Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00550
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: June 11, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00550
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text





S12 P1
LIBRARY OF FLA HM)SIORY
PO EBOX 1170WDb 4 Tt
GAINESVILlE Fl. 325,1-70 I NlI I


One Family Serving Since 1923




Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Volumne 85 Numbier 37


Violent

crime rates

question

Gun Bounty

Program
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miaiiiitiimesoniline.com

The Gun Bounty Program,
which was launched May 2007,
makes it possible for residents
to get a $1,000 reward for
information that leads to a
person with an illegal gun. The
goal of the program is to get
more weapons and criminals off
the streets of Miami by reaching
out to people who know someone
who has control of an illegal
forearm.
"While other communities
around the country have
implemented Gun Bounty
Programs, no community is
tackling the issue of gun violence
quite like Miami-Dade County,",
said Mayor Alvarez. "We are
attempting to get guns off the
streets by marketing to the very
individuals who know exactly
where illegal guns are.
As county leaders celebrated
the one year anniversary of
the program at Miami-Dade
police headquarters, they were
convinced that the program had
been successful in recovering
scores of guns and solving a
range of crimes. One homicide,
nine robberies and 34 burglaries
were among the crimes solved.
A total of 27 people have been
imprisoned for charges relating
to warrants, drugs and grand
-theft auto. The tips have led,........
police to obtain drugs with a
street value of $183,280, $7,588
in cash, a stolen car, a police
badge, four bullet-proof vests, a
radar gun and one live grenade.
According to FBI statistics,
which were released on Monday,
violent crime has decreased
1.4 percent nationwide but it
has increased in roughly every
South Florida city with more
than 100,000 residents. In the
past year, Miami has been one
of the many cities in Florida that
has conducted more homicides,
rapes, and robberies cases.
Violent crimes have increased in
Miami to 6,120 from 5,931.
In hearing those statistics,
it questions programs such as
the Gun Bounty. Risa Bell,
a representative for Director
Robert Parker of the Miami-
Dade Police, insist that the Gun
Bounty has brought success in
Miami-Dade County. "As a result
Please turn to PROGRAM 4A


Alison Austin, Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson, State Representative Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall, Gov. Charlie Crist,
State Senator Larcenia Bullard, Leigh Tony and children from Belafonte Tacolcy Center at the signing of the legislation desig-
nating the "Magic City Children's Zone" within District 3. Ms. Austin and Ms. Leigh worked with Commissioner Edmonson and
other elected officials to make the Children's Zone possible.
SEE STORY ON PAGE 4A


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Residents

fail to

show up

at MMAP

meeting

By Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.com

Metro-Miami Action Plan
Trust (MMAP) held a community
roundtable on Saturday, June 7
at Joseph Caleb Center in which
members of the media, elected
officials, business owners, and
residents came together to
address the issues occurring in
our community.
Since its 1983 establishment,
MMAP has committed to helping
the community by implementing
such programs as the Miami-
Dade County Teen Court, Martin
Luther King Jr. Leadership
Academy, Homeownership
Assistance Program, First Time
Buyer Programs, and so on.
Hot 105 and WEDR 99 JAMZ
broadcasted the event live on
Hot 105 radio station. Issues
from unemployment, education,
housing, Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test (FCAT), health
services, and foreclosure were
discussed among the panel of
guest that offered advice and
solutions to people who were
struggling in these area.
Although the GoomBay festival
was in town, members of the
community failed to show up
for this significant event that
would benefit everyone. Sadly,
panel members exceeded the
Please turn to MMAP 5A


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Gradua'tes 2008,,' on P, rs Day on Pages 7 8A














OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9A THF MIAMI TIMFR IIINF 11-17. 2008


*WORD-FOR-WORD

Are we turning a

blind eye to justice?

For two days, beginning Sunday, a United Nations expert
on racism will be in Miami on a fact-finding mission. Below
are excerpts from the American Civil Liberties Union's report
on the issue, "Race and Ethnicity in America: Turning a
Blind Eye to Injustice." The full report is at www.aclu. org/
pdfs/humanrights/cerd_ full_report.pdf
Racial and ethnic discrimination and inequality remain
ongoing and pervasive in the United States, and the
U.S. government has not done enough to address these
important problems. Hurricane Katrina exposed to the
world many of America's grave, persistent economic and
social disparities, and their impact on African-American
and other minority communities. U.S. policies and
practices at the federal, state and local level continue to
disproportionately burden the most vulnerable groups in
society: racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, non-
U.S. citizens, low-wage workers, women, children and the
accused.
/
Profiling of drivers
Minorities are unfairly victimized by racial profiling,
a practice law enforcement uses that is based on race,
ethnicity, nationality, religion, or perceived immigration
status.
Authorities investigate, stop, frisk, search, or use
force against individuals based on subjective, personal
characteristics, rather than on concrete evidence of
unlawful behavior.

People of color are profiled while they drive, shop, pray,
stand on the sidewalk waiting for work, or travel on
airplanes, trains and buses. While it has most frequently
been associated with African Americans and Latinos, racial
and ethnic profiling continues to have a devastating impact
on Asians, Native Americans and, increasingly after 9/11,
Arabs, Muslims and Asians. ?

According to recent government data concerning the
profiling of drivers' 'while Hispanic, black and white
drivers were stopped by the police about as often, Hispanic
drivers or their vehicles were searched 8.8 percent of the
time, black drivers 9.5 percent and white drivers only 3.6
percent.

Immigrants have become the targets of frequent
racially discriminatory acts and statements, as well as a
governmental crackdown that including workplace raids.
Cities and towns have enacted ordinances to penalize those
who offer immigrants employment or accommodation and,
in some cases, to prohibit the speaking of languages other
than English at work.

Immigrant workers of color are particularly vulnerable.
Most of the industries that employ immigrant workers
pay low wages, maintain dangerous working conditions,
and frequently violate labor, environmental, and anti-
discrimination laws. In the wake of the U.S. Supreme
Court's Hoffman Plastic decision, undocumented workers
have lost antidiscrimination protection, available remedies
when injured or killed on the job, overtime pay, workers'
compensation, family and medical leave, and other
fundamental safeguards.

No right to counsel
Low-wage South Asian and Muslim workers are
particularlyvulnerable, as theyface anti-immigranthostility,
employment abuse, and post-9/11 discrimination.

Further compromising their status, the government does
not provide non-citizens the right to counsel in immigration
proceedings, with the large majority of immigrants having
to challenge their immigration detention and deportation
pro se. Even if an immigrant has access to counsel, recent
legislative actions and court decisions have sharply limited
their right to challenge the basis for their detention in the
courts, and have created a second class system of justice
for non-citizens, especially those held in the so called "War
on Terror."

Read the United Nations complete report on "Race and
Ethnicity in America" on www.aclu.org/pdfs/humanrights/
cerd_ full_report.pdf


WIVIEN THE NE\\ MATTERS TO YOU
TURN l(.) '1.B 1.IR. N'a'PAPIR

,, ,


(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 541h Street
Miami. Florida 33127-1818
Post Otfice Box 270200CO
Buena Vista Siatlon. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES. Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR.. Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member ol the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Blad3 Press believes trial America can oest lead the world from racial and national antagonism when it accords to
every person. regarailss or race creed or color his or her human and legal rights Haling no parson. tearing no person, the
Black Press strives 10 help every persr io n tha e irm belief thai all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back

Ap The Media Audit =


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The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper.
Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone
number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fa\ them to 305-757-5770;
Email: miamiteditorial@bellsouth.net.


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OPINION


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


BL ACKS MtlST CONTROL THIiR OW\\N DESIGN' I


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If you want to know what's really going on in Cuba these
days local attorney H.T. Smith should know. He and a
group of 67 members of the National Bar Association spent
last week in Havana visiting schools, hospitals, prisons
and the local popular places on a fact-finding tour.

Some local school board members who seem to be trying
to protect the jobs of those teachers and administrators
whose jobs are being threatened by budget cuts are getting
a little frustrated. They are caught between a rock and
a hard place by trying to deal with the quarter-billion-
dollar deficit forced on us by state budget cuts and rising
costs. It's tough, but most people think they should let
Superintendent Rudy Crew run the show and do his job.

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Alvarez has gotten
his goody-two-shoes image tarnished again. It seems full-
time senior advisor Luis Andre Gazitua has been using
the mayor's downtown office to drum up clients for his law
firm. Not good ethics Mr. Mayor.

The Miami-Dade Transit Agency is in bad shape and
causing some anxious moments on Wall Street. Most
of the transit tax revenue supposed to fund expansion,
was diverted into operating budgets. Meanwhile, county
commissioners wasted money by pushing transit officials
to create unneeded bus routes through their districts.
Stay tuned.

Our county seems to be in serious trouble and owners as
well as renters are being hit by hard times. If South Florida
is a barometer for the housing crisis and the economy, the
forecast does not look good. Like other areas nationwide,
evictions are rising throughout the state, clogging county
courts and spawning a boom in companies that handle
evictions.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL TlIHIR OWN DESTINY


Edmonson's 'Magic City Children's Zone' signed into law


On June 6, Miami-Dade
County legislation authored
by Commissioner Audrey M.
Edmonson and Florida State
legislation sponsored by Rep.
Dorothy Bendross-Mindin-
gall and Senator Larcenia
Bullard was signed into law
by Governor Charlie Crist,
designating the "Magic City
Children's Zone" an area in
Miami-Dade County that will
provide family stability, eco-
nomic development, afford-
able housing, youth activi-
ties, education, and parental
support to the children living


PROPOSED SERVICES INCLUDE

* "Bably B.Ti'ii." program addres,ing proper infanit care 3aid developniilt
* Health education on topics such as lead paint poisuning ind astlrima
* H-iii3ciil lteracy lor teens
* "Litles. Older Pact" program
* Other educational and social services networks


within the zone. The selected
zone includes many inner-
city neighborhoods within
District 3 Liberty City,
Little Haiti, Allapattah, and
Wynwood where opportuni-


ties for positive growth and
success are inundated with
hardships. State funding in
the amount of $3.5 million
will be used as seed money
to initiate the project.


"The purpose of this bill is
to improve the lives of the
children of Wynwood, Allap-
attah, Liberty City and Little
Haiti, who live in the Magic
City of Miami, but whose life
experiences, beset with ob-
stacles and challenges, limit
their ability to fully realize
their dreams," stated Com-
missioner Edmonson at a,
press conference on June
6 held at Belafonte Tacolcy
Center located in District 3.
"The program clearly endors-
es the notion that the earlier
a child is exposed to a posi-


tive and stimulating environ-
ment, the better chance he or
she will have of becoming a
productive and fulfilled mem-
ber of our society."
The Magic City Children's
Zone lies.within the borders
of 79th Street, 36th Street,
Miami Avenue, and 27th
Avenue. The pilot' program
seeks to replicate the suc-
cess of similar programs. The
Harlem's Children Zone, for
example, has gathered com-
munity members for the past
forty years to create positive
opportunities for all children


living in a 100-block area of
Central Harlem. Children and
families living in the Magic
City Children's Zone will re-
ceive services and programs
geared towards supporting
healthy and positive develop-
ment from community ser-
vice providers and govern-
ment agencies.
In addition, the initiative
seeks to strengthen the infra-
structure of non-profit agen-
cies in the Magic City Chil-
dren's Zone so that they can
be of optimal service to the
children in the community.


Your Ticket to Opportunity



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II


SATURDAY, JUNE 21, 2008



10:00 AM to 02:00 PM

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Program brings no

PROGRAM
continued from 1A

of the information given to the
Gun Bounty, two old cases
have been solved. Additionally,
there had been 76 total arrests
and 134 guns recovered with
24 high power rifles, 101
semi-automatics guns, and 9
shotgun."
For years, when it came to


change to violent crimes in Miami-Dade


law enforcement, the 'Stop
Snitching Campaign' has
caused people to be silent in
the Black community. Criminal
informants or any form of
communication with the cops
was unacceptable and could
cost you your life. "One gun,
one arrest, and one grand. The
award money is going to go
down so residents may receive
up to $3000. In general, people


appear to be moving away from
the 'no snitching' rule because
the crimes are affecting the
individuals," said Bell.
Not condoning the efforts of
the Gun Bounty program but
with the increase of violent
crimes, the numbers do not
offer celebration for the many
in Miami-Dade County who
have lost a loved one or become
victims to violence.


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4A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008









Bi \Ct'2s NtIUS' C ONTIROLTHI LIR (-)\N Di SlNY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


Disappointing turnout at Metro-Action community roundtable


MMAP
continued from 1A

audience members.

MIAMI IS BEHIND
According to panelist Joy
Ann Reid, the City of Miami is
becoming one of the poorest
cities in America. The median
household is $27,000 a year.
Of those living in poverty, four
of ten do not hold a high school
diploma. Miami is one of the
most expensive cities to live in
America and is slowly falling
behind.
State Representative Dorothy
Bendross-Mindgall attended
the event to give insight to the
'Magic City Children's Zone' bill
that was passed by the state
Legislature on Friday. "When
you here the state is building
more prisons, it shows that our
kids have become members of
the haves. When we put our
children first, we are going to
serve them as they should be
served." said Mindgall.

NO EXCUSE TO NOT VOTE
The event reminded people


that it was important for
us to go to the polls and
vote. Miami-Dade Elections
displayed the election form
in the Caleb lobby. With
the voting machines in
place, representatives did
demonstrations on how to cast
their vote in the upcoming
elections. "Politicians respond
to two things-voting and
money. We are not showing up
to vote for our judges, mayors,
or commissioners," Joy Ann
Reid.
"Funding for employment
services has decreased. If you
don't support or don't vote,
then your resources will slowly
diminish right before your
eyes," Rick Beasley, South
Florida Workforce Mobile
Unit.
"Sometimes 1 say that we
have met the enemy, and the
enemy is ourselves. We can't
wait until November to vote
because there are important
elections coming forward. I am
glad that Barack Obama won
the Democratic Nomination.
It is not so important who is
in the White House but who


is in our local government,"
Reverend Jimmy Brown, Radio
Host Hot Talk.
THE NEXT
GENERATION SPEAKS
Implemented by MMAP,
Miami-Dade County Teen
Court has been a successful
program that has helped
young people become more
familiar with the law. Through
their involvement, Teen Court
helps in lessening juvenile
delinquency by breaking
off what seems to be the
beginning stages of criminal
behavior. The program has
provided youth, volunteers and
participants, an opportunity
to gain knowledge and skills
in an innovative judicial
process.
Leonard Thompson, who is
one of the members of Teen
Court Program Participant and
in the Carol City High School
SLaw Magnet, shared with the
panel and the community his
observations of his experience
in the Teen Court program.
"Society needs to offer more
programs for the youth. I feel
that as, a generation we have


a lot of potential. I also feel
that it is up to the parents to
teach the kids. As well, we as a
younger generation need to be
accountable for our actions.
The youth need to change
their mentality."

WE NEED MORE
AFFORDABLE HOUSING
All over the country, people
are loosing their homes. In
January, Florida was voted
as one of the top foreclosure
states. "What's happening
right now is people are living in
homes that they can-no longer
afford," Debra Johnson-King,
President/CEO of Millenium
Group.
In this struggling economy,
Jean Castor President of
American Mortgage, advices
that, "Right now, it is a good
time to buy a home. If you are
thinking about buying a house,
educate yourself. Without the
proper knowledge, you will fall
into traps. Seek the first-time
homebuyer counseling."

WE HAVE A LONG WAY TO
GO AND SHORT TIME


TO GET THERE
People United to Lead the
Struggle for Equality, Inc.
(P.U.L.S.E.), Miami-Dade
Community Development, The
Children's Trust, Teen Court,
and other organizations
set up booths in the lobby
to offer information to the
people. Miami-Dade shared
the Dial-A-Life Program that
has implemented in which
they collect used cell phones
and refurbish them then
distribute them to at-risk
Miami-Dade County residents,
such as low-income, elderly,
disabled, domestic violence
victims and families with at-
risk or disabled children, can
conveniently call 9-1-1 for
emergency assistance.
Brodes H. Hartley,
Chairman of Health Choice,
and Dr. Deborah A. Holmes,
President of the Psychological
Association reminded the
community to take care of
themselves mentally and
physically. "We are prone to
diabetes and obesity," said Dr.
Holmes. "One of the reasons,
we can't address it is because


we define good health as the
absence of pain but these
issues such as depression,
obesity, and diabetes need to
be discussed. We cannot hide
what's already there."

MMAP IS HERE TO HELP
YOU
Former Carrie Meek and her
son, Kendrick Meek stopped in
before heading to his Fathers
Day Picnic engagement to
share some support to MMAP.
"If we can spend fifteen million
more dollars in Iraq, then we
can make MMAP work," Carrie
Meek. "We really need good jobs
in the community. Never forget
that MMAP was designated
as your organization for city
development. They have
done more than economic
development in our community
but human resources."
"We have a problem that
includes foreclosure and it is
affecting our community. Let's
not just leave here but we
should also make solutions to
these reoccurring problems,"
John Dixon Jr., MMAP Interim
Executive Director.


Local commissioners provide relief for Haiti


Miami Dade County
Commissioners Barbara J.
Jordan and Audrey Edmonson
held a press conference
on Monday at the County
Warehouse, 2361 N.W. 67
Avenue, to give an account on
the success of the County's
food relief drive for Haiti.
"Our creator is very pleased
when we act like him," said
Angel Aloma, Executive
Director of Food for the Poor.
"The conditions in Haiti are
destitute and desperate. Let's
continue to help Haiti," said
Jordan.
Over 39,000 pounds of food
have been collected including
containers filled with water,
rice, canned meats and other
non-perishable food items
during the two-week collection
drive led by Commissioner
Jordan and supported by
Commissioner Edmonson and
Mayor Carlos Alvarez.
Nadia Pierre, a spokesperson
from the Mayor's office, stated,
"We have one main goal which
is to help the people of Haiti.
We thank everyone for their
efforts because we could not
do it without you."
Two months ago, Haiti was
hit with a food crisis that was
broadcasted all over the world.
A call for action was needed
throughout the island. Prices
of rice, beans and cooking oil
doubled. The high food prices
have had an effect on most of
the residents on the island.
Many have been surviving on
less than a dollar a day while
47 percent are malnourished.
Many opened their hearts


relief effort.


during this crisis to bring
a smile to a stranger's face.
After hearing about the food
crisis in Haiti, the students
at Marjory Stoneman Douglas
Elementary donated and
collected over eight pounds of
food to send to Haiti. Miami-
Dade transit employees have
given 55 gallons of food for
Haiti's relief. Miami-Dade
correctional employees and
other county agencies also
contributed in aiding Haiti.
Over $5000 was raised from
county agencies and every


dollar that was raised, World
Vision matched it three
times turning the amount to
$15,000.
"Our contribution will
certainly make a difference
for a mother and a child is
wondering where the next
meal is coming from," says
Edmonson.
"Miami-Dade has always
been gracious. Not everyone
is as fortunate as we are.
When we had storms in the
past, people have aided us,"
said Commissioner Jose


"Pepe" Diaz.
In sending aid to Haiti,
many have wondered whether
everybody will receive the
necessary aid or will relief be
distributed to selected people.
"We want to make sure the
people in the rural areas are
being able to receive the food,"
said Jordan.
"It is hard work for many of
us but we have been able to
move this project forward,"
said C. Douglas Bass, Director
of Office of Emergency
Management (OEM).


FAMU President honored by

Tallahassee Urban League


TALLAHASSEE, Florida
A&M University (FAMU) Presi-
dent James H. Ammons, was
recently honored by the Talla-
hassee Urban League with the
"Weathering the Storm Award"
for his continuous dedication to
FAMU and ensuring its success.
"Although my drive for a better
FAMU is derived from a sincere
love for an institution, and not
from the desire of recognition,
I am grateful for the Tallahas-
see Urban League's notice of my


dedication to FAMU," said Am-
mons.
The award is intended to honor
local religious leaders, political
figures, a family or an individ-
ual that weathered a dangerous
storm and survived to tell their
* stories.
We wanted to award Dr. Am-
mons because of a strong come-
back of university," said Rev.
Ernest Ferrell, president and
CEO of the Tallahassee Urban
League.


ATTORNEYS AT LAW

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


BTW Class of 1967 help deserving students i.,, ,....


The Booker T. Washington
Class of 1967 in keeping with
their commitment to help de-
serving students of B.T.W.
further their education, host-
ed a reception last Saturday,
at the African Cultural Arts
Center to present this year's
recipients with the Johnny
Bruce Turner Educational
Award in memory of class-
mate and past President J.B.
Turner.
The 2008 recipients were
Markea Hannah who holds a
4.7 G.P.A. and will be attend-
ing the University of South
Florida and Nelsa Napoles
who holds a 4.0 G.P.A. and
will be attending Florida State
University.
Giving words of inspiration
to the recipients were Ro-
berta Daniels, B.T.W. Alumni
President, Lucius King, Class
President, Carolyn Jones, Ro-
land Clarke, Claretha Devoe,
Janet Symonette, Janice Mar-
tin, Jerry Mitchell, Richard
Demeritt, Leila Thomas, and
Bernard Troutman.


F BOOKER T. WASHINGTON JR./SR. HIGH


4










"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content

* Available from Commercial News Providers"





bY ij King


Survivor uses her colon cancer battle to educate others


Diagnosed with colon cancer
earlier this year, Patricia Macias
knew she was in a fight for her
life.
"I told God this was his battle,"
said Patricia Macias, a resident
of Liberty City. "He answered my
prayers. My recovery was quick.
I went in to have the surgery and
I was up walking in a matter of
days."
Her recovery is an ongoing
process, but her healing includes
educating others.
"I now know there are a lot of
things I could have done to pre-
vent this disease, "added Macias.
"I learned a lot about this dis-
ease and how it can be prevented
through the American Cancer So-
ciety. But it was after I was diag-
nosed. I want to educate others
so they can prevent colon can-
cer."
Her life lessons are an imme-
diate impact for others.
"I drink a lot of juice," said


Sabrina Bartley, 41, a resident of
Liberty Square who participated
in Macias' outreach session held
in the conference room of the Lib-
erty Square public housing u nit
last Thursday. "From now on, I
will drink a lot of water and watch
what I eat."
Macias hopes to give
other people the message at the
front end. She regularly visits
public housing sites, churches,
community events, and homeless
shelters to share her story and
urge low-income residents to get
screened. This was her first ses-
sion at Liberty Square. Twelve
people attended the session.
Several attendees volunteered to
help her distribute information to
the areas 4,000 residents..
"People don't want to get test-
ed. If they are diagnosed with
cancer, they will give up. But
life is worth living. Patty is an
example of beating cancer, "said
Ream Davis, 29, a new Liberty


Patricia Macias (right) reviews American Cancer Society
colon cancer information with Sabrina Bartley.


Square resident.
Macias believes eliminating the
stigma and sharing her story will
result in more testing.
"I tell them the truth. I share my
struggles to look attractive while
wearing a colostomy bag. I tell
them all of the issues that come
with this disease, "said Macias.
"I've been given a second chance


to make a bigger difference in this,
community. I am on the frontline
to prevent colon cancer."
According to statistics, Black
Americans are more likely to de-
velop and die from cancer than
any other racial or ethnic group.
Colorectal cancer is the third
most common cancer in both
Black men and women.


-Preschool To 12th Grade
*Aftercare and Tutorial N0
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* Transportation Available

* Mckay ESE Scholarship
* Florida Pride Scholarship. Carrie
Meek Scholarship

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14450 NE 6 Avenue
786-267-5061 / 305-947-9974


urn


Lt im


On Thursday, June 19, join millions of commuters and leave your car at home and
ride the bus or train to get to work, school or wherever life takes you. Send a strong
message that you are tired of rising gas prices and want to save our planet.


TRANSIT HAS ITS REWARDS
By riding transit on June 19, you can be eligible to win $1,000 cash, tickets to
Universal Studios Orlando, a Hawks Cay Resort getaway in the Florida Keys,
Dunkin' Donuts gift cards or other great prizes, Prize cards will be distributed at
select bus terminals and train stations while supplies last.*


COMMUTER CHOICES
In addition to transit, many people are opting to carpool or vanpool to work. It's all
about choices that can save you money, conserve gasoline and reduce harmful
greenhouse gases.


PLAN YOUR TRIP AND SUPPORT NATIONAL DUMP THE PUMP DAY.
CALL 1-800-234RIDE OR VISIT WWW.1800234RIDE.COM


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rCUN


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TRANSIT


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COMMUTER
SERVICES


* No purchase necessary. Certain restrictions apply. No cash value. Complete rules at www.1800234ride.com.


khf
~: 4ILI


SAY NO, TO HIGH, GAS PRICES!


.- .1,









7A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


BLACKS MUST COiNTROL iIIFR ON\\N DLSTINY


ALVIN JOHNSON

Daddy I miss you and love
you. From your
baby girl Nana Boo.


OLIVER L. MAYCOCK
12/12/20 09/10/05

Gone, but not forgotten.
Love, Karen.


HERBERT JOSEPH, JR.
10/08/26 02/07/08

Love your wife, kids, grands
and great grands.


JAMES McGINTIS
04/26/25-06/08/05


It's been three hard years
and we are still shedding
tears. .
Losing the head of our
family makes all of us face
our fears.
We miss you so much and
we managed too keep our
sanity.
From your loving wife,
children, and grandchildren.


MELVIN JONES, JR.
09/08/12 07/11/93

WVe will always love and miss
you. Daughters, Barbara,
Peggy and family.




wp Aw


.~'. ..~


EDWARD LUDLOW
03/13/2003

Gone but no forgotten. We
love you Dad. Ludlow's.


JOE F. NELLICLIFF
01/17/26- 11/03/06

You are in our thoughts, hearts
and prayers.
We miss you very much.
You remain in our
daily conversation.
Miss and love you forever.
Nellicliff and Thomas
Family


JIMMIE LEE HARRELL, JR.
AKA 'JIM BOB'
1/211/69 06/21/06
Baby boy, its approaching two
years since you left us.
Everyday we think of you. Its seems
like yesterday ou were here with us.
The love you shared with us, will live
in our hearts forever.
Strengthen by our love and the
warmth of your memories, your
daughters, Jameisha and Jamiyah;
your loving parents, Wylene and
Joseph Young, Jimmie and Annette
Harrell, Sr.; brother, Vitz and sister,
Valarie, extended brothers and
sisters, families and friends.
S Jimmie we love and miss you so
very much.


W-7l


JOHN P. BRYANT
07/24/25 04/21/07

A special day! We miss you.
Linda Bryant and Lewis family.


EDDIE J. GROVER SR.
09/08/1965 04/28/1993

We miss you always.
Love, Eddie Jr. and Jeannie.


JEFFERY 'JB' BROWN
09/01/58 12/29/04

We miss you. Your mother,
Louise, children and brothers.


DEA. WILLIE L. BROWN
06/12/31 05/22/02

Hpapy Birthday. We miss
you. Your wife, Louise and
sons.


SIDONIE R. HILLS
06/28/69 03/07/07


Beloved we carry you forever
in our hearts. The Family.


WILLIAM EARL GRIFFIN
07/02/32 07/31/04

Love is forever. wife,Marjorie;
children, Elaine,'Shirley and
Griffin family.


HENRY JONES
10/19/09- 04/11/75

We will always keep you in
our hearts. Love your family.


JOHN LOUIS MCCRAY
09/12/38 04/15/04

We will always love and miss
you. Wife, Peggy; children
and family.


CLARENCE A. DEAN
03/03/42 08/19/98


We will always love and miss
you. Son, Clarence Jr. and
family.


ADAM L. NORRISON
09/29/49 01/12/04

You are gone, but never for-
gotten. Love your family.


HENRY 'SMITTY' SMITH
11/26/50 03/29/08

Missing you. Thanks for all
the love you shared.
The Smith Family.


ERNEST "DICKEY" SMITH
12/30/43 09/06/91

Still missing and loving you
will never be forgotten.
The Smith Family.


PERRY OWENS
10/28/27 -05/10/06

You will forever be in our
hearts. Love your wife, chil-
dren and family.


CLARENCE JACKSON
10/11/66 03/25/97

We will forever love and miss
you. The Hall Family.


JAMES HALL
02/10/29- 07/28/76

We will forever love and miss
you. The Hall Family.


JAMES 'CHICKEN' HALL, JR.
09/25/57- 07/16/95

We will forever love and miss
you. The Hall Family.


We will forever love and miss
you. The Hall Family.


GREGORY HALL
01/12/58 10/04/90

We will forever love and miss
you. The Hall Family.


LARMORRIS E. DIXON, SR.
01/30/48 12/05/03

Forever in our hearts. Love
always. Wife, Melvina and
family.


LEONARD FLUKER
1962- 1996

Missing you. Love, Allese,
Lenese, Chiquita, Laquita
and grandchildren.


TERRY 'TEE' MORLEY
07/23/55 05/12/89

Missing you, but still loving
you. Joyce, Pat, Connie,
Mike, Carol and son, Timmie.


ARTHUR 'BUG' SCOTT, JR.
07/21/69 11/17/96

Gone, but you will never be
forgotten. Love, Auntie Trish
and family.


JEROME 'BIG J' ANDERSON
12/23/36 12/08/88

Gone, but you will never be
forgotten. Love, Trish and
family.


JOVAN 'BEAN' WILLIAMS
01/25/78- 02/01/98

Love you always, your
daughter, Brionca; mother,
auntie, uncles and family.


JAMES M. BRADSHAW, SR.
04/02/15-12/13/88

We love and miss you.
Adgnoe and your children.









.LACKS MUUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


RiA T14F MIAM~I TIMR &IIIIUF 11-17. 2008


We will forever love and miss
you. Patrice, Sharon and
Bryan Jones and family.


TRAVIS A. WILIAMS

Mom, 5 sisters,
daughter Kammorah
and Bionca. Love Ya!


MICHAEL A. JONES
12/05/60- 02/26/03

We will forever love and miss
you. Your sisters, brothers,
nieces, nephews and family.


DENNIS L. GRAHAM


We miss you Dad! Shawn,
Nisia, Bobo, Brit, Keva,
Taytay, Tevia and Lil Dennis.


ETHEL B. PHILLIPS, Re-
tired Miami- ,
Dade Pub-
lic School
Custodian;
85, of Coco-
nut Grove,
died June
6th at Mt. .
Sinai Hos-
pital & Medical Center The
family will receive friends Fri.
6- 8 p.m. at Greater St. Paul
A.M.E. Church. Services will
be held Sat. 1 p.m. at Great-
er St Paul A.M E Church .


ROBERT LEEANDERSON,
SR. Truck
Driver,
69, of Mi-
ami died
June 8th ,
at South
Pointe

Center
Survivors include wife, Jean
A. Anderson; daughters,
Theresa Lofton and Sandra
Mitchell; son, Robert Lee
Anderson, Jr.; mother-in-law,
Fannie Billings, sister-in-law,


Catherine Jay, Services will
be held Fri. 12 Noon at the
, Chapel.

EMMA L. BENTLEY, Beau-
tician, 84, of Richmond
Heights died June 4th at
home. SUr- .
viv ors

daughters
Gwendo-
lyn Beni-
ley Thorpe
and Krist.ail ..
Hickmon,


son, Roy W. Bentley, Jr.,
granddaughters, Michele P.
Bryant and Karmen B. Blue;
grandsons, Randall W. Bent-
ley and Christen L. Thorpe;
Services will be held Wed.
10 A.M. at Second Baptist
Church .

CARLOS KNAPPER, La-
borer, 41, of Naranja, died
June 5th at St. Anne's Cath-
olic Nursing Center. Servic-
es will be held Thursday, 11
a.m. at the Chapel.


ALBERT LEON DORSEY

You are loved and you will
always be missed. The Wide-
man family.


You are loved and you will
always be missed, The Atkins
family.


RONALD REED ROGERS

We love you and miss you.
Your son Corey and family.


Sigma Gamma Rho honors Cherry at FAMU School of Law


Concluding a week of histori-
cal significance, The Gwen Saw-
yer Cherry tribute received rave
reviews on June 5th in Orlando.
The celebration included the dedi-
cation of The Gwendolyn Sawyer
Cherry, Esq. Lecture Hall and En-
dowed Scholarship Fund Presen-
tation at FAMU College of Law.
The Life and Legacy of Cherry,
a distinguished educator, author,
attorney, law professor and state
legislator, was reflected during
the hour-long impressive pro-
gram. Fr. Leenette Morse Pen-
nington, past interim president
of Edward Waters College, char-,
tered the course for the evening.
Ms. Tanya White, member of the
Gwendolyn Sawyer Cherry Chap-
ter of Phi Alpha Delta Law Frater-
nity, welcomed the diverse audi-
ence. Ms. White, a third year law
student, is also member of Sigma
Gamma Rho.



Ribbon Cutting:

Katie L.Williams,

Garth C. Reeves, Sr.,

Ruby T. Rayford, .

Jennifer A Gunn,

Dean Leroy Pernell

and


Other program participants giv-
ing historical highlights were Dr.
Mynora J. Bryant, International
Grand Basileustof Sigma Gamma
and former law student of the hon-
oree; Mr. Henry Givens, Southern
Health Network, and Ms. Jenni-
fer A. Gunn, Southeast Regional
Syntatkes of Sigma Gamma Rho.
With humor and facts, the history
lessons was eloquently shared by
Garth C. Reeves, Sr. the keynote
speaker. An expression of grati-
tude and closure of the historical
event were given by Katie L. Wil-
liams, Tribute Chair and Leroy
Pernell, Dean of FAMU College of
Law.
In the absence of Cyrus M. Jol-
livette, a donation of $10,000 from
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida
was presented to the Cherry En-
dowed Scholarship fund. The
scholarship fund matures in 2012
with annual donations of $1,000.


The first scholarship recipient will
be announced this August.
Soloist Lynwood Carter of
Shiloh Baptist Church of Orlando
rendered unique and solemn trib-
utes.
The ribbon cutting for the GSC
Lecture Hall, a trial advocacy
courtroom on the second floor of
the College of Law, followed the
program. The lecture hall is the
first to be named and dedicated at
the College of Law for an alum.
Endowed scholarship commit-
tee members from Gamma Delta
Sigma chapter included Wilma
Council, Catherine Gipson, Akilah
Johnson, Juila A. Myers, W. Doris
Neal, Terriceda Newkirk and Mary
G. Williams. Katie L. Williams and
Ruby T. Rayford chair and co-
chair respectively were lauded for
their efforts along with Christina
E. Mobley, Antionette Ownes and
Shirley Pringle.


Katie L.Williams, Endowed Scholarship Chair, Ruby T. Rayford, Co-Chair, Blue Cross
Blue Shield Rep, Leroy Pernell, Dean, FAMU College of Law, Dr. Mynora J. Bryant,
International Grand Basileus, Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. and Jennifer A. Gunn,
Southeast Regional Syntakes.


Dr. Mynora J. Bryant.


Dr. Mynora J.

Bryant, Dean

Leroy Pernell

and Ron Block-

er, Superinten-

dent of Orange

County Public


Schools.


Program participants seated in Jury Box of the Lecture Hall. Standing: Ralph L.
Flowers, retired judge; Lynwood Carter, soloist; Garth C. Reeves, Sr., keynote speaker;
Dean Leroy Pernell and Henry L. Givens. Seated: Dr. Leenette Morse Pennington, Katie
L.Williams, Dr. Mynora J. Bryant and Jennifer S. Gunn.


OA IIlt VIIAVIII IIIE.) JUIL 1-1/,/I,


LEROY WIDEMAN

You are loved and you will
always be missed. The Wide-
man family.


You are loved and you will al-
ways be missed. The Wide-
man family.


P.M..-


We will always love and
cherish your memory. Your wife,
children, grands, greatgrands


L. FRANCIS JR.


HAROLD


Daddy you are in our hearts.
Love, Harriet, Angie, Lolitia,
grands and Ashley.


BISHOP LARRY MINCEY

We love you and miss
you. Mom and family.


ERNEST PRICE JR.
06/29/1946-1 71/20/1995

Gone but not forgotten.
Love, The Price family.


\\ HEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER








.!i.tA. Sun..
.,


t


Ms








9A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


bl-WK MUM it N CON1\I 1.111i:11, ON\N\ I)[NliN I


Pre-Fathers Day program Jackson Health System honors Its Black nurses


The New Life Baptist
Fellowship Ministry will host
a fellowship service 4 p.m.
on Saturday, June 14 at New
Providence Missionary Baptist
Church, 760 N.W. 53 Street,
Reverend Vinson Davis, Pastor/
Teacher.
The keynote speaker will be,
the renowned and Distinguished
Rev. Dr. Henry J. Lyons,
President of the General Baptist
State Convention of Florida.
The entire south Florida com-
munity is invited to come
and enjoy. For additional
information, please contact
Sis. Dora McGregor at
305-625-2627.


DR. HENRY J. LYONS


Well it's about that time again!
Tree of Life presents our
fourth Annual Apostolic and
Prophetic Conference 2008.
Hosted by Apostle Scott and :.
Ministries.
The guest speakers will .. '
be, Women on the front line.
Prophetess Tonya Hall of
Jacksonvilleand otherrenowned
Apostles and Prophets. Dr. Iris
J. Troy, Miami; Prophet Perry,
Rhode Island; Apostle Wright,
Ft. Pierce; Apostle Cherry, New
Jersey. And many other great
prophets and pastors teaching
the school of knowledge. PROPHETESS TONYA HALL
Tree of Life Deliverance
Ministries, 4150 NW 7 Avenue, 8 p.m. General Assembly.
305-751-3777, June 16-22, The attire is white. Come with
6:45 p.m. school of knowledge. an expectation!

Restoration Life Women's Conference
Restoration Life Changing
Ministries presents its First
Annual Women's Conference on
June 19-22, 7:30 p.m. nightly.
Our motto, 'Women Enriched
by Christ for Christ.' Our guests
speakers are Pastor Duranice
Pace of the Anointed Pace
Sisters and Pastor Philip Rawls
of Jacksonville. The conference
will be held at Refuge Life
Changing Ministry, 2412 N.W.
19 Street, Ft. Lauderdale. For
further information contact
Minister Angela Paulk at
305-785-7742. PASTOR DURANICE PACE


Twenty Black nurses were
honored with Nurse of the Year
awards at a public celebration
held at Jackson Memorial Hos-
pital. As part of National Nurse
Week activities, a licensed prac-
tical nurse, an advanced prac-
tice nurse, a registered nurse
and a rookie nurse from each
of Jackson Health System's pa-
tient care centers, specialty ar-
eas, satellite centers, Jackson
North Medical Center and Jack-
son South Community Hospital
were selected by their colleagues
as the nurses who have 'contrib-
uted the most to quality caring
throughout the system. A total
of 57 nurses were honored with
Nurse of the Year awards. The
nurses received their awards
from Marvin O'Quinn, president


and CEO of Jackson Health
System, Georgena Ford, R.N.,
trustee of the Public Health
Trust, and D. Jane Mass, R.N.,
senior vice president for Patient
Care Services and chief nursing
officer.
Cheryl Fleming, R.N., Gyne-
cology/ Gynecology Oncology
Unit of the Women's Hospi-
tal Center, Jackson Memorial
Hospital, was the recipient of
the Clinical Excellence Award
that is presented annually to
the nurse who best exemplifies
selfless dedication, compassion
and nursing pride system-wide
throughout the years.
Fleming was honored for be-
ing an innovative and extraor-
dinary leader who has created
one of the most successful Unit


Apostolic Revival Center Prayer Breakfast
The Apostolic Revival Center
women's ministry invites you
to their 7th Annual Prayer
Breakfast on Saturday, June
14 at the Hyatt Hotel. The
theme will be Women of Faith '
Persevering Beyond The Break. -.
The speaker will be Sis.
Geneva O. Smith, first lady of '
the Apostolic Revival Center, an
anointed woman of God. ';
Contact Sis. Ernestine .
Cowart for reservations at
954-558-8444.Q
Dr. G. S. Smith is the pastor. SIS. GENEVA O. SMITH

Revival at First Baptist Church of Brownsville I
The First Baptist Church..,
of Brownsville, 4600 N.W. 23
Avenue, Miami, will hold a
three night revival starting
Wednesday, June 11 through
Friday, June 13 at 7 p.m. nightly
with preaching beginning at 8
p.m. The guest revival evangelist
will be Rev. Maurice Johnson
of roanoke Baptist Church of
West Palm Ber-h, Florida. He is -
a powerful, profound, prolific,
insightful and inspirational REV. MAURICE E. JOHNSON
preacher who will, bring a
powerful soul stirring message at large to come join us for three
each night. Pastor Kenneth spirit-filled, soul saving nights
McGee invites the community of revival.


Practice Councils in the Jack-
son Health System. She has
been extremely instrumental in
motivating and inspiring oth-
ers by believing and adapting
the core values and mission of
Jackson Health System in or-
der to meet the needs of every


patient in the Women's Hospital
Center.
To qualify for the Nurse of
the Year awards, nurses must
have been employed for at least
three years of continual service;
for the "rookie" category, it can
Please turn to JACKSON 10A


TNTi MEETINGS

CALLING ALL LIBERTY SQUARE HOUSING RESIDENTS TO ATTEND
Bring
SuareWel-
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troubles, and give praise th Lord
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S. A Voice crying out in the winderness ...

WELCOME! WELCOME WELCOME!

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For Further Information Contact:
Br. John Jackson at 305-903-9028









10A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008



7 mmlll


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


ASHLEY D. WILLIAMS
Miami Northwestern

Congratualtions on your new
journey. The Walker Family


BRIDGETTE TURNER
Miami Carol City Sr High


We are so proud of youlCon-
gratulations. Love your family


Congratulations from your
grandmother, Lelia.


OLUFUNMILAYO IDOWU
MacArthur High School

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


ADEBAWORIN JOACHIM
North Miami Senior High

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


DEBORAH ADEOLA OLAWALE
North Miami Senior High

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


Marvin O'Quinn, president and CEO, Pub-
lic Health Trust & Jackson Health System; 1
Michelle Johnson-Chen, R.N, Cheryl Flem-
ing, R.N., Gynecology/Gynecology Oncol-
ogy Unit of the Women's Hospital Center,
Jackson Memorial Hospital; Public Health
Trust Board Trustee Georgena D. Ford, R.N.;
and D. Jane Mass, R.N., M.S.N., senior vice
president for Patient Care Services and
chief nursing officer.


First Row Sharon R. Johnson, R.N.,
Denise Montfleury, R.N., Audrey Roberts,
A.R.N.R, Annette Mornay, R.N., Loud-
ine Saint Charles, R.N., Odiane Medacier,
A.R.N.R, and Shirley James, A.R.N.R
Second Row-Marcia Drane, R.N., Pauline
Bailey, R.N., Stacy Malcolm, L.RN.,Yuvonne
Martin, A.R.N.R, Jacqueline Swasey, R.N.,
Sharonda Thompson, L.RN., and Shree Am-
brister, L.RN.


Jackson Health System honors Black nurses


JACKSON
continued from 9A

be one year or less. The nurses
must demonstrate excellence
in their job performance, prov-
en by a consistent, above- av-
erage evaluation. There can
be no record of counseling or
disciplinary action in their
personnel files within the last
three years, and they have
to demonstrate fulfillment of
Jackson Health System Stan-
dards of Excellence. There
must also be evidence of well-
rounded professional activities


that consolidate the nurses as
role models.
Honorees for the Nurse of
the Year awards were:
Ambulatory Care Center, Sha-
ronda Thomspon, L.P.N.; Cor-
rection Health Services Shirley
James, A.R.N.P., Kenneth Miz-
ell, L.P.N., Sharon R. Johnson,
R.N.; Critical Care Hospital
Center, Annette Mornay, R.N.;
Emergency Care Service, Au-
drey Roberts, A.R.N.P., Denise
Montfleury, R.N. Jackson Me-
morial Long Term Care Cen-
ter, Yuvonne Martin, A.R.N.P.,
Stacy Malcolm, L.P.N., Pau-


line Bailey, R.N., Jacqueline
Swasey, R.N. (Rookie).
Jackson Memorial Perdue
Medical Center, Charon Moss,
L.P.N.; Medical-Surgical Hos-
pital Center, Rose Ledan, R.N.,
North Dade Health Center/
School-Based Health Center,
Shree Ambrister, L.P.N., Mar-
cia Drane, R.N.
Perioperative Services, Odiane
Medacier, A.R.N.P.; Rehabili-
tation Hospital, Michelle War-
ner, L.P.N., Germain Blemur,
R.N.; Women's Hospital Center,
Cheryl Fleming, R.N., Loudine
Saint Charles, R.N. (Rookie).


Become a father to the


fatherless


Children's
Children's Home


For more information
on foster care or adoption,
please contact:


His House Children's Home

(305) 430-0085 ext. 210

www.hhch.org


DESMOND ROBERTS
Dr. Micheal Krop

God continuous blessing.
Love, Mom and family


DR. MONICA C. THURSTON
Nova University

Congratulations on your
degree. You did it! The Family!


SHONTREYL J. DEAN
Hialeah Miami Lakes

Congratulations.and best
wishes for a bright future.
Pruett Family


SERGE DELICE
Dillard High School

From your mom, Gina, Quita,
Tiffany and Donnel.


EMMANUEL 0. AJAGBE
Ransom Everglades

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


FLORENCE TEMITAYO ADENUGA
School of Advance Studies

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


MOSUNMOLA JOODA
Piper High School

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


OLUWOLE OLANIPEKUN
American Senior High School

Congratulations as you grad-
uate from high school. Pastor
and Christ Apostolic Church.


ZENOBIA ARCHIE

High School graduated from
North Miami Beach Sr. High


BRIAN JOHNSON
Miami Norland Sr. High

We are so proud of you
love your family


LOUIS E. PHILMORE V
Monsignor Pace High School

Congrats to you on your new
journey to FAMU. Love
your family.


KIONDRA LANIER
Miami Springs Sr. High

Jackie, Godfery Lanier, Bes-
sie and Mae grandparents.


DANYEL ASHLEY
Carol City Sr. High

Congratulations and best
wishes for a bright future.
Love your family.


DARNISHA AVANT
Turner Tech

Congratulations and best
wishes for a bright future.
Love your family.


ANNESHA JOHNSON
Norland Sr. High


Best wishes for a bright
future. Love Mom!








11A THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


BLCK MUM k'Ni iON IROI liii R (0\\ N 1)1 'IN)


World press hails Obama's victory; senses change


Obama's victory stirs hope from abroad


Ray Hartley
Editor Tin Times. Soutli Africa

"Barack Obama has captured
the Democratic Party's nomi-
nation for the position of U.S.
president to be decided later this
year. His ascendancy has raised
the hope that the United States
will finally assume its role as
a responsible superpower that
will extract itself from the con-
flict in Iraq. ... There can be no
doubt that Africa is celebrating
his victory, which signals the
long overdue deracialization of
American politics. ...
Should he become president, it
will go a long way toward remov-
ing racial loyalty from politics.
... The question that remains is:
Will he be able to deliver on his
promises, or will he succumb to
powerful interests?"

The Times, London
In an editorial
"Obama . has already re-
kindled America's faith in its
prodigious powers of reinven-
tion and the world's admira-
tion for America. ... It has been
a bruising journey. ... But today
at least the tide of history seems
to be with him. Win or lose in
November, he will have gone far-
ther than anyone in history to
bury the toxic enmity that fu-
eled America's Civil War and has
haunted it ever since. ... Details
of the delegate count no longer
matter. This moment's signifi-
cance is its resounding proof of
the truism about America as a
land of opportunity: Obama's
opportunity to graduate from
Harvard and take Washington by
storm; the opportunity that the
world's most responsive demo-


cratic system gives its voters to
be inspired by an unknown; the
opportunity that outsiders now
have to reassess the superpow-
er that too many of them love to
hate."
Schmuel Rosner
columnist and U.S. correspondent,
Haaretz, Israel:
"Obama's victory is not sur-
prising. The epic duel with (Hil-
lary) Clinton gave everyone, in-
cluding past and present Israeli
officials dealing with the Unit-
ed States, time to prepare. ...
AIPAC's (American Israel Public
Affairs Committee) wily and ex-
perienced lobbyists predict the
first year of an Obama presiden-
cy will be challenging for Israel,
not because he has bad inten-
tions, but because they might be
too good. Until then, Israel will
unwillingly be at the heart of the
storm of the presidential race.
... There are enough reasons to
prefer (John) McCain to Obama,
or Clinton to Obama, regard-
ing their intended policy toward
Iran. But even those who op-
pose him should put aside their
political preferences, fear of the
future, and their pros and cons
list for just a moment. Now is
the time to take in Obama's as-
tounding political victory, if one
can still feel awe for anything in
this day and age. Against all the
odds, the campaign broke down
the boundaries of bias and race,
and brought out voters to cast
their ballots. They may be na-
ive, but they are not indifferent.
They may be a little childish,
but they aren't cynical."

The Times of India
In an editorial:


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"Finally, Sen. Obama is the
one who will lead the Democratic
charge for the White House. ...
With the stage set for Obama's
face-off with McCain, cam-
paign season promises to get
tougher and meaner. ... As far
as India is concerned, Obama
is perhaps the least known for
his views. McCain and Clinton
have a clear position on where
New Delhi fits in the emerging
world. In that scheme, India
ranks pretty high. Obama ap-
pears to share no such vision,
at least not yet. But, irrespec-
tive of whether eventually Mc-
Cain wins or Obama does,
there's no denying that a page
has been turned in America's
history."


Alphayo Otiento
Journalist, in Daily Nation, Kenya:
"A core element of that Obama
message has always been hope
and inspiration. This is the one
political message that simultane-
ously persuades swing voters and
motivates mobilizable voters who
rarely go to the polls. ... Obama
showed that appeals to division
- whether from elements that
stirred up fear that a 'black can-
didate couldn't win,' or from his
former pastor, Jeremiah Wright
- could be overcome by Amer-
ica's overwhelming hunger for
unity. ... Now it will be up to ev-
ery Democrat, every progressive,
to take advantage of this historic
opportunity to make Obama the
American president who leads the
world into a new progressive era
of unprecedented possibilities."


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES JUN 8


ILL M" """ ... . . I. .. ....


Last week, I wrote about how
we respond to disappointing
situations. I mentioned that some
foolishly blame God and vent
their anger on Him. Bad choice;
wrong answer!! Someone told me
that God can take our anger and
that He has big shoulders and
our being angry at Him does not
bother Him. I see no evidence
in the Word where God is well
with our disobedience and our
disrespect. Of course, God can


take anything, but it does not
mean that He intends us to take
our anger out on Him for what is
our sin, or the enemy's attacks.
Life is not easy or fair. We
were never told that it would be.
Sometimes we are shocked when
we face trails and tribulations.
We do not understand why we are
the victims of crime, or gossip,
or attacks on our character.
The Bible tells us that this
would happen. It happened to


the disciples, and the apostles,
and it certainly happened to our
Lord. How we respond to these
circumstances is extremely
important. As I wrote last
week, our first step is to look
clearly at what has happened
by taking a long, honest look
in the mirror. We should not
av oid to acknowledge if we are
the reason for that job loss, or
that relationship ending, or the
mounting bills.
Are we the best employee that
we should be? Are we good
stewards of our finances? Have
we taken the time to not only
maintain a good relationship
with our spouse, friends and
family, but to make these
relationships a priority? The
first thing that we must do
is to take an honest, humble


assessment of our commitment
to the areas in our lives that
we have a responsibility. Are
we really doing the very best
that we can do? Now, after this
assessment, if you know that you
have made some mistakes, then
do two things. First, repent to
the Lord for what you have done.
Sometimes, we also ne ed to seek
out the persons we have offended
or disappointed and apologize
to them too. The second thing
is to make a change. In fact,
repentance means 'making a
change; to turn'.
We cannot continue to walk
the same path and do the same
things, and then expect different
results. If you can honestly say
that you have done all that you
know you should have done,
and things still have blown up


in your face, then two things
must be considered. One is
that our Father who loves us so
much, and is the best Parent of
all, knows what is best for us.
Father really does know best.
Though we do not always like
what Daddy believes is best,
He is still Daddy! Trust Him
to know the right path that we
need to be on. If we truly put
our lives in His hands, then He
is going to intervene when He
sees that we are turning left, a
nd we should be turning right.
When we tell God to guide
us and lead us and that we
surrender all, we should mean
it!
We also should always
remember and never lose sight
of the fact that we do have an
enemy. He is an enemy of God,


and if we are friends of God,
then we are enemies of satan.
He does not want us to prosper.
John 10:10 tells us clearly that
he is here to steal, kill and
destroy. He wants your health,
your joy, your sane mind, your
children, family, job and money.
He also will interfere in your
life. However, the difference
between his interference and
God's is that you can and
should kick him firmly out of
whatever concerns you. You
don't do that with God!
Prayer, insight into ourselves,
and communication with God
is the key to knowing why we
are going through what we are
going through. Is it the result
of sin, or God's discipline, or the
enemy's attack? The answer
determines our response.


8 *


Broward County Cham-
ber of Commerce presents the
2008 South Florida Expo at the
BankAtlantic Center on Thurs-
day, June 26 at 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
For more information, please call
954 565-5750 or log on to www.
BrowardBiz.com

Miami Edison Senior High
Class of 1998 ten year reunion
will take place on July 25 and
26. Tickets for the event are
now on sale. For more informa-
tion, please contact the class
of 1998 planning committee at
786-399-4615 or email: redraid-
ers98@hotmail.com
********


Haitian-American Scholar-
ship Fund, Inc. cordially invites
you to its Seventh Annual Fund-
raising Gala on Saturday, June
21 at the Biscayne Bay Marriott
Hotel with cocktail beginning
at 6:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please call the office at
305-893-4500.

The Beta Beta Lambda Chap-
ter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity, Inc. will be holding its
monthly meeting on Saturday,
June 14 at 7:06 p.m. at the
North Miami Police Community
Center.

Florida Memorial University


is holding an open house on Sat-
urday, June 21 from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. You are invited to attend
free inaugural basketball clin-
ic on June 24 & 25 at Florida
Memorial University Gymna-
sium from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-726-7782 or 305-216-0195.

The City of Miami City N.E.T
and Partners presents their
2008 Seventh Annual June-
teenth Celebration on Friday,
June 20 at 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. and
Saturday, June 21 at 12 p.m.
to 5 p.m. For more information,
please call 305-795-2303.

Right to the City of Miami
hosts the March on the Mayors
from June 19 to June 24. On
June 19, People State of the City
Summit will have a discussion


about the U.S. urban agenda.
On June 20, March on the May-
ors: Day of Action will bring the
people's urban agenda to U.S.
mayors and presidential candi-
dates.

Opa-locka Rotary Club is
holding a Family/ Communi-
ty Resource Fair on Saturday,
June 14 at 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at
the Dr. Robert B. Ingram El-
ementary School. Free prizes
and toys will be given to kids.
For more information, please
call 305-688-4605.

Pandemonium Productions
presents 'Never too much' by
artist Wibby White on Saturday,
June 14 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Calling all females and males
that are 18 and over to be a part
of the making of a music video


from his new cd: African Ameri-
can Idol. For more information,
please log on to www.myspace.
com/wibbywhite.

2008 FBI Youth Academy at
Miami Dade College, North Cam-
pus are inviting teens who are
entering the eleventh or twelve
grade during the fall to partici-
pate in their program. The dead-
line is June 11. Students can
apply online. For more informa-
tion, please contact Ms. Mara
Peruyero at (305) 237-1828 or
email: mara.peruyero@mdc.edu


2008 Miss Black South Flor-
ida Pageant will be held on Sat-
urday, June 21 at 7 p.m. at
Florida International Universi-
ty, Biscayne Bay Campus Mary
Ann Wolfe Auditorium. To visit


the new Miss Black South Flor-
ida, please log on to www.miss-
blacksouthflorida. com.
This summer, the Deering
Discovery Series will be offer-
ing a variety of enriching art and
health classes at the Deering Es-
tate. Space is limited. To register
call 305-235-1668 ext. 233. For
more information please visit
www.deeringestate.org.

Miami Dade County Health
Department Office of Commu-
nity Health and Planning in-
vites you to attend free classes
and screenings on blood pres-
sure and cholesterol screening,
diabetes risk assessment, body
mass index, body fat analysis
at West Perrine Health Cen-
ter. For more information,
please call 305-278-0442 or
305-278-0418.


. . . .


Second Canaan M. B.C. fam-
ily cordially invite you to their
Annual Women's Day Banquet
being held on June 14 at 5 p.m.
You are also invited to their An-
nual Women's Day Climax be-
ing held on June 22.

59 Street Pentecostal
Church of God proudly invites
you to attend Preach the Word
Appreciation Program on Sat-
urday, June 14 at 6 p.m.
******** *
Restoration Life Changing
Ministries is holding their First
Annual Women's Conference on
June 19-22 at 7:30 p.m. For
more information, please con-
tact Minister Angela Paulk at
305-785-7742.

St. Philip Neri Catholic
Church will host a community
festival on June 21 from 10


a.m. to 7 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please contact Connie
Thornton at 305-33-3390.

Cynthia Bell Productions &
Ministries presents their An-
nual Father and Son Wordshop
which will be held at Piccadilly
Cafeteria on June 14 from 12
p.m. to 3 p.m. The theme of the
event is, In My Father's House
are Many Mansions. For
more information, please call
954-540-2360.

Redemption Missionary
Baptist Church will be having
an early morning service and
free breakfast for all fathers on
Father's Day, June 15 at 8:30
a.m. For more information,
please call 305-770-7064 or
305-793-7388.

International Deliverance


Ministries presents Father's
Day Jubilee on Sunday, June
15 at 11 a.m. Come out and
celebrate the man that God
created you to be. For more
information, please call Evan-
gelist Elizabeth Summers at
305-307-2416.

Mount Calvary M.B. Church
will be having their Youth Re-
vival on June 18-20. All service
will start at 7:30 p.m.

St. John Missionary Bap-
tist Church will be celebrating
Father's Day on June 15 and
holding their Vacation Bible
School on June 16-20 at 8:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. On June 22,
you are invited to celebrate 102
Church Anniversary and Old
Fashion Day.

Love Tabernacle of God will
host a one Night Men's Con-
ference on June 13 at 7 p.m.
For more information, please
contact the church office at
786-406-5729.
** **** *


New Life Baptist Fellowship
will host a Pre-Father's Day Fel-
lowship Service on Saturday,
June 14 at 4 p.m. at the New
Provident Missionary Baptist
Church. For additional informa-
tion, please contact Sister Dora
McGregor at 305-625-2627.

United Fellowship Interna-
tional will be holding worship
service at God Word God Way
Church of God in Christ every
Sunday morning at 8 a.m. Pas-
tor and Prophetess Robinson
Ministry will be having wor-
ship service at God Word God
Way Church of God in Christ
every Saturday at 2:30 p.m.
God Word God Way Church of
God in Christ invites you to a
powerful anointed bible study
teaching Wednesday night at
8 p.m. For more information,
please call 786-326-3455.
********
If you submitting announce-
ments for the community calen-
dar or church notes, please have
it no later than Monday after-
noon by fax or email.


GOSPEL TABERNACLE

OF FAITH DELIVERANCE CHURCH
3301 NW 189TH STREET MIAMI

2008 Women, o fxcellence (Lonference
S7/Wotman, of owe/ r -- Tz,rougl t, cLove of. Gjod


Pastor Vivian L. Irving
Conference Hostess


Wednesday, June 18
"Get Acquainted Session"
7:30 p.m./Host Church

Thursday, June 19th and Friday June 20th
7:30 p.m. Sheraton Suites Plantation

Sunday, June 22nd 7 p.m./Host Church

Speakers include: Evangelist Mildred
Callahan Evangelist LaVern Mitchell
Evangelist Laura Pickett


for more info call: 305-626-9162
ALL SESSIONS ARE FREE No REGISTRATION REQUIRED


Subscribe


-O]AY


Why is there pulpit rivalry in Christianity?


By Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer

Preachers from local church-
es and television evangelists are
involved in a Christian family
feud. They all belofig to the same
family; they are all sisters and
brothers in the spirit but they
just can't seem to get along. The
local churches accuse television
ministries of stealing their flock
causing local churches to be on
the defensive. More and more,
we see smaller churches study-
ing the competition and taking
measures to preserve current
members as well as attract new
parishioners.
Not to be left behind, lo-
cal churches are now sending
their -deacons, stewards, and
trustees to leadership train-
ings, evangelism seminars, and
they are reading Rick Warren's
"The purpose driven church"
which is a how-to manual for
church growth. To win over the
younger generation, traditional
churches are becoming more
relaxed in their dress code and
music choices. Instead of the
traditional hymns, pastors are
investing in ministers of music


who are skilled at finding the
right balance of reverence and
modern day appeal. The "old
church" as we sometimes refer
to it frowns on contemporary
Christian music declaring that
all we're doing is bringing the
world into the church.
Additionally, local churches
are becoming creative in their
development of activities for the
youth. One pastor used to say...
if you don't hear babies crying
in a church, that is the sign of
a dying church. Just like we
transfer knowledge, jobs, and
wealth to the next generation;
youth are the church of tomor-
row and leaders that have been
holding an office for 25 years
need to think about passing
the mantle on.
TV ministries and mega
churches, sometimes un-
fairly, are accused of being
false prophets, celebrities and
entertainers. They are often
charged with watering down
the gospel and only preaching
prosperity sermons stealing
the tithes that should be going
to the local churches. That is a
one-sided view since TV min-
istries reach hurting people


world-wide; something a small
local church cannot do.
Because of television, the
gospel can reach countless
lives where missionaries and
outreach teams cannot go or
maybe even forbidden to teach
Christianity. One pastor of a
mega church (Joel Olsteen)
consistently encourages those
just getting saved through his
television ministry to join a Bi-
ble-based church in their local
community which is very re-


sponsible and commendable.
A healthy way to view televli-"
sion ministries is to see it as
big wide net to catch new souls
and then those new souls are -'
nurtured in the Word and be-
gin.to grow and develop in the
local churches. Our command
is to "Go into all the world and
preach the gospel to every
creature" (Mark 16:15) and
television evangelism helps in
a mega way to make this pos-
sible.


DR. FREDERICK FERGUSON MD


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30 55S12


Life is not easy or fair


THE TRUE MEASURE OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
LIES IN ITS COURAGE, ITS PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
AND ITS DEDICATION TO THE COMMUNITY IT SERVES




Measures UP!


I


I









The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 11-17, 2008


.Copyr. lighted Material .



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Available from Commercial News Providers"





















**.. ...* W 1


Young Black

men should

know they


matter
Way out in the boondocks, in tiny
Sharon in western York County,
estimated population 471, a group of
Black men are trying to save everybody
else who looks like them.
We all, of any color, ought to jump up
and cheer.
Because these guys are trying.
"The Black male, young, we see the
state of him as a crisis," said Dennis
Wilson of St. John Baptist Church in
Sharon and the Western York. County
branch of the NAACP.
"We need to show, tell, shout, that all
Black men are not in jail," Wilson said.

"If somebody is hanging

out at the car wash in York,

out in the street, I am here to

say that someone will come

and get you...
"All do not sell dope. But we also must
rise up and take responsibility for our
own community, and ourselves."
It may be coincidence that in the
same week, Barack Obama -- a Black
man who has challenged other men who
look like himself to be better fathers and
contributors in society and to take more
responsibility -- secured the Democratic
nomination for president. Whatever
the reason, men who stand up and be
counted and who want to bring others
along deserve credit.
Tonight ,through Sunday is the
Christian Men's Fellowship Conference
at St. John Baptist Church. Tonight is
a "youth explosion." Song, dance and
young people doing their thing.
On Saturday, U.S. Rep. John Spratt
will kick off the day, followed by a panel
discussion on the topic, "The state of the
Black male in America in 2008. Where
do we go from here and what must our
mission be?"
On that panel will be so many
successful Black men that the church
might have to borrow extra chairs. Rock
Hill Police Chief John Gregory. Lonnie
Randolph, president of the S.C. NAACP.
Russell Booker, superintendent of York
schools. Doctors, preachers and more.
Please turn to BLACK MEN 14B


Commissioner Dorrin Rolle, Clara Steen
and Dr. Rev. Carl Johnson
11/04/35 06/16/07


CLARA


R E M

In loving memory of Clara
Steen, affectionately known
as "Mother Steen", who died
on June 16, 2007.
Mother Steen was faithful
member and mother of the
93rd Street Community
Baptist Church. She
received many certificates


STEEN


E M B E

of special recognition for
her devoted and invaluable
services at the church and
in the community. She was
awarded Mother of the Year
in 2000.
We think of you always,
but especially today. You
will never be forgotten,


R E D


although you
away.


are gone


Your memory is a keepsake
with which we never part.
God has you in his keeping;
we have you in our heart.
We love and miss you, your
daughter, Karla Addison
and family.


Big brother is always watching


Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer

Nowadays, especially since
9-11, we have accustomed our-
selves to just ignore the hyped
up surveillance at court houses
and airports and just go about
our business. Increasingly, we
are trading off our privacy for
security. Take a moment and
just count the number of ways
our government has access to
our personal information and
can pinpoint our location in
minutes.
For starters, there is our
bank statement, medical re-
cords, email, travel records,
ATM transactions, cell phone,
satellite navigation in our cars,
and even cameras at major in-
tersections right here in South
Florida. What will we do when
they invent a technology that
will be able to see what we are
doing inside our homes be-
hind closed doors? Alas, the
Big Brother that George Orwell
wrote about in his novel, Nine-
teen Eighty Four, has finally ar-
rived. We live in a society where
cameras and computers can
track our every movement.
As Christians we have no
need to be worried about who
or what is watching us because
we have the assurance that our
Elder Brother Jesus Christ, the
real Big Brother, is our shield
and our fortress; He hides us
in the secret places of the most
High and we shall abide under


his picture was taken by NASA with the Hubbell telescope.


It is called "The Eye of God."
the shadow of the Almighty
(Psalm 91:1-2KJV). In 2003,
NASA's Hubble telescope pho-
tographed the Helix Nebula
that is approximately 650 light
years away from earth. The
photo strangely resembles an
eye and has been referred to
by many as the eye of God. As
Believers, it is not important
whether the picture is authen-
tic or man-made because we
already know that the eyes of
the Lord are, over the righteous
and His ears are open to their
prayers (1 Peter 3:12). God is
everywhere, He is omnipres-
ent. David asked the question
in Psalm 139... whither shall I
go from thy spirit? Or whither
shall I flee from thy presence?
My soul shouts Hallelujah to


know that God knows exactly
where we are at all times. If He
knows where I am that means
He also knows where my en-
emies are. God just doesn't
see our physical natural body;
He sees our hearts and our
thoughts. Proverbs 5:21 re-
minds us that the ways of man
are before the eyes of the Lord,
and He pondereth all his go-
ings. Job declared: Doth not
He see my ways and count all
my steps? If I have walked with
vanity, or if my foot hath hast-
ed to deceit God sees it. (Job
31:4-5KJV)
Yes, science may have the
Hubble telescope but that too
belongs to God since all the
earth and the fullness thereof
is His.


%M 16 %6 1 1 V.,F R'S W








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


%Ir irr kL rb pwhmrvr Ir o d.htrlwi"4 t -i rate' for L bibs M pho


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


-~. Q


Available from Commercial News Providers"


All young Black men are not in jail


BLACK MEN
continued from 13B

"All these men have
succeeded, made a difference
in their communities," said the
church's senior pastor, the Rev.
John Brown.
Even a couple of ex-gang
members will speak about how
their lives almost were ruined
by the pull of gangs.
"All people want a sense of
belonging to something; what
we want to stress to young men
is that belonging to a gang is
not what they need to belong
to," Brown said.
The church and other
organizations have vans


available to pick up young
people who want to go. All a
young man needs to do to be a
part of this is want to be there.
"If somebody is hanging out
at the car wash in York, out in
the street, I am here to say that
someone will come and get you,
show you that you matter, and
bring you home afterward,"
said Wilson.
Brown and Wilson, who is
studying to become a preacher,
organized the event to show
young men that they are not
patronizing them, not saying
one thing from the pulpit and
doing another.
"It is time for all of us to put
our money where our mouth


is, for young men to be fathers
and take their families back,"
Wilson said.
Sharon is way off the beaten
tiack. But the goal of this
church and this group is
the same for Rock Hill, York
or anywhere else. In other
communities, including in
Rock Hill in February, different
groups have hosted similar
summits.
All these events show that the
track to young people finding
out they can be great has many
paths. Come see the men who
made it. Listen to them say how
they did it.
Then go home, and be the
man all of us know you can be.


-


top, I %A % l


6 a. 4p


fhuiDirector
MA -"i D f V '


/ 93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"1 Street
305-836-0942


a fr1


Order of Svr-v~e',
M1 a in Eady Mociaing \5'hip
aIl aii.NlI'mng oig\Ccl'ip
lveincmg XWorshiip
li r&3rd Smdy, ..6 pt
f-"Loy iu koSl1.1Sl), .7plith
"NI cbsilo cm'.. o


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Sirvices
7:45 a.m. I1:15 am,
Sunday School 9:45 a.mi
1Bible Stt"y Tuesday
10 anm. &7 p.m.
SPrayer Meeting -Tues. 6 p.m.




Mt. Calvary Missionary'
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, .Jr Bild.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
IMn, thr Fri. Noon Day Pimayer'
Bible Study...rhu'...,7 p.m.
d SundayWorship...7-11 mamvi
Sun.. daybc ool. I 9:30 a .



Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W 68* Street, Miami, Fe,33147
(305) 836-1495
Srder of Services:-
Early I,,, ..rvices
(2.3,4.51 .. i, 8:00) ant
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Monting Service ..I i:00 mI I






.Temple Missionary pn
Baptist Church
1723 NW. 3"' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 30-573-4060*Fax 3)05-255-8541
OrdtE or Services:


IkT isda .y Bible Study
w n. ,.p
0rC 11.11 1. .1 ., p.1i1
T1Ijt"%. Outrcch Mimustry....6 30 pat
\Ismwmara / ,. ,. ,,,me / ,


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services'
Co oirnl'Siinila o Slhool.... a0 a Ini
i Suailtay \Worsh)ip Sevice ... 10 a n,
Mk.\\id W ck Scilice ... \Nedtlsday'.


Howo l,''o- lme Dayil.'al N,..c
12 p, ,Iii pmi.
I clii 'S -ip , ,it


First Baptist Missionary "\
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:


LA


Su1111.1.... ...1730 tIIt ~il
lllliylichSdool ..10 a i
I hle' t Mcplilit ldo11 11111)
B opli'lliTiiIlll s kcf..'ic
Filcdsi P.111, ,
,30 & I I asm,


Mt. Zion A.M.E. Churches
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300

Sunday
aIwr..h School ... 0 am
Worship service .. 1I a.m.
^ Monday
B bl S tly r' p.iia .
oWednfesday
"Thre is a place for you"
m m mlt


I apostolic Revival Center Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc'.
6702 NWV. 15thi Wenu e Ss5 N.W, )1th Street
305-836-1224 305-688-1612
Order of Services Fax: 305-681-8719
New linie forI '.. P'iograni Order oServicest
.OR HOl'E FOR TODAY i 0i:ii n...1 (Sk. Sclshol)
sn 9:, tip S rvic .. ... l lll
W e h c'iv, .i y'plml ilO i l ',u llsi l c. pi FaImil] Night
S ,, Mcrce 1 .... W\Ved 1 l am I n hitce,.ma11 ayvcr
Sun Ft W p ,.-30 p T1 Wed B11ble 1 lams'. 12 1 l1
\Vcd Bible d }1'1aSS 7 p11n
|L_~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Rv Carol NasBbl'hud..... LeI .. .e
Seir-ror1ece


Friendship Missionary \
Baptist Church

Mliant. H.
305-759-8875
r, A -I,' ,h
I-lo t l ur I
rly M ...... '
Sunday School 9:30 ain,
I 1 ,Iu






New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N,W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
Order of Services:
i;rlv Moy lint W slhip ..Ist & 3ld SullI
.1'l- III sight M inh 'jly" ..,......; p~ ll
SPfyer S t; iior i. :.......... :30 p.m
S "ile Slldy ........ ........... . ,8 p Pan
.0. .. ,


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 SW. 56lh Avenue IHollywood, FL33023
(O iketi 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. '** M morning Worship ............. 10 am.
Evening Wos ip .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m. ..
'TV P'r.ti,mn Tuesday, 8:30 ta.m.. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8, 19, 21, 22, 23, 30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
WeVb page: wwwycmnbrokepatrk.chur~chmolht, t.com E'mnail: petnlbrolkeparkec ,bellsotlth net


Word of Faith '
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081
/ 'deir of Service's:

L, .... .y Morliisy Services
\;- man3u mm" '.yBiblcludy 8ph'


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105
"'. Order of ServircTs:
m' wm'm" /.le Sly W ............
Sllll(ik y S ll Io . ...... I 0 11.Ill,
'llpi W oIfll, Scl 11, '30 ;.11 .
\V.('.l. h ,ip il.icrcvssoiy il'iyer
-y flcii 7 :;!(l I' S p.1.
A ... '' Smiliy Wolsii'hipr Seovice .30 1) Ill.


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Wo hip .. ... ... 7 mn.
[jl', I,,,, ,








1350 N.W.95' Street
30S.83.5-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
SEarly Moiing Woinship 7:30 a.m.
Su. Church School 9:30 a.m.
.. i Mornig Wovshipi) ..... a.m.
I Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
[W.,'jl n 'ivs.befolthe lt l SI .S..7p.m.
I B Mil-week Worship




St. John Baptist Church"
1328 N.W. 3"' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order o" Services:
__ '___ Fvrly Sou day
I' .... 1 '' . ip i 0 a.m .
.S l/tti Chn/ch v
S 1 'l'.)5p.m".
S ..... ..hip .......7 p.m.
S I. (Tues.) 7 p.tm.



/" Zion Hope a\
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.1
30S-696-4341 Fax: 30S-696-2301
(Order of Servlces:
-- Suiday Sd nol ............. 9310) a l.
SFir ^ n' lu Mlhlhi Sn(itay
<'< ujetlllmO, s WOlli m 6 a., I
-. >naycr Mecliing & '. Hible Stludy
'iic sda.y 7 p.m.
'"!lm 'a lrih l tn(Hir i. hhl3f'y. ,8 il] I
LauSBSSm SESSS/


aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
%.n l i ui v Schcl ........... ....9:30 an
\iSun. Morn Wmsip-.-..-l1k ain.
ies. Fay ..... .. 6 p.1,
School o isdom ....... N) p in
Ml i cmL x Ni lNih.i ..-.--p. in


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 NW. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Serimces
I ol)iy Stulday ScIooil -., 9:45uan
HhSiv MoiTin \\' olip ..-11i in
Sunda)In M Ins'. ille Study ,.- ,pt i,
S Suldav .'Vc\ni g W Mship ,.6 p nm
Tuesday Night Bible Stlud\ ,7,30pm
Si '. i .IIl
30S-t4-4.MS30 1050-.1-(i95S



Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th SlCL 1
305-836-4555
Order of Services:

Sunday School............10 a.m.
[ Sunday Evening .............6 p.m.


/M New Day "N" Christ '\
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundalys. ( uc h cooL ...........10 am.
Wo0ship Sen ic .......... :15 a. I
Tusdays Bib Class.......... pm,



/Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church\
17800 NBV 25th Ave.
M, ,, ,idwe.. p 0,...
305-621-5167 Fa\: .315-623-3104
Order of Services:
S S1bday Wa\ship Services:
Sa.11. & 10 a.m.
Chinch Sclxol: 8 3(0 a.m.
Pi store Nin1 DaV Bibie Shly
Bible Istitum&. 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week shiphp 7:30 p.m.



Logos Baptist Church \
16305 NW 48th Ave,.
305-430-9383
Order ot Services
"A... Sunday
Montiig osiat S I am.
. Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
"Thursday
I BiNe Stw4y 7 p.m,
__._ Saturday
No Semi",e


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11
a.mln.. 7 p.Il.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tu'sda.v (Bible Stndy) 0:45p.in.
,i.,. ..I 31 Bible9t Stluiy
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptis\t
17IX) N.W 55th Sii-L
305-696-7322

---" -- .. Order of Services:
l-Eady Momihng \Wo,.bhip.7:30a.m.
SiSundy School ..........9:30a.m,
'. onming W ship ....1 i Il.m.
Iyer Meeting ....... 7:30 p.im.
I Bible Study ................8 p.m .



Hosamina Community \
Baptist Church
2171 N.W, 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
SuntlaySlOlK)d ..... 9:45 IuiL



l~~~ri ~I )Ar~ll iitl


/ St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
sun iday 7:30 a1 1 n 11 a.m,
9:30 am i.......... Sunday School
Sj''es,,ly........ 7 p i. Biblc Study
8 p nll. ...Prayer Meeling
Monday, Wednlcsday, I'ridlay
121).11 ....... Day P oyer



New Vision For Christ '\
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10)' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:



Lmll h I ,1 11. ,i i. iii
IIi I I SBli t B B r l i1,,i i .llllr.l


I (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmlami.org


K


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- 4


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SECTION


The Miami Times





Health

B MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 11-17, 2008




























"opyrig hted Material


Syndicated Content


AvailabilefromnCommercialiNews Providers"


Red wine


potent


at extending lifespon


D m 1M


'Hear' today, gone tomorrow


Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer
If you're able to get your
teen's undivided attention,
you are an exceptional parent.
Today's teens, also referred
to as Generation Y, are
heavily influenced by mass
communication and technology.
It is seldom that you will find
them without either a cell
phone, Bluetooth, iPod, CD
player, video game or some
other music or information
source controlling their minds.
Hearing loss or damage should
be of concern to our teenagers.
Loud music from their car
radios and stereos should
also be of concern as they
create a distraction for young
drivers interfering with their
ability to hear an approaching
train, ambulance, fire truck
or weather phenomenon
'making them less responsible
and less responsive drivers.
When driving we need all
our senses focused on the
traffic. Becoming absorbed
with TV, phones, computers
and electronic games have


made our children solitary,
inaccessible and unsociable. It
is not uncommon for a 10-year
old to spend hours on the
weekend watching MTV or to
be absorbed in a video game
pausing only for a bathroom
break and to eat. This is time
that can be spent outside
getting much needed physical
activity or spending quality
time with the family.
Portable music players
present a threat for hearing
loss because (a) the length of
time teens listen to music being
pumped directly into their ear
canal; and (2) the volume at
which they listen. Insist that
your child does not listen at full
volume and for no more than
sixty minutes each day. Most
high school students are not
concerned with health issues
because at their age they feel
invincible, foolishly thinking
they are going to live forever.
Youth has a way of making
one feel that nothing can or
will ever happen to us causing
our teens to carelessly throw
caution to the wind. Teenagers
tend to be short-sighted. They


live in the moment and for
the moment. The long-term
consequences of their actions
and decisions are very vague
for them and they perceive
warnings from adults as an
attempt to spoil their fun but
as parents we have to err on
the side of common sense and
practicality which often makes
us very unpopular with our
children.
Andy Vermiglio, MA, CCC-A,
FAAA, a Senior Research
Audiologist at the House
Ear Institute in Los Angeles
reported to WebMD that
hearing loss can go unnoticed
in teens because the early
symptoms tend to.come on
gradually which can result in
the problem becoming more
advanced before it is realized
they're having serious difficulty
hearing. Some of the symptoms
that can occur are: muffled
sounds, reduced ability to
follow a conversation in a noisy
environment and ringing in the
ears. Hearing loss used to be
more common with older people
but now it is creeping farther
down the age spectrum.


What does your

belly look like?

Excess fat in the stomach; however,
is bad for posture and spinal
alignment...
Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer
Whether yours is a beer belly, protruding
potbelly, flabby pendulous apron or bulging
monument, it is time to bust the gut. A little
fat reserve is alright says Pamela Peeke, MD,
Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine at the
University of Maryland. In her book Fight Fat
After Forty (Penguin, 2000), Peeke explains the
fat in our abdomen serves as a cushion for our
other organs, helps to maintain internal body
temperature, and is also a good source of back-
up fuel.
Excess fat in the stomach; however, is bad for
posture and spinal alignment. Carrying a big
stomach pulls the body forward and can result
in slouching shoulders and a curved lower back.
Along with back problems, other complications
such as heart disease, diabetes and some forms
of cancer can be associated with belly fat. AARP
The Magazine (July/August 2007) reports that
a study was conducted by VU University Medi-
cal Center in Amsterdam that found links be-
tween belly fat and capillary inflammation (a


WATCH YOUR


WEIGHT


contributor to heart disease) and between belly
fat and insulin resistance.
Michael Jensen, M.D., an Endocrinology Spe-
cialist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., advis-
es that men are more likely to put on weight
around the waist than women. Women tend to
put on pounds on their thighs, hips, and legs.
When a man's waist size is over 40 inches his
risk factors for heart disease and other diseases-
increase.
The extra fat we carry around our middle
could be making us hungrier, so we eat more,
which in turn leads to even more belly fat. Dr.
Kaiping Yang and his colleagues at the Lawson
Health Research Institute affiliated with The
Please turn to BELLY 18B


w0olo'


ft e







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


v^5") U ITHE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL IN COLLABORATION WITH WAL-MART
jj i s i 'E'


N--^ J mf *[A ohl Ri B Bito.- 11
*^ '^* i r.. !,. . .t "i;o ,


Miami-Dade
Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle,
District 2

invites residents of the
Arcola Lakes community and
surrounding areas to get a progress report on
the proposed ARCOLA LAKES SENIOR CENTER at an

IMPORTANT COMMUNITY MEETING

on

Wednesday, June 18, 7 p.m.

at

William H. Turner Technical Arts

High School Auditorium

10151 N.W. 19th Avenue

Representatives from Miami-Dade Park and Recreation
Department will provide information on the advancement
of the project and take residents' concerns and input.


For more information about the meeting,
contact Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle's District Office at

305-694-2779.


/D L P iN WAL*MARZT'_
S T A De I. daLUea"M


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17B THE MIAMI TIMES,JUNE 11-17, 2008


BLCK NA ~ LIST CvONI1 IW1- THEIR COW\N DESTIINYI


Hall Ferguson e tt
JOHN GREGORY WILLIAMS,
52, construction
worker, died
June 5 at home. -
Services 11 i
a.m., Saturday,
June 14 in the I
chapel.


JOHNNIE MAE WHITE, 90, day
care worker,
died June 6 at
home. Services
1:30 p.m., Sat-
urday, June 14
at New Provi-
dence MBC.




Gregg L. Mason.
AARON WILCOX, 75, City of Mi-
ami Park and
Recreation,died
June 5 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
wife, Eunice;
son, Ronald
Jordan (Caro-
lyn); step-children, Michael Ray,
Lorraine Deleveaux (Larry), Rod-
ney McNeil (Tessa), Jerry McNeil
(Debra), Tawanna Williams (Todd)
and Walbert Lawton; sisters, Edith
Moss, Lucille Wiggins and Ernes-
tine Brown; and a host of other
family members and friends. Visi-
tation Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service 12
noon, Saturday in the chapel. In-
terments: Dade Memorial Park.

DEBRA ANN JACKSON, 37,
baby-sitter, died
June 3 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
aunt, Judy Ann
Jackson Hill
(Pastor Michael
Hill); great aunt,
Hazetta Hayes
(John); and a host of other fam-
ily members and friends. Services
were held.

ROBERT LEE CHURCH AKA
"BOBBY", 69, ..
laborer, died A
June 8 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
sons, John Ar-
thur and Scotty
T (Jolynnette);
daughters, Mary Lewis (Glenn)
and Susie A. Rhodes (Ferris);
former wife, Lizzie; brother, John
Hardaway (Mary); the late Bar-
bara Hicks family; and a host of
other family members and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service
Saturday, 12 p.m. at First Baptist
of Brownsville. Interment: Dade
Memorial Park.


Grace
CALVIN BUTLER, 64, Mainte-
nance Worker,
Aimco Property
Management,
Service were
held.




BILLY RALPH FOWLER, 68,
property man-.
ager, died June
6 at Mt. Sinai
Medical Center. :1.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, June
14 at Westview
Baptist Church.


BONNIE LAWHORNE, 60, cook,
The Mahogany
Grille, died June
6 at Jackson
North Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
June 14 at Mt.
Calvary Baptist
Church.


JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


Jay's J
PAUL SPELL, 53, Leisure City

Miami Heart.
Service Satur-
day, time to be "'
announced. .




BARBARA MITCHELL, 69, Mi-









SYLVIA BRYANT, 37, Miami
ami died JuneMay 30 at
Jackson North.
Services 4 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.
SYCLARENCE JONES, 63, MiamiCutler
Bay died May 30 atJune
4 at Jacksonorth.

Services 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.





chapel.


ROSE HENLEY,
died May 31st.
Services 11
a.m., Saturday i
at Mt. Calvary
Baptist Church.


25, Florida City


SENORITA HELEN KING, 80,
teacher, Rich-
mond Heights .
died June 6 at
home. Services
11 a.m., Fri-
day at Bethel
FGBC. i..-



BENJAMIN JONES, 92, teach-
er, Richmond
Heights died
June 7 at Gra-
mercy Park
Nursing Home.
Services 11
a.m., Thursday
at Mt. Pleasant
M.B.C.

HENRY LEE SUMMERS, 77, Flor-
ida City died June 6th at Veterans
Administration Medical Center.
Services 12 noon, Saturday in the
chapel.


ANDREW CANTY, 69, Goulds
died June 2nd. Memorial service
6 p.m., Wednesday in the chapel.
Final rites and burial in Zebulon,
GA.

WILLIE BOONE, 4MIAMI, died
June 5th. Arraignments are incom-
plete.


JIMMY PETERS, 55, Goulds died
June 7 at Jackson South Com-
munity Hospital. Services 10 a.m.,
Friday at Sweet Home Baptist
Church.

RICHARD HARRINGTON, 44, Mi-
ami, died June 6 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday at Morning Star Baptist
Church.

HORTENCIA WATSON, 46, Per-
rine died June 6 at South Miami
Hospital. Arrangements are in-
complete.


THEODORE JONES, 90, Home-
stead died June 2 at Homestead
Hospital. Services 10 a.m., Satur-
day in the chapel.

OCTAVIUS WILCOX, JR., one
month old, Perrine died June 1 at
Baptist Hospital. Services Satur-
day, time to be announced.


St. Fort -
MICHELIEN CHARLESTIN, 48,
died on May 5. Arrangements in-
complete.


PoitierL-
ARTIS DENNARD, 82, bus driver,
died June 7th
at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m.,
Friday at Ap-
ostolic Revival
Center.


DYLAN FISHER, seven months
old, died June 6
at Memorial Re-
gional Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday at Je-
sus Christ True -:
Church of Apos-
tolic Faith.

VIOLA MAE ACOSTA, 69, operat-
ing room tech-
nician. Service
next week at
Greater Fellow-
ship Missionary
Baptist Church. .



LEMANUEL ASH, SR., 71, truck
driver, died May
30. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.





JAMES ARTHUR COLEMAN,
54, laborer, died
June 6. Service
3 p.m., Satur-
day at Mt. Zion
M.B. Church.





Alfonso M. Richarson
ALMETA JACKSON, 69, of Miami
Gardens died
June 6 at home.
Survivors in-
cludes her hus-
band, Manuel;
children, Joyce
Sumler, Audrey,
Carl Dunbar,
Dominie; sis-
ters, Dorothy
Vaughn, Elease Burgess, Hattie
B. Holloway, Rosa Green, Doro-
thy Edwards; brothers, David,
Earl and John McAllister. Viewing
Friday 4-9 p.m. Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday at New Providence Bap-
tist Church, 760 N.W. 53rd St.

OMAR J. DUKES, 27, of North Mi-
ami Beach died June 1. Survived
by mother, Joyce; brother, Phillip;
sisters, Maishia, Nakia, Crystal,
Marinee; grandparents, Bertha and
Theodore. Services were held.


Royal 0
GEORGE WILSON, 72, died June
3. Service 10 1
a.m., Saturday LI
at Mt. Zion AME7
Church. Visita-
tion will be Fri-
day 4-9 p.m.




TOYIN AYODELE, 46, died June
4. Service 11
a.m., Saturday
at John Walsh






ERIC DWAYNE GLASS, Sr., 35,
died June 8.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at First
Baptist Church
of Bunche Park.
Visitation Fri-
day '5-9 p.m.
at the church.
He is survived
by: parents, Rev. Alexander and
Alice Bostic, Jr.; father, Minister
Thomas J. Glass; children, Eric
Jr. and Alicea Jarnae; brothers,


Sheldon Clark, Alexander Bos-
tic III, Jonathan Bostic and Mario
Money; grandfather, Deacon Gar-
rett Howard. Eric served faithfully
in the United States Army. In lieu
of flowers, the family request con-
tributions to the Eric Glass, Sr. Me-
morial Fund.


Richardson =~
MRS. EVELYN T. SAPP, 65, re-
tired dietician
aide supervi- i
sor, died June
6. Survivors
includes sons, .
Jonathan, Mau-
rice; daughter, .
Kimberly. A hot .
of grands, great
grands, nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. A special
friend, Marcus Miller. Services 10
a.m., Saturday in the chapel.

BENJAMIN BROWN, 55, died
June 6. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day at Oasis of
Love.





MRS. KATHERINE SOLOMON
SHROPSHIRE,
38, died June 8.
Service 1 p.m., ,
saturday at
World Deliver-
ance Church. -. -



THERESA A. SUTTON, 54, died
May 31. Servic-
es were held.







ANN HAYES MORRISON, 79,
died May 28.
Services were
held.








Hadley
GLEN MICHAEL HARDING 55,
pastor, died
June 4 at Mount
Sinai Hospital.
Services 11
a.m., Saturday,
June 14th in the
chapel.


GARY SOLOMON STEWART, 60,
died May 22. Services were held
Saturday at Greater Peace MBC.

REGINALD JOHNSON 47, died
May 26. Service was held Satur-
day at Mt. Olive MBC.

Carey Royal Ram'n
ALPHONSO QUINTIN HANLEY,
65, of Miami died May 29 at North
Shore Medical Center. ServicesA 1
p.m., Tuesday in the chapel.

JUAN RAMON DIAZ, 81, of North
Miami died June 5 at Jackson
North medical Center. Service to
be announced.

BABY MOHAMMED MAMOON,
one day old, of Pompano Beach,
died June 6 at Plantation General'
Hospital.

ANDHA HAROON, 82, of South
Miami, died June 7 at Heartland
Health Care Center of Kendall.

Davis & Brice
SHIRLEE HARRIS, 40, of Pem-
broke Pines died May 30. Service
Saturday at Bethel Baptist Church
in Dania.

ROSETTA HIGG, 87, of Dania
Beach died June 8. Service 11
a.m., Saturday, June 21 at New
Jerusalem Baptist Church in Hol-
lywood.

NAOMI TUCKER, 86, of Holly-
wood died June 9. Arrangements
incomplete.

Manker
TODD JEROME SMITH, 43, of Mi-


ami died June 1
at University of
Miami Medical
Center. Funeral
11 a.m., Sat-
urday at New
Shiloh Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


Range,
MARIA L. TINDLE, 81, private duty
nurse, died May
31. Services 1
p.m., Thursday
at Valley Grove
M.B. Church. ..




EDNA MAE BALLARD, 81, home-
maker, died
June 6. She is
survived by her
son, Alonzo Bal-
lard Sr. (Joan);
daughter, Eu-
nice Mathurin;
brother, Charles
Clark; six
grandchildren;
19 great grandchildren; a host of
nieces, nephews other relatives
and friends. Services 10 a.m., Sat-
urday at Greater Israel Primitive
Baptist Church.

SAMUEL WALTER LYNCH, 84,
retired from
United States
Navy died June. :
6. Her is sur-
vived by daugh-
ter, Leother
Lynch-Carter
(Robert); broth-
er, Charles; a
host of nieces, nephews other
relatives and friends. Services 11
a.m., Saturday at The Historic St.
Agnes Episcopal Church.

GEORGE M. PRATT, 53,. mail
handler for U.S.
Postal Service
died June 9. he
is survived by
his wife, Barba-
ra; three daugh-
ters, Sabrina
Davis, Shellisa
Harvey (Daniel)
and Paula; son,
Anton; step-son, Bruce Hamm;
step-daughter, Tiffanie Hamm; two
brothers, Asa Collins and Albert
Rahmings; four sisters, Dianne
Drayton, Estella Rollins, Debra
Gordon and Christine Williams. a
host of other relatives and friends.
Services Saturday MEC Ministries,
Inc. 2 p.m.

DR. GUSTAV MARTIN ST.
JULES, 69, clinical psychologist
died May 31. Services 2 p.m., Fri-
day at Stanton Memorial Baptist
Church.

CORINNE C. SEALEY, 85, retired
domestic died June 6. Services 11
a.m., Friday in the chapel.

Eric S. Georg f -g
ZETHRAY PAGE, 82, of Miami.
Services were held.

SHERWANDA WARE, 34, of West
Park. Services were held.

FELECIA Y. COPELAND, 42, of
West Park died on June 6. Service
10 a.m., Saturday, June 14 at New
Jerusalem First Baptist Church,
Hollywood.

FRANCENA STEVENSON, 78, of
West Park died on June 3rd. Ser-
vice 11 a.m., Saturday, June 14 at
Mt. Zion AME Church, West Park.

Wright & Young
BRENDA JOICE WASHINGTON,
50, paraprofes-
sional at North
Miami Middle
School and
John F. Ken-
nedy Middle
School. Survi-
vors include:
son, Dwainton
Bacon; mother, Irene Washington;
siblings, Melvin McNair, Patricia
Andrews, Doris Contino, Aurelia
Ford, Levette Washington, Sha-
ron Jordan Viona and Tommie
Bobo. Services 1 p.m., Saturday,
June 14 at Liberty City Church of
Christ.


CHARLES JEANTY 46, painter
died June 3 at Inverness Homes


in Mississippi. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Chapel of Faith
KENNETH B. JONES, 42, died
May 27. Services were held.


Wright & Young4
JOSEPH WILLIAMS, 82, laborer
died May 30 at
home. Survivors
include nephew,
Chester (Bar-
bara); nieces,
Alfreda Mur-
ray and Annie
Lee Kilpatrick;
siblings, Annie
Owen and Archielee. Services 12
noon, Wednesday, June 11 in the
chapel.

TOMMY WILL WHITE, 58, died
June 5 at Holy
Cross Hospital,
Survivors in-
clude children
Tony (Sandra),
Leon (Clarissa),
Paula, Monique
and 12 siblings.
Services 11 a.m.,
Saturday June 14 at Gospel Taber-
nacle of Faith and Deliverance.

MINERVA LOWERY, 62, retired
operating techni-
cian died June 6
at Jackson North
Medical Center.
Survivors in-
clude husband,
Ernest; children,
/Tonya Scott and
Deran Blair;
mother, Eva Mae Alston; siblings,
Sullie Mae Kemp, Annie Lee Alston,
Gloria Griffin, Rosa Lee Shingles,
Helen Pratt, Linda Alston, and Par-
rish Shawanda Nesmith. Services
2 p.m., Thursday, June 12 at Truth
Worship Center.

JOHNNY BENYARD, 79, mechanic
died June 7 at
Jackson Me-
morial Nursing
Home. Survivors
include: children
and siblings.
Services 12
noon, Saturday,
June 14 at New
Birth Cathedral of Faith.

HARRY YOUNG, JR. 37, construc-
tion aborer died
June 7. Survivors
include: wife,
Kauka; children,
Antwan, Harry,
Omari, Eshia,
Jaqueelah, and
Danianh; father,
Harry, Sr.; sib-
lings, Jermaine and Beatrice. Ser-
vices Saturday, time and place will
be announced.

DOROTHY PALMER ST. FLEUR
48, cook died
June 5 at home
in Ohio. Survi-
vors include:
husband, Grant
Harrell; children,
Crystal Lee,
Daniel, Tyrone,
Pierre, and Jack-
ie; siblings, Bertha, Gladys, Marga-
retta, Laura-Ann, Rovenia, Shirley;
special friend, Will. Services 2 p.m.,
Saturday, June 14 at Jordan Grove
Baptist Church.

WILLIAM VICTORIA, JR. ,56, en-
trepreneur died
June 8 at home.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Car-
olyn; children,
Dwayne, Shonta
Jackson, and
Valorie; father ,
William Sr.; sib-
lings, Randolph
(Laura Jean), Wayne (Hazel), Daisy
(Kenny) Foreman, Rosie McArthur,
Charlsey, Albertha (Bill) Badie. Ser-
vices 2 p.m., Saturday, June 14 at
Westview Baptist Church.

CHARLES HOWARD, JR. 81, re-
tired repairman
for Eastern Air-
lines died June 7
at Jackson North
Medical Center. '
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Sonya, Charles
Ill(Patricia);
siblings, Kathryn Hanker, Emma
Joyce Baker; grandson, Charles IV;


god daughter, Elmira Adams. Ser-
vices 11 a.m., Saturday, June 14 at
Peace M.B Church.
H(-Inor YouLIr
Loved C) ione
\Vith an In
Ni ci vo r i i a1


.


DLA( t,,', IVIU, I I- JtN I


Tt. - ..., -- I "








18B THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


mm I k/owlt I '[if l llf- rlt> i f [ w fll r|ftA$a


4b dl -M --. mm-


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"

,* . .. . .. *M I ,... t t


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

. ','. ,,,. L ,', ,".i',"..'#" :" .' ,.: ;' ",:< l ,'" : }


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


CARLOS 'LOS' ROYAL
06/10/2007


WAYMON LEE JACKSON
07/18/1941 06/15/2007

It's been one year since
you've been gone, but the love
you gave still remains.
We miss you!
Mary, Waymon Jr., Stacey
and the family
In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


It's not a day goes by that
we don't think of you. We miss
you and love you Mom sisters
and friends.
In Memoriam
In loving memory of two brothers,


Study: Drinking red wine can extend your lifespan


RED WINE
continued from 15B

gain equivalent dosages people
would have to drink more than
100 bottles of red wine a day.
The Wisconsin scientists
used a dose on mice equivalent
to just 35 bottles a day. But red
wine contains many other res-
veratrol-like compounds that
may also be beneficial. Taking
these into account, as well as
mice's higher metabolic rate,
a mere four 5-ounce glasses
of wine "starts getting close" to
the amount of resveratrol they
found effective, Weindruch
said.
Resveratrol can also be ob-


trained in the form of capsules
marketed by several compa-
nies. Those made by one com-
pany, Longevinex, include
extracts of red wine and of
a Chinese plant called giant
knotweed. The Wisconsin re-
searchers conclude that res-
veratrol can mimic many of the
effects of a caloric-restricted
diet "at doses that can readily
be achieved in humans."
The effectiveness of the low
doses was not tested direct-
ly, however, but with a DNA
chip that measures changes
in the activity of genes. The
Wisconsin team first defined
the pattern of gene activity
established in mice on caloric


Excess fat in the stomach is bad

for posture and spinal alignment


BELLY
continued from 15B

University of Western Ontario
(FASEB Journal March 7, 2008)
found abdominal fat tissue can
reproduce a hormone known
as NPY that stimulates fat cell
.production. Yang says this may
lead to a vicious cycle where NPY
produced in the brain causes
you to eat more and therefore
gain more fat around your mid-
dle, and then that fat produces


more NYP hormone which leads
to even more fat cells.
Belly fat can be the most stub-
born to lose. There is no magic
pill and there aren't any short
cuts to safely losing your spare
tire. A sensible diet, frequent
physical activity, and reducing
the stress in your life are all
needed to safely lose and keep
the weight off. As always, read-
ers should consult their health
care professional before starting
a weight loss regimen.


Dial-A-Life distributes free cell

phones to seniors in Kendall


Esther Abolila (Deputy Chief
of Staff, Office of Commissioner
Joe A. Martinez, District 11),
Chief Lindsey Plummer (Division
Chief, Communications
Division), Carmen Williams
(Dial-A-Life Program
Coordinator, MDFR), Vivian
Acosta and Stephanie
Jackson distributed more
than 50 Dial-A-Life Program
telephones, to seniors at
the Kendall Indian Hammocks
Park. The telephones, used
to call 9-1-1 for emergency
assistance, were distributed to
the seniors after they completed
their daily exercise class.
The group's leader, Mrs. Rita
Quesada, stated, "We appreciate
this program, created by


Commissioner Martinez, for
giving us telephones to call for
help." Earlier this month, at
the Dial-A-Life Program re-
launch event, more than 80
Dial-A-Life program telephones
were distributed to seniors at
the Senior LI.F.T. Center.
The program's main goal is to
distribute program telephones
to all at-risk residents of Miami-
Dade County. Since its inception,
the program has distributed
over 4,000 telephones.
For more information on the
Dial-A-Life Program, to donate
cellular telephones, or to request
a program telephone, visit the
Dial-A-Life Program website
www.miamidade.gov/dialalife
or call 305-375-DIAL (3425).


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET* MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion

IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,

CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


THAT CARES.


Milton A. Hall I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


restriction, and then showed
that very low doses of resvera-
trol produced just the same
pattern.
Auwerx, who used doses
almost 100 times greater in
his treadmill experiments, ex-
pressed reservations about the
new result. "I would be really
cautious, as we never saw sig-
nificant effects with such low


amounts," he said Tuesday in
an e-mail message.
Another researcher in the
sirtuin field, Dr. Matthew Kae-
berlein of the University of
Washington in Seattle, said,
"There's no way of knowing
from this data, or from the
prior work, if something simi-
lar would happen in humans
at either low or high doses."


N LOVING MEMOR

/ T-SHIRTS

BY STUDIO-XSINE 1989
/R.I.P T-SHIRTS
FAMILY REUNIONS
OBITUARIES
MARBLES MEMORY PLAQUES
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
REMEMBERANCES
BUTTONS AND AIR BRUSH
We accept special packages for
schools, business, etc.
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AIRMAN LARRY B. WELLS
08/02/55 06/19/78
U ,mm m -\


TIMOTHY L GORDON
08/26/55- 06/04/07


Precious memories! Always
in our hearts.
Your brother Al and the
family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


PFC MICHAEL A. WELLS
06/12/60 12/12/06
We love and miss you both.
Mother, Leola Wells; siblings,
Sandra. Dianc, Gregory and
Karen

Card of Thanks
The family of the-ite,


LAREESE HADLEY
07/16/81 06/14/07


It's been one year, but it
seems like yesterday.
Everyday you are in our
thoughts. You are gone, but
never forgotten. We miss you
so very much.
From your mother and step-
father, Janice and Vincent
Walden; brother, Tony; sisters,
Kesha and Shanai; your dear
children, family and friends.


Death Notice


David Moore, Jr., 72, bus
driver for Metro Dade Tran-
sit, died June 9 at home.
Survivors include: son,
Sedric Moore (fiancee Cher-
yl), Isaac Moore (Marsha);
daughters, Yolanda Nixon,
Julia Moore, Davine Moore
and Lynette Moore; sisters
and brothers; sisters and
brothers; sister-in-law, Glo-
ria James, and a host of
family members and friends.
Services will be held Monday,
June 16 in Madison, Flori-
da. Arrangements entrusted
to Gregg L. Mason Funeral
Home.


GRADY LINDSEY
wishes to express our sincere
thanks and gratitude for the
many acts of kindness, cards,
flowers, and prayers.
Special thanks to Rev. Harold
0. Rose, Senior pastor of
Greater Fellowship M.B. Church
and Senior Pastor, Rev. Johnny
L. Barber of Mt. Sinai M.B.
Church.
May God bless each of you is
our prayer.
The Family
Happy Father's Day, Dad!


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


OLA BELL MITCHELL CAISON
06/15/1950 06/17/2007
It's about to be one year you
went away. You know we miss
you. Ma, I will stay strong
though some will go on. Your
one and only girl will carry
you on always.
Love you., Miss you, never
will forget you.
Love, Yolanda, Shaquita,
Derrick, family and friends.


Cl 0I I 068i; '~neI *I ircos








Liesty les


FASHION HIP HoP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


'C ~ P
~gra4~,;LJ.~9k%~ C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 11-17, 2008


I


THE MIAMI TIMES


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JACK DANIELS
rEnreprereur, Author and Speaker


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A good friend and I were
heavily engaged in a conversa-
tion about what it would truly
take for his woman to satisfy
and please him. He simply
couldn't understand why and
how the process of one wom-
an making him happy was so
hard. He was convinced that
he had covered all of the bases
in the course of their relation-
ship and was at a loss as to
what else he could do to remain
faithful. According to him, he
was unhappy with her inability
to satisfy all of his desires. Of
course everyone who knows me
Please turn to FELLAS 3C


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BlACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9P THF MIAMI TIMFES IIINF 11-17. 2008


The marriage celebration of
LaKeysha Natasha Pratt and
Gerard Frantz Acloque, Jr.
took place, Saturday, May 24,
at New Hope Missionary Baptist
Church with Minister Fritz
Poitier, officiating. Music was
provided by PG1. The bride and
groom chose green and white as
their colors, the men wore white
tuxedos with green accessories
and the bridal attendants wore
green gowns and carried white
roses.
Klebert Acloque and
Germaine Jean, grandparents of
the groom, led the processional,
followed by Doris Brown,
grandmother of the bride;
Gerard and Micheline Acloque,
parents of the groom; and Joel
and Maxine Pratt, parents of
the bride, along with Abebe
McPherson, Karen Brown, and
Aiasha Donaldson, ushers,
assisted the bridal party.
Others in the wedding party
included Karlyn Hylton and
Jude Acloque, Nadine Acloque
and Michael Strauss, Sheajah
McPherson and Tyrone Webb,
Ajah McPherson and Robert
Brown Jr., Stephanie Leger
and Herold Leger, Arielle
Leger and Harold Jenkins, and
Daniel Acloque.
Ta'Sheba Pratt, maid of
honor, Kaneesha Perry, matron
of honor, Justin Stroughter,
best man, Camilla Brown, flower
girl, and Kymani Walker, ring
bearer. The bride was beautiful
in her tiara, mini-earrings, a
string of pearls around her
neck, long gloves, and a mini-
train with crystals showing on
the bodice and hem of her skirt.


When she
reached her groom,
the both of them
received greetings
and blessings from i '- '
the officiant and ----
watched Forgiven
Dancers perform. This is followed
by giving of the bride, exchange
of vows, giving and receiving of
the rings, and a saxophone solo
by Keven Shepard, and the
lighting of the unity candle.
Minister Poitier took the time to
acknowledge demised relatives,
beginning with Hezekiah Pratt,
bride's grandfather, Amy Pratt,
grandmother, Clifton Brown,
groom's grandfather, Gerardo
Acloque, groom's grandmother
and Gerard Jean, grandfather.
Mr. and Mrs. Acloque was
asked to face the congregation
as married people and received
a standing ovation as they
walked down the aisle to the
stretch limousine for the trip to
the reception and celebration.


According to Marshonda
Austin-Cheatham, M.S. Family
Counselor, Watkins Elem.
Magnet, she envisioned A Star
is to be Born and placed the
celebration at Pines Recreation
Center, Saturday, May 10, with
lights, camera and action. Gwen
Bennett-Russell, Arnetta
Davis, Wileance Fletcher, Paula
Harden, Tonya Cheatman-
Marshall, Torri Pierce, Lori
Strachan, and Shelby Rushin.
The camera focused on Bobby
and Marshonda Cheatman, an
Omega and Delta who greeted
the guests in a setting of pink,


X- pg?

.. .... .. ERNE,

By Dr. Richard Strachan


white and silver. Music, hours
d'oeuvres, and an atmosphere
of camaraderie led by hostesses
Arielle Bolton, Janice Campbell
and Latesha Cotney, as Willete
Brown, led the guests in prayer
and blessed the food.
Other proud people were the
grandparents Susie and Roy
Austin, Deborah and Bobby
Cheatham, Sr. The out-of-town-
guests included Donald and
Lorna Parker, Maryland, Karen
Johnson, Kentucky, Katrina
Hammonds and Remonia
Ficklin, Atlanta. Many games
were played by the guests,
especially the name selected
for the baby: Nevaeh (heaven
spelled backwards) and the
viewing of a beautiful DVD of
the couple.


Speaking of a, beautiful
gathering, it is ironic
how families get
together after church to
dine together, like the
members of Mr. Zion
Cirius Baptist Church,
Civilien Cherfils,
Pasteur, who brought
his entire congregation
to Picadillys, last HU(
Sunday, to enjoy a
pleasant afternoon of dining and
conversation, made an impact
on 'Chatter.'
Some of the members in
attendance included Marie,
Esther, Nixon, and Cirius
Cherfils, Esther, Lovedeng,
Timothy and David Pericles,
Wislene and Mellissa Germain,
Jeffery, Marie Geurda, Theny,
Marie, Ches, Samantha
Joseph, Simon Ngwayi,
Wilbert Jean, Lovinsky, Lisa,
and Al'iya Albrique, Andrea
LaFleur, Myrium and Montel
Pierre, Carlyle and Francison
Joseph, and Lorida Dieuveille.
It was reported that the


LU I IIL IviltAlvil I JIVILJ, JUIIL I I It I W- I ,


Congratulations to Doro-
thy Jenkins-Field who is
now writing a column title
Black In Time. All of us need
to read this column espe-
cially our youth. Our history
is very important or should
be. If you do know about Mi-
ami and our early trials and
tribulation, then everything
is done to us by other people
- which will make life hard-
er for you! You! and You! The
column appears in Neighbors
section of The Miami Herald.

The Church of the Open
Door is pleased to announce
a recital featuring our own
James M. (Jimmy) Ford. Re-


nown former child
prodigy. Jimmy 1
was reared and
still lies Over-
town. He is a 1953
graduate of B.T.W. -
and the University
of Miami. Son of the late Dr.
and Mrs. Robert Benjamin
Ford. His mother was prin-
cipal for many years in our
school system. The concert is
scheduled for Saturday, June
14 at 4 p.m. You must hear
this "native son."

Happy Belated Birthday to
a swell guy and former co-
worker, Richard Cook. Rich-
ard celebrated his natal day,


June 3rd.

Get well wishes to all of you!
Bernice Shorter-Meares,
Joyce Gibson-Johnson,
Sam Cleare, Cliffonia Ross,
Rowena Livingston, Doris
Hutchinson, Vashti Ambris-
ter, Prince Gordon, Grace
Heastie-Patterson, Lou-
ise Cromartie and Elry T.
Sands.

The NAACP needs you! Mem-
bership is the life-blood of the
NAACP. They are depending
on our member's generosity
to insure the NAACP's inde-
pendence. They depend on us
to keep the flames of freedom
burning bright. Remember,
freedom is not free!

Wedding anniversary greet-
ings to the following couples:


Lorenzo and (Shatawn L.)
Dailey, June 4th their 14th.
Horace and Bertha John-
son, June 6: their 43rd.

Congratulations to the
graduation class of 20081
Your community loves you!
We all wish for you, the very
best!

Promise yourself to be so
strong that nothing can dis-
turb your peace of mind. To
talk health, happiness, and
prosperity to every person
you meet. To make all your
friends feel that there is some-
thing in them. Look on the
sunny side of everything and
make your optimism come
true. To think only the best,
to work only for the best and
to expect only the best. To be
just as enthusiastic about the


success of others "as you are
about your own."
To forget the mistakes of
the past and press on to
greater achievements of the
future. To %ear ai ._.beerfui
countenance at all times and
give every living creature you
greet a smile.
To give so much time to the
improvement of yourself that
you have no time to criticize
others.
To be too large for worry, too
noble for anger, too strong for
defeat, and too happy to per-
mit the presence of trouble.
Continuation of Saint Ceci-
la Chapter of the it.C.W. who
make the trip to Memphis,
Tenn.

Gwen Thomas, Hildred
Tutien, Sheryl Troutman,
Cynthia T. Brown, Paula


Campbell-Stone, Audrey
Strachan, Pamela Smith,
Marjorie Raymore, Mari-
lyn Randall, Ted Abraham,
William and Jessie Pinder,
Betty Spence and Chelsea-
Spence, Evangeline Ram-
beau and son, Jabori, Iva
Dell Bodie, Helene Parris,
Gloria Parks, Arthur Jones
and Ryan Everitt.

Congratulations to the 2008
Silver Knight Awards (Honor-
able Mentions). We as a com-
munity are very proud of all
of youl Shanna-Kay Turner,
Dina Lewis, Jonathan Val-
court, Sharria Scavella,
Mirtha Voltaire, Jonathan
Parker, Kem Chatfield,
Crystal Goss and Marie Fa-
til. This is the 50th anniver-
sary of the awards. Each re-
ceived $500 and a plaque.


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minister allowed them to order
what they wanted with the blue
tickets given to each one upon
arriving. They were very dignified
and displayed a Christian-like
atmosphere. Now, we have new
readers of The Miami Times.


Ann McPhee-Moorman,
president, The Broward
Business & Professional
Women's Network and
officers and members
are commended on
their Fourth Annual
Founder's Day Awards
Celebration, which took
place at the Hill Crest PAS
Golf & Country Club,
recently, where the 2008
honorees were recognized.
They included Bishop Dr.
Elaine Buchanon for community
service, Robert Henderson,
entrepreneur, Calvin
Hughes, Man of
Distinction, Andrea
McClain, business,
Dr. Rozalyn H.
Paschal, professional,
and Cynthia Slater,
educator.
Some of the people
HES in attendance were
Sarah Marshall, Joyce
Arrieta, Lorna Tracy, Roberta
Felton, Rose Johnson, Beverly
Hinson, Lillie F. Ross, Dr. W.
Blanca Moore-Velez, Camille
Moore, Mae Reid, Arnetha
Thomas, Sylvia Ferguson,
Marie Diamond, Sonja
Dellmar, Milton Felton, and
Robert Velez.


Kudos go out to John
Esposito, chairman-Barcardi
USA, Inc., Robert G. Beatty,
Esq, publisher, Regina
Jollivette Frazier presenting
The Thurgood Marshall College
Fund, ; Inc. and Awards of


Excellence for some special
people.
The Thurgood Marshall
College Fund is named for
the late U.S. Supreme Court
Associate Justice back in 1987
and represents 47 HBCUs in
22-states with a population
well over 235,000 students and
more than $68 million given

I organization.
In addition,
recognition were given
to Mario P. Goderich,
Donald J. Graham,
Carrie P. Meek, H.T.
Smith, Esq. and Elijah
HAL Williams. Gordon
*HAL 'Eric' Knowles, Dophin
Stadium PR headed the
dinner committee and a full
house was in force with music by
Leesa Richards, and Demarco
Morgan, emcee, at the Westin
Diplomat Hotel.


Baljean Smith, president,
Dorsey High School alumni,
and members were deeply
saddened after learning about
the passing of Lucille Dorsett
Glass, Class of '47 and followed
by the passing of Betty Jane
Gaitor Timmons the next
week. The both of them drew
the same people, because they
were like sisters, as well as close
classmates.
Father J. Kenneth Major,
Rector, Church of the
Incarnation, and Reverend
Henry Green, pastor, Mt.
Hermon AME Church, gave
them their due at the wake, as
well as the final rites.
It was repeated over and
over again by those who paid
tributes how the both of them
played basketball for the Dorsey
Bulls team and won many
games including the City's
championship. After Lucille


C


graduated, she
attended the
U of Alaska,
Miami-Dade CC
and received
s her bachelor's,
master's and
Doctorate of Arts

M cEEK degree from the
sMEEK National Institute
of Cosmetology
in Washington, D.C. Then
she married her high school
sweetheart, Thomas Glass, an
Army veteran and traveled all
over the world until he retired.
Betty matriculated at Allen U.
and continued her athletics in
basketball, and graduating with
honors and coming back home
to teach at her alma mater and
run Alpha Gamma Chapter of
Eta Phi Beta Sorority, if she
was or wasn't the president.
Her name will
go do in history
as an invaluable
person to the
school, church
and community.
Someofthoseon
hand to witness
both wakes and
SMITH services were
close family
members, Ruby
Rayford, basketball teammate,
Exenia Humes, Gloria Davis,
Edna Devauex, Annie G.
Sweeting Althea Sample, Otis
Sample, Fred Brown, Ebenezer
Edwards, Thomas L. Albury,
Josephine Norwood, Laurice
Hepburn, Alpha Freeman,
Lavonia F. Robinson, Laura
L. Tynes-Knowles, Herman
and Gloria Bannister, Cleomie
Forbes, Patricia Lenard, David
Dean, Jessie Sandiland, Lona
B. Mathis, Lonnie McCartney,
Naomi Smith, Israel Milton
and Wilfred McPhee, along
with Georgia J. Ayers, Ishmay
Prescott, class of '46.


of


"Includes Florida sales tax


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5C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


BLAC KS NIUSi CONTROLTHI fR OW\N DESTIINYI


Fight to save junior colleges


Two year colleges serve as a
bridge to better paying jobs or a
four year degree, both of which
improve the quality of life for
the students who attend. These
students and the schools
themselves are now at risk,
thanks to the large banks who
no longer want to do business
with smaller, less competitive
schools. Several major lending
institutions, CitiBank, Chase,


HSBC and Citizens
Bank among them,
have opted out of .
providing student
loans to commu-
nity colleges and
less-selective four
year schools w while -...-..
continuing to serve more presti-
gious universities.
Over 40 percent of this cou
try's undergraduate students


tend a community college. These
new lending practices jeopardize
their chances to get an educa-
tion, find[ a good job and actively
contribute to their communities.
Community college students of-
ten come from lower or working
class families that are less likely
to be able to afford out of pocket
education expenses. Without
access to funds, many students
will opt out of attending school
altogether or work an extra job,
putting their studies at risk, to
pay tuition.
While everyone who desires
has the right to access higher
education and the benefits it
brings, these students in partic-
ular need the "lift up" an educa-


tion can provide.
The banks say it is a business
decision: the economy is head-
ed towards a recession and the
loans made to students at these
schools tend to be less profitable.
The federal government guaran-
tees 95 percent of the amount
of loans banks issue to student
lenders. And it heavily penalizes
borrowers who default on their
education loans. The banks
aren't worried so much about
losing money from these loans
as much as they are about mak-
ing money. The banks deciding
to deal only with elite schools -
where tuition is higher and the
loan amounts are larger say
the interest they accrue on the


shorter, smaller loans doesn't
generate enough of a profit for
them.
Once again, corporate America
is only looking at its immediate
bottom line, not realizing that its
actions today will affect its busi-
ness and the American economy
- far into the future. If community
college students, unable to afford
the expense, decide not to attend
school, the amount of money they
earn over their lifetime will drop
significantly. With more Ameri-
cans earning less money, the
economy will take a hit. Schools
that don't make the elite rankings
will also suffer. If students can't
afford these schools, enrollment
will drop, leading to cutbacks in


classes offered and, in extreme
cases, school closings. With one
bottom line focused decision,
these banks have started a chain
reaction that could prevent the
lower class from ascending.
The economy is in a tailspin;
limiting access to education is
not the way to fix it. Write or call
your legislator and urge him/
her to introduce legislation that
stops this trend before it be-
comes more widespread. A law
that provides incentives to those
lenders who continue to deal
with smaller, less elite schools
- or disincentives for those who
don't could encourage banks to
think twice before adopting this
practice.


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SUNCF
A mind Is a terrible
thing to waste.


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 11-17, 2008


RECORD




FORECLOSURES


WON'T


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Imagining life's


coming attractions


Farrah Gray is the author of Get Real, Get
Rich: Conquer the 7 Lies Blocking You from
Success and the international best-seller Real-
lionaire: Nine Steps to Becoming Rich from the
Inside Out.


Each moment can
change the rest of your
life and the course of
your direction. If you
are not intentional
with your actions, you
will plan to fail. Suc-
cessful people operate
from the beat of their
own drum, but they
are intentional.
Successful people
don't become success-
ful by accident-it's
sheer, practical ap-
plication. You have to
do at least one thing
toward your goal every
single day. You have to


dedicate yourself every
day to doing what you
love. Don't just talk
about it. Talk is cheap.
You may have no con-
cept where you want to
be other than theory,
and that's okay. You
are guaranteed to get
closer to your dreams
if you just walk forward
and begin to question.
Let's return to this
concept of "work" once
more. "Work" is doing
what's necessary to get
to where you want to
be. Doing what's nec-
essary and what needs


to be done. Work hard
so you can play hard.
When you keep try-
ing to do something


the wrong direction
will always leave you
unsatisfied and un-
fulfilled. You are likely


when things are not
falling into place over
and over again. They
are signaling you to go


I challenge you to take what I've already given you thus far and start
to imagine your future. Imagine your own coming attraction, and I
bet a few planning ideas will gradually arise.


and it just doesn't fit-
problem after prob-
lem-then you're do-
ing something wrong.
You can't do anything
unless you put "work"
into it, but working in


to be broke financially
and spiritually when
you've traveled thou-
sands of miles in the
wrong direction.
Be sensitive to rec-
ognizing the resistance


back to the drawing
board and ask your-
self, what am I doing?
Some people tty to
fit a round peg into a
square hole. When you
are walking the true


path, things come to-
gether and you notice a
difference. You will still
have classic bad days
(I like to say those are
the days you get paid
forl), but they don't
hold you back in the
long run. Those days
may feel like stumbling
blocks in your drive,
but you're still headed
in the right direction.
Albert Einstein once
said that "Your imagi-
nation is your preview
of life's coming attrac-
tion." I believe he's
Please turn to GRAY 6D


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6D THE MIAMI lIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008 BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Dedicate yourself to doing what you love 0 b* WA q.* L a


GRAY
continued from 5D
right. That phrase en-
capsulates so much
of how I live each day.
Remember, when you
think positively about
your future, leaving
the past behind, you
can attract it toward
you. It's about your
imagination and no
one else's. I challenge
you to take what I've


already given you
thus far and start to
imagine your future.
Imagine your own
coming attraction,
and I bet a few plan-
ning ideas will gradu-
ally arise.
"What would you
attempt to do if you
knew you could not
fail?" Anonymous
Success-oriented
peopled give only af-
ter great struggle and


UOAY


painful deliberation.
And when they decide
to depart from the
path they are travel-
ing, they throw noth-
ing away. Rather, they
gather up all they
have learned from the
experience and build
it into the next set of
future plans.
Dr. Gray can be
reached via e-mail al
fg@drfarrahgray,. com.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will he received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 75155 ELEVATOR MODERNIZATION
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:010P.M., MONDAY, JUNE 23, 2008
A MANDATORYpre-bid conference and site visit will be held on Thursday.
June12 2008 at 10:00 am at the Miami Riverside Center Building., 444 SW
2nd Ave. Miami FL., (meet in lobby). The purpose of this conference is to
allow potential Bidden an opportunity to present questions to staff and obtain
clarification of the requirements of the Bid documents. It is mandatory that a
representative (s) of the bidder attend in order to qualify to bid. Detailed speci-
fications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department,
website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1906.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pete Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 002406

JOIN OUR


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 350G Pan American Drive, Miami, EL 33133 for the following:
REP NO.-75163 -REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL TO PROVIDE NETWORK
BACKBONE EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2008
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department website at www.miamiqov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager




AD NO. 005024




SMIAMI-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
MDX PROCUREMENTICONTRACT NO.: RFQ-08-05
MDX WORK PROGRAM NO.: 83622.050
MDX PROJECT/SERVICE TITLE: CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING -
AND INSPECTION (CE&I) SERVICES FOR THE DESIGN AND
CONSTRUCTION OF AN EASTBOUND AUXILIARY LANE ALONG
DOLPHIN EXPRESSWAY (STATE ROAD 836). FROM WEST OF
NORTHWEST 57TH AVENUE TO NORTHWEST 42ND AVENUE
The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority is seeking Professional Services from
a Consultant that has the necessary qualifications and experience to provide
construction engineering and inspection services and contract administration
for the Design-Build Project of MDX Work Program Number 83622.030 for the
design and construction of an eastbound auxiliary lane along Dolphin Express-
way (State Road 836), from West of Northwest 57th Avenue to Northwest 42nd
Avenue. The Services consists of, but is not limited to, providing all manage-
ment, oversight, administration, and quality assurance with respect to all con-
struction, engineering, and inspection services. MDX notifies all Proposers and
individuals that it requires and encourages small, minority and women-owned
businesses to have fill opportunity to submit a response to any Solicitation
Document issued by MDX. In accordance with its Small Business Participation
Policy, available on MDX's website, MDX requires satisfaction of fifteen percent
(15%) small business participation requirement in this procurement. For copies
of the REQ with complete information on pre-qualification requirements, the
scope of services as well as submittal requirements, please log onto our web
site at www.mdx-wav.com or call MDX Procurement Office at 305-637-3277.
Please note: In order to download any MDX solicitations, you must register as
a Vendor. The Vendor Registration can only be done through MDX's website.
The deadline for submitting a Proposal is July 22, 2008 by 2:00 P.M., Eastern
Time. A Pre-Proposal Conference is scheduled for June 25, 2008 at 10:00 A.M.
at the MDX Headquarters Building. Attendance to the Pre-Proposal Confer-
ence is NOT mandatory however, everyone is encouraged to attend.


40 -man Sg* m

bwvvd P- -bu


Subscribe


BLACKS MUST CONTRoi, THEIR OWN DESTINY


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6D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008











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SECTION D




Business Rentals
FOR LEASE
901 N.W. 79 STREET
BLDG/OFFICE SPACE
Suitable for real estate,
insurance, daycare or
medical business. 1810 sq.
feet. Call
305-794-8039
SUnturnished Rooms
3185 N.W. 75th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
Tiled floor. Near rail $100
weekly. Call 305-439-2906
54th St. N.E. 1st Ave
$150 a week
Call 786-287-2942
CAROL CITY AREA
One bedroom and bath. Nice
driveway, fenced patio. 305-
621-7940.
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Nice cozy rooms, central air
included. Call 305-827-4593.

Furnished Rooms
13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-6819756 /305-691-3486
1426 N.W.70th Street
$375 monthly Call 305-836-
8378.
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
1845 N.W. 50th STREET
$135 weekly, with air, $270
to move in. Call 786-286-
7455.
2010 N.W. 55th Terrace
One room furnished with
central air and appliances,
$130 weekly, $390 to move
in.
Call 786-487-2222
2136 N.W. 43rd Street
$400 and up per month.
$600 moves you in. Call 305-
637-9359 or 305-303-0156.
335 N.W. 203rd Terrace
A private entrance and bath
air heat, tv, refrigerator, mi-
crowave, all utilities included.
Gated community. Call 954
678-8996.
7611 NW 3rd Avenue
Shared house private bed-
room and bathroom $450 a
month working adults utilities
included. 305-746-2129.
Furnished room for rent,
$350
plus. Call 305-637-3635
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Very clean room, quiet neigh-
borhood, all utilities included.
786-541-5234
LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, non-smoker
Call 786-237-5281
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nice room, private entrance,
305-769-4985 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
ROOMING HOUSE
Open House 11 12 Noon.
8013 N.W. 10th Court
Central air, new bathrooms
and kitchen, security gates
$125 -$150 weekly.
Call Kevin 954-744-6612
ROOMS IN CASTLE
MANSION
Free lights Room $450
monthly plus $150 security/
near bus line Family Dollar
three blocks north, 720 N.W.
75 St.. 786-523-1736.
Very nice air conditioned
rooms. Rent plans are nego-
tiable. Call 786-663-4600

1 Efficiencies
13377 N.W. 30th AVENUE
$105 weekly, private kitchen
/bath, free utilities,
appliances.
305 691-3486 or 474-8188.

6811 N.W. 29th Avenue
Nice room with private en-
trance. $550 monthly.
Utilities included. 305-696-
5278.
MIAMI GARDENS
All utilities free cable $700
monthly, first, last and securi-
ty. Call 786-546-9650.
MIRAMAR
Efficiency, $575 monthly, first
and last. 407-445-3235.
Near 135 St. and 27 Ave.
$100 weekly, $300 to move
in. All utilities included.
Call 305-688-0577

Opa-Locka Area
Single working person.
Room
with air $475 monthly,
Call 305-769-0294

I Apartments

1116 Sesame Street
Opa Locka area. Two bed-
rooms one bath $900
monthly
Call 954 805 3233

1130 N.W. 2nd Avenue
DOWNTOWN AREA
One bedroom, one bath, fully
remodeled. Call 305-375-
0673 or 786-444-0771.


1146 SESAME STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly, $1400 down
Call 786-287-1080

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667


MIAMI, FLORIDA, JUNE 11-17, 2008


Apartments
1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1261 N.W. 59th Street
1 bdrm, 1 bath, $550.
305-642-7080
1277 N.W. 58th Street#2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances included. Section
8 welcome. 786-277-9925.
135 N. W. 18th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath,
$525 monthly, all appliances
included. Joel: 786-355-
7578.
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
Two bdrms, one bath, $575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
140 SW 6th STREET
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$650 monthly. No section 8.
Call 305-267-9449
1411 N.W. 51 Street #B
One bedroom, one bath,
lights, water and appliances
included Section 8 Welcome.
786-277-9925
1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors. $600 monthly; $1200
moves you in. One month
rent Move in special for 40
years and older. Call 305-
458-3977.
1520 NW 61ST STREET
One and two bedroom apart-
ments renovated, all housing
agencies welcome.
Call 305-720-2927
1525 N.W. 1 Place
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$800 monthly. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch Flat
Screen TV. Call Joel:
786-355-7578
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
One bedroom, one bath,
$525 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Free 20 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1540 NW 1st Crt.
Three bedrooms, two bath.
$800 per month. All applian-
ces included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1558 N.W. 1st AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fully remodeled. Call 786-
444-0771 or 786-488-6119.
1801 N. W. 2nd AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly, all appliances
included. Joel: 786-355-7578
1955 N.W. 2 Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bdrm, one bath. $450.
305-642-7080

200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$425
305-642-7080
2040 N.E. 168th Street, #4
One bedroom, one bath,
Close to the mall. Water in-
cluded.
Call 786-2779925
2440-42 NW 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$850 per month, first and se-
curity. Call 305-651-1078.

247 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, fenced yard, parking,
$775 monthly plus security.
Section 8 OK.
Call 786-216-7533.

2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate
$600 monthly.
954-430-0849

3090 N.W. 134th Street
Two bedrooms, water includ-
ed, $850 per month, $1250
to move in. Section 8
welcome.
786-512-7643

3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath
$350 bi-weekly $800 moves
you in. Call:786-389-1686
421 NW 59 Terr.
Call in for MOVE IN
SPECIAL
One bedroom $575
Two bdrms, $700
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-259-7054
458 N.W. 7TH STREET
One bedroom, central air,
centrally located, very nice,
$475 monthly. Section 8. Call
305-557-1750:
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

5842 N.W. 12th Avenue #2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
water included. Section 8
welcome. Call 305-238-6876


6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699


Apartments Duplex
7513 NORTH MIAMI AVE. 215-217 N.E. 55 Terrace
One bedroom, one bath. Two bdrm, one bath and one
Renovated, new appliances bdrm, one bath. Section 8.
and parking. Section 8 Call 305-761-0061.
HOPWA OK. $765 monthly. 2277 NW 98 Street
Drive by, then call 9 am to 6 Two bedroom, one bath $950
p.m. Call Dick 305-754-7900. a month, first, last and $200
8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE security. Call 305-224-3107
One bedroom, one bath, all 2330 NW 101st Street
appliances included, $600 Two bedrooms, one bath.
monthly. $975. Washer,dryer and wa-
Call Joel 786-355-7578. ter included.
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS Call 786-262-3402
One and two bedrooms., 2425 NW 104th Street
from $495-$585 monthly. Three bedrooms, $1375
Free water, window bars and monthly, $1975 to move in.
iron gate doors. Apply at: 305-751-6720 305-331-3899.
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699 2466-B N.W. 44 Street
One bedroom, air. $575


ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information/specials.
CIVIC CENTER AREA
Two bedrooms, air, applian-
ces, new tile and carpet $760
monthly. 1545 N.W. 8th Ave-
nue. Call 786-506-3067.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-$695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath $515
Two bdrm, one bath $630
FREE WATER!
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
160f N.W. 62 Street, one
bedroom, one bath. $500
monthly.Section 8 welcome
call 305-717-6084
Liberty Square Area
Two/one one/one. Please
call for an appointment. 786-
267-3199.
MIAMI AREA
One, two and four bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
MOVE IN SPECIAL
415-439 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$525 with air.
Move in special $950
Please call for appointment
305-326-8855
786-343-7800
Wynwood Area Apts.
28th Street + 1st Ave.
One Bedroom, one bath -
$575 monthly. Two Bed-
room, one bath $800
monthly. All appliances
included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

Duplex

1148 NW 100 St (front)
Two bedrooms, one bath,
den, central air and water.
Section 8 welcomed, $1000
a month. 954-430-0849
12280 NW 15th Ave.
Spacious one bedroom, one
bath, new air units, tiled
floors, front and back yard.
Miami FL, $725 monthly plus
utilities. Call 954-205-0693.
1290-1292 N.W. 44 Street
Two bedrooms, duplex.
Section 8. 305-525-4644.
1501 NW 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
conditioning. $725 monthly.
appliances included.
Call: Gwen 786-246-4403
1547 NW 53 Street
Renovated two bdrm one
bath. Air and new
appliances. Call 305-693-
9118 or 305-318-1284.
1611 NW41 Steet
Two bedroom, one bath, A/C,
includes appiances, free wa-
ter, secuirty bars, fenced
private parking, large yard, 3
blocks to metrorail. $700
monthly, NO Section 8
First Last and Security.
Call 786-229-5652

1811 N.W. 84 Street
9570 N.W. 20 Avenue
One bedroom with den, eat
in kitchen, new carpet, paint
and tile. $475 monthly.
Call: 305-389-2765.

2031 N.W. 98 Street
Three bdrm, one bath,
central air, newly tiled, and
painted. Quiet neighborhood.
Section 8 welcome. 305-710-
2921 or 710-2964.

2035 N.W. 69th Terrace (A)
Two bedrooms, with applian-
ces and air. 786-426-6263.


monthly.No deposit 786-226-
2072.
3051 N.W. 134th Street
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
Newly remodeled two large
bedrooms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, cable, central air,
tile, security bars and large
walk-in closet. $1050
monthly. Call 954-557-4567

310 NW 96th Street
Two bedrooms. $850
monthly Call 954-437-8034
Gloria

344 N.W. 59 STREET
Two bdrm, one bath, hard
wood and tile floor, refrigera-
tor, stove and Section 8 wel-
come.$850 monthly.
786-709-3707

38 N. E. 64th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath,
$750 monthly, NO section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.

5537 N.W. 5 Ave
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $900 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome. Drive-
way and gated'.
786-663-0234

572 NE 65th Street
Two bedrooms one bath.
$900 monthly, $500 security
deposit. Call 786-488-2264

6920 N.W 2nd Court
1422 N.W. 51st Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
Section 8 O.K. 305-490-
7033.

7000 N.W. 5th Place
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1000 monthly. Section 8
welcome.786-399-8557

756 NW 3 Ct. Hallendale
Two Beds central a/c sec. 8
$750.00 monthly 305-624-
0451.

77 N.W. 51 Street
Nice two bdrm, one bath,
central a/c, $975 monthly,
$500 deposit. Section 8
ready. 786-229-5394.

7752 N.W. 2nd Court
Four bedrooms, two baths
$1465 monthly.
Section 8 OK!.
Ron Jackson 305-582-8210
845 N.W. 110 ST.
Nice two bedroom, one bath
with central air and applian-
ces. $850 monthly. Section 8
welcome. Call 786-873-2694.

8960 N. E. 2nd AVENUE
Section 8 ready, lovely two
bedrooms, $1000 monthly,
other locations. Call 305-
621-6128 and 305-788-0000.

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
MIAMI AREA
Two bedroom one bath with
everything included. Studio
available $105 weekly $450
move in Call 786-286-2540.

NORTHWEST AREA
Like new three bedrooms,
central air. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-269-5643

Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air.. $595-$975. Call
786-344-3278

Sondos/Townhouses

6172 SW 68 Th Street
Section 8 Three bedroom,
one and a half bath, two-
story townhouse in South
Miami near metro rail station.
A corner unit located in Lee
Park.
Available next month. $1200
a month. one month security
needed. We also have a four
bedroom, two baths in same
complex which will be in
September for $1400 a
month.
Please call 786-543-3872.

Miami Gardens Area
Two bedroom, one and a half
bath townhouse, $1100
monthly, first, last and securi-
ty call 305-829-6000.

MIAMI GARDENS
Two bedroom, one bath $800
monthly. First, last and de-
posit. Call 305-633-0304.


I Houses
1014 N.W. 60 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air and heat, all appli-
ances, lawn maintenance in-
cluded. $1400 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome. Call
786-229-9488
15421 N.W. 27 PL (rear)
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 accepted. Call Lor-
enzo 786-356-0486 or Gigi
786-356-0487.
1545 N.W. 115 Street
Three bdrm, one bath. Sec-
tion 8. Call 305-761-0061.
15630 N.W. 159 Street
Road
Beautiful three bedroom, one
bath, air, tile, $1300 monthly,
huge yard call 305-297-5932.
16415 N.W. 23rd Court
Two bdrms, one bath, $1,000
monthly, 305-662-5505.
1780 N.W. 60 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
spacious yard. A gem! Refer-
ence must check out. $1000
monthly. Going fast] Call
305-801-5690, 786-444-1199
1785 N.W. 43 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Large yard.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449.
1812 N.W. 66th Street
Three bdrms, one bath; tiled,
air, $1300 mthly, first and
last. Sec. 8 welcome.
Call 786-344-9284.
1856 N.W. 70TH STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Remodeled home. $1250
monthly, $600 security. New
appliance, washer and dryer.
Section 8 ok. 305-926-2839.
1971 NW 154 Street
New four bedrooms, two
baths, $1600 monthly sect.8
ok. Call 786-399 8557.
2120 N.W. 89 Street
Two or three bedroom, one
bath, totally remodeled $950
monthly. 786-290-4625. Rod
22 N.E. 59 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1400 and two bedrooms,
one bath, $750. One month
free! Section 8 Okay.
Jerome
305-801-8994.
2441 NW 152 Terr.
Nice 2 beds, new kitchen.
Sec. 8 HOPA $1,075 month.
305-624-0451.
254 N. W .75th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
.$960 monthly.
Call 305-766-7943 or
404-861-1965.
2592 S. E. 12TH COURT
Three bedrooms, three
baths, beautiful house,
homestead gated
community, with pool,
recreational area, washer,
dryer, dishwasher, lake view,
section 8 welcome, cash
back $1500 monthly call
305-717-6084.
2723 NW 43 Terrace
Three bedroom, two baths,
laundry room, large car port.
305-576-6697.

2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
2832 Wiley St.
Hollywood, two beds., den,
central a/c, section. 8. $1200
.305 624 0451.

3240 N.W .170 Street
Three bedroom, 2 baths
$1500 monthly. Section 8
Ok.
786-260-1856.

3530 NW 197 ST
Three beds/ 4th room use as
bedroom/den. Central A/C
Sec. 8 HOPA. 305-624-0451

355 N.W. 187 Street
Three bedroom $1200 a
month $2400 to move in.
305-758-6133 or 305-962-
1814.

442 N.W. 59 TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
brand new kitchen, brand
new appliances. $850
monthly, $1700 moves you
in. Section 8 Welcome.
305-458-3977


6940 N.W. 6th COURT
Four bdrm, one bath, sec. 8
welcome, bars, air, stove, re-
frigerator, washer and dryer.
$1400 mthly, 786-709-3707.

710 N.W. 6th Street
Four bedrooms one bath with
garage big yard $1705
monthly first and last security
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 786-312-4447

7121 N.W. 21st Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths
Section 8 Only 305-720-7072

781 NW 77th Street (rear)
One bedroom, appliances in-
cluded, air, utilities paid by
tenant. $550 monthly. $1375
to move in. 305-742-1050

828 N.W. 64th STREET


Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Call 786-344-
3278

CAROL CITY AREA
Homes and town homes
three and four bedrooms .
Call Ali 786-346-9878


I Houses
CAROL CITY AREA
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$750 monthly, three bed-
rooms, one bath $1000
monthly. Asking two months
to move in. Appliances in-
cluded. 305-827-4593.
COCONUT GROVE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, family/laundry room, ga-
rage. Call 786-597-3999.
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three and four bed-
rooms. $700-$1250 with air.
305-642-7080.
LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Florida room, fenced, bars,
central air. Section 8 okay!
Call 786-390-0809
MIAMI AREA
Four bedrooms two bath
$1450.718-354-7234.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome, 305-510-
2841.
MIAMI GARDENS
Newly remodeled Four
bedrooms, two bath-
rooms central air washer and
dryer. $1600 monthly, Sec-
tion 8 welcome. 15941 NW
18th Ct. Call 954-818-9112.
North Miami Area
2 bedrooms 1 bath Nice area
Section 8 OK 954-549-5192
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Four bedroom, one bath.
Nice area, fenced yard,
tile,and large storage room.
Section 8 Ok. $1598
monthly.
786-390-8425
NORTH WEST AREA
Two, three, four houses for
rent Section 8 only. 786-
317-8444 and 305-244-0917.
NW / NE AREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.
Special Program $1000
moves you in.Change from
rent to own. Own a three
bedroom home for as little as
$1200 a month. Call today
786-277-3717.


Real Estate Services

FIXER UPPER
Owner Finance, rent to
own $169,500 three
bedroom, 3/1
hugh yard, 24 hr recordingi-
800-970-5628 ext 8.

Homeowners / Home seekers
Refinance or purchase with
FHA/owner financing call
1800-242-0363 ext. 3644

Owner finance, rent to own
4 nice homes available. Hear
recorded list 1-800-970-5628
Ext8.


112 MARION ROAD
Why rent, Buy! Miami Gar-
dens. Three bedrooms, cen-
tral air, pool. Try $995 down-
$1349 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839.

15720 N.W. 28th Place
Four bedrooms, central air.
$995 down and $1299
monthly. FHA, 786-306-
4839.
17910 N.W. 42 Place
Why rent-Buy! Three bed-
rooms, central air. $995
down
and $1349 monthly. FHA.
786-306-4839
18305 N.W. 23 AVENUE
Why rent-Buy! Four bed-
rooms, central air. $995
down and $1299 monthly.
FHA, 786-306-4839.
2236 N.W. 59th Street
Totally remodeled, three bed-
rooms, one bath, $149,900.
Owner/Agent 305-491-7522..
3315 N.W. 49th Street
Four bedrooms, central air.
$995 down and $997 month-
ly. FHA, 786-306-4839.
7770 MERIDIAN STREET
Why rent-Buyl Miramar.
Three bedrooms, central air.
$995 down-$1349 monthly
FHA, 786-306-4839.
790 N.W. 64 Street
Totally remodeled.Three bed-
room, two baths, $169,900.
Owner/Agent 305-491-7522

ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty

MIAMI BEAUTY $128K
Two bedroom, seller to help
with closing. Hallea Hall
Realty 754-423-4132.


North Miami Beach $134K
Two bedroom newer roof
Great terms. Hallea Hall Re-
alty, 754-423-4132.


. '- IY -,,i'- '


S Houses
NORTHWEST AREA
Owner interested in selling.
rooming house. Two houses
on one lot. Also a beautiful
remodeled two story home
with basement. Call 786-337-
0864/ 305-634-4030.
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedroom, two bath.
Large yard. Call 305-873-
4729

S Services
Bank's and Son
Lawn Service. Low rates.
Call
305-836-6804/305-620-5913.
Help God's Truck. Moving
Dade and Broward. Call 305-
638-5028.
JUST IN TIME FOR
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL
Handyman specializing in
carpet, plumbing, doors,
cabinets and lawn service.
305-801-5690.

Repairs
GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.
Install and repair window.
Operator, screens and glass.
305-635-9869.
Henry
M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves, re-
frigerators, water heaters.
Joel cell 305-244-8948 or
305-758-8608.

Employment

Collections
Strong organization and
communication skills re-
quired to coordinate collec-
tion process, and cash flow.
Two years exp. Fax re-
sume to 305-758-3617.


-4P MOTIVATED &
PERSONABLE
Classified Sales
Will train applicants with
great interpersonal and
communication skills.
Computer literate. Typing
speed minimum 40 wpm.
Needed to sell! Sell! SELL!
Salary plus commission.
Must meet weekly quotas.
Furnish employment,
salary histories and
references.
The Miami Times
Fax: 305-758-3617


Needed VPK/CDA
Teachers immediately
great pay and benefits
305- 984-0185.


Souring economy puts

the bite on pet owners

By Rodrique Ngowi
Associated Press

FRANKLIN, Mass. Diana Bardsley wiped tears
from her eyes as she recalled taking food off her
plate to feed her beloved spaniel Hunter and two
Siamese cats.
Her greatest fear: that she could be forced to sur-
render the animals as she struggled to stretch her
food stamps and Social Security income to meet
the escalating cost of living.
Some hope was restored after she visited a lo-
cal food pantry, which has started offering free
pet food to help owners keep their animals out of
shelters.
"I know a lot of people will probably say, 'Well,
if you don't have enough money to be able to feed
your animals, that you shouldn't have pets,"' said
Bardsley, 53, of Franklin, as Hunter played in the
living room with three of her grandchildren.
But, "Just because financially you may go down-
hill a little or a lot, doesn't necessarily mean you
have give the part of your family that you love,"
she said.
For some pet owners, though, there is little
choice.
The rising costs of fuel, food and housing and
the rising tide of foreclosures have generated a
surge in requests for pet food from traditional food
pantries and prompted some pet owners to give up
their animals. Others are trying to save money by
forgoing veterinary care.
The Animal Welfare League in Chicago Ridge, Ill.,
has seen the average number of pet owners getting
monthly rations from its pet food pantry increase
by more than 50% since last year. Meanwhile, the
number of people seeking service at its discounted
veterinary clinic has more than doubled, said Lin-
da Estrada, the group's director and president.
"We could do it every day if we had enough food,
I mean, that's how bad it's gotten," Estrada said.
"The line goes all the way down the street" as pet
owners gather once a month for supplies.
In Santa Cruz, Calif., a pet food bank run by the
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
has seen demand spike by about 20% just in the
past six months. The facility typically hands out
about 5,000 pounds of free pet food a month.
"In the past, the demographics has been people
who are disabled or on disability and senior citi-
zens," said executive director Lisa Carter. "Nowa-
days, during the pet food program, I see people
who are able-bodied and not able to find a job."


/~~''~~~

., .~,


.1


.~,,. ~


l ... :3 .

REAL ESTATE
ASSISTANT
Anthony: 305-794-9299.

Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street




I Schools

Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $55, also
do G and concealed.Open
seven days 786-333-2084.

Caught Speeding ????
Call DC Today 305-653-5955
online classes available
www.anythingandeverything
trafficschool.com
"Don't Be A Victim"
NRA Certified, Personal Pro-
tection, in the home security
classes Available-"D" and "G"
Call 305-653-5955.
HURRY HURRY!!!
Leam a skill, get a job. Train
to be a CNA, Home Health
Aide,and a Patient Care
Technician. State board
review for LPN, RN, CNA;
also, CPR, OSHA, domestic
violence, and so much
more.Tuition assistance if
qualified.Call 305-754-4035



Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com

Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784













(;a% pri's hit naliounal arragr of$4


4. .... .. ..


I "8 .. .. .


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"



|I mp&B @ In al (I wtm tfg *ium i < M frkran u iM Mu4rit


Am-"- 000 40 %OP:MAW O .WW 0 d OP %
4a'- W u


CITY OF MIAMI GENERAL EMPLOYEES'
AND SANITATION EMPLOYEES'
RETIREMENT TRUST

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT the City of Miami General Employees' and
Sanitation Employees' Retirement Trust, has rescheduled their Thursday, July
31, 2008, board meeting to Tuesday, July 29, 2008, at 9:00 a.m. The meeting
will take place in the Waldemar Lee Meeting Room, located at the Rose Gor-
don Building, 2901 Bridgeport Avenue, Coconut Grove, Florida 33133

If you have any questions, please call (305) 441-2300.
Sandra Elenberg
Pension Administrator


CITY OF MIAMI GENERAL EMPLOYEES'
AND SANITATION EMPLOYEES'
RETIREMENT TRUST

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT the City of Miami General Employees' and
Sanitation Employees' Retirement Trust is going to hold an Educational and
Planning Retreat on Friday, June 13, 2008, through Sunday, June 15, 2008.
Said meeting to be held at the Marriott Key Largo Bay Beach Resort located at
103800 Overseas Highway, Key Largo, Florida, 33037. Said meeting will start
Friday at 10:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and
Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Your attendance is, invited; however, no
action will be taken on any matters discussed at this Educational and Planning
Retreat.

If you have any questions, please call (305) 441-2300.
Sandra Elenberg
Pension Administrator


Retreat Agenda for Friday, June 13, 2008

1. Introduction
2. Call to Order
3. Investments 101
4. Actuarial 101
5. Sub-Prime Loans Educational Session
6. Viewing of Trustee Gordon's 90th Birthday Video

Retreat Agenda for Saturday, June 14, 2008

1. Call to order
2. Issues pertaining to conflict of interest and the Code of Ethics
3. Sexual Harassment Educational Session
4. Data Security Educational Session

Retreat Agenda for Sunday, June 15, 2008

1. Call to order
2. Roundtable discussion wrap-up


SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans $150
Infusion Frontal laces
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $85
786-277-6821
06/10/08


A.V. INSURANCE
$ave $$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
04/10/08
C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners *
General Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue
305-836-5206


GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07/20/08


FAITH FINANCIAL
Reverse Mortgage!
Stay at home Enjoy Tax Free
No Mtg. Payments. If you are
62 yrs or older call me
Alex at 305-205-1697
01/09


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08


Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553
4/30/08

wtee& tlziwfzt
Call
305-694-6210


Fax
305-694-6211


Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional, Sale & Conlidenillal Services

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
-Individual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
S Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP
305-621-1399


fHabitat
for Humanty'
of Greater Miami
Own a Townhouse!
1 bed/1 bath 1290 NW 61 St
Approx. $550/month
Stop renting...be a homeowners
305-634-3628 I

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

OneArtCenter
4111 North MiamiAvenue, Miami
Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and
equipment for the OneArtCenter project, a one story
5,650 sq. ft. community arts center, will be received at
the offices of JUDSON ARCHITECTURE, 18425 NW
2nd Avenue, Suite #402, Miami Gardens, FL 33169 until
2:00 PM local time on June 30, 2008. No bids will be
accepted after 2:00 PM.
Bid Documents may be obtained at the offices of
JUDSON ARCHITECTURE, 18425 NW 2nd Avenue,
Suite #402, Miami Gardens, FL 33169 starting on June
9, 2008. A Pre-Bid meeting will be held on June 16,
2008, at 10:00 AM at OneArt Center, 4111 North Miami
Avenue, Miami.
All general contractors bidding on this project must be
licensed and insured. All bids must be submitted in
sealed envelopes bearing on the outside, the name and
address of the bidder, and the name of the project.
This project is funded with Community Development
Block Grants Program through the City of Miami
Department of Community Development and the Miami-
Dade County Office of Community and Economic
Development, and as such bidders must comply with all
applicable federal, state and local ordinances.
OneArt Center reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Bids from any person, firm or corporation in default
upon any agreement with Miami-Dade County and/or the
City of Miami will be rejected.
No bidder may withdraw his/her bid within ninety (90)
calendar days from the bid submittal date of June 30,
2008.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008










9D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008


BL1AC KS NAUt'C( CON I ROl I- THIR OWN DiV,s11N)'


Black telecom professionals cited for Verizon's successes


By William Reed ...
.,
"To be equal in ...
opportunity, rec- '
ignition and re '
aspect" is the goal
of CITE execu-
tive Jan Rich-
ardson. Amid
celebrations of the 25th anni-
versary of the Consortium of
Information and Telecommu-
nications Executives (CITE) in
Washington, D.C. Richardson
exhibited high confidence that
the African-American employee
resource group (ERG) has cre-
ated such an environment at
Verizon Communications Inc.
Verizon Communications Inc.
is an American broadband and
telecommunications company.
Just 8 years old, Verizon was
formed in 2000 when Bell At-
lantic's Regional Bell Operat-
ing Company merged with GTE.
Listed number 17 on the For-
tune 100 List, Verizon is a $100
billion a year company that op-
erates coast-to-coast, serves 70
million customers and has al-


most a quarter million employ-
ees.
Verizon and CITE are real
success stories. CITE repre-
sents the interest of Verizon's
35,000 Black employees. An
employee resource group, CITE
has aided and monitored Veri-
zon's commitment to excellence
in community service, and per-
sonal and professional develop-
ment for over 25 years. Black
Enterprise magazine says Veri-
zon "has set the bar in terms of
workforce diversity". Long-time
members of the company's se-
nior leadership CITE activists
have had a seat at the table
making company policy and
kept diversity issues at the fore-
front of practices. The annual
DiversityInc Top 50 Companies
for Diversity currently rates Ve-
rizon Number 2 for "recruitment
and retention" and says the
company demonstrates "consis-
tent strength" in CEO commit-
ment, human capital, corporate
and organizational communica-
tions, and supplier diversity.
The CITE model is timely


Verizon and CITE are real success

stories. CITE represents the-

interest of Verizon's 35,000


Black employees.

and ongoing. CITE members
arguer for African American in-
terests inside and out the com-
pany. Prior to its transforma-
tion into Verizon, Bell Atlantic
had merged with another Bell
Operating Company, NYNEX,
in 1997 and the CITE concept
evolved with the telecommu-
nications giant. CITE & Com-
pany provides voice, video and
data services to residential and
small business customers in 28
states and Washington, D.C.
It is in a competitive market
and operates a Fiber-to-the-
Premises (FTTP) network under
the FiOS service mark. FTTP
network offers bandwidth for
voice, data, and video services,
and FiOS provides broadband
access speeds and digital voice


services.The verilZ p
Verizon net-
work operates 41 million wire-
line access lines, 8.2 million
broadband connections, and
had 943,000 FiOS television
customers
Ivan Seidenberg, Verizon
Chairman/CEO, supports CITE
and says, "Diversity isn't just a
concept at Verizon. It's an inte-
gral part of our business. Di-
versity drives everything from
the best people with the lead-
ership skills we need, the best
products and services built
through our innovation and
customer focus, and the best
network maintained by our
ability to drive results. The di-
verse minds, experiences, cul-
ture and unique perspectives


.AML


MDX hosts procurement workshop for small and minority businesses


Participants to gain access to list of

contracting opportunities


The Miami-Dade Expressway
Authority (MDX) is hosting its
5th Annual Procurement Work-
shop for Small and Minority
Businesses at the Wyndham
Miami Airport Hotel on Friday,
June 27 at 8 a.m. The work-
shop is free, open to the pub-
lic and will allow participants
to gain insight into how to win
government contracts.
"The workshop will be a one
stop information portal," said
Karen Hollis, Small Business
and Contract Compliance Spe-
cialist, MDX. "We have ensured


that every exhibitor comes with
a list of upcoming contracting
opportunities to distribute to
all participants. We know that
small firms make a significant
sacrifice to attend these events
and we want to make sure they
leave with concrete business
opportunities."
MDX has secured the partici-
pation of prominent engineering
firms and construction compa-
nies as Exhibitors to share their
contracting opportunities. Agen-
cies that certify, pre-qualify and
provide assistance to small and


minority business will also be
there to help firms that desire
to develop their growth.
The workshop will also pro-
vide an overview of the Small
Business Training Program. A
session will review the Govern-
ment Contractor Certification
(GCC) program, which is de-
signed to educate government
contractors on the procurement
process; and, the Construction
Training Qualification Program
certification, which will equip
contractors wishing to provide
technical support on transpor-
tation projects and roadway
systems.
Participants will also enjoy a
construction roundtable with
a panel of project management


experts and have an opportu-
nity to meet one-on-one with
matchmakers.
MDX will also put its Agency
on display. Participants will
leave with information -
on the history, struc-
ture, current and future
projects, accomplish-
ments of MDX; and,
how to get involved in
the process of helping
MDX improve the fu-
ture transportation in
Miami-Dade County.
MDX is funded al-
most entirely by toll 1
revenues and is dedi-
cated to the enhance-
ment of mobility in Mi-
ami-Dade County. MDX


A four day work week idea getting closer to reality


TELECOMMUTE
Ccontinued from 8D

serve food, mow
lawns, treat patients
or perform other jobs
tied to specific loca-
tions. Some compa-
nies have responded
with programs rang-
ing from van-pooling
to bike-sharing.
Another alternative
is compressing the
five-day work week
into four, 10-hour
days. Condensed work
weeks are the most
popular program for
employers trying to
reduce workers' com-
muting costs, accord-
ing to a recent survey
by Challenger, Gray
& Christmas, a job
placement consulting
group.
The Kentucky Sec-
retary of State, Trey
Grayson, is offering
employees a four-day
week in light of high
gas prices.
Oklahoma House
Rep. IMIike Shelton
is encouraging state
agencies to adopt
a compressed work
week to spare em-
ployees some pain at
the pump. On New
York's Long Island,
Suffolk County Leg-
islator Wayne Horsley
is making a similar
proposal.


MIKE SHELTON
Oklahoma House Rep.
In West Virginia,
Doug Stalnaker of the
House of Delegates
said an interim study
is being conducted to
see if a four-day week
makes sense for state
employees espe-
cially rural workers
with long commutes.
West Virginia forest-
ers already are test-
ing a four-day sched-
ule, though fuel costs
were a secondary con-
sideration after cre-
ating more efficient
work schedules.
Officials in College
Township, Pa., are
looking into expand-
ing employees' work-
day to 7:30 a.m. to
5:30 p.m. with either
Monday or Friday off
as a way to save elec-
tricity and fuel costs.
Township Manager
Adam Brumbaugh
said he came up with
the idea after watch-


Saudi minister calls oil prices 'unjustified,'


RIYADH, Saudi
Arabia (AP) Saudi
Arabia says it will call
for a meeting of oil
producing countries
and consumers to
discuss soaring oil
prices and work to
prevent unjustified rise
in prices.
Information and
Culture Minister
lyad Madani says the
kingdom will work
with the Organizatiion
of Petroleum Exporting


Countries to "guarantee
the availability of oil
supplies now and in
the future."
In a statement
following the weekly
Cabinet meeting,
Monday, the minister
said Saudi Arabia will
also work to control
"unwarranted and
unnatural" price
hikes.
He said that the
current price of oil is
unjustified.


ing pump prices rise
twice in one day last
month.
But employers have
traditionally been
leery of changes that
could leave the of-
fice empty on Friday,
which is why the
Georgia House em-
ployees must stagger
their telecommuting
days. Another fear is
employees slacking
off either because
they're at home or
working long stretch-
es.
The National Rec-
reation and Park
Association, an ad-
vocacy group, had
"mixed success" last
summer with a gas
price-inspired pro-
gram that allowed
employees to telecom-
mute a day a week or
go to four-10-hour
days, said spokesman


John Crosby. He said
there were nagging
problems, like tele-
commuters failing to
forward their calls to
home phones or work
left just shy of done
on Thursday after-
noons.
"They'd say 'Well, my
day's over and I'll get
to it on Monday,' and
that became problem-
atic," Crosby said.
Other employers re-
port success.
Workers at Green
River Cabins in Cam-
pobello, S.C., have
been working Mon-
day through Thurs-
day for a few years
after workers voiced
concerns about high
gas prices. Building
wooden cabins is de-
manding work, but
owner Dean Garrit-
son said there are no
signs his carpenters


are lagging at the end
of the day.
"A three-day week-
end is a wonderful
incentive," Garrit-
son said, adding that
employees also earn
more money when
production increases.
Ann Bamesberger,
a vice president with
Sun, said the company
believes the program
increases productiv-
ity. Sun says workers
who take part in the
program give 60% of
their saved commute
time back to the com-
pany.
Michelle Merrick
of Frederick, Md., a
work-at-home man-
ager for VIPdesk,
which provides cus-
tomer support over
the phone for corpo-
rate clients, said it's
just easier to work at
home.


CITY OF MIAMI GENERAL EMPLOYEES' AND
SANITATION EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT TRUST

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR ACTUARIAL CONSULTING SERVICE

The City of Miami General Employees' & Sanitation Employees' Retirement
Trust is seeking proposals from qualified actuaries to perform Actuarial Con-
sulting Services. Please contact Elena Valdes at ELENA@GESE.ORG if you
would like a copy of the RFP. The deadline to respond to the RFP is July 16,
2008, no later than 4:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

REQUEST FOR BIDS (RFB) 6000000187
C-4 FLOODWALL, MIAMI-DADE county, Florida

The South Florida Water Management District will receive sealed bids through
the Procurement Office, B-1 Bldg., 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach,
Florida 33406, for C-4 Floodwall, Miami-Dade County, FL on Tuesday, July
22, 2008 at 2:30 p.m. local time, at which timely submitted bids will be opened
and publicly read. Project consists of providing all labor, materials & equipment
necessary to construct a floodwall on the north bank of the C4 Canal between
SW 122nd Ave & the FL Turnpike. Project includes construction of an internal
drainage system along the north side of the wall, clearing & grubbing, demoli-
tion, excavation, concrete, sheet pile cut off wall & drainage.

An OPTIONAL pre-bid conference will be held on Thursday, July 3, 2008 at
10:00 a.m. at SFWMD Miami Field Station Conf Rm, 9001 NW 58th St., Miami,
FL 33178 For directions call 305-513-3420. Site visit will immediately follow.
All bids must conform to the instructions in the Request for Bidders (RFB).
Interested respondents may obtain a copy of the complete RFB by obtaining a
CD for $5.00 at the above address, by calling (561) 682-6391, or by calling the
24-hour BID HOTLINE 800-472-5290. The public is invited to attend the bid
opening. Information bn the status of this solicitation can be obtained at
our web site www.sfwmd.gov.


is also committed to bringing
more efficient, market-driven,
user-friendly management to
its expressways. For more in-
formation on MDX or SunPass,


contact MDX at 305-637-3277
or visit the website at www.
mdxway.com. For information
on SunPass, please contact
1-888-TOLL-FLA (865-5352).


MIAMIO

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 ,Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference


MIAMI-DADE:



LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for
contract opportunities, which can be obtained through the Department of Pro-
curement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dDm.
Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, free of charge,
from our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is available
at all branches of the Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that ven-
dors visit our Website on a daily basis to view newly posted solicitations, ad-
dendums, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject
to change.

interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5 00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of
the bid package through the United States Postal Service.


These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.

Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids and
proposals by requiring vendor affidavits only once at the time of vendor
registration.
Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavits one
time, instead of each time they submit a bid or proposal. Solicitations adver-
tised after June 1st will require that all vendors complete the new Vendor Reg-
istration Package before they can be awarded a new County contract. Obtain
the Vendor Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.



Regional Commuter Facility
MIA Project B761-A2
Parsons-Odebrecht Joint Venture is soliciting quotes and bids from CSBE
subcontractors and suppliers that are certified by Miami-Dade County, for the
Regional Commuter Facility project at Miami International Airport. Plans may be
reviewed by appointment, at 201 Alhambra Circle, Suite 1400, Coral Gables, FL
33134. Call Erika at 305-341-8800.

CSBE contractors and suppliers may also contact our CSBE Program
Manager, Tommy Wallace, 305-341-8800 for assistance, if required.

Bids and quotes from CSBE subcontractors shall be faxed to Fax# 305-569-1501
C/O: Bidding Department.
Bid Closing Date: 6/18/2008


of our employees are what give
us our competitive advantage.
Diversity and inclusion are a
critical link to our customers,
communities and sharehold-
ers. Verizon firmly believes that
developing the right skills and
providing the resources for our
employees is essential to cre-
ate our winning culture. Our
employees have access and are
encouraged to utilize our train-
ing opportunities, including
our diversity leadership work-
shops and extensive online li-
brary, connect with a mentor,
join one of our many support
networks, and utilize our work
/ life tools".
CITE is a model for all Amer-
ican enterprises. At its "25
Years of Excellence -- Continu-
ing the Legacy" Conference, Ve-
rizon's Regional President Bill
Roberts was the host; and as
a CITE member illustrated the
employee resource group's lon-
gevity and legacy.
These types of networks of
employees with common inter-
ests increasingly are being used


to strategically advance busi-
nesses by involving and using
members' ideas for marketing
campaigns targeting fast-grow-
ing markets and as a means of
increasing recruitment, reten-
tion and promotion of top tal-
ent. Like many African Ameri-
cans, not all black Verizon
employees buy into "that race
stuff'. Of Verizon's 34,000 Af-
rican American employees, just
12,000 are active in CITE.
Despite the established rec-
ognition of diversity as a busi-
ness imperative, discussions
around diversity remain sen-
sitive, and implementation
of such practices is often met
with ambivalence. The fact
that most companies remain
largely indifferent to changing
corporate America's predomi-
nately white status quo makes
it all the more important to
laud those who are aggressively
pursuing initiatives for Blacks'
"opportunities, recognition and
respect".
William Reed www.Black-
PressInternational. com)








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AUDIT
SERVICES
The Richmond Per-
rine Optimist Club is
accepting proposals to
provide Audit Services
for its Social Services
Programs. Please for-
ward proposals no lat-
er than 06/27/2008 to:
Richmond-Perrine Op-
timist Club 9955 West
Indigo Street Miami,
Florida 33157 (305)
233-9325


ADVERTISEMENT

Project MCC- M-128-A
Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for the following project at Miami-
Dade Aviation Department.
MCC-M-1 28-A MIA- Building 716 I: This project consists of upgrade to
building offices and warehouse. The work to include the following: Package "A"
General-demolition, masonry, insulation, doors & hardware & drywall (CSBE),
Package "B" Acoustical Ceilings (CSBE), Package "C" Carpet, Vinyl Tile &
Base (CSBE), Package 'D" Paint and Pressure Clean (CSBE), Package "E"
Dock Level Service & Bumpers (Open), Package "F" Fire Sprinkler (Open),
Package "G" HVAC (CSBE), Package "H" Electrical (CSBE), and Package
"I" Concrete Curb and Striping (CSBE). Plan Cost; $50.00 Refundable upon
return of the plans.
Pre-bid Conference (Mandatory): Tues., July 1, 2008 10:00am, Bid Opening:
Tuesday, July 15, 2008 @ 2:00pm
Location: 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room "F".
For more information, call Ginny or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444.


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."
"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


TITLE


PRE-BID CONFERENCE
ADDENDUMS


063-HH06 6/24/2008 Coarse Aggregates, Soil Mix and Clay

096-HHO1 6/17/2008 STUDENT DESKS

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF.MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


THE TRUE MEASURE
OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
LIES IN ITS COURAGE,
ITS PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
AND ITS DEDICATION
TO THE COMMUNITY IT SERVES


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Measures uPI


REQUEST FOR BID

CONSTRUCTION OF WATER & SEWER EXTENSIONS
ABRAHAM VILLAS TOWNI-IOMES

PUBLIC NOTICE

Sealed bids for consideration to provide services detailed in the "Scope of Work" given below shall be
received by Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami, 3800 NW 22 Avenue, Miami, Florida 33142 until 12:00
Noon, on June 24, 2008. The proposals shall be clearly marked "ABRAHAM VILLAS". The project location
is at 1290 NW 61 St., Miami, FL. Bids shall be seated. Late bids shall not be accepted or considered.
This project, in part, will be federally assisted and may be funded, in part, by a Self-help Homeownership
Opportunity Program, Bidders must comply with Presidential Executive Order 11246 clause, as amended;
the Davis-Bacon Act Provision, Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; the Copeland (Anti-
Kickback) Act; the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act and all other applicable federal and
state laws, and local ordinance.
This is also a Section 3 covered activity. Section 3 requires that job training, employment and contracting
opportunities be directed to low and very-low income persons or business owners who live in the project's
area.
Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami is an EOE (Equal Opportunity Employer) and invites bids from small
businesses, minority-business enterprises or women-owned businesses.
Selection will be made based on the contractor's qualifications, experience in MiamiDade County,
professional references, and the ability to meet Owner's schedule and budget.
Bidders must obtain a pre-bid package, in person, at Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami, 3800 NW 22nd
Avenue weekdays (9:OOAM-4:00 PM)
SCOPE OF WORK Water & Sewer Extensions for an 8 Unit Townhome Project in North Dade. Specifications
will be included in the pre-bid package.


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, JUNE 11-17, 2008




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