Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00084
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: October 18, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00084
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text






South's Largest Black Weekly Circulation


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LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


One Family Serving Since 1923

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NAACP national prez

announces FL election

monitoring program

Special to The Times

The national NAACP (National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People) announced on Monday
that it will monitor voting in 10 states, including
Florida, during the crucial November elections. The
NAACP will act in a non-partisan manner to assure that
all voters will vote fairly without regard to their affilia-
tions.
National President Bruce
Please turn to NAACP 4A
1
.While the NAACP
will take steps to counter
obstacles to voter partici-
pation, we are encourag-
ing our communities to
cast their votes, even if it
requires extra effort. ,
--NAACP National President Bruce Gordon ,


... during Bishop
Curry's last
tenure, the
NAACP
increased its visi-
bility among
grassroots and
non-NAACP
members.
-Tangela Sears


Vice
president Shirley
Johnson said she
was the perfect
candidate
because of her
family's involve-
ment.


Curry and Johnson seek

local NAACP presidency

Other nominations made were Brad Brown

for first vice president, Jamal Sexton for

second vice president.


Special to The Times

A membership crisis in the
Miami-Dade branch of the
NAACP (National Association
for the Advancement of
Colored People) has resulted in
the first contested presidency
in years. Nominated by long
time member Carolyn Bose
was former branch president
Bishop Victor T. Curry, the
senior pastor at New Birth
Baptist Cathedral and presi-
dent of WMBM-AM radio. Also
nominated was the current
branch's first vice president
Shirley Johnson.
Vice president Shirley
Johnson said she was the per-
fect candidate because of her
family's involvement. "I've seen


where the
organization
has come
from, and I
see where the
organization
is going,"
Johnson told
The Miami
Times.
Local com- SEARS
munity
activist Tangela Sears, presi-
dent of The Coalition of
Concerned Parents, voiced her
opinion to The Miami Times,
"leadership in the Black com-
munity is suffering from medi-
ocrity and the NAACP needs an
aggressive and uncontrolled
[by others outside the Black
Please turn to NAACP 6A


UM-FIU wrestling and fighting embarrasses all


Former UM player Thomas fired


Special to The Times

The consequences to players
involved in the televised
University of Miami-Florida
International football game
continue to mount. Former
UM players Lamar Thomas
was fired from his TV analyst
position Monday over state-
ments he made during the
sideline clearing brawl involv-


ing the Hurricanes and Golden
Panthers football teams.
Comcast Sports, a regional
cable network that hired
Thomas before the season,
also stated they would edit out
his comments before the game
replay is shown later this
week.
"We were disappointed in the
incident that happened on the
Please turn to BRAWL 4A


As the
fight was
abating,
Thomas
continued
with his
comments. "I say, why
don't they just meet out-
side in the tunnel after
the ball game and get in
on some more?


Public Health

Trust buys

Parkway Hospital
Special to The Times

Recently, the Public Health
Trust approved the proposed
acquisition of Parkway Regional
Medical Center in North Miami
Beach from Tenet Healthcare
Corporation (NYSE:THC).
Jackson Health
System has entered
into a definitive
agreement with
Tenet, which is
subject to the
approval of the
Miami-Dade Board HANDFIELD
of County
Commissioners.
The addition of the medical center
to Jackson's network of hospitals,
clinics and centers ensures that
every resident of Miami-Dade can
access Jackson's quality services
closer to home.
The expansion of Jackson into
north Miami-Dade enables
Jackson Health System to provide
medical care to residents
Please turn to HOSPITAL 7A


Pastor tries to explain anti-Muslim stand


Special to The Times

The Reverend O'Neal
Dozier, the conservative
Pompano Beach minister
who called Islam a "danger-
ous and evil cult," is willing
to work with peace-loving
Muslims but only on his
terms.


Dozier, who has waged a
vigorous campaign against
a mosque's. planned move
to a predominantly Black
neighborhood in this city,
said Wednesday he had
softened his views after
speaking with a California-
based organization that
promotes global freedom.


-- But
DOZIER said
Nissan of March
Terror USA urged


Dozier to encourage moderate Muslims
to put a page in the Koran that would
urge readers to interpret its "evil verses"
historically and not take them literally.


Dozier
Paul
Against
him to


encourage groups such as
the Council on American-
Islamic Relations to corn
Please turn to PASTOR 4A


Gentrification and housing are surface problems


Affordable housing advocates
claim crisis caused by land
and power
Special to The Times

The Center for Pan African
Development (CPAD), an activist
organization involved with the recent
housing demands to government
officials, has released a strong analy-
sis of the causes and options for the
community to fight for affordable
housing. CPAD leader Max Rameau
issued an analysis to The Miami


Rameau stated that the government has not
been an ally in the fight for decent human hous-
ing, but has supported "wealthy developers
looking to become even wealthier


Times that will
be printed in full
next week.
Rameau's statement promulgates
CPAD 's position that while issues of
gentrification and lack of affordable
housing are the immediate issues
facing effected communities, such as
Overtown and Liberty City, "the fun-


damental issues are really land and
power." Rameau states that there
must be fundamental changes of
"the power relationship between peo-
ple and land in order to avoid being
segregated and gentrified out of our
land, at the whim of those who ben-
efit from our misery and the officials
Please turn to HOUSING 4A


Yahweh parole

supervision

denied?
A Miami federal
judge has rejected a
request by convict-
ed Miami cult
leader Yahweh ben
Yahweh to order a
parole commission
to end his parole YAHWEH
supervision because he's dying.
U.S. District Judge Marcia
Cooke said there were no grounds
to take any action because the
U.S. Parole Commission is set to
hear his bid on Thursday.
Yahweh, is dying of advanced
prostate cancer and is seeking
parole release so he can die with
dignity, his lawyers said.
Lawyers for Yahweh, went to
federal court earlier this month
with an emergency motion asking
Cooke to order the Parole
Commission to release him from
supervision or set an immediate
hearing date for parole termina-
tion.
Please turn to YAHWEH 4A


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2A The Miami Times. October 18-24, 2006 Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Ill"11


NAACP needs a change of

leadership to increase

its membership

R ecent disclosures that the Miami-Dade branch
of the (NAACP) National Association for the
dvancement of Colored People) has regressed
in membership from over 5,000 members in the 1980's
to only 350 to 500 today. The top leadership of the
NAACP has not changed since Bishop Victor Curry left
a few years ago. Regretfully, the visiblility and activity
of the branch is not known beyond the few who are
active in the branch. The NAACP's ACT-SO program
that showcases local youth talent is nationally known.
Yet its local activities are not known to those who need
to be inspired to join for more than the glorious histo-
ry of the organization.
The recent nominations meeting, in which approxi-
mately 35 people attended, is an indication that a
strong statement of change and inspiration is needed
in order for the organization to be more than a social
community based organization with a great civil rights
past.
The Times does not need to endorse any candidate to,
lead the organization. However, the past gives us guid-
ance that an organization that relies primarily on the
commitment of volunteers needs to be inspired by the
top leadership. The present leadership is committed
and tested. However, it has not inspired or articulated
how the future will differ from the past.
Albert Einstein once defined insanity as "doing the
same thing over and over again and expecting different
results." The NAACP cannot continue to rotate the
leadership or activities and expect that somehow mem-
berships will rise and its capacity will grow to force
changes within and without the community it purports
to serve.
Can anyone state the NAACP's position or involve-
ment in the present affordable housing crisis? What is
the NAACP doing about the surge of violent deaths
among and by our youth? What is the NAACP doing to
speak to our youth and their family about the moral
values that hypocrites in congress profess but do not
show? Does the disintegration of the Black family pres-
ent issues where the NAACP should act, with assis-
tance from the moral wisdom of our elders. The hyp-
ocrites in congress and in the so-called 'religious right'
of Pat Roberson have a family values agenda that does
not speak to the Black American family.
The NAACP needs a dynamic leader who has no fear
of speaking out on issues. Furthermore, the NAACP
leadership is most effective when its ability to eat and
pay bills comes, from the people it represents rather
than one of the pillars that must sometimes be
attacked to protect our people.
Miami-Dade's NAACP is at a pivotal moment. It can
take the path of a social organization with a great past
or an active community based advocate with a greater
purpose and future. Memberships and 'followship'
hang in the decision of what path is taken.



UM-FIU fight suspensions

involved few inner city

school athletes
The unsportsmanlike, foot-stomping and helmet
throwing fight at last week's University of Miami-
Florida International football game was a dis-
graceful exhibition and lesson to young athletes. The
showboating, bowing and touting by a second string
halfback after a six yard touchdown pass added fire to a
boiling pot that ignited on the ensuing point after play.
The ridiculous comments by 36 year old former player
Lamar Thomas, who was fired from his broadcast job,
are a further indication that football and basketball ath-
letes should be required to take courses that teach them
to "think before you speak or act."
Miami and FIU have a combined total of 49 players
from Miami-Dade high schools on their rosters. Of those
49, Miami's inner city schools produced 25 players.
Inner city schools are another name for the predomi-
nately Black schools of Booker T. Washington, Carol
City, Central, Edison, Norland, North Miami and
Northwestern high schools. It is from these schools that
many expected the unruly and thug like conduct would
come.
Of the 31 players suspended, one Miami inner city
player, formerly of Northwestern High School, was
included and FIU suspended 18 players included one
former Northwestern High School player and one former
North Miami High player.
However, not all the players engaged in the thugish
conduct. The players who did not go onto the field or
who followed instructions from officials and coaches in
extricating themselves from the gang fight or who did


not allow the tensions of a game to cause them to injure
their futures should receive some positive recognition.

. I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people


Editorials I


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antagonism when it accords to every person, regardless of race, creed oi color, his or her
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TEbe 1!tamt Ttme.5
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305- 694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
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RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman
Ap


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


2A The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2006


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


OPINION
The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2006 3A


If we claim to be without sin,
we deceive ourselves and the
truth is not in us.
1 John 1:8

The Republican Party theme
is that it is the party of "family
values." Hiding and covering
up for a great fundraising
pedophile is not a family value.
There are some absolute morale
standards that all men of truth
should agree upon. One of
these morale values is that a
52 year old man should not
have sex with 15-year-old boys.
I don't care how you want to cut
it that is wrong. Let us be
straight, Congressman Foley's
e-mails were nasty. He was
clearly having impure thoughts
with young boys.
Congressman Foley has gone
into rehab and admitted that he
is an alcoholic and a homosex-
ual. These are not the sins that
he needs to be confessing.
At first, when the scandal
broke, some Republicans were
aghast and called for a change
in leadership when it was
learned that Mr. Hastert knew
or should have known about
Foley's inappropriate e-mails
with Congressional pages. I felt
at that moment that some
Republicans did really believe
and have family values. A
problem had arisen and they
were dealing with it.
Somehow that initial fervor
died down, when Mr. Hqstert
and some Republican leaders
reminded everyone that mid-
term elections were around the
corner and it was not a conven-
ient time to clean house. All of
a sudden the spin changed,
and Representative Cannon
was suggesting that it was the
pages fault for being so know-
ing and that the parents had a
responsibility in this debacle by
apparently assuming that their
sons would be safe surrounded
by allegedly morale and upright
congresspersons. This spin
sickened me and made me real-
ize that the Republican leader-
ship current actions show that
they probably did cover-up
Foley's misdeeds, because they
were surely trying to cover up
now.


Each day, a new person
comes forward and announces
that they had alerted someone
about Foley's misconduct. In
my mind the party of family val-
ues is so corrupted by power
and the desire to retain power
that they will cover up the most
horrendous crimes to keep a
few congressional seats. "Do
not love the world or anything
in the world. If anyone loves
the world, the love of the Father
is not in him." -J John 2:15
The world is a sick place, and
several recent stories heighten
this belief. Anderson Cooper
recently did a story on the
Congo. He focused on violence
against women and the eradi-
cation of the gorilla. I am not
sure why those two stories
should go together. I assume
as a marketing tool if brutality
against African women did not
upset the viewing public, then
the destruction of the gorilla
would surely pull some heart
strings. Some 1,900 women
per year. are being raped in
Congo. The rapes include 15
men gang raping a three year
old. The depravity of that act
tore me apart. The little girl
has been so traumatized that
she cannot talk. What makes
man so evil?
It seems like everywhere you
turn there is another story of
mayhem. A man with a grudge,
shoots innocent, Amish school
girls. I felt sprry for the Amish,
who have tried to live outside
this sick world and carve out a
safe, Christian domain. In the
midst of the horrors of this
week, the Amish gave me hope.
During the shootings, the two
oldest girls volunteer to be shot
first with the apparent hope
that this would satisfy the mon-
ster and thereby protect the
younger girls.
Despite the monster's atroci-
ties, the Amish were praying for
him and his family, and were
already talking about forgive-
ness. Finally, in the midst of a
busy week for Satan, I found a
life raft. Can you imagine any
greater testament to Christian
faith than forgiving the killer of
your innocent children. Our
Congressman could learn a lot
from the Amish.


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Who has moral values?


Reverend Reginald Jean-Mary and Notre Dame D' Haiti
Church got a blessing on Friday when two benefactors
donated a new mixer, several new instruments and speak-
ers to replace items taken during a recent Fash of burgla-
ries at the Little Haiti church. The replacements were
made just in time for their annual weeklong spiritual
revival-Jericho.

*****
A whole lot of folks are asking why big time entrepreneur
Magic Johnson is spending all that money to develop
affordable housing in Little Havana. Maybe someone
should remind him that Overtown and Liberty City have
the greatest need for decent housing for people who are
not rich. Stay tuned.


The name of the late Miami politician Arthur Teele, Jr.
is back in the news this week as former electrical contrac-
tor Jack Maxwell stands trial in federal court, accused of
conspiring with Teele to secure a $20 million aircraft deal
and then paying him a huge consultant fee. Stay tuned.


Everybody around the Miami Dade County Courthouse
is wondering who the principles are in the circuit court
civil cases concealed from the public since 1993. Florida's
Chief Justice is conducting an inquiry into the sealing of
state court records after the Herald exposed the hidden
secret dockets in Broward County.


The Florida Republican Party is having a rough time get-
ting ready for the November 7 election with the Tom Foley
scandal and the Iraq war, so they are trying to buy votes
with big dollars. State election records show Repubs have
taken in $27.9 million in contributions, most from big cor-
poration donations. That's nearly double the $15.1 million
that went into Florida Democratic coffers.


Residents wanting service at the Caleb Center are won-
dering what is going on with the changes of agencies and
personnel. Familiar and helpful faces and people just dis-
appeared.


People are talking about how former Rod Smith cam-
paign worker Tangela Sears is now working to elect Jim
Davis and Daryl Jones.


The City of Miami Commission race that includes
Coconut Grove has folks asking about why no candidate is
talking about how to stop the encroachment on the his-
toric community by greedy developers.


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31 suspensions involved in UM-FIU football confrontation


BRAWL
continued from 1A

field and regret the way it was
handled in the broadcast
booth," CSS general manager


game Saturday night. Thirty-
one players have been sus-
pended and officials from both
schools have publicly apolo-
gized.
Thomas said, "Now," that's


Thomas continued with his
comments. "I say, why don't
they just meet outside in the
tunnel after the ball game and
get in on some more? You don't
come into the OB, baby."


they had consulted with Miami
officials before determining
what actions needed to be
taken. Miami recommends on-
air personnel for UM broadcasts
according to Fuhrman.
The University of Miami has
28 players from Miami-Dade
high schools and 10 from
Broward high schools on its


roster. Of the 28, 16 are from
local inner city schools, Booker
T. Washington Carol City,
Central, Edison, Norland, North
Miami and Northwestern. FlU's
roster has 21 players from
Miami-Dade and 13 from
Broward. Of the 21 Miami-Dade
schools, 9 are from the same
inner city schools


Among the inner city schools
only one, Chris Barney of
Northwestern High School, was
among the 16 suspended UM
players. Of the FlU suspended
18 players, only Roland Clarke
of Northwestern and Michael
Dominquez of North Miami
High were from the local inner
city high schools.


Miami's Matt Perrelli is hit by Florida Miami and Florida International players brawl
International's Chris Smith. -APPhoto during the third quarter of a football game in
Miami, Saturday, Oct. 14. -AP Photo


Mark Fuhrman said. "We do
not support or condone the
inappropriate comments made
by color analyst Lamar Thomas
and have taken the necessary
steps to prevent a similar situ-
ation from ever occurring
again." CSS will replay the
game twice today.
Thomas made his comments
as groups of Miami and FIU
players ran onto the Orange
Bowl field and fought during
the third quarter of their teams'


what I'm talking about, "as the
brawl was obviously raging out
of control. He continued, "You
come into our house, you
should get your behind kicked.
You don't come into the OB
playing that stuff. You're across
the ocean over there. You're
across the city. You can't come
over to our place talking noise
like that. You'll get your butt
beat. I was about to go down the
elevator to get in that thing."
As the fight was abating,


Thomas' comments were avail-
able on the internet Sunday
and Monday, according to CSS.
Thomas was a third-round
draft choice of the Tampa Bay
Buccaneers in 1993 and spent
six seasons in the NFL, includ-
ing three with the Bucs and
three with the Miami Dolphins.
He has a Gainesville address,
but no listed telephone number
and The Miami Times had no
other way to contact him.
CSS official Fuhrman said


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Do you feel that teachers are paid enough monet? If no,

how much do you feel they should be paid?


CHANTEL RAIFORD


"I think that
it's a shame
that teachers
are one of the
lowest paid
occupations.
For a state
that talks so
much about
the future of
the children,
they aren't doing enough to
make sure it's bright. Teachers
should be paid on the level of
some of the top professionals
around."


FRED KING

"No, I don't
think teachers
are paid
enough. I
belie ve
because they
don't get paid
a lot of money,
they may tend
to care less
about their
jobs. That is not a good thing.
The children are our future and
the teachers aren't being com-
pensated for the work they do."


KENAN HANKS


"It is well
known that
teachers don't
make the
amount of
money they
should. They
should be
among the top
paid profes-
sionals. People
need to think
about it, they are the ones that
are teaching our children. It
doesn't make sense that they
get paid that amount of
money."


YOLANDA DANIELS

"I think
teachers
should get paid
around the
same amount
as lawyers.
They are our
future because
they are the
ones teaching
our kids. It is sad that there are
hundreds of other professions
that get paid more than teach-
ers."


QUINTON MOORE

"I feel that
teachers are
not paid
enough
money. The
reason I say
that is
because they
put time and
effort into put-
ting together a
lesson plan, teaching the chil-
dren, dealing with attitudes
and making the future better.
Teachers no' doubt should be
paid more for their services."

LAVERNE BOONE

"Of course
they aren't
getting paid
e n o u g h
m o n e y.
Otherwise
they wouldn't
be complain-
ing. To me,
teaching is
one of the
hardest jobs that someone can
do because they are dealing
with kids. For people that are
teaching our future to not be
one of the top paid jobs is a
shame."


"Copyrighted Material


. Syndicated Content *

Available from Commercial News Providers"





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Crime-8~ ~SceeCople y erel.Cato


Florida among crucial elections wat


NAACP
continued from 1A

Gordon stated the NAACP will
send observers to polling
places, take citizen complaints
and notify the Justice
Department of any serious
problems.
The chosen states are those
with pivotal elections, with
concentrations of Black votes,
and those with a history of
polling problems, according to


the Baltimore based civil rights
organization. The other moni-
tored states are Alabama,
Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland,
Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio,
Pennsylvania and Texas.
President Gordon urged vot-
ers to persist in trying to cast
ballots.
"While the NAACP will take
steps to counter obstacles to
voter participation, we are
encouraging our communities
to cast their votes, even if it


ched by NAACP

requires extra effort," he said
in a statement released before
Monday's news conference at
the organization's national
headquarters.
"Civil rights activists went to
extraordinary lengths to earn
the right for Black Americans
to vote. Some lost their lives.
We owe it to them and our-
selves to honor their sacrifice
by voting, no matter what
challenges we face," Gordon
said.


Center to advocate community control over land


HOUSING
continued from 1A

who do their bidding." CPAD
will present options to the com-
munity to "circumvent the pow-
ers that be and [to] exercise
direct control" over land where
community residents live.
Rameau stated that the gov-
ernment has not been an ally in
the fight for decent human
housing, but has supported
"wealthy developers looking to
become even wealthier" with
actions that have made the
shortage of affordable housing
worse. CDAP claims it has been


Newspapers

Come and Go...
Well at least some of them


meeting with government offi-
cials since 1998 and presented
alternative policies and plans
on housing. Rameau noted that
they addressed the HOPE VI
problems of vacancies with rec-
ommendations such as increas-
ing Section 8 vouchers.
CPAD's statement claims
that it relied on "logic, statis-
tics and appeals of conscious
and 'urging a public policy
which benefits the common
good." Rameau states that
"the interests of developers
and the power of their lobby-
ists" won out over the commu-
nity.


The statement addressed the
scandal and corruption in the
county's housing agency, but
states that corruption did not
cause the shortage of afford-
able housing; it only made an
existing crisis worse. The
statement analyzes three
issues that must be resolved
in order to solve the problems
in housing and other issues of
poverty in Miami-Dade: cor-
ruption, public policy and eco-
nomic and social system. Next
week's statement in The Miami
Times and other actions by
CPAD will further explain how
the community can act.


Lawyers say, Yahweh's death imminent


YAHWEH
continued from 1A

Yahweh served 11 years of an
18-year sentence on a federal
conviction for conspiracy and
has completed five years on
parole. The 70-year-old lives
alone in Miami, his lawyers said.
"He is now unable to walk due
to bone and nerve involvement
by the cancer. His prognosis is


extremely poor and death
appears imminent," his doctor,
Wynne A. Steinsnyder, wrote in
a letter to the court dated Sept.
28.
Yahweh's lawyers, Jayne
Weintraub and Steven Potolsky,
say he is suffering from the last
stages of metastasized cancer
and that keeping him under
supervision is worsening the
disease.


Dozier's


PASTOR
continued from 1A

bat terrorism by stating in
writing that they oppose
jihads, or holy wars, against
non-Muslims.
The organization asked
Dozier to encourage moderate
Muslims to put a page in the
Koran that would urge read-
ers to interpret its "evil vers-
es" historically and not take
them literally.
[Nissan] "called me up and
presented me with an idea,"
Dozier said in an interview.
"He said March Against Terror
could use you if the communi-
ty receives you. We could work
with moderate Muslims. We
should be about curtailing,
stopping, and eradicating rad-
ical extremist Islam."
Altaf Ali, executive director
of the Florida Chapter of
CAIR, and the group's attor-
ney Areeb Naseer, both
attended a morning news con-
ference called by Dozier.
The minister greeted them
with handshakes and a smile
and said to them, "We can find
common ground. It's got to
start somewhere."
All responded: "There's no
better place than in the house
of God."
Dozier then astounded the
two Muslim leaders, saying he
could work with CAIR, "pro-
vided they prove they are a
peaceful loving organization
and share our American val-
ues ... and put in writing they
renounce terrorism."
Ali and Naseer came away
disappointed.
"I was disturbed by many
things he said," Ali said. "It
was painful to hear him citing
the Koran. He's a Christian
professing to know the
Koran."


compassion comes with strings


Ali took issue with Dozier's
trying "to reform Islam," and
explained CAIR had already
distanced itself from radical
extremists. Ali said he sees no
need to do so in writing to
appease Dozier.
However, CAIR remains
open to dialogue, All said.
Dozier still opposes the
mosque moving to the north-
west section of Pompano
Beach because the land was
originally zoned for low-
income housing, which he
said the community needed.
He said by approving the relo-
cation of the mosque, the city
ignored a moratorium on
additional houses of worship
in the community, which is
saturated with churches.
Dexter Callender Jr., a pro-
fessor of religion at the
University of Miami, said
Dozier's approach seems lack-
ing.
"It sounds like he is going
about it not very efficiently,
based on ignorance of the
Koran and what's in it,"
Callender said. "He'd do better
to invite people to dialogue."


Dozier's remarks about
Islam prompted Gov. Jeb
Bush to ask him to resign
from the Broward Judicial
Nominating Committee.
Republican gubernatorial
nominee Charlie Crist later
removed Dozier from a cam-
paign committee.
But Dozier was heartened
by Nissan's recognition of his
efforts. March Against Terror
USA is a division of March
Against Terror International,
Inc., a nonprofit educational
organization, which promotes
global freedom, justice, and
human rights, according to
its Web site. The group aims
to recruit groups who believe
in non-violence and oppose
terrorism.
Dozier credited prayer and
Nissan for his change of
thought on Muslims.
However, the closest Dozier
came to an apology was when
he said, "I have a change of
heart. When 'dangerous cult'
came off my lips, it was not
something I planned to say. I
was trying to rally support on
the mosque."


Don't Cook Tonight


Call Your

Order In!


Credit cards accepted!

4799 NW 7th Avenue 305-702-1848


It I" iMII"IIMI i 1,,liml I Vl,1


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i Ti b 18 24 2006


-qp











Phase I of Scott Carver projects to be completed by January


What's going on with Hope VI?


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward(i miamitimesonline.com

County Manager George
Burgess and Senior Advisor
Cynthia Curry, administrator
of The Miami-Dade Housing
Authority, agreed to provide
updated information regarding


Times for the distribution of its
readers. The Hope VI project
has made visible progress
since the groundbreaking of 12
homes this past summer.
Along NW 69th Street and
22nd Avenue, you can see the
foundation of homes that are
scheduled to be completed by


Habitat for Humanity plans to have 12 homes completed by
January.


housing developments to the
community through The Miami


January. The Housing Agency
plans to work diligently to con-


struct the entire development
within the next two years.
According to the Miami-Dade
Housing Agency Management
Assistance Team Progress
Report submitted by County


Manager George Burgess,
"Phase 1 of the Hope VI project
is currently under construction.
Habitat for Humanity is current-
ly developing 52 single family
units which are scheduled for


completion in January, 2008."
Additional staff has been hired
to assist Habitat for Humanity
to reduce construction time.
Efforts have also begun for the
construction of units in Phase


II between NW 75th street and
24th avenue. The demolition of
the final 314 former Scott-
Carver units is also currently
underway. Phase II, which
includes sectors two, three,
and four is scheduled to be
completely demolished and to
undergo asbestos abatement
by March 2007.
Last month, the Housing
Agency advertised the Request
for Design Build Services for
Phase II in order to revise the
construction schedule for the
completion of the public hous-
ing component for 160 units by
the summer of 2009 and 254
homeownership units by the
summer of 2010. Sherra
Mcleod, Public Information
Officer for The Miami-Dade
Housing Authority, told The
Miami Times that a pre-sub-
mittal project briefing for inter-
ested firms was held last
Thursday. The progress report
compiled by Assistant Manager
and Senior Advisor, Cynthia
Curry stated that the agency is
required by U.S. HUD to use
competitive bidding for all
facets on the contract award
for the Hope VI project.


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The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2006 5A


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Local NAACP presidency


NAACP
continued from 1A
community] leader. This
organization can not play
musical chairs with the lead-
ership, "It is time for a seri-
ous change." Sears also noted
that during Bishop Curry's
last tenure, the NAACP


increased its visibility among
grassroots and non-NAACP
members.
Approximately 30 members
came to the general meeting.
Recent disclosures revealed
that the branch's membership
had plummeted from 5,000
just two decades ago to 350-
500 presently.


o be contested
Other nominations made
were Brad Brown for first vice
president, Jamal Sexton for
second vice president.
Bishop Victor T. Curry was
originally nominated for third
vice president, but once he was
nominated for president, his
previous nomination was obvi-
ated.


LET S FIX OUR COMMUNITY


Two weeks and counting
In an effort to help expedite
the completion of repairs in
our community, The Miami
Times has embarked on a 'Lets
Fix Our Community' feature
that will identify broken traffic
signs, cracked sidewalks,
patched up streets, unwanted
signs and trash sights that
impact the appearance of our


community.
We will keep
track of how
long the prob-
lem exists
before it is
remedied.
On 53rd
Street and NW 27th Avenue,
there is a vacant alleyway that
has been trashed and it damp-
ens the look of the community.


The targeted problem area has
long been in existence.
The Miami Times contacted
the. staff of Commissioner
Audrey Edmonson and were
told the problem is being
worked on.
To notify The Miami Times of
areas in need of repair, reno-
vation or cleaning, please con-
tact Terrell Clayton at 305-
694-6216.


0


i


U


:RAL ELECTION

DAY IS

VEMBER 7TH

for your sample ballot
in your mailbox.


The Sample Ballot contains:
Candidates running jn various political races,
Important issues / voter questions,
Information about your voter information card,
Instructions for using the iVotronic voting
machines.


Get Ready to Vote. Get Your Sample Ballot.


Visit:
www.miamidade.gov/elections
for details or call

305-499-VOTE (8683)


MIAMI


ewcraqbyo nkr On yOe
~ A


b ~


THE3 STORES



ExmA MILE...
To Bring You
The BLACK Community Interests
The owners of the stores listed below are making space
available for the South's largest Black weekly circulation.
You no longer have to share your copy. When you pick up
The Miami Times, don't forget to buy something, too. Please
patronize the following stores and shops.
South Dade
Allen's Market, 212 W. Mowry Dr. Homestead
M&M Market, 11607 S.W. 216th Street
Nat's Grocery, 17600 Homestead Avenue
West Dade
City Kids Clothes, Mall of Americas
Miami Gardens
Billy's Food Market, 4078 N.W. 167 Street
Opa-locka
Freedom Market, 14495 N.W. 22 Avenue
North Miami
Safa Market, 15400 N.W. 7 Avenue
La Prima Market, 9930 N.W. 7 Avenue
Central Miami
Phillip's Market, 9100 N.W. 17 Avenue
Miami
S&G Supermarket, 5100 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Price Choice, 2173 N.W. 62 Street
Nini's Market, 1297 N.W. 54 Street
Noor Market, 4701 N.W. 17 Avenue
Joysi Food Market 4002 N.W. 17th Avenue
North Miami Beach
NMB Food Market, 473 N.E. 167 Street
Downtown Miami
Robert's Drug, 111 NW 1st Street
Broward
John's Market, 229 N. Dixie Hwy
PS House of Meat, 4050 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.


Call Tina today!
305-694-6214


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


b 1824 2006


.











Sweet Vine Youth Center comes in and fills the gap


By Kaila Heard

"We think about Africans
that are starving, without
proper shelter or clothing but
we have all the same prob-
lems," said Tonnette Collier
founder of Sweet Vine Youth
Center, an outreach and pre-
vention youth community
group in Florida City.
Locally as Collier looked
around the Homestead and
Florida City area, she noticed
the lack of intercultural com-
munication, encouragement,
environmental awareness and
simply a lack of a safe, nurtur-
ing environment for children.
"Sweet Vine comes in and
fills the gap," said Collier.
Almost 75 local children of
various ethnicities, ranging in
ages from 5 to 18, receive men-
toring, homework help and
after school care, Mondays
thru Fridays from 2 6 p.m.
Simultaneously, the youth cen-


ter exposes them to tolerance,
self-respect, as well as behav-
ior management and etiquette.
"Exposure is key, especially
since the children from the
youth center come from homes
where the median income is
$21,000," said Collier, and
they come from under served
areas.
On weekends, the youth cen-
ter takes field trips to the
Everglades, drug awareness
lectures, theatre performanc-
es, sporting events or even to
local board meetings. "All in an
effort to expose them to a dif-
ferent way of life," explained
Collier, "so they can find what
they want to be in life."
Last year, Sweet Vine had 52
field trips and 66 the year
before. The most recent trip
took them on a river cruise, fol-
lowed by dinner at The Golden
Corral, while on another day
the Sweet Vine youth experi-
enced a Hispanic Heritage tour.


Collier laughed at her busy-
schedule and joked "1I have no
life!"
However, even in the youth
center's nurturing and accept-
ing environment nothing is
given and everything must be


earned. The children turn in
report cards to prove their
grades are high enough to go
on field trips. Those that
receive a low grade are provid-
ed tutoring and are sent to
Sweet Vine's budding library,


according to Collier, who has
been collecting needed books
for the past six years.
And while parents experience
the relief of knowing, with cer-
tainty, their child's location,
well-being and activities, they


must also participate so that
the community center suc-
ceeds and their children can
remain at Sweet Vine
Youth Center.
Parents must volunteer three
hours a month, said Tamara
Robinson, an administrative
assistant for the Sweet Vine
Youth Center.
Parents also attend quarterly
meetings, where they hear lec-
tures about healthy eating,
children doing homework, etc.
In the end, the Sweet Vine
Youth Center is meant to teach
local children and their par-
ents to become active. "We
want to touch their lives in a
positive way," said Robinson,
"so they'll go to college and
return to give back to their
community."
For more information about
Sweet Vine Youth Center locat-
ed at 745 W. Palm Drive,
Florfda City, FL 33034, please
call 305-246-1193.


WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU

TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER


JMH announces North Dade expansion


HOSPITAL
continued from 1A


throughout the county by
adding capacity to its main
campus hospital in downtown
Miami and to Jackson South
Community Hospital. Ir is
anticipated to take several
months to complete the pur-
chase and transition Parkway
Regional Medical Center into
the Jackson Health System.
"The benefits of this expan-
sion are compelling, beginning
with the ability to increase
our margin-that is, the num-
ber of funded patients that we
serve-in order to support our
mission of providing care to
all Miami-Dade residents,
regardless of their ability to
pay," said Marvin O'Quinn,
president and CEO of the
Jackson Health
System/Public Health Trust.
"In addition, it gives us the
capacity, such as hospital
beds and operating/exam
rooms, to bet-
ter handle our
current and

de m a n d
Larry R.
Handfield,
Esq., chair-
man of the
Public Health
Trust, said, O'QUINN
"The hospital
acquisition will also create an
economic boom for the North
Dade community and the
Public Health Trust is plan-
ning on investing 20 million to
upgrade the facility."
Attorney Handfield also
said, "Parkway's reputation
for quality medical care, its
history of community involve-
ment, and desirable north
Miami-Dade location make it
a natural fit
for Jackson."
Parkway has served the
healthcare needs of north
Miami-Dade for more than 40
years. The acquisition means
that Jackson will add a 382-
bed acute care center to its
current capacity, and be able
to offer a range of additional
services. Jackson will work
with the community physi-
cians who currently practice
at Parkway to build upon their
success.
Jackson Health System has
more than 10,000 employees,
making it one of Miami-Dade
County's largest employers.
Jackson Health System, an
integrated healthcare delivery


system, consists of its center-
piece, Jackson Memorial
Hospital; 10 primary care cen-
ters and two primary care
mobile vans; nine school-
based clinics serving 11 ele-
mentary,, middle and high
schools; two long-term care
nursing facilities; six
Corrections Health Services
clinics; a network of mental
health facilities; Holtz
Children's Hospital, Jackson
Rehabilitation Hospital and
Jackson South Community
Hospital. Governed by the
Public Health Trust, a dedi-
cated team of citizen volun-
teers acting on behalf of the
Miami-Dade Board of County
Commissioners, Jackson
Health System ensures that
all residents of Miami-Dade
County receive a single high
standard of care regardless of
their ability to pay.


How can

Transit officials

As Miami-Dade Transit keeps
focused on its goal to increase
passenger satisfaction by continu-
ing to improve its services, MDT
Director Roosevelt Bradley and
senior staff are riding with cus-
tomers to learn from them how to
best tailor services to meet their
transit needs.
Recently, daring one of my trips on
transit, Ms. Daphne McGregor,
who has been riding transit for
more than 1.9 years, asked me why
sometimes buses arrive three at a
time and then it's a while before
the next buhs arrives.
I explained to Ms. McGregor
that our buses run on planned
schedules that allow buses to
arrive at a predetermined fre-
quency. But sometimes, bridge
openings, accidents ad.,,other
Sunforeseen occurrences aqfect
the on-time peibfornuce.
Miami-Dade Transit is address-
ing this problem by incorporat-
ing Automatic Vehicle Location
technology. An AVL transmitter
in each bus sends a signal that
identifies the location of each
vehicle, which is monitored by
Bus Traffic controllers to keep
buses on schedule.
In response to multiple requests
from Miami Beach residents
interested in using transit to go
to the new Carnival Center for
the Performing Arts, MDT has
extended Metrobus Route A serv-
ice. Buses travel on the Venetian


OPPORTUNI TY


we make your ride better?

ride buses and trains to get feedback on services


Miami-Dade Transit Director Roosevelt Bradley speaks with customer Daphne McGregor about her concerns.


Causeway, from bus stops next to
the parking lot on 17th Street and
Washington Avenue- to the Onmi
bus ,ennminal, which is just a short
walk to ihe center
Buses on Route A provide serv-
ice approximately every 20 min-
utes, with the last bus departing
for South Beach at 11:40 p.m.
Additional service will be pro-
vided for late performances at
the center:
Patrons can also take other bus
routes that serve the Omni termi-
nal, or take Metrorail to the
Government Center.Station, trans-
fer fiee to Metromover's Omni
Loop and exit at the Ohnni Station.
Metmmover hours of operation
are adjusted to accommodate
special events at the center:


Aside firom talking to our cus-
tomers, I've also been talking to


2006, we have confiscated over
800 fraudulent passes.


transit employees to learhow We also miant to express our grat-
transit administrators can provide itude to the Mianmi-Dade Police
the proper tools and support sys- Department for working closely
terns employees need to provide with MDT in reducing ftre
excellent customer service. One of evasion. In August 2006, MDPD
the main concerns bus operators agreed to increase their involve-
have is fare evasion, ment, resulting in 41 arrests.
Earlier this year, we instituted If you would like for the Transit
an improved Fare Evasion Plan. director to ride with you, call 305-
This plan was enhanced by the 375-2597. Or send him an e-mail
suggestions collected during our at rbradley@miamidade.gov. You
2006 employee forums. Due to may also send him your comments
the diligence of employees, we and/or concerns by logging on to
have substantially curtailed fare www.miamidade.gov/transit and
evasion. In fact, since June clicking the feedback zone link.


iE5 Y 7mce Ev 4y 2 MI


ENDTHE


Sweet Vine Youth Center kids at an outing at Virginia Key Beach


The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2006 7A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny







O31 e ILJ Is LLLIILL LIILHL.&J .LCj-,L 'IJ__________------ 1.')-Ba ck MutCon.tro hirOnDs ti



kCharlie Crist is aman
^r J- isr a m^_^ r-f*^^^uA -.anA.A i .I


for all Floridians!


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WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE."


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i i Ti O t b 18-24 2006







The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2006 9B


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


% ho ranW our childMrrei


- parti% or cild care prwdim?


* .


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II E Em
Join the Daughters of
Jerusalem and Sisters of
Mercy October 22, at 4931 SW
20th Street. Give and hear tes-
timonies of praise and deliver-
ance as there will be an First
Women Outreach Service.
Service starts at 9 a.m.
*******
Westview Baptist Church
invites you to their introduc-
tion celebration of Women
Answering the Call. The even
will take place on October 22,
at 4 p.m.
*******
You are cordially invited to
attend the Annual Program of
Appreciation at the Holy
Ghost Assembly on October
22, at 2:30 p.m. It will be the
honoring of Chief Musician
and Junior Bishop Jerome
Johnson.

The Missionary Board of St.
Mary's Wesleyan Methodist
Church invites you to attend
their anniversary celebration
on Sunday, October 22, at
3:30 p.m.

Pastor Dr. Wayne G. Finn of
Kelly's Chapel UNC, invites
you to their annual Dual Day
on Sunday, October 22 at 4
p.m.
********
New Bethel AME Church of
Goulds, Miami, cordially
invites the community to join
them in celebrating it's 90th


anniversary on
October 22 at 4 p.m.
*******


* and a Fellowship Revival at
Mount Olive Primitive
Baptist Church on October 22
and 23. The first event starts
Sunday, at 7:30 a.m. and the
Fellowship Revival starts at
7:30 p.m.


There will be an Ordination
service for Minister Joanne
Sanon of New Christ
Tabernacle and Minister
Shandett Cage of Soul Saving.
The service will be held at
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville on
Sunday, October 22 at 3:30
p.m.
*******
St. Peter's African
Orthodox Cathedral invites
you to Family and Friends Day
on October 22, at 9:30 a.m.
For more information, call
305-389-1530.
*******
God Word God Way Cogic,
invites you to worship the Lord
on Sunday, October 22 at 11
a.m. and 4 p.m.

Faith Cathedral, Inc.
invites you to the showing of
part two of the movie dramati-
zation of the Book of Acts. The
movie showing will take place
on Sunday, October 22 at 7
p.m.

Mt. Vernon Missionary
Baptist Church cordially
invites you to their Annual
Birthday Service on Sunday,
October 22 at 3:30 p.m.
*******
There will be a Annual men
and Women Fellowship Day


First Baptist Church of
Bunche Park welcomes you to
worship with them on October
22 at 11 a.m.

The Music Ministry of
Total Change and
Empowerment Ministries,
Inc. invites you to the Music
Ministry Anniversary service
on Friday, October 27, at 7:30
p.m.
*******
Reverend Karl A. Jackson of
God's Way Assembly Faith
Cathedral, Inc. can be heard
every Sunday from 7 a.m. to 8
a.m. on 104.5.
*******
Titus Chapel invites you to
their annual Youth Revival,
October 18-20, 7:30 p.m.
nightly,
*******
New Jericho Pentecostal
Holiness Ministry, Cora
Richardson, pastor, invites you
to their revival October 17-20,
7:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-696-
6529.
*******
Mt. Olivette F.W.B.C INC,
Eldress Katie L. Wright, pastor,
invites you to their .Church
Revival on October 18-20, 7:30
p.m. For more information,
please call 305-633-5547 .or


305-691-6621.

Join the Daughters of
Jerusalem and Sisters of
Mercy, Basil Lindsay, pastor,
First Women Outreach service,
October 22, 9 a.m. Must RSVP
by October 18. Please call 954-
322-6835.

Mt. Calvary National
Church of God Inc., Bishop L.
Rolle, pastor,invites you to
, their 26th Church Anniversary
Celebration on Thursday and
Friday, October 19 and 20,
7:30 p.m. and Sunday,
October 22, 3:30 p.m. For
more information, please
email mrolle@bellsouth.net or
call 305-378-8707.
*******
Peace Missionary Baptist
Church sponsors their
Womens Conference October
19-20. Workshops begin at
7.p.m. For more information,
please call 305-621-3826.
*******
New Covenant
Presbyterian Church invites
you to celebrate their 4,th
Anniversary October 21. The
event will begin with a banquet
at Florida Memorial
University,. 7 p.m. RSVP
mandatory. Please call Claudia
Gray 305-638-0794. Regular
church services follows the
banquet and all are welcome
to worship.
*******
The New Birth Cathedral of
Faith, Avery Jones, pastor,
and the Spirit of Life Choir
invites you to their 25th


Singing Anniversary Reunion
Concert on Saturday, October
21, 7:00 p.m. The celebration
will take place at the New
Birth Cathedral of Faith.

Come Celebrate the 23rd
Pastoral Anniversary with
Reverend Walter Richardson
and Sweet Home Missionary
Baptist Church on October 20
& 22, 7:30 p.m. For more
information, please call 305-
251-5753
*******
Faith Evangelistic Praise
and Worship Center presents
250 Women and Men in Colors
from the Holy Bible, October
22, 4 p.m. RSVP by October
16. For more information,
please call 305-953-1042.
*******
Victory in Christ
Ministries, W. M. Fayne, pas-
tor, invite you to their first
Annual Women's Conference,
"A Man You Can Trust,"
October 28, 9 a.m-1 p.m. For
registration and information,
please call 786-735-7002
*******
The Voluntary Miracle
Church of Faith, Inc invites
you to an evening of Gospel
singing, October 29, 4 p.m.
For more information, please
call 305-308-7790.
*******
The Voices of Wisdom
Choir celebrates their 9th
Anniversary by planning a trip.
to the Holy Land in Orlando
on November 18. For more
information, please call 305-
888-6763.


AMWANB invites you to cel-
ebrate their Building
Fundraiser Service with them,
October 27, 7:30 p.m.
*******
Victory In Christ
Ministries Inc., W.M. Fayne,
pastor, invites you to their first
Women's Conference, October
28 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. The
conference will be held at the
El Palacio Hotel and the theme
will be "A Man You Can
Trust." For details and regis-
tration, please call 786-735-
7002.

Our Father's House of
Prayer Ministry Church,
Stephanie E. Russell, pastor,
invites you to their 5th
Pastoral Anniversary, October
8, 15, 22, and 29, 4 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-624-2888.

Macedonia Missionary
Baptist Church, Rudolph
Daniels,pastor, invites you to
celebrate their 111th Church
Anniversary for the entire
month of October! Dates are
October 22 and 29. For more
information, please call 305-
443-0679.

Send your church
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamitedito-
rial@bellsouth or mail to
900 NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6216.


IIIIII _
The City of Miramar Social
Services Department will
hold its Annual Senior Health
and Wellness Expo at the
Miramar Civic center, located
at 6920 SW 35th Street,
onFriday, October 20, at 9:30
a.m.
*******
There will be a Free
Homebuyers' Education
Workshop on Saturday,
October 21 from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.The workshop will take
place at Markon Housing
Counseling Agency, located at
7414 West Commercial
Boulevard, in Lauderhill,
Florida.


On Friday, October 27,
Florida's Secretary of Health,
Dr. M. Rony Francis will be one
of the keynote speakers at the
Minority Development and
Empowerment's Inc 10th
Anniversary Luncheon.

On October 29, Mt. Hermon
AME Church, will hold it's first
Health and Wellness Fair on
Sunday, October 29 from 8:45
to 10:45 a.m. There will be free
screenings for blood pressure,
cholesterol, diabetes, oral
health and more.

There is an opportunity for
children grades K-12 at Grade
Academy International. The
private academy offers various
after-school activities such as
fashion design, dance, drama,
book club and much more. For
more information, call 305-
751-5910

The Christian Hill Jr. Golf
and Learning Center will host
their 8th Annual Charity
Tournament on November 10,
at 1:00 p.m. Proceeds from the
tournament will benefit
upcoming programs and proj-
ects for junior golfers of all
ages.

The North Central Dade
Council and Metro Miami
Action Plan invites you to
M.M.A.P Executive Board
Meeting, October 18, 12 -
2p.m. at 2525 NW 62nd Street.
For more information, please
call Alan Morley 786-234-
9821.

The Miami Dade


iC~end


Community Action Agency
.(CAA) will help income eligible
residents in Miami-Dade
County with paying gas and
electric bills for as long as
funds are available. The pro-
gram offers the one time $100
- $200 credit on a first come,.
first serve basis. For more
information, here are a few of
CAA's distribution sites: Opa-
Locka 305-623-6500, Liberty
City 305-756-2830, Coconut
Grove 305-446-3311 and
Florida City 305-247-2068

Miami Dade Water and
Sewer Department will
change its method of chlorina-
tion at each of its regional
water treatment facilities from
October 8-22. Drinking water
will be treated with free chlo-
rine because it is considered
an effective method of cleans-
ing water distribution systems.
Residents may experience
some chlorine smell/taste in
thier water. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-520-4738
(north of SW 8th St) or 305-
275-3170 (south of SW 8th St).
*******
The Susan G. Komen
Breast Cancer Foundation is
accepting nominations for new
members to serve on three
minority advisory councils,
including an African-
American National Advisory
Council (AANAC), in an effort
to reduce disparities in breast
cancer mortality among U.S.
minority populations.
Downloadable nomination
information and forms are
available at
http: / /www.komen.org.

FAMU is accepting applica-
tions for the Arthur Thompson
Scholarship for students who
graduated from a Big Bend


area high school, have minni-
mum of 30 credit hours, be
enrolled in 12 credit hours,
and meet minimum require-
ments for the State University
System of Florida.
Applications due by 5 p.m. on
October 20. For more informa-
tion, call 850-599-3413.
*******
Neighborhood Housing
Services will have its annual
meeting luncheon, November
2 from 12-2 p.m. at the
Radisson Hotel. The year's
accomplishments and future
plans will be highlighted. For
more information, please call
305-751-5511 or visit
www.mdnhs.org.
*******
Benefit Programs for City
of Miami Residents, if you
meet the income requirements
for the Federal Earned Income
Tax Credit,you may be eligible
to apply. Programs include
Tax Prepartion Services, The
Benefit Bank, The Matching
Saving Fund, Micro-Lending,
Florida KidCare, City of Miami
Health Care Providers, Florida
Housing Fice Corporation,
City of Miami community
Development Housing
Division, and One Stop
Centers.
*******
Join us every Wednesday for
our homebuyer classes from
6:30-8:30 p.m. Call to register
- 305-690-4391.

Become a Mentor! Be a Big
Brother/Big Sister. Volunteer
one hour a week or two out-
ings per month. For more
Information, please call 305-
'644-0066.

The Center for Family and
Child Enrichment, Inc. is
currently recruiting Foster
Parents and Adoptive Parents.
For more information, call
305-694-7450. ext. 190.
Please turn to CALENDAR 14B


Richard A. Grant, DDS, PA
General, Cosmetic, 'Implant Dentistry

Member: ADA, FDA, SFDDA, AGD


305

652-3001

20215 NW 2nd Ave.

Suite #2

Miami, FL 33169

www.dentistgrant.com


COSMETIC DENTISTRY
* Teeth Whitening 1 hour
* Porcelain Crowns & Bridges
* Porcelain Veneers
* Cosmetic Bonding


RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY
* Implant Supported
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* Tooth Colored Fillings
* Gum Therapy
* Root Canal
* Dentures and Partials



* Nitrous Oxide (tranquilizing air)
* Sedation Dentistry
* Steam Sterilization
* State of The Art Facility


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Missing Teeth or Dentures?

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S- NW. dAve. Insurance Welcome We Offer Financial Arrangements
i I Lab On Premises Repairs While You Wait
Evening and Saturday Appointments


The Patient and any other person responsible for payment has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for payment for any
other service examination or treatment which is performed or as result of and within seventy-two (72) hours of responding to the advertisement
for the fee, discounted fee or reduced fee service,examination or treatment.


Serving the Community since 1984


Heather Woo lery-Lb yd, MD Laser Hair Removal-Callfor afree
UM Cosmetic Center laser consultation
(305) 532-5552 Titan Laser-Aw laser to tighten
4701 N.M ieridi A .NidAl Bld Suite 7450 loose sn on abdomen andface/neck
ChemnicalPeels
Microdeinnabrasion
Uneven Skdn Tone
Removalof Moles
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4D 46 0




10B The Miami Times, October
,


Col raises womienI's osteoporosts isi


ted Matel
Cd Conte
ercial Ne


Skin cancer rare, but more
dangerous in Blacks
i^*


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


1824 2006


...am *0M Iw















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S ndicated Conten

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George and Alvalia celebrate 50 years
Retired high school principal and administrator, George
W. Ellis, Sr., and Alvalia J., his wife of 50 years came to
The Miami Times to share their happiness and gratitude
with a former student. From segregated schools to inte-
grated schools, Mr. Ellis taught and molded Black youth.
He deserves his retirement and Golden Anniversary
recognition.


amosamom








Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


12B The Miami Times, Oct 4,


I I All 4 1111^


How to steal an election


Jim Crow laws were laws
that imposed racial segrega-
tion. They existed mainly
in the South and originated
from the Black Codes that were
enforced from 1865 to 1866.
The laws sprouted up in the
late nineteenth century after
Reconstruction and lasted
until the 1960s. The Black
vote was the object of so much
tyranny up to 1965 and so
many maneuvering schemes of
gerrymandering, annexation,


at-large voting, roll purging
and voter intimidation through
the 1990s. Still prevalent in
the 2000 and 2004 elections,
the black vote, this is so
instrumental when our vote is
counted, has been again tar-
geted in several ways. The
impact of that targeting affects
us all: 1) the longest lines; 2)
the most spoilage and dis-
counted votes; 3) the most
eliminated provisional votes; 4)
the most inconvenienced; 5)


the most victimized by precinct
manipulation.
Listed below is a just a sam-
ple of the tactics used by
Republicans in the 2000 and
2004 elections to intimidate
voters across America:
Virginia County asked to halt
plan for armed, uniformed
police at polling places.
The ACLU said that the
planned police presence is a
reminder of when armed gov-
ernment officials were used to
prevent minorities from vot-
ing and will only intimidate
many potential voters, causing
them to avoid the polls.
RNC funded company
trashed voter registration
forms.
"Voter's Outreach of
America" aka "America Votes"


is responsible for ripping up
democratic voter registrations
in Nevada. According to the
investigative report, hundreds
and perhaps thousands of
individuals who think they are
registered to vote actually are
not. We should also point out
that similar complaints have
been received in Reno.
Armed, plain clothed police
officers intimidated elderly
Black voters in Orlando.
Plain clothed police officers,
revealing their side arms,
made house calls to elderly,
Black voters who voted in
Orlando's mayoral race in
March 2003. The voters were
in large part campaign workers
or volunteers that helped to
organize and get out the vote,
mainly usitg absentee bal-


lots, for African-American
Mayor Buddy Dyer.
Florida election officials
sought to purge African-
Americans from voter rolls.
In fact they struck over two
thousand eligible voters from
voting records. Of that num-
ber, 62% were Democrats,
more than half were Black. An
analysis by the Miami Herald
found that the Florida Division
of Elections had improperly
included 2,119 voters who
were on a list of more than
47,000 felons potentially ineli-
gible to vote in the November
elections. Florida law requires
convicted felons to request
clemency in order to regain
their right to vote. Of the 2,119
people on the list, 62% were
registered Democrats, almost


half were Black and less than
20 percent were Republican.
Only sixty-one Hispanics were
included on the list of over
47,000 felons though they
comprise 11 percent of the
prison population, a politically
significant fact for the
November elections since
Hispanics in Florida vote over- *
whelmingly Republican while
Blacks vote Democrat.
Native Americans were told
"To Go Home" in primary elec-
tions.
Poll workers demanded iden-
tification from Native
Americans in South Dakota's
primary, and they illegally
turned away Native American
voters from the polls when they
did not have it. The state's
Please turn to ELECTIONS 14B


"Copyrighted Material




Syndicated Content




Available from Commercial News Providers"


m iu i-r P-eoly t-S-1


93"'Street Community /postolic'Revival Centern
Missionary Baptist Church 6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
2330 N.W. 93rd Street 305-836-1224
305-836-0942 Order of Services
New time foir T.V. Program


Ws/SS 7:3(B ) Order of e rshipc
Order of Services
Early Worship .m.....yMorning Worship
I MItt.. Mnfihing os!hip
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd S dy........6..... p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study ...7 p.m.
websile: cttbc.org




Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12h Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Sunday School ............. 9 urn.

W orship ......................... 4 p)m .
Mission and Bible Class
Tuesday.......6:3(1 p.mn.
Yoth Meetin0/Choir rehearsal
M onday ...................... 6:30 p.m.


FOR HOPE I FOR TODAY
S0 .) 1. i in,. Stin lday 5 pi
Wed.- Inlercess.a.y Prayer 9 atmi.- 12 pnil.
Morning Service .................. I Ia.m .
Sun,- Eve.Worship ........... 7:30 p.m.
Tues. Prayer Meeting........ 7:30 p.m.
Fri.- Bible Study ................7:30 p.m.




Liberty City Church'
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Mornin ...........8 a.m.
Sunday School .............im
SuInday Evening ............. 6 p.m.
Mon. Excellence ........7:30 p.m.
Tue. Bible Class ......... 7:30 p.m.
Thurs. Fellowship .........10 a.m.


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


Pembroke Park
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue
(Office) 954-962-9327


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiamni.org


Church of Christ
Hollywood, FL 33023
(Fax) 954-962-3396


Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday, 8 a.m.- 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8,19, 22, 23, 30 and 37
Web page: www.pembrokeparkcoc.org


Trinity Faith Tabernacle ,
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4"' Street, Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Services:
Sunday Scholn l ........... 10:30 i1.m .
Sui. Mining Sevs......12 p.m.
Evlining Worship Serv..6 p.im.
rucsdIly "Youtlh Night".8., p1).
Wed.. Noon Dity Prayer..12 p.m.
Wed Nighl Bible Study.... 8 p. m.
TIhursttday Night "Ciovington Bible
(Cillcge .......... 6-1I0p.m .
Friday Night Woiship Scriv...8p1)am


L. a


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
Sunday Mioringti Serv.ices
S .............
Wos rship Set vice ....... I I a. .
Titstldy litte Stiudt.) .8 p.i.
urslay Playet r Selvice 8p.ii


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
Lord Day Sunday Schiool .9:45am
Sunday Morning Worship ....I I a.m.
Sunday Men's Bible Study ....5 pan.
Sunday Ladies Bible Study .I.5 p.m.
Sunday Evening Worship .....6 p.m.
Tuesday Night Bible Study ....7:30pm
Thursday Morning Bible Class 11 ann.
TIansportation available Call:
305-634-4850 305-691-6958



Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

.'iS Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m.





New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
y Eaorning dayorsp... 3rdun
M morning Wo rship .............. :30 a.1 .






Sunday Svichool ................... 7:30 am.
nib le S wldy ............... ........ 8 p.....
Ch rin g school .................. 9 a.m.




St. John Baptist Church




SMorning Worship .....7:30 a.m.





S305-691-4081nday School .......... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...Fax: 305-694-9105a.m.
Ntre for rBaptist Chlurches
(B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
Evening Worship ........ 7 p.m.










Order of Services:
Bible Study Wed............8 p.m.
S1 i.. 78r h Shi etpa.tv 11:30 it..
Wed N ight Intericessory rayer
SUtitlySV. i W ship Se"cr...i 1:31) p.m.


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413


Sunday School- 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.




SNew Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103" St.
305-696-7745
Order of Services:


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95t" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
Early Morning Worship 7:30 a.m.
Suit. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
STles. before the Ist Sun...7 pm.





St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
Early Morning Worship.7:30a.m.
Sunday School ..........9:30a.m.
Morning Worship .....II1 a.m.
WEDNFISDAY
Prayer Meeting ............ 7:30 p.m.I




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301


I2


Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:30 a.m .
Morning Praise/Worship ..11 a.m.
Youth Choir Saturtlay ......11 a.m.
Prayer Mccling & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.m.
,irnitg li .llhqi.C l AI 0.ll t5-621-4513.


faith Evangelistie Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday School .................:30 :uam.
a.) 1Sun. Morning Worship...........I I am.
Tues. Pr yer.....................6 pn.m .
School of Wi.sdom...........6:) p.m.
SHealing & Deliveranm Serv...7:30 pin.
WedJSat. Mauna (prayer).......5 am.
Friday Youth Night ................7 p.m.
\.^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^" "" ""


New Mount Moriah
Missionary Baptist Church
6700 N.W. 14th Avenue
305-691-1811
Order of Services:
iundPay Wvorlop..8.iiind 10eatu..
Sunday School..........9:45 ait
Monday mliyer Wvuiaors luh).i....37:1 p.N)
Monday Bible Study............................. 8 pma,
Satalhy Home Mission...........l..... an,
Satlr y .ld Give-a-Way ........... ........ 1a .


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 101" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
SEarly Sunday Worship...7:30 a.m.
Sunday Scho l ...............9:30 a.m.
SundayyMorning Worship.....l am.
Sunday Evening Service ...6 p.m.
Tu.-esday Prayer Meeting ..7:30 pJin.
Wednesday Bible Study ...7:30 p.m.
"Not Just a Church But a Movemen "



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3d Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060'Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Suritday School ........... 9:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning Servs. .. I a.m.
41, Sun....BTU..I1:30-2:30 p.m.
ITuesday. Bible Study
Feeding Ministry....11.) i.t.
Wed. Bible Study/Prayer..6:30 p.m
Thurs. Outreach Ministry...6:30 p.m


Ft-trndship Missionary '
Baptist Church
wwwiridndshipiutliinna.org
Iricudshiipn yert hcllasoutli.nct
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875

| E rly Monting Woiship....7:3(1 ii.n.
Mofniing Worship............ I I n ..
Youth Ministry Study.....Wed.....7 p.m.
Pruyer/Bible Sludy.....Wed......7 p.m.
N(niday Altar Player...(M-F)
Feeding the ltIungry eveiy
Wednesday I........ .- pi.


New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Church School...............10 a.m.
Worship Service..............I I :15 a.m.
Tuesdays Bible Class..............7 p.m.
4th Sunday Baplism Early Mmrning ..8 a.m.


Peaceful Zion Missionary,
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68'1 Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3.4,5" Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service ..... 11:00 am
Communion Service
(Murs. before e Sunday)7:30 pm
J Prayer Meeting/Bible Study




The Soul Saving Station O
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
1880 Washington Ave.,
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
S Order of Services:
Sunday School ...........9 a.m.
ISunday Worship.. I a.m. & 7 p.n
rTuesday Worship....... 7:45 p.m.
Noon Day Prayer.......Mon.-Fri.


Join the




pays for itself and keeps your church and

your pastor before the community.

Call 305-694-6210


Bishop Victol-T. Curry, D.Min., D.D, Senior llastoiTI'Laacliei


Is nivn p*__ u x- __*-v' n 4^ia- 10- 00A onn


*


AlinDanels,.,Miniterm


I RXIMMENW/







The Miami Times, Octobei 18-24, 2006 13B


Royal


GREGORY FRASER 'JIT,' 21,
died October 13.

Saturday, 11
a.m. at Magnolia
Park Church of
Christ.




ESSIE STROUD, 84, died
October 14.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Mount
Hermon A.M.E.
Church.




JAMES COLLINS, 53, died
October 3. Services were held.

HENRY RUDOLPH, 69, died
October 14. Services were held.

Wright
CARLA QUEELEY, 34, nurse,
died October 14.
Surviv orss
include: mother,
Delphine; broth-
er, Livingston.

Saturday,
October 21, 2
p.m. at Peaceful
Zion Missionary
Baptist Church.

CHAQUON WATSON, 7, student,
died October 14.
Surviv ors
include: father,
Edward; grand-
m o t h e r ,
mothi ner,
Delphine
Queeley. uncle,

Q u eeleey.
Service l
Saturday,
October 21, 2 p.m. at Peaceful Zion
Missionary Baptist Church.

WILLIE JAMES HUDSON, 62,
custodian, died October 11 at North
Shore Medical Center. Remains will
be held shipped to Saturday,
October 21 in Cairo Georgia.

Pc
LIZZIE MAE GEORGE, -87,
homemak e r,
died October 10
at Cedars
Medical Center.
Service Friday,
11 a.m. at St.
Mark Baptist
Church.



ANDREW EUGENE LEWIS, 42,
construction
worker, died
October 12 at
Mercy Hospital.
Service
Saturday, 10
a.m. at the
House Of God
Miracle Revival
Fellowship
Church.

CHARLEMAGNE ST. CHARLES,
69, construction
worker, died
October 12 at
Franco Nursing
Home. Service
Saturday, 9:30
a.m. at the Notre
Dame Catholic
Church.


Barret Frayar
WILLIAM JAMES SMILEY, 60,
died October 11 at Baptist Hospital.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
Gelndale Missionary Baptist
Church.

SANDRA FERGUSON, 42, died
October 11 at Jackson South
Community Hospital. Services were
held.

Nakia Ingraham
ANOCIADE MARCELIN, 72, died
.October 15 at Memorial Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Richardson
LARRY JOHNSON, 48'. Service
Saturday, 10
am. at St.
Matthews
Freewill Baptist


Church.





ANNIE MAE SHERMAN, 77,
died. Arrangements are incomplete.

JOHN HENRY BAKER, 85, died
October 16. Arrangements are
incomplete.


WILLIE MAE LEE, 85, died
October 15.
Service
Saturday, 10
a.m. at St.

A.M.E. Church.




ROBERT RAHMING, 58, died
October 6. Service Saturday, 1 p.m.
in the chapel.

BEVERLY SAMUELS, 39, died
October 2. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

CECIL BERNARD, 50, died
October 9. Service Saturday, 1 p.m.
at First Baptist Church of Bunche
Park.

FELTON ROBINSON, 74, died
October 10. Services were held.

Manker
ERICA M. McGHEE, 23, died
October 7 at
Parkway
Regional
Medical Center.




Center. Services were held.
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at New Hope
Baptist Church.



BARBARA J. COLEMAN, 87,
died October 4 at Vitas Health Care
Center. Services were held.

ETHEL ANDERSON, 106, died
October 12 at Franco Nursing
Home. Remains will be shipped to
Live Oak, FL for final rites and burial.


Carey Royal Raincomplete'n
CORAL. WALLACE, 61, died
October 7 at Florida Club Care
Center. Serviceside were held.

HORACE AARON, 87, died
October 15 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

CONSTANCE ROSS, 56, died
October 15 at Cleveland Clinic
Hospital. Graveside services were
held.
)itier
S ULRIC KENNETH PIERRE, 47,
manager for
Caribe, Inc.,
died October 12
at home..

Saturday, 4:30
p.m. in the
chapel.



IRMA TILLMAN, 47, homemaker,
died October 14
at home.
Service
Saturday, 1:30
p.m. at the
House Of God
Miracle Temple.




Grace
TASHA PHILLIPS, 38, mail carri-
er, died October
11 at Jackson-

Hospital

Saturday, 1 p.m.
at St. James
A.M.E. Church.


DELOIS PEELE, 59, deli atten-





Baptist Church.


EDWARD
scaper, died
were held.


STUBBS, 47, land-
October 8. Services


E.A. Stevens
ROSA LEE MIDGETT, 82, 1430
Avon Lane in North Lauderdale,
died October 11. Services were
held.

ANTHONY MILLS, 51, 810 N.W.
3rd Terrace, Hallandale Beach, died
October 11. Service Wednesday, 10
a.m. at Koinonia Worship Center,
Pembroke Park.


Deadline for

obituaries are

Monday, 3:30 p.m.

Call

305-694-6210


Gregg L. Mason


WALTER HORNE, 92, tractor
trailer driver for
US Postal
Service, died
October 11 at
Parkwa y


Medical Center.
Survivors
include: his wife,
Minnie HoQuince;
sister, Christine MunionDeb; grandson,t
Walter; three great children; and a
host of family members and friends.
and friends. Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m. Service
Saturday, 10 a.m. at Holy Temple
Missionary Baptist Church.
Interment at Dade Memorial ParkF

BARBARA A BURTON, 48, food
service at diedM,
died October 11.
Surviv ors
include: mother,
Helen Bonney;
two sons, Corey
and Melvin
Burton; daugh-
ter, Kamona.
Whorley; broth-
er, Quincey
Bonney; sister, Debra Roundtree;
and a host of other family members
and friends. Visitation Friday 2-9
p.m. Service Saturday, 2 p.m. at
Jordon Grove. Interment at Forest
Lawn.
Emmanuel
EALER 'MAE' McCLOUD, died
October 5 at
Jackson

Services were
held.


DEACONESS LAURA
POLLOCK, 74,
died October 11
at Memorial
Hospital.
Surviv ors
include: three
sons, Jimmy
(Maxine),
Clarence
(Tynia) and
Gregory
Pollock; three daughters, Joyce
Straws, Sandra Wallace (Lee) and
Bridgette Washington (Selvie),
brother, Willie Sharp (Jean); and a
host of other family members and
friends. Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at Zion
Hope Missionary Baptist Church.
Interment .at Fred Hunters
Cemetery.

Jay's
MAMIE MCCRAY, 70, Florida
City, died October 11 at Aventura
Hospital. Service Saturday, 1:30
p.m. at Crusade for Christ
Missionary Baptist Church.

JOY JONES, 24, Goulds, died
October 13 at home. Service
Saturday, 2 p.m. at Morning Star
Missionary Baptist Church.

JAMES E. DANIELS, 57, Goulds,
died. Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
New Hope Church of God in Unity,
Naranja.

MICHAEL KING, 48, died
October 14 at Jackson South
Communty Hospital. Service
Saturday, 1:30 p.m. at Glendale
Missionary Baptist Church.

DOROTHY FORSHEE, 45,
Goulds, died October 15.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Death Notice


ZANDRA MATILDA
ANDERSON, 51, died October
15 at Jackson Memorial
Hospital.
Survivors include: sister;
Alfreda Anderson; brothers,
Anthony and Lerome Anderson;
sister-in-law, Joanne Anderson.
Arrangements are incomplete
and under the direction
of Alfonso M. Richardson Fu-
neral Home.

Death Notice


Range


ERIC ALLEN JENKINS, 41, elec-
tronic techni-
cian, died
October 10 in
Decatur, GA.
Survivors
include: father,
Allan Jenkins
(Barbara); moth-
er, Alberta Mack
(Leon); daugh-
ter, Ariel Imani
Jenkins; seven sisters; three broth-
ers; and a host of uncles, aunts,
nieces, nephews and other rela-
tives. Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist Church.

CHRISTINE STEPHENS-HILL-
MAN, 95, home-
maker, died
October 7.
Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
in the chapel.


October 2 at
Cedars Medical
Center. Services
were held.


JAMES L. BOSTICK, 79, retired
owner of Mr.
Bills Barbeque \
in Coconut
Grove, died
October 15.
Survivors
include: his
wife, Theodis
Bostick; four
b r'o thers ,
Gregor y ,
Michael and Anthony Bostick and
James Rainey; sister, Grace
Demeritte; brother, Gerald Bostick;
and a host of nieces, nephews,
grandchildren and other relatives
and friends. Service at Macedonia
Baptist Church.

JOHN W. BELL, 56, self
employed handyman, died October
18. Service Wednesday, 11 a.m. at
St. Mark Missionary Baptist Church.


FRANK STAFFORD BETHEL,
76, retired sanitation supervisor,
died October 10. Service Saturday,
10 a.m. in the chapel.

Hall*Ferguson*Hewitt
81 presser, died LEOLA ARMSTRONG, 87; died
October 15 at
home. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Mt. Carmel
Missionary
Baptist Church.


CURTIS ROBINSON, 73, envi-
ronmental serv-
ices, died
October 14 at
VA Medical
Center.
Surviv orss
include: sisters,
Agnes Fashaw
and Dorothy
Hamilton; broth-
ers, Minister
Vincent and Melvin Robinson.
Service Sunday, 12 p.m. at
Northside SDA.

LEON FELDER, 48, limo driver,
died October 14
at 2200 NW
54th Street.

Saturday, 11
a.m. at Mt.

Missionary
Baptist Church.


LILLIE MAE CONE ROBINSON,
66, state department custodian,
died October 15 at Jackson
Hospital. Service Saturday, 11 a.m.
Antioch Church of Brownsville.


Death Notice


ANTOINE NATHANIEL
KING, 31. died Friday,
October 13.
Funeral service will be held
at Believers Life Ministry,
Saturday, October 21 at 1
p.m.


WALTER VEIL, 70, truck driver,
died September
24 at Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.
Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Antioch
Missionary
Baptist Church
of Liberty City.


CHARLES FRISON, construction
laborer, died
October 14 at
home. Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. in the
chapel.




MARY BROWN, 63, crossing
guard, died October 11 at Aventura
Medical Center. Remains were
shipped to Quincy, FL for final rites
and burial.

Deadline for obituaries
are Monday, 3:30 p.m.


LORETHA LATELY
HOLMES, 56, died September
15. Memorial service will be held
October 20 at 12 p.m. at Florida
Funeral Home and Crematory,
1495 NW 17th Avenue.

Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


Death Notice


ANTHONY 'TONY' SMITH,
a Miami native and chef died on
October 12, 2006 in Dallas,
Texas.
He leaves to mourn a loving
wife, Sonya; parents, Timothy
and Clara Smith; children,
Phillip and Bianca; siblings,
Timothy Wardell, Jack, Bertha
and David, a host of in-laws,
aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews,
family and friends.
Services were held at the Pot-
ter's House in Dallas, Texas on
Monday. A memorial service will
be held at Ebenezer United
Methodist Church, 2001 N.W.
35 St on Friday, October 20 at 4
p.m.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


LAWYER FREEMON, JR.

09/09/1938 10/12/2005

Our hearts are still heavy with
sadness. The tears still flow and
the longing to see you is just as
strong as yesterday.
Our lives have been changed
forever. I know the Lord is taking
care of you now.
You are missed.
We will always love you, Dee
and family.

Happy Birthday


In loving memory of,


JACKIE N. JAMES, SR.

10/18/49 08/31/06

Love you for life!
Cheese and Jason


Public Notice

As a public service to our
community, The Miami Times
prints weekly obituary
notices submitted by area
funeral homes at no charge.
These notices include name
of the deceased, age, place of
death, employment, and date,
location, family phone num-
ber and time of services.
Additional information and
photo may be included for a
nominal charge. The deadline
is Monday at 3:30 p.m.


SGT. DENISE L. ERA


10/22/68 01/05/97

Niecy, your presence is often
felt and deeply missed. In our
hearts your memory continues
to live.
We love you beyond words.
Happy birthday our God given
angel.
"The Era Family"


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
For 33 years, we have served this community
with integrity and compassion.
A dignified, personalized service with integrity, giving you
a beautiful lasting memory of your loved one.

"OUR GOAL IS TO SATISFY EVERY FAMILY
IN YOUR TIME OF NEED, CALL THE FUNERAL
HOME THAT CARES. GOD CARES AND WEL CARE"





dA Independently Owned


1993 Morician of the Year
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


I Ca l ,ii .., I,,I,. I


DICIChb IIU,L -,UIILLUI I Ll-Il %--JWIL L--,5LIIIY


n N EORIAM 9 HAPY IRHDA ]EMMRANCsES*DEAH NOTICE^^S*OBTAIS 49


Rla,-s Mut Conntrnol Their OuO n nostinv








A Th, Miami Tim...s. Ot.b.r.. 8... 2 6lkM to l


Jesus is the

greatest problem

solver ever known


Come to the Church of God
Tabernacle, Sunday, October
22 at 11:30 a.m. at 2908 NW
62nd Street and be blessed
and hear the rest.
John 3-4 says, how can an
old man be born again when
he is old. Only Jesus can make
that happen and He made it a
must.
John 3-7 says, that we be
born again. My first birth, I
was produced by a mother and
father; the second birth is from
Jesus and the Holy Spirit.
Matthew 14-25 says,
nobody could walk on water
like Jesus. Jesus went to them
walking on the sea.
Matthew 14-19 Jesus told
His disciples to sit. Five thou-
sand men, plus women and
children sat on the grass with
two fish and five loaves of


Bishop John Wilson
bread and had 12 baskets left.
Who can do that, only Jesus?
Malachi 3-10 Who can
open Heaven's windows. If any
body, sinner, pastor, deacon, a
bishop, woman or man will
obey God and pay tithes and
offering.
God promises to bless you.
Please write me at P.O. Box
531078, Miami, FL 33153.


Historic Greater Bethel sponsors banquet
Historic Greater Bethel Michelle Spence-Jones on
A.M.E. Church Incorporated Friday, October 20, at. 7 p.m. at
1896, will sponsor its second Don Shula Hotel and Golf Club,
Historical Preservation and 6842 Main Street, Miami
Scholarship banquet honoring, Lakes.
Mr. David Lawrence, Attorney The donation is $100.
Marlon Hill, Doctor Dorothy The toastmaster will be
Fields and Commissioner Shomari Stone.


St. John hosts Harvest Gathering service


The Pastor's Aide Ministry of
St. John Baptist Church will
present its Harvest Gathering
service Friday, October 20 at 7
p.m. in the fellowship hall of
the church.
Devotion will be led by
Deacon Spencer Taylor of
Greater Love Baptist Church.
Other special guests include:
Evangelist Betty Durante of
White Rock Baptist Church
and seven year old Leia
Ambrister will present her well
known liturgical dances. Our
own Deacon Walter Dennis will
serve as the Master of
Ceremony. Deaconess Ida
Adkins is president of the
Pastors Aide Ministry.
The Annual Unity Day service


Back to the

Mother Land

Dr. and Mrs. G.S. Smith and
the Apostolic Revival Center
family, invites you on a trip of
a life time; 12 wonderful days
to Amsterdam, Cairo Egypt
and Nairo-bi, Kenya, June 17-
28, 2007.
For a brochure call Mrs.
Geneva Smith at 305-891-
3570.
Space is limited.


Leia Ambrister


will be held on Sunday,
October 22.
Reverend Henry Nevin is the
pastor.


Dr. and Mrs. G.S. Smith


Blacks need to stand up, speak out and vote


ELECTIONS
continued from 12B

elections auditor did not dis-
tribute a memo to state poll
workers advising that all vot-
ers must have identification
but did not widely dissemi-
nate that information; nor did
they inform Native American
voters that they could sign an
affidavit in lieu of showing
identification.
Kentucky Republicans
placed vote challengers in


Black precincts, maker says GOP needs to
Kentucky's Jefferson "suppress" the Detroit Voters.
County Republican Party Michigan State
announced that it would place Representative, John
Republican vote challengers Pappageorge, told members of
in predominantly Black the Oakland County
precincts during the Republican Party that the GOP
November 2004 elections, reit- would do poorly in the 2004
erating their 2003 attempt to elections if it failed to "sup-
suppress voter turnout. In press the Detroit vote."
2003, -county Republicans Pappageorge's comments were
placed challengers at 18 a thinly veiled mandate to sup-
polling places in predominant- press Black voter turnout in a
ly Black districts, city where 83 percent of the
Michigan Republican law- .population is Black and over-


whelmingly votes Democratic.
We refuse to accept the crim-
inal activity of George Bush
and the Republican party who
run an aggressive-dirty tricks
campaign to frighten and
intimidate poor and Black vot-
ers.
George Bush and the
Republican Party are turning
history upside down and
reverting back to Jim Crow
tactics; and unless we stand
up, speak out and VOTE they
will steal the election again.


1% 1) 1It A Ilk t I N


Minister Joanne Sanon Minister Shandett Cage


Ordination service at Antioch of Brownsville


New Christ Tabernacle
Baptist Church, Reverend
Harold Marsh, pastor/teacher
and Soul Saving Missionary
Baptist Church, Reverend
Jodie Alexander, pastor, in-
vites you to the ordination
service for Minister Joanne
Sanon of New Christ


Tabernacle and Minister
Shandett Cage of Soul Saving.
The service will be held at
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville,
Sunday, October 22, 3:30 p.m.
Reverend Alexander will
deliver the ordination mes-
sage.


"Copyr


laterial


Card of Thanks


Ab Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


CALENDAR
continued from 9B

Class Meetings
The Booker T. Washingon
class of 1963 meets every
third tuesday at Allen Chapel.
A bus trip to Islamarada is
planned for October 21. For
more information, call 305-
691-8996.

The Miami Carol
City/North Dade High
School class of 1967 is final-
izing plans for their 40th class
reunion being held in 2007.
The scheduled meeting is for
October 28, at 7 p.m., at St.
Peters A.O.C. in Miami. For
more information call 305-
607-9228.

The Miami Northwestern
Class of 1971 invites the fam-
ilies of any deceased class
members to attend our
Memorial Service on October
26 at St. James AME Church -
1854 NW 65th St.

Attention Miami Norland
High School Class of 1982.
Please contact A. Smith 305-
693-4377, regarding a special
class meeting.

Miami Northwestern's
Class of 1967 are making


plans for their 40th Reunion.
Come and be a part of it. For
more information, please call
Connie Sheffield at 305-626-
0757 or Elaine Patterson at
305-757-4471.

The Miami Carol City Class
of "81" will host their Family
and Friends Weekend in Vero
Beach October 20-22, Skating
and Card Party on October 28,
The 50/50 Affair on November
24 and Christmas Party on
December 23. For more infor-
mation, call 305-688-5914.

Miami Northwestern Class
of 1971 35th Class
Reunion invites all fellow
graduates of 1971 to celebrate
with them October 22-October
29. Featured events incude
Friday Night in White party on
October 27 and the Willie
Everett Memorial Scholarship
Ball on October 28. For more
information, please call 305-
307-2416.

Send your community
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamitedito-
rial@bellsouth.net or mail
to 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, 33127-1818. For fur-
ther information, call 305-
694-6216.


Death Notice

MARY ALICE WILLIAMS,
76, housewife, died October 16
at Jackson South Community
Hospital.
Viewing Friday, October 20, 6-
9 p.m. at Second Baptist
Church, Richmond Heights.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at
Second Baptist Church,
Richmond Heights.
Poitier Funeral Home, Inc.
directing.

Death Notice

RAEZJA WILLIAMS, 9, stu-
dent at Van E. Blanton Elemen-
tary, died October 16 at Jackson
Memorial Hospital.
Survivors include: mother,
Melanie Davis; father, Robert
Lee; step-father. Demetrius
Williams; grandfather, Wilbert
Davis; two grandmothers; and a
host of sisters and brothers.
Service Saturday, October 21.
11 a.m. at The Historic Mount
Zion, 301 N.W. 9th Street.
Visitation Friday, October 20, 5


to 9 p.m. Grace Funeral Home
directing.


Death Notice

LILLIE MAE PARMS, 78, classroom teacher, died October
17 at North SHore Regional Medical Center.
Survivors include: two sons, Anthony and Billy Parms; daugh-
ter, Florderia Parms; sister-in-law, Ethel Parms. Services will be
held Tuesday, 2 p.m. at Bethany Seven Day Adventist Church.


The family of the late,

EFFIE M. FIELDS

are grateful, indeed for the
kind words, righteous prayers,
exquisite flower arrangements,
delightful food dishes and other
acts of love that was demon-
strated during our time of
bereavement.
We thank you with all our
hearts for the generosity which
you have shown us.
We pray Almighty God's richest
blessings upon you and your
families.

Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,

ERNEST CUTLER

Four years have gone by and
nothing has changed.
Memories of you still remain
the same.
You're in our hearts from day
to day. . forever, always, that's
where you'll stay.
Missing you.
Love always, The Cutler family.




Card of Thanks

We the family of the late,

TIJUANA 'TWIN' SMITH

would like to give our sincere
appreciation for all calls, visits,
cards, flowers, food and support
during our time of lost. Your
many acts of-kindness will never
be forgotten.
Special thanks to St. Mark Mis-
sionary Baptist and everyone that
participated in the glorious
homegoing service.
May God so richly bless and
keep you all.
With great love the Sims family.


We love you dearly, The Fields
family.


14B The Miami Times Ot*t 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4011w:::


















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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


2C The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2006
I ma


Congratulations go out to Dr.
Marty Pinkston and the staff
at Florida Memorial
University; Mayor
Shirley Gibson and
Commissions from the
City of Miami Gardens;
and over 300 support-
ers of the Democratic
Party for filling the Lou
Rawls Center for the
Performing Arts, last
Friday, to welcome
Senator Barack
Obama, Gubernatorial OBR
Jim Davis, and Darryl
Jones, running mate, to a SRO
yelling crowd.
The program was set for high
noon and people began to line
up long before 10 a.m. to jock-
ey for a good seat. Further, on
stage was a group of selected
students from the university
including Rodney Howard,
SGA president, who was the
first to welcome everyone and
the first to hear Mayor Gibson
say, "The college is in good
hands," speaking to the stu-
dent president, followed by
Olyvya Kelly singing, God
Bless America to a standing
ovation.
Mayor Gibson returned to
the microphone and recognized
Congresswoman Carrie P.
Meek, who quipped "the time a
Republican did anything for us
was Abe Lincoln," Senator
Frederica S. Wilson, Dr.
Robert "Bob" Ingram, Tim
Hardaway, former Heat player,


Commisioner Barbara Jordan,
Pastor Richard T. Dunn, and
Dr. Brad and Mable
Brown. With everyone
in place, the trio of
politicians entered to a
standing ovation:
Obama, Davis, and
Jones.
Each one spoke elo-
quently and estab-
lished a slogan as, "It's
Time for a Change,"
"We're on a Mission,"
AMA and "We have Hope and
Much Optimism," After
the speeches, the politicians
were inundated for autographs
and "good lucks."
Others in attendance
included Eufaulua Frazier,
Marva Lightbourne, Dr.
Pinkston, Dave Patlak, James
Moss, Leo Albury, Dolly
Person, Justin Bishop, Dr.
and Mrs. Malcolm Black, Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan and the
Emmanuel Family.


Speaking of Senator
Frederica S. Wilson, she was
in the spotlight last week when
she initiated a special orienta-
tion for principals in Miami-
Dade Public School System,
along with site directors and
mentors. The Rusty Pelican
was the venue and the meal
was buffet.
Pamela Jones, Melody
Delancey, Ray George, Glenys
Vincent and other staff mem-


bers organized two sessions:
One for the middle schools in
the morning and the second
one for the senior high schools
after lunch. Each school was
given a packet with information
on bus transportation, an essay
contest, scholarship availabili-
ty, etc. Senator Wilson
addressed both groups and
thanked them for their partici-
pation over the years.
More importantly, each men-
tor was asked to give his or her
name and say something about
him or herself. Heading the list
was Lemroy Lawrence, who
was killed the same night, fol-
lowed by Roderick Alexaisdek,
Bishop Joseph Watson, Dr.
Charles Phillips, Thurman
McNeil, Jai Ingraham, Kevin
Ross, Gregory Lay, Benano
Lake, Herschel Haynes, Dr.
Herman Dorsett,
Representative Ronald Brise,
James Farrington, David
Dean, Dr. Henry Mack and
William Thurston, who was
the best dressed in the build-
ing, followed by Watson who
wore red, blood shoes.
Also, Frank Goa, Alexander
Pope, Wilkes Kemp, Willie
Brinson,. BalJean Smith,
Phillip John, John Walker,
Carl Cunningham, Dr. Dwight
Bernard, David James,
Donald James, Mark Dozier,
Dr. Robert Ingram, Officer
Tim Belcher, Erhabor
Ighodaro, Dr. Chico Arenas,
Dr. Lorraine F. Strachan, and'
Reverend Abraham Thomas.


The Egelloc Civic & Social
Club begins the 2006-2007
year with Mary L. Dunn, chair-
person, Men of Tomorrow,
Mary Thomas-McCloud, presi-
dent, and Cora Solomon
Johnson, immediate past pres-
ident. The initial meeting was


held at Bible Baptist, last
Sunday, with parents, Men of
Tomorrow, and other members.
During the orientation, sub-
committee chairpersons were
introduced as W. Doris Neal,
Janeen E. Scavella parents,
Vera D. Purcell essay,
Laurice Hepburn Black
History, Wilma Rogers talent
expo, Veronica Rahming sou-
venir journal, T. Eilene
Martin-Major and McCloud -
finances, who spoke for
Josephine Davis-Rolle.
In addition, Johnson gave
the history of the organization
and its purpose that started
with five ladies: Christina
Martin Eve, Cleomia Ward
Bloomfield, Julia Washington
Hepburn, Wilhelmina Ross
Page, and Eddie Lee Wilson,
because their vision was to
enhance and develop young
men, especially 11lth graders
with the experience of social
graces, articulation, leadership,
salesmanship, talent, writing,
and camaraderie.
Activities will begin immedi-
ately with the young men work-
ing with senior citizens, giving
out Thanksgiving baskets,
Christmas baskets, community
chores, etc. They will report to
the Joseph Caleb Center the
first Thursday in January,
2007 for four months of prepa-
ration.
Some of the young men in
attendance included Steven
Williams, Keondke Collins,
Jeffrey Bowers, Darrion
Ferguson, Shawn Thompson,
Travon Petit, Jonathan
Jones, Kyrow Parker, Charles
Hadden, Lawrence T. Smith,
Jr., Dorian Hawkins, Brian
Smith and Kaheen Reid.


Shatia M. Middleton had her
first birthday party when she


was three years old, but the cel-
ebration of her eighth birthday
was the best of the lot. Her par-
ents, Mike Middleton and
Sonya Phillips lit up Little
River BLVD, last Saturday, as
DJ West's music filled the air,
faces were painted on the kids
and adults, games played, and
a huge frontier cake of multi-
colors was served with
heaping ice cream and
the singing of "Happy
Birthday."
Some of the family
members included
Linda Hayes, grand-
mother; Miquisha
Middleton, sister;
Shaketha Hayes, i
Jamia Hayes,
Christian Phillips and
Leandrea Phillips, S. MIDi
aunties; Lola Summer,
godmother; and best friends of
the honoree as guintavia
McKay, Kyler Tucker,
Ramisha Everette; Tamisha
Everette, god sister; Cathy
Hill, aunt; and Jefferey Hill,
uncle/chef.
With all of the fun going on,
three family members were
missing. Suddenly, Coach
Kenny Hayes arrived with his
son, Terrence and Coach
Martel. The three of them were
coaching their little league
team at T.A.C.O.L.C.Y. They
lost, but Coach Kenny was
proud he trained Coach
Terrence and Coach Martel as
little leaguer when they per-
formed under his coaching at
The Boys Club. Despite their
lost, they, too, enjoyed the rest
of the evening.


Kudos go out to
Commissioner Dorothy
"Dottie" Johnson and her
daughters for a spiritual Prayer
Breakfast, last Saturday, in her


D


office building on Fisherman in
Opa-Locka.
The main purpose was to
intensify more spiritualism in
her political race against John
Riley, former mayor of Opa
Locka. Furthermore,
Commissioner Johnson invited
Pastor Stalling, Reverend. Dr.
Robert Ingram, keynote speak-
er, Michael
Emmanuel, musician
and the Arcola Lakes
Park Singing Angels to
crank up her Prayer
Breakfast.
Pastor Stalling
added the blessing of
the food; the Singing
Angels set the tone
with the singing of I
Will Survive, Total
LETON Praise, How Great Thou
Are, and Enjoy Jesus as
the prayers sang, clapped,
shouted, and got into the spirit;
Reverend. Ingram's message
complimented the atmosphere
and created much enthusiasm
and praise, while Emmanuel
soothed everyone with English
horn wailing away on several
songs from Amazing Grace to
To God Be The Glory.
Johnson felt the spirit and
she, too, delivered a prayer
likened to that of Dr. J.D.
Jakes, while the 200 guests
joined in repeating Thank you
Lord, Return her to the Seat and
He Has the Whole World in his
Hands.
So, November 7, an impor-
tant day for "Dottie," as her
follows remarked. Some of
them included Dr. Enid C.
Pinkney, Martha Anderson,
Tillie Stibbins, Mary
Simmons, Lonnie McCartney,
Mamie Ivory, Mamie
Williams, Henry Williams,
Joe and Shelia Mack, Mamie
Horne, Daphane Johnson,
and Dr. Lorraine Strachan.


Congratulations to Bethune-
Cookman College (BCC)
Alumni, friends and associates,
the family of Lloyd "Tank"
Johnson and of course the
honoree, Lloyd "Tank"
Johnson and his family. Last
week "Tank" was honored dur-
ing homecoming weekend at
The Shores Resort and Spa in
Daytona Beach. "Tank" has
been an inspirational football
player, teacher, dedicated
coach, mentor and an admired
athletic director for his beloved
"BCC." This affair was headed
up by Tonya Matthews, Joe
Johns, Fred Beneby, Marva
Hopkins, Ardis Jack Hall and
Ronald Mayhew. Lloyd is the
brother and brother-in-law of
Leona Johnson-Swilley and
Jack Swilley.
Warmest congratulations to
Julie Bevans-Edwards,
Assistant Executive Director of
the Miami-Dade County


Homeless Trust, who was
appointed interim Executive
Director of the Community
Action Agency, on September
20.
Wedding anniversary greet-
ings to the following love birds:
Frank and Shirley Cooney,
Jr., October 12: Their 21st.
H. Malcolm and Diane N.
Davis, October 12: Their 15th
Clinton and Peggy Greene,
October 16: Their 40th
Miamian Udonis Haslem, a
forward with our champion
Miami Heat, visited in Opa-
Locka for an appearance with
the youngsters at Sherbondy
Park, then went to City Hall,
where he was honored as a spe-
cial guest of the city. Haslem
was presented with a basket-
ball and t-shirt signed by the
children.
Congratulations goes out to
Macedonia Missionary Baptist
Church in Coconut Grove. The


first Black church in Miami
Dade County is celebrating its
111th Anniversary. Reverend
Rudolph Daniels is their pas-
tor.
Get well wishes to all of you,
from all of us!
Kevin Meares, Mertis
Seymour, Ralph "RC"
McCartney, Alma Brown,
Julie Gilchrist, Ruby King,
Pat Ebron, Wanda Walker,
.Franklin Beckwith, Frances
Brown, Mae Hamilton-Clear
and Janie Clark-Florence.
Enid Curtis-Pinkney cele-
brated her 75th Natal Day on
October 13, with classmates
and her many friends at her
beloved church of The Open
Door United Church of Christ
Fellowship Hall where a grand
time was had by all in atten-
dance. Happy, happy.
Happy birthday goes to
Desmond Tutu, former
Archbishop of Cape Town and
the leader of the Truth and
Reconciliation Commission
who celebrated his 75th birth-
day in Cape Town with family
and his many friends.
Dr. Roland C. Burroughs,
sends a big hello to his many
friends and classmates.
SkyWay Elementary was


named the Do The Right Thing
Elementary School of the year.
Congratulations to Skyway
Principal Linda Harrison, boys
and girls and teachers. Student
of the year is Janelle Smalls;
Janelle's mother is Debra Bell;
Janelle's teachers are Errolyn
Deverow and Barbara Duncan.
Congrats!
Happy, happy birthday to an
elegant lady Mrs. Willie Pearl
Kelker-Porter who celebrated
her 95th birthday with family
and friends at Don Shula's
Steak House. Her monetary
gifts will go toward scholar-
ships for students who will
enter the field of nursing at
Florida A&M University. Father
J. Kenneth Major, her priest,
was Master of Ceremony for the
lovely affair.
Reginald Mathis, so sorry
your name was omitted as one
of the Alpha men having
attended your 100th in
Washington, D.C. this past
summer.
Cleveland Browns
Team origin: 1946
Stadium Information
Name: Cleveland Browns
Stadium
Year opened: 1932
Origin of stadium: Name of


the team
Playing surface: Grass
Football seating capacity:
78,512
Oakland Raiders
Team origin: 1960
Stadium information
Name: McAfee Coliseum
Year opened: 1923
Playing surface: grass
Football seating capacity:
67,800
Kendra Clarke, returned
home last week from Silver
Spring, Maryland 'on af6ur day
holiday to visit her: dad and
mom, Harold and Maliney
Clarke, and her brothers Elton
and Harold, Jr. Kendra works
in Maryland for the National
Institutes of Health (NIH).
Welcome home Kendra!
Don't be surprised if our
Dade County School Board
along with our school
Superintendent Rudy Crew,
presents a plan for a boys only
public high school. I am sure it
will be well received by parents.
Our young men seem to think
because they may not pass the
FCAT and receive their diplo-
ma, there is no hope for them.
Wrong! Wrong! Wrong! Young
men!
Gloria Julius-Greene,


Evelyn Roberts, Israel Milton,
Martha Clayton-Day and
Bloneva Higgs returned to
their Alma Mater, Bethune-
Cookman College to observe
their 55th reunion. Two stal-
wart who will be greatly missed
Quentin L. North and
Johnahn Thurston.
So sorry Anthony
'Armbrister, I've known you
and your mom Violet for many
years. Sometimes the mind
plays tricks (smile). Correction:
retire'" officer Anthony
Armbhister, attended the
changing of command ceremo-
ny 'for Lieutenant Colonel
Michael D. Robinson at Camp
Lejune in North Carolina.
Special Addendum:
Congratulations, Marie
Davis officially retired from the
educational system after 38
years. Thirty-seven years in
Dade County public schools
and 36 years at Pine Crest
Elementary School. On August
31, 2006, she was notified that
she has been listed in the
2005-2006 10th edition of the
Who's Who Among America's
Teachers.
Truly great friends are hard to
find difficult to leave and impos-
sible to forget.


IMT Trest Il M *d t'ha



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The Miami Times Octobe 6 SC


Blacks Must Control Their Own Dest
,
iny


Is IRS being used politically?


Churches, social justice
organizations and other non-
profits are prohibited, under the
law, from doing any political
campaign work. If they break
the rules, the Internal Revenue
Service (IRS) can come in and
snatch away the organization's
tax exempt status. The law was
first introduced in 1954 by then-
Senator Lyndon Johnson who


wanted to stop verbal attacks
against him by some nonprofit
organizations in his home state
of Texas.
It seems the law is once again
being used to silence dissenting
political voices. The IRS has
once again gone after an organi-
zation that dared to present a
view that contradicts those of
the conservative right that cur-


rently runs this country. Is the
IRS aggressively seeking to
make sure nonprofits play by
the rules or is the organization a
pawn in a master plan that
seeks to limit freedom of expres-
sion?
All Saints Episcopal Church in
Pasadena, California is the IRS'
latest target. A guest speaker at
the church made antiwar com-
ments a few days before the
2004 presidential elections. Now
the IRS wants the church to
turn over documents that relate
to those remarks. Believing the
probe is politically motivated,
the church's leaders voted to
challenge the IRS in court. By
refusing, the church forces the
IRS to either drop the case or to
ask the Justice Department to


take the church to court.
The IRS' investigation is a
clear act of political censorship.
It is apparent that the current
administration wants to sup-
press voices that oppose the war
in Iraq and the Bush adminis-
tration at large. This isn't the
first time an organization has
been attacked for its views.
After Julian Bond, the NAACP's
chairman, made negative
remarks about the president in
a speech at the group's national
convention, the NAACP received
a letter from the IRS requesting
information related to the
speech. The NAACP, the coun-
try's oldest civil rights organiza-
tion, refused to comply. That
resistance was rewarded in the
courts. We can only hope All


Saints Church will also be victo-
rious.
The Bush administration sup-
ports conservative Christian
organizations through its "faith-
based" initiatives. Those very
same groups have a huge impact
on the current administration's
policy decisions issues such as
stem cell research, abortion and
gay rights are all heavily influ-
enced by the Christian right. The
president himself often uses his
faith to justify his actions. And,
when mobilizing voters for the
2004 elections, the president's
chief strategist relied heavily on
conservative churches and
organizations to spread his
"message." Yet, the federal gov-
ernment now wants to challenge
a liberal church, returning to


that old dictum, saying church
and state should be separate.
The hypocrisy is appalling.
The Justice Department
should begin its own investiga-
tion. One that looks into these
IRS challenges to find out
whether they actually have a
legal basis or are politically moti-
vated. Our government agencies
cannot be used as political
pawns. Intimidating progressive
voices in this country whether
through wire tapping or IRS
sanctions will only eliminate
what little piece of democracy
this nation has left.
Judge Greg Mathis is national
vice president of Rainbow PUSH
and a national board member of
the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference.


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"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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The Adams Report

Fashion, Beauty . and Stuff



Self Awareness


This week's
article is a gen-
tle reminder,
from me to you,
to take care of I.
yourself. Taking
care of yourself
may sound like
a very simple ADAMS
concept, and
many of us think that we do,
but we really don't. We work
out for a stronger, healthier
body. We take the time for man-
icures, pedicures, facials, wax-
ing, going to the beauty shop.
All the things that help us to
create the appearance that
everything is in order. Looking
waxed, buffed, polished and
spit-shined on the outside just
isn't enough.
How about your insides? Are
your tissues pink and healthy?
Have you done everything pos-
sible to insure that your veins
and arteries, your muscles and
all your vital organs are func-
tioning at optimum capacity?
And yes, have you checked for
lumps, bumps, lesions and
other abnormalities? If you


haven't then shame on you! The
one thing;,you should never .do.
is to play games, with your
health. Your physical, mental
and emotional well-being are
essential to the quality of your
life. So, here's a reminder, this
is Breast Cancer Awareness
Month.
Maybe you have lost a friend,
relative or know of someone
who has battled, is battling or
survived this thing called
breast cancer. Maybe you have
had to deal with the diagnosis
yourself. One thing is for sure;
it might be scary to think about
the possibility of having it, but
even scarier is not knowing.
There is no excuse for not
assuming the responsibility for
your own health. Don't stop
reading now. I know that you
know what I am talking about!
We tend to ignore health issues
until it happens to happen to
us.
Why is it that we have to wait
for a "Disease Awareness
Month" to think seriously about
any aspect of our health?
Maintaining your health is a full


time, year round job. You owe it
to yourself to take the time to
maintain your insides as well as
you do your outside.
If you aren't afraid to change
your hair color or consider los-
ing a few pounds by embarking
on a weight-training program,
than surely you can take a few
precious moments out of one
day in 364 to be good to your-
self by getting a mammogram.
Your breasts, no your family,
friends and most importantly,
you will be relieved and happy
even, that you did.
Now, I don't know you per-
sonally and you don't know me.
But woman to woman, please
get a mammogram. Be a good
friend; remind one another to
get a mammogram. Go get
mammograms together! Stop
thinking that it happens to
everybody else, it can happen to
you. Think about it. See you
next week.
Audrey Adams, former direc-
tor of corporate public relations
and fashion merchandising for
ESSENCE and model and assis-
tant commentator for the world
renowned EBONY FASHION
FAIR, motivates and inspires
women through her syndicated
columns and motivational
speaking engagements and web
site, The Adams Report.com.
E-mail your fashion, beauty
and lifestyle questions or com-
ments to her at
Audrey@itheadamsreport.comr


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Strip Clubs are designed to provide


a fantasy, not a relationship


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward@miamitimesonline.com
Strip clubs are a very popular
scene here in Miami. The major-
ity of dudes I know would rather
go to a place like Club Rolexx
rather than Club Bed. Many
women wonder why, but differ-
ent men will give you different
answers. Some say it provides a
relaxing atmosphere and some
say it's a nice place to socialize.
Yet, one answer remains the
same across the board, the
desire to 'appreciate' the female
form.
So let's answer the age-old
question, why pay for the cow
when most times, the milk is at
home for free? Most women
think strip clubs are a waste of
money. But men view it as a
means of paying for a simple
pleasure. I have even heard
them say strip clubs prevent
them from cheating on their
mates because the desire to look
and feel the body of another
woman is fulfilled by strippers.
Personally, I'm not a fan of
strip clubs, but if you're that


Men don't go in looking for
a girlfriend; most times these
women get them ready for
the intimacy waiting at
home.
curious about what goes on
when your man sits center
stage, you might want to
accompany him one night. I
know several couples that go to
strip clubs together. The
females don't necessarily go to


look at the women for their per-
sonal desire, but to see how
their man reacts to them. They
want to know which woman
their man finds most attractive
and will often pay her to give
him a lap dance. I find that men
have the desire to go less when
their mates don't object.
Arguing about it takes away
from intimacy time and subcon-
sciously makes them want to go
more.
Don't let strippers make you
feel insecure. Their job is pro-
viding a fantasy, not take the
role as wifey. No man wants a
woman that other men are con-
stantly touching. I can count on
one hand the amount of men I
know who would actually have
any type of sexual intercourse
with a stripper. Men don't go in
looking for a girlfriend; most
times these women get them
ready for the intimacy waiting
at home. The next time your
man and his boys hit the "booty
club," don't trip, just get out
your short skirt and high stilet-
tos and give him something to
come home to.


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Why more teens should get involved in their communities


Volunteering makes all the difference


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

Everyday we read about
children that die in third
world countries, homeless
people beaten up or animals
run over by cars. Even though
you may think these tragedies
are not related, they all have
something in common. Each
tragedy could have been
avoided if someone would
have offered them a helping
hand. By simply volunteering
at a shelter, donating money
or purchasing a homeless pet,
you could have inadvertently
helped saved lives.
Most people do not under-
stand that volunteering
involves offering your free time
and skills to help your com-
munity. Start in your neigh-
borhood, town, country or
even the global community.
You can make a difference


that is a reward in itself when
you see what your help can do
to a family without food or an
animal without a home.
It is a fact that almost every
organization lacks the finan-
cial and human resources to
accomplish everything they
would like to do. With volun-
teers helping them, they can
get closer to achieving their
goals. When you volunteer
remember that someone
always benefits from your par-
ticipation.
For example, an elderly per-
son you visit in a retirement
home, the over grown hiking
trail that you help clear, the
campaign you are working on
to save the rainforests or the
student that you are teaching
how to read. Helping others
also feels good and gives you a
broader perspective on what's
happening in the world
around you. Finally, volun-


teering gives you experience
that schools and employers
like to see on resumes'.
Another great thing about
volunteering is that if you
really want to help and are
under the age of 16, some pro-
grams offer parents to volun-
teer with their child. Today
more organizations are includ-
ing volunteer opportunities for
kids and teens. If an organiza-
tion that you are interested in
doesn't have anything listed,
you should contact them any-
way and see if you can figure
out a way to get involved with
the organization.
Volunteering is important
not only because of what it
does but what it does to you.
It can teach you:

A SENSE OF
RESPONSIBILITY
By volunteering, you can
learn what it means to make
and keep a commitment. You
also learn how to be on time
for a job, do your best and be


proud of the results. Most
importantly you learn that we
are responsible for the well-
being of our entire communi-
ty.

THE KNOWLEDGE THAT
ONE PERSON CAN MAKE A
DIFFERENCE
A wonderful, empowering
message you will receive is
that you are important enough
to have an impact on someone
or something else.

THE BENEFIT OF
SACRIFICE
By giving up a toy to a less
fortunate child, you can learn
that it is good to sacrifice
sometimes. Cutting back on
recreation time to help clean
up a beach tells you that there
are more important things
other than yourself and your
immediate needs.

TOLERANCE
Working in community serv-
ice can bring you in touch


with people of different back-
grounds, abilities, ethnicities,
ages, education and income
levels. You will likely find that
even the most diverse individ-
uals can be united by common
values.

JOB SKILLS
Community service can help
you decide on your future
career. Are you interested in
the medical field? Hospitals
and clinics often have teenage
volunteer programs. Do you
love politics? Kids can work
on the campaigns of local
political candidates, learning
to work as a team member,
taking on leadership roles and
setting project goals. These
are all skills that can be
gained by volunteering and
will serve you well in any
future career.

HOW TO FILL IDLE
TIME WISELY
If a you are not involved in
traditional after-school activi-


ties, community service can
be a wonderful alternative.
Notice a problem in your
community? Have a solution
for it? How about starting
your own project to turn that
idea into action? Remember,
that every organization that
exists today was somebody's
idea. There are millions of
organizations around the
world, millions of ideas in
action. Why not give yours a
try?
Stepping out of your normal
routine and doing something
out of the ordinary like volun-
teering, can give you a sense
of pride and fulfillment.
Remember that "China wasn't
built in a day" so don't feel
discouraged if your volunteer-
ing is taking slow to progress.
Eventually good things will
come of it, showing others why
it is vital for them to offer a
helping hand too. So, what are
you waiting for? Check out
some volunteer organizations
in your neighborhood today.


Tattoos: not just a pretty picture, may be a serious health hazard


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

Part III of III

Now it's time to learn of
some risk associated with tat-
tooing your body.
If you decide to get a tattoo,
chances are everything will go
as planned. However, if you
don't go to a tattoo studio or
the tattoo studio doesn't follow
precautions like using steril-
ized equipment or if it shares
ink between customers, you're
putting yourself at risk for get-
ting viral infections such as
hepatitis, bacterial skin infec-
tions,or dermatitis (severe
skin irritation).
Also, some people have aller-
gic reactions to the tattoo ink.
And if you already have a skin
condition such as eczema, you
may have flare-ups as a result
of the tattoo.
Serious complications can
result if you attempt to do a
tattoo yourself, have a friend
do it for you or have it done in
any unclean environment.
Because tattooing involves
injections under the skin,
viruses such as HIV and hep-
atitis B and C can be trans-
ferred into your body if proper
precautions aren't followed.
For this reason, the American
Red Cross and some other
blood banks require people to
wait 12 months after getting a
tattoo before they 'can donate
blood.
Another thing to consider is
that time will pass and that


tattoo you got with your
boyfriend or girlfriend may no
longer seem so romantic.
What if your new lover wants
to share this act illustrating
your love for each other. What
then?
In the past, tattoo removal
required surgery, but now it
can be done through a med-
ical procedure that uses a
laser. Some tattoo shops also
offer tattoo removal, but it's a
better idea to make sure the
person doing the removal is a
medical doctor. Before you go
just anywhere to get your tat-
too removed, check with your
doctor or contact the
American Dermatological
Association to find a rep-
utable laser removal special-
ist in your area.
Although it's called tattoo
removal, completely removing
a tattoo can be difficult
depending on factors like how
old the tattoo is, how big the
tattoo is and the types and
colors of inks that were used.
It's best to consult with a der-
matologist who specializes in
tattoo removal to get your
questions answered such as
whether anesthesia is used.
The dermatologist can also
give you a good idea of how
much (if at all) of the tattoo
can be removed.
Laser tattoo removal usual-
ly requires a number of visits,
with each procedure lasting
only a few minutes.
Anesthesia may or may not be
used. What happens is the
laser sends short zaps of light


In the past, tattoo removal
required surgery, but now it
can be done through a med-
ical procedure that uses a
laser. Some tattoo shops also
offer tattoo removal


through the top layers of your
skin, with the laser's energy
aimed at specific pigments in
the tattoo. Those zapped pig-
ments are then removed by
your body's immune system.
Removing a tattoo by laser
can be uncomfortable and
can feel a lot like getting a
tattoo. The entire process can,
take several weeks.
Just like when you get a
tattoo, you must look after
the wound area after a tattoo
is removed. The area should
be kept clean, but it should-
n't be scrubbed. Also, it
might turn red for a few days
and a scab might form. Don't
rub or scrub the area or pick
at the scab. Let it heal on its
own.
Laser tattoo removal is usu-
ally effective for the most
part, but there can be some
side effects. The area can
become infected or scarred,
and it can also be susceptible
to hyperpigmentation, which
causes the area where your
tattoo used to be to become
darker than your normal
skin, or hypopigmentation,
which causes the area where
your tattoo used to be to
become lighter than your nor-
mal skin color.
Now for the big part tattoo
removal can be pretty expen-
sive. Depending on factors
like the size and design of the
tattoo, removal can cost sig-
nificantly more than the actu-
al tattoo.
You read all the information
above and probably are unde-


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cided what to do and now feel
at a stalemate. So it's now
time to ask yourself: Is get-
ting a tattoo worth the money
and hassle?
It's up to you. Some people
really enjoy their tattoos and
keep them for life, whereas
others might regret that they
acted on impulse and didn't
think enough about it before
they got one. Getting a tattoo
is a big deal, especially
because they're designed to


be permanent.
If you've thought about it
and decided you want a tat-
too, make sure you do a little
detective work and find a
clean, safe and professional
tattoo shop. Also, remember
that getting and maintaining
a tattoo involves some
responsibility after you leave
the tattoo shop, it's up to you
to protect and treat it to pre-
vent infections or other com-
plications.


Are you sinKing deeper iniqpni uoceiun fulli u t ur.l' Arev yuu swim
ming toward an unknown location? Are you fishing for answers with I
unknown solutions? Are you floating towards oblivion? Well I'm here to
keep you afloat. With my htest and trustworthy advice you'll be able to
get a grasp on any troubling situation sailing towards you. So e-mail me
at jazz4advice@yahoo.com with any unanswered questions, pressing
concerns and important information you wish to share with me.


Jazz,
Ever since I was little, I've always
admired my older brother and wanted to
follow in his footsteps. I couldn't picture a
day without seeing or being near him. So
when he informed our family he would be
attending an out- of-state college, it left me
speechless. I mean not only would he not
be living with us but to find out he wanted
to live in a different state was very hurtful.
I know I shouldn't take it personal because
my brother is art overachiever. If he
thought this school offered him a better
chance at succeeding in life, he surely
would jump on it.
Yet, I feel like he is pushing me aside
and leaving me alone and abandoned. I
mean my brother and I have always been
close and my brother's name was my first
word. So you can see how this will affect
me. I even thought of making up a phony
letter of rejection from the college he
wants to attend. I know it's very childish
and selfish, but how can I convince him to
stay?


Don't Leave Me

Don't Leave Me,
One of the hardest lessons in life we
have to learn is how to say goodbye. We
figure, if we never actually say the words
then the person we love is still with us. We
want to hold on to them and the memories


of happier times with them. We figure that
by keeping those two words inside, we can
live in a state of denial that makes us feel
better rather than face reality. Yet when
we hold on to someone for selfish reasons,
we are only causing ourselves and them
more pain. They would not want you to hold
them back from bettering themselves and
may hold a bit of resentment towards you.
Even though it will be a tough choice in the
end, you will realize that it will also be the
right choice.
Your brother is going on to bigger and
maybe better things in life and he wants
your support. This will be hard enough
from him leaving his family, friends and his
past life behind. So he will need to know
whether or not that he is making the right
choice. You have to be strong for him and
show him that you will be his shoulder to
lean on in spirit. You will go on with life and
will always be there when he is doubting
whether he made the right choice or not.
Show your brother that you never doubted
his decisions in life and if he believes this
is best for him, then you will stand behind
him 100 percent. So have faith that every-
thing happens for a reason and in due time
it will come clear to you.
Hey look on the bright side, your family
now has a new vacation spot. So take this
time to learn about yourself since you may
have hid in his shadows, rather than face
the world head-on. You will become more
independent and aware of what makes you
special.


QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Nothing is as real as a dream.
The world can change around you, but your dream will not.
Responsibilities need not erase it. Duties need not obscure it.
Because the dream is within you, no one can take it away.
-Unknown



lamne ii6 teen senstionr

_____ began his career as a dancer and became a model for stores such as
Macy's, GAP, Target and Toys "R" US. He made his first appearance on screen in
the theatrical films Galaxy Quest (1999) followed by Catch That Kid (2004), before
coming to fame for his roles in the 2006. He starred in the Disney Channel Original
Movie High School Musical and the Discovery Kid Series Flight 20 Down. He also
guest starred in the pilot episode of Disney's Channel Hannah Montana and
appeared in the 2006 Disney Channel Games, where he was a member of the
Blue team. As of September 2006, he is appearing in the second season of Flight
20 Down. He is scheduled to star in two Disney Channel movies set for release in
2007: Jump Inl in which he will play a boxer with an interest in jump roping and
High School Musical 2. His debut music album is scheduled for release in early
2007, possibly in March.


4C The Miami Times, October 18-24, 2 6


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Businessil. akC


Welder helps airplanes soar


J.L. Welding Inc.

Location of Business
5002 NW 36th Street
305-871-1048

Owner
Joe Chandler [All
responses are from Mr.
Chandler].

Full Time and part time
employees
Five full-time and two
part-time employees

Year Established
1988

Products/Services
We are a FAA repair sta-
tion. We are certified by
the federal government
to do work on air-flights.
We weld parts and com-
ponents on an aircraft.
We also do welding work
on the side but working
on the aircraft is what we
specialize in. Most of the
time we work specifically
at the airport. We are the
only Black owned minor-
ity business in the
United States that does
this type of work.

Future Goals
My future goal for the
business isn't about
'expanding; it's to make
more money. We do work
all over the country and
we have a satellite shop
in Jacksonville.

Why did you start this
business and how has it
grown?
In a way, this business
accidentally started. I
worked for Eastern
Airlines in the mid 80's.
Some people came to me
and asked me if I would
open up a shop so I can
work on their airline
parts. After a while, the
word spread around
about my quality of work
and the business grew
from there. The business
went from making
around $50,000 a year
to a million dollars plus
a year.

What were some of the
obstacles you faced and
how did you overcome
them?
The biggest obstacle I
faced in the beginning
was others not wanting a
Black man to start a
business of this nature.
Someone was always
looking over my shoulder
looking for me to mess
up. I overcame them by
not giving up. I had no
other choice. My wife
and I agreed that we
were going to fight the


Joe Chandler


battle together.

Who does your business
best serve and why?
The general public. It is
beneficial to the general
public because they are
the ones that fly on the
aircrafts. If a plane has a
crack in it, it cannot take
off until someone welds
it. That's where my busi-
ness comes into play.

Why do believe your
business will withstand
the test of time?
My business has lasted
this long because of the
quality of work I provide.
Many of my workers
have been working with
me in this company for a
long time. Also, I have a
building relationship
with all of my customers.
If I come tp your compa-
ny to work on your air-
craft, I make sure you
know the type of person
you are dealing with. I
have a great personality.

What were some of
your past experiences
that helped you meet
the needs of your
clients?
I learned. that word of
mouth was the best way
for my business to
expand. There were
times when I dressed up
while going to find new
customers and people
told me they needed my
services, but I didn't
hear anything from
them. We even tried
advertising the business.
None of those tactics
worked. Over the years, I
learned that word of
mouth helped my busi-
ness grow better than
anything.

Where did you get the
name of your business?
My first name is Joe and
my middle initial is L.
When I was thinking of a
name for the business
that was the only thing I
could think of at the
time. No one else had
that name so I stuck
with it.


Transit


expansion


and


mean Black economic development


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward@miamitimesonline.com
In an exclusive interview,
The Miami Times conferred
with the leadership of the
Transport Workers Union, the
second largest employee
organization among the coun-
ty's over thirty thousand
workers. The discussions and
questions focused on the
impact of economic develop-
ment of the extension of the
Metrorail system, community
economic development asso-


ciated with such expansion
and- the TWU workers who
operate and administer the
system.
Miami-Dade and the TWU
are currently planning for the
extension of the rail from the
Airport Expressway to bring
northbound service into
Brownsville, as well as
extending the system from its
present northwest 79th
Street terminus north to the
Broward County line on
northwest 27th Avenue.
Please turn to TRANSIT 9D


Transport Union Worker executives


CAHSA prepares for fourth meeting Oct. 19


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward@miamitimesonline.comrn

The Community Affordable
Housing Strategies Alliance
Task Force (CAHSA) is cur-
rently preparing for their
fourth meeting, tentatively
scheduled for October 19, the
first since county commission-
ers approved the increased
2007 housing budget. CAHSA
was established this past sum-
mer by the Board of County
Commissioners to address the
affordable housing crisis in
Miami-Dade. Its ultimate goal is
to establish recommendations
for maintenance, construction,
funding and community partici-
pation.
At the meeting, each of the
nine subcommittees is respon-
sible for reporting recommenda-
tions, not limited to, but in con-
sideration of the current county


activities and budget
issues. Since it's ini-
tiation in July, the
subcommittees were
required to meet reg-
ularly outside of
CAHSA meetings to
brainstorm and con-
duct data analysis
as well as to involve
and inform the com-
munity about their
findings.
Sherra Mcleod,
Public Information
Officer for the
Miami Dade


Housing Agency, told The Miami
Times that there has been a
noticeable increase in commu-
nity attendance and participa-
tion. "We anticipate that the
October 19 meeting will be well
attended since the subcommit-
tee recommendations will be
presented to and voted upon by


CURRY


the Task Force at
that time," said
Mcleod.
Since CAHSA's
last meeting, sub-
committees were
asked to finalize a
comprehensive set
of recommenda-
tions, which will be
reviewed for
approval by the
Task Force. These
points will in turn
serve as the basis
for a draft report.
At the end of the


year, a Housing Summit will be
held to present the report to the
community, where citizens can
provide valuable feedback
before the final report is drafted.
The CAHSA Task Force was
created by ordinance and is
scheduled to dissolve in April
2007, but may be extended by


the county commission. "Since
the CAHSA process incorporat-
ed the work of the long-standing
Housing Policy Work Group
(HPWG), the housing recom-
mendations will roll over to the
permanent HPWG and will be
taken to the Board of County
Commissioners to be acted
upon," said Mcleod.
Cynthia Curry, who serves as
Senior Advisor and Assistant
County Manager, told The
Miami Times that she and
County Manager. George
Burgess recently traveled to
meet with the Housing Agency
Director of Atlanta, Georgia.
Curry and Burgess received
insight and toured housing
developments to incorporate
ideas that may be presented in
the upcoming meeting.
The Miami Times will provide
a synopsis of the CAHSA meet-
ing.


FAMU's success should concern all Blacks


By Ava L. Parker
Florida Board of Governors

Every Black Floridian has a
connection to Florida A&M
University. Through memories
of studying at FAMU or, like
me, through family members
who did so, or through our
appreciation for Black history
and culture, FAMU looms
large in all our hearts and
minds.
When FAMU excels, we all
feel proud. When FAMU fal-
ters, we grow concerned the
telephone rings, the conversa-
tion at church sparks up, the
chat rooms and blogs run
wild. We always have our ears
tuned to the news about this
national treasure.


Ava Parker
I am happy to say that the
news is good. More freshmen
are enrolling at Florida A&M,


and Black Enterprise magazine
just named FAMU its No. 1
recommendation among col-
leges for Blacks ahead of
Howard University, North
Carolina A&T, Harvard,
Spelman College, Yale,
Morehouse and Columbia.
That's proud company.
These students coming to
FAMU have made the right
choice, and I want to applaud
their decision. We all need to
get this message out it is
time for students to return to
the Orange and Green.
As a member of the Board of
Governors, which sets policy
and provides guidance for the
State University System of
Florida, I am familiar with
FAMU its administration,
its budget and its Board of


Trustees. As a native
Floridian, I grew up with
FAMU's legends and more -
learned through my mother,
my niece and my nephew, all
FAMU alumni. I might have
become a Rattler myself had I
not received a scholarship
from another institution. I love
FAMU and I appreciate its his-
tory and triumphs.
FAMU has seen some rocky
times the headlines have
not always been good. The
university faces some serious
problems and it is overcom-
ing those challenges, under
the guidance and leadership of
Interim President Castell
Bryant.
Dr. Bryant and Board of
Trustees chair Challis Lowe
Please turn to PARKER 6D


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6D The Miami Times Octo 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


=* "Copyrighted Material



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MIAMI-

-mi


ADVERTISEMENT FOR
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
PROFESSIONAL COST ESTIMATING SERVICES
CONSULTANT FOR THE MIAMI DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT
RFQ-MDAD-05-03


Moving in the right direction

PARKER to encourage our best and bright-
continued from 5D est to come to FAMU to pursue
their degrees.
are steering FAMU on a course of Tell them that Florida A&M
improvement. They are putting in University creates a special. sense
place modern systems of manage- of connectedness for Blacks that
ment that will only make FAMU they may not find at other univer-
stronger and are laying the foun- sities.
dation of success for a new presi- Explain to them how FAMU has
dent in 2007. They deserve our great colleges and programs that
respect and support for all they are are getting stronger with an
doing to raise FAMU higher, accreditation review now under
Throughout these changes, way.
FAMU has remained focused on its Let them know about FAMU's
historic mission providing high- caring faculty and staff, profes-
quality education to Black fami- sionals who truly understand
lies. FAMU's success is impressive. Black students.
Consider that: 1) more Black stu- Talk to them about how you get a
dents earn bachelor's degrees at whole lot more than just academic
FAMU than at any other university training at FAMU you learn
in the nation; 2) FAMU is the top about life experiences as well.
producer of Black Ph.D.s in And remind them that FAMU
physics; 3) The university has just graduates get good jobs employ-
received a $5 million grant from ers want what FAMU is teaching.
the National Science Foundation For more than a century, FAMU
to establish a new research cen- has provided excellence with caring
ter and to increase Black gradu- to generations of Black students,
ates in astro-physics a Qastr-p and FAMU is now well on its way
chemistry; 4) T. ei'icaseothef ser
top producer ai1 4C arm aI 6by spread-
cists; 5) FAMUme o... d sharing
the lowest tuition and fees in the the goo news. is time for stu-
nation. dents to come to the home of
What can we do to help FAMU excellence and achievement that
continue this mission and build awaits them in Tallahassee.
on this success? Jacksonville attorney Ava L.
We can get out the good word. Parker is a member of the Board
We can become Rattler recruiters., of Governors, the constitutional
Florida A&M is an excellent body created by voters in 2002 to
value for young Blacks an even provide leadership and guidance
better bargain with the improve- to the 11 institutions of the State
ments taking place now. We need University System of Florida.


1. Miami-Dade County (the "County") as represented by the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department ("MDAD"), requires the servic-
es of an experienced and qualified firm to provide professional
Cost Estimating Services and any associated scheduling and
claims consulting services for Miami International Airport and
the five (5) County-owned auxiliary airports, Kendall-Tamiami
Executive Airport, Opa-Locka Airport, Opa Locka West Airport,
Dade-Collier Training and Transition Airport, Homestead
General Aviation Airport.

2. REQUIREMENTS AND SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

The services to be provided by the Respondent will be related to
and be used in connection with construction projects, proposed
construction projects and construction projects in the design
stage, such projects being a part of the County's airport system.
At any given time, the Respondent may be required to provide
services for more than one (1) project, and/or for more than one
(1) airport. Services to be provided by the Respondent may
include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. Analyzing the factors and activities, which affect the
progress and timely completion of construction projects, and
preparation of recommendations as a result of such analysis.

b. Analyzing and preparing of cost estimates either for entire
construction projects or parts thereof. Said estimates to be pre-
pared, checked and presented by qualified estimators.

c. Recommending as to text to be included in the Contract
Documents relating to schedules, payments and claims.

d. Preparing and presenting reports, diagrams, sketches, illus-
trations, spreadsheets and any similar tasks related to items a
thru c above.

e. Attending meetings .between any of the parties related to the
construction projects for related services.
f. Traveling to or from any city to attend meetings, seminars,
or any matter related to the services described herein

g. Preparing and presenting any of the above described
material as appropriate to claims arising from the design and
construction of projects including but not limited to the following
services:

* Reviewing and organizing relevant project schedule, cost esti-
mating, and claim-information.

* Pinpointing crucial documents.

* Analyzing the impact of the delays, inefficiency, description,
interference and acceleration.

* Preparing project schedules (as planned, as-built and as-
adjusted).

* Cost estimating for disputed items.

* Detailed review of existing projects, costs and contractor/con-
sultant costs regarding performance, problems and delays.

* Preparing a chronological list of major problems and delays
broken down by cause (owner, contractor or other).

* Calculating damages and assisting in development of back
charges

* Evaluating claims submitted by others

* Writing technical reports, preparing evidentiary tools, designing
and constructing demonstration models

* Review and coordinate claim findings with MDAD to assure
they are knowledgeable as to the facts and findings

* Assisting in negotiations

* Recommending procedures to be undertaken to minimrnize the
impacts of continuing actions for which claims have been assert-
ed

3.. Sealed Qualification Statements for the Miami-Dade County
Request for Qualifications RFQ-MDAD-05-03, entitled "PRO-
FESSIONAL COST ESTIMATING SERVICES CONSULTANT
FOR THE MIAMI-DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT," will be
received by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade
County, Florida, at the Office of the Clerk of the Board, Stephen
P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, 17th floor, Suite 202,
Miami, Florida 33128 until 2:00 P.M., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3,
2006 or as modified by addendum. The County will receive
sealed Qualification Statements from qualified, interested par-
ties based upon the terms, covenants and provisions of the
Advertisement and the RFQ. The Department reserves the
right to postpone or cancel the Qualification Statements opening
at any time prior to the scheduled due date of the Qualification
Statements. Respondents are invited to be present.
Qualification Statements received after the time and date spec-
ified may not be considered, and may be returned unopened.
4. Hardcopies of this solicitation package can be obtained
through the MDAD, Contracts Administration Division, 4200 NW
36th Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122 on or after
Wednesday, October, 4, 2006 at a cost of twenty-five dollars
S25.00 (non-refundable) check or money order for each
solicitation package payable to: Miami-Dade Aviation
Department. The package may also be requested in writing,
along with the $25.00 payment, to MDAD Contracts


Administration Division, P.O. Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-
5504. Each respondent shall furnish an address, telephone
and fax number and e-mail address for the purpose of contact
during the RFQ process.

5. A project briefing has been scheduled for 10:00 a.m.,
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2006 at the Miami-Dade Aviation
Department,.4200 N.W. 36th Street, Building 5A, Conference
Room "F" on the 4th Floor, Miami, FL. Attenda ce is recom-
mended but not mandatory. The purpose of this p oject briefing
is to review the Scope of Services and response requirements,
and to afford Respondents an opportunity to seek clarification
prior to the Qualification Statements Due gate. The
Respondents are encouraged to submit any questiops they may
have, in writing, to the Contracting Officer delineated in the RFQ
in advance of the project briefing.

6 All Qualification Statements must be submitted Os set forth
in the RFQ.

7. The Department reserves the right to reject any or all
Qualification Statements to waive informalities and irreg ularities,
or to re-advertise for Qualification Statements. The De artment,
by choosing to exercise its right of rejection, does so without the
imposition of any liability against the Department by any and all
Respondents.

8. Any changes to this RFQ will be by written addendum..

9. Contract measures established for this project is 30% Small
Business Enterprise (SBE) goal.

10. "Cone of Silence:" Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Code of Miami-Dade County (the "Code") and A.O. No. 3-27 (the
"Cone of Silence Provisions"), a "Cone of Silence" is imposed
upon request for Qualification Statements ("RFQs"), RFPs, or
invitations to bid ("lITBs") after advertisement and terminates at
the time the County a }nagerissues a written recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence
prohibits communication regar`iaig RFPs, RFQs, or bids
between: A) potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobby-
ists or consultants, and the County's professional staff including,
but not limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff; B) a potential vendor, service provider, bidder,
lobbyist, or consultant, and the Mayor, Board or their respective
staffs; C) the Mayor, Board or their respective staffs, and any
member of the County's professional staff including, but not lim-
ited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff; D)
a potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consult-
ant, and any member of the selection committee for the RFQ,
RFP, or ITB; E) the Mayor, Board or their respective staffs, and
member of the selection committee for the RFQ, RFP, or ITB; F)
any member of the County's professional staff and any member
of the selection committee for the RFQ, RFP, or ITB.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the Code and A.O. No. 3-27, permits oral
communications regarding a particular RFQ, RFP or ITB for
solicitation of goods or services, between any person and
the procurement officer responsible for administering the
procurement process for such RFQ, RFP, or ITB, provided
that the communication is limited strictly to matters of
process or procedure already contained in the correspon-
ding solicitation document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral com-
munications at pre-qualification conferences, oral presen-
tations before selection committees, contract negotiations
during any duly noticed public meetings, public presenta-
tions made to the Board during any duly noticed public
meeting, or communications in writing at any time unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFQ, RFP, or ITB
document. Respondents must file a copy of any written
communications with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be
made available to any person upon request. Written com-
munications may be submitted via e-mail to the Clerk at
CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV. The County shall respond
in writing and file a copy with the Clerk, which shall be
made available to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of
the Cone of Silence Provisions by any Respondent'shall render
any RFQ award voidable. Any person having personal knowl-
edge of a violation of the Cone of Silence Provisions shall report
such violation to the Office of the State Attorney anc/ or may file
a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Submitters should
reference the actual Cone of Silence Provisions for further clar-
ification.

All Respondents will be notified in writing when the Board of
County Commissioners makes an award.

The Contracting Officer for this RFQ is:


Name and Title:

Name of Agency:

Physical Address:

Mailing Address:
E-mail Address:
Telephone No.:
Facsimile No.:


Maryse Georges
Aviation Procurement Contract Officer
MDAD-Contracts Administration
Division
4200 NW 36th St. Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor,
Miami, FL 33122
P.O. Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-5504
mgeorges@miami-airport.com
(305) 876-7939
(305) 876-8068


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK

BY:
DEPUTY CLERK


CITY OF MIAMI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT the City of Miami Community
Redevelopment Agency (CRA) for the Southeast Overtown/Park West and
the Omni Districts has scheduled a Board of Commissioners Meeting to be
held on Monday, October 30, 2006, beginning at 5 p.m., at The Lyric
Theater, located at 819 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida 33128.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For copies of the agenda,
please contact the CRA Office at (305) 679-6800.

James Villacorta
(#15789) Interim Executive Director, SEOPW CRA


NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTION
IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
FOR
NOMINATING CANDIDATES FOR THE
OFFICE OF ONE DISTRICT TWO COMMISSIONER
TO BE HELD ON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006,
PURSUANT TO ORDINANCE NO. 12829

A special election will be held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006, from 7:00
a.m. until 7:00 p.m., in the City of Miami, Florida, at the polling places in the
several election precincts designated by the Board of County
Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida, at which election the quali-
fied electors participating therein will vote for the nomination of a candidate
for the office of District Two Commissioner of the City of Miami, Florida, to
be voted on at the runoff election that is to be held on Tuesday, November
21, 2006, unless in the special election a candidate for the district receives
a majority vote for the prospective office.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15787) City Clerk


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Falling gasoline price bolsters U.S. consumers


---' "Copyrighted Material



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Available from Commercial News Providers"


MIAMI.

M


REVISED ADVERTISEMENT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
PROFESSIONAL SCHEDULING SERVICES CONSULTANT
FOR THE MIAMI DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT
RFQ-MDAD-05-02


__ "m


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annual fee. Transactions at non-Colonial AMs subject to activity lees. Additional charges may be imposed by non-Colonial
financial institutions or ATM operators. Colonial Bank, N.A. Member FDIC.


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All occasions, weddings, parties,
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(West of 27th Ave.) Limo Rentals
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Rozalyn H. Paschal, MD
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Gene and Sons, Inc.
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Faith Financial Group
Purchase, Refinance
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Home, Business Land
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305-510-4201
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1. Miami-Dade County (the "County") as represented by the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department ("MDAD"), requires the servic-
es of an experienced and qualified firm to provide professional
Scheduling Services and any associated estimating and claims
consulting services for Miami International Airport and the five
(5) County-owned auxiliary airports, Kendall-Tamiami Executive
Airport, Opa-Locka Airport, Opa Locka West Airport, Dade-
Collier Training and Transition Airport, Homestead General
Aviation Airport.

2. REQUIREMENTS AND SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

The services to be provided by the Respondent will be related to
and be used in connection with construction projects, proposed
construction projects and construction projects in the design
stage, such projects being a part of the County's airport system.
At any given time, the Respondent may be required to provide
services for more than one (1) project, and/or for more than one
(1) airport. Services to be provided by the Respondent may
include, but not be limited to, the following:

a. Analyzing the factors and activities, which affect the
progress and timely completion of construction projects, and
preparation of recommendations as a result of such analysis.

b. Preparing of an overall construction network schedule
based on the Architect/Engineer project schedule for a given
construction project, by whatever method directed in the Service
Order. This may include CPM, PERT, Bar Graph or variations
of these or other techniques, either by manual or computer
assisted programs.

c. Preparing of schedules which detail a portion of the overall
progress schedule.

d. Recommendation as to text and/or time frames to be includ-
ed in the Contract Documents relating to schedules, payments
and claims.

e. Preparing and presenting of reports, diagrams, sketches,
illustrations and any similar tasks related to items a thru d
above.

f. Attending at meetings between any of the parties related to
the construction projects for related services.

g. Traveling to or from any city to attend meetings, seminars,
or any matter related to the services described herein.

h. Preparing and presenting of any of the above described
material as appropriate to claims arising from the design and
construction of projects including but not limited to the following
services:

* Reviewing and organizing relevant project schedules, costs,
and claim information.

* Pinpointing crucial documents.

* Analyzing the impact of the delays, inefficiency, description,
interference and acceleration.

* Preparing project schedules (as planned, as-built and as-
adjusted).

* Detailed review of existing projects regarding schedules, per-
formance, problems and delays.

* Preparing a chronological list of major problems and delays
broken down by cause (owner, contractor or other).

* Assisting in negotiations

* Evaluating claims submitted by others

* Writing reports, designing and constructing demonstration
models

* Examination of schedule requirements, including schedule
preparation, maintenance and modification and development of
questions to clarify the facts and positions of the parties involved

* Reviewing and coordinating their findings with MDAD to assure
that they are knowledgeable as to the facts and findings regard-
ing claims

* Recommending procedures to be undertaken to minimize the
impacts of continuing actions for which claims have been assert-
ed

3. Sealed Qualification Statements for the Miami-Dade County
Request for Qualifications RFQ-MDAD-05-02, entitled "PRO-
FESSIONAL SCHEDULING SERVICES CONSULTANT FOR
THE MIAMI-DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT," will be received
by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County,
Florida, at the Office of the Clerk of the Board, Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, 17th floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida
33128 until 2:00 P.M., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER, 3, 2006 or as
modified by addendum. The County will receive sealed
Qualification Statements from qualified, interested parties based
upon the terms, covenants and provisions of the Advertisement
and the RFQ. The Department reserves the right to postpone
or cancel the Qualification Statements opening at any time prior
to the scheduled due date of the Qualification Statements.
Respondents are invited to be present. Qualification
Statements received after the time and date specified may not
be considered, and may be returned unopened.

4. Hardcopies of this solicitation package can be obtained
through the MDAD, Contracts Administration Division, 4200 NW
36th Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, FL 33122 on or after
Wednesday, October, 4, 2006 at a cost of twenty-five dollars


$25.00 (non-refundable) check or money order for each
solicitation package payable to: Miami-Dade Aviation
Department. The package may also be requested in writing,
along with the $25.00 payment, to MDAD Contracts
Administration Division, P.O. Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-
5504. Each respondent shall furnish an address, telephone
and fax number and e-mail address for the purpose of contact
during the RFQ process.

5. A project briefing has been scheduled for 11:00 a.m.,
Wednesday, October, 18, 2006 at the Miami-Dade Aviation
Department, 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Building 5A, Conference
Room "F" on the 4th Floor, Miami, FL. Attendance is recom-
mended but not mandatory. The purpose of this project briefing
is to review the Scope of Services and response requirements,
and to afford Respondents an opportunity to seek clarification
prior to the Qualification Statements Due Date. The
Respondents are encouraged to submit any questions they may
have, in writing, to the Contracting Officer delineated in the RFQ
in advance of the project briefing.

6. All Qualification Statements must be submitted as set forth
in the RFQ.

7. The Department reserves the right to reject any or all
Qualification Statements to waive informalities and irregularities,
or to re-advertise for Qualification Statements. The Department,
by choosing to exercise its right of rejection, does so without the
imposition of any liability against the Department by any and all
Respondents.

8. Any changes to this RFQ will,be by written addendum.

9. Contract measures established for this project is 30% Small
Business Enterprise (SBE) goal.

10. "Cone of Silence:" Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Code of Miami-Dade County (the "Code") and A.O. No. 3-27 (the
"Cone of Silence Provisions"), a "Cone of Silence" is imposed
upon request for, Qualification Statempnts ("RFQs"), RFPs, or
invitations to bid (l"ITBs") after advertisement and terminates at.
the time the Counhyoanager issues a written recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence
prohibits communication regarding RFPs, RFQs, or bids
between: A) potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobby-
ists or consultants, and the County's professional staff including,
but not limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff; B) a potential vendor, service provider, bidder,
lobbyist, or consultant, and the Mayor, Board or their respective
staffs; C) the Mayor, Board or their respective staffs, and any
member of the County's professional staff including, but not lim-
ited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff; D)
a potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consult-
ant, and any member of the selection committee for the RFQ,
RFP, or ITB; E) the Mayor, Board or their respective staffs, and
member of the selection committee for the RFQ, RFP, or ITB; F)
any member of the County's professional staff and any member
of the selection committee for the RFQ, RFP, or ITB.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the Code and A.O. No. 3-27, permits oral
communications regarding a particular RFQ, RFP or ITB for
solicitation of goods or services, between any person and
the procurement officer responsible for administering the
procurement process for such RFQ, RFP, or ITB, provided
that the communication is limited strictly to matters of
process or procedure already contained in the correspon-
ding solicitation document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral com-
munications at pre-qualification conferences, oral presen-
tations before selection committees, contract negotiations
during any duly noticed public meetings, public presenta-
tions made to the Board during any duly noticed public
meeting, or communications in writing at any time unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFQ, RFP, or ITB
document. Respondents must file a copy of any written
communications with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be
made available to any person upon request. Written com-
munications may be submitted via e-mail to the Clerk at
CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV. The County shall respond
in writing and file a copy with the Clerk, which shall be
made available to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of
the Cone of Silence Provisions by any Respondent shall render
any RFQ award voidable. Any person having personal knowl-
edge of a violation of the Cone of Silence Provisions shall report
such violation to the Office of the State Attorney and/ or may file
a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Submitters should
reference the actual Cone of Silence Provisions for further clar-
ification.

, All Respondents will be notified in writing when the Board of
County Commissioners makes an award.

The Contracting Officer for this RFQ is:
Name and Title: Maryse Georges


Name of Agency:

Physical Address:

Mailing Address:
E-mail Address:
Telephone No.:
Facsimile No.:


Aviation Procurement Contract Officer
MDAD-Contracts Administration
Division
4200 NW 36th St. Bldg. 5A, 4th Floor,
Miami, FL 33122
P.O. Box 025504, Miami, FL 33102-5504
mgeorges@miami-airport.com
(305) 876-7939
(305) 876-8068


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK


DEPUTY CLERK


- -


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


8D Th vi i Times Octob 6








The Miami Times. October 18-24. 2006 9D


Transport Workers Union working to develop community


TRANSIT
continued from 5D
The union's goal is to get
people who usually drive their
cars to ride transit. "If the
transit agency sinks, we [rid-
ers, residents and private vehi-
cle drivers] drown," said J. W.
Johnson, President Emeritus
and C.E.O. of TWU. The Route
112 extension will add 38
miles of rail services for
Miami-Dade transit.
Additional workers, including
mechanics and operators will
be employed. "Each inch of
rail means a new job," said
Johnson. According to TWU,
transit work is the most
sought after job in the Black
community. Approximately
300 people are on a waiting
list to take the required skills
test and participate in the six
to eight week training class.
TWU believes that their $57
million project will also bring
employees and businesses
back to Brownsville. There will
be several job opportunities
from the construction of gro-
cery stores, banks and com-
munity centers. Through
recruitment of minority con-
tractors, financiers and elec-
tricians, laborers will have the
opportunity to gain experience
in a trade that usually takes
longer with license certifica-
tion. "I work for the people. We
care about our community
and want citizens to grow up
safe, have affordable housing
and live the American Dream,"
said TWU Executive Assistant,
Ken McKay.
According to Johnson, the
TWU was established in 1971


by a group of transit workers
who felt the need to belong to
an organization where their
concerns could be heard
regarding management, bene-
fits and salary. Since the


union's initiation, the mem-
bership has grown from 80 to
3000 and is the second largest
in the county.
"Without a union, you have
no rights and no protection. If


you get fired, you're just fired
and there's nothing you can
do about it. Through the
union, employees work harder
and feel more secure," said
Executive Assistant McKay.
TWU's composition is 80 per-
cent minority and embodies
98 percent of all eligible work-
ers. "Most unions only have
35 percent of their workers.
Evidentally we're doing some-
thing right," said Johnson.
"We have one of the best
contractual agreements in the
southeastern part of the
United States," said Terry
Daniels, President of TWU. He
told The Miami Times he is in
charge of contract ratifica-
tions, which must be
approved by The Board of
County Commissioners, and
that summary bulletin points
are posted for adequate review
by union members. Through
their efforts, 3000 transit
workers have the opportunity
to receive benefit packages,
insurance policies and a
salary between $15 and $30
per hour. "We are not
ashamed of allowing a nice
salary for our employees. We
know that we make a good liv-
ing, but we also make it a pri-
ority to give back to the com-
munity," said Johnson.
TWU is currently undergoing
a project to bring 320 afford-
able housing units to the
Brownsville community. "We
wanted to be a bigger part of
the community. We have ties
in Brownsville as many of us
grew up there," said Johnson.
He said the union also chose
Brownsville because of the
vast amount of empty


lots and community gentrifica-
tion. "Blacks are no longer the
majority in Brownsville. This
was a historically Black settle-
ment and most residents have
moved. We want to give back to
a community that is losing its
face and background," said
Johnson.


reconstruction and disburse-
ment of clothing and supplies
at their own expense.
The Transport Workers
Union is currently holding a
raffle to raise funds for their
community service affiliation.
A drawing will be held on
December 16 and participants


President of TWU, Terry Daniels, says "the union has a great compas-
sion for people who ride transit."


TWU has been recognized for
a significant amount of other
community service projects.
Within the past year, they have
received The Hood Works
Award from United Way, a
Certificate of Dedication from
the Community Partnership
for the Homeless and a
Certificate of Appreciation
from Commissioner Barbara
Jordan for their efforts in New
Orleans following Hurricane
Katrina: Many union workers
traveled to Louisiana to assist
with garbage pick-up, house


are entered to win a brand
new 2006 Ford F150 Lariat
Pickup. Raffle proceeds will be
used for students attending
college, donation of gifts and
presents to children in the
Annual Toys-for-Tots Drive,
donation of perishables dur-
ing the holidays and provi-
sion for affordable housing for
the disadvantaged through
work with Habitat for
Humanity. For more informa-
tion, readers may contact
President Terry Daniels at
305-652-9250.


William R. Harvey receives

Community Builders Award
HAMPTON, VA. Hampton University
President Dr. William R. Harvey was honored
as the recipient of the Gandhi, King, Ikeda
Community Builders
Award on October 2, as
part of the opening
reception for the
'Gandhi, King, Ikeda: A
Segacy of Buil ding
Peace Exhibitict on
display at the Hampton
University Museum.
The annual award
was created to cele-
brate the lives and
work of Mahatma
Gandhi, Martin Luther
King, Jr., and Diasaku
Ikeda three men
from three different
Dr. William R. Harvey cultures and countries
whose common path of
profound dedication to peace has been recog-
nized internationally. Recipients of the award
have shown commitment, to fostering peace,
celebrating human rights and nonviolence.
Harvey was recognized for his extraordinary
efforts to promote a policy of inclusion and to
humanize education.
"You have wonderfully embodied the noble
virtues of the individuals for which this award
was named," stated Dr. Lawrence Edward
Carter, Sr., founder of the Gandhi Institute for
Reconciliation, who presented the award to
Please turn to HARVEY 10D


TWU assists Hurricane Katrina victims.


TWU 291 during Hurricane Katrina Effort.


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on October 26, 2006, at 9:00 a.m. in the City Commission Chambers
at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of
giving the general public the opportunity to be heard, express their concerns
and hold formal public discussion on the purchase and installation of the
Overt Cameras portion of the Close Circuit Television Project.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodation to participate in these proceedings may
contact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than
two (2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior tothe proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15791) City Clerk


* -


AiF M1AMADME EXPRSS WAY AUTHORITY

MEETING NOTICE

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX)
will hold a Special Board Meeting on Friday,
October 20, 2006 at 9:30 A.M. at the MDX
Headquarters, 3790 NW 21 Street, Miami, FL
3142. The meeting has been called to consider
any and all matters related to the selection by
MDX of a successor Executive Director.
Attendance by MDX Board Members or mem-
bers of the public may be in person or via con-
ference telephone. If a person decides to
appeal any decision made by any board,
agency or commission with respect to any mat-
ter considered at its Board meeting, he/she will
need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedipgs is made, including the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is based.
All MDX meeting locations comply with applica-
ble requirements of the American with
Disabilities Act. Auxiliary aids or services will be
provided upon request with at least one (1)
day's notice prior to the proceedings. If hearing
impaired, telephone the Florida Relay Service
Numbers (800)955-8771 (TDD) or (800)955-
8770 (Voice), for assistance. MDX invites all
interested parties to attend. For further informa-
tion, including information on attendance by
telephone, please visit www.mdx-way.com or
contact:

Miami-Dade Expressway Authority
Attention: Maria Luisa Navia Lobo
3790 NW 21 Street
Miami, Florida 33142
305-637-3277


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),
from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dpm. Vendors may choose to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
RATIFICATION OF EMERGENCY FINDINGS
FOR WAIVER OF BIDS TO CONTINUE THE
CIVIC TOWERS REMEDIATION PROJECT
CONTRACT (NO. K-040039)


The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on October 26, 2006
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public interest that the
City Commission ratify, approve and confirm the Emergency Findings of the
City Manager justifying the waiver of competitive bids to modify an existing
contract (No. K-040039) to complete the Civic Towers Remediation Project.
The City awarded contract to PEICO Inc. permits environmental /coastal
engineering services. PEICO will also be permitted to conduct the capital
improvements necessary to remediate the Civic Towers property.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled
City Commission meeting of October 26, 2006 at:

MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with
respect to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any
decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered
at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any
appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15790) City Clerk


lB k Must Control T g








10D h Mi i Ti O tober 18 6


B k leadr ad fr"rId kilHd m Okober I I. Inbut M frgoltea




"Copyrighted Material,


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Hampton sponsors exhibit

HARVEY
continued from 9D

Harvey. "This exhibit and award emphasize
the difference one person can make in promot-
ing peace through non-violent action."
Past recipients of this prestigious award
include Prince El Hassan bin Talal, prince of
Jordan; the Honorable Nelson Mandela; the
Honorable Mikhail S. Gorbachev; Andrew
Young, former U.S. ambassador to the United
Nations; the Honorable F.W. DeKlerk, former
president of the Republic of South Africa;
Lincoln C. Almond, governor of Rhode Island;
and Northern Ireland's Betty Williams, founder
of World Centers of Compassion for Children.
The Gandhi, King, Ikeda: A Legacy of Building
Peace Exhibition, conveys the themes and piv-
otal episodes that are consistent within the
lives of these three men of peace. The exhibit
is sponsored by the Hampton University
Museum, the HU Religious Studies Program
and the Martin Luther King, Jr. International
Chapel at Morehouse College and co-sponsored
by the Soka Gakkai International-USA. The
exhibit will be on display at the Hampton
University Museum through October 22.


CITY OF HIALEAH

POLICE OFFICER






$1,460 $2,325 Biweekly

The City of Hialeah is currently accepting appli-
cations for the position of Certified and Non-
Certified Police Officer.

Copies of following documents must be
submitted at time of application:

If not certified, I/O Solutions or CJBAT passing
test results
Driver's License
If prior U.S. military service, original DD214
required
If FDLE certified, original certificate required
Accredited High School diploma or equivalent
Social Security card
Birth certificate
Proof of U.S. citizenship

Applicants must be:

Minimum of 19 years of age
Of good moral character
No felony or misdemeanor conviction involv-
ing perjury or false statement
No dishonorable discharge from any of the *
Armed Forces of the United States

The City of Hialeah, an equal opportunity
employer, is seeking qualified applicants for
employment without regard to race, color, celi-
gion, sex or national origin. The City is encour-
aging African-Americans, as well as other
minority individuals and women to apply. The
position does not require residency within the
City as a condition of employment.

MUST APPLY IN PERSON AT HUMAN
RESOURCES
501 Palm Avenue, 3rd Floor
Hialeah FL
(305) 883-8050 *Job Hotline: (305) 883-8057

Applications being accepted from:
October 16 30, 2006 9 am to 4 pm

Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer


REVISED
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA


MIAMI-ADE


Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and
equipment for the following project will be received
in the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 N.W. 1st. Street, Miami, up to 2:00
p.m., Local Time, Wednesday. November 8. 2006
where they will be publicly opened and read aloud
for projects that do not have an established
Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE)
contract measure. When applicable, only the
names of the bids submitted will be publicly
opened and read aloud for those projects contain-
ing contract measures. Bid prices will be
opened and read aloud forty-eight hours later
based on the Department of Business
Developments (DBD) preliminary responsiveness
review.

PROJECT NAME: Roadway Improvements to
SW 137 Avenue, from SW 88 Street to SW 72
Street.

PROJECT NUMBERS: 20060025

LOCATION: SW 137 Avenue from SW 88 Street
to SW 72 Street.

DESCRIPTION: The scope of work shall consist of
roadway improvements along S.W. 137 Avenue,
from S.W. 88 Street to S.W. 72 Street.
Specifically, widening S.W. 137 Avenue from four
(4) to six (6) lanes, from S.W. 88 Street to S.W. 84
Street. Improvements along the existing four (4)
lanes, from S.W. 88 Street to S.W. 82 Street,
include milling and resurfacing of the roadway
along with new sidewalk, curb and gutter, median,
a continuous storm drainage system, pavement
markings, signage and signalization. In addition,
roadway lighting will be installed along the entire
corridor.

A Pre-Bid Conference to answer any questions
regarding this project will be held on Tuesday.
October 24. 2006 at 10:00 a.m. in the 15th floor
Front Conference Room, of the Stephen P. Clark
Center located at 111 N.W. 1st Street.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CER-
TIFICATE OF COMPETENCY IS REQUIRED IN
ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:
General Building, General Engineering, Paving
Engineering or other categories as applicable to
Chapter 10 of the Code of Miami-Dade County.

Specifications and Contract Documents are open
to public inspec tion and may be obtained from the
Contracts and Specifications Section, Public
Works Department, Telephone No. (305) 375-2930
at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street,
Suite 1510, Miami, Florida 33128-1970 upon a
non-refundable deposit, of $50.00 in check or
money order payable to the Board of County
Commis sioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida for
each set of documents.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE
(CSBE)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance
No.'s 97-52 and 97-158; A.O.3-22, a 18% CSBE
SUBCONTRACT GOAL has been established
for this project. Compliance with these
Ordinances is required for all contractors sub-
miffing a bid for this project. See Appendix
"A" of the CSBE Participation Provisions ,
which are bound herein and are made part of
the Specifications and Contract Documents.

In order to allow time for the CSBE
Subcontractor participation presentation and
the review of said presentation, no Contractor
may withdraw his bid for a period of up to one
hundred twenty (120) calendar days after the
bid opening. Disregard anything to the con-
trary within these Contract Documents.

Bidders must submit a completed Schedule of
Intent Affidavit form (FORM DBD 400) to the
person or office to whom the bid was submitted
on the bid submittal due date. Defective
Schedule of Intent (SOI) Affidavits that are
incomplete or inaccurate upon notification by
the Department of Business Development
(DBD), bidders may correct defects that exist
on the SOI Affidavits within forty-eight (48)
hours after bid submission. Failure to submit
the required SOI Affidavit or commitment letter
at the time of bid submission shall render the
bid non-responsive. Examples of defects
include, but are not limited to improperly exe-
cuted letters, the listing of an unidentifiable
CSBE and percentage miscalculations that are
not mere clerical errors apparent on the face of
the SOI Affidavit. Bidders who fail to submit
the SOI Affidavit shall be considered non-
responsive.

Please note that the Contractor must submit
two separately labeled and sealed envelopes
with the completed bid package. The first
envelope (Envelope "A") will contain the above
mentioned SOI Affidavit and the second enve-


lope (Envelope "B") will contain the bid price.
Both envelopes are due at the time and bid date
specified in the advertisement. Envelope "A"
will be opened on the bid opening date and
reviewed by DBD. If the SOI Affidavit contains
correctible defects (See attached CSBE
Participation Provisions), the bidder will be
notified by DBD and afforded forty-eight hours
to rectify any correctible deficiencies. Forty-
eight hours later, DBD will notify Public Works
of those approved bidders whose SOI's
Affidavits are responsive. Those deemed
responsive will have Envelope "B" opened and
prices read aloud.

Community Workforce Program (CWP) (Not
Apolicable)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No.
03-01, put into force by Resolution No. R-77-03,
the Community Workforce Program has been
established for this project. Compliance with this
Ordinance is required for all contractors submitting
a bid for this project. See Appendix "D" within these
contract documents for information and require-
ments regarding this program.

Bid Bond Requirements

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified
check or accept able bid bond in the amount of
five percent (5%) of the proposed bid amount as
guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract,
will within ten (10) consecutive work days after
being notified of the availability of the prescribed-
contract forms, enter into a written contract with the
Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade
County, Florida in accor dance with the accepted
bid, and give a Contractor's Performance and
Payment bond satis factory to the Board of County
Commission ers, Miami-Dade County, Florida,
equal to one hundred (100%) percent of the con-
-tract award amount.

Performance Bond Requirements

Simultaneously with the return of the executed
Contract Documents, the Contractor will be
required to submit a Contractor's Performance
and Payment Bond, either Cash or Surety, sat-
isfactory to the Board of Commissioners,
Miami-Dade County Florida, equal to One
Hundred (100%) percent of the awarded
amount, as security for the faithful perform-
ance of the terms and conditions stated herein,
including but not limited to, any extended main-
tenance obligations.

ORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONS and/or ADMIN-
ISTRATIVE ORDERS

To request a copy of any ordinance, resolution
and/or administrative order cited in this bid
solicitation, the bidder must contact the Clerk
of the Board at 305-375-5126.

CONE OF SILENCE: Pursuant to Section 2-
11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative
Order 3-27 ("Cone of Silence Provisions"), as
amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon
RFPs, RFQs,'or bids after advertisement and ter-
minates at the time the County Manager issues a
written recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits
communication regarding RFPs, RFQs, or bids
between: A) potential vendors, service providers,
bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the County's
professional staff including, but not limited to, the
County Manager and the County Manager's staff;
B) a potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lob-
byist, or consultant and the Mayor, County
Commissioners or their respective staffs; C) the
Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective
staffs and any member

of the County's professional staff including, but not
limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff; D) a potential vendor, service
provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and any
member of the selection committee therefore; E)
the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respec-
tive staffs and member of the selection committee
therefore; F) any member of the County's profes-
sional staff and any member of the selection com-
mittee therefore.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the County Code and
Administrative Order 3-27, as amended, permits
oral communications regarding a particular RFP,
RFQ or bid for solicitation of goods or services
between any person and the procurement officer
responsible for administering the procurement
process for such RFP, RFQ, or bid, provided that
the communication is limited strictly to matters of
process or procedure already contained in the cor-
responding solicitation document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to
oral communications at pre-bid conferences,
oral presentations before selection commit-
tees, contract negotiations during any duly
noticed public meetings, public presentations


I I d


s kcalB Must Control y


-I -


made to the Board of County Commissioners
during any duly noticed public meeting, or
communications in writing at any time unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP,
RFQ, or bid document. Bidders must file a
copy of any written communications with the
Clerk of the Board, which shall be made avail-
able to any person upon request.

Written communications may be submitted via
e-mail to the Clerk of the Board at CLERK-
BCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV. The County shall
respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk
of the Board, which shall be made available to
any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law,
violation of the Cone of Silence Provisions by any
proposer and bidder shall render any RFP award,
RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person
having personal knowledge of a violation of the
Cone of Silence provisions shall report such viola-
tion to the State Attorney and/ or may file a com-
plaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders should
reference the actual Cone of Silence Provisions for
further clarification.

All Bidders will be notified in writing when the
County Manager makes an award recommenda-
tion to the Board of County Commissioners.
Ordinance No. 90-143, The Responsible Wages
and Benefits Ordi nance, Ordinance No. 91-142,
Family Leave Ordinance, Ordi?nance. No. 92-15,
Drug-Free Workplace Ordinance, Ordinance No.
93-129, Contractor Debarment Ordinance,
Ordinances Nos. 94-166 and 96-26 Local Prefer
ence Ordinances, Ordinances Nos. 97-35 and 97-
104 Fair Subcontract ing Practices, Resolution No.
R-702-98 (Repeals and supersedes Resolutions
Nos. R-1206-97 and R-366:97) Welfare to Work
Initiative arnd Ordinance ,

No. 98-30, County ContraCtors Employment and
Procure ment Practices are referenced for this con-
tract document.

NOTE: Ordinance 97-104 requires a bid or pro-
posal for a County or Public Health Trust con-
tract involving the expenditure of $100,000.00
or more to include a listing of subcontractors
and suppliers who will be used on the contract.
Failure to include the required listing shall ren-
der the bid or proposal non-responsive.

The required listing must be submitted even
though the bidder or proposer will not utilize
subcontractors or suppliers on the contract.
In the latter case, the listing must expressly
state no subcontractors or suppliers will be
used on the contract.

Timely submission of a properly completed and
signed "Subcontractor/Supplier Listing, SUB
Form 100" (a copy of which is included in the
specifications) constitutes compliance with the
listing requirements of the Ordinance. In
order to be deemed properly completed the
word "NONE" must be entered under the
appropriate heading of SUB Form 100 if no sub-
contractors or suppliers will be used on the
contract.

The County shall have the right but not the obli-
gation to retain the services of an Independent
Private-Sector Inspector General (IPSIG). The
requirements are set forth in the Instructions to
Prospective Contractor, Appendix "A",
Paragraph 22. Also, the Contract is subject to
review and audit by the Office of the Miami-
Dade County Inspector General and further
information is specified in the Instructions to
Prospective Contractor, Appendix "A",
Paragraph 21.

All bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes
bearing on the outside the name of the Bidder, his
address, the number of the project for which the bid
is submitted, and the date of opening.

The County reserves the right to waive any infor-
mality in, or to reject any or all bids. Bids from any
person, firm or corpo ration in default upon any
agreement with the County will be rejected.,

Vendor applications and solicitation packages for
Invitations to Bid (ITB), Request for Proposals
(RFP) and Architectural and Engineering (A&E)
projects can be obtained on the 13th floor of the
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, in
the Vendor Assistance Unit. The VIC will provide
information and assistance in doing business with
Miami-Dade County, vendor registration and certi-
fication, and current contracting opportunities coun-
tywide. Vendor Assistance staff can be reached by
phone at 305-375-5773 or on the web at
www.miamidade.gov/dpm/vendor-enrollment.asp.

GEORGE M. BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK
KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK


* -


*









The Miami Times Octobe 6 11D


Blacks Must Control The ,


To Place Your Ad

Call: 305-694-6225


To Fax Your Ad
Fax: 305-757-4764


classifieds@ miamitimesonline.com


I F


Business Rentals
COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27th Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down
security doors. Outside
lighting, $700 per month.
$700 security deposit.
Call 305-638-3699
DOWNTOWN/OPA-LOCKA,
717 Opa-locka Blvd,
Prime store, front location,
good for medical office, bar-
ber/beauty salon, general of-
fice use or retail, 700 sq. ft.,
central air, move in condition.
$750 monthly.
Call 786-897-6633

STORE FRONT FOR RENT
6905 NW 15th Avenue
$950.00 Monthly
Call 786-263-1590

Furnished RooMs
15810 NW 38th Place
$80 weekly. Free utilities,
kitchen. One person. 305-
474-8188 .305-691-3486.
1721 NW 41 Street
One room furnished with air,
and appliances. $125 each
week. $500 to move in.
Call 786-487-2222.
1920 NW 81 Terrace
Clean room $350 monthly.
Call 786-486-2354 or
305-479-3632

2365 N W 97 Street
Room for rent. $500 to move
in $90 weekly.
305-691-2703/305-303-9912

720 N.W. 75th Street
Efficency in castle
style mansion.
Mansion has waterfall, mar-
ble platform, 7 ft. lion statues
in front of the castle. Free
lights, water, air and parking.
Near bus line. $600 monthly,
$400 security.
Call 786-223-5374
ALLAPATTAH
1016 NW 42 Street
Furnished. room, with air.
$100 weekly $200 to move
in. 786-277-5592.
CAROL CITY AREA
ROOM FOR RENT
Women Only Call 305-625-
3081 or 786-273-0808.
Central air and heat. Middle
Age Call 305-836-5848
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Furnished room. Adults Only.
Call 954-557-7629
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Clean room, private
entrance,
outdoor patio, cable and air.
Call 305-688-0187
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Large, cable TV, quiet neigh-
borhood, central air, parking,
utilities included.
Call 305-725-0272
OPA LOCKAAREA
Very clean rooms. $130 to
$150 weekly
786-718-7886
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Fully furnished rooms with
central air.
Call 786-251-2204

SUMMER PALACE
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, air, use of kitchen, plus
more. Call 305-835-2728.
Three Quarter Way House
Grand Opening Nov. 1
Drug Treatment
$30.00 daily,meals included.
305-696-3236


IUU 1.v. I4t OStreet
Fully furnished, utilities and
cable (HBO, BET, ESPN),
free local and nationwide
call-
ing, property protected by se-
curity camera 24 hours. $210
weekly, $690 monthly.
Call 305-751-6232

1756 N.W. 85th Street
Utilities included $725 moves
you in.
786-389-1686
86 Street NE 2nd Ave Area
Efficiency, References
305-754-7776

Apartments

13880 N.E. 6th Avenue
Nice, cozy one bedroom, air,
tile, appliances. $750! $2250
move-in. Call 305-769-3740

1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
190 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, appliances in-
cluded.$660 monthly, $1500
moves you in.
786-389-1686.
2407 N.W. 135 ST
Large one bedroom, $675.
Newly renovated with cen-
tral air.
Call 305-769-0146 .
2840 NW 135th Street Rear
One bedroom, one bath,
air,tile, private yard $650
monthly. Water and garbage
included.
Call 786-853-8313


3301 N.W. 51st Street
One bedroom, one bath with
utilities and air. $900 moves
you in.
Call:786-389-1686

50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $445-$520
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
5990 N.W. 14th Avenue
Nice large one bedroom
apartment in small building.
References $550 monthly!
Drive by!
Call 305-754-5728
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$510-520 per month, one
bedrooms, $410 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
6215 N.W. 2nd Place
Four unit building, large,
clean one bedroom one bath.
New kitchen cabinets. Free
water and appliances.
Call 786-419-6613
800 NW 67th Street
Large one bedroom, with util-
ities and air included. $350
bi-weekly $1200 moves you
in.
Call 786-389-1686
8475 N.E. 2nd Avenue
One bedroom apartment.
Section 8. Call 305-754-7776
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $455-$530 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699

Capital Rental Agency
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-locka, Brownsville,
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses Efficiencies, one,
two and three bedrooms,
Many with appliances.
Same day approval.
Call for information

Downtown/Biscayne Area
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with- parking. $595-$675
monthly.
1315 N.E. Miami Court.
786-351-4516

Eighth StreetApartments
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One and a half months
Efficiency, one bath, $365;
One bedroom, one bath
$450, with air.
Call 786-236-1144 or
786-298-0125

HAMPTON HOUSE
Newly Renovated
Move in special 1 1/2 months
One bedroom, one bath
$470.
786-236-1144 or
786-298-0125Air
MIAMI AREA
131 NE 77 Street, two bed-
room one bath two story
apartment. $900 monthly,
first and security. Section 8
Welcome.
Call 786-262-7653

MIAMI AREA
1724 N W 75 Street, three
bedrooms, two baths, air and
tile. $1226 monthly, $250 se-
curity deposit. Section 8 Wel-
come. Call 786-597-4121
MIAMI AREA
5200 N.W. 26nd Avenue
Two bedrooms, $700.
Gall 305-634-3545.
Section 8 Welcome

Ninth Street Apartments
One bedroom, one bath,
$450; three bedroom, two
bath, $725, air.
Call 305-358-1617

NORTH DADE/NW AREA
One bedroom, $525 easy
move in. Two bedrooms,
$675, three bedrooms $825
new tile, appliances, kitchen,
security bars. 305-944-2101
RENTER'S PARADISE

ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$430 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $480 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
SECTION 8 ONLY
172 NW 12 Street One bed-
room, one bath.Newly reno-
vated
Call 786-263-1590
SOUTH MIAMI AREA
Three bedroom one and a
half bath. Two story town-
house in South Miami. 6006
SW 68 Street. Walk across
the street to Metro Rail Sta-
tion. Section 8 Welcome.
$1200 monthly.


Call 786-543-3872
TWO BEDROOMS $650
5200 N W 26th Avenue. Call
786-402-0672


DupleX
10745 N.W. 8th Avenue
Very Spacious two bed-
rooms, two baths, central air,
tile, laundry room, security
bars, applicances included
$1,100 monthly, $2800 to
move in
Call 305-331-2655
10811 NW 12 Avenue
Completely remodeled two
and three bedrooms with all
appliances, water and central
air. Call 305-305-4665.
1260 Sesame Street
One bedrm, one bath.
remodeled. $620 5 p.m. 10
p.m.
Rod 305-975-0711
1417 NW 58 Terrace
Two bedroom, one bath, air,
$950 monthly. SECTION 8
Welcome. 305-21'6-5640 or
305-525-7221

1754 NW 53rd Street
2 bdrms, 1 bath. Ready for
move in. $975 monthly. Sec-
tion 8 OK! Drive by.
Call 305-758-7022.
1824 NW 43rd Street
Two bedroom, one bath $800
.monthly, $2400 move in.
Call 305-621-9947
1841 NW 74th Street
Two bedroom, one bath,.
Stove, refrigerator, air, tile
throughout. $800 monthly.
Call Miguel 786-346-1873
21301 NW 37 Avenue, Apt 1
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
conditioned, tiled floors, new
paint, $895 monthly, $1790
move in. No Section 8. ND1
Realtors 305-655-1700
4603 NW 15th Avenue
Spacious 2 bdrms, $875
monthly. Look then call!
305-638-5946/305-759-2280
4625 N.W.15th Avenue, #B
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, Section 8'
OK.Call 305-490-9284
7010 N.W. 5th Place
Two bedrooms one bath.
Section 8 O.K.
Call 786-399-0050
NORTHWEST AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
near bus transportation,
$750 monthly. First, and last
to move in.
Call 786-514-0175

OPA LOCKA AREA
One bedroom, one bath,
$700 monthly, 305-607-7192'

SECTION 8 ONLY
575 NW 94th Street
Two bedroom, one bath.
Call 786-263-1590
SECTION 8 ONLY
7005 NW 4 Court. Two bed-
rooms, one bath.
Call 786-263-1590
Under New
Management
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $550 per month, $550
security deposit, $1100 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Condos/TownhouseS
1503 NW 207th Street
Beautiful two bedrooms, two
baths, $1200 monthly, re-
quires first, last and security.
SEC 8 tenants welcomed!
Please call
The Real Estate Experts
305-652-9343
20020 S.W. 123 Drive
Perrine, FL
Four bedroom, two bath, all
household appliances, two
levels. $1500 monthly Con-
tact Rickey, 786-253-7218.

20607 NW 15th Avenue
(Andover) Beautiful three
bedrooms, two and half
baths. Newly renovated.
$1400 monthly. NO SEC-
TION 8 $2800 move in
Call between 5-9
786-488-0819


$99 monthly buy a five bed-
rooms, three baths, foreclo-
sure, 4% down, 30 years at
8% APR! For listings 800-
749-8168 xD074

1043 N.W. 28 Street
Three bedroom one bath, tile
throughout, fence all around,
walk to Jackson Memorial
Hospital. $1500 monthly.
Call 786-423-7233 or
305-401-9165
1079 NW 122nd Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
big kitchen, dinning room, liv-
ing room, Florida room. Back
yard. $1200 monthly.
Call Anne
786-285-4335
1101 NW 58th Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1350 monthly .$3500 move
in. Call786-586-9973
1321 N.W. 44 Street


Newly renovated house.
Four bedrooms, two baths
with central air.
Please call 305-345-8817
1341 NE 148th Street
Five bedrooms, two baths
,$2700 monthly
Call 305-218-1227


M ,Ualm


2462 N.W. 170th Street
A first time starter dream
home four bedrooms, two
baths property for $260,000.
Please call The Real Estate
Experts, 305-652-9343.
2481 N W 140 Street
Three bedrooms one bath.
$1000 monthly. No Section
8. Call 305-267-9449
2921 NW 174th Street
Four bedrms, two baths, ap-
pliances. Section 8 welcome.
5 p.m.-10 p.m.
Rod 305-975-0711
2954 NW 51 Terrace
Four bedrooms,two
baths,with stove,
refrigerator,air. Section 8 OK.
$1,400. 305-642-7080
4131 N.W. 203 Road Lane
Three bedrooms, two baths,
large corner, no section 8,
$1200 monthly.
Call 305-267-9449
69 Street N.W. 5 Ave Area
Section 8 welcome, referen-
ces. 305-754-7776.
7770 Meridian Street
MIRAMAR
Two bedrooms, one bath,
with den or could be three
bedrooms, one bath. New
kitchen, new paint, new car-
pet, air conditioned, $1195
monthly, $2390 to move in.
NO SECTION 8
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
8250 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath, in-
cludes water $750 monthly.
NO Section 8.
305-267-9449
944 NW 81st Street A
Three bedrooms, one bath.
very clean. $1000
monthly.$3000 move in. NO
EVICTIONS NO SECTION 8.
786-488-2264
COCONUT GROVE'
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, family/laundry room, ga-
rage. Call 786-597-3999.
LIBERTY CITY AREA
1700 NW 66 Street beautiful
three bedroom one bath.
$1100 monthly, first, last and
security. SECTION 8 Wel-
come Call 786-312-5481
MIAMI AREA
1441 N W 68 Street,
Three bedroom, one bath,
central air, remodeled.. For
rent or sale, ....
Call 305-986-2408
MIAMI AREA
1792 NW 71 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
across from school. $1300
monthly. $2500 to move in.
Call 786-333-2596
NEVER RENT AGAIN!
Buy a five bedrooms, three
baths, $14,000! Foreclosures!
For listings
800-749-8168
xD041
New homes in the Treasure
Coast area starting from
$180k Available immediately.
5k closing assist. Stop fore-
closure! Cash available
NOW! Credit repair and refi-
nancing 954-678-7543/
305-527-2958
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
18400 NE 11th Avenue.
2 bdrm, 2 baths, den, central
air, tiled, new kitchen. $1400
monthly. $3800 move in. No
Section 8.
Call 305-625-4515
NORTHWEST DADE
8120 NW 14 Court,
Three bedroom two bath, tile,
central air. $1300 monthly,
Miami Beach, Hialeah, Sec-
tion 8 okay 305-662-5505.

NORWOOD AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
living room, dining room,
fenced in yard, central a/c,
washer/dryer hook-up availa-
ble, $1200 monthly. Available
on appointment only.
Call 305-388-7477
STOP!!!!
Behind in your rent? 24 hour
notice? Behind in your mort-
gage? Call Kathy:
786-326-7916



BEHIND ON MORTGAGE?
We will make payments!
Call Ray 786-488-8617
Stop Renting!
Own Your Own Home! Bad
credit welcome! Zero down
payment, first time home
buyers, self-employed,
teachers.
Call 786-267-7129

The Mortgage Mecca
Small Commercial
Loans Made Easy
with new program
786-318-1705 or
apply on line
www.mortgagemeccaco.com




| condosTownhouses

MIAMI GARDENS
RENT TO OWN
3050 NW 204 Lane


Three bedrooms, two baths,
beautiful corner lot. Ready to
move in. credit
problems/Sec-
tion 8 OK, Call 786-223-7711


Condos/Townhouses
Carmel Condo
California Club
Lovely two bedroom, two
baths, in gated community.
Near shopping mall, movies
and restaurants, also public
transportation. For sale or
rent. Call Davien
305-725-5884.
Sales/Alvin 305-652-8880
CALIFORNIA CLUB
CONDO
Monterey
Clean, bright, split three bed-
room, two bath with all new
kitchen, washer, dryer, air
and updated bathrooms.
$205,000. HURRY!
Call Steve Schulman
786-302-4121
ERA Sales/Alvin, Inc.
305-652-8880
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths,
townhouse, central air, owner
will help with closing costs,
priced $199,000.
Call 786-285-5577



1839 NW 74th Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
each side, sold as is. Section
8 tenants, great investment.
$177,000.
Call Miguel 786-346-1873


1261 N.W. 70th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$164,900. 305-895-3739.
17920 NW 31st Avenue
Spacious, beautiful starter
home. Owner motivated
bring best offer. Financing
available.
Call Laide 954-549-4395
20921 N W 30 Court
Beautiful three bedrooms,
one and a half baths with
huge Florida Room
$239,900.
Call305-685-6275
Brown Realty Inc
3825 NW 210th Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
huge master suite, huge
family room, central air, iron
fence. Try $2900 down and
$1299.00 monthly (good
credit required) $299K.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
6717 NW 6 Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths,
totally remodeled, central air,
45 x 100 lot, new fence, only
$2500 down and no closing
costs. Move in three weeks.
Call 786-236-5035
BISCAYNE GARDENS
14900 NW 9th Court
Spacious three bedrooms,
two baths, new roof, water
view, central air, will arrange
financing $2699K.
Keith 305-336-9650
CAROL CITY
3971 NW 176th Terrace
Two houses, one price. Front
house, three bedrooms, one
bath, large family room, plus
large efficiency, rear house
with everything new, com-
pletely fenced, new tile, roof,
and more. Try 5% down and
$1221.00 monthly with a new
adjustable mortgage (good
credit needed) $379K. Drive
by only, then call.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
CAROL CITY AREA
4910 NW 170th Street
Four bedroom two baths,
central air, new windows,
new paint. Try $1900 down
and $1399 monthly (good
credit required) $329K.
NDI Realtors, 305-655-1700
CAROL CITY
NW 210th St. and 35th Ave.
A brand new house (built
2005). Four bedrooms, two
baths, central air, alarm,
mas-
ter suite, large kitchen and
more. Try 5% down and
$964.00 monthly (good credit
needed) $299K.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
FORECLOSURE
All Areas of Dade,
Hundreds to Choose,
Easy to Qualify.
FREE LIST. Call now!
Larry Albert 305-255-9040
HOLLYWOOD
451 S.W0 SW Street.
"Hollywood Bargain," three
bedrooms, one bath. Huge
bed rooms! $209,900.
Brown Realty & Investment
305-685-6275

HUD HOMES
Five bedrooms, three baths
Only $14,000. For listings:
800-749-8168 xD046
INCOME POTENTIAL
Six bedrooms, five bath-
rooms, three separate kitch-
ens, over 2400 sq. ft.,
$325,000. Call 305-467-6095
between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.
MIAMI AREA
1455 N W 69 Terrace, Beau-
tiful well kept three bedroom
one bath completely tiled
double lot.Marble bath with


jauzzi tub, Professionally
landscaped. Fully upgraded!
You'll love it! Must see!
Call Johnnie
786-443-2337


MIAMI AREA
912 N W 63 Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
central air. Price negotiable.
Good investment.
Call 305-986-2408
NW AREA
Three bedrooms ,one bath
$95K. cash buyer and seas-
oned investors only. Call for
details 786-287-2942.



SENIOR 62 AND OLDER
DON'T REFINANCE YOUR
HOME until you find out if a
special FHA/HUD program
can help you.
You maybe able to get mon-
ey you'll never have to pay
back as long as you live in
your home. Call 305-836-
8622 for more information.



HANDYMAN
Painting, plumbing, windows,
doors, floors, minor roof re-
pairs, hauling and yard clean
ing and more.
Call 786-260-4722
305-693-5673
House Keeping
Surprising clean! 12 years
experience. Operation hours
7-10 a.m.
Call Kathy
305-318-6299
I BUY HOUSES
$ CASH $
Sell in 24 hours
Call NOW!!! 954-445-5470
Need A Carrier?
Operation days Saturday and
Sundays only. For deliveries
call Kathy 305-318-6299.
Spiritual Lady
Palm and tarot cards reader.
Helps in all problems of
life.Call today, be rid of your
problems tommorrow.
Call 305-448-0528
Will help with elderly in your
home. Call 305-331-5943



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing electrical,appliance
roof, air Call 305-685-1898

S ( g

ACURA from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167xK023
ACURA from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167xK023
Chevy's from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167 xK020




ASSISTANT APARTMENT
MANAGER ASSISTANT
APARTMENT MANAGER
needed. Must be high
school graduate, computer
literate. Good benefits.
Nice working environment.
Reply: Miami Times Adver-
tiser, Suite 2-270, 2520
S.W. 22nd Street, Miami,
FL 33145.


CHEF CREDO
Seafood & BBQ
4799 NW 7th Avenue.
Seeking experienced
cooks and kitchen helpers
with valid driver license.
Call Chef Credo
305-510-6629

CLERICAL ASSISTANT
to real estate agent. Part or
full time.North Miami area.
Call 305-439-2683

CORNERSTONE
FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Pastor Steve Hart, looking
for born again christian
musician, small
congregation.
305-585-7440


DAYCARE TEACHER
Fulltime /part time. Must
have CDA plus 40 hours.
Call 305-754-7979


DRIVER'S WANTED!!!
Newly established compa-
ny searching for CDL
Class A drivers. Over the
road only. Flatbeds,
Reefers and Containers.
Drug Free environment.
Call 786-218-4207
Fax 786-228-0566


Experienced Part-time
Telemarketers
Work from Home
Mon. Sat., flexible hours,
Up to $6 hourly, plus
commission.
Call 305-999-0048


Experienced Secretary
Needed 305-751-3381


Need person to work
Age 40-55. Apply in person
2175 NW 76th Street

Operator/Heavy equipment
operator needed.
305-693-3503


RECEPTIONIST
needed for busy office.
Must have excellent
verbal skills, a friendly
demeanor, and the ability
to MULTI-TASK. Boring
and frigid personalities
need not apply!

Fax resume to
Ele Minii E imeS
305-694-6215
or email mwilliams@
miamitimesonline.com


Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour
Plus gas mileage
For a 1/2 days work

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets. WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 8 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Applications are received
Thursday and Friday
900 NW 54th Street


TEACHERS NEEDED
We are currently seeking en-
ergetic, passionate retired
teachers, teachers aides and
volunteers. Join us in making
a momentous impact in the
communities and the young
people lives that we serve.
For more information contact
us at 305-751-5910 or email
graceacademyintl@yahoo.com




No Jive seeking male actors
30-35 for upcoming stage
play. Call 786-473-6435


TALENT WANTED
Majestic Vision Inc. is
holding Auditions/Casting
Call on October 28, for
Models,Rappers, Rythm
and Blues Singers and Co-
medians. Must be 21 years
and older. If you have
stlye, attractive, sings well
and can tell jokes ,for more
information contact:
Ms. P Simpkins
305-653-0242.


SUNVERSTYOF




COORDINATOR 3
University of Miami Department
of Theatre Arts seeks a resident
Coordinator 3 for the Jerry
Herman Ring Theatre and Studio
Theatre. This position will be
responsible for all technical
aspects of the department's
plays and musicals while working
with a team of faculty, designers
and production support staff.
This position will mentor and
supervise students assigned to
stagecraft labs and work study
positions. This professional
position is also responsible for
maintenance and supervision of
the physical plant and shop
equipment in keeping with OSHA
and industry standards and
practices. Working on a twelve
month calendar, this position will
report directly to the Production
Manager while maintaining an
advanced level of autonomy. This
position requires a Bachelor's
degree and five years relevant
experience; or Masters degree
and relevant experience in
technical theatre or any suitable
combination of education,
training or experience.
Interested candidates
please apply online at
www.miami.edu/careers
(Keyword: 019565) and submit
your resume. EO/AAE


ional, Safe & Confidential Services

ermination Up to 22 Weeks
dividual Counseling Services
Board Certified OB GYN's
- Complete GYN Services '

ITION START $180 AND UP

05-621-1399


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Ut1ABORTIONS


Up to 10 weeks completely asleep $180(Y0
Sonogramsi a5and aiya Indoc'?E 6g


Sonogram
included.

AGYN


and office visit after 14 days


DIAGNOSTIC CENTER
267 E. 49 St., Hialeah, FL.
(same as 103 St.)




305-824-8816


S m I

DiVosta Homes presents

Mallory Creek at Abacoa.
Brand new DiVosta Homes in prime Jupiter location.


DiVOSTA
HOMES
g Trfem!.!n mWot~-.Wy'


Call 561.625.6969
for information.
Participating brokers must
accompany on first visit


T & J INSURANCE
Where we provide service
you deserve for your
Auto, Business and

Homeowners needs!
Call for a free quote at
305-474-4639


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12D The Miami Times, Oct 4,


"Copyrighted Material

W Syndicated Content

om Commercial News Providers"


B.ethu .am ho -e omin *am



















Bethune-Cookman wins homecoming game


Jesus Cortez's first-
quarter extra-point
kick put Bethune-
Cookman ahead and
his late field goal pro-
vided some insurance
points as the Wildcats
posted a 10-6 home-
coming win against
Winston-Salem on
Saturday.
Cortez's PAT came


after teammate Coyla
Dailey scored from the
four on an option
pitch with 2:11 left in
the first period. His
run highlighted an 80-
yard, 17-play drive
that consumed most
of the first-quarter
clock. Dailey's score,
the only touchdown in
the game, erased a 3-


0 deficit for Bethune-
Cookman. Winston-
Salem had the lead on
its first possession.
Bethune-Cookman,
which had lost two
straight, was playing
new Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference
member Winston-
Salem for the first
time. Winston-Salem


officially becomes eli-
gible for the MEAC
,championship in
2007.
Winston-Salem has
lost four of its last
five.


FAMU loses to South Carolina 28-21


South Carolina
State used a strong
running game to beat
Florida A&M 28-21
Saturday.
DeShawn Baker and
Will Ford combined
for 285 rushing yards
and three touch-


downs to lead South
Carolina State in
Tallahassee.
The Bulldogs
rushed for 315 yards
with Baker gaining
153 and Ford adding
132.
Albert Chester


threw two second-half
touchdown passes to
Willie Hayward and
another to Ronald
Wright for the Florida
A&M scores. The loss
ended a three-game
winning streak for the
Rattlers.


Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating representations of the developer. For correct representations, make reference to the
purchase agreement and to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee.


File No.: 13-0182014-002
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF EXEMPTION
The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice that a project proposed by South Florida Water
Management District to: maintenance dredge 22,562 cubic yards of material to a depth of -0.2 feet MLW
within a 185,005-sq. ft. area, located within the L-29 Canal, Class III Waters, adjacent to the S-12D spill-
way, on the Tamiami Trail, (Sections 13 and 24, Township 54 South, Range 36 East), in Miami-Dade
County (N 250 45' 43.98" / W 80o 40' 54.90"), has been determined to be exempt from requirements to
obtain an environmental resource permit.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's action may petition for an adminis-
trative proceeding (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. The petition must
contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General
Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000.
Mediation is not available.
If a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial
interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to inter-
vene in the proceeding. Intervention will be permitted only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon
the filing of a motion in compliance with rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code.
In accordance with rule 62-110.106(3), F.A.C., petitions for an administrative hearing must be filed within
21 days of publication of the notice or receipt of written notice, whichever occurs first. Under rule 62-
110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose, substantial interests are affected by the
Department's action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing.
The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for
extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900
Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000 prior to the applicable dead-
line. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running of the time period for filing a petition until
the request is acted upon. Upon motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request
for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect, the Department may also
grant the requested extension of time.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time
of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time
period shall constitute a waiver of that right.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the fol-
lowing information:
(a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency's file or identification number, if
known;
(b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the petitioner's representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the
course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner's substantial interests are or will be
affected by the agency determination;
(c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision;
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate;
(e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts the petitioner contends
warrant reversal or modification of the agency's proposed action;
(f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modifica-
tion of the agency's proposed action; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wish-
es the agency to take with respect to the agency's proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action is based shall state
that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as
required by rule 28-106.301.
Under sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statutes, a petition for administrative hearing shall be
dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is
untimely filed.
Complete copies of all documents relating to this determination of exemption are available for public
inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, at the Southeast
District office, 400 North Congress Avenue, West Palm Beach, Florida.


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