Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00540
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: March 26, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00540
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text





America's new slavery: Black men in prison


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One Family Serving Since 1923



Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS

Volume 85 Number 28 J-t -. ,. 2~: ..... 1, 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)


Haiti's Consul: American Airlines disrespectful
By Henry Paul An incident of alleged diplomat. Latortue, the nation's Consul Friday, onboard American nephew, Sebastien Delatour.
mistreatment of passengers American Airlines exhibits General in Miami. Flight 816, involving Elisabeth According to the letter, an
Haiti's Consul General in with ties to Haiti's president, "an ongoing pattern of Latortue's letter echoed Delatour, an advisor to American flight attendant
Miami has issued a stinging onboard an American Airlines disrespect" to Haitian the sentiments of many local Haitian President Ren6 Pr6val. insistedthatDelatour'snephew
complaint to American Airlines flight from Port-au-Prince to customers, according to a Haitians who have criticized She was traveling in business sit in economy class, so that
about the disrespectful Miami, has sparked an outcry letter sent as "an official the airlines in the past about class with two minors, her an off-duty flight attendant
treatment of its Haitian of discrimination from the complaint" to the carrier the treatment of passengers, son and her nephew, and had identified as Leon Harris could
customers. nation's top South Florida this past weekend by Ralph The incident occurred purchased an upgrade for her Please turn to AIRLINES 4A


* MARY J AND JAY-Z OPEN 'HEART OF THE CITY TOUR'


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Tiger win streak ends; Masters next
Tiger Woods saw his streak of seven straight tour-
nament victories worldwide come to an end after he
fell two shots behind World Golf Championships-CA
Championship victor Geoff Ogilvy.
See story 4A


1 ,i


Liberty City

Charter battles

to stay alive
Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimes.online.com
Despite the enormous financial debt,
the community continue to fight to keep
the Liberty City Charter School alive.
Parents, teachers, and students gathered
two weeks ago at an emotional meeting
with the Miami-Dade School Board in
efforts to fight the school board decision
to close the school.
Founded by Jeb Bush and T. Willard
Fair over 12 years ago, the first charter
school of Florida has gained a sense of
hope for the residents of the Liberty City
community.
At the meeting, the former principal of
the Liberty City Charter School, Katrina
Wilson-Davis, surrounded the supporters
with words of encouragement. She
requested to the school board ways of
paying off the school's debt like requesting
a loan forgiveness and auctioning a piece
of property owned by the school. Parents
formed committees and also suggested
that they turn to local businesses for
assistance.
"It is not the parents or staff decision
Please turn to SCHOOL 4A


Mary J Bliege and Jay-Z performs at the kickoff of their 26-city Heart of the City
Tour at American Airlines Arena Saturday Night. -MiamiTimes photo/Rich dackson
See story 8A


NAACP: Long-awaited Town Hall Meeting


Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn
Last night, over 300
residents and county officials
attended the long-awaited
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP) Town Hall Meeting
which was held at New Birth
Baptist Church located 2300
NW 135t" Street.
Hosted by NAACP President
Bishop Victor T. Curry, the
meeting was started with a
prayer followed by questions to
Mayor Carlos Alvarez and his
staff. The local residents were
eager to address their issues


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that have been affecting their
community for a long period
of time. Residents held their
composure patiently while they
listened to what the mayor had
to say.
Questions were raised
about Timothy P. Ryan,
Director Miami-Dade County
Corrections, attitude and
behavior towards his minority
employees. He is supposedly
accused of firing employees
because they did not follow the
uniform policy which included
wearing braids or cornrows
in their hair. Mayor Alvarez
stated, "If a county employee is
Please turn to MEETING 4A


Reverend Victor T. Curry
NAACP President


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OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly al 900 NW 54th Street.
Miami. Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45.00 Six Months $30.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami; Flnd ; . .' .
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210


CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national antagonism wren It accords tq
every person, regardless of race creed or color his or her human and legal rights Hating no person. fearing no person, the
Black Press strives Io help every person rn the firm belief lhat all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held Dack.


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Baggy pants statute
Dear Editor:

Once again, I am disappointed in the misguided efforts of
some of our state elected officials. I am speaking specifically
about the time being spent to structure and pass a bill on
baggy pants. This effort is being' lead by Sen. Gary Siplin
(Orlando), Sen. Larcenia Bullard (Miami) and State Rep. Ed
Bullard (Miami). With the price of gas as high as it is and the
housing foreclosures that many Dade county residents face,
it seems like our lawmakers could focus on matters that are
of more concern than a baggy pants fad.
What our lawmakers also fail to address is that once a
Florida Statute is created against these 'kids,' there will be a
penalty component to those that don't comply. Now we'll have
new offenders entering into an already over crowded criminal
justice system, that has to ask our financially strapped state
legislators for money to deal with a problem that Sen. Siplin,
Sen. Bullard and State Rep. Bullard helped to start. One
old school solution is that Sen. Gary Siplin, Sen. Larcenia
Bullard and State Rep. Ed Bullard get off the side line and
come meet the problem head on.
It's easy to penalize our children from the state capital,
but it's better if we strengthen our teachers and schools and
patrol our own neighborhoods so we all can give these 'kids'
a different image to look up to. I can say this because the
senator has been the least responsive but the most invisible
state legislator that represents the district where the Brothers
of the Same Mind offices are located.

Brian Dennis
Miami

S. . I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action..." Malcolm X


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


Obama's options is America ready I


Ra L krnin Ikrm k ()banm


For most of Black America, no
matter how patriotic we may be
to this country; we have always
realized the hypocrisy of slave
owners signing the Declaration
of Independence that holds "all
men are created equal." "All
men" did not include African
slaves, nor did it include women.
To white America this was the
birth of our country. As my
father pointed out to me as child,
the Emancipation Proclamation
should be designated the Birth
of Black Americans and our
Constitution should be the
1964 Civil Rights Act. We
were not free in 1776, nor did
we enjoy any rights when the
Constitution was first drafted.
White America cannot
understand how an ex-marine
and member of the clergy can
criticize America after the 9-11
tragedy. To me, it is perfectly
understandable. Many Black
Americans can love this country
and yet recognize that the
country that they die and bleed
for, does not always return the
love. After World War I, and
World War II, returning Black
heroes, were welcomed home
with the same racism that they
had fought to preserve.
I White America does not
want to think about race.
They are tired about hearing
of discrimination, tired of
affirmative action, tired of
Million Man marches, and tired
of hearing about Martin Luther
King, Jr. White American
initially flocked to Barack
Obama because he was a good
Black man, he did not talk
about race, nor did he have that
chip on his shoulder-that many
Black men have and blame his
ill-fortune and lot in life on race.
To Black America, Obama was'
too white, because he seemingly
did not understand our issues,
had not suffered the slings of
racism that build that chip on
your shoulder.
I think everyone was wrong.
Obama understands white
America and he understands
Black America. He is truly
V/2 Black and 1/2 white. He
understands the pain reflected
in Reverend Jeremiah Wright's


sermons and
understands the
fear of his white
grandmother. He
has presented
America with two
options, continue on the path
of simmering racial tension or
begin to address the issue in a
new and frank manner.
Barack Obama. is a rare
commodity in this nation and
for that matter the world. He is
a true leader. He is not like most
politicians, who watch polls,
and then tell the people what
they want to hear. Obama told
us what we did not want to hear,
he told us of a problem that for
too long we have been too afraid
to address. He wants to move
us closer to the ideals of our
Declaration of Independence.
While white America cannot
understand Jeremiah Wright
and may not be ready for
Barack Obama. I do believe
that the principal author of the
Declaration of Independence
and our Third President would
understand and approve of both
Reverend Wright and Barack
Obama.
Reverend Wright exercised his
natural right as an American
to criticize the government.
Thomas Jefferson stated,
"the spirit of resistance to
government is so valuable on
certain occasions that I wish it
always to be kept alive." Unlike,
the political pundits of today,
Jefferson fervently believed that
the people should not blindly
accept their government.
Thomas Jefferson would also
approve of Barack Obama's
desire to bring closure to the
original sin of America- slavery.
In 1778, Jefferson proposed a
ban on further importation of
slaves into Virginia. He stated
that while the law would not
bring about full emancipation,
"it stopped the increase of the evil
by importation, leaving to future
efforts its final eradication."
Barack Obama's desire to have
a frank discussion of race and
move us closer to the ideals of
"all persons are created equal"
is in effect carrying out the final
eradication of slavery.


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American Airlines is in big trouble with its Haitian
customers who claim that the airline staff is disrespectful
and handles them in what they call an "aggressive way"
when addressing them. Stay tuned.

Smokers had better get ready for a big increase in the
cigarette tax from .34 cents a pack, South Florida Democrats
and health care advocates are pushing the Legislature to
boost the state cigarette tax to $1 a pack, to $1.34. The
national average for states is $1.12.

Congressman Kendrick Meek and businesswoman Debbie
Wasserman Schultz are caught between a rock and a hard
place and many Democrats are beginning to question their
allegiance to the Party. Democrats, believe for the first time
they have a good chance of unseating one or more of the three
Republican Cuben-Americans representing South Florida -
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Lincoln Diaz-Balart and Mario Diaz-
Balart, but Meek and Wasserman Schultz because of their
ties of friendship with the three Cubans will sit the election
out. Stay tuned.

If you were born more than 60 years ago you probably
remember the CCC or 'Roosevelts Tree Army' as they were
called. Participants in the Civilian Conservation Corps
(CCC), proposed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt
in a message to Congress in March 1933, sweated to build
bridges and roads, fire towers and parks. They fought fires,
shored up levees and stabilized millions of acres of farmland
ruined by erosion. More than anything they planted 2.5
billion trees from 1933 to 1942 and was dismantled at the
start of World War II. The group celebrate its 75th anniversary
this month.

A lot of people in this community are still very upset about
the recent situation at Miami Edison High School and why
the situation was allowed to reach the disgraceful point
where a peaceful protest resulted in massive arrests on a
school campus. School administrators should have done a
better job than what we saw happen.

The country's economy is in the toilet and budget cuts are
all over the place. Unfortunately, our state's most vulnerable
are at risk. Medicaid takes the biggest bite out of the cuts
and that means poor children, the disabled and elderly will
be in for a rough time. It's not fair, but whom do we kill?


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


NAACP's Town Meeting takes Mayor and County directors to task


MEETING
continued from 1A

terminated, they have a right
to appeal."
There was an agreement
among local residents that the
rise of black on black crimes
among young black men
was tearing the community
apart. Parents who had lost
their young children due to
these acts of violence came
out to support. Bishop
Curry brought up the alleged
excessive force often used by
the Miami-Dade Police crime.
suppression team (CST) also
known as the "jump out
boys". As a result of their
excessive force, in November
2007, four young Black men
were killed within nineteen
days by the CST. "It's always
shoot and then we'll ask
questions, we'll sort this stuff
out later," said Bishop Curry
then continuing on, "it seems


as if young black men, when
it comes to law enforcement,
never get the benefit of the
doubt".
When asked if racial
profiling was still prevalent
in our community, J.D.
Patterson, Support Services
Assistant Director of Miami-
Dade Police Department, 'dug
around the bush' leaving the
questioned unanswered.
Local resident Barry Atkins
appealed to the mayor that,
after years of holding his
job at Miami-Dade Animal
Services, he was fired. "I was
an excellent employee. I was
always on time. I had good job
performance but they fired me
for one mistake." Since there
has been a decrease of black
jobs in our community to
make room for others, Atkin's
story prompted residents to
ask the mayor why jobs are
not being allocated to blacks
in our neighborhoods. "When


I look at Dade County, I see
it as a whole," said Mayor
Alvarez.
Commissioners and
residents argued against
the building of the Marlins
Stadium. Many felt that the
funds used for the Marlins
stadium could be used on
more important things in
Miaipi-Dade County. "If we
can build a Marlin stadium
then we can build affordable
housing in Overtown," said
Commissioner Dennis C.
Moss.
Other issues discussed
at the meeting included:
discrimination of employees
in county jobs, giving the
independent review panel
power to investigate police
misconduct, the firing of
Miami-Dade transit director
Roosevelt Bradley, and the
police involvement at the
Edison Senior High incident.
"I think that a meeting


like this is healthy for our Not change next month or budget cuts. "We need an
community," said Bishop next year but it is needed now open door policy from the
Curry. At the end of the night, and this long-awaited change mayor so when these issues
the building was filled with should not be disregarded come up, we can deal with
the same thought--change. because of the statewide them." Curry said.


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Are Haitians receiving unfair treatment from American Airlines?


AIRLINES
continued from 1A

sit in the business class seat.
American spokeswoman
Martha Pantin said the airline
is "very committed to the
Haitian market" and "has a
long standing commitment
with the Haitian community
both in the U.S. and in Haiti,"
serving Haiti for 37 years.
"Unfortunately, there was
a misunderstanding recently
on flight 816 regarding an
upgrade," Pantin said via
e-mail. "Our country director
in Haiti has spoken to Ms.
Delatour personally and has
apologized. Currently we are
investigating this incident


and based on our woman, who had
investigation we suffered with heart
will determine disease and had

should be taken." drew complaints
Federal Aviation from her family
Administration that the airline did
spokeswoman not do enough to
Kathleen Bergen respond.
said the FAA also will review "This is another outrageous
the matter, example of the lack of
Latortue said the incident is compassion and respect
not isolated, citing complaints toward Haitians," the consul
from Haitian passengers his general wrote, adding
office has received, that "passengers of other
Latortue's three-page letter nationalities are not treated
also outlined other issues. in this manner by your crew."
Among them: a flight from Latortue's three-page
Haiti to New York, in which letter outlined other issues,
a Haitian passenger died. including a flight to Miami
The death of the 44-year-old from Port-au-Prince that was


Charter School open till school ends


SCHOOL
continued from 1A

but it is school board's
decision. Once the school
board has made a decision,
they have 30 days to
appeal," says Assistant
Superintendent of Special
Programs, Michael Bell.
"Unfortunately, there
was no agreement that was


made with the school board
to keep the Liberty City
Charter School open so we
are still deciding whether
we will follow through with
the appeal process," says
Wilson-Davis.
Currently, the school is
being housed at the Lillian
C. Evans Elementary, where
classes are being held until
the end of the school year.


diverted last May to Palm
Beach for 10 hours, when
passengers were given only a
bag of chips. He also pointed to
the "aggressive way" American
addresses Haitian passengers
at the departure gate, and
routine cancellations of flights
between Haiti and Miami.
Pantin said that as an
example of how American is
committed to Haiti, it even
has a flight service director
on all flights to and from Port-
au-Prince, to assist Creole
speaking customers with
forms.
"This is a unique program to
this market," she said, "and
shows AA's commitment to
serve our Haitian customers.


IF A PICTURE OF YOUR LOVED
ONE WAS USED FROM
OCTOBER 2002 THRU APRIL 2007
PLEASE PICK THEM UP BY APRIL 30
After April 30 we are sorry we will no longer be responsible for your pictures


The CITT





Become a member of the
Citizens' Independent Transportation Trust, and
make a difference in hom sour tax dollars fund the
projects in the People's Transportation Plan.

The CITT is a volunteer board created to
1 monitor and oversee ho\ thie half-penny
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Applications and additional information are
available online at \ w '.miamidadc.go''citt or
by calling the Oflice of the Citizens Indcpndecnt
rransportation TrLusi at 3)5-375-1357.

All applications are due by 4:00 p.m.
Friday, April 18, 2008


CITT
Akoving Foriward on the People s Trapol t station Plan







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For every member of your group who opens a checking account with SunTrust, we'll
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', -


~_ _


5A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\N DESTINY


S-.^G









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 6 THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL1, 2008


Are you voting for Obama just because he is Black?


Brittany Mobley, 20


Jude Marselle, 33


I am voting-
Democrat
because I am
a Democrat.
I don't care
who wins the
Democrat
nomination,
as long as a
Republican is not in office,
I am fine. I am tired of those
Republicans because they
really don't care about us.

Marisa Beck,47

I am a
Democrat. I
am voting for
which ever
Democrat
that wins the
Democratic
nomination. I
wouldn't vote
for Obama because he is Black
_40* m AU but I am voting for change. We
g0 uM cannot spend another four or
eight years in this stagnant
place. The Republicans have
had their 8 years in office
and I am fed up with them.
Republicans are in it for the
money, not the people.


Obama
has a good
purpose and
objective for
this country.
I am not
concerned, .
about the
color of his
skin but I just want him to be
the right man for the job.

Ray Brown, 55

Barack
Obama
0 b a r a n
and Hillary
Clinton, who
ever wins the
election, will
make history.
I do believe
that Obama
is serious about this election.
He is a process and agenda
that he cannot only say but
he can do. Being Black has'
nothing to do with my voting
in the November elections but
I want to see change not only
across the nation but in this
community.


I feel that
B arac k
Obama is a
Black man
who can bring
change to this
country. We
need change.


Connie Uptgrow,50

First of
all, I don't
agree with
the idea of a
White woman
run ning
against a
Black man. I
think it could
have been done another way.
Obama is a Black man with
a good track record and he
understands the concerns of
Black people. I have nothing
against Senator Clinton but
she has had her time to play
White House when Bill Clinton
was President. She should give
Obama a chance.


At the age of 60, Saoul Mamby fights on


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content


Saoul Mamby probably
shouldn't be fighting, but he's
been doing it for so long I'm not
-, going to be the one to tell him
to stop.
The grandfather of 11 first
fought for money in 1969, year
he remembers well even if a lot
of others don't. Once a world
champion who fought on the
same card as Muhammad Ali,
he's fought around the world
in places you'd be hard pressed
to find on a map, but where he


could always find a payday.
The other night he went 10
rounds with a man half his age
down in the Cayman Islands.
He took the fight on a few days
notice; figuring that even a few
months shy of 61 he could beat
a guy who had lost 13 of his
last 14 fights.
He couldn't, but at his age
one more loss isn't going to
deter him.
"I didn't get hurt or beat
down. It's just that my tools


weren't sharp," Mamby said.
"Now that I've got 10 good
rounds under me I'm ready to
go again."
Just when that will be
depends on the ability of his
manager, Steve Tannenbaum, to
convince a boxing commission
somewhere that 60 is the new
30 and that a fighter shouldn't
be discriminated against just
because he's only a few months
away from collecting Social
Security.


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CALL


Richard Perlini E.
Nis9=9 '9


If you are in an accident, call
Richard Perlini, Esq. at


1-877-763-4LAW 24 hoursperda
(529)
As a trial attorney, practicing 30 years in Florida,
Richard Perlini, Esq. can see your case all the way through to completion.


* Automobile Accidents


* Injuries
* Slip & Fall


Richard Perlini, Esq.
11o S.E. 6 Street Suite 1920
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301


* Wrongful Death
* Worker Compensati


7A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


K-A








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES. MARCH 26-APRIL 1. 2008


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-Miami Times photo/Rich Jackson


Jay-Z, Mary J. Blige

kick off tour in Miami


The first co-headlining tour
by rapper Jay-Z and soul
singer Mary J. Blige got off to
a rousing and nearly flawless
start on Saturday night at
Miami's AmericanAirlines
Arena.
A capacity crowd spent much
of the three-hour performance
on its feet, rapping along to
Jay-Z and singing along to
Blige.
Concertgoers also cheered
surprise guest appearances
during Jay-Z's set by rapper
Memphis Bleek, rapper
Kanye West and hitmaking
- producer and songwriter Tim


"Timbaland" Moseley.
"I know you paid a lot for
those tickets," Jay-Z said at one
point, "but we got a lot of songs
in exchange for us robbing you.
I got a million of these."
Between them, the two
headliners played parts or all of
about four dozen songs, aided
by a large band that included
strings, horns, DJs, drummers,
backing vocalists and more.
Blige, the more experienced
live performer, went first, and
each brought the other onstage
for guest turns during a fun,
congenial and hit-packed
evening.


Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. Miami, FL 33127-1818


MAMI E3




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You still have time to pay your property taxes.

Property owners have until March 31st

to pay taxes and avoid additional charges.

Mailed payments must be postmarked by deadline.

Property taxes become delinquent April 1, 2008



Save Time...Pay Online!

www.miamidade.gov

For more information, please call

Miami-Dade County Tax Collector at 305-270-4916


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9A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL TlIEIR OiVN DESTINY


Edison Park Elementary seek national championship


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comi

Webber Charles is more than
just an art teacher at Edison Park
Elementary located at 500 NW
67th Avenue but Charles is also
the coach of a state championship
chess team. You probably would
not know that since Edison Park
has been characterized by the
Miami-Dade School Board as a
"zone" school meaning that it is
a low-performing school and also
the area in which Edison Park is
located is prone to violence. Not
only do the students have to deal
with FCAT and peer pressure but
they struggle to survive in the
streets and its negative images.
"I grew up in this community.
Even though I moved out of it for
a while, I felt compelled to return
back here. I have worked at
Edison Park for almost five years


and I love it here. This school
is filled with talented individuals
who can conquer the world.
We have a lot of talent in this
community but we lack strong
leaders who are willing to invest
time and effort into these kids,"
says coach and art teacher,
Webber Charles.
The journey of chess for
Edison Park began two years
ago. Joe Rubio, who introduced
the program, transferred to
Edison Park from Paul W. Bell
Middle School. Rubio had taken
on chess as a hobby and had
been playing for almost 15 years.
Rubio had introduced the chess
to "at risk" kids at his former
school so he felt compelled to
teach the game at Edison Park.
Having no equipment and no
coach for the team, Rubio
contacted Andy Ramos, District
Chess Coordinator Division of


Edison Park Elementary State Championship Chess Team with their coach Webber Charles


Members of the Chess Team work hard and practice harder


I


Life Skills and Special Projects
of Miami-Dade County Public
Schools. Although they had
never spoken before, Ramos
willingly supplied the necessary
things needed to bring this team
alive.
Next, Rubio had to find a coach
for the team so he approached
Webber Charles. Charles was
reluctant to take on the task,
after all, he was an art teacher
who did not know how to play
the game and some of his
students were reading at a very
low level. Charles was not a
defeated man so he took on the
challenge. Charles studied the


game by buying chess games and
playing it on his computer. He
practiced the game with his kids.
He recruited 12 kids with good
academics and had them practice
continuously. "Surprisingly, it
used to be an all-girl team," says
Charles. As they were learning
the ropes of the game, they lost
competitions but Charles and
his team persevered. He sought
guidance from other coaches and
read different journals about
chess.
After two years, with the
assistance of AJ and Holly
Warco, coach Charles and his
team have become very powerful.


Their consistent victories have
gained them local attention.
"I make sure these kids are
recognized on a local level.
Their confidence builds when
they realize that they can break
barriers. They are learning more
than just about chess but they
are learning things that will get
them through life," says Charles.
Unfortunately, manyplayers have
graduated from the elementary
school and have furthered on to
the middle school. "My graduates
still come back to play the game
and practice with the little kids,"
says Charles.
Earlier this year, the team


brought victory to Edison by
winning first place at the Regional
Center Chess Tournament.
At the 2007 Florida Scholastic
Chess Championship held at
the Sheraton Miami Mart Hotel,
Edison Park came in first place
out of 24 teams with 21 points
in the kindergarten through
fifth grade level. Although the
students faced some challenging
opponents, they triumphed
and brought victory home.
Surprisingly, despite the fact that
more than 1500 kids competed
all over Florida, four students
from Edison Park finished in the
top twenty.
"It is a good game because
it helps me with my school.
Unfortunately, I don't have
anyone to play with at home so I
only play at school." 3rd grader
Daphnee Das
"Chess is a game of knowledge.
It helps me to concentrate in my
work at school. I want to keep on
playing chest," says 5th grader
Julina Gonzalez.
"Chess is a war game. The
toughest player can loose to the
weakest player.
I.don't play at home because
I have no one to play with me
so I only play at school," says
5th grader and state champion,
Woody Jean-Louis.
"I envision opening a center
that would teach subjects such
as math, English, science; art,
and chess. What I know about
chess now I wish I knew that
when I was a kid. The objective is
to teach these kids that growing
up poor or in the hood does not
mean that you are destined for
failure. There is so much in
them but it is our responsibility
to show it to them," Charles
said.
Edison Park's next goal is to
win the national title at 2008
Florida Superstate V Scholastic
Chess Championships which will
be held on April 11-13 but they
need your help. If you would like
to donate or support the team,
you may contact coach Charles
Webber at (786) 269-4337.


STDs attack the Black


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.comn

In a study recently released
by the Center of Disease Control
(CDC) one in four teenage girls
between the ages of 14 and
19 have acquired a sexually
transmitted disease (STD) in
the United States. Shockingly,
the same study revealed that
nearly 48% of young Black
women have a STD, in contrast
to 20% of young white women.
With the numbers increasing
across the country and the
South a frequent aim of new
STD cases in young people, it
leaves us to ask, what can we
do to ensure our youth do not
become a target of sexually
transmitted diseases?
The rate of Chlamydia among
Black people was over eight
times higher than that of whites
in 2006. According to the CDC,
Chlamydia is a common sexual
transmitted disease that can
be transmitted during vaginal,
anal, or oral sex. Chlamydia is
identified as a "silent" disease
because about 75% of infected
women and about 50% of
infected men have no symptoms.
"We are a clinic for teenagers
and we have found very high
cases of Chlamydia infections
among the ages of 14-25 within
young Black adolescents,"
says Kalenthia Nunally-Bain,
Founder/Director of Teen
Pregnancy Prevention Center
here in Miami. Studies have
found that Chlamydia is more
frequentwith adolescentfemales
than adolescent males and the
long-term consequences, if not
treated, are more critical for
females. Since Chlamydia is
more common among young
women, the CDC advises
sexually active women under
the age of 26 to have yearly
Chlamydia screening..
Gonorrhea is another sexually
transmitted disease. Some


men with gonorrhea can go
along with no symptoms at all.
Sometimes men with gonorrhea
get aching or enlarged testicles.
In women, the symptoms of
gonorrhea are often minor, but
most women who are infected
have no indicators. According
to the CDC, in 2006, gonorrhea
was the highest for Black
youths aged 15-19 and 20-24.
In that same year, Black women
between the ages of 15-19 had a


community
increased since 2004 and
from 1.5 cases per 100,000
population to 1.9 in 2005 and
2.3 in 2006.
"We get a group of friends,
who are in the same circle, get
tested together. When the test
comes back, we find that the
friends were having sex within
the circle and are affecting one
another," says Nunally-Bain.
According to the Care
Resource, a South Florida HIV/


The numbers are disturbing and asks us what can be
done in the Black community to change this. Some ways
of helping the youth include:

Establish a dialogue with your children about sex. Let your children
be able to talk to you openly about sex because most of the information
that they already have or are receiving are from their peers or
television and you know how that story goes.
Educate your kids on sexually transmitted diseases and their
consequences, not waiting for it to be offered in their Anatomy,
Biology or Health class.
If your.kids continue to have sex, then teach them to communicate
with their partners.


gonorrhea rate of 2,898.1 cases
per 100,000 women, which is
a rate of 14 times greater than
the 2006 rate among the white
women of similar age. Black
men in the 15-19 age group
had a 2006 gonorrhea rate
of 1,503.8 cases per 100,000
which was 39 times higher than
the rate among of white men in
the equivalent age group.
Syphilis is a sexually
transmitted disease (STD) that
is also known as "the great
imitator" because so many of
the signs and symptoms are
identical to other STDs. Sadly,
in 2006, the South continued
to have higher rates of primary
and secondary Syphilis than
any other region in the United
States. Syphilis rates among
15 to 19 year old women have


AIDS non-profit organization,
in Miami-Dade, there are
over 4,000 AIDS cases among
teenagers between the ages
of 13-29. Young people aged
15-24 compose 40% of new HIV
infections among those 15 and
over worldwide. Between 2001
and 2005, HIV/AIDS cases
increased among young people
15-29 in the nation.
Unfortunately, we live in a
society where sex and sexual
images are everywhere. It seems
like almost every television
show, billboard advertisement,
or song are saying, "let's have
sex" so it is no surprise that
a number of Black youth are
having sex. We can no longer
stand in the dark to what has
already been revealed in the
light.


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EVERY



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........... .. ..... ...... ....... ............................................................................................................. .....................................................................................................................


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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10A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL1, 2008 1













SUGAR COATED "


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* etm ee -meO00

q eoi aim *
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Boys & Girls Ages 4-12
Hours: 7:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Hip Hop Modern,
*African *Tumbling *Crafts
*Field Trips Black History
*Pizza Every Friday
Price: $65 weekly plus $ 30 Reg. Fee
Register Early- Space Is Limited
Classes for Ages 3 and up also available
CALL US AT


305-685-0037


Miami Children's Hospital is the only
pediatric hospital in Florida ranked one of
"America's Best" by U.S.News & World Report.
Miami Children's Hospital has been ranked among the nation's
top children's hospitals by U.S News & World Report The report
ranked top medical centers across the United States and Miami
Children's was the only children's hospital in Florida to make the
list. Nowhere will you find physicians more experienced, facilities
as advanced, or a staff more devoted to children. We know you
want the best for your children, so if you ever need to take your
child to the hospital, you'll feel secure knowing that no
one knows children like Miami Children's


To be eligible for this year's rankings, a medical
facilny had to be classified by the National
Asociation of Children's Hospitals and Related
Institutions (NACHRI) as a freestanding
children's hospital or as a children'ss
"hospital within a hospital' a large,
multdlidciplinarv pediatric service within
a medical *:enter Of the 122 children's
hospitals that met this standard as of
March 2007, 113 responded to a U.S Ne',t
iurvE~, a'-king for dat.,a and stai~iics rr a
variety of procedures such as the number
of bone marrow transplants and difficult
heart operations performed Thirty of these
facilities made the cut as one of
"America's Best Children's Hospitals."


MIAMI -
CHILDREN'S :"
HOSPITAL.
THE MARY ANN iNIGHT INTERNATIONAL INSTITuTE OF PEDiATRiCS
FOUNDED AS VARIE TV CHILDREN S HOSPITAL
We're here for the children
6. 9,' .' I.
310S 2dAv. imFL31530 _______r________iim-ae wwwmch xorn


93 rdStee omunt
-aptis tC ucI


2330 N.W. 93" STREET MIAMI, FL
4tHAnnual Church Growth Conference
March 31-April 1st 7 p.m. Nightly


33147


Elder Kenneth A. Duke
Senior Pastor Teacher
New Jerusalem Primitive
S Baptist Church
Monday, March 31'
7 p.m. Guest Preacher


e v. M il l l 7 W . .
Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson Senior Pastor/Teacher


CONFERENCE SCHEDULE
Workshop Services 6 p.m.
Worship Services Start
Promptly at 7 p.m. Nightly
Rev. Dr. Carl Johnson
Senior Pastor/Teacher
93rd Street Community
Baptist Church
Monday, March 31st
and Tuesday, April 1st
6 p.m. Lecturer


Rev. Arthur Jackson, III
Senior Pastor. Teacher
Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church
Tuesday, April 1 '
7 p m. Guest Preacher

GOSPEL
CONCERT
Sunday, April 6 at 6 p.m.
Featuring
The Mighty Clouds of Joy
The conference is FREE! And
everyone is invited to attend. So
come and receive your overflow
blessing through the word of God
from the men of God.


For more information
^B Ccall 35-83-094


Consumers of


FLEET PHOSPHO-SODA

or similar oral laxative and colonscopy bowel cleansing products


If you have been diagnosed with


KIDNEY FAILURE
or *


KIDNEY DISEASE

after using a laxative or colonscopy bowel movement
cleansing product, please call for a free consultation to discuss your legal rights.


CARLOS A. LOPEZ-ALBEAR, P.A.

1545 S.W. 1 Street, Suite 300

305-644-3217

The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


O I r paientsreR't the onyone


BL-ACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


I


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


12B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL1, 2008


Chirr U lakn1 S M. a'tMianr frw ,rIinkr i m m_





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scrib


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93"r Street Community-
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942


S Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
S:,.2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45a.m.-11:15a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
.10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting lTues. 6 p.m.




Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383

Order of Services
M.:.m..-.g Worshi at 8 & 11 a.m.
SunJiy School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service
Ln !. m cklh leti-,...m, atr/te .... y


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Worship Service Sunday Morning
I 10a-m.Worship Service (1st Sundayonly)
S7:30 & 11 a.m. (2nd. 3rd, 4th & 5th) Sun.
Church School 8:30 a.m. st Sunday only


Te Prayer Meeting. 7:30 a.m.
Bible Study, 8:15 p.m.



//aith Evangelistic Praise &7
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday School ................... 9:30 a.m.
Sun. Morning Worship ........... 11 am.
ues. Prayer .................... 6 p.m.
School of Wisdomm............6:30 p.m.
Healing& DelivenmceeServ...7:30p.m.





/ Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

S Order of Services: r
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday School ....... 9:30 a.m.


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

I Order of Services:
Early Morning Worship.7:30a.m.
Sunday School..........9:30a.m.
Morning Worship..... 11 a.m.
WEDNESDAY
Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


/ St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305.691-8861


I


Order of Services:
Sunday 7;,30 and II a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m......... Sunday School
Tuesday.........7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p.m........Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
12 p.m.......Day Prayer


/Apostolic Revival Center,
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time for T.V. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
UHFICAILECH. 37 COMCAST CH 23
Sun.9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday 5 p.n.
Wed.-IntercessoryPrayer 9 a.m.- 12p.m.
Morning Service.................. 11 am.
Sun. Eve. Worship ........... 7:30 p.nm.
Tues. Prayer Meeting. 7:30 p.m.
Fri. Bible Study ................. 7:30 p.m.


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
[" I Sunday...............7:30 & 11 a.m.
Sunday School...............10 a.m.
Thursday..........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
Baptism Thurs. before
First Sun..7 p.m.
Communion First Sun......
7:30 & 11 a.m.



/Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church'
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
Order of Services
Sun ay
Church School ............9:30 a.m.
Worship Service ..............I I a.m.
Monday
Bible Sundy 7: pm,
Wednesday.
Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
"There is a place for you"



/'Peaceful Zion Missionary-
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68 Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3,4,51 Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service 11:00 am
S(Thurs. before 1" Sunday) 7:30 pl l
I Prayer Meeting/Bible Study




/ Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3" Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Sunday School...........9:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning Servs...... I a.m.
4" Sun....BTU 1....:30-2:30 p.m.
Tuesday.....Bible Study
Feeding Ministry......10 a.m.
Wed. Bible Sludy/Prayer..6:3(0 p.m


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Services:
Sun...9:30 am....(Sunday School)
Walk in the Word Ministry
Worship Service..............I11 a.m.
Tuesday....7 p.m....Family Night
Wed.. 11 a.m..Intercessory Prayer
Wed. Bible Class........12 p.m.
Wed. Bible Class..............7 p.m.

^SEenior Pstor/reachr


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www.friendshipnlbcniat.org
friendshippnIyer@bellsoutli.nct
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
.g I Order of services
Hour of Prayer.. 6:30 a.m.
i! r ., ~ ..,,,.: '. .. r II. I .m .
S.,,. lT. n, -;,. h \.:. 7 p.m.
I" 10 I .' ,l .li. *;i ..n, 1.,l p.m .
',,n. ln F r.I
Wednesday........ 11 a.m.- I p.m.



New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Church School...............10 a.m.
Worship Service ..............H : 15 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class..............7 p.m.
4th Sunday Evening Worship.........6 p.m.
Aao n111-~ no]mdM I:i Rhrts rm '.


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School.............9:45 a.m.
WotshipI.........11 amr
Bible Study, Thursday ...7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Mon.-Wed.





Brownsville -\
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
,look .9:45an.
S.11 a.m.
I. ... .. 5p.m.
.6p.m.
G. r.r ..7:30pmn
S Tri -p-rlta".rinlUble Call:
305-634-4850 305-691-6958


Jordan Grove Missionary\
Baptist Church.
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
SSunday School............. 9 a.m.
nTnB C ............................ 10:05 a.m .
W orship .......................11 a.m .
Worship..... ......4 p.m.
Mission and Bible Class
o Tuesday ............... 6:30p.m.
SYouth Meeting/Choir rehearsal
Monday .......................6:30 p.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

SOrder of Services:
S Worship...It & 3rd Sun.
r rihip .............. 1030
S Minkitry.............. 6 pm.
7:30 p.,.
. .p............ .............. 8
l.hool 9 antl,


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 0l a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Comcast Channels: 8, 19, 21, 22, 23, 30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web pige -vvwv.pembrokeparkihuri oilchiiM.coni Enmail: pembokepuzkeoctbllsouth.net


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87" Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
l.. ay Morning Sevice
School ...... .. 10)a. n.
n,, .Iy BibleStudy....8 p.m.
1 ,I Prayer S crvice. 8...8 p.


Word of Truth "
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

Order of Services:
Bible Sludy Wed ................8 p.m.
Sunday School................ 1er 0 I ..
Sun. Worship Serv. 11:30 a.mn.
Wed. Night Intercessory Prayer
from 7:300 to 8 p.m.
Sunday Worship Servacc..6:31) p.m.


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Z JN .l- I U, -.nl 6 .1", h n.n ... '.
u,...L nL)J..:..n S.e u n ,

.fas o....l, meP.a.er ., *o p I





/Mt Hermon A.ME. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mthermonworshipcenter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104
Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sundi. NhlomIng ...........8 a.m.
Sun Eie.l.,ch el ............10 a.m.
Sund.., E enng .............6 p.m.
N..rn E cellence .7:30 p.m.
uc Bible ..........7:30 p.m.
'Thor, -IN hip. 10 a.m.
Isi Sur, Son, Factice ..6 p.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church\
1350 N.W.951h Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
Early Morning Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
l Iucs. before the Ist Sun7.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship




St. John Baptist Church \
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue
305-372-3877 305-37.1-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
N.KI.i-.i.iL Worship .....7:30 a.m.
Sud School ..........9:30 a.m.
M..r .ing Worship ...11 a.m.
,A..I for Baptist Churches
B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
L, 4i, g Worship ........7 p.m.
SM ccl 1 ........ .(Tues.) 7 p.m.



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:30 a.m.
Momig Praise/Worship .. 11 a.m.
li'mt :ul Third SuKnday
Seveni.ng wori.hip tit 6 p.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
ITuoesday 7 po.m..
IIl)ltlESS tl{tl,,vmltSS f~StESSSS


S-.


Bishop Victor T.C II.I. N D.Nill D.D, selP m. IIllsIor Teacm ii


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The Miami Times




FaithP


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


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BONNIE NEWBOLD STIRRUP CELEBRATES


A moment to remember


As the gracious and
beautiful Bonnie Newbold
Stirrup stepped into the grand
ballroom of the Miami Marriott
Biscayne Bay Hotel on Friday,
February 29, she was surprised
to see her special friends and
relatives greet her with the
"Happy Birthday" song and
a resounding applause. The
elegant ambiance, filled with
exotic roses and gleaming
candles, generated a feeling
of love, admiration, nostalgia,
appreciation, blessings and
tributes that came from
her daughter Deborah and
grandson Christon, along with
her nieces and special friends.
Bonnie, who is now the
matriarch of the Maxwell
Newbold, Sr. family, discreetly
moved among the guests,
expressing her love and thanks
in celebration of another
milestone in her life (March
4th, the actual birthday).
For those who know "Ms.
Bonnie Mae", (fondly called by
some of her long-time friends)
know that she's lived a life of
honesty and moral character
throughout the years as she
continues to shine and feel
God's natural beauty and
strength.


-rn .


BONNIE NEWBOLD STIRRUP


The talented Bonnie Stirrup
is a graduate of Bethune-
Cookman College where


she received the B.S. degree
in Home Economics and
subsequently continued her


studies at Barry University and
the University of Miami, thus
completing requirements in
Elementary Education. Upon
graduating from BCC, she
volunteered at James E. Scott
Community Agency, serving as
a Youth Worker and teaching
teenage girls (Sub-Debs) social
graces and everyday etiquette.
Today, many of these young
ladies are successful lawyers)
educators, journalists,
physicians and social workers
who are contributing citizens
in our community. As a teacher
in the Miami-Dade County
Public Schools, Bonnie taught
Kindergarten at Dunbar, South
Miami and Holmes Elementary
Schools, serving as lead teacher
for college interns, chairperson
of the Curriculum committee
and grade group Committees.
At Holmes Elementary, Bonnie
established the Charm Club
(1993) in conjunction with the
mentors of the Greater Miami
Coalition of 100 Black Women
to develop and build positive
self-esteem for young girls (2'
4th grades) as they participate
in several social, cultural and
educational activities. The club
was called "The Charmers"
Please turn to STIRRUP 15B


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Health


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Sctr m rrawrrvctim m mAmrrtood bI C rka faithful


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"Copyrighted Material

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A celebration for Bonnie Newbold Stirrup


STIRRUP
continued from 13B


Growing up in her native city
of Miami, Bonnie, the 4th child
of six siblings (four are now
deceased) enjoyed her musical
family. Herparents, Maxwell, Sr.
and Clara (Thompson) Newbold
(Bahamian immigrants),
encouraged their children
to "sing" or play a musical
instrument in their household.
Her father played the bass
violin and her mother played
the piano. Her two brothers
played saxophones, and two
sisters sang. Poor Bonnie
tried to sing, but just couldn't
carry a "tune"; so her mother
encouraged her to play the
piano instead. Bonnie became
an accomplished pianist who
performed for many social and
civic organizations and school
children as. a way of enriching
the lives of others.
On the spiritual level, Bonnie
was christened and confirmed
at St. Agnes' Episcopal Church
in Overtown, where she
participated in many church
activities, untilherfamilymoved
to Liberty City, and transferred


their membership to the Church
of the Incarnation. Bonnie
continued her involvement
in the church working
faithfully and reverently on
the Episcopal Church Women
Executive Board. She served
twice as chairperson of the
All States Tea; chair of the
March Birthday Group and
assisted with the annual Black
History Celebration. She also
is a member of The Order of
the Daughters of the King. For
her dedicated and outstanding
work in the church for many
years, Bonnie has received
numerous awards from the
Episcopal Church Women of
the Church of the Incarnation.
In the Miami-Dade County
community, Bonnie has
spread her wings in making
a difference in the lives
of others via her diligent
participation in the following
public service organizations:
Board of Trustees of the Black
Archives Foundation (Speakers
Bureau.. sharing experiences
with students during Black
History Month; Chairperson
for the annual Charter Day
Honors Luncheon and the


Post-Centennial Tea during
the celebration of the City of
Miami's Birthday); Bethune-
Cookman University Alumni
Association, Dorsey high School
Alumni Association, Union of
The Black Episcopalian and
the M. Athalie Range Cultural
Arts Foundation.
Bonnie has served as the
chairperson for several years of
the Ebony Fashion Fair, which
is sponsored by the Gamma
Zeta Omega Chapter of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
She's also a "Golden Soror" of
her beloved sorority, having
received numerous awards and
proclamations for her dedicated


service. Because of her love
for children and the need to
read successfully, Bonnie has
begun working on two books
entitled: Things Kindergarten
Children Do and Say and The
Alphabet Rap (exclusively for
Pre-K and K children.) God's
Richest Blessings upon the
talented and elegant lady
. Bonnie Newbold Stirrup
whose gifts to the community
have touched so many lives. In
the words of Browning: "Grow
old along with me; the best is
yet to be The last of life for
which the first was made: Our
times are in his hand." Happy
birthday Bonniel


DR. FREDERICK FERGUSON MD


100 NW 170 Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33169

Family Medicinre Doctor

Graduate of Meharry Medical College
and University
of Florida Family Medicine Residency Pro
gram

Board Certified in Family Medicine

12 years of Medical experience

Insurances Accepted: Amerigroup,
Avmed, Cigna, Humana, Tricare,
Medicaid and Medicare

Receive a FREE MEDICAL
visit with presentation of this Ad
( Laboratory and Radiology Studies are not included).


30565-121


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


JESCA
83 YEARS OF PROVIDING
SOCIAL SERVICES IN YOUR COMMUNITY
HELPING PEOPLE HELP THEMSELVES
Please help JESCA help others with your financial contribution.
Donations are tax deductible.
Mail or bring checks to JESCA: 2389 NW 54th Street, Miami, FL
33142; or donate online: www.jescaonline.org

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 305-637-1018



RONIZE OUR ADVERTISER
They patronize your
community and

they appreciate your business


Take it from me. You can prevent colon cancer by getting tested.
They check your colon, and if they find a polyp, they remove it before
it becomes cancer.

If you're 50 or older, talk to your doctor about getting tested for colon cancer.
For a free information packet on the different ways you can be tested
call 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org/colon.

Hope. Progress. Answers.,/ 1 *800'ACS'2345 / www.cancer.org


15B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


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Usher's Ministry Day at St. John
Members of the Usher's Minis-
try will observe their annual
day on this Sunday.
The special guests for the
4 p.m. services be the Rev.
Woodrow C. Jenkins, Jr. and
his congregation of St. Luke
Missionary Baptist Church.
The Ushers are inviting the
public to come out and share
this special day with them.
Sister Diane Badie is
President.
The Rev. Dr. Henry Nevin is ,
Pastor.
REV. WOODROW C. JENKINS, JR.


Revival at New Jerusalem
Minister Kelon D. Duke,
biological and spiritual son
of Elder Kenneth A. Duke is
coming home to revive our
souls in our Spring Revival,
April 8-10 at 7:30 p.m. The
church is located at 777 N. W.
85th Street, Miami.
For more information, call
305-693-8323 ext. 101 or
email to info@njpbc.org.


MINISTER KELON D. DUKE


Youth observance
On Sunday, March 30,
2008, the Historic St. Agnes
Episcopal Church will
celebrate its thirtieth Annual
Youth Sunday Observance
sponsored by the ladies of
St. Scholastica's Chapter of
the Episcopal Church women
during the 10:45 a.m. service.
The youth speaker is Miss.
Sharria Winnette Scavella
who is the daughter ofWinston
and Gloria Scavella. She is a
senior at Miami Northwestern
Senior High School.


Subscribe


at St. Agnes


SHARRIA WINNETTE SCAVELLA


TODAY!


ANNOUNCING A JOYFUL NEW SERIES OF MUSIC


AT THE


IT CENTER


A Musical Celebration with
GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM


March 30 at 4 P.M.

ADMISSION IS FREE,
but tickets are required.
Call 305.949.6722 or reserve
at arshtcenter.org.


Featuring our community's
best and brightest gospel
soloists and choirs
The series continues April 27
and May 25.
Gospel groups and choirs
interested in participating
are invited to contact
Debra Toomer, WMIvBM
Director of Marketing, at
305) 769-1100 or via email
at dtoomer@wmbm com.


IFree parking for Free Gospel Sundays patrons is available at Arsht Center
lots C and E only. Standard parking fees will apply at all other lots.


THE ARSHT CENTER Knight Concert Hall


1300 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, FL 33132


SAdrienne Arsht Center
,for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County
*oTd CARNIVAL CENTER
;\. :. . : I ** .'f; .n t- ..'. G --r


COMING SOON!


BRAND NEW AFFORDABLE


RENTAL HOUSING


If you're a former resident of District 5 considering coming back to the neighborhood or a current
resident interested in a new and affordable place to call home, The Carrie Meek Foundation in
partnership with The City of Miami and The Liberty City Trust is looking for you.

Within the next 18 months over 1000 new apartments for low income families will be ready
for occupancy. In fact, some of them are already under construction.

There is no need to wait until the buildings are finished. Plan ahead, apply now, find out if
you're eligible and claim your spot in line.



There's Been Enough Talk About The Need For

Affordable Housing!


We're Building It, And We're Looking For YOU!


For Additional information or a pre-application please call (305) 953-0525
or visit www.carriemeekfoundation.org


SIGN UP FOR E-MAIL REMINDERS!
If you are not already receiving e-mails from
The Arsht Center, sign up at arshtcenter.org and
get all the details about our Free Gospel Sundays
as soon as they are announced.


I I


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BLCK MSTCNTREOLTERONDSINYM *7HATHE MIAMDYR M M R NC SoD AH ,I TIMSARCH2-PI L ,20


Hall Ferguson -ewitt
ELEASE SMITH, 76, teacher, died
March 18 at Kin-
dred Hospital.
Arrangements
are incomplete.
COLOR PIC-
TURE
MATTHEW B.
GORE, Jr., 22,
died March 18
at Jackson Hospital. Survivors in-
clude: father, Matthew, Sr.; mother,
Gerona Meadows; sisters, Nicole
and Shawana; brother, Claude
Camphor; grandfather, Jasper,
and a host of aunts, uncles and
sorrowful relatives and friends.

RUBY CEASAR, 84, nurse's aide,
died March 22 -
at North Shore
Medical Center.
Memorial ser-
vice, Thursday,
3 p.m. in the
chapel.


DESSIE 'SUG' BURDETTE, 89,
domestic engi-
neer, died March
16, LaKe BennetI
Health & Reha-
bilitation. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m.
in the chapel.


MARIE IDELLA WATSON, 49,
switch board
operator, died
March 21 at
home. Survivors
include: brother,
Ronnie Higgs;
sisters, Barbara
Jean, Linda, ,
Audrey Carolyn,
Stephanie and Cecelia Patterson.
Service Satu'rday, 2 p.m., New
Harvest MB Church.
Royal ._fI
CONSTANCE WINDROSS, 50,
did March 13.
Visitation. Fri-
day, 4-0 p.m.
Service. Satur-
day, 11 a.m. in
the chapel.


MARY ELIZABETH ABRAHAM,
58, died March
15. Visitation
Friday, 4-9 p.m.
Service Satur-
day, 10 a.m.,
Nativity Catholic
Church.


BARRY GARARD, 50, died March
18. Visitation
Thursday, 4-9
p.m. Service
Friday, Friend-
ship Missionary
Baptist Church.
LYON HALL,
36, died March
15. Final rites
and burial in St. Elizabeth, Jamai-
ca Saturday.

THESSIE KELLOM, 83, died
March 23. Visi-
tation Friday 49

Saturday, 4 p.m.
in the chapel.




TRUELLMER THO AS, 95, died
March 23. Arrangements are in-
complete.

FRANCES BETHEL, 80, died
March 22. Arrangements are in-
complete.

DERICK THOMPSON, Jr., 22,
died March 15. Visitation Friday,
4-9 p.m. Service Saturday, 2 p.m.
in the chapel.


ARNETTA McDUFFIE JONES,
68, died on
March 20 at
North Shore
Hospital. She
is survived by


daughters, Elma
Allen (James),
Carolyn M. Bry-
ant (Kenneth)
and Jacqueline Dopson (Ellie); one
son, Darrell. Family will receive
friends at 1880 NW 41 Street.
Service Saturday, March 29, First
Baptist Church of, Brownsville,
4600 NW 23 Avenue, 2 p.m.


Wright & Young3.


THOMAS JACKSON, 89, labor-
er, died March
21 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
daughters, Ana
Jackson and Ly-
neath Mackey;
and son, Leroy
Jackson. Service Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Seller Memorial United Method-
ist Church.


RICKY GLENN,
19. Service Sat-
urday, 2 p.m.
at Prayer and
Praise Interna-
tional Ministries.


20, died March


JEAN DELAUGHTER AKA 'AN-
TIONETTE',
59, laborer, died
March 23 at
Jackson North
Medical Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children,
Bobbie James
Gamble (Ce-
cilia), Robbie Reynard Gamble;
Tawana Lynette Latimore Spicer
(Michaele), and Krystal Nicole
Thomas; and siblings, Clarence
DeLaughter (Tammie) of Anchor-
age, Alaska, Juanita Sanders,
Gwendolyn Burke, Veronica Wat-
son (Gunnie), Denise Zellers-Per-
ry (Roy), Cornise Sellers, Nathan-
iel Sellers Jr., Alvin Jerome Sellers
of Anchorage, Alaska, Kenneth
Reginald Sellers, and Derryle La-
mar Sellers. Service Saturday, 1
p.m. at St. Mark Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

RONICA L. PENSION, 52, nurse,
died Marchh 23
at University
of Miami. Sur-
vivors include:
daughter, Ashi-
ca; three sons,
Averil, Saud
and Kyle; sister,
Roslyn Wright;
and brother, Robert. Service Sat-
urday, 11 a.m. at Wright and Young
'Chapel.


Richardson~?
XAVIEIN BENDROSS, 28, died









MARCEL MILES, 37. died March
17. Private ser-
vice was held









E.A. STEVENSNe
JOHN MULKEY, 81, 201 SW
First Ave., Hallandale Beach, died
March 19 at home. Service Friday,
11 a.m., Ebenezer Baptist Church.
Interment Hallandale Cemetery.
KATHERYNE BUSH, 58, 2760
Somerset Drive, Lauderdale
Lakes, died March 21 at Florida
Medical Center. Service Saturday,
11 a.m., St. Luke Primitive Baptist
Church in West Park.

Pax Villa
MICHEL, FRITZNER, 66, died
March 4. Service has been held.

NIXON ASTRE, 22, died March
13. Service has been held.

MERCINE JEAN REMAIN, 62,
died March 16. Service has been
held.

MARIE ROSEMENEPDAVID, 51,
died March 20. Service Saturday,
10:30 a.m., Church of God of Holi-
ness in Christ, interment Southern
Memorial Park.


Range


SANDY McKENZIE STURRUP,
42, court clerk,
died March 17.
Survivors In-
clude: husband,
Wendell; four
sons, Michael,
.Jonathan, Wen-
dell Earl Sturrup
and Devonte
Sigger; two daughters, Micelle
McKenzie and Alexia Sturrup'
mother, Lucinda McKenzie; four
sisters, Karen James, Barbara
McKenzie, Bridgette Braye and
Alice Glinton; one brother, Michael
McKenzie and a host of nieces,
nephews and other relatives and
friends. Service Saturday, 11 a.m.
in the chapel.

THELMA L. CARTWRIGHT, 86,
retired supervi-
sor, died March
21 .Survivors
include: three
sons, Ronald,
Edward, Jr.
and Kenneth
(Wendy); one
daughter, Cyn-
thia Tynes (Phil-
lip); 12 grandchildren; 10 great-
grandchildren and a host of other
relatives and friends. Service Sat-
urday, 11 a.m., Mt. Tabor Baptist
Church;

JOSEPH FERGUSON, 83, gar-
dener, died March 22. Service Sat-
urday, April 5, 12 p.m., St. Francis
Xavier Catholic Church.

Poitie r -
JOHN BOND, 64, retired truck
driver, died
March 18 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Service Satur-
day, 11 a.m. in
the chapel.


JAMES PERVIS CHEEVER, Sr.,
100, retired
worker, died
March 21 at
North Shore
Medical Cen-
ter. Survivors


include: two
sons, James, Jr.
and Henry; one
daughter, Margie
vice Saturday, 11
Temple Church.


B. Mayes. Ser-
a.m., Cooper's


WILLIE JAMES FELTON, 80,
retired bank
custodian, died
March 19 at -.
Mercy Nursing-
Home. Service
Saturday, 12
p.m., St. James
Baptist Church.

Gregg L. Mason
DAVID VINCENT LAVERITY, Jr.,
39, died March
23 at Miami VA
Healthcare Sys-
tems. Survivors
include: mother,
Carolyn, grand-
mother, Mildred
Betties; sister,
Shameka La-
verity Latson; brother, Terrance;
niece, LaTiana Latson; nephew,
Derek Latson, Jr.: and a host of
other family members and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service
Saturday. 12 p.m. at Jordan Grove
MBC. Interment, VA Cemetery.

ENID M. FRATER, 86, died March
22 at North Shore Medical Center.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Broadmoor
Baptist.

CLARA GLORIA WHITEHEAD,
67, nurse's aide, died at home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

New Generation
SILAS WASHINGTON, 68, Hal-
landale, died March 21. Service
Wednesday, 11 a.m. in the cha-
pel.

BENJAMIN EVANS, 80, Miramar,
died March 19, Service Thursday,
1 p.m. in the chapel.
wAiviCo JAr1ur~, ,,, r77 iyU-11..


JAVMES JACKSOIUN, /77, Hollywood,
MARIE NICOLE JOSEPH, 65, died March 20. Service Saturday,
died March 21. Service Wednes- 11 a.m., Sure FoundationWest
day, March 26, 2 p.m. in the cha- Park.
pel, 1941 W. Oakland Park Boule- FRED CRAIG, 87, West Park. Ar-
vIn.ri


rangements are incomplete.


Jay _-
LUCIOUS WORDLY, 71, Goulds,
died March 19
at home.. Ser-
vice has been
held.
VIRGINIA CAL-
LOWAY, 54, Mi-
ami, died March
16 at Baptist
Hospital. Ser-
vice Saturday, 11 a.m. in the cha-
pel.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Death Notice


Miami, died


EDDIE HUGHES


JIMMY HODGES,
March 22 at -
Baptist Hospi- '
tal. Service Sat-
urday, Glendale
Baptist Church.


JOHNNY REDDICK, 53, Florida
City, died March 20 at Baptist Hos-
pital, Service Saturday, 11 a.m.,
Shiloh MBC.

Carey Royal Ram'n
TAHIR MALIK, 68, Hialeah, died
March 21 at Palmetto Hospital.
Service as been held.

HENRY THOMPSON, 67, Miami,
died March 21 at home. Service
Friday, 10 a.m.. in the chapel.

YANICK JOSEPH, infant died
March 21 at Joe Demaggio Hospi-
tal. Service has beenheld.

Grace-
LIVIE LEMINEUR, 52, bus aide,
died March 18 at
Hialeah Hospi-
tal. Service Sat-
urday, 10 a.m.,
Notre Dame De
Haiti Catholic
Church.


CLARENCE CHAPMAN, 84,
painter, died
March 23. Ser-
vice Saturday,
10 a.m. at Mt.
Calvary Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



In Memoriam
In loving memory of, :


ELLA MAE GIBSON
'SWEETIE'
01/15/26 03/27/00


Eight years have passed. We
thought of you with love today,
but that is nothing new. We
thought about you yesterday
and days before that, too. We
think of you in silence.
We often speak your name,
all we have now are our
memories and your picture in
a frame. Your memory are our
keepsake with which we will
never part.
God has you in his keeping
and we have you in our
hearts. A million times we
cried, "if love alone could
have saved you, you would
not have died."
In life we loved you dearly,
in death we love you still, in
our hearts you hold a place
no one can ever fill. It broke
our hearts to lose you, but
you did not go alone, for part
of us went with you the day
God took you home.
From your children,
grandchildren and great
grandchildren

JOIN THE

c EuaOui flte
by becoming a member of our



CALL 305-694-6210


Words can not express the
gratitude we feel for your
thoughtfulness. thanks for the
many acts of kindness and
prayers you showed to our
family during the illness and
passing of our love one.
Thank you very much!
The Eddie Hughes Family


Card of Thanks


BETTY KEY


We express our thanks for
the calls, cards, visits, flow-
ers, special dishes and all
of the many acts of kindness
shown during our time of be-
reavement.
Your thoughtfulness was
noticed and appreciated. God
bless you.
The family of Betty Key

In. Memoriam
In loving memory of,


WILLIAM LAI(GSTON JR.
11/05/39 03/26/80

We love you. Your family.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


MARIAN N. SHACKLEFORD
11/06/1926 03/26/2006

Love, your family and dear
friends.

Premie &6
KENNEITHA CAROLYN MAR-
JORIE HILL,
'NIKKI', 53, fu-
neral associate,
died March 19
at home. Visita-
tion Friday. 5-9
p.m., Manker
Funeral Home.
9 p.m. until fu-
neral time at home, 1776 NW 4,7
Street. Service Saturday, 10 a.m.,
Church of God of Prophecy Miami
#2, 4528 NW 1 Avenue. Interment,
Dade Memorial Park North.


Telma L. Clark, 69, died
March 23 at Victorial Select
Hospital. Service Saturday,
March 29 at 2 p.m. in Poitier
Chapel.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of our
wonderful mother,


ORA LANIER WILLIAMS
03/28/19 08/19/99

"MOTHER DEAR," "Earth
has no sorrow, that heaven
cannot heal."
Missing you more and
more, Shirley, Wendell, Harry,
Charles P. Williams and the
family.

Death Notice


PETER SEEJATTAN, 63,
died Fri. Mar. 21 in Trini-
dad, West Indies. He was the
founder of Hi-Lo-Food Store,
better known as Bait and
Tackle, Pete as he was affec-
tionately called, was known
for his contributions to the
Miami Gardens community
for 32 years. Pete had such
love and admiration for his
homeland that in late 2007
he relocated to Trinidad.
Survivors include: wife, Lau-
ra; brother, Lal; son, Terance
(Tirzah); daughters, Laura,
Gina and Lisa; grandchil-
dren, Terance Jr., Antonio,
Myles, Christi and Jordan.
Funeral service are incom-
plete at this time. He will be
greatly missed by a host of
family, friends and the Miami
Gardens community. ,

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


RUBY MAE HOUSTON
05/17/13 03/25/04


It's been four years since
God called you home. There's
not a day that passes and I
don't think of you.
Sadly, missed and never
forgotten.
Your son, Rick (Marvilean)
and the rest of the family.


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


vaiu.


117B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL1, 2008


NNW a b


S do*v e sof


Miami Northwestern
Class of 1968 meeting at
Cultural Art Center on Sat.,
March 29 at 2 p.m. For more
information call 786-487-0787
or 786-223-1644.
****** *
The Booker T. Washington
'62 Alumni Class will meet
the first Saturday monthly
at African cultural Center at
4 p.m. For more information
please contact Helen Tharpes


A Mission With a New
Beginning, Bishop Eugene
Joyner along with Youth Dept.
invites you to our Sunday
services at 11:30 a.m. Come
hear five youth, dynamic


Boneparte 305-691-1333 or
Lonzie Nichols 305-835-6588.


Calling all members of
the Miami Northwestern
Class of 1965! It's time to
fellowship together at New Hope
M.B. church 5th Sunday,
March 30 at 10:45 a.m. For
more information contact
Marguerite Bivins Mosley at
305-635-8671.


speakers.

God Word God Way Church
of God in Christ invites you
to Fellowship service with
First Deliverance COGIC,


Bishop Cohen, pastor Tuesday-
Thursday, April 1st at 8 p.m.
nightly. For information call
783-326-3455.


Mt. Sinai M.B. Church and
Rev. Johnny Barber, pastor
invites you to our 4th Annual
Spring tent Revival, April 2-4 at
7 p.m. nightly. Revivalists are;
Wednesday, Rev. Donelle White;


The Concerned Citizens
Committee will resume their
monthly meetings at Caleb
Center, Room 100 on March 31,
Monday and April 8, Tuesday, 6
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. contact Marva
Lightbourne, 305-758-2292.


The Student Services Dept.
at Miami Northwestern Senior
high Community School is
hosting an Alumni Career Day
scheduled for Friday, April 25
at 7 a.m. thru 12:30 p.m. The
alumni representatives will
talk ot students about their
career choices. The Alumni


Thursday Rev. Diane Owens;
Friday, Rev. Torrey Phillips.


God Word God Way Church of
God in Christ, Elder. Reginald
Wilkerson, pastor invites you
to a Revival to hear powerful
preaching by Minister Torey
Higgs, Wednesday, March 26
at 8 p.m. For information call
783-326-3455.


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


In loving memory of,


Rebecca Jean Gordon,
49, employee of Veterans
Hospital, died March 25
at Jackson North Medical
Center. Survivors include:
husband, Fernando; daughter,
Charmese; sisters, Juanita
Bailey, Shirley Flowers and
Theresa Harris; and brothers,
Arthur Jr., Lenny and William
Clarke. Service Saturday,
March 29, 11 a.m. at Liberty
City Church of Christ. Funeral
arrangements entrusted to
Wright and Young Funeral
Home.

Death Notice


HENRY STANLEY
AKA "Stan the Man"
05/19/33 03/28/07
It's been a year since God
called you home, but our
memories of you still lives on.
We are so-grateful for the
time God lent you to us and
the ways you touched our
lives.
We love and miss you so
much.
Your wife, Albertha;
children; grandchildren and
family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


Majorie J. Lowery died on
March 20. Services will be
held at Mitchell Funeral Home
on 03/29/08. 305-638-0088.


Honor

Your

Loved

One
With an
In
Memorial
in
The Miami
Times


RICHARD HAROLD
CRUMP "BATMITE"
11/13/75 03/24/04

Four years have slipped by,
since you took your home on
high.
Our hearts still grieve and
cry.
Then remembering your
contagious smile brings
instant relief for a while.
Just wanted you to know
that we miss you dearly and
still love you so much.
Your mom, Darlene;
brothers, sister, .daughter,
aunts, uncles, cousins,
nephews and nieces.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


KATHRINE MITCHELL
04/01/26 -03/27/06

Miss you and love you
always.
The Turner and Mitchell
Family.


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements


,im^bM10L k1 ^ ^h^^


career day will also feature
a continental breakfast,
entertainment, gifts, prizes, a
luncheon, and of course good
fellowship. So if you want to be
a part of this grand occasion,
please contact William Brown
at 305-836-0991 ext. 2221.


To Miami Northwestern
Class of 1963 an important
meeting regarding our 45th
class reunion in June will
be held on Thursday, April
10 at 7:30 p.m. at the school.
Please call 305-754-8705 or
305-634-5656 for further
information.


.


-- *




The Miami Times
Lifestyles


FASHION HIP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


THE MIAMI TIMES


b-


I ScoNas SECOND No. I
"Copyrighted Material mm-
Syndicated Content "- :* a- ---
Available from Commercial News Providers" --


4blom drft


The sunshine slate of


Flo


Rida


wm~mlo 4m











2C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008 BlACKS MIJSI CONTROL rIILIR O\\ N DES FINY


Congratulations to Dr.
Gwendolyn Robinson,
president, Gamma Delta Sigma
Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho,
Veronica Floyd, chairperson,
Claudia Slater, talent
coordinator, and members of
the sorority as they celebrate
40-years of community service
and providing Florida Memorial
U. with Buds of Spring 2008
Talent Showcase Luncheon,
last Saturday.
Slater orchestrated putting
the talent together, selecting the
adjudicators and corroborating
with Floyd and committee
members, Annette Brantley,
Wilma Council, Lillian
Davis, Irene Handsford,
Denita Henry, W. Doris Neal,
Terriceda Newkirk Dr. Enid
Pinckney, and Helen Roberts,
for the presentation of the great
talented Buds.
Judges selected, Reverend Dr.
W. J. Bailey (Bill), a graduate
from Middleton High School,
FAMU, Vanderbilt U, Columbia
Theological Seminary, and
Ministry at United Theological
Seminary; Jaslyn J. Chinnery
Lewis, a native of St. Thomas,
graduated magna cum laude
from Florida Memorial U, she
was also crowne*Miss FMU and
a teacher at North Glade; and
Dr. Wanda Williams, a diva who
formed The Mystic Five recorded
and traveled internationally,
and subsequently became Miss
Black Miami and a finalist for
Miss Florida and Miss Miami,
while giging with The Staple
Singers, Englebert Humberdink,
The Stylistics and James
Brown.


The Buds
participating
in the Talent
Showcase included
Donquayvia
McBride, singing
For You I Will;
Natalie Johnson,
poetry, I Too Sing America;
Diona Thurston, dance, Me;
Quanitha Simmons, solo,
Because of Who Your Are with
her father on the keyboard;
Queensly Moore, dance,;
Shaneese Sharpe, poetry, Dying
To Evolve; Chjaala Womble,
dance, I Am Beautiful.
Also, Ra'Anna Pickens,
poetry Still I Rise; Salinna
Reese, majorette routine;
Amber Toller, poetry, Lord
Why Did You Make Me Black?;
Brianna Pringley, dance,;
Brande Brewton, Mime;
Kiandra Brooks, dance; and
Leopoldine Barnabe, solo,
When Heaven Calls.
Following the talent
showcase, Dr. Robinson gave
greetings, Slater thanked the
judges, and Newkirk gave
the blessing of the luncheon,
while Mark Lockwood,
soundman, performed as a DJ
and provided incidental music
for the audience, followed by
recognition of participants
by Henry and Council and
Newkirk taking pictures of the
special people.
A drum roll was executed
and Slater announced the
winners of the talent showcase.
Third place went to Ra'Anna
Pickens; 2nd place went to
Diona Thurston; and 1st places
went to Chjaala Womble and


By Dr Rihr Strachan


Kiandra Brooks. All of the Buds
received a standing ovation
and the winners a thunderous
applaud.
In the audience were
Ebenezer, his two daughters
and grand, Dr. Lorraine F.
Strachan, Charles Cooper,
while Dr. Pinkney announced
the African American
Committee of Dade Heritage's
essay contest for interested
students. The topic is Why I
Love My Heritage. High School
Senior will receive $500. for
1st, $300 for 2nd, and $100 for
3rd. For more information call
305-638-5800.

*********
Annette Baham, wedding
planner, dressed in a red
gown, arrived early to put the
finishing touches on celebrating
the marriage of Bernetta Perry
and Lorenzo Copeland, last
Saturday, at Mr. Calvary MBC
with Dr. Reverend Billy W.L.
Strange Jr., officiating.
After the prelude music, Tellis
Copeland, Sr., and Sharon
Hall, aunt of the groom, entered
from their limousine, followed
by Nettie Perry, mother of
the bride. They proceeded
to initiate the lighting of the
memorial candles and repeated
the words: Although death
has separated us physically,
faith and love have bound us
eternally. Though we can not
see, .hear or touch you, we feel
the warmth of your smile as we
began a new chapter of our lives.
Today we pause to reflect upon
the late Walter Perry & Helen
Copeland, who have shaped,
our lives, molded our spirits and
touched our hearts.
Others in the bridal
party included bridesmaids
and groomsmen Latasha
Desqouttes and James


groom, Yvonne Bethel
and Jessie Pollock, great
grandmothers of the bride,
Malvese King, grandmother
of the groom, John Pollock,
grandfather of the bride, Rine
Bryant and Myrtlene White,
grandmothers of the bride,
Arnold Coats, father of the
I I


Desqouttes, Tracy Copeland
and Tellis Copeland, Jr., Judy
Perry and Kermit Wilson,
Deforios Durant and Charles
Green, Monique Perry and
Pedro Perry, Tonya Dockery
and Kenneth Foy, and Jasmine
Jackson and Robert Pinkins.
Also Trace Perry-Wilson
and best men, Stacy Copeland
and Gregory Green; Lenice
Copeland and Tatiana
Copeland, Jr. Bridesmiads;
Khari Jones and Kaleb Hollins,
Jr. groomsmen; Porscha
Thompson and Courtney
Davis, flowergirls; Keyshawn
Thompson, ringbearer;
De'shawn Thompson, aisle
runner; Quanisha Copeland,
Latevia Copeland, Andre
Burgess, and Billy Woods,
usherettes and ushers.
The wedding ceremony
included opening prayer,
scripture reading, exchange
of vows, rings, and lighting
of the unity candle. After the
pronouncement of marriage, the
newly weds led the entourage
to the limos for the trip to the
reception and celebration, while
Shirley Scott, a graduate of
Miami. Jackson waved to her
aunt with a happy smile.


According to, Rine Bryant,
over 500 guests witnessed
Tiffany Richardson, a
potential Top Model and Chad
Coats as they were united in
holy matrimony, Saturday,
March 8, at Antioch MBC with
Pastor Larry T. Walthour, II,
officiating, and the mother
and daughter team of
Wedding Planners of Lifestyles
coordinating the spectacular
event.
Similar to Tyler Perry's
wedding scene, the family:
Gloria Coats, aunt of the


groom, Jacquelyn Coats,
mother of the groom, and
Loleatha White, mother of
the bride, were escorted into
the sanctuary to the tune of
Set the Atmosphere by Kurt
Carr.
After the family was seated,
the groomsmen Nicholas
Bucknor, Stefan Logan,
Kevin Mahdi, Maurice
Mears, Eddie Strachan,
Jamal White, Omar Wright,
Jr. groomsman, Zackery
White, bestmen Donald Burch
and Williams Golden and
the groom entered to Jaime
Foxx's The Wedding Song.
They were followed by the
bridesmaids Chantel Adkins,
Lakiesha Brantley, Tila
Griffin, Angelese Ladson,
Janine Saulsbury, Latrice
Simon, Ashley Vangates,
Regina Wilkerson, junior
bridesmaid Lawanda Bethel,
maid of honor Tashara
Bethel and Janie Finley, the
couples' son: Chadrick Coats,


ringbearer, and flower girls
Aubria Jones and Leisha
King to the tune You For Me by
J. Gill, while Pa'tron Gillum
unrolled the aisle carpet,
closed the door and awaited
the bride's entrance.
With the melodic sounds of
Kenny G and Toni Braxton
singing That Somebody Was
You, the bride entered in a white
strapless Cinderella ball gown
with a cathedral train escorted
by her father, Jeffery White.
She, subsequently, joined her
groom and participated in a
ceremony fit for royalty, as
reflected by the wedding colors
of purple and gold.
The couple chose to include
the African rituals: tasting
of the elements and jumping
the broom, while the aunt of
the bride, Minister Lessie
Wilkerson performed the
unity ceremony, as the couple
was pronounced husband
and wife. They jumped the
broom to the tune of Fred
Hammond's When the Spirit
of the Lord or Dance Like
David out of the sanctuary
and on to the reception, where
they were greeted by hostesses
Tina Alexander, Annette
Bethel, Dominique Bethel,
Conchitta Gillum, Margie
Jefferson, Lashawn Knight,
Della Logan, Sonjia Reese,
Delores Simon, Stephanie
Simpson, and the wedding
directress, Sabrina Baker-
Bouie.
A traditional party continued
with the first dance, toasts from
the bestmen and groomsmen,
while the guests dined on roast
beef, baked chicken, peas and
rice, potatoes, macaroni and
cheese, potato salad, punch
and wedding cake. And they
celebrated until the wee hours
the next morning.


The African American
Committee of Dade Heritage
Trust honored pioneer
women buried in the Miami
City Cemetary last Monday
during their 10th annual
Women's History luncheon.
The following deceased
pioneer women were honored:
Cloie Sweeting, Marie
Rolle, Loranna Sweeting,
Ella Griffin, Cecelia Gars,
Catherine McKenzie and
Jane Thompson.
The life of Robert Simms,
teacher/author/historian/
Activist was presented to the
public in words and pictures
last week at the University
of Miami Richter Library.
Before the family and friends,
the Bob Simms Collection
was unveiled at the Richter
Library. Congratulations!


Get well wishes
to all of you! Doris
Jordan-Duty, Mae
Hamilton-Clear, ...
Doris Mckinney- ;
Pittman, Leila ...
O'Berry, Inez Aj,^.-.
McKinney-
Johnson, John Farrington',
Denesia Bethel-Harris,
Lemuel A. Moncur, W.
Delores Gordan and Linda
Lewis.
Hats and caps off to Senator
Larcenia Bullard, a Miami
Democrat and Co-sponsor
of the bill that requires that
schools enforce penalties on
students that contiune to
want to show their underwear
to all of us all over Dade
County except Coral City.
Can you believe these young
men and some older men


are suppose to have begun
this awful fad, because bad
guys in prison once had to
stop waering belts for safety
purposes. I was always
taught when you don't know
something ask/read. Thanks
to Senator Bullard's husband
Rep. Ed Bullard and the
house committee. Long,
long overdue. Also, girls get
yourselves together, Too
many tattoos! Pull up your
pants and stop the tattoos.
You are asking for your life of
work to be limited. Dress for
success. We are depending on
this generation to go forward.
You were given the best, you
are the tallest, healthiest,
brightest and probably best
looking generation to inhabit
this earth. "It is my hope and
I know the hope of these two
generations that you find the
answer to these problems of
yuours. You can do anything
you want to do by hard work,
hunility, hope and faith in
mankind. Try it."


A swearing In ceremony
for State Representative
Oscar Braynon II District
103 was held last Saturday,
March 22, at Miami Gardens
City Hall before he heads
to Tallahassee. Hearty
Congratulations to you and
your family.
Did you know former
Senator Edward W. Brooke
now lives in Miami The
nation's first Black Senator
is now 88 years young.
Angela Gittens (remember
her?) former Miami Dade
Aviation Director has been
named Director General of
Airport Council International
World, the headquarter in
Geneva, Switzerland. She wil
assume her new role at the
end of April.
Cynthia (Snook,
everybody's mama) Forcer
was pleasantly surprised
on hr 75th birthday by her
children on Saturday, March
8 at St. Paul AME fellowship
hall. The fellowship hall was


the place to be on March 8.
"Sorry, I missed your lovely
affair. Happy, Happy Belated
Birthday. Also Happy Belated
Birthday to Mary "Mother"
Bivens."
Barbara Patterson
celebrated her birthday on
March 20 and will continue to
celebrate on Easter in Atlanta,
GA with her daughter, Denise
and grand-daughters Sharae
and Sherease Hathorn.
The Palm Sunday gang
assembled in the afternoon
at the home of Jaunita Allen
Lane to enjoy an evening of
reminiscence of our school
days and what joy we had
when we marched on Palm
Sunday from St. Agnes
Church to Northwest 14
Street on to 6 Avenue, then to
17th Street and back to our
church. Gone are those days,
but will never be forgotten.
Friends of George
Wilkerson were sadden to
hear of the demise of his
beloved wife, "DeDe" whose


homegoing celebration was
held in New York last week. A
memorial service was held at
the Church of the Incarnation
on March 25th at 11 a.m.
Sympathy to the Wilkerson
and Tresvant's families.
As grown ups and high
school students who will soon
turn 18 years jor already of
age to vote, I will like to share
with you a few important
facts. What is a caucus? A
party meeting at the precint
level at which citizens
express their candidates
preferences and pick delegates
to their county conventions.
It's the lowest level of party
politics the real grass roots.
These meetings usually draw
anywhere from a handful
of people in rural areas
to hundreds in suburban
areas.
Who takes part? Any one
who is eligible to vote in the
November general election
and is a member of the
party.


Rik RAPI% nml, %nrui Mulk ,n% j Krn JILs,


m m


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWVN DESTINY


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2C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008 1









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You- Comn iy N newspaper Since 1923


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


- --








BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


The sunshine state of Flo Rida









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ON.


- .


MIAMI CITY BALLET PROGRAM IV

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The Tony Award-Winning Musical starring the New York cast!
"If Adam Sandier wrote a musical, this would be it." Miam, New T,mes
See the Miami premiere of one of New York's longest-running
Tony Award-winning hits. This wickedly funny roast of Broadway
musicals features outrageous costumes, hilarious lyrics spoofing Miami City Ballel
Broadway's best songs. and madcap impressions of your
favorite Broadway stars.
2 PM a $50
5 PM $45 Carnival Studio Theater
Adrienne Arshi Center presents.
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS AT THE ARSHT CENTER
A Musical Celebration with GOSPEL AM 1490 WMBM
The Arsht Center and WMBM host a monthly series of free
concerts in celebration of great American music Free Gospel
Sunday at The Arsht Center feature many of our community's
best and brightest gospel soloists and choirs, many affiliated
with Miami-Dade County churches
4 PM Knight Concert Hall FREE Foibraden Broadway
ALSO! FREE PARKING for Free Gospel Sundays patrons is
available at Arsht Center lots C and E only. Standard parking fees
will apply at other lots.
FORBIDDEN BROADWAY
7 .U PM Carnival Studio Theater $45
Co .-h,, --i,, .-r Fier3apRnda.r on O
YUNDI LI, PIANO
, .,., Mussorgsky. Pictures at an ExhibitionzG
Works by Mozart Liszt. Berg. Ravel and Ginastera.
8 PM Knighrit Concert Hall $15. $33. $60, $90 S

p FORBIDDEN BROADWAY
7.30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $45
FORBIDDEN BROADWAY
7 30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $45


FORBIDDEN BROADWAY
7:30 PM Carnival Studio Theater $50


FORBIDDEN BROADWAY
5 and 8 PM C3rnival Studio Theater $50
FORBIDDEN BROADWAY
2 PM $50
5 PM $45 Carnival Studio Theater


4p, Bu mHIOa H gdw


Yundi Li


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
FNo reservations necessary.


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The Miami Times



Business


SECTION D MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


Reports suggest economy weakening more



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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


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Who Cares


What Black People Think


Anyway?

If you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think, think again.Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you.
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote. And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you, you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make.
Give your money, your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
right now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
earned more than 400 billion dollars.

That's clout.






.q !F,


Think about it


James A. Cummings, Inc., Total Program Manag-
er, will be accepting SEALED SUBCONTRACTOR
BIDS for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Estimate
for Coconut Creek Elementary School TPM Class-
room Addition until 5:00 PM on April 10, 2006. The
work includes all trades for CSI Divisions 2, 10 and
16. James A. Cummings, Inc. is actively seeking
Broward County School Board certified minority
subcontractors and suppliers. Sealed bids will be
accepted at James A- Cummings, Inc. main of-
fice @ 3575 NW 53 Street; Fort Lauderdale, FL
33309. Bid documents will be available through
Cummings, Dodge and Reed Construction alter
March 25, 2008. For more information please call
Patrick Murrin @ James A. Cummings, Inc. (954)
733-4211 or Fax (954) 485-9688.


PARKVIEW APARTMENTS
A SUBSIDY HOUSING FOR THE
ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED
Applications are now being accepted for the very
low income elderly, 62 years and over, or handi-
capped, on a "first come, first serve" basis, to be
placed on the waiting list. Applicants may appear
in person, between the hours of 9:00 AM to 4:00
PM at 660 NE 149' Street, North Miami, Florida, or
request an application by mail
CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD
(305) 643-2079

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
opPORTuNITY


_I


JOINIOUR
BUSINESS& SERVICE

CONNECTION


I












~1,
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SECTION D




Business Rentals
Restaurant Wanted
Fully equipped, rea-
sonable rent. Call Debbie
786-262-4559
pOffice Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600
Furnished Rooms
1031 NW 197th TERRACE
Room for rent. Call Linton
305-652-4763
128 N.E. 82nd Terrace
In my private home.$150 and
up weekly plus $300 security.
Single working person only.
786-355-5948.
1341. NW 68 TERRACE
Private entrance, kitchen, air.
$130 weekly 305-213-8659.
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
15810 N.W. 38th PLACE
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen,and bathroom One
person, private entrance.
305-474-8186/305-691-3486
2905 NW 57th STREET
Small clean room $285
monthly. $670 to move in
First, last and security. Kitch-
en available. 305-635-
8302/305-989-6989
441 N.W. 83rd STREET
Furnished room for rent,
cable ready, washer, dryer,
all utilities included. $525
monthly $725 to move in.
Call 954-709-5409
6257 N.W. 18th Avenue
$350 deposit,$130 weekly,
air
Call 305-305-0597
695 N.W. 41st Street
Air, $125 weekly,$250 move
in.Call 305-322-8966
LITTLE RIVER DRIVE
Nice room, non-smoker
Call 786-237-5281
Non Smoker
Private entrance between 8
and 6. Call 305-633-6290
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
AREA
Furnished room for rent. Call
305-300-2799
WEST PARK
HALLANDALE
Room for rent. Call 786-547-
1302

Efficiencies
13377 N.W. 30th AVENUE
$105 weekly, newly renovat-
ed, free utilities, appliances.
305 474-8188 or 305-691-
3486
1480 N W 195th Street
Furnished with air, cable, util-
ities. $550 monthly. First, last
and $200 security required.
Call 786-317-1804
19541 N.W. 37th Court
Utilities included $575
monthly, furnished. $300
security.
Call 305-621-0576

20530 N.W. 20th Court
Small one bedroom, one
bath, utilities included, free
cable. $600 a month. First
last and $100 security to.
move in. 786-715-7814 or
305-474-0498
5422 NW 7 COURT
Large effiency includes water
and electric. $700 monthly.
NO Section.
Call 305-267-9449

720 N.W. 75th Street
ROOMS AND EFFICIENCY
IN CASTLE STYLE
MANSION
Has waterfall, marble
platform, 7 ft. lion statues,
Free light.
Room $450 monthly plus
$150 security/ near bus
line.Efficiency $600 monthly
plus $300 security. Family
Dollar three blocks north
786-523-1736.

86 St. N.E. 2nd Ave. Area
Call 305-754-7776


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


I Efficiencies
MIAMI GARDENS
One bedroom, one bath. Call
954-651-0489

MIAMI SHORES AREA
Furnished efficiency,utilites,
cable $450 monthly. First
and last. Call 305-751-7536

Apartments
1116 Sesame Street
Opa Locka area. Two bed-
rooms one bath $900
monthly
Call 954 805 3233
1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1245 NW 58th STREET
Studio $450 monthly, one
bedroom, $575 monthly. All
appliances included. Free 20
inch Flat Screen TV. Call
Joel 786-355-7578
1277 N.W. 58th Street#1
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances included. Section
8 welcome.
Call 305-238-6876
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one and two bed-
rooms. $525 and. $725
monthly Appliances included.
Call 305-747-4552
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL -
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
140 SW 6th STREET
HOMESTEAD
Three bedroom, one bath.
$700 monthly. No section 8.
Call 305-267-9449
1425 N. W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$625 monthly. Includes
refrigerator, stove, central
air water $1100. to move
in. Call 305-628-2212

1490 N.W. 69 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, up-
stairs, $500 Call between
3:30-5 p.m. 305-439-4880.
1520 NW 61ST STREET
One and two bedroom apart-
ments renovated, all housing
agencies welcome.
Call 305-720-2927
15201 Memorial Highway
One and two bedrooms. Sec-
tion 8 O.K. Call Manager
Gwen Johnson 305-758-
7022

1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included. Free 20 Inch Flat
Screen Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$999 per month. Newly reno-
vated, all appliances includ-
ed. Free 26 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1540 NW 1ST COURT
Three bedroom, two bath.
$800 monthly. All appliances
included. Call Joel 786-355-
7578
1835 N.W. 2nd COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 monthly, appliances
free, 20 inch flat screen Tele-
vision.
Call.Joel 786-355-7578

2040 N.E. 168th Street, #4
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Close to the mall. Water in-
cluded.
Call 305-238-6876
210 N.W. 17 STREET
One bedroom $475. Stove,
refrigerator air. 305-642-7080

220 NW 16 Street
Two bedrooms, $650
Stove, refrigerator, air
305-642-7080/786-236-1144

2295 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom $725, two bed-
rooms $925 newly
renovated, appliances
included.
Call Tony 305-213-5013


Apartments
2440-42 NW 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$800 per month, first, last
and security.Call 305-651-
1078.
3330 N.W. 48th Terrace
Totally remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath in nice quiet
area. All appliances included.
$625 monthly. MUST SEE!
Call Mr. Cruz 305-213-5013
421 NW 59 Terr.
One bedroom $575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/ 786-359-7054
48 N.W. 77TH STREET
One bedroom, $575
monthly,
$1550. to move in.
Call 305-753-7738.
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
5553 N.W. 32 AVENUE
Newly remodeled. one bed-
room $750 monthly. Free wa-
ter and lights. 305-634-8105
5755 N. W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, parking,
$625 monthly, $1000. move
in Call 954-394-7562.
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
7001 NW 15th AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath.
$525 month. All appliances
included. Call Joel 786-355-
7578
8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One bedroom apartment.
Section 8. Call 305-754-7776
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.;
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free wa-
ter, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information.
CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air
and appliances. Starting from
$650. Call 786-506-3067.
Downtown/Biscayne Area
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking, $650-695
Call 786-351-4516
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515.00
Two bedroom, one bath
$630.00
Free water, air
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath.
Call 786-877-4766.
MIAMI AREA
One, and two bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom, two bath.Sec-
tion 8 welcome. $900 month-
ly. Call 954-432-3198 or 954-
303-3368


Apartments
OPA LOCKA AREA
3040 N. W. 135th St, one
bedroom, one bath, $630.
monthly, 305-823-6090
305-305-3929
OPA LOCKA AREA
Section 8. one bedroom, one
bath. $500 cash back. Call
305-717-6084/786-597-2248
OPA LOCKA AREA
Updated two and three bed-
rooms available. Tiled,
central air, appliances and
water included. First month
free move in special. Limited
time!!. Section 8 Welcome.
305-688-2749
WYNWOOD AREA
28th Street and 1st Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly. Two bedrooms
one bath, $750 monthly. All
appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.
! 0Duplex I
1097 N.W. 51 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
water included. Section 8
Welcome
Call 305-238-6876

1180 N. W. 64 St
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Recently remodeled. Section
8 Welcome. $1000 monthly.
Call 786-258-1843.
1243 NW 100TH TERRACE
Two bedroom, one bath. No
appliances. Cental air $825.
1550 NE 131st Lane
Two bedrooms, one bath ap-
pliances included.Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-238-6876

1767 NW 41 STREET
Two bedroom, one bath.
Call Jane 305-947-0141
1842 NW 89th TERRACE
Two bedroom, one bath. All
Section 8 programs welcome
only. Contact Angela 305-
796-3874
2585 NW 165th Street
Two bedrooms/ one bath
$1100 Section 8 OK
Call 305-542-0810
2830 NE 59th STREET
Two bedroom, one bath.
Tiled floors, air. Section 8
O.K. Call 954-560-7365
3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
ONE BEDROOM Section 8
ok. Call 305-754-7776
542 NW 60TH STREET
Three bedrooms,' two baths,
$850 security. $1100 month-
ly. Call 305-301-1993.
5507N.W. 5th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath, air,
security bars, appliances.
$750 mthly, first and last. Af-
ter 5:30 305-979-3509.
586 N W 83 STREET B
One bedroom one bath.
$700 monthly. First and
security $1400 to move in.
No Section
8. Call 786-488-2264.

68 NW 45thStreet
Two bedrooms, central air..
Call 786-344-3278

745 NW 114 STREET
Two bedroom, one bath.
$950 monthly First and last,
plus $500 deposit to move in.
Call 305-788-3063
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first last, security. Section 8
preferred. Call 786-374-9278

COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Like new three bedroom, one
bath. Call 786-269-5643
NORTH DADE
Remodeled two bedroom.
one bath. Section 8
welcome.
$1000 monthly.
305-216-2724


Duplex
NORTHWEST AREA
One bedroom, one bath.
Section 8 welcome. Call 305-
836-4392
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 305-836-4392

| Condos/Townhouses
191st Street NW 35th Ave
Four bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.

19453 N.W. 30th COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath
Contact 305-625-3708 or
786-709-5234
CAROL CITY AREA
18709 NW 46 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths
SECTION 8 WELCOME
786-367-6268

Houses
12405 N W 20 Avenue
Three bedrooms two baths
$1300 monthly. One bed-
room, two bath $700
monthly.
A Must see! 305-788-3785

131 STREET/
NW18th AVENUE
Rent while qualify to buy
Three bedroom two bath,
florida room, garage.,$1550
monthly. Sales Alvin 954-
430-0849
1340 N.W. 88th STREET
Four bedrooms,three baths,
$1390monthly, $3180 to
move in. Call 786-315-3193
1345 NE 128 STREET
Three bedroom, one bath.
One car garage, big yard.
$1200 monthly. NO Section8
Call 305-267-9449
151 STREET NW 18th
AVENUE
Three bedroom, one bath.
Central air. $1350 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
954-430-0849
16015 NW 22nd COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Central Air. $1300 monthly.
Section 8 OK Call 305-409-
8113.
1615 NW 65th Street .
Newly renovated, three bed-
room, one bath for $1200
Negotiable. Section 8
Call Clarinda 305-331-9593
18715 NW 45TH AVENUE
SECTION 8 OK
Three bedrooms, one bath
with tile floors, central air, in
quiet area. $1365 monthly.
Call Joe 954-849-6793
19200 NW 11th AVENUE
This one is for you. Three
bedrooms, two bath with bo-
nus room. $1300 monthly.
305-620-0290
2015 N.W. 68th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath
Hialeah Section 8 Welcome
call 1-347-804-2240 or 786-
367-6468 for Mr. Bride

2825 N.W. 163rd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1400, air, tile floors, bars,
$4200 to move in. Call Terry
Dellerson 305-891-6776
.3031 NW 87 STREET
Why rent. Buy!! Three bed-
rooms, central air. $1100
down and $1266 month
FHA 786-306-4839

3121 NW 165 STREET
Three bedroom, den, air
$1250, tile floors, bars,
fenced. $3750 move in.
Terry Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776
36 N.E. 171 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
family room converts to
fourth bedroom, $1390
monthly, 305-710-5160.

5th Avenue NW 41 Street
Four bedrooms. Section 8
welcome. 305-754-7776

NORTH MIAMI AREA
One to four bedrooms.
Call 305-474-9730


S Houses
811 NW 118TH STREET
Recently remodeled two bed-
room, one bath.Front
porch,large yard, pets o.k.
Quiet neighborhood. Water
included. $1100 monthly
Call 786-344-0132.
936 NW 29TH STREET
Three bedrooms, two
bath,for rent $1450 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.Discount
first month Call 786-262-
7313.
97 N.W. 27 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1350 monthly, all
appliances
included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
CAROL CITY AREA
3623 N.W. 194th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$1350. monthly. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-761-
5256.
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three, and four bed-
rooms with air. $800 to
$1200
305-642-7080.
N.W. DADE AREA
Two bedroom appliances air,
fenced yard, $1050 a month,
plus security. Sec. 8
welcome Call 954-961-3530.

NW/NEAREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.
Off 119th Street
Two bedroom, one bath with
garage and backyard. 1152
sq. ft. Living room, dining
room, den/family room. Parti-
ally furnished, Includes
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, washer and
dryer. Central air
and ceiling fans. Clean
house. Safe neighborhood.
Next to policeman's home.
Five minutes to 1-95, and 10
minutes to downtown Miami.
One year lease or 2 year op-
tion to buy. $1200 monthly
and $1000 deposit. Owned
by retired military. Referen-
ces required Rent must be
paid by direct deposit. Non
negotiable. Serious offers
only. Call 305-778-9506.




Duplex
2440-42 NW 82 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$170,000 or best offer
Call 305-651-1078

I Houses I
1035 NW 49 STREET
Two bedroom, one bath, with
enclosed garage. 150K
.Sales Alvin 954-430-0849

1228 NW 68th TERRACE
Three bedroom, one bath
home Up to $120,000 in
grants.
Selling Price $140,000
305-801-5868
16125 NW 22 AVENUE
No closing costs. Three
bedrooms, one bath,
huge yard.786-269-5643.
8200 N.W. 14 AVENUE
Why rent, Buy!. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, central air.
$1900 down and $1199
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.
112 MARION
Miami Gardens. Why rent,
Buy! Three bedrooms,
central
air, pool. $1100 down and
$1266 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839
2335 NW 88 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Three bed-
rooms, central air. Try $900
down and $995 monthly.
FHA. 786-306-4839
1570 NW 70 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Three bed-
rooms, air. Try $995 down
and $759 monthly FHA. 786-
306-4839.
4910 NW 170 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Four bed-
rooms, two baths, central air.
$1900 down and $1519
monthly FHA 786-306-4839
NORTH WEST AREA
Clean quiet room wit security
bars. $65 weekly. Call
305-769-3347


I Houses
FIXER UPPERS Owner Will
Finance or Rent to Own
$197,500 four bedroom, two
bath Miami Gardens:
$159,500 three bedroom,
one bath North Miami 24 hr
recording 1-800-970-5628
ext 8
MIAMI GARDENS
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$205K. Call 786-423-1096
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, two bath.
$187K. Call 786-423-1096.
New roof and air.
Two, three and four
bedroom houses at whole-
sale prices 786-285-8872

wf-
COIN LAUNDRY
For sale 50K 1659 N.W. 3
Ave. 305-588-9084.



Be a Security Guard
$55 or renew your D license
$55 G license $150 and con-
cealed license $125 G and
concealed together at special
price. Reliable #DS2600085
#K200017. Open 7 days
786-333-2084

Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565
HANDYMAN CARPENTRY
Painting, Tree Trimming,
Yard Cleaning, Landscaping
786-237-7656/ 305-633-1593

HANDYMAN SPECIAL
House repairs, painting, I do
floor Call 786-547-1302
IMPROVE YOUR CREDIT
Remove late and collection
accounts. Results within 45
days. Call Bob 305-418-2338

Mortgage Broker
If you are over 62 years of
age and own your home.
Possibly having a difficult
time making ends meet or
need extra cash. Call 305-
746-4193. We can help
you. American Money Arc
Lending Services.

WE BUY HOUSES
Any type of real estate
Any area, condition, price
fast cash., Call 786-285-
8872



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, and plastering. Also
additions. Call 954-980-4231
or 305-892-0315
GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.
M & J APPLIANCE
SERVICE
Washer, dryers, stoves, re-
frigerators, water heaters.
Joe 305-758-8608 or cell
305-244-8948.
REPAIRS
I have done maintenance on
large apartment complexes
and other rental properties
since 1992. I do plumbing,
carpentry, windows, doors.
Light electrical, drywall,
plastering and painting. Call
Morris 305-588-0205




MUSICIAN WANTED
Saint James Baptist
Church of Coconut Grove
is in search of a spirit-
filled,
God-fearing musician. If
you are interested in this
position, please contact
Deacon Jimmy Smith Sr.
305-259-6218 or call the
church at 305-443-4440.
Office hours, 10 a.m. -
3:30
p.m. Reverend Kenton L.
Williams Sr., Senior Pastor


Employment

Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street


Six Weeks
Sales Opportunity
Money Money
0 Money

The Miami Times has a
special six weeks project
for experienced sales rep-
resentatives.
Straight Commission
Call immediately!
Two vacancies left.
305-694-6227




MUSICIAN WANTED
11591 SW 220 th Street
Mt. Pleasant Missionary Bap-
tist Church. 305-253-2905




Bad Credit, No Credit,
No problem!
Learn how to obtain credit
cards, small business loans,
consolidate your debts,
repair your on credit and
much more.
1-888-583-9213

Extra sod (landscaping
grass) for sell. Lowest price
guaranteed. Call 305-754-
6888.
WANTED
I want to buy a house under
$90,000 from owner in
Liberty City area. Call 786-
715-6678




Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com

Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784

HEALING-LOVE, MONEY,
Court cases. Call for
meeting.
305-879-3234


su1] s cri e


0 Check or money order enclosed


0 Bill my credit card


THE MIAMI


TIMES


SUPPORT THE TIMES WE'RE ALWAYS WORKING FOR YOU
Q S48"' for a 12-month subscription L- $321" for a 6-month subscription



Send to The Miami Times. 900 NW 54 St Miami. FL 33127-1818


Authorized Slynatuis

Name
Address
- City


_____________ State ____________ Zip ____


"Includes Florida sales tax Phone


To


State Zip


einail


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


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A.V. INSURANCE
$ave $$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
04/10/08
C. BRIAN HART
INSURANCE
Auto Homeowners *
General Liability
Workers Compensation
7954 NW 22 Avenue
305-836-5206


GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
* Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07120/08


SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans $150
Infusion Frontal laces
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $85
786-277-6821
06/10/08


DARYL'S BANQUET HALb
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08


Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553
4/30/08


426fi- I/S co weeA& i,/jwrit


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"Copyrighted Material -
Syndicated Content .

-from Commercial News P-virs


ST. AGUSTIN VILLAS
A SUBSIDY HOUSING FOR
THE ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED

Applications are now being accepted for the very
low income elderly, 62 years and over, or handi-
capped, on a 'first come, first serve" basis, to be
placed on the waiting list. Applicants may appear in
person, between the hours of 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
at 1919 NW 15 Avenue, Miami, Florida, or request
an application by mail.

CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD
(305) 643-2079

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


City of Miami
Virginia Key Beach Park Trust
Request for Proposals, (RFP)
& Request for Letters of Interest, (RFLI)
Opening date: 12:00 PM, Friday, March 28th, 2008

The Virginia Key Beach Park Trust ("Trust"), a limited agency and instrumental-
ity of the City of Miami, is requesting proposals, RFP, and requesting letters of
interest (RFLI) from qualified and experienced contractors licensed to operate
in the State of Florida to provide the following professional services for the
Trust:

* Covered Shade Shelters Installation (RFP)
* Food and Beverage Services for the Park (RFLI)

Detailed specifications of this RFP, No, 03-28-08-05 and RFLI, No. 03-28-08-06
are available upon request at the Trust's offices, 4020 Virginia Beach Drive,
Miami, Florida 33149 or via the Trust website www.virginiakeybeachpark.net.
The telephone number is (305) 960.4600.

Sealed written proposals must be received by the City of Miami's City Clerk's
office, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida. 33133, no later than 3:30 PM,
April 16th, 2008. All proposals received after this time and date will be ineli-
gible for considerations. Deadline to Request additional information/clarifica-
tion: 2:00 PM, April 9th, 2008.


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Rates on 30car mortgages drop back Ibelo 6









"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Palm Beach School Board

makes new appointment


The School Board of
Palm Beach County
has appointed Audley
Porter to its Audit
Committee. Porter is
an accountant with
Sharpton, Brunson &
Company, P.A., a top
25 ranked full-service
CPA *firm with offices
in north and south
Florida.
The Audit Committee
is an advisory
committee to the Board
created to provide
advice to the School
Board and guidance
and assistance to the
District Auditor. The
committee assures the
District is in compliance
with pertinent laws and
regulations relating













wee/l i//te l
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


to accounting and
financial matters; and
is operating with sound
business practices.
"It's an honor for
me to serve the school
board in the capacity
of an audit committee
member. I look forward
to working with my
fellow committee
members to fulfill our
mission in assuring the
District's financial and
management practices
are sound," Porter
said.
He was nominated by
school board member
Carrie Hill.


Advanced Syn Clinic
F letsir .Sald, t & Cod idnlia &frf io

Termination Up to 22 Weeks
Individual Counseling Services
Boar Cetified OB GYN's
Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START$1t0 AND UP

305-621-1399
- - --- - --- -- ---- --------

SAGA BAY APARTMENTS
A SUBSIDY HOUSING FOR
THE ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED

Applications are now being accepted for the very
low income elderly,. 62 years and over, or handi-
capped, on a "first come, first serve" basis, to be
placed on the waiting list. Applicants may appear
in person, between the hours of 9:00 AM to 4:00
PM at 21215 SW 85' Avenue, Miami, Florida or re-
quest an application by mail.

CNC Management Inc. (305) 642-3634/TDD (305)
643-2079 EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


MIAMI-DAD

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
challenging environment full of opportunity.
Find your next job at
www.miamidade.gov/jobs
305-375-JOBS (5627)
or visit our
Employment Customer Care Center
140 West Flagler Street, Suite 105 Miami, Florida
Search online at any Miami-Dade County library, South Florida Workforce
Career Center or Team Metro location.
EOE/M/F/D/Veterans' Preference
1) .6. rhm Zae 1"mC ei~c E oc-n y Z)a 1


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida on April 10, 2008 at 9:00
a.m., in the City Commission Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the
purpose of waiving the requirements of obtaining sealed competitive bids for the procurement of services
and replacement parts/equipment for the automated computerized fuel facility system (FuelOmat Fuel
Management System) located at 1390 N.W. 20th Street, Miami, Florida, for the Department of General
Services Administration, Fleet Management Division, from AHA Electronic & Fuel Systems, Inc., sole
source provider, on an as-needed contract basis for one (1) year, with option to extend for two (2) additional
one-year periods with prices fixed and firm for the three year period.

Orpak USA, Inc.'s (formerly know as Rapac Network International, Inc.) FuelOmat fuel management system
is proprietary and its sole source supplier in the South Florida area is AHA Electronic & Fuel Systems,
Inc.

This action is being considered pursuant to Section 18-92 of the City Code, of the City of Miami, as amended,
and requires a 4/5th affirmative vote of the Miami City Commission after a duly advertised public hearing.
The recommendation and findings to be considered in this matter are set forth in the proposed resolution
and in this Code Section, which are deemed to be incorporated by reference herein and are available as
public records from the City of Miami. The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly
scheduled City Commission meeting at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.

Inquiries from other potential sources who feel that they might be able to satisfy the City's requirements
for this item may contact Terry Byrnes, Sr. Procurement Specialists, at the City of Miami Purchasing
Department, at (305) 416-1917 or email: TByrnes@ci.miami.fl.us.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning the proposed sole source
determination. Should any person desire to appeal'any decision of the City Commission with respect to
any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodations
to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no
later that two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later that three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk




(#003113)



NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board
Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date des-
ignated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF
PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address
above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the
scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be
available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


BID NUMBER OPENING
DOWNLOAD >DATE


S' TI E'


PRE*BID CONFERENCE
ADDENDUMS


Carpet and Floor Tile
(Furnish and Install) -Districtwide


Paint: Florida School Plant Management
Association (FSPMA) Approved


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2008

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING : TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2nd Floor Council Chambers, 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 Avenue, North Miami Beach

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING.
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney
NOTICE: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Coun-
cil with respect considered at this meeting, that person shall insure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence
upon which any appeal may be based (f/s 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities-Act of 1990, persons needing special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk
no later than two (2) days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001
for assistance; if hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909
for assistance.


I


B..\AC'KS MUtST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


9D THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH, 26-APRIL 1, 2008






BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 26-APRIL 1, 2008


Existing home sales rise in February

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Syndicated Content

- Available from Commercial News Providers"


IF A PICTURE OF YOUR LOVED
ONE WAS USED FROM
OCTOBER 2002 THRU APRIL 2007
PLEASE PICK THEN UP BY APRIL 30
Arler Apnil 30 we are sorry we will no longer Do resConrsiDle for our picture


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Mike Gomez Construction Consulting, Inc
Free
MCC-7-2005 Continuing Education Seminar
CILB Course #0010240, Miami Dade Course # d003-038
ECLB Course # 0007859
COURSE CREDIT HOURS AS FOLLOWS:
CILB COURSE: 7 CREDIT HOURS
ELCB COURSE: 7 CREDIT HOURS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY COURSE: 8 CREDIT HOURS
DATE: Friday, April 11, 2008
LOCATION: 4200 NW 36 Street, Bldg. 5A, 4th Fir., Conf. Room "F"
Time: 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM
The seminar will cover the following required courses:
* 1-HOUR ADVANCE BUILDING CODE MODULE
* 1-HOUR WIND MITIGATION
* 5-HOUR GENERAL
MGCC will be providing complimentary breakfast & lunch. Please arrive early.
Please call or fax to confirm attendance to MGCC @ (305) 876-8357(Fax).
Space is limited.
Any questions, call Ginny or Anil @ 305-876-8444.
Attending: Yes No
Person's Name:
Company Name:


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