Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00562
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: September 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00562
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text




"".****SCH 3-DIG)T 326
S12 PI
LIBRARY OF FLA HISTORY
PC BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


One Family Serving Since 1923



Tj j*1tamt tme% 3
Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties
Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutanwr In Illis


DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS

Volume 86 Number 2 MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Turning boys into men -


Young men's preparatory academy opens


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn

An all-boy school was surely
expected after Young Women's
Preparatory Academy, an all-
girl school, emerged. This
year, Young Men's Preparatory


Academy (YMPA) opened its
doors to 84 ninth-and tenth-
grade boys.
A project that began in 2006,
the district renovated 3001
N.W. Second Avenue, which
was formerly Buena Vista
Elementary, in order to build


the school.
"This school is purposeful. I
see what is happening to our
young men. The idea is that
we are going to get the young
men where they should be
just warms my heart," said
Andre Gainey, a lead teacher
at YMPA. Gainey is a former
Academy leader at Miami
Please turn to ACADEMY 5A


Miami-Dade Schools Superintendent Rudy Crew addresses students at Young Men's Prepa-
ratory Academy on the first day of school.


Voter


turnout


weak,


a


few unexpected surprises

Incumbents' dominance discourages some


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimfesonline.com


JORDAN EDMONSON


MOSS


BUSH


It was a disappointing Primary election
day turnout in Miami-Dade County,
with less than 20 percent of voters
showing up at the polls last Tuesday.
"We are dealing with individuals
who will be placed in position that will
directly affect our lives. Decisions that
are made by our local elected officials
are important to us. We can't complain,
if we didn't vote," said local activist
Tangela Sears.
Olivia Saunders, a 25 year-old
college student in Liberty City, opted
not to participate in Tuesday's primary
election, with the belief that the same
people would remain in the office.
According to the Miami-Dade County
Elections Office, 520,182 are registered
as Democrats and 372,097 are
registered as Republicans countywide
while 201,875 Blacks registered as
Democrats and 9,377 Blacks registered
Republican.
Please turn to VOTERS 5A


11A




'4


The Miami Heat honored Olympic gold medalist Dwyane Wade at a public
ceremony on Thursday. -MiamiTimes photo/Rich dackson


Olympian D- Wade



brings home the gold


By DeAndre Phillips


It was a picturesque mo-
ment for Dwyane Wade on
Thursday. With the gold med-
al hanging proudly around his
neck, Wade emerged from a
shower of red, white, and blue
confetti amidst 2,000 jubilant
HEAT fans who gathered to
give him a hero's welcome.
Wade, who helped Team
USA win gold in this year's
Olympics, was honored with a
banner unveiling at the Amer-


icanAirlines Arena. The ban-
ner will be displayed along-
side the HEAT division and
NBA championship banners.
HEAT President Pat Riley
was in attendance and of-
fered inspiring words about
the four-time HEAT All-Star.
He said he is looking forward
to a completely healthy Wade
rebounding this season from
knee and shoulder surgeries
to being among the elite once
again.
"In my humble opinion,"


Riley said addressing the
crowd, "and I'm not biased,
I'm knowledgeable. I think
Dwyane Wade is the greatest
player in the world."
Wade admitted to getting
teary-eyed during the cel-
ebration and said the banner
is one of his most crowning
achievements.
"Every time I look up there,
I'm never going to get over it,"
he said. "I'm going to look up
there and see I have a banner
Please turn to GOLD 5A


HOPE FOR FELONS


Sealing and expunging records


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Miami-Dade State Attorneys Office
partnered with the American Civil Liber-
ties Union of Florida (ACLU), Clerk of the
Courts, and the Miami-Dade Elections
Department on August 23 to offer the
Sealing and Expungement Program at
the Gwen Margolis Community Center,
1590 N.E. 123 St., for individuals who
have been incarcerated.
The Sealing and Expungement Pro-
gram, which is spearheaded by State
Attorney Katherine Fernandez-Rundle,
gives individuals a chance back into so-
ciety.
"I will get a better job. I am not a bad
person and I have had only one alterca-
tion with the law," said Darris Straugh-
ter, a 28 year-old from Liberty City who
heard about the program from The Miami
Times.
"We hhve gotten a lot of turnouts. A


lot of word-of-mouth advertising about
this program. On an average day, we
see 100 people. If they have a convic-
tion, nothing can be done," said Melba
V. Pearson, assistant state attorney
from the Community Prosecution Unit
According to the state attorney's office,
both felonies and misdemeanors are


there is no record, while if records are
sealed, no information is given, but a de-
fendant's name appears. Defendants can
only have their record sealed or expunged
once in Florida.
Some examples of felony crimes in-
clude: aggravated assault, arson, battery,
embezzlement and illegal drug abuse and


criminal. Expunging occurs if an individ-
ual's case was either dismissed or no ac-
tion was taken on the case. Sealing hap-
pens if a defendant took a plea (certain
charges) or was found not guilty at trial.
When employers conduct background
checks, if the records are expunged then


examples of misdemeanors include: pros-
titution, disorderly conduct, trespass,
and vandalism.
Burger King employee Marvin Andrews,
45, of North Miami Beach, thought that
by getting his records expunged or sealed
Please turn to FELONS 5A


Hanna downgraded to

tropical storm, targets Ga.
By Oren Dorell

Georgia and South Carolina were bracing for Tropical Storm
Hanna, forecast to strike Friday.
"If it continues on its track we will order evacuations, probably
partial evacuations," said Courtney Cunningham of Chatham
Emergency Management Agency, which includes Savannah, Ga.
Hanna had been classified as a hurricane but downgraded on
Tuesday morning.
South Carolina is worried about three major population
centers in Hanna's path on the state's 110-mile coast. Hilton
Head Island is a popular vacation spot with numerous golf
courses; Charleston has a historic district of antebellum
mansions; and Myrtle Beach is lined with hotels and tourist
attractions. "The No. 1 challenge is getting people out of
harm's way," said Joe Farmer of the South Carolina emergency
management division.
Hanna is expected to pass over the Bahamas today and drive
north at the Georgia-South Carolina border Friday. Forecasters
say it will be a Category 2 storm, packing 98-mph winds, said
Colin McAdie of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
Hurricane center forecasters are also tracking Tropical Storm
Ike, expected to become a hurricane and arrive at the Bahamas
by Friday. Such rapid-fire activity "is a bit unusual," McAdie
said. "But we are at the peak of hurricane season, so it's
expected."


7Day
Weather
Forecast


WEDNESDAY



89F 797F
SCATTERED T-STORMS


THURSDAY



88AF 78F
SCATTERED T-STORMS


FRIDAY



91F 79F
PARTLY CLOUDY


SATURDAY



90F 80F
SCATTERED T-STORMS


SUNDAY



887 807F
ISOLATED T-STORMS


MONDAY



86TF 78T
T.STORMS


TUESDAY



SCATTERED STORMS 8 901 58 001000 o


William Lehrer of the county's elections department says that October
6 is the deadline for voters wishing to restore their rights. It takes three-
to-four weeks to process the information, but if voters have not received
their voter registration information then they should call the elections de-
partment.














OPINION


2A THF MIAMI TIMES. SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


LMI- 1IM II 1 II


IL *--".- *. -- .---- - :..-

History in the making
W hen Barack Obama accepted his party's presidential
nomination in Denver Thursday night it was an
historical occasion and one of significant precedence
in this country. Just four years after his national debut at the
last Democratic convention the brilliant freshman senator from
Illinois has proven is political skills and now stands on the verge
of becoming the most powerful man in the country and probably
the world.
Most people in this country and especially those of color, thought
they would never live to see a Black man win the presidential
nomination of a major party. No matter what the final outcome
will be on November 4 Black people found new meaning and a bit
more hope that Reverend Martin Luther King might have been
a prophet for even dreaming that someday everyone would be
judged "not by the color of their skin but by the content of their
character."
Obama's acceptance speech to his 75,000 supporters in Mile
High Stadium carried a huge historical significance -to many of
us who remembered King's historical "I Have A Dream" speech on
the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on the same day in 1963. Many
of us felt that America had heard our plea for equality because
the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act followed
the historic March On Washington when more than 200,000
men and women called for a redress of their grievances with the
government.
After the tumult and the shouting of the Democratic Party
Convention has died down comes the most audacious and difficult
task facing the 47-year-old first term Senator. Very few people
can honestly doubt the campaign skills in fund raising and staff
zation that led him to victory in the bruising primaries and
'ver the favorite Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton.
mericans of all races and creeds are grudgingly taking
is young man of African descent who shares their values
and more each day is proving that he can manage the
non,h and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Apparently, Obama has eased concerns about his experience
because the latest polls show him leading McCain in favorable/
unfavorable rating by seven points.
Black Americans have waited a long time for this country to live
out its true creed promised in the Constitution. We see no good
in wallowing in the bitterness of our segregated past. We should
view this time in history as a new beginning to put the battles
over racial grievance and preference further into the background
of American public life.
We see this as our moment. Let us seize it and move forward. It
would make Martin Luther King and all the others who sacrificed
in the struggle proud.




Improving outcome for all
Dear Editor:
Rudy Crew 'has demonstrated' high-quality leadership in several
of our nation's largest public school systems," said Paul Houston,
American Association of School Administrators (AASA) Executive
Director.
"From developing innovative school improvement programs to
strengthening collaboration with the local community,' he has
worked hard to improve learning outcomes for all children.
AASA is proud to have him represent the best of the profession
in 2008." The four national finalists were chosen from 50 state Su-
perintendent of the Year finalists, all of whom 'represent excellence
in school leadership' nationwide.
'Thank you' Dr. Rudolph "Rudy' Crew, Superintendent, Miami-
Dade public schools, newly re-elected Miami-Dade County Mayor,
Carlos Alvarez, South Florida Workforce Executive Director, Work-
force Regional Board 23, Rick Beasley, and the countless others
who have demonstrated high-quality leadership and consequently
have affected 'positive' change for the good of all including those
who have historically not been afforded the level of care needed to
help themselves. Quote: You, Lord God, Bless Everyone Who Cares
For The Poor .. Psalm 41:1
Rothel W. Fussell
Miami

Residents "vehemently"

concur with Crist


Member of Nal
Member of the
Subscription R
iSSN 0739-03191) 7 percent sales
Published Weekly al 900 NW 541h Street Periodicals Po
Miami. Florida 33127-1818 Postmasler- S
Post OriOce Bo 270200Buen Postmaster S
Buena Visia Stallon rM'iami. Florida 33127 Buena Visa S
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968 The Black Press believes I
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982 every per-on, regarcieas of ra
Black Press s airies io help ev
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman AP
U .'inms ___mm


U f", ,9


tional Newspaper PuDlisher Association
Newspaper Association of America
ates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
s tax for Florida residents
stage Paid at Miami, Florida
end address changes to The Miami Times. P.O. Box 270200
nation, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
Lrial America can Dest lead the world from racial and rnarinal antagonism when II accords to
.ce creed cr color. his or her hurnan and legal rights Haling no person learning no person the
very person in Ihe lirm belilt Inal 311 persons are nurtn as lon as anyone is held Dack


p
L--- --I


The Media Audit .


~1 9


9k a W


SCopyrighted Material



Syndicated Content .



Available from Commercial News Providers

M. .. .. ......


pm mit


iiii.i.i.i.iiI'.EIiiiiIIIi'iiiiiii.


. .': ; ,,.+ .:..::


S


N *"' -

- 'N ~W~""W ~ a


Dear Editor:


I question the logic of The Miami Times editorial board and ask
how in God's name could you endorse a no-name candidate,
Erhabor Ighodaro for Miami-Dade school board District 1, over a
highly respected servant of Miami-Dade County?
Mr. Wilbert "Tee" Holloway represented his district well in the
state House during his tenure. And he was appointed to the School
Board in November by Gov. Charlie Crist after board member Robert
Ingram died. Crist appointed the best man for the job. Despite all
the undermining, and behind-the-scene trickery that played out,
the residents of District 1 vehemently concurred with Crist.
Valerie Person-Baker
Miami Gardens


so 0 0 -o M


a ~ .4~' %I.


- a%jd s I c .&


,i,


i .


::!: .
















OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


BY REGINALD CLYNE


The politics of

race and gender


Race, gender and ethnicity
are becoming dominant issues
in national and local politics. In
Miami-Dade County, it is now
clear that Hispanic candidates,
especially in judicial races,
have the voting strength to un-
seat incumbents. In Broward,
the tables are turned, judicial
candidates without Hispanic
surnames took out Hispanic
judges. On national level, Mc-
Cain's choice of an unknown,
woman governor from the 491h
State, Governor Sara Palin, is
clearly pandering to woman
voters and conservatives. Like-
wise, Obama's choice of an old
white man, is meant to lure
white, middleclass voters, who
questioned his "experience."
Does race, gender and ethnic


voters are turned d
off by the clear
pandering. Others,
believe that this proves that Mc-
Cain is a true maverick. The ul-
timate test will be whether Sar-
ah Palin can become a woman
under siege and thereby draw
the sympathies of female vot-
ers. Has Biden had an effect. I
think that those who really felt
that Senator Obama did not
have sufficient experience, but
would like to vote for him are
pleased with choice of Senator
Biden. For those voters, who
will never vote for a Black man,
the lower middle class voters in
West Virginia, Pennsylvania and
other parts of the country the
addition of Senator Biden will
not make a difference.


Does race, gender and ethnic pandering work? Clearly, local and
national politicians, believe it does. I do not clearly think that
pandering works in all instances.


pandering work? Clearly, local
and national politicians, believe
it does. I do not clearly think
that pandering works in all in-
stances. At the outset of the
democratic presidential nomi-
nee race, Senator Clinton had
over 67% of the Black vote and
had the support of the Black
political elite. Former President
Clinton's statements about
Senator Barack Obama led to a
colossal shift. The Former Pres-
ident, known as the first Black
President, showed that when
the race tightened Bill was
clearly a white man and Sena-
tor Obama was a Black man.
To Black voters, this made the
foreign Obama just like the
rest of us a Black man under
siege. From that point, Senator
Obama won 80%+ of the Black
vote.
Likewise, the race between
Senator Clinton and Senator
Obama became a race between
a man and woman, when Sena-
tor Clinton cried during the New
Hampshire primary and woman
voters perceived her as being
slighted by the press in other
words, Hillary became just like
other woman not obtaining
the recognition and respect that
she deserved.
Will Sarah Palin have the de-
sired effect. Right now, the re-
sults are mixed. Many woman


What does the shift mean for
minorities and woman in the
future. It means that we have
become important as electoral
forces. The female vote can
swing an election, likewise, one
cannot ignore the Black and
Hispanic vote, particularly in
big electoral college states such
as California, Texas, Florida
and New York. President Bush,
a politician from Texas, where
the Hispanic vote is monumen-
tal knew how to pander to that
group and did well with Hispan-
ic voters across the country.
Now, we know that we are
force, what should we do? We
have to turn our political power
into economic power. We need
to obtain the government con-
tracts, obtain the appointments
and learn how to obtain and
wield our power. If one looks
at the transition of political
power in Atlanta, the model is
set before us. Mayor Maynard
Jackson, Jr. became first Black
mayor of that city. He then di-
rected contracts and appoint-
ments to Blacks. The result the
rise of Black construction com-'
panies, the two largest in the
country, development of Black
insurance companies, banks,
developers, and businessper-
sons of every stripe. The Black
business community has never
looked back.


BY ADAM BLACKMON


Why James
Former state Rep. James
Bush III scored a upset victory
election day when he defeated
the Meek brand candidate Cyn-
thia Stafford. It was a combina-
tion of a name, a surge and a
dissatisfaction.
Stafford was selected by the
Meek brand to succeed state
Representative Dorothy Ben-
dross-Mindingall who termed
out after eight years in office.
Stafford is a board member of
the Carrie P. Meek Foundation
and former aide to Bendross-
Mindingall. She had the en-
dorsement of every union and
political operation that counts.
She was endorsed by both the
Miami Times and the Miami
Herald. She was the odds on
favorite.

A NAME
The age-old political adage
held true name recognition is
everything.
To digress, back in the seven-
ties, a bus driver by the name of
Plummer ran for the state legis-
lature. It was assumed that he
was a member of the politically
connected Plummer family. J.L.


Bush III beat the Meek b


Plummer was a city commis-
sioner and Larry Plummer was
a state senator.
This Plummer was not a fam-
ily member and more so he was
Black. He never put out any
posters and skipped all political
debates. He won and the laugh
was on the voters. Of course he
only served one term.


of votes Stafford was depending
upon. TEAM FLORIDA hit with
a controversial slate featuring
the image and name of Barack
Obama.
The slate caused such an im-
pact on the Stafford campaign
that Congressman Kendrick
Meek alerted the Miami Herald
in an attempt to have the slate


S afford was selected by the Meek brand to succeed state
Representative Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall who termed
out after eight years in office.


Back to Mr. Bush. He was
outspent five-to-one by at least
three candidates. Yet, his tenac-
ity, shoe leather and hard work
out distanced them all. He had
the one thing the others lacked.
He had a house hold name. His
block of voters supported him.

A SURGE
Bush did not do it all on his
own. A late surge in the polls
by candidate Bess McElroy with
the support of TEAM FLORIDA
diminished the women's block


discredited. However, all the
Miami Herald could do is report,
that the Obama campaign had
no knowledge of the slate and
did not endorse state level can-
didates. Unfazed, TEAM FLOR-
IDA continued pushing the slate
featuring several candidates in-
cluding Bess McElroy.

A DISSATISFACTION
Further, many in the Black-
belt are upset that Rep. Kend-
rick Meek endorsed Hillary Clin-
ton over Barack Obama. And,


rand
well after it was
clear that Obama
would win, Meek continued to
travel with former President Bill
Clinton who had been chastised
by many Blacks for playing the
Race Card against Obama. Even
South Carolina Rep. James Cly-
burn had to tell Bill to cool it.
The combination of Bush's
name recognition, the McEl-
roy's surge and a dissatisfac-
tion with Kendrick Meek de-
feated the shoe-in Cynthia
Stafford.
Nonetheless, Mr. Bush should
take great care in serving his
constituents this term. He only
won twenty-nine percent (29%)
of the vote. This means that
severity-one percent (71%) of
the voters voted someone else.
I can hear the knives sharpen-
ing now for 2010.
Bush beat the Meek team
which includes, former Con-
gresswoman Carrie P. Meek,'
Rep. Kendrick Meek, former
state Rep. Dorothy Bendross-
Mindingall and former county
commissioner Barbara Carey-
Shuler. This is a political first
that insiders are talking about.


*_ s ig


y r4


* ~


to .&::d I-A:::J i


10%10 ~ I A 11 f I%


Copyrighted Material y




Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


', ,* *k~q
I


The Democratic Convention in Denver last week kept most of
us glued to our television sets every evening for what proved to
be series of great speeches. Michelle Obama and Senator Hil-
lary Clinton were both very good followed by former President
Jimmy Carter and Senator Joe Biden. Barack Obama hit it
out of the park on Thursday night before more than 80,000
cheering supporters wvho gave him the longest ovation ever.


The continuing public spat between those disgruntled His-
panic school board members who seem intent on firing.Su-
perintendent Rudy Crew is beginning to get some unwanted
national attention for this area that we don't need. It could
bring repercussions. Stay tuned.

******** *
Most crooks in Miami-Dade who steal us blind usually end
up cutting a deal with prosecution officials when caught and
wind up receiving a short reduced sentence for their crimes.
Keep your eyes on the outcome of the case of brothers: Car-
los, Luis and Jose Benitez who fleeced millions from the
federal health insurance program. The crooked trio -- a physi-
cian, a clinic administrator and a money launderer -- admit-
ted in separate plea deals last week that they aided an elabo-
rate conspiracy to bill $110 million in false Medicare claims.
Authorities say the ring leaders are three brothers -- Carlos,
Luis and Jose Benitez -- who are suspected of operating
about a dozen HIV infusion treatment clinics that collected
$84 million in Medicare payments between 2001 and 2004.
They fled to Cuba before their fraud indictment was unsealed
in June, according to the FBI.


Friday is the deadline for the Miami-Dade Transit to submit
its complete application to federal regulators for the annual
rating on the proposed Metrorail North Corridor -- one of the
three linked projects collectively known as the Orange Line. It
will be interesting to find out if the government will give $700
million in matching construction funds for the job to such a
screwed up transit system as Miami-Dades. Stay tuned.


It looks like the country is finally getting around to the case
of former banker and developer Raul Masvidal who they say
swindled it out of $10 million in a deal to build a $25 million
headquarters for the county's Housing Agency. We wondered
when the county was going to begin sending people to jail
for stealing all that money two years ago. Maybe the county
is waiting for the tax payers to forget about the scandal that
involved so many of their own friends and employers.


Many Republicans are somewhat embarrassed by John
McCain's surprise selection of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin
as his running mate. Her focus seemed to have been to at-
tract votes from Hillary Clinton's disaffected core. But Palin's
staunchly conservative views on abortion, gun control, and
teaching creationism in schools make her an unlikely fit for
those voters.








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Long Division: th



over the value of p


By Gautam Naik


Parents and policy makers
have long debated whether pre-
schools provide any educational
benefit and whether it makes
sense for states to spend mil-
lions of taxpayer dollars to fund
them. A study appearing Friday
in the journal Science could re-
ignite the debate.
In the study, researchers in
England found that the benefits
of attending a good preschool,
including improved mathemat-
ic and reading ability and so-
cial skills, can last for several
years and give children a leg
up when they enter elementary
school. For example, 10-year-
olds who had attended a high-
quality preschool a designa-
tion based on the researchers'
observations scored 27%
higher in math than those who
had attended poor preschools.
That may sound obvious, but
the study follows a recent one
that compared kids who attend-
ed preschool with those who
didn't, with similar results.
"We found that [good] pre-
schools bffer learning opportu-
nities over and above what most
homes can provide," says Ed-
ward Melhuish, a co-author of
the paper and professor of hu-
man development at Birkbeck,
University of London. "Chil-
dren's ability to work indepen-
dently improves significantly,
and that's a high predictor of
future academic success."
The study, funded by the
British government and based
on data from 3,000 children in
141 preschools across England,
sought to isolate the benefit
that structured learning in a
nursery setting can have on a
child in later years. By closely
monitoring and assessing kids
from ages 3 through 10, the
authors measured key factors
that influence mathematical
ability, for instance, in elemen-
tary school, including parents'
income, home learning environ-
ment and mother's and father's
education levels.
Douglas Besharov of the
American Enterprise Institute
and a professor of public pol-
icy at the University of Mary-
land says that even though the
British researchers took pains
to separate the impact of the
various factors on math ability,
"we do not know whether the...
effectiveness of the particular
preschools was real or just a


function of family factors."
Prof. Melhuish says the
model was designed to isolate
the impact of each factor, and
concludes: "For a typical child
with average ability, going to a
high-quality preschool would
improve their math scores by
about 27% relative to the rest of

Doing the Math
The size of the effect* of
various factors on the math
ability of 10-year-olds.
Mother's education

Primary school effectiveness
0.39
Family income

Pre-school effectiveness
0.25
Father s education
0.23
Birth weight
20.12
"E "l,' ._ .,c: rn.ur .d ri :Idar, mdi rad 0.Or.,ul.
t.-.' Ie l l, eirlur i o:f. lc h lciL r,.I, rr.mih



the class."
The thinking is that in the
right setting, kids assembled
together learn effectively from
each other and that teachers
properly trained in early-child-
hood education can offer spe-
cial guidance as their charges
manipulate blocks or work puz-
zles.
The controversial issue is
scarcely academic. In the U.S.,
nearly 70% of mothers with
preschoolers work at least part
time and must leave their chil-
dren in the care of a family
member, a nanny, a preschool
or the like. About 70% of Amer-
ican 4-year-olds attend a pre-
school.
The big question is whether
states should spend millions
of dollars to train additional
teachers and offer the program
universally. Oklahoma, Geor-
gia and Florida have made the
most significant push toward
universal preschool, while New
York, Illinois, Iowa and West
Virginia have laws in place to
reach the same goal. In 2006,
California voters defeated a
$2.4 billion ballot proposal to
offer free half-day preschool to
all 4-year-olds.
The National Institute for
Early Education Research es-
timates that it would require


e debate



reschool

$34 billion to provide a quality
preschool education to every
4-year-old in the U.S., based
on an annual cost per child of
about $8,700. Nieer estimates
that $10 billion to $15 billion
is currently spent by local and
state governments and the fed-
eral government on preschools.
Democratic presidential can-
didate Barack Obama has laid
out plans to increase federal
spending on early education by
about $10 billion. In addition,
he has promised to provide
grants to states to implement
universal preschool.
Critics complain that uni-
versal preschool education will
mainly benefit teachers unions
and other special-interest
groups. They point out that
educational gains from Head
Start, the federal preschool
program for low-income chil-
dren, have been small at best
and tend to fade away as the
children get older. And while
there is credible research indi-
cating that preschool can boost
school readiness and educa-
tional achievements for disad-
vantaged kids, there has been
little proof that it helps children
in middle- and upper-income
groups.
Now, "emerging research con-
tradicts that viewpoint," says
W. Steven Barnett, director
of Nieer and professor of edu-
cation economics and policy
at Rutgers University in New
Brunswick, N.J., who is famil-
iar with the latest findings in
Science. "The U.K. study is one
of the best examples."
In June, another study, also
published in Science, found
that children who participated
in a state-funded preschool,pro-
gram in Tulsa, Okla., saw gains,
of nine months in prereading
skills, seven months in prewrit-
ing skills and five months in
premath skills, relative to their
peers. Internationally, the PISA
project, or Program for Internia-
tional Student Assessment, over-
seen by the Organization of Eco-
nomic Cooperation and Develop-
ment, has found that high math
achievement is associated with
attendance at preschools. Gains
from preschool attendance have
been recorded as far afield as
Argentina, Uruguay and Bangla-
desh. Today, more than 95% of
toddlers attend preschool in Eng-
land, which, along with Scandi-
navia and France, has a univer-
sal preschool system in place.


HODRICK HARRIS, 57
Disabled, Brownsville

I think that
the school will
help keep our
young men out
of trouble by
investing more
time and focus
on them.


OLIVER THOMPSON, 51
Construction Worker, Liberty City

Parents are
not going to go
the extra mile
to spend the
extra dollar
to send their
children to a
school down-
town which
offers the same curriculum as
the other schools in the dis-
trict. However, for some little
boys with their egos, little girls
can be an outlet and cause dis-
traction so separating the two
sexes does bring less problems.
The school should offer some
type of trade or vocational pro-
gram. The way this country is
going, eighth and ninth graders
should be learning trade be-
cause not everybody wants to
go to college.


DEBRA PALMER, 42
Student Assistant, Liberty City

If the school
is able to open
these kidss'
eyes to see
something
that they are
not able to see ,-
on an aver-
age day, then
the school will be successful.
Introduce them activities such
as: horseback riding, archery,
canoeing, skiing and educate
them on Black history. Open
their eyes to see beyond what
is in front of them. Especially
our Black children, they need to
know about these things.

BARBARA JACKSON, 23
Student, North Miami

I think that
the project will
be successful
because the
focus will be
on our young
men only. Boys
have a ten-
dency of being
easily distracted, when they are
around females. Now, instead of
them competing to win a female's
affection, they will be competing
among themselves. The separa-
tion gives them the will to learn


better to become successful in-
dividuals in this society.

FREDDIE LEWIS, 64
Retired, Liberty City

I think that.
the school is
a good idea'
for the young
boys in our:
communi -
ty. We don't
usually have
other schools
where young
boys are able to have a one-
on-one experience. Young
men need that guidance. The
school will help them get their
minds on right track. Once
you learn better, then you will
do better.

WILLIE ASHLEY SR., 25
Entrepreneur, Liberty City

Unfortunately, we have a lot
of parents in
our communi-
ties who ba-
sically don't
care about
their children
so building a
school to focus
on our young
men will not work, if the par-
ents don't get involved. We have
to start with the parents.


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


Carter: McCain 'milking' POW status


By Alan Gomez

DENVER Former president
Jimmy Carter called Republican
presidential candidate John Mc-
Cain a "distinguished naval offi-
cer," but said the Arizona sena-
tor has been "milking every pos-
sible drop of advantage" from his
time served as a prisoner of war
in Vietnam.
Carter spoke Thursday with
USA TODAY and Gannett News
Service reporters ahead of Ba-
rack Obama's acceptance speech
to cap off the Democratic Na-
tional Convention. Carter spoke
of Obama's challenges facing the
lingering effects of racism in the
United States and the ability of
the Clintons to bring their sup-
porters over to Obama. He de-
cried Connecticut Sen. Joe Lie-
berman's decision to "abandon"
the Democrats by speaking at
the Republican convention next
week.
Carter, however, focused heav-
ily on McCain. He said he was
bewildered by McCain's perfor-
mance at the Saddleback Presi-
dential Forum hosted by pas-
tor and author Rick Warren in
Lake Forest, Calif., earlier this
month.
Carter said that whether he
was asked about religion, do-
mestic or foreign affairs, every
answer came back to McCain's 5
years as a POW.
"John McCain was able to
weave in his experience in a
Vietnam prison camp, no matter
what the question was," Carter
said. "It's much better than talk-
ing about how he's changed his
total character between being a
senator, a kind of a maverick and
his acquiescence in the last few


Former president Jimmy Carter speaks to USA TODAY report-
ers and editors Thursday at the Democratic National Conven-


tion in Denver.
months with every kind of lobby-
ist pressure that the right-wing
Republicans have presented."
Carter said Lieberman, Al
Gore's running mate in 2000
and now an independent, had
cast his lot with the GOP by de-
ciding to speak at the party's
convention.
Lieberman switched his party
registration after losing the 2006
Democratic senatorial primary to
Ned Lamont, who made opposi-
tion to the Iraq war central to his
campaign. Lieberman kept his
seat and has helped Democrats
maintain a 51-49 voting edge.
"I would hope that the Demo-
crats could have enough sena-
tors elected in November so that
we would not any longer need to
include Joe Lieberman among
the senators," Carter said.


Carter called Hillary Rodham
Clinton's speech at the conven-
tion Tuesday "superb," but ques-
tioned her for pointing out her
accomplishments in some areas
and merely saying that Obama
shared those concerns.
Carter said former president
Bill Clinton's speech Wednesday
was "perfect." Carter said the
two speeches took pressure off
Obama by uniting the party and
ensuring that Clinton support-
ers would support Obama.
Carter cited a USA TODAY/
Gallup Poll last week that found
47 percent of Clinton support-
ers said they were solidly behind
Obama and 30 percent said they
would vote for McCain, someone
else or no one at all. "I think that
this week has eliminated that
disparity," he said.


HE MIAMI TIMES



SUPPORT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR YOU

L )$481" for a 12-month subscription 0 $321' for a 6-month subscription
Li Check or money order enclosed
L] Bill my credit card


Exp_

Authorized Signature


Name

......Address

City State Zip

Phone e-mail

Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 *Includes Florida sales tax


What do you think about the new all-boy

school, Young Men's Preparatory Academy?









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Prep school aims to instill self confidence


ACADEMY
continued from 1A

Edison Senior High and math
coach at William H. Turner
Technical Arts High School.

THE EXPERIENCE
Gainey says that the first day
of school they looked a little
puzzled, wondering how they
would adjust to the school's
atmosphere. But an hour later,
they started to feel more at
ease. Although the first day of
school is usually viewed as the
"relaxing day" for students, the
YMPA students were put to
work.
Even though most of the
students are freshman,' they
have already started researching
colleges and finding out what it
takes to get into the selected
schools. Leadership is being
taught basically in every class.
The teachers are going through
their lessons quickly with few
students in the classroom.
Joshua Brinsley, a ninth-
grader at YMPA, said the school
that pertained to him and where
he lives is Miami Norland Senior
High, but he told his parents
that he did not want to attend
Norland for the ninth grade,
so he looked around for other
schools. He came across YMPA
from a friend who had previously
thought about attending the
school but decided not to.
Brinsley applied for the school


and was accepted.
"This is life changing. I am
going to be a computer engineer.
This school is not like many
other high schools because the
work may be hard and a little
more advanced, but at least you
are learning." Jokingly he said,
"I don't have to impress any
girls or score any points."
Ninth-grader Bizmarck
Fernandez enjoys being at
YMPA. "I want to be a game
designer. I am motivated here
just knowing that I will receive
a scholarship, get into a good
college, and a good career."
Principal Leonard Ruan said
the academy's job is to help build
the students' confidence and
give them the tools to master the
skills so that they can become
successful individuals in our
society. His focus is on student
achievement. Ruan defines the
curriculum to be "in-depth."

THE TRANSITION FROM
PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS
Currently, of the 84 boys
enrolled at YMPA, 50 percent
are Black, 48 percent Hispanic,
and 2 percent are White. YMPA
has enrolled students from
all over the school district,
including in North Miami and
Liberty City. The drawback
is that transportation to the
school is unavailable, but will
be once the school increases
enrollment.
The YMPA students are


taking the same basic courses
as students in public high
schools, such as math, English,
science, social studies, and
their electives. The difference is
Steven Covey's book, 7 Habits
of Highly Effective People, is
applied to the curriculum.
The boys are being taught on
how to be proactive, personal
management, having winning
mind and personal leadership,
which are some of the principles
taught in Covey's book and could
be adopted in the students'
everyday life.
Each classroom consists of no
more than 16 students, which
offers better student-teacher
interaction. Students have
access to computers in their
classrooms.
Uniforms are mandatory on
campus. They consist of a navy
long/short-sleeve collar shirt
with a khaki pant and blue
blazer. The boys' shirts are
tucked in as though they are
going to a job interview. Gainey
says that for the teachers, it is
challenging to see the young
men in suits and ties because
they have never seen it before.
Though many students would'
object to uniforms, believing
that their identity would be,
stripped, Brinsley says, "You
come to school for an education,
not for a uniform."
So far, there is huge parental
support for the school. "In the
morning, as they drop their


children off, I wave at 20-
25 parents," said Gainey. At
least 40 parents attended the
first Parent Teacher Student
Association (PTSA) meeting held
Wednesday night.
The YMPA will be working on
building their media, fitness,
and science center, along with
WI-FI all over the school. Every
student is expected to receive a
laptop they can take home with
them. Tenth- grade students are
able to take Advanced Placement
(AP) classes so that they can
be more prepared when they
matriculate to. college. Monthly
symposiums in which speakers
offer motivational techniques are
held in the school's auditorium.

THE MISSION
Poet Ralph Waldo Emerson
once said that, "What lies behind
you and what lies in front of you,
pales in comparison to what lies
inside of you."
The quote is posted on the
walls of YMPA as soon as you
walk into the building.
"The mission is to make boys
into men. The word around town
is that we are promoting Ivy
league to our children. Our goal
is that when they graduate they
are able to not only attend the
college of their choice but also
come back and become strong
leaders in their communities,"
said Gainey. '
YMPA is not officially accepting
. students at this time.


rug% W Soodd cky






Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


Voters opt to tax selves for The Children's Trust


VOTERS
continued from 1A

All 764 voting precincts were
opened from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
on Tuesday. The county reports
that approximately 7, 500 poll
workers were available to make
sure that voters were able to
cast their votes efficiently.
People heading to the polls were
required to have a valid picture
identification with a signature
and their voter registration -card
to avoid any delays.
Andrew Thomas, a sales
associate in Liberty City, said
that voting machines were
much better and easier this time
around.
Voters were given the
opportunity to use scan machines
to cast their vote, which replaced
the previous touch-screen
system. More than 47,000 people
used the new machines in both
counties. Voters are asked to fill
in ovals next to a candidate's
name and place their ballot into
a scanner that eventually prints
out a paper tranl. An estimated 6
percent of the registered voters
choose to use absentee ballots
or the two-week early-voting
period.

A BLAST FROM THE PAST
Nine candidates fought for
District 109 State Representative,
which is currently being held by
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall,


but voters elected James
Bush III. Bush served as State
Representative from 1992 to
2000, but because of term limits,
he had to sit out one term before
he could run again.
"My victory shows that I
have support from the people
in District 109. I feel that I am
ready to address the issues and
concerns of the people. The
people have spoken. Whatever I
need to do to serve the people I
will do. It was not passed down
or handed down by anyone but
the people put me in office. I have
a mandate before me and it is to
serve with dignity and honor in
District 109," Bush said.
"The needs of the community
are vast. Of course, I am
disappointed that I was not
victorious but we as a community
must support the state
representative. Right now, it is
a clarity that we have to come
to terms on how we elect our
elected officials. If we are doing
the same things and expecting
different results then it is not
going to happen. At the end of
the day, the people decide and
they should be responsible for
their choice as well," said Chris
Norwood, who also ran for the
position as state representative
for District 109.
Norwood said that this loss
will not deter him from doing
public service and the process
has provided him with wisdom


to continue on his journey.
On another note, Dwight
Bullard, the son of Sen. Larcenia
Bullard and Rep. Edward
Bullard, will replace his father
after his victory for the District
118 seat, with 3,800 votes.

INCUMBENTS'
POSITIONS SECURED
Miami-Dade Commissioners:
Barbara Jordan (District 1),
Audrey Edmonson (District 3)
and
Dennis Moss (District 9)
successfully maintained their
positions on the Board of
Commissioners after defeating
their challengers.
Mayor Carlos Alvarez will
continue on for a second
term, with 110, 566 votes over
challenger Helen Williams.
Alvarez said, "I am looking
forward to the next four years."
Evelyn Greer, long-time
supporter of Miami-Dade
Superintendent of Schools Rudy
Crew, lost her seat on the school
board to retired principal Larry
Feldman by almost 11 percent.
Greer was one of the five votes
that opposed Crew's intended
ouster last month as chief of the
school board. Many question
whether the seat change could
affect Crew's future with the
board.
Board member Renier Diaz
de la Portilla, who launched
an initial campaign to remove


Sealing, expunction is a one-time deal


FELONS
continued from 1A

he would obtain a better job.
He thinks that it is a lot hard-
er when employers are running
background; checks. Andrews
has been arrested four times for
drug possession and aggravated
assault. He says that he heard
about the program in the past
but he didn't have the money to
pursue it.
The way the process works is,
with each individual applicant,
the state attorney's office scans
through their records on the


computer to see what kinds of
violations were committed, such
as felonies and misdemeanors.
If they are eligible, then the ap-
plication is given back to the in-
dividual. The application is then
sent to Tallahassee with a $75
money order.
In addition to getting their re-
cords expunged or sealed, indi-
viduals are able to restore their
voting rights.
William Lehrer of the county's
elections department says that
October 6 is the deadline for vot-
ers wishing to restore their rights.
It takes three-to-four weeks to


process the information, but if
voters have not received their vot-
er registration information then
they should call the elections de-
partment.
The Sealing and Expungement
program is free and held once
a month in various locations
throughout Miami-Dade. Most
recently, when the program was
offered to residents in Florida
City, 96 people were eligible for
sealing and expungement.
To receive information on when
the program will be offered in your
area, please contact the Miami-
Dade State Attorney's Office.


Wade in awe of accomplishments


GOLD
continued from 1A

for something that I've accom-
plished. It's going to bring chills
to my body."
Wade led Team USA in scor-
ing, averaging 16.0 points while
shooting 67.1 percent from the
field. The 2006 NBA Finals MVP
had his best moment during the
gold medal match versus Spain,
where he finished with a game-
high 27 points and made key
plays on both sides of the ball to
help Team USA win, 118-107.


"This is the beginning of the
building process, but we're
starting at the front," he said.
"We have enough on this team
to have a good year. Like my
rookie year, we didn't win a
championship, but it was a
special year, a memorable year
for the franchise, for the players
who I played with. Special years
don't always end in champion-
ships.
"We can assure you guys that
this year is going to be special;
it's going to be different. We're
going to have fun again in Mi-


ami," Wade said to the crowd.
Despite the fame and acco-
lades from being a superstar
player, Wade still finds himself
in awe of his accomplishments.
"Having the opportunity to
come from Robbins, IL to go to
China, go to the Great Wall, do-
ing things in life that you never
even would dream or envision
you would do, but you can," he
said. "It's amazing. I feel blessed
in many different areas in my
life outside of basketball.
"I'm still living in the gold mo-
ment."


Crew as superintendent, was re-
elected, so were Crew supporters
Wilbert "Tee" Holloway and
Martin Karp.
With 86 percent of votes,
The. Children's Trust ballot
item supporting an ad valorem
property tax was passed.
Chairman of The Children's
Trust, David Lawrence Jr., said
that voters have given a gift to
the children of this community
and the generations to come.
Similarly, voters also chose to'
construct an Arts and Culture
Center at Tropical Park.


Miami-Dade's Transit Cuts


Are Just Plain Cruel





J,




















Miami-Dade residents are hurting, as our economy remains in a tail spin. And it's only
going to get worse for residents if County Manager George Burgess gets his way.

Hundreds of thousands of residents rely on the Miami-Dade transit system. But it's becoming a severe
hardship for many to get to and from work every day. George Burgess has made massive, devastating cuts
to our public transit system more than six million miles of bus routes, drastic reductions to Metrorail and
Metromover, and far fewer bus stops and shelters.
Worse, Burgess wants even more cuts.
The result will be devastating and cruel to workers who will have to wait even longer in the pouring
rain or broiling sun for a bus.

Contact County Manager George Burgess
@ 305-375-3601 or manager@miamidade.gov.


Tell Him Transit Riders Don't

Deserve His Cruelty.



Public Awareness Response-Join Us!

Thursday, September 4th, 2008 (3 to 5 p.m.)

111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami

FL08TWUMDE2032B


0 0m 4p 4- .NOW
coe moowft ummmesom 1 0.





BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Eight million Blacks still not r1gistcrtd to vote










k..



SCopyrighted Material

S pSyndicated Content"i a"'


Availablefr'om Commercial News Providers-


..


m. fwwom Sb...* m qo t mw W. AM AN,. ::w, m,

Itahti mot lift lowhr Ip iImrw
4b-







IhiniMmam~wrmw~ a~A rAir
.. ..... .....


Hundreds of indoor exhibitors showcasing: After-School Programs KidCare
.Outreach Injury Prevention Parenting Classes Pre-K Registration
Programs for Children with Special Needs...and much more! A











Opa-locka takes steps to transform 'Old Triangle' - -


Team steps in on foot to
halt the flow of drugs

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Retiree Marcus Innocent has
been a resident of the "Old Tri-
angle" (17 to 22 Avenue of Ali
Baba Avenue in Opa-locka), also
known as Magnolia North, for
the last 15 years. He recalls see-
ing drug dealers driving down his
block and feeling unsafe to leave
his home for most of the day.
Lately, though, he says he has
seen progress in his neighbor-
hood. The fear of walking down
his street to go grocery shopping
no longer takes control over him
anymore.
The City of Opa-locka joined
residents, Assistant State Attor-
ney Kionne McGhee, and local
churches on Saturday at 2105
Ali Baba Avenue to celebrate
change and growth in Magnolia
North.
"I think that a lot of the resi-
dents gathered here today are
not afraid anymore. They used to
be afraid of leaving their house.
It is good to see people come out,
no longer being isolated in their
homes. We are trying to bring
it [Magnolia North] back to life.
They have cleaned it up. People
are continuously writing letters
to their commissioners saying
how they are happy to see the
change," said Opa-locka Com-
missioner Gail Miller.
Throughout the past couple
of months, the Community Em-
powerment Team has made
some significant changes in
Magnolia. Spearheaded by Em-
powerment Team Chairman Jeff
Gorley and Coordinator Tamika
Miller-Wiggins, Magnolia has
transformed. Buildings such as
Shalabe Market have been con-
demned closed down to si-
phon out the high level of drug
activity. According to Miller-Wig-
gens, the crime rate dropped by
98 percent. In 2007. And a new
medical facility would bring free


Opa-locka Commissioner Gail Miller participates in a game of Connect 4 with Magnolia
North kids.


immunizations and HIV testing.
Currently, 80 percent of Magno-
lia residents are living with HIV.
There is a substance abuse
problem in Magnolia North.
Commissioner Miller says that in
the past, the "old triangle" was
ignored because of the drugs.
But she is finding that residents
in the neighborhood desperately
want the help provided to them.
The Empowerment Team has
helped residents find jobs and
walked through the neighbor-
hoods to become acquainted
with residents and break the
barrier between citizens and law
enforcement. While walking the
streets, the team also gives writ-
ten warnings to residents who
have opened condemned busi-
nesses, or use an operating busi-
ness to sell or do drugs, or come
under suspicion for abandoning
a vehicle.. One of the main goals
of the Empowerment Team is
help improve the quality of life
for residents.
Dilapidated buildings that
used to serve as nesting grounds
for drugs and crimes have been
boarded up and come under


the control of the Department
of Housing and Urban Develop-
ment, with plans to build homes
for residents in the community,
according to Gorley.
Police presence was minimal
before, but now the police are
securing the neighborhood 24
hours a day. It is not just Opa-
locka police but also Miami
Gardens police. The streets are
so safe, infact, that residents
are able to walk their children
to school, visit the local grocery
store, or just hang out with their


neighbors.
By going door-to-door and dis-
tributing flyers at local churches,
residents are becoming aware of
these initiatives and programs.
Throughout the afternoon, ta-
bles were set up and flyers were
handed out to residents so they
could be aware of the services
provided by the City.
There is more work that needs
to be done says Commissioner
Miller and the city is pressing for-
ward to make sure that Magnolia
North stays safe and viable.


Assistant State Attorney Kionne McGhee (left), and Jeff Gor-
ley, chairman of the Community Empowerment Team, enjoy
the festivities.


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content
*Awa .*ia b ...o Com. .-rial N ew Pr iMe

Available from Commercial News Providers








...


Women's Camp Meeting
The New Beginning Praise
Tabernacle will host its annual
Women's Camp Meeting
September 4 through 28 with
anointed preaching and good
singing; 7:30 p.m. nightly at
2398 N.W. 119 Street.
All are welcome. For more
information on the monthly
schedule call 305-681-0119. JOHN H. & MYRA TAYLOR


Tomatoes on the Vine...............991b
Greenhouse-Grown, High in Vitamin C
SAVE UP TO 1.50 LB


Top Sirloin Steaks Italian Five Grain Bread ....................... 2 9
E 1:,r,:l I :,. r, I i irr,,,,,t, ,: I,-,j 6 .r i_.i L ,.,i. Choose From White or Wheat, Contains: Oats, Cracked Wheat, Barley, Millet,
SAVE UP TO 2.00 LS Flaxseed, and Sunflower Seeds, From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .60


v7


Klondike
or Slim-A-Bear
Ice Cream
Treats .................* F ree
Assorted Varieties,
16 to 27-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.59


Doritos
Tortilla
Chips......... Free
Assorted Varieties,
12.25 to 13-oz bag
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.79


S


Maxwell House 2 500
C coffee ....................... 5 -
Assorted Varieties, 11 to 13-oz bag
or Yuban, 11 or 12-oz can
(Excluding Instant.)
SAVE UP TO 2.14 ON 2
(Assorted Maxwell House Decaf,
11.5-oz bag ... 2/6.00)


12-Pack Selected
Coca-Cola 3110
Products .................
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 2.77 ON 3


Prices effective Thursday, September 4 through Wednesday, September 10, 2008. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.


BLACKS MUST CONTROi- THEIR OWN DESTINY


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


10 ?-W! = -.- --am
............................... ...................................... ................ ............... 1.1" ... ............. -.. .. ............







The Miami Times




Faithf EaMi

MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


e. ,"-m we


om E mm... i ao ow


*a -*e.. e** .s*

0 ..* r 0 ua

al -smnW 0~ ,s, ,


4FI1"I'"- a 4e


aim... ann ..ulni,
a M anu Agme-
0 m l* Mdmp
to a*%udulowmml



I pb"t ,o 0*


-bate l A %r hI Ri M aor -M 't I V

1waM ( e \ h< ** IiriM N Vmier


.I -.. ... .. OS'.. e. a... l .. *.. ".... .
5- se:.a S


- a .


I oe kM a" I, i S .y .a hau gif t"w







k 0 *


SECTION B


aw wm


we N OwIe b 4twIn,&e tum hf ,-eyb* o *I tws 6


4b aobw- m oali..


-. ...U ,.,e


ftpb.Vanmwmlu








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


(rp km bdpdCopyrighted Materialptom to ni


Syndicated Content


he
. ell


Available from Commercial News Providers


scribe


THE MIAMI TIMES



SUPPORT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR'YOU
D S48O' for a 12-month subscription J S321' for a 1-month subscription
0 Check or money order enclosed
- Q Bill my credit card


I MA


Exp_
Exp____


Auth


Add

City


S- ___Exp_

lorized Signature


le

ress

State Zip -


Phone


email


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


*Includes Florida sales tax


93"' Street Community \
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
':30 n11.aIy MAninoWashrp
11 a.m. ..Moling Wo.Bldip
Evening Worship
1st & 3rd Sunday .6 pnm
TnAby Bible Study .,7 pan
webse: vM beonarg



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2(00 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413

Sunday Morning Services
7:45a.m. -11:15a.m.
Sunday School- 9:S.45a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. &7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting -Tues. 6 p.m.




Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr Martin Luther King. Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

I Order of Services:
I -, thru Fri. Noon I)ay Prayer
e B Ile Study...Thurs.:...7 p.m.
uday Woshbip...7-ftI am.
nday School.. 9:30 sa.m.



Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W 68 Streetl, Miami, FL33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3.4. Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service .....11:00 ant
(Thm before u )73pm
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study



S Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 NW.AV 31 Avenue
Church 305-.573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-854
Order of Services:
sunday school... 9,45 a.m.
Sun. Moming Sen,'s .. 1I a.m.
4" Sun -t T 1:30-2:30 p.m,
'uesday. .Bible Saidy
Feeding Minslly.... 10 Ifa .
Wed. Bible Smudy/Pmyer..6:30 p.n
This. Outreucl Ministry. ..6:30 p.im
\s,,J te ggingl ,.p a ga. ,g n /


Antioch Missionary Baptist-
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
CahauismdcJy School;... 8:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship Se 'ice .... to10 a.m
Mub-Wek Service .... Wc lesday's
Howr of Power-Noon Dayamycr
12 p.m.-I p.m.
E-vening Worship... 7 p.m.



/ First Baptist Missionary-\
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-6,15-81153 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sundayschool...........7: 10 o,.
Thinday..........p.m. Bible S dy
,, .pt .ism ,Thu .rs 'dw re
SCominmion m- First Sim .....
l7:30 a l anu m.



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
--- -- Order of Services

Worship servi" -- I. .
Monday
Wednesday
iT aye r Mamsn l y'p.m.


postolic Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New lime for TV. Progamm
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
4 .0A9 C~cCa.. os CorASa. 23
sa.9 aia. 3 pim. Sunday 5 p .i
W~ io lter'cesy yr9 am.. 12pm-
MC r Iillg Snmic'..................I I an.,
Suni E hi.p ........ 730 pim
Tres .rt'iayer Mctig ..... .30 pri.
Fri. Biic Study................. 7:30p.m.



Friendship Missionary \
Baptist Church

Miami, H,
305-759-8S75


"" i, ,1111 T P.m .

Wednesday, ....... ,1 .... p..



New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
Order of Services:
I Monng Worship ls &.Mrd Sunm
S*1 i Woship 0..............1030 a.,
a I r S ................... 7:30 i .
t- e study ............................8 p.m.
Slhurcl SclooL .................. 9 am.
I l lllll*lill / liI I--


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services A
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a
Evening Worship ..............6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m.- 9 am.
Comcast Channels: 8,19, 21, 22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22'
Wit, pahg. wwwu piiinilrkeparit hilurchsrn t.com u s,,, il: p o hrokcp.rknIlc lll. act


faith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065

SSunday Schootl............ 9.30 aml.
l f Sunl. Moning Wislip ........... 11 .
r I es. m--' .er:......... ...... 6p.m.
School of WC domiii....... 6 0 pm.
I taling & Deliverune Sav...7:30p,m.
WL SaL' Mi w 'I i ait ly )...(tr .e,) ... ap.i
tlday Youth Nigl..t 7 pm.
\NURITMWWWW /


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.; 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
sund. y CultchSchool .... ..o. ..i.. ) iL
Worshii p Servie .......... l :15 a i.
Tuesday Bile ( ......... 7 .
4th Sunday l evening Worshlip..,.,.6 il
I\klm mali l mammmm, l ~fil/li, t


/- \\ord of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081


Order of Services:
...day Morning Services
School ............ 10 an.
',,,i lup Serv e............ 11 a.m .
I ,-y Bible Study ..8 p.m
Ti,, : Pl,. p yer Scivic...... p.m


Jordan Grove Missionary",
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 121'Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
l3u'ly," X oi-hip "f xin
IiNV'(

hoIlsu J hi i -.




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.951 Street
.11-S l-N 1I1 Pax# 3il5-'(h >.e li
Church Schedule:
S .1 1 .l i.iii. Vs h W tsldp7:30 a.m.
SI ,*II,. I iSdco ol 9:30 aim..
,i l oilip ....Ill a.m .
"-1.biw ole Class 7 C p.m.
S1I.- i, l i le st Stl a ...7 p.n .
; 00l.l .iek Worship


St. John Baptist Church -
1328 N.W. 3r Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821

Order of Services:
Monmio n' *'1 4 ,. "
Sunday School .........9:30 a,..
'B" P Moninig Worship ...II a.m.
IMe' :-" ru yer ,and Bible St, ly
M meeting ......... 1). p .




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
30S-696-4341 Fax: 30S-696-2301
Order of Services:
Situdaiy Schm)l ............9:30 a.m.
Morning PraiseAoWmhip ..11 a.m.
a 1'y ThirT Smuday
eveimig mxstrip at 6 p ni.
i .. Bible Siudy
Tuesday 7 pn.m.
1' At6po4n.ron 4ttode ot 9 ,m u .n'
\uod3


Brownsville e \
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services

'.l' ri, r. pin
i, .4 -, l r .r7 r,,4 p ,i l
rrlu ri a4Jrtl ,* .didhk I all


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Iur,Ll,', ing . ......... a .
r i ui., I'irnl 6 10a.m.
ii i ..L crun ...........6 p.m.
MoIt i clkncl .......7:30 p.m.
II , Jl' 'li, .. ..30 pa m.
] har I i,. ip .......lp 10 a.m.I
I 414 ',,**s ractice .6 p.1.


S Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NIW 87 Street
305-694-2332



Sunday Morning PriaseWarship .. 11 a.m
First Sunday Evening Worship.. 6 p.m.
Bible Study Monday .. 7"30 p.m.
Choir Rehearal Thurlay.. 7:30 p.m.


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
-Bwwmtheriouworshint21FaBrxurg
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


N


Order of Services:
Sunday Wobship Services:
7a.m. & 10 a.m
Churdl School: & 30 a.m.
Wednesday
PastorWs Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week \brship 7:30 p.m.


Logos Baptist Churche
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383
Order of Services
Sunday
Moning WorshipW at 8 & I I a.m.
Sunday School iat 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
BDible Study 7 p.m.
X Saturday
No Sevce .


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:4 5p.m.
Wednesday Biblc Study
10:4<5 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptis
1790 N.W, 55th Street
305-696-7322

.f-.. Order of Services:
r ESady yMorning Worship.7:30a.m.
Simday School ..........9:30a.m.
Morning Wohip .....11 a.m.
WEVDNE'.SDAY
Myer Meeting ............7;30 p.m.
Bible Sltdy ............... p.m.



Hosanna Community \
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
iutn, y Sctaxol .. 9.45 a.i..
\ lp........ l am,
Rl'e SttxyThtdy~hV f0pm.
6pm.il.


I (8(04) 254-MuBt:
-305-695.-37010
Faxm: 305-685.07015
Nwwssnewbirthbntilistmiami.org


St. Mark Missionary "
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order orf Services:
Sunday 7:30 and II a.m.
4 Worship Ser vice
130ua a y school
"nB oday ....... 7 pmi. Bible Study
8 p.mP ........Prayer vleeting
H Monday. Wednesday. Friday
11 ^ \12 p.m. ....Day Prayer



New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
r i, l ,day Worlhip...7:30 a.m.
di m..., -o-l-...............9.30 am.
.. EiveningSaNice...6 p m.
la-, .i lity I r rit i....1:t30pm.
'. blc xd y ...:30 pJn.
r h,,, Ch h But a Movcmcmn"


,h ..,D feto.,
O--. '.. .

' ." .. .



,.


1% 000


r Bishop Viclor T. Curry, DAtin, D.D. senior Paim/Teaclivi- TIA


IlL


I V 11F






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


m~~r "ulowpsrtm' d. crmV~r~ aakw
14I..,JI%AfIrald i hm


-


mo


Copyrighted Materiaml" I A Lt,
mpwrrym n nilsm

Syndicated Content -


: Available from Commercial News Providers
I S
S 5 o

-~~ S a


mbt


* m-. - a.. m 4

Four ( eorgia cb..l
board members fired


In a time of uncertainty,

we offer stability.
SunTrust has always been committed to bringing you sound strategies to meet your
financial needs, helping you find the right solutions for any market condition. Now
more than ever, you need ways to make your money grow but still have access to
your funds. Consider these options that provide the guaranteed returns you want,
with the flexibility you need.


4.30





3.30


APY





APY


25-Month CD and CD IRA
Offers a guaranteed return at a competitive rate of
interest for deposits of $2,000 or greater.


30-Month No-Penalty CD and CD IRA
Provides a guaranteed return with the option to withdraw
some or all of your funds one time during the term
without penalty. For deposits of $2,000 or greater.


Now there are more sound reasons than ever to bank with us. For comprehensive
solutions to all of your financial needs, visit your local SunTrust branch today or
call 800.SUNTRUST.
,-,' 1.'".-..


SUNTRUST
Seeing beyond money


3C:...n r~[ o t We or b: .. :1 j:: I y o er I,-I h r,,- I-:r. 3I, rI.& '' r"TI'r r .; .:ldrw- Ch r 7 1 2 rtej'C-j

III TI TrI~ .t.I j. r T,, 1, r h. A .1111. ,r-'I -r.ir jI I*: ... :1,, i1 >.. Trr *iV,,r I d. I.~, ...I[f 1 ru ,.r1 1,,I~E,ng Th 'am '.- I- .
r,.,r ,i,.j r~m,r3 11. ntijFLI 'r...IA'he l ., jr L jrI ~iT,r Ilt,r- b n',* I:,...D .i,.I, I *: r.. r V,,hc? 1.,rfr 2.3nI;


. 0









I


SECTION B

W .,II


The Miami Times


earth


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Slop .6. owero* :: Ro


Copyrighted Material


eAM m a.-4= M


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers
8a^^ I^,A 1t S


\t


.... BL.. . .... i ^a


p m ......


Active video games help kids exercise
a = w --4 -'. Sss 6k 4


41 ,II'd//P...:I|M
1"41--|lr= .... -i<(


e -qm


,i 486 a 5


Sp S e .:


-a aid


%t% lch out for drug names
that look and wound alike
lbS Mw. vw- qo -..-H


I b i 4mm &MM ow *s mI *4 b4 &aet k a Sntt


4 e:. Lilm a


SMfewe ring tone ingv%

'(Condom. condom!'
ft lkmi-


r- e. ar S






a< .... - ..( r i
h aME0 a w
a --*. -M-tt -


aO Mn-n -


,-


~1


*k ,* = 1








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


0 ~ 1~llll\W ~ThY~


1H~UtL~


Never mind the naysayers


I recently read a quote by
Martin Luther, the great
theologian. He said, "Temp-
tations, of course, cannot be
avoided, but because we can-
not prevent the birds from
flying over our heads, there
is no need that we should let
them nest in our hair." I love
this quote! It is so true. We
cannot prevent most of the
trials and tribulations that is
present in our lives. I know


some of you have heard Pas-
tors and Ministers tell you
that once you accept Jesus
as Savior; you will have no
more problems. You might
have heard that you will no
longer endure hardships,
never be broke, never be ill,
and live happily ever after
with the man or woman of
your dreams.
As believers, we can cer-
tainly look forward to being


the recipients of good things.
The Bible tells us that God
loves to give good gifts to His
children, as any good par-
ent (Luke 11:13). The Bible
tells us that we can live with
confidence that a bad report
from the doctor need not be a
death sentence for us (Isaiah
53:5). We know that no mat-
ter how rebellious the kids
might be, we can stand on
God's Word that the children
of the righteous will pros-
per not just in the natural,
but more importantly, in the
spiritual as well.
However, we are promised,
yes, promised by the One
Who knows best, that we will
endure trials and tribula-
tions. We live in this world,


and this world is evil, under
the attack of the evil one, sa-
tan. We cannot live in this
world without being touched
in even a small, indirect way
by the things of this world.
But as Martin Luther states
so well, we don't have to
stand still and take the at-
tacks of the enemy. We
should already know that we
are victors. Jesus has won
the war, and as joint heirs,
we too, are victors (John
16:33). We must maintain
our victory by fighting bat-
tles in the meantime.
We should not lie down,
and wallow in self-pity, be-
lieving that we are not en-
titled to win this war. If you
have asked God for a thing,


and you have determined
that is His will, then do not
let anything or anyone be-
come an obstacle from you
receiving for what you are
believing God. Our path
can be full of pits and cov-
ered holes waiting to trip us
up and bring us down. Will
you fall though you love the
Lord and trust Him? Yes, it
is still possible. You can still
fall. You can take your eyes
off the prize for one instant
and end up in the muck and
mud. You can come under
the attack of the enemy of
the brethren. It can happen,
you can fall, but you don't
have to stay there.
If you are still standing
and it seems that nothing is


working out for you, and you
have become dry and discour-
aged, then move! Perhaps an
actual physical move is not
required (though sometimes
it is), you can move in other
ways. Maybe a job change is
needed. Maybe you should
go back to school, or even
take a course at the local
high school. Maybe you need
to do something as simple as
changing your prayer and
devotion time. Maybe you
need to hook up with some
powerful, anointed, passion-
ate people of God.
Don't just stand there and
be a nest for the vultures. Let
them find somewhere else to
live! When you look up, look
for the Son, not the birds!


0 0


The National Minority
Business Development
Council will hold its annual
conference and business
opportunity fair at the Las
Vegas Convention Center
in Las Vegas, beginning on
Sunday, October 26. For more
information, please call the
National Minority Business
Development Council at 212-
944-2430, or visit the website
at www.nmsdc.org.

Iota Phi Lambda Sorority,
Inc. Gamma Alpha Chapter
cordially invites the community
to its annual Ann B. Smith
Scholarship Prayer Breakfast
on Saturday, September 13
at 9 a.m. at Florida Memorial
University. For ticket
information, please call 305-
688-2383.

Locust projects presents
Dream-Cum-Tru by Hilger
Award winner Clifton
Childree. The opening will be
on September 13 at 7 p.m. For
more information, please call
the Locust Projects at 305-
576-8570.
********


The Miami-Dade Public
Library System's first-ever
Amnesty Program designed for
patrons to return or replace
overdue materials and have
fines removed from their
accounts begins August 1 and
will run through September 30.
The Amnesty Program comes
before the implementation of a
new policy for handling overdue
accounts, which begins October
1. Currently, any library
card account with a balance
of $30 or more is suspended
and the holder is prevented
from borrowing materials. For
more information, please visit:
www.mdpls.org or call 305-
375-2665.

The Greater Miami
Convention & Visitors Bureau
annual meeting will take place
on Thursday, October 16, at
the Fillmore Miami Beach
Jackie Gleason Theater.

The First Annual South
Florida Corporate Tennis
Challenge will take place
Saturday, October 25, at
Crandon Park Tennis Center on
Key Biscayne. The tournament


is supported by the Greater
Miami Convention & Visitors
Bureau and the United States
Tennis Association. For
more information, including
sponsorship opportunities,
please call 305-539-3126.
******** *
The Miami-Dade County
League of Cities will hold its
Installation Gala on Saturday,
October 4, at 7 p.m. For
sponsorship opportunities
or ticket reservations, please
call 305-416-4155 or e-mail
MDCLC@bellsouth.net.
********
BRM Productions will
be auditioning models and
performers on Saturday,
September 27, from 4:30 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m. at the Teach'em
Dance Academy. Males and
females ages 18 years and up
are invited to attend. For more
information, please call 786-
343-4391.

The Miami Children's
Museum is now accepting
applications forits free Saturday
film school. Students ages 13
to 18 attend 12 workshops at
the museum from October to
February, then collaborate to
produce their own movie. The
application deadline is Friday,
October 3, at 6 p.m. For more
information, call 305-373-
5437 ext. 124


******** *
Liberty City Trust invites
you to attend a Homebuyers
Workshop on Saturday,
September 6, from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. at the Liberty Square
Community Room. For more
information, please contact
305-635-2301 ext. 373.

The City of Miami Parks
& Recreation Department
announces the sponsorship of
the Afterschool Snack Program,
a subcomponent of the Child
Care Food Program. This
program is designed primarily
to provide nutritious snacks
to children in the Afterschool
Programs.

Miami Shores Business
and Professional Women's
Club will hold club meetings
every first Wednesday of each
month. For information about
reservations or joining the
club, please call 305-895-
2669 or 305-893-6993.

Faith Christian Center will
be having a yard and dinner
sale on Saturday, September
27, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. For
information, please call 305-
246-4084.

Mothers, the foundation
of a family, invites you to
a powerful free Women's


Empowerment Seminar on
Saturday, September 6, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 14295
N.W. 21 Court. For more
information, please RSVP
Tamika Wiggins at 786-412-
0206 or Tara Lazier at 305-
303-9585.

City of Opa-locka will kick
off their Health and Wellness
Slim-Down and Community
Bazaar on Saturday,
September 13 from 9 a.m. to
12 p.m. at Sherbondy Park.
For more information, please
contact the media coordinator
with the City Manager's office
at 305-953-2821.

The Children's Trust
Youth Advisory Committee
(YAC) is seeking new members
for the year ahead. The
YAC offers students in the
10th, 11th and 12th grades
an excellent opportunity to
develop leadership skills, earn
community service hours and
gain first-hand experience
in understanding children's
services and advocacy.
The application deadline is
Monday, September 15. For
more information and to
apply, email persephone@
thechildrenstrust.org.-

Miami-Dade College
will participate in a one-


day community cultural
event designed to increase
awareness and understanding
of Black church culture and
its impact on socioeconomic
issues, politics, and more. The
event titled, the Black Church
Evolution: Liberation Theology
and its Appeal to Black
Americans, will take place on
Saturday, September 6, at
11 a.m., at African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center.

Christian Community
Development Association
will have a conference at the
Hyatt Regency and James L.
Knight Center from October 22
to 26. For more information,
please visit: http://www.ccda.
org or call 786-388-3000.

The National Association
for the Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP of
Miami-Dade) Get Out To Vote
Political Action Committee will
be on site at Kelly's Chapel
UMC to participate in a Voter
Registration Drive. The Miami- '
Dade Elections Department
will be on hand to demonstrate
the optical equipment with
applications for poll workers
and will provide information
to assist those in search of
restoration of civil rights
September 13 at 10 a.m. to
2 p.m.


6(fl:k&TP4~YK'TR~ rm


Women of Integrity
Ministries presents "Fire
Starters Conference" at
the Hyatt Regency from
September 17 to 20. For more


information, please call 954-
483-5502.

Mt. Zion AME Church
invites you to participate in


the Holy Communion this
Sunday at 11 a.m. There will
be an Appreciation program
honoring Rev. Adams on
Sunday, September 14 at 4
p.m.

Revelation Christian
Academy invites you to come
and help celebrate its 15th
Anniversary on Saturday,


September 20 at Ebenezer
United Methodist Church at
7 p.m. For more information,
please call Ms. Reid at 305-
7558-5656 or 305-691-
4572.

Harmony & Unity For
Christ International
Covenant Outreach
Ministries, Inc. presents


its annual "Men & Women's
Conference" starting
September 2 to 7 at the Hope
Outreach Love
Center, Inc. in Fort
Lauderdale. For more
information, please contact
954-815-0307.

You are invited tojoin Myrtle
Grove Presbyterian Women


to honor Grandparent's Day
on September 14 at 4 p.m.
For more information, please
call 305-651-2274.

The' renowned Bethune-
Cookman University
Concert Chorale will perform
at Ebenezer United Methodist
Church on Sunday,
September 14 at 11 a.m.


.an~altil r~cArtb\ ^Mean 4 omfp %%ctk hnjing












Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers



*


-e qw e@Po

60ftPIAIOAWb ~ b'

Wa 1W ANAVo W*


- DR. FREDERICK FERGUSON MD


100 NW 170 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169

Family Medicine Doctor

Graduate of Meharry Medical College
and University
of Florida Family Medicine Residency Pro
gram

Board Certified in Family Medicine

12 years of Medical experience

Insurances Accepted: Amerigroup,
Avmed, Cigna, Humana, Tricare,
Medicaid and Medicare

Receive a FREE MEDICAL

visit with presentation of this Ad
(Laboratory and Radiology Studies are not included).


0 *


r- -A








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Hall Ferguson Rewitt Jay Happy Birthday Death Notice Happy Birthday In Memoriam
OSEPH WATERS, 25, died in CLIFFORD SMOTHERS, 69, died The family of the late, ----.-- In lovinIn loving m, In loving memory of,

service was Gramercy Park :
field. Nursing Home.
Service was -
held.


DAVID BURKE, 68, died August
22. Service 1
p.m. Saturday,
September 6, in
the chapel.





WILLIE SLATON, 57, home repair,
died August 25 at home. Service
was held.
Royal ,
MAKEIA SAMARA HAYNES, 25,
died August 26
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Deborah Sand-
ers; father, Mi-
chael Haynes;
grandparents;
sisters; brother and a host of aunts,
uncles and other relatives and
friends. Service 1 p.m. Saturday
at New Birth Baptist Church The
Cathedral of Faith International.
Visitation Friday 4 to 9 p.m.


ERROL DODD,
24. Service Sat-
urday at St. Bar-
tholomew Cath-
olic Church.
Visitation Friday
4 to 9 p.m. Ro-
sary 7:30 p.m.


24, died August


CATHERINE RAY-WALKER, 30,
Miami-Dade
County school
teacher, died
August 28. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.
Saturday at
New Hope Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church. Visita-
tion Friday 5 to 9 p.m.

DECLINE BURROWS, 76, died
August 29. Arrangements are in-
complete.

MARY WILLIAMS, 45, died Au-
gust 29. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

GEORGE CHIWUZOR, 56, died
August 26. Arrangements are in-
complete.,

ERROL DONALDSON, 58, died
August 18. Arrangements are in-
complete.

WILLIE TIMMONS, 84, died Au-
gust 26. Service was held.


Nakia Ingrahan
IVY LAWSON, 72, of Coral
Springs, died August 26. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

BILLY BANKS. Died. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

GARON GOLDBERG, 70, of Pem-
broke Pines. Service was held.

DOMINIC FUCCI, 67, of Holly-
wood, died August 28. Service
Thursday, September 4 in the cha-
pel.

YOLANDA SMITH, of Fort Lau-
derdale, died. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Carey Royal Ram'n
ANTHONY SOTOMAYOR, 21,
died August 24 at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.

FRANCISCO LEOPOLD HAR-
LEY, 38, died August 26 at Jack-
son Memorial Hospital. Service 11
a.m. Saturday in the chapel.

MARTHA GREENE, 76, died Au-
gust 28 at home. Service Saturday
in Hackensack, New Jersey.

JASPER ROGERS, 39, of Hallan-
dale, died at home August 28. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


THOMAS HARPER JR., 67,
died August
28 at Home-
stead Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m. Saturday
at Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

THERESA LADSON, 91, died Au-
gust 26 at Miami Heart Institute,
Service was held.

Range
ROY G. COVINGTON, 68, retired
truck driver,
died August
27. Suvivors in-
clude: daughter,
Robin F. Cov-
ington-McLary;,
brother, Walter;
three sisters,
Lois, Arva and
Gladys Wright; two grandsons,
Christopher Coleman and Chris-
tian McLary; a great nephew, Jer-
ryn; many nieces and nephews

friends. Service 2 p.m. Saturday
at New Hope M.B. Church.

ALVINA L. BUSH-WELLS, 60,
homemaker died August 26 at Uni-
versity of Miami Hospital. Survi-
vors include: mother, Izetta Bush;
son, Kikuyu Brown; two sisters,
Gertrude Thomas and Vanessa
Gibson; three brothers, Albert,
Charles and Willie Bush. Service
11 a.m. Saturday at Liberty City
Fellowship Church of God.

Grace
LADARVIS D. JOHNSON, 25,
concrete tech-
nician, JAMO,
died August 28..
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday, Sep-
tember 6 at Mt.
Carmel Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

CHRISTIANNAJONES, 66, home-
maker, died August 27. Service will
be held in Nassau, Bahamas.


Poitie
GERTRUDE J. DALLIS, 89, died
August 27 at 7 .
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital
North. Survi-
vors include:
three sons, Wil-
liam E. Bouy-
erl (Bridgette),
Herman C.
Dallis II and Leon C. Dallis; four
daughters, Mary D. Roker, Mar-
tha D. Boyer (Roosevelt), Barbara
Poitier (Bernard) and Rosalind D.
Baldwin (Jefferey); 22 grandchil-
dren, 36 great grandchildren and 7
great great grandchildren. Viewing
Friday 6 to 8 p.m., service Satur-
day 11 a.m. at Mt. Herman A.M.E.
Church.

ROSA LEE ROBINSON, 79, re-
tired Miami-
Dade County
Public School
employee, died
August 25. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Saturday, Sep-
tember 6 in the
chapel.

HAROLD ANDERSON BEN-
NETT, custo-
dian, died Au-

Shore Medical
Center. Service
was held.



ADIB ABDUL SHAHEED,

inspector'died

North Shore
Medical Center.
Service was
held.


REV. WILLIAM "BILL"
ROLLE You cannot do a kind-
ness too soon, for you never
know how soon it will be too
late.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

Even in our time of grief we
say Thank You God. We thank
you for sending your earth
Angels to our side.
It is with sincere apprecia-
tion that Lavances Wright-
Rolle, Akilah and William ex-
press our heartfelt thanks.
Every act of kindness touched
our hearts.
We especially thank our
immediate family members
(Rosa, Katoya, Angela and
Lutricia) that literally placed
their lives on hold to be with
us throughout our time of be-
reavement.
The overwhelming support
from AT&T Advertising &
Publishing Corp. executives,
co-workers and friends will be
treasured.
Thank you to Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Pas-
tor Larry Lovett, the Stephen-
son Special,Ushers, and Anti-
och Mass Choir. Thank you to
St. James Baptist Church of
Patterson, Georgia, Rev. Rob-
ert Mitchell and Elder Glen
Rolle, our church family, God
Filled Days Ministries and
Mother Audrey Rolle.
Finally, it is with heartfelt
gratitude that we say thank
you to the Reverends James E.
Trapp, CEO/President of the
Association of Unity Church-
es International for words of
comfort and Rev. James W.
Stepherson II, Eulogist, Pas-
tor of Mount Calvary Baptist
Church of Fitzgerald, Geor-
gia and Harrol Chapel Bap-
tist Church of Lenox, Geor-
gia. Gregg L. Mason Funeral
Home for a job well done, the
final arrangements are com-
plete because of you.
May God bless and keep
each and every one of you.


Death Notice


EARCILE BURNETT, 71,
homemaker died August 31
at Memorial East. Survivors
include sons, Quintin (Yahaira)
and Jimmie; daughter, Connie
Franklin.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
September 6 at Hadley's
Funeral Home Chapel.
Services are entrusted to
Hadley's Funeral Home.



St. Fort _
THERESA ST. FORT, 26, died Au-
gust 31. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

MARIE ANDREA NELSON, 84,
died August 26 at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Service was held.

ELSIE PROPHETE, 65, died Au-
gust 24. Service was held.


AUNDREA N. MARTIN-
JACKSON, 39, employed with
Jackson Health Services died
August 29. She is survived by
husband, Kareen; daughter,
De'Aundrea.
Service 3:30 p.m., Saturday,
September 6 at Peaceful Zion
Missionary Baptist Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DREXSEL LAMARD
WILLIAMS, II aka 'DREX'
05/20/75 09/07/05

It's been three years and our
hearts still ache in sadness
and many tears still flows.
What is meant to lose you, no
one can ever know.
We thank God for the years
we shared with you.
Love, Mom, Dad, daughter,
relatives and friends.

Death Notice


GAYLE G. JONES, 64,
case worker for Miami-Dade
County, died August 29 at
Aventura Hospital. Survivors
include: daughter, Gennise
Jones-Sims; sisters, Gloria
Jones-Lovett and Joyce Jones;
brothers, Ronald and Jef-
frey; grandchildren and great
grandchildren; and a host of
other relatives and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m.
at Coconut Grove Church of
Christ, 3345 Douglas Road.
Arrangements entrusted
to Gregg L. Mason Funeral
Home.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DR. ROBERT INGRAM, who
departed this life September
5,2007.
We will always love and
remember you in our hearts
until we meet again.
Your loving family, wife,
Delores; daughter, Tirzah and
Tammy; grandchildren, great
grandchildren and family.


MARC ANTHONY BOOKER
09/3/67 -07/3/08

It's been two months since
you were called home with
the angels and I know you are
resting peacefully and happily
with your soul mate, Dawn
Grafe. We all miss you.
At this time I wish to thank
everyone for their thoughts
and prayers, visits, flowers,
food and donations from the
bottom of my heart. Someone
once said that 'it takes a
village to raise a child,' and
Marc was surrounded by his
grandparents, the late Moses
and Allean Roberson, great-
grandparents James and
Irene Odum, his godparents,
friends and devoted extended
family, Mrs. Dru Van Houten
and the Monteagudo family.
May God bless you and may
He continue to shower you
with His Grace and mercy.
Special thanks to Evangelist
Martha Mitchell Gathers,
Ed and Liz Monteagudo, the
BTW Class of 1963 and his
friends and co-workers at Neff
Rental.
You are not forgotten, loved
one. Nor will you ever be. As
long as life and memory last,
we will remember you. We
miss you now. Our hearts are
sore. As time goes by, 'well
miss you more. Your loving
smile, your gentle face, no one
can fill your vacant place.
Maureen Booker (Hey Ma!)


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of the late,


EDWARD 'TROUTIE' TROUTMAN
12/10/45 09/01/07

We think of you always
but especially today. You will
never be forgotten although
you are gone away. Your
memory is a keepsake with
which we never part. God has
you in His keeping we have
you in our hearts.
Your loving mother, Naomi
Troutman and family


Death Notice


DAVID ROBERTS aka
"Duke", 57, died August 29.
He leaves his mother, Louise;
son, David Jr.; grandson,
Kavin Agard; wife, Mary; three
brothers, Willie, Ivan and
Darrell.
Service will be 2 p.m.,
Saturday, September 6 at
Second Canaan M.B. Church,
4343 N.W. 17th Avenue.
Arrangements handled by
Mitchell Funeral Home.


VIRGIL JOHNSON
aka "Peewee"
9/22/29 09/01/98

Peewee, it's been 10 years
since you been gone. Seems
like yesterday you was right
here at home. But, now I know
you are in God's arms.
Rest in peace. You are not
alone. We love you and think
of you all the time.
Much love your wife,
Elizabeth C. Johnson; son,
John; grands- and great
grands.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


DARRELL V. OWENS
08/29/64 08/21/87


Its has now been 21 years
since a mother lost her child
and a sister lost a big brother,
but just know that you are
still in our hearts.
Love Carolyn, Duane and
Shoney.


Death Notice


MARYANN WILLIAMS, 44,
died August 29: She leaves a
daughter, Lakidra; grandson,
Laress Nelson; mother, Betty
Williams Barnes, stepfather,
Jimmy Barnes; devoted friend,.
Washington Caldwell; sisters,
Naomi, Wannette, Jannette;
brother, Virgirl Woodson and
Billy Daniel.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday
at HolyTemple, 2341 N.W. 143
St. Arrangements entrusted
to Royal Funeral Home.


Honor


Your Loved


One


With an In


Memoriam


In The


Miami Times


J
N

h






I BLACKS M4USTI CON FROIiTHEIR OWxN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Am w*


wm ( 1%1r* % v% A4urv %1% thaoil~~r


Copyrighted Material


[Syndicated Content]


,.Available from.Commercial News Providers


4--W. .. .... AW


Birthday and
Memorial Celebration


Death Notice


ED WILLIE BOSTIC Home.


Ed Willie (Eddie) Bostic to
know him was to love him. Come
and reflect 7:30 p.m., Thursday,
September 11 at 8400 N.W.
25 Ave. Featuring groups and
choirs.
More information call Virginia
Bostic 305-621-8126.


JOIN THE
Ssiqoi coi E&E
by becoming a member of our
CiL ue- ITEat0oi19
CALL 305-694-6210


I Ij! I k X


( 414 fw% r1






The Miami Times


Li esty es


FASHION HIP Hop *


Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


I i ':
4baM- WM -


.ittttr \


r^.is.1


r T1 t,


f cur


(1
4'


fa a0k-aI 1


.. 0.I


-
,a


U!I I!
I


9


a


p, !


fh f:. ,1 ....


,W 4w.


.:. *I. .y.


lK I I i' lb tilt 'It-III









2C THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL IIIEIR OWN DESTINY


Kudos to the officers and
members of Eta Phi Beta Soror-
ity, Inc., Alpha Gamma Chapter
for being a part of the dream of
the visionaries of the sorority
which, was initiated in 1942 to
connect Black women to each
other professionally, provide a
space where they could express
the highest standard of woman-
hood and share their gifts, tal-
ents and skills with each other
and ultimately, the world.
Special recognition to found-
ers Mattie Rankin, Katherine
Douglas, Mae Edwards Cur-
ry, Dorothy Sylvers Brown,
Atheline S. Graham, Earline
Carter, Merry G. Hubbard,
Ivy B. Banks, Ethel Madison,
Lena Reed, and Ann Porter to
participate in the 28th Biennial
Grand Boule in Houston, Texas,
August 3 to 9, led by Michele
Wyatt-Sweeting, president.
The Miamians made an impact
as they settled into the Hilton
Houston Post Oak Hotel impec-
cably attired and ready to take
care of business. Commissioner
Sharon Pritchett, Miami Gar-
dens, was elected as Grand Di-
rector of Education; The Miami
Chapter received two trophies,
one as second-place winner in
the talent show and recruiting
and reactivating members into
the chapter.
Others that shared in the ad-
venture included Dannie Mc-
Millon, Linette Rogers, Colette
McCurdy-Jackson, Barbara
Killen, Shirley Day Worthy
and husband, Rosetta Nelson,
Althea Sample, Cindy Camp-
bell, Thelma A. Rolle, Janet
Symonette and husband, Syl-
via Williams-Garner and Shad
Theodore Garner, Sergeant-at-
arms and scholarship chairper-
son, and a memorial for the late
Bettye Gaitor Timmons, past


national presi- f
dent, and Corlette
Floyd.
The Senord (sev- '
enth-grade boys),
Bee-Ettes (sev-
enth-grade girls)
and Shads (husbands of so-
rqrs) participated as escorts to
the events; beauty contest and
other special functions when
needed.
The 10th Biennial Youth
Conference and, The Patricia
Osborne Futurama Pageant
.pleased the young people with


SYLVIA WILLIAMS-GARNER
AND SHAD THEODORE GARNER


Rev. Robin Cook collaborating
with Rev. Claudia Williams for
a successful activity. Included
were the crowning of Miss Bee-
Ette, Whitney Roberts and Mr.
Senord, Kendall Cash, along
with essay winners ages 5 to
18.
Alpha Gamma Chapter mem-
bers are still beaming over the
special activities where the
color of red was worn for some
activities, as well as white, and
the grand ball colors were gold,
white or red. Williams-Garner
indicated how lovely everyone
looked with each color and the
ball was something to behold as


MM2 mffim=:


over 500 guests took over the
electric slide.
Now that everyone is back
at school, Williams-Garner is
planning her annual Grandpar-
ent Luncheon, Saturday, Sept.
13, at the Church of the Open
Door, beginning at 11:30 a.m.,
with live music and much to eat.
To attend this free celebration,
please call 786-423-0429.


Lavonia F. Robinson, saw
the need to bring The Rev. Ber-
nard Carlton Poitier, a pillar of
our community, recognition last
Saturday, by Reverends, politi-
cians, business people, alumni
of Dorsey High, Class of '55,
and friends. Reverend Poiti-
er's community service projects
were brought to the forefront
before a capacity crowd at New
Hope MBC.
The program began with a
praise and worship led by Mi-
ami Herald reporter Bea Hines,
and Hazel Hepburn with Mt.
Calvary MBC. The processional
followed,. and among attend-
ees were the Rev. Randall and
Prophetess Sharlene Holts,
Bernadette Poitier, mistress of
ceremonies, Rev. Douglas Cook,
pastor, Jordan Grove MBC,
Minister Ulysses Morris, House
of God Miracles Revival Fellow-
ship, Rev. Epi Montalvo, Caro-
lyn Boyce, alumni of Dorsey
High, and Robinson, orchestra-
tor, while the honoree emerged
from a limousine with his wife,
Barbara, and family members
and entered the church to a
standing ovation.
Bernadette Poitier, emcee,
settled the huge crowd down
with her experience of handling
the mic by introducing the dais
members. Kenya Peak Miller,
soloist, Mt. Hermon AME.
She continued with tributes
from Rev. Holts, Prophetess
Holts, Cora Portee, retired prin-
cipal, Ruby Rayford, Dr. James
Bush III, House of Representa-
tives, and a representative from
the Haitian Neighborhood Cen-


ter, followed by the male choir
from 93rd Street MBC, Dr. Carl
Johnson, pastor.
Poitier allowed everyone to
participate in the program by
administering a Love Offering
led by Alpha F. Fluitt, chairper-
son, as well as Kaitalyn
S. Roker, Anita Smith,
Doris T. Pinder, Floyd
Benton, Vincent Ste-
phens, Charles Span
and J. Rule.
More tributes came
from Ethelyn Hamil- .-.,
ton, Annie Ross, Jim-
my Anders, Dwight SANT
Jackson, Richardson
Funeral Home,' Baljean Smith,
president, Dorsey High Alum-
ni, Daryl Reaves, and Carliss
Cook, president, class of '55.
Kudos to soloists James Poit-
ier, Bethune-Cookman Uni-
versity., Lonnie P. McCartney
and special presentations from
Elder Moultrey, and a superb
declaration of the honoree's
life by Bernadette Poitier who
underlined his parents the late
Cyril and Albertha S. Poitier.
Bernard was the third of ten
children and grew up in Liber-
ty City, while attending Dorsey
High and subsequently, Tuskeg-
ee Institute, Bethune-Cookman
College (University) and Atlanta
School of Mortuary Science, as
well as Miami-Dade Community
College.
The honoree began his teach-
ing career in the Miami-Dade
public schools system for sev-
eral years and through hard
work, opened his new funeral
home in April 1993; established
St. Luke Cousin Memorial AME,
and received more than 100
prestigious awards for his com-
mitment to youth and the com-
munity.
According to Rev. Irene
Burns-Brown, noted author/
writer, he was a man for all sea-
sons and, along with Robinson,
the both of them took the time
to recognize unsung heros and
sheros in Liberty City for several
years, as well as enriching the


lives of senior citizens through
programs, gifts, turkeys, Christ-
mas trees, and more.
He truly deserved the honor,
yet was gracious enough to in-
voke others he felt should have
streets named in their honor,
never alluding to fam-
ily members he buried
without any money. He
is more than a "man of
all seasons." Congratu-
lations!


Leann Santiague be-
AGUE came a star last Sat-
urday, as her parents
and family members gave her
a birthday party to celebrate
seven years on this earth. This
second-grader from Rainbow
Park Elementary was on cloud
nine during the entire time of
her celebration. Her godmother,
Lacricia Mitchell, was assisting
her as she maneuvered from the
DJ music to the house bouncer,
while her mother, Felicia Grant,
made sure everyone ate heartily
and enjoyed themselves.
Other family members who
attended include Michael San-
tiague, father, Hugh and Gloria
McGrath, grandparents, Jer-
ald Mitchell, grandfather, Pat-
rick and Quilla Elliott, uncle
and aunt, from Jamaica, and
Latosha Donaldson, a close
friend of the mother, a member
of St. Paul A.M.E. Church.
Some of Leann's friends at
the party were Myesha, Tyne-
tra, Patrice, Davontae, Tionia,
Takeemah, Kastreemah, Mal-
colm, Paula, Ja' Kiya, Deano-
ria, Deanasia, Ariea, Terrain,
Termain, Jeneva, Iyshad, and
Jasmine.
In addition, Diane Hargrett
informed Leann how birthdays
are so important as she reflect-
ed on her mother's and great
aunt's birthday celebration in
Hawthorne, Fla. recently. Er-
nestine Roberson, mother, and
Edna Berry, great aunt were
surprised with a party spon-
sored by her relatives from Mi-


I *her pbam O)e NgtN Sa 'd tour forw Iadir* oa


Copyrighted Material--




Syndicated Cohtent --




Available from Commercial News Providers




wnpcf cl*ertf uw lith high Ithl .

4" 0


I

iy


THE MIAMI TIMES



SUPPORT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR YOU

Qi S408' for a 12-month subscription L S321'- for a B-month subscription
lJ Check or money order enclosed
LI Bill my credit card


Li

Li~


Exp_____
E.p____
Exp____


Authorized Signature


- -


Address


State Zip __


Phone e-mail


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


BLACKS MUST CONTROLTHEIR OWN DESTINY


Includes Florida sales tax


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


ami.
They chose to dine at Red
Lobster for the occasion. Both
honorees said dinner was heav-
enly, especially the lobster tail,
shrimp, and grouper, followed
Happy Birthday wishes from at-
tendees and Red Lobster staff.
The icing on the cake was the
opportunity to pick "bullets,"
grapes, from the vine nearby
and reminisce.
Some of those in atten-
dance included Deacon Edward
Wright-Perkins and his wife,
Sylvia, Pricilla Bush, Mr. and
Mrs. Nelson, Roz Gordan, and
Diane Hargrett.

*********
Audley Coakley, alumni rep.
on the Bethune-Cookman board
of trustees, Dr. Larry Handfield,
trustee, John Williams, former
NAP, and Carol Weathering-
ton, local president, are plan-
ning a Comprehensive Cam-
paign, Friday, September 19, at
the Omega Activity Center, be-
ginning at 7 p.m. This campaign
is designed to bring alumni and
friends of the university closer
together as we begin the 2008
school year.
The aim is to break the re-
cord of alumni and put the class
year in groups. There will be
live entertainment, and a DJ.
The event is BYOB, or settle for
punch. See you there Wildcats!

Richard Faison













IBERBER Sq Yd
Extra ha-avm Qualily
Reg. SI4 Sq Yd.
L.-------------......--......j
r----------------------------
[ 50% OFF SALE
WALL TO WALL CARPET
S INSTALLED FREE PAD
:GORGEOUS CARPET $7.99
:REG. 16 S.Y. S.Y.
,40 6S' WAS ~&,340 noa 320
P50 S Y VA'Ai z12aK i n(,w t640
100R ).' WA' S 160flO nrw S799
L----------------------- J
CARPET
iWHOLL. HOU'SE $49ii9

'LIV RM DIN l, j
i RM. HALLi i-., -, 199
W' )k,! N -O ltl. ". .NJ:,.' AL.j. N ;'.\ ,
L-------------- --I
LIKE NEW $19
CARPET SALE
AM M NOW
11 L.:-IV, T. : zI i '(1 Si $19
1: 1 1 i.:n Lr.,)uri-n] ',i Sg19

I.: I I b.aulllljl hJ lu 1 ,1 :1 S19
And Many MoW

70%OFF$Agg

CARPET L
'..... o.i -. i .......................
:LAMINATE 79c
TILE 69
BAMBOO 199
DON BAILEY FLOORS
8300 Bisc. Blvd., Miami 14831 NW 7th Ave., Miami
2208 South State Rd. 7, Miramar
3422 W. Broward Blvd., FL Laud. 1283 NW 31 Ace., FL Laud.
FREE SHOP AT HOME
Toll Free 1-866-721-7171








BLCIMS O RLTERONDSFN 3CTEMAITMS ETMEi-,20


%~elmwh ow he"% SW


- Copyrighted Material -



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


owft-*s n NM


mm*-


-wo m o451M


4m do- 0 *


- D *


m *


4 4 *a ow0


Mi april His.panr,,. Baller l n Arrriri ran lirn,.e.L pr. s
XIII INTERNATIONAL BALLET FESTIVAL OF MIAMI
XIIl Initernalional Bailer Fesiiv.-l of M mia i 2008 U.S A. considered
one of the most successful ballet festivals in the United States.
features a dazzling lineup of the lines national and international
ballet companies, represented by their greatest stars
Performances include: Staatsballett Berlin. Germany, The Royal
Ballet, England: Housion Ballel, USA, and many more.
8 PM Ziff Ballet Opera House $35, $45. $55, S65


Idrienrn i4r.nl Cenier ,, Dja, 1 Eni irinm.ritn prec,-,d
FITO PAEZ Solo Acompahado
Latin Grammy"' Award-winning Fil Paez has been the l,rical
voice and music-al conscience of Argentina for an entire
generation He is a megastar of Latin American rock and roll
vith the global appeal of Bob Dylan and Paul Simon
With n l songs such as "Marposa Tecknicolor" and "Ternm de
Piluso h" h'll also be joined by some soon-to-be-announced
special musical guess'
8 PM Knight Concerl Hall S50, $65. $80. $95


- m *q .


m 0


____ 4D m


domb ft- mwm


Gm *m A 1-


S rree Aarienne Arsnt center Tours: Mondays and saturday at noon, starting at ite
No reservations necessary.


emom


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


BLACKS Musi, CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


e


- *me


--------------------------------


^


:illj iniwnaiional E,31ii
F e-., Iv. a I of M .3r -., i


m 4 MP 0


4 40






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 5-9, 2008


RK&I artist

Jami Jackson

carve out her j

own path


^ MW OW
.: K ' 1-
+:p.=++z wm=+ ,.+ l ,q


I kF o I trrBondamd6r-ad
4k4Wk -


MM 4Hi O*^"
.- a.lw1
elm 4




41m- A -o


CopyrighteddMaterial


ISvnd icatedContenti


Available fromiommercia


News Providers-
ill wags,,, h4,1 4,


IATI at o~''bak i n aThe air lb" lam


Ib rii~hi


f.6k k. %


?q. b'fV% J%%t~jlt1


,. h~ '


a *


Miami Cuisine at its Best!
i1,,--


AMERICAN EXPRESS PRESENTS

/HAAl.SP CE
i Love Miami Spice.com
ORGANIZED BY THE GREATER MIAMI CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU
This August and September, celebrate the city's
passion for food and life by enjoying special
dinner and/or lunch menus at reduced prices at
Miami's finest restaurants.


Lunch $23* I Dinner $36*
N". O Tur 1 m 3rl inrhjd .ijpl:cr. .ri En t ii: a* y i-nr- iFi:-~ erii :.I' f Lir rijl uit r i r:I l rir:i ludedl
NOTE: F':e.l jrint p.n i ,ir1i n. 1r lJ.' ",'-red rJ n -f r rn j n rf, ..i-n. i ,rr, .uier , h i.ii i e


Prese~nting Sponsor


OrQnn'e'i Dty


S' :-, Southern Florida
Concierge
S"-; Association



Please visit www.iLoveMiamiSpice.com for the latest information


Suppulit-Ilby


I


I





The IL. Times

Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Pitnram to help hom r hurr with down paamnwnt rnai red
ft W -a......n... ....H. ..-..


mSyndicatedContent m p
-merciaNewProvid
Available from CProviders
... a 0 Mrmi 0it


In bu


Stagi V()loir ho1(i0e


for a' qLuicker sale


a". emS -wg


S4ft '4111k," S.%v--mpw*


Wk 4NO1^40% AmM 40> ^f


*woo mw ll mmmutH b I&
flmm eON ev oe'- omo

e mm an

q-. vmm nOW .de
ftw.e ff ..ee lopSm


Juro &award lIsatld S' In l if ratis t
a qamnk .


o ri e
thmm md o em
mmumimm esmodbwp tan **=
S.. .in.au* -n PdSM heN
e -..h


%% hIrrt' the br-ad? Iou haer Iot haer a plan. and ancel tloo
tw .... a ...... ...1 111W


abos Sua


4nmm m mm


mm::N: mFm








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Working with the mortgage crisis .."






Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content -



Available from Commercial News Providers
9 NiP] aI/LO-I wiI4w


4011U L i on swa
4bS mel


%~nicl' inl itJfl pa atw' help tvu kCurn


prbx
,, MIAMI.-AD'E EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
MDX PROCUREMENT/CONTRACT NO.: RFQ-09-01

MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE:
MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL & SWAP ADVISORY SERVICES

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority is seeking qualified firms to submit
Proposals to provide Municipal Financial and Swap Advisory Services. The
Services consists of, but is not limited to, on-going services related to the pres-
ent and potential financial affairs of MDX, Swap advisory services or advisory
services related to the issuance of bonds, notes, certificates or other financing
instruments. MDX notifies all Proposers and individuals that it requires and en-
courages small, minority and women-owned businesses to have full opportu-
nity to submit a response to any Solicitation Document issued by MDX. There
is no Small Business participation requirement in this Solicitation. However,
MDX will assign SB Bonus Points, as detailed in the Solicitation Documents.
For copies of the RFQ with complete information on pre-qualification require-
ments, the scope of services as well as submittal requirements, please log onto
our web site at www.mdx-way.com or call MDX Procurement Office at 305-637-
3277. Please note: In order to download any MDX solicitations, you must reg-
ister as a Vendor. The Vendor Registration can only be done through MDX's
website. The deadline for submitting a Proposal is September 30, 2008 by
2:00 P.M., Eastern Time. A Pre-Proposal Conference is scheduled for Sep-
tember 10, 2008 at 8:30 A.M. at the MDX Headquarters Building. Attendance
to the Pre-Proposal Conference is NOT mandatory however, everyone is
encouraged to attend.

PUBLIC NOTICE

ALLAPATTAH COMMUNITY HOUSING
FOR THE ELDERLY

Applications will be distributed for 79 new rental apartments located at 1390 N.W.
24th Avenue, Miami. Do not go to site as it is under construction. Eligible appli-
cants must be at least 62 years of age and very low income. Other eligibility re-
quirements also apply. Move in is expected by December, 2008 or shortly thereaf-
ter, depending on construction. There is a HUD subsidy so rent will depend upon
each resident's income.
The first 220 persons who meet these requirements may pick up an application,
first come, first serve, in person only, on Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 9 a.m. at:
Allapattah Community Action, Inc.
2257 NW North River Drive
Miami, FL 33125

Any questions may be directed to the office at 305-633-1161. In compliance
with ADA, the TDD phone number for persons with special hearing disabilities is
1-800-545-1833 ext. 715. Thank you for your interest.


OPPORTUNITY


SUBSCRIBE

TODAY!
END THE
i N C 0 N V E N I E C E
OF EMPTY
NEWSPAPER
B O X ES ,
F I G H TI N 6G
THE WEATHER

H IU jI T I N G
DOW N BAC i
C ) P I E S

CALL
305-694-6214


IFB NO. 88048

OPENING DATE:


INVITATION FOR BID FOR KITCHEN CABINET
REPLACEMENT AT FIRE STATION #1
2:00 PM, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2008


A MANDATORYp re-bid conference will be held on Wednesday, September 3,
2008 at 10:00 AM at Fire Station #1 144 NW 5th Street Miami FL. The purpose
of this conference is to allow potential Bidders an opportunity to present ques-
tions to staff and obtain clarification of the requirements of the Bid documents.
It is mandatory that a representative (s) of the bidder attend in order to qualify
to bid.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 007101


MIAM3n

September 2008
COMMUNITY MEETING CALENDAR
Public Notice
FY 2009 Request for Application Process
The Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED) is holding a series of community meetings in Neighborhood Revitalization
Strategy Areas (NRSAs).
During September, new applicants/activities are required to give presentations to the Community Advisory Committees (CACs) on proposed
developments for which they are seeking funding through the FY 2009 Request for Application (RFA) process. CAC allocations will be made
during the September meetings.
These meetings allow the community to identify priority needs for Miami-Dade County's FY 2008-2012 Consolidated Plan. At the meetings,
County staff will give an update on the FY 2009 Request for Application process. Proposed amendments to the Citizen Participation Plan will
also be discussed.
Please call OCED at (786) 469-2149 to schedule a presentation at least five days before the meeting. The Citizen Participation Plan provides
for and encourages citizens to participate in the updating of the Consolidated Plan. Some CACs will be making their Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) Capital Improveme its, Economic Development and Housing allocations. The meetings are open to the public,


6:00 pm District 2
MELROSE
MDTA AUDITORIUM
3300 N.W 32 Avenue


7:00 pm District 9
GOULDS
Isaac A. Withers
Community Center
21300 SW 122 Avenue


I T~sa, Spebr9 08 MnaSpebr1,20.


6:30 pm Districts 8 & 9
LEISURE CITYINARANJA
DHS Naranja
Neighborhood Center
13955 S.W 264 Street


7:00 pm Districts 6 & 7
SOUTH MIAMI
HUD Senior Center
6701 S.W 62 Avenue


6:00 pm District 2
WEST LITTLE RIVER
Arcola Lakes Park
1301 NW 83 Street
&
7:00 p.m. District 9
PERRINE
Perrine CAA Enrichment Center
17801 Homestead Avenue


7:00 p.m. District 3
MODEL CITY
Joseph Caleb Center
5400 NW 22nd Ave.,
Room 110

6:30 p.m. Districts 1 & 13
OPA-LOCKA
Opa-locka Train Station
490 All Baba Avenue


Multiple members of individual Community Councils may be present. Miami-Dade County provides equal access and opportunity in
employment and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its program or services. For material in an alternate format, a sign
language interpreter or other accommodations, please call the Office of Community and Economic Development at 769-469-2112 least five
(5) days in advance.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami
City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American
Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 200


I


I


I

















SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


sSS^^S~t^ ^HEi~lfi8^^*1



e~jZt~tfl^


$1,000 Move In Special
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 305-216-5390.

$1,000 Move In Special
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 305-318-8197.

$1000 Move In Special
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Please call. 786-326-8280

1118 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$575
Two bedrooms, one bath
$650
Stove, refrigerator, air. 305-
642-7080.

1202 N W 61 Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. $800 monthly. Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080, 786-236-1144

12400 N.E. 11 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1100. SECTION 8 OK.
305-642-7080

12400 N.E. 12 Ct Apt#6
Newly renovated one bed-
room, one bath, new appli-
ances, tile, ceiling fans and
laundry room. Call 305-498-
2266 or 954-549-8787.

1245 NW 58TH STREET
Studio $450 Per Month
One bdrm $575 Per Month.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen TV. Call:
Joel 786-355-7578

1261 N.W. 59 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$575, stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080.

1341 NW 58 Terr.
Three bedroom, one bath-
room $1150. One bedroom,
one bathroom $650. 954-
993-8240

140 N.W. 13th Street
One month to move in Two
bedrooms, one bath, $575.
786-236-114/305-642-7080

140 S.W. 6th Street
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. No Section 8.
Call (305) 267-9449.

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, one bdrm.
apt., $495 per month, all ap-
pliances included. Free 20
inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1525 N.W. 1st Place
Newly remodeled, three bed-
rooms. $800 per month, all
appliances included, central
air. Free 20 inch flat screen
T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1540 NW 1st CRT
Studio $425 monthly
One bedroom -$525 monthly
Two bdrm $625 monthly
All appliances included, free
20 inch flat screen TV. Call:
Joel 786-355-7578

1801 N.W. 1 STACT
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month newly renovated.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen T.V.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.

1801 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch flat
screen TV. Call Joel
786-355-7578

1835 N.W. 2 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$625. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free Water. 305-642-7080.

200 N.W. 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
one bedroom, one bath $425
305-642-7080.

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$695. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

220 NW 11 Ter
Two bedrooms, Free water
$525 305-373-7310 or 305-
539-1312

2515 N.W. 52 St #3
One bedroom, tiled, air, no
appliances. $550 monthly.
$1100 to move in. 954-522-
4645.

421 NW 59 Terrace
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Studio, $600
One bdrm, $675
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

458 N.W. 7 Street


One bedroom, very nice. Call
305-557-1750


a=,


$450, 305-717-6084


MIAMI LAKES AREA
Studio, Remodeled
786-301-4368, 305-558-2249


50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars,
iron gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 N W 50 Street
Call 305-638-3699

6020 NW 13 Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N W 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

6832 N.W. 5th Place
Two bedrooms, one bath and
one efficiency, everything in-
cluded. 786-286-2540.

7104 N.W. 14 Place
Large three bedrooms, two
baths, unit for rent. Central
air, water included. Section
8 Welcome. Call 305-715-
0400.

77 N.W. 77th Street
Two bedrooms,one and half
bath $820.
Call 786-306-4505

781 N.W. 80th Street
One bedroom, one bath. Call
(786) 295-9961

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly. Free 20 inch flat
screen T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699

Capital Rental Agency Inc.
Overtown, Liberty City, Opa
Locka, Brownsville Apart-
ments, Duplexes, Houses,
Efficiencies. One two and
three bedrooms, many with
appliances. Same day ap-
proval. Call for information/
specials 305-642-7080

CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air,
appliances, new tile and car-
pet. Starting at $650. 1545
N.W. 8 Avenue. Call 786-506-
3067

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
duplex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 monthly, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at 3737 Charles Ter-
race

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live across the street from
Brownsville Metrorail Station.
On major bus lines. Fiftieth
Street Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move-
in special or visit our Rental
Office, 2651 N.W. 50 Street,
Miami, Florida

GAS PRICES TOO HIGH?
Live within walking distance
of Brownsville Metrorail Sta-
tion. On major bus lines. Al-
berta Heights Apartments.
Call 305-638-3699 for move
in special or visit our Rent-
al Office, 2651 N.W. 50th
StreetMiami,Florida


HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath $515
Two bedroom, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144


HOLLYWOOD AREA
Nice location, close to schools
and church. One bedroom
with tile, air, stove and refrig-
erator, water included in rent,
305-624-9590.


Immediate Occupancy at
Westview Terrance Apts.
Spacious studio's, one and
two bedrooms. Bring ad for
move-in deals.
Call 305-688-8881


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines. Call
305-638-3699


LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,


Newly remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath, central air,
call Mrs. Reynolds 786-356-
1457.

1944 N.W. 93 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.


OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 1351h Street
1/2 Monlh FREE. one and
two bedrooms. central air.
Appliances and waier in-
cluded Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits
305-769-0146 or 786-521-
7151

Opa Locka Area
One bedroom, one bath
$450-$500
Two bedrooms, one bath
$575-625
Free water 786-267-1646

OPA LOCKA AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 welcome, $500
cash back, 305-717-6084.

OVERTOWN APTS.
One bedroom, one bath,
$480-$550
Two bedrooms, one bath
$600-$650
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$900-$950
Stove, refrigerator, air, free
water. 305-642-7080,
786-236-1144.

Wynwood Area Apts.
28 Street and 1st Avenue
One bdrm., one bath,
$600-$650 per month, two
bedrooms $750 monthly. All
appliances included. Joel
786-355-7578


COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27 Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down secu-
rity doors. Outside lighting.
$950 monthly, $950 Security
Deposit. Call 305-638-3699


3058 N.W. 203 Lane
Three- bedrooms, corner,
fenced, HOPWA and Section
8 okay. Call 954-392-0070.

CAROL CITY AREA
2775 N.W. 193rd Terrace
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

CAROL CITY AREA
2775 N.W. 193rd Terrace
18709 N.W. 46th Avenue
Three bedrooms
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268

Miami Gardens
17934 NW 40th CT
Four bedrooms, two bath.
$1400 monthly, Section 8 Ok.
ALL POINTS REALTY
305-542-5184

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
totally renovated, Section 8
welcome, call 305-715-0400.

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
One bdrm, one and half bath,
Section 8, 786-277-3688.


10 N.W. 60th Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath
and two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tile throughout,
Section 8 welcome, call 954-
609-5043 or 305-219-4121.

1078 NW 100 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $985 monthly, first,
last, security. $2500 to move
in. Call 786-315-8491

11232 N.W. 22 Avenue
Great location, three bed-
rooms, one bath. Central air,
$1050 monthly. Call Urline,
954-499-4620.

11620 N.W. 17th Avenue
Three bedrooms, Section 8
okay, $1350, 305-305-1184.

1373 N.W. 58th Terrace
Huge two bedrooms, one
bath, central air, new appli-
ances, indoor laundry room
and tile Section 8 welcome!
Call 305-490-7033

1452 N.W. 53rd Street
Beautiful one bedroom, one
bath, air, $750 monthly, first
and security deposit. Call
305-710-1343 or 786-486-
6613.

1539 N.W. 45th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
new appliances, ceiling
fans, air conditioner, washer,
$1000 monthly, first and last
month to move in. No deposit.
Section 8 welcome. Call 305-
206-8184.

15903 N.E. 18th Place
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Florida room, washer, dryer,
air, $1000. 786-356-6101

1782 NRW. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 a month. Please call af-
ter 4 p.m. 305-778-3160.

1865 N.W. 42nd Street


Nice room, utilities included.
Move in immediately. $125
weekly, $260 moves you in.
Call 786-277-2693

6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
E Slocum Investment $350
down and $130 weekly, a/c.


$825. Eat-in kitchen, large
closets. 305-541-2885.

21301 N.W. 37 Avenue
Two bedrooms, air, huge.
$895. No Section 8. 786-306-
4839

3189 N.W. 59th Street
Two bedroom, one bath, re-
modeled, call Rod 305-975-
0711.

326 N.E. 56 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$950. Stove, refrigerator, air.
Free water. 305-642-7080.

38 N.E. 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$700 monthly. No Section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

40 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, new kitchen,
central air, bars, water, $900
monthly, 305-310-7366.

4320 N.W. 23 Court
Two bedrooms, Sec. 8 wel-
come, call Joe 954-257-7008
or 954-438-9942

4436 N.W. 23rd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath
Call 786-586-0629

4603 N.W. 15th Avenue
Two bedroom, den, $975
monthly, 305-638-5946 or
305-759-2280.

4992 N.W. 18 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1000 monthly, $2000 to
move in. Louis 305-632-2426

5537 N.W. 5th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, $850 monthly,
Section 8 welcome. Drive-
way and gated. Call 786-663-
0234

7520 N.W. 8th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8 ok,
call 305-490-9284, $1100.

7985 N.W. 12th Court
Three bedrooms,one bath.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 786-768-8973

874 N.W. 70th Street
New three bedrooms, two.
bath, section 8 $1300.
Call 786-285-9611/ 786-346-
8505

ALLAPATTAHAREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first, last and security. Section
8, HOPWA OK. CALL
305-244-6845

N W And N EAreas
One, two and three bed-
rooms from $700-$1367 Call
305-757-7067
Design Realty


100 N.W. 14 Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO), BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide call-
ing, property protected by se-
curity camera 24 hours, $185
weekly, $650 monthly. Call
305-751-6232

13377 NW 30th AVENUE
$110 weekly,private kitchen/
bath,free utilitiesappliances.
305-474-8188,305-691-3486

2410 N.W. 102 Street
Studio, rear unit, air, washer,
dryer, $625 monthly, first and
last 706-536-5068.

3153 N.W. 53 Street
$400 monthly. First, last and
security. 305-751-6232

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished. Own entrance.
First and last to move in. Call
305-628-4987

Room and Efficiency for
Rent 305-836-5848/305-653-
8954/305-691-4824


1426 N.W. 70th Street
$300-$350 Monthly
305-836-8378

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1887 NW 44 Street
$485 monthly. $650 moves
you in. Private bathroom.
305-637-9359 or 305-303-
0156

19561 N.W. 30th Court
With air, $120 weekly, $240 to
move in. 305-310-5272.

2170 Washington Avenue
Opa Locka
Clean rooms, $95 weekly,
$410 monthly. 786-277-3434,
786-227-0666

4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486

6233 N.W. 22 Court


10741 SW 150 Ter
Three bedroom, one bath
$1000 monthly. No Section 8.
305-267-9449

1530 N.W. 71 Street
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$750. Air. 305-642-7080.

1532 West 9Th Street
Riviera Beach,FI
(Palm Beach Area)
Three bedrooms,one
bath,tiled floors, spacious.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 786-547-0926

17981 N.W. 2 Place
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1500 monthly.
All Points Realty
305-542-5184

1863 NW 91 Street
Beautiful one bedroom, can
convert to two bedrooms.
Totally remodeled, all
appliances. $750 monthly,
first and last. 305-801-6496.

1935 N.W. 96 St
Two bedrooms, one bath,
two one bedrooms, one bath.
786-419-8852 or
786-346-6481

19600 N.W. 5 Place
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1450 monthly. Call David at
786-277-2453

1961 Wilmington Street
Opa Locka, three bedrooms,
one bath, $1000 monthly.
First and last. 305-389-8414.

2325 N.W. 89 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1100 monthly, $2700 to
move in. 305-685-9402 or
305-873-3397

2968 N.W. 51st Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome,
Call 786-277-2693

301 N.W. 189th Street
Section 8 with voucher only,
three bdrms, 305-218-0629.

3030 N.W. 214th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$730 monthly, $2190 to move
in. Must see! Yard and water
taken care of by owner.
Call 305-621-3573

531 N.W. 110 Street
Three bedrooms. $1150, air,
tile, bars, $3450 to move in.
No Section 8. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776

5604 NW 189 Terr
Three bedrooms, two
baths.$1500 monthly, $3750
moves you in. Call Sharon
305-510-3388

8250 NW 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath,
$775 monthly includes water.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bdrms, single rooms,
Section 8. 786-308-5625.

MIAMI AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1450, 718-354-7234.

MIAMI AREA
Newly remodeled, two bed-
rooms, one bath, washer, dry-
er, central air, $1175 a month,
Section 8 welcome,
954-818-9112


Call 305-305-0597

6849 N.W. 15th Avenue
Nice rooms, different sizes,
quiet area, utilities included,
$105-$130 weekly, $260 to
move in immediately,
Call 786-277-2693

7612 N.W. 2nd Court
$125 plus weekly, central air,
clean, call 786-444-7932.

7749 N.W. 15th Avenue
NO DEPOSIT!
Large room with air. Call
786-357-1395.

9935 N.W. 22 Avenue
Only $125 weekly, $375 to
move in. Women welcome.
305-924-1028.

Homestead Area
Fully furnished, microwave,
air, refrigerator, cable TV and
armoire. 786-285-9611
786-346-8505

LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, $110 weekly.
Call 305-335-9463.

NORTHWEST AREA
62 Street N.W. First Av-
enue,$625 to move in, $425
monthly and $200 security.
Call 305-989-8824

NORTHWEST AREA
Furnished room, 305-634-
4030 or 786-337-0864.

Northwest Miami Area
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-2451

NW AREA
Private entrance with bath.
Exchanged for light cooking,
housekeeping, meals includ-
ed. 305-835-9798.


112 Marion Road
Miami Gardens. Three bed-
rooms, pool and patio. Try
$500 down and $1499 month-
ly. 786-306-4839. Call for list.

1327 N.W. 40th Street
Three bdrm, one bath, $125K,
owner/agent, 954-663-5263.

3315 N.W. 213 Terrace
Five bedrooms, three baths.
Built 1986. Try $500 down
and $1399 monthly. 786-306-
4839.

8200 N.W. 14 Avenue
Why rent-buy. 'A Perfect 10'
. Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Try $500 down
and $1199 monthly. FHA.
786-306-4839

8200 N.W. 14 Avenue
Why rent-buy. 'A Perfect 10'
. Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Try $500 down
and $1199 monthly. FHA.
786-306-4839

ATTENTION
Now You Can own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65.000
On Any Home
Also Available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP?'T
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty


MIAMI GARDENS AREA
A very nice three bedrooms,
one bath, appliances includ-
ed. First, last and security.
Call 305-626-8001

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Beautiful three bedrooms,
central air, 786-541-3621.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three and four bedrooms,two
baths, $1200 and $1400, air,
remodeled. No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker,
305-891-6776

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
786-287-0864, or 786-337-
5853.

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Four bedrooms, one bath,
nice area, fenced yard, tile
and large storage room. Sec-
tion 8 okay. $1598 monthly.
786-390-8425

STOP!!!
Behind in Your Rent? 24 Hour
notice Behind in Your Mort-
gage? Kathy. 786-326-7916

M^Bry


Automatic Transmission
Two years warranty. Cheap!
MV#38262, MVR#22105617.
786-444-0095

Computer Repair Tech
$15 in Home Diagnostics
305-725-9789 Professional
ID# comp001007116528.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, plastering and addi-
tions. Call 954-980-4231 or
305-892-0315

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, appl.,
roof, air, 786-273-1130.

MY PRICES ARE THE
BEST IN TOWN
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors,
cabinet and lawn service.
Moving and hauling.
305-801-5690


A. A. S. PLUMBING
Call 786-663-5958
Free Estimate
Prices won't be beat


2 AL. A.m


%Wr defmg w wow

ft G*No spo aONW


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Boarding House
1430 N.W. 68 Street Available from Commercial News Providers
12 bdrms 2 addlrooms. Great
for Recovery Programs,
Halfway House or Rooming
house. Currently occupied.
Immediate revenue of over
$4000 mthly or $48,000 year-
ly. 786-351-8109.

N.W. 194 Street
and 17 Avenue
A Rolling Oaks Mansion.
Four bedrooms, three baths,
pool, garage, two story. Only
$279,900. Try $7900 down
and $1769 P & I Monthly. .
FHA. 786-306-4839. Call for. .....
list.


Owner Finance
or Rent to Own
Three bedrooms, two baths,
renovated, huge yard. North
Miami.. $197,500. 24 hour
recording 1-800-970-5628
Extension 8.



Account Rep needed
Any job experience is
needed to carry out the job.
You must have computer
skills and speak English
fluently. You will earn up to
$3,000 / month. Email me at
andrewmikel 900@yahoo.
com if interested.

Directors and Teachers
with credentials for Sheyes of
Miami Daycare. All interested
call 305-986-8395

Hair Stylist/Barber
Nail Technicians
305-949-9780


Internal Medicine
Hospitalist
in Miami. Medical degree
or equiv. req.; Board Cert.
in Internal Medicine, State
of FL medical license plus
2 yrs. exp. in job offered
or as ER physician or
any suitable combo of
eductation/training/exp.
Mail resumes to: Jackson
Memorial Hospital, 1611
NW 12th Ave. Miami, FL
33136, Park Plaza West,
Ground Level, Suite I,
Miami FL 33136, Attn.:
Nathaniel Sweet. EOE


~ey~ %"awl


55


Joe's auto body shop
Qualified auto and paint body
workers, AATI certified pre-
ferred.
Call 305-694-1549

REAL ESTATE ASST.
with car. $300 wkly plus
comm. 786-326-7916.







No Credit, Bad Credit?
We can help, we
approve small
business,mortgage,vehicle,
personal and debt con-
solidation loans, immediate
response. Give us a call
today 1-866-606-9459

Owner Finance
Rent To Own
Four nice homes. Owner
must sell. Hear recorded list.
1-800-970-5628 Extension 8









8ITEMAITMS ETME I-,20 LCSMs ONRLTEROv E~N


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers









%niaII (ip% 'at c %twu o'cr the Ions^ tcrm



NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."



001-J.J12 9/23/2008 Mail Sorting Service

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


-2






/-? weeX&



Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners *
General Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


305-836-5206
09/18/08




Call: 305-694-6210 Fax: 305-694-6211


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional Sate & Confidential Services


Terminaltion Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP
305-621-1399


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
MIAMI AVENUE TWIN BASCULE BRIDGES REPAIRS,
LOCATED WITHIN COMMISSION DISTRICT 5
OCI PROJECT NO. E08-PW-02, GOB

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, 2-8.1 and 2-10.4 of the County
Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional engineering services will be required for the design and post design
services in preparation of complete construction plans for the needed repairs to the existing Twin Bascule bridges on Miami Avenue
over the Miami River, for the Public Works Department (PWD).

The scope of services consists of design and post-design services in the preparation of complete construction documents for
the needed repairs to the existing Twin Bascule bridges on Miami Avenue over the Miami River. The project shall include the
replacement of the steel flooring and locks, painting of the bridges, and repairs to the bascule leafs and the operating system. Scope
of work may also include structural design, special provisions, permits, cost estimates, and any supportive tasks ancillary to the
primary scope of services. The condition of the existing bridges must be taken into consideration as well as the maintenance of
pedestrian and bicycle traffic to facilities on and off the Miami Avenue bridge.

The non-exclusive professional services agreement (PSA) will have a term of three (3) years.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

3.03 HIGHWAY SYSTEMS BRIDGE DESIGN (PRIME)

3.02 Highway systems Highway Design
3.09 Highway Systems Signing, Pavement Marking,
and Channelization
9.04 Soils, Foundations and Material testing Non-
Destructive Testing and Inspection
A copy of the Notice to Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provisions (as applicable) may be
obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering Unit located at 111 NW 1st Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL
33128. The phone number and fax respectively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be
forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail address in their
vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms
without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notification. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at
http://www.co.miami-dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amelia M. Cordova-Jimenez who may be contacted via e-mail at ameliac@miamidade.
gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-2036.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement- 10% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal


A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on September 9, 2008, at 3:30 P.M. at the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111
N.W. 1st Street 19th Floor, Main Conference Room Miami, Florida.., While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE
ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is September 26, 2008 at 3:30 P.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed envelopes and containers
must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, 111 NW 1't Street, 17th Floor, Suite
202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS
RECEIVED AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code,
as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of


Invitation to Bid for Construction Services

Gaita Gardens Condos
1666 Kennedy Causeway Suite 400,
North Bay Village
Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for the rehabilita-
tion of Gaita Gardens Rehab and Condo Conversion, 1254 & 1260 NW 59th
St., a 2 story, 5,360 sqft. Project will be received at the GAITA ENTERPRISES
office, 1666 Kennedy Cwy., Ste. 400 N. Bay Village, FL 33141 until 4:00 PM
local time on September 15, 2008. Bids will not be accepted after 4:00 PM.
Bid Documents may be obtained at the gaita ENTERPRISES office, 1666 Ken-
nedy Cwy. Ste. 400, N. Bay Village, FL 33141 starting on September 2, 2008.
A mandatory Pre-Bid meeting will be held on September 5, 2008, at 10:00 AM
at Gaita Gardens 1254 & 1260 NW 59th St, Miami.
All general contractors bidding on this project must be licensed and insured. All
bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the outside, the name
and address of the bidder, and the name of the project.

This project is funded with FY 2008 Community Development Block Grants
Program through The Miami-Dade County Office of Community and Economic
Development. Bidders must comply with Presidential Executive Order 11246;
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended; Section 3 of the Housing
and Urban Development Act of 1968, as amended 12, U.S.C. 1701u (section
3); the Davis Bacon Act and Related Acts, e.g., Copeland (Anti-Kick Back) Act,
Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act; Clean Air Act and all other ap-
plicable federal, state and local ordinances.

Gaita Gardens reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Bids from any person,
firm or corporation in default upon any agreement with Miami-Dade County will
be rejected.

No bidder may withdraw his/her bid within ninety (90) calendar days from the
bid submittal date of September 15, 2008.


BLACKS MUST CONTROi- THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008 1


I ,


sommob 8D omw mono bmwe








BLACKS MUST CON FROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 9D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008


Bargain hunters jump on homes


Available


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



om Commercial News


loo ~m am4Dqw


q*lm a m 4 m N

*o

qow- S dovwm




Providers=
am

M*


Ih'U S61


mAW..


inroad qwt


W. I *'id &w

vf.j B 116l


%&A$ ww ro wOto e


NEED SPIRITUALIST HELP?
Will help you with all problems
Health- Bad .Luck Business Problems Marriage Love
Companionship Problems on the Job Law Suits Fear of
going to jail Help with education and exams
You owe it to yourself and your loved ones
Readings free to New York and Canada
Open every day
Call now for an appointment Miami, FL 33127 7 am. o10pm
experiene 305-759-4126 813 NW 57St.


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P.
INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Establishedi Slne 953 One ot e i o eldet t Podlakic PcictI&
10 oe Csourc Over s Yeas of aChild Cor
., 4. '?W Mvwww.rozalynhpaschalmd.comn
NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave., Ste O50 660 N, State Rd. 7. Ste 3A
Miami, FL 33147 Phone: 305-758-0591 Plantation, FL 33317 Phone: 954-880-8399
JACKSON NORTH MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
(formesy Pnrlway Medical Plaza)
16800 NW 2 Ave. Ste. 203
N. Miamn Beach. FL 33169 Phone: 305-652-6095


MIAMI-DADE

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
ih Efri Ecedlence 't-ry Iahy




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
RATIFICATION OF EMERGENCY FINDINGS FOR WAIVER
OF FORMAL BIDS TO HIRE FIRM FOR CRITICAL
STRUCTURAL REPAIRS FOR CITY HALL
City Hall 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida






The Miami City Commission will hold a Pubiic Hearing on September 11th, 2008
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest
that the City Commission ratify, approve and confirm the Emergency Findings
of the City Manager justifying the waiver of competitive bids to hire Walter L.
Lista, Inc. for construction services for the City Hall Restoration Project in the
amount of $418,000.00.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of September 11t", 2008 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect
to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may-contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003158)


Project MCC-O-013-A, MIA Building 707 Miscellaneous Repairs
Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for the following project at MiamiDade Aviation Department.

Project MCC-O-013-A, MIA Building 707 Miscellaneous Repairs: Removal of carpet & base, painting of
doors and hallways and column protection to include demo, concrete and miscellaneous metals: Pkg. "A"
Column Protection, Concrete, Demo & Metals (CSBE), Pkg. "B" Painting (CSBE), Pkg. "C" Carpet & Base
(CSBE).

Plans cost: $25.00 Refundable upon return of the plans.

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Thursday, Sept 11, 2008 @ 10:OAM,
Bid Opening: Thurs., Sept. 18, 2008 @ 2:00PM
Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".
For more information, call Ginny or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444.


THE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF MIAMI BEACH

NOTICE OF OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE WAITING LISTS FOR THE
HOUSING ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Starting on Wednesday, September 17, 2008, the Housing Authority of the
City of Miami Beach (HACMB) will open its waiting lists for the following
programs:
Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher
Section 8 Project-Based Harding Village
Section 8 Project-Based Shindler
Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Blackstone Apartments
Section 8 New Construction Rebecca Towers North
Public Housing Rebecca Towers South

Pre-applications will be published within the Metro Section of the Miami
Herald and El Nuevo Herald newspapers, and the Miami Times newspaper on
Wednesday, September 17, 2008.

Pre-applications must be mailed via U. S. Postal Service regular or Certified
mail only. Pre-applications must be postmarked by the waiting list closing
date of Monday, September 22, 2008. Pre-applications must be received at
the HACMB no later than Friday, October 3, 2008. Pre-applications must be
mailed to the HACMB, ATTN: Pre-applications, 200 Alton Road, Miami Beach,
FL 33139. Any application received after October 3, 2008 or postmarked after
September 22, 2008 will be considered void. HACMB will not be responsible
for any error or late mail delivery by the U. S. Postal Service.


MIAMI- I

LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING EXPRESSIONS OF
INTEREST-FOUR DEVELOPMENT SITES AT MIAMI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
PROJECT NO. EOI-01-08
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department is announcing the availability of the above referenced Expressions of Interest document (EOI),
which can be obtained by visiting our Website at:
www.miamiairport.com/html/business-opportunities.html (in order to view the full EOI document, please select "Advertisements"
link, at the bottom of the Business Opportunities page and then select the respective project).
INVESTMENT SITES: Miami-Dade County's Aviation Department (MDAD) is soliciting responses to the Expressions of Interest (E0I)
from developers/investors for the development of four investment sites at Miami International Airport (MIA).
The four investment sites are located in areas adjacent to MIA's Central Boulevard which is the main public entranceway to the Terminal
Building. These investment sites are:
1) Area "A," commonly known as "Central Base," is a 25 +/- acre site. If an investor/developer chooses, the site may be
subdivided into an 8+/- acre parcel that currently consists of a surface parking area; if this option is chosen, the
investor/developer will not have any future development rights to the remaining 17 acres. MDAD is not mandating what
type of development should go on this site; however, preliminary feedback from interested parties indicates that a
conference center hotel may be ideal for this site. Also, MDAD will not consider any proposals regarding fixed-based
operations (FBO) for this site.
2) Area "B" is an 8 +/- acre site adjacent to NW 20 Street and is designated for the development of a new retail service plaza.
3) Area "C" is the designated new hotel site and is comprised of a 3 +/- acre area that straddles the access lanes to the
parking garages (the "New Hotel Site").
4) Area "D" is the existing in-terminal hotel located at Concourse "E". The hotel has undergone several renovations; however,
extensive renovations are still required including meeting Miami-Dade County Building codes compliance. Currently, Area
D is the existing 252-room, in-terminal MIA Hotel site that may also include three floors of adjoining office space currently
occupied by MDAD.
All other applicable rules, procedures, regulations applicable to privately-funded projects on airport properties will apply. See Exhibit D
of the EOldocument for the applicable lobbying rules.


DESTINY I


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN I


rN fw a. 0


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 3-9, 2008. .








13LACKS MlUST CONTROL THELIR OWVN DELSTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, SEPTEMBER 5-9, 2008


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated teContent 0-



Available from Commercial News.providers
... ........


4b 4b ":.:.: 4M I.:: m .W: ---I


~'{f26jofI /63 wees vm
Call: 305-694-6210 Fax: 305-694-6211


SHEYES OF MIAMI
LEARNING CENTER

Serving our community for 26 years.
Free VPK. Safe environment, qualified teachers,
after care. We also utilize The Creative
Curriculum. Special! One Week free and any
additional week when you bring-a friend

SHEYESIGILBERTS
3038 N.W. 48 Terrace
305-634-6268

SHEYES OF MIAMI LEARNING CENTER #1
6043 N.W. 6 Court
305-758-7167

SHEYES OF MIAMI LEARNING CENTER #3
4801 N.W. 7 Ave
305-754-4087
Effective August through September 30, 2008


-INU
C CONNEi. K~


:4":# %4 .04 K CAW
Aw WN Uw men % *%A A44 'k %bm "I a I


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The City of Miami Commission will hold its first public hearing in connection
with the City of Miami Fiscal Year 2008-2009 Budget on Thursday, September
11, 2008 at 5:05 p.m. A second public hearing regarding same is tentatively
scheduled to be held on Thursday, September 25, 2008 at 5:05 p.m. Said
meetings will take place in the City Commission Chamber located at City Hall,
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact
the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2)
business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than
three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk



(#003159)
(#003159)


September 2-15, 2008
9:30 am 4:30 pm
Tues Fri
945 Pennsylvania Ave
2nd Floor
Miami Beach, FL



OPPORTUNITY


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANYPERSONWHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OREXPENSESFORCONDUCTING
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR
TO ENGAGING IN LOBBYINGACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDSAND COMMITTEES OR THE
CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF
THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA,
33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE
HELD ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2008, AT 9:00 A.M., IN ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN
DRIVE, THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO THE
REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTS,
RESCINDING RESOLUTION NO. R-08-0049 WHICH ACCEPTED THE PLAT ENTITLED
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI PAC CRB SITE, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, AND
FURTHER DIRECTING THE CITY MANAGER TO RELEASE THE LETTER OF CREDIT,
IN THEAMOUNT OF $127,773.00, POSTED FOR THE SUBDIVISION IMPROVEMENTS
AT UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI PAC CRB SITE.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works Department, Survey and
Land Records Section of the Construction Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 41th Floor, during regular
working hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be. present or represented at this meeting and
are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk




(#003157)


MIAMI-DADE


ANNUAL LOCAL BUSINESS
TAX RENEWAL NOTICE
(Formerly known as the Occupational License)
Notice Is hereby given, that all businesses operating in
Miami-Dade County are required to renew or purchase a
Local Business Tax Receipt for Fiscal Year 2008-2009 during
the period of July 1, 2008 through September 30, 2008.
Receipts not renewed by September 30th, are delinquent and subject
to a penalty of ten percent (10%) for the month of October, plus an
additional five percent (5%) each, for the months of November,
December and January. Additional penalties (of up to $250), citations,
civil actions and prior year assessments may be added for taxpayers
that are delinquent for over 150 days and businesses found operating
without having registered with the Tax Collector's Office.
To pay on-line, download a business tax application, or to get
more information, please visit the Tax Collector's website at
www.miamidade.gov/taxcollector
Or visit one of our two locations:
Downtown Miami South Dade Government Center
140 West Flagler Street, Room 101 10710 SW 211th Street, Room 104
Miami, Florida 33130 Cutler Bay, Florida 33189
Office Hours: Monday Friday 8:00 5:00 pm, excluding legal holidays
Telephone: (305) 270 4949


k rs smm &mow &" o db qv lk I %4 f6w mft v --mmloo ma oid*:p % %




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs