Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00545
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: April 30, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00545
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text



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Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


D I STR I B UTE D IN M IAM I- D A D E A N D B R OWARD C O U NTI E S FO R OVE R 8 5 YEARS


Volume 85 Number 32


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


SMITH FLEURANTIN


CLYNE


Local attorneys


question third


trial of


'Liberty City 6'


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamnitimesonline.com,

A third trial is set for the six Liberty City men
arrested on terrorism charges. So far, the men
have survived two mistrials in this federal case.
You may remember back in 2006, seven men
were arrested for allegedly plotting with al-al-
Qaeda to blow-up Chicago's Sears Tower and
bomb FBI offices in several cities.
"We should be looking for real terrorist in
Afghanistan. People have tried to tell the President
and the U.S. Attorney's office that there are no
terrorist in the Liberty seven, six, or five. Justice
is blind but President Bush and the U.S. Attorney
are not supposed to be blind. Unfortunately, it
appears that they are," said local Attorney H.T.
Smith.
Last week, U.S. District Judge Joan Lenard
declared a mistrial in the second trial because
jurors could not agree on a verdict for the six
Please turn to SIX 6A



Father accused


of burning son


with iron

Police are searching
for a father accused of
burning his 12-year-old
son repeatedly with an
iron in Overtown earlier
this month.
After spending three
years in prison, 27-year-
old Cedrick Brown was
released and went to his
mother's house to reunite
with his son. According
to police, the boy was CEDRICK BROWN
tortured by his father Abusive Father
throughout the day by
being stripped naked, beaten and whipped, and
then burned him repeatedly with an iron because
his son had misbehaved at school. Brown also
threatened to castrate the boy.
"He said something that really stuck out to
the detectives," Delrish Moss, Miami police
spokesman. "They asked him how he reacted to
everything, and he said 'I took it like a man'."
The suspect's sister could not believe that her
brother could commit such act. "My brother is
Please turn to ABUSE 6A


Investigation of airport contracts sought


Another scandal is threatening troublesome
Miami International Airport where a whistle-
blower complaint has been filed by an
employee asking for the investigation of a
minority partner.
The minority partner in a huge MIA
construction contract with Dade Aviation
Consultants spent a year in jail on
embezzlement charges while the agreement
was in force.
Linda Forrest, the minority participant
had the power to dispense multimillion
dollar contracts to Clark Contractors, Inc.
own by relatives of the division director at
MIA's contract administration department, a
department employee alleges.
Behind the complaint is Maryse Georges, a


Miami International Airport contracts officer,
Georges sent a letter to the county's inspector
general asking him to open an investigation
into Poinciana Development Group, headed
by Forrest.
Georges asked that the investigation focus
on the relationship between Poinciana's
lobbyist/partner and a family member who
is employed by MDAD who administers
Poinciana's MDAD contracts. She indicated
that there was the possibility of conflict and
ethnic violations.
Clark Contractors owners are related to the
late Steve Clark, former Miami-Dade mayor.
Forrest, 43, was indicted in May 2003 for
conspiracy to embezzle insurance funds,
Please turn to CONTRACTS 5A


Strong Mayor

government

offers no balance

of power

Commissioner Jordan takes a
stand for the people
Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Commissioner Barbara
J. Jordan is for the people
and wants to bring back
the executive form of
government which gives a
balance of power to elected
officials.
"This is the form of
government that works
best for the community,"
said Jordan.
Jordan, elected in 2004
as the commissioner of
District 1, represents the Barbara Jordan
cities of Opa Locka and Commissioner District I
Miami Gardens, including
the following communities of Carol City, Norland,
Crestview, Rolling Oaks, Bunche Park;, Scott
Lakes, and Andover. Portions of North Miami
Beach and North Miami are also part of her
district.
She is vice-chairperson for the Transit
Committee and sits on the Economic Development
Please turn to POWER 6A



MDPS facing


major cuts
The growing financial crisis in Tallahassee will
cost major changes in the Miami-Dade School
Board budget for next year.
Hundreds of positions, administrators
bonuses, teacher raises and some summer school
programs could be eliminated as the board seeks


"While it hurts me in my heart to do
this, I would rather do this than lay off
teachers who already are under con-
tract in the system."


Solomon Stinson, Board member
Supported the proposal


to slash $284 million from the budget.
On Monday the board agreed to support
postponing the salary increases promised to
teachers, raising the price of school lunches,
and eliminating transportation for magnet-and-
vocational-school students.
They also agreed once again to consider
repurposing a controversial proposal to close up
to a dozen under enrolled schools, which came
under intense scrutiny earlier this year.
The measures are intended to cut more
than $284 million from the school system's
2008-2009 budge Superintendent Rudy Crew
calculated the shortfall based on an expected
$75 million decrease in funding from state
Please turn to CUTS 6A


Distinguished officers of the month


The Miami-Dade Police
Department (MDPD) is pleased
to announce Officers Tracy
Postell and Charles Woods have
been awarded the departmental
Silver Medal of Valor and
Lifesaving Awards, and selected
to share Distinguished Officer
of the Month honors for April
2008. Officer Postell has been a
Department member since June
1995 and Officer Woods since
August 2006. They are both
assigned to the Intracoastal
District.
On January 13, 2008,
Officers Postell and Woods
were dispatched to a violent
disturbance in Miami-Dade


County. Upon arrival, they
heard a woman screaming
from one of the apartments.
As they approached, a male
voice from inside the apartment
stated that the police were
not needed. However, a female
was heard screaming in agony
and requesting help. The man
continued to refuse entry, at
which point Officer Woods kicked
in the front door.
Upon entering, the officers saw
an elderly woman lying on the
floor in a pool of blood, her feet
tied together with electrical cord.
The subject was observed actively
burning the victim with cooking
utensils. Realizing that the victim


had sustained lifethreatening
injuries and was in additional
peril, Officers Woods and Postell
rushed the subject and pinned
him to the floor. The woman
was transported to the hospital
with serious lacerations, bums,
and blunt force trauma to her
head. Subsequent investigation
revealed that the suspect falsely
imprisoned the victim, sexually
assaulted her, and told her that
"Today is the last day of your
life."
The officers are commended
for their teamwork and prompt
actions that resulted in the
apprehension of a violent subject
and saved the life of a citizen.


Officers Tracy Postell and Charles Woods


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES. APRIL 30- MAY 6. 2008


Miscarriage of justice
The decision by the U.S. federal court to retry the case of
the so-called Liberty City Seven after two other panels
had rendered mistrials by hung juror should go down
in court annals as cruel and inhuman punishment.
Having two juries deadlock over the same case is highly
unusual and has never happened in a major terrorism
prosecution, leaving officials in an awkward position of
dispensing equal justice without fear or favor.
The two trials have already cost several million, dollars,
including investigative expenses, fees for court-appointed
defense lawyers, and prosecutors' salaries. Simply providing
security for the two trials has cost more than $1 million,
according to the U.S. Marshals Service.
And let us not forget the thousands of dollars the FBI paid
to the two Arab criminals to acquire information from the
men about their ties to al-Qaeda.
In June 2006, the men were arrested based on allegations
they were part of a homegrown terrorist cell plotting with al-
Qaeda to blow up the Chicago Sears Tower and Miami FBI
headquarters. But defense attorneys argued the men were
set up by two paid FBI informants. And the group's leader,
Narseal Batiste,34, testified in both trials that he pretended
to go along with the plot to swindle money from an informant
disguised as an al-Qaeda operative.
Prosecutors have failed miserably to prove otherwise
and Batiste's testimony suggests that the government got
snookered and ended up with a major embarrassment.
The 9-11 incident has made us all aware of the serious
threat of terrorism to this country, and we applaud the
efforts of the FBI to keep us safe from attacks. But we are in
a nation of laws and every person should get a fair share.
A third trial for these men lead many to feel that the
government is going a bit far to save some officials from being
embarrassed after expending so much time and money on a
case without getting a conviction.
But the result would be far worse if we sent innocent men
to prison.




The following editorial appeared this week in The Miami Herald.
It deals with one of the most important and troubling situations in
our community and one that must be dealt with in an intelligent and
prudent manner. It is up to this community to seize the moment.

JESCA is broken,

but can be repaired
OUR OPINION: AGENCY PROVIDES VITAL SERVICES
TO A NEEDY COMMUNITY

The financially struggling James E. Scott Community
Association -- JESCA -- needs an overhaul, a cash infusion
and new management with solid business expertise. The
social-services agency is struggling to make payroll, among
other financial problems. This isn't JESCA's first fiscal crisis,
but if the agency's board of directors acts wisely, it could be
its last. That's important. The social net that JESCA provides
for infants, teens, seniors and others must be mended,
particularly since the Legislature is cutting state funding for
services.

MONEY PROBLEMS ANEW
Vacancies on JESCA's board and the apparent resignation
of CEO Dorrin Rolle provide an opening to bring new blood
to the board and the agency. A search is on, with help from
United Way, for new leaders now that former chair Wilbert
"Tee" Holloway has resigned following his appointment to the
Miami-Dade County School Board. Heading JESCA's board
requires financial acumen and a keen appreciation for the
vital role JESCA plays in the community.
As for Mr. Rolle's successor, now more than ever the job
must go to someone with a sound financial background. Mr.
Rolle, a Miami-Dade County commissioner, pulled the agency
together in the 1990s after a former director left its finances
in shambles by embezzling thousands of dollars. In recent
years, money problems have resurfaced -- checks bounce,
payroll is late, accounting is unreliable. The School Board
finally dropped a program run by JESCA in 2007 because of
its jumbled finances. JESCA's payroll checks have been late
11 times in the last year.
JESCA relies on government grants to fund its programs,
and the grant money sometimes is delayed. With chronically
low cash balances, any holdup in funds can put JESCA's
budget in arrears. Another problem is how JESCA seeks
grant money, which annually amounts to almost $8 million,
92 percent of its revenues. Too often the agency seeks the
grant before creating the program it is earmarked to fund.
That is backward.

STRONG BOARD NEEDED
JESCA needs to strip away all but its core programs,
determine their actual costs and then seek funding. Finally,
the agency needs a cash reserve on hand so that it isn't always
playing catch-up. This will require a vigorous fundraising
campaign.
Successful nonprofit social-service providers have
committed boards of directors made up of community leaders,
philanthropists and program experts with no turf at stake in
the agency. A strong board is needed to hire and oversee
an experienced professional to run the agency. This sounds
simple, but it is not at all easy. Those who believe in JESCA's
mission must step up and make the agency whole again.


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Democrat's votes should count


Dear Editor,

I think the way the votes
should be handle is to count
the votes that was already
cast on 01/29/08. Then since
the Florida voles are now to be
counted have the local election
supervisor check the voter
roll of the 01/29/08 election
and find out who did not vote.


Then mail the ones who did
not vote ballots to be cast.
That way you are not mailing
everybody ballots only the one
who did not vote. The process
would, not cost as much as
sending everybody a ballot to
cast. I'm very disappointed
in Florida here its 2008 and
will still having problems with
the voting system. I'm really


very passionate about the
voting process because I had
a g2neration that died so I can
have the opportunity to vote.
That's why I get so upset when
my manager on my job does
not allow me to participate in
the election process on voting
day. They think it's for the
money, "please" on Election
Day you work from 5:45a.m.


To 7:00 p.m. or even longer for
the amount of $120. Believed
me it's not for the money I just
feel so proud to be working
on Election Day. I feel like I'm
continuing the process of my
past generation.

Vernon Floyd
Miami


The sagging truth


Dear Editor,

I have read with interest the
recent letters to the editor and
Miami Times articles about the
proposed legislation against
sagging (or the low wearing
of pants and trousers) that is
being sponsored by Senator
Larcenia Bullard and Senator
Gary Siplin. On the contrary,
the proposed legislation is not
against the wearing of baggy
pants that are worn by women
or the baggy trousers that are
worn by men. The proposed
legislation is about "sagging"
and it is on target and should
be supported, by parents, the
Black community, governor
Charlie Crist and the NAACP
and others. Why?
Sagging usually occurs when
belts are not worn with trousers
or pants and consequently,
these apparels drop lower on
one's body and sag and there
within is the problem when it is
properly defined. Specifically,
the greater problem with
sagging is that it often insults
the public when one's lower
rear anatomy is revealed
and it becomes indecent
exposure. Additionally, the
proposed sagging legislation
should, from a common sense
perspective, also necessitate


broad support from educators,
parents, church folks, law
abiding citizens, civil rights
advocates and others. In
support of this position, the
following facts are submitted:
Sagging is the practicing of
a jail behavior.. Sagging is
also anti employment, in that
major and minor employers do
not hire persons who present
themselves as sagging style
wearers. Persons at large
who are against the proposed
Sagging Bill probably don't sag
in theirrespectiveworkplaces or
in public places like churches,
schools, government offices,
etc. Why then would these
persons and organizations
want to facilitate sagging or
say to young adults and to
older adults that it is ok to sag
with their approval?
Governor Charlie Crist,
reportedly by the Miami Times
(March 26-April 1, 2008)
would consider vetoing the
sagging bill. This would be a
major mistake. Surely he has
"misspoken" if this is true. He
does not sag and in the state
of Florida we would like to
think that he will support the
sagging legislation and not
present himself as a supporter
and facilitator of sagging.
Our ministers, educators


and elected officials don't
sag either. Why is this the
reality? To practice sagging
would create a negative
image for these persons and
subsequently perhaps a little
disrespect and ultimately a
lack of support and respect.
More specifically, it is very
apparent that these persons
are also, consciously aware
that sagging is associated
with negative behavior, a jail
behavior. These persons also
know that there are indecent
exposure laws that provide
consequences for indecent
exposure behavior that take
place in public. Given these
realities, why then would we
want to say to our children that
its ok to sag in extreme ways
in public. We don't We adults
may not want to promote the
sagging behavior and practice.
It sends the wrong message to
the youth.
We also know that the lack
of adequate parenting may
be a contributing factor to
sagging.
We also know that it's a
fact that some parents and
relatives bring their jail habits
home.
Even though these practices
are perhaps true, we would
also like to think that no


parent would want their
children to be in prison or
jail. Why then would we as
adults even think about
approving sagging behaviors
that prepare our children for
the incarceration experience.
As adults, we should not
condone sagging or allow our
schools to approve it or ignore
it in their dress codes. Nor
should our present and future
plans include sagging as a
consideration for approval.
Additionally, my discussion
in this letter and the
presentation of facts as
I perceive them related to
saging, would also suggest
that the Florida State
NAACP's position on the
sagging bill maybe wrong and
should be reconsidered.
What about a person's
individual right to sag and
show his/her rear anatomy in
public?
What about the. rights
of an individual to expose
him/her self indecently in
public? I prefer to leave these
questions and their legality to
be addressed by others with
legal backgrounds and legal
knowledge.

Benjamin B. Cowins, Sr.
Miami Gardens


--


The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other materialin thenewpae
Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed and rnust include the name, area l
number of the writer for purposes of confirming authorship.
SSend letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305-757-77
Email: miamiteditorial@bellsouth.net.
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OPINION


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


Bl.A\Ck.S M\IST CONTROL I'HEIR Ow\VN )DESTINY


Do you feel stimulated? .
President Bush you the reasons that I
remember him? The guy who respect McCain.
is living in the White House. His grandfather
Anyway, he is pleased to served, his father
thqt most Americans sePrvedP John


CIlannounceU LanL OL 1mos UU
will be getting a huge stimulus
- between $600 to $1,200. This
stimulus package was suppose
to turn around the economy
by enormously boosting up
spending. Now, it is hoped that
it will help defray the cost of gas
and rising food prices. Do you
feel better now that you can gas
up again?
If you are facing foreclosure,
the stimulus might save you
for 1 more month. If you have
been recently evicted because


McCain served and
his son served. He is one of the
few Senators who can state that
their children were put in harms
way during the recent crisis.
Notable by their absence are any
Busheg, Cheneys, or other top
Republican leaders children. In
Great Britain, the Prince served
his tour of duty gladly. Why is it
that American political leaders
are so willing to go to war, but
so unwilling to send their own
children? I think there should


While President Bush and Vice President Cheney dodge
their tour of military service, a poor Black man volun-
teered for the Marineand served two tours inVietnam.


the home you lived in was
foreclosed upon, then you have
a little money to help put down
on your next rental unit. If you
are a month behind in your car
payments or need to pay car
insurance, then you got the cash
for that. Perhaps, you might
want to buy groceries. Well you
have enough for two trips and a
pair jeans.
Now that you have spent
your stimulus do you feel
stimulated?

VETERANS EARNED
THE RIGHT TO
SPEAK OUT
I have this thing about
veterans I respect them. I
figure that anyone who will risk
his life for his country deserves
our respect and admiration.
During the Vietnam era, three
prominent Americans faced the
issue of whether to show their
patriotism and fight or take a
less savory approach. President
Bush joined the National Guard
and then ducked out of serving
his full term by "working on
a political campaign." Vice
President Cheney deferred his
draft and stayed in school. Both
men are now tough on defense
and are willing to send other
people's children to fight in Iraq
and Afghanistan. This is one of


be a law passed that if you vote
for the war, then you have to
send some family members over
to the war zone, on the front
line, so they can live or die by
your vote. I wonder if President
Bush would have been able to
invade Iraq, for no reason, if he
had to convince Laura that the
twins would be serving 3 terms
in the hot zone?
While President Bush and
Vice President Cheney dodge
their tour of military service,
a poor Black man volunteered
for the Marines and served
two tours in Vietnam. This
gentlemen a decorated soldier,
in my mind, has protected the
Constitution and this country
and earned the right to exercise
his First Amendment Rights to
speak out on the pulpit about
the policies of this country that
he beliefs are detrimental to
this country. Jeremiah Wright
appears to be tired of staying
in the shadows and has been
speaking out. He rightly states
that only snippets of his sermon
are being played and that even
the snippet is from a quote from
a white Republican. All patriots
were not quiet and silent, but
many were vociferously, critical
of the government hence the
founding of this country after
patriots revolted from English
rule.


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Rev. Jeremiah Wright surprised a lot of people on
Monday when he refused to distance himself from Louis
Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam leader; Wright excused
Farrakhan's anti-Semitic remarks as having been made
"20 years ago" and added that although he does not always
agree with Farrakhan, "he is one of the most important
voices in the 20th and 21st century."


As destructive as it turned out for Barack Obama, some
political observers see the hand of cagey Bill Clinton
behind the National Press Club speech in Washington on
Monday. But Wright's appearance was organized by the
Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference, an ecumenical group
of Black religious leaders that he helped found five years
ago.


Local leaders are insisting that Little Haiti name their new
community enter for former Miami Commissioner Arthur
E. Teele Jr. who committed suicide in 2006 when he was
59. The ironic part is that Teele's conviction on the minor
charge for threatening a police officer was overturned
posthumously on appeal.


After two hung juries and no new evidence many people
feel the government prosecutors are trying to hand a
terrorism conviction on the Liberty City Six, they should
throw in the towel and admit that those two FBI informants
sold them a bill of goods.


A coalition of civil rights advocates on Sunday in New
York urged changes in the handling of police misconduct
and brutality complaints after the acquittal of three officers
involved in the shooting death of an unarmed man on his
wedding day.


Republican John McCain has the field to himself while
Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton are carrying on a heated
battle among themselves. Democratic National Committee
Chairman Howard Dean, while not saying which one he
thinks it will be, said Monday that one of his party's last
two presidential contenders will need to drop out of the
race after the last primary on June 3.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


Edison Raiders take winning


to aother level

Sandra J. Charite
scihariri( 1@iatritiiri nsonline. coin

Edison Park Elementary is continuing to shine in
the Liberty City community. Located in an area that is
plagued with violence, Edison students have stepped
out and shown the community that despite what the
darkness brings, they can and will walk through the
light.

KING AND QUEENS
Last year, Coach Webber Charles and his phenomenal
chess team brought home a State Championship. Since
then, they have been undefeated and continue to be
victorious fighting down legends and taking in the kings
and queens.
At the Grand Prix, Professional Chess Service, which
was held on April 19th at the Doral Middle School,
the team ranked first and third place in the group
competitions. "We have been practicing for a very long
time,", said Cary Canton (5th grade) Milton Canton (5th
grade), Daphne Das (3rd grade), Woody Jean-Louis (5th
grade), Denaric Mikle (5th grade), and Julina Gonzalez
(5th grade) were among the top stars in the individual
competition.
The chess team, which started in 2006, has grown
and received enormous media attention. With the team's
multiplying success, the students have excelled in their
classrooms as their confidence and passion to be best
continues to increase.
"Through success and the management of failure, they
have conducted themselves accordingly, and remained
resolute in their quest to be the best elementary school
chess team Miami-Dade County Schools has to offer,"
said Coach Webber Charles.

THE 'THREE MUSKETEERS'
"We held an audition throughout the school to see
which individuals would compete in this competition.
These three students performed spectacularly, so we
chose them to represent Edison Park for the Oratorical
Competition," says Sharon Simmons, media specialist at
Edison Park Elementary.
Angeline Duroseau, Leia Ambrister, and Toni Anthony
were the three third graders chosen to represent
Edison Park. Sharon Simmons and Holly Warco, who
is a Reading First Coach, placed these students under
rigorous and meticulous training, leading these young
ladies into the world of theatrical speaking.
Doroseau and Ambrister performed pieces by Langston
Hughes, Ballad of the Landlord and Madam and the
Rent Man, and Anthony delivered a speech by Jamie
Mckinney called Standing Tall.


Edison Park Elementary oratorical team


"The best part about this for me is the kids got to learn
more about Black History. In order for the audience to feel
them, the kids had to understand what they were saying
," says Ms. Simmons.
"I felt so great," said Anthony. The angelic and yet
ambitious Anthony is also a part of Edison's State
Championship Chess team. She came in second place at the
2008 Florida Super State Scholastic Chess Tournament.
"Before I performed, Mrs. Simmons told me to practice
and I did just that but I was a little scared so I performed
in order to get rid of my fear. I am determined and I strive
to reach my goal," says Ambrister.
"We learned that when we are on that stage, we should
have fun because we only have two minutes and those two
minutes we will never see again," says Duroseau.
Anthony and Ambrister, who are also members of the
Edison Park's news team, were selected to represent
Region IV at the Theodore Gibson Oratorical Final which
will take place at Miami-Dade College on May 14.
"These kids did such an awesome job and watching
them perform encourages me to continue this next year
with more students," says Simmons.
The Raider Rooks chess team is preparing for the 2008
Burt Lerner K-6 Elementary National Championships on
May 8 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Eight students will be
attending the competition but they are short $2000. If
you would like to donate or support the team, you can call
Charles Webber at 786-269-4337.
Edison Park is a dynamic school filled with extraordinary
children, who are able to conquer the world with their gifts.
We look forward to hearing more exciting things about the
school in the upcoming future.


Florida Super State Scholastic chess tournament champions


Edison Park Elementary chess team


CLINTON DARNELL ENGRAM SR.

Congratulations
Youth pastor Clinton Darnell
Engram, Sr. was ordained at
Jesus People Ministries Church
International on Thursday, May
8, during the Right Connection
Association Convention by his
leaders Bishop Isaiah and Dr.
Gloria Williams.
The Engram family requests
your continual prayers as God
uses Pastor Engram to assist in
the work of the ministry while
reaching this next Generation
for Christ.

Big Mothers Day

celebration
On Sunday May 11 at Holy Cross
Missionary Baptist Church, 1555
N.W. 93 Ter., 3 p.m.. The event
is sponsored by the Wimberly
Sisters Outreach Association.
Appearing on the program are
the South Florida Singers,
Wimberly Sisters, Lil Kelly, Five
Singing Stars, Southern Echoes,
Southernaires and others. Come
and worship with us.


DR. VAN ANDRE JOHNSON
Congratulations!
On April 26, Van Andre
Johnson received his Doctorate
Degree in podiatric medicine
from Barry University.
Congratulations from, parents
Van Sr. and Carletha Johnson,
sister Vanette Johnson, and
grandmother Ann Smith.


BARBARA GRAHAM


DR. MARY HYLOR


St. John Baptist Church presents

their annual Mother-Daughter Tea


Using as a theme 'Mothers
and Daughters: Praising God
Together,' the Young Matrons
Ministry will honor sisters
Barbara Graham and Dr. Mary
Hylor at its annual Mother-
Daughter Tea. The keynote


speaker will be Minister Mildred
Moore of Memorial Temple
Baptist Church. The program
will be held this Saturday, May
3 at 6 p.m. in the Fellowship
Hall of the church. Rev. Henry
Nevin, pastor.


,. '' ,






LAQUITA LAZETTE HUMPHREY

Congratulations!

On Saturday May 3, Laquita Humphrey will graduate from
Miami Dade College and receive an Associate Arts Degree in
accounting. Our blessings to her from her mother, Lela T.
Humphrey and son Patrick Leon Wright, Jr.


C3 TY OF MA T AM










6/~~
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2em ANNE N; R''i5 A L

FWOI dle SANRTE BeL AUD











I I


Green Design meet to discuss

the fight for affordable housing


Miami Workers Center (MWC),
Low-Income Families Fighting
Together (LIFFT), and the
United States Green Builders
council gathered on April 26 at
the Gwen Cherry Park, 2591 NW
71 Street, to host the Designing
Green Competition.
"The Green Competition is a
state-wide design. We want to
give the community a chance to
envision their vision of Liberty
City," said Aiyeshia Hudson,
an organizer with the Miami
Workers Center.
Last Saturday, in the area
where Scott Carver homes once
was, participants assembled to
redesign 850 environmentally
sustainable public housing
units. Former Scott Carver
residents and the Green
Businesses participated in a
panel discussion. Scott Carver
homes were built in 1954 but
were torn down by the county
with the use of a federal HOPE
VI grant in 2002, leaving
residents displaced. "Scott
Carver was our home and the
community where we helped
raise each others kids. When
they tore it down, they broke
apart that community. We need
our homes back," said Mae


Smith, former Scott resident
who lived there since it was
built.
After the panel discussion
competition contestants broke
into three groups and were led
on a tour of Scott Carver site by
former residents.
Designing Green comes
at a tense time for the Scott
redevelopment. In the past
two years, there have been
allegations of corruption in the
Miami Dade Housing Agency
(MDHA). Low-Income Families
Fighting Together and the
Miami Workers Center revived
their community organizing
campaign, Justice for Scotts.
The organizations have met
with residents to regain the last
standing of the Scotts building
and confronted the head of the
housing agency demanding all
residents get a right to return
and all low-income housing
units be brought back to the
community.
In February 2007, Miami Dade
Housing Agency (MDHA) signed
an agreement with MWC/
LIFFT meeting all the demands
including building back 850
public housing units, agreeing
for the right for residents to


LIFFT Leader Yvonne Stratford


return and the expansion of
services including job training
for returning residents. In the
summer 2007, Housing and
Urban Development (HUD) took
over MDHA. HUD is now saying
they are lacking funds so they
are only building back 150
units of public housing which
has many residents frustrated .
"We believe the community
should have control over
housing and as Scotts people
have been fighting to bring back
their community for over 6 years
now. HUD is not listening to
the needs of the people. We are


hosting this competition to get
a design for Scott that isn't only
environmentally sustainable
and healthy for the community,
but also to demonstrate a
community lead re-design
process," said Hudson.
Touched by the stories of
residents, Kevin Otway of
Veteran's energy solutions
said, "In the green industry we
focus on being more efficient to
save the earth but also to save
money in the long term. But we
are here today not just saving
money, really we are trying to
save lives."


Mariah Washington

celebrates her 100th birthday


Happy birthday to Mariah
Washington who was born
100 years ago on May 1.
Mrs. Washington and her late
husband moved to Miami with
their son Willie in the 1950's.
In her early years, she enjoyed
teaching Sunday School,
baking, and sewing.
These days, she enjoys
spending time with her son and
her younger sister Mattie Wells,


96. When asked about their
longevity, Mrs. Wells said, "We
put the Lord first in our lives.
We always pray because He is
the only one who can help us.
I thank the Lord every day for
blessing me with good health
and a sound mind".
Mrs. Washington plans to
celebrate her birthday with
her family, friends, and care
givers.


Arthur Teele is not forgotten in Little Haiti


It has been almost three years
since former City Commissioner
Arthur E. Teele Jr., committed
suicide in the lobby of the Miami
Herald. Teele, who was facing
corruption charges at the time,
is still remembered today.
Before his death, Teele was
negotiating city projects and
wanted to build a new park in
the Little Haiti neighborhood.
The park has reached its final
phase and city construction
crews have been putting the
finishing touches on the park.


Strip searches
The unlawful practice of
strip-searching arrested
people in the Broward jail
will cost the county a lot of
money. As many as 40,000
people arrested by the
Broward Sheriff's Office and
strip searched could receive
$1000 under a deal approved
by a judge last week.
The $11.5 million settlement
ends a contentious legal
battle between BSO and two
women who claimed the law


Now, the debate is
what should the park
be named.
"If it wasn't for
Commissioner Teele,
there would be no
park. The park
should be named
after him with no
questions asked. It
is time for him to
receive recognition
for the works that
he has done in
this community


TEELE


which have helped
a lot of people.
Commissioner Teele
has done more work
in District 5 than any
other Commissioner
who has stepped
foot in commission,"
said Hattie Willis,
President of
Communities United,
Inc.
At a Thursday
night meeting,
Commissioners


openly talked about the
naming of the park. Not one
Commissioner spoke against
naming the park after Teele,
but no vote was taken that
night. Despite his past flaws,
many believed that Teele should
be honored for his dedication,
commitment, and service to the
community.
Miami leaders plan to keep the
park name Little Haiti Park, with
the community center named
after Teele, and its soccer fields
named after a Haitian athlete.


in Broward jail costs taxpayers $11.5 million


enforcement agency violated
their constitutional rights by
strip searching them without
probable cause.
From 1998 through 2001,
BSO had a written policy that
strip searches were required
of anyone transferred to the
general population of the jail
system.
The policy spawned
constitutional challenges
to the rule- and ended in
2001, but strip searches


Drivers cut back as gas prices

hit all-time high in major cities


By James R. Healey

The average price for regular
gasoline across the USA was a
record $3.508 a gallon Monday,
eclipsing the inflation-adjusted
peak of $3.413 set in March 1981
$1.417 back then according to
the U.S. Energy Information
Administration.
The weekly average rose 11.9
cents from last week. Diesel was
$4.143, up 8.4 cents.
Separately, the AAA and the Oil
Price Information Service, which
use a different method, reported
a U.S. gasoline average of $3.503
Monday.
The two surveys emphasize
what Americans already know:
However the price is measured,
fuel is more expensive than it's
ever been.
Drivers are cutting back.
Gasoline sales have fallen 2% to
11% a month since December in
a study by 13 owners of stations
scattered across the USA that


are not direct competitors, says
Jay Ricker, a member of a study
group. He's president of Ricker
Oil, which runs 30 Marathon and
BP stations in Indiana.
"People aren't getting used to
these prices," he says. "I'm hearing
more comments, people saying, 'I
need to get a more fuel-efficient
car next time.' "
Expect no relief. EIA predicts
regional averages as high as $4
in the next few months. And the
price of crude oil, which EIA says
accounts for about 72% of the gas
price, continues to zoom. It closed
Nymex trading Monday at a record
$117.48, up 79 cents from Friday.
Americans already were feeling
pinched, according to a USA
TODAY/Gallup Poll five weeks
ago, when gasoline averaged
about $3.28. About 63% said fuel
prices were a hardship. That's the
biggest percentage recorded since
2005 by the poll, which has asked
the question since February
2000.


continued.
The two lead plaintiffs in
the case, Martha Echeverry,
of Pembroke Pines and Daisy
Cole, of Plantation, will each
receive $50,000.
Others who can verify they


were strip searched during
the time period will receive
between $500 and $1,000 in
damages or could potentially
opt out of the class-action
lawsuit settlement andpursue
their case individually.


State Attorney gives donation

to Little Haiti Sant La center


Miami-Dade County
State Attorney Katherine
Fernandez Rundle gave a
$5,000 contribution from
the State Attorney's ValuJet
Memorial Fund to the Sant
La Neighborhood Center at
their annual gala dinner on
Thursday, April 24th.
The ValuJet Flight
592 crashed on May
11, 1996enroutefrom
Miami International
Airport in Miami,
Florida, United
States to Hartsfield
International
Airport in Atlanta,
Georgia, U.S.. The
crash ruined the KATI
credibility of the FERNAND
low-priced carrier,
ValuJet Airlines.
The SantLacenter, anonprofit
organization in Little Haiti,
offers information and referral
services in the areas of social
services, education, housing
opportunities, economic self-
sufficiency, and access to
healthcare and legal services
to residents of the Little Haiti
neighborhood in Miami.
Their mission is "to empower,
strengthen and stabilize South


HE
DE2


Florida's Haitian community
by providing free access to
information and existing
services to ensureits transition
from a struggling immigrant
community to a successful
and stable one". Sant La is
also dedicated to establishing
buildings and partnership
opportunities for
neighborhood
agencies.
"The Sant
La Haitian
Neighborhood Center
is a community jewel
whose value to our
Haitian citizens
grows day by day,"
'RINE commented State
Z RUNDLE Attorney Fernandez
Rundle. "It is my
pleasure to help Sant La
educate more individuals
and families so that the
complexities of our legal
system are better understood,
and, as a result, crime victim's
services are made more
accessible to everyone."
The donated funds, which
are to be used for educational
purposes, were part of the
punishment imposed in the
ValuJet case.


Contract investigation sought
CONTRACTS served time in Coleman, Fl.
continued from 1A Georges also sued the county
in 2006, alleging that she was
unrelated to DAC. She pleaded discriminated against because
guilty in August 2003. She she is Haitian.



Law Offices of


Gordon Murray, P.A.
Over 20 years of legal experience

Licensed in State-and Federal Court

Criminal, traffic & family law cases


550 NE 124th Street
North Miami, FL33161
: f, J305-398- 7' '"

A member of the ARAG and US Legal Insurance family
Teachers and County Employees welcome
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*Aftercare and Tutorial
* Accelerated Curriculum
*Transportation Available


Mckay ESE Scholarship
SFlorida Pride Scholarship/ Carrie
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J&D OWENS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY
14450 NE 6 Avenue
786-267-5061 / 305-947-9974




MIAM I B

Driver's Education

Safety Trust Fund
Miami-Dade County is announcing the availability of FY 2006-
2007 Driver's Education Safety Trust Funds for eligible organi-
zations and activities. The County is seeking letters of interest
from a public school system or not-for-profit private schools,
located in Miami-Dade County, that offer the opportunity to learn
to drive. Private driving schools established principally for the
purpose of driver education are not eligible.
Additional grant requirements include: 1) curriculum must
include behind the wheel experience; 2) the driver's education
must be offered to private as well as public school students in
Miami-Dade County; 3) funds must not be used for administra-
tive/overhead expenses; and 4) the grantee(s) must agree to
provide appropriate accountability/reporting.
The deadline for submission of letters of interest is 1:00 P.M.,
Friday, May 9, 2008 at the Miami-Dade County, Office of
Strategic Business Management, 111 N.W. 1st Street, 22nd
Floor, Miami, Florida 33128.
The contact person for the Driver's Education Safety Trust
Fund, Daniel T. Wall, Assistant Director, Office of Strategic
Business Management, may be reached at (305) 375-5143.
Miami-Dade County is not liable for any cost incurred by the
applicant in responding to this solicitation, and it reserves the
right to modify or amend the deadline schedule for letters of
interest if it is deemed necessary and in the best interest of
Miami-Dade County. The County also reserves the right to
accept or reject any or all applications, to waive any minor
technicalities or irregularities and to award grants in the best
interest of Miami-Dade County.
Miami-Dade County is an equal opportunity employer and
does not discriminate based on age, gender, race or disability.


MIAM1i. PUBLIC WORKSHOP


As a part of Miami-Dade County's continuing commitment to
public participation in local government, the Park and
Recreation Department invites area residents to attend a
public workshop:

SUNKIST PINELAND PARK
8401 SW 64th STREET MIAMI, FL 33143

The Sunkist Pineland Park General Plan will be presented for
public comment. As part of the meeting, County staff will
answer questions about planning, development and
operations. The meeting will take place:

THE SALVATION ARMY
MIAMI SUNSET CORPS, CAFETERIA
8445 SW 72nd STREET MIAMI, FL 33143
THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2008 7:00-9:00PM

For further information, requests for foreign language
interpreters, or questions prior to the meeting please contact:

DIANA CORNELY, PARK PLANNER
Miami-Dade County Park and Recreation Department
dcornel@miamidade.gov or 305-755-7907

Call 305-755-7848 (V/TDD) for materials in accessible format,
information on access for Persons with Disabilities or sign language
interpreters (five days in advance).

Multiple members of individual community councils may attend.


BI.ACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR O\VN IDESTINYI


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008










6A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 50-MAY 6, 2008



('andal r t# fm' r pmlor



dor mI "%ppk ofw campaign










"Copyrighted Mlterial





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Jordan: Strong

POWER
continued from 1A

and Human Services, and
Recreation and Cultural Affairs
Committees. She was named
in Success South Florida
Magazine's as one of 50 Most
Influential Black Professionals
of 2007. Jordan has held
seminars for residents in
District 1 who are searching
for ways to save their homes
from mortgage foreclosures
and offering financial counsel.
Before she was elected
to the Board of County
Commissioners, Commissioner
Jordan served as Assistant
County Manager, where she
managed the county agencies
that included: Miami-Dade


Mayor not best

Housing Agency, Housing
Finance Authority, Department
of Business Development,
Office of Community &
Economic Development, Urban
Revitalization Task Force,
Metro-Miami Action Plan, the
Community Relations Board
and South Florida Workforce
Board & Consortium.
"This has nothing to do with
the mayor. I have had many
talks with the mayor but we
want to be able to do more for
the people in our communities,"
said Jordan.
With the hiring and
firing of county employees,
Commissioners are able
to sit down and talk to the
individuals but Commissioners
are not a part of the decision-


for community

making. "Regardless of who
is in the seat, I am trying to
go back to the executive form
of government. Many of the
decisions made, commissioners
have little to no say in the
matter," said Jordan.
According to Miami-Dade
County, Commissioners are
elected in the 13 districts
to represent the people. For
months, many residents have
asked and complained about
the lack of representations
from elected county officials.
Jordan says that Miami-
Dade needs order where the
powers are not limited to
one man. The people in our
community have issues and
problems that one mayor
cannot handle all by himself.


Liberty City 6 to endure third trial


SIX
continued from 1A

men. The first trial in the
'Liberty City Seven' case ended
in December with a mistrial
except the seventh defendant,
Lyglenson Lemorin, was
acquitted. Now, he is facing
possible deportation.
"After two sets of jurors
decided in good conscience
that they were not convinced
beyond a reasonable doubt
that the 'Liberty City Seven'
and the 'Liberty City Six' were
guilty of the charges, it is highly
unfair to subject these men to a
third trial. It does not serve the
end of justice by trying these
men many times because it
shows how flawed the criminal
justice system is since there is
no available recourse against
the government's ability and
decision to try these men
repeatedly until the government
gets its desired result," said
Attorney Larry Fleurantin from


Larryk. Fleurantin & Associates
in North Miami Beach.
Prosecutor Richard Gregorie
said the U.S. attorney's office
decided to continue with
a 'third trial because the
ringleader, Narseal Batiste, was
a dangerous man who was on
a mission to bring destruction
in a war against the United
States.
According to the juror
foreman in the second trial,
the main problem with the
government's investigation was
the lack of evidence provided to
conclude that all six defendants
could carry out a terrorism
plot. After their arrests in June
2006, investigators did not
find any explosives, weapons,
ammunition, or terrorist
blueprints on them. "I don't
thinktheyhad aplan. Obviously,
they had no weapons. It was
just a lot of talk and that's it,"
said the jury foreman, who did
not want to be identified. He
also said the jurors battled with


the FBI's undercover operation,
in which the FBI used an Arabic
informant to pretend to be an
al-Qaeda representative.
The jury foreman said the
majority of jurors wanted
to convict Batiste, and his
so-called assistant, Patrick
Abraham, on the central
charges of plotting to offer
'material support' to al-Qaeda.
Almost all the jurors wanted to
exonerate Naudimar Herrera
and Rotschild Augustine. The
jurors were embattled by their
decision for Burson Augustin
and Stanley Grant.
"It is a colossal waste of
taxpayer money to retry these
gentlemen, because they never
posed a threat to anyone and
were simply trying to get money
in an attempt to scam their
proposed benefactor," said local
Attorney Reginald Clyne from
Clyne & Associates.
It was not clear when the third
trial will begin but there will be
a third trial.


IBLAiK.' MKlSTi CONTROL THEIR OW\N DESTINY


Should the 'wet-foot, dry-foot' policy be applied to Haitians?


BYRON ESKRIDGE, 28
Truck Driver; Miami Gardens

It is about
time. With
the food crisis
over in Haiti,
Haitians
should be
able to come
to America for
a better life.
We are letting the Cubans in so
why can't the Haitians come?
This is all politics and people
have their own agendas. This
is supposed to be the land of
opportunity and with all these
resources available to America,
why are we denying it to the
people that really need it? This
country is too rich to deny
anyone anything. The Cubans
come here without nothing, and
within time, they take nothing
and make it into something.

CLIFTON JONES, 36
Driver and Trainer,; Liberty City

I think
that we have
forgotten that
Haitians are



There shouldn't be any type



of difference between the two.
These people are risking their
lives and tying to make a better
life Cubanfor themselves.
come here but
yet we don't let the Haitians.
There shouldn't be any type
of difference between the two.
These people are risking their
lives and trying to make a better
life for themselves.


REGINA WARD, 52
Restaurant Employee, Liberty City

Haitians
should be
allowed to
stay. They are
risking their
life to come to
America for
a better life.
There are more
opportunities in this country so
why are we limiting people? We
let the Cubans come here and
they take all of our jobs.


ALTHEA HUNTER, 22
Student, Liberty City

I feel that no
one should be
banned from
coming into
the United
States. These
people are
struggling and
are trying to
make a better life for themselves
so who are we to tell them "no".
They should be able to receive
the governmental resources
because it is discrimination
how we allow the Cubans and
yet we reject the Haitians.

LIONEL VALADURT, 27
Airport Superviso,; Opa Locka

Haitians should be allowed to
stay in America. Cubans can't
or don't want to go back to Cuba.
The only problem is that with


Abusive father on the run

ABUSE
continued from 1A

not violent. He loves his kids.
He will do anything for the kids.
I don't know what happened,"
said Chantale Brown.
After the incident occurred,
the boy's grandmother,
Annette Brown, did not allow
him to attend school fearing
that the abuse would be found
by teachers and his peers.
Since Brown failed to report
the beating to authorities or
seek any medical attention
for her grandson, she was Brown is on the ru
arrested and charged with on one count of
child neglect. She has since child abuse. He
posted bond and was released weighs between
from jail. pounds, and has s


Schools facing major cuts


CUTS
continued from 1A
legislator and over $200 million
in price hikes and other cost
increases.
Among the other moves
a majority board members
supported:


in, wanted
aggravated
is 5'09",
170-180
short hair,


Cutting. 261 positions
from the district's central
administration for a saving of
$20 million
Eliminating all non-
mandatory summer-school
programs, saving $9.9 million
Agreeing not to rehire
administrators or teachers who


the Cuban
community,
they take of
their own.
They hire,
promote, and
build their
own people.
When their
people come, they make sure
they get residency, housing, and
all the benefits. The Haitian
community should be able to
help Haitian migrants in the
same way.


PROPEL BLACK, 36
School Board Employee, Liberty City

The policy
should apply
to everybody.
This is
supposed to
be the land of
opportunity.
We let the
Cubans come
over here so Haitians should be
entitled to the same thing. Sadly,
the Cubans are prospering more
than Americans.









ir 'really hulrS


with possibly some braids. If
you have any information on
Brown's whereabouts, call
Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers
at 305-471-TIPS.


have already retired saving
$13.9 million
Enforcing pay cuts for
administrators, principals,
and vice principals, saving $1
million
Eliminating bonus pay for
administrators, principals and
vice principals, $1.4 million.


Ray Shipman is Mr. Florida Basketball
Ray Shipman, a senior won it in 1996. Other the second consecutive
guard at Monsignor Pace High, winners from Dade were year. Shipman also was
became the first Miami Dade Chris Corchiani (Hialeah- named to the class 4A
County recipient in 12 years Miami Lakes), Steve |I All-State first team by the
of the Florida Diary Farmers Edwards (Miami High) Florida Sports Writers
Mr. Basketball award is given and Douglas Edwards Association. Pace forward
annually to the state's top (Miami High). i Terrance Saintil, a
player. Shipman averaged 25.2 Virginia Commonwealth
Shipman, who is head to the points and led Pace to its SHIPMAN signee, was named to the
University of Florida this fall, second consecutive Class second team, and junior
is the fifth Dade Player to win 4A stated championship, and forward Rakeem Buckles, a
the award and first since former he was named Most Valuable Louisville commitment, made
South Miami guard Luke Barnes Player in the state final four for the third team.


Northwestern and Central win district tract titles


The Bulls of Miami
Northwestern High School
continue to add to their
outstanding athletic season as
their girls tract team won the
District 14-4A track and field
championship.
Miami Central High Rockets
edged the Northwestern boys
by 37 points led by Lamar
Vernon's victories in the long
jump and triple jump and
Jimmy Florestal's wins in the
1,600 and 3,200 meters.


The Bulls won convincingly,
totaling 317 points, and were
led by Skyler Wallen's victories
in the 800 and 1,600, and
Destinee Romain's sweep
of the shot put and discus.
Northwestern also swept all
three relays.
The Rockets won the 400 and
3,200 meter relays as well.
Central sprinter Tiffany
Williams led the Rockets' girls to
the runner-up finish by winning
the 100 and 200 meters.


The Bulls' boys has a pair of
double winners.
David Clark won the 110 and
300 hurdles, and Corvin Lamb
won the 200 and 400 meter
races.
Northwestern's boys' 1,600
relay team, which has the top
time in the state this season
(316.38), also won its event.
The track met was held at Traz
Powell Stadium last Tuesday
and is a preview for the regional
and state championships.













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6
5 0


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LEGAL NOTICE


Studies: SAT writing portion good predictor of grades


While the best predictor of grades is a student's high school
GPA, the writing portion of the SAT is the most important
among tests required by the UC system ...


By Janet Kornblum and Greg Toppo

The controversial new
writing portion of the SAT is
actually a better predictor of
grades for freshmen college
students than the older, more-
established, critical reading
and mathematics portions,
according to preliminary results
of two new studies.
The College Board, which
administers the SAT, studied test
scores from 150,000 freshmen
entering 110 colleges in 2006
and then looked at their GPAs
at the end of their freshmen
year, says Wayne Camara, vice
president of research.
"Our study suggests that the
writing test is the best single
predictor" of freshman grades,
he says. The study won't be
finalized until summer, he says.


t. .~


I AC


The University of California
drew a similar conclusion from
an analysis of its incoming
2006 freshmen and their GPAs,
says Sam Agronow, coordinator
of admissions research and
evaluation at the University
of California's office of the
president.
While the best predictor
of grades is a student's high
school GPA, the writing portion
of the SAT is the most important
among tests required by the UC
system, Agronow says.
UC will continue to study
grades as students proceed
through school, but the
preliminary results, presented
at a small conference in
November, came as a surprise to
many administrators there, he
says. The College Board voted in
2002 to add the writing portion.


UC leaders had threatened to
abandon the SAT because it
didn't reflect what students
were learning in school. The
writing portion was introduced
in March 2005.
Many colleges make the
writing portion optional.
Anecdotally, colleges are
using the writing portion as a
monitored writing sample, says
Barmak Nassirian, a policy
analyst with the American
Association of Collegiate
Registrars and Admissions
Officers. "It wasn't the scores
that interested them as that
they encountered the student's
voice, not that of some coach
or consultant."
Bob Schaeffer with FairTest,
a testing watchdog group,
says,
"The question is whether you
need the test at all, or whether
high school grades are a more
accurate predictor than any
combination of test scores."


Supplemental Notice from Miami-Dade County Circuit Court
ATTENTION

FLORIDA SMOKERS, EX SMOKERS AND SURVIVORS
OF SMOKERS MUST REGISTER NO LATER THAN
JUNE 16, 2008 TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR A SHARE IN A
TRUST FUND OF APPROXIMATELY $600 MILLION


I. HISTORY
The Engle Class Action was filed in 1994 and went to trial against the tobacco industry in July 1998. Howard A.
Engle. M.D., et al., (Plaintiffs) v. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Philip Monis. Inc., Brown & Williamson Tobacco
Corp., individually and as successor to American Tobacco Co., Lorillard Tobacco Co., Lorillard, Inc., Liggett Group,
Inc., Brooke Group Holdings, Inc. fik/a Booke Group, Ltd., Inc., Council foriTbacco Research U.S.A. and Tobacco
Institute (Defendants). Case No. 94-08273 CA (22) Dade County Circuit Court. This Notice addresses a distinct,
unprcccdented monetary fund (the "Engle Trust Fund") created for the class by Susan and Stanley Rosenblatt,
counsel for the class.
II. QUALIFIED ENGLE CLASS MEMBERS ARE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE A SHARE OF THE
TRUST FUND
You may be qualified to receive money from the Engle Trust Fund if you (or your decedent) have suffered, presently
suffer, or have died from diseases and medical conditions (listed below) caused by addiction to cigarettes that
contained nicotine. The disease or medical condition must have been first diagnosed or first manifested itself on or
before November 21, 1996. YOU MUST REGISTER NO LATER THAN JUNE .16, 2008, TO BE ELIGIBLE TO
RECEIVE A SHARE OF THIE ENGLE TRUST FUND. You will be required to submit contemporaneous,
verifiable proof to support your claim. You will also be required to submit your claim under penalty of perjury.


aortic aneurysm
bladder cancer
cerebrovascular disease (including stroke)
cervical cancer
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
COPD (including emphysema)
coronary heart disease
(including cardiovascular disease,
hardening of the arteries, atherosclerosis,
coronary artery disease and
arteriosclerosis, angina, abnormal blood
clotting, blood vessel damage, myocardial
infarction (heart attack))
esophageal (throat) cancer


kidney cancer
laryngeal (throat or voice box) cancer
lung cancer (including adenocarcinoma,
large cell carcinoma, small cell
carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma)
complications of pregnancy
(miscarriage)
oral cavity/tongue cancer
pancreatic cancer
peripheral vascular disease
(including Buerger's disease)
pharyngeal cancer
stomach cancer


III. QUALIFIED ENGLE CLASS MEMBERS MUST REGISTER NO LATER THAN JUNE 16,
2008, TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR A SHARE OF THE TRUST FUND MONEYS
At the hearing on April 15, 2008, the Court set a schedule for the allocation and distribution of the Engle
Trust Fund. Qualified Engle class members MUST register by mail or online no later than June 16, 2008,
to be eligible to receive a share of the Engle Trust Fund. Registration does not assure qualification to share
in the Engle Trust Fund.
Individuals who received a copy of this Notice by mail should have also received a copy of the Registration Form
that must be submitted by the June 16, 2008, deadline. To obtain another Registration Form, if necessary, contact
the Claims Administrator toll-free at 1 (888) 420-1666; send an email to Enl tg!tE xuulnd(kadILg... SInm;
send a written request to Engle Trust Fund, c/o The Garden City Group, Inc., P.O. Box 013241, Miami, FL 33101;
or download a copy of the Registration Form at wwwEngleTrustFund.com. Alternatively, class members may
submit Registration Forms online at www.yngleTrustund.com no later than midnight on June 16, 2008.
The Claims Administrator will mail letters acknowledging receipt of each Registration Form. The letters will request
and identify all additional information and paperwork necessary to determine whether you qualify for a share of the
Engle Trust Fund. The letter will also provide specific information regarding deadlines. Class member paperwork
must be submitted to the Claims Administrator by August 1, 2008. Disctibution by the Claims Administrator shall
be equally made on a ecr smoker basis.
IV. DO I NEED TO HIRE AN ATTORNEY?
You may hire counsel, at your own expense, to represent your interests in connection with the allocation and
distribution of the Engle Trust Fund money or the Court-appointed Trustee will determine how your interests will
be represented. If you have an attorney who represents you (or your decedent) with regard to a tobacco claim,
please consult your attorney regarding this notice and the applicable registration and claims deadlines.
V. TO OBTAIN ASSISTANCE AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Do not call or write the Courtlc Thstec or the Clerk of the Cotl for further information. Any inquiries or questions
concerning this Notice or the distribution and allocation process should be directed to the Claims Administrator by
toll-fiee phone at I (888) 420-1666; by email to EngleTrustFund(igardencitgroup.com: or by sending a written
request to Engle Trust Fund, co Tche Garden City Group, Inc., P.O. Box 013241, Miami, FL 33101.

DONE and ORDERED this 18th day of April 2008 Is

David C. Miller
Circuit Court Judge


"If the lions do not write their own

history, then the hunters

will get all the credit."

-African Proverb


MIAMI PBLIC WORKSHOP
MIAMM-DAD


As a part of Miami-Dade County's continuing commitment to public
participation in local government, the Park and Recreation Department
invites area residents to attend a public workshop:

A.D. "DOUG" BARNES PARK
3401 SW 72nd AVENUE MIAMI, FL 33155

The meeting is designed for the public to share ideas and discussion
on potential improvements. As part of the meeting, County staff and
consultant will answer questions about planning, development and
operations. Residents are encouraged to attend and comment on
planning for A.D. "Doug" Barnes Park. The meeting will take place:

A.D. "DOUG" BARNES PARK
RECREATION BUILDING
3401 SW 72nd AVENUE MIAMI, FL 33155
WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 2008 7:00-9:00PM
For further information, requests for foreign language interpreters, or
questions prior to the meeting please contact:

DIANA CORNELY, PARK PLANNER
Miami-Dade County Park and Recreation Department
dcornel@miamidade.gov or 305-755-7907

Call 305-755-7848 (VITDD) for materials in accessible format, information on
access for Persons with Disabilities or sign language interpreters (five days in
advance).

Multiple members of individual community councils may attend.


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


BL.A\CKS MUSi.L 'ONI'ROI I'TIFIR O\\VN DFI, IINv


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


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9B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


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City"*Ma ,F317 88

> Phone ._ _ _", _

Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


*Includes Florida sales tax


93n Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30 a.m. Early Morning Worship
11 a.m. ..Moring Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd Sunday ........6 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Sudy ...7 p.m.
website: cmbc.org




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.





Logos Baptist Churchd
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Sunday
Morning Worship at 8 & I 1 a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


Antioch Missionary Baptis /Apostolic Revival Center\
Church of Brownsville 6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
2799 N.W. 46th Street 305-836-1224
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services New time for T.V. Progrntn
Church/Sunday School ..... 8:30 a.m. FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
Sunday Worship Servie 10 a.m .tnt i. o. i I ..
Mid-Week Service .... Wednesday's Sun) a.m-i p it Stii da 5 pilt


Hour of Power-Noon Day Prayer
12 p.m.-I p.m,
Evening Worship... 7 p.m,


aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday School...................9:30 am.
S Sun. Morning Worship........... 11 am.
Tues. Prayer.....................6 p.m.
School ofWisdom............6:30 p.m.
Healing & Deliverance Serv...7:30 pm
I WedJSat Manna (pryer).......5 a.m.
SFriday Youth Night................7 p.m.




Mt. Calvary Missionary'
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday Schooj.......9:30 a.m.


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
Early Moming Worship.7:30a.m.
Sunday School .......... 9:30a.m.
Morning Worship .....I I a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.riewbirthbaptistmiami.org


SSt. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691.8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and II a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m.......... Sunday School
Tuesday.......7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p........Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wednesday,. Friday
12 p.m......Day Prayer


Wead s Inteivessary Praycr n m- 12 pm
wh cis, u1ir oae9 t12p it.!:! i
I ming Serie .............11 I
Sun. E r W itnp ...7:30i pm,.
olies t1 ,er MtNeeing ........ 7:30 pi1
Fri- ibu SudS ...... 7:3 pi




First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:


Thursday...........7 p.m. Bible Study.
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
Baptism Thurs. before
First Sun..7 p.m.
Communion First Sun ........
7:30 & 11 a.m.



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sun lay




"There is at plaice for youu"



{Peaceful Zion Missionary
ChBa twist Churchc l ...1..:301.






(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Worhi. Service ..... ........I I.l.
Monday
Bible Study 7: p.ll,
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 7 p.llr.
"There is placeflbr you "



rPeaceful Zion Missionary`
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 6811, Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Pmrjv Mornins, Servicesil.


\ 5n~ i


Early IMlI Ilrllg ervlcesa
(2,3,4,5" Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service ..... 11:00 am
Communion Service
(Thurs. before 1" Sunday) 7:30 pin
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
(Wednesday) 7:30 pmin
wwp n ~uuIm1.


S Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060,Fax 305-255-8544
Order of Services:
Sunday School........... 9:15 a.m.
Suin. Morning Servs.....- IaI.m
4"' Sun...BTU.... 1:30-2:30 p.m,
Tuesday.l..,Bible Study
Feeding Ministry......l ll.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer..6:30 p.m
Thulrs. Outreach Minisiry....6:30 pI.m


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Servicesi
Sun...9:30 a.m...(Sunday School)
Walk in (he Word Ministry
Worship Service.............. I1 a.m.
Tuesday...7 p.m....Family Night
Wed..l I a.ln..lntercessolr' Prayer
Wed. Bible Class........12 p.mn.
Wed. Bible Class..............7 p.m.




Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www .fricndshipmbclmia.orE
friendshipprayertbellsouth.net
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
HOrder of services
Hour of Prayer........6:30 a.m.
Early Morning Worship....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School .........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship............I11 a.m.
Youth Ministry Study....Wed......7 p.m.
Prayer/Bible Study.....Wed......7 p.m.
Noonday Altar Prayer..(M-F)
Feeding the IHungry every
Wednesdlay....... I1 a.m.-I p.m.



S New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Ciurcl l Scloll ...............10 Il 111.
Worship Service.............. 1:15 an.m.
Tuesdays Bible Classi.............. 7 p.il.
4th Standay Evening Worship.........6 p.mt.


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:45 am.
W hip ......ll 11 am
Bible Study, Thursday ...7:30 pm.
Youth Ministry Mon.-Wed.
6 p.m.




Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
Lord Day Sunday School ..9:45an
Sunday Moring Worship ... 1 a.m.
Sunday Men's Bible Study .....5 p.m.
Sunday Ladies Bible Study ...5 p.m
Sunday Evening Worship ......6 p.m.
Tl*estdy Night Bible Study ... 7:30pm
IursIlday Morning Bible ClIs ItI a.m.
l amsportation available Call:
305-64-4850 3105-691-6958




Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 121 Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
Sunday School............. 9 a.m.
BC ........... .................10:05 a.m.
W orship .......................IIla.m.
W orship .........................4 p.m.
SMission and Bible Class
o Youth M tin./ C.oir riesa
Monday .....................6:30 p.m.



New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
Early Moming Worship..,Ist & 3rnl Sun.
MOrning \Voslp ............., 10:30 11n
Prayer Service .................. 7:30 p.n,.
ible S tody ....... ............... p.m-
\Bwible Sl.a tm dy..../..8 p.m.


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W, 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19, 21, 22, 23, 30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: w .pemihrokeparkctnirhtolchlii-isi.com Email: pemblrokepLrkcac h ellsou h.nct


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
Sunillay Morning Services
S un11dny ...ol ............... I0 n1.
Worshl ip Service.. .......... II ani.
Tuesday IBible Studly.....,.8 p.m
Ihulrsday Prayer Service.....8 p.n


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

Order of Services:
Bible Study W ed.............. .... ....8 .
Suidily Suy chool-. .. ... . tio ...
Sun. Wvriship Se.......:30 1a.m i
'rWed. Night Intercessory Pnayer
lfromui 7:30{ to 8 Ip.in.
SundaIily Wrshlllp SetiCvic..(6:30 pIm.


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10* Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Early Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Wship -11 a.m.
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ...7:30 pn.
"Not Just a Church But a Movement"


Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.nilthermonworshipcenterorg
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.




Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning ...........8 am.
Sunday School............. 10 am.
Sunday Evening ..... 6 p.m.
Mon. Excellence ........7:30 p.m.
Tue. Bible Class .........7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Fellowship .........10 a.m.
Ist Sun. Song Pectice ..6 p.m.




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.951h Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Early Morning Worship 7:30 am.
SSun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Ii Morning Worship ..... 11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Rles. before tie Ist Som.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3"' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
Morning Worship .....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ..........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ... I a.m.
Nattu'efor Baptist Churches
(B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
Evening Worship ........7 p.m.
Meeting ........(Tues.) 7 p.m.




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:30 am.
Monting P'aiseAVorship .. I a.m.
First atdTh'inl Sunday
evening worship at 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
aTuesday 7 p.tm.
morring, UIri,. Call 305-b-i s 390,.
l aa~tu u napu t nlon e u I slll


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MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Freewill Christian Center
invites you to come and
fellowship with Bishop Neil. C.
Ellis of Nassau, Bahamas on
May1l4 at 7:30 p.m. For more
information contact the church
at 305-628-1774, Reverend
David Ellis is pastor.

Reverend 'Rogery Adams


and the members of Mt. Zion
African Methodist Episcopal
Church will celebrate its 1st
anual Health Fair on Saturday,
May 2 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Pastor Barbara Boyce and
New Life Family Worship
Cener invites everyone out to
two great nights of powerful


service May 1 and 2 at 7:30
p.m. For more information call
305-623-0054.

Join the Wimberly Sisters
and others on Mothers Day
at 3 p.m. at Holy Cross
Missionary Baptist Church
for a singfest.
*******
Christ's Kingdom Life
Center International Church
invites you to Unction to
Function Sundays, April
20 -May 11, 9 to 10 a.m.
Hfomeork read Ephesians


Chapter 3. Call 305-332-8208
or 954-651-5198.

Saint Matthews Free
Will Baptist Church invites
you to an appreciation
program for First Lady Elder
Patricia Randall at the
Carrie Meek Center on May
3. For more information call
305-751-4251.

Alpha Ministries presents a
Fellowship Breakfast on May
L40,' For mort-information call
-b54-292-48!T


4 0


er -0


-* **As**%%


Meek encourages competition for high school artists


Congressman Kendrick B. to reviewing all the entries," said
Meek (D-FL) is encouraging Meek.
all artists who attend The winning artwork
high school in his will appear in a
Congressional District permanent exhibition
to submit their artwork in the Cannon Tunnel
before May 2 to his of the U.S. Capitol
Miami Gardens office for one year, before
for entry in the 2008 being returned to the
Congressional Art winning student.
Competition. All entries must be
The competition is two-dimensional; no
open to students who longer than 30 inches
attend high school in MEEK by 30 inches; and be


Congressman Meek's
Congressional District, which
includes parts of Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties.
"This competition is a great
opportunity for high school
students to showcase their
artistic skills, and I look forward


no more than 4 inches
in depth
Artwork categories include:
Paintings: oil, acrylics,
watercolor
Drawings: pastels, colored
pencil, pencil, charcoal, ink,
markers


Collage: must be two
dimensional
Prints: lithographs, silkscreen,
block prints
Mixed media: use of more
than two mediums such as pencil
and ink
Computer generated art
Photography
A release form signed by
both teacher and student must
be attached to the artwork to
certify the: originality of the
piece. The form can be obtained
by contacting Congressman
Meek's Deputy District Director,
Mrs. Shirlee Lafleur at 305-
690-5905.
The final decision regarding
suitability for exhibition in
the Capitol will be made by
a panel of qualified persons


chaired by the Architect of
the Capitol.
Last year's winner of the
competition was 17-year-old
Design and Architecture Senior
High School student, Jennifer
Suarez. Her winning painting
was titled Drummer Boy.
Meek's office is located at 111
NW 183rd Street, Suite 315,
Miami Gardens, Florida, 33169.
Students who attend high
school in Meek's district, but
do not reside in the district are
eligible to participate in this
competition.
To find out if you attend high
school in Congressman Meek's
Congressional District, log on to
www.house.gov and enter your
school's nine-digit zip code in the
upper-left side of the website.


Re% nrtftf htir nub.an jmLtwn PIm I


*4M*


* ** * ** * ** ** ******* * *


.. .e0
ow o a o





-m -e


Subscribe


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B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


Bl i.KS MNIUST CONTROl. TI!IR (OWN DESTINY


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
SALLY PICKLE, 89, homemaker,
died April 23 at
Kindred Holly-
wood Hospital.
service 11 a.m.
thursday, May
1 at House of
God.



DEACON LOUIS SMITH Sr., 91,
retired auto
body painter,
died April 26 at
Jackson North.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, May
3 at Mt. Calvary
MBC.

LEROY MANNING, 66, fiberglass
installer, died
at VA Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday, May 3
in the chapel. R r





LORRAINE WILKS, 50, home-
maker, died
april 26 at North
Shore Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
saturday, May 3
at Pilgrim Rest
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

RANDY MICHAEL THADDEUS
JOHNSON, 41,
inventory con-
trol specialist,
died april 26 at
Kindred Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Brandy and
Ranisha, sons;
Randy Jr and
Jared Johnson; siblings, Lorenzo,
Betty, Brenda, James Jr., Anthony,
Diane and Jeffrey Johnson; fian-
cee, Jennifer Love. Service 12
noon Saturday, May 3 at Friend-
ship Missionary Baptist Church.

Alfonso M. Richardson
ERVIN LEON CLARK, 54, se-
curity guard,
died April 24.
He is survived
by: mother, Ev-
elyn; son, Mau-
rice; daughters,
Christina and UI-
trina; five broth-
ers, Thomas,
Curtis, Stanley, Rodney and Kev-
in; three sisters, Sherryln, saprena
and Christie and a host of relatives
and friends. Viewing Friday 4 to 8
p.m. in the chapel, 3790 N.W. 167
Street, Miami Gardens. Service 11
a.m. Saturday at St. James A.M.E.
Church. Service under the directio
of Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral
Services, 305-625-7177.
Grace_ e
JUSTIN VOLTAIRE, 67, truck
driver, died April
25 at Jackson
North Hospital.
Service Satur-
day, May 3, at
St. Mary's Ca-
thedral. Time
and place to be
announced.

MASTER D'MAURI ROBINSON,
9, died April 28,
at Baptist Hos-
pital. Service
Saturday, May
3, place and
time to be an-
nounced.



YVON ST. ALBIN, 67, retired
guidance counselor, died april 27
at Jackson Memorial Hospital Ser-
vice 4 p.m. Friday, May 2 at Unity
on the Bay.

Carey Royal Ram'n
BENITO TOUSSAINT, 77, died
April 22 at North Shore Medical
Center. service 10 a.m. Friday at


Stanton Memorial Baptist Church.

CLARENCE STEPHEN LAKE,
died April 19. Service will be held
in Grass Valley, California.

HORACE ROSS, 87, died april
28 at home. Arrangements are in-
complete.


Jay's ^ Poitier Richardson2,
DELORES SMITH, 47, died April MARCUE LAMAR DILLARD, 24, DEVONTAE DARRIN BELL, 14,
21 at Jackson student, died died April 18.
South Commu- April 25. Ser- service 1 p.m.
nity Hospital. Vice 11 a.m. Saturday at Mt.
Service was SaturdayMay 5 Calvary Mis-
held. in the chapel. sionary Baptist
Church.


BELINDA JAMES, 49, died April
22 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service
was held.






JOSEPH LUMPKIN Jr., 31, died
April 27. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day at Morning-
star Missionary
Baptist Church.





ELIZABETH ROSS, 88, died
April 24, Ser-
vice 10:30 a.m.
Saturday at
Ebenezer Unit-
ed Methodist
Church.



DENNIS TORRENCE Sr., 48, died
April 27. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day at Mount
Pleasant Baptist
Church.


EMMITT BOWLING, 72, died April
25. Service 1
p.m. Saturday
at Shiloh Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


BEULAH CARTER,
26. Service 1
p.m. Saturday
at Sweet Home
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


79, died april


EDWARD JOHNSON 84, diedApril
21 at Home-
stead Hospi-
tal. Service 1
p.m. Saturday
at Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.



BENJAMIN MOLE, 66, died aptil
23 at Jackson South Community
Hospital. Service 1 p.m. Saturday
at Holy Faith Tabernacle.

Eric S. George
Robert Boone, 66, died Wednes-
day, April 23. Service 11 a.m. Sat-
urday at Friendship Baptist Church
in Hallandale Beach.

JOSHUA N. NELSON, infant
died. Graveside service 11 a.m.
Wedndsday at Hallandale Beach
Cemetery.

E.A. Stevens
MAYBELLE ROBINSON DAVIS,
died April 27 at Hollywood Me-
morial Hospital South. Service
10 a.m. Saturday at Gethsemane
Baptist Church.

LAMAR MILLER, died April 22 at
Memorial Regional Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Saturday at the Bible-
way Baptist Church, Dania.

FRANK DELEGAL, died April 26.
Arrangements are incomplete.

JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our


CALL 305-694-6210


RICHMOND JOHNSON WIL-
LIAMS, 68,
plumber, died
April 23 at Clar-
idge Nursing
Home. service
11 a.m. Tues-
day, April 29 in
the chapel.


ALMA BELL PARLER, 70, home-
maker, died april
18 at Woodside
Nursing Home.
Service Satur-
day May 5.


TAMIKA 'JAMMIE' ATKINS, 27,
cook, died April
26. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.





AVA MARIE WILLIAMS, 89,
nurse, died
April 27 at Pines
Nursing Home.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.



WENTWORTH THOMAS, 35,
singer, died April 24. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

Royal _g.
BURNELL ROBERTSON, 71,
died April 22.
Service was
held Saturday
at Antioch Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church of Carol
City.


HERBERT WATTS, 79, died April.
23. Visitation
Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 1
p.m. Saturday
in the chapel.




HOPE HAYE, 87, died April 24.
Visitation 4 to 9 p.m. Thursday.
Service 11 a.m. at Cooper City
Church of God.

ANGELA JOHNSON, 51, died
April 21. Visitation Friday 4 to 9
p.m. Service 10 a.m. Saturday at
Sierra Norwood Calvary Baptist
Church.

LLOYD WRIGHT, 77, died April
21. Visitation Saturday 5 to 8 p.m.
Service 11 a.m. Sunday at Norland
Seventh-Day Adventist Church.

Manker ~Ag
JESSE CLAUDE MITCHELL, 77,
died April 25 at North Shore Medi-
cal Center. Services are incom-
plete.

St. Fort's
DUVIGNOL PEDRO MEDINA, 91,
died Aprill 22. Service will be held
12 noon May 8 at Notre Dame
Catholic Church

LUNISE ZAMY, 70, died April 21.
Service 10 a.m. Saturday May 3 at
North Miami Church of Nazarene.

ISTHEL FRAYMONT, 88, died
April 24. Services are incomplete.

Range Coconut Grove
EVELYN LOUISE BROWN, 67, of
Miami, died April 25th at Hialeah
Hospital. Services will be held 1:
30 p.m. Saturday at Macedonia
Missionary Baptist Church.

EDWARD BUSH, 61, of Miami,
died April 23rd at Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital. Services will be held
11 a.m. Saturday in the Chapel.


FREDDIE CRAWFORD, 78, died
April 21. Service
11 a.m. tuesday
in the chapel.






DERIONA TAHNIYA NICHOLS,
seven months,
died April 24.
Service will be
held 10 a.m. Fri-
day at 93 Com-
munity Baptist
Church.


JOHN E. BLACKMON, JR., 49,
died April 25.
Viewing 7 p.m.
Friday at Mt.
Tabor M.B.
Church. Service
12 noon Satur-
day.




DEON BENEBY, died April 17.
Service was
held.







RASHAWN BENEBY, 22, died
April 17. Service
was held.








DARNELL PARKER, 22, died April
17. Service was
held.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


ALMA B. WALKER
05/01/1914 05/22/1994

Little did we know that
morning that God would call
your name, In life we loved
you dearly, in death we do the
same. It broke our hearts to
lose you, you did not go alone,
for part of us went with you,
the day God called you home.
You left us peaceful
memories, your love is still our
guide, and though we cannot
see you, you are always on
our side.
Our family chain is broken
and nothing seems the same,
but as God calls us one by one,
the chain will link again.
Your children, Spencer,
Marva, Johnnie, Stanley and
your grand-children.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


GRADY LOWMAN
WILLIAMS
04/01/1921 05/01/2004

To some you are forgotten,
to some you are of the past.
But to us, the ones who loved
and lost you, your memories
will always last.
Love, McQueen and
Williams families

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


HUBERT GORE, 56, died April
18. Service was
held.


FERNANDO LESHON MYRICKS,
42, died April
20. Service was
held.








Gregg L. Mason9Di
IDA N. JONES, 99, homemaker
died April 26. Graveside services
will be held at Hollywood Memo-
rial Gardens North. She is sur-
vived by a host of loving family,
and friends.

BERTHIN THEODORE, 85, died
April 24 at Kindred Hospital. View-
ing Saturday, 11:00am. Service
Saturday, 2:00pm in the chapel.

WILLIE J. THOMAS, 81, chauf-
feur, died April 23 at home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

Rock of Ages6.
LaKESHA O'NEAL, 30, died April
8 at North Shore Medical Center.
Services are incomplete.

Pax Villa
JEFF CHERY, 49, died april 25.
Service 2 p.m. Wednesday, April
30 at St. James Catholic Church.


JOHN ALBERT PRINGLE

would like to sincerely thank
everyone for your prayers and
loving acts of kindness during
our hour of bereavement. There
will always be a special place in
our hearts for each of you.
The Pringle family

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


NATHANAEL MARS SR.
05/77/1977 11/01/2007

Happy Birthday to the love
of my lifel It's been six months
since God called you home,
but our memories of you still
live on. We will always love
you, and we miss you!
Your wife, Tarese and son
Nathanael Mars Jr. and
family


Wright & YoungS
JAMESHA MCMINNS 6, student
died April 22
at North Shore
Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors
include: mother,
Christine White;
father, James
McMinns: broth-
er, James Mc-
Minns, Jr.: grandparents, Ruby
White, Veronica McMinns and
Rodney Redding, Sr. Service will
be held 1 p.m. Saturday, May 3 at
Westview Baptist Church

RACHEL MOORE 86, domestic,
died April 24
at home. Sur-
vivors include:
children, Janice
Young, Marvin
(Bertha) Young,
J ac q u eline
Moore: grand-
children ,Kendra
Young, Darius
Moore and Ashanti Johnson. Ser-
vice will be held 12 noon Satur-
day, May 3rd at St. Mary,s Weslyn
Methodist Church.

Mitchell
ROGERS STEPHENS, retired,
died April 21 at
home. Service
10 a.m. Satur-
day, May 3 at
New Bethel Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


ELIZABETH M. EUTSAY, 70, died
April 28. Service
12 noon Satur-
day at First Bap-
tist Church of
Brownsville.




Rangein
SYBLE K. BROWN, 76, retired
custodian, died
April 25. She
is survived by:
two daughters,
Syble Simmons,
and Rosena
Mc K in ne y
(Paul); seven
grandchildren,
Charles Simmons II, Kelleye Sim-
mons, Helen Knowles, Karen McK-
inney, Owen McKinney (Sophie),
Quincy McKinney (Sharon), and
Nedra Woodside(Clayton); Nine
great-grandchildren; a host of oth-
er relatives and friends. Funeral
services will be held Saturday 2
p.m. at New Bethel M.B. Church.

IDA N. JONES, 99, homemaker
died April 26. Graveside services
will be held Thursday 1 p.m. at Hol-
lywood Memorial Gardens North.


Nakia Ingraham
HECTOR BERRIOUS, 39, died
April 26. Service 6 p.m. Wednes-
day.

CARMEN MUNIZ, 47, died April
27. Arrangements are incomplete.

GUSTAVO RESTREPO, 65, died
April 28. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

PAULINE MITLO, 76. Service 3
p.m. Thursday in the chapel.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


VERONICA PIPER
wish to express our apprecia-
tion for the cards, flowers
and overwhelming support by
family, friends and co-workers.
Special thanks to Richardson
Funeral Home.
Gavonnia Gaspard, Mike and
Ciello Herring and family








BLACKS MusT CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


New


website


helps


people with disabilities


Social Security touches the
lives of people with disabilities
everyday. That's why wejoined
21 other federal agencies to
create www.disabilityinfo.gov.
Disabilityinfo.gov is a
comprehensive website
designed to offer people
with disabilities access to
important information they
can use.
Disabilityinfo.gov is a one-
stop website not only for
people with disabilities, but
also for older Americans,
employers, Social Security
beneficiaries, community- and
faith-based service providers
and others. Disabilityinfo.
gov features information on
a number of related topics.
The site is easy to navigate,
and is organized into subject
areas, including benefits,
civil rights, community life,
education, employment,
health, housing, technology
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Disabilityinfo.gov also is
a useful information and
referral tool for responding to
the questions and concerns
of Social Security's nearly
50 million beneficiaries.
Individuals receiving
Supplemental Security Income
(SSI), disability or retirement
benefits, as well as advocates
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transportation and much
more.


Information about your
Social Security
If you want to get specific,
detailed information about
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On Social Security's website,
you can even complete
your application over the
Internet from the comfort
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to www.socialsecurity.gov/
applyfordisability to start your
application.
The Disabilityinfo.gov web
site shares general information
about how Social Security can
help people with disabilities,
and much more. The web
site offers a free subscription
service where you can sign up to
receive Disability Connection,
a quarterly newsletter, as well
as other e-mail alerts covering
information tailored to your
individual interests. Just fill
in your email address under
the gold "subscribe" banner on
the right side of the page.
To learn more about
information available for people
with disabilities, 'visit www.
disabilityinfo.gov. To learn
more about Social Security,
visit www.socialsecurity.gov.


-








I *'"" "" I I I^ lkIIIIIIr
..... .... ...






.,."Copyrightd MatNerial



Syndicated Content

Avilible from Commerciil News Providers"


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,
-7~~!^r. -- iMf w la-&


DOROTHY STANLEY
BELCHER, 53, retired from
the Department of Correc-
tions for the State of Floida,
died April 28 in Jackson-
ville. She was also a licensed
mortgage broker and realtor.
Survivors include: daughter,
Ayotunde Ware (Franklin)
Jones; father, Lawyer Stan-
ley; sisters, Brenda Stanley,
regina (Curtis) Anderson;
brothers, Calvin and Tony
Stanley. Service will be held
at Jesus People Ministries.
Services entruted to Wright
and Young Funeral Home.


Death Notice


BETTYE WOOTEN
WILLIAMS
04/27/1940 04/25/2002

Mom, we love and miss you
dearly.
Phyllis, Kimberly, Tanya
and family

In Memoriam


DOROTHY MAE
WOODS BRYANT
04/07/22 05/02/07


JAMES BELLE, 69, plaster,
died April 28 at the Miami
Jewish Home. Survivors
include: fiance, Thelma
Wallace' children, Judith,
Josette, Julian and Jamesi;
sisters, Connie Swain and
Gail Jones; brother-in-law,
Anthony Swain; son-in-laws,
Keith Jackson and Anthony
Ferguson. Service 10 a.m.
Saturday, May 3 at Apostolic
Revival Center. Services
rendered by Hall Ferguson
Hewitt Mortuary.





Honor



SYour



Loved



One

With an

In

Memorial

in

The Times


Hall-Ferguson- ew Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion

IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,


CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


THAT CARES.


Milton A. Hall I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


It has been one year since
the Lord called you home. We
miss you.
We thank God for the many
years you were with us arnd
the wonderful memories. We
will always keep you alive in
our hearts forever.
Love you, Gloria Woods
Lundy and family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DAVID L. MITCHELL
08/25/1949 11/01/2007

My love, it does not seem
like six months since I held
you in my arms. You are my
eyes, my ears and my heart.
I truly believe that your spirit
continues to lead me on. My
life is so empty without you,
what carries me is the grace of
God and my faith that I have
in Him. I know that you are in
a better place, but I can't help
to think how different my life
would be with you here. Baby,
can't no one ever take your
place in my heart, ever.
I'll love you forever.
Your wife, Linda


WALTER LEE STRONG,
60, died April 24 at home. He
was employed as a bus driver
for many years with Ameri-
can Coach Line then as a
safety supervisor with Grey-
hound Lines until his recent
illness.
Survivors include: four
children, Ronald Strong,
Calenthia Jackson and Clan-
sci Strong of Miami Florida
and Derrick (Undrica) Hall of
Dublin, Georgia; special God-
son, Michael (Lourdes) Roan;
five brothers, Clarence (Flor-
ence), Curtis (Juanita) of Mi-
ami, Florida, William (Louise)
of Kingstree, S.C., Samuel
(Pearlie Mae) of Chicago, IL,
and Clifford of Brooklyn, NY;
three sisters, Ella of Philadel-
phia, Pa, Soundra (Freddy)
of Rochester, NY and Daisy
of Maryland; five grandchil-
dren, Jerron, Mya, Derrick
Jr., Darius and Devion; spe-
cial friend, .Gail Taylor and a
host of aunts, uncles, niec-
es, nephews and sorrowiing
friends.
Public viewing will be held
Wednesday, April 30 at Alfon-
so Richardson Funeral Home
3790 N.W. 167 Street, Miami
Gardens, FL, from 5 to 8 p.m.
Remains will be shipped to
Dimery and Rogers Funeral
Home in Kingstree, S.C. for
funeral on Saturday May 3.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


DORA S. NICKSON
09/02/1940 05/01/2007

It's been a year since you
went to be with the Lord, but
you left us memories that will
last a lifetime.
Love always, Jerry, Louis,
Tab, Clara, Antionette,
Latravia, and Crystal.


Card of Thanks

We the family of the late,
William 'Bill' Sawyer Jr., thank
you sincerely for sharing our
sorrow. Your kindness is deeply
appreciated and may God bless
each of you always.


Happy Birth
In loving memory of,


ANNIE M. GREEN
04/23/1915 05/01/2007

Loving you always, Deloris
Francis and family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


RUBY NEWBOLD
ANDERSON
08/31/42 04/30/02


It has been six years since
you left us, but it seems like
yesterday. Everyday you are
in our thoughts. You're gone
but never, never forgotten.
Your loving family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


REV. BRENDA M. SINGLETON
10/23/1952 04/30/2004

It's been four years since
our father called you home.
Our lives will never be the
same. We miss you so much.
Love, Ronin and Shont'a







Miami Northwestern Class
of 1963 will meet on May 5 at
the Heritage African Culture
Center, 7 p.m. sharp.


Edison Senior High
School class of 1998 has
finalized reunion plans.
contact the 1998 Planning
Committee at 786-399-4615 or
redraiders98@hotmail.com.


The First Regional District of The Florida Morticians Association,'
Inc. is pleased to recognize Mrs. Barbara Bain Jordan as the 2008
Mortician of the Year on both the district and state levels. The dis-
trict will host a gala in her honor on Sunday, May 18th 2008, at the
Biscayne Bay Marriott in downtown Miami, 1633 North Bayshore
Drive. The reception is at 6:00 p.m. with the dinner and program to
follow at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $60 each or $600 per table of ten.
Mrs. Jordan, the daughter of Victor J. and the late Helen H. Bap-
tiste Bain, has distinguished herself in funeral service for over 36
years starting at the family firm, Bain's Funeral Home in Coconut
Grove. She is currently the licensed funeral director in charge at the
Grace Funeral Home in North Miami. Mrs. Jordan is past president of
FMA, Inc., the second woman to hold this office in the 84-year his-
tory of the association. She is Steward Pro-Tem at Greater St. Paul
A.M.E. Church in Coconut Grove and is active in her community. For
more information, please contact Hall, Ferguson, Hewitt Mortuary at
(305) 633-0688 or Ms. Jeanette Kelley at (305) 7265330.


-------- ----


--------


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Li"he si Tiy es

iesty les


S, FASHION HIP HOP MusIc FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


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C 2 THE MIAMI TIMES APRIL 50-MAY 6, 2008


S.IIL .


Two lives and two hearts
were joined in friendship
and love when Altarina
Roslyn Nichols and Michael
Todd Starkes wedded, last
Saturday, at New Shiloh
MBC with Reverend Willie
Starks, officiating, before a
full church of anxious family
members, coworkers, and
friends.
The bride and groom chose
beige and white as their
colors, the female attendants
wore beige gowns with
white accessories and the
groomsmen complimented
them with beige tuxedos.
The bridal party arrived in a
22-executive limousine and
the bride in a white Rolls
Royce.
With the playing of How
Deeply I Need You by
Shekinah Glory Ministry,
the parents were escorted to
their seats, beginning with
Hattie Atkinson, mother of
the groom, followed by James
and Mattie Nichols, parents
of the bride, as Kenny G's I'll
Always Love You filled the
edifice. The officiant, groom
and Don Junior Taylor,
best man completed the first
phase with the singing of
You Are by Kem.
The bridal party entered
on Special Day beginning
with bridesmaids Shelia
Mann and Duane Starkes,
Michelle McCollum and
Lavell Nichols, Sr., Lisa
Augustin Quinton Nichols,
Cynthia Starkes and
Solomon Willis, and Nakesia
Ragin and Mitchoun
Alusma.
Xamya Nichols, junior
bridesmaid, Zaria Starkes,
junior bride, Austin Teate,
junior groomsman, and


Lavell James,
Jr., junior groom;
Kyla Nichols
and Zaijah
Nichols, flower
girls; Lavaris
Nichols, ring
bearer, Jeanine
Monestine and Jonathan
Monestine, ushers; and
Daniel Brown and Frank
Barnes, escorts.
Give Me Forever I Do filled
the chapel as the bride
entered on the arm of her
father. She was radiant in
a full tiara, mini-earrings,
a flowing beige gown and
train. With triumphant steps
she glided towards the altar,
she, was about to marry her
soul mate.
Deborah Jones serenaded
the both of them, followed by
an opening prayer, exchange
of vows and rings, and
lighting of the unity candles,
while Whitney Houston sang,
You Light Up My Life.
Following the presentation
of Mr. and Mrs. Michael T.
Starkes, the newlyweds led
the entourage to Paradise
Banquet Hall for the
celebration and reception
with Clark Major, emcee.
He began by seating the
parents, followed by Step In
The Name Of Love by R. Kelly
for the entire wedding party.
The bride and groom entered
on Celebrate and did the first
dance. After the blessing of
the food, dinner was served,
followed by toasts, garter
toss, and bouquet toss, while
Deborah Jones, wedding
planner accepted another
thank you for a job well
done and Tangela Nichols
beamed after traveling all
the way from Columbus, SC.


MR M E


By O, Rihar Strcha


and taking the time to assist
Chatter.


Speaking of a special
service, kudos to David
Smith, vocalist and organizer
of Ebenezer UMC Family And
Friends Day, last Sunday at
the church, where their was
standing room only (SRO)
from the beginning to the
end.
It was the second Sunday
and The Choraliers were
featured. They waited until
pastor D. Joretha Capers
made her entrance before
word and praise began.
Smith led the choir in You
Are Welcome in this Place
and the audience stood with
reverence soaking up the
blessings that
circled the room.
The song We
Worship Him filled
the room and
generated a new
spirit as each one
waved, clapped,
stomped, and
praise the Lord
for 10-minutes of
the song, while
the M.A.S.K.
and JB Dancers
added a new
dimension and Altarina I
the icing on the Michae
cake by joining in
with their style of
praising.
It took several minutes
for the spirit to subside,
while family members
spoke persons recognized
attending families. It began
in the back with The Bradley
family with 3r10 persons in
attendance. Others followed
included the Clark -family,
The Whyms family, the
Thomas family, the Smith
family, the Powell family, the
Arcola Lakes Singing Angels,
the Hill family, the Bethel
family, the Perry family, the


Martin family, The Strachan
family, the Francis family,
the Bookings family, the
Larchmond family, the
Lopez family and 300 more.
The highlight of Family and
Friends Day brought out new
young talent, the daughter
of Joyceland Thomas,
who had the experience of
delivering a mini-sermon, a
short prayer, and, now, the
solo in Because of You with
the choir and brought a
standing ovation.
Many other presentations
included the dance groups
and much more singing,
while the audience blessings
began to over-run the cup.
And, when everyone thought
it was over, the Choraliers
mixed in I Never Would've
Made With Out
You featuring
< Paula, David
and Jill Bethel.
The spirit rose to
such a level until
someone wanted
to call the Fire
SRescue to cool it
down.
Smithwas given
a thunderous
applause for a
job well-done.
He was so carried
ichols and away with the
Starkes many responses,
he is planning
another day with
outside artists being invited
the next time around. Stay
tuned for more information.


Mary Simmons, a member
and officer at St. Paul A.M.E.
Church. president of the
senior citizens group, and
directress of The Singing
Angels reports that 12
adventurous people took the
time to visit Salvador (Bahia)
Brazil. These outstanding
travelers included Dorothy
Huggins, Marilyn Randall,


Betty Spence, Carolyn
Frazier, Minnie Cox,
Shirley Gibson, Millie Barr,
Emma Worlds, Beverly
Burns, Adlee Lodges, and
Gwendolyn Franklin.
These Miamians boarded
TAM Airlines to Rio De
Janeiro, March 30 and
returned, April 8. During
their stay they went on
many historical tours into
African cultures, viewing
historical relics, religious
arts, museums and the old
Quarters in Bahia.
They dined on Brazilian
food daily in the many
restaurants frequented,
especially on the finest
meats served Brazilian style
and sliced to your preference
right at the table.
SSome highlights of the
trip included sugar loaf,
the a, 230 feet high granite
cone that rises from the bay
and was reached by cable
car. Next was the visit to
Corvoualo Mountain which
was breathtaking, as well
as the picture-taking under
the towering statue of Christ
the Redeemer. Others shows
included The Samba, Camba
rhythms that was spectacular
and magnificent with proper
costumes and movement.
Mary indicated that each
visiting country had the
opportunity to display some
talent. And, ofcourse, Frazier
be-bopped 'New York' to the
delight of the crowd and the
present Singing Angels. The
gang stated not to forget
visiting the Convento Do
Carmo in Bahia, which was
a convent and now converted
into a grand hotel. Some of
the structure was from the
18 and 19 centuries, as well
as the jewelry for which the
tourists shopped until they
dropped in the area.

*****Liberty City came alive
Liberty City came alive


when Harold Ferguson
returned from Mexico City,
Mexico after a four month
visit with Herbert and
Vivian and Harry Long. So
happy were family members
to see him, they arranged
a feast of chicken wings,
conch fritters, fish, hot dogs,
French fries, sodas, potato
salad spearheaded by Alvilda
"Tree" Green, sister.
Other members of the
family included The Barnett,
Dunnings, Greenes, Jones,
Kings, Knowles, Mills,
Mingos, and Reddicks,
along with activities such
as scrabble, spades, bid
whist, and children games
on the computer. Ferg was
surprised and jubilant
among his family members
and expressed his desire for
Liberty City, especially when
he knows what people are
saying. Can you imagine a
Bahamian speaking Spanish
in Mexico. It will be gibberish
all of the time.

******
Congratulations go out to
Juanita Miller, president,
Women Empowered-
Responding to Serve Valued
People and membership
for the Forum on HIV/
AIDS, recently at the First
Baptist Church of Bunche
Park before a capacity-filled
church.
Carolyn Y. McKay, forum
chair welcomed everyone,
followed by her dad, Deacon
Archie McKay, Sr. bringing
prayer, followed by the
Holy Family Dance Group,
Dr. Gay Outler, 2nd vice
giving the Mission, Rosalyn
Allen, a special story and
remarks from Florence
Greer, coordinator, Dr.
Deborah Holmes, keynote
speaker, and Kavin
Davis, representative from
Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson's office.


ETA PHI BETA Sorority, Inc.
Alpha Gamma Chapter inducted
the following new members on
April 6, 2008 at Kzah Temple in
Opa-locka. Tawanna Boykin,
Mayisha Brown, Angela Hurst,
Deborah Bragg, Jacquelyn
Otis, Leelia Troutman, Julia
Gilchrist and Shirley Clark.
Congratulations Ladies!
Wedding Anniversary to all
of you! Heman and Luvenia
Keith, April 20: celebrating
31 years; Gregory and Shelly
Powers, April 21: celebrating 12
years; Anthony and Lakeshia
Taylor, April 24: celebrating 4
years; Arthur and Jacqueline
Livingston, April25: celebrating
54 years; LTC Anthony P. and
Juanita Armbrister, April


25: celebrating 35
years; Edwin and
Gaile Holland,
April 25: celebrating
21 years; Alex
and Kenyatta
Jaramillo, April
26: celebrating 5 years. Happy
Anniversary!
Congratulations to Barbara
Rolle-Burrows. She has been
awarded 'The Bishop's Lay'
annual award for 2008. We
are all happy for you! The
presentation was held at the
Saint Agnes Episcopal Church
(Fr. Richard L.M. Barry, Rector)
during the 10:45 am service.
I were sadden to read about
the passing of the last member of
'The Murphy Clan' of Baltimore


who family owned the Black
newspaper since 1892. Frances
L. Murphy, II served as editor-
publisher of the Washington
Afro-American (1986-1999).
Her mother were one of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority founders
at Howard University Vashti
Turley Murphy. At the Omega
Omega service two dozen Deltas
conducted her service. Relatives,
whom are all Delta's conducted
her service. Her eulogy was
given by her niece, Bishop
Vashti Murphy Mckenzie,
National Chaplain of DST.
If you missed The Egelloc
(College spelled backwards)
Thirty Ninth Annual
presentation 'Men of Tomorrow,'
you really missed a treat. It is so
very, very nice to see our young
boys doing positive activities.
I salute Mary Ann Thomas
McCloud, President and their
members for an excellent job


also Dr. Richard Strachan,
Choreographer
Congratulatiqns to the
Culmer's family. Shelby E.
Brooks, daughter of the late
Franena Culmer-Brooks and
Arthur Brooks and the late
Venerable Father John E. and
Mrs. Leome Scavella-Culmer
will graduate from Alcorn State
University on Saturday, May 10.
We are very proud and happy for
you Shelby. Shelby will receive
a Bachelor of Science Degree in
Biology.
Dashawn LaRodney
Patterson christening was
held Sunday, April 27 at
Transfiguration Episcopal
Church. His godparents
Donnina M. Jones, Adrian
Asia-Davy, Louis K. Smith
and Stephan Logan. LaCory
and Antoinette Patterson the
parents of Dashawn, reception
was held at the home of Gayle


S. Gee.
Congratulations to this year
selection of those persons
recognize on the AT&T-Bell
south calendar. They are
Edward H. Hanna, Jr.; Earl J.
Caroll; Rev. J. Kenneth Major,
DD; Pamela M. Hutchinson;
Marvin E. Ellis; Robert H.
Simms; Leome F. Scavella-
Culmer; Lenora Braynon-
Smith; Kenneth Thomas
Williams; and Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority for over 100
years of service.
Get Well Wishes to all of you:
Cecil Stanley Newbold, III;
Prince Gordon; Kayla Edwards;
Yvonne Johnson-Gatore;
Joyce Gibson-Johnson;
Celestine Hepburn-Brown;
Deloris Gordon; Frances
Brown; Leo Moss (BTW class of
'48) ; Noami Adams; Clifornia
Ross; Bernice S. Meares; and
Vashti Armbrister.


Hearty Congratulations to
Dr. Nelson L. Adams, who was
recently presented with the
Distinguished Alumni award
from the National Medical
Fellowships, a nonprofit
organization founded in 1946.
The organizatin is dedicated
to improving the quality of
health care for low income
and minority communities by
increasing the number of under
representd minority Physicians
and researchers in the United
States. Dr. Adams is the son
of the late Nelson L. Adams
and Naomi Alien Adams, who
lives in Tuskegee, AL with her
daughter, Sceiva Holland and
her family. Sceiva was in town
for the 'Men of Tomorrow' grand
affair and to see her nephew
strut with the other young men
with theif canes and sharp
white suits on. April is Child
Abuse Prevention Month!


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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 50-MAY 6, 2008


BIL ACK MUSTI CONTROL TIIER OWN DESTINY


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Solange Knowles: What's in a name?


By Peter Gicas

To paraphrase the famous
line about a rose by any
other name still being a rose,
Beyonce's sister-by whatever
name-is still Beyonc&'s sister!
It seems B's younger sibling
(and Jay-Z's new sister-in-law),
Solange Knowles, will now go
by the oh-so-creative moniker
SoL-AngeL on her upcoming


sophomore album.
And she says that getting the
CD made in the first place was
quite an effort.
"I literally had to beg [record
producer] Cee-Lo to listen to
my music, but once he did, he
signed on immediately."
Ah, we stand corrected. For
a minute there, we thought
maybe nepotism had someting
to do with it.


YOUR0WEEKL


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
So many people want your help you
don't know what to do. Being altruis-
tic isn't your strong suit. Detach and
let everyone deal with their own stuff.
With everything you've got going on it
looks like you're the one that needs
help. Lucky numbers 4, 30, 22, 10, 4.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
Putting the cart before the horse
never works. You're so busy thinking
about what's next you can't see that
there's a ton of old business getting in
the way. Back up and deal with it. Your
big plans will go nowhere if you don't.
Lucky numbers 4, 30, 22, 1, 12.

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
If you have doubts about this your
intuition could be right on. What looks
good on paper will turn out to be noth-
ing but a headache. Since no one else
seems to notice it's up to you to get
this to move in a different direction.
Lucky numbers 3, 20, 43, 29, 7.

CANCER:JUNE 21- JULY 20
You know you can't do this. Letting
it all go will raise questions from oth-
ers. If things get confused don't cave
in. At this point it doesn't matter what
they think or want. It's what you want
that will decide how things go. Lucky


numbers 5, 50, 44, 3, 8.

LEO:JULY 21 AUGUST 20
Other people's plans seem a bit
crazy. For now you need to go along
with them.This won't go anywhere, so
don't worry. Things will turn out ex-
actly the way you want them to once
others' wake up and realize they're
delusional. Lucky numbers 6, 7, 30,
21, 9.

VIRGO: AUGUST 21 SEPT. 20
Feeling a little lost, you're doing
your best to find yourself. This is your
life so don't feel beholden to what you
think others expect. If all you try to do
is be what others want you to be you
will never find yourself. Lucky num-
bers 7, 40, 32, 19, 4.

LIBRA: SEPT.21 OCT.20
Right now, relationships are a bit
of a headache. This will continue to
trouble you until you find a way to let
others be accountable for their own
actions. Detach if you can. They won't
grow if you keep bailing them out.
Lucky numbers 3, 20, 17, 12, 3.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
You can't keep blaming everything
on the weather. This could all shift if
you gave your self more options. Mov-


ing wouldn't be a bad idea. Expand
your horizons. When the going gets
tough it's always best to think out-
side the box. Lucky numbers 5, 40,
32, 10, 11.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
Don't assume that you're being vic-
timized. You made your choices and if
part of you wasn't prepared for this,
you didn't think things through proper-
ly. Get a grip.This is happening because
your last move set it up to go this way.
Lucky numbers 18, 9, 32, 1, 8.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21 JAN.20
Life is so confusing it's hard for
you to see that you need some space
to process it. Cut back on your work-
load. There's so much going on at the
personal and inner levels, you need to
spend most of your energy sorting it
out. Lucky numbers 30, 21, 34, 55, 6.

AQUARIUS: JAN.21 FEB.20
Misplacing your faith has made you
wonder if the whole human race is out
of integrity. This is more about you and
your lack of discernment. It might help
to examine your deeper reasons for
keeping company with the wrong peo-
ple. Lucky numbers 8, 5, 43, 52, 4.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
The fear of success is often stron-
ger than the fear of failure. When we
get too close to having what we want,
things tend to turn a corner. If you re-
ally believe that you deserve this, and
stay in joy, it will be yours. Lucky num-
bers 1, 17, 8, 6, 3.


2'


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.









IBL.AC'K.S MUST (CON IROLI THI 11R OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


She never dreamed she'd be an inventor


in her Maidenform

backless bra

By Theresa Howard l k


Elaine Cato, 40, never
intended to become a bra
designer.
All she wanted, seven
months after the birth of her
second daughter in 1998, was
to look hot for a New Year's Eve
party. Last week, Maidenform
rolled out for other women
what she invented to solve
the problem, calling it the
Breakthrough Backless bra.
About a month before
ringing in 1999, the size-four
Nashville mother of two had
set her sights on fitting into
a black, backless number for
the party. The problem: Her
34DD bust needed a little
support after nursing baby
No. 2, and she could not find
a backless bra that worked.
"When I couldn't find
anything on the market to
support this outfit, I thought
maybe I could take one of my
bras and alter it," says Cato.
"I started to experiment with
reconfiguring the straps."
She was not an expert. "I
took a sewing class in high
school, and my mom taught


ELAINE CATO


OUT 4








HaE
t:vf


me stuff about sewing," she
says, "but I never went beyond
the basics."


But she cut and sewed
some old bras together and
ultimately created a backless


bra that even had five other
configurations, including
halter and crisscross, and
was a hit at the New Year's
Eve party.
"When I wore the bra that
night ... women were asking,
'What do you have on?' "
Cato says. "They knew that
for a heavy-busted woman
with small body frame, the
adhesive types of bras on the
market really don't give you
the lift and support that you
want."
Cato saw marketing
potential in her bra and
figured out how to file for a
patent because she couldn't
afford the $4,000 fee for a
patent attorney.
She was granted the patent
in 2000, but her big break


came after she heard about
ABC reality show American
Inventor, which had a million-
dollar top prize for the best
invention.
She won an audition
to compete in the show's
second season last year. Her
bra finished second in the
competition, but Maidenform
noticed and surprised her
with a licensing offer on the
season's final episode.
Maidenform tweaked the
backless bra, but it remains
true to Cato's design. It has
adjustable straps that are
attached to the outside edge
of the cups in the front, loop
over the shoulder and come
back under the arm to attach
to sturdy but pliable 2-inch
wings that extend back from
the cups.
It went on sale at retailers
last week for a suggested
price of $32. and will be the
centerpiece of Maidenform
marketing this year that
emphasizes new products
and seeks new customers.
The tagline of the campaign:
This Feels Right.
Innovation "is our big story
for the year," says Sally
Skidmore, Maidenform's vice
president of marketing and
advertising. "We're bringing
something new to the market
that (the female consumer


has) never seen before."
The Breakthrough Backless
bra and other new products,
including seamless and
single-construction bras, are
featured in the new ads.
Print ads will run
in magazines such as
Cosmopolitan and Glamour.
Online advertising includes
banner ads, as well as video
and ring tones at MySpace.
com. Billboards and posters
will run in out-of-home ad
spaces ranging from women's
locker rooms at gyms to a
giant display on a tall, old
warehouse along the Long
Island Expressway in New
York.
The warehouse has two
billboards on the roof, a giant
poster down the middle and
walls of windows at each end
have been painted to look as
if women are throwing their
old bras out the windows.
The idea: "Out with the old,
in with the new."
"We're really trying to
encompass something new
for Maidenform," says Greg
Smith, chief creative officer
for The Via Group, the
Portland, Maine, agency that
created the campaign. "How
we are able to market the
brand is derived from what
they have done with the
product."


Snoop Dogg wins latest


visa battle with Britain


US rapper Snoop Dogg is a
step closer to being allowed
back into Britain after a court
overruled his visa ban, it
emerged Thursday.
Snoop and five members of
his entourage were arrested
at Heathrow airport in 2006
following a mass brawl in the
British Airways VIP lounge in
which bottles were smashed
and several police officers
were injured.
As a result, immigration
officials refused the
controversial singer a visa to
the UK, claiming his presence
here was "non-conducive to
the public good".
Snoop, 37, had applied for,
and was denied, a visa in 2007
to join fellow rapper P Diddy to
speak to teenagers at an event
against gun crime and gang
violence.
However, in January
immigration judge Nehar
Bird watched a DVD of the
Heathrow incident and found
there was no evidence Snoop
had been responsible for
public disorder and that he
had actively co-operated with
police.
In fact, Bird was quoted by
the Guardian as saying that
the disorder at the airport
was "precipitated by decisions
made by BA staff and the
police".
He added: "The appellant's
behaviour on the DVD did
show him interacting with
the public. The children
were laughing and generally
enjoying either dancing or
singing or playing music."
The Home Office appealed
but senior immigration


SNOOP DOGG


told the paper: "It has been
an appalling waste of public
money to pursue this man.
"It is outrageous that the
government is trying to exclude
someone who is an innocent
figure and has frequently
spoken against gang culture
and youths carrying guns."
The Home Office now has
until Wednesday to appeal
again.


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NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Invitation to Bid (ITB) 08-6053-RP,
Urgent Care Center (UCC) Demolition
Bids are hereby solicited and will be received on behalf of the Jackson Health System-Public Health
Trust of Miami-Dade County in the Procurement Management Department, 1611 NW 12th Avenue, Holtz
Center, Room B-066, Miami, FL 33136 on the date indicated below. The ITB solicitation document can
be obtained at the same location at this time. There will be a $50.00 non-refundable charge for the plans
and specs. Payment may be made by personal check, company check, money order, or cashier's check.
Checks and other such instruments of funds shall be made out to the Jackson Health Systems Public
Health Trust. This ITB includes a CWP allocation and an incentive for "Small Business Enterprise" sub-
contracting. This competitive ITB process is governed at this time by the "Cone of Silence" in accordance
with County Ordinance No. 98-106. Only the Procurement Department Representative shown below
may be contacted regarding this ITB.

Procurement Department Representative


Contact Name:
Contact Number:
E Mail:


Reynaldo Palma, Senior Procurement Contracting Officer
305-585-6919
reynaldo.palma@jhsmiami.org


CRITICAL INFORMATION
Non Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference Monday, May 5, 2008, 9 AM Local Time
Date, Time and Location: Institute Annex Building, 4th Floor.
Conference Room 410
Bid Due Date & Time and Location Thursday May 22, 2008, 2:00 PM Local Time
Procurement Management Department
Jackson Memorial Hospital
East Tower, Room B-066
Miami, Florida 33136
The work consists of furnishing all materials, labor and equipment necessary to demolish, remove debris
and salvage as directed the Urgent Care Center (UCC) as described and as shown on the demolition plans
and specifications. Close coordination with sub-contractor(s) responsible for the underground utility
systems, Infection Control Risk Assessment (ICRA) compliance and other activities associated with this
Project shall be required. The Scope of Work encompasses the complete demolition of the Urgent Care
Center and adjacent areas, including the relocation of an existing electrical power panel. The extent of
demolition is defined in the Construction Documents prepared by HKS, the Architect, which is made part of
the ITB Items identified as "salvage items" in the construction document plans shall be removed and
carefully stored on an on-site facility or as per owner's direction.


MIAMI-DAD


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can be
obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM), from
our Website: www.miamidade.aov/dUm. Vendors may choose to download
the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under "Solicitations
Online". Internet access is available at all branches of the Miami-Dade Public
Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our Website on a daily basis to
view newly posted solicitations, addendums, revised bid opening dates and
other information that may be subject to change.
Interested parties may also visit or call:
Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773
There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the
bid package through the United States Postal Service.
These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


__ I















K K \\


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


Office Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600

Unfurnished RoomS s
MIAMI AREA
4 beedroom 2 bath section 8
only 954-605-1360
MIAMI AREA
Rooms $550 monthly, every-
thing included. 954-605-1360
MIAMI GARDENS
Separate private entrance,
front door, one room, one
bath, two closets, utilities and
satellite TV included. $500
monthly, $1000 to omove in
Call 786-704-7708.
Room for rent, and
apartment.
Call 305-637-7862 or
786-426-4875

Furmshed RoorS
$199 DEPOSIT
2169 N.W. 49 Street -
FREE AIR and Cable TV
$115 weekly 786-234-5683
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.

1775 N.W. 151 Street
Air, cable TV, refrigeratorand
microwave. Utilities included.
Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
1876 NW 66th STREET
Room for rent with air $450 a
month. No deposit. Call 786-
357-1395
2168 NW 98 Street
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, 1 person.
305-474-8188/305-691-3486.
2900 N.W. 54th Street
One room, refrigerator and
air. No smoking in the
building. Call 954-885-8583
or 954-275-9503
2905 NW 57 STREET
Small clean room (one per-
son) $285 monthly First and
last month plus security $75,
$670 to move in 305-989-
6989.
8275 N.W 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776
9119 NW 25 Avenue
Quiet room with AC. $360
monthly. Call 305-691-2703.
9200 NW 25 AVENUE
$300 monthly. Call 305-691-
2703.

By Downtown/Overtown
Rooms, $400 monthly and
$600 to move in.
786 -357-1957
LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, non-smoker
Call 786-237-5281
MIAMI GARDENS
786-308-5625
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AREA
Furnished room and efficien-
cy for rent. Call 786-999-
2818/305-949-4329.
Northwest Area
Utilities included, very clean
954-245-2528



100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$215 weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$140 weekly, $600 moves
you in. 786-389-1686
2571 E. Superior Street
Efficiency $700 moves you
in, $287 bi-weekly.
Call 786-389-1686

MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished, own entrance.
First and last to move in.
Call305-628-4987

NORTHWEST AREA
Rooms and Efficency for
rent.
Call 305-967-9074.


Effcnci
ROOMS IN CASTLE STYLE
MANSION
Free light.s
Room $450 monthly plus
$150 security/ near bus line
or $400 monthly with air plus
$150 security. Family Dollar
three blocks north.
786-523-1736.

Apartment
101 N.E. 78th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950. Balcony, laundry room,
and parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424
1082 N.W. 55 STREET
Brand-new beautiful one
bedroom. apartment $880
plus one month security
call. Section 8 OK Nancy
305-389-7258, 305-756-7277
English or Fabian
786-200-8627 Spanish
1084 N.W. 55 Street
Brand new beautiful upstairs
apartment, large deck. Off
street parking. $1250 plus
one month security.Section 8
Welcome Nancy
305-389-7258, 305-756-7277
English or Fabian
786-200-8627 Spanish
1130 N.W. 2nd Avenue
DOWNTOWN AREA
One bedroom, one bath, fully
remodeled. Call 305-375-
0673 or 786-444-0771.
12108 NE 5 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath. Tile
floors, $735 monthly. Section
8 Okay.Call 305-206-1566
14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge one bedroom, one
bath, with central air, in quiet
area, $725 monthly!
Raciel Cruz: 305-213-5013
1500 N.W. 65th Street
One bedroom, air, $560.
monthly utilities not included.
Gated property.
Call 786-514-4746.
1518 N.W. 103 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, bars totally
remodeled $995 monthly Call
Rod 786-290-4625
1520 NW 61ST STREET
One and two bedroom apart-
ments renovated, all housing
agencies welcome.
Call 305-720-2927
1558 N.W. 1st AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fully remodeled. Call 786-
444-0771 / 786-488-6119.
1811 Ali-Baba Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
'$550 monthly. 954-704-0094
1872 N.W. 24 STREET
Small one bedroom garden
apartment. Very good condi-
tion. Off steet parking. $700
plus one month security.
Section 8 welcome call
Nancy 305-389-7258
305-756-7277 English or
Fabian 786-200-8627
Spanish.
1872 N.W. 24 STREET
Small two bedroom garden
apartment, very good condi-
tion. Off street parking. $900
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Nancy 305-389-7258,
305-756-7277 English or
Fabian 786-200-8627 for
Spanish.

21201 S.W. 120 Avenue
Small one bedroom cottage.
Off street parking. $550 plus
one month security.
Section 8
Welcome. Call Nancy
305-389-7258, 305-756-7277
English or Fabian
786-200-8627 English.

21201 S.W. 120 Avenue
Very nice condition, two bed-
rooms, one bath. Off street
parking. $950 monthly plus
one month security.
Section 8
welcome. Call Nancy 305-
389-7258, 305 756 7277
English or Fabian
786-200-8627 Spanish.
2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $725, two bed-
rooms .$925 newly
renovated, appliances
included.
Call Tony 305-213-5013
2352 NW 97 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475 monthly. 305-691-2703.


Apartments
249 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, just renovated fenced
yard, parking, $800 monthly
plus security. Section 8
welcome.Call 786-216-7533.
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate
$600 monthly.
954-430-0849
3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath
$350 bi-weekly $800 moves
you in. Call:786-389-1686
3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Totally remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath in nice quiet
area. All appliances included.
$625 monthly. MUST SEE!
Call Mr. Cruz 305-213-5013
416 NE 58 STREET
One bedroom with
appliances and air. $700
monthly.
Call 786-426-6263
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
575 N.W. 94 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$750 monthly, **close to ev-
erything.** 786-263-1590
5755 N. W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, parking,
$625 monthly, $1000 move
in Call 954-394-7562

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
7527 NW 22 Ave Upstairs
Spacious, two bedrooms,
305-331-5399
8028 N.W. 5 COURT
Very bright and clean. $550
monthly plus one month se-
curity. Off street parking.
Section 8 Welcome. Call
Nancy 305-389-7258,
305305-756-7277 English or
Fabian 786-200-8627
Spanish
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One bedroom apartment.
Section 8. Call 305-754-7776
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air
and appliances. Starting from
$650. Call 786-506-3067.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-695
Call 786-351-4516
FOR RENT
One and two bedroom City
Subsidized units for those
that qualify. Hurry won't last.
Call 786-326-8280.
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
5101 N.W. 24 AVENUE
One bedroom starting at
$525 786-597-2248

MIAMI AREA
One, two and four bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
OPA LOCKA AREA
From $300, section 8 OK.
305-717-3343


Duplex
13315 ALEXANDER DRIVE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$800 monthly, washer and
dryer provided. Section 8
OK.
Call 786-252-4953
1697 NW 116th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
First, last and security, $750
mthly, 770-496-4376
2166 NW 91 Street
Two bedroom one bath, cen-
tral air, section 8 welcome
305-710-2921 or 305-710-
2964
2452 N.W. 44th Street #1
One bedroom, air. $600
monthly. Call 786-877-5358.
3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
ONE BEDROOM Section 8
ok. Call 305-754-7776
3051 N.W. 134th Street
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
Newly remodeled two large
bedrooms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, cable, central air,
tile, security bars and large
walk-in closet. $1050
monthly. Call 954-557-4567
4245 N.W. 24 Ave Apt B
Newly remodeled two bed-
rooms, one bath. $1000
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-219-5225..
5201 N.W. 15 Avenue
One bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. 305-975-6605
5507N.W. 5th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
security bars, applicances.
$750 monthly, first and last.
After 5:30 305-979-3509.
572 NE 65th Street
Two bedrooms one bath.
$900 monthly, $500 security
deposit. Call 786-488-2264
586 N W 83 STREET B
One bedroom one bath.
$700 monthly. First and
security $1400 to move in.
Call 786-488-2264.
58th Street 31st Avenue
Small one bedroom partially
furnished with air, lights and
water. For one or two people
only. Call 305-693-9486.
638 NW 65 STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
fenced yard, security bars,
appliances, air, fans, kitchen
hood includes water. $750
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call John 305-389-4011 or
305-632-3387
8775 N.W. 20th Avenue
Tile floors $750.monthly Call
770-421-9857
940 NW 103rd st
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, appliances, $1250mnthly.
section 8 ok 954.431.3777
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first last, security. Section 8
preferred. Call 786-374-9278

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Like new three bedroom,
Section8 welcome. Call 786-
269-5643.
MIAMI AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 monthly. Call 786-
286-2540.
MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath
$885 monthly and one bed-
room one bath $675 monthly,
everything included call 786-
286-2540
PERRINE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly. HOPWA/Sec-
tion 8 okay. 305-632-9092

Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air.. $595-$975. Call
786-344-3278



140 N.W. 70 STREET
Brand new four bedrooms,
two baths, garage, two story.
Must see $1800 monthly.
786-399-8557.


Condos/Townhouses
191st Street NW 35th Ave
Four bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.

Houses

119 NE 56 Street.
Three bedroom, one bath.
Tile floors, newly renovated
off street parking, air, new
carpet bedrooms, fenced
front yard, back court yard
$925 plus security call 305-
754-7900 for appt. 9-5

1333 NW 75 STREET
Three bedrooms, two bath.
$1450 monthly.954-704-0094
1345 NE 128 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
One car garage, big yard.
$1200 monthly. NO Section8
Call 305-267-9449
14900 NW 6 COURT
Four bedrooms, three baths
updated. $1500 monthly.
305-662-5505.
17401 N.W. 37 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
carport, $1200 monthly. No
Section 8. 305-267-9449
1785 N.W. 43 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Large yard.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449.
17910 N.W. 42 Place
Three bedrooms, central air.
No Section 8. $1495.
786-306-4839.
22 N.E. 59 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1400. Section 8 Okay. Jer-
ome 305-801-8994.
2300 N.W. 53 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
bars. central air,Section 8
Welcome. Call 305 206 0500
9-7 p.m.
2311 N.W. 152 Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths.
786-715-4968
2401 N.W. 92 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths
completely remodeled, cen-
tral air. Huge clean
corner lot,
appliances included. Section
8 Welcome.no coral way
772-834-5735.
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
2967 NW 135th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$1200. 954-704-0094
3061 N.W. 51 Terrace
Two bedroom, one bath,
$900 monthly 305.794.9959
41 Street N.W. 5 AVENUE
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776
4644 N.W. 16th Avenue
Two bedrooms, $875 move
in special. 954-625-5901.
6108 SW 31 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1300 monthly.305-794-9959
MIAMI AREA
4 beedroom 2 bath section 8
only 954-605-1360
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, large yard. Call
305-625-6813 5-8, or
786-267-8271 8-5. Ask for
Oliver or Delores Coachman.
MIAMI GARDENS
Three and four bedrooms,
$1250 to $1500, air, tile
floors, bars. $3750 to $4500
move in. No Section 8.
T. Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
MIRAMAR AREA
Clean three bedroom, one
bath. Central air, large patio.
Section 8 OK. 954-274-1856
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Laundry, central air, $1250
monthly. First, last, and
security.305-345-3420
NW 54th St and 6th Avenue
Two bedroom, one bath with
den. $950 month.Reference
and one month deposit.
305-496-6227/786-554-5657
OPA LOCKA AREA
1551 N.W. 154 Street, three
bedrooms, one bath, large
yard, central air. Section 8
OK. 305-681-2886.


Houses
1320 N.W. 90 Street
Why rent?-Buy. Little River.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, garage, pool. $1900
down $1468 monthly, FHA.
786-306-4839.
1570 N.W. 70 Street
Why rent? Buy. Three bed-
rooms, one bath. Try $500
down and $759 monthly.
FHA. 786-306-4839.
1819 N.W. 57 Street
Why rent buy! two bedroom
one bath, appliances includ-
ed. Call 786-357-5523
18305 N.W. 23 AVENUE
Why rent?-Buy. Four bed-
rooms, three baths. Try
$1900 down and $1215
monthly. FHA, 786-306-
4839.
3211 N.W. 169 Terrace
Why rent?Buy. Three bed-
rooms two baths, pool. Try
$1900 down and $1399
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.
4910 N.W. 170 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Four bed-
rooms, two baths, air. Try
$1900 down and $1468
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.
ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also available
HUDNA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
Miami Gardens
Three, two asking $288,000
negotiable. call 786-718-
5902
PLANTATION AREA
Motivated make offer. Four
bedroom two bath $97,000
equity. Inground pool
305-788-7632.



24 HR. Plumbing
Unclog All types of Blockage.
Check Water Heaters and
Septic tank. Free Estimates.
786-597-1924 /305-576-5331
GAS LINE INSTALLED
From gas supply and
connect appliances and
make repairs to all major
appliances. Call 786-897-
2971,305-757-9899



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, and plastering. Also
additions. Call 954-980-4231
or 305-892-0315.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.
J's APPLIANCES
Same day service, no
service charge with repairs,
repair air conditioners,
central air, all makes, models
and wall units. Big screen
T.V repair
305-469-0835
M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves, re-
frigerators, water heaters.
Joel cell 305-244-8948 or
305-758-8608.



Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street

SHOE SALES
Experience necessary.
Apply in person at Bida
Shoes, 1651 N.E. 163 St


Employment

TEACHER
needed for two and three
year olds.
Call 305-836-1178



COIN LAUNDRY
Bank Foreclosure
800-421-8237, ext 41
COIN LAUNDRY
Overtown 1659 N.W. 3 Ave.
21 washers, 22 dryers. 30
day guarantee. 305-588-
9084



Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com

Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784


Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $55,
also do G and conceled.
Reliable
786-333-2084.

KIARA CHILD CARE
Accepting children 12
months through five years.
Free registration and
school t-shir with
enrollment. 305-474-9369.




Miami Edison
Class of 1978
Having a fish fry, barbecue,
dinner sale Friday, May 2 at
724 N.W. 77 Street.Come
and give us your support.
Call 786-390-0809 for
orders.


u-


Gov. Crist celebrates open,


transpar
TALLAHASSEE
Governor Charlie
today joined
reporters, news
editors and
members of the
at the First Amen'
Foundation's a
legislative lunch
He spoke of
importance of FlI
public records la
the democratic pr
Later this evenir
will host a recept
the Governor's Me
to recognize st
winners of the
Sunshine Week
Contest.
"Government
continue to hone
people we serve
remembering Ab:
Lincoln's charge
our government is
people, by the p
and for the pe
Governor Crist
"The people of F
are our boss, and i
responsibility to
government acce
and transparen
them."
In one of his
official acts as Gov
Charlie Crist
Executive Order
on January 2,
and created the
of Open Gover
and the Plain Lar
Initiative. Boti
designed to
Floridians
information


ent


Crist
news
paper
other
media
dment


government
state government
and ensure that
government's actions
are always transparent
and accountable to
taxpayers.
Governor Crist


nnual also announced
cheon. improvements made
the in communication
orida's strategies by state
iws to agencies since the
-ocess. creation of the Plain
ig, he Language Initiative. The
ion at comprehensive 2007
mansion annual report released
student today outlines both the
2008 history of the initiative
Essay and the activities of the
Executive Office of the
must Governor and 25 state
or the agencies. The activities
re by are evidence ofthe state's
raham commitment to ensuring
That open, transparent
'of the government.
people, "I applaud our
;ople," employees for their
said. effort and enthusiasm
Florida for the Plain Language
tis our Initiative and
make ensuring that the
essible people of Florida have
it to uncomplicated access
to the information they
First need," said Governor
rernor, Crist. "Our commitment
issued to communicate clearly
07-01 and concisely is not
2007, only a one-year project.
Office Instead,understandable
nment communication is
iguage vital to our mission to
h are embrace a culture of
help high quality customer
access service within state
about government."


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If you think nobody gives a damn what Black
people think, think again. Some people care a lot.
Especially when they need something from you.

Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what
you think when they're looking for your vote. And TV and radio stations
hope you will pay attention to their shows.
The point is,all these people want something from you.And when
people want something from you, you have got power over them.We


should learn to use that power wisely to make the changes we need to
make.
Give your money, your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return.People who are
doing the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lotof people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicat-
ing to you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it.
For instance, right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and
last year we earned more than 400 billion dollars.



Th at s clout,


Think about it











The MiamiTimes
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923
Phone:305-694-6210


%, IIOlm J -


Who "ares What Black People Think AnywayI


ss


SECTIONM n









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


) 18 THE MIAMI TIMES APRIL 50- 8


Credit card rates


By Kathy Chu

Even as the
Federal Reserve has
cut interest rates,
financial institutions
have sharply raised
rates for credit card
customers even
those who pay on time
- as they grapple with
losses from other bard
consumer loans.
This month,
Washington Mutual
(WM) told some credit
card customers that
it was raising their
rates by as much as
100%. Discover (DFS)
is lifting its penalty
rate to 31%, effective
May 1,. and may apply
that maximum to
consumers who exceed
their credit limit twice
in a rolling 12 months.
Bank of America
(BAC) raised rates
for some customers
in March triple, in
some cases, though
spokeswoman Betty
Riess says, "It would be
very rare."
All three institutions
say they reserve the


right to adjust rates
when customers
become higher
risks. Keith Givens,


with tough business
conditions, their
definition of risk is
evolving: "It's a lot like


haven't change
being hit, says J
Ridout, a spoke
for Consumer A


Credit card signs on an ATM in San Jose, Calif. Some banks are
ing their rates on cards significantly to make up for losses fror
loans.


a spokesman for
Washington Mutual,
also notes that the
decision to raise some
rates is "an indicator of
overall deterioration in
the economy."
As banks deal


beauty; it's in the eye
of the beholder," says
Greg McBride, senior
financial analyst at
Bankrate.com.
That's why even
responsible consumers
whose credit scores


an advocacy grou
Bill Hardekopf
ofLowCards.com
the card compa
site is "seeing
aggressive fees
out, and issuer
quicker to ct


skyrockets
are interest rates." go into bankruptcy,"
oseph He notes that as says Dan Blanton, of
:sman banks lose money on Pevely, Mo. He was
.ction, mortgage loans, it's notified this month
logical they would try that his Washington
to boost credit card Mutual credit card
profits. "If one end rate would nearly
of your business is double, to 24%.
suffering, you look to Blanton calls the
the other end to pick rate increase "totally
up the slack." unfair." He pays his
To boost profits, credit card bills on
some banks have also time and generally
imposed higher fees on pays more than the
consumers for paying minimum due. He
late, transferring also has a solid credit
credit card balances score of nearly 700,
and withdrawing he says. (Washington
money from an ATM. Mutual says it doesn't
The danger for card comment on individual
holders is that as accounts.)
some struggle to pay Discover's new
bills, steep rate or penalty rate applies
fee increases could to all new customers
Sras- nudge them toward About 10% of existing
S default. Credit card customers could also
m bad delinquencies a behitwiththe31%rate
precursor to defaults if they miss a payment
have been climbing, or exceed their credit
ip. and overall consumer limit twice in a year
,CEO loan delinquencies are Bank of America anc
i, says at their highest since Washington Mutua:
prison 1992. declined to say what
more "If every (card percentage of theii
come company) raises your existing customer
rs are rate, you might have base would be hit with
hange to write the debt off or higher interest rates.


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Hundreds of thousands of utility customers at risk of disconnections


ECONOMY
continued from 5D

months. Those
restrictions typically
end March 31 or April
15. Companies try
to work out payment
plans before curtailing
service, and aid is
available for some low-
income customers.
A record $40 million
was owed by 226,670
delinquent customers
of rate-regulated
utilities statewide in
March, says Jerry


McKim of Iowa's
Bureau of Energy
Assistance. "What we
have is a crisis that
never goes away," and
more federal and state
assistance is needed,
he says.
In March, 89,002
disconnect notices
were issued, up from
86,035 in March 2007,
McKim says. Iowa's
moratorium applies
only to customers who
qualify and apply for
low-income energy aid.
Elsewhere:


Central Maine
Power Company says
that as of March 31,
29,000 of its 537,000
residential customers
had not paid anything
on their accounts since
December a 4%
increase from 2007.
Northern Utilities,
which supplies natural
gas to 26,000 residential
and business customers
in Maine, says the
amount owed by
customers whose bills
are 30-60 days past due
is up 45% from the first


quarter of 2007.
Northern's customers
in New Hampshire
and accounts at sister
company Bay State Gas
in Massachusetts have
similar arrearages, says
spokeswoman Sheila
Doiron.
In River Falls, Wis.,
a city of 14,000, service
to a dozen homes
with overdue bills
was discontinued by
River Falls Municipal
Utilities this month,
says customer service
supervisor Jan Lorenz.


The utility has 5,800
customers. "In past
years, nobody would be
shut off," she says.
Home foreclosures
and high gasoline prices
are part of the problem.
"We see people that just
move in the middle of
the night and they're
gone," Lorenz says. "We
have people say, 'I can't
afford gas to go to work,
so how can I pay my
bills?' "
Forty-five customers
of St. Croix Gas, which
serves 7,000 customers


in the River Falls area,
haven't paid after being
cut off on April 15 -
a 10% increase from
2007, vice president
Marti Piepgras says.
Disconnect notices are
up 50% this year.
Wisconsin Public
Service says 12%-15% of
its 500,000 residential
customers have past-
due bills. That's up 5%
from 2007, says credit
administrator Jim
Ollmann. "Customers
are struggling," he
says.


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"James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manager, will be accepting SEALED
SUBCONTRACTOR BIDS for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Estimate for
Pompano each Elementary School Total Program Management Classroom Ad-
dition until 5:00 PM on May 15, 2008. The work includes various trades for CSI
Divisions 2, 10 and 16. James A. Cummings, Inc. is actively seeking Broward
County School Board certified minority subcontractors and suppliers. Sealed bids
will be accepted at James A. Cummings, Inc. main office @ 3575 NW 53 Street;
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309. Bid documents will be available through Cummings,
Dodge and Reed Construction. For more information please call Patrick Holland
@ James A. Cummings, Inc. (954) 733-4211 or Fax: (954) 485-9688.


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THE MIAMI TIMES


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No Mtg. Payments. If you are
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"Copyrighted Material




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Buffett: Economy in a recession, will be worse than feared


NEW YORK (Reuters)
- Warren Buffett, the
world's richest person,
said Monday that the
U.S. economy is in a
recession that will be
more severe than most
people expect.
Buffett made his
comments on CNBC
television after his
Berkshire Hathaway
(BRKA, BRKB) agreed
to invest $6.5 billion
in the takeover of
chewing gum maker
Wm Wrigley Jr (WWY)
by Mars in a $23 billion
transaction.
"This is not a field of
specialty for me, but
my general feeling is
that the recession will
be longer and deeper
than most people
think," Buffett said.
"This will not be short


and shallow.
"I think consumers
are feeling gas and food
prices," he added, "and
not feeling they've got a
lot of money for other.
things."
He was not
immediately available
for further comment.
Known for his frugality,
the 77-year-old Buffett
has lived in the same
10-room Omaha, house
for a half-century,
despite being worth an
estimated $62 billion.
On Wednesday, the
Commerce Department
is expected to say how
fast the economy grew
in the first quarter.
Economists on average
have projected that
gross domestic product
grew at an annualized
0.2% rate in the


WARREN BUFFETT
quarter.
Two quarters of
declining GDP is a
ti-aditional indicator
of recession. That last
happened in 2001.
Economists expect the
Federal Reserve on
Wednesday to cut a
key lending rate for a
seventh time beginning
last September.
Berkshire is a $197


billion conglomerate
best known for its
insurance holdings,
such as auto insurer
Geico, but it owns more
than 70 businesses.
Many of those
businesses are tied to
the housing market,
including Acme Brick,
insulation maker
Johns Manville and the
real estate brokerage
HomeServices of
America.
Others depend on
consumers to spend
more on discretionary
items, such as Ben
Bridge Jeweler and
Borsheims Fine
Jewelry.
"In the retail
businesses ... if
anything, they've
gotten a little worse,"
Buffett said. "Of course,


things connected with
housing, whether it's
in brick or whether
it's in carpet, those
businesses have shown
no uptick at all. Jewelry
had a bad Christmas
... and it stayed that
way."
Buffett sees no
respite from the
housing slump.
"I think this is going
to be fairly long and
fairly deep, but who
knows," he said.
In March, Forbes
magazine pegged
Buffett's net worth at
$62 billion, ahead of
Mexican tycoon Carlos
Slim's $60 billion and
Microsoft Chairman
Bill Gates' $58 billion.
Gates is a friend of
Buffett and a Berkshire
director.


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 50-MAY 6, 2008


MIAMIU

Grow your career in a rewarding,,diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs
305-375-JOBS (5627)
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
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MIAMI. 3 D,

LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR
JANITORIAL SERVICES
RFP NO. MDAD-09-06
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY MIAMI, FLORIDA
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department is announcing the availability of the above
referenced advertisement, which can be obtained by visiting our Website at:
www.miami-airport.com/html/business opportunities.html (in order to view the full
Advertisement, please select "Advertisements" link at the bottom of the Business
Opportunities page and then select the respective solicitation)
Copies of the RFP solicitation package can only be obtained through the MDAD,
Contracts Administration Division, in person or via courier at 4200 NW 36th Street,
Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122, or through a mail request to P.O. Box 025504,
Miami, FL 33102-5504. The cost for each solicitation package is $50.00 (non-
refundable) check or money order payable to: Miami-Dade Aviation Department.
This solicitation is subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with section 2-11.1(t)
of the Miami-Dade County Code.


Subjects With Kidney Disease
Needed for a Research Study

The University of Miami is looking for people 18 through 79 years of age with
proven kidney disease to participate in a research study of an investigational
medication. Participants that meet the requirements of the study will stay in the
clinic for about 6 days followed by 2 out-patient visits, receive study related
testing and study medication at no cost to the participants, and will be com-
pensated for their time. Please call 305-243-6795 M-F 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
for information. MI
MILLER
SCHOOL OFMEDICINE
University of Miami,
Division of Clinical Pharmacology
1500 NW 12th Ave. 15 Floor West. Miami, FL 33136


%Smw(d ~ rr slr pCrLA


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
WAIVER OF COMPETITIVE BIDS AND
SELECTION OF CONSULTANTS FOR
MIAMI 21 MASTER PLAN
ADDITIONAL SERVICES
Miami, Florida







The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on May 8, 2008 beginning at 9:00 am to consider
whether it is in the public's best interest that the City select consultants to provide additional services for
the Miami 21 Master Plan by method other than competitive bid as follows:

The City of Miami, Florida is currently engaged in a Citywide town planning project known as the "Miami
21 Master Plan". The additional services consist of the preparation for additional Town Planning, public
meetings, and Urban Design services for the Citywide Miami 21 Master Plan, increasing the authorized
amount for the Miami 21 Work Order by an amount not to exceed $510,000. The total estimated cost
based on the entire scope of services proposal for the Miami 21 Master Plan is an amount not to exceed
$2,210,000.00.

The City of Miami proposes to select Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company, LLC formerly known as Duany
Plater-Zyberk & Company, Inc., Master Planners and Prime Consultant, to provide additional Town Plan-
ning, public meetings, and Urban Design services for the Miami 21 Master Plan. This action follows the
City Manager's written finding of a valid public emergency to the effect that the time required for the
competitive procurement and award of contract for said project creates an undue hardship on the public
welfare, thus it is in the best interest of the public to waive competitive procurement procedures. The
City Manager has investigated and identified the aforementioned firm as having excellent qualifications
distinctly geared to the aforementioned project and a substantial record of experience in projects of like
size and complexity. The City Manager has further determined that said firm is appropriately licensed
and certified as consultants uniquely qualified to undertake and perform the required work on behalf of
the City.

This action is being considered pursuant to Florida Statutes 287.055 (Consultant's Competitive Negotia-
tion Act) and Sections 18-85 (Competitive Sealed Bidding/Waiver Procedures), 18-87 (Professional Ser-
vices as defined in F.S. Section 287.055) and 18-90 (Emergency Procurements) of the Code of the City
of Miami, as amended. The criteria to be considered in this matter are set forth in the proposed resolution
and in these Code sections and in F.S. Section 287.055, which are deemed to be incorporated by refer-
ence herein and are available as public records from the City of Miami.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City commission meeting of
May 8. 2008 at:

MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect to the proposed issue.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be
considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommoda-
tions to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice)
no later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three
(3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#003123) City Clerk


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board
Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in,the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date des-
ignated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF
PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net,or Room 351, address
above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the
scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be
available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."






Library /Classroom Furniture: Tables,
058-HH01 5/8/2008 Desks and Chairs


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


I








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 30-MAY 6, 2008


(- n d dWin %proi- kw%4tr


Available from


U.S. newspaper circulation falls 3.6 percent


NEWYORK (Reuters)
- U.S. newspaper
circulation fell 3.6
percent in the latest
set of figures released
by an industry group
on Monday, reflecting
a migration of readers
to the Internet and
publishers' efforts
to streamline their
businesses.
The figures were
released by the Audit
Bureau of Circulations
and compare the six
months ending in
March 2008 to the


same period a year
earlier.
Weekday paid
circulation at many of
the top 25 U.S. papers
fell, though some
papers, including
Gannett Co Inc's USA
Todayand News Corp's
Wall Street Journal,
reported gains of less
than 1 percent.
Weekday circulation
at The New York
Times fell 3.85 percent
while Tribune Co's
Los Angeles Times
reported a drop of


5.13 percent.
The New York Post,
which is owned by
Rupert Murdoch's
News Corp, reported
a drop of 3.07 percent
while the New York
Daily News, owned by
tabloid rival Mortimer
Zuckerman, posted
a 2.09 percent drop.
The Daily News
reported circulation
of 703,137, slightly
ahead of the Post at
702,488.
Murdoch and
Zuckerman are vying


to buy the Newsday
newspaper on Long
Island from Tribune.
That paper reported a
4.68 percent drop in
circulation to 379,613
copies.
Sunday circulation
fell 4.6 percent overall.
The New York Times
and the New York
Daily News both saw
Sunday circulation
fall more than 9
percent. At Newhouse
Newspapers's The
Sta r-Ledgerin Newark,
New Jersey, Sunday


circulation dropped
12 percent.
The Denver Post and
Rocky Mountain News
reported a combined
drop of 14.79 percent.
The Denver Post is
owned by privately
held MediaNews
Group Inc. The Rocky
Mountain News is
published by EW
Scripps Co.
The weekday results
include more than 530
papers. The Sunday
results include nearly
600 papers.


Jackie Robinson Foundation celebrates 35th anniversary


LOS ANGELES,
April 28 /PRNewswire-
USNewswire/ The
Jackie Robinson
Foundation will
commemorate its 35th
anniversary with a
reception on April 30th
hosted by Deloitte at its
beautiful space on 350
South Grand Avenue.
Guests will include
basketball legend
Kareem Abdul Jabbar,
actor. James Avery,
Dodger greats Lou
"Sweet Lou" Johnson,
Al Downing and Tommy
Davis, each of whom
has a longstanding
history of supporting
the Foundation's
efforts.
The Jackie Robinson
Foundation was
established in 1973 by
Rachel Robinson, wife
of the baseball and
civil rights luminary,
to perpetuate Jackie
Robinson's pioneering
legacy and commitment
to equal opportunity
and excellence.
The Foundation
provides four-year
college scholarships,
mentoring and
leadership development
trainingto academically
gifted minority students
with leadership
capacity who would not
otherwise be able to
attend college.
Guests will learn
more about the
scholarship program


through the story of
Danielle Benjamin-
Arrington, a Gardena,
California native
who is completing a
Bachelor's of Science
degree in Business and
Social Welfare at the
University of California
at Berkeley. Benjamin-
Arrington graduated
from Junipero Serra
High School as captain
of the basketball team
and was a dedicated


JACKIE ROBINSON

volunteer to the
homeless community
on Skid Row. She
will describe the
tremendous personal
hurdles she has
overcome en route to
her dream of attending
college and how the
Foundation has helped
her to succeed.
At the prestigious
Haas School of
Business, Benjamin-
Arrington has taken
a keen interest in
the accounting field.
She is the immediate
past president of the
Berkeley Chapter of


the National Council
of Negro Women,
and is still currently
active running the
mentoring program
for underprivileged
girls in Richmond. She
has complemented her
studies by interning
with Jackie Robinson
Foundation sponsor
Deloitte during each
of her undergraduate
summers and will
work for the firm full-
time beginning in the
fall.
Since its inception in
1973, the Foundation
hasprovidedover 1,200
college scholarships
and its students
have maintained
a remarkable 97%
graduation rate --
more than twice the
national average for
minority students.
This enormous
success results from
the Foundation's
innovative approach
to marrying financial
assistance with
hands-on, extensive
mentoring and
leadership training.
This year there
are currently 259
JRF scholarship
recipients attending
93 of the nation's most
prestigious colleges
and universities in 30
states.
JRF alumni continue
to stay involved in
the organization after


graduation to mentor
and support current
students. Among its
members, the dynamic
JRFAlumniAssociation
counts partners at
noted Wall Street
firms, several non-


profit entrepreneurs,
critically acclaimed
musicians, and award-
winning journalists,
as well as skilled and
committed doctors,
lawyers, teachers
and policy makers.


(Paer fAma'a S


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ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.

A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St., Hialeah, FL.
s( (samue as 103 St.)
(Please mention ad)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611


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News Providers"


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB No.- 82046 INVITIATION TO BID FOR THE RENTAL
OF PASSENGER VANS

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 12:00 P.M. Monday May 19,2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami Purchas-
ing' Department. website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILIENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager





AD NO. 005005










CITY OF MIAMI


POLICE OFFICER

(This position is Non-exempt under FLSA)


Starting Salary:

$44592
(Starting Salary does not include $2,000 Crime Prevention Pay)
Maximum Salary:

$64,582 annually
(Please see note below)

Closing Date: Friday, May 16, 2008
(Or the first 750 applicants, whichever comes first)

*The annualized wage rate during the academy and until the State
certification exam is passed is $42,469. Applicants will be hired in the
classification of Police Officer-Probationary [Occ. Code 50031, and upon
successful completion of the academy and the state examination will. be
promoted to the classification of Police Officer (Occ. Code 50051.


DOCUMENTATION
Copies of the fo towing document must be submitted at the time of,
i plation in order to qualify and sit for the City of Miami's Police
Officer entrance exam:

Proof of passing score on the FBAT, CJBAT orFDLE poLice examination,

CoUege at 3051 237-1722
Valid Driver's License from any State
High School Diploma, GED or higher degree
Birth Certificate, naturalization certificate or valid U.S. Passport reflecting
U.S. Citizenship.
If claiming veteran's preference, al 0DD-214 forms, must be submitted
with application. In addition to the Form DD-214, applicantswho have

reflected on the Form DD-214 must submit supplemental documents
from the Department of Defense that demonstrates possssionqo ':

veteran's preference points. Veteran's preference points witllbe awarded
in accordance with F.S.S, 295.

For details on salary benefits and the hiring process, visit
www.miamigov.com or visit the City of Miami Emplnoyment office at

4 W2aThe C .Riy of Miami 2Mmnd q priE1 d
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LEGAL NOTICE FOR NOMINATIONS
Nominations are currently being accepted for members of the UNITED WAY
Board of TRUSTEES and DIRECTORS. The nominees should be individuals
contributing and rendering meritorious voluntary services to United Way and
shall be broadly representative of all elements within the Miami-Dade County
community. Email nominations to nomination@unitedwaymiami.org, fax nomi-
nations to 305.646.7107, or send nominations to PO Box 459007, Miami, Flor-
ida 33245-9007 by May 20, 2008.


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