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TRl\U.OnA JUTANTUn ET NOS l\ItJTAl\JUU IN IUt


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38TH YEAR* NO 31 MIAMI FLORDA, SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1961 SIXTEEN PAGES TEN CI

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I COLLINS HEADS 10 RUSSWURM AWARD WINNERS I


\ A+ ,
PUBLISHERSPICK office facilities. Lester B. Grang. -
.
er, retiring executive head Of \ RESCUES FRIEND -r-- .5-...
TOP the National Urban League,, GOV. BRYANT ,
made ,the Russwurm role call I1 FROM DITCH '
TEN CITIZENS recognition of his untiring and< CONGRATULATESNEGRO 0'
devoted leadership In the nation
Tuesday afternoon a Miami .
PRESS .
wide social welfare agency.
As the nation paid tribute to Dally News carrier jumped Into
the appearance or the first Negro Atlanta youths Charlayp Governor Farris Bryant today eight feet of murky rain waterto
newspaper in the United Hunter and Hamilton Holme, sent congratuatlons to The Miami save a 10-year-old friend, '
States, the public affairs committee j first Negro students to enroll fLt Times on the occasion of after a heavy downpour.New .
of the National Newspaper National Negro Newspaper Week.
the University of Georgia, were street drains are being \
Publishers Association announced j named for their unreproachabl Tho Governor also m a d especial constructed at 63rd st. and 14th
the office of Its
from conduct and courage in facia; recognition of the role ave., and a ditch about 10 feet
chairman, Frank L. Stanley, ton unanticipated situations at the of bar I
members
the Times' plays as wide and 25 feet long was
Russwurm Awards had been 175-year-old Athens institution. minority ina However the torrential
the ,American press ricaded. ,
of the founderof
made in
memory Hunter-Holmes incident Jed<
The world of unrest rainfall filled the. excavation.
Freedom's Journal's first pub to the abolishment of a Georgiegljlftture *
lishetl at ,New York. City on / 1 proviso, which per. The Governor went On to .IIT; Some ofthV: boys, were wadingin
March 16,, 1827. I mited the slate's governor to "The information you have pro. the water when lOjrearJe
withhold state funds from dese. Tided for your readers has meant rome Fisher tell Into the hole. ;
grated :public institutions. much to the success Florida As he ,screamed, Willie: Johnson, :
achieves In meeting problems of 14, of 2020 NW 66th st., jumped yr: r,
Andrew T. Hatcher, Whit< great difficulty.: May you con l
Into the pit, shoes and all,
House Associaate press secretary tinue your good work through ]
and former San Francisco this year and those ahead." and pulled out Jerome. I

newspaperman, received NNP
nod in tribute to his scholar!,

approach to Journa'lsm in a not Maxlno Stevenson, a junior at
able career marked by modesty North Dade High was recently
but effective work which( led fc SIX DROWN IN elected ").lIss North Dade" for

a top post in the Kennedy-Ad the term 1961.62. The popular
ministration family. Mrs. Mary junior, daughter of Chief WIJ-
TJ TJJOHN Louise Hooper, also of San bert Stevenson and Verdell
Francisco, is listed in the award Stevenson, is to be crowned ata
group for her work in behalf of MIAMI CANALS Coronation Ball in her honoron
the advancement of the welfareof April 7 at 7 p.m.
native Africans principally $In Maxine Is a momber of various -
South Africa and more recentlyIn Two brothers drowned (In the er brother who swam less, wentin organizations on the campus.
other areas of the continent.Mrs. Little River Canal near 105th the canal and panicked. Tom. Namey: the Honor Society
Hooper is associated \Aid Terr and 23rd ave. on Saturday. my 'grabbed him and together Spanish Cub, Chorus and pep
the Aflrcan Defense and Dead were Tommy Brooks, 13 they went down. team. She also is president of
Fund of the American Committee and Phillip, 11, when they were Carl Saceo, 2290 NW 107th her class and vice president ot
n. RUSSMUIIM on Africa.Dr. pulled from 20 feet of water by st., whose home t* near the can- junior class
'rogmen Edwin Zehnder and al, was attracted by the scream
According to Stanley, editor- James Nabrlt, president,, Fred Roberts of the Metro po Ing of the boys' companions He .
publisher. The Louisville: Defender Howard University, joined hop lice rescue team. dived, but did not find them. He
NNPA considers the recipients oreee' list for his long-time, "be- The boys lived with their stepfather then called Metro police. during In Tamlaml hurricane Canal Donna drowned
of its awards as being the hind-the-acenes" support and and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Services will be he.d Saturday Thursday
persons having made the most guidance in a series of legal encounters Andrew Dennis, 2345 NW 74th afternoon at Shiloh Baptist afternoon when a parked car
they were playing in rolled into.
contributions to the civil .
outstanding on rights front accompanied by Church
Terr. They were
race relations during 1960. Seven Over the period of two decades, Richard Newton, 10, and Mike 20 feet of water.

persons in the group were the former Howard University, Terry 8,, of 2375 NW 74th Terr., GIRLS PERISH IN The tragedy brought to six'the
cited- individually, while the School of Law dean has gv.D} Metro Homicide Investigator number of children deaths by
Governor and Lt. Governor of scholarly and wise legal advice Jerry Evans said. TAMIAMI CANALTwo drowning in Dado County in ..
Kentucky tour 'YOuthful sit- to associate and former students Tommy, who could swim a week. Two Negro boys drowned
Inners and two students at the in their civil rights cases, little went into the water first, young children of a last Saturday and two whit.

University of Georgia received the boys told police The young! mother who died ot asthma ,boys drowned on Wednesday.. 'i
joint honors. Seven of the /If- Labor leader A. Phillip Randolph ,_- ___ .__ ,- .........,.. .11I
teen honorees are either teenagers a veteran of social action,, .. : Victims of the tragedy were
or young adults. received honor for his courage ::4 ; .! ;p4 Linda Bennett, 3 and tier sister,
to encounter' with labor movement Dolores, 10 months, who lived
Former Florida Governor, powers and as prime mov with an aunt Mrs Anna Mae
LeRoy Collins National Association or In the founding of the American Ucnnttt, at 12151 SW 219th) St.,
of Broadcasters Washings Negro Labor Council an Goulds.
s D. C., was cited for his instrument to assure fuller: participation -
forthright approach with respect for all workers In the The children had gone with
to use of pubic luncheon facilities labor arena. their aunt for a day's outing!
and his appointment of an a ong Tamtam Canal about two
effective bl-raclal Florida Committee Three-Gold-Medal winner Miss miles west of Krome Ave.
ex Wilma the Tennessee
positive Rudolph
which gave 'I was standing by the car,"
ploratlon to the delicate prob flash from A&I: University, aftd said Mrs. Bennett. "The baby
lem. Four North Carolina A&I undoubtedly the world's fastest
was playing with the gearshift
College students Ezell Blair, woman, is named to the honor lever and she moved it."
Jr., Franklin McCain, Joseph Me- roll In support of her exploit at
nelll and David Richmond received As the lever of the automatic
the I960 Rome Olympics. "Miss
,
tor having
recognition shift moved from "park" to
.; initiated the student alt-ins. Rudolph," notes Mr. Stanley, "neutral," the car, parked at an
", "might well appear at the tOp angle on the downwardslopingcanal
Governor Bert Combs shares of our Russwurm Honor: Roll) bank, began to Inch forward *
honors with his Lt. Governor ,
10.- Wilson Wyatt, Kentucky, for but 'fo'rthe fact that NNPA feels
their leadership in the enactment that In their own right each pf "I tried to bold it back.' sob.

of laws establishing of the its honorees deserves top listingfor bed the aunt, "but I couldn't. It
Com- going on and on .l1d
first State Human Rights just kept
contribution to racial pro-
'mission with paid staff operat- I TOMMY, 13 PHILLIP, 11 then it went into the water."
ainc- ,|.nds at Capitol bun4ln* cress In I860 '





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MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA ;: 1! M I II .
PUN PHUN y 'y

PAGE 2 SATURDAY, MARCH 2&> 1&81
llv PHIL OSSOFER Teens '

......
PAUL II. WYCI1E JR.
By
""- : .... ...... '-,
';'
: Well, another JESCA Annual
Membership Dinner Meeting has
come and gone. It was a lively ConferenceHi
Around Miami affair, well attended. As usual,
despite the hard work of all the

various committees which set up .. -i''I
- _. -
the meeting, the "kitchen com ._ .; --r.----:
mittee" put on the best show --J.
by DAVE BONDU What delicious food! teentimers! here we are town scoring victories for the
R again with the Texas Conference.Last school team you usually find
So much fOr the material feast. week we were discussing yourse'f strolling towards a soda
r As for the spiritual feast, (the Magazines. Let's continue OK? and the magazine rack of the
-- ----- - -- -- ;... fellowship following: the .dinner OK.; corner drug store. You spend a

GAITHER PERKINS, a new LAST SUNDAY the Par ** 'singing discovery, has become Birdie Club of Miami held Its year, with the ease with which has 'to his readers. It is, magazine or two for the even-
'one of Miami Beach's favorite first annual tournament at the we find that spark of unity that i Instead the duty of ,the writer to ing's light reading. When you
''singer Gaither, young and 'beau'tifQ1 Orange Brook Countty Club in generates from this annual affair extend a helping hand to strug- pay the c'erk (the current haircut
\ ha t ben slnflrint since she Hollywood. Trophies were awarded ,- and from the cooperation of suffering sInning human Cassanova of the neighbor*
gling,
was eight' years old. She Just cut at the new and beautiful the committees creating it. We ity, rather than typing the taint hood) you .!find your pensive" moment
'11"r first record on. Knight' label l, Hampton House. Winners were forget the outward superficial ed actions of his fellowman. has turned into an expen
which 1 Iq catching on like wildfire Ernest Hayes, 1st place? Duke differences, irrelevant) differences sive one.
Oaither's manager, Dan Jenkins, 2nd, and Al Mitchell, Which go beyond the pale Teentimers, perhaps we can Teentimers, let's face the financial
Mvers, Is planning to make the 3rd. of race, color and religion, and never stop publishers from printing (acts. Why .should we
cute little' singer one of Ameri In the ladles division Mrs are meaningless when comparedto i such smut 'but we can stop waste our allowance money and
ca's top stars. It make me most Chris' Jenkins took first; Mrs. the similarities in all.: By the reading this realistic rot (and I worthwhile hours on low down
of God brought together mean ROT) and ''keep our focus Instead of
we are
happy to see young talent climb Rebecca Long, 2nd and Mayme grace literature? stoppingat
the 'adder to success. You remember Bondu 3rd.Scores in a worthy cause, our on fine fiction. the drug store (that .Bells:
her name. Gaither Per. actions bearing witness to the There may be a Fran or a magazines), we could saunter a
kins from Perrlne, who has were Hayes 73; D. tact that we are all made in the Frank in your future, but don't ,few blocks further to the Public
taken Miami Beach by storm. De Jenkins 76; Mitchell 77. C. Jen- image of God. What a pity we rely on the "Fortune Teller's Library and pick up the good
sure' vou buy her records and sins 76r Rebecca Lang, 77; l1ay. do not have such meetings more Monthly" to tell you when that book our htstory or English
dig' what L? In store for you. me Bondu 79. often I phone will ring All the magazines : teacher recommended. And don't
Mrs. Long was the most surprised books fortune about being tagged as
Som of you will remember and teaching worry a
'Gaither as the :little girl who winner"of the day. She has JESCA does the community a tel'ing? superstitions or spiritismare dull person no doubt you will
'sang 'while her brother. Duly) been playing only a short time, great service with its regular (or should ''be) strictly !void meet quite a few of your c'ass-
played for her on Saturday and had not played a tournamentwith activities, but it does the whole coupons for your reading and mates there. It's the right recipeto
a handicap before. This world even greater service with the idle hour into
mnrninf-s when Mr. and Mrs. reference preference. For too change an
Swing h"d the children's pro- proved that learners have a its Integrated cooperative com many teen-agers tend toward ideal one.
chance to win as everyone else, mittees. These are seeds destined and 'Should ,toe
gram on WMBM. temptation placed Well let's close the Teens
so come on girls and learn to to flower Into the garden of uni-
in
the "forbidden forever" cate- this
same
today
Conference
,
versal and here have
play golf. peace they
PRETTY mm, OF THE Week: : After presentations moved taken hold in fertile soil. gory, just as all magazines and topic will be continued next
we
I books which are professedly ob Until then long,
week. 10
Boy of the Week: Frank T. *
to the
spacious home of Mr. and .. .
Rivera Man Albout Town: Mrs. Ernest for I am humbly grateful to have scene. Let's put a veto on such
Samuel Moncur. where Hayes meeting been chosen to help cultivate things, as those 'which may undermine Hv61
we elected:
our officers for morals.
this our
spiritual garden.Entertains .
the new year. They are: Al Mitchell

EASTKU: MONDAY, April S, a president; Miss Grace Here Is a chance to watch your
Mr. E'eitlne' Crue Pretty Wade, vice; Mayme Dondu, secretary at Dinner step and kid brother's reading.
new motl will be born. The old ; Miss Irma Bodie, assis When you grew into bobby socks
Hoo'ter Terrace is now the New tant secretary; Mrs Rebecca And Bridge you discarded the comic books
Hampton House and Vll'as on Long, treasurer; Ernest Hayes, but little brother is still in the

27th ave. at 42nd st. It'a general tournament director and memo Mrs. Mabel J. Matthews, a retired throes of "Amazing Amazons"and
manager, Bill Knighton, will be bership chairman; Dave Dondu, teacher of Washington, "The Two Gun Wonder Man y
on hand to see that you and your business manager. D.C. and sister of Mrs. R. W. Rides Again." If we grab a can-

fr'ends will have the finest service Other players and members: Jackson of 1745 NW 55th Terr., did glimpse of these colorful
to h* had. The Hamnton participating were Amos Jenkins, entertained some of her Miami magazines that Junior is buyingup
ITnn e, with its newly furnished Mtas Lemmer Carter of Akron, friends at dinner and bridge on ''by the depressing dozens,
rooms, is something to see Of Ohio and Mrs. Mary Minor of last Saturday at 1 p.m. in the we'll find them crude and de
conr, e. the facilities of the Cleveland. Unfortunately, Mrs. Fiesta Room of the Mary Eliza moralizing.' For the most part,.
rwMmm'n' nonl are for the guests Minor was hit by a ball on the beth hotel. they are no longer 'comics" as
but good food can be had at the 8th hole and had to be rushed I their name implies, but ''fantastic
JTnmnton Hnm Restaurant to Broward County hospital 1 Those present were Mrs. Betty stories of superhuman sluthschalking
umpired bv Martin Crue and where eight stitches were required Alford, Mrs. Hazelle Brown, Mrs. up many murders or p k, f
Mina' Pearl Courteous service bv in treatment. Marie Drown, Mr. and Mrs. Wll. scantily clad glamazons grapplingwith

eenahle desk clerks) are at yourv"'rv Ernest Hayes and Chris Ham Gordan of D. C.; Miss Jungle ;lions. It the younger
Jen
command The formal kips won the' Leg Blanche Calloway, Mrs. Blanche: male (or female) member of
Trophies for
c,"e.ln' In'' Aoril 3 hy invitation' the year 1961. The who Carey, Mrs. Ozell Dunn; Mrs. your family is eating up this type
person
rmlv I am pure you wll'' be han keeps these leg trophies Alida Campbell, Mrs. Theora of literature, change his diet to
rv in n"nd your friends to the win them three times In must Houston, Mr. and Mrs. R. W. the lovab'e, laughable comics
New' Hampton House. sion. Duke, the succes Jackson, Mrs. Ova Killen, Mrs. that exclude the sordid side of
founder ot' the
Anne
Lindsey, Mrs. Henrietta life If you are still 'wondering
Par and Birdie Club, donated Antoinette Silva contestant for
Lindsey, Dr. and Mrs .
MV the men's leg William how to tackle the problem, (lewd Junior Miss Rhonianla Contest
MOST) hearty think to trophy and Nat Murrell
Mrs. Bessie Slater
Pflr-Mne: ninok Isabel Beer Co. Potamkln of Vic Potamkln Chev Albertha Sawyer, Mrs. Mrs. comics, not ,brother,) try sending to be held on April 7 at PhjTis:
inc the donation to the Carllni rolet donated the ladles' trophy. Thomas, Mrs. Mayme Evelyn In a (substitute, Tom Sawyer, Wheatley Elementary School
('!.n1, Tropbv to the Par and Blrrt The club is open for membership and Dr. and Mrs. Elmer Thompson Ward. for instance! Soon weird and wild sponsored by the Gamma Delta
,'" rinh, A''AO to Charlie Havek and anyone interested may adventure magazines will be partof Sigma; Chapter of Sigma Gamma
r>' Ml TlowHn" Alley for doni-' contact Earnest Hayes or any First prize was won by Mrs. their forgotten past. I Hbo Sorority. Antoinette is a
fnf n tronhv. We of the Par member of the club. Anne Lindsey; second, Mrs. Eve When it is Saturday night and 3rd grader at F. 8. Tucker Ele-
and B'rd'e' Club sincerely thank lyn Thomas; third, Mrs. Estelle Hank the heartbeat is out of mentary School.

you THE lr'LOIt STATE Teachers Jackson, fourth, Mrs. Killens,
Association meeting is com fifth, Miss Calloway and booby, : : :- ..: rl>l

ing up March 30, 31 and April 1. Mrs. Henrietta Lindsey.Men's .
MOST OP YOU will be Retting Many of
your friends will be f in
a ,letter from Mavme soon te'l- the city and the balling will be prizes were won by Mr. FLORSHEIMPresents
,Innvon the story of a heart on, Let's be helpful in traffic. If Gordon and Mr. Jackson. Mrs.
r"'"'''n''' .rttmtlon in Miami. The you see someone lost, he'p him Allda Campbell was score keep'
rh''rl''n's Service' Bureau of Miami find his way. It would be nice to er.
|. had> in need of our practice this with each other because
n1n Tvev have had to discon. this traffic Is a mess I in The Natural
..""e their pervloe to Negro or- Miami, anyhow. REPAIRS .;
?hens end nee v children and y
'h'''R'' """"dr n have been! turned AND CLEANING ON ALL
That's
it for this
week. Till
.,. .
.., .
to welfare With Juatn
next week, live :life, every" gold TypewritersQUALITY
.11 ; > Wnll'1 child be
one can
en minute of it. PEACE!
",'',,""rt 'in a footer home! where WORK AT

"e "I' "hft rn get medical care, REA8ONAHLE PRICES
'IInv" end affection and other Sales Rentals .
n"",,,,.rt t"'n"'s' until they are WANTED Rental Purchase Supplies Plan

avlnpte4 When you get the let Adding Machines Caucu'ators :
tnr please) read it carefully and EXPERIENCED Cash Registers Check Writers S
,
'oon your hearts and pocket-
OPERATOR ATLANTIC)
hanks to th"se children I know BUSINESS

thAt von can set!" all kind of re. 14552 NW 22nd Ave. MACHINES EXCHANGE
ou'vts for money, but this is an 0007 N.W. 7th Ate. PL ?,
7445
"" !:"nt and much needed service. For Interview
This is the only Negro Adoption
a"'''ncy in Florida, and servises Magnolia
Salon
Beauty
Dade County Children: although
th"v are placed throughout the THE
state. Please help. Or Call MU 5.3921 SLEEK a

LOOK IN
t aflOISNIItif


STAR MEAT MARKET BOG I


RACING
Lightweight Polished Calf In

1520 N.W. 62nd Street Black or Light Tan
$22.95

._ _, .4 e V With white solo stitch

! THE MARKET WITH COURTEOUS SERVICE .


I I' Seaefapms'r horJ'hel TJ SHOE STORE


/ 245 E. .
FlaglerALSO
tt-f II

Fresh Meat-low Prices BA EJ 04, .

THAYER McNEIL (Cowen's) 155 E. FLAGLER

DUPONT BLDO.THE .

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MIAMI TIMES -" MIAMI, FLORIDA SIGMAS MEET IN

SATURDAY MARCH 25, 1961 PAGE 3 N

.." ----, ,;; "-" ." MISSISSIPPIRowan

R. High School In Hatties

: THIS and V' Southeastern burg, was the Regional scene Conference of th..

of the Sigma Gamma R h o
'
::,: .,. Sorority, March 10 and 11 Beta:

: :;:::i.k4 i.' THAT .' >f i ki A 4 iChl Sigma, the hostess chapter'

,}',.", "., rolled out the velvet carpet tot
'.,je' ; ..' all visiting 80ror De'egatesJ
concentrated on the' theme
.
RUTH N. POLITE ,
By
Far
"Training Our Youth Com"

,,4.," ____. _____.________________,.__._________. i p+ munity Leadership."
..._.___"' w -.----..--""' Conference activities opCtud1

MARCH may be a month of Jennie B. Roberts, Gladys on Friday evening, March 19
blustery winds, low flying Knowles, Amelia Burley, Luella after registration with a public
clouds and beating rains but it W. Thompson, March 24; program in the auditorium.
also has the first day of Spring Mable T. Glover! Vanessa E. An- itIk Greetings were extended by
the first shy buds and blossoms derson, March 25; Donald R. N. Durger, principal of the
peeking from the soil, and every Chism, Carole L. Buskin, March Rowan High School; S. E. Wit'
tree with its leafless branches 26; Sandra Coverson, March 28; son, polemarch of Kappa Alpha
begins to show evidence of new Alma DeVaugh, March 29; Fran. Psi and Soror R. M. Tadamy of

Gina Culmer, Godfrey Powell, the hostess chapter. The keynote
life.This menage Of hope in the Lovell Richardson Jr., John "., 'i:, ,'t,' address was given by the grand
renewal of life every springtime Charles Thomas, March 30; -- ,'.':.: \. I baslleus Dr. Lorraine A. Wll-
has made It possible: for man to Ceeste: Withers James LucasJr. Sunday, March 12 Dr. Harry Foundation and Laurence A. Hams of Howard University,
endure the difficulties and trag- ., March 2LTHOUGHT Sweeting publicly unveiled the Godden, a director of the Foundation Soror Myrtle Russell of Nash
edies of his life. No hardship no charter of the Sweeting Foundation ; Prof. S. Meredith Mosley, vllle made the introduction.
trying situation no clouding of FOR THE WEEK: Fund, ,Inc. Shown standing secretary-treasurer, was not
the brightest day can last for Those who live on the mountain from left to right are: Rev. Ed- present for the picture, neitherwas Soror Elisabeth M. Blackman,
ever. Sooner or :later tire tide have a longer day than those ward T. Graham of Mt. Zion Thomas O. Berryhill, the regional syntaktes. presided over
changes "Weeping may endure who live in the valley. Some Baptist Church, Miami; HerbertC. acting attorney who drew up the the business sessions with the
for a night but Joy cometh In times all we need to brightenour Long vice president of the charter for the Foundation.The able assistance of Soror Evelyn
the morning." The tragedies of day Is to rise a little higher. Foundation; Edward Johns, Foundation has for its Hood campus coordinator .
this life am not the finalities of mayor of Ft. Lauderdale; Father purpose the granting of Educational Highlighting the social affairs
man's destiny.If Royal Twenty ClubThe Theodore Gibson' Christ Episcopal Scholarships to deserving ': of the conference was' the
cOQ ttall chit-chat
nature becomes vibrant with Church, Coconut Grove: Dr. girls and boys regardless of race given by the
and Royal Twenty Women's Sweeting, president of the or creed. Philoa of Deta Chi Sigma at the
new life and brings joy 111. home
of Soror Estelle Jenkln
Club' held its regular meeting at
with assured regularity '
beauty
the lovely home of Mrs. Eliza The people of Jlattle burg are
how certain It is that the soul
beth ,Bethune at 1741 NW 5th That Wonder Girl Tally All BandOrganizes to be commended for the fine*
of man can have a new begin City spirit of cooperation exhibited
n'ng.' Every WINTER of mlsfor. Drown is back in town, produc-
ave.Several in accepting this conference* .having
tune is followed by a SPRING topics were discussedat ing and starring in the Fine experienced dffttauU
many
this meeting with emphasison
time of new life. future projects. Most notable Arts ,Conservatory show. "Sing ties during the recent flood.
All of
17
Yesterday is gone. TomorrowIs Out Dance-In" April' 7 8:30 persons over years
among these are the plans for : p.m.Northwt".stern
age including high school students Many had not returned to
not here. Today can be a new
the children's room at Christian Senior High School. and adults who either their
day! One of life's greatest pos are homes as a result of flood; :
Hospital. .
beginners, Intermediates, or advanced water damages
sessions is theabl11ty to say
The lovely hostess and daughter -
band students invitedto
are Representing the local chapter
amid the darkness of our days
were thanked highly by Mrs. Beautiful Homo Join "All Star Band"
"This, too, will pass!I" on were Sorors Hazel L Grant
Carrie Bryant for such a wonderful
Registration for this group basileus and Sarah Alice Cherry
Your Lot
and delicious repast was held on March 20, in the regional grammateus.
THE AMERICAN Association which was prepared by the sisterof Northwestern Senior High They returned to Miami via.
of University Women. The NEWCOMER the hostess. 7fi axd& School's band room at 7 o'clock National Airlines with much
The next will be
GROUP of AAUW, meeting heU p,m. praise for the hospitality of the.
March 26 at the home of Mrs.
Featured activities w e 'r e
headed by committee chairman, people of Hattlesburg, Miss.
Mrs. Clifford G. Singleton pro- Carrie Bryant at 1060 NW 64th dance band concert band, theory,
B"ntpd the annual "SPRING St.Mrs. solos and ensembles. All Miami
FEVER" fashion show luncheonto Ada ,Bell Dune president; musicians are welcome. "
an enthusiastic audience of Mrs. Ethel Peavy, reporter. The material fee tor this activity Watch for Fine Arts Conservatory

more than 300 at the Dup.ontPlAza is only $2.00 per quarter.For Annual Show .
on March 18. The affair Boegaters Entertain Complete Building 8.rvlo further information call "SING OUT DANCE IN"APRIL
7TH 8UO: P.M.
I'L 4-5491 Monday through Friday
was given to benefit the local!
hul'dlng and scholarship funds. With Birthday Party PLANNING from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m. Northwestern High School

Thill talented REGINA JOLLI. BUILDING
-- -
Rev. a.ndIrs.! Sheppard Boe
VETTE performed with marked FINANCINGYour
aesthetic ability in executing an gaters entertained Mrs. Miriam
interpretive dance. Gifted MARSHA Culmer of Key West on the oc New Horn ;
McIVER accompanied her casion of her birthday, with a
at the piano. The models wore very unique party held at the No Down
fashions by Parsons and the Boegaters' home 627 NW 9th
Younger Set of Coral Gables. St., apt. 1, Sunday afternoon.Mrs. Payment
Culmer was accompaniedto
Mrs. Singleton had among her Miami by her daughter and Ovtr Twenty Years of
aides Mft'dames demons Hapclnnd. ,0n'ln-Jaw. Mr. and Mrs. Shaus-
WI'lIam Dawson Ernest man and their three children Construction ExptrUnci
Crowder, Harold Williams Gloria A goodly number of relativesand Guaranteed Satisfaction .
Peters C. Harold Williams: friends attended the affair
Ruth Greenfield May deForest and enjoyed of Its many festlvitles 1?aaaL7aaa
nu h N. Po'lte. Others were A lovely, rppast was served
MlMes. Rose Mae Lee. Mary Ann and enjoyed by all present. (!)@fE\3\
n rand wood, Diana Lopez Har. The entire group extended hap-
rlet Wilson: Alice Amdor, Bever1r py birthday greetings to Mrs. I PL 1-3604
Cox, Gall Hammaker. Culmer and wished her many, FREE DELIVEAY DRUG
many more.'Returns. 888 N.E. 79th St. .
I -
Miami ,.' "'t.'Jf_:'__ :'
WEDDING DELLS will ring ,
for Miss GLORIA MAY DnA y. FromBahamian HAROLD JOLLIVETTI, Manager
NON and RAYMOND JULIAN
VisitMrs.
RODINSON on the evening of
March 29 at St. Paul AME Rhona Hlggs Hutcherson
Church. The Business and Pro and Mrs. Elizabeth Bethel have w4yy
fessional Girls C'ub of YWCA returned to Miami after spend
mv'. a !cltchen shower for the ing a refreshing vacation in the
hrld'e.tobe. The social affair Bahamas. They were accompanied
tnok place last Tuesday evening. by their brother on this trip.
the Rev. H W Brown, pastor of
nOUOUET of Get-Well WishM Bethel Baptist Church Nassau,
to Edwin R. Rogers who is in who was over here attending a
Mt. Sinai Hospital for the week. Baptist District 'Convention.
The same is extended to the While In the Bahamas Mrs. \\W\\
famed Dr. JEANNE S. NOBLE, Hutcheson and Mrs. Bethel visit.
national: president of Delta Sigma ed Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera and
ThPta Sorority who is bed. had a happy reunion with their
rtd at Mt. Morris Park Hospital, sister Mrs. Alma Hutcheson, \ \ t \
10 Mt. Morris Park West, NYC. mother of Rev. Ernest Hutche-
son Jr. of Miami. The two sisters
HAPPY WEDDING Annlvernry were pleased to have another
greetings to Mr. and Mrs. sister, Mrs. J. H Johnson of West
Ernest Crowder March 23. Palm Beach down on the 10th. 4
Mrs. Hutchwon returned to New
GREETINGS to York :last week.

...
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: '.: ;f( fll L J

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Easter Fashion ShowThe
Police
I and
-!'et.bue; Killens
: :PAGE 4 SATURDAY, MARCH 28. tHt j HospitalityClub

i JUST BROWSIN'ayPAUL Capture Sunday presents Its annual Musical) Tel
and Easter Fashions Easter Day
HENRY9S98SSSSSSSSSSSSSSS Spotlight April 2, 4 to 6p.m.., Masonic
t .. .-, -i 8i:! incomparable Clyde K11- Temple 1744 NW 3rd ave. Do
The Miami night club nation 60 cents.. Mrs. Irene

1.;. 1 I .. -_- --=: -_.'_ _-,. _. -___-- ._...-,..___.. ::,week The decided New York to Yankees move from their this St. SSagSr.who triumph'' to his added long series another of Rolle Perkins.' ,secretary president; Miss ,listen
quarters
viUi'l'tr fnrttg
> when he
: Main Office At G4o N.W., lath Avenue--Phone OX l.out ': iettf3r Durg to Ft. Lauderdale. successes last Sunday who Fashion
,
with local police Easter Tea
f Yanks
together
.
r Branch at 1112 N.W. Third Ave., MiarI; Florida- u>ne FR ... : .\ eglnitlbg,'next spring the their annual dance: at
sponsored
.pp. Lauderdale
.J.. ., j "e1p( ct to train In Ft. Park Auditorium"stole The Bethany SDA home and
I Bayfront
II. E. SIGISMU.XD IIEEVE8, Editor and Publisher i| for the next decade. Training the show" at both the School; will present an ,Easter

Garth C. Reeves, Managing Editor and Business Sfanager at St. Petersburgthe of: the National dance,. and the Knight Beat Club Fashion Tea featuring tots Jun.
new team fol'owlng' the annual affair. Kll' ors and teenagers on _Easier

Entered as Second Glass Matter, August 0, 1927, pt the Post Office League. still looking for a 'len attended and rendered a Sunday at 4:30 p.m. at 6001
Metro 15 at the Police NW 25th ave. Come out and see
at Miami, Florida, under the act of )March. : 1870 manager. There are local 11 appucantJCseven fo.k.- timely dance and service Immediately following the latest and most beautiful
: of them Easter frocks of the season. Vivian
'" t: Long, Is president.The .

Palm Sunday r'. .., a.. Hollywood t mall tornado Tuesday struck afternoon West- pub'lc is invited to a dinner .

Rid on! Ride on 'in majesty 1 r ::: ..... .. .1 destroying on 12 small p.anea'at sale glvdn.by the Bethany
SDA Church building committee.Full .
experienced
Hark! All the tribes hosanna cry; the airfield.winds Miami and some course dinners for $1.00

Thy humble beast pursues the road"With : much needed strong rain.Announcement each. Come Out and help this

,palms and scattered garments strowed.On worthy cause.
of a new
Sunday we commemorate the Triumph'al' En- schedule of minimum wage North Dade Chorusto

try of Our Lord into Jerusalem, commonly called Palm rates by the Labor Departmentshows
Sunday. 10 cents a bucket for to. Present CantataThe
25 cents a crate. The
Christ's earthly work was done. He had advertised jnatoes hourly or rate for vegetables la 60 North Dada Senior High

His presence to the nation by three years journeyings, by an hour. This Is Just about whatIt the celebration, he the po chorus will present the cantata,
His own unceasing miracles; by the journeying and mi had been. lice and most of the large crowd "The Seven Last Words of
made what seemed to be a bee Christ" in the school auditoriumon
:racles of the Twelve and of the Seventy. The time had
,
Good news come from South line for Killens' Knight Beat Wednesday, March 29 at
'come for Him to be offered as the Lamb of God. That was Dade migrant camps. There are Club where the group enjoyed 8:15: pm. The public is invited.

what He came into the world for, and He knew it. In a about 8,000 workers on the Job. another evening of stellar en Charles H. Jones Is the director -

grand demonstration, as final notice to the Holy City that However a $10,000 picking machine tertainment. Those who were .
has been put on the Job there are saying that "they
the King of Glory was at hand. He entered amidst the and this will certainly cut were hanging from the rafters"at
hallelujahs and hosannas of the expectant multitudes, an down the number of workers. I both affairs, and everyone Benefit Dinner PartyA

occasion to make even 'the stones cry aloud for joy. I had the time of his life. I benefit dinner party will be
Circuit Court Judge John Ke- held
on Saturday night March
Nearly two thousand years later we commemoratethis hoe has proposed that the Florida 25, at 7:30 at the Liberty
annual event with special services, outdoor proces- Legislature enact a compulsory Square auditorium 6306 NW
sions and, with bands of music and the carrying of palms.It Insurance law covering all 14th ave. The affair is a bene.
licensed motorists. He believes.It fit for the Queen Bee Rally of
is indeed a great event and well may it be com. would mean fewer accidents, the Spiritual Guidance Templeof
memorated. protection for persons suffering Truth 1740 NW 3rd ave.
Injury or damage and would Mrs. Thelma Edmonson is the
Evangelist Graham Crusade keep countless Irresponsible sponsor. The public is invited.
drivers off the highways.The .
Evangelist Billy Graham; well known throughoutthe measure would require a .
world has been in :Miami minimum of $10,000 liability
conducting a religious crusade insurance for anyone getting a FOR SALELuncheonette
for the past four weeks. During that time more than Florida license. The measure .

200,000 attended his meetings at the Miami Beach Con- would also change the expiration

vention Hall. Others heard him at some of our churchesand date of licenses to midnighton
the birthday of each Indivi
on television. -- dual, or In case of families on _Beer and wine license
The number of persons letting the evangelist know the birthday of the head of the is .

they were Christians or making decisions by going to the family. It would prohibit any Good location
Insurance from '
company suspending -
front were over 5,000. or revoking a policy I Owner leaving town.
Evangelist Graham ,expressed disappointment at the unless' the company gives a 60. '.

:number of Negroes attending the crusade ; there were day notice to the state and the \ Terms to right party. See at

about 300 each night.. He said it was a great opportunityfor Individual.We. will have to wait and see gk ); '

the Negro people to work together with 'other races what the legislators think about idtj,1 ... 7517 N.W. 22nd Ave.

in reaching a new spiritual dimension. Perhaps transportation this proposal. .
Sgt. Jesse Nash, who was one /N. 'H
had, something to do with the small attendance.
of the leaders of the Police As-
Douglas William Johnson, i J. F. DEAL STUDIO
Evangelist Graham, speaking about combating Communism who found $240,000 and turnedIt sociation that sponsored the Phone FR 4.3034
said that America should remedy its "total ignorance" over to the FDI should be a dance on Sunday and who was
also those
among who led the 307 N.W. 2nd Ave.
very happy man today. He has
about Communism by teaching it in its public received a check for $10,000 bee line from the auditorium to We copy and enlarge picture nf
schools and seminaries.The the Knight Beat C ub. Sgt.
from the Brinks Co.
owners of your loved ones at half pHcr. \V>
crusade has received much favorable comment.We the money. Of course, honesty Nash, other officers, Killens the
make all kinds of .
guests all agreed that It was a pictures..MNNN..NN.N..N.NM..N..NN.
Is the best
hope the impression it made upon those attendingwill policy great night at both p'aces-'onr: ,. .

be a lasting one, not only to themselves but to :Miamias In New York an all-Negrr that will long be remembered.

a whole. production has been started on
The crusade will hold its last meeting on Sunday, a flm: entitled "Uhuru." The I EXPERT WATCH AND NEED MONEY

March 26.MAYOR. idea for the film came from the CLOCK REPAIRS $25 to $600
"Freedom Now Suite" written
SALUTES TIMES DURING NATIONAL "nd recorded bv drummer Max Andrews' Jewelers Call PL 8-3653
Roach and folk singer Oscar 303 N.W. 2nd .Ave.
NEGRO NEWSPAPER WEEKMr. Drown, Sidney Poplar is direct- All work guaranteed IDEAL LOAN
Ing the film production. 6105 N.W. Ave.
40 Years In business 7th
Henry E. S, Reeves .
FR 3-0152
Owner-Publisher Last Snndav the congregation!
The Miami Times of the Church of the Incarnation I .
-
the Rev Ellsha! Clarke
6740 N.W. 151h Avenue
vicar was the guest of Christ
Miami: Florida Church.! Coconut Grove, the
Rr. Theodore Gibson vicar
Dear Mr. Reeves: The Rev. Fr. Clarke deliveredthe ATTENTION
sermon. Annually these
I would like to take this opportunity to salute you churches hold a Joint service two

and your newspaper during this, the 23rd annual National during the Lenten season.!

Negro Newspaper Week. Omega PM Phi Fraternity will
The Miami Times is an excellent example of devotionto hold Its 24th meeting of the The Seaboard Shoe

the community, as evidenced .by the many awards you Seventh District on March 30.31
have received. tn Ocala with PsI Chi chapteras
host. There are 47 chaptersof
Your record of 38 years of continuous publication is the fraternity In Alabama,

in itself an achievement of which all may well be proud. Florida, Georgia and Mississip Repair Shop
pi comprising the district. /
May you and your newspaper continue your, fine Guest speaker for the occasion "
work in will be J. B. may ton t
serving our community. of Atlanta .
banker and educator. 2186 N.W. 7th Avenue '
Sincerely,
(Noar Seaboard Railway Station)
Robert King High, Mayor The Western and Southern
Life Insurance Co., Chicago,
South Africa to Quit Commonwealth. who emp'oyed Melvin Hawkins Has Opened a Complete
as their first Negro salesman In
The British Commonwealth of Nations is shrinking. June of 19(0 has been *o pleas
ed with his record they have CANCELLATION SHOE DEPT.Featuring .
'
The latest move in this direction comes from Prime Minister -
promoted him to be associate
Verwoerd of South! Africa, who declares t hat on manager.

May 81, Republic Day, South Africa'will leave the Com- Brown ----a-
monwealth. The Premier's statement followed a conference Mrs. Leroy C. spent
last week In Cocoa at the bed
which condemned South African racial policies. side of her uncle, Willie
Verwoerd's action to withdraw has been criticizedby Williams who died March 7 Men's, Women's and Children's Shoes .;

members of the South African Parliament as Miss Elizabeth Williams: Mrs.
some Ida Belle Eddy Mrs. Gertna Williams WORK SHOES, OUR SPECIALTY
well as by other Commonwealth members. and daughter Saundra and

I South Africa's withdrawal is being widely discussed. Mrs Ira Mae Jones joined her Prices From $1.00 To $5.98NO
later to attend the funeral They
Africans have been, treated badly enough within the were accompanied back by aunts.
Commonwealth. Imagine what will happen when she Mr; Roxie Brown, Miss Gussle MORE LATEST STYLES ,
Wi 'lams of Mt. Claire N. J. and I II
wJthdraws.'Y I Mib Josey Williams of Cocoa. I



I
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'. _... ._... _. ... ,J 1:1: '0 _ ,. ./If, ,,- fOl .






MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA LUXURIOUS NEW 11 MAKE B-CC Rev. Abernathy

'SATURDAY, MARCH 25,. 1961 PAGE: 5 ACCOMMODATIONSGRANDSTAND HONOR ROLL
I J Mt. Zion Sunday
----- -
Dayton Bts/eb Llsted- are
y persons fromV Miami. whO"'wtlre The Her Ralph D. Abernathyof
Y on the Dean') list for they ffll Montgomery, Ala, will deliver .
semester at : ''Bethune kman the Palm Sunday messageat
College: RAscellat Davis, 3.50; 11 a.m. at the Mt. Zion Baptist .
Aletha Hall. 3.63; ; Maude, New
Church, Rev. E. T. Graham,
.l>old 3.66; Kathryn..Bethel\ 3.25; minister.
nonorable: mention' ; Johnny M.
ARtHIE I1ftIZ Drown 3.06; Parnella\Cobb 3.00; The Rev. Abernathy is a militant
: 111 CPINDCR Evadney Curlin S.18-Tvonne;: D. race leader and coworker
Kenner 3.13; Gwendolyn Park of Dr. Martin Luther King. He
DX 'er, 3.13 Moxe'l Ttirne(3.2.2, and was one of those who led in the

1_ Delores Ding, 3.00- ,,'Goulds.4 I famous Montgomery Boycott

.tI 1I Killer SentencedCircuit t J wife, Rosezenla Lee In the
KAPPA. Alpha Psl Fraternity Vernon Harris looks a lol '. 9- mouth with a shotgun while she
Is busy planning) its 50th anniversary better since he hit that $1,019 I Judge 'Francis J. was arguing with him. The
tor April 28 when they double at Hialeah The Pos Christie sentenced Wallace Lee, slaying occurred last Dec. 18 at I
present a Black and White Ball tal Employees dance was the Jr., to ten years in FlOrida State Campbell's Quarters in South
at Bayfront Auditorium biggest and liveliest ever seen In Prison Friday for '''shooting his Dade.
Gamma Delta Sigma Chapter is the Bayfront auditorium The aa
staging its 'Rhomanla" Friday, King of Clubs Annual Prom b4 3CAL'S
April 7 at Phyllis Wheatley 'tother Friday night was a real
Auditorium The Pioneer high class} affair. No ,bully-gully NEED MONEY ?
Cub is mailing Invites to their lines.
First Annual Tea April 9 on the
lawn 'Of Range Funeral Home. JOHNNIE MATIIIS, Just voted BAR & GRILLENOW WE MAKE AND REFINANCE MORTGAGESWE
one of the 10 best
dressed men
DtOSB! of NASSAU In America, has made the Na BUY LOTS AND HOMESCall
has 'been in Jackson hosp. for 5 ;Ional Urban League beneficiary SERVINGBREAKFAST
months Willie Mae Denson co a $25,000 insurance policy
LUNCH Ronald I. Baron
has teen In Christian hosp for 2 I When Jackie Robinson JE 2.43 3
week now. She was banged up I spoke at Mt. Olivette a few AND DINNERAt ,Mortgage Broker ..
when a reckless motorist banged reeks ago he donated his $100
into her car while on the way to I, lonorarlum to the Fr. Gibson Popular Price 228 SUNNY+ ISLE HLVD. fjf| 7.3566
work Young popular Orange lefense fund This is a ter MIAMI BEACH Iff
Hayes is co-owner of the Wank :'Iflc whiskey price war going on 6006 N.W. 22nd Ave.
er-Hill Funeral Home ocally. Haig and Halg scotch Is
15th and' 67th t. ., Recall corner the ol down to $4.29 and Seagram's VO .....y ,Ir ""n...,,"............ .. ........ ... .: .. ... .... ......
Terrtflcos recently* now at the jells for $4,59 a fifth Jes ,., ,., ,a.: ............ wa. .. fCi_.!I.:. ..:>.!.....::.\:; -...*,* t*.**.:?*.3..W'kfiAJW'- **.:.:.._*.'?A i.Efta'T.atWoL.,, -=....*. **,- ( !.*.**S..*..**.5?..&*.**rPaffiMQjM.......... D
Thunderbird Motel, Miami Beach lie Smith leaves for Nassau, to
you saw them at the King 0' day to arrange a fashion showor I
Hearts as the singing, swinging : April 7 Fats Domino 1 Is ---------------.JNSURANCE..CIi. I I
Zeniths. Remember acing a paternity suit in L. A.
C. Blythe Andrews Jr.. Fla.
Sentinel editor, came over from
THEY TELL !ME another
bowling al ey is on blue: print lamps for the fight. '
along with a :ounge, when the OF FLORIDA
LOMELO'S King O'Heartfl Chi LIT C
Commercial Bank .I
moves out ol: jpreaded the red carpet welcom I
Its 7th ave. location to 95th it ng the return of Sammy Moore
And it's to be operated by tin
and Dave Prater. Their New
same owner as Ml on 75th St.
The Senior's Funeral Home fork, Apollo Theatre appearance
tad recent association with At PROUDLY PRESENTS
is under
new .
ownership taggea
Brownsville Funeral Home. Willie antic Recording Artist (they cut '. ; .
wo for the Juke boxes) which
Williams,
manager, Robert ire to be released soon, "I NeeLovo" <
Moore and Jac'.c: Corbltt
are as
"
aifltants The Railroader and "Shout will reach s' THE NEW
you sooner than the recording.
Club is expecting you at 1U j.A:
The show also
new pack
spring dance Friday, March 31
at the Fiesta Club. Billy Rolle'sband 3am Early's band, new In these
wi 1 furnish the parts, and his unique style on
for the happenings the organ, This Is, something you
railroad
and their -guests.JI2HRV employess must presented see and Vanilla hear. Phil Williamsand Harris :.r; Golden Shield

her new fire dance. No admission -
D13VKAUX came down ..
', '
from New York for his cousin's so it will pay to make 'o/t'I./ .* "J

burial Dr. Martin Luther .oservatlons early. .. ...... .. t '
King paid a short visit to Miami ', .. .."oJ.',.",.'.''.'.''.'..- ... I., .. ( .;.;""t.!1+ '. I
.f ''I 'vIt
three weeks ago Leontyne .' ./ .' .- .
Price, who made her debut at TALENTUNLIMITED .. < ICY
the Met six weeks ago, was on .* / !

the cover of Time mag last week ----A.. 1 .; '.' !

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JOHN A.

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1

tin Franklin, U.S. Army Rt.; and Rev. Abernathy to
THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA 10 Graduate From of
Frank X. Marter, director
Speak in
PACE 6 SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1961 Electronics School training of the 38 schools thru-
out the U. S. and Canada. Mr. Ft. LauderdaleThe

By GRADY L. CIIISHOL51 Joseph "George" Raulston, owner Fort Lauderdale Alumni

and president of Certified Chapter of Kappa Alpha Pal
ALONG FREEDOM'S ROAD The Radio Electronics Television : Radio and TV Supply, Inc., and Fraternity is observing its '15th

I School, Internationallyknown the guest speaker of the evening year of achievement, Sunday,

as RETS, held a banquetin Benny L. O'Berry of the March 26, at 3:30( p.m. In the
By RUTH PERRY O'Berry Magic City Driving Dillard High School: auditorium.
honor of its first graduatingclass
.. 3&&ir Xata'XZ S X ; .....,.. ". School. Some of the most outstanding
of Negroes, Friday, March leaders in the country are expected *
Several years ago, the Ameri a multiplicity of devices to defeat 10. The 'banquet was held atop Also introduced was Alexander to be present. The Rev.

can Jewish Congress published avery or delay implementation of the roof of the Carver Hotel Brook, president of the The Ralph D. Abernathy, militant
admirable and Interesting the Court's decision. At first only Sphinx Civic Club and James leader of Montgomery, Aa., and
study called "Assault Upon the constitutional guaranty of It was a history making event McFadgon the financial secre- co-worker of Dr. Martin Luther

Freedom of Association." It Is a equality was challenged. Today, because It's fhe first time thata tary. King will deliver the main ad
study of the Southern attack on however, the fundamental rights Negro has graduated from a dress. 'Music for the occasionwill
the NAACP, showing the recordof of expression are in jeopardy school of electronics of this call John McFadgon was presentedwith be furnished by our county
the Southern states In detail The attack on the NAACP is a bre in the south, and also onethat's a beautiful desk set and school bands and chorus groups.
: with each of the graduates
reckless effort to preserve in headed by a Negro. plaque Roscoe C. Webb is polemarchof
equality by stifling freedom, and names Inscribed as a tokenof the dhapter.Happenings.
NAACP IS LEGITIMATE because of this, all Americansface John McFadgon, a native Ml- thanks of a job well done.

I in this move a menace to mian, has the distinction of being
In view of the great social ten I Consequently each of the stu at
their most treasured liberties. the only Negro instructor in
sionarlslng In the Southern dents, under the guidance of
Therefore states the study the the' of the is the
employ system,
I
states because of the Supreme Mr. McFadgon took a test, Sphinx Civic Club
right of the NAACP to survive head of a school.'
Court decision on desegregationof passed and received their FCC
and work for its must
public schools, It would be program Although the weather was licenses. The Sphinx Civic Club celebrated -
be defended even by those who
foolish and useless to expect Brotherhood Week with
quite cool for the occasion the
disagree with Its purposes. The ten graduates are: Samuel its
annual dinner
compete: and universal agree- roof was filled: to Invitational ca party at the
ment as to how quickly the Supreme THE LAW DISTORTEDThe pacity. Never once was a mention L. Abraham, South Miami: Rol. spacious home of Its presidentand
Court decision: can and made of the weather once the lo Dirk, Ft. Lauderdale: Grady wife, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander .
should be made effective. But It American Jewish Con festivities were underway. L. Chisholm, Richmond Heights; Brooks In Opa Locka, Feb.
is not too much to expect that grfss report further states. that Moses Lias, Winter Park; Lester 28.Mrs.
all Americans should be con one aspect of the attack on the ,Mr. McFadgon acted as toast Miller, Perrine; Walter Powell, Eloise B. Brown assisted
cerned with the actions being NAACP is perhaps the gravest in master and proved to be a very South Miami; John W. Singleton Mrs. Brooks: as hostess.
taken to liquidate the NAACP in Its potentialities. Laws are being capable one. Several speakerswere Miami; George Thronton, The group engaged in singing
many Southern states. distorted from their true pur- Introduced, which were Pompano: John Timmons, Coco several spicy songs which were

pose, oppressive Investigationsmade Alfred W. Keniston, personnel, nut Grove and Melvin K. Wright, followed by addresses on Broth
No one who knows or recog- prosecutions started and director; General Albert Galla- HalLandal: erhood.
nizes the facts honestly and rea penalties imposed, not in the Brotherhood in Clubs by James
listically can b'ame the NAACPfor normal course of law enforce I : ,' vI McFadgon, a member, of the
the racial problems In our Sphinx Club.Brotherhood.
ment, 'but to serve an ulterior
country or can they thlnlc of this purpose. In order to silence or in the Communi

organization as made up of extremists ganized dissent, the NAACP and ty by Mrs. Evelyn Williams, a
of one sort to be set its leaders are subjected to requirements teacher at the Bethune Elemen-
opposite the extremists on the tests and searchesnot tary School.
other side who make up the
applied to others. Anti Both'
White Citizens Councils and the speakers challenged us to
Ku Klux Klan The study by the barratry and other laws are 'end a hand to help one another,
passed with the Obvious Intent of in
American Jewish Congress our daily toll of life and
using them dlscrlminatorlly: when we meet a weaker
brother
states that it is clear to anyone
Little effort 13 made to conceal to help him in his strife.
to read the rec-
who is wll.lng
the fact that the full apparatus
ord that the NAACP is a legitimate of state government is ,being us- We enjoyed the fellowship of
association which by legal 'd to many local guests and one out of
destroy or cripple the
means is attempting to win for VAACP towner, Mrs. Eva Raiford of
colored peoples the rights which hand.by any means that come Chicago, Ill., who was guest of
0 In short, continues the Mr.
and
Mrs.
J.
citizens. Fortson.
they deserve as
study, Southern officials have
FREEDOM ASSOCIATIONThe lefied what the Supreme Court This dinner party was one that
has described as "the mandatesof guests and club members will
assaults made upon the equality and liberty that bind task: about for many days.

NAACP in the past few years, officials everywhere. f Y The club is engaging !in many
and still continuing, should be of community activities.
deep and immediate concern to A democracy must ever be on They are making many hearts
all who cherish the right of free guard against abuse of the pow- S C :WV'M happy, looking forward and not
dom of association upon whichour ers it entrusts to its officals. A l back, showing love and brotherhood .
democratic society depends strong, vital and watchful democracy and making sincere friends.

tor to America, Alexis de Toe can prevent .auch. Alexander: Brooks, president
More than 100 years ago, a vis- abuse. A democracy that falls to Junlous Fortson reporter.
------ - -
quevllle, observed that "when prevent them surrenders its right ,---or:7 ::: "
some kinds of associations are to the name. The people of the _

prohibited and others are allowed Southern states, together with For
The
it is difficult to distinguish their fellow citizens in all partsof Finest Apartments at Moderate Rates-Call
the former from the latter be- I the country, must Insure equal:
forehand. In this state of doubt justice for the NAACP if they
are to keep it for themselves.
men abstain from them alto
BONDED
gether, and a sort of public Every American has a stake
opinion passes current, that tendsto in the struggle of the NAACP to
cause any association what survive and continue its work.
ever to be regarded as a bold Freedom of
association, like the
and! almost Illicit enterprise." _
an
freedom of speech '
press and con
Freedom of association (with science which it Implements, exIsts COLLECTION al p.

special reference to the NAACP) primarily for the benefit of
the people at large. It .
protectsthe
has ''been under severe attack Yrs. _
during the past few years in people's right to hear, to
some Southern states. Since the know, to be Informed so that
'historic decision of the U. S. they may 'properly exercise their AGENCY
rights and! fulfill their obligations Inc.
Supreme Court in May, 1954,
condemning racial l segregation in as citizens.Advertise. _
public: schools, a number of Y
stale governments have invoked It Pays!

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,0'" -__ -r---------- ''L _- ., . ,






.. .;
Og.COOOOOQQCooooaOOG C THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA

sorcii'i s i I
LOOKING THE SATURDAY MARCH 25, 1961 PAGE

__
. .. <:: -c-<::-c-<::"<::c:;<::C'c; <::""C'C'c r ; ccc;<<-ca



SPORTS WORLD OVERBy 'r r Richmond Heights FlashesBy


LEO B. ARMBRISTER I ORA TAYLOR

._. __.. ..ft.. AAA.. _A____-w'_",_- _"'.''' '" '" w-", ..,!ijVV 'V._.. __ ..-. .....: ..- Is your social employer.security correctly reportingyour ? -,, ='"= --- .:-- =->- ,-.-'" '" .- =- = .....

The recent scandal in basketball young right handers have been "Your protection under the law GET WELL SOON We wishto HEART DRIVE We arc
circles arouses the antagon.ism showing great stuff and with the depends upon this," Edward P. send get-well cards to our happy again to say "thank you"to
of every sportsman who infield getting a solid hitting Blonston, .social security district many friends and acquaintancesin
treasures this particular sport as first baseman Boyd and general manager said today, in urging the Heights and over Dade each one who contributed to
a game. of competitive skill: improvement all around, some all workers to' police their own County too numereuos to list in our Heart Fund Drive. Becauseof
illness
well played by contestants who thing good should come out of accounts. p our column. However we mention of some key workers
give their all and are truly Kansas City this year. "Earnings of workers are Raymond Larryfl science in. we did not do as well as we

playing first class, because they yours Truly hopes for something credited from reports of their structor at, Mays High who was hoped.twill However each penny need given
', lore the game. Whatever it great to come from the employers and most of them," hurt recently in an auto acci whether serve a great
maybe, and second, to prove personal invitation Mr. Finley Mr. Bl'Onston said, "faithfully dent. His wife's grandmother, a awaits young at the or Heart old.Centers.To Service.
their worth to the specific sportin has extended to him to visit report these earnings year after passenger in the car, was also the you volunteers
worked
who
which they are toting: part. Kansas City as soon as the reg- year." Some employers may not hurt. lie is in the Veterans Hospital this again and the
ular season starts. Who knows realize their responsobllity; and in Coral Gables' and the year new ones
Our ego U deflated like a their in grandhother is in Jackson. Accept -the- Heart Association of Great
maybe a scout for Kansas City emplyees, particular,' .
blown out tire, when we find er Miami joins us as area chair.
will 'be in these parts. should make sure they are protected our "Get Well:! Soon.
these athletes, in whom we have ,Friends will visit or send get man in thanking you from the
tendered so much admiration, HILL RUSSELL NBA'S BEST "Postcard forms for checking! well cards depths of a heart as big as all
are deceiving us with unfair tac Bill Russell was voted the top I your individual account 'with the heart workers put together.
tics of throwing games for their player in the National Basket- social security are available at Your services have indeed filled
THE BARBECUE PIT-Richmond a great need. Among these
are
personal gains.Although
ba.l Association AllStar poll. ill district offices and should be
Heights welcomes the Mrs. Bes'ie
new Wright, Mrs. Ar
Wilt Chamberlain used
who has at least three
upset every years
condolence is not "Barbecue Pit" on Bethune Dr. thur Whitehead, Mrs. Jean
every record in the books, by all workers, Mr. Blonston
given to this type of performance could said. back of the Bethel Baptist Young, Mrs. Marie Bean, Mrs.
; there must be some deep get no, more than. a .second Church building. A courteousand Wells: Mrs. E. Troup Mrs. Ruth
team comp iment of votes. If statements returned by so-
seated reason why this very un. satisfactory service awaits Freeman, Mrs. -Woodle Brown,
On the first team with Russell cial security revea;- that earningsare
sportsmanlike practice is able there. Mrs. Kathleen Chisolm
to you Mrs.
is his Celtics' team mate Bob not 'posted to your record, Ethel
flourish. Carson Mrs.
Cousy, Bob Petit of the Hawks, steps will 'be taken to correct Eloulse Harrison

One avenue of approach to Elgin Baylor of the Lakers, and the ommisslon and Insure proper I NEW BUSINESSES We note Mary, Taylor Mrs. ,Mamie Mrs. George Young,Dean.Mrs.
clearing the smut from around Oscar Robertson of the Royals. reportongs by your employer progress continues in building Mrs. Barbara S. Owens The list
good. clean, honest competitionin Robertson was unanimously vot. "Most peop'e need many yearsof in the heights A new building ;*I11 be completed next.
sport would be to make a ed Rookie of the Year. social security credit to qualify I Is now under construction on
complete revision of the now for benefits," Mr., Blon.!ton I Bethune Drive across from the MIAMI DISTRICT CONFER..

complete, and unfavorable to the! Bridge Club NewsThe said, adding "It's your social Barbecue Pit. Soon there will ENCE Rev S. A. Roberts, the
athlete rue: which governs al security; make sure you are protected be others until we can truthfullysay presiding elder of the Miami Dis.
athletes in high school and col. ." "we have a shopping cent trict of the AME Church sent an
leges, colleges in particular, Sunshine State Duplicate ter." If you would like a business :invitation to the district meeting
Fhould be looked Into. ridge Club met at the home of Young Democratsto lot while they are :ow prlc. to be he'd at Homestead Wednesday
.
:.lr. and Mrs. Charles Gray of ed call your scribe at CE 5-4246 and Thursday of this

True there are scholarship: Richmond Heights, March 11. Meet MondayFellow and be on the road to. progress.Get week, We wL'h for them a suc
grants to the top-rated athletes, fne discussion was led by Mrs. your application in now. cessful meeting.

but that is all that is legallj' Ethel Qrier. The pair winners Democrats: a... ... "'-'-'''- "- ......." ..,.. "'So'" ..... .
P'rmlttcd, may be a small gra- Here first Gertrude McCoy and Re: Membership Drive and an n'II'IiI''IiI'.I: : !:' tuity for outstanding preform. Lucille Wheatley; second Chas. nual election: 8 p.m. Monday
anca is added, so when these Gray and Effie Williams; third March 27. Pace: Mary E'1za' TV Service $ .50
ath'etes find living conditions a Blanche Calloway and Haze beth Hotel, 638 NW 2nd ave. Calls !
little taxing they become easy Wright. The social hour was delightful This is an urgent call to a'l
prey for the vulturous racketeerwho Dade County Registered Democrats
dangles a few pieces of ail The next meeting will be at to attend this important ALL MAKES-ALL MODELS PLUS 'AUN .
ver in front of them.It the home of Mrs. Wright, 3155 meeting to plan for dynamic po.
NW 52nd St., March 25. lltical action in 1961. LARRY'S T.V.
is proposed that the rules We urge al:- members to get in Please come on time and

governing. these activities be so some practice and study be- bring with you any persons you WE BUY SELL AND TRADE TV SETS
rrlarei( : that athletes be given tween meetings especially those can interest in this vital com -
enough financial: aid to eliminate planning to attend the National munity project. I RADIOS, HI-FI AND STEREO REPAIRS
the need for turning to Tournament in Los (Angeles in Respectfully yours,
racketeers, whose main objec- August. Call the hostess NE Dr. E. A. Ward, 1551 N.W. 62nd Street OX 1-8024
tive Is to exploit them with no 41285. This is bridge ''etiquette. chairman of the board I''
regard for their ability to play I
the game.ANOTHER. 1liIJlrll.IIllllrI i11flrllll.II..Jmlll<<

1 -
CHAMPIONSHIP -
FOIl MIAMI "
Miami, which has YOUR FUTURf
not been ,
host to a championship fight in UNLIMITED +r.w ]
IS
almost three decades until the
Floyd Patterson. Ingemar Jo. I".
INelecfronlcs -
hansson heavyweight bout two 1 s f
-
weeks ago, wil 1 again be the LJ I
L
center of attraction for the stagIng PL( ; # .
of the welterweight champ

ionship crown between defending n.Mnfry rMputU.fr ItrfU,TV.....,. #
champion Denny (Kid) Paret ....4.-4 MUtlki. rn.tl.n Aircraft, Unitary .L
and Emile Griffith /k.' C..Ir.I., 1f..tI........,..'If
This promises to be the action flan M.r. ..IU for fritfil tkn
fight of the year, as both fight .. ... ..,,1 Ir. Waft Ii.111,.H./ r M011
ers are up and ready f., T imlU' f.. ".1 ht TOWPVTUUttli. 1k 1.)431rr. t.i .

KANSAS CITY TO VACATE

CELLAR A. A. Flnley vice president of / ... Ci tv 4r
the Kansas City Athletics, had as YU i-oaio _
UliUlt IlKtriiM Trtllltf Of "lr tm
this to [ M1 Uriilt
say about the ball club:
"We will definitely emerge from r----------
the second division'thIs .teason." I R.11.Ir."t= I

His reasoning, he explained: I III N.I. lift St., ......, ,..,14. II I II ;
was on the pitching arm of I KAMI .................................. A.l ......... _
Bass and Danford. These two I AODIISS j ...............u........... CITY ...........u J wi.slr __ "I :
I
1:1
fill MMUHW. Itikltt Hi tM,i.U MfimitiH, vrtto 11 uU, _
I
._

OPA LOCKA

f, .rA h4.

HEALTH CLUB Central Life Insurance Co. of Florida



ANNOUNCES .


New Combination HospitalAnd



Home Policy

i-

Hospital Benefits up to $15 per day __

i.C.2

Home Benefits up to $20 per week In Fine Whiskey. .


ALL IN ONE POLICY FLEISCHMANN'Sis

.. r u at ,. .,,ra
-- -
Candidates for "Mr. Physical SPECIAL AMBULANCE, MATERNITY AND the BIG buy !

Fitness" Contest, 8 p.m. Satur MISCELLANEOUS HOSPITAL BENEFITS Ml,
day, April 29 at Carpenters :
Union Hall 2939 NW 46th it. .
To qualify: Pose, military I l I

press snatch, clean and jerk Agents and Branches StatewideContact PROOF wny.
bench pro's. Deadline for all go
entries is Thursday April 27.
Branch Offices
one of our Agent or
To enter see Zeak. the muscle
BLENDED WHISKEY 00 PROOF 69% GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS
152nd it Information
builder, at 1995 NW Statewide for Additional
or call MU 13667. The pubic THE FLEISCHMANN' DISTILLINO CORPORATION NEW YORK CITY

. A29I -
la Inrited. ----- -- -





I

i .... +t ---- ,



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PAGE 8 r THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA- _y_._ SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1961-_ I


'IL IJ..IL lJ.. IJ.. -f1L _. .- -_.-_ ...JL. --- --- .- 1d".oJi Ih. &..r



'

A
A e e



GRAND .



A


WAY



DISCOUNT CENTERS

a= '"





GIRLS' FAMOUS MAKE ;

TOTS' & TODDLERS'PAJAMAS <

; DRESIEIJ i

i u rr .




# ::

vta>
r w

e S Comparable

Comperrable 1#+,, f Value 2983.98
Yalu. $1.19 ;, I r
*
a I

Drip dry or pllsso eottensl'!
Cute juvenile prints! i '
4
r' Dripper maps. one and 2 t ( ,
e e* piece styles! Lllic! Orange! Hot Pink! Blue! Mint! Maize! White! Redl! So '
G Sins 2-1 and 4-81 J many dainty styles to choose from.. cap slim &sleeveless I'1 h
Included! Fine detailing by top makers make these dresses 1 30911 J ; %
,' Sr :? 'v just lovable! Sizes 1-3,3-6x and 714. A truly wonderful say ,
4r
Ml C ,lyings for the young it heart! j a h v.
I It
ALSO .-
I' If Its ,
/) r o s GIRLS BETTER DRESSES r


GIRLS' ROMPER lovMblt... Slus! 7,1,10, ),
roeeblel :17,141 '
S'ECH'AAS-E fine workman* emodlve 357) _
Z ti F shlpl styl.sandsp'n' I
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LAYSUITS ..' ....# eltrtl' ,
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(I sac n W '1 l "*'"*'* +' ****+Bl'* VK

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Comparable Value 1.29 a

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Cool, comfortable play suits with tit ___ 44_ l I I 1 .lrr- : +t r
shoulders! A wide selection of assorted } ,
colorful prints! Fine washable cottons! I f / t ,
SIzII,4'141* !
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I"I I:;:!,.''t...- .'i, 5 H I R.T 5 1\'t'f\.':';. ,''1",'''. r. ..f. ..,\.;
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'/ ,. % ; random cord
,r:, :, 4 .' l,\,\, I .lt1!\\I \ I 7 57'. ."";rv. J .. .' weave!
\ \\ \ .J OR "' 1(? J ) : Polished cottons too, In solids and .. y "
1 1/ \ \\ .' :.\ ; r.- OCR. : :.... : :;; fancies! ,
\ \ ,..-- ': I :' ;.., .. .. Self belt' slide elastic for
1 I I .,.\ .. ; J ( ) "" model
I r t ,, ;\ 1 .," i So' i Nti: 'etreirtiettil- tithes: !," 'v ;.,>"..,,h", ,. 7"--- snug Pewter fit,!blue, told, beige I v'1p
i S \ Fd flUlWA antelope! 1
irW1q d
I'f) /I :t.Its.1er : .' fwttkeettttMiateltrlleetteatiKUtfiwt' l /J Available In sixes 6 to 12!
I t \\I! "i ,,'/a 0'tt ru MgtieaA.a'alftr! }!\. .. ,I t, .' 5 ,. .
(;
;
/4" tw h tlftl ; es br. : : "- \ ...- BOYS
TI :: ,studs w er .;. SHORT
:..t 1pd !N M tsl / } "k.1" "
: SLEEVE

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a. ; SOCKS SHOES t'i .. .:!I( .l ': '.t.t\t; .1. .... :. ,. .. .. enter'
S t: ... .. : ;Jf.(:'' i,.'SPORTCOAn' .laTS. .-' SLACk h.. .._' ,_ '.

1 1 VAT (/ !1I 1 Yi '


MIAMI .';1i steel LAI p RDAi it a W. HOLLYWOOD So J If

wta cwt ST. MIAMi ... S. mat
AI I191,12tlr AmwI

.P-_ ---------------..u""---- "' - - _ _
_
-
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_ -1-1r _ 6



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H.--------,. -.-" .. .-::' .-._-..-..-_-_-_-::::_ _" _._ _, '8:III'.-- \) .
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"" '




THE MIAMI TIMES'MIAMI. FLORIDA. Students Off to

SATURDAY, MARCH 25,..1961. PAGE 9 State. Conference RUPTURED ? "

,.
Delegates from -- I "'1
the high =
MIAMI OFFICER this' one ahoold' be commended schools of the county left by Tn cost* Altar torn***. Af tn< U>. I
for his very fine and courteous chartered bus for the 10th annual PILEs RECTAL DISEASES
COMMENDEDFOR actions on this occasion, in or- state conference of Student -
I der to let the general public Council being held In Orlando *DR.. LONG'S CLINIC lug"i.w,i0'rr,
COURTESY know and understand. that there this weekend.. : x.::' _. --
are some very fine, manly and Headed by the state president '
considerate officers on the local Regina Jo'.llvette: of Northwest E5F_ Ja1JII\..IM.IIIil nn \11JII\ _;.;;-mi-mi Mf-mir->m in*J-._ ..
police force., ern, the group of 20 students ill .. ..,' ._ .
four sponsors and one principal,
are ready 'to confer on the :
theme, "The Student Council 'I.t.
Meets the Challenges of The .TY
Soaring 60's."
Principal Cecil W. Boston .AsvtN1.wil.ets

by said concentrating in his invitation intensely that "on od),. OX 1-7959 N.W. 22nd Ave. & 69th St
3'ws
the challenges that this era un.
folds daily, and by becoming .... FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
closely allied with these chal
lenges to the extent that students -
fight hard to attain all HOPE
BOB LUCIfl.E BALL
; r elements necessary for meetingand ,
conquering these challengescan
we measure up to our true w a PANAMA & FIANK roooticnohl'THE
worth as an American school (:..
student and consequently aa. a \
--- .
responsible adult American citi '
I LCO CORBAR zen." 1''QrtL; Ar

A graduat'e of Dorsey High, With this challenge in mind .. \ l OFLF
Officer Thompson has been a and the faith of the students u p .' K. I =E::: ;
member, of force since 1956 and they represent these delegates ; \
has realize that this is big business .--'' .
established
a fine record. ---...__- tssNM
._.
''f and that much thought is nec. suns MUSTS
Officer Ruben Thompson, a Thompson lives at 1050 NW essary if they expect to evolve
member of the police force was 62nd at and 1 It a bachelor. any solutions from this confer. THEATRES
commended this week for cour- Corbar also said that he did ence. -
teous and considerate service not know the officer personally, Participating schools include
above and beyond the call of but learned his identity from Northwestern, Booker T. Wash- PLUS
duty. Officer Thompson) was :I his badge' number, through the ington, North Dade and Mays.
commended by Elco Corbar of precinct. Sponsors accompanying the
1031 NW 63rd St. who operatesa group are Miss Roberta Hodge JOUR WAYNE LWiLHAM HOLDER
trucking and trash hauling service and Charles Baker of Northwest. '
in the Miami area. BIA Center Drive ern; Mesdames Dorothr'Evans.,
and Hazel Grant of BTW, and
Corbar told the Miami Times Charles L. Williams, member of
that he was'stopped by the offl. Sunday the Mate advisory committee.The .
cer on Saturday morning ,, Brownsvllie group will return on Sat.
March 18 in the vicinity of The Improvement urday evening.
Booker T. Washington High Association' has set aside PalmS ham L '
School, NW 6th ave and .13th u n d a y as Community Fund 1
St., for a minor traffic violation. Drive Day. The objective Is to AIR OONDmONEDCAPITOL 1 vV
Corbar added that he expectedthe build a community center
officer to be somewhat discourteous I where young people may enjoy THE HORSE SOLDIERS
to .him, aa has been wholesome recreation.
his experience on a number.of. Students of the Brownsville THEATRE: fc bs wHerte bNLV twe OR CATONfeS aof
occasions But to his surprise, Junior' High School will be
AT 9 O'CLOCK
SAT. MIDNTTE
Corbar
continued, Officer
ringing door bell for donations,
Thompson not only was courteous and the public is asked to give SUN., MONM TUES.
PATTERSON JOHANSSON FIGHT
but actually went out of generously, -
his way to explain: and demon "THE BIG FISHERFISHERMAN"
strate the application of the law The late Rev. E. D. RIchard. PICTURE
involved in a dignified and con. son, whose untimely death oc. .
eiderate- manner.. Corbar, (ur. curred about 18 month. ago,, Plus .
ther explained that since so had this project as one ot his "I Give ,My Life" ,' SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY .
-
many officers are criticized for life's ambitions. The entire :
being discourteous he felt it community la urged to give full *
only fair and appropriate .that cooperation in the, drive. FIRST MIAMI SHOWING


RITZTHEATRE .

,Large 3-Room HouseFURNISHED :

r DEAN
NOW SHOWING"Hippodrome"
: I -w
I ei
,'I
Florida room, large'' dining room and living room, .A
SlIIRL Ya4
large kitchen, utility room and carporte. This homeis PLUS

in excellent condition. Naked! Jungle" ,
; zrwaMd
Ready to move into. $500 down, balance ,like rent, Charlton Ileston

one mortgage. Open Sunday from 12 to 6 p.m. i

1902 N.W. 51st TerraceWe t otc Cow I.

I
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finance automobile liability insuranceon I
can your
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on easy* monthly payment MLIA NI: ;:

COME ONE COME ALL

I Goodm n' Real Estate t Insurance First Showing,


, 2688 N.W. 62nd Street OX 1-0380 Sunday 2 to 6 p.m.

All 3 bedrooms, 2 baths I 7 V

= = ? << iR>i 3' it Split Levels, Florida rooms
Built*!* Oven and Range r i V
I HOMES FOR SALE I Tub and shower enclosures

I SEE THEM NOW .I 1260 N.W. 55th St. -
1437 N.W. 56th St. S.LIFE DEATN STORY OF THE
FOR LARGE FAMILY SPECIAL $9,500 THE TRUETRUE- -AND- ,,|
N.W. 56th
839 St.
garage, no qualifying, no Only $450 down. No HAH'WHO LED THE FIBIIT AGAINST THE MAFIA! ;

garage, so qualifying, no closing cost. $67.00. 2- Harman, Inc. MO 5.3592

closings, move right in. bedroom, bath, furnished -

Only one mortgage, fenced in back yard. OPEN SUN. 2 to 6 P.M.
$80.25 pays all. Well Seeing is believing

landscaped, fenced yard. 1354 N.W. 53rd St. Richmond Heights

1310 N.W. 53rd St. ONLY $11,500No Corner Coral Reef Drive

SEE IT NOW. NICE closing, no qualifying. And Fillmore St.

CORNER Only $64 monthly, nice LOW DOWN PAYMENT

2 bedroom, hardwood bedroom, closed in LOW MONTHLY .Law I

floors, fenced yard. Well front porch. One of the PAYMENT 1. p 1S11NALSO
landscaped. Flexible: nice corner properties.

terms to suit your bud. Only one mortgage. SEE 3 bedroom, 2 baths, garage PATTERSON-JOHANSSON FIGHT PICTURE
get. Only one mortgage. IT NOW. WON'T LAST Built-in Oven and Range

1300 N.W. 52nd St. 1390 N.W. 53rd St. Tremendous corner lot .

ACTION REALTY Sodded and landscaped STARTS WEDNESDAY ,

L df Ora D., Taylor C& 5-4240. "PHENIX CITY STORY"JJi

Call E. Harry Denny TU :: .. .
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THE MIAMI TIMES' MIAMI, FLORIDA


I PAGE 10 SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1961

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AME Conference at State Baptist to

Meet in JaxThe
BeachThe
Deerfield,
Women's Missionary and
Second Quarterly' Conference Educational Convention, will
was held at Bethel AME hold its '72nd session in Tile

Church, Deerfield Beach, Rev.J Shiloh Baptist Church 1118W.

S. Blake, pastor and Rev. Beaver St. Rev. A. B. Coleman,
A. A. Williams, presiding elder. pastor. The Local. committee

This conference was a great. headed by Mrs; A. B. Colemanand

Woitian's Day GRACE PRESBYTERIAN ST. JAMES AMES; CHURCH success.The presiding elder said that Mrs. Carrie Mrs. C. B.A.Sloan Weaver directing with

6895 N.W. 14th Ave. this church paid the pastor) the activities have assured Mrs.
Harris pastor.
H. McNeal ,
Rev
.
At 'Corinth: Rev W. F. Savoy, pastor Mrs.. Sadie F. Dean, reporter highest amount; only second to Susie C. Holley, president of ,the

Sunday School 9:30: Sunday School 9:30: Payne Chapel.On convention that the committee
The second annual woman'sDay
will be celebrated at Corinth Morning Service 11:00: Morning worship 11:00. the night of March 16, and supporting members are

Baptist Church, 1450 NW Evening Service . . 7:00: .Evening 'worship 7:00: some of the members gave the ready to ,entertain what they
59th St. Sunday March 26. Wed. Night Study . 8:16: pastor and his wife a surprise hope will be the greatest session
.services highly
._ Our were In the Convention history.
Youth Fellowship Friday 7 p.m. birthday 'party These good members -
spirited all day Sunday. The The convention with a
What is the good news? The are: Mrs. Flora Edwards, opens
pastor spoke on "The Meeting of preboard! session April 5.
reveal Mrs. Ira Adams, Mrs. Toney,
good news is that God is The
and the Woman at -
Jesus During the week national and
ed in Jesus Christ. In looking to Morris Adams, Mr. and Mrs. '
Well. Henry Hail Mrs. Annie Jordan state pastors and leaders will:
,
Jesus and following: Him, we GIbbs Club
C. A.
The Bishop bring to the delegation.
know what God is like. God is :Mrs. Pauline Hill, Mrs; Velma messages
celebrated: their 7th anniversaryby An outstanding feature will* be
:Horne, Mr. and Mrs. Henry
like the
shepherd who goes out
in the morning '
after the lost worshipping Ford Children, Bettye Jackson, a Fellowship Banquet on Satur
sheep. He is like I
: their
had guest
service. They as day: at which time recognition
the father, welcoming home the (Ida Bennette Mr. and Mrs.
and Auxiliary
Board
the, Faysonlte will be given to special workers.
George Johnson, Mrs. Aretha
wayward son. He is like the Board No.. 2 of Bethel AME
Saviour, who takes all the obstacles Church. The cathedral choir and 'Kitt, Mrs. Eva Sampson' The Emphasis will, be p'aced upon

of life upon: Himself, and usher 'board No. 1 of St. Paul. 'Ford Children, Bettye Jatckson, 'youth and young adults during
proves that life offers true vic Sherry and Larry Home, Tar :the sessions climaxing in a
tory. There is no God like Him Stewardess Board No. 2 celebrated i;ver Howard, Mr and Mrs. Ernest 'giant rally on Sunday at 11 a.m.

who has been revealed In Jesus its anniversary Sunday Price, Mrs. Grace Edwards, Mrs. Holley and the 'board .of
Christ: first in compassion, first afternoon at 3:30.: : Stewardess Mr. and Mrs. Singleton and 'directors will be on hand to

in faith, first in sacrifice and Board No. 1 held its regular Mrs. Stripling. welcome messengers as they ar

victory. Let us rest in the assur- meeting Sunday afternoon. I ;rive from all parts of the state
rance that God Is an "Almighty Holy Communion will be ST. MARY'S C. W. M. 'and the Bahama Islands.
Father, Strong to Save." This Is served at sunrise services and I
the good news of the Gospel. :he 11 o'clock service Easter Rev. B.: A. Culmer, pastor
Sunday The Sunday School will Mrs. S. Dawkins, reporter First Woman's Day

have their Easter 7 Sunday School . . 9:45:
MT. CALVARY BAPTISTRev. program
Morning worship . 11:00:

E. M. Thomas, pastor p.m.Mrs.. Delaney delivered the Evening worship . 7:30: At New ProvidenceNew

,1 Phyllis Myers, reporter night message. Please visit the Bro. H. V. Providence. Missionary
r r Sunday School . . 9:30: sick and ahutins.JEHOVAH Stewart'was\ in Baptist Church will hold HH
Morning Service . . 11:00 charge of both services morningand first annual Women's Day

Mrs. Lula Moran has been Evening Service . . 7:00: ( night. Our pastor was not March 26.Services.
able to be out. We
selected 8.9' the speaker for the Sunday morning we had a visiting WITNESSESJehovah Lord will restore his pray that the will be held at the

morning. She is president of the minister, Rev. Me Quary, pletely.Let health com. Northwestern High School, loot
Witnesses Invite all
: Florida East Coast Missionary to deliver the sermon. His subject NW 12th ave.
persons of goodwill to a talk us pray for our sick and
Ministers and Deacons I "The Office of a Dea-
Union and was vhich will be given worldwide.The shut-ins.
member of Mt. Sinai con" ta'cen! from Timothy 3:8:
Baptist title of the talk' is "The March 26 will be Palm Sunday
Church.At A'so Sunday morning we had the
Sacred Bible and our Problem of At 3 p.m. we are expecting to go
3 there will I ordination of two deacons, Deacons
p.m. be a "
on Palm
Survival. our
This talk will be given Sunday parade by
.
program conducted by the Juniors Beal and HolJis. the of the
Iby R II. General who recent help Lord. Anyone
of the church. night we had another
Sunday
I ly had a refresher course at the wishing to join us is welcome.
visiting minister, Rev. Green, tode'lver
rc c ,.' the sermon Watchtower School of GI ead. come.
The talk will be given at 6
p.m.
Patricia Morley is still very at the address 6306 NW 14th This Sunday at 1 o'clock there
ill. We are praying for her to ave., Sunday evening April 2. will be a dinner sale at the a
have a speedy recovery. church hall, 1609 NW 6th court.

Dinners served will be turkey or

TEMPLE BAPTISTRev. MT. HERMON A. M. E. 'chicken. The public is invited.
Dinners are $1.00.
: L. A. Thompson, pastor Rev. S. L. Gay, pastor

a Sunday School. 9:30: Sunday School . . 9:30: THE INCARNATION
I Morning 'worship& 11:00: Morning Worship . 11:00:

DTU 5:30: Cveilng Worship . . 7:00: Palm: Sunday
Evening worship 7:00: Publicity Committee Church School . . 9:30:
Confirmation Instruction. .
The annual Spring Rally of This week is a great one for Sung Mass, distribution of 9:45:

I Temple terminates on this Sun- the people around Mt. Hermonand Palms, outdoor ,

day. All: the faithful are determ Opa Locka. The pastor has procession . . 10:45:
toed to make this one of the called the church into conference Jr. EYC meetlng..5

most successful in the church'shistory. to p'an the coming. spring Sr. EYC, meeting . 6 p.m.p.m. I
1 1I I the "Let'S put It over, is rally on Tuesday night. And Evensong, ,program of Sacred

I The slogan for the day. then on Thursday night, March music . . . 7:00:
one-week evangelistic 23 there is that lovely play, Guest the Dorsey Jr. High
s campaign, conducted by the Rev. "Medea" at the North Dade High school. chorus IIKATKICK WALDRON.

(Mother) Ethel Hunter, begins School. A play that everyone I Low Mass . . . 6:30:
Sunday night and will close Easter The> morning speaker will be
should fee. Then on March 24, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday I
Day. The Rev. Mrs. Beatrice
Hunter
i hasrecent'j our presiding elder, Rev. F. A. Sung Mass and Stripping of the Waldron of Roanoke -

: I observed her 50th anniversary Allen: will be with us for the sec Altar . . . 6 p.m. Baptist Church, West Palm
( The evening .speaker will be as a missionary evangellst ond quarterly conference. Alls Thursday Beach

.i Mrs. M. Green, evangelist and here in the Bahamas, and 1 boards and clubs are requestedto Mass of the Pre-Sanctified 6:30:
on vacation.
r t member of Greater Bethel' Methodist She Is a dedicated make a report. The meetingwill Friday '

Church. The chairman, leader who has devoted. Christian extend through Sunday. Evensong . . . .8:00
Mrs. Verdell Copeland and her tire life to the her en- The elder will bring the Sunday Tuesday and Wednesday
chairman gospel ministry
Mrs. Carrie Thomas morning message.
,are making this day a euc- and the winning of souls. Ser Please don't forget we are Special Guild evening services:
ceas in which we hope everyone vices will be held every night planning a wonderful Easter Tuesday, Sts. Ann.Margaret an**
will enjoy next week. The public is cordial.y St. Elizabeth chaters
: sunrise service at the church. the Guild
Invited.
Rev. W. T. Thomas is the Temple and Spend Holy Week at You should be there to enjoy of Our Lady and St. Cecelia's
Taster have your soul revived the blessings of the Holy spirit. Guild; Wednesday, Sacred Heart
and St. Theresa' chanter iHospita'ity .

I ST. LUKE BAPTISTRev. Committee,- the ush:
ers guild( and junior and senior
Not Palm Reader Not a Fortune Teller EYC.
Not Rootman P. W. Williams, pastor
a Not God RVN
Either _
But
Mrs. Burnesta Green reporter NEW BETHEL A.
JUST M. E.
A GOD SENT MAN Sunday School . . 9:30:

Rev. Shepherd BogaetorsDo Morning Worship . 11:00: Goulds Tit.

BTU . . . . 5:30: Rev. J. S. Blake, pastor
you hay" a problem? Evening Worship . . 7:00:
kF N w as as u' Business Sunday, March 12 was the
1 Ibid, Marriage Sunday, April 2 there 'will be annual Women's Day. The speak. i 1

2 Failing Can't win the manor an Easter Sunrise Service beginning er for the occasion 'was Mrs.

iii ,.. ,, woman you love, Been at 4:30: am. both choirs are Eunice M. Tanner guidance
asked to emerge also both ushers counselor
Crossed, Need Money\ at Mays Junior and
: boards. Senior High School and wife of
a Everything Going Wrong? All children of St. Luke are the ,Rev W. F Tanner of Corn- .
Health Bad? Can't asked to come to Easter practice nut Grove. She spoke eloquently.
a Satisfy especially! the teenagers. Contact on "Facing Responsibilities in MRS. C. I). MILLER
a
j Your Husband or Wife? Mrs. Arthur Lee Collins our Changing World." The evening speaker will be

t program chairman, for time. During the evening service the Mrs. C. B. Miller of Mt. Zion
Want a New Home or ,Car? Your cooperation is expected. debating team from Mays High Baptist Church of Hialeah.

Pray for the flick and shut-Ins. under the direction of Mrs Dorothy Everyone is invited to attend.
.
-
,
Walace: had a panel discus Mrs. Maybe'le Anderson is
i ,lion on "Youth Faces chairman of Women's Day Com
SEE Responsi
ME TODAY TRIUMPH mittee Miss Iris
1' CHURCHPrince abilities ; WIson: cochairman -

j Remember I am not a for We are grateful to those young ; Rev. C. J. Burney,

tune teller, rootman or C. Mobley, pastor people for that very fine discus pastor.

i.' 1 palm reader, I am not God, Sis. C. McKinney, reporter sion., The chairman, Mrs. Co'e,
: f but a God tent manl' School of Wisdom . 10:00: the pastor and members of New BAHA'I ASSEMBLY

,t Y. P. E. Band . . 6:30 Bethel 'wish to thank all of the Miss
I+1 IL It cost nothing to Evening worship . . 8:00 visiting friends for their presence NE 8th court Betty will Keogan lead the of regu 8120

come in and talk March 24 thru 26 will be the and participation on the lar week'y discussion at the
program. We feel that this
L was Baha'l Center, 137 NW 11th
closing of ave.
your quarterly:
conferin
one of the finest
Women's Dav
627 N.W. 9th SL, Apt. 1 FR 9-9138 ence.Brownsville The meeting at 2994 will NW 48th jver held. $1,113., subject 8 p.m. will Sunday be ,"The March Messengersof 26. Her

In Key West Every Street convene The women raised God". Everyone la
Tuesday at 708 Angela with our honorabel Bishop E. This effort Invited.
I Iw was for the benefit Phone Miss Solomon
at
L. in FR
Simpson charge.
... of the building fund.. 15420.





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;
THE MIAMI TIMES
MIAMI FLORIDA 'i Rev. E. T. Brown LIBERTY CITY LUTIIKKAPT ,

.' PAY, MARCH, 1961 PAGE 11 New Pastor of The Rev. Walter Pinnt will
conduct services this Sunday at Brand New Home
:, Trinity CME Church the Liberty City Luteheran
tian Vocational Church of The Open Door Church, meeting temporarily in SPECIAL DELUXE '

1 Dy MRS. DOCIA HOWELL the breezeway of the Carver
Terence Rev. H.(Congregational C. ) YMCA, NW 58th st. at 15th ave. 1073 NW 64th St. Y
McDowell
pastor The officers and members of Sunday School. and Bible Class
Carver[ Branch YMCA and A. E. McNeal, reporter Trinity are happy to have the are held at 2 p.m. The worship Open Sun. 4-6 p.m. ,

eater .Miami Ministeriale Coming' Events: ,Sunday morn Rev. E. T. Brown, formerly of service Is held at 3 p.m. "
Carter Tabernacle of Orlando, as Plans ''are being made to cele CAPPER CONST. ,CORP. '
are preparing a ing, March 26. at 11 a.m. there I their 'I
pro- pastor. brate the Lord's, Sunoer for the Ji
for all youth who are In. will be special observance of first time on Easter INDF ;
d In Christian vocations: Palm Sunday with an appropriate Lutheran services were begun Sunday.in ..ij
"Unistry, church music, mis- sermon and special music by the Liberty City area two months
Christian Education, tLn'd.and the choir. xI F ,
YWCA professional ago.The ;
',i
Thursday evening March 30, Lutheran Church has : '
8 p.m. commemoration of the made avallab e the minute of j SEE THE SOUTH'S
standing leaders will bend institution of our Lord of the meditation, "Portals of Prayer,"
in this program, to help Sacrament of Holy Communion. with which station 'WMBAI be- LEADING COLOREDLet
outh prepare themselves for All church members and Chris gins its broadcast day.
Christian vocation of theirst. tlans shoud: observe this night
> The Christian Vocation
with
deep reverance and under.
inference will be held Fri.
,(March 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 standing. NEW BETHEL BAPTIST
at the Carver Branch Easter, April 2nd, 11 a.m. our
5A. Ministers and Christian first observance of Easter in our h"J. 1571 N. W. 68th Terrace
cation directors own sanctuary, 786 NW 61st st. Rev. Ernest Williams, pastor
are )
urged eaoon Fred
end Interested'tin to the YMCA names Thursday evening April 6. 8 Sunday School Williams. . reporter. 9:30:
Irenes youth in the p.m., the presentation of "Tal- Morning worship . 11:00:
together with the reg. ent Unlimited," a program that Evening Service . . 7:00:
lion fee of $1.50 per per- Is a must where the students of On Palm Sunday
No.
our 1
The 'program will consist of our local school will give a and No.? 2 choirs will
render the
esses, discussion groups, Broadway production of music, music. her year of experience guide
Ing and recreation, and a drama and song. This is and protect you throughout lift
our ma
fghtful meal. Please take ad- jar event of the year, so we are as a lighthouse guide the ships In ,
|tage of this once- a storm. For success In buslnu
a-year op- asking our friends to buy tick.
and love
unity! ets and help us to put this over Attention Ladies!
A very energetic and spiritual
READER
I preacher, he received his train.I For distinctive -PSYCHIC CONSULT HER-
ing from Howe School of Relig hair styling DON'T STAY IN THE RUT. GET
ion of Memphis, Tenn., Lane hair colorIng OUT NOW. BY THE HELP OF
College; and Phillip's School of and or hair GOD SHE CAN HELP YOU.
Theology in Jackson, Tenn. He weeving to fit
served as a lecturer, conference your wrsonall-- Office Hour:
-J preacher at many conferencesand ity see M I a n 9 a.m. 9 p.m.
leadership schools.He Mary Frances Thurs. 9 a.m. to
pastored several of out ,Dlxon at her 7 p.m.
standing churches Including St. new location of DAILYSunday
Paul CME and the Lane Col employment.
lege church. He is outstandingas

a builder and financier. _.. .._ I MlM Dixon :
'Members of the board of trus. ----- 10 a.m. 3 p.m.READING .

tees of Allies College, director of has been for more than 10
Christian Education of the Fla. years ono of Miami's outstanding 4 #
Conference. He is especially outstanding and qualified beauticians. To $1.00 UP
for the contributionthat be abreast with the modern do's
he led in civic and Interna and loot's of halr-dressing, she
,i A} Y.t'll tlona; movement. ha attended workshops At Flor 23 Years Experience

His charming wife Mrs. E. T. ida Agricultural and Mechanical
Drown, also attended Lane College University I Recently sho wan A MADAMHUNTER
l i Phillip School of Theology participant in A hair style show
In Jackson. During their s i x held in the city of Atlanta, Oa.Let .
years of :'pastorIng in Orlando, 1657 N.W. 73rd ST.
sl' Mrs. Drown held the following Miss Dixon help you MIAMI, FLA.Don't ,
positions: District president of look more glamorous, visit herat .
Writ, *-Call In Person
the Women Missionary Society, Vogue Ileatity Fair, 233 NW
Y minister wife, council tlupervl.I Oth St., FH 00010.
F. slon of the local Missionary Society
I a teacher In the Sunday
School, a member of the NAACPand
Eastern Star.
Rev. Drown ,will be happy to I
greet all of Trinity members and I
_. --.- friends. _

Ilev. J. E. Murray, pastor of time, the church grew from a Our annual visitor day will behold
It. Nebo Ilaptlst Church, South small mission holding services in : Palm Sunday, March 26.
Miami, is shown holding A beautiful the J .11. K. Lee Elementary: Each member has been asked to
silver trophy which was School to the present beautiful bring one or more persons to
presented to him recently on the $GOOOO edifice, which It completely share with us in worship A apec 1H
radon of the celebration of free of all Indebtneas to lal good Friday Service will be
ils 23th anniversary an pastor of date. Ilev. Murray wan also presented held at 7 o'clock p.m.
It. Nebo by the members of the a gift of $300 in cash on
church. Also shown in the picture the occasion.
are: Mrs. Classle Hauser, The Ilev. E. I*. Ilrown, fMUtor TALENTUNLIMITED
eft, Mr*. J. E. Murray, second I of the First BaptUt Church of
|from right, Mrs. Carrie Henry, lirounsville, WM the speaker and
Iffht, and Little II. L. Murray. delivered a very,, Inspiring tnesttage. -
Her. Murray was honored for The celebration wa held
ils inspiring leadership duringthe / following the suggestion by Mrs.
| past 25 years during which Henry and Mrs. Leila Price. SAVE YOUR HAIR


'* I

ANNOUNCEMENTIT'S
;. :; T.rrY. ; } H

a f ,,
.

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MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA MEMORIAM ,
SATURDAY MARCH 25 1961 I EXCELLENT BUSINESS
PAGE 12 ,
I In ;loving of dear
.. memory my DEATHS .. -
'-- husband.XLEON' DAVISj OpeORTUfilTYfr: ; ;- ..?-\.''. ,

I CARDS MEMORIALS who departed' this life March 21, -- Centrally located :store for
I, 1959. .
Gone, but not forgotten.' May Range sale. Well stocked grocery-
....
he
rest in
'Peace. business, fully equipped
IN MEMORIAM Mrs. Elvina Davis, wife Mrs. Georgia Mae Taylor of
I I IN MEMORIALOUTLINES : And Family 5804 NW 12th ave.,. apt. A, died Person can take over
In sad but loving memory ofm" March 16. She same to Miami 11 immediately* ** "
dear mother, from Brownsville, >'1: .
In Loving memory of my dear IN MEMORIAMIn years ago
husband and Tenn. Services will be held In "St.
---_.._ son,, .. loving memory of our dear Jordan Grove Baptist Church, 363 N.W.14th
rvrT: : e wife, mother, daughter and ,sis i Saturday, March 25 1 p.m. She "

'. ter, ,_.. .. Is survived by her husband, Le- FR 3.9433
'--'-- ----- father, a
roy, six children, her
4i' sister and two brothers. Mrs.
1W z 41 Taylor is now In repose in the
?1 hapel._ House For Sale


Thomas Brooks, student' at By Owner ..-
DorseyJunior High School, was $
the victim of an accidenta:
$ g "; drowning last Saturday. He re. N. 1LOW DOWN"PAYMENT
r.
sided at 2345 NW 74th Terr
no .__ __. .._._no__.. I mother Mrs Thelma M
i with his ,
L&44E REV J. N. BYRD a Summers, two sisters and a
who passed away March 26, 1959 ,brother. Services will be held
r Gone, but not forgotten. 4:30: p.m. Saturday in Shiloh

i I IOU We best.love you but God loves Baptist Church. 1232 NW 51st St.

I Mrs J. N Byrd, wife Phillip Brooks, brother of
I Mrs. Mary Byrd, mother Thomas, also a drowning victimon .
Saturday. The double funeral House For Sale
.
i IN MEMORIAM: will be at Shiloh. Both boys are

on view in the chapel. Colored 1311 NW 52nd St.
_...__.........___, ''Wm......",."'" In memory of my beloved ,
i I mother: ._ Ben Williams of 1130 NW '
MRS. JOANNA SMITH JOHNSONwho .... $11,000 Total Price
"T.-ryo.- 2, died March 22.
H yMRS. 'j, 62nd St., apt.
passed away March 26, '.tf.' .-: Xy:'" ,d. .. '; 1958. }<.O' .1:! '1 .. ...'. r.l I He came to Miami four yean
.' ; -....,'. ago from Quincy. He is survivedby $1,050 Down
Gone but not forgotten. May .,,'b olj i! }, itf.: "' IRS.-MAMIE ,
-
WHITE his mother, Mrs. Mary Jane
; > I
she rest in
;
peace. '. .' n(, [ Mother Albert ;
Miss LaFronla Hlggs, : Donaldson his step father, Approx $74 Month
{
Dona'dson and brother,
a
Daughter and Famly !" .,
/. "J Thomas Williams Jr. ,Arrange FHA'TERMS
a r ''f ';.z ,4 ments are Incomplete. open every day from 1.5
IN MEMORIAMIn
.*.',
I J
memory of our dear one, 1.;
who departed this life a year ) { Manker . House For Sale

ago March 21, 1958. 1':, .
Lee Washington German of
'j .J,;'..," 1320 NW 61st St., apt. 48 died Lovely home for better living

,..,, March 12. The body was shippedto ; all electric kitchen, 2
." ; Statesboro, Ga. for final rites. bedrooms, 1 bath CBS
.. i" He is survived by a wife, Sadie,
----- four brothers, Elder Calvin, Ed.. home, carport, hard wood

b1 EMIL DEVEAUXwho ward Daniel German, all of Mi. floors, and tiled roof. Fur
( passed away on last Palm ami. nished
Sunday, April 10, 1960. i or unfurnished,
Now the laborer's task is o'er, Mrs. Martha Welch of 1427 good terms. FHA available
Now the battle: day is past; NW 58th terrace, died March 16 Must have at least $1,000
Now upon the farther shore at Jackson Memorial Hospital cash
Lands the voyager at last. Funeral was held Monday nlgnt
Father, in Thy gracious keeping In the chapel with Rev. Scott officlating. Open all day Sunday
+ Iti Leave we now Thy servant sleep- Survivors are a daughter 3380 Percival Ave.,
Ing.Earth Mrs. Albertha R. Coverdale: Coconut ;Grove HI 8-7952
i, 4 to earth and dust to dust, of Miami, a brother, Rev. William
3 Calmly now the word we say; ,( Martin of Danville, Va.
Left behind, we wait in trust
For the resurrection day. I E. C. Marshall of 226 NW 16th A SQUARE DEAL
Father, in Thy gracious keeping, MRS. FLORENCE LAUGHLIN st., died March 14 at Jackson

a Leave.sleeping.we now Thy servant Daughter and Sister I I Hospital. Funeral was held $400 .down ''$78 Mo.
Tuesday 3 p.m. in the chapel.
who
departed this life March 26,
May she rest in
peace. 1960. Survivors are a wife, Vinetta,
Mrs. Vera Taylor, daughter INo closing cost
One year has passed dear ones three brothers, Oscar, Augustaand
Mrs. Hilda Mills, Robert, a sister Inez Brazlll
since God has taken all
__ grand daughterAnd you all of Toledo, Ohio. ,1 mortgage, gorgeous CBS''
home to be with him in heaven
HENRY N. CLARKE SR. Family around the snow white throne. -. _. .
3
The sorrows of death compassedus. years new, convenient to.
We miss you, oh, we miss you
CARD OF THANKSWe all. How could we help but cry. everything
We found much sorrow. Then Dut if live all will
the family of the late, we as you we
called ... meet you all again bye and bye. 7741 N.W. 10th Avenue,
the of the Lord. ----- ----
Upon name Authur White, husband
0, Lord we beseech Thee, deliverour '.;."., .,, And Children
souls, \ And The White Family
Gracious is the Lord and .
First
Time
"4.,. Offered:
righteous; yea r1
Our God is merciful. .,< IN MEMORIAM

May he rest in peace. In everlasting memory of our Sparkling clean CBS.

.Mrs.Mrs. Vera Eloyce Clark Clarke, wife .... ;:t.. : I mother dearly beloved and devoted 1726 NW 51st St. $350 down $71 MoA .

Jennings, daughter '. .i, ELLEN ALBURY Beautiful custom built 2
Henry N. Clarke Jr., son whom God called home March doll house. See to apprec
25, 1940. bedroom CBS plus a CBS iate. 1731 NW1 52nd Street:

IN MEMORIAMIn Our hearts still ache with I rental cottage, large lot,
loneliness: LEGAL
our eyes shed manya REALTYfor
loving., memory of our dear n tear, God alone knows how carporte, tile roof, hard
hIh.nrI nrt father.4w1 much we miss you, as it ends wood floor. Down paymentto appointmentMU
these twenty-one years. God has
you in his keeping darling, we be arranged. 8-3923 PL 8-0290
have you in our hearts..
The Albury Family -.- Nights, weekdays, Sundays

Near 49th St. and


"iL SEE THE WORLD'S NW 9th Ave. $150 Cash $65 Mo.

a Ap ft c: GREAT SPIRITUAL
: Very large custom built 2- Large bedroom fenced

/ SAMUEL JONES SMITH LEADER bedroom CBS with Florida yard. Partly furnished, gar

who passed away March 8, and \ND PHYCHIC READER room, garage, tile roof No age, one mortgage.No .
I was laid to rest March 15 wish \ closing cost. $2,000 under
L .o express our than'ca to our BISHOP HUNTERIf
I relatives and many friends fort FHA. Valuation only. $75 qualifyingThis

\ I e r many kindness that was month one won't last
mortgage.
I rendered to us during our hoursof you arc tick or vrrrl4 "0""
bereavement. We thank you fall to ... m. t Uy. Offl. k*.r.. -. --
for the many cards, cars, flow dally 1 p.m. to I p.m. Thirvdiy. Big House
era: and telegrams and special 1 p.m. to f p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. 1935 NW 49th St.
thanks to the pastor and members to S p.m. _._._
.
of Church of God and the Custom built
bedroom
l I Range Funeral Home.
The Family R* '.. CBS with carporte, screen. $495 Cash $75 Mo.
r READINGS .
........,.. _.......-" '1.M ed porch, tile roof, oak bedroom, dining
room .
I CARD OF THANKS ,
TED LAWRENCE floors, no closing costs. Fla. room, one mortgage..
who departed this life March 25, I The Rev. Ellis King, hU wife Total
price $10,795. move right in
1958. and relatives, take this method 5417 aw 1f Ot. today.

r Beyond the gate our loved one of thanking the. many friends waIT .- TRIO REALTY
who attended the funeral of .
t has found happiness and rest,
I and there Is comfort In the (Buddy) Elonle Fussel on March HOLLYWOOD'LA. V*, 'k CASH FOR YOUR LOT
that a loving God knows 7 at Gethsemane Baptist ChurchIn 801 N.W. 54th SL
thpught West Hollywood. Thanks for PL 7-8456 283 NW 79th St

best.Carrie Lawrence, wife the flowers, cards and telegrams PROP.. HUNTII1 PL 9-8372 OX 61740THE -

Children -
And -- \'

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[EROINES OF WANTED MIAMI FLORIDA I II
I ,
..
EXPERIENCED Operator. Vogue I PAGE 13 I'
ERICHO MARCHtlOSETTA Beauty Box. ,
929 NW 3rd ave.. .
FR 47151.

EXPERIENCED cocktail wait VACATION. '
"' 'f
..r ':-. ress. Apply King 0' Hearts Club
l., ; .. after 8 p.m. LET'S VISIT
;. .
,
hitl I
v t
+ ;
I h
"'T. ,1f
.'f l-1iIf." TV NOT WORKING?

rneri a ;
.. It you live In Liberty City or
Brownsville we will repair your
TV 'on' credit. -Pav w .kly. Free AND NIGHTS :
estimate. Call OX' 19426. indf
Sao Paulo
,
21

!\ Aires, Santiago,
t FOR SALE :

i. i t CBS ONE'DEDnOOM .
House at
i Ii 6140 NW 19th aveHot water, LATER
? \ good location, small down pay- ;
ment, balance like rent. #J. S. $645.00
Songer, owner, '13SO NW 24th l 'Accommodations, Sight.

ct. 1d2$ Airports, Taxes, Tips and

LUNCHEONETTE, beer and:
wine license, for ale. Good location TUESDAY
; Owner leaving town.,
3:00
,Terms to right party.' See It at p.m.
7617 'NW' 22nd ave. NOW

StLLlVAK OR PHONE
GOOD BUSINESS For Sale. Gro.
,The Heroines and Heroes of beer and wine
eery; also living
Dade County and surroundingareas quarters. Gross about $1,200 a Bureau
proud'y invite the public month. For Information call NE
and the entire Masonic family 54908. A8
to help us celebrate "Heroines of FR 9-6779

Jericho Day" Palm Sunday, HOUSEHOLD Furniture, 2 living
March 26 at 2 p.m. All Masters, room chairs, and sofa, apartment
Matrons and other heads of various ..
gas stove, dinette set. Call! - ----
organizations are especially evenings NE 4.5935.DO .
urged to attend. Today

YOU WANT a bargain? On
Bring your juvenile. Refresh Ilcml in Collier County
account of sickness price reduc-
meats served. The band will I *d $2,000 for quick sale $125 ) ) $695
leave 10th st. and 3rd are at 2
month $500 down. Full price
sharp for New Hope Primitive ( Lots)
$11,000. House 2 bedrooms and
Baptist Church, corner 13th st. two apartments, all furnished $10 Monthly
and 1st Rev. H. R. Sam-
place,
rent $90 and $65. 1044 NW
uel, pastor. 64th st. Taxes Until Paid in Full

Heroine Johnnie M. Hilt; Extra Charges
deputy I Property For 30 Days
Heroine Rosetta Sullivan, FOR RENT Write Como by

Royal Queen of Light of OONT MISS THIS Lovely house INC
South P. M. A.M. Council ,
for refined
family. New colored
PL 7.2559
neighborhood. $25 per week, I
Will sell $100 down. NE 5-5566.

K of P's ANDCALANTHES
1-BEDROOM HOUSE. FR

TO V7830. S Bargain

BEDROOM HOUSE, Floridaoom
enclosed porch. Very nice
$80 Month
CELEBRATEThe and reasonable. Also four room
house. Light and water furnlsh-
Knights of Pythias and d. Owner at 2220 NW 61st st.
the court of Calanthes of the March 18only. Phone MU 1-5740.
Dade County area, will hold i'ti't Street
their anniversary and Thanksgiving BURNISHED ROOMS and efflMency. I'

Kerr service Memorial on this Sunday Methodist at 1027 NW 55th St. wood floors, tile

Church. 10030 Indigo St., Per- FURNISHED ROOM, water and rear porch, tile bath,
nine of which the E. J. Sheppard tight free 709 NW 65th St. .. Total price only
Jr.. is the pastor. AI' happy.
Knights of Calanthes of the area ROOM for gentleman. Reasonable: you
are requested to be present at -ates. Kitchen privileges. In
the church at 9 a.m. on Suns "lean respectable home PL
dan Dinners and refreshmentswl'l 90802. Call from 4 to 11:30 FLORIDA ROOM
be served throughout the n.m.
day. and a special program will
be held at 3 p.m. The public is ROOM in quiet home. Full house $75 Month
Invited. Sir Abram Grace, geneal nrivlJeges. Inquire at home.
chairman 2931 NW 62nd at. Call NE I I2798 Street
"- or NE 3.3679.
72ND ANNUAL SESSIONThe

72nd Annual Grand Session NICE, LARGE furnished bed. I
and
Insurance
of the Knights and Calan room. 1530 NW 67th St.
then of the State of Florida wli:

beheld In Miami May 14 thru : PRIVATE. CLEAN ROOM. Dath, OX 1.0380
'17. Sessions will be he'd at St. 'titchen facilities. Middle are
Paul AME Church in Coconut
man $8.00 per week. Call NE
Grove of which Rev. T. C. Kelley 5.5283.
Jr.. is the past.or.RppresentatlVE's .

from all partsof MODERN FURNISHED ROOM
the state, Texas and Alabama with all conveniences. In clean SPECIALS!
slon.will come to Miami for this ses. quiet. place Call OX 14864.

2 BEDROOMS AM' for rent. Du THIS!
Among out of town guests
plex. 2360 NW 66th St.
will be!' Sir R. A. Hester Supreme
Chancellor of Dallas, Texas and ROOMS Furnished
Wor and unfurnished can qualify for one of
Sir A. O, Gaston Supreme I
clean wholesome neleh.orhood .
of Birmingham,
thy Counselor
Ala P'orlda state officers willInclude -> reasonable rates. 2116 the Liberty City area.
VW 60th st.
Sir R. A. Dlesbach,
Grand Chancellor; Sir R. MeGriff. finances.
100M. lIot'and cold water 1270
Grand Keeper of Record
VW 72nd st. PL 73247. Mrs.
and Seals; Sir II. Manning Eff-
niara Borbes, after six .
erron, Grand Master of the Bz. Down $77.87 Mo.
chequer; R. L., Williams Deputy BURNISHED ROOM In nice.
Potentate and Mrs.
Imperial
tulet home. Double bed. $I O. Down $62.43 Mo.
Ameria Cole, Grand Worthy
Apply 3035 NW 59th St.
Counsellor of the Calanthes.
Down $60.67 Mo.
The local committee is now
soliciting ads for the souvenir Open 1 to 5 p.m. Down $73.50 Mo.
program and rooms for degeatesand
other visitors. Saturday and Sunday Down

For ads In the program inter bedroom home)
ested persons may contact Sir 2043 NW 51st St.
Walter L. Belle, chairman. 14430 Costs
Graves Drive, phone CE 64606.And .
anyone having rooms aval'. $350 Down
able may contact Mrs. Maggie S. 200 OTHERS
Cash, chairman 3567 Grand 30 Year FHA Mortgage
Ave., Coconut Grove, Miami 33, EVERY DAY
phone HI 38227. Small monthly payments
Sir Abram Grace may be contacted Tiled bath, hardwood
I at 4750 Jefferson St., Coconut floors Inc
\ Grove HI 4.8836. carporte ,

.- 2 bedrooms CBS corner lot

PL 7-2559
TALENTUNLIMITED Ray Dockum, Inc. I

FR 74685 MQ 7-05.3. I






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c.o :.; I
THE MIAMI '1 'MES MIAMI, FLORIDA oooooooo

PAGE 14 SATURDAY, MARCH_ 25,, 1961 I HAPPENINGS IN OUR SCHOOLS


I WINNERS OF ARITHMETIC: BEEp ............... ... ........-:'l ............................... .4"';;' .}oo.-.t, 1& III II. ... 4 11:;'" JI J..

.___ U T' School Kids Visit New Classes at Miami School

Federal ;iCourtRepresentatives Fine ArtsThe Papers Win

elected< from Fine t! Arts Conservatory State Awards"The
Junior American Citizens Clubs proudly announces the openingof Monocle" publication of
sponsored iby John MacDonald a new creative dance class the North Dade Junior-Senior
Chapter, DAR, were guests In a under the direction of Pat : High School, Opa Locka walked
Federal Court in the Southern Sonen, wife of Rev. Robert Son- away with two awards at the
District of Florida. en of the First Unitarian Churchof 11th Annual InterscholasticPress
With the approval of the Hon- Miami Mrs. Sonen Is a grad- Conference at Fla. A and
orable Emett C. Choate, U. S. uate of the University of Tulsa :M University. It was adjudgedthe
judge In this district, presiding.! and has studied modern and top award paper in both the
Boys and girls from the sixth creative dancing with Cora "Best Ail-Around Paper and the
w p V { grade in the East Opa Locka Welles and Barbara Metter in 'Best Sports Story" divisions

Elementary School, accompaniedby Boston. She has taught all age Winning the award for "Best
1 their principal, Mrs. Jose groups (preschool through Layout" was 'The Washington
and membersof adult in Oklahoma and Louis
phine D. Mackey ) Ian" of Booker T. Washington
the faculty attended a Natural- iana. She has performed "The
,1 i n"x High School, Miami. Taking the
iztlon Court proceedings Sacred Dance" in many churchesand award for having the Best
The children had studied in concerts. Pat Sonen will Column was 'The Stantonian" of

pamphlets, provided by J o h n be teaching creative dance at New Stanton High School, Jacksonville
MacDonald :Chapter, detailingthe Carver YMCA on Saturdays 1:30 .
requirements upon foreign pm. for 9-12 year olds: at $8 "The Mlddletonlan" of
born to become naturalized citi- per month per child. Regiatra- Middleton High School
Tampa
: ,
: zens. And they were familar tlons are open every Saturday ,at took the award for the Best
with the oath that all applicantsmust 1 p.m. Classes are limited, so News Story.

take before the Judge pro register now The collection of awards gave

.. nounces them American citizens. The Conservatory continues to Miami
---------------- .u top rating in the
The children saw and heard offer excellent piano, ballet. trainingof
Pictured are first, second and Second row: Vernal Wells, 142 foreign :born, with tears and jazz, dance, woodwind and art young journalists. More
third place timers of the llobert Colston, Robert Fulcher,, smiles, become fellow Ameri classes at Carver YMCA. For ,awards found their way to Mi-
West Robert Grubbs, ami than to any other city in
Arithmetic Bee recently held in Emory cans. further information call MO :
all grades at Poinciana Park Thomas Walker These new citizens had come 5-2608 or FR 47053. the state.
Elementary School. Third row Charles McKay, from every European country, Booker T. Washington, North
First row: Fred Williams, Kenneth Davis, Steve James, including Russia, from South western and North Dade boarded
Oulda English, Beverly Champion Kelvin Davis, Sheryl Johnson American Countries, from Canada the train for Tallahassee to-
Sonj Bethel, Linda Williams !Mrs. Elizabeth Pittiruin 1 is and from the Orient. About William R. Rolle.: Every class in gether and traveledto the city on
.
the school had
( Alva Brown and Mario principal and Mrs. Ruble Mizell, 40 percent were Latin Amerl.cans. our opportunity the hill
to
show off its various talentsin
curriculum assistant. .
Carr.
-U the form of dance to t h'e
John MacDonald Chapter is
teachers, parents and friends.
JUNIOR COLLEGE EAST OPA LOCKA very happy and to novel have arrangedthis I I The affair was quite colorful REDUCING!
rare experiencefor .
and was climaxed by the crown!
ELECTS FIRST Two wonderful events have Opa Lochs Elementary, in ing of our king and queen, Lose 10 inches in 30 days
been enjoyed by the school family which every child is a memberof
Brenda Bethel and Rudolph The
secret of HOW be
STUDENT GOV.The this month. They were the a Junior American Citizens Wltherspoon. can
I
"Canlendar Tea" and a visit Club yours for lifeDon't
Northwestern Center of The Florida State Teachers'
the Dade County Junior College from Opa Locka's city officials. Association will convene in our Delay Register Today t!

recently held its first election The tea was quite a success. FRANCES S. TUCKER city on next weekend. Delegates' Call Mrs. E. Tynes
for officers of the Student Government We were fortunate to have had from our school will be Mrs, 'B.
Mrs. Inez Fryson of Bunche Park Spring is in the air! However, NA 1.0470 OX 1.1766
The results Rayford and F. Murray. We
were as spring fever has not yet touchedour are
E'ementary as our guest speaker.Mrs.
hoping that their'
fol'ows
will
: presence
school as is evidenced by
Annie Grant introduced EASY METHOD
President Harry McCartney; our the many activities that are taking be as such that we, as teachers
vice president. Roslyn Clark; speaker. place. will be stimulated to the extent SCHOOL OF CHARM
In regular PTA meetingon
sccretarv, Willie Mae Golden: our On Wednesday, our students that we will see modification in
treasurer, Frances Walkes; chief have March had 20 as, we our were guest honoredto speak. were the stars in the spring festival : our professional organization.. 1540' N.W. 62nd St.

Justice (honor court), Mildred er Harold Hillard, the city man that was headed by our I. J. Meares, principal; F. AS

Johnson.Associate Justices: Barbara ager of Opa Locka who was introduced physical education instructor, Murray, Mrs. L. Reed, reporters.

Co'.son: Phillip DeShazlor, Geraldine by Atty. James Mat.
thews.
Smith, Barbara Williams.
Mr. Hillard spoke with us on
Senators: Marva Hill, Brenda "American Democratic Govern.
Jackson, Thelma Jones, Vivian ment."
; \
Lockett. We were also' honored to have '
C'erk (honor court), Mary A. had Major BlnnLs and :Commls 4

Johnson, secretary, Alice Faye sloner Bowers as guests for the
Thorpe. evening.Mrs. !

Prpsldont's Cabinet: Defense Josephine- Mackey, prin- :
committee, Hernando Brown, cipal; Mary A. Jenkins, secre r.
chairman; public relations com tary.
mittee, Jacquelyn Harrell, chairman .
: welfare committee, Caro- )
LIBERTY CITY
lyn Danle' chairman: state com
mltteo, Dorothy Snyder, chair Earl Williams and Maurice !r--
man; statutes committee, Sammy Graham, the directors of the
Stanley, chairman I chaplain, patrols, are now in the midst of
Catherine Bradley; budget com a campaign in order to help
mittee, Louise Bradley, Greta unite the patrols and to provide
Holmes: Charles Ward, Betty each patrol with badges and
Jean Brown.DUNBAR. helmets. Don't forget to attend
k-
their annual kite flying contest.In 1 il'II

ELEMENTARY case you haven't seen Mrs.
E, Sands recently, her cass: .! has
The faculty Is presently involv. four contestants to compete in i'1I w VI
Pd with the selection of content the annual Spelling flee '

from our practicum, "Oral and to see the smiling .faces of Mrs. 4
Written Communication at Dun Our school family is so glad
bar Elementary School" to be Thelma Outler and Miss Sara
presented at the culminating Cherry back at school after IlLnesses jiY'
program scheduled for the latter .
part of :
April The postman cometh. Yes,

We are pleased to have one of Mrs Effie McFadgon has really \ .-
our former pupils' Janice Aran- Invited him out to school. It iLiNCOLNESTATES- I
ha a8 Interne from Fla. A and M seems as it the boys and girlsIn ._ ?
University her elMs have Just completed -

Brownie Troop 305, Amanda a unit on the postman.At WINNER IN
Frnn1clln and Clara Alexander our PTA meeting last
troop :leaders, worshipped in to Tuesday the group decided to
bOdy at St. Luke Baptist Church, give a Parent-Teacher Tea FashIon ELKS' CONTESTClarence
on last Sunday; morning. Fol- Show, ,but unlike most teas,
lowing t e service the 18 Drown. the group decided to have fash. third from left, a
les Invited four young guests to Ion show at the same time Why senior At George: Washington
accompany them on a visit to not help support your PTAT Carver High School, is shown o
Crandon Park Zoo and to enjoy Our weekly radio program receiving A large, beautiful tro-
a picnic at Virginia Beach., will be heard this Sunday morning nhy from W. O. Perry Sr., presl."
Although our school has Kindly call .station WMBM dent of the Florida' State Assoc. WHY RENT ?

\ activities in process, our many for the exact time iation of Elks .his school's
able ACE representative very In case you see a group of award for hN winning the J lk8'
,
tlce Richardson found time EJes-to Liberty Cltyltes at the Crandon District Oratorical Contest held 3-BEDROOMS SOME GARAGES

( '. train a group to participate 1 In Park Zoo, don't foe surprised, for Sunday, May 12 at the Carver
1 a group to Participate in the anI they are members of Mrs. Alice YMCA Lawrence spoke on the
I I the annual Play Festival Pittman's class. subject, "The Negro And The
"Moth
p,' cr Goose Bake8hP" was the title! Mary F. Williams, principal; Constitution." As Low as $250

of the W? which received 3rd Dents Thomas, reporter. Also shown in the picture are:

Place area competition I to r: Zeke Brady, grand or-
held' on last Friday night at W. HOMESTEAD JUNIOR ganircr for the Elks; Clarence Prices from $9,300

PhYllis Wheatley Eementary: Brown, A teacher at Carver, and
Expressions manifested
t School. We wish to congratu'ate friends indicate the by our coach of the winner. ..... .....
many success -
C for Phyllis Wheatley and Douglas of our dedication program Isom, exacted ruler of Greater $62.00 per month pays everythingSee
i fine setting the pace with their which was held on March 7. Miami Lodge; Roily Johnson A
presentations.Melvin Mrs Walton Y. Robinson, director of the State Education the three bedroom model at
\ Watson Jerry of Committee; 1\Irs.\I00! Tucker,
Ivery principal A. L. Lewis, reign-
and Tony Rozier of Mrs. Bu). el magnificently as mistress of Daughter. Ruler of Liberty 10835 S.W. 221st Street Goulds
lard's 6th grade class are re ceremonies Mrs. Anna B. Mey Temple "And Harold Higgs, exalt ,
eponslb.e for the library's spec" ers, a member of the school ed ruler of Atlas Lodge.

lal ETV bulletin board and book board made the address. Shirley Rumners.up in the contest DeCarlo Homes Inc. HI 44681Advertising
'display.: Tony draws the flags Ann Bennett was student repre. were: Barbara Walker, A seniorat ,
w v of the countries being studed: tentative appearing on the tele- Northwestern who won second

Jerry arranges the bulletin cast place and Robert Smith a .,
board and Melvin collefts the N. L. Bethel, principal; The!. senior of Booker T. Washington, "; '
books for the display. ma S. King, reporter. who finished third. >! in The Miajpi i Times. Pays QfJ





I.
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,
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COMPLETE


I i ; FOOD STORE


III U 27th Ave. at '54th St. -+

NEVER CLOSED

SPECIALS GOOD;{'THURSDAY-SUNDAY MARCH 26th :
.
GRADE A DRESSED AND DRAWN BOX

Fryers 2ScSMOKED 5LB $1.49

:
COLD BEER
COUPON COUPON GOOD FROM 7 A.M.TIL 4 P.M.DAILY COUPON CoW Beer at
24 Hours
5 IB BAG SUNSHINE SWEETSUGAR FREE all times
Day and Night
: '- -
Quantity We cash payrollChecks
WITH$15.00 ORDER OR MORE AND THIS COUPON
for yourconvenience .
RightsReserved GOOD AT WELLER'S AG ONLY NW 54th St.&27th Ave.


I, U.S.No.1 WHITE
FOR' LB.Spare
FINE BAR.B.Q
Rib Tips 19c Potatoes 10 CBS 39cEACH

PALM RIVER PKG. I Bell Peppers 2c
FRANKS n oz 29 LB.

SIRLOIN' US Choice Boneless/ Cabbage
3CL0.
IBc
Steak 89cPINEAPPLE OnionsIIRFINE

I' .
<<

303 CAN

JUICE 69C 3 for Peas 2for 29C

WALKER'S AUSTEXCHILI 2 FOR

Jello Ao/ :;:: 4 for 37C HOOD 49c 2 FOR

SHURFINE 303 CAN '33' BLEACH 25c
Jh GALLON
Corn 2 for 29c Ice Cream Manor House 49C

-"W' II I, ., .= -. '. ",,;' .... '- ".. .. -. /'

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YTHE

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t
MIAMI TIMES MIAMI FLORIDA

PAGE 16' SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1961 I The'Finest Addrau"In 'fdWnl"+ '
TAKE HOME

Hampton\ ,House .Ushers NoticeThe $200 Every Week Sir JOHN HOTEL: ..
Ushers' Union Associa
And Villas FTA, Ion will meet on Sunday, March .:, j ,
Convention 26, 3 p.m. at St. Luke Baptist Beer, and Wine ''N.W.. .''6th,Street :From.2nd to 3rd Avc. .,1'. '
Church, 17th and 19th ets on i.
6th ave. The. program will be Doing $800 Weekly I', I. '. .
HeadquartersThe sponsored between St. Luke's .
Senior and Friendship's Junior Volume BEAUTIFULLY. FURNISHED APARTMENTS:
and different Hamn- ushers. The president Is asking '
new
ton House and Villas, 4200 NW that all members-be out and on Machines rent and :With,kitchenette,and'tub ghower. _,
recenty been des time. Deacon David Hudson, pay { '
has
27th ave. INCLUDES I ''FllkK'GAS, ELECTIUCVVATBtt ANDTELEPHONE ''t
as .official headquarterstS president, Dorothy Major, reporter mortgage .
the coming conventionof ': SmiVlCB -
the Florida State Teachers'. 8Ul t '. Ooh '.ttNO.POtfO SHWFLB. BOARDROOM
Association, which meets In Miami 81st Anniversary CASH REQUIRED ; ,04ULl LOUNGE

announcempnts March 29.31 made, according by the to The Knights of Pythias and I '$1,500 *i .'.., .' I "
Courts I
this week. of Calanthes are having
management
At the,same time the manage- their 81st anniversary programon i -+- ,- SPECIAL RATEi... 'TO"PERMANENT CUESTSt,'
ment also, announced the new Sunday, March 26. At 10 YEARLY LEASfi'
"look") and policy, which are a.m. until 7 p.m. Food and re. Owner going into bigger
now In effect. freshments will be on hand businessMURRAY'S .
William Knlghton: manager throughout the day. All Knights $j84 DAiLY
Interview, and Calanthes and the
stated In a recent public are BAR .
"we certainly welcome the privi 'nvlted to attend this affair at MI.
leJte.of serving' the teachers of Kerr Memorial Methodist Church 644 N.W. 5th Ave. (Per Person *.2 to a Room') -.
Florida on this occasion becauseIt at 10066 West Indigo In PerrTne,
affords us an opportunity to Rev. E. J. Sheppard, pastor. "
show and demonstrate our new Eugene Brown, reporter
modern botel facilities, as well -
..
leaders In education - -- - - - -- -- - -- --'
as to hate these
observe the high stand.
ards which we are pursuing In
order to make this a motel of Our 8th Year 'of Devoted Service to. the CommunityFOR
which they can well: be proud
and can recommend" of their A FAIR DEAL SEE FAIR REALTYThis
friends everywhere.
The new air conditioned convention -,'
hall will be used for
various meetings during the "
convention. A'l' of the other facilities i:':'
of the motel will alwayp L
be available for the use' of the ,
delegates and;, visitors to this .
convention.

:,
A&M Coach Fired .,I
.
Jacksonville An assistant '
football coach at Florida A and ':' '
M University was fired by the ;
State Board of 'Control Friday. ....
The board discharged Macon f:., .,
L. Williams after Dr. George W.
Gore reported the assistant
coach had terrolzed three wo.

men students of the university. Gorgeous Home Can Be Yours


LOVELY NEW THE ABOVE MODEL HOME OPEN FOR YOUR INSPECTION. SEE MR.

3 \BEDROOM GEORGE SUNDAY 1.6 P.M. AT 1949 N.W 152nd ST., OPA LOCKA

2 BUILT-IN BATHS. FLA.ELECTRIC ROOM BRAND ,NEW 3-BEDROOM CBS HOME, ON LARGE LOT WITH BEAUTIFULALL

: KITCHEN, GARAGE JALOUSIED FLORIDA ROOM, B'UILT-IN OVEN AND RANGE, UTILITY .

1232 N.W.. 55th STREET ROOM, LARGE CLOSETS. NO CLO SING COSTS.. 1 MORTGAGE ONLY..

1426 N.W. 58th TERR. $895 DOWN.

1430 N.W. 59th ST. F1 ...I:! "Il!a..A a. "4 !!..e..I'I.a' .I! !Ie
- ----- ------- ------- --------

Open 3 to 5 p.m. BROWN SUB BEAUTY CARVER RANCH SPECIAL,
See 1923 N.W. 58th St.
", We build on your lot Brand ,new 3-bedroom. Rear Brand new '3-bedroom CBS at

NO MONEY DOWN Fla. porch, built-in oven and 5341 S.W. 19th St. 2-bedroom. Newly painted, one
range, 1 mortgage only. Move in Only $395 Down
Cash paid for your lot or mortgage only. Move right in.
See 2991 N.W. 43rd St. $85 month. 1 mortgage, 'no closing
homes Open Sunday for inspection.
costs. Open Sunday 1 6

Only $595 Down P.m. -f. Only $595 Down

... siga: =ya=a=s=a gw
NEW! DIFFERENT! ; ::; :< :;
I BROWN SUB BRAND INEW u
FHA MORTGAGE :
HouseAND
Hampton 3-bedroom, 2 baths. Open .for. Custom built beauty
',' .
VILLAS No closing costs. $79.75 month. : 'inspection... Close, to bus., and

2 bedroom CBS. schools. See us. See 6090 N.W. 9th Ave.
4200 N.W. 27th Ave:
$350 Down pays all $995 Downytflf.flftfyf.fgSf&fff&f'r
Phone NE 3-0611 i I 3-bedroom, 2 baths. By appointment *
"" tI:
NOW OPEN FOROCCUPANCY only.
4-bedroom. Also zoned for bus BEDROOM BATH BEAUTY

All air conditioned iness. Could be used for nursery, I See 1580 N.W. 77th Terr. DUPLEX' .

beauty parlor, convalescent : CBS, corner. Oven and range,
9 Swimming pool close to NW
sprinkler system,
We consider the buy of the
home. Close to NW 17th Ave.
17th Ave. and NW 79th St.
Dining J :
room month. For price, location and
and NW 54th St. Buses, city Buses, quiet area, also Floridaroom.
9 Convention hall down payment.
water. $795 Down.
e Intimate cocktail lounge Only $995. Down Only $995 Down

0 High hotel standards Small home for couple. Total I For nice folks "'., carports, all nice furniture,

f 6 Kitchenette Apta. price $5,000 : = city water, quiet area. Close to
$50 month !
pays Have you a lot to sell, trade or everything. No closing costs.
Single,and, double rooms all. 1 mortgage no closing costs maybe build on? We can he.\ p

Make this motel your home Only $295 Down you get started. See 5200 N.W. 10th Ave.

away from home ...,, ------------ - - - -- -------- -
OJ rrc:;; .III! .
I' '.
i 'SHOPPING CENTER SEE US AT 201 NW.62ND STREET
'
: BUS STOPS AT MOTEL

; r', Largo parking area FAIR I REALTY PL7-1645H
I I' .,.; > j
'
I
't 4200 N.W. 27th Avenue

; ; NE 3-0611 We are open every day 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. including SundaysList

-:, your lots with us for quick cash sale. Best prices paid
',William' Knighton, Mgr.
- - -
''td------ ...... --n-------
-- - - "
"Iii{j"C:' -v -




........ -, ".."
-- .L I J.I
..-



The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00258
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Creation Date: March 25, 1961
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
Funding: Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved. Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
System ID: UF00028321:00258

Full Text






1,11 ,,,l.I lllll ,l l Ihll ill,,I, ll l>l',, 1 111h, ll, 111, ,l 11,I
*****************SCH 3-DIGIT 326
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LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
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PO BOX 117007
GAIHESVILLE FL 32611-7007
D.
D


I;


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis
DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI -DADE AND BROWARD COU NTIES FOR OVER 87 YEARS


Volume 87 Number 12 MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)




Liberty City thankful despite hard times


Local residents feel they have much to be thankful for i


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.comn


The fourth Thursday of November is a
time when Americans stop to give simple
thanks for all the good things in their lives.
Since the meal known as the first Thanks-
giving, which occurred at Plymouth Rock
in 1621, Americans--even before there was
an America--have gathered to give thanks
for what they have. Even in these difficult


economic times, Liberty City's resi-
dents are no exception.
"I'm most thankful for my .*
wife and children," said Ty- .*'
rone Greene, owner of .
Greene Dreams Shoe Repair.
"I thank God for my life, my j'
health, and my strength. ', J_
I'm also thankful to God that "'-
he's still in control of the
Please turn to THANKFUL 4A CHARLIE BE'


Spence-Jones vows to rerun

Locals seek vacant seat


By Sandra J. Charity
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Former City Commissioner Mi-
chelle Spence-Jones arrest earlier
this month locked her up but didn't
knock her down.
The ousted District 5 Commis-
sioner announced Thursday at a
rally in Liberty City that she would
be running in the January 2010
special election for District 5.
"For me not to run is an admis-
sion of guilt," she said on stage in
a strip mall parking lot behind her
campaign headquarters surrounded
Please turn to VOW 4A


-The MiamiTimes photo/ Sandra Charite
Michelle Spence-Jones announces she will re-run for District 5 seat
at Thursday's rally in Liberty City.


Plans change for North Corridor


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


In an effort to gain input from
the public regarding future transit
plans, County Commission Chair-
man Dennis C. Moss, County Com-
missioner Barbara Jordan and
Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Alvarez
hosted the second annual Tran-
sit Summit last Wednesday. More
than 200 local residents attended
the town-hall style meeting, taking
the opportunity to ask direct ques-
tions to their representatives.


Unsurprisingly, the issue of the
long-awaited North Corridor was
raised early in the evening.
"We're going to make good on
that commitment. It may not be
heavy rail, but we will make good,"
said Moss. The "commitment" that
chairman Moss spoke of dates back
to 2002. In the late 1970's, the line
was supposed to go up 27th avenue,
but it was diverted out to Hialeah.
When the People's Transportation
Plan (PTP) was brought back in
2002, it was with the understand-
ing that the North Corridor would


be the number one priority.
"It will come gradually, not over-
night," said Harpal Kapoor, Miami-
Dade Transit Director.
When the PTP was revived in
2002, there were seven metro-rail
expansions tied to the surtax. None
have occurred. According to Moss,
it was also included in the text that
the North Corridor would be given
first priority, as it has been prom-
ised to the constituents in the late
1970's.
It was Theodore Wilde, of Miami
Please turn to PLANS 4A


-Miami Times Photo/Rich Jackson

Heat host Thanksgiving Celebration

Miami Heat star Dwayne Wade helped to get the holiday started off on
Monday by serving a traditional Thanksgiving dinner at the Miami Rescue
Mission, which is located at 2020 Northwest First Avenue.


GRAVE


ROBBERS


Graveyard vandalism remains a concern


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com


While still a very rare crime, grave robbery
remains a persistent one.
Noel Vernon, 38, who works as a caretak-
er at Evergreen Cemetery says the past year
has shown an alarming upsurge.
"I've worked here for four years, and it
wasn't always like this. It's just been in the
last year or so. Someone's going through
busting them," he said.
The truth of Vernon's statements is evi-
dent, as many of the grave-sites have been
disturbed. The most common apparent
method is the use of a sledgehammer of
some sort.
Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery,
Please turn to ROBBERS 4A


The graves of children are
Park Cemetery.


7. /


* . ' . *
-4*
-The Miami Times photo/Tariq Osborne
not spared as vandals assault Evergreen Memorial


Crist appoints Republican

to Broward Commission


The Miami Times Special Report

' Governor Charlie Crist has
appointed Albert C. Jones, a
Black Republican, to replace
suspended Broward County
Commissioner Josephus Eg-
gelletion.
While the district is over-
whelmingly Democratic,
Crist had little option but to
appoint a Republican as he
faces intense pressure from
his party.
As a Black Republican
Jones, 63, is a rarity Bro-
ward. He will be the board's
sole Republican and only
Black.
It is not clear how long
. Jones will remain on the
commission. His tenure par-
tially depends upon the out-
come of Eggelletion's case.
Also, he does not live in the


district he will represent,
though the county attorney
has said that he has 30 days
to move there.
Jones said on Monday that
he intends to do so, but did
not specify when.
Jones has said that he
will very likely run for the
Please turn to JONES 4A


- ." Weatlier -
-J/ . , " . .'.U . Forecast
. Sher.com


WEDNESDAY


800 660
T-SHOWERS


THURSDAY


80� 580
SHOWERS


72� 54�
PARTLY CLOUDY


74� 600
PARTLY CLOUDY


790 670
MOSTLY SUNNY


MONDAY


81� 68�
PARTLY CLOUDY


TJUSDAY


82� 670
MOSTLY CLOUDY


8 90158 00100 o















OPINION


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Sentences a

miscarriage of justice

he City of Miami has yet another reason to be ashamed.
This time it is our treatment of 24-year-old Burson Au-
gustin and his elder brother Rotschild Augustin, 26.
The pair were recently sentenced to six and seven years in pris-
on respectively. The brothers, along with three others, were ac-
cused of plotting with Al Qaeda to blow up the Sears Tower in
what became known as the the infamous Liberty City 7 case.
Prosecutors were disappointed. They had sought the maxi-
mum sentence for each, which would have been 30 years. The'
Associated Press has described the sentences of the Augustin
brothers as "relatively light."
Nonsense.
A just outcome would have been acquittal for both of these
men. More just, would have been a public apology from the
FBI agent who offered them $50,000 to join in a terrorist plot.
Entrapment is the act of a law enforcement official inducing
a person to commit an offense that would be illegal and that
the person would otherwise have been unlikely to commit. This
was entrapment. It resulted in a mistrial--as it should have. It
also eventually resulted in a retrial. It should not have.

Worse still, the FBI informants were unsavory in their own
right. The two informants-Abbas AI-Saidi and Elie Assad-
earned over $130,000 for their services to the FBI, giving them
ample reason to provide (or manufacture) evidence in order to
justify their employment.
Early in the trial, Judge Lenard ruled that key information
about these two men could not be presented to the jury. Al-
Saidi had previously been involved in an attempt to extort
money from a friend who had raped Al-Saidi's girlfriend. He
was later convicted of battery for beating the same girlfriend.
Judge Joan Leonard then, was complicit in railroading these
men.
The prosecution sets a terrible example for the community.
It further marginalizes Blacks from the system. It is another
reason to avoid rather than engage. What' it'says is'that once
accused of a crime, the presumption is guilt, and that the gov-
ernment will continue to press its case until conviction, mak-
ing trial by jury little more than a formality. In the meantime,
the accused sits in jail. Despite the two mistrials, the men re-
mained up from the time of their 2006 arrest.
Even after it became evident that the men were attempting to
scam the undercover agent out of the money without engaging
in any actual terror acts, the trial continued to its pre-deter-
mined outcome. They didn't have the means, the know-how,
or the desire to destroy the Sears Tower.
Nevertheless, they will remain in jail.
Judge Joan Leonard's "light" sentence probably reflects the
dubious nature of these convictions. But it is not nearly light
enough.
Setting the men free would have been the only fair thing to


MIe *fiamv
,ISSN 0739-03191
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami Florida 33127-1818
PoST Oflice Box 270200
Buena vista a Sialion Miami. Florida 3312'"
Phone 305-694-6210
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GARTH C. REEVES. JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman


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every person regardless of race.. creed or color, his or her human and legal rights Hating no person. fearing no person, the
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LOCAL


OPINION


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


Just because; re-elect

Spence-Jones

I strongly advocate that indi- back, but ul- "
viduals in public office should timately end-
be held to the highest standards ed up laying
and strongly support Katherine off staff.
Fernandez-Rundle for having Most re-
the guts to go after corrupt poli- cently, Jessie Trice Center had
ticians. However, in the case money slated to build a new
of Michelle Spence-Jones, I feel headquarters. They spent
that the current prosecution is $600,000 in pre-development
ill-timed. Allegedly, the State money. The shovels are ready to
Attorney had charges ready to break ground. It would be sec-
drop in August, but held off be- ond development in Brownsville
cause they did not want to im- area in last 7 years, it would
pact the on-going election. The bring in 150 construction jobs.
State Attorney had been criti- It would help deliver health care
cized in the past for filing indict- to the poor and needy in one of
ments during elections, which the worst poverty stricken dis-
obviously swings the election to tricts in our community. Well,
the opponent. The only problem the money is gone. Someone at
with the late filing is that the County redirected it. I bet you
timing is suspicious. $1,000,0000 that no one is in-
After Spence-Jones was elect- dicted, that no press comes of
ed, she publicly stated her it. It is just another Black run
innocence and that she was organization getting the shaft. I
subject to a technical lynching bet $10 million dollars that The
which are statements that at- Miami Herald does not run a big
tack the State Attorneys Office. expose on this issue. I bet $100
Two days later, she is served million that the New Times does


I am nota resident of District 5. ido not advocate supporting corrupt
politicians, but if I was a resident of District 5, I would put Spence-
Jones back in office without a moment of hesitation. Why?...


with an indictment. Makes you
think - hmmm - isn't that tim-
ing lovely.
While State Attorney may
have filed late to avoid affecting
an election, the current deci-
sion is worse. Now we have to
go through another election at
a cost of $200,000 to the tax-
payers when the City is already
struggling through a finan-
cial crisis. The State Attorney
dropped two bombs in succes-
sion, leaving us with three com-
missioners instead. of five, so
the City is effectively crippled
from doing any business as the
new Mayor enters office. I guess
that is a welcome to the Mayor's
Office for Mr. Tomas Regalado.
I am not a resident of District
5. I do not advocate support-
ing corrupt politicians, but if I
was a resident of District 5, I
would put Spence-Jones back
in office without a moment of
hesitation. Why? Despite re-
peated attacks on her, which
do take their personal toll, she
has been working hard and de-
livering to her district. She is a
fighter, and I admire fighters. I
remember that I was impressed
with her during the stadium
wars for coming out of bed after
just delivering a baby to make
sure that money was slated for
her district. She used her swing
vote effectively. She has made
inroads to combat problems of
crime, she has made inroads to
start some development in her
district, and she is working on
delivering jobs.

DISAPPEARING
ACT OF COUNTY FUNDS
The issue of money being slat-
ed for one entity and being shift-
ed to another - the great act of
corruption that occurred when
she was just an ordinary citizen
trying to get her small piece of
the pie - is just not corruption.
It happens all the time. The
County habitually has money
moving from one entity to anoth-
er. I have seen money budgeted
for Tools for Change taken away
without notice, because some
commissioner felt the money
would be better served going to
another entity. The end result
was Tools for Change cried a
little, fought to get their money


not run a story. Why because it
happens all the time. It is called
politics, it is called business as
usual at the County.

LET HER WORK CONTINUE
The shame is that Spence-
Jones money was used to re-
develop an area in Liberty City.
The money did not just disap-
pear - there are visible results.
I also know that funding is
used for a variety of purposes
by receiving entities. Absent
a Herald expose, no one has
been prosecuted for reimburs-
ing their credit card expendi-
tures. In fact, in recent history,
the only two people who have
been indicted for such activity
are Rev. Gaston Smith, pastor
of Friendship Baptist Church,
and Spence-Jones - two high
profile Black people who have
ruffled feathers.
In the few instances, when the
County claims someone used
money inappropriately, they are
required to make restitution.
No one is indicted, no one goes
to jail. The entity might lose its
next contract.
While I think all public mon-
ey is important, and should be
safeguarded. I ask myself, when
you have cost overruns in the
billions at the airport, why are
the limited resources of State
Attorney focused on $50,000?
Why not go after the big con-
tractors, American Airlines, and
the other major players who
through judicious change or-
ders, cost overruns and other
technical ploys have taken liter-
ally billions from the taxpayer.
Maybe it is the rebel in me,
maybe it is the part of me who
hates to see bullying, maybe
it is the part of me who hates
unfairness, maybe it is part of
me that is suspicious of attacks
on our leaders - I can't tell you
why. But my gut tells me that
Spence-Jones should be re-
elected and allowed to finish
some of the good work that she
has started. I don't know who
else is running, and I am sure
that I am stepping on power-
ful toes. I seem to do that a lot
lately, but just because every-
one is picking on her - I would
love to see her get a few blows
back.


". . . I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
create a program, you get action ..."
- Malcolm X


BY D.C. CLARK


Raising expectations in the Black community
belong to any of these groups, cials show little white and tends to e
PartII then your path to success is Asian toddlers being taught professional
Question? Do you remember going to be very difficult at how to read before the age of class as well. Instead of tak-
when our parents and teachers best. Since Blacks have yet to six months, some Black par- ing some of the billions of dol-
use to tell us that Black people develop a degree of power that ents are still goo going and lars we gross in this country
have to work twice as hard as will place us on par with oth- gaa gaaing little Shaniqua and every year and reinvest in our
everyone else in order to make ers, we are going to continue Ray Ray until they are nearly communities, we would rather
it? .You remember when they to depend on those very same three-years-old. It's very ob- blow it on frivolous things that
told us that we would have to groups to make us whole. And vious who has the advantage does very little to help anyone.
produce more than all others A snapshot of how ridiculous
just to be treated fairly? If so we've become is captured on
then tell me, when was this according to historian Harold Cruse, even though America ide- a recent video that has been
link broken? When did we as a allies the rights of the individual, in reality, this is a country floating around lately. It
people stop realizing we are liv- shows former NFL 1st round
ing in a very competitive soci- dominated by the social power of groups, classes, in-group draft choice, Adam "Pac Man"
ety and that we have to be bet- and cliques both ethnic and religious. Jones, showering dancers in a
ter prepared than anyone else strip club with approximately
just to survive this madness? $100,000 at one time. That's
According to historian Har- if you know like I know, the coming out of the gate. Also, $100, 000 that he could have
old Cruse, even though Amer- powerful has never granted the what about the names we tag contributed to creating a busi-
ica idealizes the rights of the powerless the necessary tools our children with. We brand ness in the Black community.
individual, in reality, this is a to elevate to his equal. This our children with names that The brother has so much cash
country dominated by the so- means the competitive nature have no meaning, names that in his arms, he could hardly
cial power of groups, classes, that America demands from have no cultural, historical or carry it all. Now he is out of
in-groups and cliques both each of it's citizens, is magni- social significance, once again the league, trying to petition
ethnic and religious. To make fled tenfold when it comes to placing our children at a-dis- the CFL (Canadian Football
it plain, America is run by being Black in this country. tinct disadvantage even be- League) to give him a tryout.
power groups (i.e. Jews, Ger- What Blacks must realize fore they can mutter a single He hopes to make approxi-
mans, Irish, Catholics, His- is this competition begins at word. mately $100,000 for the entire
panics, etc.). and if you don't birth. While today's infomer- This competition also ex- year.


Will history be repeated in the District 5 race?
Dear Editor: Carey, while she was under a understand that the pending bers.
cloud of suspicion. and subsequent indictment There are 39,960 registered
I am writing this letter in re- The reason this community was new charges stemming voters in District 5 and less
sponse to The Miami Herald elected Michelle Spence-Jones from the same investigation, than 3,500 voters showed up
James H. Burnett, III column, while she was under a cloud Based on the initial statement to the polls and all 3500 vot-
"Why politicians under a cloud of suspicion was because the from the County State Attor- ers did not vote for the Comn-
keep winning" on Nov. 20. on-again, off-again investiga- ney's office, District 5 voters missioner. Why only 5,000
Burnett must be new to this tion confused the voters. Dur- were under the impression voters show up to the polls?
community and he did not do ing the election the rumor mill that Spence-Jones was cleared Some politicos are saying a low
his research. If he had, he and her campaign kept tell- on all charges and the hoop-la voter turnout was expected
would have learned that his- ing voters that Miami-Dade surrounding a new indictment and others are saying that the
torically, Miami's Black com- County State Attorney Office was a campaign tactic engaged low turnout is a sign that the
munity does not elect indicted had cleared Spence-Jones of by Spence-Jones opponents to confusion weight heavily on
Commissioners; that's a char- all alleged charges, which was discredit her. the minds of the more than 39,
acteristic attributed to the Lat- indeed the case. As you know, During the January 2010 000 voters who did not go to
in Community. several months prior to the election, there will be no con- the polls.
The only Black elected of- election Miami-Dade State At- fusion, it will be clear to the With such a large number of
ficial to run for office while torney Katherine Fernandez- voters that Spence-Jones has registered uncommitted voters
under indictment was County Rundle issued a statement been indicted and a trial is this election is wide open. And
Commissioner James Burke clearing Spence-Jones of some pending. Will she win election the winner will be the candi-
and he was defeated. How- alleged charges. When the anyway? Well, if history is a date who can "shake the trees"
ever, Billy Hardemon ran while State Attorney issued charges guide, Spence-Jones will lose and get the voters to the polls.
under a cloud of indictment the day after the election, the her seat on the City of Miami Also, in my humble opinion, I
and he lost. And, the late Mi- new charges created a "wall of Commission. Also, the politico think history will prevail.
ami Commissioner Art Teele confusion" and Spence-Jones who are predicting that Spen-
won his first election defeating campaign capitalized on that ce-Jones will win have appar- Tangela Sears
seated Commissioner Barbara confusion. The voters did not ently not looked at the num- Miami


Personal survival over community needs
Dear Editor: addressed her supporters. I community will have a sitting
came out of that meeting feel- Commissioner serving while
Whether you believe that Mi- ing very conflicted at her de- under a criminal investigation
chelle Spence-Jones is guilty cision to enter in the special awaiting trial. Soon, it will al-
or innocent of the charges election. I agree that she has most feel like the community
against her, it is clear, that the the right to clear her name but is on trial with her. The trial
communities in District 5 is at what cost to the communi- will surely have a circus at-
destined to face a traumatic ty? For the sake of argument, mosphere particularly when
and embarrassing ordeal. Re- let's envision the Commission- the sworn statements from
cently, I attended a P.U.L.S.E er winning the special elec- her mentor former County
meeting where Spence-Jones tion in January 2010 then the Commissioner Barbara Carey-


Shuler and her Pastor/Friend
Reverend Gaston Smith are
discussed. Can the communi-
ty endure a year or two of this
level of scrutiny and embar-
rassment? The community
will have a chance to answer
this question in January.

Dr. Robert Malone Jr.
Miami


Has the economy changed your Thanksgiving holiday plans?


WILLIAM HOWARD, 57
Unemployed, Miami


my family. It's
no different
than during
better eco-
nomic times. 5
Thanksgiv-
ing's always
been about being together and
giving thanks for what we have.
It shouldn't be about complain-
ing about what you don't have.
Thanksgiving's a time for family
and being together. The econo-
my doesn't change that.

JEANETTE JONES, 44
Boutique Owner, Liberty City

I plan to
go to North
Carolina and
enjoy the holi-
day with some
family I have
up there. i
think times


are getting better. When they
were harder, I wouldn't have
been able to go, but Obama's
fixing things.

BETTY DEAN, 54
Retired, Miami

I"ll be feed-
ing 20 home-
less people. I
guess if times
were harder, ,
I'd be feeding
more, but re- , "
ally the econ-
omy isn't making that much of
a difference. It isn't the econo-
my that makes things hard for
people anyway, it's personal
responsibility. I've been lucky
that nursing jobs--which is
what I did, are recession proof.
But people need to be more in-
dependent and stop blaming
the economy. There's still work
for people who get out and look
for it. But Thanksgiving--and
and the other holidays, should
be about giving and service.


GRADY MUHAMMAD, 42
Grant Writer, Overtown


My plans
are just to en-
joy it; to spend
time with my
family and my
children and
to give bless-
ings to God.
This is what
we do every
year. It's time
to reflect and to enjoy yourself.
It's a good time to watch foot-
ball and eat turkey. You don't
need to be rich for that.


TIMOTHY DRAKE, 46
Cook, Liberty City

I'm going to
spend it with
my wife and
kids, which
is what I'd be
doing no mat-
ter how the
times were. I


might buy them more gifts and
things if times were better, but
Thanksgiving is really about
spending that time together.

WILLIE COVINGTON, 57
Baker, Opa-locka

My plans are -
really to relax
and eat. II1Il
be with fam-
ily. I probably
would do the
same no mat-
ter how the
times were.
There might
be a little more food on the ta-
ble in better times--but no; I'd
be doing the same thing.



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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


AA THF MIAMI TIMFS NOVFMRFER 25-DECEMBER 1. 2009


Caretaker: It's been getting worse in the last year or so


ROBBERS
continued from 1A

which is located at Northwest
41 Street and 30th Avenue, is
particularly vulnerable to the
practice because the concrete
sleeves surrounding the cof-
fins are above ground, leaving
them exposed to the elements-
and to thieves.
On several occasions, Vernon
has seen two Hispanic women
in the graveyard after dusk,
but is careful not to make any
accusations, or to guess at the
thieves' intent.
Often grave-robbers are look-
ing for valuables, such as met-
als or marble. But suggestions
that the thieves could be attrib-
uted to marauding teens, and


even occultists have all been
made. "I don't know about
that," he said. "But heads have
been missing.
Evergreen Cemetery's owner,
Garth Reeves, says that the
vandalism is not new. "We've
been repairing that cemetery
ever since we bought it," he
said.
Police reports from as far as
1997 validate his claim. Oc-
casionally, chicken feathers
or chicken bones have been
found in the areas, causing po-
lice to suspect the vandalisms
may be some sort of religious
practice.
Sadly, even the graves of
children are not immune. At
Evergreen Cemetery, the tiny
coffins are as likely to be van-


-The MiamiTimes photo/Tariq Osborne
At Evergreen Memorial Park Cemetery, Many of the graves show
signs of vandalism consistent with the use of a sledgehammer.


dalized as the larger ones.
Evergreen Cemetery's own-
er, Garth Reeves, bought the
cemetery from the bankruptcy
court in 1994. The Cemetery
had been a neglected and
abandoned property for many
years prior. No one has been
interred there since, and ac-
cording to records, the prop-
erty has never been profitable.
Reeves however, put up a fence
and hired caretakers to restore
the property, so that families
might visit the graves of their
loved ones.
The history of the Evergreen
memorial Park Cemetery began
in 1932, when Benjamin and
Capitola Solomon purchased
five lots from white real estate
developers. The parcel was col-


lectively referred to as Happy
Acres.
Solomon's wife sold the prop-
erty to Tropical Home Builders
after his death in 1955.
Since then, the cemetery has
changed hands four times. Ev-
ergreen Cemetery was donat-
ed to the Greater Tabernacle
Baptist Church, 151 NW 60th
Street, in 1976. The church
eventually sold the cemetery
to John Wagoner of Maquoke-
la, Iowa, in 1989. In January
of 1990, Molly and Bernard
Zaminsky of Pembroke Pines
were the highest bidders for
a tax certificate on the prop-
erty. Reeves bought the prop-
erty from the bankruptcy court
after the Zaminskys filed for
bankruptcy.


NATIONN


-Photo/ Miami-Dade County Commission
Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson on stage with Laverne Holliday
and Lavern Elie from the Curley's House on Sunday.

Booker T. Washington defeats Norland


For the Booker T. Washing-
ton Tornadoes have taken ,a
step closer to the class 3A state
championship in their defeat of
Norland. On Friday night, the
Tornadoes (10-1), -overcame
a momentum-shifting touch-
down to seize a 24-13 victory at
Curtis Park.
On Friday, they will play
either Belen or District


rival Jackson.
Tornadoes Quarterback Bi-
dler Dorlean was 11 of 18 for
212 yards and three touch-
downs. Jayvon Wrentz, caught
four passes for 90 yards and
two touchdowns. Ernest Tynes
finished with three receptions
for 58 yards. Late in the third
quarter, Tynes made a 56-yard
touchdown reception to give the


Tornadoes a 24-7 lead.
Booker T. Washington was
holding a 17-0 lead at that point
in the game, on the strength of
a 25-yard field goal by Oscar
Diaz and the two touchdowns
scored by Wrentz.
Norland scored early in the
fourth quarter when Duke
Johnson made a 29-yard touch-
down reception.


Moss seeks federal funds for transit

PLANS ures, running buses instead Sun-Rail," he said. Moss be-
continued from 1A of building rail is cheaper by lives that this will attract the
30 percent. To this end, the federal funds necessary for
Gardens, who asked whether county has purchased 12 the North Corridor project,
the rapid transit buses would right-of-way parcels, at a cost and also other additions like
be feasible, due to the of $4.3 million. a high-speed rail con-
area's urban density. Moss also necting Miami to Or-
Mayor Alvarez hedged, played up a land.
"we are constrained by federal com- Miami-Dade Transit
the economics of to- mitment that .has been running a.
day. We know some of the county deficit for years. Some
the promises we made seeks. of the PTP helped to
were virtually impos- "When met- resolve some of the
sible to keep, and we ro-rail was deficit. We're trying to
will never make that ,I built, 80 per- bring it to where it's
mistake again." MOSS cent of the JORDAN not such a loss. We've
County Manager funding came got to bring more rev-
George Burgess said much the from the gov- enue in, at the same
same. "We need to live within ernment. Today it's almost time reducing our costs,"
our means and be fiscally re- the opposite. The government Moss has said.
sponsible," he said. needs to step in and help not Jordan said she views the
The transit authority plans just build systems, but op- buses as a stopgap measure
to keep at least the spirit erate and maintain them," for difficult times, and hopes
of the promises; but by us- he has said. "What we've got to build incrementally when
ing buses rather than heavy to get is dedicated source of the financial times allow for
rail. According to transit fig- funding for the Tri-Rail and it.



Date of Thanksgiving was briefly contended


THANKFUL
continued from 1A

neighborhood. He is the first
and the last," Greene said.
Greene's wife, Paulette, said
much the same. "I thank God
for life, and for his gracious
mercy," she said.
Lanita Dixon, a 20-year-old
dental student at Miami Dade
College had a simple expres-
sion of gratitude. "I'm thank-
ful for life itself; for waking up
every morning," she said.
Joe Sims, 71, is thankful
for his 50-year career in con-
struction, which the economy
brought to a recent end.
"I worked for Valiant Con-
struction, he said. They told
me yesterday." Despite the
grim news, Sims remains
grateful. "In this economy, I'm
surprised I lasted as long as I
did. I thank the Lord for that,"
he said.
Though Americans began
celebrating Thanksgiving
shortly after the revolution-


ary war, it did not become
an official holiday until Abra-
ham Lincoln declared the last
Thursday in November would
be Thanksgiving in 1863. Ev-
ery president since Lincoln
has declared Thanksgiving a
national holiday.
Congress, in 1941, declared
again that the fourth Thurs-
day in November would be
Thanksgiving. This was. nec-
essary because it reversed
a decision by Roosevelt to
celebrate the holiday on the
third Thursday of November,
to give people more time in
between to shop for Christ-
mas.
Since then, Thanksgiving
has been celebrated on the
fourth Thursday of the month-
-but not in every home.
Charlie Beau, a Broward
County transit bus driver,
was in town visiting Leon Cus-
tom Tailor does not celebrate
the traditional Thanksgiving.
"Thanksgiving is a holiday
for people who had nothing


to do with me," he said. "My
day of thanks would be Ju-
neteenth. That's the holiday
for my people." he said.
When pressed, however,
Beau was able to think of
several things for which he
is thankful, which suggests
that one need not celebrate
the official holiday to share
the spirit of. gratitude. "I'm
thankful for having a job in
this economy, the way things
are on the job market," he
said. "I'm also thankful for
reality; for being here right at
this moment.
In the end--everyone has
something for which to be
thankful. Percy Williams
summed up his feelings on
the matter.
While waiting his turn in
the Mop City Barbershop,
Williams said he was most
thankful for the health of his
family. "I"m going to spend
the holiday with them," he
said. "I'm. also thankful to
have God in my life."


MALONE


TORAIN


DUNN


Malone: New direction and character needed in District 5


vow
continued from 1A

by her attorney,family and
friends. "It's about making
sure we complete what we
started."
With supporters holding up
signs, Spence-Jones main-
tained her innocence.
"Spence-Jones is running
for District 5," she said, refer-
ring to herself. "When you're
not guilty, when you're not
afraid, when you know you've
done nothing wrong, you just
corisider it a stumble in the
road."
Shortly after an 83 percent
victory in the District 5 race,
Spence-Jones was arrested on
one count of second-degree
grand theft. According to the
State Attorney Office, Spence-
Jones alledgely submitted a let-
ter in Carey-Shuler's name in-
structing Metro-Miami Action
Plan Trust (MMAP) to transfer
the two grants to Karym Ven-
tures, a company then owned
by Spence-Jones and her fam-
ily. The funds were to be allo-


cated to help improve District
5.
Spence-Jones previously
said, "This charge is about re-
moving me from office."
Gov. Charlie Crist suspend-
ed Spence-Jones from her Dis-
trict 5 seat following her arrest
which has led to the vacant
seat.
In addition to Spence-Jones
rerunning, District 5 candi-
date Jeff Torain will also rerun
for the seat.
"I am hoping that residents
will focus on the issues that
are, affecting District 5 rather
than the personality," said To-
rain in a phone interview Tues-
day.
This special election will cost
the City over $200,000 which
Torain believes could have
been avoided if an individual
was appointed to the seat then
hold an election in the next
municipal.
Since the commission did not
have a quorum and the time
expired to appoint someone,
the City was left with no choice
but to have a special election.


Jones faces 2010 challenge


JONES
continued from 1A

seat when it comes up for
election next November. If he
does so, he will face at least
three Democratic challeng-
ers.
Former Ft. Lauderdale
Commissioner Carlton Moore,
Lauderhill Commissioner
Margaret Bates, and Pastor


Allen Jackson have all an-
nounced bids for the seat.
Jones won his first elected
position to the Dania Beach
City Commission in 1993, but
lost it in 1997. In 1998, he
changed parties, becoming a
Republican and was appoint-
ed the next year to the South
Broward Hospital District by
Gov. Jeb Bush. He still re-
tains this position.


UNITED TEACHERS OF DADE
The Education Experts
www.UTD.ora


A third contender for the
District 5 seat is Dr. Robert
Malone Jr.
Malone, 41, is a community
coordinator/ University re-
cruiter who previously ran for
the State Representative Dis-
trict 109 seat in 2008.
"We need a new direction and
character in the District," said
Malone to The Miami Times on
Tuesday. "I think I and others
are fed up with the things that
are going on in District 5. Peo-
ple are tired of the condition
and corruption in the commu-
nity. The community is starv-
ing for leadership that they can
trust, depend and believe .in."
Pierre E. Rutledge, a Miami-
Dade County Schools admin-
istrator, told The Times, "no
decision has been made as of
yet."
District 5 runner-up in the
November election, David
Chiverton, and the notable
community activist Rev. Rich-
ard P. Dunn are also rumored
to be running for the seat. Nei-
ther could be reached for com-
ment.


Kae - - izUT reidn
Arte, eihne. JTDFist icePrsidntFedic Inram UD Scrtar-Teasre
I -I *.


__________________,_I


Media Specialist
Carol City Elementary
* Masters Degree in Reading
* National Board Certified Teacher
* Certified in Reading K-12, Media
Specialist K-12, Varying
Exceptionalities K-12, Mental
Retardalion K-12, ESOL Endorsement
* Member of District Special Student
Education (SPED) Task Force
* Educational Research & Dissemination
District and Slate Trainer - Strategies
for Student Success I course
* Past Teacher of the Year for Carol City
Elementary
* Member, United Teachers of Dade

Y .-


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5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Years of development good or bad for Miami?


By Damien Cave

The office of Mayor Manny
Diaz smelled of fresh paint and
departure. He had only a few
hours left before term limits
pushed him out, but when the
city's planning director men-
tioned a development by a large
Spanish bank, the mayor's eyes
lit up.
"I'd love to see it," Diaz said.
"Will you call me?"
It was a telling exchange for
a mayor who oversaw one of
Miami's most extensive physi-
cal transformations. The city
he served for eight years now
has cafes where prostitutes
used to strut. There are more
trees and art offerings, too,
but mostly there are buildings.
More than 100 million square
feet of residential and commer-
cial space has been added since
2001 -- mostly towers and not
just downtown, but also across
neighborhoods with one-story
homes.
And in assessing these ad-
ditions, which range from dia-
monds tQ rhinestones, Miami
has come to exemplify a deep,
national ambivalence about the
boom's lasting impact.
This month's mayoral elec-
tion was in many ways a refer-
endum on the idea that more
construction means, progress.
And as was the case in Se-
attle, where the incumbent
lost in a primary, and in New
York, where Mayor Michael R.
Bloomberg won, but not by
much, the results pointed to
retrenchment: Tomas Regala-
do, after campaigning against
grand plans, beat a protege of
Diaz's, Joe Sanchez, winning
72 percent of the vote.
"It was wild," Regalado said,
describing the Diaz era. "And
many times, irresponsible."

COMPLICATED COURSE
The causes, of course, are
complicated. In a time of easy
credit, experts said, Diaz in-
herited a laissez-faire zoning
code that let developers rule.
By legal right, they could build
a 40-story building beside a re-
tiree's 1950s ranch-style home.
In terms of design, the city
could only request alterations.
"It's a little like the Ten Com-
mandments," said Arva Moore
Parks, a historian and member
of the Miami Planning Adviso-
ry Board from 2002 until this
year. "It's just suggestions."
Still, there is no doubt that
Diaz, a registered indepen-
dent, welcomed development.
He said he came into office in
2001 with a sense of urgency
because Miami had yet to ex-


perience a revival like New York
City's or Miami Beach's. This
was a city with a $140 million
surplus where rusted-out cars
filled empty lots and thunder-
storms caused flooding, and
politicians talked more about
Havana than Tallahassee.
"We were something of a
laughingstock," Diaz said, add-
ing, "I wanted to turn that im-
age around, and I think I did."
Those who saw his adminis-
tration up close generally agree.
Several former officials said
Diaz, 55, a lawyer, modernized
city government. His office did
not even have a computer when
he arrived; now Miami's police
officers have laptops with voice
recognition software in their
cruisers.

INTERNATIONAL CITY
For some residents, the good
outweighs the bad. "I'm thrilled
that Miami has become a ma-
jor international city," said Bert
Silvestre, 51, a resident of the
Roads neighborhood and a se-
nior manager for IBM. "Devel-
opment is the price we pay."
But for now at least, Silvestre
appears to be in the minority.
With record unemployment,
foreclosures and budget cuts
-- in an area with one of the na-
tion's largest gaps between rich
and poor residents -- anger is
the norm.
Like many others, John
Thomas, 76, had one question:
"Where did all the money go?"
Though he lives on a street with
new storm drains, near a park
overhauled under Diaz, he crit-
icized politicians as expecting
bailouts after "'they spent them-
selves into the grave."
Just as common are the views
of Miriam Galliana, 63, who
said she voted for Diaz but now
believes "this is not New York
City, and it shouldn't be."
Galliana lives in Silvestre's
neighborhood, in a simple
home just off Coral Way. And
her opinion has been shaped
by what she sees from her front
door: a new 13-story apartment
building.

NEIGHBORHOOD CAMPAIGN
"This was a quiet, nice, beau-
tiful neighborhood, and it's not
like that anymore," she said.
"It's horrible."
Elvis Cruz, an activist with
Miami Neighborhoods United,
said the building exemplified
the Diaz era. He said that be-
cause it was in a designated
"special district," which allows
for more oversight, the city
should have insisted that the
design "respond to the physical,
contextual environment," as the


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zoning ordinance requires.
"This is an illegal building,"
Cruz said. "But the city allowed
it."
Parks, who was chairwoman
during her last four years on
the planning board, said the
problem of loose enforcement
preceded Diaz, though during
the building boom, the mech-
anisms of government were
overwhelmed. The planning
board sometimes met until 2
a.m., Parks said, and lawyers
for developers held more sway
than critics. Developers, after
all, were major campaign con-
tributors who could drag the
city into expensive lawsuits.
Even in the case of the large,
controversial projects that did
come before Miami's five-mem-


ber commission and the may-
or, "yes" votes carried the day.
Diaz could have stepped in, for
instance, to veto the commis-
sion's approval in 2007 of three
condominium towers near Viz-
caya, the historic museum in
Coconut Grove. But he did
not. Instead, the development
died in the courts last year af-
ter preservationists (including
Parks) sued to stop it.

STADIUM DIVISIVE
Other divisive projects, like
the new stadium under con-
struction for the Florida Mar-
lins on the site of the Orange
Bowl, also received the Diaz
signature. In eight years, he
said, he did not veto anything.
He said he preferred trans-


formation. It took four years,
but in October, the City Com-
mission approved his ambi-
tious urban blueprint, Miami
21, which will encourage more
mixed use and bring stricter
height restrictions to residen-
tial areas. It also gives the plan-
ning board the power to reject
projects based on their design
and other criteria.
But for many, Miami 21 has
come too late, leaving open
whether Diaz will be remem-
bered as a visionary or by the
nickname he picked up along
the way, Money Diaz.
He was, by his own admis-
sion, "a deal man." At times, he
said, he wondered if he did too
much deciding and not enough
explaining. His friends said he


hated public relations and pre-
ferred sharing Scotch in his of-
fice with fellow insiders.
It is that culture that has left
Miami with a bitter aftertaste.
Two commissioners who were
often Diaz allies have left of-
fice since the election because
of corruption scandals, and the
city today faces a fiscal night-
mare -- partly because of pen-
sion obligations, partly because
of declining revenue from prop-
erty taxes. Both are now part of
the Diaz legacy.
"In the time of the boom, you
could do everything and any-
thing, and no one would no-
tice," Regalado said. Now, he
added, it is time to emphasize
different values: accountability
and caution.


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Sf. BSrk* rvbubd bi FArI FtbI (IIMnke btw o prakN




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a-. - .- --- - -


Valerie Ward, principal of Scott Lake Elementary School.

Scott Lake Elementary principal wins $10K


Special to the Times

Valerie Ward, principal of
Scott Lake Elementary School,
was the top Miami-Dade school
principal winners of the seventh
annual Leonard Miller Prin-
cipal Leadership Award from
the Council for Educational
Change at a special event held
Sunday. Gilberto Bonce, princi-
pal of South Miami Senior High
School was named one of two
Gold Medallion winners, along
with Dr. Christi Chandler-Buell


of Tampa.
The three winners were cho-
sen from among a selection of
statewide applicants who dem-
onstrated extraordinary leader-
ship in three areas: raising stu-
dent achievement, empowering
staff leadership, and forming
meaningful partnerships with
businesses and community.
Ward, who has raised Scott
Lake Elementary's grade from
a C to an A, won the $10,000
prize. She was surprised with a
congratulatory video and poem


from Scott Lake's students and
staff. The event was held at the
Star Island home of Sue Miller,
Council Board Member and
Chair of its Educational Ad-
vancement Committee. Bonce
and Chandler-Buell each re-
ceived $5,000.
The award is named for Leon-
ard Miller, the late chair of the
South Florida Annenberg Chal-
lenge, who firmly believed that
principal leadership was the
catalyst to increasing student
achievement.


FBI report shows more hate-motivated crime


By Marisol Bello


The number of crimes against
Black people and members of re-
ligious groups increased in 2008,
making up a growing share of
incidents motivated by bias, the
FBI reported Monday.
Those categories accounted
for 56% of the 7,783 hate crimes
reported in 2008. Overall, .hate
crimes increased 2% from 2007.
The election of the first Black
president and hot-button issues
such as abortion and gay mar-
riage contributed to the spikes,
anti-bias groups say.
"There is this kind of ex-
tremism going .on," says Hilary
Shelton, director of the NAACP
Washington bureau. He says
Obama's election and the reces-
sion led to a backlash against
Blacks as some people look for
someone to blame for hard eco-,
nomic times.
The number of attacks on
Blacks increased 8% to 2,876,
accounting for seven of every 10
race-motivated crimes.
Brian Levin, director of the
Center for the Study of Hate &
Extremism at California State
University-San Bernardino,
says it is hard to draw conclu-
sions from the FBI data because
the number of agencies report-
ing varies each year and some
do better than others at classify-
ing hate crimes.
Most hate crimes, almost four
in 10, involved property damage
and vandalism. Almost three in
10 involve intimidation of a per-
son. Three in 10 are assaults.
Hate crimes based on sexual
orientation increased 3% to
1,297, although the number of
people victimized went up 13%,
to 1,706.
Geo Vaughn, 23, of Queens,


N.Y., reported to police that he
was beaten in August 2008 in
Manhattan by a gang of young
men shouting anti-gay epithets.
He says lesbians, gay men, bi-
sexuals and transgender people
are more vulnerable now because
they are increasingly in the pub-
lic eye in the debate over equal
rights, including a California vote
that overturned a new law allow-


ing same-sex marriage. "It gives
our attackers more drive to hurt
us," he says.
Two men have been charged
with a hate crime against
Vaughn.
Hate crimes based on religion
rose 9% to 1,519. Most, 67%,
were against Jews. Incidents in-
volving Catholics increased 23%
to 75.


n
MIAMI DADE AN S .M
WATER A NER ARm
DEPARTMENT By Ana Maria Monte Flores
A A

The Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department is pleased to welcome you to
this new feature. Through this column we will regularly report water news
and practical information that will keep you informed about Miami-Dade's
tap water, how to use it wisely and all the services provided by the Depart-
ment. Our goal is to serve the residents and businesses of Miami-Dade
County by providing high-quality drinking water and wastewater services, by
protecting public health and by acting In the best interest of our environ-
ment.

READING YOUR METER

The amount of water you use is measured and billed in hundreds of cubic
feet (ccfs). For your convenience, the number of gallons used is printed on
your bill as well. Tracking your water usage is as simple as tracking.the mile-
age on your car. Just take a look at your water meter and read the numbers
on the white dials. To determine your water usage, subtract your previous
reading from your current reading.

HIGH BILLS, METER CHECKS AND REREADS

Usually, the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department will automatically in-
vestigate the occurrence of a high bill, to check for an improperly working
meter or leakage, but customers are welcome to call Customer Relations at
305-665-7477 and bring a high bill to our attention. An initial investigation
of the meter will be done at no cost to you. Please note that the investigator
will NOT check your inside plumbing.
If your any reason you believe your water meter is giving incorrect readings,
call 305-665-7477. A Certified Meter Test request form will be mailed to you
and arrangements will be made to have your meter checked. If the meter is
found to be malfunctioning, you will not be charged for the test and your bill
will be adjusted to correct inaccurate readings. If the meter is found to be
working properly, the Department will charge $40.00 to your account to
cover the cost of the test.


SEC: Theodule defrauded fellow Haitians


Miami Times Special Report

George Theodule, charged
with scamming $23.4 million
from his fellow Haitian-Amer-
icans, has reached a settle-
ment with federal securities
regulators.
The self-styled "investment
guru, has agreed to an injunc-
tion, but has not admitted or
denied the allegations. The
court will now decide what civ-


il penalties Theodule will pay.
The charges stem from last
December, when the Securities
and Exchange Commission
(SEC) alleged that Theodule
was running a Ponzi scheme
that involved thousands of
Haitian Americans across the
country. Creative Capital Con-
sortium and A Creative Capital
Concept$, Theodule's compa-
nies, had their assets frozen.
In 2007, Theodule began


creating investment clubs
across the country, claiming
that the money would be used
to fund business ventures in
Haiti, Sierra Leone, and in the
United States. He promised
returns of 100 percent within
90 days.
The SEC alleges that the
ventures were not legitimate,
but rather that he paid the
older investors with the in-
vestments of newer recruits.


Governor looks into wasteful spending


Miami Times Special Report


This week, Governor Char-
lie Crist ordered an inves-
tigation of Juvenile Justice
Secretary Frank Peterman's
extensive taxpayer-funded
travel. A citizen has lodged
an ethics complaint on the
same topic. Peterman often
travelled between Tallahassee
and Tampa, which is near his


family home.
Crist ordered Melinda
Miguel, his inspector general,
based on a report that says
Peterman has spent $44,000
in less than two years. Accord-
ing to a Crist spokesperson,
Miguel's mission is to root out
exactly this sort of waste.
Peterman intends to cooper-
ate with the investigation.
Twenty thousand dollars (of


the$44,000 total) was spent
on trips between the capital
and Tampa, and many of the
trips allowed Peterson to spend
weekends with his family.
Peterman, a senior pastor at
the Rock of Jesus Missionai-y
Baptist Church in St. Peters-
burg, drew a $29,000 salary
from the church last year. In
addition, his state position
pays him $120,000 per year.


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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN.DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


Army investigates soldier mom

Lawyer: Baby not being used to shrink duty '


By Alan Gomez
An Army mother who refused
to go to Afghanistan because
she failed to get someone to care
for her son wants the military
to discharge her rather than
enforce a policy thousands of
single mothers have abided by.
Spc. Alexis Hutchinson, 21,
was to depart Nov. 5 with her
unit of the 3rd Infantry Division
from Fort Stewart in Georgia.
She refused after her mother
declined to care for Hutchin-
son's 10-month-old son, Ka-
mani.
Her lawyer insists that
Hutchinson is genuinely stuck
and not using her child to get
out of duty.
Under Army policy, soldiers
who cannot find a suitable
caregiver may be disciplined or
honorably discharged.
"These women are given a
choice which is a very bad one
to face: deploying and aban-
doning your children, or re-
fusing your orders and facing
charges," says Hutchinson's ci-
vilian lawyer Rai Sue Sussman.
"I think (the Army has) shown
... a lack of understanding for a
young soldier, a young mother,,
in a difficult situation."
The Army says Hutchinson
may have acted improperly in
her handling of the situation
and is not entitled to be treated
differently from other women.
"There are thousands of sol-
diers that have similar cir-


cumstances," Fort Stewart
spokesman Kevin Larson said.
"They're single parents. They
do the right thing. They prepare
for their deployment. They ful-
fill their sworn duty."
More than 30,000 single
mothers have deployed to the
two most recent wars, accord-
ing to a study by Iraq and Af-
ghanistan Veterans of America.
An Army cook, Hutchinson
turned herself in to military po-
lice the day after she was sup-
posed to deploy.
Hutchinson was ordered
held, and her son was placed
in a protective service until
Hutchinson's mother could fly
from Oakland the next day to
care for him.
Hutchinson is confined to the
base, awaiting the result of an
Army investigation.
Larson said Hutchinson was
detained because her command
"became aware of additional in-
formation" and concluded that
there may have been "alleged
misconduct" on her part. He
would not elaborate.
The Army generally gives par-
ents enough time to formulate
a written plan for care of the
children prior to a deployment,
Army spokesman Wayne Hall
said.
Sussman says Hutchinson
has done all she can to find
a caregiver and wants a dis-
charge.
While not speaking directly
about Hutchinson's case, Hall


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An undated self-portrait shows Spc. Alexis Hutchinson
with her son, Kamani, 10 months. Hutchinson was sched-
uled to deploy to Afghanistan with her unit Nov. 5.
said a unit's commanding offi- now in Afghanistan, which
cer generally oversees a court- means she could end up there
martial. Hutchinson's unit is after all.


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9A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


*.' 1".;-7 .,


WNBA star Marie Ferdinand Harris
.ceive a proclamation from the City
-MiamiTimes photos/Sandra J. Charite North Miami Mayor Andre Pierre.


WNBA star Marie Ferdinand Harris teach students in the FANM after-school
program how to shoot a basketball.

WNBA star returns to


Edison High alumni shares her story


with local students
By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
Marie Ferdinand-Harris, a
Haitian-American, imagined her-
self becoming an entrepreneur
involved in different ventures or
even a non-profit organization
for kids but today she finds her-
self on the court wearing a num-
ber 24 jersey as a shooting guard
for the professional basketball
team, Los Angeles Sparks.
"It's funny how things work
out," she said to The Miami Times
in an exclusive interview outside
Haitian Women of Miami (FANM
Ayisyen Nan Miyami) building in




W I WO..
t l-BBr r W


Little Haiti on Nov. 18.
Ferdinand Harris, 31, visited
several schools last week that in-
.clude Toussaint Louverture Ele-
mentary and Miami Edison High
(her alma mater), to share her
life story and motivate students.
Ferdinand Harris, who is 5 feet
9 inches tall, joined Marleine
Bastien, Executive Director of
Haitian Women of Miami (FANM
Ayisyen Nan Miyami), North Mi-
ami Mayor Andre Pierre, Haitian
poet/artist Mecca A.K.A. Gri-
mo and several students at the
FANM building in Little Haiti for
a game of basketball on Nov. 18.
At the age of 13, the Miami


Edison High recalls her first en-
counter with the sport.
"The first day, I could not put
the ball down," she said. "I fell in
love with the sport."
Ferdinand-Harris' best friend
saw her love for the sport and
encouraged her to pursue it.
That she did. In her senior year,
Ferdinand-Harris averaged 24.0
points, seven rebounds, 5.4 as-
sists, and 2 steals per game, and
was named the 1995 Player of
the Year in Florida. She contin-
ued her education at Louisiana
State University and she played
for the LSU Lady Tigers basket-
ball team.
She entered the WNBA in 2001
after being selected eighth over-
all by the Utah Starzz in the first
round WNBA draft. Ferdinand-


Miami
Harris is a two-time WNBA All-
Star.
In 2003, she joined the San
Antonio Silver Stars then finally
found home with 'the Los An-
geles Sparks in 2008. She took
some time off in 2006 to prepare
for her first born child. Today,
Ferdinand-Harris is married to
Cedrick Harris, former baseball
player for the LSU Tigers and
former baseball coach at Anto-
nian College Preparatory High
School.
With students from the FANM
after-school program in the au-
dience, Mayor Pierre presented
Ferdinand-Harris with a proc-
lamation from the City of North
Miami. He said, "It is a privilege
to have great talent within the
community."


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The Miami Times




Faith


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


MIAMI TIMES


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-Photo by Miami-Dade County
(L-R) Santa Claus, Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson, Kathy Cole, New Jour-
neys Executive/Program Director, Quenika Boston, New Journeys Founder/CEO and Burnie, Miami
Heat mascot.

Edmonson raises funds for women

transitioning out of foster care


Special to the Times


County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson
drummed up some early holiday cheer for young
women aging out of the foster care system. Ed-
monson took part in the "Dreams Do Come True"
charity event earlier this month that benefited
the New Journeys Transitional Home, a non-
profit organization that provides a nurturing en-
vironment to promote independence and self-suf-
ficiency among the young women it houses. New
Journeys focuses on women ages 18 to 24 that
are homeless or no longer in foster care.
The event, held at Dolly's Florist, featured a
silent auction with proceeds going toward New
Journeys, as well as kid-friendly activities, in-
cluding face painting, reading corner, arts and
crafts lesson, and a visit from Santa Claus. In
addition, Heat fans got to meet Heat player Dor-
rell Wright, the Miami Heat Dancers, and mascot
Burnie. Also in attendance was Deco Drive's Luis
Aguirre.


"The women at New Journeys learn the skills
they will need to not only survive, but thrive as
they pursue jobs, education and living on their
own," said Edmonson, an avid supporter of the
organization. "We must all do what we can, de-
spite tough economic times, to help New Jour-
neys nurture many more young women."
New Journeys Transitional Home's mission is
to decrease the rate of homelessness for young
adults transitioning out of the foster care system
by providing housing and teaching skills needed
for self-sufficiency. The majority of its residents
have come from the organization's partnerships
with the Community Partnership For the Home-
less (The HAC), The Charlee Program, The Miami
Rescue Mission, and Switchboard of Miami. The
facility consists of warmly furnished double bed-
rooms, a common living area for leisure time, and
office space for workshops and computer use.
Open for little more than two years, New Jour-
neys has already housed over thirty young women
and relies on donations to continue its operations.


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11B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL T HEIR OWN DESTINY


EPIC hotel is celebrating the
25h anniversary of White Par-
ty Week in Miami, the world's
oldest and largest HIV/AIDS
fundraiser, and offering spe-
cial rates for those visiting Mi-
ami to enjoy White Party Week
events and festivities from Nov.
25-30. 305-424-5226 or visit
www.epichotel.com.
******** *
The Blue Cross and Blue
Shield of Florida Turkey Trot
5K will take place at the Tropi-
cal Park, 7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 26. 305-278-
8668.


'City of Hallandale Beach
Human Services Department
presents their 2009 annual
Community Thanksgiving Lun-
cheon at the Austin Hepburn
Center, from 10 a.m. - 12 p.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 26. 954-457-
1460.


The Big Blue any You Foun-
dation presents Kids Ocean
Adventure Series at the New-
port Beachside Hotel and Re-
sort Sunny Isles Beach from 11
a.m. - 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov.
28. 954-558-9664.


The Booker T. Washing-
ton (BTW) Class of 1961 wor-
ship service will be held at the
St. Paul A.M.E. Church at 10
a.m., Sunday, Nov. 29. 305-
688-7072.
********
University of Miami's Mau-
rice Gusman Concert Hall will
present Festival Miami now
through November 30. 305-
284-4940 or visit: www.festi-
valmiami.com


W.I.T. Transitional Training
Center will hold their Gradu-
ation Ceremony at the Greater
Bethel Fellowship Hall at 10
a.m., Thursday, Dec. 3. 305-
757-0715.


Booker T. Washington
(BTW) Class of 1965 is having
a holiday extravaganza, Touch
of Class Ball, at the Grand Pa-
risilen Ballroom; from 8 p.m. - 1
a.m., Friday, Dec. 4. Barbara
Graham, 305-634-3887, Rich-
ard Williams, 305-621-5048 or
Gwendolyn Thomas, 786-715-
5662.


The Miami-Dade Chamber of
Commerce will host its fourth


*
S a.


annual Holiday Gala, "Progress:
The New Currency," at the Hyatt
Regency in Downtown Miami
on Saturday, Dec. 5. Beverly
James, 305-751-8648 or visit
www.m-dcc.org


Miami-Dade County Public
Schools (M-DCPS), in partner-
ship with Miami Dade College
(MDC), will host the 2009-2010
Student and Adult Career Path-
ways EXPO, at Miami Jackson
Senior High School, from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m., on Saturday,
December 5, 2009. 305-693-
3015 or visit http://dcte.dade-
schools.net.
*********
Animal Services invites you
to celebrate Home for Every Hol-
iday, Pet Adoption Event at the
Animal Services Shelter, from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., on December
6. Visit: www.miamidade.gov/
animals


Haitian American Leader-
ship Organization (HALO) is
offering six scholarships of up
to $1,000 to high school seniors
of Haitian descent in good aca-
demic standing. Applications
are now being accepted for
the 2010 scholarships and the
deadline is Dec. 11. The award
recipients will be invited to at-
tend HALO's annual gala and
award ceremony that will be
held at the JW Marriott Hotel
in Miami on January 16, 2010.
Call 888-759-0085 or visit:
www.halohaiti.org.


The community is invited
to get on the bus to the Florida
Classic on Saturday, Nov. 21.
For more information. Also,
come take a ride to the Holy
Land in Orlando, Fla. On Dec.
12. Call Phillip, 786-873-9498.


South Florida Super Bowl
Host Committee will host their
kickoff luncheon at the Land
Shark Stadium, from 11:30
a.m. - 1:30 p.m., Monday, Dec.
7. 305-614-7555.


The Mandarin Oriental Ho-
tel will host the celebration of
the Miami Music Festival on
Brickell Key, from 6-7:30 p.m.,
on Wednesday, Dec. 9. Email:
mkomfeld@intunepartners.com


The Florida Alliance for Arts
Education (FAAE) is hosting a
Florida symposia at the Adri-
enne Arsht Center for the Per-
forming Arts, starting at 9 a.m.,
on Dec. 10. Email: info@faae.
org or visit www.faae.org
******** *
M.W. Cypress Grand Lodge,
A.F. and A.M., is sponsoring its
annual Christmas festival and
toy-give-away at the Masonic
Temple, from 9 a.m. to. 12 p.m.,
Saturday, Dec. 12. George E.
Pitts, 305-467-5609 or email:
gfitts@carolina.rr.com


The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take


place at Hard Rock Iive at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel &
Casino on Dec. 17-19 .


Miami-Dade County is seek-
ing outstanding women nomi-
nees for the 22nd annual In the
Company of Women Awards
Ceremony which will be held in
March 2010. The deadline for
nominations is 5 p.m. on Fri-
day, Dec. 18. Lisa Fernandez,
305-480-1717 ext. 104.


Rainbow Ladies-Our Space,
an organization for women, is
having their second annual
Holiday Gala at the Fantasy
Ballroom at 9 p.m., Dec. 19.
Adrienne Lamb, 305-772-4712.


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010
Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion615@cfl.
rr.com


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their upcom-
ing Alumni Pep Rally. 305- 804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


National Investment Devel-


The Gamble Memorial
Church of God in Christ invites
tie community to their annual
free Thanksgiving dinner and
service, from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.,
Nov. 26. 3-5-633-7235 or 305-
821-3692.


Greater St. James Mission-
ary Baptist International
church v.ill old 'its 50th" an-
nu'af Men's Day at 11 a.rim. -on
Sunday, Noiv. 29. 305-693-
.2726.


Women in White service at 3:30
p.m., Sunday, Nov. 29. Virginia
Bostic, 305-621-8126.


The New Saint Mark family
will be celebrating their assis-
tant pastor at 3:30 p.m., Sun-
day, Nov. 29.
******** . *
Ebenezer United Methodist
Church will have their sLtth an-
nual HIV/AIDS Benefit Health
Fair and Concert starting at 2
. p.m. on Dec. 5. 305-635-7413.


New Christ Tabernacle ********
Church invites you to their an- House of Bethlehem A Place
nual 100 Men in Black and 100 of Bread Ministries is inviting


everyone to participate in their
tour bus trip to Holyland, from
Tues.- Thurs. Deacon Arthur
Robinson, 786-624-7979.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.


Redemption M.B. Church is
sponsoring a fundraising break-
fast and yard sale on Friday
and Saturday. Redemption will
also host a minise'rs and dea-
cons Union of the New Life M.B
Association on Nov. 18-21. Rev.
Silas Pinkney, 305-696-9964.
Pastor Willie McCrae, 305-793-
7388 or 305-836-1990.
Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30 p.m.
on Monday.


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seling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering, free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. - 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email: lgreen@expertsresourc-
es.com or lougreen2@yahoo.
corn for appointments.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is seeking Reunion
Organizing Committee Repre-
sentatives from the Classes of
1981 -2008 to call 305-904-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


The Florida Film Institute
presents Cinerama Saturdays
at the Little Haiti Cultural Cen-
ter, from 10:30 a.m. - 12:30
p.m., until April 10, 2010. 305-
891-3456 or register at www.
flfilminstitute.org


A&A Associates is currently
hiring approximately1000 peo-
ple for the 2010 Super Bowl and
Pro Bowl football games which
will be held at Land Shark Sta-
dium in Miami Gardens. 561-
533-5303 or email Annette@as-
sociatestaffing.com


Rendo -Goju-Ryu Karate
Academy will be offering free
Karate lessons at the Liberty
Square Community Center
from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursday. 305-694-2757.


I �00 - -,;oo


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


17R THF MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1. 2009


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Waste not, want not:.
By Greg Latshaw rials, wi
and pet
A growing number of compa- es.
nies are turning their attention "The la
to creating renewable products country
- such as adhesives and plas- bodies o
tics - from the animal parts Waste
that can't be sold on supermar- process
ket shelves. cial con
From plastics made from because
feather protein to diesel fuel odors ax
made from fat to organic fertil- decompo
izer made from poultry litter, O'Brien,
the USA's top meat producers search f
are developing new uses and sociation
markets for the animal parts "Anytim
that humans won't eat, says amount
Tom Cook, president of the Na- you're p
tional Renderers Association in O'Brien
Alexandria, Va. Among
For years, those parts have way:
ended up in cosmetics, soap, * Tysc
pet food and animal feed. Now, Ark., is
meat companies are putting hesives
more resources into sustain- rials fro
ability programs, says Paul found i
Rutledge of the American Meat Webster
Institute's sustainability com- dent of
mittee. division.
At Clemson University, such diapers
products are being tested at the be made
South Carolina school's Animal says.
Co-Products Research & Edu- Tyson
cation Center, says center Di- in a joir
rector Annel Greene. leum Cc
Greene says there are a num- renewal
ber of uses for the leftover ma- Rouge.
trials that have yet to be dis- expected
covered. "It's fascinating to see next Jul
everything that can be done," low, por
Greene says. cooking
Kathy Guillermo, vice presi- diesel fu
dent of laboratory investigations ultra-low
for People for the Ethical Treat- will be
ment of Animals, says many cap mar
consumers would be surprised ing corn
to learn the number of prod- aviation
ucts with animal ingredients in * Perd
them. She says rendered mate- try litter


Companies f
which are fed to livestock
s, could spread diseas-

ast thing we need in this
is another use for the
of animals," she says.
materials from meat
ing are treated with spe-
siderations at landfills,
they produce strong
nd methane gases when
losing, said Jeremy
director of applied re-
for the Solid Waste As-
n of North America.
e you can reduce the
of waste going into one,
preserving a resource,"
said.
g the projects under-

in Foods of Springdale,
developing plastics, ad-
and non-woven mate-
im the keratin protein
n feathers, says Jeff
, the group vice presi-
the renewable products
L Someday disposable
or hospital gowns could
from the materials, he

Foods is also involved
it venture with Syntro-
>rp. of Tulsa to build a
>le fuels plant in Baton
Webster says the plant,
1 to be at full production
ly, will convert beef tal-
k lard, chicken fat and
grease into a synthetic
.el. Because of the fuel's
w emissions grade,. it
marketed to emission-
kets, underground min-
panies and the general
market.
ue Farms collects poul-
r - a blend of manure


ind uses for leftover animal parts
and wood shavings - and con- operates its own biodiesel plant
verts it into organic fertilizer near Montreal and uses a por-
pellets to be sold to wholesalers, tion of the fuel it produces in its
says Cathy Klein, vice president company trucks, says Todd Mo-
for co-product sales. ser, vice president of alternative
* Maple Leaf Foods of Toronto fuels.


It found toddlers had a four times greater risk of second-
hand smoke exposure when compared with adolescents, de-
spite having similar reported home exposures


Secondhand smoke worst

for toddlers, obese kids
By Bill Berkrot and Ransdell Pierson

Toddlers and obese children suffer far greater blood-vessel dam-
age and other harm from secondhand smoke than other children,
which could put them on the path to heart disease later in life,
according to a new study.
The study, presented at the American Heart Association scien-
tific meeting in Orlando on Wednesday, found a link between the
amount of secondhand smoke exposure and a marker of vascular
injury in toddlers, defined as children ages 2 to 5. The link was
twice as great in toddlers who were obese, researchers said.
"We think that the two factors together - smoke exposure plus
obesity - may interact to amplify the degree of inflammation or
vascular cell damage that occurs," said John Bauer, the study's
co-lead investigator from Nationwide Children's Hospital & Re-
search Institute at Ohio State University.
The study of American boys and girls exposed to smokers in-
cluded 52 toddlers and 107 older children ages 9 td 18.
It found toddlers had a four times greater risk of secondhand
smoke exposure when compared with adolescents, despite having
similar reported home exposures.
This may be because toddlers.. tend to be in closer proximity to
their smoking parents for extended periods of time.
"Adolescents are less joined at the hip to their parents. Toddlers
don't have the same access to move in and out of the house," Bau-
er said.
Toddlers exposed to secondhand smoke were also found to have
a 30 percent reduction in circulating vascular endothelial progeni-
tor cells, a type of cell involved in the repair and maintenance of a
healthy blood vessel network, researchers said. '
"The changes we detected in these groups of children are simi-
lar to changes that are well recognized risks for heart disease in
adults," Bauer said.
"This suggests that some aspects of adult heart disease may be
initiated in early childhood, where prevention strategies may have
great long-term impact," Bauer said.
At least a quarter of children in the United States are exposed to
secondhand smoke, researchers said.
Bauer said the study did not differentiate between smoke expo-
sure at home and while in a car, which Bauer called "a real fish in
a fish bowl experience."


r MIartM n .ii L thIer Kin Jr.

-Bland c History Month
^fta r -** * '









13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


o * *No w a* -.* - O mM 4 * B

. ". Copyrighted Material - eow"

Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


SCharges dropped against FMU student


Mitchell fights to be readmitted to University
By Sandra J. Charite 4M' ._ .
scharite@iniamnitimesonline.com V - w
----------------~~ /-. ,* ' y _ <


Emory Mitchell wants to clear
his name and get his life back
to normal.
On Oct. 19, Mitchell, 19, was
involved in a scuffle on the Flor-
ida Memorial University cam-
pus that resulted in his arrest
and suspension from school.
Charges against Mitchell were
dropped on Nov. 18, but Mitch-
ell has yet to be readmitted into
the University.
"I want to return to school
to finish out this semester but
Florida Memorial is still refus-
ing to allow me to come back
based on the allegations of
those officers," said Mitchell.
"My suspension was only until
the case was addressed how-
ever that's no longer the case,
obviously."
FMU released a statement
on Thursday stating, "'We have
just been informed that the
State Attorney's Office dis-
missed the case against Emory
Mitchell. * We are unaware of
the circumstances that led to
this dismissal. Emory Mitchell
remains suspended pending in-
vestigation and adjudication of
possible violations of University
rules and regulations. These
possible violations relate to ac-
tions prior to October 19, 2009,
as well as the conduct that oc-
curred on October 19th. In or-
der not to jeopardize that inves-
tigation, we cannot comment
further at this time."
According to police reports,
officers responded to a fight be-
tween the University security
guards and a student who was
identified as Mitchell.
Mitchell recalls the incident.
"Officer Harry [Monestime]
walked up to me asking if I had
possession of marijuana and
expressing that he wanted to
search me. I informed him that
I did not have possession of any
substance and if he wished to
search me he would have to


EMORY MITCHELL
contact Miami-Dade County
Police because he did not have
the right to search me," said
Mitchell.
The security guard then
asked Mitchell for his student
identification but Mitchell in-
formed that the school admin-
istration was aware that he did
not have one.
The incident escalated leav-
ing Mitchell and the security
guards barricaded in the bath-
room. Students outraged at the
actions of the security guards
began to bang on the bath-
room door. FMU junior Jeffrey
Y. Martin captured some of the
incident on tape.
"The altercation was going on
for at least fifteen minutes and
I only captured a little less than
five minutes on video," said
Martin in a statement released


to The Miami Times.
Outraged at the commotion
from students demanding an-
swers as to why Mitchell was
barricaded in the bathroom,
an Allied Barton security guard
pulled his handgun and flashed
it at the crowd of students.
Mitchell was later arrested
that night and charged for a as-
sault. He faced three counts of
battery on a security officer.
It was a surprise to Mitchell,
who felt he had to protect him-
self from the officers. He said
he was repeatedly beaten by
the officers while he was con-
fined in the bathroom.
"The officers grabbed me and
tried to turn me around and
force my hands behind my back.
I was backed into the left front
corner of the restroom. I was
afraid of being put in a helpless
situation and not being able
to prevent myself from being
beaten so I continued to move
around and make attempts to
keep the officer from handcuff-
ing me," he said. "The officers
were using excessive force such
as slamming my head against
the wail and pushing me for-
ward causing my head to hit
the sink."
Now that the charges have
been dropped, Mitchell says
this obstacle will not hinder
him from completing his edu-
cation.
"So now, I'm hoping to trans-
fer to [Florida International Uni-
versity] FIU, although I know I
may lose a lot of credits," he
said. "I cannot give up because
I faced this obstacle."


" A/rican Artwork & Hwamesto-re


FOOT Project Managers
will be on hand to hear
your thoughts and answer
your questions


rPOGRAM


g;~~


xN


Come learn about the Florida Department of Transportation District Six Annual Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan


MONROE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 2, 2009, 6-8 p.m.
Marathon Government Center
2798 Overseas Highway (Mile Marker 50)
Marathon


SOUTH MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 8-10 a.m.
University of Miami Bank United Center
Hurricane 100 Room, 1245 Dauer Drive
Coral Gables


NORTHEAST MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 9, 2008, 8-10 a.m.
Miami Shores Country Club
Village Room, 10000 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami Shores


Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) project information will also be available.


These public hearings are being held in accordance with Section 339.135, Florida Statutes and toroffer the public an oppor-
tunity to comment on all projects for the highway systems and public transportation within Florida Department of Trans-
portation District Six's Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan. District Six comprises Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties,
These hearings will also include consideration of proposed projects for Florida's Turnpike Enterprise corridors and
information on several projects in the District. The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan covers the period from July 1,
2010 to June 30, 2015.
Send written comments (by mail or e-mail) to Maribel Lena, District Public Information Office, 1000 NW 111 Avenue, Room
6134, Miami, Florida 33172, telephone 305-470-5349 or email (Maribel.Lena@dot.state.us) by December 18, 2009. The
comments will also be incorporated into the public document.
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. The proposed improvements have been developed in accordance with


the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Under Title VI and Title VIII of the United States Civil Rights Acts
any person or beneficiary who believes he or she has been subjected to discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, age,
national origin, disability, or familial status may file a written complaint with the Florida Department of Transportation's Equal
Opportunity Office in Tallahassee, 605 Suwannee Street, M.S. 65, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0450, 866-374-FDOT or
contact Elizabeth Perez, District Six's Title VI and Title VIII Coordinator, 1000 N.W. 111 Avenue, Room 611 1-A, Miami, Florida
33172, 305-470-5219.
Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation
services (free of charge) should contact the Public Information Office at 305-470-5277 at least seven days prior to the meeting.
The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan can be viewed after November 27, 2009 at:
http://www.dot.state.fl.us/programdevelopmentoffice/


/

.4.,
-7


usiblockgoogs.ne 780-413-0774


For more information contact Denise Polomovsky at 305-573-4455 or DPojomovsky@communikatz.com


O









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


14B THE MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


Remember to give thanks daily


Tomorrow is Thanksgiving.
Most people are preparing for a
wonderful meal and fellowship
with friends and family. Even
shelters are offering hot meals
for those unfortunate enough
to not be able to provide their
own meal, or for their family.
As exciting and exhilarating as
the holiday may be, we need to


extend those
feelings to
the day after
Thanksgiving,
and the day
after, and the
day after and
...well, how
about every
single day?l


One Bible writer who never
ceased to thank God for every
situation was David. David's
many psalms thanked God for
good times as well as not so good
times. Besides David's exten-
sive repertoire, other psalmists
and Bible authors wrote words
of praise and thanksgiving to
our awesome God.
In Psalm 26:7, David sings a
song of thanksgiving, and tells
of all of God's wonders. We
should never be remiss in giv-
* ing God daily thanks. Before
my feet touch the floor each
morning, I thank God because
if not for Him, my eyes would
not be open to begin another
day. I remember years ago


when I was employed by the
Postal Service, I often worked
with some angry, complaining
co-workers. They were quite
mocking concerning the things
of the Lord, and made a point
of letting anyone who would
listen know that God had
done nothing for them. They
told me on more than one oc-
casion that they had nothing
for which to thank- God. I re-
sponded that if they could not
think of anything, then thank
God that I was not the same
Pat that I used to be. If I were,
their lives would not be pleas-
ant ones during our working
hours
Another thing about this


verse is thank God first, and
then tell someone what you
thanked God for. It is not al-
ways necessary, or we might
not always be in a place where
we can share the testimony of
our salvation, and a momen-
tous miracle that took place
in our lives. But it is a simple
thing to say, "It's certainly a
beautiful day. Thank God that
it didn't rain." It's also easy to
say, "Thank God for the rain.
We certainly need it."
In Psalm 28:7, David says
that his heart is so full of joy
that he bursts out in songs of
thanksgiving. Sing songs of
praise while getting ready in
the morning, driving to work


or to run errands. We need not
limit singing songs of thanks-
giving to church services. And
of course, we can never forget
Psalm 100, known by many as
a song of thanksgiving. Praise
is due our Lord always, but also
do not neglect to offer thanks
to others. Thank the cashier
who gives you your morning
coffee, though I know that they
do not always respond in kind.
Thank your spouse for a chore
performed or dinner prepared,
and thank your kids for bring-
ing your remote or your house
slippers, even if you had to
ask for them. Keep words of
thanksgiving on your lips at all
times.


Rev. Jackson's historic runs

stand with us, even today


By DeWayne Wickham


In a little noticed, long over-
due act of acknowledgement,
12 members of the Congres-
sional Black Caucus stood be-
fore a nearly empty chamber of
the House of Representatives
last week to give the Rev. Jesse
Jackson the praise many would
deny him.
Jackson's campaigns for
the Democratic Party's presi-
dential nominations "forever
changed the political ... land-
scape of this country" and "laid
the foundation" for the election
of Barack Obama, Rep. Donna
Edwards, D-Md., said in a brief
floor speech.
That was the recurring theme
of the 12 black members of
Congress and Rep. Dennis Ku.-
cinich, D-Ohio, the lone white
representative, who spoke in
tribute to the 25th anniversary
of Jackson's 1984 campaign
for the Democratic presidential
nomination. Back then, News-
week and the Village Voice
proclaimed Jackson the candi-
date of "transformations" and
"change."
In his presidential campaign
last year, Obama promised to
talk to America's enemies if he
became president. But in Jack-
son's trailblazing campaign,
he did just that when he per-
4iW $ Sy Ari President Hafez
Assad to free Nav3 LtP'Robert
Goodman, a U.S. pilot shot
down over Lebanon by Syrian
anti-aircraft gunners a month
earlier.


INITIAL SETBACKS
Although his campaigns were
far from flawless - Jackson's
use of the pejorative "Hymi-
etown" to describe New York
Jews dealt his 1984 ambition
a serious blow - his two presi-
dential runs did more to change
the face of American politics
than anything else in the past
100 years. While the 1965 Vot-
ing Rights Act opened the way
for more blacks to vote, Jack-
son was the political Pied Piper
who drew them to the polls in
record numbers.
Marjorie Fields Harris, a for-
mer executive director of Al
Sharpton's National Action
Network, said of Jackson: "His
voter registration effort in pre-
viously overlooked and disen-
franchised communities was
historic" and helped lift "Afri-
can-American governors, sena-
tors, judges and otler elected
officials into .office. His run
was iconic and - love him, or
hate him - no student of his-
tory could ever argue that his
campaign wasn't our first real
glimpse of what an African-
American president would look
like."

ACCOLADES DESERVED
That's no idle praise.
"Jackson brought about sig-
nificant increases in black vot-
er res-frafibnrin "84 id 88
And beYnocrats rrilde'1&cion
gains that were very much tied
to the turnout of these black
voters," said David Bositis, a '
senior research associate at
the Joint Center for Political


and Economic Studies.
In fact, Democrats regained
control of the Senate in 1986
due in large part to that surge
in black voter registration, the
Joint Center has reported. And
that wasn't the only ripple ef-
fect from Jackson's campaigns.
Since 1984, the number of
blacks in Congress has grown
from 21 to 42 members. Many
blacks who rose to prominent
positions in the Democratic
Party also had close ties to his
candidacy.
Among them are Ron Brown
and Alexis Herman, who served
as the secretaries of Commerce
and Labor in the Clinton ad-
ministration. Brown also did
a stint as Democratic Party
chairman after serving as an
adviser to Jackson. Donna
Brazile, a manager of Al Gore's
2000 presidential campaign,
also had close ties to Jackson's
White House campaigns.
Those who forge change sel-
dom bene it;7 it. The d L
th&t- Jacks ened ma
possible for Obama to achieve
Jackson's dream. And that's
Something those who write the
history of these times shouldn't
forget.


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w I


Gospel Program
There will be a big gospel
program featuring Smiling Ju-
bilees, Ft. Lauderdale; Faithful
Few, Shining Stars and others,
3 p.m., Sunday at Holy Cross
Church, 1555 N.W. 93rd Ter-
race.
Call Lil' Rev. 305-693-9336.


I *


,�% 4 lqv 4,n4rh- f %jII$ rvi~ai tv Jbm4asoi


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I


RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS

NEEDED FOR A

PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH

STUDY TESTING AN

INVESTIGATIONAL DRUG


You may qualify to participate if

you are: a healthy male or

female between the ages

of 65 and 80

Participants who are enrolled

will be compensated for their

time in the research study


For more information call:


SEA VIEW RESEARCH

305-646-6785


'4 SEAVIEW
RESEARCH


* * -









The Miami Times




Heath


SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


CDC: Teen girls at high risk for STDs

Black females aged 15 to 19 had the highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea centers for Disease Control and
DrLountion runnorts vunnn niric anarl ',00


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@riamitimesonline. corn


A shock for many parents when a
2008 study revealed one in four teen-
aged girls had a Sexually Transmitted
Disease (STD). A year later, the num-
bers have not declined.
An STD, also known as sexually
transmitted infection (STI) or venereal
disease (VD), is an illness that can be
transmitted by sexual contact, includ-
ing vaginal intercourse, oral sex, and
anal sex. Common STDs include syphi-
lis, chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, hep-
atitis and genital warts.
Centers for Disease Control and Pre-
vention reports young girls aged 15-19
years continue to have the highest num-


ber of chlamydia and gonorrhea cases
(409,531) when compared to any other
age group.
The report, a 2008 Sexually Trans-
mitted Disease Surveillance that tracks
cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and
syphilis in the United States, found that
more than 1.5 million cases of chlamyd-
ia and gonorrhea were reported in 2008.
Also, Black teenaged girls continue to
be disproportionately affected by STDs.
They have a higher percentage than any
other age group.
"This is nothing new. This is a con-
tinuing trend," said Dr. Toye Brewer,
State of Florida STD/HIV Medical Epi-
demiologist.
Although there are better screenings
to detect the STDs in young women,


Brewer faults the lack of funding to
public health. Under the guidelines,
young women under the age of 25 are to
be screened once a year for STDs says
Brewer but unfortunately, that becomes
an issue to those who do not have ac-
cess to healthcare in underprivileged
areas.
She goes on to say that adjusting
the cost of screening is not possible in
Miami-Dade due to budget constraints,
but the fact is that sexually active ad-
olescents need to be screened once a
year.
While access to healthcare is sig-
nificant, Kalenthia Nunnally-Bain, ex-
ecutive director of the Teen Pregnancy
Prevention Center in Allapattah, says
Please turn to STD'S 18B


I S -'WWI hern fo�unt IPMM ih44101"%




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4b-


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Sperpt ces


* Complimentary Dental
Services with No Co-Pay
* Primary Care Physician
* Laboratory
* Gynecology
* Diagnostic Ultrasound
* EKG - Electrocardiogram
* ECHO- Echocardiogram
* X-Rays
* A Comprehensive Chiropractic
Service Center
* Pain Management
* Massage Therapy


6405 NW 27th Avenue
Miami, Florida
For information or appointments,


CENTER)


* Free Concierge-Style
Transportation with
Private Vehicle
* Activity Center
* Education
* Exercise Program
* Nutrition
* Osteoporosis screenings


do


call: 305-403-4003
Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 oop.m.

Health First Medical Center
Maximum Quality Medical Care for our Community

Ooclor (nO^a wit ovo ears r Exerince ^^^^^
Weaccept Medicare and Medic I^^^^^


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Movie theater


[popcorn will make you fat A


Pd& % MW 16 0004 �* -.00 V 10 `*-- 0 0 bw malb - .0 w 0 %Wmw : -**A -









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


I rmiU14-1l \ . # Copyrighted Material TI I i * 4k htkf


Men's Day Sunday at Greater St. James
The Reverend Dr. James Bush
III will be the morning speaker
at the 50th Annual Men's Day
at the 11 a.m. Worship Service,
Nov. 29.
The Male Chorus of St. Mark
M.B. Church will render music.
Deacon Willie Mosley is chair-
person; Deacon Jerome Coo-
per and Bro. James Parks, co-
chairpersons.
The church is located at 4875
N.W. 2nd Ave. Dr. William H.
Washington is pastor. DR. JAMES BUSH, III


The Miami Times
is announcing our
.W CHURCH LISTINGS
r Church Denominarion
Beginning January 2010
Sfor more intormnlalon o.[n.iac
S our new church jI-uimc.
o rahe Roker. 3056-t - 62 10 e 10
y-space is lirnitred * Nev Pricir.iy


Volunteer sign-up Saturday
Student volunteers are needed Avenue.
for the Battle of the High School Volunteers will receive 25
Bands, Saturday, December 12 community hours.
at Ted Hendricks Stadium. Non-volunteers will receive 10
Volunteer sign-up will take community hours.
place from 2 p.m. until 5 p.m., Tickets are $10.
Saturday, November 28th at For info, Contact Big Mo at
Tacolcy Park, 6161 N.W. 9th 786-318-6020.


Exp__


Authorized Signature


Name

Address


City


State _ Zip __


Phone email
*Includes Florida sales tax
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW54 St. * Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymiamitimes.com


.' *..1. ^ . ,.. 'I-


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services







Weda yb Males, dry a y
9a n. 12p0m
Morru. 9Ierm II a m
Sun ie WoSship I il p m
lues Piayer M Atg 7 30 p T,
Fri Bible ,rudy 7i 30 p; m




Ebenezer United
Methodist (hurch
2001 N.W. 35th Street

Order ofServices
S,..dy ehl. i ,'ct
7 45,a' ,, 11 li r
Su,',diy P t ,,l ,f) 45' oam
B-bl iudy iu�-day
PrayE m 0i*ig lya opm
RvD WaMMaps


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3rd Avenue


I I *.


Order of Services
iodly :..ud,
I.,doal ',ihaol )l a
,Mui WrrThip II o .r,
fau-'r ul'd B,lt luidy
M il.ng Ilu,:. I p aT


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
il/,E! WW WtiWHI * I i


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

L Order of Services
Suoday 7 10 andII ami
3 )0 o , undr y p' hor,
f ue.day 7 pm B.bl %ludy
8 p l m P'ray.r Merrng




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue

Order of Services
S unluay', h ,ul S Ti
. a ^l ,us Mariiii fLn a m ,

So hi*WE b , ut , r, tl ,T
i u blEdMudy PrlnM i . r, 6300-


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue * Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday Bible Siudy 9 a m * Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Televsion Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS Comcast 3 * Saturday* - 7:30 a.m.
I ... . wwpenilbrleprlchur(huFiuiiiiir m * pembrokeparkcoc@bellsouth.net


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

Order of Services
Early Worntip 7 oIT"
Sunday SdrooI a im
NBC 10L 0am
norvhip 11 amr Worihp 4pm
S Mion and Bible
(la, lueday6' t IiJOpm




Bethlehem Cathedral
Outreach Ctr. Miami
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services
�ue-day bA 16 rm.rai 8 a m
Sunday Woar- p 9q
Sunday eunag b pim niaer
aod rpd'toral IOu.,el15
friday Bble ,Ti,,ar W pT


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


i iI


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services

.Mem.irg PlNo, rw :h.p II a m
FIm aThd alld Sunddy
opening morship at 6 p m
Prayer M ieng & idble Study
Tuesday 7 p m
Rev r .Ew ardMitcel


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Streel
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.,
11 a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


I Bsho Vcto T.CuryD.in. . eiorPso ece


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Or der of Seivices

[hurri iy BibI. Sijdy I p ii


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street

Order of Services

'v,,dav Wu,,h 11 ,,
F., I urnday
. e, ,vo Walhi p 6 P m
Ml Weph . Ihr I p ar
(tar Vluari, hI r day


Al in aies r. inse


I * I.';


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W. 56th Street

Order of Services
I \ Sunday Shooal 9 45 a m
Wor.hip II am
I.ble Sludy Thurday 7 30 p m
Vou rh Minisfry
Mao Wed 6pm




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
[tEly Sunaday Wrship 1 30 am
Su.ilday Sit.el 9 0W am
. iuld erilg )m.ng Warh,p IIa r
i Sunday vie..g rs.is t6 p I.
lw.dry N ye,.Meei.lIng/ I l o pm
Wedr.day B.bie n ul 0 t am



Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

3 Order of Services
Ordoe r MofoSeces
W uor.hipon.re 1 am
lun.. * M,, II,, dy, p




Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Ministry International
21485 N.W. 27 Ave.

Order of Services
'v,,day -ol 9 a m
B1bi ludy Wedulday 13 p m
ww- ,t dr.-undhio,-e,,tm org


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street

Order of Services
Sunday Morning 8 a in
S;Adary .,6a0l la a.m
Sunday Eveniig 6 p m
MaoilExellene 730 prm
Tue Bible Clais 7 30 pf..
"Thurs fellowship 10 a m




Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville
2799 N.W. 46th Street

Order of Services
NO (huh nday 'hool 8 O a min
q .-i Sulday Wor.ship Serile 10 am
flour of Power.iNon Day Prayer
12 p in lpmin
Sverng Wort,,p lom



New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org

Order of Services
Early Morr...i g WorN.p 1 0 a ..
SS Sn (hurnih Shool 9 30 oanm
Mong Worh'p I a in
luaiyday Bble la h 7 p m
IUe, bloiae ti IW


Alpha Agape SDA Church
8400 N.W. 25th Ave.


Order of Services
Sabbolh 'Ahwl 9 30 a . (Sai)
[in.l, uWortiy IIaT l ,Dal
u .ulh Hour (l .ory Salurday
I haul beI,etner)
'Ad Wtl Payer erae I]U Wed




Sunrise Missionary Baptist Church
3087 N.W. 60 Street
smbcpasiorjds@aol.com
I' It/"* IIl~l


Order of Services
'undey ih,.ol 1l am
,,lday W(.,,,, II a m
Proe,. M er.h. A.bli
iludy Wed 17 0 ,
Midl W rl wui-h pihuriday
1.h0 6m


a * ,:-:-, i 4h..


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


L-


m


I I


305-759-8875 1










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Range
MARIE KELLY DEVOE, 93, re-
tired custodian
for Miami Dade
Public Schools, .
died November
22. Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Wilfred Devoe;
son, Joseph
Deveaux; sis-
ters, Irma K. Sweeping, Josephine
Curry Kelly, Clara Kelly McCoy,
and Mildred K. McKinney; many
nieces, nephews, cousins, other
relatives and friends. Viewing
6:30-9 p.m., Friday, Church of the
Transfiguration. Service 10 a.m.,
Saturday, Church of the Transfigu-
ration.

JIM M. GLOVER, 84, cook at
Cye's River-
gate, died No-
vember 20. Sur-
vivors include:
wife, Aretha
Glover; daugh-
ter, Elaine L.
Bryd-Ponder
(Kency); son,
Barry Byrd; six grandchildren;
nine great-grandchildren; a host
of nieces, nephews other relatives
ahd friends. Service 12 p.m., Sat-
urday, Mt. Calvary M.B. Church.

LEROY E. WHILE SR., 58,
presser at
Instant Dry
Cleaners, died
November 19.
Survivors in-
clude: wife, Ju-
lia Whiley; son,
Leroy Whiley
Jr.; daughters,
Latasha Whiley and Aliscia Whi-
ley; stepdaughter, Ayana Sand-
ers; brothers, James McKenzie,
William Miller and Ronald Whiley;
sisters, Beverly Whiley ahd Rosa-
lie Whiley; two grandchildren, a
host of nieces, nephews, other rel-
atives and friends. Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt. Olive Fire Baptized
Holiness Church of God located at
8400 N.W. 22 Avenue.

Richardson
b'DLORES OWEm f"i'.OT,
76, former Mi- -
amian died
November 9 in
Columbia S.C.
She was con-
firmed at st.
Agnes Episco- .
pal Church in ,
1945 and was a
Bopker T Washington High School
Alumna, Class of 1951. Dolores
resided in Somerset, New Jersey.
Survivors include: husband of 44
years, Joseph. Local survivors:
uncle, Lloyd B. Johnson (Juanita);
cousins, Cynthia Garvin Clark,
Erica V. Williams, Lloyd Deryk
Johnson and Linda J. Johnson. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

BETTE GRAHAM, 73, retired
principal, died
November 17.
Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Church of the
Open Door.



-BENNY LYNTHROPE
O'BERRY, 93,
entrepreneur,
died November
21. Arrange-
ments are in-
complete.



EARL JAMES STAFFORD III,
48, laborer, died


are incomplete.





Carey Royal Ram'n
HORACE ROSS, 92, died Novem-
ber 19 at home. Service was held.

BETTY THOMPSON, 56, accoun-
tant, died November 19 at Cleveland
Clinic Hospital. Service 10 a.m., Sat-
urday in the chapel.


Grace
MARCELIN PAUL, 74, died No-
vember 20 at North Shore Medical
Center. Service 12 p.m., Saturday,
St. James Catholic Church.


Wright and Young
PEARLIE MAE JOHNSON,
66, custodian,
died November
19. Survivors
include: son.
Johnnie Mor-
ris; sister, Faye
Burgess; aunt.
Marie Coleman:

Mary Morris; best friend, Naomi
Tucker; goddaughter, Leslie Bar-
thell-Ward; four grandchildren,
one great grandchild and a host
of sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law,
nieces, nephews, relatives and
friends. Service 1 p.m, Saturday,
Peaceful Zion MB Church.

GLADINE VONICA JOHNSON,
80, retired clerk
for Miami-Dade
County Public
Schools, died
November 18 at
Regional Hos-
pital. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Thoams;
sons, Ernie and Harold Johnson;
daughters, Santhia Johnson,
Debra Johnson, Terri Wiwo, Har-
riet Johnson, Sislynn Powell and
Thomasena Hudson (David Sr.).
Service 12 noon, Saturday, Koi-
nonia Worship Center.

BRITTEYOLANDO MACHELLE
SMITH, 45, as-
sistant office
manager, died
November 22
at Jackson Me-
morial Hospital.
Survivors in-
clude: mother, -.
Dorothy B.
Smith; father, Luther B. Smith;
sister, Shirley Walker. Service 12
p.m., Saturday, Soul Saving Sta-
tion Church.

ANN MARIE WILSON, 56, ca-
shier, died No-
vember 18. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Ru-
dolph Wilson,
Sr.; daughter,
Anihette ..Wi-
son; son, Ru-
dolph Wilson,
Jr.; grandchildren, Randel Pino,
Rudolph III, Anntyresha Wiggins,
Arnnitra Wiggins and Joseph Gib-
son. Service 11 a.m., Saturday,
(5th), New St. Paul Missionary
Baptist Church.

MARYANN MARTIN-FORCER,
65, pediatrician,
died November
22 at Kindred
Hospital. Sur-
vivors include:
daughter, De-
nise Forcer;
sister, Patri-
cia Anderson;
brothers, Rickey Forcer and Alex-
ander Martin, Jr. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt
WILLIS O'BRIEN, 76, retired
USPS carrier,
died November
12 in Roswell,
GA, Service
was held.




GERALDINE A. COLLIER, 80,

20 at Aventura
Medial Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children,

rington, Jospe- ,

Gwendolyn
Banks and Norman Bentley. Lin-
da Williams (deceased). Service
11 a.m., Saturday, St. Paul AME
Church.

BARBARA ANN HITCHENS,
58, property appraisal clerk, died
November 17 at Memorial West.
Service was held.

COREY McNEAL, 38, laborer,
died November 14. Service was
held.


WILMORE ROLLE, 70, chef,
died November 23 at home. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.


Poitie -4 Jay's - '
ERNEST ADAMS, 63, televi- JAMES WILLIAM, 77, died No-
sion technician, vember 19 at
died November Gramercy Park
14 at Aventura Nursing Center.
Hospice. Ar- Service was
rangements are held.
incomplete. i


ANNETTE MARIE FIELDER,
30, cashier,
died Novem-
ber 17 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service,
11 a.m., Satur-
day, New Jeru-
salem PBC.

CORRINE E. ROLLE-McNEAL,
91, custodian,
died November
20. Service 11
a.m., Wednes-
day (today),
Holy Redeem-
er Catholic
Church.

RAYNATHAN RAY, 14, student,
died November
14. Service 2
p.m., Saturday,
Christian Fel-
lowship Wor-
ship Center.



BETTY JEAN DAVIS, 65,
homemaker,
Died November
22 at Jackson
Memorial Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m, Saturday
in the chapel.


CHRISTOPHER E. BETHEL,
JR, 66, cook, died November 18
at Miami Gardens Care Centre.
Service 11 a.m., Tuesday(lst), in
the chapel.

FREDELL LEE, 61,truck driver,
died November 16. Arrangements
are incomplete.
Mainker -.


SGT. WILLARD
MYLES, 76,
police officer,
died November
21 at home. Ar-
rangements are
incomplete.



Hadley-Da
TRACY McDONAL
November 18.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.


CRYSTAL FELTON, 26, died
November 22.
Service 1 p.m.,
Saturday, Mt.
Pleasant Mis-
sionary Baptist
Church.



JACQUELYN LAWSON, 62,
died November 21. Service 1:30
p.m., Saturday, Sweet Home Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.

NAIMOON HOSEIN, 69, home-
maker, died November 21. Service
was held.

JAMES DELEVEAUX, 59, died
November 23. Arrangements are
incomplete.

ERMA BOULER, 61, died No-
vember 21. Service 11 a.m., Satur-
day, New Mt. Zion Baptist Church.

ANTHONY HOUSTON, 42, died
November 23 at Homestead Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

E. A. Stevens
ANVEL T. WIDEMAN, 53,
homemaker, died November 16 at
home. Service 11a.m., Saturday,
The Pentecostal's of Cooper City.

TRAVIS TYRONE JEFFER-
SON, 24, laborer, died November
17 at Memorial Regional Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

ROBERT RUMPHREY, 79, la-
borer, died November 19 at Plan-
tation General Hospital. Service
12:30 p.m., Saturday in the 'cha-
pel.


JAMES Gregg L. Mason
MELVIN DOUGLAS, 51, re-
pairman, Air-
line Container
Leasing, died
November 14.
Survivors in-
clude: . wife,
Carrie; daugh-
. ter, Tiffany;
vib parents, Sam o
D, 32, died and Dimple Douglas; brothers, Mi-
chael and Marion Douglas; sister,
Marilyn Tyre; and a host of other
relatives and friends. Service' 12
p.m., Saturday in the chapel.


BARBARA ANN ELLIS, 53,
homemaker, died November 13 at
University of Miami Hospital. Ser-
vice was held.

FERNANDO A. BRITO, 66,
mechanic, died November 13 at
Jackson Medical Center. Service
was held.
Royal '
DEACON CLEVELAND BELL,
JR, 85. truck
driver, died No-
vember 17. Ser-
vice was held.


WILLIAM SMITH III, 49, library
clerk, died No-
vember 17. Ser-
vice was held.


LOUISE HENRY PERKINS, 56,
housekeeper,
died November
16. Survivors
include: hus-
band, Ronnie;
son, Steven
Henry; daugh-
ters, ,Rosevella
and Shontavia
Henry; mother, Elizabeth Logan;
step-daughter, Sabrina Wright;
brothers, Charles Smith; sisters,
Dorothy Mitchell, Betty Sands and
Janice Ricketts; and a host of oth-
er relatives and friends. Service
was held.

Death Notice

BERNICE E. HUMES TUCK-
ER, 87, housekeeper, died
November 17 at Hollywood
Hillcrest Nursing Home.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Mitchell Funeral Home Cha-
pel.


17B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


In loving memory of,


SHIRLEY ANN DAVIS SGT. JOHNICE CANDICE
11/21/44 - 07/14/91 ADDERLY CANADY
02/06/80 - 11/30/07


I think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which I will never part.
God has you in His keeping;
I have you in my heart.
Love always, Crick

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,

LENARD ANDERSON
BKA 'NODDIE'
11/27/55 - 06/06/09

We remember when you
graduated from Miami Central
Senior High in 1974 and went
on to to ,take the field with the
FAMU Marching 100, playing
the tenor drum.
We felt so proud when we
marched along with you in
the Classic Parade.
We love and miss you,
Your father, Edward J. Peo-
ples; brothers, Kenneth and
Howard Anderson, Samuel,
Lloyd and Nathan Peoples;
play sister, Inez Harris; god
sister, Antoinette Williams.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


COLLIER BERTRAM ISAACS
08/14/1972 - 11/23/02

Seven years ago, God called
home this son, brother, grand-
son, uncle, nephew, cousin
and friend.
You are sorely missed by all
mother, Mamie Isaacs; broth-
er, Van Isaacs; grandmother,
Dessie Butts; aunts, Runette
Butts and Gleniese Toutant;
cousin, Willie Frazier

E. S. George
CURTIS L. SOLOMAN, 54, avi-
onie technical, died November 19
at Florida Medical Center. Final
rites and burial, Trinidad and To-
bago.

LIZZIE MAE MILLINER, 95,
homemaker, died November 20
at Hospice by the Sea. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, Mt. Zion AME
Church, West Park.

JOANNE SPENCER, 64, sales-
person, died November 21 at Vitas
Hospice. Service 1 p.m., Friday,
Northwest Dade Church of Christ.


It's been two years since
you've gone to your heavenly
home to stay. We know within
our minds that God would
call you to come back to him
one day. Our hearts are filled
with love for you. A love that
will never fade away. We hold
sweet memories of you that we
will always treasure. There's
nothing like holding you in
our arms, where you gave us
so much pleasure. My dearest
Lady you're resting in God's
arms, safe and secure from
all harm. We will be with you
in just a little while and see
your smile. So when the sun-
shine down from heaven each
day, we will say "just a little
while" Johnice, wait "just a
little while."
Love, Mom, Janice Chain
and family
Memorial 5 p.m., Monday,
St. Agnes Episcopal Church.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JOSEPH A. YOUNG, JR.
05/22/59 - 11/29/08


Lil Joe, one year passed so
quickly. We miss you so very
much. You will remain in our
hearts and thoughts forever.
Love always, mother, Shirley;
father, Joseph A. Sr.(Wylene);
sister, Shari Young-Hawkins;
family and friends.

Bain-Range (Coconut Grove)
ROSIE HAMILTON, 74, home-
maker, died . ,S.
November 19 ,
at home. Sur-
vivors include: "
husband, Dea-
con Gentle
Hamiltonn
daughter, Caro-
lyn Hamilton;
son, Gentle Hamilton, Jr. (Pris-
cilla); grandson, Gentle Hamilton
III; three brothers and two sisters;
and a host of other relatives and
friends. Viewing 6-8 p.m., Friday,
St. James Baptist Church, Coco-
nut Grove. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, Greater St. Paul A.M.E.
Church.

EMORY BERRY, SR., 58, ac-
countant, died Nov. 19 at home.
Service was held.


BABY BRYANNA EDWARDS,
infant, died November 18. Ar-
rangements are incomplete.

LORRAINE McCATTY, 62,
housewife, died November 20.
Viewing 4-9 p.m., Friday. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.

DORRETT DIAS, 57, house-
wife, died November 21. Arrange-
ments are incomplete.


Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,



I, /









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


IRR THEF MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBR 259-DECEMBRFR1, 20091


STD'S
continued from 15B
young people are lacking educa-
tion on STDs.
"It is important to raise aware-
ness about STDs to our young
people," said Nunnally-Bain.
"Teens receiving information
from so many different sources
but are they accurate?"
However, eliminating services
or resources in the community
also plays a factor. For example,
due to budget woes Juanita
Mann, which has served resi-
dents in the Brownsville and
Liberty City community, is
among the many clinics that will
be closing its doors by January.
"Most of the youth do not go
to clinics but they go to a place
where they feel safe," said Nun-
nally-Bain.


Miami-Dade had 10,796 STD
cases in 2008, according to the
Florida Department of Health.
More than 2000 cases con-
sisted of young women aged 15-
19.
"When you take into account
the severe health consequenc-
es of STDs and the millions of
Americans 'infected every year,
it is clear that much more work
needs to be done to prevent un-
intended long-term health is-
sues," said Kevin Fenton, M.D.,
director of CDC's National Cen-
ter for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepa-
titis, STD, and TB Prevention.
"We know adolescent girls and
minorities are most impacted
by STDs. So it is up to us as
a nation, to reach out to them
and ensure we are providing the
necessary prevention, testing
and treatment services."


Happy Dsirt
In loving memory of,


The family of the late,


Happy Birthday Happy Birthday
In loving memory of, In loving memory of,


MOTHER WILLIE BROTHER LONNIE THOMAS
MATE SCOTT


11125/20 - 03123/05

There is not a day that goes
by that I don't think of you.
Every time I wake up, I
wake up praying, but If I don't
wake up, just know that I've
gone where the other half of
my heart is.
Mom, we were inseparable
and I'm missing you like cra-
zy.
I can't help but feel so
blessed and thankful for hav-
ing had you in my life.
Love, Trish and family

Death Notice


Copyrighted Material
..Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


GARY ALLEN WILLIAMS,
53, shipper, died November
23 at home.
Survivors include: wife,
Louella; mother, Margaret; fa-
ther, Nathaniel; six children;
seven siblings.
Viewing 6 to 9 p.m., Friday,
Royal Funeral Home.
Service 10 a.m., Saturday,
Greater New Bethel Mission-
ary Baptist Church, 17025
N.W. 22nd Avenue, Dr. G. Da-
vid Horton, Pastor.

Happy Birthday
In loving memory of,


wishes to express our sincere
thanks to Rev. Johnny Barber
and members of Mt. Sinai Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Elder
Marc and Mrs. Joy Cooper of
Cooper Temple Church of God
In Christ, Range Funeral Home
and Staff, the Hodge-Wright-
Harris and Haynes families of
Omaha, Nebraska, the Floyd,
Sanders, Robinson, Hartley,
Brown, White, Carroll, Thomas,
Garcia families, the neighbors
of 52nd Street, Miami, Fl, the
Scott family of Madison, FL.,
Rev and Mrs. Ed Scott of Tal-
lahassee, Fl., the Blakely family
of Chicago, IL., the Lee family of
Pensacola, FL., and the family
and friends that attended the
graveside service at Oak Ridge
.Cemetery in Madison, FL.
We would like to thank you
for your visits, cards, telephone
calls and floral sprays and the
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority of
Madison, FL., for a beautiful re-
past.
Thanks again The family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of our
brother,


WILLIAM DAVID PAULK
11/29/40 - 04/1/06

For yesterday's memories,
today's love and tomorrow
dreams. We love you,
Marilyn (wife), Mamie
(mother), children and grand-
children.

In Memoriam


MICHAEL JOHNSON JR.
07/13/89- 11/24/08

We think of you always, but
especially today.
You will never be forgotten
although you are gone away.
Your memory is a keepsake
with which we never part.
God has you in His keeping;
we have you in our heart.
Your father and family.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


JAMAAL GAINER
bka B. L


JAMAAL GAINER
11/23/81 - 10/14/07

To my only son, you will be
forever in our hearts. You are
unforgettable and well loved.
We truly miss you, in this
life. We must let go and let
God do the rest.
R.I.P. The Ole Boy (Slim)
and Mama Syl. Uncles, aunts,
cousins, nieces, nephews and
frineds.


Death Notice


FREDDIE 'LIL DADDY'
LAWRENCE, 73, retired, died
November 18 in Panama City,
FL at Bay Memorial Hospital.
Cremation and private buri-
al was held in Ocala, FL.


Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


Honor


Your


Loved One

With


an


In Memoriam


In


The Miami Times


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


J = The Joy you brought to
me.
A = Allowing me to be your big
sister.
M = Missing you so, so much
A = Admiring your swag
A = Affection that I feel for
you.
L = Loving you for ever.
Love always, Leartis, Chatisha,
and Miss Eunice.
Death Notice


LILLIAN S. LONGLEY
"Tootsie"
08/17/45 -11/29/08


It's been a year since you've
left us. Your memories are
in our heart forever. We love
youl


ZULA MAE JACKSON
11/26/29 - 09/02/08


I


LEO ADOLPHUS
WILLIAMS I
06/13/40 - 11/29/89


They say there is a reason,
they say that time will heal,
but neither time nor reason,
will change the way we feel.
For no one knows the heart-
ache that lies, behind our
smiles, 'no one know how
many times we have broken
down and cried.
We want to tell you some-
thing so there won't be any
doubt, you're so wonderful
to think of but so hard to be
without.
We cannot bring the old
days back, when we were all
together, the family chain is
broken now, but memories
live forever.
Love always, Terilyn, Lance,
Lemuel, Leo II and off springs


Nakia Ingraham
IOLANDO FALK, 71, store man-
ager, died November 19 at home.
Service 3 p.m., Wednesday (today),
St. Joseph's Catholic Church.


Mother you have been my
friend, my comforter and my
strength. You watched me
grow from a tender child to an
independent adult. You have
always been there to pick me
up when I have fallen. You
taught me .everything that I
know. We shared a bond that
can never be broken by time.
You have been called by many
names Jackson, Laughlin,
Jones and Zula. But the name
that fit you best are Mother
and Grandmother. Happy
Birthday!
Love, Dianne, Freddy, Mar-
cel and Family.


CATHERINE ABERCROMBIE

wishes to thank all of you
for your cards, letters, love,
support and heartfelt sym-
pathy during our time of be-
reavement.
Special thanks to Pastor
Samuel Boone, Liberty United
Church and the Royal Funer-
al Home staff.
May God bless each of you.
The Abercrombie Family


BARBARA STACEY, 60, meat
cutter, died November 18 at Mt.
Sinai Hospital. Viewing Friday
4 to 9 p.m. Service Saturday
4 p.m., in the chapel. Services
entrusted to Genesis Funeral
Home.


Remember to ask

your funeral home for

your discount co 0111

to place your

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in

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is announcing our










NEW
CHURCH LISTINGS
By Church Denomination

Beginning January 2010
For more information contact
our new church assistant,
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SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 25- DECEMBER 1, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES



"Irreconcilable Bondage"

Loving him almost to death


Local activist debuts movie "God, Me...HIV?"

Robinson: This is more than a movie;
this is a chance to save lives


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Having traveled all over the world, Fort
Lauderdale native Devin T. Robinson X is
still on a mission.
Robinson, 26, has appeared on the TV
series Apollo twice, BET's 106 & Park,
MTV, UPN, NBC, National Public Radio
and been featured in such magazines
including Seventeen, HIV Plus and POZ
magazines--all in an effort to educate the
nation about HIV/AIDS.
Statistics show that every 9 1/2 min-
utes, someone in the United States be-
comes infected by HIV. For Robinson, a
nationally acclaimed actor, poet, dancer,
and motivational speaker, the mission to
educate the world about HIV/AIDS has
now become part of his lifestyle.
Robinson, also known as Egypt, is tak-
ing his craft to a new level this year for
World AIDS Day at the Cinema Paradiso
Movie Theater in Miami/Fort Lauder-
dale on Dec. 1. The movie is rated PG 13.


Partnering with Cinema Paradiso Movie
Theater, Robinson will premiere his mov-
ie, "God, Me...HIV?" which an alteration
of his 2005 one-man show "God Did Not
Give Me HIV" showcasing seven confes-
sional narratives about -the pandemic
HIV.
Using comedy, poetry and motivational,
Robinson, also known as Egypt, will at-
tempt to entertain, educate and yet em-
power the audience.
"Although it will be entertaining, you
will be receiving so much information
that you can go out and inform people
about HIV/AIDS," said Robinson in an
interview with The Miami Times on Fri-
day.
In addition to the movie premiere, there
will be testing available to those who are
curious about knowing their HIV/AIDS
status at no cost.
"For the first time, you have. a movie
that can directly change your life," he
said. "This is more than a movie; this is a
chance to save lives."


- 4ZM


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Copyrighted Material


Syndicated. Content
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Available from Commercial News Providers


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 20091


-I ... ....


State Sen Frederica S.
Wilson, the isionar found-
er of the 5000 Role Models
of Excellence, approaches
issues in a unique way. She
makes certain her Role Mod-
els have new experiences.
They have been to the Signa-
ture Gardens, Parrot Jungle,
The Fountainbleau Hotel &
Spa, Westview Country Club,
Arsht Performing Center, and
recently, The Blast Off with
Wilson for Congress Gala..
Assisting her at the gala were
Bobbie Mumford, PR. and
Maude Newbold, who helped,
escort special guests to the


proper stage includ-
ing Ed O'Dell, emcee.
Her history is still
being written.She has
gone from the class-
room to principal,
school board, Senate
seat, and now Con-
gresswoman for the
United States. They


boots, and co'- , ^ l
boy hats led by
Linda Holloway,
presidentu'cho- "
reographer, and . .
Dorothy Wells,
assistant, followed by Akua
Scott, Agnes Crane, Alpha
Fluitt, Arleace Carrion,
Bettye Phinazee-Williams,
Cerina Bass, Daniel Sey-
more, Elizabeth W. Wells,
Josetta Lindsey, Kathy
Johnson, Lynn A Williams,
Mildred Casmay, Ramona
Varner, Shirley Clark, and
Wanda Francis. They elec-
trified the guests with 4-line


routines.
Senator Wilson
was brought to the
stage to introduced
her special politi-
cians, such as Sena-
tor Chris Smith,
Senator Gwen Margo-
lis, Rep. Perry Thur-
ston, Rep. Annie Be-


WILSON


.all showed up to support her
Fundraising Extravaganza
including President Patricia
Garrett, Angela Belemy, Al-
ice Bryant, Mabel Claring-
ton, Karen Cook, Melinda
Davis, Barbara Dent, Wini-
fred Fountain, Tylanny W.
Gilmore, Dr. Alice Johnson,
Tony McDuffie, and Ernes-
tine Perkins (deceased), rep-
resenting The Elite Jewels.
The huge crowd came
to life when O'Dell brought
on the Miami Gardens Su-
per Soul Steppers. They hit
the stage dressed in jeans,


tancourt. Commissioners
Audrey Edmonson, Barbara
Jordan, Dorothy Johnson,
Marta Perez, Betsy Kaplan,
Dr. Larry Handfield, Joe
Mathis, former Superinten-
dent Rodger Quevas, Pame-
la Jones, Melody Delancy.
Jai Ingraham and Ronald
and Betty Major who flew in
from Lakeland to support Dr.
Wilson.'s gala.
As promised, the biggest
electric line was formed and
everyone had a chance to
profile their outfits and shake
their derriere for five minutes


Berthine Pamela Dean-Mason, daughter of
the late Bertram Dean, Sr., and Marian McIn-
tosh Dean was in Orlando attending a Nurses
Conference. "-Bertli-M also visited her -fam- I
ily in Miami: Alexander and Christina Dean,
niece Alexis and brother Bertram, Jr.. Berthine lives in
Spring, Texas near Houston and is the Director of Associ-
ate Nursing Program. Her Zeta Sorors were also glad to
see Berthine. She is also working on her Ph. D.


Willis "Shorty" O'Brien died in Georgia last Thursday.
Shorty was a former Booker T. Washington field goal kick-
er for the "Tornadoes" and finished in the Class of 1953.
Wedding anniversary greetings to Paul and Karen
Brown, Nov. 15, their 12th; William C. and Cathy Wan-
za, Nov. 19, their 32nd and Alfred R. and Edith Barr,
Nov. 20, their 38th.


Florida A & M University was shut out for the first time
since a 62-0 loss to Virginia Tech in 2004 and for the first
time in MEAC play since a 25-0 loss to Bethune Cookman
in 1988.
As most Floridians travel to Orlando to witness the
"Classic" of Bethune - Cookman and FAMU - May we all
enjoy our trip there, have a joyous time and return home
safe.


Saint Agnes Episcopal Church held their annual sea-
sonal Calendar Tea on Sunday, Nov. 15 for the first place
winners for the months of Sept., Oct. and Nov. Captain
for Sept. included Sheila Rolle, Velma Arnold, Aundra
Goodmond, Elizabeth Mackey, Evangeline Rambaeu,
Kendra Clarke and Sandra Barry-Williams. Oct. Capt:
Bryley Wilson, Angelita Browne and Calvina Parks.
Nov. Capt: Sylvia Rolle, Helen Bennett, Chauncey
Edgecombe, Hughie Nairn, Michelle Roper and Wil-
helmina Welch.


Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of the late Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. , embraced the legacy and lead-
ership of her parents as she became the first woman to
head the civil rights organization co-founded by her fa-
ther. She is the first female leader of the Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference.


Rev. Joseph Lowery, known as the "Dean of the Civil
Rights Movement" celebrated his 88th birthday with his
wife, Evelyn, Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin during a
tribute at Morehouse College in Atlanta. The Morehouse
and Spelman College glee clubs all sang to the honoree,
"Amazing Grace, Mary Don't You Weep, Old Landmark
and Precious Memories."


The first Black president of the American Dental Asso-
ciation (ADA) named its first Black president during the
organization's recent meeting in Honolulu. He is Dr. Ray-
mond F. Gist, who practices general dentistry in Flint, MI
and was voted president-elect of the more than 157,000
member organization by the ADA House of Delegates.


as the Psi Phi Band pro-
vided the music including
Lee Johnson singing "Ain't
Know Stop Us Now" and
Lady "Gee" singing "Rock
Steady" from the Tyler Perry
movie, "I Can Do Bad All By
Myself'.
Emcee Ed O'Dell brought
Paul Wilson, son, to intro-
duce his mother, the senator.
It was a proud moment for
him to articulate brilliantly
on how he has been emulat-
ing her since he graduated
from high school. And, of
course, it was a proud
moment to hear a son
elaborated the way he
did. It was almost a
hard act for her to fol-
low, but she was ex-
tremely proud. She
used that time to thank
everyone for their sup-
port and to -continue M
raising money for her
campaign. It's badly needed
in a tough race.
Then, Nassau came to
Karu & Y Club VIA Langley
and the Bahamas Junkanoo
Revue led by Senator Wilson
and Consulate Gladys John-
son-Sands. Everyone got
into the act and reggae their
style for 15 minutes. And,
before the music cool down
itself, O'Dell brought on the
Miami Jackson High Tempt-
ing Temptations. The group
reminisce on the Tempta-
tion popular tunes and en-
tertained the crowd over-
whelmingly. And, course,
the Junkanoo Revue closed
out the evening and everyone
left feeling good, feeling full
and started getting ready for
Blast Off 2.


Kudos to Slyvia Williams
Garner for her benevolence
of putting a smile, on the
faces of senior citizens and
food in their stomachs at her
annual picnics in selected
restaurants and, recently, at
Amelia Earhart Park, where
she started alone preparing
the ribs, chicken, beans and
salad for the awaited feast,
while "Tree Top", the one-
man band entertained the


early arrivals.
Some of tlhe early arrivals
included A.D. Moore, found-
er of CORE, Bertha Carswell,
former secretary to Dr. Solo-
mon C. Stinson, Dr. Carlton
Fisher, President, Alumni
Coalition, Prescola Beneby,
Dr. Lorraine F. Strachan,
James and Ruth Copeland,
electricians, Barbara King,
former Singing Angels Presi-
dent, Rep. James Bush III,
candidate for Congressman,
who came loaded with evi-
dence of his enviable record
in politics that shows
accountability and
transparency in his
4-page brochure,
Daphne Johnson,
and Ceola Adams.
Finally, the food
was ready to be
served and everyone
EEK lined up to be served.
Some of the others in
line included Robert Badger,
Joyce Bandoo, Elizabeth
Bouie, Beverly Chin, Geor-
gia Duncan, Joyce Edwards,
Harold Ferguson, former
vice president, Dorsey High
Alumni, Jenesta A. Flem-
ing, Irene Hayes,
Fernando Lennon, '
Joe and Shelia Mack,
Geletera Johnson, .
Manuel Jones, Joel
L. Williams, Pepper, ;
Ward Towers and
Williams Home for the
aged. HANI


In January of 1989, Al-
len Jones asked Stephen
Thompson if he would be in-
terested in taking a ski trip.
The reason being he saw an
event featured on Black En-
tertainment Television on
skiing by the National Broth-
erhood of Skiers in Steam-
boat, Colorado. Thompson
inquired and received docu-
mentation on how to orga-
nize. Then on June 28 1989,
Sunshine Slopers Inc. was
born at the North Dade Re-
gional Library and became
incorporated, Oct. 2, 1989.
Congratulations to Sun-
shine Slopers Ski Club, Inc.
for celebrating 20-years of


D


existence, October 24, 2009,
with Samuel Jackson at the
helm and other persons in
the leadership role, such as
Stephen Thompson, Glenn
Holcomb, Charles Golphin,
Eunice Martin, and Bill
Simmons and visiting dig-
nitaries Ray Camp-
bell, director Easter
Region and president,
Onyx Ski Club.
Twenty years of ."
existence was sup-
ported by Gov. Char-
lie Christ, Sen. Bill
Nelson, Congressman DES
Kendrick B. Meek,
Michelle Spence-
Jones, Barbara Jordan,
and Mayor Shirley Gibson,
according to Darlene Gay-
Anniversary, Chair., Linda
S. Taylor, Linda C. Taylor,
Anita McGruder, Jacque-
line Givens, Pecola Broad-
nax, Rhonda Acklin, Dr.
Cathia Darling, Charles
Sargent, Howard Dupree,
Karen Bankston, Thomp-
son., Cynthia and Larry
Handfield. Can you imagine
them skiing down a slope at
50 miles an hour? They can
do'it.
A special be-
lated Happy Birthday.
to one of my former
students at Norland
Middle-- Melodie
7 Delancey. She is con-
sidered a bad Scorpio
'FIELD as her birthday was
October 28. It came
as a surprise by her daugh-
ter, Tameka Johnson, and
special friend, Patrick Mur-
phree with a bang of a party
at Miami Prime Grill. Her
special guest was Senator.
Frederica Wilson, her boss
of 13-years for whom she is
working tireless to help her
win a seat in Congress, along
with Alix Desulme, City of
North Miami Clerk.
Others in attendance
included William Delanc-
ey, father, Thelma Walker,
mother, siblings Cynthia
and Gregory; Lakesha Wil-
son-Rochelle, Doretha Den-
nis, Barbara Duncan, Bar-
bara Drummond Katrina
Wilson-Davis, Mr. and Mrs.


Quel Ferguson, Mr. and
Mrs. Marquiese Williams,
Brandy Williams, Raylin
and Rachel Wiggins, Neysa
Williams, Lenny Delancey,
Destinie Delancy, Quin-
cy Corley, and Michael
Brown.
Also, Tonya Bain,
Viragie Jackson, Ar-
netta Anderson, Pa-
trice Palmer, Keisha
Kerr, Valencia Wil-
liams, Eric Accime,
George Ray, Ed-
ddie Manson, Willie
S Mae Inniss, Ekeisha
JLME White, Lori Delhom-
me, Willie Curry,
Karen John, Charles (CJ),
Patrick Murphree, Patter-
son Murphree, June Mur-
phree, Pat and Patrice Mur-
phree, Moises Hernandez,
Sandy Lacy, and Jessica
Gullien.
Near the end of the party,
Melodie took to the mic and
thanked everyone for sur-
prising her and making her
birthday one to remember,
while her family members
gave her a special hug. Melo-
die also commended Debbie
Taylor and Band, as well as
photographer Donnie Douce
and cake maker, Nancy Bar-
rigais.

******** ** *
Baljean Smith, presi-
dent, and Harcourt Clark,
chairman, retired brothers of
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity an-
nounced the turkey basket
for the citizens of Miami Gar-
den in conjunction with the
Miami Garden Police Depart-
ment and the Mayor's office.
Please contact the Mayor's
office for the day, time, and
venue.
Clark also indicated that
the give-away-baskets will
be for the needy and not
the greedy. Furthermore,
this our 15m-year donating
thanksgiving baskets and it
is one of our projects to the
community. The other proj-
ect is to entertain the se-
niors at the Frat House each
Christmas with a full-course
dinner. For more info. please
call 305-620-5533


Oprah Winfrey show began as the underdog


SHOW
continued from 1C

hand to will be a great suc-
cess," the unit of CBS Corp.
said in a statement. "We look
forward to working with her
for the next several years, and
hopefully afterwards as well."
Winfrey's 24th season
opened earlier this year with a
bang, as she drew more than
20,000 fans to Chicago's Mag-
nificent Mile on Michigan Av-
enue for a block party with the
Black Eyed Peas.
She followed up with a series
of blockbuster interviews -


Mike Tyson and Evander Ho-
lyfield, exclusives with singer
Whitney Houston and ESPN's
Erin Andrews, and just this
week, former Alaska governor,
GOP vice presidential candi-
date and best-selling author
Sarah Palin.
Over the years, "The Oprah
Winfrey Show" grew from a
newcomer that chipped away
at talk king Phil Donahue's
dominance into a program
that turned inspirational. The
show covered a gamut that
ranged from interviews with
the world's most famous celeb-
rities to an honest discussion


about her weight struggles.
In 1986, pianist-showman
Liberace gave his final TV inter-
view to Winfrey, just six weeks
before he died. In a widely
viewed prime-time special
aired in 1993, Michael Jack-
son revealed he suffered from
a skin condition that produc-
es depigmentation.
The show also became a
launching pad for Oprah's
Book Club, and authors
whose books were selected
became best-sellers. The ti-
tles ranged from "Song of Sol-
omon" and "Paradise" by Toni
Morrison to Wally Lamb's


Knowing the signs could


AUTHOR
continued from 1C

"My dad had left me when
I was 13 because my mom
didn't want him anymore. I
turned to men for comfort. I
resented my dad for leaving
me because I was close to
him as a child," said John-
son.
The youngest of her three
sisters, Johnson was raised
by her grandmother who also
raised 14 other kids. At the
age of nine, she moved into
the projects with her mother
but at 18, she was deter-
mined to leave the projects
because she wanted better
for herself.
Johnson admits that she
stayed in an abusive rela-
tionship with spouse be-
cause of the financial secu-
rity.
"Because he was a bread
winner and I had low self-es-
teem, I stayed with him out
of spite because I hated his


mom so much," she laughs.
Sadly, Johnson encourag-
es every woman to know the
signs and be aware of the red
flags for domestic violence.
"Knowing the signs will be
the difference between life
and death," she says.
The 57-page book is a
journey through a woman's
fight to find her place in this
world.
Today, Johnson is a qual-
ity control technician and a
counselor. She advices wom-
en to: "don't drag the abuse,"
thinking that he is going to
change; "go to counseling,"
if you find yourself having
trouble leaving an abusive
mate; "don't be a nurturer,"
don't babysit your mate to
get him to change and lastly,
"don't go back," walk out the
door with the intention of not
returning.
If you wish to contact Geral-
dine Johnson, you can email
her at iriecoiciblebondage@
S ,,. il, .' ,,


"She's Come Undone" and
Elie Wiesel's "Night."
For others, the selection
backfired. "A Million Little
Pieces" exploded in sales af-
ter Winfrey chose the James
Frey memoir in fall 2005.
Soon after, it was revealed
as a fabricated tale of addic-
tion and recovery, and Winfrey
later chewed out Frey on her
show.
"She's been a great inspira-
tion, a great support for all
the shifts in politics and social
consciousness and conscious-
ness in general," said hip-
hop mogul Russell Simmons.


your life


save










3C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Jay-Z, Will Smith co-produce Broadway show "Fela!"


By Monica Herrera

Jay-Z, Will Smith and Jada
Pinkett Smith have officially
signed on as co-producers of
"Fela!," a musical about Nige-
rian Afrobeat pioneer Fela Ani-
kulapo-Kuti that opens Monday
(November 23) on Broadway.
The news confirms weeks of
speculation that the three would
back the show.
A representative for "Fela!"
did not specify the amount of
the celebrities' investment, but
their endorsement alone gives
the musical's profile a signifi-
cant boost just a week before its
premiere.
"There's going to be an enor-
mous incentive for people to in-
vestigate Fela when they know
that Jay-Z and Will Smith are
all rabid fans," Rikki Stein,
Kuti's former co-manager and
executor of his estate, recently
told Billboard. "It's a sign that
the underground is moving
overground."


JAY-Z
Ceo / Mogul
"Felal" will help find a larger
audience for the music of Kuti,
who pioneered Afrobeat from
the sounds of James Brown
and West African high-life mu-
sic, became a political icon in
his native Nigeria and earned
the admiration of everyone from


Paul McCartney to the Brazilian
singer Gilberto Gil before his
death in 1997.
MCA reissued Kuti's catalog
in 2001, but Bernstein, who
helped market that series, said
its potential wasn't fully realized.
"MCA was a major label, and no
I


matter how much they said they
loved Fela and how important
he was, he was definitely lost in
the shuffle," he said.
Stein is all too familiar with
labels' conflicted admiration for
Kuti. In the mid-'80s, he said he
met with every major about a


potential deal. "They all received
me respectfully and saw Fela as
akin to Miles Davis or any of the
jazz greats," Stein recalls. "But
they'd ask: 'Rikki, which three
minutes of this 18-minute song
do you want me to put on the
radio?'"
"I'd ask Fela to write me a
small tune," Stein added. "He
used to say, 'I'm writing African
classical music. Don't mess with
Tchaikovsky.'"
A deal nearly came to fruition
in 1993, when then-Motown Re-
cords president Jheryl Busby of-
fered Kuti a five-album deal un-
der his new Africa-oriented la-
bel, with a $1.3 million advance
for each album and another $1
million for full ownership of Ku-


ti's catalog, Stein said. But af-
ter talking to his spirit advisers,
Kuti refused to sign until April
1995. Busby left Motown the
week of the scheduled signing,
and Andre Harrell's first action
as Motown's new president was
to ax the African label.
"Felal" re-creates the Shrine
-- the Lagos, Nigeria, nightclub
where Kuti played multiple
nights each week with his band,
Africa 70. Singers, dancers and
musicians perform Kuti songs
including "Shakara," "Zombie"
and "Teacher Don't Teach Me
Nonsense" behind lead actor
Sahr Ngaujah, who has won an
Obie Award for his spot-on por-
trayal of Kuti in the show's Off
Broadway run last year.


Fe Tbl


Laurence Fishburne and 'CSI': The evidence is weak


By Robert Bianco

Sadly, good actors and good
shows don't always turn out to be
good matches.
There's no question that Lau-
rence Fishburne is a fine actor, as
anyone who has seen his best film
work can attest, or that.CSI (CBS,
tonight, 9 ET/PT) remains a fine
TV show. Yet fresh on the heels
of last week's reasonably well-
watched but creatively disastrous
CSI/Miami/NY triple crossover, it
may be time to. admit that Fish-
burne's stint on CSI isn't work-
ing, at least not to the extent CSI
needs.
Considering the relative strength
of the series, Fishburne's perfor-
mance might be good enough and
the character strong enough to
function as a member of the en-
semble. But what CSI needs in


the still-roiling wake of William
Petersen's departure is a lead
character and a charismatic star
turn, and Fishburne's Ray Langs-
ton is not filling either bill.
It didn't help, of course, that
the trilogy was a ridiculous mish-
mash of disjointed plots that failed
to serve any of the shows well. A
girl gets caught in a credit card
scam in Miami, shipped for her
body parts to New York, and then
forced into prostitution in Las Ve-
gas? Even by TV standards, that's
a remarkable run of bad luck.
Still, badly plotted or not, the
point of the Fishburne-driven
trilogy was to bolster his star
status, and at that, it failed dis-
mally. Indeed, the episodes were
actually better when he wasn't on
screen, if only because for those
few moments, the writers weren't
aggressively pushing "Dr. Ray"


LAURENCE FISHBURNE
Actor / Director
upon us.
The 2007 crossover between
CSI and Without a Trace was no


great prize-winner either, but it
held your interest because the two
main characters were so distinct-
ly different: Petersen's wry, odd,
observant Gil Grissom clashing
with Anthony LaPaglia's more
aggressive, emotional and pro-
active Jack Malone. Ray seems
to have no distinctive traits or
quirks at all, and having the
Miami and New York characters
fuss over him like he was some
forensics rock star did nothing
to lend him one.
We do know one unusual fact
about Langston: He was raised
in Korea. But so far, that seems
to be no more than the kind of
back story actors invent to help
them latch on to a character.
The show has yet to use it in any
significant or even vaguely enter-
taining way that viewers can.
appreciate.


Sat.Nov28

@PRIME ATLANTIS'8P.M.-12AM.
1727 E. HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD - HALLANDALE. FL 33309



FEATURING:

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J-Shin * Pretty Boys TDrop * Smoove

& Many More.!! PLUS

"3 Live Fashion Shows"


Janet Jackson confirms break-up with Jermaine Dupri


By Cristina Everett

That's the way love goes.
Despite reports that Janet
Jackson and Jermaine Dupri
are still a couple, the singer
confirmed breakup rumors when
she recently referred to him as
her "ex."
During a radio interview with
Atlanta's "Bert Show," Jackson
reveals that she has a very short
list of ex-boyfriends with whom
she still communicates.
"I'm not the type of girl that


stays in touch with your ex like
that," the singer, 43, said.
However, Jackson said that
Dupri, 37, is an exception.
"Jermaine is one of my best
friends," she said. "I love him to
death. We're still connected. We're
still good friends. We still talk."
Following the tragic death of
her brother Michael in June,
Jackson and Dupri broke off
their seven-year relationship.
According to Usmagazine.com,
the couple temporarily reunited
in September to celebrate Dupri's


YOU WoU
HoroScoe
B*fy Minrvail g^ ^


ARIES: MARCH 21 - APRIL 20
At a point where you're taking a gi-
ant step forward, others are taking two
steps back. Any conflicts you have stem
from not being on the same page. If
there's no harmony here now, it'll return
in a month or so. Lucky numbers 8, 12,
24, 26,31

TAURUS: APRIL 21 - MAY 20
You can pretty much do what you
want. Much to your surprise, whoever
you thought would interfere with your
plans has backed off. Now that you have
all the control, what are you going to do
with it? Lucky numbers 10, 13, 15, 25,
298

GEMINI: MAY 21 - JUNE 20
Differences of opinion about how
things should be have stirred up trouble
in paradise. If you can keep a sense
of humor this won't turn into a scene.
Everything will improve if you can just
agree to disagree. Lucky numbers 6, 9,
10, 15, 19

CANCER: JUNE 21- JULY 20
Things haven't settled down enough
for you to think that you've made peace
with this. Whatever you're fine with, oth-
ers are having a hard time forgiving you
for things that came about because you
copped out. Lucky numbers 15, 18, 21,
23, 26

LEO: JULY 21 - AUGUST 20
You've seen this too many times to get
upset about it. Loving someone through
something one more time is one of those
Karmic things. This may be tiresome but


lessons in compassion underscore the
need for patience. Lucky numbers 13,
18, 21, 35, 38

VIRGO: AUGUST 21-SEPT 20
Something got triggered a while back
and you've been flying high ever since.
Holding your own in the midst of diffi-
culty is easier when your heart knows
how to see the light even in the worst-
case scenario. Lucky numbers 7, 14, 26,
28,30

LIBRA: SEPT 21 - OCT 20
You've gotten so right about whatever
you're doing there's no room for anyone
who doesn't see it your way. Don't close
,yourself off. The mark of an evolved per-
son is their ability to tolerate others.
Lucky numbers 9, 12, 15, 25, 29

SCORPIO: OCT 21 - NOV 20
Obsess less and play a little more.
Don't drive yourself nuts wondering why
life isn't going the way it's supposed to.
You won't get anywhere if you keep push-
ing the river. Lighten up and go with the
flow. Lucky numbers 14, 16, 18, 26, 31


birthday in Lake Como, Italy.
When asked if the singer would
ever marry again, Jackson - who
has been married twice, as a teen
to James DeBarge and in her 20s
to choreographer Rene Elizondo -
is skeptical.
"I don't know if I'll get married
again," she told Harper's Bazaar.
"I'll put it like this: If God wants
me to, then I will. I've had people
ask me out. I haven't entertained
any offers thus far, but I'm
locking myself in my work right
now. "


SAGITTARIUS: NOV 21 - DEC 20
Old friends and the old track have
become a'bit of a drain. You're so done
with this. At this point in your develop-
ment you'd do better to hang with peo-
ple who know where you're going and
who you're becoming. Lucky numbers
14, 19, 24, 31, 35

CAPRICORN: DEC 21 - JAN 20
You'd love it if things would settle
down. Guess again! Finding the joy in
this craziness will require you to be open
to the idea that there's a purpose to it
and you're just here to find out what that
is. Lucky numbers 12, 16, 19, 25, 28

AQUARIUS: JAN 21 - FEB 20
Your attitude has changed about a
lot of things. The old way of seeing it
doesn't work anymore. Opening your
mind has allowed some unusual people
to enter your life. Make no mistake; they
will teach you a lot. Lucky numbers 6, 9,
13, 15, 19

PISCES: FEB 21 - MARCH 20
Don't be in a rush to move forward.
What's left of the past is still there and
you have no clue about what's next. As
you clean up the remains of the day, be
grateful for unseen blessings already on
their way. Lucky numbers 15, 21, 23, 25,
28


-IDEMl BER:4l


Adrienne Arsht Center and Larry Rosen presents
JAZZ ROOTS: AN EVENING WITH DAVE GRUSIN
Featuring Jon Secada, Patti Austin, Gary Burton, Arturo Sandoval,
Nestor Torres and Sammy Figueroa.
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $25, $45, $55, $85, $125


Adrienne Arsht Center presents
BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
Israel's Top Dance Company! "This is not dancing you will see anywhere
else!" The New York Times
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $25, $35, $45, $60, $75, $90


tsraels-
Batslieva Ensemble


BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
"The'dancers are remarkable!" vinage Voice
Batsheva is one of the most influential and exciting dance companies on
the planet!
2 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House *$25, $35, '$45, $60, $75, $90
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS: FEATURING RICHARD SMALLWOOD
Grammy winning legend Richard Smallwood is the featured guest on this
Free Gospel Sundays holiday program.
4 PM * Knight Concert Hall * FREE


Adrienne Arsht Center and Broadway Across America presents
BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50
i i s3]::S SBE] l S>l


Free Gospel Sundays:
Richard Smallwood


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $50.50, $80,50, $90.50, $205.50


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
SWEET HONEY IN THE ROCK
This African-American all-female vocal ensemble brings to Miami a holiday
concert fusing the many warm and wonderful traditions that mark the end
of the year.
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50


BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50
Adrienne Arsht Center presents
BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL
Brian Stokes Mitchell won a Tony Award for his role in Kiss Me Kate, and received
Tony nominations for Man of La Mancha, Ragtime, and King Hedley II. Join
him for a spectacular evening of show tunes, ballads and classic love songs!
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $45, $60, $75

BILLY CRYSTAL'S 700 SUNDAYS
3 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $50.50, $80.50, $90.50, $205.50


Billy Crystal


Sweet

rock
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80HIH&


,Aniio - S S S .55 * t Aic k nd. 5


EI


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.
PRELUDE NOW OPEN
S SIX NIGHTS AWEEKI CU
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FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
KNIGHT CONCERT HALL CARNIVAL" STUDIO THEATER ZIFF BALLET�


[ FRI DECEMBER 11 1


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


AC THF MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1. 2009


On American Idol,. being "too
Broadway" has become syn-
onymous with a ticket home.
- But for Season 7's third-place
finisher, Syesha Mercado, be-
ing Broadway is a good thing.
She's taking the stage as
Deena Jones in the national
tour of Dreamgirls, a musical
about a girl group that en-
counters fame, fortune and
heartache, which opens Sun-
day at the Apollo Theater in
New York and wraps up July
25 in Kansas City.
"(The judges) say a lot of
things about Broadway, but
it's OK," says Mercado, 22.
"Broadway is a good thing. I
love Broadway."
Mercado has sizable shoes to
fill: Dreamgirls fans associate
the role with Beyonc6, who
played Deena in the 2006 film
version. (The show originated
as a Broadway hit in the '80s,
with Sheryl Lee Ralph and
Jennifer Holliday.)
"I definitely pay homage to
Beyonc6," says Mercado. "But
I try to focus on what the
character is to me. We both
grew up in a very poor back-
ground. I lived in the proj-
ects when I was younger, so
I know what it's like to 'come
from nothing."
After the Idols Live tour in
2008, Mercado joined hun-
dreds of other hopefuls in a
"rigorous" six-month audi-
tion process. During her last
callback, she says, "I felt like
Deena Jones."
She was in front of Radio City
," . : ,: .,. d -4


ercado


Syesha



Too Broadway for 'Ic

By Kristin McGrath ' Music Hall with friend


ds when


she got the call offering her
the role. '
"Everybody was looking at
me like I was crazy because
I was jumping up and down,
screaming," Mercado says.
"It was like a fairy-tale movie
ending."
She's enthused about the
venue because "the energy at
the Apollo is amazing. Just
knowing that Ella Fitzgerald,
Michael Jackson and Sammy
Davis Jr. have been on the
exact same stage."
Her wedding plans are on
hold while the show is on the
road. (She got engaged to col-


lege classmate Hess Wesley
during her Idol run.) "I have
people who love me in life,"
Mercado says. "E-mail is my
best friend. It's tough, but
the Dreamgirls cast are my
family."
After the tour, she'll contin-
ue recording her pop/R&B
debut album with a cast of
writers and producers, in-
cluding REO, who produced
Beyoncd's Hello. She could
see herself in New York. Or
L.A. Or Miami. She plans to
do Broadway, film and TV,
start a charity and, of course,
sing.
"There s a line Deena has,"


Mercado says. "She says, 'I
want to be more. I want to be
an artist, I want to act.' I want
to be so much more than just
one thing."
Idol will always be a part of
her identity, she says. She
just had a sleepover with fel-
low finalist Ramiele Malubay,
lunched with Carly Smithson
and Brooke White, and saw
David Cook's L.A. show.
"No matter where I go in my
career, someone is going to
remember me as the girl from
American Idol," Mercado
says. "And that's OK. Every-
one will remember me for dif-
ferent things."


-Photo/Toky Photography
Dream tour: Syesha Mercado stars as Deena, the role
played by Beyonce's in the 2006 film.


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The Miami Times



Business


SECTION D


THE MIAMI TIMES


By Mike Krumboltz .


Attention, class. Here's a logic
question for you: If it's true that
everyone loves a deal, and Black
Friday offers the best deals of the
year, then is it safe to assume
that folks will go into a state of
high-grade hysteria the day after
Thanksgiving? The answer is: duh,
of course.
Though over a week away, Black
Friday is already igniting the
Search box. Shoppers have pushed


up searches on "black friday 2009"
and "black friday ads" to dizzying
heights. One might think that re-
tailers would keep the deals a se-
cret until the big day, but nothing
could be further from the truth.
In an effort to get spend-happy
shoppers to their stores, retailers
have "leaked" many of their most
drool-og tyy deaJs. .Offers from
WalJmart; Best Bu,' and Target
are all garnernng a ton of lookups.
And, interestingly, many of the
deals are quite similar.


CNN Money explains what shop-
pers can expect find at Walmart on
November 27. According to sourc-
es, there will be HDTVs, laptops,
toys, and Blu-ray players for the
grabbing. Confirmed products in-
clude a 50-inch Sanyo 720p plas-
ma TV for $598, a Magnavox Blu-
ray player for $78, and a GPS from
TomTom for $59.
And across th.e-cur[gaiqprvaIl at
Target? A lot of the same, actu-
ally. There, you can get a 32-inch
LCD HDTV from Westinghouse for


$246, some toys for 50 percent off,
and toasters and coffeemakers for
just $3. Best Buy will reportedly
offer shoppers a 50-inch Samsung
plasma TV for $898, "huge dis-
counts" on GPS units, and a Play-
Station 3 Slim with two games for
$300.
It's worth noting: that none of
these deals are. "official," as the
stores have-et-,to .coOrftrr thtrt.-:'
But odds are, they're the real deal.
Set your alarms and sharpen your
claws - it's gonna be a long day.


Many compete

for seasonal Jobs

By Laura Petrecca"
Seasonal job interviewees, it's time
to play up your best guest-greeting
and gift-wrapping skills: The battle
for holiday employment is brutal.
With the national unemployment
rate above 10%, and employed folks
looking to bolster budgets by taking
second jobs, the competition for re-
tail, movie theater, package-delivery
and other holiday posts is fierce.
"There are a lot more people look-
ing for jobs this year," says Jennifer
Grasz, a spokeswoman fof- online job
site CareerBuilder.com. For instance,
laid-off employees are competing with
those who want to pad income af-
ter being hit with furloughs and pay
cuts, she says.
About 1-in-8 employed workers plan
to take on a seasonal job, according
to a CareerBuilder.com survey.
More than half of employers expect
to get more applications tian last
year, according to a separate sea-
sonal hiring survey by SnagAJob.
com. At the same time. those manag-
ers expect to hire 16% fewer hourly
workers.
CareerBuilder.com is more optimis-
tic in its hiring outlook. It expects it
to be on par with last year. However,
2008's hiring levels were dramatical-
ly lower than the previous five years,
according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
Yet, many big firms are cutting
back. For instance, retail behemoth
Target hopes to glean some savings
by reducing its number of untrained
new hires in favor of asking existing
employees to work more shifts.
Video-game, retailer GameStop,
which has filled about 15,000 posi-
.forsdntr'eceived "significantly more ap-
p-lltl6ns than in past years," spokes-
man Charles Hodges says.


New and used car prices


jump


ftam qom


Copyrighted Miterial



Syndicated Content


VAvailable from Commercial News Providers,
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MIAMI, FLOQIDA,










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


- r
f


Higher gas prices greet



Thanksgiving travelers

Thanksgiving travel provides an opportunity to gauge the mood of U.S. consumers


By Julie Schmit

Thanksgiving travelers
will find gasoline prices
much higher than last year
with little hope for respite
heading into the rest of the
holiday season, oil and gas
analysts say.
The national average for
a gallon of regular gas was
$2.64 on Monday, slightly
less than a month ago but
up 72 cents a gallon from a
year ago, the auto club AAA
says.
Oil prices ended the day
Monday, up 9 cents, closing
at.$77.56 a barrel, indicat-
ing little change ahead for
gasoline prices. "It's a fairly
stable pricing environment,"
says Jim Ritterbusch, pres-
ident of oil trading adviser
firm Ritterbusch and Asso-
ciates.
Thanksgiving travel pro-
vides an opportunity'" to
gauge the mnood of U.S. con-
sumers, AAA says.
The auto club expects 2%
more travelers on roadways


this year than last, for a to-
tal of 33.2 million people.
The expected increase re-
flects improved consumer
confidence, a rising stock
market and growing sense
among many consumers
that the worst of the global
economic crisis is behind
us, AAA says.
Last year, Thanksgiving
travel tanked 25% from the
previous year in the wake of
the housing and financial
meltdown.
Now, gas prices could
emerge as a drag on con-
sumer spending with the
nation's unemployment rate
hitting 10.2% last month,
says Tom Kloza, chief oil
analyst for the Oil Price In-
formation Service.
"When we dipped into the
recession, cheaper energy
was a silver lining," Kloza
says. "That silver lining has
disappeared and that will
test this recovery."
In the next month, he says,
he expects crude oil prices
to be twice the level of last


year, a situation that rarely
occurs. Oil has traded be-
tween $76 and $82 a barrel
for more than a month. Ini-
tially, it was driven higher
on expectations of an eco-
nomic recovery and a weak
dollar. Because oil is priced
in dollars, a falling dollar
drives oil prices up.
Countering those factors
are big inventories of gaso-
line, heating oil, natural gas
and diesel fuel in the U.S.,
Ritterbusch says. "As long
as we have unemployment
above 10%, that'll keep a
lid on rising gas prices or
changes in people's driving
habits," he adds.
The Energy Information
Administration, the re-
search arm of the U.S. De-
partment of Energy, expects
higher crude oil prices to
drive gas near $3 a gallon
during next year's summer
driving season. Crude oil
prices account for 64% of
the cost of gas, the Energy
Information Administration
says.


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF NOVEMBER 25, 2009 SPECIAL
COMMISSION MEETING





Pursuant to Section 2-33 (I) of the Code of the City
of Miami, Florida, as amended, Chairman Marc
D. Sarnoff has called a special meeting of the
Miami City Commission on November 25, 2009
at 1:00 PM, at Miami City Hall located at 3500
Pan American Drive. The purpose of this meeting
is to address filling the current vacancy on the City
Commission in the District 1 commission seat, to
set an election pursuant to the City Charter to fill
the current vacancy in the District 5 commission
seat and to discuss and set the next City Commis-
sion meeting for; December 10th, 2009 at 9 AM. No
other business shall be conducted outside of that
indicated above.

All interested persons may appear at the meeting
with respect to these matters. Should any person
desire to appeal any decision of the City Commis-
sion with respect to any matter to be considered at
this meeting, that person shall ensure that a ver-
batim record of the proceedings is made including
all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal
may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990, persons needing special accommo-
dations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360
(Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to
the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later
than three (3) business days prior to the proceed-
ing.


(#003326)


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk


A Gyn Diagnostic
AAA Attorney Referral
Adrienne Arsht Center
Alba Medical Center
Boss Group Ministries
CarePlus
City of Miami
Dept. of Procurement
Dr. Rozalyn Paschal
Family Dentist
Florida Department
Florida Dept.
Florida PCI
General Motors
Gregg Mason Funeral
Health First/Humana
Just Black Goods
Liberty City Community
Miami-Dade Water & Sewer
Publix
Rasools Mens
Seaview Research
Superbowl Host Committee
SunTrust
Toys R Us
United Teachers of Dade

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Study shows U.S. lags


in paid work benefits


The United States lags far behind
other nations in offering paid sick
days, paid parental leave and other
workplace benefits that proponents
consider vital to public health' and
workers rights, according to research
released Tuesday.
The eight-year study found the
most economically competitive
nations offer forms of paid leave
to workers that the United States
does not, according to researchers
at Harvard University and Canada's
McGill University.
Of the world's 15 most competitive
nations, 14 mandate paid sick leave,
13 guarantee paid maternal leave
and 12 provide paid paternal leave
by law, they said. Eleven provide
paid leave to care for children's
health and eight provide paid leave
for adult family care.
The issue of paid employee leave
in the United States has heated up.
Advocates argue paid leave allows
sick workers to stay home without
financial hardship and helps prevent
workers from spreading such
diseases as the HlN1 flu.
Advocates for women's rights
argue paid family leave is essential


for women, who tend to care more
for family members than do men,
to compete and advance in the job
market.
Opponents argue that mandating
such leave policies would cost
jobs and be a financial burden on
businesses.
The 15 nations are Australia,
Austria, Britain, Canada, Denmark,
Finland, Germany, Iceland, Japan,
Netherlands, Norway, Singapore,
Sweden, Switzerland and the United
States, all of which have been
ranked most competitive over the
last decade by the World Economic
Forum.
Co-authored by Alison Earle, who
was a research scientist at Harvard's
School of Public Health, the book is
published by Stanford University
Press.
Looking more widely at 190
countries, the researchers found 163
guarantee paid sick leave and 164
guarantee paid annual leave.
Also, 177 nations guarantee paid
leave for new mothers, 74 nations
guarantee paid leave for new fathers
and 157 nations guarantee workers a
day of rest each week, they said.


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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
33133 on the receiving dates referenced below for the following five projects (separate bids):

PROJECT NAME BID NO. RECEIVING DATE RECEIVING TIME

District 1 - Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-038 Monday, January 4, 2010 10:00 AM
Improvements
District 2 - Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-039 Monday, January 4, 2010 11:00 AM
Improvements
District 3 - Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-040 Tuesday, January 5, 2010 10:00AM
Improvements
District 4 - Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-041 Tuesday, January 5, 2010 11:00AM
Improvements
District 5 - Citywide ADA & Sidewalk 08-09-042 Wednesday, January 6, 10:00 AM
Improvements 2010

Scope of Work: The projects include the removal of deteriorated, damaged,.or unsafe concrete sidewalks and construction of new
concrete sidewalks and handicap ramps for the City's ADA program, upgrade, replacement and repair of concrete curbs and curbs
and gutters, and reinstallation of water meter boxes or similar utility structures located in the sidewalk area, 2-ft of asphalt pavement
restoration for the c&g restoration, and trimming and removal of tree roots, as necessary, in order to prevent future damage to the new
concrete sidewalk, driveway or access ramps, concrete curb and gutter.

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor from the State of Florida
or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade (Paving/Concrete Specialty). Proof of experience for
the work may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complexity, and supported by references within the
past three (3) years. The Prospective Bidder must self-perform at least thirty percent (30%) of the work.

THIS PROJECT IS BEING FUNDED UNDER THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009. THE CONTRAC-


TOR MUST ABIDE BY THE PR .


A 100% Performance Bond and 5% Bid Bond are required for this project.

The Bids can only be obtained by visiting the Public Works Department's Website:

http://www.miamigov.com/Public_Works/Pages/Solicitations/

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in duplicate originals in a sealed
manila envelope with the project name and bid number legibly marked on the outside. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be
publicly opened. Any bids or proposals received after,tifne and date specified will be returned to the bidder unopened. The responsibil-
ity for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City
is not responsible for delays caused by mail, courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE
WITH CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE NO. 12271.


Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager
Add. No. DP-007622


,.4 .. ' .
















woqiaS'S'iV


SECTION D


GREAT NEWS!!!

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, Fl 33142
A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT: $698.00
APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MORE!!!

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET,

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING: JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505

"Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change




101-A CIVIC CENTER
AREA
FREE 32-INCH LCD HD
TV One bedroom $650
Two bedrooms $760
Central air. tree water, ap-
pliances. parking, laundry
Ouiet Area
1545 N.W. 8 Ave.
786-506-3067
'Limited Time Offer!

1031 NW 197 TERR
One bedroom, one bath.
Rooms also available.
Call Linton at 786-222-6764
1140 N.W. 79 ST.
One bdrm, one bath $550.
Free Water. Mr. Willie #109
305-642-7080

1212 N. W. 1 Avenue
$500 MOVE IN One
bedroom, one Dath. $500,
stove, refrigerator. air
305-642-7080

1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile. $700 mthly, $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
' 1229 N.W. 1 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

1245 NW 58 STREET
Move i;n special. One
bedroom, one bath $495
monthly, $750 to move in.
All appliances included.
Free 19 inch LCD TV. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bath
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1302 NW 1 PLACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$650 monthly. All appliances
included. Section 8 OK. Call
305-255-6330
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425. Ms. Shorty
#1
786-290-1438

1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bdrm, one bath $450.
Two bdrms one bath $525.
305-642-7080

13880 NE 6 Avenue
One bedroom, $680 mthly.
Efficiency, $500 mthly. First,
last and security. References
Required. 305-769-3740


140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN.
Two bdrms, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642-
7080

1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bdrm, one bath.
$600 mthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in.
786-290-5498
1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bdrm, one bath $425.
Two bdrms, one bath. $525.
305-642-7080

1459 N.W. 60th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
brand new appliances, tiled
floors, $600 monthly.
One month moves you in.
Call 305-458-3977
1525 N.W. 1 Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL! First
month moves you in. Three
bdrms., two baths, $695
monthly. All appliances
included. Central ai. Free
19 Inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355- 7578

1525 N.W. 1st Place
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bedroom. one bath.
$395 monthly. $600 lo
move in Newly renovated.
All appliances included
Free 19 inch LCD TV
Call Joel 786-355-7578

1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water..
305-642-7080. 786-236-
1144

210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080

2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080.
2131 NW 100 STREET
One bedroom, stove, refrig-
erator, air, bars, water, fenced
and more.
305-948-6913
220 N.W. 16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600. Appliances.
305-642-7080

2416 N.W. 22 Court
One bedroom one bath
$600
Two bedrooms two bath
$725
Air, Free Water.
305-642-7080

2701 N.W. 1 Ave
MOVE IN SPECIAL. One
bedroom, one bath. $500
month. $750 to move in. All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD TV.
Call Joel 786-355-7578

2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3186 N.W. 135th Street
One bdrm, one bath, $650
monthly. Call 954-704-009
3301 N.W. 51 Street
One bedroom, one bath. $600
moves you in. Appliances in-
cluded. 786-389-1686
361 N.W. 7th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 monthly, $200 deposit.
305-861-4683.
3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650, stove, re-
frigerator, air. 305-642-7080
3900 N.W. 165 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $950
monthly. 786-223-3353
411 N.W. 37 STREET
Studios, $395 monthly. All
appliances included. Call
Joel
786-355-7578

423 N.W. 9 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$450 monthly, $700 move
in special. Easy qualifying.
786-339-4106
786-985-8097


$500 OFF FIRST MONTH
Extra large one and two
bdrms. Call 786-262-5661.
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Hallandale FLORIDA
Two bedrooms, one bath, with
living room, washer and dryer
connection, $850 monthly,
$1450 move in.
786-370-0832
5755 N.W. 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, park-
ing. $625 monthly. $1000 to
move in. Call 954-394-7562.
60 and 61 STREET
One and two bdrms. renovat-
ed, security gate, $595 and
$695. 954-638-2972
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
6900 NW 2 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 o.k. 786-295-9961
6950 N.W. 8th Avenue
Newly remodeled studio apt.,
$450-$500, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-675-1740.
7001 NW 15 AVENUE
Move-in special! One bed-
room, one bath. $399 per
month, $600 to move in All
appliances included. Free
19 inch LCD T.V. Call Joel:
786-355-7578

7601 N.E. 3 Court
Two bedrooms,,one bath. Re-
modeled kitchen new floors,
appliances. $750 monthly,
security negotiable.
Call 305-525-0338
7625 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$600. Stove, refrigerator,
free water. 305-642-7080
800 N.W. 67 Street
One bedroom, utilities includ-
ed. $800 moves you in.
786-389-1686
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One and two bcm apts.
Section 8. 305-754-7776
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply.at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699
ALLAPATTAH AREA
New, one and two bdrms.
Section 8 Welcome!
Call 786-355-5665
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.
BEAUTIFUL
5120 N.W. 23 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, wa-
ter included. $600 monthly.
George 305-283-6804
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080 *
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tion/specials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com

DOWNTOWN BISCAYNE
1312-1315 N.E. Miami Court.
One bdrm, one bath, safe,
clean, new kitchen, new tile,
fresh paint, secured parking,
$595-$650. 305-528-7766
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath, $495, two bedrooms,
one bath, $595. Free water!
Leonard 786-236-1144


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 18-24, 2009


L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, 305-717-6084
LIBERTY SQUARE
One and two bedrooms, tiled.
786-267-3199
MIAMI SHORES AREA
Starting at $850 a month,
gated community, Call for
Move in Special!
Jessica 305-751-4747
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Corner of N.W. 103 St. Beau-
tiful two bedrooms. $700
monthly. $1000 to move in.
Gated, security, tiled floors,
central air. 786-402-0672
N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Studio $522+, One bdrm
$671+, Two bdrrns $852+
305-947-0045
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bdrms., 'one bath, cen-
tral air, $1050. One bdrm,
one bath, remodeled, $700.
12108 N.E. 5 Avenue.
305-206-1566
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$775 monthly. 305-754-1100
OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air.
Appliances and water in-
cluded Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits
786-521-7151
305-769-0146
OPA LOCKA AREA
Special! One bdrm, one bath.
$425 monthly.
305-717-6084
OVERTOWN AREA
One bdrm, one bath, $475
monthly. Call 786-262-4536.
RENTAL ASSISTANCE
NOW AVAILABLE
One month free rent, free
water. Two bedrooms, one
bath $695, one bedroom,
one bath $495. Tiled, air,
recently remodeled, Private.
1761 ALI BABA AVE
786-439-8044, 786-236-
'0214

"Condos/Townhouses]
13480 NE 6 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths,
corner unit, two balconies,
central air. $900 monthly.
Section 8 OK. Call:
305-255-6330
DOWNTOWN MIAMI
Two bedrooms, two baths,
penthouse, ocean view.
$1100 monthly. 1000
square feet.
Section 8 Welcome
786-260-5708 Cell
305-652-2257 Office .
www.themiamicondo.com

Duplexes

1023 N.W. 47 ST
Newly Remodeled three
bedroom one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Appli-
ances. Free electric, water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144
103 STREET NW 9 AVE
Large, two bedrooms, one
bath, $875 monthly.
305-836-1899
1066 NW 55 STREET
Two bdrm, one bath $825
Special. 305-758-7022
Frank Cooper Real Estate
12400 N.E. 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
three bedrooms two baths
$1000-$1100), two baths.
Appliances, central air.
305-642-7080

1245 N.E. 111th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$850 monthly. Section 8 OK.
786-357-8885, 786-290-0768
1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800. Stove, refrigerator,
air.
305-642-7080


1461 NW 59 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 OK. $1450 mthly. 954-
624-5906
1477 NW 2 AVENUE
FLORIDA CITY
Two" bedrooms, two baths,
townhouse style, central ait,
gated. $750 monthly. Section
8 OK. 305-255-6330
1737 N.W. 47 TERR.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 mthly. Section 8 OK.
305-751-6720, 305-331-3899
1812 N. W. 50 Street
Two bdrms, one bath, $900
mthly, Sebtion 8 OK.
.305-751-6720, 305-331-3899
1875 NW 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, tiled floors. $900
mntly. Section 8 welcome.
305-331-2431
2035 NW 69 TERRACE
Two bdrms, air, appliances
and free utilities.
786-426-6263
2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath
$850 Free Water
305-642-7080

2370 N.W. 61 Street
Newly remodeled, two
bdrms., one bath, appliances,
water, central air, $800 mthly,
Section 8 okay.
561-294-0044
2416 N.W. 22 CT
One bedroom one bath
$600 Two bedrooms one
oath $725 Ar Free Water.
305-642-7080

2561 YORK STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 OK! $1342 monthly,
$1200 deposit. Alarm System
included. 305-757-3709
2632 N.E. 212 TER
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$950 Appliances. 305-642-
7080
3030 N.W. 19th Avenue
One bedroom, Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-
7776.
3190 N.W. 135 STREET
One bdrms, one bath.
305-763-5092, 305-975-0711
42 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, new kitchen,
central air, bars, water. $900
monthly. Call:
305-310-7366.
449 N.W. 82 Street
Two bdrms. $1050 mthly.
Section 8 OK. 305-751-3381
5600 N.W. 4 AVE.
One and two bdrms, one
bath, central air,: Starting
from $750 to $950. Section 8
OKI 786-930-0582
594 N.W. 67 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! $1700 monthly,
$1200 Deposit. Alarm System
included. 305-757-3709
6250 N.W. 1 Ave
Newly Remodeled. Two
bedrooms one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Ap-
ploances, Free electric,
water. 305-642-7080, 786-
236-1144
747 N.W. 69 STREET
Four bedrooms two baths.
$1702 mthly. $1200 Deposit.
Section 8 OK. 305-757-3709
7521 NW 1 AVENUE
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths. ALL NEW! Impact
Windows, central air. $1275
monthly. 305-793-0002
7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances, free water,
305-642-7080

8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, air, tile. $650
monthly, $1500 to move in.
Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
86 Street NE 2 Ave Area
Two bedrooms. Section 8
Welcome. Call 305-754-7776
9357 NW 31 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two
baths, air, tiled floor, washer
and dryer hook up. $1150
monthly, first and last. Not
Section 8 approved.
305-625-4515
93rd St. NW 18th Avenue
Two bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.



E I 5 A P'ER IN


)be litamt tme


AFFORDABLE NEWS ADVERTISING THAT WORKS



Bart Williams
Advertising Coordinator



CALL 305-693-7093 TODAY!!

advertis1ng@m1amit1mesonltne.com


Drive More



Customers td


Your Busines


TOD-


STERLING SAUNDERS
Advertising Consultant

305-694-6210, Ext. 103

Qt e ^It mWAs
One Family - 'Serving Since 1923
THE iLARSEST MINORITYi
tWVNED EW SPAPEi,
1N.THE SOUTHEAST






mlu~mlumllg~mnllA


.9626 N.W. 8 AVE
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 OK! $1342 monthly.
$1200 Deposit. Alarm System
included. 305-757-3709
9900 N.W. Oth Avenue
One bdrm,'one bath, $750
mthly, 786-277-4395 or
305-624-4395
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
* 3737 Charles Terrace
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrms. one bath, first,
and security. Section 8 and
HOPWA Welcome. One
Month Free! 305-244-6845
NORTH ALLAPATTH
One and two bdrms. Section
8 welcome. 305-836-3612
PERRINE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, $650 monthly.
Call 305-896-3976
Efficiencies
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished' utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN). 24 hour
security camera, $185 wkly,
$650 mthly.
305-751-6232
18201 N.W. 9th Avenue
Efficiency, $600 monthly,
$1200 moves you in.
Call 305-467-4651
2245 NW 92 STREET
One bdrm, furnished, one per-
son only.. Paid Utilities. $500
monthly, Move in $1000. 305-
835-7681
3153 N.W. 53rd Street
Starting at $450 monthly.
First, last and security.
305-751-6232
Close to Miami Avenue
on N.E. 84th Street
Laundry room, water includ-
ed, new ceramic tile floors.
$525 monthly. Call 305-970-
5574
MIAMI AREA
Nice rental for $600, water,
electricity. Section 8 okay.
Call: 305-469-5062
NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance , cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.
OVERTOWN AREA
Furnished efficiency, $115.
weekly, $680 to move in.
Call 786-897-9090.

Furnished Rooms
13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1368 N.W. 70th Street
$500 mthly, washer and
dryer, kitchen access, air,
cable available.
Call 305-691-0458

1525 NE 158 STREET
Rooms available.
305-693-1017, 305-298-0388
1935 N.W. 76th Street
Large furnished room, air, ca-
ble, kitchen privilege, parking,
no security, $485 monthly,
786-955-4703.
2170 Washington Avenue
OPA LOCKA AREA
Clean rooms, $110 weekly,
$476 monthly. 786-277-
3434,786-298-4383
3185 N.W. 75th Street
Roommate needed. Access
to entire house. Near Tri-Rail.
$100 weekly.
305-439-2906
8275 N.W. 18th Avenue
Clean rooms available.
Call 305-754-7776.
MIAMI AREA
Three quarter way house.
Nice Area. Bed space in a
shared room. Hot meals, hot
shower, all for only $15 a
day.
305-919-9253, 786-704-5143
Miramar Area
Near Miami. $125 wkly. 954-
305-4713 or 305-299-6421.
NICELY FURNISHED
Air, cable, TV, utilities. $150
wkly. 786-290-0946
NORLAND AREA
$400 monthly. First and last to
move in. Background check.
Call Pam.
305-332-3133


THE 50JTHt AST


NORLAND AREA
Nice quiet room, near bus ter-
minal. Call 305-766-2055
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.

Houses
13140 NW 18 AVE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-344-9560
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013
1430 N.E. 71 ST.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$925. stove, refrigerator, air.
305-642-7080

1490 NW 46 STREET
Three bedrooms; one batli,
recently renovated. Move in
Special, Section 8 Welcome!
305-318-8197
16000 N.W. 21 Avenue
Three bdrhns, family room,
huge yard. Section 8 OK!
954-993-5426
1720 N.W. 68th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, game
room, refrigerator, security
bars, fenced, central air/heat
$750 monthly. Section 8 OK!
Call 305-215-8125
1785 N.W. 43 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. 305-267-9449
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath
$995. Central Air, appli-
ances, ceiling fans 305-
642-7080
191 St N.W. 11 Ave. Area
Four bdrms, two baths.
Section OK! 305-754-7776
20027 N.W. 32nd Place
Three bdrms, one and half
bath, $1366 , security deposit
required. Section 8 preferred.
Call 954-547-9011.
20061 NW 14 PLACE
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances. 786-356-1686
20922 NW 39 AVENUE
MIAMI GARDENS
Large, three bedrooms, one
bath, central air. Pets OK.
$925 monthly. Call:
305-975-0840
2436 N.W. 66 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1350 mthly. 786-399-8557
2441 N.W. 104 ST
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Call 786-238-3071
2531 N.W. 131 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1700 mthly. 954-704-0094
25872 S.W. 133rd Place
Three bdrms, two baths, one
car garage, air, tiled, Section
8 welcome.
786-443-5367
288 N. W. 51 t. Street
Three bedrooms, two bath
house $900 monthly Aii
appliances included Call
Joel
786-355-7578

2902 N.W. 162 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1500 monthly. Section 8
OK.
305-510-2841
3030 NW 163 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fully tiled, central air. $1300,
first, last and security. Section
8, HOPWA, New Norizon.
Ms. Johnson 786-506-1245
3850 NW 174 STREET.
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Newly renovated, brand new
appliances, alarm system,
large fenced yard. Near 826.
Close to schools and bus.
$1600 monthly. $1200 to
move in. Call:
786-277-7310
4021 NW 203 LANE
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath. $1400 monthly, first
and last. 305-623-8422, 305-
773-7445
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.


5158 NW 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, air.
$700 monthly. Call:
305-322-3912
6717 N.W. 6 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
big yard, central air. Section 8
accepted. 786-326-2789
83rd Street N. Miami Ave.
Two bedrooms, two baths.
$800 monthly. Section 8 OK.
Call 305-255-6330
ALLAPPATTAH AREA
Small two bedrooms. $800
mthly, first, last and security.
Not sanctioned for Section 8.
305-836-7306
N.W. 133 St. and 18 Ave
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-754-7776
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
appliances. 786-286-2540
Office Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office Space for rent, from
$300 to $500 monthly.
305-681-9600.

IUnfurnished Rooms
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Rooms starting at $550 to
$600 monthly. 305-319-9830
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
$400 Monthly, Free Utilities.
Dave 786-253-0005
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI GARDENS
Also Miami and Miramar
305-300-7783


GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, plastering and addi-
tions. Call 954-980-4231 or
305-892-0315.
TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing, and leak
repairs. Call 305-491-4515.




BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only
You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a m
and 1 p m Must have reli-
able, insured vehicle and
current Driver License
Apply in person at
The Miami Times
900 N W 54th Street


Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required. 877-471-5682



BE A SECURITY
OFFICER
$60. Be prepared for Super
Bowl employment. Traffic
School, four hours, $28.
786-333-2084


GENE AND SONS, INC.
Custom-made cabinets for
kitchens and bathrooms at
affordable prices. 14140
N.W. 22nd Avenue.
Call 305-685-3565.
i ' - l











8D TH IM'IENVME 5DCME ,2U LCSMS OTO HI W ETN


Attn Miami Gardens

Residents only:
If you had issues with the building
dept join our class action suit. Send
name, address and phone # to
Penned by Gece, PO Box 170032,
Hialeah, FL 33017-0032.





* Accidents * Arrests
* DUI 8 Tickets * Bankruptcy
* Criminal Defense * Wills/Probate
* Personal Injury * Divorce/Custody
100's of Lawyers Statewide
1-0-73LEA ca~llfe


TRUST


LIBERTY CITY COMMUNITY REVITALIZATION TRUST

"Working Together to Serve You Better"

PUBLIC NOTICE OF MEETING

A meeting of the Board of Directors of the Liberty City Community
Revitalization Trust will be held:

CHARLES HADLEY PARK
Carrie P. Meek Senior Citizen and Cultural Center
1350 NW 50th Street, Miami, Florida 33142
********* Monday, November 30, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.**********




MIAMI I=


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF SOLICITATIONS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of solicitations for
contract opportunities, which can be obtained through the Department of Pro-
curement Management (DPM), from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dDm.
Vendors may choose to download the solicitation packagess, free of charge,
from our Website under "Solicitations Online". Internet access is available at
all branches of the Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors
visit our Website on a daily basis to view newly posted solicitations, adden-
dums, revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW Ist Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an additional
$5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper copy of the
bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.

Miami-Dade County has streamlined the process for accepting bids and
proposals by requiring vendor affidavits only once - at the time of
vendor registration.

Starting June 1, 2008, vendors will be able to provide required affidavits one
time, instead of each time they submit a bid or proposal. Solicitations adver-
tised after June 1st will require that all vendors complete the new Vendor Reg-
istration Package before they can be awarded a new County contract. Obtain
the Vendor Registration Package on-line from the DPM website.

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the
following:


IFB NO. 145119


INVITATION FOR BID FOR PRINTER AND
SCANNER REPAIR SERVICES, CITYWIDE


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2009

Detailed scope of work and specifications for this bid are available at the
City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.miamiqov.com/
procurement Telephone No. 305-416-1958.
Deadline for Request for Clarification: Monday December 7 2009 at 5:00


- u- l 12 lul I XU-4UU-- lfl _al>. M. I U 1.. .. mVIV ]Ucly, , f , . C IL ).U
P.M.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE
NO.12271.
Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 008107


Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
r INFANTS. CHILDREN. AND TEENAGERS
r' ' ti .rntsreaSoce i * -1 or we n oldest pediatric Practices
i, n; 0'jae 'Lur * I �0 . years of Child Care
WEBSITE
Sw.rozalynhpaschalmd.com
NORTHSIDE PLAZA .PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 * Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 * Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2Ave. Ste 203
N. Miami Beach FL 33169 * 305-652-6095


Pregnant? LOW COST ABORTIONS
Local or general Anesthesia
TERMINATION UP TO 22 WEEKS
Open Monday thru Saturday
ALBA MEDICAL CENTER
4210 Palm Ave * Hialeah, Florida
Call: 305-827-3412
20% discount with AD


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE FOR CONSTRUCTION BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, for the projects listed herein, until 2:00 P.M. local time,
Tuesday, the 151_ day of December 2009 at 1450 N.E. Second Avenue, Room 351, Miami, Florida, following which time and place,
or as soon thereafter as the Board can attend to same, the said bids will be publicly opened, read and tabulated in the Board Auditorium,
Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building, by an authorized representative of the Board. Award of the contract will be
made to the lowest, pre-qualified responsible bidder for the actual amount bid considering base bid as listed in the bidding documents.
The Board will award the contract based upon the result of the tabulations as covered by applicable laws and regulations.

PROJECT NO. 00390000
CONTRACTS RTB09-C1 & RTB09-C2
ROOFING TERM BID
VARIOUS FACILITIES
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

DAVIS-BACON ACT LABOR STANDARDS:

This Project may be funded in whole or in part under the provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 or other
Federal funding program. Therefore, the Bidder shall comply with all applicable, provisions of 40 U.S.C. �276a-�276a-7, the Davis-
Bacon-Act, as supplemented by the Department of Labor regulations (29 C.F.R., part 5 "Labor Standards Provisions Applicable to Con-
tracts Governing Federally Financed and Assisted Construction"). Accordingly, the Base Bid and Alternate Bids for this Project shall be
in full compliance with the aforementioned provisions as further described in the Contract Documents and all bids shall be calculated
in compliance with the Davis-Bacon Act wage determination applicable to this Project. Under the Davis-Bacon Act, contractors are
required to pay laborers and mechanics not less than the minimum wages specified in a wage determination made by the Secretary of
Labor, which wage determination will be attached to and incorporated into the Construction Bid documents. The award of a construction
contract is conditioned upon the Bidder accepting the wage determination.

CONE OF SILENCE:

Pursuant to Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance of the Legal Advertisement and end-
ing at such time as the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to award or approve a contract, to reject all bids
or responses, or otherwise takes action which ends the solicitation and review process. Any violation of the Cone of Silence may be
punishable as provided for under Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, in addition to any other penalty provided by law. All written communica-
tions must be sent to the Project Architect/Engineer, -- Landera Associates, PA 7500 S Red Road, Suite D, Miami, Florida 33143, and
a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.

NOTICE & PROTEST PROCEDURES:

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in Board Rule 6Gx13- 3C-1.11, and in accordance with �
120.57(3), Fla. Stat. (2002), shall constitute a waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes. Any person who is adversely
affected by the agency decision or intended decision shall file with the agency a notice of protest in writing within 72 hours after the
posting of the notice of decision or intended decision. Failure to file a notice of protest or failure to file a formal written protest within the
time permitted shall constitute a waiver of proceedings. With respect to a protest of the terms, conditions, and specifications contained
in a solicitation, including any provisions governing the methods of ranking bids, bids, or replies, awarding contracts, reserving rights of
further negotiation, or modifying or amending any contract, the notice of protest shall be filed'in writing within 72 hours after the posting
of the solicitation. In either event, the protest must include a bond in accordance with the provisions of F.S. 255.0516 and Board Rule
6Gx13- 3C-1.11. The formal written protest shall be filed within 10 days after the date the notice of protest is filed. The formal written
protest shall state with particularity the facts and law upon which the protest is based. Saturday, Sundays, and state holidays shall be
excluded in the computation of the 72-hour time periods established herein.

JESSICA LUNSFORD ACT

The successful Bidder shall fully comply with the AJessica Lunsford Act@ and all related Board Rules and procedures as applicable.

The Pre-Bid Conference has been scheduled for Wednesday, December 2nd at 10:00 AM at MDCPS Div. of Roofing, 12525 NW
28th Avenue, Opa-Locka, Florida

PRE-BID CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE BY THE BIDDER OR ITS QUALIFIED REPRESENTATIVE IS HIGHLY ENCOURAGED


THIS PROJECT IS OPEN ONLY TO THOSE BIDDERS WHICH HAVE BEEN PRE-QUALIFIED BY THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA. PRIOR TO BIDDING


The advertisement is for the award of two (2) Term Bid Contracts (hereinafter called "Term Bid"). A Term Bid is a competitively bid,
unit price indefinite quantity contract. It includes a collection of detailed repair and replacement tasks with specifications that require
unit prices. It is placed with Contractor for the accomplishment of repairs and replacement of various roofing systems throughout the
District. Ordering is accomplished by means of issuance of individual Work Orders against the contract.

The Term Bid awarded under this solicitation will have a minimum value of $50,000 and a maximum initial value of $1,500,000, with
three (3) possible extension of $1,500,000 within each term. The term of the contract will be twelve (12) months and may include two
(2) renewal options for one (1) additional year each. It is the current intention of the Board to award two (2) Term Bid Contracts under
this solicitation. However, the Board reserves the right to make additional awards under this solicitation for a period of one hundred
and eighty (180) days after the opening of bids.

These contracts are only open to those bidders which have been pre-qualified for the maximum potential value of the Term Bid Contract
by the School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida.

Pre-qualified bidders may obtain one (1) or two (2) sets of bid and contract documents from the office of MDCPS DIVISION OF
ROOFING. 12525 NW 28 Avenue, Miami, FL 33167 (305) 995-7955 on and after November 23. 2009, with deposit of $75.00 - Non
Refundable per set, (Cashier's Check or Money Order, Payable to The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida). Deposits will
be retained by The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida.

The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Alberto M Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132
Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be opened and read at the Miami-Dade County School Board Administration Building.
Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date designated. Bid forms on
which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT
MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address above,.telephone
(305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the scheduled Board
meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be available in the DI-
VISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The Board reserves
the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of a
solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-
1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-
3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."




RFP - Workers Compensation and Third Party Liability
RFP 006-KK10 1/26/2010 Claims Administration Services
Commercial Leasing of Paved Parking Facilities at
021 -KK10 12/15/2009 Fienberg/Fisher K-8 Center
RFP - State Legislative Consultant
RFP 019-KK10 12/8/2009

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
By: Mr. Alberto M. Carvalho
Superintendent of Schools


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIME S, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 20091









9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


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10D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 25-DECEMBER 1, 2000


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...... ....Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers


Tight budgets mean some prisoners go light on meals


By John Tuohy

The inmates at Plainfield Correc-
tional Facility east of Indianapolis
can't be accused of getting a free
lunch. Or any lunch at all. At least
on some days.
The medium-security prison has
eliminated lunch on Fridays, Satur-
days and Sundays - part of a pilot
program that could go statewide.
The Indiana Department of Cor-
rection (DOC) insists it's not about
saving money but what's in the best
interest of prisoners. The move is be-
ing criticized by national civil rights
groups and lawmakers.
"Denying food or cutting back on
meals is beneath the dignity of the
state of Indiana and is not in sync
with our Hoosier values," said state
Sen; Mike Delph, R-Carmel. Delph is
chairman of the state Senate correc-
tions subcommittee.
Indiana Department of Correction
spokesman Doug Garrison said the
department has received few com-
plaints since rolling out the changes
last month.
Because of tight budgets, a hand-
ful of other states have cut meals to
save money. Georgia inmates don't
get lunch on the weekends, ac-
cording to the Associated Press,
and Ohio is considering ending
its weekend breakfasts. Other
states have thinned menus or lim-
ited items such as milk and fresh
fruit.
Indiana prison officials said the
driving force here was to give pris-
oners more classroom and recre-
ational time.
"Serving meals is a time-con-
suming effort that takes hours,"
Garrison said. "By eliminating one
meal, we are able to operate our
programs more efficiently."
Elizabeth Alexander, director
of the American Civil Liberties
Union's National Prison Project,
said cutting lunch creates "a tre-
mendous gap between meals."
"Making prisoners go hungry for
long periods is not the way to solve
anything," she said. "Food is not
the place to make cuts, especially
since it is such a small percentage


of a prison's budget."
Food service accounts for about
5% of the Department of Correc-
tion's $726 million budget in 2010,
according to the House Ways and
Means Committee.
The new meal plan in Indiana
combines breakfast and lunch
and is served beginning at 6
a.m., said Kevin Mulroony, Plain-
field Correctional spokesman. Din-
ner is served 10 hours later, at 4
p.m. Lunch is served at 11:30 a.m.
Monday through Thursdays.
Gil Holmes, executive director of
the American Civil Liberties Union
of Indiana, said the organization
was aware of the change but had
not received any complaints from
prisoners.
Until it does, the ACLU of Indi-
ana probably won't take any ac-
tion, Holmes said.
The DOC said the pilot program
would last an indefinite length of
time and is being reviewed to deter-
mine other prisons where it might
work. Eventually, all 30 prisons in
the system could switch to the new
eating schedule, Garrison said.
DOC officials said inmates can
always get chips, cookies and Ra-
men noodles in the commissary
to tide them over between meals.


Prisoners have to pay for those.
"You'd be amazed at what prison-
ers can do with a bag of Ramen,"
Mulroony said. "It's as good as any-
thing served in a restaurant."


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