Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00551
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: June 18, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00551
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text



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LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
SAINEEVIL1E Fl. Qti-T7


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DI S T R I B U T E D IN M I A M I -DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR O V E R 85 YEARS


One Family Serving Since 1923




Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Volume 85 Number 38 '. ; '1-, v ,



Graduation party turns deadly


Parents discuss Opa-locka
teen shooting death
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@mniamitmesonline.comi

It was supposed to be a celebra-
tion. A group of teenagers gathered
at the Roman Pub and Lounge,
1774 Northwest 183 Street, on
Thursday night to commemorate
the accomplishments of two grad-
uates. By the end of the night, the
celebration took a tragic turn after
a shooting left 16-year-old Willie
Mathis Jr. dead.
"He wasn't a bad person. As a
mother, I tried to do everything to
make sure that he stayed out of
trouble," said Tawanda Thompson,
Mathis' mother.
According to investigators, Ma-
this left the party on foot and was


WILLIE MATHIS JR.
Shooting Victim
approached by an individual. The
two argued and the suspect pulled


out a gun. The suspect fired multi-
ple shots at the victim then entered
an unidentified vehicle and drove
east on Northwest 183 Street. Ma-
this died at the scene. An on-duty
Miami Gardens Police officer, hired
to monitor the graduation party,
heard the shots and ran over to
find Mathis' body at a parking lot
outside the lounge.
Thompson spoke to her only son,
who called asking if he could at-
tend the party, no more than five
minutes before he was killed, she
said.
Mathis, a ninth-grader at Mac-
Arthur North High School in Hia-
leah, is described by neighbors as
being a loveable young man. "All
children go through their changes
in life. Everyone loved him. He was
always laughing at people's jokes,"
Please turn to SHOOTING 7A


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In limbo, public school

job cuts await decision


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitmesonline.com

Another school year is over,
but the Miami-Dade School
Board has some critical de-
cisions yet to make that will
impact both teachers and stu-
dents. And as the new
fiscal year begins, it
has to decide on almost
$300 million in cuts to i
its budget. ".
Crunch time brought
frustration at the
school board's Thurs-
day night meeting,
with no decision yet
on where to trim. That, HOLI
however, didn't stop a
few from being on edge.
"The last proposal that was
made was rejected last month.
The situation is we are facing
a budget shortfall by July 1
and are being challenged as we
make the necessary cuts," said
Wilbert "Tee" Holloway, District
1 school board member.


6
.1


A proposal aimed at cutting
500 teaching positions was
dismissed by school board
members, but many teach-
ers still fear that their jobs are
in jeopardy. "By breaking our
contract, it does not improve
the outcomes for our students.
If we cannot believe
the district's words
when we sign a con-
tract then why should
we teach," said Karen
Aronowitz, president
of United Teachers of
Dade.
"Hundreds of teach-
ers are being laid off.
)WAY They are not empha-
sizing the importance
of education as they
continue to lay off teachers.
This is affecting the kids and
teachers. This is critical. The
less you put in education, the
less prepared that the kids will
be for globalization," said Ra-
fael Benitez, a social studies
Please turn to CUTS 6A


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Officials celebrate city's

low-cost housing plans


Lafayette Square Apartments


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By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @iiamiitmesonline.com

Miami is one of the most
expensive cities to live, according
to a recent Metro Action Plan
"State of Miami-Dade" town
meeting. Many residents are
struggling to make rent and
mortgage payments, apart
from nationwide economic
pressures. But there is relief in
sight. And affordable housing
does, indeed, exist.
County Mayor Carlos Alvarez
and District 3 Commissioner
Audrey Edmonson, along with
the Gatehouse Group, Carlisle
Development Group, Biscayne
Housing Group and Pinnacle
Housing Group, held a news
conference on Thursday, June
12 celebrating the affordable
housing projects being built
throughout the community.
"I want to salute our mayor
for his leadership in fighting
for affordable housing. These
facilities that we are building


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demonstrate the efforts that
we are making in Miami-
Dade," said Commissioner
Edmonson.
The event took place at
Lafayette Square Apartments,
150 N.E. 79th St., in the heart
of Little Haiti. Lafayette is
one in a series of affordable
housing projects in the works
in an effort to rejuvenate the
streets of Miami. Lafayette's
amenities include a fire
sprinkler and announcement
speaker in each unit, a library,
which includes computer work
stations, Internet access in
the units, community room,
a state-of-the-art gym with
television monitors, a trash
chute and washer/dryer
hookups. Tenants may use the
available facilities with their
access card. Keys that can
not be duplicated are given to
tenants. Around 80 percent
of tenants have washers and
dryers installed in their units.
Please turn to HOUSING 8A


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


Diaz sentence a miscarriage

and an "open door"
Developers have long been a source of consternation
for Miami-Dade's working class and working poor,
even when it seemed they tooted their own horns to
the tune of progress. But as the housing corruption scandal
unfolds, just what happens to these criminals is both baffling
and telling.
The most egregious example of the baffling in the corruption
scandal is Reynaldo Diaz, who fleeced the Miami-Dade
Housing Agency through a $5 million dollar program that
promised to "open the doors to homeownership" to working
poor families. In one audacious example of malfeasance in a
series of frauds, Diaz submitted a fake contract for $73, 590
for six lots owned by one of his employees. The only problem
was the employee never owned the land but was pushed by
Diaz to sign the bogus contract.
In total, Diaz built a disgraceful two of the 28 homes he
promised to construct for working poor families. It's unclear
how much he actually stole through insider deals and waste,
but Diaz has returned $940,000. Another unscrupulous
developer, Oscar Rivero used more than $700,000 in county
funds to buy a house for himself. Yet another, Raul Masvidal,
has denied any wrongdoing and is awaiting trial for allegedly
taking housing money to buy a sculpture of a giant watermelon
slice. How refreshing!
But more disturbing isn't merely the fact that developers like
Diaz didn't fulfill their Samaritan promises to communities in
dire need of respectable housing, it's the laughable "penalties"
he received in a plea deal that saved his hide from a 30-year
prison term. No, thankfully for Diaz, who was denied an
outrageous request that he be allowed to report to probation
by mail, he was "sentenced" to three years' probation and
ordered to complete 326 days of "work" with Habitat for
Humanity. He also agreed never to seek a contract with the
county again. But that likely won't matter.
At the end of the day, the ones who suffer most are the
people on waiting lists for affordable housing. With so-called
penalties such Diaz', there will be plenty more crooked
developers waiting in the wings for a peace of government
cheese at the expense of the working poor. After all what's to
stop them?


tbe Miami iusm I

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 orJW 541h Sireael
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
PoEI Ofice Box 270200 i
Buena Vsta Staiion. Miami, Florida 33127 t
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60 00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
PeJ odicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The BlackI Press believes InhatAmeic3a can oest lead the world from racial and national aniagonisrr when it accords to
every person, regardless of race creed or color his or her human and legal rights Haling no person, fearing no person. the
Black Press series to10 nelp avery parson in the firm deliei inal all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held Dack

Ap I' The Media Audit ==


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Mayors Conference: Ticket prices keeping us out?


Democratic Presidential
candidate Barack Obama will
address the nation's mayors
at the U.S. Conference of May-
ors in Miami this week. While
the mayors and the candi-
date discuss urban solutions
to some of the most pressing
issues of our time, a very im-
portant group will be absent:
the majority. With tickets top-
ping $1,1650 it is no wonder
that the majority of people
can't seem to get a seat at the
table. But it isn't just ticket
prices that keep us out.
Mayors nationwide are ap-
pealing to the minority of
special interest, private com-
panies, developers and specu-
lators instead of the majority:
small businesses, families,
community organizations that
make up our city. These part-
nerships of big capital with
power holders are playing out
the city, regional and federal
levels. Deals are cut to funnel
public money into the private
sector without accountability.
In Miami, no new affordable
housing has been built for
the most low income families,
even at the height of the hous-
ing crisis. Instead, politicians
gave land and infrastructure
to developers for mega-de-
velopments. Access to pub-
lic education is under attack
as children are seen more
as criminals than students.
In Florida alone budgets for
schools were cut while spend-


ing on prisons increased. So-
cial service programs were
gutted using racist justifica-
tions while tax cuts continue
for the richest of the rich. This
divestment from the public
good, the good of the major-
ity of residents, and funneling
of money from public good to
private interest is the crux of
neo-liberalism.
Neo-liberal policies are de-
stroying our cities. Under
neo-liberalism, public goods
are used or sold for corporate


end to the neo-liberal hijack-
ing of our cities and assert a
right to the city for all people.
This mobilization, the March
on the Mayors, is organized
by the Right to City National
Alliance (RTTC). Composed
regionally of Miami Workers
Center, Power U Center, Veci-
nos Unidos and Florida Legal
Services -grassroots commu-
nity organizations from seven
mega-metropolitan regions in
the U.S., RTTC is building a
movement for a democratic


n Miami, no new affordable housing has been built for the
most low income families, even at the height of the hous-
ing crisis.


welfare. There is only one bot-
tom line: profit. Other needs
and values, such as commu-
nity health, environmental
sustainability, education, af-
fordable housing, fair jobs,
and access to public space all
become deprioritized.
Rather than regulate these
deals to protect and also serve
the community, politicians
are signing over our cities to
the highest campaign contrib-
utor. A minority of business-
men, developers, and specu-
lators should not be dictating
the policies, programs, and
services of our cities.
During the U.S. Conference
of Mayors, residents from
across the country will con-
verge on Miami to demand an


human right to the city with
racial justice, economic jus-
tice and self determination at
its core.
Over 150 national delegates
and 300 Miami residents will
gather in a summit to start
building a national urban plat-
form, the People's State of the
City Summit. They will per-
form a New Orleans Jazz Fu-
neral, led by the New Orleans
second-line To Be Continued
brass band. Marchers will
bury coffins and giant skel-
eton puppets symbolizing the
worst of our cities: gentrifica-
tion, racism bad governance,
and celebrate a growing move-
ment for urban justice. Final-
ly, RTTC is collaborating with
Katrina Information Network


to lobby U.S. mayors to stop
doing business with FEMA
contractors who were cited by
U.S. Congress for profiteering
from Hurricane Katrina relief
efforts.
Today, our economy is en-
tering a tailspin and countless
condo towers stand dark and
empty on the tropical hori-
zon. More than 1,100 African-"
American residents were dis-
placed by the destruction of
the Scott and Carver homes.
Thousands of long-term mo-
bile home park residents face
eviction as landlords try to flip
their land, and slumlords are
squeezing rent out of tenants
in terrible living conditions,
banking on an overall lack of
affordable housing. It is clear
where corporate control of our
politicians has taken us: in
the wrong direction.
Clearly it is time to take our
cities back. RTTC is united
around the principles of land
for people vs. land for specu-
lation, land ownership, eco-
nomic justice, indigenous
justice, environmental jus-
tice, freedom from police ha-
rassment, immigrant justice,
community institutions, de-
mocracy and participation,
reparations, international
solidarity, and rural justice.
When we make it simple we
are united and fighting for our
democratic human right to
the city, a right that has been
denied for too long.


NLNT14E NLWS HATTER-; To You
T URN -f ()YOI R'N-l1\%xSI11. %P 1;


Tbe 1fiami Timaf
[he M,,mii T'nes .elcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commrreniianes as xwill as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback makes
for -t he,Jth,:,.lo digu e rn,ongu our readership nnd their community Lctlers must. however, be briel and to the point All letters must be signed and must
inclth.de he namine. addresss and teleplione riumber of the r.iter tfr puLpiuses o confirming auithorship.
Send letters r.i Letuers to the Editor Thi-e lMiarn Tirnms, 900 N W 54th Street. Mitam, FL .33127, or fa>. them to 305-757-5770. Email: miaLmteditonalii
bIells outh net


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OPINION


BL ACKS NALIST CON rROLI. THEIR OWN D015 liINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


- BY JOSEPH Q. PHILLIPS


Obama ordained by God


"Barack Obama has been
ordained by God" to be our
next president. Or so read the
email from a friend of mine. Of
course, he is not alone in this
opinion. Congressman Jesse
Jackson, Jr. (D-IL) is on record
as suggesting that this Obama
victory "is so extraordinary
that another chapter could be
added to the Bible to chroni-
cle its significance." I remain
unconvinced that the sena-
tor's clinching the Democratic
nomination is on a par with,
say, parting the Red Sea or
rising from the dead.(Obama's
promise in his victory speech
that his administration will,
"heal the planet" and calm the
oceans notwithstanding.)I am,
however, excited by the his-
torical moment. Our nation
is standing on the precipice
of history looking over into a


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cils and the Klan. Men hke
George "segregation forever",
Wallace carried the banner for
the Democratic Party.
Those days seem to belong
to another time when in fact it
was not all that long ago. It
is a testament to the great-
ness not only of the American
people, but of the central idea
of our American founding that
we have reached this mile-
stone in so brief a time. There
is no question that our jour-
ney has been grueling, painful
and bloody, but as the histori-
cal clock goes it has been rela-
tively short.
That is not to say that race
and/or racism no longer play a
role in our American lives. In-
deed it is one of the great iro-
nies of this moment that even
as we are poised to deliver the
death blow to white suprema-


I ...


I am old enough to recall an America where the "N-word" was
used more frequently by White folks than Black, Protests and
race riots were staples of the nightly news and a Black family
moving into a White neighborhood was a remarkable event.


brave new world; poised to
take a historic leap and it does
indeed seem as if the hand of
providence is pulling the heav-
enly strings. I am at this very
moment scanning the heavens
for omens either good or bad:
falling stars, birds flying back-
wards anything that may shed
some light on the great mys-
tery.
I am old enough to recall an
America where the "N-word"
was used more frequently by
White folks than Black, Pro-
tests and race riots were sta-
ples of the nightly news and
a Black family moving into a
White neighborhood was a re-
markable event. (I was the first
Black student to attend my el-
ementary school.)
My stories, of course, pale
in comparison to those told by
my parents who would recall
the days when federal build-
ings were segregated. Black
employees of our government
were forced to use separate
bathrooms, back entrances
and lunch rooms to say noth-
ing of being excluded from the
halls of power. The doors to op-
portunity remained closed. Jim
Crow was the rule and Black
people were expected to "know
their place." It was a time when
the Democratic Party was the
home of White Citizen's Coun-


cy, race will be front and cen-
ter in this upcoming general
election.
Republican candidate John
McCain's words will be mea-
sured and analyzed against the
"new language of race." We
have already been instructed
that criticisms of Obama as
elitist are in actuality code for
saying he is uppity and to call
attention to his inexperience is
really to call him a "boy" and
so forth. There will be pressure
on Black voters to support Ba-
rack as a measure of one's ra-
cial solidarity; White voters will
be urged to purge themselves of
racial guilt. Such ever present
notions are exclusively about
race and seem to cast a doubt
on the real amount of progress
we have made.
But I prefer to look at the
glass as being half-full. In the
end, we have demonstrated the
moral veracity of the American
ideal of the equality of man-
kind. I do not know if God has a
hand in Barack Obama becom-
ing president of these United
States. I am however, certain
beyond a doubt that there is a
greater power guiding this greal
nation.
Joseph C. Phillips is the au.
thor of "He Talk Like A White
Boy" available wherever books
are sold.


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State Senator Tony Hill of Jacksonville had a clear mes-
sage for the Democratic Black Caucus meeting at the Westin
Diplomat Resort & Spa in Hollywood least weekend during
the Jefferson-Jackson activities. Drop the egos at the door. No
personalities. And come together. He said unity payoff. When
Obama takes the oath of office, Hill said, "the whole world's
Going to change."

The Obama campaign is serious about taking this state away
from the Republicans. Tampa saw an invasion last weekend.
:i It's part of a massive mobilization of volunteers for Obama's
campaign throughout the nation. The 3,600 volunteers the
campaign calls them "fellows" include 400 in the key bat-
fI I ^'!^ K tleground state of Florida.
Gay couples from all over the country seem to be heading to
California this week as legalized same-sex marriages goes into
effect in the state. While most clerks plan to marry gay cou-
ples, a few, such as Kern County Clerk Ann Barnett, canceled
weddings altogether. That won't stop couples from marrying,
though: The county still must issue marriages licenses.

Many people throughout the county will be celebrating Ju-
neteenth tomorrow. Juneteenth commemorates the day Union
soldiers freed the last African slaves in Galveston, Texas 2
-/2 years after President Lincoln enacted the Emancipation
4 Proclamation in 1863.
Today, 29 states including Florida recognize Juneteenth as
a state holiday, but people don't get the day off.

Here's a new twist on the troubled mortgage problems peo-
ple are experiencing today. Some South Florida homeowners
have sued their mortgage lenders, alleging the institutions
committed fraud in making loans that borrowers couldn't af-
ford to pay.

9 The recent upturn in the Florida Comprehensive Assess-
'V ment Test proved to everyone that hard work and dedication
pays off in the classroom. We think far too much weight is
given to this one aspect of teaching, but isn't it a good feeling
when we see resources, visions and leadership overcome pov-
N AA erty, language and culture?

Our Florida politicians usually play their games together,
but somebody must have gotten the signals crossed on that
lucrative transportation bill for Florida's Turnpike. Gov. Char-
lie Crist voted a measure that House Speaker Marco Rubio
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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BLACKS Musi CoNTROl TI-ILIR OWN DESTINY 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


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.Vi


Miami-Dade County: Some limitations, restrictions, coinsurance and co-payments may apply. CarePlus Health Plans, Inc. is an MA organization with a Medicare contract. You must be entitled to Medicare Part A and enrolled in Part B. You
must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium, if not otherwise paid for you under Medicaid or by another third-party. This plan is a Medicare approved Chronic Disease Special Needs Plan and physician diagnosis of the disease
must be verified. *The products and services described above are neither offered nor guaranteed under our contract with the Medicare program. In addition, they are not subject to the Medicare appeals processes. Any disputes regard-
ing these products and services may be subject to the CarePlus grievance process.


BLACKS MUST CONTRoi- THEIR OWN DESTINY I


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24,2008


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6A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


- ~ I


i


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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle


Miami-Dade County,


District 2


invites you to a
FREE FORECLOSURE SEMINAR
designed to provide practical information to help
homeowners avoid foreclosure


Free one-on-one


'4'.",

.r~j


/2x


counseling

Friday, June 20
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at
Northwest
Christian Academy
951 NW 136th Street

For more information
about the seminar, call
305-375-4833.


L -


United Teachers offers suggestions to minimize


CUTS
continued from 1A
teacher at Paul W. Bell Middle
School.
The United Teachers of Dade
has suggested ways to mini-
mize the budget, such as cut-
ting school administrators and
redirecting them back into the
classrooms (estimated savings
of $14 million), reducing ad-
ministrator contracts (estimat-
ed savings of 8 to 17 percent of
administrator salaries), class-
size hiring practices (estimat-
ed savings of $50 million), in-
crease usage of extra teaching
period supplements (estimated
savings of $5 million), inef-
ficient utilization of existing
schools (estimated savings of
at least $11 million) and not
implementing new programs.
"If we run the system more ef-


fectively, then we can save the
jobs. Now is the time to fix the
missing elements. The United
Teachers of Dade have offered
alternatives such as cutting
back overtime so that more
jobs can be saved. The long-
term resolution is for our state
Legislature to take our schools
more seriously. It is not right
that our kids have to deal with
budget cuts. It shows the lack
of respect for the students in
the public education system
and teachers," said Fedrick
Ingram, secretary/treasurer of
the United Teachers of Dade.
Aronowitz said some of the
surplus would benefit some
of the county's most vulner-
able students.
On Thursday, the board
declined a proposal to re-
move food-service workers,
deferred the idea of selling


WLRN, and refused to. use
any funds to support WLRN
stations.
The school board must
make its budget decision be-
fore its July 1 deadline.


Join MDX for our 5th Annual

Procurement Workshop for

Small and Minority Businesses

Creating Opportunities & Facilitating Resources


Location:


Wyndham Miami Airport Hotel Date:


(adjacent to MDX Office)
3900 N.W. 21 Street
Miami, Florida 33142


Friday, June 27, 2008


Time: 8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.


Here's what's in store:
Expo & Trade Show: Prime contractors, top minority businesses,
educational institutions and government agencies.


Construction Workshop: A roundtable of experts for large construction
projects to provide information on current contracting opportunities.
Matchmaking Sessions: Participants will meet one-on-one with
matchmakers to display their company and learn about
upcoming contracting opportunities.


Free and open to the public. To RSVP or for more
information call MDX at (305) 637-3277 or e-mail
at procurementdept@mdxway.com



i MIAMI.DADBE XPRISSWAYAUTHORITY
www.mdxway.com


THE TRUE MEASURE OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
LIES IN ITS COURAGE, ITS PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
AND ITS DEDICATION TO THE COMMUNITY IT SERVES

Zlfe hliami times
Measures uPIl


NOY hupIrs


I


I


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( pq wc


AFARS








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Foundation seeks applicants for Range scholarship


The M. Athalie Range Cul-
tural Arts Foundation, Inc.
(MARCAF), the famed ener-
getic charitable organization
established in honor of Mi-
ami's late beloved matriarch,
seeks talented high school
seniors who seriously aspire
to professional careers in the
performing arts to apply for
scholarships to further their
education.
MARCAF Scholarships are
open to graduating seniors of
African descent/heritage who
have attended a Miami-Dade
public school for at least two
years. Applicants must reside
in Miami-Dade County and be


a U.S. citizen or hold a perma-
nent residency card.
Applicants must have a grade
point average of at least 2.5 or
C+ and submit an essay. They
must enroll as a fulltime un-
dergraduate student at a post-
secondary community college
or state or private educational
institution, and must pursue
a degree in the performing
arts arena. The scholarships
are valued at $2,500 each. Ap-
plications must be submitted
by Monday, June 30.
The Range Foundation is
dedicated to perpetuating Mrs.
Range's dream of expanding
community awareness and


M. ATHALIE RANGE
Founder, MARCAF


appreciation of the perform-
ing arts, particularly by show-
casing world-class African
American performers at its
Annual Musical Celebration
of Life Gala, and by providing
direct support to promising
young aspirants to perform-
ing arts careers. (MARCAF
also honors outstanding indi-
viduals and organizations for
their exemplary lifetime con-
tributions, with one of South
Florida's most prestigious and
coveted annual awards.)
For more application in-
structions and other informa-
tion on scholarships, call the
Foundation at 305-893-5468.


Victim's mother questions MySpace promotion


SHOOTING
continued from 1A
said Thompson. Mathis' MyS-
pace.com profile page shows
the teen holding what appears
to be a fire arm. He has no
criminal past on record.
Cassandra Harrell threw the
party for her daughter and an-
other young lady. To ensure
safety, Harrell hired five se-
curity officers and one under-
cover police officer. iSome of
the people put their invitation
on MySpace but everyone was
patted down when they came
into the party,i said Harrell.
About 75 to 100 people attend-
ed the event, which did not
turn violent inside the lounge,
that night. Harrell said the two
young ladies insisted they did
not know Mathis.


Thompson questions the
promotion of the party. Many
young people posted the invi-
tation on their MySpace pages,
leaving the party open to any-
one who wished to attend. "The
security that was hired should
have been more visual of their
surroundings. It's sad but it
seems like every year young
people are losing their lives
to graduation parties that are
meant to bring celebration not
mourning," said Thompson.
This becomes the second
year that a violent death has
occurred at a high school
graduation- party. Last year,
two young men were shot and
killed while attending a party
inside Miami's Polish Ameri-
can Club. Sixteen-year-old
Labron Brown is awaiting trial
on a second-degree murder


charge.
"I don't want any revenge but
I want the violence to stop. I
want the young people to stop.
Not just the Black-on-Black
crimes . I don't want any
parent to have to go through
what I am going through. Be-
ing a single parent, I am proud
that I got him to sixteen with-
out a criminal record. I can
honestly say that I did good,"
said Thompson.
"We took all the necessary
precautions in order to pre-
vent this from happening and
have an enjoyable time. If the
parents were more involved
in their children's lives then
these things would not be hap-
pening. Parents need to know
what's happening in their kid's
personal life," said Harrell.
The Miami Times was un-,


(htafTi Ac, timr so kiwr mr\ux-fa-<


*











Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"

*1


successful in its attempts to
contact the Roman Pub and
Lounge via telephone, and the
lounge's doors were locked
Monday afternoon.
"It seems like he was mak-
ing his rounds throughout the
week. I came into his room to
grab his laundry and he kissed
me on the cheek, said Thomp-
son. "He was being so nice to
me. He said, 'Mama, you have
been so good to me.' "
Miami-Dade Police urge any-
one with information about
the shooting to contact the de-
partment's homicide bureau at
305-471-2400 or CrimeStop-
pers at 305-471-8477.


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"




ATTORNEYS AT LAW

JOSEPH M. COREY, JR., P.A




FAMILY LAW


Divorce/$250.00* Paternity
Domestic Violence Child Support/Visitation
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No kids no property plus court costs


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We will extend your stay in your home
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Seal Records


Welterweight Mayweather Jr.

announces retirement again


Unbeaten welterweight
Floyd Mayweather Jr. an-
nounced his retirement again
on Friday, with boxing's un-
official pound-for-pound king
saying he no longer has the
passion necessary to fight.
Mayweather, the WBC wel-
terweight champion, made
the announcement in a letter
to select media.
The 31-year-old former
U.S. Olympian (39-0, 25 KOs)
hasn't fought since beating
Ricky Hatton in December, but


was widely expected to fight
Oscar De La Hoya in Septem-
ber in a rematch of the richest
fight in boxing history.
"'This decision was not an
easy one for me to make, as
boxing is all I have done since
I was a child," said Mayweath-
er, the son and nephew of
three of the sport's top train-
ers. "However, these past few
years have been extremely
difficult for me to find the de-
sire and joy to continue in the
sport."


\'HEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN[ _) YOI-R Ni-\v'P-,AI'ILH


RESCHEDULED PUBLIC HEARING
The Governing Board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Miami Urbanized Area has rescheduled its public hearing items,
originally scheduled for June 19, 2008, to a Special Meeting on Wednesday, July 16, 2008, at 2:00 p.m. in the County Commission
Chambers, Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW First Street, Miami, Florida.
The Governing Board will consider the following Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) and Transportation Improvement Program (TIP)
Amendments:
1. 2030 LRTP: 57th Avenue (SR 823) and NW 135th Street
This amendment will include in Priority IV unfunded list the following capacity improvements:
Widening from 6 to 8 lanes NW 57th Avenue (SR 823) between Palmetto Expressway (SR 826) and NW 135th Street (SR 916).
Widening from 4 to 6 lanes NW 135th Street (R 916) between NW 57th Avenue (SR 823) and NW 42 Avenue (SR 953).
2. FY 2008 TIP: Busway Flyer from Key Largo
This amendment is to modify the scope for the subject project to increase ridership on the existing Route 34 from Dadeland South to Florida
City and delete the reference to Key Largo in the project description.
3. FY 2008 TIP: East-West Corridor Metrorail Extension (Orange Line)/North Corridor Metrorail Extension
This amendment will transfer $4,900,500 in federally earmarked funding for the East West Corridor Metrorail Extension to the North
Corridor Metrorail Extension. These funds are scheduled to expire on September 30, 2008.
4. FY 2008 TIP: Job Access Reverse Commute
This amendment will reconcile the funding difference of $10,912 over the amount represented in the 2008-2012 TIP for the subject project.
5. FY 2008 TIP: New Freedom
This amendment will reconcile the funding difference of $5,978 over the amount represented in the 2008-2012 TIP for the subject project.
In addition to the above items, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District 6 will be seeking MPO Board approval for a number
of revisions to the FDOT Tentative Five-Year Work Program for Fiscal Year 20008/09 2012/13 due to a potential $73.6 million revenue shortfall
for Miami-Dade and Monroe counties; Project details will be provided.
All interested parties are invited to attend. For further information, please contact the MPO Secretariat, Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW First
Street, Suite 910, Miami, Florida 33128, phone: (305) 375-4507; e-mail: mpo@miamidade.gov; website: www.miamidade.gov/mpo.
It is the policy of Miami Dade County to comply with all of the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The facility is accessible.
For sign language interpreters, assistive listening devices, or materials in accessible format, please call 305-375-4507 at least
five business days in advance.







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Affordable housing becomes available to residents


HOUSING
continued from 1A
According to Louis Wolfson
III, partner at Pinnacle Hous-
ing Group, much of these
affordable housing I'i I
are geared toward residents
whose annual household in-
comes are between $15,000
to $38,000 per year.
Nadine Calixte noticed the
Lafayette development while
driving by one afternoon. At
the time, Calixte was strug-
gling to find a decent and in-
expensive place for her fam-
ily, which includes an infant
son, to live. It seemed like an
impossible task, but deter-
mined, she stopped in at the
development to ask for infor-
mation on the units. Lacking
an office location at the time,
representatives were unable
to provide any details about
the units and suggested she
return. Now, just a short
time later, Calixte is a Lafay-
ette resident. ort time, she
became a tenant at Lafayette.
She pays less than $800 for
her spacious three-bedroom
apartment.
"I am glad that I did come
back and got the information
about this place. I enjoy liv-
ing here. This place is really


Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Alvarez and Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson with the
developers of Gatehouse Group, Carlisle Development Group, Biscayne Housing Group and


Pinnacle Housing Group.
big. Everything that I need
is accessible to me and my
family," Calixte said.
"It is used to be the word
'affordable' did not go to-
gether in Miami-Dade. We
have made affordable hous-
ing become a priority. Every
district in Miami-Dade has
affordable housing. It's all
about helping the residents


of Miami live the American
dream. We are making a lot
of improvement and making
sure that affordable housing
becomes a reality in Miami,"
said Mayor Alvarez.
The event honoring af-
fordable housing comes a
day after Miami developer
Reynaldo Diaz plead guilty
to charges in an organized


scheme to defraud. Diaz, the
second developer to plead
guilty in a public housing
corruption scandal in Miami-
Dade County, faced up to 30


years in prison ,but instead
received a sentence of three
years' probation, was ordered
to complete 326 days of com-
munity service with Habitat
for Humanity and agreed to
help with the ongoing inves-
tigation. Diaz received hous-
ing agency money through
a $5 million program for
working-poor families. He
has repaid the $940,000 he
allegedly received from the
Miami-Dade Housing Agency
for which he constructed two
of the 28 homes he prom-
ised. Last month, developer
Oscar Rivero was sentenced
to 21 months in prison after
using more than $700,000
of a county loan for personal
expenses.
"The Commissioner and the
mayor have been advocates
of this industry because they
have understood that 87
percent of these dollars have
come from outside leverage.
These developments and
units have been built with
no scandals, no problems, no
unfilled commitments, and


no compromise in quality,"
said Wolfson.
The problem now is how
residents will access afford-
able housing information
that is available to them, be-
cause so far word of mouth
seems to have been the only
means of communication.
Area developers have hired
the Carrie Meek Foundation
to inform prospective ten-
ants. "We have beer sending
out advertisements and press
releases. We have gone on
1490 WMBM-AM and many
of the Haitian stations to let
the community know what is
going on. People are hearing
us because we are receiving a
lot of applications. The most
important thing that people
should know is to take ad-
vantage of this opportunity,"
said Anthony Williams, ex-
ecutive director of the Carrie
Meek Foundation..
Residents can visit www.
carriemeekfoundation.org to
receive additional informa-
tion or download a housing
application.


Class of '55 gives $500 for team bling

Full of pride for their alma mater, the Booker T. Washington Senior High School class of 1955 recently do-
nated $500 to the football team to assist with the purchase of its championship rings and jacket. The team
currently reigns as state football champions.
Presenting the check to Coach Tim Harris on behalf of the class of 1955 are (left to right), Preston Mar-
shall, Franklin Clark, Eugene Strachan, Clifton Taylor, Agnes Rolle Morton and Sonia Thompson Hodges..
Willie Knowles is class president.


I U i THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL IN COLLABORATION WITH WAL-MART

S 3rd. ANNUAL CITY of MIAMI GARDENS
,..- .. .. ^ . ..... -,_^. ,4,' ., .. .. .

T L n) g i




e' l'


Become a father to the


JHI's


Children's Home


fatherless




For more information
on foster care or adoption,
please contact:


His House Children's Home

(305) 430-0085 ext. 210

www.hhch.org


Lai




UA


DOLPHIN
*~' i *- :" i .. .. ; i


WA* M '


S,.M.. Z


ANNOUNCES OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, June 28 Grace Academy International will hold its annual Open House for prospective students
from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Private school opportunity grades 3 -12
NO FCAT! ESE STUDENTS ARE WELCOME!
Limited space available
McKay Scholarship (free scholarship for ESE students
Florida Pride (for low Income families)
Grace Academy "Bridging the gap between education, communities and success"
It's the open house of an enrichment center that will transform your child's life forever.
"Grace provides students with a quality education with an emphasis on individual attention, plus the op-
portunity to participate in diverse activities and service to others."

Free scholarships available to students grade 3-12.
13400 N.W. 28 Avenue Miami, Florida
For more information Call 305-751-5910


I. i


8A THE kliAlvil JUNE 18-24, 2008


qw





-e Miami Times



;--, IAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 18-24, 2008


S1-e churches


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10B THE MIAMI TIMES, J


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IINF 18-24, 220081


/
?tJ"g f ~tr J{f


RAVEN R. DRAYTON
Miami Northwestern

Look for the best the world
have tp offer. Grand Dad!


KENDALL K. AUSTIN HALL
Valedictorian, Sheyes of Miami.

Congratulations! Proud
parents Kip and Alesha Hall.


Congratulations
On enduring, out lasting and
conquering all the trials and
tribulations grade school placed
before you.
As you continue your
higher education at Florida
International University in your
pursuit of a D.D.S. in dentistry,
let NO challenges, negative
forces or negative people hinder
you in your purpose of life.
You are a child of God, so stay
focused and you will succeed!
You have made us very, very,
very proud young man. We
love you dearly, sincerely and
forever.
Your parents, Sherria and


Terry Elliott Jr.
.. -


TERRY ELLIOTT JR.
Terry Elliott Sr., Linda and
Calvin Jackson (God-parents)


R. Bain-Walden receives doctorate


The family of Retevea "Teve"
Bain-Walden would like to con-
gratulate her on her recent
achievement of obtaining her
Doctorate Degree from Jack-
sonville Theolouicil Seminary,
located in Jackson'. il,:.. FL.
Retevea also holds a Bach-
elors Degree in Biblical Studies
and a Master's Degree in Chris-
tian Counseling.
Professionally, she is a grad-
uate of Miami-Dade Commu-
nity College TSchool of Nursing
and she has been employed in
this profession for the past 20
years.
She is also a minister and ac-
tive member of Out Reach of
Excitement Ministry, under the
leadership of Mother Ruth E.


~0'~
~ *~


RETEVEA BAIN-WALDEN
Crockett.
Retevea is also the wife of
James Walden, III; a mother
of three and a grandmother of
one.


Carnation singers anniversary
Come celebrate the Carnation The Galilee Gospel Singers of
Gospel Singers 18th year anni- Pompano Beach, The Doe Family
versary at ..3 p.m. on Sunday, and The Smiling Jubelears of
June 22nd at Greater Holy Ft. Lauderdale.
Cross M.B.C.. 1555 N.W. 93rd Special guest, The Bryant
Terrace. Family of Tampa and many


The donation is $10 in advance
and $13 at the door.
Featured performances by
The Wimberly Sisters of Miami,


more.
For more information,
contact Sis. Lula Rowen at
786-357-7245.


Lee Williams and the Spiritual
QC's in concert 7 p.m. on
Friday. June 20 at 93rd Street
Crnmunity Bapruit Church,
2330 N.W. 93rd St.
Everyone is invited to come
and get .,our praise on with Lee
Williams.
For more information
please call 'the church at
305-836-0942.



Canon Richard

Barry celebrates

40th anniversary
Service- of Thanksgiving for
the 40th anniversary of the
ordination .of Canon Richard
L. Marquess-Barry will be held
Sunday June 22 at The Historic
St. Agnes' Episcop.:J Church
with Solemn Mass at 9 a.m.
Your are invited to attend this
celebration. Brunch follows the
service in the parish hall. Your
presence is 3our gift to him.


REV. DR. CARL JOHNSON


CANON RICHARD L.
MARQUESS-BARRY
D.D., L.H.D.


REVEREND RICHARD P. DUNN


St. John celebrates

102nd anniversary

St. John Missionary Baptist
Church will celebrate its 102nd
anniversary on this Sunday.
The 10:45 a.m. guest speaker
will be one of the sons of the
church, Reverend Richard P.
Dunn, Senior Pastor of The
Cathedral of Hope Baptist
Church, a very powerful preacher
of the word. The theme is 'Lord I
Revive Us Again'.
Everyone is asked to dress
in old fashion attire. The
anniversary will conclude
with a delicious dinner in
Fellowship Hall following
the service. For additional
information, please call the
church at 305-372-3877 or
305-371-3212.


Faith Evangelistic
Praise and Worship

holds convention

Faith Evangelistic Praise
and Worship Ministries under
the leadership of Bishop Daisy
Jones will be hosting their an-
nual Greater Harvest Conven-
tion, June 23-29 at 7770 N.W.
23 Avenue 6 and 8 p.m. night-
ly.


Sunday Service
New Missionary Church,
1990 Ali Baba Ave., Opa-Locka,
invites you to their 11 a.m.
Sunday service on June, 22nd.
The Mighty Men Chorus will
be singing. Rev. Fred Carter will
be preaching. Frank Patterson
is the pastor.


Broadmoor Elementary names Teacher of the Year


Devoted third grade teacher,
Carolyn Thomrn pso'r was selected
teacher of year at Broadmoor
Elementary for the 2008-2009
school year.
Mrs. Thomps'.o- received
a Bachelor's Degree in
Educational Psychology from
the University of Miami and a
Master's Degree in Elementary
Education from Nova
University.
Her husband. Dwight
Thompson, a music teacher


CAROLYN THOMPSON


at Devon Aire K8 Center, has
always encouraged her to do
her very best. Originally from
Arkansas, she wishes to thank
her mother, Pendora Pugh,
family members and friends for
their support.
Thanks also, to the
administration and staff at
Broadmoor for selecting me for
such a distinguished honor.
Most of all, she gives thanks to
God through His son Yeshua for
allowing her to be a teacher.


Model City N.E.T. & Partners seventh annual Juneteenth celebration


Our theme this year is, There
is Strength in Unity'. This year's
celebration will take place on
Friday, June 20 and Saturday,
June 21. The celebration for
Friday will be held at 1000 N.W.
62 Street (the City of Miami
North Police .Station) beginning
at 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. We


are providing the community
with free food, free live
entertainment, the Junkanoo
band and honoring some of our
trailblazers, Dr. Robert Ingram,
Mother M. Athalie Range and
attorney Jessie McCrary Jr.
Our Mistres of Ceremony for
Friday will be Ms. Stephanie


Bromfield from LOVE 94 and
the speaker will be Dr. Lester
Brown. Presently, Dr. Brown is
retired, but he volunteers
to teach at risk students
on a regular basis at Windsor
Academy, Miami Gardens,
Florida. For information, please
call 305-795-2303.


Youth Revival at New Mt. Calvary


The youth department of
New Mt. Calvary M.B. Church
annual Youth Revival will be
held on June 18-20., everyone
is welcome. Come and be
blessed.
Our evangelist is the Rev. Dr.
Tracy L. McCloud, Sr. pastor of
Peace M.B. Church. All services
start promptly at 7:30 p.m.
On Sunday, June 22 at 7:30
a.m., Rev. Evelyn McCloud of
Peace M.B. Church will be our
speaker and at 11 a.m. Rev.
Robert J. Brooks, Jr. of Second
Baptist will close out Youth
Day.
Come out and celebrate this
worship experience with our
youth.


REV. DR. TRACY L MCCLOUD
Pastor of Peace M.B. Church


HAPPY

FATHERS DAY


DEACON ROBERT HINES SR.
Daddy, you'll rest in our
hearts forever.
Love, your family


"Copyrighted Material



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Available from Commercial News Providers"


.. ,
.fr 9,'. -.


.. .. ,.
. .4- . -


Caleb Center
5400 N.W. 22nd Avenue, Miami, FL 33142



TOPICS INCLUDE:
Foreclosure Prevention Default Counseling
* Delinquency Procedure Understanding Your Options
Loss Mitigation Anticipated Lender Sessions


Sponsored By:

Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson
Miami-Dade County, District 3

and
Miami-Dade Housing Finance Authority
Miami-Dade Affordable Housing Foundation, Inc.
Miami-Dade Neighborhood Housing Services
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Dade County Alumnae Chapter


"."


C


I


TERELL KILLINGS
Miami Northwestern


Congratulations and best
wishes for a bright future.
Love your family


BRANDON B. DRAYTON
Miami Northwestern

Look for the best the world
have to offer. Grand Dad!


Concert at 93rd Street


IUIIL lu-L.-+, LVUU


F---







BLACKs MUST CONTROLt I1IR OWN DESTrINY 11B THE MIAMI TIMES,JUNE 18-24, 2008


addingng brll ring frw %awIr-w'r coimipku in ('alifornia

















"Cop i ohted Material




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Available from Commercial News Providers"


Commissioner Spence-Jones puts seniors first


June 1st marks the begin-
ning of the Hurricane Season
and forecasters are predicting
an active 2008 season. While
most South Florida residents
are well educated and informed
on Hurricane preparedness,
some of our most vulnerable
residents like senior citizens
are left wondering what to do
in the event of a hurricane.
In order to help better pre-
pare senior citizens in District
5 for the 2008 Hurricane sea-
son, City of Miami Commis-
sioner Michelle Spence-Jones
will present the 3rd Annual
Seniors First Hurricane Readi-
ness Expo '08 on Tuesday,
June 17th from 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. at Jungle Island, located
at 1111 Parrot Jungle Trail.
The Seniors First Hurricane
Readiness Expo will provide
500 seniors in District 5 with
information needed to be bet-
ter prepared during the 2008
Hurricane Season. Represen-
tatives from various organiza-
tions including: Miami Dade
County Office of Emergency
Management, Florida Power
& Light, City of Miami Fire-
Rescue and the City of Miami
Neighborhood Enhancement


MICHELLE SPENCE-JONES
Commissioner, District 5
Team (NET) and Community
Development departments will
be in attendance to answer
questions, address concerns
and present information on
the do's and don't when con-
fronted with a hurricane.
During the expo, seniors will
have the opportunity to regis-'
ter for hurricane emergency
services including free shut-
ters under the My Safe Florida
Home Program for those who
are eligible. Free hurricane
survival kits will be provided


do .4 0


to each senior citizen that at-
tends. Each kit will include
items such as: flashlights with
AM/FM radios and dry goods.
Seniors First is an initia-
tive of Commissioner Spence-
Jones that puts senior citizens
first by providing food and in-
formation on health, housing
and emergency disaster ser-
vices to senior citizens in Dis-
trict 5.
"Each year, my office partners
with various organizations in
the South Florida community
to present the Seniors First
Hurricane Readiness Expo to
make sure our senior citizens
are fully prepared before and
after a hurricane strikes," said
Commissioner Spence-Jones
"Although, South Florida has
been spared a direct hit from a
hurricane in the last few years
we still want to make sure that
our most vulnerable residents
are prepared."
The Seniors First Hurricane
Readiness Expo will be hosted
by former NBC 6 reporter, Ed
O'Dell. For more information
on the Seniors First Hurricane
Expo, please call the office of
Commissioner Spence-Jones
at 305-250-5390.

4 4 *'-- 0-%


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Available from Commercial News Providers"

VRW3.^


4;


00 -4


f


SATURDAY, JUNE 21, 2006

10:00 AM to 02:00 PM

FLORIDA MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY
15800 N.W- 42ND AVENUE
MIAMI GARDENS, FL 33054


A COLLEGE DEGREE


ANYWHERE YOU WANT TO GO!

AFFORDABLE


Attend Florida Memorial's Open House for:

Scholarship Giveaway
Complimentary Refreshments
Admissions and Financial Aid Workshop
Campus Tour
Academic Advisement

RSVP by June 19th call 1-800-822-1362,
and visit www.finmuniv.edu for more information.


Your Tirk,.et to Opportunity.



Join Us For An Open House June 21 st


TODAY!


- 4w









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


some crrz 4.Copyrighted'Material ofo mn,,




Syndicated Content -



Available from Commercial News Providers"


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PTHE MIAMI TIMES



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93" Street Community Antioch Missionary Baptist
Missionary Baptist Church Church of Brownisville
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-836-0942 305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Order of Services ('iut'viLun(iy sci(h),....mSA. i30nn
n 7:301a. Ear, Mannuig \Wcship Sunday Woslhip Servic ... 10 a.im
n a.m. ..Monling Worslip MkldWeek Service .. Wednesday-s

1st & 3rd Sunday........p.m. 12p. l p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study...7 pn .
webdin n tag cEvncinCIg Waisihip .7p ni


\ mL.-iror Rev.m Crltii -onsonl


postolic Revival Cente r Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc)
6702 N.W\ 15fth Avenue 1855 N.W 119th Street
305-836-1224 305-688-1612
Order of Services Fax: 305-681-8719
New time for Tr.. Prognmr Order of Services:
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY i Sl.. 30 aii. .. (Sutnday School)
U ll (CA11 Ii 1 o t ccii... 1.nceil idlk I the \ii rd iltn astry
.-i .9 a oI ,i n t n'i.cci 5 p 1i .\si,'si p Serice .. ... 1 Itll,
Ski p S~it n th td n i .or
St tin, Ee.\\otship .-....."30 PmWe dBclk s. At2 0
T,". toni Snlinyct Me. 75:.p0 1n H i 21 .ibc tis 1
I)ii.- Bib Nlen S y .. :0 Nm Wed Bible .ass p..
14j Blk luiv _. I .-W F /


Church of hrist'S

305-634-66480*350-,9.


rMt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
305-621-5067 F: 305-623-3104


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 10a.m.
Church Schol: & 30 a.m.
\%-desday .
Pastors Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 630 p.m.
Mid-week Wabrship 7:30 pim.


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 am.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 am. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting -Tues. 6 p.m.


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. tru Fri.NoonDayPri ayers
Bible Study..Thus.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m
Sunday Schoolay).9:30 am.




STeaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 NW 61723 N.Wtreet. 3 Ami, FLvenue33147







Church 305)-73-3711495
(2,Fax 303,4060* Sunday)x 3:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am,






S Mo trling Servic .....11:0.0 am.
ComSSunEon Service3
4Ths* 1 8 IaJ..,T'Sundy)7.:30pn I
PITsay. 1.i/Bible Study
,, ,.lay) 7:30 pm



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church


Fax 305S73.4o60sFax 305-25581.54


SFirst Baptist Missionary "
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
30 5-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday ................7:30 & i I m.
SSuniy School ...............10 a.n.
l'Thursday ...........7-p.m. Bible Srtudy.
Prayer Mecling, B.T.U.
Baptism Thlurs. before
'--Fi" 1m ..7 p.i i
Bgl j ~ ICommunion Fint Sll........
7:30 & II aIm,




t. Zion A.1M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300


a,77


-Qsr !fLSsrmkice^s
Sunday
Churchl School ... ........30 .m.
Wnrntlip Service ............1 a.m.
Monday
B bible Stdy pin1p1,
Wednesday
Frayer Mt i ip.r,


There is a place for your I



Pembroke Park
3707 SW. 56th Avenue
(Office) 954.962-9327


Faith Evangelistic Praise &"
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
'inn.lay school ........... 9.3. 0 ,
S9 I 'Moiing Wi p NsN ........ i a n
'w esi ra.ycr,... .. ..... in.
S.'-chool o m" o ......'30pi [Ill.
I tAllmrlg& D)li'ivtol ceS'rv,,,'3 i.m.
WoiSal.Man (prain yer). ...... 1


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
2 'NII 2. 7t," h .'eIr,' nu
Miami, F.
305-759-8875
Hour of h rist
BIF-rly Mor.... i I "1
y Schoo.....9:30 a.m.
S M Worsip ......... II an
I Youi Miaisti) Studvy,..Wc&...+7 p.m.
yefBfible Stdy.' Wed......7p.m.
-..n N,. ay A hyr P ii e': M .F -





"New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
n l el hf In ice ,
rf *** n l ", Si, i .

: ',," ,, ,. '





Church of Christ
* Hollywood, FL33023
* (Fax) 954,962-3396


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
inldiays (lCh ch S ol ........ 10

Tuiesdays .i t ibl, Clas t .. 7 p..i.
401 Swiday Ivzw ingW,3rhip ........6 panu


Jordan Grove Missionary /"Liberty City Church "\ /
Baptist Church of Christ
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave. 1263 N.W 67th Street
305-751-9323 305-836-4555
Order of Services: Ordrof Services:
F.i'ly Wnr hil> ..... .7 mS day M or g ...........8 a* -
S. Sm layMo g........... a.i
.. i 1 in | .IIda r' n o l s
S unid iiic ..- .P..1c t 1.;1 1 p it
7. i I .II' -'1 p IIl- I i I. Im -i l
l .'h h". | _1111 1'. .i.i I <. ll
; : . .. . . W = . + + ) .\ A"a + I : ~~


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'" Street
305.M53- 828I i Fax# 305-696-6220
Cnbrchi Schedile:
S Early Motming 'tbshlip 7:30 amn.
u I Smu. Chuch School 9:30 a.m.
I Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
4 Tuesday ible Class 7 p.m.
*xs.befoe ilte 1st Slu.,..7p.m,
S Mid-week Worship




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3,' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Earlv Sunday
...11. ',, [hip ....:7:30 a.m .
.- ....,....9:30 a.,.
i , ,'ip ..,11 Ia.m.
".,, * '. pist Churches
I, ih I i.) 5 pim,
. hip ........7 p.m.




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
30.-696-4341 Fax: 30S-696-2301
Order ofr Services:
i Sm y S tn l ............. 9':30 1,111.
NMomningliiisoVWomihip.. I Ia.ln.
frtHist and 'Tinl SunLay
evening wminshipat 6 p.Im.
LA VrayNr Mleefing & Bible Study
.Tuesly 7 p.nm.
W*"*On'l ,w. Ifs].t vali:i i<


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Morning Worship at S & I1 a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thai7da
Bible Stu4y ?..
SaturfIay.
No Set- qo,


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 1-3ill Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
I i N,W 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:

Sunday School .........:30a.m.
NMomning Washlip .....11 a.m.
SI-nyer Meeting............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ................. p .



Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
--- S may School ............9:45 a l.
tible Strlly. Thntad y ..7 30 pn..
o t 6plniiii i W l


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-370T
Fax: 305-685.0705
wwnw.tiewbirthbaptistnmiaini.org


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Servies:
Sunday 7:30 aid II a.m
Worship Service
9:30 am .......... Sunday Sc hool
Tuesday.-....... 7 pm. Bible Study
Monday, Wednesday, Ir m ^ 12 p.m..,Day Prayer



New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10 Avenue
305-899 7224
Order of Servtes:

ln W_ 1 I % Ie 1t 1 t1l n


- ~ ---


Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 in. .
Evening Worship.............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8, 19,21,22, 23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: wwpombrokeparkturchofchial.com Emnil; pEmbrokepnicceHbeliith.net


11j,- sellior Pastor/Telleller


I -


Ili tor
PeN" Dl I fell rv V. lVen, Ir- l


-I"


---mmumul MUMMUM


I


I
Loh cm
or% Im
r-Z. MIL.M







The Miami Times



HeaIh

SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 18-24, 2008


I~sb Kmad
%46"bam


C o pyri hite-d mMateriaI


S-Syndicated Content

Availablefrom Commercial News Pro


I d a


. ......-


viders


HPV vaccine for Boys?


J S


MI


H T


H A P N


U-


m 4m No


TURN DOWN THE VOLUME
If you're able to get your teen's undivided attention, you are an ex-
ceptional parent. Today's teens, also referred to as Generation Y, are
heavily influenced by mass communication and technology.


Teen


Hearing


Loss


YOUR


If you're able to get your teen's undivided attention, you are
an exceptional parent. Today's teens, also referred to as Gen-
eration Y, are heavily influenced by mass communication and
technology. It is seldom that you will find them without either
a cell phone, Bluetooth, iPod, CD -player, video game or some
other music or information source controlling their minds.
Hearing loss or damage should be of concern to our teenag-
ers. Loud music from their car radios and stereos should also
be of concern as they create a distraction for young drivers
interfering with their ability to hear an approaching train, am-
bulance, fire truck or weather phenomenon making them less
responsible and less responsive drivers.
When driving we need all our senses focused on the traffic.
Becoming absorbed with TV, phones, computers and electron-
ic games have made our children solitary, inaccessible and
unsociable. It is not uncommon for a 10-year old to spend
hours on the weekend watching MTV or to be absorbed in a
video game pausing only for a bathroom break and to eat.
This is time that can be spent outside getting much needed
physical activity or spending quality time with the family.
Portable music players present a threat for hearing loss be-
cause (a) the length of time teens listen to music being pumped


HEAR


KEEP


THE


VOLUME


DOWN


directly into their ear canal; and (2) the volume at which they
listen. Insist that your child does not listen at full volume and
for no more than sixty minutes each day. Most high school
students are not concerned with health issues because at
their age they feel invincible, foolishly thinking they are going
to live forever. Youth has a way of making one feel that nothing
can or will ever happen to us causing our teens to carelessly
throw caution to the wind.
Teenagers tend to be short-sighted. They live in the moment
and for the moment. The long-term consequences of their ac-
tions and decisions are very vague for them and they perceive
warnings from adults as an attempt to spoil their fun but as
parents we have to err on the side of common sense and prac-
ticality which often makes us very unpopular with our chil-
dren.
Andy Vermiglio, MA, CCC-A, FAAA, a Senior Research Audi-
ologist at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles reported to
WebMD that hearing loss can go unnoticed in teens because
the early symptoms tend to come on gradually which can re-
sult in the problem becoming more advanced before it is re-
alized they're having serious difficulty hearing. Some of the
symptoms that can occur are: muffled sounds, reduced ability
to follow a conversation in a noisy environment and ringing
in the ears. Hearing loss used to be more common with older
people but now it is creeping farther down the age spectrum.


4b a...-~


AftS



.. .....


PROTECT
Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer


Portable music players present a threat for hearing loss
because of (a) the length of time teens listen to music
being pumped directly into their ear canal; and (2) the
volume at which they listen.









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


Th~1n


Group founded by inmates

spreads S.E.E.D.S. of healing


Last year I had the privilege of
meeting a group called Revela-
tion S.E.E.D., which stands for
Separate Entities Eternally De-
livered. After meeting with the
ladies and speaking to them, I
learned some very interesting
facts about them.
The group was founded by
Margaret Reynolds while incar-
cerated in a federal prison. In
addition to Sister Reynolds, all


of the ladies from the original
group ( Deana Butler, Chelec
Fields, Nicole Gellineau and
Donna Hubbard) were all 'guests'
of the Department of Correc-
tions. When Sister Margaret
was released, her good friend,
singer and songwriter, Betty
Wright encouraged her to take
the ministry around the world.
She believed that it was impor-
tant to other women suffering


in the same situations of which
these ladies were victims alco-
hol and drug abuse, homeless-
ness, rape, prostitution, physi-
cal and emotional abuse to hear
their testimonies of deliverance
through Jesus Christ.
When I asked what the pur-
pose of this ministry was, I was
told that because of the crimes
that they committed, the mem-
bers of the group realized that
they took things from the com-
munity. They realized that their
decisions affected society at
large, and specifically, their own
families. Through the ministry
of this group, they hope to give
back to the community. They
want to give hopeless people the
hope that is Jesus Christ. They
want to give those who feel that
they are dirty and worthless the


joy that is experienced in know-
ing Jesus Christ, and accepting
His great love for us.
Sister Margaret said that she
was not interested in a group
of women who merely sang, but
women who wanted to minister
and live the Word of God. They
are accomplishing this through
programs that meet the needs
of the abused, drug addicted,
those suffering from HIV, high
risk children, and those pres-
ently incarcerated, as well as
ex-offenders. They also ac-
knowledge the need to save our
children so much so that they
have created a CD and DVD to
remind us of the plight of our
children, and the need to make
them a priority. As a volunteer
in the department of corrections
for almost 20 years, I applaud


these women.
Next week from June 20 -22,
they are holding their first Re-
union. This will be a bringing
together of all of the spiritual
children who have been birthed
through this powerful ministry
for more than 10 years. They
also want to honor their mentor
and founder, Evangelist Mar-
garet Reynolds. Pastor Jolinda
Wade, the mother of basketball
superstar Dwayne Wade, who
recently established her own
church, will be the guest speak-
er at this conference. Pastor
Wade feels a kinship with these
women who have lost so much,
hurt so much, and now honored
to give so much.
What they are doing is scrip-
tural. This is why it is so mean-
ingful. We are commanded to


love and help our neighbors.
Remember, neighbors aren't
just people who live next door,
but everyone. Paul also told the
church in 2 Corinthians 1:3 -7,
that our afflictions and suffer-
ings are to encourage others.
We need to help each other, and
let each other know what Christ
has done for us, because surely
He will do the same for them
too.
I hope that you will be able to
join these great ladies and oth-
ers as they honor those who
have been committed and faith-
ful to the God's Kingdom work
(also scriptural), and to recon-
nect and fellowship with other
overcomers (scriptural, too!).
If you are interested call 954
445-3779, 305 788-3377, or
email www.revelationseed.com.


City of Sunny Isles Beach
Cultural and Human Services
Department will celebrate its
11lth anniversary on June 22.
The event will be at Samson
Oceanfront Park from 12 p.m to
4 p.m. and everyone is invited to
this wonderful celebration. For
more information, please call the
Cultural and Human Services
Department at 305-792-1706.

U.S. Border Patrol is having
a one-day statewide recruiting
blitz for Border Patrol agents in
Fort Lauderdale, Jacksonville,
Orlando, Pensacola, Tallahassee


MSR Ministries, Inc. invites
you to their Women's Retreat on
Friday, June 27 from 5:30 p.m.
to 8 p.m. at the Miami Seventh
Day Baptist Church.

Mt. Calvary M.B. Church will
hold a Youth Revival from June
18 to 20. All services will be at


and Tampa on Saturday, June
21 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more
information, please contact Tara
Dunlop at 202-344-2497.
***** ***
Miami-Dade County Com-
missioner Dorrin D. Rolle is
hosting a free foreclosure pre-
vention seminar. The education-
al workshop will be held Friday,
June 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Northwestern Christian Acad-
emy. For additional information,
contact Commissioner Rolle's
office at 305-375-4833.
Gwen S. Cherry***** Black Wo
Gwen S. Cherry Black Wom-


7:30 p.m.


Triumphing Jesus Christ
Faith Holiness Church invites
you to come hear a prophetic
word June 23 to 27 at 8 p.m.
nightly. For more information,
please call Corneise J. Weaver
at 305-305-6923.


en Lawyers Association cor-
dially invites you to attend its
awards and installation lun-
cheon on Thursday, June 26 at
the Doubletree Grand Hotel Bis-
cayne Bay. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-493-0644.

Miami Northwestern Senior
High Class of 1983 will celebrate
its 25th-year class reunion July
11 to 13. For more informa-
tion, please call Angela Pickney-
Yalledy or Michael McLeod at
305-773-9840.

Florida Memorial University
is holding an open house on
Saturday, June 21 from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. All students, poten-
tial students, and parents are
invited.
***** ***

****** **
Peace Missionary Baptist
Church presents the "Three-
fold Ministry of Man: Priest,
Prophet, and King" on June 29
at 4 p.m. For more information,
please call Deacon S. Grant at
305-989-6670.
*** *** **
New Christ Tabernacle
M.B.C. will have a revival be-
ginning June 16 to 20 at 7:30
p.m. nightly. For more informa-
tion, please call Virginia Bostic
at 305-621-8126.


Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami,
Inc. cordially invites you to at-
tend a networking breakfast on
June 26 from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30
a.m. The event will be at the
Banker's Club. For more infor-
mation, please RSVP by calling
305-751-8050 or email: finno-
cent@fanm.org

Butterbugs Entertainment
presents the 2008 Miss Black
South Florida Pageant on Sat-
urday, June 21 at 7 p.m. at
Florida International Universi-
ty, Biscayne Bay Campus in the
Mary Ann Wolfe Auditorium. To
meet the contestants or to re-
ceive more information, please
visit www.missblacksouthflori-
da.com.

The Booker T. Washington


Memorial Temple Mission-
ary Baptist Church will host
its Annual Women's Confer-
ence, beginning on Friday, June
21 at 9 a.m. and continuing to
Sunday, June 22 at 11 a.m. For
more information, please call
the church at 305-624--2502.
********
Holy Ghost Faith Deliver-
ance Ministries invites you to
revival service on Thursday and
Friday. For more information,
please call 786-326-3455.


Senior High School Class of
1955 will meet on Saturday,
June 21 at 4 p.m. at the St.
Peter's African Church. For
more information, please call
305-297-1608.

Registration for Miami-
Dade Public Library System's
S.M.A.R.T. (Science Math and
Reading Tutoring) Program
for the 2008-2009 school year
began-on June 9 at all library
branches and runs through July
7. S.M.A.R.T. tutoring sessions
begin on Saturday, October 4
and continue through May 16,
2009. To learn more about the
S.M.A.R.T. Program, please call
305-375-3563 or visit www.
mdpls.org.

The South Florida Work-


Mount Moriah Missionary
Baptist Church, Inc. will hold
its Vacation Bible School July 7
to 10 at 6:30 p.m. nightly. Re-
freshments will be served after
each night-class sessions.

Solid Rock Redemptive Min-
istries invites you to their 2008
Youth Explosion June 26 to 29.
For more information, please
call 305-730-9850.

New Saint Mark M.B. Church


force (SFW) will be hosting a
Job Fair on June 25 from 11
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Mi-
ami-Dade Firefighter Memorial
Building. For more information,
please contact Waddell McGee
at 305-213-5496 or Joe Pagan
at 305-437-2639, or e-mail joe.
pagan@hq.southcom.mil.

The Urban League of Bro-
ward County Young Profes-
sionals Network will celebrate
Juneteenth, African-American
Emancipation Day, by hosting
a panel discussion about how
Broward's youth. The event
will take place on June 18
from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. For
more information, please call
the African-American Research
Library & Cultural Center at
954-625-2548.

family will celebrate its Pastor's
Appreciation from June 18 to 20
at 7:30 p.m. nightly. You may
contact Sister Mattie James at
305-681-0702 for more infor-
mation.

Please join Convoy of Hope
for there is a lot of work to be
done from now until Septem-
ber 13. Help with phone calls,
contributions, mailings, en-
tertainment, and more. To get
involved, please call Curley at
786-237-9435.


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Honor Your Loved One With an In Memoriam In The Miami Times







15B THE MIAMI TIMES,JUNE 18-24, 2008


BLACKS NAU I CONTROL I ILIR OWN Disi*[NYI


*~~~ k 1m ilt:v


' Wright & Youngi29
MICHAEL VAUGHN CHEEKES,
66, machin-
ist for Batah
Air, died June
14, at Palmetto
General Hos- .
pital. Survivors
include: wife,
Aisha Cheekes;
son, Warren
Cheekes (Shonda); daughters,
Michelle Cheekes Little and Sonia
Cheekes-Roselli; sisters, Joan,
Carol, Annette, Cheryl, Patsy, and
Claire. Service Wednesday, June
18, 11 a.m. in the chapel.

CLINTON JULIUS RUSSELL, 65,
water supervisor
for City of Mi-
ami Beach, died
June 14. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Ruth;
sons, Alexander,
Darin, and Ar-
temius; daugh-
ters, Angelica,
Angela, Tara and Makeshea; broth-
er, Jimmy; sisters, Beverly Douglas
and Stephanie Russell. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at 93rd Street
Community Baptist Church.

CHARLES JEANTY, 46, painter,
died June 3. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Marie
Charles; two
sons, Charles
and Charlen;
step daughter,
Asheka; sister,
Bernadette; and
two brothers, Vincent and Ficien.
Service Saturday, June 21, 11 a.m.
at Peaceful Zion Missionary Baptist
Church.

FABIAN A. BURKS, 24, laborer,
died June 14. Arrangements are
incomplete.

Gregg L. Mason 2
DAVID MOORE, JR. 72, Bus Driver
for Metro Dade -
Transit. died June
9 at home. Visita-
tion Vd.ne.day.
5 C3-, -;mu in
the chapel. Ser-
vices Saturday
June 21 in Mad,-
son, Florida.

DEACON WILLIE PAUL SHAT-
TEEN, 63, Re-
tired School
Principal for Mi-
ami-DadeCounty
Public Schools,
died June 15 at
Memorial Pem-
broke. Survivors
include: mother,
Alice Jones of
Fort Pierce; daughters, Paulette
Barnes (Edward) and Jasmine Shat-
teen; devoted companion, Eugenia
Smith; sisters Laverne, Patricia and
Cheryl Shatteen of Chicago IL; broth-
er, Wilson Shatteen of Chicago, IL.;
and a host of other family members
and friends, Viewing Friday, 6-9pm
at Memorial Temple Baptist Church.
Service Saturday, 1:00pm at Susie B
Hollie Religious Center, 15845 NW
42nd Avenue.

FRANCINE L. LASSITER, 52, Off-
set Press Printer for Universal Print-
ing, died June
14 at Jackson
North Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
sisters, Shirlene
Lassiter, Yolanda
Craig-Rolle and
Charlotte Clark;
brothers, Dwight
and Vincent Clark; and a host of
other family members and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m. p;Service
Saturday, 1 p.m. in the chapel.

WESLEY L WILSON, 41, Foreman
for Winn Dixie
Warehouse, died

versity of Miami
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
wife: Hanna

daughters, Han-.
nah and Farryn
Wilson; brothers, Frank, Randy (Al-


freda), Anderson and Danny (Shilse)
Wilson; sisters, Mary Scott and Di-
ane McCray (Richard); and a host of
other family members and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9pm. Service
Saturday, 12 p.m. at Jordan Grove
MBC. 5946 NW 12th Avenue. Inter-
ment: Dade Memorial Park.


Jay's
CYRUS CLARK, 31, died June
16 at Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11 a.m. Saturday at
Kerr Memorial.

WILLIE REVERE JR., died June
13 at Jackson
South Com-
munity Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m. Saturday
at Mt. Pleasant
M.B.C.


MARIE SPICER, 57, died June 14.
Arrangements
are incomplete.







JIMMY MILLS, 52, died June 14.
Service 2 p.m. [7 1|


saturday at Mt.
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


DONALD WALKER, died June
13 at Jacksoni
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service 12 noon
Saturday in the
chapel



RUBEN. COLEMAN, 66, died
June 10 at Unity. .
Health & Rehab
Center. Service


11 a.m. Satur-
day at Bethel
Full Gospel
Baptist Church.



PATRICIA ANN
June 10 at Jack-
son South Com-
Smuni-ty Hospital.
Service 2 p m
Saturday in the
chapel.


DAVIS, 46, died


ASTLEY MCKOY, 59, died June
10 Service 9 a.m. Saturday at
Second Baptist.

ROBERT MILLS, 53, died June
14 at Baptist Hospital. service 10
a.m. Saturday at Goulds Church
Of Christ Written In Heaven.

E.A. Stevens.
RAYMOND SINGLETON, JR.,
41, died June 11. Service 11 a.m.
Thursday in the chapel.

CALLIE M. DAVIS, 62, died June
11 at Hollywood Memorial Region-
al Hospital. Service 11 a.m. Sat-
urday at Bibleway Baptist Church,
Dania.

CAROLYN FISHE, 70, died June
12 at home. Final rites and burial
will be in Oglethorpe, Georgia.

St. Fort
ROSETTE BOURDEAU, 76, died
May 9. Service June.21 10 a.m. in
the chapel.

MARIE 1. DESIR, 69, died June 8.
Service 1 p.m. in the chapel June
21.

JEAN DEERNIER FRANCOIS,
died June 15. Service incomplete.

MICHELIEN CHARLESTIN, 48,
died on May 5. Arrangements in-
complete.


Grace
MARQUEZ JAMES, 16, student
died June 15. Arrangements are
incomplete.

KATHLEEN GILLARD, 45, died
June 15. Arrangements are incom-
plete.


Hadley
GLEN MICHAEL HARDING, 55,
died June 4 at Mount Sinai Medi-
cal Center. Service held Saturday,
June 14 in the chapel.


Poitie r_
DELCY W. WELCOME, 33, labor-
er, died June 11 i7
at Northshore
Medical Center.
Service 3 p.m.
Saturday in the .
chapel.



KATRINA EVETTE HOWARD,
52, cashier,
died June 12.
Service 2 p.m.
Saturday at
Dayspring Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


VIOLA MAE ACOSTA, 69, operat-
ing room techni-
cian, died June
2 at Aventura
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Saturday at
Greater Fellow- ,,
ship Missionary
Baptist Church.

RUPERT WILLIAMS CURRY JR.
55, laborer, died
June 2 atrAven-
tura Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.



SHERMAN LEE TYSON, 91, re-
tired truck driv-
er, died June. 15
at Miami Jewish
Nursing Home ;
and Hospital.
Service Satur-
day, time to be
announced.



Royal _,
ELLA MAE FERGUSON, 61, died
June 6. Service
10 a.m. satur- .
day at Ebenezer
LUnited .ALethod-
ist.CQhh. Visi,
tation"'Friday 4'
to 9 p.m.


BETTY DESIR, 71, died June 12.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at
House of God
Church. Visita-
tion 4 to 9 p.m.
Friday in the
chapel. A me-
morial service
however, will be
held at the Chruch Friday 7 p.m.

EULA ROBINSON, 67, died June
14. Service 10
a.m. Saturday
at Memorial
Temple Baptist
Church. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to '
9 p.m.


MINNIE SCOTT, 67, died June 14.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday in the -
chapel. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to
9 p.m.




ULIE JACKSON, 91, died June
13. Arrangements are pending.

SHANIELE CHAMBERS, 25, died
June 14. Service 11 a.m. Thursday
in the chapel. Visitation Wednes-
day 4 to9 p.m.

ALFRED SCOTT, 55, died June
15. Arrangements are pending.

RICHARD BURGESS, 68, died
June 16. Arrangements are pend-
ing.



Barbara Falowski
WILLIE TORRENCE MATHIS,


died June 12.
Service 1 p.m.
Saturday at Cal-
vary Holiness
Church of God.


Richardson
JOHN DAVID 'JR' POWELL, JR.,
50, truck driver,
died June 14.
Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Lizzie Hutton,
step-father
Giles Hutton;
sisters, Yolonda
Thompson, Gail
Davis (Ulysses), Elaine Snell (Je-
rome), Denise Jerry, Sonya Bowe
(Calvin). Service 12 noon Friday at
Liberty City Church of Christ.

FANNIE EMMA YOUNG, 76, died
June 11. Service 2 p.m. Wednes-
day in the chapel and Saturday
at Morning Star Baptist Church,
Goulds, Florida.

Range
ALTER M. WILLIAMS, 73, furni-
ture refinisher
died June 15.
She is survived.
by: daughter,
Marilyn Mc-
Swain; two
sons, William
McSwain, and
Michael Terry;
two brothers; Will Mack and Mar-
vin Lampley; sister, Delmar Lam-
pley; a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends. Fu-
neral services will be held Friday
11 a.m. at Greater Fellowship M.B.
Church located at 2601 N.W. 65TH
Street.

INEZ MASON, 71, domestic for
private families
died June 15.
She is survived
by: son, Steve
Mason; sisters,
Lorraine Wal-
lace, Lillie Rolle,
Sally Dill, Miller-
cent Miller, and
Geraldine Rolle; a host of other
relatives and friends. Prayer ser-
vices will be held Friday 6:30 p.m.
at St. Vincent de Paul Catholic
Church Funeral Services will be
held Saturday at 11 a.m.

CARRIE DELORIS CARTER, 51,

tant for Miami
Central Senior
High-School.
She is survived
by: daughter,
Christina Har-
rington; son,
Michael Rich-
mond; two brothers, Lincoln Dingle
Jr.(Dorothy), and Glen A. Dingle
(Wendy); a sister, Shirley Axson
(Terry); two grandchildren; a host
of nieces, nephews, other relatives
and friends.
Funeral services will be held Sat-
urday 10:00 am at Mt. Calvary
M.B. Church..

ARMAND DESROSIER, 65, la-
borer, died June 15. Funeral ser-
vices will be held June 27. Time
and place to be announced.

Carey Royal Ram'n
DEBORAH ANN GREEN, 51,
died June 12
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service was
held Monday in
the chapel.


d
YOURSELF ABDUL MOHAMMAD,
98, died June 13 at Cleveland Clin-
ic Hospital. Service will be held in
New York.

ROLAND FRANKS, 63, died June
14 at home. Service 11 a.m. Friday

THOMAS HOUSTON, 70, died
June 15 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

Manker
QUEENIE S. BRIDGES, 87, died
June 10atAven- .
tura Medical
Center. Service
1 p.m. Saturday
at Mount Cal-
vary Missionary
Baptist Church.


TODD JEROME SMITH, 43, died
June 1 at University of Miami
Medical Center. Service was held
Thursday, June 12 at New Shiloh
Missionary Baptist Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


LEON LONGMIRE
06/18/1954 12/02/2007

It's been six months since
you left me to be with the
Lord. I miss you very much.
Love, Sonya

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MOTHER
VICTORIA C. WILLIAMS
04/04/1924 06/20/2004

The memory of you mother
is forever in my heart. As the
dew of fresh morning, I'm
reminded of the newest and
freshness ofyour love. God had
a greater need when He called
you home, but my strength is
renewed in knowing that I will
see you again.
Your loving daughter, Mrs.
Delores C. Wiliams-Ates'

Davis & Bricei
ROSETTA HIGGS, 87, died May
30. Service 10 a.m. Saturday at
New Jerusalem Baptist Church,
Hollywood.

NAOMI TUCKER, 86, died June 9.
Service 1 p.m. Saturday at Sure
Foundation, West Hollywood;

WESLEY MEARIDY, 22, died
June 11. Service Saturday, time to
be announced at New Jeerusalem
B.C. Hollywood.

LULA VON JOHNSON, 70, died
June 14. Service 11 a.m. Saturday,
St. Ruth Baptist Church, Dania.

Eric S. George?
BENONI MCRAE, 10 died Monday
June 9 at Memorial Hospital West.
Service 10 a.m. Saturday June 21
at Pembroke Road Baptist Church
in Miramar, Florida.

Mitchell
SAMMIE JINKS, died June 11.
Service 11 a.m. June 21 at St.
Matthews Freewill Baptist Church.


Hall Ferguson ewitt
TURMAN JOSEPH MCMULLEN,
81, died June.
13. Viewing Fri-
day June 20,
time to be an-
nounced.




Pax Villa
FRED GAUTHIER, 64, died June
5. .Service 12 p.m. Saturday,
June 21 at Devine Mercy Catholic
Church.

GABRIELLE DEXTRA, 71, died
June 6. Service will be held in
Haiti.

Faithi .
DEA'JOHNE JOHNSON, 19, stu-
dent, died June 9 at Jackson North
Hospital. Service 11 a.m. Wednes-
day in the chapel.

BARBARA CANNON, 61, printer,
died May 30 at University of Miami
Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


SAMUEL BROWN
09/01/90 06/17/07


A year has passed since
you've been gone, but you're
still forever loved and missed.
Love always, your mother,
Trinia Kancey; sisters, Kiani
and Kashia; brothers, James
and Jamari; Miami Norland
Sr. Class of 2008.



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MOTHER WILLIE MAE CARTER
06/16/1900 12/19/1959

Sadly missed!
Your son, Adam Carter and
family



In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ANN HARRIS-BROOKS
06/17/1945 12/31/2002

A million times we've needed
you, a million times we've
cried.
If love alone could have
saved you, you never would
have died.
In life we loved you dearly,
in death we love you still.
In our hearts you hold a
place, no one else will ever
fill.
It broke our hearts to lose
you, but you didn't go alone.
Part of us went with you, the
day God called you home.
We love and miss you Annl
Your Family


Range Coconut Grove
WILLIAM A. COOPER, retired
U.S. Postal
Service letter





wife, Leona Hel-
en Ferguson-
Cooper; daughters, Clarice Coo-
per, Wilhemina Cooper and Leslie
Cooper; son, William Paul Cooper
(LaTeesha); sister, Leona Coo-
per-Baker; grandchildren, Austin,
Leigh, Carlin, Qianna, Toni and
Emily; nieces, nephews, cousins,
other relatives and friends. Servic-
es will be held, Thusrday 10 a.m.
at Christ Episcopal Church (Coco-
nut Grove).







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


Carrie Meek's brother, King George Pittman, dies
^-" ..7 ,. . .. .... ..-


King George Pittman III, 87, a decorated
World War II and Korean War veteran, passed
away June 10, 2008 in St. Petersburg,
Florida.
Mr. Pittman, whose friends called him
"Sarg," served in the U.S. Army from May
22, 1941 through December 14, 1956. He
received many service awards, including a
Purple Heart, Korean Service Medal with
one Bronze Service Star, and Republic of
Korea Presidential Unit Citation Badge.
For 25 years, he ran an Appliance TV
Store on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Street
in St. Petersburg.
Born on October 23, 1920, Mr. Pittman
was the fourth youngest of 12 children born
to Willie Pittman and Carrie Tansy Pittman
of Tallahassee, Florida. He attended
Lincoln High School in Tallahassee and was
a member of Philadelphia Primitive Baptist
Church.


III'\

-w


=: ': .t ..


KING GEORGE PITTMAN III
World War II and Korean War veteran


Mr. Pittman is survived by his sister,
retired U.S. Congresswoman Carrie P.
Meek of Miami, Florida; nephews U.S.
Congressman Kendrick B. Meek, Samuel
Pittman, and Charles Bellamy; nieces
Lucia Davis Raiford, Sheila Kinui, Betty
Jean Pittman, Katrina Presley and other
relatives.
"He was extremely proud of two things
- the military, and his blackness,"
Congresswoman Carrie Meek told the St.
Petersburg Times. "He was very proud of
the fact that he knew all of the history of
black America."
Mr. Pittman will be buried in Arlington
National Cemetery with full military honors
on June 19th at 9 a.m.
Donations in honor of Mr. Pittman can
be made to the Bay Pines VA Health Care
System in Bay Pines, Florida by calling
727-398-6661, ext. 5594.


A


S ,~


Death Notice


-1
TRACIE ALLEN-COX, 33,
unit secretary, died June
13 at Pembroke Memorial
Hospi-tal. Survivors include:
husband, Robert Cox Jr.;
daughters, Daijah and Ra-
ven. Service 2 p.m. Saturday
at Antioch M.B.Church of
Liberty City. Viewing Friday
4 to 8 p.m. at New Mt. Zion
M.B.C. 5895 N.W. 23 Av-
enue.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


TAMIKA LEWIS
06/21/1984 02/02/2008

Happy 24th Birthday.
We love you but God loves
you best.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Death Notice


AMMIE TERRELL
08/13/14 06/22/04

Gone but not forgotten. .
Your daughters, Essie,j'
Frankie,
Emily and the family. ,


( etJstIajf~ ~ 0


-."Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"


DOROTHY DEKOTA
TIMMONS, died June 17 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Survivors include:
daughters, Laclyde (Kenneth)
Douglas, Priscilla Mcglond,
Eddis Bartlett. Service 2
p.m. Saturday at 93rd Street
Community Baptist Church.
Viewing 2 to 8 p.m. Friday
at Hadley's Funeral Home.
Repast at 93rd Street Com-
munity Baptist Church.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


ANNIE ELIZABETH
JACKSON INGRAHAM

Words cannot express the
gratitude we feel for your
thoughtfulness. Thank you
for your acts of kindness and
prayers shown to our family
during the illness and passing
of our loved one.
You are appreciated.
The Junious, Ross, Davis and
Ingraham families.


*~ ~ i' m~ 'V


TYRONE LEE MAXWELL
JR., 28, laborer, died June 14.
Survivors include: children,
John Latimore, Tyrone III
and Tyrell; mother, Cindy
Parker; step-father, Leon
Parker; father, Tyrone Sr.;
grandparents, Katie Mae and
Sam Coleman; fianc,--
Vaushaun Harvin; sisters,
Jahkelia Maxwell, Nakemah
and Tanika Parker; brothers,
LaKevis, Kelsey, Quintel,
Jamal, and Leon Jr. Service
Saturday, June 21, 2:30 p.m.
at Word of Truth. Services
entrusted to Wright and Young,
Funeral Home Inc.


A ~?Ii ~ S


Because of the recession, Poitier says,
'Let's give back to the community.'

* Infant caskets and service free
* Senior Citizens free protective sealer casket with
service by Poitier
* Veterans caskets free with service by Poitier
* Services performed during the week only.
Additional cost may apply

Financing available if you qualify




Offer expires May 31, 2008


IN bw4oowo aIn' M Uwww vI lro4 VW-9 a b 1 962 A A


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The Mimi '",i '

Lifesty es


m,.,
FASHION' IP Ho,;; .M sI. .FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 18-24, 2008


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ml. 423,000
firsn day


THE MIAMI TIMES



a u "mm- ',, .ai.d ',.. .. ,M. ..- .
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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


ByD.RcadSrca


Kudos to Sen. Dr. Frederica
S. Wilson, founder/director
who gave rise to a Parents-On-
Line computer program for the
5000 Role Models of Excellence
Project. The program was de-
veloped in conjunction with the
State of Florida's initiative to
introduce technology to all seg-
ments of the community for the
past six months.
Selected students and parents
from kindergarten to twelfth
grades participated in the proj-
ect and received a diploma and
computer as a reward for their
increased knowledge of the
computer.
The formal program was held
at Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson's 93rd
Street Community Missionary
Baptist Church. The program
began with incidental music by
Dr. Richard J. Strachan until
Dr. Wilson arrived on the scene
and the program started with
her words of wisdom and an
overview of the program taught
to the parents and students.
She concluded by introduc-
ing G. Eric Knowles,
senior director, opera-
tions and government
relations, Dolphin Sta-
dium, as the emcee for
the evening. Knowles
began by introducing
Rev. Johnson who gave
the invocation, followed
by greetings from Sen. JOHi
Wilson and Wilbert
"Tee" Holloway, school
board member, next Elder Bar-
bara Lamb, New Birth Baptist


Church, electrified
the full house sing- ,
ing Amazing Grace.
She was dynamic ..
and religious. ..
Sen. Wilson was _. .
brought back to
the mic to introduce keynote
speaker, Les Brown, renowned
professional speaker, author
and television personality. He
got the attention of the audi-
ence when he gave out formu-
las for making a millionh dollars'
and introducing cliques: holis-
tic approach to commit-
ment, I have something
special, face your fears, .
have the willingness to
continue, and support
each other.
Brown concluded
with these words: "a
wise man once said,
prepare yourself for WIL
liftoff-there are going to
be some tough times as
you go about your life, so em-
brace yourself and you will be
able to handle them." Selected
speakers recognized
the recipients of the
diplomas and comput-
ers, and Bishop Joseph
Watson closing out with
the benediction.


According to Linda
SON Holloway, wife of Wil-
bert "Tee" Holloway,
she and her committee
orchestrated a WhiteNite Kool
Summer Breeze, last Saturday,


I


List to live by:
The greatest joy: giving
The greatest loss: loss of
self-respect
The most satisfying work:
Helping others
Our greatest natural re-
source: Our youth
The most crippling failure
disease: Excuses
The most powerful force in
life: Love
The world's most incredible
computer: The brain
The two most power-filled
words: I can
The most beautiful attire:
Smile
Congratulations to Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
on our 58th Cotillion last
month, as well as the 11lth
grade committee for a job well
done on our 17th Orita Rites
of Passage. Regina M. Giles
is our president.
Get well wishes to all of
you! Samuel Cleare, Yvonne
Johnson-Gaitor, Frances
Brown, Celestine Hepburn-
Brown, Wellington Gibson,
Bernice Shorter-Meares,
Vashti Armbrister, Prince
Gordon, Cliffonia Ross, De-
nesia Harris, Virla Rolle-
Barry, Leo Moss, Grace


Heastie-Patter-
son, Wilma Wake-
Gilbert, Carmet-
ta Cash-Russell .
and Frank Hol-
linshed. ""- "

Vanessa Williams, former
Miss American, received her
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree
during recent graduation cer-
emonies at Syracuse Univer-
sity.

John and Kathy Culmer of
Houston, Texas were in the
city to attend the wedding of
his cousin, Lemuel Raynard
Moncur and Diona Marie
Stokes, June 7 at The His-
toric Saint Agnes Episcopal
Church with The Reverend
Canon Richard L. Marquess
Barry and The Reverend
Horace D. Ward, officiating.
Hearty congratulations to the
newly weds!

Members of Alpha Gamma
Chapter and chapter mem-
bers around the country of
Eta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.
came to pay tribute to their
deceased member Betty
Jane Gaitor-Timmons, who
was a national president and


local chapter president of the
sorority.

The Wells family of the
U.S.A. departed Miami last
weekend by ship for eastern
keys and other ports down
in the Caribbean. Dr. Roland
C. Burroughs and his fam-
ily was in attendance and
was entertained by long time
friend Jim Nabors and Victor
Garfield and friends from the
V.F.W. Post in Saint Thomas.
A lavish picnic at Magen's
Bay was enjoyed by all. Jef-
frey Burroughs hosted a lav-
ish gathering at Behio Re-
sort in Grand Turk. Denver,
Cleveland, Orlando, New York
and Boca Raton, were the cit-
ies the Wells descendants
were from. A good time was
enjoyed by all. Accompany-
ing her son on the cruise was
Joycelyn Newbold-Smith,
her nurse Audrey Allen, Jef-
frey Burroughs (Roland's
son) and his wife, Nicole and
their son, Bailey Constan-
tine. Roland and his wife,
Barbara will remain in Miami
to embark on his class (1953)
cruise to Nassau for their 55m
B.T.W. class reunion. Clinton
Brown is president.

Delta Sigma Theta Soror-
ity, Inc. National Convention
is being held in Orlando, July
24-31. This is DST's second
national being held in Orlan-


do. Regina M. Giles is presi-
dent.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Soror-
ity, Inc. will soon depart for
Washington, D.C. to hold
their 100th celebration and
their founding at Howard
University in July. Deborah
Simmons is the president.
A professional educator's
organization, the National So-
rority of Phi Delta Kappa, Inc.
Alpha Delta Chapter observed
Founders Day Saturday, May
24 at Miami Park Elemen-
tary school and worshipped
with the Soror of the Year,
Mary Dunn at Bible Baptist
Church, Sunday, May 25.
The highlights of Founder's
Day were the ritualistic torch
lighting ceremony and guest
speaker, Gloria J. Humes.
Ms. Humes had done a mar-
velous job of researching the
chapter's founders and the
early history of prominent
black educators in Dade
County during the 1940's
when the sorority was found-
ed. Best of all, she sat and in-
terviewed the chapter's only
surviving founder, Ms. Susie
Francis, age 96, who shared
a wealth of information about
the sorority and county's his-
tory. Her presentation was
most interesting and impres-
sive. Alpha Delta Chapter and
Basileus Regina Bruton ob-
served a memorable Found-


ers Day and Weekend.

June 7, Alpha Delta award-
ed local high school seniors
for their scholastic achieve-
ment and others for partici-
pating in their Zinos/Kudos
youth group.

The National Sorority of
Phi Delta Kappa, Inc., Alpha
Delta Chapter held its An-
nual Scholarship Awards
Luncheon Saturday, June
7 at Piccadilly Cafe in Hiale-
ah. The chapter's 2008 local
scholarship winner was Mia
C. Saunders a graduate of Mi-
ami Northwestern Senior High
who will be attending Univer-
sity of Florida beginning sum-
mer term. Jonathan Jones,
an outstanding member of the
chapter's Xinos/Kudos Youth
Group, was also awarded a
scholarship. He is a graduate
of Miami Northwestern, who
will attend Florida Memorial
University in the fall. Other
graduating Kudos awarded
were Parker Daniels and
Kevin Jones. Words of inspi-
ration were formerly extended
to the graduates by Soror of
the Year, Mary Dunn. Regi-
na Bruton is Basileus, Anna
Wyche is First Anti-Basileus
and Xinos/Kudos Advisor and
Irene Edwards is Local Schol-
arship Chair.

High Schools seniors of


the community interested in
careers in education are en-
couraged to meet with their
school's CAP Advisors in the
fall of each year to apply for
Phi Delta Kappa Inc.'s nation-
al, regional and local scholar-
ships. Regina Bruton, Basile-
us.

Angelica A. Pearson, daugh-
ter of James and Iris Pearson,
was- the proud recipient' of
the 2008 Eddie E. Edwards
Scholarship at Myrtle Grove
Presbyterian Church, pas-
tor Reverend N. Leon Lovell-
Martin. Angelica is a gradu-
ate of William Turner Tech.
High and will attend Florida
Memorial Univ. The scholar-
ship is named in honor of one
of the founders of Grace Pres-
byterian Church which was
the first Black Presbyterian
Church in Miami.
The scholarship recognizes
youth of the church for ser-
vice to the church, school
and community which were
principles stressed by the late
Mr. Edwards. The award was
presented by Tommy Bruton,
grandson of Mr. Edwards and
Warren Rogers, 2007 recipi-
ent of the scholarship, during
the church's annual Educa-
tional Awards Recognition
Service. Eddie E. Edwards
was the father of Ebenezer
'Scrooge' Edwards and Irene
Kelly Edwards.


R appt. ar Ja& / wId f SI mssew













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*Includes Florida sales tax


I


at Rendezous On The Lake, off
of 6685 Eagle Nest Lane, where
the atmosphere was condu-
cive and everyone let their hair
down dancing to the live enter-
tainment.
Remember, school board
member Holloway was ap-
pointed to the position, which
he filled for the late Dr. Robert
Ingram and must be elected by
the people in November.
Some of the early arrivals in-
cluded Cotella Walton, Gloria
Humes, Gayle Crocker, Tan-
dy L. Caraway, Nikki Young,
John Westmoreland, Sheri
Watson, Rachel Walker, Dani-
lo Vergas, Leid Utrice, Talesia
Smith, Marie Russell, Brenda
R. Torres, Aaton, Alice Rob-
erts, Latorres Mosley and Ar-
nold R. Montgomery
Others that joined
in with the festivities
-, included andrea Pres-
ton, Alexandra Pierre,
Angela Myers, Latricia
Macias, Andrew Luck-
ie, Kenneth M. Kilpa-
traick, Commissioner
[SON Barbara Jordan, Vice
Mayor Dorothy "Dot-
tie" Johnson, Willie James,
Mohammad Hamalaudin,
Lauretta Hall, and Herman
Edwards.
Holloway made his spiel for
funding and much money was
raised for his campaign, while
an enormous amount of pledg-
es were made and more 'fund
raising' will be organized by
Linda Holloway.


Joe and Shelia Mack invited
The Singing Angels to a very
interesting play, last Saturday,
at the Lou Rawls Performing
Center, which was sponsored


by Pastor Jimmye Finch-Lar-
kin and written by Jerome-
Anthony Larkin and present-
ed by Patricia Warren with
proceeds going to New Fellow-
ship Development Center and
under the title: "An Exit To No
Where."
The characters included
Mindy Tellisman played by
Soneasha Johnson;
Betty Jones played by
Kim B. Bryant; Alberta
Tellisman played by
Eleanor T. Brown; Ag-
new Jennings played
by Sean Chavis; May-
belline McCallister
played by Sarah Bull-
ard; Ruthie-Ann played HOLI
by Anita Wilson; and
Lennon McCallister played by
Jerome-Anthony Larkin.
An Exit To No Where began
some where when the actors
made their entrances from
back of the auditorium onto the
stage area, while the lights were
dimmed after each segment and
the new scene began immedi-
ately. The lines were amplified
with a remote mic on each per-
son to avoid the hearers from
straining their ears to hear. It
also allowed the comedy to flow
and keep the audience alert.
Some of the people in the au-
dience, Samuel "Chase" Wil-
liams, Dr. Carl Wright, John-
nie, Eunice, Johnnie, Jr., Jer-
my, Eunice Orr, Deacon and
Mrs. Ralph Coleman, Mother
Armstrong, Kateva Williams,
Derrick Larkin, Cecilia Honey-
wood, Merial and Artis Larkin.
Plus 50-more from the church.
All came to see a young man be-
ing torn between his mother and
girlfriend, finding a good job and
avoiding the negative challenges
in life to survive.


Congratulations to Rev. Dr.
Joreatha M. Capers, senior
pastor, for eliciting the commu-
nity to participate in Celebra-
tion for Jesus which is now in
force and will continue for the
rest of June. Selected members
demonstrated how they will vis-
it people in the community by
walking in with water,'
light bulbs, pennies and
coins, wash cloths and
towels, golf caps, gift
bags filled with mints,
lifesaver, candy, plas-
tic zip lock bags, pens/
pencils, hand sanitizers
and hand lotion, plus
)WAY prayer for the souls to
be saved.
After listening to. the Cho-
raliers perform beautifully, T.
Eilene Martin-Major took to
the mic and narrated the signifi-
cance of the theme, as Marquan
Robinson brought in a case
of water, followed by each age
group, Maritez Veeren, Ber-
tha Martin, Marva Hill and her
97-year old mother, Truenell
Hill, etcetra.


When Joseph F. Williams at-
tended Miami Northwestern back
in the 60's, his manner-
ism were unlike today,
he has become a Chris-
tian, attended a school
of theology, and ended
up Senior Pastor at St.
Mark MBC, where his
Class of '64 attended,
last Sunday to celebrate
44-years and listen to ING
Rev. Joseph F. Wil-
liams, a dynamic pas-
tor with a growing church and
members who love him dearly.
Some of those who showed up


after service at Picadillys includ-
ed Arthur B. McCarthy, Rod-
ney T. Chain, Herbert Thonp-
son, Oswald Turner, Marvin
Carson, Bertha Clayton Lip-
scomb, Althea, Patrick, Essie,
Gerene, Berry, Phil Lowery,
Loyd C. Harrison, Anthony K.
Johnson, Rochelle A. Allen,
Annie Taylor Otey, Elizabeth
Washington, Carolyn Crowell,
and Alvin W. Roberts, presi-
dent.
This class is always in the
spotlight doing scholarships
for needy students, attending
churches and supporting the
communitity, while the Rev. Wil-
liams picked-up the tab costing
over $200.00. Keep it up and I
will continue to write.


The name Stop n' Shop is a
new grocery store and a place to
get a cooked meal. The neigh-
bors on Lake 'Creavo frequented
"Bo Bo's," Phillips's Mini Mall"
and now Stop n' Shop which
provides free meals every first
and third Saturday from 3 p.m.
to 9 p.m., along with music and
door prizes.
Any time you visit, you will
find Alvin, Joe and Catherine
Pigadd ready to serve you with
a smile. So, please sup-
port your Black busi-
ness at 9100 NW 17th
Ave. they serve break-
fast, lunch and dinner.
Grits, eggs, bacon,
sausage, toasts, steak
and cheese, fried conch
and fries, shrimp and
;RAM fries, leg quarter with
rice, veg or beans, and
sub sandwiches with an
array of other items and spe-
cial plans when you come to
shop.


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We'cr Ill Ineti.ll.h engivnrrid to push twurwlch thnugih life
do


Adrienne As ht Center and PelloMusic by arrangement with Cardenas
Marketing Network, Inc. present
CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
iAzucar! Cuban legend and global icon Celia Cruz is back in an
explosive new musical. Celia takes you on an amazing musical
journey through the life and music of the sensational salsa diva.
3 PM and 7 PM Knight Concert Hall
$95 VIP package Orchestra seating plus meet-the-cast reception;
$75 Orchestra seating; $50 First Tier seating
American Express, The Adrienne Arsht Center, and City Theatre present
SIGNATURE SHORTS
Celia: The Life & Music of
The series of one-act plays featuring a brand new mix of comedies Celia cez
and heartfelt dramas in two alternating programs, A & B.
3:00 PM Program A Carnival Studio Theatre $37
4:30 PM Theatre Fare (A short meal!) $18
5:30 PM Program B Carnival Studio Theatre $37
Full program information is online at arshtcenter.org


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CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
7.30 PM Knight Concert Hall $95 VIP package and meei-the-
cast reception. $75, $50

CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
7:30 PM Knight Concert Hall $95 VIP package and meet-the-
cast reception, $75, $50

CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
7-30 PM Knight Concert Hall VIP package and meet-the-cast
reception. $75, $50

CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
7:30 PM Knight Concert Hall $95 VIP package and meet-trhe-
cast reception, $75, $50

CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
5 PM and 9 PM Knight Concert Hall $95 VIP package and
meel-ihe-cast reception, $75, $50
C.jican Musi,'3 pfeSer,.
COSECHA 2008 NEGRONI'S TRIO: FATHER & SON
As the first performance in the Cosecha Summer Concert Series,
Latin Jazz Gramm-v nominee Jose Negroni will perform
selections from the recent release Father & Son with his son
Nomar or drums and accompanied bv special guests Ed Calle
on saxophone and Marco Panascia on bass.
8:15 PM Carnival Studio Theater $40.00

CELIA: THE LIFE & MUSIC OF CELIA CRUZ
3 PM and 7 PM Knight Concert Hall $95 VIP package and
meel-lhe-casl reception, $75, $50


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Free Aarienne Arsnt Center Tours: Monaays and Saturaays at noon, starting at mte LITT allet upera rivouse ouuuy.
No reservations necessary.

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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


BLACKS NAUST CONTROi- THEIR OWN DESTINY






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


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- I,


BENEFITTING THE MIAMI CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL
THROUGH THE CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK


Lisa Flashingbeurg ( Touch Catering Manager), Jerry Kelly (GM of The fithe Night
Club), Lumari McAnnish (CEO of Lumari Designer), Saun Lightbourne (party host), Dr.
Andrea Trower, Claudine Smurfit (Philanthropist), Peggy Benua (GM South Beach Mar-
riott) and Gary Gentile (GM Eden Roc).


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MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 18-24, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR. OWN DESTINY


D 6 THE MIAMI TIMES JUNE 8


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w


AUDIT
SERVICES
The Richmond Per-
rine Optimist Club is
accepting proposals to
provide Audit Services
for its Social Services
Programs. Please for-
ward proposals no lat-
er than 06/27/2008 to:
Richmond-Perrine Op-
timist Club 9955 West
Indigo Street Miami,
Florida 33157 (305)
233-9325


SMALL BUSINESSES MICRO LOANS
*Financing up to $5,000
*Available to New and Expanding Businesses
Located in Miami-Dade County
*Loan Can Be Used For Inventory, Equipment, and Other
Short-Term Needs
*Loan Terms From 12 months to 18 months
And Businesses Can Re-Borrow (Thirty days after total repay
ment)
*Interest Rate at Approximately 50% of the Current Prime
Rate (example: as of 5/20/08 prime is 5.00% therefore V would
be 2.50%)
*New Businesses are required to have Contract(s) to Support
Repayment of the Loan. Existing Businesses can have either
Contract(s) or Past Sales that are sufficient to repay the
Loan.
Accepting Applications Now
Contact: Gloria Rice, 305-751-8934
5800 N.W. 7th Avenue Suite 212 "Miami, FL 33127
Telephone: 305-751-8934 Fax: 305-751-1619


N.A.N.A.
.I .i lj


1 TOOLS FOOR
CHANGE


Tools For Change is sponsored by Neighbors And Neighbors Association


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.
A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Hialeah, FL.
(saUne s 103 St.)
( Plea." nmiozhon aid)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611


.sub scribe

THE MIAMI TIMES


SUPPORT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR YOU
Jr S48"' for a 12-month subscription L $32I" for a 6-month subscription
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Name
-- Address
City Slate Zip
Phone e-mail
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MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 18-24, 2008


.. -,'.'.' A .


Business Rentals
6001 N.W. 17 Ave.
Prime location. Call 954-
245-2528.

SUnfurnished Rooms
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Nice cozy rooms, central air
included. Call 305-827-4593.
One bedroom, one bath
$700 full kitchen, laundry fa-
cilities, close to Miami Ave-
nue on N.E. 84th Street. For
more information
Call 305-970-5574

Furnished Rooms
$199 DEPOSIT
2169 N.W. 49 Street
FREE AIR and Cable TV
$115 weekly 786-234-5683
13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-474-8186/305-691-3486
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
15840 N.W. 18th Place
Furnished room, kitchen
privileges. Call 305-962-8157

1949 N.W. 83 Street
Furnished room. Seeking
single male. Please apply in
person.

2136 N.W. 43rd Street
$400 and up per month.
$600 moves you in. Call 305-
637-9359 or 305-303-0156.

2365 N.W. 97TH STREET
Room with air, $370 monthly.
First and last to move in. Call
305-691-2703.

335 N.W. 203rd Terrace
A private entrance and bath
air, heat, tv, refrigerator, mi-
crowave, all utilities included.
Gated community. Call 954
678-8996.
6233 NW 22nd Court
Nice room,utilities included.
Move in immediately. $125
weekly. $260 moves you in.
Call 786-277-2693
6849 N.W. 15th AVENUE
Nice rooms, different sizes,
quiet area, utilities included.
$105-$130 weekly, $260 to
move in immediately. Call
786-277-2693
7110 NW 15th Court
Brand new with air. $110
weekly. Call 305-254-6610.
7612 NW 2 Court
$160 plus weekly, central air
clean and cable included.
Call 786-444-7932.
8275 N.W 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776
9119 N.W. 25TH AVENUE
Small room, $340 monthly,
first and last to move in. Call
305-691-2703.
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Very clean room, quiet neigh-
borhood, all utilities included.
786-541-5234
North Miami Beach
Furnished room with private
entrance, close to 163rd
Street Mall single, working
occupant with work refer-
ence. Call 305-749-6418
Northwest Area
Utilities included, very clean
954-245-2528
OPA LOCKA AREA
Rooms for rent central air.
move in special786-251 -
2204
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Large room central air.
Call 786-541-3621
ROOMS
Monthly and weekly. Call
305-757-8596.

I Efficiencies I

100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$185 weekly, $650 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

1492 N.W. 38 Street (Rear)
Lights, water and air, $650
monthly, $900 moves you in.
Call David 786-258-3984


S Efficiencies
6811 N.W. 29th Avenue
Nice room with private en-
trance. $550 monthly.
Utilities included. 305-696-
5278.
86 St. N.E. 2nd Ave. Area
Call 305-754-7776
MIAMI GARDENS
All utilities free cable $700
monthly, first, last and securi-
ty. Call 786-546-9650.
Miami Gardens Area
Efficiency for rent, utilities
included. Call 305-610-7024
Miami Shores Area
Fenced yard, patio, $600
monthly, includes water and
lawn maintenance. Don at
305-793-0002.
North Dade
Furnished. First and last re-
quired. Call 786-267-7619.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
$550 monthly Call 786-999-
2818.
NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance, bath, air
and cable. 305-758-6013.

Apartments
101 N.E. 78th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950. Balcony, laundry room,
and parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424.
1181 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom $575
Two bedrooms $650
Stove, refrigerator, air
305-642-7080
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1261 N.W. 59th Street
1 bdrm, 1 bath, $550.
305-642-7080
1281 N.W. 61 STREET
Renovated one bedroom
$525, two bedrooms $725,
appliances included.
305-747-4552
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
Two bdrms, one bath, $575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
15600 NW 7 Ave.
One bedroom, one bath, sev-
enth floor. Pool, lobby, tennis
court. Call 305-753-6006.
17500 N.W. 40th Avenue
Large studio apartment, new-
ly remodeled, $550 monthly
all utilities included and free
cable. Call 786-853-8313.
1955 N.W. 2 Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bdrm, one bath. $450.
305-642-7080

200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$425
305-642-7080

20400 N.W. 7th AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath,
$850 monthly. 305-527-1103.

2440-42 NW 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$800 per month, first and se-
curity. Call 305-651-1078.

249 N. E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, just renovated fenced
yard, parking, $775 monthly
plus security. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-216-7533.

2515 NW 52nd Street #3
One bedroom, tiled floors,
air, no appliances. $550
monthly, $1100 to move in.
954-522-4645.
2553 York Street
Newly renovated one bed-
room, one bath. Section 8
Welcome. Call 786-853-
5820.

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate
$600 monthly.
954-430-0849

2911 N.W. 135TH STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1100 monthly 786-333-7291
418 NE 59 STREET
One bedroom with
appliances
and air. $650 monthly.
Call 786-426-6263


Apartments
421 NW 59 Terr.
MOVE IN SPECIAL 1 Month
One bedroom $575
Two bdrms, $700
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/ 786-259-7054
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
565 N.E. 131 STREET
One bedroom, one bath, like
a little house in rear with pa-
tio, $835 monthly, great loca-
tion in North Miami.Section 8
ok.Call 786-326-7424.

5755 N. W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, parking,
$625 monthly, $1000 move
in Call 954-394-7562
58th Street 31st Avenue
Small one bedroom, partially
furnish, air, lights and water.
For one or two people only.
Call 305-693-9486.
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One bedroom apartment.
Section 8. Call 305-754-7776
924 N.W. 29th Street
Two bedrooms one bath
$1000. Section 8 accepted.
Call 786-262-7313.

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information/specials.
CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air,
appliances, new tile and car-
pet starting at $650. 1545
N.W. 8th Avenue. Call 786-
506-3067.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath $515
Two bdrm, one bath $630
FREE WATER I
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Call For Move In Special
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
gated community, on bus
lines. $1080 to move in
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
1601 N.W. 62 Street, one
bedroom, one bath. $500
monthly.Section 8 welcome
call 305-717-6084
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Moving Special, $1000, Rent
$550 monthly. One and two
bedrooms, one bath. Fully
renovated. Call 786-326-
8280
MIAMI AREA
One, two and four bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.


I Apartments
MOVE IN SPECIAL
415-439 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$525 with air.
Move in special $950
Please call for appointment
305-326-8855
786-343-7800
OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135 Street
One and two bedrooms,
central air. Appliances and
water included. Section 8
Welcome. 305-769-0146 or
786-521-7151
OVERTOWN AREA
One bedroom, one bath
$550. monthly. Section 8
Newly renovated, no applica-
tion fee. 786-859-2289.
SANFORD APTS
1907 NW 2nd Court
Nice one bedroom,, air, win-
dow shades, appliances, free
hot water and tenant pays for
cold water. $390 monthly,
plus $200 deposit.Call: 305-
665-4938 Cell: 305-498-8811

1 Duplex
11254 N.W. 22 Avenue
Three bedrooms, Central air.
Try $1195. No Section 8
786-306-4839.
1130 NW 88th Street
Completely remodeled two
and three bedrooms with all
appliances, water and central
air. Call 305-305-4665.
1180 NE 112 Street
Two bedroom, one bath, en-
closed porch. Call 786-443-
7853 and 305-978-9704
121 N.E 63 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Vouchers accepted.
Call 786-308-6290
147 N.E. 167th STREET
Three bedroom. Call 786-
333-0024 and 786-709-3926.
1611 NW 41 Steet
Two bedroom, one bath, A/C,
includes appiances, free wa-
ter, secuirty bars, fenced
private parking, large yard, 3
blocks to metrorail. $700
monthly, NO Section 8
First Last and Security.
Call 786-229-5652
1734 N.W. 49 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security bars,
appliances. Section 8 Wel-
come. $1325. 305-215-8125.
1751 N. W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, Available
July 1st. Special no deposit
for qualified Section 8
tenants. Call 305-871-3280.
2035 N.W. 69th Terrace (A)
Two bedrooms, with applian-
ces and air. $850 mthly utilit-
ies included. 786-426-6263.
2226 N.W. 82nd Street k
One bedroom, one bath,
cen-tral air. $750 monthly.
NO Section 8. Call 305 685-
9909.

2253 NW 94 STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
small room attached, family
and dining room, $950
monthly, Call 954-802-2423.
2425 NW 104th Street
Three bedrooms, $1375
monthly, $1800 to move in.
305-751-6720 305-331-3899.
2466-B N.W. 44 Street
One bedroom, air. $575
monthly. No deposit 786-
877-5358.

3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
ONE BEDROOM Section 8
ok. Call 305-754-7776

3503 NW 8th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath
with tile floors, air
conditioned and
appliances included. Section
8 Prefer Call 305-301-4347

5100 N.W. 14 Ave
One bedroom, one bath,
central air, all utilities
included.
$750 monthly. 786-470-0406.
532 N.W. 145th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 O.K.
Call 754-281-0277

6920 N.W 2nd Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Section 8 O.K.
305-490-7033.

7000 N.W. 5th Place
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$998 monthly. 786-399-8557


Duplex
7752 N.W. 2nd Court
Four bedrooms, two baths
$1465 monthly.
Section 8 OK!.
Ron Jackson 305-582-8210
81st. and 6th Ave.
Three bdrm, two bath, two
bdrm, one bath. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-298-9166
or 786-351-2147.
93rd St. N.W. 18th AVENUE
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.

ALLAPATTAH AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first last, security. Section 8,
HOPWA OK Call 786-374-
9278
HOLLYWOOD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
954-967-9870.
LIBERTY CITY
One bedroom, one bath
$850, two bedroom, one bath
$1000. Section 8 preferred.
786-267-4227.
Miami
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Premier
Realty Team
call 786-301-2171.
N.E. 119 Street
Two bedrooms, one
bath.$850.
N.W. 99 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1100.
N.W. 74 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
$1100.
N.W. 159 Street
Five bedrooms. $1800.
N.W. 185 Terrace
Four bedrooms. $1600.
N.W. 3 Avenue
Two bedrooms. $950.
305-757-7067
Design Realty
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedroom. $695 monthly.
786-319-2695
NORTHWEST AREA
Like new three bedrooms,
central air. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-269-5643
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air.. $595. Call
786-431-5520

| CondosTownhouses |

20607 N.W. 15th Avenue
Beautiful three bedrooms,
two and half baths. $1350
monthly. Section O.K. $2700
move in. Call 786-488-0819

6172 SW 68 Th Street
Section 8 Three bedroom,
one and a half bath, two-
story
townhouse in South Miami
near metro rail station. A cor-
ner unit located in Lee Park.
Available next month. $1200
a month, one month security
needed. We also have a four
bedroom, two baths in same
complex which will be in
September for $1400 a
month.
Please call 786-543-3872.
NORTHEAST MIAMI
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$1080 monthly. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-254-6610
I HOuses

1014 N.W. 60 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air and heat, all appli-
ances, lawn maintenance in-
cluded. $1400 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome. Call
786-229-9488

133St N.W. 18th Ave Area.
Three bedrooms, two bath.
Call 305-754-7776

1531 N.W. 63rd STREET
1880 N.W. 65th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 monthly. Section 8
welcome. Call 786-262-7313.
15630 N.W. 159 Street
Road
Beautiful three bedroom, one
bath, air, tile, $1300 monthly,
huge yard call 305-297-5932.
1735 N.W. 121 Street
Two bedroom, two bath.Sec-
tion 8. 305-796-5252.

1812 N.W. 66th Street
Three bdrms, one bath, tiled,
air, $1200 mthly, first and
last. Sec. 8 welcome.
Call 786-344-9284.


I Houses
2164 N.W. 83RD TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, central air, tile,
housing programs welcome
or rent with an option to buy.
786-306-2078.
2258 N.W. 63RD STREET
Three bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 OK. 305-967-9074.
254 N. W .75th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
.$960 monthly.
Call 305-766-7943 or
404-861-1965.
2545 N.W. 167th Street
Three bedrooms, two bath
No section 8, move in $2250
$1475 monthly.Call 786-319-
8184.
271 NW 55th Street
Three bedroom, one bath.
big yard. Call: 786-326-6869
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
2920 N.W. 161 Terrace
Three bedrooms, $1450
monthly. Move in $2175 No
section 8 Call 786-319-8184.
3171 NW 52 ST
Four bedroom, two bath,
completely remodeled. Sec-
tion 8 welcome. Call 305-
753-6006.

3220 N.W. 135th Street
Two bedroom one bath, large
lot, remodeled, central air,
$1200. monthly all utilities in-
cluded. First and last to
move
in, no application fee. Call
786-853-8313.
3240 N.W .170 Street
Three bedrooms, 2 baths
$1500 monthly. Section 8
Ok.
786-260-1856.
4311 N.W. 186th Street
Miami Gardens
Three bedrooms, two baths.
786-312-5339
6935 N.W. 6th Court
Two bdrm, one bath, applian-
ces, bars. $900 monthly.
Section 8 OK! 305-621-5301.
7121 N.W. 21st Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths
Section 8 Only 305-720-7072
725 N.W. 42nd Street
Section 8 Welcome. Jason
Slocum. Call 786-229-5896
7801 N.W. 2ND COURT
Small two bedroom, one
bath, $650 a month, $1300
to
move in. Call 305-479-3632.

840 N.W. 76 Street
Updated three bedrooms,
two baths. $1250 monthly.
Section 8 Ok. 305-662-5505

941 NW 44th St
Three bedrooms two bath
with all appliances $1700 to
move in and $1325 monthly
Central air Fenced in yard
Call 229-561-7944 or 786-
417 -4668.
CAROL CITY AREA
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750 monthly, three bed-
rooms, one bath $1000
monthly. Asking two months
to move in. Appliances in-
cluded. 305-827-4593.
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three and four bed-
rooms. $700-$1250 with air.
305-642-7080.
LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Florida room, fenced, bars,
central air. Section 8 okay!
Call 786-390-0809
MIAMI AREA
One bedroom, air. Call
305-758-2870
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Nice three bedroom, $1475
monthly 305-308-8111.
Mlramar
Two bedroom, one bath, and
three bedroom, two bath.
Section 8 O.K. 954-240-
2179.
NICE AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
all tiled, air, backyard, 943
NW 65 St. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 305-778-2092
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two to four bedrooms. No
section 8. Call 305-474-9730


CondoslTownhouses
759 N.W. 70 STREET
Three bedroom, three bath,
den and patio, $199,000.
$40k from City of Miami and
$7k down payment to quali-
fied buyers. Ocean Palm Re-
alty 305-456-6630.
ANGIE TOWNHOMES
720 N.W. 1ST STREET
Brand new 1,2, and 3 bed-
room townhomes. Monthly
payments of $712.10 (*).
(*) Subsidy and grants
available for District 3
teachers and City of Miami
employees. Call Olde Towne
International Realty 305-319-
2979.


I Houses |
112 MARION ROAD
Why rent, Buy! Miami Gar-
dens. Three bedrooms, pool.
$995 down- $1299 monthly
FHA. 786-306-4839.

15720 N.W. 28th Place
Four bedrooms, central air.
$995 down. and $1299
monthly. FHA, 786-306-
4839.
1716 N.W. 66 STREET
Brand new home. Three bed-
room, two bath. Only $1,000
down. 786-227-3460.

2184 N.W. 86 Terrace
Gorgeous, new three bed-
rooms, two baths, appliances
included, affordable housing
accepted. Call 305-318-
7317.
3211 N.W. 169 Terrace
Why rent?Buy. Three bed-
rooms two baths, pool. Will
remodel Try $995 down and
$1349 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839.

3315 N.W. 213 TERR.
Why rent-Buy! Five bed-
rooms, three baths, central
air. $995 down-$1499 month-
ly, FHA. 786-306-4839.

3315 N.W. 49th Street
Four bedrooms, central air.
$995 down and $997 month-
ly. FHA, 786-306-4839.

515 N.E. 131 STREET
Total update, new kitchen,
bath only 3 percent down.
786-227-3460.

5819 N.W. 19th Avenue
New construction, three bed-
rooms, two baths, eat-in-
kitchen, $190,000, owner is
to give $2,500 appliance
credit at closing. Affordable
housing programs welcome.
Call 305-216-0492.

ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty

N.W. 19 AVENUE -191 ST.
Rollling Oaks. Why rent-Buy.
Five bedrooms, garage, pool.
$4900 down and $1399
monthly. 786-306-4839.



Attorney Services
Available for little monies.
Call 786-853-7274.
Bank's and Son
Lawn Service. Low rates.
Call
305-836-6804/305-620-5913.
JUST IN TIME FOR
CHRISTMAS SPEICAL
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors,
cabinets and lawn service.
305-801-5690.



Collections
Strong organization and
communication skills re-
quired to coordinate collec-
tion process, and cash flow.
Two years exp. Fax re-
sume to 305-758-3617.


Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street




Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $55, also
do G and concealed.Open
seven days 786-333-2084.

Caught Speeding ????
Call DC Today 305-653-5955
online classes available
www.anythingandeverything
trafficschool.com

"Don't Be A Victim"
NRA Certified, Personal Pro-
tection, in the home security
classes Available-"D" and "G"
Call 305-653-5955.

TRAFFIC SCHOOL
Drug and Alcohol Course
$29. Court ordered 4, 8 and
12 hour courses. Classroom
and online courses.
www.drivelegalprogram.com
305-694-2220



Church drummer....
If you've been blessed with
the gift of playing to praise
the Lord, Will you give what
you've received to a 10 year
old boy? Teach him to play
drums. Please volunteer your
gift. 305-316-8874.



Notice of Public Sale
Moorer Towing, Inc.
gives Notice of Foreclo-
sure of Lien and Intent to
sell vehicles pursuant to
subsection 713.78 of the
Florida statutes that on
04/21/2008, 9 a.m. at
6023 N.W. 6 Court, Miami,
FL 33127. Moorer Towing,
Inc. reserves the right to
accept or reject any and/or
all bids.
1997 Chevrolet P.U.
1GCEC19R1VE156949





HOPE IS NOT LOST
For your Mystical, Spiritial,
Herbal Healing, Consult a
West African Herbalist,
and
Psychotherapist for
reading
treatment of hypertension,
Arthritis, Stress, Epilepsy,
Sexual disability, Law/legal
cases, Love problems,
Dia-
betes, infertility in men and
women. Obesity, Initiation
into Cults/Shrines of
African religion and
buying
marriages.
Phone 305-756-8333,
786-201-1903 or
786-444-0407
for appointment.

INDIAN PSYCHIC
Help on all problems, rela-
tionships and marriages
.Help
and advice on all problems.
Fast results! Call for mini
reading. 305-621-9112 or
786-357-9687




See i
,f


Who Cares What Black People Think Anyway?


If you think nobody gives a damn what Black
people think, think again. Some people care a lot.
Especially when they need something from you.

Take corporations.'They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what
you think when they're looking for your vote.And TV and radio stations
hope you will pay attention to their shows.
The point Is,all these people want something from you.And when
people want something from you,you have got power over them.We


should learn to use that power wisely to make the changes we need to
make.
Give your money,your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something In return. People who are
doing the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times Is about the business of commtunicatio)n.Communicat-
ing to you the power you have and letting you know howyou can use It.
For Instance, right now there are 32 mllillon Black people in this country and
last year we earned moire than 400 billion dollars.



That's clout.


Think about it










The Miami Times
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923
Phon ; 305-694,6210










- I II IIWL),J ~ LIV & WI.I


an THIF MIAMI TIMFES IIINF 18-24. 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Bankruptcy rising among sniors


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SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans $150
Infusion Frontal laces
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $85
786-277-6821
06/10/08


A.V. INSURANCE
$ave.$$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
04/10/08
C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners *
General Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue
305-836-5206


GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 NW. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07/20/08


FAITH FINANCIAL
Reverse Mortgage!
Stay at home Enjoy Tax Free
No Mtg. Payments. If you are
62 yrs or older call me
Alex at 305-205-1697
01/09


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08
. , .

Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553
4/30/08


Call
305-694-6210


Fax
305-694-6211


Stop renting...be a homeowner!
Ae "'TOWNHOUSES
1 bed/1 bath Approx. $550/month
1290 NW61 St.

F to Habitat for Humanity"
of Greater Miami
305-634-3628


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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOSAL

Sealed proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her
office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:


RIP NO. 85050

CLOSING DATE/TIME:


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR EXTERNAL
AUDITING SERVICES FOR BAYFRONT PARK
MANAGEMENT TRUST
2:00 P.M., MONDAY, JULY 7, 2008


Detailed specifications for this RFP are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing
Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement telephone No.
305-416-1906.
THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Heruandez
City Manager


ADVERTISEMENT

Project MCC- 0-031-A
Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for the following project at Miami-
Dade Aviation Department.

MCC-M-0-031-A MIA- Building 861 & 862: This project consists of upgrades
to Building 861 & 862. The work includes the following: Package 'A" Demoli-
tion, masonry, concrete, doors, finishes, & specialties (CSBE), Package "B"
Fire Protection (Open), Package "C" Windows (CSBE), Package 'D" Hurricane
Shutters (CS BE), Package "E" Electrical (CSBE), Plans cost: $50.00 Refund-
able upon return of the plans.

Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Tues., July 8, 2008 @ 10:00am, Bid Open-
ing: Tuesday, July 22, 2006 @2:00pm
Location: 4200 N.W. 36"' Street, Bldg. 5A4th Floor, Conf Room "F"

For more information, call Ginny or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444

CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on June 26th, 2008, to
consider the approval of an amendment to the existing professional services
agreement with Charlie Delucca for the continued operations and management
of the City's Melreese Golf Course, and to consider the City Manager's recom-
mendation and finding that competitive negotiation methods are not practicable
or advantageous regarding this issue. Inquires regarding this notice may be
addressed to Ed Blanco, Department of Parks and Recreation at (305) 416-
1253.
This action is being considered pursuant to Section 18-85 the Code of the City
of Miami, Florida, as amended. The recommendation and finding to be consid-
ered in this matter are set forth in the proposed resolution and in Section 18-85
of the City Code, which are deemed to be incorporated by reference herein and
are available as public records from the City of Miami. The Public Hearing will
be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City Commission meeting of
June 26th, 2008 at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.
All interested individuals are invited to attend this hearing and may comment
on the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that
person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(003136)


AD NO. 002305 -"


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ROOFING & CONSTRUCTION
Repairs, New Roof's Additions
& Complete Home Makeovers

783-663-5900
Burcorp LLC
License & Insured


OU I IIL I


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MIAMI-DADE

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/DNeterans' Preference -
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Regional Commuter Facility
MIA Project B761-A2
Parsons-Odebrecht Joint Venture is soliciting quotes and bids from CSBE
subcontractors and suppliers that are certified by Miami-Dade County, for the
Regional Commuter Facility project at Miami Intemational Airport. Plans may be
reviewed by appointment, at 201 Alhambra Circle, Suite 1400, Coral Gables, FL
33134. Call Erika at 305-341-8800.
CSBE contractors and suppliers may also contact our CSBE Program
Manager, Tommy Wallace, 305-341-8800 for assistance, if required.
Bids and quotes from CSBE subcontractors shall be faxed to Fax# 305-569-1501
C/O: Bidding Department.
Bid Closing Date: 7/2/2008


INVITATION TO BID NO. 07-08-017
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 1st Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
Florida 33133-5504 for:
MELREESE CLUBHOUSE AND RESTAURANT, B- 30566
Bids Due: Thursday, July 17, 2008, AT 2:00 P.M.

Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary to The Work consists of the following:
The Project consists of construction of a new Melreese Golf Course Club House & Restaurant Facility consisting of a
gross building area of approximately 17,459 SF, including indoors and outdoor spaces, breezeways, courtyard, tennis
courts and covered open air perimeter.
The Project consists of two Phases. The Phase I consists of the construction of the clubhouse, tennis shelter, and
receiving area and golf cart parking area including all necessary utilities. Also included in this phase are the improvements
to the existing parking lot and the connection to the adjacent parking lot which serves the sports complex. Phase II
consists of the removal of the existing trailers and tent canopies and removal/capping of existing abandoned utilities. Also
included in this phase is the construction of the tennis courts and fence; construction of the road that will serve the kitchen
receiving area, and the improvements to the existing service road.
The completed Work will provide other incidental work in connection therewith all as indicated on drawings. The Contractor
shall furnish all required materials, labor and equipment for the Project.
CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference which will be held at the following date, time and location:
Location: City of Miami MRC Building, 444 SW 2nd Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33130 10th Floor City Manager's Main Conference Room
Date/Time: Thursday, June 26, 2008 at 10:00 a.m.
Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor from the State of Florida
or a current certified license as a Building Contractor from the State of Florida and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience
in the construction of similar projects including five (5) separate project references of similar size, scope, and complexity, supported
by references within the past five (5) years. At least one of these projects must have been for the construction of a new retail and/or
restaurant facility The Bidder must self-perform at least twenty percent (20%) of the physical construction work.
Bid packages containing complete instructions, plans and specifications may be obtained on or after June 18. 2008, from the City of
Miami Department of Capital Improvements Program, in person from Melanie Whitaker, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, Florida
33130 (305-416-1775), mwhitaker@miamigov.com, Bid packages will be available in hard copy gnly for a Non-refundable fee of
$200.00.

It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms Deriodically
check the CIP webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda at:
http://www.miamigov.com/Capitallmprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate originals in the envelopes
provided. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly opened. Any bids received after time and date specified will not
be considered. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility
of the bidder/Bidder. The City is not responsible for delays no matter what the cause.
YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE
WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.

DP# 000814


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008


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EMERGENCY NEWS
LANDLORDS OWNERS
Effective July 1, 2008
New State mandated eviction rates
FULL AND FASTEST SERVICE
For more information call
MICKENS EVICTION HEADQUARTERS

305-956-7997


FINANCIAL BREAKTHROUGH!
Saturday June, 21
8:30 p.m. to 9:45 p.m.
at Northside SDA Church
1769 NW. 119 Street Miami, FL
DR. JESSE WALKER SR.

CALL 305-625-5939
Free Gift to first 10 Visitors!


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Proleusional, Sale & Conhidenlial Survioes


Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Board Certifled OB GYN s
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


PRE-BDI CONFERENCE
ADDENDUM,


TITLE


RFP 091-HH10 7/22/2008 RFP 091-HH10 Travel Agency Services

082-HH12 7/8/2008 Recycling of Ballasts and Mercury -Containing Lamps

093-HH06 6/24/2008 Window Shade Fabric and Accessories

074-HH08 6/24/2008 Fitness Equipment-Catalog Discount

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


Jackson iM
HEMTH SYSTEM

Notice of Funding
Availability
2008-2009
Community-Based
Organizations

Jackson Health System
Office of Community
Health Services will be
accepting applications
from community-based
programs seeking funding
for healthcare initiatives
for uninsured and
underinsured populations
of Miami-Dade County.
A total of $787,000 is
available for awarding.
The funding availability
for the FY 2008-2009
Community-Based
Programs will be
awarded based on those
programs who will meet
the following funding
priorities:
Priority 1: Innovative
programs that provide
or improve access to
a medical home. This
priority will include
programs that provide
health screenings,
education, outreach and
eligibility screenings that
connect each patient to
a primary care facility
within the Miami-Dade
community.
Priority 2: Improved
access to health services
for special populations
with emphasis on chronic
disease management.
This priority will include
funding for special
populations such as HIV/
AIDS, cancer, epilepsy,
and chronic diseases of
children and the elderly
with an emphasis on
specific plans on medically
managing these diseases.
All applicants should
include a long-term
sustainability plan
with their request for
funding. Additionally,
applicants are c',uraid
to find opportunities for
leveraging other federal,
state or private match
dollars.
Applications will be
available fir pick-up or
to be mailed from June
1 ,_200kLthrough July.
1QL20 .,Lat Jackson
Medical Towers, 1500
N.W 12'h Avenue, Room
711E, Miami, FL 33136.
Applications will also be
made available online at
www.jhsmiami.org.
All application packages
must be submitted by hand
delivery, courier or mail
no later than Eridajulyb.
11, 29Q8., at 12 noon. No
e-mail submissions will be
accepted.
If you are a 501 (c)(3)
non-profit organization
and would like an
application, please call
(305) 585-5513 for more
information,


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, JUNE 24, 2008

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2nd FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 7:30 PM AT
17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE. NORTH MIAMI BEACH

All INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney
NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Coun-
cil with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall
insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (f/s 286.0105); 2) in accor-
dance with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing spe-
cial accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office
of the City Clerk no later than two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone
(305) 787-6001 for assistance; if heariog impaired, telephone our TDD line at
(305) 948-2909 for assistance.


.5


BLACKS MUST CONTIZOLrHEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 18-24, 2008




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