Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00544
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: April 23, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00544
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text


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One Family Serving Since 1923


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Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


I'inpora Mutantur El Nos MaiituIr In IIllis


DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS


Volume 85 Number 31


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 23-29, 2008


50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


U.S. CONGRESSMAN KENDRICK MEEK
GREETS HAITIAN PRESIDENT RENi PREVAL


President Rene Preval and Congressman Kendrick Meek
shake hands in agreement for change in Haiti.


Food crisis in Haiti


hits home
Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamiitimesonline.com

"The people in Haiti are
hungry. It's not that there is no
food but the food is expensive
and not everyone can afford it.
The unemployment rate is very
high. People don't have the
resources that they need," said
Camille Merilus, Miami Camille
Merilus Foundation.
Merilus, and like other
South Florida residents, are
reacting to the food crisis that
has been going on in one of
the poorest countries in the
Western Hemisphere. The food
crisis has led to six people
being killed and more than 60
injured from riots and violence
in the streets.


MARLEINE BASTIEN
Executive Director of
Haitian Women of Miami
Violence and riots have
erupted in the country due to
the price of food. "National
production is at its lowest.
America should intervene and
offer some assistance. There
should be a solution," said
Please turn to HAITI 8A


Despite a 82 percent vote
of no confidence by Miami-
Dade School Police officers
Superintendent Rudy Crew is
solidly behind Gerald Darling.
Eighty-two percent of the 160
officers voted against Darling,
said Howard Giraldo, president
of the Fraternal Order of Police.
Thirty-one eligible officers did
not note,
Many observers were
surprised at the vote but sensed
the union's fight for salary
increases and the criticism it
received for the way the recent
disturbances at Edison High
School was handled.
Crew issued the following
statement on Friday:
"Today's vote in no way
diminishes my confidence
and trust in Chief Darling. He
has led Miami-Dade Schools
Police with honor, dignity
and wisdom, to the benefit of


GERALD DARLING
Miami-Dade School Police Chief
our students. He deserves the
greatest respect from everyone
in this school district."
Darling is a 23-year veteran
official in the police department
who retired in 2004.


Reverend Gaston Smith remains



faithful through his legal battles


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com,

"I have trust in our legal
system," said Reverend Gaston
E. Smith, who continues to
maintain his innocence.
Smith is facing grand theft
charges after an investigation
uncovered he spent the funds
assigned for a Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. project for his
personal use. The investigation
conducted by the Miami-Dade
Police Department Public
Corruption Investigations
Bureau states that the
non-profit corporation led


by Smith, Friends of MLK,
received a $25,000 grant
on June 14, 2005, from the
Miami Metro Action Plan
(MMAP). The grant was
pushed by then Commissioner
Barbara Carey-Shuler. The
funding was supposed to be
used to address and reinforce
the principles and legacy of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,
particularly to promote the
efforts of restoring Northwest
62nd Street, also known as
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
The money was to be used to
expand promotional material
for a community outreach


REV. GASTON SMITH
Friendship MBC


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Available from Commercial Ne


The 80th birthday celebration of Maya Angelou, was
an affair to remember. The celebration was produced
and hosted by TV mogul Oprah Winfrey.
Chief Sandrell Rivers was escorted to the celebrity
weekend party by Ambassador Dr. Bobby Jones.
This occasion attracted mega stars from around the
country and Africa.
Please turn to BIRTHDAY 7A


campaign, design and
implement awebsite to promote
local efforts, coordinate an
MLK fundraising reception,
and manage a senior-citizen
garden.
The Miami-Dade
investigation learned that
Smith allegedly took out
$10,356.50 in ATM cash
withdrawals at various
locations throughout Miami-
Dade County, Broward
County, Orlando, Texas, and
Las Vegas. Smith spent more
than $500 at a martini bar
in Las Vegas. It also claims
Please turn to SMITH 7A


riderss"


FIU budget cut plan


up for consideration


Sandra J. Charite
scharite @miamitimnesonline.com

We have been hearing about
it for almost a year now. The
college and universities have
become the latest prey to
cutbacks. Triggered by the
statewide budget cuts, Florida
International University will
be taking huge hits in order to
save money.
"I feel that the problems we
are facing now are due to a
lack of sound judgment by
administrators. Because of
poor decisions, the students
are suffering. It's difficult
enough to be a student without
all of these problems, and now
we have to find ways to prove to
administrators that we are not
just 'a small expensive niche


school'," said Shervin Bain, a
FIU senior majoring in public
relations.
At a town hall meeting held
on April 14, over 100 faculty
and students filled the Graham
Center Ballroom at FIU as FIU's
President Modesto A. Madique,
Senior Vice-President Provost
Dr. Ronald M. Berkman, and
Chief Financial Officer Vivian
Sanchez presented them with
a recommended budget plan
and addressed any concerned
questions.
FIU could possibly lay off
close to 200 employees. As the
rate of graduating high school
seniors are continuing to
increase, unfortunately, next
year's FIU freshman class, will
be the smallest in the school's
Please turn to FIU 7A


Professor diversity lagging at South Florida universities


By Scott Travis

South Florida has some of
the most diverse universities in
the country, but you might not
know that by who's teaching
inside the classrooms.
One-third of students at
Florida Atlantic University in
Boca Raton this year are Black
or Hispanic. But for faculty,
it's 12 percent.
At Florida International
University in Miami, Blacks
and Hispanics make up nearly
three-quarters of the student


body, but less than one-quarter
of the faculty.
Blacks and Hispanics make
up half of all students at Nova
Southeastern University in
Davie, but just 13 percent of
faculty.
Schools in South Florida
and around the country are all
grappling with how to attract
professors who look like their
growing minority student
populations. Nationally, just
6 percent of faculty are Black
and 4 percent are Hispanic,
according to 2005 data from the


U.S. Department of Education.
The University of Florida and
Florida State University both
have faculty bodies that are
less than 10 percent Black and
Hispanic.
The pool of qualified
applicants is small, and many
universities from every state
are competing for the same
candidates, administrators
said.
Just 7 percent of Black
and Hispanic students
receive doctorate degrees, a
requirement for most professor


jobs in South Florida and
elsewhere,according to 2005
report from the Woodrow
Wilson National Fellowship
Foundation.
"If Latinos and African-
Americans are not in graduate
education, we're not going to be
there as.faculty," Nancy "Rusty"
Barcelo, a Mexican American
who serves as vice president
for equity and diversity at the
University of Minnesota. "We're
grossly underrepresented in.
graduate education, and that's
something we need to fix."


GROSSLY UNDERREPRESENTED
And as a result, some
minority students say it's rare
to see a professor who looks
like them.
"It's a problem," said Cindy
Betty, 24, a Black student from
Miami who said she's only had
one Black instructor during
her two years at FAU. "It's a
college atmosphere. There are
different types of students.
There should be different types
of professors."
At FAU, officials said it


would be tough to have a
faculty that mirrored the
student population, mainly
because they are drawing from
two different places. Many
local universities draw their
students largely from South
Florida, where 20 percent of
the population is Black and 38
percent is Hispanic.
"When we're recruiting our
faculty, we have a national or
international pool," said Diane
Alperin, an associate provost
at FAU who oversees faculty
Please turn to DIVERSITY 7A


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Crew backs Darling over

union in school police fight


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A 2 THE MIAMI TIMES AP 8


M IH I iL X %/ t U


The high cost of war
he turn of events in our war with Iraq has given us an-
other reason to pack up our gear and bring our troops
back home. Or will we continue to fight a war we can
never win?
At last count a total of 3,990 Americans have lost their lives in
Iraq, the great majority of those losses suffered in combat. The
number of wounded has reached 29,395, just over half of those
designated wounded but returned to duty.
The losses to the people of Iraq are so much more staggering
that we cannot put a figure on them.
War is a serious and dreadful business and its losses are irre-
placeable. Nothing can replace a father or mother who has been
killed in this war, or any war. Nothing can compensate for all
the lives shattered when a soldier dies in combat. In Iraq it is es-
timated that the human toll includes nearly 1,375 spouses who
have been left behind, alone, and more than 2,300 children who
have lost a parent to the war.
Nor can you repair or replace what has been lost by hundreds
of soldiers severely injured by powerful IED blasts and left
double or triple amputees, blind or brain damaged, riddled by
shrapnel. For them, and those who love them, life has suddenly
become an unending struggle.
Isn't it time that Americans begin to take up the chant of the
old spiritual, "I ain't gonna study war no more."

Attention deficit on boys
Last week, Massachusetts educators were delighted
to discover that their state's eighth-graders ranked
third in the nation on the national writing exam.
Then they read the fine print: Twice as many girls as boys
earned proficiency ratings.
At least in Massachusetts the top educators noticed.
Similar gender gaps are evident in all the states, but most
educators ignore the problem.
Many teachers and parents will tell you that's natural
because girls excel at writing and reading while boys make
up for it in math and science. That conventional wisdom,
however, is misleading. Girls enjoy huge advantages in
literacy skills, but boys have a much smaller edge in math
and science.
The latest National Assessment of Education Progress
shows that:
In writing, 32% of females score proficient or above,
compared with 16% of males. In reading, 41% of females are
proficient, compared with 29% of males.
In science, 16% of females are proficient, compared
with 21% of males. In math, 21% of females are proficient,
compared with 25% of the males.
Clearly, both sexes have room to improve their scores. But
the gaps in literacy skills are particularly worrisome because
students are headed into an increasingly verbal society.
Engineers, doctors and police officers have to write reams of
documentation. Many blue-collar jobs now require either an
associate's degree or significant post-high school training.
At virtually any college, students are measured by their
verbal skills. The weaker reading and writing skills found
among boys partly explain why, by 2014, the college
population is expected to be 60% female.
Increasingly, verbal skills are the pathway to understanding
math and science, getting into college, graduating from college
and landing a decent-paying job. So the next time a teacher
downplays your son's poor literacy skills by suggesting he'll
make up for it in math and science, beg to differ.
Writing experts have shown they can narrow the gender
gaps by giving boys books they actually like to read and
writing assignments that spark their imaginations. But that
won't happen unless educators and parents first recognize
the problem. -USA TODAY


OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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S. : . I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action ..." Malcolm X


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OPINION


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


BLACKS MUIlST CONTROL TH-EI1R OW\\N Di.SrTINY


Mario Diaz-Balart is

not fit for Congress


KI k and %a I mft~mmns


Charlie Rangel has
made history as a Black
man from Harlem who
has risen from humble
beginnings to become the second
most powerful congress person
in the country. He is the highest
ranking Black congressman in
the United States and chair of
the power full Ways and Means
Committee. He in effect controls
the purse strings of the United
States.
Recently, Congressman Rangel
has been the issue of great debate
in the Mario Diaz-Balart contest
against Democratic challenger
Joe Garcia. Congressman Rangel
is supporting Joe Garcia, and
plans to attend a fund
raiser for Joe Garcia in New
York. Mario Diaz-Balart
has made a campaign
issue out of the support
of Congressman Rangel,
because Congressman
Rangel visited Cuba and
Venezuela. He is labeling
Congressman Rangel a leftist,
codewordforCommunist. Only in
Miami would the support of
the most powerful man in
Congress be viewed as somehow
detrimental. Only in Miami,
would Congressman
Rangel, a combat veteran
decorated with the
Bronze Star (bravery) and
Purple heart (wounded in battle)
for fighting communist in North
Korea, be labeled a communist
by a junior congressman who
has never put his life on the line
for his country.
It is amazing to me that
Congressman Rangel
visits to Cuba led to the
label of a communist, At
the same time that
Congressman Rangel is
being labeled a communist,
the Miami Herald runs an
article on President Bush's last
meeting with Prime Minister
Putin of Russia a former KGB
Director, hardliner and
communist. President Bush is
not deemed a communist for this
meeting. Nor did Ronald Reagan
become deemed a communist


for meeting with P "
Gorbachev and 7>-
ending the
cold war. Henry Kissinger is
deemed one of our greatest
diplomats for his meetings
with the Communist Chinese
that resulted in the opening of
that society and reduction in
tensions.
Iguessin Miami,we do notwant
our national political leaders
to meet with Cuban leaders,
because that might somehow
lead to the democratization of
Cuba If nobody has noticed our
continuous dialogue
with the Nicaraguan
leadership led to democratic
elections and return to
democracy in that country. Our
continued boycott of Cuba and
failure to meet with Fidel Castro
has led to the great victory of
Fidel retiring after 50 years in
power and being replaced by his
brother, Raul Castro. I don't
believe replacing Fidel with Raul
is progress.
Mario Diaz-Balart is unfit to
he a Congress person. If he does
not realize that the first rule of
foreign relations is to try to
rationallywork out disputes with
your neighbors by talking, then
he should not be in a position of
trust... Screamingoverthe straits
and boycotting Cuba has led
to nothing but a hardening
of Castro's position. In
the meantime, the United
States has improved
relationships with Russia,
China, Nicaragua, Vietnam
and the Berlin Wall has fallen.
It is idiotic to think that the
boycott has had any effect
on Cuba, when Cuba is
still communist with no
end in sight. While Mario
Diaz-Balart advocates
the boycott, he receives funding
from companies that are defying
the boycott by doing business
with Cuba. The hypocrisy of
this man.
Inthemeantime, Congressman
Diaz-Balart who has one claim
to 14-me as a Congressperson -
Please turn to CLYNE 7A


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Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart realizes that his Democrat opponent
Joe Garcia will present some tough opposition in the coming
congressional race because he has the backing of Rep.
Charles Rangel. The popular and powerful Harlem Democrat
is a decorated Korean war veteran and chairman of the
House Ways and Means Committee. Rangel is being trashed
on Spanish language radio because he favors normalizing
relations with the island nation and eliminating the embargo.
Stay Tuned.
Three Haitians pioneers who really helped build the
community will be honored Thursday night at the Hilton Hotel
on Biscayne Boulevard: Viter Juste, a former businessman
who's credited with coining the phrase "Little Haiti:. Marie-
Jos6e Ledan, an early women's advocate on health and other
issues. Carmelau Monestime, the founder of South Florida's
first Creole-language radio station.
It's unfortunate but a lot of Floridians in our state legislature
still want to sing about "darkies" and the "old folks at home"
when they croon the state song. After spending more than a
year trying to come up with a new song to replace the Stephen
Foster classic Swanee River-with lyrics some found racist-
Florida politicians are expected to keep the song but update
its lyrics. That is if they do anything.
Many people thinks its high time that Miami-Dade County
Commission demand that the audit on the Wackethut Corp.
security services at metro-rail stations be make public, Cathy
Jacksons auditing staff completed its work 19 months ago, so
what's the hold up? Stay tuned.
State lawmakers are finally getting wise to the lucrative
'shadow banking' industry that local businesses call check
cashing. Some are legit, but many use the caper to avoid
paying millions of dollars in payroll taxes to illegal immigrant
workers. Drug dealers find it the best way to launder money
from dirty contractors and Medicare con artists. Stay tuned.
President Bush might not feel that this country's economy
is in the toilet, but don't tell that story to our biggest banks.
Consumer weakness and the housing slump has caused the
nations largest retail bank write downs led it to report a 77
percent decline in first quarter profit of $1.21 billion or 23
cents share, on $17 billion in revenue. That compared with
net income of $5.26 billion, or $1.16 a share, a year earlier on
$18.16 billion in revenue.
Friendship Baptist Church's popular pastor Rev. Gaston
Smith has added heavy weight lawyer Larry Handfield to his
legal team to help protect his good name in the community.

Just in case the race between Barack Obama and Hillary
Clinton goes down to the wire and the 25 powerful clique of
Florida power brokers will be called upon to settle the issues
here are the five Black super delegates: U.S. Rep. Corrine
Brown, Jacksonville U.S. Rep. Alcee Hastings, Miramar;
U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek, Miami; Stat Rep. Joyce Cusack,
Deland and Janee Murphy, Tampa.


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4A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29,2008


Employees celebrate 'Comcast Cares Day'


Less than one month from
today, Saturday, May 3rd,
more than 1,000 local Comcast
employees and their families,
friends and local community
partners will volunteer to
improve a children's physical
rehabilitation center in the Keys,
a substance abuse facility in
Miami Dade and an arts magnet
elementary school in Broward
as part of Comcast's seventh
annual 'Comcast Cares Day.'
In total, more than 50,000
Comcast volunteers throughout
the country will participate
in this year's day of service,
making it one of the nation's
largest single-day corporate
volunteer efforts, as the group
will amass more than 400,000
volunteer hours of service in a
single day.
Throughout South Florida,
more than 1,000 volunteers will


be rehabilitating three separate
facilities. In Broward County,
volunteers will be painting and
partnering with local artists to
draw murals, in keeping with the
school's art and music theme,
planting xeriscape, landscaping
and creating a butterfly garden
at Walker Elementary School in
Ft. Lauderdale; Here's Help in
Opa-locka, a drug rehab center
operated by South Florida radio
personality Footy, will get a
facelift as volunteers refurbish
offices and landscape common
spaces and The Florida Keys
Easter Seals rehabilitation center
in Key West will be transformed
as Comcast volunteers from the
area will paint, landscape and
spruce up the facility.
"Comcast is embedded in
thousands of communities
across the country, and we're
very proud that 50,000 of


Local day of service is a part of50,000
Comcast caYres day volunteers nationwide


our employees, their families
and friends will be giving
their time to help improve
their neighborhoods" said
Comcast Chairman and Chief
Executive Officer, Brian L.
Roberts. "Comcast Cares Day
is the cornerstone celebration
of a year-long commitment
to our community, and we're


comcast.

thrilled to once again partner
with organizations across
the country to help make
this special day a resounding
success."
"Comcast is proud to be an
active member of communities
all over South Florida, and
Comcast Cares Day is a tangible
way we can give back in mass
by improving the quality of
lives of those who live in the
communities we serve," added
Filemon Lopez, regional senior


Miami Light Project, Arsht Center present Low


Miami Light Project and the
Adrienne Arsht Center for the
Performing Arts of Miami-
Dade County present Low:
Meditations Trilogy Part 1,
a one-woman tour-de-force
by Rha Goddess that cuts
to the core of the harrowing
world of mental illness. The
performance will take place on
May 9 and 10, at 8 p.m. in the
Carnival Studio Theater.
The San Diego Union Tribune
raves: "Low bursts at the seams
with the warm energy of its
incandescent writer-performer,
Rha Goddess."
In her contagious and
rhythmic style of floetry,
the Goddess tackles serious
issues with the authenticity
of an activist and delivers
breathtakingly savage
monologues that take you right
inside the mind of Lowquesha,
a creative young girl who is
spiraling into madness. Live-
feed video and film projection
draw you in further with an


almost unbearable intimacy.
Brilliantly staged and directed
by Chay Yew, Low offers up
an equal dose of laughter,
outrage and compassion in a
performance that is bitingly
articulate and modulated for
emotional power. More than
just an artistic performance,
Low is a seismic wake-up call
that is long overdue.
Combining vibrant images,
linguistic brilliance, hip-hop
rhythms, and unflappable
honesty, the work of Rha
Goddess is legendary. Her
work has been internationally
featuredin several compilations,
anthologies, forums and
festivals. Rha's debut project,
Soulah Vibe, received rave
industry reviews from Time,
Interview, The Source, XXL,
and Ms. Magazine, among
many others.
In May 2000, Essence
Magazine recognized Rha as
one of 30 Women to Watch in
the new millennium. In 2002,


the prestigious Next Wave Tickets for Low are available
Festival's NextNext series through the Adrienne
a program of the Brooklyn Arsht Center box office at
Academy of Music chose her 305-949-6722 or online at
as one of six artists deemed www.arshtcenter.org and www.
to be influential in the next miamilightproject.com.
decade. In 2005, Rha co- For groups 15 or more,
wrote and co-produced the contact 786-468-2326.
international hit All Over The
World which launched MTV's
Africa channel.


BI SACKS IMiuS' CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


vice president for the South
Florida Region. "There is
nothing more rewarding than
giving back, and I'm grateful
to the 1,000 local Comcast
Cares Day volunteers who will
be donating their time to help
make such a big difference
here in South Florida."
The Comcast Foundation
will also donate more than
$1.5 million in grants to
local community partner
organizations across the
country on behalf of each
employee and family member
who volunteers on Comcast
Cares Day. The grants will
help Comcast's community
partners continue their mission
of serving the community
throughout the year.
For more information on
Comcast's volunteer and
community investment
initiatives, visit http://www.
comcast.com/Corporate/
About/InTheCommunity/
InTheCommunity.html.


TALLAHASSEE The State
Capitol was a buzz with the
excitement that is usually
reserved for movies stars and
the 'glitterati' of Hollywood or
New York. Although, no movies
stars werepresent at this event,
the smiles and cameras were
everywhere.
Barrington Irving, 23 year
old aviator from Miami, was
honored in both the House
and Senate chambers. The
excitement around this
young man's adventure and
accomplishments not only
spread across both chambers,
but it also spread across party
lines. A resolution to honor
him was submitted by members
of each chamber of the State
Legislature. State Senator
Frederica S. Wilson, Democrat
of Miami, along with State
Representative Julio Robaina,
Republican of South Miami,
have sponsored resolutions


to honor him. Ken Pruitt,
Senator from Port St Lucie also
made a special presentation to
Barrington.
Irving, a Jamaican native who
grew up in Miami, set two world
records in aviation, when he
became the first Black person
and the youngest person to ever
fly solo around the globe.
Senator Wilson, beamed
with a mother's pride as she
introduced, Barrington, who is
also one of her 'boys,' a member
of the 5000 Role Models of
Excellence Project.
This young man, continues
to share his adventure and
love for flying with students.
Those sitting in the Senate
gallery, from Charles Drew and
Parkway Middle schools were
very excited to one day have
an opportunity through his,
Experience Aviation Learning
Center which is based at Opa-
locka Executive Airport.


Handfield patriarch honored at 50th


anniversary of BCC graduation


CITY OF MIAMI GARDENS

ELDERLY AFFAIRS COMMITTEE


The Handfield family would
like to congratulate Cornelius
Handfield, Sr. on the 50th
Golden Anniversary of his
graduation from .Bethune
Cookman College.
The 2008 keynote
Commence-ment addresses
were given by two honorary
doctoral degree recipients;
legendary actress Cicely
Tyson and World renowned
entrepreneur Bill Graves of
Black Enterprise Magazine.
Thirteen "Golden Wildcats"
members of Bethune
Cookman's class of 1958
walked across the stage and
were recognized by all in
attendance. Mr. Handfield, a
retired Dade County Public


CORNELIUS HANDFIELD, SR.
School teacher, remembered
that in 1958, the ceremony


was held in the old
gymnasium, and the keynote
address was delivered by a
prominent young minister by
the name of Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr.
The weekend was full of
festive splendor, but Mr.
Handfield was most proud of
the fact that he was able to
share the memories with his
wife of 49 years, Alice Ann
Handfield, his sister Rosetta
Charles (who attended his 1958
graduation), his four children,
their spouses, and seven of
his eight grandchildren. Two
of his grandchildren will be
seniors at Bethune Cookman
University; continuing the
Wildcat tradition.


2da FERIA ANNUAL

S de SANTE De La SALUD


Senator Frederica S.Wilson and Barrington Irving

Irving shares his journey


at State Capitol


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6A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


Detroit City Council refuses to


hear Indicted mayor's budget


By Zachary Gorchow

DETROIT-The City Council
delivered a stinging rebuke
to embattled Mayor Kwame
Kilpatrick on Monday, telling
the mayor it would not accept
his budget recommendation.
It was the first time
Kilpatrick had come before
the City Council since it voted
7-1 last month to ask him to
resign after racy text messages
between the mayor and a
former aide were revealed by
the Detroit Free Press.
A week after the resignation
vote, perjury and other felony
charges were filed against the
mayor and former chief of staff
Christine Beatty for allegedly
lying under oath during a
police whistle-blower trial
when they denied having an
extramarital affair and firing
a former top police official.
The city eventually settled
the whistle-blower lawsuit
and a second, similar lawsuit
at a total cost to taxpayers of
$9 million.
Kilpatrick has refused to
resign.
On Monday, Council


Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick ac-
cuses City Council of Grand-
standing.
President Ken Cockrel waited
until after the mayor sat down
at the table to tell him that
the council would not address
his budget.
"It seems as if that could
have happened in my office,"
Kilpatrick responded.
"Grandstanding is not
beneficial to our citizens."
Kilpatrick told reporters


afterward he had no idea the
council would refuse to hear
his presentation.
"It was a total blindside," he
said. "It was childish."
Cockrel said the decision
developed that morning
in reaction to two critical
comments by the mayor.
Kilpatrick said last week
that the City Council should
focus on its job instead of
conducting hearings into the
text-message scandal, and
shouldn't take a nine-day
recess.
"The budget process that
the council undertakes
will continue," Cockrel told
reporters afterward. "The only
thing we chose to do today
was not to hear the mayor's
budget address."
Cockrel denied he was
playing politics or retaliating.
The decision to rebuke the
mayor appeared to have the
support of six of the nine
members.
Kilpatrick and Beatty each
pleaded not guilty to the
felony charges. A pretrial
court hearing is scheduled for
Friday.


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Are you required to speak Spanish to get a job in Miami?


WALTER MONESTIN, 21
Caregivei; Miaii Shores

Spanish is
not the only
language in
Miami. If we >
have to learn
Spanish, then
we got to learn
every other
language.
There are different people in
Miami like Haitians so we have
to learn Creole to get a job.
Besides, this is America. This is
not a foreign country, we speak
English.

ANNIE WATSON, 54
City Worket; Liberty City

If you take
up Spanish in
school, well
that's good
for you but it
shouldn't be
required in
order to get
a job. This is
America. Why should we be
required to learn someone else's
language in order to work?
That's make no sense to me at
all.

JOE SIMMIONS, 39
Construction. Libertr\ City

No, this is
our country.
If you learn it
at your oiwn
will then that
is an A+ for
you but that
shouldn't be a
requirementon




Tiger rehabs
By Jerry Potter

Tiger Woods called his golf
coach, Hank Haney, on' Tuesday
with the offer of a vacation.
"He said, 'You're going to get
a little time off,' Haney said
Wednesday. "It's not the type of
time that I wanted."
Woods had arthroscopic
surgery on his left knee Tuesday
and will miss at least fur weeks
of the PGA Tour. He plans to
play the U.S. Open on June
12-15 and might return earlier.
Haney doesn't anticipate any
problems with Woods' game
when he returns. "It was not
a major procedure," he said.
"They went in and cleaned out
his knee. When he has had that
done before, he didn't have any
problems."
Woods' other knee surgeries
were in 1994 and 2002, when
he missed five events before
returning to the Tour in 2003.
The last surgery came two


a job application. At the same
time, people who don't speak
any English seem to have the
best job. Nobody forces them
to speak English so why are
we obligated to speak Spanish?
English should be the primary
language and that's it.

EARL LEWIS, 52
SWorke,; Coconut Creek

No, we are in
America. Our
skills should
stand for itself.
We shouldn't
have to learn
Spanish to be
employed in
Miami.


IDA MERRIOTT, 45
Retired, Liberty City

You should
not required to
speak Spanish
to get a job in
Miami but if
you do speak
Spanish that's
good for you.
Besides, the
last time
I checked this was still...
America.


KENNY HARDWICK, 30
EMT7 Liberty Citmy

No, it's not fair. If we go to any
foreign country, they don't make
any special accommodations for
us. It is up to us to learn their
language and their customs
so why do we have to learn


Spanish?
They are not
learning our
language.
Some of them
have been in
this country
for so many
years and
they still don't know a word
in English so why should we
have to adjust to their needs?
They get mad at you because
you don't want to speak their
language. That makes no sense
at all.

CHAYNELLE BROWN, 15
Student, Liberty City

Not everyone
here is born
Spanish so
why should we
be obligated
or required
to speak
S p a n i s h ?
That's not fair
at all.

HERBERT NORMAN, 51
Self-employed, Liberty City

Y o u
You
shouldn't be
required to
speak Spanish
for a job in
Miami. This
is not a Cuban
country. Ifyou
are applying
for a job in a Hispanic area
then that is understandable. It
is discrimination when we are
required to be binlingual in our
own country.


after surgery on left knee
days after he finished second in adversity. He has such
The Masters, ending his chance strong work ethic that I think
of a Grand Slam sweep of this he will come back faster thai
year's majors. expected."
"I knew he wanted to have He will start with short shot;


a
k
-n

ts
S


Woods will miss the Wachovia Championship in Charlotte
and The Players Championship near Jacksonville.


surgery sometime this year. I
didn't know it would be after
Augusta," said Haney, pointing
out Woods already has begun
the rehabilitation process.
"He's pretty good at overcoming


- putting and chipping and
work back to full shots. He
struggled with the short game
in The Masters and that kept
him from making a run at his
14th major title.


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 S


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


FIU keeps students and faculty informed


FIU
continued from 1A

history. Fewer qualified
students will have trouble
getting into Miami-Dade's
only public university. Sadly,
several academic centers will
have to close, several degree
programs will be eliminated,
fewer research projects,
and tuition will definitely
increase. Although the layoffs
will probably affect the
administrative and support
staff, some tenured professors
could lose their jobs, if their
programs are eliminated. The
academic centers have a bigger
issue for they are being told
that they must raise the funds
themselves or they will be shut
down.
The schools of law,
architecture, business,
engineering, and arts were
among the programs discussed
at the meeting. They could
possibly be affected by almost
15 percent of the budget cuts.
Journalism, engineering, and
architecture programs will


have fewer slots available for
students.
"I can't understand how
these things happen and I wish
the university was more vocal
about educating us on the
matter instead of informing us
what to expect for the upcoming
semesters. If students were
more knowledgeable on the
subject, they would be a lot
more interested in fighting
for change," said Nefertiti
Alexander, a FIU senior
majoring in Psychology.
Public universities across
the state are also adjusting
to the budget cuts. FAU has
had $9.6 million of recurring
reductions in 2007-08. They
are expecting additional cuts to
their budget for the upcoming
year. So far, depending on
reduction in 2008-09, FAU
will decide what actions will
be taken in order to meet the
budget requirements.
To ensure the safety of
students, on campus, FIU
has added more security on
campus which stretched the
dollars available in the pocket.


Berkman informed attendees
at the town meeting that no
official decision has been
made thus far. Madique has
designed a strategic plan
to make sure that students
and faculty are continuingly
informed and updated on the
budget cuts.
"The students are the future
of America, and would think
that the decision makers
would keep in mind that their
future also rest in the hands of
the students, and they should
hope they are well educated.
With classes being offered
at a limited capacity, our
graduation is being postponed.
Many students cannot afford
to continue and are not willing
to take out loans. A four year
program should be just that,
four years," said Bain.
This week, unfortunately,
FIU eliminated six jobs from
the College of Social Work,
Justice, and the Public Affairs.
Surprisingly, these layoffs were
unrelated to the budget cuts
and planned for some time.
The university insists that


they will help the individuals
find new jobs.
"As the only public university
in South Florida we are, for
many minority students, the
best option for an affordable
university education.
Unfortunately, these budget
cuts are forcing us to cap
enrollment resulting in
having to turn away qualified
students. It is important for
our community, including
our prospective students,
to make sure our legislators
know what is at stake as they
make economic decisions that
will have this kind of negative
impact on our university and
our community's future," said
President Maidique.
The university was unable
to provide an exact ratio or
percentage of ethnic group
individuals that would
potentially lose their jobs from
these budget cuts.
FIU's Board of Trustees will
make a final decision on the
cuts in June. Another meeting
is scheduled for May 15 at 3
p.m.


Professor diversity lacking at South Florida schools


DIVERSITY
continued from 1A

hiring. "All of the institutions
of higher education are looking
at increasing the diversity of
their faculty, and we're in a
competitive market."
Dianne Wright, an associate
professor of education
leadership on FAU's Boca Raton
and Davie campuses, is one
of 60 Black faculty members
at the university. Some of her
students say she's the only
Black professor they've had
there. She said she's surprised
by the low numbers.
"It's probably a Catch
22. We don't have many
minorities in faculty positions,
so students don't have role
models, and they're not seeing
higher education as a career
possibility," she said.
She said she would like to
see universities offer more
mentoring programs that
encourage current minority
faculty to stay, as well as
young students to enter the
profession.
Barcelo said she would like
to see universities look beyond
the traditional ways of finding
minority faculty. She said
they could offer post-doctoral
programs where new educators
can try out a university before
beginning the rigorous tenure
process. Universities also could


look at recruiting minority
faculty who come directly from
professional fields, she said.
At Florida International
University in Miami, Hispanics
and Blacks make up 72 percent
of the student body, and 24
percent of the faculty.


ONLY 7% AT FIU
Ron Berkman, provost at FIU,
said his university has done a
good job of recruiting Hispanic
faculty, which now comprise
17 percent of the faculty. While
that's well below the student
population, it's the highest of
any public university in the
state. But just 7 percent of the
faculty is Black.
He said it's a supply-and-
demand issue, as there is a
heavy need for a relatively small
group of qualified minority
faculty members.
About 37 percent of students
in FIU's doctoral programs are
Hispanic or Black, giving the
university a potential pool of
home-grown' candidates. But
Berkman said FIU, like many
research universities, does
not recruit from its graduate
doctoral program.
"We believe it's important
for Ph.D.s to get out into the
national arena and breathe
different air," he said.
Don Rosenblum,.dean for the
college of arts and sciences at


Nova Southeastern, said- he's
not satisfied with his school's
faculty diversity.

ONLY 5% AT NOVA
Only 5 percent of faculty at
Nova is Black, and 8 percent
is Hispanic, despite the two
groups making up half of
the student body. He said
the university advertises in
publications that cater to
minority educators, such as
Hispanic Outlook in Higher
Education and Diverse Issues
in Higher Education.
"It's important for students
in the community to see
themselves in the faculty and
staff," he said. "We have a
diverse student population.
and we have an ongoing
commitment to diversity
among faculty and staff."
The University of Miami
prides itself for having one
of the most diverse student
bodies and faculties in the
country.
About 32 percent of UM's
enrollment is minority. That's
more than any other large
private school in the country
except for Howard University
in Washington, D.C., .and
Clark Atlanta University, two
historically Black, private
schools, according to 2007
data from the National Center
for Education Statistics.
About 18 percent of the UM


faculty this year is Hispanic,
easily the largest of any major
private college.
"I think the University
of Miami has a very, very
long history of thriving as a
multicultural campus and
being nurturing to different
cultures," said Dr. Sheri Keitz,
associate dean for faculty
diversity and development
at the UM Miller School of
Medicine.
For example, she said,
the medical school has
partnerships with many other
universities around the world
to train physicians. While
many go back to their home
countries, others decide to
work at UM.
Rupert Rhodd, an FAU
associate professor of business
at FAU, said he believes it
is important for minority
students to have minority
faculty members they can look
up to. But he said it's not the
most important factor in a
student's education.
"In the overall scheme,
students are more concerned
about the quality of
instruction," said Rhodd, who
is Black. "If the faculty member
doesn't match up in terms of
the instruction they're looking
for, they're the first ones to
say, 'I'm going elsewhere."'
Scott Travis is a staff writer at
the Sun-Sentinel.


Liberty City pastor maintains his innocence


SMITH
continued from 1A

that Smith spent $5,076.73 to
purchase airline tickets, car
rentals, hotel accommodations,
and used money for classes
at the University of North
Florida.
The grant was not used
for its full purpose and the
investigators are still totaling
the corrected balance used
from the grant by Smith.
One of Smith's parishioners
have been added to his legal
battles. Miami Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones


is being investigated for
the $8000 paid to her for
consulting fees by Smith in
2005. The money came out of
Miami-Dade County's grant
to Friends of MLK. Smith
believes that he was urged by
Spencer-Jones to create the
Friends of MLK group.
Smith was recorded secretly
by a Miami-Dade police
detective. The transcript
was released by the state
attorney's office last week to
Smith's defense lawyers.
"Considering the
complexities of this case
and my pursuit of total


vindication, Attorney Larry
Handfield, who is one of our
nation's most elite attorneys,
will be joining our legal team.
We are mutually excited about
his arrival," said Smith.
Reverend Smith is the
Senior Pastor and Teacher
of Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church in Liberty
City. Smith has had an
outstanding reputation
within the community.
He has devoted his life to
sharing the gospel and his
time to his congregation.
He is a respected chaplain
with the city of Miami


Police Department.
Commissioner Spence-
Jones briefly commented that
she stands behind Reverend
Smith.
Last month, Smith refused
to take the prosecutor's
plea bargain if he agreed to
cooperate with the Spence-
Jones investigation and he
would take a misdemeanor
charge and take a polygraph.
"Although it has been
uncomfortable for the people
that know me, I believe that
the truth will come out
because my record speaks for
itself," said Smith.


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Diaz-Balart is not fit for Congress


CLYNE
continued from 3A

tighten the boycott on Cuba, is
notablypoorin deliveringFederal
dollars to his district, which
couldimproveourroads, schools,
bridges, airports and a multitude
of other bread and butter
issues that impact our
daily lives. Congressman
Diaz-Balart is hurting
his constituents, because
he also does not know how to
cross the aisle and work with
everyone to bringhome the bacon.
Only an idiot would snub the
Chair of the Ways and Means
Committee.
His present attacks on Joe
Garcia are a new form of
McCarthyism, and indicates that
Congressman Diaz-Balart is
caught in a time warp and needs


to realize thatwe have sent a man
to the moon and everyone now
has computers. Somebody tell
him that the 1950's happened 50
years ago.
Congressman Diaz-
Balart attack on a revered
Black Congressman,
remind me of the snub to
Nelson Mandela. It shows a
complete lack of sensitivity to the
Black community. This latest,
desperate attack is a strong
reason that the Black
community should support Joe
Garcia.
Congressman Diaz-
Balart clearly does not care
about the people living
in his district, because
his myopic view of the world
seems to center only on Cuba to
the detriment oft is constituents
living in the United States.


Miamians enjoy Palm Beach affair


BIRTHDAY
continued from 1A

The guest attending included
royal families from Ghana,
West Africa, Miami's Wallis
and Gene Tinnie, Donald
Trump, Tyler Perry, Cecily
Tyson, Quincy Jones, Freddie
Jackson, Natalie Cole, Ashford
and Simpson, Tony Bennett,
George Faison, Ambassador
Andy Young, BeBe, CeCe
and Marvin Winnan, Michael
Feinstein, Jesse Norman,
Vanessa Bell Armstrong, The


Clark Sisters, Fred Hammond,
Reverend A.R. Bernard and
many more.
It was an experience to
remember for the Chief who
was among friends. It was a
reunion for Oprah, Bobby and
Chief Rivers, all graduates of
Tennessee State University
and former radio and TV
colleagues.
Maya was overwhelmed with
love and remarked that, "It
is so important to be among
my most dearest friends and
family."


THE TRUE MEASURE OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
LIES IN ITS COURAGE, ITS PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
AND ITS DEDICATION TO THE COMMUNITY IT SERVES


ale uliari si
Measures UP!


l0i I\ hi Mtisl CONIROIn. TIIR (\llI\N Dis'IINVY


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8A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


Local politicians call for change in Haiti


HAITI
continued from 1A


Merilus. Thousands have
protested in the capitals
and looters have ransacked
warehouses. Drivers have been
terrorized and shopkeepers have
had rocks thrown at them.
Globally, the price of food
has soared tremendously but
in a country where people are
making close to $2 a day, the
price does make a difference.
"I think that right now we are
in the early stages of what
possibly could become an issue
for Haiti and South Florida,"
said U.S. Congressman
Kendrick Meek. With eight
million people in the country,
about 270,000 have consistent
day-to-day jobs.
With the current state
of Haiti right now, several
Haitian residents have called
for the dismissal of President
Ren6 Preval and the return
of former President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide, who was
exiled to South Africa after a
2004 revolt. So far, Haitian
lawmakers have dismissed
Prime Minister Jacques
Edouard Alexis because he
refused to increase national
food production and did not
set a date for the departure of
U.N. peacekeepers.
Much of Haiti's once
productive farmland has been
deserted as farmers struggle
to produce crops in soil
destroyed by deforestation,
erosion, flooding, and tropical
storms. To make a profit,
many of the farmers often
price their crops higher than
imported American products
which usually benefit from
U.S. government funding.
Many are starving forced to
eat mud cookies, which is dirt
mixed with butter, this has
become a meal. "Things are
hard over there. It's really hard
to talk about it because people
are struggling to make it. The
people are slowly perishing
but only God can help them,"
said Marilynne Alix, a North

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Miami resident.

TilE PRICE OF FREEDOM
Although food prices have
pushed many into utter poverty
causing riots in Haiti, but
this has not translated so far
into a spike in the number of
migrants. Last month, more
than 100 Haitian migrants
landed on Hallandale beach
after spending at least three
weeks at sea in a dilapidated
sailboat. Some of the Haitians
swam to shore, while many
jumped onto the beach after the-


Under the current 'wet-foot,
dry-foot' policy, Cubans who
reach U.S. soil are allowed to
remain in the United States
but those stopped at sea are
sent home. The 'wet foot/dry
foot' policy is unfortunately
not applied to Haitians. There
shouldn't be any special
treatment but equal treatment
for all.
"The 'wet-foot, dry-foot'
policy needs to change because
it discriminates against the
Haitian people," said Marlene
Bastien, Executive Director


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roughly 30 foot boat landed.
Authorities captured and
brought to shore those who
could not swim. Close to five
people had to be hospitalized
for dehydration but one man'
died. The migrants were taken
into custody by officials.
On Monday, the U.S. Coast
Guard discovered the bodies
of 14 Haitian migrants near
the Bahamas. The boat had
capsized as the migrants
were trying to flee to the
U.S. The three survivors, two
Haitians and one Honduran,
were found. The Honduran
man was trying to smuggle.
the Haitians to America. On
Tuesday morning, the Coast
Guard continued their search
for more missing migrants in
the Bahamian shark-infested
waters.


of Haitian Women of Miami.
She continues on to say, "We
are asking the government to
grant the Temporary Protective
Status to Haitians who have
been in the United States for
almost 15 years or more. Many
Haitians are facing possible
deportations. We are asking for
temporary residency and work
permits pending the situation
in Haiti. The most important
thing right now is to allow
those who have been here to
be able to stay and work in the
U.S. Many of them are unable
to work and some of them are
supporting their families back
in Haiti. For many Haitians,
they want to stay in Haiti but the
conditions need to change. The
government needs to provide
clean water, food, housing and
more job opportunities."


HELP IS ON THE1 WAY
Congressman Meek's two day
visit to Haiti allowed him to meet
with Haitian President Preval to
discuss the food crisis affecting
Haiti. "One of the main things
that I shared with President
Preval is that other countries
are struggling with hunger but
in Haiti people are struggling
because of the prices of food,"
said Meek.
Meek also discussed Haiti's
foreign debt and the possibility
of legislation granting members
of the Haitian community
Temporary Protected Status
(TPS), and the greater trade
preferences for Haiti, referred to
as HOPE II (Haitian Hemispheric
OpportunityThrough Partnership
Encouragement Act of 2008).
Earlier this year, President Preval
urged President George W. Bush
to give TPS to Haitian immigrants
but no action has been taken so
far by President Bush.
According to the U.S. Census
in 2000, 750,000 Haitians lived
in the U.S. and more than a third
lived in South Florida but the
number has greatly increased
within the last eight years.
Norte Dame D' Haiti Church,
which is located in Little Haiti,
have been collecting non-
perishing goods such as apple
sauce, rice, soups, and noodles to
send over to the island. "We have
a great responsibility to Haiti
with a country so close to South
Florida," said Congressman
Meek.
Reverend Jesse Jackson met
with Haitian leaders in South
Florida and discussed about
the issues in Haiti. "People are
making mud cakes not pancakes,"
said Reverend Jackson. He led
a short prayer for the country
and called for America to step up
and help. "I urge the presidential
candidates, as they address Iraq
and Afghanistan, address Haiti
which is home and has a great,
great need," said Reverend Jesse
Jackson.
"We look forward to going back
and meeting with the people in
Haiti to let them know that the
United States is here and we have
not left their sides," said Meek.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN Di.STINY


Commander Raleigh Flowers

Hialeah Police Department

promote 2 Black officers

On last Wednesday the City of Hialeah Police Department promoted
two Black officers who were part of the racial discrimination lawsuit
filed and spearheaded by PULSE in 1996.
Officer Willie Leonard was promoted to the rank of Sergeant,
making him the third of the six whom were products of the lawsuit
to attain the rank, and Sergeant Raleigh Flowers, was appointed
to the rank of Commander, making him the highest ranking black
officer in the history of the Hialeah Police Department.
PULSE, staff of WMBM and members of other civic organizations
were present to witness this historical moment.
The promotional ceremony took place at the Goodlet Theatre, in
Hialeah.


Woman body
Early Friday morning, a
Miami-Dade Metrobus driver
found a woman's body lying
on the southbound lane of
Interstate 95 just south of the
Golden Glades interchange.
The victim has been
identified as 53-year-old Nelly
Delinois, who is a mother of
four. Delinois' body was lying
between the two traffic lanes in
the safety zone where the flyover
lane merges with the rest of the
lanes. Delinois' brother was
watching the news but he didn't
know that it was his sister's
body that was lying on 1-95.
Traffic homicide investigators
have determined that Delinois
was hit by a vehicle, but they
are unsure if she died on
the highway or if her body
was dumped there. So far,
investigators have not found
any physical evidence other
than fresh skid marks near her
body.


found on 1-95
"We don't know if she was
already dead before the crash.
We don't know if she was a
pedestrian. We don't know if she
was thrown out of a vehicle,"
said Lt. Pat Santangelo of the'
Florida Highway Patrol.
After speaking to Delinois'
family, police strongly believe
that Delinois walked onto 1-95
and was hit. Her family felt
that she was mentally unstable.
She had left her apartment at
5 a.m., and family members
reported her missing at about
9 a.m. After the death of her
husband, Delinois had believe
to have fallen into a state of
depression.
While police investigated the
crime scene, all southbound
lanes on 1-95 near the Golden
Glades were shut down.
Southbound rush hour traffic
on 1-95 remained slow on Friday
morning as three lanes of traffic
opened for drivers.


...


Tomatoes on the Vine......... ..... 149
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(Organic Tomatoes on the Vine ... Ib 2.99)


Chicago Hard Rolls, 8-Count..........
Handmade Each Day in the Store, Crispy Crust,
Fresh From the Publix Bakery, 12-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .50


20 Piece
Hot & Spicy W ings ........ 8
Breaded or Non-Breaded, Fried in Trans Fat Free Oil,
Hot or Freshly Chilled, each box
SAVE UP TO ,3.0


Kellogg's
S ecidaK = .
Cereal ....................ree
Original, Red Berries, Vanilla Almond Crisp,
Low Carb, Fruit & Yogurt, Chocolatey Pieces,
or Cinnamon Pecan, 12 to 14-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.21


Doritos F
Tortilla Chips.... ree
Assorted Varieties, 12.25 to 13-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.49


12-Pack
Selected 3 1 00
Pepsi Products ......... 1f 0
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 3.07 ON 3


Prices effective Thursday, April 24 through Wednesday, April 30, 2008. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe Counties.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market. Quantity rights reserved.
....................................................


z --- ---------- --------- -
Z .......-....-......... ...... .

LOg,

2


329


I





9B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


BLACKS MUSI CONTROL [)IIIR R O\VN r DE INY
~t ~ rvms amp i bs.


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l1clicven1


ql0* ft_ w e 40 m 10- m
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Available f


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rom Commercial


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)ntent
News Providers"
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prei al strke sad heart aIack
a son*-


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ftp. m 'bun. toef


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Miami-Dade Public Library System's
Art of Storytelling
International Festival Day


-


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.AC( K Mui S T CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


Senate budget bill cuts funds for the poor, elderly


By Linda Kleindienst
and Josh Hafenbrack

TALLAHASSEE Prisons,
child abuse investigations,
public schools and health
programs for Florida's poor and
elderly would be dramatically
cut under the Senate's plan to
balance a state budget reeling
from a stalled economy.
In approving their version of a
proposed state budget, senators
on Wednesday voted to trim their
own salaries as well as that
of the governor and Cabinet.
But the Republican majority
resoundingly rejected attempts
by Democrats to cushion $3
billion in state spending cuts by
closing corporate tax loopholes
or tapping into funds slated
for CSX railroad repairs and
a Central Florida rapid transit
system.
Sen. Lisa Carlton, R-Osprey,
the Senate's budget chief, said
the spending bill was "fiscally
responsible" and that the state
needed to live within its means
even if some of the cuts are
painful.


"We've made every effort
to prioritize and make tough
decisions on programs like we've
never done before," she said.
The Senate passed its version
of a $65.9 billion state budget
by a 26-12 vote, but nothing is
a done deal yet.
The House will vote out its
spending plan today, and
the two chambers then will
begin negotiations to reach
a compromise before the
Legislature's scheduled May 2
adjournment.
All 12 of the Senate's 'no' votes
were cast by Democrats.
"I can't support a budget that
puts $3 billion in cuts on the
backs of poor, elderly and the
children," said Sen. Nan Rich,
D-Weston, who blasted cuts to
county health departments,
pediatric AIDS programs and
child abuse investigators.
Only one Democrat, Sen.
Mandy Dawson of Fort
Lauderdale, voted in favor of the
budget bill.
Senate Democratic Leader
Steve Geller of Cooper City
predicted some people would


Reverend James Bevel found


The Rev. James L. Bevel, 71, a
top lieutenant to the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. was sentenced
to 15 years behind bars for
sexually molesting his daughter.
Rev. Bevel also helped organize
the Million Man march.
His daughter, Aaralyn Mills,
29, testified that she was
repeatedly molested by Bevel
beginning when she was just 6


years old and by 1993 it was the
actual act of sex.
The jury reached a guilty
verdict after three hours of
deliberations.
Family members who
confronted Bevel in 2004
testified that he read a written
accusation by his daughter and
replied that he did not contest
the facts she laid out.


die from the spending cutbacks,
adding they could have been
tempered if the GOP majority
had considered new revenues,
including more gambling
money, a cigarette tax hike and
a closing of tax loopholes used
by some large corporations.
"I'm appalled at the
indifference we saw here today,"
Geller said.
Among the Senate's proposed
cuts are 1,800 correctional
officers, 660 probation officers
and more than 70 child abuse
investigators. Public school
funding would drop by $115.90
per student. Most of the cuts
to community colleges and
universities would be offset by
a proposed 6 percent tuition
hike.
While the Senate voted on
its budget plan, the House
spent six hours on a question-
and-answer session that
showed the wide rift between
the Republican leadership
and Democratic members on
spending. Republicans argued
their $65 billion spending
plan is fiscally prudent while


guilty of incest
Bevel denied the charge on the
witness stand and testified that
his family mistakenly perceived
his refusal to deny the specific
allegations against him as an
admission of guilt.
He testified that although
he had rubbed his daughter's
chest, but he never had sex with
her because that would have
violated his moral law.


Democrats painted the spending
cuts as cruel blows to the state's
neediest.
The sometimes testy debate,
which focused on cuts to
education and health care
programs, took so long the
House called in dinner before
legislators even began debate


on a roster of 29 amendments
mostly offered by Democrats.
"Our budget reflects Florida,
it reflects the businesses
of Florida, it reflects the
families of Florida," said
House Budget Chairman Ray
Sansom, R-Destin, saying the
House's plan shows "spending


discipline."
But at a news conference,
House Democratic Leader
Dan Gelber took aim at the
chamber's Republican leaders,
saying they crafted a budget
that favors "corporate bigwigs"
and special interests over low-
and middle-income Floridians.


STHE MIAMI TIMES




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Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


City

Phone _


a3'Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30 a.m. Early Moring Worship
II1 a.m...Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd Sunday ...... 6 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study ...7 p.m.
website: cmbc.rg




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.





Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Sun ay
Morning Worshil at 8 & II a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Ctuircl/Sunadiy Scltol ..... tS:3 a.m.
f Suina y w\ S i \ Ni e ..... 1,d .i .
Mid-Week Srclvice .:.. W\dnlesday s


I our oI'Power Ntioon ly lPraye
12 p.m.-1 p.m.
Ivcnhig n'shiI,, 7 pm.

grgrOMMRIMIM


aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday School................:..9:30 a.m.
Suln. Morning Volr lip........... 1 .m;
Tics. P, a er....................i6 p.nm .
Schl il o 'fWisdomi............6:30 p.m.
Haling & Delivernmc Scri...7:30 p.m.
SWcdySa1. Manna; (pilyer)........5 a.n.
Friday Youth Nighl.................7 p.m..




Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Pralyer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Woship...7-1 1 a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 a.m.


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist /
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
tirly Moming Wortslip.7:30a.m.
Sunday School ..........9:30at.m.
Morning Worship .....I I a.m.
WEDNESDAY
ltPrayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study .................. 8 p.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fat: 305-685-0705
www.newhirtlihaptistiniminii.org


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
SOrder of Services:'
intlrldly 7,30 ;lilt] l l ia.lm .
Wlrship) Service
9:30 I.m .......... Sunday School
l ay. ..... 7 pm I. Iile Sllludy
Sp. ....... 'rayil Mocetilng
M I'ltdy, \ dlll .'sd:ly, F:rldily
1 il 2 .... ...Day Prny ci


postolic Revival Center Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
6702 N.W 15th Avenue1855N.W. 9th Street
305-836-1224 305-688-1612
Order of Services Fax: 305-681-8719
New time for T.V Program Order of Services:
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY Sii...9:30 a.mi..(Sunday Sclhol)
it i tt i ct(tl i7C- -A ti -tiiWalk in the \Votd Ministry
Suil.9 a..-3 t p SundaI 5 p.. iWorship Service.............. I I i ll.
wed.- Iltcrnessory P el)r al anm.- 12p i.ll. Tiesday....7 p t.....lFaiily NightI
lin S i ................. I I ll Wed. II a lteressor Pr r
Sill. Eve. \Vor-hip ........... 7:30 11.m.
ulies- IhrMe,ing,....... 7:30ii \\CL. Bible Class. 12 p..
1 Fri. Biile Si dy ................7:30 p.m W ed. Bihle Class.... 7.... 7 .i.


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday ................ 7:30 & II a.m.
Sunday School...............10 a.m.
Thursday..........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
Baptism Thurs. before
Firsm Sun..7 p.m.
Communion Fist Sun........
7:30 & 11 I .m.




Mt., Zion A.M.E. Church\
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sunday
C hurch SOJ-1Oo ,.. ,,9:30 .111.
Worhip Service ... IIn... I I In.
Monday
Bible S-udy 7: p1m.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
"There isaplace for Von"


Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68" Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3,4,5" Sunday) ......8:00 amn
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service .....1:00 am
Communion Service
(Thus.L' before I" Sunday) 7:30 pm
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
A (WtHincsday) 7:30 pm




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060'Fax 305-255-8544
Order of Services:
Stlidtly Schooll ...........9:45 iI.nl
Su 1, M. rnlling SCIrVS..... I 11.11,
4"' SIIn.IBlTU.... 1:30-2:30 p.nm.
kTuesday...B.ible Slndly
I'eeding Ministry... m.l0 ..
IWed. Bible Sliudy/Prayci..6:301 tI
TliMs. Onuliacch Ministry. .6:30 .in


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:45 a.m.
VashCip ........lI a.nr
Bible Study. Thursday ...7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministty Mon.-Wed.
6 p.m.




Brownsville \
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
Loanl Dy Sunday School .......9:45m l
Sunday Momninlg WotslipI....I -n.I
Sunday Men's iible Study .....5 p. i
Sunday Ladies Bible Study ...5 pan
Sunday EveLninltg Won,hip ..,6 p
'liesd;ay Nightl Bible Study ...,7:30pni
Illlmla'iiy Monilg Bible Class II iln.
Tlinslmrt0at5ti 3 n4llihhle Call:
305.64-450 305-691-6955


Friendship Missionary Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church Baptist Church
ffiendshipriver('"bclsllsoitht 5946 N.W. 12'h Ave.
740 N.W. 58th Street
Mianmi, FL 305-751-9323
305-759-8875
Order Order of Services:
SHour of Payer......... 6:30 a.m. Early Worship .............7 a.m.
Early Momnin Worship....7:30 ,am. Sunday School............. 9 a.m.
Sunday School.........9:30 a.m NBC ..........................10:05 a.nm.
Morning Worshiip........... II a.m. Worship ....................11 .m.
Youth Ministry Smudy....\d......7 p.m. v Worship .....................4 p.m.
Pryer/Bibe Stud....WWed.....7 p.m. Mission and Bible Class
Nooltday Allar Prayerl..(M-l Tuesda ........:...6 .
Feeding thtle lnungry eve Youth eetii /Choir reearsl
\V'edcd..... I I a..- I p.. Monday.......................6:30 p.m.
i < n m r. ,,i P


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'h Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sulldays- Chllut ch School...............10 ia.lll
Worship Servi ce.............. 11: 15a.mi.
Tuesldays Bible Ctlss ..............7 p.nl.
4thI Sunday Evening Worship.........6 p.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue

305-681-3500

Order of Services:
Early hMoing i lu nhiip..i & 3xl Sill
hMonl ing \' rhip ............... 10:3
bDa. h- sight .hlistry. ....... .. pall.
1 ible Studv ............................. S p.lK .
Prayer Service................. 30 ..


S Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. '** Morning W orship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tliesday, 8:30 a.il. 9 a.m.0
Conicast Channels: 8,19, 21, 22, 23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Wellb pgc: www.pe-l brokep;i'klu hol'chrisl.coml i liluni: pelllblOlkepaki oct hell lllhthne.l


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
305-836-9081


Order t o Services:
J Sttittly Moriit l Scr\tictt s '
Sullldli y Sti. hooi l............. M
W Iorshilp Serviee .......... I I aill,
Tticsdeily Bible Sludylv...M.S i.
'I' L I 't Pa( l e' Sc1I.N e rci* tic 8 l


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

Order of Services:

Still. \\W or'hl Ship \. ....... I :1130 a.nm ,
\V'td. Nightly llttel'essOy I Pl"Iyer
S dthiy \VoiIi Seti cvice,6:30 pt.t.


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
SEarly Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ................9:30 am.
Sunday Moming Woaship..ll a.m.
Sunday Evening Service ...6 p.m
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ...7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ...7:30 p.m.
"Not Just a Church But a Movement"



Mt Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mthermonworshipccnter.org
305-621-5067- Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mlid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.




NLiberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836'4555.
Order of Services:
Sm day Moring Wo.......rsh am.
Sunday School. ........ 0 a.m.
Sunday Evening .i ....... 6 p.m.
Tue. Bible Class .. 730 p.m.
Thurs. Fellowship :........0 a.m.
1st Sui. Song Practice ..6 p.m.




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'1 Street
305-835-8280 7 Fax# 305-69636220
Church Schedule:

Early Mlorning Worl hip 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ... I a.nm.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.

Mid-week Worship





St. John Baptist Church s





Morning Worship .....7:30 a.m.









/^ Zion Hope -



305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School ..........9:30 n.m.
Morning ieWoellip .II a.m.

I M nA iin ltli'n.lBa tist Clt?. Sll.. .
(B B.T.U.)5 p.lm.
Evening Worship .......7 p.m.
Meeting ........(Tucs.)7 p.m.




Zion Ho pe
Missionary Waptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:


L


----


- -- -- ---I ~p- --


Mlllllllbaahl lMMVA UNAQ


1


*Includes Florida sales tax


Citirry, D.Min., DyDl Soii~r llastoir or


caasCaa Tina.


\9[sC~E91b~m~


\ I~n~n~Bnlmr&lbl~-/








The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 23-29, 2008


Parents






SOve


By Sylvia Mitchell Sanders
Miami Times Writer

Caring parents in their haste to make a
sick child feel better may subject their child
to potential risks associated with over-the-
counter cough and cold medicines. Parents
and care takers should exercise diligence
by taking the time to read the instructions,
warnings, and emergency procedures in
case of accidental overdose. Selecting the
right over-the-counter medicine for your
child can become very confusing because
of the wide variety of flavors, strengths,
forms and combinations available.
Selecting a cough and/or cold medicine
is very similar to visiting the cereal aisle
in most supermarkets. The choices are
limitless. Combination treatments may be
especially confusing some combination
formulas treat runny nose and congestion
while another formula quiets a cough
and numbs sore throats and yet another
formula loosens mucus and reduces
fever. During your visit to the pharmacy,


iewatre


?r-the-Counter Medicines


supermarket, convenience store or gas
station, you rarely have the time to process
all of the information to make such a
difficult and exact selection. When you


consider that these over-the-counter
medicines do not cure but only temporarily
treat the symptoms of the common cold,
it is not worth the risk to your child.
Frequent side effects of these medicines
are agitation, sleepiness, and hyperactivity.
More serious life-threatening side effects
can also occur. Researchers at the Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention report
an estimated 7,000 children ages 11 and
younger are treated in emergency rooms
each year because of complications related
to non-prescription drugs. The study was
published by the American Academy of
Pediatrics journal, Pediatrics.
After a public advisory committee
meeting held October 18-19, 2007, the
United States Federal Drug Administration
(FDA) recommended that over-the-counter
cough and cold products.not be used for
infants and children under two years of
age because serious and potentially life-
threatening side effects can occur.
Parents need to be aware that serious
Please turn to MEDICINES 12B


Cremation industry awaits tougher controls

As method grows popular, so does need for scrutiny .l I


By Chris Joyner

The last thing most industries
want is increased government
regulation. But that's exactly
what the Cremation Association
of North America is advocating.
Currently 12 states-Arizona,
California, Georgia, Illinois,
Louisiana, Nebraska, New
Hampshire,' New York, North
Carolina, South Carolina, Texas
and West Virginia regulate
cremation, at a time when
more people are choosing the
service, said Mike Nicodemus,
chairman of the association's
operator certification program.
The rate of people choosing
cremation had grown to one
in three by the end of 2006,


according to the group's most
recent figures.
Nicodemus said the majority
of operators are honest, but the
dishonest ones hurt the industry
and tougher regulations are
the only way to root them out.
"We know that people with
regulation in their state are held
to a higher standard," he said.
"The girl that cuts my hair has
to jump through more hoops
than my crematory operator
does," he added.
Scandals in the industry have
caused more states to toughen
regulations, Nicodemus said,
but he thinks too many wait
until there is a problem.
One recent issue was
discovered this past month in


An overflow of concerned people flocked to the state Board of Fu-
neral Services meeting held April 3, in Flowood, Miss.


Jackson, Miss., when a former
employee of crematory owner
Mark Seepe snapped photos
of what appear to be bones
and ash being heaped into a
55-gallon barrel. Seepe has
denied doinganything improper.
His attorneys pointed out that
Mississippi law says little about
what operators can and cannot


do with human remains.
Mississippi Attorney General
Jim Hood and the State
Board of Funeral Service are
investigating the allegations.
Colette Bryant of Byram,
Miss., took her sister's body to
Seepe in November 2006 and
was horrified when she heard
Please turn to CREMATION 12D


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MISSIONARY MAGGIE CARTER

Hialeah Temple
honors Missionary
Maggie L. Carter
On Sunday April 27 at
11:30 a.m., Hialeah Temple
COGIC, honors Missionary
Maggie L. Carter. Mother
Carter has served 45 years
as Church Mother, serving
under three pastors since
1963 and is the only living
original trustee for the
church.
At 80 years old Missionary
Carter is still driving and
giving service to God's
people. She is a great
example to follow! God bless
Mother Maggie L. Carter


Unity day at Walker Temple
On Saturday April 26 from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Walker
Temple COGIC church
anniversary fund raiser,
Barbecue and church yard
sale at 1781 N.W. 69 Ter.
Rev.
Jessie Tolbert is pastor.


APRIL 24-25, 2008


Worship Services

begin at 6:30p.m.


Mary Saunders Park 4750 SW 2 Ist Street, West Park, Florida

(formerly known as Carver Ranches)


............ ..............
. . . . . .


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I


... .. ...

... .. .. ....
.. .... .... .. ...... ..
.. . . . . . . . . .
.. . ..... ... .. ....
se









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


Viper venom examined to save stroll

Bp Robert Davis


The whole episode remains
a blur to Kenneth Transeau
of Katy, Texas, as he was
transported by an air
ambulance to a stroke center
in Houston. But sometime
after the noisy helicopter ride
and the hurried hospital brain
scans, Transeau went from
being a stroke victim to a test
subject.
Researchers began dripping
an experimental drug made
from viper snake venom into
the veins of the 69-year-
old husband, father and
grandfather.
The pet supply salesman
doesn't recall anybody
mentioning risks. "They may
have," he says. "I just knew I
wanted to take it. I knew they
wouldn't be testing it if it wasn't
safe."
But the safety of the drug
Viprinex is anything but
certain.
Similar human studies were
"an abysmal failure in Europe,"
says Paul Freiman, president
and CEO of Neurobiological
Technologies, a U.S. company
testing the drug.
For the record, Transeau was
told of the risks, the hospital
says.
His wife Irene signed the


Believers Life Ministries,
Inc. invite you to come and help
celebrate the appreciation of
our beloved Bishop Michealane
Sims Lightbourn, April 23-25,
7:30 p.m. nightly. Information
call Min. Collins 305-751-7674.


A Mission With A New
Beginning Church members
invites you to come fellowship
with us weekly at our 11:30
a.m. Sunday morning services.


On Sunday, April 27, the
entire community is invited to
attend and share "Family and
Friends" Day at St. Mary's
Wesleyan Methodist Church.
Service begins at 10:30 a.m. the
speaker of the day will be Rev.
Cynthia Rogers, pastor of A
well of Living Waters Christian
Ministries.


Elder Willie Di James, pastor
and the Outreach Ministry of
Holy Ghost Faith Deliverance
Ministries, invites all to our
2008 Outdoor Revival on April


Senator Gwen Margolis Park,
located behind the City Hall at
17815 North Bay Rd, will be the
site for this year's Arbor Day
Celebration on Friday, April
25. The event,w which will run
rom 10 a.m. 'til noon, is free of
charge and servers toe educate
residents about the benefits
of trees as part of the world-
recognized Arbor Day holiday.
The City of Sunny Isles Beach
Annual Arbor Day ceremony
will e celebrated rain or shine.
For information,c contact the
Cultural and Human Services
department at 305-792-1706.


Miami Northwestern Class
of 1968 meeting at Cultural
Art Center on Sat., April 26 at
2 p.m. Call 786-487-0787 or
786-223-1644.


A study launched in November 2005 is designed to deter-
mine whether infusing select blood-thinning parts of Malay-
sian viper venom into some patients can halt a stroke and


prevent more brain damage.
consent form, which ^detailed
the bleeding and deaths seen
in previous studies, to enroll
her husband in the worldwide
trial that hopes to study 650
patients.
"We're taking this (failed
experiment) and transforming
it" by changing the way it
is administered to patients,
Freiman says.
The study, launched in
November 2005, is designed
to determine whether infusing
select parts of Malaysian viper


16-18, from 6-8 p.m. There will
be free food and clothing given
away. For more information call
786-319-0194.


Greater New Macedonia will
have three nights of revival,
April 23, 24, 25 at 7:30 p.m.
nightly. Revivalist, Reverend
Gaston E. Smith. Reverend
Sherman Mungin, pastor.


New Corinth celebrates their
Pastor's 36th anniversary. You
are invited to celebrate with
us, and show you love. Climax,
April 27, 4 p.m. Come and be
blessed with the word.

********
An House of Prayer for All
People, Inc. will be having
Intercessory Prayer Services,
Sunday, April 27 at 10 a.m.
Call 305-474-7430 for more
information.


God Word God Way
COGIC, Elder Reginald
Wilkerson, pastor, invites


Iota Phi Lambda Sorority,
Inc., Gamma Alpha Chapter
will celebrate their annual
Business Month Celebration
on Sunday, April 27 at 4 p.m.
at New Covenant Presbyterian
Church. keynote speaker will
be the Rev. Carol Nash-Lester
of Bethel Apostolic Church. The
event is free and the public is
invited. For further information
call 305-987-1066.


Brothers of the Same Mind,
Inc. want to invite all ex-felon,
business owners, inactive
members and the community
to join us in our annual
meeting on May 7, 6 to 8
p.m. to vote for new boards
members. Refreshments Wvill be
served. For more information
call 786-879-5776.


venom into some patients can
halt a stroke and prevent more
brain damage.
For years, the concept has
tempted scientists, who believe
the way the snake's venom
kills also should help doctors
put the brakes on a stroke.
When a blood clot forms
in the brain, doctors try to
dissolve it while getting blood
to flow more freely around
the blockage and in smaller
blood vessels nearby so that
surrounding neurons can be


you to join our Bible Study
teaching, Wednesday at 8
p.m. For information call
786-326-3455.

********
Class sessions, Unction
to Function . Revelation,
Inspiration, Impartation and
information. Matthew 10:27.
Sundays, April 20-May 11, 9-10
a.m. at Christ's Kingdom Life
Center Int'l, Hollywood. Apostle
Leslie Brown, III Sr. pastor/
teacher.

*********
Allen Chapel A.M.E. Church
will have it's Annual Unity Day
Celebration, April 27 at 10 a.m.
A spirit filled program has been
planned for you. Our speaker is
Retired PresidingElderRaymond
Heastie. Chairpersons for this
event are Shirley Thomas and
J.W. Hale. Rev. Marie W. Poitier,
pastor. For more information
call 305-754-9055.


New Providence M.B.
Church is inviting you, your
family members and friends to
come out and worship with us
on Fellowship Day and Family
& Friends Day on April 27.
Our speakers are as follows
at 7:30 a.m. Reverend Dwayne
Wright and 11 a.m. Evangelist




The McIntyre Institute
specializing in liturgical dance
is proud to present "Called 2
Dance Chapter V" on May 24
at 7 p.m. at the Broward Center
of Performing Arts. For more
information call 305-628-8920
or visit www.mcintyreinstitute.
com.

Enjoy the fresh spring air and
the smooth sounds of jazz at the
monthly SunTrust Sunday Jazz
Brunch, which features three
hours of free music on four
stages on Sunday, May 4 from
11 a.m.-2 p.m. Parking for the
SunTrust Sunday Jazz Brunch
is available at the county garage
located on S.W. 2nd St. between
S.W. 2nd Ave and Brickell Ave
or at the Riverwalk Arts and
Entertainment District parking
garage at S.W. Fifth Ave in
Fort Lauderdale. This event is
produced by the Ft. Lauderdale
Parks and Recreation Dept.
For more information call
954-462-0222.


Scandals in the cremation industry


CREMATION
continued from 11B

the allegations. "There should
have been more rules and
regulations. I didn't know
there wasn't," she said.
Charles Riles, chairman
of the Mississippi Board of
Funeral Service, said the
state will require certification
for crematory operators once
the board can adopt new


regulations.
Georgia and other states
were prompted to address
cremation procedures after
a 2002 incident in which
authorities in northern
Georgia discovered hundreds
of uncremated bodies on the
propertyofTri-State Crematory
operator Brent Marsh. Marsh
pleaded guilty to abuse of a
body, theft, fraud and making
false statements. He received


12 years in prison.
A 2005 incident involving
unlabeled remains at the
Bayview Crematory in
Seabrook, N.H., moved the
state to begin mandatory
crematory inspections. Daniel
Healy, with the New Hampshire
Board of Registration of
Funeral Directors and
Embalmers, said the industry
welcomed the changes "with
open arms."


ie sufferers Keep all medications out of kids reach


MEDICINES
continued from 11B


nourished and survive.
The viper's venom causes
its prey's blood to thin, a
transformation that is exactly
what doctors want to happen
when trying to reverse a stroke
caused by a clot, only on a
much smaller scale.
"The snakes cause their
victims to bleed to death
internally," Freiman says. "It
would be nice if you could thin
blood out like this for stroke
victims."
Transeau's case shows
the typical race against
time doctors face when they
encounter a patient suffering
a stroke. A stroke occurs when
blood flow is cut off to part
of the brain, either because
of a blood clot or because of
bleeding in the brain, causing
the brain tissue to die. More
than 700,000 strokes occur in
the United States each year,
making it the leading cause of
disability and the third leading
cause of death.
"In an average stroke, 2
million neurons die per minute
in the first few hours so we are
racing against the clock," says
Transeau's doctor, David Chiu,
director of the Eddy Scurlock
Stroke Center at Methodist
Neurological Institute in
Houston. "The earlier we treat,
the better the benefit."


Hayes-Jones. Reverend Vinson
Davis Jr., pastor/teacher. For
information call 305-758-0922.


Redemption Missionary
Baptist Church are
sponsoring a Prayer Breakfast
on April 26 at 8:30 a.m. and
we are inviting you all to join
us for this morning of prayer.
We will be praying for our
world conditions and of God's
people. For further information
please contact Pastor
McCrae at 305-770-7064 or
305-793-7388.


You are invited to our
Annual Deacons Assembly
Sunday, April 27 at 3 p.m.
Pentecostal Church of God.
For more information call
305-633-6220.


Miami Children's Hospital is the only
pediatric hospital in Florida ranked one of
"America's Best" by U.S.News & World Report.

Miami Children's Hospital has been ranked among the nation's
top children's hospitals by U.S.News & World Report Thereport
ranked top medical centers across the United States and Miami
Children's was the only children's hospital in Florida to make the
list. Nowhere will you find physicians more experienced, facilities
as advanced, or a staff more devoted children. We know you
want the best for your children, so if you ever need to take your
child to the hospital, you'll feel secure knowing that no
one knows children like Miami Children's.


side effects from cough and
cold medicines can also
occur in children two years
of age and older. The FDA is
in the process of completing
a comprehensive review of
the safety of over-the-counter
cough and cold medicines for
children two years of age and
older and will communicate
those results to the public as
soon as they are available.
Some of the common
mistakes parents make in
administering medicine to
their children are:
Giving medicine previously
used by an older sibling to an
infant or toddler;
Forgetting to check the
expiration date on the
medicine;
Not using a proper measuring
device (i.e., dropper, measuring
cup or spoon) kitchen
teaspoons should not be used;
Not understanding that
much of pediatrics is based
on the child's weight and not
their age;
and Forgetting to consider
the effects of different drug
interactions.
If your child's symptoms do
not improve in a few days, stop
using the product and he or
she needs to be evaluated by
a physician.
For older children, remember
to keep all medications out
of their reach and ensure a
child proof safety cap is on
the medicine at all times.
Often, we tell our children
that medication is candy to
entice them to take it. Parents
should reconsider this strategy
for getting kids to take their
medicine just in case a child
finds an unsecured bottle of


Honor Your Loved One



With an In Memoriam

in The Miami Times


---------


---


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O u r p a ti e n t s a r e n 't t h e o n l y o n e s ...,r ~

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medicine. Above all, be vigilant
and wary about all products
(medicine, food, cleaning
products, etc) brought into
your home. Investigate to see
if a product has the approval
of the FDA; go online to
diligently research products to
be used by the people that you
love most. Do not feel guilty or
anxious if your child is just a
little uncomfortable for a few
days due to the common cold.
Make sure a fever is controlled
and in the case of an ordinary
cold, the virus usually will run
its course in a few days. So
often we forget that coughing
is the mechanism our bodies
use to clear foreign matter
from the airways.
When mucous builds up, it
causes coughing. Attempting
to stop the cough is not always
the best thing to do since the
body is clearing the airway.
Keep the child well hydrated
and use a humidifier in the
room. (Pay attention to an
extended dry hacking cough
since a visit to your healthcare
professional may be required.)
Readers should not consider
this article a replacement for
sound medical advice.


PEDIATRIC PROVIDERS
Pediatric Associates
Professional Arts Center
1150 NW 14th Street, Suite 709
Miami, FL 33136
305-243-7570

Miami Children's Hospital
Pediatric Care Center
3100 SW 62nd Avenue
Miami, FL 33155
305-669-6505

ICFH Pediatrics Unit
15490 NW 7th Avenue
Miami, FL 33169
305-685-6976









13B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


RichardsonY Jay's Poitierg -
JONATHAN BRADSHAW, 57, MARIE JOSEPH, 66, died April
VERONICA PIPER, 51, ied April d ied April 10. 18 at Claridge
20. Friday at Sice ce 2:30 House Nursing
a.m. Friday at p.m. Saturday Home. Service
St. Agnes Epis-Church. in the chapel. 10 a.m. Satur-
day at Notre
Dame d'Haiti
Church.


DEON BENEBY died April 17.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.




RASHAWN BENEBY, 22, died










DARNELL PARKER, 22, died
April 17. Service
2 p.m. saturday
at Jordan Grove
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.





HUBERT GORE, 56, died April 18.
Service Monday
in the chapel







DEVONTAE BELL, 14, died April
18. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.







FERNANDO LESHON MYRICKS,
42, died April
20. Service 4:30
p.m. at New Be-
ginnings Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



Rock of Ages.,
PHELDA MCDONALD, 41, main-
tenance worker,
died April 16 at
Westside Regi-
nal Medical
Center. Service
11 a.m. Satur-
day.



Nakia Ingraham
JERRILYN TAYLOR, 40, died April
19. Service 2
p.m. Saturday
in the chapel.






EZEKIEL WILLIAMS, 53. Service
1 p.m. Saturday at International
Faith and Christian Fellowship.

Hadley's
ANDREW WHITE, 67, construc-
tion worker,
died April 17 at
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday April
26 in the cha-
pel.

IRIS ELAINE FREELOVE, 54,
customer ser-
vice supervi-
sor, died April
17 at Mount
Sinai Hospital.
Service 2 p.m.
Sat April 26 at
Mount Calvary
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.


CHARLES CHAMBERS, 68,
died April 15 at
Baptist Hospi-
tal. Service 2
p.m. Saturday
at Morning Star
Baptist Church.




HAZEL MORRIS, 77, died April
16 at Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service was
held.





Carey Royal Ram'n
RUSSELL F. JAMES Sr., 63, died
April 19 at Mi-
ami VA Health-
care System.
Service 11 a.m.
Saturday at
Temple Baptist
Church.



HENRY THOMAS, 45, died April
19 at home. Service Thursday in
the chapel.

BERTRAM VANCE, 87 died April
21 at home. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Mitchell -_ .
WILLIE MAE MOORMAN; 92,
died April 16.
Service 1 p.m.
Friday, April 25
at St. Paul AME
Church.




LYNELL D. 'EYEZ' HUMPHERY,
died April 13
at North Shore
Hospital. Ser-
vice 10 a.m.
April 26 at Solid
Rock Deliver-
ance Church.

Royal ?A
VELMA MCKINNON, 62, died
April 18. Ser-
vice Friday 11
a.m. at Sixth Av-
enue Church of
God. Visistation
Thursday 6 to 9







SIMEON FULLBACK' DAWKINS,
65 died April 17.
Survivors include:
wife, Emma; sons
Simeon and Sel- a a tr
vin; daughters,""
Simone Clark
and Alexis McEI
haney; brothers
Joseph, Isreal





landale. Service 10 a.m. Saturday
at the church. Services under the
direction of Alfonso M. Richardson
Funeral Services, 305-625-7177.

EDDIE MAE BURROWS, 50, died
April 20. Survivors
include: mother,
Jacquline; father,
Edward; sister,
Jemitta; brother
Yoursaidis and a
host of relatives
and friends. View-
ing Wednesday 4
to 8 p.mn. at Alfonso M. Richardson
Funeral Services, 3790 N.W. 167
Street, Miami Gardens. Remains
to be shipped to Demery & Rogers
Funeral Home in Kingstree, South
Carolina.


LATASHA MITCHELL 'SHELL'
FULTON, 43,
died April 16 at
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 10 a.m.
Saturday at Jor-
dan Grove Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.

JOHNNY LEE GREEN, 49, la-
borer, died April
13 at Hialeah
Hospital. Survi-
vors included:
wife, Annie
Wright-Green;
daughters,
Shamka, Matha,
Johnesnika;
mother, Ruth Mae. Service 11 a.m.
Saturday in the chapel.

SYLVESTER STALLING, 57,
presser, died
April 14. Service
2 p.m. Saturday
in the chapel.





ROBERT LEE GREEN, 64, wash-
er, died April 14
at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 4 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.




ANDREW LITMAN Jr., 39, labor-
er, died April 15
at Northshore
Medical Center.
Service 5 p.m.
Saturday in the
chapel.



PALMER LEE MATHIS Jr., 42,
cook, died April
12. Service was
held.






MARIO WEEKS, 56, forklift op-
erator, died April
18 at Bershire
Manor Nursing
Home. Service
10 a.m. Satur-
day in the cha-
pel.



Eric S. Georgeg2
BERNARD S. WILSON, 44, died
April 19. Service 10 a.m. Saturday,
April 26 at Gethsemane Baptist
Church in West Park.

St. Fort's -
ANNITE MARIE SOLAGE, 82,
died April 17. Service 1 p.m. Sat-
urday, May 4 at Eden Church.

DOMINIQUE J. FENELON, 89,
died April 13. Serice 10 a.m. Sat-
urday April 26 at Saint James
Catholic Church.

CHARMENT LAKITA SMITH, 41,
died April 16. Service Saturday
April 26 in the chapel.

MYRLEINE ZEPHUR, 70, died
April 17. Final rites and burial in
Canada.
E.A. STEVENS
LEVON GREEN, died February
27 at Jackson Hospital Service 7
p.m. Thursday in the chapel.

REMILDA JOHNSON, 84, died
April 17 at Memorial Regional Hos-
pital. Service 11 a.m. Saturday in
the chapel.

DOROTHY MCINTRYE, 75, died
April 21 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service 11 a.m. Satur-
day at Hollywood Church of God
of Prophecy.


Hall Ferguson itt
MARY FRAZIER, 78, nursing as-
sistant, died
April 15 at North
Beach Nursing
home. Service
was held.



Range_
CEDELLA MARLEY BOOKER,
81, entertainer,
Mother of Ja-
maican music
legend Bob
Marley, died at
home in Miami,
Florida on April
8. She is sur-
vived by: son
Richard Booker;daughters-in-law,
Rita Marley, and Sharien Vo-
gel; daughter, Pearl Livingston,
14 grandchildren, and 49 great-
grandchildren. Services were
held.. Final rites and burial in Nine
Mile, Jamaica, W.I.

WILLIAM BENJAMIN SAWYER
Jr., 89, devel-
oper, died April
11. He is sur-
vived by: wife,
Bernice Cart-
wright-Sawyer;
daughter, Ber-
nice A. Sawyer-
Watson; son-in-
law, Joseph Levi Watson Sr.; two
Grandsons, Joseph Levi Watson,
Jr., and Jordan Williams Sawyer
Watson; Granddaughter, Jasmine
Bernice Euleta Watson; niece,
Mary Barnett Rauls; Funeral ser-
vices will be held Saturday 1:00
P.M. at Greater Bethel A.M.E.
Church.

ADAM GABRIEL WILLIAMS, 85,
brick mason for
the died April
17. He is sur-
vived by: wife,
Bettye Carey
Williams of 61
years; daugh-
ter, Antonia Wil-
liams-Gary of
Miami; sons, Aubrey Gerald (San-
dra) of Fresno, California, Sidney
Michael of Miami, and Haywood
Earl (Hester) of Summerville,
South Carolina; seven grandchil-
dren; 9 great-grandchildren; three
sisters; Inez Middleton, Los An-
geles, California, Gloria Gleason,
Hilton Head, South Carolina, and
Jean Green(Joe), Palm Dessert,
California; sister-in-law, Helen
Williams, Elloree of, South Caro-
lina, Josephine and Viola Carey,
both of Miami; a host of cousins,
nieces, nephews, and numerous
other family members.. Omega
Memorial Services Wednesday
7:00 p.m. in the chapel. Funeral
services will follow Thursday 11:30
a.m. in the chapel.

Grace-i
ERNEST BANKS, 83, landscaper,
died April 14.
Service was
held.






MARIE MICHELLE TOUSS~INT,
45, secretary, died April 20 at
North Shore Hospital. Service 10
a.m. Saturday in the chapel.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


MATTHEW GORE JR.
wishes to express sincere
appreciation to everyone for
their words of comfort, cards,
flowers, gifts and other acts of
kindness.
Special thanks to Rev. T.J.
Edwards Rev. Harold Marsh,
Evangelist Frances Palmer, The
Miller family, All Florida Paper
Company and the staff of Hall-
Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary.
The Gore family


Gregg L. Mason
JAMES LEWIS WILCOX, 62, of
Miami, Florida,
died April 21.
James was a
U.S. Navy vet-
eran who served
during the Viet-
nam War. After
his service he
enrolled in ac-
counting studies at Miami-Dade
Community College and the Uni-
versity of Miami. He went on to
become a Certified Public Accoun-
tant. He worked approximately 20
years for the Coulter Corporation of
Hialeah. From 2001 to his passing
he was Controller with the Wallace
H. Coulter Foundation. He lived
to excel in his work, debate the
issues of the day and make ,,ab-
surd%o comedy commentary. He
celebrated the strength and good-
ness derived from a caring family.
Survivors include: mother, Annie
Wilcox; brothers, Earl and Thad-
deus (Jacqueline) Wilcox; sisters,
Marian and Phyllis Wilcox.
Though absent in body, he will con-
tinue to live with us in the generous
spirit we all knew him to be. View-
ing ceremony will be Wednesday,
April 23, from 5-8 p.m,. at Gregg L
Mason Funeral Chapel, 10936 NE
6th Avenue, Miami, Florida. Finak
resting place will be in the family's
hometown of Fitzgerald, GA.

DEXTER ENGRAM SMITH, 48,
died April 18 in
Georgia. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Gwen-
dolyn Smith;
sisters, Sonja L
Smith (Clayton),
Dr. Jawanna S
Wilkins (James),
Cassandra Ojomo and Vernerda
Neely; grandmother, Corrine Rob-
erts; godmother, Charlie Mae Cul-
pepper, and a host of other fam-
ily members and friends. Viewing
Saturday at church.from 10:00am
to 10:45am. Service Saturday,
11:00am at the Church of the Open
Door. 6001 NW 8th Avenue. Inter-
ment: Dade Memorial Park.

PATRICK CLEOPHAT, 19, Stu-
dent at Central High School, died
April 19 at Northshore Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Range Homestead
ISRAEL CYRIL ANDREWS,
SR., 83, of Homestead, died
Friday, April 18, at home. Services
will be held Saturday 1 p.m. at
Sacred Heart Catholic Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,
S :. .


DWAYNE R. SMITH
04/24/1969- 11/14/2006

Words can't express our love
for you. You are truly missed
and will never be forgotten.
Love always, Christa,
Maggie, Christian, Dywon
and Damari

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


MORRIS HAYDEN
04/25/1956 02/06/2005

Gone but not forgotten.
The family


Wright & Young k
SALLY BROWN JACKSON, 86,
nurse assistant,
died April 14 at
Hialeah Shores
Nursing Home.
Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Dianne; and
grandchildren,
Brenda Brown
and Shawn Brown, Adriene and
Crystal Thomas, Slomique and
Richard Tasby, LaTrena, Diontae
Lewther, and Justin L. King Ser-
vice Saturday, 11 a.m. at Church
of God of Prophecy.

MICHAEL DONNELL BELL-
INGER, 37,
disabled, died
April 20 at Jack-
son Main. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Kicia;
sons, Michael
II, Matthew and
Markus; moth-
er, Beulah Jackson; and father,
Roosevelt Graham. Service Sat-
urday, 11 a.m. at Center of Hope
C.O.G.I.C, Perrine.

WILLIE CHARLES BRANT JR.,
86, laborer,
died April 16 at
Kindred Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Willette
Brown, Karol
Brant and Pa-
mela Joseph;
and son, Samuel Phillip. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Mt. Hermon
AME Church.

RAYON RICARDO SMELLIE, 21,
cashier, died
April 15. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Sierra Nor-
wood Calvary
Baptist Church.



MERIAM WALKER, 23, died April
18 at Memo-
rial West. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Dianne
Walker-Williams
(Leepoleon); fa-
ther, Fitgerald
Walker; siblings,
Katina Lynn-Wil-
liams, Nzinga, Toshsheka, Dennis,
Orlando, Joel, Curtis, Richard, and
Yahru. Service Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Friendship Missionary Baptist
Church.

Monique & Loriston
ETHLYN SYLVESTRE, 62, died
April 14. Ser-
vice will be held
in the chapel 10
a.m. Wednes-
day, April 23.
14990 West Di-
xie Highway.


Mankeirfh-.
BERNICE BRYANT SCOTT, 102,
died March 15.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Virginia Jordan,
Charlie Mae
Myles, Alice
Mae Reeves
and Irvin Wil-
liams. Service
was held.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


HERBERT S. MILLER, SR.
a.k.a. CAP
04/22/23 02/12/79

Happy Birthday, for our late
beloved husband and father.
Your ever loving family. May
God bless and continue to
keep you always.
"Diddo," from your friends
and co-workers ILA 1416.


BL. ACK.s M'sr 'ON i\.U TH.'IK (.\VN n'lMl' INV








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 25-29, 2008


New St. Paul celebrates 26 years
New St. Paul celebrates 26 years Ld


The New Saint Paul Missionary
Baptist Church cordially
invites you to our pastor's 26th
anniversary for the Reverend
Roosevelt Johnson, senior
pastor.
The services will be
Wednesday, April 23 at 7:30
p.m., Pilgrim Rest M.B. Church,
Reverend Ponder in charge of
service.
Climaxing April 27 at 3 p.m.,
New Bethany M.B. church,
Reverend Hicks in charge of
service.
Come one and all to this joyful
occasion and have a praise-the-
Lord good time.
The address is 4755 N.W. 2nd
Ave. Thanks to Berea Baptist
Church, Reverend Toles Jr. who


REVEREND ROOSEVELT
JOHNSON
rendered service Sunday, April
20 at 3 p.m.


Pre-Mother's Day program

at Mt. Calvary M.B. Church


The Pastor's Aide Board
of Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church is proud to
announce their Pre-Mother's
Day Program,
April 27 at 4 p.m. Guest
speaker is the First Lady of
the 93rd Street Community
Baptist Church, Sister Esther
Johnson. Our there is "From
the Lips of a Mother." Everyone
is invited. Sister, Gwendolyn
Scott, President; Rev. Samuel
Atchinson, Pastor-Emeritus;
Rev. "Billy" W. L. Strange, Jr.,
Pastor.


SISTER ESTHER JOHNSON


Theresa Wren
delivers initial sermon
On April 27 at 3:30 p.m. under
the leadership of Rev. Dennis
M. Jackson II., Theresa Wren
will deliver her initial sermon at
New Mount Moriah Missionary ir hpe'lly kf'-%S
Baptist Church, 6700 N.W. 14 'M
Avenue.


10936 NORTHEAST OTH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements




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Hours of Operation
Monday- Friday 10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Sunday 9 Holidays by Appointment Only

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Miami, FL 33168
Phn.: (305) 688-7500
Fax: (305) 688-7501
www.TheFuneralStore.com


Owned and operated by

Experienced Funeral Professional


JOHN ALBERT PRINGLE
would like to sincerely thank
everyone for your prayers and
loving acts of kindness during
our hour of bereavement.
There will always be a special
place in our hearts for each of
you.
The Pringle family


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MILDRED 'MILLIE' JILES
12/07/1957 04/22/2006

Love you always and forever.
Your family and friends


Death Notice

HENRY L. WATKINS, 72,
died April 17. He is survived
by: sons; Gregory Hudson
and Charles Watkins; daugh-
ters, Bernice Gilbert, Ira
Arceus-Pierce (Juan). Caro-
lyn Drayton (Dwayne), Nina,
Audra and Evelyn Facyson;
brother Jesse (Pete) Watkins
Sr. (Annie Ruth); sisters, Ella
Mae Jackson, Carrie Coney
(Floyd), Donna Lewis and
Dorothy Scott (Lee Arthur);'
16 grandchildren, six great
grand-children and a host of
nieces and nephews. Service
was held Tuesday, April 27.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,

ETHEL JAMES HIGGS
STEWART
09/19/1931- 04/21/2003

ELOISE JAMES
02/23/1912 04/22/2003

Mama and Grandma, five
years have passed and we miss
you both very much:
Love,. Gregory and the family


Subscribe


ALDINES SALES JR., 59,
died April 20 at Memorial
Hospital West, after a lifetime
of complications of type II
diabetes and kidney failure.
Funeral service will be held
2 p.m. Saturday, April 26
at First Baptist Missionary
Church of Brownsville, pas-
tor Rev. Kenneth McGee offi-
ciating. Internment will be at
Dade Memorial Park.
Aldines, was a distin-
guished musician and teach-
er of voice who loved to share
his talents and skills with
those who wanted to learn.
His services extended to
many community and church
organizations from Florida to
New York and New Jersey. In
the span of his career, he has
accompanied such greats as
Aretha Franklin, Whitney
Houston and Cissy Houston.
He is survived by his lov-
ing and devoted mother: Lula
Mae Sales; sisters, Catherine
Sales Edwards, Lovarna (Rog-
er) Harrell and Aretha Sales-
Smith, all of Miami; brothers,
Rev. Phillip (Hey-Chi) Sales of
Columbus, Ga.; Joseph Sales
of Miami and Jeremiah Sales
of Atlanta, Ga. Arrangements
are entrusted to Mitchell Fu-
neral Home, 8080 N.W. 22
Avenue, Miami, Fl.
Viewing Friday from 3 p.m.
to 8 p.m.


In Memoriam


WILLIAM D. CHANEY
02/27/1946 -;04/25/2007

One year has past and
it seems like an eternity,
however, you will always be a
guiding force in our lives!
Missing You! Gloria,
Nicholas and Seimaj.


T]DAY!


Gracie M. Hunter, 83, Re-
tired Food Service Worker
for Pan American Airlines,
died April 21, at University
of Miami. Survivors include:
daughters, Shirley Sparks
and Charlotte Harlem (Rob-
ert); brother, Malachi Burke;
grandchildren; and a host of
other family members and
friends. Visitation Friday,
2-9pm. Service Saturday,
2:00pm at Saint James AME
Church. Entombment: Dade
Memorial Park. Arran ge-
ments entrusted to Gregg L
Mason Funeral Home.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


CALVIN THURSTON SR.
bka "Razor Face"
04-03-1947 04-22-2006

Love always, your wife,
Violean Thurston.


DUAL STEWARDSHIP DAY

AT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BROW


The First Baptist M.B. Church of
Brownsville located at 4600 N.W. 23rd
Ave., Miami will sponsor our annual Dual
Stewardship Day Celebration on Sunday,
April 27, the theme for the day "Christian
men and Women Working Together for the
Building of God's Kingdom" Romans 8:28.
The colors for the day are Pink and Black
with a touch of silver.
As this annual day come to fruition we


will be honored with Rev. Phillip Readon,
Sr. pastor of Bible Baptist M.B. Church
as the 7:30 a.m. Early Morning Worship
Service speaker for the Men's Dept. Our
11 a.m. divine worship service will feature
Elder Marietta Freeman as the guest
speaker for the Women's Department.
As the Dual Day Spiritual Worshipping
services end the final service will climax
at 4 p.m. with Rev. Carl Johnson and the


WALTER JOHNSON, 60,
"Dinosaur", died on Friday,
April 18 in Macon, GA.
Survived by daughter, Ni-
cole of Washington, DC;
brothers, Albert, John Henry,
Leroy, Robert, Tommy, and
Charlie Smith of Ft. Pierce;
sisters, Bishop Janie Davis,
Lillie, Pearl Johnson Stratton
and Earnestine Brown.
Arrangements handle by
Darien Funeral Home, 1000
Ca Dellivers Rd, Darien, GA,
telephone: 912-437-4123.


Death Notice


CIERRA NICOLE WIL-
LIAMS, 11, aka "Cece and T-
Boo," died on April 4.
Funeral services were held
April 11 in Troy, Alabama.
We love and miss you.


NSVILLE


93rd Street Community Baptist Church
congregation as our special guests.
Rev. Kenneth McGee gives plaudits to
Sis. Debra Blackman and Min. Horace
Brown, chairpersons and the 2008 Dual
Stewardship Day Committee for their
untiring efforts of fund raising activities to
make this annual day a success, to God be
the glory. The community is invited to join
us all day for this auspicious occasionl


Honor Your Loved

One With an

In Memoriam in

The Miami Times




A Manker Service Makes The Difference "
MANKER FUNERAL HOME
2075 North West 54th Street
Miami, Florida 33142
Ph: 305/635-4453 Fax(305)s35-33
EMAIL: rminakner n bestouth, net
Traditional Service S2,995
Cremation with service $995
Direct Cremation $650


Still serving our community faithfully lor 50 years
Family owned and operated
William E. Manker Jr,
L.F. 1). & Embalmer


Elder Marietta Freeman Rev. Carl Johnson
New Birth Baptist Church 93rd St. Community


Rev. Kenneth McGee Rev. Phillip Readon
First Baptist of Brownsville Bible Baptist MB Church





The Miami Tim."es

Lifesty es


FASHION H HP oP Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 23-29, 2008 THE MIAMI TIMES


SECTION C









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


INSsommi
By Dr, Richard Stracha


Mary Ann Thomas-
McCloud, president, Mary
Dunn, director, and other
officers and members
celebrated their 38th year of
The Egelloc Civic and Social
Club, Inc. Men of Tomorrow
presentation, last Sunday, at
the James L. Knight Center,
downtown Miami, before a
filled auditorium of parents
and friends. The members
added opulence to a dignified
atmosphere throughout the
evening.
Mary Dunn reached
a milestone with the
organization by ascending to
the presidency from director
of the Men of Tomorrow per
organizational tradition to
share the responsibilities and
create more leadership within
the club.
Kudos go out to all of them
for presenting 22 outstanding
11th grade young men, along
with their female escorts and
parents of the young men to
an enchanted evening that will
be recorded in the annals of
history. They included Jordan
Hall, president, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Milton Hall, whose
guest was Cierra Burnes.
Also, Richard A. Williams,
Jr., vice president, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Williams,
Sr., whose guest was Olgalee
Morales; Darrell Parker, 3rd
vice, son ofMr. and Mrs. Dudley
Parker, whose guest was
Tavhani Quarterman;Julian
Hall, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Bobby Hall, whose guest
was Jessica Moorer; Giden
Brown, chaplain, son Mr. and
Mrs. Roy Brown, whose guest
was Shannon Hart; Miles


Dixon, son of
John Dixon, Sr.
and Anita Green,
whose guest was
Aunjilee Phillips.
Also, Leonard
Thompson,
son of Lynette
Pemberton, whose guest was
Charnice James; Brandin
Hudson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Hubert Hudson, whose guest
was Jessica Parker; Rashad
Sabir, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Nashie Sabir, whose guest was
Rosenana Murray; Darron
Byrd, son of Darron Byrd,
Sr. and Mia Franklin, whose
guest was Reimi Cooper; Chaz
Wright, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald Wright, whose guest
was Taelor Powell; Oscar
Toller, III, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar Toller, II, whose guest
was Quanisha Newton.
Corey Armstrong, son
Nerissa Armstrong and Cory
Lane, whose guest was Felecia
Peters; Ryan King, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Roy King, whose
guest was Leandria Vickers;
Anthony Phillips, son of
Deborah Wilson, whose guest
was Briana Jones; Sterling
L. Griffin, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Steven Griffin, whose
guest was Lakeisha Renazile;
Nelson Adams, IV, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Nelson Adams, III,
whose guest was Elan Byrd.
Also, Samdel Johnson, III,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Johnson, II, whose guest
was Shellie Augustus; Kaleb
Hollins, son of Tyrone Hollins
and Kaitalyn Roker, whose
guest was Ariel Shorter;
Jharuis Lewis, son of James
and Eleanor Watson, whose


guest was Kimberely Elliott;
Corey Perry, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Perry, whose guest
was Eboni D. Finley; Jamal
Smith, son of Paula Smith,
whose guest was Tivia
Rouland; Richard Howell,
whose guest was Hope Miller
and Benjamin McNamee,
son of Dr. Sharrie R.
Dean, whose guest
was Raquel Tellez-
Martinez.
The spectacular
program's music by
the Psi Phi Band and
speakers setting the
evening to include
Dunn, McCloud,
Effie Adams,
president for the parents, and
acknowledgement of guests
by Mary Salary-Gibson, a
former president, while the
winners of the talent showcase
performed and entertained the
audience, Richard Williams,
3rd, Justin Townsel, 2nd, and
Darrell Parker, 1st, followed
by the Black Heritage Awards
winners: Darron Byrd, 1st,
Nelson Adams, 2nd, and
Anthony Phillips, 3rd; essay
contest; Samuel Johnson, 1st,
Derrell Parker, 2"d, and Corey
Armstrong, 3"r. souvenier
journal: Nelson Adams, 1st,
Derrell Parker, 2nd, and Julian
Hall, 3rd, while the awarders
included Wilma Rogers,
Josephine Davis-Rolle, Cora
Solomon-Johnson, Bernice
Carey, Dr. Gwendolyn
Robinson, Marietta Bullard,
Stephenia Willis, and Vera
Purcell.
Gloria Clausell, Barbara
Golphin, W. Doris Neal,
Bertha Milton, Black Heritage
Awards; Vera Purcell, Mary
Saunders-Wallace, and
Veronica Rahming, essay,
and Carter, Deborah Carter,
Constance Veronica D.
Rahming, Mary Wallace-


Saunders, Cora Solomon-
Johnson, souvenir journal
awarders.
Highlighting the evening
was T. Eileen Martin-Major,
who presented scholarships to
former Men of Tomorrow, while
certificates were presented
by W. Doris Neal, Barbara
Golphin, Constance
Carter, and Stephanie
H. Frederick with
Johnson, and Bullard
introducing the 2008
Men of Tomorrow
who performed a
cane routine, gospel
K presentation, cane
dance, cotillion, family
waltz and marching
and singing the theme song.
Mary L. Dunn sent everyone
home pleased, happy to have
come, and in awe of the entire
evening.


Dr. Astrid Mack, past
president, returned to the
King of Clubs, last Tuesday,
to conduct the agenda in
the stead of Hosea Butler,
president, and concluded the
agenda with a proposed
Scholarship Awards
Banquet, Sunday, May
4, at the Doubletree
Hotel, beginning at
6:30 p.m.
James Maull,
scholarships
chairman, announced PAS
the recipients for
the 2008 awards to
include The Dr. T.S. Greer
Scholarship will be presented
to Brandon E. Forbes, Miami
Norland, Glenisha James,
Miami Northwestern, Jennifer
Estime, Miami Southridge;
Drs. Richard aid Lorraine
Strachan will present their
scholarship to Shakeyla Byrd,
Miami Central; Dr. Rozalyn
H. Paschal Presidential


Scholarship to Chimene
Mathurin, Homestead Sr.;
Fletcher Paschal Jr. Memorial
Scholarship to Peterson
Monestime, North Miami Sr.
The activity is opened to the
public by calling any member
from the presidents down to
Maull for more information. A
stellar program will be included
to keep you entertained and
very happy to be in attendance.
A special salute to member Dr.
Arthur Woodard who shared
a plaque and proclamation
putting his name in the State
of Florida Hall of Fame by
Governor Charlie Crist for
his athleticism, head coach at
Tivoli High, Defuniak Springs,
1955-67.
Also, winning over 100 games
and being undefeated from '61
to '66; being a principal at
Douglas MacArthur North, and
an influence over the Kwanzaa
celebration for the past ten
years with his wife, Mary and
two children. So, come to the
scholarship banquet and see
them, touch them and take a
picture with them.

******** *
Hats are off to the
the Miami Times route
drivers that deliver
you paper on time
each week, rain or
shine. They are Krutel
Joseph, Gwendolyn
CHAL Middlebrooks,
Christian Jeune,
Tawanna Cox,
Errol Watson, Gina Delice,
Theophillus Stewart, Valerie
Powe, Valerie Thomas, and
Essie Baker. Last but not
least, there is Shawn Sapp and
she keeps everthing moving
like clockwork. Keep up the
dedicated task gang.

Claudia M. Slater, director,
Claudia M. Slater, director,


officers and members of
Gamma Delta Sigma Chapter
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorotiy,
Inc. will present their annual
Buds of Spring 2008, Sunday,
April 27, beginning at 5:30
p.m., at the James L. Knight
Center.
Buds of Springto be presented
included Leopoldine Barnaby,
Brande Brewton, Abrianne
Brookins, Kiandra Brooks,
Kumarie Byrd, Chevelle
Howard, Sharde' Jackson,
Natalie Johnson, Donquayvia
McBride, Queensily Moore,
Ra'Anna Pickens, Brianna
Pringley, Salina Reese, Nyia
Rolle, Shaneese Sharp,
Quanitha Simmons, Amber
Toller, Diona Thurston, and
Chaala Womble.
Escorts are Darrell Butler,
Robert Haggans, Tavaris
Huff, Richard Howell, Walter
James Parlins, Mark R.
Lockwood, Jr., Charleston
Jenkins, Roderick Randle,
Robert Hudson, Spencer
Pratt, Ricardo Pierre-Louis,
ChaalaWomble, JamarJones,
II, and Sheldon Myles.
Other committee members
are 4Julia Myers, co-chair,
Annette Brantley, Bernice
Carey, Wilma Council, Lillian
Davis, Veronica Floyd,
Irene Handsford, Denitra
Henry Wendell Doris Neal,
Terriceda Newkirk, Dr. Enid
Pinkney, Helen Roberts,
Fannye Searcy, Linda Tartt,
Reatha Whitehead, and Katie
Williams.
Be a part of an evening
when these young ladies are
presented to society for the
first time singing I'm A Bud of
Spring written by Dr. Richard
J. Strachan and Slater doing
the choreographer in several
dance routine to Barry White's
Love Theme, Satin Soul and
My Cherie Amour by Stevie
Wonder.


Bynaa


A trip to Las Vegas, Nevada
is being sponsored by the
months of March April and
May of The Historic Saint
Agnes' Episcopal Church.
If interested call Sharon
L. Anderson, Barbara
Patterson, Maud Newbold
or Freda Rhodes. The trip is
scheduled for December 1-4,
2008.
Twenty boys were selected
from the following schools
Master Academy Charter
High, Miami Northwestern,
Brownsville Middle, Charles
R. Drew Middle, Edison
Middle, Madison Middle and
Linda Lentin Elementary.
These young men washed
cars and ended the evening
with fine dining at Joe's


Stone Crab in
Miami Beach.
The students were
selected by the
State Attorney's
Office. The adults
in attendance
urged the students to listen
to those who are considered
the best in their professions
as one way of achieving
success.
Love and hearty
congratulations to our
2008 debutante scholarship
winners and their parents and
all Delta SigmaTheta Sorority
Debs who were presented last
Sunday evening. The First
scholarship winners was
Sharria Winnette Scavella,
daughter of Winston and


Gloria Scavella; Jescelle
Major daughter of Tanya
Brown Major and Anthony
Major, Jescelle is the grand-
daughter of soror Jesselyn
Brown and Wesley Brown.
Andre Hudson, is the
daughter ofCelia and Horace
Hudson. Kathy Horton, was
the general chairman, this
year. Speaking of Delta's, at
our last meeting 'DST' was
pleasantly surprised when
our Soror Maxine Bright-
Dacies, at 94 years young
attended sorority meeting,
with her high heeled shoes on
and looking great! She made
Delta in 1938 at west Virginia
State college, She is our last
living charter member of
Miami Alumnae and lives in
West Palm Beach. Regina G.
Giles, is our president.
There is a great shortage
of nurses. Infact 15,000 are
needed now! Young ladies


and young men also. As you
graduate from high school,
think about this profession.
We salute Nurse Week May
6-12, I know it is early, but it
is always nice to be grateful
for them.
To have grown wise and
kind is the greatest success
of all.
Wedding anniversary
greetings go out to the
following couples: Antoin
'Tracy' Mathis, April 13th:
Their 12th, Harold 'Shirley'
Clark, April 16th: Their 31st,
Wilfred 'Julie B' Edwards,
April 17th: Their 9th Fred
C. 'Delores S.' Bethel, April
19th: Their 33rd.
Did you know our own
Willis Murray, was the
founder of the American
Cancer Society's Northwest
Dade Relay for Life? We are
proud of you Willis!
Happy belated birthday


goes out to Nettie Dove
who was 85 years young on
March 24th. May you live
a long time and never grow
old.
Get Well wishes to all
of you! Joyce Gibson-
Johnson, Yvonne
Johnson-Gaitor, Celestin
Hepburn-Brown, Naomi
Allen-Adams, Georgiana
Johnson-Bethel, Gloria
Wright, Prince and Deloris
Gordon, Wellington
Gibson, Doris McKinney-
Pittman, Inez McKinney-
Johnson, Clifford Ross,
Bernice Shorter-Meares
and Yashti Armbrister.
Returning home for the
funeral of their sister, aunt
and sister-in-law class of '46'
Deloris Idella Gibson, were
Elder Thomas and Jaupita
'Gibson' Samuels, and their
children Gernita Samuels
and Thomas II, who lives


in Washington, D.C., and
Synovia Tettice who lives
in Charlotte, N.C., Norman
Gibson-Christopher, of New
York City.
Patricia Moss and
her daughters Janet M.
Williams and Sherri Moss
are in New York City to
attend the funeral of their
nephew and cousins Harold
Oliver, Jr.
Congratulations to the
persons who received awards
for having made and is
making a difference in their
communities: Opa-locka
Mayor Joseph L. Kelley. Rev.
Douglas Cook, Sr., religious
leadership: Janice Lee
Jackson, unsung heroine;
Darryl Holsendolph,
business entrepreneurship,
Jacquelle E. Sconier,
community service; and
Vernell Ellen Douglas,
educational leadership.


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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


BLACKS Mh UST CONTROL TIlEIR OCN IDSTINY


Thomna ddrww rvlilir ivuwr% people battle eterdav

















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0. ft


040 "MO- -4 omma 0.NI


Soul Train Music Awards derailed


LOS ANGELES (Reuters
Life!) It's the end of the
line for the Soul Train Music
Awards, which have largely
been ignored by the African-
American stars the event aims
to honor.
A spokeswoman said the
show would not go ahead with
its 22nid annual installment
this year, but a reason was not
specified.
At last year's event in
Pasadena, most of the winners
did not show up, including
such A-listers as Beyonce
Knowles, Mary J. Blige, John
Legend and Gnarls Barkley.
The show takes place a few
weeks after the Grammys, the
music industry's top awards.


Similarly themed ceremonies
like the BET Awards have also
provided some competition.
Perhaps more critically, the
underlying syndicated dance
show "Soul Train" ended
its historic run in 2006. It
was distributed by Tribune
Entertainment, which exited
the syndication business when
billionaire Sam Zell took its
Tribune Co. parent private late
last year in a highly leveraged
deal.
The "Soul Train" TV show
has served as an important
promotional springboard for
black music's biggest stars
since launching in national
syndication in 1971. It claimed
to be the longest-running show


YOURW EEKL


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
New opportunities to showcase
your abilities will take you far. It'll feel
strange until you figure out that the
fear that you don't have what it takes
is an illusion. Once you get going, you'll
find out how good you truly are. Lucky
numbers 8, 20, 11, 32, 4.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
You're about to be presented with a
proposal that will answer every prayer.
You won't admit it but you need this
opportunity. If your ego gets in the
way, you'll say no and end up kicking
your self for being too proud to take it.
Lucky numbers 2, 10, 43, 28, 3.

GEMINI: MAY 21 JUNE 20
In spite of all your efforts, no one
seems to appreciate you, or what you
do for them. If it hurts to be taken for
granted, keep in mind that you never
gave anyone any indication that you
deserved any better. Lucky numbers
50, 33, 39, 2, 14.

CANCER: JUNE 21- JULY 20
You're sick of this. Part of you knows
that it has to stop. Nothing you do will
bear fruit until it does. No one can
stray too far from their own truth with-
out having to pay for it. If you need to
make a change, just do it. Lucky num-


bers 7, 50, 43, 22, 1.

LEO: JULY 21 AUGUST 20
Pay attention to the significance of
your new interests. What appears to
be fun and games is much more than
that. Consider yourself fortunate. If
life is about doing what you love, you
have just stumbled across your bliss!
Lucky numbers 7, 6, 50, 43, 24.

VIRGO: AUG. 21- SEPT.20
You want something too much. Try-
ing too hard to make it happen won't
bring it any closer. It would be better
to let go of the idea that you can't live
without it. This will gel a lot sooner if
you learn how to not let it matter. Lucky
numbers 20, 22, 34, 55, 3.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCTOBER 20
The universe keeps track of every-
thing we do. Life is a 2-way trail and
you have some outstanding debts.
Giving back some portion of what has
been bestowed upon you will show you
that it's much better to give than it is
to receive. Lucky numbers 21, 29, 5,
49,32.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
Don't waste time asking God why no
one's there for you. The lesson is plain
and simple. It's up to you to shoulder


airing in first-run syndication.
The franchise is the brainchild
of Don Cornelius, an ambitious
Chicago DJ who decided in
the late '60s that there was a
need for a TV show featuring
young black people dancing to
recorded music. Few shared his
view, and he self-funded a pilot
in 1969. It aired on a Chicago
TV station the following year,
and quickly became a hit.
Cornelius, famed for an
expansive afro in his younger
days, hosted the show for the
first 22 years. But he has kept
a low public profile and rarely
consents to interviews. He
tearfully accepted a Grammy
Award for lifetime achievement
in 2005.

these burdens. As hard as this appears
to be, you're about to find out that
you're stronger than you think. Lucky
numbers 7, 6, 40, 42, 38.

SAGITTARIUS:
NOV.21- DEC.20
Think about taking off for a while.
Trips to a different time-space contin-
uum will remind you that new perspec-
tives often change the way we relate
to life and ourselves. Any adventure
will give birth to new opportunities.
Lucky numbers 18, 10, 3, 11, 4.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21- JAN.20
Tlhe next few months will be full of
stress. Don't let what's routine erase
your sense of serenity. Our daily life
is filled with spiritual lessons. You're
faced with having to find meaning in
things that only appear to be mundane.
Lucky numbers 8, 7, 48, 17, 5.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21 FEB.20
You have it made right now. For a
few months there will be enough room
for your work and even more space
for what you love. Throw your self
into whatever turns you on. And while
you're at it, grab any opportunity to
travel. Lucky numbers 4, 40, 32, 10, 6.

PISCES: FEB. 21- MARCH 20
The only thing you can do to make
things better is get in touch with what's
important to you now. Your perfect life
can't be frozen in time or it will be-
come stale. Change is afoot. Be willing
to trade what you have for something
new. Lucky numbers 5, 40, 33, 2, 10.


"If the lions do not write their own


history, then the hunters will get all the credit."

-African Proverb


Fantasia Barrino is festival grand marshal
WINCHESTER, Va. An to a four-time Grammy nominee
"American Idol" will serve as and Broadway actress.
grand marshal of this year's Fantasia followed her 2004
Shenandoah Apple Blossom "American Idol" win by releasing
Festival. her first CD "Free Yourself,"
Festival officials announced which has sold more than 2
that Fantasia Barrino, the million copies worldwide.
winner of the third season of In April 2007, Fantasia
the Fox TV show, will be the debuted on Broadway, playing
celebrity marshal for the Grand lf the lead role of Celie in the
Feature parade on May 3. musical version of "The Color
The 23-year-old Barrino has Purple." She will star in the film
gone from high school dropout version of the musical.


S Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
n reasrvations nefessarv. I


C
xmm





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BI l.clLs MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 25-29, 2008


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Florida Lottery retailers are vital to our support of education. Thanks to them,
we've sent more than 350,000 high school students to Florida colleges
on Bright Futures Scholarships; contributed more than $18 Billion to education
statewide; and helped build, renovate and maintain 780 public schools.
We couldn't do it without you, our players. When you play, we all win.

Visit flalottery.com to learn how we're supporting education in your county 2008 Florida Lottery


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


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Broward County to consider affordable housing plan


Broward County plan would tap new businesses


By Scott Wyman

New businesses
could be taxed to help
generate affordable
housing needed for
workers under .a
proposal that Broward
County officials agreed
to explore Tuesday.
About $2.6 million
could be raised to
build homes or rental
complexes or help
families with home
purchases if the
county were to charge
developers an extra
$1 per square foot for
their projects.
Builders have
expressed skepticism
about the housing
fees, but supporters
argue it will provide
needed financing to
solve a long-standing
problem. Independent
studies have repeatedly
shown the area has
a shortfall of housing
for low- and middle-
income families
because wages have
not kept pace with
real estate prices and
rents.
"This is new to us,
but other communities
that have faced
affordable housing
crises do this," County
Commissioner Kristin
Jacobs said. "It is
important if we are ever
going to get ahead of
the curve on housing.
We have to take control
of this problem."
Based on a flat
$1-a-square-foot fee, a
new pharmacy would
be charged $15,000
while a new fast-food
restaurant would owe
$4,000. A new grocery
store would pay about
$50,000 in housing
fees.
The fees would
apply to business
S development and
are similar to those
charged on new
housing to .cover the


impact on roads and
other government
services.
Commissioners
agreed to study the idea
further although some
said the fee could drive
away new business and
questioned what would
happen if cities begin
charging their own
fee as well. A detailed
proposal would likely
be brought back to the
commission later this
year.
Such housing
fees are common
in California and
other urban areas.
In Florida, Coconut
Creek, Winter Park
and Marathon are
among cities that
charge developers
such fees. Fees range
to as high as $15 per
square foot in San
Francisco even though
charges of between $3
and $4 a square foot
are more common.
Developers spend
about $200 a square
foot to build a
warehouse and $345
a square foot to build
an office building.
County housing
administrators said
rentals for low-income
households and homes
for moderate-income
families are Broward's


most pressing housing
needs.
A study released this
year by the private
not-for-profit Broward
Housing Partnership
concluded the current
$314,200 median
sales price for a
single-family home in
Broward is still too
high for the average
worker. Affordability
gaps the average
difference between
the amount of house a
buyer can afford and
what is available -
ranged from $153,558
in Pompano Beach
to $2.77,499 in Fort
Lauderdale, the study
said.
The Associated
Builders and


Contractors wrote the
county in December,
saying the cost will
likely be pased 'on
and thus raised costs
for the person trying to
afford a home. County
attorneys said the fee
is legal and can be
pursued.
County Mayor Lois
Wexler said the county
must find solutions
to affordable housing
soon. She is leading
a task force that is to
present other ideas to
the commission this
summer.
"I don't want to lose
track of the American
dream just because
this country is in a
crisis right now," she
said.


AD NO. 003554


SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN/PARK WEST AND OMNI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE that a regular CRA Boards of Commissioners
Meeting of the Southeast Overtown/Park West and Omni Redevelopment
District Community Redevelopment Agencies will take place on April 28, 2008
at 5:00 pm, at the Frederick Douglass Elementary in the Cafetorium.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For more information please con-
tact the CRA offices at (305) 679-6800.

(#003122) James H. Villacorta, Executive Director
Southeast Overtown/Park West, and
Omni Redevelopment District


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

RFQ NO.- 81049 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION FOR POLICE
LATENT PRINT EXAMINATION SERVICES

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, MAY 12, 2008

Detailed specificatioTus for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


MIAMI*D4DE

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR EVALUATION SERVICES TO
THE MIAMI-DADE COUNTY HOMELESS TRUST
Miami-Dade County Government, through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust, is seeking qualifications from
interested evaluators to conduct a program and system evaluation of Miami-Dade County's continuum of care for
homeless persons. After a review of the qualifications received, interviews will be scheduled with those respondents
judged most qualified given the goals of the evaluation. Selected respondent/s will then be asked to submit complete
proposals for review before a final selection is made. Responses from individual consultants, consulting firms or a team
of individuals will be considered; however the evaluator must be acting in concert with or have an affiliation with a public
or private university.
The County will evaluate all qualifications to determine the best qualified evaluator(s) to perform the outlined scope of.
services. Interested parties may pick-up a copy of the Request for Qualifications (RFQ) beginning April 21, 2008 at the
following address or may request a copy of the RFQ via email:
Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust
111 NW 1st Street, 27th Floor, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1490
8:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
The due date for submission of applications is 4:00 p.m. on May 21, 2008 at the Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners on the 17th Floor, Room 17-202 of the Stephen P. Clark Center, Miami, Florida.
Miami-Dade County is not liable for any cost incurred by the applicant in responding to the RFQ, and it reserves the right
to modify or amend the application deadline schedule if it is deemed necessary or in the interest of Miami-Dade County.
Miami-Dade County provides equal access and opportunity in employment and services and does not discriminate on the
basis of handicap. The contact person for purposes of this RFQ is David Raymond, (305) 375-1490 or email:
dray@miamidade.gov

















MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 23-29, 2008


SECTION D


1rime uoiaen ulaaes
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600


MIAMI AREA
Rooms $550 monthly, every-
thing included 954605-1360


1444 N.W. 70th Street
Three rooms with central air
and appliances, $125
weekly, $375 to move in.
Call 786-487-2222

1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
1560 N.W. 70 Street
Utilities included, very clean
1-754-245-2528
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Air, cable TV, refrigerator,and
microwave. Utilities included.
Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996

1845 N.W. 50th STREET
$135 weekly, with air, $270
to move in. Call 786-286-
7455 or 786-295-2002

2136 N.W. 43rd Street
$400 and up. $200 security.
Call 305-637-9359 or
305-303-0156
2301 N.W. 98 Stret
From $125 weekly and up.
305-975-6605.
2555 N.W. 158 Street
Newly renovated three bed-
room house. Rooms for rent.
$150 weekly. Air, washer and
dryer. Near buses and
stores.
Matured women preferred.
305-764-8102.
7110 NW 15th Court
Brand new with air. $110
weekly. Call 305-254-6610.
ALLAPATTAH
Room for rent, private en-
trance $150 weekly utilities
included. $300 Deposit Call
Deloris: 305-634-5877 be-
tween 1-5 p.m.
CAROL CITY AREA
Furnished rooms for rent.
Call 305-528-3716.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Room for rent, private
entrance. 786-290-6893.
NORTH MIAMI
Large bedroom, cable, cen-
tral air, parking, utilities in-
cluded. Call 786-285-3197.
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.
Rooms for rent
305-836-5848/305-653-8954
ROOMS FOR RENT
3042 N.W. 44 Street.Air,
$125 weekly, $250 to move
in. 305-836-1492.



100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$215 weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$215 weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

350 NW 45 Street
Furnished efficiency. Utilities
included. $575 monthly. First
and last.786-493-0686.
534 NW 52 STREET
Efficiency for rent
Call Michelle 786-260-1613.
CAROL CITY AREA
Private entry, utilities includ-
ed, $660 monthly, first and
last required.
4915 N.W. 182nd Street
Call 305-308-0223
between 8 a.m. 5 p.m.

Efficiency $600 up.
786-319-2695
NORLAND AREA
$650 monthly, $1,000 to
move in. call 305-332-3133.

OVERTOWN AREA
Furnished efficiency. $110
weekly, $640 to move in.
Call 786-897-9090


Utilities and appliances in-
cluded. $600 First and last
to move in. Call 786-897-
4629.

Apartment s
101 N.E. 78th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$950. Balcony, laundry room,
and parking. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 786-326-7424
1146 SESAME STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
$650 monthly, $1500 down
Call 786-287-1080
1205 N.W. 58 Street
One bedroom. All appliances
included. $600 monthly plus
security. Section 8 Ok.
786-277-0632
1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1245 N.W. 60 Street
One bedroom, one bath, se-
curity bars, fenced in, Italian
tiles. 786-210-5644.
1245 NW 58th STREET

$575 monthly. All appliances
Free 20 inch flat screen TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1277 N.W. 58th Street#2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances included. Section
8 welcome. 786-277-9925.
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL -
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
1411 N.W. 51 Street #B
One bedroom, one bath,
lights, water and appliances
included Section 8 Welcome.
786-277-9925
1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors. $600; $1200 moves
you in. Call 305-458-3977.
1500 N.W. 65th Street
One bedroom, air, $560.
monthly utilities not included.
Gated property.
Call 786-514-4746.
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
One bedroom, one bath,
$525 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Free 20 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
.1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$950 monthly. Newly
renovat-
ed, all appliances included.
Free 26 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1835 N.W. 2nd COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 monthly, appliances
free, 20 inch flat screen Tele-
vision.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$425
305-642-7080
210 N.W. 17 STREET
One bedroom $475. Stove,
refrigerator air. 305-642-7080
249 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, just renovated fenced
yard, parking, $800 monthly
plus security. Section 8
welcome.Call 786-216-7533.
2950 N.W. 64th STREET
One bedroom $850 and
three bedrooms, one bath,
$1100.
954-704-3994
3151 NW 53rd Street
Two bedrooms. $750
monthly, first, last and
security Call 305-751-6232
421 NW 59 Terr.
One bedroom $575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-359-7054

4425-4427 N.W. 23 Coourt
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$825. Four bedrooms, two

50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
5200 N.W. 26 Avenue
Three or two bedrooms from
$700. Section 8 welccme.No
Security Deposit
Call 305-634-3545


Apartments
5509 NW Miami Court
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$650 monthly. 305-751-6232
575 N.W. 94 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$750 monthly, **close to ev-
erything.** 786-263-1590
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
7001 N.W. 15 Ave
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 monthly. All appliances
included. Joel 786-355-7578.
7521 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
One bedroom, one bath.
Renovated, new appliances
and parking. Section 8
HOPWA OK. $810 monthly.
Drive by, then call 9 am to 6
p.m. Call Dick 305-754-7900
84TH STREET AND NORTH
MIAMI AVENUE
Newly renovated efficiencies
and one bedrooms, full kitch-
en, laundry facility. For more
information call 305-970-
5574

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information.
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515.00
Two bedroom, one bath
$630.00
Free water, air
Leonard 786-236-1144
HOLLYWOOD AREA
Nice location, close to
schools and church. One and
two bedrooms with tile, air
stove and refigerator, water
included in rent.
305-624-9590
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath
unit for rent. $400 moves
you in. Call 305-827-4593,
305-316-2176
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Senior Citizen Special $400
will move you in one bed-
room, freshly painted unit.
Please call 305-827-4593 or
305-316-2176.
MIAMI AREA
One and two bedrooms.
Move in Special, one
month's rent. Section 8
Welcome.
Call 786-285-0072
MIAMI AREA
One, two and four bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
OPA LOCKA AREA
From $300, section 8 OK.
305-717-3343
Over Town Area
One bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 ok. 786-262-4536
SCOTT LAKE AREA
One bedroom, one bath.
Very nice quiet area, central
air. Tiled throughout,
first/last.
305-770-4479
Duplex
1182 N. W. 64 St
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Recently remodeled. Section


1250 N.W. 51st Terrace
Two bedrooms. Section 8
welcome 305-691-3977 or
305-469-9868.
140 NW 70TH STREET
New two story four bedroom,
two bath wtih garage and
balcony on Master bedroom.
2000 square feet. $2500 de-
posit, $1800 monthly. Section
8 Accepted. Call 305-796-
8130 or 305-651-3245.


1501 NW 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
conditioning. $725 monthly.
appliances included.
Call: Gwen 786-246-4403
15741 N.W. 40 COURT
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1475 monthly. Section 8
welcome! Call 305-621-7883
or 786-385-8174
2053 ALI BABA AVENUE
Newly renovated one bed-
room, one bath. Tile floor,
new appliances, central air
$600, first and security.
Call 305-332-4426
21301 N.W. 37 Avenue
Two bedrooms, everything
new. $950. No Section 8.
786-306-4839.
2452 N.W. 44th Street #1
One bedroom, air. $600
monthly. Call 786-877-5358.

3051 N.W. 134th Street
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
Newly remodeled two large
bedrooms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, cable, central air,

walk-in closet. $1050
monthly. Call 954-557-4567
3190 N.W. 135th Street
One bedroom, one bath, re-
modeled. Section 8
welcome.
Call Marie 786-367-3820
4245 N.W. 24 Ave Apt B
Newly remodeled two bed-
rooms, one bath. $1100
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-219-5225..
5201 N.W. 15 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. 305-975-6605
5302 N.W. 1 AVENUE
Extra large two bedrooms,
one bath. Fenced yard, no
pets. $750 monthly.
305-891-5567 from 6-8 p.m.
596 N.W. 67 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1702 monthly .$1500
deposit Section 8 OK!
Call 561-699-9679 or
786-262-6884
760-762 N.W. 70 Street
Five bedrooms, two baths.
Brand new. $1900 monthly,
$2400 deposit.for Section 8
954-624-5906
796 N.W. 55 Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1600 monthly, $2000
moves you in. Call Jenny at
305-651-3245 Office or
305-796-8130 Cell
SECTION 8 ACCEPTED

8143 N.W. 5 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, appliances. $1000
monthly. 305-984-2162
8201 NW 6th AVENUE
Newly remodeled two bed-
room, one bath. Central air
$875 monthly. Call 786-299-
4093
8960 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Two bedrooms, clean and
lovely. Security bars, air and
appliances. Tiled and carpet-
ing. Quiet Miami Shores
area.
Other locations
$1100 monthly 305-621-6128
or 305-788-0000.
921-923 NW 70th STREET
Five bedrooms, two
baths.Brand new. $1900
monthly, $1900 deposit for

Call 954-624-5906
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace

plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Like new three bedroom,
Section8 welcome. Call 786-
269-5643.



140 N.W. 70 STREET
Brand new four bedrooms,
two baths, garage, two story.
Must see $1800 monthly.
786-399-8557.


14047 NE 2ND AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$1080 monthly. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-254-6610

14310 N.E. 5 Place
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
great area. $1300 monthly.
305-300-1301, 954-226-8688
19453 N.W. 30th COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath
Contact 305-625-3708 or
786-709-5234
2876 N.W. 196 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, fenced yard. Sec-
tion 8 Welcome. $1100
monthly. 305-253-7096
CAROL CITY
Three bedrooms, central air.
Moving Special $800
monthly
$1600 to move in. Call
7-n9iLfn-noon


Five bedrooms, two baths
$1750 monthly. New Home
No Deposit.786-325-7383
1131 N.W. 64th Street
Spacious three bedrooms,
one bath, tiled throughout,
central air, $1150 negotiable.
Call 786-252-2791
1256 N.W. 51st Street
Large three bedrooms, one
and half bath, front and back-
yard fenced. $1300 monthly.
Plus one month security and
deposit. Call 305-788-2605.
1345 NE 128 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath.
One car garage, big yard.
$1200 monthly. NO Section8
Call 305-267-9449
1540 N.E. 153rd Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 welcome, $1,300
monthly, $1500 move in,
786-486-5805.
1650 N.W. 112th Terrace
Three bedrooms one bath
Call Roy at 305-608-8757.
17401 N.W. 37 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
carport, $1200 monthly. No
Section 8. 305-267-9449
1785 N.W. 43 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly. Large yard.
No Section 8. 305-267-9449.
17910 N.W. 42 Place
Three bedrooms, central air.
No Section 8. $1495. 786-
306-4839.
19401 N.W. 23 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths,
garage. Section 8 Welcome
1-678-200-3621

1950 N.W. 86th Terrace
Remodeled three bedrooms,
one bath, central air, $1175
monthly, 305-662-5505.

2015 N.W. 68th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
Hialeah Section 8 Welcome
call 1-347-804-2240 or 786-
367-6468 for Mr. Bride

2311 N.W. 152 Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8. 786-715-4968

2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793

2825 N.W. 163rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1400, air, tile floors, bars,
$4200 to move in. No
Section 8 Call Terry
Dellerson 305-891-6776

3121 NW 165 STREET
Three bedroom, den, air
$1250, tile floors, bars,
fenced. $3750 move in. No
Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

3138 N.W. 67 Street
Four bedrooms, one and a
half bath. Section 8 Only.
305-696-3084
3300 N.W. 174 STREET
Three bedrooms, den, air, tile
floors. $1300 monthly, $3900
to move in. No Section 8.
Terry Dellerson, Broker.
305-891-6776

3520 N.W. 208 Street
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath. Section 8 Only.
Call Mr. Melton 305-625-
2135
4644 N.W. 16th Avenue
Two bedrooms, $875 to
move in. 954-625-5901.


5599 Wiley Street
Hollywood, three bedrooms,
two baths $1475 monthly.
Section 8 welcome. Call 305-
772-6240.
5650 N.E. MIAMI COURT
Four bedrooms two baths,
$1600 monthly, $3200 to
move in. No Section 8. Con-
tact Joseph 305-632-2426.
781 NW 77th Street (rear)
One bedroom, appliances in-
cluded, air, utilities paid by
tenant. $550 monthly. $1375
to move in. 305-742-1050
790 N.W. 172 Terrace
Five bedrooms, two baths,
tile, central air, $1695 month-
ly. 305-662-5505
COCONUT GROVE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, family/laundry room, ga-
rage. Call 786-597-3999.
Good Neighborhood
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$950 monthly. 786-624-7205
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three, and four bed-
rooms with air. $700 to
$1250
305-642-7080.
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.
LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Florida room, fenced, bars,
central air. Section 8 okay!
Call 786-390-0809
Miami Gardens Area
Three bedrooms, two baths
284 N.W. 40 Street
One bedroom one bath
Call Marcia Jones
305-469-5062
Newly Renovated
Three bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. 786-291-7814
North Miami Area
2 bedrooms 1 bath Nice area
Section 8 OK 954-549-5192
NORTH MIAMI AREA
One to four bedrooms.
Call 305-474-9730
NW / NE AREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.
STOP!!!
Behind in rent and
mortgage?
Call Kathy 786-326-7916
Rent Wih Opon
1550 N.W. 63 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$165,000. zoned multi-family
(up to 4 units). Will help with
downpayment and closing.
Own for $1350 monthly.
Priced to sell. Fully remod-
eled, air, alarm, new roof .
Please call with pre-
approved letter. Lisa 305-
968-9161



6600 N.W. 27TH AVE.
Office/warehouse yard near
Miami Airport; 1-95 and 27th
Avenue. Great price.
Call 305-693-3550

Don't Lose Your Home
We Stop Foreclosures Fast!
Call 305-677-2226



18322 N.W. 68th Avenue
Why Rent-buy. One bed-
room, two story. Try $1250
down and $996 monthly.
FHA. 786-306-4839
750 N.E. 199th Street
Why Rent-buy. Three bed-
rooms, two baths, immacu-
late. Try $1500 down and
$995 monthly. FHA.
Ta786-AnR-AR3


II IU i.VV. b!) Iciic.ce
Why rent-Buy. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, renovated.
Try $900 down and $1199
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.
1175 NW 133 Street
Why rent, Buy!. Two bed-
rooms, carport. Try $1900
down and $995 monthly
.786-306-4839.
1450 N.W. 181 Street
Why rent-Buy. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, huge den,
patio. Try $1900 down and
$1499 monthly FHA
786-306-4839
3029 N.W. 66th Street
New construction home for
sale, affordable housing pro-
grams welcome, four bed-
rooms, two baths, call 786-
229-4824 or 305-807-6115.


331a N,.w. a23t terrace
Why rent-Buy. Four bed-
rooms, three baths. Try
$1900 down and $1595
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.
3315 N.W. 49 Street
Beautiful three bedrooms,
two baths, with plenty of
space. Come walk through
and make an offer at the
Open- House on saturday,
May 3 at 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
4910 N.W. 170 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Four bed-
rooms, two baths, air. Try
$1900 down and $1395
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.
8200 N.W. 14 Avenue
Why rent, Buyl. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, air. Try
$1900 down and $1199
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.
960 N.W. 182nd Street
New construction home for
sale, affordable housing pro-
grams welcome, three bed-
rooms, two baths, $225,000,
call 786-229-4824 or 305-
807-6115.
ATTENTION
Now You Can n OwYour
Own Home

FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home. .
Also available
S HUD/VAHomes t.A
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???:
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realtyi
CITY OF MIAMI
Six bedrooms, three baths,
mini castle. No Down! OK
Credit. 786-326-7916.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Owner Relocating
Nice area, three bedrooms,
one bath, large home, all ap-
pliances, utility room,
$239,900, call 305-685-6862.
Owner can finance or rent
to own: 4 nice homes availa-
ble. Hear recorded list 1-800-
970-5628x8.
Three bedrooms, two
baths
HOME FOR AUCTION!
Trustee Liquidation Sale.
Completely Renovated! New
Kitchen with stainless steel
appliances, updated baths
and new roof, new windows
with shutters. 100% financ-
ing, 0 down, avail, valued at
$300k. $197,521 obo. 1871
NE 157 Terr. on Sat. and
Sun., 4/26-4/27, 12-4 pm.
786-522-3513.



24 HR. Plumbing
Unclog All types of Blockage.
Check Water Heaters and
Septic tank. Free Estimates.
Call 786-597-1924 or
305-576-5331
BEHIND IN YOUR
MORTGAGE payments? We
Stop Foreclosure! We Buy
Your Home Directly from the
Bank! Call Marie Campolo
1-888-815-4621



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.
M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves, re-
frigerators, water heaters.
Joel cell 305-244-8948 or
305-758-8608.
REPAIRS
I have done maintenance on
large apartment complexes
and other rental properties
since 1992. I do plumbing,
carpentry, windows, doors.
Light electrical, drywall,
plastering and painting. Call
Morris 305-588-0205




LIVE IN AIDE WANTED
Health Care Papers
Helpful
Call 305-835-9798

MUSICIAN WANTED
Saint James Baptist
Church of Coconut Grove
is in search of a spirit-
filled,
God-fearing musician. If
you are interested in this
position, please contact
Deacon Jimmy Smith Sr.
305-259-6218 or call the
church at 305-443-4440.
Office hours, 10a.m. -
3:30
p.m. Reverend Kenton L.
Williams Sr., Senior Pastor


Preschool Teachers
PreK
40 Hours ,CDA
Call 305-948-9235

Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street

SHOE SALES
Experience necessary.
Apply in person at Bida
Shoes, 1651 N.E. 163 St



COIN LAUNDRY
LAUNDROMART, Florida's
largest chain of self-service
laundries is offering excellent
investment opportunities in
Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach County. These are not
a franchise, but are investor
owned business that are
recession proof. We're offer-
ing superior sites and the
world's best energy efficient
commercial laundry equip-
ment. We have a West Palm
Beach location opened, a
North Miami location ready to
open and two Broward loca-
tions that will be ready within
(30) days. Join a $5
billion/year industry with an
exceptional return on your
investment. For more infor-
mation contact:
Edward Smith
Vice President, Sales
Laundromart, Inc.
6100 Powerline Road
Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33309
954-772-7100 ext.141
edsmith@laundromart.com

COIN LAUNDRY
Overtown 1659 N.W. 3 Ave.
21 washers, 22 dryers. 30
day guarantee. 305-588-
9084
INFORMATIONAL
SEMINARS :
BAD CREDIT NO CREDIT
Tuesday and Thursday
6:30 p.m. to,8 p.m. $25
Business Opportunity-
Create Multiple streams of
Income. Sat. 11Fa.m. to
1 p.m. No Fee
Appointments: 786-253-0945
305-944-2674



Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $55, also
do
G and conceled. Reliable
#DS2600085 and #k200017.
786-333-2084.

KIARA CHILD CARE
Accepting children 12
months through five years.
Free registration and
school t-shir with
enrollment. 305-474-9369.




WE'LL PAY 25 PERCENT
Interest to use your (un-
touched) $90,000 CD as col-
lateral for three months.
pitstopcommerce@yahoo.co
m.




Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com

Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784


lh rs If you think nobody gives a damn what Black

W I O V ars Wat people think, think again. Some people care a lot,
Especially when they need something from you.


Black People




Think Anyway


Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what
you think when they're looking for your vote And TV and radio stations
hope you will payattentlon to their shows,
The point is, all these people want something from you.And when
people want something from you,you have got power over them.We


should lean touse thatpower wisely to:mr e the changeswe need ~t
make.
Giveyour money.your votes and your loyalty to peoplewhodeserveit.
People who are going to give you something In return. Pepe who are
doing the most for the Black community,
Who cares what Black people think? A lotof people do,
The Miami Times ts about the business of communication.Comnmuniat-
Ing to you the power you have and letting you know how you cat se it,
For instance, right now there are 32 million Black people In this countryman
last year we earned morethan 400 billion dollars.


_________I__________11_1____11____


------------------- a


__ _.--______l___---lr-~-_---- r-~. .C.._ -'


es


ss


0










I- l r rr m p erwaau so ?


SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans
Infusion Frontal lac
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $8
786-277-6821


"Copyrighted Material





Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"


TrI, CiJtiieim \um' %ukJ tI ( hi- a,* In I '


E
$150
es

85
06/10/08


A.V. INSURANCE
$ave $$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
04/10/08
C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners
General Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue
305-836-5206


GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
* Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07120/08


rAlln IrINANUI.L
Reverse. Mortgage!
Stay at home Enjoy Tax Free
No Mtg. Payments. If you are
62 yrs or older call me
Alex at 305-205-1697
01/09

DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08

Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553
4/30/08
s650 -26'
weeAis v /aewzt
Call
305-694-6210


Fax
305-694-6211


PROFESSIONAL CARE HRS CERTIFIED.
LOW COST SERVICE. SERVICE UP TO 10 WEEKS. $175
* Daily appointments Treatments upto 12 weeks.
S; Abortion without surgery.


600 East 4th Ave. 305-877-3001
Hialeah Florida, or
33010 786-286-6628
BRING THIS AD!


JON U


THE MIAMIbe

) THE MIAMI TIMES


:'" PhoneI "I.. ..... ..
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami FL 33127-1818 includes Florida sales taxil
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 Includes Florida sales tax


S4 AtJ


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
IFB NO.- 81050 INVITATATION TO BID FOR TIM PURCHASE OF
TROPHIES AND PLAQUES

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, MAY 12, 2008
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department website at www.miamiaov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager



AD NO. 005001


ADVERTISEMENT

Project MCC-O-030-A
Mike Gomez Construction is soliciting bids for the following project at Miami-
Dade Aviation Department.
MCC-O-030-A MIA- Building 701: This project consist of interior build-out of
two areas of offices, classrooms, and lounges for the use of MD College. Work
to include Demo/wall partitions (CSBE), flooring (CSBE), painting (CSBE),
HVAC (CSBE), electrical (CSBE) and fire suppression (Open).
Pre-bid Conference: Tues., May 6, 2008 @ 10:00am, Bid Opening: Tuesday,
May 20, 2008 @ 2:00pm
Location: 4200 NW, 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor, Conf. Room F.
For more information, call Ginny or J. Caballero @ 305-876-8444


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY









BLACKS MuSI' CONTROL TI- IR 0\\N 11SI'TINY


90 THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 23-29, 2008


Does the economic slump mean small business disaster?


I am getting bombarded
by the media's doom and
gloom about the economy!
I can't take it anymore!!
My future, my financial
success, my life are in my
hands and in my hands
alone. That is my rock.
That is what I must believe.
Because the minute I
assign blame to anyone
else or any other entity
including "the economy"
I'm done for. At that
moment I can do nothing
to change any aspect of it.
My company is holding
its own. In fact, we're still
growing. More slowly, yes.
But growth is growth. We
are up from this time last
year by 6%.
But, even though I can
control my own income
and my own life, most
business people feel,
understandably, like
they are totally at the


whims and control of the
economy. I mean, they
can see the numbers going
down. They can observe
less sales and less reach
from their potential market.
How do you go from viewing
something obvious to
changing it totally. First
you have to believe you
can. If you're reading this
and you've already decided
'it's impossible to do well in
this economy' then just give
up and close the doors. I'm
serious, stop reading. You're
done. But, if you think you
cando something about it
and if you believe me, well -
carry on with your reading.
So let's look at the reality.
It is true that people are
spending less. It's also true
that business owners, due
to that observation, are
marketing less. Well, take
advantage of that! If you
market more you will pull


in the business instead of
those others that aren't
marketing.

MARKETING IN A
RECESSION
In the book, Olgivy on
Advertising, David Olgivy
(winner of the Parlin Award
for Marketing) states his.
own empirical observations
on marketing in a recession.
He says,
"What should you do in
time of recession, when
you need every penny to
sustain your earnings?
Stop advertising?
"If you stop advertising
a brand which is still in
its introductory phase,
you will probably kill
it for ever. Studies of
the last 6 recessions
have demonstrated that
companies which do not
cut back their advertising
budgets achieve greater


increases in profit than
companies which do cut
back.
"In a Morril survey of
40,000 men and women
involved in the purchase
of 23 industrial products
over five years, it was found
that share-of-market went
up in bad times when
advertising was continued."
He goes on to source the
American Business Press
that had pie charts of
sales of companies which
cut back their advertising
expenditure during the
1974-75 recessions
compared with companies
that did not cut back. The
companies that did not cut
their advertising budgets
had more than doubled their
sales 2 years later while
sales from the companies
that cut their advertising
had barely gone up 50%.
Three years later sales were


down for companies that
had cut their advertising
while it was up for those
that did not. The net income
for these companies also
followed the same suit over
the same period of years -
those companies that did
not cut their advertising
had more than tripled in
sales, while companies
that did cut back during
the recession had barely
doubled.

CONSEQUENCES
DURING A RECESSION
There is a consequential
effect that marketing has on
your business 1, 2, 3 years
and more down the line if
you don't market during
a recession. And while the
cost of living increases along
with inflation and other
factors, you will be losing
sales and income down the
road when you will really


need it if you cut back on
marketing during times
of recession. But as I say,
even though unfortunately,
companies will invariably
cut their advertising budget
during a recession so be
smarter and use that to
your advantage for more
business and growth now
as well as in the future,
because if you do you will
come way out ahead with
the recession starts to
wane.
At my company,
PostcardMania, we are
definitely being hit by all
the business owners that
feel they had better cut
back on their marketing
due to the economy. Don't
misunderstand; we are still
growing and doing great
but our growth has slowed
slightly. And that growth is
harder won these days.


MARKETING SMARTER
It's at these times you
have to be smarter. You
have to market smarter and
reach higher quantities of
people with your marketing
message. Your return
on investment MAY be
lower and you may earn
less per dollar spent on
marketing. But think this
through... if you cut back
on your advertising- you
will undoubtedly have
less business coming in.
Operating that way, now
look a year down the road...
how's your business doing?
Scary.
However, if you increase
your advertising and
marketing budget and your
competition is cutting back
what will happen? Look
a year into the future on
this one too... what do you
think will happen? Who
will get the business?


MDC's Class of 2008 attain academic and personal goals on graduation day


Miami Dade College to graduate nearly


9,000 students on Saturday,
Miami Dade College more than 9,000 MDC
(MDC) students come students will step
from 181 different closer to their dreams
countries and all walks at seven graduation
of life. Their cultural ceremonies across
diversity, achievements Miami-Dade County.
and determination to U.S. House Speaker
overcome obstacles Nancy Pelosi, U.S.
to succeed are the Department of
heart of this college, Education Secretary
widely regarded among Margaret Spellings and
the most respected El Salvador's President
institutions of higher Elias Antonio Saca
learning in the nation, are among national
On Saturday, May 3, and world leaders who


May 3
will deliver keynote
addresses. However,
many student leaders
who've performed
extraordinarily or
surmounted great
challenges will walk
across the stage to get
their diplomas. Meet
some of MDC's most
outstanding students
graduating this year:
Anthony Labossiere,
Olivier Ade and
Karl Fritz Eugene


are keeping vision
care in the family.
The three Haitian-
American cousins are
set to graduate from
MDC's Medical Center
Campus with Associate
in Science degrees in
opticianry. Labossiere,
who held two records
for three hundred meter
hurdles and the high
jump in high school,
decided to follow in the
footsteps of his parents,
both MDC alumni.
Ade's uncle inspired
and influenced him to
attend MDC. Eugene


completed high school
in Haiti before coming
to live and study in
Miami. A fourth cousin,
Pierre-Alex Nemorin, is
wrapping up his first
year in the opticianry
program at MDC.
For Michael L.
Johnson, who
previously battled
alcoholism and
homelessness, MDC
was among the first
steps toward a better
life. Johnson had
an epiphany about
two years ago at a
detoxification clinic.


He found help at
New Hope CORPS, a
rehabilitation center
located in Homestead,
where he still lives and
manages the after-care
program. At MDC's
Homestead Campus,
Johnson majored in
mathematics and set
a goal to not earn
anything less than an
"A" in all his classes.
Today, he is president
of Phi Theta Kappa, a
member of the First
Team of the All-Florida
Academic Team, a
member of the MDC


mathematics honors
society, and has
received numerous
scholarships. This
year, he will graduate
top of his class with a
3.95 GPA.
MDC is the nation's
largest institution of
higher education with
an enrollment of more
than 165,000 students.
In fact, 1.5 million
people have attended
the college since it
opened its doors in
1960. The college's
eight campuses and
outreach center offer


more than 200 distinct
degree programs
including several
baccalaureate degrees
in education, public
safety management
and nursing. MDC is
also renowned for its
rich cultural programs.
It is home of the Miami
Book Fair International,
Miami International
Film Festival, the
Cultural del Lobo
performing arts series,
the Miami International
Sculpture Park, and
a large art gallery and
theater system.


Jaguars, Garrard settle on $60M deal


Quarterback David
Garrard probably
could have gotten the
Jacksonville Jaguars
to pay him more.
But tired of
negotiating, Garrard
ended the contract
process Monday by
signing a seven-year,
$60 million contract
that is the richest in the
NFL team's history.
"I pretty much had to
say, 'Let's go ahead and
wrap it up. I'm done,' "
Garrard said. "It's too
much stress on me and
my family. My wife was
done five weeks ago.
She's already been on
board with everything.
We just kept working
on it, and I finally just
said, 'You know what,
I'd rather be happy
now, have the city
happy now, have the
team, the organization,
the owner happy now
than trying to string
something out having
everybody on edge.' "
Garrard and his
agent, Albert Irby,
wanted a deal similar
to the six-year, $67.5
million contract Dallas
Cowboys quarterback
Tony Romo signed last
season. But Garrard,
30, settled for the
latest offer because he
"felt like it was time."
Garrard, who was to
earn about $2 million
this season, completed
64% of his passes for
2,509 yards and 18
touchdowns despite
missing three games
with an ankle injury.
He threw just three
interceptions and
had the NFL's third-


UAVID GTAKRKAKL
highest passer rating
(102.2), proving coach
Jack Del Rio made the
right move when he
released starter Byron
Leftwich a week before
the season opener
and made Garrard the
starter.
"When you look at
what transpired and
how David responded,,
I think that's what's
most impressive," Del
Rio said.
*Second-year
running back Quincy
Wilson has been waived
by the Cincinnati
Bengals. It is the
second time in five
days the Bengals cut
a player who had been
arrested. Wilson was
arrested last June 17
in Huntington, W.Va.,
and charged with
disorderly conduct for
failing to disperse after
a weekend wedding
party. The Bengals
released receiver Chris
Henry after he was
arrested last week on
an assault charge, his
fifth arrest sincejoining
the team. ... The New
Orleans Saints signed
cornerback Aaron
Glenn, a 14-year
veteran and former
first-round draft pick
who started four
games for Jacksonville


Steve McNair retires from football


Baltimore Ravens
quarterback Steve McNair
announced his retirement
Thursday, ending a
13-year career in which
he was selected co-MVP,
led the Tennessee Titans
to the Super Bowl and
orchestrated the most
successful regular season.
in the Ravens history.
He had intentions to
carry out the final three
years of his contract
with the Ravens, but the
athlete felt his battered


body would never reach
100 percent for the
upcoming season.
"Comingoutandmaking
this decision, it was
hard," he said Thursday
during a hastily arranged
news conference. "In your
mind, you feel like you
can play, that you can
still compete. But when
your mind and your
body are not in accord,
it's not going to work in
the National Football
League.


in 2007. He has
41 interceptions,
six returned for
touchdowns. ... The
New England Patriots
signed free agent
linebacker Victor
Hobson, who played
all of his seasons with
the New York Jets and
started 58 of the 76
games he played...
Strong safety Clinton
Hart agreed to terms
on a five-year contract
to remain with the
San Diego Chargers
through the 2012
season.


Miami Heat sells $10 se;
Fans encouraged to buy now and beat the rush


The Miami HEAT has
launched the Ten Gets
You In!' season ticket
package. For only
ten dollars per
game, per seat,
Heat fans can 4B
secure their seat MIT
location for the Hi
2008-09seasonand
enjoy an unparalleled
entertainment
experience as a Miami
Heat Season ticket
holder. Heat fans that
purchase season tickets
by way of the Ten Gets
You In!'promotion will
lock in their seats before
the NBA draft lottery, in
advance of the additional
season ticket holders
expected to jump on the


Heat bandwagon once its
position in the upcoming
NBA draft is finalized.
Ten Gets You In!'
buyers secure their
spot in line for the
seat relocation /
AMl upgrade program,
EAT where they can
change or upgrade
their seat location if they
so choose.
Ten Gets You In!'
seating is located in
rows four and above
of the 400 level in
uptown and represents
a return to the original
price structure for the
balcony seating area.
"Where else are you
going to get such a great
deal?! Nothingcompares


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR NON-EXCLUSIVE
TELECOMMUNICATIONS & NETWORK MANAGEMENT SERVICES AGREEMENT FOR THE
MIAMI-DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT
RFP NO. MDAD-08-06
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY MIAMI, FLORIDA
Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of the above referenced, advertisement, which can be obtained by
visiting the Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) Website at:
www.mlami-airort.conmhtmiladverteiaments.html (in order to view fullAdvertisement please select Advertisements" link
and select respective solicitation).
Copies of the RFP solicitation package can only be obtained through the MDAD, Contracts Administration Division, in person
or via courier at 4200 NW 36th Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122, or through a mail request to P.O. Box 025504,
Miami, FL 33102-5504. The cost for each solicitation package is $50.00 (non-refundable) check or money order payable to:
Miami-Dade Aviation Department.
This solicitation is subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with section 2-11.1(1) of the Miami-Dade County Code.


MIAMI DADE COLLEGE
PRESENTA SU SHOW ANNUAL DE NEGOCIO
24 de abril del 2008 a partir de las 9:30am-12:00pm
Este evento proveera oportunidades de negocio en Miami Dade College
Localizacion del evento: Miami Dade North Campus, Edificio 4000
Para mas informacion sobre este evento por favor Ilamar at (305) 237-0013 o
al correo electronico
cmurillo@mdc.edu

MIAMI DADE COLLEGE's
ANNUAL BUSINESS MATCHMAKING OPPORTUNITY
April 24, 2008 from 9:30am 12:00pm
Show Location: Miami Dade North Campus, Building 4000
For more information on MDC's Match Making Trade Show Opportunity
please contact MDC's Purchasing Department
at (305) 237-0013 or e-Mail your RSVP to
cmurillo@mdc.edu


Subjects With Kidney D e


Needed for a Research Study


The University of Miami is looking for people 18 through 79 years of age with
proven kidney disease to participate in a research study of an investigational
medication. Participants that meet the requirements of the study will stay in the
clinic for about 6 days followed by 2 out-patient visits, receive study related
testing and study medication at no cost to the participants, and will be com-
pensated for their time. Please call 305-243-6795 M-F 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
for information. MIL
MILLER
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
University of Miami,
Division of Clinical Pharmacology
1500 NW 12th Ave. 15 Floor West. Miami, FL 33136


ason tickets
to the entertainment
thrown down at a
Heat game D. Wade,
the HeatDancers, DJ
Irie, the golden oldies,
Burnie, the Jr. Jam, the
Heat Street Band and
HEATV; and Uptown
is where it all goes
down," said Dale, the
Mayor of Uptown, the
upper level seating area
at AmericanAirlines
Arena. Come hang out
with me in Uptown for
just ten bucks.


inced Gyn Clinlc
uioeal, SaaI vot sinul ess

- TenltiatldO Uip l o 22 Weeks
Irvid1ual omseling Services
-~Board CertifieOd 08 Y 's
Conplie -YN S9rvices

ORTION START.$18 AND UP

35621-1399


JOI6OU

BUINSS&SEVC ONCIN


MIAMIDADE

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs
305-375-JOBS (5627)
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/DA/eterans' Preference
'2iertj EdcfleKcrf Ee 7rv nay









SATURDAY, APRIL 26 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
Mt. Hermon AME Church
17800 NW 25th Ave. Miami Gardens, FL 33056
Cost: FREE


SPONSORED BY: MT. HERMON AME CHURCH POLITICAL, SOCIAL
ACTION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MINISTRY IN PARTNERSHIP
WITH THE COLLECTIVE BANKING GROUP OF MIAMI-DADE AND VICINITY

SI.


- --...w.. a -`.. . . . . .









10D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 25-29, 2008


Pictured: Seated front row, left to right: Chuck White Jr., regional director, Publix; Gary Cor-
rell, director of merchandising, Publix; Alicia Rosier, executive director,The Nat Moore Foun-
dation; and Kim Yaeger, manager of community affairs and media relations, Publix. Top row,
left to right: Bill Fauerbach, vice president operations Miami Division, Publix;Willie Carpenter,
treasurer,The Nat Moore Foundation; Nat Moore, founder,The Nat Moore Foundation; Sergio
Pereira, president, The Nat Moore Foundation; Denis Zegar, president and CEO, Food For All;
and Mike Meredith, regional director, Publix.


Publix and Food For All team up to help

support The Nat Moore Foundation

Publix Super Markets and Food For All recently teamed up to contribute $25,000 to The Nat Moore
Foundation's Urban Scholarship Program. Please find picture attached from check presentation. The
Foundation provides college scholarships to South Florida youths living in low income and under-
served areas without the means to pursue higher education. The Nat Moore Foundation annually
awards a $10,000 college scholarship $2,500 per year for four years to at least one qualifying
minority high school senior from a disadvantaged family. To date, the Foundation has given financial
aid to 19 students and will award five more this year. Scholarship applications are currently available
for this year's awards and can be obtained by calling The Nat Moore Foundation at (305) 770-0995.
The deadline to apply is May 1.


Obamas' $4.2M income fueled by profits from books


Democratic Sen. Barack
Obama and his wife, Michelle,
made $4.2 million last year
as widespread interest in the
presidential candidate pushed
the sales of his two books.
In tax returns the campaign
released Wednesday, the
Obamas reported a significant
jump in their income from the
previous year as profits from
the books Dreams From My.
Father and The Audacity of
Hope accounted for $4 million.
The Obamas paid federal taxes
of $1.4 million and donated
$240,370 to charity. Their
salaried income was $260,735.
In 2006, Obama and his wife
reported income of $991,296.
The sum included Obama's
Senate salary of $157,082
and his wife's earnings of
$273,618 from her position as
an administrator at University


& & & 4


of Chicago Hospitals. Michelle
Obama also earned $51,200 in
director's fees from TreeHouse
Foods, a food distributor. They
paid $277,431 in federal taxes
- an overpayment of $40,856,
which they designated for
estimated tax payments this


year.
Among the charitable
donations in 2007 was $26,270
to Trinity United Church of
Christ, where incendiary
sermons of Obama's former
pastor have created problems
for the candidate.


Material


Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"



Alphonso Jackson was good for Black America


GIANT
continued from 6D

Jackson began.
I personally on a
few occasions took
Black business
owners to meet with
Secretary Jackson on
an introductory basis.
He would sit there
and asked pointed
questions of them
and, in conclusion,
would offer pointed
advice about who
to see and what
approach to take. It
was like going to see
Solomon. Many of
our members would
connect with success.
Some eventually
won competitive
multi-million dollar
contracts and found
their businesses going


to two or three phases
higher in their career
paths. Never once did
Secretary Jackson or


arty of his staff ask
about the political
persuasion of any of
the business owners.


Never!! The fact is
most of the successful
ones were Democratic
but it didn't matter.


Miami-Dade County
Mayor Carlos Alvarez
participates in the
third Miami-Dade
Wireless Pilot Project
launch, on April 10, at
Goulds Park. For six
months, free wireless
service, sponsored by
Wialan Technologies,
will be available at
Goulds Park.
In addition to the
free wireless service,
six laptops have been
placed in the Goulds
recreational center
for residents without
WiFi access. Security
cameras have also
been placed around
the park to allow


for increased public
safety.
"The goal of Wireless
Miami-Dade is to
create an environment
that is technologically
appealing a to
residents, visitors and
businesses; to reach
out to underserved
people who frequent
our parks with their
families and friends;
and to establish and
maintain community
safety," Mayor Alvarez
said. "I am confident
that our residents
in South Dade will
take full advantage of
the newly connected
and secured Goulds


Park."
Since the wireless
project kickoff just
two months ago in
Tropical Park and


then Tamiami Park,
more than 1,800
residents have made
more than 4,000
wireless connections.


Gas, food costs drive retail sales up slightly


By John Waggoner

Retail sales rose in
March, but economists
aren't cheering: Most of
the gain in sales came
at the gas station and
not at the mall.
The Commerce
Department said
Monday that retail
sales rose 0.2% last
month, to $381.4
billion. Excluding gas
sales, which were
pushed up 1.1% by
rising gas prices, retail
sales were flat.
Soaring grain and
dairy prices pushed
up the value of sales
at food and beverage
stores by 0.4%.


Glover gets

backing for

Haitian film
CARACAS
Lawmakers are
spending $19.7 million
to back an independent
movie directed by
actor Danny Glover,
a supporter of
Venezuelan President
Hugo Chavez.
The National
Assembly on
Wednesday approved
$9.8 million for
Toussaint, a film
about Haitian rebel
leader Toussaint
Louverture, after
previously approving
$9.9 million. The most
recent funding was
announced on the
assembly's website.
The movie will


Contact Name:
Contact Number:
E Mail:


"Higher gas prices
and higher food prices
played a big role in
giving us a higher (retail
sales) number," says
Paul Kasriel, economic
research chief at
Northern Trust.
On a quarterly basis,
retail sales for the first
three months of 2008
are the weakest in
nearly six years.
Biggest losers: Sales
at building materials
and supply stores fell
1.6%. Sales at furniture
stores fell for the ninth
consecutive month.
Consumers have been
hammered by higher
prices for items they
must buy on a daily


DANNY GLOVER
be produced by
Glover's independent
company Louvertoure
Films with support
from Cinema Villa,
Venezuela's state film
studio. Louvertoure
Films produces
-movies of "historical
relevance, social
purpose, commercial
value and artistic
integrity," according
to the company's
website.


basis. For example, gas
prices soared 7% from
February to March,
hitting an average
$3.24 a gallon, the
government says. Corn
prices rose 24.5% the
first quarter, according
to Bloomberg News.
Higher prices for
necessities means less
money in the family
budget for new clothes,
autos and other
extras.
Some economists
say the new retail sales
report wasn't as bad
as it could have been
- and, in fact, that
consumer spending
could rebound in the
second half of the


year.
"For those warning
of a consumer-
spending recession,
(the report) was soft,
but it wasn't falling off
a cliff," says Alexander
Paris, president of
Barrington Research,
an investment firm
based in Chicago. "If
spending is about flat,
that's not too bad."
Even though
consumer spending is
stalled, incomes are
still growing, Paris
says. And while the
unemployment rate
rose to 5.1% in March,
Paris doesn't think
joblessness will soar,
either.


House votes to boost spending on Africa
The House of that has helped save
Representatives voted more than 1 million
Wednesday to triple lives in Africa. Every
U.S. humanitarian day, 6,000 people
spending on fighting are infected with
AIDS, malaria and the HIV virus, said
tuberculosis in House Foreign Affairs
Africa and other Committee Chairman
stricken areas of the Howard Berman,
world. About $41 D-Calif.
billion of the $50 The White House
billion over five years backs the plan, and
would be devoted to a Senate panel has
AIDS, significantly approved a similar
expanding a program bill.

PUBLIC NOTICE
Brownsville Community
Development Corporation
located at 4520 N.W. 27th Avenue, Suite 3 Mi-
ami, Florida 33142 is applying for the 21st Cen-
tury Orant that will offer an Afterschool Program
to the children in the Brownsville/Liberty City
area.
305-636-2046


Reynaldo Palma, Senior Procurement Contracting Officer
305-585-6919
reynaldo.palma@jhsmiami.org


CRITICAL INFORMATION

Non Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference Monday, May 5, 2008, 9 AM Local Time
Date, Time and Location: Institute Annex Building, 4th Floor.
Conference Room 410
Bid Due Date & Time and Location Thursday May 22, 2008, 2:00 PM Local Time
Procurement Management Department
Jackson Memorial Hospital
East Tower, Room B-066
Miami, Florida 33136

The work consists of furnishing all materials, labor and equipment necessary to demolish, remove debris
and salvage as directed the Urgent Care Center (UCC) as described and as shown on the demolition plans
and specifications. Close coordination with sub-contractor(s) responsible for the underground utility
systems, Infection Control Risk Assessment (ICRA) compliance and other activities associated with this
Project shall be required. The Scope of Work encompasses the complete demolition of the Urgent Care
Center and adjacent areas, including the relocation of an existing electrical power panel. The extent of
demolition is defined in the Construction Documents prepared by HKS, the Architect, which is made part of
the ITB Items identified as "salvage items" in the construction document plans shall be removed and
carefully stored on an on-site facility or as per owner's direction.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1'*1 l Mayor Alvarez launches third wireless

~ Miami-Dade pilot project at Goulds Park


. Ui'*


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Invitation to Bid (ITB) 08-6053-RP,
Urgent Care Center (UCC) Demolition

Bids are hereby solicited and will be received on behalf of the Jackson Health System-Public Health
Trust of Miami-Dade County in the Procurement Management Department, 1611 NW 12th Avenue, Holtz
Center, Room B-066, Miami, FL 33136 on the date indicated below. The ITB solicitation document can
be obtained at the same location at this time. There will be a $50.00 non-refundable charge for the plans
and specs. Payment may be made by personal check, company check, money order, or cashier's check.
Checks and other such instruments of funds shall be made out to the Jackson Health Systems Public
Health Trust. This ITB includes a CWP allocation and an incentive for "Small Business Enterprise" sub-
contracting. This competitive ITB process is governed at this time by the "Cone of Silence" in accordance
with County Ordinance No. 98-106. Only the Procurement Department Representative shown below
may be contacted regarding this ITB.

Procurement Department Representative


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE:
INITIAL CHARTER REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE INITIAL ORGANIZATIONAL CHAR-
TER REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING WILL BE HELD TUESDAY, APRIL 29,
2008 AT 7:00 P.M., CITY HALL, 17011 ND 19 AVENUE 4TH FLOOR CON-
FERENCE ROOM (#400), NORTH MIAMI BEACH,.FLORIDA.

Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard City Attorney

NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the city coun-
cil with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall
insure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is make including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F/S286.0105); 2) In ac-
cordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodation to participated in the proceeding should contact the
Office of the City Clerk no later than tow (2) days prior to the proceeding. Tele-
phone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone our TDD
line at (305) 948-2029 for assistance.




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