Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00548
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami, Fla
Publication Date: May 21, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00548
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231
Classification: lcc - Newspaper

Full Text



hnlhhhlh,,, lh,,llh,,) ll,,| l,, h,) ,,, h| h,,|,,
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LIBRARY OF FLA HlISTDRY
PO BOX 117a07 O X l tt
GAINESILLE FlV 32611-7W?I

Tempora Mitantur Et Nos Mutainur In llis


DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR


One Family Serving Since 1923




Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties
d


OVER 85 YEARS


Volume 85 Number 34 MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 21-27, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


NAACP to fight


school fund cuts
Some 300 concerned citizens
gathered at the NAACP meeting
Monday night at the Caleb
Center to hear Bishop Victor
Curry protest the pending $284
million funding cuts in our
school system.
The NAACP president made it
clear to all that this community
will not stand idly by and accept
policy decisions that have the
real potential to bankrupt public
education in Florida.
Miami-Dade school officials
last week presented a proposal
to eliminate more than 500 VICTOR T. CURRY
positions before the next school NAACP President
year.
The reduction in force the school system's first would save
the district about $33 million. The School Board will vote on
the proposal at it's next meeting on May 21.
If approved, the eliminated positions would include 235
transportation workers and 28 assistant principals, district
officials said.
The remainder of the positions would come from the district's
central offices. They include:
Seventy-nine clerical workers, community specialists and
aides.
Seventy managers.
Sixty-eight teachers on special assignment.
Twenty-five technical workers.
Twelve police positions.
Last month the board eliminated 154 positions after voting to
reorganize the district's regional administration.
Corrv called on state legislators to schedule a special session
to reconsider public school funding.
The Miami-Dade school district faces more than $280 million
in budget cuts that could result in hundreds of layoffs and
threaten scheduled raises for teachers.


Murdered boys parents get $1 million
TALLAHASSEE Gov. reached with the school board.
Charlie Crist on Monday They have already received
signed into law the bill $700,000 from the settlement
ordering the Miami- and needed legislative
Dade School Board approval to receive the
to pay $1 million to rest.
the parents of Jaime Gough's classmate,
Gough, the 14-year- Michael Hernandez,
old Southwood Middle confessed to stabbing
School student Gough 41 times in
stabbed to death in the middle' school
school in 2004. bathroom and is
The Gough parents, awaiting trial. The
Maria and Jorge, will Gough family argued
each receive$500,000, GOUGH that the school district


minus the 25 percent,
or $250,000, their attorneys
are entitled to receive, under
the wrongful death agreement


Miami attorney
A Miamian who graduated
from Southridge High School
in 1985 went on to win a
law degree has been named
senior counsel and diversity
council chair at CNN.
Johnita Due, daughter of
civil rights activists John Due
and Patricia Stephens Due,
has come full circle.
A Silver Knight award
winner in journalism at
Southridge, she is now
making sure the voices of
people who often aren't heard
get their say.


should have installed
metal detectors and that
would have prevented the
murder.


y gets CNN post

J-1

lEHU


JOHNITA DUE


C 0 R 0 N A T


IO N


I M E


Pictured is a scene from the queen's coronation festivities held September 26, 1957 at Booker T. Washington High School,
when the charming senior Marcia Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Ward of 30 N.W. 14th Terrace, was formally
crowned Miss BTW. The photo shows Miss Johnson seated in the center flanked by the young ladies of her court and their
escorts.They are: Eunice Mann who represented the Alumni Association; Henry Pinkney,Annie Bell Campbell, Maude Newbold,
Herman Dorsett, Little Brenda Mapp,Anna Jean Hawkins, Harold Culmer, president of the Student Council, who crowned Miss
BTW, Marcella Wake, Charles Johnson, Little Allen Shootes, son of Mr. and Mrs.A.J. Shootes, Betty Kelly, Elizabeth Thompson,
Phillip Hepburn, Joy Evans and Willie Williams. During the festivities Miss Evans sang a beautiful solo, and timely remarks
were offered by Elliott J. Pieze, president of the Alumni Association, head coach James Everett, assistant coach William Haley
and director of athletics, William "Bill" Stirrup. Reprinted from The Miami Times, Saturday October 5,1957.


Booker T. Washington Alumni honors


classes of 1928, '38, '48, '58 and 2008


The annual Alumni Day and
Memorial Ceremony on
Sunday, May 25, at 4 p.m.
in the school auditorium. All
Washingtonians are
invited to this event,
featuring Marcia Johnson
Saunders, Miss BTW of the
Class of 1958, (shown in the
photo above, along with some of
the class leaders), who will make
special presentations to Mr.
and Mrs. BTW of 2008.
The members of the class


of 1958 and class reunion
president, Mrs. Leotha Sands
Harrell, are proud to announce
their 50th Reunion Celebration
activities that are scheduled for
June 12 15 in Miami.
It will certainly be a time
for joy, a time for tears, a
time for classmates to
remember the good ole' years,
throughout the halls of dear
BTW.
They prepared to meet
their future goals upon


graduation, on June 5,
1958 at the Dade County
Auditorium.
The historic Booker T.
Washington High School,
the first colored high school,
founded in 1926 in Miami's
Overtown. It has served as one
of the city's most prominent
educational institutions,
fostering both civic, cultural
and social concerns
that have impacted
the quality of life. of our


students, parents and the
community at large.
For the past 50 years, many
class members have dared
to ,meet the challenges in
their Overtown community
by reaching out to at-risk
students and families whose
incomes were below the poverty
level.
The class of 1958 provided
scholarships to several
students who showed potential
Please turn to BTW 8A


4 hen. drtht1uAL.

~ ~a~b ~


Commissioner Edmonson helps clean-up at Olinda Park
Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson got together with the Earlington Heights/Olinda
Homeowners Association on Saturday for its annual neighborhood clean-up. Commis-
sioner Edmonson and her staff began the clean-up at Olinda Park,2101 NW 51 St.,and
continued throughout the neighborhood. Later, Commissioner Edmonson presented a
check to the Helping HandsYouth Program at Partners' Park on NW 54 St.and NW 22
Ave. Joining Commissioner Edmonson are Wesley Russell and Ari Wildstein.


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* .1


OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Decline in male college

attendance big problem
W here the Boys Are, released in 1960, is the quin-
tessential college spring-break movie. Today,
visi-tors to college campuses can't help but ask:
Whereare the boys? Currently, 135 women receive bachelor's
degrees for every 100 men. That gender imbalance will
widen in the comingyears, according to a new report by the
U.S. Department of Education. This is ominous for every
parent with a male child. The decline in college attendance
means many will needlessly miss out on success in life. The
loss of educated workers also means the country will be
less able to compete economically. The social implications
women having a hard time finding equally educated
mates are already beginning to play out. But the inequity
has yet to provoke the kind of response that finally opened
opportunities for women a generation ago. In fact, virtually
no one is exploring the obvious questions: What has gone
wrong? And what happens to all the boys who aren't in
college? Some join the armed forces, but the size of the
military has remained steady, at about 1.4 million, for the
past decade.
For the rest, the prospects appear dark:

THE WORKFORCE
Thotisands of young men find work as drywallers, painters
and general laborers, but many have trouble landing jobs.
The unemployment rate for young men ages 20-24 is 10.1%,
twice the national rate. As for earnings, those who don't
graduate from college are at a severe, lifelong financial
disadvan-tage: Last year, men 25 and older with a college
degree made an average of $47,000 a year, while those with
a high school degree earned $30,000.

PRISONS AND JAILS
Nearly as many men are behind bars or on probation and
parole (5 million) as are in college (7.3 million).

LOST
Young people who aren't in school or the workforce are
dubbed 'non-engaged' by the annual Kids Count report from
the Annie E. Casey Foundation. But lost' sounds just as
accurate. About 3.8 million youth ages 18-24 belong to this
group, roughly 15% of all people of that age. Though there
are no gender break downs for this group, the pathways
leading to this dead end dropping out from high school,
emerging from the juvenile justice system are dominated
by boys.While demographers and economists have a pretty
good idea where the boys end up, educators are largely
clueless about the causes. Some say female teachers in
elementary and middle schools, where male teachers are
scarce, naturally enforce a girl-friendly environment that
rewards students who can sit quietly not a strong point
for many boys, who earn poor grades and fall behind.
Others argue that a smart-isn't-cool bias has seeped into
boys of all racial and ethnic groups. Solutions are just as
uncertain. Hiring more male teachers would likely help,
as would countering the anti-intellectual male code. But
it's not that simple. Many boys leave middle school with
pronounced shortcomings in verbal skills. Those lapses
contribute to the low grade and high dropout rates.Surely,
a problem that creates crime, increases unemploy-ment and
leads to hopelessness deserves attention. Where are the
boys? Too often, going nowhere.

Lending respectability to racism
| e term minority, when referred to a racial group,
conjures up different interpretations depending on the
context in which it is used. Racial minorities are created
by pressures exerted by the majority.
If the majority did not choose to exclude a group, because of
race, that group would not be a racial minority. It would very
well be an indistinguishable part of the whole social body. By
definition, the term minority perpetuates exclusion when it is
used in reference to race.
The race question has always been an enigma in this nation
ever since the first Black man was brought to the shores of
North America as a slave. There has always been, and there
still exists, a general denial of the depth and the pervasiveness
of race in this society.
Several persons of good will and well meaning have sought
to bring us face to face with the problem in a systematic and
meaningful way but, he/she has always been shot down -
sometimes literally as a troublemaker. Those who would
push it aside in the name of getting along do more harm than
good because it (the race problem) remains the elephant in
America's living room.
When a chief justice rules that the Black man has no rights
that a White man is bound to. respect, that lends respectability
to racism. (Dred Scott).
When a supreme court rules that separate can be equal, and
only the separate is rigidly enforced, but the equal never is,
that lends respectability to racism. (Plessy v Fergusson)
When a supreme court rules that separate is inherently
unequal and to desegregate the public school with deliberate
speed in 1954 and 50 years later, public schools in the Black
communities are still of poor quality, that lends respectability
to racism. (Brown v Topeka, Board of Education)
When an entire city (Greenwood) in Tulsa, Oklahoma can
burned to the ground and most of its citizens are killed and
no one is brought to justice, no compensation/reparations
are paid to the survivors and the reason given by the court
is because the statute of limitations has run out, that lends
respectability to racism.
When commissions are set up to study the race problem and
many Black survivors of racial attacks by whites are located,
yet no real effort is made to locate the perpetrators, that lends
respectability to racism.
And when the executive branch of government, charged
with enforcing the laws of the land, seeks to accommodate
rather apprehend the perpetrators that lends respectability to
racism.
Those who claim that the Constitution should be adhered
to and interpreted in its original form are the ones who lend
respectability to racism.


Re iami tfmnt

(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 541h Street.
Miami. Florida 33127-1818
POST Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR.. Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales lax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes rial America can Dest lead the world from racial and national antagonism when iI accords to
every person regardless of race creed of color his or her human and legal rignis Haling no person, fearing no person. the
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief trial all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held back


-AP -'- The Media Audit =


I .-m b 4.a p ta o Ltr 4 lrw. t oe.* t,, ( oa


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h t. Available from Commercial News Providers
* i -. * . d *


Bs o ~e - o


This is America, we speak


Dear Editor,

On May 7 the Seniors of
Arcola Lake Park were invited
to the Mayor's Senior Show
Case in honor of Seniors
Month. This was a program
that did not go over well
with the Arcola Lake Park
Seniors because there was
no consideration given to the


many guests who were present
and did not speak Spanish
nor understand Spanish.
At the request of many
guests to please translate
the program in both English
and Spanish the mistress of
ceremony refused to do so.
The Mayor gave his speech in
both English and Spanish and
requested the M.C. to do the


English Mr. S
same, however, she refused to
do so, and said it in Spanish
that she would not do it in
English.
This program was geared more
towards the Spanish audience
not the American audience.
We as a group feel very much
disrespected as American
citizens. We did not appreciate
the treatment we received.


strong Mayor
To show how strongly we felt
about this incident those who
attended the program have
chosen to sign a petition and
feel that we deserve an apology
from the Mayor.
Keep in mind, we are all
registered voters.

Mary Simmons
Miami


Friendship parishioner wants questions answered


Dear Editor,


I am a member of Friendship
Baptist Church under the
leadership of Gaston Smith. A
few weeks ago you did an article
on the pastors's charges on grand
theft. Our church is in deep
trouble. To date we as the church
members don't know what is
really going on. No one ha' met
with us and explained anything
to us so rumors are flying. The
pastor is arrogant and feels we
don't need to know a thing.


There was a financial
conference held a few weeks ago
and we were told that the money
was fine there were checks and
balances dealing with the money
but we were not shown any
financial statements or given
anything in writing.
It was the just" trust us"
speech. At this point there
should be a complete auc 'g
of Friendship's finances by an
outside auditing company but
that will never happen if the
pastor has something to do


with it. The pastor is now in the
process of trying to change the
bylaws of the church and he
stated in the conference that
leaders for the church should
be appointed by him and not
elected.
He is trying to get complete
control of everything so there
will be no questions asked.
I embctrs of the tri
board have rumored that money
is being mismanaged-that is
why we need an outside audit
and it should be demanded by


all church members.
I have stopped paying tithes
and offers due to all of this.
Whether we want to believe it
or not, this church is becoming
more about money than God.
Many members were asking the
pastor questions about all of
this-he replied "don't ask him
any questions". Friendship it is
time to mal..: him be accountable
or vote him out.

Ruth Jackson
Miami


I I


I c
















OPINION


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


RT AC IS MITST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


The 'F' president

On CNN today, the their
commentator was discussing program
George Bush's concern for his has
legacy, and that he had hoped to power i:
score some major policy victories and it
by his recent trip to the Middle matter
East. develop
However, the trip was a Raul C
disaster, because his speech buy st
before the Israeli Knesset caused compul
a domestic firestorm, because teenage
he used it to attack Barack to our
Obama's opinion that we need to On
speak with our adversaries. Of Preside
course, after his speech, he met inflation:
with Arab leaders who can be debacle
described as lukewarm to very a risir
adversarial. Americ
He was somewhat country
condescending in his address directic
to them, which went over like a If Pre
lead balloon. He also was trying Public
to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian get an F
conflict, which did not work
out so well, because he pissed ON
off Hamas by criticizing Barack On a
Obama's concept that you need Obama
to speak with your adversaries, be havi
Finally, he visited his old buddies Diplom
the Saudis and was even. seen 22, an
holding hands with the Sheik. Orland
Alas, the visit did not result and ni
in an increase in oil production. to cinc
Gas prices in fact rose while he leading
was trying his hand at foreign delegate
diplomacy; I am seeing signs To her
for gas at $4.09. Meantime, the keeps s
people of Afghanistan are upset The I
because of slow pace of economic change
development despite the billions being
we have spent. The Iraqi people that wi
are upset because they still don't rate, e
have air conditioning in 120 non-co
degree heat, violence is still high, swallo\
and things generally seemed a lot for Sen
better under Saddam Hussein. A McCc
trillion dollar just doesn't go that his fan
far anymore for regime change and re
work. of the
.Iran is flourishing, and Iraq by
developing its nuclear program. that 5
North Korea is busily developing accept


nuclear \ h
m. Chavez
consolidated El
n Venezuela,
is only a
of time before he starts
ping his nuclear program.
Castro is letting Cubans
tereos, cell phones and
ters, so there is hope that
;rs in Cuban can catch up
young consumers.
n the domestic front,
nt Bush's legacy is
n, a real estate market
e, rising unemployment,
ig deficit and 86% of
ans who now believe the
y is moving in the wrong
in.
sident Bush was a Florida
School, he would have to
F.

V A BRIGHTER NOTE
a brighter note, Senator
a is visiting Florida. He will
ing a fundraiser at Westin
nat, Hollywood on May
ad another fundraiser in
o. He has 1,904 delegates
needs only 122 delegates
:h the nomination. He is
Hillary in both pledged
tes and superdelegates.
credit or discredit, she
soldiering on.
tone of the campaign has
:d, both candidates are
respectful. It is hoped
th an 86% dissatisfaction
yven white, blue collar,
liege educated voters will
w their prejudice and vote
ator Obarna
ain has retreated' 'froit
nous 100 year war speech
recently said that most
troops would be out of
y 2013. Does that mean
more years of war are
able?


epta A0t oR-


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QCe Miami uimte
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial
commentaries as elleU as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback
makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the cornmuriry.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed
and must include the name, addresE and telephone number of the w-nter for
purposes of confirming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Time.s, 900 N.W. 54th Street.
Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email- rmarrndeditoriak",
bellsouth.net.


Re-% frvvm.nbh %rw Ntinfrwrw r, J~ prw wgnJsv>


Recent world tragedies are making a lot of people uneasy
and wondering if some sort of message is hidden in between
the events. What's with the cyclone in Burma claiming
43,000 lives and the China earthquake more than 50,000.
Make you wonder what is next in store for us. Stay tuned.


That Hallandale Beach Church where the Reverend Daniel
Mundell was holding revivals and preaching that God will
free them of debt and make them millionaires is out of
business. The Good Shepherd Ministries closed the doors
on the evangelist for raising money to build a church in Fort
Lauderdale that he never built.


Ever since 1974 presidents have been talking about energy
independence. And what does this country have to show for
it? $4 a gallon gas and a frustrated citizenry. Starting" with
Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, G.W. Bush, Clinton and
Bush, all we got was a lot of gas the wrong kind.


Cries are beginning to ring out in the community as
the Miami-Dade School Board tries to cut $284 million
from it budget before next school year. We hear Booker T.
Washington and Miami Northwestern Community Schools
will be. closed.


BY REALD CLYNE


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A THE MIAMI TIMES MAY 8


Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimesonline.com

Spase Designz Inc., a local
promotions and marketing
company, presented "Smart
is the New Gangster" forum at
Miami Northwestern Senior
High, 1100 NW 71 Street on
Tuesday, May 6. The event was
free and open to the public.
The forum focused on such
topics as leadership, reality and
false images in the television
and music industry, business
development, nonviolence, peer
pressure, and reckless sexual
activity.
The purpose of the event was
to bring young entrepreneurs
from Liberty City And various
business profession s togcillei
that can relate and discuss the
pressures and issues that have
been affecting the young men
and women in our community,
What made the forum effective
was that many of the people
on the panel have their own
business or are self-employed
and were born and raised in the
Liberty City area.
"Now is the time to prepare
yourself for tomorrow," stated
John Gay the owner and
operator of Tax Doctorz, a full
scale tax and consultant office.
The panelists connected with
the young individuals by giving
them insight and reminding
them about the importance of
changing their mindset rather
than idolizing the clothes and the
music that serve no.relevarce in
obtaining the unwritten rules of
survival and success in Miami.
"We just wanted to touch pne
of the students," said Jerrnell
Jenkins, CEO of Spase Designz
Inc and also a graduate of Miami
Northwestern.
The event targeted
freshmen and sophomores


Ump from Draft Picks Sports


at Northwestern. Students
listened and took advice from
the panelist. A large number
of students stayed after the
dismissal bell rung which led
Jenkins and his colleagues
to believe that they had
accomplished their mission.
One of the key points addressed
to the students is that they
can create their own jobs and
control their economic fate.
"If we can just change the
thinking of our teenagers, that
the real gangsters or thugs
are the ones that wear the
business suits, make laws and
create jobs (business men),"
said Jenkins.
"We want to bring positive
male role models to the
forefront instead of the normal
negative images portrayed on


Television and in music," says
Javier Fernandez, President of
Spase Designz.
In recent months, the local
news have been engulfed with
the incessant violence and
crimes in the streets of Miami.
Although local leaders have held
town hall meetings and offered
different incentives for the youth,
violence continues to soar in the
neighborhoods. Whether they
are reported or unreported, the
daily and weekly obituaries are
evidently telling the stories that
no one seems to be able to tell.
This is only the beginning
of the empowerment sessions
for the young people as the
company looks to have them
twice a month in the upcoming
school year. "We are on a
mission, said Fernandez.


'Smart is the new gangster'


Raider Rook National Team 008

Winning streak continues for Edison Park


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

The winning streak does
not stop for Edison Park
Elementary
The Edison Park Raider
Rooks Chess Team left South
Florida on a practical mission.
Their mission was to win the


1 a


f *


Burt Lerner (K-6) National
Championship in Pittsburg,
Pennsylvania. We can gladly
say that the team returned
May 12, tied in first place,
proudly wearing the title as co-
champions.
"We persevered. We climbed
that mountain of defeat with
everything we had inside,


I,
h ~ lie


clinging to every rock, pulling
and pushing. It was our destiny
to be the best team in the
nation," said coach Webber
Charles.
Last Saturday, the Raider
Rooks completed the season
as Title I District Chess
Championships for the fourth
and fifth grade.


0 "


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Illness causes Pompano's vice mayor resignation


POMPANO BEACH Vice
Mayor E. Pat Larkins, who
has battled complications
from a malignant brain tumor
since last fall, resigned from
the Pompano Beach City
Commission Tuesday night
after 25 years of public service.
The commissioner, 66, who
was the city's first African-
American mayor, had recently
suffered a stroke.
Hewalked into the commission
chambers, relying on a walker,


and accompanied by his wife
of 39 years, Bettye Lamar-
Larkins, and announced his
resignation at the start of the
meeting.
"This is probably one of the
few times that I don't have a lot
to say," said Larkins, who broke
down in tears, prompting a long
standing ovation.
His term was to end in March
2009. 1
"I just want you all to know
that I am proud to have served


this city well, and I wish all of
those who follow me to do what
we can for Pompano," Larkins
said. "It's a great city and we've
seen it grow into something we
can be proud of."
Larkins' appearance at the
meeting was a surprise to
constituents and his fellow
commissioners, some of
whom had visited with him
in recent weeks. There were a
few moments of silence after
Larkins left the dais.


ul 'Iofa1 6. wla slw rs na am oI rd a


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Councilman Melvin L. Bratton
and the
City of Miami Gardens
cordially invite you to
The City of Miami Gardens' 4th Annual

MEMORIAL DAY BREAKFAST
"COMMEMORATING OUR HEROES"

MONDAY MAY 26, 2008
8:30 am 10:30 am
KEYNOTE SPEAKER
AIRFORCE CHIEF MASTER SERGEANT
MARJORIE L. MCNICHOLS
of the U,S. Southern Commond

Florida Memorial University
Albert E. & Sadie B. Smith
Conference Center
15800 NW 42nd Avenue Miami Gardens, Florida 33054
To RSVP, Please call (305) 622-8000 Ext. 2314
email: hmarshall@miamigardens-fl.gov


t4I


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Do you need help with:
Paying your utility bills?
Paying your rent/mortgagea?
Free or affordable childcare?
Job Training or Employment A"sletanten?
After-,$'chool programs?
Questions about Housing?
Visit your


ComnunMit Action Agency
NeIghborhlood Service Center
Open House
Wednesday, May 21, 2008
Perrine Community Enrichment Centerr
17801 Homeste ac Avenue. Miami Ft. 33157
Goulds Community Enricrhment Center
21300 SW 122nd Avenue., Miami FI.33170
Pine Island After School Program
Za7, S8W 128th Avenue., Miami Fl 33032

Thursday, May 22, 2008
Liberty City Comomunity Enrichment Center
,100" NW 7tvh Avenue, ftMiami FI 330-5
A^coon Communrity Enrichment Center
888 Weal Flagler Street. Mliami Fl. 33130
South teach Community Enrichment Center
833 Sixth Street. Miami BReaoh, F. -3139
AM4W-0 m Amteon Ag n^"
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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Miami-Dade School Board forced to


make decisions about budget cuts


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

As the state of Florida wrestles
with the nation's economic
problems, Miami-Dade County
Public Schools (M-DCPS),
unfortunately, are continuing
to undergo major budget cuts
affecting parents, students, and
faculty.
"We have seen this potential
impact coming for some time
and have addressed it at
several public meetings," said
Superintendent Rudy Crew.
"Now it has become a reality, and
it is a terrible development both
for our employees and for our
students, who are the recipients
of their services."

THE BUDGET
CUTS EFFECT US ALL
In the recent state budget,
Miami-Dade Schools were
considered as the losers after
receiving a budget cut of almost
$300 million.
In March, funds used to pay
part-time hourly workers at a
number of District locations,
including schools, were cut back
and some employees were told
not to report to work.
Hundreds of positions,
administrative bonuses, teacher
raises and some summer
school programs were under
consideration to be eliminated
as the Miami-Dade School
Board looked to cut $284
million from next year's budget.
"Unfortunately, the country does
not recognize teachers and the
power of teaching. Teachers
are not paid enough," said
Crew. "No one in Congress or
State Legislature have fought or
thought of a strategy of public
teaching."

DIAL-A-TEACHER HOMEWORK
HOT LINE IS SAVED
Dial-A-Teacher homework hot
line, is a free service that has
been offered by the Miami-Dade
County Public Schools with
support of the United Teachers of
IDade and.WLRN-TV for the last
two decades, was almost shut
down due to the budget cuts.
Dial-A-Teacher has provided
homework assistance to students


in grades K 12 in numerous
subject areas. Parents also have
been able to use the hotline in
helping their children with their
homework.
The homework hotline has
struggled within the last couple
of years forcing the show to go off
the air in 2000, but the teachers
stayed available by telephone to
answer the numerous calls by
students and parents: Students
all over Miami-Dade County


would call the hot line on weekday
evenings and connect with the
television, in efforts to receive the
additional help offered outside of
the classroom.
Dial-A-Teacher has been short
$12,000 to finish the rest of
the school year but at the time
the amount seemed to large.
Thankfully, at a School Board
meeting in April after a retired
teacher pleaded for the homework
hotline to remain open, School
Board member Evelyn Greer
offered a $12,000 contribution
from her law firm to support the
program for the rest of the school
year.


from the 2008-09 budget, with
more cuts likely to be announced
by the State of Florida after the
November election. Every school,
no matter how small, costs about
$1 million to open we pay for
a principal, assistant principal,
cafeteria workers, custodians,
security monitors, electric, air
conditioning, clerical staff, etc.
This does not include teachers
or aides. We have almost 30
schools in the district that have


fewer than 75% occupied some
have 45% occupancy, some with
only 250 children. In these tough
budget times when we are laying
off employees, I would rather
close these small, under enrolled
schools, transfer the children,
teachers and aides to nearby
schools, and fire fewer employees,"
said Evelyn Langlieb Greer, Miami-
Dade County Public School Board
Member of District 9.
At the end of the meeting,
the board decided to not to
'repurpose' any schools at the
time. "The actual physical vote
for the budget cuts will take place
on Wednesday, May 21," said Ana
L Shri h l Boaqrd member.


CLOSING SCHOOLS Loan, i'.. . ..
Though it was an issue
discussed earlier this year, the SOLUTIONS
proposal to close under enrolled Miami-Dade School Board
schools resurfaced last Tuesday. member Marta Perez has been
The School Board met to discuss offering cash prizes to school
the proposal at the morning district employees with the best
workshop. ideas in saving money. Perez
Crew recommended selecting has asked employees to send
the criteria for 'repurposing' their ideas through emails ,and
first and choose the school later, within the first hour, Perez
Repurposing is the district's way received more than 150 emails.
of postponing classes at various $100 will be awarded to the
schools and utilizing the buildings employees that submit the top
for other academic, professional five ideas.
and community functions. "The proposed budget cuts
The board was considering from Tallahassee will have
'repurposing' 11 schools which a negative effect on us. The
would save them $11 million, state has unfortunately put a
SUnder enrolled schools Xould ,, tremendous .burden on public
be the main candidates, especially .ediaggtion. The impact will
if the nearby schools could take in really be devastating from these
their students. incredibly, powerful deep cuts.
"The Miami-Dade County Public I happen to believe that. this is a
Schools have to cut $290 million recession," said Crew.


(I" um


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Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Sra~i. mu -I im


The homework hotline has struggled within the
last couple of years forcing the show to go off the
air in 2000, but the teachers stayed available by
telephone to answer the numerous calls by students


* *


9






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 20(


lb e b


What is your definition of the word 'ghetto'?


.,w


* *
Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


LAVEL, 25
Sound Engineering, Coral Gables
The word is
misused by
many people
because they
don't know
what the word
really means
and where the
word really
comes from. Personally, I feel
that it is an insult to be called
ghetto because nothing positive
comes from that.
VI, 25
Juvenile Therapist, North Miami
Ghetto, to
me, is being able
loud and y
ignorant. I
would say
that it's lnot a
positive Word.
Ghetto can be
interrupted as
you being able
to hold down the front and your
peace because you are a survivor
of various life's obstacles.


GEORGE HARRIS, 26
City of Miami Employee, Miami
'Poke and g
Beans' project
is my meaning
of ghetto. -I
grew up int
the ghetto
and it made
me stronger
but usually people who are
termed as being ghetto have no
manners and do not portray any
home training in public. I don't
think that it is a good thing to
call someone ghetto because it
is not a compliment.
ARNIE FOSTER, 25
City of Miami employee, Miami
I think that
the word
ghetto is a
termed used
in the African-
American
community
to remind
us where we come from and
environment that we grew up in.
It is a sense of comfort to many
of us. I don't think that it is a
negative word but I understand


how people would think that.
ARNETTE NEAL, 35
Disabled, Liberty City
Ghetto is
the mentality
in how people
think. It is
the heart of the
person. A lot
of ignorance
and lack of
understanding
comes from the word ghetto. I
feel that when you don't have the
knowledge of God then that is
what makes you ghetto. Fearing
is the beginning of wisdom.
JAY, 23
School Board Employee, Liberty City


positive word.
Growing up
in the hood, it
is a term that
many of us
used in order
to connect. It
is a part of our history and it is
just a word.


ow -gum


If you live in Dilftrit I


this


is important to you.


(District 1 boundaries roughly County Line Road to the north, 1-95 to
the east, NW 135th Street to the south and NW 57th Ave to the west)


Commissioner Barbara J. Jordan

Invites you to a community meeting


On Thursday, May 29
Miami Norland Senior High School
1050 N.W. 1 95th Street
7 p.m. to 9 p.m.


Metrorail North Corridor Economic development
Health and safety Voting


It all affects you.

See you there!


For more information about the meeting, call 305-474-3011.


You knoW you're



,election ready




when you:


C0


are registered to vote


o know where to vote


linni iwhren to vote


o know all about the new paper ballots

* all othe above


WEMmN


so as w~mw


m I


whs


08


- -- - --mwy


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BLACKS MUST CONTROl THEIR OWN DES FINY 7A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 2008


FAMU Law School honors Gwen Cherry
A celebration of historical Cherry, who earned a J. D. the numerous individuals
significance has been slated Degree from FAMU College of in the greater Miami-Dade
for early June at FAMU college Law in 1965, was a professor Community who financially
of law in Orlando. Sigma of Law at the Tallahassee supported the initiative which
Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., in Campus. In 1979, during began in November 2000.
partnership with FAMU low her fourth term as a State The Florida A&M University
school will honor the legacy of Legislator, Cherry died in a; :. College of Law's permanent
Miamian Gwendolyn Sawyer care accident in Tallahassee. campus opened in Spring
Cherry with the dedication The tribute honors the- 2006 in Orlando's historic
of a Recture Hall at the memory of Cherry, a former /A Parramore community. These
newly constructed downtown educator, author, attorneyand images highlight some of
Orlando Facility. the first Black female, since the facility's more striking
The Gwendolyn Sawyer reconstruction, elected to the i features(abovethenclockwise)
Cherry, Lecture Hall will be state legislature in 1970. It the exterior view of the front
a trail advocacy courtroom will include the presentation entrance and southern wing
located on the second floor of of The Gwendolyn Sawyer of the building; signage which
the building which opened in Cherry Endowed Scholarship faces Interstate 4; and an
the spring of 2006. Fund. The first scholarship interior view of the multistory
According to A&M Magazine, recipient will be announced atrium.
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, prior to the academic year. GWENDOLYN Blue Cross and Blue
is the first Black Greek letter On behalf of Sigma Gamma SAWYER CHERRY Shield of Florida and Macy's
organization to purchase Rho, Katie L Williams and Florida are platinum and gold
the rights for the college of Ruby T. Rayford, chair and sorority's Tribute to Cherry, sponsor respectively of this
Law's room naming initiative, co-chair respectively, of the express sincere gratitude to historic event.


a* *a -I
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University of Miami
Cosmetic Group


Heather Woolery-Lloyd, M.D.
internationally recognized dermatologist

Cosmetic concerns in Skin of Color:
Botox, Restylane and Juvederm
Laser Hair Removal
Uneven skin tone
Titan Laser for skin tightening

Schedule an appointment to see her in Miami Beach
305-532-5552
4701 N. Meridian Avenue, Suite,7450 Miami Beach, FL 33140
www. derm.net

JHealth MILLER
WfAl~0WS*Si^ sciowMff'imXHeu


ONCE YOU STEP UP TO


LUXURY LIKE THIS,


YOU CAN RELAX.


BUICK' LUCERNE. A MORE INTELLIGENT LUXURY SEDAN.
,s.',iiu' iL ]'' ;w ti' -. inr t al',i ;I m i ll 1s ,1 hI ii, I r or tr iilhiill.nl I lit; :fl nic ',
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'r ,i l; -l m l i r .. i i i i p I ht i I lih \ 1 l.% 1 S dI ).1 1 1 in l l : 1 1 i '.l.k 1 ,I n h "l, i i q ;it
\'t'ln t'. hat th. ll ,i ^ jd, ,.l,; n,_1,1 l to tt.111, tlh e [0lh,_ -l y .ll 11 Vj&,.I.h a l g.'.1: L .1,, .1, e ..i '., 01111r
N or aw',! o- f ,",,[thei ru, il, tl'ts L .m lie ,5t:1"n "t "- 7, -'.i'i s ?l,,:,i. $s' .n."..- 1."'


AMAW

OPENINGS FOR THE BOARD OF
TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC
HEALTH TRUST
Applications are now being accepted for the Board of
Trustees of the Public Health Trust of Miami-Dade County,
the governing authority for Jackson Health System. Trustees'
serve without compensation for staggered terms of three
years. There are five vacancies for the 2008 appointment
process. The PHT Nominating Council will contact selected
applicants for interviews. Those applicants selected for inter-
view will be subject to a background check. The Miami-Dade
Board of County Commissioners, upon recommendation of
the Nominating Council, will make appointments to the
Board of Trustees.

Application forms may be obtained from the County
Executive Office, 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 2910, or online at
www.miamidade.gov. All applications must be received by
Kay Sullivan, Clerk of the Board, at 111 NW 1st Street, Suite
17-202, Miami Florida, 33128 no later than June 4, 2008 by
4:00pm. Emails or facsimiles of the application will be
accepted and can be sent to clerkbcc(o)miamidade.gov or
faxed to 305-375-2484. It is the responsibility of the applicant
to ensure electronic receipt of the application by calling the
Clerk of the Board at 305-375-1652. For additional informa-
tion regarding the application process, please call 305-375-
5311.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


-- --- -1--l-11 I-


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 2008







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 2008


( hno wN 1i ha hll. hl.. ioN qwiuakLr kleitim


Murray still working in fight
One of the most active
participate in the recent Relay
for Life event sponsored by
the American Cancer Society
was longtime health advocate
Willis Murray.
The retired veteran, public
school teacher was founder
of the American Cancer
Society's Northwest Dade
Relay for Life held March
28 at Miami Dade College's
North Campus and raised ..
more than $33,000 for the .
American Cancer Society.
Murray, 83, is a lifetime ':.:::.
Miamian now living in
Miramar. He is a veteran
board member of the /.-,f .h/:
American Cancer Society and WILLIS MURRAY
has represented the local Health Advocate


against cancer
chapter and many national
seminars and events.
No stranger to cancer
himself, underwent surgery
for prostrate cancer in
1992 and is now receiving
treatment for multimyelona
cancer.
Murray started the Relay
for Life event in 2002 and is
happy to see the program help
so many people deal with this
dreaded disease. The money
raised at this year's relay will
go to the American Cancer
Society for cancer research
and education. Relay funds
also help pay for initiatives
such as a patient navigation
program at Jackson Memorial
Hospital, 1611 NW 12 Ave.


BTW
continued from 1A
and ambition toward their
future goals.
Several of the class
members played a major
role as board members
of Booker T. Washington
Advisory Board for the purpose
of ensuring that the transition
of BTW from a middle school to a
high school would become a
reality.
For these 50 year graduates,
the legacy of Booker T.
Washington High School was
once again restored as: Not the
Largest, But the Best.


CECELIA SHEFFIELD DUNN
Street named for Cecelia Sheffield Dunn
On May 20 at Miami-Dade County Commission Meeting a
resolution was passed to name 24 Avenue and 46 to 50 street
in honor of her memory. She was truly 'a virtuous woman'.
Special thanks to Commissioner Audrey Edmonson and the
entire Commission for passing this resolution.
The Dunn Family


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.:-:-CARRIE MEEK



FV:.'." ,,- . '.
, .,. j- ,'- .


Carrie RP.MeeK.


Foundation-


APPLY TODAY FOR A CARRIE MEEK SCHOLARSHIP



At the Carrie Meek Foundation, we believe that every child deserves the best
education possible.

That's why we are partnering with Step Up For Students and the Black Alliance for
Educational Options. Scholarships worth up to $3,750 are now available for low-
income families with children in Kindergarten through 12th grade. There are over
140 schools in Miami-Dade and over 70 in Broward to choose from that accept
our scholarship-so don't delay, call to see if your child is eligible for a Carrie Meek
Foundation Scholarship.



BNothing is more important than the education of our
children; let's give them every opportunity to succeed.


SFor more information, please call 1-866-590-5368 Or visit our
;a. ,o website at www.CarrieMeekFoundation.org


THE CARRIE MEEK FOUNDATION


SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM


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Available from Commercial News Providers


THE HELEN B. BENTLEY

FAMILY HEALTH CENTER I
will hold its 2008 Annual Meeting on Wednesday, May 28 from 6 '
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Center in the Community Activities Confer-
ence Room. HBBFHC is located at 3090 S.W. 37th Avenue (corner
of Peacock Avenue and South Douglas Road directly in front of the
Metrorail Douglas Road Station parking lot).

The Keynote Speaker for this year's Annual Meeting is The Honorable Ileana Ros
Lehtinen, United States Congresswoman, 18th District of Florida.

The theme for this year is
FUTURE FORWARD: Exceeding Expectations.
Caleb A. Davis, President/CEO
Contact Beverly Hepburn-Thompson at

305-351-1315
for additional information







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\x'N DESTINY 9A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 2008


' L, ,


Mrs, I ~ '

---- - -
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4-


That's why CareDirect offers nutrition
and wellness education at no additional cost.

CareDirect is a new Medicare Advantage Special Needs plan designed especially for adults


living with diabetes.


CareDirect offers the health benefits you need to stay healthy plus


additional benefits to help you reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications -
like learning about the importance of nutrition and weight control.


* $0 co-pay for primary care office visits
* $0 co-pay for podiatry and specialist office visits
* $0 co-pay for diabetes monitoring supplies -
including lancets, test strips and glucose
monitors from a network mail
order pharmacy
* Many commonly used Diabetes medications
will be covered at no additional cost to you.
If you reach the Coverage Gap, you will
continue to pay the same Tier 2 $0 co-pays


on medications such as Byetta, Actos
and Avandia.
* Annual routine eye exams
* Meals delivery discount and weight
control programs*
* $25 over-the-counter health and wellness
product benefit every month

* SilverSneakersO Fitness Program
* QuitNet smoking cessation program


arePlus
HEALTH PLANS, INC.
www.careplus-hp.com


Call for more information:

1-800-794-4105 TTY: 1-877-245-7930


o,' --
7. ''- -- -. -.
V : .
st .,. : :-'.. ....I t.- --' -,..- -- L ..,,:-,;I---,-, ,. ., .,I: ,! : d ,. .'... . ,_.',


H1019-CP-P73-0308 Rev A


Miami-Dade County: Some limitations, restrictions, co-insurance and co-payments may apply. CarePlus Health Plans, Inc. is an MA organization with a Medicare contract. You must be entitled to Medicare Part A and enrolled in Part B. You must
continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium, if not otherwise paid for you under Medicaid or by another third-party. This plan is a Medicare approved Chronic Disease Special Needs Plan and physician diagnosis of the disease must be verified.
*The products and services described above are neither offered nor guaranteed under our contact with the Medicare program. In addition, they are not subject to the Medicare appeals processes. Any disputes regarding these products and
services may be subject to the CarePlus grievance process.


i-S
I-


0,,.
44


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26,2008


'i







10A THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-26, 2008


F 1C oy


Set


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I


Co nrihted Material


%A w|iy I NUN ***^WA 1"I
the ..
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abevailable rom commercial News Providers
Available from Commercial News Providers


A .',T


vw
^^*t^WOW


Florida Corn............................. 2
White, Yellow, or Bi-Color Varieties,
A Good Source of Vitamin C, each
SAVE UP TO 2.00 ON 8


ID ,- III


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A p p le P ie ................................................ ... ..... .9 .
All American Pie, Choice of Flaky Double Crust or Dutch Apple
With Streusel Topping, From the Publix Bakery, 28 or 34-oz size
SAVE UP TO 1.80


Boar's Head 1'
Ultimate Party Sub ........18
Or Chicken, Ham, Italian, Roast Beef, or Turkey,
Your Choice of Cheese and Toppings,
Serves 10 to 12, each
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE
(Publix, each ... 16.99)


Icre Cerream............. Free
Assorted Varieties, 48 or 56-oz ctn.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 5.93


Nabisco
Chips Ahoy! Free
Cookies ....... ...Free
Assorted Varieties, 14 to 15.25-oz pkg.
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.89


Classic



Lay's /ffi ,T":
Potato Chips..... I C
Assorted Varieties, Made With 100% Pure
Sunflower Oil, 11.5 to 13.25-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.79


ach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. ',t m ,
QgQ'-^-'CT. W1ri -_ES


0 -,


Prices effective Thursday, May 22 through Wednesday, May 28, 2008. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Bea
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market; Quantity rights reserved.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


lack of training confronts family caregivers

*


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Available from Commercial News Providers








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I PAMeI


93"YStreet Community Antioch Missionary Baptis /postolic Revival Center
Missionary Baptist Chtirch Church of Brownsville 6702NV 15thAvei 2 l
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 2799 N.W. 46th Street 305-836-.1224
305-836-0942 305-634-6721* Fax: 305-635-8355 Order or Services
Order of Services, New time Ifr TV Pi'bgram
VCDTUL rMI D ii rls tUK IULA


Order of Services
731 a in Iaoiy Moanng Wcishtp
11 a.m. ..Morning Wolrslip


ieu lay Bible S ty..7 .. t p




Ebenezer United '\
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Moming Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Sludy Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
SPrayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.





S Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528











Baptist Church
240X) N.W 68* Sired, Miami. FL33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
(2.3, Sunday Worship)...7-18:10 ani
Sunday School.......9:3045 a.m
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P Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N6 W. 3"1e Avmnue
Church 36-573-3714
Fax 305-S73-4060,Fax 305-255-854!
Order of Services:









S'u lday School ..........9:45 a. .
Morning hSetvic .eA1:0 ,
(ThursWbef. ieV Sundliy)r7:30 pm






Baptist Church
17-3 N.W 3 Avenu/





4" iun WI T, 1 30 2:30 p, i


We& Bible "uag ;11ayer 6: 1,11


Cr iMrkh/Sutlaiy School ..... 8:30 iam
S Sunday Wor;tup Serce .... 10 am
SMid Week Setview .. Wc dnIvIay's
How of Power-Noon Day Prayer

Sveninig Worship... 7 p.m.

fir1mpm 111131


/ First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305.635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026


Order of Services:
sundaym................7:& I a.m.
Sunday School .... .... i.10 am.
Thnrday .........7 p.m. ible Study,
Prayer Meeting, B.T. L
Blapl smin-Thfrs. before
First Sun..7 p.m.
(0 0i031n ion Fit "ll, .......
'73'0 & I I a.111.


FOR I-K)PE FOR TODAY

Mwilihlg- t l iC ...... ... ........ I1 a
Sunii. -c\ WOln l ........ 730 p il
,, T a o i Tha i 15C13 :. .30p lim
1ri. ti lek Skdy}....la .. 1p.30 m.




Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church

Miami, FH.
305-759-8875
a. iim I lour of Prayer.........:30a.m
'i Early Moming Wotship....7:30 a.m.
.. Sunday School m..... a. ..
1 ,, ,* ,, I I 1
., / ,,' . ..... 1 1. .it ., j ? p.m.
P" rayerl'ible'Study... & ...p.m.
, ;'N.ji,'^- Nooni, Altar Pr)Mytr (M.-)')





New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681.3500

o. i e r ., h*i I". ". .


Pembroke Park Church of Christ "
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday | .
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Woirs ip ............. 10 a.m. !
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m. i '
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m. : ,
TV Program Tuesdlay, 8:30 .m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19,21.22, 23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
1We 3 pa i l w ivwpecrni'iniparkhtti|iorfchint.cor1ii> Pmitali ItTith trk.' 1'kciikcall thn t


W Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 871" Street
305-836-9081

Order of Services:

S, ,,, a S to .. 10 a .m n
S C h 'Ie x I I aII
I,. I ,y Dille Siudy.... 8 p51
11. .. PntyCirServite. .... p.81


F Word of Truth -
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

All t Order o" Services:
"" M"'" Bible Sltudv Wed.... ..8........8 .m.
Sunday School................ 10 a.nu.
.. Siu. WorWhip Sua ........11.30 a.m.
1-9 Wed. Night Inlvelcewl y Player
swi low 7..10 to 8 I p in, l.
Sunday Womllip Svic,, ., 30 p.m.


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
3(15-(6SS- 11 2
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order ot'Servicesti
Su ..9.30 a.m....(Sldayv School)
Walk in the \Vord MlustIly
Woshlp Service ............11 a.nm .
Tuesday ..7 p.i Family Night
Scd..1 1 a...Intrecsso' T rav r
Wed Rible (lass ..)12 p t
\ d. \ i B3ible Class ..............7 p.m.


/aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
"i t unday School...............- 9:30 a..
M omng W ship.. ...... a.m.
V 1 lies,1 I'myer p............ 6p.ml
I Schwl oi Wisdoan1 ...... 630pl p
ealing & DeAlianw Ser...:30p.im.
L' edf3le w t. M o S l. a ayer)>.- ..
ttpftmip__ J hndayYtghNighl.......... .... "p,


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-34-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
ri'der of Services
S .r 9:45a



i .I i. i. i I
[ liS JF I Irni -lil' ", iii3,* le 0 i :all,
.1113,__ tt-034-485e .l0a-b9i1693


Jordan Grove Missionary Libert) City Church
Baptist Church of Christ
5946 N.W. 12' Ave. 1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-751-9323 305-836-4555
Order of Services: Order of Services:
,,I N-" L o .. L- i.nl g l ...........7 a.m .
N Ir F .Old ..I .........6.10 a.m.
I -;.-.und. iu. ...........6 p.m.
I 'A .JI '*., I Icn. 7:30 p.m.
I-,, i .h I.' i a lh rI n ..4. ........7:30 p.mT
S .hur_, hip..... 0. a.m.


/New Shiloh M.B. Churches
1350 N.W.95'0 Street
305-835-828- Fax# 3i15. 06-622.1
Church Schedule:
E 1arly Moming Worship 7:30 a.m.
S a. Chluvh Sdiool 9:30 a.m.
"10 Moing Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
STu, btelor the 1s Si.,...7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 31 Avenue
305-372-3877. 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
___Eai'ly Sunday
1.. u. .> Worship .....7:30 a.m.
.ir.I. School .......... 9:30 a.m .
.t.. g \\Wr'ilip ...11 a.m.
f r..., /w' Baptist Churches
,i B.T.U.) 5 p.m
[ ....... W olship ........7 p.m .
.-.(Tues.) 7 p~m.




/" Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
j- Sunday School ... ......9:30ani,
r^I k Morning Phaise/Woinhip 11 a.m.
i Vf irstand'FhinuSxiun"y
ev ciinl 9oa ship at 6 p.I t
Priaycr alciin & Biblu midy
I Tuesday 7 pi n

\GNP


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

(Order of Services;
utdy!:a,- ty un ch S ool 10.. a
W iship Sewice.............. l:15 a.l.
Sn' 0jday B ,E C las .........' m
S 4t h unday Evening Worship.......6 pm.



r Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
.www-niienouwIorshit'3apc23r.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


Order of Services:
Sunday Woolhip Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m,
Church School: 8 30l a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bile Instiuite. 6:30 p.rm.
Mid.weok Worslip 7:30 p in.


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383


. .-
- --* I


Order of Services
Sunday
Morning Wolship at 8 & 11 au.m.
.1-(qd3y School at 9:45 a.3i.
'-Thursday
Dible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
\'o Servtce


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith Interniational


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sundilay Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m,.
Sunday School 9:30 a.inm.
Tuesday (Bible Study)l 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible, Study
10:15 3a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist\
1790) NW.. 55th Street
305-696-7322

- ,' i Order of Service.s:
w F.vy Mornliing Woi'ip.7:3(30a.n.
Simday School.........9:30a.m.
Morning Wols~hip .....11 a.m.
\WEDn )NFSI)AY
Prayer Meeting .................7:30 p.m.
] Bible Su1 dy ................. p.m.



/ Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Streel
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sum(kly Sckho)l .... ...9:45:ini.
^ X\\ ishp, .......11tun.
Rible Siw,'Ilinsay. ,30p1m
Y outxil MinisruyMon iWxl
It (tm.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


St. Mark Missionary \
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order or Servieos:
sundA,6 "0 aI4 1 na.m.
Won l hip Sernice I
30 a.1 ..... n l School
T lutday 7 {) !p33 Bible 331b(1.'m
Io2 m I ,,V dicl ay. Fr iday




New Vision For Christ 'l
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10' \,velie
305-899-7224
Order lof Services:


P i , 31 Sch '.' 3. ..... 3
,.', i lyrI Mel tiirll i)S re m
.1 '. 33y 13lc aul3y a 0 | tl


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Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sunday
-ChIumri.l S1iax1 a........ .la
-b e Wors y 7rvi ....... a.i.

HljWednesday
Prayr Meenw p.m.
Thm ere i f placejor ou"


r Rev-, eit4 fuier.p~sorIvce


LU BiS1101) ViClOl'T. CIVITY, DAUM, D.D, P.04WITeacher








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


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BLCK M'TCOTRl THI -ONDETN
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:Copyrighted Material


'Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


The Entrepreneurial Institute
at Florida Memorial University
is offering three free, noncredit
business seminars: Starting
a .Business and Preparing a
Business Plan on May 22, a
Small Business on June 5, and
Marketing a Small Business
on June 12. To register, please
contact Dr. Philip II Mann at
305-626-3155.

5000 Role Models of
Excellence Project invites you
to their Scholarship Ceremony
at New Birth Baptist Church on
Thursday, May 22 at 5:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. For more information,
please contact 305-995-2451.
Miami Edison Senior High
School will be holding a Miami
Edison Ole Timer's Pep Rally
on May 30 at 6:30 p.m. in the
school's gymnasium. For more
information, please contact
305-754-0194 or bingraham@
prodigy.net

Benefit Concert featuring
CeCe Winans & Jonathan
Butler on May 25 at 7:30 pm at
the Broward Center. For more
information, please visit www.
gospelindustryretreat.com.

The Community Book and
Dance Academy presents
Unsung Hero: The Eric Jenkins
Story on May 24 at 7:30 p.m. at
the Florida Memorial University,
Lou Rawls Peforming Theater.
For more information, please call
305-625-7200.

Adrienne Arsht Center will
host their fifth Annual Creative
Visions Student Exhibition


Triumphing Jesus Christ
Faith Holiness Church invites
you to come and fellowship with
them at the annual "Family &
Friends / Old Fashion Day" on
Sunday, May 25 at 3 p.m. For
,more information, please call
305-573-7650.

First Deliverance Church of
God In Christ will celebrate and
honor the life of Daisy Daniels
on Friday, June 6 at 7 p.m.
For more information, please
contact Carol S. Ridgeway at
305-903-1477 or Valarie Ellis
at 305-621-8857.

You are invited to attend
Praise on the Beach BBQ on
Monday, May 26 at the Westin
Diplomat Resort & Spa from
11:30 am -2:00 pm. For more
information, please visit www.
gospelindustryretreat.com

You are invited to the
Southern Florida Judicial
Galatians District Nightly
Meeting at 7:30 p.m. on May
19 -23 at God Word God Way
COGIC with Eason Temple
COGIC for information call
783-326-3455.

On Saturday, May 24 at 7
p.m., the Brotherhood Men's


and Inaugural Creative Golden
Visions Exhibition. The event
will be held at the Adrienne Arsht
Center for the Performing Arts.
For more information on the both
the Creative Visions Student
and Creative Golden Visions
exhibitions, please contact the
district office of Commissioner
Martinez at 305-552-1155.

You are invited to a Prayer
Breakfast and Fundraiser in
honor of Helen B. Williams,
candidate for mayor of Miami-
Dade County, on May 24 at 9:30
a.m. at the Imperial Banquet
Hall. For more information,
please contact Aurienta Ware at
305-621-0966 or Gerri Braxton
305-244-6522.
The GIRL POWER Program is
now accepting registration for its
"Fun in the Sun" Summer Camp.
The camp is free and open to all
Miami-Dade County girls' ages
11 to 17 'years. Camp starts
June 16-August 8 from 9 a.m'.
-3:30 p.m. For more information,
please call 305-756-5502.

In Harmony presents
"Imagine.. .OurWorldinHarmony"
on Saturday, May 31 at 8 p.m.
and Sunday, June 1 at 3 p.m.
The event will take place at the
Broward Main Library Theater.
For more information, please call
954-717-9494 or email: tickets@
inharmonyproductions.org

The Miami Science Museum
presents the Spam Allstars
in ifs fifth installment of the
Professional Happy Hour
Mixer, @MiaSci on Thursday,
May 29 from 6 10 p.m. For


Missionary Fellowship of the
St. John I.M. Baptist Church
will honor the 2007 Florida
State 4A Champion Booker T.
Washington Tornadoes.

Glory 'Temple COGIC
invites you to our Pastor's
six year Pastoral Celebration
on May 25 at 3:30 p.m. For
more information, please call
754-244-8677.

St. James A.M.E. Church
invites the community to join
us at our annual Pentecostal
Revival on May 28-30 at 7
p.m. For further information,
please call the church at
305-691-4212.

Glory Temple COGIC
invites you to their revival
on June 4-6 at 7:30 p.m. For
more information, please call
754-244-8677.

New Providence will be
sponsoring their second annual
Bee-Day Tournament on
Saturday, May 31 from 10 a.m.
to 7 p.m. at Charles R. Drew
Middle School.

Mission with a New
Beginning Church Women's
Department invites the


more information, please call
305.646.4209 and visit www.
myspace.com/atmiasci

The World Literacy Crusade
of Florida Girl Power Program
presents Shakin the Mess Outta
Misery, a benefit performance
stage play. The play will take
place on Saturday, June 7 at
the Byron Carlyle Theatre. The
performance will begin at 7:30
p.m. For more information,
please visit www.ticketmaster.
com or call 305-358-5885.
First-Friday Skate will be held
on Friday, June 6 at 6:45 p.m. For
an 11-mile loop that begins and
ends on Lincoln Road Mall, traffic
stops, pedestrians gawk and
bikers a-hd skaters own the road.
For more information, please call
Candice at 954-599-0333.

BarryUniversity, Department
of Theology and Philosophy
presents Voices, Muchas Voces,
One song, Una Cancion, Music
Ministry in a Multicultural
' Church on Friday, June 13 from
2:30 7 p.m. and Saturday
June 14 from 8:30 4 p.m. For
more information, please call
Sr. Mary Frances Fleischaker
at 305-458-9919 or email
mfleischaker@mail.barry.edu

Rising Sons and Star Sisters
invites you to come and join
them as they celebrate the
Second Memorial Day tribute
honoring the fallen soldiers
in the Iraq war. Bring your
picnic baskets, chairs, games,
and drums to commemorate
the soldiers at Legion Park on
Monday May, 26 from 1 p.m.- 5
p.m. For information, please call


community to their Women's
Convention on June 5 -7. There
will be a 10 a.m. forum with a
morning brunch on June 7.

Tabernacle Baptist Church
will have their Gospel Program
on Saturday, May 24 at 7:30
p.m. For more information,
please contact Brother Andrew
Young at 754-214-4995.

Faith Evangelistic Praise
and Worship International
Ministries cordially invites you
and your congregation to their
third Annual Men's Conference.
The event will be held on May
28-30 at 7:30 p.m. If you have
any questions, please call Elder
John Byrd at 954-893-5711,
305-691-3865, or email him at
marvinibyrd(@hotmail.com.

Spirit of the Lord Ministries
invites the public to their
Pastor's Appreciation on May
20-30 nightly at 7:30 p.m. For
more information, please call
786-355-1605.

Total Change and
Empowerment Ministries,
Inc. will be celebrating "Family
and Friends Night" on Friday,
May 30 at 7:30 p.m.

Mount Olive Primitive
Baptist Church invites you to
their Annual Spring Revival
from June 2-6 at 7 p.m. For
more information, please
contact 305-836-8554.


305-693-9379.

Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr. Bar
Association will be holding a
general membership meeting on
May 29th at the Squire Sanders &
Dempsey, LLP. For information,
please contact Jennifer Ellis
at (305) 536-2732 or JEllis@
hunton.com

The International
Communion of the Charismatic
Episcopal Church (ICCEC) will
convene in Orlando, Florida
to host the 2008 International
Convocation this summer.
The event will take place at
the Wyndham Orlando Resort
beginning Wednesday, July 30
and ending Friday, August 1,
2008. For more information,
please contact Bernadette Morris
at 305-948-8063.


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e











The Miami Times





Faith i


SEPTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 21-27, 2008


Abstinence,



not a reality


The clothes, makeup and hair that we permit our


middle and high school
provocative...
By Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer

While we may want our
adolescents to remain
abstinent until marriage, it is
not always realistic. Parents
need to know what is going
on in the teen culture: are
we aware of the lyrics in the
music; are we aware of the
content of their cell phone


daughters to wear is often


text messages? Our children
are sending nude pictures of
themselves via text messages.
Access to phone sex hotlines
increase the opportunity
for older men to create
inappropriate and illegal
alliances with adolescent girls.
Social networking websites like
Myspace has wreaked havoc
not only in the life of teens but
Please turn to REALITY 16B


How to protect our teens from risky sexual behavior is a growing problem. Our children physically mature earlier, the media
glamorizes sexual freedom and our teens are impressionable. -Miami Times Illustration/S. Canes


Graduates


MAKE YOUR LIFE COUNT FOR' SOMETHING


-Graduation: An appropriate time to toast parents

Graduation: An appropriate time to toast parents'


By Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer


Graduations are more for parents
and grandparents than it is for the
graduating student. As we select cards
this month for high school and college
graduates, pick out a thoughtful card
for the parent, grandparent, or any
other guardian or caretaker that was
instrumental in the student's life.
If you're invited to a graduation at
the James L. Knight Center, Miami
Beach Convention Center, or -the


BankUnited Center; take a close look
at any family that's there supporting
someone very special to them. In the
eyes of those family members you
will often find tears of joy and tears
of relief.
As they watch for their loved one
to march down the aisle, some are
walking down memory lane as they re-
live their child's first steps, first words
or first day in kindergarten. Where
has the time gone? Tucked between
memories of T-ball, choir rehearsal,
summer camp and ballet recitals


there were a few incidents they would
rather not recall such as when little
Johnny, playing with matches, set
his godmother's bedroom drapes on
fire. Of course the family could have
gotten along just fine without those
mishaps but as they say it made us
stronger and we have more character
as a result of it.
Looking into the faces of these
parents it is easy to find where the
time has gone. Each night their 15
year old stayed out past curfew a fine
Please turn to GRADUATION 14A


In the spirit of true professionals, nurses put their personal issues and
challenges behind them when they walk into the healthcare facility.


Nurses always make


a human connection


By Sylvia Mitchell-Sanders
Miami Times Writer

The week of May 6-12 is set
aside to recognize and honor the
profession of nursing. Regardless
of how you slice it, nurses, unlike
most other professionals, must
have the ability to combine the
technical and human aspects of
their jobs in order to be effective.
Many professions can be learned
solely from a textbook and result
in a rewarding career; but in the
case of nurses there has to be
a passion and a calling to truly
want to help others in order to
connect with the patient and help
foster a healing environment.
In so many other professions,
the human touch has been lost
by the wayside. The banking


-and education industries once
offered very personalized services.
Customer service was once the
defining element that separated
excellence from mediocrity. With
the advent of online or distance
learning, a student can matriculate
with an accredited degree and
hardly spend anytime on campus
or in a brick and mortar classroom.
Banking can be taken care of at
ATM machines, through the mail,
online, or at Kiosks in a shopping
mall without the assistance of a
teller. Similarly, in the grocery
store patrons can checkout without
a cashier. Whenever we have the
good fortune to encounter a real
live breathing person behind the
counter or on the phone we need to
count our blessings and applaud
Please turn to NURSES 13B


New Baptist Association comes to South Florida


On March 17th of this year,
a new Baptist Association
was organized with several
churches in Miami extending
to Pompano Beach, Florida.
The South Florida Baptist
District Association was
established for the purpose
that The Unity of God may
come forth in order to fulfill
the work of Jesus Christ by
helping churches accomplish
their Biblical mission and


providing channels for coop-
erative ministry in South
Florida.
This Friday, May 23rd,
startingat 7 p.m., the Inaugural
and Installation service will be
held at the Westview Baptist
Church, located at 13301 N.W.
24th Avenue. Reception in the
Fellowship
Hall will begin at 6 p.m. The
public is invited to attend this
memorable event. Dr. Henry


Rev. Johnson 15th Pastoral Anniversary
The 93rd Street Community M.B Church family invites you
to celebrate our pastor's 15th anniversary on Sunday, May 25
at 7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Our theme is "Leadership Worth Following." Our 7:30 a.m.
guest Massager will be Bishop J.E. Jenkins and the Saint City
Church family; 11 a.m. guest massager will be Pastor Zackery
Royal and St. Mary Baptist Church.
The city is invited to come and help us celebrate, God's Man
in God's Time. Happy Anniversary to Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson.
All services will be held at the 93rd Street Community M.B
Church, 2330 NW 93rd Street.


J. Lyons, State President of
the General Baptist State
Convention of Florida, Inc.,
will be our guest preacher.
Dr. Barry R. Young, Ph.D.,
is the First Vice- President
of the General Baptist State
Convention of Florida Inc. and
the Moderator-elect Dr. Esther
Pinkney is the President-elect
of the Women District.
For more information please
call 954-967-0237.


REV. DR. CARL JOHNSON


Mount Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church, where Rev.
Dr. Billy W.L. Strange, Jr.
is Pastor, will host a four
night Pentecostal Revival
Celebration, May 25 28
7 p.m. nightly. The guest
preacher of the hour will
be the anointed preacher,
teacher, author and recording
artist Rev. Timothy Fleming
Sr., Senior Pastor of Mt.
Carmel Missionary Baptist
Church, Atlanta, GA.
Rev. Fleming, a beloved
man of God has been the
shepherd of the flock of the
Mt. Carmel congregation for
29 years. During that time, he
has been blessed to achieve
many great feats, not only as
pastor of an 11,000 member
congregation, but also in the
capacity as an author, having
written the book 'Coping With


REV. DR. BILLY STRANGE JR.
the Uncopable.' He has also
made his mark on the gospel
music industry as founder
and owner of God's Strength
Records, and has received
recognition as a recipient of
the James Cleveland Gospel
Workshop of America Award,


REV. TIMOTHY FLEMING SR.
not to mention having been
awarded the MLK, Jr. Award
for helping the homeless.
For additional information,
please contact the Mt.
Calvary Missionary Baptist
Church Administrative
Office at 305-759-8226.


Rev. Timothy Fleming Sr. at

Mt. Calvary's pentecostal revival







14B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008 B


Room with a p: Wade gi mon her mn church


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Available from-Commercial News P.rovi'ders--a---


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Appreciate your parents who got you to where you are today


GRADUATION
continued from 13A
line was etched at the corner
of their eyes; and when their
teenager began driving is the
same time the first gray hairs
and worry lines on the forehead
appeared. A parent's face is a
road map of the ups and downs,
valleys and hills they have had
to navigate on the journey to
ensure their child arrived at this
Stvery moment. Often parents are
unsung heroes graduation is
an appropriate time to toast
parents for the battles they've
endured to get the child to this
,,, milestone.
If we dare to look just a little
deeper into those faces, seated


in the audience are the proud
grandparents Grandparents.
now they really have a story
to share. So many of whom
took a leap of faith and left the
familiar to journey to the land
of opportunity so their children
and their children's children
could find purpose and success.
This leapoffaith was possible for
them because they had within
them the hope of glory realizing
that God has a generational
perspective. Whatever God has
promised He wip deliver. These
grandparents, just like Moses.
have the vision but may not get
to see the promises, but future
generations will.
Some have worked two and
three jobs as factory workers,


domestics and janitors
carefully scrimping and
saving their money to invest
in a grandchild; to invest
in their family's future. For
quite a few of those seated in
the audience, this is the first
graduation in their family:
whether it is high school
or college. The graduating
student has brought honor
to their family not just to
themselves Grandparents too
are often not celebrated or
honored for all that they do
in the lives of their children
and grandchildren. Because
of their age and wisdom,
grandparents so often calm
tensions between teenagers
arid their parents.


GOSPEL GOES GLOBAL
WHERE THE WORLD MEETS
Gospel Complex for Education & Preservation
In Collaboration with

BI-ANNUAL
L GOSPEL INDUSTRY RETREAT
HOSTED BYr
DR. BOBBY JONES
4
SATURDAY S SUNDAY MONDAY
MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

MAY 24- 26, 2008

I^^WSII^MH^ ^^^^^^^^^^ *:tg.^^i-^g~gi .-^^ s W,..^g^^HH-HIH^H^


LEGEND'S BALL
Featuring Melvin Williams and Vanessa Bell Armstrong
SATURDAY. MAY 24, 2008 6 pm
Westin Diplomat Resort & Spa
3555 South Ocean Drive, Hollywood, FL 33019
Honoring Gospel Music Living Legends
Brother Sullivan Pugh, Evangelist Rosa Shaw,
Smiling Jubilaires of Fort Lauderdale
and Dr. Albertina Walker


V


I


"WHERE THE WORLD MEETS"
BENEFIT CONCERT
7:30 pm MAY 25, 2008 SUNDAY
Broward Center for the Performing Arts
201 SW 5th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
featuring
CeCeWinans, Jonathan Butler
and The Woods
Hosted by Pastor Paula White


PRAISE ON THE BEACH
MEMORIAL DAY
FAMILY PICNIC
AND CONCERT
MONDAY. MAY 26, 2008
11:30 am 2:00 pm
Westin Diplomat Resort & Spa
3555 South Ocean Drive, Hollywood, FL 33019
Hosted by TyeTribbet
Performances by
Canton Jones and more...


S


GROUND BLESSING CEREMONY
SUNDAY MAY 25, 2008 3 pm
PUBLIC INVITED
NW Corner (ST. RD7/441 & Sunrise Blvd.)
Parking .'aiiabie at the Lauderhill Mall 12th St. Entrance. Shuttle Service will be Provided.

SOUTH FLORIDA RESIDENT PACKAGE
includes entry to:
Inaugural Gospel Legends Ball, Where the World Meets Benefit Concert, Praise on the Beach
Memorial Day Family Picnic & Concert, and Dr. Bobby Jones Gospel Show tapings (Monday only)


For more information about the 22nd Bi-Annual International Gospel Industry Retreat visit www.gospelindustryretreat.com or call (954) 494-7596.


Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Pompano Cha


BI''AAD Urban League of
BR'c WARD Broward County
,._' l ITY
ia!BMB~in"Baa ^^


- bahbffid
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Apter '


Retreat


Hilton Hotels Corporation
Broward Black Elected Officials


THE
INTE


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Hall Ferguson Rewitt
WILLIAM WITHERSPOON, 76,
mechanical
engineer, died
May 11 at North
Shore Shopital.
Viewing 5 to 8
p.m. May 21
in the chapel.
Service will be
held May 24 in
Charleston, SC.

MADIE LANE, 76, nurse assistant,
died May 16 at /
Mercy Hospital
Service 10 a.m.
May 24 at Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


HARRY LEE BRADLEY, 67, en-
trepre n e u r,
died May 16 at
Memorial Pem-
broke. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day, May 24 at
Ebenezer Unit-
ed Methodist
Church.

Faith ~
STEVEN WILLIAM MCCLALIN,
16, died May12. e
Service 11 a.m. .
Saturday at Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



AVA HANNAH, 55, caretaker, died
May 10. Service 11 a.m. Thursday
at Spirit of Christ.

Hadley's
TICHELLE LYNETTE CLARKE,
22, died May 13
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday at
New Birth Bap-
tist Church.


ALLEN DOUGLAS GALLON, 52,
died May 8 at home. Service was
held.

Carey Royal Ram 'n
EARLENE BRADLEY, 61, died
May 17 at NorthJackn Mmoal
Shore Medical
Center. Service
2 p.m. Saturday
in the chapel.




ALPHONSO HODGE, 71, died
May 12 at Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital. Service 11 a.m. Sat-
urday at New Life Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

GREGORY CARLSON, 90, died
May 19 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

GHOLAMREZAABBASI, 47, died
May 12 at home. Final arrange-
ments will be held in Tehran, Iran.

LOUIS PHILOME PRADERE, 91,
died May 8 at home. Service will
be held in Leogane, Haiti.

Manke
CLEVELAND JONES JR., 73,
died May 15 at Jackson Memorial
North Center. Service 10 a.m. Sat-
urday at St. Luke Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

Eric S. George .
CARROLL BURROWS, 52, of
Nassau Bahamas, died May 16.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Nakia Ingraham
WILLIAM ANDERSEN, died. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

TRACEY ROGERS, 50, died. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


Honor Your

Loved One

With an In

Memoriam


Jay's -
CORA BANKS, 73, died May 14.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at St.
John Missionary
Baptist Church.


GERALD JONES, 25, died May
12 at Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at Mt.
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


JERRY HARRELL, 76, died May
14 at Baptist
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Saturday at ud
Coconut Grove
Church of
Christ.


ROBERT LONG, 61, died May 17
at Homestead
Hospital. Ser-
vice is incom-
plete.





WILLIAM STEPHENS, 85, died
May 19. Service
2 p.m. Saturday
in the chapel. .






LATOIYA MOIQUE FRANKLIN,
24, died May.
15. Service was
held.






LESTER HART JR., 68, died May
13 at South Miami Hospital. Final
rites in Oglethorpe, Georgia.


CARLTON L. HOLMES, 56, mail
handler, died
May 15 at Jack-
son North Medi-
cal Center. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Jessie
Quinn; father,
Albert Holmes;
brother, Torine
Holmes; sisters, Vanessa Burke
(Donnell) and Verneta Hooper; a
host of other family members and
friends. Family hour Wednesday,
5 7 p.m. Service 11 a.m. Thurs-
day at The Historic Mt. Zion Bap-
tist Church.
BURIL L. WILKES, 67, died May
17. Arrangements are incomplete.
Rangei2
DELORY HARRELL JR., 62, real
estate entrepre-
neur, died May
14 at home. He
is survived by:
sons, Keith L.
Harrell of Miami,
Florida, and *
Timothy Har-
rell of NeW Port
News, Virginia;
father, Delory Harrell Sr.; two
brothers, O.C. and Norwood Har-
rell, Sr.; one sister, Eva Donald of
Cairo, Georgia; five grandchildren;
a host of uncles, aunts, other rela-
tives and friends.
Service 1 p.m. Saturday at Mt.
Calvary M.B. Church.

PAULINE EUNICE HICKS, 88, re-
tired, died May :
16. She is sur-
vived by: son,

Hicks Jr.; daugh-
ters, Evelyn and

granddaughters,
Brenda L. and
Joy L. Hicks; sister, Luverta Reid;
great-grandson Kenneth Ross;
a host of nieces, nephews, other
relatives and friends. Funeral ser-
vices will be held 2 p.m. Saturday
at Jordan Grove M.B. Church.


Royal
SHAUN PHILLIP-JAMES ERMI-
LUS, 18 months,
died May 10.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday at
I.B.B. Church,
17701 N W. 57
Avenue, Miami,
Fl. Visitation Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.

THELMA DAVIS, 77, died May 13.
Service 9 a.m. Saturday at Mt. Cal-
vary Missionary
Baptist Church.
Visitation Friday
4 to 9 p.m.


PATRICIA FLOYD, 51
11. Service was
held Moday at
New Birth Bap-
tist Church.


Poitiei^*.
TEYON L.A. DENNIS, three
months, died
May 16 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Thursday, May
22 in the cha-
pel.

CHRISTOPHER ANDRE SCOTT,
34, died May 17
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospi-
tal. Service 12
noon Saturday,
May 24 in the
chapel.


SJOSEPH KNOWLING, construc-
tion laborer, died
1, died May May 7 at North
1Shore Medical
S Center. Service
was held.

i :


LEROY SMILEY, 73, died May 17.
Service 1 p.m. .
Saturday in the
chapel. Visita-
tion Friday 4 to
9p.m.




ADLYN O'CONNOR, 79, died May
11. Service Friday 11 a.m. at Holy
Family Episcopal Church. Visita-
tion Thursday 6 to 9 p.m.

MONICA HIGGINS, 68, died
May 15. Service will be Saturday
11 a.m. at Cornerstone Baptist
Church in Coral Springs, Florida.
Visitaion will be Friday 5 to 9 p.m.

CATHERINE MOBLEY, 85, died
May 14. Service 1 p.m. Thursday
at New Way Fellowship Praise
and Worship Center. Visitation
Wednesday 4 to 9 p.m.

JAMES SAUNDERS, 63. died
May 19. Arrangements are pend-
ing.
Richardsonj
JESSIE ALTON MCMINNS, 70,
died May 17.
Service will be
held Thursday .,
in the chapel.





DARYL CLINTON WILLIAMS,
47, died May
18. Service 2
p.m.Saturday
at Allen Chapel
A.M.E. Church.




FRANK SAXON, 78, died May
15. Service 11
am. Saturday
at Church of
Christ Written In
Heaven.




LUCILLE FRANCES GLASS, 78,
died May 14.
Service was
held Tuesday,
May 20 at the,
Church of Then -
Incarnation,




Range Coconut Grove
INEZ SMITH, retired ward clerk, 78,
died May 17 at
Mercy Hospital. M
Survivors in-
clude: daughters,
Phyllis Stewart-
Williams and
Regina Smith;
sons, Charles,
Clarence Jr. and
Derrell Smith; companion, Frank
Brown; sister, Laverne Carter;
brothers, Charlie (Christine) and
Albert Norwood, Sr.; The family will
receive friends 6 to 8 p.m. Friday
at Greater St. Paul A.M.E. Church.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday at Great-
er St. Paul A.M.E.


EMMA LOU STANLEY, 65, private
nurse, died May
10 at Mt. Sinai
Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.





THELUNDA CROWDER, 43,
housewife, died
May 8 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.




CARLISLE MCCRAY, 75, con-
struction la-
borer, died May
10 at Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.
Saturday at 93
Street Com-
munity Baptist
Church.

TAMIKA 'JAMMIE' AKINS, 27,
chef, died April
26 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-e
pital. Service r,
was held. ,




REGINA ROBERTS, 34, laborer,
self-employed, died May 10 at
Aventura Hospital. Service incom-
plete.

LONNIE CORBETT, died May 17,
at Miami Heart Institute. Service
incomplete.

Wright & Young r -
ZA,KHARI ISAIAH SAUNDERS,
2, died May 15.
Survivors in-
clude: mothers,
Tanika Brown
and Sandy
De-los-Rios;
fathers, Issac
Saunders and
Gerardo De-
los-Rios; sisters, Ta,Keirri Brown,
Jamie Cecil, Andretta Brunson,
Dalia (Jason) Dail, Elizabeth
(Aaron) Quinn, Jerlyn De-los-Ri-
os, Akiylah Saunders, Remi and
Nylah Saunders; brothers, Henry
Issac, Antone Brunson, Graycin
and Gerardo De-los-Rios, and
Isiah Saunders; grandmothers,
Audrey Brown, Barbara Cecil,
Mercedes Fernandez De-lara,
and Sema Morgan; and grand-
fathers, Franklin Williams, Juan
De-los-Rios and Mario Fernan-
dez-De-lara. Service 1 p.m.
Thursday at 93rd Street Com-
munity Baptist Church.


BRANDON CHARLES BETTS,
24, died May
17. Survivors
include: father,
Bobby L. Betts;
mother, Shirley
Ann Betts; sis-
ters, Gevonda,
Billie Jean,
Trellanie, Bar-
bara, Valene, and Siera; broth-
ers, Bobby Jr., David, Brentoi,.
Service Saturday, 12 p.m. at
Jordan Grove Missionary Baptist
Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DEACON WILLIE L. BROWN
06/12/1931 05/22/2002

It seems like yesterday, but
in reality it's been six years,
and for every moment of that
time you have been in our
thoughts. God has you in His
keeping, we have you in our
hearts.
Sadly missed, your loving
wife Louise J. Brown, sons,
Willie B., twins Garret and
Gary and Gillespie Brown,
grand and great grand and
family.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


11/16/60 05/20/03

It's been five years since
you went away, but we relive
your life each and every day.
We miss you.
Mable Mulkey, family and
friends.


In Memorial
In loving memory of the late,


DORIS ELAINE WARD
02/13/1921 03/19/1968

Memories of you still cast
their gentle flow to grace
our days and light our paths
wherever we may go.
Daughter, Marcia Johnson
Saunders and family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of the late,


TANYA MARTIN PEKEL
10/03/1964 05/22/2006

Your life so well lived
touched so many...echoes
forever in our hearts.
Mother, Marcia Johnson
Saunders, husband, Kent
Perkel, children, Lauren
Oubre, Adam and Victoria
Pekel, sister, Terrie (Wendell)
Rayburn (Taylor, Carter and
Sydney)


Death Notice


NELSON JENKINS JR., 85,
died May 14. He is survived
by: former wife, Flossie
Quaterman; daughter, Esther
V. Martin; nephew, James
Reed; niece, Yvonne Turner;
grandchildren, Demetrius
Lynch and Me'Chelle Martin.
Service was held.

Death Notice


JAMES EDWARD 'JUNE
LEE' SAUNDERS JR., 63,
head custodian at NMB High
School, died May 19 at home.
Survivors include: doting
wife, Luretha 'Sandy';
sons, James III (Kimberly),
Jonathan (Arianna), and
Joseph Saunders; sister,
Cynthia Saunders and a
host of aunts, uncles, nieces,
nephews, grandchildren arid
in-laws.
Homecomig service 2 p.m.
Saturday, May 24 at New
Fellowship Christian Center,
240 Bahaman Ave., Opa-
locka, Florida.

In Memoriam
We, the family of the late,


JEFFERY LAMARR
'MAlRKIE' JOHNSON, JR.
thank everyone for their
continued prayers and
support during the past two
years and need for them to
continue. Our family miss
him an awful lot.
The pain is still very much
alive and growing. May 21st
marks the second anniversary
of his senseless death. Jeffery
Jr., there is not a day that
goes by that you are not on
our minds. To us, your life
was cut way too short and the
reason is unclear. But, know
that we will always love and
treasure the time we had with
you.
The Johnson and Bain
family


Happy Birthday


IVORY WHITE ADOLDHUS
05/25/1910 09/08/2006

Your daughter, Betty Farmer
Hunter and entire family








16B THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008

Mevmti* h ,o ,! ., ,e 1 w ul ftw ,4 -of .,4 I ,t w,




Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers









Bahamas Consulate General visits with Governor Christ in Tallahassee


Senator Fred-
erica S.Wilson,
newly appoint-
ed Consulate
General of the.
Commonwealth
of the Baha-
mas--Gladys
Johnson-Sands,
Governor Char-
lie Christ.


Nurses serve as a buffer between

the patient and machines


NURSES
continued from 13B

the management of that
business for understanding
the value of the human
connection.
Nurses serve as a buffer
between the patient and
machines, and between
patients and medical
procedures that can be
frightening and uncomfortable.
Nurses provide a service to the
families of patients as well
through emotional care and
support to family members
who often feel helpless. Nurses
cover every aspect of care in
our lives: from the delivery
room to hospice and from
intensive care to rehab. In the
spirit of true professionals,
nurses put their personal
issues and challenges behind


them when they walk into
the healthcare facility. The
nature of the work is stressful;
nurses are on their feet; work
long shifts; have; demanding
caseloads; and often are not
rewarded for years of service.
These challenges, along with
burnout and baby boomers
retiring from the field, have
created a nursing shortage in
our country.
Teachers, policemen, first
responders and nurses are on
the frontline providing services
that we cannot entrust to
machines, computers, or
under trained newcomers.
These professionals earn their
stripes everyday oftentimes
exposing themselves to
harmful situations in order to
protect and care for the public.
Nurses, we thank you for what
you do and how you do it.


Teen girls mesmerized by glamorous life


REALITY
continued from 13B
is destroying the marriages of
adults who have gotten caught
up in this deceitful web.
Teen girls are mesmerized by
the glamorous life they think
strippers and dancers have.
Instead of aspiring to become
scientists, educators, nurses or
business leaders these young
ladies have their eyes set on
jobs that are risky, do not have
longevity, or upward mobility.
The music, videos, clubs, and
internet have all created an
alluring culture of consensual
and uncommitted sex.
The clothes, makeup and
hair that we permit our middle
and high school daughters to
wear is often provocative and
sends a message to boys their
age and older men that they
are ready for a lifestyle they
are not emotionally prepared to
handle.
Predators see them coming


a mile away realizing that they
are young and dumb. We can't
leave everything to the schools
and government, especially
when it comes to teaching
our children morals. Young
ladies already living in poverty
are hurt most when they fall
victim to this kind of lifestyle.
They oftendrop out of school
to follow promises of starring
in videos to find themselves
used up and left alone on the
s'., ets to fiend for themselves.
Pregnancy, STDs, drugs, and
prostitution is where these
girls end up.
How to protect our teens
from risky sexual behavior is a
growing problem. Our children
physically mature earlier,
the media glamorizes sexual
freedom and our teens are
impressionable. Parents have
to do all they can at home to lay
the right foundation and set the
right example. If parents are
out of control, we can't expect
much better from the children.


Because of the recession, Poitier says,
'Let's give back to the community.'

* Infant caskets and service free
* Senior Citizens free protective sealer casket with
service by Poitier
* Veterans caskets free with service by Poitier
* Services performed during the week only.
Additional cost may apply

Financing available if you qualify





Offer expires May 31, 2008


Tallahassee, Florida-May 01, 2008-During a recent visit to
Tallahassee, Gladys Johnson-Sands, newly appointed Consulate
General of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas toured the State
Capitol, with her cousin, the Honorable Frederica S. Wilson,
Senator, District 33-Miami. They are pictured above, during a
visit with Governor Charlie Christ.





Sra ce_



"j/Je ve','ce o/ i(lceience&


W re are proud to announce that Van G.
Brown, formerly of Barrett Fryar
Funeral Home of Richmond .Heights has
joined our family as a licensed funeral
director and embalmer.


For over 20 years, Mr. Brown served the families of the
greater South Miami-Dade communities, '.hlile employed
at Barrett Frvar Funeral Home.

Nhi. Bron is still available to serve those families of the
Richmond Heights, Perrine, sth Miami, Heights,
Goulds, Naranja, Homestead. 'and Plorida City
communities.

If you need to contact Mr. Brown,
you can reach him at
(305) 688-6388


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAX: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements




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The Miami Times


ifesty es


FASHION HIP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 21-27, 2008 THE MIAMI TIMES


Syndicated content M --

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES. MAY 21-27, 2008


ByD R -,i -ar


Soror Katie Williams, the
visionary, Ruby Rayford, the
coordinator, Dr. Gwendolyn J.
Robinson, the innovator, and
members of Sigma Gamma Rho
Sorority, Inc. of Gamma Delta
Sigma Chapter, presented their
annual Quality of Life Awards,
last Saturday, at the Miami
Shores Country Club before a
filled banquet room
Recognitions were given
to Victoria Beatty, Esq. the
recipient of the Gwendolyn Sawyer
Cherry Award; Father John Cox,
Holy Redeemer Roman Catholic
Church, The Christina M. Eve
Award; Dr. Richard Strachan
and Rosena Wright, the Walton
Y. Robinson Award; and Akilah
Johnson, was mistress of
ceremony, she introduced Dr.
Robinson, Ethelyn P. Hamilton
and Little Miss Kintisa Hallmon,
Crestview Elementary, who
electrified the audience with her
poem, The Black Women.
Johnson continued with her
eloquent voice by introducing
Floredenis Guerrier-Brown,
who said grace to the hungry
crowd. Everyone had a choice
of salmon or chicken to whet
their appetites. Bud Ra'Anna
Pickens was introduced to recite
her favorite poem, IRise, by Maya
Angelou. She, too, received a
standing ovation.
Other recipients included
Ky'Eisha Penn, Rhoer of the Year,
Carolyn Lewis, Philo of the Year,
and Ricky Brantley, Sigma Gent
of the Year, whose wife, Soror
Annette accepted in his stead.
Then Wilma Council, The Ruby
T. Rayford Award; Genevieve,
Paul, The Roberts J. Thompson


Award; Margaret I.
Smith, The Aliene
V. Taylor Award
and Margorie
Pierre, Mu Nu/U
of M and Adeenaw
Williams, Gamma
XiFmU, SGRho


h~4~
1-~u


Lifetime award presented by
Soror Denitra Henry.
The icing on the cake were
the laurels given to Claudia D.
Slater for outstanding services
as choreographer for the Buds
of Spring for over 15-years. She
was applauded loudly by her
son, Damien and Dr. Wanda
Williams, AP, N., Golden Glades.
VIP's in attendance included the
Singing Angels Tillie Stibbins,
president, Mary Simmons,
directress, Rhonda Gillard,
Leroy Wilson, Pearl Graydon,
Chester Coachman, Joe and
Sheila Mack and Dr. Lorraine
F. Strachan. Basileus Robinson
closed out the afternoon with
'words of wisdom.
Soror Katie Williams
announced the partnership
between Sigma Gamma Rho
and FAMU to memorialize the
late State Legislator Gwendolyn
Sawyer Cherry, Esq with the
presentation of an Endowed
Scholarship, June 5, at The
FAMU College of Law. For further
information call, 305-282-0444.


According to Nikki Young,
president, Iota Phi Lambda
Sorority, Gamma Alpha Chapter
recently celebrated their Annual
Business Month Celebration
where outstanding business
and community leaders were


recognized. The program was held
at New Covenant Presbyterian
Church. Members of the sorority
marched in, beautifully attired in
emerald green and white.
Mistress of ceremonies Young
opened the program to a packed
house. She brought on Mary
Dunn for the invocation, Dr.
Ivis Richardson, Soror of the
Year, gave a very warm greeting,
and Max, the 'One Man' Band,
serenaded the audience with
He's A Miracle Worker and
other songs. The spotlight was
focused on Reverend Carol Nash-
Lester, Senior pastor/Teacher
of Bethel Apostolic Temple,
who was dynamic, inspirational
and uplifting. The audience
thoroughly enjoyed her and gave
her a standing ovation.
The program continued with the
recognition of the Outstanding
Business Woman of the Year,
Grace Vernon, Flowers by
Grace, Business Man of the Year,
Johnny Cheeley, Mop City Hair
Styling Center, Business Firm of
the Year, The Resource Room,
Ebony Johnson-Jackson.
Others receiving awards for
outstanding community service
were Dr. Shirley Johnson,
Attorney Dawn Jones, Charles
Mitchell and Lorenzo Johnson,
while scholarships were awarded
to two outstanding high school
students: Yveta Brise, N. Miami
Beach and Shelda Raymonvil,
Turner Tech.
The crowd was so pleased and
cheered and whistled as each
honoree came forward to receive
their recognition. Sorority
members on the program and in
attendance included: 0. Leanne
Smith, JoAnn Jones, Corliss
Sellers, Leola Adams, Albertha
Barry, Hattie Burnett, Lillie
Williams, Ronrica Morgan,
Girlean 'Gigi' Tinsley, Franciel
Tooks, Anna Mitchell, Juanita


7


Fill

I RvAn rrpqAptn


This is a significant and very
meaningful election Inot that
others are not' but ,. e must
realize we have the opportunity
have "Obama" as our First
Black President! How sweet
that will be!
Fernley Murray was in
Miami visiting his sister,
Valdez and other family
members. Welcome home
Fernley! Don't be surprise if he
moves from New York to Africa.
Virginia "Virgie" Tresvant,
attended the funeral of her
grandson, 15 year old William
was funeralized and buried in
Phoenix, Arizona last week,
accompanying her mother was
Adell Hackett and grandson
Michael Tresvant. Sympathy
to the Wilkerson and Tresvant
Family.
Get well wishes to all of you!
Prince Gordon, Betty Gaitor-
Timmons, Bernice Shorter-
Mears Bonnie Newbold-
Stirrup, ClifforniaRoss, Joyce
Gibson-Johnson, (Nancy
Wilson, the multi-Grammy
winning entertainer) Vashti
Armbrister, Gloria Braynon-
Watson, Leo Moss (BTW class
of '48) Yvonne Johnson-


Gaitor, Celestine
Hepburn-n
Brown, and
Mary Anderson- '
Williams.
B. T. W.'s class .
of 1958 is quite
excited about the upcoming
50th reunion celebration,
which is scheduled for June
12-14 in the City of Miami,
followed by a trip to Las Vegas,
Nevada. Mrs. Leotha Sands
Harrell, alumni class president
for the past 10 years, is pleased
to announce that the class has
awarded several scholarships
to graduating students in
the community throughout
the years. The 50th reunion
celebration will take place on
Saturday, June 14th, 7 p.m.
at the Biscayne Bay Marriott,
featuring classmates Elizabeth
Thompson McKinney
(chairperson), AlfredaStibbins,
Carolyn Spicer Mond, Julia
Sawyer Rowe, Reverend Ivan
E. George, Marva Hill, Ronda
Curry Lamb, Clarence Woods,
Wilhemenia Minnis Carter,
Theddie Johnson Bain,
Marcia Johnson Saunders
(Miss BTW), Maud P. Newbold,


Shirley Davis Evans, Beverly
Nixon, Joyce Jackson
Walker, Herman Dorsett,
Ph.D., Hilda Moss Brewton,
Shirley Mitchell, Raymon
Finlayson, Dallis Lowery
Griffin, Ethel Smith Duncan,
Marion Hunt Newton, Daniel
Evans, Alvin Spencer Walker,
Isabella Johnson Stibbins,
Christophera Smith Sutton,
Irma Ross Roundtree, Brenda
Frazier McGintis and Carl
Pitts, to name a few. The Class
of 1958 will join classes of 38,
48 and 2008 at the annual
BTW Alumni Association Day
and Memorial Ceremony on
Sunday, May 25, 2008 at 4
p.m. in the school auditorium.
Congratulations to Alain K.
Sharpe who received a (AA-
Degree) from Miami Dade
College and also received her
high school diploma from
Miami Northwestern Sr. High
in June. Alain, sister Sheree
is Miss FAMU and she will join
her sister at FAMU in the fall.
These young ladies are the
daughters of Shantay Sharpe
and granddaughter of Betty
Braynon-Sharpe and Ebenezer
"Scrooge" Edwards (Shantay
father).
Booker T. Washington High
School class of "48" enjoyed
their 60th class reunion
with a fish fry at the home


of Curlene Brice-Carter, a
picnic was held at Arcola Park
with deceased classmates
family also in attendance
and worship service held at
Saint John Baptist Church
with classmate Reverend
Charles Uptgrow as our host.
After church services a lovely
dinner was served to the class
at Curlene's Home. Archie
McKay is president. Active
participants: Joyce Major-
Hepburn, Bertha Martin,
Claretha Grant- Lewis, Ellen
Rolle, Henry Goa, Dr. James
Johnson, Herman Johnson,
Leo Moss, Sybeline Gray-


Robinson, Arthur Livingston,
Allen Johnson, Joyce Barry,
William Thompson, Douglas
McKinnon, Geneva Ambrose,,
Bishop James Flowers,
Eleanor Braynon and Dorothy
Bullard.
The Mets celebrated the
61st anniversary of Jackie
Robinson breaking the Major
League color barrier by officially
unveiling the brick rotunda
intended to honor Robinson's
life. A life size number 42 (his
jersey number) would be more
distinctive than a statue. The
nine values that Robinson
lived by will be engraved into


the floor and archways. The
nine values are: courage,
excellence, persistence,
determination, citizenship,
commitment, integrity, justice
and team work. The project
will be completed by the end of
the year.
Francena Lewis-Robinson
was in Philadelphia to visit
'her brother, Floyd and family.
They will all travel to New
York to witness Frank Lewis
Johnson, her grand nephew
receive a double Master's from
Hofstra University. He will work
in New York after he receives
his degrees.


kin~~rup Ow vmw~wd yi


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THE MIAMI TIMES



SB SUPPORT THE Til.ES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR YOU

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Matthews, Alicia Young and
Alan Anthony, Jr, host and
hostess.
Also, Patricia Newkirk,
Thessalonia Tinsley, Mozelle
Rackard, Dewey Wilkerson,
and members of Bethel Apostolic
Temple that really showed up to
represent. Now, everyone will be
waiting for next year.


Congratulations to Dellena
Latriece Stone, a Ransom
Everglades graduate that
recently received a Master of


Remember, Chardea
was a pnajorette in high
school and served as
a member of the Heat
Cheerleading team,
while pursuing a musical
career as a singer and
producing a CD. Great
things are expected of MU.
her, because she makes
the right decisions in an
effort to reach her goal. Congrats!
Graduates.


The marriage between Kadi-
Ann Richards and Christopher
Hayles took place, last
Saturday, at the Pentecostal
Tabernacle, a mega church
in Miami Gardens with Pastor
S. Robert Stewart, officiate,
and a church filled with family
members, church members
and friends that demonstrated
much love for everyone.
Christine Hayles, parent
of the groom, led the
processional, followed by
Ivy Hale, grandparent of the
groom, and Mr. and Mrs.
Alvin Richards, parents of
the bride. Others that followed
included maid of honor,
Jacquie McLennon, and best
men, Dwayne Reece, Cheryl
Aitcheson and Anthony
Foster, matron of honor and
best man, respectively.
Also, bridesmaids and
groomsmen Maria Jeffrey-
Hinds and Rohan Campbell,
Dacia Davis and Rick
Christopher, Avril Richards,
Rohan Wright, Ki;oe-ann
Richards and Stephen
Richards, Kimberly Davis
and Wallie Sharpe, Stacey-
Ann Basco and Wendell
Henry, Mary-Anne Richards-
Dandles and Kevin Davis,
and Evril Richards and Kurt
Blair.


Also, Britney
Edward-Richards,
mini bride, Jayden
Welcome, page boy,
Faith Christopher,
Gabrielle Thompson,
Brianna Peart,
Mikayla Aitcheson,
RRAY Natasha Monroe,
and Naydine Lynch,
flower princesses, and
Kyendae Pinnock, wedding
coordinator.
The bride entered adored
in a flowing white, gown
accentuated with a tiara with
crystals on the bodice and
hem of the skirt. She and her
participated in a ceremony by
Pastor Stewart which included
the declaration of intent,
scripture reading from Genesis
2:18-31 and 1 Corinthians
13:13, congregational singing,
praise, exchange of vows,
blessing of bride and groom,
salt covenant, and recessional
of Rev. Marvin Sapp's Never
Could Have Made It performed
by the The Gunter Brothers
and Hands of Purpose.
Kudos to the wedding
planner and newly weds
for their visions of having a
huge tent erected next to the
Tabernacle for the reception
and celebration. Tables were
set up to seat 200 guests with
a formal setting, live flowers
on the table and a special set-
up for the bridal party which
included introduction of the
party, prayer by the minister,
toasts from the best men and
maids/matron of honor and
congregational singing to pay
tribute to the married couple,
followed by dinner..
The newly weds took the time to
thank their parents, members of
the church, friends, and the entire
bridal party for making their day
one to be remembered.


KADI-ANN RICHARDS AND
CHRISTOPHER HAYLES

Business Administration, magna
cum laude honor from Florida A
& M University with a major in
management. She is the daughter
of Rose Dawson and the grand-
daughter of Lillian Rogers, while
her advisor has been Anthony
Simons who shares the great
honor.
Chardea Murray, the daughter
of Lakeshia M. Campbell
graduated from Florida State U.
as an honor student and worked
as a legal professional in a law
office. With that experience,
she passed the admittance test
to Florida A & M Law School in
Orlando. She completed her
courses in three years and will
duplicate the same time for her
Juris Prudence.


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Adrienne Ar'ht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS AT THE ARSHT CENTER
A Musical Celebration with GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM
The Arsht Center and WMBM host a monthly series of free
concerts in celebration of great American music Free Gospel
Sunday at The Arsht Center feature many of our conmniuni;ty's
best and brightest gospel soloists and choirs many affilialed
with Miami-Dade County churchess, S"
4 PM e Knight Concert Hall a FREE
ALSO! FREE PARKING for Free Gospel Sundays patrons ;is
available at Arsht Center lots C and E only Standard parking fees
will apply at other lots


,A'nlliri>. 3,1 Exprv-t.'-, ri ." A-r lri.? -'\r.~lll ,r'il ,, ,r'ni Lnl, rI,..lre (.i-.I ,i
SIGNATURE SHORTS
The series of one-act plays hai put Surnmmer Shorts on the map.
Signature Shonrs features a brand ne i mry ol hilanriou comedies
and heartfelt dramas in two alternating programs, A A B
7.30 PM Program B Carnival Studio Theater $37
Full program information is online at arshtcenter.org.

SIGNATURE SHORTS
On Thursday and weekends "Theatre Fare" adds a delicious
dining ticket to the Signature S orts series. It's the coolest thing
to do on a hot summer night
6 PM Program A Carnival Studio Tneater $52
7:30 PM Theatre Fare $25 (A shorl meal!n
8:30 PM Program B Carnival Studio Theater $52
$122 (Theatre Fare & tVth sho-S)
Full program information is online at arshtcenter.org.

SIGNATURE SHORTS
3 PPM Program A Carni.al Studio Theater $37
4.30 PM Theatre Fare $18 (A short meal!)
5.30 PM Program B Carnu.al Sludiro Theater $37
5.55 iTheatre Fare 1 Ishowm
$92 (Theatre Fare & bolh shows
Full program information is online at arshtcenter.org.

The. Crinldrenj TrustIr pre,,rits
GROWING UP WITH THE ARTS
A kaleidoscope of performances ty children ranging lom
orchestral to choral. musical theater and dance take 'entr sitae
in a variety show that showcases what is being actnieved through
funding by The Children's Trust.
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE


s' g ,t Sh...r


O


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.

ORDER NOWJ''' 'AA^^^^^^^ ^I~^^^^Bfl^~ilf^wilf^^
305.949.6722 e arshtcenteriitsjf^J^^^^^^^B ^^^HH~i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^org^^^^


- / O* O


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27,2008







4C THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


7?a
%ran


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Syndicated Content


- om~4040N


Available from Commercial News Providers


CHART TOPPER


Rihanna tops U.S.


singles


4-m- i-R- k *W-


chart for
R&B singer Rihanna's Take a Bow soared
52 places to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100
singles chart Thursday, the second-biggest
jump to the top in-the chart's 50-year history.
The record was set last year, when pop band
Maroon 5's Makes Me Wonder leapt from No.
64 in a single bound. Coincidentally, Maroon
5 has a new single on the latest chart with
featured artist Rihanna. Their collaboration
on If I Never See Your Face Again debuted at
No. 57.
Take a Bow, the third No. 1 single of
Rihanna's career, sent English pop singer
Leona Lewis' Bleeding Love to No. 2 after a
total of four weeks at the top.
The next seven songs on the chart also
dipped one position from last week: Lil
Wayne's Lollipop featuring Static Major, at
No. 3; Jordin Sparks' No Air featuring Chris
Brown, at No. 4; Usher's "Love in this Club"
featuring Young Jeezy, at No. 5; Ray J & Yung


third time


Berg's Sexy Can I, at No. 6, Madonna's 4.
Minutes featuring Justin Timberlake, at No. 7;
Mariah Carey's Touch My Body, at No 8; and
Natasha Bedingfield's'Pocket Full of Sunshine,
at No. 9.
Danity Kane's Damaged rose one to No. 10,
.the girl group's first top 10 hit since 2006.
The week's top debut belonged to Coldplay's
Viva La Vida, which opened at No. 15.
Another Coldplay track, Violet Hill,
started at No. 40. Both come from
the band's upcoming album,
"Viva La Vida or Deathi and All
His Friends." While a No. 15
debut is impressive,
Viva La Vida is
not Coldplay's
highest new
entry. In May
2005, Speed of Sound
arrived at No. 8.


a Lao% p' p-loan aw~ m
4b -


AN NOU NCING


A JOY FUL N EW S SERIES


FRE E GOSPEL


SUNDAYS

AT THE ARSHT CENTER

A Musical Celebration with
GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM


May 25

Admission is FRE


at 4 P.M.


but tickets are required.
Call 305.949.6722 or reserve
at arshtcenter.org.


AdrienneArsht Center
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
1300 Biscayne Boulevard Miami, FL 33132

SIGN UP FOR E-MAIL REMINDERS!
If you are not already receiving e-mails from The
Adrienne Arsht Center, sign up at arshtcenter.org
and get all the details about our Free Gospel Sun-
days as soon as they are announced.


FeaTiInn, g ,ui-ir cco -im uinity S
besl anld -rightest gospel
sol'i-ists and choicrs
The senr; LcntimuEs
r lav 25
Gospel groups and choirs
interested in participating
,3ie in.'led ic, contact
Debra Toomer. WMBr.1
Dire-ltor of r-'.tri.ltrkgin, at
I30i 769- I 1i00 or 'ia e-mail
at dtoomer@wmbm.com.


t 4 I ki [ Free parking for Free Gospel Sundays patrons is available at Arsht Center
lots C and E only. Standard parking fees will apply at all other lots.
REEVEN W0.49.672g


ADRIENNE ARSHT CENTER Knight Concert Hall


1300 Biscayne Boulevard Adrienne Arsht Center
Tie Mhiami me- o Miami, FL 33132 for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County
Formerly: CARNIVAL CENTER
FOR I HE PERFORMING ARTS


OF MU S IC


FREE


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The Miami Times


Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 21-27, 2008


'4 A '~'


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Astaldi Construction Corporation is looking for Miami-Dade County certified
CBE, CSBE, SBE and ME programs subcontractors to work on the SR 874 /
Killian Parkway Interchange Improvements for the Miami-Dade Expressway
Authority (MDX). Scopes of work include MSE wall installation, MOT devic-
es, Drainage installation, Earthwork, Grading, Bridge Painting, Landscaping,
Pavement Markings, Roadway Lighting, Roadway Signage, Sale & Delivery
of Fill/Aggregates, Porto lets Curb/Gutter sidewalk & Retaining walls, Mowing,
and Piling.
Astaldi Construction Corporation intends to conduct itself in good faith with
small businesses for participation on this project. Please contact Ernest Part-
low, at 954-423-8766 or by e-mail to:
epartlow@astaldiconstruction.com for more information. Quotes and scopes of
work are due by 5/28/08

President and CEO James E. Scott Community Association, Inc. (JES-
CA), responsible for policy making, planning, organizing, staffing and direct-
ing the activities of the agency. Strong fiscal and financial aptitude is a must.
Masters degree in Public Administration, Education Administration, Business
Administration, Social Work, Social Sciences, Human Services, Urban Plan-
ning or related field is preferred. Ten years or more of responsible and continu-
ous experience in a social service organization, five of which must have been
leading a social service agency. Outstanding communications skills, both oral
and written, and the ability to represent JESCA effectively with diverse audienc-
es, as well as a demonstrated commitment to the social service, is essential.
Please send resume and cover letter to: President and CEO Search JESCA
P.O. Box 163009, Miami, FL 33116-3009, or email: resumes@jescaonline.org,
with President and CEO search in the title line.


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SUPPORT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS' WORKING FOR YOU
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6D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27,2008


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no~~i to Irha m















SS


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MAY 21-27, 2008


SECTION N


Business Rentals j
FOR LEASE
901 N.W. 79 STREET
BLDG/OFFICE SPACE
Suitable for real estate,
insur-
ance, daycare or medical
business. 1810 sq. feet. Call
305-794-8039

Unfurnished Rooms
54th St. N.E. 1st Ave
$150 a week
Call 786-287-2942
LIBERT CITY AREA
Large room, $135 weekly.
Please call 305-827-4593

Furnished Rooms
$199 DEPOSIT
2169 N.W. 49 Street
FREE AIR and Cable TV
$115 weekly 786-234-5683
1341 NW 68 TERRACE
Private entrance, kitchen, air.
$130 weekly. 305-213-8659.
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
1541 N.W. 69TH TERRACE
Clean room, $325 a month
call 305-479-3632.
1717 N.W. 67TH STREET
Private refrigerator, TV, $130
weekly. Call 786-278-1167.
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Air, cable TV, refrigerator,and
microwave. Utilities included.
Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
2136 N.W. 43rd Street
$400 and up. $200 security.
Call 305-637-9359 or
305-303-0156
2381 N.W. 66th STREET
Furnished rooms $100
weekly, $300 to move in.
786-426-3982.
3177 N.W. 42nd Street
ROOMS FOR RENT
305-904-7837
6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
$350 deposit,$130 weekly,
air
Call 305-305-0597
Free electricity, free water,
$450 monthly, $450 to move
in. Call 305-224-2569.
LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, non-smoker
Call 786-237-5281
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Private entrance ,air and light
cooking, use of pool.
Call 305-343-2732
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Rooms for rent. $500 month-
ly. 954-826-8495.
MIRAMAR AREA
Furnished room $130
weekly.
954-662-5389/954-237-1195
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nice room, private entrance,
305-769-4985 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
NORTH MIAMI
Large bedroom, cable, cen-
tral air, parking, utilities in-
cluded. Call 786-285-3197.
NORTHWEST AREA
Furnished room to rent in pri-
vate home, light kitchen privi-
leges. Call 305-621-'101.7
Opa-Locka Area
Rent a room in a nice central
air home with access to
kitchen, washer/dryer for
$525 a month
Call 305-910-1846.
ROOMS FOR RENT
3042 N.W. 44 Street.Air,
$115 weekly, $230 to move
in. Call 305-836-1492.
ROOMS FOR RENT
Utilities and cable included.
Weekly rates. 305-303-2644
Very nice air conditioned
rooms. Rent plans are nego-
tiable. Call 786-663-4600

I Efficincies

100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$195 weekly, $675 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232
1540 N. W. 1st COURT
$450 monthly, all appliances
included call Joel 786-355-
7578.
305-836-5848/305-653-8954

S. Apartments
101 N.E. 78th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950. Balcony, laundry room,
and parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424
1116 Sesame Street
Opa Locka area. Two bed-
rooms one bath $900
monthly
Call 954 805 3233
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
Call 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.


305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1245 NW 58th STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$575 monthly. All appliances
Free 20 inch flat screen TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578


Apartments
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one and two bed-
rooms. $525 and. $725
monthly Appliances included.
305-747-4552, 786-499-8212
135 N. W. 18th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath,
$525 monthly, all appliances
included call Joel 786-355-
7578.
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
14200 N.W. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly. Premier
Realty
Team. Call 786-301-2171.
1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors. $600 monthly; $1200
moves you in. One month
rent Move in special for 40
years and older. Call 305-
458-3977.
1525 N.W. 1 Place
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$800 monthly. All appliances
included. Free 20 inch Flat
Screen TV. Call Joel:
786-355-7578
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
One bedroom, one bath,
$525 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Free 20 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1801 N. W. 2nd AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath(
$600 monthly, all appliances
included call Joel 786-355-
7578
1955 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath.
$450. 305-642-7080
200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom,
one bath $425
305-642-7080
2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $725, two bed-
rooms $925 newly
renovated, appliances
included.
Call Tony 305-213-5013
247 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, fenced yard, parking,
$775 monthly plus security.
Section 8 OK.
Call 786-216-7533.
2515 NW 52nd Street #3
One bedroom, tiled floors,
air,
no appliances. $550 monthly,
$1100 to move in.
954-522-4645.
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate
$600 monthly.
954-430-0849
28 St AND 1st Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 mthly, all appliances in-
cluded. Joel 786-355-7578.
3119 N.W. 133rd Street
One bedroom, one bath,
newly remodeled. 786-374-
6658.
3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath
$350 bi-weekly $800 moves
you in. Call:786-389-1686
3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Totally remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath in nice quiet
area. All appliances included.
$625 monthly. MUST SEE!
Call Mr. Cruz 305-213-5013
341 N.E. 77 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$675 monthly. First, last and
security. Call 305-758-6133
or 786-514-5535.
421 NW 59 Terr.
One bedroom $575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/ 786-359-7054
4621 NW 15th Ave. Unit 2
One bedroom, one bath.
$600 Call 305-759-2280
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
5200 N.W. 26 Avenue
Three or two bedrooms from
$700. Section 8 welccme.No
Security Deposit
Call 305-634-3545
5545 North Miami Avenue
One bedroom, $600 per
month. $1200 to move in.
Call 305-962-1814.
5755 N. W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, parking,
$625 monthly, $1000 move
in
Call 954-394-7562
580 N.E. 127 St #20
Two bedrooms, two baths,
gated parking. Section 8
Preferred. $1050 monthly,
$1050 to move in.
954-547-9011
585 N.E 139 Street
One bedroom, $750 monthly,
$2250 to move in. Come
take a look.
Call 305-769-3740
58th Street 31st Avenue


Small one bedroom with air,
lights and water. For one or
two people only. Call
305-693-9486.


Apartments
5900 N. W. 1st avenue
Two bedroom, one bath,
clean and painted, coin oper-
ated laundry, section 8 ok,
$900 a month 305-793-5020.
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
6905 N.W. 15TH AVENUE
Newly renovated, one bed-
room, $650 monthly.
Call 786-278-1167.
7001 N.W. 15 Ave
One bedroom $495 monthly
Two bedrooms $650 monthly
All appliances included. Call
Joel 786-355-7578
7513 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
One bedroom, one bath.
Renovated, new appliances
and parking. Section 8
HOPWA OK. $765 monthly.
Drive by, then call 9 am to 6
p.m. Call Dick 305-754-7900
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information/specials.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515.00
Two bedroom, one bath
$630.00
Free water, air
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
1601 N.W. 62 Street, one
bedroom, one bath. $500
monthly.Section 8 welcome
call 305-717-6084
LIBERTY CITY AREA
5101 N.W. 24 AVENUE
One bedroom starting at
$525 786-597-2248
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly.Two bedroom,
one bath $650 monthly. For
information please call 305-
827-4593.
MIAMI AREA
One, two and four bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
MIAMI BEACH AREA
Beautiful newly renovated
waterfront studio $800-
$1000. Call 718-601-7300.
OPA LOCKA AREA
From $300 cash back.
Section 8 OK. 305-717-3343

OVERTOWN AREA
Great Deal! One bedroom
apartments. Move In Special!
786-512-5800 or
305-986-8362

Duplex
10 AVENUE N.W. 74 ST.
Thee bedrooms, one bath,
stove and refrigerator. $1100
monthly.
29 AVENUE N.W. 159 ST.
Five bedrooms, two baths,
central air, stove and refriger-
ator. $1800 monthly.
10 AVENUE N.W. 99 ST.
Two bedrooms, $1100
monthly.
13 AVENUE N.W. 81ST,
Two bedrooms. $750
monthly

3 AVENUE N.W. 50 ST.
Two bedrooms. $950
monthly

19 AVENUE N.W. 185 TER.
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1600 monthly.

305-757-7067
Design Realty


1080 NW 100 Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, $1300 a month,
first, last and security. Call
786-315-8491 or 305-256-
8134.


Duplex
1148 NW 100 St (front)
Two bedrooms, one bath,
den, central air and water.
Section 8 welcomed, $1000
a month.
954-430-0849
1340 N.W. 60th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly.
Premier Realty
Team call 786-301-2171.

1519 NW 58th Terrace
Two bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-267-3700.
1890 NW 89th Terrace
One bedroom with
appliances
$640 mthly $1350 move in
Call 786-587-3731
2290 N.W. 46th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, to-
tally renovated, water and
electricity included, $1300
monthly.
Call Tony 305-213-5013
2452 N.W. 44th Street #1
One bedroom, air. $600
monthly,No Deposit. Call
786-877-5358.
2480 NW 61st Street Apt#2
Three bedrooms, one bath
$975 monthly. Section 8 O.K.
Call 305-343-0908
3051 N.W. 134th Street
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
Newly remodeled two large
bedrooms, one bath, wash-
er. dryer, cable, central air.
tile, security bars and large
walk-in closet. $1000
monthly. Call 954-557-4567
38 N. E. 64th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath,
$775 monthly, NO section 8.
Call 305-267-9449.
4320 N.W. 23 Cout
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1000 monthly, water includ-
ed Section 8 welcome.
Call Joe 954-438-9942.
4620 N. W. 15TH AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath, sec-
tion 8 welcome 786-267-
3700
4643 NW 16th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 Call 305-759-2280
5512 N.W. 15th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath
newly remodeled.
Call 786-277-0235
558 N.W. 95TH STREET
Two bedrooms, two bath,
$900 monthly. Call 786-263-
1590.
575 NW 94 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$700 a month, call
786-263-1590
6915 N.W. 5TH COURT
Two bedrooms, and
furnished
efficiency newly renovated.
Call 786-278-1167.
6998 N.W. 5th Place
One bedroom, one
bath,$750 monthly. Section 8
welcome. 786-399-8557
7752 N.W. 2nd Court
Four bedrooms, two baths
$1465 monthly.
Section 8 OK!.
Ron Jackson 305-582-8210
796 N.W. 55TH TERRACE
Brand new four bedrooms,
two baths, $1550 monthly.
786-399-8557.
940 NW 103rd st
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, appliances, $1075
monthly. 954-431-3777.
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Like new three bedroom,cen-
tral air, Section8 welcome.
Call 786-269-5643.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air.. $595-$975. Call
786-344-3278

SCondos/Townhouses

DORAL AREA
Beautiful two bedrooms, two
baths, washer, dryer. $1100
monthly Section 8 Welcome.
954-534-1601

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Newly remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath, central air,
tiled through-out. $900
monthly. Section 8
Welcome.954-534-1601.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
totally renovated. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-827-4593



11235 N.W. 17TH AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
newly remodeled, ceiling
fans, central air, tile, private
parking, huge yard with
fence
and security. 786-267-8437.


1153 N. W. 47TH TERRACE
Four bedroom, three bath,
$1300 monthly.
786-412-1131


I Houses
13001 N. W. 18TH COURT
$1300 monthly,
786-412-1131
14200 N.W. 3RD AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1200 monthly. One
bedroom house $600
monthly another
One bedroom house $550,
monthly,first and last for all.
Call Esther 305-978-1324.or
Bishop Carty 786-290-1955.
15630 N.W. 159 Street
Road
Beautiful three bedroom, one
bath, air, tile, $1300 monthly,
huge yard call 305-297-5932.
1785 N.W. 43 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Large yard.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449.
17910 N.W. 42ND PLACE
Three bedrooms, central air.
$1395 No Section 8. Call for
list 786-306-4839.
1895 N.W. 55 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Florida room, central airga-
rage, bars, wood floors.
$1350 monthly.786-514-1771
1931 NW 97 Street
Two bedroom, one bath
Call 305-651-1078
786-357-8885
19620 N.W. 22ND AVENUE
Luxurious three bedrooms,
two baths, with garage. Sec-
tion 8 welcome. Call Fred af-
ter 6pm: 954-392-0374
20610 N.W. 28th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, large fenced yard
with fruit trees, $1,200
month-
ly, $1,200 deposit, $2,400 to
move in, purchase for
$195,000. Section 8 ok,
application accepted Sqtur-
day May 24, 2008 9-11 a.m.
Questions contact
Rose Mckay 305-761-6253.
2354 SERVICE ROAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Yard, and utility room. Sec-
tion 8 o.k. Call 305-691-2166
2592 S. E. 12TH COURT
Three bedrooms, three
baths,
beautiful house, homestead
gated community, with pool,
recreational area, washer,
dryer, dishwasher, lake view,
section 8 welcome, cash
back $1500 monthly call
305-717-6084.
2610 N.W. 166 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$750 monthly. 305-638-1475.
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
3101 N.W. 50TH STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
closed garage, fenced yard,
$900 monthly, $400 security,
air, No Section 8. 954-432-
9779 or 305-542-5436.
3411 N.W. 169 Terrace
Three bedrooms, bath and a
half, central air, heat, washer,
dryer. $1300 monthly. Sec-
tion 8 Welcome.
305-742-6520
3880 N.W. 171 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 ok, drive by then
call 954-517-1282.
576 N.W. 42ND STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Laundry, central air, $1100
monthly. First, last, and
security.305-345-3420
6940 N.W. 6th COURT
Four bdrm, one bath, sec.8
welcome, bars, central air,
$1400 mthly, view on
5/24/08.Call 786-709-3707.
7801 N.W. 2ND COURT
Small two bedroom, one
bath, $650 a month, $1300
to move in.
Call 305-479-3632.
Four bedroom, three bath,
786-412-1131

HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three and four bed-
rooms. $700-$1250 with air.
305-642-7080.
MIAMI AREA
Four bdrms $1100, three
bdrms $900,two bdrms $700.
Call 786-285-3285
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
newly renovated. Section 8
OK Call 786-202-0244 or
786-280-6844.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Lovely three bedroom home,
updated kitchen, bath,
washer, dryer, dishwasher,
spa tubnice area $1550
monthly.Call 305-308-8111.
MIAMI GARDENS
Three and four bedrooms,
$1200 to $1400, air, tile
floors, bars. $3600 to $4200
move in. No Section 8.
T. Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
MIAMIA AREA
Newly remodeled five bed-
rooms, three baths, central
air, washer dryer connection.
$1800 monthly. Section 8
Welcome. 954-818-9112


MIRAMAR AREA
Clean three bedroom, one
bath. Central air, large patio.
Section 8 welcome. Call
954-274-1856


I Houses
NORTHWEST AREA
Large two bedrooms
house/duplex, air, water
$750and $850 monthly.
No Section 8. Call
786-303-7896

NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedroom, one bath.
Remodeled home. $1250
monthly, $600 security. New
appliance, washer and dryer.
Section 8 ok. 305-926-2839.
NW / NE AREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.

RENTAL OPEN HOUSE
2006 NW 100 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
with central air, large yard.
$1245 monthly. Also two
.bedrooms, one bath, $1069.
monthly. SECTION 8 WEL-
COME! text 954-394-7338.
Showing 5/23/08 4-6 p.m.
STOP!!!
Behind in rent and
mortgage?
Call Kathy 786-326-7916

Rent With Option

3610 N. W. 212th STREET
Brand new four bedroom,
two bath, $1800 monthly,
sec.8 welcome. Call 786-
399-8557.




SReal Estate Services

EZ HOME FINANCING
Free Seminar qualify for new
home today. 1-888-395-
1951.

I Houses

112 MARION ROAD
Miami Gardens
Why rent?-Buy. three bed-
rooms, den, garage, pool.
Try
$1900 down and $1418
monthly FHA. Call for list
786-306-4839

13001 N. W. 18TH-COURT
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$230k or best offer, call
786-412-1131

1320 N.W. 90 STREET
Little River. Why Rent?-Buy.
Three bedrooms, den, ga-
rage, pool. Try $1900 down
and $1499 monthly FHA.
Call for list
786-306-4839.
2236 N.W. 59th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, kitchen, tile, car-
pet and appliances. Section
8 welcome, $1100 monthly
call
305-491-7522.

3315 N.W. 213 TERRACE
Why rent?-Buy. Five bed-
rooms three baths. Try
$1900
down and $1599 monthly-
FHA. Call for others.
786-306-4839.
7770 MERIDIAN STREET
Miramar. Why Rent?-Buy.
Three bedrooms, carpet. Try
$900 down and $1399
monthly FHA. Call for others.
786-306-4839.

8200 N.W. 14TH AVENUE
Why Rent?-Buy. Three bed-
rooms, carport. Try $900
down and $1399 monthly
FHA. Call for others
786-306-4839.

ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty

BRAND NEW HOME
Three bedrooms, two bath,
1260sq, with tile, we help
you qualify call 1-888-395-
1951.

MIRAMAR/NORLAND
AREA
Buyer's for REO'S and short
sale properties, 100% financ-
ing,550 credit ok.
1-800-242-0363 ex.3644


Duplex Lot for Sale
7900. N.W. 12 Court
By owner, 50 by 119 square
foot. $68,500. 305-469-
6452.

cServices
Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue


Call 305-685-3565

S Rep
GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.


I Automobile
CARS FOR SALE
89 cady allande 1 owner
h.top red/tan $12,500
86 cady cpe 1 owner vogue
tires,silver-black $8500
94 RR silver spur III, blue-H
bello $34,500
97 bentley blue-white
trophy 37370ks $48,000
Rajoy Mtrs 305-968-1946



DAYCARE DIRECTORS
with credentials
and daycare workers
with credentials. Interested
Call 305-986-8395
HOME CARE ASSISTANT
Located in North West Miami
Dade, need a live in Attend-
ant to assist and care for eld-
erly handicap person.
Call 786-277-8988.
Looking for Assistant Director
and full-time teacher for
daycare/preschool. Salary
negotiable. Must have
credentials. Please call
305-691-6868.

W MOTIVATED &
PERSONABLE
Classified Sales
Will train applicants with
great interpersonal and
communication skills.
Computer literate. Typing
speed minimum 40 wpm.
Needed to sell! Sell! SELL!
Salary plus commission.
Must meet weekly quotas.
Furnish employment,
salary histories and
references.
The Miami Times
Fax: 305-758-3617



RECEPTIONIST
PART-TIME
needed for busy office.
Friendly demeanor a must!
The ideal applicant has
great interpersonal and
communication skills.
He/she is computer literate
and has the ability to multi-
task. Typing speed mini-
mum 40 wpm. Please sub-
mit employment, salary
his-
tories and reference.
The Miami Times
FAX RESUME:
305-758-3617


Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY
You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street



Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $55,
also do
G and canceled. Reliable
786-333-2084.

MEDICAL BILLING
COURSE
Only 9 weeks $1350.00
$450.00 Down Payment
Began a New Career
Job Placement Assistant
Contact 305-794-3961 or
305-914-3799
Website:
PRSSONLINE.COM
SUMMER SCHOOL
SUMMER CAMP .
FCAT Preparation-Tutoring
Sports Academic
Affordable Prices
, J & D Owens
Christian Academy
14550 N.E..6 Avenue
Miami, FL 33161
For more information call
Ms. Redmond 786-267-5061
or 305-947-9979


PRIVATE SCHOOL
OPPORTUNITY!!!!

Now accepting applications
for student grades K-12
NO FCAT
ESE STUDENTS ARE
WELCOME
Limited space available
McKay Scholarship
(Free scholarship for ESE
students)
Florida Pride Scholarship
(For low income families)
Grace Academy, 'Bridging
the gap between education,
communities and success'

Should you require any
additional information please
feel free to contact us at
305-751-5910

TUTORING
Have you demonstrated
academic proficiency? Can't
pass the FCAT? Need to
graduate? If your answer is
'YES'! We can help! Call
305-681-6161 and register
today.




Kiara Child Care Center
Accepting toddlers, pre-
schoolers, and VPK. Miami
Gardens 305-474-9369
Proven stimulating curricu-
lum that prepares your
child to reach his or hers
next potential. Register
now and receive free uni-
form shirts.

North Dade Area
I will watch your child in my
home. Affordable price.
Call Kim 305-607-4051




Boat For Sale
24 Foot Sea Ray 1980, 2
Mercury Cruiser. Best Offer
786-277-5059

Problem merchandise we
buy entire warehouse un-
wanted and unsold prod-
ucts 954-549-3223 http://vi--
tatornliquidations.com
PUPPIES R LOVE
Grooming & Sales
2160 N.W. 79th St. Miami
305-696-8818
Yorkie Tcup $599, Maltese
Toy $499, Pomerian Toy
$499, Shih Tzu Toy $499.



MOTHER NATURES
100% Natural Skin and Hair
Care Products. Specializing
in: All Shea Butter Products,
Soaps, Lotion, Shampoo,
Body Wash, Hair Pomenade
etcetera. Call Bro. Peter at
786-356-5379, 786-267-6593
mothernatures5@aol.com'




Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
-Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com

Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784



INDIAN PSYCHIC
Help on all problems, rela-
tionships and marriages
.Help
and advice on all problems.
Fast results! Call for mini
reading. 305-621-9112 or
786-357-9687


Some IRS tax rebate checks

going to wrong bank accounts


GARDEN CITY, N.Y.
(AP) About 1,500 tax
rebate checks sent out
by the IRS this month
were wired to the bank
accounts of people who
already received their
payments or others who
were not entitled to the
money.
The rebates, which
are expected to reach
130 million households,
range up to $600 for
individuals and $1,200
for married couples, plus
$300 a child for eligible
parents. Congress
approved the payments
earlier this year as part
of an economic stimulus
initiative.
Newsday cited the


example of a Long
Island man who said he
found an unexpected
$1,800 in his bank
account. The man
told the newspaper he
checked with his bank
and found the deposit
belonged to someone
with a different Social
Security number.
IRS spokesman Kevin
McKeon acknowledged
that about 1,500
payments nationwide
went to wrong bank
accounts. But he said
the problem was dwarfed
by the nearly 30 million
stimulus payments
totaling more than $27
billion that have been
issued correctly.








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


Forecklonus sk rocket 65'9 in April


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SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans $150
Infusion Frontal laces
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $85
786-277-6821
06/10/08


A.V. INSURANCE
$ave $$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
94/10/08
C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners *
SGeneral Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue
305-836-5206


GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
. Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07/20/08


FAITH FINANCIAL
Reverse Mortgage!
Stay at home Enjoy Tax Free
No Mtg. Payments. If you are
62 yrs or older call me
Alex at 305-205-1697
01/09


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08


Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553
4/30/08
,Y6'50m-2 6'
weesA& ief?'vzt
Call
305-694-6210


Fax
305-694-6211


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Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


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Request for Proposals

The South Florida Workforce Investment Board
(SFWIB) is soliciting competitive proposals from
qualified organizations with the expertise and
demonstrated ability to effectively and efficiently
manage and operate the delivery of Workforce
Services and Youth Services which include sum-
mer and year round activities.
The Request for Proposals (RFP) will be avail-
able to the public commencing at 3 P.M., May
20,2008, at 7300 Corporate Center Drive (NW 19th
Street), 5th floor reception desk or the RFP may be
downloaded from the SFWIB website (www.south
floridaworkforce.com) after 4:00 p.m. on the same
day.
:,An Offerors' Conference is scheduled for 10:00
A.M., May. 23, 2008, at 7300"Corporate Center'
Drive (NW 19th Street), 5th floor, Conference
Room 3, Miami, Florida 33126.
Offerors are hereby'advised to consult the SF-
WIB website (www.southfloridaworkforce.com) for
more details on the competitive process.
Proposals must be received by the SFWIB at the
aforesaid location not later than 1:00 P.M.. June
2. 2008. Proposals not received by the SFWIB by
1:00 P.M., June 2, 20008, shall not be accepted
and shall not be considered.


MIDTOWN COMMUNITY
REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT a Special CRA
Board Meeting of the Midtown Community Rede-
velopment Agency will take place on Thursday,
May 22, 2008 after 10:00 AM, at the City of Miami
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For
more information please contact the CRA offices
at (305) 679-6800.

(#003131)


"James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manager, will be accepting
SEALED SUBCONTRACTOR BIDS for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Es-
timates for the TPM Classroom Additions for Lauderdale Manors Elemen-
tary School and the TPM Classroom Additions for Flamingo Elementary
School until 5:00 PM on May 28, 2008. The work includes various trades
for CSI Divisions 2, 10 and 16. James A. Cummings, Inc. is actively seeking
Broward County School Board certified minority subcontractors and suppli-
ers. Sealed bids for each project will be accepted at James A. Cummings,
Inc. main office 3575 NW 53 Street; Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309. Bid docu-
ments will be available through Cummings, Dodge and Reed Construction.
For more information please call Patrick Holland @ James A. Cummings,
Inc. (954) 733-4211 or Fax: (954) 485-9688.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


H"Am oa& L2% .


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, MAY 21-27, 2008


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S=Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


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Colonial bank's president appointed to center for financial training board


Eris Sandier,
president and CEO
of retail banking for
Colonial Bank's South
Florida region, has
been named to the
Center For Financial
Training's board of
directors.
Sandler has been
in banking for more
than 25 years. She


is responsible for the
growth and profitability
of more than 60
Colonial Bank offices in
Miami-Dade, Broward,
Palm Beach and
Martin counties, with
her market bringing
in nearly 15 percent
of the bank's total
deposit base. An active
community leader, she


supports organizations
such as the United
Way, and also serves as
a board member for the
Young at Art Children's
Museum and as a
board member for Kids
In Distress.
-"Eris leads by example
both professionally
and personally,"
said Connie Laguna,


%%m' bm


executive director for
the Center For Financial
Training. "She
has experienced
tremendous succession
her career at Colonial
Bank and demonstrates
a passion for excellence
in financial education. I
am pleased to have such
a phenomenal woman
join our board."


A Davie resident,
Sandler is a summa
cum laude graduate of
the University of Miami,
with a bachelor's
degree in business
administration. She
also is a graduate of the
Greater Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce
Executive Leadership
Program.


IL ArUNIVERSITYOF




ADVISOR 2
The University of Miami in Coral Gables, seeks
applicants for a FT professional staff position in the
Office of Financial Assistance Services. Bachelor's
degree & one year related exp. Proficient Customer
Service skills with working knowledge of student issues
revolving around loans & tuition balances. Frequent
interaction with parents, students & school officials
from other departments. High level of professionalism
req'd. Must be able to trouble shoot complex issues &
make quality decisions in a fast paced environment.
Meet with students and/or parents to resolve financial
issues relating to completion of financial registration
requirements. Excellent communication skills, verbal &
written req'd. Salary competitive.


Interested candidates please apply online at
www.miami.edu/careers (Keyword: 037023 &
037024) and submit your Resume.


EO/AAE


MIAMI-DADl

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
.lh'tr,, E'dErllcxcc Ev'ry Zay


Celebrate Freedom -, -V

COLONIAL

FREEDOM CHECKING*

Cash-back Rewards One Free NSF/
r eive ah bi-..rk for o.,ur C.,,ld Overdraft Fee
Ch.ck CG .rd p r. .,.. r -, rchb, e on :c.ur itn-r NSI-
c. rd r.fi f, c ai, h '.cu r r".

\\.a i the fees goodbye ,nlth Colonial Freedom Checking.
It his aIll the feature. you expect from a free checking account
like aI lree cheik card iand Free onh,'lne banking g.
But. the cash-back re\,aids and one penalty-free NSF'oveidraft
fee per vyear are the reasons we put "Freedom" in the name.
Colonial Freedom Chew.king.
uMuch more than the usual free checking account.



Colonial has mo1re than bO oft'ices. to u _s-re 'ou in
South Florida. To find a location near you.
1,1 l ..,v-[.,(. 0d/m ,l : c,,1ll ur Coll (877,) o.I 5 -2 6E .



COLONIAL BANK, N.A.
You'll like it here.

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A.o.'lbI .. H( iN:F, -id rxeP I roft -7.e- r .h F-" ke. b., .lrt e,'il rr,3I. I-l A. rt's .., ,:-.hr1i .' JInr. r. 'i x No
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Cc l,.p .1 tr,IlCnI Ir'.a[ucl c o A, T rM cpF, diL r




^^^^^^JOIN OUR^


BUSNES SRVCE CONECTIO


I www.miami.edu/careers I


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES. MAY 21-27, 2008


What career will rock your world? .aa: i1.I


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn

With FCAT out of
the way, Henry E. S.
Reeves Elementary
held their annual
career day on May
7. Miami-Dade Fire-
Fighters, Team Metro,
Ray's Trucking,
Nathaniel Curry
(Canadian League
Football Player),
Officer Snook of the
DEA Agents, Miami
Central High School
JROTC, Ronald
McDonald were among
the many participants
who attended the
event and shared their


career experiences
with students.
"While motivating
and encouraging
students on a day-
to-day basis is very
important. It is
essential for our kids
to see professionals
that work within the
community," said
Chiniqua Smith, a
fourth-grade teacher.
The students dressed
up in costumes which
detailed the career
that they planned
on pursuing when
they got older. With
the presence of so
many influential
community members,


the students were
able to experience a
variety careers and
their benefits.
"As an instructional
leader, I feel that all
students have the
exposure to various
careers and which will
enable them to become
productive citizens
and leaders in society.
This will certainly
move them into the
right direction," said
Principal Julian E.
Gibbs.
Radio personality
and comedian, Benji
Brown, entertained
the crowd of students
and teachers. He


talked to the students
about what it was
like growing up in
his parent's house
and the moral and
values in which they
instilled in his life.
Brown impersonated
different characters
and brought laughter
to the audience.
Overall, the
career day was
really successful.
Shovon Bethune, the
guidance counselor
who planned the event
said, "This career day
bought in nearly 40
local professional with
hopes of doubling the
numbers next year."


Miami-Dade Fire Rescue demonstrate to students their job responsibilities.


( on artist at %o)rk; .,- ..



watch out for Copyrighted Material..

. -......... Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


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MlAMI-DADE

CONSOLIDATED REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS FOR
HOMELESS HOUSING AND SERVICES
Miami-Dade County Government, through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust, is requesting
applications from qualified public or private non-profit service providers (or for-profit Affordable
Housing Developers for the Homeless Housing Assistance Grant only) for two housing and
services grants as part of an application to be submitted to the State of Florida, Office on
Homelessness for Match funding through the Challenge Grant for U.S. HUD funded Supportive
Housing Programs, and the Homeless Housing Assistance Grant for Capital funding for homeless
housing programs.
The County will evaluate all applications to determine the best qualified service providers) to
perform the outlined scope of services. Interested parties may pick-up a copy of the Request for
Applications (RFA) beginning May 27, 2008 at the following address:
Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust
111 NW 1st Street, 27th Floor, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1490
8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
The due date for submission of applications is 4:00 p.m. on June 12th, 2008, at the Clerk of the
Board of County Commissioners on the 17th Floor, Room 17-202 of the Stephen P. Clark Center,
Miami, Florida. A Pre-Application Workshop will be held on May 28, 2008 at 2:30 p.m. at 111
N.W. 1st Street, 27th Floor- Conference Room B, Miami, Florida, 33128
Attendance at the Pre-Application Workshop is strongly recommended. In order to maintain a fair
and impartial competitive process, the County can only answer questions at the Pre-Application
Workshop and must avoid private communication with prospective service providers during the
application preparation and evaluation period. Miami-Dade County is not liable for any cost
incurred by the applicant in responding to the RFA, and it reserves the right to modify or amend
the application deadline schedule if it is deemed necessary or in the interest of Miami-Dade
County. Miami-Dade County provides equal access and opportunity in employment and services
and does not discriminate on the basis of handicap. The contact person for purposes of this
RFA is David Raymond, (305) 375-1490.


PLEASE NOTE:


IF YOU ARE SEEKING AFFORDABLE HOUSING, PLEASE GO TO OUR
WEBSITE: www.miamidade.gov/homeless


Subscribe


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above, telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD DATE


'1'


o b., -,.* ., .


-. PRE-BID CONFERENCE
S ..ADDENDUMS


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


'TODIAV!




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