Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00063
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: May 3, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00063
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text






More murders in Opa-locka


Triangle


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Police chief intent on cutting crime


By Renee M. Harris
rharris(i)miamitimesonline.com
The recent murders of
Sharika Wilson and Antwan
Jones in Opa-locka's 'Triangle'
are two tragic examples of the
challenges faced by the city's
police department and its
chief, James Barry Wright.
Following the highly publicized
May 2005 murder of 5 year-old
Melanise Malone, the depart-
ment developed a multi-
faceted strategy with two pri-
mary goals: to reduce crime
and the fear of crime.
Jones, 30 is believed to be
the intended target in
Saturday's double homicide.
Wilson, 19 was apparently an
innocent bystander who met


the fate that
many Opa-
locka residents
seek to avoid -
a fate that
L i t t 1 e
Melanise's
family was
WRIGHT seeking to
avoid when a bullet tore
through her head, fatally
wounding the girl.
Melanise's murder sparked
"Operation Neenee" a strate-
gic plan to root out the vio-
lence by not only attacking
crime but also preventing it.
That Wilson and Jones' mur-
ders represent the first in the
area since Melanise was killed
is a significant fact tempered
by the devastating loss of two


Powell's prewar advice ignored
WASHINGTON (AP) However, she spent a good
Former secretary of State part of her appearances on
Colin Powell told a British TV three Sunday talk shows
network Sunday that he defending the White House.
unsuccessfully advised "I don't remember specifi-
President Bush before the US- cally what Secretary Powell
led invasion in March 2003 to may be referring to," Rice
send more troops to Iraq. said, adding there were many
US. troop levels have been discussions about war strate-
part of the debate over the gy.
war from the beginning. Powell, in an interview
In response, Secretary of broadcast Sunday in Britain
State Condoleezza Rice on ITV television, said he gave
defended the prewar planning the advice to now-retired gen-
and troop levels, saying Bush eral Tommy Franks, who led
followed the advice of senior the Iraq invasion plan and
military leaders. Defense Secretary Donald
Rice neither confirmed nor Rumsfeld while the president
denied Powell's assertion. was present.


SHARIKA WILSON


young lives. Wright said "we
have not wavered" when
queried about the impact of
the recent killings on the
department's strategy. The
strategy, according to Wright,
represents a "holistic and glob-
al approach" that factors qual-
ity of life issues into the crime


prevention equa-
tion.
A key part of
the plan involves
strengthening the
city's code
enforcement to
help reduce the
number of unsafe
and abandoned
structures -
buildings .com-
monly used for


drug use and
other illegal activity. Wright
said he will ensure that his
department has a role in
reviewing the approval of new
businesses in Opa-locka a
move aimed at approving only
those businesses that provide
Please turn to TRIANGLE 6A


State lawmaker accused of

calling Rudy Crew the N word
A 45-minute intend to discuss the
investigation took matter in depth, yet
place behind closed plan to keep an open
doors on the House mind until both par-
of Representatives' i ) ties have the oppor-
floor in Tallahassee i tunity to present
last Friday in their sides.
response to allega- Arza reportedly
tions of racial slurs participated in a
used by state prayer session at the
Representative meeting to stress
Ralph Arza. The that his words were
Hialeah Republican RUDY CREW taken out of context


lawmaker is accused of using
racial utterances when mak-
ing reference to Miami-Dade
School's Superintendent Rudy
Crew.
Arza, a former high school
teacher and football coach at
Miami Senior High, adamant-
ly denies making such deroga-
tory remarks. However, pub-
lished reports say "four public
officials from the Miami-Dade
area personally heard Arza on
a number of occasions use the
"N" word in English or a
Spanish equivalent that com-
pared Crew to excrement."
Calls to Crew and Miami-
Dade schools spokesman
Joseph Garcia were not
immediately returned. Crew
met with the Black Caucus on
Monday to discuss his percep-
tion of the allegations.
Members of the Caucus


and he is not a racist person.
He acknowledged that his lan-
guage is sometimes "foul" as
he often reverts back to a
coach's vocabulary.
Superintendent Crew did
not hear the alleged phrases
used by Arza, but said the
lawmaker's actions were
"inappropriate, period."
Crew began his tenure as a
chief of Miami-Dade schools
in 2004 and has often dis-
agreed with Arza on several
political issues. As a
Democrat, Crew often
opposed the conservative edu-
cation policy in which funds
from public schools are shift-
ed into private educational
institutions. Arza's alleged
comments were said to have
been in response to Crew's
unwillingness to back the
Republican agenda.


Senate kills Governor's

school voucher program


Gov. Jeb Bush's effort to
undo the will of Florida's vot-
ers met with defeat with the
help of fellow
Republicans. The pro-
posal before the Florida
Senate would have
exempted vouchers
from language in the
Florida Constitution
that bans using public
religious education and BU
from language that
requires a uniform system of
free public schools.
Had it prevailed, the propos-


al would have been on the
November ballot and would
have asked voters to change
the state Constitution
to allow for vouchers
that send more public
money to private
schools.
The voucher defeat
marked the second
education set-back for
SH the lame duck Bush.
His effort to renege on
the class size caps approved by
voters was also shot down, in
Please turn to VOUCHER 6A


-Miami Times photo/Rich Jackson

Is Ricky going to Canada?
The Toronto Argonauts, of the Canadian Football League,
have placed suspended NFL running back Ricky Williams on
their 35-player negotiations list, which means that they own
exclusive CFL rights to contact him.

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A IA L


Where's the outrage
W here's community's outrage over murders of
young Black mothers at the hands of young
Black men?
If non-Black people were responsible for the senseless
deaths of Dixon and Sharika Wilson, Black ministers and
politicians would be outraged, vying for camera time and
marching hand in hand through the streets of Little Haiti
and Opa-locka.
Predictably. the murders of Sharika Wilson and Jessica
Dixon at the hands of young Black men have generated
little more than a shaking of the head, a sucking of the
teeth and a "that's a shame" from people who should be
demanding more. The lack of public outcry is telling of
how desensitized Blacks have become to Black on Black
crime and is a sad indication of the little value placed on
Black lives.
The young Black men responsible for the murders obvi-
ously do not value life not Sharika Wilson's, not Jessica
Dixon's, not their actual targets' and certainly not their
own. Spraying bullets into the general vicinity of an
enemy boldly declares that any 'accidental' loss of life is
an accepted consequence of their actions.
Black leaders must take the lead on publicly declaring
that Black on Black crime is unacceptable. Black leaders
must say publicly that this thug violence must stop.
Black leaders must refuse to remain silent on this issue.
Silence implies surrender, it implies acceptance.
As difficult as the problem is to curtail efforts to do so
must continue. Programs that address the root causes of
crime must continue to teach young Black boys how to
deal with their emotions, increase their educational
achievement and teach them skills to help escape pover-
ty.
Black on Black crime is insidious and exceedingly frus-
trating, in part, because of the sense of hopelessness it
evokes.
Public outrage may seem pointless; however, it is neces-
sary.
Blacks must collectively and publicly mourn the loss of
these young women. Doing so encourages the women's
families, gives hope to the community and sends a mes-
sage of the value of Black life a message that must be
sent relentlessly.

Immigration protests should

also address plight of Haitians

Our brown brothers and sisters took to the streets en
mass to protest Senate legislation that would crack
down on the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants
in this country. The sentiment would have been bolstered
had the plight of Haitians been included.
The overwhelming majority of the affected immigrants are
from Mexico and other Latin countries. Although their sta-
tus in this country is not secure, they are here.
Haitians are not afforded that privilege. Far too many have
been turned back to an unstable, violent and devastated
country. Other non-Black immigrants facing similar or less
dangerous predicaments are provided Temporary Protected
Status. Haiti's violent political climate and the country's
extreme poverty that was exacerbated by the devastation
from hurricanes and tropical storms qualify its people for
TPS.
Haitians want the same things other immigrants want -
an opportunity to work hard, pay taxes, provide their chil-
dren with access to a quality education and a shot at the
"American Dream."


T t afEhiai ime
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
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H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES,.IR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL.I. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman
Ap


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The Black I'ress believes thai Anmeillc d;n bdti st l iat It l e' world I'nl n cial iandl iatlionil
aIn .u,onismn when il tcco'rds to every .perso,n. rcardllcess of' race. c oelcrd ci c or. his ui'hcr Ir
htlltiai id legal rI'ils. Ittlic n o |person. e'ri nno I elrson.lhL' ack' l s ss tS hel)I I I' .
every person in the firm beliel tIhal all persons are h1irl as lontg ;is a nyontw is'i(klpl -ni)ck. ,


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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OPINION


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


One test + students' performance = a teacher's worth?


In my opinion, Jeb Bush gets an 'F'for his A+ plan like the test.


stating that tying bonuses to
achievement will cause "cut-
throat tactics" that focus more on
boosting student achievement
than teaching. Teachers refer to
the E-Comp Plan as being, "ill
conceived, divisive and punitive."
Further, many teachers con-
tend that this will create an
incentive for teachers to move
away from the most challenging
schools and children. It also
sends a signal to people looking
at this profession as one where
excellence is not rewarded.
In Education Week's, special
report, "Quality Counts 2001"-
sixty six percent of teachers sur-,
veyed said they concentrate too
much on what's tested at the
expense of other subjects. In a
detailed survey, Miami-Dade
teachers expressed strong oppo-
sition to the FCAT. In a survey


done of Florida principals, 80
percent of Florida principals
deemed unfair the state's practice
of awarding bonus money to
schools and teachers with high or
improving FCAT scores.


Teachers teaching to the test
creates a classroom climate that
is ineffective and turns many
students off to learning.
Emphasis is on rote memoriza-
tion at the expense of more com-
plex skills such as problem solv-


It is absurd to believe that the "best and brightest"
will want to become teachers when teaching is reduced
to test prep and schools are continually attacked by
politicians, business leaders and the media.


Here's my analysis: The higher
the stakes, the more schools
focus instruction on the tests.
High stakes tests dilute the cur-
riculum. As a result, what is not
tested often is not taught.
Teachers adjust their curriculum
to fit the content or format of the
test instruction starts to look


ing. The test has eclipsed the
opportunities for teachers to
engage students in meaningful
activities and projects.
The curriculum is narrowed to
accommodate the content of test.
Pressure pushes teachers to sac-
rifice a more diverse education
for one that is easily graded on a


computer scored, multiple choice
test and de-emphasizes subjects
not on FCAT. Good teachers are
often discouraged, even disgust-
ed, by the overemphasis on test-
ing. Many excellent teachers
leave.
It is absurd to believe that the
"best and brightest" will want to
become teachers when teaching
is reduced to test prep and
schools are continually attacked
by politicians, business leaders
and the media. Narrowing the
curriculum happens to most low
income students and when
achievement is not reached, it
forces "good teachers" to leave
the lower performing schools.
This one test has given rise to
"cut throat" educational practices
that do not educate all children,
which is the obligation of public
schools everywhere. In the end,
the children suffer. Who is
accountable for that?


B r 'L
*


Comn


unity issues from a Pol-Leg view
By Jimmie C. Burke


Understanding the legislature:

Pto Z


This is the last week of Regular
Legislative Session, scheduled to
adjourn "sine die" on May 5. This
is also the last of the series
explaining selected legislative ter-
minology. The series is particular-
ly helpful to those who are
attempting to obtain legislation or
money from the legislature. The
series should also be helpful to
those who are planning cam-
paigns for the legislature or who
want to ask relevant questions of
legislative candidates about their
knowledge of the legislature
instead of their personal or social


lives. We seek to shift the focus to
which candidate can be the most
effective legislator rather than the
most sociable person.
PASSAGE is the term for favor-
able floor action on a bill.
PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE
(Tom Lee of Brandon) is the pre-
siding officer of the Senate, first
being elected by the majority
party members, then, unsurpris-
ingly, elected by the full Senate
for a two year term.
PROVISIO is the language
used in the budget (appropria-
tions) bill that can designate or


Reginald Clyne, Esq.


Black managers will soon

be extinct at the County


As we all know, huge crea-
tures called dinosaurs roamed
the earth for centuries and then


suddenly and inexplicably
became extinct. Black County
Managers appear to be going


limit the way or entity where
money is spent. This process is
similar but not the same as the
congressional "EARMARKING"
p r o c e s s.
Knowledgeable legisla-
tors can direct money
to benefit his/her dis-
trict or favored benefi-
ciaries.
QUORUM CALL is
the way in which the
presiding officer estab-
lishes that the
required majority of
legislators are present
before business may
be transacted. It can
also be strategically
used to obtain a brief :
delay before business
B
may resume.
READNG is the term used to
introduce, amend or pass a bill by
the chamber. Three separate
"readings" on three separate days
are required before a bill can
become law. This may be waived
by a two-third vote of the mem-


the way of dinosaurs. They
once roamed the halls of the
Stephen P. Clark Center and
now; mysteriously, they are all
gone or seemingly on the way
out.
At one point, Miami-Dade
County, had seemingly over-
come racism and promoted sev-
eral Blacks to prominent posi-
tions as Directors and
Assistant County Managers of
various departments: Charles
Phillips was the first Black Fire
Chief, Angela Gittens was the
first Black female Director of
the Airport, Al Brewster was the
Director of the Miami Dade
Housing Agency, Charles
McRay was the Director of
Corrections, Gail Thompson
was the Project Manager for the
Performing Arts Center, Dean
Taylor was an Assistant County
Manager, Tony Crapp was an
Assistant County Manager, and


bers. A bill is passed only on the
Third Reading.
SESSION refers to a particular
day's meeting of each chamber
as well as to the
entire period for
which the full legis-
lature is convened.
An EXTENDED
SESSION occurs
when the Regular
Session is pro-
longed beyond its
60-day limit in
order to complete
action on'specified
legislation. An
extended Session
requires a three-
fifths vote of each
chamber. REGU-
IRKE LAR SESSION
refers to the session that begins
on the first Tuesday after the first
Monday in March of each odd-
numbered year and on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday in
March, or such other date set by
law, of even-numbered years.


Roosevelt Bradley was/is the
Director of Transit.
All of the aforementioned
have been fired, forced to resign
or forced to retire, with the
exception of Tony Crapp. Crapp
was recently demoted from the
position of Assistant County
Manager, and Roosevelt
Bradley who is under investiga-
tion.
Yes, Mae Bryant and Cynthia
Curry have been promoted, but
it is anybody's guess given the
current trend, how long either
will last. As you may recall,
Cynthia Curry retired
(resigned) after she was passed
over for the County Manager's
position. Bryant had the dis-
tinction of having to serve in a
temporary position for an
extended period before finally
being made permanent.
Why have so many Black
managers, who have served


SPEAKER (Allan Bense of
North Florida) is the presiding
House officer, elected by the
majority caucus similarly to the
Senate President (above).
SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE is
the second-in-command officer
of the House, who is traditionally
proposed by the Speaker but
must be elected by the total
membership, after being elected
first by the majority caucus. He
presides in the absence of the
Speaker. In Florida's history
there has been only one Black
Speaker Pro Tempore. E-mail me
if you know.
SUMMARY is the brief, but
very helpful, explanation of the
contents of a bill. The profession-
al staff of the chamber prepares
the summary as well as the
analysis of proposed legislation.
VETO, LINE ITEM is the
power of the Governor to select
individual items in the budget
(appropriations bill) or specific
money item in a substantive act
that has money in it. This Florida

with distinction at the County
or in other locales, all of a sud-
den become extinct? Was it
due to climate change,- some
unknown disease, or did they
all want to leave their six figure
positions and try out that fun
condition called unemploy-
ment?
As an employment lawyer,
one examines the hiring and
firings and tries to find a trend.
Have the same number of white
and Hispanic managers become
extinct during the same time
period? If so, then the extinc-
tion of the Black managers can
be broadly stated to be a
change in the guard due to new
management.
However, if the Hispanic and
white managers remain and
only Black managers are
becoming extinct then the dis-
ease that is infecting them
must have something to do


power gives the Governor a
power that even the President of
the United States does not have
on congressional acts.
WAIVE THE RULES is the
process by which two-thirds of
the members are present and
voting may disregard certain
rules of the chamber.
WITHOUT OJECTION is the
phrase used by the presiding offi-
cer to indicate that a matter is
being disposed of without taking
a roll call vote: The assumption is
that the action is being unani-
mously approved. A small num-
ber of knowledgeable legislators
can use this process to pressure
the presiding officer and majority
party.
YIELD is the term used to
release a part of the time allocat-
ed to a legislator when he/she
has the floor. This allows another
member to intrude on the legisla-
tor who is speaking; usually this
is done for questions or clarifica-
ti6n of the issue under discus-
sion.

with their genetic make-up.
Perhaps, the Black managers,
like my beloved Angela Gittens
were too watchful of the public
dollars and did not "play" poli-
tics well. Nobody seemed to say
anything a month ago when
Obredecht said it was seeking
$54 million in change orders to
finish construction at the air-
port. I guess $54 million in
construction overruns is noth-
ing now that Angela Gittens has
been squelched.
Currently, Roosevelt Bradley
is under the gun. Bradley has
had a stellar career at the
County and rose through the
ranks after paying his dues and
having solid successes to back
his hard work. Bradley controls
a large budget and his depart-
ment has hired 1,400 people as
a result of the People's Transit
Plan. He is accused of making
Please turn to CLYNE 6A


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* 1,i~ r i:;:li: i ::


Ill"'I


I *~I S0


It looks like major confrontations are developing in the
chambers of the North Miami City Council over the hiring
of former Assistant County Manager Tony Crapp as
development director to replace Frank Schnidman. It
also looks like councilman Jacques Despinosse is seri-
ous about making some low-income and affordable hous-
ing available for some residents instead of directing all
that windfall tax money from the huge upscale Biscayne
Landing developing near the FIU north campus. Stay
tuned

!*****
There's another zoning dispute in neighboring North
Miami Beach where their citizens coalition is gathering
signatures, hoping to get a measure on the ballot limiting
building height and density in the city's redevelopment
zones. Mayor Raymond Marin and a majority of the city
council support buildings up to 24 stories in areas along
Biscayne Bay and West Dixie Highway.


A lot of people are becoming more interested in the
Adoptive and Foster Care Services in Miami-Dade County.
Most people usually thought of it as a Black problem, but
figures show that half of those kids needing help are
white.

******
Miami-Dade public schools are praising Senate Majority
leader Alex Villalobos who paid a stiff price for his key
vote in school voucher debate. Villalobos, whose wife is a
school teacher, saw Senate President Tom Lee strip him
of his post as majority leader minutes after the vote, say-
ing he no longer viewed the Miami senator as a team play-
er. Talk about hardball politics.


The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 3A


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OFFER GOOD FOR CONSUMERS & BUSINESSES


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The.Children's ust 211 helpline results in 100 percent call increase






The Children's Trust 211 helpline results in 100 percent call increase


By Barbara Ann Martin
Special to the Times

The recent Children's Trust
211 Helpline public awareness
campaign culminated with a
dramatic spike in calls to the
call center, located at Miami-
Dade's Switch Board of Miami.
"We have seen a tenfold
increase, that would be a 100
percent rise in the amount of
calls to our operators each
day," said Thamara Labrousse,
Switchboard of Miami
Executive Director.
The majority of South
Florida's major media were in
attendance, all to carry-out a
public awareness campaign
that is currently appearing in
print, broadcast and outdoor
media through-out Miami-
Dade County. After a busy
start, the launch culminated


with The Children's Trust
Senior Communications
Manager Emily Cardenas hold-
ing a lengthy press conference
while spending the day working
in "the trenches," amongst the
trained operators and social
workers who handle the calls.
The dramatic: 30 public serv-
ice television announcements
(PSA's) open with a 211
Helpline operator stating, "The
Children's Trust 211 Helpline,
may I help you?" The camera
then pans slowly over easels
laden with black and white
portraits of individuals of dif-
ferent races, ethnicities and
walks of life. The subjects, all
captured deep in thought, rep-
resent stark illustrations of the
many situations that may lead
a person to seek help by dialing
The Children's Trust 211
Helpline.


As the camera moves among
the portraits, a tapestry of voic-
es is heard: a man states, "a
summer camp I could afford
would be great," while the cam-
era captures his two young
boys, home alone, as they peak
longingly out of a slightly ajar
door; an adorable little girl, all
curls and smiles looks directly
at the lens as her mother's
voice is heard, "she has to be in
good hands while I'm working,"
the camera then captures a
close-up of a little boy, ther-
mometer in his mouth, his hair
damp with fever as his con-
cerned mother says, "I don't
have health insurance, so
where can I go?"
Yet another image reveals a
distraught woman, her head
clasped in her hands, her dark
eyes glancing downward as she
despairs, "I need help . I


I I cmkin tk, c Il rraonmns rilrh%


need to quit!" The radio PSA's
carry out the same theme,
echoing the serious messages
conveyed in the television ads.
"I was very pleased with the
media's response and their
recognition of the impact and
benefit that The Children's
Trust 211 Helpline will have in
our community. As I viewed
and listened to the coverage, I
saw that the journalists
focused on the variety of social
services and referrals covered
by 211, such as access to qual-
ity after-school programs,
counseling, crisis intervention,
help for parents with a child in
need of special services, finan-
cial advice and much more,
said Modesto E. Abety,
President and CEO of The
Children's Trust.


1111111


Crime Scene


A woman was charged with stealing a ruler, pen, correction fluid and dietary sup-
plements valued at $51 from Publix, located at 9050 Biscayne Boulevard. Police said
the woman hid the items in clear plastic bags, which she shoved inside her purse
before leaving the store. The incident happened around 10:40 a.m.
*******
Someone stole electronics and jewelry valued at $17,750 from a 2002 BMW
330ci.The car was parked in the area of 171st Street NE 38th Avenue, between the
hours of 1 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. Police say the thief slashed the convertible top of the
car and took $200, a navigation system, remote controls, a DVD monitor, headrests
with TV. screens, a Rolex watch valued at 12,000 and a Cartier watch valued at
$2,800.
******
Police arrested a 42-year-old woman on battery charges after she threw a gallon
container of orange juice at a cashier in Publix, located at 12855 NE 6th Avenue,
around 5:15 p.m. Police say the container hit the cashier on the shoulder.
******
Police arrested a 32-year-old woman for DUI after she made an illegal U-turn on
NE 186th Street and Biscayne Blvd around 5:37 a.m. According to the police report,
the woman had trouble finding her license, which was inside a pair of pants in her
back seat. She then failed roadside sobriety tests. According to the report, the
woman told police she has only six months left to live and she offered $10,000 in
cash for the education of the police officer's children if she was let go. This was her
second DUI; the first was in 1998.
******
A vandal scratched the word "wrong" onto the driver's side door of a 2000 Infiniti
G20 parked at Turnberry on the Green, located at 19501 W. Country Club Drive,
between the hours of 6:30 and 11 p.m. According to the police report, the victim
accidentally parked in the wrong parking space and the owner of the parking space
cursed out a valet who refused to have the car towed unless a warning sticker was
placed on the car first. The victim told police the valet saw the woman key his car
and wrote a report to the building manager regarding the incident. Damages are
estimated at $500.


The City of Miami Police Homicide Detectives are investigating a drive-by shoot-
ing that occurred at 64th Street and NW 2nd Avenue at 8:14 p.m.The offender in this
case was targeting a man outside the store who was shot but not seriously injured.
Unfortunately, another woman who was in the store shopping was hit by a stray bul-
let. Her injuries were fatal.


Someone stole a wheel and tire off a 2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo parked in a
driveway in the area of 135th Street and 1st Avenue, around 10 p.m.The thief jacked
up the front passenger side of the car and took the front passenger wheel and tire,
leaving the car resting on a cinder block. The victim told police the dealership
advised him that a new wheel and tire would cost more than $675.


I i p *


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


IIIl11111


What is the status of young Black men in Miami? -


ANN MYERS

Ma n y ------
people





se way, o p
believe our
y o u n g
Black men
are a
w a s t e .
Somehow,
someway,
we have to
regroup
and change
that image. Somewhere along
the way we forgot where we
came from and our own race is
hurting ourselves."


MAUDELL SMITH

"My perception is that once
one young
mess[es] up
then people
are quick to
give up on
them and
figure they
are no
good.
People need
to put their
arms around some young
Black men and show them that
it's alright and someone is
there for them. Many young
Black men don't understand
that it is a life to be lived and
they don't have to be in the
streets doing the wrong thing. I
know how a lot of young Black
men feel because they get
rejected when they go for these
jobs and they get a sense that
they are rejected by society and
it is not right. I feel regardless
of what someone do[es], he
should be given a chance."


JOHNNIE COOPER

"It seems as [if] the future for


y o u n g

is in bad
shape. It's
kind of sad
beca use
most of
them end
up in jail or
in a grave-
yard and
that's not right. Education is
the number one problem
because a lot of them are not
going to school. I don't know
why the image of the Black
man is like this because back
in the days it used to be all the
young men getting the jobs.
Now it's the young and older
Black women that's getting the
jobs while the men are sitting
on the corner just looking. It's
hard to get a job if you don't
finish high school. Maybe they
can go to a trade school if they
don't want to go to college. A lot
of young Black women put
young [Black] men down
because they want to be with
someone who they feel are up
to their standard but not all of
them are like that."



TAMARA DOWBELL

"I think
that people
are judging :
y o u ng
Black men
by the bad
actions of
some. I
blame part
of it on the
uip bring -
ings and
the surroundings but as the
old saying goes, it takes a vil-
lage to raise a child. If I had
the power to make a change I
would put more programs
around and I would help the
Compiled byTerrell Clayton


parents in the home."

ANGEL ALLEN


"I feel
b a d
because a
lot of Black
men make
w r o n g
decisions
but you
have to
face conse-
quences.
That's life. Most Black women
either has been raised around
a Black man who have done
them or their family or mama
wrong. Many times the way a
girl sees her mama treat a
man is the same way she is
going to treat her man or hus-
band. If I had the power to do
something I would have pub-
lic speakers, professionals
and athletes talk to these
young Black men and teach
them that they can be suc-
cessful."

TAVARES JONES

"It is a

young
future for

Black men.
I know I
have a
future. I
think that if
young men
stop going
to jail [and]
getting, in
trouble then maybe the image
of us will be different. The
reason why many women feel
like they do about Black men
is because we are always get-
ting into trouble and they
don't want to be with someone
who don't have a future. We
have to work hard and be
something. Not all Black men
are no good."


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4A The Miami Times, Ivi 6


-- -


SreTa


A A mt-_ r 3n/lfz


I






Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 5A


Tarpet marketing to Blck% In new


med


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Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


-dw a -
4 r I40


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GH_19597_HMONo DA 04/06


The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 5A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


I
~~


hdodwipf








RA The Miami TimeP. Mav .-2. 200F6


Roosevell
CLYNE
contlinued from 3A
one bad hire, and has the
unique privilege of being
stripped of his personnel
authority.
The County Manager says
lie stands behind Roosevelt
Bradley, however, it appears
that lie stands quite a long
distance behind him. What is
interesting about Bradley's
situation is that no one accus-
es him of stealing money, he
is not related to the person
hired, his department has not
gone $54 million over budget,
and he otherwise has not
trampled any ethical consid-
erations that would merit an
investigation.
Roosevelt's department
hired a lady recommended by
the South Florida
Employment Training
Consortium ("SFETC").
SFETC was formed in part to
help people who were on wel-
fare get jobs. The agency
refers people to Miami-Dade
County, City of Miami, Miami-
Dade County Public Schools
and other employers. Mayor
Penelas promoted the agency
to help people coming off wel-
fare get jobs.
Miami Dade Transit received


t Bradley
a referral and hired Fullerton
as a temporary employee.
Why was the hiring of
Fullerton problematic? She
was hired as a result of the
suggestion of a person who is
known to Roosevelt. This is
not per se a violation or every-
one who refers someone to
someone else to get hired
would be under investigation.
The situation is more ludi-
crous, when you realize that
the Director of SFETC is sup-
posed to refer unemployed
citizens to government agen-
cies and knows many senior
managers. Are all of them
now guilty of some ethical
violation? Should the
Inspector General now inves-
tigate the thousands of people
that SFETC has sent to vari-
ous potential employers?
While the Inspector General
is off investigating all of these
poor, welfare mothers who
now have jobs, such a sin, the
County can spend another
$100 million at the Airport in
cost overruns. Who cares
about a mere $200 million in
cost overruns, American
Airlines will have a beautiful
new terminal at County tax-
payer expense. Yes, we know
American Airlines was sup-
pose to build the terminal,


) % Ut % %b 16.% &aee *v 9 % b qh Wb


did nothing wrong
but you know it was such a hired in a similar manner and
bother to them the County their hiring was approved by
decided to be a good landlord his superior, Assistant County
and use our tax dollars to Manager Carlos Bonzon, then
help our poor, poor American Assistant County Manager
Airlines. Barbara Jordan, Assistant
Sorry. Back to my story. Director of Administration,
Fullerton passed the initial Mayra Bustamante, and Chief
background check and of Human Resources,
worked well in her position of Bill Foster.
a temporary employee. She If Roosevelt committed a sin
was recommended for a full- on this hiring, then why not
time position by her supervi- investigate Bonzon and his
sor who said she was a hard other superiors for approving
worker. In keeping with the last round of hiring? For
County policy, she was transi- that matter, why stop at that
tioned from temporary to full- level, the County Manager has
time employment. hired people without a com-
Are you wondering what petitive bidding process. Why
Roosevelt Bradley did wrong? not investigate him?
Nothing. He merely approved It seems that one rational
her hiring. As a result of this conclusion is that Roosevelt
approval, she had to go Bradley, a Black male, the
through a full background last Black Director at the
screening and it came back County, has a genetic defect
that she had a criminal that is leading to his extinc-
record. She was immediately tion his pigmentation is just
told that she was to be fired or a shade too dark for the
she could resign. The matter Stephen P. Clark Center.
was reported to the police and His fate seems to be that of
she was picked up. Angela Gittens, Charles
Again, what did Roosevelt Phillips, Al Brewster, Tony
Bradley do wrong? Nothing. Crapp and other Black man-
Fullerton is not a relative, not agers extinction. They all
a friend. He received no suffered from the rare disease
money for hiring her. Where that led to their extinction
is the ethical violation? "Working While Black at the
Two computer workers were County".


W. sm N vI-


0040


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
C m- ri N s

- Available from Commercial News Providers"



'L^-"(


Recent Triangle murders first

since girl's killing last year


TRIANGLE
continued from 1A
a clear benefit and can increase
the city's tax base.
He cites the new pool hall
located across the street from
the site of Saturday's murders.
"I don't have a need for a pool
hall in the city of Opa-locka," he
said. Open for only three
months, Wright said the estab-
lishment has already been
found to harbor illegal firearms.
The city's mayor, Joseph
Kelly, said he has asked the city
manager to "put together a
budget for a mini-sub [police]
station for the area" to submit
for the commission's considera-
tion. The mayor is also review-
ing the city charter to deter-
mine whether the hours of
operation of the area stores can
be modified a move to
address the criminal activity
that occurs during late night
hours.
Sounding like a sociologist
and a criminologist, Wright's
approach combines a get tough
line of attack with a focus on
prevention. The 41 year old said
community policing must also
involve efforts to eradicate the
environment that breeds crime.
Locking up criminals is one
obvious aspect; however,
Wright said for police to simply
be about arresting people is


"misguided and one-sided."
Community outreach is a
part of Opa-locka's crime
reduction strategy. Wright ven-
tures out into the community
monthly as a part of his "Chiefs
Night Out" initiative "bringing
the police department to the
community to find out first
hand how we can...be more
responsive to their needs."
A five-year employee of the
popular Homestyle restaurant
could not identify the police
chief and said she had not
heard of his "Chiefs Night Out.
The popular restaurant is
located at 14905 NW 22nd
Avenue, "around the corner"
from the murder scene. The
27-year-old employee, who
requested anonymity, said the
police department needs to
"start doing something [to] stop
the crime and drugs." When
queried on the community's
role in reducing crime, she
replied, "as far as what?"
Battling community apathy is
a part of Wright's challenge.
Despite pleas to the communi-
ty to report crime anonymously
- the chief said over the past
year, the department has
received- zero calls. Anyone
with information about
Saturday's killings can call
Crime Stoppers at 305-471-
8477. All callers may remain
anonymous.


Gov. Bush shot down again


VOUCHER
continued from 1A
part due to the support of
Republicans.
In what many see as a retal-
iatory move, Miami Republican
Alex Villalobos was stripped of
his post as majority leader by
Senate President Tom Lee.
The Republicans have
regrouped and are planning
to push an alternative vouch-
er bill despite being unsure of
its legality. The bill, which
does not require voter
approval, is aimed at protect-
ing vouchers for the 733 stu-
dents using them in private


schools by putting them into
the voucher program paid for
by corporate sponsors, which
was not struck down by the
courts. The high court
ordered the private-school
vouchers to end when the
current school year is fin-
ished.
The 'Opportunity
Scholarships' were offered to
students attending schools
that received failing grades in
accountability measures in
two out of four years. The
voucher could be used' in
another public school of the
parents' choice or in partici-
pating private schools.


Attention People with Medicare:




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Prescription Drug Plan?




Do you know if you're getting the


most value for your health care dollar?



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Medicare health plan that already includes the Medicare Part D

drug.benefit coverage* for $0 monthly plan premium?


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Our seminars present you with your choices in an easy-to-understand way.You'll
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An HMO with a Medicare contract available to anyone enrolled in both Part A and Part B of Medicare through age or disability who continues to pay Medicare applicable premiums.
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Le' ta~l lk, I... Ca/I!l[ll tda fr esraton, nfrmtonorfr accommodat] 'ion of pesonswithspeial eed atsals metigs




Monday Friday 7:00- a)m.- to 1[00p ., atrdy 700al. ll lI uJl' Jtol5:30p I. Eastern Time


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


GH19597 2 HMO No


DAD 05/06







Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 7A


i hod on M ih h rthda


"Copyrighted Material

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Leah


A. Simms,


L.L.C.
and Associates


Attorneys at Law
Former County Court Judge (1982-1987)


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The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 7A


s kcalB Must Control y







Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Forgiveness is essential to progress


Any truly successful person
knows that forgiveness was
essential to Iheir success. Oprah
Winfrey knows it. Maya Angelou
knows it. Nelson Mandela knows
It. So do the countless number of
sexual and physical assault vic-
tims who have been able to
reclaim their lives.
Forgiveness is not about say-
ing 'it' was okay. Forgiveness is
about saying you will no longer


allow whatever 'it' was to hold
you hostage. Forgiveness says
you recognize that while another
human may have been able to
inflict pain upon you, only you
have the power to release its lin-
gering affects.
There's a reason Jesus advised
us to forgive seventy times seven.
It doesn't actually compute to a
finite numerical figure. The
number seven is powerful and


electionss
symbolic. Jesus
meant that we
should forgive as
M often as neces-
sary and some-
times necessary
is as often as
every day. We can
never forgive too much.
We should forgive big and we
should forgive small. We should
forgive the spouse or significant
other who broke our heart and
we should forgive the store clerk
whose behavior we found insult-
ing. We should forgive the friend


"Copyrighted Material


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Available from Commercial News Providers"
So"Copyrighted Material
SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
... ......- -li * *
"ro-.- ,. "Copyrighted Material
... Syndicated Content ......
S:,^ Available from Commercial News Providers"







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who did not behave according to
our standards and the 'enemy'
who continuously pushes our
buttons. We should forgive our
child's teacher for daring to
expect us to conference with
them in our child's best interest
and we should forgive the driver
who cut us off in traffic.
We could learn a lot from our
children about forgiveness the
younger the child, the better.
Watching young children play is a
powerful lesson in letting go and
moving on. It is as children begin
to mature and take on adult qual-
ities that they lose the innocence


"I want my work to look like
it just happened, as if it were
made by nature."
Dale Chihuly


Tropical Chihuly Nights
Every Thursday from
6:00 9:00 p.m. It's a
whole new exhibit after dark!


that makes forgiveness easy.
Our adultness tells us that we
are justified in being angry, hold-
ing the grudge or making some-
one pay. We assume that by
replaying an event over and over
in our minds that we are some-
how moving towards its resolu-
tion. We only resolve it by letting
it go and letting it go will
always involve forgiveness.
Forgiveness is the most power-
ful action a human being can
take because it is rooted in love.
Forgiveness involves more than
simply forgetting. It involves the
recognition that, as Maya


Angelou says, "when people know
better, they do better." It involves
the awareness that the pain any-
one else inflicts upon us is rooted
in pain because hurt people hurt
people.
Forgiveness involves taking all
the energy that keeps us stuck
and refocusing it to other areas of
our lives to help us move for-
ward. If Nelson Mandela can for-
give the people who imprisoned
him for 27 years, then certainly
we can forgive folk for far lesser
slights.
Forgiveness, like the truth,
shall set you free.


Come to Fairchild this winter and spring to experience art and nature as one.
Chihuly at Fairchild weaves together art and nature, showcasing Dale Chihuly's
stunning glass forms and Fairchild's breathtaking landscape and collections.
See them for yourself December 3, 2005, through May 31, 2006.
It's the art event of the year. For more information, admission prices,
parking and advance ticketing, please visit www.fairchildgarden.org.


FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARPlN
Exploring, Explaining and Conserving the World of Tropical Plants
10901 Old Culler Road. Coral Gables, Florida 33156
www.fairchildgarden.org


The owners of the stores listed below are making space avail-
able for the South's largest Black weekly circulation.
You no longer have to share your copy. When you pick up
The Miami Times, don't forget to buy something, too. Please
patronize the following stores and shops.
South Dade
Allen's Market, 212 W Mowry Dr Homestead
M&M Market, 11607 S.W. 216th Street
Nat's Grocery, 17600 Homestead Avenue
North. Dade
Billy's Food Market, 4078 N.W. 167 Street
Freedom Market, 14495 N.W. 22 Avenue
Joysi Food Market 4002 NW 17th Avenue
La Prima Market, 9930 N.W. 7 Avenue
NMB Food Market, 473 NE 167 Street
Nini's Market, 1297 N.W. 54 Street
Phillip's Market, 9100 N.W. 17 Avenue
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Safa Market, 15400 N.W. 7 Avenue
S&G Supermarket, 5100 NW 22nd Avenue
Broward
John's Market, 229 N. Dixie Hwy
PS House of Meat, 4050 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.



Call Nathaniel today!

305-694-6214


1


For only $65, you can let Mom and the world know
how much you love, respect and appreciate her! '''
You may also send Mothers Day greetings to your
grandma, sister, godmother, aunt.., anyone who's like a mother to you.
Remember to bring in your color photograph.

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Deadline: Tuesday, May 9
Fill out the grid, bring or mail it to:
The Miami Times
900 NW 54th St., Miami, FL 33127
or FAX to 305-694-6211
or call 305-694-6210


For multiple entries form may be duplicated


CHIHULY AT FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN.
PRESENTED BY TARGET. DECEMBER 3, 2005 MAY 31, 2006.


L


I


I II iI I I .II I I I I 1t
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Blacks MUSt Control Their Own Destiny The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 9B


Don't accept less


Let's nagine that someone
told vyo that you could have
voir ci:eaim house for free.
Now, let's suppose that during
the construction of this dream
house, some people came along
and told you that you couldn't
have your dream home, or that
you really didn't deserve to
have a new house. Or if you
actually moved into the home,
someone knocked on your door


and told you that you had to
leave, and you would be moved
from your five bedrooms, four
bath home into efficiency.
Now, you might wonder
where I am going with this. I
spoke to the Lord about one of
His daughters who had been
offered a position that entailed
a generous flexibility in her
work schedule. After some
months, however, there


Can I believe what you said?


It seemed as though it were
yesterday. As. a young boy
growing up I found myself hav-
ing to work many summers to
make ends meet. My mother
was a single parent and far
from being wealthy. In the
midst of her financial shortfall
she always demonstrated a
great deal of diligence. She


fill"


Roby George Park is start-
ing the Men's Adult Basketball
League and is looking for vol-
unteer coaches and mentors.
Registration thru May 8. For
more information, contact
Derrick McPhee at 305-247-
4020 or Corey McDowell at
305-242-4305.
*******
The Center for Family and
Child Enrichment, Inc. is
currently recruiting foster
parents and adoptive parents.
For more information, contact
Alicia Curry-Hardy at 305-
624-7450 ext. 190.
*******
The North Dade Steering.
Committee will host a Town
Hall Informational Forum,
May I from 7-9 p.m. at Miami
Central High School. For more
information call Mack Samuel
at 305-758-9989.
*******
Iota Phi Lambda extends a
cordial invitation to the public
to attend its 24th annual
Iphilam Phantasia presenta-
tion of Gems and Gents, May
13 at 6 p.m. at Miami Lakes
Educational Center
Auditorium. For more infor-
mation, please call 305-836-
8048.


Illl


Pastor Boyce and New Family
Life Worship Center invites
everyone to a special Mother's
Day service on May 13 at 11
a.m. For more information,
please call 305-623-0054.
*******
Mt. Bethel Baptist Church is
having a homebuyer workshop
about New Visions CDC Down
Payment Assistance Program,
May 20 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Free breakfast and lunch with
limited seating. For more infor-
mation, call 954-768-0963.

Come celebrate with the mem-
bers of New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church of Hollywood
for the 7th Pastoral Anniversary
of Elder Connail Johnson. The
dates are May 11-14. For more
information, call 954-920-6368.

God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to praise and
worship the Lord and witness a
mighty move of God in the serv-
ice of the Lord, Sunday, May 7
at 4 p.m. For more information,
call 786-258-1826.
*******
International Prophet Henry
Walker is holding a Prophetic
Revival Service, Friday May 5 at
7 p.m. at the Richmond Heights


was a hard worker. Some
nights the lights would still be
burning as I hurried off to bed
and believe it or not as I would
slowly awaken the next morn-
ing the glare of the lights
would greet me; it was as if
she never left her work the
night before!
Weekends were great; I was


The City of Miami will host
a public meeting on May 13
from 8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. at
the Coconut Grove Exposition
Center to present to the public
the first draft of Miami 21. For
more information, call 305-
416-2121.
*******
The Family Foundation of
Miami presents a HIV/AIDS
Community Wide Seminar,
May 6 from 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
at the Joseph Caleb Center.
For more information, call
305-978-7100.
*******
The Documentary, 'Alpha
Phi Alpha Men: A Century of
Leadership,' will air every
Wednesday in May at 7 p.m.
on WLRN Learn (Channel 79
on most cable systems in
Miami-Dade County only).

Women in Transition are
having their seventh -annual
Mother's Day Breakfast, May
13 from 9-11 a.m. at
American Legion Park. To
RSVP, call Patrice Jones at
305-507-1316 or Pastor
Owens at 786-355-5985.
******New Birth Optimist Club of
New Birth Optimist Club of


Chuch ote


Woman's Club. For more infor-
mation call 305-382-8738.
******* I
Holy Ghost \ Faith
Deliverance Ministries, Inc.,
Willie D. James, pastor, will be
celebrating their Church
Anniversary, May 2-5 at 7:30
p.m. nightly and closing out
May 7 at 3 p.m. For more infor-
mation, please contact 786-413-
5939, 786-413-3639 or 305-
696-5107.

The Jewels Among Us Fifth
Anniversary Mother's
Appreciation Breakfast will be
May 13 at Signature Gardens.
For more information, call
Carolyn at 305-246-4084 or the
church at 305-251-6828.

Christian Fellowship
Worship Center For All People,
Inc., Joy E.L. Jackson, pastor,
will have Intercessory Prayer
and Bible Study Tuesdays at
6:30 and 7:30 p.m. respectively;
Sunday School at 9 a.m.; and
Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. For
more information, call 305-681-
0104.

Come sail with New
Providence Missionary Baptist
Church on the Jungle Queen
Dinner Cruise to help celebrate


Miami-Dade 3rd graders make


The percentage of third
graders in Miami-Dade County
Public Schools who can read
and do math jumped sharply
in 2006, pushed higher for a
second straight year by results
from the District's School
Improvement Zone, data
released Monday by the
Florida Department of
Education shows.
The percentage of third


graders reading at grade level
rose to 71 percent a ten-per-
centage-point increase over
last year. In terms of students,
one more third grader in every
ten can read as well as is
expected in that grade.
In the 20 elementary schools
in the School Improvement
Zone, the percentage of stu-
dents reading at grade level
climbed by 17 percentage


seemed to be some resent-
ment from other employees
because of this flexibility that
others did not enjoy. She con-
sidered leaving the position
because other employees were
becoming somewhat cool
toward her, and she felt that
she should either leave the
job, or work a 'normal' sched-
ule to lessen the conflict at
work.
Finally, my friend realized
that God blessed her with the
position, and she was doing
no more than what was
offered to her prior to accept-
ing the position. She realized
that she was being intimidat-
ed by the enemy, who did not
want her to enjoy the favor of

allowed to accompany her at
work. As a vendor at the local
market she would often tell me
that if I made a few sales she
would allow me to go to the
local movie theatre. More sales
always meant a little extra for
popcorn and drink! As we
walked to the bus station she
would tell me what my quota
for the day was and usually it
needed to be accomplished
before the afternoon movie
began; somewhere around 2
p.m. Can I believe what you
said?
Today I draw reference to
one of the greatest accounts of
trust ever seen in the Bible. In

Greater Miami Pop Warner is
in need of a Cheerleader
Commissioner, Football and
Cheerleading coaches for all
weight classes. Football and
Cheerleading registration is
now open. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-685-3700
or 305-691-3464.
*******
The .McIntyre Institute
specializing in Liturgical
Dance is having its annual
production, 'Called to Dance'
Chapter III, May 6 at 7 p.m. at
the Gusman Olympia Center.
For more information, call
305-628-8920.
*******
Miami Vice star Philip
Michael Thomas and Sandi
Morals are currently casting
triple threats for their ninth
production of Sacha on
Broadway. Accepting piack-
ages from April 15 to May 15.
For more information, visit
www.sandimorais.net.
*******
Miami Dade College North
will have its 29th annual
Theodore R. Gibson
Oratorical, Declamation and
Advocacy Project on May 3
from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more
information, visit
www.nldc.edu/ north/gibson.

Class Meetings
Miami Northwestern's


Mother's Day on May 12. For
more information, contact Sister
Yolanda Davis at 305-830-2063
or Sister Mary Doster at 305-
333-4958.
*******
Love Taberncale of God
PAWCC is hosting their annual
Women of Righteousness
Conference May 3-5 at 7:30
p.m. nightly. For more informa-
tion, please call Sister Natasha
Deloach at 786-712-6239.

Union Grove Missionary
Baptist Church presents the
first Ladies Conference Gala,
May 27 at 7 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call Minister Pamela E.
Brooks at 305-303-2809.

Faith Prayer and Praise
Deliverance Cathedral,
Dorothy Davis, pastor, invites
you to: Sunday School, 9:45
a.m.; Worship Service, Sundays
at 11 a.m.; Bible Study,
Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m.; and
Praise and Worship, Thursdays
at 7:30 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 305-696-2072.

Send your church
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamiteditori-
al@bellsouth or mail to 900
NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6216.


big FCAT gains
points. As a result, more than
half of the Zone's third graders
- 55 percent now read at
grade level. By comparison,
about a third of Zone third
graders could read that well
when the District launched the
initiative in 2004. Identified
based on chronic poor per-
formance, Zone schools have
longer school days and school
Please turn to FCAT 10B


the Lord. She decided to con-
tinue working the hours as
initially agreed upon, and not
entertain any more thoughts
of leaving because of the atti-
tudes of other co-workers.
When I presented this situa-
tion before the Lord, He asked
me why His people could not
be more like this child of His.
"Why is it," He asked, "is it
that I promise certain things
to My children, and they set-
tle for so much less?"
This is the reason that I
posed the scenario in the
beginning of this article. In
the natural, we would want
what we were promised. If we
were promised, and expected,
and planned for a five bedroom

Matthew 8 verse 5-10 it reads;
As Jesus went into
Capernaum, a centurion came
up to Him begging Him and
saying, Lord my servant boy is
lying at the house paralyzed
and distressed with intense
pains. And Jesus said to him,
I will come and restore him.
The centurion .replied to Him,
Lord I am not worthy or fit to
have you come under my roof;
but only speak the word and
my servant boy will be cured. I
am also a man under authori-
ty, with soldiers subject to me;
and I say to one, go and he
goes; and to another, Come
and he comes; and to my

Class of 1956, Invincibles II,
will be celebrating its 50th
class reunion. Classmates are
invited to join us June 8 19.
For more information, please
call Bettie Clay Anderson at
305-625-6744 or Elizabeth
McDugle Davis at 305-693-
2854.
*******
Mays High School Alumni
Association Reunion 2006
will be at the Miccousukee
Resort and Gaming, June 15-
18. For more information, call
305-246-4084.

Attention all Miami
Northwestern Sr. High
Alumni Class Presidents or
Representatives from 1980 -,
2005: Please call the following
numbers for information
about an important upcoming
event, 305-638-1946 or 305-
638-5618 ext. 232.


home, then that's exactly what
we would want. God has made
some great and marvelous
promises to us. He lias shared
them with us in His Holy Word.
in quiet times with us. and
through prophecies by anoint-
ed men and women of God. We
hear these promises and they
excite us, and we wait with
hope and anticipation for them
to come to pass. However,
when the devil gets wind of
what is on the horizon, and
begins to cause disturbances,
we wimp out and back off.
We begin to accept less than
what God has promised us.
My friend said that she felt that
it was an insult to compromise
with her schedule simply

slave, do this and he does it.
When Jesus heard him, iHe
/ marveled and said to those
who followed Him, I tell you
truly I have not found so much
faith as this with any one,
even in Israel (amplified ver-
sion). Can I believe what you
said?
Well, my mother usually
came through once I made my
quota; but today as I observe
the lack of faith by persons
claiming to know God: the
question on the table is Can
we believe what God said? I
am persuaded that we can;
Jesus was so impressed by the
faith demonstrated by this

*******
Miami Jackson's Class of
1971's Reunion will be held
June 19-25. For more infor-
mation, please call Gail D
(Lemon) Roberts at 305-620-
7370 or 305-343-0839 or call
Sherry (Peters) Jones at 305-
635-5019.
*******
Miami Edison will have an
Ole' Timer's Pep Rally, May 19
from 6:30 9:30 p.m. and we
are looking for all Edison fam-
ily members to attend. For
more information, call 305-
754-0194.
*******
The B.T.W class of 1961
will sell dinners May 6 from
12-3 p.m. at Our Saviour
Lutheran Church. All pro-
ceeds go to the B.T.W scholar-
ship fund. For more informa-
tion, call 305-332-3951.
********


because someone else ihad a
problem with it. A schedule
change would not benelit he
company: it was just to pia'iilv
jealous rumblings. She said
that it would be an offense to a
good and generous God 1 give
back what He had given lier.
Please take the time to think
if you have been settling for
less than what God has for
you. There are times that God
is not ready for us to have all
that WE want, and we must be
patient and wait for His perfect
timing to release His blessings.
But when God has decided
that it is time let no man or
demon get in your way. Accept
nothing from the devil. Accept
everything from the Lord.

centurion who clearly made it
evident as he said. I can
believe what you said. Only
speak the word and my ser-
vant will be healed! Today we
are living in trying times.
Challenges seem to have
become greater than ever
before; but I know that if we
would hold on to the promises
of God, He will come throilgh!
God is unable to lie, therefore
every promise He made, He
must fulfill; His word is forev-
er settled in heaven! Can 1
believe what you said?
"Whether you believe or not:
God said it and that settles it!"
- Reverend Leo Douglas

The 1981 Classes of Miami
Jackson, Miami Central!and
Miami Northwestern I are
coming together as one to
triple their fun for.their 25th
High School Reunion, Jun 4 -
11. For more information,
please call 305-769-2459.

Coral Gables Senior High
School's 1986 Class
Reunion will be August > at
The Sonesta Hotel and S ites
in Coconut Grove. For ti ore
information, risit
www.reunionweb.com. *1

Send your commu ity
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305- 57-
5770, email to miamitetito-
rial@bellsouth.net or rail
to 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, 33127-1818. Forfur-
ther information, call 105-
694-6216.


3: 0 0 M

WHILE YOU'RE TAKING YOUR DAUGHTER TO DANCE CLASS,

DR. HARRIS FINDS BREAST CANCER IN HER PATIENT

A YEAR BEFORE SHE WOULD HAVE FELT A LUMP.


You treasIure lVCTV icvmoment in youri !ioie an t'che. (lotorls Avi n
[Hospital and Medical Center are doing, great .hings cto. cnstirA A O.u
experience ajl .of1 A iln,. Dh ocI rs, lii.:c : AlanmmI I Hurris, Director A of the1
\venturi": Brcast Diagnousic (Cren;er, She h;:s mnade it hei,. iif:cs work io I.'
n dvocme for i ;eariy deltecion (of reato cancer, pon. t entric esrtin"
anod the most 'dvAncAd ,iagnostic A'ols, givin mwo.en ohe ibs or '!A ival';I.


Dr. Harris is just one of the renownAed sp.ecialitsIis .u Avcnluira Hospital
11d is pl t: of the reason why we w arc ', ec'mling one of th.e liOI
respected hospitals in Sauudrh Iorida. From lifc-savi.nf' soarcrics, o
pio r cin icriii' s, our di ciors i 're sommei < > tAe, Sanic th ing au I:i'ozi.)ri cs
in medicine today. So \h :cithd r : i( I -m )or I po, wve'r wor.:;ki ..'
p!'Vidi





For a breast screening or consultation
:ith one of our breast cancer specialists,
call 1-888-256-7692.













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all(l .Medtical Cn)(r ]

GREAT THINGS ARE HAPPENING.







\V. lprovidc free tra.nslpol-,rni t ,lPcas. call to find Out if you rcsid


I 0___ _i


The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 9B


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny










x. vin jSe I aL. mL IL L U.N, ISt. Oy %j u


Beta Beta Lambda Chapter wins Regional Chapter of the Year award


The mighty South Florida
Alpha Phi Alpha Chapter. Beta
Beta Lambda, Inc. of Miami,
Florida won the prestigious
Southern Region Outstanding
Chapter of the Year Award.
Receiving the award on a
Sunday morning, the last day of
the Southern Region
Convention, were: Chapter
President Ola O. Aluko; Vice
President David Young Sr.;
Franklin Clark; Albert Dotson,
Sr.; Brodes Hartley, Jr.;
Anthony Munroe; Marc Garcia;
Dana Moss Sr.; Brian Phillip
and Joseph Bay.
The Chapter competed
against six other chapters from
different states in the Southern
region. The states included:
Alabama, Mississippi,
Tennessee, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Georgia and


FCAT scores shows promise


FCAT
continued from 9B

years and use a uniform, high-
ly structured instructional
program that emphasizes liter-
acy.
FCAT reading results are
particularly important for 3rd
graders, who need to score
above the lowest FCAT level -
Level one to be promoted
into fourth grade or receive a
waiver of that state require-
ment. In 2006, only 18 percent
of the District's third graders
scored at Level one in reading,
the first time that fewer than
20 percent of third graders in
Miami-Dade are at risk of
being retained. In the Zone
schools, fewer than a third of
3rd graders scored at Level
one, down from slightly more


than half two years ago.
The drop in students scoring
at Level one in reading
District-wide means that more
than 2,000 more third graders
will be promoted into fourth
grade for next school year.
A portion of the FCAT also
compares the performance of
students in Florida's to those
nationally. Results from this
part of the test showed that
the District's median reading
score rose to 57 percent, plac-
ing Miami-Dade's median
above the national median of
50.
In math, the percentage of
third graders scoring at grade
level rose to 69 percent, up by
six percentage points over
2005. In the Zone schools, the
percentage scoring at grade
level rose by ten points.


Florida. The competition criteria
was based on community serv-
ice, fraternal service, awards,
scholarship, economic empow-
erment and personal growth of
members of the organization.
Later this year in July, the
brothers of Beta Beta Lambda
will convene in Washington,
D.C. with over 20,000 Alphas to


Miami Alphas win top regional award


ODates: AJun 2-.Jul 2. 2006
Time: Mor; 8e.L'tin J0am@0SVOt#
Locaiionf7: V T Ishfng SHS :
12X, NWi"&h Ave,. Marn. FL 33136
EligdMily: GA-s 00V
1!s-7t grdef or a S 3 13
Fee $Y0 R17 h;Wra ion 8 S 15 Miow.k
Before and Aftercare: $2,we ek

E1LY LOACH AD SMACK IW41 'LLID
AV Arplf da5tun4W fA T 1, 2Wr6i


celebrate their Centennial
Anniversary.
At this event, the Beta Beta
Lambda Chapter will be
bestowed the honor of Co-
National Outstanding Chapter
of the year. This will make the
first time in twenty years that
the chapter has received this
prestigious award.


The Rites of Passage Community Celebration will feature posi-
tive youth performances, tribute to women pioneers, drum call
and featured guests as we recognize girls in their Rites of
Passage into Womanhood.
DATE: SATURDAY MAY 6, 2006
TIME: 12 NOON 3PM
LOCATION: CHARLES HADLEY PARK BLACK BOX THEATRE
1300 NW 50TH STREET MIAMI, FL 33142
TICKETS: $25 ADULTS/ $10 AGE 17 AND UNDER
LUNCH INCLUDED
FOR MORE INFORMATION
TEL: 305-576-3084 OR VISIT: WWW.URGENTINC.ORG

Special Guests Performances By
Larry Robinson
Will "Da Real One" Bell
Venus Rising Drum and Dance Ensemble
Latrice Bruno
Kay McGill
Professor Slap Drummers
Event Hosts
Elder Emily Diane Gunter
Founder Rites of Passage Youth Empowerment Academy
Gene Tinnie
Kuumba Artists Collective of Miami


P A PALLIANCE
I NP IP t r tO: f w rpiT h t Cu 'tfsris FOR
--rs--- t f ttt i HUMAN
V7 *> v-w 3 e wwwarawino..auB 'he rst SERVICE


'1.a


r


.I1 ...... C O


93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"' Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30 a.1i. Iily Miming Worship
II a.m..,Mornin Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3ni Sunday ........( I11.
iTueslday Bible Study ...7 p. in
wehsite: cibhc.ii,r



Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
Itil- llslhlil)l'rlycii ?yrS, lls ulhi.lll
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami. FL
305-759-8875
Orler ,olfservices
i IIlm "f Prayer......... 6:30 a.m.
,I/arly& Morning Worship....7:30() a m.l
ySund;ty SchtIl ...........9:30 a.ml.
M IIllill Wori hip ............I I .lll.
Youil t Miniisry Sldy....W ..... 7 pI.i.
S iyr/BillC Sliudy ...W lcd.... 7 I.III
Nitlniday Allar I'nay nI.. M-F)
Feeiliig lie I liuisy eveiy
WS citlnSeyl....... II I .1 )I 11.



New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sulldays C5 ii5 h School...............L 11a.lm.

Tuedays B ible C(lass..............7 p.n.
4th S nlday livenilg Worship........6 p.nl.


/ postolic Revival Center,
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New lime lif T.V. 'Program
SFOR HOP1 E FOR TOI)AY
51 1\Vcd a .ll lr i IIIIs r e 1ll tl 1i I iII.

rii ll Serv\iceV l. .................I
Sil. li\.. l l ...........7:0 1.3 l p ,
1' ;.- yll ,y M e, i.. ........ 7:30 n...
hi. ]UN, Simly ............... 17:0p


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
rlalla y Worshil ..............7 a.m.
Su day School.. .......... l.1m.
N 13C ............................10:(05 a.m.
Worshi p .......................I I U.a.m.
W orshlli .........................4 p .m.n
Mission lld 1 Bihle Class
'Tuesdayly ...............6:30 p.m.
YYoullh Meclin./i(hiir Iclheiisal
Moini3y ...................... :30 n.im.



/New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500


Order of Services:

S w' i I hi :i l s ti
nin:;, W tu' lip .... .... 0:30

\is .... i ..... ........ 8 Ii,
B ible Slll.. ............. il.l. )


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396


Order of Services
Sunday
IBible Study ............. 9 a;.m. : :::* M orning W orship ...........
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday, 8 a.m.- 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8, 19, 22, 23, 30 and 37
Web page: www.penmlbrokeparkcoc.org


Victory on the Rock "
Ministries, Inc.
16178 NW 27th Avenue
305-625-3376 / 305-333-3144

Order of Services:
Sun daly M0 n1ill n ............t) a.ii
We\VeC'lil ty Night Ilible Studyy
7 p .i


1(1 a m


Trinity Faith Tabernacle
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4' Street. Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Services:
tSul tv y Scll sl .......l ..i :. I IIn.
suLll. M. l nig L ts ., .. 12 pm....
FI' unii .W ou hil ,Serlv.... 11.
TI sdII l "y Youth Nihl" ....S pI ..
W I N. i "Noi Pli' IiS'iiC .. hi lli I' i
W ed Nil' Hihl '(l s.....8 Irali
Th[lii m l d Ni, hl ( 'lii lllll iblo e
"itl y Niuhl \V.l 'lip S i',I...' 1 i.,n,
\AmmRa=Mwi i


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. I19th Street
305-688-1612
Fay: 305-681-8719
Order of Services:
Sun...9:30(1 n.m....(Sunday School)
Walk in Ihe Woid lMinistry
Worship Service .............. I .m.11
Tuesday....7 p.m:...Family Night
Wed.. I m.init.1-iclcessory Piayer
Wed. Bible Class........12 p..
Wed. Bible Class..............7 p.m.
Rev. Carol Nash,^^^^^^^
^ S enorPs tor/Teach


Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Mornling ...........8 a.m.
Sunday School .............10 a.111.
Sunday Evening ............. 6 p.m.
Mon. Excellence ........7:30 p.m.
< Tue. Bible Class ........7:30 p.m.
i-i,- Tr s Fellowship) ......... 1( L .
Ist Suim. Song PiPactice ..6 piam



New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103'1 St.
305-696-7745
Order oW' Services:


S ntll moon,, wh "hip
('hul'uh S'Llt)I |/( )tiClll 3il ,.n') ill.
No Dn , P.;- ,l
inday Iriday....12 p n,. I panm

'I'lln a. ....... ............ 7: 0 p.m




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 31' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
lrly Sunt1ltk y
Morning Worship .....7:30 a.m.









1755 N.W. 78' Street
Sunday Sdhool .......... 9:30 a.m .
Morning Worshilp ...11 a.m.

I.,cn ,i,, Worship ........ 7 p.m .




Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 781'1 Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105


Ii


Order of Services:
I ible Stldy W i .. .......... ..... i. .
SmnaI I l h t S.C l ..... ... I i :1 .11
Ssii. \W tsliilp S ,t. ... II i i. lii
red Nihl ItIc'se Hi. Ih awi ,l
IIlmlii 7: 1() w N p. I.
Slstllwih Wllr o l"iill S \ ic ..6:i l p.' iii


S Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
i I) l SLiitlsday Sclo)ol .......9:45- unl
Sunlliny ,ornllin Wol hill ,..... I Ia.ln.
Suiint; y Mcll's Bible Stul y ...5 p.
S"nIdl)y Ladies Bible Simttly ....5 p.ll.
T.clay Ni1ght Bhlu Sluy ....7:3(
rhtdllay M 13 11onalin Bile I l a ..


Christian Hill AME Church
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LMO9@BellSouth.Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services:
Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School...................... 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ........ I a.m.
Free Golf Every 2"' & 4' Sunday ............4 p.m.
Don Shula's Golf Course


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m., 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Sludy
10:45 a.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95"' Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

l Early Moming Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morningll Worlship .....I I a.m.
TuLesday Bible (Class 7 Ip.m.
Tues. Iri'm the Ist Sun3.... p.m.
Midl-week Worship




St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
iirly Morning Woiship.7:30a.m.in
Suilda;ly Schol ol ..........9:3 al.m.
Morning Wohip .....11 a.m.
WED)NESI)AY
Prayer Meeling ............7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.nl.



Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081

Order of Servsices:

Si' i) S rll Ic S .......... 1 S .Ill
ei bhlel I S rdI S I p.tII.

PatrCliseCatSeirte Yl


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmniami.org


St


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10'l Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
L Early Sunday Worship...7:30 ai.i.
Sunday Schllxl ................ 9:30 a.m.
Suixlay Momiing Wrship .....II I un..
Sunday Evcening Service ...6 p.m.
Tucslay Playcr Meeting ...7:')30 pm.
Wcdnesdlay Bible Study ...7:30 pm.
"Not Jusl a (]llrch Bill a Movellelt "



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8544
Order of Services:
Siiu day School ........... 9:45 a.m.
Suill. Morillnr Sei''. .... Ii .m.
4" Sun....BTU l .:30i-2:30 p.m.
Ie'lCsdT y.iL Bible Study
FIeeliing- Ministry......1 I.ll
IWel. Bible Siuly/lI'P;yer..6:30 pil



Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
SuLII lay Schioi l .............9:30 a.m .
NMo1iing IPrai.se/Worship..I I a.m.
Youlh Cllhoir- Siaturday ......II a.m.
Prayer Mecling & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.m.
m eni g hhqClA,. (' ll 15 121-451t
Reverenm W.Edward Mitchell


New Mount Moriah
Missionary Baptist Church
6700 N.W. 14th Avenue
305-691-1811
Order of Services:
Sunday Woi-hsip. S and I 0a.m.
Sunday Scho l ........... 9:45 a.m
Mondays
Prayer Waniors (Push)...7:30 p.m.
Bible Study......................8 p.m.




Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Moining Services
7:45 a.m.n.- 11I:15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a;.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.




Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. Ihru Fri. Noon Day Prayecr
Bible Stludy...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Sunday Worship...7- II a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 a.m.




Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68"' Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(23.4.5'" Sunday) ......8:00 am
Sunday School .......... 9:45 am
Morning Service ..... I1:00 am
Commnlunion Service
(Thuis. bclbr IP Sunlday) 7:30 pm
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
(Wednesday) 7:30 pm



/ he Soul Saving Station 0
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
1880 Washington Ave.
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
Order of Services:
Sunday School ........... 9 a.m.
Sunday Worship..l I am.i & 7 p.m1
Tuesday Worship .......7:45 p.m.
Noon Day Pi nyci....... Mon.-Fti.


^-------~---- -^7

The tik lujwad a Aeal

pays for Itself

and keeps your

church andyour pastor

before the community.

Call 305-694-6210


I


- --


- - '- - - -- -


cutraafar


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10B Th Mi i Times IVIa 6


I


r Bisop Vitor 1. Cury, DMin.,D.D, enio Ilasor/Techea


Dr. Prentiss C.Spivey, Ministe


IViP(mYm~SlmillR ~/






















Northwestern alumni visit school to provide encouragement


By Isheka Harrison
iharrison(cimiamitimesonline.com

When William Brown invited
me to come to my alma mater
and participate in Miami
Northwestern's annual career
day, I jumped at the chance. I
was excited about reaching out
to those who had come after me
and would carry on the proud
tradition of being a 'Bull'. I
looked forward to the event,
which did not disappoint.
On March 21, Miami
Northwestern Senior High
School held its annual Alumni
Career Day a day for suc-
cessful alumni to share their
experiences with current stu-
dents and encourage them to
strive for excellence while pur-
suing their dreams.
Chaired by Northwestern's
Student Service staff, the event
was well organized. JROTC
escorts greeted the alumni par-
ticipants and showed us to our
destinations. The morning
began with registration and a
continental breakfast in the
Johnnie M. Perry-Batist
Historical Archive. Afterwards


we gathered in the Theatre of
Performing Arts, where Bishop
Victor T. Curry and The
Morning Glory Team were
broadcasting live.
Introductions were made before
we shared why we chose to par-
ticipate.
Jermell Jenkins, president of
Miami-based promotional and
marketing company, Spase
Designz, is a 1994 graduate of
Miami Northwestern. He said
he attended the career day to
give back to future generations
and help address the problems
they faced. "I think it's very
important that we stop talking
behind closed doors and start
putting actions behind our
words to help our youth.
Everyone realizes the problems
but no one is enacting solu-
tions. This is a great way to
start."
Every occupation was repre-
sented from lawyers, educa-
tors and healthcare workers to
professional poets, journalists
and marketing specialists.
Even members from the first
graduating class of 1956, who
will be celebrating their 50th


Exceptional Student
Education, with a 2.94 grade
point average. Heather also
received an Associate in Arts
degree, hers in Elementary
Education. Her 3.78 grade
point average means she grad-
uated with highest honors.
A member of Phi Theta
Kappa, the younger Crowder
carved out time to perform
with the University of Miami
Hurricanes marching band for
the past three years. Come fall,
when she starts working


towards a Bachelor's degree in
Education, the increased work-
load will likely bring her hobby
to an end. She hopes to soon
be teaching second graders.
Her mother will be returning to
MDC for two more years, in
hopes of obtaining a Bachelor's
degree in Special Education.
The elder Crowder started to
attend classes at MDC while
her daughter was still a stu-
dent at South Ridge High
School. Heather initially
planned to study architecture,


Ruth Lee Wooten


Happy 90th birthday
From your children, grandchil-
dren and great grandchildren.


Northwestern alumni gather for the school's annual career day.


anniversary this year, were in
attendance.
The students were excited
and gave us great feedback.
They questioned how we
accomplished our goals,


whether we enjoyed our chosen
professions and shared with us
their own career goals.
When class visitation was
over, the alumni conversed
about how impressed we were


Mother-daughter duo graduate from college together


It is a family tradition for
mothers to join their daughters
on the very first day of school.
Gracie Crowder, however, has
gone much further. She stood
side by side with her daughter,
Heather Crowder, on April 29,
as both women graduated from
Miami Dade College's
Homestead Campus. Both
women studied education and
plan to become teachers in
South Florida
The Crowders mother
Gracie, age 47 and daughter
Heather, age 20 share a fam-
ily home in Goulds, Florida.
Heather is the youngest of her
siblings. Gracie, a single moth-
er who at one point had to rely
on government assistance to
feed her family, waited until all
five children were grown to
pursue a college degree.
Gracie, who entered Miami
Dade College (MDC) before her
daughter, attended classes
while working as an aide at a
local retirement center.
Gracie Crowder received an
Associate in Arts degree in


Powerful revival at

Christian Fellowship


The Christian Fellowship
Worship Center, 13700 N.W.
19 Avenue, will host a power-
ful, life changing revival on
May 8 through May 11, 8 p.m.
nightly.
Revivalist for this week will be
Dr. Larry P. Brown.
The host pastor is Joy E. L.
Jackson.


Dr. Larry P. Brown


RITES OF PASSAGE


Celebration Saturday

at Hadley Park
The community is invited to
attend Urgent, Inc.'s 6th annu-
al Rites of Passage Community
Celebration on Saturday, May
6. The 6th Annual, 'Rites of
Passage Community


Celebration' will be held from
12 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Charles
Hadley Park's Black Box
Theatre located at 1300 NW
52nd Street.
The event celebrates the
multicultural rhythms of
Miami's urban landscape.
Performances merging hip hop
Please turn to RITES 13B


A smart Black man won't sell out for money


The Song of Solomon: 1:5-6.
Yes, I am Black, but I am not a
fool. I am not selling out and
going to no country woods
where the store and shopping
center are 65 miles from the
house.
It took me 50 years to pay all of
my bills in Miami. Gas is almost
four dollars a gallon. I am a
smart Black man. Okay
Solomon is my brother and he
said stop looking at my Black
face.
Thirty years ago when
Overtown was booming, the
Mary Elizabeth Hotel was open
and many other Black business-
es. We also had the Orange Bowl
Classic every year. Then the
churches had
good preachers, that preach the
Bible. They loved the Lord and
not their pocketbook.


Bishop John Wilson
That is a big difference. The
love of money is the root of all
evil. Millions of people heard
about the sandy beaches and
plenty sunshine. I remember
when I had to have a police card
to go on the beach. I couldn't sit


at the lunch counter at Shell's
Restaurant neither at McCrory
to eat a hamburger. I had to
stand up and drink water from a
fountain that said colored only.
We lived through all of that;
brought property and paid
taxes. Now I can see clearly now
that the rain is gone. The other
day a group got off the boat and
tried to buy my little piece of my
Miami.
No way. I'm not selling my hat
neither my coat. When the
queen of Sheba heard about
Solomon, a Black man, a wise
and rich Black man, IKings
10:1-10. She did not buy his
wealth. She gave him more
wealth.
Don't forget the mourning
bench and the tarryng room.
Write to P. O. Box 531078,
Miami, FL 33153.


but decided to join her mother
at Miami Dade College after a
few hours of community serv-
ice teaching young children
showed her how much fun she
would have as a teacher.
"The Crowders are a great
example that it's never too late
to get a college degree," said
Miami Dade College
Homestead Campus president
Dr. Jeanne F. Jacobs, adding,
"Other students were inspired
by their example. In fact, many
thought it was rather cute that
mother and daughter would
walk the halls or attend lec-
tures together."
Shortly after 8 a.m. April 29,
the Crowders joined 379 of
their 'fellow Homestead
Campus students at com-
mencement exercises held in
the YMCA at 1034 Northeast
Eighth Street. The elder
Crowder was one of 35 gradu-
ating students over age 41. The
mother-daughter duo were
among 216 women students on
stage; 57% of the graduating
class is female.


with some of the students,
including how much everyone
really admired the current Mr.
Northwestern. According to the
students, he "really tries to
lookout for everyone." Lunch


Zion Hope Missionary Baptist
Church will celebrate the
Reverend W.E. Mitchell, Jr.'s
first anniversary, 7:30 p.m.
nightly.
Monday; May 8. Reverend
Wilfred Miller, Jr., Mt. Vernon
Missionary Baptist Church;
Wednesday, May 10, Reverend
Reginald R. Edwards, Sr.,
Central Missionary Baptist
Church of Hollywood; Thursday,
May 11, Reverend Quentin
Pinkston. 1st Thessalonians
Missionary Baptist Church.
Closing Sunday, May 28, 3:30
p.m. with Reverend Douglas



Happy

Sweet 16th

Birthday

I would like to say
have a very joyful
sweet 16th birthday
party.

Love, mom, Katrice


-l




was provided andb"I''
Northwestern's staff thanked 'd:1
everyone for participating. Itt''"'-
was an enjoyable experience; oi
Invitations for next year's event 'l"'
have already been extended. '
I'1 o
-----.,-! ()*)i,


Reverend W.E. Mitchell, Jr.
Cook of Jordan Grove
Missionary Baptist Church.


TAKE THE ASSLE OUT OF SHOPPING!



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Residentia and Commercial Delivery (No Charge)

North America Distribution Center 18798 SW 108th Ave. Miami FL 33157

Phone: 305-254-6285 Fax: 305-254-6285
emiail: josephco@aol.com


Pricing available upon request Alfred Joseph, Sales Rep. England


hoto


Zion Hope Missionary Baptist Church' ,)

celebrates pastors first anniversary;,i
n rl


(I-r) Mother and daughter Gracie and Heather Crowder.


Bus trips to prisons
We stop at all prisons along the US 27 route to Bellglade and
Desota. If you would like to visit your loved ones, call us for
reservations Saturday and Sundays only. Ask for Johnny or
Ms. Gail, 786-470-7374 or 754-204-3764, Broward.


Miss Diamond Princess


-


c


Q .X
~r---
I "~
~I

I i





Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i i Ivi 3 9 2006


"Copyrighted Material I

Syndicated Content

. Available from Commercial News Providers" A


i ... .. ".... I.
uriI



JAIN&. AL,
W" ofcleal


12B The Miam Tmes, a
-
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Blck MutCnrlTEirOwnAM Dest InTDAyEMMRThS EMAmiTimeNay3-9I206ES


HARRY GRAYS, III, aka
HARRY 'O,' 39, labored
died April 30, 2006.
He is survived by mother, Lula
and father, Harry Grays, Jr. He
also leaves behind a daughter,
Quanisha Johnson; five sisters,
Mary (deceased), Harriette,
Sharmanita (deceased),
Reytoshia, and Reynolva; two
brothers, Alonzo (Valarie) and
Terrence and a host of relatives
and friends.
Services will be held 4 p.m.,
Saturday, May 6 at St. Lukes
Missionary Baptist Church,
1790 N.W. 55 Street.



Dieters goals

are not realistic

DIET
continued from 12B

again how difficult it is for peo-
ple to lose weight, which
screams out that obesity is a
problem that must be prevent-
ed."
"People define the word 'diet'
in many different ways,"
Brownell says. "People say they
are dieting because they
restrict sometimes, but at other
times they have trouble con-
trolling their eating."




. _
15 l


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O):
0 )



0:1

oC
o cr


In Memoriam

In loving memory of.


In Memoriam


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


CLARISSA WASHINGTON ANDY D. SAUNDERS
FERGUSON aka 'RISSA'


We love you, Clarissa. Most of
all, we miss you.
The family.



Death Notice


MATTIE LOUISE TAYLOR
BROWN, 67, entered eternal
rest at South Miami Hospital
on Monday, May 1, 2006. A
native of Miami.
Mattie was employed at Toby's
Cafeteria Biscayne Cafeteria and
the University of Miami Marine
Biology Institute as a Head cook
and Baker. Private catering was
her love and speciality.
Service will be held 12 p.m. on
Monday, May 8 at the Saint John
African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 6461 S.W. 59 Place in
South Miami.
The family will receive friends 5
p.m., Sunday, May 7, from 5
p.m. to 8 p.m. at Saint John
African methodist Episcopal
Church.
Survivors include her sons,
Andre N. (Vanessa) Dawson,
Vincent T. Brown, Gregory
(Pamela) Brown, Clarence L.
Brown; daughters, Gwendolyn L.
Brown, Stephanie L. Young,
Zerelda M. (Randy) Spann, and
Georgia D. Johnson; 21 grand-
children; five great grandchil-
dren: brothers, Curtis Taylor,
John H. (Linda) Taylor; stepsis-
ter, Lucretia Pitts-Taylor; aunts,
Virginia Williams of Rosedale,
NY, Amy Walker, Alice H. (Earl)
Daniels, and Lula M. Thomas of
Miami and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and friends.
Service arrangements are en-
trusted to Grace Funeral Home,
770 N.W. 119 Street, 305-688-
6388. Entombment will be at
Dade Memorial South Cemetery,
Miami.


12/26/67-05/06/2005

God called you quietly to His
heavenly home, you left us here.
sad and alone. We will always
remember your smiling face. The
memory of you will never erase.
The good times we shared, I
thought would never end. You
were a loving son, father, broth-
er and friend. You brought joy to
us.
When we were angry or sad,
your humor would engulf us and
make us glad.
Andy, we miss you and will re-
member you. each day, the pain
in our hearts will never go away.
We hope someday to see you
again. The joy of meeting you
will erase our pain.
Sadly missed by mother, and a
host of family and friends


Death Notice


REVEREND MOTHER
CLEMENTINA WILLIAMS-
STUBBS, 83 of Devil's
Point, Cat Island, Bahamas. On
April 22, laid down her armor
and picked up her crown in
glory. Services will be held on
Thursday, May 4, 10am at
Bethel Full Gospel Baptist
Church and Sunday, May 7 at
1pm at Calvary Deliverance
Church in Nassau, Bahamas.
Interment will be at The Western
Cementary, in Nassau. Viewing
Wednesday May 3, 1- 9 p.m. at
Scarano Funeral Home,
9000 Pines Blvd.



Deadline for

obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.


Girls make transition into womanhood


RITES
continued from 11B

and African traditions of the
Diaspora come together for an
intercultural exchange of the
arts. The Celebration will
showcase positive youth per-
formances, tribute to commu-
nity elders and professional
artists as we recognize girls in
their Rites of Passage into
Womanhood.
"This show is going to be
great, our best one yet. We
have been working really hard
every Saturday for the past
five months with a lot of great
local artists to get our acts
just right," states Elvia, a
fourth year member of the
Rites of Passage Youth
Empowerment Academy
located at Edison Park
Elementary.
The Rites of Passage pro-
gram works with girls, ages
10-17, year round in the com-
munities of Little Haiti and


Overtown. Girls participating
in the program come from six
different elementary, middle
and senior high schools. Each
year girls improve their lead-
ership abilities, school per-
formance, are supported to
make positive choices and
have opportunities to build on
their own skills and talents.
Spoken word artist, Will
"Da Real One" Bell, actress
Latrice Bruno and Kay McGill,
actor Larry Robinson and
Venus Rising Drum and
Dance ensemble have been
working with the girls in order
to provide specialized work-
shops to improve their per-
formances.
"Working with this great
group of girls and sharing
with them to help build their
confidence and skills has
been a rewarding experience,
to see their transformation
has been remarkable," com-
ments Latrice Bruno whose
accolades include an impre-


sive rendention of Mom's
Mabley. Each artist will also
perform at the event.
Officiating over the cere-
mony will be Elder Emily
Gunter founder of the Rites of
Passage Youth Empowerment
Foundation and Gene Tinnie,
Founding Member of the
Kuumba Artists Collective of
Miami.
SThere is limited seating
and anyone interested in
attending is advised to call
305-576-3084 or visit
www.urgentinc.org to pur-
chase their ticket. Adults
$25/Students $10. Lunch
will be served. All proceeds
help sustain the Rites of
Passage Youth Empowerment
Academy programs.
Urgent, Inc. is a non-profit
community based organiza-
tion established in 1994 to
empower and revitalize
urban communities. For more
information about Urgent,
Inc. visit www.urgentinc.org.


Happy Birthday


In loving memory of my won-
derful son,


JOHN L. WATERS
aka JOE/ JOE-JOE


11/27/28 05/03/05

It has been one year and the
pain is still here as though it
was today.
We love you and we miss you
dearly. We will always love you.
Your wife, Tressie and chil-
dren, Elbert (Patricia), Linda
(Osborne), Stevie (Yolanda),
Tammy (Eugene), Brenda
(David), your grandchildren, and
host of other relatives and
friends.

Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


ERMA LOUISE GIVENS

would like to thank the com-
munity, family and friends for
your kind expressions of love
shown during our bereavement.
Your prayers, calls, flowers,
plants, monetary gifts, various
food dishes, etc. were greatly ap-
preciated.
Special thanks to Father Ri-
chard Barry, The St. Agnes
Church family, Richardson Mor-
tuary, Ms. Carolyn Clear, Mr.
and Mrs. Willie Tosten, Grey-
nolds Manor Nursing Home, Pe-
dro Simms, St. Peter's A.O. Ca-
thedral Church family, and Pri-
mate George Sands.
May God's richest blessings be
upon each of you.
Father in thy gracious keeping,
leave thee now thy servant
sleeping.
Juanita lopkins, daughter;
the Clear, Sampson and Givens
families.

Public Notice

As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices sub-
mitted by area funeral homes at
no charge. These notices
include name of the deceased,
age, place of death, employ-
ment, and date, location, and
time of services. Additional
information and photo may be
included for a nominal charge.
The deadline is Monday at 3:30
p.m.


MACE ETHAN REID


05/03/63 02/10/06

Happy Birthday "Homey", sis-
ter, Sabrina; brother, I smile
whenever I think of "you", twin
brother, Mark.
My dear son, I love you so!
Happy Birthday the "sunshine of
my life," Mom.
You left us two months before
your 43rd birthday. We all miss
and love you.
Your entire family


Death Notice


SHIRLEY J. BRIDGES, 67,
died on April 25, 2006.
Shirely was born in Willams-
burg, VA on June 20, 1938. A
resident of Miami, Florida since
1976.
Daughter of the late John and
Katie Robert-Ashlock.
Shirley leaves behind her hus-
band, Saul Bridges; daughter,
Kim Bridges; son; Kevin Bridges
(diseased); three grandchildren,
Brandi, Brittani, and Brandon;
four sisters, three brothers, a
host of nieces, nephews, in-laws
and friends.
"Shirley will be greatly missed."
Service arrangements: Viewing
will be at 3 p.m., Friday, May 5
at Range Funeral Home, 5727
NW 17 Avenue.
Church services will be at 2
p.m. Saturday, May 06 at Seller
Memorial United Methodist
Church, 8350 NW 14 Avenue.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


HAROLD L. FRANCIS, JR.

Expressions of gratitude as we'
praise the Lord for good friends,,
family and acquaintances like'
you who helped to see us
through our grief and sorrow.
For all the generous acts of
sympathies expressed with a,
meaningful touch that soothed,
us so much during our time of;
bereavement. Our heartfelt,
thanks.
May God bless each of you al-,
ways.
The Francis Family


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


DWAYNE RUTHERFORD

Dwayne, you've been gone for
ten years, when we look back
out comes the tears.
Though we choose to remem-
ber the loving times, as a son,
brother, uncle, father, you're on
our minds.
Always for your family you took
a stand, although you left us
God had a plan.
We know you're safe in His
arms, because you were special
and full of charm.
So until we meet, we want to
say, peace be still and Happy
Birthday.
The Family


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET* MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142

For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion


IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,


CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


THAT CARES.


Milton A. Hall I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


W' nu wwuat Jtcne, Jzinc


Office: 305-688 .-2030 Fax: 3015-88-2293
Kimberly B. Whitei L.F.D.


The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 13B


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Ii i I Ca li Ix oI










14BB M Their OwsDst
J.2J I~ .YALLILLA II~~,IVLcy J, '- '.


Royal


JACQUELINE M. JONES, 66,
retired school
teacher of 35
years, died April
27. She attend-
ed elementary
and high school
here in Miami.
She is also a
graduate of
Booker T.
Washington
High School. Survivors: godchild,
Cleo Trice; godson, Wesley; dear
friend, Beverly; and other family
members and friends. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. in the chapel.

IRMA HARDY, 81, died April 28.
Survivors: children, Janice and
John, Jr. and John A. Peak.
Arrangements are incomplete.


ANTAWN JONES, 30, died April
2 9
Arrangements
are incomplete.








IRIS JACKSON, 101, died April
22. Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Monument of Faith Church.

ALVA HEATH, 63, died April 27.
Arrangements are incomplete.

DANE PARRIS, 20, died April
23. Arrangements are incom-
plete.


Gregg L. Mason
JOSEPHINE T. HUNTER, 70, ALONZO CLARK, JR., 50, died.
died April 30. Survivors: his
Survivors: her sons, Alonzo
sons, Rodrick Clark, III
(Lavette) and (Sharla) and
Darryl Hunter; Stanley Clark;
daughters, Judy d a u g h t e r,
Hunter and Antoinette Clark;
Carolyn Pollock and a host of
(Alvin); brother, other family
Willie J. (Inell) members and
and Hubert W. friends. Service
(Celestine) Hunter; sisters, Elzula Wednesday (today) 7 p.m. at
Suber, Dorothy Allen, Cheryl Masonic Lodge, 5598 NW 7th
Saleem (Abdul); and a host of other Avenue.
family members and friends.
Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m., family VENER CAYARD, 29, died April
will receive friends in the chapel 16th. Services were held.
from 6-8 p.m. Service Saturday, 11
a.m. at Historic Mt. Zion Missionary JAMES "JT" ANDERSON, 16,
Baptist Church, 301 NW 9th Street. died April 23rd. Services were held.
Interment at Dade Memorial Park.
SHIRLEY TYSE SCOTT, 62, died
GREGORY LINDELL COOK, 45, April 25. Services were held
died April 28th. Remains shipped to Monday.
Palatka for burial.

Range
CELESTINE Y. HOHEB, 58, died HARRIETT E. HART, 89, died
April 27 at April 26 at home.
P a r k w a y Survivors: son,
Medical Center. Michael Douglas'
Survivors: two Hart (Vivian);
daughters, three grandchil-
E g e t t e dren, Michael
Shillingford and D w a y n e
Rosena Hoheb; Lacarvia and
son, Edward Christopher;
Shillingford; great grandson,
mother, Phyllis Lacari. Service
Ann Wilheight; two sisters, Cheryl Wednesday, 10 a.m. at Church of
and Elizabeth Polley; two brothers, the Open Door.
Jospeh and Timothy Polley; three
grandchildren. Service Saturday, 1 SHIRLEY JUANITA BRIDGES,
p.m. at Mt. Calvary Baptist 67; died April 25 at Jackson
Church. Hospital. Service Saturday, 2 p.m. at
Sellers Memorial United Methodist
MARY A. BLACK, 83, died April Church.
24 at Cedars
Medical Center. GWENDOLYN 'QUEEN' GEARY,
Survivors: god- 81, died April 26 at Palmetto
son, McVicker General Hospital. Service
Coleman, Ill. Wednesday, 12 p.m. in the chapel.
Graveside serv-
ice Thursday, 11 Carey Royal *
a.m. at Our Lady Rm
of Mercy Ram'n
Cemetery. CASSONDRA TRENAE THORN-
TON, 33, died
Alfonso M. Richardson April 24 at
Jackson Hospital.
WALTER T. KING, JR., 19, forklift Service Saturday,
driver, died April 11 a.m. at
24. Survivors: S u n r i s e
mother, Althea Missionary
L. Williams; Baptist Church,
father, Walter T. 3087 NW 60th
King, Sr.; step Street.
father, Daryl
Williams; broth- USAMA BAMIEH, 46, died April 29
ers, Matthew at Baptist Hospital. Services were
and Marquis held.
King; grand-
mothers, Gladys Covington and MISAN BANIASADI, 20,
Patricia Williams. Viewing Friday, 3- Hollywood, died April 27 at Memorial
8 p.m. at 3790 NW 167th Street, Regional Hospital. Remains will be
Miami Gardens. Service Saturday, shipped to Tehran, Iran for final rites
11 a.m. at New Vision for Christ and burial.
Ministry, 13650 NE 10th Avenue.
Services under the direction of NOSTRA COSBY, 56, died May 1
Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral at home. Arrangements are incom-
Services, 305-625-7177. plete.

LOIS KAIGLER, 48, teacher, Grace
died April 29. CYRIL MOSS, 81, paint techni-
Survivors: moth-
cian, died April
er, Nettie 25 at North
Kaigler; broth- Shore Medical
ers, Georges Center. Service
and Mark; sis- Thursday, 11
ters, Glenda, a.m. at St.
Willa, Minnie A g n e s
Kaigler and Episcopal

Visitation
Thursday, 3-8 p.m. at 3790 NW
167th Street, Miami Gardens. KEN STANLEY FILS-AIME, 24,
Service Friday, 11 a.m. in the student, died April 28. Service
chapel. Services under the direction Saturday, 2 p.m. at St. James
of Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral Catholic Church.
Services, 305-625-7177.
ISRAEL DONNELL McBRIDE,
Barrett-Fryar 46, laborer, died April 30 at Parkway
Regional Medical Center. Service
EDDIE PEARSON, 64, died. Saturday, 10 a.m. in the chapel.
Viewing Wednesday (today), 5-7
p.m. at Robert Morgan Educational Davis and Brice
Center.
ANNIE HANDFIELD, 92, Dania
JOHN PINDER, 73, Richmond Beach, died April 28. Service
Heights, died at his residence. Saturday, 10 a.m. a St. Ruth Baptist
Service Saturday, 1:30 p.m. at Church.
Second Baptist Church.
LEROY GRAYER, Dania Beach,
ALLYSON JONES, 18, Redlands, died April 30. Arrangements are
died. Arrangements are incomplete, incomplete.


GILFRED FERGUSON, 72, died
April 27. Service
Friday, 11 a.m.
at St. Agnes
Episcopal
Church.






ALISON B. SMITH, 81, teacher,
died April 28.

Saturday, 11
a.m. at St.
James A.M.E.
Church.





CARRIE BROWN, 43, died April
25. Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at St. Luke
Missionary
Baptist Church.


JESSICA R. DIXON, 23, died
April 25 at
Jackson
Ho s p i t a I .
Survivors: broth-
ers, Jermaine,
Hollice, Jr. and
Marcus; grand-
parents, John
and Betty Dixon.
Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Second Canaan Missionary
Baptist Church.

TATTIANA THOMAS, 4 months
old, died April 26 at Parkway
Regional Medical Center. Private
burial.


Wright
ANN SONYA POND, 73, died
April 25 at
C e da rs
Ho s p i t a I .
Survivors: sons,
Earl and Robert
Pond; daugh-
ters, Debora
Johnson and
Kimberly Pond;
sister-in-law,
Bernice Pond.
Service Friday, 11 a.m at New
Jerusalem Primitive Baptist Church.
Interment at Dade Memorial Park.

SHARIKA DANIELLE LYNCH,
19, cashier, died
April 29.
Survivors: moth-
er, Sarita Lynch;
daughter,
Ahmani Cozart;
brothers,
Antwan Wilson,
Devonte Wilson,
Bradley Lewis,
Denzel Lynch
and Daniel, Jr.; sisters, Zakia
Branton, Danielle Lynch, Jen'ae
Lynch, Kierra Lynch and Quaneshia
Lynch; grandmothers, Veronica
Phillips and Doris Lynch; grandfa-
ther, Eddie Eiland; special friend,
Ahmab Cozart. Service Saturday,
12 p.m. at Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church. Interment at Dade
Memorial Park.

RUBY LINDA HARRIS, 46, sec-
retary specialist,
died April 28 at
Pari okway
Regional
Medical Center.
Survivors: par-
ents, Robert Lee
Harris, Sr. and
Annie Lee
Harris; son,
Willie A. Little;
daughter, Selena Harris; five broth-
ers, Robert L., Jr. (Lisa), William T.,
Darrell, Lorenzo and Tyrone M.
Harris; sister, Mert Lawson (David);
grandmother, Louise Wright; and
grandfather, Felton Boston. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m. at Mt Zion
Apostolic Temple. Interment at
Dade Memorial Park.



Eric S. George
JACKIE L. WIMBERLY, 45,
Hollywood, died April 28 in
Adventura Medical Center in
Aventure, Fl. Service Saturday 10
a.m. at Ebenezer Baptist Church in
Hallandale.

MARY FRANCES KINNEBREW,
45, Hollywood, died April 29 at
Hollywood Medical Center. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m. at St Luke Primitive
Baptist Church, Hollywood.

JORGE F. FAUSTINO, 48,
Pompano Beach, died April 25 at
Holy Cross Hospital, Ft. Lauderdale.
Arrangements are incomplete.


SANDY HODGES, 71, died April
2. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Antioch
Baptist Church
of Liberty City.






MARSHA JONES, 53, died April
24. Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
at First Baptist
Church of
Brownsville.






MATTIE RICHARDSON, 69, edu-
cator, died April
28. Remains will
be shipped to
Iverness, Florida
for final rite and
burial.


HENRY SWINE, 69, died April 27

Medical Center.
Memorial serv-
ice Saturday, 10
a.m. at Holy
Temple Baptist
Church.


LAURA MAE STUBBS, 44,
domestic worker, died April 25 at
Parkway Regional Medical Center.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. in the
chapel.

Poitier
RONNIE CLARK, 32, construc-
tion laborer, died
April 23 at home.
Services were
held.







MANUEL JAMES ALEXANDER,
79, mail delivery
for Miami-Dade
Water and
Sewer, died
April 25 at
C e d a r s
t .Hospital.
H o s p i t a I ncmle
Service
Saturday, 10
a.m. at St.
M a r y s
Missionary Baptist Church.

SOLOMIA L. MYLES, 79,
domestic private homes, died May
1 at Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Manker
THEOPHILUS A. WILLIAMS, 77,
died April 25 at
VA Medical
Center. Service
Wednesday
(today), 2 p.m.
at St. James
A.M.E. Church.
Interment at
Bushnel
Na t i o n al
Cemetery.

MADELYN WILLIAMSTON, 66,
died April 27 at
Franco Nursing
Home. Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Greater
Friendship
Missionary
Baptist Church.


Death Notice


Happy Birthday


In loving memory of,


Its been a year since you've
been gone, but it seemed liked
yesterday.
Your family and friends.


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


From your loving family and
friends.

Happy 60th Birthday

In loving memory of my dear
husband,


RAMSON RILEY

05/07/46 11/09/04


MR. JIMMIE MANNINGS

12/18/15 05/06/02

It's been four years, but it
seems like yesterday. You are
deeply missed. From your loving
family.


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


MR. EDWIN LEE TOLIVER

05/07/1954 11/26/2005

It's only been a few months
since you've been gone, my love-
ly husband. But God had anoth-
er plan for you in His heavenly
home.
We miss you very much each
and everyday.
Your lovely smile will always be
with us.
Love your wife and family.
Toliver Scott


Public Notice

As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices sub-
mitted by area funeral homes at
no charge. These notices
include name of the deceased,
age, place of death, employ-
ment, and date, location, and
time of services. Additional
information and photo may be
included for a nominal charge.
The deadline is Monday at 3:30
p.m.


Your voice and laughing We
no longer hear.
Your body We no longer can
touch, but the love we have for
you will be eternal.
Virgie and Bam



Death Notice


ALISON REBECCA BUR-
ROWS SMITH, 81, died
on April 28 in Jacksonville, FL.
Alison was educated in the
public schools of Dade County.
Alison worked in the Dade
County School System as well as
in private day cares for a number
of years before retiring. She was
also a Master Cosmetologist.
Alison was married to the late
Damon Shaw and that union
produced a son, Dale Livingston
Shaw and she was also married
to the late Albert E. Smith.
Alison was a member of St.
James AME Church, where she
was a member of the church
choir and various organizations.
Alison leaves to cherish her
memory one son, Dale; a daugh-
ter-in-law, Doretha Shaw; two
grandsons, Damon and Juling-
ton; one aunt, Ecela Carroll; nie-
ces, nephews, cousins, godchil-
dren, and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Alison was noted for her love
and care for people, she always
exhibited a smile, a giving and
loving heart to all she met. She
will always be remembered and
sorely missed.
Services will be held 11 a.m.,
Saturday, May 6 at St. James
AME Church, 1845 N.W. 65
Street. Richardson Mortuary is


II in charge.


KEN STANLEY FILSAIME
was called home on Friday. April
28, 2006 at 1:05 p.m.
He leaves behind his mother,
father, sister and loved ones. He
would be placed to rest Saturday
May 6. 2006, 2 p.m. at St.
James Catholic Church.


Richardson


CRAIG SETH WADE VERA WASHINGTON

05/07/62 03/07/05 05/03/48 02/11/06


Hall Ferguson Hewitt


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


i i Ti Ivi 3 9 2006














































































A V E D


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"Copyrighted Materia



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News

ANN--a


4 MM


African Heritage Cultural
Arts Center 2166 MLK Blvd.
EXHIBITION
The Sixth Annual Oscar
Thomas Memorial
People's Art Exhibition
The 6th Annual Oscar
Thomas Memorial People's
Art Exhibition features
unveiled new works by
South Florida African World
artists, special guest artists
and a special remembrance.
The exhibit runs through
May 21 (Closing Reception,
please bring flowers).
Gallery hours are Monday-
Friday from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m or by appointment. Call
305-638-6771.

Calabash Visual Arts


Arts & Culture Division will
sponsor the First Annual
Calabash Visual Arts
Festival, at the African
Heritage Cultural Arts
Center, in cooperation with
the Kuumba Artists
Collective of Miami, from 11
a.m. until 6 p.m.
Calabash is an
indoor/outdoor visual arts
festival that will focus on
various modes, mediums,
techniques, styles and
approaches to visual
expression. One of the pri-
mary objectives says
Marshall L. Davis; manager
of the African Heritage
Cultural Arts Center, is to
have areas set up where
artists could be seen execut-
ing their art forms. People
usually see the finished
product of the artist but


Several areas will be desig-
nated to fulfill the purpose
of having artists' work dis-
played and/or actually cre-
ate and demonstrate in their
mode of artistic expression.
Noted artist Bayunga
Kialeuka will have a large
demonstration of painting.
Other distinguished paint-
ers, sculptors and graphic
artists such as Charles
Humes, Robert McKnight,
Gene Tinnie, Ray Parris,
Darryn Ferguson and more
will be on hand to showcase
their works and provide
enlightenment regarding
their creative techniques
and processes through
panel discussions and lec-
ture demonstrations.
Various other activities are
scheduled that will support
aspiring and professional
artists. There will also be


Space is available for craft
and food vendors. Young
artists and spectators will
have the pleasure of engag-
ing in craft projects, face
painting, and dialoguing
with real professional
artists. An event the entire
family will enjoy. Call 305-
638-6771.

Art of Culture in
Celebration of Haitian
Heritage Month
The month of May is
Haitian Heritage Month. As
we celebrate, the Haitian
Heritage Museum presents
Art of Culture with author
Tony Hattenback doing an
Art Talk & Book Signing
about the 'Glory Days of
Haiti' when well-known
celeberties that visited the
let set island. Go through


Bookstore Irom 7-8 p.m.
with Antony Hattenback
author of 'Stars Over Haiti'
and Mecca aka' Grimo.
Sunday, May 14-19: Come
experience the Haitian cul-
ture at Barnes & Nobles in
Aventura for an entire week
as we display the Haitian
culture through books.
Friday, May 19: Meet
author Anthony Hattenback
of 'Stars Over Haiti' and
Mecca (Grimo) as he does
spoken word about the
beauty of Haiti from his
newly released CD 'Boat
People' at Barnes & Nobles
Aventura from 7-8 p.m. Call
305- 935-9198.

Diaspora World Cinema
Presents Asian Media
Xplosion '06
Saturday, May 6:
You're invited to meet
multi-talented Suzanne


currently the host of HGTV
hit show, House Hunters.
Ms Whang will be taking
part in, Asian Media
Xplosion'06, at Florida
International Univer-sity,
University Park Camp-us,
11200 S.W. 8th St., in the
Graham Center, Room
GC243.
The event will also feature
the screening of the award
winning Chinese film, 'A
World Without Thieves,' star-
ring Asian heart throb, Andy
Lau (Hong Kong) and the
sultry Rene Liu (Taiwan).
Veteran actress, Suzanne
Whang, has ignited the
world of American cable tel-
evision on fire with her
fierce wit, sure-fire delivery
and incredible comic timing.
She has co-starred in such
hit television series as The
Practice, NYPD Blue among
- r nfn Thi- xn.nt iQ


Chief


p 4 i









Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


zL, e ILn I LV amIIL I y - *7I Vly-U,


Marijuana convictions

shouldn't prohibit financial aid


Current federal laws prevent
anyone with a drug conviction
- even a nonviolent one from
receiving financial aid for col-
lege. With America's rising drug
problem, the logic behind the
law is obvious deter young
people from engaging in drug
activities by threatening their


Congratulations to Dr.
Richard J. Strachan and fami-
ly who will soon open RJS
Enterprises featuring his Psi
Phi Band. It will include event
production, educational con-
sultant, catering, legal matters
and a cooperative charter
school.
Congratulations to the south
Florida chapters of Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity for bringing
twenty-one new brothers into
Greekdom on March 25. Dana
Adams, John Billingsley,
Jimmie Cryer, Brandon
Cloman, Cordaro Davis,
Joseph Dubery, Andrew Dixon
III, Leslie Elus, Julian


chance to go to college.
However, the law is seriously
flawed. Individuals with convic-
tions involving marijuana
should not be lumped into the
same category as those convict-
ed of selling crack or crystal
meth. These are very different
drugs, with very different effects


Gordon, Jr., Kelvin Harris,
Micrus Jones, Ralph Kenol,
Winfred Merilien, Carl Henri
Monfiston, Gordon Murray,
Jr., Willitone Petit, Lavauris
Pierre, Anthony Rogers,
Jessie Tyson, Terrance
Thomason and Noel White.
Welcome to Greekdom
Gentleman!
Returning home to visit his
mother, Zeola C. Jones, and
sister, Stephanie Bromfield,
was Arthur Stephen Jones,
wife Celeste and their two sons
AJ and Reese Jones. They
reside in Bayonne, New Jersey
and came for spring break.
Zeola was elated to see her


on society. As usual, America's
one size fits all drug policies
treat all crimes as equal, even
when they clearly are not.
A recently released study
shows that nearly 190,000 stu-
dents have been turned down
for financial aid since the feder-
al government added a question
that asks students if they have
a drug conviction to federal
financial aid forms. The study,
released by Students for
Sensible Drug Policy, shows
that one in every 400 students
is refused financial aid when
they answer 'yes' to this ques-
tion. Not answering the ques-
tion won't make a difference -
a student will only be automat-
ically disqualified from receiv-
ing aid. Those with convictions



grands, especially the newborn
Reese.
Oklahoma City dedicated $33
million plus to Frederick
Douglass High School with his
kin, Frederick Douglass, IV
and his wife BJ. Governor Brad
Henry and Mayor Mick
Cornett were also in atten-
dance.
Representative John Lewis (D-
Georgia) urged Congress to
immediately pass the legislation
to honor the Tuskegee Airmen
because the men are now in their
80's and should all be given the
opportunity to receive the con-
gressional tribute in person.
Our get well wishes to all of you
from all of us! Frances Brown,
Cleomie Allen-Smith, Pearline
Nairn, Myrna Range-Lee, Oscar
Morley, Pauline and Calvin
McKinney, Victor Morley,
Celestine Hepburn-Brown,
Henry Sanky Newbold, Yvonne
Johnson-Gaitor, Janice
Sanders, Mae Hamilton-Clear,


can regain their aid eligibility
by completing a drug rehab
program that includes random
drug tests.
Although illegal, marijuana
does not wreak havoc on indi-
viduals, families and entire
communities the way other
drugs are known to. Why then,
is it grouped in with other
more dangerous drugs? Under
age drinking is a huge problem
in America, particularly on col-
lege campuses; there aren't
any policies that keep minors
caught drinking from receiving
financial aid. This is not to
advocate for marijuana use,
this is to simply point out how
unfair it is to subject someone
convicted of smoking a joint to
the same fate as someone con-



Leila O'Berry, Andrew 'Bo'
Robinson, Gayle Sweeting-Gee,
Louise Cromartie, Gilfred
Ferguson, Sr., Allison B. Smith
and Ella Mae Dean.
Miamians were saddened once
again to learn of the demise of
pioneer Miamian and fraternal
matriarch, Mrs. Louise Brown-
Dean, mother of Lorna Brown-
Mathis and grandmother of
Robin Mathis.
Congratulations to the
McKinney-Johnson families,
whose daughter and grand-
daughter Dortresia Bryley and
Jane Johnson will graduate
May 6 from the University of
South Florida. Dortresia is the
daughter of Fitzhugh Newton-
Johnson and granddaughter of
Doris McKinney-Pittman. The
McKinney Clan has four gradu-
ates this year. Kenneth Alien,
Elijah Johnson, Brandon
Bryce Wilson and Dontresia.
Fr. Terrance Taylor, who has
headed the diocesan youth min-


victed of smoking and selling
crack. As with any legal situa-
tion, especially those involving
drugs, all of the circumstances
surrounding the case should
be considered: one question on
an application should not be
enough to determine whether
or not a student gets money
for college. If the question isn't
going to be removed from the
application altogether, then a
second question should be
added, asking the applicant to
classify the drug conviction
and list the type of drug and
the street value. At least, in
this way, financial aid officials
will have a better picture of the
crime committed and can
make a more informed deci-
sion.



istry since 2003 began a new
ministry as rector of Saint
Christopher's Episcopal Church
in West Palm Beach.
Congratulations Father Taylor.
He is the nephew of the late
Father Austin Cooper and from
the pioneer family of Coconut
Grove.
Delta Sorors along with our
community were saddened to
hear of the demise of Aubrey
Watkins-Simms, who died April
22. Miami Delta's will never for-
get her genuine hospitality when
we (Delta's) met in Alabama and
the wonderful outing she and
her family gave us. The late
General Chappie James was
her brother-in-law.
Happy wedding anniversary
greetings to the following 'Love
Birds.'
LTC Anthony P. and Juanita
W. Armbrister, April 25, their
37th
Edwin and Gaile M. Holland,
April 25; their 19th


During the 2003-2004
school year, more than 40,000
applicants were refused finan-
cial aid because they had drug
convictions. That's 40,000 stu-
dents that could have gone on
to become teachers, doctors,
lawyers or even President of
the United States in short,
productive members of society.
There's no guarantee that
these students won't live out
their dreams of finishing col-
lege, but one thing is certain:
this current barrier will only
make achieving that goal that
much more difficult.
Judge Greg Mathis is national
vice president of Rainbow PUSH
and a national board member of
the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference.



Arthur and Jacqueline F.
Livingston, April 25, their 52nd
Alex and Kenyatta B.
Jaramillo, April 26; their third
Benny and Veronica B.
O'Berry, April 27, their 65th
Henry and Gwendolyn F.
Clarke, April 30; their 51st.
The 5000 Role Models of
Excellence Project's 2006 schol-
arship ceremony will be held
Wednesday. May 10 at New Birth
Baptist Church. The scholar-
ships will be presented to the
young recipients by their
founder, Senator Frederica S.
Wilson and Dr. Randal Pinkett,
Apprentice season four.
Everyone is invited. There is no
admission Congratulations
young men!
As long as we love to serve and
as long as we are loved by oth-
ers, we should be supportive of
each other and no man should
be useless.
Encouragement is oxygen for
the soul.


It's Dade County's time to shine


IMAGE
continued from 1C

streets." Life in the fast lane
came to a crying halt when he
became a father at the age of
17. After parenthood and his
parents' fear of losing their only
child, Image and another young
man started a group called the
Two Sides of Life. 'he group
would later have a "low budget-
movie filmed in the streets of
Miami," he said.
Partnerships don't always
last. After the demise of TSOL,
Image contemplated leaving his
love of music unfulfilled until
his cousin Max persuaded him
otherwise.
In 2004, he said he rebuilt his
perseverance to pursue the
music game with his independ-
ent label, Hometeam Music. He
mentioned that by this time he
knew the music business well
enough to start yet another
business venture.
Over the past few years, the
sound of Miami's rappers has
been relatively hushed by main-
stream DJs many of whom
appear grossly unfamiliar with
the street life of Miami natives.
Image said that "there is a
Miami issue that needs to be
addressed ... the spotlight is on
us ... we need to get together as


a movement."
Image said that every major
city has had a movement and
now is the time for Dade County
to really get the
recognition it
deserves. He said
that "Miami got lyri-
cists ... we got style,"
he went on to say
"that Atlanta people's
come down to Dade,
catch the flava of the
'bottom' and take it
back to the 'A.'"
His independence
led to him serving as an arbitra-
tor between opposing artists in
Little Haiti.
'Dis' tapes from Zoe Pound's
'Blind' and budding rapper
Smitty were exchanged in a war
of words concerning street cred-
ibility. Image said he "reached
out to Blind and to Smitty to
squash the beef." According to
Image, his relationship with the
two rappers was instrumental
in helping "the two young men
to see the bigger picture of the
rap game in Miami."
Most would agree that eco-
nomics is the ruler of the day
and the night when 'gettin on' in
the music industry and that
Miami's preoccupation with
thug passion stifles the growth
of local rappers' worldwide
recognition.


Image considers beef and jeal-
ousy as the "seeds of ugly."
"Fightin' within our own city is
what's slowin' down Miami
artists from really
blowin' up," he said.
He credits Luther
'Luke' Campbell as
his role model -not
for his raunchy
music and legendary
videos but his abili-,
ty to make it on the
national level as an
independent artist
and businessman.
"Luke was the first Master P ...
Russell Simmons was inde-
pendent but he sold out to
Universal," he said.
Aside from Luke, P' and
Simmons, Image sites Rick
Ross as the most recent rapper
from Miami to open the doors
for other Miami artists to enter.
He says that Ross' contract of
reportedly "$1.5 million proves
that the world may be ready to
again show Miami some love."
Image meaning In Me a God
Eternal gets to the heart of the
matter of Miami's music scene.
"O1' Miami needs to remember
what it used to be like in Dade
- n****s don't remember how
Miami used to vibe we ain't
vibin' like we used to," he said.
"The lack of support of radio
listeners [who] don't call in to


stations and request songs out
of Dade," is significant. He said
"people need to know the power
of the radio." By Image's
assessment no one is reppin'
Dade, "all of the spots have
been shut down or cut down -
n****s act like they don't
remember 119 Street.
Crenshaw, the Jumbo's on 7th
Ave., the 'Tree' ..
I.maget;J;,!erizes that a major
part of Miami's downfall is its
failure to recognize the impor-
tance of money, "... you don't
have to sell out to get the
money and the recognition," he
declared.
IMiami rapper] Trick set it
off for Miami for a minute, but
one person is not enough to
bring every other artist on." He
says that "everybody gotta find
their own way, but to find their
way there has to be a form of
unity in all the hoods."
Thinking aloud, Image asks,
"How can we in Black Miami
stand as one and shout our
power?" He said "nobody can
stop us ... we have to stop the
beef s*** and get this money ..."
Image believes there is wisdom
in our past. Blacks back in
the day knew it was about
stickin' together to get what
they needed done ... we have be
the same way we gotta do it in
modern times," he added.


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The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 3C


ac s us onro er wn es ny


Tosha Drashan Williams and
Terril La Shae Hope united as
one in celebration of their love,
last Saturday, at New Way
Fellowship Church with Pastor
Wendell Baskin and Reverend
Dr. Willie L. Golden, officiants;
Marvin Jones, organist; Sax-
Will, saxophonist; and Beatrice
Hines, Mozel Daniels and
Carrollo Phillips,
soloists.
There was a white
Rolls Royce, an 18-pas-
senger Hummer and a
white stretch limousine
for the entire bridal
party. The bridal party
was led by Marion L.
Hops, mother of the
groom; Caswell TOSHA
Larmond, grandfather of the
groom; and Patricia A.
Stewart, mother of the bride.
As You and I was sang, the
groom, Ayounga Reddick, the
best man and officiants
entered, followed by brides-
maids and groomsmen
Monique Byrd and Sammy
Kohn; Sonya Frazier and
Justin Larmons; Tonya
Frazier and Dwight Kevy;
Tangela Smith and Tyrone
Williams.
Also a part of the wedding
party: Sharon Holmes, maid of
honor; TeShawnee Hope and
Jada Jefferson, flower girls;
Karon Guerrier, ring bearer;
Amanda Gordon and Steven
Morrison; and Rachel Holmes,
Santa Anita Larmond, Sharon
Morrison, Hilton McDowell,
Luke Miller and Gary Tavel,
ushers. They marched while
Ribbon in the Sky was played.
Phillips brought in the bride
singing You are so Beautiful.
She was escorted by
Commissioner Timothy


Holmes. She was beautiful in a
sparkling tiara, mini veil, ear-
rings, a spider necklace and a
gown accentuated with crystals
on the bodice and the hem of
the gown. One in a Million con-
cluded the walk.
A traditional ceremony fol-
lowed including wedding vows,
blessings, exchanges of rings,
communion, Flesh of
My Flesh, Arden
Larmond reading I
Corinthians 13: 1-13
and The Lord's Prayer,
played by Sax-Will.
Following the reces-
sional, the newly weds
led the entourage to
Signature Grand in
& TERRIL Davie, Florida for the
reception and celebration where
Neville Campbell and King
Arthur were emcees. Everyone
partied until early morning. The
bride and groom thanked their
parents and party for support-
ing them and took off on a hon-
eymoon to the Caribbean for a
week.
******
Commencement was held at
Bethune-Cookman College last
weekend and many Miamians
attended, particularly the grad-
uating class of 1956, which cel-
ebrated 50-Golden Years and
donated $50,000 to the college
(most being paid through
pledges).
Because of illness, Dr. Walter
Oden, president, was unable to
make it, but he was represented
by other Miamians, such as
Jesselyn McCloud Brown, Dr.
John Pittman, John Shaw,
Floria Gibbs, Nellie B. Wilder,
Richard J. Strachan, president
of the summer graduation and
supporters like Rubye Rankin,


Francenia Hall Scott, Mildred
Marquis, Ponce Gibbs and Dr.
Lorraine F. Strachan.
A memorial was chaired by
Helen Young who, along with
members of the class, celebrat-
ed the lives of Arthur Eulin,
Everett Crim, Jacquelyn H.
Crosby, The Honorable William
H. Turner and Colin R.
Walton. Kudos went out to
Gladeez W. McCoy, who gradu-
ated in the Class of '06 and
made a tremendous
impact during her four
years on campus. She
graduated from Miami
Northwestern back in the
days and left a musical
impact. She did the same
thing at graduation. She
sang, tore the house down
and received a standing
ovation when her name EDA
was called as a magna
cum laude recipient.


Congratulations go out to Dr.
Enid C. Pinkney, president and
the committee of the successful
13th annual Commemorative
Service, last Sunday at the City
Cemetery. This year Joseph
Cooper was honored while his
family members looked on with
tears in their eyes.
Adding to the program was
the The Singing Angles from
Arcola Lakes Park, providing
songs entitled One More Time,
How Great Thou Art, Walk With
Me Lord, In The Garden, All Of
Me and Enjoy Jesus.
A special salute goes to
Everett Stewart, president of
the Brownsville Improvement
Association, for organizing the
processional from St. Agnes
Episcopal Church. Others to be
thanked for their help include
The Progressive Band with
Harcourt Clark, drum major;
Donnie Albury, president;
Richard B. Strachan; Bertram
Colebrook; Dr. Fred Morley;
Norman Cox, Jr.; Norman
Cox, Sr.; George Lane; Aaron
Johnson; Cyril Albury; Chris
Albury, Sr.; Chris Albury, Jr.;
Dr. Preston Marshall; Paul
Brown; Jesse Hill; Vernon
'Kegman' Clark and Quinton


from Miami Norland..
Pinkney took the time to
thank Leome Culmer, Attorney
Angela Culmer, Gwen Welters,
Marva Lighbourne, Eugenia
Thomas, Elsaida Anders,
Gloria Green, Ruby Rayford,
Helen B. Williams, Wilfred
McKenzie, Fred Brown, Frank
Pinkney, The Tree of
Knowledge, sponsors from the
City of Miami and NET from
Overtown.
******
When we think of
amazing women, on
the national level we
begin with
Condoleezza Rice,
Secretary of State
and then end up with
the outstanding
fONSON women right here in
Miami.
Congratulations go out to the
"Women on Top" in Miami,
beginning with Commissioner
Audrey M. Edmonson,
Veronica Swindell-Wesley,
Rhonda Y. Williams, Isabel D.
Castillio, Patricia C. Duncan,
Sally Hutchings, Connie
Martinez, Julia E. Brown,
Candice Trimm, Brenda
Snipes, Dr. Gwendolyn
Robinson, Reverend Carol
Nash, Deborah Porter, Dr.
Enid C. Pinkney and Senator
Dr. Frederica S.
Wilson.
Some of them are
unsung heroines in
South Florida and they
will continue to make
an impact as others join
them.


Doris Rutledge PIN
Hart could be consid-
ered a "mover and shaker" with
the NAACP and its ACTSO.pro-
gram. This year a group of tal-
ented youth from Miami-Dade
will be competing for the gold
medal. They have participated
annually since 1980 with 61
present last year.
Some of the participants and
schools include: Michael
Feliz, drawing, New World;
Latrice Jackson,


K


Northwestern; Charolette
Jarrett, Michael Krop; Asia
Jones, Design and
Architecture; Eric Walker,
Miami LEC; Isiah Dawson,
Northwestern; Dave Fils-aime,
Michael Krop; Ayanna
McDonald, Palmetto; Jamilah
Foster, New World; Rosa Lee,
New World; Marlon Wong,
Killian; Dunya Rowley, New
World; Jasmine Lattimore,
Booker T. Washington; Kelvin
Williams, Jackson; Weina
Scott, Michael Krop; Dorian
Hawkins, Everglades:
Tiondra Cooper,
Norland; Sherika
Green, Norland and A.
Streeter, Booker T.
Washington.
******
A special salute goes
out to Brenton G.
Lopez for his first PIN,
publication, How To
Activate Your Magnetic
Powers. It was exposed last
Sunday at Ebenezer UMC
during the Easter program
before his parents, Roy and
Delores Lopez, and his
church family.
Lopez used a unique
method by taping his book on
a disk and instead of reading,
the listener can insert the
disk and listen to his words of
wisdom on being moti-
vated, taking chances
and using your pur-
pose in life to help
yourself and, subse-
quently, help others.
Some of the digni-
taries at the book
signing included
Reverend Dr.
(ETT Joeretha Capers,
Minister Pamela Hall,
Minister David Staples, Dr.
M. Tina Dupree 'The Chicken
Lady,' Sonia Chess, Jill
Bethel, Marva Hill, Minister
Joann Brookings and Ivan
Roberts.
For more information,
please call 786-287-9479.
******
According to Senator Dr.
Frederica S. Wilson, the


K


stage is all set for the return
of Role Model Dr. Randal
Pinkett, 'The Apprentice.'
who will address the graduat-
ing Role Models of Excellence
just before each one receives
$1,000 or more as an annual
gift.
This year's venue will be
held, Wednesday. May 10 at
New Birth Baptist Church,
2300 NW 125th St., beginning
promptly at 5:30 p.m. A full
program is being planned by
Pamela Jones, Melody
Delancy and other
office staff members.
Remember it is free
and open to the pub-
lic. So, come out and
attend the 13th annu-
al Scholarship
Ceremony.
The winners of the
essay contest, "Why Is
NEY It Important for Me to
Respect Women? were
announced. First prize win-
ners received a bicycle; sec-
ond, an electronic dictionary
and thesaurus; and third
place, a wrist watch.
The winners included:
Golden Glades, Jamal Cook,
1st, Calvin Melvin, 2nd, and
Scott Williams, 3rd; Myrtle
Grove, Alfonso Mitchell and
Jerrell Allen, 1st, Davon
Williams and Corey Jones,
2nd and Peter Hibbert and.
Willie Taylor, 3rd; Oak
Grove, Joseph Grant, Tches
Joseph and Chris Austin;
R.R. Moton, Robert
Compton, Nelson Milan,
James Orr, W.J. Bryan, Mark
Wedderburn, Craig Smith
and Jonathan Joshua.
Other winners were:
Brownsville, Joseph Brown
and Alfred Lambert;
Centennial, Marquis Holmes
and Reggie Knox; Cutler
Ridge, Jamal Harris; Jr Lee,
Derrick Doyle, Gabriel
Kinchens and Nathan Oliver;
Springs Mid., Zachary
Richardson; N. Miami,
Anthony Olive, Michael
Eugene and Jean Erickson;
and Parkway, Adrian Pearl,
Jovon Laffite and Walter
Exantus.


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


C%-i .-t *.._-_ ,i.--^^ 20... a 0 onnf


4C The Miami Times, ay
,


A teen gets an STD every eight seconds!


Are teens aware of the all STDs that can be
contracted before they have sex?


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

Few of us know as much as
we should about sexually
transmitted diseases. If you're
like most people, you probably
don't spend a lot of time think-
ing about your risk of getting
or spreading an STD.
Sexually transmitted dis-
eases (STDs), also known as
sexually transmitted infections
(STIs) are very real and happen
to many teens, more than you
think. One out of four sexually
active teens have a STD. In
order to reduce your risk of
infection, you should reduce
risky behaviors.
STDs are among the most
common infectious diseases in
the U.S. today. In fact, 10,000
teens or one teen every eight
seconds are infected by STDs
per day!
The term STD refers to a
group of diseases that are
spread from person to person
usually during sexual contact,
but can also be spread by
using an infected needle. The
germs that cause STDs can be
spread during oral (mouth),
anal or vaginal sex. Some
STDs are spread from skin-to-
skin contact with an infected
partner's genital area not just
through intercourse.
How can you tell if you have
a STD? How do you identify
which STD it is? How can you
cure or treat it?

CRABS (PUBIC LICE)
Parasites or bugs that live in
pubic hair. It causes intense
itching in the genital area.
Visual evidence of crabs, can
be spotted easily. It is spread
by close personal contact with
someone who has crabs, Uar-


The impact of growin
By Katrell Rahming
Turner Tech Student

"Who is my daddy?" the little
girl asked as her mother dressed
her for school. This is another
case in which the mother has to
play both her own role and that
of daddy's in the child's life. We
see it happening all around us
and some believe it's not easy for
a mother to teach a child right
from wrong without a father to
back her up and set a firm foun-
dation.
It is quoted that "a mother can
only do so much for a child, but
she does it to the best of her abil-
ities." So why can't a father do
the same? This is a question that
deadbeat fathers should have
thrown up in their faces daily
until they finally step up and
become the man they should
have been a long time ago.
One of the biggest crimes a
child could condemn their par-
ents for is not being there for
them emotionally, physically and
mentally. A child is like a play;
without guidance, a leader or a
director; it will only end in fail-
ure. There are too many fathers
who want to lay around but
aren't man enough to stay
around. Whatever happened to
the fathers who used to bond
with their children and not only
lectured them but listened to
what the children had to say.
Children living in a fatherless
home have a greater challenge
fitting into the world than chil-
dren living in a two-parent envi-
ronment. A common stereotype
Is that a number of children are
becoming pregnant, drug
abusers, homosexuals and mur-
derers because they don't have
both parents in their lives. They
have to deal with their mother,
the police and everyone else


ing of personal items that are
infested with crabs or crab
eggs. Treat with prescription
and over-the-counter medica-
tion.

HERPES
A recurrent skin condition
that can cause skin irritations
in the genital region. Pain or
burning during urination, flu-
like symptoms and small red
bumps which will then turn
into fluid-filled blisters.
Blisters will dry and heal with-
in one to three weeks. There is
usually pain, burning or itch-


Treat with antibiotic medica-
tions. It will not go away
unless treated. Sexual part-
ners must also be treated.

GONORRHEA
Bacterial infection of the
penis, vagina or anus. Pain or
burning during urination and
pus-like discharge. Sometimes
there are no signs. Passed on
during sexual contact with
someone who has gonorrhea.
Antibiotics can be taken; sexu-
al partners must also be test-
ed / treated.

SYPHILIS
Bacterial infection that can
spread throughout the body


The term sexually transmitted diseases (STD)
refers to a group of diseases that are spread from
person to person usually during sexual contact,
but can also be spread by using an infected nee-
dle.


ing during this time. Herpes
remains even after the blisters
are healed. Blisters may come
back. Sometimes there are no
symptoms. It is contracted by
sexual contact (oral, anal,
vaginal) with someone who has
herpes, kissing or touching the
body parts that are infected.
Herpes can be spread after
blisters are healed! There is 'no
cure' for herpes.

CHLAMYDIA
A bacterial infection that can
scar the fallopian tubes affect-
ing a woman's ability to have
children. Discharge from penis
or vagina, pain or burning dur-
ing urination, pain in the
abdominal area. Often you
have no signs!
It is passed on during sexual
contact with someone who has
chlamydia.


g up without a father
being down their throats for
whatever mistakes they may
have made. You have to take a
step into the child's shoes; look
at what they have been through
and all they have endured for
them to become the way they are
today.
The National Center for
Fathering, states that young
children living in a single parent
home are five times as likely to
be poor and ten times as likely to
be extremely poor. They also sug-
gest that 75% of American chil-
dren living in a single parent
families will experience signs of
depression, self-esteem issues,
loneliness and fear of rejection.
But how does this really effect a
child in the long run.

A FATHERLESS CHILD MAY BE
LEAD TO THE FOLLOWING
STATISTICS:
72% of all teenage murderers
grew up without fathers in their
homes.
70% of the minors held in
Juvenile Correction Facilities
grew up in a single parent home.
Fatherless children are twice
as likely to drop out of school as
opposed to their classmates who
live with two parents.
80% of the adolescents in
psychiatric hospitals come from
fatherless homes.
Compared to girls raised in
homes where both parents are
present, the daughter of single
parents are 64 % more likely to
become pregnant before mar-
riage, 53% more likely to marry
as teenagers and 92% more like-
ly to divorce soon.
Even though society wants us
to believe that a little girl without
a father may not amount to
much, it isn't true. "A fatherless
child can be anything they set
their minds to be."


Skincare do's and don'ts


We all know that upon
entering adulthood we will
have to endure the ackward
stage of puberty. In doing so
we will deal with acne, weight
problems, self esteem issues
and other unwelcome surpris-
es. We will try dozens of skin
and hair products, diets or
anything that .will make us
look better. Yet some of the
products you are using may
end up making you look


worse than what you were
looking before.
Don't under any circum-
stances pop your pimples
Do cleanse, exfoliate, tone
and moisturize your face daily
Don't try those one-a-day
weight loss diets fads
Do exercise regurlarly
Don't get under eight
hours of sleep at night
Do set a regular sleep
schedule
(


and affect the heart, brain and
nerves. First stage: a sore
(chancre) appears at the site of
infection; the sore will heal but
you still have syphilis. Second
stage: after the sore heals, a
skin rash and flu-like symp-
toms appear. Symptoms will go
away, but the disease remains.
Passed through sexual contact
with someone who has
syphilis.
May be treated with antibiot-
ic medication. It is very impor-
tant to follow up and make
sure the disease is cured. If left
untreated syphilis can lead to
very severe health problems
and even death.

GENITAL WARTS/ HUMAN
PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV)
A virus that affects the skin
in the genital area as well as
the female's cervix. Small,


bumpy growths on, in or
around sex organs or anus
that vary in color and size,
Sometimes they cannot be
seen at all. Passed through
skin to skin sexual contact
with a person who has genital
warts. There is no cure for
HPV.

HEPATITIS B
A disease that affects the
liver. Tiredness, vomiting,
stomach pain, loss of
appetite/weight, aching mus-
cles/joints, fever, nausea,
diarrhea, yellowing of skin or
eyes (jaundice) and dark col-
ored urine. You may only feel
one or a couple of these symp-
toms or none at all. Spread
through contact with blood,
semen or vaginal fluids of a
person who has Hepaitis B.
Mainly spread through sexual
contact, but can also be
spread through needle sharing
and during birth. There is no
cure for hepatitis B.

HIV AND AIDS
Human immunodeficiency
virus (HIV) is a virus that
attacks the immune system
resulting in acquired immun-
odeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
Persistent symptoms that
might include fever, night
sweats, unexplained weight
loss, diarrhea, tiredness,
swollen lymph glands and
nausea. Often there are no
symptoms with early HIV
infection, but some may have
brief flu-like symptoms. Virus
is passed through the
exchange of blood, semen or
vaginal fluids with an infected
person. This happens most
often through sex and sharing
needles. An infected woman
can also pass the virus to her
child before or during birth.
HIV can also be spread to an
infant through breast milk.
There is no cure for HIV.


Bio: Kilroy is a proud mem-
ber of the class of 2007. He
has a 3.0 GPA with above aver-
age classes such as: Honors
Algebra 2, Psychology, English
3 Honors, Theatre Level 4,
Spanish 2, AP U.S. History,
Anatomy and Physiology. He is
currently trying to pursue his
dream of becoming a runway
and commercial catalogue
model as well as an actor.
Some of his attributes include
the Thespian Society where he
holds office as president.
Kilroy has been a part of his
school's fashion show on more
then one occasion, including
prom "do's and don'ts" and
modeling for his school talent
show." I've ran for (just] about
each title there was at Miami
Carol City Senior High School.
I didn't win, however I made a


great effort to represent" says
Kilroy. He also helped decorate
different school functions such
as the junior ring ceremonies,
the 5000 Role Model talent
show and numerous other
events. He plans on enlisting
into the Air Force if he isn't
accepted to Fordham
University, Columbia State,
Julliard or NYU for fashion
design. He wants to be a
model, actor or some type of
performing arts director, be it
dance, art, theatre or music.
He also wants to work in a pro-
fession dealing with children
since he is very multi-taskful.
"Working with children has
always been one of my enjoy-
ments so [to] be able to do both
thearts and teach the children
will be [al task that I will more
than enjoy."


iic lOOat ou Iin:


Do you ever wonder if your voice is being heard or are
tired of being looked over because you're still a child? Do
you ever feel that adults don't have all the answers. Well it's
time to let your opinion be known. Just email me what you
think about these subjects at jazz4advice@yahoo.com.


Are you sinking deeper into an ocean rutl or rurmoiur are you
swimming toward an unknown location? Are you fishing for
answers with unknown solutions? Are you floating towards obliv-
ion? Well I'm here to keep you afloat. With my honest and trust-
worthy advice you'll be able to get a grasp on any troubling situa-
tion sailing towards you. So e-mail me atjazz4advice@yahoo.com
with any unanswered questions, pressing concerns and important
information you wish to share with me.


Jazz,
My life is spiraling out of control at the
moment. I feel like all my life dreams are
flushing down the toilet right before my
eyes. I don't mean to be all that dramat-
ic but I keep getting knocked down over
and over again and I don't know if I'II be
able to get back up. First my parents
decided to separate, then my best friend
tells me she is moving in a week, my
boyfriend just dumped me at a time when
I needed him the most and to top it all off
my top three college choices did not
accept me. So you see I have reasons to
be depressed and I really need advice on
dealing with all this. Where do I go from
here?
Stuck
Stuck,
I believe that God deals many challenges
in life and it's up to you to overcome them
or have them overcome you. When you
are dealt with troubles you should not
hide or run away from them. You should
tackle them head on and know that there
is a light at the end of the tunnel. There


probably were signs that your parents
were divorcing so you probably expected
this, so this really isn't that much of a
shock for you.
So now is the time you and your parents
need to schedule a meeting for you to
express your feelings and concerns. Next
you should have the best of times with
'your friend, even though she's leaving
you can still have a long-distance friend-
ship. Your boyfriend may not know how
to deal with pressure so he felt that you
would depend on him more and he didn't
know how to handle it. So in a way it's
good you found out his true colors and
now it's time to focus on yourself. When
the time is right you will meet someone
who you'll always be able to depend on.
Unfortunately your colleges did not
accept you, which doesn't mean you're
not smart enough. All colleges look for
various types of students, so keep look-
ing and you will find a college right for
you. All events in life have a purpose.
Hopefully yours will make you a stronger
person.


Dear Jazz,
I am truly elated to be writing you at this moment and to be
able to correspond with someone who is doing something posi-
tive for our youth in Miami Dade County.
At the same time I hope that this letter reaches you in the best
of health and spirits. I would really like for you to publish what
I am going to write in this letter concerning our youth today.
I was once a youth/teenager or whatever you want to call it
during my time on the streets. My question is "Where do we go
from here?" That includes from finishing school, getting out of
jail, surviving a life threatening/ changing incident and etc. We
look around for help in the streets while we're the essence of our
own problems. We want fast money that don't last long. We
blame the "white man" for our predicament whether we're in
prison or struggling in the streets. We turn to drugs (weed, X and
liquor) to lead astray from facing reality.
Some of us make it, some of us don't. We need afather figure,
a true role model that has overcame the "crabs in a bucket" slogan
and someone who has made it out of the hood. That's what our
youth need to go from here. If we act our age, carry ourselves with
respect and respect our elders we'll go farther in life. Selling drugs
is not going to get it! It's temporary.
I know I am writing too much, but I have a lot of things on my
mind to relate to my younger brothers on the streets. If by
chance my letter gets published. I would end it like this: "Dead
like the rest of my friends, in prison like me or living a success-
ful life." So tell me, where do we go from here?
As I end this letter, I pray that always peace be on you as well
as His mercy. May He bless continuously the path you journey
on throughout your future. I want you to take care of yourself
Jazz and I would like to hear from you concerning the Issues at
hand.

Keep hope alive!!!

Sincerely
Asad
Formerly "Don-Don"



Arteention!


ALL ASPIRING TEENAGE JOURNALISTS:
Have you ever wished to have your writing published or get
your very own byline. Well here is your chance to have your very
own news articles published in The Miami Times. Please email me
your writings at jazz4advicee(yahoo.com.


Spoken Words

DUE TO THE GRAPHIC NATURE

By: William Reyes


Due to the graphic nature of what you're able to endure, I advise you to

brace yourself for this is unlike anything you have ever experienced. Life's

journey has lead you to love and love has lead you to me to relax and let

this thing called destiny take its toll and allow us to partake in

many challenges it has to offer...



Rest your heart upon my hand and know that I shall restore this thing

called love to its rightful owner, yet, in my eyes you're merely a cloner

renouncing me the owner of your love. You have failed to realize that

modern day love means so much yet not enough, for you to place your

trust in 198,205 men in whom you shall find no comfort and who's words
and thoughts have been erupt. But, I come from a higher power to show

the true meaning of love to the world through Jesus Christ.


Amazing Profiles

KILROY DEMETRIUSE LOVE JR., 17,
11TH GRADE, MIAMI CAROL CITY
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL


- --------


;;oto


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One Stop Center provides a wealth of job hunting tools


By Isheka Harrison
iharrison(imiamitimesonline.com

"To provide high-quality
employment and training solu-
tions to job seekers, workers
and employers to foster region-
al economic growth" is a mis-
sion that South Florida
Workforce certainly fulfills
through its One Stop Career
Centers.
With 14 locations in the
region, these career centers
offer an array of services
intended to benefit the com-
munity. Whether a job seeker,
employer or staffing agency,
the career centers have some-
thing for everyone.


Among the services provided
are job placement, internet
access, resume writing, skills
training, recruitment assis-
tance and referrals. Federal
and state tax dollars allow the
centers to provide their servic-
es free of charge.
Miami's Downtown location
is no exception. According to
the center's director, William
Brinson, they are dedicated to
helping their customers be
fully productive in society. "We
try to assist people to become
self sufficient, either through
placement, training or retrain-
ing. I think we provide a serv-
ice that's direly needed in the
community."


South Florida Workforce Executive Director Rick Beasley (left) speaks
with downtown One Stop Center director, William Brinson.


Brinson also noted that they
have a very diverse group of
customers, most of which orig-
inate from the Overtown and
Wynwood areas. Based on
client satisfaction surveys,
about 98.6 percent of their
adult customers are satisfied
with the experience they have,
while their dislocated (laid off
or terminated) population
boasts 100 percent satisfac-
tion. Brinson also states that if
a customer is not satisfied, he
wants to know why. I ask my
staff to bring it to my atten-
tion if someone is not satisfied.
If it's not beyond my control I
try to make changes," he said.
Customers who frequent the


center agree that the staff is
caring. Paishala Edwards. an
Overtown resident who has
been coming to the center for
about ten months, said the
center has impacted her life
positively. "Some of the people
that I have come into contact
with have a heart and are very
warm and very cooperative as
far as needs go...They under-
stand your situation and know
how to adapt instead of stay-
ing in the box. Not only do they
train but they put empathy
into their work."
Rothel Fussell, a supervisor
at the center, echoes this sen-
timent, explaining that they
Please turn to ONE STOP 10D


Business7jji lcac
SPONSORED BY
T-THE BEACON COUNCIL
Miami-Dade County's Official Economic Development Partnership

Computer service at its best


Full Name of Business:
The Creative Shoppe"'m Inc.
1865 NE 167th Street
Ofc: 786-244-8294
Cell: 786-274-7534
Fax: 305-244-8294
Tcshoppe@Thecreativeshop
pe.com

Year Established
1993


Owner
Ray Stewart
CEO


- President /


Number of full-time/part
time employees
4 Full-time / 2 Part-time

Products/services
Computer upgrades,
repairs and sales of new
and used computers and
personal income tax serv-
ices.

Future Goals
To be able to supply all the
local mom and pop stores
with affordable computer
expertise without the large
corporate price. To enable
the average user to learn
and have the confidence to
perform repairs and
upgrades on their own
without always having to
seek hired help.
Ultimately, to educate all
of our local communities.

Why did you start this
business and how has it
grown?
I started this business
because the need to edu-
cate individuals with prop-
er knowledge of computers
is ever growing and the
affordable supply to edu-
cate is decreasing.
Through the years, the
company has grown in
ways that overwhelms
financial gain. The
respect and pride that
comes from knowing that
a person has gained
knowledge of how to han-
dle and deal with your
everyday common com-
puter problems is great.
The services are not free
but they are very close to
being free as compared to
the average cost for the
services we offer. All of
our past clients agree.
With the adding of other
subsidiaries, The Creative
Shoppe has started to
make its mark in the tri-
county area. Our client
base has grown from 40 to
approximately 500 in the
last year. We look forward
to making our name and
or trademark a well known
and very respected item.


Owner


What obstacles have you
faced and how did you
overcome them?
Initially the biggest obstacle
was trust. Most people
would not let someone.take
their computer out of their
house. Through building
respect with the clients, it
became clear that The
Creative Shoppe was a com-
pany that intended to pro-
vide a service for a very fair
price. So our motto was
born, "Where Saving Money
Doesn't Risk Quality."
Additionally, in meeting and
joining forces with Mr.
Lehem Felican, who is our
Executive VP, the company
is now reaching goals that
otherwise might not have
been attainable.

Who does your company
best serve and why?
We serve from Miami and
Florida City to West Palm
Beach.

How have your past experi-
ences helped meet the
need of your clients?
I have learned through
experience that everyone,
including myself, wants the
best deal for their money.
This is something that
drives even those who are
more financially secure
than others. The whole
purpose of our company is
to do just that, provide a
service at a fee that even the
tightest of the tight can
agree upon, while maintain-
ing the price integrity for
the business.

Where did you get the
name of your business and
does it have any significant
meaning?
I came up with the name
because of the variety of
services that we offer.
Initially starting out as a
Sole Proprietor, I realized it
would take someone who is
very creative to be able to
provide more than one serv-
ice efficiently.


Chester named to Suited for Success board


Organization assists
low-income women
with clothing and
job training skills

Suited for Success, Inc.
announced that Charesse
Chester, president of the public
relations agency Charesse
Chester & Associates, Inc., has
been named to the Board of
Directors.
"Suited for Success is pleased
to add Ms. Chester to our
Board of Directors. Her expert-
ise in public relations, comple-
mented by her network of gov-
ernment, private and commu-
nity-based contacts rounds out
our existing board. We are con-


Charesse Chester
fident she will be an asset to
our organization as we enter


our second decade of service in
Miami-Dade County," said
Chelsea Wilkerson,
Development Director of Suited
for Success.
Chester is a longtime activist
in the South Florida communi-
ty. "I enjoy helping others reach
the next level in their lives,"
said Chester. "I do my best to
make an impact in this com-
munity and it just happens to
be a lot of fun for me as well."
In addition to being a college
professor and columnist,
Chester serves as a member of
the American Cancer Society
Board of Directors and is a
graduate of the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce
Leadership Miami. She holds a
master's degree in
Communications from


University of Miami and a bach-
elor's degree in
Communications from Florida
International University.
As president of Charesse
Chester & Associates, Inc.,
Chester has managed many
national and local accounts,
including PBS&J, Wilbur Smith
Associates Engineers, Black
Coaches Association, Orange
Bowl Committee, North Dade
Community Development
Federal Credit Union and 100
Black Men of South Florida,
Inc.
Suited for Success, Inc. is a
non-profit organization that
provides professional clothing
and educational assistance to
low-income women in their
effort to achieve self-sufficien-
cy.


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CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:


BID NO. 05-06-067


OPENING DATE:


PORT LIGHTWEIGHT ALTERNATE LIGHT
SOURCE (ALS) KIT

2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 2006


(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 5/10/06)

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement.
Telephone No. (305) 416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.


Joe Arriola
City Manager


AD NO. 6799


-
ft m s o 4mwa


a m
-


MEA A D W' B SE A L ND SOF BA L Stndng ad eelyHoos)


MEAC ATLMID EASTERN
MEACWATHLETIC CONFERENCE


Bethune-Cookman
Norfolk State
Delaware State
Florida A&M
Coppin State
Maryland-E. S.
NC A&T State


CONF ALL
W L W L
12 0 24 22
8 7 19 24
7 8 15 29
6 7 13 26
5 7 10 34
6 10 9 28 j
5 10 18 28 <
c


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
CHRIS HENAULT, Jr., SS, B-CC, New Ipswich,
NH Batted .333 with three RBIs including a
double and a homer to help B-CC to a 3-0 week.
Assisted on three double plays.
PITCHER
PATRICK OATES, So., P, NC A&T, Clinton, NC
- Went 1-0 last week giving up three hits and six
walks through six innings. Also hit the game-win-
ning HR in win over DelState.
ROOKIE
RONALD PHELPS, Fr., P, NC A&T, Roper, NC
- Saved both wins of a double-header sweep vs.
DelState. Did not give up a hit and struck out
three while facing 19 batters in 3.1 innings of
relief.


LU
CD,


SWAG SOUTHWESTERN
SW AC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
DIV ALL
E.DIVISION W L W L
Jackson State 18 5 22 13
Miss. Valley St. 18 6 23 24
Alcorn State 13 9 21 18
Alabama State 6 17 12 31
Alabama A&M 3 21 8 28
E. DIVISION W L W L
Prairie View 17 7 29 18
Southern 16 8 23 18
Texas Southern 15 9 19 26
Ark. Pine Bluff 9 15 15 25
Grambling State 3 21 6 35
SWAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
SHUNDELL RUSSAW, Sr., OF, JSU,
Alexander City, AL -Helped Tigers maintain E.
Div. lead with 3-0 week by hitting .692 (9-o1-13)
with 5 doubles, 1 triple, 9 RBIs and 9 runs
scored. Also stole 5 bases in 5 attempts.
PITCHER
ISAAC DANIELS, RHP, Sr., TSU, Portland,
OR In team's 3-0 week, pitched 11.2 innings
with 11 strikeouts, 1 walk and 1 save. Had ERA
of 0.00 with one complete game, 1 shutout and
1 save.


MEAC M EASTERN
MEAC- ATHLETIC CONFERENCE


Florida A&M
Delaware State
Hampton
Bethune-Cookman
Norfolk State
NC A&T State
Howard
Morgan State
Coppin State
S. C. Slate
Maryland-E. S.


CONF
14 0
10 4
10 4
10 4
7 7
6 7
6 8
5 9
4 10
4 10
0 13


MEAC PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
PLAYER
ANGELA BALSER, So., OF. HAMPTON, Prince
George, VA Hit.667 and drcve in six runs as Lady
Pirates swept Norfolk State last week. Hit a three-run
HR in game one and Iollowed with a two-run double in
the second game. Was 4 of 6 on the week with three
runs.
PITCHER
LEEKYCIA BROWN, Fr., P/IF, NSU, Woodslield, OH
- Went 1-2 with 2.47 ERA g ving up 19 hits, eight
earned runs and two walks in 17 innings. Had shutout
vs. UMES and three complete games in the week.
ROOKIE
BREANNA SHAW, Fr., SS, B-CC, Lithonia, GA Hit
.600 against No. 24 Florida. Hit safely in two contests
anc collected four putouts and six assists.


W AC SOUTHWESTERN
SW AC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE
FINAL REGULAR SEASON DIV ALL
E.DIV W L W L
Miss. Valley State 11 1 13 20
Alcorn State 9 6 12 25
Jackson State 7 5 20 17
Alabama A&M 9 7 11 29
Alabama State 0 0 0 2
E. DIV W L W L
Southern 9 7 16 20
Ark. Pine Bluff 4 4 7. 22
Texas Southern 4 8 8 25
Grambling State 3 8 3 18
Prairie View 3 13 7 28
SWAC TOURNAMENT MVP
PLAYER
BALENCIA YOUNG, MISSISSIPPI VALLEY
STATE


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT OF BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:

BID NO. 05-06-068 GAS MASK & ACCESSORIES

OPENING DATE: 2:00 P.M., MONDAY, MAY 22, 2006

(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 5/15/06)

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement.
Telephone No. (305) 416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.

Joe Arriola .-
City Manager ,

AD NO. 6800 (


I


9


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


6D The Miami Times Ma 6


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Maseratis feature a
Ferrari engineered
V8 engine
producing 400
horsepower




Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


MI IANi TIMES I
1 I I I I 1 lil I{S



S I II ()0 II 0 I N I) 'I' l (; I 110 I I';


Maserati proudly announces Master
Maserati North America driving school
for owners and enthusiasts looking to
experience the spectacular sensation of
piloting a Maserati around world-class
Road Atlanta racetrack.
-PRNewsFoto/Maserati North America, Inc.


The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 7D


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_CITY OF MIAMI


trdm ti a


Information Technology invites
applications for the following
openings:
* Communication
Systems Consultant
* IT Security and Cane
Card Manager
* Media Training and
Production Specialist
* Network Specialists (2)
Interested candidates
please apply online at
www.miami.edu/careers
and submit your resume.
- -f. |


AD. No 07806


COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY
PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT the City of Miami Community
Redevelopment Agency (CRA) for the Southeast Overtown/Park West and
the Omni Districts has scheduled a Board of Commissioners Meeting to be
held on Thursday, May 11, 2006, at 10:00 A.M or after in the City
Commission Chambers located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive,
Miami, Florida.
All interested persons are invited to attend. For copies of the agenda,
please contact the CRA Office at (305) 679-6800.
Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15733) Clerk of the Board


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),
from our Website: www.miamidade.aov/dpm. Vendors may choose to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.
Interested parties may also visit or call:
Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773
There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the bid package through the United States Postal Service.
These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


MIAMI-DADE



MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY TRANSIT DEPARTMENT
DESIGN OF PEDESTRIAN OVERPASSES AT
SOUTH MIAMI AND UNIVERSITY METRORAIL STATIONS
OCI PROJECT NO. E05-MDT-01, PTP
MDT PROJECT NO. NFP003-TR07-FD1
The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, and
Chapter 2, Sections 2-8.1 (As,amended by Ordinance 05-15), and 2-10.4 of the Miami-Dade County,;
Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A/E)
services will be required for the design of new pedestrian overpasses at the following locations: U.S.
1 at University Metrorail Station, and U.S. 1 at South Miami Metrorail Station, for the Miami-Dade Transit
Department (MDT).
The anticipated scope of work includes design, public involvement activities, preparation of a complete
set of biddable construction documents, technical specifications and preparation of the engineer's esti-
mate of probable construction cost. The scope of work shall include all the necessary coordination with
all involved agencies and organizations, including but not limited to, MDT, Miami Dade Public Works
(PWD), Transportation Aesthetics Review Committee (TARC), Florida Department of Transportation
(FDOT), pertinent municipalities and institutions and all the appropriate permitting agencies. Elements
of the work include, but are not limited to, architecture, surveying, right of way issues, soils investiga-
tion, structures, utility identification and relocation, lighting, landscaping, maintenance of traffic, environ-
mental studies and environmental mitigation plans, as required.
At MDT's sole discretion, the County may exercise the following options to be included in the contract:
For any additional locations under consideration for a pedestrian bridge, services consisting of the
development of conceptual studies, preparation of environmental studies or categorical exclusion
reports, and/or final design services.
Construction, Engineering and Inspection (CE&I) services.
Design services during construction.

Proposers are advised that a Second-Tier meeting is required for this solicitation. Please refer to
Section 3.3 entitled "Proposal Evaluation" for the requirement for firms short-listed and advancing to the
Second-Tier meeting.
The non-exclusive Professional Services Agreement has an effective term of five (5) years.
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
14.00 Architecture (PRIME)
9.02 Soils, Foundations and Material Testing
15.01 Surveying and Mapping Land Geotechnical and Materials Engineering Services Surveying
11.00 General Structural Engineering 16.00 General Civil Engineering
12.00 General Mechanical Engineering 17.00 Engineering Construction Management
13.00 General Electrical Engineering 20.00 Landscape Architecture
A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provi-
sions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering
Unit located at 111 NW 1St Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respec-
tively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded elec-
tronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail
address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-
line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notifi-
cation. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-
dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."
The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amelia M .Cordova-Jimenez who may be contacted via e-
mail at ameliac@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-2036.
CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS
1 AGREEMENT 20% DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (DBE) MEASURE
A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on May 4, 2006, at 3:30 P.M. in
Conference Room 18-2, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to
attend.
Deadline for submission of proposals is May 19, 2006 at 11:00 A.M., LOCAL TIME,.all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED.
This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1 (t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27
for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT


Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida 33133 for the following:
PROJECT NAME: "CORAL WAY MAINTENANCE CONTRACT, B-30389"
BID NO.: 05-06-059
The project consists of complete landscaping maintenance services along the Coral Way Median
including mowing, trimming, litter pick up, mulching, reinstalling root guards, planting shrubbery, water-
ing and installing all electric appurtenances. The median is located along SW 22 Street between SW 37
Avenue and SW 12 Avenue. This project shall cover the maintenance of the medians, curb to curb,
including the 423 electrical fixtures. The mdian is approximately 13,000 linear feet (2.46 miles) in length
and this project would cover approximately 130,000 square feet (2.96 acres) of maintenance surface
area. The contract term is for a one year period with the option to renew for four (4) one year addition-
al periods, subject to funding availability and contractor's performance.
Prospective Bidder shall hold a current certified license as a General Contractor from the State of
FLorida or a Miami-Dade County Business Occupational License in the appropriate trade. An Electrical
contractor must be used for the electrical maintenance of the work and a minimum of three (3) years
experience is required for the electrical portion of the project. Proof of experience for landscaping and
electrical projects may be required for three (3) separate projects of similar size, scope, and complexi-
ty, supported by references within the past three (3) years.
A Performance Bond is required for this project.
Receiving Date & Time: Tuesday May 30, 2006 at 11:00 AM
Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request, after April 28, 2006, at the City of Miami,
Department of Public Works, 444 S.W. 2nd Avenue, Eight Floor, Miami, FL 33130. Telephone No. (305)
416-1200.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 18-74 OF THE CITY OF MIAMI ORDINANCE NO. 12271.
Joe Arriola
City Manager


SD The Miami Times, May 3-9, 20


b~J~n~


.n V% 1.. -- M**.- .* wf_- Qr 0 of06


mll 4


NOW









RJIaHMt \nr Inl ThpirL Cumn f i TheL MiamITimes, May3-9, 2006


To Place Your Ad
Call: 305-694-6225


Tim e ds@mes
classifieds@miamitimesonline.com


To Fax Your Ad
Fax: 305-757-4764


Business Rentals
2955 NW 62nd Street
Store for rent, church or
small business.
Call 954-450-5573
COMMERCIAL
RENTAL PROPERTY
4801 NW 27th Avenue
Freestanding store available,
completely renovated. Air
conditioned. Roll-down
security doors. Outside
lighting.$700 per month.
$700 security deposit.
Call 305-638-3699

S Office Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $260 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600
Unfurnished Rooms
14801 N.W. 7 Court
Newly remodeled, large,
clean, unfurnished rooms,
near shopping, college and
public transportation. Neatly
kept. Call 305-300-9424.
Furnished Rooms
1426 NW 70th Street
$300-$350 monthly including
utilities, and air. Must have
income.
Call 305-836-8378.
15810 N.W. 38th Place
$80 weekly, air, free utilities,
kitchen,and bath One
person.
305-691-3486 or 474-8188
15840 N.W. 18 PLACE
Furnished room, kitchen
privileges.
Call 305-548-5488 or
305-962-8157
210 NW 43rd Street
Two rooms for rent. Must
have income, utilities includ-
ed, $450 per month or $113
weekly, $200 security depos-
it, full use of house. Call 305-
836-5739 or 305-335-6454.
3001 NW 45th Street
Newly renovated furnish
room, air conditioning and
utilities included. $385 to
move in and $300 monthly.
Call: Lola at 786-486-7086 or
Charles at 786-287-3872
6233 N.W. 22nd Court
Clean quiet tenant wanted,
utilities included. $110 week-
ly. Call 786-277-2693
8275 N. W. 18 Avenue
References 305-754-7776
North Miami Area
$400 monthly, untilities and
cable included. Deposit re-
quired. Call 305-336-8620
NORTHWEST MIAMI AREA
Nice room with privileges like
home, responsible person
preferred. Call 305-696-2451
OPA-LOCKA AREA
$100 per week. $200 to
move in. Cable TV. 305-621-
6066
Very nice, air conditioned
rooms, rent plans are nego-
tiable. Any reasonable plan
accepted. One week free.
Call 786-663-4600
| Efficiencies
1321 N.W. 68th Terrace
Clean efficiency, $425 a
month, utilities included, call:
305-479-3632
5890 NW 12th Ave. in Rear
Large one bedroom, one
bath, kitchen, living room.
Call 786-315-6362
NORTH MIAMI AREA
$500 monthly, $450 security,
one person 786-319-2695
OPALOCKAAREA
Efficiency for rent unfurnish-
ed, utilities included. $500
monthly.
Call: Deborah 305-766-7089

Apartments
1235 Wilmington Street
Opa-Locka, One bedroom,
$585 monthly. 305-696-4526
1298 N.W. 60th Street
One and two bedrooms
available. Section 8
welcome.
Call 786-282-8775
14100 N.W. 6th Court
Huge, one bedroom, one
bath, with central air, in quiet
area. $650 monthly!
Raciel Cruz 305-213-5013
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$510-520 per month, one
bedrooms, $410 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
6837 N.W. 6th Avenue
Extra large one bedroom, air,
$400 monthly, 305-206-1438.
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS


One and two bedrooms.,
from $420-$495 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699


NORTH DADE/NW AREA
One bedroom, $525 EZ-
Move in. Two bedrooms,
$675, new tile, appliances,
kitchen, security bars.
305-944-2101
RENT PARADISE
OPA-LOCKA AREA
One bedroom in the rear of
home. All utilities included.
$725 monthly! Great for one
person. Call 305-467-6095.

ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$410 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $450 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

WILDROSE
Large, two and three bed-
rooms available. All applian-
ces with central air. Section 8
Welcome! Call 305-688-2749

S Duplex

1108 N.E. 113th Street
North Miami, 2-two bed-
rooms, two bath, call:
786-267-4329
1130 NW 88th Street
Completely remodeled two
and three bedrooms with all
appliances, water and central
air. Call 305-305-4665
1187 N.W. 63rd Street
Two bedrooms, $750 month-
ly, first, last and security.
Call 305-389-8414
1272 NW 46th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
Section 8 only. $950
Call 305-331-6289
1746 N.W. 48th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
tiled, air, security bars, $695
mthly, water included. First
last and $300 security to
move in.
Call 305-688-7209
8451 NW 19th Avenue
One bedroom home, air, tile,
bars, water, fenced, $700,
$2100 move in. NO Section
8. Terry Dellerson, Broker
305-891-6776
ALLAPATTAH AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
first last, security. Section 8
preferred.
Call 305-244-6845.
NORTHWEST AREA
One bedroom, upstairs, air,
stove, refrigerator, $700 a
month, $1300 to move in.
Call Ed 786-232-1309.
Under New
Management
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $525 per month, $525
security deposit, $1050 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.

Condos/Townhouses
1040 N.E. 210th Terrace
Two bedrooms, two and half
bath, tiled, central air, $1200
a month. 305-665-1845
191st Street NW 35th Ave
Four bedrooms, Section 8
welcome. Call 305-754-7776.
3451 NW 194th Terrace
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1275 per month, Section 8
welcome! Available June 1.
Call 786-486-8104
4521 NW 194th Street
Three bedroms, one bath,
updated, central air, tile,
$1100 monthly.
Call 305-665-1845
479 N.W. 19th Street
Four bedrooms, one and half
bath. Townhouse. Section 8
O.K.$1300, 305-815-2445.
| Houses
1120 N.W. 105th Street
Two bedrooms one bath.
$1100 monthly. Section 8
welcome.First last and se-
curity. Call Martha
786-389-6223.
1321 N.W 111th St
Four bedrooms, one bath,
$1200 a month, call 305-759-
6418. House will not pass in-
spection for Section 8.
1345 N.W. 51 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Hialeah, Miami Beach, Sec-
tion 8 only, 305-836-0500.
1481 N.W. 44 Street
Two bedroom, one bath,
family room, large kitchen,
front and back porch, large
yard, central air and heat.
$1100 monthly. First, last and
deposit to move in.
Call 305-528-8800
15901 N. W. 18 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath
$1150 monthly. Call Genesis
Real Estate, 954-987-8880.
1720 N.W. 180 Terrace
Large four bedrooms two
baths. Section 8 welcome.
Call Tony 305-934-1171
2359 NW 56 Street


Four bedrooms, two baths
with central air. Section 8
welcome, $1450 monthly,
first and security. Open
house Saturday 10-2pm.
Call 305-761-0061


2520 N.W. 141st Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome.
Call Denise 305-732-9875 or
305-624-4395
3096 N.W. 52nd Street
Newly remodeled, two bed-
rooms, one bath, first, last
and security. $1050 a month.
786-663-5900
3100 NW 164th Terrace
Five bedrooms, two baths,
large kitchen, in door laundry
hook up, central air, fully
fenced, asking $1700 per
month. Two months security,
credit check / application,
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-621-4960
3120 NW 67th Street
Remodeled three bedrooms,
two baths, central air, $1200
monthly. Call 305-352-3257
3265 N.W. 50th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
remodeled, $1325 monthly,
Section 8 ok. 305-216-5640.
3300 N.W. 174th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
air, bars, tile, $1400, $4200
move in, family room, NO
Section 8, fenced, Terry Del-
lerson Broker 305-891-6776.
3650 Grand Avenue
Coconut Grove, nice one
bedroom apts. Good
location. Central air, tiled
floors, security bars, near
Metrorail and Metro Bus.
$700 a month. Section 8
welcome. Call 305-926-3032
or 305-696-2825
5500 N.W. 4th Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths
with large yard. $1475 or
best offer. Section 8 okay.
Call John at 305-986-6609
after 1 p.m.
5650 N.E. MIAMI COURT
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Please contact Joseph. Louis
at 305-632-2426.
BRAND NEW HOME
180 NW 53rd Street
(under construction, will be
ready by the first of June.)
Over 1200 square feet. Four
bedrooms, two baths, $1500
monthly, first and security
with Section 8. First last and


security without
Go look first bef
PLEASE! 877-G

CAROL CIT
Nice three
bedrooms availa
8 and HOPV
welcome.Call 30

CAROL CIT
Three bedroon
$1500 monthly
May 15. Section
Call 305-76

NEVER REN
Buy a four bec
baths, $43,000!F
For listings 8
xD041.

STOP
Behind in your re
notice? Behind in
mortgage? Call I
786-326-



!!!ATTENT
Now You Can
Own Home
****WITH
FREE CASH
UP TO $6
HUDNA Home
FIRST TIME
NEED HE
305-892-
House Of Hon

!!IATTENT
Now You Can
Own Home
**-WITH
FREE CASH
UP TO $6
HUDNA Home
FIRST TIME
NEED HEI
305-892-
House Of Hon

$ CAS
for REAL E
or Vacant Lots
Call Dave 305
Homeowners,
No credit n
Call 786-48
I will buy yoi
house or multi
can close within
Call 305-24
If you thinking
to Atlanta, GA
buy a house?
Call Dawnel, 67
Independen
Co.
LOTS FOR
Contact Chris:
0260. Stop forecl
Call Battalliah 30


Duplex

1730 NW 52nd Street
$131,000
Two units One bedroom,
one bath, great income.
Do not disturb tenants.
Call Joe Clark
305-776-7438

215-217 N.E. 55 Terrace
Duplex for sale, in design
district. 21-11 $290,000.
Price negotionable. Will pay
closing. Call for an appoint-
ment 305-761-0061

| : Houses: I
1121 N.W. 46th Street
Four bedrooms, one bath,
large beautiful home, remod-
eled, central air, alarm, tiled
flooring, utility room, fenced,
backyard. Why pay rent?
100% financing available.
$1750 monthly. Pay only
closing costs. Call Norman:
305-322-1090
12001 N.W. 22nd Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$215,000, financing
available.
Call 786-486-7217
1745 NW 122 Street
"Awesome" Four bedrooms,
three and one half bath. Two
big master bedrooms and big
Florida room, kitchen, tiled
floors, and superior decora-
tions, $355,000.
Brown Realty Inv. Corp.
305-685-6275
3010 NW 101 Street
Four bedrooms, three baths,
Seller is paying 3% closing
fees. Why rent when you can
buy? Call 954-449-1428.
3990 N.W. 179th Street
Priced $249,000, three bed-
rooms, one bath, quiet neigh-
borhood. Financing
available.
Call 786-486-7217
5350 N.W. 30th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath
2936 N.W. 47th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
1603 N.W. 44th Street
Corner lot, three bedrooms,
two baths, family room, air.


Section 8. 17425 N.W. 17th Avenue
fore you call, Three bedrooms, two baths,
iFI-LLC-1 family room, central air.
Motivated sellers! Ride by,
call M. Jones, 954-430-9112
Y AREA or 786-512-5126, :NJA
and four Realty.
able. Section Realty. .
/A program 5725 Mayo Street
5-624-0451. Fantastic three bedroom one
bath with patio and huge
*Y AREA third bedroom, Hollywood
n, two bath. area. $249,900
. Available Brown Reality and
n 8 welcome Investment, Corp.
51-9464 305-685-6275
CENTRAL MIAMI
T AGAIN! Renovated two bedrooms,
drooms, two one bath, move in condition,
Foreclosures! seller may pay closing costs,
00-749-8168 please call 305-608-6975.
FORECLOSURE
All Areas of Dade,
!!!! Hundreds to Choose
ant 24 hour Easy to Qualify.
n your FREE LIST. Call now!
Kathy: Larry Albert 305-255-9040
7916
FORECLOSURES!
Four bedrooms, two baths..
Must Sell! Only $43,000!
800-749-8168 xD040
ION!!!
ION! Yr HUD HOMES!
Own Your Four bedrooms, Only
SToday $43,000. For listings:
-I""
RANTS 800-749-8168 xD046
GRANTS
35,000 LITTLE RIVER AREA
s Available Four bedrooms, two baths
BUYERS and three bedrooms, one
LP??? bath, two houses on half
8315 acre, $275,000. Appraised at
ies Realty $350,000. Call Kathy:
786-326-7916
*ION!!!
Own Your Lots
SToday
H-"** Florida Land Grab
GRANTS Lake Wales 1.25 Acre $9800
5,000 Fort McCoy. 18 Acre $11000
s Available Ocala Residential lot .10
BUYERS $9650 Daytona 2.5 Acre
LP??? $28000. Sebring .25 Acre
8315 $19500. Owner financing
ies Realty available. Call Flobert Anoza
754-204-7185. Absolute sale
'H $ no reserve. Hurry, sells fast!


STATE
in 24 hours
-301-2112
need cash?
eeded!
8-8617
ur problem
units and I
48 hours.
4-9003
of moving
and need to

8-471-6527
t Realty

SALE
305-219-
osure.
5-525-8546


Condos/Townhouses

2000 N.W. 119 Street
Pretty! Two bedroom two
bath, lake front and gate,
condo with balcony.
$200,000. Brown Realty and
Investment, Corp.
305-685-6275


24 hour cleaning services
Clean with the team that
works all nite.Nite Owl clean-
ing services. 786-273-0762.
I BUY HOUSES
$ CASH $
Sell in 24 hours
Call Greg 954-445-5470
I STOP FORECLOSURES
IN 48 HOURS
I BUY HOUSES CASH! I
LEND MONEY. NO CREDIT
CHECK. CALL 305-951-3861
R. L. Stevens Roofing
Call us for all your roofing
needs. Flat, tile and shingles.
No wait and reasonable pri-
ces. Call Mr. Palmer, 786-
277-3434. Office, 305-940-
9386.



REPAIRS
Carpentry, shutters, painting,
tiling, and plastering. Also
additions.
Call 954-980-4231 or
305-892-0315


Chevy's from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167 xK020
HONDA ACCORD 1993
$700 OBO! MUST SELL! For
listings 800-749-8167 xK035
HONDA'S from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167 xK023



ASSISTANT APARTMENT
MANAGER needed. Must
be high school graduate,
computer literate and have
two years of experience in
apartment business. Good
benefits. Nice working
environment.
Reply:
aptguy305@hotmail.com

CHILDCARE TEACHER
Requirement CDA certifi-
cate must be current, must
be reliable and love chil-
dren. Call 305-323-9768 or
305-633-5547.

Developmental Service
Group Home for Children
seeking House Parents,
Residential Care Workers,
Managers, and Directors.
Must have experience
with working with children
with disabilities and
severe behavioral
problems. "Requirements
include local and FDLE
background check /
clearance. Contact David
or Therese at 305-242-
7266, locations include
North Miami, Dade and
Homestead.

Experienced Part-time
Telemarketers
Work from Home
Monday Saturday,
flexible hours, Up to $6
hourly, plus commission.
Call 305-999-0048


Experienced Counter Help,
Bagging Personnel For
Dry Cleaners.
Call 305-624-6354

Maintenance Person
Must have valid FL driver's
license, office detail clean-
ing experience, and de-
pendable. Knowledge of
industrial lawn mower and
yard work. Apply in person.
Urllr sj1liil1i Tillles
900 NW 54 Street
See Mr. Saunders

NOW HIRING
Commercial company has
immediated openings for
experienced sprinkler
technicians and lawn
maintence techs.
Call 305-696-8488




AAA HOME INCOME
23 people needed NOW.
Earn PT/FT income. Apply
online to get started:
www.wahusa.com

BUY 1/4 WEALTH UNIT
($250) get $450 plus in less
than a year. Get paid every
20 business days. Call
Charles for details, 786-356-
5011.



KINDERGARTEN
AVAILABLE
Zoned for 30 children.
Call 305-687-1218



Single Back male, no chil-
dren, needs place for rent,
one bedroom, $400-$600
a month. If interested
contact (248) 340-8996.


REWARD


Up to $5,000.00 will be paid
at our sole discretion for
information leading to the
arrest and conviction for the

attempted armed robbery of
the KINGSWAY APART-
MENTS which took place at
3737 Charles Terrace,

Coconut Grove, Florida, on
April 28, 2006.



305-285-1222






$77 Million Available
for 1st Time Home Buyers
Don't Miss This Opportunity
Get Help With Your
Down Payment & Closing Costs

Inyang E. Inyang
Oceanview Int'l Realty, Inc.

305-467-4269



T&J INSURANCE

We provide service you

deserve for your

Auto, Business and

Commercial needs!

Call for a free quote at:

305-474-4639








DiVosta Homes presents

Mallory Creek at Abacoa.
Brand new DiVosta Homes in prime Jupiter location,


HA6
DiVOSTA
HOMES
0 n . .


Call 561.625.6969
for information.
Participating brokers must
accompany on first visit.


O. :, i; ,i ,' r' ,: !. ,


The Liberty City Charter School,
Florida's 1st Charter School, seeks
enthusiastic K-6th Teachers and PE
Teacher to join our Winning TEAM!
FL Cert. required.
ESOL and Reading Endorsements +
Fax resume to 305-759-9111 by May
12th. 8700 NW 5th Avenue, El Portal
area in Miami, FL






IIIALEAl

WOMEN'S CENTER

952 EAST 25 ST.
SA\ IlIE AS 79 ST.
AI B()ITI( NS STAI'rTIN(G AT I(SO

CALL 305-836-9701



I : I I N I


CAROL CITY

Wowan's Solution

FAMILY PLANNING & ABORTION
16166 N.W. 27 Avenue

S05-430-8126



Papa Paul Voodoo Priest
Come see him at

Jlalouba Qotanica
f 101 NE 54st, Miami

HE SPECIALIZES IN READING AND TREATMENTS.
All kinds of problems.
CALL 305-751-7485 OR 954-588-2784



World Renowned

Spiritual Psychic Advisor

Do you wake
up feeling tired and worried?



Love, success, home, business, and family
Mrs. Day will reveal past, present, future
Call for a free sample reading

912-673-8754



SISTER WISDOM

Southern born spiritualist, reader and
advisor. Helps with all problems in life,
such as love,marriage, health, court
cases and business. Also restore nature.
I have blessed candles, baths and
incense oils. One free question by phone.

CALL 305-300-8728



SPIRITUALIST MELA

Specializing in:
Psychic, Candles, Tarot Cards, Palm, Shells,
Orishas and Home Cleansinges, o
Problem with Love, Healthri, tl
Court or Prosperity

CALL OR COME IN FOR ADVICE
786-443-8273i





SISTER LISA

I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life,
such as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business
transactions of all kinds. I never fail to reunite the sep-
arated, cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome
enemies, rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling
blocks and bad luck of all kind. There is no heart so
sad so dreary that I cannot bring sunshine into it. In
fact, no matter what may be your hope, fear or ambi-
tion, I guarantee to tell it before you utter a word to


me.
7615 NW 7th Ave. Miami
305-757-8705
and
517 Pembroke Road, Hollywood
954-496-6640
Two free questions by phone/Licensed Spirilt list


The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 9D


alB nks Milst Contro u








10D The Miami Times M 6


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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Miami-Dade County Public Schools


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132


Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designat-
ed date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School
Board Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on
the date designated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from
the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or
Room 351, address above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the
Friday preceding the scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School
Board meetings will be available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday
following the meetings. The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all
bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from
issuance of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board
Rule 6Gx13-8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule
6Gx13-3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."

Bid Number Opening Title Pre-Bid Conference
Download Date Addendums

105-FF10 5/23/2006 Collection Agency Services


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


Quality job

ONE STOP
continued from 5D

not only assist with
job placement, but try
to meet the needs of
the entire person. She
encourages customers
to take full advantage
of their programs.
"Job seekers should
take advantage of the
workforce services
that are available to
them and always put
their best foot forward
and the best will be


training

returned to. them,"
Fussell continued.
To learn more about
the services offered by
The South Florida
Workforce and their
One Stop Centers, go
to www.southflorida-
workforce.com, call
305-573-7301 or visit
any One Stop Center
Monday, Wednesday
and Friday from 8
a.m. 5 p.m. or
Tuesday and
Thursday from 7 a.m.
- 7 p.m.


MIAMI.DADE

TRANSIT
MIC-EARLINGTON HEIGHTS CONNECTOR

'You are

Invited!


We cordially invite you to a public
workshop for the Preliminary
Engineering/Final Design Study
for the MIC/Earlington Heights
Metrorail Connector to Miami
International Airport.
Two dates and two locations have been
scheduled for your convenience:
1. Monday, May 15, 2006
7:00 7:30 Open House
7:30 8:30 Presentation
Embassy Suites Hotel
Miami international Airport
3974 NW South River Drive
Miami, Fl. 33142
2. Wednesday, May 17, 2006
4:00 4:30 Open House
4:30 5:30 Presentation
Miami-Dade Transit
Sheila Winitzer Central
Administration Building
3300 NW 32nd Avenue
Miami, FL 33142

Both workshops will give the public an oppor-
tunity to meet the project team, obtain infor-
mation on the project, as well as receive
answers to any questions. Public comments are
encouraged.
It is the policy of Miami-Dade County to
comply with all of the requirements for the
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). For
special accommodations call (305) 573-2049
ext. 43 at least five days In advance.
For more information about the study or the
upcoming workshops, please call the URS Public
Information Office at (305) 573- 2049 ext, 43.


Advertisement for DBE Goal for MIA South Terminal Dual Taxiway Construction
Project In Accordance with Department of Transportation 49 CFR Part 26

ESTABLISHMENT OF DBE GOAL FOR MIA
SOUTH TERMINAL DUAL TAXIWAY PROJECT
No. MDAD #K150A
FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) is preparing to establish a DBE goal for
participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises for the Dual Taxi Way Construction
project at Miami International Airport for Fiscal Year 2006 (October 1, 2005 through
September 30, 2006). MDAD invites comments from minorities, small businesses,
women's and general contractor groups, community organizations, and other officials or
organizations which may have information concerning the availability of disadvantaged
and non-disadvantaged business, the effects of discrimination on opportunities for DBEs,
and what might constitute a "level playing field for participation of DBEs in MDAD
projects. A"level playing field" is defined, as the amount of participation DBE firms would
have in MDAD projects if there were no discrimination against them.
MDAD is proposing a DBE goal for participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
for MIA South Terminal Dual Taxi Way construction project of sixteen (16.0%) percent,
based on information currently available. The rationale for this goal and supporting
information may be requested from the MDAD Minority Affairs Office by calling 305-876-
7971, and will be available for public inspection at MDAD Minority Affairs office, 4200 NW
36 Street, Building 5-A, 3rd Floor, Miami, Florida 33122, Monday through Friday from
8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., for 30 days from the publication of this notice. MDAD and the
U.S. Department of Transportation will accept comments on the DBE goal for 45 days
from the date of this advertisement.


J.V VL, U &-


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Sealed responses will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her
office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for
the following:

RFQ NO. 05-06-062 COLOR AERIALS FOR THE CITY OF MIAMI'S
ENTERPRISE GIS PROGRAM

OPENING DATE: 1:00 P.M., MONDAY, MAY 22, 2006
(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 5/10/06)
Detailed specifications for this request for qualifications are available upon
request at the City of Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue,
Sixth Floor, Miami, FL 33130 or download from City's website at
www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement. Telephone No. (305) 416-1906.
THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.
Joe Arriola
City Manager

AD NO. 14604


CITY OF MIAMI

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on May 11, 2006 at 9:00 AM at City Hall, located at 3500 Pan
American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the following:
A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO EXE-
CUTE AN AMENDMENT TO A TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION
EASEMENT AGREEMENT ON CITY-OWNED PROPERTY
LOCATED AT 501 BRICKELL AVENUE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, IN
FAVOR OF CITY NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA, A NATIONAL
BANKING CORPORATION, AS TRUSTEE UNDER LAND TRUST
AGREEMENT NUMBER 2401-1863-000 (THE "EASEMENT"),
TO REDUCE THE TERM OF THE EASEMENT FROM A PERIOD
NOT TO EXCEED FIVE (5) YEARS TO A PERIOD NOT TO
EXCEED FOUR (4) YEARS FROM NOVEMBER 18, 2005, THE
EFFECTIVE DATE OF THE ORIGINAL EASEMENT, AND TO
INCREASE THE SIZE OF THE EASEMENT AREA BY APPROX-
IMATELY 12,560 SQUARE FEET.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson, CMC
(#15732) City Clerk


City of Police
Hialeah Officer



$1,411 $2,139 Biweekly

The City of Hialeah is currently accepting applications for the position of
police officer. Minimum requirements are:

* minimum of 19 years of age
* citizen of the United States
* high school graduate or its equivalent
* of good moral character
* no felony or misdemeanor conviction involving perjury or false statement
* no dishonorable discharge from any of the Armed Forces of the United
States
* I/O Solutions or CJBAT passing test results
* valid State of Florida Driver's license
* social security card

Copies of Following Documents Must Be Attached At Time of
Submission:

* I/O Solutions or CJBAT passing test results
* Driver's License
* if prior U.S. military service, original DD214 required
* if FDLE certified, original certificate required
* High School diploma or equivalent
* Social Security card
* Birth certificate
* Proof of citizenship

The City of Hialeah is an equal opportunity employer; is seeking qualified
applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex or
national original; is encouraging African-Americans, as well as other
minority individuals and women to apply; does not require residency with
the City as a condition of employment.
MUST APPLY IN PERSON AT HUMAN RESOURCES
501 Palm Avenue, 3'd Floor
(305) 883-8050 *Job Hotline: (305) 883-8057
Applications being accepted from:
May 1 May 12, 2006, 9 am to 4 pm

Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer


VALLUILL A ,IRLIaw LVJLC V Cd%-#%JW


immma!


I


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


me .








The Miami Times May 3-9, 2006 11D


Blacks Must Control I heir Uwn Destiny..u-an'-


Fed Cup Rookie Jamea Jackson leads U.S. upset of Germany


ETTENHEIM,
GERMANY
Nineteen-year-old
rookie Jamea Jackson
went 2-0 in singles to
lead the United States


Fed Cup team to a 3-2
upset over host
Germany in the quar-
terfinals of the 2006
Fed Cup by BNP
Paribas on clay at TC


Ettenheim this week-
end.
U.S. Fed Cup
Captain Zina
Garrison traveled to
Europe with an
unproven line-up led
by 31-year-old jour-
neywoman Jill
Craybas, whose
career-high ranking
of No. 39 currently
makes her the third
highest ranked
American in the world
behind Lindsay
Davenport and Venus
Williams. Craybas,
winless in her two
previous Fed Cup
appearances, was
joined by three rook-
ies: Jackson, Shenay
Perry and Vania King,
a 17-year-old ama-
teur ranked No. 91 on
the WTA Tour.
Ranked No. 75 in
the world, Jackson
gave the U.S. an
insurmountable 3-1
lead when she defeat-
ed Martina Muller, 7-
6 (2), 6-2 Sunday.
Jackson became the
lowest-ranked' woman
to play singles for the


U.S. Fed Cup Captain Zina Garrison applauds Jamea Jackson after leading the
United States Fed Cup team to a 3-2 upset over host Germany in the quarterfinals
of the 2006 Fed Cup by BNP Paribas on clay at TC Ettenheim this weekend.


U.S. Fed Cup team
when she upset world
No. 14 Anna-Lena
Groenefeld in the
opening match on
Saturday, 6-2, 3-6, 7-
5.
"I am definitely
happy with my per-
formance here. I
think that the big
thing was, especially
in this last match,
that I fought well,"


said Jackson. "I have
respect for every play-
er out there, but I
have confidence in
myself and in my
game. I was coming
here hoping to con-
tribute to my team
and get a couple of
wins under my belt
and help us take the
tie. That's what I did,
so I am extremely
happy."


a. J




"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


Craybas gave the
United States a 2-0
lead on Saturday
when she rallied to
beat Julia Schruff 4-
6, 6-2, 7-5, but failed
to clinch the win for
the United States
when she lost to
Groenefeld 6-2, 7-5 in
Sunday's opener.
The United States
will face Belgium in
the semifinals July
15-16 (the weekend
after the Wimbledon
finals) at a site to be
selected by the
Belgian tennis federa-
tion. Led by No. 2 Kim
Clijsters and No. 4
Justine Henin-


Hardenne, Belgium
knocked off two-time
defending champion
Russia in the first
round. 3-2.
Asked if she viewed
the semifinals as
another chance for
the United States to
pull an upset,
Craybas said, "We
don't look at it that
way. We look at it as
our next match and
we will go out there to
win. We always go
out there to win."
The United States
leads all nations with
17 Fed Cup titles, but
has not won the event
since 2000.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
regarding
RATIFICATION OF EMERGENCY FINDINGS FOR
WAIVER OF BIDS FOR THE AWARD OF A
CONTRACT FOR RENOVATION OF DINNER KEY
SPOIL ISLANDS AND CITY FACILITIES UTILIZED
BY THE SHAKE-A-LEG MIAMI,
PROJECT NOS. B-30002, B-30270A and B-35855


City Hall -


3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida


The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on May 11, 2006
beginning at 9:00 a.m. to consider whether it is in the public's best interest
that the City Commission ratify, approve and confirm the Emergency
Findings of the City Manager justifying the waiver of competitive bids to
award a contract for the renovation of certain Dinner Key Spoil Islands and
the City facility utilized by Shake-A-Leg Foundation, Project Nos. B-30002,
B-30270A and B-35855 to CMC Construction, Inc. in the combined amount
of $1,407,000.00.

The Public Hearing will be held in conjunction with the regularly scheduled
City Commission meeting of May 11, 2006 at:
MIAMI CITY HALL
3500 Pan American Drive
Miami, Florida

All interested persons may appear at the meeting and may be heard with
respect to the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any
decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter to be considered
at this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any
appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

PRISCILLA A. THOMPSON, CMC
(#15730) CITY CLERK
-- ------------------ --- \ ---


MAKE IT MIAMI


m i a mi -d a d e


county


*1~d



4O


Udonis Haslem, Forward
Miami HEAT


Donna Shalala, President
University of Miami


PERFECT FOR ANY SIZE BUSINESS


SThe Beacon Counil
miomio-De cunetm s oqfli
Etomai Developmeni Prtmenhip


TO EXPAND OR RELOCATE YOUR BUSINESS IN MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CALL THE BEACON COUNCIL AT 305-579-1300 OR VISIT MAKEITMIAMI.COM
Miami-Dade Marketing Initiative campaign funded in partnership with Miami-Dade County and the private sector.


U.S. Fed Cup Rookie Jamea Jackson


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

THE PUBLIC HEALTH TRUST OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA IS
SEEKING INDICATION OF INTEREST FROM PROFESSIONAL ARCHI-
TECTURAL FIRMS TO PROVIDE ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING
SERVICES FOR:

THE CONSTRUCTION OF
JACKSON SOUTH COMMUNITY HOSPITAL'S
EXPANSION & RENOVATION PROJECT

THIS IS A NON-EXCLUSIVE AGREEMENT FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. INTERESTED PRO-
FESSIONAL FIRMS MUST CONTACT THE CAPITAL PROJECTS DEPARTMENT TO OBTAIN THE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION RELATED TO THE QUALIFI-
CATIONS AND THE HOSPITAL CAMPUS. ALL FIRMS SUBMITTING.QUALIFICATIONS SHALL
MEET REQUIREMENTS OF THE QUALIFICATIONS FORMAT AND CONTENT AS DESCRIBED IN
THE REFERENCED RFQ ONE CONTRACT IS TO BE AWARDED TO THE HIGHEST RANKED FIRM.
ADDITIONALLY PROPOSES MUST COMPLY WITH ORDINANCE 97-104.

THE SELECTION PROCEDURES WILL BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
CONSULTANT'S COMPETITIVE NEGOTIATION ACT, FLORIDA STATUTE
287.055. THIS PROJECT IS SUBJECT TO FUNDING. FIRM SELECTION
SHALL BE IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE TRUST. THE TRUST HAS
THE RIGHT TO WAIVE ANY INFORMALITIES.

RESPONSE MUST BE RECEIVED NO LATER THAN 4:00 PM EST ON
TUESDAY, MAY 23, 2006. RESPONSES SHOULD BE FORWARDED TO:

JACKSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
CAPITAL PROJECTS DEPARTMENT
1611 N.W. 12TH AVENUE
4TH FLOOR INSTITUTE ANNEX
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33136
ATTN: Richard Morgan
TEL: 305-585-1302
FAX: 305-585-8050


MIAMAD
^SSES


I


- 1 AA I ---








12D The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006 Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


"Copyrighted Ma


Syndicated Con


Available from Commercial NeW .Provider.
;. fXL~ ;; ^^^^1
...... i^^ ^ B k I

...... -,.... o , ......




** i n .... II k KM j .^


A 8' 'T 0


Ws Ilb
Ribeye Steak
Bone-in, Publix Premium Certified Beef,
JSDA Choice, Beef Rib, Any Size Package
(Maverick Ranch Bone-In Ribeye Steak,
USDA Select, NaturaLite ... Ib 9.49)
SAVE UP TO 2.50 LB


Mangos or F
Hass Avocados ............. 1.
A Taste of the Tropics, Cholesterol-Free, each
SAVE UP TO .98 ON 2 -


White Mountain
Bread .......................... 1.69
Handmade in Our Bakery, Baked Fresh Throughout the Day,
From the Publix Bakery, 16-oz loaf
SAVE UP TO .30
Available at Publix Stores With Fresh Bakeries Only.


Mojo
Rotisserie Chicken .........6,19
Hot or Fresh Chilled,
Fresh From the Publix Deli!, each
SAVE UP TO .30


Publix
Premium Ice Cream.... 206.00
Assorted Varieties,
half-gal ctn.
SAVE UP TO 2.38 ON 2


12-Pack Selected
Pepsi Products.......2... 2 7.00
12-oz can
(6-Pack Selected Pepsi Products,
24-oz bot.... 3/9.00)
SAVE UP TO .78 ON 2


Gatorade
Thirst Quencher..... 3R5.00
Assorted Varieties,
64-oz bot.
SAVE UP TO 2.50 ON 3


Prices effective Thursday, May 4 through Wednesday, May 10, 2006.
Only inr the Followiing Counties: MiamniDad.e, Browaid, Palm Beachl, Mvarlin, SL. Lue i, Indian Rivet, Okr.echobv.ie and Monme.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved.
www. p ubllix. com/a d s


PublixN
W H E R E S H O P P I N G I S A P L. E A S U R E


Ubl
,*"3&


12D The Miami Times, May 3-9, 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


I l I ..




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