Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00542
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: April 9, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00542
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text



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Volume 85 Number 29 MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 9-15, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


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Raising a spoiled generation


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn
Most recently, I stood in line
at my local grocery store and,
thank God, I wasn't in a rush
because that line long and was
moving slowly. I had hoped
that one of the cashiers would
open another register but,
unfortunately, they didn't and
my ice cream was beginning
to melt.
I stopped paying attention to
the line when a family ahead of


me got my attention. A mother
with her three kids between
the ages of approximately
four and ten became the focal
point of nearly everyone in the
front of the store. These kids
were getting on my nerves and
they were not listening to their
mother at all. They were loud,
touching everything on the
shelf and trying to get their
mother to buy everything they
wanted.
The mother was extremely
embarrassed as people in line


began to stare at her and the
kids. Finally out of frustration,
the woman grabbed her kids
and threatened to beat them
when they got home. That
didn't stop them.
The woman finally
approached the check out and
her youngest child noticed
that her siblings had put
whatever they wanted into the
shopping cart, so this child
took Laffy Taffy candy off
the shelf and put it into the
cart. The mother scolded her


and put the candy back in its
place on the shelf. The child
started crying--piercing the
customers' eardrums. To avoid
further embarrassment, the
mother put the crying child's
candy into the basket and
paid for all of the kids stuff. At
the end, she didn't even have
enough money so she ended
up leaving the ground beef,
pasta, and cheese that she
had hoped to purchase.
As a child, I remember
Please turn to SPOILED 6A


'Magic City Children's Zone' in Liberty City
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


In efforts to improve the family structure
in the inner-city neighborhoods,
House Speaker Marco Rubio (District
111-Miami), Senator Larcenia J. Bullard
(District 39-Miami), and Representative
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall (District
109-Miami) filed a bill to create a "Magic
City Children's Zone" in Miami.
"In America today, we have a crisis of
historic proportions. It is the tragic tale
of what is happening to young African
American males. These are gifted young
men and our nation is not benefiting
from their talents. Many are also absent
fathers, and so we have hundreds of
thousands of young single mothers left
to struggle alone with their children,"
says Rubio.
The purpose of the children's zone is
to restore disadvantaged areas through
programs and services for children and
families living within its boundaries,
giving residents the power to take
back their streets. Programs that will
be offered include: Education Health
and Wellness, Parent and Guardian


At the Florida Senate in Tallahassee pictured with Senator Larcenia Bullard is also Rep.
Dorothy Bendross-Mindingall from Miami.


Support, Community Safety, Housing
and Community Development, and
Early Development and Childcare. The


program will be based at the Belafonte
Tacolcy Center which is located at 6161
Please turn to CHILDREN ZONE 6A


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Schools begin open

enrollment lor

choice program
By Sandra J. Charity
scharite@miamitimesoniii e. omi
It's that time of the yeir again. Openenrollment for
choice program will befrom April 14 to May 2.
In January 8, 2002, President Bush signed the No Child
Left Behind (NCLB) Act, iwich requires that "all children
have a fair, equal, and signifiant opportunity to obtain a
high-quality education and reach, at a minimum,:
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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


Charlton Heston

and Alzheimer's
Most of us will remember Charlton Heston as a
brilliant actor and an activist who marched with
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the Civil Rights
struggle of the 1960s. But Heston, who died Saturday at the
age of 84, will now be remembered in a large way for calling
national attention to the disease that killed him and has
become a mounting threat to millions of people who have
managed to live past 70.
We will never forget the brilliant actor who gave us superb
performances in Ben Hur and The Ten Commandments. But
now we hope those movie fans will see the movie Away From
Her, where Julie Christie won an Oscar nomination this
year.
Many people in our community, have no doubt, from time
to time have asked the question, 'what ever happened to?'
some person who we have known for a long time, but have
not seen or have heard from in a long time. Most likely that
person is a victim of Alzheimer's. it's a subject people are
hesitant to discuss, like cancer and AIDS.
Alzheimer's places a massive burden, too, on caregivers
as their loved ones disappear into the fogs of a condition
that claims memory and personality. That different kind of
anguish has increasingly been documented.
We hope that Heston's death will help others to meet this
terrible disease head-on and hope that a cure for Alzheimer's
will soon be found.


BAAB speaks out on violence at
Miami Edison Senior High School
Dear Editor:
The Miami-Dade Black Affairs Advisory Board (BAAB), which
reports to the Miami Dade Board of County Commissioners, has
worked with the Miami Dade Schools Police and other community-
based organizations over the years to bring attention to the status
of youth in our community.
Briefly, members of the BAAB met with Chief Darling and
Assistant Chief Charles Martin over a period of time in an effort to
implement several programs including the Truancy Hotline, which
would allow residents or citizens to call a centralized number
305-371-SKIP to report truant students. Additionally, as part of
a collaborative effort, the Schools Police Department initiated a
Civil Citation Program, which gives officers the option of writing
students a citation as opposed to taking them directly to the
Juvenile Assessment Center, thereby allowing students to avoid
the criminal justice system, a move we wholeheartedly supported.
We have also proposed "Diversion Centers" instead of "Outdoor
Suspension."
The BAAB has held several "Respect Life! Village Dialogues"
most notably two "Generation Rap" sessions in both the north and
south ends of the county in which students had an opportunity
to voice their opinions and give adults their view of the state of
their lives. We further introduced our "Anti-Violence Ambassador"
and gunshot survivor Robert Boseman, Jr., who gives a firsthand
testimony on being a victim of gun violence.
We realize that what happened at Miami Edison is unfortunate
and should be dealt with in a fair and unbiased manner for all
involved parties. We also believe that every child at every school
deserves to be educated in an arena free of violence and that it is
the responsibility of each child to take advantage of all educational
services available to them. We further realize that our youth
deserve the opportunity to receive a decent education and that
if we fail them, we plan the failure of our children, our city and
nation.
We invite feedback by asking that concerned citizens call our
office at 305- 375-4606 to provide information and support in this
"Village" effort.
D. J. Fabien, Chair
Miami-Dade County
Black Affairs Advisory Board

Financial reparations should

be a part of the apology
Dear Editor:
I was reading the article in the April 2, 2008 issue of the
Miami Times about "Florida Apologizing for Slavery." I agree with
Attorney H.T. Smith that's not enough. The Jews received financial
reparation for their injustice.
Financial reparation should be given to every Negro college to
help educate the descendant's children. Our ancestors were denied
of an education and was treated with injustice.
Legislators should make sure this happens. There is no apology
big enough for the way another human being was treated, and
denied of being human (and still).
Maybe the state didn't have to apologize, but every state knows
what happened to our ancestors wasn't right, for people to be
treated worse than animals.
We were denied of everything, places we couldn't go to enjoy as
others (some still). Limit on voting act.
After reading your article, I thought I would right you so I hope
it is alright.
Sincerely,
Willie P. Stephens


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OPINION


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


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Broward County expects to break ground next month on
a $60 million dollar Gospel complex and Education Center
named for popular, gospel TV giant Dr. Bobby Jones. Gov.
Crist vetoed $900,000 in state funding for the project last
year, but grants and fundraising are expected to bring in
about $30 million. Stay tuned.
*********
Former Miami Edison and Gulliver Prep star Sylvia
Fowles will possibly be the first chosen later this year when
the women pros select their draft picks. The outstanding
Haitian lassie who stands 6.6 inches came up big in a one
point buzzer beater loss to Tennessee Sunday with 24 points
and 20 rebounds in the final game of her college career.
She posted 86 double-doubles, an SEC record, during her
career.
*********
Scam artists are back at work and still taking advantage
of the old and gullible who fall for their schemes. An elderly
woman lost $9,000 in the old 'pigeon drop' hustle last week
at the Northside Shopping Center when two men conned her
into taking the money out of her credit union account at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
*********
House Speaker Marco Rubio is under fire with State
transportation officials for helping his friend, South Florida
fuel distributor, Max Alvarez get a $265 million turnpike
deal. It looks like the old political game of 'greasing the skids'
for the lobbyists and big campaign contributions.
*********
The long-standing court feud over financial matters at Fort
Lauderdale's new Mt. Olive Baptist Church is still going on
among disgruntled membership factions, former trustee
board members Nathaniel Green, Patricia Davis, Kevin
Mitchell and Kenneth Mullins are questioning $53 million
in church deposits that are not accounted for. Stay tuned.
Miami-Dade County can't win for losing. Latest scandal
blossoming is an audit on Metrorail's Security in August
2006 that suggested that the Wackenhut agency had billed
the county for $1.6 million over a three-year period for work
its employees were never paid for. Auditor Cathy Jackson
reported her findings, but nothing was ever done about it.
Wackenhut denied the charges. Stay tuned.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


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Does racial profiling still exist in our community?


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MICHAEL MCGHEE, 38
Electrician, Miami

Racial
profiling does
still exist.
It hasn't
happened to
me personally
but I have seen
it happen to
those around.

JAMAL JOHNSON, 20
Student/Musician, Liberty City

I have never
had to deal
with racial
profiling and
I 'don't think
there is a lot
of that in this
area. I think
that we all get
treated pretty much the same
way. If I went to Pembroke
Pines that would be a whole
another story.


NADIA BASTIEN, 31
Beauty Consultant, North Miami

Yeah, I think
that racial
profiling does
still exist.
Unfortunately,
it has
happened to
me personally
and those
around me. I just had to deal
with it.


WILLIE GRIFFIN, 52
Disabled, Richmond Heights

It still does
exist. I see it
every day in my
neighborhood.
It happens
in the
restaurants,
grocery stores,
and with
the police. It's sad but it has
happened to me personally.


MARY, 18
Student, Liberty City

No, I don't
think that
racial profiling
happensinthis
community.
I have never
personally
been a victim
of it.


ARTHUR, 50
Maintenance Worker, Liberty City

R a c i al
profiling does
still exist and
I don't want to
be prejudice
but it happens
a lot to the
Iranian
business
owners. People wonder what
are they doing in an all Black
community.


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Black teen STD rate needs our attention


By Yolanda Young


Once again, fr
a study has
found a wide
gap between
Blacks and
whites, and yet
again the news
is not good for
African-Americans.
The latest study, according to
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention, shows that
an alarming 48% of African-
American girls ages 14-19 have
a sexually transmitted disease,
compared with 20% of young
white and Mexican-American
females. The CDC analyzed
data on 838 female adolescents
who participated in the 2003-04
National Health and Nutrition
Examination Survey. The
researchers found that Black
teens had far greater rates
of common STDs, including
human papillomavirus (HPV),
chlamydia, : herpes simplex
virus and trichomoniasis.
Sadly, this is not a new
trend.
Though this study did not


include syphilis, gonorrhea
or HIV because of their low
prevalence in this age group,
these diseases strike Black
women in lateryears at strikingly
high rates. In 2006, the rate of
chlamydia cases among Black
women was more than seven
times that of white women; the
gonorrhea rate among African-
American women was 18 times
greater than for whites; and the
rate of syphilis cases in Black
women was 16 times higher
than in white women.

WHY THE DISPARITY?
STDs are concentrated
in poor, segregated
neighborhoods.
Sexuality of teens starts
earlier and earlier, heightened
by music lyrics and images on
television.
More than 20% of Blacks
are uninsured. So without
access to health care, more
Blacks with STDs go untreated
while the diseases are often
undetected.
The significance of this
problem can't be overstated, as
STDs also can cause infertility


and cervical cancer.
What can be done? The
CDC suggests sex with an
uninfected monogamous
partner and habitual condom
use. Abstinence, of course, is
the surest way to avoid STDs.
But advice isn't enough. With
incidence levels already high
among young Black women,
more emphasis should be placed
on STD screening, treatment,
and vaccinations at health
clinics where contraceptive
services are also offered.
Ultimately, we must reverse
this trend of early sexual
activity. The CDC suggests that
sex education delays sexual
activity among teens.
What else might influence
girls? Father figures who
affirm them and women who
demonstrate responsible
sexual behavior that girls could
emulate. This is not science,
just my opinion based on what
I've seen.
But one thing we should all
agree on is that this is an issue
that Blacks can't afford to
ignore. We need more talking
and less doing.


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Iraq's Sadr calls for massive march against U.S. occupation


Anti-U.S. Shiite cleric
Muqtada al-Sadr called on Iraqis
)n Thursday to demonstrate in
millions next week to protest
:he U.S. occupation of Iraq.
In a statement issued by Sadr
)ffice in the holy Shiite city
)f Najaf, Sadr called on Iraqi
Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds to
march to Najaf, some 160 km
3outh of Baghdad, on April 9
marking the fifth anniversary of
:he fall of Baghdad.
"Time has come to express


your rejection and raise your
voices loud against the unjust
occupier, the enemy of the
peoples. and humanity and
against the horrible massacres
which have been committed
against our people," Sadr said
in the statement.
He called on demonstrators
to carry national flags to show
their unity and demand the
independence of their country,
Sadr said.
In 2004, Sadr led his Mahdi


Army militia in two uprisings
against U.S. forces, before
taking part in Iraq's political
process.
Last week, Sadr militia fought
fierce battles in southern Iraqi
city of Basra with U.S.-backed
Iraqi security forces, as Iraqi
security forces launched a
massive offensive, dubbed
"Operation Cavalry Assault"
aimed at restoring order in
the city where instability was
spreading.


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


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Preventing another school uprising


Schools must explore more creative means to deal with

minor misbehavior of their students


By Judith Browne-Dianis

The recent student
rebellion at Miami
Edison Senior High
School was no
surprise. In fact, it
was inevitable. For
almost ten years,
Advancement Project-
-a national civil rights
organization--has
watched in districts throughout
the country, including Miami-
Dade, the type of harsh and
unfair treatment of students
that led to the recent clash
between students and police at
Miami Edison. This incident
is the foreseeable result of
a progression of destructive
policies and practices within
schools in Miami and elsewhere
- the proverbial pot of boiling
water that finally overflowed.
How long can youth be
criminalized unfairly without
backlash?
Inrecentyears, school districts
throughout Florida, including


Miami-Dade County Public
Schools, have adopted a variety
of harsh, 'zero tolerance'
school discipline policies
directed at minor
S misconduct. At the
same time, most districts
.have turned to law
enforcement to handle
discipline. The effect
has been the creation
of a "schoolhouse-to-
jailhouse track," in which
Florida schools increasingly
use punitive measures such as
suspensions, expulsions, and
school-based arrests to deal with
student misbehavior, and huge
numbers of youth especially
students of color are being
pushed out of school and into
the juvenile and criminal justice
systems for minor misconduct.
Yes, we want safe schools;
yet, these practices do not
accomplish this goal. In
2006-07, there were 22,926
delinquency referrals from
Florida schools, and two-thirds
of them were for misdemeanors.


Throughout the state, reports
of abusive treatment of
students by law enforcement
and unnecessary long-term
out-of-school suspensions are
extremely common. These
policies and practices have a
corrosive effect on schools, and
can be particularly damaging for
Black students, who are more
than twice as likely as their


White peers to be suspended
or arrested in school in Florida.
We have got to fix our schools,
not arrest our children.
Indeed, national research on
'zero tolerance' has concluded
that such policies are associated
with student and teacher
perceptions of aless effective and
inviting school climate. There
is also no credible evidence that
'zero tolerance' policies improve
student behavior, but they have


been associated with lower
academic achievement and
lower graduation rates. This
should be of particular concern
in Florida, where the statewide
graduation rate is only 61%,
and 47% for Black students.

WHAT HAPPENED AT EDISON
SHOULD PROMOTE CHANGE
While Miami-Dade's school
arrest rate has declined, there
is clearly more work to be done.
This unfortunate incident
should serve as a lesson
that unfair criminalization


of students is not tolerable.
Instead, the district should use
this as an opportunity for change
that will provide students and
parents with confidence that
the district is invested in the
future of its students. Across
the country, school districts
are moving away from 'zero
tolerance' toward the creation of
safe, effective schools through
prevention and interventions.
These districts are placing


renewed emphasis on resolving
low-level misconduct iri) the
classroom; focusing on using
developmentally appropriate
disciplinary techniques that
limit the amount of time spent
outside of class; treating
misbehavior as a teachable
moment, rather than as a
chance to punish; stressing
the importance of fairness and
uniformity, and the elimination
of racial disparities; and calling
upon law enforcement only for
serious or immediate threats to
safety.

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE
Many districts, including
some that have been plagued by
serious violence, have adopted
"Restorative Justice" programs
for addressing student
misconduct and creating a
positive learning environment.
Restorative Justice, which
has been implemented by
the Chicago Public Schools,
Minneapolis Public Schools,
and the Denver Public
Schools, among many others,
is an approach to discipline
that has a proven record of
success in involving students
directly in resolving conflict,


reducing school violence and
misbehavior, and increasing
students' commitment to
their education. For a school
like Edison, and many others
throughout Florida, adopting
a Restorative Justice approach
may prove to be just the change
that is needed.
Regardless of the approach
taken, districts should heed
the recommendation presented
by the Florida Blueprint
Commission on Juvenile
Justice, which stressed the
importance of eliminating 'zero
tolerance' for all but the most
serious offenses, and instead
using alternatives to suspension
and other punitive options.
Not only would this be a more
just approach for the children
of Florida and represent
more sound educational and
economic policy, it may prevent
a replay of the ugly incident at
Edison.
Browne-Dianis is the co-
director of Advancement Project,
a national civil rights organization
that advances universal
opportunity, equity and access
for those left behind in America.
For more information, please visit
www. advancementproject. org


"We have got to fix our schools, not arrest
our children"


PROMTE OURBVINE S' Y JINIG OR BSINES SRVIE CNNETIO


BL.ACKS. MUST CONIROI_ ITlIR OWN SIIN









6A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


Fearing the penniless path


Young people fear to be in
the same financial crisis
as their parents

Sandra J. Charite
sclarite@niianuitimesoniline.conf i

All across the country,
young people are witnessing
and feeling the tension of their
parents' economic despair.
Although they are hurting for
their parents, many of them fear
that they are may be heading
down the same penniless path.
Young people are afraid of
homelessness, debt from loans,
that their money will run out,
and the possibility that their
parents will divorce.
Young people have expressed
the anxiety that they experience
from their parents and the
constant report from the media
about the gas prices, cost of
tuition, out of control debt,
foreclosures, and recession.
Here in South Florida, young
people express their thoughts:
"I worry a lot. Honestly, I feel
that the status of the economy
does have a major impact on
our generation. Right now, I am


in college and I have to take on
loans. It feels like we are living
on nickels. It's getting harder
than ever before. The only thing
that I am more worried about
is when I have kids. I wonder
if I11 be able to provide their
necessary needs and support
their education," says Miami
college student, Miriam Lixme.
"Our generation will definitely
be poor. The way things are,
the future doesn't look bright,
money wise, for our future,"
says 20 year-old, Alexandra
Gaspard.
"I worry about my kids. It
seems like we are not leaving
anything for them right now.
I don't want them to have to
struggle," says 38 year old
father, Derek Chang.
"I think that we are being left
with a diminishing economy
of our fathers and mothers.
I don't see any way for us to
be able to repay those debts.
Houses are more expensive, we
might not have social security
and the minimum wage seems
to be stagnant. I hate to say
'penniless' but it seems like
we've dealt a hand that we can't
possibly win," says FIU student
Antonette Whiteman.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY












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Success

Magazine honors

Barbara Jordan
Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Barbara J.
Jordan was named Public
Official of the Year and she
is listed among the nation's
Black movers and shakers
in Success South Florida
Magazine's 50MostInfluential
Black Professionals of 2007.
Commissioner Jordan
tenaciously advocates for
those who can't fight for
themselves, she tackles
the tough issues that are
controversial and sometimes
contentious, but are always
for the betterment of the
community at large. It is
Commissioner Jordan's
lifelong display of these
outstanding leadership
attributes that helped her to
win this prestigious honor.
The list, which appears
this month in the magazine's
Black power issue, includes
nationally recognizable
names like radio personality
Tom Joyner, award winning
author Edwidge Danticat and
power attorney Willie Gary.
Commissioner. Jordan and
the other individuals were
honored at a reception hosted


BARBARA JORDAN
by Success South Florida
Magazine, March 22.
The honorees, were
selected from hundreds of
nominations, represent a
variety of industries including
law, media, art, medicine,
banking and education.
"I am humbled by this
honor and recognition
by my community," said
Commissioner Jordan. "I am
happy to serve the residents of
Miami-Dade County and that
is its own reward, but I am
also very honored to be listed
among such distinguished
personalities like University
of Miami's football coach
Randy Shannon and Florida
Memorial University president
Dr. Karl Wright."


CHILDREN ZONE
continued from 1A


NW 9th Avenue.
A similar Children's Zone
was formed in New York
called "Harlem Children's
Zone" (HCZ) which has served
more than 13,000 children
and adults, including over
10,000 at-risk children. The
success of the program has
created nationwide attention.
The HCZ Project has formed
opportunities for children
living in Harlem by helping
parents, residents, and even
teachers produce a safe
learning environment for the
youth. The outcomes of the
program has transformed
the minds of residents who
live in poor and devastated
communities, showing them
that the possibility of success
starts on the inside.
"It has been said it takes a
whole village to raise a child and
I strongly believe that it is our
responsibility to provide every


opportunity for our children,"
said Senator Bullard. "These
children need a glimmer of
hope, and depend on us to
deliver it. If this program
worked in Harlem, it will surely
work here. This is our chance
to grab this opportunity and
show its effectiveness to the
community and the State of
Florida."
The Children's Zone passed
the House last year but it did
not pass the Senate. This year
it has been expanded with
proposed programs in both
Miami and Jacksonville.
"It is intolerable and
unacceptable that an entire
segment of our population
has come to believe that
the American Dream .is. not
available to them. And we
can never be the nation God
intended us to be so long as
this tragedy persists. If we
accomplish this, it will serve
as a lesson to the rest of this
nation on how to address what
is a national tragedy, says
Rubio.


,t p e






"Copyrighted Material.


Syndicated Content --


Available from Commercial News Providers'


There are many challenges to overcome when raising a child


SPOILED
continued from 6A

going to the store with my
parents and watching the little
white kids act up or throw
tantrums in the store and my
mother would give me that
look which said, "Child, I wish
you would act up like that".
It was always expected in the
Black community that our kids
were the most disciplined and
respectful in and out of the
households. We answered our
elders with "yes, ma'am" and
"no, sir". We knew that if mama
didn't buy us what we wanted in
the store, we dare not complain
or even try to throw a fit. So why
and how has the script been
flipped in such a short time?
This goes beyond throwing a
fit or not getting what they want.
Black households in particular
have spent larger percentages
of their incomes paying credit
card and other high-interest


rate debt, heading closer to
foreclosure and bankruptcy
while enriching lenders. We are
the number one race in debt
while being the number one
consumers.

WHAT OTHERS SAY
"I think that these kids are
very spoiled. Some of these
parents are going far beyond
their means. We have created a
dangerous trend," says Sharon
Pikes, mother of two from North
Miami. I have seen parents
struggle to pay rent as their
children walk around in Baby
Phat jeans and Sean John duds,
while texting on their iphones.
Seriously, the iphones could
have been forfeited to pay some
bills or half of that mortgage.
In fact, a couple of years ago,
some of the Black community
was furious with comedian Bill
Cosby for arguing that there
was a lack of role models for
young black children and a


misrepresentation of the family
structure within the Black
community. "Your dirty laundry
gets out of school at 2:30 every
day, it's cursing and calling
each other [the N-word] as
they're walking up and down
the street. They think they're
hip. They can't read. They


can't write. They're laughing
and giggling, and they're going
nowhere," says Cosby.
Speaking about some of
her peers, Mildred Guerrier, a
local college student, says, "my
generation is very materialistic
and extremely spoiled. Instead
of educating themselves, they
are focused on their status or
their material possessions. They
praise Beyonce and Paris Hilton


rather than acknowledging
the accomplishments of a
Condoleeza Rice or an Oprah
Winfrey. Some of them are like,
'If I have this outfit then people
will like me'."
Liberty City resident and
mother Estella Brown echoes
that sentiment: "Today, kids are


very selfish. They are spoiled
and stuck in their material
possessions. Unfortunately,
many of them are being raised
by young parents who do not
establish any morals in their
households, so how can they
expect the kids to have morals
if they don't themselves?" She
advises, "We need to teach
these kids how to respect
authority, their elders, and


most importantly, themselves.
These young parents cannot do
it themselves so let's go back to
old school when the child was
being raised by a village. Stop
trying to be your child's friend
and teach them something that
will carry them through life".

PARENTAL
RESPONSIBILITIES
As parents, we have an
obligation to teach these kids
the fundamentals that will
guide them through life. These
things cannot be taught by
an iPod, a pair of Nike shoes,
makeup, video games, or cell
phones, especially when you
can't honestly afford these
items. No one is saying that you
can't provide your kids with the
luxuries of life but there are
more important values that need
to be developed that will carry
them much farther and more
successfully through life than
those external attachments.


A word problem every parent
should be able to solve: If little
Johnny can't pass the FCAT, why
are you spending $300 worth
of new clothes on him? If little
Suzie keeps on skipping school,
then why\is mommy and daddy
still paying Suzie's cell phone
bill which is over two-hundred
dollars a month? If little Michael
can't respect your rules, why
do you allow him to participate
on the basketball team or any
other extra curricular activities
at school?

SOLUTION
The concern should not
be on' penalizing these kids
but teaching them how to
value wisely, helping them
to develop character to avoid
the perpetuation of a spoiled
generation which lacks the
morality, discipline, and the
respect of others, their elders,
and eventually their own self
value.


- a1w p e A r

4b Itmom


"We need to teach these kids how to respect authority,
their elders, and most importantly, themselves.









BLACKS MUST CONTRIOI IIElR O\VN DESfINY'


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


9 skycaps win $325,000 in tips in suit over curbside fees


By Dan Reed

A federal jury in Boston
on Monday determined that
American Airlines (AMR)
diverted more than $325,000
in tips from nine skycaps over
the past two years since it
imposed a $2 fee for curbside
bag checking.
Now the attorney who
represented the nine skycaps,
all of whom worked at Boston's
Logan Airport, wants to certify
the case as a class-action
suit on behalf of hundreds of
skycaps who work mostly as
contractors for American at
about 60 airports across the
USA.
She also is looking into


filing similar lawsuits against
other airlines that in recent
years have imposed curbside
baggage check fees.
"This judgment proves that
human beings are willing
to pay tips to those who
help them make their trips
a little more bearable," said
Shannon Liss-Riordan, a
Boston employment attorney
who represented the skycaps
against American. The airline,
she said, "stuffed its hands
into the pockets of some of
its lowest-paid workers and
redirected their tip money to
its own coffers."
The jury found that American
violated a Massachusetts
tipping law and interfered


A passenger collected his bags near the skycaps at American Airlines
at Logan Airport last month.The nine skycaps in the lawsuit will receive
amounts ranging from $3,066 to $64,138. -Dominic Chavez


in the customary tips-based
relationship skycaps have
with travelers.
Tim Smith, a spokesman
for Fort Worth-based
American, said the carrier "is
disappointed by the verdict
and the amount awarded" and
is evaluating its legal options.
The case stems from
American's decision in 2005 to
begin charging customers $2
for each bag checked curbside.
The change angered the
company's skycaps, who are
paid like restaurant waiters
- below minimum wage,
augmented by customers'
tips.
Liss-Riordan argued that
travelers mistook American's


new service fee, which the
skycaps were required to
charge, as a tip that went to
the skycaps, and therefore did
not tip at all, or tipped less
than they had before.
Liss-Riordan said American
managers forecast in company
planning documents in 2005
that the airline would get $16
million to $20 million a year
in "savings/revenues" from
the curbside bag checking fee.
But, she said, the documents
also showed that the carrier's
cost of employing skycaps and
their contracting companies
was only about $7 million
nationwide, leaving $9 million
to $13 million in profit for the
airline.


% 1.K Jr. aim



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Most Cubans can't afford new freedoms


By Alan Gomez

For the first time in decades,
Cubans can stroll' through
and even spend a night in the
Nacional and the Riviera, iconic
hotels with ocean views that
had previously been reserved
for tourists.
But the average salary for
Cuban workers is $19 a month,
and a night in a hotel runs at
least $150, so some Cubans see
the gesture as an empty one.
"You have to save up a whole
year to stay in a hotel room one
night," says Oscar Espinosa, a
Havana economist.
The opening of hotels was
among a series of changes rolled
out in recent weeks by Rau'l
Castro, who officially became
Cuba's president in February,
replacing his ailing brother
Fidel.
For the first time in their lives,
Cubans can legally buy DVD
players, microwaves, cellphones
and computers.
Some Cubans snatched up
the long-forbidden electronics
and took their first steps inside
Havana's signature hotels,
according to the Associated
Press. What the changes
mean for average Cubans and
whether they are a sign of


A woman receives a money order in a post office in Havana on
Thursday. DVD DVD players, flat screen televisions, French cosmetics
and Uruguayan steaks are now available to anyone who can afford them
at elite stores in Cuba, but few on the island can afford such goods.


broader economic and political
changes to come on the island
is a mystery.
U.S. Commerce Secretary
Carlos Gutierrez dismisses
the changes as meaningless,
saying they don't even begin
to address the low wages and
other economic problems facing
the island.
"I think it's sad that after 50
years of suffering and 50 years
of repression ... that the Cuban
people are now going to be able


By Javier Galeano, AP
to buy a toaster oven," he says.
"It's sad that people see this as
reform."
Espinosa says the changes
are superficial because the few
people who can afford expensive
electronics could already get
them on the island through
the black market. Though
computers are available,
access to the Internet is heavily
restricted, he says.
"These changes don't mean
anything," says Espinosa, who


was jailed in 2003 during a
sweep of dozens of critics of the
regime.
Vicki Huddleston, a former
head of the U.S. Interests
Section in Havana, sees hope.
She says the changes are
a calculated move by Rau'l
.Castro, who she says does not
have the charisma to win over
Cuba like his brother did. He
knows he must improve the
lives of Cubans to survive, she
says.
"It makes Rau'l look like a
pretty nice guy," says Huddleston
of the Brookings Institution.
Huddleston says Castro's
moves could be the first
steps in a larger plan to
reform the economy: Cuba
could legalize or expand the
few private industries, such
as restaurants, taxis and
computer services. Such an
action, along with agricultural
changes announced in recent
weeks and an easing of travel
restrictions, could put Cuba on
a path similar to that of China's
shift toward a market economy,
she says.
"When you look at the
Chinese model, they did
agricultural (reform) and more
of this entrepreneurial thing,"
she says.


.a Ua a w d f -








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


, .,A, . , ,, , ` r.',XW, JA'ANM I.,,IsWPA / 'A 5/ A'.l I A I l k lM ll


Medium A
Cooked Shrimp .........4 99b
Farm-Raised, Previously Frozen,
41 to 50 per Pound
: -: ..-;,G -SAVEUPTO5.O00 LB


Boar's Head
Italian Half Sub / 39
Combo...................... -
Tavern Ham, Genoa Salami. Capicola,
and Provolone Cheese, Choice of Toppings,
Medium Drink, and Dirty Chips, each
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE
(Publix, each ... 5.89)


Italian Bread ............
Handmade in Our Bakery,
Baked Fresh Throughout the Day,
From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .40.


219


Asparagus.......
Excellent With Hollandaise Sauce,
California-Grown
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE


K ellogg's C ereal ............. .... ... ................... ................ F r
Apple Jacks or Corn Pops, 14.7 or 15-oz, Cocoa Krispies, 17.5 or 18-oz,
Cereal Straws, 8.8-oz, or Grab & Go, 5.3 or 6.4-oz box Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.23


Keebler Chips Deluxe Cookies.............................. F ree
Or Sandies Shortbread, Assorted Varieties, 9.5 to 18-oz pkg.
Quantity rights reserved,
SAVE UP TO 4.07


Nabisco
Ritz FTre
Crackers........ F ree
Assorted Varieties, 14.5 to 16-oz box
(Excluding Original Ritz, 12-oz box.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.59


12-Pack
Selected Pepsi 1 1 0
Products..... ...... 11
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 3.07 ON 3


Doritos
Tortilla Fr
Chips................ r eeC
Assorted Varieties, 12.25 to 13-oz bag
(Excluding Baked!, Light, and Natural.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3.49


12-Pack1 9
Heineken Beer... 1269-
Or Amstel Light or Heineken Premium Light,
12-oz can or bot.
SAVE UP TO 1.00
(6-Pack Peroni Nastro Azzurro or Assorted
Birra Moretti Beer, 12-oz bot. ... 6.49)


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The Miami Times
I-


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 9-15, 2008


longer victims


still succumb to the effects of
environmental racism?
There was no evidence I
knew of that Lewis' death had
resulted from living in Black
neighborhoods that, because
of racially tinged zoning


with our foreign policy, or by
putting thousands of Black
men in prison in a racially
biased war on drugs. On many
subjects, Wright and other
Black leaders are absolutely
correct.


I routinely hear Blacks say that not only has
nothing changed for Blacks in this country, but
that in fact things have gotten worse. In a survey
last year..., only 20% of Blacks said things have
gotten better for them in the past five years, the
lowest percentage since 1983 ...


Children of our


military men and


women


How are they coping?


By Sylvia Mitchell Sanders
Miami Times Writer

War is hard on families.
The children in those
families have their own
battle to fight each night
as they search for answers
and reassurances that
their dad or their mom


structure. If there are other
military children in the
schools there is an added
comfort and reassurance
that they are not alone in
this situation.
It is an enormous task
for the caretakers of these
children to explain a war
that adults themselves find
difficult to understand.
The children may be left on
their own to sort through


BARACK OBAMA
Presidential Candidate-


By Sheryl McCarthy


Years ago, when the African-
American financier and
multimillionaire Reginald
Lewis died of brain cancer at:
age 50, I heard about a young
Black woman with an MBA who
said she was so discouraged by
Lewis' death that she felt like
giving up her profession. Didn't
Lewis' premature demise prove
that if you're Black, even if you
do all the right things, you could


decisions, had been dumping
grounds for cancer-causing
chemicals. And since he was
among the most gifted and
privileged of men, it seemed .a
huge stretch to paint him as a
victim. But this was the tape
that was playing in that young
woman's mind.
I thought of her when the
controversy broke out over
Barack Obama's relationship
with the Rev. Jeremiah Wright,
since it raises the issue of how
differently many Blacks see the
world vs. those of other races.
The comments for which Wright
is being criticized aren't all
that different from the remarks
one hears from countless other
Black ministers, politicians,
educators and community
leaders of all stripes, in any
venue where lots of Black people
gather.
They might not say "God d--
America!" as Wright did, but
they regularly take America's
leaders to the woodshed for
failing to live up to the country's
ideals whether by provoking
the wiath of Muslims worldwide


FACT-CHALLENGED
ASSERTIONS
Where they go wrong is by
engaging in demagoguery that
paints Blacks as the relentless
victims of racist conspiracies
that have no basis in fact,
such as the often-repeated
claims that the government
intentionally introduced illegal
drugs and the AIDS virus into
Black communities.
These speeches often include
exhortations to activism,
political involvement and
individual self-improvement.
But the charge that whatever's
wrong in the Black community
is the result of "how white
folks do us" is still the default
position, and it plays better
than any other message.
.I routinely hear Blacks say
that not only has nothing
changed for Blacks in this
country, but that in fact things
have gotten worse. In a survey
last year by the Pew Research
Center, only 20% of Blacks said
things have gotten better for
them in the past five years, the
lowest percentage since 1983.


JEREMIAH WRRIGHT
Reverend
Only 44% said they think life
for Blacks will get better in the
future, down from 57% in a
1986 survey.
Yet the amount of progress
Black have made in this country
over time is phenomenal.
The indicators include the
steady increase in the number
of Blacks with high school
diplomas, who have college
degrees or are attending
college; the decline in Black
living in poverty; the increase
in the number of Black elected
officials and the number who
have held Cabinet positions; the
presence of four Black as CEOs
of Fortune 500 companies; the
dominance of Black athletes
in pro sports; and, whether or
not one likes their. music or
the roles. they play, the high
visibility of Black performers in
Please turn to VICTIMS 12B


Men's Day worship
at Hurst Chapel
Join Hurst Chapel A.M.E.
Church on April 13, 11 a.m.
speaker Minister J.D. Patterson
Assistant Director MDPD. 'Our
3 p.m. speaker will be former
representative James Bush III.
The church is located at 10080
west Jessamine St., Perrine.
Leeomia W. Kelly is pastor.


St. Agnes' presents
Norfolk State University
Concert Choir in concert
On Friday April 11 at 7 p.m.
St. Agnes' Episcopal Church
proudly presents The Norfolk
State University concert Choir
in concert. The admission is
free. The church is located at
1750 N.W. 3 Avenue, Father
Richard L. Marquess-Barry,
Rector.


*Y;IXWY_________U___IIIILWIU


APRIL 24-25, 2008


Worship Services

begin at 6:30p.m.


Mary Saunders Park 4750 SW 21ist Street, Wet Park, Florida
(formerly known as Carver Ranches)


No


OBAMA DISTANCED HIMSELF FROM HIS PASTOR IN

ACKNOWLEDGING THE SIGNIFICANT PROGRESS MADE BY

BLACKS AND THE HOPE FOR EVEN GREATER THINGS


I -


CllArid 1 t e it;,A ipf-,,)rnth ar wlldawal on 2""1


.. .. .









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1OB THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


Will our children be able to cope with the war on terror?


KIDS
continued from 9B

your child does not want to talk
about his or her feelings, don't
force them to. Children are
often more comfortable making
a scrapbook or photo album
of the family to send to the
deployed parent. Older children
may even enjoy a group activity
that supports our troops.
An important point to
remember is that as an adult the
child is watching your attitude
and your reactions as well as
listening to your conversations


with other adults. It is okay for
your child to know that you are
concerned about his father or
mother returning home from the
war. Even if you don't tell them
they will pick up on it anyway.
Children need to see adults
taking positive action such as
helping other families or being
active in the community and
their schools. They don't need
to see the parent watching the
news constantly or behaving in
a way that signals they have
lost hope. Adults should try to
keep the home environment as
close to normal as they can.
Children are usually tougher
than we think and they
recover quickly. Most children
of military families grew up


in homes where they had to
uproot themselves from friends
and schools and move to new
cities and start all over again
more than on one occasion.
Most of these children have
experienced a parent being
away for a few months at a
time. Iraq, though, has been
different. We have been in this
war for five years now and some
troops have been deployed as
many as three times. Since
the war began on March 19,
2003, there have been a total
of 3,996 American deaths.
Scripps Howard News Service


has identified nearly 900 U.S.
children who have lost a parent
in the war since the start of the
conflict in Iraq.
The focus of this article has
been on American children.
Imagine for a moment what
the children in Iraq must be
experiencing. So many of
these children have witnessed
firsthand their parents
and siblings being killed,
traumatizing them possibly for
the rest of their lives. UNICEF
is increasingly concerned that
the number of vulnerable
children in Iraq has outstripped
the country's capacity to care
for them. Many are orphaned
and sexual .victims because
they have been separated


from relatives as a result of all
the chaos. In some conflicts
around the world, children
become soldiers just to survive
and even worse children are
forced to perpetrate violence
against their own families
in order to toughen them up
so they can become ruthless
soldiers. War hurts children. It


New Faith Deliverance
Tabernacle. Revival held over for
second week with hosts Pastor
Katrine Forbes and Apostle Billy
Wonders from Chicago, IL. April
8-11. Call 305-694-0836 for
more information.

God Word God Way Church
invites you to worship service on
Sunday, April 13, 11 a.m. and 4
p.m. Elder Reginald Wilkerson,
Pastor. For information call
786-326-3455.

Holy Ghost Faith Deliverance


Embrace Girl Powerl
announces their day at the
fair, featuring members of
Embrace Girl Power! as the
mardi gras parade Grand


doesn't matter what side you're
supporting or who you think is
right or wrong the children
are innocent victims, both in
America and Iraq.
Parents and caretakers on
the home front, be encouraged.
Know that you can have peace
in the middle of the storm;
know that God is your refuge


Ministries invite all to three
nights of street services on
Wednesday--Friday, April 16
to 18 at 6 p.m. Free food and
clothing.Call 786-337-5939
or 305-687-6190 for more
information.
*A.*******
Peace Missionary Baptist
Church invites you to our
Pastor's Anniversary on April
16--27 at 7:30 p.m. nightly and
on Sundays at 3:30 p.m. Rev.
Tracy L. McCloud, D.Min. For
information call 786-312-7469
or 786-389-3266.


Marshalls, on Wednesday, April
9 at the Miami-Dade County
Fair Expo Center. Parade time
is 6:30 p.m. It's a family affair.
For information contact The


and fortress put your trust
in Him and not in what you
see all around you. You are
the biggest influence in your
child's life; show that daughter
or son how they should grow
up to handle life situations
by the example of confidence
in Almighty God that you live
before them now.


* *** * *


Holy Temple Missionary
Baptist Church providing health
screenings, health education,
food, children's games, HIV
testing, door prizes and much
more. Alice Brown, RN, MS
Health Fair Coordinator. Contact
church at 305-681-6048. Joseph
L. Kelley, Pastor.

New Mt. Calvary M.B.
Church, Rev. Albert Jones,
Pastor, invites you to its 21st
Pastoral anniversary. Include
Rock of Ages Church, Greater
New Macedonia J.B. Church,
Mt. Everett M.B. Church, and
New Christ Tabernacle Church.
All are welcome.

Soul Saving Missionary


Embrace Girls Foundation,
Inc. at 305-270-4099 or
visit their website at www.
embracegirlpower.org.

The Booker T. Washington
alumni class of 1961 is
finalizing plans for its Seascape
Dinner Cruise on April 26. For
more information please call F.
Hall at 305-688-7072.


If you feel like your child
or adolescent (and yourself)
is in need of counseling, call
The Children's Trust at 211
where trained counselors are
standing by (24 hours a day,
7 days a week, in English,
Spanish and Creole) to provide
assessment of your needs and
crisis counseling.


Baptist Church will sponsor
Annual Spring Conference on
April 9--11, 7:30 p.m. Facilitator
Rev. Julis Davis. Family and
friend day on April 13 at 11
a.m. service. You are welcome
to join us. For information call
305-696-0405.

The Way, The Truth, and
The Life Church of Praise
announces revival meetings
March 19--21 at 7:30 p.m.
nightly. Elder W.R. Courtney,
Sr. Pastor.

A Mission with a New
Beginning Pastor Eugene
Joyner, along with the Women's
Dept. invite you to our Women's
Day service on Sunday, at 11:30
a.m.


The Joint Coalition of
Miami-Dade County Schools
(Booket T. Washington, Mays,
Carver, Dorsey, Northwestern
and North-Dade high schools)
willbe meeting on SaturdayApril
12 at the Cultural Arts Center,
4:00 p.m. For more information
call 305-693-4377.


93" Street Community'\ Antioch Missionary Baptis /postolic Revival Center
Missionary Baptist Church Church of Brownsville 6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 2799 N.W. 46th Street 30-3-1
305-836-0942 305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services New time for TV. Program
Order of Services Worship Service Sunday Momning FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
(e.e c10 m- Worship Service (istrSunday only) t:IFC.t11iACtH, 37 t. ti
7:30 am. Early Morning Worship 7:30 & 11 a.m2n. 32ad S & 5th) Sun. Sun.9 l.n.-3 p.t.in Sudtl, 5 p.n
Church School 8:30a.... It Sunday o-ly
Sam.EveMorning Worship :15 Lm l h .d. Inte wr P.)r a.m.- 12 p
S& 3rd Sunday ........6 p.m. Mid Week Service Wednesday's vMoming Seice ............ 1 a.m
l st & 3s i Sunday ...6 p.m. Horof oerNon-a y Ptyer 12-I p. Su Eve. ohip ...... 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study ..7 p.m. Pe. ir nein....... 7:e pl
website: mbc .rg Pryer M ng, 7:30 .m. Fri. Bible Sty ...............7:3 p..
Bible Study. 8:15 p.m.
.-----)---MMM aIMEM MM wM


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.





Logos Baptist Church \
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Sunday
Morning Worshil at 8 & 11 a.m.

Thursday
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.

Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
Early Morning Worship.7:30a.m.
Sunday School ..........9:30a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.


aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday School...................9:30 a.m
Sun. Morning Worship........... 11 am.
Taes. Prayer.....................6 p.m.
School ofWisdom............6:30 p.m
Healing & Deliveance Sev...7:30 pm.
WedJSaL Manna (pryer).......5 am.
Friday Youth Night.................7 p.m.




/Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


SSt. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and II a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m.......... Sunday School
Tuesday.........7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p.m........Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m.......Day PIayer


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:




First Sun..7 p.m.
Communion Firs Sun....




Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church\
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
SunsIay










Baptist Church
Chur lch Scho- ol ...5.......,.9:3 0 .1
Wo rdrip Servic e .............. 1 m
Monday
Wible Sllldy 7: ..iy
Wednesday
Prayer Meetingi 7 p.m.
"There is a place fir you "



Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68 Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3,4,5', Sunday) ......38:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service .....11:00 am
Communion Service
(nT hI M before P Sunday) 7:30 pm I
IPrayer Meeting/Bfble Study
(Wednesday) 7:30 pIn




Temple Missionary "
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"! Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060Fax 305-255-854
Order ol' Services:
Sunday School........... 9:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning Scrvs......I I a.m.
,I'- Sun ...BTU....1:30-2:30 p.In,
Tuesday......Bible Study
.Feeding Ministry.....10 a.m.
IWed. Bible Study/Prayer..6:30 imt
Thus. Outreach Ministry....6:30 pma


/BethelAr i st ic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Servicesi
Su n...9:3.0 1.m... (Suldl School)
W.Walk i( he Word Miniistr\'
o'orlhip Service.............. I n 1 .ll..
Tuesday....7 p.m.,,Family Night
wed,. Ii am..lInteressory Prayer
Wed. Bible Class1........12 p.m.
Wed. Bible Class..............7 p.m.


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:45 am.
orsthip .........11 an
Bible Study, Thursday ...7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministy Mon.-Wed
6 p.m.




'Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
SLori Day Sunday School .......9:45am
Sunday Momini Worship ..... I :In..
Sll' M ll.s Bible Study .....5 p .
Sunday Ladies Bible Study ...5 p.m.
Sunday Eeniln Worship .....6 p.ml
1\Cesdldy Night Bible Study ..7:30pm
thIlur ay Morning Bible Cl I a.m.
rut 'l iop n available Call:
305-64-14850 305.691-6958


Friendship Missionary J ordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church Baptist Church.
\ in. fricndshipmnlcni .org
fricndshIippraer'bells t 5946 N.W. 12' Ave.
740 N.. 58th Street
Miami, FL 305-751-9323
305-759-8875Order of Services:
Hour or______ Order of Services:
*jSSI i Order of srics o .. 7
Hour of Prayer........6:30 a.. Early Worship.............7 a.m.
Early Morning VWorship....7:30 a.m. Sunday School............ 9 a.m.
Sunday Sclool.......... 9:30 a.m. NBC.. ............10:05 anm.
Moming WVorship............ 1I a.m. .r....:.......... 11 a.m.
Youth Ministry Study...... .... 7 p.m. Worship .........................4 p.m.
Pniyer/Bible Study....Wed.......7 p.. Mission and Bible Class
Noonday Altar Prayer...(M-F) Tuesday ............6:30 p.m.
Feeding the Hungry every Youth Meeting/Choir rhearsal
Wednesday....I,. 11 a.nt.-I p.m. Monday ......................6:30 p.m.


/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76"' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- ChiulVh School...............10 a.m.
W lorship) Service .............. 11:15 in.
Tuesldays- Ilible Cltss7........p..... i p ,
4 tF Sstd1Sunay E ni tg \ sliip..... 6 p.i.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
Early Moniing Worship.,hIst & 3Mi Sun.
Morning Worship .............. 0:30 ,
Ills. ln-lght Minlsl r iy. .............. 6 p Im
Pa le S crtice ................... 7: 30 I
Bible Snldy ........................ 8 p.l,,,
C lauh School .............. 9 ll


( Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954.962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8, 19, 21, 22, 23, 30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web plge.: www.pemblnrok cplk ulllrofchris.col Emnil: pembrokepairkcoc(@bellsouth.net
lemmn~~arNowr


Word of Faith \
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
305-836-9081

Order of Services:
Sulndaly Morning Service,
Su lnday Schooll.............10 a .nl.
W orshl. ip Service............. I Ia.m .
Tuesda;ly IBihle Study....... 8 p.m.
"1ma Pray er Service......8 p.m.


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78"' Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

Order of Services:
Bible Study Wed ................8 p.m.
Sunday Schlool............... 10 l.nl.
Sun. Worshllip Scr........11:30 a.m.
Wed. Night Intercessory Prayer
fronl 7:30 to 8 p.mt.
Sunday VWorship Service,,6:30 p.m.


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
lEarly Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ................ 930 am..

Sunday Evening Service .6 p.m
Tuesday Prayer Meeting ..7:30 p..
Wednesday Bible Study ...7:30 pm.
Not Just a Church But a Movement"



Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
nw\vsllirmonNaworshipcenter.org
305-621-5067* Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.




Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning ...........8 a.m.
Sunday School.............0 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6 p.m.
Mon. Excellence ........7:30 p.m.
lTuee. Bible Class .....7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Fellowship .........10 a.m.
1st Sun. Song P tice ..6 p.m.




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'h Street

Church Schedule:

Early Moring Worship 7:30 am.
Sun. ChurSc School 9:30 am.
Morning Worship .....II a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Tues. befbotthee 1st S....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship





St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 317 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday'
Morning Worship .....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ...........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...1 a.m.
Nature for Baptist Chutrches
(B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
Evening Worship ......7 p.m.
SMeeting ........(Tues.)7 p.m.




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School.............9:30 a.nm.
Morngit Praise/Worship I 1.m.
FirstaKI ndThi StuKday
evening wotshlip at 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.mr.
'vn prt t" fo AI r"I [iniva SIIrlund
Mantitng InwtrshipC can 305-836-8390,


An important point to remember is that as an adult the
child is watching your attitude and your reactions as well
as listening to your conversations with other adults.


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


---- -


\~l~amac~sn~/


BisopvitolT.CuryD.il., .D Snio Ias l.Tech


E









11B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


BLACKS MUST CON ROL I'HEIR OWN DESTINY


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
WILLIE B. JONES, 79, construc-
tion worker, died
apr. 4 at Uni-
versity of Miami
Hospital. Service
11 a.m. Thur.
apr, 12 at St.
Luke Missionary
Baptist Church.

DOROTHY MCKINNON, 60, do-
mestic engineer,
died Apr. 3 at
Jackson Memo-
rial Hospital Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat.
Apr. 12 in the
chapel.


LORETTA HARRELL, 51, died
Apr. 3 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Service
2 p.m, Sat. Apr.
12 at New Be-
ginning Church
of Deliverance.


ETTIE BETHEL, 83, died Apr. 4
at North Shore.
Service 11 a.m.
Sat. Apr. 12 at
Pentecostal Tab-
ernacle.




Rock of Agesj
ALTON TY'REK SMITH, thre
months died
Mar. 31. Sur-
vivors in-
clude: moth-
er, Chaquita
Chase; father,
Andrew T. Smith
Sr.; sister, Adri-
anna; brother,
Andrew T. Smith Jr. Service 11
a.m. Thursday at St. John Baptist
Church. Viewing Wed. 12 6 p.m.
in the chapel and from 7 p.m. until
funeral time at the residende 557
N.W. 22 Street.

DAVON CHRISTOPHER SMITH,
16, died Apr. 5.
Service Apr. 19
at Christian Fel-
lowship Center.





NEVAEH SELON, 1 day, died Mar.
31 at Jackson North. Graveside
service today at 12 noon at Forest
Lawn Cemetery.

Carey Royal Ram'n
KHALED ZRAIKA, died Apr. 6,
at Aventura Hospital and Medical
Center.

STEPHANIE CLARKE, 47, of
Nassau, Bahamas died at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service will be
held at Commonwealth Funeral
Home in Nassau, Bahamas.

VIVIAN GORE, 45, died Apr. 7 at
home. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

BABARA FRANKS, 78, died Apr.
7 at Jackson South Hospital. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.
E.A. STEVENS
ELLA MAE ROBINSON, 80, died
Apr. 1. Service 11 a.m. Sat. at
Ebenezer Baptist Church in Hal-
landale Beach.

SAMUEL E. NEELY, 89, died Apr.
5. Funeral arrangements pending.

Nakia Ingraham
PAULINE MITLO, 76, died Apr. 3.
Arrangements are incomplete.

KEITH ROBOTHAM, 76, died Apr.
5. Arrangements are incomplete.

Alphonso Richardson
Elouise Griffin, 73, died Apr 3.
Survivors in-
clude: daughter,
Sheila Bridges,
son-in-law, Cal-


vin Bridges; sis-
ters, Berneva
Bruton, Lenoria
Milton and a host
of relatives and
friends. Viewing Fri. 4 to 8 p.m. in
the chapel. Funeral 11 a.m. Sat. at
New Shiloh Baptist Church. Burial
in Lake City, Florida.


Poitier .ff/-
BOBBIE ROBERTS, 103, cook,
died Apr. 3. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat.
in the chapel.






MATTIE WARE, 90, insurance
agent, died Apr.
5 at Villa Maria
Nursing Home.
Service 2 p.m.
Sat in the cha-
pel.



HAROLD EUGENE WILLIAMS,
53, cook, died
Mar. 30 at North
Shore Medical
Cener. -Service
was held.





RUBY L. HARRIS, 94, domestic
private homes,
died Mar. 27.
Service was
held.





ANTHONY MORRIS BEAU-
BRUM, 21, en-
trepreneur, died
Apr. 4. Service
will be held at
New Hope Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church. Time to
be announced.

ROSA LEE KEITT, 77, house-
wife, died Apr.
5 at Plantation
Nursing Reha-
biliation Center.
Service




LESLIE BELIZAIRE, 62 laborer,
died Mar. 29 at
Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Sat. at Montsion
church.




CLARENCE BEAVER, 83, me-
chanic, died
Apr. 4. Service
5;30 Sat. in the
chapel.





SANDRAWORKMAN, 59, domes-
tic, died Apr. 7
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Service 4:30
p.m. Sat. in the
chapel.



SARA SOLOMON, 85, housewife,
died Apr. 2 at University of Miami
Medical Center. Service 11 a.m.
Wed. in the chapel.

CHARLES A. HARRIS, 56, la-
borer, died Mar. 25 at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital. Arrangments are
incomplete.

RUBY JEAN MARTIN-WARE, 53,
food service, died apr. 1 at Aven-
tura Hospital. Service 11 a.m. Sat.
at Triumph the church Kingdom of
God in Christ Church.


Grace
FRANKLIN WINSTON HER-
NANDEZ, 21,
househuband,
died Apr. 4 at
Memorial Re-
gional Hospital


Service 11 a.m.
Sat at Logos
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

ROBERT H. BUTLER, 71, retired
airforceman, died Apr 2. Service
10 a.m. today in the chapel.


Royal_2D.,
FOSTER GARLAND, 49, died
Mar. 31. Visitation Fri. 4 to 9 p.m.
Service 1 p.m. Sat. in the chapel.

DELORES GIBSON, 79, died apr.
5 Visitation Thur. 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Fri at Bethany Sev-
enth-Day Adventist Church.

LEWELLYN BASS, 77, died Apr.
5. Arrangements are pending.

ENOS COWARD, 79, died Apr. 4.
Arrangements are pending.

NORMAN CURRIE, 68, died apr.
2. Visitation Thur 4 to 9 p.m. Ser-
vice 1 p.m. Fri. at Jesus People
Ministries Church International.

JANICE LYTTLE, 52, died Apr.
1. Final rites and burial will be in
Kingstown, St. Vincent, W.I.

STERLIN GARLAND, 61, died
Apr. 2. Final rites and burial will
be in Grant Turk, turks and Caicos
Islands.


Richardsong

MAE CLEAR, 96, died Apr.1. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Thur at Saint
Agnes Episco-
pal Church.


JUANITA HAMPTON MOSLEY,
67, died Apr. 3
Service 11 a.m.
Sat. at 93rd
Comm unity
Baptist Church.




BENJAMIN KELLY JR. Memorial
service 4 p.m.
Sat in the cha-
pel.






Jay's
KENDRICK LOCKHART, 19, died
Mar. 30. Ser-
vice 1p.m. Sat.
at Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




MARTHA MCKNIGHT, 75, died
Apr. 5 at Home-
stead Hospital.
Service 12 noon
Sat at Pente-
costal Power
Church of The
Apostolic Faith.


Pax Villa
ANELLE SIMON, 75, died Mar.
31. Service 10 a.m. Sat. Apr. 12 at
Central Church of The Nazarene.
Faith .!/,
JEANETT HAYWOOD, 68. died
Mar. 30 at North Shore Hospital.
Service was held.


In Memoriam


REVEREND RASH SMITH
04/09/1923 04/11/2007

A year has passed and
missing you has not been
easy, but the love of God,.
friends and church family
have kept us strong during
this difficult and trying time.
We love you and miss you
dearly!
Trusting in God, your
loving wife, Betty Williams-
Smith, sons and daughter,
Rev. Ozzie Smith, Rudien
Keyes, Karl, Cletis, Avery and
Ronald, grandchildren, great
grandchildren and family


Wright & Young.S=
DEANDRE JAMAL ANDERSON,
14, student, died
April 3. Survi-
vors include:
mother, Mary
Holt; father, Har-
old Keith Ander-
son; brothers,
Harold Jr. and
Ethan Taylor;
sisters, Savannah Sirmons and
Bernaricka Holt; and grandmother,
Yvonne D. Barnes. Service Satur-
day, 11 a.m. at Tree of Life

HUGUSTER MELLERSON, 72,
truck driver, died
April 4 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
wife, Angeline;
sons, Gregory,
Jeffrey K. and
Jamaal (Michae-
la); daughters,
Hattie Brunson (David); and step
son, Willie Reid. Service Saturday,
10 a.m. at St. Matthews Freewill
Baptist Church.

JIMMY ALFONSO DEKLE, 46,
cook, died April
6 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: mother,
Lois; father,
James McPher-
son; sisters,
Sharon Green
and Donna Green; and brothers,
Glenn Green and Walter Green.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at St.
Mark Missionary Baptist Church.

Range
CARNEATHA LANGSTON, 46,
security officer
for Jackson
Me m o r i a l
H o sp i t a I
died April 1,
2008. She is
survived by
her three sons,
Andre Denson
(Litisha), and Sterling Langston,
Paryss Langston; Mother, Barbara
Prater(Sammie); Father, Samuel
Hutchinson Sr.,(Annette) three
sisters, Charmaine Repress,
Wanda Hernandez, and Chantrell
Hutchinson; two brothers, Samuel
Hutchinson Jr., and Lacavian
Hutchinson; one granddaughter,
Journee Denson; a host of other
relatives and friends. Funeral
Services will be held Saturday 1
p.m. at Antioch Baptist Church of
Carol City.

ANNIE ALLEN TECHEL, 71,
domestic, died
April 2. Funeral
services were
held Friday.


JOE SHAW, 79, retired baker for
Rascal House
Restaurant died
April 1, 2008.
He is survived
by his daughter,
Renee Jones
(Thomas), a
son, Joe A.
Shaw; two
Sisters, Beatrice Peppers, and
Annie Youngblood; one Brother,
Tom Shaw; one granddaughter,
Terrin S. Jones; a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins, other relatives
and friends. Funeral services
were held Monday.


Hadley's
JERAMIE COBB 'JJ' MILLER,
19, died Mar.
30 Service 4
p.m. Wed. Apr.
9 in the chapel.






PAULA D. SANDS, 39, died Apr.
4 at Aventura
Hospital. Serice
11 a.m. Sat. at
New Missionary
Baptist Church.


In loving memory of,


In loving memory of,


MARSHA PATRICIA LEWIS
TIDHRA SINGLETON 04/14/1957 01/30/2005
'TWEETY''


10/01/1971 04/14/2007

There's not a day that goes
by that we don't discuss
'Tweety" and the events that
lead up to her demise. Our
sanity keeper is knowing
she's an angel with God.
We miss her so much. It's so
hard for us to let her go...when
she died a piece of us died
with her. The overwhelming
responses to her death and
seeing the funeral recession
that were so many miles
long with the abundant
amount of breathtaking floral
arrangements shows how she
was truly loved by so many
friends and customers.
Lovingly mom, JoAnn
'Chocolate', sister Kimberly
'Lucky', brother Jo'Ron and
sons Trennode and Tahj.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


KENNY ANDRE COTTMAN
aka 'TWIN' and 'SNOOP'
12/16/71 04/15/05

It's been three years since
you left us. Gone but never
forgotten.
Your mother, brothers,
daughters, sorrowing relatives
and friends miss you dearly.
Your legacy of love and
kindness lives on in us.
You are our guardian
angel.


Range Coconut Grove
MARY DENISE THORNTON,
49, of Coconut
Grove, died
March 29th at
Doctor's Hos-
pital. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete at this
time.

JANICE EVANS, Sales Clerk, 49,
of Miami a Services will be held
Wed. 2:00 P.M. at the Chapel.

FRANK CHANDLER, Landscap-
ing, 64, of Coconut Grove, died
March 30th. Services were held.

LARRY STORR, Disabled, 60, of
Miami, died April 6th Archer Nurs-
ing Home. Arrangements are in-
complete at this time.


Davis and Bruce
ETHEL PEARL 'PRECIOUS' PE-
TERSON, 58.
died Apr. 5 at
home. Service
1 p.m. Sat. apr.
12 at Mt. Ver-
non Missionary
Baptist Church,
1323 N.W. 54 St.
Mia. Fl. Viewing
Fri. April 11 at
Poitier Funeral Home.

JOIN THE

by becoming a member of our

CALL 305-694-6210
. .. .... ..


If your life is not what you
want it to be, ask Jesus into
your heart. You will never be
the same. He gives you love,
power, peace and joy that
never ends.
Gone but not forgotten.
The family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


WALTER H. JACKSON SR.
'WALDO' AND 'BUTCH'
08/08/1953 04/10/2007

It's been a year since God
called you home, but our
memories of you still lives
on. We are so grateful for the
time God loaned you to us
and the ways you touched our
lives. We love and miss you so
much.
Your wife, Denice, children,
Shanette, Shantinell Porter
(Levan), Walter Jr. (LaTanya)
and Denesha, grandchildren
WaTanya, LeVan III, DeVonte'.
Walter III, Wakeal, Washad,
Vanessa

Death Notice


AVERY A. DELEVEAUX,
40, custodian for West Little
River Elementary School,
died April 7 at home. Survi-
vors include: mother, Wini-
fred Gates; son, Avery Jr.
and. Elijah; daughter, Ivoree;
brothers, Aubrey Jones and
Philip McCray; sisters, De-
siree Carter (James Jr.) and
Adrianne Lightsey; special
friend, Shanita Covington
and a host of other family
members and friends. Visita-
tion 2-9 p.m. Friday. Service
Saturday, 1:30 p.m. in the
chapel. Service entrusted To
Gregg Mason Funeral Home.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


BRENDA WILLIAMS
thank you for your
prayers, flowers arid acts of
kindness shown during our
bereavement.
The Gibbs, Godfrey family


Fly,~








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


B 21 THE MIAMI TIMES APRIL 9-15 20 8


Black officers club offers

academic scholarships
African-American high The Progressive Officers
school students residing in Club, Inc. is a non-profit
Miami-Dade and Broward organization.
Counties, who are in good The award is for high school
academic standing that will seniors, who have been
be participating in the com- accepted to an institution of
mencement ceremony for the higher learning as a full time


This weekend, Saturday,
April 12; Sunday, April 13
our church will observe the
Annual Disability Awareness
Programs. The theme is
"Prayer, Faith and Healing."
On Saturday at 9 a.m., a
Prayer Breakfast will be held.
Dr. Enid Pinkney, a renown
Civic Activist and charter
member of the Church of the
Open Door, will serve as the
guest speaker. There is a
$10 donation for the Prayer
Breakfast.
On Sunday at the 11 a.m.
services, Sister Marva Demita
Lee will bring the message.
She is widely-known as one


So, you think you might
qualify for benefits but aren't
sure who to ask, where to
start, or how to begin. Should
you be applying for Social
Security or Supplemental
Security Income? Medicare
or Medicaid? What's the
difference? For someone not
familiar with such benefits, it
can all seem confusing.
That's why we'd like to show
you the BEST way to get the
process started.
Just visit Social Security's
Benefit Eligibility Screening


who walks and speaks by faith
and is a charter member of
the Pool of Bethesda Christian
Center.
For additional information
about these activities, please
contact Disability Awareness
Ministry Chairperson
Deaconess Mazie Baker at
305-685-1617 or the church
305-372-3877. Colors: yellow
and White (optional) Additional
special events around the
church are Saturday, April 19
at 8 a.m. "Walk A Mile With A
Child"; Saturday, April 26th,
Willing Workers' Ministry
"Seascape Cruise." The Rev.
Dr. Henry Nevin is Pastor.


Tool (BEST) at www.
GovBenefits.gov. BEST will
help you determine whether
you may be eligible for different
types of benefits, including:
Social Security Disability;
Social Security Retirement;
Social Security Survivors;
Medicare;
Special Veterans Benefits;
and
Supplemental Security
Income (SSI).
BEST also links users to an
additional website that can help
you determine whether you


"Class of 2008," are eligible to
apply for (1) $1,000 of $33,000
Educational Assistance Award
from the Progressive Officers
Club, Inc., an African-American
organization that's comprise of
police and correctional officers
in Miami-Dade County.


student for the upcoming tall
semester (2008).
A request for the application
must be submitted and post-
marked no later than Friday,
April 23, to Progressive Officers
Club. P.O. Box 680398, Miami,
FL 33168.


Masons and Eastern Stars celebrates
58th convention anniversary
Grand Master Illustrious and Order of The Eastern
Bobbie J. Meeks, 33 and Star will be having its 58th
Grand Matron Sister Christine convention anniversary on
W. Hayes, is pleased to April 11 13 at the Radisson
announce the State of Florida Resort, 3011 Maingate Lane,
International F.& A.M. Masons Kissimmee, Florida.

Celebration of life
A celebration of life honoring the late Luetisha Neely Russell will
be held 11 a.m. Saturday, April 12 at St. James AME Church,
Miami, Florida.


may qualify for the Medicare
Prescription Drug Plan through
Medicare and for extra help
with your prescription drug
costs through Social Security.
At the BEST website, you'll
be asked some basic questions
about your situation. It will
take about five to 10 minutes
to complete the questions.
No one will see the answers
you give and the session
will not be recorded. It is a
confidential way for you to
plug in your situation and get
quick answers regarding the


000-00-0000 2

.. JohnbJPublio III

Information about your
Social Security
benefits you may be eligible to
apply for.
Why not get started now?
Just visit www.Govbenefits.
gov and answer a few simple
questions to find out whether
you might be eligible for
benefits. You can also visit
www.socialsecurity.gov for
additional information about
Social Security.


Md Pry -d e fm i p"h


laterial


Card of Thanks
The family of the late


JOHN VINCENT COOPER
would like to thank everyone
who made the time of John's
transition easier for us to bear.
Thanks to Hall Ferguson
Hewitt and staff, New
Jerusalem Primitive Baptist
Church, Rev. Kenneth Dukes,
Min. James Woods, the Woods
Brothers, Sherry Screen, Ms.
Hattaway, Usher Board #4 from
New Shiloh Baptist Church.
Special thanks go to the
countless family and friends
who prayed to help us through
this trying time, particularly
to T-Man from D & E Party
Supplies in Opa Locka, and
Ms. Shirley Brown


Your acts of kindness will
never be forgotten.
The Cooper and Moore
families


Pastors 21st anniversary at

New Mount Calvary


New Mount Calvary
Missionary Baptist Church,
Reverend Albert Jones, pastor,
invites you to our 21st Pastoral
Anniversary on Wednesday
night, April 16 at Rock of Ages
Missionary Baptist Church,
Reverend Johnny White and
congregation will be in charge
of the service.
Thursday night April
17, Greater New Macedonia
Missionary Baptist Church,
Reverend Sherman Mungins
and congregation will be in


charge of the service. Friday
night, April 17, Mount Everett
Missionary Baptist Church,
Reverend Paul Kelley and
congregation will be in charge of
the service. All services starts
at 7:30 p.m.
On Sunday, April 20 at 3
p.m. New Christ Tabernacle,
Reverend Harold Marsh and
congregation will close out the
pastor's anniversary.
Come out and be blessed as
these men of God bring the word
of God. Everyone is welcomed.


ontent


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Obama distances himself from his pastor


VICTIMS
continued from 9B

the music, television and movie
industries.
To acknowledge that Blacks
have made progress in so
many ways doesn't mean you
have to stop agitating to close
the education gap that exists
between Black students and
other students; decrying the
stagnation of Black family
incomes and the persistent
gap between their incomes
and overall assets and those
of white families; protesting
continued racial segregation in
housing and schools; or calling
for a more just application of
the criminal laws.

OWNING THE PROBLEM
It's important to acknowledge


that the education gap is at
least as much the result of
the reluctance of Blacks to
engage in positive ways with
the system as it is the result
of underfunding or school
officials' disdain for Black
children. And the vaunted
"crisis" among Black men is as
much a personal development
and community values issue as
it is a discrimination issue.
In his now-famous speech on
race, Obama did something rare
for a Black leader. He distanced
himself from those who rev up
the crowd by talking "as if no
progress has been made," and
as if this country "is irrevocably
bound to a tragic past," in favor
of the belief that not only has
there been tremendous change,
but that there is hope for a lot
more. The fact that the first


Black candidate with a real
shot of making it to the White
House has been damaged
by the relentless rhetoric of
victimhood is yet another
reason to move away from it. As
Black comedian Wanda Sykes
puts it: "I'm worried because if
he (Obama) wins, Black people
are going to have to come up
with another excuse. You can't
blame .the Man when you are
the Man."
In the age of Obama, having
a leader with a message other
than the same one we've always
heard might help move us
toward the type of change we're
looking for. If you change the
rhetoric, it's possible to change
the way people think. And,
if you change the way people
think, it's possible to change
what they do.


HE MIAMI IMES



IRT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR
for a 12-month subscription '$321for a I 'month subscription
eck or money order enclosed


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0 Q.1 Exp-


Honor Your Loved One With an

In Memoriam in The Miami Times


City Sta'te .. Zip, .
SPhonee ....___: _,_ maill,

Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 *Includes Florida sales tax


DR. ENID PINKNEY SISTER MARVA LEE

Disability Awareness Day at St. John


"If the lions do not write their own history,

then the hunters will get all the credit."
-African Proverb


I I


Your best interest at heart


I I


MIAMI LANDMARK -
THE HISTORIC SAINT AGNES' EPISCOPAL CHURCH
HOLY CONFIRMATION AT ST. AGNES' PARISH

The Right Reverend Leopold Frade, D.D., Third
Bishop, The Episcopal Diocese of Southeast
Florida, will make his annual Pastoral Visitation
to the Historic St. Agnes' Church on Sunday, april
13, at the one worshp service of the day at 9:00
a.m. The Rector, the Reverend Canon Richard L.
Marquess-Barry, will present a small class to him
for Holy Confirmation. The parish extends an in-
vitation to you to come and share in its worship
and fellowship. REV. LEOPOLD
FRADE, D.D.


W 41


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MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 9-15 4,2 -


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THE MIAMI TIMES


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


"- .
BDrRcard Stacha


The wedding ceremony
uniting Charles Braddy
and Faedhie Eliassaint,
last Saturday, drew quite a
number of people outside of
the church when a white Rolls
Royce brought the bride and
a 22-passenger Excursion
discharged the bridal party.
The men wore white tuxedos
with mint green assessories; the
females wore mint green gowns;
and the children wore white
suits and dresses, respectively.
With the playing of Bittersweet
by Jim Brickman and Forever
in Love by Kenny G, the
procession began with Parlee
Anderson, mother of the groom,
entering, followed by pictures
of the late Charles McCloud
and Cora Braddy, family of the
groom, and Yvrose Eliassaint
and Berny Eliassaint, parents
of the bride bringing up the
rear. All of them participated in
the Lighting of the Candles and
took their rightful seats.
The music changed to
Silhouette by Kenny G for the
entrance of Reverend Nathan
Austin, officiant, groom and
best men Mitchell Anderson
and Michael Anderson,
followed by bridesmaids and
groomsmen Diamond Wilson
and Benedhie Eliassaint,
Mykelle Henry and Joe
Polydoir, Yolanda Jefferson-
Major and Clarence Thomas
with Dion Munnings and
Benson Eliassaint, honorary
groomsmen, followed by
Renee Dillon and Juilande
Eliassaint, -maids of honor.
Also, Rickia Braddy, flower
girl; James Major, Jr. ring
bearer, and Daianee Williams
and Sachiya Findlay,
attendants, while the music


was changed to
For the Rest of
my Life by Bebe
Winans for the
grand entrance of
the bride. She was
escorted by her
father attired in a
flowing Cinderella gown topped
off with a tiara, mini-earrings,
a diamond necklace with
sparkling gems on the bodice
and skirt of the gown. She
kept a smile as she greeted her
family members and friends.
Upon her arrival next to her
husband, the both of them
participated in the welcome
message of prayer, exchange
of vows, rings, and the unity
candle ceremony, while Kenny
Latimore sang For You. At
the reception and celebration,
Charles and Faedhie took
the time to pay tribute to the
deceased parents and expressed
much love and gratitude to their
parents and friends for years of
support to come.


Destiny played an
intricate part in the life
of Jovan C. Campbell
when he was born on
January 5th in Miami,
to Yvette Johnson and
Herbert Campbell. He
attended Miami Carol R
City and played football.
Upon graduation, he
enlisted in the U.S. Army;
served his time and wore the
uniform of a correction officer
before attending Miami-Dade
Community College.
Kemelia V. Dixon was born
on September 11"' in St. Anns
Jamaica to Valerie Harris and
Lenworth Dixon. Her mother


brought her to Miami at the
age of two, and, subsequently,
graduated from Miami Norland
and decided to attend Miami-
Dade CC.
During the interim, she
spotted Jovan in class and he
did likewise. Subsequently, they
began to talk, experience dates
together and ended up,
last Saturday, sharing 'I
do's and I wills' together
at New Birth Baptist
Church Cathedral of
Faith Int.
On hand were family
members Cymphone
Campbell, daughter,
Valerie Harris, BET7
Kemelia's mom,
Yvette and Herbert Campbell,
parents, Walt and Anette
Johnson and Jean Albury
Perry, grandparent, Nakie
Barnes conducted the huge
wedding.
Others in the wedding party
included Elmina Predelus
and Tiffany Finlayson,
maid of honor; bridesmaids
Arlene Nickie, Nadia Dixon,
Keneasha Dixon, Kimberly
Harris, Jihan Bryan, and
Lashawn Bowens; groomsmen
Louis Fish, Herbert Clemons,
Rashaun Dean, Sean
Campbell, Byron
Clemons, and Michael
Campbell.
Randy Griffin and
Rashad Jarrel, best
men; Marshay Pender,
junior bridesmaid,
Gordon Linton,
junior groomsman,
E Cymphony Campbell,
ring princess, Shayon
Pender, Jr., junior escort; and
Octavia Noble, Rene Boykins,
Jacques Holloway, Shayonnia
Pender, Bayanni Clemons, and
Brianna Clemons, hostesses
and flower girls, respectively.
The both of them are planning
to pursue a career in medicine
and police work, while focusing


on being good parents for their
children.


A golden salute goes out to
Carol Wetherington, Robert
McKinzie, and Lanita F.
Parries, for collaborating with
Audley Coakley, South Florida
Booster Director and
John Williams, former
National Alumni
president, to produce
The first Tri-County
Alumni Luncheon
featuring Dr. Trudie
Kibbie Reed, president,
Bethune-Cookman
HUNE University, last
Saturday, at the Westin
Hotel in North Lauderdale.
More than 400 alumni and
supporters traveled to hear the
president and fraternize with
alumni at the gala affair.
Coakley orchestrated
the preparation of the
room and the Psi Phi
Band to provide the
music, while Parrish
gave the invocation
to begin the profound
program.
Shirlyon J. HAN
McWhorter, Esq., was
unable to attend to
introduce the president, but
the task was taken over by Dr.
Larry Handfield, Esq., Trustee
Board Member who had the
honor of hiring Dr. Reed as
the second female president.
Handfield alluded to the fact
that the first list of applicants
went awry when mistakes and
information were leaked out to
the press. Consequently, new
procedures were initiated as if
the applicant was a consultant
giving out professional
resolutions of selecting a
president. Before introducing
the keynote speaker, Handfield
humored the crowd with one
of his favorite jokes about
"BillyBob."


D


As the Psi Phi Band played
the B-CU Pep song and the
audience joined in, Dr. Reed
took to the mic and eloquently
controlled the audience in the
palm of her hand. She iterated
her experience with Dr.
Mary McLeod Bethune at a
conference in which she spoke
to her about her vision of being
a president of a college. Dr.
Bethune listened and her by
saying, "Child, you have all of
the qualities of being president
of many colleges."
After a thunderous applause,
the audience simmered down
and waited for more exciting
news. She informed them
that Walt Disney would not
sponsor the Florida Classic
any more and Tom Joyner
will put a package together for
Southwest Air Lines to take
over the sponsorship
at $1.4 million for
FAMU and BC-U.
She concluded by
stating the university
is in good shape with
accreditation coming
from the. Southern
Association and a
FIELD new nursing school
already paid for with
$5 million.
From that information,
Coakley took to the mic and
rallied up pledges from the
alumni to equal the $3 million
Dr. Handfield has already
raised. Everyone left happy
and more Tri-County activities
are being planned for the
future.


Bertha Keys-Milton,
etiquette luncheon chair and
members of the Egelloc Civic
and Social Club took the Men
of Tomorrow, last Sunday, to
a Chineese Buffet in Miami
Gardens for the annual
etiquette procedure for taking
a young lady out to dinner.


Jordan Hall, MOT President
took over as emcee and
introduced Mary Ann Thomas-
McCloud, president, Gideon
Brown, chaplain, Ryan King,
instrumental solo, and essay
winners Corey Armstrong, 3rd,
Darrel Parker, 2nd, and Samuel
Johnson, 1st, while Mary L.
Dunn sent her remarks from
Atlanta, Ga, and Dr. Richard
J. Strachan demonstrated
technique for dining, seating,
and proper encore.
Now, the organization is
planning for its culminating
activity, it's 34th presentation,
Sunday, April 20, 6 p.m. at
the James L. Knight Center.
Twenty-four Men of Tomorrow
will be presented, while the top
talented winners will perform
and the Black History projects
will be on display for the formal
activity
Some of the parents included
Alexis Parker, Lenora Smith,
Deborah Wilson, Roy Phillips,
Cheryl Johnson, Antoinette
Hudson, Barry Mackey,
Annamana R. Roller, Nashid
and Christie Sabir, Effie and
Dr. Nelson Adams, Eleanor
and James Watson and
Jacquelyn Townsel-Bryan.
Other young men in
attendance were Derrell
Parker, Anthony Phillips,
Brandin Hudson, Kaleb
Hollis, Oscar D. Toller, III,
Rashid Sabir, Nelson L.
Adams, Jr. Jarrod E. Watson,
and Justin K. Townsel.


Beverly Johnson reports how
her weekend with her husband
Lee, excites the people at
Lorelei's in Islamorada, where
they entertained with a great
band featuring Johnnie Riles,
leader and sax player, Melvin
Williams, guitar, Jeff Babik,
drummer. So, join them at
Mile marker #81 any weekend,
beginning at sun down.


In case you're wondering
how David Alexander-
Patterson, a Brooklyn,
New York native, lost most
of his eyesight (This is what
happened) as a result of
childhood infection that
damaged his optic nerve
the governor of New York lost
most of his eyesight. He does
not use a cane or a guide dog,
and can recognize shapes
and people up close. He has
refused to learn Braille and
memorizes all of his speeches.
He is the third Black to serve
as governor of any state since
reconstruction. L. Douglas
Wilder, the former governor
of Virginia, became the first
Black governor in 1990. Deval
Patrick was elected governor
of Massachusetts in 2006.
Congratulations to County


Commissioner
Barbara J. I
Jordan named
among the nations
Black movers and
shakers in Success
South Fla. Magazine.
Get well wishes to all of you!
Bernice Shorter-Meares,
Georgiana Johnson-Bethel,
W. Delores Gordon, Linda
Lewis, Evelyn Heild, Joyce
Gibson-Johnson, Inez
McKinney-Johnson, Herbert
J. Rhodes, Jr., Dorris
McKinney-Pittman, Clifford
Ross, Vashti Armbrister, and
Yvonne Johnson Gaitor.
For many, many reasons
we need Barrack Obama as
president of the United States
of America. Hallie Berry
actress is only the third Black
woman to win an Oscar in the


Academy's 80 year history.
Berry is the only Black female
to win an Oscar in the Best
Actress category. Whoopi
Goldberg won an Oscar for
best supporting Actress in the
movie Ghost. Hattie McDaniel
won an Oscar for her role in
Gone With The Wind in 1939.
This is the 21st Century, My!
My! My!
Lena Calhoun Home, turns
91 on June 30th Lena retired
from the public spotlight
nearly 10 years ago.
Wedding anniversary
greetings goes out to: Robert
(Emma) Taylor, Sr., April 3rd:
Their 47th.
Congratulations to attorney
Oliver Gilbert III who will
replace Oscar Braynon II who
was elected to the state House
of Representative Mr. Gilbert
won unanimous endorsements
from the city council. Mayor
Shirley Gibson nominated
him to fill the seat.
Congrats to Merdochey


LaFrance who will receive
her masters in Public
Administration in April from
Florida International (FIU).
Calling all members of
Booker T. Washington class
of "48" please join your
classmates on Wednesday at
"First Baptist" in preparation
for the class reunion of a
lifetime. Archie McKay is
president.
Join the Parish Chapter of
Episcopal Church Women
Sunday, April 20 at 10:45 a.m.
When Good Old Memories take
place. Women are being asked
to wear their hats (which was
a must, when I was growing
up) pearls, suits, and gloves.
Guys are asked to wear suits,
ties and suspenders. It would
be so, so nice to reminisce on
how it used to be! Come, take
a part! Join us! you will enjoy!
Janet Brown is president.
Sandra Blue-Harris and
her daughter MaKeda Harris
are visiting her parents and


1 / K I a O


grand-parents Elizabeth
Betty and Edward Blue. They
live in Kernersville, North
Carolina and are enjoying
their spring break.
Promise yourself that
nothing can disturb your
peace of mind. To talk
health, happiness, and
prosperity to every person
you meet. To make all your
friends feel that there is
something in them. Look on
the sunny side of everything
and make your dreams come
true. To think only the best,
to work only for the best and
to expect only the best. To
be just about the success of
others 'as you are about your
own.' To forget the mistakes
of the past and press on to


greater achievements of the
future. To wear a cheerful
countenance at all times and
give every living creature you
greet a smile. To give so much
time to the improvement of
yourselfthatyou have no time
to criticize others. To be too
large for worry, too noble for
anger, too strong for defeat,.
and too happy to permit the
presence of trouble.
The Historic St. Agnes'
Episcopal Church proudly
presents the Norfolk State
University Concert Choir in
concert on Friday, April 11 at
7 p.m. Admission is free. The
Historic St. Agnes' is located
at 1750 N.W. 3rd ave., Miami.
Canon Richard M. Barry is
rector.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROLi THEIR OWN DESTINY


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H YOUR WE


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
You feel like it's time to go.This is a hard
one because there's nothing intrinsically
wrong here. You just want to do something
else. People will take it personally until they
see that you doing your own thing is better
for them. Lucky numbers 10, 22, 39,5, 1.

TAURUS:APRIL 21- MAY 20
Something is coming to a perfect conclu-
sion. No more delays or questions about
who's there for you and who isn't. You're
free to proceed with this project or person,
knowing that whatever happens from here
on out will be good. Lucky numbers 4, 39,
5,50,2.

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
Material security is such a big deal for
you. You're so busy sitting in the counting
house, you're missing the point. Abundance
comes from within. Focus on staying happy
and the money will come. Trust me. That's
how it works. Lucky numbers 9, 7, 49, 32,
11.

CANCER: JUNE 21- JULY 20
You've moved through some incredible
changes. Looking back there's a feeling of
contentment and a sense of trust that wasn't
there before. Savor the moment. Times like
this exist to remind us that we are lucky to


be alive. Lucky numbers 5, 49, 32, 19, 7.

LEO: JULY 21- AUGUST 20
You've got all kinds of opportunities for
love. Before you jump on any of them take
time to consider whose baggage you want
to carry. Some of these candidates for your
affection aren't what they appear to be. Be
smart. Choose carefully. Lucky numbers 3,
20, 19, 44, 3.

VIRGO:AUG.21- SEPT.20
Being overpowered by someone who
doesn't know how to play fair has made you
question your self. People who cheat to get
what they want rarely succeed. Don't drive
your self nuts here. They're the ones who
should be questioning them selves. Lucky
numbers 55, 3,29, 15, 6.

LIBRA: SEPT.21- OCT.20
The Truth usually hurts but it's far more
painful not to see it. You're eyes are wide
open, and as painful as this is, you are as
free as a bird. Kiss every regret goodbye and
open up to the idea that everything happens
for a reason. Lucky numbers 17, 20, 50, 31,
18.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21- NOV. 20
You have plenty of reasons to be defen-
sive. Whether it's necessary in this situation


is unclear. If you're worried about being
overwhelmed by forces you don't have the
power to contain, I'm here to tell you you're
stronger than ever. Lucky numbers 6, 59,
44, 30, 2.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
You don't need to know where this is go-
ing. Sometimes it's better to enjoy the ride.
As far as making choices goes, you are mak-
ing the right one. Others may disagree, but
in the end they will see that this is right for
them too. Lucky numbers 9, 40, 32, 19, 3.

CAPRICORN: DEC.21- JAN.20
Adhering too much to social guidelines
takes all the fun out of life. Right and Wrong
are always relative to the individual. Your
next lesson will teach you not to let your be-
liefs interfere with your experience of your
own truth. Lucky numbers 6, 38, 46, 23, 5.

AQUARIUS: JAN. 21- FEB.20
What appears to be a shakedown is re-
ally a blessing. You can't admit it but your
life needed this. As you look around and try
to make sense of what's left, don't even try
to resurrect anything that fell apart during
this recent affair. Lucky numbers 4, 14, 30,
52, 17.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
Your ideas are bigger than you are only
in the sense that you don't have the creden-
tials or the connections to achieve them.
That's OK. It's good to think big. If this is
right for you the forces of synchronicity will
bring it on. Lucky numbers 5, 40, 33, 21, 4.


S Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby. I
Nn roresrvuatinns necessary. I


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008-









4C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008



Brown dishes the dirt on Whitney


By Joal Ryan

Bobby Brown was not the bad
guy in his 'marriage to Whitney
Houston. According to Bobby
Brown.
In a new book, Brown, best
known now for his frequent run-
ins with the law rather than his
onetime Grammy-winning music
career, writes that Houston fueled
his appetite for drugs and used
him to tidy up her image.
Passages from Bobby Brown:
The Truth, the Whole Truth and
Nothing But..., due out June 1,
were leaked Thursday to the New
York Post. The publisher, Down
South Books, confirmed to E!
News that the excerpts were legit.
In a statement from Houston's
rep, the star was said to be "sad
that Bobby feels the need t6 say
such things, but she chooses to
take the high road, and will not
speak badly about the father of
her child even if it's to set the
record straight."
Brown has a different view on


how to address the mother of his
15-year-old daughter, Bobbi.
"I never used cocaine until after
I met Whitney," Brown writes.
"Before then, I had experimented
with other drugs, but marijuana
was my drug of choice."
Brown married Houston in
1992. At the time, he was the ex-
New Edition singer who'd made
good as a solo act with three
platinum albums; she was music's
supreme diva about to score the
biggest success of her career with
The Bodyguard soundtrack.
If the pairing looked like the
perfect match the King of New
Jack Swing meets the Queen
of Ballads Brown says the
union was "doomed from the very
beginning."
Houston, according to Brown,
wanted to get married to deflect
attention from rumors about her
sexuality.
While Houston was out to get
married and get pregnant in
order to "kill all speculation,"
Brown writes, he just wanted to


Ii.A(CKS MUIST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


E -w e fm


be loved.
Brown does tell tales on himself,
as well, in the book.
According to the tome's blurb
copy, it notes he dated Janet
Jackson and Madonna, "sle[pt]
with thousands of women," and
nearly died from a drug overdose.
For boy-band completists, it
promises to reveal "the real
reason he left New Edition." And
for fans of author and music-
video star Karrine "Superhead"


Steffans, it offers this critique:
"Yes, I've spent several nights at
her house," Brown writes. "But
she was only good for what her
nickname stood for."
Brown, 39, and Houston, 44,
formally ended their marriage
last April after 15 years, several
separations due to Brown's
various incarcerations, numerous
tabloid stories and one warts-
and-all reality series, Being Bobby
Brown.



-B us


6


Campbell released
after charged with
assault on officer
Naomi Campbell was freed
on bail Friday following
her.arrest the day before at
London's Heathrow Airport.
The supermodel had just
boarded a British Airways
(BA) flight headed to Los
Angeles when she was told
that one of her two checked
bags at the new Terminal 5
had gone missing. According
to witnesses, Campbell had a
fit and allegedly spat on a cop
that was called to the scene.
She was escorted off
the plane and arrested on
suspicion of assaulting a
police officer. The runway diva
was released shortly after
midnight on Friday and told to
return in late May.
"So far as we are aware, BA
has still failed to offer any
explanation as to why her bag
went missing at Terminal 5,"
said Campbell's rep.
BA has been beset by
problems with the high-
tech check-in and baggage
handling systems at the
4.3 billion pound terminal,
reports Reuters. Hundreds of
flights have been cancelled
and tens of thousands of bags
have gone missing, costing
the airline about 16 million
pounds since the terminal's
opening last month.


:Available from Commecile o Nw Poviders"


. O


____ S -
ME" 0.
-- .-


Push is on for a wilt Chamberlain stamp


CHAMBERLAIN
continued from 3C

on March 2, 1962 against the
New York Knicks in Hershey,
Pa.
"I don't think a lot of kids
today know how great he was,"
Hunt said. "It's good to know
the history of the game and
Wilt's a big part of the history."
Chamberlain starred in
the NBA from 1959 through
1973, when he played for the
Philadelphia (later the San
Francisco) Warriors, 76ers and
Lakers.
The 31,419points Chamberlain
scored during his career stood
as a record until Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar broke it in 1934.
Chamberlain, who never fouled
out in 1,205 regular-season
and playoff games, also holds
the rebounding record with
23,924.
The best way for Chamberlain,
who died in 1999, to earn a
sticky square is for supporters
to write letters to the Citizens'


Stamp Advisory Committee.
The committee reviews
proposals four times a year and
passes their recommendations
on to the postmaster general.
The earliest Chamberlain could
appear on a stamp is 2010, said
Roy Betts, a U.S. postal service
spokesman.
"It would be hard not to
pay attention if you generate
the volume advocating this
particular subject," Betts said.
Chamberlain still has his
fans at the University of
Kansas, where his retired
No. 13 jersey hangs in the
rafters of Allen Fieldhouse. As
a sophomore, Chamberlain
led the 1957 Jayhawks to the
NCAA tournament finals, when
Kansas lost to unbeaten North
Carolina in triple overtime.
Jayhawks coach Bill Self, who
is preparing his team to play the
Tar Heels on Saturday in the
Final Four, said Chamberlain
deserved the recognition.
"Anybody who can drop 100
in a game deserves something,"


Self said. "Still, to this day, you
can make a strong case that he
is the most dominant basketball
player of all time. And not only
was he a dominant basketball
player, he was maybe as good an
athlete as there's been, period.
The fact he went to school here,
we're biased, but we would love
to see that."
John Hadl, a two-time football
All-America selection and KU's
associate athletic director for
major gifts, gives the idea his
stamp of approval.

"He's as good as anybody
who's already on there, except
maybe George Washington,"
Hadl said.
Fans interested in having a
Chamberlain stamp should
write a letter to the following
address:
US Postal Service Stamp
Development
Attn: Stamp Development
1735 North Lynn St., Suite
5013
Arlington, VA 22209-6432


mr "Is. umoS o


Who {ares




What Black People Think




Anyway?



If you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think, think again.Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you.
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote.And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you, you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your Votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars.


in"l


.







The Miami Times



Business


*1,


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 9-15, 2008


Late payments on

consumer loans at

16-year high


By Jonathan Stempel
NEW YORK More
Americans have fallen behind
on consumer loans than at
any time in nearly 16 years,
as credit problems once
concentrated in mortgages
spread into other forms of
debt.
In a quarterly study,
the American Bankers
Association said the
percentage of loans at least
30 days past due rose to
2.65% in the fourth quarter
from 2.44% in the third
quarter, and from 2.23% a
year earlier.
The rate of delinquencies
was the highest since a
2.75% rate in the first
quarter of 1992. It provides
a fresh sign the nation's
economy is slowing, and may
be in recession.
"There's no question that
the economy is weakening
beyond housing, resulting
in the loss of household
purchasing power," said
John Lonski, chief economist
at Moody's Investors Service.
"Deterioration of household
credit should continue
through 2008, though the
rate may moderate," he
added. "Ifit intensifies, then
the current recession may


prove more severe than
anticipated."
ABA Chief Economist
James Chessen attributed
the jump in the delinquency
rate largely to auto loans.
Late payments on "indirect"
auto loans, which are made
through dealerships, totaled
3.13%, the highest on record.
Delinquencies on direct
auto loans rose to 1.90%, a
2-1/2-year high.
Credit and debit card
delinquencies rose to 4.38%
from the third quarter's
4.18%, following four straight
quarterly declines.
Housing wasn't spared.
Delinquencies on home
equity loans rose to a
2-1/2-year high of 2.39%,
and on home equity lines
of credit rose to 0.96%,
matching a level last seen in
the fourth quarter of 1997.
The ABA study covers more
than 300 banks that extend
a majority of outstanding
consumer loans, Its study
covers direct auto, indirect
auto, home equity, home
improvement, marine,
mobile home, personal and
recreational vehicle loans.
Losses tied to mortgages,
credit cards and other
consumer loans are expected
Please turn to LOANS 9D


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FOR


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ALL


LESSON
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Providers


Black women step up in business world


MVsrrwd to a unll
ii Offt


By Jim Hopkins
SAN FRANCISCO Camille
Young worked at big businesses
for years until she discovered
an idea for her own company
during a South Pacific
vacation.
Back in New Jersey, she
started looking for the food
she ate in Fiji, frequenting
fresh-juice bars in Manhattan
because she couldn't find any
near home. "Someone really
needs to open a juice bar here,"
Young recalls thinking.
She quit her bank job last
year to open the first of two
juice bars in her BaGua Juice
chain in Jersey City. She hopes
the company will grow to as
many as 50 locations.
Young, 34, is one ofthousands
of African-Afnerican women
starting businesses, research
shows, in a trend that's tipping
the balance of economic power
in the Black community.
As women take
entrepreneurship's lead,
marketers from banks to
tech companies are tapping
Black women as a new
source of revenue. "It's a huge
opportunity," says Angela
Burt-Murray, editor in chief
of Essence, a leading lifestyle
magazine for Black women.
Black women are launching
companies for many of the same
reasons spurring other women.
They've gained corporate
experience, but a glass ceiling
keeps them from rising to the
CEOl's office. They're better
educated. Self-employment


Camille Young, right, in one of her BaGua Juice shops. She w
ling chain after a visit to Fiji.


offers more flexibility to care for
children and aging parents.
Start-up costs have fallen
as computers and other
technologies grow cheaper.
And the economy is shifting
even more to retail and service
businesses well-suited to
corporate refugees.


DRIVING START-UP GROWTH
The new research, published
last week by the Small
Business Administration,
shows that women drove
much of the growth in Black
entrepreneurship.
Black women owned 547,341
companies in 2002, up 75%
from five years before, when the


as inspired to open the fledg-
photo by Jennifer S. Altman
Census Bureau last counted,
The number owned by men
rose a smaller 29%, to 571,670,
says the study by economist
Ying Lowrey in the SBA's Office
of Economic Research.
For the first time since the
government began counting,
Black women now likely own
Please turn to BUSINESS 10D


March 11-14, 2008, was a
very special weekend for those
who attended the NCBFA in
Louisville, Ken. For 35 years
now, this conference has
brought Black people together
from across the country and
has established a proud legacy
of Black consciousness, self-
love, education, and collective
empowerment.
Dr. Joseph McMillan is the
conference coordinator and
has been at it for 30 of the 35


years. He and
his dedicated
staff impressed
me beyond my
expectations in every way
possible. I highly recommend
this event to you next year.
As I like to do when I am
invited to speak at conferences,
I went in a couple of days
prior to the time of my speech
to get a feel of the event and
to meet the attendees. I like
to hear other speakers too,


and this conference had
several powerful speakers.
Charlie Johnson, Chairman
and CEO of Johnson Xpress
Trucking Company, is a
former professional football
player whose example of
being blessed and being a
blessing to others should be
taught among all of today's
athletes. He shared his
thoughts and expressed his
feelings in a way that assured
us he understands what life is
all about, which includes an
obligation to "give something
back."
Theda Rudd, Professor at
Michigan State University
and Business Consultant,
painted a vivid picture of
her life, which included the
untimely death of her 33
year-old husband, during
her pregnancy, and all of the


issues she faced immediately
thereafter. Her story is one
that moved from trials to
tragedy but ultimately ended
in triumph because she
refused to give up and was


dedicated to carrying on the
legacy of her husband's hard
work to build a franchise
business. I told her there's
a great book inside of her
waiting to be written. Keep an
eye out for this sister.
Dr. Boyce Watkins, "The
People's Scholar," Professor
at Syracuse University, and


regular guest on nightly news
shows, is a refreshing young
brother who is unafraid and
unwavering in his "callouts"
to awaken our people. He
also gets in the faces of those


"conservative" talk show
hosts; he doesn't allow them
to talk-over his response,
take him of track, or twist
his words. He is intelligent
and on his game all the time.
Check out his website at
boycewatkins.com.
Dr. Claud Anderson,
President of the Harvest


Institute and author of
Powernomics,, is a man who
really needs no introduction
to those who read my books
and this column. A fighter, a
staunch advocate for Black
people, a doer, an educator, a
businessman, Claud has been
on the economic empowerment
front-line for decades, trying
as best he can to teach and to
bring economic initiatives to
our people. You may remember
him in Detroit where he tried
to develop a Black business
enclave but was rebuffed by
the Mayor and a few other
City Councilpersons. Kwame
kilpatrick could sure use Dr.
Anderson's project now. Looks
like he's gonna need a new
gig.
Haki Madhubuti, Owner of
Third World Press in Chicago,
Please turn to CLINGMAN 8D


Charlie Johnson, Chairman and CEO of Johnson Xpress
Trucking Company, is a former professional football player
whose example of being blessed and being a blessing to
others should be taught among all of today's athletes.


I -----------------


I








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


Investing: Fundamental analysis

vs. technical analysis


In life, there is always some
form of opposition taking place.
There's race, there's political
parties, there's religion, and
there's good versus bad. In the
world of investing, there's the
fundamentalist investor- one
who makes investment decisions
based on the quality, product,


and management of the
business, and there's, L |
the technical investor-
one who makes investment
decisions based on historical
charts and graphs that track
the price and volume movement
of the company's share price
(stock movement). Confused?


Lets look at it another way.
When we look at each other,
we judge by appearance right?
A fine young man or woman
appears fundamentally
appealing to the naked eye,
however, after getting to know
them, technically they're not
appealing at all. Another
example is, you walk into youi'
doctor's office for a routine
check-up and you feel fine, but
after your doctor examines you,
he rushes you to the emergency
room because your main
artery is blocked and your
blood pressure is very high.
Fundamentally you looked fine,
however, technically you were
in danger of dropping dead at


any minute.

BOTH MATTER
Everything in life has two
sides, a woman can be beautiful
and yet complicated as well. The
stock market as well as the real
estate market must be analyzed
from either a fundamental
or technical analysis. Most
investors make the mistake of
favoring one over the other; this
is where the opposition comes
into play. The fundamentalist
feels the technician is wrong
and the technician feels the
fundamentalist is wrong. It
reminds me of the bickering
that goes on between the
democrats and the republicans,


somehow, at times, both parties
seem to forget that both are
Americans and need to do
what's best for the Country.
Technical analysis people don't
care how well a company's
products or services are selling,
if their technical charts and
graphs say sell the companies
stock on Wednesday, they sell
on Wednesday. Many times a
company's share price will drop
temporarily in value for nothing-
more other than a technical sell
off. Technical analysis reminds
me of someone who studies the
stars and horoscopes, some
fundamentalist believes it's all
hogwash, but with millions of
folks practicing and believing


in technical analysis, trust
me, it's serious business. After
more than 25 years of being in
the financial services business,
I personally use both forms
of analyzing investments.
Whether you choose to follow
one technique over the other,
one thing is for sure, in the
investment world, there are no
guarantees, only faith, patience,
and courage, will lead you to the
land of prosperity. Neft week,
more on money. Listen every
Saturday at 8am-9am on WKAT
1360am for a live discussion on
money, business and finance.
Robert Henderson is a Certified
Financial Planner and author of
The New Underground Railroad.


n ( I he brain of fnancial r takerr



ofpun- --- -






"Copyrighted Material ---
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Syndicated Content _-'-



Available from Commercial News Providers" -






__ -mm *


Luxury car sales show the rich are spending less

By Chris Woodyard income surveyed late only half the rate of the on those catering to fell 3.3% in February. a turnaround.
last year by Unity same quarter a year the very rich, such as Falling housing .'"People are a little
Suddenly the rich Marlketing said they ago. Prada, Johnson says. values have affected cautious right now,"
aren't getting richer would be spending The biggest impact Neiman Marcus Group wealthy customers says Tim Smith, who
and luxury car dealers less in 2008 on luxury has, been on more in February registered most in Florida and runs the family-owned
are joining other high- goods. Bob Smith BMW in
end retailers in feeling Calabasas, Calif., a Los
the pinch. I I IVIDV I D IC nII n-nc: AC Angeles suburb.


Adding to a
turnabout in once-
resilient upscale goods,
most luxury car brands
saw sales drops last
month.
Mercedes-Benz
softened 3.7%
compared with March
last year, Autodata
reports. BMW fell 8.7%,
and Lexus plummeted
13.6%.
Overall, luxury
vehicle sales are off
almost 13% this year.
Purveyors of the finer
things in life are finding
their well-heeled
customers are caught
in the same economic
riptide tugging at the
less well-off.
"It's a recession that
has a double whammy:
Your real estate is down,
and your investment
portfolio is down," says
Milton Pedraza, CEO of
the Luxury Institute.
"Even the ultrawealthy
are saying, 'Let me
pause here and see
what's going on.' "
The biggest impact
is at the entry level of
the high-end market
- "aspirational luxury"
for relative newcomers
to upscale living,
says Craig Johnson,
president of Customer
Growth Partners, a
research firm.
Nearly four out of 10
consumers averaging
$155,700 annual


hAU I[I jUIU'IN, UUui I Urj
March sales of luxury auto brands and change from
March 2007.
Make Vehicles sold Pctg. c
Lexus 24,939 13.6
BMW 23,115
Mercedes-Benz 20,817
Cadillac 17,453 -
Infiniti 13,821
Acura 13,288


When it comes to
luxury cars, buyers
aren't trading down.
They're holding off.
"They just want to see
that the worst is over,
the bottom is there and
everything is going to be
OK," says Mike Jackson,
CEO of AutoNation, the
nation's largest new-car
dealership chain.

The nation's largest
Mercedes dealer,
Fletcher Jones
Motorcars in Newport
Beach, Calif., is still
ahead of last year's
sales pace, but
customers are trying
to drive tougher deals,
says Garth Blumenthal,
general manager.
Luxury car dealers
are coping with the
same chill as other
high-end retailers.
Though the fortunes of
the most elite luxury
retailers were still rising
in Customer Growth
Partners' first-quarter
survey, up 6%, that's


mass-market upscale
retailers, such as
Nordstrom (JWN) and
Neiman Marcus, than


its first monthly
comparable-store-sales
decline since March
2003. Nordstrom sales


California, Johnson
says. Car dealers in
those states are feeling
it, but they still look for


"James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manager, will be accepting
SEALED SUBCONTRACTOR BIDS for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Es-
timate for Seminole Middle School Total Program Management Classroom
Addition until 5:00 PM on April 24, 200&. The work includes various trades
for CSI Divisions 2, 10, and 16. Jalnes A. Cummings, Inc. Is actively seeking
Broward County School Board certified minority subcontractors and suppliers.
Sealed bids will be accepted at James A.Cummings, Inc. main office @ 3575
NW 53 Street; Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309. Bid documents will be available
through Cummings, Dodge and Reed Construction. For more information
please call Patrick Holland @ James A. Cummings, Inc. (954) 733-4211 or
Fax: (954) 485-9686.


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 2008

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2ND FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 7:30 pm
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

Notice: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council with
respect to any matter to.be considered at this meeting, that person shall insure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence upon
which any appeal may be based (f/s 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate
in this proceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk no later than two (2)
days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if hearing
impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Scaled bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 35.00 Pan American Drive, Miami, a 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 76046 INVITATION FOR BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF
BREECHES, PUTTEES, AND BOOTS

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 12:00 P.M., MONDAY, APRIL 28, 2008

Detailed specifications for this.bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at viww.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager





AD NO. 003553

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


INVITATION FOR BID FOR RADIATOR REPAIRS,
REPLACEMENT AND RECOR1NG FOR ALL CITY
OF MIAMI FLEET AND FIRE DEPARTMENT VEHICLES


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 002402


1FB NO. 71043


THE TRUE MEASURE OF A GREAT
NEWSPAPER LIES IN ITS COURAGE,
ITS PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
AND ITS DEDICATION TO THE
COMMUNITY IT SERVES

M e flllami surimesW.
INri5ra [65 UP!

















MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 9-15, 2008


1448 N.W. 69th Street
$400 monthly, $500 to move
in. Call 305-934-9327
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$80 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen,and bathroom One
person,305-474-8188
305-691-3486
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Air, cable TV, refrigerator,and
microwave. Utilities included.
Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
19561 N.W. 30th Court
With air, $120 weekly, $240
to move in. 305-310-5272
2555 N.W. 158 Street
Newly renovated three bed-
room house. Rooms for rent.
$150 weekly. Air, washer and
dryer. Near buses and
stores. 305-764-8102.
6849 N.W. 15th AVENUE
Luxury rooms different sizes
quiet area, utilities included.
$100/$125 weekly $250.,
move in immediately.
786-277-2693
8275 N.W 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776
CAROL CITY AREA
Furnished rooms for rent.
Call 305-528-3716.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Furnished and unfurnished
rooms. $150 weekly, free
cable, washer, dryer. $650 to
move in. 954-397-1283
NORTH MIAMI
Large bedroom, cable, cen-
tral air, parking, utilities in-
cluded. Call 305-733-4896
Rooms for rent
Air. Call 305-634-6026.
South Beach
Beautiful fully furnished one
bedroom on 12 Street.
Central air, washer, dryer, ca-
ble and wireless internet.
comer unit. Unobstructed
views. Immediate occupancy.
$1275 monthly 860-836-
0136


100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$215 weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232
18032 NW 8 Avenue
Room for rent. Private home,
beautiful neighborhood. Call
407-445-3235.

19541 N.W. 37th Court
Utilities included $575
monthly, furnished. $300
security.
Call 305-621-0576
534 NW 52 STREET
Efficienct for rent
Call Michelle 786-260-1613.
FURNISHED STUDIO
North Miami, full kitchen, ca-
ble, central air, utilities
included. Call 786-285-3197.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Efficiency, lights, water, cable
included $500 monthly.
786-306-8786

MIAMI SHORES AREA
Furnished efficiency,utilites,
cable $450 monthly. First
and last. Call 305-751-7536

ROOMS IN CASTLE
STYLE MANSION
Free light.s
Room $450 monthly plus
$150 security/ near bus line
or $350 monthly plus $150
security. Family Dollar three
blocks north.786-523-1736.



1146 SESAME STREET
One bedroom, one bath,
$650 monthly, $1500 down
Call 786-287-1080

1205 N.W. 58 Street
One bedroom. All appliances
included. $600 monthly plus
security. Section 8 and
HOW-PA Ok. 786-277-0632


1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575 Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1245 NW 58th STREET
One beddroom, one bath.
R575 monthly. All appliances
Free 20 inch flat screen TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one and two bed-
rooms. $525 and. $725
monthly Appliances included.
Call 305-747-4552
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL -
Two bedrooms, one
bath, $575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
1425 N. W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes
refrigerator, stove, central
air water $1100. to move
in. Call 305-628-2212
1500 N.W. 65th Street
One bedroom, air, $560.
monthly utilities not included.
Gated property.
Call 786-514-4746.
1510 N.W. 68 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Studio $475. Applian-
ces included.
786-797-6417
1520 NW 61ST STREET
One and two bedroom apart-
ments renovated, all housing
agencies welcome.
Call 305-720-2927
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Free 20 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1835 N.W. 2nd COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 monthly, appliances
free, 20 inch flat screen Tele-
vision.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$425
305-642-7080
210 N.W. 17 STREET
One bedroom $475. Stove,
refrigerator air. 305-642-7080
249 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, just renovated fenced
yard, parking, $800 monthly
plus security. Section 8
welcome.Call 786-216-7533.
421 NW 59 Terr.
One bedroom $575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/ 786-359-7054
4425-4427 N.W. 23 Coourt
Two bedrooms, one bath
$825. Four bedrooms, two
baths $1200. 305-642-7080.
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
5200 N.W. 26 Avenue
Three or two bedrooms from
$700. Section 8 welcocme.No
Security Deposit
Call 305-634-3545
5755 N. W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, parking,
$625 monthly, $1000 security
deposit. Call 954-394-7562.
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
7001 N.W. 15 Ave
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 monthly. All appliances
included. Joel 786-355-7578.
7521 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
One bedroom, one bath.
Renovated, new appliances
and parking. Section 8
HOPWA OK. Free TV with
lease $840 monthly. Drive by,
then call 9 am to 6 p.m. Ask
for Dick 305-754-7900
8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.


8475 N.E. 2na Avenue
One bedroom apartment.
Section 8. Call 305-754-7776
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, one,
two, and three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry arid gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515.00
Two bedroom, one bath
$630.00
Free water, air
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
MIAMI LAKES
Studio, Brand new
786-301-4368 305-558-2249
Northwest Dade
Two bedrooms, upstairs.
305-331-5399
OPA LOCKA AREA
From $300, section 8 OK.
305-717-3343
OPA LOCKA AREA
Updated two and three bed-
rooms available. Tiled,
central air, appliances and
water included. First month
free move in special. Limited
time!!. Section 8 Welcome.
305-688-2749
Over Town Area
One bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 ok. 786-262-4536
WYNWOOD AREA
28th Street and 1 st Avenue
two bedrooms, one bath.
$800 monthly, all appliances.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.


10070 N.W. 12 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1050 monthly. Section 8.
786-277-8287.
10273 N.W. 25 Avenue
Two bedrooms, two baths,
laundry, fenced yard. $1200
monthly. 305-696-8338.
10th AVE. NW 61 STREET
Brand new three bedrooms,
two baths. HOPWA and
Section 8 ok. 305-624-0451
1245 N.W. 60 Street
One and two bedrooms, one
bath, security bars, fenced
in, Italian tiles. 786-210-
5644.
1290 N.W. 44 Street
Two bedrooms, duplex.
Section 8. 305-525-4644.
1734 N.W. 49 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, security bars,
appliances. Section 8 Wel-
come. $1325. 305-215-8125.
1817 N.W. 41 Street
Remodeled two bedrooms,
one bath. $850 monthly,
$2150 to move in.
305-634-5794.
1848 NW 42 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Appliances, water included,
central air. Section 8
welcome. Call 786-290-6750.
1875 N.W. 94 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly.
Call Stanley 786-663-1962.
2553 YORK STREET
"New" one bedroom triplex.
Section 8 305-525-4644.


OUU INI.VV. I tl MVAIenu
ONE BEDROOM Section 8
ok. Call 305-754-7776
3051 N.W. 134th Street
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
Newly remodeled two large
bedrooms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, cable, central air,
tile, security bars and large
walk-in closet. $1050
monthly. Call 954-557-4567
4245 N.W. 24 Ave Apt B
Newly remodeled two bed-
rooms, one bath. $1100
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-219-5225..
4714 N.W. 16 AVENUE
Four bedrooms, one bath,
central air, water included.
$1200. 305-218-1227.
7633 N.W. 2 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1075 monthly. Section 8
OK. Call 305-332-5008.
7752 N.W. 2nd Court
Four bedrooms, two baths
$1465 monthly.
Section 8 OK!.
Ron Jackson 305-582-8210
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first last, security. Section 8
preferred. Call 786-374-9278

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
NORTHWEST AREA
One, two, three, five bed-
rooms from $500 to $1800
monthly
305-757-7067
Design Realty


191st Street NW 35th Ave
Four bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.
3058 N.W. 203 LANE
Three bedrooms, comer,
fenced.HOPWA and Section
8 ok. Call 305-624-0451.
CAROL CITY AREA
18709 NW 46 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths
SECTION 8 WELCOME
786-367-6268
CAROL CITY
Three bedrooms, one bath,
washer and dryer, central air,
alarm system included. Call
786-326-8280.
IVES DAIRY ROAD AREA
Two bedrooms, two baths,
very nice. Large rooms. All
new appliances. Near
California Mall. 55 and over
community Ask for Steve
305-318-9640
LAUDERHILL
Three bedrooms, three
baths,
washer, dryer. $1600
monthly. 305-333-0514


1045 NW 47th STREET
Five bedrooms, two baths
$1750 monthly.786-325-7383
1128 N.W. 76 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled. Section 8.
305-316-0681
1311 ST NW18th AVENUE
Rent while qualify to buy
Three bedrooms two baths,
Florida room, garage.,$1550
monthly. Sales Alvin
954-430-0849
1333 NW 75 STREET
Three bedrooms, two bath.
$1350 monthly.954-704-0094
14410 NW 21 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, all new inside.
Section 8 O.K. 786-738-1225
151 ST. NW 18th AVE.
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Central air. $1350 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
954-430-0849

15701 N.W. 18th Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
with washer and dryer and
appliances, $1600 monthly.
Section 8 Ready.
Friend Management
Rickey 786-253-7218


IUiU IN .V. I. I I. II i lCl
Three bedrooms one bath
Call Roy at 305-608-8757.
1790 NW 52nd STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$950. 786-457-3287.
18032 NW 8 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 407-445-3235.
18715 NW 45TH AVENUE
SECTION 8 OK
Three bedrooms, one bath
with tile floors, central air, in
quiet area. $1365 monthly.
Call Joe 954-849-6793
19620 N.W. 22ND AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths
plus garage home. Section 8
welcome. Call Fred:
954-392-0374
2535 NW 161 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air. No Section 8 Call
305-685-0574.
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
321 NW 51 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths
with tiled floors, central air,
heat. $1500 monthly. No
Section 8. Call 305-652-9343
3520 N.W. 208 Street
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath. Section 8 Only.
Call
Mr. Melton 305-625-2135
41 Street N.W. 5 AVENUE
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776
4644 N.W.16th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. 954-499-3030.
7350 N.W. 2 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1000 monthly, $2000 to
move in. 305-934-9327.
780 N.W. 42 Street
Beautiful ready to move in
three bedrooms, one bath,
new kitchen. $1400 monthly
also brand new efficiency.
$500 monthly. 786-488-7795.
781 NW 77th Street (rear)
One bedroom, appliances in-
cluded, air, utilities paid by
tenant. $550 monthly. $1375
to move in. 305-742-1050
97 N.W. 28 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
house with den $1200
monthly, all appliances
included.
Section 8 Welcome. Call Joel
786-355-7578.
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three, and four bed-
rooms with air. $700 to
$1250
305-642-7080.
MIAMI GARDENS
Three bedrooms, one
bath,tile, carpet, family room,
custom window treatments,
mirrors, canopy carport, ap-
pliances, washer/dryer, key-
stone and shutters.
Section 8.
First, last, and security.$1500
monthly Call 305-790-0093.
NW / NE AREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.
Opa Locka Area
Three bedrooms, den, air, tile
floors, fenced yard. $1200
monthly. No Section 8.
305-691-8556
ROLLING OAKS
Four bedroom, three baths,
786-260-3453
STOP!!!
Behind in rent and mortgage?
Call Kathy 786-326-7916




1550 N.W. 63 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1275 monthly plus one
monthly to move in. Section
8 welcome. Rent to own.
305-968-9161


1839 N.W. 74 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$165,000. 305-794-9959


1035 NW 49 STREET
Two bedroom, one bath, with
enclosed garage. 150K
.Sales Alvin 954-430-0849
17430 N.W. 47 Ave
Four bedrooms, three baths.
Need to sell fast, job relocat-
ing. Includes $30,000 worth
of new furniture, 2004 Honda
free with home purchase.
Asking $289,500 or best
offer.Call 786-662-9021 or
305-733-0560.
1852 N.W. 45th Street
New construction home for
sale, affordable housing pro-
grams welcome, three bed-
rooms, two baths, $225,000,
call 786-229-4824 or 305-
807-6115.
3029 N.W. 66th Street
New construction home for
sale, affordable housing pro-
grams welcome, four bed-
rooms, two baths, call 786-
229-4824 or 305-807-6115.
960 N.W. 182nd Street
New construction home for
sale, affordable housing pro-
grams welcome, three bed-
rooms, two baths, $225,000,
call 786-229-4824 or 305-
807-6115.
NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedroom, two bath.
House for sale Large yard.
Call 305-873-4729


COIN LAUNDRY
For sale 50K 1659 N.W. 3
Ave. 305-588-9084.


Don't Lose Your Home
We Stop Foreclosures Fastl
Call 305-677-2226
24 HR. Plumbing
Unclog All typ6s of Blockage.
Check Water Heaters and
Septic tank. Free Estimates.
Call 786-597-1924 or
305-576-5331
FUNERAL PACKAGES
Starting at $1495.
Serving Miami to Key West.
Call 786-333-2084
IMPROVE YOUR CREDIT
Remove late and collection
accounts. Results within 45
days. Call Bob 305-418-2338
Need a Drain Fill?
Good Work! Good Price!
Call Morris 305-588-0205



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, and plastering. Also
additions. Call 954-980-4231
or 305-892-0315.

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.

M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves, re-
frigerators,d water heaters.
Joel 305-758-8608 or cell
305-244-8948.




LIVE-IN CAREGIVER
Experienced only
786-277-1836

MUSICIAN WANTED
Saint James Baptist,
Church of Coconut Grove
is in search of a spirit-
filled,
God-fearing musician. If
you are interested in this
position, please contact
Deacon Jimmy Smith Sr.
305-259-6218 or call the
church at 305-443-4440.
Office hours, 10 a.m. -
3:30
p.m. Reverend Kenton L.
Williams Sr., Senior Pastor


301 NW 177th STREET
UNIT 232 BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Oversized one bedroom, Earn Extra Income
one- Independent Distributors
bath tiled floors, central needed. Free training, incen-
air/heat $825 monthly tives and bonuses.
Call 305-652-9343. CALL today! 1-877-570-1610


VILLAGE

OF PINECREST Route Drivers
NOW HIRING! II;


Police Officer
$46,800 upon
certification

$30,420 while
attending police
academy

Certified and
non-certified
positions available.

Excellent pay
and benefits
job description and
application process at
www.pinecrest-fl.gov/
jobs

Village of Pinecrest
12645 So. Dikie Hwy..
EOE M/FN/VD-DFWP


MARKETING

Associate Vice
President Advertis-
ing & New Media

The Greater Miami
Convention & Visitors
Bureau is a sales and
marketing organiza-
tion whose mission is
to market Greater Mi-
ami and the Beaches
across the globe as
a premier convention
and vacation destina-
tion. We are seeking
to hire a senior market-
ing executive with 7-10
years of experience in
traditional advertising
and consumer brand-
ing as well as 3-5
years in eMarketing
initiatives. Ideal candi-
date will have experi-
ence in simultaneous-
ly managing on-line
and off-line initiatives
to ensure consistency
in messaging across
platforms. Ability to
think strategically with
extensive knowledge
in developing Web 2.0
strategies is essential.
This position requires
very strong interper-
sonal skills, demon-
strated staff manage-
ment skills, proven
relationship-building
skills and excellent
presentation skills.
English language com-
munication skills (writ-
ten and verbal) are
a must. Foreign lan-
guage communication
skills are a plus, but not
required. A bachelor's
degree in Advertising
or Communication is
preferred with addi-
tional' consideration
for a relevant Master's
degree or professional
certification(s).

We offer an excellent
compensation and
benefits package. For
consideration SEND
cover letter, resume
and salary require-
ments by April 21,
2008 to: employ-
ment@gmcvb.com or
fax our Human Re-
sources Department
at: 305 530-5859.
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE. EOE


Be a Security Guard
Or renew license $55, also
do
G and conceled. Reliable
#DS2600085 and #k200017.
786-333-2084.


Free wireless

internet at

Goulds Park
Miami-Dade County
Mayor Carlos Alvarez
will join members of
the Wireless Miami-
Dade Steering
Committee to launch
free wireless service
at the scoreboard field
in Goulds Park on
Thursday, April 10,
2008. The 10:00 a.m.
launch is the third
in a series of wireless
parks to go online. The
free wireless service,
already in place at
Tamiami and Tropical
Parks, is sponsored by
Wialan Technologies
as part of the Mayor's
Wireless Miami-Dade
Initiative, a six-month
pilot project.
On April 17, Amelia
Earhart Park will
also begin to offer
free wireless service
with the assistance of
an additional vendor
Cisco.
"Ourpartnershipwith
Wialan Technologies
will enable County
residents to surf the
internet and work and
learn in a pleasant
outdoor setting. It will
help close the digital
divide and keep our
parks safe through the
use of wireless security
cameras," said Mayor
Alvarez.
Wireless Miami-
Dade is an initiative to
create an environment
that is technologically
appealing to
citizens, visitors and
businesses. For more
information on the
Wireless initiative, visit
www.miamidade.gov/
mayor/wireless.asp.


~be %Uiarnf ~imtt


seeks an


ADVER RISING


REPRESENTATIVE


to join our growing staff


The suecessfut candidate will possess:
* At leasi Iws ycats experKence in sales and nuikteting.
* Great communication skili and outgoing personality.
* Excellent ability to organize and set priorities.
* A reliable veh vce, as daily contact with clients is mandatory.
* Knowledge of basic computer program s.


Here's what you can expect:
* Srmail. eInlhUiasaNIic saff.
* Lyald readers and advertisers.
* Hnuse accounts available.
* Tremendnmus grwth puoential|,
* Serious money to be made.


Send resume and cover letter to:a
ad.e rtdsng@ niamtitmesonline.cem


SECTION Dl


...........


ZCO I MAIM Lip


---------------


ss


es









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


D 8 THE MIAMI TIMES APRIL 9-15, 2008


Which way do investors go next?


Technology stocks are cheap now,

at least relative to their earnings


By John Waggoner

One day, stocks are down
and gold is up. The next day,
precious metals plunge and
stocks soar.
Pity the poor 401(k)
investor. Last quarter's
market volatility the
highest in five years was
enough to give anyone an
anxiety headache.
If you're puzzled about
what to do right now with
your retirement money,
you've got plenty of company.
So we're presenting two
views on the stock market
- one bullish, the other
bearish from two first-
rate mutual fund managers.
You can decide which one is
most helpful.
First, a word from the
bears. Robert Rodriguez is
a switch-hitter: He's one of
the few fund managers who
runs both a stock and a
bond fund. Each of his funds
scores in the top 25% of its
investment category. But
Rodriguez says he worries
about the near-term threats
to both the stock and bond
markets.


"Our conclusion is
that we're going into a
period of longer-term
inflation," Rodriguez
says. His reasoning: The
Federal Reserve has been
too focused on avoiding
recession and not focused
enough on combating rising
prices. "In our opinion, the
Fed is proceeding down a
road that's inflationary,"
Rodriguez says.
He titled his most recent
investment outlook Crossing
the Rubicon, a reference
to Roman history that
now means an irrevocable
decision. To Rodriguez, the
die was cast for inflation
once the Fed bailed out
Bear Stearns, the troubled
investment bank. By
assisting in the Bear Stearns
merger with JPMorgan
Chase, Rodriguez thinks, the
government is heightening
the risk that other, similar
investment firms will expect
to be bailed out, too, if they
run into trouble.
For his bond fund, FPA
New Income, Rodriguez has
become ultra-defensive,
buying only very short-term,


high-quality bonds. One
measure of how cautious
he has become: The average
security in the portfolio
matures in less than one
year. "My basic feeling is
that long-term Treasury
yields of 3% to 4% have no
inherent investment value,"
Rodriguez says.
FPA Capital, his stock
fund, is 40% in money
market securities, or cash.
And he's gone on a temporary
"buyer's strike," adding no
new holdings to the fund
until the environment seems
more stable. "Earnings
expectations are too high,"
Rodriguez says. Even if a
recovery takes root in the
second half of the year -
the current consensus on
Wall Street it'll be modest
at best, he believes.
On the bull side is Dan
Chung, chief investment
officer for the Alger funds.
His Alger MidCap Growth
ranks in the top 20% of
all midcap growth funds
over the past five years,
according to Morningstar,
the investment trackers.
Chung feels that much of
the broad-based stock sell-
off of the past few weeks was
sparked not by broad-based
economic fundamentals but
by troubles in the financial


So which

one is right?

You may not have long to

wait to find Out. eCompanies



quarter earnins ovbetter than

ext few wees. d halfthe

esuector and redismal,rkets.

bear-market case could

have longer to run. But

if"W companies report that

business was better than

expected, the second half

of 2008 could prove much

happier than the first.


sector and credit markets.
"We're seeing some pain
in housing and consumer
spending, but the stock
market's reaction has been
overly punishing across the
board," Chung says.
Even fears_ about real


estate may be overstated, he
thinks. "From 2004 through
2007, a significant number
of homes bought were second
homes, vacation homes or
investments," Chung says.
"That's a large part of the
bubble." Having investors
absorb losses on bad real
estate investments isn't as
damaging, he says, as it
would be if those investors
were losing their primary
homes.
Even though the world
economy is slowing, Chung
says, it's still growing at
a faster pace than in the
USA. China's economy, for
example, has fallen from
its double-digit pace of last
year, but it's still growing
at a robust 8% to 9%.
Overseas growth will mean
solid earnings growth in
technology, industrial and
health care, Chung says,
thanks to demand from
abroad.
Technology stocks are
cheap now, at least relative
to their earnings, he says.
Many tech companies also
have sizable stockpiles
of cash on their balance
sheets, so they're not highly
vulnerable to the credit
crunch. Even better, they
derive a good chunk of their
earnings from overseas.


Foreclourr relief bill clears hurdle






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WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


National Conference on the Black Family in America (NCBFA)


CLINGMAN
continued from 5D

just celebrated his
40th year in the
publishing business.
A pioneer in Black
pride, economic
empowerment, and
Black consciousness,
Haki gave a stirring
spoken word in
remembrance of his
friend and colleague,
Dr. Asa Hilliard. It was
an emotional moment
and a special moment
because Dr. Hilliard's
wife, Patsy Jo, was
in attendance. Haki's
words, written for that
special occasion, were
absolutely beautiful.
Nowhere else
can you get a line-
up like that, along
with educational
workshops ,
entertainment by four
of the best soloists
and spoken word
artists I have ever
heard, and great food
and fellowship.
I felt so blessed to
be in the company of
those in attendance,
and even after the
conference was over
many of us convened
to listen to Baba
Serikali and witness
the talents of his
young "men" as they
demonstrated their
Marshall Arts skills,
their discipline, their
Black consciousness,
and their educational
acumen. As you
can see, I was and


still am very excited
about this event and
I am already looking
forward to attending
next year.
I truly wish I .could
name all of those
whom I met and those
who managed the
conference and made
sure I had everything
I needed, but that
would take up a lot
of space. I want them
to know, however,


that I appreciate the
opportunity they
gave me to speak,
especially Dr. Thomas
Scott (Brother K) who
recommended me. I
also appreciate now
being added to the
"Hall of Fame" list of
past speakers. Just go
to the website (http://
louisville.edu/ edu/
bfa/) and you will see
what I mean.
Finally, but certainly


not in the least was the
pleasure and honor of
meeting Dr. Joseph
McMillan and his
family. At 80 years of
age, yes, slowed down
a little by illness and
other issues in his
life, was there every
morning bright and
early, ready to "start
on time."
He is a man among
men and a glowing
example of staying in


the race, determined
to finish his course.
Despite obstacles that
would make most of
us give up, Dr. Mac
seems to thrive on
challenges and has
a history of turning
stumbling blocks
into stepping stones.
It is to him that I owe
my deepest gratitude
for allowing me to be
a part of this historic
national conference.


sc ribe


THE MIAMI TIMES


City _____:_ii State Zip -
Phone email ________ ___,':_, *
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818 "Includes Florida sales tax


"James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manager, will be accepting SEALED
SUBCONTRACTOR BIDS for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Estimate for
Coconut Creek Elementary School Total Program Management Classroom Ad-
dition until 5:00 PM on April 17, 2008. The work includes various trades for CSI
Divisions 2, 10 and 16. James A. Cummings, Inc. Is actively seeking Broward
County School Board certified minority subcontractors and suppliers. Sealed
bids will be accepted at James A. Cummings, inc. main office 3575 NW 53
Street; Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309. Bid documents will be available through
Cummings, Dodge and Reed Construction. For more information please call
Patrick Holland @ James A. Cummings, inc. (954) 733-4211 or Fax: (954)
485-9688.


'9'


.9 ... ,,",~


Small Business Grant
Applications Available
April 10, 2008 thru May 1, 2008

The West Perrine Community Advisory Committee representing District 9 is
pleased to announce the Micro-Enterprise Business Grant Program for small
businesses in the West Perrine Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area
(NRSA). The maximum grant amount a business can receive is $25,000. All
small businesses in West Perrine (NRSA) may apply including businesses
that have received funding from other county programs. Grant application
requirements must be met to receive funding.

The Micro- Enterprise Business Grant Program is a special project made
possible by Commissioner Dennis C. Moss, West Perrine Community Advi-
sory Committee and the Office of Community and Economic Development
(OCED). The program is designed to stimulate economic growth and to assist
existing and start-up small businesses.

Applications will be available for pick-up on Thursday, April 10, 2008 at the
-Office of Commissioner Dennis Moss, 10710 SW 211th Street, Suite 206 and
CAA Center, 17801 Homestead Ave..

Two mandatory Information Meetings will be held. Attendance at one of the
meetings is required. Please be on time. Meetings will be held on the follow-
ing dates:
* Tuesday, April 22, 2008, 10:00 am until 11:00 a.m., South Dade
Government Center, 10710 SW 211 th Street, Suite 203.

* Thursday, April 24, 2008 6:30 pm until 7:30 pm, CAA Center, 17801
I homestead Avenue.

Applications can only be returned on Friday, May 2, 2008, between 10:00
a.m.-- 5:00 p.m. to the CAA Center located at 17801 Homestead Avenue. No
late applications will be accepted. For additional information, please contact
Cynthia Perry at NANA/Tools For Change Office at 305 751-8934.









BLA..CKS lMUST (CONIROI.


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


"Copyrighted Material






Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"


Timing is key when

running a small business


TAX TIME
continued from 5D

"There's no room to
fool .around with this
stuff," she said.
Her failure to put
the money aside was
compounded by the
fact that Goldstein, who
uses an accounting
program to keep her
books, didn't look
at her year-to-date
figures to see what her
tax liability might be.
"It's really a function
of looking at it, of
financial mindfulness,"
she said.
Tax professionals
say a lack of financial
discipline or vigilance
is often a problem for
small business owners.
Frequently, they're so
busy with other aspects
of running the company
that they don't keep
their books current, or,
like Goldstein, they'll
decide everything is
well in hand and they
don't have to pay such
close attention. The
answer for some is to
get some help, either
to keep track of your
books, or to keep tabs
on you, the owner,
so you don't get into
trouble.
Goldstein's solution
has been the latter -
a new accountant who
keeps after her.
Jaci Rae, an author
and owner of several
small businesses
based in Salinas,
Calif., learned a lesson
that many other small
business owners have
had she had the
wrong accountant,
someone who knew all
about personal returns,
but not enough about
a small company's
needs.
The common wisdom
among small business
owners is to find an
accountant or other
tax professional who
will understand the
needs of your type of
business or industry.
Referrals from friends
are one source, and
that's the route Rae
took, but your tax
preparer still needs to
be someone who can do
a competent job when
it comes to a small
business return.
Rae said her former
accountant missed a
number of deductions
that she could have
taken, for example, for
items the business had
donated to a charity.
She also missed some
key deadlines that
businesses need to
abide by.
She discovered some
of the problems when
she went online to do
some research.
"'The lesson I learned
is to check out at least
two to three sources


for an accountant,"
including current or
former clients, said
Rae, noting that many
people would seek out
a second opinion in
medical situations, but
fail to do so with a tax
professional.
Shealsochidesherself
now for not following
her instincts she
didn't feel comfortable
with her former CPA
on a personal or
.professional level,
but stayed with him
anyway. She realizes
she should have found
someone else .much
sooner.
Eileen Levitt's lesson
was one that many
owners have to learn
after being in business
for just a few years:
income taxes aren't
a one-year event,
but rather need to
be considered in the
context of previous and
subsequent years. She
also discovered that tax
events in her business
could have a painful
impact on her personal
tax liability.
Levitt, president of
HR Team, a Columbia,
Md.-based human
resources firm, found
she'd overpaid her
state income tax in
2005, so in 2006, she
had a big refund. That
might have been OK,
but when that money
was combined with
her earnings from her
company, it landed her
in a situation where
she was subject to the
alternative minimum
tax, which added
significantly to her tax
bill.
"The timing of things
is key," said Levitt, who
also reported that she
had to pay tax when
she bought equipment
in one year, but didn't
put it into service until
the next, thereby losing
out on tax savings
known as the Section
179 deduction. The
deduction requires
equipment to be bought
and put into service in
the same year.
"Sometimes you get
deals at the end of the
year," Levitt said. But
she realizes she could
have had a better deal
by taking that extra
step required by the
tax code.
Levitt says she's more
careful about timing
now: "'Sometimes you
don't know until the
next year how things
are going to turn out."
And, she's learned
it's probably safer to
have to owe the state
government a few
dollars in April rather
than the IRS a huge
amount next year at
tax time. She's no
longer overpaying her
state taxes.


Percentage of loans 30 days past due rose to 2.65%


LOANS
continued from 5D

to hurt quarterly
results at large lenders
such as Citigroup
(C), Bank of America
(BAC) and Wachovia
(WB), and at more
specialized lenders
such as GMAC, the
auto finance and
mortgage company.
Financial companies
worldwide have
written off more than
$200 billion related to
subprime mortgages


and other debt, and
analysts expect tens
of billions of dollars
of additional write-
downs for the just-
completed quarter.
Labor market
woes won't help.
Economists surveyed
by Reuters expect the
government on Friday
to report the economy
shed 60,000 jobs in
March, boosting the
unemployment rate
to 5% from February's
4.8%.
"Debt repayment


abilities of consumers
should continue to
erode until the labor
market firms," Lonski
said. "It will be difficult
to have a firming of
the labor market if
household purchasing
power continues to
suffer from faster
growth in food and
energy prices, relative
to income."



ir Really 'u-rS


MIAMIDAD

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs
305-375-JOBS (5627)
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
7eliverint ELccelexrce Every lay


ADVERTISEMENT
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE COVERING THE OPENING OF BIDS
JOB ORDER CONTRACT FOR MDCPS FACILITIES OPERATIONS, MAINTENANCE
FOR

1) JOB ORDER CONTRACT/08-CENTRAL 1
for all Regions of the MDCPS Facilities Operations, Maintenance
Contract # JOC08-C1

2) JOB ORDER CONTRACT/08-CENTRAL 2
for all Regions of the MDCPS Facilities Operations, Maintenance
Contract # JOC08-C2

3) JOB ORDER CONTRACT/08-CENTRAL 3
for all Regions of the MDCPS Facilities Operations, Maintenance
Contract # JOC08-C3


These contracts are only open to those bidders which have been pre-qualified as General Contractors by The School Board of Miami-Dade County. Florida.

Cone of Silence: A Cone of Silence is applicable to this competitive solicitation. Any inquiry, clarification or information regarding this bid must be requested in
writing by FAX or e-mail to:

Mr. Francis Hoar, District Director
Maintenance Project Operations
FAX #305-995-7964
E-mail: fhoar@dadeschools.net

This rule can be found at http://www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/.

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, (hereinafter called the "Board") from bidders for the contracts hereinafter set
forth at and until 2:00 P.M. local time according to the following schedule:
Description Set Aside Contract # Day Date
Job Order Contract ... JOC08-Cl Tuesday 05/06/2008


Job Order Contract

Job Order Contract


Open with Assistance Levels
.
Open with Assistance Levels


JOC08-C2 Tuesday

JOC08-C3 Tuesday


05/06/2008

05106/2008


Open with Assistance Levels
Bids shall be received at 1450 N.E. Second Avenue, Room 351, Miami, Florida, following which time and place, or as soon thereafter as the Board can attend
to same, said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an
authorized representative of the Board. The Board may thereafter make one or more awards of the contract, based upon the result of the tabulations as covered
by applicable laws and regulations.

This advertisement is for the award of three (3) Job Order Contracts (hereinafter called "JOC"). A JOC is a competitively bid, indefinite quantity contract with firm
fixed prices. It includes a collection of detailed repair and construction tasks with specifications that have established unit prices. It is placed with a contractor for
the accomplishment of repair, alteration, modernization, maintenance, rehabilitation, construction, etc., of buildings, structures, or other real property. Ordering
is accomplished by means of issuance of individual Lump Sum Work Orders against the contract.
Under the JOC concept, the contractor furnishes all management, professional design services as required, labor, materials and equipment needed to perform
the work.
The JOC(s) awarded under this solicitation will have a minimum value of $50,000 and a maximum initial value of $2,000,000 with two (2) possible extensions of
$2,000,000 each within each term. The term of the contract(s) will be for twelve (12) Months and may include two (2) renewal options for one (1) additional year
each. It is the current intention of the Board to award three (3) Job Order Contracts under this solicitation. The Bidder will hold their adjustment factors for one
hundred eighty (180) days and the Board reserves the right to make additional awards under this solicitation for a period of one hundred eighty (180) days after
the opening of bids.
The Board reserves the right to limit the total number of concurrent Job Order Contracts to be held by, or awarded to, a single bidder.

AFRICAN AMERICAN AND/OR WOMEN OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION
The Job Order Contracts are limited to those bidders which have been pre-qualified by the School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, prior to bidding, and
include the M/WBE subcontracting assistance levels of:
Contract No. African American Women Total Participation
JOC08-C1 18% 6% 24%
JOC08-C2 18% 6% 24%
JOC08-C3 18% 6% 24 %
These contracts are for MDCPS Facilities Operations, Maintenance, for work occurring in all areas of the Miami-Dade County Public School District. The Board
reserves the right to award and use multiple Job Order Contracts within the same region.
Intending bidders must attend a mandatory Pre-Bid Conference to be held at the Miami Dade County Public Schools' Maintenance Materials Management and
Facilities Operations, Maintenance Building in Room 215 2nd Floor Training Room at 12525 N.W.28t1 Avenue Miami, Florida, beginning promptly at 9:00 a.m. local
time on Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008 for the purpose of discussing the JOC concept and documents, answering questions and discussing JOC from the contractor's
perspective. Note that persons arriving after 9:15 a.m. will not be admitted to the meeting and will be considered non-responsive for bidding.
Each bidder must submit two price adjustment factors to be considered responsive. These same adjustment factors must apply to all the work tasks listed in the
contract documents. The first adjustment factor will be applied to that work which the construction is anticipated to be accomplished during normal working hours.
The second adjustment factor will be applied to that work which the construction is anticipated to be accomplished during other than normal working hours.
The estimated percentage of work by category is as follows: normal working hours construction 75% and other than normal working hours construction -
25%.

Intending Bidders may obtain one set, at no cost, of the bid and contract documents on CD-ROM, from April 7th thru April 22nd, 2008 at 12525 NW 28th Avenue,
Miami, FL 33167 2nd Floor, Maintenance Project Operations, Room 366, or at the Pre-Bid Conference.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.


"James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manager, will be accepting SEALED
SUBCONTRACTOR BIDS for the Partial Guaranteed Maximum Price Estimate
for Harbordale Elementary School Total Program Management Classroom Ad-
dition until 5:00 PM on April 17, 2008. The work includes all work required for
the Demolition of the Existing Cafeteria Building. James A. Cummings, Inc. is
actively seeking Broward County School Board certified minority subcontrac-
tors and suppliers. Sealed bids will be accepted at James A. Cummings, Inc.
main office @ 3575 NW 53rd Street; Fort Lauderdale. FL 33309. Bid docu-
ments will be available through Cummings Dodge and Reed Construction. For
more information please call Patrick Holland @ James A. Cummings, Inc. (954)
733-4211 or Fax: (954) 485-9658.


I_


I'lF+IR OWN DESTINY








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 9-15, 2008


Close to home: Housing market stable in Gainesville


By Christine Dugas

Though it isn't far
from the Atlantic and
the Gulf of Mexico,
Gainesville is an inland
city that never saw the
scorching highs and
deflating' lows that
have shaken real estate
in the state's sandy
coastal cities.
The median home
price and sales of


existing homes have
slipped lately, but
some positive signs
have recently emerged.
"I think we're heading
in the right direction,"
says Craig McCall,
president-elect of the
Gainesville Alachua
County Association of
Realtors.
More buyers, McCall
says, are beginning to
look at properties,'and


agents are starting to
receive more offers.
Gainesville, which
lies in north-central
Florida, has escaped the
waves of foreclosures
that have struck many
other U.S. cities.
Foreclosure patterns
have varied widely in
Florida, a report issued
last month by the
University of Florida
Bergstrom Center for


Real Estate Studies
concluded.
Wayne Archer, the
center's director, said
that most counties in
north Florida are in
good shape, especially
Leon County and
Alachua County, of
which Gainesville is
county seat.
While Gainesville as a
whole didn't experience
the indiscriminate


jump in home prices
that hit some other
parts of the state, a few
sections of the metro
area saw double-digit
price increases, the
local retail association
says. But overall in
recent years, annual
price appreciation has
generally amounted to
a comparatively modest
5% to 7%.
"We've largely been


Black women in business


BUSINESS
continued from 5D

more companies than
Black men, assuming
growth rates stayed
constant after 2002,
says Gwen Martin,
director of research at
the Center for Women's
Business Research.
Black women, like
all female owners, still
lag behind men by
some key measures.
The majority of their
companies are part-
time ventures, often
run from home at
night or on weekends
to supplement daytime
pay. Just 5% had
employees, vs. 10%
for Black men. Annual
revenue averaged about
$39,000, vs. $114,000
for Black men, Lowrey's
research shows.

EXTRA PRESSURE
Still, many aim
for bigger ventures,
such as BaGua Juice;
it employs six part-
timers.
Young worked for
business consulting
firms and the Bank of
New York after getting
degrees from Howard
University and New
York University's Stern
School of Business.
She says she was
promoted quickly but
grew disenchanted
with big-business
bureaucracy. Some
co-workers with less
education but more
seniority appeared,
unfairly to Young, to
get passed over for
promotion. "Inequality
is a very difficult thing
to deal with."
Also, as a Black
woman, she felt extra
performance pressure.
"You must work harder
just to be viewed as



Small business

owners and

their spouses

PAYCHECK
continue from 5D

small business owners
offer medical, dental or
other health benefits.
This creates recruiting
and operational
challenges for
businesses and it is why
Wells Fargo developed
insurance and
retirement solutions
to help small business
owners navigate these
hurdles."

ABOUT THE SMALL
BUSINESS INDEX
For the last 19
quarters, the Wells
Fargo/Gallup Small
Business Index
has surveyed small
business owners on
their current and
future perceptions
of their business
environment relating
to their business
situation. Results are
based on telephone
interviews with 600
small business owners
nationwide conducted
January 15 January
30, 2008. The margin
of sampling error
is +/- 4 percentage
points.


average," she says.
Young dipped into
her 401(k) retirement
account and savings
for the $80,000 needed
to open her first
store on the ground
floor of a Jersey City
apartment building.
She's opened a second
in a Goldman Sachs
cafeteria. Young, who
is single, is living on
savings until BaGua is
profitable.
Lowrey says one of
the most important
factors fuelingwomen's
entrepreneurship is
their "dramatically"
rising academic
credentials. Among
Blacks, twice as many
women as men earned
bachelor's and master's
degrees in, 2004, the
latest government
figures show. The gap


was narrower 20 years
ago. Black women
now get about 11%
of all bachelor's and
master's degrees.
"It just gives them
many opportunities
to do things on their
own," says Martin, at
the Center for Women's
Business Research.
The non-profit center
gets financial support
from banks and other
big companies seeking
to do business with
female entrepreneurs.
Mia Jackson,
38, leveraged her
education to start a
public relations and
marketing business in'
North Bethesda, Md.,
partly to solve her
child-care quandary.
Jackson got a
bachelor's in English
from Stanford


University. She worked
in Charles Schwab's
ad department before
getting laid off in
2001, when the San
Francisco-based
discount broker
trimmed operations
amid a recession.
She moved to the
Washington area,
where she considered
working for another
company.
But the single
mother no longer
wanted to deal with
the stressful "day-care
dash," rushing out at 5
each afternoon to pick
up her daughter.
She started Doro
Marketing Services
five years ago, working
alone from a home
office. Clients include
non-profit groups,
small companies


and government
agencies. She spent
about $15,000 from
her 401(k) and from
profits generated by
the business itself for
a computer and other
essentials.
Jackson often
works 50-hour weeks,
-including weekends.
But as her own boss,
she works around her
daughter's schedule.
"Every time I think
about going back in
the corporate setting, I
can't do it."
Caring for aging
parents
Tech-company
founder Josie Cheri
Lamkin launched
Gypsy Lane
Technologies to
resolve another family
challenge: elderly
parents.


an insulated and stable
market," McCall says.
Gainesville isn't
considered a traditional
site for vacation homes.
Still, it tends to attract
young and old alike.
For one thing, it's


home to the University
of Florida, the state's
largestuniversity. It has
four hospitals. It offers
a range of cultural and
recreational resources.
And it's relatively
close to beaches and


championship golf
courses.
Travel and consumer
magazines have
sometimes named it
one of the most livable
cities in the nation. This
year, SmartMoney.com


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INVITATION TO BID NO. 07-08-016
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk,
City Hall, 1st Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133-5504,
until 11:00 A.M. on May 9, 2008 for:
GSA Fleet Truck Wash Upgrade, B-74205A
Bids Due: May 9, 2008
AT 11:00 A.M.
Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and
equipment necessary to construct the Project(s) as described below and as
shown on the plans for a complete and functional Project. The Work consists
of the renovation of the existing masonry truck wash facility, demolition of the
existing metal building and the construction of a new 2,670 square foot single
story masonry expanded truck wash facility, equipment room and associated
site work.
Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified li-
cense as a General Contractor or General Engineering Contractor from the
State of Florida (and/or Subcontractors) and must have a minimum of (5) years
experience in the construction of similar projects including five (5) sepa-
rate project references of similar size, scope, and complexity, supported by
references within the past five (5) years. The Bidder must self-perform at least
thirty percent (30%) of the Work.
A non-mandatory conference and site visit will be held on Friday, April 18,
2008 starting at 10:00 A.M. at 1390 NW 20th Street, Miami, Florida 33130 to
discuss this solicitation.
Bid packages may be fully obtained from the Department of Capital Improve-
ments' website, www.miamigov.com/Capitallmprovements on or after April 10,
2008.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids
must be submitted in duplicate originals in the envelopes provided at the time,
date, and place above. Bids will be publicly opened. Any bids or proposals
received after time and date specified will not be considered. The respon-
sibility for submitting a bid before the stated time and date is solely and strictly
the responsibility of the Bidder. The City is not responsible for delays caused
by courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT
TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORDINANCE NO.
12271.



DP-000811


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
WAIVER OF COMPETITIVE BIDS AND
SELECTION OF CONSULTANTS FOR
MIAMI 21 MASTER PLAN
ADDITIONAL SERVICES
Miami, Florida

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on April 10, 2008 beginning at 9:00 am to consider
whether it is in the public's best interest that the City select consultants to provide additional services for
the Miami 21 Master Plan by method other than competitive bid as follows:

SThe City of Miami, Florida is currently engaged in a Citywide town planning project known as
the "Miami 21 Master Plan". The additional services consist of the preparation for additional
Town Planning, public meetings, and Urban Design services for the Citywide Miami 21 Master
Plan, increasing the authorized amount for the Miami 21 Work Order by an amount not to
exceed $510,000. The total estimated cost based on the entire scope of services proposal for
the Miami 21 Master Plan is an amount not to exceed $2,210,000.00.

The City of Miami proposes to select Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company, LLC formerly known as Duany
Plater-Zyberk & Company, Inc., Master Planners and Prime Consultant, to provide additional Town Plan-
ning, public meetings, and Urban Design services for the Miami 21 Master Plan. This action follows the City
Manager's written finding of a valid public emergency to the effect that the time required for the competitive
procurement and award of contract for said project creates an undue hardship on the public welfare, thus it
is in the best interest of the public to waive competitive procurement procedures. The City Manager has in-
vestigated and identified the aforementioned firm as having excellent qualifications distinctly geared to the
aforementioned project and a substantial record of experience in projects of like size and complexity. The
City Manager has further determined that said firm is appropriately licensed and certified as consultants
uniquely qualified to undertake and perform the required work on behalf of the City.

This action is being considered pursuant to Florida Statutes 287.055 (Consultant's'Competitive Negotiation
Act) and Sections 18-85 (Competitive Sealed Bidding/Waiver Procedures), 18-87 (Professional Services
as defined in F.S. Section 287.055) and 18-90 (Emergency Procurements) of the Code of the City of Mi-
ami, as amended. The criteria to be considered in this matter are set forth in the proposed resolution and
in these Code sections and in F.S. Section 287.055, which are deemed to be incorporated by reference
herein and are available as public records from the City of Miami.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City commission meeting of
April 10, 2008 at:

MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect to the proposed issue.
Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be
considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later
than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) busi-
ness days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


(Ad 003117)


SOUTHEAST OVERTOWN / PARK WEST, OMNI AND MIDTOWN
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

PUBLIC NOTICE

The City of Miami Southeast Overtown / Park West, Omni and Midtown Com-
munity Redevelopment Agencies (CRA) 2007 Annual Report Available.

In accordance with section 163.356(3)(c), Florida Statutes, the City of Miami's
Southeast Overtown/Park West Omni and Midtown Community Redevelop-
ment Agencies (CRA's) have developed the annual report of their activities
including a complete financial statement setting forth assets, liabilities, income,
and operating expenses as of the end of Fiscal Year 2007. This report has
been filed with the City of Miami's Office of the City Clerk and is available for
inspection during business hours in the Office of the City Clerk, located at City
Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive. In addition, the report is available in the office
of the CRA, located at 49 N.W. 5th Street, Suite 100 and also on the CRA's
website, www.miami-cra.org.

For further information, contact the CRA at (305) 679-6800.

James Villacorta
(# 003118) Executive Director, SEOPW, OMNI & MIDTOWN CRA




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