Group Title: Miami times.
Title: Miami Times
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028321/00047
 Material Information
Title: Miami Times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Miami times
Publisher: The Magic Printery
Place of Publication: Miami, Fla.
Publication Date: January 4, 2006
Copyright Date: 2006
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami
Coordinates: 25.787676 x -80.224145 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028321
Volume ID: VID00047
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 2264129
isbn - 0739-0319

Full Text






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One Family Serving Since 1923
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Informing Miami-Dade
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"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Provi


Record hurricane season finally ends


Tropical Storm Zeta moved
slowly westward over the cen-
tral Atlantic, posing no threat
to land.Zeta is the 27th named
storm of the 2005 hurricane
season. Zeta was expected to
begin weakening by today and
wasn't likely to become a hur-
ricane, according to the
National Hurricane Center


in Miami.
The storm developed Friday,
tying a record for the latest-
developing storm since record-
keeping began in 1851. The
2006 season officially begins
June 1, but tropical storms
that form after Jan. 1 will be
part of that tally. The first
name on the list is Alberto.


Friendship Church cleared


by IRS of political activity


In a clear case of political
intimidation by the Internal
Revenue Service, a popular 75-
year-old Liberty City church
has been cleared of "political
activity" and would not put the
non-profit tax' exemption in
jeopardy..
The allegation came during
the height of the 2004 nation-
al election when Democratic
presidential candidate,
Senator John Kerry visited
Friendship Missionary Baptist
Church at 740 NW 58th
Street. Accompanying Kerry
were Reverend Jessie Jackson,
Reverend Al Sharpton and
U.S. Representative Kendrick
Meek.
It has been a long practice in
this area for politicians to visit
Black churches during politi-
cal campaigns, and many,citi-
zens were alarmed when a let-
ter from the IRS was sent to
the church asking it to answer


certain questions.
Among the questions, the
church had to answer about
the circumstances surround-


REVEREND GASTON SMITH
Pastor Friendship Missionary Baptist

ing Kerry's appearance: Did
the pastor endorse Kerry or
oppose another presidential


candidate? Did the church
coordinate the event with the
Kerry campaign? Were contri-
butions solicited on behalf of
the campaign?
Guy Lewis, a former US
attorney for South Florida,
who is representing the
church pro bono, was glad the
IRS rightfully looked at this
and made the right determina-
tion.
Lewis explained that Kerry
was not invited to the Palm
Sunday service at the church,
"Because the church is in a
highly accessible location for
Liberty City citizens to gather
conveniently; community lead-
ers frequently attend Sunday
services and ask to be recog-
nized.
The probe began after a
Washington-based political
action committee complained
to the IRS about an October
visit to the church.


Our Kids stands its ground


By Sonia Morgan Galiana
Special to The Miami Times


The Department of Children and Families
and Miami-Dade County's privately managed
foster-care agency, Our Kids, have been at
loggerheads in recent weeks over funding for
the Independent Living program for young
adults who have aged out of the foster-care
system.
DCF's Director of Communication, Flora


Beal, said the state-run
organization has
assembled a review
team, which will be
looking over the individ-
ual files of the young
adults benefiting from
the Independent Living HOOD
program to verify eligi-
bility. Additionally, this team will be reviewing
Please turn to OUR KIDS 6A


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From Rosa Parks, whose defiant act on a bus
in 1955 changed U.S. race relations, to Richard
Pryor, groundbreaking comedian known for his
raunchy stand-up comedy, the world mourned
many luminaries in 2005


Rosa Parks was called the
mother of the civil rights move-
ment for refusing to give her
bus seat to a white man in
Montgomery, Ala., on
Dec. 1, 1955.
Her quiet act of defiance and


subsequent arrest for violating
the city's racial segregation
laws led to a historic 381-day
boycott of Montgomery's buses.
She was simply tired not
from her day's work as a seam-
stress but from the disrespect


PAK.K UAVIS
and injustice that had plagued
African-Americans.
Parks died of natural causes
Oct. 24 at the age of 92, five
weeks shy of the 50th anniver-
sary of her arrest for telling a
bus driver in Montgomery that


PRYOR


RUSSELL


she would not stand so that a
white man could sit on a
crowded bus.
That action became a semi-
nal moment in U.S. history,
sparking the bus boycott and
prompting a legal assault that


VANDROSS SHORT
knocked down Jim Crow laws
in the South. When the U.S.
Supreme Court decreed an end
to segregation on
Montgomery's buses, the mod-
ern civil rights movement was
launched.


THE ARTS
Clarence "Gatemouth"
Brown, 81, singer and guitarist
who built a 50-year career
playing blues, country, jazz
and Cajun music. Lung cancer
and heart disease, Sept. 10.
Ossie Davis, 87, whose rich
baritone and elegant, unshak-
able bearing made him a giant
of the stage, screen and the
civil rights movement often
with his wife, Ruby Dee.
Natural causes, Feb. 4.
Shirley Horn, 71, jazz
pianist and vocalist who got
her start opening for Miles
Please turn to LUMINARIES 6A


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Black churches waking up

T he Black church is the seat of political and econom-
ic power of the Black community. You have probably
heard this statement many times before, but now a
group of churches in our community are once again rallying
behind this time honored phrase and vowing to practice
what they preach.
Some members of our churches seem to be asking for a
more progressive and meaningful leadership in our religious
institutions. Some questions being asked today in our
churches may not be of a religious nature, but are equally
important. What are we doing to remedy the lack of afford-
able housing? Why aren't churches funding and encourag-
ing business development among its members? Why don't
we have more charter schools? Why don't we have more
credit unions?
These ideas might seem out of the ordinary for the average
Black church, but translate the motto on the mast head of
this newspaper and you will get the meaning.
No longer are church members merely satisfied with the
preachers saving their souls; but what about their homes'
mortgages? Where will our members live when they become
senior citizens if no affordable housing is available?
We commend the progressive members of our religious
community who feel that it is time for our churches to make
a more meaningful contribution to the welfare of those who
live here and support our churches. Many churches are
actively involved in projects that help to improve the lives of
our people.
The recent announcement that 30 South Florida ministers,
calling themselves the Collective Banking Group, are inviting
several local banks to join them in a "Community Covenant
for Economic Development" is one of the best ideas to come
along lately. The program, open to only church members,
will focus on helping residents in Black communities includ-
ing Overtown, Allapattah, Liberty City and Fort Lauderdale.
The aim is to use the same forces that enabled the church
to bring about the civil rights movement, to economically
empower the Black community. Let us not forget that the
Black Church and the Black Press are the only economic
institutions we control.
The preliminary discussions about the aims and objectives
of these organizations are laudable, but the proof of the pud-
ding and the success of its efforts will be known when we
determine if these churches have made meaningful contri-
butions to improve the lives of the people in our communi-
ties.
We will be watching.


We must ensure that

Christmas stays in our hearts
Three years ago America was amazed to hear about the stories
of two ordinary citizens who gave extraordinary gifts to the
world, Matel Dawson and Ms. Osceola McCarty. Their stories are
even memorable given the untold suffering so many faced in
2005.
First, there was Matel Dawson Jr., a blue-collar worker at Ford
Motor Company in Detroit, who since 1939 lived in a small one
bedroom one apartment in nearby Highland Park, Michigan. He
was 81.
Outwardly, Matel Dawson wore the trappings of an ordinary
person: Racial segregation had forced him from the South with-
out a high school diploma. He worked for Ford in a series of blue-
collar skilled jobs. He lived frugally, and drove modest cars -
always Fords, of course.
But Matel Dawson was a wealthy man, having amassed during
his career a great deal of money through frugal living and wise
investments; and during the last decade or so of his life, he pro-
ceeded to give great chunks of his wealth away. He gave
$680,000 to Detroit's Wayne State University, and $300,000 to


Marc H.s Mrial

"... Unemployment remains high especial-
ly for the most disadvantaged. Even more
have joined the ranks of the jobless and poten-
tially homeless as temporary housing for
many Katrina victims will soon go away ...

Louisiana State University. He gave $240,000 to the United
Negro College Fund, and thousands more to his church and
other churches, to community colleges, and to civil rights organ-
izations.
In 2002, his was honored by the White House, and received the
annual Community Service Award of the National Urban League.
But let's be clear about what we all were honoring. It was not
Matel Dawson's financial acumen and his horde of money. What
we were honoring was his wealth of spirit, his generosity.
Matel Dawson came to the nation's attention after the late
Osceola McCarty, who had been a laundress and seamstress
most of her life, had captured the nation's admiration for giving,
huge sums of her meticulously amassed savings to higher edu-
cation in her native Mississippi and elsewhere.
If Charles Dickens' classic tale, A Christmas Carol, is part of
your obligatory reading this time of year, you might say that
Matel Dawson and Osceola McCarty were individuals who knew
how to keep Christmas.
In the 19th-century story that knowledge is what signals the
redemption of its central character, the financier Ebenezer
Scrooge, who pledges after a Christmas Eve-night of visitations
from the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, that "I
will know Christmas in my heart."
"To know Christmas in our hearts." That is the pledge we in
the modern world must make continually.
By Christmas, of course, I mean not the Christian holiday per
se, but the spirit it brings to mind of compassion toward the
needy, and of good will toward our fellow' human beings that
is to be found in other religions as well, and which, beyond its
connection to religious sentiment, is the core of human beings'
humanity.
That commitment to compassion is more necessary than ever
today as millions of people are adrift in an America.
Unemployment remains high especially for the most disadvan-


taged. Even more have joined the ranks of the jobless and poten-
tially homeless as temporary housing for many Katrina victims
will soon go away. These challenges are the "human element"
that so gripped the nation's attention and compassion earlier
this Fall may now have waned somewhat.
But, we must not forget. As reported in this column weeks ago
and reiterated by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a
progressive Washington, D.C. think tank, nearly 250,000
wrecked businesses have applied to the federal Small Business
Administration for loans; 150,000 evacuees remain housed in
hotel rooms around the country, wholly dependent upon the fed-
eral government to pay their hotel bills (having recently gained a
reprieve from the cut-off of such federal support until January
7); and roughly 25 percent of evacuees who lost their jobs
because of the storm remain unemployed.


Thte %Jltamt ,i mes
(ISSN 0739-0319)
Published Weekly at 900 NW 54th Street,
Miami, Florida 33 127- IXI
Post Office Box 270200
Buena Vista Station, Miami, Florida 33127
Phone 305- 694-62 10

H.E.SIGISMUND REEVES, Founder, 1923-1968
GARTH C. REEVES,.IR., Editor, 1972-1982

GARTH C. REEVES, SR., Publisher Emeritus
RACHEL J. REEVES, Publisher and Chairmain

Ap


Late Christmas night,
Charlotte Purvis, the oldest of
my three sisters, had me laugh-
ing out of control at Mama's
house in Augusta, Ga. I have
reminded Charlotte far more
times than she probably cares
to count, of how she came to be
the sister that stole Christmas.
Briefly, when we were kids,
Charlotte told Mama that she
didn't believe in Santa Claus.
Although Charlotte is four
years younger, I cringed the
moment she uttered those fatal
words. Mama said that if she
didn't believe in Santa, he
wouldn't have to bring her any
more toys. I qUickly informed
Mama that I still believed in the
Fat Guy because I didn't want
my annual toy supply cut
short. When were alone, I told
Charlotte that as smart as she
was she had skipped the
first grade that was not a


smart move.
We've had running conversa-
tions about that incident over
the years, but Charlotte decid-
ed to pay me back this year. I
was sitting at the kitchen table


the lungs of the poor by saying
that race should not be an
issue in the battle against
toxic pollution, and that it will
protect all groups against
environmental damage. The
Bush record shows that it has
done just the opposite.


Member of National Newspapikii&liKlNI1r 'sYi1'i nin)'' t'a"'
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Periodicals Postlaf, tljiaillat Pllii, t
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Miami Times, P.O. S6:St(W(V-t() ,''"?t'
Buena Vista Station, Miami, P1t: jF 27 ~t -62 14 ,..J.l M

Credo of the Black Press
The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world I'rolm raIcia aand national
inlat0Inisi when i accords (o1 every person, regardless o' Iracc, creed or color., his or her
human and legal rights. Haling no person. I aleing no pierson, lthe Black Press strives to help
every person in the illl belief rl that all persons are hil I7.1l as lo itng as anyone is held hack.


N-n~wpaprr
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Bll


trollably. And because of our
history, her skit needed no
explanation. When I finally
stopped laughing, I was
exhausted.
It had been that kind of


. .Briefly, when we were kids,
Charlotte told Mama that she didn't believe
in Santa Claus. Although Charlotte is four
years younger, I cringed the moment she
uttered those fatal words . "


when she entered the room
with her red Santa bag and
jumping on one foot, yelling
"Ho, ho, ho, Merry Christmas."
Seeing Sister No. 1, as she likes
to call herself, hopping on one
foot and pretending to be Santa
Claus had me laughing uncon-


evening we're always crack-
ing jokes, imitating relatives
and recounting fond memories
when we get together during
holidays and we had migrat-
ed to the living room when the
phone rang at 10 minutes to
midnight. Mama answered it


severe health hazard. Despite
the severe health risks that
toxic damage poses in these
neighborhoods, the residents
have gotten very little atten-
tion or support from environ-
mental groups. But the fight
against environmental racism


"Merry Christmas" and discov-
ered that Sara, an ex-wife of my
youngest uncle, Jesse Harris,
was on the other end. When
Mama mentioned that I was
visiting, she asked to speak to
me. When I- picked up the
phone, she greeted me and got
directly to the point: "Your
Uncle Jesse died this morning
in Birmingham." I don't
remember what else she said
because I ran from the room,
sobbing, "No, no, no." Everyone
knew from my reaction that
Uncle Padna, as we called him,
had died. That side of the fami-
ly had gone without a death in
the inner circle for more than
three decades. Now, this was
the third one in three years:
Aunt Kat, Uncle Percy and now
Uncle Padna.
We made a few key late night
calls and followed those up
Please turn to CURRY 7A


The top ten stories of 2006


Columnists are endowed with
the gift of perfect clairvoyance,
so here are a few predictions for
2006 each guaranteed to be
at least as accurate as George
Tenet's "slam-dunk" intelli-
gence about Iraq:
(1) George W. Bush will con-
tinue his bid to enter the
Guinness Book of World
Records for "Most Frequent Use
of the Blame-the-Messenger
Strategy (Modern Era)." We saw
the latest example recently
when the administration react-
ed to disclosure of its vast
domestic surveillance program
by launching a Justice
Department investigation -
not to reexamine the electronic
spying itself, which: seems to
violate the law, but to identify.
the whistle-blower who brought
this practice to light. Next tar-
get: Who's leaking all that
unhelpful news from Iraq, such
as figures on American casual-
ties and reports of torture by
U.S.-trained Iraqi police?
(2) The administration will
see steady "progress" in Iraq,
even if the new government's
first act is to sign a friendship


pact with Iran. This "progress"
will allow some U.S. troops to
be brought home in the sum-
mer and fall. Unfortunately,
they will have to be sent right
back to Iraq in mid-November,
after the midterm election. But
who could have foreseen that?
(3) Congress will soldier on in


plication. The only duty of
Congress is to spend money as
fast as the Chinese will lend it
to us.
(4) Whenever she's asked,
Condoleezza Rice will deny
she's even thinking about run-
ning for president. But when
reporters get back to the office


"... Fox News Channel, having had such
success inventing and then covering last
month's imaginary "war on Christmas,"
will go on to concoct imaginary "wars"
against other holidays ... .-;. .


its brave attempt to spend and
collect publi Rfunds without the
use of a pocket calculator. It
seems that whenever a senator
or representative tries to bring
one of those devices into the
Capitol, it gets confiscated at
the door. It's wartime, and sim-
ple addition can be a security
risk to say nothing of multi-


and review their notes, they'll
discover that the door was left
open just a crack that she
said "I don't want to" run, not "I
won't." Meanwhile, Rice will
discover that solving the
world's crises somehow
requires taking quite a few
domestic trips, a la her recent
homecoming tour of Alabama.


Photogenic little children,
American flags and miles of
campaign-style bunting will
magically appear whenever the
cameras are rolling.
(5) Hillary Clinton will also
deny that she's running for
president at least until she
gets reelected to the Senate.
But all the while, she will slog
ahead on her epic rightward
march, reinforcing her change
of allegiance in the Culture
War. When her support for a
bill to outlaw flag-burning fails
to soften the hearts of the most
adamant Hillary-haters, she
may have to go all the way and
announce she intends to honor
oui. troops in Iraq by baking a;
batch of cookies for each and
every.,brave unit.
(6) Many other potential can-
didates will not deny they are
running for president in 2008.
In fact, anyone who might need
to travel to New Hampshire or
Iowa any time in the next two
years should book now,
because flights and hotel rooms
are filling up. Of all these hope-
fuls, though, only John McCain
Please turn to ROBINSON 5A


What about the quality of justice from Blacks?


As I looked at the Black
superintendent of police in
New Orleans, Warren Riley, on
television recently justifying
the killing of a Black man on
the streets of the city by his
police force (perhaps by bullets
fired by a Black policeman
among the three) I knew that
this was not a result for which
the civil rights movement was
fought.
For some time, a major goal
of the movement has been to
obtain more police, more
judges, more of everything in
the hope that the quality of
justice for Blacks would
improve, but it doesn't seem to
have made much difference.
This hints at the failure of
many Blacks who have become
law enforcement professionals
to take the civil rights move-
ment inside the institution
with them.
Looking through a number of


Web sites and statistical
sources, it is difficult to say
whether police killings of
Blacks is rising or falling. But.
the facts gathered by INQUEST
show that reported police
shootings reached a peak of
400 in 2001 and dropped to


ters with police, a rate of twice
that of Whites. The growth of
violent incidents have
appeared all over the country,
in Cincinnati, Ohio, New York
City, several cities on the West
Coast, Florida, and repeatedly
in New Orleans.


"... Are Black police officers part of the
solution in these cases, or are they firing
their weapons at the same rate, trying to
fit into an often violent, racist police cul-
ture. . "


200 per year in each succes-
sive year thereafter.
Nevertheless, these killings
involve Blacks and Hispanics
disproportionately, and 57 per-
cent of them reported in 2001
that they have violent encoun-


Are Black police officers part
of the solution in these cases,
or are they firing their weapons
at the same rate, trying to fit
into an often violent, racist
police culture. And even where
Blacks are leaders, have they


adopted that culture as a way
of insuring their mobility in the
system?
Ostensibly, they have some
weapons, both in the law and
in the principles that should
govern police conduct. For
example, the U. S. Department
of Justice guidelines on
"Principles of Good Policing"
which focus on avoiding violent
encounters, suggests that
police culture is clearly a prob-
lem and recommends that
police departments adopt a set
of values that discourage the
use of force. One of those is
that "the police department
places it highest value on the
preservation of human life."
But the repeated use of deadly
force has been criticized by the
National Black Police Officers
Association, headed by Ron
Hampton, and the National
Association of Black Law
Please turn to WALTERS 9A


Bush assures more dirty air for Blacks


Environmentalists hit the
roof in 2002 when President
Bush announced his Clean
Sky Initiative. The initiative
would not clean the skies but
dirty them further. It would
allow corporations to dump
tons more toxic pollutants in
the air, delay or exempt
enforcement of smog and soot
pollution standards, and gut
EPA pollution enforcement
powers. Though the initiative
is stalled in Congress, Bush
did an end around and used
an administrative order to
weaken enforcement.
That virtually assures that
Blacks, especially poor
Blacks, will breathe dirtier air.
This has had dire health con-
sequences. The Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention has repeatedly
warned that Blacks are more
likely to live in neighborhoods


with higher air pollution levels
and suffer higher rates of res-
piratory and blood ailments
than whites, and suffer more
deaths. The Bush administra-
tion defends its contempt for


A recent Associated Press
survey of government data
found that in 19 states Blacks
were more than twice as likely
as whites to live in neighbor-
hoods where pollution posed a


is a civil rights battle, and a
fight to save Black lives. That
battle should fully engage civil
rights and environmental
groups. Black residents in
some cities have screamed
just as loudly as white, middle
class homeowners and urban
conservationists about hacked
up parkland, toxic dump
sites, waste incinerators,
garbage dumps, recycling cen-
ters, contaminated sewage
sites, and power plants in
their backyard. They label this
racially-warped policy,
"PIBBY" or, put it in Blacks
backyard.
In 1979, Houston city offi-
cials tried to dump yet anoth-
er toxic waste site in a Black
neighborhood. This time the
homeowners and residents
fought back. They filed and
won the first major lawsuit
Please turn to HUTCHINSON 7A


Losing a generation of relatives


"... A recent Associated Press survey of
government data found that in 19 states
blacks were more than twice as likely as
i whites to live in neighborhoods where pol-
lution posed a severe health hazard... "


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


2A The Miami Times Ja 6


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OPINION


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006 3A


4D ob &


Sl-t "Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers"


Rapist took advantage


of lax policy


By Joyce Cohen
Special to The Miami Times

It appears that the rapist
took advantage of lax policy or
practice in the Miami-Dade
Corrections and
Rehabilitations Facility,
MDCR, to acquire and utilize
bed linens in his daring
escape. The alleged serial
rapist escaped by tying togeth-
er multiple sheets and fash-
ioning them into ropes after he
gained access to the vent that
led him to roof. Reynaldo E.
Rapalo and another prisoner
then rappelled several stories
down to the ground of the high
security Turner Guilford
Knight Correctional Facility.
In March 2005, three
employees of the MDCR sent a
proposal through the
Employee Dade Suggestion
Program entitled, Expenditure
Reduction Proposal. Their pro-
posal documented problems
that in hindsight seems almost
prophetic. The proposal states
that inmates were k"'ping
linens and using them as
weapons, to transfer items
between inmates, as ropes to
use in escapes and as curtains
to prevent guards from seeing


way with ropes and in both
attempts hack saws were
used. Hall, says that she
cannot confirm the hacksaw
allegations nor the number of
sheets used during Rapalo's
escape. All of those details are
a "part of the investigation that
is not concluded and that the
Miami-Dade Police
Department is the lead on the
investigation." There is anoth-
er incident report that docu-
mented a December 1 event of
Inmates using strips of sheets
to "open the latches on their
outer cell doors." This inci-
dent was discovered during a
security check.
On September 29, Vickers
emailed Jackie Berry regarding
the proposal. In the email
Vickers asked, "Is the Director
aware of this suggestion?" On
November 4, Vickers again
inquired via email about the
status of the proposal. In sub-
sequent emails from .Berry
November 4 and November 8,
Berry replied that the delay in
the evaluation of the proposal
was due to Wilma and that the
proposal evaluation would be
sent to the Director by the end
of the week. Wilma occurred
on October 23, nearly 7


Corrections failed to heed warnings


their illegal activities. The pro-
posal identified as ESP #
251127 lingered in the sugges-
tion program despite numer-
ous attempts by its submitters
to determine if it was going to
be rejected, accepted or
ignored. The proposal's sub-
mitters are corrections offi-
cers who saw their suggestion
as a practical money-saving
and safety improvement factor
for MDCR. According to their
proposal, the ideas of linen
accountability could be imple-
mented without any additional
costs using existing MDCR
technology.
The focus of the proposal's
submitters was the failure of
the current system to account
for bedding. That failure is a
security and safety issue and
leads to the waste of county
resources including mattress-
es, blankets, sheets and tow-
els, items that are costly for
MDCR to replace. They allege
in their proposal that MDCR
could save over a million dol-
lars by making inmates
accountable for intentional
destruction and provide safe-
guards to prevent destruction,
misuse and loss.
The proposal's submitters
are Deroda Bennett, Tony
Vickers and Desi Daniels.
Daniels and Bennett work at
the pre-trial detention center
and Tony Vickers is Executive
Director of the Security and
Internal Affairs Bureau. All
three are MDCR Lieutenants.
In October 2005, there were
two attempted escapes from
the corrections facility at 1321
N. W. 13th Street that were
confirmed by Jennelle Hall,
Public Information Officer for
MDCR. It is alleged that in
one attempt, the inmate
reached the roof. In the sec-
ond attempt, inmates were
caught on the 6th floor walk-


months after the proposal was
submitted.
After Rapalo escaped,
Vickers sent the Director of
MDCR the proposal that he
and the other two officers
wrote to address the lack of
bedding accountability.
According to MDCR Director,
Charles McRay, the "acquisi-
tion of extra sheets by Rapalo
was not due to policy failure"
but a question of "how practice
matches policy." With regard
to the proposal from the cor-
rections officers, McRay says
that there was feedback given
to the officers and MDCR did
make a determination that the
proposal as written was not
"feasible to pursue because the
current policy addresses the
extra linen" issue. There is a
memo from Captain Susan
Kronberg, Facility Supervisor,
regarding linen exchange at
the Pre-Trial Detention
Center. That memorandum
dated October 23 requires all
inmates to turn in their linen.
McRay acknowledged that
there has been a "delay in
MDCR's formal response" to
the proposal. He said the
department evaluated the pro-
posal earlier but the steps in
the approval process" take a
long time. Further McRay
says the "MDCR's analysis did
not find the savings claimed in
the proposal valid and that the
bedding accountability "issues
are not as simple as por-
trayed."
Vickers also forwarded a
copy of the proposal to George
Burgess, County Manager.
According to Vickie Mallette,
the Communications Director
for Miami-Dade County Mayor,
Carlos Alvarez, "the Mayor is
out of the country but had said
previously in response to the
ongoing investigation of
Please turn to COHEN 7A


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The Miami Times welcomes and encourages letters on its editorial commentaries as well as all other material in the newspaper. Such feedback
makes for a healthy dialogue among our readership and the community.
Letters must, however, be brief and to the point. All letters must be signed and must include the name, address and telephone number of the
writer. For purposes of confirming authorship. Send letters to: Letters to the Editor, The Miami Times, 900 N.W. 54th Street, Miami, FL 33127,
or fax them to 305-757-5770; Email: mwilliams@miamitimesonline.com.


.


. .


-


LJrCIH! LIIdL L111i il aoui LU Uc











4A Th Mi i Ti s Janua 6


Hall-Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary
1900 NW 54TH STREET* MIAMI, FLORIDA 33142
For 31 years we have Served this community
with integrity and compassion

N Y'lR I ME OFI NIEED I)

C(A\I-. I-T E F I 1 NER AL H C) IIOME11


T IA T (ARS\


Milton A. Hall I
"1993 Mortician of the Year"


Tony E. Ferguson
"2003 Mortician of the Year"


Happy Birthday


In loving memory of,


CHARLES W. EDGECOMB
01/04/25 12/22/03
In Memoriam
In loving memory of,


44


SGT. DENISE L. ERA i
10/22/68 01/05/97a
It's been nine year's' 'inc'the
Lord needed an Angel.
To those who love and miss
you it seems just like yesterday.
Niecy we love you, but Jesus
loves you best.
The Era Family


Hard to believe it's been
two years since you were
called home. To this world
you were just one person,
but to the family you were
the world.
We miss you each day and
keep you in our hearts and
thoughts always. 'Till we
meet again, may God hold
you in the palm of His hand.
You are truly missed.
From the Turner,
Jeffersons, nephew, nieces,
devoted friend and family.

In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


; OTHONY V. BAKER
Ai aka 'TOO TALL'


11/23/71 01/08/03
It's been two years since you
been gone. We miss and love
you.
Mom and the family.


Seminary degree studies at Second Canaan


Jacksonville Theological
Seminary announces continu-
ing studies at our Miami Liberty
City Campus on the premises at
Second Canaan Missionary
Baptist Church located at 4343
N.W. 17 Avenue in Miami.
We are an accredited Seminary
offering Associate, Bachelors,
Masters and Doctorate degrees.
Systematic Theology classes
began at Second Canaan M.B.
Church in August 2005 and a
new course is taught each
month. The best is yet to come
in 2006.

Happy New Year from
Crusade for Christ


Bishop Larry R. and
Pastor Carolyn Washington
Bishop Larry R. Washington
and Pastor Carolyn
Washington would like to wish
our family, congregation and
friends a Happy and
Prosperous New Year.

Happy Birthday

To our son, brother and father,


ALVIN D. WHITE


01/04/59 06/14/04
Although you are gone, you
know that you continue to live
within our hearts. With you
being the missing link in our
chain, we finally realize that,
"WE ALL WE GOT!"


When it Matters

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Integrity Honor Respect



The top ten stories of 2006


ROBINSON
continued from 2A
will gain any real traction. The
White House will attempt to
seem pleased by this develop-
ment.
(7) Any and all of the above
will be driven from the public
consciousness, or at least
crowded off the cable television
news shows, by an engrossing,
ratings-boosting saga: An
attractive young white woman
will vanish.
(8) Fox News Channel, having
had such success inventing and
then covering last month's imag-
Inary "war on Christmas," will go


on to concoct imaginary "wars"
against other holidays. A "war
on Easter" would be too obvious
and a "war on Independence
Day" too easy, so here's a chal-
lenge'to my talented friends at
Fox: Come up with a "war on
Labor Day." It sounds tough,
since organized labor isn't a nat-
ural Fox constituency, but
maybe there's a way to work in
the illegal immigration issue, or
examine how the practice of out-
sourcing jobs robs Americans of
employment opportunities.
(9) When the summer hurri-
canes come to batter Florida and
wipe out what little progress has
been made on rebuilding the


Gulf Coast, the president will
give a bold speech full of noble
promises. Evacuees from
Hurricane Katrina, still in their
cramped trailers and temporary
apartments, will not applaud.
(10) Americans will suddenly
wake up and question the Bush
administration about Iraq,
about domestic spying, about
global warming, about tax cuts.
But just then, as the president
fumbles for answers, a com-
pelling news event will steal
away the nation's attention.
Hard to believe, but another
attractive young white woman
will vanish.
eugenerobinson(itwashpost.com


Contact Dr. Arnold J. Kelly at
305-633-4639 or 305-638-
1789, for more detailed informa-
tion and registration. You will be
blessed. Abiding under the
shadow of the Almighty.


Apostolic Revival

Center back to the

Mother Land


Dr. and Mrs. G.S. Smith
Dr. and Mrs. G. S. Smith and
the Apostolic Revival Center
family invite you on a trip of a
life time 11 wonderful days to
Nairobi Kenya, and Cairo
Egypt, from June 19 to June
29, 2006, for more information
and brochure call 305-891-
3570. Space is very limited.


The Beacon Council
li'0 !l lf lNdef ft'w i M ia l
0~iol Oi80000 Und;i~r~i


Division Chief Hope Gibbs

celebrates several 'firsts'
Citing nearly 20 years of
exemplary service to the Coral
Gables Fire Department. Fire
Chief Richard Cook recently
promoted Lt. Hope Simmons
Gibbs to Division Chief, making
her the first woman and first
Black to attain Chief Fire
Officer rank within the
Department.
Division Chief Gibbs set
another 'first' when she was
hired 18 years ago, becoming
the first female and the first
Black firefighter in Coral
Gables.
The City congratulates Hope Gibbs
Division Chief Gibbs for this Dvision Chief
well-deserved recognition.
Her father, Ulysses (Rocky) the best Christmas presents he
Simmons, says this was one of has ever received.

Ordination service at Healing Place
On Sunday, January 8 at 4
p.m. Pastor Lionel S. Reckley
and the congregation of
Healing Place Ministries
invites the community to come
out and join us as we ordain
Reverend Alvin C. Lee, Sr. to
the service of the Lord.
The church is located at 1006
NE 215th Street. For more
information, please call 305-
650-9191.
Rev. Alvin C. Lee, Sr.


Are you a small business owner or aspiring
entrepreneur? Expanding your business? Need
guidance? The Beacon Council, Miami-Dade
County's official economic development partner-
ship and the Miami-Dade County Enterprise
Community Center (ECC) can provide you with
information you need to get started.

The Beacon Council, working closely with
the Miami-Dade Empowerment Trust and other
partners, hosts free business assistance work-
shops around the county to meet with busi-
nesses and identify their needs.

Following the workshops, The Beacon
Council can individually refer businesses to the
appropriate organization for targeted assistance.
One of our many sources for business start-ups
is the ECC, a division of the Miami-Dade
Empowerment Trust.

The ECC is based on the One Stop Capital
Shop concept, whereby a small business owner
or aspiring entrepreneur can find a grouping of
business development services under one roof.

The ECC coordinates the services available
by linking the small business owners to profes-
sional consultants according to the specific
needs of the business owner or entrepreneur.
The coordination of resources maximizes the
services to residents of Miami-Dade County with
the objective of furthering economic growth and
development.

The ECC is an information center that hous-
es a Small Business Resource Center, a network
of service providers, and a Resource Center
Library which provides access to free Internet
for business research, hard copy resources,
databases, computer software and systems and
other business assistance literature.


Services include business counseling,
seminars, workshops and training. The ECC
technical assistance consultants provide
information leading to the start-up and for-
mation of a business from idea to reality by
delivering the following: business plans
* feasibility studies market studies market
strategies loan packages access to finan-
cial resources franchise opportunities
* franchise development incorporations
* financial projections contract preparation
* bid and procurement preparation disad-
vantaged business certifications manage-
ment plans and strategies leadership man-
agement new product/idea development
site potential evaluation acquisition feasibili-
ty analysis financial analysis business
budget planning business credit reviews
* commercial real estate financing reverse
mortgages equity lines of credit.

The combined experience of the ECC and
their business consultants is available to the
general public by attending free business sem-
inars on topics important to both emerging and
expanding businesses. You may visit, the ECC
on the Web at www.miamidade.gov/ced

Keep reading The Miami Times. Next week,
The Beacon Council will have more information
to help you get your business started.

CONTACT THE ECC

The Miami-Dade County
Enterprise Community Center
Adriana Diaz-Masvidal
Manager
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 201
Miami, Fl 33137
Contact: 305-579-2730
Adriana@miamidade.gov


MIAMI*
0m


,W'git tunfE at Jaetom JiMx


15332 NW 7th Avenue Miami, Florida 33169
Office: 305-688-2030 Fax: 305-688-2293
Kimberly B, White L.ED.
______


Starting a New Business in the New Year?

The Beacon Council and the Enterprise Community Center can help get you started


MAKE IT MIAMI
maml d d oounty


The Beacon Council
The Beacon Council, Miami-Dade County's official economic development partnership, is a not-for-
profit, public-private organization that focuses on job creation and economic growth by coordinating
community-wide programs; promoting minority business and urban economic revitalization;.provid-
ing assistance to local businesses in their expansion efforts; and marketing Miami-Dade' County
throughout the world.
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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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6A The Miami Times, January
,


The world mourned many luminaries in 2005 m


LUMINARIES
continued from 1A

Davis and became revered as a
master interpreter of American
standards. Long illness, Oct. 20.
Richard Pryor, 65, ground-
breaking comedian known for
his raunchy stand-up comedy
and a variety of acting roles in
almost 40 films. Heart attack,
Dec. 10.
John Raitt, 88, robust bari-
tone who created the role of Billy
Bigelow in the original New York
production of Carousel and was
the father of singer Bonnie Raitt.
Pneumonia, Feb. 20.
Nipsey Russell, 80, who
played Tinman in The Wiz as
part of a decades-long career in
stage, television and film.
Cancer, Oct. 2.
Bobby Short, 80, tuxedoed
cabaret singer who was the
embodiment of New York style
and sophistication while a fix-
ture at his piano in the Carlyle


Hotel for more than 35 years.
Leukemia, March 21.
Jimmy Smith, 79, jazz organ-
ist who is considered a pioneer
for transforming the organ into a
jazz instrument. Smith ruled the
Hammond B-3 organ in the
1950s and 1960s, fusing R&B,
blues and gospel influences with
bebop references. Natural caus-
es, Feb. 8.
Luther Vandross, 54, R&B
singer who personified style and
class on stage and whose voice,
arrangements and extravagant
sets left audiences in rapt silence.
Rapper LL Cool J once described
him as "the Frank Sinatra of
Black music." Complications
from a stroke, July.1.
August Wilson, 60, Tony
Award-winning playwright who
fashioned his tales of the Black
struggle in 20th-century America
into a monumental 10-play cycle.
Among his plays were Fences, his
biggest Broadway hit, and The
Piano Lesson. Liver cancer, Oct. 2.


LAW AND POLITICS
Shirley Chisholm, 80, first
Black woman elected to Congress
and an advocate for women and
minorities during her seven
terms in the House of
Representatives. Cause not
released, Jan. 1.
Johnnie Cochran, 67, whose
legal career representing victims
of police abuse and celebrities in
peril converged under the media
glare in 1995 when he success-
fully defended O.J. Simpson from
murder charges. Brain tumor,
March 29.
Constance Baker Motley, 84,
federal judge who as a young
lawyer represented Martin
Luther King Jr. and played a piv-
otal role in the nation's civil rights
struggle. In 1966 she became the
first Black woman appointed to
the federal bench. Congestive
heart failure, Sept. 28.

LITERATURE AND MEDIA
John H. Johnson, 87, pub-


lisher whose Ebony and Jet
magazines countered stereotypi-
cal coverage of Blacks after
World War II and turned him
into one of the most influential
Black leaders in America.
Heart failure, Aug. 8.

OTHER
James Forman, 76, civil
rights pioneer credited with
organizing the Student Non-
violent Coordinating
Committee. He participated in
the "Freedom Rides" in which
Blacks rode across the South
as a way to make sure buses
were integrated as ordered by
the courts. Colon cancer, Jan.
10.
Clarence 'Big House' Gains,
81, who with 828 wins at
Winston Salem State is sixth on
the NCAA basketball career
coaching wins list. In 1967 he led
the Rams to an NCAA champi-,
onship. Complications related to
a stroke, April 18.


DCF assembles review team


OUR KIDS
continued from 1A

the budget and the allocation to
see if there are any surpluses
which could be channeled into
this program.
The ongoing battle between
the two organizations is riddled
with disagreements over the
contract, threats of a lawsuit
from Our Kids and DCF's with-
holding of $8 million needed to
fund the Independent Living
program in Miami-Dade and
Monroe Counties. Our Kids
maintains that the contract
signed with DCF stipulates that
Our Kids is not responsible to
raise these funds, nor should
the funding of the Independent
Living program come from its
$75 million budget.
Fran Allegra, Vice President of
Operations said "Our Kids
stance is that our contract is
very clear. The funding [for the
Independent Living program]


goes directly to the children and
was never in our contract. Our
responsibility under the con-
tract is to ensure that children
receive services and that we
make decisions concerning
their eligibility in the Road to
Independence program."
According to Allegra, "Our
Kids will continue to provide
these services until both parties
can come to some agreement as
to the funding."
The issue of funding arose
because DCF budgeted for
about 400 former foster kids
that would qualify this year,
while Our Kids found an excess
of 250 more kids eligible for up
to $16,692 in annual assistance
while they attend school and
transition into adults. Our Kids
requested more funds for the
extra 250 who were eligible, but
DCF District 11 Zone
Administrator, Charles Hood
recommended the agency use
funds from its $75 million


(which is allotted for foster care
and adoption programs), raise
private funding, reduce the eli-
gibility list or drop those who
qualify for financial aid services.
When asked why Our Kids
does not employ fundraising as
a means of subsidizing the
Independent Living fund,
Allegra said, "Fundraising is
best utilized for non-recurring
projects, for example to buy
computers, clothing, or hosting
an event. If you raise funds for a
recurring program, what do you
do when the funding is not
there?" Additionally, she said
"funders are reluctant to pro-
vide funding that is a state
responsibility. For example The
Children's Trust has a very
strict policy about funding
[what are supposed to bel state
funded projects."
Beal told The Miami Times
that the 19 other Community
Based Care agencies do
fundraising to subsidize some


of their programs. But Allegra
said, "I have spoken with many
of the agencies and not one of
them suggested that an $8 mil-
lion deficit can be bridged by
fundraising." Allegra said there
was no ambiguity in the con-
tract and therefore it is the
responsibility of the state-run
DCF to come up with the prop-
er funding. "Contractually we
believe the situation is very
clear and it has always been
the department's responsibili-
ty."
Our Kids is concerned that if
these benefits are taken away
from these young adults who
have no families to assist them,
they may end up on the streets.
The DCF Administrator said,
"The Department is committed
to assisting young adults par-
ticipating in the Independent
Living program and will con-
tinue to work cooperatively
with Our Kids to resolve these
challenges."


TiM p nkl MakeP" hu ti. Jupul I*aMJ


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


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MIAMI-AD


PUBLIC NOTICE
CORRECTION


TOWNAL
ARE AREEVLOPEN

PLANNN


DATE:
TIME:
PLAC
E:


Tuesday, January 10th, 2006
6:00 P.M.
THE WEST PERRINE CAA BUILDING,
LOCATED AT 17801 HOMESTEAD AVE.,
MIAMI. FL.


THE BOUNDARIES OF THE REDEVELOPMENT AREA
ARE GENERALLY DESCRIBED AS, BOUNDED ON
THE NORTH BY SW 168TH STREET, BOUNDED ON
THE EAST AND THE SOUTHEAST BY STATE ROAD 5
(US-1), CROSSING OVER TO THE BUSWAY AT SW
186TH STREET, AND THEN TO THE EAST BY THE
BUSWAY, AND THEN BOUNDED ON THE WEST AND
SOUTHWEST BY THE STATE ROAD 821 (THE
HOMESTEAD EXTENSION OF FLORIDA'S
TURNPIKE), IN UNINCORPORATED MIAMI-DADE
COUNTY.
The purpose of the meeting is to provide an opportunity for the
community to have input into the redevelopment plan study that
is beilg prepared for the redevelopment area.i .

The meeting will be hosted by redevelopment planning
consultants, the Office of Community and Economic
Development and the Office of Strategic Business Management.
The meeting is open to the public. Please call (305) 375-3418,
should you desire any additional information.


Miami-Dade County provides equal access and equal
opportunity in the employment and services and does not
discriminate on the basis of the handicap "Sign Language
interpreters are available upon request."
Please call (305) 375-3418 at least five days in advance.


0 *


*


.
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9


- ~ - ~


* MDX is investing $577 million in improvements to
its five roadways over the next five years

* The MDX work program will create approximately
lo,ooo new jobs over the next five years

* Improvements will reduce traffic delays by more than
20 million hours each year, valued at an estimated
$351 million in average worker compensation

* More high speed SunPass lanes allow drivers to pass
through tollbooths at expressway speeds saving both
time and gas


MDX puts your toll dollars to work!


DRIVE-5 SU A
-r", %IRIPAIP TOLL PROOsAM


MIAMI-DADE EXPRESSWAY AUTHORITY

www.mdxway.com


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Blacks_ Mus Contro Thi w siyTh im Tms anay410 067


Congressman Rainey is first Black portrait in House


First Black in Congress honored 135 years later


In 1870, Joseph Rainey became the first Black
person elected to the House of Representatives. In
2005 he becomes the first to have his portrait hung
in the House.
The oil painting of the South Carolina congress-
man was unveiled this month to the Congressional
Black Caucus and family descendants.


Joseph Hayne Rainey of
South Carolina was the first
Black to be elected to the House
of Representatives and take his
seat. He was born to slave par-
ents in Georgetown, South
Carolina, on June 21, 1832.
Rainey's father Edward pur-
chased his family's freedom and
taught his son the barber's
trade. In 1846 the Rainey fami-
ly moved to Charleston. Rainey
may have lived for a time in
Philadelphia, and it was there
that he married a woman
named Susan in 1859.
During the Civil War, South
Carolina drafted him to provide
food and serve passengers on a
Confederate blockade runner
and to work on the fortifications
of Charleston. In 1862 he and
his wife escaped on a blockade
runner to Bermuda, where slav-
ery had been abolished in 1834.
They settled in St. Georges,
where Rainey resumed barber-
ing. He used his acquaintance
with sailors and blockade run-
ners to keep in touch with
events in South Carolina.
The Raineys returned to the


state in 1866 and moved to
Georgetown the following year.
Joseph Rainey soon became a
member of the executive com-
mittee of the South Carolina
Republican party and was a
representative from Georgetown
at the 1868 South Carolina
Constitutional Convention. He
was elected to a four-year term
in the state senate in 1870 and
was chairman of the finance
committee.
After Congressman Benjamin
F. Whittemore resigned in
February 1870 amid charges
that he had sold appointment to
the United States military acad-
emies, First District
Republicans nominated Rainey,
who defeated Democrat C.W.
Dudley in a special election and
was sworn into the Forty-first
Congress on December 12,
1870. He joined the Committee
on Freedmen's Affairs and held
his seat through the Forty-third
Congress.
He spoke in favor of Senator
Charles Sumner's civil rights
legislation that outlawed racial
discrimination in juries,


schools, transportation and
public accommodations. Rainey
insisted that unless civil rights
measures were enacted, he
would not support amnesty bills
permitting former Confederates
to participate in political life.
Rainey was also a warm sup-
porter of the acts authorizing
the president to call on the mil-
itary to protect Black voters
from the threats and violence of
the Ku Klux Klan.
In 1872 Rainey was reelected
to the Forty-third Congress
without opposition. During
debate on the Indian
Appropriation bill in May 1874
Rainey replaced Speaker James
G. Blaine in the chair and
became the first Black repre-
sentative to preside over a
House session. A member of the
Committee on Indian Affairs, he
had a special interest in the
subject being discussed that
day.
In 1874 Rainey won a narrow
reelection victory over Samuel
Lee, an Independent Democrat.
Lee asked the House Committee
on Elections to void 669 Rainey
ballots, but it held in May 1876
that Rainey had been duly elect-
ed. In the Forty-fourth Congress
Rainey served on the Invalid
Pensions Committee and the
Select committee on Centennial
Celebration and Proposed the
National Census of 1875. He
strongly condemned the July 4,
1876, massacre of Black militi-
amen at Hamburg, South
Carolina.
In 1876 Rainey defeated
Democrat John S. Richardson,
who claimed that he was enti-


tied to the seat because of voter
intimidation exercised by feder-
al soldiers (sent to the state in
response to the Hamburg mas-
sacre), by armed Black political
clubs and by the Black militia.
Richardson also claimed that
his election had been certified
by the governor. Rainey
maintained that only the South
Carolina secretary of state, who
had certified his election, had
the legal right to authorize the


JOSEPH HAYNE RAINEY


winner in a congressional race:
While the case was being
considered, Rainey entered the
Forty-fifth Congress in 1877 as
a member of the Invalid
Pensions Committee and the
Select Committee on Enrolled
Bills. He defended the use of
federal troops in South
Carolina during the election of
1876. He opposed an amend-
ment to the charter of the
Freedmen's Savings and Trust
Company (Freedmen's Bank)


that would have allowed half of
its deposits to be invested in
commercial paper monies.
The Committee on Elections
finally concluded in May 1878
that so many election irregu-
larities had taken place in the
First District that the seat
should be declared vacant, but
the full House referred the
report back to the Committee,
ensuring that Rainey would
retain his seat. Rainey, howev-
er, was defeated by Richardson
in 1878 as the Democratic
party solidified its control in
post-Reconstruction South
Carolina.
After leaving his seat on
March 3, 1879, Rainey received
promises of Republican sup-
port for the position of Clerk of
the House of Representatives,
but Democratic control of the
Forty-sixth Congress ruled out
his appointment. Instead
Rainey became an internal rev-
enue agent in South Carolina
for two years. When the
Republicans regained control
of the House in 1881, he spent
time in Washington trying to
secure his promised appoint-
ment, but his name was not
placed in nomination. He
remained in Washington and
established a brokerage and
banking firm. After the collapse
of his firm, he managed a coal
wood yard before he returned
to South Carolina, poor and in
ill health. To provide their fam-
ily with support, Susan Rainey
opened a womens' hat busi-
ness in Georgetown, where
Joseph Rainey died on August
2, 1887.


Losing a generation of relatives


CURRY
continued from 2A
with others the next morning.
My youngest sister, Susan
Gandy and her family, had left
earlier in the day to return to
Tuskegee, Ala. We tried to reach
her and my other sister, Chris,
on the West Coast. Charlotte
and I made a mental list of peo-
ple to call and divided the
responsibilities.
With the calls made and my
preparing to return home mid-
day Monday, Mama said she
had received another call
informing her that the landlord
where Padna had been living
was mistaken and he was not
dead. He was at the local VA
hospital in serious condition,
but he was alive. This was
bizarre. But I told Mama that


given the choice between
believing someone was dead
and their ending up alive or
believing someone was alive
when, in fact, they Were dead,
I'd take our predicament.
Charlotte and I embarked on a
second round of calls, telling
the family that our uncle was
still alive. I began my return
trip home and several hours
later, Charlotte did likewise.
Having driven Neyah, my 3-
year-old granddaughter, from
Silver Spring, Md. to see her
great grandmother in Augusta,
I finally arrived back in
Maryland after midnight.
Neyah, eager to see her parents
after five days with Papa.
Neyah believes in Santa, so St.
Nick was very good to her.
I settled into bed around 2
a.m. for what I thought would


be at least 10 hours of sleep.
However, Monique Harris
Clitandre, one of Padna's
daughters, called from Atlanta
at 8:35 a.m. to say that Padna
had died for certain this time.
She and another daughter,
Renee Hedgemon Blango in
Buffalo, had spoken with the
doctor on a three-way call.
So, the roller coaster ride of
calling some of the same people
for a third time, learning when
and where the funeral would be
held, and gathering informa-
tion that could be used in an
obituary was put in motion
again.
Although I was tired from my
Christmas trip to Augusta, I
agreed to drive my Uncle Willie
James Harris (Uncle Buddy)
and his wife, Martha, to the
funeral in Birmingham from


Jonesborough, Tenn., near
Johnson City. After I took them
back home, I spent time with
my oldest aunt, Julia Mac
Cousin, in Johnson City.?Aunt
Julia Mae is 87 and Uncle
Buddy will turn 74 in
February. Uncle Frank, like
Aunt Kat who died three years
ago, has Alzheimer's and is 84
years old.
My cousin Lynn Stuart and I
have always lamented this day.
We have no other uncles and
aunts left on my mother's side.
I have only one aunt, Mary Jo
Bradford of Reform, Ala., left
on my father's side. It's hard to
see them grow old and even
harder to see them depart all
too quickly.
George E. Curry is editor-in-
chief of the NNPA News Service
and BlackPressUSA.com.


Bush assures more dirty air for Blacks


HUTCHINSON
continued from 2A

against the dumping of a waste
facility in an urban neighbor-
hood. Their action transformed
the fight for environmental jus-
tice into a health and a civil
rights issue. Since then Blacks
have marched, demonstrated,
filed lawsuits, been jailed, and
held local and national confer-
ences, to denounce environmen-
tal degradation of their neigh-
borhoods. In a milestone report
on race and toxic wastes in
1987, the Commission for Racial
Justice, a church-based civil
rights advocacy group, revealed
that Blacks are far more likely
than whites to live near aban-
doned toxic waste sites, waste
landfills, and sewer treatment
plants. They prodded former
President Clinton in 1994 to
issue an executive order direct-
ing federal agencies to intensify
efforts to determine the harm
toxic waste plants and sites
wreak on urban communities.
A decade later, the
Government Accounting Office
found that all of the offsite haz-
ardous waste landfills in nine
Southern states were situated in
or in close proximity to Black
neighborhoods. This environ-
mental racism outraged Black
environmental activists.
Meanwhile, Bush has done
everything he could to scrap the
Clinton rules, and corporations
and public officials have dutiful-
ly taken their cue and tossed
more pollutants into the air and
water. The courts haven't
helped. Residents in poor, high-
ly toxic neighborhoods can sue
polluters under the 1964 Civil


Rights Act, but they must prove
intentional discrimination. This
is virtually impossible to prove.
The Supreme Court has ruled
that private citizens can't sue to
enforce federal environmental
regulations that ban discrimina-
tion. The EPA has moved with
glacial speed to investigate com-
plaints of environmental pollu-
tion, and has been even more
reluctant to take strong action
against polluters. In one two-
year stretch from 2001 to 2003,
the EPA settled only two cases
against corporate polluters.
There's little evidence that the
agency's settlement scorecard
has gotten much better since
then.
The damage from official neg-
lect of the problem has been
profound. Toxic eyesores disfig-
ure Black neighborhoods,
degrade property values, and
discourage public and private
investment in those neighbor-
hoods, and that in addition to
the grave health risks that toxic
pollution poses to the residents.
, Corporate and industrial pol-
luters get away with their toxic
assault on low-income, Black
neighborhoods by skillfully
twisting the jobs versus environ-
ment issue. They claim that the
choice is between creating more
jobs and business growth and
economic stagnation. Their eco-
nomic blackmail works since
few politicians will risk being
tagged as anti-business. They
gamble that poor, Blacks and
Latinos, many of whom do not
own their homes, and vote in far
smaller numbers, are less likely
than politically connected white,
middle-class homeowners to
squawk at putting a hazardous


plant or toxic waste site in their
neighborhood.
Many officials will eagerly waive
requirements for environmental
reports, provide special tax
breaks, and even alter zoning and


land use requirements to allow
them to set up shop in these
underserved neighborhoods.
They'll get it with the full blessing
of the Bush administration, but
let's hope not with Congress.


"Copyrighted Material

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Corrections failed to heed warnings


COHEN
continued from 3A

Rapalo's escape that any-
thing and everything will be
done" with regard to citizen
security. After Monday's cap-
ture of Rapalo, Alvarez's office
issued this statement: "All of
the agencies involved worked
long and hard over the holi-
days to ensure the quick and
safe recapture of Reynaldo
Rapalo. Mr. Rapalo will now


face the justice system, as
intended. However, this case
is far from closed. An investi-
gation is ongoing to deter-
mine what flaws and failures
in the system led to Mr.
Rapalo's escape. I can assure
the public that Miami-Dade
County is searching for
answers and measures are
and will continue to be taken
to prevent an incident such
as this from happening
again."


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I 11 IIII -


The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006 7A


s kcalB Must Control Their Own Destiny


(fr


.^








s kcalB Must Control Their Own Destiny


8A The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006


What is the quality of

justice from Blacks?


WALTERS
continued from 2A
Enforcement Executives, as
devaluing 'the lives of other
Blacks in many crises situa-
tions. But what would happen
if Black police officers began to
object, disrupt and legally chal-
lenge these practices from the
inside. In other words, rather
than joining the dysfunctional
police culture, what if they took
the civil rights movement inside
the institution.
In this connection, I have also
wondered about Black judges.
While I have heard about the
occasional Black judge who has
exercised mercy in cases clear-
ly involving an injustice to a
Black defendant, why would
the incarceration rate be as
high as it is, with many of them
serving on the bench now? We
know that Black judges have
spoken out against racism in
the criminal justice system, as
indicated by a recent book,
"Black Judges on Justice" rec-
ognized as the first reader
where judges have spoken out
against racism in profiling,
incarceration, sentencing and
etc. Moreover, one is also aware
of the outstanding civil rights
work of the National Bar
Association and Black student
law organizations.
But I also ran across a study
in Social Science Quarterly
(December 2001) in which a
study of 10 Black male judges
(4,374 sentences) with 80 white
males judges (34,668 sen-
tences) in Pennsylvania coun-
ties, between 1991 -1994. It


found that Black judges were
1.66 times more likely to incar-
cerate offenders than while
judges, even though the aver-
age sentences given by Black
judges were one month shorter.
This made me wonder how rep-
resentative this study might be
nationally, how hard Black
judges buck the established
system of sentencing in the
guidelines, how hard they fight
the death penalty, how hard
they fight for probation for pris-
oners like Tookie Williams who
have been rehabilitated, and
how hard they fight with the
legislature and the governors to
restore the voting rights of con-
victed felons. In other words,
now that we have a significant
number of Black judges, are
they part of the problem?
We should continue to push
for Black policemen and
policewomen and Black
judges, and excoriate the Bush
administration for its paltry
record of having elevated only
15 (7 of them replacing other
Blacks) of 200 Blacks to the
federal bench. But we should
demand the judicial and intel-
lectual firepower of Black
judges be turned up on the
racism in the justice system
rather than benefitting from
their mobility within it. They
have been too quiet on nomi-
nations for the Supreme Court
that may change the nature of
justice for generations.
In this era, we should look
for the civil rights movement
within institutions like the
criminal justice system rather
than always in the street.


11111111


S a


Do you know Audrey Edmonson and if so how do
you feel about her being appointed to take Barbara
Carey-Shuler's place as District 3 Commissioner?


PERCY I)ORSETT

"I know Audrey Edmonson's
face when I
see her but I
really don 't
know much
about her. I
haven't heard
about any of
the works she
has done and
I've never heard of how she
helped the people around the
community. You like to hear
from someone who has been
around in the public eye. I
can't tell you. anything about
her but she's taking Shuler's
place."


SHERRIE JONES

"I heard of
her name
before and
she's fine with
me. I have no
problem
about her
being the new
Commissioner
of District 3; I think I voted for
her and its time for a change."


JEREMIAH RANSON


"No, I don't
know who
AudreyI
Edmonson is.
I feel like
everyone
deserves a
chance

















never been in the public eye.
though. The
community should accept her.
The way things are now maybe
something new would be
good."

DONNA RICHARDS

"No, I
haven't heard
of her before
but I just
hope she is as
good as
Barbara
Carey-Shuler
was. I never
heard of her because she's
never been in the public eye.
That could pose some big prob-
lems with people not knowing
who she is in the community. I
don't know if she's done any
work in the city or if she even
lives in the community ."


11 1l"l'


Crime S cen


On Dec. 1, 2005, a woman went to her business located at 7777
NE 3rd Ct., which has been closed since October 24, 2005 due to
the effects of Hurricane Wilma, only to notice one of the rear win-
dows was broken and an office had been ransacked. The victim
also noticed a rear classroom door jarred open, which she careful-
ly inspected and found a Black male suspect removing items from
her business. The suspect left the scene and was subsequently
arrested by police.
******
On Dec. 5, 2005, homeowner Ms. Marin hired three helpers to
remove an ex-tenant's belongings from the house. The items were
placed on the front lawn and the locks on the front door were
replaced. Marin stated she observed the ex-tenant inside the
house through a side window removing personal popery that was
not removed the day before. She noticed her side window was
damaged and, after a brief confrontation, the ex-tenant was
charged with vandalism.
******
On Dec. 5, 2005, a Black male reported that he secured his gen-
erator in his shed located in the backyard of his home at 901 NW
49th St. Later that day he discovered that some unknown person
had entered his yard, broke the security lock off the shed and
taken the generator.
******
On Dec. 15, 2005, a woman stated that she went to her business
to check on her daycare center. While searching around the build-
ing she observed a Black man taking items from a rear classroom.
The victim saw the man place the items inside a grocery cart then
flee the scene..Officer S. McGill, whom was around the area at
the time, arrested the defendant close to the scene.
******
On Dec. 19, 2005, a man stated that he was admitted into the
hospital for a few days. His friend came to visit him and took his
keys for his apartment located at 390 NW 2nd St. in order to
assist him in feeding his dog. Upon returning home from the hos-
pital the man observed items were missing from his apartment.
The friend has not been seen since nor has the house key.


lkun; nrwn feiw thekirkr& I mrrka % inn

04MW me a


0es S00


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"-


Calling all FAMU Rattlers and friends


FAMU's National Alumni
Association is hosting their
annual Winter Meeting in
Miami January 5-7 at the new
Radisson Hotel, 1601 Biscayne
Blvd. (formerly the Omni). All
graduates of FAMU, friends
and relatives are invited to
attend the meetings.
The annual gala (dance and
banquet) will be held this
Friday, January 6.
Tickets are $50 per person.
Chico the Virgo (Hot 105) will


Bishop Wilson brings

Hello Miami; the old fash-
ion mourners bench in the
Baptist church is back.
Bishop Wilson is making
a plea to all Jesus loving
people to come to the
mourners bench with me.
He also have a room to
tarry for those who wish to
seek to get saved, sancti-
fied and baptized with the
Holy Ghost and fire.
Service will begin every
Wednesday night from 6 to
7 p.m. Only one hour.
Come as you are to 2908


be your host and M.C.
You will also be entertained
by the Junkanoos, the Instant
Attraction Band and much
more.
Please call Huston Usry 305-
251-667 or Dr. Freddie Young
305-251-2089 for tickets
and/or additional information.
We need to have all Rattlers,
all friends and relative of
Rattlers present. Time, 7 p.m.,
semi-formal attire. We need
everyone's support.


back mourners bench


Bishop John Wilson
N.W. 62nd Street.


Just lackGroods


AFRICAN ART & HOME STORE


AFTER X-MAS
SALE
10% TO 50% OFF

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786-413-0774

Open
Monday-Saturday
10 a.m.-7:30 p.m.


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L -1


Prophetic revival at Richmond Heights Woman's Club


International Prophet Henry
Walker is holding a Prophetic
revival service Friday, January
13 at 7 p.m. at the Richmond
Heights Woman's Club, 14855
S.W. 116 Ave in Richmond
Heights, Miami.
The next service will be held on
Friday, February. 3 and Friday,
March 3, at the same location.
Future monthly dates will be
announced. Do you need a per-
sonal word from God? Are you
looking for answers? Do you
need encouragement? Do you
need to be healed or delivered?
This service is to get you
stronger for your church
Come on out and get your mir-
aclel Prophet Walker is deter-


mined that you will be set free
and realize who you are in
Christ! Prophel Walker is an


anointed end time vessel, a dis-
cerner of the times and seasons!
Don't miss these services!
Directions: Florida's Turnpike
South to exit 16 (SW 152 St). At
light make a left (SW 117 Ave.).
Right on Lincoln Blvd. Right on
Bethune Dr. (First right Past
Bethel Full Gospel Church). The
Woman's Club is at the end of
the street on the right hand
side.
Directions: Florida's Turnpike
North to exit 16 (SW 152 Street).
Cross over 152 Street and make
a right on Bethune Dr. The
Woman' s Club is the first build-
ing on the left.
For further information, call
772-871-9759.


HO SWOOD OCelebrate the Legacy of
O Ol Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
"An Evening with Martin & Langston...
Recreating the Powerofj the Man"
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR GALA
Friday, January 13 '
Featuring Special Guest Speakers
Danny Glover & Felix Justice
With Entertainment and Dancing
6:30 p.m. Reception |7:30p.m.Dinner
Westin Diplomat Resort & Spa
3555 S. OceanPrive
Tickets $75
per person, muist
purchased in advance.
S. 954-921-3404


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The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006 9A


s kcalB Must Control y


Hlrart attma ptkanl Igin orerdom a












"Copyrighted Material


tirn f.t( ,ith h.p hN. Syndicated Content


*Available from Commercial News Providers"


001,i


Chwt


93"'Street Community
Missionary Baptist Church
2330 N.W. 93"' Street
305-836-0942
Order of Services
7:30( ai.Bily Momning WMIihip
I I a.i.l ..Monilg W ,shil
Evening Worship
I It & 3 Sud ........ I .I
Tu CsdaIy .iue SlIIly ..7 p.l.
website: mbllll`.olg



Ebenezer United
Methodist Church
2001 N.W. 35th Street
305-635-7413
Order of Services:
Sunday Morning Services
7:45 a.m.- I 1:15 a.m.
Sunday Schtol 9:45 a.m.
Bible Study Tuesday
IO a.m. & 7 p.m.
Prayer Meccting Tues.- 6 p.m.




Mt. Calvary Missionary
Baptist Church
1140 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.
305-759-8226 Fax: 305-759-0528



Mon. Ihru Fri. Noon Day Prayer
Bible Study...Thurs.....7 p.m.
Suntllay Worship..7-11 a.m.n
Sudayly School.......9:30 a.m.





ew Providence M.B. Church
760 N.W. 531" Street
305-758-0922 Fax# 759-5030
Order of Services:
ialy Moming Woaship 7:3011i. .
Sunday School ....:....9:30 a.m.
Morning W rshllipI.....ll a.m.
Bible Studv/
&Prayer Meeting
Tuesdtly ...................7 p.m.




St. John Baptist Church
1328 N.W. 3"' Avenue
305-372-3877 305-371-3821
Order of Services:
Early SunIlRiy
9 Morning Worsllip .....7:30 ;a.m.
Sunday School ..........9 :30 a.n.
Morning Worship ...I Ia.m.
Na-tflr.'io Baprliml Churlrches
(B B.T.U.)5 p.m.

Meeling ........(Tucs.) 7 p.m.




SVictory on the Rock
Ministries, Inc.
1235 N.W. 103rd Street
305-333-3144 / 305-343-5973

Order ol'f Services:


7 p"m.


/postolic Revival Center
6702 N.W. 15th Avenue
305-836-1224
Order of Services
New time Ir T.V. Progurlam
FOR HOPE FOR TODAY
[Sla ii.p- lini. Stilsay 5 pmn
Wedl.- Illie 'rSt o ly I 'ly n 9 l..- 12 ipn.m
iMnlllllg service ........... I I aim'
Stin live, Wollip ...........l7:3(I0p 1i .
hlies. Ir, lyDr Meeling..... 7:30 p1m.
Fri.- ihle Slily .................7:30 p.m.



Friendship Missionary
Baptist Church
]'i I llllr; ilyiirOhcllsl Itlh
fi i'lld'hiIipprayci iheillkm .ith Cl
740 N.W. 58th Street
Miami. FL
305-759-8875
I oulr ol Prayei........ :3) 0 am.
E early Morning Worshi.7:30 ain.
Sunllday SI1 chL ol.......... 9:3) a.l.
Moming W ship i l............ 11 am
Youklh Minllistly Sludy....Wed .. 7 p.nm
Iryer/lile Study...Wd.......7 p.m.
Nmlnahy Altar IPaycr...(M-I-)
Feedinlg Ihe Iluntlly cvc ly
Wednesday...... II 1. 111.- p..




New Day "N" Christ
Deliverance Ministries
3055 N.W. 76"' Street, 33147
Message Ctr.: 305-836-7815

Order of Services:
Sll lutlys- ('Clurch Seoml................10 a.lm.
Worshilp service.............. 11:15 a.m .
Tuelsdays ilhle Cliss ..............7 p.m.
4th Suinday Eveningllg Wol hip6......... I).n.




New Shiloh M.B. Church
1350 N.W.95"' Street
305-835-8280 Fax# 305-696-6220
Church Schedule:

Early Morning Wonship 7:30 a.m.
Sun. Church School 9:30 a.m.
Morning Worship .....l ,.m.
Tuesday Bible Class 7 p.m.
Stles. bei),V the Is Stiun.....7 p.m.
Mid-week Worship




St. Luke Missionary Baptist
1790 N.W. 55th Street
305-696-7322

Order ol Services:
Ladly Morning Worship.7:30a.m.
SunIlly SchoIol .......... 9:3(!i.m.
Morning WoNship ..... I a.m.
WED)NIE:SDAY
Prayer Meeting ............ 7:30 p.m.
Bible Study ..................8 p.m.


)ry Over Darkness
3aptist Church
treach Ministries
52 N.W. 61st Street
305-754-5363
Order of Services:
Sunday School ...........IO i.m.
Worship Service Sun...... I a.m.
Prayer/Iihlc Sludy Tuesday...7 p.m.
Prayer Mon. & Wed.........12 p.1m.
Alternaive lri' ichcnill
lFriday...................7 p.m .


Bethel Apostolic Temple, Inc.
1855 N.W. 119th Street
305-688-1612
Fax: 305-681-8719
Order ol Services;
Stln..9:30 lmii. .(Sumlnty School)
Walk ill Ihe Word Ministry
Worship Service.............. 11 a.m.
Tuesday....7 p.m...Family Night
Wed..I I a.m..nllcl'essmry Prayer
Wed. Bible ('lass........12 p.ni.
Wed. 13ihle Class .............7 p.m.




arvest Fire Worship Ctr.
2260 N.W. 183rd Street
305-620-2986
Order of Services:
Sunday....... 7 a;.m............ 10 a.m.
Wed.- Bible Sluly.......7:30 p.m.
Friday- Youth
First & Fortnh
Tues......Women's/Men's Mtg.
Early Morning Pnrayer.....6-7 a.m.
Prayer Sunday3........6:30 p.m.




New Harvest Missionary
Baptist Church
12145 N.W. 27th Avenue
305-681-3500

SOrder of Services:
E lM l ) l,'ll ig Wiwni hip...W &3 rd Siull
ollrningl Wo 'ohiI ............... 10:30a .
"l'll'k s. hl:- ig hl fi lli* ry.)................ 6 ]p..',.
*lycr Service ............... ... 7:310 pm l,.
\ Ih,,",ll S-- ll .................. /




New Vision For Christ
Ministries
13650 N.E. 10"' Avenue
305-899-7224
Order of Services:
li'arly Sunday Worship...7:30an.m.
Sut day Schlu il ................9:30 a.m.
Sulbay Ma~iing Wxhip .....I I an.
Sunday Evening Service ..6 .m1.
Tuesday Iyer Meeting ...7:30.(p.m.
Weadne.qlay Bible Study ...7:30) p..
"Nohi Jus d Bu clutrh im a Momvn ent



Temple Missionary
Baptist Church
1723 N.W. 3"Avenue
Church 305-573-3714












Word of Faith "\
Christian Center
2370 N.W. 87"' Street
ax 305-573-4060 -90815-255-8
Order of Services:
W mSithy Scl ............ 9:45 1a.m.

Fel illg MilliS lry......I(I il.l.
ue a Hibl e Sludy/PtIi ... 3 p. I











Thsoildva rne;lr s IViCe..s6:30
Wol'shiI) .u'rvi cc ............ I 1 ;il.1.
rucslday Bihlc Sillly.......X p. .
6 I [ l / T ll tna Y P ray e r S erv ic e...... I m


Brownsville
Church of Christ
4561 N.W. 33rd Court
305-634-4850/Fax & Messages
305-634-6604
Order of Services
llll I )ay SMlllliay Shl. I ....L9:45
S IIly MI ornh.lg Wol hiI ......9I I a.I.
Sudal y IMet is Iibl, Sludy ....5 I).l.
T11-day Night iible Stuy .7 :30pn ,
lIl ddayi Morin IBiblc (hlass I I an.m
STan.Imrlahiln available Call:
)5-(,34-U45 311i5-69I-bl695



Jordan Grove Missionary
Baptist Church
5946 N.W. 12'" Ave.
305-751-9323


SNew Hope Missionary
Baptist Church
1881 N.W. 103" St.
305-696-7745
Order or Services:










Peaceful Zion Missionary
Baptist Church
2400 N.W. 681 Street, Miami, FL 33147
(305) 836-1495
Order of Services:
Early Morning Services
(2 (23,4,5"' S(nday) ...... 8:00 am
Sunday School ..........9:45 an'
Morning Service ..... 11:00 am
Communion Service
(T11uls. belilNe I Sunday) 7:30 pm
a Prayer Meeting/Bible Study
(Wednesdaly) 7:30 pm




The Church of the
Kingdom of God, Ext. 11
2933 N.W. 170th Street
Miami Gardens, FL 33055
305-624-8839

SundFax: 30y School ..........:45 a.m.
Sun. Morning ServiCe...I 1:30 a.m. j
Bi Order of Ser devices:
Tuesdaly ................. ......7:301 p.m.





Word of Truth
1755 N.W. 78'" Street
305-691-4081
Fax: 305-694-9105


Bfiblel Study Wer ...ol ..... S i p.nmi .
Sun11day Sc h l ................. .0 Iu .n1l.
Sun W o rship Sc rv. 1....... I: 311 a.m l.
WedL. Night Inltrcessory Prayer
fsnd m 7:30 o, o ).pii.
SHundlay Worshilp Service..6:31) p.mn.


Cathedral of Hope Church
Omega Activity Center
15600 N.W. 42nd Avenue
954-534-3468

Order of Services:
Sul I ay School ............. 8 .11.
: ultl(l iy Worship Service...........9) il.lll
Tuestlny-Hiible Siudy. .............7 I.m.





Liberty City Church
of Christ
1263 N.W. 67th Street
305-836-4555
Order of Services:
Sunday Moming ...........8 a.m.
Sunday School.............10 a.m.
Sunday Evening .............6 p.m.
Mon. Excclence ........7:30 p.m.
Tue. Bible Class .........7:30 p.m.
Thuns. Fellowship ......... a.m.
1st Sun. Song Practice ..6 p.m.
\ZiMW~lWW~lI /


The Soul Saving Station 0
Christ's Crusaders of Florida
1880 Washington Ave.
www.ssschristscrusadersfla.org
305-688-4543 Fax: 305-681-6004
Order of Services:
Sunday Schoo, l ........... 0 am.I
Sunday Wolship.. I a.m. & 7 p.mn
TuLsday Worship.......7:45 p.m.
Nor on Day Pnycr.......Mon .-Fri.


Zion Hope
Missionary Baptist
5129 N.W. 17th Ave.
305-696-4341 Fax: 305-696-2301
Order of Services:
Sunday School ............. 9:30 a.m.
Morning Pnis/Woship ..11 a.1i1.
YouI h C1hoir- Salunday l......11 a..
Pl;ayec Meeling & Bible Stldy
Tuesday 7 Ip.m.


Christian Hill AME Church
Innercity Golf & Learning Center
9101 N.W. 29th Ave.
LM09@BellSouth.Net/
www.lmgolf.com
Order of Services:
-Tuesday 6:30 p.m. -Prayer Service
Sunday's
Sunday School....................... :30 .m.
Morning Worship Service ........II aln.
Fee Golf Every 2"' & 4" Sunday ............4 p.m.
Don Shula's Golf Course




Mansion Ministries Int'l
Christian Center
Miramar High School, AUD.
NW 37'" Ave. South of-Miramar Pkwy
954-443-6142
Order of Services:
Sun. School .........9:45- 10:45 a.m.
Worshi1p..........I I a.m.- 12:30 p.tm.
www.iiliillsiu iiiiiiiiislries.orlg
imnl sionll nil ti yc'bc'hllsouI i.1uel
I.0O. lBox 246505
Pemohmke 17i1s. FI.33024


New Birth Baptist Church, The Cathedral
of Faith International


2300 NW 135th Street
Order of Services
Sunday Worship 7 a.m.. 11
a.m., 7 p.m.
Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday (Bible Study) 6:45p.m.
Wednesday Bible Study
10:45 a.m.


I (800) 254-NBBC
305-685-3700
Fax: 305-685-0705
www.newhirthbaptistniaumi.org


The Elite Church Directory

pays for Itself and keeps

your church andyour pastor

before the community.

Call 305-694-6210


w M~


Pembroke Park Church of Christ
3707 S.W. 56th Avenue Hollywood, FL 33023
(Office) 954-962-9327 (Fax) 954-962-3396
Order of Services
Sunday
Bible Study ............. 9 a.m. *** Morning Worship ............. 10 a.m.
Evening Worship .............. 6:p.m.
Wednesday....General Bible Study ..... 7:30 p.m.
TV Program Sunday, 8 a.m. 8:30 a.m.
Comcast Digital Cable: 8, 19, 22, 23,30 and 37
Web page: www.penihrokeparkcoc.org


Victor

Oul
116


/Trinity Faith Tabernacle
Deliverance Center
512 S.W. 4' Street, Homestead 33136
305-246-2265
Order of Services:
Sutduy Sclllol...........10:30 aillm.
Suti. Morning Scrvs......12 pll.m.
eilliing Woilship Scrv.....6 p.l1.
Tucdtlay "Youlh NiMhll...8 p.m.
Wed. "Nooll I)y 'rayer"....l12 pu,
Wed. Nighl IMihk Sludy.....X p.nl.
Thursday Nighl "'Cvinghlm Bible
Coillege..........(6- I(p 1.m .
IFriday Night Wtorlship Serv...8 ,p
\!l emmh mmmmwqlnl kuittu Iom/~llI


~naaamr~rmraa r/ \I Y~LPn~~S~lnIIIR


\ liwnn~crm~q~ r/


it]
6,










eA]-Q a mes, anu ,


OLLIE BROWN,
Decemebr 29.
S e rv i c e
Saturday, 11
a.m. at New
S h i I o h
Missionary r
Baptist Church.


46, died


IVA MAE BULLARD, 81, died
Decemebr 28.
Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at
Ebenezer
U n i t e d
Methodist
Church.


LEOLA SHERMAN, 68, died
December 31.
S e r v i c e
Saturday, 2:30
p.m. at Liberty
City Church of
Christ.





BABY ANGEL REANA DUBOIS,
3, died
December 30.
Arrangements
are incomplete.

.*


VERA LEONA ALBURY, 91, died January 1. Arrangements are incom-
plete.


Royal


KIRKLAND 'BUTCH' COLMAN,
50, died
Decemebr 27.
S e r v i c e
Thursday, 1
p.m. at Trinity
C.M.E. Church.





JAMES BROWN, 62, died
December 30.
S e r v i c e
Thursday, 11
a.m. at Church
of The Kingdom
of God.





ORELIA JEROME, 64, died
December 25.
Service
Saturday, 10
a.m. at St.
Mary's Catholic
Church.





MICHAEL THERVIL, 20, died
December 29. Arrangements are
incomplete.

JOY STERLING, 49, died
January 1. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Wr
HERMINE FORDE, 77, teacher,
died December
31 at Memorial
West Hospital.
Survivors: hus-
band, Aston, Sr.;
children, Aston,
Jr., Norman,
Audrey Forde
and Janet
Vaughn;brother,
Joseph. Service
Saturday, 11 a.m. at Florida Bible
Church. Interment at Hollywood
Memorial Gardens.


died
IL-1


NICOLE MANUEL, 32,
December
27.Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. at New
Providence
Missionary
Baptist Church.




GLORIA ROSE, 58,
Decemebr 24.
Service Sunday,
10 a.m. at
Maranatha
Seventh Day
A d v e n t i s t
Church.


HOMER STAFFORD, 87, died
Decemebr 27. Service Wednesday
(today), 1 p.m at Mt. Hermon A.M.E
Church

CREMENE CENORVIL, 58, died
December 27. Arrangements are
incomplete.


MINDY
December
incomplete.


COHEN, 47, died
16. Arrangements are


KERREN GORDON, 95, died
December 25. Arrangements are
incomplete.

INEZ ELLIS, 61, died January 1.
Arrangements are incomplete.


ight
ELIZABETH CHARNELL JACK-
SON, 20, died
December 28 at
Jackson
Hoes p i t a I .
Survivors: father,
Jessie; mother,
Eliza; seven sis-
ters; six broth-
ers. Service
Saturday, 2
p.m. at St.
Matthews Freewill Baptist Church.
Interment at Southern Memorial
Park.


Poitier


HOLLAND REDDING, 95, labor-
er, died
December 30 at
Jackson South
Ho s p i t a I .
Service Friday,
1 p.m. at St.
James A.M.E
Church.



SYLVIA BETTY RUTLAND
JOHNSON, 71,
nurse aid, died
December 30 at
Aventura
Hospital .
Service
Saturday, 10:30
a.m. at Jordan
Grove
G r o v e
Missionary
Baptist Church.
LOUIS DAVID, 65, laborer, died
Home Center. Services were held.


Mitchell
URSA TRINNETTE BLASH, 35,
died at North
Shore Medical
Center.
Survivors: chil-
dren, Keirston
Morgan and
Amaris Brown;
parents, James
and Eva; sib-
lings, Derrick,
Tracy, and
Sheneka; dear friend, Willie Neal;
and a host of relatives and friends.
Viewing Friday, 3:30-9 p.m. Service
Saturday, January 7, 2 p.m. at
Crooms Temple, 2090 NW 151
Street.


CLEO E. THOMAS, matriarch for
her family, died
December 30.
Service Friday,



Christ.




EMMANUEL R CUSSEAUX, 72,
sky cap, died
January 1 at
Unity Nursing
Home. Service
Saturday, 11
a.m. in the
chapel.




Decemebr 7 at Unity Health Nursing


Davis & Brice
WILLIE RODGER WHITE, SR.,
65, Dania, died December 26.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at St.
Ruth Baptist Church.

WILLIAM SCOTT, Ft.
Lauderdale, died January 2.
Arrangements are incomplete.

BOBBIE JEAN CLARK,
Hallandale, died December 28.
Arrangements are incomplete.


E.A. Stevens
CEDRIC ACOSTA, 45,
Hallandale died December 26.
Services were held.


Grace


DEKOVEN DORSEY AKA 'JODY
MO,' 29, enter-
tainer for FL Boy
Entertainment,
died January 1
at Jackson
Ho's p i t a I.
Arrangements
are incomplete.


H E ID Y
LIZANO, 50, housewife,
December 23 at Mount
Hospital. Services were held.


died
Sinai


PEDRO RIVERA, 29, carpenter,
died December 25. Arrangements
are incpomplete.

MARIE CAROLE LOUIS-HYP-
POLITE, 56, inspector for Children
and Families, died December 28.
Service Saturday, 12 p.m. at Holy
Family Catholic Church.

DOROTHY WOODS, 53, died
December 31 at Jackson Hospital.
Service Saturday, 3 p.m. in the
chapel.


IDA MAE SMITH, 76, housewife,
died December
29 at Mt. Sinai
Hospital. Service
Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Macedonia
Missionary
Baptist Church.



JOSEPH LINDER, 75, brick
mason, died
December 31 at
Jewish Home
and Hospital.
Arrangements
are incomplete.




DOROTHY TAYLOR, 56, died
December 25 at Northshore
Medical Center. Services were held.
MAUDE BAILEY, 94, died
January 2. Arrangements are
incomplete.


Hall Ferguson Hewitt


EMANUEL E. GRIFFIN, JR., 20,
baker, died
December 28.
S e r v i c e
Saturday, 11
a.m. at 93rd
Street C.M.B
died Church.


WILLIE (BILL) STIRRUP, 80,
died December
26 at Select
Ho s p i t a I
Survivors: loving
and devoted
wife, Lucille B.;
one daughter,
Miriam Stirrup-
Tawwab (Tariq);
three sons,
Wallace, Willie,
and Rodney (Geneva) Stirrup; one
sister, Gloria S. Tolliver; three broth-
ers, Archie, Charles (Irene), Harold
(Roberta) Stirrup; 11 grandchildren;
several great-grandchildren; and a
host of sorrowing relatives and
friends. Service Saturday, 12 p.m. at
Peaceful Zion Missionary Baptist


Church.
GERALDINE
HANKS, 63,
homemaker,
died January 2 at
Jackson
Me fmorial
HospD 2 ita H .
Survivors: hus-
band, Frank
Hanks; two
daughters, Linda
Roberts and Cassandra Duncan;
step-daughter, Shelia Hanks. Service
Saturday, 2 p.m. in the chapel.

GUSSIE MAE SCOTT, 102, home-
maker, died December 20. Remains
will be shipped to Bainbridge,
Georgia for final rites and burial.

DONNIE COBB, 52, died
December 25 at home. Services
were held.

WILLIE BARRON, 90, died
December 21 at Hialeah Hospital.
Services were held.

ANNIE BELL WIGGINS, 72, died
December 21 at Kindred Hospital.
Services were held.


Richardson


Range


LUCILLE LANETTA SIMS, 77,
retired atten-
dant for Range
Funeral Home,
died December
27. Survivors:
three daugh-
ters, Evelyn,
Lillie Sims-
Howard and
Latara Sims-
Taylor; two
sons, Rev. Willie, Jr. and Rev.
Christopher; five grandchildren,
three great grandchildren. Services
were held Tuesday.


MARVALYNE
HENRY, 68,
homemaker,
died December
31. Service
Monday, 1 p.m.
in the chapel.


WOODSON


FRANCINE T. CHAIN, 48, home-
maker, died
December 30.
Survivors: com-
panion, Earl
Gadson; son,
Adam Butler;
three daugh-
ters, Sade,
Naomi and
Desha; three
brothers,
Anthony, Rodney and Micheal; sis-
ter, Janice. Service Saturday, 11
a.m. in the chapel.



Manker
DESMOND MICHON FINCHER,
17, died
December 29.
S e r v i c e
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at St. Paul
A.M.E Church.






Delores Mills
JACK CASSIDY, 83, died
December 23 at Florida Medical
Center. Services were held.

LEON L. FARRINGTON, died
December 27 at Northshore
Medical Center. Arrangements are
incomplete.


EDWARD J. HICKS, retired
laborer, died
December 31.
Survivors: two
sisters, Evelyn
and Theresa;
brother, Jimmie
Lee, Jr.; mother,
Pauline E.;
aunts, Luverta
SReid and Ather
Mae Francis;
nieces, Joy Lynn and Brenda Lee;
and a host of other relatives.
Service Saturday, 2 p.m. at Jordan
Grove Missionary Baptist Church.

WAVY EVERETT, SR., 74, retired
plasterer, died
January 1.
Survivors: two
sons, Wavy
Everett, Jr.
(Shirley) and
Raymond
Dwight; two
daughters,
Lizzie M. and
Barbara Everett
McKenzie (Ellis); three grandchil-
dren, Adrian and Mercedes Everett
and Candice Chester; two great
grandchildren, Ricky, III and Shawn.
Memorial service Wednesday, 7
p.m. in the chapel.


AGNES COOPER ROGERS, 91,
house mother for Florida Memorial
College, died December 21. Service
were held Friday.


Alphonso Richardson


WILLIE BEE WRIGHT, 90, died
December 29 at
h o m e
Survivors: one
brother, Clee
Stubbs; sisters,
Alice Roberts
and Mary
Young; niece,
Mary Liz White;
and a host of
relatives.
Visitation Friday, 4-8 p.m. Service
Saturday, 12 p.m. in the chapel.
Services under the direction of
Alfonso M. Richardson Funeral
Services, 3790 NW 167th Street,
Miami Gardens, 305-625-7177.


Eric S. George
KIMBERLY WHITE, 41,
Hollywood. Service Saturday, 11
a.m. at Star of Bethleham Baptist
Church, Hollywood.

LEE AUTER POUGH 41.
Arrangements are incomplete.


1931-2003


Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


Carey Royal *
Ram'n
TOMMY LEE RICE, 43, died
December 22 at
home. Services
were held.








LUCILLE LENA LEBRUN, 72,
died December 29 at Miami Heart
Institute. Service Thursday, 1 p.m.
in the chapel.

MOHAMMED TURK, 78, died
December 23 at Jackson Memorial
Hospital. Services were held.

MARCUS MANNS, 67, died
January 1 at home. Arrangements
are incomplete.


Barrett-Fryar
KEMIA KEEPLER, 30, died
January 1 at
Cedars Medical
Center. Service
Saturday, 1 p.m.
at New Hope
Missionary
Baptist Church.




BURK JONES, SR., 83,
Richmond Heights, died Decemebr
28 at Doctor's Hospital. Services
were held.

GLORIA WASHINGTON
PRUITT, 40, Richmond Heights.
died Decemebr 29 at Jackson
South Community Hospital.
Service Saturday, 2 p.m. at Hurst
Chapel A.M.E.

ANNIE TEASLEY, 79, Richmond
Heights, died December 30 at
home. Service Saturday, 11 a.m. at
Morningstar Missionary Baptist
Church.


Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


Perhaps you sent a floral ar-
rangement, spoke a word of
kindness, said a special prayer
or shared the day with my fami-
ly.
Whatever act of kindness,
whether in thought, word, or
deed, it made the burden lighter
and my family's day brighter.
A special thanks to family and
friends, the pastors and mem-
bers of New Christ Tabernacle,
First Baptist of Brownsville,
Antioch of Brownsville and
directors and staff of Hall-
Ferguson-Hewitt Mortuary.
The Bostic Family



Happy Birthday

In loving memory of,


4-r s


REOSHARD T. DONALD, SR.

01/04/77 11/08/05

Gone, but I haven't forgot
about you. I will never forget
you. Until we meet again.
Love you, your girl, Toya.



Card of Thanks

The family of the late,


We love and miss you.
The Family



In Memoriam

In loving memory of,


MARY S. PETERS

05/17/33 01/07/05


It seems just like yesterday,
but in reality you've been gone a
year.
And not too many days have
went by that I haven't shed a
tear.
They say that in time, my heart
will began to heal.
But, if only they knew the
depth of this pain that I feel.
I miss you so much.
Your granddaughter, Chiquita.


Gregg Mason
MARCELYNE NELSON, 59,
died. Visitation Friday, 2-9 p.m.
Service Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Pentecostal Church of Miami.


BETTY JEAN BROWN


11/17/44- 12/08/05

wishes to thank you for your
kind expressions of sympathy
during the time of our bereave-
ment.
Please know that we are
blessed to have friends like you,
who have shown immeasurable
love and concerns.
Special thanks to the Range
Funeral Home staff for their pro-
fessionalism and compassion.
May God continue to shower
His blessings on all of you.




Deadline

for obituaries

Monday, 3:30 p.m.

Call

305-694-6210


ED WILLIE BOSTIC


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


10A Th Mi i Ti J ar 4- 6


r j


I


















































































Re 4 4; *H~ *S~ ,'BI~I~iI ~ i~rL ~


woo i 4


African Heritage Cultural Arts Center
2166 MLK Blvd.
The Soul Within
Through January 20:
Miami-Dade Parks Division of Art and
Culture presents 'The Soul Within'
Exhibition featuring recent works by
Kabuya Pamela Bowens. Gallery hours
are Monday through Friday from 9
a.m.-5 p.m. The exhibition runs
through January 20. Call 305-638-
6771.
EXHIBITIONS
Diaspora Vibe Gallery
3839 N Miami Ave Design Dtr
Thursday, Janary 5:


A Diaspora Vibe Gallery
Opens the new year with a
i t solo exhibit featuring inter-
nationally exhibited Korean
u artist, Kim Myung-Sik.
Using a palette of rich colors,
Kim utilizes the language of abstraction
to present recent paintings from his East
Side Story Series. Described as a
"painters' painter," his work reveals lus-
cious, layered, tactile surfaces that the-
matically refer to the notion of home.
Born in Korea, Kim refers to his origins
stating, "East, where the sun rises has
been the beginning of the day and is a
symbol of purity in my mind."
Opening Reception is from 6-10 p.m.
Exhibition continues until January 31.
Artist Talk, will be held on January 7,
from 2-4 p.m. Miami Design Gallery Walk
Please turn to CULTURE 3B


Kwanzaa Celebration at the Caleb The 16th Annual FAMU Miami Chapter Kwanznaa Celebration &
Feast have young drummers gather as they escort the Council of Elders out of the auditorium. The pro-
gram featured Junior and Senior High Schools Performing Arts programs, poetry,. a piano solo. a tribute
to the late Bob Marley. photo Alline


I*i *


* 4


i*









,H h MLiAiA TImes. Jaur 4- 2s


It was a white Christmas cel-
ebration for Judy Scavella,
wife of the late Elliot J.
Scavella. Not with snow, but
with a transformation of her
home into a setting of white
miniature lights, white table
settings with white chair cover-
ings, white on white attire for
the Psi Phi Band, and a gor-
geous white 2-piece suit accen-
tuated with diamonds worn by
the hostess.
At the reception, soft jazz
music greeted the arriv-
ing guests along with
hors dioeuvres from
shrimp and crab salads
to conch fritters, etc.
Among the first to arrive
were Larry and Carolyn
Adams and Gigi B.
Watson.
At the stroke of 5 p.m.,
the guests ascended the J. SCA
stairs to the dining room
and there were Elliot and
Judy's friends who had been
around since forming the
'Snowbirds' long before his
death. Once in the dining area,
two helpers gave each person a
plate and they helped them-
selves to the hostess' cooking,
consisting of oxtails, ham, chit-
terlings, macaroni and cheese,
collard greens, okra, assorted
cakes and drinks.
During the dinner, favorite
songs were played, such as
New York, New York, Chicago,


At Last, and several Christmas
favorites including The
Christmas Song, Bells Will be
Ringing, and Winter
Wonderland. Even though it
was a sit-down dinner, some of
the guests hit the dance floor to
demonstrate their dance
prowess including Gregg L.
Mason and Carolyn Adams
who joined Beverly Johnson to
do the Electric Slide.
Some of the guests included
Reverend and Mrs. Eikeren
Koetier-Rye, NY; Mr.
and Mrs. Oscar Lee;
Mr. and Mrs. Russell
Jackson, Tamarac; Mr.
and Mrs. Garth C.
Reeves; Portar
Thompson and
Clarence Jackson; Mr.
and Mrs. Leon
Robinson, Evanston,
VELLA IL.; Mr. and Mrs. Brian
M i t c h e 1 1
Mitchelliville, MD.; Mr. and
Mrs. John Wallace, Pompano
Beach; Mr. and Mrs. George
Brown, Boca Raton; Marie
Saughter Brown; The
Honorable Cardiss Collins; Mr.
and Mrs. Gladston Morales;
and Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Wright.
Also in attendance were
Sharon Y. Woodruff; Jimmy
and Carolyn Roberts; Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Etta Potts; Mr.
and Mrs. Richard L. Evans;
Maxine McCurine, Chicago;


William Hudgins; Mr. and Mrs.
Sheilie M. Power and son.
Gary; Fernley A.
Murray, New York;
Jacquline Richardson;
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
Allen and Alice
Harrison.
To finish off an elegant
afternoon, Judy
received thanks from
those in attendance and
rewarded each with a MA
Christmas bag consist-
ing of a Judy Scavella
Enterprises, Inc. Planner for
2006, a fountain pen, and a 4-
pack gift of champagne from
California. Now she has begun
to plan for next year and added
more to the guest list.

******
Congratulations go out to
Soror Bobbie Brown, chair;
Andrea Foiley; Karen
Wiggins; and SoiMone
Washington of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority,
Inc. for planning such
an elaborate Christmas
party for their Delta
Gems (Deltateens),
recently, at the Job
Corp Building on 183rd
Street. Their invited
guests were the
Lamplighters of Omega M
Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.
with Cordelle Hayes, director.
The Delta Gems provided an
interesting Christmas program
consisting of poems, songs,
monolouges, liturgical dances,
and a delicious lunch. Some of
the participants were Denise
Martin, Clara Foster,
Shatome Richardson, Taquisa
Brown, Latarra Larkin,
Dalnita Larkin, Chantel Reed,
and Brittney Martinez, presi-
dent.
Also enjoying the invitations


and program were
Lamplighters Chauncey
Paugh, president;
Keyonta Wofford, vice
president; Mark
LockWood, treasurer;
Todd Ballou, step cap-
tain; Dantei Edwards;
Dahnel Sanders; Keon
Lee; Warren Clark;
Austin Harris; Charles
Cooper; Travis
.SON Brazzel; Tayron
Straughter; William
Sunkett; Trevin Price;
Deandre Sutherland; Dante
Hanley; Charles Josh; Paul
Benson; Roan White; and
Dunae Perry.
Kudos go out to the
Lamplighter chaperones, Lori
Capehart, Laurice Hepburn,
Jesse Sandiland, Rose Ballou,
Bettye Bacon, Stacie B. Price,
and Desirei Jenkins.


Senator Dr. Frederica
S. Wilson began the
year of 2005 with the
5000 Role Models of
Excellence annual Dr.
Martin L. King, Jr.
Unity Breakfast with a
big bang and ended the
year with an even bigger
bang by closing out with
EEK a Holiday Youth Summit
held at the Port of Miami
(Terminal 'J'), on December 13.
Two weeks prior, she and her
staff provided a Prevention of
Drugs Program at Miami Edison
Middle for the same elementary
students.
It was a cool morning when
the students arrived wearing
their white shirts and role
model ties. They were escorted
to their seats by Role Models
Detective Robert Garland,
George Kennedy, Major Artie
Weatherinton, Thurman


McNeal, Warden Alonso
Perkins, Everglades Prison,
Staff Sgt. Donald Blackshear,
etc.
After being seated,
Reverend Abraham Thomas
led the group in singing
Christmas songs like Deck
The Halls, Santa is Coming to
Town, Jingle Bells and
more. Everyone got into
the spirit. That was the
cue for Mimi
Sutherland, RN,
Jackson Memorial
Hospsital and her staff
to present a Kids and
Guns/Kids Killing Kids
Show. The role models
really enjoyed the pup- WIJ
pets singing and danc-
ing to many of the songs they
were familiar with.
Grace was given for the
lunch and the Psi Phi Band
provided entertainment dur-
ing the meal. The band played
Santa Is Coming to Town
while Santa made his
entrance shouting Ho, Ho, Ho
and a very Merry Christmas!
Santa was none other than
Paul Wilson, son of Senator
Wilson.
Following Santa's greetings,
each role model received gifts
including a basketball or
football, an electronic game,
and a pair of role models
sneakers. Each one thanked
the Police Officers for their
sponsorship and contribu-
tions.
Some of the schools present
included Biscayne Gardens,
Broadmoor, Carol City,
Carrie P. Meek, Edison Park,
Golden Glades, Holmes, Lillie
C. Evans, Miami Park, Myrtle
Grove, Oak Grove, Phyllis
Wheatley, Poinciana Park,
R.R. Moton, Shadowlawn,
Skyway, W.J. Bryan, and


William A. Chapman.


Sadness covered South Florida
as the demise of Dr. Christina
Martin Eve interrupted the spir-
it of Christmas. Family mem-
bers, Sigma Gamma Rho and
Egelloc Civic and Social Club
members, Ebenezer
UMC members and
friends celebrated her
life in a week of mourn-
ing, memorization, and
home-going two days
before Christmas.
Eve was memoralized
S at her church, Ebenezer
S UMC with T. Eilene
LSON Martin-Major serving as
Mistress of Ceremony.
Eve's organizational members
relived her legacy and resolutions
were read from Ebenezer UMC,
Miami-Dade County and
Bethune-Cookman College.
Kudos go out to Emily Gail
Clark, a loving god-daughter,
and family members who pre-
pared a state-of-the-art homego-
ing program with an elegant for-
mat, multi-colors, bio, and a
review of her congressional
honor by Congresswoman Carrie
Meek.
The impact Dr. Eve made as a
teacher, assistant principal, prin-
cipal, school namesake honoree,
and being the last living founder
of Egelloc, was proclaimed from
the lips of G. Holmes Braddock,
retired school board chairman;
Dr. S. Frank McKoy, alumni,
Shaw University; Aggie M. Reed;
Reverend Dr. Joreatha McCall
Capers, Pastor; Pernella Burke;
and Walter Clark who led Your
Grace and Mercy and It is Well
With My Soul along with the
mass choir of the church. She's
gone, but will always be remem-
bered. Sleep on Dr. Eve and
take your needed rest.


Congratulations to Donna
Benton-Grant, Ph.D. upon
publication of her new chil-
dren's book: "Meet the Red
Bear." Secure your copy by
contacting Donna at 305-205-
8396.
Newly elected Union of Black
Episcopalians officers of the
Theodore R. Gibson Chapter
who were installed by the very
Rev. Cannon Fritz Bazin,
Dean of the North Deanery are
Kathleen Walker, Church of


the Incarnation, President;
Gay Outler, the Historic St.
Agnes, Vice-President;
Cupidine Dean, St. Agnes,
Treasurer; Josephine-Davis
Rolle, Church of the
Incarnation, Historian; -and
Donald F. Benjamin, Trinity
Episcopal Cathedral,
Secretary.
Hearty congratulations to
Judge Shirlyon J.
McWhorter, who was appoint-
ed by her peers, to the presti-


gious position of Circuit Court
Representative for the 2006
Judges' Conference. This
event will be held at the Ritz
Carlton in Amelia
Island from January
3rd-6th.
Your Soror's (Delta's)
are very happy for you!
Nellie C. Jackson,
eldest daughter of the
late Euturpie R.
Newsome, is visiting
her family and old time
friends and classmates GIl
for the holidays. Nellie
lives in Junction City, Kansas.
Former Pittsburgh Steeler
grid star and network football
analyst Lynn Swann is
expected to become a candi-
date for Governor of
Pennsylvania.
Get well wishes to all of
you, From all of us and a


Blessed New Year.
Alice Dean-Harrison,
Cleomie Allen-Smith,
Mertis Seymour, Mae
Hamilton Clear,
Henry Goa, Emily
Carey-Pittman,
i: Lawrence Seymore,
Alice Harrison,
Marcus Symonette,
Ida Cash, Anna
SWestmore, Diane
Culmer. Herbert
Rhodes, Lt. Col.
'ON Norman Carey,
George V. McPhee,
Bessie Forbes, Lillian
Richardson, Frances Brown,
Rudie Marks, and Princess
Roberts Lamb.
Old Miamians and longtime
friends were saddened to
learn of the demise of Voilet
Higgs-Armbrister, Christina
Martin Eve and Valerie


Bethel-Smith. All three were
laid to rest last week.
Condolences to their families.
Congratulations to
Sidney McCray,
International First
Vice President of Phi
Beta Sigma Fraternity,
Inc.
Kendra Clarke is
home for the Holidays
visiting her family and
friends. Kendra now M
lives in Silver Springs,
Md. Evelyn Hield-
Brown returned home to 'vit
her sisters Janet Hield and
"DgDa" Saunders and their
family. Christmas Day was
Evelyn's Birthday and she
really enjoyed the day with
her family. Evelyn lives in
New York City, N.Y.
Also returning home for the
holidays was our college stu-


10


dents. Welcome home all of
you!
Billie Bouie flew in from
Los Angeles, California
to attend his Aunt
Rowena Marshall
funeral and to visit his
sisters Velma Arnold
and Gwen Thomas.
Wedding Anniversary
Greetings go out to our
Love Birds: Micheal D.
&RTER & (Davyre
Gibson)Smith, Sr.,
Dec 26th: Their 13th
Calvik C. and Pauline B.
McKinney, Dec.29th: Their
55thi;
George V. and Gloria B.
McPhee, Dec. 29th: Their
48th
In 2006 may all of your
wishes come true for you! and
may you enjoy every Golden
Day in the New year!


New Jersey Officials say that the situation was up in the air over the future
for newly appointed Assemblywoman Evelyn Williams who was arrested for
shoplifting in a downtown Newark store. She is accused of
switching a price tag from a $14.99 item to a set of bed sheets
priced at $59.99. Selected last month by political leaders to
replace the late Donald Tucker, Williams had previously served
as a deputy mayor and a correction officer .. .
Out in Detroit, City Councilwoman-Elect Monica Conyers, wife
of Michigan's powerful Congressman John Conyers, was
BLIGE accused of slugging a woman in her eye in a bar fight, which
started as an argument and a shoving match. Police were await-
ing charges, if any . CONYERS
The US Postal Service announced the celebrities to be on the new first class 39
cents stamps being issued on Jan. 8th, including actress Hattie McDaniels, boxer Sugar Ray
Robinson, baseball hall-of-famer Roy Campanella, and diplomat Clifton Wharton ...
Look for a rash of new names to emerge on local and state political party lists as Black and
Latino candidates reach out for top posts in 2006. Cuban-American New Jersey
US Senate designee Robert Menendez and Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael Steele,
Republican, top the list, while Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell looms as
a key GOP choice for his state's gubernatorial nomination, and Devil Patrick, a
former US Justice Department official, is running for the Democratic nomina-
l tion for Governor of Massachusetts. The former Pittsburgh Steelers star receiv-
er is impressing Republicans as he seeks the party's gubernatori-
al nomination. In possible senate races, Tennessee Rep. Harold
Ford, 35, is leading in the polls for the Democratic nomination,
STEELE and in Michigan, where Sen. Barach Obama already sits, popu-
lar Detroit preacher Reverend Keith Butler, has won the support
of leading Republicans for the GOP Senate nomination ...
Meanwhile it is no longer, 'Look-Who-Is-Coming-to-Dinner,' as once taboo
interracial romances are more common in primetime television. Although the TV
industry has been accused of not casting and portraying enough actors of dif-
ferent races, many say that this has been slowly shifting, but still has a way to WINFREY
go ...
The year 2005 has been one of success for Black coaches in the NFL, which could lead to
more opportunities for Blacks to be offered more coaching jobs, what with Tony Dungy's
record with the Indianapolis Colts, before his family tragedy, Lovie Smith maneuvering the
turnaround for the Chicago Bears, and Marvin Lewis' guiding of the Cincinnati Bengals. With
six Black head coaches in the NFL this season, there should be more openings in 2006 . .
Shipping company FEDEX has yanked a commercial starring Minnesota Vikings quarterback
Daunte Culpepper and three teammates after they were arrested for partici- --
pating in a lewd incident on a boat in October . .
For the second straight year TV icon Oprah Winfrey is listed as Entertainment
Tonight top celebrity and she is tied for 9th place on Access Hollywood. For the
holidays, Winfrey and her 'significant other' Steadman Graham played match-
maker with best friend Gayle King and Gospel singer Benjamin 'BeBe' Winans
inviting them to bring in the New Year at her Santa Barbara estate . .
Mary J. Blige will be among the headliners for the 2006 Essence Music
Festival on July lst-3rd now relocated to Houston, TX from New Orleans, LA.
CULPEPPER


AROUND TOWN
I am not interested in being Archie Bunker, I am looking for-
ward to becoming George Bush,' declared Reverend Al Sharpton
last week as he claimed that he was dropping his role on a tele-
vision sitcom which had been tentatively titled, 'Al in the Family,'
by CBS TV...
NYC's Department of Education has given the Boy's Choir of
Harlem until Jan. 31st to vacate its premises at 127th Street and
Madison Avenue asserting that founder Walter Turnbull had
COMBS failed to sever his ties with and was still running the Boys Choir.
The Choir Academy, a partnership between the Board of WILLIAMS
Education and the Boys Choir, has 616 students enrolled, but fewer than 125
are actually in the choir ...
Democratic activist Charlie King, who has made two attempts for the Democratic nomina-
tion for Lt. Governor, has raised $1.5 million in his bid for Attorney General in a crowded six
person race ...
Seeking the Democratic nod for Lt. Governor is Letitia Eve, a Buffalo political power and
daughter of former Assembly Deputy Speaker Arthur Eve ..
Although she begins actual City Council duties on January 4th, Harlem's
popular Councilwoman-elect Inez 'Betty' Dickens will have her community
inaugural ceremony in her district on Friday, January 6th beginning at 7 p.m.
at Our Children's Foundation located at 527 West 125th Street.


SHARPTON


The New York Yankees happily re-signed All-Star outfielder
Bernie Williams for the minimum $1.5 million salary ...
Police said they were still investigating the incidents at the
56th Street club Exit where three people were reported shot and OBAMA
three others stabbed at a CD listening party hosted by Sean
'Diddy' Combs' Bad Boy Records. Combs and his entourage attended the party,
but left before the violence started, sources said ...
Brooklyn court reporters asserted that Judge Theodore Jones, who handled
the NYC's transit strike issues at its crucial times, is in line for a promotion to
the newly created position of Chief of Administration for the borough's civil


courts . .
Congrats to veteran news woman Nayaba Arinde who moved from the Daily Challenge to edi-
tor of the Amsterdam News ..
It was a wedding unique in many ways on December 14th in Pretoria, South Africa climaxing
a ten year acquaintance, as Kim Robinson, daughter of a Queens hospital
administrative assistant and a Brooklyn mail carrier, and Andries Nel, whose
father is a retired diplomat in the former apartheid government
were wed before an audience that included two Cabinet members
of the Mbeki government. Nel is currently an African Nationalist
Congress Member of Parliament, serving as the party's chief
deputy whip . .
S In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, contemporary American
artist Kara Walker, 36, widely recognized for her explorations of
issues of race, gender and sexuality through the 18th century STEELE
medium of cut-paper silhouettes, juxtaposes American paintings
PATAKI from the Museum's collection with her own work to explore waterborne disas-
ters and their impact on African-Americans.

LATE TICKER
Baseball circles were saddened over the death this week of Elrod Hendricks, 64, longtime
Orioles coach and player, who was born in the Virgin Islands and spent most of his professional
time with the Orioles ..
New York Gov. George Pataki's only clemency request granted this year went to Darryl Best,
who was convicted in a 2001 controversial charge. Best, 49, was given a 15 year sentence, but
Pataki cut the term to time served, making him available to be released in January.


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


2B The Miami Times Janu 6


BS







........ ..I. ..... ....w...... Mi miTi elJnu r 4-10


____ a a"


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content
Available fro C % omeal Nws Pd rs

Available from Commercial News Providers"


* f*.


CULTURE
continued from 1B


Night, January
6-10 p.m. Call
4046.


12, from
305-573-


Joseph Caleb Auditorium
5400 NW 22 Ave.
A Night of Dances for
the Nations
Saturday, Janary 7:
Affluent Productions is


Africa Melody Kwanzaa Drum Circle at the Caleb


proud to present A Nightt of
Dances obr the Nations at 7
p.m. at the Joseph Caleb
Auditorium.
"The goal of our company
is to present quality arts
oriented productions," said
Wanda Mack, Artistic
Director and C.E.O. of
Affluent Productions, Inc.
Our vision is to take inner
city, at risk girls and intro-
duce them to the arts, more
specifically dance.
Spanning everything from
liturgical and ballet to
urban hip hop and mod-
ern.
Programs like this will
showcase young women
who have and are overcom-
ing the obstacles that
they've had to face growing-
up in an impoverished
area. It is with great pride
that we present to the com-
munity a positive message
of spirituality, poise, beau-
ty, confidence and grace.
A Night of Dances fJr the
Natiorts is sure to be an
awesome production you
don't want to miss. Tickets
are on sale now at the
Joseph Caleb Auditorium
Box Office or at any ticke-
master outlet. For more
information, please call
Affluent Productions at
305-345-0416.


HanpI ha% nU% In nluJcVi


*0 0


,vvrf- s ns faIm


ARIES: MARCH 20- APRIL 18
The object of your infatuation leaves you
tongue-tied. Famous lines from an old poem
may inspire speech: "Drink to me only with
thine eyes and I will pledge with mine." Lucky
numbers 12, 10, 41, 2, 1.

TAURUS: APRIL 19 MAY 20
All differences aside, family gatherings
sure gave you a warm feeling over the holi-
days. More effort may be involved to meet at
other times, but the cared-for feeling one can
experience with kin has its own immeasurable
reward. Lucky numbers 50, 14, 31, 14, 50.

GEMINI: MAY 21 -JUNE 20
Kermit the Frog laments that, "It's not easy
being green." Well, it's not easy being you
right now. Thorny issues have come up which
could easily dishearten you. Set priorities,
plan your approach and then act. Lucky num-
bers 51, 6, 10, 11, 6.

CANCER: JUNE 21 JULY 22
If you were to give yourself a grade on how
good a friend you've been lately, would it be a
passing or failing one? If you can give yourself
high marks, hurrah! If not, you can always do
"extra credit" to bring it up. Lucky numbers 40,


50,3, 11, 10.

LEO: JULY 23 AUGUST 22
The Milky Way galaxy contains the brilliant
star that is our Sun. It's quite apparent that
you would like to be the center of the
Universe. But, frankly, even you have to con-
cede that your competition is a little too
strong. Lucky numbers 6, 5, 7, 44, 20.

VIRGO: AUG. 23 SEPT. 22
In a relay race, you hand off the baton to
your teammate at the end of your lap. Virgos,
however, are prone to take the whole task on
themselves. Remember, you have teammates.
Call on them to share the load and help navi-
gate the turns. Lucky numbers 50, 4, 6, 13, 9.

LIBRA: SEPT. 23 OCT. 22
So sorry, the primal impulses of your Id will
be rudely slapped down by your Superego.
This "parental figure" of your psyche is work-
ing overtime to insure that social standards
are met. Now you know where all the fun
went. Lucky numbers 10, 50, 40, 52, 4.
SCORPIO: OCT. 23 NOV. 21
PT Barnum believed, 'There's a sucker
born every minute."Therefore, he felt no com-


pulsion to deliver on a sideshow act as billed.
RT. may have gotten away with that tactic, but
his philosophy would hardly merit a ringing
endorsement from any reputable busi-
nessperson. Lucky numbers 4, 8, 1, 10, 51.
SAGITTARIUS: NOV. 22 DEC. 21
Normally, I would say it's not polite to toot
your own horn. But, with what you've just
accomplished, I waive that advice. Right now,
your self-pride is utterly justified. Lucky num-
bers 17, 42, 35, 36, 6.
CAPRICORN: DEC.22 JAN.19
Real estate agents are required to fully dis-
close to a buyer any pertinent data. In every-
day life, candidness is most often suggested
also, but one needn't expose every personal
detail. Lucky numbers 6, 16, 50, 6, 18.

AQUARIUS: JAN.20 FEB.18
As Sherlock Holmes would say, 'The game
is afoot." Something curious and fascinating
has popped into your life. All of your senses
have been put on high alert as this new mys-
tery completely absorbs you. Lucky numbers
5, 41, 33, 12, 21.

PISCES: FEB. 19 MARCH 19
If only you could call upon an industrious elf
or two to magically appear and handle all of
your disagreeable work. Better not hold your
breath; the required elbow grease will need
to come from you. Rumplestilskin is but a fairy
tale. Lucky numbers. 9, 20, 2, 14, 7.


SOMETHING EXTRA SPECIAL FOR YOU FROM

OCEAN BANK


Visit one of our offices today or call (305) 569-5162. We always have your best interest in mind.
IB OCEAN BANK
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Bird Road: 7951 S tW 40tllh Ste Miami. FRolida l3315 Coral Gables: 2(i:l I.eJneoo F.o) (;ora i GablOlfni Iirrdl 31:14 E bassyLakes:'lSI 7 r41 t low ,l itiool P .; I trl ji02[
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Brickell: ICOO Ui ,cllA velnue Mamoi. floiida 33131 Mianl Lakes: M7455ML) ie MOl l0 ,u .lL- 11,4illA (n:O4Ii .G.lo':, f0, id.o 3.*,3133
Coeal Way: Ir(15 S W Sli Stret Mi.mi, Floidatu 31795 Owntown Miami: ;'0!1:0 I lt aMlee. Miami I 10(,ri :31n '3 M:iller Drive: 1i-,'02o 1w wh o to' S Mna i~m., onl C33A1
West tIialeah: 1801 West Ith Av,1 ue. ialeah. rioia 33UT0 Downtow Fort Laulerale- d N.F 3r1d Aw I a.Arda F,100 : l Weston: 2700 S uComnmerce P y Wel0n. 1Horid6 3313.1
Kendall: 10950 Kr 'iii Dll r ,av M nl, fl uiidal 331;7"


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will be a penalty Ior early withdrawal Ior CDs. Interest cannot rerttain onr deposit and payout of intlresi is nlanrdalory for lthe 13 month CD.
M(lmbtel.
1121a Ffiml Opportunity / Affirnativn Actiori Ftnployr FDIC


j


ac~ls ,o19u109uui otO:


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offices, nursing homes, public transportation
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The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006 3B


s kcalB Must Control y







T WV inami Timc.% .anuarv 4-.1. g 2006


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


lumawr


rtt nM% fIn 2 Completion of HOPE VI homes


- 4w


- -
sme e


v -


- "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


HOPE VI
continued from 7B
Section 8 vouchers to
homes that Habitat for
Humanity of Miami
has built at the site
where the housing
project once stood.
The non-profit organi-
zation has completed
three of five homes
under the $35 million
HOPE VI project,
which is part of a larg-
er $106 million hous-
ing revitalization in
the community. The
program will replace
the distressed public
housing which for-
merly stood on the
site with a mix of
homeownership and


rental units.
"This is a dream for
these homeowners,"
Rolle said. "Now their
kids can play in their
own yards, and they
can drive up their own
driveways. They have
gone from renting to
homeownership and I
am especially proud of
all the work performed
from all the parties
including MDHA,
Habitat, and U.S.
HUD."
Lawton, 62, a grand-
mother who is raising
her granddaughter
and three great-
grandchildren, was a
37-year resident of
Scott Homes. Lawton,
who will be moving


into a four-
bedroom/two- bath-
room house located
near NW 21 Ave and
NW 70 Street, was
happy that she would
be able to celebrate
the holidays in her
new space.
"I would just like to
say that I am very glad
to be moving into my
own home and I would
like to thank HOPE VI
and Habitat for mak-
ing it possible for me
and my family to move
into our dream home,"
she said.
Kim Sheriff, who is
moving into a three-
bedroom/one-bath-
room house also locat-
ed near NW 21 Ave.


and NW 70 Street,
lived in the former
Scott homes for 12
years. A native of
Liberty City, she cur-
rently works for the
City of Miami Parks
department. She will
be living in the home
with her son and
daughter.
"I would like to
thank all the members
and staff of Habitat for
Humanity, Scott-
Carver project, and
HOPE VI for their sup-
port and efforts for
helping me build my
new home. I also have
a special thank you to
all the volunteers for
their help," Sheriff
said.


MIAMI-DADE

--""1


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T-W -


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MIAMI"I

-wim I


RE-ADVERTISEMENT


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY FIRE RESCUE DEPARTMENT
REQUEST FOR DESIGN-BUILD SERVICES (RDBS) FOR
THE EAST HOMESTEAD FIRE RESCUE STATION NO. 65
OCI PROJECT NO. DB04-FIRE-02
FIRE PROJECT NO. MDFRD D-B 10

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County), pursuant to Chapter 287.055, Florida Statutes, and
Chapter 2, Sections 2-8.1'asiamended by Ordinance 05-15, 2-10.4 of the&Miami-Dade Codunty Cede i
and Administrative Order 3-39, announces that design-build services are required for the Miami-Dade
Fire Rescue Department (FIRE), East Homestead Fire Rescue Station No. 65, located at SW 344th
Street, east of SW 167th Avenue (also denominated as the Southeast corner of Palm Drive and S.E.
13th Avenue), in the City of Homestead, Miami-Dade County, Florida.

Copies of the design-build criteria package may be purchased beginning on December 28, 2005 at 2:00
PM at the offices of Perez Associates, located at 9450 Sunset Drive, Suite 100-A, Miami, FL, 33173.
The phone number for Perez Associates is (305) 596-5006. The non-refundable fee for each design-
build criteria package is $50.00 and only checks or money orders are acceptable and shall be made
payable to Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners.

TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS


11.00 General Structural Engineering
12.00 General Mechanical Engineering
13.00 General Electrical Engineering
14.00 Architecture


16.00 General Civil Engineering
18.00 -Architectural Construction Management
20.00 Landscape Architecture


To satisfy the technical certification requirements listed above for the requested services, valid techni-
cal certification in all of the above-specified area(s) of work must be held by a firm responding as a sole
respondent, or a team of firms. Teams of firms must designate one of its members as the "prime con-
sultant". Furthermore, if an individual is providing services that require technical certification by Miami-
Dade County, the individual is required to have the relevant certification(s). Individuals who are not
technically certified will not be "allowed" to perform work for those scopes of work requiring technical
certification. Additionally, firms that list other areas of work as supplements to the required technical
certifications must also be certified for those supplemental areas.

Pursuant to Administrative Order a design-build firm is defined as a partnership, corporation, or other
legal entity that:
a. Is certified under Section 489.119, Florida Statutes, to engage in contracting through a certified
or registered general contractor or a certified or registered building contractor as the qualifying
agent; or

b. Is certified under Section 471.023, Florida Statutes, to practice engineering; certified under
Section 481.219 to practice architecture; or certified under Section 481.319 to practice landscape
architecture.

Those firms submitting as a joint venture must submit documentation for each entity participating in the
joint venture to include the legal name of the companies participating in the joint venture as registered
with the State of Florida.

A solicitation notification will be forwarded electronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with
Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail address in their vendor registration form. It will also
be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms without
an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation notification.

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Fernando V. Ponassi who may be contacted via e-mail at
FernanP@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-5637.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement
100% Set Aside Community Business Enterprise Program (CBE) Measures (Design Portion Only)
29% Community Small Business Enterprise Program (CSBE) Measures (Construction Portion Only)

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on January 10, 2006 at 3:00 P.M. in the
Stephen P. Clark Center, 111 NW 1st Street, 18th Floor, Conference Room 18-3, Miami, Florida. While
attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is January 27, 2006 at 11:00 A.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED.*

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27
for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.


MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE TO PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
DESIGN OF A STORMWATER PUMP STATION
OCI PROJECT NO. E05-DERM-01 GOB 311-71002

The County Manager, Miami-Dade County (County); pursuant to Section 287.055, Florida Statutes, and
Chapter 2, Sections 2-8.1, (as amended by Ordinance 05-15), and 2-10.4 of the County Code and
Administrative Order 3-39, announces that professional architectural and engineering (A/E) services will
be required for the design of a stormwater pump station for the Department of Environmental Resources
Management.

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

Proposers are advised of the following minimum consultant requirements. The prime and/or subcon-
sultants selected must have experience in the following areas:
1. Design of at least three (3) stormwater pump stations, to include emergency generators and trash
racks, for governmental agencies and/or municipalities, within the last eight (8) years from the submit-
tal date of this solicitation.
2. Proof of experience must include letters from clients indicating successful designs of pump stations
along with a description of involvement by principal and key workers.

The above expertise must be met by a qualified individual(s) of the prime consultant's and/or subcon-
sultant's firm who has demonstrated project management experience related to the above minimum
requirements. The experience must be demonstrated by direct or substantial involvement of the indi-
vidual(s) in a supervisory capacity at the project manager level or above in these projects. The deter-
mination of the individual's qualifications and compliance with these minimum requirements shall be at
the sole discretion of the County.

,, leseff te that the individual(s) providing such expertise must be.at.the project manager level or
abov .a9nh myst: 'I) Be an'employee of the cons~ianf (2).HaVe supervisor. responsibility atthe proj
ect manager level or above, and (3) Have a direct and substantial involvement with the proposed proj-
.".'bct 6 la'ay"f-td-1y basis&.'The firm's selection will be bsed upon tie 6expei~We and expertise of the
firm and the individual(s) providing such experience to meet the minimum requirement. The individual(s)
providing the required expertise shall not be reassigned during the course of the contract without the
express written consent of the County. Any such substitutions shall be of equivalent or better
qualifications and the County reserves the right to review and approve replacements and/or substitu-
tions at its sole discretion.

Any respondents not meeting the above minimum experience requirements will not be considered for
further evaluation by the Competitive Selection Committee. Information regarding the aforementioned
minimum requirements must be included in Sections F and/or G of OCI Form 1, as indicated in Section
2.1(2).

SCOPE OF SERVICES
The scope of services consists of the design (including but not limited to environmental, structural,
mechanical, electrical, and architectural work related to this project) of a stormwater pump station with
its telemetry system and a conveyance system to be connected to a piping system currently under con-
struction. The project, located in the vicinity of NW 82 Avenue and NW 7 Street, requires boring a micro
tunnel beneath SR 826 to allow the discharge of stormwater into the North line Canal, located on the
opposite side of the expressway. The selected consultant will be required to find a suitable location for
the pump station within the vicinity of the project, subject to County approval. Due to conditions in the
area, the pump station will require the installation of an emergency generator. One qualified consultant
will be retained under a non-exclusive Professional Services Agreement (PSA) with an effective term of
three (3) years.


3.02A
11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00


TECHNICAL CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
10.01 Environmental Engineering Stormwater Drainage Design and
Engineering Services (PRIME)
16.00 General Civil Engineering (PRIME)
Highway Systems Tunnel Design
General Structural Engineering
General Mechanical Engineering
General Electrical Engineering
Architecture


A copy of the Notice To Professional Consultants (NTPC), forms and accompanying participation provi-
sions (as applicable) may be obtained at the Office of Capital Improvements Architectural & Engineering
Unit located at 111 NW 1St Street, 21st Floor, Miami, FL 33128. The phone number and fax respec-
tively for the unit is (305) 375-2307 and (305) 350-6265. A solicitation notification will be forwarded elec-
tronically to all consultants who are pre-qualified with Miami-Dade County and have included an e-mail
address in their vendor registration form. It will also be e-mailed to those who have vendor enrolled on-
line. Additionally, those pre-qualified firms without an e-mail address will be faxed a solicitation
notification. The NTPC and accompanying documents may be obtained on line at http://www.co.miami-
dade.fl.us/dpm, at the following link "Solicitations On-Line."

The Consultant Coordinator for this project is Terry L.' Rolle who may be contacted via e-mail at
xtlr@miamidade.gov, fax: (305) 350-6265 or phone: (305) 375-2272.

CONTRACT MEASURE REQUIREMENTS

One (1) Agreement 30% Community Business Enterprise (CBE) Goal

A pre-submittal project briefing for interested firms will be held on January 6, 2006, at 2:00 P.M. in the
Stephen P. Clark Center, located at 111 N.W. 1st Street, Miami, Florida, on the 18th floor, in Conference
Room 18-3. While attendance IS NOT mandatory, interested parties ARE ENCOURAGED to attend.

Deadline for submission of proposals is January 20, 2005 at 11:00 A.M., LOCAL TIME, all sealed
envelopes and containers must be received at Miami-Dade County, Clerk of the Board of County
Commissioners, 111 NW 1st Street, 17th Floor, Suite 202, Miami, Florida 33128-1983. BE
ADVISED THAT ANY AND ALL SEALED PROPOSAL ENVELOPES OR CONTAINERS RECEIVED
AFTER THE ABOVE SPECIFIED RESPONSE DEADLINE SHALL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

This solicitation is subject to Miami-Dade County's Cone of Silence pursuant to Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Miami-Dade County Code, as amended. Please review Miami-Dade County Administrative Order 3-27
for a complete and thorough description of the Cone of Silence.





C H E C K OUUT OU R CLASSI F I E DS


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


S T Miami Times. January 4-10, 2006


CELEBRATIONI



_ f_ _i"Copyrighted Material


---S. Syndicated Content


Available from'Commercial News Providers"


150YEARS OF DESSER


Fresh Express f
Salad Blend. ...........2... Z 4 .0 0
Spring Mix, Triple Hearts, European, Italian, Riviera,
American, Veggie Lover's, Fancy Field Greens or
Hearts of Romaine, 5 to 12-oz bag
SAVE UP TO 2.98 ON 2


Chicago Rolls,
8-Count ......................... 1.89
Crispy, Crusty and Fresh, From the Publix Bakery, 12-oz pkg.
SAVE UP TO .70


PU LU
WSri


Publix Deli Family
Combo Meal ....... ...... 99
Hot or Chilled, Includes One Rotisserie
or 8-pc. Mixed Fried Chicken, Choice
of Two 16-oz Sides, Potato Salad,
Slaw or Beans and 1-pk. of 4-rolls, each
SAVE UP TO .50


12-Pack Selected
Pepsi Products.......3 10.00
12-oz can (Limit two deals on selected
advertised varieties.) (6-Pack Selected
Pepsi Products, 24-oz bot. ... 2.99)
SAVE UP TO 1.67 ON 3


Kraft Mayo or Miracle OBU ONE
Whip Dressing ....... GET oNE EE
Light, Fat Free, Real Mayo or Real
Mayonnaise With Lime Juice or Light,
Free or Regular Miracle Whip Dressing,
32-or jar or cont. (Limit two deals on
selected advertised varieties.)
SAVE UP TO 3.39


12-Pack
Heineken Beer.......... 11.59
Or Amstel Light, 12-oz bot. or Heineken
or Amstel Light Fridge Pack, 12-oz can
SAVE UP TO 2.90


Prices effective Thursday, January 5 through Wednesday, January 11, 2006.
Only in the Following Counties; Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie. Indian River, Okeechobee and Monroe.
Prices not effective at Publix Sabor. Quantity Rights Reserved.
www. publix. com/ads


Publix
WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE.'


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:S ineS S lack
SPONSORED BY
:THE BEACON COUNCIL
Miami-Dade County's Official Economic Development Partnership


Full Name of
Business
Chi-Chi's Beauty Salon
6341 NW 7th Ave.
Miami, Florida 33150
786-863-7581

Year established
October 2004

Owners
Chiquetta Joseph

Number of full-time
employees
4

Products/Services
Hair, nails, haircuts,
and pedicures

Future goals
To also become a nail
supply distributor
within Miami

Why did you start
this business and
how has it grown?
I have always been
interested in beauty
products. I tried every-
thing but beauty is my
niche. I started with
one person and over
the years the clientel
has grown dramatical-
ly.

What were some of
the obstacles you
faced and how did
you overcome them?
When I first opened my
business I didnt have
the slightlest idea what
to do. I went out and
started asking ques-
tions and advertised. I
didn't know how to get
my permits but once I
got that together I
started working and
the clients started to
come to me.


Who does your
business best
serve and why?


CHIQUETTA JONES
We serve a lot of men.
A lot of times when we
are packed it's
because of the men
being here in addition
the women. I have a lot
of clients from the
North Miami and Carol
City areas. A lot of cus-
tomers come from this
area as well.

How have your
experiences helped
meet the needs
of your clients?
As I progressed along,
I've learned more
about people and I
learned how to give the
customers exactly
what they want
instead of what I think
they need. Sometimes
you want to do some-
thing and the cus-
tomers have different
ideas, so I've learned
to really adapt to their
needs.

Where did you get
the name of your
company and does
it have any
significant meaning?
Chi-Chi is a name
given by my Uncle.
Everyone called me
Chiquetta except him.
I wanted my business
to be something
unique.


Completion of HOPE VI homes


Miami-Dade Housing
Agency and Habitat
for Humanity joined
Commissioner Rolle

County Commissioner Dorrin
D. Rolle joined new homeown-
ers Mattie Lawson and Kim
Sheriff to celebrate the joy and
pride of homeownership during
a ceremony on Thursday,
December 20. Cathy McCann,
the president of the Board of
Directors of .Habitat for
Humanity of Miami; Jose
Cintron, housing and develop-
ment coordinator of the office of
Public Housing, United States
Department of Housing and
Urban Development; and
Alphonso K. Brewster director
of Miami-Dade Housing Agency
joined the commissioner in
congratulating Lawson and
Sheriff, former residents in the
troubled James E. Scott hous-
Sing project.
Sheriff and Lawton are using
Please turn to HOPE VI 4B


( 0go prktos %urigrI


Mattie Lawson looks appreciatively at the keys to her new home as she takes them
from District Two's Commissioner Dorrin D. Rolle. Lawson and Kim Sheriff (also pic-
tured) are moving into new houses built by Habitat for Humanity on the site of the for-
mer James E. Scott housing project.


"ci-iUI


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Syndicated Content .

Available from Commercial News Providers"
.


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Miami a top city
Miami has cracked the top 10
travelers' picks for U.S. cities in
which to spend New Year's Eve.
The city moved up to ninth
place from No. 12 last year in a
study by Hotwire.com.
For the second consecutive
year, Chicago topped the list
from the San Francisco-based
discount travel site.
"Chicago has become a
perennial favorite destination
for New Year's Eve festivities,
due to its consistently low
prices on hotels and attractive
entertainment," explained
Barbara Messing, Hotwire vice
president of customer experi-
ence.


for New Year's
Orlando was the only othei
Florida city to appear. The
theme park mecca hit No. 2, uI
from No. 5 in 2005.
No. 3 is Phoenix, up from No
13 last year, while Hotwire's
home city of San Francisco fel
a notch to fourth place.
No. 5, Las Vegas, rose frorr
10th place last year, while thi,
year's No. 6, Atlanta, upped its
ranking from ninth.
Traditional New Year's Eve
destination New York Cit3
remained seventh on the list foi
Ihe second year.
Completing the top 10 wa,
San Diego, which fell from sixtl
place last year.


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............ .... ......


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Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny


8B The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006


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Syndicated Content


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CHECK OUT OUR CLASSIFIEDS


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:
A RESOLUTION, WITH ATTACHMENTS, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF TEMPORARY
CONSTRUCTION EASEMENT ("AGREEMENT"), IN SUB-
STANTIALLY THE ATTACHED FORM, ON CITY-OWNED
PROPERTY LOCATED ON WATSON ISLAND TO FLAG-
STONE ISLAND GARDENS, LLC ("FLAGSTONE"), TO PRO-
VIDE FOR: (1) TEMPORARY, NON-EXCLUSIVE USE OF
APPROXIMATELY 6.53 ACRES OF LAND, AS MORE PARTIC-
ULARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO
AND MADE A PART HEREOF, AS A PRIMARY STAGING
AREA, AND/OR SALES AND CONSTRUCTION OFFICES AND
EQUIPMENT MATERIAL LAY-DOWN; (2) TEMPORARY, NON-
EXCLUSIVE USE FROM TIME TO TIME, SUBJECT TO AVAIL-
ABILITY, OF APPROXIMATELY 48,289 SQUARE FEET OF
LAND, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT
"B" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF, AS AN
ADDITIONAL STAGING AREA AND/OR CONSTRUCTION
AND SALES OFFICES; AND (3) TEMPORARY NON-EXCLU-
SIVE USE OF APPROXIMATELY 93,853 SQUARE FEET OF
LAND, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT
"C" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF, FOR
THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING INGRESS AND EGRESS TO
AND FROM THE STAGING AREAS AND FOR SALES AND/OR
CONSTRUCTION OFFICES AND EQUIPMENT AND MATERI-
ALS LAY-DOWN; WITH TERMS AND CONDITIONS MORE
PARTICULARLY SET FORTH IN SAID AGREEMENT.
All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15671) City Clerk


MIAMI-DADE

Notice to Qualified Contractors
Miami-Dade County is soliciting interested contractors to agree to participate and perform in two (2) Miscellaneous Construction Contract (MCC) Bid No.
CICC 7040-0107 & CICC 7360-0/08 for various Departments throughout Miami-Dade County.
PRE-QUALIFICATION DOCUMENTS are open to public inspection and may be obtained from the Office of Capital Improvement, located at 111 NW 1 Street, 21st
Floor, Miami, Fl. 33128.
AVAILABLE
CICC 7360-0/08 REQUEST FOR PRICE QUOTATIONS (RPQ)


Miami Dade Public Works Contracts & Specification Section -15th Floor 111
NW 1st Street, Miami, FI
PWRK Contact Person/Telephone No.: Luis 0. Perez @ 305/375-2930
RPQ No.: 20050336 TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION LOCATION: SW 67
Avenue & SW 10 Street License Requirements: Electrical Contractor EST.
COST: $125,000.-
RPQ No.: 20050275 TRAFFIC SIGNAL INSTALLATION LOCATION: West 18
Ave & West 41 Street License Requirements: Electrical Contractor EST.
COST: $140,000 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following:
furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment, tools and performing all
operations necessary for the complete installation of traffic signals, that includes
traffic controller assembly, and mast arms. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 8, 2006
at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 1/25/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location:
111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
PWRK Contact Person/Telephone No.:
Jean Bernard Philippeaux @ 305/375-2930
RPQ No.: 20050326 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT LOCATION:
SW 157 Avenue & SW 96 Street License Requirements: Electrical Contractor
- EST. COST: $100,000-
RPQ No.: 20050325 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT LOCATION:
NW 97 Avenue & NW 58 Street License Requirements: Electrical Contractor -
EST. COST: $19,000 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following:
furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment, tools and performing all
operations necessary for the complete installation of traffic signals, that includes
traffic controller assembly, and mast arms. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 8, 2006
at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 1/31/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location:
111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, FI)
RPQ No.: 20050300 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT MIAMI
BEACH LOCATION: West Avenue & 15 Street- License Requirements:
Electrical Contractor EST. COST: $110,000 -
RPQ No.: 20050229 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT MIAMI
BEACH LOCATION: 17 Street & James Avenue License Requirements:
Electrical Contractor EST. COST: $110,000 -
RPQ No.: 20050298 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT MIAMI


BEACH- LOCATION: 73 Street & Byron Avenue License Requirements:
Electrical Contractor EST. COST: $110,000 -
RPQ No.: 20050297 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT MIAMI
BEACH LOCATION: Dickens Avenue & 75 Street- License Requirements:
Electrical Contractor EST. COST: $110,000 -
RPQ No.: 20050296 TRAFFIC SIGNAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENT MIAMI
BEACH- LOCATION: Tatum Waterway Drive & 81 Street & Byron Avenue -
License Requirements: Electrical Contractor EST. COST: $110,000 -
SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is not limited to, the following:
furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment, tools and performing all
operations necessary for the complete installation of traffic signals, that includes
traffic controller assembly, and mast arms. RPQ Bid Due Date: February 15, 2006
at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 2/7/2006 @ 10:00 a.m. Location:
111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
PWRK Contact Person/Telephone No,: Rolando Jimenez @ 305/375-2930
RPQ No.: 20050331 -ADA HOTLINE SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION LOCATION:
NW 17 Avenue from NW 20-21 Street License Requirements: General
Building, General Engineering, Concrete Engineering & Paving Engineering
Contractor- EST. COST: $400,000 SCOPE OF WORK: Work shall include, but is
not limited to, the following: furnishing all supervision, labor, materials, equipment,
tools and performing all operations necessary for the complete installation of
concrete sidewalks and pedestrian ramps that includes base preparation, clearing &
grubbing, fill, sodding and removal of existing curb and/or gutter.. RPQ Bid Due
Date: February 1, 2006 at 2:00 P.M. (Non-Mandatory Pre-bid Meeting: 1/18/2006
@ 9:00 a.m. Location: 111 NW 1st Street, Suite 1510, Miami, Fl)
Cone of Silence
Miami-Dade County's "Cone of Silence" Ordinance 98-106 (Section 2-11.1(t) of the
Code) approved by the Board of County Commissioners as of July 21, 1998, and
amended January 29, 2002, is adopted herein. This ordinance specifically prohibits
communication in regard to these bid solicitation with County Staff except by written
means with copy filed with Clerk of the Board. Certain exceptions are made such as
oral communication during pre-bid conferences and communications with those
persons defined in the ordinance regarding matters of process or procedure already
contained in the solicitation document. The "Cone of Silence" takes effect upon
advertisement for bids and terminates when recommendation for.Award is made by
the County Department.


MIAMI-CD


Advertisement for DBE Goal for Kendall-Tamiami Runway Extension Project In
Accordance with Department of Transportation 49 CFR Part 26
ESTABLISHMENT OF DBE GOAL FOR
KENDALL-TAMIAMI RUNWAY
EXTENSION PROJECT No. L141A
FOR FISCAL YEAR 2006

The Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD) is preparing to establish a DBE goal for
participation by Disadvantaged Business Enterprises for the MDAD Kendall-Tamiami
Runway Extension project for Fiscal Year 2006 (October 1, 2005 through September 30,
2006). MDAD'invites comments from minorities, small businesses, women's and
general contractor groups, community organizations, and other officials or organizations
which may have information concerning the availability of disadvantaged and non-
disadvantaged business, the effects of discrimination on opportunities for DBEs, and
what might constitute a "level playing field for participation of DBEs in MDAD projects.
A "level playing field" is defined, as the amount of participation DBE firms would have in
MDAD projects if there were no discrimination against them.
MDAD is proposing a DBE goal for participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises
for Kendall-Tamiami Runway Extension project of twenty five (25%) percent, based on
information currently available. The rationale for this goal and supporting information
may be requested from the MDAD Minority Affairs Office by calling 305-876-7971, and
will be available for public inspection at MDAD Minority Affairs office, 4200 NW 36 Street,
Building 5-A, 3rd Floor, Miami, Florida 33122, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m.
until 5:00 p.m., for 30 days from the publication of this notice. MDAD and the U.S.
Department of Transportation will accept comments on the DBE goal for 45 days from
the date of this advertisement.


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:
A RESOLUTION, WITH ATTACHMENTS, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF SOUTH PLAZA
EASEMENT ("AGREEMENT"), IN SUBSTANTIALLY THE
ATTACHED FORM, ON CITY-OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED
ON WATSON ISLAND TO FLAGSTONE ISLAND GARDENS,
LLC ("FLAGSTONE"), TO PROVIDE FOR THE NON-EXCLU-
SIVE USE OF PORTIONS OF WATSON ISLAND, AS MORE
SET FORTH IN THE AGREEMENT, FOR THE LIMITED PUR-
POSE OF CONSTRUCTION ACCESS AND ACTIVITIES
RELATED TO THE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTE-
NANCE OF THE PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS; WITH TERMS
AND CONDITIONS MORE PARTICULARLY SET FORTH IN
SAID AGREEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard conperning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim, record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business-days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15668) City Clerk


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:
A RESOLUTION, WITH ATTACHMENTS, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF TEMPORARY
PRE-DEVELOPMENT EASEMENT AGREEMENT ("AGREE-
MENT"), IN SUBSTANTIALLY THE ATTACHED FORM, ON
CITY-OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED ON WATSON ISLAND
TO FLAGSTONE ISLAND GARDENS, LLC ("FLAGSTONE"),
TO PROVIDE FOR THE TEMPORARY, NON-EXCLUSIVE
USE OF APPROXIMATELY 10.8 ACRES OF UPLAND AND
13.4 ACRES OF SUBMERGED LAND, AS MORE PARTICU-
LARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT "A" (THE "UPLAND PAR-
CEL") AND EXHIBIT "B" (THE "SUBMERGED PARCEL")
ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF, FOR THE
LIMITED PURPOSE OF PREDEVELOPMENT WORK
INCLUDING INFRASTRUCTURE RELOCATION AND MODIFI-
CATIONS, ENVIRONMENTAL MITIGATION, SEAWALL
REPAIRS AND RECONSTRUCTION, TREE RELOCATION,
ROADWAY WORK, DREDGING, FILL, DEWATERING, CON-
STRUCTION MOBILIZATION, SALES AND CONSTRUCTION
OFFICES, AND TEMPORARY AND FINAL UTILITIES ON THE
PROPERTY; WITH TERMS AND CONDITIONS MORE PAR-
TICULARLY SET FORTH IN SAID AGREEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15667) City Clerk


I


- I&


w







The Miami Times, January 4-10, 2006 9B


U i V4 U lti% MeRRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR
That's what we at

aId rAanlt Fibnani Gro
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S "Copyrihted Material season happy and debt free.
Copyrig d Material CALL NOW TO APPLY FOR ALL TYPES OF LOANS.

Syndicated Content 1-877-280-0277

Available from Commercial News Providers" -


A IiA LEGAI t n Ar Fle RS
A t.;. I., Pw' G A I, M ATTE T .R S
* Personal Injury Wills/Probate
* Medical Malpractice Criminal Defense
* Nursing Home Abuse DUI/Tickets
* Wrongful Death Marital/Family


1-0073-54


Birth Control Methods
(Depo Provera, Pills, Patches, IDU)
SSTD testing Pap Smears

180 NW 183 St. #117
Miami, FL 33169

305-999-9093


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:

A RESOLUTION, WITH ATTACHMENTS, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO ACCEPT A GRANT OF PERMANENT
ACCESS EASEMENT AGREEMENT ("AGREEMENT"), IN
SUBSTANTIALLY THE ATTACHED FORM, ON CITY-OWNED
,PROPERTY LOCATED ON WATSON ISLAND FROM THE
FLAGSTONE ISLAND GARDENS, LLC ("FLAGSTONE") TO
PROVIDE FOR VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN INGRESS
AND EGRESS AND ACCESS TO AND FROM APPROXIMATE-
LY 72,940 SQUARE FEET OF LAND LEASED TO FLAG-
STONE, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT
"A" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF; WITH
TERMS AND CONDITIONS MORE PARTICULARLY SET
FORTH IN SAID AGREEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15672) City Clerk





















lSoerie BEB a d5q !

SANNUAL SALARY 67 6% Pension y to
: $40,393,60 $63,897.60 maximum of::Bl% @ 3.9 yerS
S* Non-Certified Officers Pay Range; Up to 5 weeks of annual va
$40,393 60 -$63,897.60 Tuition reimbursement
S In the Police Academy: 100 of the Se
$1,553 60 Bi-weekly, plus overtime No mate or local emfl6%a
SCertified Officers Pay Range Exc ,t health & denta i 'pii
$42,43200- $63,897.60 17 days paid mility .eave
1 to 2.9 years of fulltime experience Paternity/Materni leave
$45,926 40 Personally signed vehicle program
S3 to 4 9 years of fulltime experience Civil Service Protection
-i = A._ MAI


I


CITY OF MIAMI


erous benefit package.
Hiring decisions are contingent upon the results of a background and physical examina-
tion, including alcohol and drug screening. Applicants must meet residence requirement.
EOE/M/F/D


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., in the City Commission
Chambers at City Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the
purpose of hearing objections from any interested parties affected by the
Renaming of Southeast 1 Avenue to Brickell Plaza from Southeast 8 Street
to Southeast 12 Street.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
this matter. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15677) City Clerk









CITY OF MIAMI

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be he,ld by the Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida, on January 12, 2006, in the City Commission Chambers at City
Hall, 3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of hearing
objections from any interested parties affected by the Amendment to
Chapter 55 of the Code of the City of Miami, Florida, as amended entitled,
"Subdivision Regulations" to lengthen the period of tentative plat approval.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
this reduction in zoned right of way width. Should any person desire to
appeal any decision of the City Commission with respect to any matter con-
sidered at this hearing, that person shall ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings is made, including all testimony and evidence upon which
any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
1 ter than three (3) business'days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15678) City Clerk




MIAMI-

2Dticivtri6tc E' llent Even' -'S
DEPUTY DIRECTOR, EMPLOYEE RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
(EXEMPT)
Salary: Entry $98,528 Max $158,173 Annually

At Miami-Dade County, Florida, our mission is "Delivering Excellence Every
Day". The Employee Relations Department with an annual budget of $11
million, has a challenging opportunity for a highly dedicated, dynamic, inno-
vative and highly responsible professional to handle executive level work in
planning and managing daily activities. This position reports to the Director
of Employee Relations Department and assists the Director in the overall
planning and management of the department and other assignments
deemed appropriate by the Director.

Responsibilities include planning and managing a wide variety of county-
wide employee relations activities to ensure the appropriate interpretation
and application of County personnel policies and procedures, and state and
federal employment law requirements. The Deputy Director serves as the
department's primary project manager, who is responsible for ensuring that
all departmental projects are planned, organized, and executed in an effi-
cient and timely manner and identifying opportunities to implement business
process change. Project management duties include overseeing the devel-
opment of the project plan timeline, ensuring adherence to project plan
milestones, conducting a qualitative evaluation of project results, mediating
disputes, identifying opportunities for change and efficiencies, facilitating
participant communication and developing periodic reports for senior man-
agement.

Other duties include providing oversight to:
Centralized payroll processing and administration;
Implementation of a Human Resources Information System;
Collective bargaining negotiation and administration;
Employee appeal activities;
Centralized personnel services including new hire processing,
compensation, recruitment, internal placement, and testing and
validation; and
Career development functions including employee development,
American with Disabilities Act compliance and employee assistance
programs.
Successful candidate must possess a Bachelor's degree and a minimum of
six to ten years of progressively responsible managerial and/or administra-
tive experience in varied personnel or labor management functions to
include project management are required.

Candidates must submit resumes with a cover letter indicating Requisition
# 6050015 and title of position to: Luis L. Gonzalez, Manager,
Recruitment and Internal Placement Section, Employee Relations
Department, Personnel Services Division, 111 NW 1 Street, Suite 2020,
Miami, FL 33128, or submit via e-mail as a Word document attachment
to LLG(.)miamidade.gov. Resumes must be received by January 20,
2006. (Employee Relations Department) (Downtown)

Resumes and other information submitted in response to this advertisement
are public records pursuant to Chapter 119 Florida Statutes. We offer a gen-


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny







10B Th Mi i Ti J nuar 4-1 6


Financial resolutions for 2006


2006
continued from 4B

Florida woman who
died after a very public
family battle about
whether to withdraw
her feeding tube. Her
husband said she never
would have wanted to
live in a vegetative
state. Her parents said
there was hope and she
should live.
The state Legislature
passed a law that
allowed Gov. Jeb Bush
to intervene and order
the tube reinserted. The
state Supreme Court
ruled the law unconsti-
tutional. She died in
March after the tube
was removed.
If you don't want that
kind of battle, you need
to make your wishes
known in writing,
legally. Name a medical
advocate, someone with
the authority to decide
for you if you can't
decide for yourself.
Think hard about who
that person is. You
probably don't want
someone who'll pull the
plug right away. On the
other hand, you might
want someone with the
guts to make the tough
decision when all hope
is gone.
Five Wishes is an
example of a living will.
It is offered by Aging
with Dignity, a non-
profit group in
Tallahassee, Fla., which
is an advocate for med-
ical directives. The Five
Wishes document lets
you name a health
advocate and determine
what kinds of medical
treatment you want,
among other things.
(See www.agingwithdig-
nity.org.)
A living will won't
guarantee that you don't
end up on feeding tubes.
The paperwork might
not be available when
health care profession-
als make emergency
decisions, for instance.
But if you have named
an advocate, they can
make de~ ifiis that y6u~
have already discussed.

Get FREE money!
You're reading this
one, aren't you?
If you have a 401(k)
plan through your
employer, be sure you
contribute up to your
company's match. Most
companies match 50
cents for every dollar
you invest, up to 6% of



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your income, according
to Hewitt Associates,
which tracks retirement
issues. That's a 3 per-
cent raise going into
your retirement
account.
That's free money.

Get money tax free!
You're reading this
one, too, right?
If you qualify, Roth
IRAs are like a big, fat
government giveback.
How often does that
happen?
If you earn less that
$95,000 for a single per-
son and $150,000 for a
couple, you can set up
a Roth IRA. (Income is
defined as your modi-
fied adjusted gross
income on your income
taxes.) Earnings in the
account grow tax-
deferred. You don't get
a deduction for your
contributions. But
when you take money
out after age 591/2,


you don't pay taxes on
the interest you earned.
Amazing.

Add 1 percent to
retirement savings.
Big goals are so, well,
big. So keep it small
and simple. Just
increase your retire-
ment savings by 1 per-
cent. So if you con-
tribute 4 percent to
your 401(k), increase
that to 5 percent. You
won't even miss it. And
it'll add up. When you
realize how painless
that is, do it again.
You know you're
supposed to contribute
the maximum you can
to your retirement
account. Start small
and work your way up.
You'll feel better.

Pay off your high-
est-rate credit card.
If it's too big a reso-
lution to say, "I'm
going to pay off my


credit card debt," then
start small. Pick the
highest-rate card. Call
the credit card compa-
ny first to try to negoti-
ate a lower rate.
If you've paid on
time, you should be
able to. You probably
*won't be able to talk
your rate down really
low, but take what you
can get. Then, focus on
paying it off. Double
up your monthly pay-
ments or more, if
you can. Pay the
monthly minimum on
lower-rate cards.
The average U.S.
credit card debt per
household is estimat-
ed at $9,312, accord-
ing to CardWeb.com.
Gulp.

Start a Christmas
fund.
In the olden days,
Virginia, people used
to set up separate sav-
ings accounts for holi-


days. Quaint, huh?
But as you sit there
reading, stuffed after
gorging on all that
food and depleted
after charging all
those holiday gifts,
think how smug you
would feel if you'd
paid cash for every-
thing. Or, almost
everything.
Be sure you get a
low- or no-fee
account. Some banks
offer interest-earning
"Christmas Club" sav-
ings accounts that
you can open with
just $1. You can set
up automatic trans-
fers of $50 a month.
Or $100. You'll have
$500 to $1,000 in
cash next November
when you hit the pre-
Christmas sales.
It's an old-fashioned
personal-finance tip.
But what worked for
grandma can work for
you.


The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, intends to select additional
Management (CM) at-risk firm(s) for the following:


FACILITIES WORK PROGRAM FY 05 06
(as may be amended from time to time)
FOR
NEW, REMODELING & RENOVATIONS PROJECTS

CATEGO CONSTRUCTION COST
RY ESTIMATES

A over $15 million

B between $5 million & $15 million
C under $5 million


Construction


One or more commission recommendations may be made for packaged, individual projects and/or
phased projects in each category. However, Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) does not
guarantee any specific project or dollar value and reserves the right to utilize an alternate delivery
method other than CM at-risk for any project. It is M-DCPS' intention to align the anticipated project
construction values with each of the firms' capabilities and pre-qualification certificate amounts. M-
SDCPS may extend project assignments to include three additional years of the Facilities Work Program.
A list of potential projects (subject to change) will be available at the Pre-proposal conference.

Firms that submitted proposals on November 21, 2005 in response to a previous solicitation
need not apply.

Firms or companies desiring to participate in the CM at-risk selection process shall submit an original
qualification proposal and eight (8) copies by no later than 4:30 p.m.. Eastern Standard Time (EST).
Monday. January 23. 2006, to the attention of:

Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Department of A/E Selection, Negotiations & Design Management
Ms. Nazira Abdo-Decoster, R.A., Supervisor II
1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 305
Miami, Florida 33132

The Procedures for Selection of CM at-risk (with all pertinent information and forms) as referenced in
School Board Rule 6Gx13- 7B-1.021 can be accessed on line at
http://facilities.dadeschools.net/ae solicitations/sp/CM.pdf or picked up at the above address.
Applicants must submit in the format and forms prescribed in the procedures in order to be considered.
Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) reserves the right to request clarification of information
submitted and to request additional information of one or more proposers.

PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE: A pre-proposal conference will be held at The South Florida
Educational Federal Credit Union (located adjacent to the School Board Administration Building) at
1498 NE 2nd Avenue, 2nd Floor Conference Room, Miami, Florida 33132, on Wednesday.
January 11, 2006, at 9:30 a.m. Attendance is highly encouraged.

If the applicant is a joint venture, an executed copy of the joint venture agreement must be submitted
with the application. Percentages of participation of fees must be clearly stated for each joint venture
partner. Only one submittal will be accepted per applicant, either as a single prime firm or as
part of a joint venture. Applicants may request to be considered for an alternate category in their
Letter of Interest (however, firms will only be considered for one category or as otherwise deter-
mined by the Board).

Applicants desiring to participate in this contract must be pre-qualified by the Board prior to submitting
their proposal in response to this solicitation. Contact the Office of Contractor Pre-Qualification, at (305)
995-1420, for information regarding Contractors' Pre-Qualification procedures. Applicants must have
an active Contractors' Pre-Qualification certificate with a single project dollar value of:

greater than $15 million to be eligible for Category A projects
between $5 $15 million to be eligible for Category B projects
from $1 $5 million to be eligible for Category C projects

M-DCPS strongly encourages the participation of certified M/WBE firms either as a prime proposer or
as part of a consulting/supporting team.

The School Board of Miami-Dade County, Florida, adheres to a policy of non-discrimination in educa-
tional programs/activities and employment and strives affirmatively to provide equal opportunity for all.

Any firm or individual, whose contract has been terminated by the Board, with cause, within the last
three years, shall not be considered under this Request for Qualifications.

The successful Applicant(s) shall fully comply with the State of Florida's House Bill 1877 AJessica
Lunsford Act@ and all related Board Rules and procedures as applicable.

Pursuant to School Board Rule 6Gx13- 8C-1.212, a Cone of Silence is enacted beginning with issuance
of the Legal Advertisement and ending when the Superintendent of Schools submits a written recom-
mendation to commission or otherwise takes action that would end the solicitation. Any violation of the
Cone of Silence may be punishable as provided for under the referenced School Board Rule, in addi-
tion to any other penalty provided by law. All written communications must be sent to the address above
and a copy filed with the Clerk of The School Board at 1450 NE 2nd Avenue, Room 268, Miami, Florida
33132.

Failure to file a protest within the time prescribed and in the manner specified in School Board Rule
6Gx13- 3C-1.11, or in accordance with Section 120.57(3), Florida Statutes (2002), shall constitute a
waiver of proceedings under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.

School Board Rules can be accessed on the M-DCPS website at www.dadeschools.net/board/rules/.
This solicitation can be accessed at http://facilities.dadeschools.net/default.aspx?id=ae solicitations.


LEGAL ANNOUNCEMENT OF BIDS
MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
MIAMI, FLORIDA

Miami-Dade County, Florida is announcing the availability of bids, which can
be obtained through the Department of Procurement Management (DPM),
from our Website: www.miamidade.gov/dpm. Vendors may choose to
download the bid package(s), free of charge, from our Website under
"Solicitations Online." Internet access is available at all branches of the
Miami-Dade Public Library. It is recommended that vendors visit our
Website on a weekly basis to view newly posted solicitations, addendums,
revised bid opening dates and other information that may be subject to
change.

Interested parties may also visit or call:

Miami-Dade County
Department of Procurement Management
Vendor Assistance Unit
111 NW 1st Street, 13th floor,
Miami, FL 33128
Phone Number: 305-375-5773

There is a nominal non-refundable fee for each bid package and an addi-
tional $5.00 handling charge for those vendors wishing to receive a paper
copy of the bid package through the United States Postal Service.

These solicitations are subject to the "Cone of Silence" in accordance with
County Ordinance No. 98-106.


NOTICE
REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS
FOR
Miami-Dade County Public Schools CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
AT-RISK FIRM(S)


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:
A RESOLUTION, WITH ATTACHMENTS, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF A PERMANENT
NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT AGREEMENT ("AGREE-
MENT"), IN SUBSTANTIALLY THE ATTACHED FORM, ON
CITY-OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED ON WATSON ISLAND,
TO FLAGSTONE ISLAND GARDENS, LLC ("FLAGSTONE"),
TO PROVIDE FOR: (1) VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN
INGRESS AND EGRESS FOR DELIVERY AND FIRE SAFETY
AND EMERGENCY VEHICLES; AND (2) ACCESS TO ALTER
AND IMPROVE THE EASEMENT AREA WITH PRIOR
APPROVAL OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, ON
APPROXIMATELY AN.8,790 SQUARE FOOT PARCEL OF
LAND LOCATED ON TWO SEPARATE LEVELS, AS MORE. .
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT "A", ATTACHED,.
HEREt6 AND MADE A PART HEREOF (THE-"PROPERTY''
WITH TERMS AND CONDITIONS MORE PARTICULARLY
SET FORTH IN SAID AGREEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business days prior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15669) City Clerk


CITY OF MIAMI


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

A public hearing will be held by the City Commission of the City of Miami,
Florida on January 12, 2006, at 9:00 a.m., at Miami City Hall, located at
3500 Pan American Drive, Miami, Florida, for the purpose of granting the
following:
A RESOLUTION, WITH ATTACHMENTS, AUTHORIZING THE
CITY MANAGER TO EXECUTE A GRANT OF PERMANENT
SOUTH ROAD EASEMENT ("AGREEMENT"), IN SUBSTAN-
TIALLY THE ATTACHED FORM, ON CITY-OWNED PROPER-
TY LOCATED ON WATSON ISLAND TO FLAGSTONE ISLAND
GARDENS, LLC ("FLAGSTONE"), TO PROVIDE FOR THE
NON-EXCLUSIVE USE OF APPROXIMATELY 25,903
SQUARE FEET, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN
EXHIBIT "A" ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HERE-
OF, FOR THE LIMITED PURPOSE OF VEHICULAR AND
PEDESTRIAN INGRESS, EGRESS AND ACCESS TO AND
FROM THE LEASED PROPERTY ("PROPERTY"); WITH
TERMS AND CONDITIONS MORE PARTICULARLY SET
FORTH IN SAID AGREEMENT.

All interested persons are invited to appear and may be heard concerning
these items. Should any person desire to appeal any decision of the City
Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, that per-
son shall ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, includ-
ing all testimony and evidence upon which any appeal may be based.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons
needing special accommodations to participate in this proceeding may con-
tact the Office of the City Clerk at (305) 250-5360 (Voice) no later than two
(2) business daysjprior to the proceeding or at (305) 250-5472 (TTY) no
later than three (3) business days prior to the proceeding.

Priscilla A. Thompson
(#15670) City Clerk


e am mes, a y ,


Blacks Must Control Their Own Destiny












lilacks M~ust control nheir OJwn Destiy


To Place Your Ad

Call: 305-694-6225


Ti


To Fax Your Aw

Fax: 305-757-4764


classifieds@ miamitimesonline.co m


Furnished Rooms
5550 N.W. 9ta Avenue
Comfortable room.
$100 weekly 305-694-9405
or
786-326-0482.
6233 N.W. 22nd Court
Quiet tenant wanted, utilities
included. $100 weekly.
Call 786-277-2693
7749 N.W. 15th Avenue
Finally nice rooms, next to
buses and stores. Cenral air.
Manager,Rock 786-357-8617
MIAMI GARDENS
Single peson only. Next to
buses and stores (off 441).
$110 weekly. First and last to
move-in. Call 305-652-2207.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Nice room, private entrance,
with phone line.
305-687-0475
8 a.m.-10 p.m.
NORTH MIAMI AREA
Rooms with utilities and
appliances included, good
credentials. $450 mthly, $400
security.
786-319-2695

SUMMER PALACE
1500 N.W. 74th Street
Microwave, refrigerator, color
TV, air, use of kitchen, plus
more. Call 305-835-2728.

Efficiencie
6348 SW 23 Street
MIRAMAR
$600 monthly.
954-964-1790 or
305-632-5215

partments

140 NW 13 Street
Two bdrm., One bath,
$550, Four bdrm.Two
baths, $900
305-358-3703/
305-642-7080

1490 N.W. 69 Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath, up-
stairs, $400. 954-485-1065.
1525 N.W. 1st Place
One bedroom, one bath,
$500 monthly. Newly
renovat-
ed. All appliances included.
Call Joel 786-355-7578
180 N.E. 71st Street
Two and one bedrooms, one
bath with water included.
Section 8 Wejcome.
Call 786-285-0072 or
305-772-2236.
2407 N.W. 135 ST
Large one bedroom, $675
monthly! Newly renovated
with central air. $200 OFF!
Call 305-769-0146

245 N.E. 77th Street
One bedroom, one bath, tile
floors, good condition,
fenced yard, parking, $700
monthly. $1400 move in.
Section 8 welcome.
Call 305-674-7335
3186 NW 135th Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$600 monthly 954-704-0094
415 N.W. 9th Street
One bedroom, one bath
$450. Stove, refrigerator,
air.
305-358-1617

48 NW 77th Street
Large one bdrm, Little Haiti
area, tiled, and sec. bars.
Section 8 welcome! First, last
and security. 305-753-7738.
4900 N.W. 26th Avenue
Completely renovated two
bedroom house with fenced
yard in nice Brownsville
neighborhood. Air condition-
ing and ceramic tile floors
throughout. Brand new stove
and refrigerator. Only $750
per month; $1,500 to move
in. Includes free water and
free lawn service.
Contact Rental Office
2651 N.W: 50th Street
Phone 305-638-3699
4905 NW 7 Avenue
Furnished one bedroom
apartment.
Call 305-905-0935.
50TH STREET HEIGHTS
Walking distance from
Brownsville metrorail. Free
water, gas, security, bars,
iron gate doors, one and two
bedrooms, from $410-$485
monthly!
2651 NW 50th Street.
Call 305-638-3699
6020 N.W. 13th Avenue
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$485-$495 per month, one
bedrooms, $385 per month,
security bars and iron gate
doors. Free water and gas.
Apply at: 2651 NW 50th
Street or Call 305-638-3699
6828 NW 3rd Avenue
ONE MONTH FREE
Three bedrooms, two baths,
newly remodeled, Section 8
welcome. 305-305-7742
7525 NORTH MIAMI AVE.
One bedroom, one bath. To-


tally renovated, new applian-
ces and parking. Section
8/HOPWA OK. $750 monthly.
Drive by, then call
305-669-4320

830 N.W. 70 Street
One bedroom, one bath,
$525
Stove, refrigerator, air
305-642-7080


97 N.W. 69th Street
Spacious clean one
bedroom.
for rent with cable.
$375 to $530 monthly.
Call 305-282-0536 or
786-587-9735

ALBERTA HEIGHTS APTS
One and two bedrooms.,
from. $420-$495 monthly.
Free water, security bars and
iron gate doors. Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street or
Call 305-638-3699

ARENA GARDEN
FREE BASIC CABLE
Remodeled two and three
bedrooms, air, ceiling fan,
ap-pliances, laundry, and
gate. 100 NW 11th St. Mgr.
#106,305-374-4412

Capital Rental Agency
1497 NW 7 Street
305-642-7080
Overtown, Liberty City,
Opa Locka, Brownsville,
Apts, Duplexes, Houses
Efficiencies, One, Two
and Three bedrooms.
Many with appliances.
Same day approval. Call
for information


Eighth Street
Apartments
MOVE IN SPECIAL
Efficiency, One bath, $365
One bdrm, One bath $450
Two bdrm, One bath $595
Three bdrm, Two baths
$695
Stove, refrigerator, air
786-236-1144/
786-298-0125

HAMPTON HOUSE
APTS.
One bdrm., One bath $425
Stove, refrigerator, air
Free water.
786-236-1144
305-642-7080

KENDALL
Gated community, spacious
One, two and three bed-
rooms. HC and Non HC ac-
cessible apartments., con-
venient location with pool,
resident activities. NO PETSI
Water and sewer included.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
Lakeside Towers
S- 308: 383-2042
TDD 1-800-955-8770

OPA-LOCKA AREA
30 Avenue and 154th Terr
Small apartment. $600
monthly plus $100 utilities.
First and last. Call cell 786-
271-4863 or 305-687-6529

ORCHARD VILLA APTS.
1255 NW 58 Street
1256 NW 58 Terrace
Free water, gas, security
bars and iron gate doors,
$385 monthly. Two
bedrooms, $425 monthly.
Apply at:
2651 NW 50th Street
Call 305-638-3699
WILDROSE
Large, two and three bed-
rooms available. All applian-
ces with central air. Section 8
Welcome! Call 305-688-2749


10954 NE 3 Court
Two bedrooms, one bath.
Section 8 welcome.
954-895-2246
1490 N.W. 69th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
four-plex central air, bars,
tiled, $725 monthly.
786-290-4625.
2310 N.W. 86th Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
appliances and air. Must see
to appreciate. $1200
monthly.
Call 305-793-8910
240 N.W. 60th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
$780 monthly plus security,
central air/heat and tiled. Wa-
ter included.
Call 305-490-5811
2980 N.W. 48 Terrace
Large two bdrms., one bath,
nice, fenced yard for kids.
$850 per month, three
months to move in and good
ref. Call 305-794-9299.
38 NE 64 Street
Two bedrooms, one bath in-
cludes water. $625 monthly.
NO Section 8. 305-267-9449
5420 NW 7 Court
Large' one bedroom, one
bath includes water and
electric. $775 monthly.
NO Section 8
305-267-9449
COCONUT GROVE AREA
3166 Hibiscus Street
Two bedrooms, one bath,
two story duplex. Section 8
approved, new carpet, new
paint, off street parking, re-
frigerator, stove, air. $795
monthly. 305-336-3099

LIBERTY CITY AREA
One bedroom one bath. In-


cludes appliances and air.
$650 monthly. Section 8 wel-
come. 305-206-8184
MIAMI AREA
Newly remodeled One bed-
room one bath, cenral air,
washer and dryer connection.
Section 8 Welcome.
Call 954-818-9112.


MIAMI AREA
Newly remodeled Three bed-
room, one bath, cenral air,
washer and dryer connection.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 954-818-9112
MIAMI AREA
Newly remodeled Three bed-
room one bath, cenral air,
washer and dryer connection.
Section 8 Welcome
Call 954-818-9112

Under New
Management
KINGSWAY APTS
3737 Charles Terrace
Two bedrooms, one bath du-
plex located in Coconut
Grove. Near schools and
buses. $525 per month, $525
security deposit, $1050 total
to move in. 305-448-4225 or
apply at: 3737 Charles Ter-
race.

Condos/Townhouses
MIRAMAR AREA
6805 SW 38 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Asking $1,300
monthly.

KING GARDENS
17934 NW 40 Court
Four bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Asking $1,450
monthly.
All Points Realty &
Investments
305-621-5800


12240 NW 17th Court
Four bedrooms, two baths,
air, $1400, $4200 move in.
NO Section 8. Terry Deller-
son, Broker 305-891-6776
12931 Wood Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
$1300 monthly. Call 1-800-
257-1311 or 404-861-1965.
1515 N.W. 82 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
with air. $900 monthly. Sec-
tion 8 welcome.
Call 305-244-3239
15570 NW 158 Street Road
BUNCHE PARK AREA
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air, appliances. $1200
monthly. Section 8 welcome.
For further information call
305-970-0070
2279 NW 48th Street
Five bedrooms, two baths,
$1500 monthly. Section 8
welcomed-Gall 305-759-3909
2765 NW 212th Street
Four bedroom, two bath, with
central air. $1500 monthly,
security and first month. No
Section 8! Appointment only
call Mr. White at 954-431-
8795 or 305-205-6599
3045 NW 68 Street
Three bedrooms, one bath.
$1200 monthly.954-704-0094
3096 NW 65th Street
Three bedrooms, one bath,
air.$925 a month. First, last
and security.786-344-8196.
355 N.W. 47th Street
Three bedrooms, two bath,
Florida room, pool home,
stove, refrigerator, washer
and dryer hookup, tiled,
central air/heat, carport,
fenced yard, security bars,
$1450 a month, first and se-
curity required. Section 8
okay. Call 954-424-7003.
5511 N.W. 1st Court
Two bedrooms, one bath,
central air, large fenced yard,
$850 monthly. Section 8 wel-
come. Call 305-467-4269
557 NW 22nd Street
Four bedrooms, two baths,
washer/dryer hook ups, large
yard, central air, $1350
monthly Section 8 OKI
305-751-8865
8451 NW 19th Avenue
One bedroom home, air, tile,
bars, water $650, $1950
move in. NO Section 8. Terry
Dellerson, Broker,
305-891-6776
912 N.W. 46 Street
Spacious three bedroom,
one bath. Hardwood floors,
ceramic tile, central air, and
fenced backyard. $1200
monthly. 305-331-2431
9405-B NW 4th Avenue
Miami Shores Area
One bedroom, one bath,
central air, bars, cottage
style, Newly renovated.
$745 monthly.
Call 786-514-1771
BROWNSVILLE AREA
Three bedrooms, one bath.
Special low deposit for Sec-
tion 8 tenant only.
Call Dade Associates
305-871-3280

HOUSES
FOR RENT
CALL 305-668-7450
or 305-836-1040

MIRAMAR AREA
2948 Tarpon Drive
Three bedrooms, two baths,
pool, garage. $1,500
monthly.
All Points Realty &
Investments


305-621-5800
RICHMOND HEIGHTS
10741 S.W. 150th Terrace
Three bedrooms, one bath,
florida room/ car port, $1200
monthly. NO Section 81
Call 305-267-9449


NEVER RENTAGAIN!
Buy a four bedrooms, two
baths, Foreclosure. $50,000
800-749-8168 xD041
Rentals, one to four bed-
rooms available. Ready for
immediate occupancy. First,
last and security required to
move in. Call for more infor-
mation 786-556-9266


STOP!
Behind in your re
notice? Behind in
mortgage? Call K
786-326-


cw~i"


C!!!
nt 24 hour
your
:athy:
7916



I


IIIATTENTIONI!
Now You Can Own Your
Own Home Today
""WITH.*"*
FREE CASH GRANTS
UP TO $65,000
Hud/VA Homes Available
FIRST TIME BUYERS
NEED HELP???
305-892-8315
House Of Homes Realty



$ CASH $
for REAL ESTATE
or Vacant Lots in 24 hours
Call Dave 305-301-2112

ATTN: MULTI-FAMILY UNIT
OWNERS & INVESTORS.
BENEFIT FROM THE CON-
DO CONVERSION CRAZE!
FIND OUT HOW -
CALL 786-355-0764
I buy houses
any area, any condition
305-303-5173
www.igginchomes.com
Mortgages in Minutes!
First, Second &
Refinance
Call Today!
Shaheed Agency Inc.
Licensed Mortgage Broker
954-964-3982

WE BUY HOMES CASH
ANY AREA
ANY CONDITION
ANY PRICE
FAST CLOSING
CALL MATTHEW
305-556-5366
954-430-3663


ni i


283 NE 111 Street
Large one bedroom, one
bath on each side. Asking
$279,000.
All Points Realty &
Investment
305-621-5800

HouseS
1027 NW 65 Street
Will help with closing. Call
786-395-4379
12215 N.W. 17th Court
Three bedrooms, one bath,
front porch, big fenced yard,
$185,000. Call:
Brown Realty & Inv. Corp.
305-685-6275
or 305-905-4184
13940 NE 4th Avenue
Beautiful two bedrooms, two
baths villa. $150,000.
Call 954-903-8831
1440 NW 194 Street
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Asking $255,000.
All Points Realty &
Investment
305-621-5800
17311 N.W. 52 Place
Five bedrooms, two baths,
den, pool, central air, hot tub,
large patio, large tiki hut, car-
port. Try $9500 down and
$1695 monthly. (new adj.
mtg.) $379K. NDI Realtors
305-655-1700.
18030 N.W. 31st Avenue
Clean, four bedrooms, two
bath, central air, huge back-
yard, $250,000. Call:
Brown Realty & Inv. Corp.
305-685-6275
20450 NW 17 Avenue
New three bedrooms, two
baths, lake view and garage.
$275,000. 305-624-0029 or
305-508-2000
2144 N.W. 80th Street
Two bedrooms, one bath
with family room car port,
central air, Everything brand
new. Ceramic tile and carpet.
ALL APPLIANCES Asking
$165,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872

2361 GOLF DRIVE
Three bedrooms, one bath
with family room, central air,
Everything brand new! Ce-
ramic tile and carpet. ALL
APPLIANCES Asking
$225,000.
Call Monique Morgan Realty
786-285-8872

5910 NW 7th Court
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Three bedrooms, two baths,
central air. Asking $187,000
firm. Call 305-303-5173
8028 N.W. 13th Court
Five bedrooms, two baths,
two story, carport. Try $4900
down and $895 monthly
(new adj. mtg.) $199K.
NDI Realtors
305-655-1700.


5921 NW 24 Avenue
New three bedrooms, two
baths with open kitchen.
$200,00,0. 305-633-8818 or
305-508-2000
743 N.W. 77 STREET
Three bedroom one bath.
Central air, new appliances,
and pool. Asking $195,000
Call 786-285-1232
846 N.W. 114th Street
Three bedrooms, new paint,
large fenced lot, air. Try
$3900 down and $849
monthly (new adj. mtg.)
$169K. NDI Realtors 305-
655-1700.
FORECLOSURES
Five bedrooms, Must Sell!
Only $33,500
800-749-8168 xD040
FREE
LIST/FORECLOSURE
Below market values.
Hundreds to choose.
Low down payments.
Easy to qualify. Call nowl
Larry Albert 305-255-9040
HUD HOMES
Five bedrooms, Only
$33,500. For listings
800-749-8168xD046
NO MONEY DOWN
600 Fico score. Two


We are looking
< aa for
Distributors
in these areas
NORTH MIAMI
Pembroke Pines
Miramar
FT. LAUDERDALE
contact our
Circulation Dept.
305-694-6214
Tlle .flliaiii T inies

We are seeking candi-
dates with at least one
year of warehouse and
forklift experience. 50 Ib
minimum lifting
requirement.
Job responsibilites:
General warehouse
duties, loading and
unloading truck,
shipping and receiving
and other duties as
requested. Please call for
appointment 305-436-
1415 ask for Carolina
Ramirez.


bedroom one Dat, just
remodeled. 3071 N.W. 45 St.
Leibert Realtors
305-458-4419
9209 NW 22 Avenue
IFully equipped salon for rent.
Call 770-369-2094
First and second mortgages. EARN HIGH YEILD
NO CREDIT CHECK! Private Like the wealthy!
money. Call 305-267-9449 Be on this call at 8 p.m.,
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and
Fridays 1-646-519-5860 pin
no. 1172#. Call Charles for
FORECLOSURE? information, 786-356-5011.
I BUY HOUSES CASH! I
LEND MONEY. I PAY RE- Entreprenuers
FERRALS. 305-951-3861 Join our team. $14,000 per
mWE BUY HOUSonth. Travel industry. Call
WE BUY HOUSES 954-436-8736
Any area, any condition, any
price, fast cash.
Call 786-285-8872


ALL APPLIANCES SALE
$99 We repair also. 215 NW
22 Avenue 305-644-0333



$500 Police Impounds
C::hevy's from $500
''' For listings -- I ,
800-749-8167 xK020
HONDA'S from $500!
Police Impounds. For listings
800-749-8167xK023



CDL Drivers/Warehouse.
Minimum two years experi-
ence. 305-653-5532.


Hawkers
Looking for individuals
to sell newspapers at
different major intersec-
tions in Dade and Bro-
ward county. CALL:
305-694-6214
The Miami Times


Hiring barbers in
Kendall
Call 305-595-1002

HOUSE HUNTERS
WANTED!
It's very simple. You locate
the homes, I put up the
money and you get paid.
Call for information
786-290-9127


Route Drivers

Make Up To $10 an Hour
Plus gas mileage
For a 1/2 days work

We are seeking drivers to
deliver newspaper to retail
outlets. WEDNESDAY ONLY

You must be available
between the hrs., of 8 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Must have
reliable, insured vehicle
and current Driver License.

Applications are received
Thursday and Friday
900 NW 54th Street


SECRETARY
NEEDED
8 hours $8.00 hourly,
plus commission. Comput-
er knowledgeable. Good
presence. Bilingual prefer-
red. Call 305-244-7408

TEACHER
Experienced, dependable
child care teacher with
CDA
to teach abeka curriculum
to 3 year olds in private
center. Call 305-836-1178

Telemarketing
Experienced, ambitious,
go-getters! Better than
average oral skills. Sales
experience a must. Fax
resume and salary history
to: irE lir .'l, i 0 1insll
305-758-3617
1


TAX PREPARATION SALE
$30 040EZ Easy Form
$45 1040AShort Form
$60 1040 Long Form
305-836-9844 MrsT.4t.com


I MER


18 church pews available.
Excellent condition. Askingg'
Price $250 each." I ': ":"
Call 305-333-9146




P/T LECTURERS
Civil, Architectural and
Environmental Engineering
Master's degree in Civil
Engineering. Architectural
Engineering or closely related
field and college-level teaching
experience required. Duties
include: teaching graduate and
undergraduate courses in the
areas of computer-aided drafting
and design, AutoCAD, Micro
Station, structural analysis, fluid
mechanics, mechanics,
geotechnical engineering and
environmental engineering.
Send a letter indicating teaching
interests and a resume that
includes the names, addresses
and phone numbers of at
least three references to:
Dr Michael K. Phang,
Department of Civil, Architectural,
and Environmental Engineedng,
PO Box 248294, Coral Gables,
FL 331240630.
Phone (305) 2843391;
Fax (305) 2843492;
E-nal mphang@niami.edu EO/AAE
wh --BiI iiedu/careers


--C^a- aliB *^^ "^Ft',i" ll
File your taxes here nd......






Ask for your
Refund
Anticipation Loan..... TODAY!
PATI'rTERSON-CL-ARKE., CPA, P.A.
Ti'UES)AVY, WEI)NESIDAY & SATIUR)AY'S
by appointment only
PIA. PALA(7I () Ii('Yi'EL & I$'ILl'IIQLi E
Co()NFERENCCI R(t)oM
16805 NW 12''" AVEI
305-<655-1880 I'()R IVM()R INICO ()R To
SCHE-I)ULE AN APP)OIN'TNIEN'r
HSIIC Taxpayer Financial Services
Sulj-t* to, cvdit ,pp-I.)prP.-vul r -.tlu. t :s r. -rvi--d IL y IjS' itt(
-lnxp-nyc-r I'iinu.cIl Servtics In.-
II"l.ik prdlut-, provided ly HIII CI Is nk UJSA. N.A..
Menihrer 1F113,1C.






\('o : I I. S ll

Grand Opening of Sales!
Newprest ,aid .,
I'OiiSla IOR8ts y alsw ISGe, 2 i80Aba .
ew h i droem 1Ims. h MI s i tonhitmaol- me'xith 2-car gragies
pinfd Ltr m faBB Wt f.iFiil a m 2, s i 5 ;ad ibo hedomns
4Ii' I ima l ho1101e if t h J-i tr!c +,iivua Ili a l e20tls



iWoDivsis

(a (5f 2 4)S')69 for 1i1Qrl.0

( f' i .1,56 ,1 254' 1919'.! iJt,; ,Wlriit, *ln'tz ilk
C *'i':Ii"? ..3r.








PSYC HIC FRIEND

Can 'help you with all your problems you
may have. Times are bad, but she can
help with all problems of life.

Call for appointment

954-927-8740




SISTER WISDOM

Southern born spiritualist, reader and
advisor. Helps with all problems in life,
such as love, marriage, health, court
cases and business. Also restore nature.
I have blessed candles, baths and
incense oils. One free question by phone.


CALL 305-300-8728


- ---- -- - - ----- - -- -- - ---
Plc yu casiid dTOA


SALES
Help Wanted
Experienced Advertising salesperson in print or radio.
Salary plus commission.
Fax resume to:
Sales 305-758-3617


DON'T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO BE A HERO EVERYDAY!


POLICE OFFICER
(This position is Non-exempt under FLSA)
Starting Salary: $37,817 annually Maximum Salary: $50,764 annually
(Please see note below)
Closing Date: Friday, January 13, 2006
(or the first 500 applicants, whichever occurs first)

The annualized wage rate during the academy and until the State certification
exam is passed is $36,017. Applicants will be hired in the classification of Police
Officer-Probationary (Occ. Code 5003), and upon successful completion of the
academy and the state examination will be promoted to the classification of
Police Officer (Occ. Code 5005).

DOCUMENTATION: Copies of the following documents must be submitted at
the time of application in order to qualify and sit for the City of Miami's Police
Officer entrance exam:
- Proof of passing score on the FBAT, CJBAT or FDLE police examination
- Valid Driver's License from any State (Class E or higher)
- High School Diploma, GED or higher degree
- Applicants must be 19 years of age by February 27, 2006. Birth Certificate,
naturalization certificate or valid U.S. Passport reflecting U. S. Citizenship
- If claiming Veteran's Preference, military discharge papers (Form DD-214); For
claiming Disabled Veteran's Preference, a letter from Veteran's Affairs or the
Department of Defense dated within one year of the closing date is also need-
ed. Letter of disability must state percentage of disability. Original or certified
originals must be submitted as proof.
- Heart Bill Addidavit (Notarized)
- Veteran's Preference: Veteran's Preference points will be awarded in accor-
dance with F.S.S. 295.07 and 295.08.

All applicants must submit a City of Miami employment application with the
required credentials to the City of Miami Employment Office, no faxes allowed.
To download the required application form and Non-Smoker's Affidavit, visit
www.miamigov.com and click on Employment. For additional details, visit our
website at www.miamigov.com or call the job hotline at (305) 416-2050 or
visit our Employment Office located at 444 SW 2nd Avenue, Room 129.

The City of Miami is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate.
AD# 10566
II


r~l--]-- NA


The Miami Times Januar 6 11B







s kcalB Must Control Their Own Destiny


12B The Miami Times, January 4-1 ,


Ikui klooL sto tarl bealig


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"



%, rrl(f 1n wn halth ia inr p Wr

a 40


Fane's A/C
Appliance Re
Wall units, central air,
refrigerator, washer an
305-754-501
Bp.: 305-566-1


Daryl's Banquet
All occasions, weddings, F
1290 Ali Baba (West of
Limo Rentals
305-622-336
305-796-95


Range Funeral
The Directors are: M. Atha
and N. Patrick Rang
5727 N.W. 17th Avel
305-691-434


& Gene and Sons, Inc.
pair Custom-made cabinets for kitchens
stove, and bathrooms at affordable prices.
d dryer. 14140 NW 22nd Avenue
60 305-685-3565
8389

General Home Repair
Air condition, plumbing, electrical,
t Hall roofing, appliances, washer, dryer,
parties, etc. stove. Call Benny
27th Ave) 305-685-1898
786-273-1130
61
58
Southeastern Roofing
& Painting
Home General Home Repairs. Repair
lie Range and Roofs. Financing.
nue Call 305-694-9405
43 786-326-0482


iumASSA SERVICE CONNECTION'
W,.,13 weeks in print

"210 Fax:.305,757-4764
"Call-on 00; .A.00. I professionals TODAY!
...... . . . . . . .


Wedding Video
Productions
Corporate videos, Music videos,
high definition/film
786-258-3732


EIT MIA


e county


4,


Udonis Haslem, Forward
Miami HEAT


Donna Shalala, President
University of Miami


PERFECT FOR ANY SIZE BUSINESS


' The Beacon Council
Mioml-Daod County's Off dal
Economk Development Partnership


TO EXPAND OR RELOCATE YOUR BUSINESS IN MIAMI-DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CALL THE BEACON COUNCIL AT 305-579-1300 OR VISIT MAKEITMIAMI.COM
Miami-Dade Marketing Initiative campaign funded in partnership with Miami-Dade County and the private sector.


A


m i


ami -dad


v -


MIAMI.DADE
mss


PCPCCII


C. Brian Hart Ins.
Auto Flood Windstorm General
Liability Home Worker's
Compensation
7954 NW 22nd Avenue
305-836-5206

RUSSELL with the
MUSCLES
24 hours Moving/Deliveries
Low Rates Senior Citizens and
Disability Discounts
305-625-3461 or
305-651-5544


Coops' Kitchen
Specialized in Bar-B-Que Ribs
and Chicken
7910 NW 22 Avene
786-229-7031
Thursday-Saturday


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