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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00369
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: 06-29-2011
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00369
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

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ii


ONTICELLO


NEWS


143rd Year No.


28


Wednesday, June 29, 2011


50� 460 + 4


County SCHOOL BOARD REJECTS SECOND


Expands

Its Search

For Mining

Expert
LAZARO ALEMAN
ECB Publishing
Senior Staff Writer
Commissioners have decided
to expand the search for a mining
expert to advise them on how
best to operate the county-owned
rock mine near Goose Pasture.
The decision - made for the
sake of procedural correctness
and to placate the concerns of
Commissioner Betsy Barfield -
left at least one citizen question-
ing if the process wasn't weighed
toward favoring one individual.
County Coordinator Roy
Schleicher informed the Jeffer-
son County Commission on
Thursday evening, June 16, that
the decision to advertise for the
job had followed a meeting be-
Please See MINING
EXPERT Page 13A


COUNTY MAN

ARRESTED FOR

CULTIVATION

OF MARIJUANA
FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
A county man was arrested
last week and charged with culti-
vation of marijuana after
deputies found the area where
the marijuana was growing and
observing the suspect tending to
the plants.
The Jefferson County Sher-
iff's Office reported that on June
14 the Sheriff's Office received
information in reference to mar-
ijuana being cultivated at 1525
South Jefferson Street. Investiga-
tor Kevin Sears, Deputy Kevin
Tharpe and Investigator Logan
Wilcox located the marijuana
plants and conducted surveil-
lance on it.
During the surveillance
deputies learned that a white
male they identified as Donald
Glynn Barton, 49, of Jefferson
County, was growing marijuana
plants in or near a garden behind
a residence located at the ad-
dress. They also learned that
Barton would check on the mari-
juana plants on most days be-
tween 5 p.m. and 6 p.m.
On June 21 at approximately
6 p.m., deputies observed Barton
walk into the garden near about
seven two to six-foot marijuana
plants, looked around, bent
down, did something with his
hands, stood up and looked
Please See COUNTY MAN
Page 4A


Donald Glynn Barton


CHOICE FOR JCHMS PRINCIPAL


DECISION CAUSES UUITE A STIR


LAZARO ALEMAN
ECB Publishing
Senior Staff Writer
For the second time in as many weeks, the Jefferson
County School Board on Thursday, June 23. dealt School Su-
perintendent Bill Brumfield another blow, narrowly
rejecting his latest pick for principal of Jef-
ferson County Middle High School
(JCMHS). ..
In the process.
board members sub-
jected candidate Loi-
etta Holmes to a
bruising interview,
hurled pointed re-
marks at each other,
and continued to en-
gage in heated ex-
changes amongst


themselves and with members of the public at the conclusion
of the generally emotional meeting, which ended unceremoni-
ously without the typical adjournment vote.
"You have three board members who don't
care about education or our children," School
Board Member Shirley Washington loudly pro-
claimed right after the 3-2 vote and went on
loudly declaring as she exited the boardroom.
Washington was referring to colleagues Mar-
ianne Arbulu, Charles Boland and Ed Vollert-
sen, all three of whom voted against the
approval of Holmes as the new principal at
JCMHS.
No one leaving the meeting was happy - not
Holmes, not the citizens and parents who attended, not
the School Board members, not Assistant Superintendent
Dr. Kelvin Norton and other administrators, and not Brum-
field. Sad to say, the proceeding largely accentuated and exac-
Please See PRINCIPAL Page 4A


Regional Landfill Recognizes

State Agency Staff


Pictured from left to right are Jorge Caspary, Malcolm Page, Richard Tedder, Chris McGuire,
Frank Darabi, and Charles Goddard.


Chairman Malcolm Page and Engineer
Frank Darabi, of the Aucilla Area Solid Waste
Administration, presented plaques to Attorney
Chris McGuire and PE Administrator Richard
Tedder, of the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, in appreciation of


their efforts in helping the landfill save
$500,000.00 in unnecessary expenses during the
recent expansion construction. Charles
Goddard, chief of Solid and Hazardous Waste,
and Jorge Caspary, director of the Division of
Waste Management, were also present.


MAY IS NINTH DRIEST

MONTH IN 79 YEARS


LAZARO ALEMAN
ECB Publishing
Senior Staff Writer
It will probably come as no
surprise to many that May was
an unusually dry and hot
month. Indeed, it was the ninth
driest May since 1932 when the
Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District (SRWMD)
began keeping such records.
This according to the latest
hydrologic conditions report
released by the SRWMD on
June 7. The report indicates
that the average rainfall in
May was 1.35 inches, which
represents 39 percent of the
historical May average of 3.32
inches.
Meanwhile, the average 12-
month deficit increased to 5.4
inches; and "deficits nearing
25 inches persisted in the


upper Aucilla, Suwannee and
Santa Fe basins".
"Localized areas along the
coast saw almost no rain, while
parts of Union, Bradford, and
Alachua counties had near
normal totals," the report
states.
The report shows Jeffer-
son County received 1.25
inches of rainfall in May, com-
pared with the May average of
5.88 inches. The county has re-
ceived 11.23 inches of rainfall
during the last three months
and 44.28 inches during the last
12 months.
Madison County, mean-
while, received 1.39 inches in
May, compared with the May
average of 4.73 inches. Madi-
son County has received 10.60
inches during the last three
months and 47.30 inches dur-


ing the last 12 months.
River levels for the month
were generally low and near
record lows in some instances.
Meanwhile, levels at 16 moni-
tored lakes fell an average of
five inches, putting all at below
their historical average levels.
And groundwater levels
dropped 92 percent in the mon-
itored wells of the upper Flori-
dan Aquifer, meaning that
each dropped an average of
three inches since April, ac-
cording to the report.
The report notes that the
U.S. Geological Survey catego-
rizes the Suwannee River and
its tributaries as being in se-
vere hydrologic drought, and
other basins in the district as
being below normal.
Please See DRIEST
MONTH Page 4A


WATERMILL

ROAD

SET FOR

IMPROVEMENTS
LAZARO ALEMAN
ECB Publishing
Senior Staff Writer
Watermill Road now
has joined the list of
county roads scheduled
for upgrading in the not
too distant future.
The Jefferson County
Commission on Thurs-
day, June 16, adopted a
resolution allowing for
the resurfacing and
widening of the paved
portion of the road from
Lloyd Creek Road to CR-
259 (Waukeenah High-
way) under the County
Incentive Grant Program
(CIGP).
Please See WATER-
MILL Page 4A


Around Jeff. C
Church
Classifieds


1 Section 14 Pages
o. 3-7A Legals
8A-11A Sports
12A Viewpoint


13A
14A
s 2A


Wed
SWed 90/72 .
6/29 --
Scattered thunderstorms. A few
storms may be severe. High near
90F.


I U


Thu


n'nl


6/30 -
A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the low 90s and lows in
the low 70s.


Fri 92/71
7/1
A few thunderstorms possible.
Highs in the low 90s and lows in
the low 70s.


iRY t


^to^ ^.T * * *<* * */* W9J 1L/ *' ^..^ * W I




2A:Layout 1 6/28/11 10:50 AM Page 1


2A * Monticello News


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com






SEFFERSON


Wednesday, June 29, 2011





COUNTYY


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ARE TYPED WORD FOR WORD,
COMMA FOR COMMA, AS SENT TO THIS NEWSPAPER.


To The Taxpayers Of District 3


Thank you for choosing me to be
the recipient of a $500 scholarship. I
am very happy to have been selected
as such. I will be going to college in
August and the scholarship is a mas-
sive boon to me.
The course I will be taking is
Criminal Justice, and it will take me a
full two years to complete. Upon com-
pletion, I will have my Associates


degree.
By awarding me this scholarship,
my finances have been freed up, and
the load lightened. Your generosity is
highly appreciated, and will not go to
waste.
Sincerely,
2o1Aih W0. Sordah,
2011 JCMHS Senior


"It's Just A Dog"

To whom it may concern, I have written your paper once before in an effort
to recognize and express appreciation for all the warm hearted articles that
your paper publishes on behalf of the critters who cannot speak for themselves.
My barn partner lives in Jefferson County, and she saves your paper for me to
read, because I love it so. On Wednesday, May 25, Fran Hunt wrote a beautiful
article. It was very obvious that she had her heart in every word she wrote and
it is my prayer that all those who read what she wrote will be moved enough to
make a difference in the life of those creatures who depend on us for love and
care. My Husband and I have adopted six dogs and nine cats (several from
JCHS) and everyday they are a blessing in our life! I pray that someday there
will be no more homeless, abused, neglected, abandoned or suffering critters.
Till then, thank everyone at Monticello News for getting the word out; for edu-
cating people to the need, and putting heart behind the words!
From my heart,
eck W. mTlc9i (I


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134o 9g1 1Drkthday

DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Katherine Ammons Nealy celebrated 93 years
of life on Friday, June 24, 2011. She was born to
Robert and Annah Poke Ammons on June 24, 1918.
"Mother" is known for her wisdom, her knowl-
edge of the Bible and her love for her family and
her church family. She has always said, "It's
because of God's grace and mercy that I'm still
here."
She was married to the late Beatrice Nealy for
40+ years. "Miss Honey," as some may know her,
gave birth to 15 children, nine of which are still
alive. Six of her children are in the ministry, her
children are: Rev Cornelia Francis, Min. Mary
Geathers, Min. Ollie Swan, Min. Joretha Sloan, Rev.
Lucille Graham, Rev. Barbara Frazier, as well as:
Ann Mae
Goldsmith,
Doris Smith
and William
Nealy.
She has 45-
grandchildren
(three are min-
isters,) 96-great-
grandchildren,
56-great-great-
grandchildren
and one-great-
great-great
grandchild.
Please join
the family in
wishing
Katherine
Nealy a very
Happy
Birthday!


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MONTICEL LLO o


NEWS
EMERALD GREENE Advertisement is Monday at 3 pm.
for Wednesday's paper, and 'O


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 180 W Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than
6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


- 1�


THEM
INDEPENDEI

ACROSS
1. Very light wo
6. School support
9. *Don't get

13. Once more
14. Poetic "even
15. *Done to Ar
the Fourth
16. The
Comics
17. Landers or C
18. One up
19. *First to
Declaration
21. Not yet test
23. Make a mist:
24. Clothed
25. Ogre-like cre
28. Target of gra
30. "Wild Blue
35. Action word
37. This over ma
39. Hollow rock
40. Butter subst
41. Haze over
43. Seed cover
44. Twisted cott
46. Irritate or di
47. Printing uni
48.8vo


E: 50. City in Nevada
NCE DAY 52. Eye infection
53. SAT, e.g.
55. Gremlin or pixie
od 57. Name of geographical
rt org. place
fireworks 61. *Between life and pur-
suit of happiness
65. What volcanoes do
" 66. *"Home of the brave"
merica on 68. Ralph in Paris
69. Puzzle in pictures
Marvel 70. Cow chew
71. Fill with optimism
;oulter, e.g. 72. *Seamstress Betsy
73. *Anthem writer
sign the 74. Truth

d
ake DOWN
1. Soaking ritual
feature 2. Title for Turkish leader
and theft 3. Past participle of "lie"
" 4. From then on
5. Fluffy sweater material
matter? 6. Pinnacle
7. *Number of amend-
itute ments in Bill Of Rights
8. Declare invalid
9. Grim
on thread 10. Not in favor of
.sturb 11. Pie a la
t 12. Poking instrument
15. *Edible favorite


20. Pigeon food?
22. Negative response
24. Acquire more evidence
25. Convex molding
26. Antiquity of the past
27. Summit
29. Wedding cake layer
31. Less than average tide
32. Singer and actress Day
33. Authoritative procla-
mation
34. 4 x 4 race
36. Cowboy's necktie
38. Clinton's 1996 con-
tender
42. Many geniuses
45. *"When in the course
of human ..."
49. moron
51. Chinoises, aka
shadow play
54. Without self-control
56. *Famous portrait
painter
57. Territory, abbr.
58. Dunking treat
59. Taverns
60. Chopin's creation, e.g.
61. Tramp's companion
62. Lion's sound
63. "Swan Lake" outfit
64. Big bang theory's orig-
inal matter
67. File a suit


"IT'S JUST A DOG" ( OR A

CAT, HORSE, CHICKEN ETC...)

"It's just a dog", they say to me,
But how could they know or how could they see?
This dog is an extension of my heart and my soul,
The communication between us speaks volumes
untold.

"It's just a dog", they say to me,
But how could they know or how could they see?
It's a true friend and companion as no human can be,
With unconditional love and an ability to see,
All that is good in someone like me.

"Its just a dog", they say to me,
But how could they know or how could they see?
Those eyes when they see me, a tail wagging strong,
True signs of their devotion and faith
that I'll let nothing go wrong.

It's love and it's trust,
friendship and care.
Sharing and devotion for those that dare.
At times it's hard, and quite expensive too,
But the bond that is shared defines kinship anew!

by Becky Walker McNeill


7


Publisher/Owner Wednesday at 3 p.m. for Friday's
paper.
LAZARO ALEMAN There will be a '10" charge for Affidavits.
Senior StaffWriter
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Deadline for classified is Monday Subscription Rates:
at 3:00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper, Florida $45 per year
and Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. for Out-of-State $52 per year
Friday's paper. Deadline for Legal (State & local taxes included)


I


, ,


P.O. Box 428
180 W. Washington
Street
Monticello, Florida
32345
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
Email: monticellonews
m
(?�embarqmail.co I


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Wednesday, June 29, 2011


OUND


www.ecbpublishing.corn


JEFFERSON


Monticello News * 3A


COUNTY


Library Opens New Computer Lab


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County Bailar Public Library
recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony to introduce
the public to its new Computer Lab. Library staff
offered a brief program, with an enjoyable skit, an
introduction of local dignitaries and a welcome to
those in attendance.
Residents will be able to access the lab to focus on
professional development and it will be a tool for bet-
ter education programs.
The lab will be open on a scheduled basis, to peo-
ple who are attending school online, filling out job
applications, applying for benefits and services, tak-
ing exams and the like. There will be a part-time
attendant to handle scheduling, teach classes and
provide assistance.


[ B 4% .


....~ ~
~)


C--


ECB Publishing Photos By Will Smith, June 16, 2011.
The Jefferson County Bailar Public Library recently held a ribbon cutting cer-
emony to introduce the public to its new Computer Lab. In attendance and pic-
tured from left to right are: Linda Nickell, Dick Bailar, Natalie Binder, Carl Hanks,
Edna Henry and Kitty Brooks.


Choose Capital Health Plan,
your health care partner.


ECB Publishing Photos By Will Smith, June 16, 2011.
Library staff and friends presented an enjoyable skit during the opening cer-
emonies of the new library computer lab. Pictured from left to right are: Penny
Hackett, Natalie Binder, Kitty Brooks and Doris Andrews.


'C


A, .


ECB Publishing Photos By
Will Smith, June 16, 2011.
In attendance to the
opening of the new
library computer lab pic-
tured from left to right
are: Kitty Brooks, library
director, Linda Hamedani,
Cheryl Turner and Linda
Nickell.

Community organiza-
tions that would prefer to
use the small, private
computer lab instead of
the community room are
encouraged to schedule
time in the lab. The lab
will be restricted to adults
in order to maintain a pro-
fessional atmosphere.
Library Technology
Associate Natalie Binder
should be contacted dur-
ing library hours at 850-
342-0205.


859-997-

3jifi.


M&R


Lic. # CBC 1256821





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Health Plan also received a 5 out of 5 star summary rating of health
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Plan performance summary star ratings are assessed each year and
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Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract.
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4A * Monticello News





AR OUND


www. ecbpu blishing. com






SEFFERSON


Wednesday, June 29, 2011





COUNTY


Principal Cont. From Page 1


erbated the divisiveness
among board members
and played into the poli-
tics of race. And it over-
all made for another dis-
turbing display of a lack
of civility and decorum
on the part of public offi-
cials.
The recommenda-
tion of Holmes for the
JCMHS principalship
followed the board's
June 9 rejection of
Brumfield's first choice,
Dr. Jonathan Prince, of
Palm Beach County
Featuring prominently
among the board's rea-
sons for rejecting Prince
was his misuse of a
school district purchase
card, which resulted in a
deferred prosecution
agreement with the
Palm Beach County
State Attorney's office,
his demotion from prin-
cipal to assistant princi-
pal for an 18-month peri-
od, and a prohibition
that he not deal with
non-personal finances
for a three-year period.
Holmes, it turned
out, also had skeletons in
her closet, to the degree
that she had written four
bad checks when she
was a 19-year-old student
in college. More impor-
tantly, at least from some
School Board members'
point of view, Holmes
lacked experience as
principal or assistant
principal, although she
had a teaching back-
ground and currently
headed a reading and
writing program at the
Florida Department of
Education (FDOE).
Prompted by
Washington's question-
ing, Holmes initially
appeared to impress the
board with her recital of
her accomplishments;
her plans and vision for
JCMHS, if selected prin-
cipal; her people skills;
and the fact that she was
familiar with JCMHS
and its students, having
coordinated a coaching
program for reading and
writing at the school
during the last two
years.
Holmes identified,
among the school's prob-
lems, a sense of uncer-
tainty and deflated
morale on the part of the
staff and the students
alike, stemming from the
frequent turnovers at
the leadership level; the
lack of a clear vision and
objectives; and the lack
of consistent, applied
standards.
She identified,
among the strengths and
qualities that she would
bring to the table, a sense
of stability; an under-



Watermill



The CIGP is one of
three programs that
the Florida
Department of
Transportation (FDOT)
administers to help
counties with road
improvement projects.
The other two are the
Small County Road
Assistance Program
(SCRAP) and the Small
County Outreach
Program (SCOP).
Commissioners
adopted the resolution
accepting the
Watermill Road project
at the request of Clerk
of Court Kirk Reams.
"We applied for this
funding in 2009,"


Reams said. "Actually,


standing of rural com-
munities, having grown
up in rural Suwannee
County; a dedication to
academic excellence;
and a track record of
improved reading and
writing scores at the var-
ious schools where she
coordinated a coaching
program.
She said one of her
major initiatives would
be to establish a school
climate that allowed for
a safe, orderly environ-
ment where learning
could take place. She
would also be adamant
about communicating
with parents and having
the staff also communi-
cate with the parents,
she said. Collaboration
was critical, Holmes
said, and she vowed to
tap into teachers' cumu-
lative wisdom and
involve them in the for-
mulation of policies and
procedures for the
school.
Washington and
School Board Member
Sandra Saunders said
they heard Holmes artic-
ulate exactly what they
believed the kids, the
school and the communi-
ty needed and wanted.
They also believed that
with Holmes' FDOE
background, she could
act as a liaison and facil-
itate the district's deal-
ings with the state
agency, a point that
Holmes affirmed.
"I have relationships
and capabilities within
the department that
would help me negotiate
issues with the FDOE,"
she said.
Holmes conceded
that her lack of experi-
ence as a principal or
assistant principal rep-
resented a concern that
she herself would enter-
tain if she were a School
Board member. But she
was confidence of her
ability to perform, and
failure was simply not,
nor had it ever been, an
option for her, she said.
Saunders and
Washington were enthu-
siastic in their support
of Holmes. Washington,
for example, noted that
when she had started out
as a teacher, she also had
lacked experience. But
the principal had been
willing to give her a
chance, she said. And
she had risen to the occa-
sion and proven herself
a good teacher, she said.
And so would Holmes, if
given the chance, she
argued.
Saunders, the only
School Board member
with a child at JCMHS,
is, by her own words,


well attuned to the
school's inner workings
and dynamics, as she
works at the school. She
also wholeheartedly sup-
ported Holmes.
"I hear you say what
we need in this commu-
nity" Saunders said to
Holmes.
Arbulu said she
agreed with Holmes'
expressed sentiments
about the school, but she
frankly had concerns
about the latter's lack of
management, budgetary
and other such experi-
ences. She challenged
Holmes to provide a spe-
cific and relevant exam-
ple from her past
employment that
demonstrated her ability
to handle the principal-
ship. Arbulu also asked
Holmes to explain why
the reading and writing
scores at JCHMS hadn't
improved as they had
improved in other
schools where Holmes
coordinated reading and
writing programs?
Holmes attributed
the poor showings at
JCMHS to a high
turnover of reading and
writing teachers, in com-
bination with the reten-
tion of other teachers
who should have been
replaced. Which teach-
ers she would replace if
she became principal,
she added.
Vollertsen returned
to Holmes' lack of expe-
rience as a principal. To
which concern Holmes
responded that she was
certified at all levels and
thus qualified to be a
principal.
Vollertsen next
raised the issue of
Holmes pleading no con-
test to uttering or writ-
ing false checks in col-
lege, a written explana-
tion of which incident
Holmes had submitted
with her application.
Saunders said the
particular issue should
be left alone, given that
Holmes had provided a
written explanation. She
had a problem with a
board member "trying to
make a biggy out of
this," Saunders said. She
noted that Holmes had
been 19 at the time of the
incident and that it had
involved a personal
account. Yet, some on the
board apparently
weren't concerned about
another candidate who
had been placed on
three-year probation for
misusing school district
funds, Saunders said.
And as for assigning
fault to Holmes for the
poor reading and writ-
ing scores at JCMHS,


Cont. From Page 1


we applied for several
projects and the FDOT
gave us $500,000 for
Watermill Road."
In conjunction with
the adoption of the res-
olution accepting the
Watermill Road proj-
ect, the commission
also approved a budget
amendment that allows
for the expenditure of a
combined $2,896,445 for
three upcoming road
improvement projects.
Besides the $500,000
for the Watermill Road,
the other two projects
are the resurfacing of
Whitehouse Road from
SR-59 to the Leon
County line, $922,077;
and the resurfacing


and widening of the
Waukeenah Highway
from SR-50 at Wacissa
to U.S. 27 at
Waukeenah, $1,474,368.
The reason for the
budget amendments is
that, as with most
FDOT road assistance
funding, counties must
expend the money
upfront and then get
reimbursed.
"This is an account-
ing cleanup recogniz-
ing that the program
may take place during
this year," Reams said
of the budget amend-
ment. "This will give us
the budgetary authori-
ty to expend these
funds during the year."


the problem hadn't just
materialized overnight,
Saunders said.
"They (scores) have
been like that for years,"
she said. "Reading is a
problem at our school.
We have had reading
counselors who knew it
what their responsibili-
ty to improve the read-
ing. We should have
been concerned about
this for years. We had
principals in place that
should have been con-
cerned about it."
Arbulu agreed the
problem had long exist-
ed. Her point, she said,
was not to denigrate
Holmes but rather to
point out that if the lat-
ter was going to take
credit for the schools
she had helped
improved, she also had
to be willing to take
responsibility for those
schools that hadn't
improved.
School Board
Charles Boland took
strong exception to
Saunders' statement
that the uttering inci-
dent should not be
raised.
"Do we have a dou-
ble standard for asking
questions?" Boland
asked vehemently "I'm
not supposed to ask
these questions? All I've
gotten is this applica-
tion form showing four
yeses on 15 questions."
Washington inter-
rupted to demand that
everyone on the board
take a minute and exam-
ine his or her "own
teenage closet".
"Do we have any-
thing we can pull out
that we wouldn't want
pulled out?" Washington
asked. "I want the board
to be quiet for a minute
and take a search over
your life."
She herself had
overdrawn her bank
account when she had
been young and inexpe-
rienced in financial mat-
ters, she said.
"Are you going to
penalize me in my
career because I did
this?" Washington
asked. "She (Holmes)
stole no money, but we
had someone who took
school money and that
was okay seeming. So
we do have a double
standard. We're focus-
ing on everything but
the children. If we're
not focused on the chil-
dren, we don't need to be
on this board. We're
looking at petty stuff.
Think about the chil-
dren. Think about the
children. Think about
the children."


Boland challenged
that Brumfield had
never answered the
question of whether
Holmes was qualified
for the job; nor had the
superintendent ade-
quately explained the
uttering incident, he
said.
Brumfield dis-
agreed.
"I called each board
member individually
and told you about the
application and pointed
out that this might be a
concern," Brumfield
said, speaking of the
uttering incident.
Vollertsen returned
to Prince, whom he
described as an experi-
enced principal with a
doctorate and a proven
track record at turning
around failing schools
and who had essentially
been "thrown under the
bus" for political rea-
sons in his home dis-
tricts.
Vollertsen referred
to a letter written by
Prince's former super-
intendent to the FDOE
early in the current
year. In the letter, the
superintendent - Dr.
Art Johnson - had
expressed his intention
to restore Prince to a
principalship in Palm
Beach County, a deci-
sion the FDOE
affirmed.
But Washington gleeful-
ly pointed out that sub-
sequent to the FDOE's
affirmation memo,
Johnson himself had
run afoul of the Palm
Beach County School
Board and the latter had
removed him from the
appointed office. Her
point, Washington said,
was that Johnson was
no one to put great faith
in. As for Prince, the lat-
ter had never been able
to verify his alleged
achievements to her sat-
isfaction, she said.
"Anything looks
good on paper, but if
you can't tell me what
you did, it's no good,"
Washington said.
And so went the dis-
cussion, ever downhill.
Washington said she
believed some on the
board purposely wanted
to see the school fail.
How many board mem-
bers actually had chil-
dren in the school, she
asked, a remark that
Boland took as being
directed at him, given
his daughter attends
Aucilla Christian
Academy
"I know that was
directed at me," he said.
Saunders, mean-
while, grew passionate,


Driest Month


The SRWMD contin-
ues its phase-one water
shortage advisory urging
voluntary reduction of
water consumption. It
reminds homeowners
and others whose water
use the district doesn't
regulate via a permit that
they are required to limit


as the issue affected her
both as a parent and as a
board member, she said.
Like all parents, she
wanted what was best
for her daughter,
Saunders said. Which
was why she was so inti-
mately involved with
the school, she said. She
had followed her daugh-
ter through elementary
school and into the high
school to ensure the lat-
ter did her best. She had
a stake in the issue,
Saunders said. She
knew what was happen-
ing at the school - both
the good and the bad.
She talked to the kids.
She saw how demoral-
ized they were because
of the lack of leader-
ship and the constant
instability
She had no toler-
ance for negativity,
Saunders said. And she
had no patience for peo-
ple who complained
about the school but did-
n't do anything to help
improve it. If a person
wasn't part of the solu-
tion, then that the per-
son was part of the
problem, she said.
"I know the needs of
the children," Saunders
said passionately "What
I'm hearing her
(Holmes) say is what the
board and the communi-
ty has been asking for.
It's what we need and
want. If what she's
bringing is not what we
want, what then is that
we want? If this is not
what we're looking for,
what then is it that
we're looking for? I
make a motion to accept
the recommendation of
Loietta Holmes for prin-
cipal."
The response from
the rest of the board
was silence.
Forgetting or sim-
ply ignoring parliamen-
tary procedures in her
frustration, Washington
herself seconded the
motion without bother-
ing to temporarily relin-
quish the chairmanship
- a minor but telling
point of order.
Washington then called
for a vote, and immedi-
ately upon the 3-2 result,
she stood and the board
disbanded absent proto-
col, board member
engaging in separate
debates with each other
and members of the
public.
It was all Sheriff
Deputy O.J. Sloan could
do to monitor the situa-
tion and ensure the
strong discussions did-
n't escalate to the point
of a physical confronta-
tion.


Cont. From Page 1


landscape irrigation to
two days per week
between March and
October.
The district compiles
the hydrologic condi-
tions report using water
resource data collected
from radar-derived rain-
fall estimates, groundwa-


County Man


around again and walked
out.
Investigators Sears
and Wilcox approached
Barton and identified
themselves as law
enforcement officers.
They placed Barton into
custody for cultivation of
marijuana.
Deputy Paul Peebles
transported Barton to the


ter and surface water lev-
els, and river flows,
among other variables.
The district encom-
passes all or parts of 15
counties in north-central
Florida, including
Madison County and the
eastern half of Jefferson
County


Cont. From Page 1


County Jail.
Investigating
deputies seized the seven
two to six-foot marijuana
plants as evidence.
Investigator Sears field
tested the marijuana
plants with positive
results.
Deputies received
information that Barton
was on probation out of


St. John's County, FL.
They asked Barton if he
was on probation and he
stated that he was.
A total bond of
$25,000 was set on the
local charges. He also had
a violation of probation
out of St. John's County
and a hold was put on
him. He remained at the
County Jail June 27.






Wednesday, June 29, 2011


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


JEFFERSON


Monticello News * 5A


COUNTY


U


TONNVnII AL:N0,IL


JUNE 30
Fireworks Committee meet-
ings are held from 5 to 6 p.m.
on Thursday evenings at the
American Legion Otto
Walker Post 49. For more
information contact SAL
Commander Bubba Bullock
at 850-997-3920; or AL
Commander Paul Klug at
850-997-3603; or VFW
Commander Ned Hill, Jr at
850-339-5524; or VFW Ladies
Auxiliary President Mary
Madison at 850-210-7090.
JUNE 30
AA meetings are held week-
ly at 8 p.m. on Thursdays at
the Christ Episcopal Church


annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 850-997-2129 or 850-
997-1955.
JULY 1
Rotary meets at 12 p.m. on
Friday at the First
Presbyterian Church in the
fellowship hall for lunch and
a meeting with a program
and speaker. Contact
President Bill Watson at 850-
997-2591 or member Mary
Frances Gramling at 850-
997-3657 for more informa-
tion.
JULY 1
Monticello Jamboree is held
7 to 11 p.m. every Friday


ROBERT STEWART

Robert "Robbie" Bryant Stewart, Jr., age 22, of
Crawfordville, FL passed away on Friday, June 24,
2011.
Robbie (aka Rob Jr., Bud, RJ) was born in
Tallahassee, FL on April 9, 1989. He was employed by
Notary Public Underwriters, Inc. and was a great
joy of life and loved his family deeply
Growing up Robbie
was into all types of
sports, hunting, fishing,
soccer, baseball, paint-
ball, billiards and motor-
cycles. He always had a
gift... the ability to excel
and play every sport toI
the highest of levels. He
would always light up the
room, and was the life of
the party always doing
something silly to get a
big laugh. He was a kind
and caring person and is
loved and will be greatly .
missed.
Visitation was held
on Monday, June 27, 2011 .
from 6 to 8 p.m. at Bevis .
Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel in
Crawfordville, 850-926-3333. Services were held on
Tuesday, June 28, 2011 at 10 a.m. at the Crawfordville
First Baptist Church. Burial followed at the Zion
Hill Cemetery
He is survived by his father Robert Bryant
Stewart, Sr.; his mother Melissa Miller Stewart;
brother Ryan Glenn Stewart; sister Raegan Marie
Stewart; girlfriend Morgan Mills; grandparents
Robert Stewart, Margaret Miller, Glenn and Martha
Miller; aunt Carol Salter; uncle Shelby Lawrence;
first cousins Heather Salter, Victoria and Peyton
Lawrence and many other family and friends.
He was preceded in death by his grandmother
Della Ann Stewart.


evening at 625 South Water
Street, just three blocks
north of the American
Legion Otto Walker Post 49.
For questions or concerns
contact Curtis Morgan at
850-933-8138 or Bobby
Connell at 850-445-0049.
There are doorprizes, cold
soft drinks and snacks.
JULY 1
Ashville Area Volunteer
Fire Department meets 6:30
p.m. on the first Friday of
each month at the fire sta-
tion. Contact John Staffieri
at 850-997-6807 for more
details.
JULY 1
First Friday Happy Hour at
Brick House Eatery with
music beginning at 6 p.m.
Beer, wine and lots of good
food until 9 p.m. For more
information call 850-997-
2100 or go to brickhouse-
eaterv(gmail.com
JULY 2
Cub Scout Pack 808 meets at
5 p.m. every other Saturday
at the Beau Turner Youth
Conservation Center. For
more information contact
Cub Scout Master Greg
Wynot at 850-997-5366.
JULY 2
Lions Club Yard Sale begin-
ning at 8 a.m. on Saturday in
the Monticello News park-
ing lot. Contact Lion Debbie
at 850-997-0901 to make table
arrangements for your sale.
Donations of yard sale
items can be dropped off at
the News Office 8 a.m. to 5


p.m. or on the day of the
event.
JULY 3
VFW Post 251 meets 5 p.m.
on the first Sunday of each
month at the Learning
Center on Marvin Street for
a meeting. Contact
Commander Ned Hill at 850-
339-5524 for more informa-
tion.
JULY 4
Celebrate America in
Monticello at the Old High
School Football Field, Tiger
Lane off South Water
Street. Presented by the
American Legion and
Veterans of Foreign Wars,
there will be food and enter-
tainment sponsored by
Progress Energy beginning
at 6:00 p.m. This year's cele-
bration is free of charge.
Fireworks will begin at 9:15
p.m.
JULY 4
VFW Ladies Auxiliary Post
251 meets 6:30 p.m. on the
first Monday of each month
at Memorial MB Church.
Contact President Mary
Madison at 850-210-7090 for
more information.
JULY 4
Sons Of The American
Legion (SAL) meetings are
held at 6:30 p.m. on the first
Monday of each month in
the Otto Walker Post 49 on
South Water Street in
Monticello. For more infor-
mation contact District III
Commander Buddy
Westbrook at 850-997-2973.


Teate Family


Reunion July 9
FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The descendants of Rhoda (Fountain) and
Abner Teate are asked to attend the huge family
reunion, slated for 10 a.m. until, on July 9 at the
Cody Pentecostal Holiness Church, located at 3812
Tram Road (CR-259), Wacissa/Cody, in Jefferson
County, FL.
Many names in the county and the country are
the descendants of the Teate family, including the
family names of Monroe, Connell, High, Fletcher,
Kornegay, Miller, Moore, Coggins, Ward, Register
and more.
There will be a covered dish lunch, with paper
goods and ice furnished.
Attendees are asked to bring family photos and
all family information to share with others.
For any additional questions contact Ann
(Johnson) Brown at 1-251-931-3179 or 1-251-752-9757.


fu

T























F











































i Stay
VY1


FIRIEWORKS


FUND

- -

Looking beyond this year's Fourth of July
celebration, the committee behind the
undraising effort is looking for donations to
build a fund for next year's and
subsequent years' fireworks displays.
To make a donation to the Fireworks Fund,
visit Capital City Bank or
Farmers & Merchants Bank or
call American Legion Post 49
Buddy Westbrook at
850-997-2973.
'ATRIOT FIREWORKS' CONTRIBUTORS
MONTICELLO NEWS & JOURNAL
George Carswell
Buddy Westbrook
Fred Beshears - Total Landscape Supplies
Morris Petroleum
Childers Construction Company
Don Taylor
Hiram Masonic Lodge #5
FMB
Preble-Rish Inc.
Jackson's Drug Store
Charles Sarkisian
Jack Carswell
Carolyn Martin
Angela Gray
Judge Robert Plaines
Bill Brumfield
Kirk Reams
Gerald Hocking
John Finlayson
Brown & Brown
John Hawkins
Tom Harmon
Steve C. Walker Realty
Jon D. Caminez, PA
Hines Boyd
Thomas L. Folsom
Dick Bailar
Jeni Bond Smith
Paul Adams
Debbie D'Attile
Mike Humphries
Altrusa Int'l of Monticello
JC Republican Party
Carla Wheeler - Creative Stitches
American Legion Post 49
Charlie Reichert
Postel Hopkins
Raymond Kercher
Allen Brake
Sean Gray
Tom Hogle
Monticello Rotary
Pinckney Plantation
North Florida Abstract
Tommy Surles
Jimmy's Auto
Atty. Robert Morris
Chicken Delight w
VFW Post 251
Boy Scout Troop 803
Dick Dibble
Bubba Bullock
Lois Hunter
Sheriff David Hobbs
Marty Bishop
County Commissioners
City of Monticello
Emily Anderson
Asst. State's Atty. Neill Wade
Sarah G. Pafford
Tinker & Tinker Masonry
Big Bend Realty
Allen Boyd, Jr.
Roger Champion
Ray Hughes
Roy Schleicher
Capital City Bank
Kiwanis
Carl Hanks
Jim Billberry
Big Bend Timber
Rare Door Restaurant
Marianne Arbulu
Ron Slik
Frank Colb
Lions Club
Patti Liles "
Chuck McKelvy
Steve Rissman
Jeff Sorensen _
Dean Jerger



V overnight in beautiful Jefferson County
ad & Breakfasts; Local Hotels & Motels
For more information go to
www.visitjeffersoncountyflorida.com



^S ^A -L4w*


THANK YOU

Citizens of Monticello
It has been four years since you gave me the honor of letting me
serve on the City Council of our great city. With the deepest sense of
humility, I would like to express my thanks for the faith that you
have put in my abilities, and I will continue to work every day for the
benefit of the City of Monticello and all its citizens. I look forward
to tackling the challenges we face ahead to make Monticello a
better place for its future generations. Sincerely Yours
Idella Scott
City Council Woman
Group 3








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Tuesday, Nov j4 1 .6 p^^^^m. Center at (850) 431-5404.5 u^^^^





6A * Monticello News


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com





SEFFERSON


Wednesday, June 29, 2011


COUNTY


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FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
David Daniel
Herrera, 28, of
Tallahassee, FL, was
arrested June 16 and
charged with posses-
sion of marijuana with
intent to sell. Bond was
set at $5,000 and he
bonded out of jail the
following day
Tyavariu s
Williams, 27, of
Tallahassee, FL, was
sentenced in court June
16 to serve two years in
the Florida Department
of Corrections, to be
served concurrently
with three cases Leon
County has against


him. He was credited
for 641 days time
served.
Alton E. Diggs, 42,
of Perry, FL, was
arrested June 17 and
charged with posses-
sion of marijuana less
than 20 grams. Bond
was set at $500 and he
bonded out of jail the
same day
John T. Harp, 42, of
Monticello, was arrest-
ed June 17 and charged
with two counts of vio-
lation of probation on
the charge of burglary
of a dwelling and 13
counts of violation of
probation on the charge
of burglary of a struc-
ture. Bond was with-


held and he remained
at the County Jail June
27.
Craig Johnson, 36,
of Jacksonville, FL,
was sentenced in court
June 17 to serve 30 days
in the County Jail on
the charge of driving
under the influence
causing damage to per-
sonal property.
Kenneth Monroe,
Jr., 20, of Monticello,
was arrested June 20


and charged with vio-
lation of probation on
the charge of burglary
of a structure and vio-
lation of probation on
the charge of dealing
in stolen property.
Bond was withheld and
he remained at the
County Jail June 27.
William Jackson
Chason, 28, of Quincy,
FL, was arrested June
21 and charged with
failure to appear on the


charge of improper
class license. Bond was
set at $100 and he bond-
ed out of jail the same
day
Donald Glynn
Barton, 49, of Jefferson
County, was arrested
June 21 and charged
with cultivation of mari-
juana. A total bond of
$25,000 was set on the
local charges. He also
had a violation of proba-
tion out of St. John's


County and a hold was
put on him. He remained
at the County Jail June
27.
Kimberly D.
Mitchell, 30, of
Monticello, was arrested
June 23 and charged
with three counts of fail-
ure to appear on the
charge of fraud, insuffi-
cient funds. A total bond
of $1,500 was set and she
bonded out of jail the
same day.


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COUNTY HISTORY HEARD


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Longtime resident
and Jefferson County
historian Dee Counts
was guest speaker at the
June 22 meeting of the
Monticello Kiwanis.
She was invited to share
with the membership a
bit of Jefferson County
history... specifically
involving the five law
enforcement officers
killed in the line of duty,


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O JOHN DEERE


back to the mid 1800's.
Counts is the well-
known author of
"Familiar Faces and
Quiet Places: A Pictorial
and Narrative History of
Jefferson County,
Florida" by Derylene
Delp Counts 2005. She is
an active member of the
local Historical Society
and is very well versed
on the history of local
people and sites. She
makes herself available
to speak to groups and
organizations whenever
asked.
Kiwanis meetings
are held at noon on
Wednesday at the
Jefferson Country Club.
For more information
about this group and its
events, contact
President Jessica Corley
at 850-997-2591.


JES DRESS CODE


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Je fferson
Elementary School
Principal Valarie
Thompson announces
the student dress code
that will be enforced this
2011-2012 School Term.
Please adhere to the
guide below as you begin
selecting school clothing
for your child. This
information will be pro-
vided on the school web-
site, in the newspaper
and by mail to allow par-
ents/guardians to make
informed decisions
about their child's


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school clothes. Listed
below is the approved
wear for the 2011-2012
school term:
Tops should be a
solid color, short or long
sleeved polo shirt with
collar. Bottoms should be
solid color khaki pants
or jeans with no holes or
tears and worn with a
belt at the waist. Shorts
and skirts must be knee
length, to the kneecap.
Shoes should be secured
to the feet and have a
protective sole. There
should be no flip-flops,
shower shoes, sandals,
bare feet, bedroom
shoes, slippers, open toe
shoes or shoes with
spiked heels, wheels or
cleats. Shoes must also
cover the feet and must
not be a hazard to the
wearer or others. Black


shoes tend to stay clean-
er because students par-
ticipate in outside activi-
ties.
Friday are School
Spirit Day; everyone is
expected to wear a
school spirit shirt.
Additional shirts may be
purchased from the
main office as needed.
Last school year
went great and many
goals were accom-
plished. This year, JES
will build on its success-
es to achieve even
greater success, and
will, with continued sup-
port and encourage-
ment. Thompson and the
JES staff are looking for-
ward to seeing the stu-
dents in the aforemen-
tioned dress code, on the
first day of school,
Monday, August 22.


- -
~ - -
a I
I
III


Tomatoes


Peas


Call:
% After Dark: 973-8286..............(Timmy)
Daytime: 251-5463............(Timmy's Cell)
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Wednesday, June 29, 2011


OUND


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JEFFERSON


Monticello News * 7A


COUNTY


U


In Search Of The USA


By: Cleo Kelly
It began with a
three-person discussion
and a shopping list. The
talk was on unemploy-
ment, high cost of living
and how to make a dif-
ference. The business-
man said "we need to
block all import sales,"
the accountant asked
"what we would buy if
we did" and the grand-
mother looked at her
shopping list and won-
dered "how she could
make a difference." The
list was of simple needs:
paper supplies, cotton
dishcloths and curtain
hardware. The local
Wal-Mart would have all
those.
The discussion of
the morning resounded
through her head as she
pulled into the parking
lot and she determined
to buy only things made
in the USA. Here in the
sunny south, surround-
ed with cotton fields,
replacement of her
threadbare dishcloths
would be the easiest
thing to purchase. The
big cart went first to
household goods and a
wall of lovely cotton.
There were netted
scrubbers, twilled
squares of cloth, ribbed
towels in an array of col-
ors. Turning them over
to look for the country
they were milled in
offered a different array
of choices. The legends
read India, Bangladesh,
China and Pakistan. She
stepped back! Wasn't
Pakistan that country
that wanted her own sol-
dier son dead? She
searched again through
every rack but not a


USA label could be
found. Feeling a little
betrayed she stepped
away thinking "This is
the south! Why aren't we
represented here? Why
are Pakistan products in
our American store, at
all?"
Maybe the business-
man had been right
when he said we send
raw goods to other coun-
tries, so we can buy
them back as imported
products later. A trem-
bling began at the pit of
her stomach as she
searched her short shop-
ping list.
She needed a
tieback for the curtains
on the sliding glass
doors. As she pushed the
empty cart around to
that rack she felt a little
better. Here were home
furnishings with names
she knew! Look! Better
Homes and Gardens, she
had subscribed to that
magazine for years.
They had such an abun-
dance of delightful
choices. The glass knobs
were pretty enough to
brighten up the dullest
paneled room. She hap-
pily grabbed the bright-
est one, knowing that it
had to be American
made. Under the cheer-
ful packaging were three
little words. Made in
China. Floored, she
looked under everything
on the shelf rack. Like
uniform soldiers the
words remained. Made
in China. Everything!
What ever happened to
Birmingham Steel? Isn't
iron pulled from
American soil anymore?
Her buggy remained
empty as she moved


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away That shaky feeling
was back. What could
she, a grandmother, do?
Well, for one thing, she
would stop getting that
magazine that had
betrayed her so.
She stepped over to
office supply for the
needed paper items. A
box of green hanging
file folders was on dis-
play and she picked
them up and cautiously
search for the label. It
was there. MADE IN
USA. Without consider-
ing the price she
dropped the box in her
cart.
"These are less
money" Her friend held
up a smaller bundle of
bright colored folders.
'"Are they made in
America?"
"No."
"Never mind." The
tremors calmed a little
as she answered. "I'm
buying American."
The office supply
area was littered with
bright colored things
made elsewhere, but she
burrowed through them
and found a desk pad
calendar made by Mead
in Dayton, Ohio. They
also made post-it notes
and a day planner, not
littered with flowers and
color but sturdy and
large enough she could
write and read what she
had written, without her


Lastly, she moved to
the sewing supplies. The
old rocking horse was in
need of a new mane and
tail. Bins and bins of
yarn goods awaited her
perusal. Looking over
them, she suddenly felt
overwhelmed, almost
defeated. The mild tri-
umph she felt buying
paper products wilted as
she leaned against the
cart dejected. As she
viewed the skeins of
yarn her vision focused
on a small red dot and
she moved closer. A tiny
American flag heralded
the declaration: Made in
the USA - New York, NY.
She bought two!
She exited the store
with her list incomplete
but a new determina-
tion. She would heed
what the businessman
had said and make
changes to help the
American worker. It was
a small endeavor but
just maybe if enough
people made the com-
mitment, we could bring
back the factories, the
industries we the
American people invent-
ed, perfected and shared
with a world that now
wants us defeated.
She will continue
her search for the USA.


j
/


WE TAKE THE
ot$AS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


limi IameFiaa

Ii



By: CLEO KELLY
Moving to Monticello meant leaving friends,
church and a familiar country behind. The prayer
went heavenward asking God to find the family a
church home. It settled that the first place to ask the
family to attend would be God's answer. First Baptist
of Lloyd asked, and the family attended. Two embit-
tered teens, a married daughter and her six-month-
old son, came reluctantly with their mother one
Mother's Day
They settled beside an older gentleman, in a sur-
prisingly full sanctuary, that first day After the
singing, the children's corner and announcements
were made, the baby began to fuss. Bodies rustled
preparing to move aside for the mother to slip out
with him. The older gentleman beside her simply
smiled, as he reached large vein studded hands to
scoop up the boy Both mother and grandmother
stared in shock at his action. He placed the baby on
his knee and rocked it in place as he listened to the
sermon. The child stared at the lined face in wonder
and popped his thumb in his mouth. The service
continued. The baby wiggled with impatience and
was tucked into the crook of an arm that jostled him
gently Lashes fought to stay awake but finally set-
tled against his cheeks as he nestled into the chest.
The message from the pulpit has slipped from
memory He gave the family a church home with the
simple act of meeting a need and easing a baby to
sleep. The family came to learn that this place was
made of strong, courageous men tempered with
kindness.
Russell Hill went home to God last week. He left
us with children grounded in God because he took a
grandchild and soothed him through his first
church service. This gentle calm giant of a man,
who saw a need and had enough heart to create a
solution, will be sorely missed. The quiet, confi-
dence of a Godly man availeth much (to misquote
scripture). So, a last thank you is expressed for the
wonderful church home Russell gave me, one long
ago May day


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Wednesday, June 29, 2011


CHURCH


Cityof Monticello
2010 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report
We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water
and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water.
We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources.
We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from three wells. The wells draw from the
Floridan Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfection purposes.

In 2009 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system. The assessment was
conducted to provide information about any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity of our wells. There are 16 potential
sources of contamination identified for this system with moderate susceptibility levels. The assessment results are available on the
FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp or they can be obtained from Steve
Wingate at 850-294-8329.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Steve Wingate at 850-294-8329. We en-
courage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly
scheduled meetings. They are held on the first Tuesday of every month at the City Hall at 7 pm.

The City of Monticello routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regu-
lations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to Decem-
ber 31, 2010. Data obtained before January 1, 2010, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in
accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations.

In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the fol-
lowing definitions:
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to
the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or ex-
pected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water sys-
tem must follow.
Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE): An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is
a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes
(THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compli-
ance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing ev-
idence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or
expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.
Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (pg/I): one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample.
Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/I): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample.
Picocurie per liter (pCi/L): measure of the radioactivity in water.
2010 CONTAMINANTS TABLE
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Level Range of Likely Source of Continaion
Unit of sampling Violation Detected Results MCLG MCL Likely Source ofContamination
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N
Radioactive Contaminants
Alpha emitters Jun 08 N 1.2 ND-1.2 0 15 Erosion of natural deposits

Radium 226 4 228 or
combined radium Jun 08 N 1.4 0.9-1.4 0 5 Erosion of natural deposits
(pCiL)
Inorganic Contaminants
0.007- Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge
Barium (ppm) Jun 08 N 0.01 0.01 2 2 from metal refineries; erosion of natural
deposits
Corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of
Cadmium (ppb) Jun08 N 0.1 ND0.1 5 natural deposits; discharge from metal
refineries; runoff from waste batteries and
paints
Chromium (ppb) Jun 08 N 0.4 ND-0.4 100 100 Discharge from steel and pulp mills;
erosion of natural deposits
Erosion of natural deposits; discharge
0.089- from fertilizer and aluminum factories.
Fluoride (ppm) Jun 08 N 0.092 0.092 4 4.0 Water additive which promotes strong
teeth when at optimum levels between 0.7
and 1.3 ppm
Lead (point ofentry) Residue from man-made pollution such as
(ppb) Jun 08 N 0.7 0.3-0.7 0 15 auto emissions and paint; lead pipe,
(-b *casing, and solder
Nickel (ppb) Jun 08 N 1.1 0.9-1.1 N/A 100 Pollution from mining and refining
Nu 0 operations. Natural occurrence in soil
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) Aug. 10 N 0.49 ND-0.49 10 10 septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural
(ppm) deposits
Sodium (ppm) Jun 08 N 3.7 3.1-3.7 N/A 160 Salt water intrusion, leaching from soil

Disinfectant or Dates of MCL or Range
Contaminant and sampling MRDL Level ne MCLG or MCL or Likely Source of Contamination
Unit of (moRlyr.) Violation Detected of MRDLG MRDL
Measurement (mY/N/yr) YNResult
Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection By-Products
Jan- Dec Water additive used to control
Chlorine (ppm) Jan- Dec N 0.50 0.42-0.5 MRDLG = 4 MRDL = 4.0 Water additive used to control
Haoacetic Acids )pp)0 0.39- N/A MCL 60 By-product of drinking water
Haloacetic Acids p 0.71 N/A MCL =.60
(five) (HAA5) (ppb) 1.31 disinfection
TTIIM [Total 4.57- By-product of drinking water
trihalomethanes] Sep 08 N 9.75 18.4 N/A MCL 80 By-produisinfectiong water
(ppb)I
Contaminant Dates of AL 90th No. of sampling AL
and Unit of sampling Exceeded Percentile sites exceeding MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Result the AL Level)
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Copper (tap Jun-Sep Corrosion of household plumbing
paper (tp N 0.46 0 of 20 1.3 1.3 systems; erosion of natural deposits;
water) (ppm) leaching from wood preservatives
Lead (tap Jun-Sep N 6.4 1 of 20 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing
water) (ppb) 10 systems, erosion of natural deposits

The City of Monticello constantly monitors for various contaminants in the water supply to meet all regulatory requirements.
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water
is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. City of Monticello is responsible for providing
high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for sev-
eral hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing
methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material,
and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural
livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, indus-
trial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential
uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes
and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water pro-
vided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which
must provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence
of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health
effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised per-
sons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS
or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek


advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPAICDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of in-
fection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-
4791).

"We at City of Monticello work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap," said Steve Wingate. We ask that all our customers
help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children's future.


Refreshing


Maria Isabel (14) outside her family's leaky
adobe room.


SPAC teamer Jenny and two village girls

by Lloyd Monroe
You sent abundant rain, 0 God, to refresh...
Psalm 68:9 (NLT) The generous will prosper; those
who refresh others will themselves be refreshed.
Proverbs 11:25 (NLT)

Melanie and I left hot, dry North Florida and
returned to Guatemala's cool and wet Western
Highlands mid-month. Many folks don't know that,
largely because of Panajachel's mile-high altitude,
our temperatures are spring-like all year long
(high's in the 70's, low's in the 60's).We have neither
air conditioning nor heater in our house!
While returning to Panajachel's delightful cli-
mate indeed refreshed us, generous and giving folks
in the states likewise refreshed our spirits and fur-
ther empowered the work of Porch de Salomon; both
as we visited up there and now "down here." Such
people, in turn, allow Porch de Salomon to be gener-
ous toward and refresh many here: single-mother
indigenous families, poor or physically challenged
children, the hopeless and many others who cross
our ministry's path. Our hope and prayer is that you
will feel and sense God's constant refreshing in your
lives.
Some current refreshing:
*Team St. Peter's Anglican Youth, the first of
six-straight short-term teams, arrived three days
after we did, 19 strong. They are funding and build-
ing Juana Toc family's house in Chuaxic, plastering
parsonage walls in San Pablo La Laguna and debut-
ing the Semillitas Bible school program in that lat-
ter village. Team Killearn UMC arrived June 25 to
conduct ten free village medical clinics.
*We are enjoying getting to know our three col-
lege-age summer mission interns: Christy Steffy,
Susanna Zorn and Megan Robbins. New friend
Steve Metz left the world of Tallahassee lobbying to
experience Porch work up-close for a week; another
new friend, Linda Duvernois, has moved from
Boone, NC, to volunteer with us. Like old friend
Dusty Turner (who now plays keyboard on the
Queen Elizabeth for a living but joined our band
again for a week), all these people bring new stuff
and spirit to our mix.
* Our seventh 2011 new house project will be for
Maria Asuncion and her six children in Chuaxic; we
break ground June 25. Maria's husband deserted
the family years ago; his bad actions made things
very difficult for the family in the village. They are
fearful, timid, and malnourished and mostly keep to
their crumbling old adobe room. Daughter Maria
Isabel's (14) quit school because of her untreated
epilepsy She has now visited a specialist and
receives medicine as part of Porch's medical out-
reach.
We thank so many for refreshing Porch so that
we can refresh families like this.
Visit www.porchdesalomon.org or contact
lloyd(tporchdesalomon. org or Rex 850.933.0344 for
more information or to get involved.





Wednesday, June 29, 2011


www. ecbpu blishing. com


Monticello News * 9A


CHURCH


ThL e IP-lpil- Yov fve SomelLng T Lve JTor


Evangelist Pattie
Terrell Bennett,
Associate Minister
Mount Pleasant Ministries of Capps
Elder Charles G. Smith, Senior Pastor
The bible tells how the Jews took up st
throw at Jesus because He claimed to be the Son
But Jesus hid himself, and went out of the
through the midst of them, and passed by thb
John 8:59). This lesson was taken, and parap
from verses found in St. John 9:1-41, in whicl
passed by a man who was blind from birth. Th
the man's blindness was considered to be a per
disability in which he would never be able to
light, and would forever live in total darkness.
his blindness, the man relied on what he heard c
find his way around. He was also a beggar who i
near the temple to ask for handouts. The Jewis
ers taught that poverty, sickness, bad luck, anc
ing were punishment for those who had commit
So when the disciples saw the blind man, they
Jesus if this man or his parent's sins caused hi
ness. Jesus told his disciples the man's blindn
neither caused by his sins nor his parent's sin
ever, Jesus did not mean the man or his parent
sinless, but that the man was purposely born b
God's glory, and for His Son to be glorified by tl
ifesting of His divine work. Jesus also knew HF
on earth was drawing nigh, and He had to ful
purpose by doing His Father's Will; while He ye
Jesus also told his disciples, "As long as He wa
world, He was the light of the world." Then Je5,
on the ground and made a ball of clay from the
He took the clay and anointed the blind man's e:
told him to go and wash in the pool of Siloam
means, "Sent." Obediently, the blind man wen
pool and washed, and immediately he could see
both spiritually and physically The people coulc
lieve the man who was born blind and sat and
for handouts could now see clearly When they as
man how his eyes were opened, he told them the
of how a man called "Jesus" had opened his e
cause Jesus healed the blind man on the Sabbh
some of the Pharisees said, "This man is not of
cause He keepeth not the Sabbath day," the hol1
others asked the Pharisees: "How can a man tt
such miracles be a sinner?" The man's parents
the Jews: for the Jews had already agreed if m
fessed that Jesus was Christ, he should be put o0
synagogue; which was an awful punishment ti
Therefore, his parents said, "We know that thi
son, and that he was born blind, but we don't kn
he now seeth, or who hath opened his eyes, w
not: he is of age; he shall
speak for himself." They
questioned the man again
about how Jesus had
opened his eyes; and said N
Jesus was a sinner. So the
man answered them and
said: "Whether he be a sin-
ner or not, I know I was
blind now I see." He also A
said: "Since the world
began it was it not heard
that any man opened the
eyes of one that was born 0
blind. Now we know that
God heareth not sinners;
but if any man be a wor-
shipper of God, and doeth
His will, him he heareth. If S
this man were not of God,
he could do nothing." It
made the Pharisees angry
that this man now spoke
with a better knowledge of
the scriptures and was able
to teach them. So they cast
him out of the synagogue.
Jesus heard that they had
cast him out; and when he
found him, Jesus said to E
him, "Dost thou believe on
the Son of God?" The man
answered Jesus and said
"who is he Lord that I might
believe on him?" And Jesus
said, "Thou hast both seen
him, and it is he that N
talketh with thee." The man
said, Lord, I believe; and he
openly worshipped the
Lord. The Pharisees saw T
proof of the power of
Jesus, but they still refused
to believe in Him. Their
spiritual blindness resulted
from their jealousy and
envy of the popularity
Jesus received from chang-
ing the lives of the people
He healed. The Pharisees
were of age and morally re- e
sponsibility for their deci-
sion to remain in their sins. A
They were aware of their
spiritual blindness, but TI
they chose to remain in
darkness. H
God has a purpose for
your life that was planned
before you were born. As it
was with the Pharisees,
many people still believe
that afflictions result from
a person's sins or genera-
tional curses inherited F
from the sins of their par-
ents. But Jesus made it
clear that it does not mean A T
that everyone who suffers A
has committed sin. The
truth is, sometimes suffer-


ing even comes with right-
eous living. Christ never


sinned yet His purpose on earth was to suffer so that we
would be redeemed from sin. In John 11:4, when Jesus
heard Lazarus was sick, He said, "This sickness is not
unto death, but for the glory of God, that the Son of God
might be glorified thereby" However, Satan will launch
an attack on your mind by using the influence of oth-
ers who walk in darkness, to convince you that your suf-
fering is from your sins. Satan will also make you
think your condition is incurable and a per-
manent disability Whatever problems
you are faced with today, Jesus knows, "
and you have something to live for.
The Lord knows the afflictions
you are having, and with your af-
flictions, He has anointed and
appointed you for a special
task. Your blindness may be
due to an illness that has left
you crippled and unable to
get around on your own
abilities. You may be incar-
cerated and required to live
in constant darkness that
make you feel alone. Your
blindness may have resulted
from the lost of a love one, a
divorce, or a bad relation-
ship. Your blindness may be
due to a financial need. No
matter how long you have been
spiritually blind, and unable to
see or feel your way out of dark-
ness, know that you have something
to live for. Your affliction is just a set-up
for God to get the glory out of your life. In
due time, Jesus will show up to brighten up your
day, and lead you to the light. Psalm 119:105 says, "Thy
word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path."
But you must be in the right place and have the right
spiritual mind to receive Him when He comes. No mat-
ter what you have done, Jesus will touch you where you
need healing, and cleanse you for His use. Your faith in
Christ will be manifested when you obey His command-
ments, even if what He sends you to do seem strange.
When you have developed a personal relationship with
Christ, you will not fear what man can do to you. Even
if they threaten to cast you out of the church, keep
telling the world what the Lord has done for you. You
must have Holy boldness in order to please Christ.
God's process of taking you through trials is to
strengthen and prepare you for the next level. As true
believers of Christ, you will be persecuted for right-
eousness' sake. But if you stay focused on your purpose,


and not allow your personal feelings to take control,
Jesus said you will be blessed. You cannot do anything
without Christ. Just keep working to fulfill your pur-
pose, because you have something to live for. Even in
the midst of trials and persecutions, keep praising the
Lord, because you have something to live for. When oth-
ers see the miraculous change in your life, and they
know nobody "but God" did it, they will also come to
Christ and confess their belief in Him as the
Son of God. In St. Matthew 5:12, Jesus
said: "Rejoice and be exceeding glad for
great is your reward in heaven: for so
persecuted they the prophets
which were before you." Follow
in the footsteps of Christ, so the
world will be able to see your
good works, and glorify our
Father. In St. Matthew 5:14
and 16, Jesus said: "Ye are
the light of the world. A city

hid. Let your light so shine
that they may see your good
works, and glorify your Fa-
ther which is in heaven." I
am a witness that, "God's
grace is sufficient." "Amazing
grace how sweet the sound
that saved a wretch like me, I
once was lost, but now I'm found,
was blind but now I see," As Jesus
did with the blind man, He is ex-
rending an invitation for you to come
out of darkness. Don't let your final fate
be determined by your choice to reject
Christ as the Son of God. Walk out on faith, and
start working for Christ while it is day Because, when
night (death) cometh, no man can work.
May God bless you! (850-997-3612)





WORK TOWARD YOUR OwN

FINANCIAL INDEPENDENCE DAY

Provided by Robert J. Davison

On July 4, we shoot fireworks, attend picnics, watch parades
and otherwise celebrate our nation's independence and the many
freedoms we enjoy. But as you go through life, you'll find out how
important it is to work towards another type of freedom - finan-
cial freedom. That's why you need to put strategies in place to help
you work towards your own Financial Independence Day.

And there's no way to "sugar-coat" this task, because it will
be challenging. In recent years, a combination of factors - in-
cluding depressed housing prices, rising health care costs, frozen
or eliminated pension plans and the financial market plunge of
2008 and early 2009 - has made it more difficult for many of us
to accumulate the resources we'll need to enjoy the retirement
lifestyle we've envisioned. In fact, the average American family
faces a 37 percent shortfall in the income they will need in retire-
ment, according to a recent report by consulting firm McKinsey &
Company.

But now that we've gotten the "bad" stuff out of the way,
let's turn to the good news: You can do a great deal to work towards
financial freedom during your retirement years. Here are some sug-
gestions that can help:

* Save and invest more. Obviously, the younger you are, the
greater the benefit you'll get by increasing your savings and in-
vestments. But whatever your age, you'll find that it pays to save
and invest more. During difficult economic times, of course, it's
not always easy to boost your savings and investments, but try to
find ways that are as "automatic" as possible. For example, when-
ever you get a raise, increase your 401(k) contributions, which
come directly from your paycheck. And whenever you get a "wind-
fall," such as a tax refund, try to use part of it for your IRA or an-
other investment account.

* Rebalance your portfolio. It's always a good idea to periodically
rebalance your investments to make sure they are still aligned with
your goals and risk tolerance. But it's especially important to re-
balance as you get older and you near retirement. At this stage,
you'll want to decrease the volatility in your portfolio and lock in
what gains you've achieved, so you may want to move some (but
certainly not all) of your more aggressive investments into less
volatile ones.

* Cut down on debts. It's easier said than done, but anything you
can do to reduce your debt load will free up money to invest for
your retirement. Work diligently to pay off whatever debts you can
and examine your lifestyle to find areas in which you can reduce
spending.

* Consider working part-time during retirement. Many Americans
are now living longer and enjoying happy, healthy retirements. In
fact, the concept of "retirement" has changed so that it now in-
cludes any number of activities - including part-time work in a
completely different area from one's previous career. If you are will-
ing to do even a little part-time work during your retirement years,
you can greatly reduce the financial pressures you may face during
this time of your life.
The 4th of July comes and goes quickly. So put strategies in place
now to help you work towards your own Financial Independence
Day.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184 H
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com


-


































nm The Heart Music Hour


he Monticello Opera House


Saturday, July 9,2011


www.edwarajones.com E
Making Sense of Investing
MEMBER SIPC






10A * Monticello News


www. ecbpu blishing. com


Wednesday, June 29, 2011


CHURCH


9472 South Jefferson Highway, Capps
U.S.19 @Highway 27
850-997-1066, 850-345-8623
revcharlesgsmith@aol.com
Pastor /Teacher Charles G. Smith, Sr.
Sunday School........................... 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship..........11:oo AM
2nd Sunday Youth...... .............11:oo AM
4th Sunday Service......................8:00 PM
Tuesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study..............................7:00 PM

.^^^S FIRSTSSUNITEDi^
^^^METHODIST CHURCH


325 W. Walnut Street * Monticello
Pastor Wayne Cook 997-5545
Sunday Praise & Worship...........8:30 AM
Sunday School............................. 9:45 AM
Traditional Worship.................11:oo AM
Youth Group................................5:30 PM

Vacation Bible School
June 13th - 17th
9:00 a.m. - Noon


JUNE 29
Handbell classes will be held
from 5 to 6 p.m. on Wednesday
evenings at First United
Methodist Church, in the Sunday
School building. For more infor-
mation and to register, call
Marilyn Youtzy at 850-997-4632.
This Music Ministry is free of
charge for children ages four to
12.
JUNE 30
Gold City will appear in concert
at the Northside Church of God
on Thursday, at 7 p.m. at the
Northside Church of God, located
at 1339 North Byron Butler
Parkway in Perry For more infor-
mation, call 850-464-0114 or 850-
843-4913.
JULY 2-3
Homecoming 2011 will be cele-
brated at Saint Phillip AME
Church beginning with a kickoff
'Youth Explosion Worship


Service' on Saturday at 6
p.m. Bro. Padrick Scott will be
keynote speaker for the kick-off.
The celebration will culminate
with a good ole fashion Worship
and Communion Service on
Sunday at 11 a.m. The Sunday
morning preacher will be the Ret.
Rev. McKinley Young, Presiding
Bishop of the 11th Episcopal
District of the AME Church, and
his wife. Everyone is invited to
join and receive a special blessing
from God. This is a first for an
AME Bishop to visit Monticello.
For further information, call 850-
997-4226 or 850-291-6938. Rev J. W.
Tisdale, pastor.
JULY 9-10
Miracles, Healing, and Prophetic
Services will be held at
Transforming Life Church in
Lloyd. This is an amazing life-
changing opportunity being held
on Saturday at 6:00 p.m. and on


Sunday at 10:30 a.m. For more
information and directions call
850-997-TLC7.
JULY 22-23
USDA Commodities Food
Program and Second Harvest
Food Bank have joined with New
Bethel AME, Elizabeth MB,
Hickory Hill MB, Mt. Pleasant
AME and Philadelphia MB
churches to provide food to any-
one needing assistance including
the needy, infants and the elderly.
This is done monthly with distri-
bution from 8 to 9 a.m. usually on
the fourth Saturday at the New
Bethel AME Church located at
6496 Ashville Highway
Volunteers are also welcome to
come on Friday evening at 6 p.m.
to help bag the food packages.
Contact Nellie Randall at 850-997-
5605 or 850-997-6929 to volunteer
or for more information about the
program.


Wacissa * 997-2179 or 997-1769
Pastor James Gamble
Sunday School............................. 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning.........................10:55 AM
Sunday Bible Study...................6:30 PM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting...................6:30 PM
Youth Group............................... 6:oo PM
Choir Practice............................... 7:30 PM



7150 Apalachee Pkwy * Tallahassee
www.chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick Burrus 850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash 850-459-6490
Sunday School...............o:oo...... 00 AM
Sunday Worship......... .....11:oo AM
Children's Chapel...... .............11:oo AM
Sunday Evening................6:00 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students


US 19 N 1590 N. Jefferson Street
997-3906
1285 Magnolia Ave.
Debra@monticellonaz@gmail.com
Rev. Timothy Hildreth
Sunday School.................................. 9:45 AM
Morning Worship..........................10:45 AM
Wednesday Evening
Supper...................................................5:30 PM
Small Group Breakout...................6:30 PM
Bible Study & Prayer Meeting............6:30 PM
Saturday
Spanish Church Services....................7:30 PM



4124 Bassett Dairy Rd * Monticello * 997-8444
Email: ebcmonticello@hcsmail.com
Dr Dean Spivey, Pastor
Student Pastor, Don Self
Sunday Worship Service..............8:30 AM
Sunday: Bible Study.....................9:45 AM
Worship Service........................11:oo AM
Choir Practice.............................6:00 PM
Worship Service...........................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Children/Student Ministry...........3:30 PM
Senior Adult Choir Practice...........7:00 PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends &Youth.6:oo PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...........6:00 PM




425 North Cherry Street * Monticello * 997-4116
www.ChristChurchMonticello.com
Rev. Buzz Yarborough
Communicating the Good News of Jesus Christ since 1840
Sunday 9:oo AM............Adult and Children Sunday School
10:00oo AM ................................. Holy Eucharist
Nursery provided for children under 5


780 Second Street * Monticello * 997-4947
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor
Worship Services 2nd and 4th Sundays
Sunday School (every Sunday)....9:3o AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Children's Worship...... ...........11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study....... 7:00 PM


TMA [ [ t
1565 East Washington Street
Monticello * 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 90)
Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
Sunday Mass.............................11:oo AM
Wed. followed by Novena............7:00 PM
1st & 3rd Saturday
Spanish M ass................................7:00 PM


Word Of Life Brazil

Reaching the Amazon with the Gospel of Christ
Word Of Life Brazil After the Word of Life BRAZIL
Greg and Anne Parker first camp I 4. .,, . .
Dear family and am going to be -- .
friends, I am so sorry it doing my sur- .-
has been so long since vival training . '
we have sent an update. with them so .,, ...
Life has been very busy please prayk "
and we have very few for safety on
chances to use the that.
Internet. We just got Anne just P-
back from a medical trip got her two
with 'A Doctors Heart." lower wisdom
The trip went great. We teeth pulled,
treated over 1,400 peo- so she is in a
ple. Now we have a week little bit of

trip, which will be with days. Please
internship students pray for her to !" 7 .-
from WOL Belem. We have a quick
will be gone for almost a recovery them to help us out. We Thanks for all your
month. They are going We were thinking of know everything is in prayers and support. We
to do two camps and stay going back for about a the Lords hands. wouldn't be here if it
a couple of days in vari- month in November That's about all wasn't for all of you.
ous communities. Please because our home that's going on with us. God Bless.
pray for this trip, that church in North
the camps will go well Carolina will have its
and that a lot of young Missions Conference,
people can turn their but unfortunately we
lives over to the Lord. were not accepted onEAI
Also, pray for the boat, this year for support.
as we will have 22 peo- Please pray that other
ple living on it and it fits doors will open because
comfortably 12 people! we were counting on


|I A A

Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ, Inc
63 Tinnell Road
Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-0399
District Elder Tony Lane, Pastor
Services:
Sunday
Bible School............... ......................................... 9:45AM
M morning W orship................................................... 11:oo AM
1st Sunday Holy Communion Service
Monday
W ings of Prayer....................................................... 5:00 PM
Wednesday
Noonday Prayer..................................................... 12:00 PM
(Mid-Week Church Fasting Day)
1st Wednesday
Praise and W orship.................................................... 7:30 PM
Prayer......................................................................... 7:00 PM
Bible Class................................................................. 7:30 PM
1st, 4th, 5th Saturday
Prayer...................... ..................................... ........... 9:ooAM
Everyday
Morning Universal Prayer.....................................6:oo AM





124 St. Louis Street * Lloyd * 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.com
Pastor George L. Smith
Sunday
Sunday School..............................9:15 AM
Praise & Worship.....................10:30 AM
AWANA (ages 3yr-6th grade).....5:00 PM
Impact 4Jesus (Grades 6th-College)5:30 PM
Praise & Worship.......................6:oo PM
Adult Choir...................................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Family Supper........................5:45 PM
W orship.........................................7:00 PM
Joyful Sounds Children's Choir...7:00oo PM
5th quarter Youth......................7:00 PM
1st & 3rd Monday
Mighty Monday-Ladies Bible Study...6:30 PM
2nd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints....................11:oo AM
3rd Thursday
W.W. Diners(Widows/Widowers outing)...5:30 PM
3rd Saturday
Brotherhood..............................8:oo AM


7369 Boston Hwy.
850-997-1596
Bro. Art Beal, Interim Pastor

Sunday Bible Study........................10:oo00 AM
Sunday Worship...............................11:oo AM
Sunday Evening............................... 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Bible & Prayer Meeting....................... 7:00 PM


325 West Washington Street
Monticello * 997-2349
Dr. Rick Kelley, Pastor
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship........... 6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 PM
Children's Church - Ages 4-6....11:3o AM
-Nursery for all services-



625 Tindell Road * Aucilla * 997-2081
P.O. Box 163 * Monticello
Pastor Daryl Adams 850-251-0129
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship Service............11:oo AM
Choir Practice.............................. 5:00 PM
Worship Service........................6:oo PM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study........7:00 PM





Wednesday, June 29, 2011


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Monticello News * 11A


HURCH


LOLW6uDLI 6LIJOGTQ~ D
^(Z~IT DmZPTBET L(33CL �3J


LYNETTE NORRIS
A Special From Greene
Publishing, Inc.
Friday evening of
June 17, VBS Director
Jean Willis wrapped up
a week of Vacation
Bible School for about 50
children who had gath-
ered in the First Baptist
Church sanctuary to re-
cite their memory
verses and sing the VBS
songs they had learned,
while their parents
smiled, took dozens of
pictures and applauded.
During the entire
week of "Hometown
Nazareth - When Jesus
was a Kid," the children
learned about a differ-
ent aspect of Jesus'
childhood from their
memory verses and
"visits to Mary's house"
where they could talk to
Mary (played on alter-
nate days by Christy
Grant and Donna Hill),
ask questions and listen
as she told them a differ-
ent story each day about
Jesus' childhood, de-
scribed what it was like
to be the mother of
God's son.
Besides bible verses
and bible study, there
was plenty of food and
fast-action games played
indoors, away from the
punishing summer heat.
They learned and sang
songs ranging from the
high-energy, foot-tap-
ping "Great Things are
Gonna Happen!" to the
more lyrical and haunt-
ing "God With Us."
Those of us who re-
member crafts as a big
part of our VBS experi-
ence as children would
not have been disap-
pointed with this week's
list of projects, which
included everything
from making key chains
with colorful beads to
painting miniature bird-
houses, and also in-
cluded a mission
outreach project. Each
class assembled dozens
of "care bags" for chil-
dren in hospitals that in-
cluded a fuzzy blanket, a
small stuffed animal, a
coloring book, crayons
and miscellaneous toys.
Altogether, the children
put together 72 care
bags, which were dis-
played on the stage Fri-
day night.


As they concluded
their busy week Friday
evening, filing into the
sanctuary filled with
late afternoon sun slant-
ing through the stained
glass windows, there
were echoes from vaca-
tion bible schools of
years ago where chil-
dren lined up by age
group and class and
took their seats. Maybe
some of the parents
could remember when
they were that age,
walking into the church
just so, gathering in the
pew, and pledging alle-
giance to the American
flag, the Christian Flag
and the Bible, "God's
Holy word...a lamp unto
my feet" - words that
strike a familiar chord
with so many who are
no longer children, but
who remember those
words they once spoke
in unison with others.
When it came time


to sing, they filed up
onto a stage that was an
open-air market in an-
cient Nazareth, dressed
with trees and fruit
stand and painted stone
wall backdrops beneath
the AV screen overhead
as the accompanying
music and video began.
As for the songs the
children learned all
week, the new
audio/visual technol-
ogy has presented the
music in new and excit-
ing ways to those gath-
ered in the auditorium,
allowing the children to
watch performances of


415 E Palmer Mill Rd * Monticello * 997-1119
newhope415@yahoo
Pastors Ray and Angel Hill
Sunday School...........................10:00oo AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo00 AM
Sunday Prayer.............................6:00 PM
Wed. Family Training Hour........7:00 PM




690 Cypress Street Monticello 850-997-4375
"Standing Firm On The Word Of God"
Dr. Melvin Roberts, Pastor

Sunday Church School..............:....o:00 A.M.
Sunday Praise & Worship................. 11:15 A-M.
2nd Sunday Youth Praise & Worship
4th Sunday Individual Outreach Ministry & Fellowship
3rd Sunday Holy Communion
Wednesday Evenings
Prayer Meeting................................. 6:30 P.M .
Bible Study........................................... 7:00 P.M .





290 East Dogwood Street * Monticello * 850-997-2252
Rev. Sharon Schuler, Pastor
Sunday School............................................ 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship(except last Sunday of month)..11:00 AM
SonShine Worship(last Sunday of month).........9:00 AM
Adult Bible Study-Wednesday................6:30-7:30 PM
Men's Breakfast..............8:00 a.m. on 2nd Saturday


ECB Publishing Inc., Photo by Lynette Norris, June 17, 2011
The children sang their hearts out Friday evening at the final assembly for Vacation Bible School.


sung in older songs by
previous generations of
children sitting in rows
in Vacation Bible
School...as timeless as
when they were first
committed to parch-


ment or clay tablets
2000 years ago.
Perhaps that is
what makes us all be-
lieve that "Great
Things are Gonna Hap-
pen."


285 Iagnoila bSt * llonice10o * 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr. David E. Walker, Pastor
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning.......................11:o00o AM
Sunday Evening.........................6:30 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Wed. TRAC Club for teens...........7:00 PM



Hwy 27 South * (1 mile south of Hwy 59)
Monticello * 997-4226
Rev. J. W. Tisdale
Sunday Morning..........................9:30 AM
Sunday Worship.............11:o00o AM
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible..............................7:00 PM


13 Barrington Road * Monticello * 850-997-8747
Rev. James Mack, Pastor
Sunday School................(Every Sunday)... 9:45 AM
Morning Worship...........(1st & 3rd Sundays)1:oo AM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting- ................................
(Thursday before 1st & 3rd sunday).......... 7:30 PM.




1206 Springfield Road * Lloyd * 997-TLC7 (8527)
Pastors Tim and Beverly Buchholtz
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com

Sunday............................................. 10:30 AM
Sunday Morning Praise and Worship
Children's Church
Infants & Toddler Nursery
W ednesday............................................7:00 PM
Praise & Worship
Adult & Teen Bible Study
Young Explorers (K-5th Grade)



1287 South Jefferson Street * 997-RGCC (7422)
www.restoredglory.org
Pastor Eddie and Elder Veronica Yon
Sunday Church Service.............10:00 AM
Thursday Church Service............7:00 PM
Monday & Friday
Women's Fellowship/ Fitness- 6:30 PM-7:30 PM
Tuesday Night Tae Bo.............6:30 PM-7:30 PM
Wednesday with Pastor........10:oo AM - 2:00 PM
Saturday For Realville for teens- 6:00 PM - 8:oo PM


81 Methodist Church Rd * Waukeenah * 997-2171
www.waukeenah-umc.org
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship........ ...........11:oo AM
Youth Group.................................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice........................... 7:00 PM
Youth Group.................................7:00 PM
Family Fellowship
2nd Thursday of each month
Thrift Store open every Saturday,
8:oo AM-12:oo PM


the songs as they
learned the words and
hand motions and sing
along with the video.
However, even


though the songs them-
selves were new, the
stories they told re-
main as timeless as
when they were first


3862 Tram Rd.*Monticel0o * 997-6774
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas
Sunday School..........................lo0:00 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship........... 6:oo PM
Wednesday Worship...................7:00 PM





5593 Veterans Memorial Drive (Hwy 59)
Tallahassee * 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev. Greg Roberts
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship...................... 11:oo00 AM
Children's Worship...................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal...........................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting........................7:45 PM



4543 Waukeenah Hwy * Monticello -850-264-0802
Pastor Stephen Lenzo

Sunday School.......................................... 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship..... ......................11:oo AM
Nursery Provided
Tues Bible Study.......................................... 6:30PM
www.sardis.his-body.com
email-lenzos@his-body.com



1599 Springhollow Road * Monticello - 212-7669
Pastor Marvin Graham
Sunday Discipleship Class...................9:30 AM
Sunday Worship................................10:30 AM
Healing Service
Every 2nd & 4th Sunday......................6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study .............................7:00 PM
Wed. Young People Bible Study .............7:00 PM
Wed. Counseling...................5:30 PM-8:30 PM
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study............................7:00 PM
Sunday Worship.....................:00 PM-4:oo PM
Thurs. Jail Ministry.............7:00 PM-9:oo PM
AA Tuesday............................................8:00 PM


ECB Publishing Inc., Photo by Lynette Norris, June 17, 2011
The Vacation Bible School Classes assembled 72 "care bags" during the week
for children in hospitals.






12A * Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. comr


Wednesday, June 29, 2011


CHILDREN'S DRESSES-
white long dresses/gowns size
3,4,7-8. $50. White long gown
size 16 $100. Also gorgeous
Lime Green Dress w/ sequins
teen size 14 $300. Call 850-973-
3497 leave message.
2/23,tfn,nc.
"GALLON'S GARDEN
FRESH PRODUCE"
Okra + Watermelon
Pesticide Free
Monday-Saturday 1171 Barnes
Road. Yard Sale on Saturday's
8:00 a.m.- until. Housewares,
Home Decor, Furniture, Kitchen
Aides, Clothes & Shoes. 997-
0898 or 464-3429.
6/24 2" Ip .. d.


Steel Buildings- Disc
Factory Inventory
38x50, 48x96, 60x150
Sizes, limited availability
w w w.sunwardstee
Source# 1IU
352-253-4047








Public Auction
House in town on double
other lots. Trucks,vehicle
tors, equipment, misc.,
lumber.Consignment we
Sat., July 2nd at 9 a.m.
west of 1-75 on US 90, La
Fl. Atkinson Realty & A
800-756-4098. A
www.lakecityauctionceni


1 Br /1 Ba Grove Apartments-
1400 N. Jefferson, Monticello.
For elderly 62+ and disabled.
(Equal Housing Opportunity)
850-997-5321
10/20,tfn,c.

Commercial/Industrial
Property - with state highway
frontage. Comer lots. Fronts both
Harvey Greene Dr. & Highway 53
South. Enterprise Zone Natural
gas line, 8 inch water main, access
to city utilities, fire hydrant, and
service from two power com-
paines. Property has easy access to
1-10, via SR 53 & SR 14. Will
build to suit tenant for short or
long term lease. Call Tommy
Greene 850-973-4141.


rtn,nc.
mountedd
24x36, Charming spacious HISTORIC
Misc. HOME, in town. 631-0577.
y 2/16,tfn,c.
1.com
2-1BR PARK MODEL

6/29,c. 3 BR singlewide M.H.
2BR/2BA mobile home.
No calls before 9:30 a.m.
or after 8 p.m.
Call Liz at 997-1638.
5/4,tfn,c.
1 - Efficiency Unit
$360/month with utilities.
le lot & 1 - Large 2 BR M. Home.
es, trac- New paint and flooring
tools, $450/month.
welcome. 1 - Large 2 BR with fenced
6 miles yard "nice" $475/month.
ke City, No Smokers or Drugers.
auction, Need proof of ability to pay
Bll41. on time.
ter.com. Call 850-251-9540.
6/29,pd
6/15-7/8,c.


(850) 997-4340
Realtor@timpeary.com


1405 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344


Simply the Best!





BACKHOE
SERVICES AVAILABLE
Driveways, roads, ditches,
tree and shrub removal, mow-
ing, 1pi ,111i,. harrowing, burn
piles and field plots. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116 or 933-
3458.
\ 10/22, rtnc. /
MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
850-509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn.
"HAVE MOTOR GRADER
WILL TRAVEL" - Private road
maintenance. Storm drain work.
Land clearing and hauling. Call
Joe at 850-321-1778
4/8,tfn,c.
BUSH HOGGING-
Finish Mowing/ $55/hr.
Call 850-567-6715.
4/20-7/20,c.
HANDY MAN
,All ' "'./ of repairs
Electric, Plumbing, Painting,
Carpentry, Yard Work,
Reasonable Rates.
Call Don At 997-5940.
6/24,29,pd.


I ForRent


FULL TIME CHEMISTRY INSTRUCTOR WANTED AT
NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY COLLEGE. SEE
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6/10,15,17,22,24,29,c.
Monticello Christian Academy- Middle/High school teaching
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management skills a must. Strengths in Math and English.
Contact School Administrator at 997-6048.

6/15,17,22,24,29,7/1,6,8c.

Brynwood Center- 1656 South Jefferson Street. Monticello,
Florida 32344. 850-997-1800. Open position: Registered Nurse.
Call for appointment. EOE Drug Free Work Place.


FOR SALE
1993 Toyota 4-Runner
Automatic, loaded, good condi-
tion, $2500 obo. Call Matt at
264-4665 or 997-3318.
11/26,tfn,nc.
FOR SALE
Jeep Cherokee Sport 2000,
4WD, 4DR, Good Condition.
Call 850-443-4260.
6/15,tfn,nc.




FREE KITTENS

5 cute kittens (1 female and 4
males) that are 8 weeks old.
Call 850-973-3497
or 850-973-4141.

rtn,n/c


Aderisn NtwrkO Ford


asubsidiaroidia I oSID


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Wednesday, June 29, 2011


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News * 13A


LEGALS


NOI( CE OF FORE( I O.NL RE .s%1.E B
(I. ERIk OF I HE (IR(LCI I (1 C(O Rl
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UII IK '1 *.'Iii K1N1K

BEGIN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHEASIERLI EDGE OF -NEW ROWD", 25
FEET FROM THE CENTER, 1ITH THE SOUIHEASTFRLI EDGE OFSTATF ROAD II,f50
FEE i FROM CENT ER, AND RUN NORTH 35 DEGREES 55 fMMINTE. EAST, ;LONG THE
EASTERLY EDCE OF THE RIGHT OF WAl OF STATE ROAD 14y. 448.44 FEET FOR A
POINT OF BEGINNING,THENCE NORTH 35 DEGREES 55 MINUTES EAST 558.92 FEET 0TO
THi BEGINNING OFACURVE OTHER LEFT, HOINGARADIUS OF l%.08FE IEl, AND
H l\IG CENIR4I 4NGLF OF 40 DEGREES 2' MINUTE& THENCE NORTHERLY
ALONG S\ID CLRVE. 13852 FEET TO THE END OF IHE CURE. THENCE NORTH 4
DEGREES 32 MINUTWEWE T 302 4 FEET, THENCE, LrA ING bT 1E ROD 149. RUN
SOL'TH 89 DEGREES 4(1 MINUrESA ST 49'3 FEET, THENCE NORTH I DEGREES :5
1tINl'TE' 9EST 588 l FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 3o MINLTFS EAST 800 10
FFE I.THENCE SOL IH 0 DEGREES45 MINUTES E1 20h93 Jl FEET.THENCE NORTH F,
DEGREES 13MNIINITESWESTi2.UFEEI, HENCE SOITH IIDEGREES:28 MINLIESEASI
3b3.u FEET. THENCE NORTH b( DEGREES 3Q MINUTES WESr I'.~5m FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, BE ING LOCATED IN THE EASI' OF SECTION 18ANDI THE
FS', OF SECTION 17. TOWNSHIP; NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTIV.
FLORIDA.

LESS A.ND EXCEPT

A TRACT OF PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NORTH[ ST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHEAST QLtRTLROFSECIIONIS,FOWNSHIP2NORIT H,RANGE 5E BONDED
.IS FOLLOWS- (OMIN.NCE &T THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 18.
THENCE RUIN ,ESTERL1 ALONG THE NORTH LINE THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 1332
FEET TO THE CENTER OF SR N14), THENCE ALONG SMID CENTER LINE SOUTH 4
DEGREES 32 MINUTES EAST 2071 I FEET 10 THE BEGINNING OF (L CRVE, SIATE
ROAD DEP RTME NT ST \T ION 64--27.6, THENCE SOUTHIRLI AND SOUTHWESTERLY
ALONG .A CURl E (ONCA l10 THE WESTERN. HI& ING A RDILS OF 1910.08 FEET

AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 40 DEGREES 27 MILNTIS, q DISTANCE OF 1348.33 FEET,
ALONG THE CENTERLLNE OF SAID SR #149 TO THE END OF SOUTH 35 DEGREES 55
1M1NbIESWESI 1115.12FEET 41ONG THE CENT[ERLNEOF SAID ROAD, THENCESOUTH
54 DFGREF.S 05 MINUTES FAST 50 FEET 10 A POINT 01 THE SOUTHEASTERN
BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHI OF WA' OF SAID sR lP49. WHICH IS IHE POINT OF
BEGINNING. HENCE RUN NORTH 35 DECREES 55 MINliTFS FAST Iis5 12 FEE T LONG
SID RIGHT OF , A BOULNDIR TO POINT OF CURVE. THENCE NORTHEASTERLY
%LONG A CURl E CONC \ E TO THE WESTERLY. HAVlNG A RADIUS OF 160.08 FEET
FOR %DISIA.NCEOF 19.M88EET LONGTHF EEASTERNBOUINDU1ROFTKHERIGl OF
WY, OF SAID SR #149 TOTAL DISTANCE OF 225 FFFT ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WA,
BOUNDARi,THENCERL'N SOnUTH 84DEGREES21 MINUTES EAST 244.3 FEET.THENCEF
%OlIH ill DEGREEs illi MINUTES EAST 22u FEET. THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 15
MINUTlESEST r2" FEET,THENCE NORTH ii DEGREES 14 MINL TESWVSTl1125 FEET
TO iHE POINT OF BEGINNING.

4LSO LESS ND EXCEPT

BEGIN ATTHEINTERSECTIONOF lHENORTHLASIERLIEDGEOF k9FOOTGR.DED
ROAD WITH THE SOUIHLASTLRL1 EDGE OF 100 FOOT RIGHT OF WA\ OF STATE
ROAD 149, WHICH IS LO(C IED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOlTHIA.T
QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOD NSHIP 2 NORTH, R NGE 5 EAST., AND RUN NORTH 35
DEGREES 55 MINUTES EAST. ALONG ROAD 14'I, 44644 FEET, THENCE SOMTH 69
DEGREES 39 MINUTES FASI 6822 FEEI FOR IHE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE
NORTH )0 DECREES ill MINL TES iEST ALONG THE E iST LINE OF SAID SECTION 18,
'6 5 FEET, THENCE NORTH 84 DECREES 21 MINUTES WEST 24511 FEET TO THE
EASTERLd EDGE OF THE 100 FOOT RIGHT OF A.\Y OF STATE ROAD 149. THE NCE
NORTHERLY ON A 1960.8 FOOT RADIUS CRVE TO THIE LEFT, 126364 FEET TO THE
ENDOF IHECLRVE,THENFC NORTH4DEGREES3 MIMITFSHFST,ALONG ROAD 149,
3u2.4 FEET, THENCE LEAVING THE ROAD SOUTH 8 DEGREES 40 MINUTES E4 ST 4J.73
FEET, THENCE NORTH I DEGREE 25 MINUTES EST 58S.1 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 84
DEGREFES3 MINIrITES[ I'1i8I FEET TO A POINTON THE SOUTHSIDE OFAGRADED
ROD.THFNCE SOUTH t DEGREES45 MINUTES EAST 2693.30 FEFT,THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 13 MINUTES WEST872.0FEET,THENCESOUTH ODEGREE8 MINUTES EAST
363.f FEET: THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES39 MINUTES WEST.497 FEFTTOTHE POINT
OF BEGINNINGAND BEINGPART OF THE STONE HALFOFSECTIONI', TOWNSHIP
2NORIHRANGE5EAST, AND0M14[LLPIECEOFTHENORTHEFAS1QARIEROFIHE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 5 E IST,
IEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA4.

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Mining Expert

tween the county's negotiating committee and Randy
Hatch, the expert whom county officials have been
courting for several months. Hatch is a former
Suwannee County commissioner and president of
Hatch Enterprise, a private rock mining company He
recently evaluated the county's rock mine and offered
to help make the operation more productive and effi-
cient, per some kind of a fee-based agreement.
Schleicher said the committee had discussed sever-
al options for hiring Hatch, including declaring him a
sole source or having the county's consultant engineer
firm act as middleman and hire Hatch. But the commit-
tee had ultimately rejected all the options, he said.
"We decided the best and fairest way to go was to
put out a Request for Qualifications (RFQ)," Schleicher
said.
Commissioner Hines Boyd allowed that other fac-
tors had played into the decision.
"We're trying to make sure all the procedural bases
are covered, that's essentially what's going on," Boyd
said.
Also, he added, the committee wanted to alleviate
Barfield's concerns. Barfield's preference is to have the


NO I C i




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Cont From Page 1
,,county give up the rock mine. But if the commission
I ,, ,.i , , , , . I I,,,, , , . ,,, , , ,. 1,, ,


expert to make the operation moreIl efficient and pro-





























ductive, the board shouldn't limit itself to one person,
Schleicher next proceeded to explain how the RFQ
W , .I .,] .,, ,% ,, ,









process would work. He said the RFQ would list the













commission would then i interview the top choices, he
Ih .,.!.,.,,! ! , ,n !,n,.I.,- 1






















counfaied to product the arock mine. But ifesult, the commission then moved
wasto the second choice, and so onf the mine, untilre a
exprcandidate was hired. Once the cion more efficient undecided prto
moductive on theo another party howeveshouldn't limit couldn't return to




















the former ones, he said.
Phil Calandra, a citizen with experience in the
Ph!il Cala,!. !,.1 ,! ,�ndraa,,,tnze wit exp rin cel,,, n., the!.,


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,:,:q n.t ati a 'con.cr te o cminnit nair in, the TTri ti , rn r : IE ,t
'Irk.heasf" Quirtepr of tihe Nort - ,.est .:",u rt'r -f ' te.r..n n T,.,nr li
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"mon RIenlt oi n th e s . -,,th rl r l h -i [-t",.3 ,- ,, ,i,r ' i r ,, - f|,-,r,.,l
Po1-ar c trp.ritlion Fangmint then, run florth * d4d rjre?<' .1 iti itar.
V, .econd. 149tt. al.,nq' -,r-,.ii ';,llIth l14 . t- ,- F-,,3. Til l? ),
199t to an Iron iod .for p ,:'[_r nr itn JI rIn;, . n--. [,,,a 1,1,
P-'int .f Begirqlnnin 3q 1ii ri d i. .n -.3j? j onl rjn ilu r -,,i ... i; . | ij run
SgO ti l11 n l ,oqi q 1 6 pin,ite 'l- , - n,7 li rCm r. i r,[ ,,.c, 1 '..:, b, irnr
rlrdh 5 dq .ijqrf q lh ! jaqrl ,l miS miter 1in rnjrqin | '' iP 7 1 ,1' 1, 1 nt
to p int .n t the Nor i t ri .lit -nf-uy ln ,.,,rj.r p,3jdli ,.
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corporate world, remarked that per the description ofII




the RFQ, it sounded as if it the document was tailored

I1...source , even though you're going through the,

process," Caandra sa.I. d.



Schleicher assu..red h,,Inm that the RFQ was broad
enough that other experts could well respond, naming.
.n.I a couple of individuals whom he said were experts..n in


n,..Barfield tha .nked the committee, and Boyd. in par-

.ticular, for giving credence to I. her concerns and .


responding to them by deciding to go the RFQ route.
The issue of what to do with the county's rocket. , 11.,r r .I II cr-
minIe has occupied commission, herns for months.


corporate world, remarked that per the description ofevalua-
the RFQ, it sounde and tells if it the documentif it was woras tailoredping.
for Hatch's response was that the mine was worth keep-
ing, if it was opncernated that you'vperly He onstrucggested a soleral
steps that neededource, even though you're going make through theion
Schlmore productiveiher assured himoffered thato undertake the RFQ wask, broadif
enough tha agreement other experts oulrked out.well respond, naming







an agreement could be worked out.


' . ' I I





14A * Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Wednesday, June 29, 2011


PORTS


7Zird annual Sheriff"


Charity


olf tournament July 16


FRAN HUNT $100 per person and
ECB Publishing includes 18 holes of golf,
Staff Writer golf cart, goodie bag,
The Third Annual towel, two Mulligan per
Sheriff's Charity Golf player (A Mulligan is a
Tournament is slated "do-over." Hit a bad
for July 16 and this shot? Take a Mulligan
year's event is expected and replay that stroke. A
by coordinators to be an Mulligan is
even bigger :-iil i-tt:-i
success than th .it
of last yeat s /
tournament
This year's
proceeds
will go to
benefit the
Florida
Sheriff's
Bo y s

County Relay
for Life and
Jefferson Sen ilo
Center. Last yeaL"
event raised over n e v e r
$20,000. "legal" under the Rules
The event will be of Golf. Mulligans are
held July 16 at the most often employed
Jefferson Country Club during friendly rounds
with tee times of 9 a.m. by golf buddies; or dur-
and 1 p.m., preferred ing charity or play day
times are on a first call tournaments where
basis. The registration Mulligans are some-
fee is $400 per team or times sold), coupons for


free Warrior golf club,
meal at 7 p.m. and a door
prize ticket.
There will be three
flights consisting of 12
teams per flight. Prizes
will be awarded to the
top five teams in each
flight. The format is a
best-ball scramble with
four golfers on each
team.
This is a great way
to support our commu-
nity, support Jefferson
County and get your
name/business
advertised.
There are several
levels of sponsor-
ships available for the
tournament. They
include; $100 Hole
Sponsor (a sign with
your name/business dis-
played at a hole); Par
Sponsor ($100,
name/business on Par
banner); Birdie Sponsor
($250, name/business on
Birdie banner); Eagle
Sponsor ($500,
name/business on Eagle
banner); or Ace Sponsor,
($1,000, name/business
on Ace banner). All of


the sponsor banners
will be prominently dis-
played during the event.
Available sponsor-
ships also include a
"Total Tournament
Sponsor" ($5,000 and
includes a four-person
team, large banner in
several locations at the
club, wall plaque, and
recognition during the
tournament, in the
Monticello News;
"Partial Tournament
Sponsor" ($2,500,

'I: I i


includes four person
team, large banner and
recognition at the event.
The tournament
prizes are top quality,
name brand items as
they have been in years
past. Once again, there
will also be Hole-In-One
prizes offered as well.
The list of those prizes
will be forthcoming
when fully determined.
Checks should be
made payable to
Sheriff's Charity Golf


Tournament.
Any item that you
wish to donate for door
prizes or items to be
placed in the golfer's
goodie bags can be
dropped off or mailed to
Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office, atten-
tion Cricket, 171
Industrial Park,
Monticello, FL, 32344.
For any additional
information contact
Dawn or Jean at 997-
2523.
Il I


DINING OUT




Guide


I k


.


JEFFERSON WARRIORS

HAMMER FLORIDA RHINO


FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The Jefferson
County Warriors semi-
pro football team faced
off against the Florida
Rhino June 18 and the
Warriors hammered
their opponent for a 42-6
victory to remain unde-
feated.
The Jefferson
defense held the Rhino
scoreless for the first
three quarters, while the
Warriors put six points
on the board in the first
quarter; added another
22 points in the second
quarter; and marked up
another six points in the
third quarter. Jefferson
put another eight points
on the board in the
fourth quarter and the
Florida Rhino chalked
up six points.
The Warriors quar-
terbacks totaled 11 pass
completions out of 19
attempts for 210 yards
and one touchdown.
Deion Graham com-
pleted nine passes out of
15 attempts for 124 yards.
Brandon Robinson
completed two passes out
of four attempts for 86
yards and one touch-
down.
The Jefferson run-
ning backs had 13 carries
for 70 yards, three two-
point conversions and
three touchdowns.
Nicholas Freeman
had two carries for an
eight-yard loss.
Graham had five car-
ries for 10 yards, one two-
point conversion and one
touchdown.
Tony Sims had two
carries for 20 yards, one
two-point conversion and
one touchdown.
Montray Crumity
had two carries for 23
yards, one fumble and
one touchdown.
Harry Reddick had
one carry for two yards.
Jarvis Davis had one
carry for 20 yards.
Robinson had two
carries for three yards
and one two-point conver-


sion.
Warriors' receivers
had a total of 11 pass
receptions for 210 yards
and one touchdown.
Robinson had one
reception for 10 yards.
Freddy Pompey had
six pass receptions for
150 yards and one touch-
down.
Antonio Ivey had two
receptions for 20 yards.
Jitavian Bennett had
one reception for 20
yards.
LaMarkus Bennett
had one pass reception
for 10 yards.
Robinson averaged
60 yards per punt.
For punt returns, the
Warriors had two
returns for 90 yards.
Jeffery Williams had
one return for 60 yards.
LaMarkus Bennett
had one punt return for
30 yards.
Jefferson had three
kickoff returns for 95
yards.
Ranardrick Phillips
had two returns for 65
yards.
Crumity had one
kickoff return for 30
yards.
On the defensive side
of the field, Clinton
Pleas had one tackle, one
assist and one tackle for
a loss.
Phillips had seven
tackles, one assist, one
pass interception for a 45-
yard return and one tack-
le for a loss.
Ivey had two tackles,


one assist, one tackle for
a loss and two quarter-
back sacks.
Trey Latimore had
one tackle and one assist.
Crumity had one
tackle and one assist.
Terrell Harrell had
one tackle and one assist.
Gregory Clark had
three tackles.
Kendrick Thomas
had one tackle, three
assists and one fumble
recovery
Chris Bryant had
one assist and one tackle
for a loss.
Justin Lovett had
five tackles and two
assists.
Laddie Fead had four
tackles and three assists.
Tyric Florence had
one assist.
Bay Lee had three
tackles.
Markel Andrew had
two tackles and one
assist.
Keith Merrell had
one tackle.
Bryant Gant had four
tackles, three assists, one
forced fumble, one tackle
for a loss and three quar-
terback sacks.
Jermaine Collins
had three tackles and
three assists.
Victor Brady had one
tackle.
Clinton Pleas was
named as the offensive
player of the week for a
blocked punt.
Pompey was named
the defensive player of
the week.


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Industrial and Commerolal Handlers

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