Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00052
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: February 15, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00052
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text





Johnson pays $1.7 billion for 100 hotels
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South's Largest Black Weekly Circulation


One Family Serving Since 1923
83YEARS
Informing Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties


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The Miami Times
Black History 2006




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Hialeah Gardens police accused of racism


By Renee M. Harris
rharris@miamitimesonline.com


As the rest of the country celebrates the contributions that
Blacks have made to this country while simultaneously mourn-
ing the loss of historic civil rights legends a local woman is
suing the Hialeah Gardens police department for its 'Jim Crow'
type behavior towards her.
Alexandria Clayton, 41, is currently on paid administrative leave
pending an investigation into whether she disobeyed a direct order
and insulted a local resident, charges she denied.
Because her leave status forbids her from leaving her home from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays, Clayton did not accompany her
attorney, David Comras, to an interview with The Miami Times.
Clayton's case is garnering significant attention, having been
covered by local print and electronic media. A group made up of
local ministers and civil rights groups has voiced support for her,
meeting recently with the current mayor, Yosette De La Cruz.


ALEXANDRIA CLAYTON


According to Clayton's attorney, the
mayor's office was ready to accommo-
date a few people for the Feb. 8 meet- ,
ing, but had to retrieve more chairs
because of the large number of people
in the group.
The group included members of the
Baptist Ministers Counselors, repre-
sentatives from the NAACP and Clarice
Pollack, local president of the National
Organization of Women. Clayton has
filed a federal lawsuit alleging acts of
discrimination and retaliation.
According to her lawyer, the suit was
filed.around the end of January.
Other Hialeah Gardens officers have
expressed concern with the depart-
ment's treatment of Clayton. Jonathan


i--------------------------.- Peisi, 58, is a retired Hialeah Gardens
" ...The city and its police officer who said "they're not doing
olic dartmen ar Alex right." Peisi said the department
needs to be more diverse, adding that
known for discrimina- Clayton is one of two Blacks employed
by the city. Peisi said Clayton is compe-
tory acts,...a federal tent and "has a mind of her own."
jury awarded $633,000 The challenge of integrating a previ-
ously non-Black department is proving
after concluding that stressful for the married mother of two.
Hialeah Gardens Clayton has reported incidents perpetu-
ated against her that include the plain
trampled a man's bizarre discovery of frogs hopping across
constitutional right to her feet as she drove her patrol car to
the seriously deviant attempts of physi-
"enter into contracts cal assault by her colleagues.
withn s Adding to the amount of stress
with nonwhites...Please turn to POLICE 3A


Funk Jazz Lounge back on the air


By Renee M. Harris
rharris@miamitimesonline.com
Black music lovers jonesing for an
opportunity to hear neo-soul music on the
air waves were thrilled with HOT 105's
debut of the Funk Jazz Lounge in 2001.
Finally, we thought, music for adults
grown weary of the rump shaking, sexual-
ly explicit, non-imaginative concoctions


being passed off as music.
Those same fans were equally disap-
pointed when, three years later, the Miami
radio station pulled the plug on the show
due to what management said was low lis-
tenership an explanation that did not fly
with loyal listeners who tuned in on the
regular, yours truly included.
Well funk jazz fans can rejoice because
the Funk Jazz Lounge is back. Different


station, different frequency (monthly,
instead of weekly), same soulful sounds
and same soulful host. Demus and his
publicist, Hasan Brown, stopped by The
Miami Times to talk about the show's
rebirth and his plans for its future on its
new home WDNA 88.9 on the FM dial.
With his distinctively smooth voice, old-
soul personality and genuine good guy
Please turn to LOUNGE 6A


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Katrina waste, fraud and

abuse is unacceptable

Just when we thought it could not possibly get any
worse, we learn that the White House was very like-
ly aware that Hurricane Katrina victims were being
ravaged by flooding from the city's broken levees a day
before they claimed. To add insult to injury, we now learn
that loads of post Hurricane Katrina fraud have been
uncovered.
As a congressional report pointed the finger at govern-
ment-wide ineptitude for mishandling the Hurricane
Katrina relief effort, a government accounting report
revealed massive misspending on hurricane efforts.
The 600-page report by a special Republican-dominated
House inquiry into one of the worst natural disasters in U.S.
history concluded that "Katrina was a national failure, an
abdication of the most solemn obligation to provide for the
common welfare. At every level individual, corporate,
philanthropic, and governmental we failed to meet the
challenge that was Katrina."
In its haste to provide Katrina disaster aid, the obviously
unprepared Federal Emergency Management Agency wast-
ed millions of dollars and overpaid for hotel rooms, includ-
ing $438-a-day lodging in New York City.
Two other reports released by the Government
Accountability Office and the Homeland Security
Department's office of inspector general detail a series of
accounting flaws, fraud or mismanagement in their initial
review of how $85 billion in federal aid is being spent.
The two audits found that up to 900,000 of the 2.5 million
applicants who received aid under FEMA's emergency cash
assistance program which included the $2,000 debit
cards given to evacuees were based on duplicate or
invalid Social Security numbers, or false addresses and
names.
Thousands of additional dollars appear to have been
squandered on hotel rooms for evacuees that were paid at
retail rather than the contractor's lower estimated cost.
They included $438 rooms in New York City and beachfront
condominiums in Panama City, Fla:, at $375 a night,
according to the audits.
Let's hope that as the 2006 hurricane season rolls around
in June that our government has learned from its horren-
dous handling of Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.


We are not optimistic.


he futiamTi Time5
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305- 694-6210
H.E. SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairman
Ap


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $40.00 Six Months $25.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax for Florida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami, Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, FL 33127 305-694-6210
Credo of the Black Press''
The Black Press believes that America can bestleaq th op.rld from.raoi~l.'ind;. national '
antagonism when it accords to every person, regardless of race. creed or color. his or her,
human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person. he Black Press strives o help
every person in the firm belief that all persons are hurt as ongas anyone is held back;
S.- on ... .
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Your letters are welcome
The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its
editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the
newspaper. Such feedback makes for a healthy dialogue
among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All let-
ters must be signed and must include the name, address
and telephone number of the writer for purposes of con-
firming authorship.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900
N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127, orfax them to 305-757-
5770; Email: miamitl @bellsouth. net.


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Editorial


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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OPINION


The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 3A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Beacon of Black What's real?

By Jarrell Douse
Special to The Times
Let there be light.
It has become a sad state of Black affairs in Miami-Dade
County and other Black communities across these united
states. Many of the businesses thriving in our communities
aren't owned and operated by entrepreneurs who look like us -
who mirror our own identity.
What identity? That's the question I've recently pondered and
examined.
In pursuit of defining this seemingly elusive identification, I
was daunted to realize that after years of being Black, we are the
only group of people to grapple for a solidified identity in the
world's social, political, and economic caste systems and on its
scales.
WHO ARE WE?
We wrestle with issues of whether we are African-American,
Black, niggers, and or niggas. Far too much time has been
expended on efforts to attain an acceptable title that's comfort-
able to us and less abrasive to the world, when in fact, the color
green proves it encompasses and surpasses all other hues.
Money is the axis on which the world spins around and around.
Questions. Why is it that we continue to live by and under less
than optimal political and financial powers? Why is it that we
accept one-dimensionalism when the rest of the watching world
embraces the facets of capitalism and survival of the fittest.
My peers and I are an auspicious group of intellect and talent
and we love to be seen and heard; however, the music of our
lives rattles the vertebrae with resonating bass from speakers
boasting 'hood' chronicles and stultifying poverty prophesy.




.. We wrestle with issues of whether we are
African-American, Black, niggers, and or niggas. Far
too much time has been expended on efforts to attain
an acceptable title that's comfortable to us and less
abrasive to the world..."

WE ARE THE
MASTERS OF OUR FATE
Who is responsible for writing the story of the 'hood?' Who
is the cunning artist who illustrates the character's lives and
gives a plot to the theme of life's capricious screen play.
Simply, we are.
We are the authors of own our fate as evidenced by the
choices and decisions we make. Choices that inevitably
shape our individual (though collective) destinies. Contrary
to popular belief, the predisposition to pen the bestselling
book of our lives and publish it as well is not out of real-
ity.
We chant platitudes of keeping it 'gangsta' -of keeping it
'real' when in reality, our power, relatively speaking, is
miniscule and only perpetuates -what isn't really real.
But what are we really willing to endorse?
Perhaps, literacy, respect of self and the need to demand it
from others? These are real issues that plague our commu-
nity and hush our collective voice.
If there is anyone to contest such pitches I direct your
attention to what could be a booming Black world of homes
and businesses, an opportunity being squandered by gentri-
fication at its slyest-finest.
WE ARE GREATER
THAN WE KNOW
Being Black is more than what some consider tainted blood
and an inferior exterior. The message of being Black isn't
solely expressed in our hue, but rather in the power and the
soul ensconced in it. We need only reference The
Autobiography of Malcolm X or the list of inventions credited
to Black men and women during the month of February to be
reminded of our inherent greatness, our real brilliance.
Keeping it real appears to have opaqued the vision of our
standing in our own world forget about what the rest of
America thinks of us. Our failure to take an honest look in
the mirror is a stubborn blindness that serves as an enmity
against our productive selves.
We are so preoccupied with defining our external sem-
blance that we fail to embrace the truths of being human,
and that's the bottom-line being of humanity.
Questions we should all ask "Are my aspirations a
reflection of my truth? Are my thoughts helping me or hurt-
ing me keeping me stuck or moving me forward?
It is our complacency that encumbers our ambitions and
consumes our potential faster than a cancer of any vital
organ. Like a cancer detected early and given due care, how-
ever,. there's hope. Remission is possible through stringent
radiation. Black light to our future?
Jarrell Douse is a 2005 graduate of Florida A & M University,
an avid reader of thought-provoking material, a future lawyer and
skilled agitator. Write to him at miamiteditorial@bellsouth.net.



Hialeah Gardens police make life
tough for only Black, only woman


POLICE
continued from 1A
Clayton is enduring with
Hialeah Gardens was her 20-
year old daughter's diagnosis
with cancer in October. Her
daughter is responding favor-
ably to treatment.
The city and its police
department have been known
for discriminatory acts. A fed-
eral jury awarded former
Thunder Wheels roller skating
rink owner, Medardo Martin,
$633,000 in damages after


concluding that Hialeah
Gardens trampled on Martin's
constitutional right to "enter
into contracts with non-
whites."
Martin filed the lawsuit after
constant harassment from
Hialeah Gardens police officers
during Thunder Wheels Soul
Night, an event that attracted
young Blacks to the city.
According to Compras, all of
the tickets and citations issued
to the Blacks attending the
roller rink were fought and
won.


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4A The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 5A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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Funk Jazz Lounge reappears on WDNA


LOUNGE
continued from 1A

charm, Demus became an
instant favorite among Funk
Jazz listeners. The popularity of
the show led to the creation of
the Funk Jazz Lounge weekly
event a party that offered
South Florida's mature Black
professional a venue to soothe
all senses.
At the Thursday night gather-
ings, guests were able to listen
to spoken word artists, see
their favorite neo-soul artists
perform live, eat, drink and
dance to the sounds of Miami's
hottest deejays.
The event bounced around
from its early home at Tim
Hardaway's Firehouse Four to a
long run at Sax on the Beach.
After being hosted at Jade night
club and restaurant for a while
the party gravitated to the
upscale Forge restaurant on
Miami Beach. The Thursday
night suare is currently on hia-
tus while the Forge undergoes
renovation.
Hiatus is a good way to
describe the radio show's
absence. Demus' silent convic-
tion to bring his idea to fruition
and his fans' hunger for it could
not be destroyed by anyone
else's lack of vision. Based
purely on the concept of supply
and demand, The Funk Jazz
Lounge is meant to be.
Demus' new gig came about
because of his love of music. A
fellow music lover and friend,
Michael Valentine, offered him
the chance to revive the radio
program on the public radio
station that bills itself as
'Serious Jazz.'
Valentine, described on the
station's web site as 'the calm,
friendly voice delivering a bal-
anced mix of jazz favorites and
new releases was a fan of Funk
Jazz Lounge when it was on Hot
105. Valentine is such a fan
that he actually gave up some
of his airtime to make room for
Demus.
At WDNA, Demus is hoping to
do a "lot of things that we were
not able to do at Hot."


When queried about the real
reason the show was discontin-
ued at Hot 105, Demus
responds, "the real reason"
Demus repeats, was "part jeal-
ousy, part they wanted . to


JILL SCOTT
control me and the show and it
was hard for them to do that
once everything started to hap-
pen."
What started to happen is
that the show struck a nerve
among South Florida's mature
radio listeners who could find
no other local station offering
them what they wanted to hear.
That Demus would provide the
opportunity for this largely
Black professional crowd to
come together face to face was a
natural progression that was
strongly embraced and resulted
in a packed house, week after
week.
Demus said eventually his
promotion and marketing com-
pany, Funk Jazz Entertainment
was being contacted directly by
the artists and their manage-
ment. "Everything was under
my company including the
show. I trademarked every-
thing, copywrote everything,
eveything was produced by
Funk Jazz Entertainment," he
said.
His business acumen
notwithstanding, Demus said
he attempted to make the situ-
ation with his employer a
win/win. "Any sponsors that
wanted to be a part of anything
we did, I sent them Lo the sta-
tion first, that way the station


could make some kind of rev-
enue," he said.
The station's decision to can-
cel the show did not totally sur-
prise him, although the reason
provided to the public did. "I
was never talked to regarding
the ratings or listenership.
When that was put out there it
was a surprise to me and every-
one else," he said.
This Funk Jazz fan was
among those taken by surprise.
I discovered the show was no
more when, one Sunday after
leaving church, I tuned into
Hot 105 and found blues
instead of Demus. After check-
ing to make sure my radio was
functioning properly, I emailed
Hot 105 Program Director,
Derrick Brown to find out what
happened. Brown's reply was
that the show was cancelled
due to low listenership.
I sense that Demus saw his
departure from Hot 105 as a


U -


INDIA ARIE


blessing in disguise. The broth-
er appears to be absent of any
grudges and genuinely at
peace. When our conversation
shifts to spirituality, religion
and the power of God, Demus
sums it up with "all I wanted to
do was have a radio show and it
blossomed into other things."
The Funk Jazz Lounge can be
heard on the last Sunday of
each month from noon to 2 pm.
Because the station is not regu-
lated by ratings giant Arbitron,
Demus said "listener response
is crucial." Visit the station's
web site at www.wdna.org or
call 1-866-688-WDNA.


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Displaced by Hurricane Katrina or Rita?

Housing Help is Available.



You may be eligible for temporary housing assistance from the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to cover the cost of renting an
apartment or home for your family.

Call FEMA to register or go online
1-800-621-FEMA (open 24 hours daily)
TTY: 1-800-462-7585
www.fema.gov
Multilingual operators are available

An application for a U.S. Small Business Administration Loan
is not required to determine eligibility for FEMA's Temporary Housing assistance.

FEMA's Housing Locator Service
1-800-762-8740 (open daily from 8 am 9 pm EST)
TTY: 1-800-462-7585
www.dhronline.org

If you need help locating available apartments or homes,
FEMA's Housing Locator Service can help.

HUD Disaster Housing Assistance
1-866-373-9509
TTY: 1-800-877-8339

If you were displaced from a low-income or subsidized housing unit funded
by the government or homeless before the storm, U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) can help you find housing options.

There are grants and resources available to eligible applicants to help with
long term housing needs. Join the hundreds of thousands who have already been
assisted and have moved on to a better long term housing solution.

Diisaster recovery assistance is available without rgarl to race, color, sex, religtional orliini,. d ri '.
disabilil:v or economic s*tats. If lyo, or someone you know has been d iscriiniated against.
you shou ld call FEMA at ,00-621-3362 or contact your Stlt' Office olf Eqqual Rliits.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


6A The Miami Times Fe 6






Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 7A

l.a Io imnludr Blak l islh r in cldarowmn ing ignorrd




"Copyrighted Material


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


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.. T.. Mam. Tm F r 15-21 2r


14th Avenue ramp to close in March


By Terrell Clayton
Miami Times Writer

The Miami-Dade expressway
Authority(MDX) delayed plans
to close the 112 ramp at 14th
Avenue. The ramp was sched-
uled to be closed on Feb. 18.
but due to mixed emotions from
the community, MDX has
decided to postpone the closure
until mid March to afford the
community an opportunity to
voice its collective opinion.
"I think 62nd street is going
to be a mad house if they close
that area. I can't understand
why they would even think
about closing this ramp. I've
been using this ramp since the
1970's and now it seems I have
to find another way to get to
work," said Richard Philips, a
concerned resident who lives on
the north side of the ramp.
The purpose of the ramp clo-
sure, according to MDX, is


twofold; to help traffic move
along the expressway at a faster
rate even during the busiest
times: and to eliminate safety
hazards with trucks crisscross-
ing in the area.
"What we are doing right now
is incorporating the ramp
express Sunpass lanes. We
have been discussing ways to
help the flow of traffic since
2001, when people in the com-
munity complained about
trucks crossing through the
neighborhood avoiding the toll,"
said Dere Garcia, public infor-
mation officer for MDX.
Several of the residents likely
to be most impacted by the clo-
sure did not realize the ramp
was closing. According to MDX,
the closure was a change the
community have been looking
forward to for years.
"There are a number of resi-
dents that came to ask for the
ramp to be closed from years


back. The community has been
very aggressive feeling it's a life
issue," said Yvette Holt, presi-
dent of Holt Communications
and Sub-Consultant for MDX.
The purpose of the ramp is
for safety issues as the new
sunpass express lanes allows
cars to travel at normal
expressway speeds through the
toll. Cars will be merging over
from the right and left lanes so
in order to avoid possible acci-
dents the closing of the 112
ramp will eliminate crisscross-
ing of traffic.
Area business owners who
frequently use the ramp feel the
Department of Transportation
is forcing traffic to go through
the adjacent toll booth to collect
more revenue. "The closing of
this ramp will become a major
hassle for residents trying to
get to work. My funeral service
goes this route every week. Now
Please turn to RAMP 12A


b- Sb P1s ftw


How do you feel about the fire fee scandal? Do you feel the
seven people who received the money should give it back?


CURL GONZALEZ
"I feel
robbed. It
seems as any-
time some-
thing can help ...
out the Black
community, it
never hap-
pens. The city
manager and
mayor think Blacks don't read
or look at the news, but that's
not true. They have never been
informative to the [Black] com-
munity since day one. I believe
the people who did get the
money should keep the money
because they was informed. It's
not their fault the money was
given to them."

LIONEL LIGHTBOURNE

"It feels like an information
robbery
because we
are in an inner
circle where
we are
deprived of
what we need
to know. The
City of Miami
is like an eco-
nomical Ku Klux Klan where
poverty is not a Black thing but
a lack (of money) thing. These
people get paid to do their jobs
and they still mess up.
Everybody should have received
some of the seven million. This


had to be an inside job."

VANESSA BOYKIN

"It's a bad situation. They are
robbing from
the poor and
giving it all to
the rich. I feel
if the City of
Miami gave
only seven
people a por-
tion of seven
million than
the city should be able to
redeem it back from them. I
believe that would be the best
option, only if the mayor is
capable of doing the right thing.
That's something I seriously
doubt."

DAWN SMITH

"I expect something like this.
The rich peo-
ple control
what happens
to all the /
money. The
rich and the
poor should've
been able to i
spend the fire '
fee money.
Now you have a lot of people
that was being charged money
that didn't have anything from
the beginning. Those people
still have nothing. If everybody-
can't have the money, then no
one should."


PATRICK SCOTT


"That's bull
how they get
over all the
time. Whoever
got charged
for the fire fee
should be the
ones getting
paid. How can
the judge and


the mayor do something like
that. You can't take money or
give it away without everyone
knowing. People who did get
money should have to give it
back."

ERIC JOINER

S"There
probably
isn't even a

explanation




had a good
mayor, then we wouldn't even
be talking about this. Even
when he found out about the
scandal, why didn't the money
go to some organization? The
people who got the money prob-
ably don't pay taxes."


Compiled by
Terrell Clayton


Federal judge rejects inmate's appeal in Atlanta child murders


ATLANTA (AP) -A federal judge
has rejected an appeal by an
inmate who was blamed in a
string of child murders and disap-
pearances 25 years ago.
Wayne Williams, who was con-
victed of killing two men in 1982
and is serving life in prison,
claimed that prosecutors with-
held critical evidence that could


have led to an acquittal.
But U.S. District Judge
Beverly Martin wrote last week
that none of the allegedly with-
held evidence" would have had
more than a minimal impact
upon the outcome of Mr.
Williams' trial had it been pre-
sented to the jury."
Two dozen young Black men


and children disappeared or
were killed in a string of slay-
ings that terrorized Atlanta's
Black community from 1979-
1981.
Williams was convicted of
killing Nathaniel Carter, 27, and
Jimmy Ray Payne, 21, consid-
ered the last two victims in the
string.


1lllll11


On Wednesday, February 8, a man was found dead next to the train
tracks located at Northeast 182nd Street and West Dixie Highway.
The man was found around 4:30 a.m. with a gash in the back of his
head. The victim was wearing light blue jean shorts and a light col-
ored t-shirt with Black sneakers and white socks. Officers are still
unsure if he was hit by the train. An Aventura police spokesman esti-
mated the man to be between the ages of 50 and 60 years old.


On Saturday, February 4, a man walked into the Metro Ford locat-
ed at 900 NW 7th Avenue, upset over a deal he had made for a new
Ford Escape. When he was told he could not change the car, he
plowed the new vehicle through the showroom glass, doused it with
a flammable liquid and set it on fire. The fire damaged as many as
a dozen more cars on display. He was arrested and charged with
first-degree arson and criminal mischief.



On Monday, February 6, a suspected car thief tried to ram a
Nissan Altima at a police officer before officers shot him. Officers
noticed a man crouching inside a car with the engine running. When
the officers approached the suspect, he placed the car in reverse.
The officers feared for their lives and shot the suspect in the hand
and leg. The suspect is in stable condition at Jackson Memorial
Hospital but has not been identified.


On Wednesday, February 1, someone stole a refrigerator and a gas
stove after removing the front door knob and a wrought iron securi-
ty bat from the apartment buildings located at 127 NW 27th
Avenue. The thief stole items estimated at $1,760.



On January 26, two cars were broken into at the North Terminal
Garage located at 132nd Street NW 7th Avenue. The thief broke the
glove compartment and stole a stereo and speakers from a 1991
Honda Prelude. The suspect also stole other electronics from a 2001
Lincoln limousine:


MIAMf M

Public Comment Meeting
U.S. HUD 2006 Super NOFA (Notice of Funding
Availability) Application Priorities
Homeless Continuum of Care
Annually, the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust invites comments on
priorities for Homeless Services leading up to a County-wide grant appli-
cation to the United States Department of Housing and Urban
Development. This notice serves to announce the following meetings:
Date: February 22, 2006
Time: 10:00 a.m.
Place: Homeless Assistance Center (HAC 2)
28205 S.W. 125th Avenue
Homestead, Florida
Time: 2:00 p.m.
Place: Homeless Assistance Center (HAC 1)
1550 North Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida
For material in alternate format, a sign language interpreter, or
other accommodations, please call 305-375-1490.


I AM m Ir s mr i arn H krt otL4m


"Copyrighted Material


q0


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"


* New four-lane extension of SR 836 between N.W.
lo7th Avenue and N.W. 137th Avenue. This is the
first expressway extension in South Florida in more
than 10 years

* New construction of a six-lane roadway, 137th
Avenue, between S.W. 8th Street and N.W. 12th Street

* New sound barrier walls, lighting, landscaping and a
bike path connecting to the Miami-Dade Bikeway System


MDX puts your toll dollars to work!


11ss5 p, 5 Tis RGA

DRIVE15 SIIM^,,,,,


MIAMI-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY

www.mdxway.com


Crime Scene I


I


8A The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


I


, .


:*I:4
r






Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 9A


Courtesy AP/Wide World Photos.


Photo by Don Cravens I Time Life Pictures/Getty Images.


-1






-c,



__


fO







rO


Photo by Dan Weiner I Courtesy Sandra Weiner.


Photo by Don Cravens I Time Life Pictures/Getty Images.


AARP is proud to present
381 Days because we
believe that knowledge
drives change. To learn
more about the exhibit
and tour schedules, visit
www.si Ltr.si.edu.


For more about AARP,
please visit www.aarp.org
or call 1-888-OUR-AARP.


SM B B
The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story


Day1







. Day 78








) Day 204








) Day 381


AARP presents 381 Days: The
Montgomery Bus Boycott
Story, a traveling 15-city exhibit
highlighting the moments that
gave birth to the Civil Rights
Movement. Created by the
Smithsonian Institution, this
multifaceted retrospective celebrates
the struggle and subsequent successes
of those who helped change the
country forever. We invite you to
leave your mark in history by
contributing your story to the:
"Voices of Civil Rights" project,
the largest archive of personal
accounts from the Civil Rights
era, either by visiting 381Days
in a city near you or online at
www.voicesofcivilrights.org.


AARP
( tg ~The power to make it better."


# Smithsonian

381 Days: The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story was developed by the Smithsonian
Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in collaboration with the Troy University Rosa Parks
Library and Museum.
I


WE KNOW THE JOURNEY,
NOW LET'S REDISCOVER
THE STOPS.


The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 9A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny






Jmbn r, muI the h rf d el cr


"Copyrighted Material


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. Available from Commercial News Providers"


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10A The Miami Times F 6








The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 11A


Sta, pta OeSied. urp, h(rr





"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


uill


MIAMiD* PUBLIC HEARING




The Public is hereby advised that a Public Hearing will be
held on February 21, 2006 at 9:30 a.m., by the Miami-Dade
County Board of County Commissioners, in the Commission
Chambers located on the second floor of the. Miami-Dade
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 N.W. First Street, Miami,
Florida, at which time the Board will consider:

RESOLUTION ACCEPTING THE FINDING OF
NECESSITY STUDY FOR THE
GOULDS/CUTLER RIDGE AREA AND
APPROVING THE PREPARATION OF A
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT PLAN

The Goulds/Cutler Ridge Area is generally bounded
on the South by SW 232"" Street, on the West by SW 127th
Avenue, on the North by the Black Creek Canal and SW
Dixie Highway, on the East by the Florida Turnpike with
an addition of parcels between SW 232"d Street, the
Florida Turnpike SW 240"' Street and SW 117th Avenue.

All interested parties may appear and he heard at the time
and place specified. Copies of the resolution may be
obtained from the Clerk, Board of County Commissioners,
17t' Floor of the Miami-Dade County Stephen P. Clark
Center.

A person who decides to appeal any decision made by the
board, agency or commission with respect to any matter
considered at its meeting or hearing will need a record of
the proceedings. Such person may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based. Miami-Dade County provides equal access and
equal opportunity in the employment and services and does
not discriminate on the basis of the handicap. Sign
Language interpreters are available upon request. Please
call (305) 375-3418 at least five days in advance.


OUR COMMUNITY. OUR YOUTH. OUR FUTURE


_= BlueCross BlueShield
of Florida
S An i d B'pndrclnt LiUcosee of th
B iu C oss aid Blue Sh;eic Assoc a:ion


Proceeds to benefit the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund and Orange Bowl Foundation






HONOREES -
.I'S.L."


.~Z~5.

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CONGRESSMAN MRS. M. ATHAUE RANGE COMMISSIONER
ALCEE HASTINGS O,;r t C,0 HAZELLE ROGERS
S.3 RsgFunr!. 'FuSm. laliHolmlto irites


MIAMI NORTHWESTERN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
cPaiiots owis ce ,.n;,


DILLARD HIGH SCHOOL
hbf-y^G S Ni npi:, ?w.\'^\


- Friday, March 3,2006
- Broward County Convention Center, Grand Floridian Ballroom
S7:00 pm Codctail Reception j 8:30 pm Dinner & Program
Business or Cocktdil Attire
- $75 per person / $750 per table of ten
- Premium Seating: $150 pp / $1500 per table often
TICKETS: Call 305.341.4702 or visit www.rangebowLorg





'T'he Orange "Bowf'Toundation


OCEAN BANK


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


;I-
'


5 COM'B.ON CTf ER












Homeowners can get funds to spruce up houses


The Board of County
Commissioners approved a
resolution allocating funds to
H.J. Russell Construction
Company for both Liberty
City's Beautification
Demonstration and
Rehabilitation programs. The
measure, sponsored by
Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle,
will designate more than $3
million from the Surtax funds
or State Housing Initiative
Program (SHIP) to address the
upgrades to poorly designed or
antiquated housing units in
need of rehabilitation.
"A challenge we are aggres-
sively tackling is the rehabili-
tation of our community's anti-
quated infrastructure," said
Commissioner Rolle. "The
way a community looks goes to


FAMU choir performs
in Coconut Grove
The Florida A & M University
Choir will perform at Christ
Episcopal Church in Coconut
Grove on Thursday, March 9,
at 7 p.m. The church is located
at 3481 Hibiscus Street in
Coconut Grove. This outstand-
ing group will present an
evening of Classical, Spiritual,
Jazz and Gospel music pieces
that are sure to delight and
thrill, the audience.
The traveling choir is com-
posed of 53 undergraduate
members who represent 15 dif-
ferent majors within the
University. Under the direction
of Charlie J. Toomer, a gradu-
ate of Florida A & M University
and a product of Miami, the
choir is making its annual tour
of the South Florida area.
The public is cordially invited
to this free concert. Donations
will be accepted.
For further information,
please call 305-445-6662.



Newspapers

Come


and Go..
Well at least

some of them


the quality of life the residents
are experiencing. Everyone
deserves to have sound shelter
and to be proud of where they
live."
Both programs are designed
to assist single-family home-
owners in the areas bordering
NW 7 Avenue on the east, NW
17 Avenue on the west, NW 62
Street on the south and NW 79
Street on the north. Each
qualified owner participating
in the beautification demon-
stration program will receive
up to $3,900 in assistance for
landscaping, exterior painting
and facade improvements.
The rehabilitation program will
give homeowners up to
$30,000 to make qualified
structural repairs.
When he was appointed to


DORRIN ROLLE
the County Commission in
1998, Commissioner Rolle


St. John CDC fights gei


There is an exciting new story
in Overtown which shows how
our community is fighting gen-
trification. St. John
Community Development
Corporation (SJCDC), a
provider of affordable housing
for low income residents of
Miami-Dade County, has com-
pleted the renovation of a two-
story apartment building locat-
ed on the corner of 1445 N.W
1st Court in Overtown, a City of
Miami community targeted for
urban revitalization.
For years, the two-story and
10-unit apartment building
was a picture of neglect and
decay, and a blemish to
Overtown's history and pride.
Residents of the deteriorating
structure were living in condi-
tions near uninhabitable.


REV. HENRY NEVIN


In accordance with part of its
mission, "to energize the vitality
and positive image of Overtown.
. through partnerships that
build and rehabilitate housing,.
. and enhance the quality of
life," SJCDC began the rehab


process with their own dollars
and a grant from Miami-Dade
Empowerment Trust. The proj-
ect also received support from


NELSON L. ADAMS


the Miami-Dade Housing
Agency, the Knight Foundation,
and Local Initiatives Support
Corporation (LISC).
The building was donated to
SJCDC in 2000, and architec-
tural plans were completed for
major renovation by Judson &
Partners, Architects.
To avoid minimum displace-
ment to families, SJCDC reno-
vated half of the units at a time
and will complete the renova-
tion with over $385,000 invest-
ed as a forgivable loan. The
property will be fully owned and
managed by SJCDC.
With the assistance of the
MDHA and SJCDC partners,
the project is now 100% com-
plete. Special thanks to the
MDHA Board and staff for their
extraordinary support through
granting extensions and forgiv-
able loans to the 1445 Building
Project.
"As we celebrate our 20th


Inner city expressway entrance to close in March


RAMP
continued from 8A

that we need to find another
way I guarantee business
around Miami won't be the
same. They are probably going
to end up opening it right back
up," said Dwight Jackson,
owner of Richardson Mortuary
on NW 45th street and 17th
avenue.
MDX addressed residents'
concern regarding the ramp's
access to three major hospitals
in Miami: Jackson Memorial,
Cedars and Bascom Palmer.
"Whenever we do a traffic
switch we alert the hospitals
and emergency services of our
plans so they will have alterna-
-tive routes." said Garcia.
Some residents of the com-
munity still feel outraged. "I'll
understand if they did not want
all the trucks coming through,
but to close down the ramp that
has been there for decades is
ridiculous." said Philips. "The
problem is people were getting
off the expressway at 22nd
Avenue to bypass the toll
booth. If traffic is backed up it's
easier to go around then wait-
ing in all the traffic."
Alfred Lurigados, Director of
Engineers stated people in the
north and south areas of the
ramp have different viewpoints.
"Residents on the south of the
ramp want it closed, but the
north side feels they want
it open."
Lurigados said the south side
of the ramp is the entrance
where most of the trucks speed
through. "In addition to provid-
ing information to the commu-
nity we are going to provide
alternative routes and maps.
We would like to show that
there may be better routes. This


is definitely a safety issue."
The Miami-Dade Expressway
Authority will give the commu-
nity a chance to voice their
opinion as well as clarify


issues. There will be a meeting
on Feb. 28, at MDX headquar-
ters located at 3790 NW 27th
Street. Call 305-637-3277 for
more information.


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made a vow to his constituents
to revitalize the community
through new capital improve-
ment projects, job opportuni-
ties, business investments and
affordable housing. His north
Miami-Dade district is com-
prised of more than 102,000
residents, encompassing the
communities of Liberty City,
Opa-Locka, North Miami,
Miami Shores, El Portal and
North Miami Beach.
"As District Two's represen-
tative it is my responsibility to
ensure that the commitments
made to the African-American
and Haitian-American commu-
nities are kept and that our
projects are delivered as prom-.
ised," said Commissioner Rolle
in explaining the importance of
the programs.



ntrification

anniversary, the completion of
this project is an example of the
good work in which SJCDC has
long been engaged. This project
could not have been completed
without the help of our partners
who have steadfastly supported
the organization, its mission
and its commitment to the peo-
ple of Overtown," says Nelson L.
Adams, M.D., Board Chairman.
SJCDC is a nonprofit
501(c)(3) agency founded in
1985 by Reverend Henry Nevin
and a group of concerned and
dedicated residents from the
Overtown community. SJCDC
was established to respond to
the physical deterioration and
social distress of Overtown, one
of Miami-Dade County's oldest
communities dating back to
1890, and to take a lead role in
its revitalization.
SJCDC efforts are directed
towards building partnerships,
building new homes, rehabili-
tating housing units, strength-
ening the economic base and
improving the quality of life.
SJCDC is dedicated to the revi-
talization and preservation of
this historic district.


The Beocon Counci
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Tax Benefits Available for Companies in Enterprise Zones
The Beacon Council and Miami-Dade County' Office of Community & Economic Development Can Assist


The mission of the Beacon Council's Urban
Initiatives Program is to create and retain jobs
and assist businesses to relocate and expand in
our targeted urban areas.
The Beacon Council, Miami-Dade County's
official economic development partnership, helps
businesses locate financing sources; provides
information on tax incentives, wage rate, labor
training and recruitment; permitting and regulato-
ry procedures; identifies sites for new-to-market
and expanding companies; and offers a wide
range of research and marketing support that can
be customized by industry.
One of the county departments that The
Beacon Council .works closely with is Miami-
Dade County's Office of Community & Economic
Development (OCED). OCED administers feder-
al and state funding that supports the develop-
ment of viable urban neighborhoods in our coun-
ty that is characterized by decent housing,
expansion of economic opportunities and the
preservation of historic properties.
One funding program marketed by The
Beacon Council and administered by OCED is
the Enterprise Zone Program. Established by the
State of Florida and Miami-Dade County,
Enterprise Zones (EZ) were created to encour-
age business development, expansion and job
creation in economically distressed areas.
Businesses which locate or expand in an EZ and
hire employees who live in the zone can reduce
their State and County taxes.
Enterprise Zones in Miami-Dade County
include a large portion of Northwest Miami-Dade,
areas near Miami International and Opa-locka
airports, parts of Hialeah, Homestead, Florida
City, Perrine, Cutler Bay, Princeton, South
Beach, Collins Avenue, and North Miami Beach.


ADDITIONAL BENEFITS AVAILABLE ;
Contact The Beacon Council at 305-579-1342 or
Miami-Dade County's Office of Community &
Economic Development at 305-375-4535.


MAKE IT MIAMI
mlami -dade county


:'The Beacon Council
The Beacon Council,Miami-Dade County's official economic development partnership, is a not-for-profit,
public-riatergaiztion that focuses n job creation and economic growth by coordinating communi-
ty-wide programs;promoting minority business and urban economic revitalization; providing assistance
to local businesses in their expansion efforts; and marketing Miami-Dade County throughout the world.


12A The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny






















Florida conference of Black legislators


The Tallahassee Girls Choir of CHOICE performs during the FCBSL Distinguished Lecture Series.


the charge for Blacks to take respon-
sibility for their future and help our
youth understand their value in
today's society," said FCBSL
Chairman Senator Anthony 'Tony'
Hill, Sr., D-Jacksonville.
The FCBSL's 3rd Distinguished
Lecture Series
was well
attended by
constituents,
members of the
Florida
Legislature and
community
leaders. In
addition, the
FCBSL
Distinguished
Lecture Series
featured on Travis Lockett wows
aoll masse the crowd with his beau-
Tallahassee
Girls Choir of tiful voice at the 3rd
CHOICE and FCBSL Distinguished
Travis Lockett, Lecture Series,
a 13-year-old
singer. "As we reflect on Black
History month, the FCBSL is proud to
bring energetic and informative lead-
ers to the State Capitol to address the
economic and social status of our
communities. Dr. Reed delivered a
powerful message to us and we accept
our mission in helping others," said
Representative Joyce Cusack, D-
DeLand.


Southern Florida Church of

God in Christ workers meeting


The Southern Florida
Jurisdiction Church of God In
Christ invites you to their sev-
enth annual Holy Workers
meeting Monday, February 20-
26, at the jurisdiction head-
quarters, Gamble Church of
God in Christ, 1898 NW
43 Street, where the Bishop Ju-
lius C. Jackson is senior minis-
ter and pastor. The workers
meeting will continue Tuesday
through Saturday at Gamble
Memorial with day and night
services at 10 a.m. and 7:30
p.m.
The Sunday service will con-
vene at the Church of God by
Faith, 16929 NW 23rd Avenue.
Elder William Brazil is the host
pastor.
Sunday School will begin at 9
a.m. and the morning worship
will begin at 11 a.m. Speaking
from the theme, 'Energized by
the Holy Spirit,' Bishop Julian
C. Jackson will deliver the offi-
cial day sermon.


Bishop Julius C. Jackson


The community is invited to
come and fellowship with us
during these anointed sessions.
The Lord has promised to be
with us and we hope you will,
too.
Bishop Julian C. Jackson,
jurisdictional prelate, Mother
Cecille Collins, supervisor of
the Department of Women.


Annual birthday celebration


New Changing Life Deliverance
Church invites you to its annual
birthday celebration for Pastor,
Evangelist Bobby Wellons. This
year's theme is: 'We're Still Hold-
ing On!'
The services will be held at
6942 NW 15th Avenue on Sun-
day, February 19, 12 p.m. and 8
p.m., and Monday, February 20
through Friday, February 24 at
8 a.m.
Several pastors and their con-
gregations, Pastor Wellons' fami-
ly and his friends will be in
attendance to honor this blessed
occasion.
Our celebration will culminate
with our annual banquet at El
Palacio Sports Hotel and Confer-
ence Center on Saturday,


Pastor Bobby Wellons


February 25 at 7 p.m.
For more information,
contact 305-685-0629.


please


Mt. Calvary observes anniversary


Mt. Calvary's Pastor's Aide
Ministry will observe their 43
anniversary Sunday, February
19 at 4 p.m.
Reverend C. P. Preston and
the Peaceful Zion Baptist
Church will be in charge of
this service.
The public is invited to
attend. Sister Gwendolyn
Scott, president; Reverend
Samuel Atchison, pastor.


It's a revival at Mt. Olive F.B.H. Church


Four powerful nights coming
all the way from South
Carolina, Prophetess Mary
Williams will be here 7:30 p.m.
nightly on February 20, 21, 22,
23 at Mt. Olive F.B.H.C., 8400


N.W. 22 Ave.
Come out, receive God and
believe God for your miracle.
receive your healing and your
blessing.
Come out and get revived!


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Join Bishop Vtor T, Curry and the Mew Birth Baptist Church as we
kick-off our Multicultural Ministr r in a Spirited, International Might of


Praise, Worship and a


Celebratory Message of Unity translated in
Creole and 5panish


Bishop Victor T. Curry. D.Min., D.Div.
Senior PastorlTeacher
A


GUESTS INCLUDE.
LIVE JUNKANOO
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BoBBY ROSARIO AND BAND


* VOICES OF FAITH HAITIAN YOUTH
COMMUNITY CHOIR
* VOCALIST ROCHELLE SUNDERS
r GOSPEL RECORDING ARTIST Nioa


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I NEW BIRTH'S G.,R.A.C,.E.


DiVE RS3T AND UNITY
PRODUCED BY THE EVENT CONCIERGE GROUP


SPONSOED.IN ATB.


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Florida Sweet Corn
Exchange


FloPida oDpartment.of Agriculture ,.,h
and Consumer SErvicEs 5i.'i f


Law Offices of Angones, McCuhlre
& Garcia


New Birth Baptist Church Cathedral of Faith International
2300 NW 135th St. Miami, FL For Info: 305.685.3700 ext. 307


Along with the evening event, Bishop Curry iskicking off the day with a partnership with the University of Miami's Life Alliance
Organ Recovery Agency. Bishop Curry, along with Dr. Clive Callender the nationally renowned founder and director of
the Minority Organ and Tissue/Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP)/Howard University, are co-hosting a Multicultural
Community Forum on "Saving Lives through Transplantation" between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m., at the Bascom Palmer Eye
Institute Retter Auditorium 900 NW 17th Street. The forum, a live radio broadcast of the "Tuesday Talk with Bishop Victor T
Curry" on AM 7490 WMBM, will focus on health, religion, cultural diversity and saving lives. Hosted by Bishop Victor T Curry,
the broadcast is part of Life Alliance's effort to reach out to the minority communities and better inform them about living
healthy and preventing chronic diseases that could lead to transplants.


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Family fun, ministry and basketball come together


On Jan. 29, at the
BankAtlantic Center in Sunrise,
formerly known as the Office
Depot Center, Broward County
experienced it's first of the new
year. Gospel Night Explosion,
called "Playing For The King!"
The BankAtlantic Center is
home of Tim Hardaway's
Florida Pit Bulls of the
American Basketball
Association (ABA).
On this day, however, the
team's minister and Founder of
M.J. F. World Wide Ministries,
Ambassador Monzell D. Ford


was given an open door to set
the atmosphere in a unique
way. Ambassador Ford received
instructions. from the Lord to
promote and present a night
that would Glorify God and lift
up the name of Jesus!
What is often a secular envi-
ronment was converted to the
unthinkable and unimaginable,
sanctuary for all people who
believe on the name of Jesus to
come out and enjoy a night of
family fun, ministry, and be
entertained by the greatest D.J
to the gospel community, D.J.


Device of Rhythm & Gospel
Network.
As the Florida Pit Bulls con-
tinued to defeat by a lead of 13
points, during half time the
saints and friends were moved
by an amazing performance by
'Hands of Hope' praise team
from A Place Called Hope
Church in Hollywood, Florida
where Bishop Duane and
Sunny Swilley are the residing
pastors.
Directly following was a dance
performance by an awesome
urban group known as 'The Hip


Hop Kidz' coordinated and lead
by Pastor Francine Hannah. It
doesn't stop there, as the people
of God were standing to their
feet in a state of praise and ado-
ration to God, Redeeming Word
Christian Center International
Choir, Pastors Ed & Yvette
Brinson, residing pastors, lead
us in celebration to our King.
They were absolutely amazing!
Who knew we were at a basket-
ball game? Needless to say the
Florida Pit Bulls ended the
game with a whopping 123 to
105.


Talk about saving the best for
last: as the crowd cheered on
their Florida Pit Bulls for anoth-
er great victory, Ambassador
Ford introduced award winning
gospel recording artists, 'Mary
Mary.' They were hot! Singing
songs off of their new album
entitled, 'Mary Mary.' They
ministered to the multitude of
people that patiently awaited
their arrival. It was definitely
worth the wait! Afterwards they
warmly went backstage meet-
ing, greeting and taking pic-
tures with people that came


from Palm Beach to Dade
County to be a part of and expe-
rience this awesome move of
God.
Meanwhile, as the atmos-
phere was set and the crowd
was moved by the Spirit of God,
Ambassador Ford came out and
continued to encourage the
people and presented an altar
call to all those who have not
yet accepted Christ! Yes, at a
basketball game, there was an
altar call and as the Lord prom-
ised, if I be lifted up, I will draw
all men unto myself


Naked can be
Society usually thinks of being
naked as shameful. Well, let me
qualify that statement by adding
that some of society thinks that
nakedness is shameful!
Unfortunately too many in our
society see no problem with
nakedness on public beaches,
on the internet or on television
and movie screens. But as in


good
the case of so many things, we
who are called Christians often-
times use our spiritual eyes to
see what the world sees in the
natural. There are instances
such as I just named where
nakedness is inappropriate and
unacceptable. But in the spirit,
we must be naked at all times -
before the Lord.


In Hebrews 4:12, 13, The Bible
says that the Word of God is a
sword that pierces to the soul
and the spirit and judges the
thoughts, intentions and atti-
tudes of our heart. It goes on to
tell us that there is nothing in
all of creation that. is hidden
from God. He uncovers every-
thing that we do, say, and even
think and so, we must give an
account to Him of our thoughts,
words and actions. Nakedness
is good when dealing with God.
Now, I can remember times
when I first came to know the
Lord as Savior and sat under
the -teachings of men and
women whom you probably


have never heard of, but wise
ministers of the Lord, nonethe:
less. These ministers preached
and taught such powerful mes-
sages that I knew even as a new
child of God that they were
speaking to me. I knew that the
messages and passages from
the people about sins were not
for my neighbor or my family,
but for me! But I was so
ashamed of my thoughts and
actions that I would literally
bow my head because I was
embarrassed to raise my face
and eyes to the heavens.
As a babe in Christ, I did not
know then, but I know now -
that God wants us to be


stripped of that sinful old
human nature. He wants us to
cast off the filthy garments of
sin and shame. In Zechariah 3,
the Bible tells us that God
demanded that the filthy gar-
ments of the priest that repre-
sented sin should be taken
from his body and replaced
with clean, fresh garments.
These clean garments repre-
sent a new life in Christ. We
cannot continue pretending
that we are perfect or right with
God when we are not. I believe
strongly that we cannot share
everything with everyone.
There are some issues and
some things that are not meant


for all ears to hear. But there
are Godly, wise elders who
know how to pray for you and to
help you to release and kick out
those dirty imps who threaten
to ruin your life.
But even more importantly
than sharing your sins and
iniquities with Godly men and
women you must lay them at
the altar of God. You must strip
yourself of any and everything
that does not exalt Him. Next
week, I will continue with this
teaching that I pray will loose
some bands of guilt and shame
that will keep you bound and
ineffective if not acknowledged
and dealt with strongly!


11111111


The United Teachers of Dade
invite the community to its first
Education Summit on April 22
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Radisson Hotel Miami. To regis-
ter or for more information, go to
www.utd.org.
********
The 50th Anniversary of
South Miami Middle
Community School will be held
on February 16 from 5 to 9 p.m.
For more information, call 305-
661-3481.
*******
The James E. Scott
Community Association, Inc.
Uplift Program is offering free
parenting classes for parents
with children ages 6 to 12 years
old. Classes will be every
Tuesday and Thursday from
5:30-8 p.m. Free dinner, trans-
portation and childcare services
provided. 'For more information,
call Sylvia: Jones at 305-637-
1000 ext. 425.
*******
Come out to meet Santana
Moss and enjoy a day of festivi-
ties at the 163rd Street Mall on


111llll1


Join True Disciples
Missionary Baptist Church
on February 19 as Minister
Dukes of Kansas visits her
brother, Pastor Eugene Henry,
to pray a powerful prayer for
all in attendance. For more
information, call 305-693-
1200.
*******
God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor,' invites you to hear the
word of God in a Holy Ghost
filled, anointed service on
February 19. Come and be
blessed under the anointing.
For more information, call 786-
258-1826.

God Word God Way COGIC,
Elder Reginald Wilkerson, pas-
tor, invites you to hear the
'Prophet' speak a prophetic
word from the Lord in a Holy
ghost filled, anointed service
on February 16 at 8 p.m. For
more information, call 786-
258-1826.
*******
Christian Hill AME Church
invites you to our first annual
Black Heritage Tea on
February 19 at 3 p.m. For more
information, call 954-554-
8335.
******
New Life Missionary
Baptist Church Women of
Faith presents a salute to
Black History on February 25
at 6 p.m. All are welcome. For
more information, call 305-
758-7945.


Calling all Generals
Miami Jackson Alumni
Association Incorporated
presents its annual Green
and Gold Dance.
Classes from 67 through
2005 will dance the night
away from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.,
on Saturday, March 4 at the
Polish American Banquet
Hall. Admission is $20. Call
305-652-2001 or 305-688-
6806 for more information.


February 25 from 10 a.m. 3
p.m. There will be rides, games,
entertainment, giveaways and
resources.
*******
The Top Ladies of
Distinction, Inc., Mary
Simpkins, president of Miami
chapter, will have their annual
Scholarship Luncheon at Florida
Memorial University on
February 25 at 12 p.m. For more
information, call 305-696-1631.
*******
Attention all parents and stu-
dents, Miami Dade Public
Schools is sponsoring a National
College Fair on February 19
from 12-4 p.m. at the Sheraton
Miami Mart Hotel. Admission is
free.

Morningside Elementary is
having a community meeting on
February 16 from 6-8 p.m. to
discuss plans to improve stu-
dent achievement.

The Women's Theatre
Project presents Bold Girls by
Rona Munro, March 2-19 at 8


ChumrchNotesI


Church of God Triangle
Hope Ministry, Pastor Tyrone
and Lady Delores Jones, pres-
ent the third 'Abigail' Women's
Conference, February 23-25,
featuring Prophetess Jennie
Mae Huries from Nassau,
Bahamas. For more informa-
tion, call 305-318-8886.

Mt. Olivette Baptist
Church, Reverend Franklin
Clark, pastor, will host the
76th Atlantic Coast
Association, February 20-25.
Bishop Victor T. Curry will
bring the opening message on
February 20 at 7 p.m. For more
information, call 305-573-
4825.
*******
On February 13.from 1:30 -
2:30 p.m., Westview Baptist
Church, Dr. Barry Young, pas-
tor, will have "Kinard's" walk-
ing through Black history tour
bus. Admission is free.
*******
The members of Mt. Vernon
Missionary Baptist Church:
cordially invite you to fellow-
ship with us in our annual
"Old Fashion Day" worship
services on February 19 at 11
a.m. Reverend Amos Fludd will


p.m. nightly. Sundays there is
matinee performance at 2 p.m.
For more information, call 954-
462-2334.

The Nubian Sisterhood is
seeking new members that are
single, separated or divorced
with children to fellowship with.
For more information, call 305-
469-1157 and speak with Sister
Shamele.

The U.S. Small Business
Administration's deadline to
return applications for economic
injury applications from
Hurricane Wilma is July 24.
*******
Come out to Santana Moss'
Celebrity Basketball Game at
Carol City Senior High School on
February 25. Doors open at 5
.p.m. and the game starts at 6
p.m.

The Haitian Heritage
Museum is celebrating the rich-
ness of Haiti at their 2nd annu-
al Benefit Gala, February 25 at
Parrot Jungle Treetop from 7
p.m. 12 a.m.

The Musician Village is being
built to to house the returning


bring the message.

Reverend Lovett of Antioch
Missionary Baptist Church of
Brownsville will deliver a soul
stirring message on February
17 at 7 p.m. at Alien Chapel
A.M.E. Church. All are invited.
For more information, call 305-
754-9055.

There will be a father-son tag
sermon by Reverend Henry
Green, Jr. and Henry Green III,
from Mt. Hermon A.M.E
Church of Miami Gardens.
Come witness these two
dynamic ministers in action on
February 18 at Allen Chapel
A.M.E at 7 pm.
*******
Kingdom Seeker
Transportation invites you to
a Threshing Floor Experience
with God, chartered bus trip to
Atlanta, April 5-8. For more
information, call Bernadette
Jones at 305-828-0980.For
more information, call 305-
693-0820.

Send your church
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamiteditor-
ial@bellsouth or mail to 900
NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6210.


n Art BHktoor

African Art & Home Store


'4'


February is Black History Month,
grab the spotlight with African
inspired fashions 10% off
clothing wP25 purchase

13743 NW 7th Ave.
786-413-0774

Open
Mon-Sat
10 a.m.-7 p.m.


and displaced musicians of New
Orleans and South Florida. For
more information, call 786-316-
6205.
*******
Essence Magazine and The
Berklee College of Music is
having its 1st ever Hip-Hop
songwriting contest. Open to
students ages 15-18 who are
unsigned. Deadline is February
28. For more information, visit
www.essence.com.
*******
FAU is having a lecture on
"Understanding What Every
Baby Knows," on February 16 at
3:30 p.m. For more information,
call Patsy Jones at 561-297-
1307.
*******
The Urban Environment
League of Greater Miami pres-
ents "Do we have civil rights to
public space and can we move
beyond race in defining them?"
on February 21 at 6 p.m. at the
historic Miami River Inn.


********
Abundant Life Health and
Fitness Center, Inc. invites you
to a free workshop on February
17 from 5 7 p.m. at the
Belafonte Tacolcy Community
Center. For more information,
call 1-877-912-5433.
*******
Sister to Sister is having a
National Woman's Heart Day in
February 18. For more informa-
tion, visit
www.sistertosister.6rg.

Robert Greer will be at Books
and Books reading and signing
his book Resurrecting Langston
Blue on February 17 at 8 p.m.
*******
On February 17, Jolivette
Seniors will conduct a flag rais-
ing and picnic at 9 a.m. at the
Jollivette Senior Center.


on February 16 from 6-7:30
p.m. We are looking for all for-
mer auxiliary and band mem-
bers to attend. For more infor-
mation, call 305-754-0194.

North Dade Jr. High atten-
dees during 1972-1975 is plan-
ning a reunion. For more infor-
mation, call 786-423-1096.

Miami Edison's Class of
1996 will have a meeting to plan
for the 10 year reunion on
February 22 at 7 p.m. at the
high school. For more informa-
tion, call 305-206-3412 or email
mesh96classreunion@hotmail.c
om.

Send your community
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamiteditori-


al@bellsouth.net or mail to
Class Meetings 900 NW 54th Street, Miami,
Miami Edison will have an 33127-1818. For further infor-
'Ole Timer's Pep Rally' meeting mation, call 305-694-6210.,


2lJ A JJ iU


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the best gospel is

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That Puts

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First!


Our Request Lines

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Communi ty Calendar


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Bishop Victor T. Curry, President/General Manager


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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City of Miami Commissioner Michelle Spence-Jones joins religious leaders and representatives from the Table
of Brotherhood Ministers Alliance, community leaders and city employees for a prayer vigil for peaceful elections
in Haiti.


Community, leaders pray for peaceful Haiti elections


Black History service at Mt. Calvary


We invite the community
to come out and enjoy
service with us at New Mt.
Calvary Baptist Church,
Sunday, February 19, at
11 a.m.
Our guest speaker is
Deacon Lester Brown.


Deacon Lester Brown



< bi YT l t .,,* J


t.ocal clergy from the Baptist,
Catholic, Muslim, African
Methodist Episcopal and
Episcopal religious communi-
ties carried candles and sang a
prayer for peace as they gath-
ered recently at the Freedom
Garden (Toussaint L'
Ouverture Statue) in Little
Haiti.
The Prayer Vigil was held by
District 5 Commissioner
Michelle Spence-Jones and the
Table of Brotherhood Ministers


Alliance, who joined members
of the community and city offi-
cials to pray for peace in Haiti
during the elections which,
were held recently.
Prayers and readings were
offered by Table of
Brotherhood members, Father
John Cox, of St. Francis
Xavier; Father Bazin of Eglise
Episcopal St. Paul/ Les
Martyrs; Pastor Ross of Mt.
Zion Baptist Church and
Minister Rasool of


Muhammad's Mosque.
"Tonight we are joined by
clergy from around the city
from different walks of faith in
support of a country that sym-
bolizes the gateway to freedom
for all mankind." said
Commissioner Spence-Jones."
This is not just a Haitian issue;
this is a people issue that is very
important to our community."
The prayer vigil was closed
with a song by Haitian singer
Farah Juste.


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"

04Dg


St. James A.M.E. Church celebrates homecoming


Historic St. James A.M.E.
Church of Liberty City, will cele-
brate Homecoming on Sunday,
February 19, at the church at
1845 N.W. 65th Street.
Homecoming is a traditional
celebration that was established
during the pastorate of the late
Reverend J. Benjamin
Blacknell, to have a gathering of
St. James members and friends.
These traditions began in


S1949; its purpose is to have fel-
lowship feasting and to give
praise to God for His many
blessings.
This year's celebration contin-
ues under the leadership of the
recently appointed Reverend
Benny H. Johnson, pastor. The
program will feature the
Reverend Robin D. Floyd of St.
James A.M.E. Church, 7 a.m.
speaker, and the Reverend


Ronnie L. Clark Sr. of Hurst
Chapel A.M.E. Church of Winter
Haven, Florida, as the 11 a.m.
speaker.
The pastor, officers and mem-
bers invite the community to
attend the services and recep-
tion, which will follow the 11
a.m. services. This year's event
is being spearheaded by Chair
Brother Louis Sparks and Co-
chair Sister Bertha Sneed.


The Elite Church Directory pays for itself and keepsyour

church and your pastor before the community.

Call 305-694-6210


93rd Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93rd Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30 a.m. Early Morning Worship
11 a.m...Moming Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 3rd Sunday ........6 p.m.
Tuesday Bible Study .7 p.m.
website: cmbc org




Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
fri'endsbipprayere behllsoah.net
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami. FL
305-759-8875
Order of services
Hour of Prayer........6:30 a.m.
Early Morning Worship...7:30 a.m.
S Sunday School..........9:30 a.m.







Mtec.f C, lar MissionaryoWs
S Morin Wt ~orip............g I r.m.
Youth Ministryo Sttdy....Wed.7 p.m.
Payer/Bible StudyW... d.....7 p.m.
SFeeding tlhe luttigry erey





Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:

iBible Stuidy...Thurs.... 7 p.m.
1 Sunday Wor-ship......7: a.m.






SuNnday School....... m.:5 a.m.
Peaceful Zion Missionary
,Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68', Street. Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
Sunday School .......... 9:45 awI
Morning Service .....1 I1:00 am
Communion Service
I7Th, s. before I Sunday) 7:30 pm
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
(Wednesday) 7:30 pim



The Soul Saving Station O
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
1880 Washington Ave.
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688.4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
Order of Services:
Sunittday School ...........t 9.m.
Stilnday Wtorship..l I a.m. & 7 p.m
T "uelday Worship.......7:45 p.m.
Noon DayNnlll)~, Pravej .....Mon.-F ri..


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 19th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Services;
Sun...9:30 a.m....(Sunday School)
Walk in the Word Ministry
Worship Service.............. I Ia.m.
Tuesday...7 p.m....Family Night
Wed..l I a.m..Intercessory Prayer
Wed. Bible Class........12 p.m.
Wed. Bible Class..............7 p.m.




Harvest Fire Worship Ctr.
2260 N.W. 183rd Street
305-620-2986
Order of Services:
Sunday....... a.m............10 a.m.
Wed.- Bible Study.......7:30 p.m.
Friday- Youth
First & Fourth
Tues......Women's/Men's Mtg.
Early Morning Prayer.....6-7 a.m.
J Prayer Sunday........6:30 p.m.




/ New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sundays- Church School ............... 10 a.m.
tWorship Sellvice r..............I I:15 a.m
Tuesday Bible Class..............7 p.ni.
4tlh Sullnda) Evening Woirship......... 6 p.m.

Pasto a ron HX: Rrie. m /


St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3"' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early Sunday
Morning Worship ....7:30 a.m.

iNature fo Baptisi Chuiches
(B B.T.U.) 5 p.m.
Evening Worship ........7 p.m.
Meeting ........(Tues.) 7 p.m.




Victory on the Rock
Ministries, Inc.
16178 NW 27th Avenue
305-625-3376 / 305-333-3144

Order of Services:
Nloutttdty S lllit tig .......... .
Tuesday Night iihle Studys
7 p m.


Apostolic Revival Center,
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time for T.V. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
pHrCABLLCH. I7 CO-ICATIICH.2
sut.9 antittp. sidas spimt.
Wed.- Intercessory Pnrer9ai.m.- 12 p.n.
Moming service ...............I I a.m.
Su.- se. Worship ...........7:30 p.at.
S Tues.- Psi\er Meeting........ 7:30 pim.
Fri. Bible Study .................7:30 p nt.




Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12" Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
Early Worship ..............7 a.m.
Sunday School............. 9 a.m.
NBC ............................. 10:05 a.m .
I W orship .......................I1 a.mn.
SWorship ........................ 4 p.m.
^I l Nl Mission and Bible Class
I l l Tuesday ...............6:30 p.m.
Youth Meeting/Choir rehearsal
Monday ................... 6:30 p


SNew Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order of Services:
Easrl Morning Vorship...is & 3rd Sitll.
SMorlnin Worship..............l :0 an.
Tue,. h-iht M inis ............. p.
PBibl Study. ...........................8 p.m.
'C S ctuds .................. I.
Rev dG segr usDT ... uit


/Trinity Faith Tabernacle'
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4' Street, Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Services:
Sunday School...........1 0:30 a.m.
Sun. Morning Servs....12 p.im.
Erleningl Worlship Sets..... p.m.
Tuesday "Youtl Nighl".... p i.
Wed. "'Noon Day Prtay er"..12 p.nl
Wed. Night Bible Study ...8 p.nl.
Thursday Nightl "Cosington Bible
College..........6- 1(1 p.i.
tFriday Night Worship Sers4... pi


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
I. I Lord Day Sunday School ......9:45am
Sunday Moming oship ..... I a.m.
Sunday Men's Bible Study .....5 p.m.
Sunday Ladies Bible Study ....5 p.m.
Sunday Evening Worship ......6 pm.
Tuesday Night Bible Sudy ...7:30pn
I Thursday Moming Bible Class I 1 a.m.
I Transportation available Call:
305-634.4850 305-691-6958



Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Mom8ing S am.
Sunday School.............10 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6 p.m.
Mon. Excellence ........7:30 p.m.
Tue. Bible Class .........7:30 p.m.
Thutrs. Fellowship .........10 a.m.
Ist Sun. Song Practice ..6 p.ln.


New Hope Missionary >
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103" St.
305-696-7745
Order of Services:
sIsunda' lonrin' warhlup
7:30 aun. & 111:45 a o'
Chlrc, h School OrienalkDo....... il.ll.
Nol- l Da) I1"I11
Ilolday) -R iday ...... .I2 p.n to I pm,
PrnLVeImBibl Study
ruesda............ .. 7:30 m.1
PrpecssSale01. o


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'T Street
305-836-9081

Order of Services:
Ss,,lay SMo,,nitti Setities
Sullda3m School ..............10 illll,
Worship Set-vice .......... I a.
Tuesday Bible Study,.... p.m.
TIILISil\ M\C SMl\ice 1)..R .111


Christian Hill AME Church
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LM09@BellSouth.Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services:
Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School.......................9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship Service ........11 a.m.
Free Golf Every 2" & 41 Sunday ..........4 p.m.
Don Shula's Golf Course


New Birth Baptist
of Faith


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11
a.m.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'1 Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Early Moring Worship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....11 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Tues. before the Ist Sun.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship


S Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m.- 11: 15 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Tues. 6 p.m.


Church, The Cathedral
International


1 (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newbirthbaptistmiami.org


at


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10'" Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
Early Sunday \Worslhip...7:301 a m.
Sunday School ................ 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Miaing Wil ship .....1 am.
Sunday Evening Serice ...6 p.m.
Tuesday Prnyer Meeting ...7:30 pn.
WVedne'di Bible Study ...7:30 p.m.
"Not Just a Church But a Nomeint


St. Luke Missionary Baptist Temple Missionary
1790 N.W. 55th Street Baptist Church
1723 NW. 3"' Avenue
305-696-7322 Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-854
Early Moming Worship.7:30a.m. Order of Services:
Sunday School .......... 9:30a.m. Soid;y Schll ...........i9:45 ill.
S Moming Worship.....ll a.m. Sun. Morning Scrs......l I a.m.
WEDNESDAY 4 Sutn....BTU...I:30-2:30 p.1m
Tuedal.......Bible Studs
S Prayer Meeting ............7:30 p.m. Feeding tinisl........In...
Bible Study ................8 p.m. Wed. Bible Stud /Payef.. 6:301 i.
Thurs. Outi achl .Miniistr ...6:30 p.


S Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105

Order of Services:
/ Bitle Study Wed ................l 8 p.m.
ISunday School................10 a.nl.
SSui .l Worship S r. ......11:30 a.tl.
SWed. Nieht nlterce sorry Pray\er
Itis i 7:30 to 8 p.m.
Sundis Woislhip Set sicc..6:30 p.tmt


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School .............9:30 a.m.
SMomning Praise/Woilhip ..ll a.m.
Youth Cloir Satu.ay ....I I a.m.
Prayer Meeting & Bible Study
Tuesday 7 p.nI.
..,h nsa ...... .. 5-2 4


|bqr% t ge

%N% V 'var


mgoo


seepe


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday, 8 a.m.- 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8,19,22,23,30 and 37
Web page: www.pembrokeparkcoc.org
Dr. I rentis C. Spvey. Mniste


4%.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4B The Miami Times Fe 6


F Bshp icor C rr, .Nin, DDSeio Psto 'eawr-M


D-:

u~--








The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 5B


of pastor


and


installation of officers at

Saint Stephens A.M.E.


The Saint Stephens A.M.E. Church
family cordially invites you to the
induction of the pastor and installa-
tion of officers, Sunday, February 26,
11 a.m. at 3400 NW 215th Street,
Miami Gardens.
The speaker will be retired Bishop
Vinton Randolph Anderson of St.
Louis, Mo.


Reverend Charles L. Scott, Sr. and Lovie Scott


Prophet William Greene, Jr.


Revival at New Born Faith
Prophet William H. Greene, Jr., known as the Connecticut
Prophet, is coming to Miami.
The service will be 8 p.m. nightly at New Born Faith Deliverance
M.B. Church, 4816 NW 22 Ave., starting February 20 through 24.
For more information call 305-687-0200, 305-635-3512, 954-
687-7606 or 954-638-4251.
Host pastor, James L. Pacley.


Rev. Preston honored by Pastor's Aide Board


Sunday morning, 11 a.m. serv-
ice, I was late for church.
However, on my way into service it
was so loud. Something was flying
so high. I couldn't see it. The
church was on fire. It was not an
airplane. It was not a kite without
a string. It was Peaceful Zion's
preaching man, the next presi-
dent of Florida East Coast
Missionary Baptist Association,
Moderator Reverend C. P. Preston,
Jr. The pastor of Peaceful Zion
Missionary Baptist Church.
Congratulations from Margaret
Sinclair and the-Pastor's: Aide.
Board.


Reverend C.P. Preston, Jr.


Stop the killing says Bishop Wilson
Matthew 6:9
If you need to pray what must
you say. Let me teach you. Our
father which art in heaven. Hal-
lowed by thy name. Thy
Kingdom Come.
Thy will be done in earth, as it
is in Heaven. Give us this day
our daily bread. And forgive us
our debtors. And lead us not
into temptation, but deliver us
from evil; for thine is the king-
dom and the power and the
glory, for ever. Amen.
Thou shall not kill, you can kill
a person with your tongue. The
Church of God Tabernacle 2908
NW 62nd Street. Bishop John Wilson



Miracle revival at Gospel Arena

Miracle Revival with Dr. T.G.
Thompson hosted by Prophet Jr.
and Lorraine Thompson will be
held at Gospel Arena
International Ministries, 7511
N.W. 7 Ave., 8 p.m. nightly on
Wed., Feb. 15 through Fri., Feb.
17.


r. i. I. inompson


Praise cheerleaders. Do we need them?


By Robert Phillips

We see people all the time in
church say, "Praise is what I do,"
but is it really? If praise is
what we do, then why do
we need praise cheerlead-
ers.
The bible says, "Let
everything that have
breath, praise the Lord;"
so then the only prereq-
uisite for praise, is breath.
So, why then do we need
praise cheerleaders.
It is my belief that if we really
understood the term "Praise," we
would have no problem doing it.
This is the reason we need praise
cheerleaders, someone to prime
us and pump us to praise. If you
think about it, most of our praise


leaders become cheerleaders.
They want us to do something
they themselves don't do. But if
you are a real leader, you would
say do what I do and not
what I say. Doing what I
do means, I'm going to
pour out my all before
a Holy God that
knows all about me,
all my shortcomings
and idiosyncrasies
S /and loves me anyway;
a God that loves me
unconditionally and
desires the best for my life.
When I consider that, then my
praise is unlimited, not only in
church where people see me lift-
ing my hands, but in my lifestyle
where it really makes a differ-
ence.


New Christ hosts

pastor's anniversary


Happy Valentines Day
Mommy

In loving memory of,


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


CORA LEE FULTON ELDER WILLIAM YOUNG


Rev. Harold Marsh


The members of New Christ
Tabernacle Baptist Church
invites you to their Pastor's
Anniversary services.
Speaker at 11 a.m., Sun.,
Feb. 19 will be Rev. Patterson of
Mt. Sinai M.B. Church.
CAntioch Missionary Baptist
Church is in charge with Rev.
Larry Lovett at 3:30 p.m.


The Absalom

Jones service


Bishop James Ottley, D.D.


The Twenty-Second Annual
Diocese of Southeast Florida
celebration for the life, ministry
and witness of Absalom Jones,
first person of African descent
to the priested in the American
Episcopal Church, will be held
Saturday, February 18 at the
Historic Saint Agnes' Episcopal
church, 1750 NW Third Avenue
at 10 a.m.
Following the worship serv-
ice, the Theodore R. Gibson
Chapter of the Union of Black
Episcopalians will host the
Annual Absalom Jones;'
Luncheon in Saint Agnes'
Blackett Hall.
The cost of the luncheon is
$30. You can secure tickets fro
the luncheon by calling the
church's office, 305-573-5330.



Jay's
MARY E. LLOYD, 58, died
February 6 at Jackson South
Community Hospital. Services were
held.

MARY MACKENS, 67, Naranja,
died February 6 at Homestead
Hospital. Services were held.

CORNELIEA BALLARD, 47,
Perrine, died February 7. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Mt. Moriah
Baptist Church.

ALTHEA DARBY, 38, Naranja,
died February 8 at Homestead
Hospital. Service Saturday, 11 a.m.
at Goulds Church of Christ.

LAKESHA CARTER HANKS,
30, died February 9 at Kendall
Regional Medical Center. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m. at the House of
God Church, Perrine.

EFFIE HENRY, 66, died
February 9 at Baptist Hospital.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at Mt.
Pleasant Missionary Baptist
Church.


DOROTHY JEAN WALTERS

07/28/44 -02/18/04

Our dearest sweetheart, it has
been two long years since you
were plucked as one of God's
choice flowers.
We miss your motherly love
and beautiful smile, but we
know you are more beautiful in
Heaven as a rose.
Our lives are so empty without
you, but we know Heaven is full
of joy.
You are deeply missed, but will
never be forgotten.
Forever in our hearts, your girls
and family.


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


JULIA GREEN

01/01/10 02/21/05

We all miss you.



In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


ROBERT LEE KNIGHT

05/23/41- 02/15/04

We miss you.
Your wife, Barbara; sons,
daughters and family.


Death Notice

ROBERT JONES, viewing
will be Saturday, February 18 at
Carey Royal Ram'n, 5235 N.W.
7 Avenue, from 1 -3 p.m.


E.A. Stevens
ERNEST J. HARDY, 63, 2261
NW 194 Terrace, died February 6 at
Parkway Regional Medical Center.
Service Saturday, 1 p.m. at
Ebenezer Baptist Church in
Hallandale.

ANNIE BELL HERNDERSON,
89, 756 NW 3rd Court, Hallandale,
died February 11 at Miami Gardens
Care Center, North Miami Beach.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Ebenezer Baptist Church in
Hallandale.

ERIC EDGEHILL, 77, 20152 NW
12th Court, died February 5 at
Parkway Regional Medical Center.
Services were held.


February 14, 2005

Remembering you mother as
one of God's greatest gifts.
Rejoice as we know you have
gone on to peace. It has been
one year today that you left us.
The sweetest day ever you were
the wind beneath our wings. The
joy that brought us laughter.
The clay that held us together.
Mother, in our hearts we will
always love you forever.
Love always your kids,
Rochelle, Tyrone, Sheila, Andre,
Shawn Shawanda, Tynireal and
Sumiko, grands, great grands,
brother and sister.



In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


NEELY WILLIAMS

03/07/27 02/15/93


It has been 13 years since
you've been gone.
It feels like yesterday, that your
presence was here.
From your loving family.



Donaldson Fryar
ENOCH MITCHELL, JR., 48,
Key Largo, died February 9 at
Baptist Hospital. Service Saturday,
11 a.m. at Greater Williams Chapel
Freewill Baptist Church.

MOSES PENNERMAN, 73,
Homestead, died February 13 at
Homestead Manor. Arrangements
are incomplete.

Delores Mills
RAYMOND COMAS, died
January 26 at North Shore Medical
Center. Services were held.

ROBERT DAVIS, died February
11 at Memorial Hospital.
Arrangements are incomplete.

BRIAN MILLS, 34, died February
8 at Imperial Pointe Medical Center,
Fort Lauderdale. Arrangements are
incomplete.


02/15/18 04/10/94

Twelve years has past since
we've last seen your smile, but
the memories and love, shall
never pass.
. Love your wife, two children,
ten grands, seventeen great
grands and your great, great
grand daughter.


Happy Valentines Day

In loving memory of,


ALPHONSO NELSON, JR.

08/26/73 02/2000

Not a day goes by that I don't
think about you, especially on
holidays and your birthday is
the worst day.
I-rep your picture on my wall
up high, just so I wouldn't miss
a day withotit seeing you. That's
how much I miss you.
You were like a father to my
only son. I'll never forget you.
Just a little something to let you
know how much you're missed.
Love eternal, Auntie Big-E


In Memoriam


In loving memory of,


HAILE 'VALENTINE'
SLATER


02/14/74- 12/01/93

Happy Birthday from the
Hdbes and the entire Slater fam-
ilies.


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET* MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142

For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion


IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,


CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


THAT CARES.


Milton A. Hall I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


I IC Ialii .,. ,I I/


Induction


DICICK6 ivIUbL 1,,l II U II 1 :ZIl JWI I "t::lli I


IN MEMORIAL 0 OBITUARIES


s kralB Must Control y








, I, Mna hr i !- 2st


Hall Ferguson Hewitt


Manker


In Memoriam


In Memoriam


In Memoriam


LARRY JEFFEREY BLACK, 54
fitness instruc-
tor, died
February 8 at
Mercy Hospital.
Survivors: wife,
Cherese Black;
mother, Maime
Black; sisters,
daughters,
grandchildren,
n i e c e s,
nephews and a host.of other rela-
tives and friends.

DANIEL ROBERTS, SR., 80,
died February 7
at Jackson
Hospital .
Survivors: wife,
Maria Roberts
and children.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Temple

Baptist Church.


BARBARA COLEY, 40, house-
wife, died
February 9.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at Solid
R o c k
Deliverance
Church.



ROBIE ROBERTS, 72, dry clean-
er owner,, died February 3 at Select
Hospital. Service Wednesday, 11
a.m. at St. James AME Church.

FRANCES E. CHALLENOR, 84,
toxicology testing lab clerk, died
February 11 at her home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Eric. S. George
JAMES CUMBERBATCH, 90,
Hallandale Beach, died February
10. Private services will be held in
chapel.


Royal


HELEN MARSHALL, 64, died
February 11 in
Satasota.
Service
Saturday, 12
p.m. at Jesus

M ien ios t 5r ices
Ministries
International
Church.


GERALD TRUSTY, 69, died
February 10. Remains will be
shipped to Grand Cayman Island for
final rites and'burial.

WINSTON COOPER, 73, died
February 6. Service Saturday, 12
p.m. at Revival Tabernacle
Assembly of God.

Poi
BEN LEE ALLEN, 52, labor con-
struction, died
February 3 at
Hialeah
Ho s p i t a I .
Services
Tuesday, 11
a.m. at St. Luke
Cousin AME
Church.


ANNIE LUE MINCEY, 81, house-
wife, died
February 10 at
Jackson
Hospital.
Service
Saturday, 2 p.rn.
at Believer Life
Ministries.



S.L. GOLDEN, 49, instructor for
Termix, died
February 10.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. in the
chapel.






Carey Royal *
Ram'n
MARY SANDS, 47, died February
9 at home.

Saturday at Mt.
Calvary
Missionar y
Baptist Church.





LOU JAMES ESSIX, 73, died
February 5 at Cedars Medical
Center. Services were held.

MILTON TEART, 73, died
January 23 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.

DARRYL SANTOS, 34, died
February 12 at home. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. in the chapel.


Richardson
DELORES WIMBERLY STEW-
ART, 68, died
February 12.
Arrangements
are incomplete.


ERNEST SHAKES, 67, died
February 5. Service Saturday, 2
p.m. in the chapel.

GERALD TRUSTY, 69, died
February 10. Remains will be
shipped to Grand Cayman Island for
final rites and burial.

GLADYS REID, 68, died
February 7. Service Saturday, 2
p.m. in the chapel.

ANNA GARDNER, 56, died
February 4. Service Saturday, 1
p.m. at Faith Anointed Ministries.

MARLENE CARTER, 58, died
February 12. Arrangements are
incomplete.


itier
LARRY DONNALLE OATS, 26,
laborer for.
Wendy's, died
Ferbuary 7 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Services were
held.




LINDA L. MADDOX, 50, hbime-
naker, died
February 12 at
Jackson Plaza
Nursing Home.
Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
in the chapel.




BERNICE WILLIAMS, 69, med-
ical secretary for St. Frances
Hospital, died February 7. Services
were held.

Alfonso M.
Richardson
CYRIL E. ADDERLY, 82, printer,
died February 7
at Claridge
House.
Survivors: wife,
Daphne Adderly;
daughters,

Hennigan and
Lorena Adderly;
siblings, Beulah
Gray, Beverly
Rolle, Delores Johnson, Shirley
Ferguson, Laverne Moore,
Marvalena Smith, Alvin Adderly,
Chauncey Adderly and Adrienne
Morgan. Viewing Tuesday, 4-8 p.m.
Service Wedneday (today), 10:30
a.m. at the Church of Incarnation.
Service under the direction of
Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral
Services, Inc., 3790 NW 167 Street,
Miami Gardens, FL 33054, 305-625-
7177.

Death Notice


JAMES CANTY, 65, died
8:25 p.m. on February 10 at
North Shore Medical Hospital.
Services will be held 2 p.m.,
Saturday, February 18 at
Greater Holy Cross Baptist
church, 1555 NW 93 Terrace.
Viewing Friday evening from 4
p.m.-9 p.m. at Mitchell Funeral
Home, 8080 N.W. 22 Avenue.


ROSIE GOODWIN, 92, died
February 8 at
Mount Sinai
Medical Center.
Service Friday,
11 a.m. in the
chapel.





MARY SABRINA STRATFORD,
54, died
February 9 at
Cedars Medical
Center. Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Spirit of
Christ.




WALTER GRIFFIN, 72,
Mississippi, died

his residence.
Arrangements
are incomplete.





Range
IVY R. RHODES, retired adminis-
trative clerk with
Dade County
Public Schools
of 4725 Rainbow
Drive, died
February 9 at
Bethesda
Memorial
Hospital .
Survivors: four
children,
Renatta Marks, Emilla Taylor,
Herbert Rhodes, Jr. and Edrick
Rhodes; two grandchildren, Emillio
and Sylaisha Ivy Taylor. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Mount Herman
AME Church. Interment at Dade
Memorial Park.

ROSETTA LITMAN, 78, home-
maker, died February 8. Service
Saturday, 10 a.m. at Northside
Church of God.

Florida Mortuary and
Cremation
TYRONE ROBERTS aka 'TY,'
40,; attended
SMiami Jackson
Senior High,
died February
10 at ,Jackson
Hospital.
Service and
viewing in the
Florida Mortuary
and Cremation,
1495 NW 17th
Avenue. Viewing at 1. p.m. and serv-
ice at 4 p.m.


Wright
DEACON WILLIE JAMES
CROSS, 72,
truck driver,
died February 9
at Jackson
Ho s pital I
Survivors: son
Lorenzo; broth-
ers, Clifford,
Loren, Joseph
Phillips, William
Cross and
Gaston McClendon; sister, Barbara
Stapleton. Service Saturday, 11
a.m at New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church. Interment Dade
Memorial Park.

REVEREND LOVETT JUNIOR
JOHNSON, 69,
laborer, died
February 11 at
Villa Maria
Nursing .and
Rehabilitation

Survivors: wife,
Annie; children,
Delores,
Geraldine,
Gwendolyn, Lakeisha, Reverend
Ronald Johnson and Ivery Lee; sis-
ters, Nettle Mae, Thelma and
Earlene. Service Saturday, 2 p.m at
Greater Bethel AME Church.
Interment Dade Memorial Park.

JANISHA POLLOCK 26,
cashier died
February 8, at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Survivors: chil-
dren, Danisha
and India
Ingraham,
Santana and
Jada Howell;
sisters,
Dartisha Dollard and Latoya


Pollock. Service Tuesday, 3 p.m. at
Mt. Vernon Baptist Church.


Deadline for obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.


In loving memory of,


CHIEF WILLIE WATERS

11/27/36 02/14/96

Ten years seems like a long
time, but to us it feels like only
yesterday.
We think of you with fond
memories of the times we shared
together and your spirit fills our
hearts with joy.
You are gone, but never forgot-
ten. We love you and miss you
dearly.
The Waters, Hunter, Collins
and Smith families.



In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


JERRY L JACKSON


There will be a celebration at
Oasis of Love Deliverance Minis-
tries, 4723 NW 183rd Street,
Opa-locka on February 23,
2006, 7 p.m.
Dr. Iris J. Troy is the presiding
overseer.



Death Notice


-- --- --

JOHNNIE SUMMERSET,
JR. aka 'BUDDY' (to family)
aka 'TOO SWEET' (to
bowlers) aka 'CANDYMAN' (
to truckers) aka 'NEW
CROWN' (to checker players on
54th Street and 14th Avenue.
was born on June 23,
1942, to the late Johnnie Sum-
merset, Sr. and Jewell Patterson
Summerset in Vidalia who pre-
ceded him in death, died Febru-
ary 5, 2006.
He leaves to mourn a numer-
ous amount of family and
friends including: two sons,
Johnnie (Natasha), III and
Christopher Summerset; three
daughters, Gwendolyn (Monday)
Okotogbo, Janet Sutton and
Tina Summerset Mullins; broth-
er, Raymond Morgan of Miami;
three sisters, Julia Morgan, of
Miami, Marsha Summerset and
Arnesela Summerset Francis of
Connecticut, 12 grandchildren
and a host of aunts, uncles and
cousins in Vadalia, GA,
Dubin, GA and Florida.
Memorial service Saturday,
February 18, 3 p.m. at Royal
Funeral Home. Repast at 2300
NW 181 Terrace.


In loving memory of,


LOUISE PEARSON


02/28/22 02/12/92

Missed by the gang: Yvonne,
Clarence, and Rikki, of Atlanta,
Mary, Alice, and Spotlight of Mi-
ami.



Card of Thanks


The family of the late,
,. . ,


JIMMIE LEE KNOX

10/11/23 11/23/06


wishes to extend sincere
thanks for your prayers, visits,
cards, food and gifts given dur-
ing our hours of bereavement.
Special Thanks to Reverend
Dr. C.P. Preston, Peaceful Zion
Baptist Church, Reverend Victor
Curry, New Birth, Church,
Reverend R.B. Newman,
Fountain of Faith Church,
Riverdale, GA, doctors and staff
of PACE CenterJewish Home for
the Aged, Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority, Inc., Miami Alumnae
Chapter, Top Ladies of
Distinction, Miami Chapter,
BTW Alumni Association, BTW
Class of 1959, Miami
Northwestern, Class of 1959,
Cupidettes, Inc. Miami Chapter.
Thanks to the staff of Hall-Fer-
guson-Hewitt Funeral Home.
May God bless each of you!
Edward J. Knox, Carolyn K.
Dunnell and family.


In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


In loving memory of,


OVERSEER RUBY
LEE THOMAS

02/16/12 02/17/05

94 Years Young
"The Lord is my Sheppard"

I was young, but I became old.
I thank you for being my eyes. I
thank you for being my legs.
Love is what love does, love is an
action word.
I was prepared for my journey.
I tried to prepare all those which
would listen.
I taught you wisdom. I showed
you courage. I told all of you that
God can't use a coward soldier. I
told you to be strong. Keep God's
commandments, and you too
can live for 94 years.
I was young, but I became old
one day; but I have never seen
the righteous forsaken nor his
seed beg for bread.
"Thank God for the Real Holy
Ghost." Be strong pastor,
church members of The
Friendship Holiness Church.



Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


EDDIE C. WILLIAMS


takes this opportunity to ex-
press to our gratitude to the
many friends, relatives, neigh-
bors, church members for their
act of kindness during our time
of bereavement.
Your prayers, calls, cards, vis-
its made our pain easy to bear.
May God bless everyone and
you all are in our prayers.

Death Notice


LADONYA L. HARRIS
aka 'LA-LA'


S January 14, 1977

It has been two years since you
have been gone.
. We love and miss you so much.
Love mom, dad and family.

Gr
MATTIE PEARL BETHEL, 77,
retired social
worker for Dade
County HUD,
died February
12 at Claridge
Nursing Home.
Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Peaceful Zion
Missionary
Baptist Church.


JEWEL HANES, 50, died on
February 13 at North Shore
Hospital. Services incomplete.
Repast at 1206 N.W. 63 St.
Arrangements handled by
Range Funeral Home.

ace
LOUISE DALGER, 47, home-
maker, died February 7 at North
Shore Medical Center. Services
were held.

MASTER LeBRON LINDER, 7
months, died February 5. Services
were held.

JASMINE PRUDENT-GUER-
MALIE, died February 10 at Jackson
Hospital. Services were held.


Deadline for obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.

Call 305-694-6210


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


6B The Miami Times Fe 6




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I1J1 Fk6rrv


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercia


News Providers


The 6th Annual Oscar Center, 2166 MLK Blvd. The
Thomas Memorial: deadline for entry forms is
People's Art Exhibition March 20. For insurance
Call to Artists purposes, the title, the exact
Once again we prepare for dimensions, the materials
another highly successful andthe insurance value for
celebration of African World each piece has to be included
artistic creativity in South on the entry form. The dead-
Florida with the 6th Annual line for the delivery of the
Oscar Thomas Memorial works to the Center is
Oscar Thomas Memorial
People's Art Exhibition, Monday, March 27, 5 p.m.
which will run from April 3 Please include artist bio and
which will run from April 3
through May 21. statement with entry form.
The entry form can be Collectors are encouraged to
picked up at the African show their works by the late
Heritage Cultural Arts artist.


The Opening Reception will
be held on Monday, April 3,
from 6-9 p.m. Call 305-904-
7620 or 786-260-1246.
Kuumba Artists to Meet
Sunday, February 12:
Kuumba Artists will be
meeting at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center,
2166 MLK Blvd., at 11 a.m.
Discussion will include
upcoming Oscar Thomas
Memorial People's Art Exhi-
bition. Call 305-904-7620 or
786-260-1246.
Joseph Caleb Auditorium
5400 NW 22 Ave.
Film & Culture Series
Thursdays, February 16, 23:
Miami Dade Parks,
Division of Arts and Culture,
Community Artists Cultural


Arts Series proudly .presents
the Black History Month Film
and Culture Series every
Thursday in this month. This
exciting series will feature
screenings of films made by
Black filmmakers and/or
films which have African
American or African themes.
February 16, 2006, 7 p.m.
In-Law A comedy about how
a father with two daughters
treats his prospective sons-
in-law with disdain and bias.
His 'show me the money' atti-
tude towards his daughters'
suitors sacrifices character
and integrity over affluence
and wealth.
February 23, 2006, 6 p.m.
African Dance Music Video
We invite you to join us for a


tantalizing and entertaining
evening of contemporary
African music. This evening
includes a traditional West
African meal and a wine tast-
ing of wines from Ethiopia.
Reservations are required.
Call 305-636-2350.
AAPACT presents
King Hedley II
Through February 26:
The African American
Performing Arts Community
Theatre proudly presents
its production of King
Hedley II, written by the
late, incomparable play-
wright August Wilson.
Regular evening perform-
ances are 8 p.m. on Fridays
and Saturdays. Matinee
performances are Sundays


at 3 p.m. at the Charles
Hadley Park Black Box
Theatre, 1300 NW 50th St.
Call 866-390-4534.
Ceremonies in Dark
Old Men
Through March 12:
The M Ensemble Theatre
Company presents Cere-
monies in Dark Old Men by
Lonnie Elder, at 12320 W.
Dixie Highway.
Regular evening perform-
ances are 8 p.m. on Thurs-
days, Fridays and
Saturdays. Matinee per-
formances are Sundays at 3
p.m. Call 305-895-0335.
Blazin Black History
Showcase
Friday, February 17:
Please turn to CULTURE 7C


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2C The Miami Times. February 15-21. 2006


s kcalB Must Control y


Gwendolyn W. Pittman,
president, I-LALA; Inell
Hunter, vice; Clarence
Pittman, Jr., president;
Nathaniel May, Jr.; and other
members of The International
Longshoremen's Association
provided a splendid retirement
banquet at the Sheraton Miami-
Mart, last week, for 22 retiring
members while their
families looked on with
pride and dignity.
Soft lights and soft
jazz from the Psi Phi
Band greeted the guests
as they arrived to
exchange camaraderie
during the cocktail
hour. Then G. Pittman
rang a bell summoning REEI
the eager persons to
enter the dining room for the
program.
The program began with the
honor guards David Butler and
Allen Davis leading the retirees
to the dais like Andrew Black,
Loconzo Brown, Sr., Carl
Cleare, Henry Coleman, Albert
Coleman, Jr., William Cozart,
Jr., Emerson W. Davis, Simeon
Dawkins, Charlie Felton,
Roosevelt Gay, Jr. and
Gregory Gilbert.
Also participating were Cleve
Graham, Pablo Hernandez,
Willie Hightower, Harlin
Meza, Lovester Montgomery,
Sr., Willie Lee O'Neal, Tyrone
Oliver, Jesus Pinero, Eddie
Sams, Lerue Sarvis, Sr. and
Theodore Thomas. Each one
was introduced to the audience
and participated in The Pledge
of Allegiance and was escorted


to their respective seats.
Clarence Pittman continued
with the program after the invo-
cation by introducing Julia
Berry, who gave the occasion,
while the honor guards took
their positions for the special
memorial services conducted by
I-LALA. It included Debra
Ragin, Sylvia Boks, Jennie
Coleman, Josie
Wright, Pearl Higdon,
JoAnn McDonald,
Ruth Miles. G. Pittman
and Hunter assisted
with the candles.
As the lights were
lowered, candles were lit
for each deceased per-
son as their names were
VES read. Family members
stood in silence, espe-
cially those who traveled from
Atlanta, Ga.
Deceased members included
Columbus Brown, Sr., Sam
Corner, Leon James, Jr.,
Miguel Rivero, Alphonso
Taylor, Bert Whitney, James
Battle, Benjamin Bennett,
Charlie Benyon, Cotis Daniels,
John Dunnom, James Floyd,
Sylvester Harris, Audrey
McCollum, Edgar McSwain,
Bernard Moncur, Jimmie
Ratliff, Wilburt Walton, and
J.W. Williams.
Then, the main course was
served consisting of London
broil, chicken a-la-king,
mashed potatoes, green beans
and strawberry short cake for
desert. The band entertained
the retirees with songs they
used to dance to back in the
days including Stand By Me,


You Don't Love Me, In The
Midnight Hour, Mustang Sally,
Misty, Killer Joe, Stormy
Monday, Ain't No Sunshine, and
Satin Doll.
Following the dinner, The
Pittmans, along with Mays,
Ellis Canty, Sr., Jakelin
Chapman, Allen Davis, Josie
Wright, Julia Berry and Pearl
Higdon presented plaques, cer-
tificates and trophies to retirees
ranging from three to twelve
pieces.
Retirees also participated in
the naming of Retiree of the
Year. After the tabulating and&
audience's applause, Jesus
Pinero was given the crown, fol-
lowed by Eddie Sams, second
place and Simeon Dowkins,
third place. The Pittmans gave
final remarks by thanking those
who'd traveled from afar and
wished the retirees years of
enjoyment.


Baljean Smith, president,,
and James Lamar, activities
chair, of Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity, Inc. and other broth-
ers were treated to a royal meal,
last week, by Garth Reeves,
Jr., Stan Allen, Ebenezer
Edwards and Robert "Bob"'
Thomas.
The event took place at the
Omega Activity Center (The
House Built by Elliott J.
Scavella)
The setting was the usual
first-of-the-month meeting,
where the brothers plan, sip
and talk about the "good 'ole
days." However, those good
days were emphasized with
Reeves assisting financially to.
the progress of the building.:
The brothers repeatedly
thanked him for being able to
have a "frat house" unlike any
in some Omega chapters.
Smith, Lamar, Henry Mingo,
Stacy Jones, Stan and Elton
Davis are some of the historians
in the chapter. Their historical
presentations on the origin of


The Omega Center and its Williams performed Enjoy
progress have broadened the Jesus. Mary Simmons, direc-
pride and dignity tress and Patricia
among the member- l Russell added to the
ship. program.
According to Smith, Also on the program
the Christmas lunch- #j were The Anointed
eon is still being talked Angels, Shanell English
about among the ladies and The Children's
who were in atten- ',, Ministry which per-
dance. Therefore, he is formed I Cart Imagine.
stressing a bigger and LaCruser Braynon
better St. Valentine's KING recited a biblical verse


Luncheon for the wives,
sweethearts and significant oth-
ers to take place on Thursday,
February 16 at 11 a.m. Call
.305-624-3709 for more infor-
Smation.
**-*****
Bishop Noward E. Dean, pas-
tor, Preston and Marion Pratt,
chairman and co-chair, are
commended for their family and
friends day at the Church of
God of Prophecy #1 which was
likened to that of a Superbowl
Game; Instead of the game, the
Members chose to praise the
Lord in song, dance and spiritu-
al uplift.
It began with Sis. Marion
Pratt introducing Sis. Dalary
Campbell as the mistress of
:ceremony, who brought her
praise and worship team from
Miami 19th Ave. (which
includes her daughter and
niece) to electrify the remodeled
edifice with songs that were
printed on three screens while
members danced around the
aisles.
Others on: the program
included Sis. Florence Curry,
Sis. Dorothy Forbes, Deacon
Clifton Williams and Bro.
Richard Celestin from the
church. The Singing Angels of
.Arcola Lakes Park brought the
church to its feet with selections
such How Great Thou Art, sang
:by Lonnie McCartney; the
men's performance of One More
Time; Walk Me Lord featuring
Addie Williams; and Mamie
i'ivory and Mother Mamie


with much power, finess
and confidence.
Bishop Dean acknowledged
The Singing Angels and Dr.
Richard J. Strachan, founder,
acknowledged Bishop Herman
Dean, bishop emeritus, who sat
in the audience enjoying the
progress his church has experi-
enced. The Pratts were lauded
for organizing the program,
along with their sons Spencer,
a 9tn grader at N. Miami Beach
and Wesley, a 6th grader at
Biscayne Elementary.
******
Coach Richard Proctor,
Charles R. Drew Park's
Buccaneers Youth Center and
Brothers of the Same Mind,
reported that one of his other
interests is developing the
minds of youth by teaching
them the fundamentals of being
a future basketball star.
So, Coach Proctor went to
familiar ground: Annie
Coleman Projects on 58th and
27th Ave. to recruit his players.
He was successful in procuring
players from 10 to 16 and will
work with them each Saturday
from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Some of his players are
Quentin Ragin, Shawn
Hamberg, Leroy Martin, Gary
Belc, Eric Nottage, Otis
Gatlin, Boary Banister,
Deyansa Mackey and Bernard
Allen. Coach Terry will join
with him in hopes of having a
successful basketball season.
For more information and to
help, call 305-305-4388.


Kudos go out to Lt. Col.
Valarie Ruth Dunnell foi
achieving her rank as a result
of Congressman William
Lehman recommending her to
West Point Academy after she
graduated from Miami
Jackson. She trained and
fought in Germany, in the Gulf
War between Fort Meade
Maryland and Ft. Stuart.
For all of her accomplish-
ments, she gives credit to her
late grandparents: David and
Sylvia Styles Colebrook, for-
mer managers of the Modern
Theatre, and her biological par-
ents, Albertha and Rayward
Dunnell, members of St. Peters
Orthodox with Father George
Sands, Primate.
******
The demise of Coretta Scott
King shocked people all
around the world as they
remembered how gallantly she
continued the fight her hus-
band, Dr. Martin L. King, Jr.,
started and was assassinated
for in 1968. Her presence and
ability to meet the challenge
erased the act of Gov. Lester
Maddox, who refused to honor
Dr. King.
Forty years later, Gov. Sonny
Perdue of Georgia and his wife
will escort the casket into the
Rotunda as the flag flew at
half-mast and Mayor Shirley
Franklin and Yvonne Lowery
joined them during the proces-
sion at Rev. Bernice King's
church, New Birth MBC,
Lithona, GA., along with
Yolanda, Dexter, and Martin,
III.
Prominent Blacks of
W.O.M.E.N thanked Coretta
and Rosa Parks for opening
doors for them including
Oprah Winfrey and
Condoleezza Rice. They
praised Coretta for changing
the course of history for Black
women in every arena. Her
death was not in vain.


* ~*~0~
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- w


- - -


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ble senate openings are former Manhattan Borough President C. Virginia Fields and former City
Councilman Bill Perkins, who were both term limited and lost their bids for higher offices last
year. A third possible contender is Rodney Capel, 36, executive director of the New York State
Democratic Party. Several other candidates can be expected to emerge as primary campaigning
begins ... When the LA Clippers came in to beat-er-play the Knicks, Clipper star forward Elton
-Brand, a native of Peekskill, appeared on sports shows to praise Ed Peterson of Peekskill High
School, asserting if not for Peterson, he would not have made it to the NBA.

LATE TICKER
TV's 'Law & Order' Jesse L. Martin has signed a contract to play the role of Marvin Gaye, in the
bio-picture, Sexual Healing, the final years of the handsome Motown balladeer who was murdered
by his father in 1984 ...
Saying that he was happy for his fans, newly elected Football Hall of Famer, Harry Carson, who
made his mark as a member of the New York Giants, said he would attend the induction cete-
monies this August. Last year he told the Hall of Fame that he would not attend the ceremonies
after having been rejectedfor,,so long and asked to be taken off the list of candidates.,;


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She took a stand


On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks boarded a bus
in Montgomery, Alabama near the intersection of
Commerce and Montgomery Streets after
working for eighteen hours. Her courageous act
in refusing to give up her seat on a bus she had
paid to ride sparked the modern-day civil rights
movement and led to the breakdown of
segregation in the United States.

BellSouth salutes Rosa Parks and thanks her for
sitting even in the face of danger.

@ BELLSOUTH
Listening. Answering.*

bellsouth.com


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Oops! I am very sorry Pamela
Richburg-Smith that I omitted
your name as a honoree when
Saint Agnes Patronal was held
two weeks ago. Congratulations
from All of Us to You!
Lula Gray-Colebrooke
returned home after one week in
Atlanta, Ga., where she enjoyed
her grandson Patrick Johnson


and helped in the celebration of
his 13th birthday with all of
those good pots. She is known
for her cooking. We know the
birthday party was super!
Bouquets to the four persons
who were elected to St. Agnes
Vestry recently joining Malvern
V. Mathis, Patricia H. Cooper,
George Davis and Phillip


Wallace. Rotating off are Dewey
W. Knight, Gaile M. Holland,
Da'Nita Jackson and Gloria M.
Parks.Get well wishes to all of
You! From all of Us! Oscar
Morley, Pearline Nairn, Alice
D. Harrison, Ann Johnson-
Dyes, Rudie Marks, Arthur
Cole, Kim Lynch, Mertis
Seymour, LaClyde Clarke,
Louise Dean, Cleomie Allen-
Smith, Norman Carey, Frances
Brown, Mae Hamilton-Cleare,
Alma Johnson-Crawford,
Hubert Sharp, Lillian
Richardson, Janis Sanders,
Princess Roberts Lamb, Lloyd
"Tank" Johnson and George
McPhee.


This will be the last stadium
information until fall.
Pittsburgh Steelers
Name: Three Rivers Stadium
(Heinz Field)
Year opened: 1970
Origin of Stadium Name: For
it's location, the point at which
the Allegheny and Monongelo
Rivers join to form the Ohio
River.
Playing Surface: Tartan Turf
Seating capacity: 59,600
If you missed the funeral last
Tuesday on 'C' Span, of one of
our beloved leaders Coretta
Scott King (widow of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr.), you missed a
service that will be long remem-


bered. She will be greatly
missed. It was wonderful to see
diverse races, all taking an
active part in Mrs. King's home-
going. May she always be
remembered by us and genera-
tions to come for all of the good
things she did for mankind.
A very Happy Wedding
Anniversary to Maxene and
Nikeia Jean,
February 10th: Their 9th
The Theodore R. Gibson
Chapter of the Union of Black
Episcopalians cordially invites
you to join them on Feb. 18, for
their luncheon and fashion
show. Call Arnette C. Hepburn,
Cupidine D. Dean or Caroly


Mond if interested.
Congratulations to Theron
and Angelique Clark on the
birth of their son. They named
him Theron Alexander Clark
II. The proud grandmother is
Elizabeth Davis.
Daryl and Bridget Smith
Norwood are the proud parents
of a daughter Jaelyn Norwood.
Sherrily Norwood is the happy
grandmother who also has a
new grandson Matthew.
Congratulations to the Norwood
family.
Celebrate Black History every
month!
Support Black education every
month!


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IT PAYS TO PLAY.



BE A FLORIDA LOTTERY RETAILER.


Grow your business.


Get started today.
Call the Florida lotte r Businescs 've'oiment Depatl n, t
at 850.487.7733 or e-naii us at b2l t ialoter!y corn

S200ii Hloriae L.otery. "There is a S100 nonrefundable application fee.


V No start-up costs*
V Increase store traffic
V Earn commission on every ticket sold
V Earn extra cash through retailer incentives
V Support from sales, advertising and marketing staff
V More than 1.3 Million transactions daily, statewide
V Over $3.5 Billion in sales last year alone


When you play, we all win.


Rorida Lkttoy,


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THE MIAMI
F E.BiR U A


The Miarni Tires Woman is Black, beautiful,
confident, resourceful inteigern, savvy .
The Mi arn' i T!im-/es Woman is

a another, dalugh'ter, teaIChsr, r ntreparesneur,
activist, polittlan, artist, YiOL, svinvor .


Read


Thi:


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lair sty


To weave or not to wea


By Sophia Sayers
Sometimes I wear a weave. No,
I'm not flaunting a shamelessly
obvious hunk of fake hair. My
weave is not bulky and volumi-
nous like those of the seventies
and eighties. It's a sleek and
coiffed look that attracts many
compliments.
Like most sisters who have
worn weaves, however, it has
taken me a few weaves to get it.
right. Unfortunately, not all
weaves are created equal. (And
by the way, I am not nearly bald,
either; I have a rather nice head
of hair of my own!) But now I


think I've earned the right to
weave--or not to weave--with
pride. Although I am rarely sub-
jected to hair-raising taunts from
people, particularly men, about
weaves, wigs and extensions, I do
feel the need to address the
unfortunate verbal abuse that
many Black women endure when
they choose to extend their hair.
But due to lack of funds, the do-
it-yourself method, poor-quality
hair or bad lighting, some sisters-
do not have believable or flatter-
ing weaves. Hence they become
the object of hurtful jokes. If I
hear another so-called comedian
at the Apollo or on Def Comedy


Jam utter one more weave joke,
I'm going to scream!
Why don't these comedians
direct their attention to women
who walk around midtownwwith
a full head of curlers or--even
creepier--just one curler for a
bang? Or people who cover their
necks and chests with baby pow-
der, thinking it will keep them
cool during the summer? Aren't
these the real eyesores of our
community? i o .
At first a weave joke here or
there can be humorous, but after
a while it seems childish and bor-
der-line misogynistic. At one par-
ticular "round the way" club in


New York, a cheesy deej
quently chants, "All then
who have fake hair, say]
If this brother's idea of fi
to humiliate women whe
there to have a good tinm
needs to check himself! I
wonder, would this kind
disrespect be tolerated ii
White establishment?
It's common knowledg
that Black women are sen
tire to issues concerning
hair. We were in an upro,
when Bo Derek was credi
with originating cornrow,
Yetwe grapple with whet
Please turn to WEAVEr


Black women laboring in porn


is itjust anott


By Mireille Miller-Young
Turn on MTV or BET and
you will see beautiful, young
Black women dancing in vari-
ous states of undress. Nelly's
Tip Drill video took the hyper-
commodification of Black
women's bodies to another
level, when he slid a credit
card down one model's booty
and redefined the meaning of
bling. Indeed, hip-hop music
videos, being dominated by


these images, have been at the
forefront of the globalization
of Black women's bodies as
currencies of desire and dis-
gust, economy and resistance.
Yet these videos are only a
softcore taste of the types of
representations found in the
hardcore adult entertainment
industry. Not surprisingly,
powerful silences about Black
sexuality extend to Black
women in the multibillion dol-
lar American pornography


industry. How do young Black
women entering the adult
entertainment industry under-
stand their motivations and '
places in a culture that for the
most part foregoes eroticism
and reproduces two-dimen-
sional stereotypes of Black
women in hardcore as tasty
brown sugar and nasty ghetto
hoes? How do their stories
force us to rethink the line
between exploitation and
empowerment?


Black women get fewer work opportunities and fewer high-paying contrm
experience prejudicial and even hostile treatment. They tend to be marg
low-budget videos that seek to authenticate Black sexuality by situatin
hood with films such as South Central Hookers, Ghetto Booty, and Pim


More than other women in
hardcore, Black women get
fewer work opportunities and
fewer high-paying contracts,
and they experience prejudi-
cial and even hostile treat-
ment. They tend to be margin-
alized in the low-budget


videos that seek to authenti-
cate Black sexuality by situat-
ing them in 'da hood with
films such as South Central
Hookers, Ghetto Booty, and
Pimpformation. The mainly
white male producers, direc-
tors, publishers and distribu-


tors who run t-
rationalize pay
women genera
quarters of wh
es earn argu
women are les,
the sexual maria
white women.


I t4-4K4c, 4^t ... A4C .Uc(

Sale signs

Now that the holidays are over,
everywhere you look there are signs
calling to you Sale! Sale! Sale! The
urge to shop, as if you hadn't already
during the holiday season, is power-
ful. It's hard to resist an opportunity
to save by purchasing something-
anything that you "just gotta have,"
that you really only created an
impulse need for simply because it's


on sale.
I'm not pointing fingers; I'm
guilty of loving a good sale too.
But, I have to face a few cold facts.
So go with me for a minute . .
Often what looked fabulous in the
fitting room, didn't look so great
after getting home to my own mir-
ror. What I finally realized was that
I was shopping for all the wrong rea-
sons. Instead bf shopping I really
needed to address what was really
bothering me, because shopping did-
n't help me feel better. So, as I see it,
this New Year is a great time to reflect
on changes I need to make. And since
it is customary to work on the worst
habits first, I chose shopping.
All of you kindred spirits out there,


please keep reading.,;
Don't get me wrong-.
I'm not going to advo-.
cate that one should,
never shop again,
because like I said, I
love sales. But what I.
will say is that if you
A. Adams are going to shop;
shop responsibly. So,,"
here a few guidelines for you to,'!
implement before you start shop-,'
ping. Before you go, consider doing,
the following three things:
Go through your closet (as well as
your other family members) and,
contribute undamaged or slightly
worn clothing, shoes, handbags and.
other accessories to a local organizai-i;


L \fli


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Think Black Women
A U T H 0 R U N K N 0W N|





Think abO ^^^t what you hear and see.Bea ^^tif ffI Black women,


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5,-21',. 2006


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fre&.


, It's common knowledge that Black women are
he
sensitive to issues concerning our hair. We
,i were in an uproar when Bo Derek was credit-
ed with originating cornrows. Yet we grapple
re.- 'win thWhether it is politically correcto5,1,
ted straighten our hair and we struggle in corpo-


S


job?


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tionsibr shelters that work with the
less .fortunate to empower them-
selves., Having "good" clothes can
really be a great new start for some-
one. As you go through, be honest
with yourself, if you haven't worn it
in a year or it's too small-it's out!
Before you go shopping, ask your-
self if you really, really need to shop.
Youth time and energy might be bet-
ter spent improving yourself in other
ways'or spending time with family
and friends.
Ask yourself why you want to
shop. Are you lonely? Down in the
dumps? Have your ex's credit card
number? If you've got it like that
financially and have a need to spend,
then !you might consider putting


some of your disposable income to
better use like putting something
away for your child's college educa-
tion, starting an annuity, saving for a
down payment on a home, adding to
your retirement fund, taking a class
to grow professionally or giving to
charity ...
If after asking yourself these three
questions, and you still feel the need
to shop-Wait until next week's col-
umn. I have a few more things for
you to consider. Don't worry
though, the sale signs will still be
there . think about. See you next
week.
E-mail your fashion, beauty and
lifestyle questions or comments to her at
Audrey@tthe adamsreport.com.


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'I believe I can fly?'


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- d O .


JUST You

BY KYRIEJAH

Roses are red
Tulips are blue
My world stands still
When I'm without you
The honor of your presence
The anxiety of your departure
Just thinking of you
Makes me weaker and stronger
I cannot breathe
Because you have captured my air
Your beauty leaves me
In a mesmerized stare
You kidnapped the sun
And made it your smile
As well as my journey
I've been walking for miles
Steered my attention
In your direction
Enhanced my limits
To get close to perfection
I found myself
Inside of you
I love you too
For being just you


Ask Jazz


SAre you sinking deeper
into an ocean full of tur-
moil? Are you swimming
S toward an unknown loca-
Sti'on? Are you fishing for
answers with unknown
solutions? Are you floating
S towards oblivion? Well I'm here to keep
you afloat. With my honest and trust-
worthy advice you'll be able to get a
grasp on any troubling situation sailing
towards you. So e-mail me at
,m jazz4advice@yahoo.com with any
Unanswered questions, pressing con-
cerns and important information you
wish to share with me.

Jazz,
I think it's so unfair that passing the


FCAT.helps determine if you receive a
diploma or not. I have taken the test 3
times already and I still can't come
close to passing. I think that if you can't
'pass the test after the third time, there
should be a substitute for those stu-
dents. What do you think?
Diploma Dilemma

Diploma Dilemma,
Already I can tell this is a very touchy
subject. Like you, I know tons who can't
receive that passing score. Like you, I
hear everyday how it's so important to
your graduating from high school. I
think you should not put so much pres-
sure on yourself. Start attending tutor-
ing, check out practice FCA T workbooks
or start a study group. So the next time
the test comes around you can take
away some of that anxiety and hostility
you keep inside and focus only on pass-
ing the test.


Name This Teen Sensation?
started acting at the age of
four alongside Bill Cosby. She now has a
hit series on a popular kids channel. She
dreams of becoming a cook after attend-
ing culinary school. She recently
potrayed a determined teen fighting for
an integrated prom at her highschool in
For One Night.
Last week's answer: Mario


nyCollege Fair









n MiamiM



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andth Ntina Asocatonfo

Topcs:Coleg Adisson, Financial Aid


U:


STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17
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CINEMA 6 8810W 134SW 6 ST T ST. A .W LEUNE 0O. REGAL (CINEWS 'SOUTH ADE 8
NORTH MIAMI 800-FAN.DANGO O545 5 9.83 *PALACE 18 CINEMAS 'o5 'S.DlIE HWY
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CINEMAS (954) "t-581,3 PAULIEmO.XWAyoAND .830 mco US AT RED RDt
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IUOCO"ALK 16 ,.. IIDMUDAHGO 004
3015 GRANDAl 558- 3810 Pf -ANDSNSO 4
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LAS OLSD. HACWOUT. OWPAN0O. SAWGRSS, SHERIDAN AZA IS, SUNRISE 10X,
THUNDER BIRD IOCA DCIEALY I 8. !ZNER PARK PALACE C, SHADOW30 00 OR9 00O ,ASu A3CCrTD1 0 rtFSENkOE..N '|
AND AT A THEATER NEAR YOU


6C The Nfami Times Febr 6


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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To weave or not to weave


WEAVE
continued from 4C


it is politically correct to
straighten our hair, and we
struggle in corporate America
when we decide to have braids
or dreads. But as my friend
Martel says, if we allow people
to control what is on our heads,
we allow them to control what
is in our heads.
No group's hair holds as
much interest or fascination
as Black women's. I once had
Sa supervisor who asked me.
patronizing questions each
time I changed a style. At first
she just assumed my hair had
to be artificial. When I
changed it to curls, she actual-
ly had the nerve to put her
hands into my hair for her own
inspection. (I should have
sued her for harassment!)
Another ignorant supervisor
pulled my ponytail off in front
of a crowd. When I reported
her, the incident was dis-
missed as an "accident." The
truth is: To have your hair
scrutinized, handled or cri-
tiqued by a White person is an


indignity no sister should suf-
fer.
Women of African ancestry
have historically been creative
with their hair. African women
have used shells, colored cloth
and other decorations to adorn
it. Our ancestors also used
wool and fabric to extend their
hair. So, yes, our weaves, wigs
and extensions have historical
legacy.
Unfortunately, I've been con-
ditioned in America to believe
that the ultimate feminine
image--a woman with long,
flowing hair--is better. But
truth be told, I'm not just bow-
ing to societal pressure: I
think I do look more attractive
,with relaxed and longer hair.
Although I admire sisters who
sport fierce short 'do's, I admit
that sometimes I think they,
too, would look better with
longer hair.
To be honest, the decision to
weave or not to weave contin-
ues to be a personal matter. I
hope someday all the insanity
and crude comments about
weaves will be a thing of the
past.


)tnkl H Il men lIsrkc thc *an 1 %
m~ 'e


CULTURE
continued from 1C

In an effort to bring national
attention to the contributions of
Black Americans, Woodson
organized the first annual Negro
History Week in 1926. He chose
the second week of February in
honor of the birthdays of pivotal
Black supporters Frederick
Douglass and Abraham
Lincoln.
From Jackie Robinson to
Tiger Woods, Harriet Tubman to
Barack Obama, Black History
Month pays tribute to inspira-
tional Blacks from the past, as
well as those who will continue
to make history well into the
future.
Showcase takes place at
Miami Job Corps Center, 3050
NW 183rd St. Call 954-534-
1200.
EXHIBITIONS
Miami-Dade Public Library
presents
Visual Stories: The Artwork of
Jam.es E. Ransome through
February 28 at Main Library-
Auditorium.
Little Haiti, Miami: Photo-
graphs by Gary Monroe through
February 28 at Main Library-
1st Floor.
For Ibomen Only: Sande
Secret Society Masks through
February 28 at Main Library-
2nd Floor, 101 W. Flagler St.
Ba3iyunga Kialeulca through
MarTrch aq Nnrth Tnrlp


Regional, 2455 N.W. 183 St.
Artist Talk. February 22, 7-8:30
p.m.
PBS Special:
Slavery And The Making Of
America
PBS presents this television
special on February 16 from 9-
11 p.m. produced by Dante
James and narrated by Morgan
Freeman.
The film tells the story of
slavery from the point of view of
the enslaved. The series recog-
nizes the strength, humanity
and dignity of the enslaved and
redefines them as proactive
freedom fighters not passive
victims.
BROWARD
African American Research
Library & Cultural Center
2650 Sistrunk Blvd., Broward
Egypt: Africa's Glorious
Daughter
Friday, February 17:
Broward Library and F.I. U.
African New World Studies


invite you to attend the
Symposium Egypt: Africa's
Glorious Daughter from 6-9
p.m. at the Auditorium.
The issues of classical civiliza-
tions and the role Africa played
in their development have been
debated for years. While much
has been written on Egyptian,
Greek, Mesopotamian and
Babylonian civilizations, their
relationship and cross-fertiliza-
tions have not yet been fully
explored.
Speakers include: Dr. Asa
Hilliard, Dr. Martin Bernal, Dr.
Theophile Obenga. Call 954-
357-7478.
Sister Souljah
Friday, February 24:
Sister Souljah will be appear-
ing at the Research Library.
There will be an RSVP only
reception at 5:30 p.m. The pro-
gram will begin at 6 p.m. and
Sister Souljah will speak at 6:30
p.m. This event is open to the
public.


at your
EMiami-Dade Public Library!
Don't miss an extraordinary series of special programs
featuring author presentations, art exhibits, storytelling and music.


Joyce Carol Thomas will read from her popular young adult
books, includingjourney and A Gathering ofFlowers.
Thursday, February 16
10:00 a.m.
Miami Beach Regional Library, 227 22nd St.
3:30 p.m.
West Kendall Regional Library, 10201 Hammocks Blvd.


Preston Allen will present and discuss his
works, including Hoochie Mama and Bounce.

Saturday, February 18, 2:00 p.m.
Coral Reef Branch, 9211 Coral Reef Dr.


Madafo Lloyd Wilson will transport audiences to Africa
through stories, folktales, poetry, and songs.
Tuesday, February 21, 6:30 p.m.
Naranja Branch, 27056-60 S. Dixie Highway


I: EXHIBI iO I


Bajunga Kialeuka
An exhibition of contemporary works by this Miami artist.
February 4 March 30
North Dade Regional Library, 2455 N.W. 183 St.


savn@ n7


MIA~


iMEET THEillAUiTiHO RSiI


IST3ORG 1TELLIN


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 7C


. .


- -


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citibank






i F b 15-21 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


8C.. Miami Tmes, e ruary I !L_____ ----_I--------
________ _- ------------ -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


P U B L I X


C E L E B R A T E S


HI S T O R Y


my recipe for living, my history.


Marvin Woods
TV Host, Turner South's Home Plate
Chef, Author, Restaurateur Restaurant M. Woods Miami, FL
Main ingredient: Knowledge

Long before he started "Droppin' Knowledge" on Home Plate,
Marvin Woods considered it his duty to feed minds on the African,
Caribbean and Southern history of ingredients used in his health-
conscious Low Country cooking. Believing "there is drama in how
things like okra migrated from Africa," Chef Woods has made it
his mission to serve up more than delicious cuisine, but to also
inspire the world with foods rooted in his culture.


NY


Publix.
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE




www.piublix.com


`

































Full Name of Business
Law Offices of
Henrietta Pace
99 NW 183rd Street, #122
305-249-7003

Year established
1988
Owners
Henrietta Pace

Number of paid
full-time/part-time
employees
One part-time employee

Products/Services
I provide legal service
mainly real estate repre-
sentation. I do mortgage
foreclosure defense and I
help people save their
homes. If possible, we
want to keep families in
their homes.

Future goals
My future goal is to do
more marketing because I
have a service that should
really reach the masses. A
lot of people don't know
about their options when
they're being forced out of
their homes.

Why did you start this
business and how
has it grown?
I started this business
because I have love for
people. I have the same
problems, expectations
and hopes asn my clients.
My business over the past
16 years has grown as far
as the different services I
offer. My business not
only serves the Black
community but every-
one.

What were some of
the obstacles you
faced and how did you
overcome them?
I really didn't have too
many obstacles to face. I
was taught a lot of things
when I first started. Of
course racism and sexism
existed back in 1988 when
I started but I refused to


Henrietta Pace
only see the obstacles. I
chose to see the good
things.

Who does your
business best serve
and why?

My business best serves
those who don't know the
extent of their rights when
they're dealing with the
law. As an advocate it's
my job to educate the
clients as well as the
opposing clients. My job
as an attorney is to edu-
cate.

How have your
experiences helped
meet the needs of
your clients?
My experiences have
helped me accomplish
goals and feats by build-
ing upon the victories I
have won. My philosophy
is one goal is a stepping
stone to another.

Where did you get the
name of your compa-
ny and does it have
any
significant meaning?
It identifies the individual
and hopefully transcends
to the character of the
individual. Henrietta in
French means 'noble
home ruler' and Pace in
Italian means 'peace.' I
consider myself a noble
home ruler with peace.


FlU dean elected to lead ASHA


Noma Anderson, Dean of
Florida International
University's School of Health
Sciences, has been elected to be
President of the American


people we serve on the issues
most important to ASHA."
Important issues for her
include professional autonomy,
evidence-based practice, health


... it is vital that we are able to attract students,
both men and women from all racial and ethnic


backgrounds...


Speech-Language-Hearing
Association (ASHA) in 2007.
President-elect Anderson is a
speech-language pathologist
and has been a member of
ASHA for 30 years.
During her tenure, Anderson
plans to "communicate more
broadly with members and the


- Noma Anderson


care reimbursement, cultural
and linguistic diversity, person-
nel shortages in health care
and education, and doctoral
shortages.
"As ASHA moves forward,"
said Anderson, "it is vital that
we are able to attract students,
both men and women from all


NOMA ANDERSON


racial and ethnic backgrounds,
to careers in speech-language
pathology and audiology and it
is important that we provide
them with the very best aca-
demic and clinical education so
that they will be able to provide
high-quality clinical service to
clients from a wide variety of
diverse backgrounds."
Anderson has been an ASHA
volunteer leader in several key
ways. She served on ASHA's
Executive Board and has also
been named an ASHA Fellow,
one of the highest honors that
ASHA bestows.
Anderson holds a B.A. from
Hampton Institute, an M.S.
from Emerson College, and a
Ph.D. from the University of
Pittsburgh.
Please turn to FIU 6D


roviders"


Edmonson seeks partnership with Overtown


The newest member of the
Miami-Dade County
Commission, Commissioner
Audrey M. Edmonson has hit
the ground running. She has
embraced a cutting edge initia-
tive that has the capacity to
change the landscape and lives
of Overtown and its residents
forever.
At the Feb. 6 Board of
County Commission meeting,
Commissioner Edmonson
instructed the County manager
to negotiate in good faith with
the Overtown Civic Partnership
for the purpose of developing a
public-private partnership in
the operation, management
and marketing of the TECO
Chiller Plant.


AUDREY EDMONSON


Miami-Dade County has
entered into contract to pur-
chase the Tampa Electric
Company (TECO) water chilling
plant located at 1110 NE First
Avenue. The TECO plant pro-
vides chilled water for the air
conditioning system at the
American Airline Arena and the
Network Access point of the
Americas (NAP). Further, the
county intends to use the exist-
ing excess capacity along with
the expanded capacity to meet
its present and future needs.
A joint venture between
Miami-Dade County and the
Overtown Civic Partnership
(OCP) would be innovative and
would represent the first time a
county government has part-


nered with a Community Based
Organization (CBO) to create
an economic engine with the
possibility of facilitating social
and economic revitalization in
urban core communities.
"If this initiative works, it will
create a new paradigm for how
government addresses the
socio-economic problems in
decaying urban neighbor-
hoods", said Commissioner
Edmonson:
Edmonson said civic leaders
from the Overtown community
are very excited by the new
partnership. She added that
they have expressed high
hopes and pledge to do all they
can to make this project a suc-
cess.


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Business' laci
SPONSORED BY
THE BEACON COUNCIL
Miami-Dade County's Official Economic Development Partnership


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CITY OF MIAMI
COMMUNITY REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY

PLEASE ALL TAKE NOTICE THAT the City of Miami Community
Redevelopment Agency (CRA) for the Southeast Overtown/Park West and
the Omni Districts has scheduled a Board Meeting to be held on Thursday,
February 23, 2006, not before 10:00 a.m., in the City Commission
Chambers at Miami City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida.

All interested persons are invited to attend. For copies of the agenda,
please contact the CRA Office at (305) 679-6800.
Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15694) Clerk of the Board


_NOTICE
S REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
ARCHITECT/ENGINEERS
Miami-Dade County Public Schools

The School Beard, of Miami-Dade County,~:: -orida:,-:jntends to commission one (1) ArchitectZEngineer
(A/E) of Record for the following project:


NEW SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, STATE SCHOOL AQQQ-1".
(to relieve Dr. Michael M. Krop and North Miami Beach Senior High Schools)
Located on NE 151st Street, near Florida International University (FIU) North Campus Site
(Preliminary Construction Budget: $33 million)
Project No. 00254800

The project scope includes, but is not limited to, a new senior high school to house 1560 student sta-
tions and all related on-site and off-site work on a 3.5 acre site near FIU. The services for this project
include programming and full architectural/engineering services and may include use of specific build-
ing systems, methods and/or processes as designated by the School Board. The A/E must be experi-
enced in design of educational facilities. As part of an interlocal agreement, it is anticipated that the
project will be constructed by the City of North Miami and the City of North Miami Redevelopment
Agency utilizing a Construction Management at-Risk delivery method. The School Board reserves the
right to re-uses plans in accordance with Florida Statues.
Only one (1) submittal will be accepted per applicant for this solicitation, either as a single prime firm,
or as part of a joint venture, to be considered for the project. Submittal shall include one (1) original
package and six (6) copies. If the applicant is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint venture
agreement must be submitted along with the application. Percentage participation of fees must be
clearly stated for each joint venture partner.
A letter of interest, M-DCPS Qualifications Questionnaires and current U.S. Government General
Services Administration Form 254 (including color photographs of a sample of recent related projects)
and Form 255 as applicable must be received at the Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations &
Design Management, at the address listed below, by no later than 4:30 p.m.. Eastern Standard
Time (EST) Monday. February 27. 2006.
The Board approved "Procedures for Selection of Architects and Engineers" and required forms are
available at the address listed below or (at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/ae
solicitations/sp/Architects and Enaineers.pdf) and must accurately describe the current status and
configuration of the applicant. Architects must submit Form 254 for each of the following engineering
consultants, unless they are "in-house" staff: electrical, mechanical, structural and civil.
The successful firm(s) will be required to sign contracts that contain professional liability insurance
requirements of no less than $2,000,000. The successful Applicant(s) shall fully comply with the State
of Florida=s House Bill 1877 "Jessica Lunsford Act" and all related Board Rules and procedures as
applicable.

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educa-
tional programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.
Any firm, or individual, whose contract has been terminated by the Board, "with cause," shall not be con-
sidered for commission under this proposal.
Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence begins upon issuance of this Legal
Advertisement and ends when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to
commission one or more A/Es or takes other action that ends the solicitation and review process. Any
violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as provided for under the referenced School Board
Rule, in addition to any other penalty provided by law. Any written communications must be sent to the
address listed below and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room
268, Miami, Florida 33132.
Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in Schobl Board Rule
6Gx13- 3C-1.11, or in accordance with Section 120.57(3), Florida Statutes (2002), shall constitute a
waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.
School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/
and this solicitation can be accessed at http://facilities.dadeschools.netldefault.aspx?id=ae solic-
itations.
Proposals are to be submitted to:

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A., Supervisor II
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132
(305) 995-4500


NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
ARCHITECT/ENGINEERS
Miami-Dade County Public Schools

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to commission one (1) or more
Architect/Engineers (A/E) to provide architectural/engineering services for each category, as follows:
FACILITIES WORK PROGRAM THROUGH FY 09
(as may be amended from time to time)
FOR
NEW SCHOOLS, ADDITIONS, REMODELING & RENOVATIONS PROJECTS


CONSTRUCTION COST ESTIMATE CATEGORY

over $15 million A
between $5 million & $15 million B .B
under $5 million C


One or more commission recommendations may be made for individual, packaged, and/or phased proj-
ects in each category (AA, AB & AC). However, Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) does
not guarantee any specific project or dollar value and reserves the right to utilize an alternate method
or advertise for project specific services at a later date. It is M-DCPS' intention to align the anticipated
projects with firms' capabilities. A list of potential projects (subject to change) and the "Procedures for
Selection of Architect and Engineers" are available at the address below. The Applicants must be expe-
rienced in new construction, renovation,-and/or remodeling of educational facilities of similar size, scope
and complexity. The School Board reserves the right to re-uses plans in accordance with Florida
Statues. Applicants will be considered and evaluated for only one (1) category unless otherwise
determined by M-DCPS. Therefore, applicants must indicate one main category, and may indi-
cate an alternate category, in their Letter of Interest.
Only one (1) submittal will be accepted per applicant for this solicitation, either as a single prime firm,
or as part of a joint venture, to be considered for the project. Submittal shall include one (1) original
package and six (6) copies. If the applicant is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint venture
agreement must be submitted along with the application. Percentage participation of fees must be
clearly stated for each joint venture partner.
A letter of interest, M-DCPS Qualifications Questionnaires and current U.S. Government General
Services Administration Form 254 (including color photographs of a sample of recent related projects)
and Form 255 as applicable must be received at the Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations &
Design Management, at the address listed below, by no later than 4:30 p.m., Eastern Standard
Time (EST) Friday. March 10, 2006.
The Board approved "Procedures for Selection of Architects and Engineers" and required forms are
available at the address listed below or (at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/ae
solicitations/sp/Architects and Enaineers.odf) and must accurately describe the current status and
configuration of the applicant. Architects must submit Form 254 for each of the following engineering
consultants, unless they are "in-house" staff: electrical, mechanical, structural and civil. Projects listed
in the firm's proposal must correspond to the main category identified in the Letter of Interest.
The successful firm(s) will be required to sign contracts that contain professional liability insurance
requirements of no less than $1,000,000 or determined by M-DCPS for each project. The successful
Applicant(s) shall fully comply with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 "Jessica Lunsford Act" and all
related Board Rules and procedures as applicable.
The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educa-
tional programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.
Any firm, or individual, whose contract has been terminated by the Board, "with cause," shall not be con-
sidered for commission under this proposal.
Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence begins upon issuance of this Legal
Advertisement and ends when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recommendation to
commission one or more A/Es or takes other action that ends the solicitation and review process. Any
violation of the Cone of Silence may be punishable as provided for under the referenced School Board
Rule, in addition to any other penalty provided by law. Any written communications must be sent to the
address listed below and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room
268, Miami, Florida 33132.
Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule
6Gx13- 3C-1.11, or in accordance with Section 120.57(3), Florida Statutes (2002), shall constitute a
waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.
School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/
and this solicitation can be accessed at httD://facilities.dadeschools.netldefault.aspx?id=ae solic-
itations.
Proposals are to be submitted to:
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A., Supervisor II
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132
(305) 995-4500


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006 3D


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Small Black business less likely to succeed
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Author folloW rigioum principle for real estate health


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I


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

MDCPS Prototype Elementary
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc.
80 SW 8th Street, Suite 2710
Miami, FL 33130
Enoc Pallango, Shane Tedder
T: 305-374-1107
F: 305-374-1138
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc., Construction Manager, will receive
sealed bids at the above address for Phase III "100% CDs"(Structural &
Civil) 50% CDs for (Architectural and MEP): for the Miami-Dade County
Public Schools Project No. A-0823, A-0820, and A-01125, on or before 2:00
pm on Tuesday, March 7th, 2006.
Drawings and specifications are available through Suffolk Construction
Company, Inc. (please call or fax request for drawings)
There will be a pre-bid meeting at the above listed address on Tuesday the
21st at 2:00PM.
Suffolk Construction Company, Inc. is committed to affirmatively ensuring a
substantial increase in the awarding of construction subcontracts to con-
tractors and vendors who meet the criteria of the Miami-Dade County Public
Schools Minority/Women Business Enterprises. The M/WBE participation
goal is 18% African American and 6% Woman Owned Businesses for this
project.


DEADLINE EXTENSION
Request for Quotes
DEADLINE EXTENSION
Quotes will be received by The Housing Authority of the iCity of Miami Beach
(HACMB) for Architectural/Engineering Services for Generator and Fire
Sprinkler Pump System, Request for Quote foe RFQ#107-2005 until
February 24, 2006 at 4:00 P.M. This deadline extension supercedes the
original deadline of February 20, 2006. Scope of work information is avail-
able from HACMB office at 200 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, Fl 33139,
Executive Office. Questions may be directed to Orlando Prendes, Director
of Housing Programs at (305) 532-6401, ext. 3024.
The HACMB reserves the right to accept any quote deemed to be in the
best interest of the HACMB, to waive any informality in any quote, or to
advertise for new quotes. HACMB does not discriminate on the basis of
race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, or disability.


If you are looking to grow your business or hire more employees, The Beacon Council can
help. The Beacon Council helps businesses with: access to financial and incentive programs
Access to labor training market research business costs information site selection
assistance and permitting facilitation. For information on locating and expanding your
company in our urban communities, contact us at 305-579-1342 or go to beaconcouncil.com


introducing

TWO UNIQUE

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15 BP Gasoline


Stations w/ BP


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Miami


Palm Beach


Ft. Lauderdale


800.747.3342 x 508


www.nrc.com/508


David Birdsell
Florida Licensed Broker
in affiliation with
NRC Realty Advisors of Florida, LLC


'11ie Beaton Counil
S; MIAMI DE
I" N-ikvkvatB* mfti


MIAMI-DADE

Seeking Volunteers for the
Citizens' Independent Transportation Trust
The citizens of Miami Dade County passed a half-percent surtax in November 2002 to implement the People's Transportation Plan.
Oversight for the Plan is provided by a 15-member board known as the Citizens' Independent Transportation Trust (CITT).
The CITT monitors, oversees, reviews, audits and investigates the implementation of the transportation and transit projects listed in the
Plan and all other projects funded in whole or in part with the surtax proceeds.
Members of the CITT serve on a voluntary basis. Trust members will not have any interest, direct or indirect, in any contract with the
county or in any corporation, partnership, or other entity that has a contract with the county.
A Nominating Committee is charged with developing 15 diverse slates of four candidates from which the County Commissioners, the
Mayor and the Miami-Dade League of Cities will make appointments to the CITT.
The Nominating Committee seeks applications from all persons interested in serving as voluntary members of the CITT who are resi-
dents and electors of Miami-Dade County who possess outstanding reputations for civic involvement, integrity, responsibility and busi-
ness and/or professional ability and experience or interest in the fields of transportation mobility improvements or operations, or land
use planning.
Although the Committee will be accepting applications from all interested applicants, the Committee will only be considering applicants
from Miami-Dade County Commission Districts 6, 7, 8, and 9. All other applications are kept on file for a period not to exceed two years
for future consideration. If you submitted an application within the past two years, you do not need to reapply,
Persons wishing to be considered by the Nominating Committee for inclusion in the slates of candidates from which appointments to
the CITT will be made must submit a completed application form on or before 4 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Monday, March 6,
2006, to the following address:
Miami Dade County Clerk of the Board
Stephen P. Clark Center
111 NW 1st Street, Suite 17-202 Miami, Florida 33128
APPLICATIONS NOT RECEIVED BY THE TIME AND DATE AT THE PLACE SPECIFIED IN THE PRECEDING SENTENCE WILL NOT
BE CONSIDERED. THE REQUIRED APPLICATION FORM IS AVAILABLE AT www.miamidade.gov/citt/ OR BY CALLING 305-375-
3481. Members of the CITT will be subject to the Florida Open Records, Government in the Sunshine and Financial Disclosure laws,
the Conflict of Interest and Code of Ethics Ordinance and the investigatory powers of the Inspector General.


-


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lB k M t Control The n


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b


OWNS








.. ...T ....Miami ...Tim.... F u 5- 1 2 0 B


"Copyrighted Material


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I

All
12'
Lir




The life and legacy of Ken Bridges .


BRIDGES
continued from 2D

alone that day, without
the pleasure of seeing
his loved ones again,
without the blessing of
old age, and without
that one last hug he
always liked to get
before departing.
He lived life with the
urgency of a man who
knew his time was lim-
ited, and he worked
almost nonstop to
accomplish his goals.
Ken was never afraid
to stand up to the
winds of resistance in
his quest for true free-
dom. He was the irre-
sistible force that met
the immovable object -
and won. He lived his
life as if he knew he
were on his way to his


final destiny on that
autumn day in 2002.
He was living his last
moments the same
way he had lived his
short 53 years: To
meet, head-on, what-
ever came his way.
Ken died saying, "I
can" instead of "I
can't."
Ken Bridges was vic-
torious that day. The
sniper hit his mark
but only after Ken had
hit his. Emblazoned
on the pages of histo-
ry, Ken made his mark
on those who loved
him and cherished his
friendship, and Ken
made his mark on the
world with the MATAH
Network, his final,
most successful, and
rewarding work. Yes,
he set his sight on his


( rril Irt?&

**


target, and made a
direct hit.
Ken's legacy contin-
ues for all to see and
to follow. His mettle,
his ebullient and effer-
vescent character, and
his abiding love for his
family and his people
continue to inculcate
even strangers who
never knew him. His
smile and his sincere
embrace still warm
us. His insight and
wisdom assure us that
victory is not only pos-
sible, it is near, if we
just stay on the path.
And Ken Bridges' spir-
it is with us, urging us


on and guiding us
toward true freedom,
as he watches from
his seat among our
ancestors.
Black History? If
you didn't know about
Kenneth Bridges, your
knowledge of Black
History was lacking.
But, now that you do
know, what are you
going to do? My rec-
ommendation: As Ken
would say, "Get busy."
S e e
www.kenbridges.org
for more information.
James E. Clingman,
an adjunct professor at
the University of


Cincinnati's African
American Studies
department, is former
editor of the Cincinnati
Herald newspaper and
founder of the Greater
Cincinnati African
American Chamber of
Commerce. He hosts
the radio program,
"Blackonomics," and
has written several
books, including
Black-o-Knowledge-
Stuff. To book
Clingmanfor a speech
or purchase his books,
go to his Web site,
www.blackonomics.co
m or call him at 513/
489-4132.


Fane's A/C &
Appliance Repair
Wall units, central air, stove,
refrigerator, washer and dryer.
305-754-5060
Bp.: 305-566-8389



Daryl's Banquet Hall
occasions, weddings, parties, etc.
90 Ali Baba (West of 27th Ave.)
no Rentals '
305-622-3361
305-796-9558


w


Smart Fashion S;
Booths for rent.
discount for the firs
months. 5603 NW 7th Av
Ask for Lucy
305-757-9710


Range Funeral Home
The Directors are: M. Athalie Range
and N. Patrick Range
5727 N.W. 17th Avenue
305-691-4343


Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for kitchens
and bathrooms at affordable prices.
14140 NW 22nd Avenue
305-685-3565


General Home Repair
Air condition, plumbing, electrical,
roofing, appliances, washer, dryer,
stove. Call Benny
305-685-1898
786-273-1130


S Southeastern Roofing
& Painting
alon General Home Repairs. Repair
Special and Roofs. Financing.
t six Call 305-694-9405
'enue 786-326-0482

0


C. Brian Hart Ins.
Auto Flood Windstorm General
Liability Home Worker's
Compensation
7954 NW 22nd Avenue
305-836-5206


RUSSELL with the
MUSCLES
24 hours Moving/Deliveries
Low Rates Senior Citizens and
Disability Discounts
305-625-3461 or
305-651-5544



Foreclosure Experts
Refinance Pay Off Bills
Save Your Home Get Cash Out
Call Steven
305-636-0990


Coops' Kitchen
Specialized in Bar-B-Que Ribs
and Chicken
7910 NW 22 Avene
786-229-7031
Thursday-Saturday



Wedding Video
Productions
Corporate videos, Music videos,
high definition/film
786-258-3732


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2006

Council Conference Meeting: 4th Floor Conference Room, (TBA)
Regular City Council Meeting: 2nd Floor Council Chambers, 7:30 PM
Location: 17011 N.E. 19 Avenue, North Miami Beach

All interested parties are invited to attend this meeting.

Solomon Odenz, City Clerk Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

Notice: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Council with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that
person shall insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeel-may be-based
(F/S 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk .no later than four (4)
days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if
hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.



The Miami Times, South Florida's oldest Black newspaper, is expanding. We offer a fast-
paced, stimulating environment with great benefits, opportunities for growth and a chance
to be a part of an 83 year-old tradition serving South Florida's Black community.

If you are flexible, professional, possess strong communication skills and take pride in
your work, we invite you to apply for the following positions by submitting two (2) copies
of your resume to:

Tbet Mfiami Tfines
900 NW 54th Street
Miami, Fl 33127
Attn: Renee M. Harris

Reporters:
Bring your journalism and/or writing experience to help inform, educate and inspire
Miami's Black community with news and information for and about areas like Liberty City,
Miami Gardens, Opa-Locka, Overtown, Brownsville, Florida City, North Miami, Goulds,
Perrine, Richmond Heights, Little Haiti and Broward County. We are looking for two full
time and 12 freelance reporters to join our editorial-team. Please include three writing
samples with your resume.
Religion Editor/Reporter:
Be a part of our highly popular Faith and Families section. The perfect candidate will com-
bine solid journalism and/or writing experience with a desire to keep the Black communi-
ty abreast of religious news and information, church happenings as well as important
issues affecting Black families. Please include three writing samples with your resume.

Customer Service Representatives:
The perfect candidates understand that our readers are the reason we exist. If you are
flexible, articulate, enjoy working with the public and are capable of managing multiple pri-
orities, we invite you to apply for one of two part-time positions.

Graphic Designer:
Help our production department create on of the most attractive, visually stimulating
newspapers in the nation. The perfect candidate is flexible, innovative and highly skilled
at using PhotoShop, Quark Express, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Acrobat. We are look-
ing for one part-time graphic designer.

Receptionist:
As the first face our customers see and the first voice they hear, the ideal candidate must
be professional, articulate and enjoy working with the public. If you have a pleasant per-
sonality, are capable of working under pressure and skilled at managing multiple priori-
ties, we need you. We are looking for one full-time and one part-time receptionist.

Advertising Executive:
Help local, national, small and large companies expose their products and services to
South Florida's multimillion dollar Black community. The perfect candidate has solid sales
experience, preferably with print or electronic media. If you are articulate, professional
and a solid closer looking for an unlimited income, we need you to join our advertising
team.

Telemarketers:
Use your positive personality and selling skills to help readers receive The Miami Times
at their doorsteps each week. The ideal candidates are reliable, confident, have impecca-
ble telephone sales skills and work well in a fast-paced atmosphere. We are looking for
three part-time telemarketers.

Collections:
Experienced accounts receivable professional to collect on outstanding accounts. The
ideal candidate is assertive, has strong communication skills and solid collections experi-
ence.

No telephone calls please


MIAMI-

Nra


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),.
- from '-Ur -Website-ww .iiamiidade.bv/dpri; Vendors may. choose, to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
INVITATION TO BID FOR
LAWN MAINTENANCE SERVICES AT
BILL BAGGS CAPE FLORIDA STATE PARK

Sealed bids will be received by the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, Procurement Section, Mail
Station #93, 3800 Commonwealth Boulevard, Carr
Building, Room 235, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000,
until 2:30 P.M. EST on Tuesday, March 14, 2006 for
Lawn Maintenance Services at Bill Baggs Cape Florida
State Park in Key Biscayne, Florida.

Organizations interested in participating in this
procurement opportunity may view and download the
subject solicitation from the Florida Department of
Management Services Vendor Bid System. To view the
solicitation, go to www.myflida.cor and click on
BUSINESS. Click on "Doing Business with the State".
Under the "Everything for Vendors and Customers"
heading, click on "Vendor Bid System". Click on "Search
Advertisements". Under the "Agency" search field, select
the "Department of Environmental Protection" and click on
"Initiate Search". Select 2006047C. This will bring up the
advertisement detail. Scroll to the bottom of the page and
click on "Click here to view more related documents".

There will be a mandatory on-site inspection for all
prospective bidders. The site inspection will be held on
Wednesday, February 22, 2006, at 10:00 A.M. EST at
Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park, located at 1200 South
Crandon Blvd., Key Biscayne, Florida, in the presence of
Shaun Allen, Assistant Park Manager. Directions may be
obtained by calling Mr. Allen at (305) 361-8779.

Organizations must have Adobe Acrobat Reader to view
and print the solicitation documents. Adobe Acrobat
Reader maybe obtained, free of charge, at the following
website: http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep.html

Minority Business Enterprises are encouraged to
participate in this procurement opportunity.


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on February 23, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CITY MANAGER TO EXE-
CUTE A GRANT OF EASEMENT'AND BILL OF SALE ON CITY-
OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED AT APPROXIMATELY 2640
SOUTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO MIAMI-DADE
WATER AND SEWER ("WASA"), OF A TWELVE (12) FOOT WIDE
STRIP UTILITY EASEMENT FOR A PERPETUAL NON-EXCLU-
SIVE EASEMENT TO FACILITATE THE CONSTRUCTION,
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF WATER
AND SEWER FACILITIES WITH THE RIGHT TO RECON-
STRUCT, IMPROVE, CHANGE AND REMOVE SUCH FACILITIES
WITHIN THE EASEMENT, WITH FULL RIGHTS OF INGRESS
AND EGRESS.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15691) City Clerk


$39 fr 13wek n rn
cal30-9-61 Fx 0,-5746


4D The Miami Times Febr 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny









The Miami Times Februa 06 5D


Blacks Must Control Their ,


To Place Your Ad

Call: 305-694-6225


Ti


fi~, /4
I,


To Fax Your Ad

Fax: 305-757-4764


classifieds@miamitimesonline.com


Churches for Rent
1122 NW 119 Street
Space could be for a church,
barber or hairdresser.
Call 954-322-6914
Office Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $260 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600
SFurnished Rooms
19541 NW 37th Court
Utilities included. $375
monthly, plus $300 security.
305-621-0576
2900 N.W. 157th Street
I have two rooms, $85 and
one for $65. 305-244-9396.
335 N.W. 203rd Terrace
Waterfront Gated Communi-
ty, furnished, color TV, air,
utilities and more.
Call 305-510-9966
5550 N.W. 9th Avenue
Comfortable room.
$100 weekly 305-694-9405
or
786-326-0482.
DADE AREA
OUTREACH -Beds available.
3 meals. FREE if qualify.
786-488-5213
HALLANDALE AREA
Kitchen and bathroom ac-
cess. $112.50 weekly
Call 954-454-6645
MIRAMAR AREA
Free utilities, reasonable.
Call Eve 786-344-3842 or
954-442-1415.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nice room, private entrance,
with phone line.305-687-
0475 8 a.m.-10 p.m.

iEfficiencies

100 N.W. 14th Street
Fully furnished efficiency.
Utilities and cable (HBO,
BET, ESPN), free local and
nationwide calling. $225
weekly. $690 monthly! This
property is protected by 24
hour security cameras.
Call 305-751-6232
2565 N.W. 92nd Street
Extra clean, with air, in a nice
neighborhood. $278 bi-week-
ly and $834 to move in. Call
305-696-7423.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
$400 monthly, $800 moves
you in. Call 786-2321 330.
IeApartments

1130 N.W. 2nd Avenue
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
DOWNTOWN AREA
Apartments for Rent, Fully
remodeled air, laundry,
new appliances and kitch-
en cabinets.
Call 305-375-0673
786-488-6119

11530 NW 47th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$750 monthly. First, last and
$500 security. Call 786-256-
3174 or 786-299-1306
1245 NE 111 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
$950 monthly. First, last and
security. Section 8 welcome..
Call 305-651-1078 Ask for
Doreen.
1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$500 monthly. Newly
renovated. All appliances
included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1550 N W. 1 Court
Efficiency, one bath, $370.
One bedroom one bath,
$475
Stove, refrigerator, air
Free water 305-642-7080

1710 NW 1 Court
.Three bedroom two bath.
Fully remodeled. Call 305-
305-5601 or 786-488-6119
180 N.E. 71st Street
Two and one bedrooms, one
bath with water included.
Section 8 Welcome. Call
786-
285-0072 or 305-772-2236.
2493 N.W. 91st Street
One bedroom with air,
utilities
included. $475 a month. first,
last and security to move in.
Call 305-691-2703 or 305-
303-9912.
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air condition-
ing and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Brand new stove
and refrigerator. Only $750
per month; $1,500 to move
in. Includes free water and
free lawn service.
Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th Street
Phone 305-638-3699
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485


monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699
5755 NW 7th Avenue
Large one bedroom, one
bath, parking. $500 monthly.
First and two months securi-
ty. Call 954-394-7562.


6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$485-$495 per month, one
bedrooms, $385 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699

2751 NW 46th Street
One bedroom with remote
gate. $550 a month. First,
last and security.
Call 954-430-0849
ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $420-$495 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699

ARENA GARDEN
NEW YEAR SPECIAL
MOVE IN WITH FIRST
MONTH RENT. FREE
BASIC CABLE. Remodeled
One, two and three
bedrooms, air, ceiling fan,
appliances, laundry, and
gate.
100 NW 11th St. Mgr. #106
305-374-4412

Capital Rental Agency
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville,
Apts, Duplexes, Houses
Efficiencies, One, Two
and Three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same day approval. Call
for information

Efficiencies, two bedroom
apartments and duplexes.
Section 8 accepted.
C.P.G. PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
305-638-1475

Eighth Street
Apartments
MOVE IN SPECIAL
One bdrm, one bath $450
Stove, refrigerator, air
786-236-1144/
786-298-0125

KENDALL
Gated community, spacious
One, two and three bed-
rooms. HC and Non HC ac-
cessible apartments., con-
venient location with pool,
resident activities. NO PETS!
Water and sewer included.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
Lakeside Towers
305-383-2042
TDD 1-800-955-8770

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom, one bath; two
bedrooms, one bath, newly
remodeled, Section 8 wel-
come, call 786-262-5282.

Ninth Street Apartments
One bedroom, one bath,
$450.00 Three bedrooms,
two baths, $725.00
Stove, refrigerator, air,
305-358-1617

ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$385 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $425 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699

OVERTOWN AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths
with central air, appliances
and free 27 inch flat screen
T.V. $950 monthly!
Section 8 Welcome!
Call Joel at 786-355-7578
Duplex

1576 N.W. 58th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
newly renovated, air, tile
blinds and security bars.
$1300 monthly. Section 8
preferred. Call 786-285-4056
1602 NW 85 Street
Two bedrooms. $950 a
month. Call 770-826-0680 or
305-759-7300.
435 NW 58th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
with appliances, air, parking
and water included. $750
monthly
Call 786-355-6265
6720 NW 5th Place
Newly renovated two bed-
rooms, one bath in quiet area
with gated yard. Section .8
only.
Call 305-525-4644
747 N.W. 107th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
New paint, large yard. $975.
NDI Realtors 305-655-1700.
8118 NW 12 Court
Four bedrooms, two baths.
$1400 monthly.
Call 305-218-1227
Under New
Management
KINGSWAY APTS


3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $525 per month, $525
security deposit, $1050 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.


I Houses
1030 N.W. 44th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
new paint, new carpets. No
Section 8. Two car carport.
$1195. NDI Realtors 305-
655-1700.
2400 N.W. 159th Terrace
Three bedroom, two bath,
central air, fenced yard. Sec-
tion 8 OK. $1500 monthly.
Call 305-696-8488
2501 N.W. 151st Street
Three bedrooms, central air,
tile family room. $1,200,
$3,600 move in No Section
8.
Terry Dellerson
Broker 305-891-6776
331 NW 56 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$750 monthly. Section 8 wel-
come. 954-435-5085 or
305-688-5002
3766 N.W. 202 Street
4 bedrooms, 2 baths. Section
8 welcome. $1850 monthly.
Call 786-402-9546
305-454-3009.
653 NW 46th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
large den, totally remodeled,
$1150 monthly. First last and
security moves you in. Call
Alisha 786-299-1575
7150 NW 16th Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath
with central air. Section 8
Welcome 305-948-0140
860 N.W. 70 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
big yard.Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-326-2789
860 N.W. 74th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, new paint. No
Section 8. $1195. NDI Real-
tors 305-655-1700.
NEVER RENT AGAIN!
Buy a four bedrooms, two
baths, Foreclosure. $50,000!
For listings 800-749-8168
xD041
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
10741 S.W. 150th Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
florida room/ car port, $1100
monthly. NO Section 8!
Call 305-267-9449
STOP!!!!
Behind in your rent 24 hour
notice? Behind in your
mortgage? Call Kathy:
786-326-7916



I S

!!!ATTENTION!!!
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
****WITH****
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
Hud/A Homes Available
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House Of Homes Realty


THE MORTGAGE MECCA
Whether you are thinking of
Buying, Selling or Refinanc-
ing. Any Property! Any
Condition! Any where in
Florida!
Mortgage Mecca Company
6214 N.W. 18th Avenue
Office: 786-318-1705
Cell: 786-489-3199

WE BUY HOMES CASH
ANY AREA
ANY CONDITION
ANY PRICE
FAST CLOSING
CALL MATTHEW
305-556-5366
954-430-3663

We will buy your home any
condition. Fast closing.
Nathan 718-473-2273.




Houses

1080 N.W. 196 Terrace
Nice three bedroom, two
$279,000

2453 N.W. 175 Street
Beautiful four bedrooms, two
bath,price $285,000

3510 N.W. 208 Terr.
Nice three bedroom, one
bath. Price $212,000.

CALL:
Ron D'Oyley
Global National Realty
Corp
305-793-6316
954-964-0050

121 STREET NW 22 AVE.
Four bedrooms, one bath
with garage. 1405sq, Newly
renovated with new
appliances and new air.
Electrical upgraded to code.
100% financing with seller
contribution, Call for details
786-488-9265
se habla espanol

1555 NW 62 TERRACE
Beautiful two bedrooms one
bath. Florida room or third


bedroom. Totally renovated.
Owner will contribute 5K in
closing cost. Financing avail-
able at $933 per month. Ask-
ing $159,000. 786-282-6322


17311 N.W. 52 Place
Five bedrooms, two baths,
den, pool, central air, hot tub,
large patio, large tiki hut, car-
port. Try $9500 down and
$1695 monthly. (new adj.
mtg.) $359K. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700.
18911 NW 39th Court
Lakefront, huge three bed-
rooms, two baths, $282,000
SUNCOAST REALTY, INC.
305-758-7584
786-663-9790

2134 N.W. 80th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
with family room, central air,
Everything brand new. Ce-
ramic tile and carpet.
ALL APPLIANCES
Asking $195,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872
2144 N.W. 80th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
with family room carport,
central air, Everything brand
new. Ceramic tile and carpet.
ALLAPPLIANCES
Asking $165,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872
2361 E GOLF DRIVE
Three bedrooms, one bath
with family room, central air,
Everything brand new! Ce-
ramic tile and carpet.
ALL APPLIANCES
Asking $205,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872

846 N.W. 114th Street
Three bedrooms, new paint,
large fenced lot, air. Try
$3900 down and $849
monthly (new adj. mtg.)
$169K. NDI Realtors 305-
655-1700.
9918 W Little River Dr.
Waterfront home, no qualify-
ing.$18,000 down, $225,000
sale price, value $270,000.
Call Kathy 786-326-7916
FORECLOSURES
Five bedrooms, Must Sell!
Only $33,500
800-749-8168 xD040
FREE
LIST/FORECLOSURE
Below market values.
Hundreds to choose.
Low down payments.
Easy to qualify. Call now!
Larry Albert 305-255-9040
HUD HOMES
Five bedrooms, Only
$33,500. For listings
800-49-8168xD046
LITTLE RIVER AREA
$500 down. Almost new. 3
bedrooms, two bath home.
Large living, formal dining,
eat irn kitchen. $2000 clos-
ing.$1,100 monthly P.I.

$500 down. two bedrooms,
two story townhouse. Clean.
$1,500 closing. $659 month-
ly. P and I.

Call Rosa Moore
Beachfront Realty
305-757-2888



FORECLOSURE?
I BUY HOUSES CASH! I
LEND MONEY. I PAY RE-
FERRALS. 305-951-3861

WE BUY HOUSES
Any area, any condition, any
price, fast cash.
Call 786-285-8872



ALL APPLIANCES SALE
$99 We repair also. 215 NW
22 Avenue 305-644-0333.
General contractor specializ-
ing in shingle roofs, bobcat
service and general
construction. 305-301-2036.



1991 Lincoln Towncar,
needs work, call 786-357-
1486.
CHEVY CAVALIER 1994.
$900 Runs GREAT! Police
Impounds from $500! For
listings 800-749-8167xK036

Chevy's from $500
$500 Police Impounds
For listings 800-749-8167
xK020
HONDA CIVIC 1994 $500
Excellent Condition MUST
SELL! For listings 800-749-
8167xK035
HONDA'S from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167xK023



4201 N.W.2nd Avenue
Daycare teachers and work-
ers needed. CDA perferred.
Call 305-576-1620
or 758-7167
DRIVERS NEEDED-
Society cabs needs drivers.
Regular license required.
Call Lionel 305-321-5177.


Experienced child care
worker. CDA, full time,
postion in NW Area.
Call 786-256-7565.


Facility Maintenance
Specialist
Agency located in the City
of Miami seeks individual
with carpentry, plumbing,
painting, electrical and A/C
skills to maintain physical
plant operations. Must have
own tools. Full time posi-
tion, $14.42 / hour. Health
benefits. EOE. Fax re-
sumes to:
Valerie at 305-636-3521

HOUSE HUNTERS
Find houses and get paid
Call 786-237-9001
Live in/out Housekeeper
Mature, experienced, seri-
ous lady. Cleaning, laundry,
ironing, cooking. Work ref-
erences. Driver's license
helpful. Non smoker. 5-1/2
days. Drug testing and
background check required.
Call 305-694-6210 ext: 110

Miami Hair and Nail
Studio
Now hiring for receptionist,
and braider.
1178 NW. 54 Street
Call 305 757-1222

Need part-time charter bus
driver. Contact Mr. Jones
at 954-907-0677.

Open position for day care
worker. Must be certfied
Wanza and Braxton's
Pink and Blue Day Care
305-681-0616

TEACHER
Experienced, dependable
child care teacher with
CDA to teach abeka
curriculum to 3 year olds in
private center.
Call 305-836-1178

Business Opportunity

5 MINUTES A DAY
Is all it takes to
Make a living.
www.simplesalary com.

EARN HIGH INTEREST
Like the wealthy!
Be on this call at 8 p.m.,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Fridays 1-646-519-5860 pin
no. 2272#. Call Charles for
information, 786-356-5011.


High School Diploma,
Nursing Assistant, Assis-
tance Living Facility Train-
ing, flexible classes.
305-249-7339




Drum and Keyboard
Lesson
$12 hourly all ages welcome.
Call 305-303-9880



CHURCH AVAILABLE
With air and kitchen. Seats
75. Call 305-687-1218


Church Pews and chairs for
sale. Call 305-693-6583.



E.Meet me any Sunday at
8 a.m. the same place we
saw each other. K.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY VERA
Happy Valentines Day
To my true love
SAM




ADVISOR
Bachelor's degree and 1 year
related experience. Proficient
customer service skills with
working knowledge of student
issues revolving around loans
and tuitionbalances. Frequent
interaction with parents,
students and school officials
from other denartments. High
level of professionalism is
required. Must be able to
troubleshoot complex issues
and make quality decisions in
a fast paced environment.
Meet with students and/or
parents to resolve financial
issues relating to completion
of financial registration
requirements. Excellent
communication skills, verbal
and written, required. Salary
competitive.
Interested candidates,
please apply online at
www.miami.edu/careers and
submit your resume. EO/iAA
www.mia.eJullcree


About to loose your home?
Taxes past due, bills yetliny Lbehid?
Good credit, Bad credit, It doesn't matter
call me when everyone else says NO


BANKRUPTCY

ATTORNEY JORDAN E. BUBLICK
(American Board of Certification)
BOARD CERTIFIED IN CONSUMER BANKRUPTCY
23 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
visit us at www.bublicklaw.com

NORTH DADE SOUTH DADE
305-891-4055 305-253-0953
11645 Biscayne Blvd. 19770 S. Dixie Highway



MUSEUM DIRECTOR
EXECUTIVE SEARCH

Closing Date: 12:00PM, Tuesday, February 21,
2006

The Trust is in need of a firm to conduct a
national search for a Museum Director. The
Director should have experience in museum
collections, collection interpretations, social his-
tory information, technology, and museum
media with personnel management skills.
Detailed specifications of this position are avail-
able upon request at the Virginia Key Beach
Park Trust Office located at 3550 Biscayne
Blvd., Suite #510, Miami, Florida 33137-3855
(305) 571-8230 fax (305) 571-8311.



The Virginia Key Beach Park Trust a limited
entity of the City of Miami, is currently recruiting
for an Administrative Aide position: This posi-
tion is responsible for providing intermediate to
advanced administrative support in the areas of
Accounting, Human Resources, Procurement,
and Grants Administration. Minimum require-
ments for the position include an Associates
degree in Public Administration, Business
Administration or a related field, PLUS two (2)
years of related working experience, preferably
in the public sector. Knowledge of computer
systems and Microsoft applications is highly
desirable. Candidate must provide proof of
educational requirements. For immediate con-
sideration,mail or fax resume to : VKBPT,
3550 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 510, Miami, Florida
33137 Fax 305-571-8311. Email to
vkbpt@ci.miami.fl.us.


The Georgia Witch

Doctor

& Root Doctor

"Powerful Magic"
I Remove evil spells, court and jail cases return mate
Sex spirit & love spirit. Are you lonely? Order potion now.


Call or write 229-888-7144 Rev. Doc Brown P.O.
Box 50964 Albany GA. 31705




SISTER WISDOM

Southern born spiritualist, reader and
advisor. Helps with all problems in life,
such as love, marriage, health, court
cases and business. Also restore nature.
I have blessed candles, baths and
incense oils. One free question by phone.


CALL 305-300-8728




SISTER LISA

I GUARANTEE SUCCESS
WHERE ALL OTHER READERS FAIL
I give never failing advice upon all matters of life,
such as love, courtship, marriage, divorce, business
transactions of all kinds. I never fail to reunite the sep-
arated, cause speedy and happy marriages, overcome
enemies, rivals, lovers' quarrels, evil habits, stumbling
blocks and bad luck of all kind. There is no heart so
sad so dreary that I cannot bring sunshine into it. In
fact, no matter what may be your hope, fear or ambi-
tion, I guarantee to tell it before you utter a word to
me.
7615 NW 7th Ave. Miami
305-757-8705
and
517 Pembroke Road, Hollywood
954-496-6640
Two free questions by phone/Licensed Spiritualist









Birth Control Methods
(Depo Provera, Pills, Patches, IDU)

STD testing Pap Smears

180 NW 183 St. #117

Miami, FL 33169

305-999-9093




ABORTIONS


Professional care. HRS Certified.
Low cost. Service up to 8 weeks $150 with this ad.
Anesthesia included Daily appointments
Termination up to 22 weeks
Abortion Without Surgery! No Pain
No Anesthesia! Very Simple Procedure
Call for information

3 Convenient Locations:
ALBA
MEDICAL CENTER
4210 Palm Avenue, Hialeah Flagler near LeJeune
305-827-3412 305-446-9111
305-822-3838


Arrow Cargo, a solid & growing company pro-
viding cargo logistic services around the world,
seeks people who know the meaning of an hon-
est day's work. If you have a strong work ethic,
are dependable apply in person at:

1740 NW 69th Ave.
Mon-Fri 8a 5p

* Cargo Handlers
* Pallestizers
* Fklift Oper/Recvrs
* Purchasing Agent

The work is hard, but you'll be appreciated &
rewarded for your efforts & teamwork. F/T posi-
tions.. Must have flexibility to work nights/wknds
as needed. Exp. a plus. Drug screen & criminal
bckgrnd check reqd. We offer generous bene-
fits and a steady job with an industry leader.

arrowcargo.com


n >ru .l- I -r k n L-._ .-... Tr :. ,








6D The Miami Times, February 15-21, 2006


i.wal ttorne% to ked foundation


"Copyrighted Mat


:Syndicated Cont

Available from Commercial N


Providers"


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny






Miami-Dade County Public Schools

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

THE DISTRICT IS CURRENTLY SEEKING OUTSTANDING CANDIDATES
FOR THE FOLLOWING ADMINISTRATIVE POSITION:

COORDINATOR I, TRADES
FACILITIES, MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS

Additional application information and qualifications for this position may
be accessed at: http://iobs.dadeschools.net/

Deadline to apply: March 2, 2006
Incomplete Applications will not be processed.

Submit applications packet to: Ms. Brenda Miles. Executive Director.
Administrative/Professional and Technical Staffing, 1500 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 144, Miami, Florida 33132 (305) 995-7457. An Equal
Opportunity Employer.


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ASHA
FIU
continued from 1D

The American
Speech-Language-
Hearing Association
(ASHA) is the national
professional, scientific,
and credentialing asso-
ciation for more than
120,000 audiologists,
speech-language
pathologists, and
speech, language, and
hearing scientists.
Audiologists specialize
in preventing and
assessing hearing dis-
orders as well as pro-
viding audiologic
treatment including
hearing aids. Speech-
language pathologists
identify, assess, and
treat speech and lan-
guage problems
including swallowing
disorders.


CITY OF MIAMI
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed bids will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her office
located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for the fol-
lowing:

BID NO. 05-06-123 SPECIALIZED FLAT TIRE REPAIR SERVICES

OPENING DATE: 2:00 PM, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2006

(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 2/21/06)

Detailed specifications for this bid are available upon request at the City of
Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Sixth Floor, Miami, FL
33130 or download from City's website at www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement
Telephone No. 305-416-1906.

Joe Arriola
City Manager I
Ad NO. 10660




MIAM I.

Advertisement for DBE Goal for Strategic Airport Master Planning Services
Project In Accordance with Department of
Transportation 49 CFR Part 26
ESTABLISHMENT OF DBE GOAL FOR THE
COUNTY'S SYSTEM OF AIRPORTS PROJECT
No. MDAD-MOOIA FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006
The Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) is preparing to establish a DBE goal for
participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises for the Strategic Airport Master
Planning Services project for the County's system of airports for Fiscal Year 2006
(October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006). MDAD invites comments from
minorities, small businesses, women's and general contractor groups, community
organizations, and other officials or organizations which may have information concerning
the availability of disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged business, the effects of
discrimination on opportunities for DBEs, and what might constitute a "level playing field
for participation of DBEs in MDAD projects. A "level playing field" is defined, as the
amount of participation DBE firms would have in MDAD projects if there were no
discrimination against them.
MDAD is proposing a DBE goal for participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
for Strategic Airport Master Planning Services for the County's System of Airports of
fifteen (15.0%) percent, based on information currently available. The rationale for this
goal and supporting information may be requested from the MDAD Minority Affairs Office
by calling 305-876-7971, and will be available for public inspection at MDAD Minority
Affairs office, 4200 NW 36 Street, Building 5-A, 3rd Floor, Miami, Florida 33122, Monday
through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., for 30 days from the publication of this
notice. MDAD and the U.S. Department of Transportation will accept comments on the
DBE goal for 45 days from the date of this advertisement.



CITY OF MIAMI
NOTICE OF TEMPORARY/PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT
(These positions are non-exempt under FLSA and do not include benefits)
Closing Date: When a sufficient number of qualified applicants have
applied.
Please apply immediately!

LIFEGUARD II (POOL): Salary: $12.00 per hour
Must be at least 18 years of age by May 1, 2006, possess and submit with
application a current Basic Life Support/CPR certificate issued by the
American Red Cross or American Heart Association, current American Red
Cross Lifeguard Training certificate or Advanced Lifesaving certificate in
order to qualify. Applicants must also possess a minimum of three (3)
months supervisory experience. Certifications must be valid until
October 1, 2006.
NOTE: Applicants must describe their supervisory experience on the
application form or risk disqualification. Applicants possessing a cur-
rent Basic Swimming Instructor or Water Safety Instructor certificate
issued by the American Red Cross may be given preference in selec-
tion.

LIFEGUARD I (POOL): Salary: $10.00 per hour
Must be at least 16 years of age by May 1, 2006, possess and submit with
application a current Basic Life Support/CPR certificate issued by the
American Red Cross or American Heart Association plus current American
Red Cross Lifeguard Training certificate or Advanced Lifesaving certificate
in order to qualify. Certifications must be valid until October 1, 2006.
Applicants possessing a current Basic Swimming Instructor or Water
Safety Instructor certificate issued by the American Red Cross may be
given preference in selection. Applicants must submit proof of age in
the form of a driver's license, birth certificate, naturalization certificate
or valid U.S. passport with application.

For additional details or to download the required application form please
visit our website at www.miamiaov.com or Job Hotline (305) 416-2050.
Apply in person: City of Miami Employment Office 444 SW 2nd Avenue,
#129, Miami, Florida. ONLY COMPLETED APPLICATIONS WITH ALL
REQUIRED CERTIFICATIONS AND PROOF OF AGE WILL BE ACCEPT-
ED!

The City of Miami is an equal opportunity employer ,,
and does not discriminate. AD# 10572 "


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
INVITATION TO BID #2006-03
HIGHLAND VILLAGE SEWER CONNECTION PROJECT

The City of North Miami Beach is inviting sealed bids from qualified plumbing contractors for the HIGH-
LAND VILLAGE SEWER CONNECTION PROJECT to furnish all labor, equipment, and materials for
the connection of sewer systems on private property to the gravity sewer system in the Highland Village
Neighborhood located between NE 135 Terrace and NE 137 Street from NE 20 Avenue to NE 25
Avenue.

Specifications are available in the Purchasing Division Office, 17011 NE 19 Avenue, Room 315, North
Miami Beach (305-957-3609). Sealed bids will be received until 3:00 p.m., March 23, 2006, in the
Purchasing Division Office, at which time they will be publicly opened. Late bids will not be considered.
The City of North Miami Beach reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informality or
irregularity in any bid, and to make awards in the best interest of the City.

A Non-Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference/Site Visit will be held on Thursday, March 2, 2006, at 10:00 a.m.,
at the Highland Village Resource Center, 13565 NE 21 Avenue. All interested bidders are urged to
attend.

The project will be funded in part by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and a
Community Development Block Grant that is administered by the Miami-Dade County Department of
Community and Economic Development. Bidders must comply with all grant requirements including, but
not limited to: Presidential Executive Order 11246, as amended; by Executive Order 11375; Title VII of
the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; the Davis-Bacon Act of 1968, as amended; the Copeland Anti-
Kickback Act; the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, and all other applicable federal, state,
and local ordinances. Prevailing wages in accordance with the Davis-Bacon Act shall apply to this proj-
ect.

Bidders must ensure that employees are not discriminated against because of race, color, religion, sex,
or national origin.

This solicitation is subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance withiSection 2-11.1 (t) of the Miami
Dade County Code, as amended.



MIAMI- 3

Notice to Qualified Contractors
Miami-Dade County is soliciting interested contractors to agree to participate and perform in two (2) Miscellaneous
Construction Contract (MCC) Bid No. CICC 7040-0/07 & CICC 7360-0/08 for various Departments throughout Miami-Dade
County.
PRE-QUALIFICATION DOCUMENTS are open to public inspection and may be obtained from the Office of Capital Improvement,
located at 111 NW 1 Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FI. 33128.

AVAILABLE CICC 7360-0108 REQUEST FOR PRICE QUOTATIONS (RPQ)

1) Miami Dade Public Works Department Contracts & Specification Division -
111 NW 1 Street, Suite 1510 Miami, FI
PWRK Contact Person/Telephone No.: Alicia Arce @ 305/375-2930
CSBE REQUIREMENTS: RPQ No. 20050291 includes a 12% CSBE Sub-contractor Goal. Contractors responding to this
request are required to submit DBD Form 400 with bid. Sub-Contractors fulfilling the CSBE goal are required to be certified
with Dade County Department of Business Development at the time of bid submittals. FAILURE TO PROVIDE DBD Form 400
- ON OR BEFORE BID DUE DATES. MAY RENDER BID NON-RESPONSIVE.
RPQ No.: 20050291 SW 26 Street Roadway Widening from SW 147 Ave. to SW 149 Ave. License Requirements: Miami Dade
County Building Contractor, General Engineering, Paving Contractor EST. COST: $1,066,270.12 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: performing all operation necessary for roadway
improvements -widening from two lanes to four lanes road to SW 26th Street from SW 147th Avenue to SW 149th Avenue. RPQ
Bid Due Date: March 15, 2006 at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 3/1/2006 @ 9:00 a.m. Location: 111 NW 1st Street,
Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
RPQ No.: 20050353 Resurfacing at SW 26 8 Street & SW 147 137 Avenue. License Requirements: Miami Dade County
Building Contractor, General Engineering, Paving Contractor EST. COST: $1,000,000 -
RPQ No.: 20050354 Resurfacing at SW 42 26 Street & SW 147 137 Avenue. License Requirements: Miami Dade County
Building Contractor, General Engineering, Paving Contractor EST. COST: $800,000 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: performing all operation necessary for roadway
improvements milling of existing pavement, widening and re-surfacing of the full roadway using Type S Asphaltic Concrete. RPQ
Bid Due Date: March 15, 2006 at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 3/1/2006 @ 9:00 a.m. Location: 111 NW 1st Street,
Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
PWRK Contact Person/Telephone No.: Saifuddin Siddiqui @ 305/375-2930
RPQ No.: 20050362 GUARDRAIL IMPROVEMENTS LOCATION: Various Locations License Requirements: Miami Dade
County Building Contractor, General Engineering, Paving, Concrete Contractor- EST. COST: $800,000 SCOPE OF WORK:
Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment, tools and performing all
operations necessary for the complete installation and/or relocation of guardrails. RPQ Bid Due Date: March 15, 2006 at 2:00 P.M.
(Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 2/28/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
PWRK Contact Person/Telephone No.: Rolando Jimenez @ 3051375-2930
RPQ No.: 20050356 WASD CONCRETE AND MISCELLANEOUS REPAIRS LOCATION: Various Locations License
Requirements: Miami Dade County Building Contractor, General Engineering, Paving, Concrete Contractor- EST. COST:
$500,000-
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment,
tools and performing all operations necessary for the construction and installation of concrete sidewalk, clearing and grubbing, fill,
sodding, removal of existing curb and gutter. RPQ Bid Due Date: March 22, 2006 at 2:00 P.M, (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting:
3/8/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
(2) Miami Dade Housing Agency. Planning & Development, 1401 NW 7th Street. Miami. Fl
SECTION 3 REQUIREMENTS: This is a Section 3 covered activity. Section 3 requires that iob training and employment
opportunities be directed to low- and very-low income persons and contracting opportunities be directed to businesses that
are owned by, or that substantially employ, low- or very-low income persons. FAILURE TO PROVIDE SECTION 3
DOCUMENTS ON OR BEFORE MDHA REQUESTED DUE DATES. MAY RENDER BID NON-RESPONSIVE.
MDHA Contact Person/Telephone No.: Leoooldo Avbar @ 305/644-5306
RPQ No.: 00587 E GWEN CHERRY SITE 16 RE-ROOFING LOCATION: NW 20TH AVENUE & 18TH TERRACE License
Requirements: Roofing Contractor- EST. COST: $200,000 -
SCOPE OF WORK: This is a "Turnkey" project. The Contractor must provide all required documentation to obtain the required
permits to perform the job and supply all necessary labor, materials and equipment for the total completion of the work as specified.
for the removal of existing roof and install new roof with the following, but not limited to GAF Conventional Built-up Roof System for
lightweight concrete deck, with a ruberoid mop surface. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 28, 2006 at 10:00 A.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-
bid Meeting: 2/16/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location: NW 20 Ave. & 18 Terrace, Miami, Fl)
Cone of Silence
Miami-Dade County's "Cone of Silence" Ordinance 98-106 (Section 2-11.1(t) of the Code) approved by the Board of County
Commissioners as of July 21, 1998, and amended January 29, 2002, is adopted herein. This ordinance specifically prohibits
communication in regard to these bid solicitation with County Staff except by written means with copy filed with Clerk of the Board.
Certain exceptions are made such as oral communication during pre-bid conferences and communications with those persons defined
in the ordinance regarding matters of process or procedure already contained in the solicitation document. The "Cone of Silence" takes
effect upon advertisement for bids and terminates when recommendation for Award is made by the County Department.




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