Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: September 27, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00082
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text





Black vote key in governor's race


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South's Largest Black Weeldy Circulation


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LIBRARY OF FLA.. HISTORY
PO BOX 117007
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007


One Family Serving Since 1923
Years
Informing Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties


Tempora Mutaniiur Et Nos Miilamur in Il/is t


M r I
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Al oi. 4


Commission increases housing budget


by


$10 million


Personal stories and overnight rally
show affordable housing needs
By Brandyss Howard housing and supporti'
bhoward@miamitimesonline.com activists participated in


Over 100 people impacted
by the need for affordable


ve
an


overnight rally in front of
the Government Center.
Housing organizations and


disgruntled residents gath-
ered sleeping bags, pitched
tents, provided food sup-
plies, and held signs to dis-
play their urgent demand
for affordable housing
funds. The coalition set up
on the lawn of the Stephen
P. Clark building to empha-


size the importance of their
demand for $200 million in
housing funds, with $150
million for construction of
new units and $50 million
for rental assistance. The
group held an outside
roundtable discussion
where individuals shared


their personal stories of how
the lack of affordable hous-
ing in Miami has affected
them and their families.
Melissa Sturgis said that
she stayed in. HUD for 5
years and was kicked out
without sufficient time to
Please turn to BUDGET 4A


BURGESS JORDAN EDMONSON


TASTE OF VICTORY


"Copyrighted Ma
Syndicated Con
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No guilty plea

without DNA

question

Florida's highest state court recently adopt-
ed an emergency rule. It requires trial judges
to inquire of accused persons, their lawyers
and the prosecuting lawyers about whether
evidence exists that contains DNA that may
show the defendant did not commit the crime.
This would be of particular interest in rape,
bloody scenes and other crimes where physi-
cal evidence of the perpetrator is found.
Three of the justices, including the only
Black justice, Peggy Quince, would have
required more than the majority by demand-
ing that trial judges make a specific determi-
nation about whether such evidence does
exist. The minority opinion is important
because judges have the discretion not to
postpone the plea hearing and order testing; it
does not require that the judge do so. Some
may consider this a loophole.
The justices acted because of a new law
that lifted all deadlines for prison inmates to
file appeals of their cases based on DNA test-
ing.


-viami times Protos/Rc JacKson


FIRST WIN THIS SEASON


Daunte Culpepper endured five sacks, threw no touchdown passes and still managed to put
a positive spin on his latest erratic performance. He merely noted the final score.
Culpepper roused a slumberous offense just enough in the fourth quarter Sunday, direct-
ing a 50-yard drive that set up a field goal to help Miami beat hapless Tennessee 13-10.


CRIST


Campaign Ploy?

Experts deny civil rights
murder solved
In the heat of his $'1NI
campaign for gover- ..,\
nor, Attorney General
Charlie Crist a
announced that his
office had solved the
55-year-old murders
of a major civil-rights
activist and his wife
- identifying four
dead Ku Klux
Klansmen as the per- Jit E oo
petrators at a press Juanita E. Moore
conference right next daughter of civil
to the crime scene. rights pioneers
But scholars and Harriette and
investigators who Harry T. Moore.
have done extensive
research on the case say
Crist's mid-August
announcement in the small
Central Florida town of Mims
couldn't be further from the
truth and nothing more than
an election ploy.
Crist, who has been a pro- CRIST
ponent of tougher civil rights
laws, announced he had solved the 1951
Please turn to CRIST 4A



Race and

ethnicity may be

deciding factors
Florida's more than 1.2
million registered voters
have become a much sought-
after prize in the race
between Jim Davis and
Charlie Crist for Governor.
Both candidates, the
Tampa Democratic congress- DAVIS
man and Republican
Attorney General are trying
to reverse years of declining
Black voter turnout by por-
traying themselves as civil
rights champions.
Any voters leaning towards
taking a voter holiday dis-
pelled that thought last week JONES
with the Davis selection of
former State Sen. Daryl Jones as his run-
ning mate.
Please turn to RACE 4A


Liberty City comes together

for International Peace Day


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward(@miamitimesonline.com
September 21 was proclaimed The
International Day of Peace by The
United Nations in 1981 to commemorate
and strengthen peace worldwide. In


2001, all nations were then asked to
expand the observance for global cease-
fire and non-violence. Recently the City
of Miami has experienced a significant
amount of violence resulting in the loss
of many young lives.
Please turn to PEACE DAY 4A
-Miami Times Photos/Illustration


Lobbyist charged with
understating income
Special to The Times

Well connected and respected
lobbyist Sandy Walker was
charged by the Miami-Dade State
Attorney's Office with a one count
charge of fraud related to a loan
from The Miami-Dade WALKER
Empowerment Zone Trust.
Please turn to LOBBYIST 4A


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National voting ID is a

dangerous "abridgement" of

the right to vote
T he 15th Amendment of the United States
Constitution, adopted one hundred and thirty six
years ago mandated that no state or the United
States could deny or abridge (limit) the right of citizens to
vote. The U. S. House of Representatives seems to have
forgotten American history when it passed a bill to limit
the right of citizens to vote unless they could produce a
government issued identification and by 2010 a federal ID
that proves U. S. citizenship.

Although the 13th Amendment had outlawed slavery two
years before, the Republican party of Abraham Lincoln
had feared that Confederate sympathizers would attempt
to achieve through suppression and apparent 'race neu-
tral' laws what it could not obtain through a civil war. The
elimination of Black people from voting would allow the
former slaveholders to control the governments and
administration of the laws in the southern states. Those
Republicans initiated and implemented the 15th
Amendment to prohibit interference with the free Black
person's right to vote.

By the 1890's many southern states used literacy tests;
poll taxes and other apparent "race neutral" laws that dis-
criminated against Black voters either through their inter-
pretation or administration. An example was that most
southern states required passing a rigorous literacy test,
but voters were exempt if they could prove one of their
grandfathers had been eligible to vote (the "grandfather
clause").

The 2006 House of Representative on last week passed a
"race neutral" bill that Florida* Representative John Mica
from the St. Augustine-Daytona Beach area claims will
help Americans solve its illegal immigration problem. The
effect of the bill is that its administration and interpreta-
tion is easily a way to prohibit voting by those who cannot
afford the $97 cost of a passport, the only presently uni-
form and recognized proof of federal citizenship. Poor peo-
ple or others who have no desire or financial means to
travel outside the country will still need to prove federal
citizenship in order to vote. Even if Congress can create a
federal ID card or some other method and someone will
have to pay the costs. The interpretation, construction and
administration will be left to the party in power as was the
case in the late 1800's.

STihe hypocrisy of those who only ia'fe mont'hs a'cast'a
bipartisan vote to reauthorize the 1965 Voting Rights Act
that was originally passed to prevent such discriminatory,
although facially 'race neutral' methods. President Lyndon
Johnson led the political fight to pass the VRA and to
make the point of never again and also obtained the pas-
sage of the Twenty-Fourth Amendment that prohibits poll
axes. Perhaps Representative Mica did not read that far
i.to the Constitution. Representative John Lewis of
Atlanta who lived the history and was physically attacked
in 1965 correctly characterized the bill as an attack on
voting rights.

History and thanks goes to the Senators who are leading
the fight to kill the bill in the upper chamber. The bill
should die and be buried covered by a confederate flag.



Mayor wrong, Seijas right on

internet over housing choice
In the mist of the biggest affordable housing crisis in
the county's history, Mayor Carlos Alvarez is pursuing
a county-wide internet access system that will cost
"about 200 million dollars." Although his spokesperson
said the Mayor would look to charitable organizations for
the money to pay for such a system, only governments,
through bonding or direct tax payer dollars, can fund such
a major enterprise. It is unrealistic to depend on charitable
organizations that often come to the county and other gov-
ernments for funding or who are expending money on char-
itable efforts such as providing shelter for the homeless
and food for the hungry.

Appropriate recognition must be given to Commissioner
Natacha Seijas who rejected the Mayor's plan as "irrespon-
sible." Although she represents few Black voters, her sen-
sitivity to Black and other minority communities, particu-
larly those in need of affordable housing, childcare and
employment works to the benefit of all Miami-Dade resi-
dents.

The Commission just approved a $6.9 million dollar base
budget. Recognition should again be given to
Commissioner Seijas and her colleagues who voted for the
budget that doubled the Manager's earliest proposal to
appropriate $10 million more toward the affordable hous-
ing crisis in the county. Commissioners Jordan, Rolle,
Edmonson and Vice Chair Moss should also receive their
flowers for this effort.

Before providing for wireless access, the county should
make all efforts to provide for access to affordable housing.


Editorials


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Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida'
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Credo of the Black Press
The Black, Press believes that America can best lead tU .,woildl:ro i raial a1d it ,l)n[ l ,,
antagonism when it accords to every person, regardless of l'ae. Creed t' col r, h.,r er ....
human and legal rights. Hating no person. fearing no person, the Black Press bt'i.tv"o h flp
every person in the Itrm belief that all perslS..s'are hurt t'lig as.pntyone is held 6-tck. -* ' '".


e4 tziami Zimem
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami. Florida 33127
Phone 305- 694-62o10
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman

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Time for the 'Black Campaign' for the general elections


With a good many primary
elections behind us, it is now
time to turn our attention to the
general elections taking place
on November 7. In my most
recent book, Freedom Is Not
Enough, I argued that we
should construct a "Black cam-
paign" for our community that
would consist of three things:
the Black agenda, money and
mobilizing a large turnout.
First, the items on a Black
Agenda begin with the catastro-
phe caused by Hurricane
Katrina. It has been estimated
that at last one in every four
Blacks have some association
with families in the Gulf region;


Blacks should support govern-
ment assistance for the right to
return and rebuild. Next,
Blacks strongly oppose the war
in Iraq more than any other
group in America for good rea-
sons. Also, education is critical,
given the problems caused by
the testing system and under-
funding in the No Child Left
Behind program and the crush-
ing debt burden that college
bound youth are increasingly
facing.
We should support economic
issues such as raising the min-
imum wage, achieving a livable
wage, opposing the Bush tax
cuts for the rich, eliminating
exorbitant loan rates and gain-
ing better access to capital.
Next we should support an
urban policy that creates
affordable housing, attacks
poverty and rebuilds urban
communities by fighting blight,
crime and rampant gentrifica-
tion. Finally, we should secure
our right to vote, fight the
attempts to disenfranchise us


and make our vote count.
Mobilizing time is here and
churches, civic organizations,
community leaders and all oth-
ers should take stock of the
unregistered and urge them to
register and prepare to vote. It
is the end of September, a little
more than one month away
from the election and very little
mobilizing has occurred in the
Black community. In fact, there
is some evidence that Black
turnout is lagging. In Baltimore,
for example, turnout four years
ago was 31 percent, but was
only 23 percent in the primary.
Are Black voters turned off? It
would be a shame now that the
polls are showing that the polit-
ical system could be changed
for the better, that some of the
items on a Black Agenda might
be enacted because few showed
up to vote.
It is also true that the finan-
cial support that usually comes
from organized labor, the pro-
gressive funders and others for
our mobilizing organizations to


get going has not come. What
are they waiting for? If the
Black mobilization effort is not
funded, Democrats lose. And
that is even more the case now
that the post-Civil Rights gener-
ation is less likely to be strong
Democrats than their elders
and thus, need more motivation
to' vote for many Democratic
candidates. In the Maryland
Senate race between Black
Republican Michael Steele and
White candidate Ben Cardin, I
expect there will be an appre-
ciable number of Blacks voting
for Steele because they want to
make history even though it
smacks of how Clarence
Thomas was appointed to the
Supreme Court.
Blacks should begin now to
plan for a large turnout, which
means that they should take
some responsibility in their own
communities to see that the
election system works right. In
order to do so, you should ask
the following questions: Is my
Please turn to WALTERS 3A


S ". . I for one believe that if you give people a thorough
'understanding of what confronts them and the basic causes that
produce it, they'll create their own program, and when the people
*create a program, you get action..." Malcolm X


I'


A I


Your letters are welcome
The Miami Times welcomes and our readership and the community, purposes of confirming authorship.
encourages letters on its editorial corn- Letters must, however, be brief and to Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The
mentaries as well as all other material the point. All letters must be signed Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street. Miami, FL
in the newspaper. Such feedback and must include the name, address 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email:
makes for a healthy dialogue among and telephone number of the writer for miamiteditorial@bellsouth.net.


I


Newpaper
M of A>.,rtca


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


OPINION
The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 3A


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The Black agenda
WALTERS
continued from 2A
name active on the voting
rolls? Has my polling station
moved? Are there enough
machines being planned for my
neighborhood? What laws have
been passed (no early voting,
new ID requirements, etc.) that
might affect my ability to vote?
How will provisional ballots be
made available and counted?
Can I volunteer to work the
polls? Will my criminal record
prevent me from voting? These
and many other questions
need to be asked of election
officials by a telephone call
from you and your neighbors.
If you don't know the answers
to these and other questions
that affect your vote, even you
may buy the lie that you have
to pay all your bills to become
eligible to vote or that the elec-
tion is on a day other than
November 7. Be an informed
voter!


"IInI


Religious and non-religious people are asking if the Pope
is playing politics? Because he read a phrase from a book
saying the Islam is violent, he is apologizing to stop the vio-
lence by some Islamic folks who acted with violence.

Political watchers are talking about the smart move by
Democrats in selecting Daryl Jones for the Lt. Governor
spot. Since he joined the ticket, the Governor's race has
closed up.

People are still talking and wondering if anybody else is
going to jail for the housing scandal? Florida built plenty of
jails so there is enough 'affordable housing' for some more.
They are asking whether recent arrests are transferring the
focus to non-housing areas.

People all over the country are discussing the deceptive
radio ads by the National Black Republican Association
claiming that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, was a
Republican. Many, like Black U.S. Representative John
Lewis of Georgia, who marched and consulted with Dr.
King, called it "an insult to the legacy and memory of
Martin Luther, King," who voted for Democrats Kennedy
(1960), Johnson (1964) and supported Humphrey (1968)

Political watchers are thinking about whether Charlie
Crist's gubernatorial campaign received a setback in his
claim of civil rights leadership when it was disclosed that
his running mate, Jeff Kottkamp, was one of 30 white leg-
islators who sponsored a bill that would have prevented
removal of the confederate flag from display on public prop-
erty unless two thirds of the affected government body
approved doing so.






MAIN OFFICE............................305-694-6210
EDITORIAL................................. 305-694-6216
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CIRCULATION............................. 305-694-6214
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Housing coalition overnight rally demands impact county budget


BUDGET
continued from 1A

gather documents for re-certifi-
cation. "We need to let our
Commissioners know that poor
people need affordable housing,
no matter what ethnicity" said
Sturgis. She is currently living
off of her daughter's SSI check
in a two-bedroom apartment.
Sturgis expressed her frustra-
tion of having to sleep on the
couch as she allows her chil-
dren to occupy the bedrooms.
"There is mold on the walls and
we all have sinus problems. I
wake up with aches and pains,
so this housing crisis is affect-
ing me real hard," said Sturgis.


Herschel Haynes, Co-Chair of
Miami Neighborhood United,
told The Miami Times that he
was very hurt by the actions of
the elected officials, but is very
grateful that organizations are
coming together and support-
ing each other. "This is Godly.
The Bible teaches us that faith
without works is dead, but tak-
ing one step towards action
while keeping the faith is
enough for God to respond,"
said Haynes.
During the nightfall and rain,
coalition members gathered
underneath tents to hold a can-
dlelight vigil. Children held
their mother's hands and
prayed that Commissioners
would take steps to improve


their living situation. Caprice
Brown, spokesperson for LIFFT,
told The Miami Times that as a
former resident of Scott Carver,
the groundbreaking of twelve
homes in that community sim-
ply is not enough. "... most
families are either living on the
streets or in shelters," said
Brown. She told The Miami
Times that she and her clhil-
dren were displaced and forced
to live with family members.
"My kids aren't comfortable
with the living situations. I'm
frustrated, but I got to keep my
head up for them," said Brown.
The next morning, the BCC
budget meeting proceeded as
scheduled.
Commission action showed


that the coalition made an
impact as the pre-approved
budget of $10 million for hous-
ing was increased to $19 mil-
lion. Chairman Martinez com-
mended the coalition for their
efforts but stated that he was
unsure that the city could even
spend [$200 million] on hous-
ing in one fiscal year. County
Manager George Burgess
explained that in order to meet
the coalition's demands, there
would need to be a 20%
increase in property tax.
Commissioner Barbara
Jordan praised the coalition's
action when she said, "I
haven't seen this type of
activism in a number of years.
You've made a difference and


have been very effective."
Commissioners agreed that
$200 million was an unrealistic
request and that too many pro-
grams would have to be cut in
order to make that amount a
reality.
Other Commissioners also
stressed to the coalition that
their efforts did not fall on deaf
ears. Commissioner
Edmondson expressed that had
it not been for their diligence,
she would never have gone
before her constituents to
request more money. "The addi-
tional $9 million will help a lot
of people," said Edmondson.
Reverend George McRae of
Liberty City's Mount Tabor
Missionary Baptist Church told


The Miami Times that the coali-
tion is very hurt and disap-
pointed by the Commission's
decision. "What we were asking
for is what we need. They kept
saying that $200 was impossi-
ble. Frankly, where there's a
will, there's a way," said
McRae. He also observed that
the Commission seemed very
relaxed when discussing
money mismanagement and
expressed that housing funds
should be replenished first,
while prosecuting guilty parties
later. "We will meet and plan
strategies to get the money we
need. We will go forward from
here and continue to stand
before the Commission," said
McCrae.


International Day of Peace in Liberty City


PEACE DAY
continued from 1A

On Thursday, Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones, Miami
Police Chief John Timoney and
Senator Frederica Wilson joined
together to bring the global call
for peace to the projects of
Liberty City. Members of radio
99 Jamz staff, NBA all-star
Alonzo Mourning as well as
members of the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence, students
from private and public schools,
community leaders, and resi-
dents rallied at the Liberty
Square Housing Project
Community Center
Senator Frederica Wilson
addressed the audience with a
smile and said she was pleased
to see the community gathering
together in this effort to bring
tranquility to the communities of
Miami-Dade. She said, "We want
peace in our community and
there has to be some healing
between the residents and the
police. We will support them
100% to keep our communities
safe."
Commissioner Michelle
Spence-Jones, said, "We will
continue to fight for our chil-
dren."


Mourning stressed the impor-
tance of the responsibility par-
ents have to create a safe envi-
ronment for their children.
"Unfortunately, we have people
doing damage to our communi-
ties. It's up to the adults to feed
positive info to our children,"
said Mourning. He also stated
that city officials and the com-
munity as a whole must work
diligently to decrease the
amount of violence in Miami-
Dade. "As long as I get the sup-
port I need, I will strive to contin-
ue to save the lives of our youth
in the community," said
Mourning.
Detective Delrish Moss of the
City of Miami told The Miami
Times that he was please with
the turnout, but wishes there
were more people participating
in the event. "We only police
because residents of the com-
munity allow us to. This is defi-
nitely a community effort and is
one step forward in the fight
against violence," said Moss.
After the rally concluded, par-
ticipants marched on NW 15th
Avenue to 62nd Street. The
event ended with a mural sign-
ing which allowed participants
the ability to write a personal
message of peace that will forev-


er be marked.
Max Rameau and members of
the Center for Pan-American
Development protested the
event to show that not everyone
was supportive of the march.
Many residents were concerned
by the number of armed police
officers in attendance. "We sup-
port the International Peace
Day, however; we don't think
police have the moral authority
to lead a peace march," said
Rameau. He said that the police
are considered a hate group
among the community and
involving them in the notion of
"peace" will only give them justi-
fication for hate crimes and
police brutality.
"Police marching for peace will
only create a false dynamic.
They can go around arresting
people and racially profiling
while saying 'I did it for peace.'
Elected officials clearly see
what's going on. They sit back
and just play along," said
Rameau. He suggested that in
the future, the community
should be given an intelligent
approach to decreasing violence.
He stated the first efforts should
be geared toward unemploy-
ment, which he believes is one
of the top causes of crime.


Sandy Walker charged with fraud


LOBBYIST
continued from 1A

According to the arrest warrant
Walker submitted incorrect tax
returns after she had received
the loan. Walker is the publisher
of The Gospel Truth, a mainstay
in Miami-Dade's Black religious
community. Lobbyists work for
businesses to inform government
officials about the impact of pro-
posed action on their clients.
Often lobbyists seek to stop or
change proposed laws before
final government enactment.
Walker is charged even though
the Trust did not require Walker


to file a formal loan application
according to Trust records.
Walker's loan was the first by the
Trust. A call to Trust chief finan-
cial officer Rodney Carey was not
returned before the publication
deadline. Walker stated she
repaid $15,000 of the loan when
she received an extension and
has agreed upon monthly pay-
ments of $2,500 since.
Walker told The Miami Times
that she accepts her mistakes in
the financial matter involving the
loan.' Her business affairs related
to the apartment building
became confused when her busi-
ness partner, Bertha Neely,


became ill and died last year.
.The _building, is located in
Overtown at the corner of NW 3
Avenue and 8 Street. Walker also
told The Miami Times that she
was seeking to provide affordable
rental housing in an area a few
blocks from where Michigan
developer Crosswinds is seeking
to construct luxury condomini-
ums.
The filed documents in the case
involve only the loan by the
Empowerment Trust and no
other legal matters related to
Walker. Walker was allowed to
surrender herself and post a
$10,000 surety bond.


UMame %r'ru hI trial fe wrh


"Copyrighted Material

-. '- Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Many doubt conclusions in murder case


CRIST
continued from 1A

murder .of Black civil rights
pioneer Harry Moore and his
wife, winning praise from the
couple's daughter.
But now experts familiar
with the case are casting
doubts on the conclusions,
and Evangeline Moore, a
Maryland woman who was
videotaped by the Crist cam-
paign reading a thank-you
note, has told friends she did
not mean to endorse his candi-
dacy.
"Her intent was never to


endorse any candidate for
public office here in Florida,"
said Cedric Nixon of the
Brevard County NAACP. Crist
officials are not saying whether
Moore, who gave her permis-
sion for the taping, will end up
in a campaign commercial.
Crist's running mate, state
Rep. Jeff Kottkamp of Cape
Coral, has had to explain his
co-sponsorship of a 2001 bill
to stop local governments from
removing local monuments,
including Confederate flags,
statues and memorials.
Kottkamp said it was designed
to protect all historic monu-


ments, but the bill died after
getting stiff opposition from
Black legislators.
Nor can Ben Green, who
spent seven years researching
his 1999 book, Before His
Time, The Untold Story of
Harry. T. Moore, America's
First Civil Rights Martyr. He
fears that a campaign strategy
rather than convincing ,new
evidence lies behind the claim
that the killers have now been
identified. "I could have pulled
the name of five or six other
Klansmen out of a hat who
were just as likely to have
planted the bomb."


Racial issues many influence election


RACE
continued from 1A

It is not surprising that race
has become an elevating factor
moreso than in recent gover-
nors' contests because of
Florida's diversifying popula-
tion.

RACIAL ISSUE
Among the racially charged
issues that "recently have taken
center stage in the campaign
are a 16-year-old debate over
giving state compensation to
two Miami black men who
spent nine years on Death Row


for murders they didn't commit, both Pitts and Lee.
and a 55-year-old unsolved
murder of a Central Florida civil BLACK DEMOCRATS STRONG
rights leader and his wife. Blacks have a strong historic
Also garnering attention are base in the Florida Democratic
more recent events, including Party where almost one in four
legislation to protect of the states 4.2 million regis-
Confederate monuments, a tered Democrats are Black.
Black minister's insult of Islam, In Miami-Dade County
and Davis' selection of Jones. 1,074,424 total registered vot-
During the Democratic pri- ers include 217,201 Blacks.
mary, Davis was roundly criti- Broward County has 181,429
cized for his 1990 vote to deny Black voters out of a total
state compensation to the two 997,174.
former Death Row inmate's, Normally, the choice of lieu-
Freddie Lee Pitts and Wilbert tenant governor is hardly a
Lee. He apologized for the vote major factor in the gubernatori-
after winniriigtheisprimry; and '4al i ace, btitn a close election iti
quickly wointhe enidorsement of could be 4acisive.


City of Miami
Virginia Key Beach


Request for Proposals, (RFP)
Application deadline October 20, 2006

The Virginia Key Beach Park Trust ("Trust"), a limited agency and instrumentality of the City of Miami,
is requesting proposals, RFP, from qualified and experienced independent Certified Public Accountants
licensed to practice in the State Of Florida and/or financial auditing firms with Certified Public
Accountants licensed to practice in the State of Florida to provide External Financial Auditing Services
for the Trust.

The RFP will be available beginning on October 2, 2006 and can be obtained Monday to through Friday
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. at the Office of the City Clerk: City Hall, 1" Floor, 3500
Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133-5504.

The RFP, No. 01-08-2006, will also be available from the Trust's website at http://www.virginiakeybeach-
park.net or the Trust's offices, 4020 Virginia Beach Drive, Miami, Florida 33149. The telephone number
is 305-960-4600.

Sealed written Proposals must be received by the City of Miami's City Clerk's Office, no later than 2:00
p.m., October 20, 2006. All proposals received after this time and date will be ineligible for considera-
tion.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny





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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny



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Newspapers
Come and Go ...
Well at least some of them


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SEPTEM
1905: FirstI
tion, "Memphi
lished|by W. C.I
sale in Mempl
and was forma
1912.
1915: Xavier
first Black Catl
the United Sta
New Orleans.
1934: Greg
first regularF
actors in "Miss
born.
1950: Gwen


em 4


This Week in Black History
MBER 27 Waycross, Georgia, opened on first Black pitcher to win a
Blues compost- Broadway World Series game. Black was
s Blues," pub- also the 1952 Rookie of the
Handy, went on SEPTEMBER 29 Year award.
his, Tennessee, 1784: The First African 1960: Nigeria, the nation
Ily published in Lodge, #459, was established with the largest number of
with Prince Hall as its Black people in the world, pro-
University, the Worshipful Master. claimed its independence.
holic College in 1910: Urban League was October 2:
rates, opened in founded in New York City 1800: Nat Turner, religious
enthusiast and slave insurrec-
Morris, one of SEPTEMBER 30 tionist leader born in
prime time TV 1935: Noted crossover singer Southampton County, Va. His
ion: Impossible" Johnnie Mathis was born. slave rebellion was betrayed by
1962: President John other slaves who informed
dolyn Brooks is Kennedy sent in federalized white slave masters.


awarded Pulitzer Prize for
"Annie Allen," a book of poetry.
1950: Ralph J. Bunche
became first Black to receive
lthe Nobel Peace Prize, for suc-
cessful mediation of the
Palestinian-Israeli Mideast
conflict.
1950: Ezzard Charles defeat-
ed the great Joe Louis in the
heavyweight championship
fight in New York City.-
SEPTEMBER28
1895: Three large Baptist
organizations merged to form
The National Baptist
Convention.
1961: "Purlie Victorious" a
play by noted actor and play-
wright Ossie Davis, reared in


troops to enforce the integra-
tion of the University of
Mississippi.
1975: Muhammad Ali defeat-
ed Joe Frazier in "The Thrilla
in Manilla."
1991: Mike Powell broke the
long jump world record set by
Miami's Bob Beamon at the
1968 Olympics.
OCTOBER1
1872: Morgan State College
was founded in Maryland.
1880: Florida Memorial
College founded in St.
Augustine
1886: Kentucky State
College is founded in
Frankfort, Ky.
1952: Joe Black became the


OCTOBER 3
1856: T. Thomas Fortune,
founder of Afro-American
League in born in Marianna,
FL
1949: Jess Blayton pur-
chased first black-owned radio
station (WEDR) in the country
1956: Bethune-Cookman
opened as Daytona Normal
and Industrial School in
Daytona
1956: Nat King Cole became
the first Black performer to hot
his own TV show.
1974: Frank Robinson
became the first Black
Manager in the major sports,
as he was hired by the
Cleveland Indians.


~~I ~


et P p5g Every Tenant, Every Month


0
0 0


-CI,


The true measure of a great
newspaper lies in its courage, its :
professional responsibilities
and Its dedication to the
community It serves


TE


IN THE

NOVEMBER 7TH

NERAL ELECTIONS

REGISTER BY

OCTOBER 1 13 TH


rER TO VOTE AT:
METRO OFFICES
i LICENSE BUREAU
LIC LIBRARIES


CITY OR COUNTY HALLS


ELECTIONS


DEPARTMENT


MIAMI.DAD
ridm


yonr Vote ConnOt


Learn how to use the

new iVotronic Voting Machines
at one of our upcoming Events.


For Event locations call:

305-499-VOTE

Also visit online for a list of Event Local
www.miamidade.gov/elect


The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 5A


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Police charged a 21-year-old man with bottles of perfume before he took the him, blindfolded him and tied him up in the dropped it to the ground stating, 'Give
theft after he stole a pair of jeans at lower price tag off one bottle and replaced back seat of his own car. The man then told us time. If we get caught, we will shoot
Bloomingdale's, located at 19555 Biscayne it onto a more expensive one. According to police he was taken to anunknown loca- you." :
Boulevard, at 7 p.m. Police said store the report, the man then paid for the per- tion where he was held hostage and tor-
security saw the man take a pair of jeans, fume with the fraudulent price before tured. After investigating the man and his ***::
valued at $330, before heading to a fitting store security stopped and detained him whereabouts, police found out the man A man was robbed in the area of 8th
room where he used a razor-knife to cut until police arrived and arrested him. was lying and arrested him after he admit- Street and NE 5th Avenue around 9:30
the security tags off the jeans. He then hid ted that he had not been kidnapped but in p.m. The man was driving when he came
the jeans inside a bag and tried to leave fact was with a prostitute. upon a stop sign where two men opened
the store. Police charged a man with giving false the passenger door and placed a rag over


Police charged a 25-year-old man with
theft after he shoplifted at Marshalls,
located at 20515 Biscayne Boulevard, at
5:30 p.m. Police said store security saw
the man remove the price tags off several


information after he lied to them about
being carjacked and kidnapped in the area
of 102nd Street and Collins Avenue. Police
said after responding to a call about a man
who was kidnapped and held hostage,
they found the man who said he was in the
parking lot when someone approached


A pizza delivery man was robbed in the
area of 131 Street and NE Sixth Avenue.
According to police, two men jumped out
from behind bushes with guns, demanding
money and pizza. They took the victim's
wallet and removed $300 and then


his face with an unknown chemical on it.
The man passed out and when he woke up
in a parking lot, he noticed his cellphone
was missing, as well as a ring valued at
$14 and an ATM card. The man also
noticed that a quarter tank of gas had
been used.


hcn il l the n1t rcat HI A kadcr Ind up'


khp%


Calvin Hughes is new Channel 10 anchor


S WPLG-ABC 10 anchor anchor the weekend
Mark Schumacher will morning news with
be leaving the weekday Diane Magnum and
morning show. The sta- report stories during the
tion hired Calvin week.
Hughes, a weekend Magnum's current co-
anchor at Hughes KYW- anchor, Will Manso, is
CBS 3 in Philadelphia, moving to sports, full
to co-anchor two week- time.
day newscasts at 5 to 7 HUGHES Hughes and his wife,
a.m. and 12 to 1 p.m. labor and employment
l with Kristi Krueger. Hughes attorney Bacardi Jackson, both
expects to start in November. 35, have a son Solomon, 7
Schumacher, 47, will co- months.


THESE STORES




EXTRA MILE...
To Bring You
The BLACK Community Interests
The owners of the stores listed below are making space
available for the South's largest Black weekly circulation.
You no longer have to share your copy. When you pick up
The Miami Times, don't forget to buy something, too. Please
patronize the following stores and shops.
South Dade
Allen's Market, 212 W. Mowry Dr. Homestead
M&M Market, 11607 S.W. 216th Street
Nat's Grocery, 17600 Homestead Avenue
West Dade
City Kids Clothes, Mall of Americas
Miami Gardens
Billy's Food Market, 4078 N.W. 167 Street
Opa-locka
Freedom Market, 14495 N.W. 22 Avenue
North Miami
Safa Market, 15400 N.W. 7 Avenue
La Prima Market, 9930 N.W. 7 Avenue


Central Miami
Phillip's Market, 9100 N.W.


17 Avenue


Miami
S&G Supermarket, 5100 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Price Choice, 2173 N.W. 62 Street
Nini's Market, 1297 N.W. 54 Street
Noor Market, 4701 N.W. 17 Avenue
Joysi Food Market 4002 N.W. 17th Avenue
North Miami Beach
NMB Food Market, 473 N.E. 167 Street
Downtown Miami
Robert's Drug, 111 NW 1st Street
Broward
John's Market, 229 N. Dixie Hwy
PS House of Meat, 4050 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.


Call Tina today!

305-694-6214


The Virginia Key Beach Park Trust
has moved its offices to the Park.
Located at:
4020 Virginia Beach Drive
Miami, Florida 33149
Our New Numbers:
T. 305-960-4600
F 305-960-4620


11-119


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i i Ti s t b 27 O t ber 3 6









The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 7A


sI|l.C Ill L c.la s 1us on irol| 1 1 I .wi 1L L y ___



Ron Brise a broad background leads to public service


Special to The Times

A new face stood out from
the recent elections when
telecommunications business-
man Ron Brise captured the
Democratic nomination for the
state representative District
108 seat. Brise came over to
The Miami Times for a broad
discussion of his unique back-
ground and his arrival to vie
for public service.
Though born in Port Au
Prince, Haiti, by the age of 6
months Brise moved with his
parents to Argentina to pursue
their academic studies. There
his father, Roland, studied to
become a Seventh Day
Adventist minister, while his
mother, Nicolle, became a
math and music teacher.
When he was three, the family
moved to Honduras, where his
father accepted a position as
dean of a school and his moth-
er taught math and music.
Brise did not notice differ-
ences in people with whom he
interacted at his young age,
but racial and ethnic varieties
became a reality to him when
his family moved to Miami in
November 1981, when he was
seven.
Initially, the family came to
Miami for a brief visit "during
the winter," since the climate
was "cooler" than their South
and Central American hot cli-
mates. But his parents enjoyed
their stay so much, they decid-
ed to make South Florida their
home.
Brise and his sister, Carmina
Charles, who attended medical
school and who recently moved
to Maryland to do her intern-


is 65% Democrat, 21% others
and 14% Republican.
As of the September 15
campaign reports, Brise has
raised $42,710 to Herrera's
$5,100. Still, Brise said he is
not taking anything for grant-
ed and is continuing to work-
ing hard through the General
Election on November
Brise attributes his success-
ful campaign, where he
received 42% of the vote in the
pool of five candidates, to the
written support of community
and elected leaders of the dif-


ferent areas covered by
District 108. He is proud that
he won without polarizing one
community from another.
Unlike other campaigns, there
was no faction of the Haitian
community that aligned
against him because of the
politics of their native land.
"This," he said, "allowed me to
reach out to communities
beyond Little Haiti."
"That's the kind of legislator
I want to be," said Brise, "one
who represents the total com-
munity...brings together the


shared interests and show we
are all affected." Brise
declared he wanted "to stand
in the gap" so communities
can work together.
Brise said he was able to
raise more money this time
and simultaneously to inspire
more volunteers. He proudly
told of the 50 unpaid cam-
paign workers who came to
help him on Election Day.
Ron Brise has a unique
background and a unique
commitment to bring to Miami
public service.


Does Jim Davis having a Black running mate influence your voting decision?


I want to be known as one who brings together the shared
interests and show how we are all affected." -, on Brise


ship, attended Miami Union
Academy, a Black parochial
,school from which both gradu-
ated. After receiving degrees in
Biology and Biology Education,
as well as two MBA's in
Marketing, Brise returned to
Miami to teach Biology at
Union Academy.
Yet Brise left the classroom
to pursue his current interna-
tional telecommunications car-
rier business based in Miami.
He is currently the Executive
Vice President and C.O.O. of
the firm, IPIP Corp.
Brise was most animated
when talking about his family.
After meeting in church, he
and Jo An Salomon Brise, a
Registered Nurse, were mar-


ried on July 16, 2000. A union
Brise described simply as "six
wonderful years." They are the
parents of seven month old
Ronald Anthony Brise II.
His political life came when
he entered the42002 legisla-
tive race with several other
newcomers. That race was
won by Representative Yolly
Roberson.
After concentrating on fami-
ly and business affairs, he
sought a legislative seat this
year and successful won the
democratic nomination. He
has a decided advantage over
his Republican opponent, for-
mer Miami Shores council-
man Prospero Herrera II, in a
district where the registration


p.a r Iimb bI ennv m ID




"Copyrighted Material

fl Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

n--


ALVIN CHARLES
"No, it really
doesn't mat-
ter. I believe if
he would have
chosen a
white running
mate, it would
be the same
results. I don't
think his pur-
pose is to grab
more Black
votes."


FREDDIE MILLER

"Not really. I
believe he's
racist. Just
because he
now has a
Black man on
his side I
should vote
for him? He
hasn't been
for Blacks for
a long time
now and I don't believe any-
thing have changed. I think it's
just a move to try to get more
Blacks to vote for him."


JAMES CAMPBELL


"No. I will
choose the
best candidate
no matter who
he has run-
ning with him.
I think one of
the reasons he
might have
chose a Black
man is to try
to get more votes. I am not
racist and it really doesn't mat-
ter who runs alongside him
because I am going to pick the
best man for the job. It's not a
Black and White issue."


ABUZAA YISRAEL

"No, it does-
n't influence
my vote simply
because I
know this is a
de-facto. I
know that nei-
ther one of
them [guber-
natorial candi-
dates] have the
power, ability or capability to
get the job done so we're voting
for the lesser of two evils. Color


don't have an influence with me
or my vote."

NADEEN THOMPSON


"Yeah, in a
way it does. I
still have to
look at his his-
tory and see
what he has
done. I don't
think it makes
too much of a
difference, I
just think it's
nice that he
has picked a
mate."


Black running


BARBARA GARDNER

"Not to me it doesn't. As long
as the guy that's running is a
then that's
who I'm voting
for. Many peo-
ple might
believe that
because of his
past with Lee
and Pitts, this
might be a
move to get
Black votes. I
think he's sincere with his deci-
sions."


Compiled byTerrell Clayton


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S bend moneTST
Seeing beyond money


lB k M t C t l Th i Own D n


41b o
o









Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


SA The Miami Tmes, septe ,


Coalition to recruit 1,000 new teachers


15 groups seek
"teachers of color"
A major statewide coalition
lead by the Urban League will
work to recruit more than 1,000
talented new teachers of color
for Florida's schools over the
next two years.
T. William Fair, President and
CEO of the Urban League and
the vice chairman of the Florida
State Board of Education, offi-
cially announce the new Teach
& Inspire Florida coalition in
Miami on Monday.
Teach & Inspire Florida is
designed to augment the effec-
tive teacher recruitment efforts
of the Florida Department of
Education and individual school
districts statewide.
Florida faces a teacher short-
age crisis, with a need for tens of
thousands of new teachers every
year. Also, the percentage of
teachers of color in Florida is not
representative of the percentage
of students of color. Fifty two
percent of the state's students
are Black, Hispanic, Asian,
American Indian or multiracial
but only 25 percent of teachers
are individuals of color


"For our state to succeed and
compete, we must have a truly
diverse and talented teacher
workforce," Fair said.
"Community groups need to
work together to take on the
awesome responsibility of tack-
ling the teacher shortage crisis.
This crisis threatens the quality
of education for all of Florida's
students."
The initiative will start the
campaign with three teacher
recruitment events in Miami
next week(www.teachandin-
spire.org/events). Over the next
several months, the coalition
will develop a Web site, work to
generate corporate sponsors to
underwrite certification fees for
qualified teacher candidates,
design a promotional campaign
and hold additional recruitment
events. Teach & Inspire Florida
will be the first community
based teacher recruitment of its
kind.
The coalition, sponsored by
the American Board for
Certification of Teacher
Excellence (ABCTE), has attract-
ed a broad base of organization-
al support.
Coalition supporting partners
include the Florida School


Miamian wins U.S. Attorney General Award


Velda is the daughter of the
late Quentin North and Bonita
North and granddaughter of
the late Charles North and the
late Ruth North Polite.
Velda, who resides in
Atlanta, Georgia and is
employed by the U.S.
Justice Department as
a support services
technician, was a
member of the
Southeast Bomb Task
Force which relentless-
ly pursued the domes-
tic terrorist Eric NO.
Rudolph who detonat-
ed a pipe bomb in
Atlanta's Centennial Park dur-
ing the 1996 Summer
Olympics, killing one person
and injuring over 100 others.
Rudolph detonated two more
devices in Atlanta in 1997 and
remotely detonated another in
Birmingham, Alabama in 1998,


killing a police officer and
severely injuring a nurse.
The Task Force worked tire-
lessly for nine years investigat-
ing countless leads
and sifting through
mounds of evidence to
bring Rudolph to jus-
tice. He avoided trial,
entering guilty pleas in
2005. In addition to
one life sentence in
Birmingham, he also
received four life sen-
tences plus 120 years
RTH in Atlanta.
Each member of the
Task Force was pre-
sented the award individually
by U.S. Attorney General
Alberto Gonzales himself at
Constituiton Hall in
Washington, D.C. Velda's
proud mother was there to wit-
ness the ceremony on
September 12.


Boards Association (FSBA), the
Florida Association of School
Administrators (FASA), the
Florida State Hispanic Chamber
of Commerce (FSHCC), ASPIRA
of Florida, the Urban League of
Palm Beach County, the
Jacksonville Urban League, the


Florida Consortium of Charter
Schools, Junior Achievement of
Central Florida, the Mexican
American Council, the Florida
Education Foundation, and Rep.
Rafael Arza, Chairman of the
Florida House of Representatives
PK-12 education committee.


Transit Director Roosevelt Bradley, other Transit officials
continue riding buses and trains to talk to customers


Since the passage of the
People's Transportation Plan in
2002, Miami-Dade Transit has
attracted many riders. And as
ridership increases, so does
demand for better service. While
MDT moves forward with fine-
tuning services, I believe there is
no one better than our customers
to tell us what needs to be done.
In a letter sent to the Miami
Herald by frequent rider
Harriett Galvin, I learned of
some of her concerns regarding
overcrowding in Metromover
cars and the lack qf parking
space in some of our Metrortail
parking garages.
To address her concerns
directly, I invited M.s. Galvin to
ride with inme on Metrorail the
following Monday so that we
could further discuss transit
services,
I inJbrmed her that as a solu-
tion to the overcrowding in
Metronmover cars, we now run
two-car trains on the inner loop
during peak-service hours to
better accommodate our cus-
tomers transferring from
Metrorail to Metromove,:
As some o our customers at
times manually hold the doors
open, some. mover car doors
were not functioning properly
Ib address this issue, Miami-
Dade Transit recently imple-
mented a more frequent mainte-
nan:e schedule for all mover
cars which has reduced the fie-


Miami-Dade Transit Director Roosevelt Bradley and transit rider
Harriett Galvin at Government Center Metrorail station.


quency of doors: malfunctioning.
Moreover; Ms. Galvin also
expressed that she was unable to
find parking at certain Metrorail
stations. Wb alleviate this prob-
lem, Miami-Dade Transit plans
to add approximately 200 sur-
face parking spaces at the
Dadeland South and Dadeland
North Metrorail stations.
Currently, there are more than
200 available parking spaces at
the South Miami Metrorail park-
ing garage, and we are adding
40 more spaces at University
Station.
In addition, Miami-Dade
Transit recently opened Park &
Ride lots at SW 244th Street and


SW 296th Street adjacent to US
I and the South Miami-Dade
Busway, I told Ms. Galvin that
we are committed to finding
additional parking alternatives
as our ridership continues to
grow.
While riding on a Route 9 bus
last week, I came acmvss Latasha
Jeanimcint, a student at Lindsay
Hopkins Technical Education
Center who commended us for
our Customer Services line.
She saidtt hat the 305-770-
3131 transit telephone number is


Go The Extra Mile
BE A PART OF OUR



Call Tina TODAY! 305-694-6214


programmed into her cell phone,
because she always calls to fol-
low up on different route sched-
ules and other transit informa-
tion she might need. Ms.
Jeanuncint added that since
she's been riding transit, she has
not needed a car, especially with
the connections she's able to
make with different bus routes
and Metmrail service to get to
school.
I shared with Ms. Jeanuncint
that customers are not only able
to access transit information by
calling 305-770-3131. By logging
onto wwwmiamidade.gov/transit,
they also can get as much hnfor-
mation as needed on bus mutes
and Metwrail and Metrmnover
maps and schedules, among other
services.
Although we have made
numerous improvements to the
system, we also understand we
have a lot more to do as we get
more people on board The input
received from existing customers
like Ms. Galvin is vital in help-
ing us create a first-class transit
system.
To send suggestions to me
during this ongoing campaign,
call 305-375-2597. Or e-mail
me at rbradley@miamnidade.gov.
Also submit comments and/or
concerns on the transit system
by logging on to wwwtniami-
dade.gov/transit and clicking the
feedback zone link.


i'Seeri- tcl Every Z J


'0 a 4
0
4 V


Red Seedless or
Red Globe Grapes.. .. .2..
Peak of Season Flavor, Great as a
Healthy Snack, California Grown
SAVE UP TO .70 1B


Chicago Hard Rolls,
8-Count...... ................. .59
Handmade Each Day in the Bakery, Crispy,
Crusty, Fresh, From the Publix Bakery, 12-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO 1.00


*"~I* LIX


Nabisco B rrO
Single Serve Tray.... .ET o FREEr
Or Kraft Handi-Snacks, Assorted
Varieties, 9 to 25.2-oz pkg, (Limit two
deals on selected advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 5.79


CapriSun
All Natural Drinks.. 4 8 00
Or Roarin' Waters, Assorted Varieties,
67.5-oz pkg. (Excluding 100% Fruit Waves.)
SAVE UP TO 4.16 ON 4


12-Pack Selected
Pepsi Products....... 311.00
12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 1.21 ON 3


Prices effective Thursday, September 28 through Wednesday, October 4, 2006.
Only in the Following Counties: Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved.
www. publix com/ads


Pub ix.


W H ERE SHOPPING I S A PLEAS U R.E ."


How can we make your ride better?


MIAt4i~
- w


i b 27O t b 3 2006









-la1ks-MI t CoUt-ol1TheIr~On- Dstiy TeMaiTms etme 7Otbr3 06 9


The death of God's saints


On August 22, at approxi-
mately 5:30 a.m., Jessie
Williams died. 'This might not
mean anything to you, but for
me, my life changed on that
date. You see, Jessie Williams
was my mother. She was 86
years old and not in good
health these past few years.
One thing that I have
learned is that even when a
death is expected, it does not
make you prepared for it. Of


course, during times like
these, you oftentimes reflect
on past times with the loved
one and even think ahead to
future times that will not
include the loved one.
During this time also, I
thought about how at so many
funerals, I have always heard
someone say that the
deceased has gone home to
heaven and the loved ones will
all gather together with the


deceased in heaven one day. I
truly don't understand how
people can be bold enough to
make this statement in every
circumstance, because the
truth is that not everyone will
see their loved ones in eterni-
ty.
Me'rely dying does not imme-
diately qualify the deceased
for heaven. The Bible gives an
explicit and clear reason why
a person who dies will enter
heaven. It is because of their
relationship with the Lord, not
the fact that they died or that
they were sent off with a
grand funeral.
And if the deceased had
accepted the Lord as Savior,
then the loved ones will only
see them again in heaven if


they too have accepted the
Lord as Savior. We cannot fool
ourselves into believing that
death automatically qualifies
us to be heaven bound.
But in the midst of the pain
and hurt in the loss of my
mother, I am able to find a
peace and comfort because
my mother had accepted the
Lord as Savior, so I do rest
assured knowing that I will
see her again some day. Psalm
116:15 states that the death
of God's saints is precious in
His sight. As much as we
grieve for our loved ones, God
rejoices in knowing that His
saint will be received unto
Himself.
I also take comfort knowing
that the Apostle Paul said that


to live is Christ, but to die is
gain. There is no better living
than to live for Christ. Life just
doesn't get better than that!
Christ living is good living!
But Paul said that death for
a Christian is gain. When we
gain something, then we have
more than we had before. If
living in Christ is great, and
dying in Christ is better than
that, then how can I not
rejoice that my mother has
received her gain? Though I
will miss my mother terribly
and her daily phone calls, I
am joyful that she has been
received by the Master and
will be escorted to her man-
sion by her Lord and Savior.
I know that many of you
precious readers have also


lost loved ones. Take comfort
in knowing that if you and
your loved ones have accepted
the Lord, you will see them
again. If you have not made
that decision, it's not too late.
It doesn't take a fancy service
or a minister to talk you
through it.
You can stop right now and
ask the Lord to forgive you of:
your sins and let Him know
that you believe that He lived,
came to earth, died and has
gone on to live once more in
heaven and one day you will
see Him in all of His glory. If
you did make this decision, I
would-love to hear from you.
There is no better legacy
that you can leave your family
than that of a Godly life.


iiiII


New Providence Missionary
Baptist Church, Reverend
Vinson Davis, pastor, will be
having their Choir No. 1
Anniversary, September 29 at
7 p.m. For more information,
please call 305-758-0922.

Mt. Pleasant Missionary
Baptist Church, Dr. James C.
Wise, pastor, invites you to
their annual Revival, October
9-13 at 7:30 p.m. nightly.
Come and be revived and bring
a friend with you.
********
Faith Christian Evangelical
Covenant Church, Apostle
Winston and Cislin Williams,
pastors, will have Wednesday
Night Bible Teaching. For more
information, please call 305-
251-6828.

Reverend Karl A. Jackson,
Pastor of God's Way Assembly
Faith Cathedral, Inc., invites
you to 'All Night Prayer and
Worship Service," September
29 from 11 p.m. to sunrise. For
more information, visit our
website at www.gwafc.org or
call 305-685-6855 or 786-287-
1895.

Reverend Dr. Richard
Ledgister and the Sierra
Norwood Calvary Baptist
Church invites you join them
for Evangelical Meetings,


October 8-15 in their sanctu-
ary. For more information,
please call 35-652-7336.

Victory On The Rock
Ministries and the Golden
Bells cordially invite you to "An
Evening of Soul Refilling
Gospel Music," October 8 at 4
p.m. For more information,
please contact Reverend Alvin
Cleare at 305-333-3144 or
Sister McQueen at 786-251-
2878.

God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to partake in
our Holy Communion and Feet
Washing Service, October 1 at
11 a.m. and 4 p.m. For more
information, please call 786-
258-1826.

Triumphing Jesus Christ
Faith Holiness Church, Ruby
White, pastor, cordially invite
you to a musical program,
October 7 at 7 p.m. For more
information, please contact
Pastor White at 305-621-6121
or Billie Moore at 305-573-
7650.

The Music Ministry of Total
Change and Empowerment
Ministries, Inc., Bishop Curtis
R. Brown, pastor, proudly
invite you to our "Music
Ministry Anniversary Service,"


October 27 at 7:30 p.m. and
are requesting that your Music
Ministry, Dance Ministry or
Soloists participate with us.
Please respond by October 13
to Minister Troy Davis at 954-
496-2981 or Minister
Demetrius Burch at 786-566-
3730.
*********
Faith Christian Center is
having a Church Bazaar,
September 30. For more infor-
mation, please call 305-251-
6828.

Faith Crusade for Christ
Center will be holding its
annual Women's Conference,
October 4-6 at 7:30 p.m. night-
ly and morning prayer at 7
a.m. on October 7. Admission
is free to the community. For
more information, please con-
tact Co-Pastor Dr. Charlene
Burkes at 786-252-1462.
*********
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Carol City,
Reverend Arthur Jackson, III,
pastor, will have its annual
Church Growth Conference,
September 25-29 at 6 p.m.
nightly. For more information,
call 305-624-8170.

Real Thing His Ministry will
be having a revival entitled
"Seeking First The Kingdom,"
hosted by Pastor Atlanta White
at The House of Prayer
Testimonial Temple,
September 23-30 at 7 p.m.
nightly. For more information,


please call 786-333-9419 or
786-306-7768.
******** *
Pastor Avery Jones and the
Holy Spirit Ministries Family
invites you to their Women's
Conference, September 28 and
the Appreciation Celebration
honoring First Lady Evangelist
Albertha Jones, September 29.
Both events will occur at 7:30
p.m. at Poinciana Park
Elementary School. For further
information, please contact
305-759-3249.

Reverend Karl A. Jackson
and God's Way Assembly
Faith Cathedral invites you to
"All Night Prayer and Worship
Service," September 29 from
11 p.m. to sunrise. Breakfast
will be served. For more infor-
mation please call 305-685-
6855.
******** *
Faith Christian Center will
host The Musical/Hat Tea,
October 29 at 4 p.m. Theme
colors are Purple and Gold
* with attire semi-formal.
Donations are welcome.

God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to be part of
their powerful Bible Study on
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. and
anointed Healing and
Deliverance on Fridays at 7:30
p.m. For more information, call
786-258-1826.

God Word God Way COGIC,


Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to be a part of
their Gospel Youth Explosion
on Saturday, September 30 at
7:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call Evangelist
Glaster at 786-873-1778.

Reverend Karl A. Jackson,
Pastor of God's Way Assembly
Faith Cathedral, Inc., can be
heard every Sunday from 7
a.m. to 8 a.m. on 104.5 FM
during the 'Preserving the
Heritage Radio Ministry
Program.' Fore more informa-
tion, visit www.gwafc.org or
call 305-685-6855 or 786-287-
1895.

The St. Peters Missionary
Baptist Church Family invites
you to the Installation Services
for Kito March, Sr., October 3-8.
For more information, please
call 305-232-1620.

The Universal Truth Center
invites you to develop your
leadership and communication
skills through its
Toastmasters Program held
every first and third Friday
from 7-8 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please call Hallema at
305-772-7363.

New Providence
Development Center after
school care/tutoring is free
and will run the entire school
year. Transportation available
for pick-up only. For more
information, call 305-758-


0922.

Reverend Karl A. Jackson,
Pastor of God's Way
Assembly Faith Cathedral,
Inc., invites everyone to their
Morning Divine Worship
Service, Sundays at 11 a.m.
and Prayer and Worship
Service Tuesdays at 7 .p.m.
For more information, call
305-685-6855 or 786-,287-
1895.

Join Mayor Joseph L. Kelly
and other local pastors every
Wednesday at 12 p.m. at the
Cultural Arts Center in Opa-
locka for prayer. For more
information, please call 305-
953-2810.

Join us for Old Fashioned
Prayer every Tuesday at 8
p.m. For more information,
please contact Pastor Mary
Brantley at 786-222-3144.

Learn how to share Christ
without fear through a free
training to all from Evangelist
Debbie. For more information,
call 305-898-1025.

Lighthouse of God in
Christ Church, Overseer, Dr.
Arlene Davis, invites you to
share in the service of the
Lord as they praise and wor-
ship Christ the Lord. On
Tuesdays and Fridays at 7:30
p.m. For more information,
call 305-254-7647.
Please turn to CHURCH 10B


11'1l111


Community Clenda


The Metropolitan Planning
Organization will kick off its
Walk Safe Program, October 4
at 7 a.m. at Edison Park
Elementary School. For more
information, please call Pedro
Castellon at 305-243-8115.

The Center for Family and
Child Enrichment's first
annual Halloween Masquerade
Ball will be held Saturday,
October 28 at 8 p.m. in the
Hotel Intercontinental. For
more information, please call
305-624-7450 ext 208.
*********
Disney on Ice will be at the
American Airlines Arena,
September 27 October 1 at
7:30 p.m. nightly. For more
information, please call 305-
448-7450.
******** *
Miami-Dade County Health
Department / Project
SCREEN is offering free pap
smears and mammograms if
you are 50 and over, with no
insurance, low-income, meet
the financial guidelines and
have not been screened this
year. Screenings will take
place on Saturday, October 7
from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. at the
Women's Wellness Center. Pre-
registration is required. For
more information or to regis-
ter, please call 305-470-5634.

The Community Outreach
Center invites you to join us
for our Outreach Program on
October 7. Activities include
games, arts and crafts and
more fun and exciting events.
For more information, please
call 786-426-3965.

Lona's and Elite Tea Club
invites you to a networking
event and membership drive,
Saturday, September 30 from
6-11 p.m. at the El Palacio
Hotel. There will be a variety of
live entertainment including
Paul Bodie and Debbie
Thurston Estomene, Jamaica
Born and Alston Bair. No
charge, but you must register
at 786-253-0945.

Commissioner Barbara J.
Jordan will be the guest
speaker at the OCED
Community Council Meeting,
September 28 at 7 p.m. in the


Opa-locka Neighborhood
Center. Please come out as we
will discuss issues related to
Economic Development,
Violence Intervention,
Workforce and Affordable
Housing. For more informa-
tion, please contact Wanda
Fort at 305-770-3132 or 305-
272-4593 (Beeper).

Neighborhood Housing
Services will have its annual
meeting luncheon, November 2
from 12-2 p.m. at the Radisson
Hotel. The year's accomplish-
ments and future plans will be
highlighted. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-751-5511
or visit www.mdnhs.org.

Myrka Dellanos hosts His
House Children's Home fourth
annual Charity Gala, "A Place
to Call Home." September 30 at
7 p.m. at the Biltmore Hotel in
Coral Gables.
******** *
Bethel Temple Community
Development Corporation
will host its second annual
Economic Empowerment
Summit, October 6 -8 at Bethel
Apostolic Temple. To pre-regis-
ter or for more information,
please call the,church at 305-
688-1612 or you can email
your inquiry to
adminasst @bethelapos -


tolictemple.org.

GablesStage is having a fan-
tastic presentation of
Fahrenheit 451, October 13 at
the Biltmore Hotel in Coral
Gables. There will be a wine
and cheese reception at 6:30
p.m. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.
and show starts at 8 p.m. For
more information or to pur-
chase tickets email
mlebron@aclufl.org or call 786-
363-2719.

The Zeta Community
Center invites you to join us
for our 'Lights on After school'
event, October 12 at 5 p.m. in
the center. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-836-7060
or fax 786-318-2200.

Humana is offering free edu-
cational seminars to help con-
sumers learn about Medicare
health benefits, prescription
drug coverage options and
important dates to remember.
for 2007. Attendees can also
learn about name brand and
generic drug choices to lower
out-of-pocket costs and evalu-
ate plan options. This event is
free and open to the public,
however reservations are
required. Seminars run
approximately 90 minutes. For
more information, date, time
or location, please call 1-800-
216-8111 or TDD at 1-877-
833-4486.
Please turn to CALENDAR 14B


305.769.1100 Dade 954.522.1102 Broward 800.721,WMBM Toll Free

For song, prayer, birthday requests 305.953.WMBM, 954.525.1490

888.599.WMBM, wmbm@wmbm.com


* Gospel Classic Hour, M-F, 6:00am
* Tuesday Talk with President/GM Bishop Victor T.
Curry. Tues 9:30am
* Spirit & Soul featuring:
-* Compassion
Business In The Black
Business Showcase
Victorious Life Management
Sister To Sister
Brother To Brother

M-F at 2:00pm


n Noon Day Prayer, M-F, 12:00pm
* Business Spotlight, M-F, 1:15pm and 1:45pm; So
10:15am
a Ministry Spotlight, So, 8:15am
* Livin' Right Teen Show, So, 11:00am
* Back to the Bible, Alternating M, 9:00am
* Let's Talk Money, Alternating W, 9:00 am
* Gospel News Now, M-F 3:00pm
* Talking Sports, So 5:00pm
* Queen James Gospel Hour, So, 6:00pm
* Quartet Corner, Sun, 7:30am
* Bobby Jones Gospel Countdown, Sun, 10:00pm


i


The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 9B


s kcalB Must Control y


Church Notes I






















CURRY'S


COMMENTARY
BY BISHOP VICTOR T. CURRY


Part one

I learned about "Jim Crow"
in my Civics class. I learned
that from the 1880s into the
1960s, the majority of
American states enforced seg-
regation through "Jim Crow"
laws (so called after a Black


character in minstrel shows).
From Delaware to California
and from North Dakota to
Texas, many states (and
cities, too) could impose legal
punishments on people for
consorting with members of
another race. The most com-
mon types of laws forbade


Turning history upside down: The Jim Crow Theory


intermarriage and ordered
business owners and public
institutions to keep their
Black and white clientele sep-
arated. In the 1960's, Jim
Crow laws were abolished.
Sadly, in 2006 they still exist.
For the next eight weeks, we
will explore our voting system
and how the Bush regime is
turning our history upside
down by reverting back to Jim
Crow tactics. There is some-
thing infinitely more impor-
tant at stake here than
whether Bush or Kerry won,


The American democratic sys-
tem is on trial before the eyes
of the world.
When you allow elections to
happen, where the machines
are provided by private corpo-
rations who's CEOs are parti-
san supporters and fund-rais-
ers of Bush that is not
democracy! When you allow
Diebold or Triad or ES&S to
count the votes on their secret
proprietary software with no
transparency or accountabili-
ty to the people that is not
democracy


I am a firm believer that the
only reason Bush occupies
the presidency is because he
realized he could ethically
compromise first Florida
Secretary of State Katherine
Harris in 2000 and Ohio
Secretary of State J. Kenneth
Blackwell in 2004.
It is easy to win a close elec-
tion when you toss out new
voter registrations that favor
your opponent, narrowing
provisional balloting rules at
the last minute, certifying
absurd voting results such as


124% turnout in Perry
County or 98.55% in Miami-
Dade County and calling vot-
ers on Election Day lobbying
them to vote for issues that
banned gay marriages and
domestic partnerships in
Ohio.
A vast array of sworn testi-
mony points to only one con-
clusion: that deliberate, pre-
meditated criminal activity
took place in 2000 and 2004
to illegally suppress voters'
rights. Whether it was by
Please turn to CURRY 14B


S. ...... T d....BCHURCH
continued from 9B


"Copy righted Material


Syndicated.Con.ntet


Available from Commercial News Providers"


High to Life Ministry
(C.O.G.I.C.), Elder Derrick A.
Taylor, will hold worship serv-
ice at El Palacio Hotel every
Sunday night at 8 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-962-6987.

Westview Baptist Church,
Dr. Barry R. Young, pastor,
invites you to their Annual
Revival, October 3 5 at 7 p.m.
nightly. For more information,
please call 305-687-6004.
Mt. Vernon Missionary
Baptist Church invites you to
a pre-appreciation service for
Reverend W.A. Miller Jr,
September 29. For more infor-
mation, please call 305-754-
5300.

Zion Hope Missionary
Baptist Church, Reverend
WE. Mitchell, pastor, present a
Gospel Musical Pre-
Anniversary Celebration to
commemorate 50 years of
gospel singing for the Calvary


irNo'aNtes


Travelers of Miami, Saturday,
September 30, at 7:30 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-635-3703.
********
Victory In Christ Ministries
Inc., W.M. Fayne, pastor,
invites you to their first
Women's Conference, October
28 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. The con-
ference will be held at the El
Palacio Hotel and the theme
will be "A Man You Can Trust."
For details and registration,
please call 786-735-7002.

The Greater Bethel Church
family invites you to their
Historic Preservation and
Scholarship banquet on
Friday, Oct. 20 at Shula's Hotel
at 7 p.m. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-379-8250.

Send your church
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamitedito-
rial@bellsouth or mail to
900 NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6216.


--^. ../f'-Ss.
-'ff^
fsi:y--,^





















Housing agency honors Dewey Knight, Jr.


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward@miamitimesonline.com
The Miami-Dade Housing
Agency held The MetroForum
breakfast on Thursday at the
Parrot Jungle Island Treetop
Ballroom. The breakfast fea-
tured public and private offi-
cials, including Assistant
County Manager, Cynthia
Curry and Dr. Edward
Murray, Associate Director of
The Metropolitan Center to
discuss affordable housing in
Miami-Dade County.
Curry, who also served as
moderator, said that the
county clearly has issues that
are overwhelming to review.
"Crisis sometimes brings the
best out of us as a team.
There is a current void in the
housing agency and we are
pulling resources to revive it.
We have to make sure the
Housing Agency is not viewed
as dysfunctional, "said Curry.


Mike Jones, President and
CEO of the Economic Council
of Palm Beach discussed the
three main financial obstacles
that all counties in South
Florida encounter, education,
transportation and housing.
He presented data analysis
showing that problems in
these areas for Miami-Dade
are not much different from
Palm Beach County. "The cost
of housing is having a nega-
tive impact on recruitment of
workers for businesses
because wages are too low
and they can't afford to live
here. If the Counties continue
to come together and assess
housing issues, we may be
better prepared to get what we
need from Tallahassee," said
Jones.
The breakfast also honored
the Late Dewey W. Knight Jr.,
who's life of dedication and
public administration earned
him positions as the first


Esther Jean recieves Dewey
Knight Scholarship.
Black social worker for the
County's Children's Home,
the first Black Assistant
County Manager and the only
Deputy .County Manager in
Metro-Dade's history. Four
scholarships were presented


to Florida International
University Public
Administration students who
have demonstrated academic
excellence. His son, Dewey
Knight III, said that his father
was truly about service. "He
learned at Bethune-Cookman
College that you enter to learn
and depart to serve. My father
would be proud of the recipi-
ents," said Knight.
Esther Jean, one of the
recipients said that before
coming to the event, she was
under the impression that
more people would be receiv-
ing the award. Born in Haiti,
Jean has been working for the
Miami-Dade County
Department of Human
Services for the past six years.
Earlier this month, she was
nominated for the "Employee
of the Year" in recognition of
excellence and commitment
shown to her clients. She is a
Please turn to KNIGHT 15B


NHS educated residents at Arcola Lakes Park


Neighborhood Housing
Services (NHS) recently held
an annual fundraiser at
Arcola Lakes Park.
Celebrating cultural diversity
and homebuyer education
opportunities, residents of
Miami teamed up with NHS
for a picnic/fundraiser called
"Neighbors at the Park."
Young and old alike played
games, enjoyed a barbecue
luncheon and listened atten-
tively for raffle prize drawing
announcements.
A major highlight included
Marc Williams, NHS
Homeownership Training
Director, addressing the crowd


U 7

Local Miami residents enjoy a moment under the pav
Neighborhood Housing Services' "Neighbors at the Park."


about homeownership train-
ing opportunities. Some atten-
dees signed up for orientation
classes to be held at NHS'
office located in Little Haiti.
Event sponsors included
Charlayne Thompkins, Winn-
Dixie and Southern
Experience Caters.
Working hard to ensure
smooth delivery of services,
committee members 'Ramona
Exum, Sherri Moss, Luldina
Quinones and Mimi St.
Germain kept events rolling
throughout the day.
For further information, con-
tact Neighborhood Housing
Services, 305-751-5511.


All should pay tithes to help with God's work


Will somebody please tell us
how to live right and how to
see ourselves.
We can easily see the faults of
others, but its so hard to see
ourselves. It makes a lot sense
to get lots of money, then you
can help a lot of people; If you
will.
Malachi 3:8 says: "Will a man
rob God? Yet you have robbed
me. But ye say, where in have
we robbed thee? In tithes and
offerings." Sinners should pay
tithes.
Malachi 3:9 says: "The whole
nation robbed God." If you
wanna be blessed in every way
of life, pay your tithes.
Non-church goers, pay your
tithes to the church to build
churches. We have thousands
of apartments being built every
month; thousands of homes
and very few churches.


Bisnop Jonn Wilson

Help me build more churches
by sending your tithes to the
Church of Tabernacle, P.O.
Box 530887, Miami, FL 33153.
Heaven will bless you. Come
to church with me Sunday at
2908 NW 62nd Street.


uctoner 1 at 7 p.m. at uospei labernacle or
Faith Deliverance Church. 3311 NW 189th Street
Miami Gardens.
____ * ___ ___ *.* i^ '- *:


ORDINATION







Pastor Carl Johnson and the 93rd Street Community Baptist Church
cordially invites you to the ordination service for the following brethren
who will be ordained as Deacons.The service will commence on Sunday,
October 1 at 5 p.m. at the 93rd Street Community Baptist Ch~rch,
2330 N.W. 93rd Street.The Guest speaker iIl bePastor Arthur Jackson, Ill,
Antioch Missionary Baptist Church of Caro[ City.









P-Oo. ALiHONSO LIMPKIN
BRO. CIARLES MvRIC









BRO. CLETIS WILLIAMS BRO. DAVID DING'I





2ome ou tt


t is notew
Bito. WILLIAM 'P:UNCl OIGE ,


V ii 1111I IlII]i' 111i i'IJmWUI Ii !I ll iI: I









1 fl> Wlti.r.'; Tflafe qpntpmhir 0 7-.Atabhpvr 3^ .200


.L&i I iLn .Uiam iLL L5Les, bpiLeoAcss'...-%. uu. J,&v


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


UL.1PAIT RlANIESR LNHO


0001
Ic_ 9 -*







<0u c Dire.........Zawyy^


93d Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"` Street
305-836-0942


/Apostolic Revival Center\
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time for T.V. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
.:X (,111 c .37 u r1i rSn(t'I
Sun. an,3 p.m. S.udy 5 pm.
WedI.- Inlecsso-y Pr.yer9 am. 12 p.m.
Mom ing S ice .................. Ia.m.
Sun. Eve. Wox hil. ........... 7:30) p. .
Ties. Prayer Meeting. 7:30 p.m.
Fri.- Bible Sudy.................7:30 p .



First Thessalonians
Missionary Baptist Church
5150 N.W. 2nd Ave.
786-333-3505

Sunday School
9:301 a.m
Sunday Morning Service
I I a.m.
Bible Study
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday



Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528



Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs... 7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7-1 I a.m.





New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10'" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
I Early Sunday Worship,..7:30) ain.
ASunday Schooll ................9:30 a.m.
Suailhy MomiingWoilship. ..I tsiun.
aSunkdy Evening Service ..6 pm.
TuesTd y Tlay yer Meetin ...7:30 pimn.
l yWxlne.sday Bible Study ...7:3 p.m.
"Not Jt a Church i Movell etl '



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3" Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8544
Order of Services:
Sunday School.......... 9:45 a.m.
Stllon Morning Set'vs...... I 1 i.
4. Si.un T....T 1:30-2:30 p.nm.
Tuesday Bible Study
Feedi, ling MiisIy..ll a10.m.
Wed. Bihc sdyPycr..6:3) pln
Th t's llte:ich Mitniry....6:301 i.


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Services:

Worship Service .............. II a.m.
Tuesday7... a ....Family Night
Wed..I I a.m..Intercessory Prayer
Wed. Bible Class .............. 7 p.m.




/ Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
w wfreiid i hti i ic n iuo.rg
friunlshiippraycr@hc llisulh aiet
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
Hour of Prayer.........6:30 t.m..
Early Moiring Worship....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School..........9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ............ 11Ia.m.
Youth Ministry Study..Wed....7 p.m.
Pryer/Bible Sludy...Wed.....7 p.m.
Noolnday Altar Pnryer...(M-F)
Feeding Ihe Hungry every
Wednesday........ a.rn.- p.m,



/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76"' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:


Tuesdays Bible Class.............7 p.m.




/ eaceful Zion Missionar


uBaptist Church o r a
2400 N.W. 68" Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
Sunday School ..........9:45 am
Morning Service ..... 1 :00 am
Communion Service
SThurs. belbre I' Sunday) 7:30 pm
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study




/The Soul Saving Station Oh
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
'1880 Washington Ave.
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
Order of Services:
Sunday School ...........9 a.1.m.
Sunday Worship..I I a.m. & 7 p.m
Tuesday Worship....... 7:45 p.m.
.Noon Day Prayer........Mon.-Fri.


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
L Ird Day Sunday Selnil..9:45mi,
Sunday Moming Worship I .....II a.m.
Sunday Men's Bible Study ....5 p.m.
Sunday Ladies Bible Study ..5 p.m.
Sunday Evening WorshiI ......6 p.m.
|: 'lliutdlay Nightl Bible Sludy ...7:30p1o
S nll spday Momning Bible ChIl I I a.m.
"TIansportiation availalue Cull:
3(05.634-4850 305-691-6958


Jordan Grove MissionaryS
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12lAve.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
Sunday School.............9 a.m.
I f : NBC ........................... 10:05 a.m.
Worship .......................11 Ia.m .
S 1Mission and Bihle Class
Y"th Meeting/Choir rehearsal




New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
F irly Moring Worship...sl & 3rd Siun.
Mon itlg W orship .............. 10:30 i1.1n.
Tile -sighl Minlisy ............... 6 1.1,1.
Pry i.rService.................. 7:3 p.
Bible Study.............................. N .
Church School ................. 9 .
\%I[ t~lilIi l l /[ lD ii


/Christian Hill AME Church\
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LM09@BellSouth.Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services:.
Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School.................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ........11 a.m.
Free Golf Every 2" & 4" Sunday ............4 p.m.
Don Shula's Golf Course


/"Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning ........... 8 a.m.
Sunday EveningSchool.............6 p.m.
\ Mon. Excellence. 7:30 p.m.
Tue. Bible Class ......... 7:30 p.m.
S Thurs. Fellowship '.10 a.m.




/ New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103"' St.
305-696-7745
Order of Services:
s u Xy Muniing wiprsli|
7:31 0 .1 & 1o:45 a.im.
Chllirch Sclol/Oricllation.ll ......> 1111.
N-ai 13;,y 'P"ycr
Mondaiy-lFilay......12 W t I p.nI

.T. sdlay .................... 7:30 |l.lll
Pro plletflss w fm.,. 1l
M v


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ........1.... 0 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday, 8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8, 19, 22, 23, 30 and 37
Web page: www.pembrokeparkcoc.org


Trinity Faith Tabernacle
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4"' Street, Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Services:
Sunday School........... 101:30 a.m
Sun. Morning Serv s......12 p .m.
Evening Worship Sen6.....6 pall.
Tuesday Youth Night' ....8 p.m.
Wed NooNi Day P l'ay)t". 12 p i.
Wed Nilgh Bible Study.8 p.m.
Thursday Night "Covington Bible
CIollege ... 6-1 1.,
Friday Night Worship Svrm5..(p.in


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 871' Street
305-836-9081

I Order of Services:
Sunday Morting Services
Sunday School- t Ia.m.
WIirship Service........ I I a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Sludy.....8 p.m.
Timrslay Prayer Servicc......8 p.ni


/ Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. I 1:5 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


/ New Mount Moriah \
Missionary Baptist Church
6700 N.W. 14th Avenue
305-691-1811
Order of Services:
Sundny Wo rasip .... ad 10 an
SuaW y Sch ool..........9:45 a a
SMonday Nger Wafiors il ... 7:30 pa.m..
M oNdaY Bihl Study .............. ................. ,
Samtua Iy o e Give- Way.................. 10




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 31 Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
Morning Worship .....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School .......... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship ...II a.m.
Naturef or IBaptist Clurche I
/ W(B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
Evening Worship ........7 p.m.
Meeting .(Tues.) 7 p.m.
rm imuTRNe90RCmmm /


Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78h Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105


Order of Services:
Blible Stud W ed ................ .
Sunday School................ i nia.m.
Suit. Witnship Serv ... 11:30 a.m.t
Wed. Night Intrciessiy Ptrayer
froiii 7:30lo 8 Jip.mii.
Sunday Wiiship Se ice ,.6:31 p.m.


aith Evangelistic Praise &
Worship Center, Int.
7770 N.W. 23rd Avenue
305-691-3865 Fax: 305-624-9065
Order of Services
Sunday Sch il ..................9:3) a.m.
Sun. Morning Woaship........... I I a.m.
T uil Pres. PIyer....................6 p.m .
Schi HMealing & D&livetnue Serv...7:3N) ptn.
WedjSal. Mlminla (pnIyer)...... tmn.
iday Youth Night.................7 p.m.


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


(New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.951' Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Early Morning Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
I Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
STuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
l ITucs. before the Ist Sun.....7pm.
Mid-week Worship




St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
Missionarly Morning Wship.7:tia.m.
Sunday School ..........9:30(1 .m.
Morning Worship .....II a.m.

Prayer Meeting ............&7:30 pm.
Bible Study ..................8 pm .



IZion Hope
Missionary Blaptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday Sch(x)l ............. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Paise/WoMship ..I Itam.
Youth Cloir- Satuaray ......ll alm.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.m.

h\1-1,iA iharm/k


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


---IN


I


I PR-PASORA ANNVERSRY ERVIES


Bishop Victol.T. Curry, D.Mill., D.D, Selliol,








The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 13B


ADRIEN, ECLEA, 89, home-
maker, died September 10 at
Aventura Hospital. Service Sunday,
10 a.m. at Jerusalem SDA Church.
Poitier Funeral Home

ALEXANDER, ELLEN, 93,
died September 24. Arrangements
are incomplete. Royal

ANDERSON, MAGGIE, 75,
retired school teacher, died
September 19 at Memorial Hospital.
Services were held. Grace

BALL, OLIVER 'LAMONT'
'CHOP,' 47,
floor technician,
died September
20 at Jackson
Hospital.
Service
Saturday, 3 p.m.
in the chapel.
Hall-Ferguson-
Hewitt

BATTEAST, JOHN, 80, died
September 15. Service Satur-
day, 1 p.m. in the chapel. Royal

BERRY, THELMA N., 77,
died September 24 at Jackson
South Community Hospital.
Memorial service Saturday, 11 a.m.
in the chapel. Jay's

BETHEL, ELLEN, 70, home-
maker, died
September24 at

Arrangements
are incomplete.
Hall-Ferguson-
Hewitt




BROWN (CLARK), VIRGINIA J.,
55, retired
supervisor of
operation for
New Horizons,
died September
22 at Jackson
Hospital.
Service
Saturday, 2:30
p.m. at New
Pro vidence
Missionary Baptist Church. Mitchell

BROWN, PETER, 46, custodian
for Miami Dade
County School
Board, died
September 19 at
Jac kson

Remains will' be
shipped to
Bostic Funeral
H o m e

South Carolina for final rites and
burial.
Poitier Funeral Home

DAVIS-RAMSEY, MOTHER
SHIRLEY
ARLINE, 71, .
died September L
22 at Cedars
Medical Center.
Surviv ors
include: chil-
dren, Therisa
Davis, Verna
Patterson
(Floyd), Frank
Davis and Butch Davis (Sandra);
step children, Pastor Thomas
Ramsey (Barbara), Dr. William
Ramsey (Mary), Gail Brown (Willie),
Robert Lee Ramsey (Faye), Bernice
Hill (Reverend A.C. Hill), Daisy
Vincent and Curtis Ramsey (Amy);
two sisters, Mamie Bennett and
Edna Brown; grandmother, Lola
Gilbert; two godchildren, Sandra
Daniels and Margaret Thomas; and
a host of other family members and
friends. Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday at New Birth
Cathedral of Faith. Interment a
Dade Memorial Park. Gregg L.
Mason

GARRISON-WILLIAMS, MARY

maker, died
September 19 at
home. Survivors
include: mother,
Julia Garrison;
children,
Raquel, Herbert,
LaCarvia and
Arielle Williams;
five sisters; two
brothers; and a host of relatives and
friends. Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at
New Beginning Praise Tabernacle
Church. Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt

GOLDING, ZAVIA, 24, died
September 20. Service Saturday,
4:30 p.m. in the chapel. Royal

GOLDWlRE, JEREMY, 20,


died September
20 in Ft.
Lauderdale.
Surviv ors
in clud e :
Jacob and
Laverne
Goldwire .
Viewing Friday,
6 p.m. in the
chapel. Service Saturday, 12 p.m. at
Mount Bethel Baptist Church. PAX
Villa


GREEN, ALPHANSO, 75, died
September 15. Arrangements are
incomplete. Royal.

HARRIS, CARRIE, 96, died
September 25. Service Saturday, 12
p.m. at Mt. Hermon A.M.E. Church.
Royal

HARRIS, KING, 74, Richmond
Heights, died September 18 at V.A.
Hospital. Arrangements are incom-
plete. Barrett-Fryar

HIGGINS, LOUISE, 83, died
September 18 at Vitas Health Care.
Services were held. Manker

HOLLINGSWORTH MATTIE
MAE, 79, Richmond Heights, died
at Jackson South Community
Hospital. Service Friday, 11 a.m. at
Macedonia Church of God In Christ.
Barrett-Fryar

JEAN, OBILAS, 72, welder,


died September 1.
Medical Center. Se
Grace

JENNINGS,
correctional offi-
cer, died
September 21
at home.
Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Jordan Grove
Missionary
Baptist Church.
Hall-Ferguson-
Hewitt


SHERIFF, KOZAR, 33, construc-
tion worker, died September 15.
Services were held. Grace

SHERIFFE, DOROTHY, Hialeah
Hospital
employee, died
September 23.
Survivors in-
clude: husband,
Balvin; sons,
Dennis, Paul
and Derrick;
dau g h ters,
Marcia, Camille,
Althea, Donna
and Antionette. Rosary and prayer
service Friday, 7 p.m. at Holy
Redeemer. Service Saturday, 10
a.m. at the church. Range

SIBBLIES, FENTON, 96, died
September 19. Service Saturday,
10:30 a.m. at Sixth Avenue Church
of God. Royal


8 at North Shore STANLEY, JEFFERY,
rvices were held. shipping and
receiving clerk
at Ateco, died
KATRIN, 33, September 21
at North Shre
Medical Center.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Evangel
C h u r c h
International.
Grace


LIPSETT, CLARENCE, 83,
died September 23. Service
Saturday, 10 a.m. at MGC Worship
Center. Royal

LOPEZ, INEZ, 91, homemak-
er, died September 20. Services
were held. Grace.

McRAE, JAMES C., 59, retired
from MTA, died
September 21.
Service





Mitchell


MELLS, SAMUEL 'SAMMIE,'
56, died
September 17
at Jackson
Hospital.
Services wy e r
M held. Manker





MOORE, MARILYN, 53, home-
maker, died September 17 at
Jackson Hospital. Services were

Poitier Funeral Home

PERRY, WILLINGTON, 57, labor-
er, died
September 20
at North Shore
Medical C.enter.
S e r v i c e
Saturday in the
chapel.



Poitier Funeral Home

PROPHETE, ULMA C., 99, died
September 21 at St. Ann's Nursing
Home. Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
Martin Memorial A.M.E. Church.

REYNOLDS HOMER
THEODORE, 51, died September 20
in Miramar. Sevices were held. Jay's

ROUNDTREE, MAMIE, 59,
custodian for
Dade County
Public Schools,
died September
23 at Cedars
Hospital.

Saturday, 10
a.m. at New
P rovi den ce
Missionary
Baptist Church. Grace

SAMMS, MAJORIE, 68, home-
maker, died
September 20
at home.
Vie wing
Wednesday, 4-8
p.m. in the
chapel. Hall-

Hewitt


SAMUELS, MILTON ALLEN,
JR., 45, con-
struction worker,
died September
22 at Cedars
Medical Center.

Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Good News
Little River
Baptist Church.


Poitier Funeral Home


THOMPSON, UHILDA, 55, died,
September 22. Arrangements are
incomplete. Royal

TORRES, VIRGINIA, 64, died
Setember 19. Services were held.
Grace

YOUNG, JOHN CORNEL, 48,
pobation officer,
died September
22 at North
Shore Medical
C e n t e r


Denise Wilson;
dau g h ter ,
Stenise Rolle;
mother, Loretta
Cohen; grandson, Donovan Jordan;
uncle, Arlester Young (Evelyn); two
aunts, Patricia and Nina Rodgers;
and a host of other family members
and friends. Visitation Thursday, 2-9
p.m. Family hour 6-7 p.m. Service
Friday, 11 a.m.. at Mt. Tabor
Missionary Baptist Church.
Interment at Southern Memorial
Park. Gregg L. Mason


Death Notice


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


BOBBY CHARLES JONES
aka 'CABBAGE HEAD'


1962 2006


A true soldier was called home
to study war no more. There's
not a day that goes by that I
don't think of you. I will forever
love you.
I can still hear you say, "Every
good soldier needs to rest."
Rest on good soldier you fought
a good fight.
Your special friend.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


JAMES C. JONES, SR.

05/28/12 09/24/91


Therefore if any man be in
Christ, he is a new creature: old
things are passed away; behold,
all things are become new.
II Corinthians 5:17
The family.

In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


HARRIS, CARRIE, 96, died
September 25.
Survivors include: son, Robert
(Joanne) Byrd; granddaughters,
Judith Brown and Tracy Byrd-
Roubides; grandsons, Lamar
Joey and Anthony Harris; and
eight great grands.
Service Saturday, 12 p.m. at
Mt. Hermon A.M.E. Church.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


PRINCESS LATIMORE


12/12/62 10/01/03

It's been three years since
you've been gone. We think of
you always, but especially today.
You will never be forgotten, al-
though we don't see your smil-
ing face.
Your memory is a keepsake,
with which we will never part.
We have hopes of seeing you in
the ressurection.
We love you always. Morn, Dad
and family.


DEBORAH MOORER

04/08/52 09/28/05


Mommy, one year has passed
and my heart still aches as if it
was yesterday.
Sadly missed, Sheena and
family.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late.


EMMA Y. LELAND
'TINA'


10/27/63 08/19/06

would like to take this opportu-
nity to thank the many family
and friends for your kindness,
thoughts and prayers during
our hour of sorrow.
A special thanks to St. Mark
Missionary Baptist Church, Rev-
erend Joseph Williams, Janet
Redmon.
The LeLand, Thompkins,
Wilson and Smith families.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


With our deepest appreciation,
we are so grateful to each of you
for your outpouring of love,
kindness and support during
our time of sorrow. Especially
the members of "BTW"s Class of
62, Elder Herbert L. Davis and
all who came and shared in his
great homecoming.


Death Notice


KATRIN E. HARRELL-JEN-
NINGS, 33, died September 21.
She was the last child born to
Annie K. Philmore and Curtis L.
Harrell, Sr.
Katrin graduated from Miami
Northwestern Senior High
._chool, class of '91. Katrin grad-
uated from Miami Dade County
Corrections Academy becoming
a certified Correctional Officer.
Throughout her years working
as a correctional officer, many of
her co-workers reaped the bene-
fits of Katrin's knowledge dedi-
cation, generosity, commitment
and profound friendship.
On July 5, 2003, God united
the hearts of Katrin and Carlos
to be one with each other. They
continued to grow in an ever-
lasting love of 15 years. A few
years ago Katrin received Jesus
Christ as he personal Savior.
Survivors include: husband,
Carlos; children, Contravis and
Sade; step children, Carla, Car-
los, Jr., Paris, Shakeevia and In-
dia.
Viewing Friday, 3-9 p.m. at
Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary.
Service and repast Saturday, 2
p.m. at Jordan Grove Baptist
Church, 5946 N.W. 12th
Avenue.
All contributions will be
accepted at 1286 N.W. 53rd
Street.


RUBY MAE GIBSON, 65,
Coconut Grove, died September
23 at Mercy Hospital.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at
St. Matthews Baptist Church.

{A .< ?3'


we sincerely appreciate your
many deeds, thoughts, prayers,
cards, visits and phone calls ex-
pressed during our time of grief.
Special thanks goes to Saint
John Baptist Church and choir
along with Reverend Gregory D.
Thompson and choir of New
Harvest Missionary Baptist
Church and the many people
whose lives she touched.
Keep us in your prayers.
Thanks from the- Kelly,
Henderson, Smith and Pruitt
families.


CHARLES SIMMONS
HAYES, 62, died September 22.
Interment at National


Cemetery Bushnell, FL.
All donations to be
College Fund at
Episcopal Church,
Grove.


GARFIELD 'DOY,'
McCALL, JR., 74, died
September 22 at V.A. Hospital.
He is survived by his wife,
Josie; daughter, Nancy (Dwight)
Price; two grandchildren, Corey
Price and Sharon (Ralph)
Montgomery; two great grand-
children, Genea and Cornelius
Montgomery; brother, T.W.
(Bernice) McCall; two sisters,
Arnita Wiggins and Susie (Willie)
Brown; and sister-in-law,
Dorothy McCall.
The wake will be Thursday,
September 28, 6:30 p.m. at
Wright Funeral Home, 15332
NW 7th Avenue. Services will be
held Friday, September 29, 2
p.m. at Bethany Seventh-day
Adventist Church, 2500 NW
50th Street.


iK.. ........... ~~l: '': :., .}' : ... .. .......... . ... 7[ -


Card of Thanks


OLIVER LEE FLAMBRO ARVESTA MAE KELLY
'BIG 0'
'MS. BEA'


Death Notice


given to
Christ
Coconut


Death Notice


Death Notice


ac s ust ontro er wn es ny


lB k M C l Th i O D ti








1 A t Thoa Miami Timesc Qentmhbr 97-Ontnhper 3 2006 B


11111111


0ompt calendar


CALENDAR
continued from 9B

Miami-Dade County Public
Schools will host a Reading
Rally before the last Florida
Marlins game, October 1 at
9:30 a.m at the Dolphin
Stadium. Admission is free.
For more information, please
call 305-995-1912.

Lauderhill Businesses and
"It's In You" Speakers
Network, along with several
community organizations, are
hosting AWAKE! An Inventors
Expo on October 7 from 9
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. For details,
contact Dr. Judith Ann at
754-245-2093.

The Militant Labor Forum
will host "The Middle East,
Capitalism's World Disorder
and Prospects for
Revolutionary Change" at the
Militant Forum Hall,
September 30 at 4 p.m. For
more Information, please call
305-756-4436.

Miami-Dade Transit will be
providing express Metromover
service for passengers attend-
ing the Grand Opening cere-
monies at the Carnival Center
for the performing Arts
October 5-October 8. For
transit information, call 305-
770-3131.

The Eric E. Williams
Memorial Lecture at Florida
International University cele-
brates its eighth consecutive
year on October 6 a 6 p.m.
with a lecture titled "Eric
Williams and the Continuing
Challenges of a Diverse
Carribean" at the Wertheim
Performing Arts Center.
Admission is free and open to
the public. For more informa-
tion, please contact 305-919-
5521 or africana@flu.edu.

The Junior League of
Miami is hosting its third
annual Golf Tournament at
Crandon Park Golf Course on
October 13. The day includes
a luncheon and 18 holes of
competitive golf for fun and
prizes. For more information
on '"the event or to 'become a


11- -- --- m


sponsor, please visit the
Junior League of Miami web-
site at
http://www.jlmiami.org or
event co-chairs Kim Sarkisian
at ksarkisian@bellsouth.net
or Linda Criblez at lin-
dacriblez@yahoo .com.

The Community of West
Perrine is invited to come out
to the renaming of SW 179th
Street to Reverend Joe L.
Sumpter Sr. Street,
September 27 at 2:30 p.m. at
St. Peters Missionary Baptist
Church.

Life and Learning Centers
will have homebuyer classes
every Wednesday from 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Class space is limit-
ed. Call 305-690-4391 today
to register. Ask for Bettye.

The Center for Family and
Child Enrichment, Inc. is
currently recruiting Foster
Parents and Adoptive Parents.
For more Information, call
305-694-7450. ext. 190.

Booker T. Washington
High School Alumni
Athletic Club is accepting
requests for candidates for
the 2006 07 Hall of Fame
Banquet. You can pick up the
nomination forms Monday -
Friday from 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
The deadline for submitting is
September 30. For more infor-
mation, please call Thomas
Marshall at 305-754-6048.

Neighbor to Family, Inc.
(NTF) is looking for families
that are willing to open their
hearts and home to children
in need of temporary foster
care placement. For more
information, call 786-433-
4731.

CHARLEE Homes for
Children is looking for per-
sons interested in becoming
Foster or Adoptive parents.
For more information, please
call Danay Sanchez at 305-
779-9609 or visit us on the
web at
www. charleeprogram. org.

Sabbath Memorial Dog
Rescue Center is looking for


homes for their dogs. Anyone
interested in adopting a dog,
call 305-799-1567.

Maxim and Bud Light's
"Real Men of Comedy Tour"
will be held October 1 at the
Jackie Gleason Theater. For
ticket information, call 305-
358-5885.

The Institute for
Authentic Social Work is
looking for volunteers to train
as Life Coaches for its
Sisterhood Connection pro-
gram. Contact The Institute at
305-770-1533. Training
begins in September. One
year commitment required.

Terra Lingua (non-profit
organization) is seeking vol-
unteers to host English
speaking Foreign Exchange
Students from various coun-
tries ages 15-18. For more
information, call 877-520-
2522.

Bank of America and Life
and Learning Centers will be
holding Homebuyer
Education classes on
Wednesdays from 6:30-8:30
p.m. For more information,
call 305-690-4391.

:The City of Hollywood is
isekirig Fine Arts and Crafts
for their fourth annual
International Art and Music
Festival on October 21-22.
For more information, call
954-921-3404.

The Neighborhood
Partnership Program-


ECHOS at the Belafonte
Tacolcy Center provides reli-
able services and confidential
support to Liberty City fami-
lies in need. Call 305-751-
1295 between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. to set your appointment
today.

Class Meetings
The Miami Carol
City/North Dade High
School Class of 1967 is hold-
ing a meeting to discuss our
40th Class Reunion in 2007,
September 30 at 7 p.m. at St.
Peters A.O.C. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben
Lightner at 954-486-2144 or
Marveen Hollinger Seldon at
305-693-6844.

The B.T.W. Class of '61 will
be selling dinners on
Saturday, October 7 at Our
Lord Saviour Lutheran
Church from 12 p.m. until 4
p.m. For more information,
please call 305-332-3951.

All Northwestern Bulls!
Calling all former Band
Members (especially drum-
mers), Majorettes, Cheer
Leaders, Drill Team Members,
Color Guards and Flagettes.
Come one, come all to the Old
Timers Pep Rally being held by
the Alumni Association of
Miami Northwestern for the
Soul Bowl, which will also
include the 50th School year
recognition, Friday, November
3 and the Black and White
Ball, Saturday, November 4.
For more information, please
call 305-625-5590 or 305-
244-2528.


Miami Jackson Alumni
Association Inc. needs all
Reunion Organizing
Committee's Class President
and Vice-President from the
Classes 1980 through 2004 to
call 786-399-8593. The
Alumni Association will be
establishing an e-mail alert
system to help members react
quickly to important develop-
ments in the Association and
at Miami Jackson Sr. High
School.

The Miami Carol City Class
of "81" will host their Family
and Friends Weekend in Vero
Beach October 20-22, Skating
and Card Party on October 28,
The 50/50 Affair on November
24 and Christmas Party on
December 23. For more infor-
mation, call 305-688-5914.

The Tuskegee vs.
Morehouse football game will
be held October 7 in
,Columbus, Georgia. The
Broward Tuskegee Alumni is
sponsoring a bus to the game.
For more information, call
Juanita Williams at 954-742-
2668 or Ronald Braynon at
954-749-9835.
******
Miami Northwestern's
'Class of 1967 are making
plans for their 40th Reunion.
Come and be a part of it. For
more information, please call
Connie Sheffield at 305-626-
0757 or Elaine Patterson at
305-757-4471.

Booker T. Washington's
1962 Alumni Class meets on


IN MEMORIA~e HAPY BIRTHDAY REMEBRNE*DAHOI7S


Death Notice


In Memoriam


In loving memory of.


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


In Memoriam


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


CORA JAMES JOHNSON,
75, of Ft. Lauderdale, died Sep-
tember 19 at Florida Medical
Center.
Surviyors include: husband,
Clarence Johnson; sisters,
Lucille Walton and Susie
Mannings; care giving nieces,
Joise Thornton, Alice Ritter and
Deborah Mannings.
Services Saturday, September
30, 1 p.m. at Piney Grove First
Baptist Church, 4699-W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Lauderdale
Lakes, FL 33313.


Death Notice:


It's been one year since the
Lord has called you home. We
think of you always, especially
today. You will always be the
world's greatest mom and never
forgotten in our hearts. We know
you are in a better place resting
with your beloved sister, (Diane).
Love always, your mother, four
children, granddaughter, sis-
ters, brothers, and your favorite
niece.


It's been eight months since
you've left us to go home to your
Heavenly Father.
Mother, it hurts a lot that you
are gone, but we know that you
have gone to a better home.
Happy birthday, we love and
miss you.
Love always, husband, chil-
dren, grand and great grands,
family and friends.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


The Jim Crow Theory


CURRY
continued from 10B

accident or by design; mount-
ing evidence now shows that
voting results in the last two
presidential elections were
altered in many counties.
That is Jim Crow!!!
These two elections repre-
sented a throwback to the
thuggish tactics of the Bush
regime. Blackwell and Bush
enthusiastically embraced
naked and blatant voter sup-
pression, dirty tricks and the
outright theft of votes. That is
Jim Crowl
Why should we "get over"
105,000 voter registrations
cancelled over the last four
years in Republican-dominated
counties? Why should we turn
away as 34,000 former felons
are lied to by 20 counties about
their eligibility to vote? Why
should we remain silent while


students are forced to wait in
line up to 10 hours to vote?
Why should we ignore long
lines of African-American citi-
zens standing in a cold rain for
up to six hours in Columbus
because Secretary of State J.
Kenneth Blackwell and
Franklin County Board of
Elections Executive Director
Matt Damschroder conducted
an election with only half the
machines they needed? That
is Jim Crow!
We refuse to accept the crim-
inal activity of George Bush
and the Republican party who
runs an aggressive dirty tricks
campaign to frighten and
intimidate the poor and black
voters. George Bush and the
Republican Party are turning
history upside and reverting
back to Jim Crow tactics and
unless we stand up, speak out
and vote they will steal the
election again.


Dewey Knight Scholarships presented


KNIGHT
continued from 11B

senior at FIU and is scheduled
to receive her Bachelor's in
Public Administration in the
spring. Jean was honored to


know that she was among
only three other recipients
honored for their academic
service. "I feel proud. I will
keep doing outside work
because it makes me feel
good, "said Jean.


Card of Thanks

We the family of the late,


FRANCES NEWBOLD, 60,
operation room technician at
Aventura Hospital, died
September 21.
Survivors include: two .sons,
Ruben Newbold and Steven
Newbold; and a host of other rel-
atives and friends. Funeral serv-
ices will be held Saturday, 12
p.m. at Jordan Grove
Missionary Baptist Church.
Range Funeral Home will be
conducting the service.

Public Notice

As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age,
place of death, employment,
and date, location, family phone
number and time of services.
Additional information and
photo may be included for a
nominal charge. The deadline is
IVMonday at 3:30 p.m.


BOBBY NELL NELOMS,
would like to send a heartfelt
thank you to all who called, vis-
ited, opened their hearts and
poured out love during our time
of bereavement. We will forever
be grateful for your thoughts
and prayers during this time.
We also would like to extend a
special thank you to Pastor
Cummings and the New Life
Baptist Church family and Royal
Funeral Home. Also to the
Miami Dade County Solid Waste
Management 3B, Miami Dade
Corrections and Miami Dade
County Public Schools.
We truly appreciate the won-
derful support given from all of
you. Again, thank you and God
Bless.
The Neloms Family


HELEN COLEMAN

01/10/49 01/29/98


BEULAH MAE MCKINNEY

With grateful hearts we
express our appreciation for the
outpouring of love shown during
our time of sorrow.
Special thanks to Reverend
Dr. Joreatha M. Capers, Ebenzer
United Methodist Church fami-
ly, neighbors, friends and rela-
tives. We shall always remember
you in our prayers. May God
bless each of you.
Sincerely,
Beloved son, Bobby E.
Stinson, Sr. and the entire fami-
ly.


CYNTHIA JACKSON

03/11/57 06/25/99

To my mother and two sisters,
may you continue to rest in
God's heavenly throne.
Love, Earnestine Headings,
Conswella, lises and the
Jackson family.


DENISE L. BRANDON BERNICE STEPHENS
'NEE NEE'
09/21/36 01/22/06
06-15-64 09-23-05


GERTRUDE JACKSON

02/27/31 09/25/96


Deadline for obituaries are due

Monday, 3:30 p.m.

Call 305-694-6210


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


the first Saturday of the
month at Miami-Dade Police
Sub-Station at 4 p.m. to make
plans for the 45th Reunion in
June 2007. For more informa-
tion, please call Helen
Tharpes Boneparte at 305-
691-1333.

Richmond Heights Middle
School will join middle school
students around the state to
attempt to break the Guinnes
World Record in reading for
the "Most People Reading
Simultaneously in Multiple
Locations," September 28 at
11 a.m. During a live broad-
cast, Governor Jeb Bush will
lead the statewide read-aloud
using an excerpt from the
book Peter and the
Starcatchers. For more infor-
mation, please call 305-235-
2316.

Miami Northwestern Class
of 1971 35th Class
Reunion invites all fellow
graduates of 1971 to celebrate
with them October 22-
October 29. Featured events
incude Friday Night in White
party on October 27 and the
Willie Everett Memorial
Scholarship Ball on October
28. For more information,
please call 305-307-2416.

Send your community
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamitedito-
rial@bellsouth.net or mail
to 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, 33127-1818. For
further information, call
305-694-6216.














I ~ ~'


Great


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-AP Photo


The breakdown

of sibling roles

Jealousy among siblings
is normal, but unhealthy


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward@miamitimesonline.com


For those of us who have been blessed with sib-
lings, we know that sometimes there are friendly
rivalries amongst us. But harboring feelings of envy
and jealousy towards each other creates an
unhealthy family environment. Subconsciously, each
child plays a significant role in the family, which is
usually determined by the order in which they were
born. Siblings often believe that their role is either
more or less important than the other. This puts
pressure on parents to choose the happiness of one
child over another, which is a decision that most
times is impossible to make.
The oldest sibling often has an obvious advantage
because new mothers are extremely excited and
strive to capture every moment of their first child's
development. The eldest usually has more pictures,
more traveling experiences or accumulated a vast
amount of material items because it's much easier
providing for one child than it is for two or three.
This child's position is the gatekeeper of their sib-
lings and often requires them to play the role of 'sec-v
ond parent,' which is usually annoying to the
younger siblings.
The middle child club, which I am proudly a mem-
ber of, is stereotyped to have a
'syndrome' where they feel overshadowed by the
oldest and prioritized after the youngest. Middle chil-
dren are usually the ones that feel left out because
they fight for attention. They are also put in an awk-
ward position in the family because they live in the
shadows of their older siblings, but are expected to
protect their younger ones. Middle children are also
the "test dummies" for their parents who may have
noticed something they did wrong with their first
child and use the middle one to correct their mis-
takes, which ultimately establishes new ground for
the younger one.
The youngest child is the 'baby' of the family.
Parents feel the responsibility of taking extra meas-
ures to make sure they are safe and protected when
they release them to the world. These children are
Please turn to ROLES 3C


copyrighted Material


yndicated Content


CommercialINews Provi<









2C The Miami Times, September 27-October


Ophelia E. Brown-Lawson
celebrated 43 years of service as
Head Start Director and, subse-
quently, Executive Director of
the Community Action Agency
last Friday at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel. It was a "pomp and cir-
cumstance" of an escort with 12
elegantly-dressed men carrying
red roses; George Lane and the
House Rockers; VIP's from the
State County and Cities; and the
original Drifters added the frost-
ing on the cake.
As the 1000 guests arrived,
they were greeted with jazz
music provided by Ivan
Johnson, who used his guitar
and vocal ability. They entered a
room designed by Royal Affair,
Inc. with emblematic flags, cov-
ered chairs, centerpieces elevat-
ed two feet above the table and a
red carpet for the honoree to
walk while en route to the room
AaInaied: Club Ophelia.
To the music, "Celebration,"
the honoree entered with her
escorts, Ronald Herndon and
Dr. William Zubkoff, emcees,
described the event, followed by
welcome and greetings from
Rudolph Givens, II, Regina M.
Giles, Anthony Brunson,
Shantelle Douglas filled up the
room with her rich voice, Dr.
Robert Ingram gave the invoca-
tion and Reverend Michael K.
Bouie blessed of the food.
Brown-Lawson was inundated
with proclamations, plaques, an
orchid from Lane and a "bling
bling" gift from her husband,
Lawson. Proclamations were
presented by Congresswoman
Carrie Meek, Senator Larcenia
Billard, Rep. Edward Bullard,
Commissioners Barbara Jordan


and Dr. Barbara Carey-Shuler:
Mayors Carlos Alvarez, Miami-
Dade Count; Joseph L. Kelley,
Opa-locka; Kevin Burns, North
Miami; Horace G. Fleix, South
Miami; Roscoe Warren,
Homestead; and Otis T Wallace,
Florida City.
In addition, Miami-Dade
County manager, George
Burgess, presented the honoree
with tickets to see Color Purple in
New York, while family presented
her with 2-tickets to "anywhere."
Other presenters included
Juanita Heinzez, John
Edwards, Sarah Greene,
Modesto Abety, Dr. William
Atkins, Dorothy Lee, Edith
Brown, Givens, Brown and
Lawson families.
During the elegant dinner, the
guests were treated with a video
presentation of This Is
Your Life which emulat-
ed another part of the
honoree's life. There
were also remarks from
Commissioner Dorrin
Rolle and Daryle
Jones, candidate for Lt.
Governor.
Brown-Lawson came
on strong as she revisit-
ed her beginning as a
volunteer in the head JOA
start programs and a
recommendation from Ransom
Hill, retired MacArthur South
Principal, to be paid for her serv-
ices. She also alluded to numer-
ous of politicians who assisted
her along the way and made a
way when there was no way. The
guests stood when she reached
the dais and applauded when
she was finished.
Then it was celebration time as


3, 2006


the Drifters took to the band-
stand and the dancers moved to
Rock & Roll, doing The Twist,
The Popeye, etc. A great deal of
community pride rose as The
Drifters Band joined with
George Lane and the House
Rockers to create a sensational
finale of singing, dancing and
memorable fun as the honoree
visited each table thanking her
guests for supporting her retire-
ment.


As Dr. Enid C.
Pinkney, founder, The
Historical Hampton
House Trust (HHHT),
and her committee con-
tinue to work diligently
towards restoration,
some of the members
have reiterated the proj-
ect is moving too slowly
and the County should pINor
speed up its commit-
ment. These members
include Melton Mustafa, chair-
man, Hampton House Jazz
Cultural group, along with newly
joining members Ken Wright,
Rod Hardemon and Ernest
Davenport, who simplified the
HH.-O task with an organiza-
12ol| tional chart that includ-
ed the vision of estab-
lishing a museum of
jazz, jazz information
and a library for the

The "movers and
shakers" of the County
that are working to alle-
viate the problem
include Silvia Unzueta,
WDAN CED, Rick Glasgow,
OCED, Maria
Rodriguez-Porto, OCED, Betty
Alexander, DBO and Ed Hall,
prospective architect.
Kudos go out to the HHHT and
HHJCO for their input. The
HHJCO has been meeting for
12-consecutive weeks to share
their expertise towards restora-
tion. Some of the members are
Charlie Austin, George Lane,
Bobby Chinn, Mel Dancy,


7d


Dalton Nickerson, Eugenia
Thomas, Dr. Lolida Dobbs, Dr.
Edwin Demeritte, Charlayne
Thompkins and Commissioner
Dorothy Johnson, president.
According to Pinkney, perti-
nent issues are (1) unveiling of a
sign, (2) Luis Peneles Tribute
and reports from China Valles,
Zakiyyah Mustafa and Melton
Mustafa. The public is invited to
any Thursday meeting at 4 p.m.
library.
S* *****
Eugene Morrison,
president and the 15-
members of the Retired
Employee of
Tran s p o r t ation
Coalition, did their
annual thing of picnick-
ing in the Arcola Lakes
Park, Saturday,
September 16.
NEY Joining them were
Johnny King, VP;
Barbara Sheppard, sec-
retary; Elizabeth Barfield,
treasurer; Franklin Pinckney,
financial secretary; Reverend
Aris Perkins, chaplain; Robert
Baker, business manager;
Freddie Wooten, caller; Vilma
Walker, b/day chair; Lois
Anderson; Johnny Johnson;
T.C. Williams; Josie Poitier;
William "Scuffel" Harden; Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Jordan; Joe
Lassister, DJ; Emitt and John
Richburg and Delancy Green.
The organization gives out
scholarships, toys for tots, visits
a member church every ,fifth
Sunday and will have a banquet,
Oct. 14 at St. Paul A.M.E. at 6
p.m.


SRO was the concept at
Ebenezer United Methodist
Church when Revererend Dr.
Joreatha Capers, pastor, and
Pernella Burke, chair, present-
ed the Bethune-Cookman
College Concert Chorale in a full
performance with Dr. Rebecca
Steele still at the helm for over
40-years.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The performance was pep-


The performance was pep-
pered with Dr. Capers speaking
on the topic: "Knocked Down,
but Not Out", while Ministers
Pamela Hall, David Larmond
and Joann Brookins added the
frosting on the religious cake.
A special offering was taken for
the college that Francena Hall
Scott opened with $500 from
the Dr. Aaron Hall
Foundation, followed by
John Williams, Audley
Coakley, Carol
Weatherington, Gwen
LaVan, Charlie and
Dorothy Davis, Everlyn
Davis, T. Eilene
Martin-Major, whose
daughter, Tia, per-
formed, Aggie Reed, Dr.
Geraldine Gilyard, Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan, SAS
Dorothy Sanders and
Annette Williams.
Everyone stood in awe as the
choir ended with a unique reces-
sional that brought a tremen-
dous applause from the many
parents in attendance.


On September 9, Shawntria
Demise Sasser celebrated her
birthday party sports style. Her
theme was unique as she asked
her guests to wear sports attire
representing the professional
Miami teams: The Miami
Dolphins, The Miami Heat and
the University of Miami.
Each team had their very own
section with plenty of decorative
team paraphernalia such as
team flags. pencils, cereal
boxes, license plates and key
chains to accent each team sec-
tion. Kick off was @ 8 p.m. at
the Shawntria Dome aka the
Fire Fighters Hall. The party
started with a pep rally to hype
up the guests before Shawntria
made her Grand Entrance.
The crowd was encouraged by
the 20 loud, stomping and
chanting cheerleaders and the
dancing football player. As the
crowd started getting louder
and more excited, they


screamed Shawntria's name
anticipating her grand
entrance. Shawntria made her
grand entrance wearing an
exquisite turquoise and lime
green evening gown. All of the
175 plus guests gave her a
standing ovation cheering her
on down the isle.
As Shawntria made her way
down the middle of the
isle her and the cheer-
leaders started a line
dance, the party got
started. Smiles hugs
and lots of love were
shared at this joyous
occasion being that
some of Shawntria's
guests were family,
childhood friends and
classmates from ele-
aSER mentary, middle and
high school.
The sports theme was really a
huge success. The menu con-
sisted of grilled hot dogs,
sausages. Hamburgers and
cheeseburgers to really set off
the atmosphere. At midnight
Shawntria changed into her
sports attire to match her
guests.
As the guests gathered
around the hand painted cake
with Shawntria's picture on it to
sing happy birthday, Mr. Clint
Smart serenaded Shawntria
with a personalized happy birth-
day song. Shawntria gives spe-
cial thanks to her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Larry Williams Sr.;
her cheerleaders, Kasha
Anderson, Katrina Bentley,
Tammy Bernard, Chenika
Chambers, Patrina Coney,
Latrina Floyd, Tammy
Hawkins, Italia Hunter, Evelyn
Martinez, Shawndria Milligan,
Jennifer Philias, Janelle Sims,
Melody Smith, Angela and
Tangela Stanely, Claudette
Thompson, Beverly Williams,
Lory Williams. Also Carl
McNair, Larry Williams Jr.,
Todd Williams; Poor Boys D.J.'s
and the tremendous amount of
guests that attended her fabu-
lous gala!!!


Velda North, daughter of
Bonita North and the late
Quentin L. ,Northanand daughter of the late Chiaries
North and Ruth North-Polite,
has received the U.S. Attorney
General award for distin-
guished service by the
"Southeast Bomb Task Force."
This award was received in
recognition of service rendered
in 1996, when in Atlanta, Ga.
one person was killed and over
one hundred injured. Velda
works for the United States
Justice Department.
Congratulations Cousin!
Harry and Harold
McCartney (Twins) celebrated
their 80th Birthday with a fab-
ulous party at the family com-
pound. Happy, happy birthday!
They served all the native dish-
es and the party was enjoyed by
all. Leon's (Creep's) son Eric
was down from our nation's
capital for his uncles' bash and
Effie and her children were
down from their adopted home
of New York for her dad's birth-
day and also to christen her
daughter, Lauren, while in the
city last week.
Thanks to Jason Taylor and
his friends, who scored all the
touchdowns when they treated
deserving students to a shop-
ping spree. Each child received
$300 to spend and were assist-
ed by'the football stars Jason
Taylor, Daunte Culpepper,


Chris Chambers, Ronnie
Brown and Randy McMichael.
AlsWO plging i frpo aha ^0.eat
fame were Alonzo Mourning,
Udonis Haslem and Tim
Hardaway, along with rapper
Trick Daddy. Super, super,,
super, Gentlemen!
Jacksonville Jaguars
Team origin: 1995
Stadium information:
Name: Alltel Stadium
Year opened: 1995
Playing surface: Grass
Football seating capacity:
73,000
Atlanta Falcons
Team Origin: 1966
Stadium information:
Name: Georgia Dome
Year opened: 1992
Origin of stadium name: For
the state
Playing surface: Astroturf
Football seating capacity:
71,594
There is a record breaking
enrollment this year at
Bethune-Cookman College.
Our enrollment is up from
2004. 3000 students are now
enrolled. We are very proud
"Wildcats." Continue to growl
Herbert Johnson, son of
Inez McKinney-Johnson
returned home last week to
join the family in celebrating
his mother's birthday
September 16. Herbert and his
sister Kayla live in Houston,
Texas.


Get well wishes to all of you,
from all of us! Chester Fair,
Joyce Major-Hepburn,
Frances Brown, Julia
Johnson, Leola Charlow-
Wade, Sue Francis, Mae
Hamilton-Clear, Ralph "RC"
McCartney, Franklin
Beckwith, Patricia Ebron, Dr.
James K. Johnson, Ruby
King and Annie Beckwith.
.Happy, wedding anniversary
greetings:
Harry and Carmen
Dawkins, September 19: Their
27th
Nathaniel and Roderiqua S.
Gordon, September 19: Their
36th
Kofi Annan, United Nations
Secretary General, will sing his
swan song come December
after 10 years as secretary gen-
eral. South Korean Ban Ki-
Moon, 62, a Harvard graduate,
may succeed Kofi Annan.
Here for the funeral of their
aunt and cousin Cleomie
Allen-Smith were: Allen
Alexander Smith,
Indianapolis, Indiana; John
Harvey Smith; Dannica Fitts
and her hubby Ben Fitts;
Kevin Smith; Adeesha Smith
and Carl Willis. They came
from Daytona Beach and Saint
Petersburg. Pearl Oliver, came
from Ft. Worth, Texas. Pearl is
the daughter-in-law of Pat
Allen-Ebron; Barry Huff, Pat's
Godson, flew in from
Minneapolis, Minnesota. By
the way Barry Huff is presi-
dent of "Glory Food Company"
in Columbus, Ohio.
Congratulations to the
Braynon and Jennings fami-
lies whose son and grandson
will wed Melissa Mae in
November. Oscar James II is


Hiask rmm.kI turn imM. h4 nc r ul

M e -.


the son of Oscar and Patricia
Braynon, Sr. and grandson of
Ronald Braynon and the late
Cora Braynon and Rashford
(Sonny) and Wilhelmenia


Jennings.
Elva Heastie-Jones,
Gamble-Floyd Lewis and
Grace Heastie-Patterson send
a big hello to old-time friends


and classmates.


and classmates.
The best and most beautiful
things in the world cannot be
seen or even touched. They
must be felt with the heart.

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Don't Miss One Word


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.......................... ...... l ME : ..i .... ... ........ .... ... .. a


Support The Times We're always working for you ,

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The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 SC


s kcalB Must Control Th y


Congress shouldn't mandate


government ID to vote


The House of Representatives
passed a bill that would require
voters to show a photo ID before
they are allowed to cast their bal-
lots. The bill, known as the
Federal Election Integrity Act, is
part of the government's crack


down on illegal immigrants.
However, hundreds of thousands
of American citizens the elderly
and ex-offenders among them -
could potentially be denied their
constitutional right to vote if this
becomes law. Though a Georgia


judge recently declared a similar
law unconstitutional, Congress
has decided to move this bill for-
ward. If this government is com-
mitted to ensuring all Americans
have a voice in the political
debate, then this issue has to be
tabled... for good.
According to a report spon-
sored by the Justice Department,
such a requirement would dis-
proportionately affect Latinos
and Blacks, the elderly, the
homeless, low-income people and
married women. Studies show
these groups are less likely to
carry a photo ID. Currently, vot-
ers are required to show one of
several pieces of identification to
vote. Among them are driver's
licenses or state issued IDs, util-


ity bills and social security cards.
Under the proposed law, voters
must prove citizenship with a
photo ID. Since most states don't
require citizenship to obtain a
state ID or driver's license, the
only piece of identification on the
approved list that meets this
requirement is a passport, which
can cost up to $100. Recent sta-
tistics indicate only 25-percent of
voting age Americans have a
passport.
A few months ago, Congress
shocked many of skeptics and
reauthorized the Voting Rights
Act of 1965, giving all American's
free and clear access to vote for
the next quarter century. Yet,
here we are once again debating
who in America should and


should not vote. The bill's sup-
porters contend that this
requirement would prevent
those ineligible to vote from
doing so. However, according to
the American Civil Liberties
Union, a nonprofit organization
dedicated to preserving our con-
stitutional rights, less than 100
people have been convicted of
election fraud in the last four
years. Knowing this, we have to
ask ourselves: If voter fraud is so
uncommon, who are we trying to
keep away from the polls? With
the stories of voter intimidation
that came out of Florida and
Ohio during the 2000 and 2004
elections, we have to wonder if
this bill is an attempt at legally
keeping people of color indi-


viduals most likely to vote pro-
gressive agendas .- away from
the polls. Is this bill really about
voter integrity or is it a way to
make sure the conservatives
maintain power?
Election reform is a serious
issue in this country and it has
to be dealt with. But denying
American citizens the right to
vote is not the way to do It. By
voting down this bill, the Senate
can stand by the commitment it
made to historically disenfran-
chised people when it reautho-
rized the Voting Rights Act.
Judge Greg Mathis is national
vice president of Rainbow PUSH
and a national board member of
the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference.


* White Bovi In The Hood* Crossover movie gives a lesson in integrity


MOVIE
continued from 1C


--




"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Provid


- d


4 b -


Siblings should find a way to get along


ROLES
continued from 1C

the hardest for parents to let go
of when they become adults.
Older children have the
responsibility of making sure
their youngest sibling doesn't
get taken advantage of, which
in turn makes them feel over-
protected and is a constant
reminder of their age. The
'baby' also has a dislike for
being called so-and-so's little


brother or sister instead of
being referred to by name. In
families where a lineage has
been established, the youngest
is expected to follow in the
footsteps of their older siblings
and often makes them feels as
if they don't have their own
identity.
I can't speak for everyone's
family situation, but I have
learned that the majority of
parents love all their kids the
same. Most parents prioritize


what they give to their children
by who needs what first. There
is often an unbalance and
some children view it as unfair,
but most times what one does-
n't get immediately will come
back later down the road.
Whatever your 'position' in the
family, know that God placed
you in the arms of your par-
ents with the intention that
they will provide equal love and
compassion for all of their chil-
dren.


Vaughn (Wayne Brady) that
"The NBA is every Black boy's
dream."
Tech (Anthony Mackie) and
Noah (Wesley Jonathan) are best
i friends who live contrary
M lifestyles. Tech is a former
inmate, struggling to obtain a
GED and help his mother stay
afloat with the bills. Noah, on the
other hand, is a gifted basketball
player that has just landed a full
scholarship to UCLA and lives in
a beautiful home with his grand-
mother.
While Noah recognizes his gift,
he sees it as a means to an end.
ers" Rather than a ticket to fame and
1r fortune, he wants to use his
scholarship to go on and study
medicine. But because Tech's
had to work hard for the skills
he has on the court, he is dumb-
founded that Noah would pass
up the opportunity to be in the
NBA. He tells Noah, "You got the
gift, but you don't want it and I
do."
As the movie progresses and
other characters like Eboni
(Alecla Fears), Vanessa (Eva
Pigford) and Up (Lil JJ) are intro-
duced, the drama continues to
unfold. Each character is repre-
sentative of a different attitude;
all of which can be seen in the
people we interact with daily.
i You have Tech who is insecure


about his future and himself;
Vaughn who is only out for self-
ish gain; Up who looks up to
Tech even though Tech doesn't
think much of himself; Eboni
who refuses to be just another
notch on Tech's belt; Vanessa


Wesley Jonathan, left, and
Anthony Mackie star in
Crossover.

who is willing to use Noah, or
anyone else for that matter, to
get to the top; and Noah who is
determined to hold on to his
dreams of becoming an MD in
spite of Vaughn's grand promis-
es.
In the end, loyalty, integrity
and a belief in self prevail. Tech
realizes that playing ball for
Vaughn is not his only option
and his past doesn't have to
determine his future. Noah
refuses to compromise his
integrity for money and fame
and sticks to pursuing a medical
degree. Both friends find a way


to 'crossover' into a realm where
they can achieve greatness.
Impressed with the positive
messages found within the film,
The Miami Times queried
Whitmore and Mackie, respec-
tively, when the film premiered
at the American Black Film
Festival.
Whitmore said he got the idea
for the movie while watching a
game in which Allen Iverson
crossed over Michael Jordan.
Because Jordan was such a
great defensive player, Iverson's
crossover defied the odds.
Whitmore wanted to show that
people can defy the odds of life.
"I wrote this script in like two
and a half or three weeks. I
thought about it for a while and
didn't want to do a fake NBA
drama. I wanted to do something
real. The film is about life and
sports is used as a metaphor. Its
about making positive choices,"
Whitmore said.
Mackle said he felt really good
about the film and was excited
because "Preston took a chance
on me." "It's a story you don't
usually see. There's no turmoil
and violence and its a real story,"
he continued.
Real is the perfect word to
describe Crossover. It portrays
real people with real struggles
that have to make very real deci-
sions and speaks to the notion
that you are who you choose to
be.


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4C The Miami Times, September 27-O ,


Are they reality or fantasy


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

"Barn, Barn, Barn,
you're dead," screamed
the excited teenage boy
who just advanced to
the next level of
Zombies Awaken.

The teenage boy is just like
any 13-year-old who loves the
action, adventure and mystery
of video games. They find it
challenging to keep advancing
to the next level and mastering
the entire game. However,
many people today have reason
to believe that video games
cause signs of aggression and
violent behaviors in teenagers.
Video games leave the teen
wanting to try out what they've
seen and take the games from
being a fantasy to reality.
Today with new video games
hitting stores every day, it is
hard to find a video game that
doesn't have violence in it.
"They're not just releasing
aggression, they are practicing
aggression. When we practice
something, we get good at it. If
we don't practice something,
we don't get good at At. ,So
spending a considerable
amount of time in an aggres-
sive, violent situation on a daily
basis is going to improve our
aggression skills," Child


Psychiatrist Dr.
Adolph Casal said on
the Connecting with
Kids website.
Many studies show that
playing video games foster
social isolation since they are
often played alone. Also, many
games are based on plots of
violence, aggression and gen-
der bias. Most games also offer
weapons and characters that
can kick, stab, shoot and kill.
In playing violent games, play-
ers must become more violent
to win. I
Teens who play violent video
games also perform poorly in
school. The National Institute
on Media and the Family said
these at-risk teen boys spend
60% more time playing games
than other teens. The poor aca-
demic performance is some-
what linked to the amount of
time playing these games and
the less amount of time spent
on schoolwork.
Studies have also shown that
teens that play video games
have been found to get into
more physical fights and get
into arguments with teachers
at school.
However, not all video games
are violent or disturbing. There
are some positives to playing
video games. Some games pro-
vide problem solving skills.
Games provide occasions for
adults .and children to play
together. These games also pro-
vide entertainment for today's
teens. The majority of teens feel
that Video games don't have an
impact on them. Teens say they
play video games for the enter-
tainment and don't think that
games have an influence on
their attitudes.
Yet, many people feel the par-
ents are the ones to blame for


the violence and anger in chil-
dren. People say that kids
aren't the ones who buy most of
their games, it's their parents
that do and they are to blame.
Researchers say that parents
need to teach their kids the dif-
ference between fantasy and
reality. If kids aren't taught
this, other forms of media
could have the same effect on
kids that video game have been
said to have. Watching TV and
listening to music could
become hazardous to children.
Parents and teens need to
realize that it's ok to play these
games, but there is a thin line
between what's real and what's
imaginary. Instead of running
to pick up the new Grand Theft
Auto or Mortal Kombat video
game, reach for ,k fetjling,
more ediiGional. Ntjdy will
yOu*get to intiTILue playtiigtyour
gy es; o g 1u'getbmidethlnrig
more valuable out of it. Let's
leave the violence these games
portray where it belongs, in the
Play Station, Gameboy or on
the television screen.


TIPS FOR TEENS: Dealing with anxiety


Many teens today deal with
anxiety at the thought of taking
a test. In fact, a little anxiety can
jump start your studying and
keep you motivated. However,
too much anxiety can interfere
with your studying. You may
have difficulty learning and
remembering what you need to
know for the test. Further, too
much anxiety may block your
performance during the test.
You may have difficulty demon-
strating what you know during
the test.
So how do you know if you
have test anxiety?
You probably have test anxiety
if you answer yes to four or more
of the following:
1. I have a hard time getting
started studying for a test.
2. When studying for a test, I
find many things that distract
me.
3. I expect to do poorly on a
test no matter how much or how
hard I study.
S4. When taking a test, I expe-
rience physical discomfort such
as sweaty palms, an upset stom-
ach, a headache, difficulty
breathing and tension in my
muscles.
5. When taking a test, I find it
difficult to understand the


directions and questions.
6. When taking a test, I have
difficulty organizing my
thoughts.
7. When taking a test, I often
"draw a blank."
8. When taking a test, I find
my mind wandering to other
things.
9. I usually score lower on a
test than I do on assignments
and papers.
10. After a test, I remember
information I couldn't recall
during the test.
What can you do about test
anxiety?
Here are some things you can
do before, during and after a test
to reduce your test anxiety:
1. Use good study techniques
to gain cognitive mastery of the
material that will be covered on
the test. This mastery will help
you to approach the test with
confidence rather than have
excessive anxiety.
2. Maintain a positive attitude.


as you study. Think about doing
well, not failing. Think of the
test as an opportunity to show
how much you have learned.
3. Go into the test well rested
and well fed. Get enough sleep
the night before the test. Eat a
light and nutritious meal before
the test. Stay away from junk.
foods.
4. Stay relaxed during the
test. Taking slow, deep breaths
can help. Focus on positive
self-statements such as "I can
do this."
5. Follow a plan for taking the
test. Don't panic even if you find
the test difficult.
6. Don't worry about other
students finishing the test
before you do. Take the time
that you need to do your best.
* 7. Once you finish the test and
hand it in, forget about it tem-
porarily. There is nothing more
you can do until the graded test
is returned to you. Turn your
attention and effort to new
assignments and tests.
8. When the graded test is
returned to you, analyze it to see
how you could have done better.
Learn from your mistakes and
from what you did well. Apply
this knowledge when you take
the next test.


Attention all music lovers: Chevy provides scholarship opportunity


If music is your passion, Chevy
wants to help you pursue it. So,
General Motors Scholarship
Program are offering some out-
standing students $1,000 schol-
arships towards their first year of
college expenses, The Excellence
in Music Award.

WHAT IT TAKES
TO BE ELIGIBLE
Black students in their senior
year with sufficient credits to
graduate in spring 2007
Cumulative 3.2 GPA or high-
er (on a 4.0 scale)
Demonstrate both academic
excellence as well as outstanding
community service through
activities, volunteering and work
experiences
U.S. citizenship or eligibility
to permanently work in the U.S.


Intention to enroll in an
accredited two or four-year col-
lege or university during the fall
term of 2007
Majoring in music with the
intent of a musical career

HOW TO PREPARE
Keep your grades up
Participate in extra-curricular
activities
Garner work experience
Volunteer
Establish music career and
educational aspirations

WHAT YOU'LL NEED
Official high school transcript
including your most recent
course work
Letter of recommendation
from an appropriate high school
teacher or administrator


Letter of recommendation
from a music teacher (either
through school or through a pri-
vate instructor/coach)
Typed personal statement of
500-700 words (See "Application
Instructions")
Complete and signed applica-
tion form (photocopies are
acceptable)

WHEN TO APPLY
Application must be post-
marked by April 16, 2007

Where to find more scholar-
ships
General Motors Scholarship
Program
To learn more about this schol-
arship visit: www.gm.com/com-
pany/careers/student/stu_schol-
ar.html.


Jazz,
I recently moved into a dorm room for
my first year in college. I thought it would
be fun sharing a room with someone
because I'm an only child. However all my
roommate does is go to parties, come in at
all times of the night, invite different boys
over every other night and inhale drugs. I
told her that some of the things she does
are offensive to me and I would appreciate
the fact if she acknowledged that I'm her
roommate. After I told her this she became
real cold towards me and completely
ignored me whenever I was in the room.
She stopped her ways for a while but they
have started back up again. I even caught
her going through my purse the other night


and when I confronted her she accused me
of being jealous of her and that maybe it
was one my nerdy friends. I could not
believe she said I was jealous and insulted
my friends and to top it off I know she took
a twenty out of my purse. I love the room
and it is already a long waiting list to get
another room. How do I deal with this dis-
respectful roommate and get her to under-
stand that we each share that room equal-
ly?
Seeking a New Roommate

Seeking a New Roommate,
When you grow up as an only child its
unfamiliar for you to have to share with
someone else. You thought you were final-


ly getting that roommate you had been
waiting for since you realized your parents
were not having another child. You proba-
bly have been waiting on this moment for a
really long time. However, what you got
was someone who probably had to share
her entire life with younger siblings and
maybe she thought she was finally getting
freedom when she moved into her dorm
room. The both of you are on different lev-
els and that's why it disappoints you that
you didn't get the roommate you dreamed
of and she didn't get the freedom she
dreamed of. What needs to happen now is
that you both face reality, realize that you
have to share that room and it's important
that you make it as comfortable as it can be
for each other. Dorm rooms are supposed
to be your home away from home so it
should be as comfortable as possible. Try
having another talk with her and this time
talk about what you can do to make this
relationship work. Then if that doesn't
work, talk to your resident advisor or who-
ever runs your floor in the dorm. Hopefully
you all will find a compromise. More impor-
tantly, you know now to keep a lock on your
personal itemlse, pecially your pi.rs'e'"


What's about to become


Florida history?



All the following Scratch-Off Games of the Florida Lottery.




:a


Aces High
#613


Amazing 8's
1 #630


Bankroll
#632


Big Bingo
#635


0


Big Bucks
#581


Jumbo Jackpot
#610


Blackjack
#634


Lucky Wheel
#622


Doggie Dollars
#624


Fast 5's
#642


Money Tree
#619


Ruby Red 7s Snake Eyes
#629 #623


All these Scratch-Off games officially end September 29,2006.
So play these great games now while there are still prizes to
win. But remember, any winning tickets must be redeemed by
Tuesday, November 28, 2006. Prizes less than $600 may be
redeemed at any Florida Lottery retailer, Prizes $600 and over must
be claimed at a Florida Lottery office. (For the office nearest you call
850-487-7777.) Thanks for playing these and the many other games
of the Florida Lottery,


When you play, we all win,


~EE


P 2006 Floria Lottery Muti be 8 or oldr to plyay Pi pMay repoisbly.


. . 9... _. <"< -_ __3i -- r2'00 ,,.T -nn -

























Business I.lac


Great hair for everyone


Party Girl Wigs & Beauty
Lounge Salon
1079 NW 54th Street
305-754-1590

Owner
Lucille Modest-Ealy

Year Established
1970

Future Goals
"I have a hat shop next
door. Right now I don't
have anything in mind, but
I am always doing some-
thing new. I sell cosmetics,
mens ties and hats as well.
So when you ask about my
future goals, I have to tell


from styling wigs to doing
hair. There are so many
different textures of hair,
but when I got used to it,
clientele increased,"
Modest-Ealy said.

Who does your business
best serve and why?
"Women that like to look
good. Older and younger
women," said Modest-
Ealy.

What were your past
experiences that helped
you meet the needs of
your clients?
"I learned to always help
people. I had about one


McKinzie keynote speaker at southern region meeting

Miami meeting brings. together hundreds of
members of Black Greek letter organizations


Barbara A. McKinzie, inter-
national president of Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., will
be the keynote speaker at the
10th biennial Southern Region
meeting of the National Pan-
Hellenic Conference.
The conference, which brings
together hundreds of members
of the nine predominately
Black Greek-letter organiza-
tions from eight states, the
U.S. Virgin Islands and the
Bahamas, will be held held
Oct. 11-15 at the Embassy
Suites Hotel-Airport in Miami.
McKinzie has the distinction
of being the Centennial
International President of
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority;
in 2008 she will preside over
celebrations leading to. the
100th anniversary of the
founding of the organization.
She will speak Saturday, Oct.
14, during the black and white
awards banquet. This activity
begins at 7 p.m. and is the cul-
minating event of the confer-
ence.
The theme of the conference
is "NPHC: Working Together to
Achieve Educational, Social,


Economic and Political
Empowerment." McKinzie,
who assumed the top leader-
ship role of the sorority in
July, has made economic,
social and educational empow-
erment as the cornerstone of
her administration.
Under the theme ESP:
Economics, Service and
Partnership, McKinzie's pro-
grammatic focus will center on
Economics, Education, the
Black Family, Technology and
Health. She also plans to
heighten AKA's service pres-
ence on a global scale.
McKinzie is a nationally-
acclaimed CPA who has gained
recognition for restoring finan-
cial credibility to governmental
agencies through her financial
savvy. She is currently Deputy
Director of Finance and
Administration for Chicago's
Neighborhood Housing
Services.
Founded in 1908, the
Sorority is the oldest and
largest of its kind and is hailed
as "America's premiere Greek-
lettered organization for Black
women.".


Barbara A. McKinzie
International president of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.


fIl't H N An bv nt h- aa I as%. ome


you I'm always thinking of
something new," said
Modest-Ealy.

Number of full-time and
part time employees
Two full-time employees
(Thelma Williams and
Julia Cherie Wright-Foots)

Products/Services
"This is a full service hair
salon. I also sell a line of
cosmetics," said Modest-
Ealy.

Why did you start this
business and how has it
grown?
"I started this business
because I always wanted to
work for myself. I used to
be a singer and I wanted to
have something to fall
back on. I started out
designing wigs. I am the
type of person that always
likes to do new things. The
business has significantly
grown since 1970. With a
hair salon, the money
comes in depending on
the style and fads at the
time. You cannot say I
make this much money
because clientele fluctu-
ates," said Modest-Ealy.

What were some of the
obstacles you faced and
how did you overcome
them?
"I didn't really face any
obstacles, especially with
opening up, because
back in the days it was
much easier to start a
business. I advertised a
lot. That's what really
helped business run
smoothly. The only
obstacle I really faced
was when I switched over


or two experiences where
the customers didn't
have the money they
thought they had. When
you show people that you
care and you treat your
customers like family
then they will remember
you and it helped me out
in the long run," said
Modest-Ealy

Why do you believe your
business has been
around for so long?
"If I was on another job I
would still have to work.
This is my business and
when you own some-
thing, you have to take
good care of it. When you
enjoy something, that's
how you do it for so
long," said Modest-Ealy.

What are some of your
other business endeav-
ors?
"I am a hat designer. I
own a hat shop that's
located right next door. I
sell women beauty prod-
ucts, I sell men's ties and
inspirational pens," said
Modest-Ealy.

Where did you get the
name of your business
and it does it have any
significant meaning?
"The reason it's called
party girl wigs [is because]
that was what I named the
wigs before I opened up
the salon. Wigs were very
popular back at that time
and a lot of women that
were wearing them were
going to a party. When I
opened up the salon,
instead of changing the
name entirely, I just added
on to it," said Modest-Ealy.
--I -


ahted Material


SSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"








MDC School of Business to offer business institute


Are you a business minded
person with a busy lifestyle
struggling to find time to earn
a degree in your field?
Miami Dade College's North
Campus will soon offer a
weekend option to better fit
your tight schedule. On
October 6, MDC's North
Campus will kick-off its
Weekend Business Institute
with courses offered on
Fridays and Saturdays.


The 64 credit program is
geared at opening doors to
students in various industries
including business, trans-
portation and warehousing.
Upon completion of the cur-
riculum, graduates will
receive an Associate in
Applied Science degree in
Business Administration.
Graduates can expect to enter
such areas such as customer
relations, human resource


management, sales, market-
ing and financial manage-
ment among others.
"The Weekend Business
Institute offers flexibility and
accessibility to students who
might otherwise not be able to
take our courses because of
time demand constraints,"
said Teddie Laing, the depart-
ment chairperson for the
School of Business at Miami
Dade College's North


Campus. "We look forward to
reaching a wider-audience
and educating the most tal-
ented professionals in the
field."
This workforce develop-
ment program is designed to
build and enhance valuable
workplace skills that prepare
graduates for immediate
employment in a wide-range
of industries seeking skilled
Please turn to MDC 9D


Lucille Modest-Ealy and employee Thelma Williams


HBMR6* ss i" "



1^^-low^^^ ^^^


4600 .40








6D Th Mi i Ti s Se tembe 6


CITY OF MIAMI
REQUEST FOR LETTERS OF INTEREST

Sealed proposals will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her
office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for
the following:

RFLI NO. 05-06-113 INSURANCE BROKERAGE SERVICES

OPENING DATE: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2006

(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 10/10/06)

Detailed specifications for this RFLI are available upon request at the City
of Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami,
FL 33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us Telephone
No. 305-416-1906.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.

Pedro Hernandez
City Manager
AD: 13914



INVITATION TO BID BID DATE 11/09/06 2:00 P.M.

Scope includes:

Broward County Public Schools 2 Schools. Each School to be bid sepa-
rately. The two schools are:

Boulevard Heights Elementary School
Apollo Middle School

Scopes include demo, earthwork, utilities, paving, fence, sidewalks, site
concrete, landscaping & irrigation, tiltwall, structural concrete, masonry,
structural steel, misc. metals, rough & finish carpentry, roofing, overhead
coiling doors, doors, frames & hardware, glass, drywall, paint, stucco, floor-
ing, acoustical ceiling, specialties, canopy systems, projection screens,
folding panel partitions, elevator, wheelchair lifts, signage, equipment, cold
storage rooms, food service equipment, plumbing, HVAC and electrical.
Plans are available for qualified subcontractors.
MBE/WBE Participation Goals apply. Level II Security Clearance required
per the Jessica Lunsford Act.

Drawings will be available on 09/22/06 by written request to:
Moss & Associates
Construction Managers
Attn. Mike Thompson
2101 N. Andrews Avenue, Suite 300
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33311
Phone: 954.524.5678
Fax: 954.712.5999

Bids are due no later than 11109/06 2:00 p.m. Faxed copies are accept-
able.

A pre-bid meeting will be held on October 19, 2006 at 1:00 p.m. start-
ing at Boulevard Heights Elementary School.

The Construction Manager reserves the right to waive irregularities and to
reject any or all proposals for any reason. The6 Construction Manager will
evaluate all proposals and will award-the Contract in accordance with the
projects best interest,


',, 'f/fDrnf 73uriecr/reasure
in Ijfje fa~ssifieds
ace your Classified ad in The Miami Times j
call 305-694-6225


MIAMIDAE

-U


ADVERTISEMENT FOR REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS


NONEXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT FOR THE
OPERATION OF PUBLIC PARKING FACILITIES AT MIAMI
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
RFP NO. MDAD-02-06


Sealed Proposals for the above will be received for and in
behalf of Miami-Dade County, by the Office of the Clerk, in
the Stephen P. Clark Center, Suite 17-202, 111 N.W. Ist
Street, Miami, Florida, 33128 until 2:00 P.M., Tuesday,
October 17, 2006 or as modified by addendum, at which
time all Proposals will be taken to a room to be designated
by the Clerk of the Board in said Stephen P. Clark Center,
where the "Technical Proposal" will be publicly opened
and the names of the Proposers will be read aloud. The
County will receive sealed proposals from qualified, inter-
ested parties based upon the terms, covenants and provi-
sions of this advertisement and the Request for Proposals
("RFP"). An original and nine (9) copies (a total of 10) of
the complete Proposal (Technical Proposal and Price
Proposal) must be received by the due date as specified in
the advertisement for this RFP ("Proposal Due Date"), as
may be amended by Addendum. The original and all copies
must be bound, with the Technical Proposal packaged
separately from the Price Progosal) and submitted in an
envelope or container stating on the outside the Proposer's
name, address, telephone number and RFP number, RFP
title, and Proposal Due Date to:

Clerk of the Board
Stephen P. Clark Center
111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202
Miami, FL 33128-1983
Hand-carried proposals may be delivered to the above
address ONLY between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30
p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays observed
by the County. Proposers are responsible for informing
any commercial delivery service, if used, of all delivery
requirements and for ensuring that the required address
information appears on the outer wrapper or envelope used
by such service.

THE SCOPE OF SERVICES The County is seeking an
experienced and qualified Operator that will enhance the
quality of services offered at the Public Parking Facilities at
Miami International Airport. The Board of County
Commissioners, as well as, the Miami-Dade Aviation
Department, are committed to creating at the Airport, a pre-
mier, first class facility, both in the public County controlled
areas and the management contract areas.

To manage, operate and maintain surface lots, garages and
valet parking facilities at the Miami-Dade Aviation
Department in a first class manner and condition. Operator
will provide services and competent personnel, as needed,
or desired by MDAD to meet the needs of those parking at
Miami International Airport, while increasing gross rev-
enues and controlling costs.

Miami-Dade County (the "County"), as represented by the
Miami-Dade Aviation Department ("MDAD"), is seeking pro-
posals to enter into one (1) Management Agreement for the
operation of all Public Parking Facilities at Miami
International Airport. The term of the Agreement is for five
(5) years with the County's sole option to extend the
Agreement for five (5) separate terms of one (1) year.

It is the intention of the County to have the parking facilities
operated in a premier, first class manner, providing prompt,
efficient and courteous service by the Successful Proposer
and its staff.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS The
Proposer must provide evidence as part of its Proposal that
it meets the- below listed minimum qualification require-
ments (see Appendix A RFP No. MDAD-02-06). Any
Proposer not meeting all the minimum qualifications
requirements shall render the Proposal non-responsive.

Proposer must have the following experience:

A) The Proposer must have performed for five (5) of the
last eight (8) years, management of a major public parking
facility(ies) with annual gross revenues of not less than
$10,000,000.

B) The number of facilities operated (structure and surface
lot) shall not be less than one (1) parking structure and/or
one (1) surface lot and the total number and the parking
spaces shall not be less than 4,000 spaces. The daily oper-
ation shall not be less than 24 hours per day, 7days per
week.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL DOCUMENTS: Request for
Proposal documents will be available on or after
September 19, 2006. Prospective Proposers may obtain
the Request for Proposal documents from the Miami-Dade
Aviation Department, Contracts Administration Division,
4200 N.W. 36 Street, Building 5A, 4th Floor, Miami, Florida
33122 by payment of $50.00 (non-refundable) per set,
check or money order, made payable to the Miami-Dade
Aviation Department. The Request for Proposal documents
may also be requested in writing to the Department at P.O.
Box 025504, Miami, Florida 33102-5504 or by fax at (305)
876-8068. Each Proposer shall furnish an address, tele-
phone and FAX numbers for the purpose of contact during
solicitation process. All Proposals shall be submitted as set
forth in the Instructions to Proposers.

PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: The Miami-Dade
Aviation Department will hold a Pre-Proposal Conference
on September 27, 2006 at 9:30 A.M., Miami-Dade
Aviation Department, 4200 NW 36 Street, Building 5-A,
Conference Room F, fourth floor, Miami, for all interest-
ed parties. Attendance will be limited to two (2) represen-
tatives per firm. Any changes to this Request for Proposal
will be by written addendum. It is the policy of Miami-
Dade County to comply with all the requirements of the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For sign language,
interpreter services, material in accessible format, other
special accommodations, or airport-related ADA concerns,
please contact the MDAD Office of ADA Coordination at
(305) 876-0856.

PROPOSAL GUARANTY: Each Proposal shall be accom-
panied by a Proposal Guarantee Deposit of Fifty


Thousand Dollars ($50.000) attached to Appendix A.
Minimum Qualifications Form and Technical Proposal
Questionnaire Form. which shall be in the form of a
cashier's check, treasurers check, irrevocable letter of
credit, or bank draft drawn on any state or national bank
ONLY, payable to Miami-Dade County, Florida, or Proposal


Guarantee Bond prepared on the form attached to the RFP
as Appendix H, duly executed by the Proposer as Principal
and having a Surety thereon meeting the requirements set
forth in Subarticle 14.03 of the Agreement. No other
form of deposit will be accepted.

THE PROPOSER'S PROPOSAL IS SUBJECT TO THE
FOLLOWING PROVISIONS, AMONG OTHERS:
1) Contract Measures: A Small Business Enterprises
(SBE) selection factor applies to this solicitation.

A SBE/Micro Business Enterprise is entitled to receive an
additional ten percent (10%) of the total technical evalua-
tion points of the technical portion of this solicitation. An
SBE/Micro Business Enterprise must be certified by the
DBD for the type of goods and/or services it provides in
accordance- with the applicable commodity code(s) for
this solicitation. For certification information, contact the
Department of Business Development 375-3111 or access
www.miamidade.qov/dbd

2) Living Wages in accordance with Section 2-8.9 of the
Miami-Dade County Code

3) CONE OF SILENCE: Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of
the County Code and Administrative Order 3-27 ("Cone of
Silence Provisions"), as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is
imposed upon RFPs, RFQs, or bids after advertisement
and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a
written recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits communi-
cation regarding RFPs, RFQs, or bids between: A) poten-
tial vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or con-
sultants and the County's professional staff including, but
not limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff; B) a potential vendor, service provider,
bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and the Mayor, County
Commissioners or their respective staffs; C) the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any
member of the County's professional staff including, but
not. limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff; D) a potential vendor, service provider,
bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and any member of the
selection committee therefore; E) the Mayor, County
Commissioners or their respective staffs and member of
the selection committee therefore; F) any member of the
County's professional staff and any member of the selec-
tion committee therefore.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative
Order 3-27, as amended, permits oral communications
regarding a particular RFP, RFQ or bid for solicitation of
goods or services between any person and the contracting
officer responsible for administering the procurement
process for such RFP, RFQ, or bid, provided that the com-
munication is limited strictly to matters of process or proce-
dure already contained in the corresponding solicitation
document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral
communications at pre-proposal conferences, oral
presentations before selection committees, contract
negotiations during any duly noticed public meetings,
public presentations made to the Board of County
Commissioners during any duly noticed public meet-
ing, or communications in writing at any time unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or
bid document.

Proposers must file a copy of any written communica-
tions with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made
available to any person upon request. Written commu-
nications may be submitted via e-mail to the Clerk of
the Board at CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV. The
County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the
Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to
any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation
of the Cone of Silence Provisions by any proposer and bid-
der shall render any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award
voidable. Any person having personal knowledge of a vio-
lation of the Cone of Silence provisions shall report such
violation to the State Attorney and/ or may file a complaint
with the Ethics Commission. Proposers should reference
the actual Cone of Silence Provisions for further clarifica-
tion.

Failure of the Proposer to comply with Miami-Dade County
Ordinances Nos. 98-106 and 02-3 may result in the dis-
qualification of the Proposer.

All Proposers will be notified in writing when the County
Manager makes an award recommendation to the Board of
County Commissioners.

The Contact Person for this Request for Proposals is:


Name and Title:


Pedro J. Betancourt
Aviation Sr. Procurement Contract


Officer
Name of Agency: Miami Dade Aviation Department
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 025504,
Miami, Florida 33102-5504
Physical Location: 4200 NW 36th Street, Bldg. 5A, Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33122
Telephone: (305) 876-7345 Facsimile:(305) 876-
8068

All questions must be submitted in writing to the
Contracting Officer by October 2, 2006.

4) The County shall not be responsible for any modifica-
tions or alterations made to the Request for Proposal
Documents other than those made by Addendum.
Proposers are advised to carefully check their Request for
Proposal Documents to make certain the documents they
obtained contain the complete set of documents. Any par-
tial set of documents obtained shall be at the Proposer's
risk.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK


DEPUTY CLERK


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

ATTHE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON OCTOBER 12, 2006, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE
MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM
RELATED TO THE REGULAR AGENDA:
A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED WATSON
ISLAND SOUTHWEST, A REPLAT AND SUBDIVISION IN THE
CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF
THE PLAT AND STREET COMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS
CONTAINED IN CITY CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING
THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING
AND DIRECTING THE CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO
EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR THE RECORDA-
TION OF SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public
Works Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction
Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working
hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15780) City Clerk


e am me p ,


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destinv






Rowenta USA, will sell a new pink iron in
October for Breast Cancer Awareness
Month. All of the profits from this special-
ly designed iron, will be donated to the
Breast Cancer Research Foundation. For
more visit www.rowentausa-
ironforpink.com.
-PRNewsFoto/Rowenta
Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


P MIAMT TIMES




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The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 7D


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CITY OF HIALEAH
S- ATTENTION
LICENSED GENERAL CONTRACTORS
* THE CITY OF HIALEAH OFFERS WORK OPPORTUNITIES FOR GENER-
AL CONTRACTORS THAT ARE LICENSED AND INSURED. ELIGIBLE
SYou're Invitedto..... CONTRACTORS MAY SUBMIT BIDS ON ALL TYPES OF COMMERCIAL,
-AMERICA'S EVERGLADES HOME IMPROVEMENT, RECONSTRUCTION, AND REHABILITATION
Construction Symposium and Exhibition PROJECTS.
S- October 13, 2006 THE STATE OF FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION AND THE
- - -U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PRO-
VIDE FUNDING FOR THESE PROJECTS.
The South Florida Water Management District will host its
second annual Acceler8 Construction Symposium and IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN THESE PROGRAMS,
Exhibition on Friday October 13, 2006 at Florida Gulf CALL (305) 883-8042, (TDD [305] 883-5886), TO REQUEST AN APPLICA-
Coast University. in the Alico Arena. TION OR STOP BY THE DEPARTMENT OF GRANTS AND HUMAN SER-
S .,. 1- This all-day event for construction contractors, specialty VICES LOCATED AT 501 PALM AVENUE, 1ST FLOOR, HIALEAH, FLORI-
contractors, vendors and work-force development agencies DA 33010.
will provide information on the $1.8 billion construction
program for AccelerS, a group of eight fast-tracked MINORITYAND SECTION 3 CONTRACTORS ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY
projects needed for Everglades restoration.
Public Notce Construction on these projects has already begun, but
contractors and workers continue to be needed through
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation is pleased to announce the reopen- 2010. The symposium will provide details on the
ing of the waiting list for the following facility. The facility is currently fully pre-qualification process for all Acceler8 contracts,
occupied with a waiting list for residency. Acceler8 is a major boost for Everglades restoration. It I
reaffirms the commitment of the federal/state/local
Federation Towers partnership to revitalize the ecosystem by stepping up the
757 West West Ave., Miami Beach, FL 33139 (305-531-2388) pace on eight restoration projects. For more information,
please visit www.evergladesnow.org.
The facility is a federally subsidized rental apartment building for the low- When: Friday, October 13, 2006 (8 AM until 3 PM) CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA
income elderly (age 62 or older) and/or mobility impaired. Applications may Where: Florida Gulf Coast University,
be requested and returned at the above facility during office hours (M-F in the Alico Arena.
9:00-4:00 p.m.) beginning 10/24/06. We reserve the right to close the list at NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
any time. In compliance with ADA the TDD phone number for persons with Display booths are available for vendors, contractors,
special hearing disabilities is 1-800-545-1833, ext. 715. Thank you for your specialty subcontractors, and work force development
agencies. Please call for details. Join us to restore ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
interest. America's Everglades. EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
Registration is required to attend. Please visit our web site ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
www.evergladesnow.org fortheapplicationtoday and fax AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
(you may regis54-771-te 7690.day of the event) APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
Ep L HOUNG Call loday if you would like to take part as an exhibitor CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
____________ in this important event! MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.
-Toll free at 1-800-488-1255
AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
a' MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON OCTOBER 12, 2006, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
C .-4, ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE
MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM
RELATED TO THE REGULAR AGENDA:
RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITHA
MIA#M ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED BANKS
A' ... SUBDIVISION, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT
CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA for DBE Goal for Plan Annual Update TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET
AdvertisementCOMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY
Department of Transportation 49 CFR Part 26 CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ESTABLISHMENT OF OVERALLDBE GOAL SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE L
AOOR AD OR FISA YI EAR 20 CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; r
ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR -rU MDAD I L YEAR 2007 ^AND PROVIDING FOR THE RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED The Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) is prepar- THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO ing to establish an overall goal for participation by
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in MDAD projects RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH ATTACH-
AND COMMITTEES OR THE A ACITY COMMISSION. A COPYF OF THE for Fiscal Year 2007 (October 1, 2006 through MENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED BANKS SUBDIVISION, A
CLERK (MIAM I CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, September 30, 2007). MDAD invites comments from REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDI-
MIAKMI, FLORIDA 3313. Small, minorities and women, businesses, general con- TIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET COMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133. tractor groups, community organizations, and other offi- CONTAINED IN CITY CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DED-
A public hearing will be held by the Commission of the City of Miami, cials or organizations which may have information con- ICATIONS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT;AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE
Florida, on October 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., in the City Commission ceming the availability of disadvantaged and non-disad- CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND PRO-
Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida for the pur- vantaged businesses, the effects of discrimination on VIDING FOR THE REDADE COUNTY FLOR DA
pose of hearing objections from any interested parties affected by the pro- opportunities for DBEs, and what might constitute a "level RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
posed Amendment to Section 54-190 of the Code of the City of Miami, playing field" for'participation of DBEs in MDAD projects. Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public
Florida( as amended, entitled "Nonstandard Street Widths" by increasing A "level playing field" is defined as the amount of partici- Works Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction
the zoned right-of-way of NW/NE 79 Street between Biscayne Bay and the pation DBE firms would have in MDAD projects if there Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working
west city limits from 80 feet to 110 feet. were no discrimination against them. hours. Phone 305-416-1232.
The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or MDAD is proposing an ovBerall goal of 16.0% for partici-
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should Ption by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in MDAD The Miami City Commission requests a invited to exteressted parties be present oruld
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with projects for fiscal year 2007, based on information cur- represented at this meeting andare invited to .expresstheirviews Should^
d Yi 0 tO ipo d i J fLt0J 0 th Cit J Cmmission wit


respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15782) City Clerk


rently available. The rationale for this goal and support-
ing information will be available for public inspection for
30 days from the publication of this notice at MDAD's
Minority Affairs Office located at 4200 N.W. 36th Street,
Building 5-A, 3rd Floor, Miami, Florida 33122, Monday
through Friday from 8:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M.
MDAD and the U.S. Department of Transportation will
accept comments on the DBE goal for 45 days from the
date of this advertisement. The DBE Program Plan may
be reviewed at MDAD's Minority Affairs Office at the
address above and a copy of its Annual Update Report
may be obtained by calling (305) 876-7971.


anly person esreu LUo appeaC an1y e s uo fnl i LIo ei ,Ly tUF 1111Jil ii l y lI
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15781) City Clerk


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


b 27Otb 32006


I







The Miami Times, September 27-October 3, 2006 9D


lB k M t C t l Th i O D ti


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needs of employers to
have an educated and
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from which to recruit,"
said Dr. Jose A.
Vicente, North
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Among the courses
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Students can choose
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CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2006

COUNCIL CONFERENCE MEETING: CANCELLED
CRA MTG.: 2nd FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 6:30 PM
2"D PUBLIC HEARING 06/07 BUDGET: 2nd FLOOR COUNCIL CHAMBER,
7:00 PM
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING: 2nd FLOOR COUNCIL CHAM-
BERS, 7:30 PM
LOCATION: 17011 N.E. 19 AVENUE, NORTH MIAMI BEACH

ALL INTERESTED PARTIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND THIS MEETING

Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

Notice: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Council with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that
person shall insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F/S 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk no later than two (2) days
prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if hear-
ing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.



PUBLIC NOTICE
The Department of Off-Itreet Parking of the City of Miami d/b/a Miami
Parking Authority (MPA) is seeking Bids ("Bids") for the construction of a
Surface Parking Lot in the City of Miami (240 NW 11th Street) ITB No. 06-
03.
Interested firms/individuals ("Respondents") may pick up a copy of the
Invitation to Bid ("ITB") to be issued on October 2, 2006 at 190 Northeast
Third Street, Miami, Florida 33132. The ITB contains detailed and specific
information about the scope of the submission requirements and the selec-
tion procedures.
Submissions must be delivered to the administrative offices of the Miami
Parking Authority, 190 N.E. 3rd Street, Miami, Florida 33132 no later than
October 26, 2006 by 2:00 p.m. Submissions received past such deadline
and/or submitted to any other location or office shall be deemed not respon-
sive and summarily rejected.
MPA's Board ("Board") reserves the right to accept any Bids deemed to be
in the best interest of Miami Parking Authority, to waive any irregularities in
any Bids and/or to reject any and or all Bids and re-advertise for new Bids.
A Pre-Bid Conference is scheduled for October 11, 2006 at 2:00 PM at 190
Northeast Third Street, Miami, Florida 33132. Attendance at the aforemen-
tioned conference is not mandatory, but highly encouraged as a source of
important information.
This ITB may be subject to the City's "Cone of Silence" in accordance
with Section 18-74 of the City's Ordinance No. 12271. Any request for
additional information or clarification must be received in writing no later
than 5:00 p.m., October 6, 2006. Proposers may fax or mail their requests
to the attention of Claudia Saintanne, Procurement Manager, 190 N.E. 3rd
Street, Miami, Florida 33132. The facsimile number is (305) 371-9451;
email is: csaintannee(Jmiamiparking.com. All responses to
questions/clarifications will be sent to all prospective bidders in the form of
an addendum.
This ITB will be available on our website at www.miamiparking.com
beginning October 2, 2006.


/S, 'CITY OF MIAMI

1 PUBLIC NOTICE

Sealed Responses will be received by the City of Miami, City Clerk's office located at City Hall, First
Floor, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 until October 23rd 2006 at 2:00 PM for the fol-
lowing:

RFQ No. 05-06-107

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES FOR THE
REDEVELOPMENT OF THE ORANGE BOWL STADIUM, B-30153B
Any Proposals received after the above stated date and time or delivered to a different address/ depart-
ment! division will not be considered and will be returned to the bidder unopened.
RFQ documents containing detailed requirements may be obtained from the City of Miami Department
of Capital Improvements and Transportation's (CIT) webpage at www/miamigov.com/capitalimprove-
mentd beginning at close of business on September 22, 2006, Any firms obtaining the document from
the webpage should notify the person identified below to ensure receipt of any addenda. It is the sole
responsibility of all firms to ensure the receipt of any addendum and it is recommended that firms peri-
odically check the CIT webpage for updates and the issuance of addenda.
A non-mandatory Pre-Bid meeting and corresponding site visit is scheduled for Thursday, October 5,
2006 at the Orange Bowl Stadium Athletic Club beginning at 10:00 AM, additional details if any will be
posted on the City of Miami, Capital Improvements website www.miamigov.com/capital/improvements
Attendance at this meeting is strongly recommended.
The RFQ may also be obtained via e-mail or in person by contacting:
Hamilton Hicks
hhicks6miamigov.com
Department of Capital Improvements & Transportation
444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor
Miami, Florida 33130
The City has a CD-ROM available of some of the as-built documents if desired.
A copy of the CD-ROM is available for $250.00. Please note that receipt of the as built drawings is not
required in order to prepare a responsive submittal.
The City of Miami reserves the right to waive any informalitiesor.minor irregularities; reject any and all
Proposals which are incomplete, conditional, obscure, or which contain additions not allowed for; accept
or reject any proposal in whole or in part with or without cause; and accept the proposal(s) which best
serves the City.
THIS RFQ SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE CITY OF MIAMI CITY CODE SEC. 18-44.


Ad No. 13847


City of Miami Bid No. 05-06-107


'fou f i u'ec/resur
in e JGlass{/tecA


f-


A- INVITATION TO BID NO. 05-06-117

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami, Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 1st Floor, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133-5504, until 2:00 PM on October 10, 2006 for:
ORANGE BOWL PARKING LOT REPAIRS, ADA
Bids Due: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2006 AT 2:00 P.M.
Scope of Work: The proposed project consists of all materials, labor and equipment necessary for the
repair of 3 existing asphalt parking surfaces as required and re-striping parking spaces per revised
design layout. It also consists of new crosswalks and signage to comply with current ADA requirements.
Existing lot configuration, lighting, landscaping and islands are to remain as is; existing ADA vertical sig-
nage and wheel stops may be saved and re-used. There is a voluntary goal of 30% Black, Hispanic,
and/or Female participation by City of Miami certified Minority Women Business Enterprise (MIWBE)
owned firms for this project. For technical questions or clarifications regarding plans, specifications, or
City requirements, please submit written requests to Mr. Victor Marzo, Capital Improvements
Department, VMarzo(ci.miami.fl.us.
Minimum Requirements: Prospective Bidders shall hold a current license as a General Contractor
from the State of Florida (and/or Subcontractors) and must have a minimum of five (5) years experience
with projects of similar size and scope and supported by references of at least five (5) separate projects
of equal or higher value.
A non-mandatory Pre-Bid meeting and corresponding site visit is scheduled for Thursday, October 5,
2006 at the Orange Bowl Stadium Athletic Club beginning at 9:00 AM, additional details if any will be
posted on the City of Miami, Capital Improvements website www.miamigov/capitalimprovements.
Attendance at this meeting is strongly recommended.
Bid packages containing complete instructions, plans and specifications may be obtained at the above
referenced website or in person at the City of Miami, Miami Riverside Building, Capital Improvements
and Transportation, 444 SW. 2nd Avenue, 8th Floor, Miami, Florida 33130, Telephone (305) 416-1298
on or after September 22, 2006. A non-refundable fee for a hard copy of the bid package is $25.00. A
bid package can also be mailed to bidders upon written request to hhicks(miamiaov.com and shall
include the appropriate non-refundable fee plus an additional $10 for shipping and handling using reg-
ular US. Mail or an overnight delivery account number.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with the instructions to Bidders. Bids must be,submitted in
duplicate originals in the envelopes provided. At the time, date, and place above, bids will be publicly
opened. Any bids or proposals received after time and date specified will be returned to the bidder
unopened. The responsibility for submitting a bid/proposal before the stated time and date is solely and
strictly the responsibility of the bidder/proposer. The City is not responsible for delays caused by mail,
courier service, including U.S. Mail, or any other occurrence.
YOU ARE HEREBY ADVISED THAT THIS INVITATION TO BID IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF
SILENCE," IN ACCORDANCE WITH ORDINANCE NO. 12271.
Ad No. 13848 City of Miami Bid No. 05-06417


weekend entrepreneur make their dram coe true

opy- g0-1*.,- "Copyrighted Material




Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers.


* T







Blacks MIst Control Their Own Destiny


1o %Icah'i RRP"Copyrighted Material r


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


TGSV Enterprises, Inc. is currently bidding for
the Miami-Dade Aviation Department.
The following project:
MIA-STE Park 4 Pedestrian Bridge
Extension, MCC-H010A

Pre-Bid: October, 4, 2006 at 10:00 a.m.
Bid Opening: October 11, 2006 at 2:00 p.m.

Packages for bids are: Pkg. A Demo/Conc.
Slab (CSBE), Pkg. B Striping and Signs
(CSBE), Pkg. C Struct. Steel (CSBE), Pkg. D
Fire Protection (CSBE), Pkg, E Canvas Canopy
(Open), Pkg. F Fire Sprinkler System (Open),
Pkg. G Electrical (CSBE).

For additional information, please call TGSV's
office at 305-876-8444.


o


I emu


MIAMI-DADE5


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),
from our Website: www.miamidade.aov/dom. Vendors may choose to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised, bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.
Interested parties may also visit or call:
Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the .bid package through the United States Postal Service.
These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.



DON'T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO BE A HERO EVERYDAY!





POLICE OFFICER
(This position is Non-exempt under FLSA)
Starting Salary: $37,817 annually Maximum Salary: $50,764 annually
(Please see pote below)
Closing Date: Friday, October 13, 2006
(or the first 500 applicants, whichever occurs first)
The annualized wage rate during the academy and until the State certifica-
tion exam is passed is $36,017. Applicants will be hired in the classification
of Police Officer-Probationary (Occ. Code 5003), and upon successful com-
pletion of the academy and the state examination will be promoted to, the
classification of Police Officer (Occ. Code 5005).
DOCUMENTATION: Copies of the following documents must be submitted
at the time of application in order to qualify and sit for the City of Miami's
Police Officer entrance exam:
- Proof of passing score on the FBAT, CJBAT or FDLE police examination
- Valid Driver's License from any State (Class E or higher)
- High School Diploma, GED or higher degree
- Applicants must be 19 years of age by December 6, 2006. Birth
Certificate, naturalization certificate or valid U.S. Passport reflecting U. S.
Citizenship
- If claiming Veteran's Preference, military discharge papers (Form DD-
214); For claiming Disabled Veteran's Preference, a letter from Veteran's
Affairs or the Department of Defense dated within one year of the closing
date is also needed. Letter of disability must state percentage of disability.
Original or certified originals must be submitted as proof.
- Heart Bill Affidavit/Non-Smoker's Affidavit (Notarized)
- Veteran's Preference: Veteran's Preference points will be awarded in
accordance with F.S.S. 295.07 and 295.08.

All applicants must submit a City of Miami employment application with the
required credentials to the City of Miami Employment Office, no faxes or
e-mails allowed. For additional details, you may either visit our website at
www.miamiaov.com call the job hotline at (305) 416-2050 or visit our
Employment Office located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Room 129, Miami,
Florida.
The City of Miami is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate. AD# 10594


___ ____________ __ __ __ __ ___
S llll .llllllll Sl l -lll l lllllll ll lllllllllll llllllll l lllll lI III


Huggins Bail Bond
We won't fail you, when its
time to bail you!
6114 N.W. 7th Avenue
305-545-6323
305-634-2233 24/7



Daryl's Banquet Hall
All occasions, weddings, parties,
etc. 1290 Ali Baba
(West of 27th Ave.) Limo Rentals
305-622-3361
305-796-9558
0(1/017


Rozalyn H. Paschal, MD
Infant, Child, Teen
Northside Shopping Center
305-758-0591
Parkway 305-652-6095
Plantation 954-880-8399
0I1/04


Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for kitchens
and bathrooms at affordable prices.
14140 NW 22nd Ave.
305-685-3565


Home Remodeling &
Construction Experts
We do it ALL!
Free estimates. We finance
Good/Bad credit.
305-636-0990
I/107

Southeastern
Roofing & Painting
General Home Repairs.
Repair Any Roofs. Financing
305-694-9405 or
786-326-0482
12'22


1st & 2nd Mortgages
No credit check. No income
verification. Foreclosures &
bankruptcy O.K. 24 HR Service
305-385-9836


Faith Financial Group
Purchase, Refinance
100% Financing, FHA, VA Loans
Home, Business Land
Roy Freeman, Broker
305-510-4201



City Kids Clothes
Shirts $3.99 Pants $7.99
Skorts $4.99 Jumpers $4.99
Mall of the America
Near Old Navy
305-815-6761
11/2-3


D TIW Miami Times. September 27-October 3, 20QG


OPORTUNIDADES DE TRABAJO
Ciudad de Hialeah
Aviso para los Contratistas con
Licencias Generales

La Ciudad de Hialeah esta ofreciendo oportunidades de trabajo para
Contratistas Generales que posean licencia y seguro. Contratistas que
sean elegibles seran autorizados a someter licitaciones en toda clase de
proyectos de mejoras y rehabilitaci6n de viviendas y comerciales. Los fon-
dos para estos proyectos se reciben del State of Florida Housing Finance
Corporation y el Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano de los
Estados Unidos.

Si usted esta interesado en participar en estos programas, favor Ilame al
(305) 883-8042, 6 al nimero para personas con problemas auditivos, al
(305) 883-5886, para solicitar una aplicaci6n, 6 pres6ntese en el
Departamento de Fondos Federales y Servicios Humanos en el ler piso del
501 Palm Avenue, Hialeah, FL 33010.
MINORIAS Y CONTRATISTAS QUE PARTICIPAN EN EL PROGRAMA
DE SECCION 3 SON INVITADOS A PARTICIPAR


MIAMI

maff


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT
AVIATION ACOUSTICAL AND LAND USE
COMPATIBILITY PLANNING SERVICES
OCI PROJECT NO. E06-MDAD-02

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, and
Chapter 2, Sections 2-8.1 (as amended by Ordinance 05-15), and 2-10.4 of the Miami-Dade County
Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional engineering services will be required
from qualified firms. The consultants will be responsible for providing the following: Airport / Community
land use compatibility studies, Aircraft noise monitoring studies, Airspace flight track management stud-
ies; Environmental Assessments, Environmental Impact Statements, Federal Aviation Administration
(FAA) Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) Part 150 noise compatibility studies, and Noise abatement
studies and Noise modeling using the FAA models for the Miami-Dade Aviation Department Noise &
Environmental Planning Program. The scope of this project encompasses the Miami International
Airport (MIA), Miami-Dade General Aviation Airports (GAA) and surrounding communities.
Two (2) consultants will be retained under a non-exclusive professional services agreement (PSA) in
the amount of $500,000 each with an effective term of four (4) years, or until the monies are exhaust-
ed.
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

23.00 Aviation Acoustical and Land Use Compatibility Planning Services (PRIME)

A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provi-
sions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering
Unit located at 111 NW 1St Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respec-
tively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded elec-
tronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail
address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-
line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notifi-
cation. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-
dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amado Gonzalez who may be contacted via e-mail at
Gonzaam@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-1428.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

2 AGREEMENTS NO MEASURES

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on September 27, 2006, at 10:00 A.M.
in Conference Room 18-3, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to
attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is October 11, 2006 at 11:00 A.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27
for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


o* Oslo"*0


o









The Miami Times September 27-October 3, 2006 11D


calB ks Must Control ,


To Place Your Ad

Call: 305-694-6225


Ti es'ma ssnIIIco
classifieds@ miamitimesonline.com


To Fax Your i

Fax: 305-757-47


Business Rentals
COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27th Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down
security doors. Outside
lighting, $700 per month. $700
security deposit.
Call 305-638-3699
STORE FRONT FOR RENT
6905 NW 15 Avenue
$950.00 Monthly
Call 786-263-1590



NORLAND AREA
Room for rent Deposit re-
quired. 727-564-2444.
Furnished Rooms
13377 N.W. 30th Avenue
$80 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen, one person.
305-474-8186 or 691-3486
1341 N.W. 68th Terrace
Excellent, air conditioned,
$95 wkly. Call 305-756-5774
1822 N.W. 66th Street
$300 monthly
Call 305-625-5590 or 305-
244-2528 for appointment.
19541 NW 37th Court -
Utilities included, $375
monthly, plus $300 security.
305-621-0576
19561 N.W. 30th Court
With air, $100 weekly, $200
to move in. 305-310-5272
2957 N.W. 44th Street
Nice furnished room for rent
with central air. For more in-
formation call 305-693-1017
or 305-298-0388.
1 5500 NW 5th Avenue
$80 weekly. Free utilities,
kitchen. One person. 305-
474-8188 305-691-3486.
6233 N.W. 22nd Court
Clean room, quiet area, utilit-
ies included. $110 weekly,
$330 move in. 786-277-2693
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Furnished room for rent.$300
move in $75 weekly
Call 305-637-3635
N.W. AREA
Furnished rooms for rent
complete house priviliges.
305-319-1834/305-249-9340
NORLAND AREA
For one person, $425 month-
ly. Call 305-653 8954 or 305-
249-7823.
SCOTT LAKE AREA
Room For Rent
Call 305-754-6564.
SUMMER PALACE
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, air, use of kitchen, plus
more. Call 305-835-2728.
Three Quarter Way House
Drug Treatment
$30.00 dailymeals included.
786-260-4276


2167 NW 83rd Terrace
$450 monthly, private
entry.Refrig, stove, AC.
Call 305-836-6385 after 5pm
720 N.W. 75th Street
Efficiency in castle
style mansion.
Mansion has waterfall, mar-
ble platform, 7 ft. lion statues
in front of the castle. Free
lights, water, air and parking.
Near bus line. $600 monthly,
$525 security.
Call 786-223-5374
Large Efficiency,
Own entrance, bath, kitchen.
air must pay own electric.
$525 monthly, $1,225 moves
you in.
Call 305-688-8572
Rear Cottage
Furnished or unfurnished, air
water included.
Call 305-751-3498

ApartmentS

1190 NW 65th Street
Two bedrooms,one
bath.Sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call 786-718-6819
1202 N.W. 61st Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath, tiled floors, appliances
available. Section 8
welcome. $800 monthly.Only
serious individuals, please.
Call 786-556-1909

1298 N.W. 60th Street
Beautiful one and two bed-
rooms available. Section 8
welcome.
Call 786-282-8775
13260 Aswan Road
One and Two bedrooms, one
bath,Section 8 Welcome
Call 786-718-6819
1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly. Newly
renovated, all appliances
included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from


Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485
monthly!

2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699


2375 N.W. 97th St., Apt. A
One bedroom, $575 a
month, first, last and security
to move in.
Call 305-691-2703 or
305-303-9912

542 NW 8th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$550 monthly. 305-861-
4683

586 NW 83rd Street (B)
One bedroom, one bath, no
evictions, $650 mthly.
Call 786-488-2264

6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$510-520 per month, one
bedrooms, $410 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
750 NW 56th Street
Senior Housing
One and two bedrooms from
$600 a month. Appliances,
water & gas included.NO
PRIOR EVICTIONS. Proof of
income required.
Call 786-290-0707.
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $420-$495 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
ARENA GARDEN
1601 NW 1st Court
FREE WATER AND BASIC
CABLE. Remodeled effcien-
cy, two, three bedrooms, air,
ceiling fan, appliances, laun-
dry and gate. 305-374-4412
Capital Rental Agency
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-locka, Brownsville,
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses Efficiencies, one,
two and three bedrooms,
Many with appliances.
Same day approval.
Call for information

Downtown/Biscayne Area
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen,
new tile, fresh paint, secured
with parking. $595-$675
monthly. 1315 N.E. Miami
Court.
786-351-45.16
Eighth StreetApartments
MOVE 'IN SPECIAL
One and a half months
Efficiency, one bath, $365;
One bedroom, one bath
$450, with air.
Call 786-236-1144 or
786-298-0125

HAMPTON HOUSE
Newly Renovated
Move in special 1 1/2 months
One bedroom, one bath
$470.
786-236-1144 or
786-298-0125Air

MIAMI AREA
131 NE 77 Street, two bed-
rooms, one bath two story
apartment. $900 monthly,
first and security. Section 8
Welcome.
Call 786-262-7653
MIAMI AREA
5200 N.W. 26nd Avenue
Two bedrooms, $700
Call 305-634-3545.
Section 8 Welcome
MIRAMAR AREA
Apartments for rent in quiet
neighborhood. Section 8 OK.
Call 786-295-4848
Ninth Street Apartments
One bedroom, one bath,
$450; three bedroom, two
bath, $725, air.
Call 305-358-1617

NORTH MIAMI AREA
1234 NW 100 Terrace, one
bedroom one bath with
fenced in yard. Very private.
$300 bi-weekly. $900 to
move in. Utilities, included
Call Greg 305-681-8040.

OPA LOCKA AREA
1116 Sesame Street
Two bedroms, one bath,in
quiet area, $930 monthly.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 954-805-3233
OPA LOCKA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 elcome. Immedi-
ate occupancy.
Call 786-337-3113
ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars
and iron gate doors, $430
monthly. Two bedrooms,
$480 monthly. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
SECTION 8 ONLY
172 NW 12 Stree One bed-
room, one bath.Newly reno-
vated
Call 786-263-1590
TWO BEDROOMS $650
5200 N W 26 Avenue.
Call 786-402-0672

WILDROSE


Large, two and three bed-
rooms available. All applian-
ces with central air. Section 8
Welcome!
Call 305-688-2749


I Duplex
1045 NW 113th Terrace
One bedroom, one bath du-
plex for rent.
786-346-9269
305-469-5513
1212 NE 110 TERRACE
The Complete Duplex, two
bedrooms, two baths,
washer and dryer. Fenced in
yard, security bars, central
air and heat. Tiled
throughout. $1235 and
$1000 security. Interested,
please call Whittaker at
786-709-7436. After Septem-
ber 22 please call 786-285-
5859 or 786-287-2140.
1320 NE 117th Street
Available.Two bedrooms, two
baths. Dennis 954-434-1130
1558 NE 131st Lane
Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances included, Section 8
welcome. Call 786-277-9925
1814 NW 90th Street
Two bedrooms, one
bath.Washer and dryer
gated, security bars, central
air and heat. Nice, Clean,
Quiet. Call 786-277-3916
1871-73 N.W. 43 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
spacious, new appliances,
central air, freshly painted,
new tile, private parking and
huge yard. Section 8 okay!
Call 786-357-5000.
21301 NW 37 Avenue, Apt 1
Two bedrooms, one bath, air
conditioned, tiled floors, new
paint, $895 monthly, $1790
move in. No Section 8.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
2452 N.W. 44th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, $1100 monthly.
Call 786-226-2072
2580 YORK STREET
Two bedrooms, one bath
central air and heat Newly
renovated. $950 monthly
each unit. Section 8 welcome!
Call Chris 305-300-9708
6003 N.W. 14 Avenue
One bedroom, one bath, new
appliances, new kitchen and
tile floors. $600 monthly.
Section 8 okay!
Call 954-914-9166
6304 N. W. 1st Court
One bedroom, one bath, ce-
ramice tile, stove, refrigerator.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-285-8872
6998 N.W. 5th Place
One bedroomn, ohe 'bath,
$750 monthly. First and
security. Section 8 welcome.
786-399-8557 or
954-549-5148
7010 N.W. 5th Place
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 O.K.
Call 786-399-0050
7633 N.W. 2 Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air and appliances, $995
monthly. 954-499-3030
8160 NW 5th Ave.
Two bedrooms, two baths.
Large eat-in kitchen, large
dining and living room. Air,
walk-in closet, gas stove,
large patio. 1 month security
plus rent. $950 monthly. Sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call 305-691-5398 or
305-495-6527.
Large Two bedrooms,
one bath, new Kitchen and
applicances. $950 monthly,
utitlites included.
Call 305-807-5874
MIAMI AREA
1860-2 N,W. 45 Street, two
bedroom one bath, new
appliances, new kitchen and
tile floors. $975 monthly.
Section 8 okay!
Call 954-914-9166
POMPANO AREA
504 NW 10 Avenue, near At-
lantic Avenue. Two bedroom
one bath. $850 monthly utilit-
ies included. $1900 to move
in. Call 305-321-4077.
SECTION 8 ONLY
7005 NW 4 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath
Call 786-263-1590

UnderNew
Management
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $550 per month, $550
security deposit, $1100 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.


18360 N.W. 44 Place
Two bedroom, two baths.
Very spacious, with family
room, that can be used as an
additional room. $1250
monthly. First, last and
secur-
ity to move in.
Call Gloria 786-348-1288
6113 SW 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one and


half bath. $1,200 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-556-9425 or
786-210-0421
MIAMI GARDENS
291 NW 177 Street, one bed-
room condominium $600
monthly. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 305-975-1017


Carmel Lakes
20760 NE 4t Court
Three bedroom, two baths.
Gated area, pool, golf, nice
family area, close to Adven-
tura mall.Call 305-684-9838
NEAR DOLPHIN STADIUM
Three bedrooms, two baths
Townhome with family room.
$1500 monthly, first and se-
curity. Call 786-262-7653


1043 N.W. 28 Street
Three bedroom one bath, tile
throughout, fence all around,
walk to Jackson Memorial
Hospital. $1500 monthly. Call
786-423-7233 or 305-401-
9165.
13630 NW 5th Avenue
Three bedrooms, air,den,
$1,200, $1,300 move in.NO
Section 8. Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776
17230 NW 24th Avenue
Four bedrooms, three baths,
air, bars, $1,500, $4,500
move in. NO Section 8. 305-
891-6776, Terry Dellerson.
1730 NW 68th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 Welcome. Air and
gated.Call 786-488-7701
1751 N.W. 75th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1,300 monthly, plus
security.
Call 347-267-8350
18020 N.W. 5th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath.
CalIl-800-257-1311 or
404-403-5550
1853 NW 63rd STREET-
Three bedrooms, one
bath, newly remodeled. Sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call 305-651-4242
2441 NW 104th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 Welcome. 1-800-
257-1311 or 404-861-1965.
2462 N.W. 170 Street
A great starter home for the
first time home buyer
($260,000). This four bed-
room, two bath is also availa-
ble for rent for $1,750 month-
ly. Please call: 305-652-9343
The Real Estate Experts
284 N.W. 75th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
404-861-1965 or
1-800-257-1311
2954 NW_1, Terrace
Four bedrooms, 'two0
baths, with stove,
refrigerator, air. Section 8
OK, $1,400. 305-642-7080
2981 NW 156th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
carport, fenced yard, free
lawn service, renovated,
$1300 monthly, first, last and
security, light, water on.
Call 305-469-4040

3451 NW 174th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
den, fence, central air, bars,
tile, $1500 a month. First,
last and $700 security.
Call 305-621-0576
3810 N.W. 195 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, den, $1400, $3800 to
move in. No Section 8.
Call 786-488-2264

4131 N.W. 203 Road Lane
Three bedrooms, two baths,
large corner, no section 8,
$1200 monthly.
Call 305-267-9449
7746 N.W. 2nd Court
Four bedrooms, two baths
Section 8 OK!.
Call Ron 305-582-8210
8250 N.W. 2 Court
One bedroom, one bath, in-
cludes water $750 monthly.
NO Section 8.
305-267-9449
910 West Superior Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
air, fence, tile. $1,250 move
in $3,750. No Section 8.Terry
Dellerson Broker
305-891-6776
CAROL CITY AREA
3330 NW 214 Street. Four
bedroom two baths, large
family room, new paint,'cen-
tral air. $1295 monthly.
$2900 to move in. NO
SECTION 8.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700
CAROL CITY AREA
3800 NW 178 Street. Three
bedroom two bath, spacious
Florida Room, pool. No Sec-
tion 8.$1400 monthly, first,
last and security.Call 305-
439-2683. D & C Investment
Realty.
CAROL CITY AREA
Three bedrooms one and 1/2
baths'central air recently ren-
ovated $1,100 monthly
$3,300 moves you in. Call
786-326-8280
COZY HOME IN MIAMI
GARDENS
Two bedroom, one bath with
large den. Beautiful yard with
carport. Section 8 Welcome.
$1100/ month.
Call 786-290-0707
Five bedrooms, three baths
Foreclosure, $99/MO, 4%
down, 30 years at 8% APR!
For listings 800-749-8168
xD074


MIAMI AREA
2120 N.W. 81 Terrace, five
bedrooms two baths. $1500
monthly. Call 305-835-8468


HUGE HOUSE IN
CAROL CITY
Beautiful five bedrooms, two
baths. Sectio 8 Welcome
$1750 a month.
Call 786-290-0707
MIAMI GARDENS
Large home with large pool.
King Star Realty
Dorothy Bradley
786-380-7545
NEVER RENT AGAIN!
Buy a four bedrooms, two
baths, $10,000! Foreclosures!
For listings 800-749-8168
xD041.
NEWLY RENOVATED IN
SCOTT LAKE
Nice four bedroom two bath.
Section 8 Welcome.
$1600/month
Call 786-290-0707
NICE HOUSE IN SCOTT
LAKE
Three bedroom two bath with
yard. Section 8 Welcome.
$1500/month
Call 786-290-0707
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Huge three bedrooms, two
baths, large kitchen, nice qui-
et neighborhood. $1450
monthly, Call 786-344-8601.

NORTHWEST DADE
16301 N.W. 22 Court, three
bedrooms, two, baths, tile,
central air. $1300 monthly,
Miami Beach, Hialeah, Section
8 okay. 305-662-5505.
NW 96th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1450 monthly, plus security.
786-423-0429
OPA LOCKA AREA
1801 Wilmington Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
with laundry room, front
porch and fenced yard, with
lakeview. $1000 monthly with
option to buy at $165,000
negotionable.
Call 954-801-3508
SCOTT LAKE AREA
1441 N.W. 179 Terrace.
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, air, tile, appliances. Se-
curity bars. Section 8 Wel-
come. $1400 monthly.
Call 305-216-0285 or
954-538-0098.
STOP!!!!
Behind in your rent? 24 hour
notice? Behind in your mort-
gage? Call Kathy:
7QR-Q3-7Q9 1


Rent with option to buy
single family, three
bedrooms, two baths, central
air. Fully renovated, only
$2900 down, $1450 monthly.
Ready to move in!
Call 786-236-5035



ESCAPE FORECLOSURE
Save your home FREE
friendly phone advice.
FREE credit repair.
CALL 305-244-9003
FORECLOSURE
Single family $100,000 below
the market value. Call Yuval
954-882-6231.

INVESTORS WANTED
For investment properties.
Call Chris 305-219-0260
Doster Investment Group
Stop Renting!
Own Your Own Home! Bad
credit welcome! Zero down
payment, free credit report.
http://Taylor.eazyhomeloans.
com. Call 786-267-7129.




Condos/TownhouseS

FLORIDA CITY AREA
New townhouse, three bed-
room two and a half bath,
one car garage up-grades.
No association fee. $238,000
negotiable/$1500 monthly
rent.
Call 786-325-4659

SUNRISE FLORIDA
8350W Sunrsie Lakes boule-
vard, two bedroom two bath
condominium. Tile floor over
55 condominiums $116,500.
Brown Realty Inc.
305-685-6275

Duplex
MIAMI AREA
4625-27 N.W. 15th Court
Two bedrooms one bath on
each side, new roof and new
windows. Try $2900 down
and $1290 monthly (good
credit required), $279K.
NDI Realtors ,305-655-1700
NW AREA
$270K.
786-423-0429

Houses

1441 NW 67th Street
Beautiful four bedrooms, one
bath, new appliances, central
air, tile, freshly painted, verti-
cal blinds, huge yard, fenced
parking.asking $189,900.
Call 786-357-5000
HUD HOMES
Four bedrooms, two baths
Only $25,000. For listings:
800-749-8168 xD046


1718 NW 74th Street
Three bedrooms, one
bath. Asking $189,000.
ALL POINTS REALTY & IN-
VESTMENTS.305-621-5800
3810 NW 210 th Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, hurricane shutters
large family room, iron fence,
master suite, $299K.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700

ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
***WITH .***
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
On Any Home
Also Available HUD/ VA-
Homes
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House Of Homes Realty

BISCAYNE HEIGHTS
Two bedroom one bath
house in Biscayne Heights,
big lot. Great development
opportunity, multi-media den-
sity. Call Mrs. Rodriguez.
786-556-2686
Doral Access Realty
CAROL CITY
17730 NW 33rd Court
Three bedrooms, two
baths.Family room, central
air.Will rent til closing for
$1,500 a month. Asking
$269,000
ALL POINTS REALTY IN-
VESTMENTS. 305-621-5800
CAROL CITY AREA
4910 NW 170th Street
Four bedroom two 'baths,
central air, new windows,
new paint. Try $2900 down
and $1399 monthly (good
credit required) $329K.
NDI Realtors, 305-655-1700

FORECLOSURE
All Areas of Dade,
Hundreds to Choose,
Easy to Qualify.
FREE LIST. Call now!
Larry Albert 305-255-9040
FORECLOSURES!
Four bedrooms, two baths..
Must Sell! Only $43,000!
800-749-8168 xD040
HOLLYWOOD HILLS
5125 Washington Street
"Fantastic" beauty!
Three bedrooms, two baths,
den, and, pool., Twpcar ga-,
.rage.
Brown' Realty & Inv. Corp
305-685-6275
INCOME POTENTIAL
Six bedroom five bathroom
for sale. Income potential.
Three separate kitchens.
Over 2400 square feet.
$350,000 Call 305-467-6095
between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.
MIAMI AREA
1455.N W 69 Terrace, Beau-
tiful well kept three bedroom
one bath double lot. Profes-
sionally landscaped. Fully
upgraded! You'll love it! Must
see!
Call Johnnie
786-443-2337
'MVIIAMI AREA
3279 NW 51 Street
Three bedrooms one bath,
central air, new paint and
more. Try $1900 down and
$799 monthly (good credit
required) $195K.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
MIAMI AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
totally remodeled, central air,
45 x 100 lot, new fence, only
$2500 down and no closing
costs. Move in three weeks.
Call 786-236-5035
NORTH DADE
80 N. E. 212 Terrace. "Ele-
gant" three big bedrooms
and two baths with den and
patio,Tile floors.$275.000
Brown Realty Inc.
305-685-6275

NORTH DADE BEAUTY
Spacious, recently
remodeled three bedrooms,
two baths with brand new
kitchen, all stainless steel
appliances and newer
washer and dryer. Extra
large back yard.
Call Mr. Jean 305-528-0038.
ERA SALES/ALVIN, INC.
305-652-8880

NORTH MIAMI BEACH
Updated spacious, well kept
three bedrooms, two baths in
great location. Minutes to
163rd Mall, WalMart and
public transportation.
Property in great condition
and ready for occupancy.
Call Mr. Jean
305-528-0038
ERA SALES/ALVIN, INC.
305-652-8880

SOUTH MIAMI HEIGHTS
17000 S W 120 Court, four
bedroom, two baths. Owner
will pay up to $15K in closing
cost. $259,900.
Call I. Mitchell 305-975-1017.
Wright Track Realty


SOUTHWEST AREA
1575 N.E. 36 Avenue, three
bedroom two bath, brand
new. Owner agent will pay up
to $20K in closing cost.
$349,900.
Call I. Mitchell 305-975-1017.
Wright Track Realty


Lot
CEMETERY PLOTS
Two cemetery plots at North
Dade Memorial Park on
Northwest 135 Street. Call
954-60-66518.
CENTRAL GEORGIA LAND
Great investment opportunity
strong proven market one to
five acre tracks starting at
$5,200 an acre. Owner fi-
nancing available, call 706-
737-2954

Apartment Buildings
LIBERTY CITY AREA
Rooming house MUST SELL
305-542-8124.



AVOID FORECLOSURE!
SAVE YOUR HOME
Call for available programs
786-488-8617
STOP READ!
Are you about to lose your
home to foreclosure? Let me
help you save it. We have
many programs available.
Bad Credit welcome.
Call 786-315-0472



24 HR. Plumbing
Unclog All types of Blockage.
Check Water Heaters and
Septic tank. Free Estimates.
Call 786-597-1924 or
305-576-5331
I BUY HOUSES
$ CASH $
Sell in 24 hours
Call NOW!!! 954-445-5470
WE BUY HOUSES
Any area, any condition, any
price, fast cash.
Call 786-285-8872



GENERAL HOME REPAIRS
Plumbing electrical,appliance
roof, air Call 305-685-1898



'93 LINCOLN TOWNCAR
A/C, $799.
Call 305-438-1909
ACURA from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167xK023
Chevy's from $500!
Police Impounds. For listihgs
800-749-8167 XKO20
Honda Accord 94
$800 or best offer! Clean and
reliable. For listing:
800-749-8167 ext.K036
Toyota Camry 91
$550 or best offer, good con-
dition, For listing: 800-749-
8167 xK024




AMWANB Church seeks
keyboard player. contact
305-681-6047 or 305-694-
2127.

ASSISTANT
APARTMENT
MANAGER ASSISTANT
APARTMENT MANAGER
needed. Must be high
school graduate, computer
literate. Good benefits.
Nice working environment.
Reply: Miami Times Adver-
tiser, Suite 2-270, 2520
S.W. 22nd Street, Miami,
FL 33145.

FLYER DISTRIBUTOR
Earn $10 to $20 hourly
put-
ting up signs. 786-522-
3504 extension 21.


HANDYMAN/PROPERTY
MANAGER
Possible relocation to
Pompano. Call with
references and job
qualifications.
Call 305-321-4077

LIVE -N PART TIME
RELIEVER CNA
786-423-0429

MECHANIC
Immediate Hire
Certified Diesel, Hydraulic,
Electrical, Propane, &
Mechanical Repairs
1-2 years experience.
Computer skills a plus.
Great benefits. Apply at:
2711 SW 36 Street
Fort Lauderdale, FIl
954-581-6221 EEO/DFWP

Outside Sales

Experienced, ambitious,
go-getters! Better than
average oral skills. Sales
experience and familiar
with Dade and Broward
counties a must. Apply in
person.
Contact Ms. Thornton:

305-694-6214


SPARKLE CLEANING
Professionals
looking for professional
home cleaners.
Call 305-769-2973


PASTOR WANTED
Believers of Christ Minis-
tries Incorporated, located
in Hallandale Beach, Flori-
da, an African American
Non-Denominational
Church with 75-125 mem-
bers, established in 2001
is
seeking a Senior Pastor
who is capable of commu-
nicating God's word.
Needs
to be able to work with
committed members and
take the church to the next
level. You must have a
strong passion to grow a
church and have excellent
administrative and leader-
ship skills.
If interested please send
your resume and a recent
color photo. We are only
accepting resumes by
post-
al mail. Please send to:
Believers of Christ Minis-
tries Inc.
Attn: Board of Directors
3450 NW 205th Street -
Miami, Gardens, Fl.
33056

REAL ESTATE INVEST-
OR APPRENTICE
Huge money, earn while
you learn! 786-522-3504
extension 11.

Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour
Plus gas mileage
For a 1/2 days work

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets. WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 8 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Applications are received
Thursday and Friday
900 NW 54th Street

TEACHERS NEEDED
CDA required. 305-754-
1132.

TEACHER
Certified teacher needed to
work in private child care
center. Call 305-836-1178.

TEMPORARY
WASTE
COLLECTORS
Immediate openings
are available in Miami
Dade County Collec-
tions Department.
$10.81 per hour. Appli-
cation forms are availa-
ble 9am to 5pm Mon-
day to Friday. 740 NW
107 Street Miami, FL.
305-751-8000




KINDERGARTEN
AVAILABLE
Zoned for 30 children.
Call 305-687-1218
MIAMI GOSPEL IDOL
1st Place $500
TALENT SHOW
We are looking for choirs,
dancers, rappers etc. To
audition call 305-303-9880
No Jive seeking male actors
30-35 for upcoming stage
play. Call 786-473-6435




Brand New Queen Pillowtop
Mattress Set, $195 can deliv-
er. Call 305-968-8129.
King Size Pillowtop Mattress
Set, new in package, $279.
Call 786-390-1609



BUY A NEWLY
RENOVATED, LAKEFRONT
CONDOMINIUM
FOR AS LOW AS

$89,990!
ONLY $500 DOWN
NO CLOSING COSTSl


I. A K \ S

305-757-7110
10940 NW 14TH AVE
MIAMI, FL 33167
www.sunshinelakes.com


CALL TO


PLACE YOUR


CLASSIFIED AD


TODAY !!!!!


305-694-6225


T~>1-I, N-_ ,,,+- r,>- -+,- ] Tk1-; (-)- T-.. ^. Qfinl:.,








eLL L AVL&UI am mes,~~ p -


an"Copyrighted Material P
SSyndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"

MIZELL KIDDIE CAMPUS
Register NOW! Ages 2- 6. Abeka curriculum, certified
teachers, progress report, black history, spanish, swahili,
extra curricular programs, field trips, PTA, homework, uni-
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S ptchase agreement and tothe documents required by section 718,503, Floritda salutes, to be fumishedbyadeveloper to abuyer or lessee.


ADVERTISEMENT
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR AIRPORT SIGNAGE, FABRICATION AND INSTALLATION
FOR THE MIAMI DADE AVIATION DEPARTMENT
RFQ No. MDAD-05-01


Miami-Dade County (the "County"), as represented by the Miami-Dade
Aviation Department ("MDAD"), requires the services of no more than
four (4) qualified firm(s) to provide Airport Signage, Fabrication and
Installation.

The term of the agreement will be for four (4) years, and will include an
option to extend the term for two (2) one-year-terms at the sole discre-
tion of MDAD. A maximum of four (4) responsive firms found to meet the
qualifications will be awarded a contract for airport signage, fabrication
and installation.

Scope of Services: The required signage, fabrication and installation
work will encompass a wide variety airport signs located throughout all
County Airports. The work will include the fabrication of signs, obtaining
permits, engineering, and installation of signs. Types of signs include
internally illuminated interior and exterior signs, interior and exterior stat-
ic signs, roadway signage, parking garage signage, airfield signage,
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) signage, tactile and braille signage
and various other airport signage as required by MDAD. Some signage
work will require night installation to avoid disruption on airport opera-
tions. Services that may be required include, but are not limited to:

1. Providing custom fabricated illuminated box signs in various sizes
ranging from 1' x 1' to 5' x 30' internally illuminated with neon and/or flu-
orescent illumination, stainless steel end caps, lexan sign faces, extrud-
ed aluminum frame, double and single faced, hinged access panels and
reverse cut vinyl graphics, electrical wiring and installations.

2. Providing sign brackets, insertable sign displays, floor standing sign
holders, banner stands, sign posts, frames, rotatable signs and other
related signage systems in various sizes as required.

3. LED type signs with similar appearance to the directional signs. All
cabinets to be extruded aluminum. LED component to be specified by
MDAD and furnished by approved manufacturers

4. Providing exterior pylon type signs in various sizes as large as 20' x
20', constructed to meet all applicable Miami-Dade County Codes. All
signs must be constructed of welded aluminum frame with steel interior
supports and covered with 1/8" aluminum skin. Work scope may Include
concrete footing, installation with crane and graphics cut in engineering
grade vinyl.

5. Providing roadway sign in various sizes as large as 20' x 20' and 8' x
32', constructed with welded aluminum truss type frame, and/or structur-
al steel frame, with metal surface and engineering grade reflective vinyl
graphics. Both single and double faced signs of this type are required.
Installation is required in various airport locations such as over the road
sign structures, on the side of parking structures and on bridges.

6. Providing embedded fiberglass signs in various sizes ranging in size
from 2' x 2' to 10' x 10' utilizing various graphics techniques such as silk
screen graphics, spray cut graphics and vinyl cut graphics in multi-col-
ors. Graphics to be sub-surface, laminated between 1/8" high density
white plastic and 1/16" clear fiberglass with edges sealed. Installation will
vary, including column mounted, overhead beam mounted and wall
mounted.

7. Providing internally illuminated flush mounted and surface mounted
directories as specified by MDAD.

8. Providing freestanding internally illuminated custom designed direc-
tories with steel channel frames, rolled stainless steel and/or aluminum
covering, double faced, hinged access door and internal neon illumina-
tion to include electrical hook-up and installation.


9. Providing injection molded and photo polymer chemweld and similar
type plaque signs. ADA (American with Disabilities Act) signs to include
tactile images and braille utilizing standard international pictograms.
Sizes vary from 6" x 6" to 12" x 18". Installation to be wall mounted and
conform with ADA standards.

10. Providing single post and two post roadway ground mounted signs
ranging in size from 30" x 30" to 6' x 10'. Sign faces to be specified in
various sizes and thickness, with surface applied reflective vinyl, engi-
neering grade and diamond grade vinyl lettering and frangible pole
mounts. Installation may include, concrete footings to meet all applicable
code requirements.

11. Providing stainless steel and fiberglass elevator control panels for
elevator cab interior and exteriors to include custom graphics and col-
ors as specified. Includes installation and electrical hook-up.

12. Providing any other sign or sign component for Miami International
Airport and other Miami-Dade County auxiliary airports as requested.

13. Obtaining building permits for all sign installations. Shop drawings,
engineering calculations and Professional Engineer's seal may be
required.

The successful Signage contractor shall coordinate his installation work
with other ongoing construction affecting the work areas. Signage con-
tractor shall also coordinate delivery of all signage materials and
equipment necessary for installation with MDAD. Signage contractor
may be requirdd to perform some of the work at night and may also
be required to provide in-house capability to design and /or engineer
signage as may be requested under the contract. Prior to the
issuance of work, MDAD will provide the awarded firm(s) with either
MDAD issued. specifications or may request that specifications be
developed by the awarded firm(s) for the scope of work requested

Sealed Qualification Statements for the Miami-Dade County Request
for Qualifications (RFQ) No. MDAD-01-05, entitled "Airport Signage,
Fabrication and Installation" for the Miami-Dade Aviation Department,
will be received by the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-
Dade County, Florida, Office of the Clerk of the Board, Stephen P.
Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, 17th floor, Suite 202, Miami,
Florida 33128 until 2:00 P.M., Friday, October 27, 2006 or as modi-
fied by addendum. The County will receive sealed Qualification
Statements from qualified, interested parties based upon the terms,
covenants and provisions of the Advertisement and the RFQ. The
Department reserves the right to postpone or cancel the Qualification
Statement opening at any time prior to the scheduled opening of the
Qualification Statements. Respondents are invited to be present.
Qualification Statements received after the time and date specified
are late and will not be considered or received by the Clerk's office,
and if sent by mail, will be returned unopened.

RFQ documents may be obtained at MDAD's Contracts
Administration Division, 4200 N.W. 36th Street, Building 5A, Suite
400, Miami, Florida, Contracting Officer AnaMaria Saks, tele-
phone (305) 876-7048, on or after Monday, September 25, 2006 by
payment of Fifty Dollars ($50.00) (non-refundable) check only,
made payable to the Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD).
Each respondent shall furnish an address, telephone and fax num-
bers, and e-mail address for the purpose of contact during the RFQ
process.

All Qualification Statements must be submitted as set forth in the
RFQ.
A Qualification Statement shall be irrevocable until contract award,


unless the Qualification Statement is withdrawn. A Qualification
Statement may only be withdrawn in writing and must be addressed to
the Clerk prior to the Qualification Statement deadline.

MDAD may, at its sole and absolute discretion, reject any and all, or
parts of any and all Qualification Statements; re-advertise the RFQ;
postpone or cancel, at any time, the RFQ process; or waive any irregu-
larities in the RFQ or in the Qualification Statements received as a result
of the RFQ.

A Project Briefing will be held on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 at 10:30
a.m. at the Miami-Dade Aviation Department, 4200 N.W. 36th Street,
Building 5A, Conference Room "F" on the 4th Floor, Miami, Florida, for
all interested parties and attendance is recommended, but not manda-
tory. Any changes to the RFQ will be by written addendum.

Contract Measures: This solicitation has a 29% Community Workforce
Goal.

For questions regarding the RFQ, please see the "Cone of Silence" sec-
tion in this solicitation.

Cone of Silence: Pursuant to Section 2-11.1 of the Code, a "Cone of
Silence" is imposed, after advertisement, upon RFQs, RFPs, bids for
the provision of goods and services and audit and Independent Private
Sector Inspector General ("IPSIG") contracts. The Cone of Silence is
designed to protect the integrity of the procurement process by shield-
ing it from undue influences prior to the recommendation of contract
award. Communication regarding this RFQ will be prohibited between
the Respondent, it's service providers, lobbyists, or consultants, and the
County's professional staff including, but not limited to: (i) the County
Manager and his or her staff; (ii) the Mayor and his or her staff; (iii) the
Board; or (iv) members of the Evaluation and Selection Committee. A
Cone of Silence is also imposed between the Mayor, the Board or their
respective staffs and any member of the County's professional staff
including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff.

The Cone of Silence does not apply to: (i) oral communications at pre-
submission conferences; (ii) oral presentations before the Evaluation
and Selection Committee; (iii) oral communications with the Contracts
Officer, provided the communications is limited strictly to matters of
process or procedures; (iv) contract negotiations during any duly
noticed public meetings; (v) public presentations made to the Board dur-
ing any duly noticed public meetings; or (vi) communications in writing
at any time unless specifically prohibited by the RFQ. The Respondent
must file a copy of any written communication with the Clerk, which shall
be made available to any person upon request. The County shall
respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk, which shall also be
made available to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of Section 2-
11.1 of the Code by any Respondent shall render any RFQ award void-
able. Any person having personal knowledge of a violation of this ordi-
nance shall report such violation to the Office of the State Attorney
and/or file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. The Respondent
should reference the applicable sections of the Code for further clarifi-
cation. Failure to comply may result in the disqualification of the
Respondent.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK

BY:
DEPUTY CLERK


ABORTIONS
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Invitation to Bid

Miami Central Senior High School Sector II GMP
1781 NW 95"' Street. Miami Florida 33147
Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Project M-DCPS Project No. A001l3
Miami. Florida

PROPOSALS ARE DUE:
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2006, NO LATER THAN 2:00PM E.S.T.

JOB DESCRIPTION: Three new buildings total 103,800sf a gymnasium, a
two story administrationtclass room building and a dinning hall. Structural
steel, tilt wall construction, masonry, food service equipment, gym
equipment, and all finish trades and MEP. Related site work with sports
fields, parking and demolition.

For additional information or to request bid documents
CALL 813-282-7100

A Pre-Bid Meeting will be held on Monday October 2"", 2006 at 11:00am at
Miami Central Senior High School located at 1781 NW 95"' Street, Miami,
Florida 33147

Skanska USA and Miami-Dade County Public Schools strongly encourage
participation by local, minority and women-owned businesses on this
project.


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12D Th Mi i Ti Se tembe 6


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