Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00074
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: July 26, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00074
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text








Affordable housing scandal exposed
m's *eh'd *Iso


******C*********CH 3-DIGIT 32

LIBRARY OF FLA. HISTORY
GAINESVILLE FL 32611-7007
T'emipora Mutailil I' Nos Mfluinr In lllis


South's Largest Black Weekly Circulation



One Family Serving Since 1923
O0IYEARS
Informing Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties


Many students 'graduate' but don't get diplomas


An alarming number of high
school students are crossing
graduation platforms to
receive a nondiploma docu-
ment that is worth little more
than the paper on which it is
written for use in getting into
college, entering military serv-
ice, getting a well paying job
or increasing one's academic
knowledge and self esteem.


While many students
receive a diploma from the
principal's hand with the tra-
ditional handshake, the
majority of Black students
statewide receive a Certificate
of Completion. This document
only certifies that the student
was able to remain in the
school system for 12 or more
years. Whether they learned


the basics of reading, writing
and arithmetic is not certified
by the paper.
The number of students
who "graduate" with certifi-
cates of completion and other
non-standard papers is
increasing yearly, with the
most dramatic increase
among Black students.
Statewide and locally, Black


graduates with a standard
diploma are lagging far
behind White and Hispanic
students.
The 2004-2005 school year
records of the Florida
Department of Education
show that statewide 94 per-
cent of White students and
87.3 percent of Hispanic stu-
dents finish their high school


matriculation with standard
diplomas. Only 78.4 percent
of Black students received the
traditional indicator of 12
years of education and pas-
sage of all required tests.
Certificates of Completion
recipients are listed as 2.08
percent for White students,
9.16 percent for Hispanics and
14 percent for Blacks. Rates


for the past year are more
alarming as a Miami-Dade
Public School administrator
told The Miami Times that
14,000 students are annually
receiving certificates of com-
pletion and that 90 percent are
Black.
The same administrator said
that one example of the crisis
Please turn to DIPLOMAS 8A


Elaine Black Marva Wiley


City of Miami revamps


plagued Model City Trust


Special to The_Times

The city trust created to
bring quality affordable hous-
ing to Miami's struggling
Model City
neighborhood
is no more.
At the Miami
Commission's
July meeting
in e m b e r s
passed an
ordinance that
created the
Liberty City
Community
Housing Trust SPENCE- JONES
to coordinate
city services and activities in
the Liberty City area.
The new ordinance will take
effect in early August and will


be under the direct supervi-
sion of Commissioner Michelle
Spence-Jones. It eliminates
the authority of the board of
directors and places that
authority in the new executive
director, Elaine Black.
The city moved fast in
response to an audit that criti-
cized the financial relationship
between former Executive
Director Marva Wiley and a
high school classmate's con-
struction business. The com-
pany, Mega Construction
Team, Inc., which is wholly
owned by Tifphanie Tucker.
uses subcontractors to per-
form most of the work it
receives.
Wiley was criticized for open-
ing a bank account, using her
Please turn to TRUST 8A


Howard Gary is surprise

Commission candidate


By Jarrell Douse and
Nathanael Paul
Miami Times Writers

Former City of Miami manag-
er and government informant
Howard Gary surprised incum-
bent Commissioner Audrey
Edmonson and challenger
Bess L.
McElroy with
a last minute
filing of docu-
ments to chal- ,
lenge for the
District 3
seat.
District 3
represents
Overtown,
Little Haiti- GARY
Lemon City.
Allapattah and segments of
Liberty City.
Recently. Edmonson was in a
meeting and did not comment
directly, but a campaign man-
ager said that they were "sur-
prised that someone who
admitted to bribing publicly
elected officials and giving ille-
gal campaign contributions
would seek public office."
Edmonson's camp also


expressed
shock that
Gary "was giv-
ing a public
apology 10-
years later-
now that he
wants some-
thing from the
community."
The Miami EDMONSON
Times attempt-
ed to contact candidate Bess L.
McElroy at her home for com-
ment, but was unable to ascer-
tain a response at the time.
Nonetheless, Gary, when
asked about the surprise fac-
tor of his candi-
dacy and why he
is challenging
Edmonson, told
The Miami Times
that he should
not be asked
why he is chal-

Edmnonson, but
"What do I plan McELROY
to do to get back
to the basic needs of the com-
munity and the services offered
to its residents'?"
Please turn to GARY 4A


%I


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tmSyndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"














Mayor orders Miami-Dade Housing investigation


Stung by revelations of wide-
spread fraud and abuse in our
local public housing agency,
Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos
Alvarez called for inves-
tigations into a myriad
of allegations that are
disturbing to many of
our citizens.
At his news confer-
ence on Monday,
Alvarez admitted that
the Miami-Dade
Housing Agency has
failed in its mission to
do the job and ordered BRE
County Manager
George Burgess to find out
what went wrong and to disci-
pline those responsible.
Burgess said Monday that
shortly after Housing Agency


w


Director Alphonso
Brewster resigned in
April, his office began
an inquiry to track the
agency money.
Burgess said
he contacted
the county
inspector gen-
eral and the
public corrup-
tions arm of the
police depart-
ment. He has
requested the
fSTER audit in at least
years of the const
tion money.
This newspaper has pi
lished scores of stories inF
years about the woeful neg
and inefficiency of the Mi;


AL VA


Dade Housing Agency,
but it was a hard-hit-
ting expansive expose
in The Miami Herald
( ; that revealed a
) pattern of waste
and corruption
that sprang this
community into
action.


able housing for years are
enraged by the seemingly wan-
ton disregard for the poor peo-
ple of this community.
Assistant County
Manager Cynthia
Curry, who is also the
county's senior advisor
on housing issues,
, Said: "I want adminis-


-- The series, trative action taken
REZ House of Lies, swiftly."
which showed The mayor also
empty lots where afford- wants to retrieve pub-
able homes were sup- lic money awarded to
posed to have been CURRY those who failed to
built, found developers abide by contracts,
have received more than $12 perhaps by filing lawsuits. And
million over the past five years he said he would study the
for. homes never built, possibility of a moratorium on
Miami residents who have the use of public lands and
been waiting on decent afford- money..


Under the legislation
Governor Bush signed into law
this year, state and local sales
tax will not be collected on
clothes, footwear, books and
certain accessories selling for
$50 or less, that started from
Saturday, July 22 through
midnight on Monday, July 30.
Certain school supplies selling
for $10 or less are also tax-
exempt during this period.
"Florida's annual sales tax
holiday is a great way for our
state to give money back to
our hardworking citizens,"
said Lt. Governor Jennings.
"In addition to boosting sales
at retail stores across Florida,
the sales tax holiday allows
Floridians to save money on
important items for school."
The sales tax holiday will
save shoppers an estimated
$32.1 million in state sales tax
and an additional $7.2 million
in local sales taxes. Sales tax
holidays were held in 1998


through 2001 and in 2004 and
2005. In 2004, Governor Bush
advocated including books in
the sales tax holiday items to
encourage families to buy and
read books with their children
as part of the "Just Read,
Florida!" initiative.
Businesses and shoppers
with questions regarding the
sales tax holiday can contact
the Department of Revenue
toll-free taxpayer assistance
line at 1-800-352-3671
between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. on
weekdays. Information also
is available through the
Department of Revenue web
site at
www.myflorida.com/dor or by
visiting a Department of
Revenue Service Center.
Service center telephone num-
bers and locations are avail-
able through the web site or by
checking the Blue Pages
(Government Listings) in your
local telephone directory.


AIV' C WEOES'IDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

/ l W A 'THER 85 r 860F.. 86


SUNDAY


MONDAY


TUESDAY


I 87 86' 87F 870F
S F- 15r T P,T- IPv ; I C'! I'=:[)q! i t(CA [ T Sk,


8 90158 00100 0


Pay no taxes on clothing and

school supplies until July 30


SATURDAY


wAI(ed with no home*


a -A - c o l a










A1


Ill"Ii1


Black completers do

not have diplomas

There was a time in Black America when parents and
grandparents who were legally or practically unable
to attend public schools would go to high school
graduations of their children or grandchildren and weep
with pride as their offspring crossed the graduation stage.
This reaction resulted from the knowledge that the "piece of
paper" the students were receiving gave them the basic cre-
dentials for a better future. Whether going to college, to the
military or for better jobs, those wrinkled and gray haired
faces knew they had handed the baton of the family to the
future generation. Sadly, this is not true today.

The "piece of paper" many students receive from their
principal is just as likely to be a "certificate of completion"
rather than a diploma. The files of state and local education
boards show that statewide 21.6 percent of Black students
did not graduate with a standard diploma in the 2004-05
school year. The situation is not improving. A knowledgeable
Miami-Dade administrator told The Miami Times that
14,000 students statewide are receiving certificates of com-
pletion rather than diplomas and that 90 percent of those
completers are Black.

Local school Board records for the 2003-04 school year
show that in some predominately Black student body
schools as many as 25 percent (Edison) and 28 percent
(Central) of graduating seniors did not receive standard
diplomas. The Miami-Dade administrator told us that recent
records show that in one north county high school, only 80
of the 192 seniors graduated with a standard diploma.

While there may be a myriad of causes for these completer
rates, this reality has to be attacked by the Black communi-
ty. Parents, Black elected officials, Black education adminis-
trators, Black churches and Black community based organ-
izations. And yes, the Black press. Slaves cannot expect to
ride to freedom on pharaoh's chariot.

In the not too distant past, Black students had to learn
from torn and second hand books discarded by White
schools. But our parents and community made us open
those old books and learn what was in them. They under-
stood that whether we had old or new books did not mat-
ter if we did not open either. Beginning with the horne, bad
or good, the value of academic achievement must become
more important than athletic or entertainment achieve-
ments. Our children must know that completing the race
means little if you did not bring the baton with you.



Real estate vs. real education
Schools located in wealthy neighborhoods usually
post chart-topping scores on state tests. No sur-
prise there: Children of privilege, it has been said,
start life on third base and think they hit a triple.

But high test scores in those schools don't indicate a
successful school, just as low test scores posted by high
poverty-schools don't point to a failing school.

Identifying true success means searching for schools
that outperform their peers. In a new report, the National
Center for Education Accountability, a non-profit group
based in Texas devoted to improving student achieve-
ment, identified 200 such schools in 20 states. Parents
and educators can glean valuable lessons from the list:

Lure borderline students into advanced courses
Staffers at Dr. Michael M. Krop Senior High School in
Florida's Miami-Dade system do more than offer the
International Baccalaureate program and a full range of
Advanced Placement courses. Teachers at!Krop who are
assigned to the most elite classes also teach courses for
struggling students. Not only do all students get exposed
to the best instruction, but teachers also get a chance to
identify late-blooming talent.

Give average students a rich curriculum. Students at
the majority-Hispanic Cleveland High School in the Los
Angeles area get a "power standard" curriculum in which
teachers supplement the usual textbooks with more in-
depth material. Teens in the lowest-level English class
can be observed acting in Shakespeare's The Tempest.

Give students tailor-made teaching. Teachers at the
Charles A. Upson Elementary School in Lockport, N.Y.,
have a motto: Differentiation, not remediation. Putting
that motto into action means that a teacher about to start
a unit on fractions plans multiple lessons geared to differ-
ing student abilities.

Get students "looped." At Edison Junior High School
in Pekin, Ill1., each student gets an individual learning
plan, something usually reserved for special education
students. To ensure that students meet their goals, they
are "looped" assigned to the same team of teachers for
both years there.

Currently, many parents believe that their only option
for pursuing better schools for their children is to move to
a pricier neighborhood. But the schools in that neighbor-
hood might be only average, or worse.


Schools that use these "best practices," by contrast,
boost the achievement of students in rich and poor neigh-
borhoods alike. Persuading more schools to adopt proven
strategies would make the quality of children's education
less dependent on the value of their parents' real estate.
-USA TODAY


Ie I lfitamt Zilme
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305- 694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman

A p


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association ofl America
Subscription Rates: One Year $40.00 Six Months $25.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127 305-694-6210

Credo ofthe Black Press .
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world from racial and national,
antagonismn when it accords to every person, regardless ofTrace creed or color his or leiC ,
human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person t-he Blck Prcsssti'ive.t)6 hel' "'
every person in the firm belief that all persons are hurt as long as anyone is hijdlac^. -


IW 4.,flpnper
A~...~tIOn


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"Copyrighted Material
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[Syndicated Conten


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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The government makes millions from cheap prison labor


Dear Editor:

I have been reading your
newspaper for a greater part of
my life and I consider The
Miami Times instrumental to
the community. The communi-
ty should be aware of the
Federal Prisons Industries,
Inc., trade name UNICOR.
UNICOR is a self sustained,
government owned corporation
that was established by an Act
of Congress in 1934. UNICOR is
the corporate banner under
which prisoners are organized


into pools of cheap labor so cor-
porations may produce goods
without having to incur the
overhead costs associated with
paying reasonable wages and
benefits.
All products manufactured by
UNICOR are sold only to gov-
ernment agencies for a higher
price. The wages for prison
labor are determined based
upon your education level and
since most prisoners have little
or no education and illegal
aliens are sought after by UNI-
COR, the uneducated labor pay


can start at as little as 23 cents
an hour.
The corporate industry bid for
government contracts and then
subcontract them to UNICOR,
where the prisoners work for
cheap labor. Unemployment is
increasing and UNICOR is get-
ting more contracts from corpo-
rations due to the cheap labor.
UNICOR doesn't have to worry
about layoffs due to drug laws
that are keeping first time non-
violent prisoners for a lengthy
time.
Once again society is mislead


by the government's secret
prison corporation and 'the
profits of that corporation. It
costs 60 billion dollars a year to
keep over 2.2 million prisoners
locked up and work in UNICOR,
I hope this article will make
society inquire about UNICOR
to their representatives who
know about UNICOR, but fail to
let society be aware of UNICOR.

Prisoner of Drug War,
Desmond Ward
Miami


Blacks need to be concerned about immigration


Dear Editor:

Black leaders must realize
that the problem requires more
than just an apology or an
investigation of Rep. Arzas'
racist behavior. The bigger
problem is how recent immi-
grants have been allowed to
come to this country, become
elected officials and acquire


other positions of power; yet,
they have little or no basic
knowledge of American history
or, at best, a distorted version
of it.
As evidenced by the action of
these elected officials and as
evidenced by the continuous
turmoil in inner-city schools
throughout the country, it is
obvious that education has


become nothing more than a
monetary game, with poor little
Black children being used like
pons on a chess board.
More importantly, Blacks
must become involved in the
immigration debates. Far too
many of these foreigners are
coming to this country with
preconceived racial stereotypes,
which are forcing Blacks to


forge new fights in this battle
for racial dignity. It is a nation-
al problem and we cannot
afford to allow this type of
racist thinking to prevail.

Fernley A. Murray
Retired Educator New York
City School System
Former Educator Dade
County School System


One solution to drive-by shootings


Dear Editor:

Youth and others continue to
have their lives at risk just by liv-
ing in our local neighborhoods.
During this time of crisis, every
consideration should be made in
combating spontaneous inner -


city shootings.
Have motivated officials repre-
senting city, county, state and
national offices overlooked a sim-
ple logical joint action? Motivated
elected officials and group com-
munity leaders can immediately
meet with police officials to form


a shocking action.
The much used term 'Drive-by
Shooting' means a determined
group of individuals firing illegal
weapons at anyone they choose.
If the vehicle is confiscated by the
police it would impact drive-by
shootings.


It is very rare for dangerous
shooters to walk by or wait for
public transportation when leav-
ing a shooting scene.

Walter Sutton, Jr.
Salute Veterans Now, Inc.
Miami


Where has the soul of America gone?
Dear Editor: from the perspective of sitting up here in Canada and watching it.
Your nation is like a big drunk football player at a junior prom that
Why is America destroying the world? You screwed up in Iraq and no one has the ability to control. Where has your soul gone America?
you can't mediate anything in the Middle East because of your one
'sidedness' with Israel. I also note most Americans get the news from John Vickers
television news, which much of the time is 'twisted news,' at least Victoria, BC

Your letters are welcome
The Miami Times welcomes and our readership and the community. purposes of confirming authorship.
encourages letters on its editorial com- Letters must, however, be brief and to Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The
mentaries as well as all other material the point. All letters must be signed Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL
in the newspaper. Such feedback and must include the name, address 33127, or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email:
makes for a healthy dialogue among and telephone number of the writer for miamiteditorial@bellsouth.net.


1':


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Eitols~f^^B^


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


2A The Miami Times Ju 6-


2006


*^ *-* '''* "















Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


OPINION
The Miami Times, July 26-


2006 3A


Reginald Clyne, Esq.


A snitch for Commish?
As a kid, the lowest thing were you when our youth were
you could do was to be a getting gunned down in the
"snitch." In my young, street street? What were you doing
wisdom, a friend who ratted when Rilya Wilson was miss-
on his friends could not be ing? What have you done late-
trusted and needed to be ly that demonstrates that you
kicked out of the group. are a public servant?
Despite the passage of several Audrey Edmonson was
decades, a college education working in the Village of El
and a law degree I still react Portal. She secured $5 million
with my childhood vehemence in funding for drainage, recre-
against Howard Gary running ation and community out-
for office. Howard Gary, as you reach center and street
may recall, is one of Miami's improvements. Frederica
most famous snitches. Wilson was working on 5000
Howard Gary wore a wire and Role Models, fighting against
taped conversations he had the FCATs and fighting to dis-
with then County mantle boot camps.
Commissioner Burke and City Congressman Meek has been
Commissioner Dawkins that working to solve the problem
led to their arrest and convic- of making FEMA more effi-
tions for bribery. I do not con- cient, working on the Hope VI
done an elected official taking project to get residents back in
a bribe it is an abuse of that neighborhood, he has
power. I also do not think it is obtained funding for sewage
right for Howard Gary to give projects in Opa-locka and
bribes in order to get munici- drainage and roadway dollars
pal finance business so that for Miami Gardens. They are
he can get rich. I guess what public servants. A man mak-
irks me is that Miller Dawkins ing money out of state, who
and Jimmy Burke paid the has not been involved in our
price. Howard Gary played the community for over 10 years
game, got caught, turned well that is just a man mak-
informant and never paid any ing money for himself a pri-
price. vate servant, perhaps.
I have been told that Howard My next question would be
Gary told Miller Dawkins to Mr. Gary, as a former, unre-
when he was luring him into pentant bribe giver, how will
the bribe that "you are like a the public know that you can
father to me." If Howard Gary be trusted with our tax dollars
treats father figures in such a when you can influence the
manner, how will he treat his expenditure of billions of dol-
constituents? Is he going to lars? How do we know that
sell them down the river too? you are sincerely going to fight
Howard Gary is quoted in the for the little guy? Why should
Miami Herald as stating "I'm a we trust you? Again, my old
public servant. I love Miami." aversion to snitches comes
My question is if you love back. If you rat on your
Miami, what have you done for friends, how will you treat con-
Miami in the last ten years? stituents that you do not
Where were you during the know?
recent Hurricanes? Where Please turn to SNITCH 6A





Some people are saying housing for the poor and elderly has
become what fighting poverty and crime was a few years ago:
A way for poverty pimps to make millions by robbing from the
poor to give to the rich. Is it called the code of "Robbing
Hood?"
Many Opa-locka residents are thinking their local govern-
ment has short term memory loss with the granting of con-
tracts? It was only a short time ago that the city almost went
'into state oversight because of payouts for contracts to City
Manager Ernie Neal, Police Chief Arlington Sands and
Assistant Police Chief Collins.
A lot of people in our community are concerned that some
Haitian political candidates are out of line in running on their
"Haitianness." Weren't they Africans who were dropped off at
a different part of "the new world?" Why the tribalism against
the brothers and sisters who struggled against the vilest type
of racist slavery the world has ever known? Let us not find out
too late that the enemy is not us.
*******
If a Black county housing department head had ordered an
"advance" of $1.5 million to a non-profit organization he was
running, and that corporation had built no houses, he would
have been indicted before the news ink was dry. Stay tune'd,
many folks feel indictments are in order.
*******
The crime wave of young Black men killing each other is
consistent with the increasing number of Black students who
leave high school without a diploma. No one knows what
these students are doing since college, the armed services
and many jobs are off limits to them. Seems they are not in
adult education or other training programs. Wonder how
much training it takes to sell drugs. No excuse, but true.
*******
Watch the State Representative District race between Yolly
Roberson and Jacqui Colyer. It's a rematch of the 2002 pri-
mary.
Sherdavia' Jenkins father, David, made one of the truest
statements about how Black drug boys are able to survive in
our communities. "We knew what was going on over here and
we tried to ignore it. That was the wrong thing to do. By ignor-
ing it, it cost us our daughter's life." Are you ignoring dangers
to your family?
Hypocrites in politics are understanding what Malcolm X
meant when he talked of "chickens coming home to roost,"
Georgia's self-proclaimed moral leader and former Christian


Coalition national director Ralph Reed lost his race to an
unknown state senator after disclosures that he had used his
position to trick evangelicals, including Black churches, to
support a gambling client of disgraced lobbyist Jack
Abramoff. Should we be careful of "super Christians?"


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GARY
continued from 1A
Asked about the services he
plans to integrate if he is success-
ful at the polls, he answered by
saying that he would be involve
"special interest groups."
Probed about his proposed
'interest groups,' he said that he
would be bringing in "developers"
to combat the issue of affordable
housing that has allegedly been in
default under Edmnonson's achndmin-
istration."
In his bid for votes, Gary told The
Times that Edmonson has "forgot-
ten about the community," adding
that his focus is geared toward
"taking the community back.


OPENING

TREL'S DINER

Located at 1001 N.W. 95th Street
(Across from North Shore Hospital)
Soul Food/Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
Eat-In or Take Out
7 a.m. 4 p.m.

305-691-9831


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I I


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4A h Mi i Ti J l 26 2006


&"soup


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The Miami Times, July 26- 2006 5A


calB ks Must Contro e r wn e y


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Gump e mm e
alm ftb o 0 o W
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/VOTE

SEPTEMBER 5TH

I ste* Register to vote at:
tUS- County Team Metro Offices
,,,te~~,c tio Driver's License Bureaus
o. ts e* \ Public Libraries
SCity or County Halls
Elections Department
Community Action Agency Offices
(call 305-499-VOTE for locations)

MIAMI 3ADE

2)eniocricy '759'en4 On yiin


Learn how to use the new iVotronic Voting Machines
at one of our upcoming Events


Events for July 26th through August 2nd


Wednesday, July 26:

Friday, July 28:

Saturday, July 29:





Sunday, July 30:

Wednesday, August 2:


7:00 pm 10:00 pm Eglise Baptiste Haitienne Emmanuel Church,
7321 NE 2 Avenue, Miami
4:00pm 6:00pm Arch Bishop McArthur Residence,
13201 NW 28 Avenue, Miami
10:00am 2:00pm St. Paul AME Church-Health Fair,
1892 NW 51 Terrace, Miami
10:00am 7:00pm 163rd Street Mall Voter's Registration Drive,
1205 NE 163rd Street, #139, North Miami Beach
1:00pm 3:00pm Edison Tower Tri-Plex VR Drive,
5821 NW 7 Avenue, Miami
12:00pm 6:00pm 163rd Street Mall Voter's Registration Drive,
1205 NE 163rd Street, #139, North Miami Beach
10:00am 2:00pm MDC North Campus,
11380 NW 27 Avenue, Miami
10:00am 7:00pm 163rd Street Mall Voter's Registration Drive,
1205 NE 163rd Street, #139, North Miami Beach


For additional voter registration drives
event locations c

305-499-V4
or visit us onlin
www.miamidade.go


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Georgia ex-Navy football star acquitted


WASHINGTON -
Midshipman Lamar S. Owens
Jr.'s acquittal on a rape charge
last Thursday means he won't
face the prospect of spending
the rest of his life in a military
prison.
And even though the former
U.S. Naval Academy quarter-
back could be sentenced Friday
to jail time and kicked out of
the service because a military
jury convicted him on two less-
er charges, his civilian defense
lawyer was optimistic those
convictions would be expunged
before sentencing.
"Everyone's reaction is relief,"
said Reid Weingarten, Owens'
civilian defense counsel. "There
is no evidence that Lamar
Owens raped this woman."
Owens was acquitted of rap-
ing a female midshipman in her
room at the academy.
But the jury of five Naval offi-
cers convicted Owens on
charges of conduct unbecoming
an officer and disobeying a law-
ful order.
"We're very confident that
conduct unbecoming will go,"
he said. "There was no evidence
presented at trial to support
that charge because [the]
accuser offered no recollection
of the events and Owens said
that he was invited."
Regarding the conviction for
failure to obey a lawful order, in
which stemmed from Owens'
violation of a Naval protective
order aimed at -keeping him
away from his accuser's room,
Weingarten said, "Lamar Owens
was in the wrong hall at the
wrong time. Owens had no
intention of harassing his
accuser and had spoken to oth-
ers about leaving her alone."
"They have determined, obvi-
ously, that the consensual act
took place," Cmdr. John
Maksym, the judge, said,


adding that the jury found that
Owens "wrongfully entered the
room without permission and
wrongfully engaged in consen-
sual sex."
Owens, standing at attention
as the verdicts were read,
showed no emotion. His family
looked worried but reserved;
his father, Lamar Sr. appeared
pensive.
Owens remains free without
bond. He was not -allowed to
graduate or receive a commis-
sion in May and remains a mid-
shipman.


The punishment phase will
start in court Friday morning.
The defense can call as many
as six witnesses; the prosecu-
tion can call no more than one.
Prosecutors recommended a
sentence of two years on the
conduct unbecoming charge;
Maksym tabled discussion of a
sentence on the failure to obey
a lawful order charge until
Friday.
The judge also said he would
also consider whether to set
aside either of the charges.
During the trial, Maksym
chastised prosecutors for what
he called "the anemic nature"
of their witnesses. He was
especially critical of the qualifi-
cations of expert witnesses
prosecutors called to rebut
questions raised by Owens'
attorneys about why the
woman didn't cry out that


night and didn't immediately
notify authorities.
Owens, 22, of Savannah, Ga.,
was charged in connection with
an incident that occurred in
the room of a female midship-
man at the academy's Bancroft
Hall on Jan. 29. Owens testi-
fied that the sexual encounter
was consensual; his accuser
testified that she repeatedly
rejected his advances.
Both Owens and his accuser
testified that they had several
drinks at separate locations in
Baltimore and Annapolis in the


hours before their early morn-
ing encounter, but other wit-
nesses have said the young
woman was seen having as
many as nine drinks at a
restaurant and later at an
Annapolis bar favored by mid-
shipmen.
Although Owens' accuser
and her family had been seen
in offices near the courtroom
throughout the day, they were
not in court when the verdict
was read.
Weingarten said while it is
unclear whether Owens will
have a Naval career, "this
young man will have a very
bright future."
"All military academies and
all universities have sexual
harassment issues," he said
and he hopes that the Navy
uses this case "as an example
of how not to address it."


What do you think the atmosphere will


be like in the new Scott Carver Homes?


JERRY ANDERSON

"Everything is -,
changed now.
I think when
they moved all
of the people
out in the an
past they

decision .
almost pressed in a sense to go
demands bet-
ter and thet
people in the inner city want
better. I believe when they
move people back into that
area, the people will change
because the atmosphere and
the look has changed. We're







it will be bad
because peo-
ple change. I
think it will be
a much better
atmosphere
than it was in NO
the past.
When you put
people in a
different environment then
they are subject to act differ-
ently."


SHAWN LEWIS

"I hope it will
be better. I
don't think
it's going to be
the same p o

believe it's
going to be a
new group of
people. I hope
it won't be like
it was before because if you
move people out of the area
then move them back in, it
sorts of defeats the purpose.
That's how I feel."

SHANI STUDSTILL

"ActualIly,
what I think
they are trying
to do is move
all the Black
people out and
bring the white
people in. I
think it's a
good change
though by
rebuilding the area. Not to say
kicking Black people out and
bringing in white people is
good, but I think building up
the community is a good thing.
It's not for sure what type of
people they are planning to
bring in, but I hope whoever it
is, it's for the best. No matter
who they bring in, the atmos-
phere will be better if they keep
the community clean."


ANNIE BROWN

"I really don't know. Hopefully,
it will be nice but it depends on
the people
they move in
there. Some
people will
appreciate the
area and some
people would-
n't. I can't say
if they bring in
new people
that it would be a whole differ-
ent atmosphere because you
have the good and the bad
everywhere."


DARRON PITTS

"In my opin-
ion the only
way the
atmosphere
will change is t
if the people
change. You
will have
brand new
buildings but
if the people
around it
don't change it will be the
same 'Scotts.' The only time
the atmosphere in neighbor-
hoods change is when the peo-
ple change. It takes the people
to make the community better
than it was.


Compiled by Terrell Clayton


A thief snatched a gold chain and dropped it after asking a woman for directions
on the 1300 block of Washington Avenue at 8 a.m. The thief first approached the
woman and asked for directions. When she was finished, she started to walk away
and the man then ran, up behind her, snatched the chain and ran north on
Washington Avenue, dropping the chain and leaving it behind.

A food delivery man Wateld .aiatR.napartment complex, located in the area of
145 Street NE Sixth Avenue at 10:15 p.m. A man approached the delivery man in the
elevator with a semi-automatic pistol and demanded money. He then took four hun-
dred dollars from the deliveryman's pocket and ran away.

A television was stolen from a Miami Dade County public housing office, located
at 8401 NW 5th Avenue, between the hours of 2 a.m. and 7:50 a.m. The television
was valued at four hundred dollars.

A thief drove off with a 1996 Mitsubishi Galant after the owner left the keys in the
ignition while he used the ATM atWachovia Bank, located at 13201 NW 27th Avenue.
The thief got away with a gun belt, a hand radio, a baton and handcuffs. The incident
happened around 5:50 a.m.

Police gave a trespass warning to an 18-year-old woman after she threw rocks
and chunks of pavement over a fence and onto cars at Tremont Towing, located at
1916 Bay Road, at 1:30 a.m. Police said the woman was upset after her car had
been towed earlier in the day and returned to the tow yard, where several drivers
saw her throw the rocks and pavement over the fence, damaging several cars.
Witnesses called police, who found the woman a block away, the report stated.
Police did not arrest her because no driver could say they saw the woman throw
rocks, but issued her a trespass warning after they noticed her hands were muddy.



Celebrate FREE Sundays
at Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

JULY 30 AUGUST 27 SEPTEMBER 24


Vizcaya, Miami's National Historic Landmark on
Biscayne Bay, opens its gates free of charge on the
last Sundays of July, August and September.

Join us for free talks, tours, performances, art-making
and activities for all ages.

FOR MORF INFORMAL ION
www.vizcayamuseum.org or call 305-250-9133


VIZCAYA
MUSEUM & GARDENS
3251 South Miami Avenue
lelween Brickell AveILue an1d Coconut Grove


A I IF |
i -r 1e 0 1 1 u S |


A public servant doesn't disappear for 10 years


SNITCH new, fruitful life. However, if you
continued from 3A just make nice statements and
pretend to be sorry then you
I believe in forgiveness. If a should not be forgiven. Howard
person genuinely confesses Gary has yet to come clean. He
their sin and is repentant, then I needs to confess that he was giv-
am all for forgiving them. I ing bribes to various officials for
believe ex-cons should be given a., years, got caught and turned
chance and permitted to make "'a; itch and then ask for forgive-


ness. You are not repentant if
you deny your wrongdoing and
just say I am sorry.
Professor Dario Moreno has said
that Miami voters are very forgiv-
ing. I think Miami voters might be
forgiving, but I do not think we are
stupid. Miami-Dade County needs
leaders who are honest, willing to


work hard and who have demon-
strated a history of giving back to
the community. I do not think
someone who has been in hiding
for 10 years, because he
snitched on his friends, is the
type of person that we need as
the Commissioner for District
three.


Bush always says the right thing and does the wrong


CURRY
continued from 3A

while, more often than not,
doing the wrong thing. Let's
take the landmark University of
Michigan affirmative action
cases. On Jan. 15, 2003 Dr.
Martin Luther King's birthday
- Bush announced his oppo-
sition to two Michigan pro-
grams, one for undergradu-
ates and one for the law
school.
Again, there was the studied
compassion: "I strongly sup-
port diversity of all kinds,
including racial diversity in
higher education..."
Then the real 'George W.
came out: "At their core, the
Michigan policies amount to a
quota system that unfairly
rewards or penalizes perspec-
tive students based solely on


their race."
A Supreme Court dominated
by Republican appointees,
disagreed. The court upheld
the University of Michigan's
law school program while
striking down a more num-
bers-oriented undergraduate
admission program.
Even more disturbing than
Bush's duplicity is his willing-
ness to manipulate or mis-
state the facts.
In announcing his opposi-
tion to the Michigan pro-
grams, Bush said: "At the
undergraduate level, African
American students and some
Hispanic students and Native
American students receive 20
points out of a maximum of
150, not because of any aca-
demic achievement or life
experience, but solely because
they are African American,


Hispanic or Native American.
"To put this in perspective, a
perfect SAT score is worth
only 12 points in the Michigan
system. Students who accu-
mulate 100 points are general-
ly admitted, so those 20 points
awarded solely based on race
are often the decisive factor."
To be blunt, Bush lied about
the Michigan undergraduate
point system. It was not
restricted to people of color.
Bush neglected to note that 20
points was awarded to any
disadvantaged student, regard-
less of his or her color. He did
not mention that 20 points
were automatically awarded to
all scholarship athletes. He
ignored the provision that
allows the university's provost
the discretion to give 20 points to
any student.
He also was disingenuous in


discussing the SAT points. Yes, a
perfect SAT score was worth only
12 points. And that's because
the University of Michigan gave
greater weight to grades than
standardized tests. A straight-A
student, for example, was
awarded 80 points, more than
seven times the weight given for
a perfect SAT or ACT score. Even
C-students were awarded 40
points under this system.
In discussing Blacks, Bush
likes to talk about the bigotry of
low expectations. I am more con-
cerned about the bigotry of peo-
ple for whom we have high
expectations.
George E. Curry is editor-in-
chief of the NNPA News Service
and BlackPressUSA.com. To con-
tact Curry or to book him for a
speaking engagement, go to his
Web site,
www.georgecurry.com.


Liberty City Opa-Locka Allapatah Wynwood
1498 NW 54th Street 14001 NW 27th Ave. 219 NW 20th Street
(Former Jay's (Next to Price Choice (Corner of 20th Street &
Drugs Location) Supermarket) NW 2nd Ave.)


. All military academies and

all universities have sexual harass-
ment issues and he hopes that the
Navy uses this case "as an example
of how not to address it. . "
Lamar Owens


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i i l 26 2006


SmmoNSRI I








The Miami Times, July 26- 2006 7A


CONCLAVE IN MIAMI
The CARATS, Incorporated
31st annual Conclave was
hosted by the Miami Chapter
of CARATS at the Eden Roc
Hotel on Miami Beach last
weekend. Over three hundred
CARATS and Carateers were in
attendance at this extravagan-
za, which was dedicated in the
memory of Alice Harrison, one
of the founding members of
the Miami Chapter.
The event kicked-off
Thursday evening with a trip
to Hardrock Casino for gaming
and dining. After the general
session on Friday, guests were
treated to a "Caribbean
Carnival" with cuisine from
the many islands. The enter-
tainment included stilt walk-
ers from the Virgin Island,
Junkanoo, Cal Jacobs and
Islanda band comprised of
musicians from Trinidad,
Jamaica and Haiti and Prince
Dragon, contortionist, fire
eater and limbo dancer.
Although some guests were
sluggish from the night before,
three bus loads along with
local guests were treated to a
"Jazz Breakfast" at Macy's
Aventura Store. The store
saluted the guests with musi-
cal entertainment by Dr.
Edward Robinson and a spe-
cial sales event.
A "Diamond Tea Party" gave
way for 'the ladies to elegantly
dress accessorizing their out-
fits with hats, gloves and dia-
monds as they sipped a variety
of teas. During the program,
the Dance of Life Foundation
was presented a check in the
amount of $2500 by National
President Rosa Lee Johnson
for the Miami Chapter's com-
munity project. This founda-
tion, founded by Kathy
Connors, former member of
the Allen Alley School of Dance
and the Dance Group of
Harlem, focuses on breast
cancer awareness and educa-
tion.
While the CARATS enjoyed
their tea, the Carateers
enjoyed a fun day at the
Omega Center dining, joke
telling and entertainment
under the leadership of
Carateers Al Jackson and Art
Johnson.
The highlight of the weekend
was "Club Harlem Square"
reliving one of Miami's
'Colored' night clubs which
featured former Miamian
Marshall Davis, tap dancer.
Marshall who resides in New
York performed with Savion
Glover in Bring in da Noise
Bring in da Funk. The show
also featured Marcellus "Cello"
Davis, as the master of cere-
mony and comedian.
Music was provided by Ike
and Val Woods. The finale was
the "Inspiration Service
Breakfast" on Sunday morn-
ing. Archbishop George W.
Sands addressed the group
with words of wisdom. Hats
off to the Miami CARATS:
Hyacinth Johnson, President,
Florence Brown, Conclave
Chairperson, Carmen Dean
Jackson, Chairperson of
Entertainment and Events,
Juanita Armbrister and
Paula Bain, Chairpersons of
Registration, Linda Brown
and Eddye Rodgers,
Chairpersons of Charms and
Gifts, Alexis Harris and Wallis
Tinnie, Chairpersons of the
Diamond Tea Party, Florence
Strachan, Chairperson of the
Sunday Inspiration Service
Breakfast, Porta Thompson,
Chairperson of Hospitality,
Rosemary Braynon, Ossie
Hollis, Sherlyon McWhorter
and Rosa Nesbitt who delight-
ed so many visitors.
VACATION TIME
Marilyn Randall, Dorothy
Joseph, Carolyn Frazier and
Minnie Cox thoroughly
enjoyed their stay in the Big
Apple taking in the play "The
Color Purple," shopping on
Canal Street and topping it off
with dinner at "Sylvia's." If


that was not enough, they
even took an excursion to


Atlantic City. These ladies
truly know how to enjoy them-
selves.

RETIREMENT
Congratulations to Mae


Johnson, who has retired after
working in the Miami Dade
County Public School system
for 35 years with 20 of them
spent in Title 1/Grants
Administration serving as sec-
retary to seven different
administrators. The affair was
held at the Airport Hilton with
a flair of lavender and white
decorations throughout the
room, where friends, family
and co-workers applauded her
for her dedication and service.


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Her husband, John Johnson,
sons Torrance and Efrem,
daughter, Chrissetta and
grand children were on hand
to serenade her and dance the
night away.
2006 ESSENCE MUSIC
FESTIVAL
Enjoying LL Cool J, Mary J.
Blige, Jamie Foxx and Frankie
Beverly and Mazes at the 2006
Essence Music Festival in
Houston, Texas were


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Melissa Ponder, Denise
Bonnette Jones, Trina Wright,
Sophia Durand and Vernise
Harrell. During their stay, the
group was entertained by
Kayla Johnson, a former
Miamian.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Congratulations to Bernice
Scott who celebrated her 101st


birthday at the Martin Luther
King Park. Her daughters
Virginia Jordan, Charlie Mae
Myles and Alice Reeves, who
usually give the party were
able to relax as their children
took over the celebration
preparation for their grand-
mother. Although 101 years
old. Bernice Scott is still alert
and watches her favorite tele-
vision show daily, Walker,
Texas Ranger.
Please turn to WHIRL 8A


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I T MimiA. Tim.... y2-2006BlcksMustControlTheirOwn estin, ...


ICity revamps Model City Trust


TRUST
continued from 1A
social security number, being
an authorized signer and
cosigning a few checks,
although she claimed that the
account was solely that of the
company.
Wiley disagreed with the
audit's finding that creating
the joint bank account gave
"the appearance of ...impropri-
ety." Although she did not tell


her board about the joint
account, she claimed that the
procedure would speed up
construction and give the
Trust more oversight of the
spending.
Public Advocate for the
Trust, Roy Hardemon, stated
that Wiley informed some of
the board members although
she did not bring the matter to
the full board. He also stated
the Trust under Wiley had to
obtain approval from the


offices off the city's Attorney
and Manager.
The office of Auditor General
Victor Igwe found the quasi-
independent Model City Trust
agency routinely overpaid for
land and consulting services.
By May of this year, only eight
houses had been built or reha-
bilitated since 2002.
And when the Trust sold
four of those houses, it failed
to make sure the buyers were
low income, the audit states.


DIPLOMAS
continued from 1A
'nature of this process is that
Norland High School in north
Miami-Dade graduated 192
seniors, but only 80 of them
had standard diplomas!
Local school board records
provide information only


through the 2003-04 school
year.
However, those records also
show that schools with pre-
dominately Black student
bodies have the highest per-
centage of 'completers' who
do not receive standard
diplomas. Miami Central
had 28 percent of such


'completers,' Edison gradu-
ated 25 percent and Booker
T. Washington allowed 17
percent of its students to
leave as 'completers' without
diplomas. The Miami Times
has not received updated
'completer-diploma' infor-
mation for the 2005-06
school year.


Social Whirl: Miami's latest news


WHIRL
continued from 7A

GRADUATION
Hats off to Geneisha Allen,
Valquisha Bailey, Andrew
Brown, Jasmin Clarke'-Evans,
Norris Clarke-Evans, Levy
Dervil, Lucson Dervil, Nathan
Dervil, Jamine Easterling,
Jatisha Easterling, Nakeia
Hammet, Austin Harrison,
Natre Henley, Michael Hill,
Altaniece Jones, Bernard,


Jones, Shaniece Lee, Elijah
Lightbourne, Kevin
Lightburn, Harry McCall,
Mechelle Moffett, Demetrius
Newbold, Broderick Pee,
Javier Pollard, Sylvia
Sheffield, Wyattrell Ward,
Brandon Wheeler, and Arielle
Williams, who graduated
from Operation About Face,
an educational program
sponsored by the State of
Florida, the Department of
Children and .Families, and
the Florida, National, Guards.


This program reinforced val-
ues and life skills which are
essential for productive liv-
ing while providing the stu-
dents with a stipend. On
hand to witness this gradua-
tion were parents, Judge
Shirlyon McWhorter, Carol
Weatherington, Marsha
James, Evelyn Davis, Alstene
McKinney and Maurice
Herring. The guest speaker
was State Representative
Dorothy Bendross-
Mindingall.


-0
A A


99lb


Chuck Pot Roast


Red or White
Seedless Grapes...........169,
The Natural Snack
SAVE UP TO 1.30 LB


Multigrain
Brea ............ ....... ......8 9
Excellent Source of Whole Grains, Baked Fresh
Throughout the Day, From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .50
Available at Publix Stores With Fresh Bakeries Only.


Boar's Head Ultimate
Half Sub Combo........... 69
Roast Beef, Tavern Ham & Turkey,
Garnished With 'YtWr Choice of Cheese and
Toppings, A Medium Drink and Dirty Chips,
each (Publix, each ... 5.19)
SAVE UP TO .30
Publix Dell proudly features a
full line of Boar's Head* products.


Maxwell
House Coffee........4t REE
Original or Lite Half the Caffeine Rich or
French Roast or 100% Colombian Bold or
Smooth Master Blend, 11 to 13-oz bag
(Excluding Decaffeinated.) (Limit two deals
on selected advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 313


Nabisco
Chips Ahoy! BONEOFR
Cookies.............. GET o0NREE
Assorted Varieties,
14 to 16-oz pkg.
(Limit two deals on selected
advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 3.59


General Mills B ONFREE
Cereal ...............GET ONE
Basic 4, Honey Nut Clusters,
Oatmeal Crisp or Fiber One,
15 to 19.25-oz box (Limit two deals
on selected advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 3.99


Prices effective Thursday, July 27 through Wednesday, August 2, 2006.
Only in the Following Counties: Mianri.Dade, Browaid, Palm Beach, Martirn, St. Lucie, Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved,
www. p u blix co m / a d s


Publix
WH E R E SHOPP I N G I S A PLEAS U R E."


fl.tdjat*k hunting wfandaju cpwrwd



"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers"





Man Blacks don't get a diploma


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


8A The Miami Times Ju 6-


2006







The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006 9B


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny

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Man's disgards; God's treasures

Man's disgards; God's treasures


I was reading an account of
a person who found a lamp on
the trash pile and brought it
home. His wife scoffed and
told him to get that piece of
junk out of her living room and
put it in the garage to be
counted in with the items that
they were going to sell in a


garage sale that weekend. He
obeyed and a woman bought
the lamp for $1.00. Within a
few days, she had cleaned and
shined up the lamp and put it
in a prominent place in her liv-
ing room. She did not have
much and her furnishings
were very simple and humble,


The purpose of the church
This week as I listened to the which a thing was established.
audio Bible I found myself When we understand the pur-
somewhat captivated with the pose of a thing we: 1) can uti-
words of David as he shared lize it properly; 2) eliminate the
his experience. I am convinced dangers of abuse; 3) save time
that while we are living in the and energy experimenting and
generation of technology, we 4) can determine whether or
may equally be living in an age not it is appropriate for us. For
of confusion. Isn't it strange example, the purpose of
that there are girls claiming church; do you know why you
that they were born to be boys attend church, what you
and boys claiming to be girls should expect or what you
and accusing God for making should not expect?
them in such a manner! I Millions of people are active-
believe that one of the greatest ly involved in church atten-
discoveries is that of under- dance on a weekly basis and
standing the purpose for while that is great, many of


but she loved her little lamp.
Months later, a co-worker
came by her house and
noticed the lamp. She
remarked on its simplicity and
quiet beauty. After careful
examination, the co-worker,
who loved to go 'antiquing,'
realized that this piece of junk
lamp was extremely old and
quite valuable!
Of course, since the Lord
helps me to look at natural
events in a spiritual sense, I
thought about how our lives
are like that. Someone might
try to befriend us, but some-
one else will scoff and ask


these individuals attend con-
sistently each week only to
arrive excited and anticipat-
ing, and sadly, exiting frus-
trated and unfulfilled; the pur-
pose of church. I'm sure that
someone religious is going to
say, but the Bible says not to
forsake the assembling of our-
selves with believers; so we
should go to church. Yeah,
yeah and while I agree, please
know that I am not disputing
church attendance. To the
contrary. Instead I am speak-
ing about the purpose of
church, what its responsibility
is and what attendees should
expect? The purpose of
church.
Maybe it's only me, maybe I
,am overreacting, but I have
become so disappointed with
the messages which I have
heard in recent months and
years in churches,, most of


them what they see in us and
tell them to 'kick us to the
curb.' But Jesus will come
along and see that same 'piece
of junk' and know there is
great value in our lives. He
will pick us up off the junk
pile, clean us up and put us in
a place of prominence in His
life and in His heart. Dear
friends, someone really needs
to know that you cannot allow
yourself to be content with
others' views of your life and
your circumstances. You can-
not allow the devil to use your
spouse, your boss or even
your deacon to belittle you


which were confusing, con-
flicting, unedifying and to say
the least no relevance to lost
souls or the Kingdom's man-
date; much of what I have
heard seems to have been
motivated more by the selfish
desires and personal agendas
of religious leaders and defi-
nitely no time with
God. The purpose of church.
Perhaps you can identify with
my experience. Have you ever
visited a church for the very
first time and had absolutely
no one come over to greet you
and. I'm not referring to the
welcome which is done from
the pulpit publicly, I'm talking
about members personally
deciding to demonstrate love.
For starters church must be a
place of love; the purpose of
church.
Just as a well baked cake,,
there are some key ingredients


and make you feel unworthy.
I cannot tell you that they will
see how valuable you are and
immediately take you back or
praise you for your strengths.
But I can tell you unequivo-
cally and without any reser-
vation whatsoever that God
sees your value. If you are
waiting for man to make you
feel worthy you might have
a long wait. But all you have
to do is read John 3:16 to
know how valuable you are in
His eyes. I would rather have
the opinion of the Three Wise
Men the Father, the Son
and the Holy Spirit than


which will produce a healthy,
vibrant and growing church. A
church should provide 1)
understanding to God's word,
2) comfort to those who hurt,
3) direction to those con-
fused, 4) Love to all, 5) an
atmosphere where people can
grow into their full potentials
and 6) a super support base
for those who congregate
therein; the purpose of
church!
The psalmist David wrote in
Chapter 73 verses 1-3 and
concluding with verse 17,
truly God is good to Israel,
even to such as are of a clean
heart, but as for me, my feet
had almost gone; my steps
had well nigh slipped. For I
was envious at the foolish,
when I saw the prosperity of
the wicked. Verse 17 says,
until I went into the sanctu-
ary of God; then understood


the opinions of men who are
just like me -- imperfect
individuals who are nothing
without Christ.
Why is your soul so down-
cast? If I am speaking to you
with your face eating carpet
and it is not in worship and
devotion to the Lord, then get
up! Your value is not based
on your education, your pay-
check, your bank account.
your talent or your beauty. It
is not based on who you are,
but whose you are! Who do
you belong to? You might
need to take a spiritual DNA
test who's your Daddy?!


their end. Church must be a
place of teaching and instruc-
tion, not manipulation and
deception! There is an awe-
some song which we sang a
lot at a former church called
"A house of restoration." The
words were, "this house shall
be called a house of restora-
tion, a place where the broken
are free, where healing waters
flow and mercy abounds, my
spirit abides here saith the
Lord; the purpose of church!
Are the proper ingredients in
your church to fulfill the pur-
pose of church; are you
receiving from your church
that which is vital for your
daily survival; who gives the
instructions at your church;
God almighty or Pastor god?
"Church must be more than
nice outfits, fancy cars and
motivational speeches and per-
sonal agendas!"


11111 EU
Greater Israel Bethel
Primitive Baptist Church,
Elder K.L. Washington, pastor,
will be holding their Men's
Conference 2006, August 2 4
at 7:30 p.m. nightly. It will cul-
minate with the Men's
Conference Service, August 6
at 3:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call 305-573-6331.

The Mission Choir of
Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church, Reverend
Douglas Cook, Sr., pastor, will
sponsor an Old Fashioned
Song Fest on July 30 at 3:30
p.m. '
******.*;,^,;",:.^ ,^ "
Apostolic v 11 Center,
Dr. G.S. Smitiastor, "llbe
in revival April 1 4 at 7:30
p.m. nightly. Jeremiah
Nickson is the Evangelist for
the week.

Reverend Karl A. Jackson,
Sr., pastor of God's Way
Assembly Faith Cathedral,
Inc., invites you to their
Morning Divine Worship
Service on July 30 at 11 a.m.
and Prayer and Workshop
Service on August 1 at 7 p.m.
For more information, call
305-685-6855 or 786-287-
1895.

The Memorial Temple
Baptist Church, Ellise Cox,
pastor, invites you to their
Mission Sunday Worship on
July 30 at 10:45 a.m. and 4
p.m. For more information,


11|'III


Save the Arts Foundation,
Inc. presents a back to school
event entitled Save the Arts in
the Park, August 12 from 2-7
p.m. at Bunche Park. There
will be a bookbag giveaway,
entertainment and a bakeoff.
Those interested in being per-
formers, sponsors or vendors
or for general information, con-
tact Jimmy Nickerson at 786-
285-7540 or jimmy@savet-'
heartsyf.org.

Neighbor to Family, Inc.
(NTF) is looking for families
that are willing to open their
hearts and home to children in
need of temporary foster care
placement. For more informa-
tion, call 786-433-4731.

Miami-Dade Community
Affordable Housing
Strategies Alliance (CAHSA)
Task Force and the Housing
Policy Work Group is holding
a second meeting to examine
the current state of the data,
policies and initiatives driving
the housing conditions in
Miami-Dade. This meeting will
take place on July 27 from 3-5
p.m. For more information, call
305-375-4608.

Palm Hammock Orchid
Estate, Inc. is inviting every-
one to come see Steve Burns of
Cal Pump and Brookfield to get


call 305-624-2502.

The Ebenezer United
Methodist Church, Reverend
Dr. Joreatha M. Capers, pastor,
will celebrate its 108 Year
Anniversary, August 4 at the
7:45 and 11:15 a.m. Worship
Services. For more informa-
tion, call 305-635-7413.

A Mission with A New
Beginning Church, Bishop
Eugene Joyner Sr., pastor,
would like to invite everyone to
celebrate their Youth
Convention Program, July 27
and 28 at 7:30 p.m. nightly and
ending July 30 at the 11:15
a.m. Service. For more informa-
tion, call 305-694-2127.

New Providence Missionary
Baptist Church, Reverend
Vinson Davis, pastor, will be
having, a Senior Mission
Program, July 30 at 4 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-758-0922.

To Know is To Understand
Ministries, Inc. is having a
temporary Liquid Detergent
Assistance Project. For more
information, please contact
P.O. Box 661635, Miami
Springs, Florida, 33266-1635.

Union Grove Missionary
Baptist Church will be honor-
ing Pastor Marvin McIntyre, Sr.
and First Lady Robbie J.
McIntyre for their untiring 25
years of dedicated service on


answers to any questions
regarding your aquatic pump
or fountain. This event will be
held on July 29 at 11 a.m. For
more information, call 305-
.274-9813.

State Representative Yolly
Roberson of District 104
invites you to join her for the
third District 104 Back-to-
School Wellness Day on July
29 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. For
more information, call 305-
919-1867.

St. John Community
Development Corporation
(SJCDC) will host its Seventh
Annual "Things Are Cooking In
Overtown" Gala, August 12 at
the Radisson in downtown
Miami at 7:30 p.m. For more
information, call 305-372-0682
or 305-691-5775.
t*******


the Second Sunday in August,
the 13th. Dr. Phillip Brown of
Zion Hope Missionary Baptist
Church will bring the message
at 10:45 a.m. and newly
installed pastor, Bishop Claude
St. Gerard of Chain Breakers
Deliverance Ministry at 4 p.m.

We invite the entire commu-
nity to join us in celebrating the
First Family's Anniversary.
For further information, call
Gritzella P. Jones at 305-628-
4995 and/or Pamela Brooks at
305-691-4841.

God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to be blessed by
the Lord under the anointed
preaching of Pastor and
Overseer Dr. Arlene L. Davis,
July 30 at 4 p.m. For more
information, call 786-258-
1826.

Lighthouse Church of God
in Christ, Overseer Dr. Arlene
L. Davis, pastor, invites you to
hear the Word of God preached
at God Word God Way COGIC,
July 30 at 4 p.m.

New Christ Tabernacle
Missionary Baptist Church,
Reverend Harold Marsh, pastor,
invites you to a Stewardship
Workshop, July 24-28 at 7:30
p.m.

St. James Baptist Church
(of Coconut Grove) is sponsor-
ing "A Candidate Forum,"
August 8 at 7 p.m. All candi-
dates welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Lattie Person at
305-441-2013 or Danny Couch

The National Coalition of
100 Black Women, Inc. will be
hosting a membership informa-
tional meeting on Saturday,
August 5 in the Auditorium at
the North Dade Regional
Library. For more Information,
please contact Neichole S.J.
Hess, Esq. at 305-606-4367.

The Miami-Dade Chamber
of Commerce will host its
General Membership
Meeting / Exposition on
Wednesday, July 26 from 9
a.m. 12 p.m. at Florida
Memorial University's Smith
Conference Center, 15800
N.W. 42nd Avenue. For ques-
tions or to RSVP contact
Kyshana Guzman at 305-751-
8648.
*******
Roy A. Hodgson and
Jamaal E. Dollar graduated
with their Bachelor of Science
Degrees from Webber
International University in
May.
Please turn to CALENDAR 12B


r- -- --------------------------- ---------*1
Freedom Temple of Miami, Inc.
Ricardo Symonette;, Pastor
Back 2o The islands extramngan
Featuring: Comedian Sharon Seymour, The Rising Stars, The Church of God of
Prophecy Sunshine Band, Doe Family, and Little Rev. and 2nd Generation
Saturday, Jiy 3, 3"6at 7 p.m.
I IIO1WARD) OHNSON PIA'A HOTEL I
7707 N.W. 103 Street
Hialeah Gardens, FL
Donation: $10
1I I


at 305-246-0367.

Overseer Sean D. Mears of
The Haven of Deliverance
International Ministries
announces the "Suffering In
Silence" Women's Summit, July
26-29. For more information,
call 786-262-8241.

A Mission with a New
Beginning Youth
Department, Bishop Eugene
Joyner, pastor, will be celebrat-
ing their youth convention,
July 27-28 at 7:30 p.m. nighty
and ending on July 30 at 11:15
a.m. For more information, call
305-694-2127.

Learn how to share Christ


without fear through a free
training to all from Evangelist
Debbie. For more information,
call 305-898-1025.

Lighthouse of God in Christ
Church, Overseer Dr. Arlene
Davis, invites you to share in
the service of the Lord as they'
praise and worship Christ the
Lord. On Tuesdays and Fridays
at 7:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 305-254-7647.

To Know Is To Understand
Ministries, Inc., Felecia M.
Wright, shepherd, is having
their fourth annual "Leopard"
Back to School Bash on
August 5 from 12-2 p.m. For
more information, call


Shepherd Wright at 305-751-
0873 or Eleanor Taylor at 305-
318-5019.

High to Life Ministry
(C.O.G.I.C.), Elder Derrick A.
Taylor, will hold worship serv-
ice at El Palacio Hotel every
Sunday night at 8 p.m. For
more information, please call
305-962-6987.

Send your church
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamitedito-
rial@bellsouth or mail to
900 NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
621*6.


305.769.1100 ade 954522,1102 Broward 800,721,WMBM To Free
For song, r, pTa irhday reques 305.953.WMBM, 954.525,1490
888.599,WMBM, wmbm@wmrbm.com


* Gospel Clussc Houii, M-F, 6:OOam
* TuesdOy Talk with IPfsidentfGM Bishop ViCtor T.
Curry. Tufe 9:30om
* Spi't & Soul fectig;:


-* B^siess in Mte Flock
~sUlncss Show\c3oc
v- ioicus Lire Mai, gerrfg-ie

s ir ot 2 ise

M atof 2:00opm


* Noon Doy Prayer, MF 12:00pm
* Busness Sportight, M-F, ; 1 rTpm and 15pm Sa,


* Mii.nv Spotlight S, B:1Sam
a LiMin' Right T cc, Shoa', S", 1:00om
* Back to the Bible, iternafing M, 9;ol':
* I elNs kT Money, Ale Olin W' Y C ,: :r :
* Gospc' tows Now, M-F 3:00prm
* walkingg Spats, So 5:0porr
* ueen ,J- T'es Gospei Hour Sa 6;00p
* Quoirtet ci (: irf, uuin !/::). om
m Bobby' Jons Gcipd. Countow/,n, Sun, 10 :0pm


CSmunit Calendar


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10B The Miami Times J 6













(t4i~t(~


I


Young men benefit from youth camp


By Nathanael Paul
Miami Times Intern

When Darrayl Mincy is not
putting out fires with the Dade
County fire department, he
makes it a point to help the
community in other ways. One
of his efforts includes using his
organization, Brain Scrimmage
of South Florida, to hold a five
week program for boys entitled
Manhood Youth Development
Camp. The summer camp pro-
vides life skills, manhood edu-
cation and personal growth
training to young Black males
ages 12-15.
Fifteen parents enrolled their
sons, grandsons and relatives
in MYDC 1; a rigorous discipli-
nary training of the mind and
body, which is designed to pro-
duce socially developed young
Black males that mature into
responsible and disciplined
adults. Serving as president,
Mincy feels with everything


going on in the community
today, camps like this are very
important for young men.
For two weeks, the youth
spent their time at Norland
Senior High School. While
there, they were given academic
lessons including personal
development studies, business
leadership, decision making
and more. The last three weeks
of the camp were spent at
Florida Memorial University,
where they reside for a week
without release.
During their stay at FMU,
there are no phone calls, televi-
sion, radio, ipods or other dis-
tractions. The focus is on self
development. Mincy admits that
it may sound harsh because
they can't even see or speak to
their families. "It was rough for
them at the beginning, but they
eventually realized that they
could live without it. I even had
a few of them tell me they were
surprised that they were able to


cope without their accessories.
In order to get funding to
make the camp a success Mincy
approached individuals, organi-
zations and private businesses.
He also says that had it not
been for the deputy directors of
MYDC, Terry Williams and
Terrance Darville, who served
as key organizers in making
the camp a success, the pro-
gram could not have been real-
ized.
Mincy's future goal for the
camp is to eventually provide a
year round facility. He also said
a womanhood camp is in the
works, but this year he is focus-
ing on young men.
"I feel the development of both
sexes are equally important,
but our young men's death toll
is higher and we're finding
more and more of them in the
jails." If you have any ques-
tions about the camp contact
Darrayl Mincey at 954-274-
3234.


to-
;ris



:-0f


From left to right Ronquavis Fulton, Richard Williams, Savalas Wilcher, Nathan Austin, Tamario Evans, Marvin ^b
Daniels, Hasan Williams, Corey Carter, Breghon Wesley, Jahvaris Fulton, Darrayl D. Mincey, President of MYDC ,
and Shirley Gibson, City of Miami Gardens Mayor.


Film, entertainment opportunities for Miami's Black urban youth"I


By Jarrell Douse
jdouse@miamitimesonline.comrn

Over the weekend the fourth
annual "Script to Screen"
youth workshop was conduct-
ed at the Royal Palm hotel on

AtN


Miami Beach as part of the
American Black Film Festival
activities.
The workshop consisted of
panel discussion by veteran
filmmakers and a special guest
appearance by La Q, from the


Participants of the Script to Screen program pose with Tony Brooks and
other industry professionals that served as presenters at the workshop.



Alliance for Musical Arts


receives $10,000 grant


The Alliance for Musical Arts
is grateful to District One
Commissioner Barbara J.
Jordan for providing them with
a grant in the amount $10,000
to continue the operation of the
Musical Arts, Theater and
Tutoring (M.A.T.T.) after school


program and the Positive
Options Program (P.O.P.) sum-
mer camp 2006-07.
As a part of the program, The
Alliance for Musical Arts, along
with Latasha Strawder, director
of Move: Miami Dance
Please turn to GRANT 13B


Latasha Strawder work with dancers from 'Move: Miami Dance Project.'



Greater St. James hosts

49th Women's Day Sunday

It's happening Sunday, July
30 at Greater St. James
Missionary Baptist
International Church, 4875
N.W. 2nd Avenue, during the
11 a.m. worship service. All
Systems go!
First Lady Eloise Washington
is the chairperson: co-chair-
persons are; Judith Vassell,
Juanita Williams and Chole
Pratt. Dinner served following
services.
Dr. William H. Washington,
Sr. is the pastor. Dr. Gayle Snead
Morning Speaker


movie ATL. This engaging
experience was formatted to
entertain as well as inform
Miami's Black urban youth of
the art of filmmaking and the
vast career opportunities con-
nected to the film and enter-
tainment industries.
According to Anthony 'Tony'
Brooks, Executive Director of
the South Florida Youth Film
Workshop, the ambition
turned community initiative


La Q


spawned from a challenge by
renaissance man, Robert
Townsend who advised Brooks
to "Do something ... to involve
the kids in the film festival!,"
when as mentioned by Brooks
he told Townsend, "The film
festival is great, but what are
you doing for the kids?"
Townsend's challenge was
consistent with Brook's failed
vision of implementing a film
and entertainment vocational


academy at Miami Jackson
Senior where he once served
as an assistant principal. SD
In helping Brooks to meet
his youth inspired agenda, ,I
Alonzo Crawford, a tenured
professor of cinematography at ,
Howard University facilitated
the event.
Crawford and Brooks seem,.
to share a common goal, which o,
is commissioned to narrowing ,r4
Please turn to FILM 13B o
qa
08
.q

hA
Eli











12B TheL Mam~.. 'Jmes ,.,1 u~i~ict1 ARBak utCnto hi w etn
I 5L .LAI~t551L ~ ~i~ay -


1liii


CALENDAR
continued from 1OB

Gable Stage is having
Principal auditions by appoint-
ment, July 29 and July 31 from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on both days.
For more information or to
make an appointment, call 305-
446-116. The Producing Artistic
Director is Joseph Adler. Please
prepare a brief contemporary
monologue.

Miami-Dade Community
Action Agency is having a
Youth Conference on Violence
on July 27 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
at the Radisson in downtown
Miami. For more information,
call 305-347-4682.

From July 20-29, Animal
Services will be collecting clean
crates and carriers in all sizes to
get ready for the hurricane sea-
son. Donations will be accepted
at the Stephen P. Clark Center
lobby.

There will be a free workshop
at Maim Dade College North
campus for Faith and
Community-based organiza-
tions to learn how to deal in
financial matters, September 6
and 7 from 8:30 a.m. 4:30
p.m. Participants must attend
both days. For additional infor-
mation, call 305-536-5678 x
2271.

CHARLEE Homes for


Children is looking for persons
interested in becoming Foster
or Adoptive parents. For more
information, please call Danay
Sanchez at 305-779-9609 or
visit us on the web at
www.charleeprogram.org
*******
Sabbath Memorial Dog
Rescue Center is looking for
homes for their dogs. Anyone
interested in adopting a dog,
call 305-799-1567.

Maxim and Bud Light's
"Real Men of Comedy Tour"
will be held October 1 at the
Jackie Gleason Theater. For
ticket information, call 305-
358-5885.
*******
The Greater Miami Chapter
of the 100 Black Women, Inc.
extends an invitation to inter-
ested women to apply for mem-
bership. An informational will
be held August 5 at 2 p.m. at
the North Dade Regional
Library. For more information,
contact Neichole Hess, Esq. at
305-606-4367 or
NCBW100Miami@aol.com.

The City of Opa-locka Police
Department is pleased to
announce its upcoming
Promotional and Swearing in
Ceremony, July 27 at 1 p.m.
For more information, call 305-
953-2878.

Brothers of the Same Mind
Youth (Fun-V) and Hope for


[_ii0


the Homeless and Hopeless
unite with the Miami Worker's
Center to provide a Camp for
Arts/Crafts, July 24 August 4,
ages 8-14, from 9 a.m. to 4:30
p.m., Monday thru Friday. For
more information, call Amanda
at 305-759-8717 ext. 1001 or
Patty Macias at 305-305-0348.

DCTS/George Washington
Carver Alumni Association
Alumni Banquet will be held
August 10-13. For more infor-
mation, please contact M.
Corbett at 305-238-7887; P.
Harper Garrett at 305-253-
1685; or A. Baker at 305-444-
1482.

The Center for Family and
Child Enrichment, Inc. are
currently recruiting for Foster
parents and Adoptive parents.
For more information, call 305-
624-7450 ext. 190.
*******
The Institute for Authentic
Social Work is looking for vol-
unteers to train as Life Coaches
for its Sisterhood Connection
program. Contact The Institute
at 305-770-1533. Training
begins in September. One year
commitment required.
*******
CPC is seeking one licensed
(LCSW, LMFT, LMHC) and two,
unlicensed therapists to work
with at-risk or gang involved
youth in the North and South
areas of Miami-Dade County.
Fax or email cover letter and
resume to Human Resources at
305-685-4208 or email:
employment cpcinc@yahoo. co
m.


Miami-Dade Community
Affordable Housing Strategies
Alliance (CAHSA) Task Force
and the Housing Policy Work
Group will have its second
meeting, July 27 from 3-5 p.m.
at the Stephen P. Clark Center.
For more information, please
contact Delores Green at 305-
375-4608.

Terra Lingua (non-profit
organization) is seeking volun-
teers to host English speaking
Foreign Exchange Students
from various countries ages 15-
18. For more information, call
877-520-2522.
*******
Bank of America and Life
and Learning Centers will be
holding Homebuyer Education
classes on Wednesdays from
6:30-8:30 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call 305-690-4391.
*******
Miami-Dade Enterprise
Community Center will be
conducting its Expanded
Emerging Business Seminars
Series. For more information,
call 305-579-2730.
*******
Hollywood Parks,
Recreation and Cultural Arts
presents Progress in the Park:
A Back to School Celebration
on August 5 from 10 a.m: to 4
p.m. at Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Community Center. For
more information, call 954-
921-3412.

The City of Hollywood is
seeking Fine Arts and Crafts for
their fourth annual
International Art and Music
Festival on October 21-22. For


more information, call 954-
921-3404.

Gospel AM 1490 WMBM is
looking for the fiercest, most
floetic Spoken Word Artists.
Romantic, social, heritage as
long as it is of or respectful to
Christian doctrine. Person sub-
mitting must be the author and
hold the legal copyright to the
material. No more than two
minutes. Files can be sent MP3
to ecfreeman@wmbm.com or
CDs may be mailed to: WMBM
Spoken Word, c/o E. Claudette
Freeman, 13242 NW 7 Avenue,
North Miami, Fl 33168.

All medicare recipients
should now be aware that they
may be eligible to receive a power
wheelchair, paid by Medicare, if
they suffer from conditions such
as arthritis respiratory.

Gwen S. Cherry Black
Women Lawyers Association
invites the community to be a
part of it's Judicial Candidates
Breakfast Forum on August 19
at 9 a.m. at Overtown's Lyric
Center. For more information,
call 305-376-4154.

Florida Memorial University
Entrepreneurial Institute is
offering several free services and
seminars on owning your own
business. For more information,
call 305-626-3155.

The Neighborhood
Partnership Program-ECHOS
at the Belafonte Tacolcy Center
provides reliable services and
confidential support to Liberty
City families in need. Call 305-


Wimberly Singers 35th pre-anniversary
Wimberly Sisters will cele- Serveral groups are appearing.
brate their 35th pre-anniver- The celebration continues at
sary at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, 2:30 p.m., Sunday, August 6
August 5, at New St. James at Jordan Grove, 5946 N.W.
Missionary Baptist Church, 12th Avenue, with many
1476 N.W. 58th Terrace. groups appearing.


loin the


pays for itself and keeps your church and
your pastor before the community.

Call 305-694-6210


93- Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30Sai.n. Early Moring WSrvhip
II a....Momrning WoAship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd Sunday ........6 pin.m.
Tuesday Bible Study ...7 pin.
Websiie: cnbc.org



First Thessalonians
Missionary Baptist Church
5150 N.W. 2M n Ave.
786-333-3505
Order of Services:
Sunday School







SMt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.






Sunday School .......9:310 a.m.





.L.. Sundiay M miugWorsh Jipl.....I I aan.
New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10"' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
EHrly Sunday Worship...7:30 an.n1
Sunday Sclxxw l .................9:30 au.n.
Stuncly Moming WcxshipI.....IIan.
Sunday Evening Service ...6 pn.
lTuestlay Prnyer Meetinkg ...7:30 p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study ...7:30 pin.
"Not Just (Iuch hiIB t M-v1enent"1



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8549
Order of Services:
Sutlday Sch Ioo........... ):45 .i1.
Stiil. Moriting ServS.. It l.n.
4 Sun.ro ... ..U1:30 2: 30 pm .
'ruesday.Bible Study
Feeding Ministry..0 a.1.n,
Wed. IlBile Sludy/l'raiyer,.6:301 p.mi
Thuirris. Oilrreich Miiiislry..Ii:3() p.11


/Apostolic Revival Center,
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New lime for T.V. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
11T: PA vii Cii 7 71 ((il ASTI'lli 21
sun tin pin nnil. y 5p S ly
Wedl.- InSteIessaloy Payel iL. 12 p.m.
Momilg S i ...... 7 a .
Sun.- Eve. Worsltip ........... 7:30 pnm.
ITues. Prayer Meeing.... 7:30 p.nm.
Fri.- Bible S tuly .. ...... 7:30 pni


Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
ww- w.rirlis[ipnilhiiiiinr.
ri-intshiippriycr helll lhi.iinl
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
Order or'servicts
S .our of Prayer.........6:30 .n .
Early Morning Worship....7:301) n.ni.
S Sunday School .......... 9:30 .m.
l[iorniniig Wiirship. II aun.
SYotuth Ministry Suldy.'We].. 7 p.m.
iNguilay'Allar Prayer...IM-F)
Pr ding tIe I hlngryevery\
Wvechimlcay vIe p.



New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76', Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Cihrli h chlool)...............o1 alm.
iWoreir yService ..........11:15 a.m.
Tuesday Blible Class..............7 p.m.
41h Stlnday Evenint Worship.........6 p.m.



Peaceful Zion Missionary\
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68" Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2,3.4,51 Sunday) ...... 8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 an
Moming Service ..... 11:00 a111
Communion Service
(Tniau. Ihelor Ip" Sitlay) 7:30 pin
l Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
Tuesy -(Wednesday) 7:530 pm



/The Soul Saving Station Oy
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
1880 Washington Ave.
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
i i Order of Services:
Sunday ,Scholol ........... 9 am1 .
~llSundliay Worship.. I a.m. & 7 p.I n
T' uesday Worshipj.......7:-15 p.m.


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.)
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Servicesl
Sun.. 9:30 an.m...(Sunday Schltol)
Walk in the Word Ministry
Worship Service.............. I a.m.
Tuesday....7 p.m....Family Night
Wed..l I a.mi-Intercessory Prayer
Wed. BibleClass. 12 p.m.
Wed. Bible Class ..............7 p.m.
Rev Carol Nash,^^^P^^^^
S^enio PstorSSSSBSIe


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12"' Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
Sunday School..:.........9. )a.m.
S N BC .................:..........10:05 a.m .
w W orslhip ......................11 am
Miss, n and Bible Class
l Tuesda) ...........6:30 p in.
^ ~ Monday ....................... :30 p.m.,


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
'I' I M in ing W orship ..m............. ] ;l .... .
^ aIlycr Sc>.-i- ...................,7:30 p.m.
A 1 B ible Studyllly....................... ....... .
'** I o .,,-r. S- h ,,dlI.................. '1 ...
T Rev Gregory Ul] .Ti lh I[Ill, 11 I] 011-1r.I


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
I ril tDay Sundary Schoil ...9:45;niu
Sulnirlry Miorlling Worship .....I a im.
Sunday Mes Bible Stuy .....5 p.m.
Sunday L am1 dics lihile Study 5 p.m.
Sundayii Eelning Worship ...... ..
"1 slday Nih Iible Shti y ..7..:3pn
nl'huisrtay M inoiB vible Chl.,IIl in.
I "rrtmli'I nirsprUlioi available Cull:
3115-634-4850 1'305-691-6958


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Momlin ............ a.m
Sunday School.............1011.m.
Sunday Evenin. ............. 6 p. S. m.
Mon. Excellence 7:3(1 p.
Tue. Bible Class ......... 7:30) p.n1,.
turs. llows .....S.opr i n. .1


New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103,' St.
305-696-7745
Order of Services:


( Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday. 8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8, 19, 22, 23,30 and 37
Web page: www.pembl)rokeparkcoc.org


( Word of Faith -
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081

r.C1 Order ofl Services:

Woirslip n Service .....I. a.m.


/Christian Hill AME Church
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LM09@BellSouth.Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services:
Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School.................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ........11 a.m.
Free Golf Every 21' & 4"' Sunday ............4 p.m.
Don Shula's Golf Course


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


SNew Mount Moriah
Missionary Baptist Church
6700 N.W. 14th Avenue
305-691-1811
Order of Services:

onrday Iher nio ervi .s:3 p.n
un rly S nday..........





s M7iny pasi n.7 .
salnrlay t n -Way ......... ... n.

















rp Word of Truth
St. John Baptist Church \
1328 N.W. 3' Avenuet
305-372-3877691305-371-3821
Order of 305-694-910Services:
Early Sunday
Morning Worship ....7:30 a.m.
Sunday School .......... 9:30 a.m.
Morning. Worship ...11 a.m.
ANatnre fitr taptisi lCurches
(11B .T.U.) 5 p.m.,
I vening W or'hil ........ 7 p.m.




Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 781" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105


Order of Services:
Hilille Siuld)y W ed................ p.III
Sunday School.................. I0 a.m.
Sun. Worship Serv. .......1 1:30 a.m .
Wed. Ni.) Iltilerces.c sin Prayeri
Irolii 7:30 to 8 p).ii
Sundlr, Wnoship Sicrvic.i.6:.(I .nu.


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.mn.
Prayer Meeting Tues- 6 p.m.


1 (8100) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiamni.org


72


/New Shiloh M.B. Church\
1350 N.W.95'" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
EaIrly Morming Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
STuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
TI "rIles. elbfre the I sl Sun.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship



St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:

SMorning Worship ....11 a.m.
II I.,, WEI)NKSDAY
Pntyctr Meefin .. ............ 7:30 p.m.
Bible Study .................. P.m .



S Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
1LI- 1 Sunday School ............. 9:30 a.m.
Moming Praise/Worslhip ..1I a.m.
Youll) C hor -in- S llfll .*"".y 111.111. It
S Prayer Meeting & Biblhe'StIud
Tuesday 7 p.m.


Musical program at New St. James
On Sunday, July 30, a Groups appearing include
musical program will be held Southernnaires, Spiritualets,
at New St. James Baptist Wimberly Sisters, Reverend
Church, 1476 N.W. 58th Wright Heavenly Lights and
Terrace. many more.


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


/Trinity Faith Tabernacle
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4"' Street, Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order or Services:
St1ntdah S School........... 10:30 1,1m ,
Suni. Morning Servs ......12 p.m.
'I'uiesday "'Youh Nigbl" .8 p.mil.
Wed. Noo Day Pe 12 u ..
W d. i Nirl u i.ibil.Si1i ) e i 1.m.


751-1295 between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. to set your appointment
today.

Class Meetings
The 35th Class Reunion
Finale of the Miami Carol
City High School Class of
1971 will be held on Friday,
July 28 from 6 10 p.m. at
Miami Carol City High School.
To RSVP and for additional
information, contact Michael
Stokes at 305-625-9369 or
Emma Pringle at 305-620-
7963.

Coral Gables Senior High
School's 1986 Class Reunion
will be August 5 at The Sonesta
Hotel and Suites in Coconut
Grove. For more information,
visit www.reunionweb.com.

North Miami Beach Senior
High's 20th Year Class
Reunion will be held on August
19, 7 11:30 p.m. at The Trump
International Sonesta Beach
Resort. Visit http: / /
www.reunionweb.com for more
information.

The Miami Carol City Class
of "81" is having a Raffle and
Fish Fry on July 29 at 3 p.m.
For more information, contact
Derrick Cash at 786-457-3094.

Send your community
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamiteditor-
ial@bellsouth.net or mail to
900 NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6216.


.. irecto
? ,. -
*** .'* ft in? ^ ^ r l l '^ ^ ^ ^ f k '^ '1 : ** "' : -...... **** **"*<.... .. ....- .-**-* *,>. .- ...-.-........- ......... : ;;.,


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i i Ti J l 26 A ust 1 20 6


hi F Bishop VictorT. Curry, DJUin., D.D, Smior Pastorrileaclic.1,








The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006 13B


s kcalB Must Control y


Bill signed to help improve the plight of Black men and boys


Bill signed to help improve
the plight of Black men and
boys
Black men and boys face a
dire situation
It will take all of us to help
our men and boys
Black men and boys in the
U.S. face a far direr situation
than Black women or any other
ethnic or racial group in the
nation. In the Inner City of
Miami-Dade County, more than
half of all Black Boys do not fin-
ish high school. Many drop out
before they reach the 10th
grade.
In Florida, 21% of Black men
in their 20's who don't attend
college are in jail or prison. By
their mid-30's six out of ten of
all Black men who drop out of
school have spent time in
prison. None of the litany of
problems that young Black Men
face should be new to any of us.
The number of Black Men with-
out jobs has climbed relentless-
ly. Half of the Black men in
their 20's are jobless.
For decades we have heard
that the Black man is an
endangered species. When we
designate endangered species,
any number of oversight com-
mittees and foundations are
created. Other endangered
species in the sunshine state,
such as the Manatee, Whale
and Key Deer are protected by
Florida law. During the 1990's,


Senators Frederica Wilson, Tony Hill (D-1) and Representative Frank
Peterman (D-55) traveled to Tallahassee on Friday, June 9 to attend a 2
p.m. ceremonial bill signing in the Governor's office.


our nation spent billions of dol-
lars weaning poor, Black
women from welfare rolls. They
created job training, day care
and health care and many
received autos and affordable
housing compliments of the
federal government.
But this nation has never
invested one dime in rescuing
Black men and boys from the
pit of destruction in which they
are deeply mired or sought to
decrease the disparities that
stem from poverty, incarcera-
tion, Black-on-Black crime,
higher drop out rates, lower
incomes, higher death rates
from illness and a lower life


expectancy than males from
other ethnic and racial groups.
"There is an epidemic of vio-
lence that is overtaking our
communities across the state
regarding Black-on-Black crime
and I am outraged. This legisla-
tion will prove beneficial in
helping us to craft solutions,"
Senator Wilson said.
The Council on the Social
Status of Black Men and Boys
will be responsible for compil-
ing and reviewing data dealing
with the negative disparities
suffered by Black males includ-
ing dropout and homicide
rates, arrest and incarceration
rates, poverty, violence, drug


Pastor Lewis has 30 years of ministerial leadership


Reverend G. Vincent Lewis,
Chief Ministerial Officer and
Executive Pastor of Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church of
Carol City, was honored by the
Antioch church community for
his 30 years of ministerial
leadership and his relentless
commitment to serving the
least, lost and last within our
community. There was a three
day ordination celebration,
July 20-23, which included a
formal banquet that took place
Friday, July 21 at Trump


International Beach
Resort.
On Saturday, July
21, there was a
Breakfast Symposium
which was a forum
designed to raise con-
sciousness of the
major spiritual and
socioeconomic issues LE
that are impacting the
Black community and
the possible ministerial solu-
tions that could address those
issues.


Special Guest speak-
ers included Pastor
Arthur Jackson III,
Senior Pastor of
Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church of Carol
City; Bishop Michael
Kelsey, Senior Pastor of
New Samaritan Baptist
WIS Church' of Washington,
DC.; Dr. Johnny
Youngblood, Senior
Pastor of St. Paul Community
Baptist Church of Brooklyn,
New York; and Dr. Rudolph


McKissick Jr. of Bethel Baptist
Institutional Church of
Jacksonville, Florida.
Pastor Lewis was ordained in
1976. He received his Bachelor
of Science degree from Edward
Waters College in Jacksonville,
Florida and a Masters of
Divinity at Virginia Union
School of Theology in
Richmond, Virginia. He is a
father of six wonderful chil-
dren, three grandchildren and
a devoted husband to Novice
Aurelia Lewis.


Alliance for Musical Arts awarded $10,000 grant


GRANT
continued from 11B

Project, will present the musi-
cal 'Child of the World,' written
by John Jacobson and John
Higgins with modification by
Jo Ann Harris Ingram, pro-
gram director.
The series of musical per-
formances are scheduled to be
presented to a number of other
summer camps in District One
from July 18-20. Some of
those who will view the per-
formances include Miami-
Dade Golden Glades Park,
Teen Upward Bound and
Trinity Church.
"We are working with other
summer camps in the area to
make a difference in the
growth and development of all
of our youth," says site super-
visor, Xavier Ingram.
"We are in discussion with
other providers in hopes of


joining the partnership of
Children's Trust funded pro-
grams," says Harris Ingram.
"We have struggled along with
the help of small grants from
our District Commissioner,
Dade Community Foundation
and Keep Kids Drug Free
Foundation, awaiting a chance
to prove to the "Children's
Trust" that our programming
has validity and is an impor-
tant asset to the community.
The Alliance has been in
Opa-locka since 2001 and pro-
vides a year round after school
program and summer camp, a
food bank, community service
opportunities and employment
sites for over 150 children
enrolled in the Miami Dade
Summer Youth Employment
program.
For more information about
the performances, please call
305-688-0200 or fax us at
305-688-0270.


Members of the Positive Options Program Summer Camp pose after
rehearsal of 'Child of the World.'


Iir.A %ion p* h liv \l/hcsnw% rmnxi\c litk


abuse, death rates, disparate
annual income levels and
health issues.
Based on the compiled infor-
mation, the Council is directed
to propose measures to lessen
and correct the underlying
causes of these conditions. The
Council is to issue an annual
report to the Florida Legislature
with its findings, conclusions
and recommendations begin-
ning in December, 2007 and
every twelve months thereafter.
The Council will be housed in
the Office of the Florida
Attorney General. 1
The recent rash of shootings
in Miami-Dade County since
January 1 have claimed the
lives of more than 30 Black
Youth. Young Black men and
women have been indiscrimi-
nately killed as the result of
Black-on-Black crime. A moth-
er buying milk for her child, a
college bound student bragging
about his car, a one year-old
baby and most recently a nine
year-old girl playing on her own
front porch; all were victims of
drug or gang related wars and
vengeful retaliations.
The cities of Jacksonville and
Orlando tout similar tragic sta-
tistics. During their hour of
need, the 5000 Role Models of
Excellence rendered aid and
scholarships to the families of
the victims. Gifts of $1,000 in
cash and four-year scholar-


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


ships to college were given to
surviving relatives that are
members of the 5000 Role
Models of Excellence program.
We must be the Village that
comes to the aid of those less
fortunate, especially our chil-
dren. Children need hope and a
vision of themselves in the
future that will help them sur-
vive the rigors of childhood,
adolescent peer pressure and
grow into adult, contributing
members of society. Without
hope, they have no vision and
do not value their lives or oth-
ers. Rather, they prey on their
own communities, deepening
our sorrows with nightmarish
outcomes that serve only to fur-
ther diminish and erode the
fabric of lives.
We must mentor and nurture
our children, arming them with
optimism, faith and dreams of a


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


KENNETH E. FOXX, SR. TERRANCE T. FUDGE
aka 'DJ RED'


10/19/32 07/25/96

It's been 10 years and you are
still loved and missed.
Rest in peace.
The Family


03/03/75 07/31/05

It's been a year since the Lord
called you home. You will
always live in our hearts.
Love,Your family


Let your work speak for you
When you walk only bend .
your knees, keep your head
level so you can make wise
decisions. The right ideals
make millionaires. A fool lets
other people think for them
like Sampson did, Judges
16:1. Stop and get off the
pleasure train. Stop looking for
material things and tell some-
one how to find Jesus. That
experience will last a lifetime.
We also have a healing room
for prayer,.
Don't forget the mourning i'*
bench and the tarrying room.
Write me at P.O. Box 531078, Bishop John Wilson
Miami, FL 33153.


Youth film workshop


FILM
continued from 11B

"the gap between disadvan-
taged communities and main-
stream America, by using film
as an educational tool to
encourage [a] better under-
standing and appreciation of
cultural differences."
Brooks vision surpasses the
perimeters of the U.S. He told
The Miami Times that his long-
term objective is to "expose the
film and entertainment indus-
try internationally via a stu-
dent exchange program" he's
attempting to set in motion.
His plans to give back vital
educational tools and entre-
preneurial vocations to the
inner city child in Miami-Dade
County, who isn't limited to his
anticipated exchange program;
he has plans of rewarding


select Dade County students
with scholarships to pursue
whatever career they desire.
Though the vision was born
through his recognition of the
disadvantaged child, Brooks is
adamant in giving credit to
those who helped to make his
event a success.
Ernest Goodley, professor of
film and entertainment at
Miami-Dade College North
campus and [film] student,
Dianah is noted.
Robert Townsend, Reggie
Scott, Jeff Friday and Time
Warner are also greatly "appre-
ciated," according to Brooks.
Raynard, a 16-year -old stu-
dent of Miami Jackson Senior
said, "I learned a lot from the
workshop" adding that he may
"possibly consider a career in
the film and entertainment
industry one day."


"Copyrighted Material ,


Syndicated Content"


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Join the


(1ite liectot it pays for itself and keeps your church and

your pastor before the community. Call 305-694-6210


n IN MEMOUS]M Q


better world that they mold and
shape with their attitudes, deci-
sions and hands. The 5000
Role Models of Excellence pro-
gram needs thousands of men-
tors to fill the void of fathers,
uncles and brothers who are
incarcerated or who themselves
have become victims of the neg-
ative disparities that cripple
our communities.
Senators Frederica Wilson,
Tony Hill (D-1) and
Representative Frank Peterman
(D-55) traveled to Tallahassee
on Friday, June 9 to attend a 2
p.m. ceremonial bill signing in
the Governor's office for SB 436
regarding the Council on the
Social Status of Black Men and
Boys. This landmark legislation
will be the third such council in
the nation. There are presently
commissions in Indiana and
Ohio.


I










IN 3M-BSEM,- 4, BIRTHDAY]REMEMBRANCES-o BcksMtOntTheIrES


STALLWORTH,


ARTHUR B. COLEBROOK, 44,
computer techni-
cian, died July
19 at Jackson
H hospital.
Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at 93rd Street

Baptist Church.


CHARLIE B. MORGAN, 72, fore-
man at Florida
Sewer and
Water, died July
18 at Hialeah
Hospital
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Peaceful
Zion Baptist
Church.

Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt
MURRAY ROBERT JERRY, 50,
laborer for
Sy stem
Furniture, died
July 21 at home.
He leaves to
mourn: his wife,
Debra H. Jerry;
sons, Darrell
and Marquis
Jerry. Service
Friday, 11 a.m.
at Friendship Missionary Baptist
Church.

MERLENE CURRY-JOHNSON,
52, homemaker,
died. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
in the chapel.






Grace
OTIS McCOY, JR., 54, landscap-
er, died July 24
at Parkway
Regional
Medical Center.
Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Second
Chance
Missionary
Baptist Church.

ANGELO C. ARMBRISTER, 43,
security guard for Jackson Memorial
Hospital, died July 11 at Jackson
Hospital. Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at
New Hope Missionary Baptist
Church.

ETHEL DIANE BURKS, 60, med-
ical secretary, died July 17 at
Aventura Hospital. Services were
held.

IMOGENE H. CLARKE-SWAIN-
SON, 72, nurses aide at King
Harbor Nursing Center, died July 18
at Aventura Hospital. Service
Saturday, 10 a.m. at Norland United
Methodist Church.

Carey* Royal
Ram'n
MARY ST. HUBERT, 69, died
July 21 on vacation in California.
Arrangements are incomplete.


FRANCISCO WOLFE, 67, Miami
Beach, died July 22 at home.
Graveside service Saturday, 9 a.m.
at Woodlawn West Cemetery.

DONNA BART, 54, Weston, ded
July 24 at Cleveland Clinic Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Royal Palm
WILLIE ALBERT CARTER, self-
employed, died
July 22 at


Medical Center.
Survivors
include: daugh-
ters, Willie Mae

sons, Jesse

John and Jimmy Carter; brother,
Adam Carter; and sister, Ethel Mae
Carter. Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at Mt.
Tabor Baptist Church.

Deadline for

obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.


Royal


JOHN DAVID
92, retired
supervisor for
Southern Bell,
died July 21 at
Miami VA
Hospital. Service
Saturday, 3 p.m.
in the chapel.


CAROLYN C. PHILLIPS, 67, died
July 12 at Cedars Medical Center.
Services were held.


Van Orsdel
REFO JEROME JOHNSON, 47,
died July 18.
Services were
held.








Eric S. George
FRANCESCA DORSETT 26,
Oakland Park, died July 17 at her
home. Service will be Saturday 10
a.m. at St. Mary The Evangelist
Church in Oakland Park.

RODNEY MILLER, 52
Tallahassee, formally of Hallandale,
died July 17 in Tallahassee.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at New
Macedonia Baptist Church.

ROD ROBERTS, son of Jared
Roberts and Nyree Taylor died July
19 at Broward General Hospital, Ft.
Lauderdale.


ROSA MAE SMITH, 81, home-
maker, died July

Shore Medical
Center. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Mt. Zion
Baptist Church.



EVA BLACK SMITH, college
advisor of
Miami Dade
Schools, died
July 21 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
11 am. at
Liberty City
Church of Christ.


CHARITE CAPORAL, 77, con-
struction worker, died July 22 at
Parkway Regional Medical Center.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Range
HENRY SMITH, 67, cabinet
maker, died July
17. Survivors
include: wife,
Ada Smith; two
dau g h terss
Veronia Jordan
(Edward) and
Felecia Bennett
(Casey); son,
James Hundley;
four grandchil-
dren; three brothers, Walter C.
(Hazel), Willie (Annie Lou) and
Samuel Smith (Gwendolyn); three
sisters, Louann Fitzpatrick, Dena
Jones (Robert) and Jeannie Coley
(Carl); and a host of nieces,
nephews and other relatives.
Services were held.

LUEVENEA MATLOCK, 96,
homemaker, died July 19. Remains
will be shipped to Dallas, Texas for
final rites and burial.

MINNIE JEWEL BRYANT, 66,
currency processor for Miami-Dade
Transit Authority, died July 22.
Remains will be shipped to
Ashburn, Georgia for final rites and
burial.


Range
Coconut Grove
SHIRLEY DIANE SAMUEL, 55,
homemaker,
died July 22 at
Mercy Hospital.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m.




BETTY F. BANKS, 78, former
city of South Miami Commissioner,
died July 19 at home. Service
Wednesday, 7 p.m. in the chapel.

JASPER JEFF MOBLEY, 65,
retired maintenance worker, died
July 18 at Jackson Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.


Manker
ALBERTHA GARVIN 95, died
July 12 at
Cedars Medical
Center. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
in the chapel.


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


RHINEY S. HAGINS
'HAINEY'


08/21/51 07/24/04

It's been two years, and to
some you are forgotten, and to
some you are the past, but to us
who loved you, your memories
will always last.
Sandra Sands and Karen and
Clifford Hagins.


WILLIE F. MARSHALL, 77, Opa-

23. Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at First
Baptist Church
of Bunche Park.




PATRICIA LEITCHMORE, 46,
certified nurse assistant, died July
17. Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Harvest Fire Worship Center.

CECIL WAITHE, 90, automobile
mechanic, died July 18. Memorial
services were held.

ELOISE HOWARD, 74, died July
24 at Westside Regional Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

LEEBERT HARRIS, 74, died July
22. Service August 5 at Parkway
Baptist Church.

Wr
NELSON LOPEZ, 24, died July
21. Survivors
include: moth-
ers, Polly
Alvarez and
Mamie Davis
Poole; daugh-
ter, Zioara
Brown; siblings,
Nicole Lopez,
J o a n n
Sheppard,
'Patricia McRay, Sandra White,
Christan Rodriguez, Corey
Rodriguez and Anthony Davis.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at St. Mark
Missionary Baptist Church.

Gregg L. Mason
SHALONDA REGINA LYONS-
ANDERSON,
34, customer
service repre-
sentative for
PRC, died July
23. Survivors
include: mother,.
Mary Lyons; two
sons, Andre
Brown and
Kendrick Bailey;
four daughters, Keyondra and
Shakeyva Lee and Jahnae and
Shanae Anderson; sister, Jarice
Grant-Alexander; grandparents,
Helen Williams, Charleston, SC and
St. Julien and Sadie Mae German;
and a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins and other relatives. epose
Friday, 6-8 p.m. at the church.
Service Saturday, 2 p.m. at
Ebenezer United Methodist Church.

RONAL DELIE, 24, died July 17.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at St.
James Catholic Church.

Barrett-Fryar
O.C. TAYLOR, SR., 86, died July
20 at Mt. Sinai Medical Center.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
Morningstar Missionary Baptist
Church.

ANNETTE MORGAN, 42,
Richmond Heights, died July 22 at
North Shore Medical Center.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at Second
Baptist Church.

Davis and Brice
DONALD CAMPBELL, 59,
Aventura, died July 19. Service
Saturday at Fouilard United
Methodist Church.

ALPHONSO WILLIAMS, 85,
Hollywood, died July 24.
Arrangements are incomplete.


ERNEST L. HENRY


07/25/27 04/17/06

It's been three months since
you've been gone.
We love and miss you dearly.
Your loving daughters Tamela
and Pamela.


In Memoriam

My beloved father,

HENRY LEE TAYLOR

On May 16, my father, became
a loving memory for his family
and friends. I will always have
a place in my heart and many
tears to shed for my' father,
what about you Donald
Taylor? Donald, days after
Tater Red's burial, you gave a
beach party. Donald, you did
not contribute anything
toward your father's funeral,
so don't you think you should
return all of the money you
scammed from Tater Red's
friends, your co workers and
the congressman.
P.S. Also, please return all of
my father's important docu-
ments.
Love you, Dad.
Denice Taylor
Paid Advertisement


In Memoriam


In loving memory,


ALFRED BROWN, 55, carpenter,
died July 18. Service Saturday, 1
p.m. at Holy Family Episcopal
Church.

VALERIE HENRY, 49,
Hollywood, died July 17. Service
Saturday, 9 a.m. at Pentercostal
Church, Hollywood.

KATHLEEN REID, 84, nurses
aide, died July 14. Service Sunday,
10 a.m. at North Miami SDA
Church.

MELETA CAMPBELL, 49, maid,
died July 20. Remains will be
shipped to Bronx, NY for final rites
and burial.

JASON WESTBERRY, 72, died
July 22. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

OBEL JACKSON, 68, died July
22 at Parkway Regional Medical
Center. Arrangements are incom-
plete.

ight
WILLIE EARL DAVIS, 53, collec-
tor for the City of
Miami Beach,
died July 23.
Surviv ors
include: chil-
dren, Lawanda,
W i l l i e
Jr.(Rondricka);
siblings, Elise
Bobbitt,
Deborah
Pender, Grady (Barbara) Jenkins,
Kary and Phillip Davis; grandchil-
dren, Allen Chambers, Kiaryn and
Kyra Davis. Service Saturday, 2
p.m. at Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church. Interment at Dade
Memorial Park.

Richardson
ERNESTINE MACKEY, 50, died
July 20. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Ten mple
Baptist Church






EARNEST BLADING, 85, died
July 21. Service Thursday, 2 p.m. in
the chapel.


Jay's
FRANK ARRON MCNAIR, 54,
died July 13. Services were held.


Happy Birthday


In loving memory of,


truly appreciated your expres-
sions during our time of
bereavement. Your words of
encouragement, sympathy
cards, telephone calls, monetary
gifts, plants, flowers and food
were greatly appreciated.
Special thanks to Royal
Funeral Services, Rev. Arthur
Jackson, III, of Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church of
Carol City, Jose Marti Middle
School staff, North Dade Middle
School classes of 1962 and
1965, friends, neighbors and
family members.
The White, Stephens, and
Alexander Family.
In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


LYNN RENAE WILLIAMS

05/29/56 07/04/05


ARLEEN ROSALYN
NIXON-WILLIAMS


08/14/28 07/23/05

A year has passed since your
departures of this life. Arleen,
you are and always will be the
queen of our hearts. Your spirit
lives on within the lives that you
touched.
Lynn, your phenomenal per-
sonality and bright spirit contin-
ues to bring a smile to all that
speak your name.
' Eternal love from Joseph, Har-
old, Michael Williams and fami-
lies.
May God's everlasting light
shine upon you.


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


It's been one year since you left
us. We all love and miss you
dearly. Rest in peace.
Love Lucy, Rosemary, Valarie,
Kenneth and Deasha

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


05/14/46 07/27/05

Our very dear friend. We will
cherish the memory you have
left behind.
The Inner City Children's
Touring Dance Company.


Death Notice


ALBERT LEE CHANEY,
JR., 67, Dade County Solid
Waste Management employee,
passed on July 17.
Viewing will take place at
Johnson Funeral Home,
Homestead, FL, on Friday July
28 from 2 to 8 p.m..
Funeral service will be held at
Greater New Zion A.M.E., 890
S.W. 4th Street, Homestead, FL,
33030 on Saturday July 29, 10
a.m. Repass location to be an-
nounced.
For more information, call 305-
248-0927 or 305-945-6990.


Death Notice


MOTHER ELOISE HO-
WARD, 74, housewife, died
Monday, July 24. Survivors in-
clude devoted and loving hus-
band Garrett Howard; sons,
Donald (Frances) Roker of New
York, Thomas (Sandra) Glass;
brothers, Norman Johnson of
New York and Leon (Marie)
Johnson; sister, Gwendolyn
Roker; eight grandchildren, 11
great-grandchildren, and a host
of nieces, nephews, cousins, and
other relatives.
Services will be held Monday,
July 31, 11:30 a.m., at Jesus
People Ministries Church. Inter-
ment at Dade Memorial Park.


Poitier


09/28/65 07/30/05

It's been one year since you left
us.
Missed by your loving mom,
family and friends.

Card of Thanks


CLARA SHORTER
WILLIE ROLACK, III
aka 'BIG WILL' 03/01/20 07/28/05


The family of the late,


CONSTANCE EVETTE COMMISSIONER
ALEXANDER WHITE ARTHUR E. TEELE, JR


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


14B The Miami Times J 6









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led T MIAiLm ,41ILL As 120BakMsCnoTerw ti


To kick-off his reelection cam-
paign, Congressman Kendrick
B. Meek highlighted it with a
"Prayer Breakfast," last
Saturday morning in the sym-
phony room of the Radisson
Hotel in downtown Miami. A
golden salute goes out to Dr.
Marty Pinkston, orchestrator,
who demonstrated proficiency
with her committee that includ-
ed Yolanda Cash Jackson, esq.
There was also an elegant
reception for The Honorable
Jesse Jackson, Jr., U.S. House
of Representatives, who served
as keynote speaker.
When the more than one
thousand guests arrived, they
found a room decorated with 16
stems of 12 red, white and blue
balloons indiscriminately
placed around the wall and five
American Flags accentuated on
a dish with red, white and blue
live roses at each table. There
was no confusion at the
entrance because Dr. Ernest
Ornesta, Jackson and others
were there to assist.
The program began with the
unique voice of Tamara Gant,
radio personality,, filling the
room and introducing The
Latter Rain Ministries, Pastors
Cal and Renne Roberts,
Pembroke Pines. They are one
of the most inspiring groups
that should be on television so
the world can absorb their
musical ministry. Some of them
present included Lorna Griffin,
Caesar Griffin, Keyandra Ings,
Lisa Byer, Kartika Ings, Leann


Dr. Jasmine Turner-
Guerrier was hooded at Temple
University on May 26.
Attending, Dr. Guerrier's grad-
uation were her parents Willie
and Rhonda Turner, Kathy
Jones, Yetta Ingram and Elan
and Erin accompanied their
parents. Dr. Guerrier passed
the board on July 10 (congratu-
lations) and finished in the top
10 percent of her class. She is
the granddaughter of Sylvia
Sands and the late Fred Sands
and Willie and May Turner. Dr.
Guerrier will reside in Atlanta,
Georgia.
The "Carats" of Dade County
along with other "Carats"
throughout the U.S. met last
week on Miami Beach at the
Eden Roc Hotel. Hycinth
Johnson is president of these
young ladies and by the way,
Carmen Dean-Jackson is past
National president of "The


Taylor, Charline Louis, Sanya
Houston, Dapene Brown, Ero
Turner, Stephanie Murphy,
Chelsea Thompkins, Wendy
Smith, Shamar Brown
and Bryan Roberts.
Following such a
spiritual beginning, the
program continued in
excellence. The welcome I
was delivered by The
Honorable Carrie P.
Meek; Reverend Dr.
George E. McRae did
the invocation; Muryell ME
Epps was a soloist;
Mayor of Opa-locka, Reverend
Joseph Kelly read a scripture;
Reverend Dr. Robert B. Ingram
read a scripture that brought a
standing ovation; Reverend
Carol Nash-Lester performed
blessing of the food and Faith
Elibert, a liturgical
dancer, was given a
standing ovation after
performing to the music
provided by Dr. Alfred
A. Pinkston.
A sumptuous break-
fast of scrambled eggs,
boiled potatoes, bacon,
pastry, orange juice and
coffee caused the huge BR6
crowd to quiet down and
prepared them for the 'meat' of
the program, prayer.
It began with Reverend
Gaston E. Smith of Friendship
Baptist Church praying for the
country; Pastor David Eugene,
a Haitian Evangelist, prayed for
the State; Rabbi Dennis Wald
prayed for all families and Epps


Carats."
Dennis and Gloria Parks, Sr.
were in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,
visiting Maxwell and Rochelle
Shavers. The Shavers celebrat-
ed their 40th wedding anniver-
sary and both of their birthdays
along with their wedding
anniversary, his 75th and her
69th. Happy anniversary and
happy birthday to a lovely cou-
ple. The Shavers are the uncle
and aunt of Dennis and Gloria.
Congratulations and best of
wishes to Senator Frederica
and the late Paul Wilson, Sr.,
whose daughter, Lakesha
Mene' Wilson, married Shelly
Bryon Rochelle last Saturday
at the Historic St. Agnes
Episcopal Church.
Despite all of the national
exposure, Dwyane Wade says it
is not difficult for him to remain
humble and grounded. Less
than a week after he led the


began to sing from a CD, If I
Can Have You, but the CD
became stuck. So Richard
Clements, minister of music
from Mt. Tabor, went to the
piano and picked it up. Both of
them received a standing ova-
tion for such a remarkable
comeback.
Reverend Dr. Jimmie L.
Brown, Harris Chapel UMC and
Hot 105 Talk Show, had the
honor of introducing
Representative Jesse L.
Jackson, Jr. He was brilliant
and Latter Rain Ministries
added the frosting to
the cake as the speaker
found the crowd
already standing when
he arose to address
them. He was spectacu-
lar like his father and
emphasized the impor-
tance of Representative
Meek in Washington.
EEK The conclusion
included The Honorable
Rod Smith; Reverend Dr. Carl
Johnson, 93rd Street
Community Baptist Church;
Rep. Meek, filling the room with
his logic and deep concern for
his people in South Florida and
Reverend Eric Jones, Koinonia
Worship Center, giving
the benediction.


Vivian Brown, organ-
ist, and Jimmie Brown,
treasurer, Bethany
SDA, have been work-
ing diligently to improve
conditions in their
OWN church. Brown has
demonstrated her skills
in relation to computers and the
piano by training young people
to become more knowledgeable
in those fields.
Recently, The Browns pre-
sented their annual An Evening
of Piano Elegance. Students
included Natalia Gonzalez,
Marcus Garner, Bryanne


Miami Heat to its first NBA title,
the Finals MVP Wade returned
to his hometown of Chicago to
host his second annual Dwyane
Wade Basketball Camp at
Dwight D. Eisenhower High
School in suburban Chicago.
Wade worked with boys and
girls, ages 8 to 16 and told
them, "You have to work extra
hard, not only on the basketball
court, but in practice and in
school." Amen.
Reverend Al Sharpton put
the word out at several rallies
that he will not rule out running
for U.S. President in 2008 if
Democrats fail to address social
concerns.
Our get well wishes to all of
you, from all of us!
Sue Francis, Mae Hamilton-
Clear, Frances Brown, Emma
Leland, Leila O'Berry, Patricia
Allen-Ebron, Freddie "Jabbo"
Johnson, Celestine Hepburn-
Brown, Thomas "Nick"
Marshall, Glendina Carey-
Edwards, Christopher
Johnson, Ann Johnson-Dyes,
Mervin Armbrister, Cleomie
Allen-Smith, Pauline
McKinney, Fred Bethel and
Monica Hannah.
Wedding anniversary greet-


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ianet % alum ov%cf 1' Vw I tnIn A I an


Garner, Trae Dollar, Trevor
Dollar, Jeremy Garner,
Tonesha Rahming, Jayla
Smith, Angelica Choate,
Daralynn Choate, Dasean
Rahming, Kieja Robinson,
Leandra Solomon, Michael
White, Dale Dollar,
Tonishia Robinson,
Monique Harding,
Khristlyn Bellamy,
Shanice Lans, Jaris
Smith and Malcolm
White.
Among the standouts
were Dale Dollar (eighth
grade), who played
Beethoven's Ode to Joy; A. CB
Angelica and Daralynn
Choate (second grade), who
played solos and emceed a part
of the program; and Garner,
Solomon, White and Smith.
It was an evening parents will
always remember because
these 21 young musicians will
continue to grow and take the
places of great musicians before
them, such as Samuel
Adolphus, Tracy Long, Mabel
Glover, Korey Pryce and Lois
F. Johnson.


Kudos go out Alvin W.
Roberts, an official with the
Veterans Administration, an
officer at Ebenezer UMC and a
soloist with the Voices Of
Praise, for being recently elected
as president of Miami
Northwestern's Class of '64.
He will be joined by Loyd
Harrison, vice; Laverne Taylor,
secretary; Caroly Erowell and
Diane Smith, executive board
members; Rodney Chane,
treasurer; Arthur McCartney,
chaplain; Elizabeth Wells, par-
liamentarian and David
Solomon, assistant treasurer.
Roberts indicated his mission
will foster better communica-
tion among class members; ini-
tiate more community services;
maintain assisting the JRTC,


ings to our love birds of the
week and happy, happy
anniversary to Richard and
Lorraine Farrington Strachan,
July 20: Their 45th.
Delone and Maureen Mathis,
July 22: Their 6th
Wilfred and Julie Edwards
along with their daughters
Keanna, Kayla, Kristina and
Wilfred's father, Amoson
Edwards, spent their vacation


I'


provide scholarships for the
needy and honor the late
Samuel Cohen, principal and
John Peavy. assistant princi-
pal, for their impact on stu-
dents.


Oscar Ernest Gunn,
Sr. may not be remem-
I bered by many people
in Miami, but he was a
legend in Key West and
'0 a household name
when it came to buying
newspapers. He had
96 several jobs as a hatter,
OATE roofer, collector and
handyman at
Emmanuel Seventh-Day
Adventist Church.
He also sold newspa-
pers from 1970 until
his illness. His top sell-
ing paper was The
Miami Times from
among The Pittsburgh
Courier and Key West
Citizen. His endeavors
brought him to Miami
each week to pick up
the papers and he hired D. CH
young boys and girls to
make the deliveries. This way,
according to their age, they had
an opportunity to earn money
for themselves.
His demise shocked people
in both Key West and Miami,
including Jean Brown and
Juanita Matthews, who knew
him from visiting Bethany SDA
and drove down to pay their last
respects.
You may not know him but
he will be missed by his wife of
53 years, five children, 35
grands, 40 greatgrands, 10
great-great grands and many
more relatives and friends. Now
his great-great grands will con-
tinue his newspaper business.

Spring is in the air and it
brought Stephen and Latura
Alves together to be married


in Freeport, Bahamas visiting
family and friends.
Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA)
Sorority, Inc. met in Detroit,
Michigan last week. Some
Miamians in attendance were
Gloria Greene, Bonnie N.
Stirrup, Wanda Hewitt,
Basicleus Linda Johnson,
Mildred McKinney, Ruth Nell
Blake, Deloris Lockett and
Geneva Woodard.


and celebrate their first
anniversary last Saturday at
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church of Brownsville with
Pastor Larrie Lovett II, offi-
ciant. The bride and groom
chose blue, white and grey for
their colors with the men in
long coat black and grey tuxe-
dos and the women attired in
blue gowns.
Patrick of CC Entertainment
and Sanya Collier had the
honor of announcing the bridal
party beginning with special
guests and following with
Kathrine Alexander, mother of
the bride, who was escorted by
Kelvin Ruth, Jr.; Paulette
Bruce and Stephen Alves, Sr.,
parents of the groom; and
bridesmaids and
groomsmen Antoinette
Malcolm and Dwayne
Joseph and Shantrill
Bush and Adrain Alves.
Also in the party were
Cola Clark, matron of
honor; Robert Alsop,
best man; Jasmine
West and Jahmal
9ATE Alves, flower girls; and
Heavan Clark, ring
bearer. Because You Love Me
was the music for the brides-
maids and You are so Beautiful
was played for the entrance of
the bride.
The bride entered attired in a
long veil, diamond tiara, a spy-
der necklace and a one-piece
organic gown. She displayed a
smile of happiness as she
walked to her husband.
Following a traditional cere-
mony, the newlyweds entered a
white stretch limousine and led
the way to Violines for the cele-
bration and reception. After the
introduction of the bridal party,
toasts and rituals of the bou-
quet and garter belt, the couple
danced to their favorite song,
Spend My Life With You, as fam-
ily members and guests
applauded with delight.


In 2008, they will assemble
in our nation's capital,
Washington D.C.
We have enough trouble in
this old world without hating
people because of the color of
their skin.
Good health, great friends,
loving family Our daily bless-
ings are gifts to appreciate,
each day provides it's own
gifts.


UI KERl PES t f iNSi A FiWA PASS PieiNifi JAM X fiR[Ll AR ily IFONHAMVI lNB I RAMIE HAMR W S SA1 INS
JUSIIN IHEOUX AMRRU 'M "AAc I"' 't ATHPEYlvEH ,MOP E[10[MON
.R.. ... : .. ... PIEIERJAN HRUGGE M UNlElA [PIN I URE,-
0STRONG VIOLENCE, LANGUAGEi
SMEUl iCTE si Un II^ Wi i. i i"ii JAF AIfHE Ii llrIM www.miamivice.com

OPENS FRIDAY, JULY 28 AT THESE THEATRES
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COBB
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2C The Miami Times July 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


R1


l








The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006 3C


IciaI smust uonr roi i neir r wn es LJISIy


The double standard in women and men's sexual history


Sexual assumptions can lead to a tainted reputation

By Brandyss Howard ., ,- ,
Miami Times Writer ,

There seems to be a double
standard when it comes to the
sexual history of men com-
pared to women. I've heard
men say that when a woman is K
asked how many sexual part-
ners she's had, the number
she gives usually needs to be
multiplied by three to give an
accurate grand total. This
often insinuates that women
are more promiscuous then
they would like others to
know. If the roles were
reversed, no matter how much
'pipe work' a dude puts in, his
reputation is glorified while
the woman's is tarnished. Why
does this double standard con- Anthony Anderson is considered 'the man' to be surrounded by all
tinue to exist? of these beautiful women, but it would be looked at as bad if the
A woman's reputation is situation were reversed.


probably one of the most pre-
cious things she has. It
amazes me that with one word
from the wrong dude, a chick
can go from a nice young lady
to being 'bout-it.' Once a girl's
name is out there, it's hard to
bring it back in. People devel-
op tunnel vision and the stig-
ma often follows her well into
the future. Now I have heard of
the term "male hoe," but you
may notice that there are
females who usually seem to
be more intrigued by it than
turned off. It's like they want
to find out what makes this
dude so appealing to other
women.
Now flip the script, if a
woman has a reputation of
talking to a lot of dudes,
whether she's intimate with all
of them or not, she's automat-
ically looked down upon. Even
in innocent situations, where a


woman chooses to befriend
more males than females, they
are prone to being labeled with
negative connotations.
Contrary to what many
believe, there are people in this
world who can be 'just friends'
with those of the opposite sex.
Note to my fellas, you may
end up seriously damaging a
woman's rep or offending them
by making assumptions. Now
if you know firsthand that a
woman really is reckless with
her sexuality, there's nothing
that can save her. The dam-
age has already been done.
Just find out the real deal
before you make a statement
like 'dang, she always be with
that dude, so they must be
f***ing.'
There are also instances
where males lie about having
sex with a chick to save face.
When it comes to a person's


sexual history, once you put
something out there like it,
you can't take it back. This is
where the double standard
comes into play. Would you be
so quick to make a judgment
call if you were talking about
your homeboy?
In either case, judging a
person solely by who you
think they've slept or associ-
ated with can often give you a
false sense of who they really
are. You either accept the per-
son with all of their flaws or
make the decision to just let
them be. Just don't be hypo-
critical by holding someone
up to a standard that you
don't hold up for yourself.
Remember, people do have an
aptitude to change and grow
from their mistakes. Don't
judge a person completely by
the actions of their past. Only
Jesus embodied perfection.


The Miami Times and celebrities support Russ Parr for movie screening


By Brandyss Howard
Miami Times Writer

Russ Parr's film The Last
Stand made its advance
screening on Thursday night at
the Improv Comedy Club in
Coconut Grove. The Miami
Times was proud to assist in
publicizing this effort as the
editorial staff enjoyed an
evening with Parr, the cast and
other comedians. Sponsors
such as Budweiser, Covergirl
and Fiji water provided gift
bags, door prizes and food
donations for media outlets,
comedians and other atten-
dees. The official Last Stand
memorabilia t-shirts were also
placed on the back of every
seat at the table.
The night began in the front
lounge where people were able
to eat, mingle and take pic-
tures. They were then escorted


S -


The Miami Times staff members Isheka Harrison and Brandyss Howard
pose with comedians Kevin Hart and Red Grant.
to center stage where they at this year's American Black
enjoyed a live comedy show Film Festival. It is the story of
prior to the film's screening. four inspiring comedians who
Entertainers including the try to overcome obstacles while
likes of Chris Spencer, Tony striving for success in
Rock and Michael Blackson Hollywood. The movie was
came out to show their support comprised of some actual
for the event, events that took place in both
The Last Stand was featured Parr's life and the lives of other


comedians
in Los
Angeles. Due
to the
intense
nature of the
film, it was
nicknamed
"The Drama
of Comedy."
It features a
star-studded
cast com-


W I prised of
Russ Parr entertainers
such as
Anthony Anderson, Red Grant,
Kevin Hart and Guy Torry.
Parr's movie was well
received and has already been
recognized by the American
Black Film Festival for two
awards. The Last Stand has
been nominated for the
Audience Award for Best U.S.
Feature presented by
Blockbuster and an Audience


Award for Best Performance
nomination, presented by 1
Boost Mobile, has been given to '
Torry for his role as 'Reggie
Sinclaire.'
Coming from an old script
Parr wrote about a decade ago,
the film still remains relevant 1


and gives viewers an in-depth,
behind-the-scenes look at the
unfunny' side of comedy. It is
scheduled to be released at
theaters in October.
For more information about
The Last Stand, visit www.the-
laststand-movie.com.


"Copyrighted Mater
Syndicated Conter

Available from Commercial Nem


viders"


Talented British singer making a worldwide splash with her debut album


SINGER
continued from 1C

And now that she's con-
quered Europe, the United
States is next on her hit list -
or not.
"I don't really feel pressure to
be a big success here," said the
comely Rae, whose face is
framed by an unruly mop of
curls. "I don't think like, 'I've
got to sell so many records here
or so many records there.'
That's the record label's job.
They've got to worry about how
were doing in Kazakhstan or
Germany. My job is just to
write and sing."
It's a job she's taken serious-
ly since she was just a teen.
Back then, instead of soulful
pop with a jazzy twist, rock was
her genre of choice. At 14, Rae
- already classically trained as
a violinist created a rock
band called Helen, a four-girl,
one-boy grunge band deeply
influenced by rock gods Led
Zeppelin.
Rae sang and played electric
guitar with the group for more
than 10 years. But when she
took a job as a hat-checker at a
local jazz-and-soul club while
she was a student at Leeds
University, she discovered a
passion for rhythm and blues.
"I would just sit and watch
the bands all day," she recalled,
"and eventually I got to be real-
ly friendly with the musicians.
Sometimes they'd say, 'C'mon,
it's the last set, let's do some-
thing. So I'd get up there and
do a Bill Withers song or an Al
Green song," she said. "I began
to pine for that kind of music
where I could express hope and
warmth and more love things
(rather than) aggression, angst
and melancholy."
Under the tutelage of some of
the clubs regular musicians,
Rae began experimenting with
the sounds of Stevie Wonder,
Roberta Flack and Nancy
Wilson, which would shape her
current sound, an alluring
blend of soul, pop and jazz.
Then she focused on her
songwriting, scribing what
would become her first hit, Like
a Star, in 2002, the year after
graduating from college (and
marrying a fellow musician,
saxophonist Jason Rae).
Still, she was dedicated to
Helen until the band lost a
deal with a local record label
due to personnel issues (the
bass player got pregnant and
dropped out of the band). It was
then when Rae started shop-


ping for a solo deal while
recording what would turn out
to be her debut album.
It wasn't long before Capitol
Records snapped her up and
Rae released her debut in
Europe in February. Almost
overnight she watched her
career skyrocket. Corporations


ranging from Starbucks to AOL
gave her music a big push and
while she's drawn raves from
the likes of People and
Entertainment Weekly, which
cited her album as one of the
summer's notable releases.
"I didn't expect my popularity
to be a mainstream thing,


'cause I'd only ever been an
underground artist," she said. "I
thought, I might get to the
equivalent of a jazz cafe 'inl ew
different places. I never thought
I'd get this far."
In June, she made her U.S.
television debut on ABC's Good
Morning America. Karen Rhee,


the GMA producer who booked
Rae for the show, said of her
album: "Six months ago I was
out ini LA. and Capitol gave me
an advance copy of her album. I
stuck it in my car's CD player
and never took it out. . *
There's just something about
her music that's addicting."


Rhee is not the only one who
feels that way Rae can even
add rock legend Elton John to
her 'growing fan base these
days.
"I got to present him with an
award. He said, 'Oh, I really like
your album, we've got it in our
houses.' That was surreal!"


/ z .7 WINES PRESENT




/A// ISPICE

MIAMI RESTAURANT MONTH.COM
........ .--. ...

Lunch $20.06* I Dinner $30.06*
*3. course meal includes appetizer, entree and dessert Beverage, tax and gratuity are not included,
Miami Spice menus are subject to change.

* 510 Ocean (D) Baleen (L,0) China Grill GNU Restaurant Novecento (LD) Restaurant Brana (L) Talula (.,D)
305/531-1788 305/857-5007 & Dragon (L.,0) & Lounge (L,D) 305/403-0900 305/444-4595 305/672-0778
* 81/2 (L,D) Bizcaya (LD) 305/534-2211 786/206-7120 OLA at The Savoy (D) Restaurant Tamara (LD)
786/276-3850 305/644-4675 Chispa Restaurant & Bar (L,O) harry's grille (D) 305/695-9125 St. Michel (L,0) 305/532-2311
* 1200 Courtyard Grill (0) The Betsy Bistro & 305/648-2600 305/531-0000 OLA Steak & Tapas (D) 305/446-6572 Tim6 Restaurant & Bar (L,O)
30a5445-8066, ext.2408 Tea Lounge (D) Christy's (L,D) Isabela's (L,D) 305/461-4442 The River Oyster Bar (L,0) 305/936-1008
* Aaria (LO) 305/531-3934 305/446-1400 305/329-3500, ext.3652 Oriente at Cardozo (L,D) 305/530-1915 Touch Restaurant & Lounge (D)
305/918-6888 Blue Door at Delano (LD) Cioppino at The Ritz- La Cofradia(LD) 305/695-1121 Riverwalk Caf6 (L,D) 305/532-8003
* Acqua, 305/674-6400 Carlton, Key Biscayne (LD) 305/914-1300 Ortanique on the Mile (L,D) 305/679-3108 Tuscan Steak (D)
Four Seasons Hotel (LD) Cacao Restaurant (L.D) 305/365-4156 The Lido at The Standard (D) 305/446-7710 Santo Restaurant (D) 305/534-2233
305/381-3190 305/445-1001 Doraku (LD) 305/673-1717 Pacific Time (LD) 305/532-2882 Two Sisters (LD)
* afterglo (LD) Caffe Milano (L0D) 305/695-8383 Mark's South Beach (LD) 305/534-5979 Shula's Steak House (L,D) 305/447-6100
305/695-1717 305/532-0707 Emeril's Miami Beach (LD) 305/604-9050 Panorama Restaurant 305/820-8102 Vix (D)
* Americana Restaurant (D0) Carmen the Restaurant (D) 305/695-4550 Mendoza Miami & Lounge (L,D) Shula's Steak House at 305/779-8888
786/276-4000 305/913-1944 Escopazzo Ristorante Restaurant (L,D) 305/447-8256 The Alexander (L,D) Wish (0)
* Atrio at Centro Restaurant Italiano (I) 305/377-4442 Pascal's on Ponce (L,D) 305/341-6565 305/674-9474
The Conrad Miami (L,.) & Lounge (L,)) 305/674-9450 Neomi's Grill (D) 305/444-2024 Smith & Wollensky (L) Yuca Restaurant
305/503-6529 305/373-4627 Fifty Restaurant & 305/692-5770 Preston's at 305/673-2800 & Lounge (L.D)
* Azul (L) Chef Allen's (D) Lounge (L,D) Norman's Miami (D) The Loews (L,D) Social Miami (D) 305/532-9822
305/913-8254 305/935-2900 305/532-2441 305/446-6767 305/604-1601 786/594-3344
* Bal Harbour Bistro (L.D) Chez Walter (LD) Ginger Grove Restaurant (LD) North One 10 (LD) Red Fish Grill (D) SushiSamba droMo (LD)
305/861-4544 305/534-6300 305/779-5100 305/893-4211 305/668-8788 305/673-5337
Restaurant participation varies and is subject to change. Please visit www.MiamiRestaurantMonth.com for updates. L L d1'0:
Join Campo Viejo for complimentary wine tasting, education and more at select participating restaurants. For information on dates, times and locations visit www.MiamiRestaurantMonth.com.
Select chefs will dazzle you as they showcase their culinary skills throughout the summer at The Cellar at Macy's. Visit our website at www.MlamiRestaurantMonth.com for all the 'Spicy' details.
MIAMI SPICE RESTAURANT MONTH PRESENTED BY CAMPO VIEJO GREATER MAM Supported by:
WINES IS A MARKETING PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN THE GREATER MIAMI lVI SITORS BUREAU
CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU AND AMERICAN EXPRESS. www.MiamiandBeaches.com Southern Florida
Concierge
FROM AUGUST 1 TO SEPTEMBER 30. 2006 CHARGE YOUR PURCHASES AT PARTICIPATING MIAMI SPICE 1 \ Association
RESTA.URANST10 1THE AMlHICAN XI'PRESS' CAH)0 AND HELP FIGHT HUNGER .
Ameiskal Expriss will donate op to SS.000 to United Way of Mimi-Diaid lo fight lihiunger, lised on S.10 per
American Copoas Col parchiaso at paltcing restaurants. Donatios are not tax deductible tor Cardmemwers

M G I edu 1


lB k M t C t l Th i O D tin









40 Th Mi i Times Jul 26- 6


How many cavities do


Keeping your teeth clean


is considered important to


personal hygiene


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

When I was growing up it was
very common to hear a child
afraid of going to the dentist. They
used to tell these stories in my
neighborhood: the dentist is really
the boogeyman trying to take
away all of your teeth or the den-
tist wants to pull out your teeth so
you can't ever eat candy again.
Now I never personally believed
either one of those tall tales, but
to a child who does believe, it can
be frightening to take that first
trip to the dentist. As a result of
tall tales, they may not know that
a dentist office is actually one of
the friendliest places. It is also one
of the most important places a
child should visit throughout their
lifetime.


Everyone is born with a differ-
ent set of teeth that is their
responsibility to keep healthy and
strong. Teeth are extremely vital
in helping us intake the food that
keeps us nourished. Without
them a person would have a limit-
ed selection of the foods that give
them adequate nutrients.
Who would want that type of
restriction on their diet. Now of
course it's natural to lose our
teeth in our older stages of life.
But why should a child be forced
to live without their teeth? They
shouldn't of course, which is why
it's vital for children to learn at a
young age what a valuable asset
teeth are.
One of the most common prob-
lems a tooth can develop is a cav-
ity that occurs when a tooth
decays or breaks down. A cavity is


a hole that can grow bigger and
deeper over time. Cavities are also
called dental caries and if you
have a cavity, it's important to get
it repaired because it can cause
major destruction to all of your
teeth.
But what makes a tooth develop
a hole? The most common cause
is plaque, a sticky, slimy sub-
stance made up mostly of the
germs that cause tooth decay. The
bacteria in your mouth makes
acids, so when plaque clings to
your teeth, the acids eat away at
the outermost layer of the tooth,
called the enamel.
If you don't go to the dentist, the
acids can continue to make their
way through the enamel, and the
inside parts of your tooth can
begin to decay. If you've ever had
a toothache or heard an adult
complain about one, it may have
been because there was a cavity
that reached all the way inside a
tooth, where the nerve endings
are, which can be a major pain
and discomfort you want to live
without.
Your dentist will carefully exam-
ine your teeth and take X-rays. If


your dentist discovers a cavity, he
or she can repair it for you by first
removing the rotted part of your
tooth with a special drill. The den-
tist then fills the hole in your
tooth with a special material. It's
called a filling. Sometimes it may
hurt, but your dentist can give
you an anesthetic. That's a kind of
medicine that will numb the area
around the problem tooth while
you're getting your new filling.
Though cavities can be
repaired, try to avoid them by
taking care of your teeth. Here's
how:
Brush your teeth with fluoride
toothpaste after each meal or at
least twice a day. Bedtime is an
important time to brush.
Brush up and down in a cir-
cular motion.
Gently brush your gums as
well to keep them healthy.
Floss your teeth once a day to
remove plaque and food that's
stuck between your teeth.
Limit sweets and sugary
drinks like candy, cookies and
soda.
See your dentist twice a year
for regular checkups.


ATEZ designed to enhance development of youth


By Tiffany K. Bain
Special to The Times
During my last year of middle
school, my mom was informed
about a program called the ATEZ,
which is run by the sorors of Zeta
Mu that sponsors eighth graders.
After I joined the program, I
befriended the kids that were also
in the program and I even kept in
touch with one friend after the
program was over. When I look
back, I'd have to say that being in
the ATEZ program was one of the
highlights of eighth grade. As a
2003 Atezian (participant of the
ATEZ program), I would like for
you to learn more about the pro-
gram and encourage an eighth
grader you know to join.
ATEZ (pronounced AH-TEZ) is
an acronym that stands for
Aspiring Teens Excelling with
Zest and it's also "Zeta" spelled
backwards. The program was cre-
ated by Zeta Mu's first president,


2006 Aspiring Teens Excelling With Zest. (Top row, left to right) Frantz
Francois, Canaan Briggins, Jeloni Jones,Tavarus Armstead and Walter
Parlins, IV (Bottom row, left to right) Jonisha English, Jasmine Gibson,
Lataniece Jacobs, Norraine Washington and Aqueelah Ali.


The finance seminar teaches
Atezians about handling money
the smart and legal way and the
etiquette seminar instructs the
Atezians on the proper use of eat-


The 2006 ATEZ committee members (Top row, left to right) Sorors
Millicent Brown-Storr, Sharon Bain and Yvette Oliver. (Bottom row, left to
right) Sorors: Emily Murray, Bernadette Phillips and Shirley Walton.


Claudia Gray. "Claudia always
dreamt about a program for
young kids," explains her Soror
Millicent Brown-Storr.
"For years and years she talked
about starting a program for kids
to have something positive to do,"
Brown continued. In 1994, an
eighth grader by the name of
Perpetua "Peppie" Phillips wrote a
letter to the sorority questioning
why other sororities had special
programs for kids around their
age and they didn't. Taking this
thought into consideration, the
ATEZ Program was finally creat-
ed.
According to a written state-
ment made by Cafronia Thomas,
current President of the Alpha Pi
Chi Sorority, Inc.'s Zeta Mu
Chapter: "Our program is
designed to enhance the growth
and development of our youth in
areas of social, educational and
cultural experiences."
The sorors of this year's pro-
gram committee lined up an
incredible schedule of activities
for the Atezians. They included
health, finance and etiquette
seminars, where Atezians are
introduced and given tips about
proper hygiene, not to drink alco-
hol, not to smoke and emphasis
is placed on the importance of
abstinence.


ing utensils and how to act in a
formal or casual dinner setting.
They also attend a workshop for
tips on how to handle the peer
pressure of high school and what
classes they need to take to pre-
pare for college.
Aside from the seminars and
workshops, Atezians are required
to participate in a number of
other activities such as the
Kwanzaa celebration that takes
place in December. They also do
community service projects like
helping kindergartners with their
Christmas plays and other activi-
ties.
On top of all of this, they donate
much needed products to local
shelters and charities around
South Florida and Atezians get a
chance to visit Bethune-
Cookman College and St.
Augustine.
Atezians are required to do a
Black History Project on a person
who they consider a hero and
they participate in the Green and
White Tea where they are able to
showcase a talent to compete for
a trophy and a spot to perform at
the cotillion. The sorors of Zeta
Mu also put together a Vesper
service in which Atezians perform
special tasks given by a soror.
At the finale of the program,
Atezians participate in the cotil-


lion. The cotillion is a coming out
exercise where Atezians express
everything they accomplish as a
member of the ATEZ program.
Also during the cotillion, Atezians
are awarded a number of tro-
phies for outstanding atten-
dance, participation, Mr. or Miss
Congeniality, entrepreneurial
skills, most influential, their
Black History Projects and tal-
ents.
Canaan Briggins, 2006
Atezian, says that he would rec-
ommend that other eighth
graders become Atezians. "It was
fun because I knew that their will
always be a funny joke from
somebody." Briggins also adds "I
think this program has helped
me find myself and stick to my
dreams."


Congratulations

Ashley Victoria Waters


Ashley Victoria Waters cele-
brated her Sweet Sixteen
Birthday on July 15. Ashley is
the proud daughter of Sabrina
Waters and Thomas Bibbs;
granddaughter of the late
Chief Willie Waters and
Winifred Waters; and
Goddaughter of Lucretia Pitts
and Carl Johnson. Ashley's
royal court included: Darius
Smith as her escort,
Shalaunda Baugh, Tayana
Gibbs, Paige Humprey, Arnea
Johnson, Tasha Sneed, Nicole
Storall, Jarvis Dancy, Auriel
Hunter (Brockton, Mass.),
Napoleon Johnson, Arrington
Montgomery, Samuel
Washington Jr., Darnell


Matthew, Khambrel Johnson,
Antonio Washington, Candyce
Collins, Zakeya Chesson,
Sheneka Johnson and Torri
Waters. Ashley is in the
eleventh grade and attends
Coral Gables Senior High
School. She has a keen inter-
est in the study of Culinary
Arts and Law. Some of her
achievements include being a
part of the Zino Phi Delta
Kappa Sorority, a Sub
Debutante and a Honor Roll
student in Middle School. "I
am very proud of my daughter
and it feels good to see what
my fruits of labor have accom-
plished," says Sabrina Waters
about Ashley.


Are you sinking deeper into an ocean full of turmoil? Are you
swimming toward an unknown location? Are you fishing for
answers with unknown solutions? Are you floating towards obliv-
ion? Well I'm here to keep you afloat. With my honest and trust-
worthy advice you'll be able to get a grasp on any troubling situa-
tion sailing towards you. So e-mail me atjazz4advice@yahoo.com
with any unanswered questions, pressing concerns and important
information you wish to share with me.


Jazz,
I need some advice or rather your
feedback. I have been in a troubled rela-
tionship for a while. The guy has always
treated me like nothing. I kept taking him
back and putting up with his disrespectful
ways. Now I have met a guy that is just
wonderful. I have been seeing him for
some time now. When he first
approached me, I was like no because I
don't believe in cheating, even if it has
been done to me. I said I would give him
a call maybe once, but we ended up going
out and we have been seeing each other
ever since. It's been about two months
now. The thing is I have fallen in love with
this guy and his divorce is not final yet
and he has fallen in love with me. His
divorce is almost final and he's moving to
Virginia for his new business and he
wants me to come with him. I have never


been in a situation like this before. I need
your advice please.
Unexpected

Unexpected,
Most people believe that when you
finally come across your true love you
should take that chance or you may
never find it again. Others believe that
if you and that person were meant tobe
they would come back to you eventual-
ly. So you have been given the option of
following what you think is your true
love or hoping that he will come back to
you.
Yet with love there is always a lot at
stake so it's not very smart to jump into
it without thinking of its aftermath.
Remember that he is still a married man
and while his divorce may soon be final,
it is not over yet. Think about how.


A ttention!
The Class of 2006 has walked down the aisle to receive their
diplomas. It was a time of joy, laughter and tears since each and
everyone will be going on their separate paths in life. So if you are
interested in saying farewell to your friends, please email me your
name, school and a short farewell note. Pictures of you and your
friends are welcome to go along with your farewell note. Email me
at jazz4advice@yahoo.com or mail information to:

Jasmine Williams Teen Scene Editor
900 N.W. 54th Street Miami, Florida 33127






So it's summer vacation time, but you still don't have a clue about what
you want to do. Well, this summer each week I'll give you some things to
do to keep you entertained and relaxed. This week I'm going to list some
things you can do to make your summer more adventurous.

Have a Paintball fight with friends
Quit your job because it sucks (just kidding)
Rock climbing with adult supervision
Learn to play a new sport
Try to break a world record
Unicycle while juggling three balls
Bike ride down the steepest hill you can find
Hot-air balloon ride (in your dreams)
Make a boat and see if it floats with you in it





flame tki6 teen Jeniation

___ was born on October 31, 1990 and is a young stand-up comedian. He won BETs
comedy talent search Comin' To The Stage. He is also the host of Friday Night Slimetime on
Nickelodeon with co-host Chloe Dolandis. He was a cast member of Nickelodeon's All That and
is one of kids on Yours, Mine and Ours. Since being discovered at his elementary school in
Uttle Rock, Arkansas, he has performed at comedy clubs across the country and made an
appearance on Jay Leno's Tonight Show. He most recently guest starred on Nickelodeon's
Ned's Declassified School Survival Guide and the network is also developing a new show that
he will star in. He also made a cameo appearance in Chris Brown's music video Yo (Excuse Me
Miss). He was little Willie in the hit 2005 movie Beauty Shop starring Queen Latifah and is cur-
rently filming the movie Kidnapped.


e am y ,


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny









41, fj


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M IAMI-DADE
SMIA


Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for
the following projects will be received in the Office of the Clerk
of the Board of County Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen
P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, up to 2:00 p.m.,
Local Time, August 23, 2006. Both envelopes must be submit-
ted on this date. Bidders satisfying all requirements stated in
this Contract shall be notified to participate in the Bid Opening
activities on August 25, 2006 at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111
N.W. 1st Street, 18th Floor, where it will be publicly opened and
read aloud by the Clerk.
PROJECT NAME: The SW 157th Avenue Drainage
Improvement Project
PROJECT NUMBER: 1-70094 GOB; Contract Number
GOBQ5Q50
LOCATION: 'SW 157th Avenue between SW 42nd Street and
SW 56th Street ,....
DESCRIPTION: To construct a slab covered trench connect-
ing the canal at SW 56th Street and SW 157th Avenue, and SW
42nd Street and SW 157th Avenue. Work shall include, and not
limited to: providing comprehensive traffic control in accordance
with all federal, state, and local laws; excavation, maintenance
of traffic, drainage improvements, construction of a slab covered
trench, regrading, sodding, asphalt overlays, and pavement
restoration.
To answer any questions regarding this project, a Pre-Bid meet-
ing will be held on Tuesday August 15, 2006 at 2:00 P.M. at the
Thomas Center Building, First Floor Conference Room, 172-A
West Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33130. Specifications and
Contract Documents will be open to public inspection and may
be obtainr;d from the Contracts and Specifications Group,
Division of Recovery and Mitigation (DORM), at 172-A West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33130, Thursday July 20, 2006,
upon submitting a nonrefundable charge of $50.00 in check or
money order (No cash will be accepted) payable to the Board
of County Commis sioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida
for each set of documents.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS
REQUIRED IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:
General Building, General Engineering, Paving Engineering or
other certified categories as applicable to Chapter 10 of the
Code of Metropolitan Dade County, or State of Florida General
Contractor's License.
Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or accept-
able bid bond in the amount of five percent (5%) of the proposed
bid amount as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the
Contract, will within ten (10) consecutive work days after being
notified of the availability of the prescribed contract forms, enter
into a written contract with the Board of County Commissioners
of Miami-Dade County, Florida in accordance with the accepted
bid, and give a Contractor's Performance and Payment Bond
satisfactory to the Board of County Commissioners, Miami-Dade
County, Florida, equal to one hundred (100%) percent to the
contract award amount.

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No.'s 97-52, 97-
158, and A.O.3-22, a CSBE subcontractor goal of 15% has
been established for this project. Compliance with these
Ordinances is required for all contractors submitting a bid
for this project. See "Participation Provisions" which are
bound herein and are made part of the Specifications and
Contract Documents. Because this project is not located
within a Designated Target Area (DTA), community
Workforce Program (CWP) goals do not apply.

Please note that the Contractor will submit two envelopes: the
first envelope containing the Schedule of Intent Affidavit (SIA).
The Contractor shall also, in the second envelope, turn in the
complete bid package including pricing. Both envelopes due at
the time and bid submission date as stated in the advertisement.
The envelope with the SIA will be opened on the bid submission
date, and if the SIA is defective (see included Participations
Provisions) the bidder may be given 48 hours to rectify. At that
time (48 hours later), the approved bidders with the affirmed
SIA's will have their project pricing envelopes opened and prices
read aloud. In order to allow time for the CSBE Subcontractor
participation presentation and the review of said presentation, no
contractor may withdraw his bid for a period of up to one hundred
twenty (120) calendar days after the bid opening. Disregard
anything to the contrary within these Contract Documents.
Bidders satisfying all requirements stated in this Contract shall
be notified to participate in the Bid Opening activities at the


ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
,MI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Stephan P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, 18th Floor, where
it will be publicly opened and read aloud by the Clerk.

All bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope or container
bearing on the outside the name of the Bidder, his address, the
number of the project for which the bid is submitted, and the
date of opening. Bids will be opened promptly at the submittal
deadline. Bids received after the first bid envelope or contain-
er has been opened will not be opened or considered.
Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the Miami-Dade County Code,
as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon each RFP,
RFQ or bid after its advertisement and terminating at the time
the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the
Board on County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence pro-
hibits any communication regarding RFPs, RFQ,s or bids
between, among others:
Potentia vendors, service providers, lobbyists or consultants
and the county's professional staff including, but not lime to,
the County Manager and the County Manager's staff, the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs;
The Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs
and the bounty's professional staff including, but no limited to,
the County Manager the County Manager's staff;
^- Potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or con-
sultants, any member of the County's professional staff, the
Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any
member of the respective selection committee.

The provisions do not apply to, among other communications:

Oral communications with the staff of the Vendor Information
Center, the responsible Procurement Agent or Contracting
Officer, provided the communication is limited strictly to matters
or process or procedure already contained in the solicitation
document;
The provisions of the Cone of Silence do not apply to oral com-
munications at the proposal or pre-bid conferences, oral presen-
tations before selection committees, contract negotiation during
any duly noticed public meeting, public presentations made to
the Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed
public meeting or Board of County Commissioners unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ or bid docu-
ments.
Proposers or bidders must file a copy of any written communi-
cations with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made avail-
able to any person upon request. The County shall respond in
writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be
made available to any person upon request. Written communi-
cations may be in the form of e-mail, with a copy to the Clerk of
the Board at mailto:CLERKBCC(Sdmiamidade.aov.
In addition to any penalties provided by law, violation of the
Cone of Silence by any proposer or bidder shall render any RFP
award, RFQ award or bid award voidable. Any person having
personal knowledge of violation of these provisions shall report
such violation to the State Attorney and/or may file a complaint
with Ethics Commission. Proposers or bidders should reference
Section 2-11.1 (t) of the Miami-Dade County Code for further clar-
ification. This language is only summary of the key provisions of
the Cone of Silence. Please review Miami-Dade County
Administrative Order 3-27 for a complete and thorough descrip-
tion of the Cone of Silence. Ordinance No. 91-142, Family Leave
Ordinance; Ordinance No. 92-15, Drug-Free Workplace
Ordinance; Ordinance No. 93-129, Contractor Debarment
Ordinance; Ordinances Nos. 94-166 and 96-26 Local Preference
Ordinances; Ordinances Nos. 97-35 and 97-104 Fair
Subcontracting Practices; Resolution No. R-702-98 (Repeals
and supersedes Resolutions Nos. R-1206-97 and R-366-97)
Welfare To Work Initiative; and Ordinance No. 98-30, County
Contractors Employment and Procurement Practices; are refer-
enced for this contract document. To request a copy of any ordi-
nance, resolution and/or administrative order cited in this Bid
Solicitation, the Bidder must contact the Clerk of the Board at
(305) 375-5126.

The County reserves the right to waive any informalities in, or to
reject any or all bids. Bids from any person, firm or corporation
in default upon any agreement with the County will be rejected.
No Bidder may withdraw his bid within one hundred twenty (120)
days after date set for the opening thereof.
GEORGE M. BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK
KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:

BID NO. 05-06-096 SEGWAY HUMAN TRANSPORTERS
OPENING DATE: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, AUGUST 7, 2006

(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 7/31/06)

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement.
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.
Pete'Hernandez i
City Manager !- *
AD O ., ; N..0 .68Q$ ,. ^Im I^



CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:
BID NO. 05-06-098 RECYCLING BINS

OPENING DATE: 2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9, 2006

(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 8/2/06)

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement.
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.
Pete Hernandez
City Manager
AD NO. 15404






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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


6D The Miami Times Ju 6


.,.AD


weM I"A A










Blcs utCoto TerOw et- Te im Tms Juy 6-ugs 12067


Senior housing facility


to open in Overtown


By Brandyss Howard
bhoward@ftmiamitimesonline.com

Tuscan View Apartments, located
on the Miami River and N.W. 6th
street, held its open house on
Saturday to give a personal tour of
their community for high quality
affordable living. This complex is
solely designed for seniors aged 55
and older.
They feature amenities such as
energy-efficient HVAC systems,
cable TV, dishwashers, laundry
facilities, libraries with computers
and a controlled access parking
garage. The complex also provides


condominiums. A representative
from the apartment complex told
The Miami Times that is was so
important that the seniors in the
community were made aware of the
open house that a bus was char-
tered to transport seniors to and
from the site.
Commissioner Michelle Spence-
Jones, who actively participated in
the event, feels that Tuscan View is
a beautiful facility and believes it
can help create what was once, as
she describes, a vibrant communi-
ty. "My focus is to make sure sen-
iors in my district can qualify and
move into affordable housing," said
Spence-Jones. She pointed out that


Tuscan View apartments provides luxury accomodations at afford-
able costs.


a calendar of activities that are
designed to allow residents the
opportunity to meet their neigh-
bors.
Tuscan View has an estimated
opening date of August 15. This
Tax Credit funded program will be
renting out one through three bed-
room units from $465 to $900
monthly. Managers hope their facil-
ity will provide the community with
homes that are of a family environ-
ment. They are income restricted,
which allows residents who fall in
the lower income bracket to acquire
comfortable accommodations.
Tuscan View is also under a 50
year commitment which prohibits
them from turning their units into


there are no real pharmacies or
grocery stores in Overtown.
The Commissioner told The
Miami Times that it is her agenda to
do everything she can to make sure
that major developments like
Tuscan View truly benefit those in
the community. "By bringing more
bodies to a particular community,
more businesses will come back,"
said Spence-Jones. She has made
a personal commitment to take
action against the shortage of sen-
ior housing facilities. "They deserve
to have a good quality of living. We
need to make sure our people are
put on the list. We gotta take care
of our own first," concluded
Spence-Jones.


MIAMI-DADE
iMIA

Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for the
following project will be received in the Office of the Clerk of the
Board of County Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 N.W. 1st. Street, Miami, up to 2:00 p.m., Local Time,
Wednesday. August 23, 2006 where they will be publicly opened
and read aloud for projects that do not have an established
Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE) contract measure.
When applicable, only the names of the bids submitted will be pub-
licly opened and read aloud for those projects containing contract
measures. Bid prices will be opened and read aloud forty-eight
hours later based on the Department of Business Developments
(DBD) preliminary responsiveness review.

PROJECT NAME: Miami River Outfall Retrofit Basin 21
Drainage Improvement


PROJECT NUMBERS: 20060158

LOCATION: Miami River Outfall Retrofit, Basin 21 Drainage
Improvement Project is located in the NW Dade Area of Miami-Dade
County, Florida in Section 34, Township 53, and range 41 NW 22
Avenue and NW 11 Street Limit.

DESCRIPTION: The construction of this project will allow the
reduction of storm water runoff contaminants from Miami Basin 21;
and to discharge it through a pump station, and a series of ten (10)
drainage wells prior to final discharge into the South Fork of the
Miami River, which ultimately connects to the Miami River.

Note: The Contractor shall meet the qualifications and experience
criteria as detailed in the sub article 10.3 Certifications and
Experience Requirements of the Special Provisions.

A Pre-Bid Conference to answer any questions regarding this proj-
ect will be held on Friday. August 04. 2006 at 10:00 a.m. in the 15th
floor Front Conference Room, of the Stephen P. Clark Center locat-
ed at 111 N.W. 1st Street.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS
REQUIRED IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:
General Building, General Engineering, Paving Engineering or other
categories as applicable to Chapter 10 of the Code of Miami-Dade
County.

Specifications and Contract Documents are open to public inspec
tion and may be obtained from the Contracts and Specifications
Section, Public Works Department, Telephone No. (305) 375-2930
at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami,
Florida 33128-1970 upon a non-refundable deposit of $50.00 in
check or money order payable to the Board of County Commis sion-
ers of Miami-Dade County, Florida for each set of documents.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (CSBE)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No.'s 97-52 and 97-
158; A.O.3-22, a 3% CSBE SUBCONTRACTOR GOAL has been
established for this project. Compliance with these Ordinances
is required for all contractors submitting a bid for this project.
See Appendix "A" of the CSBE Participation Provisions which
are bound herein and are made part of the Specifications and
Contract Documents.

In order to allow time for the CSBE Subcontractor participation
presentation and the review of said presentation, no Contractor
may withdraw his bid for a period of up to one hundred twenty
(120) calendar days after the bid opening. Disregard anything
to the contrary within these Contract Documents.

Bidders must submit a completed Schedule of Intent Affidavit
form (FORM DBD 400) to the person or office to whom the bid
was submitted on the bid submittal due date. Defective
Schedule of Intent (SOIl Affidavits that are incomplete or inac-
curate upon notification by the Department of Business
Development (DBD), bidders may correct defects that exist on
the SOI Affidavits within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submis-
sion. Failure to submit the required SOI Affidavit or commit-
ment letter at the time of bid submission shall render the bid
non-responsive. Examples of defects include, but are not lim-
ited to improperly executed letters, the listing of an unidentifi-
able CSBE and percentage miscalculations that are not mere
clerical errors apparent on the face of the SOI Affidavit.
Bidders who fail to submit the SOI Affidavit shall be considered
non-responsive.

Please note that the Contractor must submit two separately labeled
and sealed envelopes with the completed bid package. The first
envelope (Envelope "A") will contain the above mentioned SOI
Affidavit and the second envelope (Envelope "B") will contain the bid
price. Both envelopes are due at the time and bid date specified in
the advertisement. Envelope "A" will be opened on the bid opening
date and reviewed by DBD. If the SOI Affidavit contains correctible
defects (See attached CSBE Participation Provisions), the bidder
will be notified by DBD and afforded forty-eight hours to rectify any
correctible deficiencies. Forty-eight hours later, DBD will notify
Public Works of those approved bidders whose SOI's Affidavits are
responsive. Those deemed responsive will have Envelope "B"
opened and prices read aloud.

Community Workforce Program (CWP)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No. 03-01, put into
force by Resolution No. R-77-03, the Community Workforce
Program has been established for this project. Compliance with
this Ordinance is required for all contractors submitting a bid for this
project. See Appendix "D" within these contract documents for
information and requirements regarding this program.

Bid Bond Requirements

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or accept
able bid bond in the amount of five percent (5%) of the pro-
posed bid amount as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the
Contract, will within ten (10) consecutive work days after being
notified of the availability of the prescribed contract forms, enter
into a written contract with the Board of County Commissioners of
Miami-Dade County, Florida in accor dance with the accepted bid,
and give a Contractor's Performance and Payment bond satis fac-
tory to the Board of County Commission ers, Miami-Dade County,
Florida, equal to one hundred (100%) percent of the contract
award amount.

Performance Bond Requirements

Simultaneously with the return of the executed Contract
Documents, the Contractor will be required to submit a


Contractor's Performance and Payment Bond, either Cash or
Surety, satisfactory to the Board of Commissioners, Miami-
Dade County Florida, equal to One Hundred (100%) percent of
the awarded amount, as security for the faithful performance
of the terms and conditions stated herein, including but not
limited to, any extended maintenance obligations.

For the work specified herein, the Contractor shall protect the
County against losses resulting from latent defects in materials
and improper performance in all work including the electrical mate-
rials and equipment required for the traffic signalization system, as


ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
kMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

well as requirements for the "ninety (90) day burn-in period"
(including maintenance).

ORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONS and/or ADMINISTRATIVE
ORDERS

To request a copy of any ordinance, resolution and/or admin-
istrative order cited in this bid solicitation, the bidder must
contact the Clerk of the Board at 305-375-5126.

CONE OF SILENCE: Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the County
Code and Administrative Order 3-27 ("Cone of Silence
Provisions"), as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon
RFPs, RFQs, or bids after advertisement and terminates at the
time the County Manager issues a written recommendation to the
Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits
communication regarding RFPs, RFQs, or bids between: A)
potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consult-
ants and the County's professional staff including, but not limited
to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff; B) a
potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant
and the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs;
C) the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and
any member of the County's professional staff including, but not
limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff; D)
a potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant
and any member of the selection committee therefore; E) the
Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and mem-
ber of the selection committee therefore; F) any member of the
County's professional staff and any member of the selection com-
mittee therefore.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-
27, as amended, permits oral communications regarding a partic-
ular RFP, RFQ or bid for solicitation of goods or services between
any person and the procurement officer responsible for administer-
ing the procurement process for such RFP, RFQ, or bid, provided
that the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or
procedure already contained in the corresponding solicitation doc-
ument.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral commu-
nications at pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before
selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly
noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the
Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed
public meeting, or communications in writing at any time
unless specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or
bid document. Bidders must file a copy of any written com-
munications with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made
available to any person upon request.

Written communications may be submitted via e-mail to the
Clerk of the Board at CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV. The
County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk
of the Board, which shall be made available to any person
upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the
Cone of Silence Provisions by any proposer and bidder shall ren-
der any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any per-
son having personal knowledge of a violation of the Cone of
Silence provisions shall report such violation to the State Attorney
and/ or may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders
should reference the actual Cone of Silence Provisions for further
clarification.

All Bidders will be notified in writing when the County Manager
makes an award recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners.

Ordinance No. 90-143, The Responsible Wages and Benefits Ordi
nance, Ordinance No. 91-142, Family Leave Ordinance, Ordi
nance No. 92-15, Drug-Free Workplace Ordinance, Ordinance No.
93-129, Contractor Debarment Ordinance, Ordinances Nos. 94-
166 and 96-26 Local Prefer ence Ordinances, Ordinances Nos.
97-35 and 97-104 Fair Subcontract ing Practices, Resolution No.
R-702-98 (Repeals and supersedes Resolutions Nos. R-1206-97
and R-366-97) Welfare to Work Initiative and Ordinance No. 98-30,
County Contractors Employment and Procure ment Practices are
referenced for this contract document.

NOTE: Ordinance 97-104 requires a bid or proposal for a
County or Public Health Trust contract involving the expendi-
ture of $100,000.00 or more to include a listing of subcontrac-
tors and suppliers who will be used on the contract. Failure to
include the required listing shall render the bid or proposal
non-responsive.

The required listing must be submitted even though the bid-
der or proposer will not utilize subcontractors or suppliers on
the contract. In the latter case, the listing must expressly
state no subcontractors or suppliers will be used on the con-
tract.

Timely submission of a properly completed and signed
"Subcontractor/Supplier Listing, SUB Form 100" (a copy of
which is included in the specifications) constitutes compli-
ance with the listing requirements of the Ordinance. In order
to be deemed properly completed the word "NONE" must be
entered under the appropriate heading of SUB Form 100 if no
subcontractors or suppliers will be used on the contract.

The County shall have the right but not the obligation to retain
the services of an Independent Private-Sector Inspector
General (IPSIG).

The requirements are set forth in the Instructions to Prospective
Contractor, Appendix "A", Paragraph 22. Also, the Contract is
subject to review and audit by the Office of the Miami-Dade
County Inspector General and further information is specified in
the Instructions to Prospective Contractor, Appendix "A",
Paragraph 21.

All bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the out-
side the name of the Bidder, his address, the number of the project
for which the bid is submitted, and the date of opening.

The County reserves the right to waive any informality in, or to reject
any or all bids. Bids from any person, firm or corpo ration in default
upon any agreement with the County will be rejected.

Vendor applications and solicitation packages for Invitations to Bid
(ITB), Request for Proposals (RFP) and Architectural and


Engineering (A&E) projects can be obtained on the 13th floor of the
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, in the Vendor
Assistance Unit. The VIC will provide information and assistance in
doing business with Miami-Dade County, vendor registration and cer-
tification, and current contracting opportunities countywide. Vendor
Assistance staff can be reached by phone at 305-375-5773 or on the
web at www.miamidade.gov/dpm/vendor-enrollment.asp.

GEORGE M. BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER
COUNTY

HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK
KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK


Miami-Dade County Public Schools

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS


MDCPS
STATE SCHOOL E-1
NORTH MIAMI EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX

Suffolk Construction Company, Inc.
515 North Flagler Drive, 5th Floor
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Shane Tedder or John Bruer
T: 561-832-1616
F: 561-832-6775

Suffolk Construction Company, Inc., Construction Manager, will receive
sealed bids at the above address for Phase III "100% CDs"(Structural &
Civil) 50% CDs for (Architectural and MEP): for the Miami-Dade County
Public Schools Project No. 00253000, on or before 2:00 pm on Friday,
August 25, 2006.

This is a school for grades K-8 of approximately 169,000 square feet of tilt-
wall, precast, and steel construction. Two 3-story classroom buildings, a 2-
story administration building, a 1-story kitchen/cafeteria/arts building and a
PE building. The site is approximately 6 acres located at the ball field area
of the existing Miami Senior High School on NE 135th Street in North Miami.

Drawings and specifications are available through Suffolk Construction
Company, Inc. (please fax request for drawings)

There will be a pre-bid meeting at the Suffolk Miami Office* on Tuesday,
August 15, 2006 at 2:00 pm. *80 SW 8th Street, Suite 2710, Miami, FL
33130 Phone: 305-374-1107

Suffolk Construction Company, Inc. is committed to affirmatively ensuring a
substantial increase in the awarding of construction subcontracts to con-
tractors and vendors who meet the criteria of the Miami-Dade County Public
Schools Minority/Women Business Enterprises. The M/WBE participation
goal is 18% African American and 6% Woman Owned Businesses for this
project.


I


The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006 7D


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny











8A Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


1 -













"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"













*


Huggins Bail Bond
We won't fail you, when its
time to bail you!
State, Federal, Immigration.
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954-894-4007 24hr
07/214


Daryl's Banquet Hall
All occasions, weddings, parties,
etc. 1290 All Baba
(West of 27th Ave.) Limo Rentals
305-622-3361
305-796-9558



Rozalyn H. Paschal, MD
Infant, Child, Teen
Northside Shopping Center
305-758-0591
Parkway 305-652-6095
Plantation 954-880-8399


Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for kitchens
and bathrooms at affordable prices.
14140 NW 22nd Ave.
305-685-3565


Home Remodeling &
Construction Experts
We do it ALL!
Free estimates. We finance
Good/Bad credit.
305-636-0990


Southeastern
Roofing & Painting
General Home Repairs.
Repair Any Roofs. Financing
305-694-9405 or
786-326-0482


1st & 2nd Mortgages
No credit check. No income
verification. Foreclosures &
bankruptcy O.K. 24 HR Service
305-385-9836
101(3


Faith Financial Group
Purchase, Refinance
100% Financing, FHA, VA Loans
Home, Business Land
Roy Freeman, Broker
305-510-4201




City Kids Clothes
Shirts $3.99 Pants $7.99
Skorts $4.99- Jumpers $4.99
Mall of the America
Near Old Navy
305-815-6761
1112''


MIAMI-DADE
MIA

Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for the
following project will be received in the Office of the Clerk of the
Board of County Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 N.W. 1st. Street, Miami, up to 2:00 p.m., Local Time,
Wednesday, August 16, 2006 where they will be publicly opened
and read aloud for projects that do not have an established
Community Small Business Enterprise (CSBE) contract measure.
When applicable, only the names of the bids submitted will be pub-
licly opened and read aloud for those projects containing contract
measures. Bid prices will be opened and read aloud forty-eight
hours later based on the Department of Business Developments
(DBD) preliminary responsiveness review.

PROJECT NAME: Reversible Lane Control Signal System
Improvement

PROJECT NUMBERS: 20060042

LOCATION: NW 199th street from NW 2nd Avenue to NW 27th
Avenue

DESCRIPTION: This contract consists of the removal and replace-
ment of the existing Reversible Lane Control System (RLCS) signals
and signs, wiring, and control equipment at each gantry and
installing new Light Emitting Diode (LED) Lane Control Signals and
Blank-out Message Signs. The Contractor will install communica-
tions equipment and shall configure, integrate, and test the equip-
ment to provide a fully functional RLCS.

A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference to answer any questions regarding
this project will be held on Tuesday. August 1 2006 at 10:00 a.m. in
the 15th floor Front Conference Room, of the Stephen P. Clark
Center located at 111 N.W. 1st Street.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS
REQUIRED IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES:
Electrical Contractor or other categories as applicable to Chapter 10
of the Code of Miami-Dade County.

Specifications and Contract Documents are open to public inspec-
tion and may be obtained from the Contracts and Specifications
Section, Public Works Department, Telephone No. (305) 375-2930
at Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami,
Florida 33128-1970 upon a non-refundable deposit of $50.00 in
check or money order payable to the Board of County Commis sion-
ers of Miami-Dade County, Florida for eabh set of documents.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (CSBE) (Not
Applicable)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No.'s 97-52 and 97-
158; A.O.3-22, a CSBE contract measure recommendation of
No Measure has been established for this project. Compliance
with these Ordinances is required for all contractors submitting
a bid for this project. See Appendix "A" of the CSBE
Participation Provisions, which are bound herein and are made
part of the Specifications and Contract Documents.

In order to allow time for the CSBE Subcontractor participation
presentation and the review of said presentation, no Contractor
may withdraw his bid for a period of up to one hundred twenty
(120) calendar days after the bid opening. Disregard anything
to the contrary within these Contract Documents.

Bidders must submit a completed Schedule of Intent Affidavit
form (FORM DBD 400) to the person or office to whom the bid
was submitted on the bid submittal due date. Defective
Schedule of Intent (SOfI Affidavits that are incomplete or inac-
curate upon notification by the Department of Business
Development (DBD), bidders may correct defects that exist on
the SOI Affidavits within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submis-
sion. Failure to submit the required SOI Affidavit or commit-
ment letter at the time of bid submission shall render the bid
non-responsive. Examples of defects include, but are not lim-
ited to improperly executed letters, the listing of an unidentifi-
able CSBE and percentage miscalculations that are not mere
clerical errors apparent on the face of the SOI Affidavit.
Bidders who fail to submit the SOI Affidavit shall be considered
non-responsive.

Please note that the Contractor must submit two separately
labeled and sealed envelopes with thecompleted bid package.
The first envelope (Envelope "A") will contain the above men-
tioned SOI Affidavit and the second envelope (Envelope "B")
will contain the bid price. Both envelopes are due at the time
and bid date specified in the advertisement. Envelope "A" will
be opened on the bid opening date and reviewed by DBD. If
the SOI Affidavit contains correctible defects (See attached
CSBE Participation Provisions), the bidder will be notified by
DBD and afforded forty-eight hours to rectify any correctible
deficiencies. Forty-eight hours later, DBD will notify Public
Works of those approved bidders whose SOI's Affidavits are
responsive. Those deemed responsive will have Envelope "B"
opened and prices read aloud.

Community Workforce Program (CWP) (Applicable)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No. 03-01, put.into force
by Resolution No. R-77-03, the Community Workforce Program
(CWP) is applicable 'to this project. A 10% CWP Goal is estab-
lished. Compliance with this Ordinance is required for all contrac-
tors submitting a bid for this project. See Appendix "D" within these
contract documents for information and requirements regarding this
program.

Bid Bond Requirements

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or accept able
bid bond in the amount of five percent (5%) of the proposed bid
amount as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will
within ten (10) consecutive work days after being notified of the avail-
ability of the prescribed contract forms, enter into a written contract
with the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County,
Florida in accor dance with the accepted bid, and give a Contractor's
Performance and Payment bond satis factory to the Board of County
Commission ers, Miami-Dade County, Florida, equal to one hun-
dred (100%) percent of the contract award amount.

Performance Bond Requirements

Simultaneously with the return of the executed Contract
Documents, the Contractor will be required to submit a
Contractor's Performance and Payment Bond, either Cash or
Surety, satisfactory to the Board of Commissioners, Miami-
Dade County Florida, equal to One Hundred (100%) percent of
the awarded amount, as security for the faithful performance


of the terms and conditions stated herein, including but not
limited to, any extended maintenance obligations.

ORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONS and/or ADMINISTRATIVE
ORDERS

To request a copy of any ordinance, resolution and/or admin-
istrative order cited in this bid solicitation, the bidder must
contact the Clerk of the Board at 305-375-5126.

Bidders are advised that proceeds from the Charter County

t f


ADVERTISEMENT
FOR BIDS
kMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

Transit System Sales Surtax levied pursuant to Section 29.121
of the Code of Miami-Dade County may be used to pay for all
or some part of the cost of this contract, no award of this con-
tract shall be effective and thereby give rise to a contractual
relationship with the County unless and until the following
have occurred: 1) the County Commission awards the con-
tract, and such award becomes final (either by expiration of 10
days after such award without veto by the Mayor, or by
Commission override of a veto); and 2) either i) the Citizens'
Independent Transportation Trust (CITT) has approved same,
or ii) in response to the CITT's disapproval, the County
Commission re-affirms its award by two-thirds (2/3) vote of the
Commission's membership and such reaffirmation becomes
final.

CONE OF SILENCE: Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the County
Code and Administrative Order 3-27 ("Cone of Silence Provisions"),
as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs, or
bids after advertisement and terminates at the time the County
Manager issues a written recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits communication
regarding RFPs, RFQs, or bids between: A) potential vendors,
service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the
County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County
Manager and the County Manager's staff; B) a potential vendor,
service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs; C) the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member
of the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the
County Manager and the County Manager's staff; D) a potential
vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and any
member of the selection committee therefore; E) the Mayor, County
Commissioners or their respective staffs and member of the selec-
tion committee therefore; F) any member of the County's profes-
sional staff and any member of the selection committee therefore.

Section 2.11.1 (t) of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-27,
as amended, permits oral communications regarding a particular
RFP, RFQ or bid for solicitation of goods or services between any
person and the procurement officer responsible for administering
the procurement process for such RFP, RFQ, or bid, provided that
the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or proce-
dure already contained in the corresponding solicitation document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral communi-
cations at pre-bid conferences, oral presentations before
selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly
noticed public meetings, public presentations made to the
Board of County Commissioners during any duly noticed pub-
lic meeting, or communications in writing at any time unless
specifically prohibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid doc-
ument. Bidders must file a copy of any written communica-
tions with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made avail-
able to any person upon request.

Written communications may be submitted via e-mail to the
Clerk of the Board at CLERKBCC@MIAMIDADE.GOV. The
County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk
of the Board, which shall be made available to any person
upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the
Cone of Silence Provisions by any proposer and bidder shall render
any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person
having personal knowledge of a violation of the Cone of Silence
provisions shall report such violation to the State Attorney and/ Or
may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders should
reference the actual Cone of Silence Provisions for further clarifica-
tion.

All Bidders will be notified in writing when the County Manager
makes an award recommendation to the Board of County
Commissioners.

Ordinance No. 90-143, The Responsible Wages and Benefits Ordi
nance, Ordinance No. 91-142, Family Leave Ordinance, Ordi
nance No. 92-15, Drug-Free Workplace Ordinance, Ordinance No.
93-129, Contractor Debarment Ordinance, Ordinances Nos. 94-166
and 96-26 Local Prefer ence Ordinances, Ordinances Nos. 97-35
and 97-104 Fair Subcontract ing Practices, Resolution No. R-702-
98 (Repeals and supersedes Resolutions Nos. R-1206-97 and R-
366-97) Welfare to Work Initiative and Ordinance No. 98-30,
County Contractors Employment and Procure ment Practices are
referenced for this contract document.

NOTE: Ordinance 97-104 requires a bid or proposal for a
County or Public Health Trust contract involving the expendi-
ture of $100,000.00 or more to include a listing of subcontrac-
tors and suppliers who will be used on the contract. Failure to
include the required listing shall render the bid or proposal
non-responsive.

The required listing must be submitted even though the bidder
or proposer will not utilize subcontractors or suppliers on the
contract. In the latter case, the listing must expressly state no
subcontractors or suppliers will be used on the contract.

Timely submission of a properly completed and signed
"Subcontractor/Supplier Listing, SUB Form 100" (a copy of
which is included in the specifications) constitutes compli-
ance with the listing requirements of the Ordinance. In order
to be deemed properly completed the word "NONE" must be
entered under the appropriate heading of SUB Form 100 if no
subcontractors or suppliers will be used on the contract.

The County shall have the right but not the obligation to retain
the services of an Independent Private-Sector Inspector
General (IPSIG). The requirements are set forth in the
Instructions to Prospective Contractor, Appendix "A",
Paragraph 22. Also, the Contract is subject to review and
audit by the Office of the Miami-Dade County Inspector
General and further information is specified in the Instructions
to Prospective Contractor, Appendix "A", Paragraph 21.

All bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the out-
side the name of the Bidder, his address, the number of the project
for which the bid is submitted, and the date of opening.

The County reserves the right to waive any informality in, or to reject
any or all bids. Bids from any person, firm or corpo ration in default
upon any agreement with the County will be rejected.

Vendor applications and solicitation packages for Invitations to Bid
(ITB), Request for Proposals (RFP) and Architectural and


Engineering (A&E) projects can be obtained on the 13th floor of the
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, in the Vendor
Assistance Unit. The VIC will provide information and assistance
in doing business with Miami-Dade County, vendor registration and
certification, and current contracting opportunities countywide.
Vendor Assistance staff can be reached by phone at 305-375-5773
or on the web at www.miamidade.gov/dpm/vendor-enrollment.asp.

GEORGE M. BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK
KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK


NOTICE OF BUDGET PUBLIC HEARING

The School Board of Miami-Dade County will conduct the first Public
Hearing on the proposed 2006-07 budget and property tax millage rate on
August 2, 2006. Information regarding the proposed millage rates, tentative
budget all funds, and the historical summary of financial and demograph-
ic data will be advertised prior o the final budget public hearing in this news-
paper in September 2006.

All concerned citizens are invited to the public hearing to be held on August
2, 2006 at 5:01 p.m. at the Board Auditorium, Miami-Dade County School
Board Administrative Building, 1450 N.E. Second Avenue, Miami, Florida.

A DECISION on the proposed millage rates, capital outlay taxes and the
budget will be made at this meeting.


DADE


MIAMI-
=19


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),
from our Website: www.miamidade.aov/dpm. Vendors may choose to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


8D The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006









Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Frazier VP of Orange Bowl Committee


The Orange Bowl
Committee (OBC), host
organization of the annual
FedEx Orange Bowl and
historic Orange Bowl
Festival, has announced
the promotion of Luin A.
Frazier to Vice President of
Business Development and
Special Projects. Frazier
previously served as the
organization's Director of
Business Development and
was the OBC's Ticket Sales
Manager for six years. He
has been with the organi-
zation since 1998.
Frazier, 30, has been
instrumental in the organi-
zation's implementation of
the acclaimed Orange Bowl
Youth Football League
(OBYFL) as well as several
new Orange Bowl Festival
events and marketing cam-


paigns during his eight-
years with the Committee.
Among the marketing con-
cepts introduced during
his tenure was the bowl-
related "Patch" program,
which invigorated the bowl
industry's ability to market
their individual trademark
in new and innovative
ways.
Entering his ninth year
at the OBC, Frazier, a
North Miami Beach Senior
High School and University
of Miami graduate, will
oversee the organization's
business development ini-
tiatives, major revenue gen-
erating initiatives and
strategic plans regarding
the organization's short and
long-term business devel-
opment goals. He will also
be the driving force in con-


/

Luin A. Frazier

tinuing the prosperity of the
OBYFL as it enters its
eighth season in 2006.
Most recently, Frazier
managed the OBC's efforts
in business development,
merchandise and licensing,
youth sports, pre-game


and half-time shows at the
FedEx Orange Bowl. Prior
to his role as Director of
Business Development,
Frazier served as the orga-
nization's Ticket Sales
Manager from September
2000 through April 2005.
His first interaction at the
OBC came in September
1998 when he served as a
Volunteer Assistant in the
marketing department.
His hard work and dedica-
tion were quickly recog-
nized and he was named
Marketing and Promotions
Assistantship in June
1999.
Frazier graduated in 1998
with a Bachelor of Business
Administration from the
University of Miami, with a
Major in Finance and Minor
Sports Management.


The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006 9D















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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


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Miamian added to Smiley Institute


WILLIAMS
continued from 5D

16 states the unique A7MQT1M
Life Management Method she
developed during her 25 years
of experience counseling high
school and college students.
Vonda Paige, Program
Manager for the Smiley
Foundation said "So many
individuals contacted us about


speaking, but we deliberately
chose those whom we believe
have an undeniable love for
empowering young people."
Williams said, "The Smiley
Foundation's determination to
prepare the next generation of
leaders is rare and unmatched.
This is the most comprehen-
sive, rock solid effort I am
aware of that sincerely teaches
students the core competen-


cies required for effective lead-
ership and gives them an
opportunity to put them into
action. It is truly an honor to
have been invited to teach."
For more information on the
College Life Skills Course
schedule or the College FAQ
Book visit www.hiddencur-
riculum.com, e-mail hidden-
curriculum@)aol.com or call
305-691-1331.


Orr honored with Sojourner Truth Award


AWARD
continued from 5D

women business
owners and profes-
sionals. NANBPWC
provides opportuni-
ties for women
through its national
leadership, regional
districts and local
clubs.
For more informa-
tion, visit
www.nanbpwc.org.
BrightStar Credit
Union is a non-profit,
member-owned coop-
erative with more
than 37,000 members
in South Florida. With
a total of six branch


locations in Broward including checking
County, BrightStar and savings accounts,
offers a variety of personal, home equity
financial services and mortgage loans


and investments and
insurance. For more
information, visit
www.bscu.org.


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FDIC


MIAMI-DADE


CANCELLATION NOTICE

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

PROJECT NAME: Dual Taxiway and Fuel Valve Pit Relocation
PROJECT NO.: MDAD No. K-150A
You are hereby notified that the Invitation to Bid the Dual Taxiway and Fuel Valve Pit
Relocation project for the Miami International Airport, MDAD Project No. K-150A, has
been cancelled until further notice.


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA

2007 FISCAL BUDGET WORKSHOP

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

The 2007 Fiscal Year Budget Workshop will be held Monday July 31, 2006,
starting at 2:30 pm, by the Commission of the City of Miami, Florida, in the
City Commission Chambers located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive,
Miami, Florida. Along with the traditional first look at the forecast for the
upcoming fiscal year, the City of Miami Finance Department will also be pre-
senting the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR).

All interested persons are invited to attend. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommo-
dations to participate in this proceeding may contact the Office of the City
Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two (2) business days prior to
the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no later than three (3) business
days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15754) City Clerk


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Miami-Dade County Public Schools


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY,
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132


FLORIDA


Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designated
date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School Board
Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the date des-
ignated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the DIVISION OF
PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or Room 351, address
above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the Friday preceding the
scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School Board meetings will be
available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday following the meetings. The
Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from issuance of
a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board Rule 6Gx13-8C-
1.212 apply."
"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School Board.
Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule 6Gx13-3C-1.11,
shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."

Bid Number Opening Title Pre-Bid Conference
Download Date Addendums
135-FF07 8/15/2006 Vehicle Towing
128-FF11 8/8/2006 Multifunctional Devices, Copying
Equipment, Services and supplies

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT
MASTER PLAN FOR THE EXPANSION OF THE COURTROOMS
AND ADMINISTRATION FACILITIES
OCI PROJECT NO. A05-GSA-06GOB

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, and
Chapter 2, Sections 2-8.1 (as amended by Ordinance 05-15), and 2-10.4 of the Miami-Dade County
Code and Administrative Order 3-39, professional architectural services will be required for the
Administrative Office of the Courts for the master plan for the expansion of courtrooms and administra-
tion facilities for the Miami-Dade's Eleventh Judicial Circuit Court.

Proposers are advised that the consultant selected for this solicitation will not be eligible to ren-
der services under a design contract executed pursuant to the study.

Professional services will be required from a qualified consultant to provide an assessment study of the
Eleventh Judicial Circuit-wide Courts Master Plan in order to assess future needs and provide design
standards for the expansion of court facilities for Miami-Dade County's Eleventh Judicial Circuit Court
which may include an annex facility adjacent to the Richard E. Gerstein Justice Building located at 1351
NW 12 Street and the creation of a new West Dade Regional Courthouse facility (site unknown at this
time), Miami-Dade County Courthouse, 73 West Flagler Street, Joseph Caleb Center Facility, 5400
N.W. 22 Avenue, North (15555 Biscayne Boulevard) and South Dade (10750 SW 211 Street) Justice
Center, Coral Gables Branch Court, 3100 Ponce de Leon, Miami Beach Branch Court, 1130
Washington Avenue, and the Child Support Enforcement Unit, 100 Biscayne Boulevard. The services
will include planning, analysis, master planning, feasibility studies, programming, site development
analysis and cost estimating. The consultant will compile information that is necessary to determine: 1)
need for expansion of the facility; 2) the type, frequency, and intensity of interaction with the courtroom
environment; 3) the number of staff directly involved with the courtroom environment; 4) the type of
space and important functional adjacencies that support an agency's relationship to the courtroom envi-
ronment. The consultant will be assessing the basic organizational structure; staff numbers and func-
tions; ratio of staff to court judges; and type and level of interaction with the court facilities and spatial
implications of the court facilities for the type of space required (offices, training capability, etc.); public
versus private spaces (waiting areas, courtroom related spaces); and functional relationships with other
components of the Courts.

One Consultant will be retained under a non-exclusive Professional Services Agreement for an effec-
tive term of two years.

EXPERIENCE AND QUALIFICATIONS:

The prime consultant must demonstrate experience in the below listed areas

(1) A minimum of three (3) Court Facility Design/Programming Projects, completed within the last ten
(10) years from the date of this solicitation.
2) Must demonstrate experience in needs assessment for a large court facility complex (minimum
125,000 square feet).

The above expertise must be met by a qualified individual(s) of the prime consultant's firm. The experi-
ence must be demonstrated by direct or substantial involvement of the individual(s) in a supervisory
capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects. The determination of the individual's
qualifications and compliance with the above experience and qualifications shall be at the sole discre-
tion of the County.

The Competitive Selection Committee will not evaluate proposals from firms that they deter-
mined failed to meet the above experience and qualifications.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

14.00 Architecture (PRIME)

A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provi-
sions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering
Unit located at 111 NW 1St Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respec-
tively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded elec-
tronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail
address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-
line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notifi-
cation. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-
dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Faith Samuels who may be contacted via e-mail at
fty@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-2774.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

NO MEASURES

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on July 25, 2006, at 2:00 P.M. in
Conference Room 18-2, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to
attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is August 9, 2006 at 11:00 A.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27
for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10D The Miami Times J 6


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The Miami Times, July 26-August 1, 2006 11D


s kcalB Must Control y


To Place Your Ad
Call: 305-694-6225


Unfurnished Rooms
BROWNSVILLE and
LIBERTY CITY AREAS
$100 -$125 weekly.
Call 786-287-2942
Furnished Rooms I
1031 NW 197th Terrace
One bedroom
Call Linton at 305-652-4763
1721 NW 41 Street
One room furnished with air,
cable and appliances. $125
each week. $375 to move in.
Call 786-487-2222.
1845 NW 50th Street
$120 weekly, with air, $240
to move in.
Call 786-317-2104 or
786-286-7455
2136B N.W. 43rd Street
$550 to move in. $350 a
month. Call 305-637-9359 or
786-355-4370
2900 N.W. 54 Street
One room, carpeted, refriger-
ator and air. No smoking in
the building. Call 954-885-
8583 or 954-275-9503.
4220 N.W. 22 Court
$80 weekly, kitchen, one per-
son. Call 305-691-3486
5550 N.W. 9th Avenue
Comfortable room.
$125 weekly 305-694-9405
or
786-326-0482.
6257 NW 18 Avenue
S Rooms with air $350 to move
in. $130 per week. For more
info Call Big-E 305-305-
0597.
720 N.W. 75th Street
Rooms in castle style
mansion. Mansion has
waterfall, marble platform, 7
ft. lion statues in front of the
castle. Free lights, water and
parking. Cable is provided.
Near bus line..
Call 786-223-5374
8275 N. W. 18 Avenue
References 305-754-7776
CAROL CITY AREA
Clean room with central air in
quiet home with your own
entrance.
Call 305-628-3029
HALLANDALE AREA
Kitchen and bathroom ac-
cess. $225 bi-weekly.
Call 954-454-6645
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Air, cable. $130 weekly. $390
to move in. 786-308-5024.
NORTHWEST AREA
Northwest 62 Street and First
avenue. $600 to move in
.$400 monthly and $200 se-
curity.. Call 305-989-8824.

S Efficiencies
515 NE 150th Street # 3
Huge enough for two people.
$650 includes water.
Call 954-437-8034 Gloria
86 Street NE 2nd Ave Area
Efficiency, References
305-754-7776
CAROL CITY AREA
Private entry, utilities includ-
ed, $585 monthly, first and
last required.
4915 N.W. 182nd Street
Call 305-308-0223
between 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
MIAMI GARDENS
Excellent Efficiency, all uti-
lizes included, free cable.
First, last and security. $800
monthly. Call 305-654-2894.
Apartments
101 N.E. 78th Street
Two and three bedrooms,
one bath, $850 and $875
monthly, with parking. Sec-
tion 8 welcome!!
Call 786-326-7424
1110 Sesame Street
Opa-Locka Area
One bedroom, one bath in
quiet area. $675 monthly
Call: 954-805-3233
13880 N.E. 6th Avenue
Nice and cozy one bedroom
with air, tile floors and appli-
ances. $750 monthly! $2250
move-in.
Call 305-769-3740

14460 N.W. 22nd Avenue
NEWLY RENOVATED
One bedroom, one bath,
$550 stove, refrigerator,
air.
305-687-2433/
305-642-7080
1490 N.W. 38 Street
One bedroom one bath stove
refrigerator air and water
$650 monthly $1150 moves
you in.
Call David 786-258-3984
1948 NW 2nd Court
One bedroom, one bath with
appliances. $420 monthly!
Call 305-607-7182
2015 NW 151st Street
One bedroom, one
bath,clean, easy move in.
Section 8. O.K. $630 month-
ly, includes water.
Call: 786-277-7028

2950 NW 64th Street #U
Upstairs, super large, newly
renovated, three bedrooms,


one bath, $985 monthly plus
security. Ready now! SEC-
TION 8 WELCOME!
Call 305-610-7051
3186 NW 135th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly 954-704-0094


3330 NW 48th Terrace
Totally remodeled, one bed-
room, one bath in nice quiet
area. All appliances included.
$500 monthly $1500 to move
in. MUST SEE! Call Mr. Cruz
305-213-5013
430 NW 203 Street
Three bedrooms, two and a
half baths, $1800 monthly,
and security.
954-704-0094.
48 NW 77th Street
Large one bedroom. $550
monthly. $1500 to move in.
Call 305-753-7738.
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$510-520 per month, one
bedrooms, $410 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
750 NW 56th Street
Senior Housing Available
One and two bedrooms from
$600 a month. NO PRIOR
EVICTIONS. Proof of income
required. Call 786-290-0707.
7619 N.E. 3 Court
One large bedroom, $575
monthly. 786-286-2540
77 NW 77th Street
Two bedrooms, one and half
bath. $900 monthly. Section
8 OK!
Call 786-306-4505
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $420-$495 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
Capital Rental Agency.
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa-locka, Brownsville,
Apartments, Duplexes,
Houses Efficiencies, one,
two and three bedrooms,
Many with appliances.
Same day approval.
Call for information

Downtown/Biscayne Area
One bedroom, one bath,
safe, clean, new kitchen and
tile, fresh paint, secured with
parking. $595-$650 monthly.
1315 N.E. Miami Court.
786-351-4516

Eighth Street
Apartments
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One and a half months
Efficiency, one bath, $365;
One bedroom, one bath
$450, with air.
Call 786-236-1144 or
786-298-0125

MIAMI'
One, two, and three bed-
rooms available. Section 8
Welcome.
Call 786-285-0072
NICE NEIGHBORHOOD
One bedroom, one bath
central air, heat, stove, refrig-
erator. Utilities, DirecTV in-
cluded. $750 monthly, $1850
move in. 305-687-7649.
Ninth Street Apartments
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One and a half months
One bedroom, one bath,
$450, air.
Call 305-358-1617

NORTH MIAMI AREA
Furnished apartment and
rooms. Newly renovated with
utilities and cable hook up.
Overlooking private lake
Call 305-769-5062
NORTH MIAMI AREA
One bedroom utilities includ-
ed .$695. Call 786-319-2695
NW MIAMI
One, two and three bed-
rooms. Call 786-286-2540.
ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$430 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $480 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

I Duplex

1841 NW 74th Street
Two bedroom, one bath,.
Stove, refrigerator, air, tile
throughout. $800 monthly.
Call Miguel 786-346-1873

1857 N.W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, two bath, ap-
pliances, air, $875 monthly
Call 954-499-3030
2273 N.W. 65 Street
Three bedroom, one bath
$1,125 monthly. $1,600 to


move in. Call 305-751-6720
or 786-317-4610.
310 NW 96th Street
Newly furbish, two
bedrooms, fully tile, and air.
$825 monthly! Two car
parking.
Call 954-437-8034 Gloria


338 N.W. 59 Street
Huge one bedroom, one bath
with central air and security
bars. $700 monthly. Section
8 welcome!
Call 305-490-7033
401 N.W. 69 Street
Two bedroom one bath air
carpet, new kitchen,, dish
washer, washer dryer. $950
monthly. Call 305-502-4171
4641 NW 16th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$675 monthly.
By application only.
Call: 305-638-5946
5328 N.W. 31 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath,
very clean, Section 8 tenant
move in with only $600.
Call 305-871-3280
5420 NW 7 Court
Large one bedroom, one
bath includes water and
electric. $775 monthly. NO
Section 8.
305-267-9449
7017 NW 4 Court
Remodeled two bedroom,
one bath duplex with central
air, tiled, new kitchen and
bath. $875 monthly, water in-
cluded. First, last, and
security to move in.
Call Charles:
786-556-9644

7736 NW 2nd Avenue
New one bedroom, one
bath for one person only,
first and security. $600 a
month. Call 786-287-9011.

8180 N.W. 23rd Avenue
Brand new four bedrooms,
two baths.
For more information, call
786-306-2946.
MIAMI AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
clean, fenced, in area of
$850 monthly, asking for first,
last and $300 security.
Call 786-312-959
Under New
Management
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $550 per month, $550
security deposit, $1100 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Condos/Townhouses
20020 S.W. 123 Drive
Perrine, FL
Four bedroom, two bath, al!
household appliances, two
levels. Contact Rickey,
786-253-7218.
CAROL CITY AREA
Four bedrooms two bath,
central air conditioning, town-
house, $1200 a month,
$3600 to move in.
Call 305 525 -3540
S Houses
1041 N.W. 28 Street
Two bedroom one bath, tile
throughout, fence all around,
walk to Jackson Memorial
Hospital. $980 monthly.
Call 786-423-7233 or
305-401-9165
1393 N.W. 53 Street
Two bedroom, one bath,with
appliances. Wall unit air.
Section 8 O.K.
Please call 305-512-1201
1410 N.W. 195th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
one car garage, central air,
$1500 monthly. NO Section 8
Call 305-267-9449.
1880 NW 62 Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths.
$1300 per month, Section 8
welcome! Call 786-486-8104.
191 Street N.W. 31 Avenue
Four bedroom, Section 8
welcome.
305-754-7776
19123 N.W. 36 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one and
half bath. $1275 per month,
Move in September 1, 2006.
Call 786-486-8104
1942 N.W. 86th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1400 monthly, first, last and
security. Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-696-8488
20040 N.W. 33 Avenue
Three bedroom, one and a
half bath, $1,700 monthly,
Section 8 welcome.
ALL POINTS REALTY
305-621-5800
20061 NW 14th Place
Three bedrooms, one bath,
nice area with central air.
Call 786-356-1686
20421 N.W 2 Court
Section 8 preferred. Large
three bedroom, two bath
home in gated community,
central air and appliances.
fenced yard.
Call 305-984-0639
21003 N.W. 37th Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
includes all appliances plus
central air and security bars.
$1250 monthly. Section 8
Welcome!
Call 305-621-5301


2269 N.W. 49th Street
Three bedroom, one bath.
$1300 monthly. Central air,
tile floors.
Call 786-512-1588


2525 NW 122 ST
Spacious three bedroom, two
bath with family room, laun-
dry room, extra storage
space and large backyard.
$1300 monthly and $650
security.
Call Summer 786-251-9382

2782 N.W. 194th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two bath,
includes all appliances plus
centralair air and security bars.
$1250 monthly. Section 8
Welcome! Call 305-621-5301
2900 N.W. 166th Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
washer and dryer, central air,
double car garage, fenced,
bar with entertainment room,
$1800 monthly. First and
last.
Call 786-326-0482 or
305-694-9405
3201 N.W. 169th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
tiled, central air, $1800 a
month, first, and security.
Call 954-292-2945
3450 N.W. 194 Terrace
Four bedroom, two bath,
Section 8 welcome, $1400
monthly, call Nikki 786-624-
0908.
4131 N.W. 203 Road Lane
Three bedrooms, two baths,
large corner, no section 8,
$1300 monthly.
Call: 305-267-9449

5650 N.E. MIAMI COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1300 monthly, $2600 to
move in, no Section 8.
Please contact Joseph Louis
at 305-632-2426.

69 Street N.W. 5 Ave Area
Section 8 welcome, referen-
ces: 305-754-7776.
7731 N.W. 15th Avenue
Three bedroom two bath new
kitchen, fenced yard. $1350
with first and security.
Call: 786-277-6602
837 N.W. 57 Street
Three bedroom,appliances,
$1350 monthly, first and last.
305-694-9405 or
786-326-0482
8421 N.W. 25th Avenue
Two bedrooms, $800 a
month, $2,400 to move in.
Call 770-826-0680
912 N.W. 46 Street
Spacious three bedroom,
one bath, hardwood floors,
ceramic tile, central air, and
fenced backyard. $1200
monthly. 305-331-2431
LITTLE HAITI AREA
Three bedroom, one central
air huge yard. Clean and re-
sponsible person. $1400
monthly. Section 8 O.K.
Call 305-761-0061
MIAMI AREA
6226 NW 19 Court, nice two
bedrooms one bath house
for rent.
Call 786-222-1053
MIAMI AREA
6226 NW 19 Court, nice two
bedrooms one bath house
for rent.
Call 786-222-1053
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
15743 N.W. 40 Court, two
bedrooms and two baths.
Section 8 Welcome. $975
monthly. Call 305-621-7883
or 786-385-8174.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
16301,NW 32 Avenue, spa-
cious four bedrooms two and
a half bath house. $1500
monthly. Call 305-681-2886.
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedroom, one bath,
great for family, central air,
gas, electric, and water in-
cluded, $1800 monthly.
786-285-4335
NEVER RENT AGAIN
Buy a four bedrooms, two
baths, $43,000!Foreclosures!
For listings 800-749-8168
xD041.
Northeast Miami Area
Four bedrooms two baths
$1400 monthly and three
bedrooms one bath $1300
monthly. Section 8 O.K.
Call 786-312-8128 or
305-751-2137
NW AREA
Four bedrooms, two baths
houses, den, Section 8 -
HOPWA welcome!
$1,450 monthly.
Call:305-624-0451
NW AREA
Three bedrooms, one and
half bath, appliances
included with air.
Call 786-426-6263
STOP!!!!
Behind in your rent? 24 hour
notice? Behind in your
mortgage? Call Kathy:
786-326-7916

S Rent With Option
MIAMI AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath,
rent option.
Call 800-242-0363 ext. 3644


$ CASH $
for
REAL ESTATE
or Vacant Lots in
24 hours!
Call Dave 305-301-2112


To Fax Your Ad
Fax: 305-757-4764


BEHIND ON MORTGAGE?
We will make payments!
Call Ray 786-488-8617
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for free" program. Buy a
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Condos/Townhouses
STAR LAKE CONDO
285 N.E. 191 Street #2920
One bedroom, one bath,
adult community. $85,500.
Mainteance fee $163 include
insurance. Call Linda at
Beachfront Realty:
305-790-5308
Duplex
FT. LAUDERDALE
2770 S.W. 2 Street
Four-plex for sale, four units,
two bedroom, one bath each,
asking $399,000..
ALL POINTS REALTY
305-621-5800
I Houses
1935 N.W. 48th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
selling for $164,999, apprais-
ed at $172,000. For fast
close, $138,000, cash.
305-962-6823.
3810 N.W. 195 Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
freshly painted, tile and car-
pet, large yard, fenced. Ask-
ing $280k.
Call 786-488-2264.
ATTENTION
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
****WITH* .
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
HUD/VA Homes Available
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House Of Homes Realty
FORECLOSURES!
Four bedrooms, two baths..
Must Sell! Only $43,000!
800-749-8168 xD040
HUD HOMES!
Three bedrooms, two baths
Only $21,500. For listings:
'800-749-8168 xD046
NORLAND
1031 N.W. 198 Street
Three bedroom, two bath,
asking $280,000.

17730 N.W. 33 Court
Three bedrooms, two bath
family Room, central air
Asking $279,900

ALL POINTS REALTY
AND INVESTMENTS
(305) 621-5800


INVESTORS!
New and rehab. mortgages
Six months no payments.
Call Glen 305-254-6610

Need a car loan, "credit is-
sues. No problem $500 down
$200 a month. 305-720-7006
STOP! READ!
Are you about to lose your
home to foreclosure? Let me
help you save it. We have
many programs available.
Call 786-315-0472



ATTENTION RENTERS!
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credit? Join the Money Doc-
tor System. 100 percent
money back guarantee.
Call Ms. Brown 305-442-2472
or 786-308-8390.
Big E Lawn Service
Free estimates. Our prices
can not be beat. Call anytime
305-305-0597
Get a jump start on educa-
tion. Tutoring classes starts
on July 25. Call Ruth,:
305-634-6026

GOOD OR BAD CREDIT
Learn how to obtain major
credit cards, business
loans, consolidate debit,
repair your own credit and
much more. Call for free
brochure 954-660-7323.
24 hour recorded
message.
GREAT OPPORTUNITY
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Money Doctor System. 100
percent money back guaran-
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305-442-2472 or
786-308-8390
Make all your financial
dreams come true with this
incredible business. Call Ms.
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Need a mortgage? Need to
refinance? No broker fee, no
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Need Fast Cash?
Join a 100 percent cheat
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$250, $500, $750, or even
$1000 per order by joining
the Money Doctor program. If
interested, call Ms. Brown
305-442-2472 or
786-308-8390


Tisdale's Lawn Service
Specializing in mowing, edg-
ing, and weed eating. Free
estimates. 305-609-6253



ALL APPLIANCES SALE
$99 We also repair. 215 NW
22 Avenue 305-644-0333.



Chevy's from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167 xK020
Honda Civic 91
$850 or best offer! Air and
gas saver. For listing:
800-749-8167 ext.K036
HONDA'S from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167 xK023



HELP WANTED
Trel's Diner, 1001 N.W. 95
Street, waitress needed.
Apply between 10 a.m.
and 3 p.m.

Maintenance Person
Must have valid FL driver's
license, office detail clean-
ing experience, and de-
pendable. Knowledge of
industrial lawn mower and
yard work. Apply in person.

900 NW 54 Street
See Mr. Saunders
305-694-6210

Receptionist
needed for busy office.
Must have excellent verbal
skills, a friendly demeanor,
and the. ability to multi-
task. Boring and frigid
personalities need not
apply! Fax resume to

305-694-6215
or email kfranklin@
miamitimesonline.com

RENT A CHEF
Experienced Cook Needed
Will Train.
Call 305-803-9085




Your Own
;Mortgage Business!
Excellent income, no experi-
ence, no license needed.
Work part-time or full-time.
We will teach you!
Call J. Diaz: 786-277-9011



POSITION WANTED
Experienced Certified Nurs-
ing Assistant seeks employ-
ment. Available days and
nights. Call 305-981-4315.



Church available
Fully furnished
Call 305-687-1218.

KINDERGARTEN
AVAILABLE
Zoned for 30 children.
Call 305-687-1218




Cingular Razr
Cell Phone $200
Call Gloria,
305-694-6210 ext. 110







Trust


Grow.


A; No'hern Trust Bank,, we have
stablined a reoitalioop m e; ieiader
,n t.uSt tnd brsx e bnknai!. cdernt
10 m iiel :opp IrtuniDy,
Ou otment da IaG

re rnm'~ nt I. h a"nd everyy
.'ei ':: 0pportei. ,}y u; creative
*T pn gemient.t1, r,' i rpp &a.on
l0: civei; Sy,"n the w'orkiIce ,nd
[ .xliQngj appr0oa,:h" exu.,ed ng our


o, u y y u .n :.lG ,ic i o .o ,w forl
++qes'.,iiicw t+iriBrn ..'it'g i CO ;
.. h I I am. ng .
l(
Northern Trust Bank, Attn:
HIuman Resources, 700 Britkell
Avenue, Miami. FL. 3313.

Northern Trust


Bank of
Florida


Teacher Positions
Open at J.E.S.C.A. until filled. Eligible candidates will
be State Certified or Certifiable, full time, Grades 9 -
12. Benefits included. Call Bobby Brown: 305-758-
8644 ext. 209 or apply at 2389 N.W. 54 Street.








DiVosta Homes presents

Mallory Creek at Abacoa.
Brand new DiVosta Homes in prime Jupiter location.


DiVOSTA
HOMES


Call 561.625.6969
for information.
Participating brokers must
accompany on first visit.


CAKOL CITY

SWoman 's Solution

FAMILY PLANNING & ABORTION
16166 N.W. 27 Avenue

S05-400-8126


ABORTIONS
Up Lo 10 weeks compleLely asleep $1801"


Sonogram
included.


and office visit after 14 days


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267 E. 49 St., Hialeah, FL.
Stsam as 103 St.)
305-824-8816


3671 W. 16 ^A". Hialeah, FL.
305-362-4611






Terminations up to 22 weeks Depo Provera I.U.D.


M MAR WOMEN'S CENTER

pBROWARD
Open Mon. Sat Se Habla Espafol

... h 954-986-0030



HIALEAH

WOMEN'S CENTER

952 EAST 25 ST.

SAMN I' AS 7!)ST.

ABORTIONS STARTLING AT '180

CALL 305-836-9701











Birth Control Methods

(Depo Provera, Pills, Patches, IDU)

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Miami, FL 33169

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Professional care. HRS Certified.
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Anesthesia included Daily appointments
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4!210 Palm Avenue,. Hialeah
305-827-3412
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Flagler near LeJeuiine
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Times,...tms
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01--1-_ N ./r1 Tk : V, C .xiyn 1\^oc :












12DT~'1 r... ~ ~ .Wl~ )..1&1C Ab lcsMs oto Theiria Ownsetuny
.1. i.J .1 L~ YALLIIL A IUL~J~ J LAJ ~, ---


Beat


The Miami's Heat team returns


By Terrell Clayton
Miami Times Writer
What most Heat fans have
hoped for since the confetti
dropped and the championship
parade ended has seemingly
come true. The championship
squad that was on the court
receiving the trophy from
NBA commissioner David
Stern on June 21 has come
back together.
Reserve center Alonzo
Mourning rounded out the ros-
ter as he finally announced his
decision to lace up his sneakers
and help make a run to defend
Miami's title. With the contract
extension of Dwyane Wade, the
accepted player option of


James Posey and Gary Payton's
vow to return, the Heat has a
legitimate chance to be the
'Beast of the East' next year
and raise the Larry O'Brien tro-
phy for the second time.
Not only will Miami have a
strong chance to repeat next
year, but they have also
strengthened their future with
the signing of Dwyane Wade to
a lucrative three year, 44.12
million dollar extension with a
fourth year option that could
pay him up to 62.03 million.
This contract has cemented the
Finals MVP in Miami until the
year of 2010.
When the contract exten-
sion begins in the 2007-2008
season, he'll be receiving


13.28 million; 14.63 million in
the '08-'09 season; 16.29 mil-
lion in '09-'10; and, if Wade
chooses to exercise the
optional fourth year of his
contract, he will be paid 17.91
million for the '10-'11 season.
"I'm doing good, I feel good
and I'm excited to be coming
back for some more years,"
Wade said.
According to the collective
bargaining agreement,
Dwyane Wade has received
the maximum offer that is
granted to players that have
under eight years of experi-
ence in the league. "I came in
three years ago with a black
suit and tie on and now three
years later I'm a world cham-


pion and NBA finals MVP. I'm
thanking God every step of the
way that I am the chosen one,"
Wade said in response of being
the new face of the NBA.
All five starters from last
year's team, O'Neal, Wade,
Walker, Williams and Haslem,
are set to return, along with
role players Alonzo Mourning,
James Posey and guard Gary
Payton. While the Miami Heat
won the title for the first time
last year, the intensity of their
hunger for a repeat next year is
yet to be determined. But if its
anything like the burning
desire they displayed during
this past season, the Heat
should be the hottest team in
the NBA next year.


Dolphins first ever Black franchise QB


By Terrell Clayton
Miami Times Writer

He has finally arrived! We
have been waiting on him for
a long time and there was a
point in which most were
ready to give up hope. The
celebrated guy he is replacing
has been gone since 1999, the
same year this new hope was
drafted. All others to date
have been unable to carry the
torch. This warrior has trav-
eled from the cold state of
Minnesota and landed in the
hot atmosphere of Miami.
Dolphin fans get ready
because Daunte Culpepper is
here with a new number and
attitude to go along with it. He
is ready to get his roll on.
This off season, the acquisi-
tion of Daunte Culpepper
came at the expense of only a
second round draft pick. With
training camp starting in
three days, this football town
is ready to put the idea of the
Miami Heat winning it's first
ever NBA title on the back
burner. Culpepper starting at
quarterback this upcoming
season makes Dolphins histo-
ry as he is the first ever Black
quarterback in the franchise.
Culpepper grew up in
Ocala, Florida and played col-
lege football at Central
Florida. He later became a
first-round draft choice of the
Minnesota Vikings. Since that
time, he has gone on to play
in 81 regular season games,
starting 80 of them. He has
had a stellar career as he has
completed 1,678 of 2,607


Daunte Culpepper


passes for 20,162 yards with
135 touchdowns, 86 intercep-
tions and a passer rating of
91.5. He also has rushed for
2,476 yards. and 29 touch-
downs on 454 attempts.
Culpepper is a giant behind
the center. He stands 6 foot 4
inches and weighs 225 lbs; he
dares defenders to jump in
his way while he's scrambling
down field. "He is so big for a
quarterback, the first time
you focus on number eight,
you tell yourself, that can't be
him. He could be a linebacker
or a tight end. Maybe even a
defensive end. To think a man
that massive has the tools
needed to play a position like
quarterback, well, it boggles


the mind," Coach Nick Saban
said in a statement reported
on MiamiDolphins.com.
Coach Saban expresses the
possibilities Daunte
Culpepper can present for the
passing game. "Nobody is
going to bring Daunte down
with one hand. I told the
receivers that plays have a
chance of lasting longer now
than with our quarterbacks
from last year."
In 2004, Culpepper was
named to his third Pro Bowl
as he set virtually every team
single-season passing record
by completing 379 of 548
passes (69.2%) for 4.717
yards with 39 touchdowns
and 11 interceptions. He also


rushed for 406 yards that
year and his 5,123 combined
passing and rushing yards
broke the NFL mark set by
Miami's great Dan Marino in
1984.
In his collegiate career at
Central Florida, Culpepper
threw for 11,412 yards and
rushed for 1,020 yards as he
broke more than 30 school
records. As a senior in 1998,
he established a NCAA single-
season record by completing
296 of 402 passes for 3,690
yards with 28 touchdowns
and seven interceptions as he
shared National Offensive
Player of the Year honors with
Ricky Williams.
While he attended
Vanguard High School in
Ocala, he set school career
records with 6,107 yards
passing and 57 touchdowns.
As a senior, he threw for
3,074 yards and 31 touch-
downs in leading Vanguard
High to the Class 5A state
championship game.
While Dan Marino was the
heart, soul and face of the
franchise for so long, one
thing he has never done was
win a championship in this
town. Now its time for the
torch to be passed. With
Ronnie Brown, Chris
Chambers, Randy
McMicheal, Zach Thomas,
Jason Taylor and Culpepper
all in the mix, the Dolphins
can shift the fans focus back
to football by making history.
The Dolphins can become the
first team to win the super-
bowl in it's home stadium.


Tiger wins one for his dad

By Terrell Clayton
Miami Times Writer
Over this past weekend, Tiger Woods won his eleventh career
major. The British Open was an emotional match as Woods was
playing without his dad for the first time and his opponent, Chris
DiMarco, lost his mother recently to a heart attack. With this
win, Tiger added to his astonishing record as he is now 11-0,
leading entering the final round. What's an even more impressive
fact is that Woods became the first player since 1983 to win golfs
oldest championship in consecutive years.
When Woods tapped in his final putt, it was too much for him.
He threw up his hands in excitement and simultaneously burst
out in tears as he expressed his rarely shown emotions. "I've
never done that, but at the that moment, it just came pouring
out. I was pretty bummed out after not winning the Masters,
because I knew that was the last major he [Earl Woods] was ever
going to see," Tiger said.
With this last win, he is now only one win short of tying Phil
Mickelson for all time majors and has earned over sixty million
for his career.
As he was drenched in tears, he expressed the agony he went
through when he lost his the masters but said his dad would
have been proud to witness this victory. "That [last] one hurt a
little bit. After the last putt, I realized my dad's never going to see
this again and I wish he could have seen this one last time. He
would have been proud."


D-Train this week


By Nathanael Paul
Miami Times Intern
Throughout the rest of the
Florida Marlins season, The
Miami Times will feature all of
Dontrelle Willis' games each
week. We feel it's important to
recognize Willis who is the
only Black pitcher in the
organization right now.
This week Dontrelle faced
the Pittsburgh Pirates in front
of 11,468 fans. Willis had to
battle for six innings in a no-
decision, but the team pulled
out a 5-4 win. Pittsburgh
effectively made Willis work,
running up 111 pitches. The
D-Train gave up three runs on
eight hits, before exiting the


game. The left-hander pitched
his shortest outing in 10
starts, since he worked six
innings on May 27 in a loss to
the Mets.
His most impressive inning
was the first inning. After
loading the bases with no
outs, the left-hander proceed-
ed to strike out Bay, Randa
and Craig Wilson in succes-
sion to wiggle out of the jam.
The Marlins have now won
three straight and wrapped up
their homestand at 7-4. The
team record now stands at 45-
52 and is inching closer to the
.500 mark after starting the
season off 11-31. The team's
next series starts Tuesday
against the Atlanta Braves.


4 1


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i Ti J l 26Au ust 1 2006




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