Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00050
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: February 1, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00050
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text






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LIBRARY OF FLA, HISTORY
205 SMA UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PO BOX 117007
GAINESV1LLE FL 32611-7007




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South's Largest Black Weekly Circulation


One Family Serving Since 1923
8-3YEARS
Informing Miami-Dade
and Broward Counties


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Fire fee scandal goes up in flames
Just when Miami Mayor Manny of thousands of other tax payers
Diaz and City Manager Joe Arriola citizens who spent found out until it
were getting high marks for running years paying an was too late for a
the city in an efficient and profes- illegal fee. refund.


sional manner, the recent fire rescue
fee scandal has shown that Miami is
still mured in its corrupt dealings
with its citizens.
The covers were pulled back last
week when former Assistant Attorney
Charles Mays testified in court that
the city paid off seven people because
it was cheaper than paying back tens


The plan,
H Mays said was to
pay a windfall to
five 'plaintiffs, and
two of their
friends, all of
whom knew what
DIAZ the courts had
done. Then the city would hope no


S Many local
S citizens are not
pleased that attor-
neys involved in
the legal battle
over the multimil-
lion dollar fee set-
fAYS tlement claimed
Please turn to SCANDAL 10A


Keeping the focus on family


By Renee M. Harris
rharrls(nmiamitimesonline.com
The organization's name
describes its mission. The
Center for Family and Child
Enrichment CFCE was
founded in 1977 by a group
of Black social workers and
psychologists residing in
what was then Carol City.
The Black professionals
took a very "grassroots"
approach to creating an
organization that could
support the emotional well-
being of Black working
class families migrating
north from Overtown and
Liberty City.
Nearly 29 years later, the
organization is still headed
by its longtime leader
Delores Dunn, but has
grown from three employ-
ees to more than 212 and


offers a variety of programs
to meet the needs of birth
and foster families involved
with Miami's child welfare
system.
Many of the organiza-
tion's current programs
were created to meet needs
identified in its initial con-
tacts with the children and
families residing in close
proximity to its Miami
Gardens location. "We iden-
tified a large number of fos-
ter families in the area,"
Dunn said. As the agency's
staff found themselves pro-
viding counseling to these
foster families, the child
welfare component of the
organization took root.
The agency is one of sev-
eral local programs pro-
viding community based
care under Florida's new
privatized foster care sys-


tem. "On June 2, we
assumed responsibility for
756 children in the
dependency system,"
Dunn said in a telephone
interview with The Miami
Times. The services pro-
vided under the new sys-
tem run the gamut from
the residential group
homes CFCE opened in
1995, to the shelter for


unaccompanied minors
located in Kendall.
Two of the services that
have become hallmarks for
the agency are its 25 year-
old parenting program
taught by longtime staff
member, Susie Bellamy;
and Intensive Crisis
Counseling Program its
crisis intervention initiative
Please turn to FOCUS 8A


Jailed Haitian priest freed
The Rev. Gerard Jean-Juste, former.
Miami Haitian rights activists, was i
freed Sunday from a Haitian jail in
order to seek medical treatment here,
but is required to return to Haiti to
stand trial.
Immediately after arriving here the
59-year old priest was admitted to
Jackson Memorial Hospital where he
will undergo treatment and tests for
lukemia.
A staunch supporter of ousted
Haitian President Jean-Bertrand
Aristide, Jean-Juste is a harsh critic
of Haiti's U.S.-backed interim govern-
ment, which he accused Sunday of
being "worse that Duvalier family dic-
tatorship.
Francois "Papa Dod" and his son
Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier
ruled Haiti for 29 years. REV. GERARD JEAN-JUSTE


The Center for Folk and Community Art's mural "Telling Stories Through
Visuals."

Community Center uses art and


*t fr %A education to address social ills


By Renee M. Harris
Srharris(s)miamitimesonline.com


Combine a couple of self-taught
Artists from New York, a strong belief
that "what comes around, goes
Around" and an innovative approach
that uses art to address social issues
and the result is the Center for Folk
Sand Community Art.
S The nonprofit organization celebrat-
S. ed its 15th year in existence last night
with a private viewing of its latest
work, "Picture of the County," a tapes-
Stry consisting of words and images of
Issues prevalent throughout Miami-
* Dade county. Substance abuse,


crime, bullying, abusive relationships
and gentrification are among the top-
ics depicted in the mural.
Let by husband-wife team, Stewart
and Dena Stewart, CFCA was created
in 1988 as a way to "use visual art as
a tool of intervention, prevention and
education to impact community
issues and improve the human condi-
tion." The program has addressed
stubborn social issues from juvenile
delinquency to HIV and AIDS and
with groups from Charles Drew ele-
mentary to the TROY Academy's alter-
native juvenile program.
In one of the programs created to
Please turn to CENTER 8A


Nat Moore still giving

back to his community


wor


By Renee M. Harris
rharris(wmlamitlmesonline.comn
"To whom much is
given, much is expected,"
is a life motto that
former Miami
Dolphins standout
running back Nat
Moore lives by.
Moore has creat-
ed a foundation
that capitalizes on
his celebrity sta-
tus to generate NAT A


much needed funding for
inner city youth and to do
for them what he says a
junior high school teacher
did for him refuse to let
him fail. Of Bill
Lee, one of his
teachers at
Brownsville junior
high school, Moore
said, "He got me
headed in the right


WOORE


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direction."
Please turn to
MOORE 10A

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Coretta Scott King led

a graceful life
The nation is mourning the death of a class
act. The widow of Martin Luther King Jr. was
married to him for only 15 years at the time
of his murder, but carried on his legacy of humani-
ty and civil rights for more than twice that long.
A reserved woman of tremendous elegance, Mrs.
King did not allow her critics' opinions that she was
*aloof and cold to change her fundamen-
tal nature nor her commitment to carry
on her husband's legacy.
Even in the face of issues that some
argued her husband would probably not
have supported, Mrs. King remained
true her husband's ideals of equality
and fairness for all. When daughter
Bernice insisted that Dr. King would not KING
agree with same sex marriages, Mrs.
King did not waiver in her insistence that her hus-
band would not tolerate discrimination against any-
one, regardless of their sexual orientation.
When faced with the opportunity to assist her
husband's accused assassin gain a new trial, Mrs.
King relied on her husband's commitment to for-
giveness and unconditional love when urging a
judge to grant James Earl Ray a new trial.
Recent squabbling among her four children
regarding the future of the King Center in Atlanta
undoubtedly stressed the family's matriarch. While
no one but the Kings can know for sure Mrs. King's
take on the issue, it is safe to assume that she
would have wanted her children to use some of her
husband's strategies for reaching an acceptable
compromise.
As we join the family and the rest of the nation in
saluting this great woman, it is our hope that her
passing serves as the catalyst to put the squabble
in its proper perspective.


Editorialsn


Member of National Newspaper Publisher Association
Member of the Newspaper Association of America
Subscription Rates: One Year $40.00 Six Months $25.00 Foreign $60.00
7 percent sales tax lbr Plorida residents
Periodicals Postage Paid at Miami. Florida
Postmaster: Send address changes tO Ilhe Miimli Timn(es, P.O. Box 270200 )
13uena Vista Station. Mi.aii,' FL 33127 305-694-6210 "
Credo of the Black Press
The Ilack Press believes that America caln best lead tlhe world fro m racial and national
tnltlgotnisni when it atcclord-s to every person, regardless of lrace, creed or color, his.or lher
htllman and legal rigihls. HI-lilng no person. Iearing no erson, tlie Black Press srives to help
evcry person in tile Iiirm belie Ithal all persons are Ih.1ut as long as anyone is hetld back.I


he ftliami Times;
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33127-1818
Post Office Box 270200
B1uena Vista Station, Miami, lloricla 33127
Phone 305- 694-621()
IH.E. SIGISMUNI) REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES, JR., Editor, 1972-1982
GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL.I. REEVES, Publisher a1nd Chairmian
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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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OPINION


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 3A


Reginald Clyne, Esq.


City of Miami fire fee: The
taxpayers the ultimate losers
The City of Miami settled a case for $7 million with seven
aintiffs who sued because they had been illegally taxed a fee
r fire services. The City Manager, Mayor and Commissioners
w want to revoke the settlement on the theory that they did
ot know that the funds would only go to seven individuals and
ot the 80,000 taxpayers who paid the tax, who were due an
stimated $75 million.
From a practical standpoint, our City leaders should have
known something was fishy when they are paying only $7 mil-
lion instead of an amount close to the $75 million due the tax-
payers. This is a comedy of errors. Our city leaders are contend-
ing that they did not know all the details of the settlement like
who the money was going to be paid to, even though city attor-
neys, Charles Mays and Alex Vilareiga advised them of this fact.
This contention means that the City Manager, Mayor and
Commissioner settled a $7 million lawsuit without getting all
the details. It makes you wonder if they are not getting details
over a relatively simple $7 million settlement, how are they
handling the more complicated business of running a multi-mil-
lion dollar City.
I guess this is the "we are stupid defense." If our City lead-
ers are not ignorant and inept, then they attempted to settle a
case for $7 million so that they would not have to refund a tax
to their constituents of an estimated $35-$75 million. In this
alternative, the elected officials, who were put in office to repre-
sent the citizens, are in effect cheating their constituents. I
guess this would be the "cheaters defense." For the citizens and
taxpayers of Miami it means you have entrusted your City to
people who are not too bright or you have entrusted your City to
people who are unscrupulous.
Either way, the taxpayers lose. Next election should be inter-
esting. It will also be interesting to see if City Manager Joe
Arriola does the right thing and steps down. At this point, the
raging bull of City hall, who is taking a $1 salary, has become a
costly adornment for Mayor Diaz.
Mine disasters
The loss of 12 miners in the Sago mine disaster is having a
beneficial effect. Congress and the Senate are passing laws to
make mines safer. However, laws are paper tigers if there is no
funding to enforce the laws, and ultimately if multi-million dol-
lar mining companies face no real sanctions for safety viola-
tions. The Sago mine had been cited with 24 safety violations
prior to the accident and was facing a few thousand dollars in
fines. The unscrupulous executives made a monetary decision
continue operating at a lucrative profit and ignore the nui-
sance fines, which are not enforced by overworked government
employees or shut down and lose hundreds of thousands of dol-
lars while they institute costly safety repairs. The owners of the
Sago mine decided to ignore the fines and 12 men lost their
lives.
Obviously, the government failed the poor working miners of
West Virginia. Who then will force large business to reform? It
will be the "liberal press", the "destructive labor unions" and
"greedy trial lawyers." Yes, all the villains of the Republican
Presidential campaign. The press has brought so much atten-
tion to the issue that our senators and congressmen are falling
all over themselves "speechifying" about mine reform. Labor
unions are already decrying the violations that led to the disas-
ter and advising everyone that they had warned of the problem.
It is hoped that they will organize the workers and thereby give
them some power to effectuate change. While the press and
labor will have an effect on future reform, it will be ultimately
the trial lawyers who will bring compensation to the widows and
orphans. "Trial lawyer" has become a dirty word as a result of
the last election, but to poor people, who have no where else to
turn an honest, hardworking trial lawyer will be their knight
in shining armor.
It will be trial lawyers who will seek compensation for the wid-
ows and orphans of the Sago mine. It will be mega-million dol-
lar verdicts and the threat of future lawsuits that will force the
rich owners of mines to make a new business decision. Face
expensive lawsuits or pay for safety precautions that prevent
accidents and cost much less than the big verdicts a jury should
provide in these egregious cases.



Don't lie to Oprah Winfrey and expect to get away with it!
In a stunning switch from dismissive to disgusted, Oprah
took one of her chosen authors, James Frey, accusing him
on live television of lying and letting down the many fans of
his memoir of addiction and recovery. "I feel duped", she said
Thursday on her syndicated talk show. "But more important-
ly, I feel that you betrayed millions of readers."

Nobody has much sympathy for that handful of the coun-
try's worst repeat criminal felons, but Public Defender
Bennett Bummer is concerned that nearly three quarters of
the selected cases are Black. Somebody must monitor the
two new RO Courts that are now processing repeat offenders
in an effort to streamline criminal justice.
*.****
A former Archdiocese of Miami priest was arrested on
charges he sexually abused a young boy he befriended a
decade ago at his church. The Reverend Neil Doherty, 62, is
the first Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of Miami to be
charged with sexual battery in a minor younger than 12.

The University of Miami made history this week with an
announcement that the school is the first in Florida to raise
$1 billion dollars from private donors in a single fundraising
drive. The accomplishment comes 18 months ahead of
schedule in the seven-year "Momentum" camapaign.


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All articles on this page were originally printed in the Miami Times on July 12,1968


DR. MAHLON C. RHANEY


DR. LEEDELL W. NEYLAND


DR. W. E. COMBS


DR. LEANDER J. SHAW


DR. THOMAS A. JACKSON


Five Administrative Changes At Florida A&M


TALLAHASSEE. The exec-
utive committee of the Board of
Regents recently approved five
faculty promotions at Florida
A&M University.
Moving up to dean of academ-
ic affairs is Dr. Mahlon C.
Rhaney, former dean of the col-
lege of arts and sciences. A
Magna Cum Laude graduate of
Dillard University, Dr. Rhaney


received his M.S. and Ph. D.
degrees at the University of
Michigan.
The new dean of the college of
arts and sciences is Dr. Leedell
W. Neyland, former professor of
history. Dr. Neyland received
the A.B. degree from Virginia
State College and the M.A. and
Ph.D. degree from New York
University. Co-author of "The


history of Florida A&M
University,' Dr. Neyland is the
author of many articles on the
education of Negroes in the
south.
Dr. W. E. Combs was promot-
ed to chairman of elementary
education in the school of edu-
cation. Dr. Combs received his
B. S. degree from Claflin
College, the M.Ed. degree from


Atlanta University and the
Ed.D. degree from Indiana
University.
Dr. Leander J, Shaw will be
the new associate dean of the
FAMU school of education. Dr.
Shaw, a former Rosenwald fel-
low, received his A.B. degree
from W. Virginia State College,
his MA, degree from the
University of Michigan and his


Ed.D. degree from Penn State
University.
The new director of the
Vocational Technical institute
is Dr. Thomas A. Jackson, for-
mer director of Research and
Grants. Dr. Jackson received
his B.S. and M.S. degrees from
Tennessee State University and
the Ed. D. degree from the
University of Tennessee.


First Rent Subsidized


Dade County's first housing
project for the poor that will be
operated by private enterprise
with government subsidy
includes units for low and mod-
erate income families.
A 62-unit apartment building
at NW 135th Street and 30th
Avenue, has been built and is
owned by a corporation that
includes Bud Rice, president;
David Ackerman, vice presi-
dent; and Max Cogen, secre-
tary-treasurer.
Half the tenants in the build-
ing will be low income families
-whose rent will be partly paid by
the federal government under


its new rent supplement pro-
gram. The tenants on subsidy
and those paying full market
rent will not be made general
knowledge, federal housing offi-
cials said.
The Federal Hdusing
Administration has reserved
$59,684 a year to pay the land-
lords the difference between
what the poor tenants can pay
and the market rent. Because
not all the tenants will be on
subsidy, this allocation will be
reduced.
One of the objects of the rent
supplement program is to
enable private enterprise to par-


Housing Opens
ticipate in the housing of fami- Yearly che
lies whose income is so low that FHA to de
they are eligible for public hous- still are (
ing. amount of
Another objective is to mix One of tl
poor families in buildings with ing poor fi
middle income families, on the plement p
theory that the experience will family's in
give them more motivation and subsidy li1
social uplift, move asi
The project will be both eco- housing. 'I
nomically and racially integrat- and pay a
ed. Three of the families sched- Market r
uled to move in are Negro. $105 a mi
Low income tenants for the included,
project were selected and bedroom
screened by the landlords, then for each o
certified by the FHA Office. units and


For Dade Families


ecks will be run by
termine whether they
eligible for the same
Supplements.
he advantages of mov-
amilies into rent sup-
projects is that if a
come rises above the
nit it does not have to
is the case in public
'he family can stay on
11 the rent itself.
-ent on the building is
month, with all utilities
for each of the 22 one-
units; $120 a month
f the 32 two bedroom
$140 for each of the


ten three-bedroom units.
Subsidized families will be
required to pay 25 percent of
their income for rent. The gov-
ernment will pay the remainder.
Developers of the project
obtained an FHA-guaranteed
mortgage at six percent interest
in the amount of $566,700,
which represents 90 percent of
the replacement cost.
The only other rent supple-
ment project definitely sched-
uled in Dade is a 46-unit town-
house project in the Urban
Renewal area to be operated by
Ecumenical Developments, Inc.,
a non-profit church group.


The Miami Times editor Garth C. Reeves Sr. smiles approval at poster acclaiming him first
prize winner in the Best News Story category at the recent National Newspaper Publishers
Association convention in New York. Reeves' story on Discrimination in Miami's Employment
Agencies won out over Clarence L. Matthews of the Louisville Defender and Ernest M. Pharr of
the Atlanta Enquirer. Adding their approval also are Russ Jollivette, Garth Jr. and Rachel
Reeves who also attended the meetings at the Summit Hotel.


Assistant To Vice President At

Miami-Dade Junior College

A young educator who received his Master's degree this
summer from Atlanta University has been named to a top
administrative position at Miami-Dade Junior College.-
Timothy McDonald's appointment as assistant to the vice
president of the multi-campus college's new South Campus
was announced by Dr. John L. Forbes, vice president and
chief administrative officer of the campus.
In addition to his Master's in Education Administration and
Supervision from Atlanta, 27-year old McDonald holds a B. S.
in Education from Oakwood College, Huntsville, Ala. He was
also principal of Oakwood's Laboratory School before going
into graduate work.
Born in Pittsburgh, Pa., McDonald is married and he and
his wife, Beverly, are the parents of three young daughters.
They live at 5330 NW 29th Court,
An enrollment of 23,341 last year made Miami-Dade the
largest institution of higher learning in Florida and one of the
largest junior colleges in the nation. In excess of 25,000 stu-
dents are projected for this fall.


Miami Times Ads Pay,
They Don't Cost


Our Soul Sister of the Week is
Jestina Ellen Days, daughter of Mrs.
Ellen Bentley and Mr. James Thomas
Days. Jestina's hobbies are reading,
sewing, dancing and drama, which
she plans to major in, in college. Next
year Jestina serves as Miss Miami
Northwestern 68 69.
L-


BEST NEWS STORY

IN 1967

That's the award your community news-
paper received last week in competition with
dozens of other leading newspapers in the
nation.

We, at The Mi ami Times, are mighty
proud of this latest in a seriesof honorsfrom
the National Newspaper Publisher's Associa-
tion.

All of this is possible though simply
because you gave your help and cooperation
in making this one of the leading weekly news-
papers in the nation. We hope you continue to
read,


The

Miami

Times


i


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


4A The Miami Times Fe 6


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The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 5A


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CELEBRATING ACK HISTORY MONTH


The members of Kamoinge, a New York City-based collective of
African-American photographers, originally united in Harlem in 1963
to alleviate the sense of isolation generally felt by black photographers.
Today, their mission is to produce significant visual images of our time
that reflect human relationships, political and social interactions, and
the spiritual world of pure imagery.
Throughout February, in celebration of Black History Month, we will
showcase images by the Kamoinge photographers on our Web site at
nordstrom.com. It is with great pride we shed light on the work generated
by members of Kamoinge, and honor the style, spirit and pride of the
African-American experience, captured so eloquently by this innovative
group of artists.



NORDSTROM


Village of Mcrrick Park, Coral Gables, 1310 Ponce de Leon Blvd. 786.999.1313. Town Center at Boca Raton, 5820 Glades Road 561.620.5555. Dadeland Mall, 7239 SW 88th St. 786.709.4100.
The Mail at Wellirnton Green, 10320 W. Forest Hill Blvd. 561.227.3000.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny







Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Broward Urban League President going national Prrecrlptlon drug Itoo colh


National Urban League
President and CEO Marc H.
Morial named Don Bowen as
the new Sr. Vice President of
Programs for the National
Urban League. Bowen will lead
the organization's economic
development, education, health
and quality of life and civil
rights and racial justice divi-
sions, whose programs are con-
ducted by over 100 Urban
League affiliates and serve 2.1
million people annually. Don
Bowen is currently the
President and CEO of the
Urban League of Broward
County.
"Don Bowen brings over
twenty years of experience as a
leader, innovator and highly
effective Urban League Affiliate
President and CEO," said Marc
H. Morial, President and CEO,
National Urban League. "He
combines the vast experience of
running effective community
programs with a sincere pas-
sion for serving disadvantaged
people."
"The Urban League move-
ment has an even greater
potential to impact the commu-
nities we serve nationwide,"
said Don Bowen. "I hope to
greatly expand our efforts to
build service capacity in local
affiliates whose efforts empower
many of our most vulnerable
citizens."
In his new role, Bowen will
oversee the National Urban
League's largest department
which designs, implements and
evaluates many of the pro-
grams carried out by Urban


League affiliates such as job
training, home ownership,
health education and childhood
literacy.
The National Urban League
and its over 100 affiliates
across the country serve prima-
rily Blacks and emerging ethnic
communities in five key


DON BOWEN


empowerment areas including
economic development, educa-
tion, health and quality of life,
civil rights and racial justice
and civic engagement, through
programs, advocacy and
research efforts.
Bowen's new role takes effect
immediately and he will join
League's office headquartered
in New York, full time on April
1, 2006.
Bowen is a twenty-one year
veteran of the Urban League
movement having begun his
tenure in Charlotte, North


Carolina as a program director
and then Vice President of
Programs. In March of 1991, he
became President and CEO of
the Urban League of Broward
County and is credited with
developing the affiliate into on
the most progressive and
respected affiliates in nation. In
2003, Bowen received the
League's most coveted Whitney
M. Young, Jr. Award for Race
Relations and has been recog-
nized by several news organiza-
tions as one of the most influ-
ential leaders shaping the
South Florida region.
Since
September of
S 2005, Bowen
has served as
an executive
on loan at the
National
Urban
Leag u e
spearheading
the organiza-
MORIAL t i o n s
Hu r r I c a n e
Katrina Relief efforts.
Upon Bowen's departure, Dr.
Germaine Smlth-Baugh, who
currently serves as the Sr. Vice
President of Programs for the
Urban League of Broward
County, will become the acting
President and CEO of the
Urban League of Broward
County.
"Dr. Germaine Smith-Baugh
has done an excellent job at the
Urban League of Broward
County over the past nine years
and she has my full confi-
dence," said Don Bowen.


The mAin it4 a rral Ni4J%
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6A The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006


ir 'ay

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Blacks_ Mus Contro Their_ Own~ Desin Th im ieFbray17 067


FIU campus
A Florida International
University police officer was
convicted of sexually assault-
ing a woman while he was on
duty.
A jury Thursday convicted
Frederick Currie as a "rouge
cop who will never be a police
officer again."
The guilty verdict for sexual
battery, a felony, will cause
Currie to lose his police
Certification.
The victim told investigators
Currie sexually assaulted her


cop convicted
while doing a "pat-down"
search after he found her
parked off campus with her
boyfriend.
After the officer drove away,
the girl, who was 18 at the
time, immediately broke down
crying, and the boy friend
called 9-1-1
It wasn't Currie's first arrest,
or even his first trial. And FIU
had tried before to fire the
nine-year veteran.
Currie has been reprimand-
ed once, repeatedly suspended


of assault
or relieved of duty, arrested
three times and fired twice.
Currie's three previous
arrests involved domestic vio-
lence:
Charges that he battered a
girlfriend in 1996 were
dropped after he agreed to go
to domestic violence treat-
ment.
Charges that he battered
his ex-wife in 1998 were
dropped after she recanted.
He was acquitted in 1999 of
charges he beat his child.


Meek seeks inquiry on hurricane response


U.S. Rep. Kendrick Meek, D-
Miami, has chosen a guest for
President Bush's State of the
Union address Tuesday night to
send a message: Improve hurri-
cane readiness.
Meek's guest will be Joelle
Bowers, 38, a New Orleans evac-
uee of Hurricane Katrina who
currently resides in Washington,
D.C.
Meek, who has called for an
independent commission to
investigate the federal govern-

Norland High gets
FCAT challenge
Miami-Dade Schools
Superintendent Rudy Crew is
standing by a deputy who told
senior high students their aging
school could be replaced faster
if they improve their scores on
the Florida
Comprehensive
Assessment
Test.
Norland Senior
High is sched-
uled to be
replaced in five
years, at which CREW
time the school
will be more than 50 years old.
But during a rally last week to
celebrate the school's new gym,
Regional Superintendent Enid
Weisman said she would recom-
mend moving up the project if
Norland's state-issued grade
improves from its current D.
Crew has labored to downplay
the importance of the contro-
versial FCAT, but his
spokesman said he would con-
sider Weisman's recommenda-
tion.


ment's response to last year's
hurricanes, charged the Bush
administration with an "appalling
insensitivity to Americans in
need" and said the sluggish


response to Katrina showed "the
cronyism that results in appoint-
ments to important government
positions on the basis of politics
instead of ability."


MMAP HOMEOWNERSHIP ASSISTANCE
PROGRAM LOTTERY INITIATIVE
Metro-Miami Action Plan Trust (MMAP) Homeownership Assistance
Program (HAP) will be accepting applications from Participating Lenders for
its Homeownership Lottery Initiative. The MMAP HAP program has created
a new product called the Homeownership Lottery Initiative. The new product
is designed to provide first time low income homebuyers up to seventy-five
percent of the purchase price in the form of a forgivable, zero percent
interest deferred, non-amortized, second mortgage. MMAP will utilize a
lottery process to select eligible applicants to participate in this initiative.
Lottery applications can be picked up at the Pre-Application Conference on
Thursday, February 9, 2006,10:00 A.M., at the Howard Johnson Plaza
Hotel, 16500 N.W. 2nd Avenue, North Miami, Florida. All participation details
will be discussed at that time. Please RSVP no later than Tuesday,
February 7, 2006 by contacting MMAP at (305) 372-7600. After February
9, 2006, applications can be picked up at South Florida Board of Realtists
located in The Mortgage Experts Bldg., 610 NW 183rd
Street, Suite 206. MiAM




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Dedicate your life


to caring for others


Sand you learn to


a recognize superior care.
Dianne Calatyud

Seventeen years as a missionary caregiver provides a person with unmatched perspective -
on what works and what doesn't. That's why, when Dianne Calatyud and her husband moved
from Peru to Miami 25 years ago, they turned to Jackson for their medical care.


Dianne admits, over the years, she and her husband have tried other medical providers. But they
have always returned to Jackson for the same reasons. They come back for the people who
go above and beyond. They come back for the world-renowned care and advanced knowledge
base. They come back because each of their medical issues gets resolved.


When asked if she would tell others about her experiences at Jackson, Dianne said,
"I don't need any prompting. I've been doing that for years."


When she wants quality care, Dianne comes to Jackson.








Jackson llj For more information and physician referrals, please call 305.415.1200.
HEALTH SYSTEM


--------


The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 7A


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8A The Miami Times Fe 6


Coretta Scott King dies at 78





*-


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Syndicated Content


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'I11111


On January 23, between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., someone stole
miscellaneous items including identification, credit cards, a set of
keys and $100 from a woman's purse inside a classroom located at
FCAA Opa-Locka School.

*******
On January 20, between the hours of 5:30 p.m and 7 p.m., some-
one kicked in the front door to a house located at 101 NW 34th Ave.
The thief stole a television, radio and microwave valued at $200.


On January 20, around 11:30 a.m., a man was robbed outside of
Publix located at 9050 Biscayne Blvd. The victim told police he was
placing three gallons of water into his car when two men walked by
and snatched an envelope containing $4,000 from his right front
pants pocket.


On January 18, two purses, a wallet, credit cards, a driver's license
and $1,800 were stolen between noon and 12:02 p.m.The thief stole
the items from an unlocked green Chevrolet Astrovan parked at
Calder Race Track located at 21001 NW 27th Ave.

******
On January 12, around 9 p.m., a woman stole $10 in cash from
another woman after she punched and repeatedly kicked the victim.
The incident happened at the intersection of Bobby Bradley Avenue
and Duval Street.

*******
On January 13, a man stole a Stihl saw from the back of a work
truck parked at a construction site located between the intersection
at 143rd street NW 17th Ave. The items were valued at $980.


Daughter's tearful pleas help

police capture her parents' killer


a, lw


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S- S





Center combines words and art to address societal problems


CENTER
continued from 1A
help youth appreciate the chal-
lenges of growing old, Stewart
describes how youth walked
around with beans in their
shoes, tried to write while their
fingers were tied together and
attempted to look through
glasses with vaseline smeared
on the lenses. The experiences
were designed to acquaint the
children with how senior citi-
zens deal with health ailments
like osteoporosis, arthritis and
visual impairments. Stewart
explained that after allowing
the youth to experience the
"ailments," they were then able
to interview a group of senior
citizens with a newfound
appreciation for their age-relat-


ed challenges. This project,
"What It Feels Like to Grow
Older," resulted in a mural that
was debuted at the 1994 White
House Conference on Aging.
Unique approaches that
allow students to "walk a mile
in another's shoes" appear to
be typical of CFCA and borne of
Stewart's personal experiences.
Stewart said his childhood
diagnosis with dyslexia shaped
his view from the cliche "what
goes around, comes around,"
to his philosophy of "what
comes around, goes around."
He surmises that it was
because dyslexia came into his
life that he was able to under-
stand the circumstances that
could lead a youth to become
involved in crime. Stewart said
his ability to empathize with


youth provided him the insight
necessary to develop curricu-
lums that validate their experi-
ences. "We encourage the use
of an alias so that the youth
can speak freely," Stewart said.
Dena is a renowned artist in
her own right. She has been
honored as a "Woman Worth
Knowing" by the Miami Beach
Commission on the Status of
Women and in 1989 served as
an Honorary Goodwill
Ambassador for UNICEF, the
charitable organization.
CFCA has been the recipient
of numerous grants to fund
their projects, among them the
Nat Moore Youth Foundation,
Miami-Dade Homeless Trust
and Miami-Dade County com-
mission.
The group's signature pro-


gram, Telling Stories Through
Visuals, affords people of all
ages and backgrounds an
opportunity to put their experi-
ences and emotions into writ-
ing. The Stewarts then assist
their subjects with visualizing
what they wrote before showing
them how to create compelling
visual images. The printed sto-
ries and the artwork done on
individual pieces of canvas -
are then crafted into moveable
murals or tapestries which are
publicly exhibited in an effort
to educate others about the
issues depicted.
To learn more about the
Center for Folk and
Community Art, visit the web
site at www.artmurals.org or
call the Stewarts at 30-534-
8807.


Center needs more foster and adoptive parents


FOCUS
continued from 1A

that focuses on preventing the
removal of children from their
birth families.
In keeping true to its initial
focus on families, Dunn said
the organization uses a family-
centered approach with the
birth and foster families it
serves. Dunn is pleased to be a
part of the community based


care network because of the
increased accountability and
oversight typical of a smaller,
less bureaucratic system and
most significantly, the smaller
caseloads carried by the
agency's case managers.
Having a smaller chunk of
the foster care system also
means the agency can devote
more of its resources to retain-
ing quality foster parents. To
that end, CFCE foster parents


have greater access to the
organization's 'leader. In addi-
tion to attending their monthly
meetings, Dunn has assured
the foster parents that if their
needs are not addressed at the
staff level, her door is open.
The organization is looking
for people interested in provid-
ing a safe and stable home to
children in the foster care sys-
tem. Many of the foster par-
ents will provide care to chil-


% ( I( PM'%' mraJ 1 rwd,
. I


dren who will eventually
return to their birth families
while others are needed to pro-
vide permanent care to chil-
dren who are adopted. Visit
the agency's web site at
www.cfce.us or call 305-624-
7450 for more information.




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After arguing with Grace "Pie"
Armstrong, 27 and Adrian
"Pooh" Johnson, Benito "Bo"
Santiago decided he would have
the last word. Santiago
returned to the couple's home
Saturday night and gunned
them down with an AK-47 in
front of their ten-year-o'ld
daughter and her five-year-old
cousin.
The 17-year old was captured
at his Liberty City home late
Monday night and could be
tried as an adult. He has been
charged with two counts of first-
degree murder charges that
factor in the element of premed-
itation.
After the couple's daughter's
appearance on local news
broadcasts, police received sev-
eral tips that helped zero in on
the suspect.
"He is a murderer and a pro-


fessional scum bag and an
idiot, because he had two tatoos
on his face and thought he
could get away with not being
recognized," police spokesman
Lt. Bill Schwartz said. "If you
kill two parents in front of small
children, the community will
care, and they did," he said.
Johnson died on the scene,
and Armstrong later died in the
hospital of her wounds.
Armstrong's sister, Rachel,
said her sister and Johnson
were high school sweethearts
who had been together for 12
years.
The children will live with
their maternal grandmother in
central Florida.
The grandmother said she will
rely on the power of prayer and
professional counselors to help
the children to deal with their
losses.


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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Teacher ums hwock value to sAop ue of the "N" word









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MIAMI-DADE


WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR BUSINESS?

Mom & Pop Small Business Grant Program can provide assistance


The mission of The Beacon Council's
Urban Initiatives Department is to create and
retain jobs and assist businesses to relocate
and expand in our Targeted Urban Market.

The Beacon Council, Miami-Dade
County's official economic development part-
nership, helps businesses locate financing
sources; provides information on tax incen-
tives, wage rate, labor training and recruit-
ment; permitting and regulatory procedures;
identifies sites for new-to-market and expand-
ing companies and offers a wide range of
research and marketing support that can be
customized by industry.

One of the financing sources that The
Beacon Council's Urban Initiatives
Department markets to businesses looking to
improve or expand their operations is the
Mom and Pop Small Business Grant
Program. The Mom and Pop Small Business
Grant Program was created to provide finan-
cial and technical assistance to qualified
small businesses throughout Miami-Dade
County.

The program provides financial assistance
that can be used to purchase equipment, sup-
plies, advertising/marketing, inventory,
building liability insurance, security systems
and to rnake minor renovations. Technical
assistance is made available to small busi-
nesses in order to create a better working and
business environment, promote economic
development opportunities, educate owners
about various county-funded programs and
projects, form/foster better working relation-
ships among small business owners, retain
and eventually create more jobs, offer the nec-
essary training that small business owners
need to become more efficient and competi-
tive.

The Neighbors and Neighbors
Association (NANA) designed and developed
the program in 1999 with $50,000 made
available for small businesses in District 3 of
Miami.)-Dade County. Today, the program cov-
ers each of the 13 commission districts and


has an annual grant budget of $1.9 million.
The program, which features a simple appli-
cation process, has made more than $5.9 mil-
lion available to small businesses throughout
the county.

Businesses interested in applying for a
grant under this countywide program must
apply in the district where the business is
located. Applications must be submitted by
Feb. 3 in most districts, but business owners
should contact their county commissioner for
the deadline date in their district. Guidelines
for the program vary across the county dis-
tricts and all interested businesses should
contact NANA at 305-756-0605 for the specif-
ic guidelines in their district.

NANA, as the program originator, contin-
ues to play an integral part and provides tech-
nical assistance to recipients, while working
closely with the county districts, Selection
Committee Members and the Miami-Dade
County Office of Community and Economic
Development to help facilitate the overall
process.


I BUSINESS CONTACT
SMom & Pop Small Business Grant Program:
Call the Neighbors and Neighbors
Association (NANA) at 305-756-0605 or
your County Commissioner,


This message brought to you by The Beacon Council


Thbe Bre- (o Council


The Reacoinc Council, Miami-Dade Countv's official eco-
nonic development partnership, is a not for-profit,
public-private' organ ization I.hal f 'clscus on job creation
iand econorlic growth by coordinatirng cnmminrrritiVy wide
programs; promoting minority business and urban eco-
nomic revitalization; providing assistance tI local b.si-
nesses in h1.eir expalsioin efforts,; d miiarkeling Miani
I.)ade (County throughout the.world.


The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 9A


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


o AOW 0 a-q


Tlse g%~~~Qtl Csurrei


minmi*d de c ounty










Fire fee scandal engulfs city


SCANDAL
continued from 1A

that the late Henry Latimer
suggested the controversial
idea that only seven individual
plaintiffs receive money to
resolve the case.
The deceased former judge,
high-powered litigate and
shareholder at Greenberg
Traurig served as the mediator
in the case. Latimer died in
January 2005 from injuries in
a Broward County car wreck.
The case settled in 2004
with seven individual
claimants splitting a $7 mil-
lion pot, leaving all other prop-
erty owners with nothing.
Upon learning of the settle-
ment, another group of prop-
erty owners has moved to
intervene and vacate the
agreement.
The settlement has boiled
over into an embarrassing
political controversy that has


tainted the city manager and
called into question the lead-
ership of Miami Mayor Manny
Diaz, whose mantra since tak-
ing office has been to run the
city more efficiently and pro-
fessionally.
At hearings on the
issue earlier this
month, attorneys for
the interveners indi-
cated that they were
seeking a court order
to inspect Latimer's
mediation files from
the executors of his
estate.
The intervening
plaintiffs have become ARl
the class representa-
tives. Both the intervening
plaintiffs and the city are mov-
ing to have the settlement set
aside, and to force seven
named plaintiffs who got paid
to return the money. Earlier
this month, Miami-Dade
Circuit Judge Peter Lopez


Dolphins football great


MOORE
continued from 1A
Since 1998, The Nat Moore
Youth Foundation has helped
hundreds of inner city youth to
head in the right direction via
an approach that is philan-
thropic, mentor-driven and
inspirational. Moore relies on
the support of colleagues,
friends and fans to help corpo-
rate America to "put its money
where its mouth is" by serving
as key sponsors of his annual
golf tournament and celebrity
party.
His foundation also capital-
izes on youth's adoration of
athletes and celebrities to help
them learn valuable life les-
sons. "It's a matter of guys
realizing that Warren Moon
came from the ghettos of Watts,
Michael Irvin from the ghettos
of Ft. Lauderdale. .Somewhere
along the way they had to make
some tough decisions about
who their friends were and how
they were going to live their
lives that would allow them
that opportunity," the 54-year-
old father of five said.
Moore's foundation allows
South Florida youth to get up
close and personal with famous
athletes and celebrities at the
Foundation's annual football


camps. Last summer's camps
allowed Liberty City youth from
Gwen Cherry, Hadley and
Moore parks access to a
"bunch of celebrities and foot-
ball players."
Moore is pleased that rough-
ly 60 percent of the founda-
tion's dollars go to the commu-
nity. According to its press kit,
the foundation has dispersed
over $721,500 to more than
twenty nonprofit organiza-
tions, among them the
Belafonte Tacolcy Center, the
Center for Folk and
Community Art, Big
Brothers/Big Sisters and the
Liberty City Optimist Club.
With his foundation's suc-
cess, Moore no longer has to
work as hard as he did in its
early days work that included
strutting the catwalk in fash-
ion shows for one of the
Foundation's pet charities,
Family Christian Association
of America. Moore now consid-
ers himself a vehicle and
enjoys "sitting back and
watching the board and staff
take it to the next level."
This year's events will
include the annual Canon
Florida Classic golf tourna-
ment which will be held on
March 10 and 11 at the Doral
Golf Resort and Spa and a


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The Miami Times
900 NW 54th St.
FAX 305-694-6211


I S cib'T V


heard testimony and argu-
ments from the major players
in the case, including Adorno
& Yoss chairman Henry
Adorno, Mayor Diaz and
Miami City Manager Joe
Arriloa.
The intervening
Plaintiffs allege that
the original plain-
tiffs, their counsel
and the city colluded
S to settle the lawsuit
individually for a
total of $7 million
and let the statue of
limitations run on
the case, so that no
IOLA other plaintiff would
be able to get the
refund.
SAdorno & Yoss, which
received $2 million of the set-
tlement fees, and its clients
are defending the outcome.
Closing arguments on the
intervening plaintiffs' motion
to vacate are set for February.


gives


back


celebrity-packed party at the
Hard Rock Casino. Tickets to
the golf tournament are $5000
for a foursome which
includes three amateurs and a
celebrity. Party tickets cost
$150 and include a buffet din-
ner, music from a band and
disc jockey and the opportuni-
ty to participate in a silent
auction with over 100 items.
Moore is grateful to all of his
celebrity friends and athletes,
but considers Charlie Delucca,
the late Ray Goode and
Wendell Beard as three of his
most valuable players. "Beard
was instrumental in getting
Ryder to do Doral. He put a lot
of Ryder's money into the
South Florida community."
In summing up his determi-
nation to use his celebrity sta-
tus to make a difference in the
lives of South Florida's youth,
Moore said "no one is success-
ful by themselves, no one fails
by themselves, one way or
another, you.make an impres-
sion on someone."
For more information, contact
Executive Director Charmaine
Gatlin at 305-770-0995 or via
e-mail at natmorefoundat(t)bell-
south.net.


CHIHULY AT FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GARDEN.
PRESENTED BY TARGET. DECEMBER 3, 2005 MAY 31, 2006.


"I want my work to look like
it just happened, as if it were
made by nature."
Dale Chihuly



Tropical Chihuly Nights
Every Thursday from
6:00 9:00 p.m. It's a
whole new exhibit after dark!


Come to Fairchild this winter and spring to experience art and nature as one.
Chihuly at Fairchild weaves together art and nature, showcasing Dale Chihuly's
stunning glass forms and Fairchild's breathtaking landscape and collections.
See them for yourself December 3, 2005, through May 31, 2006.
It's the art event of the year. For more information, admission prices,
parking and advance ticketing, please visit www.fairchildgarden.org.


FAIRCHILD TROPICAL BOTANIC GAR1IQ 0
'Exploring, Explaining and Conserving the World of Tropical Plants
10901 Old Cutler Road, Coral Gables. Florida 33156
www.fairchildgarden.org


Free Trees for



City of Miami Gardens'Residents


* LIVE OAK TAMARIND JAMAICIAN
* MANGO PARADISE DOGWOOD


* GUMBO LIMBO
* ORANGE GIEGER


Saturday, February 18

Clover Leaf Park (303 NW 191 ST.)

9:oo AM 12:00oo PM

Call (305) 622-80o9 for Information

r Only city residents arc eligible to adopt a tree

(must have proo f of residence)


NIKE & CATTS


Contemporary dining with a sassy twist

3607 NW 191 STREET
Miami Gardens

305-621-8855


* GUAVA
* AVOCADO
* LYCHEE
* STAR FRUIT


* DAHOON HOLLY
* STAR APPLE
* JACK FRUIT
* MAHOGANY


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10A The Miami Times F 6


1





















Hundreds turn out for fun-filled day


Mentors recruitedfor local children during National

Mentoring Month at the Day of the Child event


The Day of the Child is a
one-day celebration held dur-
ing National Mentoring Month
to promote the enormous need
for adult mentors in our com-
munity, demonstrated by the
hundreds of children on local
mentoring agency waiting lists
and more than 4,500 children
in foster care within Miami-
Dade County. Attended by
several hundred guests
including current mentors and
mentees, the event held at the
Miami Children's Museum on
Saturday, January 21, was a
day of fun, education, recre-
ation, food and entertainment
for children and adults alike.
The festivities were held in
honor of the caring members
of our community that play
the role of a mentor and friend
to these children in need.
High-profile attendees at the
Day of the Child included
Judge Cindy Lederman, The


Darryl and Keon playing in the bounce house.


Children's Trust President and
CEO Modesto Abety and
Department of Children and
Families District


Administrator Chuck Hood,
among others. In addition to
all of the exciting exhibits and
activities at the Miami


Quatrona beats Chuck Hood, district adminis-
trator of the Department of Children and
Families, in a sack race.


Children's Museum, the Day
of the Child event also includ-
ed clowns, face painting, sack
races, basketball hoops, sever-
al bounce houses and balloon
creations.
"The Day of the Child event
was really what mentoring is
all about," said Hood. "Seeing
adults spending time with
children, having fun playing
and interacting with each
other reminded me that the
most important thing about
National Mentoring Month is
getting more caring adults in
our community to volunteer to
become mentors to our chil-
dren. Having a mentor can
make a huge impact on a
child's life."
To raise funds for the Day of
the Child mentoring initiative,
a VIP fundraiser dinner and
silent auction was held at
Miami Beach's Alexander
Hotel last week and was
attended by more than 200
prestigious guests including
Senator Frederica Wilson and
North Miami Mayor Kevin
Burns.


Bishop Wilson...

the light in

any dark room
Jesus started working at 12
and worked until he was 33. No
vacation and He did not retire.
He was a hard worker and a
smart worker.
His work touch everybody who
followed Him. He is a light in any
dark room. No matter what is
the problem. Luke 2:49.


Bishop John Wilson


Reverend Abraham Thomas greets Katrina victim during outreach trip.

-I *


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

M- I h


A Mission with a New Beginning Church

celebrates their 10th annual anniversary


A Mission With A New Begin-
ning Church, 8745 NW 22nd
Avenue, will be celebrating the
tenth annual pastoral anniver-
sary of Bishop Eugene Joyner,
overseer and First Lady Ethel
Joyner on Tuesday, February
28, through Friday, March 3 at
7:30 p.m.
The celebration will continue
with services beginning at 11:30
a.m. Sunday, March 5 with
Elder Calvin Joyner from A
Mission With A New Beginning
#2, Fitzgerald, GA.
The theme for the anniversary
is "Anointed Shepherd Leading
God's Flock . and how shall


they hear without a preacher,
and how shall they preach
except they be sent . Romans
10:14, 15."
A banquet will be held in honor
of Bishop Eugene and First Lady
Ethel Joyner at El Palacio Sports
Hotel and Conference Center,
21485 N.W. 27th Avenue
(University Drive), 305-621-
5801, on March 4, 6-11 p.m.
Tickets for adults are $30, chil-
dren 2-12, $15.
For ticket information and pur-
chase, contact Deacon Joseph
Partridge at 305-970-2595 or
Sister Sharon Joyner at 305-
6816047.


Pastor Bishop
Eugene Joyner


.l R MISSIONARY BAPTISg T


DEACN MINISTRY


-N-WISHIP


Is There a Word

from god

Come Expecting

A Miracle


Lord Send Us

A Revival


Pastors And

Churches From

All Over Dade,

Broward &

South Miami


Rev. B.L. Richardson


Will Be Here


All the way from Albany, Georgia


February 6 thru 10 7p.m. Nightly


Calling All Bulls!
Miami Northwestern
Community Action Committee
will host a meeting on
February 6 at 7 p.m. to dis-
cuss issues concerning the
future of Miami Northwestern.
The topics to be discuss are
the schools Academics,
Budget, Certified Teachers,
Community Resources,
Leadership and School Safety.
Contact Raejean Lee at 305-
687-4179.


I


--~--








2B Th Mi i Times Febru 6


irit,*ffyspeaking

is B)PIic&Gov9


Begin the plans
Have you ever wondered why
it takes so long at times to
accomplish something? You
make plans, organize yourself.
set goals, and it seems that
things just don't go according
to what you desire. I believe
that this column is the perfect
one to follow the January


with God
columns on New Year's Goals. I
hope that if you had not
already decided to set some
goals for 2006, the columns
would have prompted you to
get started. Most people do not
have a lot of problems setting
goals they have difficulty in
keeping to the task, and espe-


A threefold cord is not quickly bi


If there was anything about
which Solomon was an expert, it
was on relationships. I'm not
quite sure if this expertise was
gained in the appropriate way,
but expert, he was.
One thing we can glean from.
the experience of Solomon was
the blessing, benefit and burden
of agreement and partnership.
What is the threefold cord that


I'li !


The Historical Museum of
South Florida invites you to cel-
ebrate Black History Month with
them on February 11 and 25
from 1 to 3 p.m. through re-
enactments and African pas-
sages. For more information, call
305-375-1625.
*******
7 on Seventh presents 14
unique designers within two pre-
sentations,"Fresh Looks for
Fall/Winter 2006," Wednesday,
February 8 at 1 and 3 p.m. For





New Christ Tabernacle
Missionary Baptist Church,
Reverend Harold Marsh, pastor,
would like to invite you to their
Pastor's pre-anniversary servic-
es, February 3, 10, and 12. For
more information on times and
locations, please call or visit the.
church.
****Salvation Now presents free
Salvation Now presents free


is not quickly broken?
consists of you, your
and God. Trust me..
relationship is held to
only you and your par
all too easy for any
creep in and destroy,
that enemy is fear, dc
trust, anger or conde
Those elements or emc
ingredients guaran


cially in completing the goals.
There are various reasons
why we run into so many
obstacles when we are attempt-
ing to get from point A to point
B. One of them is that we do
not begin organized. We get a
good idea. We even manage to
get some excitement going -
and then as quickly as the idea
commenced, it just as quickly
ceases. If we begin to do any-
thing at all, it is done haphaz-
ardly, and without being
focused on the process neces-
sary to accomplish our goal.
Another reason that we fail to
complete what we started is


search and destroy, even if we
are careful.
The Apostle Paul tells us that
"He [meaning Christ] is before
[or should be first] all things,
and by him all things consist
[belong, dwell in]" Colossians I :
ro en 17. That means that when
broken Christ is in first place of all of
our endeavors, be they financial,
That cord relational, vocational or spiritu-
r partner al, His presence is guaranteed,
. if your and where His presence is,
gether by "there is liberty (2 Corinthians
tner, it is 3:17)." In other words, the clos-
enemy to er we draw to God, the closer we
whether draw to each other. Watch this:
doubt, dis- The closer I get to God is the
emnatlon. closer I get to you. Effective
motions are communication skills are won-
teed to derful; conflict resolution skills


Carrie P. Meek Senior and
Cultural Center at Charles
Hadley Park. For more informa-
tion or to RSVP, call 305-635-
2301 ext 373.

Coconut Grove Cares, Inc.
presents a Heritage .Festival on
Saturday, February 25 at
Elizabeth Virrick Park from 11
a.m. to 5 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call 305-445-0123.
*******
Tools for Change will have a
free seminar on locating Micro-
Loans for your business, every
Wednesday at 10 a.m. For more
information, call 305-751-8934

mation, call 305-758-7945.

The House of God Church,
Brownsville, will have a Black
History Month Celebration every
Friday night in February at 7:30
p.m. For more information, call
Deaconess Tina Moore at 305-
634-8078.
******
Reverend Dr. Robert B.
Ingram and the Mt. Zion A.M.E
Church family invite you to
praise and worship with us in a
celebration of "Black History


more information, call 914-841-
2341 or e-mail sevenonsev-
enth(()aol.com.
*******
The Miami-Dade Community
Action Agency's Head Start
Program is now accepting appli-
cation for the 2006-2007 school
year. For more information, call
305-347-4622.
*******
The Model City Trust will
hold its annual Homebuyers
Fair on February 11 at the





brief seminars on How to Share
Christ. For more information,
call Evangelist Debbie 305-898-
1025.

New Life Missionary Baptist
Church, Pastor Frank
J.Glasford, Women of Faith min-
istry presents "A Salute to Black
History," February 25 at 6 p.m.
All are welcome. For more infor-


liclpny I n p .Ec In rumLtmkc








"Copyrighted Material -

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


- -do "o


Scripture of the Week:


This is my commandment "That Ye Love Another, as I have love you."
Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his


that we do not begin on the
proper foundation. What is the
proper foundation? Jesus!
Have you laid your plans on the
altar before God? Have you
asked Him if your agenda is in
line with His agenda? Have you
asked for His blessings as you
accomplish HIS perfect will in
your life? As a good friend of
mine told me years ago, and
God reminds me of her words
occasionally "an idea might
be a good thing, but is it a
GOD thing?!" We might come
up with a good idea for a proj-
ect, a business, or a financial
goal. There is nothing sinful


are great; but if I really want
intimacy with you, the best way
to get there is via intimacy with
God.
Listen, we are living in a time
when it's easy to become divid-
ed, distracted and discouraged
in the best of relationships.
According to Solomon, when
God is wrapped throughout
your relationship, or when you
and your spouse are wrapped
together, and together, you are
wrapped up in God, the cord of
your relationship is not easily
broken.
Sounds like both insurance
and assurance to me.
Times change. People change.
Relationships change. The coca-
cola shape you fell in love with

or visit www.tfc.org.
*******
Leonardo Lado, M.D. will dis-
cuss how addicts and their fam-
ilies can get help on Thursday,
February 2, 7-9 p.m. at the
Miami Biscayne Bay Marriott
Hotel. To RSVP or for more infor-
mation, call 1-800-700-SOBER
(7623).
*******
Come out to Peace Keeper's
Championship Football Game
and End Violence Now! Kick-off
time, February 5 at 3:30 p.m.
For more information, call
Minister Tim Hodges at 786-
443-5698.

Sunday," February 12 at 11
a.m. For more information, call
305-681-3300 or 305-696-
7743.

Mt. Tabor Missionary
Baptist Church will be having
its 105th Church Anniversary


in the idea, and it could very
well have merit. But is it what
God wants you to do at this
time?
It might be something that
He wants to accomplish at a
later date. Perhaps the people
that you are involving in the
project are not the people that
God wants you to be aligned
with. Perhaps God has other
plans for your life at this time.
Did you ask Him? The Bible
tells us unless God builds the
house, it will not stand. We
can apply this to every area of
our lives. Every thing that we
do; everything thing that we


has become a 2-liter now. The
"six pack" you fell for has
become a keg. The hair you
used to run your fingers
through has become a weave or
toupee. It happens.
When you and your compan-
ion are committed (beyond feel-
ings) in covenant with God and
with each other, you can receive
strength to weather the storms.
Let's look at some ways to
strengthen our connection:
Strive to learn each other's
language. You may be a talker.
Your companion may be a lis-
tener. Don't expect him or her to
respond to situations in the
same manner as you.
Take time for a "weather
report." Check in with each other


Class Meetings
Miami Central's Class of
1976 will have a 30thi class
Reunion Meeting, Tuesday,
February 7 from 7-8 p.m. at
Miami Central in the auditori-
um.

Miami Edison's Class of
1996 is having a 10 year Class
Reunion Meeting on February
8th and 22nd at 7 p.m. in the
school's auditorium. Your
attendance would be greatly
appreciated. For more informa-
tion, please call 305-206-3412
or e-mail mesh96classre-
union(@hotmail.com.

Celebration on February 12 at
7:30 and 11:45 a.m. and a
Black History Celebration on
February 13 and February 16 at
7 p.m. nightly.

For more information, call
305-693-0820.Send your,


24 hours a day

the best gospel is

on the Station

That Puts

Jesus Christ

First!


are, must line up with God's
plans. He should be the archi-
tect who designs the plans, the
lead contractor as you build,
and the authority that gives
the final permit.
Next week, I am going to
share with you an important
reason why we get distracted
or fearful in the midst of our
goals, and turn aside or just
decide not to pursue them to
fruition. The Lord shared this
reason with me during a time
of devotion, and it just
knocked my socks off! Let's
see if you have the same reac-
tion!


to see how you're doing in vari-
ous areas of your lives. You may
not want to bring the office
home with you, but if that's
what it takes to make your
spouse feel more involved in
your life, consider selectively
sharing your victories and chal-
lenges.
Commit to regular time with
each other. Whether you go to
the movies or watch them at
home; whether you go out for a
candlelight dinner or make a
meal and eat on the floor, dedi-
cate time just for you and your
companion. Don't let anything
or anyone interfere with that,
except for emergencies (that you
both consider to be an emer-
gency).

*******
Miami Northwestern's
Class of 1967 is making plans
for the 40th year reunion.
Please come out and help plan,
For more information, call
Elaine Mellerson 305 757-
4471.

Send your community
announcements by 2 p.m.
Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamitedi-
torial@bellsouth.net or
mail to 900 NW 54th
Street, Miami, 33127-
1818. For further informa-
tion,. call 305-694-6210.

church announcements by 2
p.m. Monday. Fax to 305-757-
5770, email to miamiteditori-
al@bellsouth or mail to 900
NW 54th Street, Miami,
33127-1818. For further
information, call 305-694-
6210.
,j- --. -


Our Request Lines

305-953-9626

954-525-1490

888-599-WMBM


c aI Il


Gospel AM 1490 WMBM

Bishop Victor T. Curry, President/General Manager


A13 d iL.Iumi -i I LumiI r, yuu~I, L l I 1 .vv


s kcalB Must Control g


L


j~ jj llj ~j al~ J1- "O)ii


friend.


-St. John 15: 12-13






k12,c'C Mi" VVt U Conro Thpir Ounflsiu h iaiTmeFeray ,2063


Bac


to


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*"Copyrighted Material -

SSyndicateed Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"
,, b ,A&


ScIolJhrinJ %n c jaIf iAn in IUC


Oral HI tests not the last word


me


Health care confidential


Protect your family.
Get tested for HIV.








To learn more about HIV
and AIDS, Call
1-800-FLA-AIDS or visit
WeMakeTheChange.com
FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
BUREAU OF HIV/AIDS


HiMS


Volunteers Wanted for a Research Study
Do you have chronic hepatitis B?
You may be eligible tojoin an important new study of a
new medication!
Convenient, once-a-day oral dosing...
Screening and medical care...
Requirements
o 18 to 69 years of age
o Not more than 12 weeks of previous treatment for
hepatitis B
o Must not be co-infected with hepatitis C, hepatitis D or
HIV
o Must not be pregnant or breast feeding
o Must not have a history of liver disease

Qualified participants will receive medical exams, laboratory
tests and medical treatment related to the study. All patients
will receive either the new treatment or an approved
treatment for hepatitis B. All FREE of charge.
If you are interested, please call:
Macy Ho, 305-575-3172
For
Dr. Lennox Jeffers
University of Miami School of Medicine
Center for Liver Diseases


s kcalB Must Control Their O y


The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 3B


% 46 -








Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


Rik' 4 (cviirJ hinJ ur%$c #aauM w(nvcr'\%


Om


Sial H1%\ KsIcl qurt.sAlir

41oa
4D


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"


Chimh rectoIr
,- .- -- .
.fL" .- -. .i| d > i" i -,. *


93"' Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"' Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30(1n.. m.IEuly Mnrtingi Wsitipt
I1 1 a.m...Morning Worship
Evening Worship
Ist & 31R Sunday ........6 pa.m.
1Tuesday Bible Slidy ...7 p. m.
website: ctlbc.org



Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
fri nl iippli\r.i\cr f hIllsii lll.it l
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami, FL
305-759-8875
SI r t ilyr. .... ( : ilnil.

Morning WoishipI............ I a.
Youthi Minislry Sludy.....W ......7 p.ill
PIttyeri lille Study.....W ed......7 p.m.
Nxilitday AltaIr Plyc:..(M-F)
IAM Cling tieC I lIuigry every
Wedtesdal y........ I n .- 1 p.m.



Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528

Order of Services:
Mon. tllrn Fri. Noon Day Prayerc
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.im.
Sunday Worship...7-11 a.m.
Sunday School.......9:30 a.m..




Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 68' Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
I arly Morning Services
(2,3,4,5" Sudtl aly) ......r8:00 .llm
Still(nday School ..........9:45 all
Morllilng Service .....11 :00 milll
Communion. Service
(1llbtus. lcibr P SIInday) 7:3(0)pn
Prayer Meetliniig/ible Study
(WctlLednesdaly) 7:30 pin



The Soul Saving Station O
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
1880 Washington Ave.
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
SOrder of Services:
Sulllndaly School ...........9 1.m111.
Sti uliay WOTrslii).. I1 ia.it. & 7 I).mi
'lucesdauy WoirsliI).......7:45 p.im.
Nooni I)ay Prayer......Mon.-Iri.


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order of Services:
Stn...t9:3011 n.1 ....(Sutlldly School)
Walk in the Wiord Ministry
Wolshlip Service............... I I a.ln.
Tuesday....7 p.mn....Family Night.
Wed.. II a.ll..lntercessory Piraycr
Wed. Bible Clss ........12 p.n.
Wed. Bible Class..............7 p.m.l.




Harvest Fire Worship Ctr.
2260 N.W. 183rd Street
305-620-2986
Order of Services:
Sunday....... 7 7 m ............ 10 a.m.
Wed.- Bible Study.......7:30 p.n.
hlidiiy- Ytllllh
First & l-"ollth
'Tues...... Wolen's/Men's MIg.
Early Morning Plyerl....6-7 a.1m.
Prayer Sundity........ 6:30 p.m.




New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76'" Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
SUilldl) ( nl Sclho ol ............... 10 .111.
Wolrshipl Se tr'ice .............. 11:15 .Il
'le insd ys Iible ( ss...... ..7 p.m .
41h Suall) Ei ni g Worship ......... i.




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order ol Services:
SMorniyg Worship l7:30 ai.ly
Siulal y School ..........9:310 a.i.,
Morning Worlship ... II t1.11 .
(lB H./ I i.t /5 p.m.
lEveillng WorshipI) ........7 p.m.
Mectill. ........ (Tues.) 7 p.m.



Victory on the Rock
Ministries, Inc.
16178 NW 27th Avenue
305-625-3376 / 305-333-3144

Order of Services:
SS nlllld y M tirllin ............9 i;.1.l
Tiuesday Nightl iible StIuy
7 p.m.


Apostolic Revival Center'
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New lime ll fTV. Program
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY



Stil. W L I, iish ip ..........7:30 n..
Tnle. I lla Mwt in ....... 7:30 p 1.1.
-I i. .blIn .. .................. 7:,0 p.m .




Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'"' Ave.
305-751-9323
Order of Services:
2 N.ly W 'or ship ..............7 a.m.
I iSunday School ............. 9 a.1ln.
3NB(' ............................ 1 0:05 a.lll.

Mission and Bible Clhss
l ils ly ...............6:30 i l.
BYonlhl Me ii n'/c-('hohir rehleanrs.al
M oiday .......................6:30 p.m .


New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

Order ofI Services:
Irl- 1 M llingllill W illhil ...lI .ld S 1IIII
M .l i l-jl ilnlu ill .............. I1 .I.
l'uc .I n-ihlr MIIII s r), .................. 7: .30 i.
I eeIr St, ice 7 30p................... il..
,71i < ;,= ::::::::::: n ,,


/Trinity Faith Tabernacle
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4"' Street, Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Sernvices:


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Cotirt
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
I rty it)y S hLulry Sch ool. 9:45i
.1 l Y l l l 8 II i ll p L \ V. ,h l p . .. I ; I I I
y M n il Sudy .. p..
Sumltly NMies liblH. Study ...5 p.nl.
Stnlallry livenling v Won lp ....... pin.m.
lTuesday Night Bible SIuy ....7:30pr
Thlinlay Motninhig Hitl ( 'l.-s I I a
Iransulln llion avaihllle Culll: |



Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Mornin ........... 8 a.n
Sunday evening ..............6 p.m.
Mon. Excellence ........7:3(0 p.m.
lTue. Bible (Class.........7:30 p.m.
'Thurs. Fellowvship .........I a.m.
I st Sin. Soing, 'metice..6 p.m.


New Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103,' St.
305-696-7745
Order or Services:


Word of Faith
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87'" Street
305-836-9081
Order (of Services:
Mt)ti 11 M tlrl iS e ,t'\ S
Sl ltdayI S L 'hl ol ............. I 0 :.11.n
w\V rll ip Ser ice ............ I I a.n.
T fuesdiy fible sutdy.......s pa.m
la i ) PrlyIr l Se t\ice ....... I
L ammmummm'


Christian Hill AME Church
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LM09@ BellSouth. Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services;
Tuesday 6:3() p.m. Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School..................9:30 a.m.
Morniing Worship Service ........II a.m.
Free Golf livery 2"' & 4' Sunday ............4 p.m.
Don Shula's (oll Course


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11
a.mn.. 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Sludy) 6:45p.nt.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95'" Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:
Ilirly Morning Worship 7:30 ai.m.
Suit. ChInIch ScliHIl 9:3(0 a.m..
Mornilng Worship .....lI I l.lm.
S"lTuiesday Bible C'lass 7 p.m.
hilcs. l t'tolv( theI Ist Suln..... 7 p .
Mid-week Worship




St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order of Services:
li' .irly Morning Woiship.7:30a.m.i
Sluldaly ScItXII ..........9:30a.m.
Morni,, Worship I I cini
WIEDI)NIS)AY
I'i yer Meclin ............N7:310 p.m1 .
Bible Study ......... p.m..




Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105


Order of Services:
Iille Siludi y \\ l................... p
Sutiinday S'tll ................ I ll .l.
S n. \\I'llilp SerI. ....... I :. 1I .11m .
\\ ,I. Nill linl rcenory I'rt erl
Ifin.t 7:.30) to 8 ]).m.i
Sun]:y"V,\\'rshlip S icc..l>:3.l p.m.


Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Suiiday Morning SCervices
7:45 a.m. 11:15 a.m.
SUtlday Schotxl 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tluesday
10 a.m. & 7 p.m.
Pmayer Meeting Tlucs. 6 p.m.


I (800) 254-NBIHC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.iewl)irthllliplistiiii;mli.oirg


I~I


New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10"' Avenue
305-899-7224
lall Su ly \Vo'shil...7:30 a.m.
Order of Services:
Sulld; y Schm l ................9:. m.) il.n.
Smilay Mniig l lhiip .I ;lll.
Sunday EFening Service .6Ip.mn,
'Iu ,ai y Fray r Meeling ..7:30 p.m.
\Vednelsday Bible Study ..7:30 p.mn.




Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3' Avenue
Church 305-573-3714
Fax 305-573-4060*Fax 305-255-8545
Order of Services:
Sutidnly S chol.......... :45 ani
Stul Mo rning .i ..I :.1.u2: 11 ;i.pm.
S lcy d t ......l li I I iti
i n L I ....... ........... 1 ).1 :l l




PZion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
105-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-230 l
Order of, Se'nices:
S11n10 ay SCIIA)I ............. 9:30 a.m .
Morning PIuniscAivoihip ..I I a.m.
Y011i 1( 'hail S;lLllnii II..... I Im.I
Prai)r MeeCtinl & Ilihle Stuld
tuesda\ 7 phm

/ r,' I ,' 1 I, ,tb /' lthl


4B The Miami Time


I.uw caiccr pleas', BSak


S. *0


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


fPembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W.56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. '* Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesdlay.....;eneril Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program *' Sunday, 8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8,19,22,23,30 and 37
Web page: www.peinirokeparkcoc.org
, r i.ll-eifiss('.S iI1 M Tini


s, February
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E tsilo Vicorl' Ctjr.,D.Mi., DD, Sim, aislrflecher FM


.- Roahwn-anv 1 -7 20n06


1Ymrm -~lrmnA ~/


I ,u 1r1( i 4 r% we ,% 4 t ll-n,


'I IA







The Miami Times. February 1-7, 2006 5B


s kcalB Must Control y


Former Miami Times columnist dies at 80


Booker T. Hayes, born
December 15, 1925, died on
January 27. Hayes wrote for
The Miami Times. His well
known column was called "My
Opinion."
He was raised in the "OVER-
TOWN" section of Miami on NW
1st Court. Hayes attended
Booker T. Washington Senior
High and went on to attend the
University of West Virginia. He
then joined the Army and upon
his return to Miami, he became
the first Black lifeguard for the


Booker T. Hayes


city. On August 13, 1950, he
married Mildred Jenkins who
preceded him in death. They
had three children: Denise,
Booker T. II and Brian.
He leaves to mourn: two
daughters Denise Ross (Fred)
and Garrian Hood; two sons,
Booker T. Hayes, II and Brian
Hayes (Rhonda); four grand-
children, Frankie, Ashley, Ida
and Corey; two devoted
cousins, Woodrow Carter and
Juanita Johnson; brother-in-
law, Nelson Jenkins; two sis-


ter-in-laws, Betty Jenkins and
Gwendolyn Hayes; seven
nieces; six nephews and a host
of sorrowing relatives and
friends.
Viewing, February 3, 4 p.m.
at The Barrett-Fryar Funeral
Home, 14545 Carver Drive,
Richmond Heights, Florida.
Service February 4, 11:30 a.m.
at Sweethome Missionary
Baptist Church, 17201 SW
103rd Avenue, Perrine, Florida.
In lieu of flowers, a monetary
donation will be accepted.


Fik SAW&kid J~m HAim at73





"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"




4AIXI


In Memoriam

In loving memory of.


FRANK HARRIS
'BUDDY'


10/04/40 02/01/04

Gone but not forgotten. Loved
always.
Love, Thelma and Gert.

Manker
ARRON L. JONES, JR., 49, died
January 28 at his residence. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Bright Morning
Star Church.
DEMETRIUS COLEMAN, 40.
Service Saturday, 3 p.m. in the
chapel.


Card of Thanks

We the family of the late,

REV. CLYDE W.
JUDSON, SR., and The
Good News-Little River
Baptist Church family would
like to take this opportunity to
thank each of you who took
time to share in our bereave-
ment. Your prayers, words of
comfort, solo's, quartets, ush-
ers, cards, floral arrange-
ments, and monetary gifts
helped soothe our hearts.
Know in your hearts that
each of your kind acts were a
blessing to us. Our prayer is
that God's face will continue
to shine on each of you. For
God is our light and salvation.
Ps. 27:1
Evangelist Mary Kendrick
Judson, Clyde Jr., Dwight,
Dottie and The Good News-
Little River Baptist Church
family.

E.A. Stevens
JOHN CURTIS, 54, Hollywood,
died January 29 at home.
Arrangements are incomplete.

Grace
VIOLET BAKER, homemaker,
died January 28. Service Saturday,
11 a.m. in the chapel.


Prayer brunch with New Christ Tabernacle


The members of New Christ
Tabernacle Baptist Church in-
vite you to a delightful and en-
joyable prayer brunch Saturday,
February 11 at the Piccadilly
Cafeteria 13250 Biscayne Blvd.,
at 9 a.m. $15 donation.
This is on behalf of our pas-
tor's anniversary celebration. A
great service and breakfast has

Jay's
LORRAINE GUILLAUME, 60,
Perrine, died January 24 at Baptist
Hospital. Service Saturday, 1 p.m.
at Mt. Olive Baptist Church, South
Miami.
LINDA MOORE, 43, Perrine,
died January 26 at Miami Heart
Institute. Service Saturday, 11 a.m.
at Mt. Meriah Missionary Baptist
Church.
ANNIE BURROWS, 60, Perrine,
died January 28 at South Miami
Hospital. Service Saturday, 1 p.m.
at The House of God Church.


Black memoirs


STORIES
continued from 4B
and Success by Black
Americans, a collection of six-
teen excerpts from memoirs of
Black achievers. Summers
selected a diverse group of
Blacks including Derek Jeter,
Russell Simmons, Colin
Powell, Queen Latifah and
others perhaps less well known
but equally well respected in
their fields astrophysicist
Neil de Grasse Tyson, journal-
ist Lynne Duke, and fencer
Peter Westbrook.


been planned just for you and
yours. Shephard's Care
Ministry, Sponsor. Call Virginia
Bostic at 305-621-8126 to
reserve your seat.
It's time to eat and Praise the
Lord as one body in Christ.
(African attire requested)
We need your donation by
Sunday, Feb. 5.

Davis & Brice
ERRIC UNDRA TYLER, 39, West
Palm Beach, died January 25.
Service Wednesday (today), 11 a.m.
at Gethsemane M.B Church.
SHIRLEY SIMMONS, 53, North
Lauderdale, died January' 28.
Arrangements are incomplete.
ALONZO WILLIAMS, 94, Dania,
died January 28. Service Saturday, 10
a.m. at New Jerusalem.


Barrett & Fryar
BABY RUMAINE MCBEAN, JR., 3
days, died January 27 at Baptist
Hospital. Service Thursday in the
chapel.
BOOKER T. HAYES, 80, Richmond
Heights, died January 27 at his resi-
dence. Service Saturday, 11:30 a.m. at
Sweethome Baptist Church in Perrine.
CATRILLA HENLEY, 35, died
January 25 at her residence. Service
Saturday, 12:30 p.m. at Second
Baptist Church of Richmond Heights.
WINNIFRED ELLIS, 72, died
Janaury 24 at Kindred Hospital.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at Christ
Fellowship Church (formerly First
Baptist Church of Perrine).
LARRY CONEY, Goulds, died
January 26. Service Saturday, 11 a.m.
at Morningstar Baptist Church.


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET -MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion

IN YOUR TIME OF NEED,

CALL THE FUNERAL HOME


THAT CARES.


"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


.I C Iai, il i a ji B /.I


S : , "('/7 &(
15332 NW 7th Avenue Miami. Florida 33169
Office: 305-688-2030 Fax: 305-688-2293
KimNbelyB. White L.F.D.




Otto J. McQueen

19 3 5- 2 0 0 6


Otto J. McQueen, 70, of Miami Lakes, died
Friday, Jan. 27, at the West Broward Nursing
Home of natural causes after a long illness.
Funeral services will be at 11 am., Thursday, Feb.
2, at the Church of the Incarnation, 1835 NW 54th
St. Burial services will be Saturday in St.
Augustine, Fla. Poitier Funeral Home is handling
the arrangements.
McQueen was a principal who retired after long
years of service for the Miami-Dade Public
Schools. During his time, he served as principal of
Thena Crowder Elementary, Little River Elementary and Olinda Elementary, where
he had also served as assistant principal. He began his education career in 1960, as
one of the first Black teachers at Coconut Grove Elementary.
He was born in 1935 in Jacksonville, Fla. For many years, his mother, Lillie Mae
Choice Manuel, and stepfather, Ivory Manuel, owned and operated Ivory's Chili
Pot, a popular soul food restaurant that his family operated in Jacksonville's his-
toric La Villa district.
McQueen graduated from Matthew Gilbert High School and attended Florida
A&M University. He was a catcher on the baseball team while at FAMU. McQueen
was particularly proud of his service as the tenor saxophone player for FAMU's
worldrenowned Marching 100. Well after graduation, Mr. McQueen returned con-
stantly to the Tallahassee campus to perform with other members of the FAMU
Marching 100 Alumni Band.
While at FAMU, he met Carolyn Irene Eubanks, who had been Miss Excelsior
High School her senior year at that historic school in St Augustine. Her relatives
were longtime members of St. Cyprian Episcopal Church and leaders in the local
NAACP chapter, which helped organize Dr. King's participation in civil rights
marches in St. Augustine during the summer of 1964.
The couple first settled in Jacksonville, giving birth to their first child, Michael
Anthony, christened at St. Pius X Catholic Church. In 1962, they built a house at
3220 Florida Avenue in Coconut Grove and settled into teaching careers. They gave
birth to Nichole Yvette and Christopher Michael, both christened at St. Hugh
Catholic Church, before moving to Kendall. Upon retirement, they moved to North
Dade.
McQueen is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, as are several of his rela-
tives, including: son, Michael (initiated at Fort Valley State) and brother, Kenneth
(initiated at FAMU). McQueen has received numerous awards from civic organi-
zations for his work as an educator in Miami-Dade.
Carolyn preceded him in death in 2001. She rests in peace at St. Augustine's
Evergreen Cemetery, where Otto will be buried.
Otto's survivors include: son, Michael (Glenda); daughter, Nichole Brewton; son
Christopher; grandsons, Spc. Michael II, an Army Ranger posted in Afghanistan;
grandson, Otto Sinclair of Morehouse College in Atlanta; granddaughter, Brandi
Brewton; brother, Kenneth (Roberta), a retired school superintendent in
Jacksonville; sister, Barbara Reddick (Ora).


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6B Th Mi i Ti Januar Februa 6


Range


BESSIE BRENNAN FORBES,
78, retired
teacher, died
January 27.
Survivors: two
daughters,
Renee and
Yvette Forbes;
granddaughter,
Journee
Wagner; three
nieces, Sandra,
Lillian Thompson and Trudy Baggs;
nephew, Rahmaan Thompson; and
a host of nieces, nephews and other
relatives and friends. Service
Saturday, 10 a.m. at Ebenezer
United Methodist Church.

PAUL WILSON, JR., 49, retired
cook at Joe's
Stone Crab, died
January 27.
Survivors: moth-
er, Lois Wilson;
son, Donnie;
three sisters,
Renee Brown,
Theresa Wilson
and Denise
Coffee; brother,
Larry Wilson; two aunts, Mary
Daniels and Mable Blunt; uncle,
Robert Wilson; two godmothers,
Mrs. Eva Knight and Mrs. Johnnie
Mae Fisher; two grandchildren.
Service Saturday, 1:30 p.m. at Mt.
Calvary Missionary Baptist Church.

Po
MARY DELOIS 'LOIS' PARKER,
43, child care for
Dade-County
schools, died
January 25.
Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at New
Beginnings
Praise and
Worship Center.

PORTIA LEE DUNCOMBE, 56,
housewife, died
January 27 at
Parkway
Regional
Medical Center.

Saturday, 1 p.m.
at St. Matthews

Baptist Church.

MATTE B. GAITERS-NABORS,
91, mother of
Josephine
Maltbia-
Brimberry;
mother-in-law,
James N.
Brimberry, died
January 25.
Mrs. Nabors
was a resident
of Dade County
for 13 years, she was born and
raised in Calera, Alabama. She
leaves to enjoy her memories: one
daughter and two sons, Freddy
Nabors (Ruby), Alabaster, Alabama
and Billy Joe Nabors (Pricilla),
Montgomery, Alabama. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Mt. Calvary
M.B. Church.

Range
Coconut Grove

RONALD LEE JORDAN, 64,
maintenance
worker of South
Miami, died
January 25 at
South Miami
Hospital .
Survivors: moth-
er, Eva Mae
Jordan; brothers,
Joseph and
John (Lelia)
Jordan; sister, Patricia Ann Jordan.
Service Wednesday, 1 p.m. in the
chapel.

Gregg Mason
OLGA VICTORIA FISHER, 85,
died. Survivors:
daughter, Haldor !
Redden .

Saturday, 5-8
p.m. Remains
will be shipped
to Kingston,
Jamaica (Jones
Funeral Home)
for final rites and
burial.

Lithgow Bennett *
Philbrick

DAISY WILLIAMS-ANDREWS,
66, died January
28. Survivors:
Thomas
Andrews; chil-
dren, Son,
Rodney


(wanaa) ana
Alex; daughters,
Sylvia, Daisy
(Micheal) and
Nicole. Viewing
Friday, 6-9 p.m. in the chapel.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at Tree of
Life Deliverance Ministries, 4150
NW 7th Avenue.


MISSIONARY KATHLEEN
DIALS MOODY,
55, bank teller,
died January 28.
Survivors: hus-
band, Grady
Moody; son,
Calvin Dials;
four brothers,
Ernest, Walter,
Jr., Benjamin
and Calrence
Dials; five sisters, Mary Hannah
(Zebedee), Janie Pollack (Eugene),
Lottie Dunlap (Micheal), Salle
Muezzin (Jaarobi), and Leathe
Robinson (Benjamin); step children,
Tara, Marcel, Leslie, Crichlow,
Jennie and Felecia Moody. Service
SSaturday, 10 a.m. at New
Beginnings Praise Tabernacle.

EVELYN L. ALDRIDGE, 88,
retired Dade
County school
teacher, died
January 23.
S e r v i c e
Services
Wednesday, 11
a.m. at Starlight
Holy Temple
Church of God.


TRAVIS LORENZO TAYLOR, 21,
student, died January 28. Service
Saturday, 2 p.m. in the Range
chapel.

itier
FRANK LOWE, SR., 60, laborer,
died January 25
at Miami heart
Institute.
Remains will be
shipped to Unity
Funeral Home in
Valley Alabama
for final rites and
burial.


JOE HAMPTON, 80, famer, died
January 28 at
North Shore
Medical Center.
Arrangemenets
are incomplete.






MILDRED PINDREN, 48, house-
wife, died
January. Public
vi q wing
Thursday.
Remains will be
shipped to
Americus, GA
for final rites and
burial.


MANUEL LEE DUNN, JR., 47,
manager, died January 25. Service
Saturday in the chapel. Time to be
announced.

ADRIAN JOHNSON, 28, laborer
construction, died January 28.
Service Saturday at Jordan Grove
Missionary Baptist Church. Time to
be announced

Card of Thanks

We the family of the late,
I -~


MARCUS ALEXANDER
SYMONETTE

11/02/49 01/14/06

Thank you for your acts of
kindness during our time of sor-
row in the passing of our
beloved, Marcus.
Your prayers, presence, cards,
monetary donations, foods and
everything was greatly appreci-
ated. Words can't adequately ex-
press our gratitude.
Special thanks to Fr. Richard
L.M. Barry and St. Agnes
Episcopal Church family,
Dwight L. Jackson, Aldin
Everette and Richardson
Funeral Home and staff, Booker
T. Washington Jr. Sr. High
School Class of 1967, Overtown
Neighborhood of 14th
Street, North Shore Hospital,
ICU Unit, Hospice Unit, Dr.
William Donley, and Sinia Plaza
Nursing Home.
May God bless each of you.
Marcus we miss you.
Love always, Vedrick, Wanda,
and Gwen.


ALPHONSO BROWN, 69, died
January 23.
Service Friday,
11 a.m. at St.
Agnes Episcopal
Church.






BYRON BOWLEG PAINTER,

Bahamas.
Service
Thursday, 7 p.m.
at Freewill
Christian Center.


EDWARD CLARK, died January
23. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at St. Luke
Missionary
Baptist Church.





ELIZABETH GALLOZA, 46, died
January 29. Private services were
held.

ELLA MAE SMITH, 53, died
January 26. Arrangements are
incomplete.


S OLIVIA JACKSON, 41, died
January 30. Service Saturday, 1
p.m. at St. Luke M.B. Church.

Hall Ferguson Hewitt


LORENZO GRIFFIN, 86, car
washer/detailer,
died January 27
at North Shore
Medical Center.
Service Friday,
11 a.m. at
Friendship
Missionary
Baptist Church.


FLORENCE PRESTON, 67, cook
for JESCA, died January 24 at
home. Service Wednesday (today)
at 11 a.m. at New Providence
Missionary Baptist Church.

ROBERT BACON, 73, laborer,
died January 29 at Aventura
Hospital. remains will be shipped to
Hall, Jones & Brown Funeral Home,
Inc. in Brunswick, Georgia for final
rites and burial.

Wr
LEON GEORGE JOHNSON, 24,
teacher, died
December 10.
Survivors: par-
ents, Harry and
lolna; two chil-
dren and a host
of brothers and
sisters. Service
Saturday, 10
a.m. at Wright
Funeral Home.
Interment Forest Lawn Cemetery

Alphonso M. Richardson
DETRA WATSON, 45, adminis-
trative secretary,
died January 26
at Palmetto
General ,
Hospital
Survivors





Watson; sister, Toni Gatsby; and
best friend, Carita Cooper. Remains
were shipped to James Graham
Mortuary, Jacksonville for final rites
and burial.

Mitchell
EDWIN A. DEAL SR.,
aka 'DOLLAR
DEAL,'44, porter,
died January 25
at Cedars
Hospital .
Survivors: by
son, Edwin Jr.;
father, Wallace
Sr.; sisters,
Debra, Sharon,
Tangula, and
Karen; brothers, Wallace Jr.,
Stephen, Roderick Sr., Rodney and
twin Erwin, companion; Carrie
Townsend. Service Saturday, 11 a.m.
at First Baptist Church of Brownsville.


In Memoriam

In memory loving of,

PAMELA DIANE
DELEE LEWIS

12/05/62 02/01/04

Although, it seems like yes-
terday, two years has past
since we last seen your warm
smile and beautiful face.
Remembering the last time
you held down your earthly
space, not knowing you would
be called to an even better
place.
In our hearts we will hold on


Delores Mills
TOMMY SMITH, 51, died
January 17 at 3913 SW 28th Street.
Services were held.


Deadline for obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.


MARY ADAMS, 67, homemaker,
died January 26
at Aventura
Hospital and
Medical Center.
Survivors: two
daughters Janice
Adams-Hodge
and Felicia
Adams; three
grandsons, Ray
Hodge, Jr.,
Princeton Adams and Ryan King;
granddaughter, Antionette Hodge;
sister, Bernice Mitchell; brother, Rev.
Henry Chapman, Jr. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church.

BERNICE STEPHENS, 69, died
January 22. Services were held.

GENEVA MANUEL, 97, died
January 19. Services were held.

ight
LOREN HARRIS, 82, truck driver.
diedJanuary 24
at Northshore
Medical Center.
Survivors: com-
panion, Sandra

McKinney; chil-
dren Mae Rose
Sanders, Loren
Jr. (Pasty),
Mildred Lovejoy
(Thomas) Rhine Harris, Elizabeth
Harris and Anthony Harris. Services
were held.


Manker

DEACON LINDBERGH HARVIN,
74, died January
15 at his resi-
dence. He was
preceded in
death by his
wife, Leola
Thorpe Harvin.
Born in
Mannings, SC,
he attended the
public schools of
Clarendon County. He served in the
Korean Conflict. He moved to Miami
in the 1950's and he retired from the
City of Miami, Department of
Sanitation, after 36 years of service.
Deacon Harvin is survived by a
loving and devoted family: George
F. Harvin, Manning, SC; Mamie Lee
Carter, Brooklyn, NY; Lillie E. Levy,
Buffalo, NY; Ecquador (Elouise)
Harvin, Miami; Sadie (Peter)
Cunningham, Upper Marlboro, MD;
Charles Harvin, Brooklyn, NY; two
special cousins, Theola Kinard,
Sumter, SC; Mamie Lou Evans,
Opa-locka and a host of other rela-
tives and friends.
Services were held at Refuge
Church of Our Lord of the Apostolic
Faith, Inc., Saturday, January 28, 11
a.m. Deacon Harvin was interred at
Dade Memorial Park.


to all the precious memories.
You are forever missed, but
never forgotten!
Love always, Your kids and
family.


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


TOMMY RICE WILLIE 'BILL' STIRRUP


02/05/62 12/22/2005

I was blessed to know you for
forty-three years. I was blessed
to know that you loved me. I
talked to you the day before; not
knowing I would not hear your
voice any more. You always said
I love you mama. Tommy, mama
will always love you too.
Happy Birthday!


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


SHIRENA LITA WILSON

01/31/73 08/20/94

It has been 11 years since you
were with us. We miss you dear-
ly.
Your loving Mom, Dad,
Maurice, Tim. Also the Wilson,
Spann, Walker, Johnson fami-
lies.


Happy 15th Birthday

In loving memory of,


JAVARES GRIFFIN


02/03/91 01/22/01

You will always be miss by
your family, mom, Tanya,
Maurice, Brittany, Jamesha,
James, Jr. and Michael, Jr.
J-oker
A-spiration
V-ibrant
A-dventurous
R-espectful
E-nergetic
S-ensational



Public Notice


As a public service to our
community, The Miami
Times prints weekly obituary
notices submitted by area
funeral homes at no charge.
These notices include name
of the deceased, age, place
of death, employment, and
date, location, and time of
services. Additional infor-
mation and photo may be
included for a nominal
charge. The deadline is
Monday at 3:30 p.m.


I I


who passed from his home to
his heavenly home to be with the
Lord. December 26, 2005, takes
this method to say "Thank You"
to our many, many friends,
neighbors, relatives, and ac-
quaintances for your prayers,
telegrams, telephone calls,
cards, donations, visitations,
covered dishes, and the lovely
floral arrangements, your kinds
words sympathy and other heart
warming deeds will never be for-
gotten.
Special thanks to Memorial
Temple Missionary Baptist
Church Family, Reverend Ellise
Cox, Pastor. Peaceful Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Dr. C.
P. Preston, Jr., Pastor. New Birth
Missionary Baptist Church,
Bishop Victor T. Curry, Pastor.
Community Outreach Baptist
Church. Reverend Jesse Martin,
Pastor. To all who appeared on
the program, to the very efficient
staff of Hall, Ferguson, Hewitt
Funeral Home, we say "Thank
You" we say a sincere and hearty
thank you to all who did any-
thing at all, we were blessed and
comforted by your love and con-
cern. Love has a way of making
dark days brighter, and grieving
hearts lighter.
"Thank You for your love." De-
voted wife, Lucille Stirrup, and a
host of other relatives.


Card of Thanks


The family of the late,


ELDER DAN COATS


takes this opportunity to ex-
press our gratitude to our many
relatives, friends, neighbors and
church members for the many
acts of kindness extended dur-
ing the death of our loved one,
and during our bereavement.
Special thanks to Crooms
Temple Church of God In Christ.
From your loving wife. Verna
Coats.


Death Notice


ANTHEREIS E. BAUGH,
28,landscaper, Unique Lawn
Services, died January 31 at
Jackson Memorial Hospital.
Service will be held Saturday,
February 4. Public viewing 5-9
p.m. at Grace Funeral Home,
770 NW 119 Street, February 3.


Richardson


Death Notice

ROBERT BYRD, SR., 72,
Florida City, died January 20.
Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
Greater New Mt. Zion AME
Church. Sevice by Bains
Funeral Home, 305-246-3041.


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The 6th Annual Oscar
Thomas Memorial: People's
Art Exhibition Call to
Artists
Once again we prepare for
another highly successful cele-
bration of African World artis-
tic creativity in South Florida
with the 6th Annual Oscar
Thomas Memorial People's Art
Exhibition, which will run
from April 3 through May 21.
The entry form can be
picked up at the African
Heritage Cultural Arts Center,
2166 MLK Blvd. The deadline


for entry forms is March 20.
For insurance purposes, the
title, the exact dimensions, the
materials and the insurance
value for each piece has to be
included on the entry form.
The deadline for the delivery of
the works to the Center is
Monday, March 27, 5 p.m.
Please include artist bio and
statement with entry form.
Collectors are encouraged to
show their works by the late
artist.
The Opening Reception will
be held on Monday, April 3,


from 6-9 p.m. Call 305-904-
7620 or 786-260-1246.
Kuumba Artists to Meet
Sunday, February 12:
Kuumba Artists will be
meeting at the African Heri-
tage Cultural Arts Center,
2166 MLKBlvd., at 11 a.m.
Discussion will include
upcoming Oscar Thomas
Memorial People's Art Exhi-
bition. Call 305-904-7620 or
786-260-1246.
Joseph Caleb Auditorium
5400 NW 22 Ave.
Film & Culture Series
Thursdays, February 2-23:
Miami Dade Parks, Division
of Arts and Culture,
Community Artists Cultural
Arts Series proudly presents
the Black History Month Film


and Culture Series every
Thursday in the month of
February. This exciting series
will feature screenings of films
made by African American
filmmakers and/or films which
have African American or
African themes. Feature films
are as follows:
February 2, 2006, 7 p.m.
Slcvery and the Making of
America delves beyond the
concept of slavery as a whole
to focus on the remarkable
stories of individual slaves,
demonstrating that Africans
and African Americans were
not passive victims but sur-
vivors who refused to concede
their culture, character or
spirit to the system that perse-
cuted them.


February 9, 2006, 7 p.m.
The Healing Passage In this
video, the residuals of the
Trans-Atlantic slave trade to
the present day, connects the
psychological trauma through
rituals, spoken word, music,
dance and visual art. The film
has commentary by Oscar
Brown, Jr., Tom Feelings,
Ysaye M. Barnwell, historian
Dr. Yosef Ben-Jochannan,
Goree Is-land curator
Boubacar, Halle Gerima
(Sankofa), Maafa Conference
founder Reverend Johnny Ray
Youngblood and others.
February 16, 2006, 7 p.m.
In-Law
February 23, 2006, 6 p.m.
African Dance Music Video
Space is limited and reserva-


tions are required. For tickets
call 305-636-2350.
Celebrate Black History
Month Concert at Caleb
Saturday, February 11:
Join the Miami-Dade Parks'
Heart of the City Cultural Arts
Series as they present interna-
tional jazz virtuoso Gino
Sitson, along with Senegalese
master drummer Cheikh
Tariou M'Baye and his dynam-
ic dance and drumming com-
pany Sing Sing Rhythms for a
night of seriously, eclectic
music beginnning at 8 p.m.
Born in the Bamileke region
of west Cameroon into a fami-
ly of musicians, known as
ntontas (players of horns),
Gino Sitson was introduced to
Please turn to CULTURE 7C


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2C The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006


Dr. Martin L. King, Jr.'s
recent birthday celebration is
now history, but the memories
will linger on for a very long time.
Among those memories, one of
the most special will be the 29th
annual MLK Parade, which was
started by Dr. Preston Marshall
in Liberty City and has grown to
include Brownsville.
Congratulations go
out to Dr. Marshall; his
committee members;
and Michelle Simmons
and Dwayne Wynn, who
narrated the parade on
WLRN Channel 17.
Marshall added a new
dimension to the parade
this year. He provided
special bleachers for fra- C.S. JO,
ternal groups to sit and
enjoy the three hour line of
units.
It began with the Police
Department Color Guards and
Florida International
University's marching band (a
first), followed by the Miramar
High School Band, Brownsville
Middle, N. Miami Beach High,
Stranahan High, Miami
Northwestern, American,
Charles R. Drew Middle (Dr.
Gwen Henderson, Principal), N.
Miami(Mr. Carnell White,
Principal), Miami Edison Sr. and
Booker T. Washington.
Dignitaries on the convertibles
and in the floats included:
Tangela Sears, riding with State/
Attorney Kathy F. Rundle;
Congressman Kendrick Meek,


H


walking as usual; Mayors Carlos
Alvarez and Manual Diaz;
Commissioner Joseph Kelley;
Commissoner Barbara Jordan;
Chief John Timoney;
Commissioner Dorothy
Johnson, Opa-locka; Deborah
S. Irby, City Clerk;
Commissioner Audrey
Edmondson, El Portal; Jimmy
Morales, former
Commissioner; and
Gene Finney and
Maude Newbold, repre-
senting Virginia Beach.
There were outstand-
ing floats from many
churches, including
Jerusalem Primitive,
Miami Union Academy ,
INSON Ebenezer UMC, St. John
Baptist, Christ Holy
Temple, and New Birth
Cathedral. Yet the two church
floats that got to the crowd most
were The 93rd Street Baptist
Church, under the leadership of
Dr. Carl Johnson who waved
from the convertible while his
men sang from the towing float,
and Jordan Grove MBC with
Reverend Douglas Cook, pastor,
who belted out his favorite
gospels to the delight of the
applauding crowd.
Other participants included
Commmisioner Michelle
Spence-Jones; Representative
Dorothy Bendross Mindingall;
Representative Yolly Roberson;
Roosevelt Bradley, director of
transportation; Girl Power;
Commissioner Dorrin G. Rolle;


Dr. Albert Smith and the
Queens Court; Florida Memorial
University; the drill team of
Alpha Phi Alpha; Miami women's
football team; and the exciting
Junkanoos from Miami,
Bahamas, Trinadad, etc. Now
Marshall and his committee
have begun to plan for 2007.


Kudos go out to
Arleace Carrion, chair-
person, Reverend
Gregory Williams and
the entire Holy Faith
Committee for planning
the biggest "block party"
the church has ever had
to celebrate the birthday
of Dr. Martin L. King, WIj
Jr. Patricia Ford of
Norland Sr. was the mistress of
ceremony.
The block party began with a
display of 20-booths.
Information was being given
from Representative Wilbert T.
Holloway, Oral Health, North
Dade UPPAC, Miami Dade
NAACP, Congressman Kendrick
Meek, Nova University's Dr.
Carrie Keys, Team Metro, Mary
Kay, Blood Bank, Hurricane
Relief, Carrion Family, PTSA and
Bally's Fitness.
After visiting the many booths,
the program began with Mayor
Shirley Gibson bringing greet-
ings, followed by Commissioner
Barbara Jordan, Barbara
Carey-Shuler, and Senator
Frederica S. Wilson.
Entertainment was provided by
Kamilah Otis and Angelica
Walker, who performed liturgical
dance, and Precious Otis, who
recited a poem.
Others on the program includ-
ed Minister Millicent Williams,
Lula Bennett, Eliza Mayes,
Angela Hurst, Deacon Lyons,
and the famous Willie Copeland
with his gospel group. Reverend
Williams complimented Sister A.


Carrion for her vision and made
reference to the more than 500
people participating. Carrion
closed out with a prayer.
*******
Speaking of community
involvement and civic duties,
attention is focused on
Commissioner Dorothy "Dottie"
Johnson, founder and
president of The Portrait
of Empowerment, Inc.,
for her holistic approach
to support the healthy
development of youth.
Recently, at her office,
located at 780
Fisherman Street, Suite
328, Opa-locka,
SON Johnson provided a
platform for youth to
discuss various issues.
Johnson has adopted North
Dade Middle. She and principal
Eunice Davis have been working
diligently to involve parents as
well as students in these evening
sessions.
More than 100 parents and.
just as many students converged
upon the building to hear a panel
of speakers address problems
concerning our youth as well as
try to provide solutions to some
of these problems.
Some of the panel members
were Corkey Dozier, principal of
the program; John Riley, former
mayor of Opa-locka; Bill Collins;
Dante Starks; Francilla Smith,
Humana Representative; Marie
McGill; Yolanda and Tameka
Johnson, daughters of the
founder; Joyce L. Wardlaw;
Rosa Nelson; Sarah Adams;
Marc Brown; and Mitchell and
Phyllis Gainer, volunteers.
Commissioner Johnson chal-
lenged the participants to contin-
ue their interest and attend all
sessions. She vows a change with
this program.
**ora S** Johnson, president;
Cora S. Johnson, president;


Mary Ann Thomas McCloud,
director; Mary Salary, former
president; Laurice Hepburn,
secretary; Veronica Rahming;
Mary Dunn; Stephenia Willis;
and Deborah Carter represent-
ing The Egelloc Civic and Social
Club, conducted the Men of
Tomorrow elections for 2006,
recently at the Caleb Center,
where rehearsals are held each
week, beginning at 6:45 p.m.
The officers and members of
the organization boasted to the
young men about being the best
selection in a very long time. The
young men nodded, smiled and
prepared themselves for the
important election.
After 30-minutes of campaign
speeches that outlined why they
wanted a certain office,
the committee tallied and
reported the results. The
elected officials were Jon
Ingraham, president,
Carol City, parents are
the late Joseph and
Sonya Ingraham;
Jonathan Martin, vice
president, American;
Chris Hall, chaplain, MCC
Carol City; and Cameron
Thomas, reporter, MAST
Academy,
Some of the members who
voted for them included Aka
Smith, Alex McCaskill, Ali
Cannon, Andre Everette,
Anthony Gilbert, Cecil A.
Duffle, Charles McCray, Damar
Davis, Davarius Durham,
Demetrius A. Carter, Desmond
Pratt, Emmanuel Eason,
Garland Williamson, Jaron
Johnson and Jarrell Knowles.
Also voting were Jay O.
Brooks, Johnathan Brown,
Jonathan White, Justin Elliott,
Justin O'Ferral, Keenan Brown,
Kenny Wheeler, Kirt Godfrey,
Louis Powell Miles Johnson,
Richard Jackson, Richard Way,
Sean Montford, Shannon
Williams, Spencer Everett,


--.

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She took a stand


On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks boarded a bus
in Montgomery, Alabama near the intersection of
Commerce and Montgomery Streets after
working for eighteen hours. Her courageous act
in refusing to give up her seat on a bus she had
paid to ride sparked the modern-day civil rights
movement and led to the breakdown of
segregation in the United States.

BellSouth salutes Rosa Parks and thanks her for
sitting even in the face of danger.

SBELLSOUTH
Listening. Answering.*

bellsouth.com
A;<' Ki' !Cl~


-- Q


Todd P. Ballou, Jr. and Xavier
Terrell.
Thomas closed out byi
announcing upcoming activities
like The Essay, Black History
Project, Talent, Etiquette
Luncheon, and others until the
presentation on Saturday, April,
1, at the James L. Knight
Center, beginning at 6 p.m.


According to Gwen T.
Williams, the Miami Carol City;
Class of '71 Chiefs met for break-
fast on January 14 at Golden
Corral in Pembroke Pines to fel-
lowship and reminisce about the
good old days. The honored
guests were members of the
FAMU Marching Rattlers, who
were in town for the
MLK parade in Florida
City.
Joining the Rattlers
were Chiefs Janet
Barnes; Arletta Young;
Mary and Edward
Browner and family;
Brunetta Lowere
Thurston and her
LO daughter, Megan;
L Yvette Plummer; Vida
Miller Kimpson; Joanna R.
Brown; Gwen W. Clarke; Julius
Ray; Claudia B. Perkins; Alma
W. Cash; Emma Pringle;
Carolyn N. Johnson; Michael
Stokes; Priscilla C. Courtney;
Donnette Staten; Marilyn
McKay; and M. Sharpleas.
Also in attendance were
Charlene Mobley, Alma Doe,
Lawrence Ryans and sons,
Ricky Bell, Vernet P. Knowles,
Cynthia G. Farquharson,
Steven "Soup" Rolle, Veronica
and Randy, Errol McLeod, and
Joanna Brown.
Williams thanked everyone for
coming and announced future
activities and meetings will be
held every Thursday. Go Chiefs!
For more information, call 305-
620-7963.


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Congratulations to winners
of the Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr. essay contest, which took
place recently in Miami
Gardens during the second
annual "Unity in the
Community" Celebration.
Bridget Jones, a student at
Miami Carol City High School,
won first place. Julius Butler
was the elementary school
winner, Mystrame Paul was
the middle school winner and
Soror Patricia Warren was the
adult winner. They were all
invited to speak.
Alpha Kappa Alpha 2006
Ebony Fashion Fair will be at
8:00 p.m., January 27th, at
the University of Miami Bank
United Center in Coral Gables.
The show is being sponsored
by Gamma Zeta Omega
Chapter and the WISH
Foundation to benefit their
Scholarship fund. Linda
Johnson is Bas.
Get well wishes to all of you,
from all of us! Alice Dean-
Harrison, Janice Sanders,
Rudie Marks, Frances Brown,
Henry Goa, Mae Hamilton-.
Clear, Cleomie Allen-Smith,
Bessie '-iBrennan Forbes,
Charles Hudson, Sr.,
Glendina C. Edwards, Henry
"Sanky" Newbold, Emily C.
Pittman and Lloyd "Tank"
Johnson.
This week I will give you the
history of two more football
stadiums:
Seattle Seahawks
Date founded: 1976
Name: Kingdome
Year Opened: 1976
Origin of Stadium name: For
the county and the kind of
building
Playing Surface: Astroturf
Seating capacity: 66,400
Carolina Panthers
Date founded: 1995
Name: Clemson Memorial
Stadium
Year opened: 1942
Origin of Stadium name: For
the university and American
veterans of war
Playing Surface: Grass
Seating Capacity: 82,000
Harry and Ceceile
McCartney have returned
home after an extended stay
in New York City, visiting
their daughter and son-in-
law, Attorney Thomas and
Effie Donaldson.
On January 22nd, The
Historic Saint Episcopal
Church observed the one
hundred and eighth (108)
Anniversary of our Parish
Patronal Celebration. The
Reverend Canon Richard L.
Marquess-Barry is our
beloved Rector. The following
persons in business were
honored for outstanding work
in our community and our
church. Congratulations to
The Miami Times' Garth C.
Reeves and Rachel J.
Reeves for the outstanding
job they do each week for our


community; Senator
Frederica S. Wilson was hon-
ored for the excellent work
she is doing for the youth and
all of the people in our com-
munity and state; Church
members Gail Goring,
Deborah Smith-Morris and
Michelle Johnson-Roper
were honored; and finally
Alonzo Mourning was also
honored for his work in the
community. We can never for-
get the building he had erect-
ed on 14th Street and 3rd
Avenue for our Boys and
Girls. Congratulations to all
of you! From all of us!
Wedding Anniversary
Greetings and our best wishes
to:
Reverend Shedrick E. and
Wilma W. Gilbert, Jan. 22nd:
Their 59th
Thomas and Agnator
Nottage, Jan. 22nd: Their
50th
Linzy and Paulette S.
Hayes, Jan. 24th: Their 16th
Matthew and Sandra B.
Williams, Jan. 24th
Retired attorneys Leo and
Lyn Blatch and their children
Sydella, Leo Jr. and his wife
Mary (of Washington, D.C.)
were here for the funeral of
their sister and aunt, Barbara
Jean Blatch-Brooks, last
week.
Cubell Blatch's son,
Arthur III, and his wife
Lynda were also in atten-
dance. They live in Rockledge,
Florida.
Dr. George Lightbourn and
son attorney George
Lightbourn, Jr., are in the
city visiting their sister and
aunt, Dr. Rosebud
Lightbourn-Foster. Welcome
home godbrother. The
Lightbourns live in Detroit,
Michigan.
Irna Ali-Banks (remember
her old Timers?) sends a big
hello and says she will be
down to see us soon. Irna
lives in Newark, New Jersey.
Sybeline Gray-Rodriguez
sends a "Big" hello to her
classmates (class of 48) and
her many friends. Sybeline
and her family live in
Issaquah, Washington.
Fr. Richard Marquess-
Barry was in Raleigh, N.C.
last week to receive the first
annual Theodore R. Gibson
Distinguished Alumni Award
from his Alma Mater Saint
Augustine's College. Fr. Barry
is being honored and saluted
for the significant impact he
has made on his Alma Mater
through his many contribu-
tions to the college and tire-
less commitment to minority
higher education.
Congratulations Father
Barry! Your Parishioners are
proud of you!
Preparing for the future is
the key to success. Set your
goals, Be Enthusiastic about
your Achievements!


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MAIN OFFICE..........................305-694-6210

EDITORIAL................................305-694-6216

ADVERTISING............................305-693-7093

CIRCULATION...........................................305-694-6214


The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 3C


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THE MIAMI.T
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The Miami Times Woman is Black, bea tiful,
confident, resourceful, intelligent, savvy ...
The Miami Times Woman is
a mother, daughter, teacher, entrepreneur,
activist, politician, artist, sista, survivor...


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Black Beauty
A U T H 0 R U N K N 0 W N
Black beauty is the since the beginning of time
Black woman, not even age can diStUrb
in every aspect of the word. OUr balance of lines
Despite all t lie negativity that So perfectly defined.
you ve heard.
Black Beauty is the Black woman
We are the fiber that keeps beyond a shadow of a doubt.
OL11- family together. If You look, listen, & learn,
We are the fOLInclation for You will know what we're all
OUr children's every endeavor. abOU L.
We are graceful creatures, We are living jewels,
preserved by nature Inside & Out.


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Kidnapped French citizens and
a Haitian released unharmed
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) -Three French citizens and a Haitian who
were kidnapped by gunmen near a volatile slum outside of the capital have
been released unharmed without a ransom being paid, French and U.N. offi-
cials said recently.
A nun in her 80s was released last week, while two volunteers and their
Haitian driver were also released, said U.N. spokesman David Wimhurst.
They were taken to the French Embassy in the capital, Port-au-Prince
after their release.
Wimhurst said they were doing fine, that no ransom was paid and.that
an anti-kidnapping squad of U.N. civilian police and Haitian authorities
negotiated the group's release.
The four were abducted last week near Cite Soleil, a slum on the out-
skirts of Port-au-Prince used as a base by heavily armed gangs.
A wave of kidnappings has plagued the Western Hemisphere's poorest
nation, where criminal gangs have flourished in the aftermath of the rebel-
lion that toppled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in February 2004.
Castro accuses U.S. of planning to
release a man he calls a terrorist
HAVANA (AP) Fidel Castro accused the United States recently of plan-
ning to free a man he has characterized as the Western Hemisphere's worst
terrorist, directing a march of tens of thousands of people who equated
U.S. President George W. Bush with Adolf Hitler.
The government-organized march past the American mission in Havana
was timed to coincide with the end of a 90-day detention period for Luis
Posada Carriles, an anti-Castro militant held at a U.S. federal detention
center in Texas on immigration charges.
"The government of the United States deliberately seeks to .... free the
terrorist Luis Posada Carriles," Castro said.
Cuba and Venezuela accuse the Cuban-born Posada of masterminding
the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner and of staging bombings in Havana in
1997 and 1998.
Castro called the march to protest recent U.S. actions aimed at Cuba,
including a new electronic sign along the American mission's facade to
broadcast human rights messages. The U.S. Interests Section in Havana
handles consular affairs in the absence of full diplomatic relations.
President of Bahamas-based company
charged with laundering
NEW YORK (AP) -The Canadian president of a Bahamas-based invest-
ment services company has pleaded not guilty to charges that he laundered
$1 billion (euro817 million) in proceeds from drug dealing and financial
fraud.
Martin Tremblay, 43, of Jonquiere, Quebec, entered the plea in U.S.
District Court in Manhattan. He was held without bail.
An indictment accused Tremblay of using his company, Dominion
Investments Ltd., to laudler funds for numerous clients between'1998 and
SDtcefribr 2005 tIh; returnf, 'posecutdrs alleged; Tremblay acceWtdd'Sub'
stantial commissions.
Tremblay laundered the money by using shell companies and fictitious
entities to transfer it among bank accounts in the United States, Canada,
the Bahamas and elsewhere, prosecutors said.
If convicted, Tremblay could face up to 20 years in prison and a fine of
twice the value of the laundered drug proceeds.

Inventor of a'popular wine brand dies at 80
MAYAGUEZ, Puerto Rico (AP) Wilfredo Aponte Hernandez, the inven-
tor of Sangria Fido, a fruit juice, rum and wine concoction that is popular
among Puerto Ricans, died last week at the age of 80.
"A small giant of commerce has died. Without pretensions of grandeur,
he created a product that transcended our borders," said Willy Fitz, the vice
president of the Chamber of Commerce in Mayaguez, Aponte's hometown
in western Puerto Rico.
Aponte, who suffered from kidney disease, died at a hospital outside
Mayaquez, said Dr. Armando Doval.
Aponte created Sangria Fido some 50 years ago in Mayaguez. Sweet but
carrying a punch, it is savored by thousands of people in Puerto Rico and
sold in U.S. cities with large Puerto Rican populations, such as New York.
Aponte is survived by three daughters, Virgen S. Aponte, Nilda E. Aponte,
and Ibis L. Aponte.
Jamaica selectors make lineup changes
for critical Carib Beer match
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) Jamaica's cricket selectors recalled open-
ing batsman Chris Gayle and fastbowler Darren Powell for their critical
Carib Beer Cup match against Guyana.
Jamaica, the cup's defending champions, are out of contention to retain
their title. They must beat Guyana to earn a spot in the Carib Challenge
Trophy, which is contested by the cup's four top teams.
The Jamaica selectors had promised major, lineup changes following the
team's away losses to Trinidad and Barbados. They also recalled batsman
Donovan Pagon and fastbowler Dwight Washington, while dropping bats-
men Xavier Marshall, Brenton Parchment and Shawn Findlay for poor form.
Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados lead the six-team championship with
24 points. Jamaica, Guyana and the Leeward Islands have 12 points,
though the Guyanese have played three matches, one less than Jamaica
and the Leewards.
The Windward Islands were at the bottom of the table with nine points.
New U.N. peacekeeping commander
promises to secure Haiti for elections
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) A Brazilian general took command recently
of U.N. peacekeepers in Haiti, replacing another Brazilian who committed sui-
cide, and vowed to secure the impoverished and bloodied nation before elec-
tions are held on Feb. 7.
Gen. Jose Elito Carvalho de Siqueira said the 9,000-strong U.N. force was up
to the task, but added that he would need the help of Haiti's 8 million people.
"I'm sure that we will provide the natural security for elections and after the
elections," de Siqueira said after he took command during a ceremony at a mil-
itary base. "We are here to help you and we know how to help you, but we are
not enough. We must have a lot of support from dther parts of the country -
political, economic and social."
De Siquiera, 59, was previously based in Salvador, a city in northeastern
Brazil. He replaces Brazilian Lt. Gen. UranoTeixeira da Matta Bacellar, who shot
himself in his hotel room in the capital, Port-au-Prince, on Jan. 7.
Castro offers free eye care to impoverished Americans
HAVANA (AP) Fidel Castro has offered free eye operations to impover-
ished Americans and asked the U.S. government to let them travel to the island
for treatment.
Castro made the offer late Sunday as he slammed U.S. policies toward his
communist country during a three-hour appearance on state television and
announced a protest march for Tuesday outside the American mission.


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RIaCVU M IV IZ ) L l T ILI Own DIstInI TheI-- Miami-Times,-February-1-7, 2006-7


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Big M mItwn i a big hit


CULTURE
continued from 1C

blues, jazz and traditional
African music, listening to
records his parents played,
who has incorporated African
polyphonic techniques into the
improvisational jazz vocalist
tradition .
Also performing as part of
the Heart of the City Series,
Cheikh Tariou M'Baye is no
stranger to the music world. He
is the lead master drummer for
the Sing Sing Rhythms, a
dance and drumming company
from Men-dina, Senegal. Call
305-636-2350.
AAPACT presents
King Hedley II
February 2-26:
The African American
Performing Arts Community
Theatre proudly presents its
production of King Hedley II.
written by the late, incompara-
ble playwright August Wilson.
Performances will run from
February 2 through February


26, at the Carrie P. Meek
Senior and Cultural Center at
the Charles Hadley Park Black
Box Theatre, 1300 NW 50th St.
Regular evening perform-
ances are 8 p.m. on Fridays
and Saturdays. Matinee per-
formances are Sundays at 3
p.m. On February 2, AAPACT
is offering a free dress rehears-
al performance to the general
public at 7 p.m. Call 866-390-
4534.
Ceremonies in Dark
Old Men
February 2-March 12:
The M Ensemble Theatre
Company presents Cere-
monies in Dark Old Men by
Lonnie Elder, at 12320 W.
Dixie Highway.
This portrait of ghetto life
shows us a family who aspire
to better things but who go
about it in the wrong and
tragic way. The father has a
barbershop but no customers,
and two sons and daughter.
The sons are shiftless and try
to make a fast buck with
home brew. It is the daughter


who works and supports them
all.
Regular evening perform-
ances are 8 p.m. on
Thursdays, Fridays and
Saturdays. Matinee perform-
ances are Sundays at 3 p.m.
Call 305-895-0335.
EXHIBITIONS
Miami-Dade Public Library
presents
Visual Stories: The Ariwork
of James E. Ransorme through
February 28 at Main Library-
Auditorium, 101 W. Flagler St.
Little Haiti, Miami: Photo-
graphs by Gary Mornroe
through February 28 at Main
Library-ist Floor, 101 W.
Flagler St.
For Women Only: Sande
Secret Society Masks through
February 28 at Main Library-
2nd Floor, 101 W. Flagler St.
Bayinga Kialeitka February
2-March 30 at North Dade
Regional, 2455 N.W. 183 St.
Opening reception Thursday,
February 2, 6-9 p.m. Artist
Talk, February 22, 7-8:30
p.m.


The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 7C


s kcalB Must Control y






8C The Miami Times, rebruary 1-7, 2uLFu


P U B L I X


CE L E B R A T E S


H I S T O R Y


my recipe for living, my history.


Joe Randall
Chef, Teacher; Author, Legend
Chef Joe Randall's Cooking School Savannah, GA
Main Ingredient: Enthusiasm


For over forty-two years, Chef Joe Randall has been
known as much for his dedication to guide and advise the
next generation as for his award-winning recipes. Believing
"each one, teach one," he is still cooking up authentic
Southern food and devotion from professional chefs,
restaurant owners and those he lent a helping hand.


Publix.
WHERE S HO PPI N G IS A PLEASURE."


www.publix.coni


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r%- _A I__* r7 9rn\n\





























SAvailable from






Available from,


erial News
n e rc i a I.N ews


-wwww % m


Business jlauck.
SPONSORED BY
THE BEACON COUNCIL
Miami-Dade County's Official Economic Development Partnership


Full Name of'Business
Believe Your Dreams
3914 NW 167th street
Miami, Florida 33054
305-621-1311
Year established
2005
Owners
Robert Lemon
Number of paid
full-time/part-time
employees
10 (Two Full-Time/Eight
Part-Time)
Products/Services
We provide training and
workshops for all trying to
achieve academic goals and
acquire personal professional
development.'

Future goals
'We would like to conduct
workshops in the community
for those who want to suc-
ceed in entrepreneurship.
Why did you start this
business and how
has it grown?
It started with myself knock-
ing on doors asking parents
to send their troubled kids to
my church. I envisioned
assisting troubled kids in
succeeding without last
chance programs and jail. We
started with only seven kids
and now we have over 200.
Through the program we
have inspired many kids to
stay in school and not do
drugs.

What were some of the
obstacles you faced and
how did you
overcome them?
One of our first obstacles was
trying to get a building where
we could not only have wor-
ship but also set up programs
and have workshops. Over
time we grew and we're now
set up where we can sit the
kids down and reinforce to
them that they have to be
knowledgeable to succeed.


Miami-Dade County receives $23M


Today, at an event with Miami-
Dade Mayor Carlos Alvarez, held
at Camillus House Somerville
Residence, HUD Miami Field
Office Director Armando Fana
presented a check for over $23
million to local homeless
providers. Programs throughout
the county provide critically
needed assistance to persons
and families living without a
home of their own.
These awards are part of a
national announcement that
thousands of local programs


that house and serve
homeless persons -
from emergency shelters
and transitional housing
projects to permanent
supportive housing pro-
grams will receive
$1.33 billion in funding
through grants
announced on December
20, 2005 by Housing
and Urban Development
Secretary Alphonso
Jackson.


JACKSON


"Today, we take another step


along the road toward
that day when we end
chronic homelessness
on the streets of South
Florida," said Fana.
"The- funding we
announce today will
help provide homes
and vital services to the
most vulnerable in our
community persons
and families who
deserve a place they can


call home."
"We are committed to provid-


ing affordable housing, pro-
grams and services to our com-
munity's homeless individuals
and families," said Miami-Dade
County Mayor Carlos Alvarez.
"This funding will give us the
necessary resources to care for
those less fortunate and help
them become self-reliant mem-
bers of our community."
HUD's homeless funding is
provided in two ways:
* HUD's Continuum of Care
programs provide permanent
Please turn to GRANTS 2D


TV


Robert Lemon


Who does your
business best serve
and why?
North Dade and Opa-locka are
a couple of areas that were our
main focus in the beginning
because it was well known for
having a high murder rate. But
we help anyone that has hope.
How have your
experiences helped meet
the needs of your clients?
I was a fifteen year old senior in
high school and in my first year
in college, I didn't have the
proper support system. I almost
fell through the cracks. Now I
have twenty five years [of experi-
ence] in Corporate America.
Now as a film maker as well as
a public speaker, I tell them to
love what you do so much that
you'll be willing to do it for free.
I never have to worry about
work because I found some-
thing I enjoy to doing.
Where did you get the
name of your company
and does it have any
significant meaning?
The reason we named the
business Believe Your Dreams
was because I believe if you
take one step it becomes a
walk, one word becomes a
sentence, one thought
becomes a vision and one
voice becomes hope.


BELIEVERS 2N CHRIST
MINISTRiES


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$23M for local homeless providers


GRANTS
continued from 1D

and transitional hous-
ing to homeless per-
sons. In addition,
Continuum grants
fund important servic-
es including job train-
ing, health care, men-
tal health counseling,
substance abuse
treatment and child
care.
Emergency Shelter
Grants convert build-
ings into homeless
shelters, assist in the
operation of local shel-
ters and fund related
social service and
homeless prevention
programs.


Combined, HUD's
Continuum of Care
and Emergency
Shelter Grant pro-
grams will provide
critically needed fund-
ing to nearly 5,000
local programs in all
50 states, the District
of Columbia, Puerto
Rico, Guam, and the
U.S. Virgin Islands.
For a more detailed
local summary of the
funding announced
today, visit HUD's
w e b s i t e
www.hud.gov/offices/
cpd/homeless/budg-
et/2005/index.cfm.

THE GOAL TO END
CHRONIC


-- S


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S f e OW q q


Q


HOMELESSNESS
For nearly five years,
HUD has increasingly
emphasized the Bush
Administration's goal
of ending chronic
homelessness in its
assistance programs.
Research indicates
that approximately 10
percent of all home-
less persons experi-
ence long-term or


chronic homeless-
ness. These studies
also find that this
hardest-to-serve pop-
ulation utilizes over
half of all emergency
shelter resources
designed to assist
homeless individuals
and families. By shift-
ing the federal
emphasis toward
meeting the needs of


the most vulnerable
homeless persons,
more resources
become available for
those who experience
homelessness as a
temporary condition.
To learn more about
chronic homelessness,
v i s i t
www.hud.gov/offices/
cpd / homeless / chron-
ic.cfm.


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON FEBRUARY 9, 2006, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE
MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM
RELATED TO THE REGULAR AGENDA:
A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED BRICK-
ELL FIRST, A SUBDIVISION IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT
TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET
COMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY
CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS
SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE
CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT;
AND PROVIDING FOR THE RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public
Works Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction
Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working
hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
,that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony,
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15685) City Clerk


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on February 9, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., in the City Commission
Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the
purpose of hearing objections from any interested parties affected by the
proposed Amendment of Ordinance No. 12714, as amended, extending the
franchise agreement with NUI Utilities, Inc.; and authorizing the city manag-
er to execute the franchise extension agreement extending the agreement
until the earlier of 1) August 31, 2006, or 2) the date immediately preceding
the effective date of any subsequent franchise agreement entered into by
the City and the franchisee; containing a repealer provision and a severabil-
ity clause; and providing for an effective date.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
this matter. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which lany appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of,1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15688) City Clerk


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON FEBRUARY 9, 2006, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE
MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM
RELATED TO THE REGULAR AGENDA:
A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED "CRAW-
FORD GROVE ESTATES", A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI,
SUBJECT TO ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND
STREET COMMITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN
CITY CODE SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICA-
TIONS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECT-
ING THE CITY MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE
SAID PLAT; AND PROVIDING FOR THE RECORDATION OF
SAID PLAT IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public
Works Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction
Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working
hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15686) City Clerk


CITY OF MIAMI, FLORIDA


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ANY PERSON WHO RECEIVES COMPENSATION, REMUNERATION OR
EXPENSES FOR CONDUCTING LOBBYING ACTIVITIES IS REQUIRED
TO REGISTER AS A LOBBYIST WITH THE CITY CLERK PRIOR TO
ENGAGING IN LOBBYING ACTIVITIES BEFORE CITY STAFF, BOARDS
AND COMMITTEES OR THE CITY COMMISSION. A COPY OF THE
APPLICABLE ORDINANCE IS AVAILABLE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CITY
CLERK (MIAMI CITY HALL), LOCATED AT 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE,
MIAMI, FLORIDA, 33133.

AT THE SCHEDULED MEETING OF THE COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
MIAMI, FLORIDA, TO BE HELD ON FEBRUARY 9, 2006, AT 9:00 A.M., IN
ITS CHAMBERS AT CITY HALL, 3500 PAN AMERICAN DRIVE, THE
MIAMI CITY COMMISSION WILL CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING ITEM
RELATED TO THE REGULAR AGENDA:
A RESOLUTION OF THE MIAMI CITY COMMISSION, WITH
ATTACHMENTS, ACCEPTING THE PLAT ENTITLED PADRON
ESTATES, A REPLAT IN THE CITY OF MIAMI, SUBJECT TO
ALL OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE PLAT AND STREET COM-
MITTEE AND THE PROVISIONS CONTAINED IN CITY CODE
SECTION 55-8, AND ACCEPTING THE DEDICATIONS SHOWN
ON SAID PLAT; AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE CITY
MANAGER AND CITY CLERK TO EXECUTE SAID PLAT; AND
PROVIDING FOR THE RECORDATION OF SAID PLAT IN THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Copies of the proposed Resolution are available for review at the Public
Works Department, Survey and Land Records Section of the Construction
Division, located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, 4th Floor, during regular working
hours. Phone 305-416-1232.

The Miami City Commission requests all interested parties be present or
represented at this meeting and are invited to express their views. Should
any person desire to appeal any decision of the City Commission with
respect to any matter considered at this meeting, that person shall ensure
that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, including all testimony
and evidence upon which any appeal may be based (F.S. 286.0105).

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15687) City Clerk


I


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


rvpc Pt- ir iliar 1-7- 2006t


.


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..l....... Mi.. ...... ...L L. ...I.. D til T M m i s Fr


"Closing the Gap" grant program


The Florida Departllent of'
HIealth, Office Of0 Minority
lHealtlh, annoIunces thel
availability of approximately
$6 million in lfuInds for
Fiscal Year 2006-2007 to
provide prevention, inter-
vention and education serv-
ices to reduce racial and
ethnic health disparities in
minority populations. The
Closing the Gap grants are
for communities to mobilize


and organ lize (Iheir resources
in support of effective aMnd
sustainable programs vwhichl
will assist in eliminating
health disparities of racial
and ellhnic populations.
Applicants may submit an
application addressing only
one of the health priority
areas of those identified for
funding IIV/AIDS, cardio-
vascular disease, cancer
(comprehensive or breast


and cervical), diabetes,
adult and childhood immnu-
nizations, maternal and
infant mortality or oral
health care.
A pre-application telecon-
ference will be held February
13, 2006 from 12 noon until
2 p.m. To participate in the
teleconference from outside
the Tallahassee area, please
call 1-888-816-1123.
Individuals in the


Tallahassee and surrounding
areas can access the telecon-
ference by dialing 850-921-
5230.
Online Applications are
available at:
http: / /www.doh.state.fl.us/
equopp/ctg/indexctg.html.
For information concerning
the "Closing the Gap" grant
program, contact the Office
of Minority Health: 850-245-
4444, ext. 2502.


FCBSL welcomes Dr. Truddie Kibbie Reed


Tallahassee In recogni-
tion of Black History Month,
the members of the Florida
Conference of Black State
Legislators will host their 3rd
Distinguished Lecture Series
featuring keynote speaker, Dr.
Trudie Kibbe Reed, President
of Bethune Cookman College.


This event will
be held at 6:00
p.m., on
Tu e s d a y,
February 7, in
the House
Chamber on the'
4th floor of the
Slate Capitol in


Tallahassee. "We are
extending an invitation for
everyone to attend this
historical event, as Dr.
Reed focuses on the Civic
Participation and Social
Responsibility of African
Americans," said FCBSL
Chairman Senator


Anthony "Tony" Hill, Sr., D-
Jacksonville.
"My colleagues and I look
forward to Dr. Reed's visit to
Tallahassee and the impact
she will leave on the hearts of
all who attends," said
Representative Joyce Cusack,
D-DeLand.


IBI McrwI d" pm)ta- M-o I (OT








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DATE: FEBRUARY 11,2006


"TIM:9


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Hornebuye's


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Ctrre P. M'eefe Sglea & CAulru Certer
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1350 NW Sf Stsreet
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>0re info 0r tO STTV.P
contact:
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5-635-2301 ext 373


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.,torT/.

ROYAL PALM APARTMENTS
SUBSIDIZED HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY

Royal Palm Apartments is a U.S. HUD Section 202
Project for the very low income elderly persons, locat-
ed at 2300 NW 136th Street, Opa-locka, Florida.

This project will consist of 99 one bedroom units. If you
are 62 years of age and over, please call for informa-
tion on eligibility and application process between the


hours of 9:00 am and 4:00 pm at CNC
Inc. 305-642-3634/TDD 305-643-2079.

CNC Management Inc.
Equal Housing Opportunity


Management




EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing will be held by the Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on February 9, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., in the City Commission
Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida for the pur-
pose of hearing objections from any interested parties affected by the pro-
posed Amendment to Section 54-190 of the Code of the City of Miami,
Florida, as amended, entitled "Nonstandard Street Widths" by reducing the
zoned right-of-way of N.E. 11 Street between N.E. 1 Avenue and N.E, 2
Avenue.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
this reduction in zoned right-of-way width. Should any .person desire to
appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter con-
sidered at this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made including all testimony and evidence upon which
any appeal may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding
Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15689) City Clerk



JAMES A. CUMMINGS, INC.
General Contractors
3575 Northwest 53rd Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Ohone: (954) 733-4211 Broward
(305) 945-8146 Dade
Fax: (954) 485-9688

"James A. Cummings, Inc., Construction Manager at Risk, will be accepting
proposals for the Guaranteed Maximum Price Estimate for the Early
'Sitework Package for State School JJJ for Miami Dade County Public
Schools on February 20, 2006. The site is located in Hialeah Gardens and
is approximately 56.2 acres. Located just north of State Road 25
(Ockeechobee Road), east of Hialeah Gardens Boulevard and west of NW
92 Avenue. The total street frontage along Hialeah Gardens Boulevard is
approx. 660 feet and the frontage along NW 92 Avenue is approx. 1,498
feet. The work includes extensive site improvements including, but not lim-
ited to, massive clearing and grubbing, demolition, wetlands mitigation,
removal of unsuitable soils and placement of clean structural fill materials
for the entire 56.2 acres site. Work is required for construction of a new high
school, middle school, and elementary school. A pre-bid meeting will be
held at our office for all bidders on Wednesday, February 8, 2006 at 10:00
am. James A. Cummings, Inc. is actively seeking Small Business Enterprise
(SBE) Subcontractors and suppliers for this package. Bid documents are
available though Cummings, Dodge and CMD. For more information please
call Jessica Barandiaran @ James A. Cummings, Inc. @ 3575 NW 53rd
Street; Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309; (954)733-4211 or Fax: (954) 485-
9688.


CITY OF MIAMI


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA


Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),
from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dpm. Vendors may choose to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.
Interested parties may also visit or call:
Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773
There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the bid package through the United States Postal Service.
These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


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The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006 3D


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4D The Miami Times, February 1-7, 2006


Bu eal BUlack


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"Copyrighted Material .

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"



.


-


Fane's A/C &
Appliance Repair
Wall units, central air, stove,
refrigerator, washer and dryer.
305-754-5060
Bp.: 305-566-8389


Daryl's Banquet H
All occasions, weddings, part
1290 Ali Baba (West of 27t
Limo Rentals
305-622-3361
305-796-9558



Range Funeral Hi
The Directors are: M. Athalie R
and N. Patrick Range
5727 N.W. 17th Avenue
305-691-4343


Gene and Sons, Inc.
Custom-made cabinets for kitchens
and bathrooms at affordable prices.
14140 NW 22nd Avenue
305-685-3565


General Home Repair
Air condition, plumbing, electrical,
all roofing, appliances, washer, dryer,
ies, etc. stove. Call Benny
h Ave) 305-685-1898
786-273-1130



Southeastern Roofing
ome & Painting
General Home Repairs. Repair
Range
and Roofs. Financing.
Call 305-694-9405
786-326-0482


^^^^j^^^^ P^^^~~m~X~~mi~Fl^^^^Mr
^^j^^S. ^^^O!,CO^N^WN
. .. ... ... ..


Coops' Kitchen
Specialized in Bar-B-Oue Ribs
and Chicken
7910 NW 22 Avene
786-229-7031
Thursday-Saturday


Wedding Video
Productions
Corporate videos, Music videos,
high definition/film
786-258-3732


rw


MIAMIDADE3



MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT
VENETIAN CAUSEWAY STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS
OCI PROJECT NO. E05-PW-12

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, and
Chapter 2, Sections 2-8.1 (as amended by Ordinance 05-15), and 2-10.4 of the Miami-Dade County
Code and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional engineering services will be required
for the preparation of Master Plan and roadway improvements to the Venetian Causeway for the Miami-
Dade Public Works Department. The scope of services includes professional engineering services and
master planning and preparation of complete construction plans to provide roadway beautification
enhancements and improvements to Venetian Causeway. The project boundaries are from Alton Road
to the western boundary of the City of Miami Beach city limits and from Bayshore Drive to the eastern
boundary of the City of Miami city limits. The design plans should include at a minimum: expanded side-
walks, curb and gutter, raised landscaped median, continuous bike lanes, parallel parking, drainage
improvements, pavement markings and signing, traffic mast arms, decorative roadway lighting, tree
planting, entrance features, and decorative paver crosswalks.

The non-exclusive professional services agreement (PSA) shall remain in full force and effect for a peri-
od of three (3) years after its date of execution or until completion of all project phases, whichever
occurs last, unless terminated by mutual consent of the parties hereto.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS


3.02 Highway Systems Highway Design (PRIME)


Transportation Planning Urban Area & Regional Transportation Planning
Highway Systems Traffic Engineering Studies
Highway Systems Signing, Pavement Markings & Channelization
Highway Systems Lighting
Highway Systems Signalization
Environmental Engineering -Stormwater Drainage Design Engineering Services
General Structural Engineering
General Civil Engineering
Landscape Architecture


A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provi-
sions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering
Unit located at 111 NW 1St Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respec-
tively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded elec-
tronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail
address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-
line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notifi-
cation. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-
dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Amado Gonzalez who may be contacted via e-mail at gon-
zaam@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-1428.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS
One (1) Agreement 20% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on February 2, 2006, at 3:00 P.M. in
Conference Room 18-2, 18th Floor of the Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to
attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is February 17, 2006 at 11:00 A.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27
for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


1.01
3.04
3.09
3.10
3.11
10.01
11.00
16.00
20.00


B


_ ~ __


C. Brian Hart Ins.
Auto Flood Windstorm General
Liability Home Worker's
Compensation
7954 NW.22nd Avenue
305-836-5206


RUSSELL with the,
MUSCLES
24 hours Moving/Deliveries
Low Rates Senior Citizens and
Disability Discounts
305-625-3461 or
305-651-5544


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------------ I

MIAMM3



ATTENTION HOUSING DEVELOPERS

A DEVELOPER'S FAMILIARIZATION FORUM TO DISCUSS THE
SCOTT/CARVER HOMES HOPE VI REVITALIZATION PROGRAM
Miami-Dade Housing Agency (MDHA) invites housing developers experienced in the
construction, financing and marketing of both affordable homeownership and multi-family
subsidized rental housing, to an informal forum at which the preliminary development plans for
the second phase (Phase !1) of the Scott/Carver Homes HOPE VI Revitalization Program will
be presented. This forum is being conducted in anticipation of issuing a Request for Proposal
(RFP) for a developer.
The development cost of Phase II of the Scott/Carver Homes HOPE VI Revitalization Program
is estimated to be Forty Seven Million Dollars ($47,000,000.00) and will consist of the land
development (installation of infrastructure) for the Scott/Carver site of approximately 30 acres,
and the construction of 194 new affordable homeownership units and 160 new public housing
rental units, 69 of which will be single-family homes hd 285 of which "will be town homess:."'""
Firmsthat have' been the sole party developer or the managing (general partner) entity.of a
partnership or a joint venture that has acted as the developer of other successful mixed-
finance, mixed-income residential communities of the approximate size and complexity as
Phase II of the Scott/Carver Homes HOPE VI Revitalization Program are strongly encouraged
to attend.
The conference will be held Monday, February 27, 2006, at the Joseph E. Caleb Center,
George Kilpatrick & Ralph Reynolds Meeting Room, 5400 NW 22 Avenue, Miami, Florida
33142 commencing at 8:00 a.m. and should finish by 12:00 Noon.
For more information, contact Elizabeth Ogden, Miami-Dade Housing Agency's HOPE VI
office at 305-638-5757.



The Miami Times, South Florida's oldest Black newspaper, is expanding. We offer a fast-paced, stimulating
environment with great benefits, opportunities for growth and a chance to be a part of an 83 year-old tradi-
tion serving South Florida's Black community.
If you are flexible, professional, possess strong communication skills and take pride in your work, we invite
you to apply for the following positions by submitting two (2) copies of your resume to:

X te :fliami Timens
900 NW 54th Street
Miami, Fl 33127
Attn: Renee M. Harris
Reporters:
Bring your journalism and/or writing experience to help inform, educate and inspire Miami's Black communi-
ty with news and information for and about areas like Liberty City, Miami Gardens, Opa-Locka, Overtown,
Brownsville, Florida City, North Miami, Goulds, Perrine, Richmond Heights, Little Haiti and Broward County.
We are looking for two full time and 12 freelance reporters to join our editorial team. Please include three writ-
ing samples with your resume.
Religion Editor/Reporter:
Be a part of our highly popular Faith and Families section. The perfect candidate will combine solid journal-
ism and/or writing experience with a desire to keep the Black community abreast of religious news and infor-
mation, church happenings as well as important issues affecting Black families. Please include three writing
samples with your resume.
Customer Service Representatives:
The perfect candidates understand that our readers are the reason we exist. If you are flexible, articulate,
enjoy working with the public and are capable of managing multiple priorities, we invite you to apply for one
of two part-time positions.
Graphic Designer:
Help our production department create on of the most attractive, visually stimulating newspapers in the
nation. The perfect candidate is flexible, innovative and highly skilled at using PhotoShop, Quark Express,
Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Acrobat. We are looking for one part-time graphic designer.
Receptionist:
As the first face our customers see and the first voice they hear, the ideal candidate must be professional,
articulate and enjoy working with the public. If you have a pleasant personality, are capable of working under
pressure and skilled at managing multiple priorities, we need you. We are looking for one full-time and one
part-time receptionist.
Advertising Executive:
Help local, national, small and large companies expose their products and services to South Florida's multi-
million dollar Black community. The perfect candidate has solid sales experience, preferably with print or elec-
tronic media. If you are articulate, professional and a solid closer looking for an unlimited income, we need
you to join our advertising team.
Telemarketers:
Use your positive personality and selling skills to help readers receive The Miami Times at their doorsteps
each week. The ideal candidates are reliable, confident, have impeccable telephone sales skills and work well
in a fast-paced atmosphere. We are looking for three part-time telemarketers.
Collections:
Experienced accounts receivable professional to collect on outstanding accounts. The ideal candidate is
assertive, has strong communication skills and solid collections experience.

No telephone calls please









Blacks Must Control T heir Uwfl Destiny


To Place Your Ad

Call: 305-694-6225


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classifieds@miamitimesonline.com


The Miami Times January 2 2006 5D


'1$' ;j:'


To Fax Your Ad

Fax: 305-757-4764


SOffice Space
Prime Golden Glades
Office
SPACES FOR RENT
From $260 to $475 monthly
Call 305-681-9600

Unfurnished Rooms
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Two bedrooms, one bath.
954-704-0472
Furnished Rooms
1026 N.W. 53rd Street
Rooms for rent, with air. Pay
weekly, bi-weekly or monthly.
Call for more information.
786-251-0376 or
305-626-0019
1460 NW 173rd Terrace
$350 monthly. 305-430-0674
or 786-444-9033.
19541 NW 37th Court
Utilities included.' $375
monthly, plus $300 security.
305-621-0576
335 N.W. 203rd Terrace
Waterfront Gated Communi-
ty, furnished, color TV, air,
utilities and more.
Call 305-510-9966
5550 N.W. 9th Avenue
Comfortable room.
$100 weekly 305-694-9405
or
786-326-0482.
6942 NW 15 Ave-Upstairs
Nice clean rooms, $300
monthly, first and last.
Call 305-835-2922
DADE AREA
OUTREACH -Beds available.
3 meals. FREE if qualify.
786-488-5213
North Miami Beach
Furnished room with private
entrance. Close to 163rd
street mall.
Call 305-956-9184
SUMMER PALACE
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, air, use of kitchen, plus
more. Call 305-835-2728.
SVery nice, air conditioned
rooms, rent plans are nego-
tiable. Any reasonable plan
accepted. One week free.
Call 786-663-4600
I Efficiencies
13880 N.E. 6th Avenue
Nice and cozy with air, tile
floors and appliances. $550
* monthly (negotiable)! $1100
move-in. 305-769-3740
S 350 NW 45 Street.
Furnished efficiency. Utilities
included. $550 monthly. First
and last. 786-493-0686 or
305-576-3904
Apartments

1130 N.W. 2nd Avenue
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
DOWNTOWN AREA
Apartments for Rent, Fully
remodeled air, laundry,
new appliances and kitch-
en cabinets.
Call 305-375-0673
786-488-6119

1281 N.W. 61 Street
Renovated BIG one
bedroom
Only $475 Monthly
Appliances included.
Call Nathan 786-333-2596
1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$500 monthly. Newly
renovat-
ed. All appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
1710 NW 1 Court
Three bedroom two bath.
Fully remodeled. Call 305-
305-5601 or 786-488-6119
180 N.E. 71st Street
Two and one bedrooms, one
bath with water included.
Section 8 Welcome. Call
786-
285-0072 or 305-772-2236.
247 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, good condition,
fenced
yard, parking, $700 monthly.
welcome.Call 305-674-7335
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air condition-
ing and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Brand new stove
and refrigerator. Only $750
per month; $1,500 to move
in. Includes free water and
free lawn service.
Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W. 50th Street
Phone 305-638-3699
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699
5600 NW 7 Court
Large one bedroom. All
appliances included. $540
monthly plus security.
786-277-0632


6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$485-$495 per month, one
bedrooms, $385 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699


ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from $420-$495 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699

ARENA GARDEN
NEW YEAR SPECIAL
MOVE IN WITH FIRST
MONTH RENT. FREE
BASIC CABLE. Remodeled
One, two and three
bedrooms, air, ceiling fan,
appliances, laundry, and
gate.
100 NW 11th St. Mgr. #106
305-374-4412

KENDALL
Gated community, spacious
One, two and three bed-
rooms. HC and Non HC ac-
cessible apartments., con-
venient location with pool,
resident activities. NO PETSI
Water and sewer included.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
Lakeside Towers
305-383-2042
TDD 1-800-955-8770

NW AREA
One bedroom with all appli-
ances, security bars, and
carpet. Call after 4 p.m.
305-807-3270

ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$385 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $425 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
OVERTOWN AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths
with central air, appliances
and free 27 inch flat screen
TV. $950 monthly! Section 8
Welcome!
Call Joel at 786-355-7578

2751 NW 46th Street
One bedroom with remote
gate. $550 a month. First,
last and security.
Call 954-430-0849



1130 NW 76th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
tile,, air and bars, washer
hookup, hurricane shutters,
water included. $900 month-
ly. $1800 to move in.
S-786-512-1588

12324 NE 11 Place
SECTION 8 WELCOME!
Beautiful two bedrooms, two
baths, central air $990
monthly.
Please call 305-493-9065
1576 N.W. 58th Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
newly renovated, air, tile
blinds and security bars.
$1300 monthly. Section 8
preferred. Call 786-285-4056
18423 N.E. 1st Court
Three bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly. First and se-
curity. Call 305-681-2862
2020 NW 93rd Terrace
Two bedroom, two baths,
with security bars and central
air. Landlord pays water; ten-
ant pays utilities and lawn
maintenance. First, last and
security deposit at $950 for a
total of $2850 move in. Ask
John 305-620-5604 or cell
786-402-7925.
230 NW 56 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, $750 monthly.
Section 8 OKI
Call 786-543-4579.
3041 NW 134th Street
Large two bedrooms, one
bath with air. $800 monthly
plus security. Section 8
Okay!
Call 786-512-9756
4625 N.W.15th Avenue, #A
Two bedrooms, one bath.
$875 monthly. Section 8 OK
Call 305-490-9284
6304 N. W. 1st Court
One bedroom, one bath, ce-
ramice tile, stove, refrigerator.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 786-285-8872

7720 NW Miami Place
Nice large one bedroom. Pri-
vate yard. Utility room. $525
monthly. Drive by, then call
305-754-5728
7912 N.W. 12th Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Central air, appliances,
fenced yard. $875 monthly,
water included. Section 8 OK
Call John 305-389-4011
8118 NW 12 Court
Four bedrooms, two baths.
Call 305-218-1227
97 Street NW 26 Avenue
Nice two bedrooms, one bath
all tile, central air, big carport.
Section 8 OK. 305-401-9650
FABULOUS DUPLEX
1533 N.W. 53rd Street


Refrigerator, stove, wall
units, ceiling fans, tiled, front
porch, yard (fenced), laundry
hook-up, parking, $900
monthly, call Bill at Jessie
Investors,
954-704-2228.
Northwest Area
Two bedrooms, one bath,
plus utility room. $850
monthly.
305-790-8229


Condos/Townhouses
19575 NW 29 Court
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Ready to move in. Section 8
welcome.
Call Lloyd
305-934-5095
19TH STREET 5TH PLACE
Three bedrooms, one and a
half bath. Appliances includ-
ed and central air. Section 8
OK.$850 monthly. Call: Ms.
Brenda. 305-345-6795
SOUTH BEACH
Beach front, 25th/Collins
11th floor, one bedroom, one
and a half bath, great views,
fully furnished. $1950
monthly.
Call 786-280-4127

HOuses

12425 N.W. 21st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
Section 8 only, 305-495-1909
12931 Wood Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly. Call 1-800-
257-1311 or 404-861-1965.
1348 NW 55th Street
Two bedrooms
Call 305-757-5929
1363 N.E. 176th Street
Three bedrooms with in-law
quarters, two baths, central
air, washer and dryer. $1500
monthly. Renters Paradise
305-944-2101/786-287-5293
2269 N.W. 49th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
central air, tile and wood
floors, washer hook up.
$1300 monthly. $2000 to
move in. Call 786-512-1588.

2343 NW 101 STREET
Spacious two bedroom two
bath. All appliances, central
air, and fenced yard. Call
772-834-5735 after 7p.m.
2520 NW 141 Street
Four bedrooms, two baths
$1400 monthly. Call Davis
Realty 305-694-0988
254 N W 75 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
Section 8 okay. Call 1-800-
257-1311 or 404-861-1965.
3141 NW 57 Street
Spacious two bedrooms, one
bath. Security bars, fenced
yard. $800 monthly.
Call 305-785-7314
4727 NW 6 Avenue
Three bedrooms, one bath.
SECTION 8 WELCOME.
Corner,. beautiful home in
great area.
786-344-3278
6329 NW 22 Court
Four bedrooms, one bath
with wall unit. Large fenced
yard, near metro. Section 8
welcome. 305-297-1727
781 NW 77th Street (rear)
One bedroom, appliances in-
cluded. Utilities payed by
tenant. $500 monthly. $1375
to move in.
305-742-1050
942 NW 80 Street
Four bedroom, two bath. Call
305-758-6201 or 786-423-
6107, Odinord Charles.
Buy a four bedrooms, two
baths, Foreclosure. $50,000!
NEVER RENT AGAIN For
listings 800-749-8168 xD041
HOUSES
FOR RENT
CALL 305-668-7450
or 305-836-1040/
305-420-6073

MIAMI AREA
Newly remodeled three bed-
rooms, one bath, central air,
washer/dryer connection.
$1250 monthly Section 8
welcome.
Call 954-818-9112
MIAMI GARDENS AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths!
$1400 monthly. First, last,
and security. Call 786-287-
0864 or 786-587-6821
MIRAMAR
7130 Dilido Boulevard
Three bedrooms, two baths,
family room, one car garage,
central air. $1,700 monthly.
Section 8 welcome!
All Points Realty &
Investments
305-621-5800
NORTHWEST AREA
Spacious three bedroom two
and a half bath. Central air,
tiled floors, washer and
dryer. $1150 monthly $3000
move-in. Appointments only.
305-409-3950

STOP!!!!
Behind in your rent 24 hour
notice? Behind in your
mortgage? Call Kathy:
786-326-7916





!IIATTENTION!!!
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
""WITH""


FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
Hud/VA Homes Available
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House Of Homes Realty
WWW"


Thinking About
Buying A Home?
Call us today about our
PRIVATE MORTGAGE Pro-
gram. All credit accepted!
Must have steady income.
954-449-3769
WE BUY HOMES CASH
ANY AREA
ANY CONDITION
ANY PRICE
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CALL MATTHEW
305-556-5366
954-430-3663



I Houses
121 STREET NW 22 AVE.
Four bedroom one bath with
garage. 1405sq, Newly reno-
vated with new appliances
and new air. Electrical up-
graded to code. 100%
financing with seller
contribution, Call for details
786-488-9265 se habla
espano
1555 NW 62 TERRACE
Beautiful two bedrooms one
bath. Florida room or third
bedroom. Totally renovated.
Owner will contribute 5K in
closing cost. Financing avail-
able at $933 per month. Ask-
ing $159,000. 786-282-6322
17311 N.W. 52 Place
Five bedrooms, two baths,
den, pool, central air, hot tub,
large patio, large tiki hut, car-
port. Try $9500 down and
$1695 monthly. (new adj.
mtg.) $359K. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700.
1749 NW 62 STREET
Three bedroom one bath.
Mint condition. Quick sale.
$185,000 Call 786-718-0162
2134 N.W. 80th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath
with family room, central air,
Everything brand new. Ce-
ramic tile and carpet. ALL
APPLIANCES Asking
$195,000. ,
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872
2144 N.W. 80th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
with family room car port,
central air, Everything brand
new. Ceramic tile and carpet.
ALL APPLIANCES Asking
$165,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872
2361 EAST GOLF DRIVE
Three bedrooms, one bath
with family room, central air,
Everything brand new! Ce-
ramic tile and carpet. ALL
APPLIANCES Asking
$225,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872
8028 N.W. 13th Court
Five bedrooms, two baths,
two story, carport. Try $4900
down and $895 monthly
(new adj. mtg.) $199K. NDI
Realtors 305-655-1700.
846 N.W. 114th Street
Three bedrooms, new paint,
large fenced lot, air. Try
$3900 down and $849
monthly (new adj. mtg.)
$169K. NDI Realtors 305-
655-1700.
FORECLOSURES
Five bedrooms, Must Selll
Only $33,500
800-749-8168 xD040
FREE
LIST/FORECLOSURE
Below market values.
Hundreds to choose.
Low down payments.
Easy to qualify. Call nowl
Larry Albert 305-255-9040
HUD HOMES
Five bedrooms, Only
$33,500. For listings
800-749-8168xD046



FORECLOSURE?
I BUY HOUSES CASH I
LEND MONEY. I PAY RE-
FERRALS. 305-951-3861


RAPID REFUND
Refund In 8 14 Hours

Electronic Filing
Refund In 8 14 Days

Home Service Available
Call Mrs. T 305-836-9844
MrsT3058369844.4t.com

Stop Foreclosure Nowl
Save Your Credit! We Buy
Houses and make your pay-
ments!
Call Alex 305-318-6213

The Above and Beyond
Investment Group would
like to purchase your
home at a fair price.
Please call 305-458-7402
or 954-347-9318 for a fast
closing.

WE BUY HOUSES
Any area, any condition, any
price, fast cash.


Call 786-285-8872



CHEVY CAVALIER 1994.
$900 Runs GREATI Police
Impounds from $500! For
listings 800-749-8167xK036


Chevy's from $500 Reading, English, Math Skills
$500 Police Impounds and FCAT. Elliot Weinstock,
For listings 800-749-8167 Educational Specialist.
xK020 Call 305-653-1969
HONDA ACCORD 1990I


$950 Or Best C
Impounds from
listings 800-749-1

HONDA'S fro
Police Impounds
800-749-8167xKC



CONSTRU
Fire Sprinkler
Trainee and E
level Call 305-8
786-260-

E COOK WA
Experience or
-ockaArea. 305

DRIVERS N
Society cabs ne
Regular license
Call Lionel 305

Experience Sec
Needed 305-75

Interior Demol
tractor hiring I
days a week.
background ch
have transport.
tact Anthony
305-637-

MERCHAN
Part-time. Needed
accounts in Mi.
stores. Set your
ule, excellent pa
work. 800-733-2
r www.superfric

Merchandise
Detailer Pc
vailable. Must
own car. Call Jo
information
954-894-

Retail

HUDSON(

Are you lookin
pace, employee
drug free cor
flexible hoi
competitive
KUldson News
the #1 Airpor
Retailer in over
in the United
Canada. In
International
are looking foi
hard working
for the following

SERVICE AS!
$9.75 PER

Federal Gov
background ch
conduc
Must be willir
holidays and

To apply. pie
resume to mi
hudsongro
or
Fax: 305-871-
Phone: 305-
EOE


Offer! Police
$500! For
3167xK035
NOW HIRING CERTIFIED
om $500! TEACHERS
. For listings 40 hours minimum.
023 Call 786-299-7984 or
786-286-7426.



Installers CHURCH AVAILABLE
xperience With air and kitchen. Seats
35-8400 or 70. Call 305-687-1218
8149

nlyT 9 Opa A
i-623-9490 \ A

EEDED
3 required.
-321-5177.

cretary.
51-3381

ition Con-
laborers. 6 NEED A
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ieck. Must
ation. Con-

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ami grocery
own sched-
ay, long-term
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Ige.com

er/Salon
osition /
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GROUP

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ee friendly,
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g position:

SOCIATES
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ieck will be
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ng to work
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ase send
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1113 or call
-871-1114
E


Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour
Plus gas mileage
For a 1/2 days work

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets. WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 8 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Applications are received
Thursday and Friday
900 NW 54th Street

Seeking experienced Tod-
dler teacher. Must have
lesson plan knowledge
and your CDAI
Apply at:
5605 NW 32nd Avenue

TEACHER
Experienced, dependable
child care teacher with
CDA to teach abeka
curriculum to 3 year olds in
private center.
Call 305-836-1178

TEACHERS WANTED
Childcare. Must have 40
hours or CDA. 305-218-
0991



EARN HIGH YEILD
Like the wealthy!
Be on this call at 8 p.m.,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Fridays 1-646-519-5860 pin
no. 2272#. Call Charles for
information, 786-356-5011.



High School Diploma,
Nursing Assistant, Assis-
tance Living Facility Train-
ing, flexible classes.
305-249-7339


RAPI) REFUND

Refund in 8-14 Hours

Electronic Filing

Refund in 8-14 days
Home Service Available
Mall Mrs. T. 305-836-9844


About to loose your home?
Taxes past due, bills getting behind?
Good credit, Bad credit, It doesn't matter
call me when everyone else says NO


MOVING TO A NEW LOCATION

Rozal n H. Paschal, MD




Northside Shopping Center
7900 NW 27 Avenue, Suite #3F

305-758-0591




SISTER WISDOM

Southern born spiritualist, reader and
advisor. Helps with all problems in life,
such as love, marriage, health, court
cases and business. Also restore nature.
I have blessed candles, baths and
incense oils. One free question by phone.


CALL 305-300-8728





PSYCHIC FRIEND

Can help you with all your problems you
may have. Times are bad, but she can
help with all problems of life.

Call for appointment

954-927-8740


Ask for your
Refund

Anticipation Loan..... TODAY!
PATTERSON-CLARKE, CPA, P.A.
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY'S
by appointment only
EL PALACIO HOTEL & BOUTIQUE
CONFERENCE ROOM
16805 NW 121"' AVE
305-655-1880 FOR MORE INFO OR TO
SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT

HSBC Taxpayer Financial Services
Subject to credit approval. Products are serviced by HSBC
Taxpayer Financial Services Inc.
Bank products provided by HSBC Bank USA, N.A.,
lemnber FDIC. -
t^SSESSES^




vi







s kcalB Must Control Their Own Desting


6D The Miami Times, Fe ru ,


FV" Gi.Md k*h*


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
*


qS


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
1450 N.E. 2ND AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33132


Sealed bids for categories of items listed below will be received, at the address listed, on the designat-
ed date. Said bids will be publicly opened and read in the Board auditorium, Miami-Dade County School
Board Administration Building. Bids are to be placed in the 'BID BOX' in Room 351, by 2:00 P.M., on the
date designated. Bid forms on which the bids must be submitted are available upon request from the
DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT web-site at http://procurement.dadeschools.net, or
Room 351, address above, telephone (305) 995-1380. Award recommendations will be available on the
Friday preceding the scheduled Board meeting award. The results of bids awarded at the official School
Board meetings will be available in the DIVISION OF PROCUREMENT MANAGEMENT on the Monday
following the meetings. The Board reserves the right to waive informalities and to reject any and all bids.

"The School Board of Miami-Dade County Public Schools enacts a Cone of Silence from
issuance of a solicitation to written recommendation of award. All provisions of School Board
Rule 6Gx13-8C-1.212 apply."

"Any Protest of Specifications, or Protest of Award, must be filed with the Clerk of the School
Board. Failure to adhere to the filing requirements and timelines, as specified in Board Rule
6Gx13-3C-1.11, shall constitute a waiver of proceedings."

Bid Number Opening Title Pre-Bid Conference
Download Date Addendums

049-FF07 2/21/2006 Brake Drums and Brake Lining Kits
070-FF10 2/16/2006 PROFESSIONAL CONSULTING SERVICES
FOR DEVELOPMENT OF AN
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSESSMENT AND
APPRAISAL SYSTEM


THE SCHOOL BOARD OF MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
BY: Dr. Rudolph F. Crew
SUPERINTENDENT.OF SCHOOLS


Miami-Dade County Public Schools


--r~ --


MIAMI-DAD


DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION


~1


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to commission one (1), or more, consultant(s)
to provide grant development/writing services for historical preservation of buildings for the Office of
School Facilities. The selected Consultant(s) will be responsible for the research, development, writing
and submission of grants to federal, state, foundation, private and local funding agencies as it relates
to the preservation of eligible and designated historical buildings. Responsibilities may also include
review of existing and potential historical sites and any planned improvements in order to present rec-
ommendations of eligible preservation projects.

Only one (1) original submittal (with five (5) copies) will be accepted per applicant, either as a single
Prime firm or as part of a joint venture. If the applicant is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint
venture agreement must be submitted with the application. Percentage participation of fees must be
clearly stated for each joint venture partner. The consulting firm must show a successful track record
in historical preservation grant writing.

Letters of interest, qualification documents and other proposer=s information must be received at the
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management, Room 305 by no later than 4:30
p.m.. Eastern Standard Time (EST). Friday. February 24, 2006. Such forms must accurately
describe the current status and configuration of the applicant. The Request for Qualification (RFQ)
package, with all pertinent information and required forms, may be picked up at the Department of A/E
Selection, Negotiations & Design Management at the address listed below.

M-DCPS strongly encourages the participation of certified M/WBE firms either as a prime proposer or
as part of a consulting/supporting team.

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educa-
tional programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.

Any firm or individual, whose agreement has been terminated by the Board, with cause, within the last
three years, shall not be considered under this Request for Qualifications.

Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance
of the Legal Advertisement and ending when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recom-
mendation to commission or otherwise take action that would end the solicitation. Any violation of the
Cone of Silence may be punishable as provided for under the referenced School Board Rule, in addi-
tion to any other penalty provided by law. Only written questions will be accepted. All written commu-
nications must be sent to the address below and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450
NE 2nd Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida 33132.

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule
6Gx13- 3C-1.11, or in accordance with Section 120.57(3), Florida Statutes (2002), shall constitute a
waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.

The successful Applicant(s) shall fully comply with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 Jessica
Lunsford Act and all related Board Rules and procedures as applicable.

School Board Rules can be accessed on the Miami-Dade County Public Schools website at www.dade-
schools.net/board/rules/ and this legal advertisement can be accessed at
http://facilities.dadeschools.net/ae solicitations/sp/CM.pdf

Firms presently under contract with M-DCPS may be considered for commission under this proposal,
unless their contract with M-DCPS expressly prohibits it.

Proposers may pick-up the RFQ package and submit proposal responses at the following loca-
tion:

MIAMI-DADE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Nazira Abdo-Decoster, Supervisor II.
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132




lace your Cla ified ad in Treas Mi rem i T imes cl 3 assiefs

Place your Classified ad in The Miami Times call 305-694-6225


)I


MIAMIW


Notice to Qualified Contractors

Miami-Dade County is soliciting interested contractors to agree to participate and perform in two (2) Miscellaneous
Construction Contract (MCC) Bid No. CICC 7040-0107 & CICC 7360-0108 for various Departments throughout Miami-Dade
County.
PRE-QUALIFICATION DOCUMENTS are open to public inspection and may be obtained from the Office of Capital Improvement,
located at 111 NW 1 Street, 21st Floor, Miami, Fl. 33128.

AVAILABLE CICC 7360-0/08 REQUEST FOR PRICE QUOTATIONS (RPQ)

1) Miami Dade Housing Agency, Planning & Development, 1401 NW 7th Street, Miami, FI
SECTION 3 REQUIREMENTS: This is a Section 3 covered activity. Section 3 requires that job training and employment
opportunities be directed to low- and very.low income persons and contracting opportunities be directed to businesses that
are owned by or that substantially employ, low- or very-low income persons. FAILURE TO PROVIDE SECTION 3
DOCUMENTS ON OR BEFORE MDHA REQUESTED DUE DATES, MAY RENDER BID NON-RESPONSIVE.
MDHA Contact Person/Telephone No.: Joe Chang @ 305/644-5241
RPQ No.: 05446 E-R (Rebid)'- ANNIE B. COLEMAN SITES 11 & 29 ROOF REPLACEMENT- LOCATION: NW 23 Ave & 56 St.
- License Requirements: Roofing Contractor EST. COST: $361,461 -
RPQ No.: 05466 E-R (Rebid) ANNIE B. COLEMAN SITES 28 ROOF REPLACEMENT- LOCATION: NW 23 Ave & 56 St. -
License Requirements: Roofing Contractor EST. COST: $262,462 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment,
tools and performing all operations necessary for a complete roof replacement. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 28, 2006 at 10:00
A.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 2/8/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location: NW58 Street & 25 Ave, Miami, Fl)
RPQ No.: 05462 E-R (Rebid) EDISON COURTS VACANT UNITS PREP- 14 UNITS CONTRACT No. 1 License Requirements:
General Building Contractor EST. COST: $180,000 -
RPQ No.: 05463 E-R (Rebid) EDISON COURTS VACANT UNITS PREP 16 UNITS CONTRACT No. 2- License Requirements:
General Building Contractor EST. COST: $195,500
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment,
tools and performing all operations necessary to restore the vacant units for resident occupancy. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 28,
2006 at 10:00 A.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 2/15/2006 @ 9:300 a.m. Location: 347 NW 64 Street, Miami, Fl)
2) Miami Dade Public Works Department Contracts & Specification Division 111 NW 1 Street, Suite 1510 Miami, Fl
PWRK Contact PersonlTelephone No.: Luis Perez @ 3051375-2930
RPQ No.: 20060010 TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION LOCATION: W 30 Ave. & W 68 St.- License Requirements: Electrical
Contractor- EST. COST: $150,000-
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment,
tools and performing all operations necessary for the complete installation of traffic signals, that includes traffic controller assembly,
and mast arms. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 24, 2006 at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 2/13/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. -
Location: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
RPQ No.: 20060016 TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION LOCATION: Purdy Ave. & Dade Blvd. License Requirements:
Electrical Contractor- EST. COST: $160,000 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment,
tools and performing all operations necessary for the complete installation of traffic signals, that includes traffic controller assembly,
and mast arms. RPQ Bid Due Date: March 3, 2006 at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 2/20/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. -
Location: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
Cone of Silence
Miami-Dade County's "Cone of Silence" Ordinance 98-106 (Section 2-11.1(t) of the Code) approved by the Board of County
Commissioners as of July 21, 1998, and amended January 29, 2002, is adopted herein. This ordinance specifically prohibits
communication in regard to these bid solicitation with County Staff except by written means with copy filed with Clerk of the Board.
Certain exceptions are made such as oral communication during pre-bid conferences and communications with those persons defined
in the ordinance regarding matters of process or procedure already contained in the solicitation document. The "Cone of Silence" takes
effect upon advertisement for bids and terminates when recommendation for Award is made by the County Department.


____


The Department of Environmental Resources Management, under delegation of the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP; jointly referred to as the Department), gives Notice of Intent to grant a Solid Waste Management Facility
permit (FDEP Permit No. 0176119-003-SO) to the Applicant, Miami-Dade Aviation Department, to operate an 18 tons per day
Waste Processing Facility for the transfer of solid waste generated from international flights at Miami International Airport.
The project is located at, near, or in the vicinity of NW 22"d Street & 67th Avenue, Miami, Florida. The applicant's mailing
address is Attn: Pedro F. Hemandez, PE., Manager, P.O. Box 592075, Miami, Florida 33159. The Department's tile (No:
15978/SW-1412) on this matter is available for public inspection by contacting the Pollution Control Division file clerk at 305-
372-6718 and making an appointment to view the tiles during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.ni., Monday through
Friday, except legal holidays, at 33 SW 2"d Avenue, Miami, Florida 33 130.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the above proposed agency action may petition for an administrative
determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information
set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Office of the Miami-Dade County Attorney, 111 N.W. 1"' Street, Suite 2810,
Miami, Florida 33128. Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under section 120.60(3) of the
Florida Statutes must be tiled within fourteen (14) days of publication of this notice or receipt of the written notice, whichever
occurs first. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing.
The failure of any person to file a petition within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to
request an administrative determination (hearing) under sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes, or to intervene
in this proceeding and participate as a party to it. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding initiated by another party)
will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with rule 28-106.205 of the
Florida Administrative Code.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the following information:
(a) The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner, the applicant's name and address, the
Department File Number and the county in which the project is proposed;
(b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department's action or proposed action;
(c) A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Department's action or proposed
action;
(d) A statement of all material facts disputed by petitioner or a statement that there are no disputed facts;
(e) A statement of facts which the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Department's action
or proposed action;
(f A statement of which rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the
Department's action or proposed action; and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action the petitioner wants the
Department to take with respect to the Department's action or proposed action.
A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department's action is based shall state that no such facts
are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by rule 28-106.301 of the
Florida Administrative Code.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition means that
the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. Persons whose substantial interests
will be affected by any such final decision of the Department have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding,
in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
In accordance with Section 120.573, F.S., the Department advises that mediation is not available in this case as an
alternative to filing a petition for an administrative determination.


V-T'l

NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR
GRANT DEVELOPMENT/WRITING SERVICES,,
Miami-Dade County Public Schools FOR HISTORICAL PRESERVATION OF BUILDINGS


(,


-







The Miami Times Februa D


s kcalB Must Control ,


Meek runs ING Miami Children's marathon

Congressman Kendrick Meek -
named honorary starter of the ING
run for something better final mile


On Sunday, January
29, Congressman
Kendrick B. Meek
joined City of Miami
Mayor Manny Diaz and
Senior Vice President
of ING Ricardo
Valencia as honorary
starters of the Final
Mile, a 1.2 mile run for
students in Miami-
Dade County Public
Middle Schools. As
part of the ING Run
For Something Better
Program, 1,200 kids
completed the last leg
of their 25 week, 26.2
mile marathon. The
children finished at the
official Finish Line of
the ING Miami
Marathon, receiving
gold medals, t-shirts,
and other items to
honor their achieve-
ment. Congressman
Meek also ran 1.2
miles with the children
in support of their
efforts to stay healthy
and physically active.
"This is a great pro-


gram to get our chil-
dren active and
healthy," Meek said.
"I was honored to run
with the participants,
and I hope all of them
will continue to take
their health and well-
ness seriously."
Meek has been a
strong advocate in
Congress for programs
that combat child obe-
sity, and promote
healthy, active
lifestyles for children.
The ING Run for
Something Better pro-
gram is a privately
funded, county-wide
program that invites
all middle schools in
Miami-Dade County
to establish a consis-
tent running program
as part of their
Physical Education
daily lesson plans.
Participating schools
and teachers encour-
age students to run
their first marathon
(26.2 miles) by run-


Congressman Kendrick B. Meek participates in the ING Miami
Children's Marathon on Sunday, January 29. The Children's
Marathon was part of the ING Run for Something Better pro-
gram, which encourages students in Miami-Dade County Schools
to to run regularly.


ning 1 mile a week
over 25 weeks culmi-
nating with the "Final
Mile" run during the
ING Miami Marathon
on the actual final


stretch of the
marathon course.
Each child who com-
pletes the program
receives a special race
t-shirt, a finisher's


medal, and other
items to celebrate their
accomplishment as
the youngest
marathoners in South
Florida.


Learning center receives computer lab


Terrell Clayton
Miami Times Writer

Many Miami-Dade
public school system
students are failing
easy assignments
and cramming long
hours at their school
attempting to receive
good grades.
Students residing in
the Liberty City
area, as well com-
munity residents in
need of computer
access for preparing
resumes or writing
business letters may
not be aware that a
state of the art com-
puter lab is in their
midst. Parents con-
cerned that there
aren't many tutoring
programs around to
assist their children
in school may con-
tact The Liberty City
Learning Center -
located on the cor-
ner of northwest
55th street and 7th
avenue.
Sam Mason the
President and Ceo of
the Liberty City
Learning Center
established the
institution in 1998
with goals of assist-
ing children in
grades kindergarten
to twelfth. "One of
our future goals is to
help adults in entre-
preneurship pro-
grams. It is impor-
tant that we have
the proper resources
to uplift the commu-
nity," said tutor
Diana Antione.
The center is
developing impor-
tant collaborations
in its attempt to
meet the communi-
ty's needs. In 2004,
Miami-Dade Carrie
Meek Entrepreneur
Center partnered
with the learning
center and the cen-
ter is now equipped
with tutors as well
as a state-of-the-art
computer lab that is
available to the com-
munity.
"I enjoy doing this
with the kids than
teaching at a school
because I get to
work one on one
with the kids. This
program is amaz-
ing," said tutor
Stroma MacDonna.
The Learning
Center has many
tutors ranging from
college students to
teachers who volun-
teer to teach chil-
dren beneficial skills
such as grammar,
spelling, math, and
science. All of the


center's services are
free.
"The kids love
using the computers
because a lot of
times they don't
have all of these
resources at home,"
MacDonna said.


Students enjoy new computers at Liberty City Learning Center.



MIAMII.


FEBRUARY 2006
COMMUNITY1VIEETING CALENDAR
Every month the Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED) hold a series of
community meetings in low-to-moderate income neighborhoods throughout the County.
These meetings allow the community to have input into activities as they relate to the plan-
ning and execution of Miami-Dade County's 5-year Consolidated Plan. At the February
meetings staff will be giving an update on the FY 2006 Action Plan and CAC's may be
making their $100,000 FY 2006 (and previous years, as applicable) CDBG allocations in
the categories of Capital Improvements, Economic Development and Housing.

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY
6 7 8 9
6:00 p.m. Dists. 4 & 5
EAST LITTLE HAVANA
CAA Building
6:30 p.m. Dist 2 858 W. Flagler ST 7:00 p.m. Dist. 9
MELROSE & PERRINE
MDTA Auditorium 7:00 p.m. Dist. 9 Perrine CAA
3300 NW 32nd Ave. GOULOS 17801 Homestead Ave
Isaac A. Withers
Community Center
21300 SW 122 Ave.

13 14 15 16

6:30 p.m. Dists. 8 & 9
LEISURE CiTYINARANJAJ 7:00 p.m. Dist. 2
PRINCETON WEST LITTLE RIVER
Naranja Neighborhood Arcola Lakes Park
Center ap lntin 1301 NW 83 ST
13955 SW 264 ST
Day


20 21 22 23
7:00 p.m. Dist. 3
MODEL CITY
Caleb Center
5400 NW 22nd Ave.,
Room 110 6:30 p.m. Dists. 1 & 13
& OPA-LOCKA
6:30 p.m. Dist 4 Job Corps.
N. MIAMI BEACH 3050 NW 183rd ST
McDonald Center
s/ 17011 NE 19th Ave.
Obhscrved &
6:30 p.m. Dists. 10,11 & 12
SWEETWATER
500 SW 109 Ave.

27 28
7:00 p.m. Dist 6 & 7
SOUTH MIAMI
HUD Senior Center
6701 SW 62nd Ave.



Multiple members of individual Community Councils may be present. Miami-Dade County
provides equal access and equal opportunity in employment and does not discriminate on
the basis of disability in its programs or services. For material in an alternate format, a sign
language interpreter or other accommodations, please call the Office of Community and
Economic Development at 305-375-3444 at least five days in advance.


CITY OF NORTH MIAMI BEACH
PUBLIC NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL MEETING
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2006

Council Conference Meeting: 41 Floor Conference Room, (TBA)
Regular City Council Meeting: 2nd Floor Council Chambers, 7:30 PM
Location: 17011 N.E. 19 Avenue, North Miami Beach

All interested parties are invited to attend this meeting.

Solomon Odenz, City Clerk
Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney

Notice: 1) Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Council with respect to any matter to be considered at this meeting, that
person shall insure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made
including all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based
(F/S 286.0105); 2) In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the Office of the City Clerk no later than four (4)
days prior to the proceedings. Telephone (305) 787-6001 for assistance; if
hearing impaired, telephone our TDD line at (305) 948-2909 for assistance.



CITY OF MIAMI


ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Sealed responses will be received by the City of Miami City Clerk at her
office located at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, FL 33133 for
the following:

RFQ NO. 05-06-021 STATE LOBBYING SERVICES

OPENING DATE: .2:00 P.M., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2006

(Deadline for Request for additional information/clarification: 2/14/06)

Detailed specifications for this request for qualifications are available upon
request at the city of Miami, Purchasing Department, 444 SW 2nd Avenue,
Sixth Floor, Miami, FL 33130 or download from City's website at
www.ci.miami.fl.us/procurement or by telephone number 305-416-1906.

THIS SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE "CONE OF SILENCE" IN
ACCORDANCE WITH CITY OF MIAMI CODE SECTION 18-74 ORDI-
NANCE NO. 12271.

Joe Arriola
City Manager
AD NO. 14329


MIAMI



INVITATION TO BID

SCOTT HOMES USHUD FLA 5-004 (H6 04)
WET DEMOLITION
SEALED BIDS for the project designated above will be received for and on behalf of Miami-Dade Couinty'by'the Clerk of the Board of
County Commissioners, Room 17-202, Stephen P. Clark, 111 NW 1 Street, Miami, Florida 33128, until 2:00 PM local time, February
28, 2006, when they will be publicly opened and read aloud by the Clerk
DEVELOPMENT NAME/ ADDRESS: SCOTT HOMES FLA 5-004
A total of thirty (30) buildings located as follows: Scott Homes Sector 11 (13 buildings) is divided in two areas Site (A) borders NW 72
Street on the North, NW 71 Street on the South, NW 22 Avenue on the East, and NW 23 Avenue on the West; (B) borders the F.E.C.
Railroad on the North, NW 72 Street on the South, NW 23 Avenue on the East, and NW 23 Court on the West; Sector III (14 buildings)
borders NW 75 Street on the North, NW 73 Street on the South, NW 23 Avenue on the East, and NW 24 Avenue on the West; and
Sector IIIA (3 buildings) on 7401 NW 23 Avenue, 7400 NW 22 Avenue, and 2201 NW 73 Street, in Miami, Florida.
BID DOCUMENTS PREPARED BY: Francisco Truiillo. R.A MDHA ...................
DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: Scott Homes Sector II is a 10.88 acre site consisting of 124 obsolete public housing units. The work
will be for the total demolition of all residential buildings in accordance with the demolition plans and specifications as prepared by the
Miami-Dade Housing Agency and in accordance with the "Work Procedures for Demolition of Asbestos-Containing Materials" and the
"Asbestos Survey Report", for Scott Homes-Sector II dated April 12, 2000 as prepared by ATC Associates, Inc. and the EBS
Engineering, Inc's Report of Results of Pre-Renovation Survey, Sampling, and Analysis for Asbestos-Containing Materials. This wet
demolition project is the final phase of the demolition for the Scott/Carver Homes HOPE VI Revitalization Program.
Scott Homes Sectors III and IIIA are a 9.75 acre site consisting of 190 obsolete public housing dwelling units. The work will be for the
total demolition of all improvements in accordance with the demolition plans and specifications as prepared by the Miami-Dade
Housing Agency and in accordance with the "Work Procedures for the Demolition of Asbestos-Containing Materials" and the
"Asbestos Survey Report", for Scott Homes Sector III dated April 12, 2000 as prepared by ATC Associates, Inc. and the EBS
Engineering, Inc's Report of Results of Pre-Renovation Survey, Sampling, and Analysis for Asbestos-Containing Materials.
COST ESTIMATE: $1,875,000.00
Bidders must hold at the time of bid submission (and maintain same throughout duration of the contract) a current valid Certificate of
General Building/Engineering issued by the State of Florida Construction Industry Licensing Board or the Miami-Dade County
Construction Trades Qualifying Board, or have a State of Florida Certified General Contractor's License.
Bidders are advised that this is a Federally-assisted project subject to Standard Federal Equal Employment Opportunity, Construction
Contract Specifications, and prevailing wage rates established by the U.S. Davis-Bacon Act. Bids (Proposals) must be submitted in a
sealed envelope or container (one original and two copies) and will be opened promptly at the time and place specified. Bids
(Proposals) received after the first Bid (Proposal) has been opened will not be considered. The responsibility for submitting a Bid
.(Proposal) to the Clqrk:0f The Board on or before the stated time and date is solely and-strictly the responsibility of the bidder. Miami
Dade County is not responsible for delays caused by any mail, package or courier service, including the U.S. Mail, or caused by any
other occurrence.
THIS BID SOLICITATION IS SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING REGULATIONS: Cone of Silence (Ordinance No. 98-106);
Clearinghouse (Resolution No. 937-97). To request a copy of any ordinance, resolution and/or Administrative Order cited in the bid
Solicitation, along with any applicable amendments thereto, the bidder must contact the Clerk or the board at 305-375-5126.
DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE: A goal for the participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises is not applicable
for the contract.
SECTION 3: This is a Section 3 covered activity. Section 3 requires that job training and employment opportunities be directed to low
and very low-income persons and contracting opportunities be directed to businesses that are owned by, or that substantially employ,
low or very low income persons.
BID GUARANTEE: This Bid Guarantee shall be in the amount of 5% of the Total Bid, and shall accompany each bid, in accordance
with Instruction to Bidders.
PERFORMANCE AND PAYMENT BOND: A 100% Performance & Payment Bond is required if the bid exceeds $100,000.
BID DOCUMENTS: The Bid Documents may be obtained from MDHA, Planning Section, 1401 NW 7 Street, Building 'C,' Miami
Florida 33125, as of February 6, 2006. Amount of $75.00 (non-refundable) per bid document set shall be charged. Checks or money
orders shall be made payable to Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners.
PRE-BID MEETING: A pre-bid meeting will be held at the jobsite, 7226 NW 22 Avenue, Miami, FL at 10:00 a.m., February 16,2006.
Attendance is strongly recommended.
The County reserves the right to waive any informalities or irregularities in any bid, or to reject any or all bids. Bids from any person,
firm, or corporation ever in default upon any agreement with the County will be rejected. Any questions by bidder shall be directed to
MDHA project manager, Pilar Ramos-Ortega at fax 305-644-5334. For Section 3 related questions, contact Margaret Hall at fax 305-
644-5394.
GEORGE BURGESS, COUNTY MANAGER HARVEY RUVIN, CLERK KAY SULLIVAN, DEPUTY CLERK






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