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1961 TEN CENTS EIGHTEEN PAGES
3dTH YEAK, NO 20 MIAMI, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, MARCH 11,

.,. -



Miami Deck Loaded for'PattersonJohansson






Fight



Miami Is bursting at the"
i seams with a heavy Influx ot
Uy visitors and g'1t fans her for'
r NEWS PICKS Atlanta the big showdown Monday night

HART ON ALL-- Boycott Beach at Convention Hall on Miami.

World Champion Floyd Patterson -
CITY TEAMErnest
and tho bl! Sw"'c'e Tnpemar
Hart, star guard of Wins Stores Glue inThe Johansson, have trained to a
t ti the Carver Hornets, has bean ; razor sharp edge and are merely

named to the 1961 Miami News no1iahn! r up their arsenals aa
all.star basketball team. It is the Atlanta sit-In and result I stores next .fall. they await the opening gong
"econd time that a Negro has ing boycott of downtown stores The Atlanta desegregation/ ,ett.ement The setup is perfect Each
been named to an all-city team I won a significant and important ,followed months of sit man has walked out of the ling
::. ..."r ,- ::' ff. selected: by the local dallies. victory this week when downtown In demonstrations, boycotts and in previous encounter! the victor
,+ 'f i 'f 'IhW t..1 Last year Carver's' Jimmie"Peachhead" businessmen capitulated picketing of downtown stores. by a knockout. This is the

,Pretty Barbara Ranson le I one Douglas, the sprjnt$ I and agreed to desegregate their Negro leaders agreed to urge rubber match and all the stop
of the contestant In the Miss sensation who beat the University their followers to cease such activities pers have been pulled,
Rhomanla Contest This projects of MlamlV Hobby Sher, was of Miami pending voluntary desegregation F oyd, who has become the
annually sponsored by Sigma. named to the News all'el y track e.on of the University consideration of lunch counters and toast of Miami belch with his
leas him'under facilities next fall quiet spoken, winning personality
Gamma Rho Sorority as its team. break the color other
scholarship effort The project The 6'1, 165 Ib. Hart Is a the athlete to teams. The agreement is pegged to seems fatter than ever although
with the activities senior and has averaged 25.2 bar on UM athletic the scheduled September deseg- he will come in heavier
also helps mention on
geared to curve juvenile de'in- points a game. Hart Is a B stu- Getting honorable' Wayne Lee regation of Atlanta public than in any previous fight' ., expecting
excellent quarter the News team were federal court or about 193 IbsI ,
Barbara is one of the d:nt and an Willie Galtor of shools under to we'gh
quency. It is rum of Mays and Some of tho boys Collins:
ladles vicing for bac'c: on the gridiron. der. on
the many title.young ored that Coach Andy Qustat- North Dade. I Ave, are saying Ineo will fight
CAGETOURNEY out of a crouch this t'me' and
STATE
probably 'crowd the charflpton

.AT Monday night
New style or not, the smart.
LEGISLATURE TO STAND PAT POMPANO money boys are lavin! 3.1 nn',

West Floyd, and many feel the Swedewon't
"Defending Champion ,ibe around after the sixth)
Palm Beach Roosevelt and 16 round.

other, 'hIgh school basketball Joe Louts, ex-heavywlght

LAWSy teams are entered in the state champ has ,been .In town for_a
RACIAL .f.1. ,. f
Thura-
ON
; tournament that"-beganr week and seems! to be leaning
day in the Blanche: E'y High toward Patterson Other sports

gym in Pompano Beach, figures seen around town are
Attorney General Richard Er On Friday morning at 8:30: Goose Tatum and Satchel Paige
Vln of Florida, :while attendinga Washington (Port St. Joe)
board meeting of the Wood Voided meets! Lincoln (Tal'ahassee) and 'Wh
Sentence against, Roosevelt ( ) nt
men of the World In Miami this King ; at 9:50, Roosevelt (Lake Wales) 130, and Miami Carver plays
week, said he wl.l advise the takes on Methane (Alachua.) Howard (Ocala) at 2:60.
continues I
to stand First round play
Legislature this year
The tournament continues
where it is on racial legislation. through Friday afternoon, Then
through Saturday night.
Supreme"The decisions Court (on of desegregation the U. S.- I Still on the Limb Rosenwald (Panama City) goes.

) haven't ,been too abruptfor
of Appeals
Court
Florida," he stated "I recommend The Georgia
Dr. Martin
that
has ruled
nothing further to the
1961 Legislature in the segregation SIT-IN FIGHTIN Luther King was Illegally sen
tenced to 12 months on a chargeof Y
fte d.
state license
driving without a
The state's pupil assignment TALLAHASSEEIn but did not give him a
law "has been working very clean bill
,well," Ervin said the City Court at Tallahassee
Except for the graduate Tuesday two Negroes and The case goes back to Dekalb

schools at the University of Fla. five whites pleaded not guilty to County Superior Court where .
and the limited Integration of charges resulting from disorders the minister could still get 121 I F

schools in the Miami area. Flor which developed in a *lt-ln dem months or a probated sentence. ,
The case wo reversed on a legal LA
ida Is standing still on deeegre' onstration Saturday.
and Den \ technicality.The .
tlon of .choo:". Patricia G. Stephens
The 1959 session wa.i flooded :amln F. Cowlns, the Negroes, misdemeanor statute, under '
with fighting and wan fined $25
with segregation bills, but onlya were charged which King
few unimportant ones passed. engaging in disorderly proceed and one year In a pubic works
said he would not urge camp provided for a sentence of
Erwin '
the adoption of the parent option Ings.The whites, Nathaniel l E, War six months in jail, six months in'
plan a proposal which man and his sisters Elsie and a public works camp, |600 fine,

would have allowed parents to Natalie, were charged with assault or all three

withdraw their children from Integrated and battery on a police of J)r. King's case attracted more
schools and receive fleer. than national attention last fall
school operating funds, about After the hearing, City Judge and he was sent an expression
UOO each, if the children at' John Rudd did not set the date of .sympathy by presidential 'candidate -

tended private schools. for the trial John F Kennedy,
EniD Is not sure of the con I Cowlns and a white youth .
I The alt in demonstrations, boy-
stltutlonality of a bill SenatePresident fought as he and Patricia were
Randoph: Hodges leaving the store after a .ft.fD cotta and picketing of downtown ,

wants to Introduce to expel any demonstration, police tald The stores which Rev caused King Atlanta has r
have
student or faculty member of a white youth ran. Severa white supported
to desegregate
university taking youths attacked a police sergeant businessmen to agree
stat upported
-
scratched his neck. their stores next fall.
part in racial demonstrations and _

$




I Orioles Integrate" Stadium fIi a _jf; _



morning Reeves could call Jimmie Hilton Reeves
Thursday
credit
Times takes
The Miami
.
Mils a.so told Dunn that a picket
called Jack Dunn, Orioles: __
for prompting the Baltimore and asked line would greet him Sunday If -a. ., .-...- r ----.. /
Miami Stad tant general manager '
turn Orioles for to their Integrate exhibition baeba'.lgimea. : that they reconsider their dec-! ho failed to reconsider would /JTTAS CHOOSE MRS ETHEL I IIRUIUS I leah, was the unanimous: choiceof
lion to continue the segregated Dunn told Reeves he "WOMAN OP YBAU" the Zeta women M their 1960
Oarth seating In view of action taken "a1' him right back. "Woman of The Year."
editor, audience
Time managing Bradenton and Sure enough, Mr. Dunn called Defore an appreciative I left to right, Mrs.
Howard Klein by the Brave In and Top, from
t. Reeves read of Miami Gree'ts, patrons
and said the
Wednesday's the Yanks and Cardinal In 8tPetpr.burg back In 30 minutes Rosetta Vickers, Mrs. Cora
In Zeta Chapter
bertr'a column their stadium had been Integrated, friends, Beta Tau Durtn Mrs.
in Integrating Mrs. Ruby
the Orioles badchoaen Beta Sorority culver
Miami News that I of Zeta Phi
ticket members
the stadium segregated stands for the spring. training .i and he had Informed man I unfolded their sloe.Ing Edna Williams and Mrs. Eunice
keep
to Inc.
ager Jack McGowan to sell! tickets participants for
Jimmie Hilton games. of Liberty, panel
although Stad in observance
In Miami program
for the City of Dunn told Reeves he was only for any seat Week. Mrs. the program.
Welfare Director Womanhood
with \local po'lcy.! turn to Negroes. Finer Mrs. Margaret' Miller,
along Bottom:
where going
Miami' said he didn't care the Oriole Ethel O. Primus, pioneer principal
.intone .alts. According to nil'ton. Reeves told Dunn the local poi See ,you Sunday the at third base of the James Weldon Johnson Mrs. Ethe: Gates Primus Zeta.-. ..: '
and If Pirate on
; "we let the Orioles do what I Icy wt now to Integrate, game Elementary School of Hla See ZETAR page 13
his word he line.
they want." be did not take




J

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.' essw.

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-
SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961Feature
PAGE 2 THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI., FLORIDA.- ._ _.
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"., ,:... Inc. Presents
. Sports, ,

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: The Champion'


S'e ( i e5.
? 1 5 tr ,' d
FL YOPATTER q

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n'a.y
y n
And .

,
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The Challenger


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'E s s, J'' s e S II, E"AR_ ,

1,97&',HF' e >'4; 'Y
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InI I

;;',x.P ..'xh '
S
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I R
;? .95 z ;

< ,. In The Showdown

r.*1 ;.
1i Fl


or 8 VVWI

I

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am Ions I I :




MONDAY, MARCH 13 .
l-

e Miami Beach Convention Hall J


TICKETS: Ringside $100 Raised Ringside $50 Arena $20

ALL SEATS RESERVEDNOW
ON SALE AT SIR JOHN HOTEL,276 N.W.6TH STREET-FR 33381AND
THE MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION HALL
CHOICE SEATS AVAILABLE Tv BLACKOUT IN MIAMI AREA

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THE MIAMI TIMES-MIAMI, FLORIDA

NEGRO PRESS TO OBSERVE 3'w?
SATURDAY,. MARCH 11, 1961 PAGB -




134TH ANNIVERSARY Shell's Sit-In Case Next I I


'jfrbfi: National N8wBP per idb- The Norfolk Journal and Guide, newspapers indicated the purpose APPEAL HEARING -
ll 1i Associatltin has arinodnc and Atdss 11. ttetidri: director, to which they were dedi -- I f fA
that
ed the week df Match 19- The Moss H. Ketidri Organisa cated. In addition to Freedom's - -
25 will: be observed as National tion, Washington, fi. d. Mr. Journal, there were' such desig REFUSED
Negro Newspaper Week, while Kendrlx directed the week durIng nation's AI nights of All, Mirrorof
special observances will be pro- the years 1938-43, while Liberty, Elevator, Clarion and Washington The Supreme
moted March 16 in tribute to the approaching is the 23rd an Genius of Freedom. "It 1. quite Court Monday unanimously re
the founding of the first Negro nual observance of the Negro appropriate," notes Mr. Stanley, fused to act on an appeal by 12 i H
newspaper, Freedom's Journal, 'Press Week celebration. Organ "that in turbulent times like persona arrested during two sit i
which appeared in New York izations and institutions throughout these the NNPA would suggestto in demonstrations at a white
City on March 16, 1827. the nation will observe the the Negro press that it re- lunch counter in Tallahassee.It .
founder's day and week. examine the role of a minority was the first time the high b
John H. Sengstacke, NNPA The names of early Negro press." tribunal had been asked to rule
president and head of the Chi. on a case growing out of a wave Q s ,,
sago Dally Defender and The of sit-in demonstrations in the
Defender Publications, Inc., this South.In .

Week,tht Called institutions rested upon In all the and organizations "futher-individuals Court Tells Little Rock to American Miami Civil an Liberties official of Union the

said the was "disappointed"
group
ance 6f the democratic ideal
to that the high court declinedto
Join with the nation's Negro hear the Tallahassee case. lIe
)dress iti observing: its 134th an Speed Up Integration reported the ACLU will seek to
*
niveh ry" 1 Fre dom'a Journal present a similar case to the tri
was founded by John ittwswurm .... bunal.
and the Itev. Samuel i Cornish. LOUIS .
ST. The :Eighth U.S.
"We have another case-the
NNPA has designated "The Roleof WE MAKE 'YOURPICTURE
Circuit Court of Appeals' has
Shell City which hopeto
case we
the American Minority Pressin ruled the Little Hock, Ark., Miamian AcceptedAs try before the court," com
a World of Unrest" ,
as press school board must speed desegregation
up
mented Howard Dixon, ACLU
week theme. of the city's schools. NCCY Research Florida chairman. While you wait ......

"Through the ages," noted The court held: that constitutional Assistant ....__ .. Only $1.00
Mr. Sengstacke, "Negro newspapers
and rights of Negro pupils had DAVID JEWELERS'
have stood willingly
actively ready to serve the been violated by proceedurea. Thirlee Smith Jr., of Miami Get your protection today 1188 N.W. 3rd Avenue
democratic used in making assignments to was accepted by the National
needs of this great
various schools under the Ar Committee for Children and Call HI 5-2516 Phone FR 4-1522
nation. In both of the World
Wars, the Negro element of the kansas Pupil Placement Act. Youth as their Research Assistant Life Insurance of Florida -- -- -- .....i
American Fourth Estate gave The appeals court thus in charge of student projects - :-- -
up-
of its on the National Level. lie Selling Living Benefits
every reassurance complete held arguments by attorneys for
: and unselfish devotion to 14 Negro .pupils who had contended is the son of Mr. and Mrs. '.... JOIN THE NAACP!
Thirlee Smith of 1611 NW 64th -- ---
the American way of life. Today that the board had established ,
this devotion : St. --
to the national "a governmental
cause I is no less articulate, while
framework to prevent desegrega I
He is a graduate of Fisk U.
the Negro press must likewise tlon." I in International Service. He was
serve its traditional purpose and STAR MEAT MARKEl"
recommended for this position
immediate needs of its environ- The appellate court reverseda
the American
ment." Sept. 2 ruling by Federal by University'splacement
Judge John E. Miller of Little office along with
The annual press week eventis Rock, who had ruled: that the other graduate students from
-project of NNPA's Public 'board was in compliance with other colleges in that area. 1520 N.W. 62nd Street
Affairs Committee. Frank L. the law. lie plans to remain with the
Stanley, editor-publieher, The The high court directed Judge NCCY's national office in Wash
Louisville Defender, is chairmanof Miller to retain Jurisdiction, ington until completion of his COURTEOUS SERVICE
the body on which also serve which Miller rejected In his M.A. degree program at American THE MARKET WITH
Thomas W. Young, president, September decision. University.
A
r


U.s. Cities Show that One Third of Fresh Meat-Low Prices

I



its Unemployed are NegroesNEW ', ... :r ,

'I' ,,, .
YORK The number of Urban League called attention to The survey showed that 17.3 y ,, "., '
"
unemployed Negroes in aUS. the prospects of a continuing per cent of Negro workers are
city frequently is .one third of economic downturn with disproportionate Jobless' in Chicago, 6.7 per cent
the total of its Jobless workers, harsh consequences of that city's total unemployment
a National Urban League survey visited upon the worker. rate.
showed. "With Negroes as a rule con In Detroit, the survey reported
The league made the survey centrated near the bottom of 112,000 Negroes are out of
based on figures from local bureaus wage and skill ladders," he work with the total unemployment
of employment, welfare aid, "they Inevitably feel the figure for the city 185,000.
departments and other sources first effects of widespread unem The survey also showed 67-
in 50 U.S. cities. ployment. 000 Negroes Jobless in Philadelphia
Lester D. Granger, national "When Job dlsrlmlnatlon is ; an estimated 80,000 In
executive director of the league, actively practiced by sections of New York; and 36,000 in Los
said, "months ago, the National Industry, both management and Angeles.
:abor, this becomes an unbear- "Government must take the
able 'racial tax' that Negro: first corrective step through aid
SAVE YOUR HAIR I II II workers pay In earning a living to depressed areas," Granger R 9
In America," Granger said. said.DomasMilner,


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i j I PACE 4 : MILLION BEACH OFFER 'I".


I TO DISCUSS $7


A tevett mllllofl Aoliar 4clsioo
I eocfroats the Miami city
r.
.
-- Commi sSofl when It diseussei
.
".. the fat of the }>ropo *4 Vlrglnll
I .{ and rfecreatioac
CooteBtlott
Key
.
; ...
.
.
.
ntef
I .
Alain Office 1 r Seven wUlloa .dollars Is the

branch at 1112 : : total of cash aMd I propertr .Iniproremeati -
I.i
; offerfed tb ihfe City

Garth C. n ee of Miami br the.$pooson of The
Colonnade oil Vlfglila Key, ai--
H_ E. SI > .
cording to f. defiled 4opaierpport

fubmltted to all' City.ind

4MB Metro official two 'weeks ago.
J
0.\t TEJLK *4J50 : 44.
The proposal offer ImmedlaU ,

ZCnttred as Sewnnd ( development of more than ha'f-
.
: untie of ocean frontage plus a
u dam,
; 36 par 3 hole got coarse and

: picnic areis as an outright gift

to tie city of MUat eubiect' to

the provision that It would be

the'O available to all the public without
Some most discrimination

capital cm 1fO
A $50,000 cash deposit goes
an erecntrre with the offer as a rorantee on

discrimination lease payment for approximately -
L. Cain outstanding adjacent to the golf
12 acre
The order Xra. tnta X. ponte was community a.ttalrrIn That would be the site of
itrar one of tie .. Beach was chosen Dune. .
ment co :s. I. garden-type motl-hote.-
criminate .: of tike Tear bj local the Year" by Zeus iall center which would .
ca: ventlon
h
wa not sarpriElas to
Wtek
Womanhood
of the city
gin' in hiring friends who admire there. become the amortization property period of
after an
for
11" outstanding
The order : work and ber keen 30 f'anCost.. of the center Is

Government and iat..rest la "tfrnated at more than $1.000.-

mite on ; and social in Zetadom and for
I
of Beta 000.PlanS the proposal include: \
this j*. aa! honor welfare in
on Equal
'mpl
.
has worked far beyond
motor hotel with J* cottage \
A
"Thronph --, ---------.---. .-...- ------ ............ ...... .. luxurious hotel
,: ,,,,, .... ,.... .. ,., ....... / suites; 154
tend to ensure I room and 10 state apartment

trill hare equal : Along Freedom's RoadBy In the planned roof garden peat-
houses:
menu and with: : A convention ban with 1.000

anent," h< capacity with additional 500
,. I seat
RUTH PERRY ----

The j I ;;O'_,;;;;., ., ;,;;, ;;;;r_ /" seat room capacity areas available available ta la mating the -

ed by lad of ) hotel auxiliary building: -
day I weeired a sole from drra'aUon has fallen away to
fective: WOtt ; old friend Been almost However, It is a
1 of acne, nothing. Restaurant and loxuige rooms
As a result '. -}:""' wbo wits her has- ray of hope In a dark land, that with seating capacity to accommodate

: .>>4.. Alviawere Terr active la 1 I such a paper is being published 15 to 400 people;
ity: group have Miami Branch when they liv- j In Mississippi. Fresh water Olympic sire

to work for the : here They live now la Poe swimming poo. with 20 cabanas.
Arizona, but wbeaerer I In a recent Issue of The Petal
tors. ) golf course and 12 picnic areas
from Mrs. Bercijaaaa: even Paper author John Steinbeck with barbecue pits: maims with
The order Grapes of Wrath." "Of Mice
'
sbe has been away from and dry storage fuel
mans:Jp of t1 'jcllf.Tb"ed ; : about' fro ynar' It rill and Men") bad an article about docking jnd Ice serriee. rental and charter -

Labor to mini the cafortaaate j the qua.iUf's white people expect fishing boat, bait and tackle
tragic: re* oa for their >ar- i iI Negroes to hare. Among other
FponsEbHity for 1 1oct. I things Steinbeck service;
: this urn. said"I: am fish laonth rare
ppi'p, constantly amazed at the qualities Tropical
illuminated pool;
fish In
(! I F13CL PREJUDICE: we expect In Nesroos.': We tropical of landscaping
Botanical garden type
The : expect Negroes to be wiser than
the S acre site.
'I over
partment we are more tolerant than we
X wrote Jart recently In '
are. more dijrnifled l than we. The report predicts.tha.t the
stantial or colama. Necroei. .
an not more' self controlled and self- proposed center would create
'
crly ear who
are dlscrtmi-
pledge. .
disciplined. We even demand completely new tourism for the
a.Ealzt Sa the fl
| t for
i' more talent from them than city of Miami la excess of ,000
There is
] m.. And the Berckmaaas' '
i from oureelres. A Negro must be people annually who. won.d be
from this order : arirtJte: ) are carcaUtSe
ten times as rifted as a whiteto attracted bf"e.a.usetl17 repre
:o be :hired and the war lour Sreeflaan (U we receire equal recognition. We sent economic and cultural
Jln 7>tras* a Mtl $nst; the
expect Negro to hare moreendurance tut.fat present' larpe'y unsatisfied
as the sttSa nlUUon.Rnhr .
NefToe than we in ath'etlcs, with facilities open to
; JaU sen more courage in defeat more their patronage within .the city
>ce Jar' Qteak2a? ort mad acta -
rhythm and Tersatlllty in music of Miami."
,
Dig the aiasit: jvgreraiioa.: or and dancing.
.mCrtlcr any other act of The proposal is the result of
tare became ? or rn1' zsdr My 1nt.- .\ LOT IS EXPECTEDMr a two-year study by the sponsor

frfertnixE ieij. and I bare oflra spoken a group of New Tork hotel m nand
the: Brreksnazas stare they Steinbeck continues: "We
and can iB-J i iPt"e.:1 I i(,i expect Negroes to Investors headed by HowardAronson
obey rules of
I |a2thTirJh I aia but a very with headqxiarters in
years of Secrer wrtterl and both of conduct we flout to be more
N.Y."Rumors .
:\ 5 ff''3 2 ffent wear rery tortn I'I courteous more gallant more I Syracuse,
Con ,
I
Sa IcurwSxx tbeza. %proud more steadfast. In a word and Inaccurate newspaper
game of prow: ;. : : I -- while maintaining that Negroes stories hare led to some

the: i TKiSli 1X) "-NI1 thai there are wry !i i! are' Inferior to us, by our unquestioning misunderstandings of the pro
1 I wnrtd
7*opie Sa thit w a o :
faith In them we Stewart pnbHc -
posal.; reports Jay
as idarvrrity modest of their I|I!
Last Fri : : prove' our eonrictlon that they relations director of the pro-
a3i fa
i I caTtabStttes and M.1are -
are superior In
: many fields, even _
by t gram.
', sad wbo ac stf': a-fut fields
I we are presumed to be
mess ; Ibfftr fatten-Uy and ideas asi I I trained and conditioned In and **A local newspaper ran a banner
seism sad JLMa 1\f'fthnaJtn headline labeling the proposal
osad a large they are not. For example, in We bare
as a Negro holL.
the
I w.m repe-at oar more
the Alabama bus
"hJck if'e boycott we
this pointed out to that editor that
re.* I 'mote Sa co nniaasir knew.
there would be Negro
good iiii. tws years aro v bea they no the Waldorf of New York the
tio' 'nee and there wasn't
the Miami an.lamt ha Mayflower of Washington or the
It cot : The only ()Il"nre..u white
was Ambassador of Los Aage'es
autrtes a frat lo**. be- rtolf1l In the streets
She bad at *.; twv fit 'her< bflFt duress we exPeet could a* accurately be Identified
from
courtesy Necro
tie iad to acre away from when Sy some racial tag since they
by "pretiT even we are' ugly and
&: .. not becanse tber were overlapping. In Little are frequently hosts to everyrace
Rock
bow scrapped : we "
*ft>>e 7.Pi'$.. bat because knew that any bnitaMty would' represented la America
cer ccoznt bO : .rce *cmre, coarxrroca'
originate
the whites. .
among It Some reports Indicated that
there
ings.
Is racial
troub'e, we
are the water wa to be! located oa
tit dar rtttwmtH for an
Wben i1 conrtaced that Negroes will not the present Negro ku Tnreport t
mad who acti as
strike the first blow
win: not submitel to the Council
barve TbHr friends mad
than: 1,000 attack In the aUht will not get locates the project oa the ocean
will alw them aad
oS bomb<, and
ro'.n511. our belief bout frontage more than a ha'f-mll
1ne wt rk: tbr were doiac borne **
by event north of beach
the present Necro
Yon don't : the XAACP_ We w.sb theia
ThU article r Of )lr. with the access" road eary a
'd rjre-S and ro >2 Jortft&e ta StelabeckVorUtaatly
)' have. Those e2maie bKtrr ratted ta their appeared ta the Saturday mile west ot the preeent Negro

bare are add : .. thus is ay,e+mrs the MV : Review, and t>e things beach entrance -

area eiT 'roi then" Asd *e h. has to say are tremendouslyinteresting i "We nave been avid to'taterrtew -

I '. a.t.e: nearly tTOI years, 1T 1 feel. ne ends hhutlele over tOO ;ieadtnc eU'ieas of

O rf'G bd sped by saying"Now. I am a Miami' representing all race
I mad .AITb Feeknma, wr crowa fairly ,..1'.IncatM.. and *nd most nationalities people

<( XataonaBr: : rl h. JVB wen Tsry well I hope iatellUent white man. I who understand the proposal
as he T* the dtesatt: e? kzow that rk>le ce can produce have been onanlmousV favorable
ripped into }l .r1ea wffl sea be the: sane: so trot effect of any kind. And ," Stewart declared "Particularly

1, ciffirg : : it be Ea.1t or Vert. *** It ray child wer spat on and ) those who must eater

: or Socth, sad Az&erlcax tasked, I couldn't trust myself' tats YistUnft political and business -
eoantry. An an be, waxy A2 erteax: tot to ret a ball bat and knock people of tmportaace, and

bas left a bad : Uff they b* black o2'rlau' ." oat a few brains But I trust t>oe whose buRe Is of a national

irilte officers ;Negroes act to and they atrenXo or 'International aatvre,**
TCTAl. FATni t think mucS of tho'f" schoolcaPdrea :
officer: beat b : : In Little Rack a
There is a Hctl t r mrer Hall handful who
'I be asked them I carry the
VUIMATKTStTS
erejy two+ weV, tad w..i sad conxleac' the hopes MAMI
clean tie !' hH be4 ta of aH .
up ( Jlbl'lNn Rat.
{ ant fntares ot ntllllons 11th.1'' The Mott R.". >Frauds Wtlkia,
I ironic part of
exonerated the i* aa '1 : cn I Cuba came to Miami last wek
.tinarrest: ranse. *4 )II'. Eu1'5: 3btn
hart in them
knowing
they cone" to officiate at the rawer: of theI
ami- fer a SoeUrtrae1. the of sack wtotk.- I i R, T. Richardi Der *uj -






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-_""" ",," -.r..lU\ 'd" "'>>'" ,, FL6kifcA
A ... t'i' frio" I OPA LOQKA THE' MIAMI TIMES' MIAMI, ...

':;: 'iiS and 'j 1! \,\1': HEALTH' CLUB I I SATURDAY,,MARCH. 11 r, 1961 PAGE 6

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.. :.raw'..."'i'I):..';. 'TIUT-.;., ",. ., .;\,.:. _,''- ',-;_, '* 'flf 1.""iI"I. ':;::;""" ,,,j:i & Kennedy ;Orders Halt to.


V;' :* i/fi;:,, ; 41 ,

,\. .... By RUTH N. POLITE ...,, .: ; ;

.,. -?.. _-....._ ,, iFRIENDS. > Job Discrimination
-------

Do not keep the and 'JULiUS T. LEE' as teachers
:alabaster box' of your love and of the month. The ,kind' ,expresstous W WASHINGTON;. \*- 1'i'efdeut
tenderness sealed up until your Kennedy 'set Up a new ''committee .
,' indicating the selections
k-;, + -. went) within thb government and
;:friends are dead. Fill their lives were ode Ightful. Congratulations Monday -jotbacked with with ,the Kennedy
:with eweetne Speak' approving I I \\j Under the guidance of sanctions tc) f; prevent racial said. government
cheering words while their Mrs.: :MAVME WILLIAMS and ,- ". .. t"," discrimination ';' government
ears can hear them and while other, sponsors, the third con I. ,,. ,v, hiring and in .1tl4ilg I by private
"I'I
their hearts can be thrilled and ference of Florida Futurereachers' .H ,,,, t firms ,doing business with the.
: :
.,made happier. The kind things 'of America convenedat :.t, i,; .... government. '_. RUPTURE-EASER
pod may mean to say when they BTW. Janice Maycock is "" It was the flrsf action in thefla'd IJ*.IM.U t r...cx.(*etpr S..w"H.,
are gone,, say them before they ;jreddent: of 'She group Candidates for "Mr.. Physical of civil rights taken by
.go The flowers you mean to That elegant bridge'luncheon Fitness" Contest, 8 p.m. Satur Kennedy since his' Inauguration.He : ?

'send for their coffin send themto liven by Mrs. C" S. (Mamie) day April' 29.at. Carpenters Issued an executive order ,,
brighten and sweeten their THOMPSON Wednesday morningwas Union'' Hall 2939 NW 46th It. i
which he said DotubidS
homes before leave them To qualify' Pose, military created greatly t
they in honor of, a,.-.rand Chicago strengthened for
Let clean and jerk machinery deal. Right or Left H.Sid. .
unlearn to anoint our 'ouple Mr. and Mrs. WILL press snatch
Ing with racial
friends while they are yet among 3ORDON. Both are retired. He bench press. ,Deadline for all In employment.or religious discriminAtion hOWl 5495 .'ItfII. .Ir.,,

the ,giving; Post-mortem klndne! fas a member ,of,, "Chicago'sFinest. entries .is Thursday, April 27. The order combined the AlGII1o form-flttlnj wh bl. support"
does not che r. the burden heart" ,I ." She was 'an outstandinge To enter see Zealc: the muscle President's Committee on Oov. for rtducibl IntuinM hernia Bnrk I.rled
flowers, on the coffin cast noI 'char in the Chicago school djuitkbl* Snaps up In front AdJunUblc
)Wilder at 1995 NW 162nd St. he Soft ,
ernment Employment Policy and itrap. JIM from pAd No steel l (lr"ather
,ft fragrance backward over the system Incidentally Mr. Qor- or call MU 13667. The pubic the President's Committee on bands. roe men women and cMU
weary way.PEOPLE. ion lj the brother of the late drew. Mall .rd." fir "'".ur. around
is Invited. A29 ..
Government Contracts Into a U Ml part .( abdomta, scats right left
t W Gordon first 'prIncipal of new "Committee on Equal Employment NL. ....1..
A delightful Booleer: T. '
visitor Washington II i g hchoo. "
Opportunity J.&J. 1MIUG DI:I'T. STORE
in t"e'c'ty' Is Mrs. .
Guests
CLAY of JOSEPH > at the bridge- Reaves March 8; Carl L. Johnson "Through this v ,a s t 1 > 1410 N.W. 02nd St.
Chicago.
She is the uncheon were Mesdames Essie -
Eunah Farrington March strengthened machinery, I in Miami Fin.
house gu ;
9: Alvin Sanders, Erma Fred. tend to ensure that American
Samuel Johnson, Mrs. Cleveland Jal.oway:: : second; ''Hazel Brown '
rick Juanita Mann Thelma of all colors and beliefs wll.
\ Simpson gave' a luncheon in her Jlevelaqd, Ohio ,winner of theh Knox 10; Betty Bullard Vera have equal access to employ' Advertise! It Pays!
honor on Tuesday. Invited 1 r d prize; ''Mabel Matthews
\ Hicks 11; Lillie P. Dorsett
nt8ts were Mesdames Clydr Vdel, Md.; Bessie\ Slater Pearl Frankie Shumake Charnette

Klllpns. Luther Alford S. M Stirrup W. B., ,Sawyer. Luther Muldrow John C. Davis, Bernice ..
Frazier Evelyn Thomas Luclllr Uford Tomothy LIndsey Clyde Johnson Sylvia Lambert '
,"Rlf\u and I. 0. Pratt ( ..
The Cllletis Margaret Dunn. 12; ,George Sands, Mildred :', .
with' bus'nwe man, CHARLES The James E. Scott Community, AmttlngShark
Washington Judith Crawford
: BARNETT of Nassau is in towr Vssoclatlon would like for youo 13; E.mlra: Fannln Sharal D Chtnntll
\on huHnrps and a needed 'rest attend the annual membership Johnson Nathaniel Dames 14; "U S Dancing Porpo/i..l

- whl'e here he is, the house guest! neetlng and buffet supper plan- A. J, Shootnst, Horace. Simms, .: r o Circus of the D..pl
*be his niece, Mr!. Jovcelyn Bur led especially ,for you and you Nel'le Nicholson 15 Non-Stop Action
rouehs ", Two distinguished Lt 7200 NW 22nd ave. on Wed. S SAM to Sundownl
militant gentlemen; A. PHILIP vening, March 16. You may calL BELATED Birthday greetingsto ,
Tt""1.DOJPII and BEN McLAU ) 4791 for reservations. Do ctrr SHOPl'
Mrs. Elizabeth B. Douglas It'.n non'lop cam circuit
RTN who are prominent in all St. Patrick's Day celebrations who was 87 years young March SNACK BARCAMERA
APTXJIO clre'es: took time out are in 'the air. The ".000 fMtttUe,living xMM I,
1. Mrs. Douglas Is the mother SHOP
.,. whirl of 0xcN nl;ntf
Guidance In .ndl"g '
:from convention chores to re- Spiritual Temple of of Madge Portier and Arthesea
o'' ne'V old friendships Mrs. Willie Truth La sponsoring a ,Musical "TT." Hubert. ONIPIIICEcov..U
Mae Murray had them In for Sip at the home of Mrs. Doris CflQURRIUmCIO I show and ixhiblttlCommrlyiUyiltdiyl t

,,d'rnT one evening .. The j, Stephens on Sunday Mr. 'THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK: ,
.LEON ROBIN ONS and the ind Mrs PERCY SHARPE Jr., If you would judge understand. ON 'O".N.\CI" OAUetiWA1 ChlldriB undtr I FREE
ARENCE HUDSONS returned have an addition to their faml- Seneca M'H".O.OI' DOWNTOWN MIAMI) 1.14 half pries
'home to Evanston Ill, after y. It is a baby! girl Michelle
having made the famed {Yvonne She arrived Feb 21 and
'Circle Trip" whin Includes weighed 4% ,pounds. Congratulations
surh plate as Nassau and, Jamaica I 1 Word _has come
Mr. Hudson has been that Mrs. ANNIE MAE TWJNE BIG BIG BIG DISCOUNTS
purchasing' agent for Cook is improving steadily She shouldbe ,
County School Board for 44 out' of the hospital and back

,,a years.pleasant He is retirement looking forward shortly to ;come any day now. AT'BEAtOM'' MIAMI'S, NEWEST fURNITURE STORE

Guests at Ann's QueitHoiw JOURNEY'S END. The Rev. .
BEACOM IS FAMOUS
,
(Ann LIndsey) are Mrs. Richard DeVeaux, ,May he rest ,
HELEN HILL of. Pittsburg and In peace. To the',bereaved faral- FOR BIG 5 PIE CEDISCoUNTS
Mr. and Mrs LEON WALKER. y: Think of your loved one asa '
They worshipped on Sunday at wanderer whose work Is done __ BEDROOM
the Church of the Open Door. whose troubles now are past
Miss NELLIE yMOORE, hosted entering gladly: through that
Cwest Club Tuesday evening at friendly door to peace and rest $
their regular meeting. President and love to "Home at last" 88You
MENA JACKSON made a stirring
report on the meeting of IN MGMORf AM. Henry West.,
the City Federation of Colored March 12, 1960.BIRTHDAY .
Women's Clubs which met at just CAN'T find lower
her Coconut Grove home a* GREETINGS:
guests of Cwest Club Dor- Mrs Lenora Johnson, Carl W1I-: ;g; prices, easier term: $10.64
ley Junior High School students (Urn*, Jane D. Lewis, Willie Mae _, down delivers '6 drawer

seected: Mrs. THELMA GREEN Murray, Marie Rlou, Jefferson DOUBLE DRESSER with I

MIRROR, 4 drawer CHEST

and 2 Hollywood HEADBOARDS -

WOW!
5 PCS. $88

_

SOFA BED CHAIR
'
'u. : ra' r--- -

AM _'_ 7_' I_ 3 TABLES, 2 LAMPS

'; .yes:1p : A I

$88


\ .

r' r ,: r 7 PIECES

ALL THIS for $10.64 down and

: $7.74 month it'* like havinga

__ friend at the factory. You can

,' ,. ,,J lit well and sleep well starting

: TODAY and for many years


Listed Are Floor Samples. One-of-a-kind. All as-is

.- r MATTRESS BANGED-UP CONVERTIBLESOFA

AND SPRING OVERSTUFF'EDARM BED

------ CHAIRS
The Miami chapter of the National I I I The .ocal Ilalr-Weev chapter $1.2TWIN $10IF
Hair-Weev Association U a business organization designed
i I $5
was formed on March 5 at theM for the purpose of coordinating SIZE ONLY NEW $49
and II. Hair.Weer and Beauty the efforts of all licensed
Sa; 1172 NW 62nd ,t. Halr-Weev technicians In the
on,
owned and operated by Mrs. Miami area thereby creating a OPEN DAILY UNTIL 730, SATURDAY AND!' SUNDAY TIL 6

Mildred Frane .. Down from better working relationship
Hair-Weev's home office In among the technicians.
Beacom Furniture Co
Cleveland Ohio to officiate this I Seated, first row: Sallle Co'-
occasion was Inventor and general 1'ns secretary: Mary F. Dixon
director Dr. Swanee Preston president; Emma Summersett.
Jr. vice president; Mildred Francis" FRONT ENTRANCE 15 BEACOM BOULEVARD

Wonderful Plans and propess treasurer. Standing Dr.: Christina Swanee REAR ENTRANCE 22 S.W. 22ND AVENUE
were made. The chapter' is lookIng Jenkins, Inventor: -
to the annual National Preston Jr.. national director;
forward
MIAMI 35 PHONE HI
4-6965
Hair.Weev Convention! Ideia Morris, parliamentarian;r 'F.LORIDA.-
which be held In New York Willis Mae Ceasor (not shown), .. .
City In will September of this year public relations and reporter. ,. _'1,' ., .. . ,/



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SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1061
6 THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA



The James E. Scott Community Association Annual


I
: .- ; Statistical Report, 1960

."'\ ..

.. STATEMENT
-: "1.. Group Agg. No. FINANCIAL ...

Group Enrollnment Na Served Meetings, RECEIPTS .J .
,:,
Pre-School _________________ 146 1.,599 411 Income Other Than From United Fund -------------------=-- $21,798.59

Grade School ______________ 249 19,63 331 United Fund Allocation ----------------------------------- 56,565.00
Teen.Agen ________________ 180 14,189 234 fie; -----
Adults and Senior Citizens ____ 299 299 129 TOTAL RECEIPTS ------------------------------------- $78,363.59

Board and Committees ______ 153 926 72
DISBURSEMENTS

1,027 53,447 1,177 Operational Expenses ____________________________________ $78,363.59



OUR SPECIAL THANKS TO PATRONS AND FRIENDS WHO GAVE SERVICE,

I I s .a,4: k li .a% y114
FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND OTHER GIFTS
*

Joe's Quality Market J. & J Drug D.. Harofean Story, Mrs. Oaretha Wright, Mr. Mock Cleaners, Ac Auto Service Sto..1 'SAiAiwtf 1ff(* V 1 JVfcfSwlfiwwBV\I
payment Store, "'1$. EEzsbeth Telly, Dr. and Mrs. F. B. Neosman<< Mrs. Come By- tion, Mrs. Albert red Mrs. L N. Felts,t '' *
4
Warren W. Welters Mrs. Naomi tot, roms Mrs. J. L Dixon Mrs. Dorothy Rizer, Mr. Richard M. Sepler{ Chicago Club of ) Yri16'Th Ff r
Mrs. Josephine Love Mr. Bennie CfBerry, Mr. George WtHkuns Sunshine Community Greater Miami, Sigma Omicron Chapter,
Mr Roger Williams, Dr. Albert T. Ed Club, De'ta! Sigma Theta Sorority Alpha ChI n Omega Sorority Dr. Malcolm .
words, Mitt Helen M. Dorsett, Mr. H. C.Aexondn AH Miami Appliances, Consumers SuperMarket Ross Mr. and Mrs. leon Task,
Or. George A. Simpson; Mrs. No. 2.Greetings Friendship Garden and Civic Club, Miami
Housing Authority, Day Care Committee,
Mr. Garth C. Reeves, Miss Lillian Kelly, t J r
Mr. Luther Carey, Mrs. Esther Belle, AZA
Hurricane Club, Mr Paska: Sears, Roebuck
& Co., Northside; Store; Phi Delta
Kappa Sorority, B.ta Tou Zeta Chapter, 1 ,. ,mot 14 '
Zeta Phi B.ta Sorority, leroy Lang and ",
.
His Combo Mrs. Rella C. Tyson, Mrs.
Carol! B. Morrison.


Mrs. Jon. Lvwis, Franklin D. Ross, Arthur
Evans Mrs. Hazel B. Wright, Mrs.
Mae Chartes Brown, Miss Carol Batson,
I Mrs. Yvonne Culmer, Mrs. Lois Johnson,
t I Mrs. 0.... Holes Assistant Stat. Attor.ney. I I I
.Aram P. Goshgarion, Rev. W.F. Savoy,
for their role in Democratic
Teen-agers prepare a Society
Mr. Forty B. Neasman, Mr. Anthony
Gardner, Mrs. Florence Amos, Mill Ida with the guidance of an adult Steering Committee, composedof
Solomon Dr. H. Sweeting Eastern Air. deans from junior and senior high school, social workers,
fines, Herbert Ammons, Nathaniel Powell, ministers and community leaders. The Annual Teen Youth
Mrs. Dorothy Graham, Mrs. Dorothy Ed. Clinic provides the channel through which JESCA'S youth
words, Samuel O. Cohen" E. K. Lockhart,
the future and discuss the role will In
Cwest club, Mr. and Mrs. George Kil explore they play
1 Patrick. tomorrow's democratic society.


New Homemakers Club, Mr Charles ...
Hayek Mrs. James O. H.yworth, Zeta w '''--:1: .:;: :.:
Tou Alpha Sorority, Mrs. Alene Williams,
for 1961 Program Year from the Board of Directors Mrs. Geneva Murray, Mrs. Kenneth Williams
of James E. Scott Community Association, whose Mrs. Alberta Johnson, Mrs. Mo.
Edmonds. Mrs. Eloise Smith, Mrs. W. J.
I leadership and inspiration stem from the Founder who is Johnson, Mrs. Virginia James, Mrs. B.r.
affectionately known as Captain Scott. rice Austin, Mr. MeKrln Fox, Mrs. Maude
Chandler, Mrs. Heifer I Rivers, Mrs. M.
Atholi. Range, Mankers Funeral Home
Dir., Mrs. Allene Gumyord, Acme TV
Service, Mrs. Odessa James, Mrs. Jose-
phin West, Mrs. Ethel Parks, Mrs. Arie
Gory, Miss Paul. Clark.


Mr. William Johnson" ; Dorsey Junior
Chorus Northwestern Chorus, Senior High
School, Mrs. Margaret Adderiy Mr. Haley
E. Sof;., Mrs. lona Strochon, Radio Station .
WMBM, Rodio Station WQAM, Radio
v Station WKAT. Radio Stotion WFEC, Radio a
t11C? >,9t Station WGIS, Radio Station WINZ
Charles Williams, Father Rob.rt P. DeGrandi .
Mrs. Carol Morrison, Dressler'i.
Dairy Form, William F. Manker, Carver
Portiock, James Bohannon, Mrs. Emma .
Spicer, Miss Mary Davis, Mrs. Ida Rot
r; iLwt cliff, Mrs. Carl Rhetta, George Savitt.

s4J4 YOUNGSTERS FIND OUTLET THROUGH ANNUAL TALENT
Mrs. Elsada Knowles M,. and Mrs.
Howard Nodler, Coco-Cola Bottling Co., SHOW
Mrs. Elizabeth. Johnson, Mrs. Sarah Milory,
Mrs. Richard Jones, Mils E. M. Murray, JESCA'S Youngsters find an outlet for their talent and
Miss Angle Carter, Mrs. Edna Thompson, energy through participation In recreational activities. The
I Harold Gory, Mrs. Lenore B. Smith, Mr. annual talent show
and Mrs. Elder Prince{ Mrs. Beatrice la- provides an opportunity to display their
max, Mrs. Katherine Lee, Mrs. Josephine varied talents. Adults who give of their time and talent
GETTING READY FOR TOMORROW'S WORLD White, Mrs. Arlean Williams, Mrs. Doreen in guiding these youngsters play a significant role In moldIng .
Young, Walter Bowe, Judg. Ben J. the lives of the men and women of
Preschool children in JESCA'S day care Centers at Liberty SHeppard. Dr. and Mrs. H. Franklin WIN tomorrow.
,,,.Sire and James E. Scott Homes, Public Housing Project, Hams, Mrs. Frances Baumgartner, Mrs.
have many and varied experiences. In a rapidly changing Mottle Davis Mrs. Emma Jones, Mrs.
society, lessons in sharing and good human relations are Morforle Harding Mrs. Clara Campbell,
Mrs. Geroldine Bentiey.i .
important to all children. .


;'...., ,, V;',OC Vt OCO A O OO')04, >OO O O<- -O-OOt> PO OOOO < m err yt4


THE JAMES E. SCOTT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONINVITES

:

YOU AND YOUR FRIENDS TO ATTEND x r1.w w


THE ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING AND BUFFET SUPPER

{ ,_. 'L
,
:_ AT THE JAMES E. SCOTT HOMES AUDITORIUM i'

._,". .!r.;. J

: 7200 NORTHWEST TWENTY-SECOND AVENUE ', *
.
t
'

,J: ..>'(..THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1961 At 6:45 P. M. r '

i
t ,; '
"k
BUFFET SUPPER AND ENTERTAINMENT, $2.00 As Senior Citizens thanks
give in the traditional American
; -' way, they are mindful of the problems confronting the aged.

FOR RESERVATION, TELEPHONE Plaza 8-4791 BY MARCH 14th They too are adjusting through wholesome activity program
to a changing society that Is more concerned about their
.. f ; '-' social and physical well being.






[/' 1PAGE



A G FOOD. COMPLETE STORE27th ,




Ave. at 54th St. ,

NEVER CLOSED

PRICES GOOD MARCH 7th Thru llthSwift's
-

TURKEYS Empire 0 C

Brand Ib
FREE 1 CAN CRANBERRY SAUCE WITH EACH ORDER ,
-. .' -. of
FIRST CUT LB. MAXWELL HOUSECOFFEE

PORK CHOPS 35c 57c ,

SMOKED-DIRR'S COUNTRY STYLE LB. EEL BECK 5 LB.BAG

Sausage 39cLYKESWHOLE Meal or Grits 25c

OR SHANK LB.45c. BORDEN'S ,

HAMSMOKED MILK cans' 37c

LB. STOKLEY'S 46 OZ.CAN

HAN HOCKS 19cTiilS Tomato Juice l'c

I
,
COUPON GOOD FHO.M 7 A.M.TILL 4 P.M.DAILY MAKCII 7-11 1001
:
COLD BEER
Large Stalk
'alloy Roll, t1o 24 Hours
I lb Ie 1 c
Celery 0 \.oetJ 9, Day and Night
'
Sunshine Sweet -oo'e'C -
\ \ o
\" D( f/"oO e
each 5 Ib bag I \)<'C \' (#
C / D QuantifyRights
a7o Coupon IIIUMt be pn'.entt'4l, by an adult to be ulld aP O'
6 C V One Name.coupon. ...per....t.unlly.... ...... "cld!'<<'W'l" ..0.0...... *.00 Reserved


JEWEL 3 LB.CAN FRESH CUT LB.

Shortening 59c CABBAGE 3cLARGE

DIXIE LILY FIRM HEAD EACH

RICE 557c: Lettuce lOc


Frankenmuth Sunk t ooz. I

BEER 6 Reg cans 79c'I LEMONS 29c '

:, _.' '. .. ,- '.\\ -, '/ .;:. '--.-"r-r.-.. P: '. :" .._'.. .... .". '



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TIMES MIAMI FLORIDA Benefit Breakfast
l MIAMI Enroll
your chill<< at the

PAGE 8 SATURDAY, MARCH II, 1961 A 'benefit breakfast, sponsoredby Fine Arts Conservatory's
the Opa. Locka Youth Foundation /
a to raise funds to build Adventures in Art

Youth Center Building, will be Each Saturday 1-2:30 p.m.
March 19, 8:30 to
:'he d Sunday At Carver YMCA
: 10:30: a.m.1"at: Tucker's Restu-
i rant, 2336. ,All Baba Ave. Donation 0 weeks ,$S.OO
$1.00. marlS I
h -

; \TIIL\.nII\Ta'mt} .;
w r '"/1IoI.\l 111IllII\r.m..Jm Mi





i .i/, r P:'!.!!!NJ-'J


$ r t OX 1.7959' N.W. 22nd Ave. & 69th St.


a

,' Ywe i: 1 q'K i FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

L' NOW SHOWING AT

M-G-M presents'GINA j.o;;. I -1
_... y W i'e' i f' 4 <3 ...., I ... ]
---'--' ---- ---- --- .
Key West Correspondent for left and Byrdle Daniels, right, of LOLLOBRIGIDAANTHONY '.
the Miami Times, Francis Palmer Meadville, Pa, who. is visiting .: .
and brother, Achle (Press Mrs. C'aude Thomas", left, of .f' JULIE HADEVERYTHING

Box) Pinder and Clyde Kit ens Richmond Heights, the story on FRANCIOSA xs: I' ; ; ,; I ..
at the early part of the Sunday how long the desire to try and 6 :
afternoon matinee at Miami's make Sunday matinee a success s. ;r<--_ M. _. ERNEST fL.::<:)t : BUT A SENSE
most Knight Beat ,priorto is about to the light the BORGNINE .... ,.
'
popular : see In the recent contest between ,IN d .:: :.l+ : OF SHAME!
her short visit Clyde and Archie matinee at Knight Beat is the I .
eight chapters of the Eastern ::;,:::> : :":::::::. ---:-
gave Francis, second from I place. GO HllJrED .:,::':;'.': '.:: ::$ ::::1 ; AN ARCOLA PRODUCTION

Stars Pride, Mrs.of Hialeah Gertrude No.Perkins 61 took of I" 'V"E :'\\.i,;;: :': ..;:::;!" CINEMlSCOl'EDn.D"

the first prize, and was crowned k :: .:.: :::i METROCOlOR
a Queen of the Eastern Stars., Mrs. -, 'i.<;: ;;;:;': ::;&
Gertrude Lattimore, Worthy =='- hLUANA PATTEN ::':.>&Mt"; ": \ .
Matron : "..;.JiJiJf'' ';A
RESE E Mrs. Viola Johnson of Pro
gress Chapter No. 29 was sec PLUS
,and in the contest. Mrs. Viola
Hill is Worthy Matron.
'I. Mrs. Perkins wishes to thankall IT'S A JOY-RIDE ALL THE WAY! J
ARCHIE those who helped her in
winning first p'ace. METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYERAa
11111 PINDER OX' AN ARCOIA PRODUCTION

rDebbie
11

THE TALK O'TOWNW Elizabeth Fiesta Room The RITZTHEATRE ,,
I.' the benefit show at Mi present its student body faculty ReyaoldSfn
and guest artists In "Sing Out
ami Beach Auditorium, a tribute
Dance In" at NHS audit I
April
to Fatner Gibson in which
Sammy Davis and Harry Bela- 7. Ruth Greenfield Is in charge NOW SHOWING IT STARTED WITH A loss
fonte spared: no efforts in en- The Sunshine Community CLARK GABLE '. .
Club's annual St. Patrick Day
tertaining. Also appearing were
Chickle Home, Damlto Jo, Floyd! Tea la Sunday, March 19 at Lib. MARILYN MONROE
Patterson and many others. The Square audit. Featured will be I
show if Dorsey Jr. III school chorus. If "The Misfits"PLUS
was taped, so you were
you haven't heard this talented SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY
among the many who missed it,
young group, don't miss out.
you can still help this worthy .
cause by hearing the show' Wed! "Noose For Gunmen"AIU .. "Go Naked in The World"PLUS .
.
.
nesday evening at Club Knight THE SPRING Classes of Radio .
,Beat. All proceeds from refresh and Electronics Television '
School will have their gradua'tion .1 It\. .
ments wi 1 go to the same cause.
No admission, no speeches, come banauetrvFriday (tonight) ) at .....-- '. ,.-.. ':
and hear the show and 'enjoy the ,StarLight Root of the Car "KEY, WITNESS"STARTS ., .
the evening. Rernennber the date ver Hotel CONDITIONED I
March 15.CLYDE.
"Ol l nATION ELEVEN" CAPITOLTHEATRE WEDNESDAY

Inl L.JXS' smart move CALLING ALL 'TEENAGERS
into Knight Beat Club was com Why not drop by Northwestern NOW Someone..somehowwas
mented on by this corner, to be : tomorrow night and dig SHOWING"Sanctuary"
the one to make this club the the happenings. From what I playing a
spat. My impres..don after Sun hear this affair Is going to be ... y murderous
day evening's matinee, chatting swinging. It is going to be a Featuring! game
with Clyde and many that welcomed dance with a new twist a night ODETTA 1! = with her love
the mid-evening outing, I club twist. Yes, the teens are A brilliant new Negro and hersanity
am certain this is the first spot going to the Copa Cabana tomorrow Actress ,
since! the days of the Rockland night where there will !
Palace Blue Hour. To hit the 'be a real live Calypso' band, direct The Crimson Kimono'
lights Frank Cesher, George from the Sevl.le Hotel. Alsoon
Couch and Bo claim it to be what's happening age artists as Margaret Green,
t Boby Marshall emceed the The Delltones and Introducing
hully gul.y. Tis famed Harlem Alice Day. Don't forget that's
Square rendition takes the Saturday night at Northwesternin Homes
house A special group of the gym.IlIIlTlIDAYSi. For k1
four: Betty Solomon David I
Ti !man, Johnny Mae McKinney Along with the
and Howard Styles are gully many mothers and son.* that Sale
stylist. Not bad either celebrate in March, orchids to
Little Arnold M arch 1 and Mildred a

KNIGHT HEAT matinee promises Morley Smith March 13; It 1 ,,
ente"t\inm'nt.: bigger and Archie Jr., had his March 3 and 3 New -Beauties
better than anywhere in these Beulah celebrated yesterday,
)pTti and you can rest assured March 9. All 3 bedrooms, 2 baths:
that celebrities will make the Ii! located in N.W. Liberty
p""no.! Trexie Terry, public an- '
City section A LOSS BNNTEI AIMINsoDucTION I
nouncer for the Harlem' Stars
and producer of the Harlem REDUCING! !II! I See them Sun. 2 to 6 p.m. --
Sand Man (Howard) and many I Let us show them to MYRNA 10Y RODDY McDOWALL COLOR
others were on hand to pet the Would you like to lose you HERBERT MAftSHAU-KJUUXA HUNTVENETIA
flrit of this fabuloustell Come to: DIH
Im'pt'esQlon WIWAMtIWIefU u an
trim ..
weight off
or unwanted -
you about. 1260 N.W. 55th St. ---
inches?

SOUARK CIRCLE Sportsman Harmar, Inc. MO 5-3532 PLUS
Club's 20th Spring Ball featuring We can help you a* we
two band, Fletcher Pascha! have helped others.
Professionals and Alex Stephen's
Rockland Pa'aco All Stars. is all CALL $500 DOWN
re' for T"urrday nteM March 9. MRS. EVELYN TYNESNA SEE THIS SPLIT LEVEL k
The affair was superb The BEAUTY
Loyal Buddies, Inc., will have 1.0470OX 1.1766
their 15th Anniversary Ball: RICHMOND HEIGHTS

Friday March 17 at the Fiesta Easy MethoH School Corner of
Ballroom. Happy Rose will dish f Coral Reef Drive Eastman .
out thq hippenincs and the Bud of Charm ; And Fillmore Street to
dies wll ben hand to greet old Open Sun. 2 to 6
P.m.
and neW' friends. 1540 NW 62nd StreetAll Low, low, monthly payment

TUB NEONTA SOCIAL CLUB O 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
is returning with its evening o( GARAGE 8
game, dancing and a barbecue, students and<< members areI'f'qtlt'8ted Ora D. Taylor CE STEVENSONTHE .'': ;_
of Mr. and Mrs. 5-1246 JOHN McINTIRE '
at the home
to call Mrs. Tynea a uNlvsM,+,
I u
rsmuno
Burkholta: 1829 NW 55th Terr. .... t nctwtt
.< The Miami Beauticians immediately concerning your ';'1
Unit 7 are making the scene photo for school display. Picture
soon. It's their 2nd annual Hair are NO COST to )'ou. MIAMI TIMES ADS
Style Colorama at the MaryFine I
1 DON'T
COST
: Arts Conservatory will THEY PAY I

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1
MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA 1 Organ Recital at I AT PAMTJ INTERSCnOLASTIO inEBSVORK8 OP \




Looking the Sports Incarnation in Mrs.concert Derthenia at the White Sunday Solemn, will Even-be I Washingtonian Wins I lI


I song with a Program of Sacred
'
Music on Sunday, March 12 at
the Church of the Incarnation, "Best Lav-Out" Award
World Ouer LEO B. ARMBRI5TER 1835 NW 64th st. at 7 p.m. ,

Mrs. White is a graduate of
WHY fc'LOlD; : WILL WIN thrilling activities. Fisk University with a master's Competing with 11 schools in
degree in music, a member of the Florida and one in the state of
Boxing la no doubt one of, the WOMEN'S LEAGUEACTIVATED Church of the Incarnation, Georgia, the WASHINQTONIAN,
toughest sports to be engagedin Christian Education, secretary official school newspaper of PUN PHUN '
; this severity further exacts The Magic City Debs Bowling .of the Episcopal Churchwomen Booker T. Washington Junior-
from an Individual when he becomes League, a women's league com of the Incarnation and a music Senior High School, won the fly PHIL O8SOFER
skillfully advanced to be prised of six 'teams, have their teacher of Dorsey Junior High plaque for ,the "best lay-out" at
recognized as a professional of activities on Wednesday nights school. Mrs. White's programwill the 11th annual Interscholastic t: I! !t -.J

the game; and more tensenessis The sponsors and captains are: consist of compositionsfrom Frees Workshop. Held at Florida: house I'd make a good hitch-
led to bear when his liveli Karrllon Beauty Shoppe, Jean Duxtehude, Peeters, Purvis A and M University in Tallahassee house, I'm make a good hitch
hood depends on this rough and Slater, capt.; Fenderson Olympics and Dach. She's an excellent or- entries were Judged by consultants hiker, I'm all thumbs! I try to
tough match of skill and physi : Arlene Williams, capt.; ganlst. Do come and hear her. whose names read likea avoid all physical activity at
Lady Palmland, Jessie Hawkins, "Who's Who." The Washing home because I'm one of those
que.All these factors capt.; Sunlight Beauty School, E. G. LUCKIE tonlan received accolades from "ruln-it-ytxurself" boys'
will be Gerilean Everette, capt.; two such outstanding newsmen and
brought to the teams are without sponsors, but PRESENTS "STARS Journalist educators as Harold You can > imagine my despair
center of the are captained /by Mary Mays and Keith, Pittsburgh Courier; Cliff when the good wife asked me
ring on Mon Frances Morgan, OVER MIAMI" McKay, Afro-American; Lin to install drapes over the two
day night, Feb. The Debs have monthly tro- Holloway, Norfolk Journal and windows of my den. Being too
13, whenChampion phy awards for. the month's MARCH 18 Guide; Lee Blackwell, Chicago short to work off a chair (a& a
FloydPatterson three high scores. February's Defender; Wll'lam Fowlkes, Atlanta child I used to shrink from
winners were Jean Slater, Fran Daily World, and Francis washing), I purchased ladder..
H, Mitchell of Johnson Publications I then sat down to figure out
squares off to ces, Morgan and Mattie Davis, :'.Y'
Ebony Magazine the "simple" plans that came
defend his title one, two, three. '
-/ with the equipment to be installed.
against Inge- On hand to receive the honors
\II\V: LEAGUE : .
Man
Johansson.'I BEING F those instructions
mar OIUJAM/K1) ,) .. were: Catherine Allen, editor; must have been written by the
Patterson will be managing a Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m :: : Delores Lanier, columnist; fellow who makes up the In
.
very complex situation but is ,'," Joseph Pace, business manager;
; all bowlers will meet at the ,., structions for filing Income tax
certain he can stand to the \ : Marcellus Fuller, art; Roberta
up lounge of the Ml Bowling: Laneto .. .. returns.
call; first In his favor fa t ''h e further the plans of forminga I ''! ) Thompson, news\ and their ad
great love he has for the businesshe new league. visor, Mrs Marian H Shannon. The equipment was a two way

is engaged in; then too he has Miss Kathy Rockwell, secre, -a'j A special program featuringthe ,traverse rod that was advertised -
felt the scorn of defeat and also tary of the Ml Bowling has In- :.; .. accomplishments of the as being trouble. free Sure,
tasted the sweetness of victory, formed this column that major school newspaper and newspapers you pay for the rod and get the
and along with that victory clearance has been made .on this In general is the focus of at- trouble free!. By the time I
came the prestige, admirationand project and that a noted brewery traction for the staff during National measured drilled and mounted
honor of being the best in La backing the sponsorship.This Negro Newspaper Weekj brackets A and B on the wall,
the business the champ. By will be especially beneficial -, March 12-19 and adjusted the draw cords.
no means the main objective for to bowlers who bowl often I through overlap F and under-
taking the hard knocks of this and are not in a sanctioned or or WIXH THREE FIRST IN lap G, I was in a frenzy, I was
uncomfortable. pastime the ganized league, as you mayor <$l'.1 Til PRESS PROJECT ready to forget the drapes .

art of making a living-qhould may not know, only sanctioned Three first place honors have it looked like curtains for mel
not take back seat.
a
league bowlers may cash in .on
been captured by the WASHINQ-
will win on his Time dragged, due to the
Patterson
where
their skill of bowling big
TONIAN In the annual Columbia
stall in the in-stall-ation because

to fight better than Johansson
ability national prizes are concerned.
Scholastic Press
Association TB
; but all the qualitiesthat I just didn't get the hangof
make good fighter will 1-- Press Project. The newspaperplaced it. The job had me againstthe
a
accompany him Into. the ring. FOR SALE .\notherlIaml: Talent Program first in local judging, wall: I was ready to drop
He will depart with greater rec 8:30: p.m. March 18 at first in state competition; and, the whole shady business when
ognition and admiration as a Coconut Grove Real Estate Liberty Square auditorium Many has just received word of their lo, by some mysterious accident,
Maoists' will be win In national competition.This I made the right adjustmentsand
true master of the game the Bargain orUami'8: best !
marks the second
consecutive
pugilistic idol of the world. seen and heard including Miss everything worked perfectly
2 bedrooms CBS Duplex nioL!e H. Kemp: Mrs. Harolean year. that the staff has won I turned to the second win-
PATTEIISOV WIIdWIN IN SIXIt S, Storr Mrs. Bessie Bethune the national plaque in this pro. dow with confidence It took

is to the end of all those $10,500 MortgageYou and New Hope Junior Harmon ject. The winner CSPA before win the requires plaqueIs athird very little time to get it right.

who delve In the activities of could have this for ettes and the Page Gospel Sing retained. Principal Charles L Proud as I am of my accom

contestants of any sport to $3,000 Cash ers.Also William expressed extreme 'delight plishment, it'll be a long time
leading
of
make predictions as to the out- some our
in receiving this outstanding before I traverse that road .
and
come. LOOKING THE SPORTS quartets groups. award. I rod. I'm
mean again. etlll
WORLD OVER Is thus obliged; Call HI 4-2112 The affair will benefit the weak in the home improvement
Floyd Patterson Sllvertono Singing Convention. .... ...
and can see V V- I\/
department, but I have learnedone
Admission A brand
taking no longer than the sixthrnund Jl.OO new
to ward off any advances portable television will be given Get your protection today thing from my experience.
When I have two like Items to
Ingemar Johansson may makeat away as door prize. Call HI 52516Life Install, I'll install the second
his championship. Tickets can be obtained !In one first.
Coconut Grove from Willie Lewis Insurance of Florida
FLOitIDA-BRED HORSES
III 8.3300, and In Liberty
EYEING: TRIPLE CROWN Selling Living Benefit.Ouuuuu.OOOdhhU.hU.h. *
City at LuckIe's Tailor Shop

With the opening of Gulf OX 11262. .............. Drive Carefully

stream turned, horseraclng into the in Floridahas home F. .&r. ..-ssr.-.7.&. ......sr:.rsr&. ". .. ".&. ./tss tss". ..-."'.-.;::;. -.- "'........."'.- .-.. ..,...._.._...n......-u....'..h........-...........cri...:v! .ain...ns;*.a't:..Nii/
M a
stretch and the many thrills of xit&Hy.w.ittttttty.tttttn&ttttt & M. a !!

the turf are nearing the finish
line for the local fans; when 1726 N.W. 51st St.
this sport of kings moves on to
other locales, Florida will be
Low Down PaymentTwo
well represented and grand Factory RebuiltMotors

memories and best wishes will custom built CBS
accompany such Florida-bred
sta'warts as Carry Back, Beau homes on large landscaped
Prince Garwol. Guadalcanal and
,
&
TransmissionsAll
Crozler. lot. Live rent free. Both

'These are horses which have homes partly furnished.
shown the ability to vie for a
position in the forthcoming This must be seen to ap Moires All Models

triple-crown set; which is more preciate.
than likely to see entries from
California in the name of Flut 10,000 MILE GUARANTEE
ter and Olden: Times; from the
Caro'lnas, Trial Baloon, from 919 N.W47th St.
Maryland, It's a Great Boy .I "' '1'
Many others will be taking
their test run between now and $495 Down $71 Mo.
May 6, when the first third ,of ONE DAY FREESERVICE
the triple crown, the Kentucky Beautiful 2 bedroom CBS PL 7-7603

Derby will be run for; among with large Florida room
them will be Vapor Whirl, Red PICK UP
mar, Big Smoky, Commend and screened porch awnings,

Brown Vet.EXCELSIOR. tile roof, separate dining

LEAGUE room. No closing costs 1

GEARED FOR ACTION I mortgage.

The teams on lower half of : .
the Excelsior Bowling Leagueare -- Motors No Transmissions
:
just like teams in any other
1884 N.W. 53rd St.
sport in any other place; they ,
get a kick out of knocking off i Overhauled Overhauled
the top team. $795 Down $74 Mo. Money
Last Thursday's league bowl

ing saw Our Food Store humiliate Large custom built 2 bed '
Plus Plus
the league leader, Fender
son' Olympics by beating them room with enclosed garage, 39.50 Down 29.50

the entire three game set, oak floors, stove, refrigerator. Parts Parts
Cecil's Radio and TV,
meanwhile No closing costs. Bal
pride of Looking The Sports I I
World Over was taking a two ance one mortgage.

out of three game nick out of .
Sir John's Untouchanbles. --- ALL-RITE MOTOR EXCHANGE

Competition is getting keen CASH FOR YOUR LOT
now and there are expected to
be quite a few upsets before the St
PL 7-3450 283 NW 79th
season ends. The Excelsior 7701 N. W. 7th Ave
League extends a welcome to all '. .
watch the "
to come out and 'p -0

-.Irrwr. .avlrrIrvw._ vw.. ..rvw..rv... ..;
Advertising in The Miami Times Pays Off I gLocogJIJW.r.'ZW.qri... .. .. : ... ...11,..Q..G':.. ..u"OA; :.uM; M.lO--:..rt.r. ...M N Mea.q N 1_MTHE



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THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA r r r r r r r Miamians Should


NEW INSURANCEPLAN I MAYS HIGH IN-AROUND THE BAHAMAS See and Hear


...... ....... ... ... ... ..... .. .. ... _
btti oL.J<-l'L.:1..L.:... ..>......l......... .1"-' t;;;;1; }b b 1) T> 1-li TJ L \ b 1 mn Billy GrahamThe
PRESENTEDLester F' "'; i --""' -- -
Percy (Smokey) Christie won ed by bandits on the night of
C. Albert has dreamedfor the Vikings Sporting Club marathon Feb. 21. His 'body gagged in a Editor, The Miami Times:
many* years that the day road race recently, The wooden box bed,' was found under Sunday, March 5 may well
would come when people wouldbe fleet-'footed youngster won ,the the stairs in Lowe's Phar- prove in the years ahead one of
offered a Guaranteed Risk 6% mile contest in 35 minutes macy in Market St., next morn the most far reaching and his-
Life Insurance policy on the In Tal'bot' Cooper and Clyde Dain ing. toric days in the history of' MI-
ami and of Florida for on that
dustrial basis. came in second and third respectively.
The robbers broke through a day the world renowned Rev.

A guaranteed Risk policy Is In the Junior group, Frank window of the store, opened a Dr. Billy Graham, D.D., started
simply a policy which Is In Im Rahming was first, Edward Git- door from the Inside and made revival and soul winning meetings

mediate benefit regardless of fit ten, second, and Reginald Gor their getaway with, a 725poundiron at Miami Beach Auditor
what the cause of death may be. + third. safe containing $420. The ium.
don,
Since the beginning of time, old man was tied from head to
Industrial Insurance companieshave foot with old Lacks, witnesses To see and hear Billy Graham
always issued life policies On February 19 the body of reported.Mr. will in itself, I feel, be a great
Bertram Storr was found on the
Miami and state
experience. our
which had clauses in them to
bottom of Nassau harbor. Mer- survived by a not
them in case the Insur Taylor is must miss It.
protect
ed died with a chronic disease.Mr. t. vln Wells discovered the Police body son, Charles, and a daughter, I I Here Ls a man who may well
Albert, being in the funeral and informed Eastern Gib- Enid. The CID is investigating. I rank in church history and
Constable William
business, has had the opportunity Station. Evangelism with Paul, Wesley
son, assisted by Constable Pat Whitefield, Mopdy, etc. Billy
of seeing so many case Reginald Rolle, ten-year-old
recovered the
where the people thought they rick haycock took to the died Feb. 18 at Grand Bahama Graham is the greatest evangelist -
and it
had full benefit coverage only to corpse after he was knocked down bya of our time.. "He has been
find out at the death of a loved morgue, where it was later car driven by Eva Ash. The touched by the hand of God;"
Storr's brother,
one that the policy would pay identified by drowning driver was arrested, but is out and his impact upon the 20th
Death due to
one-fourth the face value or George. was on bond. century, is for future} church and
one half the face value becausethe a post mortem showed. secular historians to evaluate.Dr. .
insured died with chronic
a
The bill to grant women the Graham knows that mankind
disease. Wilfred Richardson, 25-year-
I Rd. ballot in the Bahamas passed in needs to be born again. He
Over a year ago Albert ap Barbara A. Drown' and Eloise old mechanic of Farrington the House of Assembly on Feb. that the fate of the
knows
proached J. E. Oulbreth, a man Cowart attended the luncheon was killed almost instantly on The change becomes effective
23. new United States of America, the
ager with the Life Insurance honoring Mrs. Charles U. Cul- the way to work on Feb. 21 in June next year.
Co. of Florida, and asked him if mer, Girl Scout National presi when the front tyre of his mot future of world civilization depends
it was possible for blew out. Witnesses to upon faith and reliance
he thought dent, in February at the Dupont orcycle I
his company to issue such a Paza; Skyroom. the accident said that when they in our blessed Lord and Saviour

po icy. At that time he was giv- Barbara and Eloise are members lifted him up he was dead. His I WATCH FOR Jesus Christ.As .
en very little hope that such a of Troop 867, the only Negro survivors are his parents, Mr. was said of Abraham Lincoln
policy could ever be assurance written Senior Troop in the Hibiscus and Mrs. Wilfred Richardson, 'Opening of Don StrachanChildren's almost a century ago, so
but he was given the district. These girls are also five brothers, three sisters, one may it be said of Billy Graham
that Mr. Culbreth would take It members of the ninth grade. son and a daughter. Theatre Produc today, "He belongs to the

up with his company's officials tion, "Snow White Goes to ages."
SUPERVISED FARMING Charles Taylor, 76-year-old Ernest Hutcheson Jr.
The officials met many timesIn PROGRAM Broadway." Minister of ReligionMARCIA
considering this new type of watchman, was brutally murder I

policy. The results of those Individual farming programsare
meetings prompted the official the topics for discussion in
to present the proposed new the freshman class of Vocational
policy to their actuary and on Agriculture during these trying f
to the Insurance Department in times
Tallahassee for final approval. JANE HOMES
For a boy to take Vocational
The final approval was granted Agriculture, he must have a
and, there, the Life of For- I farming program. This programis
Ida (became the first to issue a a long-time program of coor LOOK AT THIS!
Guaranteed Risk Life policy on dinated farming activities of educational -
the Industrial basis. This is an value carried on by the
answer to a dream and prayer boy studying Vocational Agriculture Live in one of these brand new deluxe CBS homes for
which Albert has had in his This project is supervised
heart for many years. The nameof by the boy's parents and his as little as $15.00 a week
this policy is The Golden teacher.
Shield, and is being written in Your choice of 5 models
amounts of $500, $750 and Since the farming program is
$1,000. It will be written on ages a longtime operation, much time 2, 3 and 4 bedroom homes ,

from 10 to 60. must be spent by freshmen students Garages or carports

planning these ''programs. Large closets heaters built-in and
gas oven ranges
Falcons Win Final Such planning results in good
farming programs. Lots 75 ft. x 100 ft.

Cage Test Detailed planning may Include 2 blocks from schools, shopping, churches

such things as ways of producing

The Dade County Junior College a crop or livestock project,
Falcons, Northwestern Cen financing the project, and the Down Payments from $195 to $350
ter, in their last cage event of way the boy markets hU pro

the ..season, defeated the Opa duct.
Locka Jets of the Opa Locka The NO CLOSING COSTS
responsibility of
Recreation Center iby a ,score of managing
77-64 before a cheering and the projects students.are owned According largely to H.by (Pay only $5.00 per week on down payment)

roaring crowd in the Northwestern Thompson, teacher of vocational

March gym.2. on Thursday night, agriculture, students have plan. DIRECTIONS
ned some outstanding programs.

.Willard Dowe was high point NFA reporter, Sylvester Cooks,
man for the Falcons with 26, principal, James 1\1. Simmons, U.S. 1 Drive south, U.S.1- Drive south to

James Higgs was runner up with school reporter, D. Boone left(
15 point. For the Jets it was ---- Open Saturday turn at Old Cutler Albpittth Road,left on

Anthony (Dick) Roberts who Road, then turn right Alfapattah to Old Cutler
placed 23 points in the basket. Get your protection today And Sunday
Frank Drown, a former student at S.W. 118th Avenue Road, then turn right

Tompkins at Fla. A, and a former M University students and at Call HI 5-2516 For Inspection and follow the signs. and follow the signs.

Knoxville College were runner Life Insurance of Florida

ups for the Jets with a total of Selling
11 points each. Living Benefits

The Falcons' record for the -- -----
season in a schedule of 12 game
is 5 wins and 7 losses. JOIN THE NAACP I II 0 t

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I F Your TV Set 1 1 0 n




Is JIYIN'' AroundWe


.r

Know All The Music SALES REPRESENTATIVE l



CALL Pt>2546 FORD REALTY, MNC.
;
'; 5524 N. W. 7th Avenue -:. Phone: PL 7.2559 -:- Miami, Florida

OPEN TILL 0:15 MON. THRU SAT.
5

OR MAR I E L

Bring It INEXPERT \. INC. Builders


SERVICE REASONABLE RATES
376 N. W. 25th STREET


, Liberty Sales .Corp.! MIAMI FR 9-4267, FLORIDA INDUSTRIES


MEMBER FLORIDA HOME BUILDERS ASSN. & MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


915 N.W. 62nd Street HARRY MARKOWITZ, President

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NoticeMrs. THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI FLORIDA;


round Miami J Beatrice Moore, formerly SATURDAY MARCH 11. ,. -1961 PAGE 9.

of the Charm Beauty Salon .. ..
will ibe happy to greet and serve
I-: By DAVE BONDU you at the Modernistic Salon, '
826 NW 3rd ave., phone FR c 1 xy xyr
49944. The "Jackie Look" Is "

TO THE'TUNE OF her specialty. 't

MANHATTAN TOWERS: .
'
AnnouncementOn ,.
'. 'NASSAU'S my home, Nassau's -
..
my home, let me tell you Sunday, March 12, Rev.
(.Nassau's home sweet home." I Feb. 28 Drunn said that Miami Edward T. Graham will be the
|just returned from the Island, Beach officials had decided that speaker at the unveiling the
had a wonderful time, mixed there won't be any more "mix- Sweeting's Foundation Fund
with business; naturally I stayed ",ed", dances like the one experi Charter. Father Theodore R.
at Marietta's' Quest House. enced at the Fats Domino I GIbson will also be present.
She fixed a pot of pigeon peas date. At this dance there were Guest soloists will be Mrs. Fan
and rice for Chlc'.cle: Horne and colored and white dancing together nie P. Cousin of West Pa'm
"Peanuts" Tay.or that was Just and, according to Bruun Beach and Mrs. The'ma McDonald
.
out of this world. One thing you trouble was constantly brewing. of Miami. Dr. Sweating' will
can say about Marietta's GuestHouse This might have been true, but also celebrate his birthday at
is that the prices are ,Just listen \to the way Druun, this event. The public is Invited..
right and the building. are expertly dosed his masterpiece on this
cleaned each Viand every subject: "Mjlami, Beach hain't
day. progressed this', far, and person Royal Twenty Club
:( ally speaking,, I hope It never
At the Cat and Fldd'e Chlckie does. There is enough trouble In The Royal Twenty Women's f,
Horne played to a'full house this old world without deliberately Cub: held Its regular meeting at
each night, and broke It up creating more." 'Thanks the home of Mr. Gladys Thurs- .
when he announced (as Madam for letting us know how you ton, 1215 NW 6th ave. Time was
Effie Throckbottom) that she feel Paul! given to a discussion and the
was going to marry movie star planning of the annual anniver-
Sidney Poitier. Sidney laughedso RALPH RKNICK, WTVJ news sary dance.
much, tears streamed down director, has informed me of The charming hostess delighted XAA/\r/
his cheeks for 10 minutes. When the big push behind getting the members and a host of
the show was over, Sid new told guns banned, and the jsalea con guests with a delicious! repast
Chlckie that he had seen many trol of guns. Since we startedthe Mrs. Carrie Bryant thanked the RICELAND RICE t
acts In show business, but none fight two years ago, we have hostess for a perfect and de
ever moved him as much as his. had many obstacles face us. Our lightful evening.
This is where Freddie, Mannings biggest half: of the battle is won The next meeting will be heldon :
chimed In and told Chickte that 'and I feel! ..we can win the other Sunday, March 12 at the Tuna Turnovers
he could: stay a year, then I half as long as people like home of Mrs. Elizabeth Bethune. ,. : ,
butted In and told Freddie that Ralph Renick, Commissioner ,Mrs. Ada Belle Dunn president HIGH I IN ENERGY VALUE..LOW IN COST'
Chlckie can only stay til the 1st Alex Gordon Chief Walter ; Mrs. Ethel Peavy, reporter. .
Week in May, because I Intend Headley, Mayor Robert High ,
to book him in Atlantic City for and some other city and county 1 6Vi-oc, can tuna fish Doth Tabasco taut (,t..
the Joe Louis Golf Tournamentand officials, push for a ban on OES Faculty MeetsThe 3 tablespoons each, fleshy' I 'O% -OK.con condensed cream t t
Honor Birthday party, May runs and a safe life. This way chopped plmUnlo and grated .f mwthreom soup
13 at the fabulous integrated: everybody can live life, every faculty of the school of onion 1 cup water
Dunes Motel in Neptune, N.J ';oldt n !minute of it. PEACE! instruction met March 5 at the 2 ups hot cooked Riceland 1 cup grated American checteINORODIBNTSt
home of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph
Anyway, from here I'd like to Bradley at 2965 NW 62nd st Rlto METHODS

make special mention island of such aome"8 Bridge ClubThe Sunday March 12, 3 p.m., 1. Early In the day, break tuna Into small pieces, stir In onion,
the
nice people on 1742 NW 3rd ave marks the pimiento, Riceland Rice Tabasco sauce Pack liberal H cup
Mr. and Mrs. Hamlyn Singh, Sunshine State Duplicate time and p.'ace for the second of mixture into wet custard cup. Unmold into a greased shallow
he's in real estate; Capt. and Hrldgft Club met at the home of instructional session of Miami bakin -serving dish 2. Make 6 timbales, wetting tho cup each
Mrs. Thompson of Thompson's Mrs. Williams, Opa Locka, Feb. Worthy Matrons De on time time. Cover well and refrigerate. 3. At meal time mix together
Ltd. Day St.; Wll Hill mushroom soup and water and pour mixture over timbales.
Liquors on 25 with Mrs. Lois hostess.Leander
please, as there are many items
Sprinkle on cheese. 4. Bake in preheated 360F.. oven 30 to
fred Dowe of Bowe'a Supe'rMarket Jackson led the pre* scheduled for completion.Don't 35 minutes, or until cheese bubble and browns. Makes 6
,. and all of the wonder play discussion. Winners for the luscious servings.
ful musicians that helped make Individual game were: nut, miss another valuable Riceland Rice U perfect partner for any meat, vegetable, or
Chlckie's opening a huge suc Mrs. Hazel Wright; second, Le- class such as the one held last fruit. Easy, too. No paring or peeling or washing. High la
cess. Remember one thing: ander Jackson. ; third, Sgt. H R. Sunday. Those present were: energy value, low in cost,'and nonperhable.F'eReee8ook .
THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE Etchison. Bro Rudolph Bradley and Ma-
NASSAU trons Irene Harrison, Lillian
A good hand shake goes to Scott, Bessie Bethuud, Eloise
HAVE YOU MET Biff BUI Mr.s Lola, 11111, Children's Service Brown Matron Mary Monroe,
Knighton Well he Is the general Bureau and Mrs. Lucille: dean. of school, Deputy Viola N.w sassy ways to seen rice
manager of Hampton House Wheatley of the Girl Scouts be- Hill president. Other members Write RIceUnOlM,P.O.
(formerly the Booker Terrace). .ing Included with those who are Matron Cora, Solomon. Mao IICEIJD MM Ml, ftvMe f, Ark.
Big' Bill, as he Is often called, work for community: bettermentin Ester Bodie, Bros. Admiral
wants you and your ,guests to Dnde-County, from all members Deneby and Oranvllle Cam p RICE Jwcf
of Sunshine State Bridge.
keep In mind that our Hampton bridge. Matron Ethel Curry was A RICEIAI JD
Hwuse is ready to accomodate: The next meeting Saturday, absent because of the Illness of E, ; RICELAND
guests for the upcoming Patter March 11 at the home of Mr. her husband. We hope Mr. Curry RICE
Johansson fight. At present, and Mr. Charles Gray, 14000 a speedy recovery VE.LLYNlCE
our swimming pool Is available, Monroe .St., Richmond heights A very special thanks to Mr.
as well as our Hampton House Call the hostess. CE 5-5676. and Mrs. Dradey: for the delic 1 Tt1 N / !
Restaurant. Whenever you decide ious repast served at the closeof
to make u reservation fora the business session

friend, be sure to call Dig Home and School ----- -----
Bill, or Yours Truly.PRETTV '"SgfliaaflgWWWggSE
I
GIRL Of The Week: MeetingThe
Sa.ly: Stevens Pretty Boy of NOW AT NEW LOCATIONLENNY'S
the Week: Archie Pinder Dethany SDA Homo and
Man Albout Town: Nat Vaughn School will have Its regular
Policeman of the Week: jtonthly meeting Monday, March \
Roy Rogers Doctor of the 3 at 8 p.m. at the school. All. PAWN SHOP
Week: Dr. W. A. Chapman. parents and interested friends
r are asked to be present and on

CAn CA1TO VAY't3 favorite
sister, Blanche, has opened a time.Mrs.. Vivian Long, president Formerly at 903 N.W. 2nd Avenue

dry cleaning place on 2nd ave.
and 7th st. From this end tvf NOW-NEXT DOOR AT

the pen: Much luck to you Insure your salary
Blanche Drummer Man,
Prank DuBoLte is still movingthe Men $100 per week 901 N.W. 2nd Ave.
customers at the Sir John'sVIP
Lounge Band Leader Women $50 per week

the Cris El Colombo Patio to has the moved Embers from Restaurant HI 5-2516, Life of Florida ....-........--...,
on the Beach; before he

took the Jab, he made certain Lenny's Invites you to see its new store
could dine there
that his people
Proof of the pudding, Cris and Attention Ladies!

his combo Are playing their FREE Wallets to First 99 Customers
swinging music at the Embers For distinctive
which La located on 22nd At., hair .tl'

Just off Collins ave. NO! they Ing, hair coloring ....-.........--....
don't serve Chitterlings!! and or hair
weaving to fit

C. M. T.RAVKS: popular .Ml' your perftonall- SPEC'IALS$149 Sewing Machines $15.95 $19.95
ami beauticians, has opened her ta tty see M 1 s s
now modernistic beauty shop, -I4 Mary France* .
Electric Fans
formerly $39.95 $9.95
:located in the Hampton House. .DhonatberI now
She calls It the Hampton House :"'. new location of
"After Hours" Beauty Salon. t ,. employment. Radios Slashed from $37.50 to $9.95
asked her what did 'After f "
Hours' mean, and she said that _l:_' Ml1: Dixon .
>
she will ,be open on Thursday, has been for more than 10. Take advantage of these savings
Friday and Saturday nights till 'One ..01Uliml': outstanding
Beare'
all brads are done and that and fraaUfled' beautician To
can run way "after hours." be abreast<< with the modern do* ...-rr 4....-... .
Champ Floyd Patterson has a" And dont'ii of hair,dressing, she .. ", ,,,. .
let down feeling, because Miami ha attended workshop at Florida ;* -'
Negroes didn't come to the Agricultural and Mechanical USE OUR LAYAWAY PLAN
Beach to eee him work out. University. Recently he was a
Hundreds of white people, buta in hair style show
handful of. Negroes .He participant held In the city a of Atlanta, Ga. LENNY'S PAWN SHOP
Is fighting for us, the least we
can do is support him. .L!t *liss Dixon help you
took moM glamorous, visit her 901 N.W. 2nd Avenueh
PAUL )(. BRUUX who wrlt K t ogue Beauty Fair, 233 NW
the "Bruun Over Miami" column t } Bt.FR 0.6610.
In the Miami Beach Sun let hU : JJIft """ ftnl'nOm'7r1t' 1m 1m Tl'J'OmJnt: 7m'Om 12m mum:7r1t 7m'7rn'mum.'mununumlmunor.lUJlnr.n: nIn:un 5ft 1IIT

prejudice show in his column OB .. ."'. ,"+ ,

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I need to get Social Security TV NOT WORKING?
MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA payments Will my wife get
I SOCIAL SECURITY payments too? If you live In Liberty City or
PAGE 10 SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961 Brownsville we will repair your
ANSWER: You will need 3% TV on credit. Pay weekly. Free
I II years work credits. If your wifeis estimate. Call OX 19426. indf
r 62 she may also get payments.
A

TeensConference ](( o or Ii QUESTION: I am a housewife.My .
works for me three
__ maid
By PAUL II. WYC1IE JR. .A r u YOU
days a week. What must I do to
get her covered under Social Security
:NA V .
Question: I am 65. I h a v e ?

worked under Social Security ANSWER: If you pay her $50a
since 1941. If I start drawing quarter, you must report her BOGRACING
I. benefits next month, how long wages to the Internal Revenue
II. can I draw before they run out? will send a
-.;.:...-.:.- Service. They you
form to use for every quarter If
Well teentlmers, here we are zaar. ANSWER: Social Security will ask them for It.
again with the Teens' Confer Therefore, now that everything benefits don't run outl! After you '

ence. Today, we' l discuss your is settled, you can march you start drawing you draw for QUESTION: My husband is
growing up (how grown you victoriously home and proclaimto life. Of course, If you ,start backto over 65 and thinking of retiring
are.) all that since you are wilting work before you're 72, you He worked under Social Se-
So you think you've grown up? to accept mature responsibility, may lose some checks while you curity for two years. Before that
Well you have. And if you have may ,you please have the privileges are working. How much you he worked 22 years for the railroad
not kindly ask for a refund on due you. Just rememberthat lose will depend on how much We want to know if he
this newspaper (I'm just kid even though teen-agers you make each year. can draw Social Security.
ding) 'because it Is only to the have grown up, they haven't
adult teenagers that I addressmy necessarily "grown in," into the QUESTION: My father recent ANSWER: It depends on whenhe
remarks. You will simply ways of the world, so naturally ly died and I paid all the burial reached 65. If he was 65 before
not comprehend the facts ex they wouldn't be expected to assume expenses, since my mother was 1958 his two years Is
pounded in this type of litera the management of a fac financially unable to pay them. enough.
ture if you have not attained tory. Neither can they be allowed Should I claim the lump sum?
maturity. the full freedom of a 30 '
Now, let's get down to brass person who has "grown in." ANSWER: If your mother was Advertise! it Pays'' I
facts, the most obvious of whichis Besides, who wants everything living with your father at the
that you and I are teenagersand thrown at them all at once? It time of his death, she gets the --
Oh, the sermons that would be impossible to hand'eor lump-sum death payment no JT.:
inevitably follow that tiny nine get the full value from them. matter who paid the burial ex ,
letter word. But the following Right? OK. penses.
article is an exception to the
above statement. This is a dis So all the preceding talk applies husband
QUESTION: My was
to an average, mature,
cussion strictly between you, me
recently killed: in a car wreck.
teenager, 'but are you an aver
and the typewriter. No sermon
Can the children and I get Social
mature ?
is going to be preached. Instead age teen-ager
Welt, that closes today's Teens Security payments? My
we're going to look at certain,
husband worked in 1951 and
Conference until next week
so
ever-present topics and try to
long. 1952, but joined the Army and
find out just what are their was discharged only a few
good points and where we might months before he died.
have gone off on them.
Need Help With
ANSWER: You and the child
We teen-agers constantly demand That Income ren can get checks ,sInce his
Tax
more and more privileges, time spent in the Army counts
later hours, larger allowance, Return? for Social Security.
the car, new dresses, and ear ,
rings. And there isn't one rea I QUESTION: I am a 39-year-
The Miami office of the Inter
son on God's green earth whywe old widow with two children, I
can't have them, if we simply nal Revenue Service with the I and have been getting Social
turn the word privilege cooperation of the Lindsey Hop- Security since my husband died r
around and read what writtenon kins Adult Education Depart
My youngest child will be 18 in
the back. Just one word ment will conduct an evening
two Will checks be
responsibility. That is the end course in the ,preparation of in' cut off years.then? my
to all our problems. For every come tax returns at five differ' ItKI LSfrItu
desired privilege, (be willing to ent schools. The course is complete ANSWER: Yes, your checks : s
accept the corresponding responsibility in one three-hour session will stop when your youngest'
and your wish will which includes a half; hour child reaches 18, if the child: is $
come true Now this isn't Anderson question and answer period. not then disabled. -
fairy tale or Aesop Each class will be conducted by I ti ouf Orerti st annot supply you '
It's plain, everyday, 11th grade an experienced Internal Revenue QUESTION: I will be 65 in 'SEND h for MUCK 1IAM MATif ..O Box ,3457-F2 Savannah+ Qa
English (although I'm not In.. Agent from the local office. November. How much work do
the 11th grade) ; but, believe It These courses are, free with no
.. __
..'" r. --------------------
registration ------ -- -- _____
or not, there are many teenagers required. One classwill iiIJ.
who don't and won't.A be held from 7 to 10 p.m.

girl is chattering merrily at each, on of the the date schools shown listed: below For The Finest Apartments at Moderate Rates-Call

away via the telephone as the
potatoes boil over, the roast March 14, room 20, Southwest
scorches away, and the toast Miami High Center; March 16,
blows out the window by meansof study hall, Miami Jackson Center BONDED
a smoke screen. Yet, this .
same better half of a Saturday

evening date just last night an ., I
nounced to her family that she
was now a woman and as such Brand New Home COLLECTION s
should be allowed to keep awoman's 1'
dating schedule (every SPECIAL DELUXE
night.)

Next, find the necessary part 1073 N.W. 64th Street
of a Saturday evening date actually -
wondering why he and Only $2,500 Down AGENCY
his fellow; classmates aren't al
lowed to vote at 18. After all, Open Sun. 4-6 p.m. AIll/B

they're men, aren't they But CAPPER CONST. CORP. _
who wants fellows to have a I II

hand in governing our country I INDF The largest collection and rental
when they can't even make a I-
success of a .simple school ba
I agency in the South; operating in

IJlllllla fllll.LI lil 11.IILlil.llllllliilllTV


Service CallsALL $}.50 Negro Dade and Housing Broward areas Counties'y. .


L. L. BROOKS, President
MAKES-ALL MODELS PLUS PAnTS
MANAGING AND MAINTAINING MORE THAN

LARRY'S T.V. 10,000 HOUSING UNITS IN DADE AND -

WE BUY SELL AND TRADE TV SETS BROWARD COUNTIES

RADIOS, HI-FI AND STEREO REPAIRS


1551 N.W. 62nd Street OX 1-8024


.Tfiiiii. ??11Ii iI21Ii21IJ22 < .
... r.a.-' ..' ---- --'. .-i--.Nlrlr+.




M
12 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

MAIN OFFICE

2060 N.W. 75th ST. ...-........... PL 8.9827 1019 N.W. 6th ST.

3801 GRAND AVE. ....,........_ HI 5-1381 Ft Lauderdale ................ JA 43367
{
4240 N.W. 27th AVE. ............ NE 53466
'" 339 HAMMONDVILLl RD. .

1675 N.W. A2nd 8t. OX 14423 Pompano .......---.?......_... WE 31235

17325 HOMESTEAD AVE. 14460 N.W. 22nd AVE.

Perrin' ............ CE 53653 Opa Lock MU f.0617
FREE DELIVERY DRUG


1163 N.W. 3rd Avenue FR 38416THE

.. \ '
HAROLD JOLLIVETTE. Manager
.
.
-'F 'ffj; "',tea





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THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA ';

,
'
\ I. SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961 PAGE 1% i
., :
_._ _._
-- ------ --
'. ,
NEW BETHEL BAPTIST &= -I.4:
MT. HERMON A. M. >

.
1671 N. W. 68th Terrace Rev S. L. Gay, pastor

Rev. Ernest Williams, pastor Sunday School . . 9:30
f
to uu- leacon Fred Williams reporter Morning Worship . 11:00 '

'me Sunday School . . 9:30: Evening Worship . . 7:00 4
Morning worship . 11:00 Publicity Committee
Evening Service . . 7:00 \
_. The Mt. Hermon Church is )
Each Tuesday night there Is presenting the North Dade High '
prayer meeting at the church. School Thespian Society In.' l'
FIRST UNITARIANWho ST. LUKE BAPTISTRev. CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Members and friends are urgedto classical drama in two acts, en '
Is Albert Schweitzer?" atttend. titled "Medea." This play was ;,
P. W. Williams, pastor Christian Science the Pulpit Boards presented on two other
jl 1 be the sermon topic of the Mrs. Society, NW March 19 occas- '
tv Robert W. Sonen minister Burnesta Green reporter Miami, holds Its services every will celebrate their anniversary. slons to capacity audiences. If 'j
1 the First ,Unitarian, Church Sunday School . . 9:30 Sunday at 11 a.m. Booker T. There will be a large program you missed the last production I..
Morning Worship . e 11:00( Washington Sohool. Testimonial and who would like to 'of this. play then would be
anyone you
ated at 46 SW 29th Road, on BTU . . . . 5.30:
meetings Is asked' to Sis not
jnday, 11 a.m.For Evening are held once a month, participate lee doing yourself an injustice
Worship . .
three Thursday evenings 7:00 the last Wednesday In each Burrows to see It this time. If you did
Inning March 16, Mr. Sonen, Sunday, March 12 ends our month at 8 p.m. Indf There Is a sale at Sister see the last production then you
111 give a series. of lectures on pastor's anniversary. Sunday at Barr's home on Saturday. will be sure to want to see It

Introducing Urtltarlanlsm" ate 3 p.m. the Sunday School BTU, New Providence Baptist again.

church. These meetings aree Junior Pastor's Choir, Junior Ushers, Sunday School . . 11:00: TRIUMPH CHURCHPrince The time Is 8:30 p.m. In the "
and open to the public. Board Aid Club and Trustee Morning Service . . 11:00 C. Mobley, pastor North Dade High auditorium on

At this and service the general church BTU . . . ..... 5:30: Sla. C. McKinney, reporter Wednesday March 23. ., o
THE HOUSE OF GOD wi 1 ,be all presentations Evening Service . . 7:30: School of Wisdom . 10:09
made and all nice things Y. P. E. Band . . 6:30 Price: Adults $1.00, children
SAINTS IN CHRIST will be said to the pastor and We are thankful to God for Evening worship . . 8:00 50 cents.
1612 N.W. 62nd St. wife. The president of the Pas.tor's His many blessings. We are ask I
Mother E. L. Orange, pastor Aid and superintendent of ing the members to continue In Each Saturday there is a sing MT. CALVARY BAPTIST
Joseph W. Covington, reporter Sunday School will have chargeof prayer for the sick and those Ing program at the church. The I
linday School . . 10:00 this special service. who are grieved. Let us continueto address Is 14901 NW 22nd ave. Rev. E. M. Thomas, pastor
forninff Service . 11:00 Thanks In advance to the pas look forward to our Woman's Don't forget to tune In to Phyllis Myers reporter
P W. W. U. . . 6:30 tor and wife. Refreshments will Day program. "The Words of Eternal Life" Sunday School . . 9:30:
|renlng Service . . 7:30 be served after the 3 p.m. ser- each Sunday morning at 8:45: I' Morning Service . . 11:00:
service. MT. SINAI BAPTIST until 9 o'clock on station Evening' Service . . 7:00:
The YPW will be sponsoring: I WMBM\ Don't forget Youth
h annual YPWMU Day pro Rev. S. A. Thomas, pastor Night at the church on Monday Sunday night we had a vtait
ram this Sunday evening at 3. GRACE PRESBYTERIAN Mrs. J. S. Walker, reporter nights with the youth In charge ing minister, Rev Scott The
)oth morning and night service Sunday School . . 9:30: of the service. topic of his sermon was "The
ii'l be carried out by the 6895 N.W. 14th Ave. Morning worship . 11:00 Glorious Gospel."
PWMU. Come and hear about Rev. W. F. Savoy pastor . . .
BTU . . 5:00: Church of The Open Door ,Next Sunday all day the JunIor
oung people of tomorrow. Sunday School 9:30 Evening worship . . 7:00: Church will celebrate: its
Morning Service 11:00: ( (Congregational)
ST. PAUL A. M. E. Evening Service . . 7:00 The popularity contest be RPV. H. C. McDowell pastor second the Youth morning Day. The is Mrs.speakerfor V.
Wed. Night Study . 8:15 tween the Sunday School de A. E. McNeal, reporter
Rev M. J. Fayson pastor Youth Fellowship Friday 7 partments of St. Paul AME and Galney There will be a programin
Mrs. Lee Cray reporter p.m. Mt. Sinai has begun. We are Rev. McDowell was back In the evening at 3:00.: Also on

unday School . . 9:30 The women of the church will hoping that you will support us his pulpit Sunday after a few Sunday, night they will crown
Morning Worship . 11:00: be presenting a Lenten play In this contest by joining us ina days away, where he had preaching Miss Mt. Calvary. The public Is 1
"vening Worship . . 7:00 during the Sunday evening ser Straw Ride sponsored by the engagements in Birmingham Invited.
vice March 12. The women will Mt. Sinai Church Tuesday, Tallade-ga College, Ala.: and ,
Our first Sunday service was have their monthly meeting March 14. The group will leave visiting In Atlanta. While he I TEMPLE BAPTIST
[very impressive. The sermon preceding the service, and they from the church 8 p.m. Rev was away Rev. Wicks, associate I
I was dynamic. The pastor spokeon will provide refreshments after Fayson and congregation will pastor of the Coral Gables Rev L. A. Thompson, pastor
"What Will we do With the service. Visitors are warmly worship with us March 15. Let Church preached for us. We are Sunday School 9:30
Jesus!! Mrs. Delancy, the sister welcomed at both" morning and us come out and bear witness to always glad to have Rev. and Morning worship 11:00
of Rev. Williams: worshippedwith evening worship. this joyous service for Christ. Mrs. Wicks with us as they were BTU 5:30:
us Sunday morning. with us in our early beginning. Evening worship 75:00

The Missionaries held their RPV. Savoy wi'l present a ra ST. MARY'S C. W. M. Circle 1 of the church will A "Benefit Program" will
[ regular meeting Sunday evening. dlo, message, "Wings to Wor serve a Lenten breakfast this be sponsored by Mrs. Rosa
The pastor Is asking all mem ship" on station WMDM this Rev. H. A. Culmer, paitorMrs. coming Sunday from 8:30: to lor and Mrs. Vernell Stranchan Tay
bers to support the rally between Sunday at 7:15: a.m. S. Dawkins, reporter 10:15: Friends and members are Sunday at 3:30: p.m. Membersand
Mt 'Sinai Sunday School Sunday School . . 9:41: asked to come and bring the friends are invited.
and St Paul Sunday School. Mr. On Easter Sunday the first Morning worship . 11:00 whole family. Adults 50 cents
Dradwell rendered a program quarter of the year will be over Evening worship . . 7:30Sun'day and a special small:! fee for child. The choirs and the childrenare
Dy that time we hope that each Mrs. Rebecca Crowder is busy
Sunday afternoon In the Interest ren. preparing for the Eas
of Men's Day. Let's a'l, go member will have contributedfully School was opened by president of Circle One. ter activities Parents are asked
to church. Please don't forget to the support of his own the superintendent, Mrs M "Talent Unlimited" Is the by.- to cooperate.
financial pledge to the church. Worthy. The lesson was reviewed of the
'he' sick and shut-Ins. word of all the members
by the superintendent. Mrs. church We are asking you to Every loyal Temple-ite Is
S, Saunders was pianist. looking forward to Sunday,
calendar April 6,
Liberty City LutheranW SPIRITUAL BAPTIST circle on your March 26, with high expectation.
Morning devotion was led by for a date at Northwestern High That Is the date set for the
W 58th St. and 15th Ave. 10250 S.W. 176th St. 'Rev. H. V. Steward. Rev. Burns School to witness the" program, I nual Contest Rally. No one an

The newly-formed Terrine Florida was in charge of the testimonial "Talent Unlimited You can should get left In this drive, but
fi'y Liberty Rev. Ernest Hutcheson Jr., pastor service Which was verY tn.nlrfnir get tickets from any memberof those who choose to be numbered -
Lutheran Church holds
the church. Adults 11.00, stu
lie lectured r rght.r "
the
minutes among "Jiving dud The
worship services
Sunday
every cents You can't afford
dents 50 -
from St. John 14 men will
meet this
afternoon subject "I Saturday
at 3 in the
p.m. miss
to such a treat.
am going I will night to how
send the see their
breezeway! of com- strategy
the Carver YMCA, Friends are always welcometo
forter. Is
No. 1 and 2 choirs working
furnished
NW
58th st. at ,15th ave. It is come and worship with us at
music with Jennie Parks
hoped that before too long ar at the organ. No. 1 ushers our 11 a.m. service In our now Sunday services will be as usu
rangements can be made for ed. serv home, 786 NW 61st st., where al.
morning services. the door stands open to welcome

The sermon this Sunday will Evening devotion was led by you. z
*>* preached by the Rev. James the pastor. He preached from Call HI 5-2510
nouman, and its topic is "We're St Luke 6 chapter and the 8th
In Good Hands" verse, "The withered hand. CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP For The Golden Shield

The Sunday !School which Everyone was filled by the holy '
has doubled in size In the last spirit. Communion was administered 220 N.W. 20th Street Life Int. Co. of Florida
Elder G. G, Fann
four weeks Roth choirs furnished pastor
at 2 The
meets
Adult p.m. Sunday School . . 10:00 I
Bible Class is presently music with Mm. S. McFord at _
Morning worship . 11:00:
studying the teachings of the the organ. Both usher boards Christian Study . . 6:00:
Lutheran'led Church. This class is served. Evening serviced . 7:30 Drive CarefullyNot
by the Rev. Walter Plnnt.
The devotion used 'by WMBM Sunday, March 12 at 3:30: ..... -- ....
at 6-30: a.m. each morning p.m. the public Is Invited to
rayed "Portals of Prayer," is y, come out and help the missionary a// Palm Readier Not a Fortune Teller

being provided by the Lutheran celebrate their 37th anniversary Not a Rootman Not God Either But
Church of this be : : at the church, 1609 NW
Copies
obtained by contacting the may station ; 5th court. The speaker will be JUST A GOD SENT MAN

: the Rev Pridgen of Matthew Rev. Shepherd Bogaetora
Temple AME Zion Church, Feb.
N--- 22 thru the 26th .o..... ,...,.l...... ..,w Do you hate A problem?
BAHA'I ASSEMBLY We to observe the 2nd 41
pause ?
of Our general conference which HualneM Had, Marriage
of the passing
Mr, Ethel Holmes wife of anniversary our late pastor, ReT C. C. convened at the church was well d ; Falling, Can't win manor
Professor Maurice Holmes of March attended and the session was ovtehe
who passed away woman you JJocn
'the Gray
| Unlveslty of Miami, -will successful and our dele
served congregation very
lead the regular weekly discusJ 12, 1959. loyally He and faithfully.our gates were highly entertainedand Cross
$NW J+on at the Daha'l Center, 137 Services on Sunday will be ss their stay In the city was Everything Going Wrong?
11th ave. 8 Sunday, We are prayingfor
p.m. usual. very enjoyable. Health Dad? Can't
Satisfy
March 12. Her subject will be: our sick and shut-ins. Vlslor -
"The Crown of Servitude." : are always welcome. b Your Husband or Wife?
Everyone is cordially Invited THE INCARNATIONOn
to attend.. Want a New Home or Gar?
19
Passion Sunday, March ANTIOCH BAPTIST
will have our third annual
we -
MT. AARON BAPTIST Stainers Crucifixion Concert Rev O. W. Foster pastor

8340 N.W. lath Ave. along with Christ Episcopal Rachel B. Pratt reporter SEE ME TODAY
Rev C. W. Church choir. This service will Sunday School 9tQ
Scott
pastorSundaDves be held at Christ Church. Dur- Morning Worship 11:00 Remember I am not a for.
; Earl Golden clerkMorrntng the Lent .reason Christ BTU . . . . ,:3 0Enn.4ng tune teller, rootman or
School.?.?................. PJt ing 7:00
Worship ..........._.. 11:01 Church and the Incarnationhave Worship __ palm reader, I am not God,
BTU ......_......... ..: .... 8:00: two annual services to- The No. 2 choir will sponsor but a God sent man'|
Evening Worship; .: ::::::. 7:00: service one at each church. joint its third annual Spring Tea on __ It costs nothing to
Prar r "rrep.Jn. Tuesday .... 8:00: will climax our Sunday afternoon March 12 _
Lent service. from 4-6 p.m. at the church. The come in aad talk
_
,,
The Saints Ann-Margaret speaker will be Lester Albert.
Chapter is sponsoring their 3rd owner of Albert Funeral Home. 1 FR 9-9138 I
MIAMI TIMES ADS 1 Fashion Show presenting Mlami'i We are sure that you will like 627 N.W. 9th St., Apt.

Ten Best Dressed Women. 'to hear this dynamic speaker. In Key West Every Tuesday at 708 Angela Street
DON'T COST THEY PAY Watch for the place and date. Deacon R. ivory is president





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THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA IN MEMORIAMIn IN: MEMORIAM -

-- .. .. .
PAGE 12 SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961. I oving memory of, In memory ot pur i dear;ai:.mother ClassifiedGENERAL

.. MRS. GRACE LOUISE % grandmother' and gjat;;..grandmother
WILKINSON ..'...* ,'\ '
who departed this life, March MRS LOREnA.PERptALLwho "

. CARDSMEMORIALSCARD 10, 1955 May. she rest In peace, departed this-life-.. March 6, HAULING
and light perpetual shine' upon 1956. May she rest in peace.
her. '. .?: The < .
I l I .e. Family {? Call. Foster Hauling for any
... The Range and ..
moving job, big or small, minimum

OF THANKS. CARD OF THANKSThe Wilkinson Family IN' MEMORIAM $5, TU 7-8723.


We wish to thank the many members of the family of IN MEMORIAM In loving' memory- of our." dear FOR RENT
friends 'of Kenneth L' Bethel :;he late, .
who came to visit the family ,* RICHARD '''DeVEAUX Jr. In sad ,but :oving of .my dear mother, *,.3i .. FURNISHED weekly rooms.

and for the many kindnesses priest of St. Peter's American husband, n ::f4':: 1." $8.50 single;' $10 double. Mae's
shown. Many thanks and may Jathojlc Church, wish to express ERNEST JOHNSONwho J' ; .'. ', f s Y Guest House, 2170 Washington
'rest this life March 5 ,i r fj 1 ttf/ :: ..r,'.''''" ,
God's blessing upon you, their thanks and appreciationor departed I :. ,. Ave., Opa Locka. Mil
A ;
this is the prayer of his parentsand the many kindnesses shown 1963. t : ;,'. ..tin 1 :

relatives. by the. friends who called, sent Your memory lingers' in my {: :, ".:,, ; ,' FURNISHED Efficiency apt..
Mr and Mrs. (George Bethel, .lowers, letters, telegrams, and heart always Sleep on and take (. '. '.-: 709 NW 65th st. Free water
parents ;performed other acts of kindness your rest, I love you but Jesus Y' ., 'i',4i and lights Mil,
:. George Loisel Bethel, Bro. during their hour of grief and :over you best. .!
jereavement. Mrs. Mary Johnson, wife BEAUTIFUL 2-bedroom unfur

CARD OF 'THANKS I And family nished duplex apt. 1898 NW

CARD OF THANKS I h 53rd,. st..

The family of the late The family of the late, IN MEMORIAM FURNISHED ROOM for
young
SANDY McKENLEYwho
MR.
passed on February 8 and who departed WESLEY'this'SILAS life February I' In sad but loving memory of i couple, Liberty City area, OX

was laid to rest February 16 at 19, 1961, '''takes this method to our dear husband son and brother 1-3289

Daytona Beach, takes this method thank their many friends for FURNISHED
of expressing our sincere WALTER BRIDGESwho Efficiency for rent.
heir acts and deeds of kindness,
thanks and appreciation to the rendered' them during the deathof passed away on March 10, Nice neighborhood, private home,
kind ,1960. May be rest in 1387 NW 60th at. Call MU
many' friends who were BO their loved one. You came peace. I ro'r' 8,974.6.PARTMENT.
during our Mrs, Annie Bridges, wife .
'and understanding when we needed you most, and I
'hours of bereavement. Thanks Because of your prayers, God I Mrs. Carrie Bridges, mother I
for cards, telegrams, flowers, has given us strength, for sucha I Durant and Haywood .\ Two bedrooms,
,cars and all other kind gesturesof time as this. Special thanks to Bridges, brothers L duplex, 2362 NW 66th St.
sympathy which helped to the Elder and members of the Jewel Wallace, Ruth

,lighten our ,burden. Special Church of God of Prophecy, and Lennon, Leola Clemons, TWO BEDROOM apartment
vtaanks to the Richardson Fun- the Range Funeral Home. God sisters available at this time. It is Im-

eral Home, Thompson Funeral bless each of you. LYDIA JANE HILL I maculately clean. Only $18.00
Beach, Rev S. Please call FR 7-1206, 1851
of Daytona Mrs. Pearlie Silas
Home and
who departed this life March 10
IN MEMORIAM ,
A. Cousin of Bethel AME Children NW 1st court or call Rev
May God ,bless all of 1958. ,Bowles, sister, Mrs. Bu lard after
.Church. I ,
I I Beyond the gate our loved one '
He leaves to mourn his In sad but loving memory of 6 p.m. OX 17964. M18
'you. CARD
devoted and loving OF THANKS our dear daughter, has found happiness and rest

wife passing, Mrs.a Eunicesteen McKen.eyand The family of the late I ."." .x '. ...--. ,*_... __ mad there is comfort In the FURNISHED ;efficiency: Privrte:
that God
thought loving
a
a host of relatives and sor. A 1, best. home.'; 'Call OX 6-26462 Ask tfr
.rowing friends. mows Mr. or Mrs.. Taylor 2223 NW. ,
The Children: -
61st St.3BEDROOM.
:
W. C. Bethel .

CARD OF THANKSThe Enid Rahmlng .,; house. 14780 Monroe

a4 tt Ellen Welch St., Richmond Heights, PL
: of the late rvMy -
family
4-4745
after 6'p.m.. or BondedCollection
HARRY BOSTON Agency -

who departed this life February CARD OF THANKSWe

24, 1961 fail to find words'ade'' FURNISHED ROOM in qtflet

quate to express our sincere and PM the family of the late, 59th St. and 30th Ave. home.

'....thanks lor the kindness hourof RDV. W. D. DULLARD Radio, TV, telephone, parking.
help rendered during our wish Call NE 4-7934 after 10
bereavement. A special thanksto to express our sincere' appreciation p.m. Or"
Sundays
Funeral Home, for the many fexpres-:
Thompson ,
along of extended
Father Clark. Father Sands and sympathy to
us during our recent bereave FURNISHED room in Liberty
members of St. Ann's Episcopal -
-- I" the Church of Ilallandale.Neighbors meat Floral sprays from the following City area, OX 13289. :

.:, of Ojus, 7th at., In y persons and groups were
friends for highly appreciated. The employees EFFICIENCY.. Furntshed, Fre
and ,
Liberty City : of the V. A.. hospital water, gas, electricty. Phone
letters,
cards telegrams,
,
your laundry Mrs. Vashti Manes and PL 40326.
and other gestures
flowers, cars
family Mrs. Francis
of kindness May God's each richest and Lj'm Mrs. Mizpah Crutchfleid Symonette, Key, FURNISHED rooms for nice

blessing shine upon West; Vincent G. Symonette, couple or ,single man. ;NE 5-1920. .
-
everyone.. Neighbors of Fifth Court 2137 NW 59th St.
Independent
,
Mrs. Adelald Boston, wife -.- ...--...... Life Insurance Co.
Mrs. Ella Allen daughter dip
REVA LEVA FRANCISwho trlct 5 agent, Mr. McSwaln, the 2D RED 00M, furnished apt.
John H. Boston, sonFive
Grandchildren and a ''RICHARD SYLVESTER SMITH departed this life March 12, Coleman and Bandry families! Reasonable, OX 6-0919.
and St.
1959. Mary's Wesleyan Method1st
-
host of relatives take this opportunity to thank Church.
A beautiful
rose was plucked
our many friends for their many FOR SALE
IN MEMORIAM expressions of sympathy duringour nut of our earthly garden of Our special thanks go to Rev. I
and ascended to the
flowers,
recent (bereavement We are E. A. Culmer St.
Mary' W. M. CBS
duplex $16,700
,heavens above. May her little $1,000
"A'ways a silent heartache, grateful for the numerous cards, soul rest in peace. Church and the ociaterminisers down, FIIA open, 1-5 daily, 6201
.Jnd silent tear te'egrams and flowers. Special who officiated: during the and 5205
many a Mrs. Aiice Francis, mother NW 15th ave. on cor
But always beautiful memories, thanks to Rev J. A. F. Finlay. Eugene Francis, father jervlce to Mrs. Richardson and ner, lovely home on one side
son and members' of Macedonia her staff of
the
Of one we love so dear Garcella Francis, sister Richardson Funeral plus apt. to 'rent.
Baptist Church and Bethel-Wil- Home for
their
In memory of our dear mother excellent
Mrs. Tomezlne Jaskson,
dams Funeral Home for its untiring I service, and to the
many friendsof LARGE
.. ., grandmotherMr. CBS home 'by owner, 2
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1 '.P service. He Is gone but notforgotten and Mrs. II. L. Francis, Liberty City, Miami and Per tl'e baths, 2 bedrooms plus extra
; and God
rr- may bless and nine for
cY their numerous of
deeds
room be
.. .teep you in his care. grand parents and family kindness. ; can used as 3rd bed.
Mr. and Mrs. Alton Reeves, room, separate garage 18x21 ft.
Mrs. Doris G. Smith, wife
,', .t. t ,Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester aunt, uncle and family Rev. Bullard :leaves tot mourn Total 600 $85 price $15pOO. FHA $12-
Smith, parents } loving wife. Addle, two sons, per month. Other terms
Richard Anthony, son IN MEMORIAMIn a stepson, two grand daughters, available 1475 NW 52nd St.

\ Paulette Louise, daughter three great grand daughters, I
... memory of our dear many nieces and and | DO YOU WANT a bargain'; ? On
.: father and ''brother, son'l nephewa-l a account of sickness price reduced

host of
; relatives and trleids.IN .
IN MEMORIAM: $2,000
.t. '.. for quick sale $500
\e., In sad but loving memory of down. Full price $11,000. House,
"
: our dear son and brother, I MEMORIAMIn 2 bedrooms and two apartments

t' -. .. _. ,_. all furnished. 1044 NW 64th St.
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sad but loving of
memory
?: our father and brother' WANTED

:
..1.', r j I Iltjir WANTED FEMALE

MRS. MALVINA DAVIS CITY OF MIAMI CIVIL

who departed this life March 14, SERVICE
1960. Competitive exams for
i it I RECREATION SUPERVISOR
Tls sweet to know we will meet $324 and $11

again, aPMS 40-hour, :week
Where parting is no more f Dade County resident one

And our dear mpther we loved year. Age 21-44. 2 :years college
so well, training in physical education' or
Has only gone !ibefore. 1 year college training in physical .
God knows how much. we miss' : education and 1 year experience
her, In recreation; supervision,
He counts the tears we shed, or high school (education plus 2
And whispers. "Hush. ; she only 4"", ; years experience in recreation
( .. sleeps, t+ w supervision.
( Your mother Is not dead." Only U. S. citizens apply be

Someday, sometime, our eyes fore March 24, 3318 Pan American
shall see Drive.

,... ; '\,, The face we ,loved so well -
,"---
Someday, sometime her hand WILLIAM ADDERLEYwho f on

I' ..'f"'III,, we'll clasp departed this, life ,March' 9, Life of Florida. Insures
.. And never say farewell. 1950.
Lovingly remembered and sadly CAMPBELL "Dubber" MOSS I 1, Many faces' we loved have left From ages. 1 to 85
.i," missed. who passed away on March 6, us,
11 j : James A. Davis, son 19S7. But united there will be, HI 5-2516
"i... Francis Delevoux, daughter May he rest in peace and may When our Lord shall come In HARRY E. ROUNDTREEwho
i'.':: -.' Margaret Clark, daughter light perpetual shine upon him. glory, died March 7.. 1957. $12 per day Hospital for all

'+ ; Joseph C. Davis,. son Mrs. DollU Moss, mother First of all we long to see, Gone but not forgotten.

; Y .. AVbertba Ferguson, daughter Campbell Moss, Sr., father Weary souls will rest forever Josephine Simmons; *ster ". -:: J ..
""<' "t' Evelyn Davis, daughter Mrs. Mae Bell Moss No more sorrow, no more pain William Roundtree brother
., :/ :Prince Farrington, brother twin sister In the time of restitution Harry Jr., Ronnie and MIAMI TIMES ADS.

Ruth Hankerson, sister Eugene Moss, eon With our Savior we shall reign. George Roundtree, soat' DON'T'
I Eight grand children Tyrone Williams, nephew |I The Adderley Family Mary Roundtree, daughter COST THEY PAY


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I ed March 4 in the chapel. .
: I COLONEL CLARK THE MIAMI 1 MMES MIAMI, FLORIDA
DEA'THS-, M ,,"L11saWilliams) of ,2140

W"HSSSf" WOpa Locks, TO ADDRESS SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961. ... ... PAGE 13 "
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died *M"roll in her I ,
r---,. ? home She LEGIONNAIRES iI. ( ,
,
: a eon, Willie| -
btoth!TvnJy a :; ;
Aim tot Jt S fttenlf1re, > oth.rs. Arrange. Spiritual Tea ,.;
incomplete, ,
fizz Bell e ox, age'fit (jf IA't. j 1' I", f "8 .
4640 ?* 4at are, "le r 7. Shfi cande her jiiiie kep( r.; :.;f i T' WCednesdayf March: 16:, 8 :p.m.
t
lear ao fwjm Orlatidd.! She Islurrlvea _.. ___ County sponsored by Geneva 1 and Oer- i:

by a son' Will, 'b\i1etf JS"Elizabeth ,,, J-Snttsba f -.T!* IF IiElovie ; r Jet,, the home of' .Mr;" .and \ 4

C x's, .Kindergarten: : three ft NW' sist st:, died :Feb, a3, NewsBy Mrs. Dan Ferguson, 1081NW64tlf <;*.!
hehUr\ 'Victor!* .Viwori,_.Fafe <- ,Survivors are a mother, thfee ,et." Speaker will .be Mrs .
E. Hill\ ,ana'Amanda. PjeJri. sister -and a Husband, Thd Hist* Virginia, Grant. The public is in* .,

ling wbob she lived.wih, rev mail Funeral Home Ik handling yited,. .. ',
n grind chlldreft,, -great the remains in Eastman, Ga.Mrs. Walter Bowe .', :'I.. l'" '

raldd. .. '- ,.' F$ : (: '
Services w11e in Orlando Grace Jefferson of 692 ( -, -.--- -- ZETAS'aContinped ; .....
arch 18. Richardson Funeral NW 13th et., died Feb 23 in 1 ;.
charge' Her her' home. (Buddy) Fu&sell died trom.page, iy .
4ome Is In body, Survivors are a hua- A, v .. a
from Thursday Mod, a daughter: I tyGa on Monday, Feb. 27 in Memorial
jllea In repose The body will :
-" oe shipped to Hospital. He was a brother of Woman'of the Year and Mrs:
noon thru Friday p.m. Georgia for burial.; the Doris,
Rev E'lls King, owner of Carey Smith.-Johnson z

,..e.(",, .'. ',. JA'- '. Mrs S. Hajrward 'of 10657 SW the M. and G. Super, Market on photo. .
Range Pembroke Road and 48th ave.
: JIf' i'3r$1 at:. died March;*&Mn' her Services were held March 7 at Held at James E. Scott Community
f!
home; Survivors ark' a" husband, auditorium the
Mrs. Willie t Mae Lasslter of mother. Gfthsemano Baptist Church in programwas
12 children The'
Taylor presented from
1000 NW 63rd; st. died March 3fat Funeral ,. West Hollywood 5-7 "p.m.'
Home In Belle Glade Is March 5. The group cited four bf
was
She '" 1
Jackson Hospital. a handling the final rites. f their eorors for their outstand
or'Qnitman, Oa., and had
native ing service to
J the chapter and
lived In Miami. for 25 v*>irs Baby' Girl harp of 368 NW Co'onel -- To the people of Carver Ran Zeta in general. They 'were:
[ rvlcM were held in Greater 11th Terr., died Feb. 26 In Claude C. Clark, a ches: The Community Park launder Mesdames Marian H. Shannbri,
\ AME, 'Church ,Thursday.She veteran of more than 35 yearsof
Bthel Jackson Hospital. Graveside fun new management. Play associate director of South
t!. survived by her husband, eral was held March 2 at 3 p.m. honorable service with the ground for children at all time. Eastern Region; Ruth North
Army, before
[ Sv'vester, three sons, Charles Survivors, are Mr. and Mrs. will be the retiring recently, | If your lodge or club would like Po.lte, associate director Ami-
Wl'llam and Alonza: three Sharp principal speaker at to use the park or the commun cae Affairs for Southeastern
sr the
daughters, Vivian, Gall, and local observance of the 42nd ity building please call Harry Marguerite V. Miller baslleuiM ;

Rozy'yn, three grand children Valerie Brown of' 1800 NW American anniversary celebration of the O'over, YU 3-6655 or contact or the chapter and Dorothy 'J.
and her mother, Mrs, Odessa 3rd 'n., died ',Feb. 14 In her Legion Sunday. him at 4350 Pembroke Road. K 1'! .

Adams. home.'Graveside, services Feb. 17 I Sponsored by the Tenth Di I
I at 2 'p Mrs. Llllle Anderson,, of 1404 Mrs. Percy Brown the local John Griffin Post No. The Veterans of Foreign Frontiers for Women in the
NW 59th st., died, March 4. She 165, Robert L. Clark, comman Wars of South Broward Post Sixties," a panel of women rep
had lived here .sInce 1955 coming ,Mrs: Bpltania Gonzales of der, serving as host. The cele are making plans, to install their resenting the four sorority
trlri1.Cunibe land County. 1465 NW 7st ct., died March 6 bration will Include memorial officers (,March 18 at the Chain groups discussed women in bu*.
NC The body was sent to Win South Miami. mess, politics, human relations'
n Arrangementsire services, at 11 a.m. at Mt. Oli ber of Commerce Building in '
tpr Park, for fnal'rites Sunday. Incomplete. vette Baptist Church, Colonel Carver Ranches. and economics. She is survived :by a daughter, 'I Clark will deliver the address at ; Mesdames Eunice Liberty
Mrs. Clara; Younrtlood, and four a the memorial services. I (Slema Gamma Rho) ; Edna)
SODS Albert,,; Daniel, Norman and i Williams (Alpha Kappa Alpha),
Eaphfrora whipper,' and 18 CAL'S Also Included on the list of Auxiliary will serve as co-hosts Rosetta Vickers (Zeta Phi Beta)
grand children. activities during the celebrationis at this event. and Cora Culver (Delta Sigma
BAR & GRILLENOW a night of fun which wit; be Theta.),_ Zeta soror Ruby Duren
Honrv Joyce of_5419 W. 16th held at the Post home, 340 NW All Legionnaires, Auxl'Iarie. served as moderator. _
st. West Hollywood, died 'March 13th st., Wednesday, March 16 and the public in general are invited I'
B HO came; to West Hollywood: i SERVING at 8 p.m. Members of the Post to both events.ROSCOE for Serving'their, sisters as honorary were the ushers RKo

In 1949 from Quttman. Ga. Services BREAKFAST LUNCH =: ::. .:. ::= =:;; =: =: -: : Sigma Chapter brothers
- - --- : of Phi
will\ be held Saturday at neta Sigma
fraternity, Membersof '
3 n.m. |In Getrwemane Baptist AIND DINNER I: the Amlcettes, young ladles
Church He Is survived ,by his, GORDON representing
achplarshlp,
wife, Mrs. Isabell Joyce, three At Popular Prices ( vice and finer' womanhood,, serr-ser
rianghtprs. Mesdames Eva Lee "" I "d the guests, following
the
Rebecca Hall, and Mary Good- 6006 N.W. 22nd Ave. t ra { "JUST A LITTLE BIT" : program.

man, two sons, Henry Jr., and '' AND HIS BAND :(
galley, a brother, Wesley and a Other program participants
enter, Mrs. Mary Newsome. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY CLUB 77 (Included: music by Soror., Lydia
Friends may call at the funeral) TIlgHB, meditation, by 'Soror
home until the hour of service. $10,500 Income Grand Ave., Coconut ;} Ruth Polite, the occasion by
Grove Soror Marguerite Miller; vocal
Samuel James Smith of 1469 Guaranteed yearly on NW 9th st., died March 8. Mr. ringer boat. Approximate operating I remarks by Soror Doris C.
Smith was' a native of Mlamian cost 2000. Price Thurs., March 23ELKS : Smith, chairman of Finer Womanhood
and was a member of the 916.600. }'IaOS42 or FR A ( Week activities.A .
Church of God In Christ He Ir 9-4R09.
survived by his mother, Mrs CLUB : special presentation was,
RInah Smith and a sister Mrs. Ft. Lauderdale : made to Christian Hospital by
Itose Johnson. Arrangementsare 'NEAR Soror Eugenia B. Thomu. Two
incomplete. Fri. March 24 young ladles who received l clta
EVERYTHING tlons for outstanding character
of Adv, $1.50-Door $2.00 I' Istlcs of finer womanhood. were
Girl Smith, daughter
Mr.Baby and Mrs. James Smith, of 3 bedrooms. ., 2 baths, large Miko Reservation Karly J presented. '

731 NW 56th st., apt. 207, was living room, dining room, They were Doris McAllister,

stillborn. in Mt. Sinai Hosplta. utility, separate garage, 2 senior at Booker T. Washington
March 1 f 5. Oraveelde services air conditioners 2 heaters. -- ='i1 1 and Joyce Johnson senior at
March 9. .. '
were conducted Northwestern. .. 1'." .
Private entrance to 1 bedroom MANKER FUNERAL HOME

LaCharma Hen'ey, son of Mr. and bath. Open Sun Notice
and Mrs; John Henley of 6791 6701 N.W. 15th Avenue OX 1.9151 .

NW 2nd'ave.., apt. 16 died day" p.m.
March '2., Final rites were conducted 4821 N.W. 10th Ave. WILLIAM K. MANKHK AND OIIAKGK HAYES, Owners CALLING ALL SHUTTERBUOS! .
AM persons Interested in photog.
in Arcadia. Drive by then call owner 24-Hour Ambulance Service$10.00IN raphy and would like- to join a
camera club, are asked to meet
MU 1-5381
"lf"lonne of Albert. I MIAMI IT'S at the home of Mr and Mr*. A.
J. Scott, 3318 Frow Ave, Coco

NW 72nd nut Grove, Tuesday, March 14
Judge Tate of 1910
St. 'was funera'ized March 2, "COMMUNITY/ AMBULANCE"NO at 7:30: For more pertinent in
formation call HI 8-3016 .
4 p.m. in the chapel. .

for Sale METER-NO HIDDEN CHARGESOXYGENOPA
CBS home
Pro
Mrs Wt'lIe L Ware of 11220 a

'O\nll Roost Drive Perrine, died LOCKA MIAMI BEACH SOUTH DADE
Feb. 23 in Jac'uon. Survivor I A Special!

are, husband, two sons, a daub Attention I $15.00 FLAT RATE OX 1.9151
ter. She was .pent to Lafayette, p
': ,. ,
Ala. for services. .J
) .. Ptorse'Reorf I IIf PORTRAITWhile

Jam.* J, Moses of 2070 All ,

Baba were ave., conducted died Feb. 26.March Services 4, Jrou,... need a large 2-bed- 3-Bedroom Home with Florida Room you wait

at 3 at New Hope Baptist Including frame
p.ra home that has been
Church. He Is survived by h's -ootn $490 Down. $75 per Month 90cJohnson

widow Attie, mother, Mrs. Ollle custom. built, that can beSought

father.Mile Smith, a son, and step for only $400 down OPEN SUNDAY

-us closing costs and onlytl39 3081 N.W. 64th St. This is the home you have been
Vernell cklrf R. R.
Moton school student, was a ser month, see me. I waiting for. Very Rood condition, all large rooms,

drownlnsr victim Feb. 28. Ser 1.e double closets a large including large dining room and large kitchen, nice

vke* were head March 2 at Hurst bathroom, storm awnings, large lot with fruit trees,
Chapel AME Church.. Final rltT: find room, a fully tile'
Salesman Chris ChrUten-
in with hli' separate utility building
Chlpley. He raided
mother; two sisters grand, 'ah. tile roof and hardwood sen on property Sunday. Come by and see your

Parents Mr. and Mrs. Nea' floors. I'm rivincr mv- future home.
Shackleford: at 10241 SW lUst
St. half away for only S11.800. --o--

I'll see you from 2-6 p.m. "t
Joe Henry of 4408 NW 29th Be safe not sorry. We can finance your automboile

ave.by. died his Feb.widow 27. Effie.He Is survived a son 1130 N.W. 50th St. liability insurance on easy monthly paymentsGoodman's
of Miami
Joe a sister two brothers.
Chapel services were conducted P.S.-I've trot some friends Real
slate Insurance
&
March 9.Anguatv. ine- nice and 409 N.W. 17th Street
near J.. .t that are
.
: .
Holmes Jr.. son of '* .vreasonable too. 2688 N.W., 62nd Street OX 1.0380 Phone FR 7-2294

Mr. and Holmes of ,, -
Sri Mrs. Augusta diedIe1 .. ,
.NW -
10th at, Fla. City .
.
I ,
Rr."I .
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conduct .
%8. Services were : "







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--------- ::aooo.'l-- Christian
LUXURIOUS NEW

HAPPENINGS IN OUR SCHOOLS Vocational ACCOMMODATIONSGRANDSTAND


.. r Conference at 4Y

THE MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA ley was the speaker for the ser The annual Christian Vocational -
I vice. Mrs. Myrtle Bullard, 6th Conference, sponsored by
PAGE 14 SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961 grade teacher, La the leader for the Carver Branch YMCA and
this group. the Greater Miami Ministerial
Alliance, will !be held at the
FRANCES S. TUCKEROn YMCA on Friday March 31t e J
\ LIBERTY CITY EAST OPA LOCKAOn from 9 a.m. to 3 :t>.in. The pnt-

This month Is National Red Monday night, Feb. 20 the last Tuesday night: we were pose of this conference is to In-
Cross Month. In case you have East Opa Loclca PTA memberswere witnessed and shared one" of the terest and encourage youth of
most Inspiring events of the junior high and senior high age
I forgotten let's listen to our Inspired by a very enthus I I Ie !
The occasion was that of in the exciting careers of the
radio broadcast this Saturdayand iastic speech from Lester C. year.
learn from four cf our stu Albert: of the House of Albert. our dedication In honor of Mrs. ministry, Christian education,
missions, church music and YM
dents (Mrs. Sara Cherry'sroom Mr. Albert spoke on "How Frances S. Tucker.
and YW professional work. All
) the'meaning and pur- Can The Male (and Female) Our appreciation Is extendedto churches of Dade County' are Invited
poses of the Red ,Cross. Adults Help Our Youth of To. Miss M. Washington, our librarian *
to share In this wonderful
day?" A few of the Important who spear headed the
program. Ministers are asked to
To most of us, the Deauvllle
points that were mentioned were program. Assisting' Miss Washington send in the names of interested
Hotel Is just a name. Likewise, ((1)) The parents should become : were many other committees youth, and the registration fees, e
Floyd Patterson, although friends with their children so that helped to make our $1.60 to the YMCA, as soon as COLulNS
known in name alone to most of a? to'share their problems. ((2)) dedicatory ceremonies a success. possible.
us, etlll remains a person that One becomes a victim of one's The Frances S. Tucker family ..
we shall never see in real life. environment and since this Is would like to extend our deep -
On the other hand, to Alonza usually true then the parents est sympathy to the DeVeaux
Patterson, Elaine Patterson, shou'd be examples for the child. family In Its time of sorrow.!! Attention Unemployed W rkets 1
Rollon Johnson and Rosie Harris ren and good examples. (3)) The
1 these' forementloned two parents should help their children Spring Is coming) Being A FREE JOB SERVICE
thanks to mindful of the oncoming sea-
became realities ,become well-rounded '
Miss Sara A. Cherry their -mentally, physically, socially persons, son, the students are making Hat been established to help you find A. job during
sixth grade teacher and Miss mod religiously. continuous preparation for the this critical period of t ndhtp1 oyment. If you need a "-
Juanita Patton, who assisted the Miami Herald's spring Spelling
former, for they' had the experience nonsored Another one the of organization the activities Is Dee contest that will be held on job or if you are ah empldyer and need a good

of their lives: they met on Sunday by afternoon at 3:30, at April 12.I. hard and reliable worker-Call the

the whole Patterson brigade. which time we are having our .
J. Meares, principal; F.
But, if we all know Miss Cherry, annual "Calendar Tea." We will Murray and Mrs. L. Reed, re Jamaica Sam Job Finding ServiceOX
a trip like that is not all work have as our speaker, Mrs. Inez porters. 1.1541 6965 N.W. 15th Ave.
and ', for that following
play J Fryson from Bunche Park
Monday, these students werestanding Elementary School. We are also Our endeavor Is to keep our members working-No Fee
before the whole class having participants from North Northwestern BandIn
and their invited guests sharingthe Dade School our community and I

whole experience with the East Opa Locka Elementary'sown Concert Wed.The --............................................-.........................................
group. Thanks again, Miss Cher choral group. This will bea
ry for a new facet in the learn- treat you can't miss. Northwestern school band Please Help Build The

ing experience. Mrs. Josephine D. Mackey, will perform Its 10th annual

Our silent member of our fac nrlncloal, Mary A. Jenkins, reporter concert on March 15. Many out BROWNSVILLE COMMUNITY
CENTERBy
ulty Laban Conner, a fourth standing symphonic features will
grade teacher, has been most be performed. Among those
Instrumental every Saturday in numbers featured will be: Clinic donating only $1.00 to the
DUNBAR ELEMENTARY
helping to make our radio selection AA, Charles County
broadcast a success. A special The 15 members of Brownie Overture, Poet and Peasant, BROWNSVILLE IMPROVEMENT
thank you goes to Mr. Conner Troop No. 359, Mrs. Evelyn Overture, MartinQue, Descriptive
from the Liberty City' Elementary Takes. Troop Leader, gave a well Overture, Hungarian Dance No. ASSOCIATION
School Family. prepared program on International 5, Marche. Slave etc. Several
Friendship at the March creative dances by our dance 4825 N.W. 27th Avenue
,Mrs. G. Dobbs, .speech consul group will also be performed.The .
PTA
meetlne.'
tant, would have us rememberthe Information numbers performance will begin Your children desperately need
Included the Girl Scout your support
weekly speech. program which promptly at 8 p.m. In the audi
begins on March 7. The I Bounder: who mnv be a Brownie DON'T WAIT.
MAIL
programcan torium. The contribution Is only YOUR DOLLAR TODAY
whf'rA' Bnownle
the name
be heard over channel 2 60 cents, general admission.
every Tuesday and Thursday originated: and the Brownie Open House Party planned for all
Every music lover is invitedto
from 6:30 to 5:45: p.m. The -on". __
attend this unique M .a. un. __.
program.
NN..N..Nm..NN..u
first Entertainment' was provided *.NN.IN.
shall deal
program
with the
This promises to be the most
sound "th." W the'Mn A Including a medleyf
American French and Scanty successful presentation of the r
FOTTOW TTTR SUNSET IS songs! PS we'l as dances from season. This program will uti
COMING-WATCH FOR IT T."ance and Xferlro. Mrs. Lucille : lize some of the best talent of
7hpatlev. district nroeram ad. the school. There will be featured First Time Shown !
On March 6 Miss some well known
Annl M*or, wan special guest. guest
Hudson's class went on a field An ununuallv large number of conductors.
trip to The Tropical Hobbyland. 1 David Paschal Is band direc
The field trip commenced a Brents also! listened attentively tor. New Model Home In
.tudv. ot Florida: "Exploring **o the detailed report of the
State Convention
Florida." Mth annual PTA -
held In Orlando last
Please remember that our *w*>eV. Our delegates were Leon Job OpportunitiesDepartment
regular PTA meeting will be Kelly, unit preMdent and Mrs. Richmond HeightsSee
March 14. 8 p.m. In the cafe- r'herrvo Bover. Mrs Dover of Promotion and
torlurn. Let's be present and on made the renort. Mr. Kelly told Publicity, Greater Miami Urban
time. [*( the group that Mrs. Dover also League, SOlS NW First 8L, H.
Our weekly broadcast over erved both as soloist and song Allen Wheatley Jr., vocational' at 10205 S.W. 152nd Street
station WMI3M has been chan 'e der during; the meeting. services secretary. Phon FR
ed to 12:15: p.m. This week we Over two hundred fourth grade ,.8478.
can look forward to meeting our nuplls and 1R third graders Photollthographer (Coral Reef Drive)
Spanish speaking Liberty City made an educational tour of the
Console
ites. t Seaouarlum and Crandon Parkon operator
last Frldav. We were pleased Tabulating: Equipment Operator Visit Thelma Aranha on the propertyand
to receive congratulatory Driver (public welfare vehicles)
Song BattleA Credit SupervisorEngineering
messages the from excellent both places conduct concerning of Draftsman discuss the many other attractive

Battle of Songs between the nur pupl's. Thank Cashier
you parents!!
No. 2 Choir of Mt. Zlon Baptist for the fine home training you Police Clerk Officer homes available in Richmond Heights.
>.
Church
and the Gospel Chorus have given your children.
of Bethel AME Church will be Sunday afternoon the, Jail Steward
22
held: Police Complaint Officer CALL CE 5-1944
March 12 at 8 p.m. at members of Intermediate Girl or
Greater Bethel' AME Church, 246 Scout Recreation Leader
Troop No. 377, held their
Electronic
NW 8th st. The public Is Invited Technician PL 1-4061
Investiture PL 8-5586
to attend ceremony at the St. Parks Services Supervisor or
Agnes Parish: Hall. Mrs. Wheat.I (Catering Services)

I I


FOR SALE ; Special!

SEE THE WORLD'S !
n Money Available Now

. $250 Cash GREAT SPIRITUAL PORTRAITWhile

$69 Month BuysA LEADER FOR FIRST AND SECOND MORTGAGESAND

4ND PHYCHIC READER you wait REFINANCING

two bedroom home with Including frame

., fenced front yard, near BISHOP HUNTERIf 90c CONSOLIDATE YOUR BILLS

NW 46th St. Partly furnished -

Can today! you are tick' or werrlM 4.a't EASIER MONTHLY PAYMENTS
fall to eM m. today. QffU* k.....
dally 1 p.m. to t p.m. Thvrvday All transactions private and confidential
1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday 11 aum.o .
Duplex] S p.m. ,. Come in and talk it over-.No obligationASK
'"

$700 down $30 Mo. FOR MR. ADELMAN OR MR. WASSERMANMortgage


Will handle payments. Bal RBADINQ8

ance $10,800. CBS furnished. I s1...co GuaranteeCorp.
P "
; Near Manor Park Pool.
/
: See
today. 9417 8W 17 at.

_.
TRIO W19THOLLYWOOD .
REALTY
I a I
-i' 801 N.W. 54th St. LA. Johnson of Miami LICENSED BY STATE OF FLORIDA '


i ,., ..If....I-m....:PL,\ 9-8372.' OX 6-1740 PROF.. HUNTS 409 N.W. 17th Street 2815 N. Miami Ave. fR 4-1667 '

,I \: Phone FR 7-2294

'r ..
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,

THE MIAMI 1MES:
MIAMI FLORIDA
Elks ,Annual Attention All Vets ,,:
SATURDAY, MARCH 11 1961
,
PAGE 15
The American Legion William :

wit, c"S.. L>bbb.f.. ., y ..,' ,.. ':; L,. ;.. :.....<. = Oratorical Contest Henry Bethel Post No. 281 :
Q<::: -<:' la urging all veterans to join ui ..j
Sunday, March 12, the Elks In Richmond Heights and let'
will present their Oratorical Con make this a strong community.
Richmond Heights Flashes k teat at the YMCA, NW 58th st. We are still working and baring ,
and 15th ave. Contestants will our Saturday night affairs either
represent the following high In the Center or at the borne of
-- -- B> OhA fl. TAYLOtt schools: Mays, Carver, Wash- a Legionnaire. Also we are ask
ington, Northwestern and North Ing each and everyone to come I.,J
;.9 = .... 4? Dade. Judges will be members out to our tournament which
------------------------ -- of
A KEWCbMEIt -- Welcome so much the faculty of the University of will be each Friday night at 8:00 1
growth and activity as Miami. at the home of Joseph Steward, '.
We wish to) extend a hearty now in
our beautiful .
commun The committee promises that post commander, 14660 Fllmore 4'
welcome to James Banks 6f New
ity the
only one df its kind St.
each and
X'ork. City who la in every contestant will .
coming to South
Florida
or anywhere t
receive a prize. The winner of For further information eon 1.i
Florida for the first time to should
say. Everyone is
od- the contest, as usual will receive tact Joseph Stewart. Edward
seek_a permanent home. We, of ed properly: only beautiful I CBS a $100 scholarship.The Hanna Jr., or Murray James Jr.. t
the Heights wish that he
will homes, large lots smallest is chairman
school having the largest of publicity. INDP ,"
locate here. However, he will 75 x 100} a fast developing representation present will re
see Fort Lauderdale. West Palm shopping center, churches, and The Miami Colored Police ceive a trophy. State president
Beach as well as GreaterMiami schools, including several nur Benevolent Association is sponsoring William O. Perry stated that all
and then decide for himself. We sery schools and many other assets a benefit dance at the the Elks in this area have EXPERT WATCH AND
extend Mr. Banks the same gen- which go to make up a livable Bayfront Park Auditorium on promised him that they will CLOCK REPAIRS
erous' courtesies extended all clean community Thingswe March 19 from 10 p.m. until? present a united front in this
our friends and visitors hoping lack yes, some important The dance will feature Ray effort. We'll be seeing you Sun Andrews' Jewelers
he will locate in Richmond things recreation, park improvement I Char'es and his orchestra. Ad. I day afternoon March 12 at 3:00: 303 N.W. 2nd Are. '
Heights. (land is available: mission!! $ .75)n advance and p.m. All
more business places! a nursing $2.00 at the door. Tickets can work. guaranteed a.
BIRTHDAY PARTY Last home and others. We visualizea now be obtained thru the Miami 40 Years In Business
Saturday from 4.7, Jewel Armstrong complete community with Police Department (precinct). To Address FR 80162
celebrated her birthdaywith needed facllltleb installed. Our Buses to the auditorium will
leave NW 10th st. and 2nd ave. Bethel UshersUsher
large of voting precinct
a group classmates rust free water
and friends at the homeof found in some areas and a beginning at 9 p.m. Fare 20
her parents, 14440 Tyler St. closer fellowship of "Love thy cents. M18 Board No. 4 of Greater NEED MONEY
Games, dances and refreshments neighbor" In operation.PERSONALITIES Bethel AME Church cordially
were the order of the party. 12 MIAMIANS Invites you to attend its llth $25 to $600

Beautiful gifts were displayed of the week annual Spring Tea, Sunday Call PL 8-3653
March 12, 4 to 6 p.m. in the
and 'Happy Birthday" sung. -This week we wish to salutee
Mr and Mrs. M. Dorsey owners MAKE FAMUHONOR basement of the church. Mrs IDEAL LOAN
Walton Y. Robinson.
JUVENILE Delinquency is of the Pure Oil station. Those principal 6105 N.W.
of A. L. Lewis 7th Ave.
our No.1 enemy in Dade among of Richmond Heights who have ROLL Elementary will
be the
guest speaker.
Negro 'boys and girls. Our ranking not met the Dorseys have missed .
is 35 per cent of the delln two most pleasant people TALLAHASSEE Sixteen of
qupncy. That is far from 50 per anywhere. They have done a the 154 students making the
rent. It Is growing each month. most' excellent Job In selling not honor roll for the first semesterat
What can we do to help upper only station products, but courteous Florida A and M Unlversltv RUPTURED ?
hand this problem << and efficient services We made four points (all A's) and ,

A groun is now being organ' do want your cooperation for seven have been evempted from IHMttN ....I...... 0fIhe ......,.
Izpd with invitation from them at their service station. the registration fee for the TFWSflCOtT. AIhr 0eri'M..... AWl w
They are worthy citizens and spring semester .
Indies Culbreath and Sheppard we congratulate them. May Students who did not have to PILES RECTAL DISEASES
It interested in helpinsrto
you overcome are this fast growing they success.have years of prosperityand pay the $75 registration fee for : DR. LONG'S CLINIC nCl'.I: :: IT

problem, and live in Dade I the spring semester are Mrs.
I ___ _- Lutrelle McGlockton, junior
Countv where the problem I I.
home economics Port St.: Joe;:
growing vou have an opportun
Beautiful Home on Miss Darnell Mitchell, Junior,
Itv now. You will get further Information -
nursing, Century; Miss Geral. NOW YOU CAN BUY
as the tentative committee Your Lot
dine Ilolle, 4th year pharmacy
ration progresses and planning.: with organ Watch! student, Miami; Nathaniel N. 6-months' auto liability insuranceFor
Williams, Junior political scl-
7w ,
your local papers and this only $16.60 Down at
rolnmn for further develop ease, Tampa; James F. Williamson
senior, political science,
ments. Baker; and Yvonne A. Young,
HEART Junior, nursing Wildwood. SERVICE fIRST/ INSURANCE AGENCY
FUND DRIVE. Last
Sunday was Heart Sunday andn The following: students from 3497 N.W. 7th Avenue ''NE 5-6355

"nt' Heart Sunday" it was for greater the first Miami semester are honor of the rollees academic And 16300 N.W. 27th 'Avenue NA 46612BERKLEY'S
Tor Heart Association. M os t Complete Building Servloe IF YOU CAN QUALIFYNo
grateful thanks to the captain", year: William M. Dell,
Goulds; Willie Bryant, '''Goulds;
and the donors
for a great appointment
C PLANNING necessary
Alphonso Burnslde
Locka
Opa
t'au'.e' of heart health. The Association e BUILDING Lois A. Forbes, Opa Locka;; .Jloth offices open Mon.thrn Sat. 0 a.m. to 0 p.m

of Miami Joins your John D. Glover, Howard A. Hart
Scribe FINANCINGYour
area chairman for past ley Richmond Heights; Betty o
three years in a great b I g New Home Hosklns, Henry C. Ingraham; ..
"think "
you Next week wl'l Clifford McDuffy, Willie J. Mitchell -
bring you the full report and No Down Perrine; Thelma Payne,
names of Heart workers. Geraldine Rolle, Baljean Smith, CUT-RATE STOREThe

All who have not given and PaymentOver Curtis Taylor Jr., Ida Whipple,
wish to give, send or bring Florida City; and Bobbie R. Friendly Store With The Warm Welcome
your contribution to 14(501( Lin Twenty Year of Zeigler, Richmond Heights.
coin Blvd., or call CE 5-4246 Construction Experience 1201 N.W. 3rd Ave. Phone FR 4-2376

accept and a It vo'unteer for our report worker which will: Guaranteed SatisfactionoGCCDCc39 r The finest products at Cut Rate Prices
SEE THE
will FO In of Monday Greater to Miami.Heart Association 1f' fV' COLORED SOUTH'SLEADING WINTER MEDICINES

( Lydia rinklinm'a 1.50 1.00RSS Tonic ............ 2.M A 1.43
Do yon need a shop or store? Scott's Emulsion 1.70 OHc Dr. Tierce' Favorite
We have listed seven shops or np s t Super Aruihlnt 2.00" 1.00 Prescription 1.03 1.10
stores recently built except: two PL 1.3604 e sN" Super Anahlst Nana) New />'rone 7 pin lJ10Sprar

for rent or lease. If you are 888 N.E. 79th St. ic3s't "r" 1: .................................. 08c Father John's
interested call CE 5.4246, and Miami Super Anahlst Medicine ........... 1.M A 75o
9t you are interested in a home Tablet ......,,........ Otto & 03 'or land anywhere in Dade, call OPEN DAILY A SUNDAYS A.M. to 10 P.M.
also the above number. We
hare it. I MIAMI TIMES ADS JOHN A. McMINN. Owner

,
-- ---
NEW RICHMOND HEIGHTS DON'T COST THEY PAY

I-p.Never. -before has there been....___.1IIh! __ Let her of
years experience
guide
't1iiI'; : .::J>> :=> ::>- ::>- .",,. .",,,.,. ,,,,"" :::...::.>. .,y..rII .
----- and
"'-.c:" "-" "-" "- <" -"- '-<:".c.-.o-------- --- protect you throughout life
as a lighthouse guide the shies Ira LINCOLN ESTATES
I I AVON IS CALLING and storm love.For suttee In business

I IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD THROUGH TV
I
PSYCHIC READER o
I .. _CONSULT HER-
DON'T STAY IN THE RUT. GET
See the AVON representative in your OUT NOW. BY THE HELP OF WHY RENT ?

neighborhood and turn spare time to money GOD SHE CAN HELP YOU.

Office Hours:
Call FR 1-6408 0 a.m. 9 p.m. 3-BEDROOMS SOME GARAGES
Thurs. 9 a.m. to
.. ,,
;:; ;, ; 7 p.m.

rI DAILYSunday As Low as $250

I Not FICA No Balloon Mtff. No Qualifying Required :

HOMES FOR SALE 10 a.m. 3 p.m.READING r Prices from $9,300

$450 DOWN-3.310 N.W. 51st TERRACE

2 BEDROOM HOME-NEWLY PAINTED $1.00 UP

$750 DOWN-1866 N.W. 51st STREET $62.00 per month pay everythingSee

MODERN 2 BEDROOM CBS-FLORIDA ROOM 23 Years Experience
the three bedroom model at
$1,000 DOWN-1120 N.W. 56th STREET MADAMHUNTER

MODERN :2 BEDROOM CBS HOME AND COTTAGE 10835 S.W. 221st Street, Goulds

H. A. SIMON REALTOR NE 3-2663
167! N.W. 73rd ST.

MIAMI, FLA. DeCarlo Homes, Inc. HI 4-4681

Don't Write.-Call In Person

Advertising in The Mimi Times Pays Off I I ( ., .. .- --' .. I..





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; u. L tIMItW
MIAMI TIMES MIAMI, FLORIDA J. ,F. DEAL STUDIO

Story Raps Phon. FR 4-3034'
Magazine
PAGE 16 SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1961 '
307 .N.W. 2nd) Ave*
\ We copy And enlarge pictures of

KILLENS' :KNIGHT time, and now feature Hot Papa I Florida Prisons : f .f your loved ones At half pri tce. We
Turner and his talented family', make all kinds of pictures.

BEAT CLUB The'' Turner family has long been .., ,".', ill .......W......................*.........*...
r
noted for its
fine versatility In "
i im-H* m *m ! COMMUNITYSPOTLIGHT I show business and they' en TALLAHASSEE Gov. Far :
tertaln as only the Turners can i Is Bryant protested' Monday an McClairen Named 4 Z.Z.i
artlc'e: in a national magazine !
entertain. Every member of the New Bargains
family father son, and daugh telling of a Negro convict's .experiences I '.'
:
ELLIOTT J. PIEZB ]? MAKE ,OFFER
By ters are all; stars, and you'll in a Florida road Head Coach .[ .,,
"Wherever he goes, the enjoy their 'performance On I camp was a "gross misrepresen v' .' k I Open 3.5 p.m.
crowd goes with him." That's Friday night the admission IsI tation" of conditions in the Flor- at Bet
the familiar by-word of the many 75 cents, and on Saturday $1.00, ida penal system. Tune ?,,: ;,; .'Z! I Down Payment, -

night club, 'patrons In the Miami but? tables are always free. The story in the March issueof Pittsburgh. Jackt (QoosepMcClairen ) Your Lot or Home
area when discussing the one Yes, "wherever he goes, the True Magazine concerned I
top 'offensive enjl
,and only Clyde crowd Roes: with him" and you'll Willie Reid, who said he would .
; with the Pittsburgh' Steel,rb' for 1430 N.W. 59th St.
Killen and his certainly want to Join the crowdat die rather than go back to the \
popular Knight Clyde Iti'lens' popular Knight road camp where lio said he had the past ,five years, announcedhis 3-bedroom 2 baths, garage
!: Beat Club at Beat Club at the Sir John Hotel, been mistreated. retirement! Sunday to assilnxe( Oak floors built-in I Metric
the Sir John and rd ave. It's ,
\W Oth Street -
the 'of, ahead football coachat
I :1 Hotel, .NW 6th the place to go. Among other things he said post kitchen
at. and 3rd ave. The club Is normally closed on hU feet were chained togetherand Bethune-Cookman: College in" .
:Monday, but a special Victory he was mistreated by guards.In Daytona Beach, Fla. 1426 N.W. 58th 'Terr.
A long time Ball is planned for Monday nlte a letter to Editor Douglas McClairen, an outstanding
avorlte In nightclub following the championship Kennedy', Bryant said "I strongly pass catcher during his first BARON JE ,8.1340
:' circle In fight. protest this Irresponsible publication three sasons in the National
MiamiKlllens : of wild, unfounded alle Football League bad suffered NO MONEY DOWN
seems to grow gations reflecting on the good from knee trouble the'> last two We build on lot
name of the state of Florida and your
more the popular days go with by. his patronsas Advertise! It Pay1! I its, enlightened prison system. years.BEAUTIFUL .-

Kllens recently severed con .... . .
- -- """';"" - - .-. ---
nections with the Fiesta Clubat
the Mary Elizabeth Hotel and ..

transferred tions Including his- entire band, opera-show Our 8th Year of Devoted Service to the Community

and staff to the Knight Beat FOR A FAIR DEAL SEE FAIR REALTY
Club.at the Sir John. And almost ,
like daglc, the Knight Beat, i
which up to that time, had not .
enjoyed any undue success : ? HI ,
jumped Into the community \
spotlight aa the place to go. And ,.
the p'ace to go It Is. Not only ,-
Is'he packing 'em In, but, as : <'****v yfcfffy r
stated above, he seems to grow >
more popular with his followingas
the crowds, continue to In.
crease each week.
High on the list of stellar at
traditions/ offered each' : week at
the Knight Bent, is the popularSunday
afternoon matinee show
which begins at 4 o'clock and in I
which an array of stars and i
celebrities of the first magnK:
tude are presented daring the P
show. Goose Tatum, the famed
basketball star and Billy Baron This Gorgeous Home Can Be Yours
of the Ink Spots were only two
of the many celebrities who
visited the club last Sunday. THE ABOVE HOME WE CONSIDER ONE OF THE NICEST WE HAVE, BEEN
This week KilTens will feature
three bands at his Sunday PRIVILEGED TO SELL. PLEASE SEE IT! OPEN THIS SUN. 1.6 P.M.. SEE

attraction Canadians:, liu Bob Frank Allen anidhi Dubolse\ MR. GEORGE AT 1949 NW 152ND TERRACE. BEAUTY!. ''BRAND NEW 3-

Jones and his and orchestra the Jones, plus Boys.Dizzy Ad. BEDROOM, REAR JALOUSIED FLORIDA ROOM, BUILT-IN OVEN AND

mission is free and tables are RANGE. ALL LARGE ROOMS.
also free. NO CLOSING COSTS. ONLY $895 DOWN.

r i.r ONE MORTGAGE ONLY. ,

RsftftSS: __ #6L .,. T7 ____ __________ __ __ - --- -


Brown Sub Beauty New 3bed. DUPLEX

,,.. room CBS. Rear screened porch 3-bedroom, 2 baths. BeautifulCBS

built-in oven and range. See 5200 ,N.W.10th Ave. home. Oven and range,

2991 N.W. 43rd Terr. CBS, two carport, furnished, sprinkler system, air condition.,

Only $795 Down city water. ers, Florida room, corner. For


= = Only $995 Down the particular buyer.


ELLIOTT PIBZB CARVER' RANCHES -- :I See. 1580 N.W. 77th Ter.
.
I Open Sunday 1-6 I
Other "must" attractions on p.m. I A BEAUTY
Cute, small home. Ideal for I
list of Knight Beat
the weekly
See 5341 S.W. 19th St.
entertainments are u follows: A
couple. Partly furnished. Total %AAAA
Tuesday night Amateur New 3-bedroom CBS
Show, which needs no Introduction -
to Miami and vicinity, and $395 Down price $5,000. $50 monthly, one Only $350 Down
which is always a sell-out.
mortgage only.
Thursday night is Lad'iea'night
at which a parade of valu :: 2-bedroom CBS. If you can
able prizes are given away absolutely See 7531 N.W. 15th Ave.
: free every half hour. 3-bedroom completely furnisheddoll qualify. '. for FHA. No other clos-
Here, again, Klllens must be
commended upon his natural house. CBS, one mortgage $395 Down ing costs. Only $79.25 monthly.
ability and talent to come up only. Carport, close to buses, no < *' -
with something new and differ costs. Move in. I I
closing
See us to show inside
ent, when the occasion demands I .
t
it. The Thursday night attraction
is definitely something 'n wand Only $795 Down Open Sunday: 1-6 p.m. f n..i, _
different you''l like -- '
every minute of It. Admission is :::: ::1 Mansion 3 bedroom, 2 bath, : .' '1
also free on Thursday. = Brown''Sub. t r
Friday and Saturday are show 2-car carport. Corner double lot. 1 .
I 2-bedroom. Close in. Buses, : l1/ built-in And
oven
\ schools, carport, no closing City water, close to buses, shop baths

Lots of RoomIdeal costs. Move in tomorrow. ping, schools, Florida room. : range. to buses, schools.

for income or large family. Only $395 Down Beauty. Move right in.
3 bedrooms. 3 baths. See 250

NW 24th May. St.rent Small with down option payment to See 1923 N.W. 58th St. See 6090 N.W. 9th Ave., Only $995 Down

l boy. .

.
1!!
- - - --- ------------- -- ----- --------- ------- ---- - ---

j LOOKOwner I leaving city. SEE US AT 201 N.W.62ND STREET
Partly furnished CDS See 1463 .


down NW carport 67th payment., many St. Lovely extras.Go see 2-bedroom today Open. FAIR I REA L TY PL, 71645We


GOLD COAST REALTORS

? are open every day 9 a.m. to 6'p.m. including-"Sundays! ..
N.W. 2nd Ave.
,,4301 :
'..i : List your lots with us for quick cash sale. Best prices 'paidrUE
:':-r"' :*'_ PL :12428;

_..............' .. V""" .JtJ.V .J..J-V-L..JJ' *
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The Miami times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00256
 Material Information
Title: The Miami times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami Fla
Creation Date: March 11, 1961
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: African Americans -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1923.
General Note: "Florida's favorite Colored weekly."
General Note: "Tempora mutantur et nos mutamur in illis."
General Note: Editor: H.F. Sigismund Reeves, <Jan. 6, 1967-Dec. 27, 1968>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 25, no. 8 (Oct. 23, 1948).
Funding: Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: PJ-50006-05
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved. Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02264129
lccn - sn 83004231
issn - 0739-0319
System ID: UF00028321:00256

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59 P1
LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


Tempora Mutantur Et Nos Mutamur In Illis


D DISTRIBUTED IN MIAMI-DADE AND BROWARD CO U NTIES FOR OVER 87 YEARS

Volume 87 Number 11 MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009 50 cents (55 cents in Broward)



LOCAL EVENTS HIGHLIGHT BLACK MIAMI

RANGE GALA CARIBBEAN CATWALK WILSON FUNDRAISER

















S" . . " Rvan Hlla w -The MiamiTimes photo/ Sandra J. Charite - -W or ,-l ca3mpagnt hom
Miami-Dade County Commissioner Audrey M. Edmonson was Hundreds gathered at the Little Haiti Cultural State Sen. Frederica Wilson surrounded by supporters at her
honored last Sunday evening by the M.Athalie Range Cultural Arts Arts Center on Friday for the first Caribbean Cat- Fundraising Extravaganza held at the Karu & Y Ultra Nightclub in
Foundation. Left to right: Dr. Barbara Carey-Shuler, Edmonson, walk.A dancer walks down the runaway to Haitian Overtown Tuesday night.
Patrick Range II and G. Eric Knowles, board chairman. music.





Virginia Key Beach.Museum plan halted



Trust failure imperils $15 million bond money

By Oscar Pedro Musibay tory. _ ers and triggering the recent geted to cut their finding gap
omusibav@biziournals.com But, the museum isn't the departure of David Shorter, its . for the 200910 fiscal year.


It may take a public-private
partnership to revive ambitious-
plans to create a museum at
Virginia Key Beach Park, which
was Miami's black-only beach
from 1945 until the 1960s.
City Commissioners Michelle
Spence-Jones and Marc Sar-
noff have suggested partnering
with entertainers from boxing
promoter Don King to rapper
and music impresario Jay-Z.
The partnership's goal would
be to fund operations for a
museum commemorating the
beach's ties to local Black his-


only nonprofit in need of cash.
At the same time it's seeking
ways to fund museum opera-
tions the Virginia Key Beach
Park Trust is working to keep
itself alive. The city, in working
to fill its budget shortfall, cut
the trust's funding for 2009-
10. Instead of about $1 mil-
lion a year from the city, the
trust got nothing. It has about
$400,000 to continue.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DONE
The financial reality of the
cuts hit the trust hard, forcing
it to lay off a handful of staff-


$150,000-a year executive di-
rector.
Sarnoff said the trust's finan-
cial predicament is of its own
making. He said the trust had
repeatedly received funding for
more than a dozen employees
over several years, but had
only hired a handful of people.
The unspent money rolled over
each year, eventually allowing
the trust to have $1.8 million
in its coffers. Its annual budget
was about $1.2 million.
It is common for government
to have "funded vacancies"
- to budget for personnel,


DAVID SHORTER
Former Executive Director
but not hire them, said Larry
Spring, the city's CFO. In fact,
it's an area city budgeters tar-


NO BUSINESS MODEL
"In one sense, you can look at
it as being victims of our own
success in trying to keep costs
down and not hiring people:'
said Gene Tinnie, the trust's
chairman. "There were delays
in the museum process, and
we didn't want to hire people
unnecessarily."
Spring said the trust has
failed to come up with a busi-
ness model that will allow it to
receive about $15 million in
bond money, but it should be
Please turn to BEACH 1A


U�L*H ISTORI
SCheryl Parker, lifelong HAMPTON

Liberty Square resi- HOUSE COMMUNITY TRUST, INC.

Sent, conceived the new Restoration has

"-monument, which is fi

, dedicated to all victims funding in plac

, . F ..of inner-city violence. Pinkney remains committed to
Wo reconstruction project
-. ia,Dminr , o..: ,I .rl, O.on,,r By Tariq Osborne
. wan.- 4-e. a -,KW H fa r , tosborne@mianmitimesonline.com


Doves express Liberty Square's


efforts to change violent image


New sign and statue reflects
Liberty Square's desire for change


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

Hands on Miami contin-
ued its efforts in the Liberty
Square Housing complex last
week, where more than 200
volunteers painted and plant-
ed trees last Saturday.


"It's a great day for the peo-
ple of this neighborhood," said
Eric Thompson, who volun-
teers at the Liberty Square
Community Center, "this will
revitalize and improve the
community."
It has been said that Hands
on Miami has unofficially


adopted the Liberty Square
Housing complex, due to the
organization's persistent ef-
forts there. Stefanie Cole, the
organization's Youth Program
Director, confirms this.
"We don't want to come in
here and then just leave," said
Cole. "We want to make a sus-
tained change. According to
Cole, the re-painting of Liberty
Square is part of a larger plan
that includes projects in Lib-


erty City, Overtown, and Little
Havana.
On Saturday, a new sign
welcoming visitors to Liberty
Square was unveiled on the
corner of 62nd Street and 12th
Avenue. In addition, a monu-
ment to peace and unity was
unveiled directly across from
the Community Center. The
monument, which shows the
images of two doves, was the
Please turn to CHANGE 4A


The stabilization of the Historic Hampton House contin-
ues, according to Dr. Enid Pinkney, founding President and
CEO of the Historic Hampton House Community Trust.
"The Hampton house is moving along. We're in the pro-
cess of stabilizing the building,"
said Pinkney. "It was such a der-
ilict building for so long, that we
can't move forward until the 'sta-
bilization is complete. Then the
architects can see what needs to
be done," she said.
"We hope to complete that by
the end of this year."
The stabilization work Pinkney J
references began in March of this
year. The work has included re- .
placing rotted wood and clearing
weeds and plants that had tak- DR. ENID PINKNEY
en over the building's crumbling
walls.
The budget crunch has not slowed plans any.
"With the budget being cut; if we weren't committed to
this project, it would just fall by the wayside, but we are
committed. We're gonna hang in here," said Pinkney.
Pinkney moved to allay concerns about the timeliness of
the project.
"Right now the building has been gutted, and people
Please turn to RESTORATION 4A


7Day
Weather
Forecast
Weathercom


WEDNESDAY


830 670
I-SHOWERS


THURSDAY


80� 600
PARTLY CLOUDY


FRIDAY


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-8 90158 0010 0 o















OPINION


BLACKS' MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


2A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Stop the bleeding

Tyhe blood of Miami-Dade County had been slowly leak-
ing from the veins of the community for a number of
years, but the elected leaders and public officials have
been slow to notice or unwilling to deal with the problems to
stem the flow.
But now that the paradise in which we live has lost its glit-
ter, we are faced with a troubling real-estate meltdown that
forces us into a reality check. We are in big trouble if we con-
tinue on this path.
Faced with a budget shortfall of $444 million, recently-
elected Mayor Tomas Regalado has his work but out for him.
he must deal with a 10.2 percent unemployment rate and
shrinking tax revenues. But the most serious problem he will
face will be the'pensions.
Over the years, the County has been far too generous in
dealing with the police and firefighter's unions when it came
to pension benefits. We hope Regalado will have the courage
to convince them of the seriousness of the situation.
President Barack Obama and the Congress are in a battle
today over health care reform, but the problem in Miami-Dade
in financial reform. Our financial affairs are so out of control
that it will take a serious revamping to get them back in line.
If this problem is not approached in a business like man-
ner, we can look for the state to step in and impose financial
reality--just as they did in the 1900s.
The serious condition of County finances has been evi-
denced by the recent resignation of former Police Director
Robert Parker, who left the department two weeks ago with a
retirement check of more than $400,000. This is no criticism
of. Parker, who was a fine officer and served us well for 33
years, but the generous County policy entitled Mr. Parker to
58 weeks of sick leave paid at his hourly rate of $108.79 or
$250,548. He also collects $87,360 for 803 hours of holiday
leave.
Now we understand why a 56-year-old healthy man would
leave an annual salary of- $226,000 for early retirement.
The longtime director submitted his retirement papers Oct.
30, the same day County' Mayor Carlos Alvarez announced a
five percent pay cut for most non-union employees.
Mayor Regalado, who was endorsed by the police and fire-
fighters unions, plans a Nov. 16 pubic forum to push for
needed reform in the City of Miami.
We are still Waiting to hear what County Mayor Alvarez has
in mind.


Ule *Miami tnimt
(ISSN 0739-0319)'
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami. Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station. Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305-694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Ed tor. 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman


p 4ea.M


a, 0~S
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CREDO OF THE BLACK PRESS
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racal and national antagonism when it accords to
every person, regardless of race, creed or color, his or her human ano legal rights Hating no person fearing no person the
Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief lhat all persons are hurl as long as anyone is held back
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1ne Ifiami Timm
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial comment.
laries as well as all other material in the newspaper Such feedback makes for
a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community Letters must,
however be 150 words or less, brief and to the point and may be edited
for grammar, style and clarity All letters must be signed and must include the
name, address and telephone number of the writer for purposes of confirming
authorship Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N W
541h Street, Miami, FL 33127, or fax them to 305.694-6211, Email miamite-
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LOCAL


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


LOCAL (ONLAiF\T \RY -OUR C (1 )\IU `\JTY XL" '71


3A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


BY REGINALD CLYNE, E5O

Congressional race


gets more interesting


Shakespeare wrote a phrase
that I have always loved, "much
ado about nothing". In the case
of the furor raised over the stat-
utes of Haitian soldiers having a
likeness to Dr. Rudolph Moise,
Esq. and Daniel Fils-Aime,
Shakespeare's phrase rings
true. Fils-Aime, a Haitian, led
the charge for ten years to get
the statues built, and Moise put
his money where his mouth is
and donated $120,000 to pro-
vide the financing. To their de-
tractors, I ask, "What the hell
did you do to get the statutes
built?"
Like I said, "much ado about
nothing." Unless, you are run-
ning for 17th Congressional dis-
trict in the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives, were counting on


Afghanistan,
unfair immi-
gration poli-
cies, rising
crime, fund-
ing for public schools, etc.
In the meantime, two of the
contenders for Kendrick Meek's
seat are out doing what needs
to be done in a tough congres-
sional race - raising money and
meeting voters. Rod Vereen,
Esq. had his opening fundraiser
at Mahogany Grille on Tuesday,
and Frederica Wilson also had
her fundraiser at Karu and Y
on the same night. In this race,
money is important, so don't sit
on the sidelines and then won-
der why your candidate lost.
Go out and support, even if it is
only $20.00.


the Haitian vote, and just got
stung when the U.S. Air Force,
Pilot, medical doctor and lawyer
all rolled into the good-looking
and charming personage of
Moise stated that he is entering
the race for Congress. (I take
the "good-looking" part from my
wife, who like many women in
South Florida is an admirer.) I
think in this race with so many
talented people running for office
that the Haitian vote contenders
should focus on more important
issues - like health care, unem-
ployment, the war in Iraq and


Many people in the Black
community complain that our
politicians are not responsive
to, our needs. Perhaps, if we
supported our politicians finan-
cially then they would not have
to rely on funding from' other
communities. In other words,
it is a crying shame that most
of the money for Black politi-
cians comes from the Anglo and
Cuban community. Why don't
we support our own? In other
words; take a lesson from Moise
and put your money where your
mouth is.


U BY QUEEN BROWN


Stop making excuses about the violence in our community


According to the Center for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), Black males in the Unit-
ed States of America are more
likely to die from homicide than
any other cause. The CDC lists
homicide as the leading cause of
death for Black males between
the ages of 14-24 living in Amer-
ica.


this awful tragedy has happened
because God needed an angel or
a flower. I really do not want to
get into religion; however, some
of us are blaming God for our
problem. In our own pessimistic
way of thinking we blame God
for our children being murdered
and left in the streets to die like
animals.


Last year, in 2008, Miami-Dade As I sat in a waiting room at
Corners Office classified 261 re- an Auto Dealership, a news sto-
corded deaths as homicides. To ry came on the television about
start things off that year was the "an incident of youth violence in
murder of 11-year-old Joshua our community. A Minster who
Arolgia who was shot and killed
by another person. The 261 ho- timst ki
micides recorded in Miami-Dade t is time for s to stop making ex
County in 2008 included victims opening to our children and our conl
of all ages. Ninety-seven of these community because we have not a
victims were'- adolescents aged blame everything and everyone for this
24 years and younger. Among
the ninety-seven adolescents, 26
of them were age 18 years and was also in the waiting room
younger. And of the 26 victims, that day began a conversation
aged 18 years and younger, 18 about the issue of violence and
of them-were minors. One vic- the destruction of our young
tim was 10-month-old Derrick people. Not knowing that I had
Days, Jr. lost a son to violence, the minis-
It is appalling that we have lost ter began to speak of our young
and continue to lose so many people rebellion as the cause for
children from this community to their early demise. He stated it
homicides. And the fact that our is the wrath of God on our chil-
children our dying at the hands dren. It is this type of thinking
of our own children is even more that has us where we are today
disturbing. It is time for us to on the issue of violence. And if
stop making excuses and blam- it is so that God is not pleased
ing others for what is happening with our youth and is allowing
to our children and our commu- them to murder each other, than
nity. Our children continue to where are the spiritual leaders
die in this community because petitioning God on behalf of our
we have not accepted responsi- youth. God is not the problem.
ability and we continue to blame We are the problem. Nor is God
everything and everyone for this the reason for our problems. We
problem. create our own problems. We
In some instances we are even must denounce the violence in
blaming God for our children our community and see God as
early demise. To my dismay, I the answer to our problem..'
have sat at many funerals and Over the past three years, I
memorial services and listened think I have heard every excuse
to ministers tell the congregation there is as to why our children




Is their racial discrimination in


Dear Editor:

I am writing this letter be-
cause I am appalled at the fact
that no one seems interested
in investigating the EEOC vio-
lations in Miami-Dade County
Correction (MDCR). Is the lack
of interest in Corrections, be-
cause the Director is a lily white
non-Hispanic male? '
The DirectorofMDCRplanned,
developed and implemented a
system of racial discrimination
that systematic sort to limit the


number of African-American
Professional Correction Officers
in the department.
Miami-Dade County Correc-
tions was found guilty on all
counts of racism and had to pay
restitution on 14 counts of dis-
crimination. The victims are in
the COT Class that graduated
Nov. 5.
The most outrageous element
of this situation is this year,
a department of government
can retain an employee found
guilty of racial discrimination.


have become so violent. I have
heard everything from the vic-
tims are the community trouble
makers and thugs. This I find
to be very disturbing and I am
sure the parents of 10-month-
old Derrick would be willing to
prove you wrong. I've also been
told that they are all criminals,
the victims and the perpetrators;
we search to find out if the vic-
tims have criminal records (even
when the charges were dropped
or not filed). We are some how
hoping this will explain why they

uses and blaming others for what is hap-
nmunity. Our children continue to die in this
accepted responsibility and we continue to
problem.

were murdered. What we are do-
ing is finding a way to justify the
homicide and differentiate our-
selves and our children from the
victims. Somehow we seem to
find a sense of safety in knowing
I am not like them. Therefore,
it is not my problem. I really
find this excuse to be paradoxi-
cal because when the two planes
crashed into the twin towers on
911, no one in the media tried to
discredit the victims' innocence
by releasing their criminal re-
cords. What we knew was, thou-
sands of innocent Americans
died on that horrible day and
we knew it could have very well
been in any. town in America.
We somehow felt connected to
the victims of 9/11. They were
fellow Americans. My question
is, why is their a double stan-
dard for victims? Local terror-
ists are terrorizing our commu-
nity everyday. The victims in
some of our homicides are just
as innocent as the victims that


County Correcti(
My most ardent fear is that
this man is still at the helm of
MDCR. Many employees have
been fired for far lesser infrac-
tions. If this information is not
made public the County Manag-
er may seek to rehire him. His
contract is schedule for renewal.
on Dec. 6,
For specific information re-
garding this issue, please con-
tact Valarie Ephriam-Kelly,
County Corrections EEOC Co-
ordinator at 786-263-6099 and
County Attorney Lee Kraftchick
at 786-375-1324.
The plan was instituted to


died in the twin m w-
towers on 9/11.
Where is the outrage from the
community?
Violence can be prevented.
However, in order to change the
situation we must change our
thinking. And we must address
the problem, which is our chil-
dren are murdering our children.
Therefore we must address our
children. We must be willing to
go back to the basics and teach
our children how to live respon-
sible lives. We must return to
the days when it was our par-
ents that instilled values and
morals in us. We must teach our
children personal responsibility.
Our children must be willing to
accept that they are accountable
for the results of their choices.
Our children must own up to
the consequences of their be-
havior. And most importantly,
we as parents, teachers, minis-
ters, coaches and the commu-
nity must model the life we want
our children to live. Under no
circumstance should we tolerate
violent and aggressive behavior
from our children. We must be-
gin teaching our children alter-
natives to fighting and shooting
each other. We must become
our children emotional coaches
and teach them emotional in-
telligence. We must establish
standards for living in our com-
munity and hold each other ac-
countable for the actions. The
community must hold those
individuals that commit violent
crimes responsible for what they
are doing to the community, even
if it is our own child. As caregiv-
ers, we must be responsible and
seek professional help for our
children when they *are in need
of help. Personal responsibility
means no more excuses.


ons?
lighten the complexion of rank
and file officers.
To that end, Director Timo-
thy Ryan instructed, Chamona
Wynn, Personnel Coordinator,
786-263-6217 to place the Af-
rican-American application at
the bottom of the list and push
all non-Latin whites and His-
panic applications to the top. If
this do not grab you in the gut
and encourage your interest in
MDCR, then, nothing will.

Tangela Sears
Miami


Did the candidates you supported in the Mayoral and

District 5 Commission races win?


MORRIS SANDS, 66
Retired, Liberty City

I personally
didn't vote.
I didn't feel
that I knew
enough about
either of the
Mayoral can-
didates to
make an informed decision.
It's difficult to do that when
you don't really know either
of the guys or even who they
are. I don't live in District 5
and wasn't eligible to vote. I
live over in Edmonson's dis-
trict.

GLORIA MCMILLIAN, 57
Retired, Miami

I was out of town for the
vote unfortu- - .-. -
nately. I was
attending a .
funeral. But
I would have
voted for Re-
galado, so I
was glad that
he won. I live


in the downtown area and
not in District 5, so I couldn't
have voted in the District 5
race and didn't really have a
strong opinion.

RONNIE PARAMORE, 55
Retired, LIberty City

One of my ,
candidates
won and one -
didn't. I voted .
for Sanchez "
for mayor. .
Regalado
made some --
comments I don't like about
Obama; so I voted for San-
chez.
I did vote for Spence-Jones.
It was because of her integri-
ty. She is out there doing her
job. When she says she going
to do it, she does it. That's
what this community needs.

KATIANA GUE, 19
Student, Miami Shores

I voted for Spence-Jones.
I feel like I know her. She
comes and talks to my school.


I think she's
good for the
job.


candidates
blank. I re-
ally didn't
know that
much about either of them
so it wasn't really fair to vote
against one of them.

LASHAUMBE RANDOLPH, 33
Student, Liberty City

Well one
of my can-
didates won
and one
didn't. I voted
for Sanchez,
but didn't

him all that
strongly; so I wasn't too up-
set when he didn't win.
I did vote for Spence-Jones.
She came out here to Miami-
Dade college. I was very im-
pressed with her answers to
some of my questions and
questions from other audi-


ence members. She was a
very well-informed candi-
date.

LILY DUNCAN, 42
Student, Liberty City

Both of my
candidates
won. I sup-
ported Spen-
ce-Jones and
Regalado.
I like her
and what she
does for the
community. She does all that
she can to help us.
I voted for Regalado be-
cause of his ideas on the bud-
get. I thought he had better
ways to fix it. Now; of course,
well just see whether what
he promised is what he does
once he's in the chair.


Is it true a lot of Miami-Dade County employees decided
to take early retirement and quit before the five percent
pay cut took effect?


We hear a lot of changes are underway at Jackson Hos-
pital Health Services with job losses and unit closings.
And is there a little battle brewing between the doctors at
Jackson and those at Cedars?


Come on, man. A lot of people are becoming concerned
about the changing climatic conditions and global warn-
ing. They are really not accustomed to hurricanes in No-
vember and the delay of cool weather. Stay tuned.


A lot of folk got very interested when State Sen. Dan
Gelber says the proposed anticorruption package he un-
veiled earlier this week is more vital than ever in light of
the Securities and Exchange Commission's investigation
of possible fraud by the board that oversees the state pen-
sion fund. Stay tuned.


Scott Rothstein, the Fort Lauderdale Bernice Madoff,
is running true to form. This week, the FBI minded his $6
million mansion and confiscated yachts, expensive autos
and anything that wasn't nailed down. Rothstein, ousted
by his Fort Lauderdale law firm last week after hundreds
of millions disappeared from investor accounts, hung a
cheesy portrait of Al Pacino as the Godfather on his office
wall.


OPINION


M any people in the Black community complain that our politi-
cians are not responsive to our needs. Perhaps, if we sup-
ported our.politicians financially then they would not have to
rely on funding from other communities.


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU


I


I










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


4A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Financial crisis has not slowed restoration; repairs


RESTORATION
continued from 1A

are telling me that it looks
worse than it did before," said
Pinkney. But they don't under-
stand that it has to look worse
before it can look better. They
have to take out the asbestos,
the termite boards, the rotten
roof. As far as the community
is concerned, they still don't see
what we're doing. It looks like
nothing is going on, but some-


thing is," she said.
The stabilization work is be-
ing done by OAC Construction.
Upon completion, the Hampton
House Community Trust will
begin taking bids for contractors
to do the reconstruction phase.
The contractors will be working
with Gurri Matute Architectural
firm.
"We'd prefer a company ex-
perienced in historic preserva-
tion," said Pinkney.
The Hampt6n House was a


popular venue for Black en-
tertainers during segregation,
when they were not allowed to
stay hotels with Whites. Over
the years, guests have included
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mal-
colm X, Muhammad Ali, and
Sammy Davis Jr.
Upon completion, the build-
ing will include a jazz archive
and learning center for tal-
ented young musicians who
wish to learn how to play jazz
from experienced players. The


Hampton House stage, part of
its banquet/social hall facility,
will provide a low-cost venue for
aspiring young musicians to get
public exposure and experience
performing according to Hamp-
ton House committee literature.
The project is partially coun-
ty-funded, and is funded in part
by donations.
For information on how. to
contribute, contact the Historic
Hampton House community
trust at 305-638-5800.


LEST WE FORGET


Spence-Jones, Regalado clinch election wins

By Sandra J. Charite -over the past four years. "
scharite@miamitimesonline.com The almost 83 percent gap
between her opponents showed
City of Miami residents opted "the voters of District 5 were
to keep Commissioner Michelle 5 C resounding in saying that they
Spence-Jones in office and elect - r agreed with the direction we are
Tomas Regalado as the City'sv . - heading despite the distractions
new mayor. ,r endured during the campaign,"
Close to 70,000 ballots (23 I said Spence-Jones.
percent) were cast. - Her focus now is continue to
Victory meant time for change, ... help build District 5 to become a
according to Regalado. After 13 - prosperous community by cre-
years as District 4 commission- . ating jobs, affordable housing
er, he believed that it was time - / for the elderly and homeless and
to make the bid for the inayoral n t.o initiating community policing
seat. Regalado raised more than "and prevention tactics to reduce
$400,000 toward his campaign MICHELLE SPENCE-JONES TOMAS REGALADO crime in the neighborhoods.
and gained favor from resi- The swearing-in of the candi-
dents. the District 5 Commissioner the next four years. Clearly, it dates will be as followed: Regala-
"'We're going to recover our since 2005, defeated her op- means that they approve of the do will be sworn at the Miami
city and the confidence of our ponents, David Chiverton and direction the District is heading City Hall Commission Cham-
residents," he said to a crowd Jeff Torain, by more than 4000 in and I want to continue in that bers, 3500 Pan American Drive,
following the results. "And we votes. She admits that she was direction." as mayor at 12 p.m., Wednes-
will do it by not wasting mon- surprised by the support of the Had one of her opponents day, Nov. 11. A reception will
ey." community. claimed victory in the elec- follow the official ceremony.
Regalado, who is succeeding "I feel overwhelmed," said tion, Spence-Jones believes she Spence-Jones' swearing in cere-
outgoing mayor Manny Diaz, Spence-Jones. "It is really great would have been "disappointed mony will be held at the Charles
hopes to prevent the City from to know that you have the full because it would have meant Hadley Park at 12 p.m., Thurs-
having excessive debt. trust and the support of the the voters did not approve of the day, Nov. 12 with also a recep-
......... ,ne~w- rh ~ o ,abeen community to be their leader for direction we have been heading tion to follow.


"Phelicia's VeVe bags shine a
bright and positive light at our
culture," says Tamara Philip-
peaux, CAVCP board member
and executive producer at Is-
land TV.
Nelly Olbrice,. 24, had trou-
ble deciding upon just one.
"I can go a lot of places with
these bags," she said picking
up each bag and laughing.
"I don't know which one to
choose."
The Veve Collection is a
unique brand- represents a
blend of magic and wisdom
that promotes quality, authen-
ticity, value and inspiration
for the Haitian culture. Every-
thing in the collection mirrors
the Haitian culture.
Other collections included
a melange of beautiful, yogi-
esque Haitian sandals by Sa-
Che Creations and a jewelry
display by Savannah Savary,
a combination of designs dis-
playing the Lebanese and Hai-
tian heritage.


Virginia Key Beach Trust to scale back plans

Virginia Key Beach Trust to scale back plans


BEACH
continued from 1A

credited with reviving the park,
which is pristine and idyllic.
With the help of the city, the
park had its historic carrou-
sel, mini-train and dance floor
restored. All have become
money generators for the park
along with events held there.
Spring and Tinnie both ac-
knowledge the trust has now
been forced to become self-sus-
taining earlier than planned.


The nonprofit is down to one
full-time staffer and is focus-
ing on re-evaluating its mis-
sion, Tinnie said.

82 ACRE PROPERTY
The proposal to build a
20,000 to 30,000 square-foot
museum is being scaled back
for now, with trustees consid-
ering making the 82-acre prop-
erty the museum. One propos-
al would have signs detailing
the site's history along trails
throughout the property.


Tinnie said former staffers
like Shorter would probably
be brought back as consul-
tants on an as-needed basis.
"We are looking at it as an
opportunity, rather than a
setback:' Tinnie said. "We
can really take a hard look at
where are we going and how
we are going to.get there. The
[city's] master plan called for
a museum on the site. Does
that have to be a big block of
concrete, or can it be some-
thing else?"


Tinnie said he was open to
private investment, but the
scale would have to fit the
park and be sensitive to the
environment.
If there is going to be any
consideration of private de-
velopment, it really has to be
in the context of not reducing
public access to public space.
We would ask, 'Is this really
necessary? Do the benefits
justify the costs?' We would
be concerned with environ-
mental impacts."


am. * *-. Copyrighted Material -I "m



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


Sara Smith, President of the Liberty Square Resident Coun-
cil, helped to design the new sign welcoming people to Liberty
Square.The sign stands at the intersection of Northwest 62nd
Street and 12th Avenue.


Community is

CHANGE
continued from 1A

brainchild of Cheryl Parker.
Parker, a lifelong Liberty Square
resident, says she submitted the
idea to Hands on Miami between
three and four months ago. "It fi-
nally came into action," she said.
"I feel like I'm about to cry."
Donna Liverpool, who volun-
teered with Bank of America,
helped to paint the "segregation
wall," a roughly three-foot tall
wall that runs down 12th Avenue
from 62nd Street to 67th Street.
During segregation, the wall sep-
arated Liberty Square from the
surrounding "white" areas.
"it's just to do something posi-
tive for this community. And to
show my daughter that helping
others goes a long way," said Liv-
erpool.
Her. daughter Donnelle said
much the same. "i'm here to help
this community. I don't live here,
but a lot of my friends do, and a
lot of them think we don't care
about them because of their sit-
uation. We want to change that,"
she said.
The community did not rely
solely on outside help. Keith
Baptiste, of I Love You Jesus
Ministries, along with a contin-
gent of 12 youth showed up un-
expectedly and lent a hand.


helping itself
I Love You Jesus Ministries
is located on the corner of 11th
Ave. and 62nd Street. The group
planted flowers near the inter-
section of 15th Ave. and 68th
Street.
"All of us are from around
here," said Baptiste. "The least
we can do is help them help us,"
he said.
Such efforts are appreciated
not only by the immediate com-
munity, but by the County as
well. "It's really win/win," said
Annette Molina, Public Infor-
mation Officer for the Miami-
Dade Housing. "Hands on Miami
hasn't come to us with anything
that wasn't already on our agen-
da. They get to do their commu-
nity service, and we save money
by using their manpower," she
said.
In sum, more than 50 trees
were planted, which were do-
nated by the county, which also
primed the homes to be painted
and bought the paint and sup-
plies.
Sara Smith, president of the
Liberty Square Resident Council,
summed up the purpose of the
day's activities. "I've lived here
for 14 years and am a grand-
mother of nine, many of whom
live in Liberty Square. I'm trying
to make it as safe as possible
for them."


..... . .....


Kari Roots performs live on stage at the Little Haiti Cultural
Arts Center.

Caribbean Catwalk makes

its debut in Little Haiti


zipence-jones, wno nas ucen


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

Foods, bags and music. The
combination drew a crowd of
hundreds' to the Little Haiti
Cultural Arts Center on Fri-
day night. The event featured
the Haitian roots jazz by Kari
Roots and other local Haitian
artist. .
The Caribbean American
Visual Cultural Preservation
(CAVCP) debuted the first an-
nual Caribbean Catwalk and a
collection of bags Phelicia Dell
of VeVe Collections.
"This is what it is all about.
I am having so much fun and
these bags are so cute," said
local resident Lillie T. Rose.
The bags, which received
rave reviews from attendees of
the Catwalk, were vivid, mul-
ticolored, desired waist bags,
hand-sewn sequin messenger
bags and oversize jean hand-
bags. The bags suited every
occasion or event.


..... .. j i


v







BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 5A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009













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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


6A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


County grants historic designation



to Lemon City Colored Cemetery


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.com

The cemetery discovered last
June when developers began
construction at 71st Street and
the Florida East Coast Railroad
Tracks was granted historic
designation on NoV. 3. Thanks
largely to the efforts of Dr. Enid
Pinkney and the Lemon City
Cemetery Community Corpora-
tion in which she formed spe-
cifically for the purpose.
The designation came sooner,
and with less opposition, than
even Pinkney expected. Despite
the fact that the site had been
disturbed before, and that there
was no city record of it, Biscayne
Housing Corp. co-operated with
Pinkney and her associates at
every step.
"They've given us everything
we've asked for," said Pinkney.
The graveyard's rediscovery
did not begin with, the unearth-
ing of bones at the site, but with
the local YMCA, who owned title
to the land.
The YMCA had been there
since the 1980's, according to
Alfred Sanchez, President and
CEO of YMCA of Greater Miami.
The organization already host-
ed a full-facility YMCA which
boasted a child-care center, but
was looking at what to do with
the rest of its parcel. "We were
looking at what's needed here-
-and it was jobs and housing.
So we partnered with Biscayne
Housing group to bring afford-
able housing to the community.
We gave them a 55-year lease,"
he said.

THE FIRST
BODIES ARE FOUND
"My first reaction was that we
had discovered a crime scene,"
said Michael Cox, one of the
partners of Biscayne Housing
Corporation. The developers
had unearthed wrist bones, a
human skull, and the skeletons


of two small children. They
called the police department,
who in turn brought in their
medical examiner. When the
Medical Examiner determined
that the bones were more than
75 years old, the developers
called prominent Archaeologist
Bob Carr.
Eventually, Pinkney's re-
search team would discover his-
torical confirmation of the previ-
ously unknown cemetery's exis-
tence in a 1941 book published
by the Works Progress Admin-
istration. The Works Progress
Administration was a govern-
ment agency set up as part of
President Franklin Roosevelt's
response to the Great Depres-
sion of the 1930s. The book
cataloged the burial places of
American World War I veter-
ans and included a description
of the location of a. Lemon City
"colored" cemetery in Miami
that precisely matched the site
of the newly discovered burial
ground. It even listed exact di-
rections from the courthouse to
the cemetery.

COMPROMISE
Despite the fact that they al-
ready had permission from the
city to build, and despite the
fact that the site had already
been previously disturbed, the
Biscayne Housing Corporation
paused in their project. "We
started a long process of ana-
lyzing the site. We were doing
our own research and working
with Dr. Pinkney and Dr. Mar-
vin Dunn," said Cox.
"We're trying to redesign the
project to still make the proj-
ect work," Cox continued. The
developers will move a row of
townhomes they had planned
along 71st street, as well as
redesigning two buildings and
a parking garage. "We're also
going to create a passive park
and a memorial," said Cox.
Sanchez finds the degree of


Obama visits wounded soldiers


The day after a massacre at
Fort Hood, President Obama vis-
ited the Walter Reed Army Medi-
cal Center in Washington late Fri-
day. The visit was planned before
a shooting rampage left 13 peo-
ple killed and 30 wounded. Still,
the contrast is striking: soldiers
hurt while fighting two wars, and
those killed and hurt Thursday
at a Texas military post, where
the suspect is an Army major.


The visit was private and lasted
30 or 40 minutes longer than the
hour Obama had been expected
to spend visiting wounded sol-
diers. Deputy Press secretary
Tommy Vietor told the print pool,
"While at Walter Reed, the presi-
dent visited with 19 soldiers,
three families of soldiers in the
ICU, as well as hospital staff.
The President also awarded two
Purple Hearts."


Lawrence Taylor arrested


The Miami Times Special Report

Hall-of-fame linebacker Law-
rence Taylor was arrested Sun-
day night for leaving the scene
of an accident according to jail
records. Taylor, 50, was booked
just before 10 p.m. and then re-
leased on a $500 bond.
The crash occurred around
6:30 p.m. in the northbound
lanes of the Palmetto express-
way around 103rd Street. Ac-


cording to
authorities,
". ... the crash tore
the front right
tire from Tay-
lor's Cadil-
Slac Escalade.
J. , He drove two
TAYLOR miles before
stopping.
Taylor showed no signs of im-
pairment and was not given a
sobriety test.


PUBLIC HEARING
The Governing Board of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Miami
Urbanized Area will hold a public hearing on Thursday, December 17, 2009, at 2:00
p.m. in the County Commission Chambers, Stephen P Clark Center, 111 NW First
Street, Miami, Florida.
The Governing Board will consider the following amendments:
1. FY 2010 Transportation Improvement Program: Town of Golden Beach
Bridges
This amendment will include the Town of Golden Beach Bridge Projects in the FY
2010 Transportation Improvement Program Unfunded Section.
2. MPO Prospectus for Transportation Improvement: Section 7.5.2 Timely
Public Notice
This amendment to the MPO Prospectus for Transportation Improvement Section
7.5.2 (Timely Public Notice) will reduce the requirement of a thirty day (30) Public
Hearing Notice to fourteen (14) calendar days.
In addition to the above public hearing, the Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT) District 6 Tentative Five-Year Work Program for Fiscal Year 2010/11 - 2014/15
will be presented to.the MPO Governing Board for endorsement.
All interested parties are invited to attend. For further information,
please , contact the MPO Secretariat, Stephen P Clark Center,
111 NW First Street, Suite 920, Miami, Florida 33128, phone:
(305) 375-4507; e-mail: moo0miamidade.aov ; website:
www.miamidade.gov/mpo
It is the policy of Miami Dade County to comply with all of the requirements of
the Americahs with Disabilities Act. The facility is accessible. For sign language
interpreters, assistive listening devices, or materials in accessible format, please call
305-375-4507 at least five business days in advance.
& MIAM
"amI


cooperation between The Lem-
on City Cemetery Community
Corporation and the Biscayne
Housing Corporation both re-
freshing and unusual. "They've
been the real heroes here," he
said of the developers. "But you
know, this is a very socially re-
sponsible company, which is
why we partnered with them.
They've done the right thing
from the moment those bones
were found to the moment we all
signed the agreement that this
place should be designated an
historical site. That is not your
typical for-profit company."
Cox is sanguine about his
company's exemplary behavior.
"Well, what were our alterna-,
tives? The Lemon City Cemetery
Task Force is made of members
who are really good people from
a community that I have a lot of
respect for. I think the solution
was reasonable and appropri-
ate under the circumstances. I
feel like we did the right thing
here. I don't think there was a
rational alternative," he said.

PERSONAL REDISCOVERY


In helping to unearth Miami's
history, Pinkney discovered a
bit of her own. Whilst search-
ing for the name of a friend's
relative buried there, Pinkney
discovered that her own grand-
father, John Clark, was buried
there in 1924. His wife, Melva-
nia Clark, raised Pinkney.
"It became personal for me,"
she said. "it's now like he's
come into my life through this
cemetery."
Pinkney hopes to have a cer-
emony in February for all who
helped with the project; and she
does not just mean the YMCA,
Biscayne Housing Corporation,
and Lemon City Cemetery Com-
munity Corporation. "A couple
lawyers worked for us pro bono.
Even the surveyor cut his price
because we didn't have the
money," she said.
"What's happened here
should be a model for the rest
of the country, " said Sanchez.
You can have developers, non-
profits, and the community
working together to address the
needs of the future, while still
honoring the past."


WATER AN SEWER R
DEPARTMENT ' By Ana Maria Monte Flores
A A A A A A A A ^ A A A A

Since April, 2006, when the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners ad-
opted the Miami-Dade Water-Use Efficiency Plan, the County has been actively in-
volved in improving management of traditional water supplies while encouraging the
development of alternatives and improving the efficiency of our current water use.
As a component of the Miami-Dade Water-Use Efficiency Plan, these programs are de-
signed to improve the efficient use of water by retrofitting older fixtures and encourag-
ing residents to be water wise.
These programs are available to residents of Miami-Dade County who meet the
established criteria:
Water-Efficient Landscape and Irrigation Evaluations
Showerhead Exchange and Retrofit Kit
High-Efficiency Toilet Rebate Program
Senior and Low-Income Retrofit Program
In-School Program
Green Lodging and Restaurant Program
To request an application and the list of approved High-Efficiency fixtures, please visit
our webslte at: www.mlamidade.gov/conservation or call 311.

HIGH-EFFICIENCY SHOWERHEAD EXCHANGE AND RETROFIT KIT PROGRAM
Tne Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department will e.ichange your old showerhead for
a new, Htgh.Effcienc model ABSOLUELY FREE and provide you with additional water.
sav.'ing retrofit items for vour faucets and toilet. Simply ring your old snowerhead to
an� of the follo:.ving three WASD ' Exchange Locations":
CALEB CENTER
5400 NW 22nd Avenue, 1st Floor
Monda[ " through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm
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7A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Three years later: Bryan Pata case still unsolved

Jeanette Pata pleas for killer to confess \ "-- '"..


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com
When Jeanette Pata heard
about the death of former Edi-
son High football star Jasper
Howard in Connecticut last
month, the pain hit too close to
home.
"I couldn't believe that this
was happening again," she said.
"A young life taken so shortly."
Pata knew that no matter
what it took, she would comfort
the family by attending How-
ard's funeral. She traveled from
Palm Beach that Monday morn-
ing to attend Howard's funeral
at the New Birth Church in
Opa-locka. After all, she knew
she could understand Howard's
mother's grief.
Three years ago, Jeanette Pata
lost her youngest son Bryan af-
ter he was shot dead outside
his apartment complex on the
south side of the University of
Miami campus. Bryan, 22, was
also an all-star football player.
The suspect in Howard's case
was charged and arrested last
time. Sadly, Bryan's killer is yet
to be found and Jeannette Pata
is still awaiting for justice.
"The only thing that they [the
police] have told me is that
they are working on the inves-


tigation," said Pata in an ex-
clusive interview with The Mi-
ami Times. "That's not enough.
Those words do not bring my
son back. It's has been too long
when will I see justice for my
son."
Bryarn's sister, Nelly Pierre,
that although it has been hard
on the family, all they can do is
wait. "The police are doing all
they can and following proto-
col."
The Miami Times tried con-
tacting the lead detective in the
case but one of the Homicide
Bureau Commanders declined
an interview at this time, ac-
cording to Miami-Dade Detec-
tive Rebecca Perez. She said
the detectives would soon be
working on re-releasing the re-
enactment in hopes of receiving
tips from the community.
The youngest of nine, Pata
had played three seasons at
North Miami Senior High School
then transferred to Miami Cen-
tral High School. He was once
rated as the nation's 26th-best
defensive lineman by the Su-
perPrep's All America team and
one of the top 100 players in the
South, according to the Atlanta
Journal Constitution.
Upon graduation, Bryan ma-
triculated to the University of


Miami to play football and pur-
sued a degree in Criminology.
The UM defensive lineman ap-
peared in 41 games and started
23. Prior to his death, Bryan
was in his senior year at UM
and was expected to be a pick
in the 2007 NFL Draft. Now, to-
day all Pata has are memories of
her son who had such a bright
future ahead of him.
"I didn't go to any of his away
games but I attended his home
games," said Jeanette. "When
I went to his games, I always
made sure that I sat somewhere
in the stands where he could
see me while on the field."


Pierre told The Times on
Thursday that the death has
been really hard on her mom.
Three years without a phone
call frqm her son or a visit to
the house or a request to make
his favorite meal or a simply
sound of his voice; has put
Pata in a state of depression.
She longs to wake up from this
dream that has turned into a
nightmare. Currently, Pata is
unemployed.
"Everyday I am hoping and
praying for answers for son.
Why is it taking so long," said
Pata. "I don't know what to do
anymore."


-family photo
Bryan Pata and mom, Jeanette, celebrate her birthday in
July 2006.


Gorley resigns from

Miami-Dade Public Housing
The Miami Times Report

Jeffrey C. Gorley has resigned as the Crime Reduction Co-
ordinator for Miami-Dade Public Housing Agency (MDPHA)
and as Chairman of the Regional Community Collaboration
on Violence (RCCV) effective Nov. 27.. Gorley has accepted a
management position with a public housing agency out of
state in which he is slated to begin Nov. 30. He will attend
the last MDPHA/RCCV meeting on Nov. 12.
Gorley told The Miami Times on Thursday that he is leav-
ing for a "better opportunity at another public housing
agency in Virginia."


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8A THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


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SECTION B


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Rally supports local activist

ANDREA IVORY'S EFFORTS TO FIGHT BREAST CANCER


HAVE MADE HER A CANDIDATE FOR CNN'S


HERO


OF THE YEAR


'-.5


By Tariq Osborne
tosborne@miamitimesonline.comn
Hundreds of revelers hosted
a celebratory rally for local resi-
dent Andrea Ivory at Jackson
Memorial Hospital's Ira C. Clark
Diagnostic Treatment Center
Atrium on Wednesday.
Ivory is already one CNN's
top ten heroes, which carried
a $25,000 reward. The rally,
which drew the likes of District 1
County Commissioner Barbara
Jordan, and County Mayor Car-
los Alvarez, was held to encour-
age attendees to vote for Ivory
to win CNN's Hero of the year.
The award carries a $100,000
award, to be bestowed at a gala
in Hollywood, Calif.
Ivory was recognized for found-
ing Florida Breast Health Initia-
tive. Each weekend, Ivory and
her volunteers go to low-income
communities in South Florida
to spread the word about breast


cancer. Already the organization
has been responsible for provid-
ing more than 500 free mam-
mograms to eligible women and -
visiting nearly 18,000 homes.
Of the more than 200 attend-
ees; the largest contingent was a
group of students from Everest
Institute.
"We're here to support An-
drea" said Jennifer Lorfils, 20,
an Everest student who had
hand-lettered a poster saying as
much.
Shantika Thomas, 23, went
into further detail. "Women who
can't afford health care don't
stop deserving it. She's going
door to door helping women get
mammograms; because if you
.catch it early, you stand a much
better chance of surviving."
This was precisely the lesson
the students were supposed to
take from the rally, according
to Jean Phillipe, a patient care
instructor with Everest who en-


Patient care students from
Everest Institute turn out in
support of Andrea Ivory's bid
for CNN's Hero of the Year.
As health care practitioners,
they will deal with breast
cancer patients firsthand.
Left to right; Shantika Thom-
as, 23, Hurdixie Roque, 25,
and Jennifer Lorfils, 20.
courage students to attend.
"It was imperative that they be
present," he said. "These are the
things students will be dealing
with as health care profession-
als."
Commissioner Barbara Jor-
dan has been involved in the ef-
fort since very near its inception.
"Willie Ivory [Andrea's Husbandj
spoke with me and asked me tor
my support," she said. "-How can
you not say yes to a cause like
that?"
When asked whether she will
vote for Ivory, Jordan was en-
thusiastic. "Not only do I plan to
vote for her, but right now ['m
going to campaign for her. I'm
going to the commission meet-
ing and handing out the infor-
mation to the 13 commissioners
to give out to their contacts,"
she said.
Ivory seemed flattered,
and slightly awed by aLll the
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Commissioner Barbara Jordan and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Alvarez award Andrea
Ivory with a plaque officially commemorating Nov. 4 as Andrea Ivory Day for her tireless ef-
forts to fight breast cancer in low-income communities.

To support Ivory as a candidate for
CNN Iro of the Yewar, ut www.
CNNcom/heroes betwve ~ow aid
Wedhesd Nov . .


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BLA\CKS MIUST CONFI Oi IIIEIR OW\N DEs-i-INYI


11B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


17,000 child deaths linked to lack of insurance


By Karen Pallarito

(HealthDay News) - An es-
timated 17,000 children in the
United States might have died
unnecessarily over nearly two
decades because they didn't
have health insurance, accord-
ing to a report from research-
ers at Johns Hopkins Children's
Center in Baltimore.
They found that kids who
lacked health insurance were
60 percent more likely to die in
the hospital than were kids who
had insurance. After adjusting
for such differences as race and
gender, uninsured kids were still
37.8 percent more likely to die
than kids with insurance cover-
age.
David C. Chang, co-director of


the pediatric surgery outcomes
research group at Hopkins and
a study co-author, said he could
not think of a medical treatment
that has such a dramatic impact
on health outcomes as health in-
surance seemingly does.
"This is actually something
we as a society ... can choose to
do something about," he said.
"It's literally with the stroke of
somebody's pen, this could be
changed."
The article was published on-
line Oct. 30 in the Journal of
Public Health.
Bruce Lesley, president of First
Focus, a bipartisan child and
family advocacy group, noted
that data from the U.S. Institute
of Medicine have shown that
people ,who are uninsured have


a higher mortality rate.
"You knew that it existed, you
knew that there were cases [of
child deaths related to lack of in-
surance], but I think this data is
pretty shocking and really points
to the need for national health
reform," Lesley said.
In one of his first acts after
taking office in January, Presi-
dent Barack Obama signed leg-
islation reauthorizing the Chil-
dren's Health Insurance Program
(CHIP). The measure also provid-
ed funding for states to add sev-
eral million more children to the
rolls though 2013.
"CHIP has really worked and
been very important and insures
about 7 million kids in the coun-
try," Lesley said. Still, he said,
roughly 6.5 million children who


are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP
remain uninsured -- for what-
ever reason.
Enrollment barriers are part
of the problem, explained Les-
ley, whose organization endorses
legislative proposals to move to-
ward a "default enrollment" sys-
tem. "The presumption should
be the kid's enrolled, and let's
figure out what program they're
in," he said.
The Johns Hopkiris team
looked at the relationship be-
tween insurance status and
kids' mortality to better inform
the CHIP debate.
Using records from two large
databases, lead author Dr. Fizan
Abdullah, Chang and colleagues
examined more than 23 million
hospitalizations of people young-


er than 18.
Over an 18-year period though
2005, 117 million children were
hospitalized. Nearly 6 million
kids were uninsured at the time
of admission. In all, 38,649 chil-
dren died while hospitalized.
Uninsured kids were 1.6 times
more likely to die than children
who had insurance.
Assuming that the insured
and uninsured populations are
identical, the difference in risk
of mortality was 60 percent. The
authors' actual predicted mor-
tality is lower, however, because
factors such as age, race and
gender are associated with risks
that affect outcomes, Chang ex-
plained.
"The 60 percent is the theoret-
ical difference, and the 37 per-


cent is the actual difference that
you see in real life," he said. "Our
extrapolation is based on that
more conservative number."
The study includes some data
from the period before CHIP was
enacted in 1997. Though fewer
kids are uninsured today than
two decades ago, Chang said,
that would not skew the risk of
death from lack of insurance.
And though the study does
not prove that being uninsured
boosts a child's mortality risk, it
does suggest a strong associa-
tion between insurance status
and odds of dying.
"I think the message is insur-
ance is a choice we can make as
a society, and this is something
that we should consider," Chang
said.


Beer with extra buzz


on tap up to 16%


More states drafting higher alcohol limits


By Jessica Leving

A growing number of states
are moving to allow higher al-
cohol content in beer, despite
concerns from some substance-
abuse experts.
Alabama and West Virginia
have passed laws increasing
the legal alcohol-by-volume cap
for beer from 6% to as high as
13.9% this year. Similar efforts
are underway in Iowa and Mis-
sissippi, two states with very
restrictive limits on the sale of
high-alcohol beer, said Sean
Wilson, former president of Pop
the Cap, North Carolina's suc-
cessful grass-roots effort that
raised the state's limit in 2005.
The average alcohol content
in beer is 4.65%, and in wine
11.45%, according to a 2002
study by the Alcohol Research
Group in Emerv\-. i11.-. Calif.
Twenty s.i ,Iae .tili place some


alcohol in beer, Wilson said.
Paul Gatza, director of the
national Brewers Association
based in Boulder, Colo., said
limiting alcohol content restricts
flavors and styles because "you
can't put as much malt or other
sugars in your beer as you may
want to."
Some efforts to change beer
laws are led by consumers,
Gatza said. In Iowa, for exam-
ple, the Iowa Brewers Guild
and a consumer group called
Lift the Limit are working to
change the state's law on al-
cohol content in beer, Guild
President David Coy said.
David Rosenbloom, presi-
dent of the National Center
on Addiction and Substance
Abuse at Columbia University
in N.Y., said the more alcohol,
"the faster you get drunk and
the, longer you stay drunk. ...
,,,,There's no evidence that peo-


kind of limit on-the amount of ple will drink less, or fewer


-AP photo/Morry Gash
Beer is served at Sprecher Brewery in Glendale, Wis.


beers."
Chuck Hurley, CEO of Moth-
ers Against Drunk Driving,
said, "Our chief concern is
that (higher-alcohol brews) be
properly labeled so people un-
derstand it takes fewer beers
to become intoxicated."
Gatza said consumers of spe-
cialty or microbrewed beers,
also known as craft beers,
"don't drink to get drunk.
They drink to appreciate the
flavors." Ohio was among the
first to raise beer alcohol-con-
tent rules when it pushed the
allowable , alcohol-by-volume
to 12% in 2002, Gatza said.
Georgia followed in 2004, then
North Carolina in 2005 and
South Carolina in 2007.


Obesity linked to specific cancers


33% of Americans have increased risk
By Nanci Hellmich


About 100,500 new cases of
cancer are caused by obesity ev-
ery year, according to the most
comprehensive attempt ever to
estimate the cancers attributed
to extra weight.
The analysis, released today
by the American Institute for
Cancer Research, is based on
updated cancer data and a re-
port released earlier this year by
a panel of experts. Among the
types of cancer most strongly
linked to excess body fat:
* Breast, 33,000 cases a year
caused by obesity.
* Endometrial, 20,700 cases
a year.,
* Kidney, 13,900 cases.
* Colorectal, 13,200 cases.
* Pancreas, 11,900.
* Esophagus, 5,800.
* Gallbladder, 2,000.
"The list of cancers affected
by obesity will almost certainly
increase as more research is
completed," says Michael Thun,
emeritus vice president of epi-
demiological research at the


I.


I I







American Cancer Societ
eral other types of chance
multiple myeloma and
leukemias - have been
to obesity in some stud
this needs confirmation
Overall, about one-t
U.S. adults are obese,
ly 30 or more pounds
healthy weight. Obesi
increases a person's risi
betes, heart disease an
diseases.


Excess weight raises cancer
risk in different ways, says Tim
Byers, director of the Univer-
sity of Colorado Cancer Center
in Denver. For breast and en-
dometrial cancer, it seems to be
an estrogen problem, he says.
Women who are overweight
after menopause have more
estrogen circulating in their
blood, which increases cancer
risk. For esophageal cancer,
obesity leads to acid reflux,
which damages the lower part
of the esophagus.
Donna Ryan, an oncologist
and president of the Obesity
Society, says several hormones
and factors involved in obesity
may lead to cancer. "Insulin is a
ty. "Sev- prime suspect," she says. "Insu-
r - liver, lin resistance and elevated in-
certain sulin levels frequently occur in
i linked obese people. Insulin is a very
ies, but powerful cellular growth factor,
." and it affects cancer cells."
hird of To lower your risk for cancer:
rough- Lose weight, increase physical
over a activity and eat healthier, says
ty also Anne McTiernan, director of
k of dia- the Prevention Center at Fred
d other Hutchinson Cancer Research
Center in Seattle.


I -. I *tu f %If


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Alabama passed the Gour-
met Beer Bill in May, state
Rep. Thomas Jackson said.
The bill increased the cap from
6% to 13.9%.
West Virginia upped its max-
imum legal alcohol content for
beer in April from 6% to 12%.
Vermont raised the cap to
16% and Montana to 14% last
year.
Craft beers, typically stron-
ger, tend to be more expensive.
An average case of Budweiser
costs $17.76, according to In-
formation Resources, a mar-
ket research group. Midrange
higher-alcohol beers cost $24-
$40 per case, Gatza said.


%& W~b 0 bdk to %A %a 4

d~wo0 049


* Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


19R THF MIAMI TIMFS. NOVFMBFR 11-17. 09fll ~ 1,,, ', UJ . . .


The American Legion Miami
Beach Post 85 & the Veterans
of Foreign Wars Post 3559 will
host a Miami Beach Veterans
Day Parade and Wreath Laying
Ceremony on Washington Ave.
& 17th to 11th Street & west into
Flamingo Park at Jefferson Ave.,
starting at 9:30 a.m., Wednes-
day, Nov. 11. Christine Battles
at 305-865-5733/305-588-
1741 or Christine@m3events.
net


The City of North Miami An-
nual Veterans Day Ceremony
will take place at the North Mi-
ami Veterans Memorial at 10
a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 11. 305-
895- 9840 or visit: www.north-
miamifl.gov/parks.


The Miami-Dade County
Health Department will be
opening two vaccination sites:
Downtown Clinic and Fuchs Pa-
vilion in Coral Way, to offer free
H1N1 vaccine from 10 a.m. - 6
p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 11. Call
305-324-2400 or visit: www.da-
dehealth.org


Gold Coast Jazz Society
presents South Florida Jazz Or-
chestra at the Broward Center
of the Performing Arts, Amaturo
Theater, at 7:45 p.m., Nov. 11.
www.browardcenter.org


Miami-Dade Schools will
hold an Attendance Boundary
Committee Meeting at Holmes
Elementary School, Media Cen-
ter at 6:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov.
12. John Schuster, 305-995-
1126.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation invites the public to
the Soul Bowl Alumni Pep Rally
at Jackson High's Gymnasium.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. but
showtime begins at 7 p.m.,
Thursday, Nov. 12. 305-804-
5371 or 786-256-2609.


YoungArts, the core program
of the National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts, will
start its annual adjudication
process which will run from
Nov. 12 - 21, selecting up to
150 of the most talented 17-
18 year old artists out of thou-
sands of applicants from across


The Universal Truth Cen-
ter invites you to join us for
a thought-provoking dialogue
about the spiritual heal-
ing practices of New Thought
Christianity. The 2009 Heal-
ing Symposium will take place
at the Center from 7 - 10 p.m.,
Friday, November 13 and from
10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Saturday, No-
vember 14. 305-624-4991.


New Fellowship Praise and
Worship Center family cor-
dially invite the community to
their "Youth Emphasis Day" on
Sunday, Nov. 8 and a Ministry
of Arts featuring music, dance
and drama at 7:30 p.m., Fri-
day, Nov. 13. 305-625-7246 or
Leola Adams, 305-624-6795.


House of Bethlehem A Place
of Bread Ministries is inviting
everyone to participate in their


the country, to participate in
YoungArts Week. The process
will take place in-house for the
first time this year, in Youn-
gArts' new office space at the
SunTrust building in downtown
Miami. Nicolle Ugarriza, nugar-
riza@youngarts.org 305-377-
1140 ext. 1201, or Kate McPher-
son kmcpherson@youngarts.
org 305-377-1140 ext. 1203.


Miami-Dade County Health
Department cordially invites
you to Refugee Health Assess-
ment Program's ribbon cutting
ceremony to be held at 10 a.m.,
Nov. 13. RSVP, 786-336-1276.


Solymar Miami! will sponsor
a movie screening, If I Were Dic-
tator, at the Ten Museum, at 6
p.m., Friday, Nov. 13. RSVP by
Nov. 9: bcfssignup@gmail.com


ICABA's will host a Premier
Recognition and Networking
Event "South Florida's 100
Most Accomplished Blacks in
Healthcare and Law" at the
Nova Southeastern University
(Davie Campus), from 6-9 p.m.,
on Nov. 13.


"Alice in Wonderland" Chil-
dren Stage Play will debut at
the Actors' Playhouse, Miracle
Theatre in Coral Gables, now
through November 13, call.
305-444-9293 or visit: www.ac-
torsplayhouse.org


Heineken Red Star Soul
brings an all-star line-up to Mi-
ami Beach for the concert series
finale featuring performances
by N.E.R.D. and DJ Irie. The
two will perform live at the Fon-
tainebleau Miami Beach start-
ing at 11:45 p.m. on Nov. 13.
Kourtney Marquis, 212-468-
3677 or 215-630-4217.


Miami-Dade Arthritis
Walk will place in the Amuse-
ment Area at Crandon Park
in Key Biscayne, starting at
8 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 14.
www.2009awmiamiwnalk.kin-
tera.org


The brothers of Beta Beta
Lambda Chapter of the Alpha
Phi Alpha Fraternity will meet,


tour bus trip to Holyland, from
Tues.- Thurs. Deacon Arthur
Robinson, 786-624-7979.


"I'll Fly Away: American
Gospel and Folk Music" will
debut at the St. Christopher's
by-the-Sea in Key Biscayne, at
7:30 p.m., Nov. 5; First Unit-
ed Methodist Church in Coral
Gables, 7:30 p.m., Nov. 6; Mi-
ami Beach Community Church
in Miami Beach, 7 p.m., Nov.
7 and All Saints Episcopal
Church in Fort Lauderdale, 4
p.m., Nov. 8.



New Life International
Church invites you to the
Women of Distinction's annual
Women's Conference from Nov.
12-14. 305-310-8891 or 305-
622-3123.
******** *


S 8 l


Revelation Christian Acad-
emy will sponsor a Harvest
Baazar, from 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Nov 14. The Rev-
elation Christian Academy is
open for registration. After-care
is from 3-6 p.m. Call 305-758-
5656, 786-281-8098, 305-758-
5656 or 305-691-4572.


A Mission With A New Be-
ginning Church invites the
community to come fellowship
at 11:15 a.m., on Sundays and
Bible class weekly at 7 p.m.,
Thursday.


Redemption M.B. Church
is sponsoring a fundraising
breakfast and yard sale on Fri-
day and Saturday. Redemp-
tion will also host a ministers
and deacons Union of the New
Life M.B. Association on Nov.
18-21. Rev. Silas Pinkney,
305-696-9964. Pastor Willie
McCrae, 305-793-7388 or 305-
836-1990.


Note: Calendar items must
be submitted before 3:30
p.m. on Monday.


Older patients most likely to die from H1N1 influenza


By Rita Rubin


An analysis of more than
1,000 California patients hos-
pitalized with H1N1 flu during
the first four months of the pan-
demic found that infants were
most likely to be admitted, and
patients 50 and older were most
likely to die once admitted.
In the first four months of the
pandemic, H1N1, like the sea-
sonal flu, was especially severe
.in older people, who are more
likely to have underlying health
conditions, says lead author
Janice Louie, a public-health


medical officer at the California
Department of Public Health.
However, Louie says, unlike
seasonal flu, older people are
far less likely than children and
young adults to contract the
H1N1 flu in the first place. For
that reason, the study won't
lead the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention to add
healthy older people to the list
of priority groups for HIN1 vac-
cine, director Thomas Frieden
told reporters Tuesday.
Of 1,088 patients hospitalized
with H1N1 flu in California,
11%, or 118 patients, died, and


30%, or 340 patients, were ad-
mitted to intensive-care units,
Louie and her co-authors report
in today's Journal of the Ameri-
can Medical Association. In pa-
tients.50 and older, the death
rate was up to 20%, compared
with about 2% in hospitalized
patients under age 18.
The study focuses on patients
who were hospitalized between
April 23 and Aug. 11. Whether
H1N1, or swine flu, will even-
tually mutate and cause more
severe illness is not yet known,
Louie says: "Influenza.is pretty
unpredictable."


at the North Miami Beach Police
Department at 9:06 a.m., Sat-
urday, Nov. 14. 305-372-3877.

******** *
Lamplighters Aglow, North
Dade Chapter, will host a
brunch in honor of Rev. Mar-
velle Cheever at Florida Memo-
rial University, 10 a.m., Nov. 14.
Velma Arnold, 305-625-4291
or Penny Emmanuel, 305-816-
6307/ 786-718-7076.



Kozyak Tropin & Throck-
morton, P.A. will host their
sixth annual Minority Mentor-
ing Picnic at the Amelia Earhart
Park in Hialeah at 12 p.m., Nov.
14. RSVP: http://www.kttlaw.
com/picnic/


The Sigma Alpha Chapter, a
local chapter of the Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity, Inc., will have
their annual Achievement Week
will be held at the Florida Me-
morial University Banquet Hall
on Nov. 15. Timothy Belcher,
Sr,, 786-255-5998 or email:
timbelcher@aol.com


Habitat for Humanity of
Greater Miami is holding its
annual Synagogue Sunday, a
build day set aside for Jewish
volunteers who are unable to
work on Saturdays. The event
will be held at 2341 Northwest
50th Street at 7:30 a.m., Nov.
15. Lilly Izaguirre, 305-323-
5325.


Miami-Dade County Agri-
cultural will host a Farmers
Market to celebrate Farm City
Week at the Stephen P. Clark
Center Lobby, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., Thursday, Nov. 19. 305-
971-5091 or visit: www.miami-
dade.gov/ agriculture

********
Miami-Dade delegation, Mi-
ami-Dade County Council of
PTAs/PTSAs representing over
370 local units in Miami-Dade
County will host a community
discussion about Florida's fund-
ing for public education with
parents, students and leaders.
The meeting will be held at the
Miami-Dade County School
Board Administration Building
at 6 p.m., Thursday, Nov.19.
Mindy Gould, President, Miami-
Dade County Council of PTAs/
PTSAs, 305-995-1102 or e-mail
MindyGouldPTA@aol.com


You are invited to Rick Del-
laRatta and Jazz For Peace on


27icIrard~7L 9ra.14


Friday, Nov. 20. Marla War-
rington, 786-223-2554 or
email: � marlaw@EventRhythm.
corn


The Greater Hollywood
YMCA Family Center is
pleased to announce their third
annual Turkey Trot at 7:30
a.m., Saturday, Nov. 21. www.
YMCABroward.org.


Iota Phi Lambda Sorority
Inc., Gamma Alpha Chapter
cordially invites the communi-
ty to their 23rd "Apple for the
Teacher" Luncheon honoring
outstanding school teachers at
the Rusty Pelican at 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 21. 786-356-
0992.


Miami-Dade Public Library
System is seeking budding
young artists for its annual
Make-a- Bookmark Contest.
Children, ages 6-12, are invited
to submit a drawing, of a fa-
vorite character or scene from
a book, to reflect the theme
"Readiscover Your Neighbor-
hood@ the 'Library." Contest
entry must be original work,
and will be judged on creativ-
ity and neatness. Entries must
be submitted by Nov. 21. Visit:
www.mdpls.org.


Miami Dade College Kendall
Campus present the Fall Fest
2009, from 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 21. Call 305-
237-2321 or visit www.mdc.
edu/Kendall/


The founders of Vankara
School in Opa-locka will cel-
ebrate 30 years of Educational
Services at a Street Naming
Ceremony at 10 a.m., Satur-
day, Nov. 21. 305-681-6121.


Fairchild Tropical Botanic
Garden will host the Ramble-
A Garden Festival, from 9:30
a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Nov. 20-22.
Visit www.fairchildgarden.org


7DA3, jrk


9enera/, (kmne/A 7&, �Znpl bel )iylzy/r

Movidwonr ADRA, ERA. SFflIPA. aid AMOM


305



652-3001

20215 N.W. 2nd Ave.

Suite #2

Miami, Fl 33169



- ---9

E1 ' (441)

. i
22e -j


www.dentistgrant.net


EPIC hotel is celebrating the
25th anniversary of White Par-
ty Week in Miami, the world's
oldest and largest HIV/AIDS
fundraiser,, and offering spe-
cial rates for those visiting Mi-
ami to enjoy White Party Week
events and festivities from Nov.
25-30. 305-424-5226 or visit
www.epichotel.com.


The Big Blue any You Foun-
dation presents Kids Ocean
Adventure Series at the New-
port Beachside Hotel and Re-
sort Sunny Isles Beach from 11
a.m. - 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov:
28. 954-558-9664.


University of Miami's Mau-
rice Gusman Concert Hall will
present Festival Miami now
through November 30. 305-
284-4940 or visit: www.festi-
valmiami.com


The community is invited
to get on the bus to the Florida
Classic on Saturday, Nov. 21.
For more information. Also,
come take a ride to the Holy
Land in Orlando, Fla. On Dec.
12. Call Phillip, 786-873-9498.

******** *
South Florida Super Bowl
Host Committee will host their
kickoff luncheon at the Land
Shark Stadium, from 11:30
a.m. - 1:30 p.m., Monday, Dec.
7. 305-614-7555.

*********
The Florida Alliance for
Arts Education (FAAE) is host-
ing a Florida symposia at the
Adrienne Arsht Center for the
Performing Arts, starting at 9
a.m., on Dec. 10. Email: info@
faae.org or visit www.faae.org


The fourth annual World
Salsa Championships will take
place at Hard Rock Live at the
Seminole Hard Rock Hotel &
Casino on Dec. 17-19 .


Miami Northwestern Sr.
High Class'of 1965 is prepar-
ing for their July 8-11, 2010


etatol Crowd


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Reunion. Classmates are urged
to reconnect through the con-
tact 'information listed below,
providing your address, phone,
cell & email. 321-733-0958 or
305-299-5549, reunion6t5@cfl.
rr.com


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is calling all former
cheerleaders, majorettes, drill
team, dance line, flagettes and
band members for their up-
coming Alumni Pep Rally. 305-
804-5371 or 786-256-2609.

********
National Investment Devel-
opment (NID) Housing Coun-
seling Agency, a HUD approved
organization, is offering free
Housing and Legal Counseling
for Homeowners at the Experts
Resource Community Center,
9 a.m. - 5 p.m., M-F. Call 305-
652-7616 or 786-512-7400 or
email: lgreen@expertsresourc-
es.com or lougreen2@yahoo.
com for appointments.


Miami Jackson Alumni As-
sociation is seeking Reunion
Organizing Committee Repre-
sentatives from the Classes of
1981 -2008 to call 305-904-
5371 or 786-256-2609.

*********
The Florida Film Institute
presents Cinerama. Saturday
at the Little Haiti Cultural Cen-
ter, from 10:30 a.m. - 12:30
p.m., until April 10, 2010. 305-
891-3456 or register at www.fl-
filminstitute.org


A&A Associates is currently
hiring approximately 1000 peo-
ple for the 2010 Super Bowl and
Pro Bowl football games which
will be held at Land Shark Sta-
dium in Miami Gardens. 561-
533-5303 or email Annette@
associatestaffing.com


Rendo -Goju-Ryu Karate
Academy will be offering free
Karate lessons at the Liberty
Square Community Center
from 5-7 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursday. 305-694-2757.


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BlCSMs OTO HI \NDS INY1BTEMAITMSINVME 11,20


The Embrace Girls Foundation hosts


tea party for international educators


Special to the Miami Times

The Miami Council for Inter-
national Visitors (MCIV) and
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion, Inc. hosted its "Interna-
tional Royal Princess Tea Par-
ty" at the Mahogany Grille
Restaurant in Miami Gar-
dens, on Thursday, Nov. 5 in
which Delegates were recog-
nized from 17 couTntries. The
visiting was part of the U.S.
Department of State's Inter-
national Visitor Leadership
Program (IVLP), the State De-
partments number one Public
Diplomacy tool. The Delegates
represented the countries of
Bahran, Bangladesh, Bulgaria,
India, Iraq, Jordan, Malaysia,
Nigeria, Panama, Peru, Philip-
pines, Russia, Serbia, Slovak
Republic, Suriname and Swa-
ziland were elected by the U.S.
Embassies in their countries
based on their recognition as
emerging leaders in their field
and work with young girls in
each of their respective com-
munities.
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion was selected by the Coun-
cil as a result of their work
with elementary and middle
school age girls throughout
South Florida.
"We've been monitoring
this organization and its activ-
ities and events for some time
now and their work empower-
ing young girls is simply out-
standing - it was a unanimous
decision by all countries to
tour their program and learn
more about developing an In-
ternational model that per-


haps other countries can fol-
low," said Ayesha Quirke, Pro-
gram Director for the Miami
Council for International Visi-
tors Program the agency host-
ing the group of educators.
Organizers say their Miami
visit and the International
Royal Tea Party and Dinner far
exceeded all previous stops.
"I truly cannot put into
words the extraordinary detail
that went into to this event
by this organization, from the
patriotic decor to the prepara-
tion of the girls questions - ev-
erything was absolutely Five
Star," said Tonija Hope Navas,
Senior Program Officer, Inter-
national Exchange Programs.
A sentiment echoed through-
out the night as the group of
girls all dressed in Princess
attire introduced themselves
in each Country's language
and followed in English, prior
seeking answers to questions
they'd personally researched
and prepared.
"It brought me to tears of
joy to see how well these very
little girls are being prepared
for the future, I am filled with
pride to be a part of such a
beautiful event said "Magajiya
Usman, Coordinator of Girl
Child Education, represent-
ing Kano State, Nigeria "we
will definitely be working in
the near future with this orga-
nization to model their work"
she added.
For more information about
The Embrace Girls Founda-
tion, Inc., call 305-270-4099.
or visit them on line at www.
embracegirlpower.org.


I I
I'


Alt


. i
1


-Photo/ James Forbes
Back, Dominique Gutierrez, 12, and Nigeria Delegate, Maga-
jiya Usman along with Front, Myla Smith, 7, and Jeanette Daw-
son, 7, attend the International Royal Princess Tea Party at
the Mahogany Grille Restaurant on Thursday.


North Miami Mayor


predicts bright future

Fie ahoin T'mnes Special Rep, rr


In North Miami Mayor An-
dre Pierre's State of the City
address, he highlighted his
city's accomplishments over
the last year: chief among
them being the balancing of
the budget withoutt the fir-
ing of employees or cutting of
programs.
Pierre's speech was given
at the annual North Miami
Chamber of Commerce lun-
cheon.
He also said that the city's
Neighborhood Stabilization
Program expects to purchase
and rehabilitate foreclosed
homes and place families back
into them. He called the cur-
rent situation between resi-
dents and banks "no-win."
Pierre also touted a 12 per-
cent reduction in crime, a sta-
tistic he credits to the city's
policed department's efforts.
Pierre expects that Biscayne


V --
:-o'.' ,fu"',


. " - i


ANDRE PIERRE
North Miami Mayor


Landing, a $2.5 billion resi-
dential project that was sup-
posed to bring millions in tax
revenue but was scuttled by
the collapse of the real estate
market, will move forward de-
spite foreclosure proceedings.
Some of the developers will
stand in as lenders, accord-
ing to Pierre.


More charges against former

Broward commissioner
The Miami Times Special Reporu pany's business came before
the Broward County Commis-
Former Broward County sion.
Commissioner Josephus Eg- On Thursday, Eggelletion
gelletion, who is already sus- surrendered to authorities;
pended, faces yet another quickly posting bond.
criminal charge--for receiving Eggelletion was not sur-
unlawful compensation. The prised by these charges, and
charge, leveled last Thursday thus turned himself in rather
by state prosecutors, is a sec- than having police disrupt his
ond degree felony,. family, according to his attor-
Eggelletion allegedly ac- ney Johnny McCray Jr.
cepted a $3,200 golf member- Eggelletion, 60, faces ad-
ship at the Parkland Golf and ditional charges of involve-
Country Club that was paid ment in a $900,000 money-
for by Shawn Chait. Chait laundering scheme. The State
works for Prestige Homes of Attorney's office alleges that
South Florida. In exchange, he and three co-conspirators
Eggelletion is alleged to have laundered funds through the
granted three years of prefer- Bahamas and St Croix. The
ential treatment for Prestige charges carr a maximum
Homes wherever the corn- sentence of 20 years.


* $IA.ii-

LEXPSLI

LANE


Come learn about the Florida Department of Transportation District Six Annual Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan


MONROE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 2, 2009, 6-8 p.m.
Marathon Government Center
2798 Overseas Highway (Mile Marker 50)
Marathon


SOUTH MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Tuesday, December 8, 2009 8-10 a.m.
University of Miami Bank United Center
Hurricane 100 Room, 1245 Dauer Drive
Coral Gables


NORTHEAST MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
Wednesday, December 9, 2008, 8-10 a.m.
Miami Shores Country Club
Village Room, 10000 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami Shores


Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX) project information will also be available.


These public hearings are being held in accordance with Section 339.135, Florida Statutes and to offer the public an oppor- the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Under Title VI and Title VIII of the United States Civil Rights Acts
tunity to comment on all projects for the highway systems and public transportation within Florida Department of Trans- any person or beneficiary who believes he or she has been subjected to discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, age,
portation District Six's Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan. District Six comprises Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties, national origin, disability, or familial status may file a written complaint with the Florida Department of Transportation's Equal
These hearings will also include consideration of proposed projects for Florida's Turnpike Enterprise corridors and Opportunity Office in Tallahassee, 605 Suwannee Street, M.S. 65, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0450, 866-374-FDOT or
information on several projects in the District. The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan covers the period from July 1, contact Elizabeth Perez, District Six's Title VI and Title VIII Coordinator, 1000 N.W. 111 Avenue, Room 6111-A, Miami, Florida
2010 to June 30, 2015. 33172, 305-470-5219.
Send written comments (by mail or e-mail) to Maribel Lena, District Public Information Office, 1000 NW 111 Avenue, Room Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation
6134, Miami, Florida 33172, telephone 305-470-5349 or email (Maribel.Lena@dot.state.us) by December 18, 2009. The services (free of charge) should contact the Public Information Office at 305-470-5277 at least seven days prior to the meeting.
comments will also be incorporated into the public document. The Tentative Five-Year Transportation Plan can be viewed after November 27, 2009 at:
All interested persons are invited to attend and be heard. The proposed improvements have been developed in accordance with http://www.dot.state.fl.us/programdevelopmentoffice/


SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

END THE INCONVENIENCE OF EMPTY NEWSPAPER BOXES, FIGHTING THE WEATHER AND HUNTING DOWN BACK COPIES.
CALL 305-694-6214


BLACKS NiUST CONTROi- THEIR OWN DESTINY I


-^ �*"


!*;*


13B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1AR THF MIAMI TIMFS NOVFMRFER 11-17. 2009


Be quiet: God will fight


your battles

I am sure that like me, you
have come into contact with
argumentative people. I know
people who treat arguing as if
it is a career choice. They will
argue about anything - just for
the sake of arguing. If you are
for something, they are against
it, and if you are against some-
thing, they think that it's a
good idea. These people are
just contrary people, and they
can drive you crazy - if you al-


low them to do
so! Take my
advice, and
let them take
that trip all by
themselves!
This isn't just


. :"'
'di,


my advice, but


the Bible contains quite a bit
of advice about arguing with
people.
In Proverbs 9, especially
verses 7-10, we are cautioned
not to even bother to contradict


or correct mockers. They will
not receive what you say, and
they will just insult and hurt
you. The bible says that this is
just a waste of time. However,
when you correct the wise, they
will love you. People who are
wise want to know the truth.
If they are in error, or misun-
derstand a situation, they want
to be corrected. The wise will
only become wiser when you
instruct them. A wise person
does not want'to go on a path
that is destructive, or not the
way of the Lord. When you give
counsel or a warning to a wise
person, they are appreciative.
An unwise or wicked person
will either scoff at the advice,
make fun of you because you
do not indulge in frivolous' or
foolish behavior, ignore you, or
as verse 7 reminds us - mock
and insult you. Those who love
the Lord love righteousness and


truth, and desire to do what is
right.
Verse 10 is one that is well
known. Fearing the Lord (a rev-
erent and respectful worship) is
the beginning of wisdom and the
knowledge of the Lord results
in good judgment. For many
years, I have seen people follow:
the advice and counsel of those'
who led them straight to jail.
Many people make very bad de-
cisions because they feat man
more than they fear God. They
believe in man who tells them
that they can get away with all
kinds of ungodly and unlaw-
ful behavior, and do not believe
what the Word of God says. In
Galatians 5: 19 -22, Paul is very
clear about the type of behav-
ior that if practiced, will .pre-
vent you from entering Heaven.
Foolish people listen to those
who say that this behavior is
fine, and even if it's not, noth-


ing will happen to you. . I have
even heard some say mockingly
that "if I'm going to go to hell,
then I'm going to have a good
time doing it! I would rather
party in hell than be bored in
Heaven!" Now, this type of talk
is enough to convince me that
they are fools, since there is no
instance in the Bible that there
will be a party in hell, or bore-
dom in Heaven.
The final verses in this prov-
erb contrasts Wisdom with folly.
Folly is not only ignorant, but
doesn't even realize that she is
ignorant. She spends her time
trying to entice those who are
minding their own business
to spend time with her. She
encourages them to partici-
pate in lustful behavior and to
steal. I especially like verse 16
because it says that she calls
out to those who are simple -
easily led astray. She calls out


to those who lack understand-
ing. I have seen time and time
again those who do not think
for themselves or stop to pray
or seek wise counsel get caught
in the snare of 'folly'. This is
why verse 10 is so important -
"knowledge of the Lord results
in good judgment." When we
do not take the time to study,
pray and meditate on the Word
of God, we easily succumb to
what others tell us, because we
have not filled our hearts and
spirit with instructions to the
contrary.
We are admonished to be
peaceful as doves - do no harm
to people,- but we are also told
to be wise as serpents. Watch
and pray. If you aren't sure or
feel uncomfortable about some-
thing, stop and pray - seek
Godly counsel, and of course,
ask the One who knows every-
thing.


%man cdrm ru taeup modeling ma a wat da Wai lor comtr








Copyrighted Material





Syndicated Content





Available from Commercial News Providers


m


Alvarez support Ivory's bid


attention Which included
'a plaque from Mayor Alvarez,
which designates Nov. 4 as An-
drea Ivory day.
"It's overwhelming," she said.
She was quick to recognize the
efforts of her volunteers. "This
award belongs to my volun-
teers," she said.
, Mayor Alvarez begged to differ.
"Regardless of the results of the
CNN contest, you've already won
in our book," he said on behalf


of 2.4 million Miami-Dade resi-
dents. Alvarez then arched his
eyebrows quizzically. "Can any-
one explain the rules? Is it one
person; one vote?" The crowd
replied in the negative, causing
Alvarez to smile broadly, draw-
ing cheers and, applause from
the crowd. "Then vote early--and
vote often." he said.
To support Ivory as a candi-
date for CNN Hero of the Year,
visit www.CNN.com/heroes be-
tween now and Wednesday, Nov.
18.


* e* 9 * 6'' U Wi ~'


** * 0 *


b~i~~e S.. ~


1 4 bi - S


a oft ova


64a -%


BART M. WILLIAMS,JR.
Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109
One Family - Serving Since 1923
1 H !: I AftS MIS r 'y I Y
II .5 U5 T IC 1 . A SSI


19+0 1 IIL IVIIMIVII I IIWILJI IIVVLIWIULI% I I if










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY 15B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


Blacks still drawn to Islam despite FBI raids


. Copyrighted Mat erial




Syndicated Content'




Available from Commercial News


PFoviders


Putting the Negro Leagues in play .


BOARD GAME BRINGS HARD-TO-REDISCOVER HISTORY TO LIFE


By Stuart Miller
The Strat-O-Matic Game
Company, an old warhorse
in an age of computer-driven
fantasy leagues and high-tech
.video games, usually relies on
detailed statistics to create rat-
ings and tendencies for hitters
and pitchers. But in creating
a new 103-card Negro leagues
set for its board game, Strat-O-
Matic found that the data was
not easy to come by.
Coverage of Negro leagues
games was spotty, especially
because many black newspa-
pers were weeklies. Although
stories abound about Josh Gib-
son's prowess or Satchel Paige's
wizardry, much of what .has
been handed down borders on
folklore.
Yet Hal Richman, who found-
ed Strat-O-Matic in 1961, .was
determined.
"I've wanted to do this for a
long time," he said. "It's a part
of baseball history that has to
be represented."
He found an ally in Scott
Simkus, an- aspiring baseball
writer and historian, and avid
Strat-O-Matic player since
age 11. Simkus, 39, grew up
in Chicago's suburbs hearing
that his grandmother had seen
Hack Wilson play and that his
grandfather had bribed a police
officer at Wrigley Field in 1947
so they could see Jackie Robin-
son's first game there.
When his grandfather died
in 1995, Simkus went to the
library seeking microfilm arti-
cles about his semipro baseball
days. He stumbled across some
Negro leagues box scores and
printed them out.
"I got interested and I slowly
built a collection," said Simkus,
who works nights as a limou-
sine dispatcher. "Then it be-
came an obsession.".
He said he thought of writ-
ing a book with the material
(and still plans to), but he also


Tacolcy Raiders
On last Sunday morning in
the 80 Pounds Division of foot-
ball, The Tacolcy Raiders (6-0)
won the Sean Taylor Classic
Super Bowl game against The
Overtown Rattlers. In a heart
wrenching overtime game a
perfect pass was thrown by
Quarterback, Seth McGill #1
to Wide Receiver, Byron Grant
who made a brilliant catch
deep in the left corner of the
end zone. It was one of the
most thrilling finishes this
season.
A year of teamwork and
awesome coaching headed by
Coach Derrick Britt and staff
led these determined yet excit-
ed players to step up to make
big plays in a big game to a


After years of research and
Negro leagues set.
knew about Richman's desire
for a Negro leagues card set.
With more black newspaper ar-
chives becoming available on-
line, Simkus realized he could
make it happen. He, Richman
and Strat-O-Matic's computer
gurus took three years to inter-
pret the statistics and produce
the set. (The company makes
computer versions, but it sells
more cards-and-dice board
games.)
"It was a lot of hard work,"
said Simkus, who went beyond
Negro leagues box scores to
study games the stars played in
Cuba, against top semipro tal-
ent and against barnstorming
whites. He also read about 100
books on the subject.
"Hal is a perfectionist," Sim-
kus said. "I've gained a lot of
appreciation for what goes into
the game and why it feels so or-
ganic."
Several factors required care-


wins Super Bowl
grand victorious finish.
Congratulations Raidersl!l
Musical Program
Wimberly Sisters Outreach
Inc. is sponsoring a musical
program, 3 p.m., Sunday, No-
vember 22 at Holy Cross, 1555
N.W. 93rd Terrace.
Groups appearing will be
Unbelievers Gospel Brothers,
Pompano; The Ministry Gospel
Singers, Clewiston; The Free-
man Gospel Singers, Pahokee;
The Gospel Angels, Delray; UBH
Choir, Ft. Laudedale; South
Florida Singers, Ft. Lauder-
dale; Wimberly Sisters, Miami;
Soul Seekers, Miami; Southern
Echoes and many more.
No Admission


statistical interpretation, Strat-0-Matic has a new 103-card


ful calibration to meet Rich-
man's goal of objectivity.
"We wanted to be mindful and
not make stuff up regardless of
players' reputations," Simkus
said.
Each player card is based on
his peak five to seven years, an
approach Strat-O-Matic used
with its Hall of Fame set.
For instance, in the 1930s,
the Eastern teams were far
stronger than those out west,
Simkus said, so Strat-O-Matic
devised a way to adjust each


player's statistics accordingly.
Negro league players commit-
ted far more errors, perhaps
because of field conditions or
because they had to entertain
the fans before each game in-
stead of taking infield practice
or because of different scoring
standards. Nearly every Negro
leaguer who went to the minors
or the majors after integration
made fewer errors, so Strat-
O-Matic used that to evaluate
their adjustments.
Each factor, including ros-


Inner-City High School Bands Battle


Brainstorm Entertainment
and Big Mo Promotions pres-
ent the Inner-City Battle of the
High School Bands Competition
on Saturday, December 12th
at Ted Hendricks Stadium at
Milander Park in Hialeah. En-
try fee $20. Proceeds from the
event will benefit each partici-
pating school's band program.
Find out which band will be
crov�ned the "Best of the Best":
Central, Northwestern, Edison,
Jackson, Booker T. Washing-
ton, Norland or Carol City Se-


nior High School Bands.
Students can earn up to 10
community hours by simply
purchasing a ticket and show-
ing up to the event. It does not
matter if your school band is
not in the competition.
Students who volunteer can
earn 25 community hours.
Tickets go on sale this week at
each participating school.
Vendors wanted. For more in-
formation to become a vendor
or earn community hours, con-
tact Big Mo 786-318-6020.


Iota's big 'Apple for the Teacher' luncheon
Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, Inc.
Gamma Alpha Chapter cordially
invites the community to their
23rd 'Apple for the Teacher'
luncheon, honoring outstanding
school teachers on Saturday, No-
vember 21, 11 a.m. Rusty Pel-
ican Restaurant, Key Biscayne,
FL. Kristin Anderson host of The
Morning Show on SFL_TV chan-
nel 39, is keynote speaker.-1
For ticket information call
786-356-0992.
KRISTIN ANDERSON


President Obama signs the Ryan White H.I.VJAIDS Treat-
ment Extension Act of 2009, which provides medical and sup-
port services for those with H.I.V./AIDS.

Obama lifts a ban on entry into

U.S. by H.I.V.-positive people
By Julia Preston
President Obama on Friday announced the end of a 22-year ban
on travel to the United States by people who had tested positive
for the virus that causes AIDS, fulfilling a promise he made to gay
advocates and acting to eliminate a restriction he said was "rooted
in fear rather than fact."
At a White House ceremony, Mr. Obama announced that a rule
canceling the ban would be published on Monday and would take
effect after a routine 60-day waiting period. The president had
promised to end the ban before the end of the year.
"If we want to be a global leader in combating H.I.V./AIDS, we
need to act like it." Mr. Obama said. 'Now, we talk about reducing
the stigma of this disease, yet we've treated a visitor living with it
as a threat.'
The United States is one of only about a dozen countries that bar
people who have H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS.
President George W. Bush started the process last year when he
signed legislation, passed by Congress in July 2008, that repealed
the statute on which the ban was based. But the ban remained in
effect.




RESEARCH



PARTICIPANTS



NEEDED

HEALTHY MALES AND FEMALES


Between the ages of 18 and 45 And

Between the ages of 65 to 85 For a

Pharmaceutical Research Study

Participants who are enrolled will be

compensated.


For more information call:


SEA VIEW RESEARCH

305-646-6785


4> SEAVIEW
RESEARCH


414










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


16R THF MIAMI TIMFS NOVEMBER 11-17. 2009


orccb irin oin ctrtatng 4a Dir IdI%4 11hou h u ngrr


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers








Vankara celebrates 30 years
On Saturday, November 21
at 10 a.m., Reverend and Mrs.
Taylor, the Founders of Van-
kara School, 13485 Alexanria
Drive, Opa-Locka, will celebrate
30 years of educational services
at a street naming ceremony,
sponsored by the Opa-locka
City Commission.
Vankara is inviting all former
students and staff to attend.
For additional information REV. JOHN H. and VICE
call 305-681-6121. MAYOR MYRA L. TAYLOR


Q CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED Q CHARGE MY CREDIT CARD

um L Exp__


Exp_
Exp


Authorized Signature,
Name
Address


City


Phone _


State __ _ Zip __


email


*Includes Florida sales tax
Send to: The Miami Times, 900 NW 54 St. * Miami, FL 33127-1818 or Subscribe online at www.mymlamitimes.com


Apostolic
Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Ave.

Order of Services
wed Inited ory Pr
90.t, Srpm
Mo20 N ng W ,,r3 I II S r
$ur..4v, Worulhe 1)0 p.r,
" o,. Prdyer ti i,1,t I I jop T.
Fr 8 .ble Siudy 7.30 p



Ebenezer United
. Methodist (hurch
2001 N.W. 35th Street
Order of Services
SundiaVy MOr,,',,,g 4ir,,E,,

. B.ble Sludy Iiday
'. loay .g 7lpm


i ; I HI M


Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
Iil i .W g iliW ! ,


St. Mark Missionary
Baptist Church
1470 N.W. 87th Street

Order of Services
Sunday 7:30 and 11 a.m.
Worship Service
9:30 a.m Sunday School
Tuesday 7 p.m. Bible Study
S 8 p.m. Prayer Meeting




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3rd Avenue
*fl ltili tIgnn ligti "ila
r n Order of Services

1u.1 uwi n mqtr. il i m I.a
rud 0, AdyG -y I l, niuIy
Wed L,' ( er u ludy i uytl r b l 1 p),in
6hu, Ouh , ,hhM ,bill p m


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12th Ave.

i Order of Services
icir Worship i a m
S Sudny 'choaal am
0NB( 10 aom
I Woi.hp II om Whitl'.tp 4prn
.10M.,.on and Bibli
(o, lueday 6 30 p



Bethlehem Cathedral
Outreach Ctr. Miami
8610/8620 N.W. 17th Ave.

Order of Services

Soa',, i st,,p q o ,,a
Sur day evening b0 n p oayea
a..d potir.il ou.ael.nq
Fr.day B.ble itr~rt in

Pastor J.Mar* p


MT. ZION A.M.E. CHURCH
15250 N.W. 22ND AVENUE


Order of Services
SUNDAY: Worship Service
7:30 &11 a.m.
Church School 9:30o.m.
WEDNESDAY
Feeding Ministry 12 noon
___ _ ~Bible Study 7p.m.



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
- Order of Services


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Stree
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a m,
11 a.m.. 7prm
Sunday School 9 30 a.m.
tuesday (Bible Study) 6 45p m
Wednesday Bible Study
1045am


I (800) 254.NBBC
305.685-3700
Fax 305.685.0705
www newbirlhboprisimiami.org


I B. Curr, M i. iPa.....


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue * Hollywood, FL 33023

Order of Services
Sunday- Bible Study 9 a m. * Morning Worship 10 a.m.
Evening Worship 6 p.m.
Wednesday General Bible Study 7:30 p.m..


Television Program Sure Foundation
My33 WBFS (oma(osl 3 * Saturday - 7:30 a.m.
www pembroepoiorkthur(holchrs,i rom * pembrokeparkcoc@bellsouth.nel


Friendship Missionary Baptist Church
740 N.W. 58th Street

Order of Services
Hour of Prayer 6 30 a m * Early Morning Worship 7:30 a m
Sunday School 9.30 am * Morning Worship 11 am
Voulh Ministry Study, Wed 7 p m Prayer . Bible Study Wed 7 p.m
Noonday Altar Prayer (M-F)
Feeding the Hungry every Wednesday I I a.m 1 pm
r.uw fi...mdihirim ,rIm On . ir. i f... ,h.nm.i '.h.i ..i i l.....,ih . no,


Logos Baptist Church
16305 NW 48th Ave.


Order of Services
.hsonia ii air
'. udo r Meni]afii W ..
,odai'thl 8 & ai ~im
, a,'. al t. V,) a m
Ihu\ ,,doy ,bld ,'iud tI p1
wliud., Ne ~rkaN




93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street

Order of Services
lU Ta t ily M',araalr, m ii t,
Sn,,lig Wt.t4ih
i a, Ihd ,a'd'ly si m
\ i.,,-- do, ,le .udy ?ip ,
t j o.., ib, ...ig


Cornerstone Bible
Fellowship Church
2390 NW 87 Street










F Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
7Order of Services
5IdI ,.q i 'iytI q . - t







A ,',,dir M o , hbt le IId o ,
Id Wi' r l .lidy .n
', Church of ChrsI






t..,..,,,Ji L, ,,,,,] W Or t,,i, , ,,


Hosanna Community
Baptist Church
2171 N.W.56th Street

Order of Services
S uday Sihool 9 45am
S Wuarhlp II a1 m
Bible Sludy fhu,.da 7 30 p. m
,iull M..csry
SMr Wed t. p i




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10th Avenue

Order of Services
[ wll ia adli Wolth..i 130 d alii
' u.,d , ii ihul 4 30au in,
SSnidey Mom.'ag Wrr,h ,pil iT .,
SSui'dova lining Ser.e b ripm
I u, ,doa Pai r MI-r..,i i i A ,p




Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87th Street

SOrder of Services
I ,undu M,)lia|.ii g r.. i O,e
.ydayo .. hwlp 10 O r.T

W i. .,hp ,rv I I O .




Seed Time and Harvest Faith
Ministry International
21485 N.W. 27 Ave.

Order of Services
S.,,doto W,,ti, 5 A am
W;bl , S at. I J to 1, .tA






First Baptist Missionary
Baptist Church of Brownsville
S 4600 N.W. 23rd Avenue
i ,,lf,,, 7 iM II dal
Order of Services


,i r tv., l ei,,m l 6 Ll
h . ,' i 5an


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street







Antioch Missionary1 Bilaptis7t3p




2799 N.W. 46th Street
ii It,' I rW iili
. Order of Services
( thuirt unday, luI o8 30a m
s ld I uro losh- P Si r.il,�Oo TI
M.dAWntiochaMision.r dayp%





New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95th Street
www.nshilohmbc.org

Order of Services
i'i. u.'Aorai Wo ohpJ 1730a0 0.a,
SuprS h Sthdliboo l9 Oud
S " miiWunri I Is'dW iT,

lu r day Ibla0& epmrn
e S l u.o s belele C t


Alpha Agape SDA Church
8400 N.W. 25th Ave.


Sunrise Missionary Baptist Churchn

3087 N.W. 60 Street
smb(posloilds@aol (omr

- Order of Services
. . . i ',. lA It.. II a

I I,
.lud) Wd iJp.t


Authorized Signature,
Name
Address


- .#'


Rev. Dr. W. Edwar


I . -


Alvin Daniels, Jr., Minister


�-A










17B THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Wright and Young
EFFIE LEE SIMS, 75, home-
maker, died No-
vember 6. Sur-
vivors include:
husband, Rob-
ert Sims, Sr.;
children, Dollar
Simpkins, John-
ny Mae Simp-
kins, JoAnna
Kaplin, James Simpkins, Robert
Sims, Jr., Idella Sims-Falmer, An-
gela Sims-Johnson, Freddrick J.
Sims and Italia Sweeting; and a
host of grandchildren, great grand-
children and great great grandchil-
dren. Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
Jordan Grove MB Church.

DARRELL ANTHONY RAY, 44,
died November
3. Survivors in-
clude: mother,
Rudene Ray;
sister, Sabrina
Ra y - JonesS
(Lawrence);
brother, Eric
Shondell Ray;
girlfriend, Tracee Manning; grand-
mother: Willie Mae Walker. Ser-
vice was held.

JUANITA, BERNICE GARD-
NER, 77, died
November 1.
Survivors in-


clude: sister,
Sadie Young
(Jacksonville,
FL); nieces: Pa-
tricia, Cynthia,


Deborah and '
Diane; son-in-law: Clifton Clarke.
Service was held.


Manker --
HENRY DUNN, 83, died Novem-
ber 2 at Vitas Health Care Center.
Service 3 p.m., Wednesday (to-
day), in the chapel.


Pinder .-
IRMA LEE SAINT VAL, 54, re-
tired, died Octo-
ber 31 at Aven-
tura.- Hospital
Service 11 a m.,

Beginning Em-





Paradise


Jackson South Hospital. Service
was held.

JESHAWN HAWES, 3 died No-
vember 2 at home. Service was
held.


Eric S. George
MARY NELL JACKSON, 82,
homemaker, died October 25. Ser-
vice was held.

HATTIE B. NORRIS, 80, home-
maker, died November 8. Service
11 a.m, Saturday, Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, Hallandale Beach.


Grace
WILMA WALDEN, 70, house-
wife, died No-
vember 6 at
Select Special-
ity Hospital.
Service 11 a.m.,
Saturday, Gam-
ble Memorial
COGIC.

MORLINE WILLIAMS, 48, died
November 3.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the
chapel.





INEZ STEWART, 81, retired
nurse, died November 8. Final
rites and burial, entrusted to Bent's
Funeral Home.

RENEE DESILUS, 96, retired
teacher, died November 5 at Beth-
seda Memorial Hospital. Service
11 a.m., Saturday, St. Mark Catho-
lic Church.

FLORENCE NELLIE LEDER-
ER,81, housewife, died November
5. Service was held.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt

ager, Burger
King, died No-
vember 4 at Mt.
Sinai Medical
Center. Service
2 p.m., Wednes-:
day (today),
New Providence
Missionary Bap-
tist Church.

LLOYD CAMPBELL, 61, roofer,
died November
6 at Aventura
Hospital. View-
ing (only), 11-8
p.m., Thursday
in the chapel.



ROBERT DOLLAR, 77, died,
November 5 at
Jackson Memo-
rial North Hos-
pital. Service 10
a.m., Saturday,
St. Paul AME
Church.


GEORGE LEONARD GOLD-
SMITH-CREN-
'SHAW, 64, re-
tired electrician,
died November
1 at VA Medical
Center. Survi-
vors include:
daughter, Sabri-
na Golden; son,
Richard Crenshaw; sisters, Jac-
quelyn Goldsmith-Fils and Judy
Goldsmith-Walter.; brothers, John
Goldsmith, Jr., Frederick Wallace,
Willie Goldsmith Sr., and Bernard
Williams. Viewing and wake 4
p.m., Friday at Charles Gregory
Goldsmith (nephew) home, 18600
NW 22 Court, Miami Gardens.
Service 11:30 a.m., Saturday in
the chapel.

NATASHA BARFIELD-MURPH,
35, correctional
officer, Ldied
November 5 at
Memorial West
Hospital. Ser-
vice 11 a.m.,
Saturday at
93rd Community
Baptist Church.

MAGGIE HORNE, 72, 'CNA,
died November
9 at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service 2 p.m.,
Saturday in the.
chapel.




THOMAS KING, 71, laborer,
died October
28 at Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
Service was
held.





Richardso
MILLICENT B. HENDERSON,
70, teacher,
died November
6. Service was
held.






Carey Royal Ram'n
NAWZAD ALATTAR, 68, gen-
eral contractor, died November 6
at North Broward Medical Center.
Service was held.

YARAH YOUSSEF TAHA, in-
fant, died November 3 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital. Service was
held.

HUSAM BALAA, 50, retired,.
November 3 at Memorial Regional
Hospital. Service was held.

AMY ROSARIO, 56, died No-
vember 8 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Honor Your
Loved One With an
In Memoriam
In
The Miami Times


DE WITT BABCOCK, 39, died
November 3.
Service 12 p.m.,
Saturday, Alfon-
so M. Richard-
son chapel.


BELINDA WATERS, 34, care-
taker, died No-
vember 5 at 2
Hsosmers, tea ad J
.Homestead J
Hospital. Ser-
vice 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Morning
Star Missionary
Baptist Church.


Hadley-Davis
BISHOP JIM T. HOLT, 72, retired
longshoreman,
died November
8 at Mount Siani
Medical Center.
Survivors in-
clude: children:
Teresa, Derrick,
Jayme, Latoya
and Arrington;
sisters, Emma and Johnnie Mae;
brother, James; two grand chil-
dren, Service 2 p.m., Saturday,
Shekkinah Glory Deliverance Min-
istries.

FRANCES LOUISE WEST, 61,
homemaker, died October 25 at
home. Service was held.


Royal -
CLIFFORD MURPH, JR., 36,
truck driver, died November 5.
Visitation 4-9
p.m., Thursday.
Service 1 p.m.,
Friday, Corner-
stone Christian
Center.



ASTON HAYE, 73, plumber,
died November 3. Visitation 4 -9-
p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday, Norland United Methodist
Church,I

ANNABELLA CARRINGTON,
88, housewife, died November 5.
Arrangements are incomplete.

HAROLD STANLEY, 58, detail-
er, died November 4. Service was
held.

RUDOLPH CHRISTIE, 73, parts
coordinator, died November 2.
Service was held.

DELOIS RODGERS, 56, resi-
dential manager, died October 26.
Service was held.

BERNICE SIMS, 79,housewife,
died November 8. Visitation 4 -9-
p.m., Friday. Service 11 a.m., Sat-
urday in the chapel.

LINDA RIGBY, 49, laborer, died
November 9. Arrangements are in-
complete.

Jay's
RANDOLPH WALKER, JR.,
57, mainte-
nance foreman,
died November









7 atBpitHs ^^H
3. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Second Baptist
Church.


RICKY CARTER, 46, stockman,
died November
6.. Service 1
p.m., Saturday
1p.m., Trium-
phant Church of
God of Proph-
ecy. iE


BETTY JEAN FARMER, 62,
died November
7 at Baptist Hos-
pital. Service 11
a.m., Saturday,
Kerr Memorial
United Method-
ist Church.


RUDOLPH EDWARDS III, 55,
died November
8. Service 1
p.m., Saturday,
Martin Memorial
A.M.E. Church.


SHELDON WAYNE
ROKER, JR.
06/18/79 - 11/12/08


To be absent from the body
is to be present with the
Lord.
This word from God gives us
comfort.
We love you and miss you.
Mom, Beverly; Dad, Shel-
don Sr.; sister, Tia; brother,
Devante; and nieces and
nephews.

PUBLIC NOTICE

As a public service to our com-
muniru, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and date,
location, and time of services.
Additional information and pho-
to may be included for a nominal
charge.The deadline is Monday
at 3:30 p.m..


Happy Birth da
In loving memory of,


Range --
MOTHER RENA HAMPTON-
ALLEN, 88,
homemaker,
died November
7. Survivors .
include: nieces, ,
Beverly Henry
of Tampa, FL.
and Durema
Coleman of Sa-
vanna, GA; sisters, Ruth Brown,
Ida Roberson, Josephine Ander-
son of Lakes Wales, FL, and Ro-
chelle Alexander of Tallahassee,
FL; brothers, Rueben Hampton of
Lake Wales, FL, Ralph Hampton of
Boca Raton, FL, Ulysses Hampton
of Greenville, FL, and Isaac (Jack)
Hampton Jr., of Knoxville, TN;
Goddaughter, Theresa Wade; a
host of nieces, nephews, other rel-
atives and friends. Service 1p.m.,
Saturday , Christ Crusade Family
Center, 13720 N.W. 22 Avenue,
Opa-Locka, FL.

Poiter "
WILLIE JAMES BAILEY, 61,
exterminator, died November 5 at
North Shore Medical Center. Ser-
vice 2 p.m., Wednesday (today),
Jordan Grove Missionary Baptist
Church.

INFANT REGINAE SESSIONS,
14 days old, died November 4 at
home. Service 2 p.m., Saturday in
the chapel.

DOROTHY RANDOLPH, 68,
physical therapist, died November
6 at Jackson Memorial South Hos-
pital. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

Nakia Ingraham
ALICE CURRIE, 80, housewife,
died November 4 at Broward Gen-
eral Medical Center. Service 10
a.m., Saturday, First Church Of
The Open Bible.

VINCENT ANDERSON, 67, car-
penter, died October 25 at Hillcrest
Nursing Home. Final rites and
burial Montego Bay, Jamaica.

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


It's been a year and we miss
you.
No words can say how much
we admired and appreciated
you for everything that you
have done for us.
You will remain in our hearts
and thoughts forever.
Love Always,
Sharhonda, Ronekqia and
Treyvon.


In Memoriam


FRISCO GEORGE
BLACKWOOD
01/06/86 -11/12/07


Frisco, two years passed by
so quickly, but the pain feels
like yesterday. We will always
cherish our memories of life
with you, day by day.
Love always, Diana and
family.



Card of Thanks
The family of the late,


MARCELLA ELAINE
TILLMAN
would like to express our
sincere thanks to everyone
for their prayers and support
during the loss of our loved
one.
Special thanks to Rev. Wil-
fred Miller Jr., Elder Ber-
nard Edwards and the staff
of Manker Funeral Home for
services rendered.
May God Bless each of you.
The Family



by becoming a member of our
CiUtra 3 -6it-4ctoty
CALL 305-694-6210


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


LEON JAMES, JR.
S. 01/06/50- 11/12/04

t has been five years since
you went to sleep.
We continue to miss you,
but we know we will see you
in the morning.
Love always,
Your Family

In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


SHIRLEY ANN COCHRAN
HARPP
01/09/48 - 11/11/07

Love always, Sherrianne,
Willie, Shirlenia, Willie, Jr.
and family.

In Memoriam


MOTHER EULA BRONSON
10/13/13 -11/12/05

Four years have passed and
you are sadly missed.
Your children and family.

Death Notice


*-

REV. JURDAN FERGUSON,
85, died November 4.
Viewing 6 to 8 p.m., Friday
at Corinth Baptist Church,
1435 N.W. 54 Street. Funer-
al 11 a.m., Saturday at the
church. Services entrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.


I.~ E TA S0F .11A S


I ------- | ------------


GERALENE ROZIER
11/15/56 - 11111108









BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


1RR THF MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 11-17. 2009


Alleged Ohio serial killer

rare among mass killers































Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


Corrections

officer slain

by husband
The Miami Times Special Report
An estranged Miami-Dade
couple are dead after a fight late
Thursday that ended in gunfire.
According to authorities, po-
lice answered a "woman in
distress" call at a home in the
19000 block of Northwest 57th
Avenue. The call came around
10 p.m.
When they arrived, they found
the bodies of Natasha Murph,
35, and Cliffor-d -Murph, 36.
Clifford Murph dead on the
scene. Natasha was taken to a
local hospital, where she died.
Natasha Murph was a correc-
tional officer with the Miami-
Dade Corrections and Rehabili-
tation Department.
No further information has
been released; the investigation
continues.



THE


MY-S '7.p3i, HA K ..- A HN~


Death Notice


ANNIE KATE M. TUCKER,
63, typesetter, died November
8 in Tallahassee.
Viewing 4 to 9 p.m., Friday,
Mitchell Funeral Home.
For Service information call
Mitchell Funeral Home, 305-
638-0088 or Mrs. C. Manuel,
305-693-4852.


In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


ARNOLD INGRAM
02/20/54 - 11/10/07


Arnold was,more than just a
husband and father of two; he
was a friend that would cross
the depths of the frigid Bering
Sea if he thought that it would
put a smile on your face. He
will never be forgotten and will
always have a special place in
our hearts.
Your family loves you.


Death Notice


MARIO MANGHAM, 19,
died October 8 at Jackson
Hospital North.
Viewing 5 to 9 p.m., Friday.
Service 1 p.m., Saturday,
New Jerusalem Primitive Bap-
tist Church, 777 N.W. 85th
Street.
Arrangements entrusted to
Mitchell Funeral Home.


Honor


Your


Loved One


With an


In


Memoriam


In The Miami


Times


Death Notice


GENEVA "Edith" ADDER-
LEY, 90, died October 31
in Louisville, KY. Memorial
4 p.m., Sunday, Church of
God of Prophecy, Hallandale
Beach.

Death Notice


PARIS, died November 1 at
home. Survivors include: par-
ents, Heps and Sina; sisters,
Ciara and Damiana; broth-
ers, Damian, Damelle and
Cheeky.
Wake 7:30 p.m., Friday,
Palm Gardens Banquet Hall,
2700 N.W. 167th Street. Ser-
vice 10 a.m., Saturday, Pet
Heaven Memorial Park, 10901
W. Flagler St.
Repast immediately follow-
ing service at Palm Gardens
Banquet Hall.


Davis convicted 16 years later


The Miami Times Special Report
Former Miami-Dade Judge
Phillip Davis was convicted
Wednesday of looting public
grant money intended to help
inner-city Miami residents. The
verdict came 16 years after an-
other jury cleared him in a no-
torious judicial bribery case.
After hearing Davis testify, the
jurors deliberated for five hours
over two days. He repeatedly
stated how important it was to
him to "empower" poor people.
At one point, an emotional Da-
vis teared up and asked to go
home.
Davis and administrative as-
sistant Joan Headley each were
convicted of nine fraud and
money-laundering charges, all
felonies. Each faces between
four and 30-plus years in pris-
on. Miami-Dade Circuit Judge
-- " 'Beatrice Butchko set sentenc-
ing for Jan. 8.
Davis's prior arrest occurred
in 1991; the result of an FBI
sting known as Operation Court
Broom. Agents recorded Da-
vis arranging a $20,000 payoff
from,a lawyer.










& %%a
Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


At trial in 1993, Davis ad-
mitted snorting cocaine in his
chambers he attributed the
bribes to his addiction. Jurors
acquitted him.
Davis was disbarred. In the
late '90s he helped establish
Miami-Dade Resident College, a
grant-funded program intended
to teach impoverished inner-
city residents job and life skills.
In closing arguments Tues-
day, Broward County prosecu-


I


The


tor Al Guttmann said Davis and
Headley inflated salaries and
submitted fake bills to steal
more than $80,000, , some of
which was illegally used to start
a for-profit 'pretrial interven-
tion" program for young crimi-
nal defendants.
After the verdict, a represen-
tative for, Davis said he was
"'extremely disappointed and
that he expected to be found not
guilty.


Miami Times


is announcing our
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The Miami Times



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SECTION C MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009 THE MIAMI TIMES



Miami Northwestern hosts College Fair


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com

It's that time of the year.
Almost four months into a new
school year, high school seniors
across the country will begin to
narrow down their college choices.
Miami Northwestern Senior High
School wanted to assist seniors
and their parents in the selection
process so the school's College
Resource Center hosted their 10th
annual College Fair on Nov. 4 in
the Lee R. Perry Sports Complex
(Northwestern's gym).
The change of time brought a larger-
than-expected crowd of parents and
students from throughout Miami-
Dade County to speak to over 60
colleges and universities.
"This is the first time that the
College Fair was done at night,"
said CAP Advisor Lamarc Anderson.
"The event is usually held during the
day."
Anderson and College Resource
Center coordinator Irene
Wisenbacker-Clark were. surprised
by the turnout but it was not an easy


task to bring the parties together
said Wisenbacker-Clark.
"It was a lot of hard work. We
invited a number of schools that
specialized in different areas such
as arts, business or technical,"
she said. "Another thing, parents,
who are also a part of a student's
college decision, were able to ask.the
different schools questions with the
addition to the students."
Kemisha Daniels, whose daughter
Tracie is a senior, was one of those
parents.
"Times are hard right now. I want
to make sure that my child goes to
a school where they are receiving
the best quality of education and
they are able to obtain a job with the
skills they have acquired in those
four years," said Daniels with a list
of questions jotted down on a paper
for the various college representative.
She collected information from over
20 colleges that she and her daughter
will read over before making their
final decisions.
Another parent Carmita Goss, who
has always stressed the importance
Please turn to COLLEGE 4C


-Photo/ Sandra J.
A college representative helps a student fill out an informational card so that information can be mailed to the students
home about the college at the Miami Northwestern's College Fair.The Miami Times


Pop star singer Rhianna and Chris Brown on stage performing together

Singer Rihanna speaks

out about being assaulted


R&B singer Rihanna says deal-
ing with the media attention af-
ter being assaulted in February
by ex-boyfriend Chris Brown was
humiliating. But she now hopes to
speak for young women who are
afraid to talk openly about domes-
tic violence.
The 21-year-old pop star told
Glamour magazine in an inter-
view posted online last week that
the police photo of her bruised
face that was leaked to reporters
added insult to injury.
After the assault, she awoke to
find helicopters circling her house
and reporters swarming her
street. "I felt like I went to sleep as
Rihanna and woke up as Britney
Spears," she said.
Rihanna said she felt disap-
pointed and taken advantage of,
especially when she heard that
the two officers under investiga-
tion for leaking her photo were
women.
"I felt like people were making it
into a fun topic on the Internet,
and it's my life," she said.


Rihanna said she didn't realize
how much her decisions affected
people she didn't know, like her
many fans. She feels stronger,
wiser and more aware now, she
added.
"Domestic violence is a big se-
cret," Rihanna said. "The positive
thing that has come out of my
situation is that people can learn
from that. I want to give as much
insight as I can to young women,
because I feel like I represent a
voice that really isn't heard. Now I
can help speak for those women."
Brown, 20, pleaded guilty to fel-
ony assault in June. He was sen-
tenced to five years' probation, six
months of community labor and a
year of domestic violence counsel-
ing for the attack, in which he was
accused of hitting, choking and
biting Rihanna in a rented sports
car.
TMZ published the photo of
Rihanna's bruised face less than
two weeks after the beating, and
the LAPD immediately launched an
internal investigation of the leak.


Black Miamians headline annual book fair

Fields-Black advises young writers to travel more


By Sandra J. Charite
scharite@miamitimesonline.com


Edda L. Fields-Black never
thought of herself as an author.
For eight years, she struggled to
transform her dissertation into
the novel, Deep Roots: Rice Farm-
ers in West Africa and the African
Diaspora. Its 296 pages highlights
Fields-Black's journey in West Af-
rica since the early 90's and the ex-
periences that helped shaped her
views about the African Culture.
Fields-Black, a Miami native, will
be among the hundreds of authors
who will headline 26th annual Mi-
ami International Book Fair which
began on Sunday and is slated to
end until Nov. 15.
"I am so excited," said Fields-
Black. "I grew up going to the book
fairs."
Fields-Black, 37, is the daughter
of businessman Eddie Fields and'
historian Dorothy Jenkins Fields,.
She graduated from Carrollton
School of the Sacred Heart then


HUNTER FIELDS-BLACK


furthered her education, receiving
a Bachelor's degree from Emory
University.
She later became a recipient of
Emory's Cuttino Prize, allowing her
to travel outside of Europe. Fields-
Black embarked on a journey to Si-
erra Leone then returned six times
to study in West Africa where she
built a career researching, writing
and teaching African history.
She obtained a Masters degree
from the University of Florida, be-


came a Teaching Assistant at Ober-
lin College (1999) and earned a
Ph.D. from the University of Penn-
sylvania.
Fields-Black is married to Samu-
el Black and has two children. She
is currently an associate professor
for the Department of History at
the Carnegie Mellon University in
Pittsburgh, PA.
Fields-Black says that teaching
has helped make her into a writer.
Please turn to BOOKS 3C


Michael Jackson hits no. i with film and album


Five months after his death, Mi-
chael Jackson is still a chart-top-
per.
The singer's This Is It concert
documentary and album of the
same name have both reached No.
1 in the U.S. and in 16 countries
worldwide, according to ratings re,-
ports released Wednesday.
Directed by Jackson's tour cho-
reographer, Kenny Ortega, the
concert documentary -- which was
released Oct. 28 -- made movie


history as the highest-grossing
concert film of all time, besting Mi-
ley Cyrus' Hannah Montana: The
Movie. Its companion album now
tops Billboard's Top 200 charts
as well as the Soundtrack album
chart.
The disc, featuring Jackson's last
recorded single, is expected to top
album charts in Canada, Japan,
France, Italy, Holland, Belgium,
Turkey, New Zealand, Hong Kong,
Korea, Philippines, Singapore,


Taiwan, Thailand, the Middle East
and Colombia. It will likely rank
in the top three on charts in the
U.K., Australia, Argentina, Aus-
tria, Denmark, Norway, Portugal,
Switzerland and Spain.
Jackson is the first artist since
the Rolling Stones in 1971,to have
a No. 1 documentary and album
on the charts at the same time.
He died June 25 after suffering
cardiac arrest at his Holmby Hills,
Calif., home.










BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Xr TIF MIAMI TIMES. NOVEMBER 11-17, 20091


"MR*,r


A special recognition to
Minnie Mickens-Jones,
who really knows how to or-
chestrate events. She has
taken charge of the St. John
Foundation "Overtown Is
Cooking Out" and now The
Eleventh Anniversary of Jef-
ferson Reaves Sr. Health
Center Gala Celebration,
last Thursday, at the Rusty
Pelican of Key Biscayne.
It was and elegant evening
beginning with the cock-
tail hour in the lobby, fol-
lowed by the seating of the
guests. the Psi Phi
Band played in the
background. Support
came from Governor
Charlie Crist, Con-
gressman Kendrick
Meek, State Senator
Fredrica S. Wilson,
Mayor Carlos Alva- FERG
rez, Mayor Shirley
Gibson, Miami Gardens, The
Hon. Dorothy, Bendross-
Mindingall, Commissioner
Audrey M. Edmonson, and
Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mor-
tuary, PA.
After everyone was seat-
ed, Ms. Jones introduced
Rodney Baltimore from
the Tom Joyner Morning
Show as the moderator for
the evening. He welcomed
the guests and brought on
Rev. George Dickens, St.
Paul AME for the invoca-
tion. Next up were Dr. Rob-
ert Schwartz, M.D., for
the greetings, and Gregory
Gay, President of the Board,
for the occasion. He said
that the Jefferson Reaves
Sr. Health Center contin-
ues to provide comprehen-
sive primary healthcare for
thousands of residents in
Overtown, East Little Ha-
vana, Allapattah, Wynwood
and beyond. He went on to
say that some people origi-
nally considered their ,mis-


U


sion a waste of -
time, but they
grew from 5.000 4
to 25.000 visits Al
annually in the
last decade.
During the meal, the band
provided dinner music of
the "oldie goldies".
Ms. Minnie Jones was
introduced to recognize
the honorees selected by
the board. She began with
James E. Fayson Sr., an
outstanding FAMU offi-
cial, community worker,
King Of Clubs B &
W Gala chairman,
and a member of St.
Paul AME. Emanuel.
Washington, Sr. was
recognized for being
a teacher and track
and field coach , as
ISON well as Park manager
at Gibson and Miami
Parks and a retired fireman
and Optimist Coach for sev-
eral years.
Also honored were
Tony E. Ferguson,
a graduate of Miami
Northwestern, Eck-
els College of Mortu-
ary Science, who fur-
ther studied at FIU,
St. Thomas, and is
a 55-year member FAY
of Mr. Sinai Baptist
Church and Leonard Cur-
tel, a co-founder of the The
Jefferson Reaves Center
and enviable worker in the
Overtown community. Bob-
bie Mumford, daughter of
Rep. Reaves, read the proc-
lamations of each honoree,
while Baltimore introduced
keynote speaker, Dr. Nel-
son Adams who captivated
everyone with his statistics
on health.
Dr. Adams alluded to the
prevention of poor health,
obesity, and the ill health in
.Blacks and women. It was


gratifying to hear Black
women health habits have
improve, but their longev-
ity is shorter than white
women. He suggested
more visits to the doc-
tor. His remarks received
a standing ovation. Ms.
Jones was given the mic for
closure with Mr. Gay, while
the band struck up and the
electric slide dancers
dominated.


The Host Commit-
tee to elect Frederica
Wilson to Congress
invites you to a Blast-
Off Extravaganza, J0
Tuesday, November


10, beginning at 5
PM - 8 PM, at Karu &,Y Ul-
tra Nightclub, 71 NW 14th
Street. The night will feature
The Tempting Temptations,
Bahamas Junkanoo Revue,
The Psi Phi Band, Miami
Gardens super Soul Step-
pers, and you joining the
longest Electric Slide Line
in the world. Additionally,
there will be a buffet, heavy
hors d'oeuvres, and
"Happy Hour" cash
bar.
Kudos go out to
the host commit-
tees, such as the
100 Black Men, 100
Black Women, Gam-
ma Zeta Omega and
SON Pi Delta of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Soror-
ity, All Bahamians, Bethune
Cookman University, Black
Lawyers, Black Minority
Contractors, Bulls for Life,
Charmettes, Daughters of
Isis, Dade Co. and Miami
alumnae of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority, FAMU Alum-
ni, Jack & Jill Kappa Alpha
Psi, Links, Dade Democratic
Party, Morehouse College,
NAACP, Miami Northwest-
ern, Omega Psi Phi, PULSE,
State Attorney, Red Hatters
& Female Lawyer, Univer-
sity Women, and Tri-County
High School Alumni.


Senator Wilson began the
meeting by introducing new
committee members and in-
forming the group how im-
portant E-mails are to reach
people. Currently, 500-E-
mails have been sent out
which resulted in receiving
over $100,000. By contrast,
Congressman Kendrick
Meek's committee has raised
$4 million. Adrian
Jones, a graduate
of TSU and IT com-
pany owner spoke to
the importance of an
interrelationship of
fan and event pages
that should facilitate
using the Facebook
)NES 'and Fan Pages oper-


ated by Sheila Hyl-
ton.
I Other indefatigable work-
ers are Bobbie Mumford,
Barbara Dent, Melody
Delancey, Pamela Jones,
Consul General Gladys
Johnson, Betsy Kaplan,
former school board mem-
ber, Dr. Marvin Dunn,
Emma Curry, Al Dotson,
and Paul Wilson. Tune in
to Chatter next week for the
who, what, where, when,
and how.


Congratulations to
Marian Harris Shan-
non for celebrat-
ing Ninety Years of
Perfected Royalty,
last Saturday, at the
Church of the Open REA
Door with Keith La-
varity, Esquire providing
the ambience and her friends
providing the content. The
program began with Olga
Van Beverhoudt, mistress
of ceremony, and included:
Venita Timpson, invoca-
tion, Euphemia Ferguson,
musical selection, Lillie
Harris, video presentation
, and Alberta Godfrey and
Dorothy P. Lee toasting
her accomplishments from


Booker T. Washington to the
present.
Shannon is known as a
strong educator who collab-
orated with the late Jennie
Reaves to organize The Re-
tired Black Teachers Asso-
ciation with the Afro-Amer-
ican Methodist Churches
and is vital to the history of
Black teachers in the State
of Florida.
Her enviable legacy was re-
ported by Roberta Daniels,
president, BTW Alumni,
Sara F. Bullard, Dr. Doro-
thy Fields, Gwen Welters,
Brenda Williams, Sue Da-
vis, and Jason, A. Moody,
while Max - The One Man
Band provided the
music and 'Queen' A
Marian Shannon
tearfully poured her
heart out to those
who honored her and
sang Happy Birthday,
the old. fashion way.

********* * Wll
Dr. R. Joaquin Wil-
lis, Pastor, and the women
of The Church of the Open
Door initiated The Seventh
Annual women's Weekend
Retreat, Saturday,
October 17, under
the theme: "Women
of God, Harnessing
the Healing Power of
Forgiveness".
The committee
members solicited
Cynthia L. Thomp-
VES son, a multi-talented
entrepreneur, teach-
er, speaker, life coach, con-'
ference facilitator and spo-
ken word author to deliver
her inspirational and inspir-
ing speech anointed by God
to chasten, correct, convict,
and conceptualize.
Leading up to her message
included words of musical
wisdom from Deacon Annie
Otey, Chris Tomlin, Dan
Galbreath, Dr. Gwendolyn
H. Robinson, Dorothy Pat-


terson, Helen Baylor, Ad-
eyela Bennett, Gwendolyn
Smith, Deacon Lisa S. An-
derson, Danielle Geathers,
Sandra H. Butler, Patricia
Carby, and Shirley L. Ar-
chie, who introduced the
speaker.
She was brilliant with her
message and opened many
eyes with her inspirational
words. She was followed
by Karol Brant. Patsy G.
McDowell summed up the
day as the ensemble tolled
"Bless the Lord, Oh My Soul"
& "Marching to Zion".


A man of all seasons is
Reverend Abraham
SThomas, because he
is always assisting
people, especially
with the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence
. where he sings "If
I could Help Some-
body" at each meet-
LSON ing, forum or unity
breakfast.
However, his forte is writ-
ing. He writes so well that
the names of his charac-
ters merit mention here.
His first book exuded the
saga of the political world
in South Florida as a Grape-
fruit Republic, followed by
"Weezie", "Skeeter", "Dr.
John 0. Brown" biography,
"Ransom Hill" biography,
and "Murderer" which is
available presently.
He has written many
books and published many
of them himself. Currently
he has changed his hat to
composing and publish-
ing songs. His latest CD is
"Shout", where he manifest
"So Much to Shout About"
and "My Faith Looks Up To
Thee" produced by C. H.
Thomas. You can find him
at St. James AME Church
orat a 5000 Rol.e Models of
Excellence program.


I k By Ana raeSwe.ng


Marian Harris-Shannon celebrated her
90th birthday on Oct. 17 with her Zeta Phi
Beta Sorority sisters and friends in the social
hall at the Church of the Open Door. Shan-
non, all of your former students and those
who did not get a chance to be taught by you
join the Booker T. Washington High School
gang in wishing you a happy, happy belated
birthday. May you live a long time and never
grow old.

Thomas "Nick" Marshall was laid to rest
on Saturday, Oct. 31. Nick will long be re-
membered by his school mates, family and
friends. Not only was he a former City of Mi-
ami Police Officer, but Nick was also a diligent
worker of any committee that he worked on.
Whether it was the community, church, class
of Booker T. Washington or whatever, Nick
gave his all.
So sorry the United States of America could
not secure the 2016 Olympics Games would
be hosted in Chicago. Chicago, who were
thought to be front-runner, was eliminated in
the first round. The bid went to Rio de Ja-
neiro, Brazil.

Wedding anniversary greetings to Harold
and Maliney, Clarke, Sr., Nov. 3, their 36th;
Rashford (Sonny) and Wilhelmenia (Franks)
Jennings, Nov. 7, their 58th.
Our First Lady Michelle Obama graces
the cover of "Glamour" magazine. It is the
first time a President's wife has done so in
the magazine's 70-year history. "Glamour" is


honoring our "First Lady" for her
dedication to mentoring young
women.


Hearty congratulations to my buddy,
Oscar J. Braynon, Sr., who was honored
and recognized for his outstanding accom-
plishments during the Diaspora Arts Co-
alition's Awards Gala and Benefit. Honor-
ees in this category are selected based on
leadership, support and assistance with
the preservation and promotion of art and
culture throughout Miami-Dade County.

Are you ready for some football? Our
Floridda Classic 30th anniversary game be-
tween Bethune-Cookman University and
Florida A& M University in Orlando on
Nov. 21.

Deval Patrick was elected Massachusetts
first Black governor and is only the second
elected Black state governor in the United
States history. Have our young generation
and older generation thought about what
are we going to do when the "fad" of tattoos
goes out and it is no longer in style?

Norma Culmer-Mims children treated
their mother to a beautiful repast at her
daughter, Ronda, home on Sunday, Nov.
1. The family and friends joined in the happy
celebration. Norma's birthday was on Nov.


Michael Jackson's father seeks support


Joe Jackson, 81, says he
has living expenses exceeding
$20,000 a month. His attorney
says the family patriarch doesn't
have a regular income and was
dependent on his son's money.
Joe Jackson says his monthly
expenses include $5,000 for ho-
tels and air travel, $2,500 for
eating out and $1,500 for rent
on his home in Las Vegas.Mi-
chael Jackson leads 12 newcom-
ers onto the top of the tally
Michael Jackson's father
wants the late singer's estate to


help him cover living expenses according to court papers filed
that exceed $20,000 a month, Friday.



CONCH BATTER- MADE FRESH




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3C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


Women of Precious movie undertake transformational roles


By Susan Wloszczyna


Lee Daniels is the anti-Pyg-
malion. He loves to knock a diva
off her pedestal and bring her
down to earth.
Hand the filmmaker a gor-
geous specimen like Halle Berry
and he will strip away all evi-
dence of airbrushed Hollywood
artifice to reveal the talent that
lies beneath. And, as in Berry's
case when she played a dirt-
poor widow of a death row con-
vict in 2001's Monster's Ball,
her efforts just might lead to an
Oscar.
Daniels, who produced Ball,
also assumes the mantle of di-
rector with Precious: Based on
the Novel Push by Sapphire,
one of the year's most talked-
about dramas even before it
opens Friday.
And what are they are talk-
ing about, besides how Oprah
Winfrey and Tyler Perry have
thrown their clout behind the
festival-circuit favorite about a
horribly abused Harlem teen,
who is obese, illiterate and
pregnant with her second child
by her father, as she struggles
to escape from her hellish life?
Mostly, it's the heartbreak-


ingly honest performances by
the film's four main actresses -
and that Daniels dared to give
Mariah Carey a mustache.
As he says of his cast, "They
gave me a miracle, they gave
me my truth." Here is the truth
behind how each actress defied
expectations as a victimized
daughter (Gabourey Sidibe), a
monstrous mother (Mo'Nique),
a selfless teacher (Paula Pat-
ton) and a weary social worker
(Carey).
Lee Daniels says: "She speaks
like a white girl from the Val-
ley. Very chirpy and giggly. She
is a special girl and, I think,
unaware of it. She is either in
denial about her physicality or
she's from another planet. She
is evolved. She is so secure
about who she is."
Precious sits in the last row
of a classroom, her hulking
350-pound form barely fitting
behind her desk. Sullen and si-
lent, she is locked in her own
private prison. But in the fanta-
sies that unreel in her 16-year-
old mind, she gaily walks the
red carpet and flirtatiously pos-
es for a music video.
Then reality interrupts, and
she briefly comes out of her


shell to violently slug another
student for mouthing off to the
teacher.
Gabourey Sidibe, 26, is no
Precious. As she enters the
room, she is fiercely working
a clingy hot-pink dress and
wearing a smile so bright, it's
as if she has swallowed the
sun. The daughter of an R&B
singer, Alice Tan Ridley, and a
Senegalese cabdriver who left
when she was young, Sidibe
(pronounced SIH-deh-bay)
more than lives up to her nick-
name of Gabby.
The Brooklyn-born, Harlem-
raised customer-service rep
was working on a psychology
degree when. she was chosen


by Daniels, who saw at least
500 hopefuls in his quest for
the perfect Precious.
Sidibe never aspired to star-
dom. Her only previous acting
experience was in college pro-
ductions such as The Wiz (she
was Glinda the Good Witch)
and Peter Pan. "I did them be-
cause I was bored," she says. "I
never wanted to be an actress.
Never. I never thought even
when I was doing it, 'Oh, I can
make a career out of this.' "
She heard about the audi-
tions from a friend at school -
"He told me they were looking
for a plus-size girl age 18 to 25"
- and tried out. Shortly thereaf-
ter she met with Daniels.


TH OIE CEEBRTEDAROUD TEWRLD


-Photo/ToddPlitt
Paula Patton plays th,e teacher to Gabourey Sidibe's student. Patton
says that when she read the script,"I cried and I was scared." Sidibe
says, "I am still in awe."


Local author inspired by Africa


BOOKS
continued from 1C


During the Fair, Fields-
Black and fellow Miamian
Tera Hunter will take part
in a African Diaspora Pan-
el of Black women scholar's,
which will be moderated by
Carole Boyce Davies, for-
mer professor at Florida In-
ternational University and
director of the African-New
World Studies Program, at
the Miami Dade College,
Wolfson Campus, at 5 p.m.,
Nov. 14.
Fields-Black, who helped


spearhead the event, says
that she will discuss in
the panel, "why I wrote the
book and discuss some
of the challenges that we
construct as well as many
parts of the diaspora."
Hunter says she is also
excited.
A graduate of Miami Edi-
son Senior High, Hunter
earned a Bachelor's degree
from Duke University and
a PhD from Yale Univer-
sity. She is a professor of
history and African-Amer-
ican studies at Princeton
University and the author


of To 'Joy My Freedom:
Southern Black Women's
Lives and Labors After the
Civil War.
Fields-Black plans on re-
turning to Africa to work
on her second novel.
Her advice for upcoming
writers is to keep writing
and travel.
"Writing is a difficult pro-
cess," said Fields-Black.
"Get out there and get your
work out there in front as
much people as possible.
Most importantly; travel.
Traveling broadens your
perspective in many ways."


I NC NV NI E I N Gl I


0 F E M P ',1T Y : l




F BII GHTI NI 11 II G I
T H E W EI A T H E[@ I
A [ND U TI NII G


CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES


MIAMI DADE COLLEGE'S CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT



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PERFORMANCE SERIES


Fri. and Sat., Nov. 20-21, 2009


8 p.m.


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500 71 St., Miami Beach

TICKETS
General admission: $22 * Students and seniors: $18

INFORMATION
For detailed venue information and secure online tickets:
www.mdc.edu/culture * 305-237-3010

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Ft. Lauderdale 954-523-3309
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HOT PEAS 'N BUTTER
Winner of the 2006, 2008,;and 2009 "Parent's Choice Awards," Hot Peas 'N
Butter is a unique children's musical group that Incorporates elements of
traditional Latin music, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, jazz, folk, and rock.
11 AM, 2 PM and 5 PM
Carnival Studio Theater (at the Ziff Ballet Opera House) * $15
Florida Grand Opera presents
SUOR ANGELICA & PAGLIACCI
2 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House
$13.75, $22.75, $27.75, $ 62.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75, $178.75
Adrienne Arsht Center and Ghetto Youths International presents
THE AWAKE TOUR: JULIAN MARLEY
FEATURING STEPHEN AND DAMIAN "JR. GONG" MARLEY
Julian Marley and the Uprising featuring Stephen Marley and Damian "Jr.
Gong" Marley will perform with soulful vocals inspired by life and spirituality.
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $24.50, $34.50, $44.50

SUOR ANGELICA & PAGLIACCI
7 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House
$13.75, $22.75, $27.75, $ 62.75, $81.75, $99.75, $132.75, $178.75


SUOR ANGELICA & PAGLIACCI
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House
$27.75, $52.75, $81.75, $ 99.75, $132.75, $178.75, $228.75, $253.75

Adrienne Arsht Center and Larry Rosen presents
JAZZ ROOTS: AN EVENING WITH DAVE GRUSIN
Featuring: Jon Secada, Arturo Sandoval, Nestor Torres, Sammy
Figueroa, and the Mancini Institute Orchestra.Featuring Grusin's classic
jazz arrangement of West Side Story, plus many of his acclaimed film
scores, including Heaven Can Wait, The Milagro Beanfleld War,
Havana, and many more.
8 PM * Knight Concert Hall * $25, $45, $55, $85, $125


-p lH=e td: 1:.


Adrienne Arsht Center presents Masterworks Sanford and Dolores Ziff Dance Series
BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
Batsheva is one of the most influential, fresh and exciting dance companies
on the planet, and one of Israel's leading cultural ambassadors.
8 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $25, $35, $45, $60, $75, $90


BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE
2 PM * Ziff Ballet Opera House * $25, $35, $45, $60, $75, $90
FREE GOSPEL SUNDAYS:
FEATURING RICHARD SMALLWOOD
Grammy and Stellar award-winning gospel legend Richard Smallwood is
the featured guest on this Free Gospel Sundays holiday program.
4 PM * Knight Concert Hall * FREE


Hot Peas 'N Butter


The Awake Tour:
Julian Marley


Jazz Roots:
An Evening with
Dave Grusin


Batsheva Ensemble


Free Adrienne Arsht Center Tours: Mondays and Saturdays at noon, starting at the Ziff Ballet Opera House lobby.
No reservations necessary.

Six NIGHS AMWEEI
FORDERRVNCEWININ
I, ATfEETR
305.9496722 * rshtceCellor305.949Il 6722


I


AdrienneArsht Center
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
KNIGHT'COWERT. HALL* CARNIVAL STUDIO THEATEA:o ZI


Wm���


..... .....
Ho i ros
'N BUTTI


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LSAT NOVEMBER 28 1


[SUN DECEMBER 6 j












4C THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009 BLACKS Musi CONTROl THEIR OWN DESTINY


Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 :


Creativity and controversy


By Mike Snider

After gaining a reputation
for its immersive first-person
Call of Duty action video games
based in World War II, game
developer Infinity Ward wanted
to stretch its creative muscles
with an original, contemporary
game.
The result, Call of Duty 4:
Modern Warfare, won numer-
ous awards as 2007's best game
and has sold more than 14 mil-
lion units worldwide.
With the sequel, Call of Duty:
Modern Warfare 2 (out today,
Xbox 360, PS3 and PC, rated
M for ages 17-up, prices start
at $60), Infinity Ward looks to
test the boundaries of what is
considered acceptable in video
games. Players can choose to
take part in a terrorist attack
against civilians, and they de-
fend a bombed-out nation's
capital.
"The coolest thing is you .don't
exactly know who is going to
win," says creative director Ja-


son West. "It's actually scary. (A
near-future setting) allows it to
be more real and, I hope, reso-
nate with people more than the
rah-rah good vs. evil stuff of the
past."
In the first Modern Warfare,
players hunted down power-
hungry ultranationalist Rus-
sian leader Imran Zakhaev. Five
years later, a new leader named
Vladimir Makarov has risen to
power, and an elite internation-
al task force (the player includ-
ed) must pursue him.
Think 24 with terrorists
threatening the USA and Jack
Bauer forced to use any means
necessary. Or Tom Clancy's
1994 book Debt of Honor, 'in
which the U.S. Capitol is de-
stroyed during a joint session of
Congress, killing the president
and other officials.
To help pull off its thriller, In-
finity Ward enlisted Hollywood
hands including film composer
Hans Zimmer and NCIS writer/
executive producer Jesse Stern,
both of whom were impressed.


-Photo/Infinity Ward
Tough choices: Players can decide whether to attack civilians in Call
of Duty: Modern Warfare 2.


Oprah Winfrey removes Winans from show


Oprah Winfrey is remov-
ing gospel singer BeBe Win-
ans from her show's "kara-
oke challenge" until charges
against him for allegedly
pushing'.his ex-wife to the
ground., are resolved.
Winans appeared on The
Oprah Winfrey Show last
week and was seen in pro-
mos for future appearanc-
es. Now he'll be cut out of
the segment, said Winfrey
spokesman. Don Halcombe
on Thursday.
Winfrey was .criticized by
some bloggers this week for
including Winans after she
had taken a strong .stand


against domestic violence
earlier this year. She did a
show on the topic when sing-'
er Chris Brown assaulted his
then-girlfriend Rihanna.
The daytime TV leader
said at the time: "Domestic
violence is something that I
wouldn't tolerate. Period."
Halcombe would only say
that the decision to eliminate
Winans was made this week.
It was not clear if Winfrey
had been aware that Winans
was charged with misde- BEBE WINANS
meanor domestic assault in Gospel Singer
the Feb. 13 incident, where, ,
Winansr-- aid his ex-wife4 aout their children.
Debra r, d dl argu i r an ..as a. t date set


for Jan. 20.
Winans' manager did not
immediately return a tele-
phone call for comment.
"Let's just not have a double
standard on domestic violence
or even accusations of domes-
tic violence," said Joni Reyn-
olds, a woman from the Balti-
more area and author of a blog
called Ebony Mom Politics.
She had called attention
to Winans' participation and
wondered if Winfrey had over-
looked the charges because the
Winans were friends or because
there were no photos that had
become public as in Rihanna's,
case.


-Photo/Sandra J.Charite
Dominique Roy, a high school senior, receives information
from a representative at the at the Miami Northwestern's
College Fair.The Miami Times

Students concerned about college cost

COLLEGE
continued from 1C

of education to her children felt it was crucial
to meet with the college representative. Her son,
Herman Bain, is currently a junior who desires a
career in Business or Education.
"All I need is for him to attend an institution that
offers him the best so he can succeed in the real
world," said Goss.
Students also found the College Fair informative.
Dominique Roy, a high school senior, already has
a scholarship to Florida A&M University but her
dream is to attend Florida State University. She still
awaits their reply. Dominique, 17, attended the Fair
hoping to find a college that has her major and an
affordable tuition.
"I don't want to be stuck in college," said Dominique,
who plans on majoring in Psychology but she doesn't
want to be away from home and strapped for cash.
That was one concern in talking to students prior
to the College Fair, Wisenbacker-Clark said a lot of
seniors were considering college after graduation but
they worried about not having the funds to go.
"It is important that the students talk to their
advisor about financial aid opportunities are available
to them," she said. "During these tough times, there
is money available for,all students.".


publix.com/acd --------------


Publix Salad Blend......................4........ 400
Spring Mix, American, European, Italian, Hearts of Romaine,
or Caesar Salad Kit, A Healthy and Convenient Meal Solution,
5 to 12-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 1.98 ON 2












Multigrain Bread.................................. .....
Healthy Blend of Whole Grains, Handmade Throughout the Day,
From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO 1.00


Cereal............... 1
Assorted Varieties, Crispix, Rice Krispies,
Frosted Flakes, Froot Loops, Corn Pops,
or Apple Jacks, 11.2 to 16.5-oz box
Quantity rights reserved.
SAVE UP TO 4.21


Nabisco
Chips Ahoy!
Cookies.
Assorted Varieties,
10.2 to 15.25-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO 2.38 ON 2


�5OO


18-Pack
Assorted 1 299
Budweiser Beer .........1
12-oz can or bot,
SAVE UP TO 1.50
(12-Pack Assorted Yuengling Beer or Lager,
12-oz can or bot. ... 8,99)


12-Pack
Selected
Pepsi .
Products ...G ree
12-oz can
(Sale Price 3/12.00 With 1 Free,
That's 4/12.00 or 3.00 each
With the Purchase of 4.)
SAVE UP TO 7.16 ON 4


Prices effective Thursday, November 12 through Wednesday, November 18, 2009. Only in Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River,
Okeechobee and Monroe Counties. Any item carried by Publix GreenWise Market will be at the Publix advertised-sale price. Quantity rights reserved.


BLACKS MUST CONTRbi -THEIR OWN DESTINY


4C THE MIAMI TIMES, I NOVEMBER 11-17, 20091


m -
Wd - 0--l = ?01 VISA
.dd











The Miami Times



Business


SCfTION Df


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


THE MIAMI TIMES


S^ Recession: A silent


depression for Blacks


I ooo-ooo-oooo

Fannie Mae to start
renting out homes
instead of foreclosing
Thousands of borrowers on the verge
of foreclosure will soon have the option
of renting their homes from Fannie Mae,
under a policy announced Thursday.
The government-controlled company,
through its "Deed for Lease" program,
will allow borrowers to transfer owner-
ship to Fannie Mae and sign a one-year
lease, with month-to-month extensions
after that.
The program will "eliminate some of the
uncertainty of foreclosure, keeps fami-
lies and tenants in their homes during
a transitional period, and helps to sta-
bilize neighborhoods and communities,"
Jay Ryan, a Fannie Mae vice president,
said in a statement.
But the effort is likely to affect a rela-
tively small number of homeowners. In
the first half of the year, Fannie Mae took
back about 1,200 properties through
this process, known as a deed-in-lieu of
foreclosure. That pales. in comparison
to the 57,000 foreclosed properties the
company repossessed in the period.
While neither option is particularly at-
tractive for the homeowner, a deed-in-
lieu does less harm to the borrower's
credit record.
The rental program is designed to help
-homeowners who don't qualify for a loan
modification under the Obama adminis-
tration's plan, but still want to remain in
their homes. Fannie Mae is not planning
to market the homes for sale during the
one-year rental period.


Holidays: Retailers cut
prices on hot DVDs
Wal-Mart Stores is upping the ante
heading into the holiday season, cutting
online preorder prices of some upcoming
DVDs following last month's price cut on
books.
The move prompted rivals Amazon.
com and Target to slash prices of some
online pre-order DVDs, which pushed
Wal-Mart to take a few more cents off.
The world's biggest retailer said late
Thursday that it would lower online
prices of new DVDs such as "Harry
Potter and the Half Blood Prince" and
"Star Trek" to $10.
When Amazon reduced some of its DVD
prices to $9.99, Wal-Mart shot back by
lowering its DVDs to $9.98 as of Friday
morning.
The retailer, which generated more
than $400 billion in sales last year, was
embroiled in a book price war with Target
and Amazon.com last month that saw
the companies lower online pre-order
prices on titles such as "Under the Dome"
by Stephen King and "Ford County" by
John Grisham. Prices dropped as low as
$8.98.


By Kathy Bergen

The cold fact, however, is that this
deep recession is hitting Blacks more
severely than the overall population,
due largely to the staggering levels of
unemployment for this segment of the
population.
When October unemployment data
came out Friday, the nation's sea-
sonally adjusted rate was expected to
nudge upward, close to 10 percent.
But among Black, the jobless rate
was 15.5 percent in September. In Il-
linois, the Black unemployment rate
was closer to 18.6 percent in the third
quarter, according to estimates by the
Economic Policy Institute.
For Black teens nationwide, the rate
was 40.8 percent in September.
The United States historically has
seen higher unemployment rates for
minorities, but the gap has widened
in this recession, in part because of
job losses in the manufacturing and
auto sectors. And the jobless growth,
coupled with the predatory lending
that flourished in segregated neigh-
borhoods during the real estate boom,


have led to dramatic spikes in mort-
gage foreclosures, sending home
values into a downward spiral. The
bottom line: A silent depression for
Black.
"The untold story is that between
unemployment, a significant drop in
property values, the wave of foreclo-
sures and a lack of credit, there is a
whole generation of African-American
wealth that is disappearing." said
Jean Pogge. executive vice president of
ShoreBank, which operates in many
minority communities across the city
and is under financial pressure itself
due to loan losses.
"The traditional way Americans have
acquired wealth and gotten into the
middle class is through buying a home
and building equity in that home," she
said, "and a lot of that has been wiped
out by the recession."
Robert Williams, a 38-year-old who
made more than $50,000 a year train-
ing travel agents, is among those who
have come perilously close to losing a
home due to a layoff.
The South Shore condo owner had
Please, turn to BLACKS 5D


Jobless claims fall to lo-month low


The number of workers filing new
claims for jobless insurance fell more
than expected last keek to a 10-month
low, government data showed Thurs-
day, pointing to a gradual improvement
in the labor market.
Initial claims for state unemployment
benefits dropped 20,000 to a seasonal-
ly adjusted 512,000 in the week ended
Oct. 31, the lowest since early January,
the Labor Department said. New job-
less claims had bounced around the
520,000-532,000 range over the previ-
* ous four weeks.
RETAIL: October sales offer relief to
merchants
Analysts polled by Reuters had fore-
cast new claims slipping to 523,000
last week from a previously reported
530,000.
Separately, the Labor Department
reported that non-farm productivity in
the third quarter rose at its fastest pace
in six years as companies squeezed


more output from a smaller pool of labor
and cut costs to deal with a slump in de-
mand.
While new applications for unemploy-
ment insurance have substantially fallen
from March's high levels, they remain el-
evated and analysts say they need to drop
below 400,000 to signal that the economy
is creating jobs.
The four-week moving average for new
claims slipped 3,000 to 523,750 last
week, also the lowest in almost 10 months
and a decline for the ninth week in a row,
indicating the labor market continues to
edge toward stability.
The four-week moving average is consid-
ered a better gauge of underlying trends
as it irons out week-to-week volatility.
The Labor Department is expected to
report on Friday that the decline in em-
ployment is slowing. Analysts have fore-
cast that payrolls fell 175,000 in October,
compared with a decline of 263,000 in
September.


Obama signs bill to extend homebuyer credit, jobless benefits


By Brian Faler

President Barack Obama is set to
sign into law a bill that extends $8,000
tax credits for first- time homebuyers
and unemployment benefits.
The measure also provides tax re-
funds to money-losing companies.
The House approved the legislation
yesterday on a 403-12 vote; the Sen-
ate passed it 98-0 on Nov. 4. Obama
signed the bill on Friday, the same-
day the Labor Department releases
an update on the nation's jobless
rate.
The measure extends until April 30


the homebuyers tax credit that-would
otherwise expire at the end of this
month.
"The homebuyers' credit has helped
pave the way for stabilization in the
housing market and contributed to
three consecutive months of rising
home prices," said Representative
Jim McDermott, a Washington Dem-
ocrat. "Its extension will continue to
make homeownership more afford-
able and bring confidence to a hous-
ing market and economy that remain
fragile."
The jobless will get as many as .20
Please turn to CREDIT 8D


lTe business of cnmlpo A ring Black America


Copyrighted Material


SSyndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


4bat. . - m* w,














Unemployment rate climbs to 10.2 percent


By Neil Irwin

More than one in 10 members
of the American workforce were
unable to get a job in October,
the Labor Department said
Friday, the first time in nearly
three decades that the unem-
ployment rate has soared into
double digits.
The unemployment rate rose
to 10.2 percent, department
said, up from 9.8 percent in
September, the highest level
since 1983. Employers also con-
tinued slashing jobs, though at
a slower rate than September,
showing that even though the
economy is expanding, the job
market remains dismal.
The crossing of that symbolic
10 percent barrier is likely to
weigh on both the psychology
of American consumers and the
urgency of efforts in Washing-
ton to prop up the job market.


Friday, President Barack
Obama intends to sign a bill to
extend unemployment insur-
ance benefits longer, reflecting
the rise of long-term jobless-
ness. The bill also extends a
first-time home-buyer tax credit
and expands it so current ho-
meowners are eligible, and the
administration and congressio-
nal leaders ,are both weighing
other steps they could take to
bolster the job market.
The employment report in-
dicated that employers cut a
net 190,000 jobs. Those losses
were broadly in line with ana-
lysts' forecasts, and economists
generally view that number as
a more reliable indicator of the
job market's changes month-to-
month than the unemployment
rate. That number shows an
employment situation that con-
tinues to get worse, though at
a rate more typical of a normal


recession than the severe reces-
sion evident earlier in the year.
The results nonetheless show
that even as companies began
increasing their output in the
past few months -- gross do-
mestic product rose at a 3.5
percent rate in the third quarter
and likely has continued to rise
in the fourth -- they have man-
aged to do so without adding to
their payrolls, instead squeez-
ing more production out of their
existing workforce.
There were some positive
signs in the report. Job loss fig-
ures for August and September
were revised to show less severe
declines than first thought. The
average manufacturing work-
week rose 0.1 hour to 40 hours,
suggesting that employers be-
gan to bring production work-
ers back for more hours after
cutting their hours over most of
the past year.


e60,000



E *obs lost in


q,


a single day


Small businesses struggling as unemployment goes up higher


By Paul Davidson

Small businesses often lead
the nation out of recession.
Not this time.
The unemployment rate
jumped to 10.2% in October
from 9.8% in September, and
economists say a big reason is
small businesses. With sales
weak, they're still slashing
jobs and faring worse than
their larger rivals.
"Small business tends to
lead the way out, and that's
just not happening here," says
Mark Zandi of Moody's Econo-
my. com.
Nineteen percent of small-
business owners cut jobs by
a seasonally adjusted average
of 4.2 workers per firm in the
third quarter, according to a
late-October survey by the Na-
tional Federation of Indepen-


dent Business (NFIB). Just 8%
boosted employment by an av-
erage 3.5 workers per firm.
That's better than the pre-
vious month, but "the job-
generating machine is still in
reverse," says NFIB economist
William Dunkelberg.
The struggles of small busi-
nesses help explain why the
jobless rate soared even while
the Labor Department's sepa-
rate payroll survey showed
employers shed 190,000 jobs
in October, down sharply from
an average 357,000 from May
through July. The payroll sur-
vey is skewed toward larger
companies, Zandi says.
Businesses with fewer than
20 employees account for 25%
of all jobs but generated 40%
of job growth in the last recov-
ery, the Small Business Ad-
ministration says. With no ex-


r

~
~ .41


cess workers, many must hire
in a rebound to meet surging
demand.
Reasons they're struggling:
*Credit. Small firms are find-
ing it tough to secure credit,
with 14% in a recent NFIB
survey saying loans are hard
to get. That's largely because
they don't have bricks-and-
mortar assets that can serve as
collateral, says Molly Brogan,
vice president of the National
Small Business Association.
*Limited exports. They're
less likely to export their prod-
ucts, so unlike large compa-
." nies, are not benefiting from
nascent recoveries overseas,
S Zandi says.
* *Health care costs. They're
Worried about costs that are
rising more sharply than for
large firms, and uncertainty
S about reform, Brogan says.


t c j inmi grime g

Drive More


YOUT BU~nOSS gg

1 ^is \Y * .Bart Williams
1Advertising Cordinator
AL 05-693.7o93 TODAY!!
P1 advertising@miamitimesonline.com


Invitation to Bid No. 9200-0/11
ITB Title: Vehicle Logic Units

Miami-Dade County is soliciting bids to purchase
vehicle logic equipment manufactured by Digital
Recorders Inc. It is anticipated the County will
issue an agreement for twelve months. Federal
Transit Administration (FTA) funds are being used
for this purchase. All FTA requirements apply to
this solicitation.

The solicitation package, which will be, available
starting November 5. 2009. can be obtained
at no cost on-line at www.miamidade.gov/dpm.
The package can also be obtained through the
County's Vendor Assistance Unit (305) 375-5773,
Department of Procurement Management, 111 NW
1s Street, Suite 1300, Miami, FL 33128-1974 at
a cost of $10.00 for each solicitation package and
an additional $5.00 fee for a request to receive
the solicitation package through the United States
Postal Service.

Deadline for submission of proposals is December
2. 2009 at 2:00 p.m. (local time), at Miami-
Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor,
Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. This
solicitation is subject to the County's Cone. of
Silence Ordinance 98-106.


CITY OF MIAMI
SUNSHINE MEETING NOTICE





A workshop for presentation of government
procedures, public meetings, public records, ethics,
sunshine law, conflicts of interest, City of Miami form
of government, and related topics will be at Miami
City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida
at 9:00 AM on Friday November 13, 2009. The
Mayor and Miami City Commissioners and their staff
members, City Attorney's Office, and City Clerk's
Office, have been invited to attend this workshop.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk
(#003322)


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
PROPOSED INSTALLATION OF A TRAFFIC CIRCLE IN COCONUT
GROVE, AT THE INTERSECTION OF MATILDA ST. AND DAY AVE.

City Hall - 3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on Nov 19, 2009
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest that
the City Commission approve the installation of a traffic circle in Coconut Grove
at the intersection of Matilda St. and Day Ave., requesting the Miami-Dade
County Traffic Engineering Division approve implementation of the project.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled City
Commission meeting of Nov 19, 2009 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with respect
to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the
City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.


Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk . .

(#003317) . '. .


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 191150 TREE AND PALM RELOCATIONS

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 1:00 P.M., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2009

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and site visit will be held on Thursday, No-
vember 12, 2009 at 10:00 am at the Miami Riverside Center Building, 444 SW
2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida (Meet on the 8th floor conference room)..
The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Bidders an opportunity to
present questions to staff and obtain clarification of the requirements of the Bid
documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s) of the bidder attend in
order to qualify to bid. Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City
of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN AC-
CORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO.
12271.

Pete Hernandez, ' '
City Manager ,
AD NO. 009504


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO
REGISTERASALOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ENGAGING IN
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND COMMITTEES
OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE
IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL),
LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON NOVEMBER 19, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE MIAMI
CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO
THE REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, RESCINDING RESOLUTION NO. R-07-
0485 WHICH ACCEPTED THE PLAT ENTITLED JACKSON
SOUL, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works
Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction Division,
located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working hours. Phone
305-416-1248.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY)'no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk ...


(#003314)


YOU DON'T NEED

A HURRICANE,
TO CALL ME : ..

$$$ GET CASH $$$ i
Bathroom - Kitchen Plumbing Leak *" ' .
Coiling Damage. Fire Damage, ,
Broken Pipes?


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SECTION D


Apartments




GREAT NEWS!!!

PINNACLE PLAZA APTS
3650 NW 36th St.
Miami, FI33142

A NEW RENTAL
COMMUNITY .

NOW LEASING ONE,
TWO AND THREE BED-
ROOM
APARTMENTS
STARTING AT. $698 00

APARTMENTS ARE:
FULLY TILED, ENERGY
EFFICIENT APPLIANCES,
CEILING FANS AND
MUCH MOREi"

PLEASE VISIT US AT
SISTER PROPERTY
FRIENDSHIP TOWER
(COMMERCIAL AREA)
LOCATED AT:
1553 NW 36TH STREET

FOR MORE LEASING
INFORMATION
STARTING. JULY 7, 2009
(305) 635- 9505

"Income restrictions apply,
rents are subject to
change
A

101 N.E. 78 Street
Three bdrms Special $875,
two bdrms $815 and 1 bdrm,
$700. nice and clean, park-
ing. Section 8 OK!
786-326-7424
1140 N.W. 79 ST.
One bedroom, one bath
$550. Free Water Mr. Willie
#109 305-642-7080

1212 N.W. 1 Avenue
$500 MOVE IN One
bedroom, one bath, $500.
stove, retngerator, air.
305-642-7080
1215 N.W. 103 Lane
Two bdrms, gated security,
tile.'$700 mthly; $1000 to
move in. 305-696-7667
1229 N.W. 1 Court
$550 MOVE IN' One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
siove. refrigerator, air. "
305-642-7080,
786-236-1144

1250 N.W. 60 STREET
One bedroom, one bat
$525. Free Water.
305-642-7080

1261 N.W. 59 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$550. Free Water.
305-642-7080
1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated one bdrm, $525;
two bdrms, $725. One Free
Month. 305-747-4552
1306 N.W. 61 Street
Two bdrms. renov, security
gate, $600, 954-638-2972
1317 NW 2 AVENUE
$425 MOVE IN. One bdrm,
one bath $425 Ms. Shorty
#1
786-290-1438
13202 NE 6 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath, cen-
tral air, tile. $750 monthly.
786-260-3838
1348 N.W. 1 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Two bedrooms one
bath $525. 305-642-7080

140 N.W. 13 Street
$525 MOVE IN. Two bed-
room, one bath $525.
786-236-1144/305-642.
7080
140 S.W. 6 St.
HOMESTEAD
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$450 monthly
Call:305-267-9449
1425 NW 60th Street
Nice one bdrm, one bath.
$600 mthly. Includes refrig-
erator, stove, central air water
$725 to move in.
786-290-5498
1450 N.W. 1 AVENUE
One bedroom, one bath
$425. Two bedrooms one
bath. $525. 305-642-7080

1545 NW 8 AVENUE
One and Two bedrooms,
one bath, ceramic tile, cen-
tral air, carpet, balcony, new
kitchen, appliances, laundry
machine, quiet, parking.
Starting at $650.
FREE WATER
Move in today!
786-506-3067

1969 N. W. 2 Court
$550 MOVE IN! One
bedroom, one bath, $550,
stove, refrigerator, air, free
water.
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144


210 N.W. 17 Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$475. Call 305-642-7080


2121 N.E. 167 STREET
One bedroom, one bath.
$650. Appliances, free
water. 305-642-7080.

220 N.W. 16 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$600 Appliances
305-642-7080
2239 N.W. 87 Street
Spacious, clean one
bedroom, one bath. $590
monthly. New appliances,
air and hot water included.
954-410-2863
2416 N.W. 22 Court
One bedroom one bath
$600
Two bedrooms two bath
$725
Air, Free Water. 305-642-'
7080

2515 N.W. 52 Street #2
Nice one bedroom, tiled, air,
appliances. $500 monthly.
$1000 to move in
954-522-4645
2751 N.W. 46th Street
One bedroom, remote gate.
$650 monthly. 954-430-0849
2945 NW 46 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$575, Two bedrooms, one
bath, $725. Section 8 OK.
786-412-9343
2972 N.W. 61 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath, $550. Free Water.
305-642-7080

3669 Thomas Avenue
One bedroom $550, two
bedrooms $650. stove, re-
rngeraior. air. 305-642-7080
50th Street Heights
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Walking distance from
Brownsville Metrorail. Free
water, gas, window bars, iron
gate doors. One and two
bedrooms from $490-$580
monthly. 2651 N.W. 50th
Street, Call 305-638-3699
5520 S.W. 32nd Street
Hallandale FLORIDA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
with living room and washer
and dryer connection, $850
monthly, $1450 move in.
� 786-370-0832
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$520-$530 monthly. One
bedroom, $485 monthly, win-
dow bars and iron gate doors.
Free water and gas. Apply at:
2651 N. W. 50 Street
or Call 305-638-3699
6832 N.W. 5th Place
Studio, $105 weekly, $450 to
move in. 786-286-2540
6900 NW 2 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 o.k. 786-295-9961
6950 N.W. 8th Avenue
Newly remodeled studio apt.,
$450-$500, Section 8 ok!
Call 305-675-1740.
7601 N.E. 3 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath. Re-
modeled kitchen new floors,
appliances. $750 monthly,
security negotiable.
Call 305-525-0338
7625 N.E. 4 Court
One bedroom, one bath
$600. Stove, refrigerator.
4ree water. 305-642-7080
912 NW 55 TERRACE #2
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$675 monthly. Contact
Rastee, 678-575-0940
924 NW 29 STREET
SECTION 8 SPECIAL. Two
bedrooms, one bath. No
Water Bill. 786-262-7313

97th Street Area
Large apartment, separate
living room, $625 mthly. 786-
286-2540
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
CALL FOR MOVE
IN SPECIAL
One and two bedrooms, from
$495-$585 monthly. Free
water, window bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50 Street or call
305-638-3699
ARENA GARDENS
Move in with first months rent
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled one, two, and
three bedrooms, air, appli-
ances, laundry and gate.
From $450. 100 N.W. 11 St.
305-374-4412.
CAPITAL RENTAL
AGENCY
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, Brownsville.
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses. One, Two and
Three Bedrooms. Same day
approval. For more informa-
tion/specials.
www.capitalrentalagency.
com
Carver Ranches
Two bedrooms one bath.
$650 monthly, includes water
garbage and sewer.
954-885-9641

SCplose to Miami Avenue


on N.E. 84th Street
One bedroom and efficiency
for rent. Call 305-970-5574


COCONUT GROVE AREA
One bedroom, good condi-
tion, beautiful tiled floors. Low
rent. Section 8 Welcome.
305-448-2742
HAMPTON HOUSE
APARTMENTS
Easy qualify. Move in
special.One bedroom, one
bath. $495, two bedrooms.
one Oalh. $595 Free waler!
Leonard 786-236-1144

L & G APARTMENTS
CALL FOR MOVE IN
SPECIAL
Beautiful one bedroom, $540
monthly, apartment in gated
community on bus lines.
Call 305-638-3699
Located Near 90th Street
and 27 Avenue
One unfurnished apt. and one
furnished one bedroom, one
bath, lights, water, and air in-
cluded. Call 305-693-9486.
MIDTOWN MIAMI
One bdrm, one bath. $750
monthly. 305-244-4671
N. DADE Section 8 OK!
One and two bdrms. No De-
posit For Section 8.
786-488-5225

OPA LOCKA AREA
2405 N.W. 135th Street
1/2 Month FREE, one and
two bedrooms, central air
Appliances and water in-
cluded Section 8 welcome
with no security deposits.
786-521-7151
305-769-0146


Condos/Townhouses
2871 NW 195 STREET
Four bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 ok. $1600. 786-346-,
5918
3 AVE. N.W. 177 ST.
Across from Walmart.Two
bedrooms, one bath, jacuzzi,
newly remodeled, surround
system, gated security, cen-
tral air, tiled. $1200 mthly, first
and last to move in, water in-
cluded. Pets allowed. Section
8 Accepted. 786-348-4230
HIALEAH
Two bedrooms two baths.
$1000 monthly.
305-749-6749, 305-510-6465
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Three bdrms, two and a half
bath. Upstairs and down-
stairs, new appliances, wash-
er, dryer and air. $1350 nego-
tiable. Section 8 OK!.
Call 305-926-8019
Duplexes
10070 N.W. 12 Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 786-277-8287
1023 N.W. 47 ST
Newly Remodeled three
bedroom one bath, one
bedroom one balh. Appli-
ances. Free electric, water .
305-642-7080, 786-236-
1144

1081 N.W. 100th Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath, central
air, fenced, $900 mthly, first,
last and sec. to move in. Call
305-986-8395.
11053 NE 12 AVENUE
Two bedrooms, two baths,
washer, dryer, fenced yard.
security bars, central air.
heat, water included. Tiled
throughout. $1150 mthly,
$400 security. Close to
KMart, Home Depot, parks,
schools and shopping..
786-709-7436

12400 N.E. 11 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath.
three bedrooms two baths
$1000-$1100), two baths.
Appliances, central air.
305-642-7080
1274 N.W. 55 Street
One bedroom, free water,
stove, refrigerator and air.
$525 monthly. 305-642-7080
1401 NW 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$600 mthly, $1300 move in.
786-873-2694
1441 N.E. 153 TERR.
Two bedrooms, one bath,
under $800 and Three bed-
rooms, one bath, under $900.
Efficiencies also available un-
der $600. Section 8 ok.
305-456-4961

1456 N.W. 60 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$800. Stove, refrigerator,
air.
305-642-7080
172 NW 58th Street
Large three bdrms, two baths,
central air and tiled. $1200
monthly! Section 8 Welcome!
Rick 305-409-8113
1920 N.W. 31 STREET
One and two bdrms. Appli-
ances included. Section 8
Welcome. 305-688-7559
2120 NW 50 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1350. Section 8 ok.
305-331-6303,305-893-2276
21301 N.W. 37 AVE.
Two bedrooms, air. $895.


786-306-4839


MIAMI, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


2257 N.W. 82 ST
Two bedrooms, one bath
$850 Free Water.
305-642-7080
2370 N.W. 61 Street
Newly remodeled two bdrm.,
one bath, appl., water, air,
$1000 mthly, Sec. 8 welcome.
Contact 561-294-0044.
2401 NW 95 STREET
Two bdrms, one bath, wash-
er, dryer, central air. Section
8 OK. $1,175 mthly.
Matthew 954-818-9112
2416 N.W. 22 CT
One bedroom one bath
$600. Two bedrooms one
balh $725. Air Free Water.
305-642-7080

2632 N.E. 212 TER
Two bedrooms, one balh.
$950 Appliances. 305-642-
7080
3190 N.W. 135th Street
One bedroom, one bath, air,
stove, refrigerator, water in-
cluded. Section 8 Welcome.
Call Marie 305-763-5092.
42 N.W. 57th Street
Two bedrooms, new kitchen,
central air, bars, water, $900
monthly, 305-310-7366.
490 N.W. 97 Street
One bedroom, one bath, ap-
pliances/unit air. $750 mth-
ly.954-430-0849.
4902 N.W. 33rd Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, bars, $750, call
Rod 786-290-4625.
6250 N.W. 1 Ave
Newly Remodeled. Two
bedrooms one bath, one
bedroom one bath. Ap-
ploances. Free electric,
water. 305-642-7080, 786-
236-1144

68 NW 45 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air. $650. Four bed-
room also available.
786-431-5520
6937 N.W. 6th Court
One bdrm, one bath, central
air, bars, Section 8 ok! $800
mthly. 305-751-5533
745 N.W. 107 ST.
Two bedrooms. Air. $895.
786-306-4839
7735 NW 6 AVENUE
Two bdrms, two baths, Sec-
tion 8 OK. $875 monthly. 786-
277-4395,305-624-4395
7820 N.E. 1 AVENUE
Two bdrms, one bath. $925.
Appliances, free water.
305-642-7080

8451 N.W. 19 AVENUE
One bedroom, water, new
kitchen, air, tile. $650
monthly, $1500 to move
in. Not Section 8 affiliated.
Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776

CENTRAL DADE AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths.
Section 8 or regular. $1300
monthly. Ashmore 305-757-
8596
COCONUT GROVE
3345 Percival AVE.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
New paint, shiny terrazzo,
gated, clean and quiet, all ap-
pliances. $975. Drive by then
call 305-336-3099.
COCONUT GROVE
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bdrms, one bath duplex
located in Coconut Grove.
Near schools and buses.
$595 monthly, $595 security
deposit, $1190 total to move
in. 305-448-4225 or apply at:
3737. Charles Terrace
COCONUT ROVE AREA
Large Duplex, two bedrooms,
excellent condition, beautiful
tiled floors. Low rent. Section
8 Welcome. 305-448-2742
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Two bdrms one bath, first,
and security. Section 8 and
HOPWA welcome.
305-244-6845
NEW! SW 264 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths. Sec-
tion 8 ok. 305-258-6626
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$1000 monthly, first and last.
786-879-0775

Efficiencies
100 N.W. 14th Street
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO; BET, ESPN), free
local and nationwide calling,
24 hour security camera,
$185 wkly, $650 mthly.
305-751-6232
1845 NW 50 STREET
$200 wkly, $600 move in. Air,
cable, free utilities.
786-286-7455, 305-720-4049
1863-B NW 42 Street
Beautiful! $600 monthly, utili-
ties included. 786-356-1457
5422 N.W. 7 COURT
Includes water and electricity.
$600 monthly. 305-267-9449
5541 N.W. Miami Court
Newly renovated, fully
furnished, utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN),from
$185 wkly to $650 monthly.


305-751-6232.


NORTHWEST AREA
Private entrance , cable, air.
Call 305-758-6013.
Furnished Rooms
1010 N.W. 180TERR
Free cable, air and use of
kitchen. 305-835-2728
13387 N.W. 30th Avenue
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186,305-691-3486
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, free cable, air, and use of
kitchen. Call 305-835-2728.
1845 N.W. 50th Street
$100 weekly with air, $200 to
move in. 786-286-7455, 305-
720-4049
1887 N.W. 44th Street
$450 monthly. $650 moves
you in. 305-303-0156.
1899 N.W. 83 TER.
Nice and clean, air, $125
weekly, $250 to move in.
786-426-6263
1935 N.W. 76th Street
Large furnished room, air, ca-
ble, kitchen privilege, parking,
no security, $485 a month,
786-955-4703.
$199 DEPOSIT!!!
2169 N.W. 49 Street, Free Air
Direct TV, only $108 weekly.
Call NOW! 786-234-5683.
2106 N.W. 70 STREET
Room for One Person. $135
Weekly. Private Bath.
305-836-8262
2831 N.W. 159th Street
Clean, quiet, neighborhood.
Call 305-628-3029 or
954-245-8064
4220 N.W. 22 Court
$85 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, bath, one person.
305-474-8186, 305-691-3486
4712 NW 16 AVENUE
$100-$150 weekly, utilities,
kitchen, bath, air.
786-260-3838
74 STREET NW 7 AVENUE
$125 weekly, cable and utili-
ties included. $200 moves
you in. 786-306-2349
7749 N.W. 15th Avenue
One room, $480, air. No. dep.
786-597-3624
CHRISTIAN HOME
Rooms for rent, call 10 a.m.
to 10 p.m. 305-759-2889
MIAMI AREA
Shared rooms, meals, central
air. $15 daily. 786-306-4186
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Large room, private entrance,
air, cable and use of pool.
305-343-2732
NICELY FURNISHED
Air, cable, TV, utilities. $150
wkly. 786-290-0946
NORTH MIAMI AREA
$120 weekly, $240 to move
in, includes cable, central air.
786-277-7150
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Furnished, electric and water
included. $600 monthly.
954-605-1360
NORTHWEST AREA
Large clean furnished rooms.
Call 786-597-0871
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-
2451.
Houses
13140NW,18AVE
Three bedrooms, one bath.
786-344-9560, 305-688-0600
1370 NW 69 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air plus bonus room.
$1250 mthly. Not Section 8
affiliated. Call 305-829-5164
or 305-926-2245.
14082 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths,
new townhouse located in
nice area, Section 8 ok! Only
$999 security deposit.
954-826-4013
1430 N.E. 71 ST.
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$925. stove, relngeralor, air
305-642-7080
1490 NW 114 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath
plus efficiency. 305-962-1514
or 305-758-6133
1510 NE 151 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$900 monthly. 305-944-0588
1619 N.W. 38th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
air, $850 mthly, 305-642-
7080
1802 N.W. 1 AVE.
Spacious three bedrooms,
two baths. 305-300-2796
1832 N.W. 49 STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$995. Central Air, appli-
ances, ceiling fans. 305-
642-7080
19473 N.W. 28th Court
Cherry Bay, beautiful four
bedrooms, Fla. room. 786-
267-5859,404-296-5365.
20700 NW 25 AVENUE
Three bedrooms, one bath,
newly renovated, central air,
huge, fenced yard. Easy com-
mute. $1250 monthly. Section
8 preferred.
8e305-479-3221
2485 N.W. 55th TERRACE
Two bedrooms, one bath, se-
curity bars, new kitchen, new
bathroom, tiled floors. $975
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
305-663-9353


wjl^BB'^i


2920 NW 161 TERRACE
Three bedrooms. Move-in
special. $1400 monthly.
305-896-3976
3035 NW 55 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled. $900 monthly.
786-797-6417
3330 NW 214 STREET
Four bedrooms, two baths,
huge den. $1395.
786-306-4839
3361 NW 166 STREET
Three bedrooms, air. $1195.
786-306-4839
3900 NW 170 STREET
Three bdrms, two baths,
$1400 mthly. Section 8 ok.
305-299-3142
470 NW 126 STREET
Three bedrooms, one bath,
washer antd dryer included.
Section 8 OK. $1500 mthly.
954-638-8842
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air-condi-
tioned and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Stove and refrig-
erator. Only $750 per month,
$1500 to move in. Includes.
free water and free lawn ser-
vice. Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th St Miami, FL
33142, 305-638-3699.
4915 NW 182 STREET
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1250 mthly. 305-527-0702
FLORIDA CITY AREA
Nice, two bedrooms, one
bath, fenced, air, tile, clean.
$825 monthly, To Move in
$825 Only. 305-528-6889
MIAMI GARDENS
Three bedrooms, two baths.
N.W. 213 Terrace.
Call 786-326-7755
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Remodeled three bedrooms,
one bath on water. $1200.
Section 8 okay. Call:
305-600-6277
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome. 954-605-
1360
NORTHWEST
CENTRAL AREA
$500 move in. Section 8
preferred. Two or three bed-
room vouchers accepted.
954-444-6403

RUTLAND STREET
Opa Locka Area Three
bedrooms, one bath. $750
monthly.
Call Matthew 954-818-9112
Office Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office Space for rent, from
$300 to $500 monthly:
305-681-9600.




1065 N.W. 131 ST.
Three bedrooms, two baths.
All New! Impact windows,
central air, carport, immacu-
late condition. $159,000.
305-793-0002
2889 N.W. 197 Terrace
Beautiful three bdrms, one
bath. $79K. 305-675-1740
3361 N.W. 207 STREET
Three bedrooms, remodeled,
air. Try $900 down FHA and
$799 monthly. We have oth-
ers. Pick up list.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
290 N.W. 183 Street
5601 N.W.10 AVE.
Corner lot, three bdrms, two
baths. Large living room,
wooden plus tile floors, wash
room, security bars. $120K
negotiable. 305-693-8886,
954-205-6685
*ATTENTION*
Now You Can own Your
Own Home Today
***WITH***
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65.000
On Any Home/Any Area
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Need HELP?r?
305-892-8315
House of Homes Realty




COMPLETE HOME
REPAIRS
Plumbing, electrical, stove,
washer, dryer. 786-273-1130
TONY ROOFING
Shingles, re-roofing,
and leak repairs. Call
305-491-4515.
Business Opportunity
GREAT OPPORTUNITY
Have a product or Service?
Overview 1-800-374-4025,
1-800-242-0363 ext. 4484


e


Childcare
Quality Home Child Care
MIAMI GARDENS
Where All Kids Are Special!
DCF Lic # F11MD078. Call
Mrs. Rhonda 786-217-2436




BROWARD ROUTE
DRIVERS
We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets in the Broward Area.
Wednesday Only

You must be available be-
tween the hours of 6 a.m.
and 1 p.m. Must have reli-
able. insured vehicle and
. current Driver License.
Apply in person at:
The Miami Times
900 N.W. 541h Street

CASHIER AND SALES
PERSON
Wanted Full Time. Must be
Honest, Trustworthy and
Responsible Excellent
Customer Service Skills
and Positive Personality.
Only Serious Minded Need
Apply!
305-757-5283

.COLLECTIONS
Two years experience
required with strong organi-
zational and communication
skills to coordinate collec-
tion process and cash flow.
Fax resume to
305-758-3617


Mystery Shoppers
Earn up to $100 per day un-
dercover shoppers needed
to judge retail and dining
establishments. Experience
not required.
Call 877-471-5682

PAIN MANAGEMENT
DOCTOR
Needed in Tampa, Florida.
$200. an hour - Malpractice
paid - Fax Resume to:
813.879.7406


Residential Care Giver
LIVE-IN POSITION
Mike 786-237-9001

TEACHER NEEDED
with CDA to work in child-
care center. 305-836-1178



CEMETERY PLOTS
FOR SALE
Two double depth cemetery
plots with liners, located at
Dade Memorial Park, Opa
Locka. Asking price, $5000
for each plot. Price can be
negotiated. For more infor-
mation, call Gina at 954-432-
9894.
Don't Throw Away
Your Old Recordst
I Buy Old Records! Albums,
LP's, 45's, or 12" singles.
Soul, Jazz, Blues, Reggae,
Caribbean, Latin, Disco,
Rap. Also DJ Collections! Tell
Your Friends!
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OFFICER
$60. Be prepared for Super
Bowl employment. Traffic
School, four hours, $28. 786-
333-2084


BEST PRICES IN TOWNIll
Handyman, carpet cleaning,
plumbing, hanging doors,
laying tiles, bathroom
remodeling. 305-801-5690
CLEAN AS HEAVEN
Homes, offices, and floors.
Call Sherry, 786-306-2086


Fictitious Name


FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to en-
gage in business under the
fictitious name of:
YESTERYEAR'S
TREASURES
5701 Biscayne Blvd. #801
Miami, FL 33137
in the city of Miami, FL
NOTICE UNDER
Owner: Michelle Miittelman
intends to register the said
name with the Division
of Corporation of State,
Tallahassee, FL. Dated
this 11th day of November,
2009.


GROW



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Advertising Consultant
305-694-6210, Ext. 109

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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


8D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


CREDIT major expansion of McDermott said igible for the credit. wouldn't be eligible, third of the nation's
continued from 5D provisions in Febru- lawmakers will That's up from the Economic Boost unemployed have i:_.
ary's stimulus pack- probably move to current $75,000 House Majority been out of work for .
additional weeks of age, is estimated to approve additional limit for individuals Leader Steny Hoyer, at least six months,
- i &I-4'-r, llb -.1P ",R,-nn , tt ;,i ,b d $ 1 50 000n fA r q lrv -i1A,qnd Demor- according to the *p


unemployment as-
sistance, depending
on where they live.
Companies will
be given expanded
ability to apply loss-
es to previous years'
income, allowing
them to qualify this
year for $33 bil-
lion in tax refunds,
according to Con-
gress's Joint Com-
mittee on Taxation.
The legislation also
includes a tax break
to help victims of
Bernard Madoffs
multibillion-dollar
Ponzi scheme.
The bill, the first


BLACKS
continued from 8D

sought a modifica-
tion of his mortgage
terms earlier this
year after his em-


into the economy
in the 2010 fiscal
year.
Other Extensions
With unemploy-
ment projected to
average 9.85 percent
next year, according
to a Bloomberg sur-
vey of economists,
lawmakers are
considering spend-
ing billions more to
extend other ele-
ments of the stimu-
lus package. Among
them are subsidies
to help the unem-
ployed buy health
insurance.


ployer had cut sala-
ries and hours. And
then he was laid off
altogether in May,
derailing his mort-
gage negotiations
with ShoreBank.


A Hialeah Women Center Family Planning
AAA Attorney Referral Service
Adrienne Arsht Center
Advanced GYN Clinic
CarePlus
City of Miami City Clerk
City of Miami Purchasing Department
Dept. of Procurement, Miami-Dade County
Dr. Rozalyn Paschal M.D.
Family Dentist
Florida Dept. of Transportation
Florida Lottery
Florida PCI
General Motors
Miami Dade College
Miami-Dade County GovernmentInformation Center
Miami-Dade Water & Sewer
North Shore Medical Center
Public Works City of Miami
Publix
Seaview Research
Sony Pictures
SunTrust
Toys R Us
Wright Young Funeral Home



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Advanced Gyn Clinic
Professional. Sale & Conildenllal Services

- Termination Up to 22 Weeks
- Individual Counseling Services
- Board Certilied 08 GYN's
j - Complete GYN Services
ABORTION START $180 AND UP

305-621-1399


less benefits to help
the unemployed
through much of
next year, at a cost
he predicted could
reach $80 billion.
More than 1.4 mil-
lion Americans have
claimed the home-
buyer credit at a
cost so far of about
$10 billion, accord-
ing to the Treasury
Department.
Under the new
bill, couples earn-
ing up to $225,000
a year and individu-
als earning up to
$125,000 will be el-


"I was preparing
myself mentally
that there was a 90
percent chance I'd
lose my place ... and
I'd be out searching
for someplace to
live," Williams said.
"It stresses you out.
You don't want to
spend 50 cents on a
pack of gum, it got
to be that bad."
ShoreBank was
able to get him a
modified mortgage
through the Obama
administration pro-
gram launched in
March, reducing
his monthly pay-
ment to $468 from
the original $1,150.


ana Li np JJ,vJJu iori
couples.
Current Home-
owners
The bill also will
allow homebuyers
who have owned
their prior resi-
dence for at least
five years to receive
a $6,500 credit, an
expansion of the
program. Those who
sell their new home
or no longer use it
as their main resi-
dence within three
years would have
to repay the credit.
Homes worth more
than $800,000


The disparity in
the unemployment
rates for whites and
Blacks has grown
since the reces-
sion started in the
fourth quarter of
2007, according to
a study by Alger-
non Austin, direc-
tor of the Program
on Race, Ethnicity
and the Economy at
the Economic Policy
Institute.
The national white
rate increased by
3.8 percentage
points, to 7.8 per-
cent in the second
quarter of this year,
while the Black rate
rose by 6.1 percent-


crat, called the job-
less provision "an
investment that
pays off for all of
us" because "money
provided by unem-
ployment insurance
quickly goes into ne-
cessities and boosts
local economies."
The legislation
would provide 14
additional weeks of
unemployment ben-
efits in all states,
plus another six
weeks in states with
jobless rates top-
ping 8.5 percent.
More than one-


age points, to 14.7
percent, the highest
of any major racial
or ethnic group.
Black workers
"have a relatively
high representation
in manufacturing
and the auto indus-
try, and those in-
dustries have been
hit pretty hard,"
Austin said.
As well, "black
workers tend to be
younger and lower-
ranked in organiza-
tions," he said. "And
both factors make
it more likely that
when layoffs come,
you're going to be
laid off."


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


A public hearing .will be held by the City Commis-
sion of the City of Miami, Florida on November 19, 2009, at
9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for
the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF EASEMENT TO MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT, A FLORIDA CORPORATION,
OF AN APPROXIMATELY 29' x 12' FOOT WIDE STRIP OF CITY-OWNED
PROPERTY LOCATED AT 400 NW 2 AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, (ALSO
KNOWN AS COLLEGE OF POLICING), FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, OPER-
ATION AND MAINTENANCE OF WATER AND FIRE LINE FACILITIES, WITH
THE RIGHT TO RECONSTRUCT, IMPROVE, CHANGE AND REMOVE ALL
OR ANY OF THE FACILITIES WITHIN THE EASEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk " .

(#003318) . .


UCUUI J UlC LO LJLg
Labor Department.
About 1.9 million
Americans will ex-
haust their, bene-
fits, which average
$300 per week, by
the end of this year
without the bill, the
agency said.


$425 for 13
weeks in print
Call: 305-694-6210
Fax: 305-694-6211


DARYL'S BANQUET HALL
All occasions,
weddings, parties, etc.
1290 All Baba
(west of 27th Ave.) Limo Rental
305-796-9558
1/15/09


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami, Florida
on November 19, 2009 at 9:00a.m., in the City Commission Chambers at City
Hall, 3500. Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of waiving the
requirements of obtaining sealed competitive bids to dispose waste collection,
on an as needed, when basis, at Sun Recycling.
Inquiries from other service providers who feel they might be able to satisfy
the City's requirement for these services may contact Barbara Pruitt, Acting
Director, Department of Solid Waste at (305) 960-2802.
The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should any
person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to
any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence upon
which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may
contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later
than two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472
(TTY) no later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003321)


CITY OF MIAMI. FLORIDA
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED TO
REGISTERASALOBBYISTWITH THE CITYCLERK PRIORTO ENGAGING IN
LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS AND COMMITTEES'
OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE APPLICABLE ORDINANCE
IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL),
LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON NOVEMBER 19, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN. DRIVE, THE MIAMI
CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED TO
THE REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACHMENTS,
ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED MARKO ESTATES, A REPLAT IN THE
CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT
AND STREET COMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY
CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN
ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE CITY MANAGER
AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR THE
RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public Works
Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction Division,
located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working hours. Phone
305-416-1248.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A.-Thompson, CMC
City Clerk "

(#003315)


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office locat-
ed at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:


IFB NO. 140111


INVITATION FOR BID FOR ROAD SERVICE TIRE
REPAIRS - CITYWIDE


CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2009

Deadline forRequest forAdditional Information/Clarification 11/16/2009 at
3:00P.M

Detailed specifications for this bid are available at the City of Miami, Purchas-
ing Department, website at www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No.
(305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.


Pedro G. Hernandez City of Miami

City Manager


AD NO. 10459


White House program is already saving homes


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on November 19, 2009, at 9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the following:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO ACCEPT FROM THE MIAMI WOMAN'S CLUB ("CLUB"),
IN PERPETUITY, APPROXIMATELY TWENTY-THREE (23) FOOT WIDE
BAYWALK EASEMENT OF THE PROPERTY LOCATED AT 1737 NORTH
BAYSHORE DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF
THE BAYWALK TO BE USED AS A PERMANENT PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE
WATERFRONT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning these
items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing
special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003316) ( )


0 i Rozalyn Hester Paschal M.D.P.A., F.A.A.P
OF- 1 INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND TEENAGERS
Established Since 1953 * One of the oldest pediatric Practices
in Dade County * ver 50 years of Child Care
� WEBSITE
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NORTHSIDE PLAZA PLANTATION OFFICE
7900 NW 27 Ave Ste 50 660 N. State Rd 7, Ste 3A
Miami FL. 33147 * Phone 305-758-0591 Plantation FL 33317 * Phone 954-880-8399
JACKSON MEDICAL PLAZA PARKWAY
Formerly, Parkway Medical Plaza
16800 NW 2 Ave, Ste 203
N, Miami Beach FL 33169 * 305-652-6095











BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OwN DESTINY 9D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 2009


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BLACKS MUST CONTROL THEIR OWN DESTINY


10D THE MIAMI TIMES, NOVEMBER 11-17, 20091


Companies cutting back on holiday gift giving


By Laura Petrecca

Chocolate-, cheese-
and wine-loving work-
ers be warned: Ex-
pect a dearth of holi-
day gift baskets and
other goodies next
month, as the tough
economy forces com-
panies to cut back on
holiday gift giving.
One-third of small-
business owners say
they'll give employee
gifts this year vs. 46%
in 2008, according to
an American Express
Open Small Busi-
ness Holiday Monitor
survey released Mon-
day. And 47% plan
to dole out customer
presents during the
holidays, down from


George Abbott, own- Instead, he'll make
er of Omaha-based a small donation to
Aras Enterprises, a the Salvation Army
management con- in the name of his
suiting company clients: "It has been
that specializes in a very slow year."
materials handling. Even flush com-


. 52% last year.
Nearly 60% of en-
trepreneurs say the
downturn has af-
fected their holiday
gift-giving habits.
Many have ended
year-end raises and
bonuses, as well as
significantly slashed,
or outright halted,
bestowing gifts such
as sterling silver key
chains and high-
priced bottles of
wine on customers

"We normally
send out holiday
cards and some
gifts to our more
important . cli-
ents. This year
we will be do-
ing neither," says


JPMorgan Chase to hire 1,200 mortgage officers


JPMorgan Chase
said Tuesday it will
hire 1,200 mortgage
loan officers by the
end of next year, a
60% increase in its
sales force.
The workers are
needed as the compa-
ny aggressively goes
after new home mort-


gage business and
customers refinanc-
ing their home loans.
Through organization-
al changes and ad-
ditional systems, the
company has boosted
its loan capacity, said
Dave Lowman, head
of home lending at
Chase (JPM).


New loan officers
will work at bank
branches in 23 states
including California,
Florida and Texas,
and key cities such
as New York, Chicago,
Boston, St. Louis and
Washington.
The loan officers will
work with personal


bankers and refer-
ral sources, such as
real estate agents and
builders, as well as
with their own net-
work of homeowners.
Chase originated
$37.1 billion in mort-
gages in the last quar-
ter, the company said
in a statement.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the following:

IFB NO. 92062 INVITATION FOR BID FOR DECONTAMINATION, DISINFECTION AND
DISPOSAL OF ALL BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE, HYDROCARBON OR
CHEMICAL HAZARDOUS SPILLS - CITYWIDE

CLOSING DATE/TIME: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 2009

Deadline for Request for Additional Information/Clarification 11/23/2009 at 3:00P.M

Detailed specifications for this hid are available at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, website at
www.miamigov.com/procurement Telephone No. (305) 416-1913.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY
OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDINANCE NO. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez
City Manager

AD NO. 003574

CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS




Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 for the following:

PROJECT NAME: "Coral Way Medians Landscaping Project (Second Bidding) - M-0057"

BID NO: 09-10-002

Scope of Work: The project consists of complete landscaping and electrical maintenance services for
the existing medians along Coral Way (excluding trimming of Banyan trees). The scope of work includes
raking, leaf removal and litter pick up, mowing, trimming foliage, mulching as per plan, reinstalling root
guards, planting shrubbery (1 and 3 gal.), and watering the landscaped areas on a bi-weekly basis. The
maintenance also calls for the installation of all electric appurtenances to maintain a working up-lighting
system consisting of 423 light fixtures along Coral Way between SW 37 Avenue and SW 12 Avenue on a
monthly basis. The median is approximately 13,000 linear feet (2.46 miles) in length and this project would
cover approximately 130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of median surface area. The contract term is for a
two (2) year period with the option to renew for three additional - one (1) year periods.

Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor
from the State of Florida or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade.
An Electrical contractor must be used for the electrical maintenance of the work and a minimum of three
(3) years experience is required for the electrical portion of the project. Proof of experience for landscaping
and electrical projects may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complexity,
supported by references within the past three (3) years.

A performance Bond is required for this project.

Location of Work: The project is located along SW 22 Street - Coral Way Median from SW 12 Avenue to
SW 37 Avenue. The medians are approximately 130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of maintenance median
surface area.

Receiving Date & Time: Tuesday, December 1, 2009 @ 11:00 a.m.

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request, after November 9, 2009, at the City of Miami,
Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, FL 33130. Telephone No (305) 416-
1200. There are no construction plans for this maintenance project. Bid packages will be available in hard
copy form and a non-refundable fee of $20.00 will be required. A bid package can also be mailed to bidders
upon written request to the Department, and shall include the appropriate non-refundable fee plus $10 for
shipping and handling using regular U.S. Mail.

All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders. Bids must be submitted in
duplicate originals in the envelope provided with the bid package. At the time, date, and place above, bids
will be publicly opened. Any bids or proposals received after time and date specified will be returned
to the bidder unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date
is solely and strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused
by mail, courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE No. 12271.

Pedro G. Hernandez, P.E.
City Manager

ADD. No DP-007621


SUBSCRIBE

TODU!

E N D T H E
I N G 0 N V E N I E N C E
0 F E M P T Y
N E W S P A P F 11
B 0 X F S ,
F I G H T I N G
T H E W E A T H E R
A N P 11 U N T I N G
D 0 W N 13 A G K
G 0 p I E s

305-694-


panies will likely cut
back, says luxury
marketing expert
Pam Danziger. "The
culture has changed,"
she says, and excess
is out.


CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on November 19, 2009 at 9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of considering the following
resolution:

RESOLUTION OFTHE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITHATTACHMENT(S),
BY A FOUR-FIFTHS (4/5THS) AFFIRMATIVE VOTE, AFTER AN ADVER-
TISED PUBLIC HEARING, RATIFYING, APPROVING, AND CONFIRMING
THE CITY MANAGER'S FINDING, PURSUANT TO SECTION 18-85 OF THE
CODE OF THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA, AS AMENDED, WAIVING THE
REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPETITIVE BIDDING PROCEDURES FOR THE
PROCUREMENT OF SERVICES; AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO
EXECUTE AN AMENDMENT TO THE AGREEMENT WITH GLOBAL SPEC-
TRUM LIMITED PARTNERSHIP FOR THE EXPANDED MANAGEMENT AND
OPERATION OF APPROXIMATLEY 35,000 ADDITIONAL SQUARE FEET
OF MEETING AND CONFERENCE SPACE AT THE MIAMI CONVENTION
CENTER/JAMES L. KNIGHT INTERNATIONAL CENTER LOCATED AT 400
SE 2 AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA; FURTHER APPROPRIATING A TOTAL OF
$277,559 FOR THE OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE OF SAID AREA, AS
CALCULATED ON A SQUARE FOOT BASIS PER THE EXISTING AGREE-
MENT, EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2010.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning this
item. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony and
evidence upon any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may contact the
Office of the City Clerk at (305)250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business
days prior to the proceeding or at (305)250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3)
business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla Thompson, CMC
City Clerk

(#003311)


NOTICE OF MUNICIPAL RUNOFF ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2009
PURSUANT TO RESOLUTION NO. R-09-0391
FOR THE PURPOSE OF ELECTING
ONE CITY COMMISSIONER WHO IS TO BE ELECTED
FROM SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICT 4

A municipal runoff election will be held on Tuesday, November 17, 2009, from 7:00 A.M. until 7:00
P.M, in the City of Miami, Florida, at the polling places in the several election precincts designated
by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the
qualified electors participating therein will vote for the following municipal officers: one District
Commissioner who is to be elected from single member District 4.



TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT POLLING PLACE CHANGES
MIAMI RUNOFF ELECTION - NOVEMBER 17, 2009

Notice is hereby given of the following polling place changes. These changes have been made by
the Supervisor of Elections pursuant to Section 101.71, Florida Statutes.

TEMPORARY
Polling Place Changes
Pcinct New Location

. Crowne Plaza Hotel
51. 950 Le Jeune Road
Mall of The Americas
553.0 7827 W Flagler Street



OFFICIAL SAMPLE BALLOT
BOLETA OFFICIAL DE MUESTRA
ECHANTIYON BILTEN V6TOFISYtL
OFFICIAL RUN-OFF BOLETA OFFICIAL DE LA BILTENV'TOFISYL
ELECTION BALLOT ELECCI6N DE SEGUNDA VUELTA DEZYtM TOU ELEKSYON
MIAMI, FLORIDA MIAMI FLORIDA MIAMI, FLORID
NOVEMBER 17, 2009 17 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2009 17 NOVANM 2009
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COMMISSIONER - DISTRICT 4
COMISIONADO - DISTRITO 4
KOMISYONt - DISTRIK 4
(Vote for One)
(Vote por uno)
(Vote pou youn
c Manolo Reyes 90
o Francis Suarez 93



(#003323) Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
City Clerk