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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00355
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: 07/21/2010
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
sobekcm - UF00028320_00355
System ID: UF00028320:00355
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








c.4I


ONTICELLO


NEWS


142nd Year No. 29 Wednesday, July 21, 2010 50 46 +40


School District In Line For


$759,000 In Federal


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The Jefferson County
School District expects to re-
ceive a portion of the $170.2
million that U.S. Secretary of
Education Arne Duncan an-
nounced on July 2 that
Florida would be receiving to
turn around its lowest per-
forming schools through the
School Improvement Grants
(SIG) program.
The $170.2 million is part
of the $3.5 billion that the
federal government is mak-


FHP NABS

TALLAHASSEE

MAN HERE

AFTER USING

THE STOP

STICKS
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Tallahassee man was nabbed
in Jefferson County, on July 18 after
Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) got
into a high-speed chase with him
that began in Leon County In order
to apprehend the suspect, FHP had
to utilize the stop sticks (spikes).
FHP Trooper Scott was travel-
ing westbound on US-27 approach-
ing Mom and Dads restaurant at
approximately 10:35 a.m. when he
observed a black SUV traveling east-
bound at a high rate of speed.
The trooper activated his radar
and received a reading of 82 miles
per hour in a 45 mile-per hour zone.
Scott turned his vehicle around and
started traveling eastbound to over
take the vehicle. He activated his
emergency lights and the vehicle
pulled over
onto the
south shoul-
der of US-27
just east of
March Road.
Scott ran
the tag. of
the vehicle
and as he ex-
ited his pa-
trol car he
noticed that
the brake
epo Keneth lights were
Lepond Kenneth still on and
Thopson the vehicle
had the two
left tires partially on the pavement.
As the trooper got just past his
driver side door the black SUV
began to speed away.
Scott got back into his vehicle
and contacted dispatch to advise
them of the vehicle fleeing, and of
his pursuit.
He began to follow the vehicle
about /4 mile behind and was travel-
ing eastbound toward Chaires Cross
Road. They continued eastbound
past Chaires Cross Road toward Jef-
ferson County.
Jefferson County FHP units
were contacted and advised of the
Please See Tallahassee Man
Page 6A


Around Jeff. Cc
Church
Classifieds
Legals


ing available to states from
set-asides in the 2009 budget
and the American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act
(ARA), more commonly
known as stimulus money
Gloria Heath is the fed-
eral program specialist for
the Jefferson County School
District, charged with writ-
ing the applications for Title
I funding and monitoring
compliance with the funding
rules. Heath shared with the
News on Wednesday, July 7,
that between the elementary
and middle/high schools, the


Money

district should be re-
ceiving $759,293 in SIG
funding in the near fu-
ture.
Heath said the bulk
of the money would be
going to Jefferson
County Middle/High
School (JCMHS), which
is rated a Tier 1 school,
defined as "the most in
need of academic inter-
vention," according to
Heath.
Or as Dunce de-
scribed it in the press re-
lease announcing
Florida's $170.2 award, a
Tier I school is one "that
continues to perform
Please See Federal
Money Page 6A


New Septic Tank Rules


Are Still Being Written
LAZARO ALEMAN
SMonticello News
r Dfl over te tank Senior Staff Writer
S4 O' 0 el W Among the slew of new state laws
a a /6// that took effect on July 1 is one with partic-
D ant ,ular application to rural residents, as it re-
PDO A a-e' lates to the construction, maintenance,
O eat '4 installation, repair and abandonment of
septic tanks.
&IHgRFa F &Senate Bill 550,'approved by the
SAD 9A0P g l / rh /~~l Florida Legislature in the last session, is a
Comprehensive bill addressing a variety of
ad Z'teaI SL, d y t/ e (o w/da water quality and water quantity issues. In
Sthe briefest and the generalist of terms, SB
Sor / t a SafaP e to 550 will require periodic inspections and
Off'aw ,h wasOd! 's tbo a Se pump- outs of Florida's estimated 2.6 mil-
y / lion septic tanks starting in 2011.
Sd/(th 0 t& woods Other than this, don't expect to get
much more information about the bill or its
*-' implications at this time, however.
Mark Positano is the environmental-
ist specialist with the Jefferson County Health Department, charged with the respon-
sibility of enforcing the rules locally Positano, however, knows little about the bill
himself at this point, other than that it was approved.
"This is a huge undertaking of the state," Positano said. "We're still in the initial
stages."
In fact, he said, the Florida Department of Health's Bureau of Onsite Sewage Pro-
grams, which is charged with writing the rules for the new law, has yet to start the
process. Positano suggested that a call to the bureau might provide more information
about the new law.
But Bob Glenn, an environmental manager with the Bureau of Onsite Sewage
Programs, could give little more information about the bill, other than that the rules
were being written. As for how long the rule-writing process might take, Glenn of-
fered it could happen "fairly quickly", or it could take a while.
Please See Septic Tank Page 6A


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
In a bit of housekeeping on Monday
night, July 12, the Jefferson County
School Board expanded, updated and/or
clarified its policies on smoking, class
ranking and the selection of valedictori-
ans and salutatorians.
The revised smoking policy broadens
the definition of tobacco products and the
places where such products are prohib-
ited. The new policy, for example, defines
tobacco as any lighted or unlighted to-
bacco products, including cigarettes, ci-
gars, pipes, dip, chew, snuff or "electronic
cigarettes in any form".
The ban extends to properties and fa-
cilities owned, leased or contracted by the
school district, including buildings,
buses, offices, playgrounds, athletic fields
and open areas.
The policy previously was more lim-
ited and general.
The Rank in Class policy establishes
that students will be ranked on the basis


1 Section 16 Pages
o. 4-9A Pet Page
10A-11A School


12A
13A
16A
2-3A


14A Sports
15A Viewpoints


of the credits they earn in grades 9, 10, 11
and 12, including those exceptional stu-
dents who are earning credits toward a
standard diploma. The policy remains
virtually unchanged for all practical pur-
poses, with the exception of one minor re-
vision. Namely, it is that selection of
students for particular honors will hence-
forth be done in accordance with estab-
lished School Board policy, rather than by
a high school guidance committee.
As for the selection of the valedicto-
rian and salutatorian, the revised policy
establishes specific criteria that candi-
dates for the two honors must meet. Pre-
viously, the School Superintendent each
year recommended to the School Board
the criteria, guidelines and standards for
selection of the two students.
The School Board is also in the
process of adopting a revised and up-
dated Code of Student Conduct Manual.
Among the changes are new or enhanced
sections on bullying and harassment,
Please See School Board Updates
Page 6A


Wed 9774
7/21
Generally sunny despite a few af-
ternoon clouds.


Thu
7/22


The City

Helps Give

County

A Voice In

Regional

Agency

r Goal Is To
Develop
Transportation
Systems For
Region

LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The Monticello City Council on
Tuesday night, July 6, took a neces-
sary step to ensuring that Jefferson
County has a voice in a multi-
county organization that is
charged with developing trans-
portation plans for the region.
The resolution that Harry
Reid, executive director of the Cap-
ital Region Transportation Plan-
ning Agency (CRPTA), asked the
council to approve helps assure
that Jefferson County will become
a voting member of the organiza-
tion, once the Governor signs off
on the measure. Currently, Jeffer-
son County Commissioner Hines
Boyd attends CRPTA meetings, but
he doesn't have a vote.
The City Council's support on
Tuesday night of the Membership
Apportionment Plan, which ex-
pands the CRPTA's boundaries to
include Jefferson County, is a re-
quired step for the Goverhor's ap-
proval of Jefferson County's
addition to the organization. The
council's approval didn't come
without reservations on the part of
Please See Regional Agency
Page 6A


Census Enters

Its Next Phase
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
With the door-to-door follow-up
operation of the 2010 Census effec-
tively at an end, the U.S. Census Bu-
reau is alerting residents that the
count is now entering the quality-as-
surance phase, where it assures the
completeness and accuracy of the
gathered information.
Specifically, census workers will
now begin systematically canvassing
select households to confirm that the'
census takers followed the training
protocols and produced accurate
data. All told, this phase will entail
census workers re-interviewing five
percent of the households across the
country.
"We ask that if you are one of the
few homes re-interviewed, called or
visited this summer during our qual-
ity assurance operations, please take
a few minutes to help us ensure that
the 2010 Census is complete and accu-
rate," Census Bureau Director Robert
M. Groves is quoted saying.
He added that the current
process would enable the Census Bu-
reau to catch any errors or corner-
cutting and initiate immediate
corrections.
As part of the process, the Cen-
sus Bureau will call households to
eliminate confusion about the num-
ber of people reported in a household
and to make certain that there are no
missing or double-counted individu-
als.
Please See Census Page 6A


I .


95/75


Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
mid 90s and lows in the mid 70s.


Fri
94/75 j
7/23
Times of sun and clouds. Highs in
the mid 90s and lows in the mid
70s.







2A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. com


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


IEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


WHEN YOU THOUGHT I WASN'T LUK1ING


A message every
adult should be remind-
ed of because children
are watching you and
doing as you do, not as
you say..
By: Mary Rita Schilke
Korzan
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
hang my first painting
on the refrigerator, and I
immediately wanted to
paint another one.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
make my favorite cake
for me, and I learned
that the little things.can
be the special things in
life....


When you thought I
wasn't looking I heard
you say a prayer, and I
knew that there is a God
I could always talk to,
and I learned to trust in
Him.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
make a meal and take it
to a friend who was sick,
and I learned that we all
have to help take care of
each other.
When you thought I
wasn't looking, I saw
you give of your time
and money to help peo-
ple who had. nothing,
and I learned that those
who have something


Elect





BARFIEUD

for Jefferson County
Commissioner District 4

A New Voice
for
a New Day
P.O. Box 264 Lloyd, FL 32337 850.688.4251
E-mail: Betsy@BetsyBarfield.com
Political adaisaN ent aid for and approved by Besy Bari;eld, D macrat for Jeffersou County Cmrmissiy Oistric 4


should give to those who
don't.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
take care of our house
and everyone in it, and I
learned we have to take
care of what we are
given.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw
how you handled your
responsibilities, even
when you didn't feel
good, and I learned that
I wbuld have to be
responsible when I grow
up.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw
tears come from your-


eyes, and I learned that
sometimes things hurt,
but it's alright to cry
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw
that you cared, and I
wanted to be everything
that I could be.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I learned
most of life's lessons
that I need to know to be
a good arid productive
person when I grow up.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I looked
at you and wanted to say,
"Thanks for all the
things I saw when you
thought I wasn't look-
ing."


Each of us (parent,
grandparent, aunt,
uncle, teacher, friend)
influence the life of a
child.
Live simply. Love
generously Care deeply
Speak kindly. Leave the
rest to God.
About the Author:
Mary Rita Schilke
Korzan, author of
When You Thought I
Wasn't Looking wrote
this poem as a tribute to
her mother. It was first
published anonymously
in A Fourth Course of
Chicken Soup for the
Soul and has since trav-


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Reader Seeks Old Football Tapes


On behalf of the
members of the Florida
High 1964 and 1965 foot-
ball teams, I am trying
to find anyone from the
Jefferson Co Monticello
Tigers football team of
the same years that
might have or know
where to find 1964 or
1965 football film of
Monticello Tigers vs.
Florida High Demons.
The 1964 game was
played in Monticello
and was won by


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Monticello. The 1965
game was played in
Tallahassee was won by
Florida High. Jack
Youngblood was on the
1965 Monticello team.
I would gladly pay
costs to transfer the
game film of these
games to DVD and share
the same with any mem-
ber of the 1965 and 1964


Monticello football
teams. Time is getting
late. I would appreciate
any leads to find these
films. Thank you.
D1on %Soczk
1334 Avondale Way
Tallahassee, Fl
Donstockl7@
comcast.net


eled around the world,
touching the lives of
countless grateful par-
ents.


| I beings the rapidly po-
litical season is just
around the corner would
like to get something off
my chest. According to
Webster the term democ-
rat is a noun referring to a
specific political party.
The term democratic is an
adjective referencing a
form of government.
Hence, a democrat is no
more democratic than a
republican,an independent
or any other political
party. So please make
your English teacher
happy and stop referring
to the democratic party."
(Hl ow is it that the
Wife of the Building
Inspector is permitted to
work for him? Isn't that
nepotism? I thought a cou-
ple years ago this was an
issue at the Grant's Office
and someone was fired or
forced to resign. Not to
mention that she treats
people very unprofession-
ally."


EMERALD GREENE Advertisement is Monday at 3 p.m.
for Wednesday's paper, and
Publisher/Owner Wednesday at 3 p.m. for Friday's
paper.
LAZARO ALEMAN There will be a 'lP charge for Affidavits.
Senior Staff Writer
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Deadline for classified is Monday Subscription Rates:
at 3:00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper, Florida $45 per year
and Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. for Out-of-State $52 per year
Friday's paper. Deadline for Legal (State & local taxes included)


MONTICELLO peoI


NEWS i


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 180 W Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than
6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Moticellolorid

I P.O. Box 428
r 111l:ll i tcllonewsic
Ca emarI









Wednesday, July 21, 201()


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Monticello News 3A


a : a a e
JEFFERSON COUNlTY CR IMEBEAT


ALL ^^INFRMT IO SPRNE A AE FO HEMNICLOPLIEDPATET
ALL SUSPECT SHO LD ECNIEE NOEN NI RVNGITYI OR FLW


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Steven Gregory
Clark, 26, of Jefferson
County, was arrested July
9 and charged with aggra-
vated assault and false
imprisonment. A total
bond of $20,000 was set
and he paid the bond July
12 and was turned over
the same day on an out-
standing Thomas County
'warrant, to face charges
there.
Suzette Noel Wilson,
42, of Carlsbad, NM, was
arrested July 10 and
charged with possession
of marijuana more than
20 grams and possession
of paraphernalia. A total
bond of $3,500 was set and
she remained in the
County Jail July 19.
Curtis James Oliver,
40, of Jefferson County,
was arrested July 11 and
charged with trespass
after warning. Bond was


set at $1,000. and he
remained at the County
Jail July 19.
Barbara D. Cochran,
55, of Orange Park, FL,
was arrested July 13 and
charged with driving
under the influence. Bond
was set at $1,000 and she
bonded out of jail the
same day
Brian W Ivey, 31, of
Jefferson County, was
arrested July 13 and
charged with driving
while license suspended
-or revoked. Bond was set
at $500 and he bonded out
of jail the same day
Malcolm Read, 60, of
Jefferson County, was
arrested July 13 and
charged with aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon. Bond was set at
$2,500 and he bonded out
of jail July 15.
Antonio Jarrod
Mathis, 31, of Monticello,
was arrested July 13 on an
outstanding Leon County


warrant charging him
with failure to appear on
the charge of violation of
probation on the charge of
bank fraud; failure to
appear on the charge of
violation of probation on
the charge of forgery; fail-
ure to appear on the
charge of violation of pro-
bation on the charge of
uttering; failure to appear
on the charge of violation
of probation on the
charge of depositing an
item with intention to
defraud; failure to appear
on the charge of violation
of probation on the
charge of grand theft; and
'failure to appear on the
charge of violation of pro-
bation on the charge of
criminal use of personal
identification informa-
tion. He was turned over
to Leon County the same
day to face charges there.
Rodrick Jabrele
Robinson, 32, of
Tallahassee, was arrested


MPD APPREHENDS 3 JUVENILES


Monticello Police Chief Fred
Mosley reports that M.P.D. Officers
apprehended 3 juveniles after respond-
ing to a residential burglar alarm on
Pearl Street Wednesday afternoon.
Officer William Lowery responded to
the alarm. No one was home at the resi-
dence and Officer Lowery discovered
signs of a break in. Officer Lowery
requested additional officers respond.
As officers arrived, a neighbor
reported seeing three males acting sus-
piciously around the residence
moments before. Officers began to
search-the area for the three males. A
passerby flagged an officer down and
told the officer that he had just
observed three males hiding in some
bushes, and then saw them run down a
nearby bicycle path after a patrol car
passed. Officers searched and found
rs


three males on the bike path fitting the
suspects' descriptions.
As MPD officers approached, the
three suspects fled, splitting up as they
ran. Two of the males were apprehend-
ed on the bike path and the third was
found hiding in a wood line along an
adjacent field. The three were taken
into custody and questioned. The three
subsequently admitted to involvement
in the break in. Officers assisting
Lowery in the arrests and investigation
were Chief Mosley, Capt. Roger
Murphy, Lt. Mack Norton, and Sgt. Rick
Colson.
Chief Mosley adds that this is a
great example of how police officers
and citizens can and do work together
to solve crimes, which makes our com-
munity a safer place to live and work.
We truly appreciate their help.
-- % % W *. 1 1


July 13 and charged with
failure to appear on the
charge of driving while
license suspended; and
cruelty to animals. A total
bond of $6,000 was set and
he remained at the County
Jail July 19.
Sandy West, 41, of
Monticello, was arrested
July 13 and charged with
driving while license sus-
pended or revoked know-
ingly Bond was set at $500
and she bonded out of jail
the same day
Precious K. Taylor, 21,
of Port Richie, FL, was
arrested July 14 and
charged with grand theft
auto. Bond was set at
$5,000 and she bonded out
of jail July 16.
The Monticello Police
Department arrested
three juveniles July 14
and charged them all with
burglary of a dwelling.
They were turned over to
family members the same
day
Thomas Parrish, 40,
of Monticello, was sen-
tenced in court July 14 on
the charge of contempt of
court for nonpayment of
child support. He was
ordered to pay the due
support of $200 or spend
60 days in the County
Jail. He remained at the
County Jail July 19.
Vincent.Gentle, 44, of
Tallahassee, was sen-
tenced in court July 14 for
one count nonpayment of
child support and was
ordered to pay the past
due support of $600 or
append 120 days in the
County Jail. On the sec-
ond charge of nonpay-
ment of child support he
was ordered to pay the
due amount of $750 or
spend 120 days in jail. He.
paid the total past due


amount of $1,350 the
same day and was
released.
Wayne Figgers, 55, of
Quincy, FL, was sen-
tenced in court for con-
tempt of court for non-
payment of child support.
He was ordered to pay the
past due support of $600
or spend 120 days in. the
County Jail He remained
at the County Jail July 19.
Johnny Ball, 36, of
Monticello, was sen-
tenced in court July 14
and ordered to pay a total
past due amount of child
support of $700 for three
counts of contempt of
court for nonpayment of
child support, or spend
120 days in the County
Jail. He remained at the
County Jail July 19.
Manwell Antwan
Davis, 21, of Lloyd, was
arrested July 15 and
charged with simple bat-
tery; burglary of a con-
veyance with person bat-
tered; and violation of
probation on the charge of
possession of a prescrip-
tion drug without a pre-
scription. Bond was with-
held and he remained at
the County Jail July 19.
Mary Latrina Hagan,
22, of Jefferson County,
was arrested July 15 and
charged with disorderly
intoxication. Bond was
set at $500 and she bonded
out of jail the same day
Andrew P Garbo, 48,
of Boston, GA, was arrest-
ed July 16 and charged
with violation of proba-
tion on the charge of sale
of cocaine. Bond was
withheld and he remained
at the County Jail July 19.
Jeremy R. Spiers, 22,
of Jacksonville, FL, was
arrested July 16 and
charged with driving


while license suspended
or revoked; and tag
expired more than six
months. A total bond of
$500 was set and he
remained at the County
Jail July 19.
Aunta D. Lamar, 27, of
Jefferson County, was sen-
tenced in court July 16 to
serve 15 days in the
County Jail on the
charges of possession of
marijuana and driving
while license suspended.
Oliver Guy, 44, of
Jefferson County, was
arrested July 17 and
charged with battery and
possession of drug para-
phernalia. A total bond of
$1,000 was set and he
remained at the County
Jail July 19.
Lepond Kenneth
Thompson, 44, of
Tallahassee, was arrested
July 18 and charged with
reckless driving; fleeing
and eluding a law enforce-
ment officer at high
speed; driving while
license suspended or
revoked; and possession
of a controlled substance
without a prescription. A
total bond of $25,000 was
set and he remained at the
County Jail July 19.
Spencer B. Conner,
23, of Jefferson County,
was arrested July 18 and
charged with resisting an
officer without violence;
and violation of proba-
tion on the charge of
armed robbery. Bond was
withheld and he remained
at the County Jail July 19.
Pedro Godinez-
Garcia, 57, of Jefferson
County, was arrested July
18 and charged with no
valid driver's license.
Bond was set at $100 and
he bonded out of jail the
same day


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4A Monticello News


www. ecbpu blishing. com


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


Making This Right

Beaches
Claims

Cleanup
Economic Investment
Environmental Restoration
Health and Safety
Wildlife


For information visit: bp.com
restorethegulf.gov
facebook.com/bpamerica
twitter.com/bp_america
youtube.com/bp


/ grew up on the Gulf Coast. I know these waters. And I'm
doing everything I can to clean them up.
Fred Lemond, BP Cleanup Operations

BP has taken full responsibility for the cleanup in the Gulf. And
that includes keeping you informed.

Searching For And Cleaning Up The Oil
Every morning, over 50 spotter planes and helicopters search for
oil off the coast, heading to areas previously mapped with satellite
imagery and infrared photography. Once oil is found, they radio
down to the 6,000 ships and boats of all sizes that are supporting
the cleanup effort and working to collect the oil. These are
thousands of local shrimping and fishing boats organized into
task forces and strike teams, plus specialized skimmers mobilized
from as far as the Netherlands.

We have recovered-more than 27 million gallons of oil-water
mixture from the Gulf.:Other methods have also helped remove
millions of additional gallons of oil from the water. We've deployed
more than 8 million feet of boom to protect beaches and sensitive
wildlife areas.

Hurricane Preparedness
In the event of a hurricane, our first priority is keeping people
safe. In coordination with the Coast Guard and local officials, we
may suspend operations temporarily but have organized to resume
them as soon as possible.

Our Responsibility
We, have already spent more than $3.2 billion responding to the
spill and on the cleanup, and none of this will be paid by taxpayers.
We will work in the Gulf as long as it takes to get this done. We
may not always be perfect but we will do everything we can to
make this right.


For assistance, please call:
To report oil on the shoreline: (866) 448-5816
To report impacted wildlife: (866) 557-1401
To make spill-related claims: (800) 440-0858
www.floridagulfresponse.com


2010 BP, E&P


bp








Wednesday, July 21, 201()


OUND


www. ecbpu blishing. comn


JEFFERSON


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


L0NMNU I1


ALtON0A


JULY 21-31
Night and Day exhibit at
Jefferson Arts Gallery 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. every
Wednesday and Saturday,
or by appointment.
Join artist Stephen
Bennett,, his work in
landscapes is sharply con-
trasted by his work in
abstract art. Visit the art
gallery gift shop; become
a member and supporter
of Jefferson Arts Gallery.
Call 997-3311 for more
information.
JULY 22
Organic Lunch at One
Heart Earth Center at
noon on Thursday Free of
charge. Donations are
most welcome! Carry out
containers available.
Meat free, Wheat
free, Dairy Free, Sugar
free, Pesticide free. Come


Free Delivery For
Prescriptions
SJackson's Drug Store
166 E. Dogwood
Monticello
S 850-997-3553
0, B.2


as you are, from the fields,
garden, tennis courts,
house or work. Join Sam,
Sallie, and Toni for an
exquisite luncheon
meal with the finest the
Earth has to offer.
Organic, local, natural,
and served in an elegant
manner. Come and bring a
friend! OHEC is a 501 c 3
non-profit. Reserve seat-
ing by calling 997-7373, or
go to
OneHeartEarthCenter@E
mbarqmail.com
JULY 22
You may qualify for assis-
tance from Capital Area
Community Action
Agency. Call Pat Hall or
Melissa Watson at 997-
8231 for additional infor-
mation. They can tell you
what services are current-
ly being provided.


Care


Free Blood
Pressure
Check

Gifts

Medication
Counseling


CACAA will be working 9
a.m. to 12 p.m. on the
fourth Thursday This is
free to the client.
JULY 22
Learn Spanish for free at
First United Methodist
Church 6:30 p.m. on
Thursday. Classes are
open to the public. Sign
up by calling Lupe'
Wheeler at 997-5545, or
just show up and begin
learning.
JULY 22
Cub Scout Pack 808 meets
weekly 7 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday For more infor-
mation contact Cub
Master Greg Wynot at 997-
5366.
JULY 22
AA meetings are held
weekly at 8 p.m. on
Thursday at the Christ
Episcopal Church annex,


425 North Cherry S
For more information
997-2129 or 997-1955.
JULY 23
Rotary meets weekly
p.m. on Friday ai
Chamber for lunch
meeting with a pro
and speaker. Contac
Chamber at 997-555
more information.
JULY 23 AND 2
Second Harvest
Program will wel
volunteers to bag
packages 6:30 p.m. F
for distribution 8
a.m. Saturday at the
Bethel AME Church
Ashville Hig:
Contact Nellie Rand
997-5605, or Essie N
at 997-5683, for more
mation.
JULY 26
Martin Luther


CHURCH NEWS NOTE


July 19-23
Keeping It Real with Jesus
Vacation Bible School at
Greater Fellowship
Missionary Baptist
Church from 6 to 8 p.m.
each evening.
Refreshments will be
served daily at 5 p.m. There
will be a guest'speaker
every evening that will
deliver mini-seminars on
various informative topics.
Come out and join with
others. All age groups are
welcomed to. share in a
week of Bible Study, food,
fellowship, and fun. For
more information and
directions contact Patricia
Hall or Almeda
Montgomery at 933-8736.
Rev. Dr. Melvin Roberts,
pastor. "Then you will
know the truth, and the
truth will set you free."
John 8:32
July 19-23
High Seas Expedition
Vacation Bible School
will set sail Monday from
6:30 to 8:30 p.m. and will
continue through Friday at
Sardis UMC in Monticello.
Dinner will be served each
night at 6 p.m., before VBS
sessions begin. Children
age three and above,
friends, and par-
ents are invited to join a
fun-filled adventure expe-
riencing the deep rolling
waters of God's love. A
nursery will be provided
for children younger than'
three. On Friday evening
at 8 p.m., following the
days adventure, feel the sea
spray on your face at the
closing ceremony, recap-
ping the week's activities.
For more information, con-
tact VBS Coordinator
Sharon Lenzo at 284-1983.
Stephen Lenzo, pastor of


Sardis UMC
July 19-22
Galactic Blast: A Cosmic
Adventure Praising God!
Vacation Bible School for
all children ages 4-11 at
First Presbyterian Church.
The excitement begins on
Monday from 9:30 to 11:30
a.m. and continues
through Thursday
Participants will become
space cadets on the star-
ship Galactic Praise, and
view the universe and God
in a whole new way.
Spacewalk to the Good
News Galaxy to hear Bible
stories, make art projects
at Cosmic Crafts, sing new
music at Moons and
Tunes, participate in recre-
ational activities at Rocket
Rec, and enjoy tasty snacks
at Astro Bistro. Contact
Linda Wheeler at 997-4441
for more information.
July 22
Breaking Bread Gathering
12 to 1:15 p.m. on Thursday
at Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Boulivard
in Tallahassee. Area clergy
are invited to share a com-
plimentary meal, some
table conversation, and an
opportunity to exchange
ideas and tips that are
helpful in ministry Dr.
James Stapleford, contract
Clinical Pastoral
Education (CPE)
Supervisor for Big Bend
Hospice, will share some
basic information about
the Clinical. Pastoral
Education Program. He
also will offer some practi-
cal ideas for how all clergy
and spiritual leaders can
help people who need to be
heard and encouraged
through our pastoral min-
istries. To make reserva-
tions for the luncheon, Rev.


Candace McKibben at Big
Bend Hospice as soon as
possible. Her email
address is can-
dace@bigbendhospice.org
or you may call her at 850-
878-5310X250 or toll free at
800-772-5862. Feel free to
bring other clergy or staff
guests.
July 24
Fourth Saturday Gospel
Sing 7 p.m. Saturday, at
Lament United Methodist
Church. The Faithful
Servants, Tifton, FL will
perform, making for an
entertaining evening.
Fellowship and refresh-
ments will follow the
evening of music. Call the
church at 997-2527 for more
information.
July 25
The Rev. Ben Collins, direc-
tor of Stetson cooperative
Collegiate .Fellowship at
Stetson University, will
speak during the 11 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship
Service at Ebenezer
Baptist Church, located on
US 19 South. The Ebenezer
Baptist Church family
invites the community to
celebrate its relationship
.with Cooperative Baptist
Fellowship of Florida, its
missions and mission
opportunities.
July 25
Elizabeth AME Church in
the Thompson Valley com-
munity will celebrate its
annual homecoming with
Sunday School beginning
at 10 a.m. and morning
worship at 11 a.m. Guest
Speaker will ,be Elder
Calvin Wallace with Mt.
Olive Primitive Baptist
Church. Elizabeth is locat-
ed at 2728 Thompson
Valley Road. Rev. Clarence
Little, Jr. pastor.


July 25
Sons of Allen of
Bethel AME Churcl
observe its' a
Scholarship Worsh
a.m. Sunday Rev. Jar


Harvey, pastor of Holy
Light MB Church in
Havana, FL and Rebecca
MB Church in
Thomasville, GA, will be
guest minister for this
service. The public is invit-
ed to attend. Rev. Jimmie F
Dickey, pastor.
July 25
Dual Day Celebration at
Bethel AME Church,
Sunday at 11 a.m. at. 410
East York Street in
Monticello. Come worship
with the church family and
Rev. Julius Tisdale and the
St. Phillip AME Church of
Monticello, as they cele-
brate together this
Worship Experience.


street. Community Center meets
n call 6 p.m. on the last Monday
of each month at the MLK
Center. Contact Charles
at 12 Parrish at 997-3760 for
t the more information.
and a I JULY 26
gram Alzheimer's and
ct the Dementia Support is held
i2 for 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the
fourth Monday of every
14 month at the First United
Food Methodist Church in the
come Family Ministry Center
food on West Walnut Street in
'riday Monticello. A light lunch
to 10 will be served. This is a
New free monthly program.
, 6496 Call 514-2778 or 997-5545
hway for more information.
.all at JULY 26
orton Masonic Lodge #5 meets
infor- 6:30 p.m. for a light meal
and 7:30 p.m. for a meeting
and program on the
King fourth Monday of the
month at the Hiram
Masonic Lodge, 235 Olive
Street in Monticello.
Contact Roy Faglie at 933-
2938 for more informa-
tion.
New JULY 26
h will AA Women's meetings are
annual held on Mondays at 6:45
ip 11 p.m.; AA and Al-Anon
nes E. .meetings follow at 8 p.m.,


at the Christ Episcopal
Church Annex, 425 North
Cherry Street. For more
information, call 997-2129
or 997-1955.
JULY 26
AA meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at Waukeenah
United Methodist Church
for fellowship. Meetings
are open to all. For more
information, contact Rev.
Ralph Wrightstone at 997-
2171.
JULY 26
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at The Eagles
Nest on South Water
Street. For more informa-
tion, contact Scout Leader
Paul Wittig at 997-1727 or
997-3169.
JULY 27
Taoist Tai Chi beginner
class every Tuesday 7:00
to 8:30 p.m. at Christ
Episcopal Church, in the
fellowship hall, 425 North
Cherry Street in
Monticello. Improve your
health, balance,/and flexi-
bility with no special
physical requirements.
All ages welcome. For
more information contact
850-224-5438.


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6A Monticello News


OUND


www. ecbpu blishing. corn


EFFERSON


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


COUNTY


Federal Money


Cont. From Page 1 Regional Agency


Cont. From Page 1


in the bottom five per-
cent of the state and isn't
showing signs of growth or
has graduation rates below
60 percent."
As for Jefferson
Elementary School (JES), it
is a Tier III school and a
feeder to the middle/high
school, "which is why we
can serve them also," Heath
said.
She said the number
one goal of the SIG program
is to turn around persistent-
ly low achieving schools
through the implementa-
tion of one of four models:
the turnaround, restart, clo-
sure, and transformation.
Heath said Jefferson
County School District
chose to pursue the less
drastic transformation
model, which entails
improving the school
through comprehensive cur-
riculum reform, profession-
al development and extend-
ing the learning time,
among other strategies.
The three other models
are considered more dras-
tic. They range in the sever-
ity of their strategies from'
the replacement of princi-
pals and half the teaching
staffs, to converting schools
into charter schools, to out-
right closing the facilities
and sending the students to
higher achieving schools.
"The transformation
model was the best for our
school," Heath said. "It calls
for a rigorous curriculum,
rigorous instruction, an
extended school day and a
recovery program so that
kids can regain credits to
keep on track and keep from
dropping out. We felt that
the transformation model
was the one we could do the
most successful and built on
some of the things that Dr.


MAIN STREET


June 25 Meeting
Treasurer Sandy Patter-
son reported during the June 25
meeting that Main Street member-
ship renewals have been coming in
every day. New Main Street mem-
bership applications have been given
to Secretary Margie Stem to keep the
membership list updated and in the
computer.
On behalf of the board
and project manager, Vice President
Nan Baughman expressed much
gratitude to Patterson and her three
grandsons for all their efforts and
volunteer time with the Arts and
Craft vendors, and other various du-
ties, during the 2010 Jefferson
County Watermelon Festival held on
June 18 and 19. She presented her
with three signed and framed Cer-
tificates of Appreciation for each
grandson. She thanked David Patter-
son and Margie Stem for all their
volunteer hours also.
Patterson sent emails
out to all the vendors thanking them,
and asking for any suggestions to
further enhance the 2011 Water-
melon Festival. Main Street sends
out a special thank you to all the
stores and restaurants that stayed
open late to accommodate all of the
Watermelon Festival activities and.
visitors.
Project Manager Anne
Holt announced that Clerk of Court
Kirk Reams informed her that all the
old records kept in the Old Jailhouse
would be out by July I, 2010; and
that local attorney Buck Bird will
draw up a lease for the Old Jailhouse.
She also mentioned that the Main
Street Board would be present to the
July 6 City Council meeting when
she would present a letter to Reams
and the County Commissioners re-
questing that $5000 in funds for
Main Street of Monticello be put into
the Jefferson County Budget for the
upcoming fiscal year. These funds, if
acquired, will be used to add busi-
ness signage at the Courthouse Cir-
cle and at the approaches to town, as
well as assist in the renovations of
the Old Jailhouse, which will help at-
tract visitors and provide continued
revenue to all of the businesses and
the beautiful town of Monticello.
Two Main Street con-
ferences are coming up; hopefully
members will be able to attend one
or both, in Punta Gorda and in
Bonita Springs.
The membership and
guests attending the meeting talked
a bit about combining a Florida Her-
itage Festival this October with the
Southern Music Rising King Possum
Festival. More will be discussed dur-
ing upcoming meetings.


Rodney Ryan has already Race to the Top funding.
done or is doing at the mid- The district, in fact, signed
die and high school." a Memorandum of
Heath said the efforts to Understanding (MOU) earli-
raise students' perf6rmanc- er in the year detailing the
es and ensure that they are specific steps, responsibili-
making learning gains ties and programs that it
would include recruiting would undertake in collabo-
and retaining high perform- ration with the FDOE if
ance teachers, providing for awarded the funding.
professional development To be eligible for the
and updating the classroom money, school districts are
technologies. She said the required to come up with
money. would also allow for ambitious and achievable
the purchase of a data man- ,plans for "coherent, com-
agement system that would pelling and comprehensive
provide teachers with a tool education reforms" that
to gauge students' pretest turn around the lowest
and posttest progress. achieving schools.
As for the actual Heath figures that the
receipt of the federal fund- district stands to receive
ing, Heath said the Florida between $150,000 and
Department of Education $200,000 in Race to the Top
(FDOE) had indicated that it funding: But so far, she has
would.release the money to received no official word on
the individual school dis- the status of the funding,
tricts as soon as each sub- she said.
mitted an application in an Heath made a point of
acceptable form. Heath, who distinguishing between the
was in the process of corn- Race to the Top funding,
pleting the application which is a new initiative,
when the News spoke with and the SIG program, which
her, said she expected the is part of the Title I funding
district could begin the pro- that the district has been
gram as early as July 22. receiving for years. She
Meanwhile, the district explained that the usual
continues to await word on Title I funding has been in
another bundle of federal the $70,000 to $100,000 range.
money that has been.prom- "The reason that this
ised to states and school dis- one is so big is because of
trict to improve their educa- the American Recovery Act
tional systems. money," Heath said. "The
Known as the Race to way it breaks down, the reg-
the Top competition, the ular Title I allocation is
measure proposes to award $116,883. The $642,410 is
$4.35 billion in competitive from the federal stimulus
grants to states that use the package."
fund "to ease limits on char- The enhanced SIG
ter schools, tie teacher pay funding, moreover, is sup-
to student achievements, posed to be good for three
and move toward common years, Heath said.
academic standards." "So it will have a huge,
Florida is one of 40 huge impact on the school
states that applied fo? the district," Heath said. "It's a
federal funding through the wonderful opportunity for
FDOE, and Jefferson us to transform the school
County is one of 60 school and achieve Dr. Ryan's goal
districts in the state that is of having the middle/high
hoping to get some of the school be an A-grade school.

Septic Tank

Cont. From Page 1


But definitely, the program
would "take time to ramp
up," he said.
In the absence of fur-
ther information about the
possible implications, of
the new rules at this point,
Positano offered that resi-
dents should focus their
efforts on preventing the
failure bf the septic tanks
as a way to avoid problems.
Positano shared with
the News a list of do's and
don't to ensure for the
proper and efficient opera-
tion of septic tank sys-
tems.
Among the do's: do
laundry over several days
instead of all at once to put
less stress on the system;
repair faucet and toilet
leaks as soon as possible;
have the septic tank
inspected and pumped reg-


ularly by a licensed septic
tank contractor; and
divert downspouts and
other surface water away
from the tank and drain-
field, as excessive water
will keep the soil from ade-
quately cleansing the
wastewater.
Among the don't:
don't drive over the tank
and drainfield; don't plant
anything over or near the
drainfield except grass;
don't pour harmful chemi-
cals and cleansers down
the drain; and don't run a
separate pipe to carry
wash waters to a side ditch
or the woods.
For more information,
contact Positano at 342-
0170, ext. 209, or email him
a t
mark positano(rtdoh.state.
fl.us.


some of its members,
however.
Specifically,
Councilmen Tom
Vogeigesang and George
Evans questioned
Monticello's lack of
direct representation on
the CRPTA, other than
through the county.
"It appears there's
no real voice for the city
in this arrangement,"
Vogelgesang said.
"I have the same con-
cern," Evans said. "What
is the criteria for select-
ing members to the
CRPTA?"
Reid explained that
for a city to have repre-
sentation on the CRTPA,
it had to have a popula-
tion equal to one percent
or more of the total pop-
ulation represented by
the organization's mem-
bers. Monticello's popu-
lation did not meet that
threshold, he said.
SMonticello, however,
would be represented.
through the county, Reid
said. And certainly, city
residents and their rep-
resentatives would have
ample opportunity to
give input through the
various public hearings
that would be held dur-
ing the development of
the plan, he said.
Vogelgesang
remained skeptical. The
way he saw it, with the
weighted values
assigned the CRTPA
members based on their
population numbers,
Tallahassee and Leon


County would effectively
control the agenda "and
we would have no voice,"
Vogelgesang said.
When it came to the
vote, however, the coun-
cil voted unanimously to
approve the resolution.
The CRTPA, as Reid
explained it to the coun-
cil, is the Metropolitan
Planning Organization
(MPO) for Gadsden,
Ueon, Wakulla and now
Jefferson counties.
MPOs, by state and feder-
al statutes, are charged
with carrying out the
long-range transporta-
tion planning in urban-
ized areas with popula-
tions of 50,000 or more.
SThe CRTPA's mission
statement is a mouthful.
It is "to act as the princi-
ple forum for collective
transportation policy
discussions that result in
the development of a
long-range transporta-
tion plan which create an
integrated regional mul-
timodal transportation
network that supports
sustainable development
patterns and promotes
economic growth."
Its vision statement,
equally ambitions, is to
"create an integrated
regional multimodal
transportation network
that provides the most
options for moving peo-
ple and goods economi-
cally, effectively and
safely while protecting
the environment, pro-
moting economic devel-
opment and maintain-


Tallahassee Man


situation. Scott contin-
ued to keep dispatch
informed, as they began
to approach SR-59 in
Jefferson Cohnty At that
time, FHP Sgt. Smith
advised that he had stop
sticks (spikes) in his
marked patrol car. and
was going to get into
position to deploy the
device.
The vehicle contin-
ued fleeing and was pass-
ing the intersection of
US-19. Smith was east of
Scott's location getting
into position to deploy
the stop sticks. Scott
advised Smith of their
location and he stated
that he was going to set
up just east of Barber
Hill Road with the stop
sticks.
As the vehicle topped
the hill at Smith's loca-
tion the stop sticks were
deployed and executed


perfectly. Both front tires
of the black SUV struck
the stop sticks causing
the front two tires to
blow outtand shred.
The driver, later
identified by his Social
Security number as
Lepond Kenneth
Thompson, 44, of
Tallahassee, began to
slow the vehicle and
came to a stop on the
south shoulder of US-27
at Depot Road.
Thompson was
placed under arrest and
was asked why he fled.
He reportedly stated that
he was on probation.
Thompson was
searched and placed in
the back of Scott's vehi-
cle.
While Thompson's
vehicle was inventoried
for the tow log, a blue
container filled with
cloths, a pair of boots,

School Board


ing a high quality of life
with sustainable devel-
opment patterns."
The three objectives
of the organization are
to develop a unified
planning work program
(UPWP), a transporta-
tion improvement pro-
gram (TIP), and a long-
range transportation
plan (LRTP).
The first (UPWP) is a
budget document that
serves as a guide for
transportation planning
activities to be conduct-
ed over the course of
two federal/state fiscal
years (July 1 through
June 30)..
The second (TIP)
provides the public and
governmental agencies
a comprehensive listing
of all the transportation
projects covering all
modes proposed for
implementation during
a five-year period in the
MPO area.
And the third
(LRTP) provides a blue-
print for transportation
improvement projects
(roadways, bicycle and
pedestrian lanes and
transit corridors) for a
20-year period, based on
a balance of transporta-
tions needs and avail-
able funding.
Among the com-
pelling reasons that
Reid cited for prompting
the long-range planning,
is the significant growth
that is projected for the
Flofida Panhandle in
the next 50 years.


ont. From Page 1


some tools and also
inside of the container
was a prescription bottle.
prescribed to an
unknown person.
When asked about
the pills Thompson stat-
ed he did not know who
,the pills belonged to.
Thompson was asked if
the blue container was
his and he said "yes" and
added that the cloths and
boots were his.
Thompson was
transported to the
County Jail and charged
with reckless driving;
fleeing and eluding a law
enforcement officer at
high speed; driving
while license suspended
or revoked; and posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance without a pre-
scription. A total bond of
$25,000 was set and he
remained at the County
Jail July 19.

Cont. From Page 1


zero tolerance for school to students and parents at
related crimes and a clear- the start of the school year
er spelling out of the disci- and require that each sign
plinary actions and other a paper acknowledging
consequences for violation receipt of the, document.
of the rules. School officials say the
School officials plan to rules will 'be 'strictly
give copies of the manual enforced.

-Census Cont. From Page 1


Too, census workers
will visit households that
were listed as vacaAt on
April 1 (Census Day) to
double-check that no
individual has been left
out, .especially as the
nation experiences one of
the highest vacancy rates
in recent years.
And lastly, field veri-
fication operations will
verify the location of.
addresses provided by Be
Counted forms or
through telephone inter-
views, to ensure that
everyone is counted in
the correct location.
"Decades of census
taking have taught us the
importance of the quality
assurance phase, and we
know crucial federal
funding and congression-
al apportionments rely
heavily on our ability to


produce an accurate cen-
sus count," Groves said.
"That is why these quali-
ty assurance operations
- inspired by our mantra
to count everyone once,
only once, and in the
right place are critical
to our country's.future."
The U.S. Constitution
mandates the census-tak-
ing -every 10 years, with
the collected data then
used to apportion con-
gressional seats to states,
distribute more than $400
billion in federal funds to
tribal, state and local gov-
ernments each year, and
make decisions about
what community servic-
es to provide.
The 2010 Census
form is one of the short-
est in U.S. history, con-
sisting of only 10 ques-
tions.


By: Debbie Snapp
Monticello Nelws
Staff Writer




Meet Your




Neighbor



Sandy Patterson


Sandy Patterson relocated to the Jefferson
County area in 2005 from Melbourne, FL with her hus- '
band David, shortly after finding a home here for her ..
parents Grace and James Funk. They became interested
in the Monticello area when a friend was hired on at the ---
local fire department. She loves the seasons here in the
area, and the hills! They have two children and three
grandsons.
She is co-owner with Hines Boyd of United
Country Monticello Realty, in downtown Monticello. She
loves the real estate business and making dreams come true ... especially for the.
new homeowner. She is a people-person and enjoys meeting and making new
friends.
She is an active member of the Church of Christ, Main Street Monticello,
and the Monticello/Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce. Other hobbies are
shared with her husband.., especially the raising of grass-fed cows for beef.
For the future she wants to continue her work in the community, and
wants to be a part of making Monticello the very best it can be.


I









WeVdnesday, July 21, 2010


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. corn


JEFFERSON


Monticello News 7A


COUNTY


Media And Community Involvement


Award Goes To Brynwood Center


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Florida Health Care
Association recently pre-
sented Brynwood Center
with' the Association's
2010 Media and
Community Involvement
Award. Brynwood Center
Administrator, Lisa
McGinley, accepted the
award on the facility's
behalf in Orlando. during
the FHCA 2010 Annual
Conference in front of
over 600 long-term care
Professionals gathered
from across the state of
Florida. The Award is
given annually to a long-
term care facility, which
actively engages its local
community and the
media to help raise posi-
.tive awareness about the
. long-term care profession
and the work providers
do to continuously
improve resident quality
of care and quality of life.
Brynwood Center is a
97-bed facility that is com-
mitted to encouraging its
employees, residents, and
associates to become vital
change agents and posi-
tively influence long-term
care at the local, state,
and national levels.
Brynwood is intertwined
with the Monticello com-
munity, encouraging
local citizens to become
active participants .in
enhancing residents'
quality of life and repre-


senting the facility in the
community's civic and
humanitarian associa-
tions. Brynwood Center
promotes the initiatives
of the long-term care pro-
fession by actively taking
part in the legislative
process, with staff host-
ing facility tours for legis-
lators, testifying at the
Capitol during committee
meetings and meeting
with lawmakers during
FHCA's Lobby
Wednesday, and other
legislative events. The
facility is actively
engaged with the media,
with local and statewide
reporters visiting the
facility regularly to pro-
mote facility events and
for in-depth interviews
on issues that impact
nursing home residents,
ffom funding cuts to
healthcare reform. The
promotion of health and
pursuit of excellence on
behalf of Brynwood is
further exemplified in its
" Sm o k e F r e e
Florida/Brynwood" ini-
tiative and participation
in the American Health
Care Association
National Quality Awards
program endeavors.
. "FHCA is pleased to
present Brynwood Center
with the 2010 Media and
Community Involvement
Award," said Emmitt
Reed, Executive Director
of Florida Health Care
Association. "Their'


Monticello News Photo By Debbie Snapp, July 15, 2010.
Brynwood Center Administrator Lisa McGinley, Florida Health Care Association Executive Director Emmitt
Reed, and Gulf Coast Health Care President Craig Robinson, honored the Brynwood staff, and area partners with
special recognition and a Jimmy Buffett luncheon, on Thursday for their receiving of the Florida Health Care
Association 2010 Media and Community Involvement Award.


enthusiasm and dedica-
tion to their residents and
the work they do to
involve their local com-
munity makes them an
excellent role model for
other long-term care
facilities across the
state."
The 2010 Media and
Community Involvement
Award is part of Florida
Health Care Association's
Long Term Care


Excellence Awards. These
awards annually honor
an FHCA and Florida
Center for Assisted
Living (FCAL)
Administrator of the


Year, the Willis J. Gregson
Associate Member of the
Year and a number of
community volunteers
for their service to long-
term care. For more


information about
FHCA's Long Term Care
Excellence Awards, visit
the Quality Improvement
section of the FHCA web-
site at www.fhca.org


I I

I


McGinley Receives Government


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Florida. Health Care Association
(FHCA) recently awarded Lisa
McGinley, administrator of Brynwood
Center, with the FHCA 2010 Arthur H.
Harris Government Services Award.
McGinley accepted the award in
Orlando during the FHCA 2010 Annual
Conference in front of over 600 longterm
care professionals gathered from across
* the state of Florida. The Award is given
annually to an FHCA member who
actively engages in the Association's leg-
islative initiatives and advocates on
behalf of the profession and long term
care residents at the state and federal
level.
Over the past years, .McGinley has
been actively involved in FHCA legisla-
tive activities. From meeting with law-
makers and agency representatives to
educate them about the important work
carried out by longterm care providers,
or meeting with the media to help them
Gain a better understanding of the need
for adequate Medicaid funding to pre-
serve resident quality care, McGinley
never hesitated to speak on behalf of the
profession. She testified during legisla-
tive committee meetings, took part in
television and newspaper interviews
and provided testimonials during mem-
ber meetings about the importance of


Services Award
being involved. As president of FHCA
District X, she helped organize a num-
ber of grassroots initiatives, including
encouraging fellow members, resident
family members and Brynwood staff to
visit the Capitol and meet with local law-
makers or send emails and letters to
share important information about the
Association's longterm care issues.
"FHCA is pleased to present Lisa
McGinley with the Arthur H. Harris
Government Services Award," said
Emmett Reed, executive director of
Florida Health Care Association. "Hert
enthusiasm and dedication to the profes-
sion and her passion for grassroots
makes her an excellent role model for
other longterm care providers across
the state."
The Arthur H. Harris Government
Services Award is given to an FHCA
member for his or her hard work and
dedication to the Association and its
members during the preceding legisla-
tive session. The late Arthur H. Harris
was a long-time member of FHCA who
was always at the ready to advocate on
behalf of the profession and the
Association. Previous years' Award
recipients choose the winner and
his/her identity is kept secret until the
award is bestowed during the
'\ FHCA Annual Conference.


Monticello News Photo By Debbie Snapp, July 15, 2010.
Florida Health Care Association awarded Lisa
McGinley, administrator of Brynwood Center in
Monticello, with the FHCA 2010 Arthur H. Harris
Government Services Award. Pictured from left to right
are: Florida Health Care Association Executive Director
Emmitt Reed, McGinley, and Gulf Coast Health Care
President Craig Robinson presented the award on
Thursday at the Monticello facility.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Brynwood Center
received statewide honors
from the Florida Health
Care Association!
First as the winner of
the 2010 Media and
Community Involvement
Award; second for
Administrator Lisa
McGinley who was recog-
nized for the 2010 Arthur
H. Harris Government
Services Award; and third
as a 2010 recipient of the
Bronze-Commitment to
Quality National Award.
Florida Health Care
Association Executive
-Director Emmitt Reed
and Gulf Coast Health
Care President Craig
Robinson presented the
awards on Thursday, July
12 at the Monticello facili-
ty.
The Florida Health
Care Association is a fed-
eration which serves
nearly 1,000 members and
represents ovpr 500 long-
term care facilities that
provide skilled nursing
care, short-term rehab,
assisted living, and other
services to the frail elder-
ly and individuals with
disabilities in Florida.
FHCA was founded on the
premise that its members


have a moral .
obligation to
the residents ;
they serve, ;
and since
1954 the
Association -'
has worked ''
diligently to
improve
quality of
care and
quality of
life for the
state's grow- ., -
ing elder
care popula- Brynwood Center Administrator Lisa
tion. McGinley displays awards and other
T h e information during a recognition
N a t i o n a 1 gathering Thursday at the center.
Q u a 1 i t y Florida Health Care Association
Award is pre- Executive Director Emmitt Reed and
sented by the Gulf Coast Health Care President Craig
American Robinson joined her in honoring the
Health Care Brynwood staff, area partners, and
Association friends.
and National
Center for Assisted National Quality Award
Living, an organization Program. The commit-
with approximately 11,000 ment to quality designat-
members nationwide, and ed by this award is a key
is based on the core val- to developing systematic,
ues and criteria of the sustainable, person-cen-
Malcolm Baldrige tered care and services.


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FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(located behind l.angdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077








8A Monticello News


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


JEFFERSON


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


COUNTY


Rotary M

DEBBIE SNAPP fundraisers, scholar-
Monticello Neivs ships, camp sponsor-
Staff Writer ships, wheelchair
Rotary District ramps, and various
Governor Sylvia White other programs and
and Assistant Rotary services.
Governor Mark Jones During the July 2
visited the Monticello meeting of the member-
Rotary Club on July 9, ship, two new members
bringing the member- were inducted, Johnnie
ship up to speed on the Abron and Tom
great things happening Harmon. Both men will
in the district, be assets to the club, hav-
They spoke briefly ing already made them-
about the Rotary selves examples of "ser-
Foundation, the grant vice above self" by vol-
programs, Youth unteering at the Rotary
Exchange, Rotary Youth BBQ before they even
Camp, and Polio Plus. became club members.
Club President Bill The Rotary meets at
Watson took the oppor- noon on Fridays at the
tunity to brag a little Monticello/Jefferson
about the good things County Chamber of
that the Monticello Commerce building.
Rotary Club has been Contact Mary Frances
doing through it's Gramling, Chamber


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Emergency
Financial Assistance for
Housing Program
(EFAHP) provides a
one-time payment of up
to $400 to families who
are totally without shel-
ter or face the loss of
shelter because of non-
payment of rent or
*mortgage. It also helps
those families who have
had household disasters
such as fire, flood, or
other accidents.
The household must
have at least one child or
caretaker who is a legal
U.S. citizen, or legal resi-
dent to receive up to $400
and they must have
proof of the housing
emergency i.e. copies of
the eviction notice,
default letter from the
mortgage company etc.
Complete eligibility
requirements can be
found at


http://www.dcf.state.fl.u
s/homelessness/efahp.s
html Applications are
available online in
English, Spanish, and
Creole at
www.dcf.state.fl.us/hom
elessness or by calling 1-
877-891-6445.
Application guide-
lines include: *The
household must contain
at least one child under
18 years of age. *The
application must be
filled out completely,
including social securi-
ty numbers for all fami-
ly members; monthly
income from all sources;
a written explanation of
the housing emergency;
and the signature of the
applicant. *The one-page
Vendor Agreement must
be completed and signed
by the landlord, mort-
gage company, or prop-
erty owner. If the case is
approved, a State of
Florida check will be
mailed directly to the


m1 S. M Iadb R 32348 PoMa e85-1B4W-12 Fax Nl -114
Industrial and Conmmeroial Handlers



[inrilrmarru ln-LW Tr~llf l ra
SI _-l itT11 3 oTif-T 1115 l Fio [Ti oTl .T-rT

comliuem aand Honestg Prn .


- _-- I litne im.elli rs ltl :
0._i Project, Inc.


[eets Every Friday


Photo Submitted
Monticello Rotary Club President Bill Watson and Judge Bobby Plaines
installed two new members during the July 2, 2010 club membership meeting.
Pictured from left to right: Watson; Tom Harmon, new member; Johnnie Abron,
new member; and Plaines.
.....................................................................................
.Le









.n mwmoq 4o 6wf 6Ui c

To her kids and the Russell Family and her friends,
She is gone away from us but when we think about her these are the
words she would say to us. Hand in hand we walk together. God's
grace warms us from above. It's Him I thank each day I wake for
blessing me with all your love; the sunshine in my morning and the
bird that sings my song in this life when lam troubled through God
Sit's you who keeps me strong the wind beneath my wings as this
eagle takes to flightyou are the stars that brighten up my sky in the
darkness the night my truest friend fall my heart my soul my life
love forever and always.
..................... ...............*

The Great American

Trailer Park Musical


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Make your reservations now for
The Great American Trailer Park
Musical and be transported to
Armadillo Acres in Starke, Florida,
for two hours of rowdy fast paced
musical comedy!
The Great American Trailer Park
Musical is a show about agoraphobia.
adultery. 80's nostalgia, spray cheese.
road kill. kleptomania, strippers, flan,
and disco. It's everything a show
should be and... is presented by the
Thomasville On Stage & Co.
Dinner before the show is avail-
able by reservation. The menu Will
feature a sliced southern salad, smoth-
ered fried chicken with rice and coun
try gravy% fresh seasonal vegetables.
and banana pudding for dessert.
Show dates are Friday and
Saturday. .July 23 and 24. The doors


open at 6:30 p.m.; dinner is at 7:00 p.m.;
and the show is at 8:00 p.m. Show-only
tickets are $15, dinner/show tickets
are $35, with discounts for members.
Call the Monticello Opera House
at 997-4242 for more information or for
reservations.
U .'. U- - : ;


PERSONAL INJURY &

WRONGFUL DEATH









Jon D. Caminez Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney


CAMINEZ & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


landlord, mortgage com-
pany, or property owner.
*The program can
pay up to $400 one time
per year for overdue
rent or mortgage pay-
ments, or for security
deposit for a household
that is homeless, being
evicted, or whose hous-
ing has been damaged
by fire, hurricane or
other natural disaster.
Fax applications to
850-921-2559, or mail
applications to:
Department of Children
and Families Office on
Homelessness PDHO,
1317 Winewood Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-
0700.
Florida has a broad
public records law. Most
written communica-
tions to or from state
officials are public
records that will be dis-
closed to the public and
the media upon request.
E-mail communications
may be subject to public
disclosure.
Get a Plan! at
www.floridadisaster.org

Spill Baby Spill
Vote NO
Offshore
Drilling
jeffersoncountyvoice.com

Drill Baby Drill
Vote YES
Offshore
Drilling
jeffersoncountyvoice.com


EFAHP Accepting


Applications


Are you the caregiver

of a loved one with ALZHEIMERS

Or a related Dementia?


We are here to HELP you!

Monday, July 26, 2010

11:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.

First United Methodist Church

Walnut St., Monticello
This compassionate caregiver support group meets the fourth Monday of each month
and is facilitated by a professional trained in Alzheimer's and dementia related care.
This support group offers a safe, secure environment for caregivers to gather and share
experiences, offer support and suggestions to one another and request information and
additional presentations from trained professionals. Caregivers are encouraged to bring
their loved ones with Alzheimer's or dementia as a
respite room staffed by professional caregivers is also
o e available during each support group. A light lunch is
[-- T AL. t-. im provided and new members are always welcome.


Call Alzheimer's Project, Inc. for more information.
850-386-2778


I -


I







Wednesday, July 21, 2010


OUND


SEFFERSON


COUNTY


American Legion nstalls


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
American Legion
members met on Tues-


day evening, July 13 to
install their selection of
officers for the 2010-2011
Legion Year. The newly
elected officers for the


+H Doy Held cKp
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County 4-H Office held its an-
nual 8-9 Year Old Day Camp from June 29 to July 2.
A total of 13 4-H students participated in the camp,
five counselors in training, and five teen coun-
selors helping with the program.
This year's program, "Adventures in Going
Green," brought the campers together for a walk
each morning.
On Tuesday: each camper got to know each
other with some "get acquainted" games. They
traveled to the McClellan farm to touch and feed
the animals, including the camels, sheep, chickens,
and rabbits.. And,.back at the I-H office, they en-
joyed making "stuffed buddies and submarines."
On Wednesday: right after their morning walk,
the campers traveled to Green Industries Institute
for some outdoor cooking: from there it was on tot
Jack McLean Pool for some swimming.
Thursday found the campers back to Green In-
dustries Institute for some instruction on how to
use a compass and orienteering from Director Pa-
tricia Gardner. Then, it was back to the 4-H office
for a "recycled fashion show." The campers de-
signed and made an outfit with old newspapers.
Later in the afternoon, they modeled their fashions
and made "Puggy Turtles" with pie irons on hot
coals.
Friday was the last day of camp and it was a
full day of traveling to the "Beau Turner Conser-
vation Camp for a bit of fishing and a hotdog cook
out. Then back to the 4-H office for ice cream and
"Campers Awards."


_'_-" - 1
Picture Submitted
District 3 Vice Commander Ron Slik installed the new officers for the American Legion Otto Walker Post
49, during the July 13, 2010 meeting. Pictured from left to right: Slik, also post adjutant/secretary; Paul Klug,
commander; Chester Cox, vice commander; Harry Mulhearn, treasurer; Bert Banks, sergeant-at-arms; and
Dick Dibble, Chaplin. Not pictured is Buddy Westbrook, judge advocate/historian and District 3 Commander.


Otto Walker Post 49 are:
Paul Klug, commander;
Chester Cox, vice com-
mander; Ron Slik, adju-
tant/secretary; Harry
Mulhearn, treasurer;
Bert Banks, sergeant-at-
arms; Dick Dibble,
Chaplain; and Buddy
Westbrook, judge advo-
cate/historian.
District 3 Vice Com-
mander Ron Slik pre-
sented the installation
to the membership. He
also announced Outgo-
ing Commander Buddy
Westbrook to the mem-
bership as the newly
elected District 3 Com-


mander.
New Post Com-
mander Paul Klug
spoke briefly about his
plans for this new year.
It was also announced
that Post 49 has re-
ceived notice from the


Department of Florida
that the Sons of the
American Legion has
been chartered with 10
new members.
The Ladies Auxil-
iary will not meet again
until 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,


Sept. 14. The American
Legion Post 49 will con-
tinue to meet at 7 p.m.
on the second Tuesday
of each month at the
Otto Walker Post on
South Water Street.


7g.
~~P>
A


l" icers


SEducation

Wil Make

A Difference
An'ynt I n/^


Jefferson County's

First Ever Certified

County Commissioner





Jefferson County's

Only Graduate of

Local Government

Leadership School




Vote for and Re-Elect Felix "Skeet"
Joyner For County Commission
District 4, on August 24th


[',.ir,, i ,- i r. i L irc it-.,, r idi .. r i n...1 i ,p p r -.. I I .,, F,. I' 1,., r" i .., ,L ,
[',_in ,rr.lr t,( ,, li r', .k 1 11nT1- 1 .,n c'r L 'lr i iT --r


www. ecbpu blish ing. coin


Monticello News 9A


.,..
Cr-rl
.Y
P'"








10A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


CHURCH


325 West Washington Street
Monticello 997-2349
Dr. Rick Kelley, Pastor
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:oo PM
Wednesday Bible Study..............6:30 PM
Children's Church Ages 4-6....11:30 AM
-Nursery for all services- .
OLV APISTC'' U


CR 149- 7 miles North of US 19 1 mile South of FL/GA.Line
Boston, Monticello Road
850-997-1596
Pastor Harold Reams

Sunday Bible Study.........................10: AM
Sunday W orship................................. 1:oo AM
Sunday Evening............................ .... 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Bible & Prayer Meeting..................... 7:00 PM




14492 Waukeenah Hwy/ P.O. Box 411
Wacissa 997-2179 or 997-1769
Pastor James Gamble
Sunday School.....................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning........................10:55 AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............................6:30 PM
Youth Group.................................6:00 PM
Choir Practice................................ 7:30 PM



7150 Apalachee Pkwy Tallahassee
www.chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick Burrus 850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash 850-459-6490
Sunday School........................o:oo AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Children's Chapel........................11:o0 AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students


US 19 N 1590 N. Jefferson Street
Rev. Timothy Hildreth 997-3906
1285 Magnolia Ave.
Debra@monticellonaz@gmail.com

Sunday School..................................9:45 AM
Morning Worship..........................10:45 AM
Wednesday Evening
Supper................................................... 5:30 PM
Small Group Breakout.....................6:30 PM
Bible Study & Prayer Meeting............6:30 PM
Saturday
Spanish Church Services....................7:30 PM



4124 Bassett Dairy Rd Monticello 997-8444
Email: ebcmonticello@hcsmail.com
Dr Dean Spivey, Pastor
Student Pastor, Don Self
Sunday Worship Service..............8:30 AM
Sunday: Bible Study....................:45 AM
Worship Service........................11:oo AM
Choir Practice............................6:0 PM
Worship Service...........................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Children/Student Ministry...........3:30 PM
Senior Adult Choir Practice...........7:oo PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends &Youth.6:oo PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...........6:00 PM


ClHRISTEl SCOALCURCH

425 Cherry Street Monticello 997-4116
Interim Priests
Sunday Service...........................10:oo AM




124 St. Louis Street Lloyd 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.com
Pastor George L. Smith
Sunday
Sunday School..............................9:15 AM
Praise & Worship.......................10:30 AM
Youth & College...........................5:30 PM
Praise & Worship.........................6:00 PM
Adult Choir................................... 7:00 PM
Wednesday
W orship..................................... 7:oo PM
1st & 3rd Monday
Ladies Bible Study.....................6:30 PM
2nd Thursday
W.W. Diners....................................5:30 PM
3rd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints......................11:30 AM
3rd Saturday
Brotherhood................................8:00 AM


Qet A aump Start


EDDIE YON, PASTOR
Restored Glory Christian Center
Psalm 112:7 "He shall not be
afraid of evil tidings: his heart is
fixed, trusting in the LORD. "
A few weeks ago, I began to
have problems starting up one of
our vehicles. Sometimes it
would start, and other times it
> would not. However, during the
times that it would not, all I
would need to do is get a "jump
start" from another vehicle.
Based on' this scenario, I
believed there was a problem
with my battery Therefore, what
I had to do was take the battery
back to where I purchased it and
get another. Yet, there was one
catch: finding my receipt. I knew
that once I found it, there would
be no problem because I could
prove I had also purchased a 36-
month warranty.
Once I found the receipt, I
headed to the auto parts store
with full confidence because I
was covered. The warranty
clearly indicated that if the bat-
tery died, I could get a new one -
- just like that! I didn't have to
fear the sales person telling me,


[i . ,

* 1 i I .-


Eddie Yon, pastor
"your battery is no good"
because I was covered by the
warranty. What a blessing!
From our text, we basically
see the same scenario. This
scripture tells us that "He tthe
blessed man that fears the
LORD, who delights greatly in
his commandments (1st verse)];
will not be afraid of any evil
tidings." In other words, one of
the keys to walking in the bless-
ings of God is not being afraid
of potentially bad news to
come. Why? Because you are
covered by the LORD! Let me go
into detail.
Do you know that most peo-
ple fear the things they proba-
bly will never see. They fear the
car accident they will never get
into or the premature death of a
loved one that will Aever hap-
pen. Basically, if you are fear-
ing something that you will
never see, then you are really


fearing fear itself. And yet, the
bible tells us, God has the capa-
bility and compassion to deliver
us from all out fears (Psalms
34:4) through our doing these
two things: (1) fixing our hearts
on the Lord and (2) trusting Him.
By fixing our hearts on the
Lord, we "make Him big." This
is what Christians call "magni-
fying the Lord." By focusing on
Him, we focus on the Problem
Solver and not the problem.
Because if we look at the prob-
lem, it will get bigger and bigger
and will eventually be "made" so
big as to bring the belief that it's
now unsolvable. But as we focus
on God, we begin to realize that
if He (LORD) could make the
heavens and the earth, then
surely He can deal with this lit-
tle problem. Once you know that
God can deal with the problem,
you can now trust Him to take
care of the problem.
The reason the "blessed"
man/woman gets to wAlk in,
taste, see, smell, and touch the
manifestation of the blessing
while others only hope to get it
is because the blessed aren't
afraid of that "evil report" that
might come or never will come.
They are not afraid that the
business license won't go
through. They are not afraid
that the college won't accept
them. They are not afraid that
they won't get hired. They aren't
even afraid of being rejected for
a lunch date- -because they
know one thing: that their provi-
sion and blessing come from the
LORD Himself, and that alone is
reason enough to never ever fear
anything.
Tune in to "Restoring Your
Glory" with Pastor Yon each
week on 97.9 FM at 8 a.m. every
Sunday morning.


Christian Couple Discusses Love & War


M.K. GRAVES
Specialfrom
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Couples can learn how to find
their marriage's mission and get
back to the delight of companion-
ship.
In December 2009, John and
Stasi Eldredge co-wrote Love and
War: Finding the Marriage You
Dreamed Of which has given
many couples a better under-
standing of how to fight Satan,
not their spouses. The couple's
Ransomed Heart Ministries plans
to bring their newest message on
Love and War to local churches,
ministries or any community
requesting the message. Their
web address is
www.ransomedheart.com.
Stasi and John Eldredge also
co-wrote the New York Times
bestselling Captivating to talk to


Love




War
rsINING ritz MAzRlAAl
YOU'VE DItAMED OF

JOHN and STASI
ELDREDGE

AN t'N',,HRKH'.I~ n PRi,- In%) .'ON "

women about protecting their
hearts. Stasi Eldredge has a
Bachelors Degree in Sociology
from San Diego State University.
She stays active in theatre min-


325 W. Walnut Street Monticello
Pastor Wayne Cook 997-5545
Sunday Praise & Worship...........8:30 AM
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Traditional Worship...............11:oo PM
Youth Group................................5:30 PM
Wednesday
Bible Study...................................4:15 PM
Music Academy...........................5:00 PM
Prayer Group...............................4:30 PM





1565 East Washington Street
I Monticello 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 90)
Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
Sunday Mass..............................11:oo AM
Wed. followed by Novena............7:00 PM
1st & 3rd Saturday
Spanish Mass................................ 7:00 PM


istry, crisis pregnancy center
ministry, women's ministry and
children's ministry.
"We live in a time that is not
very kind to the heart," said Stasi
Eldredge. "The world is running
at an absurd pace. The church is
running at an absurd pace. By the
time you meet all the demands in
your life, little or nothing is left
for yourself and your relation-
ship with God."
She reminds women, "God
loves romance. He invented sun-
sets." She said the capacity men
and woman have for intimate
relationships tells us of God's
own vast desire for intimate rela-
tionships. In fact, it is her belief
we must each seek God in order
to know that He yearns for a rela-
tionship with us.
M.K. Graves can be reached at
Marianne(a -rieenepublishing.com


780 Second Street Monticello 997-4947
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor
Worship.Services 2nd and 4th Sundays
Sunday School (every Sunday)....9:3o AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Children's Worship.....................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study.......7:00 PM





625 Tindell Road Aucilla 997-2081
P.O. Box 163 Monticello
Pastor Daryl Adams 850-251-0129 ,
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship Service............1:oo AM
Choir Practice.............................5:00 PM
Worship Service........................6:00 PM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study........7:00 PM


(Don't See Your Church
C Listed Here? \
Call us at 850-997-3568!


r;








Wednesday, July 21, 2010


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 11 A


HURCH


rLo Listed Here?
STI .11 HiAVING FIRSTS us at 850-9935C6
Call us at 850-997-3568!


Submitted My:
Lloyd MUnroe
Porch de Salomon
hosted our first fully-secu-
lar, short-term team in
Guatemala last month; 1.7
high schoolers and five
teachers from Canada.
We were thrilled that our
unconventional ministry
approached "worked" for
them. One of the leaders
wrote:
I want to say thanks
again to Hector, Lloyd,
Melanie, Dave and all the
others at Porch for all'
their help and hospitality
during our two weeks in
Guatemala. I was some-
what apprehensive when
my wife told me that her
International Co-op class
had chosen to do a for-
eign work project
through a religious NGO
(Porch de Salomon). It
all worked out: our stu-
dents had a wonderful
time and for most it has
been a life-changing
experience. Your commu-
nication was excellent.
You are exactly who you
promised to be.
"We see clearly that
the funds we raised and
the gifts we brought will,
be put to use directly and
not lost in maintaining a
bureaucratic organiza-
tion. Your strong ties
with the local communi-
ty allowed us to feel con-
n.ected right away We
really benefited from
being a part of team that.
employs locals and is
aware of the culture, the
needs and sensibilities of
Guatemalans.
"Solomon's Porch
felt like a home away
from home; excellent
food, great music, a safe
place to come and talk,
watch movies 'or learn
from insightful speakers.
Our students had a won-
derful time and many
would love to come back
on their own. It is an eye-
opener for 'North
American teenagers to
see the human face of
poverty up close.
Opportunities like this
show them how much
they can do for others
when they work togeth-
er. You lead by example
with unconditional love
and acceptance of oth-
ers. Thank you for giv-


ing our students the
chance to see a bigger
picture."
Bruce Izard,
Campbell River,
Vancouver Island
******
We also hosted our
first dental clinic team
(with Dr Russell Rainey,
who has deep Jefferson
County FL roots!). They
wrote:
."We had an incredi-
ble time with you all
and thank God for open-
ing the door for us to
experience your love,
care and ministry. Our
lives will be forever.
changed by our time
with you and we thank


you from our hearts!
S"Love, Cheri; Russ
and Virginia"
********
We at Porch are
thankful for our sup-
porters who keep us
going in the field so that
we, the teams, and the
poor people these teams
touch, can continue


Wham! Barn! School Jam!



At Clifford Brown Memorial Park


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Restored Glory
Christian Center will
hold its Fourth Annual
Wham! Bam! School
Jam! at Clifford Brown
Memorial Park, in
Monticello. On Saturday,
Aug.7, the church family
will be on hand to pro-
vide free backpacks,
school supplies, food,
and entertainment to
Jefferson County school
students from 10 a.m. to
12 p.m. -
"We hope to send
students back to school
well-prepared and
inspired," says Eddie
Yon, pastor of RGCC.
Leading up to the


school jam will be
Restored Glory
Christian Center's first
Vacation Bible
School. The five-day
event will be held from
Monday, Aug. 2 to Friday,
Aug. 6 from 6 to 8:30
p.m., at the church loca-
tion, 1287 South
Jefferson Street, in the
Winn Dixie shopping
plaza next to Family
Dollar. Dinner will be
served nightly, and
transportation will be
provided.
The VBS theme,
"God's Plan For My
Life!" covers the life of
Moses and the Ten
Commandments.
Children ages 4 to 15
will be taught lessons of


290 East Dogwood Street Monticello 850-997-2252
Rev. Sharon Schuler, Pastor
Sunday School.......................... ....... 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship(except last Sunday of month)..11:00 AM
SonShine Worship(last Sunday of month)..........9:00 AM
Ladies Pilates Class-Tues. & Thurs..........3:30-5:00 PM
Sept. April:
Kids Kingdom (age 4-9)-Wednesday......3:30-5:30 PM
Adult Bible Study-Wednesday.................6:30-7:30 PM


obedience, purpose, and
forgiveness, reinforced
through arts, crafts, and
games.
The community is
encouraged to partici-
pate, Aug. 2 through
Aug. 7, in this exciting
week of fellowship and
fun with the Restored
Glory Christian Center.
For more informa-
tion, or to request VBS
transportation, call 997-
RGCC (7422,) or visit
whambamschool-
jam.com


experiencing "firsts."
C o n t a c t
llovd(a"lporchdesalomon.
org or Rex Ware
850.933.0344 to get
involved. -
SMelanie and Lloyd
Monroe will be stateside
Aug. 4-Sept. 21 and
would love to connect
with you or your group.


Springfield AME

Celebrates 130

Anniversary
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Springfield AME
Church celebrated its
130th Anniversary with a
"Praise Celebration" on
Sunday afternoon, July
18.
Moderator Rev. JB
Duval was guest speaker
to this special celebra-
tion, and the Memorial
Missionary Baptist
Church family was in
attendance, making a
joyful day for all. Stefon
McBride, pastor.'


1599 Springhollow Road Monticello 212-7669
Pastor Marvin Graham
Sunday Discipleship Class.....................9:30 AM
Sunday Worship...................................10:30 AM
Healing Service
Every 2nd & 4th Sunday........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study.............................7:00 PM
Wed. Young People Bible Study.............7:00 PM
Wed. Counseling..................5:30 PM-8:30 PM
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study..............................7:00 PM
Sunday Worship.....................2:00 PM-4:oo PM
Thurs. Jail Ministry.............7:00 PM-9:oo PM
AA Tuesday............................................. 8:oo PM


415 EPalmer Mill Rd Monticello 997-1119
newhope415@yahoo
Pastors Ray and Angel Hill
Sunday School....................:......10:00 AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Sunday Prayer.............................6:00 PM
Wed. Family Training Hour........7:oo PM




5593 Veterans Memoria Drive (Hwy 59)
Tallahassee 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev. Greg Roberts
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Children's Worship....................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal...........................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting.............................7:45 PM


Monticello 997-4226
Rev. J. W. Tisdale
Sunday Morning..........................9:30 AM
Sunday Worship......................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible............................7:00 PM


285 Magnolia St Monticello 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr. David E. Walker, Pastor
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning........................11:oo AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:30 PM
'Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Wed. TRAC Club for teens...........7:oo PM


3JOU 11 a111 U. IUIIIoc;IIU" /97//t-7
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas
Sunday School.....................0...10:00 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:00 PM
Wednesday Worship...................7:00 PM



Highway 259 Monticello 997-5018
Min. Tobbie Berrian III, Pastor
Sunday School.....................9:30 AM
Sunday Morning Worship...........1:oo AM
Wednesday Bible Study................7:30 PM



1206 Springfield Road Lloyd 997-TLC7 (8527)
Pastors Tim and Beverly Buchholtz
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com

Sunday................................................ 10:30 AM
Sunday Morning Praise and Worship
Children's Church
Infants & Toddler Nursery
W ednesday............................................7:00 PM
Praise & Worship
Adult & Teen Bible Study
Young Explorers (K-5th Grade)



1287 South Jefferson Street 997-RGCC (7422)
www.restoredglory.org
Sunday Radio Show 8 a.m. 97.9 FM
Pastor Eddie and Elder Veronica Yon
Sunday Church Service............10:00 AM
Thursday Church Service............ :o00 PM


11005 Miccosukee Rd. Tallahassee, F 32309
Rev. Dr. Jimmy Brookins, Sr. 850-668-2206
pastor/teacher
brookinsjimmy@yahoo.com
Sunday School.................................. 9:3 AM
Morning Worship.......................11:oo AM
Communion (on 1st Sunday)............ 6o00 PM
Tuesday Evening
Singles Ministry Meeting...................6:30 PM
(before 2nd Sunday)
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting, Bible Study...............7:00 PM



81 Methodist Church Rd Waukeenah 997-2171
www.waukeenah-umc.org
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone
Sunday School..........................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship........................11:oo AM
Youth Group.................................7:00 PM
Tuesday
Overeaters Anonymous ..........7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice................. ..... 7:00 PM
Youth Group.................................. 7:00 PM
Family Fellowship
2nd Thursday of each month
Thrift Store open every Saturday,
8:00 AM-12:oo PM
Every Monday AA Meets..............7:00 PM


rniOis uisuumteu
Bruce Izard (far right), is pictured with two Canadian students, foreman
Mariano with his helper on site


enoTo sbDmlrrea
Dr. Rainey, Hector and Hannah Monroe work at a clinic


J 5

Where will you be

sitting in eternity?

Smoldng or non-smokig?.







12A Monticello News


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www. ecbpublishing. corn


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


^*^


Pet Loss Support Offered At Big Bend Hospice


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
When a beloved pet
dies many people are
surprised by the inten-
sity of their grief. For
many people pets are
considered part of their
family so intense grief is
normal and understand-
able. Although grieving
is normal after the death
of a pet it may be diffi-
cult or even embarrass-
ing to describe how you
are feeling to someone
else.
Big Bend Hospice is
now offering grief sup-


port to those who are
grieving the loss of a pet.
The Coping with Pet Loss
program will offer adults
who have experienced
the death of an animal
companion' a safe and
supportive environment
to learn healthy ways to
cope with their loss.
This quarterly meet-
ing will be held on
Thursday, Aug. 5, from 6
to 7:30 p.m. at Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Boulevard in Tal-
lahassee with subse-
quent meetings to be
held Sept. 2, Oct. 7, and
Nov. 11.


All meetings are con-
fidential but due to costs
Big Bend Hospice is ask-
ing participants to sup-
port the program
through a suggested do-
nation of $20. Scholar-
ships are available for
those who cannot afford
to pay
"We see this as a
need in the community,"
said Diane Tomasi, com-
munity relations direc-
tor of Big Bend Hospice.
"Often the death of a pet
can trigger strong grief
reactions and there have
been few places to go
where you can be with


The Jefferson County Recycling Program
the following items for recvclina:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water
bottles, laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food
cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All Cardboard Products grocery bag, cereal boxes, food
boxes, laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc'.


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center
located at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at
any one of the collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of
our Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How
could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers,
washing machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not ac-
cepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

*The. Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be
turned into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello Offers Curbside pick-up for city res-
idents for recyclable items on each Wednesday Morning.
For further information on other items for disposal in the
City, please call Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.coiefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations
& hours of operation for each individual site.
For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


other pet lovers who
have had the same expe-
rience and understand
how you are feeling. We
have expertise in grief
and loss so this new sup-


port service seems to be
a natural extension of
our community pro-
grams."
Written materials
are also available to help


Candle, Please


Billy Gene Windham
Guest Columnist
"Candie" was a little
female brown/white mix-
ture of mostly Chi-
huahua and anyone's
guess. Somewhat an
enigma in so many ways,
you had to feel for her
such a non-storied past. I
learned she had two trips
to the dog pound, and a
dump by a roadside. So
how did I come to be her
new owner, very reluc-
tantly I admit. It's Christ-
mas and having lost my
best ever little buddy, a
little black and white
Chihuahua named Dups,
(it's SPUD" spelled back-
wards,) my kids decided I
needed a new pet. I was
almost nasty; I did not
want another dog. But,
with much persuasion
and feeling sorry for Can-
die I gave in.
I found her to be
laden with dogmatism.
She would remind you-
more of a cat than dog.
Yet, she could be very
loving but always on her
terms, (kinda like my
wife.) Very soon she be-


came very attached to
me. Then the trouble be-
gins. Someone would
come into our home and
she became very aggres-
sive and would have to be
restrained. She would
settle down and you
would think everything
is cool, and then you
would hear someone
scream. She would come
up behind them and nip
them on the leg then re-
turn to her bed as if
nothing had happened.
And, I kept waiting for a
lawsuit. Thankfully no
one ever sued.
Many times I wanted
to get rid of her. But, she
redeemed herself, leav-
ing me forever in awe
with what I am about to
tell you. This is what
happened:
My wife and our
friend, Vi Payton, had
gone to an Eastern Star
meeting. It's a Friday,
night and Candle and I
are here at home alone.
It's about 9:30 p.m. and
I'm beginning to have an
asthma attack. It's some-
thing I've been prone to


parents and guardians
talk to their children
about the death of a pet.
For more information
contact .Laurie Ward at
850-878-5310.


lelp Me!
for many years, some of
which I have ended up in
the E.R. I'm sitting in'a
lounge chair on one side
of the room; Candle is
lying on the couch on the
other side as if asleep.
With sounds I'm making
I'm sure she is not
asleep. I have reached a
point of desperation. I
am unable to breath. I re-
alize I must get help. I
arose from my chair in
an attempt to call 911. I
fell back into the chair,
looked at Candie and
said as best I could,
"Candie, please help
me!" Without hesitation
she came off the couch
and in a nonchalant and
almost a ritualistic man-
ner, made her way
around a coffee table and
passed in front of my
lounge chair and me. She
stopped, turned around
and positioned herself
on her knees directly in
front of me about two
feet from my chair and
facing east. What hap-
pened next left me star-
tled and as I relate this,
I'm wondering how
many will believe me.
(But, this for her, I will
do.) She began an emula-
tion of all the sounds I
had beer making: the
wheezing, the coughing
and the gasping for
breath, the rise and fall
of the diaphragm. She
did not miss one detail.
This display lasted one
or two minutes. She got
up, proceeded back to
where she was resting in
the same manner as pre-
viously I look over to her
and say, "Thank you Dar-
ling." No response, as if
nothing had occurred. I
thought well maybe I
should still call 911 but I
said to myself, "You're
feeling much better." I
waited a few more min-
utes; still I'm feeling
much better. Then I de-
cided I would wait until
my wife (Ann) gets home
and see what she thinks.
She came around 11
p.m. and I guess, won-
dered what I was talking
about. It's been over two
years ago now and I
haven't had another
asthma attack.
"Thank you, Dar-
ling."


Sn
-^ ..- - '-
- o^ -S


SPICK UP ThE
3W r. 1
-,efferson iJournal



MONTICELLO NEWS

Ai AT ThESE fNE RETAl ERS

S- S&M Store Tupelo's Bakery
Pit Stop p PetroFood & Gas
Si Jackson's Drugs Hilltop Store
S Monticello Pizza Joyner's Shell
1 Stop N' Go Capital City Travel
SRAJ Foods Loren Walker Stor
S Exxon Reams Store
-. Chevron Pure Store
-'M-
.;" KOA Campground Kwiky Mart ,



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(A Do(tolr' Heart, in(
with the Rotary Club of Monticello
Proudly Presents
wat th Rot Clbo lotce


I -


and




at the
Sixth Annual
HOURS D'OEUVRES FOR
THE BRAIN AND SOUL


July 31,2010 at 6PM
Heavy Hors D' oeuvres
Cash Bar $35/person
Reservations 997-4242 or 906-9840


#V' .. .,
,~, *,II I *.'lsls


~P- I -- ---I I ---I ~
__ ~~


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Wednesday, July 21, 2010


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 13A


SCHOOL & EDUCATION


NEW COURSES, PLANS FOR NEW NFCC PROGRAMS


North Florida
Community College is
constantly evolving and
growing to meet the
needs and demands of
students and the com-
munity. So as NFCC's
fall term approaches,
it's no surprise there's
new offerings and pro-
grams on the horizon.
From fall term addi-
tions of Special Topics
in Humanities Film and
Computer Animation, to
upcoming additions of a
Hip Hop in American
Culture class and an
Associate in Science
degree in digital media,
NFCC is reshaping its
academic offerings for
the benefit of its stu-
dents.


"NFCC has been
actively working on
revitalizing and updat-
ing its- curriculum,"
said Dr. Sharon Erle,
NFCC Dean of
Academic Affairs. "We
have some exciting new
courses, have some revi-
talized previously
offered courses, and are
adding a new degree we
are very excited about."
The college is planning
to offer a new Digital
Media/Multimedia
Technology program in
January that includes
an Associate in Science
degree option as well as
shorter college credit
certificate tracks. The
shorter certificate
tracks, 15-18 credit


hours each, provide
quick training in four
separate areas author-
ing, production, instruc-
tional technology, pres-
entation and web pro-
duction that build up
to the A.S. degree. The
program will teach stu-
dents to integrate
graphics, video, sound,
animation, text and still
images and prepare
them for jobs and
careers in media-related
industries.
But students don't
have to wait until spring
term to take digital
media classes. NFCC's
fall schedule already
includes Computer
Animation and
Electronic Imaging


courses that will begin
Aug. 23. Students
enrolling in these cours-
es, as electives or
towards a career path,
will have access to the
latest technology and
digital media software.
They will also gain
knowledge of one of the
fastest growing indus-
tries around media
production, design and
development.
"We've served the
educational needs of
our district for over 50
years and we are doing
everything necessary to
make sure that we con-
tinue to meet those
needs for the next 50
years," said NFCC
President John


Grosskopf. "The world
changes, the economy
changes, and we will
adapt what we do to
make sure our students
are ready for those
changes."
Other exciting
course additions this
fall include Humanities
Film, Introduction to
College composition and
an Introduction to
Biology class for non
biology majors with the
spring term featuring
Everything Google,
Creative Writing and
Fundamentals of Web
Design courses. Some
popular, in-demand
courses returning this
fall are American
Government, Short


Story and Beginning
Computers. Taught by
exceptional instructors.
these courses will add to
NFCC's already vast
course and program
offerings.
"These new addi-
tions to our curriculum
should provide students
with interesting new
options as well as
options that will help
them in pursuing their
educational goals," said
Erle.
For a complete list
of all courses and pro-
grams being offered at
NFCC, visit
www.nfcc.edu or contact
NFCC Enrollment
Services at (850) 973-
1622.


9JMA


PSsss
PSKff~l.^~j








14A Monticello News


I-eI


Brand New Four Channel
Bridgeable AMP 800w Amer-
ican Pro Bass Machine. Asking
$40, call Charles 850-459-6392
and leave message.
5/12,nc,tln.
Australian Western saddle;
brand new with tags on it;
comes with blanket, two bri-
dles, two breastplates (one
custom made), and saddle
stand. Call 850-545-5764
10/21, rtn, nc.
American Bulldog Puppies-
For Sale. Mama and Pappa on
premises, all shots, ready to go,
$300. 229-221-1648.
6/30,7/2,7,8,14,16,21,23,28,30,c.
2 GOLF CARTS
2005 Street Legal: head lights,
tail lights, blinkers, brake lights,
horn, mirrors. Asking $1950.
1997 with lights, mirrors, brake
lights and other accessories.
Asking $1,000. Call 212-5538.
7/9,14,16,21.pd.

HAY- Cow hay, $20 per roll,
stock up for winter, located in
Monticello 229-403-4554.
7/21,23,pd.


Poison Ivy Soap- wash away
the oil from the plant that
causes the rash and itch,
JACKSON'S DRUG STORE
850-997-3553

100% All Natural
M'> i No Deet.
-" Non-toxic. Peel
S & Stick Patch.
t JACKSON'S
DRUG STORE
850-997-3553





Pontoon Party Barge + Trailer
with convertible top, been
sheltered. + 50 Horse Johnson
in excellent condition. Will
trade for a 4-wheel drive trac-
tor, in good condition, 973-
4141.8am-5pm.


(850) 997-4340
Realtor@tm)impeary.com
Rentals Available!
1405 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344

Simply the Best!

JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office
300, Monticello. 1 BR ($442) &
2BR ($480). HUD vouchers ac-
cepted, subsidy available at times.
850-997-6964. TTY711. This in-
stitution is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.


5/28, tfn, c.


www. ecbp i blish ing. corn


81 GMC new 350)
Super Swamper $260
229-393-0649 or 85
ask for Glenda.
6/30,7/2.7




Day bed or trundl
small RV, 5' width to
size. Contact Debbie
0901 evenings, or
week days.






Moving sale- SaturI
580 South Waukeena
Furniture, misc. houi
pictures on the wall!
side.


HOUSE 2BR/1BTH
vaulted ceilings, fans, central
heat/air, washer/dryer hookup,
dish washer, stove, refrigerator.
$600 a month with one-year lease,
first and last months rent and de-


posit, with option to
PETS! 997-4183.

HOUSE 2/3 BEDR
2 BATH
large Florida room an
from I-10. Call 678-90




R^M


buy. NO AT ANIMAL MEDICAL.
CLINIC ON HWY 90
7/14,tfn,c. Around June 15th. Small dog
ZOOM/ with collar and leash. Call to
identify. 997-3750.
id minutes 7/14,16,21,23,nc.
6-7600 Dog- Pit-Bull, small, female
7/16,21,pd. on Highway 90 Monticello
Dumpster.
Dog- Walker hound, male near
Wacissa woods on Limrock
Both 7 to 10 months old.
Call 464-1352. 997-2555.


Licensed Junk Dealer- I buy
junk, all kinds, free removal.

Other Services Available
Mowing, bushhogging, clean-
up etc. Call Kevin @
850-210-3137
6/30,rtn,nc.

MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn.
I BUILD SHEDS
DECKS & RAMPS
Also exterior carpentry work.
Call Bob 850-242-9342 or
948-2788.
6/30,rtn,c.


The
W, 7

be,,


c.elferson journal



MVONTICELLO NEWS

- 66


engine, 37"


Wedlnesday, July 21, 2010


wiPD


) or O.B.O. Children's Dresses...
0-997-3568 *Size 3 white long dress.
worn as flower girl dress. se-
.9,24,16.nc. quin/beadwork all on bodice. se-
lquin/beadwork/ appliques on
hottom. built in crinoline. $50
SSize 4 off white dress.
worn as flower girl dress, lace
S work around bodice, pretty lace
e bed: for work at bottom, cap sleeves $25
I full/queen *Size 7-8 off white dress.
at 850-997- worn as a flower girl dress, over-
997-3568 lay of lace over entire dress, prob-
ably
6/4,tfn.nc. knee to calf length $25
*Size 8 white, long dress,
lace around neck with decorative
bodice $25
SSize 16 white long pag-
eant gown, cap sleeves, white se-
quin work across entire bodice
lay. 7 am-? and sleeves, buttons around neck
ih Street. with circular cut-out on back,
sehold, and beautiful gown- $100
Inside/Out- Teen dresses..
*Size 7-8 Kelli green
7/21,23,pd. gown. lace overlay $40
*Size 8 red gown, se-
quin/head work around bodice -
$50


*Size 14 (child's size 14 but
dress is for a teen division ap-
proximately 13-15) GOR-
GEOUS lime green dress,
strapless but with spaghetti straps
that criss cross across the back,
sequins spotted across the entire
gown, built in crinoline ab-
solutely gorgeous. $300 (paid
over $500 for it)
Call 850-973-3497
and leave message.



l < ,i ,, ,, .*



%


7/21,23,28,30,nc.



-s
,.,
, :X.'".i ,.'.


L^uto I


SThi D DEADLINE FOR WEDNESDAYPAPER 3:00 P.M. OMONMDAYS
The l a ssif e DEADIINEFOR FRIDAYPAPER3:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY

measuring up to your expectations one ad at a time.


.Never! u: <.Esi ,i.


the ".. of news.







Sports

Local News L Subscription Renewal

Outdoors

Church New Subscription


*Crime Name:

School
Address:

,4e _________


wewxaaca Phone Number:


94e.'eu4,t In State ........... $45.00 / Out of State .... $52.00

C ^/ Please fill out and mail this back with a
check or money order made out to
Monticello News
MONTICELLO NEWS P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-3568


Volunteers desperately needed at the Jefferson County Humane
Society. Call 342-0244.
6/l .tfn.nc.
Do you need a place to live? Do you like to work with horses?
Help wanted on Monticello horse farn. 229-403-4554.
7/21,23,pd.

Certified Directors & Instructors Needed New Childcare Cen-
ter Opening August 2010: *Director W/ Credentials* Instructors
W/ 40 Hour Introductory Courses. Please forward resume' to:
Valarie Thompson VAL-ET Early Childcare Center 1205 Florida
Avenue Monticello, FL 32344.
7/9.14,16,21,c.

FULL TIME STAKING TECHNICIAN Tri County Electric
Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time Staking Technician
in our Madison Office. The candidate is required to have an Asso-
ciate's Degree. Two or more years of responsible electric utility ex-
perience is preferred. The ideal candidate should have excellent
people skills, above average analytical abilities, good PC skills, and
the ability to evaluate field conditions and make quick decisions re-
lated to complex line designs and modifications. The cooperative
offers competitive salary and benefits. Tri County is an EOE and
DFWP. Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment
Applications Form, which is available at and TCEC office or online
at www.tcec.com, before August 3. to:
Stephanie Carroll, Tri- County Electric Cooperative, Inc. P.O. Box
208,Madison, FL 32341.
6/14,16,21,23,c.











imagine 1

-.. -- .




"'" "",. .


~I









Wednesday, July 21, 2010


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Moiticello News 15A


LEGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA;
CIVIL ACTION
BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff,
CASE NO.: 33-2009-CA-000264
VS. DIVISION:
MARK A. HERRING, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE
'NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Reschedilihn Foreclosure Sale dated July 12. 1'010 and
enter.- d u Case NO. 33-2009-CA-000264 of the Circuit C:.itlt iIo
the SECONDT Judicial Circuit in and for JEFFERSON
COuntmt. Filr'ilda wherein BRANCH BANKING ANT) TRUST
COMPANY. is the Plaintiff and MARK A. HERRING. are the-
DefendanLi I % %il Iell to the highest and be.t bidder for cash
at
NORTH DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE LOBBY IN
JEFFERSON COUNTY, MONTICELLO. FLORIDA at
11 :II\.AM. on the 12th day of August, 2010. the Ill:wU ig:,
described property as set forth in said Fijm:d .Jud mient
CONMMIENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SEC.
TiON 32. TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE :; EAST..JEFFER-
SON COUNTY. FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 1I DEGREES
53 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 408.2 FEET ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 32 TO THE POINT ()F
BEGINNING. THENCE DUE WEST 12l.,13 FEET TO A
POINT. SAID POINT BEING 66 FEET EAST OF THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/14 OF THE SOUTH
EAST 1 4 OF SECTION 32, THENCE NORTH 1 DEGREE 21
NIINUTES i:" SECONDS EAST 918.74 FEET TO A POINT
ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF A ih
FOOT WIDE COUNTY ROAD, THENCE .LONG THE
SOUTHERLY BOrNDARY OF SAID ROAD AS FOLLOW\ S5:
EASTERLY ALONG A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTH.
HAVING A RADRiS OF 385.35 FEET AND A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 29 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 2. SECONDS. AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 197.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 50
DEGREES 19 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 2.a1.27 FEET:
THENCE EASTERLY ALONG A CURVE CONCA VE TO
THE NORTH -LA\VING A RADIUS OF .362 26 FEET AND A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 41 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 46 SEC
ONT)S. AN ARC DISTANCE OF 264.105 FEET. THENCE
NORTH 87 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
187.75 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES .34 AINIUTES
10 SECONDS EAST 243 .41 FEET, THENCE EASTERLY
ALONG A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTH HAVING A
RADIUS OF 208. ?4 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 5?,
DEGREES 22 MINUTES 56 SECONDS, AN ARC DISTANCE
OF .-1.19 FEET. THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 3:03 IN.U
UTES 1 SECONDS EAST 66.84 FEETTHENCE EASTERLY
AL)NG A (CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTH. -LAVING A
RADIiS OF 159 28 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 12
DEGREES 59 MINUTES 11 SECONDS, AN ARC DISTANCE
OF .6.10 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST BOLUDARY OF
SECTION 32. THENCELEAVING SAID ROAD RUN SOUTH
0' DEGREES 5.3 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 747.35 FEET
T( THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT THE
FOLLOWING PARCEL RECORDED IN OR BOOK 248 PAGE
Y5 FURTHER DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT AN AXLE
NMLRKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION .32.
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 3 EAST, JEFFERSON
COUNTY. FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES c
MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE EAST
'I ENDARY OF SAID SECTION 32, 408.2 FEET TO A
POINT. T 1FNCE WEST 1281.3 FEET TO A POINT ON THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF CHINQUAPIN ROAD.
THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 21 MINUTES (- SECONDS
EAST. ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY, .:5 22 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR A POINT OF BEGIN
.NING. THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 04 SEC.
BONDS EAST. ALCNG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY, 51-.52
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF PAUL THOMPSON ROAD, SAID
POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCA VE-TO THE SOUTH,
THENCE RLiN IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIRECTION
ALONG SAID RIGHT -OF-WAY LINE AND CURVE HA'L
ING A RADIUS OF 385.35 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 29 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 23 SECONDS, FOR
AN ARC LENGTH OF 197.22 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC
BEING SOUTH t6 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 10 SECONDS
EAST 195.u7 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE SOUTH S.i
DEGREES 19 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF.WAY LINE 231.27 FEET TO AN IRON ROD,
SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE, TO THE
NORTH. THENCE RUN IN A SOUTHEASTERLY DIREC-
TION ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE AND CURVE
HAITNG A RADIUS OF 362.26 FEET, THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 29 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 16 SECONDS,
FOR AN ARC LENGTH OF 187.07 FEET, CHORD OF SAI)
ARC BEING SOUTH 65 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 07 SEC-
ONDS EAST 185 0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN
SOUTH 01 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST
256.46 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
WEST 52..87 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS
AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING PARCEL AS RECORDED
IN OR BOOK Ci:30 PAGE 29 FURTHER DESCRIBED AS:
COIMMNENCE AT AN AXLE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH. RANGE
.i EAST. JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RLUN
NORTH I.I DEGREES 53 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST,
ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID) SECTION
.32.-1 8.2i. FEET TO A POINT, THENCE WEST Ni 2:5 FEET
TO AN IRON ROD FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CO -NTINUE
WEST 615'1S FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT
THENCE NORTH ill DEGREES 21 MINUTES 0-; SECONDS
EAST 61'-..05 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONLiUMENT,
THENCE SOUTH fil DEGREES 21 MINUTES 03 SECONDS
WEST '.-I 22: FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING
A K A !:1"o PAUL THOMPSON ROAD, MONTICELLO. iFL
*.32.M44
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus ftro:m the
.sl', if any other than the property owner as of thel d:iate i:'f
the lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (6. 1uda\ ai-ter
the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court uI July. 13.
2011.
Ku-KB. Reams,
C lerk of the Circuit Court
BY Sherry Sears,
Depau, Cl-_rk
Fli Irida Default Law Group, PL. PO. Box 25018 Tampa,:
Fi-,rida "3622-5018 F091 02396.See Americans with
[Di.siblities Act* If you are a person with a disability v. h,:,
in:-eds an v accommodation in order to participate in this pr,:,.


ceedirin ,.-u are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision
S f cerrta in assistance. Please contact:
Mri UL-li Smith
Ol i1e- '_-t Court Administration
.I-Tl',r.rIn C'ounty Courthouse
Co urlthoate Circle
NM. iti.:.li. FL 32344
Phli,:,r: i -9i 342-0218
Fax ,5:-342-02422
7 21.2a~ 10.>:


AAANF Board of Directors & Advisory Council Meeting

The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc. will hold a
meeting of the Board of Directors & Advisory Council,
Thursday, July 22, at 10:30 a.m. An agenda will be available
upon request. The meeting will be held at the Area Agency on
Aging for North Florida. Inc. 2414 Mahan Drive; Tallahassee,
Florida 32308.

7/21/10,c.


NOTICE OF XPPL ICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Gerald 0. Bussell the
holder .1I the following certificate has filed said certificate for a
.,.. decd The certificate number and year of issuance, the
deni-tpui.n of the property, and the names in which it was
.. -e--cd .ire as follows:
Certificate 19 Year of Issuance 2004

C-crptiu.n of Property: 00-00-00-0220-0000-0200
L.[I, 20 and 21 Bowmans Addition
ORB 76 753 & 129 PG 55

Njiinmc II which assessed: Ervin Walker, ET Al

M I I -i .ll-i pll. '1` 1i', i l ili' i (Il- C -1,,ili. .I I icl c i 1-0. S i. iil I
Fhli'nd., Ttu. rj ,,pe ln., i lk:1', iL' l'.'|.\'t h >.ul-i in ., ji 1 .i '
_nl1 h.. i li d c l.' ll'.- I .. I 1C., Ie 1 i.cCi i. IcJlii ~ I .Ii.x il. I









F Capital srna Comnmuni3 Auclion tguenc. Inc.
Board 01il heirecdenor J Me.eting
[)p,. ,p : l di esc. ilb' d h I lih' ci. i'l l l v .llL '.' ,ll i'e o. 'ld l I L tllll ',I
hidden ji the I [llerCI i ,i (_,uni\ C,-irlitIi,_,Li r ri 'l dJ ,, r O l[ ile
181h l August. 2'111.1i alI 1 I Il AM TI pripiip , h.n ..I..Il I
,l b| c l 1 ,LIIlli[ I|1 l j IJ% L"
Daled Il-u. nIloth dJ .I Jul.,. 2ill,
Kilik B Re..ini- C ilv .I ...011. l, 1.lLr ..o C ..nni,. Fl...J.

4 21 2S. 4 l l I


Capital \rea Communilt Action \genci. Inc.
Board Of Direclors Meeting

Tuesdas.. ulh 27. 211111
5:31) pm
Tillih.i-..- ? Ci,, Hall T.llajhla. cc R...om'i
31III tih \d .i nll r.ee
Talla.lli. -e. FL 323..ul
C (_C XX* i, -i pri.lc. ri..ii-pi,'l't ilenerC, Lr. iori, L -r-i.
(-idMdic .lellir..'i Guill. Cjlh.'un Li'erl nid Fianklin ...mi i-
ue. Tlie mnieeiir.i oppen Ito the pLhlL. F..r ii rli:', i -tnic Ioi-I:i
pei ce .Cl..11 i.S l -112.1-13
2 :1 Ie.L


- II


(4k1
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out


a,
U
U


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. that Gerald 0. Bussell the hold-
er of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax
deed. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description
of the property, and the names in which it was assessed arc as fol-
lows:


Certificate 41


Year of Issuance 2005


Description of Property: 000-00-00-0260-0006-0030
Lots 3, 4, 5, Block 6 Fla. Land & Abstract Co.
ORB 465 P94 & 484 P 277

Name in which assessed: Clavlnn Nllinnonl Inc
Owner on Record: Ru.- I lull,...l,

All of said property being in the Co.mil, ,I c'i.ii..,I. IAIl oil
Florida. This property may be sub ...I i .u.. .- ii ,..1. I.-c.
Unless such certificate shall be redet ,..-d |..o.,-.J|c i-.. Ij. ithi
property described in such certificate ill hie ld I.i iLh h 'h'rie
bidder at the Jefferson County Cou ili,, .. JIr', i .-J..i *.1n IlI-
18th day of August, 2010, at 11:00 \'N TIl,: i ..'i- rn'. .en
sold is subject to current y0ar taxes.
Dated this 6th day of July, 2010.
Kirk B. Reams. Clerk of Court, Jclle..n (. ..iul,. Fl.r.Id
14 'I 2 -. 2.il0 c


Dedication


When you need to see a physician or consult an
attorney, you don't choose just anyone. You choose a
professional you can trust. When you need to adver-
tise your products and services, why not do the same
and go with us, the pros you can trust?

We know how important your business is to you, and
whatever your advertising needs, we will listen close-
ly and go the extra mile necessary to get the
job done right and on time.


Monticello News


180 W. Washington St 997-3568







16A Monticello News


www. ecbpu blish ing. com


Wednesday, July 21, 2010


PORTS


Taryn Copeland Longtime Softball


varsity pitcher in the
seventh grade.
In the ninth grade
she got moved up to the
varsity team to pitch
and the upcoming sea-
son is her fourth as the
varsity pitcher for Au-
cilla.
At the age of 12
Copeland began taking
pitching lessons from
Coach Lori Goodard in
Tallahassee and she con-
tinued taking pitching
lessons until the age of
16.
At 16 she also took


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian
Academy softball
pitcher Taryn Copeland,
17, is a longtime softball
player and extremely
loves the sport.
At the age of seven
years old she began play-
ing softball at the Madi-
son County Recreation
Park during the spring
as a pitcher. She was
picked for the All-Stars
at ages 11-14 and she be-
came the ACA junior


Promotion Guidelines
Must contact the local office by July 23, i2o.
Must take delivery by.Julyr 3 o.2010.
Subject to credit approval.
Certain restrctions apply, limited time offer. limited quantity available
Current customers may receive a minimum delivery.
We accept VISA and tiasterard!


batting lessons for a few
months.
Copeland said she
also learned a lot from
the Tallahassee Travel
Teams, where she has
serves as the pitcher for
the Tallahassee Thun-
derbolts since 2009 and
she plans to continue
playing with the team
until her college years
begin. They play six to
seven games throughout


Free Basketball (


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Former FSU basket-
ball player, and present
professional basketball lea-
guer, Benson Callier is of-
fering a free basketball
camp July 21-23 for females
and males ages 7-14 at the
Recreation Park, to pass
along some of the things
he's picked up in his jour-
ney through basketball
and life.
Callier, a 26-year-old
shooting guard is regarded
in basketball circles as one
of the best young players
not yet in the major league
(NBA). He decided to give
free basketball camps in
this area because he moved
here eight years ago to be
closer to his grandmother,
a county native, who prac-
tically raised him.
"It's my service to the
community and I saw a
need for it here. I want to
serve as a role model to the
teenagers of this county,"
he said. "As my career
grows the number of
camps will increase."
The camp will include
individual instruction,
playing basketball games
and Callier passing on all


Where Big Power Meets Small Prices.
My John Deere is the 5045D Utility Tractor.
S .. ,: .-,r. , -.. fr r~p-rr, Wa,'.- Im.-.' D er .hat',sY,, I

-j r1 .r.. .". h 1. u E r *
That's my John Deere. What's Yours?

-

hr~:- -i*'- *,.


he has learned in the sport
of basketball.
"This year I just
wanted to do something for
the community," Callier
said. "I'm going to be in
there, hands on. I think
that'll be kind of fun. I
want to get sweaty myself."
Space in the camp is
limited, so the sooner slots
are secured, the better. To
ensure a spot in the camp
contact Caller at 997-8562 or
email benson.callier-
@gmail.com.
To give some back-
ground on his experience:
Callier began playing bas-
ketball at George Junior
Republic (GJR) High
School in Pennsylvania in
2000 after growing up in St.
Petersburg, Fl,where he
came just one intervention
away from seeing his fu-
ture in basketball flash be-
fore his eyes.
Callier had NBA
scouts checking out his tal-
ents when he was just 15
years old, but as he was
skipping school one day to
play in a pickup game on a
St. Petersburg playground,
he was spotted by local
hoops fixtures Pat and An-
thony Lawrence. They gave
him the guidance missing
in his life to get back on
track.
"Basically I was dis-
covered coincidentally
while I was taking off from
class," Callier said. "I was
always a smart kid, I just
didn't understand that I
had to invest as much in
school as I did in basket-
ball. I was oblivious that I
was wasting my talent.
"Those guys (the
Lawrences), helped me get
to the point where I could
be (academically) eligible
to play basketball," he said.
While at GJR there
was a packed house of
more than 7,000 basketball
fans crowded intoY-
oungstown State Univer-
sity's Beeghly Center in
2001 as Callier carried GJR
to an upset win over Le-
Bron James and Akron's
St. Vincent-St. Mary High
School.
"It was a big deal, sold-
out crowds," Callier re-
called. "I never (before)
was exposed to that kind of
atmosphere."


the summer playing al-
most every weekend.
Though 2010 starts
her senior year at Au-
cilla, Copeland has al-
ready received a
two-year softball schol-
arship at St, John's
River Community Col-
lege in Palatka, FL, then
hopefully after that, she
will be able to attend a
bigger school.
She plans to go to



!amp Jul


-Sign-U,
The titanic match-up
was just that. Both teams
had entered the game un-
defeated and James, then a
junior, was featured on a
Sports Illustrated cover
story just weeks prior.
GJR toppled St. Vin-
cent-St. Mary, the number 6
ranked prep school in the
nation, 58-57 in overtime.
Callier, not James, was
named the game's most
valuable player after grab-
bing 11 rebounds, scoring
14 points and blocking two
of James' shots.
"I think that affected
him a little bit," Callier
said. "I didn't see him as
'Oh, LeBron James,'" Cal-
lier remembered. "I kind of
just played my game and
didn't let the hoopla effect
me."
More than just a high
school standout at GJR,
Callier and coach Bob Mc-
Connell's Tigers went 21-3
during Callier's senior sea-
son before ending the cam-
paign in the PIAA Class
AAAA semifinals.
"I think that a lot of
the distractions I had back
home were gone," he said.
"I was able to be stable. I
was able to just focus on
basketball. That is what
was needed in my life at
the time. It was really good
to be part of something,"
he added.
The people at GJR
helped him both spiritu-
ally and emotionally, too,
Callier said.
But by far he said his
favorite moment of his
Mercer County stay was
having the chance to play
James in the highly-touted
affair.
While James a year
later, would pass up college
to head straight to the
NBA, Callier went on to
play at Florida State from
2002-2004, before transfer-
ring to upstate Western
Kentucky from 2004-2006,
where he graduated with a
degree in social sciences.
"I had mentors in my
life that expressed the im-
portance of education,"
said Callier, who's now tak-
ing credits towards a mas-
ter's degree as time


Player
pharmacy school and be-
come a pharmacist.
Copeland wishes to
thank her parents, Tom
and Debbie Copeland of
Greenville, who have
given her a lot of back-
ing, support and encour-
agement and her
coaches Coach Edwin
Kinsey and Coach Jack
Clenney. "Thanks for
everything," she con-
cluded.



y 21-23


p Now-
permits.
Since then he's de-
cided to make a career out
of his basketball talents as
long as he can.
"Basketball has taken
me all over the world and
it's going to continue to do
that." He has been playing
in the professional leagues
including Continental Bas-
ketball League and Pre-
mier Basketball League
and played games in Swe-
den, Spain, Canada and
Lithuania and he is sched-
uled to go to Denmark next
month.
It hasn't always been
so easy though, he noted.
Coming out of college, he
was his own agent and had
to search for places to im-
prove his techniques and
skills. "I hit the ground
running," Callier said. "I
had to sleep in the car a
couple of nights. It wasn't
a big deal to me. I had to do
what I had to do."
As he plays profes-
sionally that push to get to
the NBA only continues to
grow, he said.
"I can't explain the
drive," Callier added. "Al-
most every great player
has someone telling them
that they can't do some-
thing. There's always
doubters. Sometimes you
got to be a little hard
headed.
"This year would of
been my year (to get to the
NBA)," he said. But be-
cause of the nation's eco-
nomic woes even the
league has become more
frugal. Because of the re-
cession, a lot of teams are
tightening up," he stated.
"I'm staying opti-
mistic and working hard,"
Callier added, referring to
his regime of constant
work outs and time spent
in the gym.
The player said he's
come face to face with his
goals in basketball, and
more importantly in life
and is close to triumphing
over the top of them.
To say he's taken the
road less traveled just to
get that chance, would be
the understatement of the
decade.


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