Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00552
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: June 25, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00552
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text




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DISTRIBUTED IN M I A MI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS


One Family Serving Since 1923




Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


Volume 85 Number 39 i .. : 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)



Obama addresses national Mayors Conference

Senator vows to squash Bush foreclosure legislation


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The Democratic nomination was
just the beginning of the journey
for Sen. Barack Obama. Now,
there is another mountain,, to
climb. In his quest for the White
House, Obama shared his vision
for mayors in what would be his
presidency to hundreds of mayors
gathered last Saturday at the 76th
Annual U.S. Conference of Mayors
at the Intercontinental Hotel in
downtown Miami.
"You need a partner in the White
House. Now is not the time for
small planes but it is a time for
bold actions," said Obama.
Obama promised mayors he
would push a bill that would


assist homeowners who are
facing foreclosure. The bill,
which President George W. Bush
has threatened to veto, would
permit the federal government to
guarantee $300 billion in loans
allowing homeowners who were
unable to pay their mortgages
to refinance their investment.
Obama's plan seeks to lessen
the foreclosure crisis burden
for mayors, who represented
cities where foreclosures are a
dominating issue for residents.
"I will fight to overturn his veto
and make sure you have the
support you need," Obama said.
In his speech, Obama explained
the importance and role of a
mayor.
Please turn to MAYORS 6A


Are town hall meetings a waste of time? {


NAACP, MMAP, Jordan
Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

In the past three months,
Miami-Dade County leaders
and members of the com-
munity have assembled for
several town hall meetings to
discuss the problems that are
troubling our neighborhoods.
Each time, residents leave the


Grove bring few results
meetings the same way they
came: with no results.
"I call these meetings Feel
Better Meetings (FBM)," said
.Georgia Ayers, executive
director of the Alternative
Programs, Inc., which helps
find suitable options instead


of prison.
Bishop
pastor of


Victor T. Curry,
New Birth Baptist


Church .Cathedral of Faith
International, moderated a
long-awaited NAACP town
hall meeting with Miami-


AYERS DUNN


Dade Mayor Carlos Alvarez
and County Manager George
Burgess in which residents
of the community were able
to share their problems and
concerns. Some of the major
problems that residents
brought to the mayor's
attention were the on-going
issues at the Miami-Dade
Corrections Department
regarding Director Tim Ryan
Please turn to TOWN HALL 6A


School Board embarrasses self, cuts jobs


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The pouring rain could not stop the
circus from coming to town and making
a grand performance last Wednesday at
.the Miami-Dade School Board meeting.
The board and concerned members of the
community gathered for another round of
discussions on budget cuts. Although the
meeting was no laughing matter, board


members continued throughout the af-
ternoon and into early Thursday in frivo-
lous debates with each other.
In an overcrowded auditorium, the
audience laughed as Chairman Agustin
Barrera of District 6 repeated the same
words throughout the night, "Ms. Logan,
you are not being heard at this time. "
A frustrated Ana Rivas Logan of District
7 sought answers from the board and the
administration staff. "We are currently


utilizing salaries out of the Capital. If
the money is coming out of the operation
budget, then it is a huge concern to me.
If we have to take money from our reserve
then we are in the red and overspending.
The reserve is the money that we have
saved for emergencies, so I will not be ac-
cepting any items that use Capital dol-
lars for salaries."
As Barrera tried to interrupt her, they
Please turn to CUTS 6A


Board members share mixed feelings on Crew


Holloway defends Crew's leadership, blames
state for budget shortfall concerns


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@@miamitimesonline.com

If there was ever a time for
Miami-Dade Schools Superin-
tendent Rudy Crew to hide un-
der a rock, now would be it. In
the midsts of making intense
budget cut decisions affecting
workers in our communities,
Crew is being outcast by mem-
bers of the school board and
questioned about his tenure




Democrats

show support

Columbus, Ohio Mayor Michael
B. Coleman, Atlanta Mayor
Shirley Franklin,Trenton, N.J.,
Mayor Douglas Palmer, South-
field, Michigan Mayor Brenda
L. Lawrence and Tallahassee
Mayor John Marks share their
support for Barack Obama's
presidential bid.

-MiamiTimes photo


as superintendent.
Last Wednesday, during the
heated school board meeting,
board member Renier Diaz de
la Portilla brought up the issue
of Crew's salary and bonus.
Even though it was not on the
agenda for the meeting, Diaz
de la Portilla was not going to
let the issue rest. He continued
by debating with his colleague,
board member Solomon Stin-
son.


WEDNESDAY


Weather a
Forecast


88TF 78F
SCATTERED T-STORMS


Stinson refused to return
any calls regarding this mat-
ter.
Further, Diaz de la Portilla


HOLLOWAY CREW

contacted the board attorney
on Thursday, seeking an ex-


THURSDAY



89'F 79'F
PM T-STORMS


FRIDAY



90'F 79T
ISOLATED ITSTORMS


planation on the legal defini-
tions of gross insubordination,
incompetence and neglect of
duty -- which would constitute
grounds for
Crew's dis-
missal. Since
then, Diaz de
S la Portilla has
spearheaded
the sought-
after ouster of
Crew.
LOGAN "This is to-
tally inappro-
priate and unfair to the board
Please turn to CREW 9A


SATURDAY



88F 78T
ISOATID T-STORMS


SUNDAY



88F 77F
ISOLATED T-STORMS


'j -f_ A P --
-Miami Times photo Tony Brooks

. At the

Mayors Conference

Mayor L. Douglas Wilder former Virginia Governor takes a break
from the Mayors Conference to catch up on community news in The
Miami Times.



Sen. Obama leading


polls in South Florida

Democrat leads McCain by 16 points


If you thought the nation's
largest swing state would be a
cake walk for the Republican
Party in the November Presi-
dential Election you might have
another thought coming.
A new Zogby International
poll shows that
Barack Obama
is sitting on a
16-point lead
over John Mc-
Cain in South
Florida and
has a slight
edge among OBAa
Hispanics.
Obama is
ahead 46-30 percent over Mc-
Cain in Miami-Dade, Broward
and Palm Beach counties in the
survey.
The surprising showing of
strength in this area has served
noticed that Democrats and es-
pecially Hispanics are ready to
make a move in the party.
Obama's three-day swing


MONDAY



88"F 77T
ISOLATED T-STRMS


through Florida last month
helped him take in nearly $1.6
million in May more than
twice what he raised statewide
in April, according to reports
filed last week with the Federal
Election Commission. McCain
collected $1.4 million in May,
compared to nearly $1.1 million
in April.
About 24 percent of South
Floridian favor
another candi-
date or haven't
made up their
minds a
large group
that could tip
the race in
the coming
McCAIN months.
Obama's cam-
paign began a strong television
advertising push in this area
last week giving viewers a better
idea about his campaign and the
move seems to be paying off.
Please turn to POLLS 6A

IESDAY



IF 77T
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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Church provides a

lesson in giving
At a time when controversial and in some cases
criminal pastors make headlines, it is truly uplifting
to see what has taken place at Church by the Glades
in Coral Springs.
The concept seems surprising but simple: Pastor David
Hughes announced a "Go Big" campaign, in which the church
gave out more than $40,000 over six services, in envelopes
holding various amounts of money. Worshipers were asked to
spend the money on people in need.
The results, as reported by James D. Davis in the South
Florida Sun-Sentinel, have been nothing less than inspiring.
The money has been used to pay the utility bills for a
hospitalized mother of four. Single mothers have received
diapers. One worshiper gave the entire contents of her
envelope -$10- to her neighborhood trash collector, who said
he would use the money to take his child out to lunch.
More than 330 congregants from throughout the area have
given feedback on mygobigstory.com, telling what they did
when they got the envelopes and explaining the heartwarming
pleasure received by the act of giving. Some worshipers have
even added money to the amounts given out by Hughes. And
the results have been gratifying for everyone.
"Churches so often ask people to be generous with us,"
Hughes was quoted as saying. "We thought it would be fun to
turn the tables."
Indeed, the gesture no matter the amount has turned into
a blessing for all concerned. One congregant even said that if
every church and synagogue and mosque did this once a year,
it could change the world.
For sure, it would change lives, for the better. Which would
be a big step in the right direction. -Sun Sentinel

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Burgess dealings worth closer scrutiny


Dear Editor:
I read the Spreading Larceny
section in this week's Miami
Times and it seems that you
are in agreement with the
article written by the Miami
Herald titled, "Dade mayor's
aide mixes private, public
roles." You know better
than anyone that the Miami
Herald is very objective until


election time and then their
subjectivity rears its ugly
head. It is interesting how
the Herald jumps all over this
story which is nothing more
than novice misstep, but they
were silent when it came to
reporting how George Burgess'
drove this community in the
ground with his lack oversight
and his thousands of back
door deals that only enriched a


select few.
At the town hall meeting with
the NAACP, there were several
former employees that made a
case that they were unjustly
terminated from their position
with Miami-Dade County. Mr.
Gazitua was instrumental
in reviewing files and getting
many of those employees their
jobs. back with Miami-Dade
County. That's more than I can


say for many in this County
government.
Considering the long
standing reputation that
The Miami Times has in this
community; it should definitely
exercise more caution.
Thank you for your time.
A.J. Melton, President
Progressive Correctional
Officers Association, Miami


Public gathering, public grounds, so speak English


Dear Editor;
How disappointing it was
to read the letter to the editor
about the Spanish MC who
refused to speak English at a
public gathering, held on public
grounds, where community
Senior Citizens from all walks
of life were invited to this public
program; yet no effort was


made to present the program
in both English and Spanish.
Even the Mayor's request for a
translation of the program was
disregarded. How disappointing
Disappointing mainly because
our recent immigrants know
nothing about the sweat and
agony that went into the
development of the Arcola Lakes
Park sweat and agony that


many Black neighbors in the
Arcola Lakes area had to endure
to obtain the park. And now,
to be insulted by such arrogance
and ignorance, is not very
neighborly at all. The Mayor
needs to assure all of the public
that in the future such a person
will never be allowed to act as
a mistress of anything held on
public property.


More importantly, the Mayor
must be held accountable for
his actions, especially since he
wants to considered a "Strong
Mayor" and the community
must continue to be vigilant in
its effort to address issues of
this type.
Fernley A. Murray
Miami


aibe fliamt Ii~mers
I ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly al 900 NW 541h Streel
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Pc-oi Onice Box 2702,00
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Phone 305-69-4-621l
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
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The Blact Pre~s belleves lrha Ameri,'-a can best lead Ire world from racial and rdlional aniagOnism wrien it accords io
.'eary person regardless ol irae c ree-d or :c.lor hi: or h.r ruman and legal rignls Haling no person. laaring no person the
Blac. Pre'i 'lnves 10o help every person in ihe irm relief Inal .all persons are hnurt as long as anyone is held back

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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


BY REGINALD CLYNE

Class comes through


Kafsr .'r Dr i~nk% dral %wwh t %.- a lchmtf"new


My momma use to say that
you can always tell people that
have it, and you can always tell
those that don't class. Sena-
tor Obama with all of the other
democrat candidates agreed
not to campaign in Florida and
Michigan, because those states
had violated DNC rules and
moved up their primary dates.
Senator Obama did not even put
his name on slate in Michigan.
Hilary made the same promise
and when she was courting New
Hampshire and Iowa voters she
told them she would not cam-
paign in Florida and Michigan.
Now, that she is losing she wants
those delegates counted. When
Obama is a mere 40 delegates
away from winning the nomina-
tion, and ahead in popular vote,
the DNC changes the rules and


counts the two re-
bellious states. He
does not protest
when the goal post
is moved back. He
does not protest when she gets
more delegates in states where
he did not campaign. Sena-
tor Clinton who is given a huge
boosts is crying before the dele-
gates have been awarded. She is
protesting the stealing of 5 del-
egates. She is also beginning to
trumpet that she won the popu-
lar vote. There are not many
policy differences between the
candidates, but the differ in very
definable personality traits one
has it and the other doesn't. It
is something indefinable, but
clearly shown by their demean-
or. It is simply class. Obama
has it, Clinton does not.


~- 0

rz.0:7d 00b40IO41S4


A time to believe


Last week, I attended the
Florida Bar Conference. I had
an interesting and heated
discussion among a group of
black lawyers, some of whom
were ardent Senator, Clinton
supporters. What struck me
most was that they said that
Barack Obama could not win
and that we should put our horse
behind Senator Clinton. What
struck me was that educated
black people will not accept a
simple truth. Barack Obama
beat Hillary Clinton. Despite her
initial lead in Super Delegates
and money due to her 8 years of
developing relationships as the
wife of the President, Barack
Obama beat her in the number
of Super Delegates, Pledged
Delegates and most important
he outr fundraised her. He is
now leading in the national polls
by between 4% and 10%.
One friend said that it is time
for us to give up our fear, to
give up our inability to dream
and believe that a black man
will make another first in
this country and become its
President. In my lifetime, I have
me the first black female senator
of the United States, the first
black female federal judge, first
black Chief of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, the first black motorcycle
police officer in Miami Dade


County, first Black female state
representative, first black law
graduate of the University of
Miami, etc.
Our race has continued to
achieve the unachievable and
now it is time to believe that a
man, who is qualified, intelligent
and committed to this country
can become its President despite
the fact that his skin is black.
We have a role in this history
making. We can make our
donations of whatever amount
that we can afford from $5.00
to $2,300.00. We can volunteer
in this campaign by registering
voters, helping drive friends to
the polls, and most importantly
exercising the right that our
forefathers died to give us vote.
In the past the average turn-
out for Presidential elections is
72%. The average black voter
turn out is only 60%. If we
turn out, then Barack Obama
can win Florida. In States with
with large black voter turn out,
Obama has won.
At this time, stop making
up excuses, register to vote,
get everyone in your home
registered to vote, restore your
voting rights if you lost them,
and let's show our children
that we were among the voters
that elected the first African
American President.


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Local political observers feel that Gov. Charlie Christ lost a lot of
followers when he caved in and joined John McCain in backing his
position in favor of offshore drilling. Give Charlie a break; the man
has a shot at being vice president. Stay tuned.


People are beginning to feel that Barack Obama is winning his
way into the hearts and minds of a lot of people who did not take his
candidacy seriously in the first place. The presumptive presidential
candidate used his address at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Mi-
ami to shore up support for a $300 billion foreclosure bailout and
curry favor with civic leaders from around the country.


Many observers feel the Miami-Dade School Board members are
trying to get rid of one the best superintendents we ever had. Rudy
Crew has done an excellent job in turning around a failing system
into a successful one. Board member Diaz de la Portilla had bet-
ter wise up.


A lot of citizens are having second thoughts as to whether they
should spend $500 million of public money to build a $600 mil-
lion baseball stadium to be owned by the Marlins President David
Samson. And why won't Samson disclose his financial statement?
Stay tuned.


Floridians are not rid of former Gov. Jeb Bush. Hoping to in-
vigorate a national dialogue on vouchers, charter schools and
accountability, Jeb convened an educational summit at Disney
World last week that drew a heavily conservative crowd. Brother
George W. sent U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings as
the keynote speaker.


Local attorney Christopher Norwood found out last weekend
that being arrested for driving under the influence is not the best
way to launch his campaign for the District 109 state House seat
being vacated by Rep. Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall who cannot
run again because of term limits.


Nobody has mentioned it, but is that the new Department of Im-
migration building going up on NW 7th Avenue and 91st Street?
We thought that spot had been reserved for an auto mall. Stay
tuned.


. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it. they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action . .
Malcolm X


Iduitaemon n far bIttifhan i wtvmn (41 a ob


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4A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JUL 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Celebrate FREE Sundays
at Vizcaya Museum and Gardens
IUNE 29 JtUL' 27 AUGUST 31



"I...
n ta.j=, . . :_~ .! . .. .


Vizcaya, Miami's National Historic Landmark
on Biscayne Bay, opens its gates free of charge
on the last Sundays of June, July and August.
Join us for free talks, tours, and family
art-making activities.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.vizcayamuseum.org or call 305-250-9133


VIZCAYA
MUSEUM & GARDENS
3251 South Miami Avenue
Between Brickell Avenue and Coconut Grove


I 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


OWN DESTINY


BLACKS NWSl' CONTROL THEIR


11 11 11 I I


.


ffia









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JUL 1, 2008


Few actions taken on promises


made at town hall meetings


TOWN HALL
continued from 1A

and alleged favoritism toward
certain corrections employees.
Director Ryan has been
accused of favoring white
and Hispanic employees and
discriminating against Black
ones.
Neither Bishop Curry nor
Ryan returned numerous
phone calls by The Times
seeking comment
After the meeting, problems
continued to fester with
employees and inmates.
According to published reports,
more inmates are being abused
and mistreated and have been
denied their legal counsel and
Black employees are losing
their positions for violating the
uniform policy which requires
them to have no braids.
Frustrated employees
scheduled a private meeting
with Mayor Alvarez and
Burgess with the NAACP
in attendance. Bringing to
light all the things that have
allegedly been kept in the
dark, Mayor Alvarez listened
to corrections employees'
accounts. He vowed to get
back to them within 30 days of
the May 12 meeting. After 30
days, no resolution regarding
alleged discrimination has
been adopted.
According to reports obtained
from Miami-Dade Corrections
employees, Ryan has been
seeking employment elsewhere
as more inmates continue to be
neglected and more employees
fall victim to discrimination.
On March 2003, he left Santa
Clara County Jail in San Jose,
Calif., following a tenure that
reportedly included escapes
by inmates two of whom
were convicted child molesters
- and a prison melee.
"Nothing has changed. I still
don't understand how could
Miami-Dade hire someone
who has a record of leaving


when things get rough," said
Walter Clarke, president
of Special Consultant for
African-American Government
Employees Inc.
Corrections employees
attended the town hall meetings
and voiced their concerns.
Many have argued that if no
changes are being made then
why waste the time and space
of having residents attend
these two-hour meetings.

WORDS BACKED
UP WITH ACTIONS
The Rev. Richard Dunn,
president of People United to
Lead the Struggle for Equality
(PULSE), held a town hall
meeting last month at the
Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church in which
committees were formed to
tackle various problems,
including youth violence, that
the area Black community
faces.
"We want to go past the feel-
good message. In order to not
make it a feel-good message, we
are forming committees with
volunteers who want to see
communities expand outside
the walls of violence," said Rev.
Dunn.
With the support of
Commissioner Aubrey
Edmonson's office, PULSE
helps many young people
obtain summer jobs, one of
the promises made at the town
hall meeting. According to
Edmonson, teenagers have been
employed in various agencies
such as Miami-Dade Parks and
Recreation, Community Action
Agency, MGM Construction,
Contractors Resource Center
and Adult Mankind.
"PULSE has been known for
producing the best follow-up.
We are known for our long-term
results. Many people think that
when we have meetings like
these that change is supposed
to happen the next hour or
day. Long-term results will not


Board moves to cut 450 additional jobs


CUTS
continued from .1A

entered into a debate about the
board rules. "You can't close
the debate, if a member wishes
to speak. Your conduct is of a
dictator," said Logan.
Solomon Stinson of District
2 scolded Logan saying, "Not
only are you disrespecting the
chair but you are wasting my
time."
Another feud erupted be-
tween Stinson and board mem-
ber Renier Diaz de la Portilla.
After Stinson denied Diaz de la
Portilla the right to comment
on Board Superintendent Rudy
Crew's $70,000 bonus, he ac-
cused Stinson of trying to take
on the roll as chairman.
Board member Wilbert "Tee"
Holloway commented, "This
was certainly disrespectful be-
havior of several members of,
the board toward our leaders
and the members of our com-
munity. Frankly, I am embar-
rassed by their behavior but
the majority of the board be-
haved in a professional man-
ner."
The board gave an embar-
rassing display and many be-
lieved that its behavior was
inappropriate at a time when
employee jobs and school pro-
grams are on the line.

SAVE OUR JOBS
In the midsts of bickering,
district employees, parents
and teachers approached the
board with their pleas to save
their jobs.
Greg Allen, a representative
for Miami-Dade Schools bus
drivers, gave a heart wrenching
plea to the board. "I am here
to advise you to reconsider
laying off bus drivers. These
people are living paycheck to
paycheck and their children
are being affected. We are a
paycheck away from being
homeless."
"Over the past four years,
violent crimes in Dade County
schools have decreased. We


are part stake holders of Dade
County. We just want to know
that our positions are secured,"
said John Smith, Sergeant
of Miami-Dade School Police
Department.
"Teachers, in spite of the
obstacles that they face daily
in their jobs, help prepare
students for the real world. Do
whatever you have to do but
don't let go of the teacher. If
you are finding money for your
salary then you can surely find
money for the teacherss" said
Helen B. Williams, candidate for
Miami-Dade Mayor, referring to
some board members' reported
requests for salary increases.
Catherine McKham, a school
psychologist, spoke to the school
board about the importance of
her job. "School psychologists
are experts that diagnose our
children. Classroom teachers
do not have the expertise to
handle kids with problems and
behaviors,"

DECISIONS ARE MADE WITH
MORE CUTS
In hearing the proposal for
new equipment for the Office
of Inspector General, board
member Evelyn Langlieb Greer
said, "You can understand why
we can't buy you equipment
right now. We just laid off 1,600
people and tonight we will be
laying off more people. We can
find you furniture but buying
new furniture is not necessary. I
don't think that it is a good time
... to buy ... office equipment at
this time."
Though Greer argued against
it, the board voted to increase
the budget for the district's
Inspector General's Office to
$225,000, which includes seven
new staff members and four
vehicles. They also approved the
department's $1.5 million budget
for 2008-2009. "I have some
major investigations underway,"
Inspector General Christopher
Mazzella said.
The board pushed forward
on the decision to advertise on
school property. They decided to
make school psychologists and


exceptional-student education
specialists 10-month, rather
than 12-month, employees.
At the end of the night, in a
5 to 4 vote, the board agreed to
remove hundreds of additional
jobs which included: 317
central office employees, 75
physical education teachers,
30 teachers' assistants and 28
assistant principals. Now, the
total number of jobs cut is more
than 2,000.
The elimination of certain
transportation services did not
pass, which means 117 bus
drivers will not lose their jobs.
"We still have a $284 million
cut to make. As difficult as it is,
we have to cut the baby in half.
I would love to keep everybody
employed but it is not possible,"
said District 1 representative
Wilbert "Tee" Holloway.


In light of "Dump the Pump Day," which encourages motorists to
ride public transit instead of driving their vehicles to work or school,
is public transportation a suitable alternative for you?


come tomorrow. It is important
to know that it is going to take
time to uproot the things that
are deep rooted," said Rev.
Dunn.
"I think that people are more
motivated now with the issues
that are occurring in our
neighborhood," said Nathaniel
J. Wilcox, executive director of
PULSE, regarding involvement
in the summer job program.

TOWN HALL MEETINGS ARE
NOTA WASTE OF TIME
Rick Beasley, executive
director of South Florida
Workforce, argues that town
hall meetings such as Metro-
Miami Action Plan Trust
(MMAP) held earlier this month
provide important information
to the people in the community.
At the recent MMAP meeting,
Beasley was disappointed
with 'the lack of residents in
attendance.
"One of the problems that I
have with the Black Community
is that we want things to be
given to us. I can show you
where the water is but I can't
make you drink it. Although
it was being broadcast on the
radio, the turnout could have
been better. I am thankful
for organizations like MMAP
that continue to provide the
information necessary to the
community," said Beasley.

NO MORE WAITING
Ayers has decided to continue
the fight for change on her
own and partner with former
Congresswoman Carrie Meek
and other local officials.
"We are in danger. We are not
safe anywhere we go. I have
designated Miami as a city in
complete chaos. I applaud what
they are trying to do but it is a
mouth say-so and not a do say-
so. After the meetings, I don't
hear anything from anyone. I
am not going to sit around and
talk anymore. It is time to walk
towards change," said Ayers.


ANTHONY BELL, 24
Entrepreneur, Liberty City

"A lot of peo-
ple are going
to have to start
riding the bus
because [the
cost] is too
high for every-
body. You will
definitely see
more people parking their cars
at home. The only ones that will
probably be driving are those
who have a longer commute to
work so their best option is to
drive. The price of transit has
no significance compared to the
gas prices."

HERMILE DELVA, 45
Unemployed, Little River

"I wouldn't
ride public
transporta-
tion. I don't
mind putting
gas in my car
and besides, I
don't have time
to sit and wait
on any bus."


Clinton supporters swing


POLLS
continued from 1A

Obama was perceived as be-
ing behind in Florida because
he did not campaign in the
state for nine months and lost
the Democratic primary to Hil-
lary Clinton. But two statewide
polls released last week showed
him with a narrow edge over
McCain.
The Zogby poll was conduct-
ed June 18-20, just as Obama's
first television ads in South
Florida went on the air.
South Florida traditionally
votes Democratic, but Obama's
lead in Miami-Dade is wider


than the narrow margin of vic-
tory posted by 2004 Democrat-
ic nominee John Kerry.
Among Hispanics in the three
counties, Obama leads McCain
40 to 35 percent. Until the tide
started to turn against the Re-
publican Party in 2006, His-
panics in Florida have long fa-
vored the GOP.
Obama's lead in the poll sug-
gests he is winning over sup-
porters of Hillary Clinton, who
won handily in South Florida
and in the Hispanic commu-
nity in the Jan. 29 presidential
primary. McCain won the His-
panic vote in the Republican
primary.


MARCHELLE HARRON, 46
Retired, Miami Gardens

"It depends

are. I only go
to church and
home. I don't
need to get on
a bus at all.
Besides, it is
more conve-
nient to drive my own car. Now,
if gas prices go up to $6, then
I will definitely be taking the
bus."

LAGNEAU JAONCH, 30
Security Guard, Miami Gardens

"I am sav-
ing a lot of
money by tak-
ing the bus.
The buses are
running in a
timely order. I
am not worry-
ing about gas,
insurance, or car payments.
The increase in fares is not a big
deal to me at all."


Hubert and Adell Edwards

Celebrating 50

years of marriage

Herbert and Adell Edwards
celebrated their 50th anniver-
sary on June 29th.


Dem. nominee stresses importance of family


MAYORS
continued from 1A

"The job of the mayor is to get
things done. It is the city hall
that we lean and call on to get
us through the hard times. It is
important to work in the local level
to bring about change. Change
comes from the bottom up not
the other way around. There are
so many mayors who are finding
new ways of strengthening our
communities. Strong regions are
the center for a strong America.
We need to stop seeing our cities
as problems but as solutions.
Promote strong cities as a
backbone for regional growth,"
Obama said.
Agreeing with Obama, Miami


-- - - - ---- -- -- -
GRACE ACADI)MY INTERNATIONAL
ANNOUNCES OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, June 28 Grace Academy International will hold its annual
Open House for prospective students from 11 a m to 6 p.m.
Private school opportunity grades 3 -12
NO FCATI ESE STUDENTS ARE WELCOME!
Limited space available
McKay Scholarship (free scholarship for ESE students
Florida Pride (for low Income families)
Grace Academy "Bridging the gap between education,
communities and success'
It's the open house of an enrichment center that will transform your
child's life forever
"Grace provides students with a quality education with an emphasis
on individual attention, plus the opportunity to participate in diverse
activities and service to others'
Free scholarships available to student grades 3-12.
13400 N.W. 28 Avenue Miami, Florida
For more information Call 305-751-5910


Are you Looking for an EXtraordinary School?
Are you a Teacher or Administrator affected by the recent layoffs? We are
looking for a few good Men and Women with a passion for educating our
children! If you are that person, Don't Delay Call Today. Positions are
limited!
EXcel Academy Charter Schools are currently enrolling students in grades
K-8 at both our South and North Dade locations. If you are looking for
smaller class sizes, excellent teachers an exciting learning environment,
then look NO further!!!
Our slots are going fast!!! Call (305) 635-5482 or (305) 572-1414 for an
application or visit 3575 Northwest 60"' Street in Miami!


Mayor and conference host Manny
Diaz said, "He is right. We see the
problems before everyone else."
Diaz did not endorse Obama's
candidacy for president.
Obama spoke highly of his
presidential opponent, Sen. John
McCain, R-Ariz., calling him a
true patriot but said, "Senator
John McCain's priorities are
different from mine and yours."
He discussed McCain's tax cuts
and his proposed gas tax, adding
that the tax would not benefit
Americans who labor daily.
The common issues affecting
cities over which the mayors
preside, besides the foreclosure
crisis, are the increases in high-
schooldropouts,homelessnessand
youth violence within their cities.


Obama called for the restoration
of family and education. "Change
starts in our homes. Instead of
building bridges to nowhere let's
find ways to help our families
and I insist that the White House
must tackle the issue of poverty in
our cities," said Obama. "Despite
the absence of leadership in
Washington, you are still seeing
a rebirth. Washington, state and
local governments cannot solve all
our problems."
Mayor Brenda L. Lawrence from
Southfield, Michigan was one of
the many mayors who stood in
support of Obama. "This is a man
that gets the role of the mayor.
Putting him in that position
as President will help us take
America to the next level."


MIAM

July 2008
COMMUNITY MEETING CALENDAR
Public Notice
FY 2009 Request for
Application Applicants
The Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED) is holding a
series of community meetings in Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Areas
(NRSAs).
These meetings allow the community to comment on the proposed FY 2009
Consolidated Planning Process Policies. At the meetings, County staff will give
an update on the FY 2009 Consolidated Planning Process. The proposed Policy
Paper contains information that includes the range of activities that may be
undertaken, in addition to the estimated amount of funding that will benefit low-
and moderate income persons and neighborhoods.
Some CACs will be making their Community Development Block Grant (CDBG)
Capital Improvement, Economic Development and Housing recommendations.
The meetings are open to the public.
TuedaJly1200,, .* .n e .a, IX2,2


6:00 pm District 2
MELROSE
MDTA AUDITORIUM
3300 N.W 32 Avenue


6:30 pm Districts 8 & 9
LEISURE CITYINARANJA
DHS Naranja Neighborhood Center
13955 S.W 264 Street


Multiple members of individual Community Councils may be present. Miami-Dade
County provides equal access and opportunity in employment and does
not discriminate on the basis of disability in its program or services. For
material in an alternate format, a sign language interpreter or other
accommodations, please call the Office of Community and Economic
Development at 769-469-2100 extension 2112 at least three (3) days in advance.


ANDREW AUSTELLE, 24
Student, Liberty City

"I think that
public trans-
portation is
much easier
than filling up
your car for
gas. By riding
the bus, I have
a huge advan-
tage because I don't have to pay
for gas, not worrying about car
payments and insurance, or
getting a decal. I am saving a
lot more. The transit hikes will
not make a big difference."

RODNEY CARSWELL, 36
Miami-Dade Parks employee, Liberty City

"Pub 1 ic
transportation
is more conve-
nient. You get
around more
and you have
more money
in your pocket.
Even though
the prices might go up for the
bus and trains, it doesn't mean
anything."






7A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


Jackson turns 90,

yet it's only the beginning.


-Ni netyvyears K-iL.c,11 -1 NI. i'. j-7 11 'City opia -petw Iits- doo-r in the M~idst ot tthe epkiic
that rrI. %mitb1'k, i;ti2ill )I R8- T11 e 110,;PitiIT,.T sPC~lIlle 1 d ead by ivic k lc :11-0 p Hit- '.M '~N. Ibwk-oi,
d\1~H .1ua vi mdlw-l cmra ~ia in iKlionrir. T 'i~ b...,~ sn~1 3-h1
h::aspiT.11 hb;. ; rrCIM11 I ntQ :1 "1 1 o 1'112 T 101 1]lIV r:I fl7.CJ l] nidica I Spqtrm of~irInM4'4"1 %L4sfwi& rcn ni~
carc to m, rc, lIrE CsxlVirippr(x.cLIItrr. -.As Nwc CdCIhraic -this pecicm1annivc:rsarv tod-1w nrIL I I`okC~t oioui rtrh
hit4':ry and! hum, ble b irn -1i[V wcwould1'ik-c to rhinak vou frcitL-ntnstillU uwl. nlcl:C:rlcLIs. W
Iriik- t-Omar~'td 1I.itnmIiui-, ore .TxLr~T-St Of rV11,jr the CO1T1T'h1L1rI i, 17b anIrntore abouitl' ,iI hCil11iS 1c: 17T1
visit www~ilsn-ii nil'org.
Only at, Jackson,


4,4


Jilt Itsu II Cio yjonW; o; H WN i wit on 10a


- -- --------


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8A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JUL 1, 2008
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--






Juneteenth celebration . .


Texas freed slaves 2 1/2 years too late


By Shirley McCoy
Special to The Miami Times

President Lincoln's Emanci-
pation Proclamation which had
become official January 1, 1863,
had little impact on the people
of Texas. That was because the
Union troops assigned there was
not able to enforce the new Exec-
utive order. 'Two and a half years
later, 'General Lee surrender in
April of 1865 and Major General
Gordon Granger entered Galves-
ton, Texas June 19, 1865. One
of his first orders of business
(General Order Number 3) was
to inform the people of Texas
that all slaves are free. This free-
dom involves an absolute equal-
ity of rights and rights of prop-
erty between former masters
and slaves Subsequently, the
connection between plantation
owners and slaves now becomes
employer and free laborer.


MANY STORIES
Explinations handed down
through the years to justify the
delay in Texas have generated
several stories. One version has
to do with the messenger who
was murdered while on his way
to Texas with the news of free-
dom. Another story has to do
with the slave masters who de-
liberately withheld the news from
the slaves in order to keep the
labor force on the plantations.
A third story had to do with the
federal troops who waited for the
slave owners to reap the profits
of one last cotton harvest before
going to Texas to enforce the
law. For whatever the reason,
Texas remained a slave state
two and a half years after the
Emancipation Proclamation was
prodaimed.

MANY CHALLENGES
The reactions to General
Granger's Order Number 3


ranged from bewilderment to
happiness. It opened avenues of
challenges for a new life. Some
former slave stayed to learn more
about the employer to employee
relationship; many left because
of their conditions on the planta-
tions; and some felt that leaving
the plantation was the first sign
of freedom. They traveled north
as a destination of true freedom.
Then there were those who de-
sired to reach family members in
neighboring states such as Loui-
siana, Arkansas and Oklahoma.
This brought on new challenges
of establishing a status of black
people in America.

JUNE 19,1865
Remembering the memories
of thai: historical day in June of
1865 served as motivation and
joy from the growing pressure
encountered in their new ter-
ritory as free men and women.
The celebration of June 19th


Loss of Tiger a mixed bag for golf


By Jerry Potter

Tiger Woods' misery might be-
come another player's pleasure
as the PGA Tour plays out the
season without the world's No. 1
golfer.
Woods will be absent while re-
covering from knee surgery to
repair a torn anterior cruciate
ligament, which means No. 2 Phil
Mickelson and a mixture of play-
ers will have the rest of the sea-
son to themselves.
"It's definitely an opportunity
for us," said Kenny Perry, who
won the Memorial after Woods
withdrew. "But the Tour will come
down a notch. It won't have near


the excitement he brings."
Woods, 32, has dominated since
he turned pro in 1996. This year,
he has won five of the seven tour-
naments he has played world-
wide, and nine of his last 12, in-
cluding the 2007 PGA Champion-
ship and the 2008 U.S. Open.
After his runner-up finish in
The Masters, he had arthroscop-
ic surgery on that left knee that
sidelined him until the U.S.
Open. In the eight weeks he was
out, Anthony Kim, 23, Sergio
Garcia, 28, and Perry, 47, each
grabbed the opportunity to earn
victories.
"The state of golf is pretty
good," said Arnold Palmer, who


led the tour into the TV era in the
1960s. "Tiger's absence will have
an adverse effect, but we will car-
ry on."
Tour officials are seeking posi-
tives.
"You can look at this a num-
ber of ways," said Ty Votaw, the
Tour's vice president. "TV ratings
are one thing, but to focus on
that is shortsighted."
Votaw noted Woods plays 18 of
about 47 Tour events each year,
though the ones he plays get
about double the TV ratings.
He's an international celeb-
rity, and his absence will be felt
among people who follow golf just
to follow him.


was called 'Juneteenth" and
grew with the participation
from descendants. This was a
time to gather family members
for reassurance with prayer. It
continued to be remembered in
Texas decades later with many
former slaves and descendants
making an annual trip back to
Galveston on June 19th
Beginning in the early 1900's,
there was a decline in June-
teenth activities and participa-
tion due to economic and cul-
tural forces. Classroom edu-
cation in lieu of family taught
practices hindered the interest
of youth about slavery. History
textbooks include the Emanci-
pation Proclamation but little or
nothing on the impact of Gen-
eral Granger and other stories
of our struggle for freedom.


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008

Holloway defends Crew's leadership,

blames Legislature for budget woes


CREW
continued from 1A

members, superintendent Crew,
and members of the communi-
ty," said board member Wilbert
"Tee" Holloway. "Crew's bonus
is not even up for consideration
at this time. As procedure,
Crew submitted his objectives
for next school year three days
before the ending of the school
year. He gave us his objectives
before the school board meeting
on Wednesday. It is nothing to
consider right now. At the end of
the school year, we are required
to evaluate him. We have not
even reached that point. One
of our members jumped on the
opportunity to posture himself
to the community."
"During the 06/07 school year
Crew overspent and had to dip
into the reserves to cover the
shortfall. We had no cuts that
year. This year, it appears that
he is once again on his way to
closing in the red. One must live
within their means and he does
not do that," said board member
Ana Rivas Logan. "We approve
items and give direction and he
does not follow through. I know
that several of my items have
passed and to this day he has
not implemented them. During
the [Miami] Northwestern [Se-
nior High] investigation it was
clear that he violated our board
rule. The Northwestern investi-
gation was the scandal where
the star football athlete was al-
lowed to play the winning game
although there were allegations
of rape on school campus on a
minor. The superintendent and
his staff were heavily involved
in this decision. The principal
has been indicted and is await-
ing trial. Our Board Rules re-
garding this incident are very
clear and were not followed."
When asked if the board could
survive another budget crisis
under Crew's leadership, Ri-
vas Logan plainly said, "No. He
has consistently closed the fis-


cal year in the red and dipped
into the reserves to balance the
budget. This figure is carried
forward to the following year. In
the past, he was able to survive
based on the booming economy,
hence the increase in revenues
from the next year. However, we
are looking at some lean years
coming up based on the econo-
my and his practice of passing
the expenditures forward to the
next year will severely impact
an already lean budget. This
practice is not only poor fiscal
management, it is devastating
for a system that depends on
its revenues from an economy
in recession."
Holloway disagreed with Lo-
gan and defended Crew. "The
state has recommended less
money to our school districts.
We have had these severe cuts
because we don't have enough
money coming from the state.
One man should not take the
blame for something that 1he
has no control over," said Hol-
loway.
Crew is currently in the fourth
year of his contract, which runs
through the 2009-10 school
year, and pays him $325,000,
with an estimated bonus of
$70,000, plus other incentives.
He was paid $295,000 in his
first year, $305,000 in his sec-
ond year and $315,000 in his
third year.
Board members Perla Tab-
ares Hantman, Renier Diaz de
la Portilla and Marta P6rez did
not return calls seeking com-
ment.
"We have focused on the bud-
get and lost sight of the reading,
writing, and FCAT scores. Our
students are learning and the
educators are teaching. Scores
are improving. Our community
should be celebrating the gains
that we are making and the ex-
cellence in our children," said
Holloway.
Board members Holloway and
Diaz de la Portilla are up for re-
election.


F nal 4mfI % .IA g Il hrrrng lram













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9 U


lp # ; 6- I


"Copyrighted Material


nSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
%M I A i


4.


T-Bone or
Porterhouse Steaks
PuIblix Premium Cerrified Beef.
LISDA Crhoce
SAE L!P 1O S:' L .


Red Seedless Watermelon..
Southern-Grown, High in Vitamin C, each
SURPRISINGLU- LOW PRICE
,," .... ,.... . -


32


29_9
Italian Five Grain Bread .......................
Choose From Wheat or White, Contains: Oats, Cracked Wheat, Barley,
Millet, Flaxseed, and Sunflower Seeds, From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .60


Boar's Head 79
Ultimate Half Sub ......
Roast Beef, Tavern Ham, Turkey and
Swiss Cheese, Choice of Toppings,
Made Fresh to Order
in the Publix Deli, each
SURPRIsmIN LOW "-n.
(Publix, each ... 4.29)


Doritos
Tortilla T,
C h ip s ................
Assorted Varieties, 12.25 to 13-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UTP TO 3.79
(Frito Lay's Dip, 9-oz can ... 2/4.00)


Breyers ~ -.
Ice Cream..... ,.
Assorted Varieties, 48 or 56-oz ctn.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5.93


------------------------
W LU#9231
wrree
12-Pack Selected
Coca-Cola Products ,
12-oz can Limit one deal per coupon
per customer. Customer i" responsible
for 3ll applicable taxes This coupon .
TI non-transferable.
.. -. .ii N ,. F tW P.RICE
Publix.
Good through July 2
for June 26, 2008 ad effective date stores.
----------------------------
12-Pack Selected
Coca-Cola 4 1100
Products ............... -
12-oz can Limit two deals.
SAVE UP TO 7.36 ON 4
.. . .-.... . 3. . ....E .


Prices effective Thursday, June 26 through Weanesday, July 2, 2008. oni, n Mianmi,.Da.jp, Brorwj,, P-ini Beacrn, rMrin. SIt i.icie. imriiaii river,
O hobech e and i Munr,,u Couril.es Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Maiket. iQuijni.v r tL re:.-ivJd.


S


1013 THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 200)8f


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


-r: L' rc I 11 -' a: J. '-, v






The Miami Times


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


A 0I 0i .t aji i


fIt i ..H;;;=I


Coyrighted Material

S ynicated Content

Available from commercial News Provid


SECTION B
r.i a .%*


* ft m o&ow.- a-a. qa -4A. a.a0flan *JPlS -*~
4w %m k U ob.1" nw o*. ow-f


Poll


NI re I)elie vers


()K with llmany aths
t .A- ,- .........


Soul Saving
M.B. Church
You're invited to our first
fashion show, theme: "Steppin'
in Style for the Lord", Saturday,
June 28 6:30 p.m. at Liberty
Hall. Liberty Hall located at
1629 N.W. 42 Street.
Entertainment by the
Smiling Jubiliaires. For ticket
information call 786-873-7489
or 305 696-3389.


fl ase


Summer Camp
Revelation Christian Academy,
Inc. Summer Performing Arts
Camp plus Martial Arts and
Academic enhancers will be
held at 8390 N.W. 14 Ave., July
1-Aug. 8. Call 305-758-5656.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES JUNE 25-JULY 8


Americans: My religion isn't the only way


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Available from Commercial News Providers"












BUY, SELL OR FINANCE A CHURCH?


Contact the experienced
i church professionals A


* a


PREMIER "0s


Tianvan


m !Ol


A gig
IdA


93rY Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"' Street
305-836-0942
Order of Servides
7:30 ai.m. Early Mmoning Wcship
11 a.in m. ..MAinng Wois4lip
Evening Worship
1st & 3rd Sumiday 6 p.t.
Tue lieay Bible Study '7 pt.
websitc: anlorg
M.CastorlRev.aryMissiona


S Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:








MoSunday Molmii. Noon Day Prayervices
7:45 a.m. 11:B5 anm.
Sunday School 9:45 a,m,
Bible Study... Tuesday







PrSundayer WoMeting -Tues, 6 p a.m.
Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1400 68Martin Lther Kingami, Jr 33Blvd147
(30305-759-8226 Fax: 305-7590528



Order of Services:
Moan. thro Fini. Noon Day Payor
T;.Bible Study ..Thurs.i.gi7 pSm,
SSSunday Worship...7-11 a.m.





Sunday School ...9:30 am.
Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 NW 681723 Street Miami, FL33147
C 30S) 836-1495
Order of Services:
E a r l y l ,i n ,n ,i g ".. r ,, ni .
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
zoning Service ....11:00 ap t
(omnmu ion Service
('I. beftre I 'Sunday) 7.30 pin
SPrayer lee ting/Bible Study p







hs (Wuldsictday M7nisy..6:30 p in
Temple Missionary "
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 31 Avenue

Fax 305 -c4h ax 305-295-854(

S1nd I .School.. 945 a.m.
4"Sun,.BTL...1:302:30 .,
I Tuesday. BUbl' Siudy
Feeding M hnisly .., 10 ami.
Wed Bible Study'Prayer, 6'30 p.m


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
ChIrcli.tSun1diy Schiool.... 8 30 a.ni
Sunday Worship Seivice ... I0i a.m
f Mid-Week Servlice ... Wednesday's
Hour of Power-NnmD ray Ptayer I
p 12pm. p.m.
SEvnig Womthip. 7 pm .




First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305.635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday............... 7:30& 11 a.m.
Sun' day School..............10 a.m.
Thursday.........7 p.m. Bible Sludy,
IJ Priayer Mccliting, B.T..
S -' Baptisman Thurs. before
/I. I J B Commnion Flst Stim........




Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church-
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300


14


Qrer of Service
Sunday
CluiS ti S ol .........9:30 a.m.
Worslhti Service ........... a.m
Monday
fible Study 7: p.ll,
Wednesday
Fraytr Meuiirg7 p.m,.


Pembroke Park
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue
(Office) 954.962-9327


/Lpostolic Revival Center
6702 N.W 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time tor TV. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
unuxtAlicts rt coM 1 t'ercu S

WN d., Inlcti ss'Cy I yycrt9 m .12 im
lonhitg sevi .... iI am
Su ve W ship .......... 7 0 pm
3.. rm. rayt~M cetlillg........ ..30 pl
Fr. ,Bilt Stdlly................"730 tpm.




Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
wv. frtidudipluicmlia.oirg
"4 ', ' ;.>lh lti l
fiami, FL
305-759-8875

l' l ii, .t L> II i C,
i ,1,f it'll I '1t '.llt
I I ,






F New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500


Order of Services:
.. Morning orship... Istl 3rd Sun.
S lig Worstip.............. 10:30 u.m

SStudy .......... .. p.
ur Sci l... ......... rn


Church of Christ
* Hollywood, FL 33023
* (Fax) 954-962.3396


Order of Services ,
Sunday .
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............ 10 ai i
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study..... 7:30 p.m. .
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcrast Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Webc page: wvw peibimkeparkclilrhofhiiti.ctmtl iminltlI perbrokepaikcoc Stbellsouih.net


Faith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order or Services
i p tSiI M,, min, Wi iN p i ........ I .,


*vWe./Sal. Manna (ixayer)...,.5.tm,
R ichy Youth Nigit l ................7 p,.m.
i\ /IIiIil'lI ] #


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 761' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815


1 Si iliday. Cihiich irlol .. 10 Iml
Womliprtvicc........... 5II l ls
Tluedays ible CAls ....... 7 Ii.
4th SSunday Ivening Woiip. ...6 p m.

\awRiBum~roi~flwallwim/


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc. Brownsville
1855 N.W ll9th Street Church of Christ
305-688-1612 4561 N.W. 33rd Court
Fax: 305-681-8719 305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
Order of Servicesq 305-634-6604
Sun. .9.30 aIn ..(Sutlday Scltool) Order of Services
Walk in the Word Mi .stry i ,1.f,, 1 li 1.'-l 9A,45a
Worship-SerImce 11 sin tie ii ti
Tielstdy .,.7 p.i..3am1ily Night i h i ill t 'l. 5 pm
xd.11. at iInterc.s sotv Payver -. 'l.,s .. tp 0 pta
\W 'd Bibe Classt ..... 12 1.01 it. iI tiC -, sit+lait
Wed. fible C la ..I........t7, p.m. i... I. .i t
-l7l ltaulo .l tu.. mhi-ll :
305-34-150 *.-.6F9


/Jordan Grove Missionary")
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 121 Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Smday School.............. 9 ami.,
NBC ....... ....10:05 a.m.
W ship ............ ......11 a.m .
Wor'sip ............4 pn m.
l Mission and Bible Class,
Youth McetiigC.hoir rehearsalT
lMonday k..........30 Im.



New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95"' Street
305 835-8280 Fax# 3i5.-696- 62211
Church Schedule:
] auly Momning Abiship 7:30 a.m.
i / Suin. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....1.1 a1..
t [Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
SIes.belfoithle sL SUta.....7 p.m,
Mid-week Worship


/St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3"1 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
l oring Worship .....7:30 a.m.
"nday School ..........9:30 a.m.
I Morning Womhip ..II am.
uIo.e for Birptlsi Chutormhe.s I
I (B B.T.L.) 5 p.m.
I .' , veniing Worship ........7 p.m.
--._,_ L 'r0t0i g ........(Tues.) 7 pm.



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 30S-696-2301
Order of Services:
Stidiy School .............9:30 ti.m.
l IMoning lmiseAvoerlip.. I 1,1.111.
iF"n iin iid l Sitdty
Ievelin wAshlp) at 6 p.m.,
i"i_ IPra'yer Mtcling &,Bible Snltdy
Tuesday 7 p.m.
i tfo imion A ll30V4 sft .)unIiliy
fIoi M ngms e Wrtship Call 31305. tl S90.
\ W S m mESB!S3ili n i i ii


/"Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sul.ip .Mnnaing ..........8 a L
'ufJd.i % tht- l............10 &m.,
S FLd, F ciini ..... ........6 p
Til I .l e le, -I . .. ..7:30 p .,
Thl'ht bl, lo ..k.hip ....7310 p&M.
I'. 1 2 P.ag i ce ,,6 p'm,


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mthermonworslhitmeater.or )
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


U


Order of Services:
Sunday \\iojast, ,n ac,
7 a li In iinu
Chlurh School: 8 30I a.m,
Wednesday
Pastor Noon lay Bible Study
Bible Instlitute, 30 p.m.
Mid-week \Whrsip 7:30 p.m.


/Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Moninig Woriip at 8 & 11 a.in.
f^-- 1 Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
't. -Bible Study pm.
\Saturday
No Sedisee


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptisht
1790 N,W 55th Street
305-696-7322

ii Order of Services:
Euily Momning Wombahip.7:30a.n.
SSutida School 9:30 an
. >. ^ .^J Moirtg Walip .....l lan,.
y' i er Meeting ...........7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ...................8 p ,.




Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
30s-637-4404 Fax: 30s-637-4474
Order of Services:
ta8 iday School ............9:45 aIl.
Sti sl p IA,,,,, l i,.
B blo a.ly, Ti l dy ..,7:30 ptill,
ltEi Yoilt'inksyva HiL,.'\\W.
6p.m. '


Fax: 305-685-07054
tt'uw.iaewbirtlabaptistutaalu l.org


Itltl~~~


/ St. Mark Missionary \
Baptist Church

1470 N.W, 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
StiLday 7:30 and II a.m.

T e ,dy......... p, .Bi t y
Sll hlDayi layer




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 101 Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:


.q l t" ll'. es ..."e'v.I. II.I,
\. t -nl n i. 'l 0 -i.elt "-: l .


RCA, C I ash-I estel,
L sl.lil)l*lll",Itstf)i,/'I'eile her


THEIR OWN DESTINY


swim


ma-ma


10,11







The Miami Times




ea th


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


m summer


By Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer

Summer in Miami can get very hot;
how hot? Hot enough to fry an egg on
the sidewalk. The average temperature
for June, July. and August is around
89 degrees Fahrenheit. The work is not
easy for construction workers or road
and utility crews who face the heat daily.
Many of us send our children to camps
and other outdoors recreation spots
where there is Little or no shelter from
the sun. Adults and children who expose
their skin for hours on a daily basis can
develop health risks. Sunlight is ben-
eficial to us as it is to most plants and
animals; however, overexposure can lead
to sunburn, sunstroke, skin cancer, and
premature aging of the skin.
People most susceptible to sunburn
and sunstroke are children, the elderly,
pregnant women, people on certain
medications that have to avoid direct


Su/i


Light, and people who are fair skinned.
Although the melanin in Black skin
helps to protect the body by absorbing
ultraviolet radiation from the sun, dark-
skinned people can get skin cancer too.
In her book Skin Deep, Carol Turkmg-
ton explains that although the melanin
in dark-skinned people helps to protect
the body by absorbing ultraviolet radia-
tion from the sun, dark-skinned people,
can still get skin cancer from prolonged
exposure to UV radiation. According to
the American Cancer Society, 59,940
new cases of melanoma were diagnosed
in 2007. The most serious type of skin.
cancer, melanoma, accounts for approxi-
mately 8,000 deaths per year.
A few common sense measures that
can be taken t,o protect you 'ndyobu. '
family from this summer heat are: .ea"
hats with wide brims; invest in a.a good,
pair of sun glasses that meet-UV require-
menfs; keep hydrated; wear clothes that
,- Pledse tarn to SUN 13B
*~ -- I


- m r


-i0
-b


How diabetes affects teeth
Gingivitis (early gum disease) results from tartar irritating the gums and causes
them to become tender, swollen and potentially bloody when brushing your
teeth. Professional dental cleaning are very important for diabetics.


By Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer
When glucose (blood sugar) is not properly
managed, diabetics run a higher risk of.peri-
odontal disease, which can result in tooth loss.
Because defense mechanisms to fight infec-
tion are weakened and blood circulation is not
optimal in diabetics, these individuals acquire
more oral infections, which if not properly.
treated can lead to chronic inflammation and
loss of gum tissue and bone. Asqual Getaneh
is an assistant clinical professor of medicine at
Columbia University in New York, where she
specializes in diabetes and obesity. Getaneli,
in an article written for EverydayHealth.com,
cautions that diabetics who experience heart
attacks and stroke also tend to have periodon-
tal disease (advanced gum disease).
Therefore, people with diabetes should main-
tain normal glucose levels, get regular dental
care, floss at least daily, refrain from smoking,
and drink in moderation. In an excerpt from
the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Publica-
tion No. 03-4280 displayed on www.dlife.com,
the writer cautions that smoking makes it more
likely to acquire severe gum disease, especially
if you have diabetes and arc age 45 or older.
A diabetic's false teeth can be a health is-
sue if not properly taken care of. A substance
called calculus (an incrustation that forms on
the teeth and gums) can grow on false teeth


and cause infections if not properly cleaned.
Something as simple as a 50/50 solution of
white vinegar and water can help keep calculus
under control.
Gingivitis (early gum disease) results from
tartar irritating the gums and causes them to
become tender, swollen and potentially bloody
when brushing your teeth. Professional dental
cleaning are very important for diabetics. In
2006, CNN.corn published "Dental Care and
Diabetes: Guide to a Healthy Mouth" a feature
article from MayoClinic.corn.
Readers are advised inr the article that poor
oral health can make your diabetes more dif-
ficult to control and infections may cause your
blood sugar to rise and require more insulin
to-keep it under control. Additionally, diabetics
should always wait until their blood sugar is
within their goal range before dental treatments
or oral surgery. If the treatment is urgent, then
have it done in.a hospital where medical pro-
fessionals are immediately accessible to moni-
tor your recovery.
If you have one or more of the following prob-
lems, the NIH publication cited earlier, sug-
gests you see your dentist immediately as you
may have tooth and gum damage from diabe-
tes: Red, sore, swollen gums; bleeding gums;
gums pulling away from your teeth so your
teeth look long; loose or sensitive teeth; bad
breath; poorly fitting dentures; or a bite that
feels differently.


Prlnmiing lthrimrr's drug apprired for lajlt sai tIrwh



"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers
~~~~* :- .8 g, ^^^j -- --iil^^^^^^^^

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1AR THF MIAMI TIMFS IIJUNE 25-JULY 1. 2008


It's all about love


This column is coming from
my 'spiritual soapbox.' It is
about a subject that we talk
about and hear about inces-
santly, but unfortunately, I
believe that we do not know as
much about the subject as we
profess. It's a four letter word,
but a good four letter word -
love. I am sure that you have
found that much of the world
have some strange ideas about
what love entails. I have seen


Rebecca "Butterfly"
Vaughns presents "Cel-
ebrating 100 Years of Great
Black Men," Saturday, June
28 at 7:00 p.m. at the Jo-
seph Caleb Auditorium. For


Believers Life Ministries in-
vites the community Sunday,
June 29 at 11 a.m. as it con-
cludes its Forty Days of Pur-
poses campaign with a Day of
Evangelism. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-751-7674.
******** *
Salem Baptist Church will
have its Women of the Bible
Conference on Sunday, June
29 at 3:30 p.m. For more in-


women return to abusive men,
and say it is because they love
them. I have heard men curse
women, beat them, and deny
their children, and they claim
to love these women. People
commit suicide because they
feel that they are no longer
loved; and others make life
changing decisions because of
love.
As Christians, our vision
and perception of love should


more information, please call
305-836-3572.


Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorori-
ty Incorporated invites you to


formation, please contact
305-764-1376.

God's Way Assembly Faith
Cathedral Inc. hosts a Health
Care Workshop on Thursday,
June 26 at 7:30 p.m. For more
information, please call Mar-
lene Smith at 305-332-8311 or
305-685-6855.

Peace Missionary Baptist


R6(.N


the ESP 1908 Global Centen-
nial Walk Saturday, June 28.
Please meet at the Virginia Key
Beach Historic Park at 10:30
a.m. For more information,
please contact 954-243-3151
or 786-205-1383.
****** *
Grace Academy Interna-
tional announces its Open
House on Saturday, June 28


Church presents the "Three-
fold Ministry of Man: Priest,
Prophet, and King" on June 29
at 4 p.m. For more information,
please call Deacon S. Grant at
305-989-6670.

New Vision of Christ Min-
istries presents Men's Re-
vival 2008 from June 25 to 27
and continuing Sunday, June
29 in all three services. The
theme of the event: Overcom-
ing the Samson Syndrome. For
more information, please call
305-899-7224.

New Christ Tabernacle in-


be clear. The Apostle John de-
clares in I John 4: 7, 8 that if
we love God, then we should
love each other. Jesus said in
Matthew 19:19 that we should
love our neighbors as our-
selves. In the parable of the
Good Samaritan, He explains
that a neighbor is anyone in
need a friend, a strang-
er, the person who lives next
door, and the person who lives
around the world. I know
many Christians, and even
those who are not, who donate
and contribute to the needs of
people. You can even read and
hear countless news stories of
many celebrities who do not
necessarily profess Christ as
Savior, but who are very gen-


from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Pri-
vate school opportunity for
grades 3-12. No FCAT. Schol-
arships will be available. For
more information, please call
305-751-5910.


Miami Northwestern Se-
nior High Class of 1983 is
celebrating its 25th class re-
union on July 11 to 13. For


vites you to a Gospel Song
Fest on Sunday, June 29 at
3:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call Virginia at
305-621-8126.
******** *
God Word God Way Church
of God in Christ invites you to
biblical teaching on Wednes-
day, June 28 at 8 p.m. For
more information, please call
786-326-3455.

Ann Abraham Ministries
will be having its Appreciation
and Prayer on Saturday, June
28 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
******** *


erous in helping people whom
they do not know, and prob-
ably will never meet.
What has been very strong
in my spirit these past few
weeks is the lack of Chris-
tian love that we sometimes
show to people whom we see
regularly those who attend
church with us. There are
far too many hurting people
who come through the church
doors who are greeted with
a smile and hug at the door,
but never receive another form
of communication from the
church when they leave. Yes,
it is definitely important to
give a loving greeting as some-
one enters the church. Being
an usher or greeter, (what the


more information, please
call Angela Pickney-Yalledy
at 305-725-5427 or Michael
McLeod at 305-773-9840.
********
Miami 21 will be hosting a
North Quadrant Open House
on development plans and
zoning for Liberty City on
Wednesday, July 2 from 6 to 8
p.m. at Charles Hadley Park.


Join Corinth Baptist
Church as it celebrates the Big
Gospel Program on June 28
at 7:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please call Lil Rev at
305-693-9336.

The South Dade Male Cho-
rus Union presents a Celebra-
tion of Gospel Music. The event
will be on Sunday, June 29 at
3 p.m. at the Saint John A.M.E.
Church. For more information,
please call Deacon Truesdell at
305-303-2805.
********
New Life Family Worship
Center invites you to the li-


14W I IIL IVIIMITII I IITILOI JUSIL &V J-1 Is w


For more information, please
call 305-416-2121.


The Neighborhoods in
Bloom Celebration for the
opening of the Butterfly Gar-
den/Mural Project will be on
Saturday, June 28 from 8 a.m.
to 12 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please contact Ms. Willis
at 786-306-6515.


censing and ordination of its
deacons and ministers on July
6 at 4 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-623-0054.
*********
Spirit of Christ Center and
Ministries will be hosting the
Men and Family Conference
July 9 to 11 at 7 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-935-5001.

New Life Revival Interna-
tional Inc. will hold free train-
ing courses to help you go to the
next level with Jesus every Fri-
day at 7 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-316-5880.


Rewrtb ucorm mm c dlue to caaW of AlbeimrrrIs diwm


"Copyigh-ted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"
















S%c%% tAc (in A printaJc dJrug And A noi A irc k
O[


Protect yourself during hot summer months


SUN
continued from 13B

are loose, cool, and light-col-
ored; choose a sunscreen prod-
uct that has "broad spectrum"
on the label and has a SPF of at
least 15. Wear lip gloss or some
other moisturizer on your lips.
Alan Greene, MD FAAP, in his
newsletter Caring for the next


generation advised parents that
the sun is more intense dur-
ing mid-day. Even when it is
overcast, harmful rays will get
through the clouds. He also re-
minds parents the sun's rays
intensify as the elevation gets
higher and also parents should
beware of surfaces such as wa-
ter, snow and sand since they
will reflect and therefore inten-


sify the sun's rays. If your kids
are in and out of the pool, re-
apply sunscreen throughout
the day. As an added precau-
tion, do not fall asleep in the
sun or leave your child or pet
in the car while you take care
of an errand. Pattie Hughes, a
freelance writer for Families.
com, gives sun safety tips for
pregnant women. Ms. Hughes


cautions expectant mothers to
remember if they are overheat-
ed, then their baby is also over-
heated. To combat overheating,
pregnant women should take
water with them, plan their out-
door activities during the cooler
part of the day, and change en-
vironment immediately if there
is a sudden change in body
temperature.


* *


DR. FREDERICK FERGUSON MD


100 NW 170 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169

Family Medicine Doctor

Graduate of Meharry Medical College
and University
of Florida Family Medicine Residency Pro
gram

Board Certified in Family Medicine

12 years of Medical experience

Insurances Accepted: Amerigroup,
Avmed, Cigna, Humana, Tricare,
Medicaid and Medicare

Receive a FREE MEDICAL
visit with presentation of this Ad
( Laboratory and Radiology Studies are not included).


3 *6 1


Bible calls a doorkeeper) is a
very important position. That
warm, sincere greeting can
make a big difference in some-
one's attitude as th ey enter.
However, I have noticed that
many churches do not have
a 'follow up' ministry. Mem-
bers or visitors are not called
when they are absent. In fact,
it doesn't hurt to call even if
they are in attendance, just to
say hello. It means so much
to know that someone noticed
that you were not in church,
or you were, but your counte-
nance was not as uplifting as
usual. Let someone know that
you noticed their child or hus-
band did not come with them
this Sunday. Let them know


that you missed their friend or
family member, and ask them
to pass on the concern.
Some might not care, or re-
spond positively to you. That's
fine. Your responsibility is to
simply show God's love and
care. If they do not respond,
that is their loss. Donating to
missionary groups and other
international ministries is im-
portant. Feeding the home-
less and collecting food, cloth-
ing and other needs for those
who are without is scriptural.
But let us not forget greetings,
smiles, hugs, phone calls and
other sincere expressions of
God's love that we should do
to our 'neighbors' every single
day.


40 4ow 4w-








15B THE MIAMI TIMES,JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


BLA\CKS MUST CONTIROILiii IR (WN DNl)SliNY


2 in *bS 00 saw,-


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
WILLIE R. FELDER, 62, educator,
died June 17 at -
Jackson Hospi-
tal. Service was
held Tuesday,
June 24.




CARLOS LEWIS, 50, fire fighter,
died June 20
at Hospice of
Palm Beach.
Service 10
a.m. Wednes-
day, June 25
at St. Francis
Xavier Catholic
Church.

LEOLA R. COTTEN, 66, educator,
died June 21 at
North Shore.
Service 10:30
a.m. Wednes-
day, June 25 at
The Church of
The Incarna- '
tion. I


JOYCE D. FRANCIS, 69, nurse,
died June 23 at ---
Hamilton Court,
NH. Service in-
complete. Sur- i
vivors include:
daughter, Dei-
dre Gail Mack,
Kenya Barr; son, .. .
Wallace Francis
Jr.; sister, Constance Pinkney.

JAMES MILLER, 66, video pack-
er, died June
21 at University
of Miami Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: son,
James Miller
Jr.; daughter,
Janshara Miller;
sister, Hattie
Miller and Willie
Mae Lawrey.
Service Saturday June, 28 in the
chapel, time to be announced.

DONALD CROCKETT, construc-
tion laborer, died June 21 at Holy
Cross Hospital. Service 11 a.m.
June 26 in the chapel.



Richardson
CHARLIE MORRISON WIL-
LIAMS, retired
bus driver, died
June 19. Ser-
vice held Tues- .
day. Remains
shipped to
Philadelphia for
final rites and
burial

GLEN RAWLS, 38, died June 20.
Service 11 a.m. -
Saturday at
Truth Worship
Center.






RONALD DAVIS, 44, died June
18. Service will
be held 1 p.m.
Saturday at Tri-
umph Church.





WILLIE JAMES BEALIS, 81,
died June 23.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday at Mt.
Calvary MBC.






Nakia Ingrahar
JOAN UZZELL, 72, died June 22.
Arrangements are incomplete.

MANZURAY PIRIZ, 74 died June


22. Arrangements are incomplete.


Roy Mizell & Kurtz
PAUL ROBINSON, 40, died June
14. Service 11 a.m. Saturday at
Church of God of Prophecy.


Jay's .
WILL COOKS, 67, died June 18.
Service 2 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.






MARIE SPICER, 57, died June
14. Service Sat-
urday at Second
Baptist Church
time to be an-
nounced.




ARNOLD STEPHENS, 66, died
June 17. Final rites in Clarendon,
Jamaica.

GERYL CLARIDY, died June 23
at Gramercy Park Nursing Home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

CLARA G. WEST, 58, died June
17 at Riverdale Hospital. Service
1 p.m. Friday at Glendale Baptist
Church.


Wright & Young_.!2
FABIAN ANTWAN BURKS, 24,
laborer, died
June 14. Ser-
vice Saturday,
11 a.m. Place to
be announced.




BOBBY LEE BETTS Sr., 54, la-
borer, died June
22 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: wife,
Shirley; sons,
Bobby Jr, Da-
vid and Bren-
ton; daughters,
Evonda Dudley (Seymour), Bille
Jean Dudley (Murphy), Rellanie,
Barbara, Valene, and Siera; moth-
er, Anne Ruth Jones; brothers, Mi-
chael and Terry; sisters, Deborah,
Jacqueline, Renita, and Majorie.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Hadley -
SYLVESER 'BIP' MOSLEY, 53,
died June 16.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel. Viewing
Friday 2 p.m. to
8:30 p.m.




PHYLLIS ANN MILLER, 59, died
June 18 at Uni-
versity of Mi-
ami Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at
First Baptist of
Bunche Park.
Viewing Friday
2 p.m. to 8:30
p.m.

DOROTHY DEKOTA TIMMONS,
moral Hospital. Service was held
June 21 at 93rd St. Community
Baptist Church.
Mitchell
BISHOP JAMES MCPHERSON, 82,
contractor, died
June 17 at home.
Service 2 p.m.
June 28 at Pen-
tecostal Church
of Lord Jesus

Faith, 1057 NW.
54 Street Miami,
Florida. Survivors include: wife, Wil-
lie Mae; children, Shirley McPher-
son, Donna Pearson, Iris Bouie,
Timothy and Anthony McPherson.

Carey Royal Ranm'n
ANGELA HOWARD, 43, died June
20. Arrangements are incomplete.

SYED BADRUDDIN, 68, died
June 19 at home.


BERNARD CARTER, 75, died
June 17 at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital North. Service 10 a.m. in the
chapel.

IRENE DIAZ, 34, died June 17 at
South Miami Hospital. Service 3
p.m. Wednesday in the chapel.


Poitie ,
WILLIAM JAMES SPENCER, 73,
truck driver, died -.
June 19at North -
Shore Medical
Center. Service ""
2 p.m. Thursday
in the chapel.
Remains will be ,f
shipped to Ala- ,
bama for final
rites and burial.

MOTHER RITA JACKSON, 92,
nurse, died
June 19 at
home. Service
2 p.m. Saturday
at Peaceful Zion
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


KARA YOLANDA MARSHALL,
pharmacy tech-
nician, died :
June 16 at ;:
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.

RUPERT WILLIAM CURRY JR.,
55, died June 7
13. Service
Saturday in the
chapel, time to
be announced.


SHERMAN LEE TYSON, 91, re-
tired, died June
15 at Miami
Jewish Home
and Hospital.
Service was
held.



KATRINA EVETTE HOWARD-
SMITH, 52, ca-
shier, died June
12. Service was
held.







Royal ._
ULIE JACKSON, 91, died June
13. Final rites and burial in Ha-
nover, Jamaica on Saturday.

DORIS RICHARDSON, 67, died
June 20. Service 11 a.m. Saturday
at Parkway Baptist Church. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m. Friday.

PHYLLIS LEWIS, 88, died June
19. Service 11 a.m. Wednesday
at Forest Lawn Cemetery in Fort
Lauderdale.

YVONNE POWELL, 46, died June
21. Arrangements are pending.

RICHARD BURGESS, 68, died
June 10. Service 2 p.m. Saturday
in the chapel. Visitation 4 to 9 p.m.
Friday.

St. Fort
CHERISSON W. PERRE, 66,
died June 17. Service was held.

JACQUES BERNARDIN, 55, died
June 20. Service 10:30 a.m. June
28 in the chapel.

E.A. Stevensjl^
GEORGE A. ADAMS, 81, died
June 17. Service 11 a.m. Saturday
at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hal-
landale.

DORIS FOSTER, 82, died June
18. Memorial service 6 p.m.
Wednesday. Final rites and burial
in Medina, Jamaica.

JODI A. MARTIN, 27, of Freeport,
Grand Bahamas died June 18 at
Memorial Regional Hospital West.
Final rites in Freeport, Grand Ba-
hamas.

Florida
CLAUDIA RICHARDS-VITAL,
73, seamstress,
died June 17.
Memorial ser-
vice 6-8 p.m.
June 25 in the
chapel. I


Range =-
ROENA PARLIN-LIVINGSTON,
91. homemaker
died June 17,
2008. She is
survived by her
cousin, Patri-
cia Johnson
(1 lershell Sr.),
Renee Davis;
Hershel! John-
son Jr., Patrick Johnson, and
Roderick Johnson; cousin-in-law,
Othello Johnson Sr.; a nephew,
.Othello Johnson Jr.; a host of oth-
er relatives and friends. Funeral
services will he held Saturday 11
a.m. at Myrtle Grove Presbyterian
Church.

DONNA HOLLOWAY, 55 Truck
Driver died
June 19, 2008.
lie is survived
by his daughter,
Thea Bryan. Tif-
fany Holloway-
Derby (Lincoln);
Faelese Ward; -
Brandi Roher-
son; Karen Roherson; four sons,
Donald Holloway Jr., Corey Rich-
ardson. Donnie Holloway, and
Kevin Roberson; six sisters. Mary
Banks. Frances Watts. Patricia
Bryant, Verlene Holloway. Thelma
Lynn Grant, and Josett Holloway;
two brothers, Edward holloway.
and Franklin David Johnson; a
host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Viewing will
he held Wednesday 3:008:00P.M.
Final rites and burial in Monticello,
Florida.

ALFRED KITCHEN, 72. Retired
Employee of
Parks and Rec-
reation for the
City of Hialeah
died June 23,
2008. I-he is
survived by his
wife, Martha
Kitchen; daugh-
ter, Theresa Champion; three
sons. Alfred, Albert, and Jeffery
Kitchen; three sisters, Ruthie Mae
Fox; Elouise Etheridge; and Ro-
salie L. Kitchen; seven grandchil-
dren; a host of nieces, nephews
other relatives and friends. Funer-
al services will be held Saturday
1:30 P.M. at Mt. Zion M.B. Church
in Hialeah.

IMOGENE DELIFORD-WIL-
LIAMS. 77.
Retired Nurses
Aide died June
17, 2008. She is
survived by her
husband. Ber-
nice Williams;
a brother, Dr.
Lemmie Deli-
ford (Carol); a host of other rela-
tives and friends. Funeral services
were held Monday 11 a.m. at Holy
Redeemer Catholic Church.

SHIRLEY SOUTER, 73, Retired
Teacher of Little
River Elemen-
tary School died
June 17, 2008.
She is survived
by two sisters.
Lillian Coplin
(Nathaniel), and
Laurice Hep-
burn; two brothers, Billy II. Davis,
and Charles Davis (Doris); a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends. Funeral ser-
vices were held Tuesday 11 a.m.
at Mt. Tabor M.B. Church.

LEWIS CAMPBELL, 90, Retired
Construction Worker, died June
21, 2008. Arrangements are In-


CLIFFORD MAHONEY, Retired
Laborer died June 20, 2008;Grave-
side service Friday at time will he

rial Park North.

Grace
ANNE BLACK DERICHO, 76,
retired nurse's
assistant, died
June 22. Ser-
vice 2 p.m. Sat-
urday at King-
dom Hall.


MARQUEZ JAMES, 16, student,
died June 14. Service 1 p.m. Sat-
urday at Mt. Olive Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


SUSIE M. LAWHORNE BARBARA ROBINSON
10/06/20 06/26/07 WHITE
07/22/1943- 06/26/2007


Her Legacy
It's been one year since
you've been gone, Your parting
words were to "carry on".
Through struggles, stress,
tears and strife
It's been so difficult without
you in our life.
You taught us to love and
support one another Brothers,
sisters and family should love
each other.
We got your message Mom,
all of us sisters and brothers.
Our lives are not easy
without the presence of you,
Mother.
We miss you terribly, Mom.
Your Family

Death Notice

REV. WILLIE C. JENKINS,
who left Miami in 1999 have
died on June 17 in Havana,
FL will be funeralized on
June 28 at Saint Mary M.B.
Church.
Rev. Jenkins was a member
of Soul Saving M.B. Church
where Rev. Jodie Alexander
is pastor.
Card of Thanks


JAMES N. KING
DECEASED 6/14/2008
thanks you for your outpouring
of love, hugs, kisses and
support.

Gregg L. Mason9i:
MILTON HEARNS, 76, retired bus
driver for Miami-
Dade Transit,
died June 19
at University of
Miami Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: brother,
Jacob Hearns
(Annie); sisters,
Willa Pendilton,
Vera Ashley (Cecil), Edna Horne
(Anthony), Ethel Batson (Em-
mitt), Christine Padamore, Lossie
Adams (Jack), Gloria Hearns and
Otha Myrick; and a host of other
family members and friends. View-
ing Wednesday, 3-8pm. Service
Saturday in Marianna, Florida.

PEARL Z. NICHOLSON, 75, certi-
fied nurse assistant, died June 20
at Jackson North Medical Center.
Visitation Friday, 2-9pm. Service
Saturday, 2:00pm at Sixth Avenue
Church of God.

TOMMIE B GILBERT, JR., 72, bus
driver for Greyhound Transporta-
tion. Memorial Service, Thursday
at 1 p.m. in the chapel.

Range Coconut Grove
RUBY D. JACKSON, 72, home-
maker, died June 21 at home.
Viewing Tuesday 5-7 p.m. in the
chapel.

MESFIN ZEWDIE, 52, truck driver
died June 16. Final arrangements
and burial in Springfield. VA.
Range Homestea8
LEROY WASHINGTON, 79, con-
struction worker, died June 19 at
Brookwood Convalescent Center..
Service 11 a.m. saturday at Mt.
Calvary Community Faith Church.


Your life story has left
an indelible impression on
many.
Not a day has passed, that
a thought of you was on the
mind of someone.
To all mother's family and
family friends, you have
been truly amazing this past
year. The support you have
given by way of telephone calls,
letters and donations to the
Barbara White Foundation have
been truly appreciated.
Mother, you are missed dear-
ly.
Sereda, Felix and grandkids


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


RONELL DENISE WARD
'NELL'
06/23/67 02/24/05

From your children and
family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JAMES BERNARD
JACKSON
06/22/51 06/16/95

We will always love and
remember you.
The Walker, Jackson/
Fulmore, Johnson and Ervin
families.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MIN. VICTOR LEVEL, Sr.
03/25/1948-06/26/2007

You answered the call of
your greatest love, Jesus
Christ. Absence from the body
to be present with the Lord!
A memorial service will be
held at a future date.
Love,
Your wife, children and
grandkids







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


in Thir MIAMI TIMES JUNE 25-JULY 1 2008


,,II. ., . . .


...................................................................................................................................
I, '. ''.! , .. ' '' ' 7 ,} :y


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"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"










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aL *i -^^^ j^^^ ." i "


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Death Notice


REV. WALLACE JOHN-
SON, JR., 63, of Tallahassee,
formerly of Miami died June
20. A celebration of life will be
held 3:30 p.m. Saturday June
28 at St. Peter Primitive Bap-
tist Church, 2565 Centerville
Road, Tallahassee, Florida.
Viewing Friday June 27, 3 -
8 p.m. at Richardson's Fam-
ily Funeral Care. Survivors
include: wife, Mary; children,
Wallace III (Amanda), Cedric
(Terrella) and Latonya John-
son Lissade (Guy); brothers,
Charles, Everette and Tyrone
Slocum (Ann); sister, Mildren
Slocum; nine grandchildren
and a host of other rela-
tives and friends. Funeral
arrangements by Richard-
son's Family Funeral Care,
Inc. 101 East Fourth Av-
enue, Tallahassee, Florida,
850-576-4144.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


CHRIS BENJAMIN JR.
06/24/1924 06/16/2007

Dad, it has been one year
since you left us. Although
our hearts are sadden we
know that you are in a better
place.
Love-always, The Benjamin,
Davis, Mobley, Tyson, Riettie
and Mixon families

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,
., .


FREDERICK MULKEY
11/28/57- 06/13/04
We love and miss you.
Mable Mulkey and family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


HENRIETTA RATLIFF JONES
07/04/1958- 10/24/2001


JANIERO L. RATLIFF
06/28/1975-06/21/2006
Time has passed, but the
loving memories that were
left behind will never be
forgotten.
Love,
The Ratliff Family
Death Notice


Elisabeth Milfort, 73, re-
tired' seamstress, died June
22 at Mt. Sinai Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors include: daugh-.
ter, Primrose Laurient (Jeani;
brothers, Leisner and Andre
Milfort; sisters, Argentine
Celestin, Paula aad Antonia
Milfort: and a fiost of other
family members and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9pm.
Rosary Friday, 7:00pm. Ser-
vice Saturday, 12:00 noon at
Notre Dame D'Haiti Catholic
Church. Services entrusted
to Gregg L Mason Funeral
Home.
In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DAVID L. MITCHELL
08/25/1949 11/01/2007
With God's giace, and
memories keep me strong
every day.
Happy Anniversary (6/28).
Love, Linda.'


Death Notice


HALL-FERGUSON-HEWITT MORTUARY, PA.
1900 Northwest 54th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
hfhmorturary8@bellsouth. net
For 35 years we have served this community with integrity and compassion
"In your time of need call the funeral home that cares"
"God cares and we care"
0 L i r G o n I I s T o S a t^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ w u ^^-^ w M ^ w w fi ^ B miu ^ ^ ^ ^ i ^ ^ ^ j | | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ m ~ ^ ^ M M j~ Ms fm iEv e r y M ^^a^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
W^ith Excelence^ i Furlerlf Serice^BS S^^^^^^^B B^^^^^^^^^
^m-Ba,~ I B--BIMBI nBB


LEWIS CAMPBELL, 91, re-
tired construction worker, died
June 21. Survivors include:
daughter, Carolyn Campbell;
son, Joseph Campbel; grand-
daughter, Dorothy C. Dingle;
grandson, Arnold K. Murray;
great-grand daughter, Cristal
L. Campbell a host of other
relatives and friends. Service
10 a.m. Saturday at Mt. Ol-
ive Primitive Baptist Church.
Service entrusted to Range
Funeral Home.


Cal356308 iesdueaiwetr


Independently Owned


MILTON A. HALL. I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


ISL~btsc~irib>c-


TONY E. FERGUSON
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


IUD I nE ]VIllilyll I 11WIL,








Lifestyles


FASHION HiP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


..'TION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


q


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(Available from Commercial News Providers"


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97 THF MIAMI TIMES. JUNE 25-JULY 1. 2008


Leonie Smith coordinated
the wedding of Marcia and
Lloyd Buckner, along with
Juliet Morris, Hilma Tucker,
and Denise Gentles, hostess-
es, last Saturday, at Monument
of Faith Ministries. Reverend
Dr. James Francis, officiant,
and Pastor Yvonne Harris, as-
sistant. The bride chose pastel
colors for the bridesmaids and
the groom chose white tuxedos
for the groomsmen, the chil-
dren wore long, white gowns.
The bridal party arrived in a
22-passenger limousine and
the driver had to try several
times before making the short
turn in front of the church.
Then, picture taking of the
party while the groomsmen
stood in white tuxedos waiting
to march into the edifice with
eight huge bouquets of flowers
placed on top of the end pews
as decor.
The musical prelude be-
gan and the groom entered
with Michael Henry, best
man and the officiant to take
their rightful places, followed
by bridesmaids and grooms-
men Shenifwa Smith and K-
Cee Charoo, Alexis Gill and
Christopher Brown, Ann-Ma-
rie Bhoorasingh and Dudley
Bhoorasingh, Lorna Bright
and William Bright, Tanzia
Christie and Ryan Wisdom,


Tiska Peak and
Gerald Webb, and
Ann-Marie Gor- ..
don and Colin
Scully.
Also, Rosetta
Oquendo, maid
of honor and Kayla Daley,
N'Stari Peak, Starr Morgan,
and Jordan Morgan, flower
girls and Mikhail Morgan,
ring bearer. The bride entered
on the arm of Krishna Peak,
give-away father, attired in ti-
ara, mini-veil, two-strings of
pearls, mini-earrings and a
flowing white gown. accentu-
ated with floral designs on the
bodice and on the back of the
skirt.
After joining her groom, the
both of them listened to Pas-
tor Harris read the Song of
Solomon, 2:8-17, followed by
Craig Hall singing a solo and
exchange of vows; blessing
and exchange of rings; and
lighting of the unity candle for
posterity.
Mr. and Mrs. Buckner then
sealed their marriage with a
long kiss and then led the par-
ty to the reception and cele-
bration with Georgette Miller,
mistress of ceremonies. She
introduLced the bridal party
and then the bride and groom
who gave the first dance and
listened to the toasts from Al-


...... ...
........... ............. i
..............

rCha't' c- rl:%

By Dr. Richai,4 Straclian


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Congratulations to Angel-
ique Gayle who was named
Student Board Advisor for
Miami-Dade County Public
Schools. In her new role An-
gelique will speak on behalf
of the 365,000 students in
Miami-Dade County. Her one
year term starts now where
she will attend School Board
meetings.
Frank and Pearl Oliver of
Fort Worth, Texas are vaca-
tioning in Miami. They are
the house guest of Patricia
Allen-Ebron. The Finley and
Miller families are celebrat-
ing their family reunion. They
will be celebrating with a
'Meet and Greet' at Misty Lake
Club House, a family picnic
and worship service at New
Jerusalem Primitive Baptist
Church with a program and
dinner to follow in their fel-
lowship hall. Their chairman
is Marilyn Randall.


Get well to all 11 of you! Sam-
uel Cleare, Joyce Gibson-
Johnson, Leo Moss, Virla
Barry Grace Heastie-Patter-
son, Lorenzo Jones, Yvonne
Johnson-Gaitor, Prince Gor-


don, Sr., Celestine
Hepburn-Brown,
Wilma Gilbert, .. '
Cecil Stanley j .....
Newbold, Doretha
Payne, Cliffo-
nia Ross, Bernice Shorter-
Meares, Shantay Sharpe.


The class of 1955 of Dorsey
High School chose Niagara
Falls and Toronto Canada
as their choice to celebrate
their 53rd year out of high
school. The following class-
mates made the trip: Hazel
Bolds-Newton, Johnnie Wal-
ton, Albertha Wright, Ruby
Robinson, Verna Edding-
ton, Althea Sample, Patri-
cia Thomas, Mozell Roberts,
Elizabeth Spencer, Annette
Williams, Juanita Maxwell,
Carliss and Odessa Cook
along with many family mem-
bers and friends.


There is a center piece dis-
play (permanently) in the
middle of N.W. 75th Street at
9th Ave. worth driving by to
see. I wonder why more Black
neighborhoods don't have


more of those? Check it out.
Just maybe more streets in
our section of the city will get
more of those.


The first grandchild of the
late Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. and Coretta Scott King
has arrived. Yolanda Renee
King was born May 24 to Mar-
tin Luther King, III and his
wife, Arndrea Waters King at
Northside Hospital in Atlanta.
The baby's birth came almost
on the same date as another
very special day, their second
wedding anniversary which
was May 23rd.


Congratulations and Best
Wishes to our beloved priest,
Father Richard Marquess
Barry who observed the Forti-
eth Anniversary of his Ordina-
tion June 22nd; of these forty
years, Father Barry, have
been with us here at Saint Ag-
nes thirty-one years on Sep-
tember 1st. My how the time
flies for good people.


Happy Anniversary to our
love birds of the week:
Charles and Delores (John-
son) McCartney, June 19th -
their 49th.
James and Paulette (Gib-
son) Derico, June 19th -


their 41st.


Opa-locka Elementary
School has been officially re-
named in honor of our late
School Board member, Robert
Ingram. Attending the dedica-
tion, Ingram's widow Delores
Ingram, Dr. Ingram's daugh-
ter and grands and a host
of dignitaries. Remarks also
came from elected officials


and members of our School
Board. Congratulations! Con-
gratulations!


You are cordially invited the
Twenty-fourth Annual Men/
Boys observance at Saint Ag-
nes Episcopal Church Sun-
day, June 29. The 10:45 a.m.
speaker, Mr. Jai Ingraham.
Gala reception will follow.
Theme: "0 for a faith that will


not shrink."
*********
An appreciation celebration
honoring Reverend Bernard
C. Poitier will be held Sun-
day, August 24 at 4 p.m. The
affair will be held at New Hope
Missionary Baptist Church.
The public is cordially invited.
Contact Lavonia Robinson for
further information. Congrat-
ulations God-brother!


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dith Ward, and Ann-Marie
Gordon.
A special dance was per-
formed by Shenikwa Smith,
Britney Brown, and Keiyana
Morris, followed by throwing
of the bouquet, garter, unveil-
ing of the cake and acknowl-
edgments from the newly weds
before leaving on their honey-
moon to Las Vegas.


A special salute to Nelson
L. Adams III, M.D. who was
featured in this month's (July)
Ebony Magazine with a story
entitled: The Epidemic of Too
Much Weight. And, of course,
he included resolutions to be-
ing overweight and not a vic-
tim of obesity which is a dan-
gerous precursor to numerous
chronic diseases, including
cardiovascular disease, diabe-
tes and some cancers.
Who is Dr. Adams? He is
president of the national Medi-
cal Association and founder
of the Maternal Child Health
Initiative (MCHI), an award-
winning model that provides
care to at-risk, low-income
pregnant women. He's also a
member of Sigma Alpha chap-
ter of Omega Psi Phi Frater-
nity, Inc. and a lecturer for
the 5000 Role Models of Ex-
cellence re: STD and its cure,
plus a member of 100 Black
Men Organization.
Our elders have said, "If you
know better, you should do
better." "Let's do better", be-
cause your "Good Better and
Best, never let it rest until


your good gets better and your
better gets best."


Keith Lavarity arranged the
musical setting, last Saturday,
for James M. Ford, a widely-
acclaimed child prodigy in Mi-
ami performed a full concert at
The Church of the Open Door
to the delight of an audience
whose appetite was whet by
the Children's Orchestra, re-
cently.
Ford included in his selec-
tion for which he never used
a piece of music -
Etude Opus 10, No 4,
Chopin, Etude Opus
10, No. 8, Chopin, Pre-
lude Opus 28, No.20,
Chopin, Prelude Opus
28, No.21, Chopin,
Prelude Opus 28, No.
22, Chopin and the
impresario broke into FO
his arrangements fol-
lowing a 10-minute intermis-
sion.
So exciting was the first
half until people rushed back
early in order not to miss the
second half as he began with
Scott Joplin's Maple Leaf Rag
and Palm Leaf Rag, followed by
a piece from the Wizard of Oz
Suite, Ode to Cowardly Lion,
Over the Rainbow and really
heavy stuff from Ludwig van
Beethoven and the musician,
himself.
Kudos go out to the pro-
ducer/directors Dr. Her-
man Dorsett, Messrs. Khary
Bruyning, Kervin Clenance,
Sumner Hutcheson, III, and


Andre' Watkins, along with
The Reverend Dr. R. Joaquin
Willis and the first lady.
The reception in the Au-
brey Watkins-Simms Memo-
rial Garden drew everyone to
meet and greet the concert art-
ist who was taught by Luella
Nash, Linton Berrien, Mable
Dorsett-Thompson (Glov-
er), Ruth Greenfield and his
mother, Mary Ford, an ele-
mentary school principal.
Some of the guests also
found out that Ford's ability
was not limited to music, but
he excels in mathemat-
ics, astrophysics, his-
tory and sports, while
earning a BA degree
from U of M. and study-
ing in New York, Palo
Alto, San Francisco
and playing for Bertha
Sharp-Jackson doing
IRD her 'heydays.' Emeritus
Erslyn F. Anders, min-
ister of music, heard him and
uttered, "You Are Good!"


Whenever you go to Picadil-
ly's on Biscayne Blvd, you will
find Alan Solomon behind the
counter serving his customers
and pleasing them with kind-
ness. Solomon has been em-
ployed their for 17-years and
his employment allowed him
to send his daughter, Sharne,
to Bethune-Cookman Univer-
sity, where she graduated,
recently, and is employed
with the Dade County Public
School System.
A special salute goes out to


him and his wife, Marlette
Hayes, for supporting their
daughter through thick and
thin, while attending Mount
Zion BC and Solomon being
on the job daily. He loves his
job as well as his customers
he serves daily.
********
Speaking of Picadilly's, Pau-
line Thompson, president, in-
vited her Patriot Usher Board
members to an outing, last
Saturday, since she retained
her position as president.
During her three years as a
member, the group never took
the time to sit down and en-
joy themselves away from the
church.
This time, they ordered what
they wanted and paid for what
they ordered from a full course
to desserts of various kinds.
They also demonstrated an
atmosphere of dignity, proper
etiquette, and social graces.
Some of those in attendance
included Janet Davison,
vice president, Betty Bull-
ard, assistant chief, Cleomie
McKenzie, secretary, Agnes
Boykin, chief, Willie Mae Gib-
son, financial secretary, and
members Dorothy M. Brown,
Frances Wilson, Altamese
Rolle, Willie Mae Pinder, and
Margaret Saunders. These la-
dies are always immaculately
attired, in white or gold suits
when they perform. They also
add much pomp and circum-
stance during service and the
pastor, Reverend Dr. Joretha
Capers loves their style.


........ ......

Peo le.,...-

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UNDER 17 REQUIRES ACCOM WNG
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STRONG BLOODY VIOLENCE THROUGHOUT,
PERVASIVE LANGUAGE AND SOME SEXUALITY


WNNNIW w dpN






3C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


BLACKS N~tUjs- CONT ROL THEIRK OWN DESTINY I


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Who Cares

What Black People Think

Any, a
If you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think, think again.Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you.
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote. And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you, you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars.


That's clout.


u-4m* m 0


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


4 h aHr' %4I N inrf

W I *rl hwm-N'


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City to city. As the TV ratings company, we work hard to accurately measure
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0 2008 The Nielsen Company


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EVERY VIEW COUNTS
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5fCTION D MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


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State's unemployment rate matches nation


TALLAHASSEE Florida's
unemployment rate jumped
5.5 percent, the highest
in five years. According
to U.S. Census Bureau
findings, the jump in the
state's unemployment
rate represents 512,000
jobless out of a labor force
of 9,261,000. The state's
May unemployment rate is
the highest since January
2003, which was also
5.5 percent. The state's
unemployment rate is equal
to the national unemployment
rate of 5.5 percent.
Both Miami-Dade and
S Broward unemployment
figures are near the 5 percent
a., O. mark.


"Our Agency, with the
help of the Governor and
our partners, is determined
to continue providing the
essential support necessary
for the growing number of
job seeking Floridians," said
Monesia T. Brown, Director
of the Agency for Workforce
Innovation. "Strengthening
families through a
commitment to education and
workforce support is at the
forefront of our priorities."
The Agency for Workforce
Innovation works closely
with Workforce Florida, Inc.
and its Regional Workforce
Board partners on programs
such as the Short Time
Compensation Program, a


voluntary employer program
designed to help employers
maintain their workforce by
offsetting the cost of full-time
wages, instead of temporarily
laying off employees; the
Quick Response Training
Program, providing
customized training for new
or expanding businesses;
and the Incumbent and
Employed Worker Training
Programs, offering upgrade
skills training for existing
full-time employees.
For more employment
information and to search
for jobs, visit EmployFlorida.
com, or visit the Agency for,
Workforce Innovation website
at Floridajobs.org.


tis tiime to finall> et vl a.t your day job









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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


HOuW habu% ig pr-mlrw' %adjsr.lo..high r --


awmom~ mq mmj qm bwmw-m a.-4w b0 b -4m ai -00
ON ___-ow__ 0- 4m__ Nm 4. 1 s -a %i o m


Is your electric bill too
high? State agency can help
TALLAHASSEE Summer is here. and so
are mounting utility bills. The Florida Public
Service Couirmmission wants residents to know of
programs to help offset the rising cost.
"Higher fuel costs are impacting the bottom
line for Floridians on everything from utility bills
to groceries." Chairman Matthew M. Carter 11
said. "Everyone is feeling the economic crunch,
and many utility companies, as well as local
charities, have programs available to assist
residents."
Utility customers experiencing financial
hardship may contact their respective electric
company and local charities to inquire about
financial assistance for utility bills. Customers
can also call the PSC's consumer assistance line
at 800-342-3552 for more information about
programs in their area.
Some programs available through the federal
government to assist Miami-Dade and Broward
residents include:
The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance
Program (LIHEAPI is a federal, statewide
program to provide home energy assistance.
LIHEAP assists households that have incomes
below 150% of the federal poverty level and need
assistance to pay their power bills.
Care to Share (through Florida Power &
Light) provides emergency assistance funds to
customers who are in a crisis situation and unable
to pay their electric bill. The funds are disbursed
through local non-profit organizations.
The Energy Neighbor Fund (through Progress
Energy Florida) provides assistance from monies
collected then distributed to needy customers
through local aid agencies.
At least 18 municipal and cooperative systems
throughout the state also have emergency
assistance programs. For additional information,
visit flondapac.com.

I we W. Omar*d, 40


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~! ~
.,** .,, ,.


SECTION Df


e .,.I


.N1s


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


Unfurnished Rooms
54th St. N.E. 1st Ave
$150 a week
Call 786-287-2942
Furnished Rooms
$199 DEPOSIT
2169 N.W. 49 Street
FREE AIR and Cable TV
Night Shift Workers Only.
$99 weekly 786-234-5683.
1031 NW 197th TERRACE
Room for rent. Call Linton
305-652-4763.
13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-474-8186/305-975-3029
1426 N.W.70th Street
$375 monthly. 305-836-8378.
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
15840 N.W. 18th Place
Furnished room, kitchen
privileges. Call 305-962-8157
1845 N.W. 50th STREET
$135 weekly, with air, $270
to move in. Call 786-286-
7455.
335 N.W. 203rd Terrace
A private entrance and bath
air heat, tv, refrigerator, mi-
crowave, all utilities included.
Gated community. Call
954 678-8996.
6233 NW 22nd Court
Nice room,utilities included.
Move in immediately. $125
weekly. $260 moves you in.
Call 786-277-2693
6849 N.W. 15th AVENUE
Nice rooms, different sizes,
quiet area, utilities included.
$105-$130 weekly, $260 to
move in immediately. Call
786-277-2693
695 N.W. 41st Street
Air, $125 weekly,$250 move
in.Call 305-322-8966
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Very clean room, quiet neigh-
borhood, all utilities included.
786-541-5234
LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, non-smoker
Call 786-237-5281
LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Room with air and kitchen
privilege. Call 305-835-2446.
MIAMI GARDENS
One bedroom, own bathroom
private entry, $150 weekly,
cable included. Call for one
bedroom apartment.
305-200-9472, 786-797-0225
MIRAMAR AREA
Furnished room $120
weekly.
954-662-5389/954-367-5094
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nice room, private entrance,
305-769-4985 8a.m.-10 p.m.
Northwest Area
Utilities included, very clean
954-245-2528
Very nice air conditioned
rooms. Rent plans are nego-
tiable. Call 786-663-4600

I Efficiencles
100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully fumished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$185 weekly, $650 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

2400A N.W. 61st Street
Water included.
786-277-9925

CAROL CITY AREA
Private entry, utilities includ-
ed, $650 monthly, first and
last required.
4915 N.W. 182nd Street
Call 305-308-0223
between 8 a.m. 5 p.m.

| Apartments

10920 N.W. 14TH AVENUE
Brand new one bedroom
starting at $775. 305-757-
4663.

1181 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $575
Two bedrooms $650
Stove, refrigerator, air
305-642-7080

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667

1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144


Apartments
1245 NW 58TH STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$575 monthly. All appliances
Free 20 inch flat screen TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1259 N.W. 58TH TERRACE
One bedroom, one bath
$625 and two bedroom, one
bath $725. Section 8
welcome.
Call 305-244-7606.
1261 N.W. 59th Street
1 bdrm, 1 bath, $550.
305-642-7080
1277 N.W. 58th Street#2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances included. Section
8 welcome. 786-277-9925.
1281 N.W. 61 STREET
Renovated one bedroom
$525, two bedrooms $725,
appliances included.
305-747-4552
135 N. W. 18th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath,
$525 monthly, all appliances
included. Joel: 786-355-
7578.
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
Two bdrms, one bath, $575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
140 SW 6th STREET
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$650 monthly. No section 8.
Call 305-267-9449
1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors. $600 monthly; $1200
moves you in. One month
rent Move in special for 40
years and older. Call 305-
458-3977.
1525 N.W. 1 Place
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$800 monthly. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch Flat
Screen TV. Call Joel:
786-355-7578
1540 NW 1st Court
Two bedroom, one bath $650
per month Three bedrooms,
two bath. $800 per month. All
appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1601 N.W. 62nd Street
Special one bedroom, one
bathroom, $450 monthly.
Section 8 welcome
Call 305-717-6084
1648 N.W. 35 Street
One and two bedrooms.
New Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-355-5665
1801 N. W. 2nd AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly, all appliances
included. Joel: 786-355-7578
1801 N.W. 1ST CT
Two bedroom, one bath $600
per month newly renovated.
All appliances included. Call
Joel 786-355-7578.
190 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, $355
bi-weekly $900 moves
you in.
786-389-1686.
1955 N.W. 2 Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bdrm, one bath. $450.
305-642-7080
200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$425
305-642-7080
2040 N.E. 168th Street, #2
One bedroom, one bath,
Close to the mall. Water in-
cluded.
Call 786-2779925
2168 N.W. 91 ST STREET
Two bedroom, one bath, ap-
pliances, central air included
$950 per month. Section 8
accepted. 786-326-2799.
2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $725, two bed-
rooms $925 newly
renovated, appliances
included.
Call Tony 305-213-5013.
249 N. E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, just renovated fenced
yard, parking, $750 monthly
plus security. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-216-7533.
28TH ST. AND 1 STAVE
One bedroom $575 per
month. Two bedroom $750
per month All appliances in-
cluded. Call Joel 786-355-
7578.
2911 N.W. 135TH STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1100 monthly 786-333-7291
3090 N.W. 134th Street
Two bedrooms, water includ-
ed, $850 per month, $1250
to move in.. Section 8
welcome.
786-512-7643


Apartments
3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath
$350 bi-weekly $800 moves
you in. Call:786-389-1686
3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Totally remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath in nice quiet
area. All appliances included.
$625 monthly. MUST SEE!
Call Mr. Cruz 305-213-5013
421 NW 59 Terr.
MOVE IN SPECIAL 1 Month
One bedroom $575
Two bdrms, $700
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/ 786-259-7054
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
55 N.E. 59 STREET
One bedroom.
Call 305-757-8596.
5555 N.W. 17TH AVENUE
Large two. bedroom parking
from $625 includes water.
786-285-0855. Fernando.
Others available.
580 N.E. 127 St #20
Two bedrooms, two baths,
gated parking. Section 8
Preferred. $950 monthly,
$1050 to move in.
954-547-9011
5842 N.W. 12th Avenue #2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
water included. Section 8
welcome. Call 786-277-9925
5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom one bath, new
appliances $600 monthly.
$1200 moves you in.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-458-3977
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
6300 NW 15 Avenue
Big studio apartment. $700
monthly.305-785-8489
676 N.W. 48TH STREET
Two bedroom, one bath. For
information, call 305-681-
4265.
7001 N.W. 1ST AVE
One bedroom $495 per
month. First month's rent
moves you in! All applian-
ces included. Call Joel:
786-355-7578
725 1/2 N.W. 100th Street
Near schools and hospital
two bedrooms, one bath, air,
appliances, wall to wall car-
pet, mini blinds. Credit
check, $640 monthly, $1280
to move in. $50 application
fee.
305-300-0983

745 NW 58 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
with air unit, refrigerator,
stove water and gas. $850
per month. One bedroom
$625 per month. Call 305-
401-4674 Monday through
Friday 9-5
8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information/specials.


I Apartmens
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath $515
Two bdrm, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
1257 N.W. 61 Street.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Completely renovated, water
included. Low rent.
Section 8 Welcome
Move in special.
786-229-6567
LIBERTY CITY AREA
1601 N.W. 62 Street, one
bedroom, one bath. $500
monthly.Section 8 welcome
call 305-717-6084
One bedroom, one bath, four
bedrooms, two baths..
Call 786-877-4766.

Dupl x |
11254 N.W. 22 Avenue
Three bedrooms, Central air.
Try $1195. No Section 8
786-306-4839.
1150 N.W. 76th Street
BEAUTIFUL!! Three bed-
rooms, two baths, appliances
with washer/dryer, spanish
tile, central air, and designer
blinds. Call 786-357-5000
1290-1292 N.W. 44 Street
Two bedrooms, duplex.
Section 8. 305-525-4644.
1558 N.E. 131 LANE
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Welcome. 786-
277-
9925
1610 N.W. 47TH STREET
Two bedroom One Bath
$695. Monthly $1390 to
move in. CALL 305-332-5008

172 NW 58th Street
Remodeled large three bed-
rooms, two baths with central
air, new appliances and car-
pet. $1300 monthly!
Section 8 Welcome!
Call Rick 305-409-8113
1734 N.W. 49 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security bars,
appliances. Section 8 Wel-
come. $1325. 305-215-8125.
1929 N.W. 55 Street (Back)
Two bedrooms, air. $825
monthly. 305-681-3736.
2035 N.W. 69th Terrace (A)
Two bedrooms, with applian-
ces and air. $850 mthly utilit-
ies included. 786-426-6263.
\ 2131 N.W. 100th Street
One bedroom, one bath with
everything you will need,
$695 monthly, 305-948-6913.
2239 N.W. 98 Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
$1500 deposit, 1456 per
month. Section 8 welcome.
Call 561-699-9679 or 786-
262-6884.
2277 NW 98 Street
Two bedroom, one bath $950
a month, first, last and $200
security. Call 305-224-3107
2285 N.W. 101 STREET
One bedroom, air, applian-
ces, bars. $700 No Section
8.
305-891-6776
Terry Dellerson
38 N. E. 64th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath,
$700 monthly, NO section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.
4301 N. W. 14 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath.
Remodeled. Section 8 wel-
come Call 786-285-8872
572 NE 65th Street
Two bedrooms one bath.
$900 monthly, $500 security
deposit. Call 786-488-2264
596 N.W. 67 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1702 monthly .$1500
depos-
it Section 8 OK!
Call 561-699-9679 or
786-262-6884
6734 N.W. 4 Ave
Four bedroom, two bath,
$1500 deposit, $1702 per
month. Section 8 welcome.
Call 561-669-9679 or 786-
262-6884.


.Ipc%-I MOM r-


Duplex
6770 NW 4TH AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath, ap-
pliances included, central air,
security bars, ceiling fans.
$950 and up
305-688-7559.
6935 N.W. 6th Court
Two bdrm, one bath, applian-
ces, bars. $900 monthly.
Section 8 OK! 305-751-5533.
756 NW 3 Ct. Hallendale
Two Beds central a/c sec. 8
$750 monthly 305-624-0451.
778 N.W. 52nd Street
One bedroom, one bath, se-
curity bars, water included.
Call 305-305-8581.
810 N.W. 61st Street
Three bedrooms, two.baths,
air, $1200 monthly. NO Sec-
tion 8! First, last, and securi-
ty. Call 305-244-6952
838 NW 98th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Tile. air, security bars,. $850
monthly, includes water.
First and last month, $500
security .Call: 305-688-7209
NORTH DADE
Remodeled two bedroom.
one bath. 'Section 8
welcome. $850 monthly.
305-216-2724
North Miami
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$925 monthly. Premier
Realty Team call 786-301-
2171.
OAKLAND PARK
Move in special two
bedroom,
one bath, appliances includ-
ed. 954-245-2528.
OPA LOCKA AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$700 monthly, 305-607-7192


CAROL CITY AREA
Three and four bedrooms,
Section 8 ONLY
Rudy 786-367-6268
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
One bedroom, one bath, gat-
ed community. Appointments
only.Fumished or
unfurnished Ms. Maine 786-
389-2544
MIAMI GARDENS
Two bedroom, one bath $850
monthly. First, last and de-
posit. Call 305-633-0304.

HoI
1014 N.W. 60 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air and heat, all appli-
ances, lawn maintenance in-
cluded. $1400 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome. Call
786-229-9488

1082 N.W. 76 STREET
Beautiful newly renovated
three bedroom, new applian-
ces. Section 8 welcome.
786-291-7814.
1453 N.W. 70 Street
Five bedrooms, two baths.
305-836-0140/ 786-427-7122
1531 N.W. 63rd STREET
1880 N.W. 65th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 monthly. Section 8
welcome. Call 786-262-7313.
15421 N.W. 27 PL (rear)
Two bedrooms, one bath.'
Section 8 accepted. Call Lor-
enzo 786-356-0486 or Gigi
786-356-0487.

15630 N.W. 159 St. Road
Beautiful three bedroom, one
bath, air, tile, $1300 monthly,
huge yard call 305-297-5932.

1735 N.W. 121 Street
Two bedroom, two bath.Sec-
tion 8. 305-796-5252.

1785 N.W. 43 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$875 monthly. Large yard.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449.

1850 NW 91ST STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath
with air and appliances. Utilit-
ies included Section 8 ok.
$1350 monthly. Call ED at
786-326-2799.

1961 NW 58th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$950 monthly, two months
security. 305-510-7538.

19620 N.W. 22ND AVENUE
Luxurious three bedrooms,
two baths, with garage. No
section 8.$1500 monthly.
Call Fred after 6pm: 954-
392-0374.


Houses
2164 N.W. 83RD TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$1050 monthly, fenced, cen-
tral air, tile, housing
programs welcome or rent
with an option to buy. 786-
306-2349.
2331 N.W. 208 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 monthly Section 8
Welcome. 305-343-1988.
2357 NW 81 Street
Two bedrooms. Lights and
water, included. $825. Large
fenced yard, 305-300-0544.
240 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedroom, one bath cen-
tral air. Mike 305-490-5811.
2511 N.W. 55th Street
THREE BEDROOMS
Call 305-624-3806
2592 S. E. 12TH COURT
Three bedrooms, three
baths,
beautiful house, homestead.
gated community, with pool,
recreational area, washer,
dryer, dishwasher, free elec-
tric, lake view, section 8 wel-
come, cash back $1500
monthly call
305-717-6084.
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
3171 NW 52 ST
Four bedrooms, two baths,
completely remodeled.
Section 8 welcome.
305-753-6006.
3380 Frow Avene
Coconut Grove.Three
bedrooms, one bath, gated.
Section 8. 305-525-4644.
3530 NW 197 ST
Three beds/ 4th room use as
bedroom/den. Central A/C
Sec. 8 HOPA. 305-624-0451
442 N.W. 59 TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
brand new kitchen, brand
new appliances. $850
monthly, $1700 moves you
in. Section 8 Welcome:
305-458-3977
595 N.W. 49TH STREET
Three bedroom. Section 8
welcome. 786-269-5643.

7121 N.W. 21st Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths
Section 8 Only 305-720-7072
7801 N.W. 2ND COURT
Small two bedroom, one
bath, $650 a month,
$1300 to
move in. Call 305-479-3632.
781 NW 77th Street (rear)
One bedroom, appliances in-
cluded, air, utilities paid by
tenant. $550 monthly. $1375
to move in. 305-742-1050

HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three and four bed-
rooms. $700-$1250 with air.
305-642-7080.

MIAMI AREA
Four bedrooms two bath
$1350.718-354-7234.

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedroom, one bath,
utilities included. $1700
monthly, first, last and securi-
ty. Furniture for .sale. Call
786-285-4335

MIAMI GARDENS
Canal front, three bedrooms,
one bath, remodeled, $1600.
Section 8 Ok. 305-879-8158,

NORTH DADE AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, large family room, wash-
er, carport, $1500 a month,
Section 8 welcome, call 305-'
467-2708.
NORTH WEST AREA
*Two, three, four houses for
rent Section 8 only. 786-
317-8444 and 305-244-0917.
NORTHWEST, MIAMI DADE
One, two, three and four
bed-
rooms. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Sean 305-205-7738.





FIXER UPPER
Owner Finance,
rent to own
$169,500 three bedroom, 3/1.
hugh yard, 24 hr recording 1-
800-970-5628 ext 8.
Owner finance, rent to own
4 nice homes available. Hear
recorded list 1-800-970-5628
Ext. 8.


SCondos/Townhouses

759 N.W. 70 STREET
Three bedroom, three bath,
den and patio, $199,000.
$40k from City of Miami and
$7k down payment to quali-
fied buyers. Ocean Palm Re-
alty 305-456-6630.

Duplex

Buy Owner Duplex for
Sale
Two separated houses,
three
bedroom, one bath and a
two 'bedroom, one bath.
Hugh fenced in yard. Newly
renovated, new central air,
bath, kitchen, roof, etc.
Must
sale. $229K .8000 N.W. 1st
Place. 305-389-7735.



1052 NW 67 Street
Four bedroom, two bath.
CBS Miami, plus family room.
Fence yard and Central air.
1669 square feet. $169.5K.
305-476-7415
112 MARION ROAD
Why rent, Buy! Miami Gar-
dens. Three bedrooms, pool.
$995 down- $1299 monthly
FHA. 786-306-4839.
15720 N.W. 28th Place
Four bedrooms, central air.
$995 down and $1299
monthly. FHA, 786-306-
4839.
2184 N.W. 86 Terrace
Gorgeous, new three bed-
rooms, two baths, appliances
included, affordable housing
accepted. Call 305-318-
7317.
3211 N.W. 169 Terrace
*Why rent?Buy. Three bed-
rooms two baths, pool. Will
remodel Try $995 down and
$1349 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839/
3315 N.W. 213 TERR.
Why rent-Buy! Five bed-
rooms, three baths, central
air. $995 down-$1499 month-
ly, FHA. 786-306-4839.
3315 N.W. 49th Street
Four bedrooms, central air.
$995 down and $997 month-
ly. FHA, 786-306-4839.
ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
'UPTO'$65,000 to
On Any Home
Also available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Really
N.W. 191 AVENUE -191 ST.
Rollling Oaks. Why rent-Buy.
Five bedrooms, garage, pool.
$4900 down and $1399
monthly. 786-306-4839.
Two, three and four
bedroom houses at whole-
sale prices 786-285-8872



Attorney Services
Available for little monies.
Call 786-853-7274.

Bank's and Son
Lawn Service. Low rates.
Call
305-836-6804/305-620-5913.
ELDERLY CARE
In Christian home. Room for
elderly male patient who
need some assistance with
daily care. Must be
ambulatory. References
available.
305-693-8326

JUST IN TIME FOR
CHRISTMAS SPEICAL
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors,
cabinets and lawn service.
305-801-5690.

Need an Accredited high
school diploma? Let us help
you accomplish that goal.
Call Barbara 754-484-1128.

New tankless water heaters
Pressure cleaning, painting,
plumbing, electrical and roof-
ing. Call now 305-625-5831.
WE BUY REAL ESTATE
Any area, condition, price
fast cash. Call 786-285-
8872
WE CAN HELP
Behind in payments.
Call 786-285-8872.


Collections
Strong organization and
communication skills re-
quired to coordinate collec-
tion process, and cash flow.
Two years exp. Fax re-
sume to 305-758-3617.

Grace Academy In-
ternational is current-
ly seeking energetic,
experienced, compas-
sionate and commit-
ted teachers, teachers
aides, and volunteers
to serve in grades K-
12 and in all subject
areas including core
subjects, Spanish,
Art, Music, and Ath-
letic Coaching. Indi-
viduals must be flexi-
ble, multi-tasking, in-
novative, and willing
to accept challenges.
We welcome you to
join us in making a
momentous effort of
restoring at-risk un-
derserved communi-
ties and families.
For more informa-
tion please feel free to
contact us at
(305) 751-5910, all
interested appli-
cants must email re-
sume to:
apps@graceacadmyfl.
org



Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street




.- Be a Security Guard
-Or renew license $55, D 40
hours $100 also do G and
concealed. Open seven days
786-333-2084.

BILLING AND
COLLECTION
COURSE
$750
9 WEEKS ONLY
SATURDAY CLASSES
EZ PAYMENT PLAN
WWW,PRSSONLINE.COM
1031 IVES DAIRY ROAD
MIAMI, FL 33179
305-794-3961 -305-914-
3799
Caught Speeding ????
Call DC Today 305-653-5955
online classes available
www.anythingandeverything
trafficschool.com
"Don't Be A Victim"
NRA Certified, Personal Pro-
tection, in the home security
classes Available-"D" and "G"
Call 305-653-5955.

SUMMER VPK PROGRAM
Prepare your 4 year old for
kindergarten. Teacher has
Masters Degree. 8 a.m. 12
p.m. Extended hours for
small fee. Ruby White.
._ Merry Poppins
3110 NW 59 Street
305-638-3279




Church available with cen-
tral air, kitchen, office Seat
85. Call: 305-687-1218.

Homemade Conch Fritter
Batter. 954-559-3739.


Who Cares What




Black People




Think Anyway


If you think nobody gives a damn what Black
people think, think again. Some people care a lot.
Especially when they need something from you.

Take corpoialions They want you to buy their products. And banks care

whether you're going to give them your money. Polltlclans.They care what

you think when they're looking for your vote. And TV and radio stations

hope you will pay attention to their shows.

The point is, all these people want something from you. And when

people want something from you, you have got power over them.We


should learn to use that power wisely to make the changes we need to

make.

Give your money, your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve It.

People who are going to give you something in return. People who are

doing the most for the Black community.

Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.

The Miami Times Is about the business of communication. Communicat-

ing to you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it.

For instance, right now there are 32 million Black people In this country and

last year we earned more than 400 billion dollars.


i 6 Ir















l*4 a m .b -dw d .S


SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans $150
Infusion Frontal laces
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $85
786-277-6821
06/10/08


A.V. INSURANCE
$ave $$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
04/10/08
C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners *
General Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue
305-836-5206

Sp 6 pl^Zt^k hmid^lpm IM "
4 41 *GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07/20/08


FAITH FINANCIAL
Reverse Mortgage!
Stay at home Enjoy Tax Free
No Mtg. Payments. If you are
62 yrs or older call me
Alex at 305-205-1697
01/09


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08


Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553

weeAs ,6diM-t
Call
305-694-6210


Fax
305-694-6211


0Copyrighted4Material.



Syndicated Content


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('SC ~. Bomb Se iw~6erv ur~ ~ h pr~


FPL seeks 16 percent hike


COMMISSION
continued from 5D

individuals and small
businesses; the PSC
should decline to allow
FPL a rate hike at this
time."
"If FPL's proposal
passes [the PSC], resi-
dents of Florida will be
forced to choose be-
tween their food and
electricity in order to
make their already
constrained budgets
meet," Commissioner
Sosa emphasized.
FPL recently an-
nounced that on July


1 it would ask the
PSC to approve a fuel
adjustment that will
result in a 16 percent
rate increase for resi-
dential electricity and
a 19 percent increase
for electricity for non-
residential customers
starting in August and
continuing through
the end of 2008. FPL
is requesting these in-
creases because of a
32 percent increase
in the price of natural
gas and a 54 percent
increase in the cost of
fuel oil within the past
year.


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional, Safe & Confidential Services


Termination Up to 22 Weeks
-Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
i ABORTION START $180 AND UP
305-621-1399


O w A


Stop renting...be a homeowner!

1e" TOWNHOUSES
1 bed/1 bath Approx. $550/month
1290 NW61 St.

w1 Habitat for Humanity'
of Greater Miami

305-634-3628


H The Georgia
Witch Doctor
& Root Doctor
"Powerful Magic"
I Remove evil spells, court and Jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.
Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev, Doc Brown
P.O. Box 50964 Albany GA. 31705


MIAMI-C


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for contract opportunities, which
can be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.
miamidade.gov/dpm. Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, free of charge, from
our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is available at all branches of the Miami-Dade
Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our Website on a daily basis to view newly posted
solicitations, addendums, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1s Street, 13t" floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional $5.00 handling charge
for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the bid package through the United States Postal
Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with County Ordinance No.
98-106.

Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids and proposals by requiring
vendor affidavits only once at the time of vendor registration.

Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavits one time, instead of each time they
submit a bid or proposal. Solicitations advertised after June 1s' will require that all vendors complete the
new Vendor Registration Package before they can be awarded a new County contract. Obtain the Vendor
Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.


PUBLIC NOTICE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY
BLUE LAGOON APARTMENTS

The waiting list for Blue Lagoon Apartments, a Section 202 Supportive Housing
for the Elderly project, has closed. Due to the high volume of applicants on the
waiting list the average wait is over two years. Therefore,,lease applications will
not be given or received, until further notice, for this particular project located at
725 NW 57 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33126

CNC Management Inc.
(305) 641-3634 TID (305) 643-2079
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY am=


BLACKS MUSTCONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


.---^-








9D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008


BLA C~KS NiMUST CONTROL FiHLIR OWN DESTINYI


(;rduatilnt high bhoo nkw roUl the dkt with walunt






"Copyrighted Material



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NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on,the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."
"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


RFP 087-HH10


7/15/2008


TITLI9


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR MEDICAL
CONSULTING SERVICES AND HEALTH PLAN
OMBUDSMAN


098-HH06 7/8/2008 Air Conditioners, Bard

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


MIAMIDADE

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/DNeterans' Preference
beZIiYtri5-E~xcrItct Ever-y tr

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS
CITY OF MIAMI CIVILIAN INVESTIGATIVE PANEL

The City of Miami Civilian Investigative Panel (CIP) seeks to fill a vacancy for
a volunteer Panel member. Applicants must be willing to commit a significant
number of hours annually to the CIP.
The CIP is an independent, citizens' oversight panel comprised of (13) mem-
bers who oversee the City of Miami Police Department. All members of the CIP
must be permanent residents of the City of Miami, own real property, or work
or maintain a business in the City of Miami. Members should have a reputa-
tion of integrity and community service and cannot have a record of a felony
conviction.
Interested individuals must submit a membership application and include a
short biography or resume. Applications may be downloaded from the CIP
website, www.miamigov.com/cip, obtained from the CIP office at. 155 S. Miami
Avenue, PH 1B, Miami, FL or by calling 305-579-2444. Complete applications
must be received or postmarked no later than 5:00 PM, Friday, July 11, 2008,
addressed to Shirley E. Richardson, Executive Director, Civilian Investigative
Panel, 155 South Miami Ave. PH-1B, Miami, Florida 33130
Ad.# 16124






SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN/PARK WEST AND OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that a regular CRA Boards of Commissioners
meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West and Omni Redevelopment Dis-
trict Community Redevelopment Agencies will take place on June 30, 2008
at 5:00 PM, at the Miami Woman's Club, 1737 N. Bayshore Drive, Miami, FL
33132
All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information please con-
tact the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.
James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West, and
(#003140) Omni Redevelopment District



MIAM fl

LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR
RETAIL, FOOD AND BEVERAGE
CONCESSIONS PROGRAM 2008
MDAD RFP NO. MDAD-01-08
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY MIAMI, FLORIDA
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department is announcing the availability of the above
referenced advertisement, which can be obtained by visiting our Website at:
www.miami-airport.com/html/businessopportunities.htmi (in order to view
the full Advertisement, please select "Advertisements" link at the bottom of the
Business Opportunities page and then select the respective solicitation).
Copies of the RFP solicitation package can only be obtained through the MDAD,
Contracts Administration Division, in person or via courier at 4200 NW 36th
Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122, or through a mail request to P.O.
Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-5504, attention Maryse Georges, Building 5A,
Contracts Administration, 4th floor, The cost for each solicitation package is
$50.00 (non-refundable) check or money order payable to: Miami-Dade Aviation
Department.
This solicitation is subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with section
2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code.

.,r


"James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manager, will be accepting SEALED
SUBCONTRACTOR BIDS for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Estimate for
Hart ordae Elementary School Total Program Management Classroom Addi-
tior Phase I until 5:00 PM on July 2, 2008. The work includes various trades
for CSI Division 2, 10 and 16. James A. Cummings, inc. Is actively seeking
Broward County School Board certified minority subcontractors and suppli-
ers. Sealed bids will be accepted at James A. Cummings, inc. main office @
3575 NW 53rd Street; Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309. Bid documents will be avail-
able through Cummings, Dodge and Reed Construction. For more information
please call Patrick Holland James A. Cummings, inc. (954) 733-4211 or Fax:
(954) 485-9688.









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY




MIAM I.DADE .,
N :1 N :-:^


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 25-JULY 1, 2008

INVITATION TO BID


Miami-Dade County
Miami-Dade Park and Recreation Department
Miami-Dade County Auditorium Theatre Improvements, Phase I
Contract No. : 410401-03-002

Miami-Dade County, hereinafter known as MDC, will receive bids for the Miami-Dade County Auditorium Theatre Improvements, Phase I, Contract No. 410401-03-002. The project will be located in Miami-Dade County, State
of Florida.

This project is Set Aside (Level 1) for competition by Community Small Business Enterprise Prime Contractors in accordance with Ordinance 97-52 and Administrative Order 3-22. This bid is limited to those certified Community
Small Businesses have established a place of business in Dade County. These Community Small Business firms shall be certified prior to the time of bid by Miami-Dade County in accordance with the requirements of Ordinance 97-52
and Administrative Order 3-22. To obtain information regarding certification, prospective bidders are advised to contact the Small Business Development (SBD), Address: 111 N.W. 1st Street, 19th Floor, Miami, FL.33128, Phone:
305-375-3111 regarding the procedures and time required to obtain the proper certification.

Locally funded projects of $100,000 and above are also subject to the Equal Employment Opportunity requirements and Section 2-11.16 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County (Responsible Wages).

Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code, as amended, a 3Cone of Silence2 is imposed upon each RFP, RFQ or bid after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recom-
mendation to the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits any communication regarding RFPs, RFQs or bids between, among others:

potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff, the Mayor, County Commis-
sioners or their respective staffs;
the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff;
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants, any member of the County's professional staff, the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the respective selection
committee.

The provisions do not apply to, among other communications:

oral communications with the staff of the Vendor Information Center, the responsible Procurement Agent or Contracting Officer, provided the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedure already con-
tained in the solicitation document;
the provisions of the Cone of Silence do not apply to oral communications at pre-proposal or pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed public meeting,
public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed public meeting; or
communications in writing at any time with any county employee, official or member of the Board of County Commissioners unless specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ or bid documents.
Proposers or bidders must file a copy of any written communications with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. The County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the
Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request. Written communications may be in the form of e-mail, with a copy to the Clerk of the Board at CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the Cone of Silence by any proposer or bidder shall render any RFP award, RFQ award or bid award voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of
these provisions shall report such violation to the State Attorney and/or may file a complaint with Ethics Commission. Proposers or bidders should reference Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code for further clarification.

This language is only a summary of the key provisions of the Cone of Silence. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.

Miami-Dade County will receive bids for the auditorium improvements which include the relocation of the sound and light control rooms for an unobstructed view of the stage, a/c as required, upgrade dimmer racks and electrical
service, new production lighting console, sound and communication equipment with selective demolition as necessary. The engineer's cost estimate for the base bid is $1,227,198.30.

Included in the bid shall be the furnishing of all materials, labor, services, supervision, tools and equipment required or incidental to this project. All work shall be performed as per the Contract Documents. Miami-Dade County, at its
sole discretion may elect to negotiate with the apparent low bidder, if only one bidder bids.

The County reserves the right to waive any informalities or irregularities in any bid, or reject any or all bids if deemed to be in the best interest of the County.

As part of this Contract, the County may, at its sole discretion, issue miscellaneous changes covering all construction disciplines. The Contractor shall be capable of expeditiously performing this change work either with its own forces
or with subcontractors. The direct and indirect cost of these changes and time extensions, if any, will be negotiated at the time the changes are issued and payment will be made in accordance with Article 36 of the General Conditions.
As the nature or extent of these changes can not be ascertained prior to notice-to-proceed, the Contractor shall not include an amount in his bid in anticipation of these changes.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED IN: As required by Chapter 10 of the Miami-Dade County. Other Certificates of Competency, if required, shall be provided by subcontractors prior to begin-
ning of work.

Bid Documents will be available on or about 6/25/2008 and may be purchased from Omara Coello at the Park and Recreation Department, 4th Floor, Hickman Bldg., Capital Programs Division, 275 N. W. 2nd Street, Miami, Florida.
A list of bidders may also be obtained at the above listed address. MDC has scheduled a Pre-Bid Conference at 10:00 A.M. local time on 7/2/2008 at the Hickman Bldg., 275 N. W. 2nd Street, 3rd Floor Training Room, Miami, Florida
33128. The Pre-Bid Conference is being held to answer any questions regarding this project.

MDC will receive SEALED Bids at the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, at the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N. W. First Street, Suite 17-202, Miami, Florida 33128 until 2:00 p.m. local time on 7/28/2008. Bids
received after that time will not be accepted, nor will qualified, segregated and/or incomplete Bids be accepted. Bids may not be revoked nor withdrawn for 180 days after the bid opening date. The Contract, if awarded, will be awarded
to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Interested parties are invited to attend.

All bids shall be submitted to the Clerk of The Board in two (2) separate sealed envelopes in the following manner.

Envelope number one shall be in a sealed white envelope containing (1) DBD form 400 Schedule of Intent for each subcontractor for projects which contain goals or are 3Set-Aside2 for CSBE contractors on the project. On the outside
of the envelope place the name of the bidder, its address, the name of the Contract for which the bid is submitted, the contract number and the date for opening of bids.

Envelope number two shall be in a sealed manilla envelope containing the required bid documents. On the outside of the envelope place the name of the bidder, its address, the name of the contract for which the bid is submitted.
The Bid Security specified in Article 7 of the Instruction To Bidders shall be enclosed with the bid. Failure to include the Bid Securit, shall render the bid non-responsive.

The opening of bids will be as follows:

DBD Staff will open the white envelope and review the DBD form 400 Schedule of Intent on the bid opening date and time. If the DBD form 400 has correctable defectss, the bidder will be given a checklist indicating the correctable
defectss. The bidder must submit the corrected DBD form 400 to DBD and the Clerk of The Board within forty-eight (48) hours of the bid opening date. If the bidder's DBD form 400 contains non-correctable defectss, DBD will im-
mediately inform the bidder that the submittal is not responsive and not approved, and envelope number two will not be opened.

Envelope number two will be opened forty-eight (48) hours after the bid opening date. Only the bids that have complied with the DBD form 400 Schedule of Intent submittal will be opened.

Requests must be accompanied by either a check or money order drawn in favor of the Board of County Commissioners, Miami-Dade County, Florida. Cash will not be accepted.

The following is a list of the available Bid Documents and their respective costs:

Contract Drawings (full size) and
Project Manual -------------------------------------------------------------$50.00 each set
(NONREFUNDABLE)
Or

Contract Drawings (full size) with

Project Manual on CD -------------------------------------------------------------$20.00 each set

(NONREFUNDABLE)

Bid Security must accompany each bid and must be in an amount of not less than five percent of the highest Total Bid Price. MDC reserves the right to waive irregularities, to reject bids and/or to extend the bidding period.

Each Contractor, and his subcontractors performing work at the Work site, will be required to pay Florida sales and use taxes and to pay for licenses and fees required by the municipalities in which the Work will be located. Each Contractor
will be required to furnish a Surety Performance and Payment Bond in accordance with Article 1.03, Contract Security, of the Supplemental General Conditions and furnish Certificates of Insurance in the amounts specified in the Contract
Documents.

The Contractor is hereby advised of Resolution No R-1145-99, Clearinghouse for Posting Notices of Job Opportunities Resulting from Construction Improvements on County Property. The procedures direct the Contractor to forward a
notice of job vacancy(ies) created as a result of this construction work to the director of the Employee Relations Department, located at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW 1st Street, suite 2110, Miami, Florida 33128. The job vacancy notices
should be delivered within ten (10) working days following award of the contractor. The Director of the Employee Relations Department will in turn distribute said job announcements to all Miami Dade County facilities participating in the
notification requirements of Resolution No. R-1145-99.

Any firm proposed for use as a CSBE on this contract, must have a valid certification from the Miami-Dade County Department of Business Development (DBD), at the time of bid.

It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to provide equal employment opportunity.

Those responding to this RFP/ITB/RFQ shall comply with the provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and 49 U.S.C. Section 1612 and other related laws and regulations.

Call (305) 755-7848, to request material in accessible format, information on access for persons with disabilities, or sign language interpreter services (7 days in advance), 305-755-7980 (tdd).

SPANISH TRANSLATION:

Llamar al (305) 755-7848, para obtener information acerca del acceso para Leisure Access Services personas minusvalidas y para obtener materials en format accessible. Los interesados en el servicio de interpretes para el idioma
de los sordomudos deben Ilamar con siete dias de antelacion, 305-755-7980 (Servicio telefonico para sordos).

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY


MIAMI-DADE PARK AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

Harvey Ruvin, Clerk
Kay Sullivan, Deputy Clerk
----




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