Group Title: Miami times.
Title: The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00538
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: March 12, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available by subscription via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00538
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
issn - 0739-0319
oclc - 2264129
lccn - sn 83004231

Full Text




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LIBRARY OF FLA HISTORY
PO BOX 117DM7
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7WJ7


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Tempora MAitantumr Et Nos Mutmur In Illis


One Family Serving Since 1923


Informing Miami-Dade and Broward Counties


DISTRIBUTED IN M IAMI-DADE AND BROWARD COUNTIES FOR OVER 85 YEARS

Volume 85 Number 26 MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 12-18, 2008 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)



FIU budget cuts limit enrollment for whom?


By Sandra J. Charite
Miami Times Writer
It's your senior year of high school.
You're excited about Grad Nite.
You just purchased your prom dress even though prom is months away.
You passed your SAT with a high score.
You recently completed your required volunteer hours.
Your GPA is a 3.33 and you are doing all you can to bring it up.
You applied to FIU and you are just patiently awaiting your acceptance letter.
You are all set because next year will be a new year for you.
You will be in college living the dream that You come home from school to find a letter
you have watched your siblings, friends, on your bed that says, "Florida International
and people on T.V. live. It seems so surreal University" and your heart jumps.
but it is all happening just as you imagined. The letter that you have been awaiting
You have done your best and no one can say for has finally arrived. You tear open the
otherwise, envelope and come to the letter staring at


the emblem of your future institution. Your
anticipation leads you to the bottom of the
letter but as you make your way to the top,
you find your hope is crushed as it reads, "We
regret to inform you that we will be unable
Please turn to BUDGET 6A


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FAMU president


visits South Florida


By Sandra J. Charite
Miami Times Writer
While on an eight city
tour across Florida,
Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University
(FAMU) President, Dr. James
H. Ammons, stopped by in
Miami. Ammons brought
his faculty, staff, and
students to emphasize the
power of education, restore
enrollment at FAMU, and
recreate a better relationship
with South Florida.
In the eight cities,
enrollment counselors and
academic advisors offered
advice to students in how
to make their application
process and college life
a much smobther ride. '
Students from the university
shared their experiences and
knowledge of their academic
life with the selected schools.
More than 50 scholarships
were given out to students
who excelled in and out of


DR. JAMES H. AMMONS
FAMU president
the classroom. In total, the
scholarships estimated to be
worth more than $500,000.
On March 10, the day before
the FCAT, Ammons was-here
to celebrate with students
and distribute scholarships
at the Booker T. Washington
Senior High School.
Dr. Ammons is no stranger
to the education system.
Please turn to FAMU 6A


ACTIVIST HONORED


Everett Stewart, Sr. and Commissioner AUdrey Edmonson

Commissioner Edmonson honors
Brownsville community activist


Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson was in Brownsville
on Saturday to honor one
of the community's favorite
sons, Everett Stewart,
Sr. The activist's work to
improve the lives of the
people of Brownsville and the
surrounding neighborhoods
will be marked into perpetuity
with the dedication of
the Everett Stewart, Sr.
Community Center at
Jefferson Reaves Park.
"The park and now the
community center honor two
men who have been stalwart
defenders and champions
for this community," said
Commissioner Edmonson.
"It is so fitting that within
the park named for Jefferson


Reaves, Sr. who took
his fight for the betterment
of Miami-Dade's residents
all the way to the Florida
House of Representatives
- we are now naming a
community center for Everett
Stewart, Sr., who fought for
innumerable neighborhood
improvements and the
renaissance of Brownsville,"
said Edmonson.
A plaque honoring
Representative Reaves, Sr. is
now prominently displayed on
a pedestal in the front of the
building. A plaque honoring
Everett Stewart, Sr. hangs
on the wall of the community
center. The plaques are a
tribute to each of the men
and their contributions to the
community of Brownsville.


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2A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


No stigma for free lunch
Surveys throughout the country have shown that many
school children who qualify for federally subsidized
lunches are going hungry and not accepting them
simply because of peer pressure. It sounds silly that a kid
with hunger pangs will pass up a good hot meal because he
doesn't want his friends to know or think that he can't afford
to pay.
But silly or not, it happens. Most kids in high schools feel
that lunch time is the best time to impress your peers. Being
seen with a free or reduced-pice meal "lowers your status."
Some school officials are looking at ways to encourage
more poor students to accept government financed meals,
including the possibility of introducing cashless cafeterias
where all students are offered the same food choices and
use debit cards or punch in codes on a keypad so that all
student check out at the cashier in the same manner.
In many cities more that half of the eligible high schools
students fail to take advantage of the subsidized meal
program. But the stigma of accepting a government lunch,
.while others were paying for food from a different menu is
not unique.
It is a problem many school districts have been guilty of
confronting with mixed results for education and school
nutrition officials.
Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture spends $8.3
billion a year to provide free and reduced-priced lunches
for 30.6 million children whose families are at or below 130
percent of the national poverty level about $26,845 for a
family of four. The program also provides reduced-priced
meals for students who are between 130 percent and 185
percent of the poverty level or $38,203 for a family of four.
Most of the separate lines came into being in response to
a federal requirement that food of minimal.nutritional value
not be sold in the same place as subsidized meals which
must meet certain nutritional standards.
This regulation should be revisited for further study
because the present system is hurting a lot of poor children
who don't necessarily want to be identified as such.
We might as well begin now to deal with the problem,
because with the way our economy is going the poor will
always be with us.

To tell our own story
ne of the less well known stories of success of Black
America is the enduring legacy which has been passed
down from generation to generation that allows us to
tell our own story, rather than having others do it for us.
The Black Press, of which, of course, The Miami Times is a
part, is now celebrating 181 years of existence. Every year at
this time we celebrate the occasion by observing Black Press
Week. In Washington, D.C., where the National Newspaper
Publishers Association is headquartered, the celebration
takes on a national flavor, with a theme chosen each year.
This newspaper takes particular pride in noting the
occasion each year. We are not 181 years old as yet but
we are fast approaching our 85th anniversary which we shall
celebrate in September this year. That we have been this
long in continuous publishing is a direct tribute to our loyal
readers and advertisers, those who have made it possible
for us to remain a voice for our community and tell our own
story.
There is an ongoing assault on the gains of Black folk
and their institutions but equally there are also exciting
opportunities ahead as for all Americans. We are confident
in the ability of our people to rise to the challenges and
grasp the opportunities. When you do it, we shall be right
alongside you to tell our story in our own words.


Prayer for the healing of AIDS
How many Black churches remembered what the
the first week of March represents? The Black
Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS, a
week of education and awareness that spotlights the role
Black churches are playing in addressing the AIDS crisis.
The program paves the way for continuous faithbased
programming that provides AIDS prevention and treatment,
education to Black congregations and communities.
The Black Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS is a
powerful week of prayer, education and action. This national
AIDS awareness campaign engages Black congregations to
support, encourage and empower Black Americans, Africans
and all people of the Diaspora to take action toward stopping
the spread of HIV/AIDS in Black communities worldwide.
The Black Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS
Is effective only if Black Americans regard prayer, education
and social action in close proximity. The Black church is
the most important institution owned and operated by and
for Black Americans. It is their religious home, community
center and much more. It is the place where norms are
set and opinions are shaped. It is the headquarters for
sharing information on health, politics and social issues.
It is the focus of Black American life. As HIV/AIDS soars
out of control in Black communities, it is essential that
religious organizations lead the struggle to stop the spread
of the disease and to deliver and demand more services and
resources for people and families infected or affected.
As a participant in the Black Church Week of Prayer for
the Healing of AIDS, your church is asked to make HIV/
AIDS the focus of the total worship experience on the first
week of March. In addition, your church can host at least
one HIV/AIDS educational program and/or prayer service
on Sunday or during the week.
On the first Sunday in March, your church is asked to
participate in the following ways:
Pastor delivers a sermon on HIV/AIDS and the role of
the church.


During the worship service, the church holds a special
prayer to heal the impact of AIDS on the lives of people who
are infected and affected by the epidemic.
Church distributes HIV/AIDS education materials to the
congregation arid/or provides an education program for the
congregation or a church unit such as the church school,
deacon boad, prison ministry or missionary department.
Over the past year, the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention reported a serious outbreak on many historical
Black college campuses. After almost 25 years of fighting
AIDS unsuccessfully in Black communities, time is certainly
running out on us!


Qe Oiami Timn

(ISSN 0739-03191
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Visla Slation, Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder. 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Associalion
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $45 00 Six Months $30 00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales lax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster Send address changes to The Miami Times, PO Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. FL 33127-0200 305-694-6210
CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The BlacP Press oelieies Itha America canr besl lead the world from racial and national aniagonisrr when IT a.xcors o1
every person, regardless 01 raca, creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Haling no person, tearing no person, the
Black Press strives to helpj e6ery person in he trn belief thai all persons are hurt as long as anyone is held bacK.

Ap The Media Audit f :


The pla~K rn.


____


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Stadium
Dear Editor,
In regards to thE
editorial "Stadium
the poor." I am
agreement with
Times position.


deal hurts the poor in Miami
stated on several occasions, do exactly that. Simply put,
I do not support community the Global Agreement takes
e last week's redevelopment funds being money from the poor to pay for
deal hurts used for initiatives that do not grandiose projects.
in complete directlybenefittheunderserved Once again, I commend The
The Miami individuals of Miami and Miami Times for addressing
As I have this "Global Agreement" will the issues that are important


to us.


Thomas Regalado
City Of Miami
Commissioner
District 4


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OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


. ..


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


Election musings


Governor Crist is claiming
that Florida voters are
disenfranchised. It sounds
good, but wasn't it the Florida
Legislature and Governor that
decided to have Florida Primaries
early despite warnings from
both the Republican National
Committee and Democratic
National Committee. Why
weren't they worried about
disenfranchisement when
they had elections and knew
the delegates would not be
counted?
Is Hilary more qualified than
Barack? Hillary states that she
has traveled to 80 countries.
Most of that travel was as the
wife of President Clinton. In fact,
prior to being a U.S. Senator,
she never held public office. Her
experience dealing with critical
issues in the White House was
watching Bill snore, and living
through Whitewater and Monica


Obama Nuclear
Non-proliferation
and Conventional
Threat Reduction


^^ < faqtt.Iurd rarnavwr n Mm a the head


'9JJ^


Act which became
law. Who is the
most experienced?
I hope Obama does not lose
the "experience issue" to Hilary.
It would be akin to draft dodging
Bush beating purple heart
decorated Kerry on the who
would be better commander in
chief. The American people fell
for it, and we now enjoy paying
$12 billion a month fighting a
war in Iraq.

OBAMA A THREAT TO BLACK
HISTORY MONTH
Whether you are white, Black,
Hispanic, Asian or Purple -
this election year is historic,
because you have a woman
and a Black man in a dead heat
for Democratic nomination for


Ihope Obama does not lose the "experience issue" to Hilary. It
would be akin to draft dodging Bush beating purple heart deco-
rated Kerry on the who would be better commander in chief.


L *- I


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Lewinsky scandals. Barack was
a state leglislator in Illinois
before becoming a U.S. Senator.
During her term as U.S. Senator,
Hilary has passed only 20 pieces
of legislation. She established
Kate Mullany National Historic
Site, she named a courthouse
after Thurgood Marshall, she
named a courthouse after James
L. Watson, she named a post
office after John A. O'Shea, and
she designated a day as National
Purple Heart Recognition Day.
During Barack Obama's 8
years as leglislator, he sponsored
820 bills. He introduced 233 bills
regarding healthcare reform, 125
on poverty and public assistance,
112 crime fighting bills, 97
economic bills, 60 human rights
bills, 21 ethics reform bills, 15
gun control and 6 veteran affairs
bills. In his first year as a U.S.
Senator, he authored 152 bills
and co-sponsored 427. This
includes the Coburn-Obama
Government Transparency
Act of 2006, and the Lugar-


President. This would seem
to indicate that our country is
growing up and finally throwing
off the chains of racism and
sexism. It should be a moment
that all Americans can feel proud
of. Not at the County. A group of
Black employees erected a Black
History month display at the
Overtown Transit Center. As part
of the display they had mouse
pad, with Obama for President.
Someone complained that this
was a threat or unseemly or
somehow supporting Obama
for President. The Mayor's
Office promptly and efficiently
had the mouse pad removed.
Now, is it me or was that just
plain trifling? What threat did
Obama pose to the County in
a State where the primary has
already been held, and where
the votes don't count? Mayor
Alvarez's Office seems to have
a complete lack of sensitivity
to the Black community, which
they shamelessly demonstrate
over and over.


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The Legislature is in a budget cutting way and unfortunately
poor people will take the brunt of the cuts. Medicaid will
probably take the hardest hit, but cost-cutting should
be done without hurting the poor who need those critical
services.


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W A lot of people are worried about the future of State Senator
Mandy Dawson who suffers from rheumatoid arthritis. The
Fort Lauderdale Democrat has been a strong supporter of
her constituents, but many think at would be better for her
to sit down and guard her health.

Veterans of the military will not have to go all the way
to Bunnell to be buried. The U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs continues its proud tradition when it dedicated
South Florida VA National Cemetery during ceremonies
this week on South State Road 7 in Lake Worth. Contact
the cemetery staff at 561-649-6489 for information about
burial and eligibility.

The Florida Comprehensive Awareness Test is here again
and area students are feeling the pressure. Here's a tip:
Leave your cellphone at home. Because of new state rules,
anyone with an "electronic device" in his or her pocket,
purse, or bookbag automatically violates the zero tolerance
rule. The state defines electronic device as anything that
records and/or transmits voice, text messages or pictures.

SBroward County residents are very upset and trying to
understand how a Lauderdale Lakes man won't face trial for
his neighbor's shooting death. Nearly a decade of bickering,
accusations and squabbles fueled the resentment between
two neighbors that culminated in an armed confrontation
over lawn height last month, according to testimony before
I^ a grand jury.

Tiger Woods returns to the CA Championship at Doral
next week in what could be another coronation. If Woods
wins for the fourth-consecutive time at the Doral Golf Resort
& Spa, his win will mark the greatest reign over the Blue
S^ Monster in its 47 years as hold to a PGA Tour event.

A lot of people are asking questions about what is happening
in the Community Action Agency that was usually located
in the Neighborhood Services Centers. Many centers are
closed and several have been relocated. Word around town
is that the actions point to another Hispanic takeover. Stay
tuned.


-


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THF MIAMI TIMES. MARCH 12-18. 2008


Black farmnr work to keep land


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IF A PICTURE OF YOUR LOVED
ONE WAS USED FROM
OCTOBER 2002
THRU APRIL 2007
PLEASE PICK THEM UP BY APRIL 30
After April 30 we are sorry we will no longer be responsible for your pictures


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PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
Miami-Dade Transit (MDT) will be holding a public meeting
on March 25, 2008 to present the current status of the
Miami Intermodal Center (MIC) / Earllington Heights
Connector Metrorail Extension, and to discuss activities
projected for the next phase.
The presentation for the public meeting will include Project
Images, current status, and upcoming Project activities.

Tuesday, March 25,2008
6:00 7:00 p.m.: Open House
7:00 8:00 p.m.: Presentation
MIAMI-DADE TRANSIT
Sheila Winitzer Administration Building, Auditorium
3300 NW 32nd Avenue, Miami, FL 33142

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If you would like to speak with a Miami-Dade Transit Representative, please contact:
Miami-Dade Transit Outreach 701 NW 1st Court, Suite 1700, Miami, FL 33136 | Phone: 786-469-5550 | Fax: 786-469-5583 1 mdtoutreach@miamidade.gov
In compliance with the American with Disabilities Act, those persons requiring special assistance should contact MDT Outreach at 786-469-5550.


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*Includes Florida sales tax






BLACKS \liisi CON FROI I ILIR O\\'N DESTINY 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


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.United in song and in

pursuit of new choir robes.


For every member of your group who opens a checking account with SunTrust, we'll
donate $100 to the qualified non-profit organization of your choice.
Simply open your SunTrust checking account, accept and make any purchase with your
new SunTrust Visa`' Check Card, and submit a completed redemption form. SunTrust
will then donate $100 in your name to the cause of your choice, which means you and
likeminded friends can make something very special happen. If your cause is a little more
personal, you can get a $50 SunTrust Visa` Gift Card instead.
SunTrust also offers SunPoints for Charity,r' an ongoing rewards program that lets you
keep supporting your favorite cause by turning everyday banking into everyday giving.
Seize the opportunity to do something great. Visit your local SunTru st branch,
call 800.485.8982, or visit suntrust.com/mycause for complete details.











SUNTRUST
Seeing beyond money
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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008 1


O()banma coast to Iory in %1Iisi4Iippi primary

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FIU budget cuts limit enrollment


BUDGET
continued from 1A

to offer you a place at Florida
International University."
Florida International
University (FIU) is among the
many schools who have taken
a fall off the cliff. FIU is a state
school that is currently one
of the top 25 largest schools
in the nation. It offers over
200 bachelors, masters, and
doctoral programs to students
in their various campuses
across South Florida. Each
year, FIU opens the door to
over 10,000 students from
all over the world who have
come for higher learning. Due


to recent budget cuts of more
than seven million dollars, FIU
President Modesto A. Maidique
fears that if this continues
FIU will have no choice but
to turn away students who
have attained 3.33 (B+) and
SAT scores higher than 1100.
In addition, many professors
would be out of a full-time
job resulting in fewer classes
being available. Kids who
worked hard in trying to get
into college might have to work
a little bit harder or apply to
other schools.
Unfortunately, as gas prices
increase, jobs decrease, milk
prices double; education
system suffers with a hit also.


Across the state of Florida,
budget cuts in education have
caused tremendous damage
in many state and private
institutions. For example,
Miami-Dade County Public
Schools lost over 30 million
dollars within this past year,
due to state budget cuts. Many
hourly part-time workers for
the county have been told not
to report to work which affects
100 employees across South
Florida. In light of this, more
budget cuts are set to take
place within the school board.
We contacted Maidique and
his Media Relations staff but
they were unavailable for
comments.


-I] TODAY!


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- a


MIAMI-.3D

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENTIAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT
SERVICES FOR HOMELESS PERSONS
Miami-Dade County Government, through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust, is requesting applications from qualified
public or private non-profit service providers for a Change of Project Sponsor for two residential substance abuse treatment
programs serving homeless individuals with substance abuse disorders.
The County will evaluate all applications to determine the best qualified service providers) to perform the outlined scope of
services. Interested parties may pick-up a copy of the Request for Applications (RFA) beginning March 17, 2008 at the following
address:
Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust
111 NW 1st Street, 27th Floor, Suite 310
Miami, Florida 33128
(305) 375-1490
8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
The due date for submission of applications is 4:00 p.m. on April 28, 2008 at the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners
on the 17th Floor, Room 17-202 of the Stephen P. Clark Center, Miami, Florida. Pre-Application Workshops will be held on:
Thursday, March 27, 2008 at 2:00 p.m., 111 NW 1st Street, Room 18-3 Miami, FL, 33128
Attendance at the Pre-Application Workshop is strongly recommended. In order to maintain a fair and impartial competitive
process, th.e County can only answer questions at the Pre-Application Workshop and must avoid private communication with
prospective service providers during the application preparation and evaluation period. Miami-Dade County is not liable for any
cost incurred by the applicant in responding to the RFA, and it reserves the right to modify or amend the application deadline
schedule if it is deemed necessary or in the interest of Miami-Dade County. Miami-Dade County provides equal access and
opportunity in employment and services and does not discriminate on the basis of handicap. The contact person for
purposes of this RFA is David Raymond, (305) 375-1490.


0~ -
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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Profw-or.: Some Hkpic deny their African root


ab--


UCopyrighted Material
Syndicaed Conent
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Wade to lst out rtm of the mn
b e


a


IF A PICTURE OF YOUR LOVED
ONE WAS USED FROM
OCTOBER 2002
THRU APRIL 2007
PLEASE PICK THEM UP BY APRIL 30


1 b CALL c mi


Richard Perlini,


If you are in an accident, call
Richard Perlini, Esq. at

1-877-763-4LAW 24hoursoperday
(529)
As a trial attorney, practicing 30 years in Florida,
Richard Perlini, Esq. can see your case all the way through to completion.


* Automobile Accidents


* Injuries
* Slip & Fall


Richard Perlini, Esq.
11o S.E. 6 Street Suite 1920
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301


* Wrongful Death
* Worker Compensa


I


t


0 Q









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008 1


Preparing a special holiday dinner does not
have to be complicated and time consuming.


0


For a 6-8 Ib semi-boneless fully cooked ham (12-16 servings)
prepare ham following recipe instructions; begin the ham
about 2-2 1/2 hours before you would like to serve.


0


About 1 hour before your ham is done, rinse sweet potatoes,
pierce several times with a fork, and wrap in foil.
Place in oven, directly on oven rack, with ham. If your family
and guests are hungry, prepare some appetizers with
Publix Deli Spinach Dip served on Nabisco crackers.


0


Even with a busy day and guests on the way,


Easter dinner can be joyous and easy.


Publix Semi-Boneless 139
Smoked-Ham Half,. .... .... .-
Or Whole, tCRbry-smtk&' d dtt,.ic,'Atitl 'r-f Lcisive d'
recipe, Pu4lK Semi-Bodele s Hamn alId-'"'lrc itbius option
for your Eastaffmeal. Plit, it% s-oh ifent t6bo:'this'fNim
comes fully cooked, ready to heat and eat.
SAVE UP TO.80 L3


Potato Rolls, 149
12-Gount .... ........ .... .-
Soft, dense, ahrdi rlfI' irft ,dir pbttatb rdllil'te a'kad kd
fresh daily in the Publix Bakery. Hgattherh in theover f&o, t,
a minute or two, and place them in a breadbasket lined
with a linen napkin to help keep them warm. 18-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .40


Sweet-Potatoes i .- ..--r ib
ArIhg'WitVftheir fluffy texture and delightful fiavboP, . .' :', !
sweet potatoes add a lot of nutritional value teo'your
Easier meal: They're excellent sources of vitamins
A and C-and also naturally fat- and cholesterol-free.
SAVE UP TO .50 LB


Family and guests will love
this simple and flavorful ham.
Log on to publix.com
for more Apron's recipes.


Publix Deli Spinach Dip
Serve With Crackers or Tortilla Chips, For Fast Sero..ce Grab & Go'. 16-oz cnr
SAVE UP TO .30


Ham With Pineapple
Mustard Sauce
Prep and Cook: 2 hours, 45 minutes
(Makes 12-16 servings) ,


1 semi-boneless fully cooked ham half (6-8 Ibs)
aluminum foil
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons pre-diced onions
2 tablespoons packed brown sugar
1 cup water
8 ounces pineapple tidbits in juice (3/4 cup, well drained)
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1 packet pork gravy mix (about 1 ounce)

1. Preheat oven to 325F. Remove all packaging and wrap ham
| in foil; place in shallow baking pan. Bake about 20 minutes per
pound or just until internal temperature at center of ham is
140F. Use meat thermometer to accurately ensure doneness.
Remove ham from oven and let stand 10-20 minutes
before slicing.
2. While ham stands, prepare sauce. Preheat medium saucepan
I on medium-high 2-3 minutes. Place butter in pan; swirl to coat.
Add onions; cook 4-5 minutes, stirring often, or until onions
begin to brown
3 Stir in remaining ingredients and bring mixture to a boil
4 Reduce heat to low, cook 10 minutes, stirring often. or until
sauce thickens and fruit sohens Sauce can be blended smooth
with a stick-type hand blender or potato masher, if desired
Slice ham and serve with sauce (Ham makes 12-16 servings.
sauce makes about 12 servings)
S..-


Pin


Follow these
easy steps to
serve a perfect
fully cooked hat
this Easter.


Nabisco Baked Snack Crackers ...................... 600
Assorted Varieties, 6.75 to 10-oz box
SAVE UP TO 3.57 ON 3
(Nabisco Easy Cheese, 7.25 or 8-oz can ... 2/6.00)




D o le P in eap p le....................... ...................................-.. 9 9
Tidbits, Slices, Crushed, or Chunks, In 100% Pineapple Juice, No Sugar Added;
or in Heavy Syrup Sweetened High in Antioxidant Vitamin C Chunks, 20-oz can
SURPRISINGLY LOW PRICE




Land 0 Lakes Sweet Cream Butter......... .... 4 00
Salted, Light Salted, or Unsalted, 4-sticks, 16-oz box
SAVE UP TO 2.78 ON 2













z


Set the oven temperature to 325F.
Remove all packaging and then wrap
the ham in foil. place the wrapped
ham in a shallow baking pan Allow 20
minutes per pound for an approximate
heating time. If ham is over 10 pounds,
allow 15-18 minutes per pound.


319


Use a meat thermometer to check the
temperature in the center of the
ham (not touching bone or fat). When
the intemal temperature of the ham
reaches 140"F. remove from the oven.


I


,ltioir 11. *,-a


m










9A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Remove your ham from the oven when your meat
thermometer-inserted into the thickest part
(not touching bone or fat)-reaches 140F.


O


After you've removed your ham, transfer it to a carving
board. Let it stand 10-20 minutes before slicing.
Use the residual heat in the oven to keep your
sweet potatoes warm and to warm your
dinner rolls and apple pie.


While the ham stands, prepare the Pineapple Mustard Sauce
and the Asparagus Amandine following recipe instructions.
Add some butter and a little brown sugar to the sweet
potatoes. Toss the fresh salad blend with your
favorite dressing. Slice the ham and serve.


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Whether you're cooking for family or hosting a get-together with friends,
Publix can help you have a great holiday. From useful tips to the perfect items and special savings,
we've got everything you need for a simple and exceptional Easter meal.


Francis Coppola 4A99
DigagQnd Series Wine ..^,! -x
The right glass of wine compliments every holiday meal with friends
and family. Francis Ford Coppola's Diamond Series Pinol,.oir is-,,
the perfect accompaniment for your Easter dinner ensemble.
This elegant wine with hinIs of black cherry and sweet spices
exquisitely accentuates the traditional ham dinner. 750-ml bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.00


U


1Aspagus99 Gourmet 0Q99
Asaragus.. ....... .V 1 Apple Pie.. .. .. t...,I .,...& .
A good source ov4ramin-C, fre asparagu.rrtakpan., ,.,, ,.. For an unforgetta3le.e6nding.(o a ,wonei;tf mpe, serve.owr -,,,,, ,q
elegant add4ion.tq. E.eser cinner..-Tryour. recipe0 Fr' : ,, ,.: Publix Bakep, Gurmt Appele ie.-Youandiyour family w iyv.- .,'.,",;
Asparagus Amandine, a perfect side dish to serve with ham. love its buttery, flaky crust-and the rich, sweet taste of -
URPRISNGLY LOW PRIC apple slices, tossed in cinnamon and sugar. 43-oz size.
SAVEJUPTO .00


Kraft or Seven Seas Dressing................. Free
Assorted Varieties, 16-oz bot. (Excluding South Beach Diet.)
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 3,07



Publix Salad Blend................................. ............ 4 00
Spring Mix, American, European, Italian, Hearts of Romaine, or
Caesar Salad Kit, Choose Your Favorite Variety, 5 to 14-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 1.98 ON 2


I Publix Premium 00
Ic e C re a m ............................................... ... ..... ...........
Assorted Varieties, half-gal ctn. (Including Light and Homemade.)
SAVE UP TO 2,88 ON 2



Entertaining Made Even Easier
Let Publix help you host a great get-together. We offer a wide variety of artistically
arranged Deli and Seafood platters, scrumptious salads, and decadent desserts.
Pick up our complimentary Start Something"' party planning guide
or go online to publix corn/entertaining


Transfer the ham to a carving board
Let stand 10-20 minutes before slicing
This allows the juices to redistribute
through the ham, resulting in a firmer,
juicier, and easier to carve ham


When the ham is ready for slicing,
place it on its side on the carving
board. Use a meat fork to hold the
ham steady, and make perpendicular
slices down to the leg bone in
the desired thickness.


Loosen the slices by cutting
horizontally along the leg bone.
Remove each slice with the fork
and arrange the ham slices on
a serving platter. Serve with
pineapple mustard sauce.


Complement your ham with this
easy and elegant asparagus recipe.
Log on to publix.com
for more Apron's recipes.


Asparagus Amandine
Prep and Cook: 20 minutes
(Makes 4 servings)

1 lb fresh asparagus spears (rinsed)
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoon seasoned salt
1/4 cup sliced almonds


1. Cut 1 inch from tough root end of asparagus spears and
discard. To do this quickly, group half the spears together,
align ends, and slice with sharp knife. Cut into 2-inch pieces
and set aside.
2. Preheat large saut6 pan on medium-high 2-3 minutes.
Place butter and seasoned salt in pan; swirl to coat.
Add almonds and cook 1-2 minutes, stirring often,
or until lightly toasted and brown.
3. Add asparagus; cook 4-5 minutes, stirring often, or
until crisp-tender. (For softer asparagus, cover during
cook time.) Serve.






Publix.








publix.com/ads

Prices effective Thursday, March 13
through Saturday, March 22, 2008.
Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin,
St. Lucle, Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe Counties.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor or Publix GreenWise Market.
Quantity rights reserved.


I


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


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11A THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


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- -MIE


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


('l=-dmh lyyg cwIm Qm'f= -


11Adrk THE IAMI I, R


^^^ ^^^B^^^"_r ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^son ^ ^ ^^^^^^


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Wendy's shooter bought gun from longtime friend


By Leon Fooksman

The suicidal gunman in the
Wendy's restaurant shooting
bought his semi-automatic
pistol for $600 from a friend
at a time he was developing
a health problem and started
to lose weight, county officials
said Thursday.
Alburn Blake, 60, got his
Glock 17 from a Riviera Beach
man he knew for at least
a decade, said Paul Miller,
spokesman for the Palm Beach
County Sheriffs Office. That
man bought the gun on Dec. 28
from the Palm Beach Shooting
Center in Lake Worth. He
sold it to Blake on Jan. 7, the
same day he picked it up from
the gun shop after passing a
criminal background check.
The powerful gun is fed by a
17-cartridge magazine. Firing
and then reloading a second
magazine, Blake fired 20 shots
from the Glock in the restaurant
west of West Palm Beach on
Monday, killing a Palm Beach
County fire lieutenant and
wounding four others before
fatally shooting himself.
The motive for the shooting
spree is stillunderinvestigation.
Detectives have said Blake may
have been depressed.
Blake, who had a landscaping
business, began developing
ailments around January,


Miller said. Investigators
declined to explain the ailments
except to say they were not
life-threatening. Detectives
previously said they had found
medication in Blake's West
Palm Beach apartment.
Federal agents traced Blake's
gun to the Lake Worth gun
shop through a serial number,








ALBURN EDWARD BLAKE

Miller said.
Two of the gun's three serial
numbers were "smoothly
drilled off' but a third number,
inside the gun, was still intact
and used in the trace. Miller
said Blake's friend had nothing
to do with filing down the
numbers on the gun.
Among the theories why
the numbers were removed:
Blake may have been trying
to protect his friend, Miller
said, and Blake may not have
known there was a third serial
number inside the gun.
An employee at the Palm
Beach Shooting Center declined
to comment Thursday.


Blake bought another gun,
a .357-caliber Magnum, from
the same friend about 10 years
ago, Miller said. Investigators
have not found that gun, but
they did discover .357 Magnum
bullets in Blake's apartment.
The two men worked together
as landscapers, Miller said.
Although detectives tracked
down the gun, they still have
not clearly reconstructed the
last 48 hours of Blake's life.
Blake's gun purchase was
legal, Miller said.
State law permits guns to be
resold. Blake's friend, whom
authorities would not name,
could have been charged with
a crime if he knew Blake had a
criminal history, mental health
troubles, was in the country
illegally or dealt with drugs,
a spokesman for the federal
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives
said. Blake was not known to
have any of those problems,
investigators said.
Also Thursday, authorities
revealed that Blake had
keys to homes where he did
landscaping and other chores.
He also worked as a landscaper
at The Weiss School in Palm
Beach Gardens.
"He was trusted by people,"
Miller said.
For reasons still unclear,
Blake appears to have


I TIODA!


abandoned his business about
three weeks ago. He owed $400
on his SUV and was responsible
for $600 in monthly child
support for a 2 1/2-year-old
daughter.


MMAP HOMEOWNERSHIP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
FILE SUBMISSIONS RE-OPENING
Metro-Miami Action Plan Trust Homeownership Assistance Program (MMAP HAP)
will conduct workshops and accept applications from Lenders, Mortgage Brokers,
Closing Agents, Real Estate Brokers, and Sales Associates interested in becoming
certified MMAP HAP Participants. This program is designed to provide First-Time
Homebuyers with up to $7,500 in down-payment and closing costs assistance in the
form of a forgivable, zero percent interest, non-amortized, deferred mortgage loan.
All HAP training materials, participation requirements and borrower eligibility require-
ments will be provided at these free Certification Workshops.

* Tuesday, March 18, 2008 10 AM 2 PM Joseph Caleb Center
Conference Rm. 110 5400 NW 22nd Ave., Miami, 33142
Registration cut-off date is Monday. March 17th

* Thursday, March 20, 2008 10 AM 2 PM South Miami-Dade Regional Library
2nd Floor Auditorium 10750 SW 211 Street, Miami 33189
Registration Cut-off date Tuesday. March 18th

Please RSVP and include company name and number of staff attending:
ericildmiamidade.gov or call the MMAP Office at 305-372-7600 ext. 243.


SEATING IS LIMITED
YOU MUST REGISTER IN ADVANCE.


I-I


MIAMAD
=a MADE


You are invited to participate in a

MIAMI-DADE TRANSIT (MDT)
PUBLIC MEETING
Thursday, March 27, 2008
6 p.m. Open House I 7 p.m. Public Meeting

Miami Dade.Collegq,,North' Campus
11380 N.W. 27th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33167
William and Joan Lehman Theater
Located on Lake Road West end of Campus Bldg. 5000

Find out the latest information about
Miami-Dade Transit's Orange Line Phase 2
North Corridor Metrorail Extension
New Starts Preliminary Engineering Phase
With Miami-Dade County Commissioners:
Barbara J. Jordan (District 1)
Dorrin D. Rolle (District 2)
Audrey Edmonson (District 3)




Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal opportunity in employment
and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its programs or services.
Auxiliary aids and services for communication are available with advance
notice. This form can be made available in accessible format upon request
(audiotape, Braille, or computer disk): For material in alternate format, a sign-
language interpreter, or other accommodations, please contact Maud Lizano
at 786-469-5478. Customers using TDD, please call through the Florida Relay
Service 1 -800.955-8771, at least five days in advance.


Subscribe


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


A 21 THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH12-18, 2008


Florida deserves a revote


By Bill Nelson


We have been immersed
for months in great debates
about the economy, Iraq
and health care. Now, with
two outstanding Democratic
candidates battling
down to the wire
for their party's
presidential
nomination, we
face an issue
fundamental in our
democracy: the right
to vote.
On Jan. 29, more
than 3.6 million
Floridians headed
to the polls and BILL N
cast ballots in the Florida U
state's presidential
Democratic and Republican
primaries. But the rules of both
national parties had reserved
early presidential contests
to a handful of states (Iowa,
New Hampshire, Nevada and
South Carolina).
As way of punishment for
violatingthe rules, bothparties
took steps to diminish the role
Florida plays in the selection
process of their respective
presidential candidates. The
GOP has docked the state
half of its allotted delegates
to the national convention
this summer. The Democratic
Party has stripped Florida
of all of its delegates 210
votes that now loom especially


IE
.S


crucial in the race between
Hillary Clinton and Barack
Obama for their party's
nomination. Michigan also is
being punished for holding
its presidential contest earlier
than the parties' rules allow.
In Florida,
this punishment
comes because
the Republican-
controlled state
legislature moved
the state's primary
date to an early spot
on the calendar. The
thinking had been
to give the large,
diverse state -- one
ILSON that is a microcosm
3. Senator of America -- more
of a say in the
nominee selection process.
But Democratic Party bosses
in Washington reacted harshly
and refused to seat even half
the delegates selected in
January, as allowed by the
party's rules.
In Michigan, all the
Democratic candidates,
except Mrs. Clinton, removed
their names from the ballot. In
Florida, they all remained on
the ballot, but agreed not to
campaign there. And because
the candidates stayed away
from my state, I remained
neutral in the Democratic
contest until the polls closed
on primary day, when I
endorsed Mrs. Clinton.


Now, after last week's
primaries in Texas, Ohio,
Rhode Island and Vermont,
it's evident that Mrs. Clinton
and Mr. Obama will remain
locked in a tight race for the
nomination for some time to
come, and perhaps all the way
to the party's convention in
August. And with that, every
delegate is becoming critically
important.
If the delegates from Florida's
January vote aren't going to be
seated, we're rapidly reaching
a point when the state must
schedule a new election.
Unfortunately, that is not as
easy as it sounds. Elections
costs millions of dollars, and
Florida is struggling with a
tight budget in these tough
economic times. I've asked
that the national party pay for
a revote, but so far Mr. Dean
has declined. He suggested
the state party could raise the
funds.
Either way, it's imperative
that the Democratic Party
at both the national and
state levels participate in
finding a solution. Otherwise
the Democratic Party
unfortunately appears headed
for a political train wreck that
could involve a floor fight at the
convention over recognizing
Florida's delegates. That risks
alienating a key battleground
state in the run-up to the
November elections.


$1.2M donation To MLK, Jr. National Memorial


':.Washington, DC On
March 4, it was announced
in :Washington, DC that credit
Unioris from California to Maine
and from Washington to Florida
have donated $1.2 million to the
Washington, DC Martin Luther
King, Jr. National Memorial
Project Foundation, Inc. The
African American Credit Union
Coalition (AACUC) was honored
for spearheading the national
fundraising effort.
General Colin Powell; Harry E.
Johnson, Sr, President and CEO
of the Memorial Foundation;
Barbara Stephens, Chair of the,
AACUC; and Hubert Hoosman,
PresidentofVantageCreditUnion
in St. Louis, MO participated in


the announcement.
"AACUC is proud to have
spearheaded the credit unions
in supporting the efforts to
build a memorial in honor of Dr.
King on the National Mall," said
Stephens. "I especially want to
thank Hubert Hoosman of the
AACUC board for birthing this
idea and we are proud to be part
of this historic effort."
"I applaud the tremendous
time and effort that the African
American Credit Union Coalition
and numerous credit unions
placed in raising funds for this
lasting national memorial to
the ideals of hope, democracy,
peace, and love for which Dr.
King stood" said Johnson. "Now


is the time for all citizens to
help make history by making
a donation of any amount by
visiting www.buildthedream.org
or calling 888 4 THE DREAM."
The Memorial Foundation
has raised $93 million to date.
Some of the major donors
which have contributed to the
Memorial: General Motors,
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,
Inc., Coca-Cola Foundation,
The Ford Motor Fund, Toyota,
AARP, Fannie Mae Corporation,
National Education Association
(NEA), PepsiCo Foundation,
Pfizer Foundation, State Farm
Insurance, Wal-Mart and
Morehouse College, among
others.


OneUnited Bank cited by Money Magazine


LOS ANGELES, CA -
OneUnited Bank was cited by
Money Magazine for its high
rate internet savings account
in its January 2008 issue "The
Best Money Websites". The
magazine article entitled "The
Party isn't Over for Savers"
cites OneUnited Bank for
offering 5.30% APY*.
"OneUnited Bank is
committed to offering great
rates that are comparable
to other premier online
financial service providers to
encourage our customers and
community to save," stated
Kevin Cohee Chairman & CEO
of OneUnited Bank. "We have
been promoting increased
savings since 2006 when we
became the first Black-owned
internet bank in the country.










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During these difficult financial
times, OneUnited Bank hopes
our community will become
believers in the importance of
saving money to support their
dreams and aspirations and
protect them during difficult
times."
In its January 2008 issue,
Money Magazine stated that
despite two recent Fed rate
cuts, you can still obtain high
yields on your cash. OneUnited
Bank was cited along with four
other financial institutions for
high rate money market and
savings accounts. OneUnited
Bank has offered its current
rate since May 15, 2007.


OneUnited Bank is the first
inter-state and fastest growing
Black-owned bank in the U.S.
with $640 million in assets and
branches in Massachusetts,
Florida and California. The
Bank's mission is to be the
premier bank serving urban
communities by offering
affordable financial services,
while maintaining superior
financial performance. The
FDIC insured Bank has
grown through a combination
of organic growth and by
acquiring community banks
in Massachusetts, Florida
and California that share its
mission.


. r. er., 7'.y
Senior lastor/Teac6er



rT4ursdaty orAoiveness

Dr. Venita 17impson

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Comm. Moss seeking insurance relief for homeowners


Miami-Dade County
Commissioner Dennis C. Moss,
District 9, is calling on Florida
Governor Charlie Crist, the
Florida Legislature, and the
Insurance Commissioner to
enforce legislation that will
allow residents to save on
their homeowners' insurance
costs. A resolution sponsored
by Commissioner Moss and
passed by the Board of County
Commissioners on Tuesday,
March 4, asks that insurance
companies be required to comply
with insurance reform legislation
passed during a special session
in January 2007 and pass
savings to policy holders.
"The legislation passed during
lastyear's special session provides


state-sponsored reinsurance
coverage for insurance companies
at significantly lower costs than
through private reinsurance
companies," Commissioner
Moss pointed out. "Homeowners
need to see the savings on their
insurance bills. That was the
whole point of the special session
and the insurance reform
legislations"
Florida is still feeling
repercussions of active storm
seasons in 2004 and 2005.
Insurance rates rose rapidly
and many major insurers have
stopped writing new policies
in the state. As part of an
effort to reduce homeowner
and commercial insurance
premiums, lawmakers passed


House Bill 1-A, expanding the
Florida Hurricane Catastrophe
Fund to provide $28 billion
in coverage for insurance
companies in the event of a major
storm. In exchange for the
increased risk being undertaken
by Florida residents, insurance
companies are required to
reduce their rates. According to
Commissioner Moss, the savings
aren't coming online quickly
enough.
"I know Governor Christ,
Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink
and Insurance Commissioner
Kevin McCarty have already
made some effort to require
compliance, including issuing
subpoenas against Allstate,"
said Commissioner Moss.


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The Miami Times


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 12-18, 2008


A Education is only


th out of poverty

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


Listen and follow Gods instructions


Last week, I asked you to
consider if this might be a
season that God is asking you
to leave your place of comfort,
and move on and up to another
level. As I wrote, when God
spoke to the Israelites at
Mount Sinai as related in
Deuteronomy 1:6-8, they had
spent some time at the foot
of this mountain. There was
nothing wrong with spending


the time in comfort and
protection. Your current job or
ministry could be your Mount
Sinai. It is there that God is
teaching you and imparting His
Word and His direction for you.
It is there that God allows you
to impart into others and be a
wonderful part of their lives. We
receive training and teaching
and a sense of direction and
accomplishment at the foot of


the mount. We should remain
at the foot of the mountain as
long as God tells us to stay.
However, because God is
a God of seasons in both
the natural as well as the
spiritual, there will be a time
that He tells us as He did to the
Israelites thousands of years
ago to move. The great thing
about God breaking up our
comfortable and complacent
existence is that He is a God of
increase. His moving involves
increase. Do not think that I
am strictly referring to financial
increase. In fact, the increase
might even bring a temporary
financial decrease, but there
should always be an emotional


and spiritual increase. God is
a giver. He loves to give us good
things, not to take them away.
Read verse 7 of this chapter.
God told the people to advance,
not retreat, not to give in or to
give up, but to advance to
increase and to move up, not
just move.
God did not just say to move
because it was something
different to do. He didn't say
to move because He did not like
the location. He said to move
because they needed to take
what He had already promised
them. Read Jeremiah 29:11.
God said that His plans for us
are of peace and prosperity.
If you are not living in peace


and prosperity, then those are
someone else's plans for your
life. God promised life, not
death. If you are struggling
with feelings of depression,
oppression or suicide, those
thoughts do not come from
God, the giver and creator of
life. They are coming from the
enemy straight from the pit of
hell.
God gives, and He wants us
to have what He has given us.
You might ask why you must
move to receive what God has.
The best answer that I can give
is that you need to be obedient.
You must be willing to do what
God wants when He wants
it and where He wants. As I


stated last week, moving does
not always mean a physical
move. You might need to move
out of your limited thinking.
You might need to move out of
your unChristlike attitude and
behavior. You might need to
move out of poverty thinking
and mentality and accepting
less than God's best.
My parting words are that
you do not allow yourself to not
receive God's best because you
are comfortable or doubtful or
fearful. Pray and ask Godly
women and men to pray with
you also for God's will. But
other people cannot make the
decision for you to be obedient
to His Will when it is revealed.


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The Reverend J. M\.. \ t I H MAJOR, D. D,, Rector
The Reverend FRED W. FLEISCHER, Organist/Choirmaster

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES
HOLY WEEK 2008
SUNDAY, March 16th
Palm Sunday
8:00 AM The Liturgy of the Palms
with Solemn Outdoor Procession
Led By: The Progressive Marching Band
9:15 AM Solemn Eucharist
with the Reading of the Passion and Sermon:
THE VENERABLE THOMAS BRUTTELL, ARCHDEACON
Diocese of Southeast Florida
MONDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY
March 17th through March 19th
12 Noon The Holy Eucharist
THURSDAY, March 20th
Maundy Thursday
6:30 PM The Holy Eucharist & Stripping of the Altar
FRIDAY, March 21st
Good Friday
12 Noon The Liturgy of the Cross
with the Reading of the Passion & Sermon:
THE REVEREND CYRIL WHITE, ASSOCIATE
St. Faith Episcopal Church, Miami
and St. Cecilia's Choir performing
"Inflannmatus et Acceusus" from Rossinis "Stabat Mater"

EASTERTIDE 2008
SATURDAY, March 22nd
Holy Saturday
3:30 PM Holy Baptism
SUNDAY, March 23rd
Easter Day
5:30 AM The Great Vigil &
Solemn Eucharist of Easter
Music: St. Cecilia's Choir
9:00 AM Procession, Solemn Eucharist and Sermon
4:00 PM Sacred Heart Easter Fashionetta
MONDAY, March 24th
4:00 PM Annual Parish Easter Egg Hunt
www.incaIrnationumnan i o 3rg


- -.u


Consumers of


FLEET PHOSPHO-SODA


or similar oral laxative and colonscopy bowel cleansing products


If you have been diagnosed with


KIDNEY FAILURE
or


KIDNEY DISEASE


after using a laxative or colonscopy bowel movement
cleansing product, please call for a free consultation to discuss your legal rights.



CARLOS A. LOPEZ-ALBEAR, P.A.

1545 S.W. 1 Street, Suite 300

305-644-3217

The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


I














Pastor to the homeless authors first book S ca rp


'Touch: Pressing Against the Wounds of a Broken World'


Before God touched his heart
and transformed his life, Rudy
Rasmus was a businessman
running a "borderline
bordello" in Houston, Texas.
But thousands now know him
as Pastor Rudy, a transformed
leader of a downtown ministry
at St. John's Church that he
and his wife, Juanita, started
to reach out to those who Jesus
called "the least of these."
"Touch: Pressing Against the
Wounds of a Bioken World"
is the amazing true story of
Rudy's life, his response to


God's grace, and his passion
to touch every person with
God's great love. This is a
book of biblical truths and
ministry principles, but more
than that, it's the story of God
using Pastor Rudy and St.
John's Church to reach into
people's deepest fears and
highest hopes and touch
them with God's transforming
love.
"When Jesus walked on
earth, He taught about the
kingdom while He healed the
sick, restored sight to the


blind, and fed the hungry.
Today, we are called to meet
the physical as well as the
spiritual needs of people all
people in our communities.
In fact, hurting and hungry
people won't believe we care if
they only hear our words but
don't see our actions to provide
tangible help for them."
Rudy Rasmus is an urban
messenger and co-pastor
with his wife Juanita at the
St. John's United Methodist
Church in Houston. He
began the church in 1992
with only nine members,
and St. John's has grown to


more than 9,000, members-
3,000 of the members are
currently or were formerly
homeless. The church is one
of the most culturally diverse
congregations in the country.
The church is known for
their infectious hope that
God will change lives. Pastor
Rudy co- founded the St.
John's Academy, which
serves Houston's neediest
children, and Bread of Life,
a non-profit organization
providing a wide range of
services for disadvantaged
individuals and families.
www.pastorrudy.net.


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The Holy Ghost Church of
God will be celebrating their
pastor's, Bishop D.D. Arline,
51st anniversary, convening
March 16 at 11:30 a.m. and
March 17-23. Come out and join
us in this celebration.


A Mission With a New
Beginning, Bishop Eugene
Joyner and congregation invites
you to our Sunday services.


Emmanuel M.B. Church,
Inc. is celebrating their pastor's,
Rev. Dr. W. J. Carpenter, 20th
pastoral anniversary at 7:30 p.m.,
March 17-21, Pre-Anniversary
and March 23 the anniversary
celebration.


Woman to Woman-Heart to
Heat Helpings Hands Ministry
a component of Woman o
Woman is sponsoring "Getting
Healthy and Staying Healthy
Day" at New Way Fellowship
Praise and Worship Center.
Workshop presentations include
problems signs and symptoms
of: Colorectal, Breast and
Ovarian Cancer, Depression
and empowerment to greater
Fitness. All of this is taking
place on March 15 from 8:30
a.m. until 12:30 p.m.


Scott lake Optimist is
seeking young ladies who will
be committed, enthusiastic,
and energetic to join their
cheerleadingstaff. Pleasecontact
Ms. Weems at 305-343-9930 or
Ms. Hicks at 305-474-0030 or


AFRICAN ATTIRE
men,women,children
AFRICAN MOVIES
christian,drama
BLACK ARTWORK
WAK and more
SKINCARE
shea butter,black soaps
oils
SCULPTURE
masks,figurines
JEWELRY
necklaces,rings,bracelets


Name change. God spoke and
in obedience we are pleased to
announce that the new name
He has given our ministry is New
Seventy-ninth Street Word
church Int'l (formerly New
Seventy-ninth Street Baptist
Church), Dr. Robert Young,
Senior Pastor/Teacher.


Christ's Kingdom Life Center
Int'l of Hollywood will host a
class on Altar Ministry Workers
and a workshop on "Unction
to Function. Apostle Leslie
Brown, III Sr. Pastor/Teacher.
Further information contact
305-332-8208 or 954-651-5198.


786-285-0380. Let's go Vikes.


The Booker T. Washington
Sr. High School Class of 1955
will meet 4 p.m., Sat., March
15 at St. Peter's Cathedral. For
additional information, please
call 305-297-1608.


Easter Celebration open to
the public on Saturday, March
15 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
Mayor Manuel Marono, the
City Commission and various
County Commissioners, invite
the residents of Sweetwater to
take part in our annual Easter
Egg Hunt. Free activities for kids
such as face painting, egg hunt
with prizes, popcorn and many
more more. This will take place
at the Jorge Mas Conosa Youth


,Just Black Goods
;:,.


7 t .-^77
373N 7 AVE


786-413-0 774
13743NW 7t" AVE
www.justblackgoods.com


Macedonia M.B. church
South Dade Male Chorus Union
presents its Second Annual
Black & White Ball on Friday,
April 11. Call Anthony Truesdell
at 305-303-2805 for more
information.


God Word God Way Church
of God in Christ invites you
to worship service at 8 p.m.
Thursday, March 13 with Chain
Breakers Deliverance Int'l
Ministry. For information call
783-326-3455.


For I was hungry, and you gave
me something to eat .... Matthew
25:35. The Substance Abuse
Ministry of St. Mathews Free
Will Baptist Church invites you
and your family to share in food
and fellowship during this holy
season on Sat., March 15 from
12 noon to 3 p.m. in the parking

Center located in Sweetwater.
For more information call
305-551-4774.


Miami Edison Ole Timer's
Pep Rally meeting on
Thursday, March 13 in the
school cafeteria from 6:30
p.m.-7:30 p.m. We are looking
for all former cheerleaders, pep
squad, majorettes, flagettes,
color guards, drill team and
band members to attend this
meeting. Contact 305-754-0194
or bingraham@prodigy.net for
more information.


The Booker T. Washington
High School Class of 1963 meets


lot area.


Friends and Family Day at
True Light Church of Jesus
Christ on March 16 at 11 a.m.
Please come and enjoy Jesus
with us.


First Deliverance COGIC,
Elder Cohen invites you to
worship with them at God Word
God Way church of God in
Christ at 7:45 p.m., Wednesday,
March 12. For information call
783-326-3455.


Soul Harvest Creative Praise
Ministries invites you to our
Easter Series Worship Service
staring Sunday, march 9 at 1
a.m. the 16th, 23rd, and 30th.
There will also be an Easter Egg
Hunt on Easter Day after service.
For more information please call
786-285-4697.

on the 3rd Tuesday each month
at 6:30, Allen Chapel. Plans
for the June reunion are being
made, contact E. Williams,
305-696-9684.


On Saturday, March 22 Grace
Academy Int'lwillhold its annual
Open House for prospective
students from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
For more information please
call 305-751-5910.


And the Women Gather
Literary Jazz Brunch will
be held on Saturday, March
29, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information call
305-573-8423.


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Take it from me. You can prevent colon cancer by getting tested.

They check your colon, and if they find a polyp, they remove it before

it becomes cancer.

If you're 50 or older, talk to your doctor about getting tested for colon cancer.
For a free information packet on the different ways you can be tested
call 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org/colon.

Hope. Progress. Answers./1 '800'ACS'2345 / www.cancer.org


-~----~---~---


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OW\N DESTINY


- -11


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15B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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Missionary Evangelist Outreach Center, Inc.


3rd Annual Usher Board



Color Rally


Where: Missionary Evangelist Outreach

Center, Inc.1766 NW 95th Street, Miami,

Florida 33147


When: Friday, March 21, 2008


Time: 7:30pm


Speaker: Pastor Raina L. Kemp of Raina L.

Kemp Ministries, Inc.


Come out and support your favorite color.


Refreshments will be served following the

service.


Directory
.D O'-:


Hosanna Community .
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 561h Street
305-637-4404 Fax: 305-637-4474
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:45 a.m.
Worship.........11 am.
Bible Study. Thursday ..7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Mon-Wed.
6p.m.

Re.CalsLcDnis MNt
S/ eniorPa1trll'l/fLTeacherLjlk~


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 101 Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
E i 'l-,.-., ill


U


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'urId., Pa.,c Mees.: ~ r. T .
S\\ed.. B-tle Su.), y p.r.


931 Street Community \
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30am. Early Morning Worship
11 am. ..Moming Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd Sunday ........6 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study .7 p.m.
website: cmbc.org



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413

Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 am.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.




Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.
305-430-9383
Order of Services
Morning Worshi at 8 & Il a.m.
Sunday School at 9:45 a.m.
Thursday
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Saturday
No Service


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street
305-634-6721 Fax: 305-635-8355
Order of Services
Worship Service Sunday Morning
10a.m. Worship Service (1st Sunday only)
S 7:30 & 11 a.m. (2nd, 3rd, 4th & 5th)Sun.
30 9 1Chumh School -8:30a.m. IsSunday4only
Mid Week Service Wednesday's
Hour of Pwer Noon-Day PRyer 12-1 p.m.
Prayer Meeting. 7:30 a.m.
eaBible Study, 8:15e p.m.



/Faith Evangelistic Praise &N
Worship Center, Intc
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
oil Sun. Morning Worship ........... II a.m.
Tues. Prayer .................... 6 p.m.
SSchool of Wisdom............ 6:30 p.m.
SHealing & Deliverance Serv...7:30p.m.
'q^HI y-^ _WedJSaL Manna (prayer).....5 am.




rMt. Calvary Missionary'
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
il.:,,. ibru Ff, N....n i ,V Prayer
Bibk- Stur. TIa, 7 p.m.
SuJ3dI, ",:,: I '- la.m.
kso-, 0 .A-ml ,1 0 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


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St. Mark Missionary "\
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street
305-691-8861
Order of Services:
Sunday 7:30 and I I a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m.......... Sunday School
Tuesday......... 7 p.m. Bible Study
8 p.m........Prayer Meeting
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
a 12 p.mn.......Day Prayer


/A stolic Re% i' al Center Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc\ Brownsville
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue 1855 N.W. ll9th Street Church of Christ
305-836-1224 305-688-1612 4561 N.W. 33rd Court
Order of Services Fax: 305-681-8719 305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
New time for T.V. Program Order of Services. 305-634-6604
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY Sun...9:30 a.m....(Sunday School) Order of Services
OF iiABi, in nisI .Ocsi cii ai Walk in the Word Ministry Lord Day Sunday School .......9:45am
Sun.9 a.m.-3 p m. Sutinday 5 p.m. Worship Service.... .......11 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship.ItI am.
Wed. Intercessory Pmyer9a.m. 12 p.m. Tuesday....7 p.m....Family Night Sunday LadiMen's Bible Study ....5 p.m.
SMorning Service.................. 11 a.m. Wed.. II a.m..Intercessory Prayer Sunday Evening Worship.......6 p.m.
Sun. Eve. Worship ...........7:30 p.m. Wed. Bible Class....12p.m. Tuesday Night Bible Study ....7:30pm
Tues.- PBiyer Meetingudy........7:30 p.m. Wed. Bible Class. 7 p.m Thursday Morning Bible Class I I a.m.
Fri..- Bile Study ............7:30p.m.W .b. ITransportation available Call:
\dimlW...W 7


First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-635-8053 Fax: 305-635-0026
Order of Services:
S Sunday................ 7:30 & II a.m.
Sunday School............... 10 a.m.
,Thursday..........7 p.m. Bible Study,
Prayer Meeting, B.T.U.
Baptism Thurs. before
First Sun..7 p.m.
Communion First Sn........
7:30 & II a.m.



Mt. Zion A.M.E. Church-
15250 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-681-3300
m Order of Services
Sunday
Worship Service ..............I1 n.I
Monday
ibe Study 7:, 1.n.
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 7 p.m.
"There i. n place for you"



Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68" Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3,4,5"' Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service .1...1:00 am
^ ^ l Communion Service
I (nturs before 1" Sunday) 7:30 pm
ii Prayer Meeting/Bible Study




/- Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3" Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8544
Order of Services:
Sunday School........... 9:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning SerIvs... I a.Im..
4' San..l.BTU.... 1:30-2:30 p.m.
iueisday. .Bible Study
Feeding Ministry.tO a.m.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer..6:30 p.m.
SThurs. Outreach Ministry....6:30 p.mr


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
www.r'cndshipmlbcmia.org
frriendshippraycr@ betlsouth.nt
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
l O dror rf cniri
P.,i ,, it .. Pn .
I I a *. m .
Sjl" P I l... l "lp .' i .m .

Wednesday........ a.m.- p.m.



New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Church School...............10 a.m.
Worship Service .............. 11:15a.m.
Tuesdays-Bible Chlass..............7p.m.
4th Sunday Evening Worship.....6 p.m.

Pasto Aro ILE Ru~ rts Sr.


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
SSunday School............. 9 a.m.
NBC ............................10:05 a.m .
Worship ..................11 am.
W worship ......................... 4 p.m.
[^.,l Mission and Bible Class
^Kua^B Tuesday ...............6:30 p.m.
SYouth Meetin.g./Choir rehearsal
Monday ...........6:30 p.m.


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
Srdr of Services:
S I ... .. W rsi..otip.lIst & 3rd Sunll.
P II I ...... ship .. l ............. I a ,
o ,i .. M ini., ir.. ............ 6 1)0 | .
..... ... ........ ........ 7:30 I.
\.' .:,,',' ;lgWWWWillllT m/


/ Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m. ."'
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. 9 a.m.
Conicast Channels: 8,19,21,22,23,30 & 37/Local Channels: 21 & 22
Web page: ww-w.pe broke prkhch1 fChristicom Iunil: pIaiibrokeparkcox rbcll.toutih.net


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
la.... y Morning Services
S Schlool............. 10 a.I .
... I.p Service......... a.m.
I i ay e Bible Study.. ii8 p.m.
I bi.. dlt, Prayer Service....8 pImu


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

Order of Services:
Bible Study Wed................8 pum.
Sundi y School ................ 10 a.lu
Sun. Worship Serv........ 1:30 a.m.
Wed. Night hntercessory Prayer
yfrom i7:30 to 8 p.lm.
Stiiday Worship Sers'icc..6:30 p.m,.


MLHeron AIE. Church
17800 NW 25th Ave.
www.mthermonworshipcenter.org
305-621-5067 Fax: 305-623-3104


Order of Services:
Sunday Worship Services:
7 a.m. & 10 a.m.
Church School: 8: 30 a.m.
Wednesday
Pastor's Noon Day Bible Study
Bible Institute, 6:30 p.m.
Mid-week Worship 7:30 p.m.


Me.Dma. lma-sE.Gr aso


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Moring ...........8 am.
Sunday School.............10 a.m.
Suaii.,] E erL rg ............. 6 p.m.
T :Bita n( .........7:30p.m.
T1hr. Felh,,,' .hip. 10 a.m.
IsI Sun So,.,n Practice ..6 p.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.951' Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
I Early Morning Worship 7:30 a.m.
A Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
L. X Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
STuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Tues. beforethe IstSun...7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship




/ St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3" Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
....Worship .....7:30 a.m.
Sound ,\ School ..........9:30 a.m.
M..-n ng Worship ... a.m.
''.t for Baptist Chutrches
B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
E r i.g Worship ......7 p.m.
_Mcei .n. ........(Tues.) 7 p.m.



f/' Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
i Sunday School .............9:30 a.m.
Morning Praise/Worship .. 11 a.m.
Firstand Thid Sunday
I Evening orlship at 6 p.m.
I Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
II Tuesday 7 | tp.m.
Srnin W r.i. "ip l3.-1 0 -836-83.- .


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


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17B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


! I I


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
MARVA BROWN, 48, died
Mar. 9. Survi-
vors include:
sons, Andre
(Kameelah).
Marion and Ant- I
wan Brown, fa-
ther, Thomas
(Charlie Mae) Al-I
bury Jr.; sisters,
Miranda Y., Montrese Albury and
Marlene (Marvin) Lewis; grand-
mother, Mary Ferrell; grandson,
Marion Tyrone Brown Jr; un-
cle, Vincent (Beverly) Albury, lov-
ing companion, Frazier Smith and
a host of loving nephews, nieces,
cousins and friends.
Family will receive friends on
Thursday, March 13 from 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. at 21111 N W 32 Ave,
Miami Gardens, Florida. The final
rites will be held at The Historic
St. Agnes Episcopal Church, 1750
N.W. 3 Avenue, Miami, Florida on
March 14 at 11 a.m. Inernment at
Dade Memorial Cemetery. Ar-
rangements by Hall, Ferguson and
Hewitt Mortuary.

LILLIAN BROOKS, 88, died Mar.
5 at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 10:30
a.m. at Sinai
MBC.





GEORGE KING, 82, died Mar. 6
at North Shore .-.
Medical Center.
Service 11 a.m. -
Sat. Mar. 15
at Pilgrim rest
MBC.



CATHERINE ROUNDTREE, 87,
died Mar. 6 at, 3
home. Service
11 a.m. Sat. Mar.
15 at Triumph
the Church and
Kingdom, 6825
N.W. 20 Ave.



KEISHA BRUNSON, 35, died Mar.
3 at Jackson
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m. Sat.
Mar. 15 at Anti-
och of Browns-
ville MBC.




CLARENCE JONES, 52, died
Mar. 4 at home.
Service 1 p.m.
Sat. Mar. 15 at
Revival Taber-
nacle Assenibly
of God. -


KEYON MOORE, died Mar. 4. Ser-
vice 2 p.m. Sat. .-
at New Bethel
MBC.


MAVIS DAVIS, 87, died Mar. 4 at
Memorial Re-
gional Medical
Center. Service -1
was held.





FANNIE MAE FRANCES, 56, died
Mar 8 at home.
Services incom-
plete.






LAVERN MITCHELL, 55, died
Mar. 3 in Winter Haven, Fl. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat. Mar. 15 at Mt.
Olivette MBC.


Range
RUTH BROOKS, 80, died Mar.
8. Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Willie; three
daughters,
Meka Mathews,
Shelda and Re-
gina Brooks; sis-
ter, Lela Diggs;
brother, Alfred
allen and a host of other relatives
and friends. Service 2 p.m. Sat. at
54th Street Ministry.-

Wright & Young 2
MARIE BURGESS STEPHENS,
63, died Mar. 9
at home. Suir-
vivors include:
husband, Arthur;
children, Andrea
Kelly, Marlo
Stephens; sitb-
lings, Maureen
Waters, Mar-
vell and roosevelt Burgess, and
granddaughter Danielle O'Neal.
Service 1 p.m. Mar. 15 at Allen
Temple A.M.E. Church.


Richardsong.

MARY J. JOHNSON, 65 died.
Service 10 a.m.
Sat. at Browns-
ville Church of
Christ.





IVY MILLS, 94, died Mar. 4.


Alphonso Richardson
HENRY PERNELL HOSEA, 45,
died Mar 7.
Survivors in-
clude: sons,
Noah, Domnic,
Keenan and
craig; daugh-
ters, alexis,
Paris, Faith and
Barbara; par-
ents George and Barbara Hosea
King; sisters, Frankie Campbell
and Francina Jones and a host of
relatives and friends.
Viewing 4 to 8 p.m. Friday in the
chapel, 3790 N.W. 167 Street,
Miami Gardens. Service 3 p.m.
Saturday at Cosmopolitan Baptist
Church, 3003 N.W. 207 Street,
Miami Gardens. Service under the
direction of Alfonso M. Richardson
Funeral Services, 305-625-7177.

Eric S. George. -

SHAWN EDWARDS, 34, died
Mar.6. Service 10a.m. Sat. Mar.15
at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Hal-
landale Beach.

NATHANIEL HUNTER, 92 died
Mar. 3 Service 11 a.m Sat. Mar. at
Bible Baptist Church in Miami.

JOHN WILLIAMS, 63 aka "Billy"
or "Playboy" died Mar. Service
1 p.m. Sat. at Ebenezer Baptist
Church in Hallandale Beach.

Manker.-
ARUDBELL ROKER, 92 died
Mar. 6 at Miami
Shores Medical
Center. Grave-
side service 11
a.m. Thursday
at Forest Lawn
Central.


MIRIAM EDITH JONES, 70, died
Mar. 5 at Miami
Jewish Home
Nursing Center.
Service 11 a.m.
Sat at Star Light
Holy Temple
Church.



ANNIE M. JACKSON, 74, died
Mar. 5 at Jackson North Medical
Center. Service was held.

BRIDGETTE K. JONES, 36, died
Mar. 5 at Mercy Medical Center.
Service 1 p.m. Wed. at St. Luke
M.B. Church.


JOIN THE


by becoming a member of our tr CfibEtoi
CALL 305-694-6210


Poitier
ZAMARIA DIAMOND MERRELL,
three months,
died March 3 at
Miami children
Hospital. ser-
vice 11:30 a.m.
today in the
chapel.


HAROLD COLBERT, 57, died
Mar. 8 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice Friday 1
p.m.




FILSTIN AUGUSTIN, 80, died
Mar. 9. Service
10 a.m. Sat at .
St. James Cath- .
olic Church.





SYRINTHIA WEST, 42, died Mar.
7 at Northshore
Medical Cen-
ter. Service 11
a.m. Sat. at
Zion Hope Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.


CONNIE GALA
Mar 7 at Jack-
son Memorial
Hospital. Ser-
vice Sat. at New
Shiloch Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church, time to
be announced.


LEVEL. 48. died


WILLIE WALKER, 73, died Mar. 6
at Franco Nursing Home. Service
3 p.m. Sat. in
the chapel.







GLADYS LOUISE PRATT, 84,
died Mar. 1 at
Jackson North
Medical Center.
Service was
held.





Royale
CHARLES JOHNSON, 84, died
Mar. 2. Services
1 p.m. Sat at;
Cosmopolitan
Baptist Church.

| I


GALE MUIRHEAD-MATHIAS,
39, died Mar. 1. Remains were
shipped to Montego Bay, Jamica
for final rites.

IRMA DAVIS, 55, died Feb.28. Re-
mains were shipped to New York
for final rites.

FREDDIE FIELDS, 78, died Mar.
3. Service was held.

BENJAMIN HENRY CAMPBELL,
77, died Mar. 7. Remains will be
shipped to Turks & Caicos Island.

RACHEL SAMUEL, 86, died Mar.
7. Arrangements are pending.

Hadley
EVERLENA THOMPKINS, 66,
died Feb 23 at Cedars Hospital.
Service was held.

Mitchell2 ..
HOMER LAWYER SR., 86, died
at home Mar. 5.
Memorial Mar
15, 5:30 pm.
in the chapel.
Service will be
held 11 a m.
Sat. at Holy Re-
deemer Catholic
Church.

Rock of Ages2
VAUGHN HOWARD, 46, died
Mar. 6. Service will be held Sat-
urday.


E.A Stevens&2
ALMETASIMMONS PALMER, 72,
died Mar. 9 at Memorial Regional.
Arrangements are incomplete.

SYLVESTER T. EDISON, 57, died
Mar. 8 at Memorial Regional. Ser-
vice 11 a.m. Sat. at Mt. Pleasant
AME Church.

Nakia Ingraham
AARON HAYES SR., 59, died
Mar. 8. Service
11 a.m. Sat.
Mar. 15 at Good
NewsaLittle River
Baptist Church
495 N.W. 77 St.
in Miami.



Carey Royal Ram'n
NOOR MUHAMMAD QURESHI,
64, died, Mar. 8 at Westside Re-
gional Medical Center. Service
held Monday at Forest Lawn.

CLARENCE HENDERSON, 35,
died Mar. 8 at home. Service Sat.
in Jacksonville, Florida.

WILLIAM COATES, 56, died Mar.
10 at South Miami Hospital. Seer-
vice Sat. in Deluth, Georgia.

Jay
GLORIA DARDEN, 60, died Mar.
6 at home. Ser-
vice 1 p.m. Sat.
at Glendale
Baptist Church.





WANDA LOWTHER HUGHES,
52, died Mar.
7 at Jackson
South Commu-
nity Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.
Sat at Sweet
Home M.B.C.1


NAOMI SIMMONS, 86, died Mar.
7 at home. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.
Sat at Greater
Freewill Baptist
Church.




SUSAN TOWNSEND, 82 died at
home on Mar. 9. Service incom-
plete.


MIN. JEAN B. SANDERS, 54,
business owner and pastoral
assistant, died on Saturday,
March 8, A celebration of life
will be held 2 p.m. Saturday,
March 15 at Bethel Apostolic
Temple, 1855 N.W. 119 Street,
Miami, Fl.
Viewing Friday 6 p.m. at the
church. 'Absent from the body,
present with the Lord.' Praise
the Lord. Entrusted to Mitchell
Funeral Home.


Honor


Your Loved


One


Witli a


memorial


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ANDREW JAMAIL HILL
08/05/1985 03/11/2007

If tears could build a
stairway, and memories build
a lane, I'd walk right up to
heaven, and bring you home
again. Andrew was a son that
will never be forgotten, he will
always be loved by his family,
we miss him each and every
day, when God's plan unfold
one day, we shall know why
our angel has been taken
away, so rest in peace!
Rev. Amos and First Lady
Hill, parents, sisters, Amy,
Abigail and Brittany

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


RUTHA MAE PARMER
03/12/1925 01/18/2007

Happy 83rd Birthday,
Mother.
The Parmer family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,
liM iil ,lilM E ... -- .' M ilt i. ,


SHEILA
McCARTNEY HAGANS
03/14/1924 07/06/2006

Although we love and miss
you, we will always keep you
near and dear in our hearts,
gone but not forgotten.
Love, your children, grand
and great grandchildren

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


KARON PATRICK MOORE
03/30/1987 03/12/2007

It's been a year since God
called you home. We love and
miss you.
The Heart and Moore
family

Grace5-
JACK RAY, 51, died Mar. 7. Ser-
vice 1 p.m. Sat. Mar. 15 at House
of God Church of the Living God.


Death Notice


JOYCE STANLEY, 74, died
March 7 in New York. She was
a member of Booker T. Wash-
ington Class of 1951. Survi-
vors include: two daughters;
three sons, three grandchil-
dren, three great grand-chil-
dren; sister, Barbara Brooks
and brother Bennie Taylor.
Funeral service 6:30 p.m.
March 15 at Emmanuel SDA
Church in Bronx, New York.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


PATRICK 'PINT' PAYTON
03/12/1982 06/22/2001

Our loving son, brother,
uncle, grandson, nephew
cousin and friend whom we
all truly love and miss. Happy
26th Birthday!
Your family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


It's been three long years
since you've been gone. Your
love will always be with us.
Your loving memories will
always remain in our hearts.
Your family the Pollocks.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


HAROLD L. CHARLOW
03/10/30 03/08/02


Gone but not forgotten. We
miss you sadly. Your loving
son, Frederick; daughter,
Sandra, grandchildren and
great grand-children.

Card of Thanks
The family of the late Jeremiah
Jerome Rock would like to thank
all of you for your support and
kind words. Special thanks to
Poitier Funeral Home and staff,
Pastor Eustace Clarke St,
Associate Pastor Gerald Jones,
Dwayne Pratt and The Senior
Choir of Church of God of
Prophecy #2 (Ridgeway)
Mother Celestine Dean Rock


Death Notice


LEE R. POLLOCK SR.
11/08/52 -03/15/05









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


18B THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


Hu filter fears tears of kidne dialysis patient


."Copyrightd Material


Syndicated Content *


Available from Commercial News Providers"







SPioneer Miami librarian dies in Michigan

i Pioneer Miami librarian dies in Michigan


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Apostolic revival Center
The congregation of the
Apostolic Revival Center
invites you to praise God with
them as they celebrate their
38th Church Anni-versary.
The theme will be "Celebrating
the manifold excellence of
God" services will begin March
18-23 at 7:30 p.m. nightly.
We are praising God for
his many blessings and the
outpouring of the Holy Ghost
upon this ministry. God has
blessed Dr. Smith in his
evangelistic endeavors to
establish churches in over 195
churches on four continents.
They include: Fort Myers, DR. AND MRS.


38 church anniversary
Florida, North, South,
and Central America, the
Caribbean Islands, and East
S". Africa.
This year we are especially
thankful that God has blessed
us to bring the gospel the
Maasai people of Kenya. Along
. with drill-ing two water wells to
E. bring water to these indigenous
people. The wells have brought
new life and prosperity to their
churches and school.
We will continue our
celebration on Saturday, March
22 with a fellowship dinner at
theHyattHotel. Forreservations
G.S. SMITH call 954-558-8444.


Chapter 220 celebrates 34 anniversary


The members of Noble
Lady Zethel 220. order of
Eastern Star, affiliated with
International F & A.M. Masons
Inc., will celebrate their 34th
anniversary Sunday, March
16 at New Providence Baptist
Church located at 760 N.W. 53
Street, 4 p.m.
They will honor


Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson, retired Football
tight-end player with the
Miami Dolphins and Kansas
City Chiefs, Sterling Ferguson,
housing developer. We invite
all Masons and Stars and all
present and former members
and visiting friends. Minister
Torence Poole (15 yrs. old) will


Pastor's Anniversary celebration
St. Matthew Missionary
Baptist Church, 3616 Day Ave.
Coconut Grove, will celebrate
their pastor, Bishop Willie J.
Leonard 25th anniversary,
March 12-March 16. On March
12 at 7:30 p.m., Community
Baptist Church, Rev. Ronald
Smith, pastor.
March 13 at 7:30 p.m., Sweet-
field Baptist Church, Rev. J. L.
Sandurs, pastor.
March 14 at 7:30 p.m., Mt.
Nebo Baptist Church, Rev.
Emanuel Whipple, pastor.
March 16 at 4 p.m., St. John
A.M.E. Church, Rev. Gregory
Gay, pastor. BISHOP WILLIE LEONARD


be preaching, the dynamic
Youth Choir of Providence
under the direction of Mrs.
Carol Poole will be in charge of
the song service. Rev. Vinson
Davis is the pastor.
Come praying and rejoicing
in the Lord, and dine with
#220. Sister Zethel Surrency
is the Worthy Matron.


Leadership revival at

Zion Church of God

There will be a 'Leadership
Revival' at Zion Church of God
of Florida City, 1055 Redland
Road, March 12 to 16, 7:30
p.m., Wednesday to Friday and
Sunday at 11 a.m. Evangelist
Reverend Zachary Bouie, Elder
W. Ferguson, Pastor.


Lugusta Tyler Colston, a
former prominent Miami died
on Tuesday, February 26 in
Southfield, Michigan. Born in
Lexington, Kentucky;November
23, 1911, she attended Wiley
college in Marshall, Texas and
received a Bachelor of arts
Degree in Library Science and
continued graduate studies
at Wayne State University in
Detroit, Michigan. She moved
to Miami in 1938 and accepted
the position of Librarian at
Booker T. Washington Sr. High
School where she remained
until her retirement in 1970.
She was preceded in death
by her husband of 61 years,
Dr. nathaniel Colston,w ho
had a successful medical
practice in Liberty city until
his retirement.
Colston, loved to help others in
whatever way she could and she
unselfishly helped to educate
many young people who needed
financial assistance. In 1966,
she became an active dedicated
and committed volunteer with
the Miami-Dade County Unit of
the American Cancer Society,
was appointed chairperson
of the -minority involvement
committee and was fondly
called "Miss Cancer." She was
honored and received a plaque


Death Notice


AUBREY K. POOLE, 50,
died March 9 at VA Hospital.
Viewing Friday 5-9 p.m. at
Manker Funeral Home.
Service 11 a.m. Saturday at
93 Street Community Baptist
Church. Interment Florida
National Cemetery.


Death Notice

LENA HOOD, 73, died Mar. 7
at home. Viewing Friday 5
to 9 p.m. at Mt. Aaron Baptist
Church. Service 2 p.m.
Saturday.
Interment at Dade North.


for 20 years of dedicated service
to the organization.
Much of her time was spent in
organizations and committees
that would benefit the black
community. She was an active
member of Delta Sigma Theta


~
L


LUGUSTA TYLER COLSTON

Sorority, Miami Alumnae
Chapter; a founding member
of the Greater Miami Chapter
of Links, Inc.; the auxiliary to
the the Dade County Chapter
of the national Medical
Association, the auxiliary to
the Florida State Dental and
Pharmaceutical Association;
the Alpha Wives; the Martin


Happy Birthday


LEROY 'BUTCH' BUSH
03/16/1950 03/01/2008

Your loving daughter Kati-
na, sons, Vernon, Terrell and
Marvyn, sister Joann, loving
niece Alicia and the entire
Bush family


Luther King Neighborhood
Association; the Dade County
Retired Teachers Association
;a nd the Miami International
Alumni Council of the United
Negro College Fund.
Colston and her husband
were stalwart members of
St. James African Methodist
Episcopal Church and were
active in the rebuilding of the
church in the 1960's. She re-
located to Southfield, Michigan
in 2001 and resided at the
Heritage, an assisted living
residence until her death.
She is survived by four
nieces: Veralee Wells (Charles),
Eresteen Williams,. Mary
Louise Henry and Barbara
Carter (Dozier) and a nephew,
Erman Fisher (Ruby), nineteen
grand nieces and nephews,
and many friends in Miami
and Detroit.
A memorial service will
be held on Saturday, March
15th at the Swanson Funeral
Home, Northwest Chapel
14751 West McNichols Road,
Detroit, Michigan 48235.
The interment will be held
in Lexington, Kentucky at a
later date. Donations in her
memory imay be made to the
Dade County Chapter of the
American Cancer Society.


Death Notice


JAMES R. 'BIG SLIM'
SALES, 80, died Mar. 7.
Serive 3:30 p.m. Sat. Mar.
15 at Grace Church of The
Nazarene.


* -


Honor Your Loved One

With an In Memoriam in The Miami Times


10936 NORTHEAST 6TH AVENUE
305-757-9000 FAx: 305-757-3505
We offer pre-arrangements


Bii)(riiim~^.-* Ri*' M R NC SID A HNoi 'E


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The Miami Times

Lifesty es


FASHION HiP Hop Music FOOD DINING ARTS & CULTURE PEOPLE


SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 12-18, 2008 THE MIAMI TIMES


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL TI-EIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


a4-m a,

ByD.Rcard CraC


The first day in March exchange of
registered the wedding of marriage vows,
Betty Jean Washington and rings, prayer, Holy
Bruce Edward Flanagan, at Communion, and
New Birth Cathedral of Faith Charles Floyd,
International with Bishop Jr. playing The
Victor T. Curry, presiding. Lord's Prayer on
Pastel colors were chosen by his flute, followed
the bride and groom with the by the presentation of Mr.
men wearing black tuxedos and Mrs. Bruce Flanagan.
with assessories of blue, The wedding party
green, beige, lavender, and ptoceeded to the
gold that matched the gowns banquet room for
worn by the -bridesmaids. the reception and
The processional began celebration with
with the entrance of the Sabrina Adams, as
officiant, groom and best the emcee.
man Leon Johnson, followed As the bridal party
by the musical, So High for entered, the guest
bridesmaids and groomsmen stood and greeted CU
Katrina Flanagan and each person when
Eric Washington, Queira his or her name was
Jackson and Fredrick called. When the bride
Washington, Tiffany and groom entered,
Williams and Larry they executed the
Washington. first dance, followed
With the playing by the blessing of
of For Always, other the food, toasts (best
members of the bridal man and maid of
party entered the honor), while Charles
edifice, Annie Mae Floyd Jr. entertained,
Washington, matron NEWBOLD along with Queiera
of honor, and Barbara Jackson.
Forde, maid of honor; The highlight of the
Amarina Evans and Chelsey reception included the bride
Lawhorne, flower girls; and dancing with her son and
Dwayne Williams, ring the groom dancing with his
bearer. daughter denoting a great
Then the bride family affair and a
stepped out of her joyous occasion never
white limousine to be forgotten, while
escorted by her son, the bride took the
Termaine Williams. time to thank Bishop
She was delightful in Curry, Bernice
a tiara, mini-veil, and Washington, Floyd
earrings that matched Jr., Terrance Gibson,
her necklace, and long DJ, and Nadine Gay-
gloves. As she walked PINKNEY Bendroff for a job
as beauty in the night, well-done on the first


the guests rose to salute her
as she reached each pew. A
huge smile told it all. She
was immensely joyous as she
reached her groom, while the
music, From Now On filled
the room.
The ceremony included


day of March.

Dr. Dorothy J. Fields,
founder, Elizabeth
Williams,; executive director,
Gwendolyn Welters,
chairperson, and members
of The Black Archives held


0GI


ByAnna rac S --tiU


On 7th Avenue at N.W. 62nd
Street. (Southeast corner)
there is a huge advertising
featuring "Northwestern High
School Bulls" football team
and a huge "Bull" letting
everyone know through
"scholarship and sports" the
students are succeeding. Your
community remains proud of
you! Continue to excel Bulls!
Former students and friends
of Lugusta Colston are sorry
to learn of her demise in
Detroit, Michigan last week.
Mrs. Colston was a former
librarian at Dear Old B.T.W.
High School and the wife of
Dr. Nathaniel Colston.
Also dying last week 99 year
old lona Holmes. Ms. Holmes
died Feb. 27, 2008 at Villa


Marie Nursing
Home. i
Get Well Wishes
to "All of you"
Gail Sweeting-
Gee, Denesia.
Bethel Harris,
Mae Hamilton-


IB*9-*


Clear, Janet Clear, Doris M.
Pittman, Inez McKinney-
Johnson, Frances Brown,
Doris Duty, Israel 'Sholders'
Milton, Joyce Major-
Hepburn, Tyeasa Robinson,
Willie 'Baldy' Thomson,
Lillian S. Richardson,
Roslyn Davis and Leila
Yvette O'Berry.
Dorothy 'DaDa' Saunders
is in New York City visiting he
ailing sister (B.T.W. class of
48) Evelyn Heild is quite ill.


an important meeting, last the way for their children
Tuesday, in the meeting room effectively.


I
I


Friends were saddened to
learn of Ms. Iona Holmes
demise last week. Although
she lived to be "99" if you knew
her you would have thought
she was "50". Rest In Peace.
Saint Agnes will miss you!
Congratulations to William
A. and Ethelyn P. Hamilton
who are celebrating their
50th wedding anniversary on
March 25th 2008. William
and Ethelyn have returned
from Atlanta, Georgia where
they visited their children
Laura Lynn Dixon, William
III and their families.
Michael Jackson,
Neverland Ranch will be put
up for sale at a public auction
next month unless Michael
pays the more than $24
million he still owes on the
property.
Elouise Bain-Farrington
celebrated her 85th Birthday
in elegant style Saturday,
March 1st with some of her


-~- Bishop Curtis was a
legend during his time
and he brought a vision
from Cat Island which
allowed him to make a
significant impact on
South Florida, while
Pinkney emulated
FIELDS him in statue,
FIELDS knowledge, and r


of the organization.
The agenda included
The 2008 Book of Life,
nomination forms,
and prospective
nominees.
Supporting
the agenda with
verbal contributions
came from Dr. Enid
Pinkney, Leome
Culmer, Bonnie Newb,
Stirrup, Maude Newbo
Dorothy Graham, Glo
J. Green, Dr. E
Braynon, And)
Thorton-Pelt, and
Richard J. Strach;
It is imperative tl
nominees visit
office (located
the Caleb Buildi
to add your fam
IRRY to the records
the Book of Life
contributions made by y(
family in South Florida a
important dates, such
birthdays, family reunio
significant accomplishmer
photocopies of certificate
letters, articles, program
birth certificates, chui
registration or plaques.
So, you have until
October to get the
facts into the office.
And, of course, the
big day is Sunday,
November 9, when
you and your family
will be recognized,
especially naming
a street after your
family for what they
did to improve South Florii


Speaking of Dr. Enid
Pinkney, she was recognize
recently in Miami Garde
Church of God of Prophecy
19th Ave. where her religic
roots got started as she joir
her parents, Bishop Her
Curtis and mother to 1
founding church in Overto
on 17th St. and 5th Ave., alo
with Evangelist Mary C
and Isadora D. Strachu
The three of them pav


AMN


the Heritage and, more
at importantly, founder of the
ng) HistoricHamptonFoundation,
iily and many more.
of In addition, members of the
for root church are proud of their
our accomplishments, Bishop
Lnd George and Idella Knowles,
as Bishop Arthur and Maebell
ns, Wilson, Bishop Eustace and
its, Emily Clarke, Bishop Lloyd
tes, and Pauline Pratt, and the
ms, late Bishop Rufus Gilbert,
rch Bishop J. D. Williams Rev.
Harold Smiley, Kenneth
Curtis, Aundrea
Curtis, and Rose
Curtis. Congrats!


4 It was reported that
S Dr. James H. Ammons,
President, Florida A &
M University, and Dr.
REED Trudie Kibbe Reed,
President, Bethune-
da. Cookman University, met and
made a pact to continue the
Florida Classic in Orlando
C. as long as necessary. This
zed news came after Steve Hogan,
ns' Executive Director, Florida
on Citrus Sports, reported Walt
)us Disney World will not be a
led sponsor for the Classic this
iry coming year.
the Hogan assured the president
wn that lucrative sponsors are in
>ng line to sponsor the Florida
'ox Classic, because it brings
an. 30-million dollars to Orlando,
red' along with over 100,000 fans


many friends and family in
attendance. The birthday
celebration was given by her
two darlings (her children)
Janis Saunders and Morris
Farrington. Happy! Happy!
Elouise!
Congratulations to Dade
County's top teachers
Jacqueline Sconiers who
received as a gift a "Toyota
Corolla" for having been
selected Miami-Dade Greatest
for 2008. She works with
students at Miami Dade
Juvenile Detention Center.
Wedding Anniversary
Greetings to all of you! Fred
W. (Eva M.) Johnson, March
2 is their 57th; and Horace
(Bertha) Johnson, March 6 is
their 43rd.
$aint Scholastica's Chapter
of Episcopal church women
cordially invites you to attend
their 30th Annual Youth
Observance Sunday, March
30, 2008 at 10:45 am. Guest


being assertive.
Her assertiveness
engendered her to
establishing The
Church of the Open
Door, The African
American Committee
of Dade' Heritage,
President of Dade


from all over the world. It is
also the biggest family reunion
consisting of tailgate parties,
hotels and share-time home
parties, battle of the bands,
and bragging rights for each
team. Please do not forget
how the late Dr. Johnny L.
Jones, Dr. Solomon Stinson,
Robert Edwards, Dr. Everett
Abney, Alfonso Oates, Fred
Young, Dr. Richard
J. Strachan, Roland
Raiford, and Samuel
Rogers, established
The Central Florida
Classic back in the
70's pitting BC-C
against a quality team
and bringing a crowd
IONS of 20,000 fans at the
same bowl. The vision
was that of Dr. Jones, who
will never be forgotten.


Black History for the month
of February gave Cooperative
Charter School the
opportunity to perform for the
community, last Monday; Ojus
Elementary, last Thursday;
and Flamingo Elementary,
last Friday. Students at those
schools, as well as parents
at those school never ceased
applauding the knowledge
of Black History delivered by
those students that
had speaking parts.
Some of them included
Shalay Answer "
Kokou, emcee, Ronald
McGhee, The Scavella -
sisters, Denise Hart,
singing; Anthony
Boatwright, Jr., Ki
delivering one of Dr.
Martin L. King, Jr.
speeches; Muriel Thomson
and Shadaye Williams and the
cheerleaders; Jaylin Martir,
Vincent Brown, Marquile
Thompson, Alexander
Givens, Jimmy Boatwright.
Joel Carridad, and the Men
in Black group.
Students at Ojus and
Flamingo Elementaries gave
them a standing ovation
during and completion of
the performance, especially
zeroing in on highlights of

Speaker: Sharria Winette
Scavella, a fifth generation
member of St. Agnes. She is
the daughter of Winston and
Gloria Scavella and sister of
Arthur Scavella.
Lemuel R. Moncur was in
Santo Domingo, Dominican
Republican for a meeting last
week with the committee of
the young adults ministry for
the Episcopal Church. Lemuel
is the son of Margaret Moncur
and the grandson of Lemuel


4









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Main Office ..........................................305-694-6210

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Business Office ........................................305-694-6218


_I


Dr. King's life; duplicating
slavery songs; and naming
items invented by slaves; and
closing out with a "rap.
Now, the third graders will
buckle down in preparation
for the FCAT test they have
been preparing for, while the
others will be completing
the Florida Writers test and
assessment tests supervised
by test chairperson, Leroy
Wright. So, if you want to know
more about Black History,
the students at Cooperative
Charter will be more than
obliging. Call 305-693-2542


Kudos go out to Teddy
Harrell, Jr., founder, Andre'
L. Gainey, co-founder, and
other members of the African
American Performing .Arts
Community Theatre, Inc.
(AAPACT) for providing the
community with a play, Stories
About The Old Days, which
was presented at the Wendell
Narcisse Theatre, 6161 NW
22nd Ave., last weekend. And,
of course, it will close the last
weekend in March.
This fantastic piece was
written by Bill Harris,
starring John Pryor and
Gail Willingham. The two
outstanding actors kept the
audience on the edge
of their seats as they
reminisce about the
"good ole days" and
what transpired.
Pryor is well-known in
Miami as a graduate
from North Dade SR.-
Jr. High School and
graduated from Miami-
Dade, FAMU, and U
of Miami. He also taught
theatre at Miami-Dade for
34-years until he retired. He
starred in many plays at The
M Emsemble.
Willingham is a local
playwright, director, and
starred in several plays on
the national level. She once
starred in Romeo and Juliet at
the Dallas Children's theatre.
Please plan to see this
unique production before the
end of March.

and Florence Moncur.
Congratulations to
Matriarch Mrs. Rebecca
Bullard-Bethel whom is
100 years younger. She is
the mother of the Late John
Bullard; the grandmother of
Johnyce and John Bullard,
Jr.; and great grandmother
of four. Mrs. Bethel's picture
was on the cover of last week's
"Tropical Life". She is a life
long member of Saint Mary's.
Wesleyan Methodist Church.


~'fi~s~d~


*Includes Florida sales tax











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


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SPINGnom


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The Adrienr= Arsrt Crrter ann Amerc.'An Epr~= present
A MUSICAL EVENING WITH MARTIN SHORT
Star of Broadway, movies and TV. "Short is the complete
entertainment package." -Vtanpr Far
7 PM Knight Concert Hall $15. $4.0. 50. $65


ConcE.rienl A~:,': r f Florida presents
STATE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OF RUSSIA
Mark Goienstein, Conductor
Denis Matsuee Piano
Fchaikovsky Three Pieces from The Snow Maiden
Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C majoi
Rachmaninofi Symphony No. 2 in E minor
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $18. $48. S81. $120


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The Tony Award-Winning Musical starring ihe eniiie
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"The laughs come at breakneck speed' The jokes fly b, so last
you'll wish you could hil rewind!' -4:..: .,reP re:
See the Miami premiere of one of New York's longesi-running
Tony Award-winning hits. This wickedly funny roasi of Broacja,
musicals features outrageous costumes, hilarious l',rnc sirfling
Broadway's best songs, and madcap impressions cl your
lavorile Broadway stars.
7:30 PM Carnival Sluatio Theater $50
Colnrert A-. socniror, i' Floindci pri '.-eni
PINK MARTINI with The Miami Pops Orchestra
Hugely popular 'vocal group whose music is part French
chanson, Argentine tango and soft merengue with a dash ot
low-lit jazz lounge.
8 PM Knight Concert Hall $25. $65. $1)05

FORBIDDEN BROADWAY PREVIEW
5 PM $50
8 PM $75
Cairrival Studio Theater
E ,,-7ellI ,'C F, ,l ,.P ,-,.-- p re-s n-,l -
GLORIA GAYNOR AND MAGGIE CARLES
Gloria Gaynor creator of great disco hits like I Will Surv,,.e' anid
"You Never Said Goodbye, will be sharing the stage with
international singer Magqge Caries, nicknamed La \,o;Z ith.
voice)
8 30 PM Zin Ballet Opera House
$73 30, $8-4, $94 70. $105.40. $217 75

FORBIDDEN BROADWAY PREVIEW
5 PM Carnial Studio Thealei $45


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4C THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008 BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY
'(al on m Ho Tin Roor x"r% rwrnowal ith all ItIck cat


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
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Who Cares

SWhat Black People Think

Anyway?
If you think nobody gives a damn what Black people think, think again.Some
people care a lot. Especially when they need something from you.
Take corporations.They want you to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what you
think when they're looking for your vote. And TV and radio stations hope you
will pay attention to their shows.
The point is, all these people want something from you. And when people
want something from you, you have got power over them.We should learn to
use that power wisely to make the changes we need to make.
Give your money,your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are doing
the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicating to
you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it. For instance,
f t 0-1 W t -0 4 w -=Wright now there are 32 million Black people in this country and last year we
S" earned more than 400 billion dollars.
al -That's clout.


Think about it


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MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 12-18, 2008

MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 12-18, 2008


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH 12-18, 2008


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A GYN DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St.. Hialeali. FL.
5u" aii-, 103 St I
SP1, 7e icihtion iad1)

305-824-8816
305-362-4611



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LOW COST SERVICE. SERVICE UP TO 10 WEEKS. $175
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600 East 4th Ave. 305-877-3001
Hialeah Florida, or
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CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 2008
COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: TBA
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2nd Floor Council Chambers, 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 Avenue, North Miami Beach
All interested parties are invited to attend this meeting.
Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney
Notice: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Council with
respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that person shall insure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence upon
which any appeal may be based (f/s 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the Americans
With Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate
in this proceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk no later than two (2)
days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if hearing
impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:
IFB NO. 74051 INVITATATION FOR BID FOR
THE PURCHASE OF FOOD FOR CANINE
CLOSING DATE/TIME: 12:00 P.M., MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2008
Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
305-416-1949.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager




AD NO. 003551






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NEED A JOB, HOME?

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A


SECTION D


Churches for Rent
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
15260 NW 19th Avenue
305-681-1660


Prime Golden Glades
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $275 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600
SFumished Rooms
1161 N.W. 139th Street.
Furnished room for rent with
air and cable. $120 weekly.
$240 to move in.
Call 305-310-5272
128 N.E. 82nd Terrace
In my private home.$150 and
up weekly plus $300 security.
Single working person only.
786-355-5948.
1500 N.W. 74 STREET
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
15810 N.W. 38th Place
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen,and bath One
person, private entrance.
305-474-8188/305-691-3486.
1775 N.W. 151 Street
Air, cable TV, refrigeratorand
microwave. Utilities included.
Two locations.
Call 954-678-8996
2301 N.W. 98 STREET
Rooms for rent,, starting from
$125 to $200 weekly. Free
utilities and cable TV, plus
washer, dryer. Large house
on corner lot, quiet area. Call
Pat 305-975-6605.
441 N.W. 83rd STREET
Furnished room for rent,
cable ready, washer, dryer,
all utilities included. $525
monthly $725 to move in.
Call 954-709-5409
6233 NW 22nd Court
Nice room,utilities included.
Move in immediately. $125
weekly. $250 moves you in.
Call 786-277-2693
6835 N.W. 15th AVENUE
Luxury rooms different sizes
quiet area, utilities included.
$100/$125 weekly $250.,
move in immediately.
786-277-2693
720 N.W. 75th Street
ROOMS IN CASTLE STYLE
MANSION
Has waterfall, marble
platform, 7 ft. lion statues,
Free light $450 monthly plus
$150 security near bus line.
786-523-1736.
BISCAYNE GARDEN
Furnished room,private en-
trance, cable and air. $115
weekly, $230 to move in. Call
786-306-0308.
Clean room for rent
7000 NW 21 Avenue
1877 NW 59th Street
Air, utilities included single
person, $380 monthly, $90
deposit. 305-720-7067.
DADEAREA
OUTREACH -Three Beds
available. $175 weekly, $350
to move in.
Call 786-443-7306
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean room, private
entrance, outdoor patio,
cable and air.
Call 305-688-0187
NORTHWEST AREA
Room for rent. $450 monthly
305-836-5848/305-653-8954

Private bath, for one, $850 to
move in. $425 monthly. 305-
620-5632.

ROOMS FOR RENT
Utilities and cable included.
Weekly rates. 305-303-2644

I Efficiencies

100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
calling, property protected by
security camera 24 hours,
$215 weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

1612 N.W. 51st Terrace
$725 moves you in, $130
weekly Call 786-389-1686

1756 N.W. 85th Street
$140 weekly, $725 moves
you in. 786-389-1686


I Efficiencies
18032 N.W. 8th AVENUE
$600.monthly.Three bed-
room, one bath. $1300
monthly
Call 407-445-3235.
2571 E. Superior Street
Efficiency $875 moves you
in, $287 bi-weekly.
Call 786-389-1686

5422 NW 7 COURT
Large effiency includes water
and electric. $700 monthly.
NO Section.
Call 305-267-9449
7657 N.E 2nd COURT
Includes refrigerator, stove
and air. $465 monthly.
Call 305-469-5093

Apartments
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bedrooms $750
Blue Lake Village
SCall 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-236-1144
1246 N.W. 58 TERRACE
Studio $475 monthly, plus
one bedroom $600 monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one and two bed-
rooms. $525 and. $725
monthly Appliances included.
Call 305-747-4552
140 N.W. 13th Street
Call for MOVE IN SPECIAL -
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$575.
786-236-1144/305-642-7080
1510 N.W. 68 STREET

$575. Studio $475. Applian-
ces included.
786-797-6417
1520 NW 61st Street
One and two bedroom apart-
ments renovated, all housing
agencies welcome.
Call 305-720-2927
1525 N.W. 1st PLACE
Three bedrooms, two bath,
$999 per month. Newly reno-
vated, all appliances includ-
ed. Free 26 Inch Flat Screen
Television.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1835 N.W. 2nd COURT
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 monthly, appliances
free, 20 inch flat screen Tele-
vision.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
210 N.W. 17 STREET
One bedroom $475. Stove,
refrigerator air. 305-642-7080
220 NW 16 Street
Two bedrooms, $650
Stove, refrigerator, air
305-642-7080/786-236-1144

2515 NW 52nd Street #2
One bedroom, tiled floors,
air, no appliances. $550
monthly, $1100 to move in.
954-522-4645.
2950 N.W. 64th STREET#U
Three bedrooms, one bath
$1100.
Call 954-704-3994.
3151 NW 53rd Street
Two bedrooms. $800
monthly, first, last and
security Call 305-751-6232
3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath
$350 bi-weekly $975 moves
you in. Call:786-389-1686
361 N.W. 7th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 monthly
Call 305-861-4683

421 NW 59 Terr.
One bedroom $575
Stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080/786-359-7054

50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors, one and two bed-
rooms, from $490-$580
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

5200 N.W. 26 Avenue
Two bedrooms $700. Section
8 Ok No Security Deposit
Call 305-634-3545

5201 NW 15th AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath.
$700 monthly. Call Pat 305-
975-6605.


Apartments
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-530 per month, one
bedrooms, $485 per month,
window bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
7001 NW 15th AVENUE
One bedroom $550 monthly
Two bedrooms $650 monthly
All appliances included. Call
Joel 786-355-7578
8261 N.E. 3rd AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, all
appliances included, $600
monthly.
Call Joel 786-355-7578.
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One bedroom, apartment.
Section 8. Call 305-754-7776

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $495-$585 monthly.
Free water, window bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Large bedroom one bath, liv-
ingroom and kitchen.Section
8 welcome. Call G&B 305-
625-0760
ARENA GARDENS
FREE WATER
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled efficiency, two,
and three bedrooms, air, ceil-
ing fan, appliances, laundry
and gate. 1601 N. W. 1st.
Court. 305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY, INC.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses, Efficiences. One,
two and three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same Day Approval.
Call for information.
CIVIC CENTER AREA
One and two bedrooms, air
and appliances. Starting from
$650. Call 786-506-3067.
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom, one bath
$515.00
Two bedroom, one bath
$630.00
Free water, air
Leonard 786-236-1144
L & G APARTMENTS
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community, on bus lines.
$1080 to move in.
Call 305-638-3699
LAFAYETTE APARTMENTS
150 NE 79th
One, two, and three bed-
rooms from $632 monthly. In-
come restrictions apply. Sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Apply at 7915 NE 2nd Ave-
nue. 305-759-7649
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath.
$450-550 monthly.Two bed-
room, one bath $650 month-
ly. For information please call
305-827-4593.
MIAMI AREA
One, and two bedrooms
available with air. Section 8
welcome.786-355-5665.
NORTH DADE/NW AREA
One bedroom, $525 easy
move in. Two bedrooms,
$675, three bedrooms $825
new tile, appliances, kitchen,
security bars. 305-219-4503
or 305-944-4919
RENTER'S PARADISE
NORTH MIAMI
15600 NW 7 Avenue #712
One bedroom, one bath.
Sec-tion 8 welcome. Call
786-237-1292

NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom, two bath.
$900
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 954-432-3198 or 954-
303-3368.
NORTH MIAMI/LAKEVIEW
19305 NE 2 AVENUE #2307
One bedroom, one and a half
bath. Section 8 welcome.
Call
786-237-1292
OPA LOCKA AREA
Section 8. one bedroom, one
bath. $500 cash back. Call
305-717-6084/786-597-2248


MIAMI, FLORIDA, MARCH 12-18, 2008


Apartments
OPA LOCKA AREA
Updated two and three bed-
rooms available. Tiled,
central air, appliances and
water included. First month
free move in special. Limited
time!!. Section 8 Welcome.
305-688-2749
OVERTOWN AREA
One bedroom, one bath
$550. monthly. Section 8
Newly renovated, no applica-
tion fee. 305-300-6192
OVERTOWNAREA
One bedroom, one bath
$550. monthly. Section 8
Newly renovated, no applica-
tion fee. 305-300-6192
1 Duplex
10340 NW 6th AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 monthly. Section 8 on-
ly.. Call 305-769-5466
13315 ALEXANDER DRIVE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly, Section 8 OK.
Call 305-244-0798
1532 N.W. 47 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air,
big back yard. $675 monthly.
786-299-1306 or 305-322-
2021
166 N.E. 58 TERRACE
230 N.W. 59 TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Call Mr. Rodney if interested
786-333-8261
1732 N.W. 41 Street
One bedroom, one bath, air,
water appliances included.
tile, carpet, with parking.
$599 monthly.Call 754-581-
6302.
17424 HOMESTEAD
AVENUE
Three bedroom, two bath
$1350. Section 8, no deposit.
Call 786-295-3244
1780 N.W. 55th Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$900 monthly.305-218-1227
1853 NW 74th STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath
with
air and appliances. $975.
monthly! Section 8 Welcome!
Call 305-318-3420.
1861 NW 42nd Street
Newly remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath central
air,water included Call Mrs.
Reynolds 786-356-1457
2283 N.W. 101st Street
Two bedrooms,water,air,
bars, appliances $750,
move
in $2250. No Section 8. Terry
Dellerson Broker 305-891-
6776
2926 N.W. 94TH STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
laundry, tile throughout.
Large backyard. $1300.
monthly. Call 305-696-8338.
3240 NW 11th Court
Brand new duplex three bed-
room, two bath. $1350
monthly Section 8. No
depos-
it required. Call 786 295
3244.
4714 N.W. 16 AVENUE
Four bedrooms, one bath,
central air, water included.
$1200. 305-218-1227.
5201 NW 15th AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath.
$750 monthly. Call Pat 305-
975-6605.
586 N W 83 STREET B
One bedroom one bath.
$700
monthly. First and security
$1400 to move in. No
Section
8. Call 786-488-2264.
6020 NW 8th AVENUE
Two bedroom, one bath.
Sec-
tion 8 welcome:
Call 305-342-8399
638 NW 65 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard, security bars,
appliances, central air, in-
cludes water. $950 monthly.
Section 8 welcome. Call
John
305-389-4011 or 305-632-
3387
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $595 per month, $595
security deposit, $1190 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.


Duplex
HOUSES FOR RENT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$800. 305-754-0757
New three bedroom, one
bath. Call 786-269-5643
OFF 102ND STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 monthly. Call 786-
286-2540.

SCondosbTownhouses

13499 BISCAYNE BLVD.
Newly renovated, two bed-
rooms, two baths, 24 hour
security, two parking spaces.
$1600 monthly, first and
last.954-744-6612.

191st Street NW 35th Ave
Four bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.
2768 NW 131 St STREET
Three bedroom, two and a
half bath. Call Dee 786-546-
5020. Section 8 welcome.
BOCA RATON
Two bedrooms, two bath.
Close to FAU. Section 8 wel-
come. Page Denise 305-732-
9875 or 305-624-4395
MIRAMAR
6805 SW 38 Street.
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly.
MIAMI GARDENS
17934 NW 40th Court
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly
ALL POINTS REALTY
Patrick 305-542-5184

I House I

1045 NW 47th STREET
$1750 monthly.Section 8
welcome. Call 786-325-7383
for deposit discount.

1122 NW-74TH STREET
Three bedroom, one bath,
$1400.monthly, $2800 move
in.Call 305-632-2426.
1261 N.W. 68 TERRACE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Tim 305-986-6888.
133St N.W. 18th Ave Area.
Three bedrooms, two bath.
Call 305-754-7776
1345 NE 128 STREET
Three bedroom, one bath.
One car garage, big yard.
$1200 monthly. NO Section8
Call 305-267-9449
1615 NW 65th Street
Newly renovated, three bed-
room, one bath for $1200
Negotiable. Section 8
Call Clarinda 305-331-9593
18715 NW 45th AVENUE
SECTION 8 OK
Three bedrooms, one bath
with tile floors, central air, in
quiet area. $1365 monthly.
Call Joe 954-849-6793

1898 NW 112th TERRACE
Three bedrooms and one
bath. Section 8 welcome!
Call Judy at 786-506-5511.
2041 NW 100th STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. First and security
required. $1100 monthly. Call
305-978-9745
22 N.E. 59 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1400 monthly. Section 8
Okay. Jerome 305-801-8994.
2354 SERVICE ROAD
Two bedrooms, one bath..
Yard, and utility room. Sec-
tion 8 o.k. Call 305-691-2166
2783 NW 193 TERRACE
Section 8 OK. Four bedroom,
one and a half bath. $1595
monthly. A Beauty. Call Joe
954-849-6793
284 NW 40 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$800 monthly. Section 8 ok.
Call 954-914-9166
3031 NW 87 STREET
Why rent. Buy!! Three bed-
rooms; central air. $1100
down and $1266 month
FHA 786-306-4839

3241 NW 197 STREET
Three bedroom two bath.
Section 8 only. New kitchen,
big yard. $1500 mthly. $3500
deposit 786-262-6249

795 N.W. 101 STREET
Three bedrooms,one bath,
$1300 a month. Section 8.
No deposit requires! Call 786
295 3244.


S Houses
8266 NW 5th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300. monthly. Section 8
Welcome. Call 954-914-9166.
828 N.W. 64th STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Call 786-344-
3278
983 N.W. 111 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Florida room, utility room,
central air. $1150, first, last,
and security. 305-693-9379
COCONUT GROVE
SECTION 8 ONLY
Four bedrooms, two bath
home on large lot. New paint,
ceramictiledfloors.$1550.
3255 William Ave. Drive by
then Call 305-336-3099.
HOUSES FOR RENT
Two, three, and four bed-
rooms with air. $800 to
$1200
305-642-7080.
LITTLE RIVER AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Florida room, fenced, bars,
central air. Section 8 okay!
Call 786-390-0809
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1200 mthly, 305-388-7477.
MIAMI GARDENS
Remodeled three bedroom,
one bath,tile, carpet, family
room, custom window treat-
ments, mirrors, canopy car-
port, appliances, washer/dry-
er, keystone and shutters.
First, last, and security.$1550
mthly. Call 305-790-0093.
MIAMI GARDENS
Three bedroom, one bath.
Newly renovatedappliances,
air. $1500. monthly. Near
schools, shops, and buses..
305-764-8102.
NORTHWEST MIAMI-DADE
Three and four bedrooms,
two baths, central air, tile
floors, $1,250 to $1,400
monthly. NO section 8.
$3,750 to $4,200 move in.
Call Terry Dellerson
305-891-6776
For a list of addresses.
NW / NE AREA
Nice three bedrooms, two
baths, 786-597-2688.
OPA LOCKA AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Fenced, jacuzzi, central air
Section 8 welcome. Page
Denise 305-732-9875 or
305-624-4395.
ROLLING OAKS
Four bedroom, three baths,
786-260-3453
STOPIll
Behind in rent and
mortgage?
Call Kathy 786-326-7916
Condos/Townhouses
301 NW 177th STREET
UNIT 232
Oversized one bedroom,
one-
bath tiled floors, central
air/heat $100K
Call 305-652-9343.





1256 NW 51 Street
Large three bedroom house,
one and a half, den bars,
central air, front/back yard,
fence and driveway.
$149,995. Call 305-788-2605
1264 N.W. 70 Street
Extra large two storey, three
bedrooms, two baths
Detached garage.
Motivated seller. $159k.
Keyes Realtors
305-793-0002
8200 N.W. 14 AVENUE
Why rent, Buy!. Four bed-
rooms, two baths, central air.
$1900 down and $1199
monthly FHA. 786-306-4839.
112 MARION
Miami Gardens. Why rent,
Buyl Three bedrooms,
central
air, pool. $1100 down and
$1266 monthly FHA.
786-306-4839
2335 NW 88 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Three bed-
rooms, central air. Try $900
down and $995 monthly.
FHA. 786-306-4839
1570 NW 70 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Three bed-
rooms, air. Try $995 down
and $759 monthly FHA. 786-
306-4839.


I Houses
4910 NW 170 STREET
Why rent, Buy! Four bed-
rooms, two baths, central air.
$1900 down and $1519
monthly FHA 786-306-4839
ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home
WITH
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also available
HUDIVA Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty
MIAMI GARDENS
Three Bedrooms, Two
Bath. Newly Remodeled.
Great Neighborhood.
Huge yard. Must See!!
$165,000.
0 Down, No Closing Cost.
will help to qualify.
call 305-490-6542.

NORTHWEST AREA
Three bedroom, two bath.
House for sale $212,000.
Call 305-873-4729


5445 N.W. 5th Court
Little Haiti, duplex lot, 50 x
125, $59K, 305-409-9685.


24 HR. Plumbing
Unclog All types of Blockage.
Check Water Heaters and
Septic tank. Free Estimates.
Call 786-597-1924 or
305-576-5331
Be a Security Guard
S$55 or renew your D li-
cense $55 G $150 and con-
cealed license $100. reliable
#DS 2600085. Open 7 days
786-333-2084
Four bedrooms three bath
home for $19,200! Foreclo-
sures for sale
For listings call 1800 706
1762 ext 6240
Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices.
14140 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Call 305-685-3565
HANDYMAN CARPENTRY
Painting, Tree Trimming,
Yard Cleaning, Landscaping
786-237-7656/305-633-1593
INDIAN SPIRITUAL
PSYCHIC
Help on relationships, and-
marriage. Business, health
and all problems.
305-621-9112

SERVICES
I have done maintenance on
large apartment complexes
and other rental properties
since 1992. I do plumbing,
carpentry, windows, doors.
Light electrical, drywall,
plastering and painting. Call
Morris 305-588-0205

WE BUY HOUSES
Any type of real estate
Any area, condition, price
fast cash. Call 786-285-
8872
WEIGHT LOSS
Get a FREE Shape Scan
Body Analysis and FREE
Weight Loss Consultation.
305-945-2785/ 786-267-2590


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, applian-
ces, roof, air, 786-273-1130.
I IAutomobile
Automobile
Handicapped Chevy Van '89,
89,000 miles. Wheelchair lift.
Good condition. $3000. Call
305-479-3690



FACILITY
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
Valid FL driver's license re-
quired. Handyman, office
cleaning, property mainte-
nance. Dependable, re-
sponsible and honest, ref-
erences. Apply in person.
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 54th Street
Contact: Samuel
305-694-6210


Employment

Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in South Dade,
Broward and Miami Dade.
WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Apply in person at:
900 N.W. 54th Street


Six Weeks
Sales Opportunity
Money 0 Money
Money

The Miami Times has a
special six weeks project
for experienced sales rep-
resentatives.
Straight Commission
Call immediately
Two vacancies left.
305-694-6227


TEACHERS NEEDED
Call 305-754-1132

VIDEO GAME
REPAIR/ANDSALES
786-312-3740 or
305-467-4179

VILLAGE OF PINECREST
NOW HIRING!

Community Service Aide
$13.91 hourly

Dispatcher (911)
$17.00 hourly
Police Officer
$46,800 upon certification
$30,420 while attending
police academy
Certified and non-certified
positions available
Excellent pay and benefits
job description and
applica-
tion process at www.pine-
crest-fl.gov/jobs


S Schools

PRIVATE SCHOOL
OPPORTUNITYII!!

Now accepting applications
for student grades K-12
NO FCAT
ESE STUDENTS ARE
WELCOME
Limited space available
McKay Scholarship
(Free scholarship for ESE
students)
Florida Pride Scholarship
(For low income families)
Grace Academy, 'Bridging
the gap between education,
communities and success'

Should you require any
additional information please
feel free to contact us at
305-751-5910

THE AFRICAN AMERICAN
EXPERIENCE IN THE
DIASPORA
Learn the truth about our his-
tory through the teachings of
Hebrew theology, Free. Con-
tact Astra 954-805-0874.

S Pesonals

Come see Papa Paul
Voodoo
Priest at Halouba Botanica
101 NE 54th Street
Readings, Money, Treat-
ment, Take away bad luck,
jobs, love, court etc. We
speak French, Spanish.
With 50 years experience.
Also check out our Email
at Haloubaatemple9.com
Call 305-751-7485 or
954-588-2784

El


Who Cares What Black People Think Anyway?


If you think nobody gives a damn what Black
people think, think again. Some people care a lot.
Especially when they need something from you.

Take corporations.Theywantyou to buy their products. And banks care
whether you're going to give them your money. Politicians.They care what
you think when they're looking for your vote.And TV and radio stations
hope you will pay attention to their shows.
The point is,all these people want something from you. And when
people want something from you,you have got power over them.We


should learn to use that power wisely to make the changes we need to
make.
Give your money,your votes and your loyalty to people who deserve it.
People who are going to give you something in return. People who are
doing the most for the Black community.
Who cares what Black people think? A lot of people do.
The Miami Times is about the business of communication.Communicat-
ing to you the power you have and letting you know how you can use it.
For Instance, right now there are 32 million Black people In this country and
last year we earned more than 400 billion dollars.



That's clout.


Think about it










The Miami Times
Your Community Newspaper Since 1923
Phone: 305-694-6210


SS


____ _


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


D S THE MIAMI TIMES MARCH12-18 20 8


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-- 4.-- "Copyrighted Material


Fm l yems Mi (h Syndicated Content w n


*-- Available from Commercial News Providers"


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I* . ...


A.V. INSURANCE
$ave $$$ Progressive Auto,
Home, Business, Est. 1965
www.avautoinsure.biz
2497 N.W. 79th Street
305-696-2291
04/10/08


GERALD ENGEL ESQUIRE
Divorce Bankruptcy $825
* Will $95 Starting from
costs plus court.
901 N.W. 22nd Avenue
305-694-7344
07/20/08



SLAM BOUTIQUE
Monthly hair care plans $150
Infusion Frontal laces
Braids and more.
Weave-in special $85
786-277-6821
06/10/08


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 Ali Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
7/3/08


Action Uniform
& Beauty Salon
$10 sales items
$10 wash/set
6050 NW 27 Ave. In Memory shirts
305-879-2553
4/30/08






Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211
Fax: 305-694-6211


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fas9


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132

Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board
Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date des-
ignated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF
PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address
above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the
scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be
available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings.
The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance
of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-
8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule
6Gx13-3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."

BID NUMBER.. OPENING ,' .-'*. : .:
DOWNLOAD DATE *; .. : .DA ". :,I ,.).Cf

_COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS-GRANT
RF#1A 3/25/2008 PARTNERSHIP APPLICANTS

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR STUDENT
RFP 047-HH10 3/25/2008 ACCIDENT AND ATHLETIC ACCIDENT
INSURANCE COVERAGES
A pre-bid conference will
be held on March 12,
2008 at 10:00 AM in the
050-HH02 3/20/2008 Rental of Caps and Gowns Procurement Manage-
ment Conference room
located at 1450 N.E.
2nd Avenue, Room 352,
Miami, Florida 33132.

KIOSKS FOR PUBLIC ACCESS OF
035-HH04 3/18/2008 THE DISTRICT PORTAL

049-HH07 3/11/2008 Remanufactured Engines

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


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9D THE MIAMI TIMES, MARCH, 12-18 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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MIAMI-AD

Grow your career in a rewarding, diverse and
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INVITATION TO BID NO. 07-08-013
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 1st Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Mi-
ami, Florida 33133-5504 until 2:00 P.M. on April 7, 2008 for:

GENERAL ROADWAY AND DRAINAGE CONSTRUCTION

Bids Due: Monday, April 7, 2008, AT 2:00 P.M.

Scope of Work: The Work consists of furnishing all materials, labor, and equipment necessary to construct the Project(s) as de-
scribed below for a complete and functional Project. Close coordination with other contractors) who are responsible for the in-
stallation of storm sewer collection systems associated with this Project may be required. Work specified in this bid consists of
furnishing all labor, machinery, tools, means of transportation, supplies, equipment, materials, and services necessary for the
repair, maintenance, and installation of roadway systems on an as needed basis, including but not limited to, paving, milling,
resurfacing, drainage, sidewalks, curbs and gutters.

The completed Work will provide other incidental work in connection therewith all as indicated on drawings. The Contractor shall
furnish all required materials, labor and equipment for Work to be performed under this Contract.

This Solicitation is for Projects that have an estimated construction cost of less than $250,000, as well as for Projects that will equal
or exceed this threshold. The following Projects are anticipated to exceed $250,000:

> Civic Center Roadway Project
> Allapattah West Roadway Project
> Allapattah East Roadway Project
> Grapeland Roadway Project
> Downtown Roadway Project
> Venetian Causeway Roadway Project
> Upper East Side Roadway Project
> Coconut Grove Roadway Project
> North Citrus Grove Roadway Project
> South Citrus Grove Roadway Project
> The Roads Roadway Project
> Shenandoah East Roadway Project
> East Little Havana Roadway Project
> Flagami Roadway Project
> West Little Havana Roadway Project
> Shenandoah West Roadway Project
> Little Haiti Roadway Project
> Model City Roadway Project
> Overtown Roadway Project

CIP has scheduled a non-mandatory pre-bid conference which will be held at the following date, time and location:

Location: City of Miami-City Hall-Commission Chambers
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133
Date: March 12, 2008 Time: 10:00 AM

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor or General Engineering
Contractor from the State of Florida or Certification from Miami-Dade County arid must have a minimum of five (5) years experience.
in the items being bid on by the Bidder. The City may consider other Certifications or Licenses from the State of Florida or Miami-Dade
County at its sole discretion. The Bidder must self-perform all single trade work and thirty percent (30%) of multiple trade work.

Bid packages may be obtained on or after, March 6 2008, from the City of Miami Department of Capital Improvements Program, in
person from Cecelia Wilson, 444 SW 2 Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, Florida 33130 (305-416-1255), cwilson(dmiamigov.com for a non-
refundable cost of $75.00. The bid package can also be downloaded at no cost by visiting:

http://www.miamiaov.com/Capitalimprovements/pages/ProcurementOpportunities/Default.asp

It is the sole responsibility of all firms to ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms periodi-
cally check the CIP webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate originals in the enve-
lopes provided. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly opened. Any bids or proposals received after time and
date specified will not be considered. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and
strictly the responsibility of the bidder/Bidder. The City is not responsible for delays caused by courier service, including U.S. Mail,
or any other occurrence.

Note: This Notice supersedes the Invitation for Bids previously published on March 6. 2008


YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE
WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.
AD NO. 0807


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10D THE MIAMI TIMES. MARCH 12-18, 2008


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY

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Syndicated Content
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The
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