. "I don't think it's
going to be an ongoing thing
or a life-threatening situation.
He's going to be alright."


approximately 50 of some of
the best adult men amateur
tour players in Georgia.
She now joins an elite list
of amateur level golfers who
have also qualified to play at
the national level on the Golf
Channel Tour.
Zakiya, known by fans as
"Z", has become a media
darling. She has been in Sports
Illustrated, EBONY Magazine,
on the Tavis Smiley Radio
Show, The Golf Channel TV
Show, nominated as a finalist
for outstanding talents and
has been featured in numerous
magazines, newspapers and
online journals around the
globe.
Randall took up golf at the
age of 10 and after winning a
series of tennis tournaments,
she was immediately successful
in golf, winning 'Player of the
Year' honors. To become a part
of this exciting experience and
make a secure online donation
or for more information, visit
www. zakiyarandall .com


NEW YORK (Reuters) Hip
Hop group Run-DMC, heavy
metal band Metallica and mu-
sician/songwriter Bobby Wom-
ack are among nine nominees
announced on Monday vying
for five spots in the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame.
Artists become eligible for
the Hall of Fame 25 years after
the release of their first single
or album and are represented
in an exhibition at the Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame and Mu-
seum in Cleveland, Ohio.
More than 500 music indus-
try professionals will choose
five of the nominees for the
24th annual induction on
April 4 in Cleveland. The in-


ductees will be announced in
January.
New York hip hop group
Run-DMC are credited with
setting the "template for mod-
ern hip-hop, from their ev-
eryday-teenager style to their
blazing live shows to a catalog
of classic songs that few rap-
pers have matched,"'the Hall
of Fame Foundation said in a
statement.
Founded in the 1980s by
Joseph "Rev. Run" Simmons,
Darryl "DMC" McDaniels and
Jason "Jam Master Jay" Miz-
ell, the group's hits include
"It's Like That," "It's Tricky"
and "Walk This Way," their
collaboration with Aerosmith.


Who Cares


What Black People Think


Anyway?

If :.,, --,,-,.. nobody giiv's a damn - .-. :. p. ple thanK thin -, agaarn, Soie
'-%. W, :n- a r :',.-:4.-.t!i' whet '.-,- need :-,.--." -- ng fr ycrny ,

,- -_:,...v,-:ng.. o ongto *,*-- them :...: ur m,:- : -. : -: ?v -i.care- what.you

v .!-r -7, -t.-,: t- h their show's.
!..- .*: :'.i 1: d thee ;:j :.-.*.*- want san-,-'is" j from u. A ,-' ,.-,,lien pfe '-otD E
.*v:,-n- n ;.* ..--, ;- r l. -. .you, ,c u hav i g.Qt .p -" ;.r t h mm,",,' h .'."c .-.'.t c" rr' to
_se i. .' power to: -y 'o makL -,- chanr:-. ,we ,- to ,I-IT
-. - .- to ive you something iri return -_.-ple 'ho are d. nr,


I .. is ,.:. he L..... : .: i.. .Com mLur .i: to
, 17,.: 1 i .. .. : ... v. . -. ..,. ,.J ... : *' :i 7O ** ..'.:-. use t. .F:.r irr n ecv,
-.1!, -,. are 32 .mtlIon IBlatk F, county and -. s Tar we
e rned rn ow ..:, -e. I4 ._. ., ,.- ..!li. .1 ,


That's clout.


I I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008







Business________
SECTION D MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008
%%ahbintemon ultual numrn hbirxl hank toI fail in I 1 hIico
-. i




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6D THE MIAMI TIMES. OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


-- - I__ ... _


Economy weakens as new-home sales drop


By Barbara Hagebaugh

WASHINGTON -
Orders for big-ticket
items plunged at the
fastest rate in seven
months in August
while the pace of new-
homes sales dropped
to its lowest level in
more than 17 years,
the government said
Thursday in sepa-
rate reports. The re-
ports underscored
the weakness in the
economy going into


that rapidly escalated
in September.
Last week, the num-
ber of Americans sign-
ing up for first-time
unemployment ben-
efits jumped in part
because businesses
were shuttered in the
wake of hurricanes
Ike and Gustav. Even
aside from the hur-
ricanes' effects, the
numbers pointed to
a weakening job mar-
ket.
The data, along with


the financial turmoil other reports out in


A newly built home site for sale in Springfield, III.,
Thursday, Sept. 25. New-home sales tumbled in Au-
gust to the slowest pace in 17 years. Enlarge
-AP photo Seth Perlman


recent weeks, suggest
a "recession is inevita-
ble," Joel Naroff, head
of Naroff Economic Ad-
visors, said in a note
to clients.
Orders for durable
goods, long-lasting
items like cars and
refrigerators, dropped
4.5% in August as
demand for machin-
ery, cars, aircraft and
other items fell, the
Commerce Depart-
ment said. It was the
sharpest drop since
January.


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Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers


I he i.,94 nw SegS ,b.o rue t

- qmwf


ATTENTION SENIORS
BRAND NEW APTS
1,2 AND 3 BEDROOMS FROM $637*
Section 8 Welcome
CORAL PLACE APTS.
Apply At
Lafayette Apts
150 NE 79th St.
305-759-6350
*income restrictions apply
ADA, EHL


COME SEETHE MONEY!

It's Your Turn

AND

Now It Is Legal.

Call Uncle Larry!

786-236-6574


REQUEST FOR BID (RFB) NO.
SLOPE MOWING SERVICES
MIAMI FIELD STATION SERVICE AREA


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!
EN D THE
I NC 0 N VE I E N ( E
OF EMP T Y
BO X E S ,
FIG H TING
THE WEATHER
A 0 1 D
H LI N T I N '3
S D 0W t N 8 A C V.
S C p I E S

CALL
305-04-0214


6000000209


The Procurement Department of the South Florida Water Management
District, B-1 Building, 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, Florida 33406,
will receive sealed proposals up to the 2:30 p.m. opening time on October
30, 2008 for side slope mowing services for the Miami Field Station Service
Area. An OPTIONAL Site Visit will be held on October 14, 2008 at 10:00
a.m. at the Miami Field Station located at 9001 N.W. 581t St. Miami, FL 33178.
Transportation will be the responsibility of attendees.

All bids must conform to the instructions in the RFB. Interested respondents
may obtain a copy of the complete RFB (1) at the above address; (2) by
downloading the solicitation from our website at www.sfwmd.gov; (3) by calling
(561) 682-2715; or (4) by calling the 24-hour BID HOTLINE (800) 472-5290.
The public is invited to attend the bid opening. Further information on the
status of this solicitation can be obtained on our web site www.sfwmd.
gov.


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."



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I023-JJ07 10/21/2008


E10 AND DIESEL No. 2 FUEL FOR NORTH AND
SOUTH OF FLAGLER STREET TRANSPORT DELIVERY


106-HHO1 10/14/2008 Money Counting Machines

093-HH06 6/24/2008 File Cabinets

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


BUSINESS SELECT

THE PERFECT BUSINESS BLEND


cl.J, ;.M Alk
Cfull %1 1 fEft


* 1,000 prroessed items FREE'

* $/ 5 rebate on first check order

* FREE Colonial CuNstm Check Cards

* FREE Check Recovery Service'

* Payroll services offered through ADP"


Colonial has more than 60 offices to serve you in
South Ho-,rida. To find a location near you,
visit :" i',....i, ,I11.;.c it'r.,,iH or c'3ll (877) 50o -"2 65.


COLONIAL BANK
You'll Ulike it here.
AM Ic


, V ,, .'- .. .) :j i : I .J. 2. :.. rpr,- r *' i :'-ra jn, i, *t f r ,t' r .VI& %T.. kt -
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MIAMIDI
W- MIAMI.MV--AEAAf
LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING EXPRESSIONS OF
INTEREST-FOUR DEVELOPMENT SITES AT MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
PROJECT NO. EOI-01-08
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department is announcing the availability of the above referenced Expressions of Interest document (E01),
which can be obtained by visiting our Website at:
www.miami-airport.com/html/buslnessopportunities.html (in order to view the full EOI document, please select "Advertisements"
link at the bottom of the Business Opportunities page and then select the respective project).
INVESTMENT SITES: Miami-Dade County's Aviation Department (MDAD), is soliciting responses to the Expressions of Interest (EOI)
from developers/investors for the development of four investment sites at Miami International Airport (MIA).
The four investment sites are located ii areas adjacent to MIA's Central Boulevard which is the main public entranceway to the Terminal
Building. These investment sites are:
1) Area "A," commonly known as "Central Base," is a 25 +/- acre site. If an investor/developer chooses, the site may be
subdivided into an 8+/- acre parcel that currently consists of a surface parking area; if this option is chosen, the
investor/developer will not have any future development rights to the remaining 17 acres. MDAD is not mandating what
type of development should go on this site; however, preliminary feedback from interested parties indicates that a
conference center hotel may be ideal for this site. Also, MDAD will not consider any proposals regarding fixed-based
operations (FBO) for this site.
2) Area "B" is an 8 +/- acre site adjacent to NW 20 Street and is designated for the development of a new retail service plaza.
3) Area "C" is the designated new hotel site and is comprised of a 3 +/- acre area that straddles the access lanes to the
parking garages (the "New Hotel Site").
4) Area "D" is the existing in-terminal hotel located at Concourse "E". The hotel has undergone several renovations; however,
extensive renovations are still required including meeting Miami-Dade County Building codes compliance. Currently, Area
D is the existing 252-room, in-terminal MIA Hotel site that may also include three floors of adjoining office space currently
occupied by MDAD.
All other applicable rules, procedures, regulations applicable to privately-funded projects on airport properties will apply. See Exhibit D
of the EOI document for the applicable lobbying rules.


NOTICE Of SPECIAL ELECTION
Pt itw...r< W Ctty ft#Mio* R-677-08; $W47?, RfMw-( R-Vt-fA wid
RW 0 adopted On My18. IS, 2 no n H Ls102aCS n 31*icrt 4 AO.i 4*, Dr"ca1 of
t r-rrr l 'frK. .' rF.,Narrs-l;A V *11.1, Frrena ir.!: r. rv.iuh u .n r d na ral .; cftiin
Court,for tareL ovalardisaspa t tr' 7ra pJras
HMms RuW Chrlar ArnAdrnitia
fwjpwding iafw Offici P Mangw rord Mayor
Sial tIhe CIter be arereca 1t 'rxn.*1r ithe 'omweI aCLitia r reres sibinsa ct the Courty
pfa s-r iu: t C. P.'t.1 0 1(1 n m i. 4 ), l 1 ri i-.vr %6g. r,:siih u e .afi P -!m M i nrt
?'n11 lrstr51m r *'cu'r! ; .'-!-rlipnfrt cri.c ~ ofl r jed tO [he IAfv7'
-E 43
NO -44
t m Rueh Charter-AzMmmnnt
RalatIg I Salaries and Survice of County Comsmsaionarm
* h'* j1 fj '.1.r.. *F""": ~C L:TI 7...:~ *t^ rI.IT^^^ 'm mle 311 h3 T'. r~c r'c 1inc" fld."' muirny

itr!ef m gtt tteaY teriwoe. Niiat^wionn..a te h wwtf Stwid 4 Xtr aenVIMOW"e kit.o ,. $eivew ndy Vo(I.4 ib o Cotyommissmk rO oI
s papr, H . na-ts, ;. :0,, I -Id: .:- L-4 i.. ZcL r 1 UIA-C- L1'.rtk/oOti
NO W4
ChzutuI Asameamidnt Peroviling Afitauntie
Pm o. to e p *Ulrr oer to of Ruch pw1w aOtth oinlenr ow "W
shagE ft C4wftecr b aeme*d tI nspmk missotw of cmrvf b cmm onw 0
YES Mp
NO 1W0
Nt o* al hrftm A~O*5ktm
c oft dOretance k e bIePlettio si smlring
wflh Fnom Approali and PUmCIL Hearlngs
Shglt Cte4'Tiw h> nw~0'1I' .*i 1* ** 14 "" (14' to>"h. '* '"- F-ri!i> *tl!F tppase* Wl
Isettfea. PsWcrO hamsang ow rpw.at ef wI amse as to nomf aaiqdone tia Condty
ciqrss-arn 1o t16 a ptea lhsrtg ki anyr stch pmian at fima ami cci Cty c rewscn normotrmig
Ottq*?S o 1* cleCt'ne k*4y1 of tho' p8tv
yLS sa
At 152
NO 1 53
Charter A'moitdmi)t R*s leg tv
Appnreva as to fhum at shmw "t cuth r s'm be o*'ended h{ 3we Mtit 1 Cer dat of* Qvtt CtOa Wtar #tAhen Tim seaB
o.f cowar Gca smmm i..,m, CAW"e iLfr p on.tfismm w tD farm
YES IDSB
NO 155
County Charftu Ameadnnmt
Croatng Unmrtar Counlywmic Fv and Rfmcuc
54cv and PI*mwi"I Emimtbng City Sum'.os
SGliaEtlh Cblarbe amc aL'a iz r:.qj1c ,-- Ilc Lw'iUJ ol A .xj CatimisnAwnaem pmose a
,intiiOp i ;IsM f anr pr" Wtltton "ng tie saNtW4 for all k-K3NytratRaW awn
', .'-.. of 1* l .0 i r, -tin i 'ha e"pliAnot .0 *iift of Migryk. Miami 5#60i,
"aw(1mo', LW2r rl.,l and 1.c% L,. .ore aMeih omay w(1! fo fBir and. rescue proatlcin
feloepB in th1i $~w
YES 1S0
NO ISe
LI .I~13i'i.mP i.Vi-i. I 1 1. .r-ii!- s n i ,.~ lit tnil .1 'J.( 0~p \t.i O a!S i jnty ltWS r EgWJO14
Al^ 'pa-1?r 1 i t*, n ' !l
To pots i he opl ft rn 7 aar- urntt 7 pmna wi tB day of the spmcfia elmsaom I Ths aspect
fl.,IInn T- .-i'. 1 ',, W t-l -l n ., jn A) II 1 1,. 7l.,.r. J, '. l. I.- d) l le |)tv '

mammlCad C aID=omClyFoni"a


I I_- ____j


-----
















SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


.1:


101 N.E. 78th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$900 nice and clean, laundry
room, parking Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bdrm, one bath, $550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$625 Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

11530 N.E. 12th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly, $1400 to move
in. Call 786-256-3174.

1191 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, major appli-
ances included, $525 month,
first, last and security.
Call 305-299-3450

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725 appliances
included, 305-747-4552.

1311 N.W. 2 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Ms. Shorty 786-290-1438

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $525.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6th Street
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bedroom, one bath.
$600 monthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$1100 to move in.
Call 305-628-2212

1510 N.W. 68 Street
One bdrm, one bath $575
Two bedroom, one bath $675
Appliances Included
Call 786-797-6417

158 STREET N.W. 24 AVE.
One bdrm, one bath, water
and electricity included. $700
monthly. Call 305-624-6061

1648 N.W. 35 Street
One bedroom*brand new*
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

200 N.W. 13 Street
One bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath
$475. One Month to move in.
305-6642-7080

2141 N.W. 91 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
private driveway, air. $625
monthly. 786-663-0234

2158 N.W.5 Ave
One bedroom, one bath. No
Deposit for Section 8 Only.
$550 monthly. 954-628-2955

220 NW 11Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310
or 305-539-1312

220N.W. 16 Street
Two bdrms, one bath $600.
305-642-7080

3 3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath. $350
bi-weekly, $700 moves you
in. Appliances and utilities in-
cluded. Call 786-389-1686

421 NW 59Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Studio, $600
One bdrm, $675
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-259-7054

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$485 monthly, $750 to move
in. 305-326-8855

50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

5510 S.W. 32nd Street
Pembroke Park Area
Three bdrm, one bath, cen-
tral air, $950 mthly, $1450 to
move in. 786-256-3174.

6020 NW 13 Avenue


CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,


$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

7104 N.W. 14 Place
Large three bedrooms, two
baths, unit for rent. Central
air, water included. Section
8 -Welcome. Call 305-316-
2176.

741 N.W. 56 Street #16
One bedroom, one bath. $550
to $600. 305-758-9911

7527 N.W. 22 Avenue
Spacious upstairs two bdrms,
appliances, air, tiled floor, wa-
ter included. 305-331-5399

77 N.W. 77th Street
Two bedrooms,one and half
bath $820.
Call 786-306-4505

924 N.W. 29TH Street
Section 8 special. Two
bedrooms,one bath $950
monthly. Call 786-262-7313.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live within walking distance
of Brownsville Metrorail Sta-
tion. On major bus lines. Al-
berta Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move
in special or visit our Rent-
al Office, 2651 N.W. 50th
Street,Miami,Florida

HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084

N.W. AREA
One and two bedrooms,one
bath. Section 8 welcome. Call
305-688-7559.

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Efficiency $606 plus, one
bedroom $711, two bedrooms
$881. 305-947-0059

Opa Locka Apartments
One bedroom, $450-$500
Two bedrooms, $575-$600
Free Water. 786-267-1646

OPA LOCKA AREA
Section 8 tenants...$0 moves
you in! Renovated two and
three bedroom apartments
available. Central air, ceramic
tile, appliances and more.
Must see. Move in incentives
available. Limited time. Call
now!!! 305-434-7808

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 welcome, $500
cash back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

SENIOR MOVE IN SPECIAL
13170 Aswan Road
Huge one bedroom, tiled
floors, gated parking. $650-
$675 monthly. 786-274-2409

SENIOR MOVE IN SPECIAL
750 N.W. 56th Street
One and two bdrms, gas and
water included. $700-$895
monthly. 786-274-2409


COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699.


3786 N.w.z21tn terrace
MIAMI GARDENS TOWN
HOME, QUIET STREET,
three bedrooms, two baths,
enclosed yard, new applianc-
es, tile floor and central air.
Call 954-243-6447

7801 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, two new bath-
rooms, free water and secu-
rity gate. 954-266-9328

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
totally renovated, Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-316-2176

North Miami Area
Two bedrooms, two and a
half bath. 786-709-5027


1076 N.W. 113th Terrace
One bedroom, air, appli-
ances, $700 per month, first,
last and security. Section 8
OK. 305-681-3236.

1078 NW 100 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $985 monthly, first,
last, security. $2500 to move
in. Call 786-315-8491

1100 N.W. 97 Street
Two and three bedrooms with
all appliances, water, central
air, 305-305-4665.

11053 N.E. 12th Avenue
Two bedrooms, two balhs.
$1100 monlily. $700 se-
curity, water included. lotal
$1800 move in. Washer,
dryer, central air and heat.
Fenced in yard, tiled Iloors,
security bars. greal location
by parks and schools.
Call 786-709-7436.
11256 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, $950 month,
786-306-4839

135 N.E. 80 Terrace
Newly remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath, central air,
$725 monthly, Section 8 wel-
come, 954-818-9112.

1695 NW 116th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 mthly, first, last, secu-
rity. Call 770-496-4376

17 Avenue and 62Ter.
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1500 to $1600 monthly.
Available October 1. Section
8 Welcome. 305-502-5559.

1722 N.W. 52 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air
and carpet included. $650
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 305-751-6232.

1832 N.W. 43rd Street
Two bdrms, one bath, $850
monthly, first and security to
move in. Call 305-638-5332.

1890 N.W. 89 Terrace
One bedroom, appliances.
$640 monthly, $1350 to move
in. Call 786-587-3731

2257 N.W. 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$850 monthly. Free Water.
305-642-7080

2266 N.W. 75 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
two bedrooms, one bath.
954-394-5887

2397 N.W. 104 Street
Three bdrms, two baths.
$1350 monthly, $1850 to
move in. 305-525-0619.

2464 N.W. 44th Street
Two bdrms, air, $995 monthly,
no deposit, 786-877-5358.

2756 N.W. 44th Street
One bedroom, $650 monthly.
Call 786-312-2159.

3105 N.W. 133th Street
Huge one bedroom, one bath,
newly remodeled, Section 8
welcome.786-374-6658

326 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$950. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

3501 N.W. 11 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly, $1500 to move
in. 305-282-7953

3621 N.W. 194th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$1000, Section 8 only, call
305-528-7340 or 305-761-
5256.

38 N.E. 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700 monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

40 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, new kitchen,
central air, bars, water, $875
monthly, 305-310-7366.

4438 N.W. 23rd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath
Call 786-586-0629

4603 N.W. 15th Avenue
Two bdrms, den. Vouchers


are accepted 305-638-5946
or 305-759-2280.


4643 N.W. 16th Avenue 3115 N.W. 58 Street
One bedroom, vouchers ac- $450 to move in. $450 month-
cepted, 305-638-5946. ly. 305-224-2569


68 N.W. 45 Street
Two bdrms $695, three
bdrms, $1100. 786-431-5520

93rd St. NW 18th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.

970 N.E. 133 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances, ceil-
ing fan, new kitchen cabinets.
flood light, new carpet, vinyl
tile. $850 mthly. $1700 to
move in. Utilities not includ-
ed. 786-488-3350.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at 3737 Charles Ter-
race

North Miami Beach
Beautiful two bedrooms, one
bath. Great area. $875, first
and last. Call 305-970-6367

Northwest Area
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Starting from $500 to
$1400.
305-757-7067 Design Realty


100 N.W. 14 Street
Newly renovated, fully fur-
nished, utilities and cable
(HBO), BET, ESPN), free lo-
cal and nationwide calling,
property protected by security
camera 24 hours, $185 wkly,
$650 mthly. 305-751-6232

1756 .W. 85 Street
$147 weekly, $625 moves
you in. 786-389-1686

3153 N.W. 53 Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

5629 Filmore Street
HOLLYWOODWOOD
Efficiency, $650 monthly,
$1000 moves you in.
Call 786-256-3174

86 St. N.E. 2nd Ave Area
Call 305-754-7776

CAROL CITY AREA
Furnished efficiency and
furnished one and half bed-
room,
Call 305-621-7940

Miami Gardens
All utilities, free cable, $700
monthly, first, last and secu-
rity. Call 786-546-9650

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large one bedroom, air,
cable, utilities included. $325
bi-weekly, $800 to move in.
Very clean, private entrance.
305-335-0429

NORTH MIAMI
Efficiency for rent, $550
monthly. 305-778-2914

SANFORD APARTMENTS
1907 N.W. 2 COURT
Nice furnished efficiency
apartment, air, window
shades, appliances. Free
gas. $350 monthly plus $200
deposit. 305-665-4938. Cell
305-498-8811

SENIORS MOVE IN SPE
CIAL
2125 N.W. 36 Street
Efficiencies and one bed-
room. Gas, and water includ-
ed. Gated parking. $525-$600
monthly. 786-274-2409


13377 N.W. 30 Ave
$95 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath,air, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

1426 N.W. 70th Street
$300-$350 Monthly
305-836-8378

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1506 N.W. 70 Street
Furnished room for rent. $350
monthly, call Ms. Queenie,
305-693-7727.

15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$85 weekly. Free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-474-8188, 305-691-3486

1822 N.W. 66th Street
$300 monthly. 305-244-2528
for appointment.

1887 NW 44 Street
$475 monthly. $600 moves
you in. Private bathroom.
305-637-9359 or
305-303-0156

2168 N.W 98 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186 305-691 -3486

2900 N.W. 54th Street


Upstairs, one room, refrigera-
tor and air. No smoking in the
building. Call 954-885-8583
or 954-275-9503.


4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

6849 N.W. 15th Avenue
Nice rooms, different sizes,
quiet area, utilities included,
Move In Special $110 week-
ly.
Call 786-277-2693

7612 N.W. 2nd Court
$125 plus weekly, central air,
clean, call 786-444-7932.

8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.

Liberty City Area
Room includes kitchen use,
private bath, utilities. $600
monthly, $1200 to move in.
Call 305-336-5180

Liberty City/Brownsville
Clean rooms, utilities
included, quiet neighbor-
hood.
786-541-5234

LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, $110 weekly.
Call 305-335-9463.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Nice furnished room in house.
786-597-2090 or 305-620-
8552.

NORTH DADE AREA
Room for rent, senior's wel-
come. Call Na 305-693-3957

NORTHSIDE AREA
Large room, kitchen privileg-
es, $485 monthly, $100 secu-
rity, $585 move in.
Call 305-653-5804.

NORTHWEST AREA
Clean quiet room with
security bars. $65 weekly.
Call 305-769-3347.

Northwest Miami Area
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-2451

Rooms with central air and
appliances. 786-487-2222

WEST HOLLYWOOD AREA
FURNISHED ROOM, 954-
305-4713 or 954-367-5094.


10741 SW 150Ter
Three bedroom, one bath
$1000 monthly. No Section 8.
305-267-9449

10951 SW 222 Ter. Miami
Three bedrooms, two baths,
nice yard. $1000. No Section
8. Call. 305-267-9449

1236 N.W. 69th Street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, Section 8, $1500, call
Tony 954-274-1058.

12405 N.W. 20 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 and one bedroom, one
bath, $700, must see,
305-788-3785

1340 N.W. 88th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air and tiled. $1299,
first and last. 786-315-3193

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750, air. 305-642-7080

15630 N.W. 159 St Road
Beautiful three bedrooms,
one bath, air, tile, $1180
monthly, huge yard.
Call 305-934-3589.

17220 N.W. 27th Avenue
Three bedroom, two baths,
Section 8 welcome, $1500
monthly, call 305-761-9464.

1780 N.W. 45th Street
Three bdrms with appliances
and air. 786-426-6263.

1856 N.W. 70th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled home, $1300
monthly, $700 security, new
appliances, washer and dry-
er. Section 8 okay.
305-926-2839.

1861 Wilmington Street
Beautifully remodeled, three
bedrooms, two baths, air. Call
Mrs. Reynolds.
786-356-1457

19432 N.W. 23rd Court
Three bedrooms, two baths
with den and dining room
area. Central air, appliances,
305-318-2718

1961 Wilmington Street
Opa Locka, three bedrooms,
one bath, $1000 monthly.
First and last. 305-389-8414.

2320 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security.
Call Waymon 305-756-1834

2424 N.W. 43rd Street
Nice, clean, three bedrooms,
two baths, 786-382-8005.

2439 N.W. 104 St.


One bedroom. $750 monthly.
Call 305-298-2837


2783 N.W. 193rd Terrance
Section 8 Ok. Four
bedrooms,one and half
bath$1595 monthly. A beauty.,
Call Joe 954-849-6793

3120 N.W. 67 Street
Remodeled tiled home, three
bedrooms, two baths, central
air, hurricane shutters. $1000
monthly. 305-562-3257

3182 N.W. 59 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $900 monthly.
305-662-5505

3416 N.W. 11 Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8. $1750 monthly,
$2000 security. 305-510-
7538

3451 N.W. 174th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
den, fenced, central air, bars,
tile, $1350 a month, first, last
and $700 security. Section 8
okay. Call 305-621-0576.

41 Street N.W. 5 Avenue
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776

4470 N.W. 203 Terrace
Large five bedrooms, two
baths, fenced in yard. 786-
285-3741 Spanish, 305-
812-3773 English.

531 N.W. 110 Street
Three bedrooms. $1200, air,
tile, bars, $3600 to move in.
No Section 8. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776

5604 NW 189 Terr
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly, $3500 moves
you in. Call Sharon 305-510-
3388

790 N.W. 64 Street
Newly remodeled. Three
. bedrooms, two baths, central
air, appliances. Corner Lot.
Section 8 Welcome.
305-491-7522

8250 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$775 monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

9410 N.W. 32 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, air, bars, tile. $1300
monthly, $3600 to move in.
No Section 8. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
garage. Section 8 OK. $1450
monthly, first, last, security.
Mr. Robinson 305-694-1116

EL PORTAL AREA
Two bdrms one bath, den
(Third bdrm). $1250 mthly,
$2500 to move in.
305-219-6130

MIAMI GARDENS
Two bedrooms, one bath, util-
ities included. 786-897-4629

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air. 786-487-2286

NEAR MIAMI SHORES
Two bdrms, one bath. Section
8 Welcome. 786-262-7444

North Miami Area
Section 8, five bedroom.
$2000 monthly. 239-247-
3885

PERRINE AREA
Three bdrms, one bath, $1175
mthly, 786-277-7028.



Prime Golden Glades Of
fice
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly.
Call 305-681-9600



Fourplex Rent To Own
Everything BRAND NEW.
Completely remodeled.
Great for investor or rent
unit and live for free. Four
separate units. Flexible
terms. 305-721-7346.



MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Room for rent, one person
305-305-1955


1041 N.W. 74th Street
Calling All Investors! Motivat-
ed Seller! Three bdrm, one
bath. Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101

1236 N.W. 69th Street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, $160,000, call Tony
954-274-1058

13001 N.W. 18th Court


Three bedrooms, two baths,
$220k or best offer, call 786-
42-1131.

14622 NW 13 Road
Why rent-buy four bedrooms,
two baths, central air, $500
down and $1399 monthly,
FHA. 786-306-4839.


1862 N.W. 185th Terrace
Three bedroom, two baths,
walk-in closets, new roof, new
bathrooms, stamp driveway,
one car garage, new wooden
floors throughout, painted in
and outside. $195,000. Call
786-285-4056.

1951 N.W. 94th Street
Three bdrm., two bath, cozy
home with huge yard.
Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101

2111 York Street
Why rent-buy two bedrooms,
one bath, central air, try $500
down, $953 monthly, FHA,
786-306-4839

400 Opa Locka Boulevard
East of 1-95 at N.W. 137 St.
Renovated three bedrooms,
two baths, tile, air, family
room. Seller pays FHA clos-
ing cost. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776

7935 N.W. 16th Avenue
Why rent-buy three bed-
rooms, two bath, central air,
everything new. $500 down,
$1193 monthly, FHA,
786-306-4839

NO QUALIFYING
NO CREDIT CHECK
Owner financing, three bed-
rooms, two baths, garage,
central air, $4900 down.
$1395 monthly,
786-306-4839

ONLY $7000
DOWN PAYMENT!
NO QUALIFYING
FOUR AND A HALF
PERCENT
OWNER FINANCING
Three bedrooms, two baths.
No red tape. 790 N.W. 69
Street. No closing costs,
no credit check, reduced to
$217,000. Call 305-491-7522

Owner Will Finance!
Must Sell. Owner Will Finance
or Rent to Own. Three bed-
room, two baths, big yard,
1855 N.W. 132nd Street
Call EB 786-991-4767

YES HERE'S HELP
TO OWN YOUR OWN
HOME"
CALL NOW'
Take Advantage of
THE FREE CASH
GRANTS
UPTO $65,000
Or, An/ Home
Also Available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELPO?
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty



Corner 179 St NW 17 Ave
16,000 sq. ft., ready to build.
Exit Metroquest Realty
Kenyada Jefferson
786-201-0101



No Credit, Bad Credit?
We can help, we
approve small
business,mortgage,vehicle,
personal and debt con-
solidation loans, immediate
response. Give us a call
today 1-866-606-9459



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

LAWN SERVICE
Tree cutting and planting
grass. Tony 786-319-0694

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors,
cabinet and lawn service.
Moving and hauling.
305-801-5690

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN


Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors,
cabinet and lawn service.
Steam clean cars and truck
interiors.
Moving and hauling.
305-801-5690

Residential Plumbing
Service, get 35% to 50% off
with this ad. 305-384-8645.

Tony Roofing
Specializing in leaks and
shingles. 305-491-4515






CERTIFIED TEACHERS
CDA Required
Call 786-539-6012



LIQUOR STORE CASHIER
AND STOCK CLERK
Part time evenings. Transpor-
tation needed, security glass.
Apply at 800 N.W. 183 Street.




CLERICAL/TYPIST
Busy newspaper need
experienced typists for
customer service. Full and
part-time positions avail-
able. Must type a minimum
of 45 wpm Please tax re-
sume and salary history to:
The Miami Times
at 305-758-3617
No Phone Calls

License Barbers Needed
Upscale Miami Lakes Barber
Shop/Spa. 305-785-4934

MUSICIAN NEEDED
New Mount Calvary M.B.
Church is seeking a musi-
cian that plays keyboard and
organ. If interested, please
contact 305-681-2137

SCHOOL BUS DRIVER
J&D Owens Christian
Academy
305-947-9974



Church available with central
air, kitchen, office. Seats 85.
Call 305-687-1218




HEALING, LOVE, MONEY!
Court cases. Call for meet-
ing. 305-879-3234


Be a Security Guard
786-333-2084
Or renew license $55, 40
hours $100 G and concealed
$150.


L & N Enterprise Services
Simple Divorce, Immigration,
Defaulted Student Loan, Fi-
nancial Aide For School. 954-
274-7532, 305-722-8000

T & J Insurance
Home, Auto and Business.
Free Quote. 305-474-4639


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!

END THE
INCONVENIENCE
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
BOXES,
FIGHTING
THE WEATHER
AND
HUNTING
DOWN BACK
COPIES

CALL
305-694-6214


Advanced Gyn Clinic
P ren ural. a' m Carndmati l SEiru ns



Ir.3i,'.djuail I:Lr5e ing Services
Board ertlfihe GB S'r'N s
C- GomplFie S'fTJ SErm'ices

ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399


* The Gwrla

1 Wflth IhDOet'



If -Pmul M -u'Ng
I "I "yziborml obpnrr


Ki:, EttcffiN*Al4. a


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8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008 BLACKS Musr CONTROL THEIR OWN DES ViNY


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
DESIGN SERVICES FOR THE 9-1-1 / 3-1-1 ANSWERPOINT,
TECHNOLOGY AND TRAFFIC CENTER (LIGHTSPEED) PHASE I FIT-UP
OCI PROJECT NO. A08-GSA-02

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the County Code and Administrative
Order 3-39, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A/E) services will be required for the design of the 9-1-1 / 3-1-1 Answerpoint, Technology
and Traffic Center (Lightspeed) Phase I Fit-Up.

The requested services shall address specifically the project requirements, referred to herein as the Project Elements, necessary to "convert" the existing County
-owned Lightspeed Building, located at 11500 NW 25 Street, Miami, Florida, to an integrated command facility (ICF) housing the functions, programs and
operations described herein together with all necessary infrastructure and "hardening" improvements, and those related computer room requirements specified
by Miami-Dade Enterprise Technology Services Department (ETSD).

The development of this facility is the first stage of the County's implementation of a Security, Survivability, and Interoperability Master Plan (SSIMP) for County
facilities and infrastructure, the scope of which was developed following a comprehensive planning process conducted in 2006. Decisions made during the
development of the ICF will be used to establish County policies, practices and design standards that will be applied to other projects in order to ensure system
interoperability and survivability across all County buildings and infrastructure. As a consequence, it is anticipated that the selected consultant may be requested
during the contract term to perform specific homeland security consulting tasks necessary in order to extend the implementation of the SSIMP from the ICF to
other critical County assets. If and as required, these assignments will be carried out over the term of the contract through additional work orders issued by GSA.

The scope of services for Phase I of this project is limited to the development of the ICF within the Lightspeed Building. The selected consultant will be expected
to apply Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles and a systems engineering approach. Work and process shall comply with
requirements established by Miami-Dade County's local mitigation strategy, pertinent Florida Statutes and regulations, Department of Homeland Security
requirements, and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). The selected consultant shall apply these methodologies and requirements in developing
the ICF including,

* Conducting risk and vulnerability assessments on the building and infrastructure at the site;

* Identifying systems and subsystems of the facility that require improved survivability, and mitigation
options;

* Developing an operational site and building conversion plan, which will include the schematic design, cost
and scheduling for ultimately converting the facility to its new mission.

* Developing drawings and specifications for mitigation options selected to improve the security,
survivability and interoperability of the facility and infrastructure (also referred to "facility hardening");

* Developing full drawings and specifications for layout of the interior space, as well as those spaces
allocated to essential building elements; and

* Designing security solutions designed to minimize the greatest number of security threats at the lowest
possible cost; and

* Any supportive tasks ancillary to the primary scope of services.

The County, at its sole discretion, reserves the right to retain the selected consultant for future development phases. The aforementioned "Project Elements" will,
at full development, total an estimated 530,520 square feet of constructed area.

The estimated contract term for this professional services agreement (PSA) consists of 1,605 days distributed as follows: 270 days for schematic design, design
development, and construction documents; 240 days for permitting, bidding, and award of construction contract; 730 days for construction administration; 365
days for warranty period.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

The prime and/or subconsultant(s) must demonstrate experience in the below listed areas. Information regarding the experience and qualifications for the
prime and/or subconsultant(s) must be included in OCI Forms 6 and 7, as indicated in Section 2.1.

1) Consultants providing services in technical categories 14.00, 16.00 (Prime), 12.00 and 13.00 (Sub-consultants) should demonstrate previous project
experience as a prime consultant in the development of at least one (1) homeland security operational command center that includes emergency operations
center functionality, advanced traffic management systems, "public safety emergency console operations", and/or other similar mission critical operations
within the past seven (7) years, with a project value of no less than $50 million.

2) Consultants providing services in technical categories 11.00 (Prime and/or sub-consultants) should demonstrate previous project experience as a prime
consultant in the development of at least one (1) facility, which included design elements directed to mitigate the effects of a potential terrorist attack, within
the past seven (7) years, with a minimum constructed area of 100,000 Sq, Ft.

3) In addition, the selected key staff team members of the Prime, Sub-Consultants, and/or specialty Sub-Consultants for this project must have comprehensive
experience performing Homeland Security-related consulting projects in the fields of electrical, mechanical, civil, structural and information technology
engineering in order to apply classic engineering disciplines to achieve security-driven objectives. The above-mentioned experience must have been
achieved through engineering consulting work for entities, at a minimum, of a size and complexity comparable to those of Miami-Dade County government
(e.g., population served, logistical operations, department coordination, etc.) Related projects should include, but are not limited to, security, survivability
and interoperability plans, assessment of emergency functions, and facility security assessment and mitigation planning, and design of homeland security
operational command centers.


The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's and/or sub-consultant's firm. The experience must be demonstrated by
direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a supervisory capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects. The determination of the
individual's qualifications and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at the sole discretion of the County.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

14.00 Architecture (PRIME)
18.00 Architectural Construction Management (PRIME)
11.00 General Structural Engineering 17.00 Engineering Construction Management
12.00 General Mechanical Engineering 20.00 Landscape Architecture
13.00 General Electrical Engineering 22.00 ADA Title II Consultant
16.00 General Civil Engineering


A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital
Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the unit
is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County
and have included an e-mail address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. Additionally, those pre-
qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notification. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.
co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Mike Ramos who may be contacted via e-mail at ramosmi@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305)
375-5215.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1)Agreement- 13% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal


A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on September 26, 2008, at 2:00 P.M. in the Citizen's Independent Transportation Trust (CITT) Main
Conference Room, 10th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested
parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is October 17, 2008 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-
Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED THAT
ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE
CONSIDERED.


This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review
Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


$425 for 13 weeks in print

Call: 305-694-6210 Fax: 305-694-6211


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SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN/PARK
WEST AND OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that a special CRA
Boards of Commissioners Meeting of the South-
east Overtown/Park West & Omni Community Re-
development Agencies will take place on Tuesday,
October 7, 2008 at 5:30 PM, at the Doubletree
Grand 1717 N. Bayshore Drive, Miami, FL 33132.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For
more information please contact the CRA offices
at (305) 679-6800.

James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West, and
Omni Redevelopment District
(#003166)

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8D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008







BI___ __ _____ ._ N s _ __ I I -9 1 INY 9D T.E MIAMI_ TIMES_, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008


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LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for
contract opportunities, which can be obtained through the Department of
Procurement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/
dpm. Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, free of
charge, from our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is
available at all branches of the Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended
that vendors visit our Website on a daily basis to view newly posted solicitations,
addendums, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be
subject to change.
Interested parties may also visit or call:
Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773
There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the
bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.

Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids
and proposals by requiring vendor affidavits only once at the time of
vendor registration.
Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavits one
time, instead of each time they submit a bid or proposal. Solicitations advertised
after June 1st will require that all vendors complete the new Vendor Registration
Package before they can be awarded a new County contract. Obtain the Vendor
Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT
ECONOMIC STIMULUS PLAN (ESP)
MIA MOVER FIXED FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION SERVICES
OCI PROJECT NO. E07-MDAD-03 ESP
The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the County
Code Administrative Order 3-39 and Ordinance 08-92, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A/E) services will
be required for MIA Mover Fixed Facilities Construction Services for the Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD).
This solicitation is one of the projects within the economic stimulus plan as approved by the Board of County
Commissioners and an expedited solicitation process will be utilized. As such Proposers will be evaluated utilizing the
First-Tier and Second-Tier Criteria with oral presentations to be scheduled.
The MIA Mover will be an Automated People Mover (APM) System that will link the terminal area at Miami International Airport with the
facilities at the Miami Intermodal Center (MIC). The system will have about 1.25 miles of elevated dual lane guideway with two end
stations. The Project is a Design, Build, Operate, and Maintain (DBOM) contract for the entire MIA Mover facility where the DBOM
firm will design and build the facility, as well as operate and maintain it after constructed. The DBOM Contract has been awarded to
Parsons-Odebrecht Joint Venture.
The MDAD's System Consultant, Lea and Elliot Team, will manage the project as the owners representative on all matters related to
the guideway, operating system, manufacturing, testing & certification of the equipment and systems.
The MIA Mover Fixed Facilities Construction Services Team (FFCST) shall be in charge of Construction Inspection Services for the
fixed facilities under the directions of the MDAD designated Project Manager and shall work in conjunction with the MDAD System
Consultant. The MIA Mover Fixed Facilities Construction Services Team (FFCST) shall function as an extension of MDAD's staff and
shall conduct oversight of the MIA Mover APM System Project including the Fixed Facilities, MIA Mover APM System infrastructure,
process and review any and all Contract submittals for verification of conformance with the approved plans and the established design
criteria, and any supportive task ancillary to the System Consultant or Fixed Facilities Consultant Scope of Services and any ancillary
tasks associated to the civil alignment, guideway structural criteria, space planning, threshold inspections, electrical engineering,
mechanical engineering, etc. and provide comments for non-conforming items. The FFCST shall schedule and conduct the construction
coordination meetings for the fixed facilities and prepare minutes thereof; oversee related aspects of the DBOM Contract; prepare
related correspondence, meeting minutes, reports, etc.; review and monitor the project work progress schedule prepared and maintained
by the DBOM Contractor, schedule of values, budget, progress, invoices, pay requests (partial and final), and other required submittals;
attend meetings to coordinate and interface with other projects and project activities; review established interfaces during design
for conformance and compliance; review the overall Contractor Plan; oversee overall quality and perform inspections of the Fixed
Facilities, and infrastructure; prepare punch lists of corrective actions (non-conformances) and monitor punch list completion; review
as-built documentation for completeness; and assist in the management of Phase 1 of the DBOM contract, review claims, and perform
other professional services as deemed necessary by the Owner. The FFCST shall evaluate the work including the testing of materials
by other professionals for compliance with the plans, prepare and submit a detailed written and sequentially numbered report of the
observed conditions of the work, the progress of the work, and other work observations which shall be submitted to the Project Manager
at least monthly. The FFCST shall assist in reviewing and evaluating all Contractors' claims relating to cost, execution, progress of the
Work, and on all other matters or questions related thereto. The FFCST shall inspect the work to determine initial punch list items prior
to substantial completion recording defects observed in the work and corrections of the defects. The FFCST shall review and prepare
Change Orders, Work Orders, Bulletins and other appropriate documentation, assist in negotiations with respect to all changes in the
Work. The FFCST shall provide a staffing plan including resumes of individuals including Sub-Consultants and their employees that
will be utilized to perform services under this agreement. At its option, the Owner may direct a Geotechnical Engineering Company,
Independent Engineering/Materials Testing Laboratory, Survey Company, or other firm(s) under contract with the Owner to provide any
necessary services for the FFCST, or authorize the FFCST to have the required services performed by an independent Geotechnical
Engineering Company, Independent Engineering/Materials Testing Laboratory, Survey Company, pre-qualified by Miami-Dade County
as a Reimbursable Expense under the Professional Services Agreement.
The services authorized by the Agreement between the Owner and the Consultant will begin upon the receipt of an appropriate written
Service Order initiated by the MDAD Project Manager directing the Consultant to perform or modify the performance of the Services
and will end when the final request for payment for Phase 1 from the DBOM contractor has been approved by the Owner, the Consultant
has submitted its Report of Contract Completion for Phase 1, the Record Drawings (As-built Drawings) have been submitted and
accepted, and all other required services through start-up, commissioning, full system operation, and the warranty period have been
completed including preparation and approval of a close-out Work Order or Change Order.
Firms and/or individuals that are prime consultants in the Design Build Professional (MDAD L+E Agreement-07-07) and prime
consultants or sub-consultants in the DBOM Contract for the MIA Mover APM System (MDAD Project No. J104A) are excluded
from participating in this solicitation.
One non-exclusive Professional Services Agreement (PSA) will be awarded with a term of five (5) years and maximum compensation
of $5,000,000.00.
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
11.00 GENERAL STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING (PRIME)
16.00 GENERAL CIVIL ENGINEERING (PRIME)
17.00 ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (PRIME)
2.01 Mass Transit Systems Mass Transit Program (Systems) Management
1.5 Mass Transit Systems General Quality Engineering
3.03 Highway Systems Bridge Design
12.00 General Mechanical Engineering
13.00 General Electrical Engineering
14.00 Architecture
A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions (as applicable) may be
obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit located at 111 NW lst Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL
33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be
forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail address in their
vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. The NTPC and accompanying documents
may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Current Solicitations".
The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Faith Samuels who may be contacted via e-mail at fty@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-
6265 or phone: (305) 375-2774.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS
One (1) Agreement 25% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal
A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on September 29, 2008, at 9:00 A.M. at Miami-Dade Aviation Department,
4200 N.W. 36 Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Conference Room F, Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested
parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.
Deadline for submission of proposals is October 17, 2007 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed envelopes and containers
must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite
202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS
RECEIVED AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.
This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code,
as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of
Silence.


BLACKS MUlST CONTROL I HIE1IR O\WN Dl.STINY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008







I I


I % lot %w pr0 ,,% i& 24 A r a t4 i sons n






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MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
DESIGN SERVICES FOR THE JOSEPH CALEB CENTER,
NEW COURTHOUSE ANNEX/ADDITIONS, AND NEW PARKING GARAGE
OCI PROJECT NO. A07-GSA-02, ESP

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the CoLnty
Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A&E) services will be required for the
renovation of the Joseph Caleb Center, new courthouse annex/additions, and new parking garage.

This solicitation is one of the projects within the economic stimulus plan as approved by the Board of County Commissioners
and an expedited solicitation process will be utilized.

The scope of services for the two main components of this project, and all other services related to and incidental thereto the
following:

(1) Courthouse Annex/Additions: research, planning, design, specifications, construction documents, permitting, bidding and
award, and construction administration services. The new courtrooms, offices and supporting spaces/areas will represent
approximately 25,000 square feet of constructed area.

(2) New Parking Garage: research, planning, design, specifications,, construction documents, permitting, bidding and award,
and construction administration services. The structure will contain up to 475 parking spaces and approximately 190,000
square feet of constructed area. The access/exit of the garage must be fully prepared for installation of an entry/exit
booth(s) and control gates(s), as well as to provide about 20 private spaces at the ground floor for Court officials.

Proper separation between the two functions/structures will be provided as per the Administrative Office of the Court (AOC) program/
specifications. This project is subject to the Miami-Dade County Zoning regulations, and must be designed to obtain a minimum
rating of "Silver" per the United States Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy Environmental Design (LEED)
Rating System.

The estimated contract term for this professional services agreement (PSA) consists of 1,530 days distributed as follows: 365 days
for schematic design, design development, and construction documents; 260 days for permitting, bidding, and award of construction
contract; 540 days for construction administration; 365 days for warranty period.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:
The Prime must demonstrate experience in the below listed areas:

1) Prime Consultant providing services for technical certification category 14.00, Architecture, and 18.00, Architectural Construction
Management, must demonstrate previous project experience having acted as Prime Consultant and/or Sub-Consultant on at
least one (1) completed multi-story office building, preferably government/courthouse services related, within the last 10 years,
with a project value of at least $5,000,000.00 and/or a minimum of 20,000 square feet of constructed area.

The Prime and/or Sub-Consultant(s) must demonstrate experience in the below listed areas:
2) Prime and/or Sub-Consultants providing services for Technical Certification Categories 11.00, General Structural Engineering,
and 17.00, Engineering Construction Management, must demonstrate previous project experience having acted as Prime and/
or Sub-Consultant on at least 1 completed multi-story parking garage, within the last 10 years, with a project value of at least
$5,000,000.00 and/or a minimum of 300 parking spaces.

The above expertise must be met by a qualified individuals) of the prime consultant's and/or sub-consultant's firm. The experience
must be demonstrated by direct or substantial involvement of the individuals) in a supervisory capacity at the project manager
level or above in these projects. The determination of the individual's qualifications and compliance with the above experience and
qualifications shall be at the sole discretion of the County.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

14.00 ARCHITECTURE (PRIME)
18.00 ARCHITECTURAL CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (PRIME)


11.00
12.00
13.00
16.00
17.00
20.00
22.00


General Structural Engineering
General Mechanical Engineering
General Electrical Engineering
General Civil Engineering
Engineering Construction Management
Landscape Architecture
ADA Title II Consultant


A copy of the Notice to Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions (as applicable) may be
obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL
33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be
forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail address in their
vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms
without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notification. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at
http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amelia M. Cordova-Jimenez who may be contacted via e-mail at ameliac@miamidade.
gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-2036.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement 23% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms was held on September 25, 2008, at 3:30 P.M. at the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111
NW 1st Street, 18th Floor Conference Room 18-4, Miami, Florida. While attendance WAS NOT mandatory, interested parties WERE
ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is October 10, 2008 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed envelopes and containers
must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite
202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS
RECEIVED AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code,
as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of
Silence.


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH PUBLIC NOTICE OF
CITY COUNCIL MEETING TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2 FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH

All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE iNVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.

Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard., City Attorney

NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council with
respect to any mater to be considered at this meeting, that person shall insure that
a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal may be based (f/s 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk no later than
two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if
hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.

CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF COMMISSION MEETING DATE CHANGE

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT at the July 24, 2008 Miami City
Commission meeting, the City Commission, per Resolution 08-0467,
changed the City Commission meeting date originally scheduled for
October 9, 2008.

The City Commission meeting originally scheduled for October
9, 2008 will now take place on October 16, 2008. The meeting will
commence at 9:00 a.m. in the City Commission Chambers at City
Hall, which is located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990,
persons needing special accommodations to participate in this
proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360
(Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or
at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior
to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



(#003165)







CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 for the following:


PROJECT NAME:


"Dr. MLK Jr. Boulevard Landscaping Contract,
M-0008"


BID NO: 07-08-022

Scope of Work: The project consists of complete landscaping services for the
Dr. MLK Jr. Boulevard located along N.W. 62 Street between N.W. 5th Place to
N.W. 12th Avenue, the east and west embankments of 1-95 ramps intersecting
N.W. 62nd Street, and the Butterfly Gardens located east and west of 1-95 and
N.W. 54th Street. The work consists of mowing, weed trimming, litter pick up,
mulching, planting shrubs (3 gal.), trees and palms (30 gal.), herbicide and
insect spraying, etc. In addition, furnishing all labor, material and equipment for
maintenance services to the irrigation system at the Butterfly Garden. NOTE:
Additional locations for landscaping and irrigation services may be added to
this contract as the maintenance responsibilities are transfer to the Public
Works Department.

A voluntary meeting will be held at the MRC 8th Floor on Tuesday, September
30, 2008 at 10:00 am.

A Performance Bond is not required for this project. The City of Miami Living
Wage Ordinance are applicable to this project. Please review City of Miami
Code Section 18-556 through Section 18-559 for a complete and thorough
description of the City of Miami Living Wage.

THE PROSPECTIVE BIDDER MUST HAVE A CURRENT CERTIFIED
CONTRACTOR'S LICENSE FROM THE STATE OF FLORIDA
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY LICENSE BOARD FOR THE CLASS OF
WORK TO BE PERFORMED, OR THE APPROPRIATE CERTIFICATE OF
COMPETENCY OR THE STATE'S CONTRACTORS CERTIFICATE OF
REGISTRATION AS ISSUED BY MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CODE, WHICH
AUTHORIZES THE BIDDER TO PERFORM THE PROPOSED WORK.
THE SELECTED CONTRACTOR SHALL HOLD A MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MUNICIPAL OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE ISSUED BY MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
IN THE APPROPRIATE TRADE AND THE WORKERS MUST HAVE OSHA
CONFINED SPACES CERTIFICATION.

Receiving Date & Time: Tuesday October 21, 2008 at 11:00 AM

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request, after September
29,2008, at the City of Miami, Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2ndAvenue,
Eight Floor, Miami, FL 33130. Telephone No (305) 416-1200. There are no
construction plans for this maintenance project. Bid packages will be available
in hard copy form and a non-refundable fee of $20.00 will be required. A bid
package can also be mailed to bidders upon written request to the Department,
and shall include the appropriate non-refundable fee plus $10 for shipping and
handling using regular U.S. Mail.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids
must be submitted in duplicate originals in the envelope provided with the bid
package. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly opened. Any
bids or proposals received after time and date specified will be returned
to the bidder unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal
before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the
bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused by mail, courier
service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE
No. 12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager
ADD. No 08407


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, OCTOBER 1-7, 2008




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