Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00541
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Miami Fla
Publication Date: April 2, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00541
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text










One Family Serving Since 1923


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Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutanmur In 1llis


DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS
Volume 85 Number 28 MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 2-8, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


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FIGHTING


TO END YOUTH


VIOLENCE


ON OUR STREETS


-4 m a ag -6


Wilem Jose,Assistant Director, Miami-Dade Weed & Seed with Miami-Dade county police officers and community volun-
teers at a block party at Belafonte Tacolcy Center.

Community: 'Take back our streets'


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miiamitimesonline.com
With the recent youth
violence that have been
plaguing our streets, Miami-
Dade and Miami Police have
adopted programs and events


in order bring peace in our
neighborhoods.
In Miami-Dade, teens
between the ages of 14 to
17 made up 87% of juvenile
arrests in 2007. The number
of juvenile arrests have gone
down while youth violent


crimes have increased," says
Wanda Finnie, Special Projects
Administrator II of Community
Anti-Violence Program at
Miami-Dade Juvenile Services
Department.
BLOCK PARTY


Miami-Dade County
State Attorney Katherine
Fernandez Rundale along
with the Miami and Miami-
Dade police departments,
Miami-Dade Weed and Seed,
and the Belafonte Tacolcy
Please turn to PARTY 4A


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Florida apologies for slavery: Is it enough?


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Florida regrets slavery
On March 26 2008, the state of Florida made history
by becoming the sixth state in our nation to formally
express regret for that shameful chapter in our
history.
It was almost painful to listen to John Phelp, curator of the
state's historic capitol, recap some of this states' old slave codes
and punishments. Many people were made uncomfortable to
hear again of the harsh whippings, inhuman treatment and
even death visited upon unfortunate slaves.
Many people dismissed the resolution of the Legislature
as meaningless considering there was no mention of
reparations.
But with a Republican dominated Legislature with a serious
budget problem, we tend to look upon the move as a sign of
progress. The leadership of this state today is nowhere near
the wisdom and progressive guidance of former governor like
Leroy Collins and Reubin Askew.
The citizens of this state deserve sound and intelligent
leadership that has been missing from Florida far too long.
We can only hope that this resolution of regret is a sign of
change and progress toward a more enlightened Legislature.

Michigan offers delegate plan
PTrhe seating of delegates fro the two defiant states of
|Florida and Michigan remain in limbo and coming to a
satisfactory resolution to the problem seems distant.
Maybe the coming primaries will settle the matter before the
convention.
A Michigan congressman proposed an alternate plan for
seating the state's delegates at the Democratic National
Convention. Rep. Bart Stupak suggested awarding delegates,
based partly on the results of Michigan's primary Jan. 15
and partly on the popular vote in all the nation's presidential
primaries.
The Democratic National Committee stripped both Michigan
and Florida of their national convention delegates because the
states moved their primaries to dates in January that were
earlier than party rules allowed under Stupak's formula, the
Michigan primary results would be used to give New York Sen.
Hillary Rodham Clinton 47 delegates. She received the most
votes in he contest Jan. 15, Illinois Sen. Barack Obama who
was not on the Jan. 15 ballot, would get 36 delegates. About
40% of the vote Jan. 15 was for uncommitted," and many of
those ballots were coast by Obama supporters Stupak said.
Stupak proposed diving up the state's remaining 73
delegates according to the percentages of the popular vote that
Clinton and Obama have received after the last Democratic
presidential primary June 3.
Grading change in the works
Around the state, you could almost hear it being
shouted in unison: "Finally.
The Florida Legislature is poised to finally make
meaningful change to the Florida Comprehensive Assessment
Test, which ranks right up there with hurricanes and traffic
as the most despised aspects of Florida life.
The change unanimously passed by the Florida Senate -
and the House needs to quickly follow suit would. alter the
way high schools are graded. Instead of only using the FCAT
to determine a school's grade, other elements including
significant barometers like graduation rates and graduation
rates of at-risk students, plus SAT and ACT scores will be
included in determining a school's overall grade.
Finally.
The plan must be adopted this session and should be
implemented for the 2009-2010 school year. By doing so,
lawmakers and educatorswouldcertainly give a fairer, more
comprehensive picture of a school's progress. State leaders
are finally realizing that a school's worth is much more than
just the cumulative FCAT grades.
School grades have become so all-important and
pressurized they now impact all aspects of a community.
Housing prices are affected depending on if an "A" school as
opposed to a "B" or "C" school is in the neighborhood.
Whether or not there are less "A" schools under the
proposed new system doesn't matter. What does matter is
a better overall look at a school, and the realization that
many factors go into making a school successful. Hopefully
schools will now look at a variety of ways to help students
succeed, rather than simply preparing for a test.
Eventually, the state needs to rethink whether the test
should be given in high school at all. The test might be better
served at elementary and middle school levels, with more
time spent in high school preparing students for college
entrance exams and entrance into the work force.
That's still in the future. For now, be glad there has finally
been positive FCAT change. -Sun Sentinel



Jackson gets no support in

Miami-Dade county
Dear Editor,
As Alphonso Jackson resigned amid allegations of corruption at
the highest echelons in HUD we in Miami are still stuck with a HUD
takeover of our local housing agency. HUD has been an ATM for
developers from New Orleans to Miami. Jackson, it seems, was playing
partisan politics with public money and public housing residents were
put out on the street not just in Miami but also New Orleans.
In the midst of all of this LaVoy is fast tracking a flawed plan to
develop only part of the Scott Carver land that was once home to over
1,100 people. His plan calls for only bringing back 150 units of low-
income housing on a partial parcel of the land. The left over Scott land
has been tested with toxic results. Once HUD finishes the meager
redevelopment, there will be no more money for further redevelopment
let alone cleaning up the vacant land.
As HUD cleans house they should get out of the way of a community
led process that would allow for a comprehensive green development
that would bring back all displaced residents, and create jobs.
Aiyeshia Hudson
Miami Workers Center


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OPINION


Bl. k'K.S MUiST CON'ROI TIlIIIRt OWN 11'STINY


Budget cuts teachers should

not turn on administrators

The current fiscal crisis at to descend on
all public schools, the court Tallahassee and ,.


system, municipalities and other
government agencies was not
created by the mismanagement
of these agencies, but by a
Legislature that instituted tax
cuts when the economy was
in a downturn. Recently, the
teachers have vociferously been
attacking the administration,
the school board and pretty
much anybody affiliated with


demand a realistic
solution to the budget crisis. We
should stop fighting each other
and start working together. I do
not think that any member of the
School Board or Administration
wants to make draconian budget
cuts, but what are you suppose
to do when you are hit with $100
million cut this year and $200
million cut next year.


T ee Holloway is startingto find his feet. He recently stood
up during all the drma and quietly proclaimed that the
finger pointing should cease


the public school system. The
teachers, administrators and
board members should direct
their ire at the Governor and
Leglislator.
During every election,
every politician proclaims the
importance of education and
seek the endorsement of the
teachers union. What the Union
needs to do is go yell at some
leglislators and ask them to
remember their promises. Rudy
Crew has faced a slashing of
his budget every year that he
has been Superintendent. It is
time for busloads of teachers,
administrators, janitors, police
officers, court administrators,
judges, firemen and anyone who
gets police, fire or waste services


Tee Holloway is starting
to find his feet. He recently
stood up during all the drama
and quietly proclaimed that
the finger pointing should
cease. Hopefully, the board,
administration, teachers,
janitors, maintenance, bus
workers (50,000 people) will start
working over their leglislators. It
is time that Tallahassee learn of
our discontent. Because if you
have not heard, they are working
on yet another tax reform that
will lead to more budget cuts.
Personally, I say keep the $300
that I got in tax savings and give
the teachers a raise and make
sure that I have firemen and
police officers who can respond
to my needs.


WHEN T HE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008



) ~ icn~enkq188


Obama: Challenging America on race


Barack Obama made one of
the best speeches on race by a
public official in the past several
years, blending the personal, the
academic and the inspirational
into one text.
But it was also courageous in
that it was given in the teeth of
the winds of the Pennsylvania
campaign. And it therefore,
constituted a risk that his base, a
large swath of the American people,
would understand his message
and add racial reconciliation to
the pantheon of issues that he has
offered for change.
I must admit that I expected a
speech that would briefly say that
he has already dealt with the issue,
that the actions of his pastor should
not be linked to his campaign and
that we should all move on. But
rather than do this, he and his
campaign must have conceived
of this as an opportunity with
enormous risk to place before the
American people a real challenge,
to move past racial division and the
resentment of Blacks and Whites
about their relative advantages
and status in society and form a
coalition for change.
In fact, he argued that it will be


necessary to form such a coalition
to make the big changes needed in
areas such as: the war in Iraq, but
also in achieving universal health
care, re-aligning the economy and
the other big ticket issues that he
has established.
Obama turned professor in


the resentment that feeds the racial
sensitivity of the low income Whites
who voted strongly for Hillary
Clinton in Ohio and are poised to
do so in Western Pennsylvania.
His campaign was not naive
in attempt to run a race neutral
campaign, because it was the


him damning America.
That seems to be what the media
wants, to do the bidding of the
Clinton campaign by wrapping the
cloak of race tightly around him
until he suffocates. It is what it
looks like.
I believe that the speech was also
courageous because it obviously
was calculated not to "throw Rev.
Jeremiah Wright under the bus"
but to explain who he was and
to provide a portrait of his works
at Trinity, thus explaining the
differences in culture between
the Black and White church.
He must have known that not to
disassociate himself from Rev.
Wright and his church would be
fodder for additional criticism that
he do so. So, in a courageous way,
he has tied his own future as a
presidential candidate to the act
of maintaining his linkage to his
pastor, his church and to the Black
community.
In this sense, the ultimate test of
America in this instance is whether
the distortion of the role of the
Black church as interpreted to
the public through the dominant
White perspective will result in the
downfall of his campaign.


helping Americans to understand
the differences between the
Black and White church, born of
different experiences in America
and therefore, where the ministers
reflect a prophetic approach to the
discussion of public events. He
looked back to slavery, to racism
as to the everyday racial slights
as the nexus within which Rev.
Jeremiah Wright was groomed,
an environment which shaped his
attitude and those his generation
and which gave them and
continues to give them the belief
that American will always harbor
racism. Obama's big gamble is that
America can change, and he can
help to lead it to turn away from


only way a Black man could win
the nomination and possibly the
presidency. But you could also
prophesy that race would be his
major stumbling block and that at
some point, he would have to deal
with it.
That is the Black man's burden.
No matter how credentialed, no
matter how skillful, no matter how
visionary, he or she will always
have to pass the gauntlet of race.
But un this case, how and why
the issue arose in the face of the
Obama campaign's attempt to run
a race-neutral campaign has been
of less interest to the media than
the persistent presentation of Rev.
Jeremiah Wrights video showing


With strain of war, their are thoughts of suicide


One day in the summer of 2005,'
a young soldier walked into my
chaplain's office in Baghdad and
told me he was thinking about
taking his own life. He was not
in despair because he had been
seriously injured in fighting.
Instead, he was emotionally
wounded by financial hardship
and a toxic relationship back
home..
With nowhere to turn, he came
to my office looking for help. We
spent the next hour discussing
why he should choose life over
death and hope over despair.
We talked about his family,
friends, faith and future. When
our session was over, he agreed
that suicide was a permanent
solution to a temporary problem.
He chose to live. Not just for
himself, but also for his children.


During my deployment in Iraq,
a few other soldiers in my unit
struggled with thoughts of
suicide but, fortunately, did not
follow through.
Unfortunately, as the nation
marks the fifth anniversary of
the war in Iraq, the Army is
beginning to see a disturbing
rise in the number of soldiers
who are taking their lives in war
zones or after they've returned
home. As many as 121 soldiers
committed suicide last year, up
about 20% over 2006, according
to Army officials. Thirty-four of
them occurred in Iraq. In 2005,
87 soldiers committed suicide,
compared with 67 in 2004 and
79 in 2003 the first year of the
war. The Army reports also found
a marked increase in attempted
suicides about 2,100 in 2007


Obama's race speech won't make wright or race go away


"There were early warning
signals of the ugliness that
could come....the message
was that Obama was not
exempt from a racial dig.
That was also evident in the
knock at Obama's Southside
Chicago church, or to be
more exact the minister
at the church, Jeremiah
Wright. He is an outspoken
afro-centric activist on
racial and social issues. The
inference was that Obama's
guilt' by membership and
friendship with him made
him a closet radical and a
race baiter."
This writer wrote these
words in a column January
6. It was a no-brainer
prediction that the Wright
card would eventually be
played hard by the media and
milked for all its worth. The
inflammatory, provocative
rants of Wright were well-
known. Thousands within
and without his church have
heard them for years. His
afro-centric tinged writings
have been widely cited by
black commentators. It was
only a matter of time.
The only surprise was the
timing. This writer expected
that the Wright card would
be kept tightly in the
political deck and dumped
on the political table by the
GOP "truth squads" in the
fall if Obama is the eventual


Democratic presidential
nominee. But. then again
why not dump it on the
table now. The Wright rants
are just too juicy, racially
salacious, and media
sensational to keep under
wraps any longer. And since
Hillary Clinton has been so
trashed and demonized by
much of the media, while
Obama got a free pass, all
the better to toss out Wright
now. If Obama can be
hammered with and tainted


by the guilt by association
tag with Wright that further
poisons the Democratic
Party well and makes the
throngs of independents
that are enthralled by
Obama waver, maybe even
rethink just who and what
they're getting into by
backing him.
But this writer didn't
just make the prediction
that the Wright card would
sooner or later be used
against Obama. He also


flatly predicted
the instant Obama stood on
the steps of the Old Capitol
building in Springfield,
Illinois back in February
2007 and announced that
he was on a history making
quest to be. president that
two things would happen.
The first is that the racial
innuendos, rumors, gossip,
hints, digs, and finger-
pointing would be a subtle
and tormenting subtext to
his campaign.


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compared with less than 1,500 in
2006.
Why the rise? The Army says
strained personal relations
are the most common cause of
suicide. But Army officials are
also concerned that longer-than-
expected and multiple tours
of duty are creating mental,
financial and legal problems for
soldiers.
Whenever I read about a young
soldier killing himself most
are in the 18-24 age group I
think back to my time in Iraq. I
remember the soldier's personal
agony. I recognize their cries for
help.


The Army is .
responding to
rising suicide rates with more
mental health providers in Iraq
as well as in the USA. More
training programs are available
for soldiers and their families,
and the Army is encouraging
battle buddies to watch out for
one another. Further, the Army
is spending $1.4 billion this
year on quality-of-life programs,
including health care for soldiers
and families. Last July, the
Department of Veterans Affairs
opened a national suicide
prevention hotline for veterans
(1-800-273-TALK).


Local politicians are jockeying for position in the coming
season and we hear a lot of wannabes are planning to test the
waters. Most ambitious so far is Val Screen of the Virginia Key
Beach Trust challenging Miami Dade Commissioner Audrey
Edmondson. Stay tuned.

We hear that former Miami Northwestern High principal
Steven Gallon Jr., has landed the superintendent's position
in New Jersey.
******
Venus and Serena Williams continue to move up the charts
at the Sony Ericsson Open on Key Biscayne, but outspoken
dad, Richard Williams continues to raise eyebrows and receive
flak for his reckless comments. Here's his latest made at the
Bangalore Open in India: "The white man hated me all my life
and I hate him. That's no secret. I'm not even an American, it
just so happens I was born in America. People are prejudiced
in tennis. I don't think Venus or Serena was ever accepted
by tennis. They never will be. But if you get some little white
no-good trasher in America like Tracy Austin or Chris Evert
who cannot hit the ball, they will claim this is great.

A lot of people are happy to see Commissioner Tomas
Regalado announce that he will run for Miami Mayor in the
next election. Regalado is very popular in this community
having been elected every term since 1996. They believe him
when he says he will have government in the sunshine and do
away with the backroom deals of the past.

Because South Flqrida is losing students faster than other
parts of the state it will be forced this year to absorb more
than half of the public school spending cuts. Miami-Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach counties will lose 7,887 students
and as a result, under the House plan, Broward, Palm Beach
and Miami-Dade counties, though they educate about 30
percent of the state's public schools students, stand to lose a
combined total of close to $12.9 million about 60 percent of
the statewide drop in spending. You do the math.

For the past 15 seasons, the San Francisco Giants have
opened the baseball season with slugger Barry Bonds in
uniform. On Monday their controversial home run king was
not there. It's too bad they could not straighten that steroid
mess out instead of ending a great career in this position.
******
North Miami residents are screaming mad about the increase
in water bills. The city needs $9.8 million a year for 30 years
to pay for a new plant that will cost $130 million. Businesses
are bearing the brunt of the increase, with a $75 fee per meter
charge in addition to usage. Residents are paying $14 a month
extra, plus usage.


T he issue here as it becomes an issue that defines Obama's
theme of change is not to "move beyond race" because that is
impossible, but to move with it...


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Web tip leads mom to Asia, abducted son


Availab


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Syndicated ontent


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Tournament champs 'Father in the Hood's,' receiving their trophy


Youth programs bring peace to the neighborhood


PARTY
continued from 1A

Center, held a block party at
Tacolcy located at 6161 NW 9th
Avenue. The purpose of the
Good Friday block party was
to encourage the residents in
the community to 'take back
their streets' and to build a
stronger relationship between
the police and the residents.
Pastor Billy Strange from
Mt. Calvary Baptist Church,
Representatives from the
Nation of Islam, 'Father
in the Hood,' Executive
Director Alvin Delaney of
BCDC Lifelines Consortium,
and Hector Taboada from
the Office of Mayor Carlos
Alvarez were among the many
guests who participated in
this celebration. There was
food, music, and a lot of
fun throughout the night.
Christian artist, God's Baby
Girl performed two songs that
kept the crowd hyped up and
full of energy.
Out of the six basketball
teams that competed,
'Father in the Hood' (a
neighborhood team)
outstanding performance
landed them as winners of
the basketball tournament
and was presented with a


trophy by Assistant State
Attorney Melba Pearson and
Tracy Kelley of Miami-Dade
Weed & Seed. 'That's Wat's
Up' (Miami Dade Weed and
Seed Team) were the runners
up but unfortunately MDPD
and City of Miami were
eliminated in the beginning.

ANTI-VIOLENCE RALLY
On March 22, the Miami-
Dade Juvenile Services
Department along with DJ
Khaled and 99JAMZ hosted
an Anti-Violence Rap Sessions
for the youth at Carol City
High School located at 3422
NW 187 Street.
The rally was the first
event held by the Violence
InterventionProject (VIP) which
has been implemented by the
Juvenile Services Department
as a way of creating a
strategic, ongoing, public
outreach campaign that focus
on the overwhelming violence
affecting our communities.
The VIP project is a brand new
initiative supported by Mayor
Carlos Alvarez.
"One of the techniques that
have been used is going into
the homes and talking to the
youth and the parents about
the roots of the problem leading
to violence and offer possible


solutions besides being
incarceration or probation. It
has really affected these kids
lives," Marie Bertot, a Senior
Media Relations Specialist
from the Miami-Dade
County Communications
Department.
At the rallies, the young
people are given a chance
to ask questions and their
voices are heard because
they are a part of visionary
solution. "When you allow
them to speak, you should
hear the passion in their
voice and they have a lot to
say," says Finnie.

THE SOLUTION
Finnie assured me that
the rallies will be an ongoing
initiative within Miami-Dade.
"We want to build a base
youth in Miami-Dade who will
carry anti-violence into their
community. So far, we have
collected over 300 signed
pledge cards from teens who
support the promotion of
non-violence," says Finnie.
The next rally will be held in
Liberty City then continuing
on to the streets of South
Miami. If you are in the
neighborhood when their in
town, stop by and make a
stand against violence.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held by the Transit Committee
of the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners in the Commission
Chambers, second floor, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, Florida, during a meeting to
begin at approximately 2:00PM, on April 16, 2008, where modifications to existing
bus routes will be considered as follows:
On or about June 15,2008, Miami-Dade Transit (MDT) proposes to eliminate
the following nine bus routes, all of which have low ridership and therefore
do not meet minimum service standards:
V, 68 (Gratigny Conection), 82, 147, 216 (Goulds Connection), 241 (North
Dade Connection), 242 (Doral Connection), 245 (Okeechobee Connection)
and the 278 (Flagaml Connection). To ensure efficient service, MDT also
proposes to make service adjustments to thefollowing routes: J, 6,41,77,95
Express, 212 (Sweetwater Circulator), and the 243 (Seaport Connection)./
At the hearing, the Committee will afford an opportunity for interested persons
or agencies to be heard with respect to the social, economic, and environmental
aspects of this project. Interested persons may submit orally or in writing evidence
and recommendations with respect to said project.
A person who decides to appeal any decision made by any board, agency, or
commission with respect to any such matter considered at its meeting or hearing,
will need a record of all proceedings. Such person may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is based.'
Miami-Dade County providesequal access and equal opportunity in employmentand
does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs or services. Auxiliary
aids and services for communication are available with advance notice. This form
can be made available in accessible format upon request (audiotape, Braille, or
computer disk). For material in alternate formats, sign-language interpreters, or
other accommodations, please contact Maud Lizano at 786-469-5478. Customers
using TDD, please call through the Florida Relay Service (1-800-955-8771) at least
five days in advance.
For more detailed information about this hearing contact Miami-Dade Transit at
305-770-3131 (for those South of 216th street, 305-891-3131) or visit Miami-Dade
Transit's website at http:llwww.mlamidade.govltransitl.
George M. BurgessM
County Manager .M


City of Miami Police Department basketball team


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


viders"


*Includes Florida sales tax









5A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Rl\ACKS MUST CONTRoL TliIR OWN DlESTIN


Why Hillary Clinton is


By DeWayne Wickham

I think there's a
pretty good chance
that Barack
Obama will win the
Democratic Party's
presidential
nomination.
But then I also
thought it was
a sure thing in 1969 that my
hometown Baltimore Colts
would defeat the New York Jets
in Super Bowl III and that the
1997 Orioles, a team that spent
the entire season in first place,
would win the World Series.
Neither happened. The Jets
upset the Colts, and the Orioles
didn't even make it into the World
Series that year, losing in the
American League Championship
Series to the Cleveland Indians.
A lot of pundits were convinced
that both teams would do much
better, but like me they learned
that calling a winner before the


final score was tallied was at
best a guessing game.
In the campaign to become the
Democratic Party's standard-
bearer, a lot of people who think
Hillary Clinton doesn't have a
chance of pulling off a come-
from-behind win over Obama
are urging her to quit the race
- though even Obama said she
should stay in the race as long
as she wants.
Even so, a growing list of his
supporters want Clinton to
quit before anyone reaches the
finish line, which is to say, they
want her to let Obama win by
default.

LAST PRIMARIES JUNE 3
When I asked Clinton on
Friday whether she saw any
scenario in which she would quit
the race before the Democratic
convention in August, she
made it clear that as far as
she's concerned, this contest
won't be over until the votes are


HILLARY CLINTON
Presidential Candidate


counted on June 3, when the
last of the party's 10 remaining
primaries are held.
"I want to let the upcoming
contests go forward because I
really believe it's good for our
party and it is the right thing to
do to let the millions of voters yet
to be heard, from Pennsylvania
to Puerto Rico, have a chance to


right to

participate," she told me.
But why drag out the race
if it's unlikely that Clinton
can overtake Obama in the
remaining contests?
Because while there's no way
she can win enough delegates
to pull ahead of Obama, he is
not likely either to get enough
delegates in these contests to
amass the 2,024 needed to win
the Democratic nomination.
That means the Democrats'
795 "super delegates" who
are appointed by the party, not
elected by voters will cast the
deciding votes.

BANKING ON BIG WINS
Clinton thinks if she does
well in the remaining primaries
especially the larger states of
Pennsylvania, North Carolina
and Indiana she can get
the support of enough super
delegates to overcome Obama's
lead and win the nomination.
Sure, that sounds as if she's


stay in the race


banking on the political
equivalent of a Hail Mary
pass but it is a strategy for
victory.
There's another reason
Clinton is holding on: Some of
her biggest financial supporters
are digging in their heels.
Last week, 21 leading donors
to her campaign sent a testy
letter to House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi, warning her to stop
trying to influence how the
super delegates will vote.
The letter was in response to
Pelosi's call for super delegates
to back the candidate who
emerges from the primaries
and caucuses with the most
pledged delegates. "This is an
untenable position that runs
counter to the party's intent
in establishing super delegates
in 1984," Clinton's financial
supporters complained in their
letter.
Though Clinton said she
had no advance knowledge of


the letter, she agreed with its
basic premise. Super delegates
should "make up their own
minds. That's the way the
process is supposed to play
out," she told me. "They have
a right and a responsibility to
make a decision. I hope it's on
the basis of who they believe in,
who they think would be the
best president, who they expect
to be the strongest candidate."
How the super delegates
vote is the endgame of this
year's Democratic presidential
nominee selection process. Any
attempt to truncate it no
matter how well intended -
could do more harm than good
to the Democratic Party.


Black-brown divide saps political clout


By Joyce King

Two years ago, hundreds of
thousands of people peacefully
took to the streets in dozens
of U.S. cities to rally for
immigration rights. Yet this
Latino civil rights movement
- complete with the Spanish
version of We Shall Overcome
- has done little to close the
divide between browns and
Blacks. In fact, this year's
Democratic presidential race
has underscored their major
differences.
Research suggests that
competition for jobs and
social services is at least in
part driving a wedge between
the groups. "I think both


groups try to compete so that
they are not last on the food
chain," says Alex del
Carmen, a professor
at the University of
Texas, Arlington.
Hispanics make up
more than 15% of the
U.S. population, in
recent years eclipsing
Blacks -at 13% as
the largest minority
group. And though Kll
Blacks and Hispanics
experience similar struggles
in American society such as
discrimination, lower wages
and education disparity the
two part ways on how they
view the treatment of African-
Americans.


N


According to a recent survey
by the Pew Center:
Two-thirds of
African-Americans
say Blacks are
discriminated against
when they apply for
a job. Only 36% of
Hispanics believe
that's the case with
Blacks.
When asked
IG whethertheconditions
for Blacks have
improved in the past decade,
31% of African-Americans say
yes. Almost half of Hispanics
44% believe things have
gotten better for Blacks.
Sixty-five percent of Blacks


say they face discrimination
when buying a house or
renting an apartment. How do
Hispanics believe Blacks are
treated? Only 36% say such
discrimination occurs.
To some degree, though,
both groups agree that
"change" is important in this
election, however it manifests
itself. In a Super Tuesday exit
poll, 46% of Hispanics and
68% of Blacks said the most
important candidate quality
is the ability to bring about
change.
Del Carmen says younger
Hispanics are choosing change
over tradition because they are
"more confident in the system."
When it comes to Black-brown


divisions, though, the professor
predicts that progress will
remain sluggish until both
sides "find a common enemy
or goal (that's) greater than
our own."
Historically, Blacks and
Hispanics have shared similar
social and economic burdens.
Each group has come to realize
independently that unity and
a common purpose bring
political clout and change.
Will change become a common
goal or a source of tension?
Without change, Blacks
and Hispanics will continue
to struggle to overcome their
differences during the next
presidential election and
beyond.


Citizens should be given direct power to elect the president


WASHINGTON, D.C.-Florida
Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson
this week proposed a new
national nominating process
and presidential
elections, based on the
nationwide popular
vote rather than the
Electoral College.
Nelson, who sued
his own party in a
failed effort to force
the Democratic
National Committee
to recognize Florida's Bill N(
Jan. 29 presidential
primary, made a rare
appearance by a federal
lawmaker before the state
Legislature to announce he's
filing legislation in Congress
that attempts to fix the election
process in a sweeping manner.
"This election has provided
further evidence that our
system is broken," Nelson
said, referring to the fact that
Florida's primary, in which a
record 3.6 million voters turned
out, is not being counted by
the Democratic Party and only
being counted half by the GOP.
He told lawmakers his bill
would establish six, rotating
interregional primaries and
"give citizens the direct power
to elect the president." The bill
would also require early voting
in every state, a paper trail for
every ballot and the availability
of absentee ballots on demand
for all voters. It would also
set up grants to develop pilot
projects on mail-in and Internet
voting.
More specifically, the election-
reform package would:

ABOLISH THE
ELECTORAL COLLEGE
A resolution for a
constitutional amendment will


e


be filed to abolish the Electoral
College and allow direct election
of the president by popular vote.
If the principle of one-person,
one vote is to mean
anything, the candidate
who wins a majority of
the votes should win
the presidency.

ESTABLISH ROTATING
INTERREGIONAL
PRIMARIES
The 2008 presidential
Ison election has
demonstrated that our
primary system is broken and
must be fixed. The legislation
will provide rationality and
fairness to the process of
selecting presidential nominees
by establishing six primary
dates beginning in March and
ending in June. It will divide
the nation into six regions. On
each of the six dates, states
from each region of the country
will be represented on a rotating
basis.

PROVIDE FOR NATIONWIDE
EARLY VOTING
Restricting voting to the first
Tuesday after the first Monday
in November unduly restricts
many voters from getting to the
polls. The bill will take what
has been instituted successfully
in Florida nationwide early
voting and expand it to cover
the entire nation, so that voters
can go to a designated polling
place before Election Day and
cast their vote.
ALLOWABSENTEE BALLOTS
ON DEMAND
Some states still require a
voter attest to an inability to
get to the polls on Election
Day in order to obtain an
absentee ballot. The legislation
would remove this barrier to


voting to impose a nationwide
requirement that states issue
qualified voters an absentee
ballot on demand.

IMPROVE VOTE
VERIFICATION
The legislation takes
nationwide the voting technology
reforms instituted last year in
Florida. It would require there
to be a verifiable paper ballot
to accompany every vote that
is cast and it would require the
elimination by 2012 of touch-
screen voting machines, which
have been banned in Florida
and decertified in several other
states.

FUND PILOT VOTE-BY-MAIL
AND INTERNET VOTING
The bill would provide incentive
grant programs to jurisdictions
that wish to institute pilot
programs for vote-by-mail
elections, based on Oregon's
successful model, or Internet
voting. Any such pilot program
would need to contain adequate
safeguards to ensure full
inclusion of all voters regardless
of race, language, or disability,
and guard against fraud.

ESTABLISH STANDARDS FOR
VOTER REGISTRATION LISTS
Although the Help America
Vote Act of 2002 required every
state to establish electronic voter
registration lists, the quality,
accuracy and completeness of
these lists vary greatly. The lists
then serve as a barrier to the
polls, because qualified voters
are excluded due to inaccurate
or incomplete lists. The bill
will establish uniform criteria
for voter registration lists
throughout the nation.
Nelson's push forelection reform
has stepped up significantly in


S"C opyrighted Material





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the past eight months since
Florida lawmakers moved the
state's presidential primary to
an early date on the national
election calendar. The idea was
to give a large and diverse state
- a microcosm of America more
of a say in the selection of the
presidential nominees.
But both national parties
decided to punish Florida,
because their rules reserved
early presidential contests
to a handful of other states.
The GOP docked the state
half of its allotted delegates
to the national convention


this summer. The Democratic
Party stripped Florida of all of
its 211 delegates who could help
decide their party's nominee.
Last October, Nelson sued
the Democratic National
Committee and its chairman
in federal district court in
Tallahassee, Florida. In
December, he lost that court
fight. But he has continued
to push for his party to find a
way to seat a delegation from
Florida, while giving voters
there a meaningful voice in
the selection of their party's
nominee.


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INVITA IONTBII


Miami-Dade County, hereinafter known as
MDC, will receive bids for the ORANGE
LINE PHASE I Miami Intermodal
Center-Earlington Heights (MIC-EHT)
Connector Metrorail Extension Contract
No. NCP004-TR06-CT2, hereinafter
referred to as the "Project". The Project
construction cost estimate ranges from
$270 to $300 million.
This Project contains Surtax and State
Funds. Bidders are advised that only
a small component of the Project is
being funded by the Federal Transit
Administration (FTA); FTA requirements
will only apply to that Project component.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Project
is located in Miami-Dade County, State of
Florida. This 2.4-mile heavy rail extension
corridor begins at the existing elevated
Metrorail line to the west of the Earlington
Heights Metrorail Station and continues
westerly along the north side of State
Road (SR) 112, crossing SR 112 and takes
a southerly turn crossing over the Miami
River Canal. It then crosses over the South
Florida Rail Corridor (SFRC) and parallels
the SFRC until it enters into the MIC. The
Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT) Project components are located
at and/or within close proximity to a Three-
Level Metrorail Station.
The major Project components include
the construction of: Elevated Guideway,
including Segnental Construction; a
Three-Level Metrorail Station; Operating
Systems; Trackwork; Three (3) Traction
Power Substations; New Roadways
and Roadway Reconstruction; and Civil
Sitework.
The Operating Systems requires the
design, furnishing, and installation
of Power Distribution; Train Control,
Signaling, and Integration at the existing


Central Control; Communications, Variable
Message Signs; and System Control and
Data Acquisition (SCADA).
Additionally, the Project includes the
following four FDOT components: Central
Station West Concourse, Central Station
Vestibule, Bus Plaza and Bus Plaza
Roadway. MDC shall have the option
to remove all or portions of the FDOT
components should FDOT funds not
become available.
If only one bid is received, MDC, at its
sole discretion may eiect to negotiate with
this bidder since it will be considered the
low bidder.
MDC Contractor's Certification is required
in General Building or General Engineering
and other categories as applicable per
Chapter 10 of the Code of Miami-Dade
County (www.municode.com).
The Contractor must have prior experience
constructing complex rail/transit projects
similar in size and scope to the MIC-
Earlington Heights Connector Metrorail
Extension Project. These additional
requirements are necessary to ensure a
well qualified and experienced team in the
area of rail construction.
Bid Documents will be available on or
about March 26, 2008 at a cost of $700.00
per set (non-refundable) and may be
examined at Miami-Dade Transit (MDT),
Overtown Transit Village, 701 NW, 1st
Court, 15th Floor, Miami, Florida. For
further information write Jesus Valderrama,
Contract Services Manager, Miami-Dade
Transit, 701 N.W. 1st Court, Suite 1500,
Miami, FL, 33136, or e-mail at jvalder@
miamidade.gov, with copy to the Clerk of
the Board at clerkbcc@miamidade.gov.
Requests must be accompanied by either
check or money order drawn in favor of


the Board of County Commissioners,
Miami-Dade County, Florida.
MDC has scheduled a Pre-Bid Conference
at 1:30 P.M. local time on April 24, 2008
at the Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W.
First Street, Suite 18-3, Miami, Florida
33128, and will receive Bids at the Office
of the Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, at the Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 N. W. First Street, Suite
17-202, Miami, Florida 33128 until 2:00
p.m. local time on June 18, 2008.
Request for Information (RFI) must be
submitted prior to May 20, 2008.
A twelve percent (12%) goal for the
participation of Disadvantaged Business
Enterprises (DBE) has been established
for this contract. Any DBE firm proposed
for use in this contract, must have a valid
certification from the MDC Department of
Business Development (DBD) at the time
the bid or proposal is submitted and a
copy of the certification document must be
submitted with the bid or proposal,
Those responding to this RFP/ITB/RFQ
shall comply with the provisions of the
Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990
and 49 U.S.C. Section 1612 and other
related laws and regulations.
Bidders must certify that they have
examined the Bid and the conditions
affecting the Work; that they are not
listed on the U.S. Comptroller General's
Consolidated List of Persons or Firms
Currently Debarred for Violations of
Various Public Contracts; and, should they
become the Contractor, that they will not
prosecute the Work using facilities which
have been listed on the Environmental
Protection Agency's List of Violating
Facilities,
MIAMIDADE








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


HIU If NHfclurv a L~. S. Sum


Do we really need a new Marlins stadium or should

the city do something else with the money?


REMIL LOUIS-JEAN, 45
Student/Pastor, Miami
We should
invest that
money in
the people
in Overtown
by building
affordable
housing for
them. The
money could also be
tourism.


IN II vfc*, r,-x %Ag oI T& W -VJ



"Copyrighted Material



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Available from Commercial News Providers"


























. ** pwrir h* m-i rn .J td9.v Y.Mmrr S ris

e4


qp


put in


MARIE MONDESIR, 52
RN Nurse North Miami Beach

They could
build more
affordable
housing for
people all over
Miami-Dade
County. With
the growth of
youth violence, more programs
should be afford to these kids so
that they can know that there is
hope out of there.
CHARLES RILEY, 70
Retired, AMiami Gardens
I have lived-
in Miami forl
almost fifty
years and I
have seen so
many changes
from the gas


prices to the school system. We
don't need a Marlins stadium.
Why are we working on a Marlins
stadium when the extended
metro rail to Broward still has
not been built yet? I rather see
that money being spent on the
children because they are the
next generation. Put the money
in tutoring or programs that will
offer skills to prepare them for
the real world like how to dress
for an interview, how to write
resumes, and so on. With the
state of the economy now, they
need a sense of hope.
PIERRE DURWOTT, 42
Barbe,; Miami
They should
invest that
money in
education
and in the
environment.
We need to
build more
resources for the homeless
and offer grants for business
owners.
ASHES ALLE, 32
Painted; North Miami
Put the
money in
education and
build more
programs for
these kids


so they can stop running the
streets.


MOISE ULLYSES, 45
Cashier, Miami
Education
should be a
big thing right
now. With all
those budget
cuts, we don't
need a Marlins
stadium. We
could also
invest the money in Miami-
Dade transit. With the high
price of gas, less people are
willing to drive their car so we
need more buses on the street
to accommodate these people.


THE TRUE MEASURE
OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
LIES IN ITS COURAGE,
ITS PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
AND ITS DEDICATION
TO THE COMMUNITY IT SERVES


MeoasuamiS im

Measures UP!


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU


TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


PULI HARIGANO CE T


Consumers of


FLEET PHOSPHO-SODA


or similar oral laxative and colonscopy bowel cleansing products


If you have been diagnosed with


KIDNEY FAILURE
or


KIDNEY DISEASE


after using a laxative or colonscopy bowel movement
cleansing product, please call for a free consultation to discuss your legal rights.



CARLOS A. LOPEZ-ALBEAR, P.A.

1545 S.W. 1 Street, Suite 300

305-644-3217

IThe hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. 3Betre you decide, ask us to send you free written infiltration about our qualifications and experience.


I ~~








7A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Il ,\tk M\L'M\1 'ON RllOI '111IR (\\N 1')F'S1 NYI









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Residents meet to discus


Sandra J. Charite
schtritrc@miln itimcsonliu'e.co ,

On Thursday night, over 75
people gathered at the Henry
S. Reeves Elementary School's
Library for a Town Hall Meeting.
Residents who reside at north
of 103 Street, south 119 Street,
east of 22 Avenue, and west of
17 Avenue of Unincorporated
Miami-Dade came out to discuss
the additional $42 increase
added on their monthly water
bill.
Leroy Jones and other
members of the Little
River Farms Neighborhood
Association invited a panel
of distinguished personals to
come out and answer questions
of the concerned citizens.
The panel of guests included:
Mark Collins, Director of North
Miami Public Works, Clarence
Patterson, North Miami City
Manager, Reverend Philip R.
Johns, a representative from
the Commissioner Dorrin Rolle's
Office, and Rafael A. "Ralph"
Terrero, Assistant Director of
Miami-Dade County Water and
Sewer Department.
"We are in a state where we
have to provide you with fresh
water every day. The water we
buy is from the city of Miami-,
Dade County which cost more
than gallons than it cost us
to produce our own water.
Additionally, a large portion of the
increase was passed to business


owners. No way of measuring
how much the businesses pay--
so all the businesses are paying
the same rate --no matter their
consumption," said Clarence
Patterson, North Miami City
Manager.
"If you have sewage then
you are paying for the sewage
and the water," Patterson said.
According to the City of North
Miami, the Capital Improvement
Fee-Sewer (CIF Water) is a NEW
fee that will be charged to every
billing unit that has sewer
service available. This fee will
support maintenance and any
improvements needed' for the
sewer infrastructure.
"Two reasons your water bill is
going up--inflation and capital
improvement fees," says Mark
E. Collins, Public Works Director
of the City of North Miami.
"I have had a heartache and
I am on a fixed income. You're
saying we don't matter when
you make these decisions
without consulting us. Most
of the people in this room are
struggling to make ends meet
so you want to raise their water
bill. You tell a single mother that
she won't be able to buy her kids
new clothes because she has to
pay her water bill. Black people,
we are on our way to back of the
bus," Minister Marvin Woods.
Although unincorporated
division of Miami-Dade has
limited rights to city decisions
which include the election of


;s water bill
city officials, angry residents
yelled that the wrong people
attended the town meeting.
Commissioner Rolle or Mayor
Alvarez should have been there
because they are a large part of
the decision making in Miami.
They are elected by the citizens
of Miami for times like these
where citizens have questions
and they need to answers. Now
that the campaigning is over
and the votes have been cast,
the citizens need to be shown
why they elected Mayor Alvarez
and Commissioner Rolle.
Patterson informed residents
that, "What you see on your bill
is just a worst case scenario but
your bill will go down."
Terrero addressed the crowd
by saying, "I am retiring soon.
This is something that has to be
changed in Tallahassee, there
is nothing that we can do about
the bill."
The community is populated
with retired and single parents
on a fixed income. With the
upsurge throughout the
economy, the increase offers no
consolidation to residents who
are trying to make ends meet.
At the end of the night, the
residents water bill stayed the
same with no change. With the
presence of few city officials,
questions resulted in little to
no answers leaving residents
filled with frustration and talks
about taking the problem to
Tallahassee.


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199











Bi A.CKs li CONTROl.' II11R 0\\'N DESTINY


Church historian looks at big faith-and-politics picture on religion


By Terry Mattingly

When it comes to religion and
politics, it's hard to talk about
the contests without naming the
players and their teams.
Consider Hillary Rodham
Clinton, who insists that her
political convictions are rooted
in her United Methodist faith.
Then there is Barack Obama
and the Rev. Jeremiah Wright of
Trinity United Church of Christ.
Enough said.
What about John "Faith
of My Fathers" McCain, an
Episcopalian who worships with
the Southern Baptists? Soon he
will pick a running mate. Do
you prefer Mitt Romney, who
served as a Mormon bishop, or
Mike Huckabee, an ordained
Southern Baptist minister?
But to see the big faith-and-
politics picture, it helps not to
focus on the details. That's why
the famous church historian
Martin Marty, speaking early in
this year's topsy-turvy primary
season, elected to do the near
impossible deliver a 45-minute
lecture on this hot-button topic
without mentioning the name of
a single candidate.
"Won't that be a relief?" asked
Marty, speaking at Palm Beach
Atlantic University in South
Florida.
The alternative is to cause
yet another shouting match in
the political pews. Tune in the
typical talk-television politico,
he said, and "as soon as there's
a label as to whether she or he
is representing a candidate or
party or whatever, you know
what they are going to say and it


ends there."
Right up front, Marty admitted
that he has been a doorbell-
ringing political activist since
1949 and he still calls Harry
Truman "my president." Also,
the intersection of religion and
public life has been a major
theme in many of his 50-plus
books and the weekly columns
he has published for 50 years.
in the Christian Century, a
mainline Protestant journal.


Truth is, he said, it's impossible,
to study American history.
without noting the role that
religion has played in politics
and culture. Since Day One,
America has offered a powerful
blend of evangelical revivalism
and enlightenment rationalism,
and believers on both sides of
the aisle have followed their
heads as well as their hearts.
This faith factor isn't fading,
as American life becomes more
pluralistic and complex. Once,
America was a Protestant,
Catholic and Jewish nation.
Now, it is a "Protestant,
Catholic, Jewish and Muslim
nation and much more," said,
Marty.
But one thing America
certainly isn't is "secular," and
there is no evidence whatsoever
that the power of religion is
fading in the world as a whole.
Marty said this reality is
hard for many scholars and


journalists to accept, especially
those influenced by studies in
the 1960s that guaranteed a
21st-century world that would
be "secular, sensate, epicurean,
hedonistic, contractual,
pragmatic, programmatic and
empirical."
"That model didn't work for
:most people" around the world)
he said, and it "doesn't work for
any of us" in America.
These days, religious believers


true?" "What is good?" "What
is noble?" "What is ugly?" Then
there are all those hot-button
issues linked to sexuality,
marriage and family life.
All of this keeps seeping into
American politics.
The bottom line, said Marty,
is that it's good for religious
activists to work in politics, but
very bad for them to confuse


religion and politics.
Believers must, he stressed,
remember that the "God who
sits in the heavens shall laugh
at our pretensions, our parties,
our causes, but the same God
holds us responsible and honors
our aspirations." And, as for the
flashpoint where politics and
religion meet, "we can't live with
it, we can't live without it. ... You


aren't going to get anywhere
without dealing, some way, justly
with the religious involvement of
the people."
Terry Mattingly directs the
Washington Journalism Center at
the Councilfor Christian Colleges
& Universities. His Web site is
www.tmatt.net. His column is
distributed by Scripps Howard
News Service.


on both sides of the aisle continue
to be shaken by aftershocks
'from the school-prayer decision
in 1963 and Roe v. Wade in
1973. The Iranian crisis in 1979
cracked the shell of America's
sense of safety and security,
which later was shattered by the
:hellish reality of Sept. 11, 2001.
Marty said it's hard to discuss
national "security" without
talking about religion. That's
also true when it comes to
debating an issue that "starts
on Page One of the Bible," which
is caring for creation and the
environment.
Then there are the issues
ihked to what he called the
"care of the other," including
health, education, welfare and
immigration. Religious believers
also are worried about the state
o9f American culture, yet it's
hard for them to find common
answers to questions such as,
"What. is beautiful?" "What is


93rd Street Community \ ntioch Missionary Baptis postolic Revival Center
Missionary Baptist Church Church of Brownsville 6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 2799 N.W. 46th Street 305-836-1224
305-836-0942 305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355 Order of Services
Order of Services New time for TV. Program
Order of Services 'V rship Service Sunday Morning FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
7:30 a.m. ErlyMoming Worship 10am. Worhip Scrice 1t Sunday onlyl) UliF C,\ iLE.l cl 0 OMCASTCH.r
I I a.m...Morning Worship 7:30 I .m. (2n., 3rd., 4d & 5011 Sun. Sun.9 a.,.-3 p. Sunday.5 p.m
t Chuurh School 8:30 l.m. Is Sut Snday only
Evening Worship 9:15 ;m. ChulchShoh ..ol{nd. 3a. 4 It & su) \e. Ihaner .e. oy Irayer 9a .m. 12 p.m.
Ist & 3rd Sunday ........6 p.m. Mid Week Serice day Moming Sei' ................. II a.m
Hoa p K- N-,viroyP.-I '- nI ...Sun, Bee. worship. 730 pu,.
Tuesday Bible Study ...7 p.m. Ho r of Pofvw No r-Il y Pler i2-1 p.m ip........ 7:30 p..
website: cmbc.or Prayer Meting. 7:3( a.. FTe Pnyerud eting......7:30 p.m.
wiblo Studytu5p. m.-Bil Stde y.. 73) p.mr..


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.





Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
Sun ay
Morning Worshi at 8 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
Early Moming Worship.7:301a.im.
Sunday School ..........9:30a.m.
Morning Worship .....II a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.
\it tlM fi'lWi~ i xi~lW W l WIri / ~ i ~l


/aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday School...................9:30 am.
Sun. Morning Worship........... 11 a.m.
Tues. Prayer....................6 p.m.
School of Wisdom............6:30 p.m.
Healing & Delivence Serv...7:30p.m.
WedSaL Manna (prayer)........5am
Friday Youth Night................7 p.m.




Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and I1 i.In.
Worshiip Serwvioc
9:30 a.l .......... Sullndly Sch oo
Tuesdalay. 7 p.m. Bible Study
Mindiy, Wednesdlay, "riday
12 ip.m...Day tPra'ye


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
Sunday................7:30 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School............... 10 a.m.
Thursday..........7 p.m. Bible. Study,

First Sun..7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting B.T.U.

Communion First Sun........
7:30 & I1 a.m.




Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church\
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sun lay





e e l Missiona ry




Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68'1 Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3,4,5"' Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service ..... 11:00 am

('Thurs. Before 1 Sunday) 7:30 pm
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
We1(Wednesday) 7:30 (pm



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"'Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Sunday School..............) :45 11.1n.
St i. Mor)I ing Sr*v s.... ,l eI11a.
1" Su 1....3TU.. 1:30-2:30 ).n
T0uesday.....Biblc Study
Feeding Ministry...1..l ) a. m.
Wed. Bible Sludy/Pinlyelr..6:30 p.l
Thus. Outreach Minlisry ,..6:30 p.1


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 19th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Services;
Sun...9:30 a.m....(Sunday School)
Walk in the Word Ministry
Worship Service.............. ll a.m.
Tuesday....7 p.m....Family Night.
Wed.. I1 a.m..Intercessory Prayer
Wed. Bible Class........12 p mt
Wed. Bible Class...............7 p.m.




Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www.fricndshipnbcrmio.org
fiendshippmryer@bellsouth.net
740 NW. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
3 7 Order of services
Hour of Prayer.........6:30 a.m.
Early Morning Worship....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School..........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship............ 11 a.m.
Youth Ministry Study.....Wed......7 p.m.
Prayer/Bible Study.....Wed...7 p.m
Noonday Altar Prayer...(M-F)
Feeding ite Hungry every
Wednesday..I....lI am.-l p.m.




New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'1 Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Church School.,:............10 a.m.
Worship Service.............. 11:15 .m.
Tulsdays Bible Class..............7 p,,m.
4th Sunday Evening Worship.........6 p.tm.


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:45 a.m.
Vrship-..1 am.
Bible Study, Thursday ...7:30 pn.m
Youth Ministy Mon.-Wed.
6 p.m.




Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
Lord Day Sunday School t.....9.:45am
Sunday Moming Worship ..... 1 a.m.
Sunday Men's Bible Study .....5 p.m.
Sunday Ladies Bible Study ....5 p.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6 p.m.
Tuesday Night Bible Study ....7:30pnr
Fnulnsdaiy Momning Bible Class I1 a.m.
3I0m4ra rtation available Call:
305-634-4850 305-691-6958


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12' Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
Sunday School............. 9 a.m
Worship ....................... a.m.
Worship ........................4 plm.
Mission and Bible Class
esday .............. ..6:30
Monday ......................6:30 p.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue

305-681-3500

Order of Services:
Enrly Morning Wortship...1st & 3rl Sun,
M n Worship..............10:30 a.n.
Tlaes. lI-sright Ministr y....... 6 p.l
Prnycr Service...................7:30 ,.,
ibhl Smy........................... 8 t'.
Ciunn 1,v &I-I..................t9 .r..


( Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. ** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tu'esday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8,19, 21, 22, 23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: vwww.pemb rokic par churchofclhist.com* Emil: pimibrmkecparkcoccObollsouh.ille


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87' Street
305-836-9081

Order of Services:
Sunllday Mollring Services
Sunday School.............10 n.Il.
Worsiip Selnvice............ I I I nll.
TuresdIay Biblee Snonly. m.....8 it.
Thm'sdayIay yer Service..., pen.


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78"t Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

S Order of Services:
Bible Stidy Wed.....n.........8 p.mr.
Sunday Slchool................10 a., .
SIit,. NVorslili Serv..... t1:30 1 a.m.
VCI W. Night Iltercessory Pranycer
Im Il 7:30 to 8 p.m. .
Sunday WVrislhip Scrvice..6:30 p.a,


SNew Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 101 Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Early Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m.
Sunday School ................9:30 a.m.
Sunday MomingVrsthip- 11 am
Sunday Evening Service ...6 p.m
Tuesday Prayer Meeting...7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ...7:30 p.m.
"Not Just a Church But a Movement"



Mt. Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mthermonworshipcenter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 1t0 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.




Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Worship 7.8 am.
Sunday School .. 10 am.
Sunday Evening ..s..... 6 .m.
Mon. Excellence 7:30 p.m.
Tue y Bible Class 7:3 p.m.
Thurs. Fellowship. 10 a.m.
Ist Sun. Song Practice .. p.m.




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95h Street
305-835-8280 *,Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Eay Momning Worship 7:30 am.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ... 11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Tuses. before the Ist Sut.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship





St. John Baptist Churche
1328 N.W. 3"r Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
S Morning Worship ....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School..........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...II ra.m.
tNaturefor Baptist Clurihes
(B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
Evening Worship ........7 p.m.
Meeting ........(Tues.) 7 p.m.
RM I raTIMIMUM^--- B^R


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School.............9:30 a.m.
Morning Prtise/Worship .. 1 a.m.
Fiit miriTd Tnhid SLUKtRay
evlning womslhip it 6 p.m.
Prnyer Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.tm.
Tnh"n~, ,rhin. ..n)wit lht3 iH's l 5 IU
\(r' /iiiiin t trsithi,. Call 150-S t-831)e.


\1gmr-gma'ggm,/ u aCH I n


9B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


c


Bishop Victor 1. Cury, D.Min., D.D, Senir Ilastor/Teacher M


I


19~






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


.olIthrt Iown murnm pn~m tribute to rdiitoun art.
*


"Copyrighted Material


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Take it from me. You can prevent colon cancer by getting tested.
They check your colon, and if they find a polyp, they remove it before
it becomes cancer.
If you're 50 or older, talk to your doctor about getting tested for colon cancer.
For a free information packet on the different ways you can be tested
call 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org/colon.
Hope. Progress, Answers.*/ 1 800 ACS '2345 / www.cancer.org
'2?007 Anlric:ar! Ca, cer Soci:iv, irc.


S "*.,-








The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 2-8, 2008


On colle






O~l


;e campuses


Si


nc


OR IS THE CONVERSATION SIMPLY CHANGIN


By Tom Krattenmaker
The moment had, on the
surface, a Nixon-goes-to-China
quality.
Filmmaker Dan Merchant
stood before an auditorium
of students assembled for
the first campus screening of
his forthcoming movie, Lord
Save Us From Your Followers.
Merchant, a Christian, was at
Lewis & Clark College, a school
in Portland, Ore., deemed by the
Princeton Review college guide
to be one of the least religious in
the USA.
Yet one conspicuous reality
defied a key premise of the event
from the moment the college
chaplain brought Merchant to
the stage: Students packed the
good-sized hall, overflowing into
the aisles and entry ways, for a
chance to see what most knew
was a Christian-themed movie
with a Gospel message.


And by the time they had
finished watching the film
- a humorous and heartfelt
examination of the culture wars
featuring a Michael Moore-
meets-Monty Python style -
those students could not wait
to talk to Merchant about his
movie and his faith.
"What struck me," Merchant
said later, "was their openness to
this conversation."
Students open to a
conversation about Christianity,
even on a campus with an
ultrasecular reputation? Such is
the state of affairs at the nation's
colleges and universities,
where religion is experiencing
something of a renaissance,
although not necessarily in
the shapes and forms older
generations are used to seeing.
Apart from the relatively small
number of officially Christian
colleges, America's campuses
are viewed by many as bastions


of liberal secularism, the places
where religious faith goes to die.
"Young people entering college
often encounter overwhelming
temptations while being force-fed
with godless philosophies and
the results can be spiritually
catastrophic," warns pastor
and radio show host John
MacArthur. Former attorney
general Edwin Meese III, now
a Heritage Foundation fellow,
says, "For years, our colleges
and universities have shown
themselves to be hostile to the
rights and dignities of religious
students."
A string of incidents do
lend some credence to these
exaggerated critiques. One of the
more recent: action by the since-
departed president of William &
Mary to remove from permanent
display a cross adorning the
Virginia college's 274-year-old
chapel (done, according to then-
president Gene Nichol, to make


the space more hospitable to
religious minorities).
Also contributing to higher
education's ultrasecular image
are rules at many colleges that
prohibit student organizations
from excluding other students -
a sure source of conflict when it
comes to conservative religious
groups that do not abide
homosexuality. And then there
is the academic habit of mind
that encourages the questioning
of, well, everything.
WHERE GOD IS ALIVE AND WELL
From the Ivy League to the
brainiac liberal arts colleges to
the major public universities,
God has been silenced or so
conventional wisdom tells us.
The conventional wisdom, as it
turns out, is not quite right.
From the pollsters come recent
data showing that religion and
spirituality are alive and well
Please turn to CAMPUS 12B


GeorgiaCotton

celebrates her

100th birthday
Happy 100th birthday, Mother.
Ms. Georgia L. Cotton was born
on April 05, 1908.
Mother, you are truly a
blessing to your family and we
love you!
May God continue to bless
you with your strength, health
and your sound mind. You are
truly our inspiration.
This is the day that the Lord
has made and I will rejoice and
be glad in it.
With love, Cotton, Hargrett,
and Victor family.


Minister Kelon D. Duke


MRS. GEORGIA L. COTTON


Elder Kenneth A. Duke


Spring Revival
Like father, like son, Minister Kelon D. Duke will lead Spring
Revival at New Jerusalem, April 8-10 at 7:30 p.m. Elder Kenneth
A. Duke will deliver Family & Friends Day message on Sunday,
April 13th at 7:30 & 10:45 a.m. The church is located at 777 N. W.
85th Street, Miami. For more information, call 305-693-8323 ext.
101 or email to info@njpbc.org.


Black officers club
African-American high school
studentsresidingin Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties, who
are in good academic standing
that will be participating in
the com-mencement ceremony
for the "Class of 2007," are
eligible to apply for (1) $1,000
Educational Assistance Award
from the Progressive Officers
Club, Inc., an African-American
organization that's comprise of
police and correctional officers
in Miami-Dade County.
The Progressive Officers


offers scholarships
Club, Inc. is a non-profit
organization.
The award is for high school
seniors, who have been accepted
to an institution of higher
learning as a full time student
for the up-coming fall semester
(2007).
A request for the application
must be submitted and post-
marked no later than Friday,
April 27,2007, to Progressive
Officers Club. P.O. Box 680398,
Miami, FL 33168. Contact
Valerie Hall 786.487-3770.


-


0|


Is


I, 1


"If



the lions do



not write



their own



history, then



the hunters



will get all



the credit."

-African Proverb


1___


P









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


A Mission With a New
Beginning, Bishop Eugene
Joyner along with Youth Dept.
invites you to our picnic at
Arcola Lakes Park Pavilion #1
Saturday at 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m.


God Word God Way Church
of God in Christ invites you to
Fellowship service with First
Deliverance COGIC, Elder
Cohen, pastor at 8 p.m. For
information call 783-326-3455.


Mt. Sinai M.B. Church and
Rev. Johnny Barber, pastor


invites you to our 4th Annual
Spring tent Revival, April 2-4 at
7 p.m. nightly. Revivalists are;
Wednesday, Rev. Donelle White;
Thursday Rev. Diane Owens;
Friday, Rev. Torrey Phillips.


The community is invited
to attend the Mount Hermon
African methodist Episcopal
Church, Miami Gardens,
Annual Health and Wellness fair
on Sunday, March 30 from 1-3
p.m. Free screening, free food,
give-a-wayg, and much more.
For more information contact
Dr. Bryant 954-987-1261.


Spring Break Revival, host
pastor, Dr. Katrine Forbes.
Revivalist Apostle Billy Wonders
from Chicago, IL, Bring the sick,
lame, and the unsaved. Starting
April 1, 8 p.m. nightly.
******
St. John Missionary Baptist
Church Prayer Breakfast 9
a.m. on April 12th in Fellowship
Hall. Sis.. Enid Pinkney will be
the guest speaker. Sponsored
by the Disability Awareness
Ministry. For more information
call Deaconess Mazie Baker,
305-685-1617.
******* *
Miami Prayerquake
2008, April 9-12 with Mosy
U. Madugba, International


Coordinator of Ministers Prayer
Network Worldwide and Steve
Olumuyiwa of Intercessors for
Africa. For more information call
New Way Fellowship Praise and
Worship Centerat305-625-7246
or 1-800-741-1889.


On Sunday, April 6 at 3 p.m.
the Wimberly Sisters Outreach
Association is sponsoring a
musical program at Mt. Claire.
******
Love Tabernacle of God
PAWCC will host The Mt. Calvary
Holy Church of American Inc.,
49th International usher and
Nurse's Convention, April 4
and 5. Services will be held at
Outreach of Excitement Church.
For more information please call
786-486-5729.


KrIKoO%% r d TERWNvd


w "Cb'pjrighted Material





Syndicated ontent "-




Available from Commercial News Providers





















Is God silenced on college campuses?


CAMPUS
continued from 11B

at colleges and universities.
A recent study by the Higher
Education Research Institute
at UCLA finds that more than
half of college juniors say
"integrating spirituality" into
their lives is very important.
Today's juniors also tend to
pray (67%, according to the
UCLA study) and 41% believe
it's important, even essential,
to "follow religious teachings"
in everyday life.
Intheseandsimilarmeasures,
the college population tends to
lag behind the population at
large, but not by much. Other
new research suggests that
one's experience in higher
education is not the cause of
any falling away from faith.
Survey results from University
of Texas researchers find that
students are less likely to
be secularized than others
ages 18-25. In other words,
navigating the working world
takes a larger toll on a young
person's faith than braving the
nation's supposedly godless
college campuses.
It's not just trendy Eastern
or New Age religions to which
students are gravitating.
Christianity is holding its own,
too, in part because many
campus Christians are showing
a different side of their religion
than the one that has lent
irresistible fodder to comedians
and given it a bad reputation in
some quarters.
Young Christians, college
students or otherwise, tend
to emphasize different public
concerns than the old-guard
Christian Right. Like the older
Christian generation, they do
consider abortion an important
issue, according to a survey
by Relevant magazine, but
the same survey finds that
they tend to care less than
their elders about asserting
Christian prerogatives in the
public square and resisting the
advance of gay rights.

SPEAKING 'TRUTH TO POWER'
Typical of the emerging new


model of campus Christians is
David Norse, a Lewis & Clark
senior and climate-change
activist. As Norse said in an
article on the college website,
"As a Christian, I feel that I have
an obligation to speak truth to
power on issues that affect the
poor, the disenfranchised and
the silenced."
To many in the coming-
of-age generation, this is
a form of faith worthy of a
hearing, whether one buys its
doctrinal premises or not. As
demonstrated by the Lord Save
Us screening at Lewis & Clark,
and by so much else I see on
campus as an administrator
at the school, I'm convinced
it's not Christianity that
provokes hard feelings among
students so much as a too-
common public face of it that
appears hostile toward those
with different beliefs.
The Lewis & Clark students
erupted in applause after
viewing Merchant's film, many
of them moved by its fresh,
idealistic vision for how Jesus'
followers might interact with
the rest of the world. (Maybe
I'm biased about the movie,
having become Merchant's
friend in the course of his
interviewing me for it, yet
it's hard to imagine anyone
nursing a grudge against all
Christians after seeing this
film.)
For some older, more
traditional believers, it could
bejarring to see their treasured
faith finding its expression in
shaggy students toting courier
bags, wearing ragged jeans
and invoking Jesus as a friend
to the marginalized. Perhaps
they will feel some relief if
they consider the alternative.
If faith weren't changing on
college campuses, it might
well be dying.
Janet Cooper Nelson is the
chaplain at Rhode Island's
Brown University, where
religion is faring just fine.
Even so, as Nelson said in
a PBS report last fall, she
believes that the more open-
ended "spirituality" category
will claim ever-more students


if established churches do not
respond to the urgent issues
of the new century. Young
people's decisions to ditch such
churches, she said, would be
understandable if the church
doesn't take on the urgent
concerns of the up-and-coming
generation.
Doesn't all the above add up


to a heretical proposition the
notion that God is changing?
Not atall. Think of it this way:
As any songwriter or musician
knows, when you hold a note but
change the underlying chord,
the note takes on a different
quality or meaning. The note
hasn't changed, but the music
sure sounds different.


GUSON MD


100 NW 170 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169

Family Medicine Doctor

Graduate of Meharry Medical College
and University
of Florida Family Medicine Residency Pro
gram

Board Certified in Family Medicine

12 years of Medical experience

Insurances Accepted: Amerigroup,
Avmed, Cigna, Humana, Tricare,
Medicaid and Medicare

Receive a FREE MEDICAL
visit with presentation of this Ad
SLaboratory and Radiology Studies are not included).


0 35* 2


Wimberly Sisters sponsors musical program
On Sunday, April 6, at 3 p.m. Groups on the program include
the Wimberly Sisters Outreach the Wimberly Sisters, Lil
Association is sponsoring Kelly and The Five Singing
a musical program at Mt. Stars, Dynamic Stars, Heaven
Claire, 7975 N.W. 22 Avenue. Owns and others.

Jessie Trice Community
Health Center, Inc.
and Miami-Dade Office
of Community Advocacy
sponsor a

COMMUNITY FORUM
JOSEPH CALEB COMMUNITY CENTER
5400 NW 22nd Avenue
Miami, FL 33142
305-805-1700

Understanding the Genetics of Diseases

AUTISM AND ALZHEIMER'S
APRIL 5
10 a.m. 12 p.m. (2.0 CME/CEU Applied for)
Professional Presentation or CME's and CEU's
for Doctors, Nurses and other

12 p.m. 4 p.m.
COMMUNITY INFORMATION AND HEALTH FAIR

The local radio station WMBM will be broadcasting from the location
and helping to inform the community of all activities and services.

You are invited to bring information for providers, caregivers and
others to help them understand the significance of these conditions
and to learn about the community resources available to them and
their families.

Please e-mail your participation to:
cclinch@hcnetwork.org
or fax 305-805-1712


Who Cares


What Black People Think


Anyway'?

Jf you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think, think again. Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you,
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products, And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote.And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you, you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make,
Give your money,your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication, Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars.


'









13B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


BL icks MusT CONTRot TilEla Y


1.------ --L, ,. ., .l".... .. .. .......... .. I.. ..... ..


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
ELEASE SMITH, 76, teacher, died
March 18, Kin-
dred Hospital.
Arrangements
are incomplete.


MATTHEW B. GORE, Jr., 22,
died March 18,
Jackson Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: father,
Matthew, Sr.;
mother, Ge-
rona Meadows;
sisters, Nicole
and Shawana;
brother, Claude Camphor; grand-
father, Jasper, and a host of aunts,
uncles and sorrowful relatives and
friends.

JOHNNIE MAE WRIGHT, 76,
died March 28
at home. Ser-
vice will be held
2 p.m. Sat. April
5 at New Provi-
dence.



MURIEL JONES, died March 30,
Palmetto Gener-
al Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
daughters, Bob-
by, Judy, and
Joann; sons,
Freddie, Albert
and Eddie. Ser-
vice will be held
12 noon Sat. April 5 at Jordan
Grove Missionary Baptist Church.

TANGILYN BRUNSON, 44, died
Mar. 31 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m. Sat.
Apr. 5 at Imani
Christian Fam-
ily Community
Church.

Kiara Wheeler, infant, died Mar.
29 at Jackson Memorial Hospi-
tal. Service 1U .am. Sat. Apr. 5 at
United Christian Fellowship Com-
munity Ministries Inc.

Rock of Ages2 .,
ALTON TY'REK SMITH, three
months, died
March 31.
Survivors in-
clude: moth-
er, Chaquita
Chase; father,
Andrew T.
Smith, Sr.; sis-
ter, Adrianna;
brother, Andrew, Jr.; grandfather,
Anthony; great grandmother, Er-
lene Chase and a host of loving
relatives and friends. For service
information please call the funeral
home.

Florida


MARTIN ROLLE, 54, died Mar.
27. Service 11 1
a.m. Sat. in the
chapel, 1495
N.W. 17 Ave.







MIitchell
AMBROSE PINNOCK, 85, died
Mar. 22 at Miami
Heart Institute.
Visitation Fri-
day 4 to 9 p.m.
Service 10 a.m.
Sat at Centervill
Church of God of
Prophecy, 2746
N.W. 51 St.

Alphonso Richardson
RAYMOND L. ROAN, 47, died
March 26. Survived by: father,
John; mother Peggy Ross; broth-
ers, Michael, Howard, Norman,
Jimmy and Kirk; sisters, Henrietta
Hunter and Telesia Davis. Servic-
es were held.


Wright & Young '
RUBY VIRGINIA WIMS JONES,
59, died March
29, North
Shore Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
daughters, Es-
tella Brown
and Claritha
Jones-Bennett;
sons, Rudolph V. Jones and Ab-
dula Hafiz Jones; mother, Marie
George Wims; brothers, Samuel
G. Wims Sr., Rudolph, Christo-
pher, Charlie, Joseph, Billy and
Johnnie Wims; sisters, Diana and
Jeanette.

JAY'ON DAVID HARTAGE, 1, died
March 23. Sur-
vivors include:
mother, Jose-
phine Hartage;
brothers, Mau-
rice and Marcus
Williams; step-
father, Maurice t
Williams; 'and
grandfather,
James Hartage. Service was held.

Carey Royal Ram'n
BLONEVA CLARK, 58, died Mar.
27 at home.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday at
Temple Baptist
Church.






MAMCU GREGG. 45, died Mar.
29 at South Miami Hospital. Ser-
vice Sat. in Vero Beach, Florida.


PoEtier 9 1
RUBY L. HARRIS, 94, died March
27 at home. Sur-
vivors include:
Mable Harrell,
Robert, Shirley
and Joan Har-
ris, Mary Ghent,
and Emory Har-
ris. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
Greater New Bethel Missionary
Baptist Church.

LESLIE BELIZAIRE, 62, died
March 30, Jack-
son Memo-
rial Hospital. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.




JAMES PERVIS CHEEVER, 100,
died March 21,
North Shore
Medical Center.
Services were
held.


THELMA L. CLARK, 69, died Mar.
23 Service was
held.


I I AMOR
WILLIE FELTON, 81, died Mar.
19. Service was
held.








Gregg L. Mason
BERNICE M THORNTON, BKA
Bonnie, 71,
Electrician
for Cordis
Corporation,
died March
24 at Jackson
Memorial Park.
Survivors
include: son,
Curtis L Harris; daughters, Lula
R Harris-Tharpe and Sheila C
McGill; and a host of other family
members and friends. Viewing


Friday, 6-7:30pm at Second
E.A. STEVENS~ Canaan Missionary Baptist Church.
CHARLES E. SMITH, 50 died Homegoing Service 1:00pm at the
Mar. 27. Service 2 p.m. Sat. in the church. 4343 NW 17th Avenue.
chapel. Interment: Dade Memorial Park.


Royal_ ,.
EARNEST WASHINGTON, 60,
died Mar. 21.
Memorial ser-
vice 3 p.m. Sat
at Miami Shores
Baptist Church.



MCALLISTER HOLDER, 86, died
Mar. 30. Service pending.

JORGE CIFUNTES, 60, died Mar.
25. Service was held.

LESLEY BERRY, 50, died Mar.
24. Service was held.

MITTIE KITCHEN, 73, died Mar.
29. Service 11 a.m. Sat. at Allen
Chapel A.M.E. Church. Visitation
Wed. 4 to 9 p.m. Final rites and
burial Sat. in Irwinville, Georgia.

Range -
JOSEPH FERGUSON, 83, of
Major's Cay,
Crooked Island,
Bahamas ,
died on March
22, at Victoria
Nursing and
Rehabilitation
Center.
Survivors
include: children, Joseph Ferguson
Jr., Naomi( Leonard) Douglas,
Angela (Albert) Glinton of Nassau,
Bahamas, Ruth Minnis- Ferguson,
Elizabeth Ferguson and Rose
Patton of Miami, Florida; sister,
Gladys Ferguson of Nassau,
Bahamas; a host of family and
friends. Funeral services will be
held Saturday 12:00 P.M. at Saint
Francis Xavier Catholic Church.

ROOSEVELT BROWN, 66,
Private
Investigatorfora
Local Law Firm
died March 25,
2008 at Jackson
Memorial
Hospital .
Surviviors
include his wife,
Sarah Brown; three sons, Roy M.
Brown, Roosevelt Brown Jr., and
James G. Brown; three daughters,
Janice Brown; Sandra Brown-
Mansfield, and Patricia Brown;
Four brothers, Claude Brown
(Queenie), Ceasar Brown, James
Brown, and Robert C. Brown; a
sister, Martha Lee Brown- Fountain
(WT), a host of other relatives
and friends. Funeral services will
be held Thursday 1 p.m. at Mt.
Carmel M.B. Church.

HENRY G. (SMITTY) SMITH, 57,
Retired Cook
died March 29,
2008. He is
survived by his
wife, Dorothy
Smith; daughter,
Akkaya Hall,
brother, Elehue
Smith; sister,
Carolyn Smith- Craig; a host of
other relatives and friends. Funeral
services will be held Saturday 10
a.m. at Mt. Calvary M.B. Church.

HOWARD LEE DUPREE SR, 83,
Retired Truck Driver died March
26, 2008. He is
Survived by his
sons, Howard
Lee Dupree
Jr.(Sharon)
Horace Lee
Dupree;
Daughters,
Valeria Lee
Dupree-Hill(Paul), Audrey Lee
McDonald(Eddie) and Monalisa
Dupree; Sister, Delores Odom;
Brother, Isiah Dupree(Elmira).
Twelve Grand-Children, Seven
Great-Grand children and a host
of nieces nephews other relatives
and friends. Funeral Service were
held Saturday.


WARREN JOSEPH PIOUS, 46,
Postal Worker died March 29,
2008. Final Rites and Burial in
Barrancas National Cemetery in
Pensacola, Florida.


JOIN THE

90Uaoi c^1
by becoming a member of our
CAuie 2 3 -9-i2cto I

CALL 305-694-6210
---------- ---- -1----------- -- - ---


Eric S. George
DELORES M. GLOVER
(O'BRIEN), %74,
died. Service 2
p.m. Sat. April 5
at Mt. Zion AME
Church.


MICHAEL FREDERICK, 35, died
Thur. Mar. 27. Service Sat. April 5
at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hal-
landale Beach, Florida.

NELLIE CLARK, 76, died Thur.
Mar. 27. Service 10 a.m. Sat. April
5 at Ebenezer Baptist Church.
Jay Johnson
BENJAMIN HINES, died Mar. 30
at home. Service Sat at Pentecos-
tal Power of The Apostolic Faith at
a time to be announced.

ALTAMESE GIBSON. 54, died
Mar. 28 at South Miami Hospital
Service 11 a.m. Sat. at Solid Rock
Apostolic Ministries.

Jay's
BETTY DAVIS, 60, died March 25,
home. Service
11 a.m., Satur-
day at Mt. Sinai.






JOHN KNOX, 72, died March
26, Homestead
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Mornin-
star Missionary
Baptist Church.


DANZEL COPPET, 17,
March 28, Jack-
son Hospital.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


DION COPPET, 20 died March 28,
Jackson Hos-
pital. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Mt. Pleasant
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.




ROBERT SHARPE, 71, died
March 28, Jack-
son South Com-
munity Hospi-
tal. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
at Morningstar
Missionary Bap-
tist church.



KENDRICK LOCKHART, 19, died
March 31. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.






LORETTA FLIPSE, 80, died March
27 at home. Services were held.

CHRISTOPHER DAYS, 41, died
March 26, North Medical Center.
Service Fri. 1 p.m. at a place to be
announced.
Richardsonrig Y?

KATRINA BRAZIL, 44, died
March 26. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat
at Goldcoast
Church of God
By Faith.


NELSON WRIGHT JR., 81, died
March 30. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.


Range Coconut Grove
MARY DENISE THORTON, 50, of
Coconut Grove,
died March
29th at Doctor's
Hospital. Ar-
rangements are.
incomplete at
time.



VANRIA L. LAWSON, Patient Care
Technician, 68, of Coconut Grove,
died March 29th at South Miami
Hospital. Services were held Mon.
at Christ Episcopal Church.


DARLENE REATH, Homemaker,
41, of Coconut Grove, died Mach
26th at Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Services will be held Sat. 1:00 P.M.
at Macedonia Baptist Church.


REGGIE L. HARRIS, SR., Secu-
rity Investigations, 34, of Coconut
Grove, died March 22nd. Services
were held Fri. at St. James Baptist
Church.


Premier By Us
ELLIOTT HARRISON HAMIL-
TON, 48, died
Mar. 19. Visita-
tion Fri. 5:30 to
8:30 p.m. Peace
Missionary Bap-
tist Church,
11500 N.W. 17
Ave. Service
11 a.m. Sat at
New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist
Church.

KENNEITHA CAROLYN MAR-
JORIE HILL, 'NIKKI', 53, funeral
associate, died
March 19 at
home. Ser-
vice was held,
Church of God
of Prophecy Mi-
ami #1, Satur-
day, March 29.


St. Fort's
JEAN ROBERT BOCO, 26, died
Mar. 23. Contact St. Fort's Funeral
Home.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


BERNICE B. SCOTT
07/21/1905 03/16/2008

would like to thank everyone
for their many acts of kindness
during our loss. You will never
be forgotten.
Special thanks to Rev. Dr.
George McRae and the Mt. Tabor
family, New Shiloh, Nazarene
family and Manker Funeral
Home.
The family


GEORGIAN WILKS
03/31/1919 04/03/2007

It has been one year since
you left us. We take comfort
in knowing that you are in a
far better place, even though
we no longer see your face,
we love and miss you dearly.
Your memory will always be
special to us. God has you in
his keeping, but we have you
in our hearts. Happy Birth-
day.
Your loving family and
friends


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ADAH REESE
08/02/1913 04/01/2007

Mother it's been a year since
you've been gone, but you're
not forgotten. We think about
you everyday, your funny
jokes, your caring and loving
touch for us.
Mother, we love and miss
you every day. Until we be
together again, stay sweet.
Love, Emma, Emery and
Jimmie

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


TRISTAN L. JACKSON
"AKA BROOKLYN"
11/13/82- 04/04/07
It's been a year and you are
still deeply missed by your
loving mother, family and
friends.
A memorial service will be
held at the family's home on
04/05/08.


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET* MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion

IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,

CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


FI &- I THAT CARES.


Milton A. Hall I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


Honor Your Loved One With an

In Memoriam in The Miami Times







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


( bJ f IIr I Im %4 od


HAROLD WILLIAMS, 54,
cook, died Mar. 30 at North
Shore Medical Center. Service
11 a.m. Sat., April 5 at Pilgrim
Rest Missionary Baptist
Church. Entrusted to Poitier
Funeral Home.

Death Notice


(trk l L rmi r


JANICE "LADY"
WILLIAMS, 42, died March
25 at University of Miami
Hospital. Viewing Wed. at 5
p.m. Service, April 3 at Greater
Fellowship M.B. Church at 11
a.m. Mitchell Funeral Home.


CHARLES EDWARD
VAMPER, 47, security guard,
died Mar. 31. Survivors
include: sisters, Barbara
Ann Brooks (Greg), Patricia
Mitchell (Nathaniel), Adririna
Rogers, Janette Vamper
Blue (Emmanuel) and Anita
Vamper; brother, Jeffrey
Vamper (Merlyn); aunt, Angie
and a host of nieces, nephews,
other relatives and friends.
Service 1 p.m. Sat at Range
Chapel.
Death Notice


TAVARUS'KrazyJit' HALL,
29, died Mar. 31.Viewing Fri.
4 to 9 p.m.. Service 11 a.m. at
Royal Funeral Home.
61


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY






The Miami Times

Lifestyles


SECTION C


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Eugenia Thomas arrived
early at the American Legion
Hall to assist in setting up for
the 10 annual African American
Luncheon. She was joined by
Ruby Rayford and Gwendolyn
Welters who manned the tables
for reservations and seating. In
the midst of it all was Dr. Enid
C. Pinkney, founder/president,
who tied up the loose ends.
After the prelude from the Psi
Phi Band, Maud Newbold took to
the mic and introduced Leome
Culmer and Angela Culmer,
as the script and historical
writers and the speakers for the
program. They included
members of the Singing
Angels, Tillie Stibbins,
president/moderator,
Rhonda Gillard,
Ramona Varner,
Shirley Futchess,
Bonnie Newbold
Stirrup, and Penny
Lambeth performed CUL
revealing the interesting
lives of "Voices From The Graves
2008, Cecelia Gars, Jane
Thompson, Martha Frederica
Gilbert-Akin, Catherine Bain
McKenzie, and Naomi Jones
Grant.
Dr. Pinkney added a new
dimension in the program
by featuring headliner Dr.
Mary Hylor who talked to the
audience about her history of
Miami and the many homes she
lived in Overtown. Her songs
were- orchestrated and she
received a standing ovation and
a future spot for years to come.
Rev. Abraham Thomas
followed with his CD tapes
and stimulated the crowd with
The Very Thought Of You, I'll
Get By and many more, while
Gillard was called upon to
neutralize the music by singing,


Glory, Glory and
returning to her
task of moderator
for Part II.
Everyone else
got into the act
accepting the door
prizes they won
and Dr., Pinkney thanked t
committee, Frank Pinkn
Horace McGraw, and Dwig
Walker his men from the Tr
of Knowledge, the historia
and the City of Miami for its p
bono services.
Special kudos to Leome
Culmer, Angela Culmer, Glol
A. Green, June Roge
S Charles L. Hudso
Anna G. Sweetir
Vennda Rei Gibso
Phillip Wallace,
Jacquelyn Livingsto
Carmen D. Jackso
Joyce M. Hepbul
Dorothy W. Fayso
LMER Wilhelmenia Park
Mona Ball, Elry Sand
Elouise Farrington, Verne
Dames, Ema Ali,
Bernice Carey, and
Dena Pinkney, who
sold T-shirts.


Palm Sunday
celebration always
begins with The Church
of The Incarnation and a
special congratulations
go out to The Rev'd J. Kenne
Major, Rector, The Rev'd Fr
W. Fleischer, Alfreda
Brown, Lenora Smith, Alfr
Barnes and Bertram Rober
And, of course, the Progress:
Band members that awaits tt
opportunity to perform for t
entourage.
Fr. Major passed out t
palms and the band stru


up When 1hee Saoints and the
parishioners joined in singing
their hearts out. I-leading the
List Garth C. Reeves, an annual
Participants, followed by Marion
Cunningham, Elizabeth Stall,
Sadie Barry, Samuel Cleare,
Milton and Josephine Hall,
Dr. Wellington Johnson,
Sandra Powell, Marilyn
Reynolds, Alice
Harrell, and Antionett
Powell.
Also Jean Morley,
:he Lamela Daily, Laleis
ey Parker, Willie Pearl
;ht Porter, Laurestine
ree Hamm, Monica
ns Adderly, Vinson
)ro Albury, Hallot
Ferguson, Bertram Roberts,
S. Keshawn Ferguson, Victoria
ria McKenzie, Wilfred and Martha
rs, KcKenzie, Barbara Williams,
>n, Lynett McKenzie, Elvis
ig, Paschal, Dana Moss, and Dr.
n, Kathy Wyche.
Jr., Kudos go out to the traditional
3n, Progressive Band (once called
n, The Saint Agnes Cornet Band)
rn, for keeping the history of
>n, Miami alive each Palm Sunday.
er, This year Ebenezer UMC was
ds, added, along with St. Agnes,
ka the first church to
march in the streets.
The members
included Harcourt
Clark, drum major,
Vernon Clark, cymbal
player, Darryl Kernel,
Dr. Fred Morley, Chris
Morley, his son, George
MOSS Lane, Donnie Brown,
Bertram Colebrook,
who started in the 50's,
th Jaroda Strapp, (the youngest
ed female and granddaughter of
E. Robert and Autherine Strapp,
ed Norman Cox, Willie Granger,
ts. Andre Brown, Michael Clear,
ive Jessie Hill, Douglas Dozier,
his Cyril Bullard, and Richard B.
he Strachan, paymaster.
Again, 1 recommend we take
he the parade to the people, not
ck the people to the parade. One


parade in Liberty City and One
Overtown with annoLincements
six months in advance.

A.****A
Good Friday is long gone, but
the memory would last forever
from those 'SnowBirds' that
frequent the palatial home of
socialite Judy Scavella,
as well as her close
friends from Dorsey
High School.
The setting was
overlooking a
picturesque lake
under a soft breeze
OLD permeating among the
three mini bars; three
fish selection bars of
groupers, snappers, and cat
fish; and "oldie-goldies" being
DJ'ed by Bernard Poitier, a
part of the clan, while the host,
Greg Mason moved
around making everyone
feel comfortable, while
hostesses Cheryl
Scott, -Joann Scott,
and Ephraim Williams
orchestrated the serving
of the food and drinks.
The guests wore
tropical clothing and
talked of enjoying the
hospitality of Judy each year.
Not for one day, but the months
they stay in Miami. Some of
them were Theresa Williams-
Smith, Carl Williams, Betty
Battles, Edna Brown, Jimmie
Roberts, Marie Slaughter-
Brown, John Leonard, and
Delores Burnett, Barbara
and Vivena Eprham, all from
Chicago.
Also, Harold and Charlesetta
Potts, Peoria, Ill. Cecile
Thompson, DooleyThompson,
Ernest Smith, BalJean and
Gloria Smith, Patricia S.
Thomas, Manny and Joan
Men'dez, Launderhill, Hazel
Bolds-Newton, Yvette and
Andy Jones, Harry and
Carmen Dawson, Larry and
Carolyn Adams, Richard and


Lorraine Strachan. Now, the
gang is talking about a movie
producers using this
setting to show the
world how some Black
people are really living.


The name of Josie
Poitierwill reign forever
and ever within Chief
John Timoney and TIMC
the City of Miami Police
Department, Mayor Manuel
Cruz, The Black Firefighters
Association, Inc. The Explorers
Post 106; Honorable Judges,
Priests of Holy Redeemer,
and the Miracle Workers for
providing the community with
the 26 Anniversary Passover
Good Friday Brunch, at the
Biscayne Marriott Spa & Hotel.
In addition, Josie used seven-
emcees for the program
and they included
former Commissioner
MillerDawkins,Willard
B. Delancy, Delrish
Moss, Harold Scott
III, Reinaldo Torres,
and Ed Williams. Each
R one displayed a unique
style and added fuel to
solemnity, as well as
humorous moment. Moss and
Delancy were superb during
the candle light ceremony when
Detective James M. Walker
and Pamela Lynette Chisolm
were memorialized before
their family members. Their
portraits were brought out by
two officers who placed them
on a tripod and the narrators
involved the audience for
moments of silence.
A change in the atmosphere
came when the entertainment
phase was presented bybringing
on Kenny Washington and the
upcoming diva, Cafidia Stuart,
who brought the audience to
their feet singing Whitney
Houston, Don't Let Me Cry
and finished with a amplified
crescendo at the end. It was


announced Cafidia would
appear at the Miami Heat's
game to sing, The Star
Spangle Banner.
More excitingmoments
continued as Josie
prepared to present
gifts to some special
people who have. been
in the background since
the beginning of the
)NEY Passover. They received
a 24x24 plaque, such
as Maurice Kemp, Deputy
Chief Fire Dept., Veldorc
Arthur, Exec. Asst., Gamalieie
Souffrant, president, PBFFA,
Robert Turner, vp., William
Street, treasurer, Ulysses
Kemp, PBFFA, Edward Lyons,
Capt, PBFFA, James Kemp,
Floyd Jordan, Ignatius
Carroll, Lt., Winifred Waters,
widow of first Black FireFighter,
in Florida (Willie Waters),
Judges David Young and Scott
Bernstien, Peter Dench, and
Laura Villagran, Clementina
Munoz Orgtega, Bermuadez,
Johathan, Siddette McIntosh,
Sandra Alexcordre, Post 106.
Also Marticu Black,
TechelineCherilus,RoseJean-
Mary, Raymond McKenzie,
Chayaisha Fullard, followed
by the Miracle Workers Jackie
Sands, Pasco Walker, Napier
Velazquez, Kha D.White,
Elsa Hung Ofc. Delrish Moss,
Ofc. Marcost, and Bea Hines,
columnist, Miami Herald.
However, the highlight of the
evening was the presentation
by Princess Vaniecia and
Prince Harold Scott, III ,
neice and nephew of Josie, to
Dr. Richard J. Strachan. A
watch was presented to him for
choreographing their Sweet 16
Celebration back in December
at the Doral Hotel, while Josie
presented a special plaque,
too. It was a complete surprise
to Strachan and he took to the
mic and thanked her for her
generosity, love, and dedication
to helping children.


State Representative District
103, Oscar Braynon, II held
a Swearing-In ceremony at
Miami Gardens City Hall
on Saturday, March 23. The
"Braynon Clan" were all in
attendance. His cousin former
Judge Harold Braynon
did the honor. A few family
members and friends joined
the Light Reception hosted
by his mother, Patricia
(Jennings); and father, Oscar
Braynon, I. Best of Wishes 02
as you return to Tallahassee.
Nevertheless, the Florida State
Rep., 02 is in the March 24th
edition of the Jet Magazine.
Native Miamian, George
Wilkinson returned home
after a home going celebration


for his beloved
wife, "DD" in New
York. A memorial
service was held at
the Church of the
Incarnation last ",
Tuesday. I send my sympathy
to the bereavement family.
Glad to see Doris Jordan-
Duty up and around again.
I wish you the best. You look
great! Also Doris McKinney-
Pittman is on her way to
recovery. Get well wishes to
all of you! Gail Sweeting-
Gee, Joyce Gibson-Johnson,
Mae Hamilton-Clear, Evelyn
Heild, Doris McKinney-
Pittman, Inez McKinney-
Johnson, Carmetta Brown-
Russell, W. Deloris Gordon,


Linda Lewis, Georgianna
Johnson-Bethel and Herbert
Rhodes.
Inner City Varsity did
it again. The club of men
presented $1200.07 to both
High Schools; Brooker T.
Washington and Miami
Northwestern Senior High. The
checks were presented to the
schools by the club secretary,
Al Richardson; Sonny
Armbrister is President; and
John Williams, Treasurer.
Congrats Gentlemen on a very
worthy cause.
South Florida Chapter
of North Carolina Central
University Alumni Association,
Inc. announced their 2nd
Annual Golf Tournament. Get
ready for a grand ol' time at
Palm Aire Country Club North
Pompano Beach on May 3,
2008. Committee memberswho
will make you very happy that


you attended are NCCU Eagles,
Debbie Adams; Laurestine
Porter; Theresa Baker; Gwen
Hankerson; James Outlaw;
Annie Rawls; Mary Robinson;
Gwen Greene; Amos Bonner;
Michael Robinson and many
more of your friends. Lunch
and Dinner will be served at
no cost. "You will not regret
attending and taking active
part."
For the first time in U.S.
History more than one out of
every 100 adults are in jail
or prison. According to a new
report documenting America's
rank as the world's No.#1
incarcerator. One out of twenty
nine is Black. It is reported by
Pew Center's Public Safety that
our 50 states spent more than
$49 billion on Corrections
last year; In contrast to 20
years earlier when the cost
was at $11 billion. Perhaps, if


we adequately invested in our
children and in education,
children who now grow up to
be criminals could become
productive workers and
taxpayers.
Halle Berry gave birth to
a girl. She named her baby,
"Nahla". It's Arabic for honey
bee.
Be There the Fair!- Miami
Dade County Fair will be in
town on March 27 to April 3.
It's great fun for the entire
family. Have a great time;
however, be extremely careful.
Did you know "Chicago" was
known as Eschikagol in 1773.
Jean Baptist Pointe Dusable
historic Black American
Pioneer was the first known
settler to build a house and'
open a trading post in what is
now the city of Chicago. Jean
Pointe Dusable was born in
Haiti.


This is a continuation of what
I know and certainly thinking
about my generation compared
to today's generation. As a
former teacher, at one time
in my career I taught Social
Studies. Oftentimes, I think
how parents during my
teen years have experienced
failures. They have not found
an alternative for war; or
racial hatred. Perhaps this
generation will perfect the
social mechanisms by which all
men may follow the ambitions
without the threat of force;
therefore, the earth will no
longer need police to enforce
laws; armies to prevent some
men from trespassing against
others. If your generation can
make as much progress in
as many areas as these two
generations have; you should
solve many of the world's
remaining ill.


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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008




Rick Fox: Mastering the




art of reinvention


From basketball superstar to emerging actor, Rick Fox keeps his

eye on the prize and his ego in check to score big every time


Rick Fox is not afraid to
fail and views every bump in
Sthe road as an opportunity to
Grow, so for this very reason,
he continues to succeed. From
his 14-year basketball career in
the NBA where he distinguished
himself as a top player, to life as
a father of two, his divorce and
reconciliation with actress Vanessa
Williams to even his seque into a
budding acting career Rick Fox
keeps it moving. Forward.
Always one to defy the odds, Fox came
from humble beginnings. He grew up in
the Bahamas of mixed ethnicity with a
Bahamian father, Canadian mother and
three siblings. With the dream of financing
his college education through sports, as a
teenager Fox left home, traveling to Indiana
where he attended high school while living
with a family under a guardianship. There, he
methodically went about accomplishing that
goal first by attending The University of North
Carolina where he honed his ball playing skills
and then by being signed as a first round draft
pick to the Boston Celtics. He would later play for
Los Angeles Lakers, helping them win three NBA
championships.
Four years ago, at age 36, Fox retired from
professional basketball with his eye on another
prize....to become a actor. He has since appeared
on such television shows as "Dirt," "One Tree
Hill," "Ugly Betty," "Love Inc," and Spike Lee's
film "He Got Game." MEET THE BROWNS opens
nationwide in theaters on Friday, March 21st


ARIES: MARCH 21 APRIL 20
Caution is advised. At the same time, if
you're too hesitant you'll miss out on a good
thing. Don't try to get too close to people until
you know they're trustworthy. If I were you I'd
find out more about their family history. Lucky
numbers 20,11,32,4,5.

TAURUS: APRIL 21 MAY 20
You're set up well enough to get this to
work. There are opposing forces to take into
account, however. Those forces will be more
receptive to you if you start respecting their
position. Nothing will fly if you continue to ig-
nore that. Lucky numbers 8, 50, 42, 12.

GEMINI: MAY 21- JUNE 20
Your love life is recovering from recent
betrayals of trust. Healing will require some
reassessment of your mutual and individual
goals. If you can make room for each other
everything will begin to move in an upward
spiral. Lucky numbers 4, 33, 2, 21, 3.

CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 20
You want to make changes that are beyond
your reach at this time. Outer restrictions out
weigh your free will. A few more dues need to
be paid before things will open Lip. When they
do you will be free and change will be the op-


and stars Angela
Bassett, Jennifer
Lewis, David and
Tamela Mann
and Tyler Perry,
who reprises his
beloved role as
Madea!
What advice
would you
give someone on
choosing a career?
Pursue the
career you'd do,
even if you couldn't
get paid.
What was your favorite
nernory of working on
Meet The Browns?
The time I spent with Angela
(Bassett) off the set running our
lines and working together. I jumped
ahead in terms of my understanding of
working with a fellow actor because Angela
grabbed me and pulled me forward. Angela
and Tyler (Perry)were like blank canvases. They
were open to what I brought to the table and what
I had to offer. The experience was invaluable.
You're Bahamian and Canadian. How did it
feel to have that background growing up in the
states?
My mom raised, my two sisters as Black women
(she's a white Italian woman) and has lived in
the Bahamas for the last 35 years. I consider
myself of mixed Iheritage and growing up in the
Bahamas, race was not an issue because it was
a mixed country. Here in the states, I saw how
important it was for people to define themselves
as part of a specific group...I felt like an outsider
in that respect.
You're a dad with two children. What's the most
challenging part of parenting?
As a parent, I think you're tested daily, but I
always try to stay in communication with them
about the things in my life that weren't great
choices, that made my life more difficult. There
nothing too sacred to discuss. I'd rather it be too
soon to discuss something than too late.
How did your cat-cer as an athlete shape wcho
ycu are today?
My experience as a ball player was all or nothing,
win or lose...that's what everything came down
to. So I try to share with my son and daughter
that the colors in between are beautiful also.....
that there's value when you come in second or
land in the middle. Otherwise the value of things
get lost when winning is the only focus.
What has failure taught you most?
What failure showed me was how to move
forward more intelligently. There are always more
wins in my losses because I always come out so
much wiser about how to approach things better
the next time.
You're a new actor. How do you approach this
new career after being a seasoned veteran ball
player? Is it tough to star over?
People get paralyzed because of the fear of
beginning again. You're a rookie, so you're not as
good as you want people to see you. I say, allow
yourself to be a beginner, and allow yourself to
grow. I had a 14 year career as a ball player -
won 3 NBA championships, made a great living.
Retired at 36. Now I have to begin my career again.
A lot of athletes struggle because they wonder
a) do I have enough time to be great again? b)
what happens if I fail? Am I willing to face the
criticism and go back at it again and again and
again? Truthfully, the thing that helped me was
examining why I wanted to act. My answer was -


erative word. Lucky numbers 9, 43, 29, 4, 5.

LEO:JULY 21- AUGUST 20
Step back and review what's happened in
the last few months. You aren't the type to cry
over spilled milk, but you're smart enough to
see that you've been too hasty. Slow down.
Your next decision should be approached with
caution. Lucky numbers 5, 49, 2, 14, 3.

VIRGO: AU. 21- SEPT. 20
You have good reason to be suspicious.
Malicious types are everywhere. Replacing
paranoia with reasonable doubt will make
it possible for you to deal with this double-
edged sword. Give everyone just enough rope
to hang them selves. Lucky numbers 2, 13, 4,
55,6.

LIBRA: SEPT. 21 OCTOBER 20
You're reaping the rewards of a lot of hard
work. It amazes you that all of this has fi-
nally come to pass. What happens from here
will take you far. If you think you've reached
your limit, don't underestimate your potential.
Lucky numbers 5,43,23,11, 5.

SCORPIO: OCT. 21 NOV. 20
It's time to get your resume out. Going back
to school wouldn't be a bad idea either. What-


ever you came here to do needs to expand via
the acquisition of more recognition or more
knowledge. If you stay where you are, you
won't grow. Lucky numbers 6, 21, 4, 2, 20.

SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 21 DEC. 20
You're in a situation where silence is gold-
en. Talking too much will rock the boat and
you can't afford to blow this. If you can heed
my advice you will soon find out that what you
want to get off your chest doesn't even need
to be said. Lucky numbers

CAPRICORN: DEC.21 JAN.20
If it seems like nothing's going on you are
mistaken. So many longstanding problems
are being healed. Underneath the surface
your inner world is transforming. When that
transformation is complete you'll be off and
running. Lucky numbers 3, 30, 22, 19, 5.

AQUARIUS: JAN.21 FEB.20
You need to trust your intuition. Nothing is
logical at this point. Up until now you knew
where you were going but you've been sur-
prised by opportunities that are offering you
a choice. Don't be held back by what seems
sensible. Lucky numbers 4, 40, 32, 4, 1.

PISCES: FEB. 21 MARCH 20
Renewing old ties is forcing you to re-
consider the importance of what binds you
together. This doesn't need to be confusing.
There's plenty of room in your life for every-
one. Anyone who can't understand that needs
to go. Lucky numbers 5, 40, 32, 10, 4.


to be expressive and create a message. So I accept
this as a marathon, not a sprint. And when I look
at actors I respect, the Morgan Freeman's, the
Denzel's, Samuel L. Jackson and I looked at their
ages, I said 'if I'm 36 now, twenty years from now
woultl I be unhappy to look back and reflect on
having had to begin again? The answer is no.
Who are your favorite athletes?
Serena Williams, who I've watched grow as a
tennis player and have taken my daughter to see
a number of times. Kevin Garnett to whom I wish
nothing but the best. I truly love his approach to
basketball. He really transcends generations, he's
about team sports. And Tiger Woods, I appreciate
him for his consistent improvement above and
beyond his dominance of the sport. He begins
every year with the things that he can get better
at. It's inspiring for me....he's about constant and


consistent improvement in life.
What are your three favorite books?
The Four Agreements
Respect for Acting (which constantly reminds
me of why I'm acting)
Proverbs
What about your favorite films?
"Love Actually" (I loved the Christmas element)
A number of Penny Marshall films I really like
"A League of Their Own"
"Hoosiers"
You're a very handsome man. How was it
growing up being a pretty boy?
I felt objectified. My mom never cut my hair,
so I had long curls and the guys were envious
because I got attention from the girls. So I found
myself always apologizing and diminishing it and
Please turn to FOX 4C


Till's case: Of the catalysts of civil rights movement


TILL
continued from 1C

movement. Till was a Black
14-year-old from Chicago who
whistled at a white woman while
visiting relatives in Mississippi.
The two men accused of
kidnapping and brutally
murdering Till were acquitted,
though they later admitted to
the crime.
Serling tried twice to
dramatize Till's murder and
the acquittal of his killers.
In both cases, the writer met
with sponsor censorship and
network interference that
diluted his final work, said
researchers Tony Albarella and
'Amy E. Boyle Johnston.
"Serling was one of the first
people to write about current
events. He was taking a major


front-page issue and showing
the universal appeal of it and
showing our own implications.
Today that's a dime a dozen. But
when Serling was doing it, that
was shocking," said Johnston,
who's working on a biography
of Serling to be published in
2009.
By the time Till was lynched,
Serling was one of the most
celebrated writers of TV's
Golden Age and already
had written several socially
conscious scripts, including
"Patterns" (about corporate
corruption) and "Requiem for
a Heavyweight." Serling's Till
story was initially accepted and
approved by the producers of
ABC's "The United States Steel
Hour," for which he'd already
written several well-received
scripts.


But when it was reported that
Serling was writing about the
Till case, thousands of protests
poured in, mostly from members
of the White Citizens Council,
a Southern white supremacist
organization, said Johnston.
Serling produced three
"Doomsday" scripts. The first
two were for the stage, said
Johnston. In the original, the
victim was a college-aged black
man. Serling's language and
descriptions also were more
coarse and idiomatic ,in the
original version, she said.
When it ran on television in
April 1956, "Noon on Doomsday"
was so watered down as to be
meaningless, Johnston said.
The location was changed to
New England. The murdered
Jew was transformed into an
unnamed foreigner.


Free Aarienne Arsnt uener ours: ivionaays andu oaturuays at nLun, tartinguy a iLeW aullit Opera rouset no uuy.
No reservations necessary.


ORDER NOWi J' *1 l B iH^f
305.949.6722 arshtcenter^org M. "a' r







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


ted Material


Dd Content


)mmercial News Providers


Who Cares



What Black People Think



Anyway?


If you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think,think again.Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you.
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products.And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote.And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you, you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make.
Give your money,your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars.


FOX
continued from 3C
I later learned to stop doing
that. I realized I was conducting
my life by not wanting to be "too
much." But you're supposed to
use the tools you're given in life,
all of them.
What kind of things do you do
with your kids?
I took my son to a Kanye West
concert for New Years and it
was our first concert together.
We experienced something
special together while watching
and enjoying someone perform
at their best. On the way
home, we talked about being
at your best and not being
at your best sometimes. We


looked at the speedometer and
I said sometimes it's on O and
sometimes it's at 100 --- and
sometimes at 5 miles per hour.
You have to adjust.
You work with your ex-wife
Vanessa Williams on the show
"Ugly Betty," so obviously
you two must have a good
relationship. How did you
achieve that?
We were married for six
years and I was on the road
10 months out of the year,
so our communication was
tested with our busy schedules
and ultimately, both parties
developed resentment. But we
have great communication now
and I'm proud that we have a
beautiful daughter together


and we've had a lot of joy in
co-parenting her. Outside of
that, we root for each other's
professional careers. There
would be no Rick Fox on "Ugly
Betty," if Vanessa hadn't said
'I'm alright with that.'


The tr mealofr o a nratwspaper
lis In IIt courage, I l prmfllolu~M nlpmlbllltleI
and It dadlardSon to the community It 1rv*l
mfieasureis UP!


Making smooth transition from NBA to movie screen


.fc . -j j r. ra i if iifillll .....g ... ..liigi... **SS-SSS -si~ii. .*^- -5S-Sii.












Business


SECTION D


MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 2-8, 2008


in


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as a
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S *.* a w


S*CGopyrighted Material


Syndicated Content.--


P*'UAvailab6le from ommercial News Providers'..-
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4,000 slain; and you wai
To take a quote from the
brother on the Miller High
Life commercials, "Y'all must
be crazy!" Now that we have
lost more soldiers than the
number of persons we lost
on September 11, 2001, and
now that we are "celebrating"
five years of war in Iraq,
and now that we have tens
of thousands of American
wounded and hundreds of
thousands Iraqis dead, we
have a presidential candidate
who ants to continue what
the current leader calls a
"noble, necessary, and just"


nt McCain?
war. Again, to
quote that
brother in the
commercial,
"Are you for
real?"
How could
anyone, other than the
sycophants and the wealthy
war barons vote for McCain?
The opposite of the High Life is
the low life, and this country
has been mired in the low life
for nearly eight years now;
and some people say, "Give
us more." It's amazing, simply
amazing.


Let's see now: we have
$4.00 gasoline and diesel
fuel and $5.00 in some
places, a recession, whether
they want to admit it or not;
a housing/mortgage crisis; a
healthcare catastrophe; an
unfathomable national debt;
a huge deficit; a dollar that's
worth about a quarter; a
rising euro; oil at $110.00 per
barrel; Venezuela now doing
what Sadaam Hussein did
back in 2000, selling its oil for
euros instead of petrodollars;
cash payoffs going to our
enemies in Iraq to keep them
from fighting us; plans to
invade Iran; Osama sending
another message to us from
the mountains of Pakistan
or Afghanistan or wherever
they say he is right now; the
bailout of Bear Stearns with
tax dollars; and we have the


Bushites bragging about how
many new schools, hospitals,
roads and highways, and all
the infrastructure they have
rebuilt in Iraq, while New
Orleans still languishes in


was in international issues.
He admitted he knows very
little about economic issues.
What's left? How about
healthcare, education, energy,
and employment?


despite the many problems we face, most of which
were caused by George Bush's administration and his
band of thieves, and exploiters, John McCain may be
our President in January 2009 ...


despair and disrepair.
Despite all of this, President-
in-waiting, John McCain
walks around Israel with a
Yamika on his head and with
Joe Lieberman at his side,
coaching him and correcting
McCain's errors regarding
Iran and other international
issues. I thought his strength


The first thing this guy does
is traipse off to Israel, instead
of New Orleans, to assure folks
halfway around the world that
we are there for them. Hey,
John, what about us? Man, I
can't wait for the Presidential
debates to start.
Finally a few Black
Republicans came out to


support McCain. Michael
Steele, Larry Elder, and Ken
Blackwell have all made
positive statements about old
John and why we should elect
him as our next President.
I refer them to the Miller
High Life brother. What is it
about political party loyalty
that would make intelligent
men and women support, at
least in rhetoric, some of the
characters placed before us
today? Is it the prospect of a
job in the administration? Is
it insider deals?
George Bush says the war is
"noble" and they go long with
his stupidity. What's noble
about lying to get into a war?
What's noble about 4000 lives
lost because of the lies? What's
noble about commandeering
a country's resources? What's
Please turn to CLINGMAN 6D0


;l w
wra










6D THE MIM IEARL28 08BAK utCNFO II W ETN


Understanding finance: Auto financing


In general, most folks really
don't understand the inner
workings and number crunching
that goes into financing a car
or truck. Most people don't
care how much it costs, their
main concern and question to a
salesman is, "how low can you
get my monthly payments?".
Truth is, the amount financed,
the interest rate charged and


the length and terms
of the loan (years
financed) are all
important factors that
ultimately determine if
you got the short end
of the deal or not.

FINANCING MORE
THAN 4 YEARS
If you finance a car or truck


for more than 4 years (48
months) you're entering the red
zone. The red zone is when your
car or truck is depreciating in
value faster than you'll pay it
off. In other words, your vehicle
is what's called "upside-down".
Listen folks, by now, all grown
folks should know that the
moment you drive a car or truck
off the lot, it begins to loose
market value. With that said,
why on earth would anybody
finance a vehicle for 6, 7, or 8
years? The longer you finance
a vehicle, the more it costs you,
and the less valuable itll be by
the time you finish paying it off.
If you can't afford the monthly


payments on a 48 month loan,
you can't afford the vehicle.

ZERO DOWN
You might not want to know
this, but, sometimes the truth
hurts. Not only does the truth
set you free, the truth will save
you money too. Get this, "zero
down" is a suckers trap. When
you elect not to pay a down
payment towards the purchase
of a vehicle, you are
diggingyourselfintoafinancial
ditch. Always remember this,
whenever you finance an asset
that depreciates in value over
time, try to pay it off as quickly
as possible. There's nothing


worst than paying good money
towards a wasting asset that's
old. If you instead invested
the money into a good growth
fund, you'd be far better off
financially in the long run.

BAD CREDIT
If you have bad credit, before
you buy a new expensive
vehicle, wait, get your credit
straight. There's no benefit in
paying high finance charges
with lousy terms just because
you "want it now". Believe
it or not, sometimes "bad
credit" can help save you from
yourself. Some folks won't
stop charging and spending


until the privilege is taken
away, somehow they don't
understand. Understand this,
if you have a limited amount
of income, your greatest power
next to dollars is your credit.
If you can't figure out how to
legally get extra income, then,
your best bet is to figure out
how to get and keep, good
credit.
Tune into WKAT 1360am
every Saturday from 8am to
9am. As we discuss more on
money, business and finance.
Robert Henderson Jr. is a
Certified Financial Planner
Authorof The New Underground
Railroad


Big, big money in national politics


- sign of excess?


FUNDS
continued from 5D

Washington University.
Weissman said the three
main presidential candidates -
Democrats Hillary Clinton and
Barack Obama and Republican
John McCain -- are pulling in a
combined total of at least $100
million a month. Figures show
the candidates are spending up
to 93 percent of what they have
raised.
To put the numbers into
perspective, seven African
countries or islands each have
a gross domestic product of
less than $1 billion, according
to International Monetary
Fund data. They include Sao
Tome and Principe, Guinea-


-




rSyn Conteni


Ava abe frm Comerc a News Provders"



Presidential Candidate
Bissau, Gambia, Comoros, the
Seychelles, Liberia and Djibouti.
While they were careful not to
criticize the American political
process, people in some aid
organizations mentioned other


possible uses for so much
money.
An official with CARE, one of
the world's leading humanitarian
organizations fighting global
poverty, said even a fraction
of $1 billion could help tens of
millions of people.
"An additional $150 million
could ensure that 10 million
girls could receive a quality
education. An additional
$150 million could help make
pregnancy and safe delivery
available for 30 million women
in 10 countries," said Deborah
Neuman, senior vice president
for resource development at
CARE.
Neuman would not criticize
the amount of money being
spent on the campaign, saying


it was important for Americans
to become participants in the
political process.
But she said, "Dollars need to
be looked at and 'made room for
in peoples' philanthropic giving
for causes like ours and fighting
poverty."

WHY SO MUCH?
Experts said the amounts
being spent in this presidential
election are much higher than
in most other countries, though
still only a fraction of what
Americans spend advertising
some basic products or eating
out in restaurants.
A large portion of the money
in the United States is spent
paying for television and radio
time while some other countries


provide broadcast time to
candidates, Weissman said.
More money is needed also
because campaigns in the
United States are much longer
compared to many other nations.
Under the American electoral
system each state holds a
nominating contest followed by
the November general election.
Usually the battle ends early
after only a few states are
finished with their nominating
contests. But with no incumbent
this election has been different
and both parties have waged a
long battle to pick nominees for
the upcoming election.
"We started two years out.
Even by American standards
that's a long election," said Gary
Klaman, of watchdog group


U.S. PIRG.
Groups like U.S. PIRG and the
Center for Responsive Politics
say while the use of the Internet
has allowed many more people
to take part by donating small
amounts of money, the bulk of
the fund-raising is still from
large donors.
"Yes it's a lot of money. But
really -- it's less about the
overall amount of money than
where that money is coming
from and who is supplying it,"
said Klaman.
Massie Ritsch of the Center
for Responsive Politics
said even with the Internet
contributions, only about 4
percent of Americans make
a contribution to a federal
politician.


Country has been mired for nearly eight years


CLINGMAN
continued from 5D
noble about spending
a trillion dollars on
this war for five years,
with no end in sight?
Tricky Dick
Cheney, responding
to recent polls that
show two-thirds of
Americans say the
Iraq war is not worth
it, simply says, "So?"
This draft-dodging,
deferment grabbing,
egomaniacal,jingoistic,
contradiction of the
man who gives new
meaning to the title
of "vice" President,
should have been
kicked out of office
years ago. But, we
have folks in "the
party" who support
him to the end.
Dems are obviously
afraid to confront his
arrogant, flippant,
disregard for what
66% of Americans
think about his war,
as well as what 80%


negatively think about
him. He thumbs his
nose at us, flips us
the bird, and takes a
cruise in the Gulf of.
Oman with some Oil
Baron. What ajoke all
of this is. Yes, folks,
and the joke is on us.
The sad part about
this entire scenario
is, despite the many
problems we face,
most of which were
caused by George
Bush's administration
and his band of
thieves and exploiters,
John McCain may
be our President
in January 2009.
Imagine a 74-year-
old anachronism,
having to be corrected
by his handlers, still
searching for that
"Cuban that came to
the prison camps of
North Vietnam and
tortured and killed
my friends. We'll get
him and bring him
to justice, too." Will
somebody shake this


guy and tell him that
was 40 years ago, if it
happened at all. You
know the saying, "The
older we get the better
we were." McCain is
probably illusionary
by now.
McCain is trying to
be elected on the basis
of having been a POW.
In my estimation, he
needs much more than


that. Oops! Maybe
not. Bush did eight
years, didn't he? We
are so dumbed-down
as an electorate. As
we fight over Obama
and Clinton and allow
so-called conservative
talk show hosts to
control our agenda,
which is reactive at
best, old John may
just get in.


Pal r ,


You Sick? Do yoy Need Help?
Do You Have Bad Luck?


visor On Business, Marriage, and Love A
igious Holy Woman Helps The Sick And
move Suffering And Bad Luck From Your
Call Your Enemies By Name and Tell Yot
ep Away From. What Your Eyes See, Your
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las The God Given Power To Help By Pra'
800 NE 4 St. Hallandale
Call 954-457-4319


(#003116)


ABORTIONS
Up to 10 weeks with Anesthia $180
Sonogram and office visit after 14 days
included.

A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St., Hialeah, FL.
li samee as 103 St.)
(Please mention ad)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611





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Call: 305-694-6210 Fax: 305-694-6211


MUNICIPAL SENIOR
PROJECT MANAGER

Kimley-Horn a national consulting firm named by
CE News as "Best CE Firm to Work For" is seeking
a Senior Project Manager to lead staff and work
with clients in the planning, design and permitting
of land development and municipal engineering
projects Relocation assistance is available. Re-
quires licensed P.E., a minimum of 15 years ex-
perience leading a variety of land development
and public infrastructure projects including utility,
Iransportation and municipal engineering. Ability
to liaise with government agencies, maintain client
relationships, manage projects and mentor staff.
Entrepreneurial spirit with a desire to develop and
expand business. For immediate consideration,
apply on-line at www.kimley-horn.com, "Careers",
using reference FL80402MT. EOE, M/FV/D


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR EXPENSES FOR
CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE
CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE
IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN
AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE
HELD ON APRIL 10, 2008, AT 9:00 A.M., IN ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN
DRIVE, THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO THE
REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTS,
RESCINDING RESOLUTION NO. R-07-0507 WHICH ACCEPTED THE PLAT
ENTITLED EVANRAFY SUBDIVISION, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works Department, Survey
and Land Records Section of the Construction Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4"1 Floor, during
regular working hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or represented at this meeting and
are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter
considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three
(3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board
Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date des-
ignated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF
PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address
above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the
scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be
available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."






064-HH12 4/22/2008 Auction Services

052-HH02 4/22/2008 Custodial Supplies

RFP070-HH10 4/15/2008 SPEECH AND LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY SERVICES

PROVIDE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
RFP 071-HH10 4/15/2008 INTERPRETATION /TRANSLITERATION,
CAPTION AND/OR COMPUTER-ASSISTED
TRANSCRIPTION SERVICES

RFP 056-HH10 4/15/2008 TITLE III COUNSELING SERVICES

COUNSELING AND PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATION
RFP 069-HH10 4/15/2008 SERVICES AT THE ROBERTRENICK EDUCATIONAL
CENTER AND RUTH OWENS KRUSE EDUCATIONAL
CENTER FOR EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED

COUNSELING AND CONSULTATION SERVICES
RFP 068- 4/15/2008 FOR CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES IN THE
HH10.pdf TOPS PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS WITH
EMOTIONAL/BEHAVIORAL DISABILITIES

COUNSELING SERVICES IN 64 PROGRAMS
RFP 067-HH10 4/15/2008 WITH STUDENTS ASSIGNED TO SELF-CONTAINED
CLASSES FOR EMOTIONAL/BEHAVIORAL
DISABILITIES
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


'f:

















MIAMI, FLORIDA, APRIL 2-8, 2008


One bedroom for single
adult. $295 monthly Creole.
Call 786-277-6430

LIBERT CITY AREA
Large room, $135 weekly.
Please call 305-827-4593
MIAMI GARDENS
One bedroom, one bath with
private entrance. $650
monthly. $1200 to move in
Call 786-704-7708
N. MIAMI BEACH
MIRAMAR
Rooms and efficiency for
rent. 305-300-7783.


1426 N.W.70th Street
$350 $400 monthly Call
305-836-8378
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen,and bathroom One
person, private entrance.
305-474-8186/305-691-3486
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Air, cable TV, refrigerator,and
microwave. Utilities included.
Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
211 N.W. 12 STREET
Rooms $110 weekly. Cable
available. 305-305-9239.
2168 NW 98 Street
$80 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, 1 person.
305-474-8188/305-691-3486
2900 N.W. 54th Street
One room, refrigerator and
air. No smoking in the
building. Call 954-885-8583
or 954-275-9503
53rd St. and 14th Ave.
Own entrance, bed, own
bathroom, refrigerator, AC
and microwave. $500
monthly, includes electricity
and water $750 to move in.
305-710-1343.
6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
$350 deposit,$130 weekly,
air
Call 305-305-0597
6849 N.W. 15th AVENUE
Luxury rooms different sizes
quiet area, utilities included.
$100/$125 weekly $250.,
move in immediately.
786-277-2693
9119 N.W. 25th Avenue
$380 monthly, $760 moves
you in. Call 305-691-2703.
Carol City Area
Nice, clean, room in quiet
home, with own entrance.
Call 305-628-3029
CAROL CITY AREA
Private entrance. Section 8
Welcome. 305-794-5856 Or
404-492-2393.
Clean room for rent
1877 NW 59th Street
Air, utilities included single
person, $380 monthly, $90
deposit. 305-720-7067.
FINALLY WE'RE BACK!
1876 N.W. 66 Street. Large
rooms from $400 $450. Eld-
erly welcome. 786-357-1395
LIBLERTY CITY AREA ,
Large room, $150 weekly.
Please call 305-827-4593
MIAMI GARDENS
786-308-5625
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean room, private
entrance,outdoor patio, cable
and air.
Call 305-688-0187
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nice room, private entrance,
305-769-4985 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
NORTH MIAMI
BEACH AREA
Furnished room for rent. Call
305-300-2799
NORTH WEST AREA
Clean quiet room wit security
bars. $65 weekly. Call
305-769-3347
NORTHWEST AREA
62nd St. N.W. First Avenue
$625 to move in, $425
monthly and $200 security.
Call 305-989-8824
OVERTOWN
Room for rent, $125 weekly,
305-761-7443.
Room and efficiency for rent
305-836-5848/305-653-8954


IIX~
:I`


Furnished Rooms
ROOMING HOUSE
Open House 11 12 Noon.
8013 N.W. 10th Court
Central air, new bathrooms
and kitchen, security gates
$125 $150 weekly.
Call Kevin 954-744-6612

Eff iciencies
100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$215 weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232
1480 N W 195th Street
Furnished with air, cable, util-
ities. $550 monthly. First, last
and $200 security required.
Call 786-317-1804
1541 N.W. 54th Street #A
Air, utilities included, $550
monthly. First, last and $200
security.Call 305-332-2117.
1736 N. W. 93 Terr.
Completely furnished, stove,
air, refrigerator, all utilities
paid $500 monthly.
786-385-8326 Joe
19541 N.W. 37th Court
Utilities included $575
monthly, furnished. $300
security. Call 305-621-0576

2571 E. Superior Street
Efficiency $800 moves you
in, $287 bi-weekly.
Call 786-389-1686

7657 N.E 2nd COURT
Includes refrigerator, stove
and air. $465 monthly.
Call 305-469-5093
8931 N.W. 16 Avenue
Private efficiency, one bed-
room, furnished, utilities. One
working person, one child.
$575 monthly. Security
arranged. 305-696-2402
CAROL CITY AREA
One bedroom efficiency
apartment, air, tile, private
patio. 954-660-0780.
Miami Gardens Area
17131 N.W. 31st Avenue
Private entrance $550
monthly, first, last and
security Call
305-333-1620/ 305-652-0901
MIAMI SHORES AREA
Furnished efficiency,utilites,
cable $450 monthly. First
and last. Call 305-751-7536
NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance, bath, air
and cable. 305-758-6013.
Utilities and appliances in-
cluded. $650 First and .last
to move in.
Call 786-597-0039
Apartments
101 N.E. 78th STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$975. Balcony, laundry room;
and parking. Section 8 wel-
come.
Call 786-326-7424
1130 N.W. 2nd Avenue
DOWNTOWN AREA
One bedroom, one bath, fully
remodeled. Call 305-375-
0673 or 786-444-0771.
1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1245 N.W. 58 St
One bedroom $575 monthly.
All appliances included. Free
20 inch flat screen TV. Call
Joel 786-355-7578.
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one and two bed-
rooms. $525 and. $725
monthly Appliances included.
Call 305-747-4552
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL -
Two bedrooms, one
bath, $575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
140 SW 6th STREET
HOMESTEAD
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$700 monthly. No section 8.
Call 305-267-9449
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Free 20 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578


Apartments

1425 N. W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes
refrigerator, stove, central
air water $1100. to move
in. Call 305-628-2212

1510 N.W. 68 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$575. Studio $475. Applian-
ces included.
786-797-6417
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$999 per month. Newly reno-
vated, all appliances includ-
ed. Free 26 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1540 NW 1ST COURT
Three bedroom, two bath.
$800 monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel 786-355-
7578
1558 N.W. 1st AVENUE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fully remodeled. Call 786-
444-0771 / 786-488-6119.
1835 N.W. 2nd COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 monthly, appliances
free, 20 inch flat screen Tele-
vision.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1971 N.W. 2nd COURT
One bedroom ,one bath, fully
remodeled. Call 786-444-
0771 / 786-488-6119
200 N.W 13 Street
ONE MONTH TO MOVE IN
One bedroom, one bath
$245
305-642-7080
210 N.W. 17 STREET
One bedroom $475. Stove,
refrigerator air. 305-642-7080
2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $725, two bed-
rooms $925 newly renovated,
appliances included.
Call Tony 305-213-5013
2365 N.W. 97 Street
One bedroom. $625 monthly,
$1250 moves you in. Call
305-691-2703.
2440-42 NW 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$800 per month, first, last
and security.Call 305-651-
1078.
249 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, good condition, fenced
yard, parking, $800 monthly
plus security. Section 8
welcome. Call 305-674-7335
3151 NW 53rd Street
Two bedrooms. $800
monthly, first, last and
security Call 305-751-6232
3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath
$350 bi-weekly $975 moves
you in. Call:786-389-1686
3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Totally remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath in nice quiet
area. All appliances included.
$625 monthly. MUST SEE!
Call Mr. Cruz 305-213-5013

421 NW 59 Terr.
One bedroom $575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-359-7054

4425-4427 N.W. 23 Coourt
Two bedrooms, one bath
$825. Four bedrooms, two
baths $1200. 305-642-7080.

50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

5200 N.W. 26 Avenue
Three or two bedrooms from
$700. Section 8 welccme.No
Security Deposit
Call 305-634-3545
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699

7001 N.W. 15 Ave
One bedroom, one bath.
$495 monthly. All appliances
included. Joel 786-355-7578.


Apartments

8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information.
CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air
and appliances. Starting from
$650. Call 786-506-3067.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515.00
Two bedroom, one bath
$630.00
Free water, air
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly.Two bedroom,
one bath $650 monthly. For
information please call 305-
827-4593.
MIAMI AREA
One, and two bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
OPA LOCKA AREA
Section 8. one bedroom, one
bath. $500 cash back. Call
305-717-6084/ 786-597-2248
OPA LOCKA AREA
Updated two and three bed-
rooms available. Tiled,
central air, appliances and
water included. First month
free move in special. Limited
time!!. Section 8 Welcome.
305-688-2749
Over Town Area
One bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 ok. 786-262-4536
SANFORD APTS
1907 NW 2nd Court
Nice two bedrooms,, air con-
dition, window shades, appli-
ances, free hot water. Tenant
pays for cold water, $450
monthly, plus $200 deposit.
Call: 305-665-4938
Cell: 305-498-8811
WYNWOOD AREA
28th Street and 1st Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly. Two bedrooms
one bath, $750 monthly. All
appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.


10th AVE. NW 61 STREET
Brand new three bedroom,
two bath. HOPWA and Sec-
tion 8 ok. 305-624-0451
1180 N. W. 64 St
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Recently remodeled. Section
8 Welcome. $1000 monthly.
Call 786-258-1843.
1250 N.W. 51st Terrace
Two Bedrooms
305-691-3977/305-469-9868

1501 NW 64th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
conditioning. $725 monthly.
$1500 deposit, appliances in-
cluded.
Call: Gwen 786-246-4403
1521 N.W. 70 Street
Five bedrooms, appliances,
air. $825 monthly.
Call 305-642-7080
2966 NW 47th Street
Three and four bedrooms,
two baths. 305-303-2087.


1817 N.W. 41 Street
Remodeled two bedrooms,
one bath. $875 monthly,
$2625 to move in.
305-634-5794.
1848 NW 42 Street
Two bedrooms, 'one bath.
Appliances, water included,
central air. Section 8
welcome. Call 786-290-6750.
2043 N W 41st STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tiled, across from
metrorail shutters and alarm
system. $950 monthly, $2700
to move in. 305-725-7280..
2253 NW 94 STREET
Clean one bedrooms, one
bath covered parking,
gated.Extra room attached.
First and last. $990 monthly.
$1980 to move in. Call 954-
802-2423 References re-
quired.
240 N.W. 60th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Section 8 Okay.
305-490-5811
2929 NW 47th STREET
Two large bedrooms, one
bath,air,stove,refrigerator,and
tile. $800 monthly. Section 8
preferred. Call James 786-
507-3887.
3873 N.W. 164 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tile floors, central air$1375.
monthly. John 305-801-7305.
542 NW 60TH STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$850 security. $1100 month-
ly. Call 305-301-1993.
7752 N.W. 2nd Court
Four bedrooms, two baths
$1465 monthly. Section 8
OK!. Call
Ron Jackson 305-582-8210
8141 NW 6th AVENUE
Newly remodeled three bed-
room, two bath. $1450
monthy. Section 8 Welcome
Call 305-298-9166
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Like new three bedroom, one
bath. Call 786-269-5643.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom apartment. No
utilities. $700 monthly.
786-319-2695
Opa Locka/ Liberty City
Nice one and two bedrooms.
Call 786-486-9507



3058 N.W. 203 LANE
Three bedrooms, corner,
fenced.HOPWA and Section
8 ok. Call 305-624-0451.
CAROL CITY AREA
18709 NW 46 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths
SECTION 8 WELCOME
786-367-6268


1110 N.W. 55 Terrace
Why rent-Buy. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, renovated.
Try $900 down and $1199
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.
1301 N.W. 90 STREET
Why rent-Buy. Three bed-
rooms, den, air, garage. Try
$1900 down and $995
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.
131ST NW18th AVENUE
Rent while qualify to buy
Three bedrooms two baths,
Florida room, garage.,$1550
monthly. Sales Alvin
954-430-0849
1320 N.W. 90 STREET
Why rent-Buy. Little River.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, garage, pool. Try
$19000 down and $1519
monthly FhA 786-306-4839.
1345 NE 128 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
One car garage, big yard.
$1200 monthly. NO Section8
Call 305-267-9449
1450 N.W. 181 Street
Why rent-Buy. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, huge den,
patio. Try $1900 down and
$1499 monthly FHA
786-306-4839


151i lHITI NW urin
AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Central air. $1350 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
954-430-0849
18032 NW 8 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 407-445-3235.
1850 NW 91ST STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath
with air and appliances. Utilit-
ies included Section 8
ok.$1350 monthly.Call ED at
786-326-2799.
18715 NW 45TH AVENUE
SECTION 8 OK
Three bedrooms, one bath
with tile floors, central air, in
quiet area. $1365 monthly.
Call Joe 954-849-6793
1898 NW 112th TERRACE
Three bedrooms and one
bath. Section 8 welcome!
Call
Judy at 305-769-9718.
22 N.E..59 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1400. Two bedrooms $750
Section 8 Okay. Jerome
305-801-8994.
2354 SERVICE ROAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Yard, and utility room. Sec-
tion 8 o.k. Call 305-691-
2166.
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
2825 N.W. 163rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1400, air, tile floors, bars,
$4200 to move in. No Section
8 Call Terry Dellerson
305-891-6776

3121 NW 165 STREET
Three bedroom, den, air
$1250, tile floors, bars,
fenced. $3750 move in. No
Section 8.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776

4910 N.W. 170 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Four bed--
rooms, two baths,central air.
Try $1900 down and $1519
monthly FHA 786-306-4839.

7617 N.E 1 Court
Large three bedrooms, two
baths. Florida room, inside
utility, large yard Section 8
Welcome.
786-853-1834 /305-932-3331

811 NW 118TH STREET
Recently remodeled two bed-
room, one bath.Front
porch,large yard, pets o.k.
Quiet neighborhood. Water
included. $1100 monthly
Call 786-344-0132.

8200 N.W. 14 Avenue
Why rent, Buy!. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, central air.
Try $1900 down and $1199
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.
97 N.W. 28 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
house with den $1200
monthly, all appliances
included. Section 8
Welcome. Call Joel
786-355-7578.
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three, and four bed-
rooms with air. $700 to
$1250
305-642-7080.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
call Marcia 305-469-5062.
Off NW119th Street
Two bedroom, one bath with
garage and backyard. 1162
sq. ft. Living room, dining
room, den/family room. Parti-
ally furnished, Includes
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, washer and
dryer. Central air
and ceiling fans. Clean
house. Safe neighborhood.
Next to policeman's home.
Five minutes to 1-95, and 10
minutes to downtown Miami.
One year lease or 2 year op-
tion to buy. $1200 monthly
and $1000 deposit. Owned
by retired military. Referen-
ces required Rent must be
paid by direct deposit. Non
negotiable. Serious offers
only.
Call 305-778-9506.


Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, and plastering. Also
additions. Call 954-980-4231
or 305-892-0315

GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.


Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air. No Section 8.
$1595. 786-306-4839.
Ft. Lauderdale Hollywood
Three bedrooms, two baths
$1500/Sale. 1-800-242-0363
extension 3644.



Don't Lose Your Home
We Stop Foreclosures Fast!
Call 305-677-2226


ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also available
HUD/VA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty

NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedroom, two bath.
House for sale Large yard.
Call 305-873-4729
NEW CONSTRUCTION
3 BEDROOM/2
BATHS
SINGLE FAMILY
HOME


Government and Seller
GRANTS and SUBSIDIES
UPTO
$110,000
AVAILABLE
$0 CLOSING COST


TOWNHOMES
$45.000
After grants
and subsidies

305-801-5868

S~ffS~t '' ~



COIN LAUNDRY
For sale 50K 1659 N.W. 3
Ave. 305-588-9084.


Stop Renting, Own Your
Own Home!
Zero Down?
FHANA LOANS
GOOD/BAD CREDIT
CALL 305-746-3971


Be a Security Guard
$55 or renew your D license
$55 G license $150 and con-
cealed license $125 G and
concealed together at special
price. Reliable #DS2600085
#K200017. Open 7 days
786-333-2084
FUNERAL PACKAGES
Starting at $1495.
Serving Miami to Key West.
Call 786-333-2084
Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565

HANDYMAN CARPENTRY
Painting, Tree Trimming,
Yard Cleaning, Landscaping
786-237-7656/305-633-1593

IMPROVE YOUR CREDIT
Remove late and collection
accounts. Results within 45
days. Call Bob 305-418-2338

Need a Drain Fill?
Good Work! Good Price!
Call Morris 305-588-0205


NO FUAT
Scholarships Available.
Preschool to 12th Grade
after care and tutorial.
McKay ESE Scholarship.
Florida Scholarship.
J&D Owens
Christian Academy
14a5n NF fth Av.onue


EXERCISE TRYOUTS
Saturday April 5 at Saint
Luke
Baptist Church, 1790 N.W.
55
St. Age 6-12. $5 Registration
Fee. 305-685-1222.


Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com

Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784


a e.t .


seeks an


REPRESENTATIVE

____- to join our growing staff


The successful candidate will possess:
* At least two years experience in sales and marketing.
* Great communication skills and outgoing personality.
* Excellent ability to organize and set priorities.
* A reliable vehicle, as daily contact with clients is mandatory.
* KnnowlPerlt nf hbasic ('ncmnnutr nrnorams


Here's what you can expect:
* Small, enthusiastic staff.
* Loyal readers and advertisers.
* House accounts available.
* Tremendous growth potential.
* Serious money to be made.


- ''~ I\ LVWU:; k I U UI*'- -'cVk--ULU rlAba -- - 1


Send resume and cover letter to:a
advertising@ miamitimesonline.com


SECTI(


aNm n


6.Fv I--


ADVERTISING


.s$


UPDATE YOUR
HOME/CONDO
Walls and ceiling textures.
Water damage, cracks,
holes, painting and
plastering. Call
John 786-515-5385



MUSICIAN WANTED
Saint James Baptist
Church of Coconut Grove
is in search of a spirit-
filled,
God-fearing musician. If
you are interested in this
position, please contact
Deacon Jimmy Smith Sr.
305-259-6218 or call the
church at 305-443-4440.
Office hours, 10 a.m. -
3:30
p.m. Reverend Kenton L
Williams Sr., Senior Pastor

Preschool Teachers
40 Hours ,CDA
Call 305-893-1313

RESIDENTIAL CARE
GIVER NEEDED
$10/hour. Experience nec-
essary.:Tony 786-237-9001

Route Driverse

MakeUp To $10 an Hour

weare eeekingdrivers ta
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Mut have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street









8D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


liami-hawd I nnur rrpwortd a km of $L2 mUlio




"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


-asb m * *mf















T lt 1 jV' 2 CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Mian
** located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Mi
Slowing:
IFB NO. 70043 INVITATION FOR BID F
BODY REPAIRS, PARTS
AND PAINTING OF CIT'
FROM LOCAL SUPPLIE

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY,

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at ti
ing Department, website at www.miamiaov.com/pr
305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THI
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODI
NANCE NO.12271.
Pedro
City Ma



AD NO. 002324




MIAMI-DADE


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
TUSMIAMI-DADE COUNTY
__ u_ MIAMI, FLORIDA
Illa11 nd J Pl i
ItlCl, tlll nil, Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can be
W obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM), from
our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dpm. Vendors may choose to download
the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under "Solicitations
At Northern Trust Bank, we have Online". Internet access is available at all branches of the Miami-Dade Public
establishedareputationasaleader Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our Website on a daily basis to
intrustandprivatebanking, client view newly posted solicitations, addendums, revised bid opening dates and
serviceandcareer opportunity other information that may be subject to change.
Our commitment to a rewarding
environment at each and every Interested parties may also visit or call:
level is supported by our creative
managementteam, anapprecation Miami-Dade County
for diversity in the workplace, and Department of Procurement Management
excitingapproaches exceeding our Vendor Assistance Unit
clients' expectations. 111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
So putyour dedication to work for Miami, FL 33128
youinanenvironmentthat encour- Phone Number: 305-375-5773
ages individual thinking with career
growthand earningpotential. Con- There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
tact us today to learn more about $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of
available positions, the bid package through the United States Postal Service.
Northern Trust Bank, Attn:
Human Resources, 700 Brickell
Avenue, Miami, FL33131. These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
Northern Trust County Ordinance No. 98-106.

Bank of
Florida NEED A JOB, HOME?
EOE M/F/D/V N :.::
,, ,...Check out he c lassi fieds


-UII


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, EL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 73031 INVITATION TO BID FOR MAINTENANCE
AND REPAIRS OF EMERGENCY GENERATORS

CLOSING DATE/TIME; 12:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16,2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager





AD NO. 002418


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION (RFQ)

Responses shall be submitted electronically via the Oracle system or re-
sponses may be submitted in hardcopy format to the City of Miami Purchas-
ing Department, 444 SW Avenue, 6th Floor, Miami, FL 33130, or faxed to
305-400-5025 for the following:
RFQ NO. 74055 PRE-QUALIFICATION OF ADDITIONAL
CATERERS
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, APRIL 7 1,2008

Detailed specifications for this RFQ are available at the City of Miami, Pur-
chasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone
No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION 15 SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMICODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 0

AD NO. 002052


BIDS

mi City Clerk at her office
ami, FL 33133 for the fol-

OR AUTO AND TRUCK
S, REFURBISHMENT
Y VEHICLES
=RS

APRIL 23, 2008

he City of Miami, Purchas-
ocurement Telephone No.

E "CONE OF SILENCE"
E SECTION 18-74 ORDI-

G. Hernandez
manager


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida on April 10, 2008 at
9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE, MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENT(S), AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO ACCEPT FROM THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT
TRUST FUND ("TRUSTEES"): (1) A MODIFICATION OF DEED NO. 18730-A, IN SUBSTANTIALLY
THE FORM ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT "A", TO SPECIFICALLY ALLOW FOR OPEN TO THE
PUBLIC, "FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED" FACILITIES RUN BY PRIVATE ENTITIES, THE CITY OF
MIAMI AND/OR GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES; AND (2) AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT THAT NO FEES
ARE DUE TO THE STATE FOR LEASES OR AGREEMENTS, OR EXTENSIONS THERETO, WHICH
ARE IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE DEED RESTRICTION AS MODIFIED HEREIN; AUTHORIZING
THE ALLOCATION OF UP TO 15% OF REVENUES RECEIVED BY THE CITY FROM ANY NEW
LEASES WITH PRIVATE ENTITIES OPERATING WITHIN THE DEED RESTRICTED AREA FOR THE
PURPOSE OF FUNDING MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENTS OF WATERFRONT PROPERTIES;
FURTHER AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE ANY ADDITIONAL DOCUMENT(S), IN
A FORM ACCEPTABLE TO THE CITY ATTORNEY, AS DEEMED NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH THE
ABOVE.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these items. Should any
person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all
testimony and evidence upon any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three
(3) business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla Thompson, CMC
City Clerk




(#003115)


""""""'~" "' "


![









9D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


BL. NACKS MUST (CON I'KROt Tl'RiR OW\N DESTINY


Your best investment? Paying off that debt


By John Waggoner

Sure, stocks are
much cheaper now
than they were at the
first of the year. So are
houses.
But if you're carrying
a lot of credit card or
other debt, your best
investment is to pay
down that debt.
Think of it this way:
If you invest $10,000
in a 10-year Treasury
note, you'll earn 3.36%
a year, or $336. After
10 years, you'll have
pocketed $3,360.
Now, for the sake of
comparison, let's say
you have a $10,000
credit card bill, and
the card charges a
19% interest rate.
Suppose your card
issuer requires you to
pay 4% of your balance
every month, so your
minimum payment is
$400.
If you pay your
minimum each month
(and assuming you
must pay at least $10
a month), it will take a
bit more than 15 years
to repay your debt. If
you pay that debt off
now, over 10 years,
you'll save $15,672 in
payments and $6,204
in interest. Put another
way: You'd earn $336
in interest from your
T-bill in your first
year. But you'd save an
average $350 a month
the first year by paying
off your credit card -
clearly a better bet.
Unfortunately,
most people don't
have $10,000 sitting
idle; that's just one
reason they're facing a
mountain of credit card
debt. Still, even if you
pay down your debts
gradually, you'll free
up money for investing
later. Just be careful
not to dig yourself a
bigger hole than you
started with. Here are
five ways to help get out
of debt and five traps
that would probably


New web site

helps women

find home

business ideas
Nationwide
Women have long been
underrepresented in
the business arena
and in leadership jobs.
According to a recent
Associated Press
article, more than
half of all Fortune 500
companies in 2006
had fewer than three
women corporate
officers. In addition,
women held only 6.4
percent of the top
earning job positions.
That same article
revealed that "women's
progress in getting the
top jobs in American
business is so slow
that at the current
rate they are becoming
corporate officers, it
would take 40 years
before women catch
up with men."
While many
organizations are
encouraging women
to fight for their
workplace rights,
BusinessWomen.org
is encouraging women
to do something
different: start their
own businesses.
The web site, which
is produced by the
National Association
of Business Women
and Moms (NABWM)
states: "Women are
left with two choices:
They can either wait
40 years, or they can
take the initiative
now to start their
own business and
gain control over the
situation."


bury you even deeper.

5 ways to climb
out of debt
1. Stop using your
cards. It won't do you
much good to pay
down your debt if you
keep adding to it. If
you've arranged to have
some recurring charges
automatically billed to
your credit card, see
if you can have those
bills deducted from
your checking account
instead. (Be sure to
keep track, to avoid
overdraft fees on your
checking account.) Or
see if you can eliminate
those bills altogether.
2. Try to get a better
rate. Some cards
charge 30% or more,
and anything you can
do to reduce your rate
is to your benefit. Start
by calling your credit
card company, says
Gerri Detweiler, an
adviser at Credit.com,
a consumer website.
"Be pleasant, but be
persistent," she says.
As you can imagine,
the odds aren't great
that you'll be rewarded
with a lower rate, but it
can't hurt to ask.
Should you transfer
balances to a cheaper
card? Possibly,
Detweiler says. But
bear in mind that
opening new accounts
can weaken your credit
record. If you can,.
transfer your balances
to a lower-rate card
that you already own.
You might also
consider a home-equity
loan, which would give
you a lower rate and
your interest will be
tax-deductible. If your
home's value has slid
precipitously, though,
you might not be able
to get one. And if you
start using your credit
cards again, you'll find
yourself with even more
debt.
3. Pay off cards with
the highest interest
rate first, and pay more


than the minimum.
Suppose you have a
$10,000 credit card bill
that charges 30%. Your
minimum payment
is 4% of your total,
or $400, and $250 of
that payment goes to
interest. Even after
sending $400 to your
credit card company,
your balance falls by
just $150. (The same
payment to a card that
charged 12% would
reduce your balance by
$300.)
The faster vou set


charges 20% to 30% or
more.
Don't limit yourself
to windfalls. Even if
you can afford to direct
only $20 extra a month
toward your debt,
you'll eventually save
thousands in interest
and pay off your debt
faster.
4. Save. Many people
sink into credit card
troubles because of
unexpected expenses:
Your car dies, your
furnace malfunctions,
vour health insurance


a list of state-approved
credit-counseling
organizations at www.
usdoj.gov/ust. Many
credit unions and
military bases offer
free credit help. Or you
can call the industry
trade group the
National Foundation
for Credit Counseling
at 800-388-2227.

5 steps to avoid digging
yourself deeper
1. Paying off one card
with another. Don't


If you have no way to pay off your credit card, it's time to call your credit card
company and try to work out a payment schedule.


rid of your high-cost
debt, the better, so try
to pay more than the
minimum. One good
source of money: .your
tax return. The average
taxpayer received a
$2,225 refund from
Uncle Sam last year.
That kind of money
could go a long way
toward paying down
your debt.
In addition, the
government wants you
to spend your economic
stimulus payment -
anywhere from $600 to
$1,200 at the mall.
But your own private
economy might receive
more stimulation if you
used your tax refund
to pay off your credit
card bill, particularly
if you have a card that


refuses to pay a big bill.
Your first priority, of
course, is to pay your
credit card. But putting
even $10 a week into a
savings account might
spare you from having
to reach for plastic in
an emergency.
5. Get help. If you
find it hard to craft a
budget and stick to
it, or you just need a
second opinion about
how to get out of debt,
consider using a non-
profit credit-counseling
service. Bankruptcy
law, in fact, requires
you to do so before
seeking protection from
creditors.
But choose your
counselor carefully -
some do more harm
than good. You can find


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 75150- INVITATION TO BID FOR THE
RENTAL OF PASSENGER VANS

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 12:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are.available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.

Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager

oVO




AD NO. 002417


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hail, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 74068 INVITATION TO BID FOR THE
PURCHASE OF TROPHIES AND PLAQUES

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamiqov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager


AD NO. 002420 "


even think about it.
If you have no way to
pay off your credit card,
it's time to call your
credit card company
and try to work out a
payment schedule.
2. Tapping your
retirement account.
Talk about expensive
money. You'll owe taxes
on the entire amount
you withdraw from a
401(k) or deductible
IRA, plus a 10% early-
withdrawal penalty, if
you're under 591/2.
Keep in mind that in
the worst-case scenario
- bankruptcy your
retirement plans would
generally be shielded
from creditors.
3. Paying off low-
interest debt. It's noble,
of course, to be debt-


ier I teamliy 'rS


free. But if you have
a loan that charges
6% interest or less,
you shouldn't worry
too much about it -
unless, of course, the
payments are onerous
for you. Concentrate
on the loans with the
highest interest rates
first.
4. Using scammy
credit-repair firms.
Some credit-counseling
agencies prey on
the desperate. They
promise to fix your
credit report and
enable you to obtain car
loans and mortgages.
Typically, they demand
upfront fees for services
that people could
do themselves or
services that they don't
perform.
Many banks and
creditors refuse to
even deal with these
credit-repair firms,
which means you end
up losing your upfront
money right from the
start. You wind up with
less money and the
same debt.
The Federal Trade
Commission offers
sound advice on credit-
repair companies at
www.ftc.gov/bcp/
conline/pubs/credit/
repair.shtm.
It also provides
detailed information
on how .to repair your
credit.
5. Giving up. In
extreme cases, you
might have to seek
bankruptcy protection
and start over.
But if you're willing
to make a plan, take
some time and work
at reducing your debt,
you can.


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Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at

www.miamidade.gov/jobs
305-375-JOBS (5627)
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library; South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
i 'veruS Eccllcn.cd every Say


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida on April 10, 2008 at
9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENT(S), AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TOACCEPT FROM THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT
TRUST FUND ("TRUSTEES"): (1) A MODIFICATION OF DEEDS # 19447, 19448, 18030, 18450
AND SENATE BILL 640, IN SUBSTANTIALLY THE FORM ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT "A", TO
SPECIFICALLY ALLOW FOR OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, "FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED" FACILITIES
RUN BY PRIVATE ENTITIES, THE CITY OF MIAMI AND/OR GOVERNMENTAL ENTITIES; (2) A
DETERMINATION THAT BISCAYNE BAY RESTAURANT (D/B/A RUSTY PELICAN), RICKENBACKER
MARINA AND COCONUT GROVE SAILING CLUB ARE CONSISTENT WITH THE PURPOSES OF
THE DEEDS AS MODIFIED; (3) A WAIVER BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE RIGHT TO ANY FEES THAT
MAY BE DUE TO THE STATE ON ANY LEASES OR LICENSES THAT DID NOT HAVE A WAIVER
OF DEED RESTRICTION IN PLACE AT THE TIME THIS DEED MODIFICATION IS APPROVED;
AND (4) AN ACKNOWLEDGEMENT THAT NO FEES ARE DUE TO THE STATE FOR LEASES OR
AGREEMENTS, OR EXTENSIONS THERETO, THATARE FOUND IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE DEED
RESTRICTIONS AS MODIFIED HEREIN; AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A QUIT
CLAIM DEED TO THE TRUSTEES OF CERTAIN SUBMERGED LAND IN CONSIDERATION OF THE
ABOVE MODIFICATION OF DEEDS AND SENATE BILL; AUTHORIZING THE ALLOCATION OF UP
TO 15% OF ALL REVENUES RECEIVED BY THE CITY FROM ANY NEW LEASES WITH PRIVATE
ENTITIES OPERATING WITHIN THE DEED RESTRICTEDAREAS FORTHE PURPOSE OF FUNDING
MAINTENANCE AND IMPROVEMENTS OF WATERFRONT PROPERTIES; FURTHER AUTHORIZING
THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE ANY ADDITIONAL DOCUMENT(S), IN A FORM ACCEPTABLE
TO THE CITY ATTORNEY, AS DEEMED NECESSARY TO ACCOMPLISH THE ABOVE.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these items. Should any
person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all
testimony and evidence upon any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three
(3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC
City Clerk




(#003114)









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, APRIL 2-8, 2008


Why IT departments hate the iPhone


Corporate information-technology

departments say the phone poses security

risks. But they seem powerless to stop

employees from using it...


By Ben Worthen

In less than a year,
the iPhone has won
the hearts of users,
who speak of the
combination cellphone,
Internet device and
music player with
reverence.
Indeed, the iPhone,
which maker Apple
Inc. says has captured
28% of the U.S. smart-
phone market, seems to
be loved by everyone -
everyone, that is, except
those who work in
corporate information-
t e c h n oo g y
departments.
Designed with the
consumer in mind, the
iPhone is less secure
than business-oriented
smart phones such
as those from Nokia
Corp. or Research
In Motion Ltd.'s
BlackBerry, according
to IT professionals.
But that isn't stopping
people from using the
device for work-related
tasks such as checking
email, managing sales
contacts and getting
information about
prospective clients. In
fact, market researcher
Nielsen Co. estimates
that one-quarter of
iPhone owners over
the age of 18 pass their
phone bills on to their
employer, suggesting
significant use of the
device for business.
Many IT groups have
banned the iPhone
from their workplaces,
complaining that
there is no way to


force employees to
-protect their iPhones
with passwords and
that they can't erase
sensitive corporate data
from remote locations
if the device is stolen or
lost. Additionally, they
say the iPhone doesn't
support the software
many businesses use
and that it only works
on one cellular carrier's
network.
But keeping the
iPhone out of the office
may be a losing battle.
As a result, some
technology experts say
the iPhone could usher
in a change in the way
businesses adopt new
technologies.

Shifting Landscape
Whereas software
vendors and other
tech suppliers
traditionally pitched
their products to high-
ranking executives
and IT managers,
some are now paying
closer attention to the
technologies workers
actually use. Some
vendors say that
if employees make
clear that they are
going to embrace a
particular device -
with or without their IT
department's approval
then they will develop
compatible products
for it. Otherwise, they
risk losing business to
rivals.
"It's clear to us that
power is shifting to the
users" and away from
IT departments, says
Mike de la Cruz, a vice


president at business-
software maker SAP
AG. "So we've changed
our strategy to focus
on the users."
SAP, of Germany,
says it is developing a
version of its customer-
management software


Apple Inc.iPhone

for the iPhone that will
let salespeople access
information about
leads and customers,
partly because its own
salespeople prefer the
iPhone. International
Business Machines
Corp. of Armonk, N.Y.,
is developing a version
of its Lotus email and
collaboration software
for iPhone users, and
salesforce.com Inc.,
of San Francisco, and
Sun Microsystems
Inc., of Santa Clara,
Calif., are among other
companies tailoring
softwarc for Apple's
device.


Some vendors are
designing applications
aimed at making the
iPhone more business-
friendly. Sybase Inc.,
for example, released
an iPhone version
of its software for
forwarding corporate
email and other data
to mobile devices.
Sybase's software is
installed and managed
centrally, so it gives
IT departments some
measure of control over
what end users are
doing. Overwhelming
demand from managers
and executives at
customer companies
led Sybase to create
the iPhone-tailored
software, according to
Senthil Krishnapillai,
a director of project
management at
the Dublin, Calif.,
company.
Apple and its iPhone
partner, AT&T Inc.,
are trying to make the
iPhone more business-
friendly, too. In
January, AT&T began to
allow iPhone purchases
by corporate-account
holders. Previously,
the telephone
company would bill
iPhone charges only
to individuals, and
they would have to
seek reimbursement
from their companies.
"We saw business
customers clamoring
for the iPhone" and
wanted to make it
easier for them to use
the device, says an
AT&T spokesperson.
Apple, of Cupertino,
Calif., said earlier
this month that it
plans to release new
iPhone software in
June that will allow
IT departments to
integrate the device
with Microsoft Corp.'s


email, calendar and
contact-management
software. The new
software also will allow
iPhones to connect to
a corporate network in
a secure fashion and
give IT staffs the ability
to erase data on a lost
or stolen iPhone from a
remote location.
Simon Yates, an
analyst at Forrester
Research Inc., says
these moves address
the biggest concerns
that IT departments
have about the iPhone.
Another research
company, Gartner Inc.,
said the announced
changes would make
the iPhone appropriate
for business use.

Harboring Doubts
Despite the steps to
make the iPhone more
business-friendly,
some chief information
officers continue to
harbor doubts. David
O'Berry, who heads
IT for the South
Carolina Department
of Probation, Parole
and Pardon Services,
says his organization
uses email software
from Novell Inc., not
Microsoft, so Apple's
changes won't help
him. In addition, even
though Apple intends
to set up a private
section of its new App
Store -- the service
through which people
download applications
for their iPhones
-- for business, Mr.
O'Berry and other chief
information officers
don't like the fact that
they would have to
go through Apple to
distribute in-house
software, to employees.
That means giving
Apple access to their
computer code, which


some are reluctant to
do.
Most people who use
their iPhones for work
don't think about these
technical challenges.
What they see is a
device capable of
connecting to wireless
Internet networks,
with a full-fledged Web
browser and a large
screen that gives them
access to the same
Internet pages they can
get on their personal
computers and gives
them the ability to play
music and movies.
SMichael King, a
Gartner analyst,
says that while other
phones have browsers
with similar features,
their smaller screen
sizes give them limited
utility.


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COMING SOON!



BRAND NEW AFFORDABLE



RENTAL HOUSING



If you're a former resident of District 5 considering coming back to the neighborhood or a current
resident interested in a new and affordable place to call home, The Carrie Meek Foundation in
partnership with The City of Miami and The Liberty City Trust is looking for you.

Within the next 18 months over 1000 new apartments for low income families will be ready
for occupancy. In fact, some of them are already under construction.

There is no need to wait until the buildings are finished. Plan ahead, apply now, find out if
you're eligible and claim your spot in line.




There's Been Enough Talk About The Need For

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We're Building It, And We're Looking For YOU!


For Additional information or a pre-application please call (305) 953-0525
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id i





i i


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:

IFB NO. 34018 INVITATION FOR BID FOR THE PURCHASE
OF MANUFACTURER'S DEALER ORIGINAL
EQUIPMENT (OEM) PARTS AND REPAIR
SERVICES

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, APRIL 28, 2008

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.

Pedro C. Hernandez
City Manager






AD NO. 002626


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