Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00054
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: March 1, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
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Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00054
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text





Who are our Black leaders?


JACKSON RICE POWELL KNOWLES FARRAKHAN WINFREY KING WOODS

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205 SMA U I!VERSITV Oi FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
IATI!ESVILLE FL 32611-76a7


7impora M itantur Et Nos Mialt nir In Illis


South's Largest Black Weekly Circulation


One Family Serving Since 1923
anYowARS
Informing Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties


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Who are our local Black leaders?

Is Bishop Victor Curry Miami's most important Black leader? Or is it newcomer City of Miami
Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones? Is it the current or retired congressperson from the Meek family?
Does Otis Pitts' business acumen make him the most important leader?


By Renee M. Harris
rharris(@miamitimesonline.com
A national Associated
Press/AOL Black Voices poll
asked Blacks to name the
nation's "most important
Black leader." Frontrunners
were Jesse Jackson and
Condoleeza Rice, garnering 15


percent and 11 percent
respectively. The top ten slots
were not filled with people,
however. Although Rice was
the second highest person on
the list, more people identified
'none' or 'other.' The largest
category of Blacks, 21 percent,
said they are not sure who the
most important Black leader


The national poll intrigued
The Miami Times editorial
board and got us to thinking
about who our local Black
leaders are and whether local
opinion vibes with the national
poll. Coupled with the release
of the Tavis Smiley led
Covenant with Black America


book and nationwide initiative
to spark dialogue and action to
improve the plight of Blacks in
America, we think the timing
for this local conversation is
opportune.
The Miami Times is interest-
ed in learning what our read-
ers think regarding how Black
leadership is selected. Should


't"V ri


the Black community be
responsible for identifying its
own leadership or allow others
to decide?
What qualities must Black
leaders possess? Which issues
are most critical? Should
Black leaders focus on social
or economic issues, or both?
What about education? Must
child welfare and issues affect-


ing the Black family be priori-
ties? Black-on Black crime?
Employment? Housing?
Criminal sentencing dispari-
ties among Blacks and non-
Blacks? Should Black leaders
be responsible for helping the
community to understand the
issues and how they affect
them?
Please turn to LEADERS 6A


1-95 ramp on 14th street protested


The Black community in
Overtown has told the Florida
Department of Transportation
that enough is enough.
An effort to build a new on-
ramp to southbound Interstate
95 from Northwest 14th
Street, and a new off-ramp
from 1-95 Northbound to NW
14th Street, has been met with
strong rejection by residents of
this embattled neighborhood.
The $8.6 million project to
build the ramps must get an
okay from the Federal Highway
Administration before the
2008 construction.
The Overtown residents are
getting strong support in their
protest from the Booker T.
Washington Alumni
Association and the activist The FE
group Power U Center for its work
Social Change, headed by Miamian
Denice Perry. historica



Concerned


Image of where protested ramp would be


DOT will no doubt have destroyed by the construction
cut out for it. Most on Interstate 95 and 395 in the
s remember how this 1960's when 25,000 residents
il community was were forced to leave the area.


citizen


FDOT is trying to improve
access to the interstate based
on the findings of a 1998 study
Please turn to RAMP 8A


prompts


city


officials to assess park's condition


By Melissa N. Brown
Miami Times Writer

Overtown's Gibson park is the community's premiere park,
but one would not be able to tell by looking. The park's play-
ground, which is behind the park's recreational center, is only
feet away from a gravel pile interlaced with garbage. Behind the
pile, hidden by weeds, lies a mattress and a bathtub. The area
behind the park is home to the homeless, but absent from this
picture are children playing on the park's playground.
"The kids don't a have a run of the park like they used to,"
said Overtown resident and community activist Karen
Cartwright. "The kids, homeless and drug addicts use it. Where
else would they (the City of Miami) allow this to go on. At some
point in time I think they (city officials) should come down here."
And city officials will. Thanks to Cartwright's steadfast
activism, Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones; District 5, plans
to tour all of Overtown's parks on Thursday, March 2. She will
be accompanied by Ernest Burkeen, director of the City of Miami
Parks and Recreation, and Alicia Cuervo Schreiber, chief of
operations for the City Manager's office. Spence-Jones said the
purpose of the tour is to address current and new issues con-
cerning Overtown's parks and creating a solution to the problem
of homeless people living behind the youth center and in the
parks.
Please turn to PARK 4A


A dirt pile mixed with trash lies near Gibson Park. In the
background a seemingly homeless man can be seen sitting in
the grass beyond the fence. -MiamiTimes Illustration


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The Miami Times is pleased to announce the cate for the rights of Blacks in South Florida, Strengthening the Black Family symposium
URRY MTA : addition of Curry's Commentary, a new column to Curry has been able to galvanize the community in 2004.
be written by Bishop Victor T. Curry, senior pastor around key quality of life issues affecting Black In addition to his leadership role at New Birth,
Ap L of the New Birth Baptist Cathedral of Faith Miami. Curry is the general manager of the Black-owned
COMING IN APRIL International Church. Nationally recognized, Curry's church was the Christian radio station, WMBM 1490 AM. Curry's
As a respected member of the clergy and advo- site of Tavis Smiley's State of the Black Union Commentary will debut in April.


At WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY
I I IHInCH LOW H1IGH LOW HRGH iOW HGH l OW HiGH LOW HIGH LOW HIGH LOW
I U ? FORECAST 801F 64 81F 65' 81' 65" 800F 66' 79"F 64 79F 64 730F 63"'*








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The selection of Black

leaders is serious business
A national Associated Press poll on the question of
Black leadership revealed that Black America is not
monolithic group with a shared opinion of who its
leaders are. The poll also revealed that while long time civil
rights leader Jesse Jackson emerged as the top vote getter,
almost half of the Blacks polled were unsure of who their
leader is or selected no one or someone not represented on
the poll.

The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. dead for almost
40 years was even selected by a small percentage of
those polled. His unsuccessful bid for the presidency raised
significant issues affecting the Black community; however,
The Reverend Al Sharpton only garnered two percent of the
votes.

The poll begs many questions that should be answered by
the people most affected by their answers Blacks. On a
local level, The Miami Times has posed to its readers some
of the questions presented in the poll, as well as others. It
is important that Blacks take the lead in determining wtio
represents their collective voice.

There are many things to consider very serious issues
affecting the Black community. Educational issues that pit
the seeming never ending battle to improve inner city
schools against the opportunity for Black parents to place
their children, at the public's expense, in private, largely
Republican supported schools.

The lack of affordable housing is an issue affecting all seg-
ments of Black Miami and is the topic of much debate.
Nationally, the foster care system is dismantling Black fam-
ilies at alarming rates with little attention from Black lead-
ership. The HIV/AIDS infection rate in Black communities
across the country is unaccepably high, killing young Black
women at a magnitude surpassing all other groups.

Blacks are still arrested more, sentenced more harshly,
incarcerated longer and executed more frequently than
whites. Black students are more likely to be suspended, less
likely to be tested for the gifted program and stand a greater
chance of being placed in learning disabled or other reme-
dial settings. Health care disparities linger and as
Washington's sorry response to the devastation from
Hurricane Katrina showed, the value placed on Black lives
is woefully lacking.

Tavis Smiley's annual State of the Black Union has creat-
ed the.Covenant with Black America a book and a pledge
to forge new- and strengthen old alliances that advance
the Black agenda. The covenant combines the wisdom of
numerous Blacks from various sdteia, 'echomic anrd 'pOliti-
cal fields. Many of the Covenant's contributors demonstrate
leadership qualities, however, were not identified in the
Associated Press poll.

Michael Eric Dyson, preacher, analyst and author con-
cluded that "a more diversified Black community doesn't
find it necessary to have one voice." Whether one or many,
the Black community must take the lead on determining its
leadership.

The high cost of war
The turn of events in our war with Iraq has given us
another reason to pack up our gear and bring our
troops back home. Or will we continue to fight a war
we can never win?

At last count a total of 2,280 Americans have lost their
lives in Iraq, the great majority of those losses suffered in
combat. The number of wounded has reached 16,653, just
over half of those designated wounded but returned to duty.

The losses to the people of Iraq are so much more stagger-
ing that we cannot put a figure on them.

War is a serious and dreadful business and its losses are
irreplaceable. Nothing can replace a father or mother who
has been killed in this war, or any war. Nothing can com-
pensate for all the lives shattered when a soldier dies in
combat. In Iraq it is estimated that the human toll includes
nearly 1,000 spouses who have been left behind, alone, and
more than 2,000 children who have lost a parent to the war.

Nor can you repair or replace what has been lost by hun-
dreds of soldiers severely injured by powerful IED blasts
and left double or triple amputees, blind or brain damaged,
riddled by shrapnel. For them, and those who love them, life
has suddenly become an unending struggle.

Isn't it time that Americans begin to take up the chant of
the old spiritual, "I ain't gonna study war no more."

WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU
TURN TO YOUR NEi-WSPAPER
--- ii*';^-. :.IH -: *: : -i ass6


hee sliami ^himes
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 541h Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-18 I8
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, IFlorida 33127
Phone 305- 694-62 10
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL.I. REEVES. Publisher and Chairman

Ap 1


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member or the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $40.00 Six Months $25.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times. P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127 305-694-6210
Credo of the Black Press
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world I'rom racial and aialional
1in111 agnisml when it accords to every person, regardless ol' I ce, creed or color, his or her
hullmn land legal riihls. l-llting no person.ll, ringg no person. Ihe Black Press strives to help
every person in the firmly belic ll;at all persons alre hurl is long as anIyone is held back.


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2A The Miami Times Marc 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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OPINION


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 3A


Sayin'




Somethin'


BY JARRELL


DOUSE


Want your kid in private

school? Pay for it yourself!

Last week in this newspaper I read an article on the thou-
sands of marchers who took to confronting the throne of
Florida's State legislation the state capitol. I looked at the
pictures and saw throngs of folk on a mission to make their
presence known and their voices heard. Good ambition?
Yes. However, their ambition is misguided by their failure to
think critically about the issue recently determined uncon-
stitutional by the court.
For voters who will make it their business to place their
bids in ballot boxes this November I encourage you to exer-
cise your civic duty, but at what communal cost?
It seems as though everyone from parents to senators to
governors are in support of supplementing privatized learn-
ing with public funds that should be used in the public's
best served interests. There seems to be a conflict of inter-
est with Gov. Bush's vehemence for FCAT success. How can
students and teachers excel at the level Bush is demanding
when the resources that might help them are being diverted
to private schools?
With the increasing demands of FCAT testing, promises of
linking teachers' pay to their students' academic perform-
ances, inadequate classroom sizes and the lack of interac-
tive media tools, these conditions should be top priority for
Florida's squandered allotments.
What about the so-called "D" and "F" schools? Couldn't
they, too, benefit from some of this scholarship? As a prod-
uct of public schools I know they could.
I am a proponent for saving minds and for the enrichment
of children's academic lives, but I am in opposition to the
greater focus being diverted to an issue that is apparently
self-serving.
The article mentioned a parent, Melissa Jones, of Orlando,
as being worried about having to leave her child at the
mercy of an educational process that has historically failed.
Jones, whose complaints sound as if she should be accom-
panied by a harpist, violinist and a mourning bench for the
weary continued her narrative,"I really like the idea of send-
ing my child where he:cari conimunicate with his teachers.
I was terrified when I learned my son could be forced to
attend a public middle school."
Here are a few questions for such fear: What would these
parents have done had these Opportunity Scholarships
never manifested? What methods to the believed historical
madness would these parents teach their children to employ
to make the best of their academic lives? How involved were
these parents in their children's public school education?
And, for Jones and others of her cognitive dissonance:
Did you not know that your child would one day have to
attend school, and that if you wanted him or her to receive
a private education then, as a concerned parent you should
have made proper provisions to offer your child such
believed benefits?
Also, are parents researching these institutions to ascer-
tain whether they are held to the same standards as their
public school cohorts? Public school teachers are required
to participate in continuing education in order to maintain
their certification. Are private school teachers held to the
same requirements? How about charter and private school
accreditation?
Questions that these parents should ask are: How will I be
able to chart my child's progress? Will my,child continue to
be mandated to pass state required exams, and, if so, will
they be held to the same retention standards set by the state
if adequate results aren't achieved?
Or will private school students simply be permitted to
matriculate to the next level without the benefit of master-
ing the skill-set needed to make the appropriate transition?
For all the support the Save Our Children march has gar-
nered, the same energy could have been funneled into
improving the public schools that according to Melissa
Jones, have "historically failed" students.
Back to Bush, who said "People should be able to choose
where their children go to school in Florida if you've got
money you can make that choice but, what about the par-
ents who don't have income don't they have dreams?
What about where people live, Mr. Bush? Parents who
don't have income would like to live in better neighborhoods.,
Got some public funding to divert to make that happen?
Alas!, is the goal about the children receiving the best edu-
cational experience or parents having their dreams come
true by sending their children to private schools at an
expense that isn't self-sponsored? Dubious?
I wonder if Bush, the parents'and other supporters have
really delved into the side effects of this prescription for
blinded advocacy. There are lines that separate private and
public sectors, as are there hours that splice today from
tomorrow. What's thinner and sneakier than a brisk wind
over a flame is the governor's questioning of low-income
household families having dreams.
It is a rule that money makes the world spin, but has it
become the all-determining factor of a child's educational
success and latitude? Are other non-monetary issues criti-
cal to a child's success? What about parental involvement?
Which brings me back to Melissa Jones and her arche-
type, just thinking the children receiving these scholar-
ships are former public school students, right? According
to the article, 42 percent (13,500) are Black and deemed
underprivileged, right? And, by Bush's assessment, "if
you've got money you can make that choice," right?
What about the education the child receives from the
same youth from his or her community? The youth who are
stuck in the schools Melissa Jones is afraid to send her chil-
dren to. Aren't other children the greatest source of learn-
ing?
These are only questions, but just one more: Will these
private and charter school children have privatized play-
mates when the dismissal bell chimes?


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County Commissioner Barbara Jordan is concerned
that the commission has approved a six-member slate
that has no women or Black members. Commissioner
Rebecca Sosa, who chaired the nominating council,
said, "I was not thinking of gender or ethnicity. I was
thinking of the quality of the candidates." That might
sound good to some folk, but when you eliminate women
and Blacks from the process, a lot of people become sus-
pect. Stay tuned.
******
No wonder Mickey Arison is so rich, after ripping the
government off for millions in that cruise ship deal he
used to scam the government after Katrina, he is still
taking in the big bucks. Miami-based cruise operator
Carnival Corp (CCL) paid its top executive a $2.9 million
bonus for fiscal 2005, up 21 percent from a year before,
according to a regulatory filing.
******
Who is kidding who about our problem of available
housing in this community? A report issued Monday by
Florida International University's Research Institute on
Social and Economic Policy, said the proposal would
reach only a "very narrow segment of the workforce:
upper-income households that do not have a great need
for affordable housing."


Your letters are welcome
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its
editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the
newspaper. Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue
among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All let-
ters must be signed and must include the name, address
and telephone number of the writer for purposes of con-
firming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor; The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th
Street, Miami, FL 33127, or f.x them to 305-757-5770; Email:
nIiamiieditorial@hellsoiuth.net.


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4A The Miami Times Ma 6


Gibson Park needs immediate attention


PARK
continued from 1A
"The residents of Overtown
are lacking what they deserve
to have. Sometimes you have
to take people there so they
can see it for themselves,"
Spence-Jones said.
The park. named after for-
mer city commissioner and
civil rights leader Father
Theodore Roosevelt Gibson, is
undergoing improvements
along with other parks in
Overtown, but for some resi-
dents the improvements are
not being completed fast
enough. The completion of
the renovations are impera-
tive for the children of
Overtown, especially students
of neighboring Fredrick
Douglass Elementary School
and Booker T. High School,
who use the park's facilities
daily.
The first phase of Gibson
Park's $1.4 million renovation
project began in October


2004 and is nearing colnple-
tion, said said Danette Perez,
public relations coordinator
for the City of Miami's











Debris and trash lie next to
Gibson Park's soon-to-be
remodeled pool bathhouse.
Department of Capitol
Improvements. The second
phase is estimated to begin in
June.
Phase two includes
improvements to the pool's
bathhouse, a new food prepa-
ration building, a new multi-
purpose building and replace-


menl of the roof oin the recre-
ation building. Completed
improvements in the first
phase of Ihe project include
the installation of drains and
beautification projects such
as, removal of trees and the
installation of additional trees
and shrubs and construction
of a metal picket fence, Perez
said.
The continuation of the ren-
ovation project not with-
standing, Cartwright is con-
cerned with its slow progress
and the general upkeep of the
park's recreation center. After
her complaints regarding the
neglect of waist-high shrub-
bery, park officials had the
shrubs trimmed.
When informed that
Spence-Jones will be visiting
the park on Thursday,
Cartwright replied, "until it
happens, I don't want to hear
it." She summed up her frus-
tration with the neglect of the
park by saying "I don't want
the promises, I want results."


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How do you feel about the coroner ruling that the

14-year-old boy from boot camp died naturally?
ARTHUR HORTEN DONTAE JOHNSON JUANITA STRONG


"I think they
need to do
more investi-
gating and get
a second opin-
ion. The coro-
ner had a bad .
background
and people
just don't die
like that. I don't understand
why people are dying behind
this program. It should be
looked into further to see what
really happened. I think they
should close the program if it is
bringing death to young people
and no one can tell the truth."

RICK WARE

"Natural? r a I
That was just
wrong. It's
beyond a con-~ ;
s p i r a c y
because the
boy is dead. '
That's first
degree murder
they did. I
think the program is good but
they need to do something
about their guards. They are
beating up kids, which means
the same people that [are] sup-
posed to protect them and
teach them something were the
ones who killed him."


"It was
wrong. I think
all those peo-
ple with high
powered jobs
need to do bet-
ter. The coro-
ner can't be
right because
they said
themselves that the boy was
beaten to death. Boot camp is a
service for those in need. The
kids need that kind of supervi-
sion, but that's not what their
parents sent them up there for.
If his parents would have done
that damage themselves, they
would have been in prison right
now."

MICSHA

"I think you
can be beat to
death but it is
a chance it
could have
been natural.
It's crazy
because it
does leave a
lot of unan-
swered questions. I won't say it
was a conspiracy but I won't
say it wasn't. It leaves a lot of
doubts. They need to see if
there's a need to close it down
because they can't close the
program based on one case."


"I think
that's incor-
rect because
they said it
was the sickle
cell amnesia
trait that
killed him and
that just does-
n't coincide.
When people saw the boy he
was swollen and bruised. Other
families came out and said the
same coroner made incorrect
diagnoses with their family
members. They need to do a
thorough investigation to find
out what really happened."

JUANITA LEGGETT

"That was
unjustified.
You don't hear
nothing about
no white child
getting beat
up. For them
to lie and say
it was a natu-
ral cause didn't make any
sense. When they showed that
boy he was all swelled up and
nobody gets swelled up from a
natural cause of death. I think
the guards need to be punished
and they need to close the boot
camp today. Are we going to
give them the chance to beat
somebody else's child to
death?"


Compiled by Terrell Clayton


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MIAMI3DADE


HOUSING AGENCY

COMMENT PERIOD AND PUBLIC
HEARING NOTICE

Proposed 2006-2007
Public Housing Agency Plan
In accordance with the United States Department of Housing
and Urban Development regulations, Miami-Dade County,
through the Miami-Dade Housing Agency (MDHA), hereby
advertises its proposed 2006-2007 Public Housing Agency
(PHA) Plan. The proposed 2006-2007 PHA Plan will be
posted on MDHA's website at www.miamidade.gov/housing
and is also available for review during a 45-day comment
period from March 1, 2006 through April 14, 2006, at the
following locations:
MDHA CENTRAL OFFICE
Quality Assurance and Compliance
Robert King High Tower, 1st Floor, 1403 NW 7 Street
MDHA REGIONAL OFFICES
Region 1 5200 NW 22 Avenue
Region 2 450 SW 5 Street
Region 3- 26201 SW 139 Court
TEAM METRO OFFICES
KendallOffice 11609 North Kendall Drive
Melrose Office 2340 NW 27 Avenue
Northeast Office Skylake Mall, 1658 NE Miami Gardens Drive
Northwest Office 7630 NW 186 Street
Northside Center 2525 NW 62 Street
South Dade Office Southland Mall, 20505 S. Dixie Hwy #1623
Tamiami Office 1409 SW 107 Avenue
West Dade Office 3800 SW 137 Avenue, 2nd Floor
Comments from the public are invited during the 45-day
comment period. Please send written comments to: Alphonso
K. Brewster, Director, Miami-Dade Housing Agency, 1401
NW 7 Street, Miami, Florida 33125.
Public Hearing on the
Proposed 2006-2007 PHA Plan
A public hearing will be held on Monday, April 17, 2006, at
2:00 p.m., in the MDHA Board Room, 1407 NW 7 Street,
Miami, Florida 33125.
Miami-Dade County and Miami-Dade Housing Agency do not
discriminate based on race, sex, color, religion, marital status,
national origin, disability, ancestry, sexual orientation, age,
pregnancy or familial status in the access to, admissions to, or
employment in housing programs or activities. If you need a sign
language interpreter or materials in accessible format for this event,
please call Magda Quirola at 305-644-5348 at least five days in
advance.


I itt-,a, LV LCLIUAJLL- I


I I


I spPuRoS iii .U l1;, NASCAR" is a registered trademark of The National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc.
Prices and offers expire 3/4/06 (unless otherwise noted), Some products and otters may be available in store only. Quantities limited to in-stock Items only.
The name Office Depot' and the Office Depot" logo are registered trademarks of The Office Club, Inc.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny





Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 5A


Great Public Schools fbr Every Child


The 4

Dr.Seuss
-I:

Approach


Works!


READ ACROSS AMERICA
AN NEA PROJECT


Children who read achieve. They boast higher test
scores and recognize letters and numbers more often
than their peers who do not read as often. The
challenge for parents, caring adults, and teachers
is getting children excited about reading.
"And will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed!
(98 and 3/4 percent guaranteed.) KID, YOU'LL
MOVE MOUNTAINS!" These lines from the
Dr. Seuss book, "Oh, the places You'll Go!" are
just one example of his enchanting rhymes and
rhythms that help to make reading fun.
It's in the spirit of making reading a joyful experience
that NEA spearheads "Read Across America." Originally
created as a one-day event on March 2nd, the birthday of
Dr. Seuss, Read Across America has become a nationwide initiative
that promotes reading every day with.more than 45 million
participating annually.
Children need to develop a joy for reading and
they need quality public schools with smaller
class sizes, good teachers, up-to-date books
and supplies.
We can work together, at home, in school
and the community, to help children
succeed in life.
Visit www.nea.org/readacross to learn
more about Read Across America and i
how you can help build a nation of
readers. '


: !: ,


The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 5A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny








A A A t Mimi Tims arc 1-7 2006I IBlaks.M- -usCnro.h- rwIDsIn


Identifying our Black leaders


LEADERS
continued from 1A
Some issues brought to the
public's attention have not been
raised by elected or appointed
officials, but by concerned citi-
zens. Are all leaders elected?
Does Max Rameau's independ-
ent and bold thoughts make him
leadership material? What about
Denise Perry's strong activism
on behalf of Overtown's poor?
Should readers consider Dannie
McMillon's educational advocacy
when pondering Black leader-
ship?
Is Bishop Victor Curry Miami's
most effective Black leader? Or
is it newcomer City of Miami


Commissioner Michelle Spencc-
Jones? Is it the current or
retired congressperson from the
Meek family? Does Otis Pitts'


leader or does State Senator
Frederica Wilson's advocacy for
Black children make the grade?
Does Cynlhia Curry's intelli-


We need to hear from you. Please complete the survey on
this page and return to us at The Miami Times 900 NW
54th Street, Miami, FL 33127; via email at
rharris@miamitimesonline.com or fax it to us at 305-757-
5770 by March 15. Results will be published in the March
22 issue of The Miami Times.


business acumen make him the
most effective leader?
Should Shirley Gibson's role
as mayor of the third largest
municipality in Miami make her
Black Miami's most effective


gence and independence make
her the obvious choice?
What about the age and expe-
rience of Black leadership? Is
Black Miami's most effective
leader a member of the older


generation or does slh or he
belong to the current generation
of leaders? What, if any, respon-
sibility does Ihe older generation
have to help groom future lead-
ers? Are leadership roles
bestowed or earned?
How important is a Black
leader's political party affilia-
tion? Should their position on
issues matter more than
whether they are Democrat,
Republican or Independent?
In addition to your responses
on the poll that appears on this
page, we welcome letters to the
editor that afford you an oppor-
tunity to fully express your
thoughts on this important
issue.


a.'sF.,~t ,u tA.a U~ A ~ rA 1 t~ A ~' ,'5 A' '~ ~ ~ ''~~'~A vrA'.1~


1. Who do you think is the most effective Black leader
in Miami-Dade county today?
2. Is the leadership of the Black community representing
your needs?
3 Is the current generation of leadership helping to groom
younger generations for leadership?
4. Should entertainers and athletes be expected to assume
a leadership role?
5. Are elected officials more effective than the independent
leadership?
6. Who do you think is the most effective Black community
activist?


V


Nelson Adams, M.D.
Rev. Samuel Atchinson, Pastor
Georgia Ayers, Community Activist
Father Richard Barry, Priest
Marlene Bastien, Community Activist
Robert Beatty, Attorney
Elaine Black, Economic Developer
Karen Cartwright, Community Activist
Reginald Clyne, Attorney
Rev. Douglas Cook, Pastor
Cynthia Curry, Miami-Dade County
Special Advisor
William Diggs, President, Miami-Dade
Chamber of Commerce
T. Willard Fair, President, ULGM
Rev. Arthur Gatlin, M.O.V.E.R.S.
Ronald Frazier, Architect
Larry Handfield, Attorney
Marion Hill, Attorney
Rev. Randall Holts, Pastor


George Knox, Attorney
Gepsie Mettalus,Community Activist
Dannie McMillon, Educational Activist
NAACP Education Chairperson
Adora Obi Nweze, Florida NAACP
Denise Perry, Community Activist
Rev. D. L. Powell, Pastor
Rev. C.P. Preston, Pastor
Max Rameau, Community Activist
M. Athalie Range, Funeral Home
Director, Community Activist
Gregg Samms, Attorney
Valeria Screen, Attorney
Leah Simms, Attorney
Rev. Gaston Smith, Pastor
H.T. Smith, Attorney
Lucy Tondreau, Community Activist
Andre Williams, President, Miami
Gardens Jaycees
Rev. Freeman T. Wyche, Pastor


11111111


Cime Scn


On February 17, around 4:15 p.m. a 54-year-old man was arrested for
shoplifting at Publix, located at 9050 Biscayne Boulevard. Store workers
noticed the man hiding two packages of lunchables, two fruit cups and a
frappuchino under his shirt. The stolen goods were valued at $10.43.


On February 16, around 2:15 p.m. a thief grabbed a bank bag from a
45-year-old woman inside of a Bank of America parking lot. The woman
told police that as she approached the bank, a man drove up next to her
and snatched her bank bag. The man was driving a 2003 Nissan Altima
when the passenger of the car and the woman fought, but the thief threw
her to the ground cutting her hands and knees. The bank bag contained
$260.

****,**
On February 11, around 5:05 p.m. vandals stole a purse containing
identification and credit cards from the BP Gas station, located at 1930
Opa-Locka Blvd. When the owner of the vehicle went inside the gas sta-
tion to pay, the vandals smashed the passenger-side window of a 1998
Dodge. Total loss was estimated at $135.

******
On February 9, between the hours of 8:35 and 9:35 a.m. a thief stole
a designer purse valued at $375 from an unlocked 2005 Honda Accord.
The incident occurred at the North Miami Montessori School, located at
655 NE 123rd Street. The thief also stole a man's wallet, a Nextel cell-
phone, a desk calculator, an electric stapler and two Miami Beach park-
ing cards.

******
On February 7, around 7:45 p.m. a woman was arrested for stealing
two prescriptions off the counter at Walgreens. The woman stole the
medication from the store, located at 18665 Biscayne Blvd. The woman
returned later that day to pick up a prescription of hydrocodone for her
deceased father. She was arrested for prescription fraud.


I.wwc HBIk t'S Scrnait i% makLin pIlmwiic imprcsmon




"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"


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*do' 40's


S%4twrOJiMl K k Kd J


Dontrell wins 'Points of Light' award


Willis has heard all the
praise.
But even Willis was short for
words after Florida's Lt. Gov.
Toni Jennings, presented him
with the state's "Points of
Light" award last week.
Willis was honored for his
community work, supplying
uniforms and baseball equip-
ment for inner-city kids in
South Florida.


"The story of Dontrelle and
what he has done with sandlot
baseball is all about giving
back," Jennings said in a cer-
emony held outside the team's
spring-training offices. "He
gave back not just monetarily.
What greater gift from some-
one than their time?"
Willis said he would be sure
to hang the plaque on his
wall.


* Construction of an auxiliary lane on SR 836 westbound
between N.W. 57th Avenue and the Palmetto to lessen
traffic congestion

* Reconstruction of the SR 836 ramp to 57th Avenue to
improve safety

* Construction of concrete barrier walls, new embankments
and lighting to increase roadway safety

* Resurfacing of existing lanes to provide a smoother and safer
ride

* New overhead sign structures and pavement markings for
better visibility


MDX puts your toll dollars to work!


DRIVE DOL PR


MIAMI-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY'
www.mdxway.com


fi-4
"s~i ~ EB~=


I


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


6A The Miami Times Ma 6


9


N


I


I










WLI P New AIDS cases drop in Miami-Dade


The number of new AIDS
cases in Miami-Dade and
Broward counties fell last year,
along with new cases of HIV in
Miami-Dade, according to the
Florida Department of Health.
But HIV cases increased in
Broward a sign that
HIV/AIDS continues to spread
in South Florida, which has
been hit hard by the virus.
"We're encouraged that there
is a decline, but this is not
cause for celebration," said
Evelyn Ullah, director of Miami-
Dade county's HIV/AIDS pro-
gram. "We still have a lot to do
... to stem the tide of HIV/AIDS
in our community."
Data on the number of people
with AIDS and HIV are notori-
ously difficult to decipher,
because reporting requirements
and testing practices have
changed over time, causing


- -
olnw bm. -0. qm Ddm 40 d


numbers to rise and fall.
Between 1998 and 2003, new
HIV/AIDS generally trended
downward in Miami-Dade, and
largely remained flat in Broward


number of new AIDS cases in
Miami-Dade fell by 9 percent,
from 1,316 to 1,209; new cases
of HIV fell from 1,607 to 1,382.
In Broward, new AIDS cases


Between 2004 and 2005, the number of new AIDS cases in
Miami-Dade fell by 9 percent,from 1316 to 1,209


and Monroe counties.
However, in 2004, the number
of new cases jumped by 30 per-
cent, which state officials attrib-
uted to increased testing and a
requirement that .providers
receiving federal AIDS funding
submit more detailed data.
The 2004 figures grabbed
headlines because Broward
and Miami-Dade counties fin-
ished first and second in the
nation for the rate of new AIDS
cases.
Between 2004 and 2005, the


fell by 14 percent, from 953 to
826, while new HIV cases rose
from 973 to 1,019.
Those declines were consis-
tent with statewide figures,
which showed that new AIDS
cases fell by 12 percent, from
5,517 to 4,869.
New HIV cases fell from
6,110 to 5,621.
The number of new HIV cases
'climbed in Monroe County,
from 35 in 2004 to 37 in 2005,
while new AIDS cases fell from
34 to 30.


Jolene Mullins, who works
on early intervention strategies
for Broward County's AIDS
program office, said apathy has
become one of the major prob-
lems in fighting HIV/AIDS.
"We've got a community
that's very complacent about
HIV infection," she said. "It's
not in our face anymore . We
don't see people walking
around Wiith such horrific
effects of HIV infections."
Yet the declines in Miami
Dade do suggest improvement,
said Bill McKeon, who runs the
South Florida AIDS Network at
Jackson Health System.
"Some df the prevention mes-
sages are getting across to peo-
ple," he said. But, he added,
"even if the numbers have
dropped, the issue is very real .
. We continue to see a lot of
patients."


Jakmar (R H& IIm -alad wek


S q U r .#" - a If

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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


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The Miami Times, March 1-7,' 2006 7A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


-







8A The Miami Times IV 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Sharpen telh Black congrerttion to not 'punk out'


S. "Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


w
0 -
0


Suspected

killer had

troubled past

Police plan to charge a 40-
year-old automobile mechanic
with a third murder after they
said he confessed to killing three
men in robberies in the past
three weeks.
At the time of his Friday arrest
on murder charges, Brian
Bethell was on probation after
being sentenced for a 2001 drug
arrest by the Broward Sheriffs
office.
Bethell, a native of Nassau,
Bahamas, is charged with two
killings that of Albert Avenaim,
63, of Aventura and Frederick
Gunther, 76, of Pompano Beach.
Fort Lauderdale Police expect
to charge him in another murder
that he has already confessed to
- that of Angel Pedro Medina, 41,
of Margate.
Bethell was being held without
bond in Fort Lauderdale's Main
Jail 'on Sunday on charges of
murder, armed robbery, grand
theft and credit card fraud.
Records show that Bethell has
been in and out of jail since
1983 when he was arrested in
Leon County on charges of sexu-
al assault and battery with a
deadly weapon. He was sen-
tenced to four years in prison.
On Saturday, Bethell's girl-
friend, Natasha Rishone
Edwards, was in BSO's North
Jail in Pompano Beach, charged
with multiple counts of armed
robbery and accessory after the
fact, grand theft and credit card
fraud. Edwards' two boys are
now in the care of another rela-
tive.
Investigators say Edwards and
Bethell went shopping within
hours of Avenaim' murder, using
his credit cards at six different
places in Plantation, Sunrise
and Margate. She claimed the
credit card was her boyfriend's
and that he was waiting for her
in their car. The cashier didn't
buy the explanation and
Edwards took off.
Bethell and Edward's used
Avenaim's card at a Coral
Springs Wal-Mart supercenter.
They returned to the same store
Friday and were recognized by
an alert employee who recog-
nized them from Crime Stoppers
posters around the store.

RAMP
continued from 1A
conducted for the Metropolitan
Planning Organization by
Florida International University.
According to the FIU study,
Overtown residents and busi-
ness owners said they were cut
off when the interstate was
built over and through their
community and that they want-
ed improved access to spur eco-
nomic development and
progress.
Overtown residents have
Please turn to RAMP 10A


Meet, F i*.ecItoresW andeactores!


MIAM


MARCH


NTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL


. .


BOB MARLEY & FRIENDS
Director: Saul Swimmer
USA, 94 min., Digital Betacam, Color,
2005
COL, Thu., Mar. 9, 9 p.m.
A celebration of the life and art of the
incomparable Bob Marley, this-joyous
documentary puts the reggae master's music
front and center, featuring rare concert
footage as well as outstanding performances
of Marley compositions and reggae classics
from some of today's top artists, including
Peter losh, Seal, Ziggy Marley & Ihe Melody
Makers, Wyclef Jean and l auryn Hill--in
celebration and in memory- 25 years
already!
=- World Premiere


PURVIS OF OVERTOWN
Directors: Shaun Conrad, David Raccuglia
USA, 66 min., 35mm, Color/B/W, 2005
COL, Sat., Mar. 4, 4 p.m.
Purvis Young's colorful, visionary paint-
ings record the life and embody the spirit
of Overtown. And, after 30 years spent
toiling away in the same dilapidated ware-
house, the art world finally took notice.
This perceptive documentary illuminates
the life and work of this uncompromising
African-American pioneer through exten-
sive interviews with the artist, his friends
and colleagues.
= World Premiere


COI Colony I'l atre
COSF Cosford Cinema
INTR Suniise Cinemas Intracoastat
RI0, K11, R17, R18 Regal South Beach


PREMIUM.
Director: Pete Chatmon
USA, 95 min., Digital Betacam, Color,
2005
R18, Mon., Mar. 6, 6:45 p.m.
R17, Fri., Mar. 10, 9:30 p.m.
R18, Sun., Mar. 12, 9 p.m.
A struggling actor named Cool is fed up
with stereotypical African-American roles.
While pumping gas to make ends meet,
he collides with his long-lost ex-fiancee.
She's getting married.to a businessman -
in 36 hours. As the clock ticks away, Cool
gets a clue and plans a comeback as an
ultra-hip musical score plays.
3 World Premiere


CONVERSATIONS ON A
SUNDAY AFTERNOON
Director: Khalo Matabane
South Africa, 82 min., Digital Betacam,
Color, 2005
R18, Sun., Mar. 5, 6:45 p.m.
R18, Wed., Mar. 8, 3:45 p.m.
An inventive film from a major new
South African voice fuses fiction and
documentary to explore Johannesburg
as an unlikely haven for the world's war
refugees. In a park where he reads heady
novels, Keniloe finds a real-life character
in Fatima, a Somali refugee with a tragic
story. Searching for her in the streets of
Johannesburg, Keniloe finds there are
many "Fatirnas."
SU.S. Premiere


THE REFUGEE ALL STARS
Directors: Zach Niles, Banker White
Guinea/Sierra Leone/USA, 80 min.,
Digital Betacam, Color, 2005
R18, Mon., Mar. 6, 9 p.m.
RIO, Thu., Mar. 9, 4 p.m.
And the beat goes on! Refugees, victims
of the brutal Sierra Leone war, form a band
and perform reggae-tinged music in their
safe-haven camp in Guinea. While their
music inspires, their powerful personal
stories quickly dispel the stereotype of
refugees as helpless victims of war. A
moving and elating experience. Winner of
the Best Documentary Award at the A.F.I.
Film Festival 2005.
Mi[ East Coast Premiere


TSOTSI
Director: Gavin Hood
South Africa/UK, 94 min., 35mm, Color,
2005
GUS, Tue., Mar. 7, 7 p.m.
A twenty-something thug is prone to
robbing, mugging and backstabbing
fellow crooks. The day he carjacks and
shoots a middle-class woman is a new
Low. The victim's baby is in the back seat.
Is anybody beyond redemption? Winner of
Audience Awards at both the Edinburgh
and Toronto International Film Festivals.
A nail-biting emotional rollercoaster.
MM East Coast Premiere


Presented by
Miami Dade College


OUAGA SAGA
Director: Dani Kouyate
Burkina Faso, 86 min., Digital Betacam,
Color, 2005
INTR, Sat., Mar. 4, 4 p.m.
R10, Fri., Mar. 10, 7 p.m.
COSF, Sat., Mar. 11, 8:30 p.m.
A winner from FESPACO in Burkina Faso,
Africa. The capital city, Ouagadougou,
is home to a group of appealing young
lads inventing a path to adulthood. They
charm even those they scam and make it
all seem easy, even the grinding poverty.
They have soccer, music, dance, and, most
of all, magic -- in this film of mystical
neo-realism from the director of Keita!
L'heritage du griot.
E U.S. Premiere


SHOOTING DOGS
Director: Michael Caton-Jones
UK, 114 min., 35mm, Color, 2005
COL, Wed., Mar. 8, 7 p.m.
The horrors of the 1994 Rwandan geno-
cide and the horrific lack of response
in the West are re-visited in this hard-
hitting British counterpoint to Hotel
Rwanda, filmed on location and based on
an actual event. John Hurt gives a career-
capping performance and Hugh Dancy a
career-making one, as two individuals
trying to save hundreds from slaughter,
S U.S. Premiere


All screening times are subject to change. For up-to-the-minute screening information, visit
ww,.:n7iamifiinfestivoL.conl. MAany of the films presented here have not yet received ratings
from ife Motion Picture A tssocialion of America. Viewer discretion is advised.


www.miamifilmfestival.com


5 W -I433)


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Josie Poitier


Jackson
HEALTH SYSTEM


To find quality health

care, Look to a local.
Born and raised in Miami, Josie Poitier knows the city like no one else. She knows its history,
its ins and outs, what works, what doesn't, and where to find the best of what she needs.
Josie loves Miami so much she volunteers in the Public Information Office for a local police
department. Josie has always chosen Miami's original hospital-for the way she's treated as
a person instead of a case number, for the way she's always involved in her treatment
decisions, for the expertise of Jackson's world-renowned quality medical care.
When she wants quality care, Josie comes to Jackson.


PUBLIC
L' HEALTH
I TRUSTI For more information and physician referrals, please call 305.415.1200.


ftwup


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1-95 challenge

RAMP
continued from 8A
challenged the FIU study and
believe there are ulterior
motives. They believe the
ramps are really intended to
improve access for the patrons
of the nearby Performing Arts
Center and the high-rise con-
dos that are being built along
the Biscayne corridor.
Last week opponents of the
ilan held a protest on the
Northwest 14th Street side of
B.T.W. Current and former stu-
dents voiced concerns about
pedestrian and bicycle; safety
with all of the traffic that
ramps might bring.
FDOT project manager Vilma
Croft insists that the project
includes wider, safer sidewalks
and.bike lanes on both sides of
NW 14th Street along with a
10-foot-wide, landscaped medi-
an strip in the center of the
road.
The opponents insist that
kids won't use the sidewalks,
especially on the north side of
14th Street, because the high
school, Overtown Youth
Center, Frederick Douglass
Elementary and Gibson Park
are all located on the south
side of the road less than a
half-mile from the proposed
ramps.
In the next nine months,
FDOT will be back in the very
same community trying to gar-
ner consensus for a much larg-
er and controversial project:
The reconstruction of 1-395.














--





- B ~


The owners of the stores listed below are making
space available for the South's largest Black weekly
circulation.
You no longer have to share your copy. When you
pick up The Miami Times, don't forget to buy some-
thing, too. Please patronize the following stores and
shops.
South Miami
M&M Market 11607 S.W. 216th Street
Nat's Grocery 17600 Homestead Avenue

North Miami
Freedom Market 14495 N.W. 22 Avenue
Phillip's Market 9100 N.W. 17 Avenue
La Prima Market 9930 N.W. 7 Avenue
Safa Market 15400 N.W. 7 Avenue






Call Nathaniel today!

305-694-6214
*Must pay $75 for six months or $150 for one year!


CHIHULY AT FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN.
PRESENTED BY TARGET. DECEMBER 3, 2005 MAY 31, 2006.


"I want my work to look like
it just happened, as if it were
made by nature."
Dale Chihuly



Tropical Chihuly Nights
SEvery Thursday from
6:00 9:00 p.m. It's a
whole new exhibit after dark!


Come to Fairchild this winter and spring to experience art and nature as one.
Chihuly at Fairchild weaves together art and nature, showcasing Dale Chihuly's
stunning glass forms and Fairchild's breathtaking landscape and collections.
See them for yourself December 3, 2005, through May 31, 2006.
It's the art event of the year. For more information, admission prices,
parking and advance ticketing, please visit www.fairchildgarden.org.


FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARPEN 0
Exploring, Explaining and Conserving the World of Tropical Plants
10901 Old Culler Road, Coral Gables, Florida 33156
www.fairchildgarden.org


GETTING AROUND BROWNSVILLE


JUST GOT EASIER WITH THE NEW


BROWNSVILLE CIRCULATOR


Ride the Brownsville Circulator (Route 254) free
until Friday, March 10, 2006.
This new minibus route, now in service, offers the
Brownsville community convenient connections to
the Joseph Caleb Center, Brownsville Metrorail
station, and Jefferson Reaves Park for only 25C per
one-way trip.
The service luns weekdays, approximately eveiy
;3 mriinules, from 9:20 a,i,. to L:;:0 ])m.n
Visit www.mianiidade.gov/transit to plan your trip
online. This new service gives you instant point-to-
point transit information within Miami-Dade,
Broward, and Palm Beach counties. You can also
plan your trip by phone by calling Customer
Services and speaking to an agentI,.


MIAM I-DADI)E TRANSIT
Customer Services......................................305-770-3131
Toll-Free South of SW 216th Street..........305-891-3131
TTY Users (deaf or hard-ol-hearing) ........305-654-6530
Website................................www.miamidade.gov/transit


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Service runs every 30 minutes from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00p.m.
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Embrace Girl Power has elegant tea party


By Isheka Harrison
iharrison(wmmiamitimesonline.com

Recently, the Embrace Girl
Power Foundation hosted a tea
party and HUD workshop that
boasted the Honorable Kim
Kendrick, Assistant Secretary of


Embrace Girl Power members look on as Kim Kendrick answers questions


Shenika Morrison


the Office of Fair Housing and
Equal Opportunity, as its special
guest.
Held at Lenora B. Smith
Elementary, the tea party was as
elegant as it was informative. The
young girls were the epitome of
beauty as they took their seats in
the Disney decorated atmosphere.


at their tea party.
Ranging in age from seven to
eleven years old, the girls had
many questions for Kendrick,
some of which many adults would
have shied away from. Seven year
old Shenika Morrison wanted to
know if she liked her job and why
or why not, while ten year old Erin
Wheeler asked Kendrick how she
felt about Kanye West's remark
that George Bush doesn't care
about Black people.
Following the tea party, there
was a HUD workshop for parents


in the community. The turnout
was excellent as the more than
40 parents attended. HUD
brought out 12 individuals who
were very helpful. Mr. Armando
Fana even stayed until after 6
p.m. counseling families that
arrived late.
Topics of discussion included
fair housing and housing dis-
crimination, housing for the
homeless, Section 8 housing and
opportunities for first time
homebuyers. Parents were very


excited about the information
they received and are currently
following up with the office of
Division Director, Candace M.
Tapscott.
When asked about her feelings
on the success of the event,
Embrace Girl Power!'s Executive
Director, Velma Lawrence,
remarked, "I was very pleased
with the turnout. Our tea parties
are our signature events and it
shows our partners and the pub-
lic what we do. Our girls had to
learn proper etiquette, to be
grateful and how to formulate
questions. This was a good thing
because it shows they are paying
attention."
When it comes to the HUD
workshop, Lawrence had this to
say: "It was great to see parents
walk away excited. We even had
to order 25 additional pamphlets
for parents who couldn't attend
and had heard about it!"
Lawrence also spoke about
how impressed she was that
Kendrick stood up and personal-
ly handed out her business
cards to each parent, telling
them if they weren't satisfied
with the results they got locally,
they could call her personally as
she was committed to quality
service.


DVD examines The Church and Holy Hip-Hop


By Melissa N. Brown
Miami Times Writer

For many, hip hop music and
culture, with its flashy lifestyle
and often profane, misogynistic
lyrics, go together with the
church like oil and water. K.
Stepheon Weech, director of the
documentary The Church and
Holy Hip Hop, is hopeful he
can convince the public other-
wise.
The Church and Holy Hip Hop
intersperses footage from the
2004 Sold Out Fa' Christ holy
hip hop tour, which made
stops at several local church-
es, while setting a case for why
Gospel rap, also called Holy
Hip Hop, should be embraced


wholeheartedly by church
leaders.
"The goal is to get the word
out about this movement and
to educate church leaders,"
Weech said.
The DVD examines holy hip
hop's roots with Kirk Franklin
and touches on the music
genre's future. The documen-
tary features commentary from
church leaders and personal
testimonies from a diverse
group .of local holy hip hop
artists such as Peter Grace,
Galilee and Chosen Element
and Scripture, who are white.
A large part of the documen-
tary details why some church-
es resist holy hip hop and why
the emerging music genre has


received a lukewarm response
from the secular music indus-
try.
Weech said many church


leaders are turned off by the
idea of holy hip hop because of
secular hip hop's flamboyant
lifestyle and often profane
lyrics.
"But this is to their disad-
vantage because kids are lis-
tening to hip hop. It has
crossed over to all spectrums
of entertainment," he said. "It's
to their advantage to use hip
hop to promote the gospel."
The Church and Holy Hip Hop
is the debut project from
Weech's 3rd Base 7th Inning
-Productions. The DVD and
soundtrack are available at
Pages of Life, 13747 NW 7th
Ave. and online at
www.thechurchandholy-
hiphop.com.


Black Family Symposium discusses deep issues


By Delvin Rogers
Special to the Times

Feb. 17 marked the 16th
annual Black Family
Symposium, co-sponsored by
Gibraltar Bank and the Miami-
Dade County Department of
Human Services. Every year for
the past several years, the
Department has held a Black
Family Symposium with pan-
elists who spoke on topics of
interest to the Black communi-
ty.
Each workshop focused on
issues which impact Black fam-
ilies in today's society such as
Education, Domestic Violence,
Economics/ Finance and
Healthcare.
This year's theme was
Understanding Ethnic and
Cultural Barriers to Serving the
Black Family. Dr. Walter T.
Richardson served as the sym-
posium's keynote speaker.
Richardson is the Pastor of
Sweet Home Missionary Baptist
Church in Perrine, Fl. He is an
advocate for social justice, has


The Black Family Symposium address issues that affect today's Black
Family.


been a leading voice for social
change and is also known for
his musical talent. Dr.
Richardson has emerged as one
of the most well-known preach-
ers of our time.
The morning began with the
Healthcare Workshop.
Presenters Nelson L. Adams,
M.D.; Monica Dawkins MS;
Crystal Lee ,LPN; and Georges


Metellus, M.D. spoke on the
importance of preventive
healthcare and nutrition in the
Black family.
They focused on interventions
to alleviate barriers. The
Education presenters were
Marleine Bastien LCSW; The
Honorable Dorothy Bendross-
Mindingall; Patricia A. Grimsley
Ed.D; and Tangier Scott Ed.D.


Each panelist shared their
views on barriers and chal-
lenges the Black Family as well
the Black community will
endure to achieve a successful
education in the public school
system. They also identified
effective reading strategies for
students as well as for parents.
One of the most interesting
and informal workshops was
Economics and Finance with
presenters Robert Henderson
Jr.; Reverend Dr. Russell E.
Odom; Lisa Rogers-Cherry Esq.;
and Nery Torrent.

Each presenter shared how
we can all create healthy finan-
cial attitudes with strategic
planning. One thing that was
learned from this panel discus-
sion was that we as Black fami-
lies should set goals, make good
decisions and establish good
credit.
The Domestic Violence
Workshop with presenters Lucia
Davis-Raiford; Oscie Fryer,
MSW; and Schiller Joseph, MA
Please turn to FAMILY 2B


240e of the Year

Congratulations to Ms.
Teandra Morris for being
Miami Northwestern Senior
High's Rookie Teacher of the
Year 2006.
She graduated from
Northwestern with the class
of 2000.
Ms. Morris teaches reading
and expects her students to
excel in all areas of education
and life.
Keep up the good work,
Teandra.
Your Family


'Teandra Morris


Pastor's appreciation at United

Christian Praise and Worship Center


The members of United
Christian Praise and Worship
Center Church, 7626 N.W. 7
Ave. invites you to a week of
celebration for our pastor for
ten years of faith, love,
preaching, teaching and lead-
ership on Wednesday, March 8
at 7 p.m., the Reverend Dr.
Tommy L. Milton of Glendale
Missionary Baptist Church.
On Thursday, March 9 at
7:30 p.m., Reverend Charles
L. Dinkins, Hosana
Community M.B. Church;
Friday,. March 10 at 7 p.m.
Reverend Conrad Jenkins of
New Bethel AME Church,
Clewister, FL.
We will culminate on
Sunday, March 12 at 3:30
p.m. with a grand celebration
at Mt. New Moriah Missionary
Baptist Church, Reverend


Reverend Dr. Dennis M. Jackson
Dennis M. Jackson III, pas-
tor/son, 6700 N.W. 14 Ave.,
will do the honor of closing out
his biological and spiritual
father.
To God be the glory!


25th pastoral anniversary celebration

Christian Fellowship M.B.
Church invites you to cele-
brate our pastor's anniver-
sary.
Thurs., March 2, F. Arnold,
Mt. Olive P.B.; Fri., March 3,
A. Jackson, Second Baptist;
Mon., March 6, E. Grace, Mt.
Zion; Tues., Marcl
7, C. Jones, New Jerusalem;
Wed., March 8, C. Johnson,
93 Baptist.; Thurs., March 9,
R. Harris, Mt. Olive and Fri.,
March 10, A. Jackson III,
Antioch.
Services begin at 7:30 p.m. Reverend Charles E. Coleman




Look who is retiring, Black Jack

Eugene Johnson 'Black
Jack,' after 30 plus years,
has finally had enough. On
March 3 he will make his
last run on the clock.
His plans are to spend
more time with his family,
gardening, fishing and
shooting the breeze with the
fellas.
Happy retirement, with
love,
From your wife, Stella,
family and friends.
Eugene Johnson


Former Oprah producer launches Black Family Today magazine


The nation's only dedicated parenting

publication for Black families


TAMPA (BlackNews.com) -
Family Today Publications, LLC
announced recently that Black
History Month would mark the
launch of its new quarterly
magazine, Black Family Today,
to address the needs aid con-
cerns of Black families across
the country.
"Our first issue will clearly set
us apart from any other publi-
cation on the market," stated
Kuae Kelch Mattox, Editor-in-
Chief. "Every issue will present
informative and intelligent cov-
erage of topics that help par-
ents build stronger families."


Key priorities for Black
Family Today are education
and empowerment. The maga-
zine will feature special news
features and permanent
columns on heritage, faith,
child development, literacy,
health, technology and finan-
cial planning.
The premiere issue invites
readers to visit with Deborah
Roberts, ABC 20/20 correspon-
dent and wife of the Today
Show's Al Roker, as she reflects
on her childhood memories
growing up in the South and
how that upbringing impacts


the way she raises her 'New
York City' kids.
NBA star Grant Hill shares
with readers his lifelong love for
art and his desire to share that
love with families across the
country. The Reverend Jesse
Jackson also recounts his per-
sonal memories of the late Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. and
reflects on what he thinks the
civil rights leader would say
about the progress of Black
America today.

COLUMN HIGHLIGHTS
INCLUDE:
Heritage Blacks tracing
their ancestry through DNA
research.
Education The history of
the minority achievement gap


and what parents and educa-
tors can do to help close it.
Literacy Boys Booked on
Barbershops, a unique com-


munity based reading program
for boys that aims to strength-
en literacy skills.
Parenting Fostering
courage and resilience in chil-
dren as important life skills.
With Black Family Today,
Publisher Stephanie Brady
sees an opportunity to tap into
advertisers that are committed
to the Black market and look-
ing for more effective ways to
influence the buying power of
Black parents.
"We give advertisers a unique
opportunity to build a brand
relationship with Black fami-
lies whefi they are most recep-
tive to their message within
a dedicated context that hits
home and closest to their heart
. . their children."


McDonald's, State Farm and
the National Education
Association are among the
debut issue advertisers.
Mattox, a former producer
for NBC News, Oprah/King
World Productions and
writer/contributor for The
Miami Herald, Washington Post
and Philadelphia Inquirer, said
she is honored to be part of a
magazine that speaks to her
own needs and concerns as a
Black parent of three young
children.
"I've searched for some time
to find something like Black
Family Today," Mattox said.
"Finally, I had to realize that
what I was looking for just did-
n't exist. I'm glad that isn't the
case anymore."


ajn-

-1








OQ Th I9t Innii TimU& MrchfL 00Plck us otrlThi, wnI- I'-Y


Love is an action word


Perhaps this message might
have best been written as a
Valentine's Day message, but
here it is for this week "Love
is an action word." John 3:16
is probably the most well
known and most quoted verse
of scripture in the Bible. Even
those who do not know or
accept Jesus as Savior are
most likely familiar with this
verse. This verse speaks vol-
umes of the love that God has
for us His people. It speaks
unequivocally of the sacrifice
that was made for us His peo-
Spie. John 3:16 states that God
so loved us all of us that
He gave His Son for us His
people.
Too many of us claim to love,
but we keep it buried- deep
inside of us. We have numer-
ous reasons why we do this.
We do this because we do not
wish to become vulnerable.
Vulnerability hurts. So we


IIl11111


The United Teachers of Dade
invite the community to its first
Education Summit on April 22
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Radisson Hotel Miami. To register
or for more information, go to
www.utd.org.
*******
The James E. Scott
Community Association, Inc.
Uplift Program is offering free par-
enting classes for parents with
children ages 6 to 12 years old.
Classes will be every Tuesday and
Thursday from 5:30-8 p.m. Free
dinner, transportation and child-
care services provided. For more
information, call Sylvia Jones at
305-637-1000 ext. 425.

The Women's Theatre Project
presents Bold Girls by Rona
Munro, March 2-19 at 8 p.m.
nightly. Sundays there is matinee
performance at 2 p.m. For more
information, call 954-462-2334.
*******
The Nubian Sisterhood is seek-
ing new members that are single,
separated or divorced with chil-
dren to fellowship with. For more
information, call 305-469-1157
and speak with Sister Shamele.
*******
The South Dade Parliamentary
Law Unit will hold its monthly
meeting on March 4 at the Coral
Gables Central Christian Church.
The program begins at 9:30 a.m.
and the business meeting begins
at 10:30 a.m. All interested in par-
liamentary procedure are welcome.
For more information, call 303-
383-0072.
********
The South Florida Chapter of
the Juvenile Diabetes Research
Foundation (JDRF) is having it
annual Miami-Dade Walk to Cure
Diabetes on March 11 at Miami
MetroZoo. Registration begins at 7
a.m.

The U.S. Small Business
Administration's deadline to





Kingdom Seekers
Transportation is sponsoring a
trip to Juanita Bynum's
Threshing Floor Revival in
Atlanta, Georgia, April 5-8. For
more information, call
Bernadette Jones at 305-828-
0980.

International Prophet Henry
Walker is holding a prophetic
revival service on March 3 at 7
p.m. at the Richmond Heights
Women's Club. For more infor-
mation, call 305-382-8738.

God Word God Way COGIC,


11111111


North Shore Medical Center
will offer support groups, aero-
bic classes and maternity
classes for the community in
March. Registration is
required. To register or obtain
information, please call 1-800-
984-3434.
********
Hialeah Hospital will offer
free classes for the community


FAMILY
continued from 1B

highlighted domestic violence
and identified the clinical
symptoms of its traumatic
impact on Black Families.


keep our emotions in check to
maintain our status quo. Yes,
love can hurt, and at times it
can hurt badly. But Jesus
commands us not suggests
to us to love. He commands
us to love others in the manner
that He loved us. Ouch! Now
that hurts! Fortunately, we do
not have to go to the cross to
prove our love for Jesus and
others. Only one perfect lamb
could make that ultimate sac-
rifice. That one could only be
Jesus, and He has already
made that perfect sacrifice for
us.
But we must still put our love
into action. How do we do
this? We show our love for
Jesus by spending time with
Him in prayer and Bible Study.
How would you feel if you had
a spouse that constantly told
you that he or she loved you,
but rarely spent time with you?
How would you feel if during


return applications for economic
injury applications from Hurricane
Wilma is July 24.

The FAMU Department of
Intercollegiate Athletics will host
the 3rd annual basketball home-
coming and reunion weekend,
March 3-4. All former FAMU bas-
ketball players and coaches inter-
ested in participating are asked to
contact W. Earl Kitching at 850-
599-3028 or
IM4FAMU(Pyahoo.com.

'The Board of Trustees of
Florida Memorial University will
be honored by your presence as we.
host a Black Tie gala for President
Albert E. Smith and First Lady
Sadie B. Smith, Friday, March 24,
7 p.m.; dinner an program, 8 p.m.
For more information, call 305-
626-3605.
*******
Florida Atlantic University's
Charles E. Schmidt College of
Science presents a lecture called
Bio-Materials Research at the
Nanoscale, March 2 at 3:30 p.m.
For more information, contact
Patsy Jones at 561-297-1307.
******* *
The Musician Village is being
built to house the returning and
displaced musicians of New
Orleans and South Florida. For
more information, call 786-316-
6205.
*******
The Beauville Committee is
reaching out to former residents
of Scott and Carver that are inter-
ested in returning to the commu-
nity and owning. their homes. To
participate or for more informa-
tion, call 786-355-0348, 305-691-
0401 or 305-633-9261.
****** *
The Miami Light Project pres-
ents jazz legend Sonny Rollins on
March 14 at 8 p.m. at the
Gusman Center for the
Performing Arts. For more infor-
mation, call 305-576-4350 or visit





Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to worship serv-
ice on March 5 at 4 p.m. as the
Word of God moves mightily set-
ting the captive free. For more
information, call 786-258-
1826.
*******
God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to a Youth
Explosion on March 12 at 4
p.m. For more information, con-
tact 786-258-1826.

An House of Prayer for All
People, Inc., Apostle C. Bender,


in March. All events are free to
attend. Reservations are
required. To register or obtain
information, please call 1-800-
470-7422.

Palmetto General Hospital
in Hialeah will offer maternity
classes, support groups, hospi-
tal tours and other activities for
the community in March. To


Domestic violence destroys all
ethnic populations but partic-
ularly our Black families and
young Black children.
Each speaker at this year's
symposium expounded on
issues and offered strategies
for greater challenges and


the little time that they did talk
to you, they only spoke to you
about their problems or their
complaints? How would you
feel if they never asked your
opinion of anything, and if you
did give a suggestion, they
completely ignored it.? How
would you feel if they com-
plained constantly that you
didn't do enough for them, and
accused you of not loving
them, or punishing them
because you didn't jump
immediately to their rescue
every time they called in the
exact way that they wanted you
to in the exact time that they
wanted?
How would you feel if your
spouse made no attempts to
offer you nothing of them-
selves, but constantly pulled
on you to give them things to
bless them? I guess you would
feel the way that God must feel
sometimes! If you love God, or
anyone, you desire to spend
time with them. You want to
share intimate details with
them, and you want them to
share intimate details with
you. You want them to put
aside time for you special
time just for the two of you. Is
this what you are doing with

www.miamilightproject.com.
******* *
The Miami-Dade Public Library
System cordially invites the com-
munity to participate in its com-
memoration of Women's History
Month (March). For more informa-
tion on event listings and times,
call 305-375-BOOK or visit
www.mdpls.org.

The Florida Chapter of the
Townsend Harris Alumni
Association will host its free
annual Spring Breakfast on March
23 at 9:30 a.m. at Temple Shaarei
Shalom. For more information,
please contact Mort Greene at
954-720-5001 or Larry Treff at
561-731-5199.
*******
You are invited to a FCAT Public
Hearing on March 1 (today) at 7
p.m. at Miami-Dade College North
Campus. For more information,
contact Terri Rodriguez at 786-267-
0991.

Lynn University will host an
Alumni and Parents Weekend,
March 24 26, with registration
beginning at 8:30 a.m. For more
information on event listings and
times, contact Susana Fernandez at
561-237-7433 or visit
www.lynn.edu/lynnweekend.

Florida Memorial University will
have an open house for the Lou
Rawls Center for the Performing
Arts and "Lift Ev'ry Voice" Sculpture
and Donor Tribute Unveiling on
March 13 at 5 p.m.

Class Meetings
The B.T.W class of 1961 will sell
dinners on March 4 from 12 p.m. to
3 p.m. at Our Saviour Lutheran
Church. All proceeds go to the
B.T.W scholarship fund. For more
information, please call 305-332-
3951.
*******
Please atttend the Miami
Northwestern Community
Action/PTSA meeting on Tues.,
Mar. 7 in the Miami Northwestern
Sr. High auditorium 1100 NW
71st Street, to discuss how the

pastor, invites you to its
Prodigal Son Ministries on
March 5 at 3 p.m.
*******
Pastor Ronnie Britton along
with the members of the
Metropolitan AME Church,
1778 NW 69th Street, cordially
invite you to come out for revival
on March 1-2 at 7:30 p.m.
nightly.

Send your church
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamiteditori-
al@bellsouth or mail to 900
NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6216.


register or obtain information,
please call 1-800-522-5292.

Send your health notes by
2 p.m. Monday. Fax to 305-
757-5770, email to miamite-
ditorial@bellsouth or mail
to 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, 33127-1818. For fur-
ther information, call 305-
694-6216.


brighter roads. I think each
panel discussion was highly
informative, highly energized
and very influential. This
year's symposium has created
positive solutions for our
Black families to apply to their
futures.


Fish hooked with a mouth full of money


the God Ihat you proclaim to
love? Love is an action word.
And it doesn't begin and end
on Sundays. Love is continu-
ous.
There is a song that I love
that speaks of Jesus' great love
for us. Part of the song says
that Jesus went the distance,
and He finished strong,
because we were His passion,
so He gave His all. We were His
passion! He didn't back out of
His commitment to 'stay the
course to the end. He didn't
change His mind about going
to the cross when He saw how
angry and violent the crowd
was. He didn't deny Himself
after being beaten with a whip
made of bone and metal. Have
you stayed the course with
Him? Have you run from place
to place and ministry to min-
istry because you fell that you
were being persecuted or not
appreciated? Have you backed
out of commitment after com-
mitment?
Read or read again the 'love
chapter" of the Bible I
Corinthians 13. Next week, I
will continue -this subject by
sharing about the second part
of God's love love for each
other.

community can help prevent
Northwestern from being closed
due to poor test scores.
*******
Miami Northwestern Senior
High Community School is hold-
ing its first Family Get Acquainted
and Recruitment Night for parents
and guardians of 8th and 9th grade
students that will be or already are
attending Miami Northwestern. It
will be March 28 at 6 p.m. in the
Theater of Performing Arts (TOPA).
For more information, call Ms.
Johnnie Mae Perry Batist at 305-
625-5399 or the school itself at
305-836-0991.
*******
North Dade Jr. High Reunion's
planning committee is forming.
Attendees of North Dade between
1972-75 are meeting monthly to
finalize the reunion activities. For
more information, call 786-236-
1480 or 786-423-1096.

Send your community
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-5770,
email to miamiteditorial@bell-
south.net or mail to 900 NW
54th Street, Miami, 33127-
1818. For further information,
call 305-694-6216.


305.769.1100 Dade 954,522.1102 Broward 800.721.WMBM Toll Free
For song, prayer, birthday requests 305.953.WMBM, 954.525.1490

888.599.WMBM, wmbm@wmbm.com


v Gospel Classic Hour, M-F, 6:00am
* Tuesday Talk with President/GM Bishop Victor T.
Curry. Tues 9:30am
* Spirit & Soul featuring:
Compassion
Business In The Black
Business Showcase
Victorious Life Management
Sister To Sister
Brother To Brother
M-F at 2:00pm


* Noon Day Prayer, M-F, 12:00pm
* Business Spotlight, M-F, 1:15pm and 1:45pm; Sa
10:15am
* Ministry Spotlight, Sa, 8:15am
* Livin' Right Teen Show, Sa, 11:00am
a Back to the Bible, Alternating M, 9:00am
* Let's Talk Money, Alternating W, 9:00 am
a Gospel News Now, M-F 3:00pm
* Talking Sports, Sa 5:00pm
* Queen James Gospel Hour, So, 6:00pm
* Quartet Corner, Sun, 7:30am
* Bobby Jones Gospel Countdown, Sun, 10:00pm


The best friend I ever found is
Jesus. In 1949 I met Him and
he sent me to the ocean and I
hooked many fish with a mouth
full of money.
I have been fishing for over 50
years. I got busy for Jesus and
in reality it pays. Jesus knows
what fish is not broke. He
taught me.
St. Matthew 17:26 "Jesus
saith unto him, then are the
children free. Notwithstanding,
lest we should offend them, go
thou to the sea, and cast a
hook, and take up the fish that
first cometh up; and when thou
hast opened his mouth, thou
shalt find a piece of money: that
take, and give unto them for me


Bishop John Wilson
and thee."
Write me at P. O. Box 531078,
Miami. FL 33153.


Faithful Few celebrates 39th anniversary


On Sunday, March 5, 2:30
p.m. at Mt. Olive Holiness
Church, 8400 NW 22nd
Avenue, many groups will min-
ister. The Spencer Aires, Lil
Kelly and The Five Gospel


Sons are just a few.
Special guest are, The New
Trumpet Jubilees of Boynton
Beach and many more.
Adults $10; children ages 6-
12, $4.


S 0


) Bst ickGoo d

African Art & Home Store

Framed Art Body Oils
Clothing Throw Fabrics
Sculpture Walking Canes
Leather Bags Incense
Figurines Oil Burners
Jewelry Lamps
Wooden Masks Mudcloth
Drums Childrens Clothing
Spears & So Much More
Soaps, Lotions, SEE US TODAY

13743 NW 7th Ave.

786-413-0774

Open Mon-Sat
10 a.m.-7 p.m.


Sendyour community news, church notes and health support
calendar by 2 p.m., Monday. Fax to 305-757-5770,
email to miamiteditorial@bellsouth or call 305-694-6216.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


2B The Miami Times Ma 6


Health Support Calendar ~T1 I(









Blics ut ottolThirOn esiy heMim Tme Mrc 17 2063


Blak womn Ir ha traditim ho wrud Itrou milalum










r "Copy righted Material 1


Syndicted Content



available from'Commercial News Providers"
1! _i_1__ V- 42I&*f


v %=i


Or_31


Alfonso M. Richardson
Owner, LFD


Alfonso M. Richardson








00C" JOY,
Funeral Services, Inc.












305-625-7177 305-625-9937 fax

3790 NW 167th Street

Miami Gardens, FL 33054


IF A PICTURE OF
YOUR LOVED ONE
WAS USED FROM
JANUARY 2001 THRU
JULY 2005
PLEASE PICK THEM
UP BY
MARCH 31, 20o6


Seminary Extension
Sponsored by the Southern Baptist Theological Seminaries. Accredited
seminary. Courses include: College Diploma Levels, Pastoral Ministries,
Educational Ministries, Childhood Education, Deacon Ministry, Nursing Home,
Social Worker and Chaplainey Ministry.
Rev. Evorn Burk, Extension Center Director, 1404 N.E. 152""Terrace, North
Miami Beach, 33162. Oak Grove Baptist Church
For further information call, cell, 954-816-9672 or 305-945-9964. (Leave
message).

Registration begins March 9, 2006, 8-10 p.m. for 9 weeks

TH3200 Systematic Theology $285


The Elite Church Directory pays for itself and keepsyour

church andyour pastor before the community.

Call 305-694-6210


93" Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93'" Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
I I :1.im. ..Molningl Worship
Evening Worship
Isl & 3rd Slllday ........ m I
ITuesday Biblc Study ...7 pI'.
wchsite: emlibe.orl"



Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
iiLc f.rliippraiyerC .CIfksolih.icI
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami. FL
305-759-8875




114 D liMin g Lthe inW, r1 7lv.


S Order l'of Serlvices:








Mon. thru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
IH Iotr i sle ,'yr.... .... ( .( ) I.111.

Su n ay Stllltlychel ..r .... 9:30 I .lI












PeMt. Calvary on Missionary
Baptist Church














2400 N.W. 68" Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of 'Services:
EMIIIurly Mornipng. Sl vices 1 i
Y(2 uh M4 fi. ly SIun dy).......:..7 .m.







Srayc/ll Schlllooly ..... ..... 7 Im












Baptist Churchs of Florida
1140 DX. Mashingtheo Kina A Blv.e.
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-6819-0528

Order of er Services:

oanuliy Mral.gSer7 oviceI
BU ible Slu.y...........7 p.nl.














(I1111 y b Wlo r I'Suhi 7ahy)t7:30 pill
hPeacefSoul SavZion Misstationary
BapChrist's Crusaders of FloridaChurch
1882400 N.W. a S, Miani gto Av 33147e.
305) 83w.slri -145
Order of Services:
Sunda1(ly School ..........9:41.5 1u11








I(TI1tly. IWOlShi .I I S mdI.&y) 7:3 p111
Noon Drayer Merill/blMo Stud. I





I~ TuesdaII ):y WI'hl':y .......~I. 7:45 .n.


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Services:
Sun...9:30 a.m....(Sunday School)
Wallk in the Word Millistry
Worship Service.............. I 1am..
Wed..l I I.lll..ll ercessory P'iycr
Wed. Bible Class........ 1p.m.
We d. Bible Classt..............7 p.m.




Harvest Fire Worship Ctr.i
2260 N.W. 183rd Street
305-620-2986
Order o' Services:
Sundlity.......7 I.m ........... 1( a.m .
Wed.- Bible Study.......7:30 p.m.
IFriday- Youth
First & Fourihi
ulcs......Women 's/Men's MIg.
liarly Monling Pnyer.....6-7 a.m.
'IayC r Sulday........6:30 p.Im .




SNew Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'11 Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order ol' Services:
Sundays- Chtarlch Schi l ...............i10 a.m.
WoMaisi p Service ............ I 1:15 .m.I.
'Tu l'll ays Bihble ClIss.......... : .7 p.m .
41iII Sumndy W rllingWoship 6... ...1 .m.




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue
305-372-38776 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Morning Worship .....7:30 n.m.
Su11tday School ..........9:30 Ia.m.
Morning Worship ...11 II .11 .
Nawure./r iBaptist s lntrchs
(13 13.T.U.) 5 p.m.
livcning Worlship ........7 p.m.
Medcin g ........(Tues.) 7 p.m.



Victory on the Rock
Ministries, Inc.
16178 NW 27th Avenue
305-625-3376 / 305-333-3144


Order of Services:

TIlsday Nighl Iliblc Silt)dy
7 1p.m.


/postolic Revival Center'
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time I'to T.V. Program
FOR tHOPE FOR TODAY
S:IIII" i lll n. Sll odilyv5 I'm.I
We. .- .l mvss y nI ri).I, 12 Ip l
M omi Ii erlesS rVi ..................1 1. 1n
S II .- [vt'v Stel ,,ill ........... 7:3( 1.111.
"rTu s.- Prayrl ........ 7:11 n.
FIi.- Iible Sludy ......,.........7:30 pi.mn


Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
liarly Wowship ..............7 a.m.
Sulldily School.................9 a.lll.
N BC ............................10:05 a.m.
W worship .......................I I .m.1
W orship .........................4 p). .
MI isslonl ailnd Iible C lass
M II1(;esdayIY ...... ......... 6 :30 p.n m.
/( 1 t r re eisal


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500
Order of Services:
V sllll'll Wll Mill,, ..... II......... i r.
I .I hisIgh hNilitlrit'. .............. p n
I~lihle l SLt 5 ............................7: 30 p .
l y S r ic .................. ...... ..
I .h I, oS i I. .... rr........ I
I i r lc rri on


S Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
Lonld Day Sulnday School .....9:451m1
SSunla: y Mofning Wn lip .....l I I a.m.
Sumndy MWn s Bihcle Stud, p.m..
S I;unday Idies Bihle Study ....5 p.
S u nd asty E 1v n i nl g i p. ....... 6 r .m .
S"Tied.,il y Nigll ihle SlmItyv ....7:311pin
IhIrsddy llly Moning hi ible CI:iss I1 na.lm
S llimspoXrlllioil uiviIvallh Cull:
04,34-48.511 305-6'J1 -69958


Christian Hill AME Church
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LM09@BellSouth.Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services:
Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School....................... :30 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ........II a.m.
Free Goll Every 22' & 4"' Sunday ............4 p.m.
Don Shula's Golf Course


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m. I1:15 a.m.
Sunday SchooIl -.9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.


Liberty City Church New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Christ of Faith International
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555 2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services:
Stll-a i y Mo'ninOrder of Services
Sunday Morning ........... a.m. Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11 1 (800) 254-NBBC
Su y4 School.............1011.i am.. 7p.m. 305-685-37(K)
Sunday Evening ............. a .. 7 p.m. 315-65-37
Mon. Excellence ........7:30 p.. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Fax: 305-685-0705
Tuie. Bible Chlss .........7:30 p.m Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m. www.newhirthbaptistminani.org
Thurs. Fellowship ........10 a. Wednesday Bible Study'
Ist Suin. Song Pilcfice ..6 p.m. 10:45 a.m.


SNew Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103"' St.
305-696-7745
Order o' Services:
7:31) i ii h1 a '.
('hlllC h Sc'l ltll(r )ri-i lllr i l,err ......r r arll.
Sirnels I isy In aIslt
hlla -Friday, 12 p Io I ..
ryvrlmllhl Sltudy
.l s .ny ....... .. 7 113 p
SBIR-ll ts-IlAII y


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a. ::::* M orning W orship ............. 0 .m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday, 8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8, 19,22,23,30 and 37
Web page: www.penbrokep;irkcoc.org
DI.Prentiss C. ivey, Mniste


Trinity Faith Tabernacle
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4"' Strecl. Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Services:
Slnd. School,. .........1110:10 I
Si. MlHIonli p S er\ ...., 1. I p. ,
'rt lc' y Yo tllllh Nihl".h.X 8 ,111,
W e.l l' Nnll D ray ieCIr 1 plll
V ed, Nighlr Iiblc Slr dy. S p.n.
T iursdy Nigh oi l,,, gi onMibll


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081
Order of Services:
WoSllshp Selvice...... S I anl
S.'csay Bible Situdy,..... S Npi.m
IThlm'day Praye Servicc .. I p nt


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
Early Moming Worship 7:30 a.m.
Suin. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....1 I1 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
'Thes. bef.lb, the Ist SunII..... 7 p. .
Mid-week Worship




St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
E ily Mornming Worship.7:3(0a.m.
Sunday SchlxI .......... 9:30a.n.
Morning Worship .....II a.m.
WEDNESDAY
BibleIIlody ................:.8 .1 I.
It Pray c r M cc i ,,.,.............7 :30 p Im .




Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78"' Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105


Order of Services:
ihble S ludy W ed ................ p.m .
Sunday Scltho l................10 ;lm.
Sulln. Worship Serv ....... 1:301) a.m.
Wed. Nigh Ier lrlC-cslly lPraye.i
Iir,,1 7:30 lo 8 p.m.
Sundltay Worship Servicc..6:3.( p.m.


Alb



a


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10'' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Early Sunday Worhip...7:30i a..
Sunday School ................ 9:30 a.m.
SuiLny Molling Walship .....II aJm.
Sunday Evening S vice ...6 p.m.
liTestly Piyer Meeting ...7:.30 p.m.
Wclnesday Bible Study ...7:30 p.l.
"Not JuIt i; lChulrch lBi a Movem oft



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3" Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-854
Order of Services:
Sunday Sch,nol............9:45 ai.i .
1 B B Sun, Morning S scry......l I .inm.
4'. sui.... 11 1 :... r ...:30-2:30 pm .
Vi "lt .eday.....lBible Sludy
ectlill& milliY esi y i0 lm.
IWred. Bible Sltudy/l>,aycr..6:30 p,.,,,m




Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Suntdltay Scolu l .............9:30( a.m.
Moninll Praise/WVrshlip .. 11 a.m.
Youth Choir Sailt lay ......I I a.m.
I'Prayer Meeing & ihble Sulldy
lTulles,,dy 7 p.m.


V ^ ""-"*"--"---


Pw-"


-


The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 3B


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Bishop Victor T. Curr, D.Nlin., D.D, Senir Pastor/Teadier PAI


\Is~F~rrm~B~C


I~RFtrmr YYlmrA -/


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elw 1,ftV m ,Tim,c I 17 bBlc Mut LM ;Ir A IoV M 1 -or


Alice Dean Harrison, retired educator, dies


Alice Dean Harrison died
Sunday, February 26 at
Parkway General Hospital.
T'he cause of death was con-
gestive heart failure. She was
a distinguished public school
teacher and administrator
who retired in 1991 after 45
years of forging a stellar
career in education. She was
77.
She was born in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


and moved to Miami with her
parents, Albert and Blanche
Dean; when she was an
infant. She inherited her love
of education from Mr. and
Mrs. Dean, two teachers,
who encouraged her to
always seek excellence in her
endeavors. She graduated at
age 15, from Booker T.
Washington High School as
an honor student. She
attained a Bachelor's degree
from Dillard University in
Louisiana and a Master's
degree in supervision and
administration at New York
University. She did further
study at Temple University


and the University of Miami.
She began her teaching
career at Dorsey High School
where she embraced the phi-
losophy that every student
could learn. Later, she
taught at North Dade Senior
High School, where she
introduced teaching strate-
gies that enhanced her stu-
dents' learning styles. She
advanced to the position of
guidance counselor at North


Dade. She served as Area
Director for the North Central
District, then as the Principal
of Van E. Blanton Elementary
School where she worked
until her retirement.
She was a founding member
of the Episcopal Church of
The Transfiguration, located
in Miami Gardens. Her many
church activities included:
charter member and a past
president of Daughters of The
King St. Ann's Chapter;
charter member of St.
Veronica' Guild; charter
member and a past president
of Episcopal Church Women;
a past church treasurer;


Alice Dean Harrison
founding member of the
Golden Age Club; and
founder of the Feeding the
Homeless Project sponsored
by The Daughters of the King-
St. Ann's Chapter. She
received national recognition
for the project.
Mrs. Harrison, a consum-
mate club woman, served as:
a past president of the Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority,
Gamma Zeta Omega Chapter;
a past president of the local
chapter of the Carats and a
past Ist vice president of the
national Carats; a past presi-
dent of the MRS. Club; a past
president of the Greater
Miami Chapter of the Links; a
former member of American


Colleges and University
Women; a past honoree of In
the Company of Women; and a
founder of the Bahamian
American Cultural Club. She
was a recipient of a letter from
President William Clinton,
dated May 5, 1995, congratu-
lating her as A Summit of the
Americas volunteer.
An Emily Post Etiquette
maven, she fostered protocol
in Miami-Dade Public
Schools. She spent many
hours traveling and meeting
people. She had a high regard
for diverse Miami.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Samuel Harrison; a
daughter, Adria Harrison
Wiley; a granddaughter,
Autumn Crumity; a grandson,
Adrian Wiley; a sister, Carmen
Dean Jackson; a brother-in
law, Alonzo Jackson; nephew,
Karlon Jackson (Patricia);
nieces, Sharla and Shame
Jackson; great nephews,
Peyton and Kollier Jackson;
and many other relatives and
friends.
Service will be held Friday,
March 3 at 9 a.m. at Church of
the Incarnation. The Litany is
scheduled for Thursday, 6:30
p.m. at Church of the
Incarnation.
The Family requests that in
lieu of flowers, donations be
made to Dillard University in
memory of Alice Dean
Harrison. a


Haitian women's group needs community's help


Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami,
Inc. is organizing its 14th Year
Anniversary Gala on March 4 to
be held at the Coconut Grove
Expo. A commemorative book
will be created and distributed
to women and human rights
organizations throughout the
U.S. and in Haiti.
group is celebrating its 14th
anniversary at a time of crisis
"for the organization and the
families it serves. Many families
lost everything they had during


Hurricane Wilma and F.A.N.M.
itself was homeless several
weeks after the storm as the
building that housed its pro-
grams were severely damaged.
The group is raising funds to
help secure a new location for
the variety of family empower-
ment ,and intervention pro-
grams, immigration advocacy
efforts and its services and eco-
nomic development initiatives.
For more information, please
call 305-756-8050.


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET* MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142

For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion


IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,


CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


THAT CARES.


"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


We celebrate your life with the
love and strength you gave to us
each day.
And we recognize that our lives
are a whole lot better because of
God blessing us with you.
We hope to make you proud of
us by accomplishing successful
goals and' leading family loving
lives.
May God bless you, and keep
you safe through out all eterni-
ty.
You will forever be loved by
LaChanze Hamm and Ruth
Hamm, your children; Rosa Lee
Hines, Yvonne Willis, Caroline
Jelks, Bruce Hamm, and Peggy
Woodard. Your step-children,
Glenda Lewis, Paul Lewis, Brian
Lewis, and the rest of the Lewis
children. Your grandchildren,
LaChanze Sordjour, Walter
Sapp, Lonnie Sapp, Michelle
Sapp, Gina Hines, Carlton
Willis, Derrick Willis, Jimmy
Willis Jr., Shantel Thompson,
Inga Thompson, Philip
Thompson Jr., Africa Jelks,
Bruce Hamm Jr., Tiffany Hamm,
Anthony Hamm, Reginald Wood-
ard Jr., Sean Woodard, and a
number of great-grands and
great great-grands.
We love you and miss you.


Range
Coconut Grove

WILLIAM EUGENE DUPUCH,
80, retired veteran, died February
26 at Westchester General Hospital.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. in the
chapel.

ANNETTE SISTRUNK ALVIS,
35, bus driver, died February 20 at
Baptist Hospital. Service
Wednesday, 1 p.m. in the chapel.


Barrett-Fryar
CURLEY MCGRIFF, JR., 79,
Coconut Grove, died February 25 at
Mercy Hospital. ServicesSaturday, 1
p.m. at St. Paul A.M.E. of Coconut
Grove.

JULIAN LEROY BROWN, 62,
Bimini, Bahamas, died January 13 in
Bahamas. Services will be held
Saturday, in Bahamas.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


wish to extend sincere thanks,
appreciation and gratitude for
your prayers and acts of kind-
ness shown during our time of
bereavement.
Michael will surely be missed.
Special thanks to Range Funeral
Home, Fr. John Madigan, His
Church families of St. Philip Neri
and Holy Redeemer; St. Philip
Men's Club and Choir, the class
of 1962, the U.S. Postal Service,
TSA, George Dean Catering and
our many family and friends
who came to the aid of his sons.
We ask for your continued
prayers during this difficult time
and may God bless you.

Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


Death Notice


JAMAL WILLIAMS, 23,
died on Feb. 23, 2006.
Service will be held at Power
and Praise Missionary
Church, 1051 NW 62 St on
March 4 at 1:30 p.m.
Viewing will be at
Richardson Funeral Home,
4500 NW 17 Ave.


Death Notice

PASTOR REV. TAFT J.
DANIELS, died on February
23, 2006.
Service will be 10 a.m.
Satuarday March 4 at First
Baptist Church of
Brownsville, 4600 NW 23
Ave., Miami.


Death Notice

STEPHEN HALL, JR., 74,
died Feb. 22, 2006. Services
will be held 11 a.m. Sat.,
March 4 at Bethlehem
Missionary Baptist
Church, 869 N.W. 27 Ave., Ft.
Lauderdale.
Repass at 2210 N.W. 9 PI,
Ft. Lauderdale.
Mizell Funeral Home, 1305
N.W. 6 St, Ft. Lauderdale is in
charge of arrangements.


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


GEORGE DEAN


03/01/42 03/05/05

It's been one year. In our
hearts it seems like yesterday.
We will always love and miss
you.
Your wife, Julia Johnson Dean;.
Alvin Holmes (Cynthia), Richard
Dean (Myra), Clayton Holmes
(Rebecca), Sadiqua Dean, step
children, grands, great grands,
family and friends.

Deadline for obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.
Call 305-694-6210


DANIEL J. COX, JR.


It has been five years since ypu
left us. We love and miss you.
The Family


Public Notice
As a public service to our com-
munity, The Miami Times prints
weekly obituary notices submit-
ted by area funeral homes at no
charge. These notices include
name of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and date,
location, and time of services.
Additional information and
photo may be included for a
nominal charge. The deadline is
Monday at 3:30 p.m.


Services will be held Friday, March 3 at 9 a.m. at
Church of the Incarnation. The Litany is scheduled
for Thursday, 6:30 p.m. at Church of the
Incarnation.


...ig uma:* S 4w -, Jnc.*


15332 NW 7th Avenue Miami, Florida 33 '69
Office: 305-688-2030 Fax: 305-688-2293
Kimberly B. White L.F.D


TROY HAMM, JR.
MERVIN MICHAEL
03/02/28 03/17/92 SEYMOUR


arrangements pro-
Mitchell Funeral


Funeral
vided by
Home.


i I Call 1,518 I ,. ., ,.. /. i,.mM


MEMOIAMODEAHNOICE 0 OITURIE


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4B Th Miami Times Mar 6







The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 5B


s kcalB Must Contro eir wn es ny


Alma Crawford, educator and community leader, dies at 90


Services for Alma Lucille
Crawford, pioneer educator and
community leader, will be held
Wednesday at 2 p.m. at the
Historic Mt. Zion Baptist
Church in Overtown. Mrs.
Crawford died Tuesday,
February 21 in Tallahassee.
She was 90.
Crawford was the first born of
seven children of Daniel E. and
Lenora Smith Johnson in
Miami, Florida on May 11,
1915. At an early age she began
her journey toward a lifetime of
learning, loving and leading.,
Education was a vital force
within her and she was an out-
standing student. She was edu-
cated in the public schools of
Dade County, graduating as
valedictorian of her 1933
Booker T. Washington High
School class. She was an honor
graduate of her class at Florida
A&M College. She received a


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


Master's degree from the
University of Michigan.
Public speaking was a natural
ability for Alma Lucille. She
delighted in participating in
church programs, oratorical
contests and on debate teams.
As a high school student, she
represented Booker .T.
Washington High in a State
competition and was awarded
first prize in a contest held at
St. Peters African Orthodox
Church. Her final public speech
was made at a 90th birthday
celebration in her honor.
As a teacher at A.L. Lewis
Elementary in Homestead,
Alma Lucille met and married
James O. Crawford. They
became parents of James
Edgecomb, Judith Lucille and
Michael. Both James and Alma
Lucille were highly respected in
Homestead and Richmond
Heights for their outstanding


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


Alma Lucille Crawford
contributions to their neigh-
bors, the Girl Scouts organiza-
tion and the community. Alma
Lucille's beloved husband,
James, and son, Michael, pre-


In Memoriam

In loving memory of, ,


ceded her in death.
Both children and adults
were drawn to Mrs. Crawford
because of her desire to teach
and share her knowledge of life
and living. She spent thirty
years of her life as a public
school teacher. She taught
mathematics and science at
Dorsey High School and ele-
mentary subjects in Homestead
and Richmond Heights. She
ended her career after serving
as a librarian for several years
at Frank C. Martin School in
Richmond Heights.
She fully embraced life by
developing an interest in many
activities. She was an active
member of the Historic Mount
Zion Baptist Church as a
youngster. Later she served as
an assistant superintendent of
the Sunday school.
An avid reader and a lover of
books, Alma Lucille inspired


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


her students and others to do
the same. In the late 1930's and
early 1940's, she organized a
Saturday afternoon children's
story hour. This was an impor-
tant part of the founding of the
first community library in the
Overtown area. The lawn adja-
cent to a building provided by
Mrs. Annie M. Coleman (a Black
pioneer civic activist) was the
location of the story hour.
As a leader, Mrs. Crawford
was involved in the initial
development of five local organ-
izations. She was a charter
member of Zeta Tau Zeta
Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta
Sorority; co-organizer of Girl
Scout Troop 79 of Mount Zion
Baptist Church; and organizer
of the Girl. Scout Troop of
Richmond Heights. Two garden
clubs, Richmond Heights in
1952 and Bougainvillea in
1977, were organized by her.


In Memoriam


Survivors left to cherish
beautiful memories of the
deceased are: her daughter,
Judith C. Hemmingway and
her husband, Ted; her son,
James Edgecomb and his wife,
Carolyn; her brother, Dr. James
A. Johnson; her sisters,
Georgiana. J. Bethel, Edna J.
Williams and Leona J. Fulton;
her grand and great-grand chil-
dren, Aja Hatton and Aarian;
Frederich and Tadarius
Crawford, Robin Edgecomb and
Deon; her nieces and grand
nieces, Sharon D. Williams,
Karen Bradford and Patricia W.
Oyeshiku; her nephews and
grand nephews,
Gerald A. Williams and wife,
Florida, Leonard Raye, Timothy
Williams, Derrall Williams,
David Fulton, Kevin Raye,
David Jeter, as well as many
cousins, goddaughters and
godsons.


Her Children Shall
Call Her Blessed


In loving memory of,


AGNES LAW WILCHER REVEREND ABRAM MOSS

03/05/22 03/04/05 09/25/22 02/28/05


MOTHER MARY LOU RONELL D. WARD
COOPER FISHER
06/23/67 02/24/05


KYRONE BEARD
MOTHER GEORGINA
11/29/84 02/28/04 WRIGHT


A lifetime of moments shared
has left us with a reservoir of
precious memories that keep us
smiling whenever we think of
you. You are always in our
hearts.
We have peace knowing that
you are resting in the arms of
the Lord.
Mother, you will forever be our
"Point of Light."
Your children and grandchil-
dren.




In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


SHELTON H. WILSON


02/27/74 07/05/92

ONE LOVE
From twin to twin; heart to
heart, connected by blood, unit-
ed from the start.
From brother to brother; a soul
to a soul, a bond that's too tight,
to ever grow old.
Though now you're a spirit, in
your home far away; you'll
always be loved, day after day.
Remembering you is easy, it's
missing you that's hard.
The only maintaining, is
through a strong faith in God.
Though thoughts of your pass-
ing bring tears and sadness. Re-
membering your presence
brings joy and gladness.
There's never another, that
could ever take your place. And
there's never a time your memo-
ry will be erased.
So keep watching and protect-
ing, in peace from above.
Though two separate hearts,
there will always be one love.
In memory of Shelton Wilson
from twin, Shellie Wilson and
siblings Rodney and Rakevia
Holmes and their dear mother,
Ms. Sandra Jackson.


It has been one year since God
has called you home to your re-
ward.
We love you dearly and miss
you very much. We cherished
the memories you have left
behind.
Your loving wife, Olga; chil-
dren, Mervin, Thaddeus,
Deborah, Carolyn, Margaret,
Albertha, Edward and grand-
children.




In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


07/19/33 03/03/05

It's been one year today. Miss
and love you, your husband,
sons and grandsons.


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


ELEAZAR "BO" BARR


CHARLES W. LEWIS

06/20/36 02/29/04


It's been two years. Its still
hard to face, since you were
taken to your resting place.
I can hear you say to the chil-
dren and me don't grieve for me
for now I'm free. I'm following
the path God laid for me. I took
His hand when I heard Him call.
I turned my back and left it all.
That you did, but its okay we
knew you could not stay anoth-
er day to laugh, to love, to work
or play. Tasks left undone must
stay that way for you found His
peace at the close of day.
Rest in peace my love. We love
you dearly and miss you more.
Your wife, children, grandchil-
dren and great grand children.



Royal
BARBARA COHENS, 65, died
February 25.
Services will be
held Saturday at
Mount Calvary
Missionary
Baptist Church.


12/18/32 02/20/06

wish to express our thanks
and appreciation for all acts of
kindness shown during this
time of our bereavement.
May God bless each of you is
our prayer.
The Barr Family



Happy Birthday


You've been gone for one year.
To some you are forgotten, to
some you are of the past,
But to us, the ones who loved
and lost you, your memories will
always Jat ,pi, .p1 ,g,
Mom, Dad and family.






In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


p.-


VANILLA MAYO
Sister-In-Law


In loving memory of,


JERRY ROLLE

02/28/22 12/08/04

The love we have for you, we
cherish each day.
The precious memories we
have for you is everlasting.
Rolle, Davis, Thompson,
Postell families.


I.


NETTIE M. EDMOND
Wife

The beauty of love will never
die, because God our Heavenly
Father is love.
"Mae" there is no doubt within
my mind I will forever love you.
Harold Edmond and children.



E.A. Stevens
WADE M. BROWN, 25,
Hallandale Beach, died February 26.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at New
Birth Baptist Church.


You are not forgotten love one,
nor will you ever be.
As long as life and memory
last; we will remember thee.
We miss you now, our hearts.
are sore; and as time goes by,,
we'll miss you more.
Your loving smile, your gentle


REVEREND DANIEL
SELDON


08/10/34 02/24/96

You are not forgotten, nor will
you ever be, as long as life and
memory last we will remember
thee.
You always seemed to have
said the right words when need-
ed, kept us surrounded by love
and humbleness.
Its been ten years and we still
miss you now, our hearts are
still sore. As time continues,
we'll miss you even more. Your
forever loving and pleasant
smile, your gentle face, always
know that no one can ever fill
your vacant place.
Your loving wife, Amelia Sel-
don; daughter, son, sisters and
grandchildren.




rtesg AI


SUNRISE 11/25/38
SUNSET 03/01/96.


Sylvia and Jackie
Stephanie, Terry, Derek,
Carnell, Pernell Willie, grand
and great grandchildren
and grandchildren Floyd,
Georgina, Tamniy, Dominique,
and greatgrands Kiera, Kinara
and Jamal.
We will never forget the ten-
der love you gave us, nor how
you taught us to be a blessing
to others.
Sleep on until we meet again.
Thank you for the legacies.
The Wright Funeral Home
Family and Staff
Jackie Hill Young,
President/CFO
Terry Wright,
VicePresident/CEO



Deadline for obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.

Call 305-694-6210






L. Hfa onm
I H nM


hTl O D ti


IN EMRIA 9HAPY IRHDA RMEBRANCE o DATH OTICS 0. OBITUARI^^ES








s kcalB Must Control Their Own Desting


6B Te Miami T imers, arc~rl -,uv
l


Range


ALICE DEAN HARRISON, 77,
school adminis-
trative for Dade
County Public
Schools, died
February 27.
Survivors: hus-
band, Samuel
Harrison; two
daughters, Afria
Harrison Wiley
and Tracey
Harrison; a second daughter is
deceased; granddaughter, Autumn
Crumity; grandson, Adrian Wiley;
sister, Carmen Dean Jackson;
brother-in-law, Alonzo Jackson,
Karlon Jackson (Patricia); nieces,
Sharla and Shame Jackson; great
nephews, Peyton and Kollier
Jackson; and many other relatives
and friends, Litany service
Thursday, 6 p.m. at the Church of
Incarnation. Service Friday, 9 a.m.
at the church.

LENA MAE NORMAN aka 'BIG
MAMMA,', 74,
homemaker,
died February
22. Survivors:
six daughters,
Rosie Bradford,
Ph y I I i s
Josephine,
Lynda and
Retha Norman
and Rita
Richards; three sons, Michael,
Marvin and Robert Norman; sister,
Albertha Norman; two brothers,
Willie Joe and Edgar Reese.
Service Saturday, 1:30 p.m. at New
Birth Cathedral of Faith.

ALMA LUCILLE CRAWFORD,
90, retired librar-


Tallahassee.
Surviv ors
daughter, Judith
Hemmingway;
son, Jimmy
Edgecomb"
granddaughter,
Aja Hatton; three
sisters, Georgiana J. Bethel, Edna
J. Williams and Leona Fulton; broth-
er, James A. Johnson, M.D. Service
Wednesday, 2 p.m. at the Historic
Mt. Zion Baptist Church. Burial
Thursday, 11 a.m. at Caballero
Woodlawn South Cemetery, S.W.
117 Avenue. In lieu of flowers the
family requests contributions be
made to Florida Memorial University
designated to Daniel and Lenora
Johnson Scholarship Fund.

LEONARD BRYANT, JR., Ed.D,
66, retired from
Hillsborough
Community
College as an
associate vice
president of stu-
dent services,
died February
20 in Tampa..
Survivors: moth-
er, Adella
Bryant; son, Craig Bryant; brother,
Federick Bryant. Services were held
Monday.

MARY E. DAVIS, 57, homemaker,
died February
24. Survivors:
dau g h ter,
Kertina Dancey;
mother, 'Thelma
Davis; sister,
Billie Moore;
three brothers,
Ben James,
Dewey A. and
Jerome C.
Davis. Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
the Historic Mt. Zion Baptist Church.

MARSHA YVETTE COLE aka
'K.C.,' 44, died February 24.
Service Monday at Range Chapel.
Time to be announced.



Alfonso M.
Richardson

MYRTLE GIBSON, 85, home-
maker, died
February 18.
Survivors: three
daughters,
Loyce Davis,

Herbert and
Gail; son, Harold
Davis. Service
Tuesday, 2 p.m.
at Bethany
Seventh Day Adventist Church.


Gregg L. Mason
MARY ETHEL WILLIAMS, 61,
nursing assistant, died February 22
at Parkway Medical Center.
Remains will be shipped to
Prattville, Alabama for final rites and
burial.

PAULIN LEONE ALCINDOR, 94,
died February 29 at Memorial
Hospital West. Arrangements are
incomplete.


DEACON LEROY HOWARD
GRANT, 86,
retired from
M e t r o
Transportation,
died February
25 at Cedars
Medical Center.
Survivors: wife
Thelma; sister,
Ethel Bartlett of.
Nassau
Bahamas. Viewing Friday, 6-8 p.m.
Funeral service, Saturday, 10 a.m.
at the Historic Mt. Zion Baptist
Church, 301 NW 9th Street.

ELAINE WARREN CALLOWAY,
51, homemaker,
died February
24. Survivors:
husband, Leory
Cal lowa y
dau g h ter,
Theresa Harrell;
two brothers,
Charlie Williams
and Robert Lee
Thomas; sister,
Shirley Warner. Service Saturday, 2
p.m. Place to be announced.

RHONDA JONES WASHING-
TON, 51, sci-
ence teacher,
died February
25. Survivors:
son, Robert Paul
Jones; parents,
Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Jones,
Sr.; two brothers,
Broderick Jones,
M.D. and Robert
C. Jones, Jr.; sisters, Jocelyn
Lawrence, M.D. Service Saturday, 2
p.m. at the Church of the Open
Door.

MADELYN MILLER
WILKINSON,
84, homemaker,
died February
23. Survivors:
son, Carl
Spevey; two
daughters,
Sandra Evans
and Felicia
Muskelly; broth-
er, Reginald
Miller. Service Wednesday (today),
10 a.m. in the chapel.

EDDIE WILLIAMS, 72, retired,
died February
24. Survivors:
dau g h ter,
Stephanie
Vanvark; two
sons, Wlater
and Alfred
Williams; three
sisters, Gloria
Anderson, Ava
Marie Lampkin
and Ann Knowles; six grandchil-
dren. Service Friday, 11 a.m. at the
Historic Mt. Zion Baptist Church.

EMILY CAREY PITTMAN, 91,
homemaker,
died February
15. Survivors:
niece, Rene
McCasskill.
Litany service
Thursday, 7
p.m. at the
Historic StL
A g n e s
Episcopal
Church. Funeral mass Friday, 11
a.m. at the church.

MAUDE TAPPIN, 89, retired
beautician, died February 21.
Survivors: son, Arthur Lee Collins.
Service were held Tuesday. at New
Providence Baptist Church.


Martha B. Solomon
ROBERT TROUTMAN aka
'COODER
BROWN, 44,
roofer, died
February 18.
Service will be
held Saturday, 2
p.m. in the
chapel.



E.A. Stevens
DEACON MERVIN TAYLOR
BAIN, SR., 79,
Hallandale, died
Feb. 22 at
Hollywood
Memorial
Regional
Hospital .

Saturday, 11
a.m. at
Ebenezer
Baptist Church, Hallandale.

WILLIE "CADILLAC" MCNEIL,


78, Hollywood, died February 22.
Final rites and burial will be in
Laurinburg, North Carolina.


Grace
LEONARD JAMES, 52, died
February 19 at Parkway Medical
Center. Services were held.


Wright


DAVID GODFREY, 70, welder,
died February
23at Jackson
Ho s p i t a I.
Survivors
include: sisters,
Mildred Bloom
and Coretta
Johnson-
Brown. Service
Saturday, 2
p.m. at Mt. Olive
Fire Baptized. Interment Southern
Memorial Park.

RICHARD JENKINS, SR., 75,
sanitation work-

February 27,
2006 at North
Shore Hospital.
Survivors
include: chil-
dren, Lee
Earnest
Jenkins, Mary
Jenkins Lee
Herbert, Jeffrey, Frank and Richard,
Jr.; sisters, Margaret, Morrel, Ruth
Caldwell and Delores Miller.
Service Saturday, March 11, 2 p.m.
at Joe Morris Funeral Chapel in
Pensacola, Fl. Viewing will be held
Wednesday, March 8 2-7'p.m. at
Wright Funeral Home. Interment
Southern Memorial Park.

DOROTHY WILKERSON, 63,
nurse, died
February 19 at
Parkway
Hospital .
SurvivorsS
include: chil-
dren, Gregory,
Anthony, April1
and Deborah.
Services were
held Saturday.


PATRICIA SMOAK, 54, died
February 19 at
Providence
Hospital in
Chicago,
I lli n o is .
Survivors
include: hus-
band, J.P; sib-
lings, Carolyn,
Thersa, Alma,
Judy Debbie,
Maretha, Curtis Robinson. Service
Monday, 1 p.m. at House of God at
1 p.m. Interment Dade Memorial
Park.

LEE ARTHUR NORRIS, 45,
Gardener.
Survivors
include mother
Lonnie; son
Antwan; sib-
lings Audrey,
Wifford, Alvin,
Clara and Rosa
Johnson and
Carolyn Norris.
Services will be
held Saturday, March 4, 11 a.m at
Wright Funeral Home.

CALVIN MAUDE WILLIAMS,
94, homemak-
er. died
February 24 at
h o m e
Survivors
include: chil-
dren, Marie
Burro ws, s
Vernell Tate,
L a rv n e
Baldwin, Daniel
Williams and Robert Williams;
brother, Calvin Banks, Jr. Servic
Saturday, 2 p.m. at Peaceful Zion
Missionary Baptist Church.
Interment Dade Memorial Park.


Poitier


HAROLD LEONARD FRANCIS,
JR., patholgy
assistance for
J ac kson
Hospital, died.


a.m. at

U n i t e d
Methodist


RICHARD LATSON, 63, foreman
construction,
died February
24 at Parkway
Regional
Medical
Hospital .
Remains will be
shipped to
Duncan
Brothers
Funeral Home
for final rites and burial.

HEBERT ROSS, 60, solid waste
for the City of Miami, died February
25 at Jackson Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

BABY GIRL YVONNE SONIA
JONES, still born, died February 19
at Jackson Hospital. Services were
held.


COREY HAMMETT,
February 20.
S e r v i c e
Wednesday at
11 a.m. at Mt.
Calvary M.B.
Church.


WADE MORROW, 75, died
February 21.
Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at St. Matthews
B. Church.






JAMARL FRANKCO WILLIAMS,
22, died February 23. Arrangements
are incomplete.

FRANKIE MAE SAPP, 83, died.
Services were held.


Ja
KEYANNA LEAKS-WALKER, 2
months, died February 21 at Baptist
Hospital. Funeral services were
held.

ERNESTINE A. KEELS WHITE,
68, Perrine, died February 22 at
Jackson South Community Hospital.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m., March 4 at
The House of God Church, Perrine.

JESSE JAMES JENKINS, 64,
Ohio, died February 21. Service
Saturday 1 p.m. at Glendale
Missionary Baptist Church.


ARGENETTE
housewife, died
February 24 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
S e r v i c e
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at St. Agnes
Catholic
Church.


DR. IRENE STIRRUP, of
16531 NW 18th Court, Opa-
locka, died Monday, February
27, in Tampa. Visitation Friday,
2-9 p.m. at the Gregg L. Mason
Funeral Home.
Services will be held Saturday,
March 4, 12:30 p.m. at the
Church of God by Faith, 16969
NW 23rd Ave., Opa-locka. Elder
William Brazel, Pastor with
Bishop Julian C. Jackson will be
officiating. Entombment will fol-
low in Dade Memorial Park
Cemetery.
Dr. Stirrup was a native of
Sycamore, Georgia and a resi-
dent of Miami, for over 60 years.
Dr. Stirrup retired after 30
years from the South Florida
State Hospital, where she was
employed as a clinical social
worker. A faithful and committed
member of the New Gamble
COGIC, where she served untir-
ingly in numerous positions. Her
greatest love was being a deliver-
er of God's word.
She was able to express this
gift and the love in her role as
State Sunday School President
of the Southern Florida
Jurisdiction. She also worked in
the Women's Department under
the leadership of Bishop Julian
C. Jackson and Mother
Altamese Lundy.
She leaves to cherish her
memory her husband of 55
years, Deacon Charles A.
Stirrup, Sr.; four children, Min.
Charles A. Stirrup, Jr. (Marsha),
Olga S. Williams (Gregory), Elder


SGT. DAHLIA NEWMAN,
died February
21. Service
JONES, 35, Saturday, 1 p.m.
-I at Trinity
Church.


MARY BELLE BENTLEY, 78,
teacher for Dade
County Schools,
died February
24 at North
Shore Medical
Center. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Cohen
Temple COGIC.


ANTHONY THOMAS BURNS,
JR., 37, cook restaurant, died
February 21 at North Shore Medical
Center. Services were held.

BAY GIRL KEVEVIA C.
GILBERT and BABY BOY
CEVETRIUS C. GILBERT, died
February 18 at Plantation General
Hospital. Services were held.


Richardson
!2, died FLORINE JENKINS, 81, died
Feb. 20, Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Christian
Fellowship M.B.
SChurch.


BESSIE
February
Serv i
Saturday,
p.m. in
chapel.


MIRTH,
25.
ce
3:30
the


68, died


ROSA LEE WELCH, 98, died
February 23. Service Wednesday,
11 a.m. in the chapel.

BABY JAILON DURANT-STU-
ART, died. Graveside Friday, 11
a.m. at Dade Memorial Park.

ly's
DEVONTE MCCLAINE, 9, died
February 27 at Miami Children's
Hospital. Service Saturday, 1
p.m. at Crusade for Christ
Church.

GEORGE DELANCY,
Homestead died February 22 at
Jackson Hospital. Service
Saturday 3 p.m. at Church of
Christ Written in Heaven, F errine.

JOHN L. HUNT, 66, Naranja,
died February 20 'uth Miami
Hospital. Services were held.


JOHN HUNT, 91, died February
21. Service
Saturday, 11.
a.m. at New
Way Fellowship
Praise and
Worship Center.





CLINTON HAYE, 86 died
February 23. Service Friday, 11 a.m.
in the chapel.



Hall Ferguson *
Hewitt

LEEROY HODGSON, 44, waiter,
died February
23 at home.
Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
in the chapel.






JOANNA SCHERRIE RUTH, 22,
died February
16. Services
were held.








SYLVIA ROUNDTREE, 54, Dade
County bus
attendant, died
February 18.
Services were
held.


Geoffrey Stirrup (Margaret), and
Oscar Lee Stirrup; eight grand-
children, Courtney Renae,
Geoffrey Jr., Samuel, Sterling,
Stephen, Krystal, Charles A., III
and Cornelius. She also leaves
seven sisters, Mary Ellen Hart,
Annie B. West, Geneva McCrae,
Johnnie Gatlin, Clara Nelson,
Barbara Weisel, and Brenda
Aikens; one brother: Rev. Oscar
West, Jr.; two brothers-in-law,
Archie Stirrup and Harold
Stirrup (Roberta); two sisters-in-
law, Gloria S. Tolliver and
Lucille Stirrup; and a host of
devoted nieces, grand nieces,
nephews, grand nephews,
cousins, special friends, and the
New Gamble Memorial COGIC
family and the College Hill
COGIC, Tampa.
Service entrusted to Gregg L.
Mason Funeral Home, 10936
NE 6th Avenue, 305-757-9000.


yal
ROBERT JOHNSON, JR., 83,
died Feb. 22.




Hermon A.M.E.
Church.




REGINALD EVE, 67, died
February 21.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Mount
Hermon A.M.E.
Church.





AMELIE EXILIEN, 74, died
February 23. Service Saturday, 10
a.m. at The Lively Stone Church of
Miami #1.


Carey Royal *
Ram'n
TERRIANCE DAVID DELIFORD,
52, died
February 21 at
J ac k s o n
Ho s p i t a I ,

Wednesday, 11
a.m. at St. Luke
Freewill Baptist
Church.


BESSIE BROOKS, 85, died Feb.
23 at Aventura
Hospital and
Medical Center.

Saturday, 12
p.m. at New
Fellowship

Center, Opa-
Iocka.

BETTY MCFADDEN, 52, died
February 23 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Remains will be
shipped to
Hemingway,
South Carolina
for final rites and
burial.


PAX-Villa


AUNES ORION, 39, died
February 10. Services were held in
Haiti.

DUCKENS ALCIME, 26, died
February 11. Services were held.

CLEZILIA JULMISTE, 31, died
February 23. Service Saturday, 10
a.m., at North Dame D'Haiti Catholic
Church.


SIMON DESTINE, 86, died
February 14. Services were held.

UTILIA PAUL, 63, died February
21. Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
North Miami Church of the
Nazarene.


RUSSIA
February 12.
Haiti.


CADET, 67, died
Services were held in


Death Notice


Public Notice
As a public service to our community, TI/ Miami Timres prints weekly obituary notices
submitted by area funeral homes at no charge. These notices include name of the
deceased, age, place of death, employment, and date, location, and time of services.
Additional information and photo may be included lor a nominal charge. The deadline
is Monday at 3:30 p.m.


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The 6th Annual Os
Thomas Memorial: Pec
Art Exhibition Call to
Once again we prep
another highly successf
bration of African World
creativity in South Fiu.lc
the 6th Annual Oscar
Memorial People's
Exhibition, which will ru
April 3 through May 21.
The entry form can be
up at the African H
Cultural Arts Center, 21E
Blvd. The deadline for
forms is March 20. For
ance purposes, the tit


& CU LTL~f
car exact dimensions, the materials
ople's and the insurance value for each
Artists piece has to be included on the
are for entry form. The deadline for the
ul cele- delivery of the works to the
artistic Center is Monday, March 27, 5
ia with p.m. Please include artist bio
Thomas and statement with entry form.
Art Collectors are encouraged to
in from show their works by the late
artist.
picked The Opening Reception will be
heritage held on Monday, April 3, from 6-
66 MLK 9 p.m. Call 305-904-7620 or
- entry 786-260-1246.
insur- Calabash Visual Arts Festival
le, the The Calabash Visual Arts


Festival is designed primarily to
showcase and support visual
artists, as well as focus on the
various modes, methods, tech-
niques and forms of visual
expressions. Several stations
within the Center will serve as
exhibit halls to focus on unique
art expressions, modes and
methodologies.
Additionally, a number of
events have been designed to
make this a fulfilling and mean-
ingful experience. These events
include lecture-demonstrations
by noted visual artists, panel
discussions that support art
professions, workshops demon-
strating various techniques, a
graffiti arts contest, a banner
and poster contest, a juried stu-
dent art exhibit, an art auction,
live entertainment and numer-
ous opportunities to see various


artists at work. A number of
activities are designed for the
youthful and emerging young
artists.
The Calabash Visual Arts
Festival will be hosted by the
African Heritage Cultural Arts
Center in partnership with the
Kuumba Arts Collective on May
19 at 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. Call
305-638-6771.
17th Annual African
American Art Festival
in Ocala
The African American ArtFest
Committee of Ocala, Florida is
once again planning for its
annual arts festival. Featured
guests will be Midnight Starl
and the Soweto Street Beat
Dance Theatre, Inc. of Atlanta.
We are blessed to say our
17th Annual African-American
Arts Festival at Gerig-Webb Park


in Ocala will be marked for a
weekend of celebration, May 5-
7. We are searching for a more
varied and diverse group of ven-
dors from across the nation.
If you have questions, please
contact 352-351-4732 or 352-
690-9992. You can email us at
vendorapp(@arts-fest.org for an
application. The deadline date is
March 31.
Ceremonies in Dark
Old Men
Through March 12:
The M Ensemble Theatre
Company presents Ceremonies
in Dark Old Men by Lonnie Elder,
at 12320 W. Dixie Highway.
Regular evening performanc-
es are 8 p.m. on Thursdays,
Fridays and Saturdays. Matinee
performances are Sundays at 3
p.m. Call 305-895-0335.
Miami International Film


Festival
March 3-12:
The Festival proudly cele-
brates the latest works from
Floridian directors and produc-
ers with films whose subjects
touch on Florida. Feature films
and documentaries are show-
cased in this special section
devoted to the Sunshine State.
Bob Marley & Friends Director:
Saul Swimmer. A celebration of
the life and art of the incompa-
rable Bob Marley, this joyous
documentary puts the reggae
master's music front and center.
It features rare concert footage
as well as outstanding perform-
ances of Marley compositions
and reggae classics from some of
today's top artists, including
Peter Tosh, Seal, Ziggy Marley &
The Melody Makers, Wyclef Jean
Please turn to CULTURE 3C


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Ad Th-,MAami Time March 1-7206BakMutCnrlTer - OnDetn


The Hampton House
Foundation, Inc. held its instal-
lation ceremony and fund rais-
ing, last week, with an elegant
breakfast for officers and mem-
bers for the year of 2006 -
2007.
Gwendolyn Welters had the
distinct honor of swearing in
Commissioner Dorothy
'Dottie' Johnson as
chairman of the board;
Dr. Enid Pinkney,
founder; and other
board and advisory
members like Melinda
Cleary, Kathy Hearst,
Eugenia Thomas,
Ruby Rayford,
Reverend Larrie
Lovett, Marva PIN1
Lightbourne, Dr. Larry
Capp, Dr. Edwin T. Demeritte,
Dalton W. Nickerson, Jr. and
Peggy Lambert.
Also, Martha Anderson,
Helen Barbary Williams,
Thirlee Smith, Martha Day
and Dr. Richard J. Strachan.
Following the ceremony, The
Singing Angels of Arcola Lakes
Park presented a Black History
Program, From Africa To
America Through Music. The
script included history of
famous Blacks, spirituals,
gospel, jazz, dance and rap,
which delighted the audience.
Georgia Ayers continued
with a timely poem, followed by
her granddaughter, who pre-
sented a liturgical dance and
received a standing ovation.
Hearst talked about Pinkney
and Capp being on CNN to talk
about the progress of the
Hampton House and Johnson
interjected her TV Program on
Comcast will profile the same


two people.
Then, it was time for the serv-
ing of breakfast that included
sausage, eggs, smothered
chicken wings, potatoes, grits,
biscuits, orange juice and cof-
fee. It was so much food, the
caterer persuaded the guests to
come back for seconds.
Pinkney took to the mic and
thanked everyone for
supporting the fund-
raising event. Then she
requested that The
Singing Angels send
everyone home happy.
They sang their favorite,
Enjoy Jesus.
Some of the other
guests in attendance
VEY included Larry Adams;
Sumner Hutcheson;
Rudolph and Beatrice
Hudnell; Ruby Rankin; Dr.
Brad Brown, former NAACP
president; Anna M. McPhee
and Gloria Green.
******
Kudos go out to Inoki Bent,
a medical student attending
Nova Southeastern University
for orchestrating the 2nd
Annual Charter Day Program
under the Sigma Alpha Chapter
and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,
Inc. The keynote speaker for
the event was Dr. Astrid Mack,
director of the Sickle Cell
Foundation. The program also
included Isaiah Dawson,
renowned local musician who
will represent the chapter in
Macon, GA. in a few weeks.
The Omega Activity Center
was filled with brothers who
were given much knowledge
regarding the honor of being an
Omega man. Dr. Mack focused


on "The Commitment of Omega
Men and The Way of Life, Living
Out the Four Cardinal
Principles: Uplift, Scholarship,
Perseverance and Manhood."
When he concluded, the fol-
lowing brothers gave him a
standing ovation: Arthur
'Jake' Simms, Dr. Ed
Braynon, Baljean Smith,
Henry Mingo, Cornelius
Handfield, Frankie
McFadden, Leslie Gamble,
Fred Cromity, Harold
Mitchell, Audley Coakley, Dr.
Thomas Snowden,
Norman Cox and
Michael Collins.
Dr. Mack thanked the
brothers and encour-
aged them to support
his Sickle Cell Walk-a-
thon on February 25.
******
Mary Simmons, pres- J. GR
ident, Arcola Lakes
Park Senior Group, and her
committee entertained the sen-
ior group with an annual
Valentine's Day Party, last
week, at the park with more
than 150 persons in atten-
dance.
Activities included door
prizes, music, dancing and' the
selection of Mr. and Ms.
Valentine. Chester Coachman
was selected Mr. Valentine and
Vernel Williams was selected
Ms. Valentine. After being
crowned, they promenaded
around the floor while the audi-
ence applauded and smiled.
They all had fun.
In addition, Simmons gave
each member a valentine's
pouch as a gift from the organ-
ization; served them fruits and
pastries; and surprised them
with an outing sponsored by
Humana, where Francilla and
Kenneth Smith and staff
awaited to entertain them.
Entertainment included a
dance contest, won by Jesse
and Irene Hayes, Eve Burnett
and Virginia Smiley. They
were given a 3-day, 2-night trip
to Disney World. Some of the
senior group members were


IL
?IA


Melvina Miller, June Savage,
Roberta Chapman. Roberta
Smith, Lillian Oprhee,
Mariland Ranoffe, Johnny
and Patsy Cooper, Bennie
Rolle, Harry Brantley, Janio
Johnson, Mae Gordan,
Catharine Armstead, Dorothy
Huggins, Grace Pierson, and
45 Singing Angels.


Speaking of St. Valentine's
Day, the retired brothers of
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.,
entertained their wives,
sweethearts and signifi-
cant others, last week,
at their annual St.
Valentine's Celebration.
Baljean Smith, presi-
dent, and James
Lamar were congratu-
lated for another suc-
cessful event. Stacy
FFIN Jones emceed and Ted
Blue provided jazz
music. 250 people gathered in
an atmosphere decorated with
red and white balloons and
table cloths. They were all
recipients of Valentine's gifts.
Some of the brothers were
Bennie Moore; Arthur Simms;
Henry Mingo; Earl Daniels;
A.G. Williams and daughter,
Toni; Dr. Ed Braynon; Oscar
Jesse; Anthony and Carolyn
Simons and mother, Bonnie N.
Stirrup; Baljean with 30-
guests; Stan Allen with 25-
guests; and Dr. David White,
bringing up the rear, with 20-
guests.
******
John Kelly, a new member
of the King of Clubs of Greater
Miami and a former football
player from FSU, and his wife,
Ernestine, entertained mem-
bers of the corporation, last
week, in their palatial.home in
a post-valentine celebration
and soiree for new members.
Dr. Astrid Mack, president,
arrived and took over the bar
from James Fayson, chairper-
son of the event, while Fayson
assisted Kelly in preparing the
fried fish and other planned


goodies.
After moments of sipping
and chatting, the ladies
excused themselves to be given
a tour of the Kelly's estate,
especially the mammoth-sized
bedroom. They came down-
stairs with many 'oohs' and
'aahs.' Arthur Simms summed
it up by remarking, "Man, this
recreation room is bigger than
my entire house."
Some of the
prospective members
in attendance included
Shirley Shantee and
wife; John Williams;
R. T. Fisher; and
Cordell Hayes.
Members of the corpo-
ration and their wives
who attended were W. Bi
Clinton and Ernestine
Brown; James and
Margie Fayson; Nelson and
Fifia Jenkins; James and Alva
Maull; Dr. Brad and Mable
Brown; Arthur and Ruth
Simms; Dr. Arthur and Mary
Woodard; Larry and Carolyn
Adams; and Ja'Shon Fayson.
Mack announced meetings will
go back to the 2nd Tuesdays.
******
Jesselyn Brown sur-
prised her husband,
Wesley, with a birthday
party at the 163rd
Intercostal Outback
Steak house.
Celebrating with them
were Georgia and
Archie Ayers; Dr. A. R<
Walter and Edith Oden;
John Shaw; Florene Hinton;
Dr. Tanya Brown-Major,
daughter; and Marcia Brown,
daughter, supervisor of trans-
portation.
Recently, James and Tina
Griffin surprised their son,
Justin, 4, with a birthday
party that boasted games and
a bounce house. Guests
include Tanisha While,
Jasmine, Ann Mezadreu,
Daniel Kelly, Michael
Melandrea, Tiana, Keayon
Meradrer, Akeal Meradreu,
Jonathan, Sandia Mezadreu,


0


*


Carolyn King, Tonya, St.
Juste Tiara, Shona and
Evelyn Meradreu.
******
A special salute goes out to
Alvin W. Roberts who has
been a driving force represent-
ing and advocating for veter-
ans for 30-years. He has
received the Presidential Unit
Citation and led the
Eleventh Judicial
Circuit Veterans
Committee. He is
impacting JROTC at
Northwestern; serving
as board president for
Independent Living of
South Florida; and
moving the center from
oWN a one-room office to a
$2 million facility with
a $50,000 to $2 million
annual budget.
Roberts has been cited by 25
major organizations and
involves himself with 10 local
organizations including the
5000 Role Models of Excellence
and Ebenezer UMC, where he
sings in the choir and serves
with Reverend Dr. Joretha M.
Capers, pastor, in
many special activi-
ties.
Recently, Roberts
was elected vice presi-
dent of the Black
Democratic Caucus
and credits his suc-
cess to his philoso-
phies: "There is
OBERTS always knowledge to
be gained and
Teamwork is the catalyst that
yields excellence from shared
strength." Whenever something
big is going on, you will see
Roberts pitching in to help.
Congrats!
******
Annette Brantley, president,
Sigma Gamma Rho; W. Doris
Neal, director, 2006 Buds of
Springs; and Claudia Slater,
choreographer, have announced
rehearsals, beginning today
(Wednesday) in Northwestern's
gymnasium from 5 6:30 p.m.


p.w


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o-we -aas


5 -
Happy wedding anniversary
greetings to:
William and Jessie C..Pinder,
Jr., Feb. 20th: Their 56th
Daryl and Sharon D. Smith,
Feb. 24th: Their 8th
Tuskegee 'Tigers' were sad-
dened to learn of the demise of
their Vice President, Dr. William
L. Lester. Lester died Feb. 7 and
was funeralized Feb. 12 in the
chapel on Tuskegee University's
Campus.


Get well wishes to all of you,
from all of us! Mary Albury
Ferrell, Alice Dean Harrison,
Kimberly Lynch, Oscar Morley,
Arthur Cole, Eugene Cole,
LaClyde Clark, George McPhee,
Inez Mckinney Johnson, Mae
Cleare, Emily Carey Pittman,
Evangeline Gibson, Norman
Carey, Josephine Davis-Rolle,
Richard Works, Lloyd 'Tank'
Johnson, Samuel 'Bow Ties'
Ferguson, Gail Goring, Mertis


Seymour, Herbert Rhodes, Jr.,
Yvonne Scarlett-Golden (The
Mayor of Daytona Beach), Ana
Johnson-Dyes, Pearline Nairn
and Janice Sanders.
On February 10 at the V.F.W.
post # 8193 in Opa-Locka last
week, Billy Maddox post com-
mander; Esme Bain Chaplain;
and James Smith, the honoree
attended a birthday party that
will be long remembered. Among
those joining in the festive cele-
bration were Robert Boyd,
Helen Seymour, The David
Taylors, Kim Bain, Henry
Green, Mario Hernandez,
Yolanda Green, George and
Frances Walker, Frank Clarke,
Harold Lawton, Philip Walker,
Lucretia Cooper, Vernon
Nelson, Clarence and Carol


DeCruise, Karima Gough,
Kathy and Manny Keltz,
Crystal Maddex and many,
many more friends.
Erna Ali-Banks (remember her
old Miamians?) lives in Newark,
New Jersey now and sends a Big
Hello to her friends and family.
She is looking forward to seeing
us soon.
Congratulations to Miami-
Dade College The college has
increased the number of Blacks
employed by adding three new
faculty members. They are
Kweku K. Bentil, the new presi-
dent of the Medical Center;
Jeanne F. Jacobs has taken over
the Homestead Campus; and
Meredith Ellen Gibbs was
named provost for operations.
Gibbs will be responsible for the


IaNh'rn -.' hic' t( | I% t harlt CULTURE
continued from 1C


in... rrr L


and Lauryn Hill in celebration
and in memory 25 years
already! Premiering at the
Colony Theater, 1040 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach on
Thursday, March 9, at 9 p.m.
Purvis of Ovuertotwn Directors:
Shaun Conrad, David
Raccuglia. Purvis Youngs col-
orful, visionary paintings
record the life and embody the
spirit of Overtown. After 30
years spent toiling away in the
same dilapidated warehouse,
the art world finally took notice.
This perceptive documentary
illuminates the life and work of
this uncompromising Black


day-to-day operations of the col-
lege, including all facilities and
fiscal operations, human
resources, master development
issues and expansion and capital
projects.
In Miami for the funeral of
Bessie Brennan-Forbes were
the Wagner and Williams family
of North Carolina; Ellen Powell
and Betty Wicks; Robert
Brennan, nephew from New
York; Dian Woodside and chil-
dren; Joseph Grace and his sis-
ter Reeta; Alvin, Barbara; Lisa
and Marian Brennan, New York;
Maria Davis West Covina,
California; Gary Ward from
Zephyhill, Fla. and Eric Ward of
Nassua.
On February 15 at the Historic
Lyric Theatre, the Honorable


pioneer through extensive
interviews with the artist, his
friends and colleagues. It pre-
mieres at the Colony Theater,
1040 Lincoln Road, Miami
Beach on Saturday, March 4, at
4 p.m. Call 305-237-FILM
(3456) for more information.
EXHIBITIONS
Miami-Dade Public Library
presents
Byiau!jagyaK(iaciaka through
March 30 at North Dade
Regional, 2455 N.W. 183 St.
BROWARD
African American Research
Library & Cultural Center
2650 Sistrunk Blvd., Broward
Kheprera (Afrikan History)
Study Group, serving the com-
munity since 1985 meets at. the
Research Library every 2nd


Manuel A. Diaz, Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones and the
public, paid tribute to the follow-
ing community icons in celebra-
tion of Black History Month:
Dr. Carl E. Yaeger, Jr.,
Medicine; Nat Moore, Sports;
Dinizulu Gene Tinnie, Art; Judge
John Johnson, Law; Thelma
Anderson Gibson, Politics; Dr.
Robert Ingram, Education;
Edwin L. O'Dell, Journalism;
Lavarice Gaudin, George F.
Knox, Philanthropy; Otis Pitts,
Jr., Business; Inner Circle
Music and Reverend Jean Fritz
Bazin, Religion. Congratulations
to all of you from all of our com-
munity!
The happiest people are those
who do the mostfor others.
Booker T. Washington


and 4th Saturday from 2-5 p.m.
The Greater Caribbean
American Chamber of
Commerce, Inc. Banquet
Friday, March 3:
The Greater Caribbean
American Chamber of
Commerce invites you to our
Annual Banquet and
Installation of Officers from 8 -
11 p.m. at the Diamante
Banquet Center, 6501 W.
Commercial Blvd. in Tamarac.
It features guest speaker Mrs.
Beverly Anderson-Manley,
Jamaica's former First Lady,
business consultant, and radio
personality. Admission
charged. Dress: Formal
Business. Music by Trilogy
Productions R.S.V.P. 954-730-
8885


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I


The large debt that high school seniors pay


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

"Ok seniors listen up as I
pass around a list of payments
for your upcoming events." As
you scan the list you notice
that cap and gown pictures
range from $30 to $60, year-
books are $65 to $75, senior
portraits packets range from
$40 to $100, prom is $80, grad
nitc is $130, grad weekend is
$290 and on top of that ring,
Jacket and graduation pack-
ages payments is also on the
list. Is it me or does it seem
every year the senior expenses
skyrocket and in return leaves
us in debt. Why have the cost of
the simple things we want aver-
age out our whole allowance.
Yet we teenagers still pay the
abundant amount that is asked
and will most likely escalate the
following year. Of course we pay
because we want everything
that verify we are seniors and
will graduate in 20?? So how
are we supposed to pay for
these various activities and
memorandums? If our mini-
mum wage after school job
barely reaches half the amount


Mikaela McIntosh works extra hours after school so she
can afford her senior activities.


and our parents start limiting
how much their willing to pay
for the expenses.
It's a well-known fact that if
your graduating class is one
half of what last year class was
then your class will have to pay
more. Schools need more
money to compensate for the


since class size is smaller. But
is it really fair when you add up
all your expenses and compare
them to a friend whose gradu-
ated the year before and paid
less money than you.
However most teens aren't
outraged by the costs of the
upcoming events. They knew


that the prices wouldn't be
cheap and some were fully pre-
pared for it. Mikaela McIntosh
said "I've been working extra
hard at my after school job so I
wouldn't have to miss any-
thing." She plans to attend all
the senior activities with her
best friends. Even though it
would probably be cheaper to
attend an outing on the week-
ends outside of school with her
friends. She says "I can do that
anytime, but I'd rather go with
my whole senior class."
SYet their still are some stu-
dents who don't want to miss
out on the fun, but simply can-
not afford it. Shaka Lee said
"My $6 a hour part-time job
won't nearly help me get half
the amount of money the
school is asking for." Students
who aren't as fortunate to have
the expected amount will feel a
little disappointed. Schools
need to realize that not every
student is rolling around in
money. It's time for an a drastic
price change. Maybe by organ-
izing more school fundraisers
or even reducing a fraction of
the price will be a compromis-
ing agreement.


What students can do to limit their debt loads


By Sandra Block

With college costs continuing
to rise,' many students can't
avoid loans. But there are
steps you can take to reduce
the size of your debts. Among
them:
If you've already graduated,
consolidate your loans before
July 1. If you're already paying
off your loans, you can lock in
a 5.375% rate for the life of the
loan. Graduates who consoli-
date during their grace period
- the six months before you
have to start making monthly
payments can lock in a rate
as low as 4.75%.
The 6.8% fixed rate that


takes effect July 1 applies to
new loans. Loans taken out
before then will still have a
variable rate that's adjusted
every July 1. That variable rate
is expected to top 6% on July
1. Consolidating your loans
will let you avoid that increase.
If you're still ill school and
have loans outstanding, talk to
your lender about "in-school"
consolidation. That would let
you lock in a rate on money
you've already borrowed. You
must consolidate before July 1,
though. The new law will bar
in-school consolidation after
""that date;'
When borrowing for college,
opt for government-guaranteed


student loans before you turn
to private loans. Because pri-
vate loans aren't guaranteed by
the government, interest rates
and fees are usually higher
than for federal Stafford loans.
The maximum that dependent
undergraduates can borrow
under the federal program is
$23,000. So some students
with high college costs have to
use private loans. But others
are taking out private loans
before they've taken full advan-
tage of the federal program. A
2003 study by the Public
Interest Research Group of
students with private loans
found that nearly 24% didn't
take but any Stafford loans.


and 26% borrowed less than
the maximum allowed.
Don't compound your prob-
lems by running up credit card
debt. The average undergradu-
ate has a credit card balance of
$2,169, according to a 2004
survey by student lender Nellie
Mae. Only 21% of students
paid off their balances each
month.
Many students use credit
cards to pay for books, sup-
plies and class fees. But keep
in mind: The average interest
rate for a standard, variable-
rate card is 13.7%, according
to Bankrate.com. And overdue
payments can cause those
rates to soar.


Low GPA + missing credits = no graduation


By Jasmine Williams
Miami Times Intern

It's your senior year and you
know what that means, gradu-
ating from high school. But
what if you find out that your
1.9 GPA is way below average
or your counselor says you
still need a fine arts credit?
These factors may keep you
from receiving your long await-
ed diploma. What happens
when your missing credits and
low GPA become the road
block in to your plans after
college? Each year the gradu-
ating rate decreases due to
drop-outs and students not
meeting graduation require-
ments.
Students are so focused on
friends and upcoming school
activities that they rarely focus
on their grades. Your grade
point average is the most
important number in your four
years of high school. It's what
colleges look at when review-
ing your applications. It's what
helps determine whether you


adequately developed in school
and are ready for the next
steps of your education.
However, teens never really
focus on their GPA until the
middle of their senior year and
by then it's too late.
Today's high schools require


Another known factor that
can squash your chances of
graduating is missing credits.
Most high schools require that
you have 18-24 credits to
receive a diploma. Many stu-
dents are so focused on taking
extra classes, they may not


three science, three social sci-
ence, two foreign language,
one fine art and one personal
fitness class are required to
graduate from high school.
Unfortunately, some stu-
dents aren't able to keep piling
on night school classes
because you can only get four
night school credits per school
year. Since you probably used
all four credits by taking
unnecessary classes you may
be in a pickle.
Studies prove that students
who take the first three years
of high school for granted will
end up scrambling to make up
for their mistakes in their sen-
ior year. Students have to real-
ize that completing high school
is vital for them to succeed in
the world.
So what do you do? Freaking
out is not the best answer.
Realize that now is the time to
make a change. Students who
fail to meet the GPA and cred-
it requirements will find them-
selves kissing their high school
diplomas good-bye.


a student to have a GPA rang-
ing between 2.0-2.5 to receive
a diploma. Many students fig-
ure they will pile on extra
classes in their senior year to
help raise their GPA, but this
rarely happens. Due to the
classes they are already tak-
ing, extracurricular activities
and their busy schedule, they
find themselves already
swamped with too much stuff
to do.


realize that they're not taking
the right classes.
Jason Jeanty, a graduate of
North Miami Beach Senior
High School, said "I used to
brag about my 3.1 GPA from
taking extra night school
classes, until I realized I was
missing a half of my fine art
credit." He says this could
have kept him from graduating
from high school.
Four math, four english,


I't.Ill tm, J rrcc in 1t4 ll 4,% %up rl rtr %ill otruh


"Copyrighted Material


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


Online book videos


bring words to life


So have you seen any good books lately?
When IarperCollins' Amistad imprint wanted a fresh, new
way to promote Lolita Files' fifth novel, Sex.Lies.Murder.Fame,
it jumped on the hottest promotional bandwagon in publish-
ing and created its first online book video.
"Consumers are online," says Amistad's Gilda Squires, "so
that's where we want to reach them."
Files' novel is a satirical look at the lit-
erary and music worlds and the lengths to
which people will go for fame and fortune.
Because of the novel's music industry
Influences, HarperCollins produced a
music video that features rising pop
; singer Silena Murrell's debut single I Like
:' My Man Hard. (See it at.video.google.com
by typing sex.lies.murder.fame in the
search field.)
Advertising on the Web and through
DAVIS cellphones and other handheld media
players is nothing new. Music videos and
movie trailers are wildly popular downloads. And though it
might seem ironic to reach readers through pictures instead
of words, publishing industry observers say it makes sense.
"Why not use the tools and technology that all other enter-
tainment media use to promote their wares?" says Jerome
Kramer of The Book Standard, an online publication that cov-
ers publishing.
The Book Standard and Bantam Dell, a division of Random
House, are sponsoring a competition for student filmmakers
to create 30-second videos for three upcoming novels: The
Thieves of Heaven by Richard Doetsch, Stuart: A Life
Backwards by Alexander Masters and Shadow Man by Cody
McFadyen. And in November, The Book Standard will launch
a book video channel on the Web.
Producing book videos is a fledgling business, and they are
created in various ways. HarperCollins used actors, but
vidlit.com creates high-tech slide shows. Vidlit videos are nar-
rated by the authors but lean toward photos and illustrations.
M.J. Rose, Bill MVaher, Julie Powell and Meg Cabot have videos
on vidlit.com.


Are you sinking deeper into an ocean
full of turmoil? Are you swimming
toward an unknown
location? Are you fishing
for answers with
unknown solutions? Are
you floating towards'
oblivion? Well I'm here
to keep you afloat. With my honest and
trustworthy advice you'll be able to get
a grasp on any troubling situation sail-
ing towards you. So e-mail me at
jazz4advice@yahoo.com with any
unanswered questions, pressing con-
cerns and important information you
wish to share with me.

Jazz,
My mom has been pressuring me to
follow in her footsteps and become a


doctor like her. But I always dreamed of
being a singer like my father was before
he passed away. How can I get her to
see that my singing voice is all I have
left of him?
Lonely Singer

Lonely Singer,
Sometimes when we lose a loved
one, we find ourselves trying to fill
their shoes. We lose focus on what we
want trying to keep their memory
alive. Your father probably was a
great singer. But you need to ask your-
self did your sudden interest in singing
come before or after his death. If your
answer is after then maybe you are
not ready to move on. Try pulling.your
mom aside and letting her know how
you're feeling. She may not under-
stand your reason for wanting to be a
singer.


Stars of Tomorrow

Everyday we read in newspapers and magazines or hear on
television and radio stories about Beyonce's relationship with
Jay-Z; Bow Wow's secret relationship with Clara; Jessica
Simpson's divorce from Nick Lachey and many more false
accusations about well-known celebrities. They live, sleep, eat
and breathe this hectic lifestyle, but almost all of them would
probably say that this is the life they were given and wouldn't
trade it for anything else.
They love the excitement that comes from hearing scream-
ing fans; the thrill of running and hiding from crazy paparazzi
and the joy of signing millions of autographs for supporting
fans. This outrageous life is not dealt out to many and some
may say that it's dealt out unfairly. What makes celebrities a
bigger person than a person that is not famous?
What about the shining stars we have sitting right rext to
us on the bus, standing behind us in the grocery lines or even
working alongside us. We never notice how talented they are
because they are so unknown to us. How is it that they have
an amazing gift but no one else in the world knows about it?
What can they do to become known in this fame driven soci-'
ety?
If you are an amazing teen and you want the world to know
it. Please send a letter describing what makes you so amazing
and include your name and phone number so we can contact
you and put your profile on the Teen Scene Page. All letters
should be addressed to:

Jasmine Williams
Teen Scene Editor
900 N.W. 54th Street
Miami, Florida 33127


il/at do uooa tunh.


Do you ever wonder if your voice is being heard or are tired of being looked over
because you're still a child? Do you ever feel that adults don't have all the answers. Well
it's time to let your opinon be known. Just email me what you think about this subject at
jazz4advice@yahoo.com.

Wh~t do yo think abot Congress


Today's high schools require a student to have a GPA
ranging between 2.0-2.5 to receive a diploma. Many stu-
dents figure they will pile on extra classes in their senior
year to help raise their GPA, but this rarely happens.


Name this famous Black historical teen

,_ Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner, field workers for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), were killed
on June 21, 1964 in a political assassination while campaigning for equal voting rights for Blacks in Philadelphia, Mississippi. After
being warned to get out of town, the local police officers, townspeople and Ku Klux Klan hunted down and murdered them. They were
missing for forty-four clays and were finally found dead in their charred car at Choctaw Indian Reservation. To acd to the cruelty they
suffered, only a small portion of the eighteen men who were involved were tried and the others were set free. Like the killing of
EmmittTill, this was another racist killing executed by whites to keep Blacks inferior to their race. Even though these men lived short
lives, they stood up for what they believed in and now Blacks can vote freely.

Last week's answer: Emmitt Till


NIVI


4C The Miami Times Ma 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destinu


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SU.


What will the demise o UPN, WB mean to TV





S. __ YOU'RE INVITED TO THE PARTY OF THE DECADE!
* * -
mmo4at a mm aftmw Wt-LKS FRo 0 o
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.. ^.. ...... ^-^


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MAIN OFFICE............................305-694-621o
EDITORIAL.................................305-694-6216
ADVERTISING................................ 305-693-7093
CIRCULATION......................... 305-694-6214


The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 5C


lB k M t C t l Th i O D tin







.. .The.M..mi.Time.. Marc 1-7. 2 6 B s .


SPUDS
fr h ptt Asnt r IMwl


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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B i
business
SP 0NSO
T HE B E A C
Miami-Dode County's Official


Full Name of Business
Focus Learning Academy
1455 NE 162nd Street
305-944-3206

Year Established
1995

Owners
Ruth Smith, M.S.

Number of full-time
/part-time employees
10 part-time

Products/Services
My product is my service.
My business is in the
service industry and my
product is providing tuto-
rial services to needy stu-
dents grades K-12.. We
assist college students as
well. We offer G.E.D. and
ESOL programs. We work
with numerous high
school students in prepa-
ration for the FCAT, SAT
and the ACT for college
admissions.

Future Goals
I would like to be the
Oprah Winfrey of tutorial
services. After retiring
from Miami-Dade public
schools I plan to open a
state-of-the-art private
school. I would like to
help prepare students for
college, vocational train-
ing and other post high
school endeavors that
will afford young people
to live long productive
lives with promising
careers and futures.

Why did you start this
business and how has it
grown?
I started this business to
provide extra help to the
children that are not
making good grades in
the classroom. There is a
great need for my service.
I began my business in
my immediate neighbor-
hood. I started helping
,those that needed extra
help. They then started
bringing their sisters,
brothers, friends and
cousins. I have grown
tremendously over the
last ten years. I turned
my volunteering into a
business and the rest is
history.

What were some of the
obstacles you faced and
how did you overcome
them?
There weren't many
obstacles. I'm good at
what I do and word of
mouth was the way I


RED BY
ON COUNCIL
Economic Development Partnership


Ruth Smith, M.S.


began my business. I'm
providing a service that
so many students need.
Many people realize that
their best investments
are their children.

Who does your business
best serve and why?
I try to reach children in
need of my services. My
business best serves stu-
dents from all walks of
life. Many parents are
just now recognizing the
importance of tutoring
and the positive impact it
has on children and
teachers. Parents must
continue to realize the
significance of private
tutoring and the many
advantages.

How have your experi-
ences helped meet the
needs of your clients?
My past experiences have
helped me because I
know my business. I'm
very effective as a class-
room teacher. My busi-
ness was started because
I am knowledgeable at
helping students with
their academic needs. I
am a 24 year veteran
teacher. I am a high
school teacher, a former
middle school teacher
and I have spent count-
less hours of training in
elementary classrooms
throughout Miami-Dade
County. I am an experi-
enced teacher; I know
how to reach all types of
children.

Where did you get the
name of your business
and does it have any
significant meaning?
The name of my busi-
ness comes from chil-
dren needing to focus
more. The nature of the
business is to get stu-
dents to FOCUS more
and become active par-
ticipants in their learn-
ing.


MEET THE BAC FUNDING CORPORATION


BAC Funding Corporation
and its affiliated entities
(collectively the "BAC") fos-
ter the growth of existing
Black owned enterprises
and is dedicated to creating
sustainable value in Black
communities in South
Florida.
BAC's action plan is to
help Black entrepreneurs

Ee


RONALD FRAZIER
CHAIRMAN


capture a critical mass of
the economic fortunes gen-
erated by the growth sec-
tors of South Florida's econ-
omy.
Formed in 1982 as a
501(c)(3) Florida nonprofit
community development
corporation, BAC is the col-
laborative effort of over
1,000 corporate and private
community leaders, organi-
zations and businesses.
These entities provided an
initial investment of over
$6.9 million dollars to pro-
vide a beacon of light to the
Black community after the
devastation of the 1980
Liberty City Riots.

BAC HISTORY
Recognizing that South
Florida's Black business
class required a financial
institution that would sup-
port its cash flow needs, the
BAC stepped in and for over
24 years has provided more
than $40 million dollars in
business loans and equity
investments.
The board of directors,
loan committee members
and staff enjoy experience
in banking, finance, busi-
ness, community and eco-
nomic development. Board
and loan committee mem-
bers' professional experi-


& M University's School of
Business and Industry.
Miller's industrious spirit is
revealed through his experi-
ence in real estate and loan
portfolio management.
Miller's professional back-
ground includes being an
account officer, credit ana-
lyst and credit manager of a
$133 million corporate- and
consumer-leasing portfolio
at the Southeast Bank leas-
ing company in Miami.
These various positions
empowered him with a
macro perspective of man-
aging a small financial
institution and helped pre-
pare him for his role as
chief operating officer at
BAC.
Jessie Houston,
Controller, has been with
BAC since 1998. Houston
holds a BS in Accounting


BAC current housing project

reports. Drayton is instru- financial needs grow; this
mental in performing topic creates cash flow con-
research and assisting with straints on both themselves
the maintenance of BAC's and BAC, as BAC's
office complex as well as resources are also
BAC's portfolio and invest- inevitably limited.
ments. Unfortunately, due to the
Courtney Cooper, admin- economic environment
istrative assistant, has been becoming increasingly con-


from Florida Memorial
University. Since joining
BAC, Houston has been
responsible for overseeing
the conipany's accounting
and fiscal functions and


with BAC since 2001.
Cooper's responsibilities
include accounts payable
management, assistance
with BAC's leasing opera-
tions and loan activities as


servative, organizations
such as BAC have been
hard pressed to receive new
donations and funding
from large financial institu-
tions and other historically


LENDING CRITERIA HIGHLIGHTS ,'
Minimum Loan: $15,000.00 In 24 years, BAC has disbursed over $40 million in loans or
Maximum Loan: $200,000.00 equity funds to enterprises located in South Florida.
Disbursed approximately $1.6 million in 2005, funding over
Revolving Credit Line: One Year (renewable)
50 businesses, ten of which are owned by women.

Interest Rate: Varies

Collateral Ruirment: Varies (some rm of tangible Created sustainable value and wealth by developing and
collateral is required) managing the $33.5 million MLK Development Center.
Financial Performance: A minimum of two years of opera- Annual management, operation and restaurant revenues
tons. represent additional income streams for minority busi-

A persona guaranty is required for all major principals. nesses of approx. $2 million per year for 30 years.


BAC BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ronald E. Frazier, Chairman Ronald E. Frazier & Associates; Jason
Murray, Carlton Fields, P.A.; Roderick Harvey, Treasurer, Harvey, Branker
& Associates; Clara Diaz-Leal, Wachovia, N.A.; Otto Latimer, Secretary,
Latimer Insurance; Karin Vickers, Moore, Stephens, Lovelace, P.A.; Basil
Bernard, Apricot Office Supplies & Furniture; Barbara Romani, Citibank,
F.S.B.; Bennett Berhane, Miami-Dade Chamber of Commerce; Danny
Martin, Banco Popular; Sonya Milord, Tajiri Ventures, Inc.; Hilda Leigh
Toney, Miami-Dade College, Entrepreneur Education Center; Leonard
Garrett, real estate and investment banker.


ence includes construction,
urban planning, insurance,
accounting, law, public
service as well as other pri-
vate businesses.

LOAN COMMITTEE
The loan committee, com-
posed of commercial
bankers, certified public
accountants, attorneys and
business professionals,
implement the loan policy
to ensure fair and sound
lending practices.
BAC is staffed with five
employees with designated
functions to provide maxi-
mum productivity by utiliz-
ing the company's estab-
lished procedures, systems
and infrastructure.

BAC STAFF
Edwin Miller, President,
has been associated with
the organization since
1993, becoming President
and Chief Operating Officer
in 1997. Miller has a BS in
Accounting from Florida A


also manages the leasing
and maintenance of BAC's
office complex.
Brian Culmer, Chief
Credit Officer, has been
with BAC since March -of
2002. Culmer holds a BS
and MBA in Finance from
Florida International
University. Culmer's profes-
sional background is in
commercial banking, work-
ing as a credit analyst and
credit administration officer
for Ocean Bank of Miami,
for four years prior to join-
ing BAC. Culmer is respon-
sible for screening, struc-
turing and analyzing loan
applications for presenta-
tion to the Loan Committee
and with the assistance of
other members of the staff,
manages BAC's loan portfo-
lio and investments.
Kuatura Drayton, office
manager, has been with
BAC since 1999 and is
responsible for preparing
and maintaining business
documentation and periodic


well as facilitating guests
and telephone calls in addi-
tion to general office admin-
istration.

BAC TODAY
Presently, BAC is focused
on real estate development,
franchisee investments,
leasing affordable office


philanthropic entities. As
such, BAC now has a high-
er cost of capital and in
turn must be more conser-
vative with its lending prac-
tices and investment deci-
sions.
Unlike many financial
institutions, BAC's objec-
tive is to graduate its better


BAC home on 6600 Northwest 27th Avenue.


space and providing short-
term bridge and/or time
gap loans to existing busi-
nesses to facilitate their
cash flow needs. This is
accomplished primarily
through contract and/or
receivable financing as well
as guidance lines of credit
for real estate acquisition
and development projects.
As BAC's more successful
borrowers grow, their


customers to more conven-
tional forms of financing,
e.g. commercial banks.
Hence, the need to continu-
ally identify under-served
creditworthy borrowers in
the Black community and
have funds available to
support them is the direc-
tive that BAC's board of
directors, loan committee
and staff has accepted with
great enthusiasm.


Edwin Miller, President and COO and Brian Culmer, CCO meet with staff on upcoming project.


i


-----


I







Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


umun


"Copyrighted Material


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able from Commercial NewsProviders


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Partnerships for a

NEWMIAMI

JOB DESCRIPTION Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
Model City Community Revitalization District Trust
Position Synopsis: Provide keen vision, reliable guidance, passionate advocacy, and skilled-expertise as it relates to the respon-
sible planning, development and implementation of the strategic goals and initiatives of the Model City Community Revitalization
District Trust as established by the Board of Directors (BOD).
Entity Profile: The City of Miami is the largest municipality in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Model City Community
Revitalization District Trust (Trust) is one of seven areas designated by the City of Miami, as a Community Revitalization District
(CRD), as delineated in the City of Miami's Five Year Consolidated Plan. Each CRD has an average income level below fifty-per-
cent (50%) of the median income in Miami-Dade County, Florida and a homeownership rate under twenty-percent (20%).

Desired Minimum Qualifications
Educational Requirements: Four year degree in a relevant field with major course work in public or business administration, city,
urban or regional planning, law or a closely related field, such as bank construction or development financing. Equivalent combi-
nation of training and experience may substitute.
Experience Requirements: At least six (6) years of progressively responsible management and administrative experience in plan-
ning and development.
Expertise/Knowledae Requirements: Knowledge of theory, principles, practices and techniques of community development,
planning, and economic development. Familiar with applicable Community Reinvestment Act Bank programs, federal, state and
local laws, codes and regulations governing the administration of community development. Knowledge of government accounting,
budgeting, and purchasing. Knowledgeable of Florida's public records laws and government in the "Sunshine," requirements. Fully
appreciate and understand the organization and function of all levels of government, i. e., City of Miami Commission, Board of
Commissioners for Miami-Dade County, Florida, and state/ federal legislative delegations.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:
The duties listed below are intended only as examples of the various responsibilities that may be required in order to fulfill the mis-
sion and goals of the Model City Community Revitalization District Trust:
Develop, implement, coordinate and monitor both the short and long-term plans, goals and objectives of the Trust;
Provide direction, resources and. technical guidance for the timely and useful re-development of Trust owned and related proper-
ties;

Plan, develop, direct and implement written policies and procedures to ensure complete compliance with federal, state, and local
laws and regulations;
Prepare, analyze and monitor all fiscal and budgetary activities of the Trust operations, including general revenues, special assess-
ments, and grant acquired funding; prepare monthly statement of financial activity for Board review and comment; develop the nec-
essary polices to ensure proper appropriation and investment of all funding sources; and acquire the proper audit services in a clear
and transparent manner.

Deadline to submit resumes are March 3, 2006. You may Contact Ms. Hudson for a complete job description


Ms. Iris Hudson Ihudson(aci.miami.fl.us
Model City Community Revitalization District Trust
4800 NW 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33147
Phone: (305) 635-2301 ext. 371
Fax: (305) 634-2774


Pla your Classi fied ad in reasi imes call 305I ssi/i-694

Place your Classified ad in The Miami Times call 305-694-6225


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:


BID NO. 04-05-104
OPENING DATE:


RENTAL OF VEHICLES-CITYWIDE
2:00 P.M., MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2006


(Deadline for Request for additional info rmationlclarilication 3/13/06)
Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of"
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL:
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement.'
Telephone No. (305) 4161906.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO TIM "CONE OF SILENCE" IN"
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.


Ad NO. 14334


Joe Arriola
City Manager


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
MDCPS Prototype Elementary
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc.
80 SW 8th Street, Suite 2710
Miami, FL 33130
Enoc Pallango
T: 305-374-1107
F: 305-374-1138
Shane Tedder, John Bruer 561-832-1616
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc., Construction Manager, will receive
sealed bids at the above address for Phase III "100% CDs"(Sit6
Remediation): for the Miami-Dade County Public Schools Project No. A-
01125, on or before 2:00 pm on Thursday, March 16th, 2006.
This work consists of removal of contaminated soil and import, grade &
compaction of clean suitable fill. Drawings and specifications are available
through Suffolk Construction Company, Inc. (please call or fax request for
drawings)
There will be a pre-bid meeting at the above listed address on Friday the.
10th at 1:00PM.
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc. is committed to affirmatively ensuring a
substantial increase in the awarding of construction subcontracts to con-
tractors and vendors who meet the criteria of the Miami-Dade County Public
Schools Minority/Women Business Enterprises. The M/WBE participation
goal is 18% African American and 6% Woman Owned Businesses for this
project.




BA------
MIALM flWl

Advertisement for DBE Goal for Strategic Airport Master Planning Services
Project In Accordance with Department of
Transportation 49 CFR Part 26
ESTABLISHMENT OF DBE GOAL FOR THE
COUNTY'S SYSTEM OF AIRPORTS PROJECT
No. MDAD-MOO1A FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) is preparing to establish a DBE goal for
participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises for the Strategic Airport Master
Planning Services project for the County's system of airports for Fiscal Year 2006
(October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006). MDAD invites comments from
minorities, small businesses, women's and general contractor groups, community
organizations, and other officials or organizations which may have information concerning
the availability of disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged business, the effects of
discrimination on opportunities for DBEs, and what might constitute a "level playing field
for participation of DBEs in MDAD projects. A "level playing field" is defined, as the
amount of participation DBE firms would have in MDAD projects if there were no
discrimination against them.
MDAD is proposing a DBE goal for participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
for Strategic Airport Master Planning Services for the County's System of Airports of
fifteen (15.0%) percent, based on information currently available. The rationale for this
goal and supporting information may be requested from the MDAD Minority Affairs Office
by calling 305-876-7971, and will be available for public inspection at MDAD Minority
Affairs office, 4200 NW 36 Street, Building 5-A, 3rd Floor, Miami, Florida 33122, Monday
through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., for 30 days from the publication of this
notice. MDAD and the U.S. Department of Transportation will accept comments on the
DBE goal for 45 days from the date of this advertisement.


& -s
- ** -
Am& 0 em -


Contact Person:




Adv No. 13770


2D The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006


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The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006 3D


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"Copyrighted Material


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CITY OF MIAMI
WHEN THE NEWS MATTERS TO YOU ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
TURN TO YOUR NEWSPAPER Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
S located at City Hall,3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:
S Bid NO. 04-05-117 GLASS REPLACEMENT, AUTOMOTIVE AND TRUCK
OPENING DATE: 1:00P.M., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 2006
(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 3/8/06)
SDetailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement
Telephone No. (305) 4161906.
S THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.

TIje iiami imes Joe Arriola
City Manager
305-694-6210 Ad NO. 10657


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on March, 9, 2006 to
consider the award of a contract, in the amount of $45,920 with an option
to renew for two additional one-year periods to Miami-Dade Family
Learning Partnership, Inc., a Florida not-for-profit corporation (MDFLP), for
the provision of creating literacy curriculum, supervision of teachers and
other like activities to be provided at five of the City's parks, African Square,
Duarte, Jose Marti, Shenandoah, and Williams in conjunction with a grant
from the Children's Trust called the Out-of-School "Heart of Our Parks"
grant and to consider the City Manager's recommendation and finding that
competitive negotiation methods are not practicable or advantageous
regarding these issues. Inquiries regarding this notice may be addressed to
Zachariah Evangelista, Department of Parks and Recreation at (305) 416-
1326.
This action is being considered pursuant to Section 18-86(a)(3)(c) (servic-
es related to educational services and activities provided by non-profit
organizations within city parks) of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida as
amended. The recommendation and finding to be considered in this matter
set forth in the proposed resolution and in this Code Section, which are
deemed to be incorporated by reference herein and are available as public
records from the City of Miami. The Public Hearing will be held in conjunc-
tion with the regularly scheduled City Commission meeting of March 9,
2006, at 9:00 A.M., at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
Florida. All interested individuals are invited to attend this hearing and may
comment on the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any
decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made including all testimony and evidence upon. which any appeal
may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding
Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15698) City Clerk

spll~ssaarsras~-----4


068-FF10


3/30/2006


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
-IMIAMI,-FLORIDA 33132


Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designat-
ed date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School
Board Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the
date designated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the
DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or
Room 351, address above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the
Friday preceding the scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School
Board meetings will be available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday
following the meetings. The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.
"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from
issuance of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board
Rule 6Gx13-8C-1.212 apply."
"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule
6Gx13-3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS


Provision of an International
Studies Senior High School Facility
Note:
Seal proposals will be accepted in
Procurement Management, at School
Board Administration Building, 1450
NE. 2nd Ave. Room 352. Miami,
Florida 33132 until 2:00 PM. on
March 30, 2006, for The School Board
of Miami-Dade County, Florida
("Board"), to acquire a new
International Studies High School
facility ('educational facility"), through
a fee simple purchase or lease-pur-
chase arrangement with the educa-
tional facility to be fully constructed
and made usable by the Proposer for
public educational purposes under a
turn-key arrangement with the Board.
The geographic search parameters
with which the new educational facility
must be located are described in the
RFP.


Wed. March 8th, 2006
at 1:00 PM. School
Board Administration
Building, 1450 NE.
2nd Ave. Room 559.
Miami, Florida 33132


A pre-bid conference
will be held Thursday,
March 9, 2006 at 2:00
054-FF10 3/21/2006 Asphalt Paving, Resurfacing p.m. in Maintenance
and Drainage Operations Training
Room, 12525 NW 28
Avenue, Miami,
Florida.
035-FF08 3/21/2006 Playground Equipment and Installation

(1)
109-EE06 3/7/2006 Pest Control, Extermination and Available
Removal Services Addendums


introducing

TWO UNIQUE

OPPORTUNITIES


15 BP Gasoline


Stations w/ BP


Connect


Franchise


Stores



Miami


Palm Beach


Ft. Lauderdale



800.747.3342 x 508

www.nrc.com/508


David Birdsell
Florida Licensed Broker
in affiliation with
NRC Realty Advisors of Florida, LLC


Miami-Dade County Public Schools


U


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I


I


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny











%aic Job inrin n musiimMiim dollar r tal cecr







"Copyrighted Material



Syndica ed Content



Available from Commercial News'Providers"


Sigmas, BSU honor local Black leaders


In what emerged as a
night depicting the
bridge linking future
and current Black
leadership, college stu-
dents honored their
elders for contribu-
tions made to, the fab-
ric of life in Black
Miami. The Phi Beta
Sigma fraternity and
the Black Student


Union at Florida
In ternational
University hosted their
premier event that rec-
ognized The Miami
Times and its publish-
er, Rachel Reeves, as
'Black Business of the
Year.'
Miami Dade school
board member, Dr.
Robert B. Ingram


%s W%%II a


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
FOR REGIONAL LAND ACQUISITION
REAL ESTATE TITLE AND CLOSING SERVICES

Sealed proposals will be received by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection, Procurement
Section, Mail Station #93, 3800 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Carr Building, Room 235, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000, until 2:30 P.M. EST on Tuesday, March 28,
2006, for Regional Land Acquisition Real Estate Title and
Closing Services.

Organizations interested in participating in this
procurement opportunity may view and download the
subject solicitation from the Florida Department of
Management Services Vendor Bid System. To view the
solicitation, go to www.myflorida.corn and click on
BUSINESS. Click on "Doing Business with the State".
Under the "Everything for Vendors and Customers"
heading, click on "Vendor Bid System". Click on "Search
Advertisements". Under the "Agency" search field, select
the "Department of Environmental Protection" and click on
"Initiate Search". Select 2006033C. This will bring up the
advertisement detail. Scroll to the bottom of the page and
click on "Click here to view more related documents".

Organizations must have Adobe Acrobat Reader to view
and print the solicitation documents. Adobe Acrobat
Reader maybe obtained, free of charge, at the following
website:
h.tv/ww^dac!iob:,mcom/plodpuct;s/a2; u a/est4p .
Minority Business Enterprises are encouraged to
participate in this procurement opportunity.


delivered the keynote
address that encour-
aged the students to
"keep their minds oin
their mission and their
mission on their
minds." Following
Ingram's rousing
keynote address,
awards were presented
to The Times; local
attorney H. T. Smith;


Terrence Pinder, vice
mayor of Opa-locka
and County
Commissioner Barbara
Jordan. The Vanguard
Award went to local
legend, long time com-
munity activist and
funeral home owner,
M. Athalie Range, 92 -
whose videotaped
acceptance speech was


shown in her absence.
Patrick Range gra-
ciously accepted his
mother's award on her
behalf.
The event was held
Monday night at the
Graham Center at
FIU's south campus
and included dinner,
musical tributes and
spoken word poetry.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at.her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:


BID NO. 04-05-116
OPENING DATE:


GROUND MAINTENANCE-CITYWIDE
2:00 PM, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15, 2006


(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 3/8/06)

A MANDATORY pre-bid conference and site visit will be held on
Wednesday March 1 2006 at 10:00 am at the Miami Riverside Center
Building. 444 SW 2" Ave. Miami. FI (Meet on the10'" floor large conference
room). The purpose of this conference is to allow potential Bidders an
opportunity to present questions to staff and obtain clarification of there
requirements of the Bid documents. It is mandatory that a representative (s)
of the bidder attend in order to qualify to bid.
Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City
of Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami,
FL 33130 Or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procure-
ment Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE"
IN ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.


Ad NO. 14333


Joe Arriola
City Manager


Fane's A/C &
Appliance Repair
Wall units, central air, stove,
refrigerator, washer and dryer.
305-754-5060
Bp.: 305-566-8389


Daryl's Ba
All occasions, we(
1290 Ali Baba (V
Limo Rentals
305-62


Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for kitchens
and bathrooms at affordable prices.
14140 NW 22nd Avenue
305-685-3565


General Home Repair
Air condition, plumbing, electrical,
nquet Hall roofing, appliances, washer, dryer,
ddings, parties, etc. stove. Call Benny
Vest of 27th Ave.) 305-685-1898
786-273-1130


305-796-9558


Smart Fashion
Booths for rent.
discount for the
months. 5603 NW 7th
Ask for Lucy
305-757-97


Southeastern Roofing
& Painting
Salon General Home Repairs. Repair
Special and Roofs. Financing.
first six Call 305-694-9405
h Avenue
786-326-0482
'10___


Range Funeral Home
The Directors are: M. Athalie Range
and N. Patrick Range
5727 N.W. 17th Avenue
305-691-4343


C. Brian Hart Ins.
Auto Flood Windstorm General
Liability Home Worker's
Compensation
7954 NW 22nd Avenue
305-836-5206


RUSSELL with the
MUSCLES
24 hours Moving/Deliveries
Low Rates Senior Citizens and
Disability Discounts
305-625-3461 or
305-651-5544


Foreclosure Experts
Refinance Pay Off Bills
Save Your Home Get Cash Out
Call Steven
305-636-0990


Coops' Kitchen
Specialized in Bar-B-Que Ribs
and Chicken
7910 NW 22 Avene
786-229-7031
Thursday-Saturday



Wedding Video
Productions
Corporate videos, Music videos,
high definition/film
786-258-3732


CITY OF MIAMI

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON MARCH 9, 2006, AT 9:00 A.M., IN ITS
CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE MIAMI
CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM RELATED
TO THE REGULAR AGENDA:

A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED LAFAYETTE
SQUARE, A SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO
ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET COM-
MITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY CODE
SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN
ON SA0:IPLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE CITY
MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND
PROVIDING FOR THE RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.
Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public
Works Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction
Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working
hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views.

Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission
with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all tes-
timony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15697) City Clerk


The Miami Times, South Florida's oldest Black newspaper, is expanding. We offer a fast-
paced, stimulating environment with great benefits, opportunities for growth and a chance
to be a part of an 83 year-old tradition serving South Florida's Black community.
)
If you are flexible, professional, possess strong communication skills and take pride ih
your work, we invite you to apply for the following positions by submitting two (2) copies
of your resume to:

Tbee fiami rimes
900 NW 54th Street
Miami, Fl 33127
Attn: Renee M. Harris

Reporters:
Bring your journalism and/or writing experience to help inform, educate and inspire
Miami's Black community with news and information for and about areas like Liberty City,
Miami Gardens, Opa-Locka, Overtown, Brownsville, Florida City, North Miami, Goulds,
Perrine, Richmond Heights, Little Haiti and Broward County. We are looking for two full
time and 12 freelance reporters to join our editorial team. Please include three writing
samples with your resume.
Religion Editor/Reporter:
Be a part of our highly popular Faith and Families section. The perfect candidate will com-
bine solid journalism and/or writing experience with a desire to keep the Black communi-
ty abreast of religious news and information, church happenings as well as important
issues affecting Black families. Please include three writing samples with your resume.

Customer Service Representatives:
The perfect candidates understand that our readers are the reason we exist. If you are
flexible, articulate, enjoy working with the public and are capable of managing multiple pri-
orities, we invite you to apply for one of two part-time positions.

Graphic Designer:
Help our production department create on of the most attractive, visually stimulating
newspapers in the nation. The perfect candidate is flexible, innovative and highly skilled
at using PhotoShop, Quark Xpress, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Acrobat. We are looking
for one part-time graphic designer.

Receptionist:
As the first face our customers see and the first voice they hear, the ideal candidate must
be professional, articulate and enjoy working with the public. If you have a pleasant per-
sonality, are capable of working under pressure and skilled at managing multiple priori-
ties, we need you. We are looking for one full-time and one part-time receptionist.

Advertising Executive:
Help local, national, small and large companies expose their products and services to
South Florida's multimillion dollar Black community. The perfect candidate has solid sales
experience, preferably with print or electronic media. If you are articulate, professional
and a solid closer looking for an unlimited income, we need you to join our advertising
team.

Telemarketers:
Use your positive personality and selling skills to help readers receive The Miami Times
at their doorsteps each week. The ideal candidates are reliable, confident, have impecca-
ble telephone sales skills and work well in a fast-paced atmosphere. We are looking for
three part-time telemarketers.
Collections:
Experienced accounts receivable professional to collect on outstanding accounts. The
ideal candidate is assertive, has strong communication skills and solid collections experi-
ence.
No telephone calls please


II r I U I I. . .. .. ........ ..11 I

stNO 1. .
BUIES 'a-ECIN


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4D The Hinmi Times Ma 6


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2.-3361























Business Rentals
1201 N.W. 3rd Avenue
STORE FRONTS
'$500 and up monthly.
S 305-321-4350 or
305-815-4917
Furnished Rooms
1426 NW 70th Street
$325 monthly including utilit-
ies, and air. Must have in-
come. Call 305-836-8378.
2373 N.W. 95th Street
$70 weekly, free utilities,
kitchen,and bath One
person.
305-915-6276
305-691-3486
335 N.W. 203rd Terrace
ANaterfront Gated Communi-
/ty, furnished, color TV, air,
utilities and more.
Call 305-510-9966
7000 NW 21 Avenue
Clean rooms for rent!
$340 monthly with air.
Call 305-720-7067
CAROL CITY AREA
$500 monthly, $1000 moves
you in, one person perferred.
Call 786-356-6030
CAROL CITY AREA
ROOM FOR RENT
Call 305-625-3081. Monday -
Friday After 6 p.m. Saturday
-Sunday anytime.

DADE AREA
OUTREACH -Beds available.
3 meals. FREE if qualify.
786-488-5213
NW AREA
Finally were back! Clean, de-
cent rooms, $300 to $600;
one efficiency.
Call Rock
786-357-8617
OPA-LOCKA AREA
Fully furnished rooms with
central air.
Call 786-251-2204

Efficiencies
100 N.W. 14th Street
Jacuzzie suite fully furnished
efficiency. Utilities and cable
(HBO, BET, ESPN), free
local
and nationwide calling. Along
with free maid service. $265
weekly. $790 monthly! This
property is protected by 24
hour security cameras.
Call 305-751-6232
1209 N.W. 3rd Avenue
Completely renovated. All
appliances. $420 monthly
plus security and utilities.
Call Joe 305-321-4350
2538 N.W. 104th Terrace
$500 monthly, utilities includ-
ed. Call 305-696-8277.

Apartments
12101 N.E. 6 Avenue #2
Sharp king size bedroom,
central air. Biscayne Park
Area. $750 monthly.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-493-9065
- 143 N.W. 77th Street
LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom with
appliances and air.
Call 305-512-1254
1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$500 monthly. Newly
renovat-
ed. All appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
2515 N.W.52nd Street #2
1 bedroom, air, tile floors,
nice and quiet.No appliances
$525 monthly, $1050 move
in. Call 954-522-4645
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Talking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699
5238 N.W. 24th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$500. call between 3 and 6
p.m. 305-439-4880.
5850 N.W. 15th Avenue
One bedroom, $600 monthly.
$1200 moves you in;
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-458-3977.
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$485-$495 per month, one
bedrooms, $385 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from
$420-$495 monthly. Free wa-
ter, security bars and iron
gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699
KENDALL
Gated community, spacious
One, two and three bed-
rooms. HC and Non HC ac-
cessible apartments., con-
venient location with pool,
resident activities. NO PETS!
Water and sewer included.


ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$410 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $450 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$410 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $450 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
OVERTOWN AREA
One bedroom, one bath,.
$450 monthly, $900 moves
you in. Call 305-216-5390
OVERTOWN AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths
with central air, appliances
and free 27 inch flat screen
TV. $950 monthly!
Section 8 Welcome!
Call Joel at 786-355-7578
WILDROSE
Large, two and three bed-
rooms available. All applian-
ces with central air. Section 8
Welcome! Call 305-688-2749

1 Duplex
1422 N.W. 51st Terrace
Large two bedrooms, one
bath, tile, new appliances,
laundry room, air. Section 8
only! Call 305-490-7033.
1446 N.W. 39 Street
One bedroom, one bath. air
conditioned, $750 monthly.
$1500 move in. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700.
1810 N.W. 50th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
carpet, central air, $925 a
month, $1850 to move in.
Call for appt.786-317-4610
1987 N.W. 56th Street
One bedroom, one bath.
$650 monthly, first, last and
security. Call 305-498-0484.
2550 N.W. 68th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, ap-
pliances, central air, $850
monthly. Move in $1500 Mrs.
Homes, 305-244-3232.
3418 N.W. 11th Avenue
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1561 monthly, Section 8
welcome. Call 954-624-5906
5522 N.W. 5th Avenue
One bedroom, one bath,
$650 monthly, water includ-
ed. Call 305-696-8277.
6941 N.W 6th Court
Large two bedrooms, one
bath, appliances included.
$800 a month. $1800 to
move in.
Call Nathan 786-333-2596
7936 N.W. 12th Court
Two and three bedrooms,
available. Central air,
appliances, fenced yard.
water included.
Section 8 OK
Call John 305-389-4011
305-632-3387
8118 NW 12 Court
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly.
Call 305-218-1227
NORTH DADE AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
completely remodeled $950
monthly Section 8 Welcome!
305-216-2724
Under New
Management
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $525 per month, $525
security deposit, $1050 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.
Condos/Townhouses

479 N.W. 19th Street
Four bedrooms, one 1/2
baths. Section 8 O.K. $1300
Call 305-815-2445
OPA-LOCKA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-632-1123

S Houses I
1090 N.W. 100th Terrace
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1400 monthly, parking, air,
big yard and Section 8 wewl-
come.Call 305-891-5745
1112 N.W. 105th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$1100 monthly. Section 8
welcome.First, last and
security.
Call Martha 786-389-6223
1491 N.W. 43rd Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
$1200 monthly.
305-696-8277

15650 N.W. 158 Street Rd
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard with central air.
$875 monthly. Security $500.
Call 305-696-8277


19120 N.W. 22nd Place
Spacious three bedrooms,
two baths, central air, appli-
ances, washer dryer hookup,
one car garage. $1400
monthly, first, last and securi-
ty. Total $3800 down.
No section 8.
Call 305-625-4515

2269 N.W. 49th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1300 monthly. Central air,
tile floors. Call 786-512-
1588.
2359 NW 56 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths
with central air. Hialeah or
Miami Beach Section 8 wel-
come. $1450 monthly, first
and security.
Call 305-761-0061

331 NW 56 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. Section 8 wel-
come. 954-435-5085 or
305-688-5002
50 NE 213th Street
Three bedrooma, two baths,
with pool Section 8 welcome!
Call 954-322-6914
653 NW 46th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
large den, totally remodeled,
$1150 monthly. First last and
security moves you in. Sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call Alisha 786-299-1575
860 N.W. 70 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
big yard.Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-326-2789

CAROL CITY AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1350 monthly.
Call 305-546-2280 or
813-671-6633
MIAMI GARDENS
Two bedrooms, two baths,
florida room, central air,
appliances. Section 8 O.K.
$1300 a month, first, last and
security. Call 305-685-9308
N.W AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath,
utilities included, quiet
neighborhood. $1500 a
month. Call 786-285-4335 or
786-439-3201.

N.W. AREA
90 near 27th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath.
SCall 305-693-9486
NEVER RENT AGAIN!
Buy a four bedrooms, two
baths, Foreclosure. $50,000!
For listings 800-749-8168
xD041
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Large one bedroom, full
bath, carpet, parking, utilities
included, central air and
kitchen.
Call 786-262-5329

RICHMOND HEIGHTS
10741 S.W. 150th Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
florida room/ car port, $1000
monthly. NO Section 8!
Call 305-267-9449

STOP!!!!
Behind in your rent 24 hour
notice? Behind in your
mortgage? Call Kathy:
786-326-7916

I nt Wih Optio

HOLLYWOOD
3 bedrooms, 2 bath, large
yard. No credit needed. $5K
down, $1500 monthly.
Call 954-205-4487






!!!ATTENTION!!!
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
****WITH****
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
HudNA Homes Available
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House Of Homes Realty


CAN'T PAY
CAN'T STAY
EVICITIONS Same Day
Service
Call Kathy:
786-326-7916

FACING
FORECLOSURE?
BEHIND IN PAYMENTS?
DON'T LOOSE YOUR
EQUITY.
WE CAN STOP FORE-
CLOSURE AT ANY
STAGE OR SELL YOUR
PROPERTY
CALL PATRICK SAMUELS
305-621-5800

HOUSE HUNTERS
Want to make money
Chris 305-219-0260

BEEI IS


The Miami Times. March 1-7. 2006 5D


Rar s ns onro er wn y


To Place Your Ad

SCall: 305-694-6225


Houses

1075 N.W. 129th Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
den, pool, patio, carport.

Brown Realty Inv. Corp
305-685-6275

1150 NW 140 Terrace
Three bedrooms, one
bath, huge yard and
den. $165,000
Brown Realty Inv. Corp
305-685-6275

1233 N.W. 51st Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Excellent Condition, New
driveway. Fully renovated,
$155K negotiable.
Call Rickey
786-718-0162
15411 Railroad Drive
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air, and more. Try
$189K. (NW 154 St. and 18
Avenue). NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
1555 N.W. 62 TERR
Two bedrooms, one bath,
florida room. $149,900.

441 N.W. 80 Street
Four bedrooms, one bath.
$169,000,

2154 N.W.76 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
hugh master. $195,000

Low down payment ,monthly
principal and interest from
$950 to $1200 per month.
Owner will help with
financing and closing cost.

Call 786-282-6322


1961 N.W. 187th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, carport. Try $6900
down and $969 monthly
(new adjustable rate). (DO
NOT KNOCK ON DOOR).

NDI Realtors
305-655-1700
2031 Wilmington Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard. $215,000.

2041 Wilmington Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
fenced yard. $175,000.

Pace Real Estate
305-249-7003
3011 N.W. 66th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath, big
fenced yard. $159,000. For
further information call
305-816-9090
ER Realty Group
3279 N.W. 51st Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, new exterior paint
(you pick color), super large
yard. Try $2900 down and
$799 monthly (new adjusta-
ble rate). (DO NOT KNOCK
ON DOOR). NDI Realtors
305-655-1700.
FORECLOSURES
Five bedrooms, Must Sell!
Only $33,500
800-749-8168 xD040
FREE
LIST/FORECLOSURE
Below market values.
Hundreds to choose.
Low down payments.
Easy to qualify. Call now!
Larry Albert 305-255-9040
HUD HOMES
Five bedrooms, Only
$33,500. For listings
800-749-8168xD046


NEWTE, or

Avoid Foreclosure and
Save Your Home!
Behind on payments? I
can help
Call 305-244-9003

BEHIND ON PAYMENTS?
STOP FORECLOSURE!
SAVE YOUR HOME/CREDIT
CALL 786-488-8617



ALL APPLIANCES SALE
$99 We repair also. 215 NW
22 Avenue 305-644-0333.



1971 Mercedes
280 SE 3.5. 71,000 miles,
with sunroof. $24,750.
Call 386-237-5300

Chevy's from $500
$500 Police Impounds
For listings 800-749-8167
xKO20
HONDA'S from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167xK023



4201 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Daycare teachers and work-
ers needed. CDA perferred.
Call 305-576-1620
305-758-7167
305-986-8395
CASTING CALL


Equal Housing Opportunity.
Lakeside Towers
305-383-2042
TDD 1-800-955-8770
NW AREA
One bedroom with all appli-
ances, security bars, and
carpet. Call after 4 p.m.
305-807-3270


STims .e.. ai


classifieds@ miamitimesonline.com


s(
100 Real
101 Cond
102 Duple
103 Hous
104 Lots
105 Apart
107 Comm
108 Busir


19031 N.W. 43rd Avenue
Three bedrooms, two baths,
carport, appliances included
with washer and dryer.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-277-9925


To Place Your Ad
By Phone:
Mon. Fri.
305-694-6225
Deadline: Tues. 6 pm
By Fax: 305-757-4764
Deadline: Tues. 2 pm
In person:
Mon. Fri.
8:30 am 6 pm

900 N.W. 54"' St.


Duplex
I Duplex .I
1446 N.W. 39 Street
One bedroom, one bath, new
paint, new roof. $189,900.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700.


Rentals
020 Business
023 Churches
025 Roommates
027 Office Space
030 Unfurnished
035 Furnished
040 Efficiencies
050 Apartments
060 Duplexes
065 Condos/Tnhs
070 Houses
080 Rent w/option


Looking for adult male
actors, for an upcoming play.
Log on to: Http://nojivepro-
ductions.com/casting.htm.
Call 786-473-6435.
Serious replies only


Elevator
Constructors

recruiting apprentices in
the Miami, Ft. Lauderdale,
West Palm Beach and Na-
ples areas for its 4 year
program. Must be 18 or
older, have high school di-
ploma or GED, pass an
aptitude test, and be able
to perform work of the
trade. A $25.00 testing fee
is required at the time of
test. Send request for ap-
plication and for more in-
formation postmarked no
later than 03/17/2006 to:

NEIEP-71
P.O. Box 245668
Pembroke Pines, Fla
33024

Equal Opportunity
Employer and Drug Free


Experienced dependable,
custodian for evening shift in
Civic Center Area. Salary
and benefits based on
experience. Must be able to
pass drug test, and criminal
background check.
Call 305-691-3003

Experienced Part-time
Telemarketers
Work from Home
Monday Saturday,
flexible hours, Up to $6
hourly, plus commission.
Call 305-999-0048


Experienced Secretary
Needed 305-751-3381


Help wanted

Person to care for mentally
challenged black male 39
years old. twice weekly.
The area of 91 Street and
7th Avenue. Call James
305-759-8761 home 305-
609-3946 Cell. After 5 p.m.
daily.

INSURANCE AGENT with
220 licenses in NW part or
full time, 305-681-7470.

Maintenance Person
Must have valid FL driver's
license, office detail clean-
ing experience, and de-
pendable. Knowledge of
industrial lawn mower and
yard work. Fax resume
and salary history to:
305-758-3617
No calls please

Miami Hair and Nail
Studio
Now hiring for receptionist,
and shampoo assistant.
1178 NW. 54 Street
Call 305 757-1222

Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour
Plus gas mileage
For a 1/2 days work

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets. WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 8 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Applications are received
Thursday and Friday
900 NW 54th Street

Seeking experienced Tod-
dier teacher. Must have les-
son plan knowledge and
your CDAI
Apply at:
5605 NW 32nd Avenue

Daycare Teacher
If interested please fax re-
sume to : 305-944-0590.


--DRIVERS NEEDED
Society cabs needs drivers.
Regular license required.
Call Lionel 305-321-5177.
Reading, English, Math Skills
and FCAT. Elliot Weinstock,
Educational Specialist.
Call 305-653-1969
TEACHERS
Infants and PreSchool
40 Hrs., required, CDA per-
ferred. N.E.Miami PreSchool.
Call 305-948-9235
305-893-1313.

Daycare Teacher
Part-time and full-time availa-
ble. Starting pay $7 and up.
Call 305-754-7979



EARN HIGH INTEREST
Like the wealthy!
Be on this call at 8 p.m.,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Fridays 1-646-519-5860 pin
no. 2272#. Call Charles for
information, 786-356-5011.



Charter school available. Of-
fice two bath and kitchen.
Call 305-687-1218.
CHURCH AVAILABLE
With air' and kitchen. Seats
75. Call 305-687-1218



Brand new coin washers
and stack dryers, 20 Ibs., 30
Ibs., 40 lbs. washers, good
for new laundry mat. Call
786-287-2942.

Two rod iron bar stool chairs.
with suede seats. Wicker
coated patio furniture. Also a
wooden breakfast Nuk.
Call 305-830-2899.


To Fax Your Ad

Fax: 305-757-4764


j7IINANTIAL
I' VROUP

6(135 N.W. 167 S IT l .SUIT # I1:21
MIAMI lAKS A

* REFINANCE NOW
* 100% Financing Available y em
S a p Lic. Mortgage Broker
On all property types Finance Specialist
* FHA & VA Financing Cell: 305-510-4201
* Property Rehabilitation Loans
* FHA 203K Loans
* 20% Down Foreign National
* Good-Credit, Bad Credit, NO Credit
* Se Habla Espanol

305-828-0001 Fax: 305-828-3311


Hairstylists, Barbers and

Nail Technicians

NEEDED AT

RUFF CUTS BEAUTY SALON

13751 N.W. 7 Ave.

Call Lacharn Crue

786-662-9022

Booth Rentals Available




SISTER WISDOM

Southern born spiritualist, reader and
advisor. Helps with all problems in life,
such as love, marriage, health, court
cases and business. Also restore nature.
I have blessed candles, baths and
incense oils. One free question by phone.


CALL 305-300-8728




SPIRITUALIST MELA

Specializing in:
Psychic, Candles, Tarot Cards, Palm, Shells,
Orishas and Home Cleansing
Problem with Love, Health,
Court or Prosperity

CALL OR COME IN FOR ADVICE

786-443-8273




SISTER LISA

I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life,
such as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business
transactions of all kinds. I never fail to reunite the sep-
arated, cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome
enemies, rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling
blocks and bad luck of all kind. There is no heart so
sad so dreary that I cannot bring sunshine into it. In
fact, no matter what may be your hope, fear or ambi-
tion, I guarantee to tell it before you utter a word to
me.
7615 NW 7th Ave. Miami
305-757-8705
and
517 Pembroke Road, Hollywood
954-496-6640
Two free questions by phone/Licensed Spiritualist











(Depo Provera, Pills, Patches, IDU)

STD testing Pap Smears

180 NW 183 St. #117
Miami, FL 33169

305-999-9093





ABORTIONS

Professional care. HRS Certified.
Low cost. Service up to 8 weeks $150 with this ad.
Anesthesia included Daily appointments
Termination up to 22 weeks
Abortion Without Surgery! No Pain
No Anesthesia] Very Simple Procedure
Call for information

3 Convenient Locations:


ALBA
MEDICAL CENTER
4210 Palm Avenue, Hialeah
305-827-3412
305-822-3838


Flagler near LeJeune
305-446-9111


iales Other
Estate 106 Money To Lend
los/Tnhs 115 Services
axes 120 Repairs
;es 150 Automobiles
175 Business Oppt.
:ments 176 Schools
mercial Prop 177 Positions Wanted
ness 180 Childcare
190 Miscellaneous
200 Merchandise
220 Personals
250 Lost and Found
998 Legals

Please check your classified ad the first day
it appears in cllr Iliaiiii Euins. All ads placed
by phone are read back for verification of
copy content.
In the event of an error elir tli.nll ii i5 is is
responsible for a makegood only for the first
incorrect insertion. We assume no responsi-
bility for any reason for any error in an ad
beyond the cost of the ad itself.
iElr t hiliiiii illn reserves the right to edit, to
reject and/or cancel a classified ad. We also
reserve the right to reclassify an ad.


C a sfe: 0 '. . : i/ .ie '. Adver : -ie 's.*" .- I n e .x-.


i k IVi t C t l Th i O De n







6D The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006


on" l"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


%% 4. 0hta pan1" fwr


uindrab


-


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:


BID NO. 04-05-104
OPENING DATE:


RENTAL OF VEHICLES-CITYWIDE
2:00 P.M., MONDAY, MARCH 20, 2006


(Deadline for Request for additional info rmationlclarilication 3/13/06)

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement.
Telephone No. (305) 4161906.

THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO TIM "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO.12271.


Ad NO. 14334


Joe Arriola
City Manager


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on March, 9, 2006 to
consider the award of a contract, in the amount of $44,738 with an option
to renew for two one-year periods to Arts for Learning/Miami, Inc., a Florida
not-for-profit corporation for the provision of visual/performing art instruc-
tion, ,art teacher management and training, and other like activities to be
provided at five of the City's parks, African Square, Duarte, Jose Marti,
Shenandoah, and Williams in conjunction with a grant from the Children's
Trust called the Out-of-School "Heart of Our Parks" grant and to consider
the City Manager's recommendation and finding that competitive negotia-
tion methods are not practicable or advantageous regarding these issues.
Inquiries regarding this notice may be addressed to Zachariah Evangelista,
Department of Parks and Recreation at (305) 416-1326.

This action is being considered pursuant to Section 18-86(a)(3)(c) (servic-
es related to educational services and activities provided by non-profit
organizations within city parks) of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida as
amended. The recommendation and finding to be considered in this matter
set forth in the proposed resolution and in this Code Section, which are
deemed to be incorporated by reference herein and are available as public
records from the City of Miami. The Public Hearing will be held in conjunc-
tion with the regularly scheduled City Commission meeting of March 9,
2006, at 9:00 AM, at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
Florida. All interested individuals are invited to attend this hearing and may
comment on the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any
decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal
may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15700) City Clerk





YOU 'ff c" I- U7I/uC e 'reasu.are


Place your Classified ad in The Miami Times
call 305-694-6225


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Miami City Commission will hold a Public Hearing on March, 9, 2006 to
consider the award of a contract, in the amount of $69,705 with an option
to renew for two additional one-year periods to Museum of Science, Inc., a
Florida not-for-profit corporation for the provision of science driven instruc-
tion, family-day field trips and other like activities to be provided at five of
the City's parks, African Square, Duarte, Jose Marti, Shenandoah, and
Williams in conjunction with a grant from the Children's Trust called the Out-
of-School "Heart of Our Parks" grant and to consider the City Manager's
recommendation and finding that competitive negotiation methods are not
practicable or advantageous regarding these issues. Inquiries regarding
this notice may be addressed to Zachariah Evangelista, Department of
Parks and Recreation at (305) 416-1326.

This action is being considered pursuant to Section 18-86(a)(3)(c) (servic-
es related to educational services and activities provided by non-profit
organizations within city parks) of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida as
amended. The recommendation and finding to be considered in this matter
set forth in the proposed resolution and in this Code Section, which are
deemed to be incorporated by reference herein and are available as public
records from the City of Miami. The Public Hearing will be held in conjunc-
tion with the regularly scheduled City Commission meeting of March 9,
2006, at 9:00 AM, at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami,
Florida. All interested individuals are invited to attend this hearing and may
comment on the proposed issue. Should any person desire to appeal any
decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at
this meeting, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal
may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
'tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15699) City Clerk


CITY OF MIAMI


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY
COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, MARCH 7, 2006

Council Conference Meeting: 4'" Floor
Conference Room, (TBA)
Regular City Council Meeting: 2"d Floor
Council Chambers, 7:30 PM
Location: 17011 N.E. 19 Avenue, North Miami
Beach

All interested parties are invited to attend this
meeting.

Solomon Odenz, City Clerk
Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

Notice: 1) Should any person desire to appeal
any decision of the City Council with respect to
any matter to be considered at this meeting,
that person shall insure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made including all testi-
mony and evidence upon which any appeal
may be based (F/S 286.0105); 2) In accor-
dance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing special accommoda-
tion to participate in this proceeding should con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk no later than
four (4) days prior to the proceedings.
Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if
hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at
(305) 948-2909 for assistance.


CITY OF MIAMI

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on March 9, 2006 at 9:00 A.M., at Miami City Hall, located at 3500
Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of considering the fol-
lowing:
A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, DECLAR-
ING SURPLUS AND APPROVING THE SALE OF THE CITY-
OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED AT 1347 N.W. 10 AVENUE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA ("PROPERTY") TO JACKSON RESIDENCES,
LLC., A FLORIDA LIMITED LIABILITY CORPORATION ("PUR-
CHASER"); ESTABLISHING FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
($5,000.00), AS THE AMOUNT TO BE PAID TO THE CITY OF
MIAMI BY THE AFOREMENTIONED; FURTHER AUTHORIZING
THE CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE AN AGREEMENT FOR PUR-
CHASE AND SALE, AND TO EXECUTE SUCH OTHER DOCU-
MENTS AS MAY BE NECESSARY TO CONSUMMATE SUCH
TRANSACTION IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERMS AND
CONDITIONS OF THE AGREEMENT, WHICH TERMS MAY BE
AMENDED BY THE CITY MANAGER AS MAY BE NECESSARY
IN ORDER TO MEET THE BEST INTERESTS OF THE CITY.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
such proposed acquisition. Should any person desire to appeal any deci-
sion of the City Commission with respect to any matter considered at this
hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings
is made, including all testimony and evidence upon any appeal may be
based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15693) City Clerk


as'`


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny






















CITY OF MIAMI
"Copyrighted Material CEAGENCY
CITY OF MIAMI
Syndicated Content NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Available from Coerc l Ns Proers" PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT the Board meeting of the City of Miami
Available froCom m ercial News ProvidersCommunity Redevelopment Agency (CRA) for the Southeast
Overtown/Park West and the Omni Districts, which was scheduled to take
place on Thursday, February 23, 2006, has been continued to March 9,
2006, at 10:00 a.m., in the City Commission Chambers located at City Hall,
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For copies of the agenda,
please contact the CRA Office at (305) 679-6800.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15701) City Clerk


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA


Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for the following project will be received in the
Office of the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen P. Clark Center, 111
N.W. 1st. Street, Miami, up to 2:00 p.m., Local Time, Wednesday, March 29, 2006 where they will be pub-
licly opened and read aloud for projects that do not have an established Community Small Business
Enterprise (CSBE) contract measure. When applicable, only the names of the bids submitted will be pub-
licly opened and read aloud for those projects containing contract measures. Bid prices will be opened
and read aloud forty-eight hours later based on the Department of Business Developments (DBD) prelim-
inary responsiveness review.


PROJECT NAME:

PROJECT NUMBERS:

LOCATION:


DESCRIPTION:


Retrofitting of Existing MDC Street Lighting

20050286 (Formerly 20040284)

The location of work for this contract is located in a vicinity of
South-Miami County (Flagler Street South to South County line).

The contract consists of retrofitting and repair of MDC Roadway
Lighting Systems. The contractor shall provide all supervision,
labor, materials, equipment and required materials (except as
provided by MDC) to provide emergency repairs, correct
malfunctions and repair old installations.


A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference to answer any questions regarding this project will be held on Tuesday,
March 21 2006 at 11:00 a.m. in the 15th floor Rear Conference Room, of the Stephen P. Clark Center
located at 111 N.W. 1st Street.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED IN ONE OF THE FOLLOW-
ING CATEGORIES: Electrical Contractor or other categories as applicable to Chapter 10 of the Code of
Miami-Dade County.

Specifications and Contract Documents are open to public inspec tion and may be obtained from the
Contracts and Specifications Section, Public Works Department, Telephone No. (305) 375-2930 at
Stephen P. Clark Center, 11 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Florida 33128-1970 upon a non-refund-
able deposit of $ 25.00 in check or money order payable to the Board of County Commis sioners of
Miami-Dade County, Florida for each set of documents.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (CSBE) (Not Applicable)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No.'s 97-52 and 97-158; A.O.3-22, a CSBE contract
-measure recommendation of No measure has been established for this project. Compliance with
these Ordinances is required for all contractors submitting a bid for this project. See Appendix A
of the CSBE Participation Provisions, which are bound herein and are made part of the
SSpecifications and Contract Documents.

In order to allow time for the CSBE Subcontractor'participation presentation and the review of said
presentation, no contractor may withdraw his bid for a period of up to one hundred eighty (180)
Calendar days after the bid opening. Disregard anything to the contrary within these Contract
Documents.

Bidders must submit a completed Schedule of Intent Affidavit form (FORM DBD 400) to the person
or office to whom the bid was submitted on the bid submittal due date. Defective Schedule of
Intent (SOI) Affidavits that are incomplete or inaccurate upon notification by the Department of
Business Development (DBD), bidders may correct defects that exist on the SOI Affidavits within
forty-eight (48) hours after bid submission. Failure to submit the required SOI Affidavit or com-
mitment letter at the time of bid submission shall render the bid non-responsive. Examples of
defects include, but are not limited to improperly executed letters, the listing of an unidentifiable
CSBE and percentage miscalculations that are not mere clerical errors apparent on the face of the
SOI Affidavit. Bidders who fail to submit the SOI Affidavit shall be considered non-responsive.

Please note that the Contractor must submit two separately labeled and sealed envelopes with the
completed bid package. The first envelope (Envelope "A") will contain the above mentioned SOI
Affidavit and the second envelope (Envelope "B") will contain the bid price. Both envelopes are
due at the time and bid date specified in the advertisement. Envelope "A" will be opened on the
bid opening date and reviewed by DBD. If the SOI Affidavit contains correctible defects (See
attached CSBE Participation Provisions), the bidder will be notified by DBD and afforded forty-
eight hours to rectify any correctible deficiencies. Forty-eight hours later, DBD will notify Public
Works of those approved bidders whose SOI's Affidavits are responsive. Those deemed respon-
sive will have Envelope "B" opened and prices read aloud.

Community Workforce Program (CWP) (Applicable)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No. 03-01, put into force by Resolution No. R-77-03, the
Community Workforce Program has been established for this project. Compliance with this Ordinance is
required for all contractors submitting a bid for this project. See Appendix "D" within these contract docu-
ments for information and requirements regarding this program.

Bid Bond Requirements

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or accept able bid bond in the amount of five per-
cent (5%) of the proposed bid amount as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will with-
in ten (10) consecutive work days after being notified of the availability of the prescribed contract forms,
enter into a written contract with the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County, Florida in
accor dance with the accepted bid, and give a Contractor's Performance and Payment bond satis?facto-
ry to the Board of County Commission ers, Miami-Dade County, Florida, equal to one hundred (100%)
percent of the contract award amount.

Performance Bond Requirements

Simultaneously with the return of the executed Contract Documents, the Contractor will be required to
submit a Contractor's Performance and Payment Bond, either Cash or Surety, satisfactory to the
Board of Commissioners, Miami-Dade County Florida, equal to One Hundred (100%) percent of the
awarded amount, as security for the faithful performance of the terms and conditions stated here-
in, including but not limited to, any extended maintenance obligations.

ORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONS and/or ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS

To request a copy of any ordinance, resolution and/or administrative order cited in this bid solici-
tation, the bidder must contact the Clerk of the Board at 305-375-5126.


Bidders are advised that proceeds from the Charter County Transit System Sales Surtax levied
pursuant to Section 29.121 of the Code of Miami-Dade County may be used to pay for all or some
part of the cost of this contract, no award of this contract shall be effective and thereby give rise
to a contractual relationship with the County unless and until the following have occurred: 1) the
County Commission awards the contract, and such award becomes final (either by expiration of
10 days after such award without veto by the Mayor, or by Commission override of a veto); and 2)
either i) the Citizens' Independent Transportation Trust (CITT) has approved same, or ii) in
response to the CITT's disapproval, the County Commission re-affirms its award by two-thirds
(2/3) vote, of the Commission's membership and such reaffirmation becomes final.

CONE OF SILENCE: Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-27
("Cone of Silence Provisions"), as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs, or bids
after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommendation to
the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits communication regarding RFPs,
RFQs, or bids between: A) potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and the
County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's
staff; B) a potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and the Mayor, County
Commissioners or their respective staffs;

C) the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the County's profes-
sional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff; D) a poten-
tial vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and any member of the selection committee
therefore; E) the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and member of the selection
committee therefore; F) any member of the County's professional staff and any member of the selection
committee therefore.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-27, as amended, permits oral communi-
cations regarding a particular RFP, RFQ or bid for solicitationof goods or services between any person
and the procurement officer responsible for administering the procurement process for such RFP, RFQ, or
bid, provided that the communication is limited strictly to matters of process or procedure already con-
tained in the corresponding solicitation document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral communications at pre-bid conferences, oral
presentations before selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed public
meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any duly
noticed public meeting, or communications in writing at any time unless specifically prohibited by
the applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders must file a copy of any written communications
with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request.

Written communications may be submitted via e-mail to the Clerk of the Board at
CLERKBCC@)MIAMIDADE.GOV. The County shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk
of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the Cone of Silence Provisions by any pro-
poser and bidder shall render any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person having
personal knowledge of a violation of the Cone of Silence provisions shall report such violation to the State
Attorney and/ or may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders should reference the actual
Cone of Silence Provisions for further clarification.

All Bidders will be notified in writing when the County Manager makes an award recommendation to the
Board of County Commissioners.
Ordinance No. 90-143, The Responsible Wages and Benefits Ordi?nance, Ordinance No. 91-142, Family
Leave Ordinance, Ordi?nance No. 92-15, Drug-Free Workplace Ordinance, Ordinance No. 93-129,
Contractor Debarment Ordinance, Ordinances Nos. 94-166 and 96-26 Local Prefer ence Ordinances,
Ordinances Nos. 97-35 and 97-104 Fair Subcontract ing Practices, Resolution No. R-702-98 (Repeals and
supersedes Resolutions Nos. R-1206-97 and R-366-97) Welfare to Work Initiative and Ordinance No. 98-
30, County Contractors Employment and Procure?ment Practices are referenced for this contract docu-
ment.

NOTE: Ordinance 97-104 requires a bid or proposal for a County or Public Health Trust contract
involving the expenditure of $100,000.00 or more to include a listing of subcontractors and suppli-
ers who will be used on the contract.' Failure to include the required listing shall render the bid or
proposal non-responsive.

The required listing must be submitted even though the bidder or proposer will not utilize subcon-
tractors or suppliers on the contract. In the latter case, the listing must expressly state no sub-
contractors or suppliers will be used on the contract.

Timely submission of a properly completed and signed "Subcontractor/Supplier Listing, SUB
Form 100" (a copy of which is included in the specifications) constitutes compliance with the list-
ing requirements of the Ordinance. In order to be deemed properly completed the word "NONE"
must be entered under the appropriate heading of SUB Form 100 if no subcontractors or suppli-
ers will be used on the contract.

The County shall have the right but not the obligation to retain the services of an Independent
Private-Sector Inspector General (IPSIG). The requirements are set forth in the Instructions to
Prospective Contractor, Appendix A, Paragraph 22. Also, the Contract is subject to review and
audit by the Office of the Miami-Dade County Inspector General and further information is speci-
fied in the Instructions to Prospective Contractor, Appendix A, Paragraph 21.

All bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the outside the name of the Bidder, his address,
the number of the project for which the bid is submitted, and the date of opening.

The County reserves the right to waive any informality in, or to reject any or all bids. Bids from any per-
son, firm or corpo ration in default upon any agreement with the County will be rejected.

Vendor applications and solicitation packages for Invitations to Bid (ITB), Request for Proposals (RFP) and
Architectural and Engineering (A&E) projects can be obtained on the 13th floor of the Stephen P. Clark
Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, in the Vendor Assistance Unit. The VIC will provide information and assis-
tance in doing business with Miami-Dade County, vendor registration and certification, and current con-
tracting opportunities countywide. Vendor Assistance staff can be reached by phone at 305-375-5773 or
on the web at www.miamidade.gov/dpm/vendor-enrollment.asp.

GEORGE M. BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK
KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK


MIAMIPDADE


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The Miami Times. March 1-7, 2006 7D










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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA


Sealed bids for furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for the following project will be received in
the Office of the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen P. Clark Center,
111 N.W. 1st. Street, Miami, up to 2:00 p.m., Local Time, Wednesday, March 29, 2006 where they will
be publicly opened and read aloud for projects that do not have an established Community Small
Business Enterprise (CSBE) contract measure. When applicable, only the names of the bids submit-
ted will be publicly opened and read aloud for those projects containing contract measures. Bid
prices will be opened and read aloud forty-eight hours later based on the Department of Business
Developments (DBD) preliminary responsiveness review.


PROJECT NAME:

PROJECT NUMBERS:

LOCATION:


DESCRIPTION:


Retrofitting of Existing MDC Street Lighting

20050287 (Formerly 20040285)

The location of work for this contract is located in a vicinity of
North-Miami Dade County (Flagler Street North to North-
County line including Miami Beach).

The contract consists of retrofitting and repair of MDC
Roadway Lighting Systems. The contractor shall provide all
supervision, labor, materials, equipment and required materi
als (except as provided by MDC) to provide emergency
repairs, correct malfunctions and repair old installations.


A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference to answer any questions regarding this project will be held
onTuesday, March 21, 2005 at 11:00 a.m. in the 15th floor Rear Conference Room, of the Stephen P.
Clark Center located at 111 N.W. 1st Street.

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY CONTRACTOR'S CERTIFICATION IS REQUIRED IN ONE OF THE FOL-
LOWING CATEGORIES: Electrical Contractor or other categories as applicable to Chapter 10 of the
Code of Miami-Dade County.

Specifications and Contract Documents are open to public inspection and may be obtained from the
Contracts and Specifications Section, Public Works Department, Telephone No. (305) 375-2930 at
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Florida 33128-1970 upon a non-
refundable deposit of $25.00 in check or money order payable to the Board of County Commis sioners
of Miami-Dade County, Florida for each set of documents.

COMMUNITY SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISE (CSBE) (Not Applicable)

In accordance with Dade Cdunty Ordinance No.'s 97-52 and 97-158; A.O.3-22, a CSBE contract
measure recommendation of No measure has been established for this project. Compliance
with these Ordinances is required for all contractors submitting a bid for this project. See
Appendix A of the CSBE Participation Provisions, which are bound herein and are made part of
the Specifications and Contract Documents.

In order to allow time for the CSBE Subcontractor participation presentation-and the review of
said presentation, no contractor may withdraw his bid for a period of up to one hundred eighty
(180) calendar days after the bid opening. Disregard apything to the contrary within these
Contract Documents.

Bidders must submit a completed Schedule of Intent Affidavit form (FORM DBD 400) to the per-
son or office to whom the bid was submitted on the bid submittal due date. Defective Schedule
of Intent (SOI) Affidavits that are incomplete or inaccurate upon notification by the Department
of Business Development (DBD), bidders may correct defects that exist on the SOI Affidavits
within forty-eight (48) hours after bid submission. Failure to submit the required SOI Affidavit
or commitment letter at the time of bid submission shall render the bid non-responsive.
Examples of defects include, but are not limited to improperly executed letters, the listing of an
unidentifiable CSBE and percentage miscalculations that are not mere clerical errors apparent
on the face of the SOI Affidavit. Bidders who fail to submit the SOI Affidavit shall be considered
non-responsive.

Please note that the Contractor must submit twoseparately labeled and sealed envelopes with
the completed bid package. The first envelope (Envelope "A") will contain the above mentioned
SOI Affidavit and the second envelope (Envelope "B") will contain the bid price. Both
envelopes are due at the time and bid date specified in the advertisement. Envelope "A" will be
opened on the bid opening date and reviewed by DBD. If the SOI Affidavit contains correctible
defects (See attached CSBE Participation Provisions), the bidder will be notified by DBD and
afforded forty-eight hours to rectify any correctible deficiencies. Forty-eight hours later, DBD
will notify Public Works of those approved bidders whose SOI's Affidavits are responsive.
Those deemed responsive will have Envelope "B" opened and prices read aloud.

Community Workforce Program (CWP) (Applicable)

In accordance with Dade County Ordinance No. 03-01, put into force by Resolution No. R-77-03, the
Community Workforce Program has been established for this project. Compliance with this Ordinance
is required for all contractors submitting a bid for this project. See Appendix "D" within these contract
documents for information and requirements regarding this program.

Bid Bond Requirements

Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check or accept able bid bond in the amount of five
percent (5%) of the proposed bid amount as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded the Contract, will
within ten (10) consecutive work days after being notified of the availability of the prescribed contract
forms, enter into a written contract with the Board of County Commissioners of Miami-Dade County,
Florida in accor dance with the accepted bid, and give a Contractor's Performance and Payment bond
satis?factory to the Board of County Commission ers, Miami-Dade County, Florida, equal to one hun-
dred (100%) percent of the contract award amount.

Performance Bond Requirements

Simultaneously with the return of the executed Contract Documents, the Contractor will be required
to submit a Contractor's Performance and Payment Bond, either Cash or Surety, satisfactory to
the Board of Commissioners, Miami-Dade County Florida, equal to One Hundred (100%) percent
of the awarded amount, as security for the faithful performance of the terms and conditions stat-
ed herein, including but not limited to, any extended maintenance obligations.

ORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONS andlor ADMINISTRATIVE ORDERS

To request a copy of any ordinance, resolution and/or administrative order cited in this bid solic-
itation, the bidder must contact the Clerk of the Board at 305-375-5126.


Bidders are advised that proceeds from the Charter County Transit System Sales Surtax levied
pursuant to Section 29.121 of the Code of Miami-Dade County may be used to pay for all or some
part of the cost of this contract, no award of this contract shall be effective and thereby give rise
to a contractual relationship with the County unless and until the following have occurred: 1) the
County Commission awards the contract, and such award becomes final (either by expiration of
10 days after such award without veto by the Mayor, or by Commission override of a veto); and
2) either i) the Citizens' Independent Transportation Trust (CITT) has approved same, or ii) in
response to the CITT's disapproval, the County Commission re-affirms its award by two-thirds
(2/3) vote of the Commission's membership and such reaffirmation becomes final.

CONE OF SILENCE: Pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-27
("Cone of Silence Provisions"), as amended, a "Cone of Silence" is imposed upon RFPs, RFQs, or bids
after advertisement and terminates at the time the County Manager issues a written recommendation
to the Board of County Commissioners. The Cone of Silence prohibits communication regarding RFPs,
RFQs, or bids between: A) potential vendors, service providers, bidders, lobbyists or consultants and
the County's professional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County
Manager's staff; B) a potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or consultant and the Mayor,
County Commissioners or their respective staffs;

C) the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and any member of the County's profes-
sional staff including, but not limited to, the County Manager and the County Manager's staff; D) a
potential vendor, service provider, bidder, lobbyist, or-consultant and any member of the selection com-
mittee therefore; E) the Mayor, County Commissioners or their respective staffs and member of the
selection committee therefore; F) any member of the County's professional staff and any member of the
selection committee therefore.

Section 2.11.1(t) of the County Code and Administrative Order 3-27, as amended, permits oral commu-
nications regarding a particular RFP, RFQ or bid for solicitation of goods or services between any per-
son and the procurement officer responsible for administering the procurement process for such RFP,
RFQ, or bid,! provided that.the communication is limited strictly to, mtters pf process or procedure
already contained in the corresponding solicitation document.

The Cone of Silence Provisions do not apply to oral communications at pre-bid conferences,
oral presentations before selection committees, contract negotiations during any duly noticed
public meetings, public presentations made to the Board of County Commissioners during any
duly noticed public meeting, or communications in writing at any time unless specifically pro-
hibited by the applicable RFP, RFQ, or bid document. Bidders must file a copy of any written
communications with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made available to any person upon
request.

Written communications may be submitted via e-mail to the Clerk of the Board at. The County
shall respond in writing and file a copy with the Clerk of the Board, which shall be made avail-
able to any person upon request.

In addition to any other penalties provided by law, violation of the Cone of Silence Provisions by any
proposer and bidder shall render any RFP award, RFQ award, or bid award voidable. Any person hav-
ing personal knowledge of a violation of the Cone of Silence provisions shall report such violation to the
State Attorney and/ or may file a complaint with the Ethics Commission. Bidders should reference the
actual Cone of Silence Provisions for further clarification.

All Bidders will be notified in writing when the County Manager makes an award recommendation to
the Board of County Commissioners.
Ordinance No. 90-143, The Responsible Wages and Benefits Ordi?nance, Ordinance No. 91-142,
Family Leave Ordinance, Ordi?nance No. 92-15, Drug-Free Workplace Ordinance, Ordinance No. 93-
129, Contractor Debarment Ordinance, Ordinances Nos. 94-166 and 96-26 Local Prefer ence
Ordinances, Ordinances Nos. 97-35 and 97-104 Fair Subcontract ing Practices, Resolution No. R-702-
98 (Repeals and supersedes Resolutions Nos. R-1206-97 and R-366-97) Welfare to Work Initiative and
Ordinance No. 98-30, County Contractors Employment and Procure?ment Practices are referenced for
this contract document.

NOTE: Ordinance 97-104 requires a bid or proposal for a County or Public Health Trust contract
involving the expenditure of $100,000.00 or more to include-a listing of subcontractors and sup-
pliers who will be used on the contract. Failure to include the required listing shall render the
bid or proposal non-responsive.

The required listing must be submitted even though the bidder or proposer will not utilize sub-
contractors or suppliers on the contract. In the latter case, the listing must expressly state no
subcontractors or suppliers will be used on the contract.

Timely submission of a properly completed and signed "Subcontractor/Supplier Listing, SUB
Form 100" (a copy of which is included in the specifications) constitutes compliance with the
listing requirements of the Ordinance. In order to be deemed properly completed the word
"NONE" must be entered under the appropriate heading of SUB Form 100 if no subcontractors
or suppliers will be used on the contract.

The County shall have the right but not the obligation to retain the services of an Independent
Private-Sector Inspector General (IPSIG). The requirements are set forth in the Instructions to
Prospective Contractor, Appendix A, Paragraph 22. Also, the Contract is subject to review and
audit by the Office of the Miami-Dade County Inspector General and further information is spec-
ified in the Instructions to Prospective Contractor, Appendix A, Paragraph 21.

All bids must be submitted in sealed envelopes bearing on the outside the name of the Bidder, his
address, the number of the project for which the bid is submitted, and the date of opening.

The County reserves the right to waive any informality in, or to reject any or all bids. Bids from any per-
son, firm or corpo ration in default upon any agreement with the County will be rejected.

Vendor applications and solicitation packages for Invitations to Bid (ITB), Request for Proposals (RFP)
and Architectural and Engineering (A&E) projects can be obtained on the 13th floor of the Stephen P.
Clark Center, 111 N.W. 1st Street, in the Vendor Assistance Unit. The VIC will provide information and
assistance in doing business with Miami-Dade County, vendor registration and certification, and cur-
rent contracting opportunities countywide. Vendor Assistance staff can be reached by phone at 305-
375-5773 or on the web at.

GEORGE M. BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK
KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK


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8D The Miami Times, March 1-7, 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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FCAA honors 16 for their achievements at annual luncheon
FCAA honors 16 for their achievements at annual luncheon


The Family Christian
Association of America. Inc.
(FCAA) held its 2006 annual
Black Achievers of Excellence
Awards Program, on Wednesday
Feb. 15, at the Radisson Hotel
Miami Downtown. This year's
theme was "The Dream
Continues...Connecting our
Youth with Excellence".
The Black Achievers of
Excellence Program, headed by
Anthony "Tony" Brunson, part-
ner in Sharpton, Brunson and
Company, honored 16 Black
men and women for their out-
standing leadership in the work-
place and the community. This
program is a partnership
between FCAA and local corpo-
rations, which is a way for FCAA
to ensure funding for its youth
programs, and at the same time
create a public forum honoring
Black professionals who serve
as role models for youth. "Our
goal is to provide young people
with the tools they need to suc-
ceed, and adult role models who
can make a difference in their
lives," said Tony Brunson.
Some of the corporate spon-
sors include: AvMed Health
Plan; Baptist Health South
Florida; Barry University; City of
Miami Police Department;
Florida Memorial University;
International Longshoremen's
Association-Local 1416; Publix
Super Markets, Inc.; Sharpton,
Brunson and Company, P.A.
and Southern Wine and Spirits
of South Florida.


Top row from left Suzanne Balbosa-Saunders; Dominique Dorsainvil Turgot; Sharhonda Ford; Kyle Davis.
Middle row from left Kevin James; John M. Beaubrun; Jean Dorismond, (Center ) Anthony "Tony" Brunson Honorary Chairman; Dr. Raymond E.
Cain, Jr.; Perry Smith; Dumas Beauchamp.
Seated from left Kimberley Spence; Jesula "Jessie" Jerome-Joseph; Ann Marie Allen; Rosemary B. Brathwaite; Dr. Denise Callwood-Brathwaite;


Yvette King-Archer.

The honorees include: Ann
Marie Allen, Manager, Staffing
and Nursing Homestead
Hospital (An Affiliate of Baptist
Health South Florida)


Suzanne Balbosa-Saunders,
RN, Patient Care Manager II -
Baptist Hospital (An Affiliate of
Baptist Health South Florida)
Jean Dorismond, Supervisor,


Plant Operations Doctors
Hospital (An Affiliate of
Baptist Health South Florida)
Dominique Dorsainvil
Turgot, Baptist Outpatient


Services Quality Management
Manager Baptist Outpatient
Services (An Affiliate of
Baptist Health South Florida)
Jesula "Jessie" Jerome-


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Donna Shalala, President
University of Miami


PERFECT FOR ANY SIZE BUSINESS


r The Beacon Council
Mioam/-Dade County's Offkiol
Elconomic Dovelopmnol.Porinurship


TO EXPAND OR RELOCATE YOUR BUSINESS IN MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CALL THE BEACON COUNCIL AT 305-579-1300 OR VISIT MAKEITMIAMI.COM

Miami-Dade Marketing Initiative campaign funded in partnership with Miami-Dade County and the private sector.


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Joseph, Clinical Coordinator
Multi-Specialty Acute Care
Program South Miami
Hospital (An Affiliate of
Baptist Health South Florida)
Yvette King-Archer, RN, BSN,
Employee Wellness Educator
RN Baptist Health South
Florida
John M. Beaubrun, Vice
Provost and Dean of
Information Technology -
Barry University
Rosemary B. Brathwaite,
Student Account Manager -
Florida Memorial University
Dr. Raymond E. Cain, Jr.,
Interim Dean Florida
Memorial University
Dr. Denise Callwood-
Brathwaite, Graduate Program
Director and Associate
Professor of Special
Education- Florida Memorial
University
Sharhonda Ford, Director of
Student Publication Florida
Memorial University
Dumas Beauchamp, Store
Manager Publix Super
Markets, Inc.
Kyle Davis, Publix Deerfield
Distribution Manager Publix
Super Markets, Inc.
Kevin James, Assistant Store
Manager Publix Super
Markets, Inc.
Perry Smith, Store Manager-
Publix Super Markets, Inc.
Kimberley Spence, Special
Events Manager Southern
Wine & Spirits of South
Florida.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10D The Miami Times M 6




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