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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00353
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: 04/07/2010
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
sobekcm - UF00028320_00353
System ID: UF00028320:00353
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text

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ONT ICELLO


NEWS


142nd Year No. 14 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 50f 4 + 4


City Officials

Ready To

Redo Water,

Sewer Rates
S Issue Set For
Discussion Tuesday Night
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
After two workshops on the
issue, city officials appear
ready again to redo the water
and sewer rate structure, this
time with an eye to making it
fairer, user-predicated and con-
servation minded.
That, at least is the intent,
as expressed by city officials at
a March 23 workshop, following
a lengthy discussion of the
findings of city resident Tom
Love, a computer expert who
worked up various statistical
scenarios for possible rate in-
creases, based on Monticello
customers' actual water usages
during January 2010.
Also motivating city offi-
cials' revisit of the rate struc-
ture at this time is a potential
$80,000-plus shortfall in the
water and sewer accounts. Put
simply, the water and sewer op-
erations are currently not pay-
ing for themselves.
Thus, city officials were
scheduled to discuss the pro-
posed rate structure initially at
7 p.m. Tuesday, April 6, with the
idea of holding the required
public hearings on the issue
subsequently.
At the March 23 workshop,
Love touched on the reasons
for the restructuring, proposed
revenue targets that needed to
be met to make the two opera-
tions self supporting, and of-
fered ways of attaining the
stated goals.
The reasons that the rates
needed to be adjusted, accord-
ing to Love: the current struc-
ture is complex and unfair; it
isn't producing enough money
to cover the expenses; and it
doesn't allow for the buildup of
a reserve.
"We need to adjust the
rates to cover the expenses and
also redesign the structure to
make it more fair and conser-
vation oriented," Love said.
"We also need to set targets."
He pointed out that for the
water operation, the projected
revenues for the current year
are $318,000, compared with
projected expenditures of
Please See Water, Sewer
Rates Page 6A


Brooks


Named

Library

Director
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Kitty Brooks is the new
head of the Jefferson County
Public Library.
It took commissioners only
minutes to decide the issue and
name Brooks the new library
director on Thursday morning,
April 1.
In making the selection,
commissioners followed the
recommendation of County Co-
ordinator Roy Schleicher; but it
appeared that even absent
Schleicher's recommendation,
commissioners would have
chosen Brooks anyways.
Indeed, the moment that
the agenda item was an-
nounced, Commissioner Hines
Boyd looked expectantly 'at
Commissioner Felix "Skeet"
Joyner, who started grinning
after a while.
"All right, I'll make the mo-
tion," Boyd said finally, when
Joyner appeared reluctant to
accept the cue.
It was then that Schleicher
interjected his recommenda-
tion, saying as much as that it
was for the sake of establishing
precedent and asserting his
commission-given authority.
Noting that it was County At-
torney Buck Bird's interpreta-
tion of the policy that the
county coordinator had the au-
thority to hire and fire depart-
ment heads contingent on the
commission's approval, Schle-
icher offered that he could also
defer that decision to the com-
missioners, as he was doing.
But having gone through the
interview process with them, it
would be his recommendation
Please See Director Page
6A


A blowout re-
sulted in a fiery crash
last week that
claimed the lives of
three people.
According to the
Florida Highway Pa-
trol, at 1 p.m., Thurs-
day, April 1, William
R. Gore, 78, of Padu-
cah, KY, was driving
a 2006 Holiday Ram-
bler Diesel Pusher
RV, westbound on 1-10
at the 224 mile
marker. In the vehi-
cle as passengers
were Dona M. Gore,
82, and her sister,
Ruth Wyatt, 78, both
also of Paducah.
FHP Sgt. David
Folsom reported that
the vehicle experi-
enced a blowout of
the right front tire


and \\ent off the
north shoulder and a
traveled down the
raveled down te Photo of Gores and Wyatt courtesy of
embankment before h
WPSD-TI VPaducah KY


slamming into sev-
eral pine trees. Wit-
nesses reported the
RV burst into flames
almost immediately
Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office
deputies immediately
barricaded the west-
bound lanes of the In-
terstate, as well as the
two westbound en-
trance ramps to all
oncoming traffic, al-
lowing only respond-
ing emergency
vehicles through.
Where deputies were
holding traffic at the
225 entrance ramps,
what sounded like ex-
plosions could clearly
be heard.
Jefferson County


Fire Rescue received
the call of the crash
at approximately 1:03
p.m. and dispatched
Engine-1, Squad-1,
Rescue-32, Rescue 36,
Pumper-1, Pumper-2
and Tanker-2 to the
scene.
Upon arrival,
Fire Rescue'person-
nel found the fully in-
volved motorhome,
which was pulling a
tow vehicle, a GMC
Arcadia, which had
detached and was ad-
jacent to the RV The
tow vehicle was not
on fire.
The grass was on
fire in and around the


RV. Fire Rescue re-
ported that several
pine trees had broken
off and were lying on
top of the RV,
The grass area
was initially extin-
guished, while a di-
rect attack was being
done on the RV. Re-
sponding to the scene
and fighting the fire
were Jefferson
County Fire Rescue,
Monticello Volunteer
Fire Department,
Lloyd Volunteer Fire
Department, and
Ashville Area Volun-
teer Fire Depart-
Please See
Crash Page 6A


Time For Little King

And Queen Pageant

Applications
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
With the warmer weather easing in, it's that time
of year again; time to prepare for the annual Water-
melon Festival activities and that includes picking up
applications for the Little King And Queen Pageant.
The Little King and Queen Pageant is Saturday June
12. Contestants must be five years of age by April 31,
2010, but no more than eight years of age by Decem-
ber 31,2010.
All contestants must be full-
time residents of Jefferson
County. An entry fee of
$20 and a color photo of
:~ the contestant must
Sb:- submitted with
S. Please See
- ,Applications
. .. Page 6A


Around Jeff. Cc
Church
Classifieds
Dining Out
Home Improver


1 Section 16 Pages
o. 4-7A Legals
10A-11A Money _&_F
14A Pet Page
9A Sports
inent 16A Viewpoints


Commission Si
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
At the urging of Commissioner
Stephen Fulford, the Jefferson
County Commission recently
adopted a resolution in support of
Florida Senate Bill 1900, currently
wending its way through the leg-
islative process.
As Fulford and David Hall, a
local beekeeper, explained it on
March 18, Senate Bill 1900 also
called the Florida Food Freedom
Act would exempt small farmers,
vegetable gardeners and beekeep-
ers from certain regulations in in-
stances where the
farmer/gardener/beekeeper is sell-
ing directly to consumers.
That's because, unlike in other
states, the Florida Food Safety Act,
passed in 1939 and amended over
the years, places strict regulations


15A
finance _- 9A
8A
12A-13A
2-3A


supports FL. Fo
and fees on all food producers, re-
gardless of the size or style of the
food distriliition.
As things stand now, Fulford
said, he is allowed to sell his boiled
peanuts locally, but Senate Bill 1900
would expand this exemption to
other commodities.
Hall noted that under the exist-
ing law, individuals in small-scale
agricultural operations are pre-
vented from selling commodities
such as eggs or honey to the public,
absent the appropriate permitting.
As it is, he is one of two local
people permitted to sell their prod-
ucts directly to consumers, Hall
said. But the many other beekeepers
in the county couldn't, given that the
various required permits amounted
to more than $500, he said.
If approved, the Florida Food
Freedom Act would allow small-
scale operations to remain viable by


Wed
Wed 87/60
4/7
Interval. of clouds and sunshine.
Warm, High 87F. Winds S at 10 to
15 mph.


Thu
4/8


78/51


/ 9


Windy with thunderstorms in the
area.


id Freedom Bill
defining a short food distribution
chain and exempting it from the reg-
ulatory oversight that is rightly ap-
plicable to longer, multi-layered food
distribution chains, according to its
adherents.
The Act would essentially per-
mit a single-link food distribution
chain, starting with the producer or
the producer's agent and ending
with the consumer.
The Act supposedly rests on the
assumption that producers' in-
tegrity combined with the con-
sumers' interest in, and knowledge
of, how the food is raised, harvested
and prepared will provide suffi-
cient oversight.
Senator Carey Baker is the
sponsor of the legislation.
As of Monday April 5, it ap-
peared that Senate Bill 1900 still
lacked a companion bill in the
House.


Fri 72/48
4/9
Partly cloudy. Highs in the low 70s
and lows in the upper 40s.


THREE DIE IN



FIERY CRASH


----


,riou IV uu dl I, \


! I W767








2A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Wednesday, April 7, 2010


IEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


JEF ER ONi-ICiOUR 1IMIA
S
ALLSSPCS HUL* E OSIEEDINOET NILPOVNGULY NA CORT F AW
A LLIN OR A TI N I R C I ED F O HE J F ER O OU T H RI F S OF IE*


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Marium Bivens, 30,
of Tallahassee, was
arrested March 30 and
charged with violation
of probation on the
charge of reckless driv-
ing. He was released
April 1 and given time
served.
William Frank
Jones, 53, of Jefferson
County, was arrested
March 30 and charged
with aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon.
Bond was set at $2,500
and he bonded out of
jail the following day.
Frank Carr, 38, of
Monticello, was arrest-


ed March 30 and
charged with domestic
violence. Bond was set
at $1,000 and he bonded
out of jail April 1.
Michael Jermaine
Zeigler, 31, of Jefferson
County, was arrested
March 31 and charged
with domestic battery
and violation of proba-
tion on the charge of
sale of a controlled sub-
stance (cocaine). Bond
was withheld and he
remained at the County
Jail April 5.
Marion D.
Thompson, 23, of
Monticello, was arrest-
ed March 31 and
charged with domestic
battery Bond was set at


$500 and he bonded out
of jail April 1.
Rodney Montez
Tyson, 20, of
Tallahassee, was arrest-
ed April 1 and charged
with three count of sale
of cocaine within 1,000
feet of a church; and
three counts of posses-
sion of cocaine with
intent to sell. A total
bond of $60,000 was set
and he remained at the
County Jail April 6.
Casey Arnez Jones,
39, of Monticello, was
arrested April 1 and
charged with possession
of marijuana, less than
20 grams. Bond was set
at $500 and he bonded
out of jail the same day.


TlHOUHI Of ThI WfEK

The best sermons are

lived, not preached.








MONTICELLO ,Oe


NEWS it.


Jesse Blue, 70, of
Monticello, was arrest-
ed April 1 and charged
with possession of
cocaine, possession of
marijuana with intent
to sell and possession of
paraphernalia. A total
bond of $5,500 was set
and he bonded out of
jail the same day.
Matthew Randall
McDaniel, 38, of
Jefferson County, was
arrested April 1 and
charged with violation
of probation on the
charge of possession of
cannabis. Bond was
withheld and he
remained at the county
Jail April 6.
Estella Denise
Roberts, 39, of
Tallahassee, was arrest-
ed April 1 and charged
with violation of proba-
tion on the charge of
felony battery Bond was
withheld and she
remained at the County
Jail April 6.
Keaton Butler
Goreau, 29, of


Gainesville, FL, was
arrested April 2 and
charged with driving
under the influence.
Bond was set at $500 and
he bonded out of jail the
same day.
Kim A. Dilling, 52, of
Jefferson County, was
arrested April 3 and
charged with domestic
battery A bond of $500
was set and she bonded
out of jail the following
day
Gordon D. Dilling,
52, of Jefferson County,
was arrested April 3 and
charged with domestic
battery. Bond was set at
$500 and he bonded out
of jail the following day.
Ira Joe Allen, 53, of
Jefferson County, was
arrested April 3 and
charged with driving
under the influence and
driving while license
suspended or revoked.
A total bond of $1,000
was set .and he bonded
out of jail the following
day.
Roger Walker, 56, of


W.'ednes- '
day. April 14. th-
-, 1 hMonticello \iwss
: ill proudly feature a
-- - special edlitioin fiior the-
upcoming Southern Music Rising Festival, which
will be held April 17. This special section will fea-
ture the schedule of events, pictures and stories of
the performing artists, and much more.
This section will sure to be a keepsake for
those enjoying the weekend's festivities, as a
carry-around in order to keep up with the day's
activities, times and places.
If you and/or your business would like to be
a part of the special Southern Music Rising
Festival section, please call Glenda at 850-997-3568.







Coconut
milk can
be used
as an
antiseptic.


Jefferson County, was
arrested April 3 and
charged with attaching
tag not assigned. Bond
was set at $100 and he
bonded out of jail the
following day.










MAIN STREET


Bill Hopkins Insurance


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S. ,a .'. lillhopkin'llc c mrn


By: Debbie Snapp
, Ionticello News
Shiaft'i ruer



Meet Your



Neighbor


Vandela Johnson
Vandela Johnson has lived in the Aucilla
area since 1982. She moved to the area from
South Florida after just one brief visit to
Monticello. She liked the friendly people,
and the surroundings reminded her of her
childhood in North Carolina.
She was born in North Carolina to
Bessie Mae and Archie Ray Mahaley, in
May 1945. She has three children and eight
grandchildren.
After several years in the workforce and as a homemaker, she prides
herself on going back to school and graduating in May 2009 from NFCC,q
with a degree in Business Administration.
Her career field is in the management profession, working part-time
at The Rare Door restaurant in Monticello. Her free time is spent with her
menagerie of animals including horses, dogs, and cats.


MUFFl IN


The "Muffin
Man" Cecil
Hampton shows
his 4-H demo
project. "How to
make blueberry
muffins, in the
early 1990's."


EMERALD GREENE Advertisement is Monday at 3 p.m.
for Wednesday's paper, and
Publisher/Owner Wednesday at 3 p.m. for Friday's
paper.
LAZARO ALEMAN There will be a' 10 charge br Anidavils.
Senior Staff Writer

CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Deadline for classified is Monday Subscription Rates:
at 3:00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper, Florida $45 per year
and Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. for Out-of-State S52 per year
Friday's paper. Deadline for Legal (State & local taxes included)


E.toablishedi 806
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-6201 designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Plublishin,. Inc.. 180 W WVashington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello. Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICEI.LO NEWS. P.O. Box 428. Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any ad\ertismentl news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Pubilishingi, Inc. lor publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than
6 months from the date they are dropped off ECB Publishing, Inc. will not he responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


svc~------~--~ lg


P.O. Box 428
824
180 W. Washington
Street
"to"
Monticello, Florida
32345c
ail 'o'jj
1. ,


7 3 _
o c
850-997-3568
Tax 850-997-33774
Email: monticellonews
(-0ernbar(In]


$~s-.j


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Wednesday, April 7, 2010 www.ecbpublishing.com







"VIEWPOINTS &


Monticello News 3A







PINIONS


Letters to the editor are typed wora or word, comma or comma, as sent to tils newspaper.


God Bless All Those That Fight To Live Everyday


Dear Editor,
Lung cancer took
my mother at age 44 in
1963. I was 12 and never
got over it. Neither did
my younger brother, or
my father who lived
until the age of 92; and
remarried when I was
15. The second marriage
lasted twice as long, but
the anger always sim-
mered. Two years
before he died, it seemed
he still blamed God. "It
took 11 months for her
to die!" The words cut
like a knife across the


dining room table. We
hardly ever talked about
her after the funer-
al...one man and two
young boys. Too much
pain. Probably nothing
compared to what she
endured during those 11
months-doctors didn't
medicate the dying then
like they do now. She
never cried out loud that
I recall; but there were
moans after school so
that I hated to go into
her bedroom; she final-
ly went to the hospital
and I never saw her


again.
The most-feared
type of breast cancer
killed 11 women in her
family, but the Hawaiian
had beaten it a year
before we met.
Champion-caliber
surfer and black belt in
karate...she could whip
me on her worst day.
She also kept her three
teenagers in line.
Double-mastectomy,
then.eventually recon-
struction. A full moon
that warm, sleepless
night in May, two lonely


people ignoring God's
rules. She asked me if I
could tell the differ-
ence...I told her no,
which was the truth. A
month later, more tests
in a southernly region.
"Terminal" said the 4:00
am text message. I could
see it in her eyes 15 min-
utes later when she
turned on the computer
webcam.
Off to the islands for
three weeks to surf and
say goodbye to a multi-
tude of aunts, uncles
and cousins. Prayers,


prayers and more
prayers...I asked God
not to let her three kids
experience what my
brother and I had
decades earlier. Then
stemcell treatment and
the miracle recovery.
Right into two weeks of
Katrina/Rita rescues
around New Orleans,
rapelling out of helicop-
tors down into the flood-
waters. She even called
me from one on a special
frequency She met
President Bush three
times at the decontami-


Slavery Raises Its Ugly Head In Americ

What transpired ment. that we now have, just beauorat will decide selves or challenge the
Sunday with the pas- First they took over wait. In that health care who gets a loan. Further government and the end
sage of the Health Care the auto industry and bill students will no more, the government result will be complete
Bill and the bailouts pre- financial industry and longer be able to go to will require you to have takeover of every aspect
viosly passed Congress now health care. If you the bank and get a loan, health care or face a of our lives and then it
has put the American think for one minute we they will have to go to fine. This bill provides will be too late and we
people in vertual slavery will be able to keep the the government for the IRS to hire 16,000 will be slaves to the gov-
to the federal govern- health care provider their loan and some more investigators to ernment. This is what


Jefferson County Historical Association


On behalf of the Jefferson County
Historical Association I want to thank
the County, City of Monticello, the
merchants, tour homeowners, and the
citizens of Jefferson County for their
part in helping to make our 2010 Tour
of Homes a great success. Over 200 out
of town visitors came to Monticello to
take part in our tour, and while here
they enjoyed the charm, beauty, and
hospitality of our town. Our tour
patrons were so impressed by the
pride our entire community takes in
our tour, and while here they enjoyed
the charm, beaty, and hospitality of
our town. Our tour patrons were so


THEME: MYTHICAL
CREATURES
ACROSS
1. Boy Scout's collectible
6. Fake tooth
9. *What a dragon does
with its wings
13. California oak
14. Be in debt
15. Mecca pilgrim
16. Broadcast in progress
17. Actress Thompson
18. Donor's bequest
19. *Oceanic temptress
21. Bank-related crime,
e.g.
23. Right-angle building
extension
24. Divulge, as in secrets
25. I have
28. Mariah Carey, e.g.?
30. line, runner's
goal
35. *A dragon breathes
fire out of its mouth or
this
37. Light and insubstan-
tial
39. Easily irritated


impressed by the pride our entire
community takes in our hsitorical
past; as shown by the preservation of
not only the Wirick-Simmons House,
but our original downtown, and all
the homes and sites graciously shown
on the tour. As we look at the same
familiar faces and quiet places, it is an
occasion like this that visitors are
able to remind us of what a unique
town Monticello really is, and Why we
choose to live in Jefferson County.

President, Jefferson County
Historical Association


40. Bart Simpson's sister
41. It surrounds an atoll
43. Snow ride
44. A rooster to farmers?
46. "Brothers & Sisters"
actor Rob
47. Territory, abbr.
48. Lie in wait
50. Margarine
52. Leaf beverage
53. *Sirens lured men to
their
55. Consumer electronics
maker
57. *Half man, half horse
61. *One-eyed giant
65. "Kick the bucket," e.g.
66. *King Kong, e.g.
68. Far beyond the norm
69. Cavern
70. Makes feathers stick
71. Disclose or reveal
72. Hops-drying kiln
73. Between E and NE
74. Figure of speech
DOWN
1. High school ball
2. First-rate
3. Type of ski lift


4. Weather in a location
averaged over time
5. Popular newspaper
name
6. *The Abominable
Snowman's favorite cli-
mate
7. "Shock and "
8. Inside an oyster?
9. Like prickly wire
10. U2 guitarist
11. Open
12. *Characteristic of
fairies and elves
15. *Tolkien's furry-foot-
ed creature
20. Relating to the ilium
22. A clod or goon
24. Bar fly's domain
25. *Kronos to Zeus' wife
Hera
26. There you are!
27. English homework?
29. Preceded violin fami-
ly
31. *The Phoenix burns
to death in this
32. Small island
33. Cubic meter
34. *Hercules' nine-head-
ed opponent
36. Jason Lee's TV char-
acter
38. A ship's small boat
42. Openly distrustful
45. Female title
49. Second person pro-
noun
51. Pertaining to magic
or witchcraft
54. Speak like Pericles
56. River in North
Germany
57. "Goodbye" to Sophia
Loren
58. Dame
59. Lice eggs
60. Civil wrong
61. Wrap up in cerecloth
62. Football great
Graham
63. Play object
64. Of sound mind
67. *Goat man


enforce these mandates
spelled out in this bill.
That is a scary thought.
It is illegal for the gov-
ernment to require us to
buy health insurance.
What happens when
the government can no
longer afford to keep up
with this and we can't
borrow more money.
Just look at California.
They are handing out
IOU's since they have no
money.
Next they will find a
way to confiscate your
guns and then we will be
helpless to defend our-


the liberals want is to
take over every aspect of
our lives and make us
dependents of the gov-
ernment so they can
redistribute the wealth.
It is sad when a citi-
zen can no longer trust
their government and
see nothing more than
corruption, lying and
stealing from our elect-
ed officials all for the
sake of power. What has
happened in the last
year is immoral when
they bankrupt our coun-
try and know that we
cannot pay back the debt


sudokeu
The objective of the game is to fill all the blank squares
in a game with the correct numbers.
There are three very simple constraints to follow.
In a 9 by 9 square Sudoku game:
Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9
in any order. Every column of 9 numbers must include all
digits 1 through 9 in any order. Every 3 by 3 subsection of
the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9.


3 6

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nation stations.
Then, my job loss
and move across the
country; her enrollment
in the fire academy,
graduation and promo-
tion from paramedic to
fireman. And I never
saw her again.
God bless all those
that fight to breathe, and
live, and heal, every day.
Keep them close. Amen.


6Aenf 9olJu1nd,
Monticello, FL




a Again

of trillions all ready
spent, it is not democrat
or republican issue but
american issue.
One congressman
stated that there are no
rules. We make them up
as we go along. Nancy
Pelosi stated that we
need to pass the bill and
then you will know what
is in it. I can assure that
congress did not read or
understand what they
were voting for. Then we
have those that stated
they would not vote for
this bill and then did.
Another lie.
Yes there needs to be
changes in our health,,
care but Tort Reform isf'
one chat should be: inl
any changes made.
There are some good
things in this bill. Why
hasn't the government
gone after those abusing
the system as we don't
need a bill to do that.
What this boils down to
is we as citizens are
becoming slaves to the
federal government.
Slavery is alive and well.
It is time to vote those in
office out and get rid of
socialism as it did not
work in Europe and it
will bankrupt this coun-
try What is happening
reminds me of Russia
and what their leaders
did to their people.
Are you beginnnig
to see what is happening
right before our eyes?
Our freedoms are
being taken from us and
it's happening faster
than you think.
Everyone needs to
get out and support good
honest leaders and vote.

[dwwaudL Uol&lkfan
~,i r


T he healthcare bill
I is like a frog in
hot water. It doesn't
know it's hot to begin
with because the water
is warm and the heat is
turned up gradually. By
the time the water is
hot the frog can't get
out and dies from the
heat of the hot water.
So we lose our freedom
in small ways when we
find out we've lost it,
it's too late. Beware of
the Trojan Horse it was
free until it came in the
gate and destroyed
them."


I I


1- 1- --- 11--







www. ecbpublishing. com


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Backyard Farm's Children's Gardening Workshop


Pnoios ouumiiiMu
The Friday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. workshop at Backyard Farm was filled quickly with 48 home-schooled children, for
the first Children's Gardening Workshop.


wae Receives ROTARY HONOR


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
During the Friday,
March 12 meeting of the
Monticello Rotary Club,
member Neil Wade
received the designation
of Paul Harris Fellow.
This prestigious title is
received when one
donates $1,000 to the
Rotary Foundation.
Rotary President
Mal Jopling made the
presentation to Neil, as
the members in atten-
dance recognized his
honor with applause.
The Rotary
Foundation is a regis-
tered charity that sup-
ports the efforts of


Photo Submitted


i.
-n -
,rrc~.J~*~n-~l~?s~r~~ r;A~W!i ~Y~~llub
I~
i
..~.:-. . ''


"K,


"Join me and become

a member of

a CHP Medicare

Advantage (HMO) Plan:'


SCapital Health
P L, A N
S r leindependentLcensed fthe .


Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARN MORE
about CHP.Advantage Plus (HMO)
and CHP Preferred Advantage (HMO).


Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
to RSVP or for more information.
(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare


Seminars will be held at the
Capital Health Plan Health Center located at
1491 Governor's Square Blvd.
at 10:00 a.m. on


Friday, April 9
Friday, April 23
Friday, May 14
Friday, May 28
Friday, June 11


Friday, June 25
Friday, July 9
Friday, July 23
Friday, August 13
Friday, August 27


Paid Endorsement. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare
contract. For accommodations of persons with special needs at sales
meetings, call the numbers above. A sales representative will be present
with information and applications. Benefits may change on January 1,
2011. H5938_2009_0909_104_090709


R o t a r y
International to achieve
world understanding
and peace through inter-
national humanitarian,
educational, and cultur-
al exchange programs. It
is supported solely by
voluntary contributions
from Rotarians and
friends of the
Foundation who share
its vision of a better
world.
For more informa-
tion about this active
service organization
contact Jopling at 251-
6463.


CELEBRATE
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Girl Scout troops and
other community partners
will showcase the ways
they are making a positive
impact on the community
during Earth Day,
Saturday, April 24.
The girls will partici-
pate in special "Take
Action" projects 9 a.m. to
12 p.m. at Lake Jackson
Mounds State Park. By
participating, the girls can
earn a special "Girl Scouts
Forever Green Patch."
Feel free to pack a pic-
nic and enjoy the park
after the event ends.
Families are most wel-
come to help celebrate


Free "How To Grow A
Vegetable Garden"
Sessions For County
Residents
The Jefferson County Extension
Office and North Florida
Community College's Green
Industries Institute are partnering to
offer Jefferson County residents ses-
sions on "How to Grow a Vegetable
Garden". Five FREE one-hour class-
es will be offered on Wednesdays at 3
p.m. beginning April 7; with training
held at both the Jefferson County
Extension Office and at Green
Industries Institute in Monticello.
Topics are: Soils on April 7:
Vegetables on April 14: Integrated
Pest Management on April 21;
Composing & H20 on May 5: and
Freezing & Canning on May 12.
Classes will include professional
instruction and hands-on demonstra-
tions. Contact Green Industries at
(850) 973-1702 to reserve yowu spot.
For more information contact
Patricia Garnet; Director of NFCC's
Green Industries Institute. at (850)
973-1702 or garnerpu)'nfcc.edu.


EARTH DAY
Earth Day with Girl Scouts
from around the Florida
Panhandle area. This
event is free for all partici-
p :a n t s
Contact Vicki Adams
at vadams(agscfp.org, or
386-2131) to register for this
event.

GIRL
SCOUT
SUMMER
CAMP
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Summer camp is
quickly approaching, and
the Girl Scout Council of
the Florida Panhandle is
still looking for seasonal
camp staff.
Camp Directors, Health
Nurses, Counselors, Arts
and Crafts Directors,
Lifeguards, Kitchen Staff,
and Kitchen Directors are
positions that will need to
be filled.
Girl Scout Camps
include Camp For All
Seasons in Tallahassee,
Camp Kolomoki in
DeFuniak Springs, and
Camp Kugelman in
Lillian, Alabama. Anyone
interested should contact
Chris Owens at 850-873-
3999, or toll free 1-888-271-
8778.
Girl Scouting is fun,
and builds girls of
courage, confidence, and
character, who make the
world a better place.
Join Junior Troop 150,
girl's ages 8 to 12, from 10
a.m. to 12 p.m. on the first
and third Saturday of
each month at the
Greenville United
Methodist Church to learn
more about Girl Scouts.
For more information
contact co-leaders Janice
and Sean Carson at 948-
6901 or contact the Girl
Scout Council of the
Florida Panhandle, at 386-
2131.


THESaX Capital Health Plan Presents:
-' 7I R A series of lunch and learn programs
Sfor older adults. OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
T, hrsd4afy, ril1.5,5at1f2:00.pm
S. .. .: .MonticelloOpera:i house '
s185Wsi Washington Street Monticelld -

High Risk Medications
in Ihe Senior Population



Hosted by: Presented by:
Anna Johnson Riedel April Johnston, PharmD

C 'itataleh .There i-n,'charge;,tbr. gyr),,o:urn d .!:
Ifl! J ,.t.. ..: '.3 rinor wl1e.prov .l.6.To s/ple^
I.t9Y W a.. '523-7333 or go Toww. pitalhealth.com.'.

Capital Health Plan isa health plan with a Medicare contract Information will be available
on CHP Advantage Plus (HMO) & (HP Preferred Advantage (HMO). If you have questions or
for accommodations for persons with special needs, please call Medicare Sales Department
seven days a week, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY 850-


---


383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).


Wednesday, April 7, 2010


4A Monticello News


H5938 DP 2010_058_021010 .









Wednesday, April 7, 2010


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


JEFFERSON


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


i0NNUN IM1


tALgN0AZ


APRIL 8, 22
Altrusa meets at noon on
the second and fourth
Thursday of each month
for a meal and a meeting.
Contact the Chamber at
997-5552 for more informa-
tion.
APRIL 8
Founder's Garden Circle
meets at noon on the sec-
ond Thursday of the
month. Contact Suzanne
Peary at 997-4043 for meet-
ing location and for more
information.
APRIL 8
The Jefferson Soil and
Water Conservation Board
will meet 11:30 a.m. on the
second Thursday of the
month in the Jefferson
County Extension Office
conference room. Dorothy
P. Lewis, secre-
tary/treasurer, reports the
meeting is open to the pub-
lic.
APRIL 8
Cub Scout Pack 808 will
meet weekly 7 to 8 p.m. on
Thursday at The Eagle's
Nest on South Water
Street. For more informa-
tion contact Cub Master
Greg Wynot at 997-5366.
APRIL 8
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. on Thursday at the
Christ Episcopal Church
'annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129 or 997-
1955.
APRIL 9
Rotary meets 12 p.m. every
Friday at the Chamber for
lunch and a meeting with
a program and speaker.
Contact. the Chamber at
997-5552 for more informa-
tion., ;
APRIL 10


Jefferson SHARE registra-
tion 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Saturday at Central
Baptist Church in Aucilla,
on Tindell Road, and at the
Jefferson County Public
Library on South Water
Street. The cost of the
basic food package is $18.
Contact Martha Creel at
445-9061 or Leslie Blank at
556-5412 for more informa-
tion. A volunteer is some-
one who is paid with a
smile and a thank you!
APRIL 10
Red Hats will meet at 11:30
a.m. on the second
Saturday at the Chamber
of Commerce for a light
lunch and fellowship.
Contact Edee Johnson at
728-0161 or Dorris Uptain
at 997-7774 for more infor-
mation.
APRIL 11
Sunday of Silence is held
every second Sunday of
the month at One Heart
Earth Center, 450 West
Madison Street in
Monticello. This is a non-
denominational time of
stillness and reflection;
"Be still and know that I
AM God." Psalm 46:10
This is a time and place to
be in prayeiful contempla-
tion, silence, and stillness.
It can be a time for read-
ing, journaling, and reflec-
tion. A meditation room,
sun porch, gardens, and
Labyrinth await you. You
are invited to come at any
time between the hours of
7 a.m. and 3 p.m. before
church, after church, stay
a little while or stay all day
Gentle Hatha yoga stretch-
es are held at 10 a.m. under
the instruction Joy Moore.
Yogaimats are provided. A


: ; ,










is celebrating his first birthday '',
^ Thursday April 8, 2010. He is the
son of Opal Hall and the grandson "
of Gwynne Seabrooks and Steve and' b
SPatricia Hall, all of Monticello. He
w. ill celebrate his birthday at Chuck- I
-- E-Cheese with family and friends. :


a ad0


simple vegetarian meal is
served and eaten in silence
at noon. This is a quiet
time, away from the busy-
ness of the daily schedule,
a time to be alone, to
immerse yourself in the
stillness is to renew your
whole being. Call Sallie
Worley at 997-7373 for
more information.
APRIL 12
Big Bend Horseman's
Club will meet 7 p.m. on
,the second Monday at
Green Industris Institute
for a brief program and
meeting. This is an open
horse club for.all breeds,
everyone welcome.
C o n t a c t
www.bigbendhorse.com
for more information.
APRIL 12, 26
Masonic Lodge #5 meets
6:30 p.m. for a light meal
and 7:30 p.m. for a meeting
and program on the sec-
ond and fourth Monday of
the 'month at the Hiram
Masonic Lodge, 235 Olive
Street in Monticello.
Contact Roy Faglie at 933-
2938 for more information.
APRIL 13
American Legion Post 49
and Ladies Auxiliary will
meet 6:30 p.m. on the sec-
ond Tuesday for a busi-
ness meeting and a pro-
gram at the Otto Walker
Post on South Water
Street. Contact
Commander Buddy
Westbrook at 997-2973 or
Adjutant Ron Slik at 997-
8103 for more information.
(APRIL 13
The Monticello Phlockers
meet at 6 p.m. on the sec-
ond Tuesday of eaph
month at The Brick Hoitse
Eatery for discussion
about upcoming events
and fundraisers, and to lis-
ten to some great Jimmy
Buffett tunes. For more
information about this
new club contact Wilfong
at 545-2821.
APRIL 13
Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of
Commerce General
Membership Meeting is
held at noon on the second
Tuesday of each month.
The meeting includes
lunch and a program.
Contact Director Mary


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee will
meet at 9:00 a.m.
April 14, 2010,
at the Jefferson
County Road Dept,
1484 South
Jefferson Street.


You Can Be A Healthcare Hero!



Find Out How At

Archbold's Healthcare

Career Night.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010
6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. (drop in)
Williams Auditorium
(East Tower Ground Floor at Archbold Memorial Hospita)
Call 228-2795 or 227-5047 for more information.

Speak to : r,- *:.' v .-; from all areas of Il,: j.:ro .. .-
Fi:nd out what colleges and universities are available in this area


and about scholarship (ippo. rti.ii.-_
Register for door prizes.


ARCHBOLD
MEMORIAL HOSPITAl
S Cor.Commianent C-omunity.


Frances Gramling at mon-
ticellojeffersonfl.com or
997-5552.
APRIL 14
Mignonette Garden Circle
meets at noon on the sec-
ond Wednesday of the
month for a meeting and
program. Contact Jan
Wadsworth at 997-4440 for
meeting location and for
more information.
APRIL 15
The Savvy Seniof monthly
outreach program, spon-
sored by Capital. Health
Plan, will begin at noon on
the third Thursday at the
Monticello Opera House.
This free monthly pro-
gram is for older adults
who want to learn more
about creating and main-
taining healthy, happy,-
and active lifestyles. Bring
a bag lunch. For more
information about this
program and to make
reservations call 850-523-
7333. Some things get bet-
ter with age.
APRIL 15
You may qualify for assis-
tance from Capital Area
Community Action
Agency Call Pat Hall or
Melissa Watson at 997-8231
for additional informa-
tion. They can tell you
what services are current-
ly being provided. CACAA
will be working 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. on the third
Thursday at the First
Baptist Church of Lloyd.
APRIL 15
The Tallahassee
Automobile Museum will
offer "Florida History" 5
to 8 p.m. on the third
Thursday of each month.
Call 942-0137 for more
information and direc-


tions.
APRIL 15-17
3rd Annual Southern
Music Rising festival, fea-
turing bluegrass and folk
music. Times, cost, and
schedule TBA. For reser-
vations or information on
these events, call the
Monticello Opera House
at 997-4242.
APRIL 17
Road CRU Car Club meets


5 p.m. every third
Saturday on North Cherry
Street in front of the Rare
Door restaurant, in down-
town Monticello. There
will be a 50/50 drawing
and lots of door prizes.
Everyone is welcome to
join the activities and see
some awesome cars.
Contact Ray Foskey at 997-
0607 for more informa-
tion.


SO I






i. '.:N9C H..eal, tHome
THE PRESCRIPTION OR Health


SFree Delivery For
Prescriptions
| Jackson's Drug Store
166 E. Dogwood
M Monticello
, 850-997-3553
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Gifts

Medication
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.-.jddlh- CtLASSIC ROCK.-


Ku II utuJannicr--. Drmurrl Lake City Reporter hioFloribaimtes-Union

Artists subject to change without notice. Show goes on rain or shine.
Taxes and processing are included in the ticket prices. Camping available.
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6A Monticello News


OUND


www.ecbpublishing. com


JEFFERSON


Wednesday, April 7, 2010


COUNTY


Applications


Cont. From Page 1 Director


Cont. From Page 1


the application, or they can email All applications
The applications are Lauren Burnette at must be turned in to the
available at the LittleKingandQueen@g Chamber of Commerce
Chamber of Commerce mail.com. by Friday April 23.


Water Sewer Rate Cont. From Page 1


$321,000, leaving an
expected shortfall of
about $3000.
He proposed that
the city set an annual
target of $350,000 for the
water operation under
the new rate structure.
For the sewer opera-
tion, Love pointed out
that the projected rev-
enues for the current
year are $587,000, versus
projected expenditures
of $793,000, leaving an
expected shortfall of
$206,000.
He proposed that
the city set an annual
target of $1 million for
the sewer operation. To
arrive at the $1 million
figure, Love calculated
the $793,000 that it
would take to make the
sewer operation self-
sustaining, and- added
an expected annual debt
service of $237,000 for
the loan that the city
will have to take out to
build a new wastewater
treatment plant.
Love next discussed
the two components of
the rate structure, one
being fixed and the
bther variable. He noted
that the current rate
structure was skewed
strongly toward he fixed
model, especially in the
sewer operation. He rec-
ommended that the city
move toward the vari-
able model, which
would result in cus-
tomers paying for actu-
al water use. Such a rate
structure would not
only encourage conser-
vation, it would also
lower the bills of cur-
rent customers who are
low water consumers,
Love said.
At the same time,
the variable model
would retain a mini-
mum fixed component
to discourage abuse of
the system or the main-
taining of abandoned
meters, he said.
The negative to the
variable model, Love
cautioned, was that cur-
rent high users of water
would experience major
increases in their water
and sewer charges,
especially if the sewer
charge was tied to water
use, rather than being a
fixed rate as it presently
is.
Too, customers with
large water leaks would
likewise experience sig-
nificant increases in
their water and sewer
bills, unless they
expended the necessary
money to repair the
plumbing problems, he
said. Equally impor-
tant, the variable model
would require that the


Crash

ment, using approxi-
mately 5,000 gallons of
water to control and
extinguish. the fire. The
Florida Division of
Forestry was also on
scene to assist with the
grass fire.
Fire Rescue reported
that the three occupants
were found inside by fire-
fighters and removed
after the fire was con-
trolled.
Sheriff David Hobbs


city acquire, strictly
accurate water usage
measurements.
Meaning that city crews
would have to regularly
monitor and maintain
all meters to ensure that
they were working
properly and recording
accurately.
Love emphasized
that his analysis was
based on real usage
data, derived from city
customers during
January 2010. He fur-
ther offered that the
proposed sewer rates
for sewer-only cus-
tomers were based on
assumed water usages
of 500 cubic feet per
month; that customers
outside the city would
be charged a 25 percent
premium over cus-
tomers inside the city;
and that no differential
were made in the pro-
posed sewer rates for
classes of customers.
That said, Love pro-
posed a monthly base
rate of $5 for water, plus
$1.20 for every 100 cubic
feet of water used. The
current water rate is
$12.50 monthly, plus
minimal incremental
increases for water
usage above a base
level.
"At 800 cubic feet,
the proposed rate
begins to do its thing,"
Love said, pointing to a
set of graphs that he
projected on a screen.
"So that the guy using
4,000 cubic feet in his
residence is now paying
nearly $500 monthly"
Love next discussed
making the sewer rate
- currently a flat $26.50
monthly regardless of
usage more realistic
by making it a variable
and tying it to water
usage. Part of the calcu-
lations, he explained,
involved dropping the'
targeted goal from $1
million to $900,000.
Love then offered
various scenarios for
the sewer rate. One
involved charging a
monthly flat fee of $13,
plus 2.4 times whatever
the water bill for the
particular month.
Another would charge a
flat $13 monthly, plus
$3.50 for every 100 cubic
feet of water used (tak-
ing out the water bill);
and a third involved
charging a monthly flat
fee of $18, plus $3 for
every 100 cubic feet of
water used.
Love calculated
that all three options
would produce about
$900,000 annually; but
he conceded that the
$18 carried a bigger


emotional wallop than
the $13.
"Emotionally, $13
sounds a lot better
than $18," Love said.
Councilman Tom
Vogelgesang had con-
cerns relative to the
$13 and $18 rates. He
worried that 0 by
embracing the $13
rate, the city might be
overly depending on
revenue projections
from the 61 customers
who currently use
above 4,000 cubic feet
of water monthly (the
great majority of city
residents use around
400 cubic feet month-
ly). Suppose that these
61 customers drasti-
cally reduced their
water rates, what then
would become of the
revenue projections?
Vogelgesang asked.
"If we base our
rates on the high users
and they repair their
leaks or conserve on
their water use, we're
in trouble," he said.
Vogelgesang said
he particularly had in
mind the chicken fac-
tory in Madison. When
that processing facili-
ty went away,
"Madison took a big
hit", he said.
Love agreed that
the $18 base rate would
better insulate the city
from revenue fluctua-
tions; he also strongly
pointed out, however,
that it would penalize
the lower water user
and poorer people.
Besides, there was a
built-in 10 percent
buffer in the water and
sewer rates, he said,
adding that he didn't
expect that people
would cut their water
use by more than 10
percent, regardless of
the circumstances.
Still, Vogelgesang
argued, his priority
was for hitting the
budget numbers.
"I say we go with
the $18 base and then
we reevaluate it later
and maybe lower it to
$13," he said.
The way the work-
shop discussion
ended, the consensus
appeared to be to
impose a $5 base rate
for water and an $18
base rate for sewer,
with additional cost
increments to be
added, depending on
the cubic feet of water
usage. All this could
change, however,
depending on the pres-
sure that citizens may
exert at the coming
public hearings.


Cont. From Page 1


reported that about one
to one and a half hours
following the crash, traf-
fic was allowed to slowly
travel the inside lane of
the Interstate and one of
the entrance ramps at
US-19 was opened and
traffic allowed to slowly
merge into traffic on 1-10,
to prevent any kind of
traffic bottleneck.
Firefighters
remained on scene until
10:05 p.m.


According to WPSD-
TV of Paducah, KY, the
three victims were on
their way home from
Florida, where the group
had just spent a week vis-
iting friends in Naples
Also assisting FHP
at the scene were
Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office deputies,
Jefferson County Fire
Rescue, Jefferson
County EMS and
Transfield.


that Brooks be the
choice, he said.
"I think we've got on
staff a very qualified
employee who has been
three years with us,"
Schleicher said. "I think
she is our best choice for
the library director. That
would be my recommen-
dation."
Immediately upon
which statement Boyd
moved to name Brooks
the director and Joyner
seconded the motion,
will all commissioners
voting: unreservedly for
the choice.
It was also the
board's decision, to
which Brooks reported-
ly had consented to dur-
ing the interview, that
she will serve as both
the children's librarian
and the director, at least
until such a time as the
funding situation is clar-
ified and the commis-
sion can possibly hire
another children's
librarian.
That's because the
local library depends in
great part on state fund-
ing, and lawmakers dur-
ing the current session
have proposed cutting
state funding to
libraries to zero. The
lawmakers have report-
edly restored some of
the funding since that


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early proposal, but the
situation remains fluid
and local officials won't
know how the funding
will ultimately turn out
until the session con-
cludes.
It's all to say that
Brooks is taking'over as
director at a difficult


time. But officials
appear confident that
she is an extremely
capable person who is
coming to the position
with extensive and well-
rounded background in
the field, including a
master's in library sci-
ence.


Expertise


Who is your favorite U.S. president?


George Washington 5%



Abraham Lincoln 5%



Ronald Reagan 53%



Barack Obama 26%



Other 11%




Please visit www.ecbpublishing.com

to vote on the Question of the Week


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attorney, you don't choose just anyone. You choose a
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and go with us, the pros you can trust?

We know how important your business is to you, and
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ly and conduct all of the research necessary to get
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Monticello News

180 West Washington Street

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Wednesday, April 7, 2010


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


SEFFERSON


Monticello News 7A


COUNTY


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Photos Submitted By Neil Graves
Gracing the front porch of the Wirick-Simmons house during the biennial Tour of Homes are the Southern Bells of Monticello. Pictured left to right: Tori Self, Lisa Kisamore,
Taryn Copeland, Sarah Sorensen, Kaitlin Jackson. Pamela Watt, Julie Ann Schwab, Gaige Winchester, Elizabeth Riley, and Katherine Hogg March 20, 2010.
...w ^ ^..... .... ....... .. .... .. ..-- jj j n n ................. .. ..... ...... rfffifrt ]


DEBBIE SNAPP including the old cemetery;
Monticello News as well as a garden party
Staff Writer with food and music at the
The Monticello 2010 Wirick-Simmons House,
Homes & Heritage Tour and a show of antique auto-
held on Saturday, March 20 mobiles.
brought in well over 250 vis- The tour included
itors from out-of-town, and Elizabeth's Cottage on East
several local residents Pearl Street, the Bird-Crew
attending the evening gar- House on East Pearl
den party. Participants were Street, the Simpson-Dam
treated to a wider selection House on East Pearl Street,
of sites this year. The tour the J.M. Henry House
included 10 gracious pri- on High Street, the
vate homes, three historical Dilworth-Barnhill House on
bed & breakfasts, and five East Washington Street, the
distinctive places of inter- Simkins-Kirkpatrick House
est in the historical district, o n
.

M* r w T f i *i
Ja~~f^ U) -a E .,'e^B^h k


East Washington Street, the
Girardeau-Dunn House on
East Washington Street and
The Avenue of Oaks on
East Dogwood Street, the
Cook-Malloy- Anderson
House on East Pearl Street,
and the Das Kliene Dorf
"The Little Bavarian
Village," South Main
Avenue.
The Bed & Breakfasts
will include the Avera-
Clarke House (Gretchen
and Troy Avera,) West,
Washington Street, John
Denham House (Pat and
Greg Inmon,) West Palmer


Mill Road, and The Cottage
(Martha and JM
Cravanzola,) West Palmer
Mill Road.
S Public buildings on the
tour will include Christ
Episcopal Church, North
Cherry Street, Monticello
Opera House, West
Washington Street, Palmer
House Antiques, South
Jefferson Street, Jefferson
Arts Center, West
Washington Street,
Jefferson Public Library,
South Water Street, and the
Wirick-Simmons
House (Jefferson County


Historical Association,)
North Jefferson Street,
Local businesses
stayed open during the
tour, offering even more
variety for the visitors as
they enjoyed a bit of the
"old south" stately homes
and buildings, beautiful
gardens, and lovely trees.
Young ladies dressed in
antebellum style graced the
tour stops.
This biennial
Monticello Toir of Homes
was given for the benefit of
the Jefferson County
Historical Association.


which sponsors projects
and events highlighting the
rich heritage of Jefferson
County For more informa-
tion call 850-997-5007 or go
to jcha1827.com
Jefferson County was
officially established in
1827, and named for
Thomas Jefferson. This
keystone county extends
from the Florida-Georgia
Line to the Gulf of Mexico.
While Florida was still a
territory of the United
States, Monticello was the
name given to this county
seat.








8A Monticello News


www. ecbpu blishing. com


Wednesday, April 7, 2010


F-ET AGE




Pet Loss Support ownerhis
S-a-.-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
When a beloved pet
dies, many people are
surprised by the intensi-
ty of their grief. For
many people, pets are
considered part of their
family, so intense grief is
normal and understand-
able.
Although grieving is
normal after the death of
a pet, it may be difficult
or even embarrassing to
describe how you are feel-
ing to someone else. Big
Bend Hospice (BBH) is
now offering grief sup-
port to those who are
grieving the loss of a pet.
The "Coping With
Pet Loss" program will.
offer adults who have
experienced the death of


an animal companion a
safe and supportive envi-
ronment to learn healthy
ways to cope with their
loss. The first meeting
will be held 6:00 to 7:30
p.m. Thursday, April 15,
at the Big Bend Hospice
Counseling and Referral
Center, 1669 Mahan
Center Boulevard in


-A, '^""M,.. :J,


Tallahassee.
All meetings are free
and confidential but
donations are gratefully
accepted. 'We see this as
a need in the communi-
ty," said Diane Tomasi,
community relation's
director of BBH. "Often
the death of a pet can
trigger strong grief reac-


tions and there have
been few places to go
where you can be with
other pet lovers who
have had the same expe-
rience and understand
how you are feeling. We
have expertise in grief
and loss so this new sup-
port service seems to be a
natural extension of our
community programs."
Coping With .Pet
Loss sessions will be
held quarterly with
future sessions sched-
uled for August 5 and
November 11. Written
materials are also avail-
able to help parents and
guardians talk to their
children about the death
of a pet.
For more informa-
tion contact Laurie
Ward at 850-878-5310.


Eas Duu Dano l Tu Pels
As many of you residents Easter danger to dogs is toxicity 1. Chocolate can be toxic in
come together with family and from Easter Lily ingestion. Eating large amounts especially the bak-.
friends to celebrate Easter there Easter Lilies can cause kidney fail- ing chocolate. Even small amounts
will be lots of good food, chocolate ure and be fatal (it is more danger- can cause nausea and vomiting in
bunnies, Easter eggs and many ous to cats but can also affect dogs). some dogs.
other festive decorations. .So keep your dogs (and especially 2. Another dangerous item in
Did you know that there is a your cats away) from Easter Lilies, the Easter basket is the plastic
traditional Easter decoration that There are a couple of other grass. The grass is not digestible
can be very dangerous to both dogs Easter dangers that you should be and can cause a gastrointestinal
and cats? aware of: chocolate and the plastic "obstruction" that can be life-
Weil there is. The biggest grass in the Easter basket. threatening.


ASPCA Te

In House I
We all know that pet
overpopulation causes
needless animal pain
and suffering. Homeless
animals are forced to live
in fear and scrounge for
food and water, do not
receive medical care,
and almost always lead
short, difficult lives.
Florida's shelters are
inundated with too many
animals to adopt out,
and euthanasia rates are
higher than any of us
can tolerate. Part of the
solutiofi to this problem
is to increase spay and
neuter efforts statewide.
Now pending in the
Florida General
Assembly, Senate Bill
2372 and House Bill 1221
would allow counties to
raise the surcharge
(from $5 to $15) they
impose on those who
violate local animal con-
trol ordinances. This
additional money would


IIs Of Bills

knd Senate
be used by counties to
finance their
spay/neuter efforts.
By reducing the
number of accidental lit-
ters born in Florida, we
will prevent animal suf-
fering as well as lessen
the financial burden on
the state's public and
private animal shelters.
The best part is that this
is not a tax, so it will not
take money out of your
pockets or the state's
budget!
What You Can.Do:
Please urge your
elected officials to sup-
port SB 2372 and HB 1221
and move them quickly
through the legislative
process. Visit the
ASPCA Advocacy
Center today to email
your state senator and
representative.
Thank you for sup-
porting the ASPCA and
Florida's animals.


c _0 STRPS









Wednesday, April 7, 2010


www.ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 9A


O\ANEY & FINANCEE




Financial Aid For Special Needs Children


By Jason Alderman
Raising a family is chal-
lenging, even under the
best circumstances. For
those with special needs
children, however, the
emotional and financial
- stakes are raised dra-
matically. Medical bills
and specialized care often
far outweigh normal
costs.
Fortunately, many
government programs
and community resources
are available to help
relieve the financial bur-
den of parenting special
needs children. But eligi-
bility criteria can be com-
plicated and the applica-
tion process time-consum-
ing. Here are a few helpful
resources:


Through the Social
Security Administration,
the government provides
two types of disability
coverage: Supplemental
Security Income (SSI) and
Social Security Disability
Income (SSDI). Rules and
eligibility requirements
differ between the two
programs and benefits
differ for children and
adults.
In a nutshell, SSI is a
needs-based, cash-assis-
tance program (like wel-
fare) for disabled people of
any age in low-income
families with limited
resources. Children
under 18 (under 22 if
attending, school) qualify
for SSI benefits if their
disability meets these cri-


teria:
Physical or mental
conditions so severe they
result in marked and
severe functional limita-
tions; and Can be expect-
ed to result in death; or
Has lasted or can be
expected to last for at least
12 continuous months.
Under age 18, income
and resources for both the
child and other family
members living in the
household are considered
when determining SSI eli-
gibility; however, after
age 18 only the child's
resources are considered.
Also after age 18, the adult
definition of disability
applies: It must result in
the inability to do any
substantial gainful activi-


ty, such as work for pay.
SSI payment amounts
vary by state, since some
states supplement federal
payments. And, in most
states, children receiving
SSI also qualify for
Medicaid to help pay med-
ical bills.
SSDI is a separate
program funded by pay-
roll deductions (FICA).
Although children some-
times receive SSDI pay-
ments if their parents are
disabled, eligibility is
based on their parents'
disability status, not their
own. However, after turn-
ing 22, children who were
already disabled niay
qualify for SSDI on their
own if at least one parent:
Is already receiving
Social Security retire-
ment or disability bene-
fits; or Died and worked


long enough to qualify for
Social Security (i.e., paid
into the system during
working years usually at
least 10 years).
Eligibility rules and
definitions for SSI and
SSDI are very complex.
Call Social Security
directly at 1-800-772-1213,
or visit their website at
www.socialsecurity.gov
and search under the
Disability tab. One partic-
ularly helpful resource is
"Benefits for Children
with Disabilities,"
Publication No. 05-10026.
To learn more about
Medicaid, vis-
itwww.cms.hhs.gov/home
/medicaid.asp.
'Fortunately, most dis-
eases and genetic disor-
ders have robust support
groups and research
organizations that can


help. A good place to start
your search is the
Alliance of Genetic
Support Groups at
www.geneticalliance.org.
One last considera-
tion: When planning for
their disabled child's long-
term financial security,
many people leave money
directly to their child or
name him or her a benefi-
ciary. This sometimes
backfires, since it may
disqualify the child from
receiving future govern-
ment benefits and servic-
es, which often impose
strict personal asset lim-
its.
Always consult an
attorney or estate-plan-
ning professional to
ensure that you have set
up the proper legal docu-
ments to protect your
child's financial future.


located at
www.edwardjones.com,
and its recruiting Web site
is www.careers. edward-
jones.com. Member SIPC.
Edward Jones, its
associates and Financial
Advisors do not provide
tax or legal advice.
Consult with your tax
advisor before converting
from a traditional IRA to
a Roth.


The income restric-
tions have been lifted for
individual investors look-
ing to convert their
traditional individual
retirement accounts
(IRAs) to Roth IRAs,
according to Edward
Jones financial advisors
in the local community.
Previously, investors
with an adjusted gross
income of more than
$100,000 (filing individual-
ly or jointly) could not
convert to 'a Roth IRA
from a traditional IRA.
Investors who own a
traditional IRA make con-
tributions that may be
tax-deductible, depending
on their income levels.
Traditional IRA earnings
grow on a tax-deferred
basis.
This means your
money has the opportuni-
ty to grow faster than it
would if it were placed in
an investment on which
you paid taxes every year.
On the other hand,
Roth IRA contributions
are not tax-deductible, but
earnings grow tax free, as
long as the investor holds
the account at least five
years and doesn't start
taking withdrawals until
at least age 59-1/2.
Investors have more
flexibility and freedom
when it comes to taking
.withdrawals from a Roth
IRA, the financial advi-
sors say.
Unlike a traditional
IRA, a Roth IRA does not
require distributions
when one reaches 70-1/2.
Investors will have to
pay taxes when they con-
vert to a Roth IRA. A
conversion is usually
reported as income for
the tax year the conver-
sion takes place. However,
in 2010 only, your conver-
sion amount will be split
and reported as income
for tax years 2011 and 2012
unless you elect to report
the entire conversion
amount on your 2010
taxes.
Whether or not
investors decide to con-
vert to a Roth IRA, they
should first consult with
their tax advisors.
For more information
about Edward Jones,
please contact: '
Robert Davison,
Edward Jones in
Monticello, 850-997-2572
Bradley Bashaw, Edward
Jones in Madison, 850-
973-8334
About Edward Jones
Edward Jones pro-
vides financial services
for individual investors in
the United States and,
through its affiliate, in
Canada. Every aspect of
the firm's business, from
the types of investment
options offered to the
location of branch offices,
is designed to cater to
individual investors in
the communities in
which they live and work.
The firm's 12,000-plus
financial advisors work
directly with nearly 7 mil-
lion clients to understand
their personal goals --
from college savings to
retirement -- and create
long-term investment
solutions that emphasize
a well-balanced portfolio
and a buy-and-hold strate-
gy. Edward Jones
embraces the importance


of building long-term,
face-to-face relationships
with clients, helping them
to understand and make
sense of the investment
options available today.
Edward Jones, which
ranked No. 2 on FOR-
TUNE magazine's "100
Best Companies to Work
For 2010," is headquar-
tered in St. Louis. The
Edward Jones Web site is


NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR ROTH IRA CONVERSION,

ACCORDING TO EDWARD JONES FINANCIAL ADVISORS


Time for "Spring Cleaning"


of Your Investments?

Provided by Robert J. Davison
Spring is here time to spruce up your house, get
rid of clutter and get things organized. But this year, go be-
yond your home and yard when you do your spring clean-
ing and look for ways to rejuvenate your investment
portfolio.
Of course, you don't have to take an "out with the
old, in with the new" approach just for the sake of chang-
ing things up. But to consistently make progress toward
your financial goals, you may need to make adjustments in
response to changes in the financial markets,; the econ-
omy and your personal situation. And springtime is as
good a time as any to take a fresh look at your investment
situation. So consider these suggestions:
* Dispose of things that aren't working. Whether it's a
burnt-out computer, a non-vacuuming vacuum cleaner
or a treadmill that lost its grip back when "the Web"
was reserved for spiders, we all own things that are no
longer useful. And the same may be true of some of your
investments. If one hasn't performed the way you had
hoped, and you've given it adequate time, you may be
better off by replacing it and using the proceeds to pur-
chase another investment.
* Get rid of duplicates. If you went through everything
in your house, you might find several items that do the
same thing. Do you really need two toaster ovens? And
how many radios can you listen to at one time? If you
looked at your investment portfolio in this same way,
you might be surprised to find some redundancies. For
example, do you own several stocks issued by similar
companies that make similar products? This might not
be a problem when the stock market is booming, but it
could be a definite concern if a downturn affects the in-
dustry to which these companies belong. Always look
for ways to diversify your holdings. While diversifica-
tion, by itself, can't guarantee profits or protect against
loss, it can help you reduce the effects of volatility.
* Put things back ir order. Over time, and inadvertently,.
the spaces in your home can get "out of balance." Per-
haps you have too many chairs in one comer, your flat-
screen television is crowding out your family pictures, or
your new desk takes up too much space in your home
office. With some rearranging, however, you can usu-
ally get things back in order. And the same need for re-
arrangement may apply to your portfolio, which might
have become unbalanced with too much of one invest-
ment and too little of another. This situation could un-
dermine your financial strategy, especially if the
imbalance means you are taking on too much risk or,
conversely, if your holdings have become too conserva-
tive to provide the growth you need. So look for ways
to restore your portfolio to its proper balance one
that reflects your risk tolerance, time horizon and long-
term goals.when prices are down and you can avoid
complacency when things are going well. You can struc-
ture your investment portfolio to meet your needs and
you can make changes when necessary. By believing in
your ability to succeed, you will free yourself to act in
your best interests.
By giving your portfolio an annual spring cleaning,
you can help make sure it reflects your current needs and
is positioned to help you make progress toward your key
financial objectives. And you won't even have to get near
the dust cloths or furniture polish.
Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense of Investing
MEMBER SIPC


Ic








10A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. com


Wednesday, April 7, 2010


HURCH


325 West Washington Street
Monticello 997-2349
Dr. Rick Kelley, Pastor
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study..............6:30 PM
Children's Church Ages 4-6....11:30 AM
-Nursery for all services-



SCR 149- 7 miles North of US 19 1 mile South of FL/GA Line
Boston, Monticello Road
850-997-1596
Pastor Harold Reams
Sunday Bible Study..........................o:oo AM
Sunday Worship................................ :oo AM
Sunday Evening................................ 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Bible & Prayer Meeting....................... 7:00 PM



14492 Waukeenah Hwy/ P.O. Box 411
Wacissa 997-2179 or 997-1769
Pastor James Gamble
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning.........................10:55 AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............................6:30 PM
Youth Group................................6:oo PM
Choir Practice...............................7:30 PM




7150 Apalachee Pkwy Tallahassee
www.chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick Burrus 850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash 850-459-6490
Sunday School.........................10:oo AM
Sunday Worship........................ 11:0o AM
Children's Chapel........................:oo'AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Evening...................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students


US 19 N 1590 N. Jefferson Street
Rev. Timothy Hildreth 997-3906
1285 Magnolia Ave.
Debra@monticellonaz@gmail.com
Sunday School.................................. 9:45 AM
Morning Worship...........................10:45 AM
Wednesday Evening
Supper...................................................5:30 PM
Small Group Breakout...................6:30 PM
Bible Study & Prayer Meeting............6:30 PM
Saturday
Spanish Church Services................7:30 PM



4124 Bassett Dairy Rd Monticello 997-8444
Email: ebcmonticello@hcsmail.com
Dr Dean Spivey, Pastor
Student Pastor, Don Self
Sunday: Bible Study................... 9:45 AM
Worship Service..........................11:oo AM
Choir Practice............................... 6:00 PM
Worship Service...........................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Children/Student Ministry..........3:30 PM
'Senior Adult Choir Practice...........7:oo PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends & Youth.6:oo PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...........6:o0 PM



425 Cherry Street Monticello 997-4116
Father Mal Jopling
Sunday Morning..................... 8:30 AM
Sunday Service.........................11:oo AM



1565 East Washington Street
Monticello 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 90)
Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
Sunday Mass.............................11:oo AM
Wed. followed by Novena............7:00 PM
1st & 3rd Saturday
Spanish Mass.............................7:oo PM


lit


Rev. Rick Kelley pastor
First Baptist Church,
Monticello
Have you been think-
ing what I've been think-
ing? What I have been
thinking about is: 1) how
blessed we are to share our
common faith at FBC, 2)
how bound we are to share
our common faith with the
world. Make no mistake
about it; God gives to us
faith to share with others.
As pastor of FBC, I am
going to work very closely
with all the staff and sup-
porting members to make
sure that FBC is known not
just in the community, but
also in the world!
In the next few weeks,
we will be launching into
the world via Internet.
This is a major opportuni-
ty for us to expand our
faith into the world and
also offer ministries to
those right at our back
door. I hope that you will
make this a matter of dili-
gent'prayer. When our web-
site is fully working, we
hope to have streaming
video, prayer and newslet-
ter updates, and many
other informational items.
Brother Daryll Stanley
will have important music
issues and news that will


."-- _.---





aid the entire church as we
worship God in the assem-
bly
Isn't this exciting?!
FBC will only be as
great as the God we serve.
Let us remember that God
has called each of us to
share the light in our dark
world. Our greatest hin-
drance will not come from
without but from within.
Let each of us now be
determined that we are
going to make FBC the best
place in all of northern
Florida to worship and
serve God. God has
brought us a new day at
FBC and we are going to do
our very best to be faithful
and fruitful until He
comes. Let's work togeth-
er!


Capital Heights Baptist Church
invites you to attend our service .
April 11th at 11 a.m.

: Guest Speaker
BOBBY BOWDEN
Information Contact Pastor Biumrus
850-345-0425
.................***********eO


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Tallahassee-Mon-Thurs 5 p.m.-Close
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ALSO AVAILABLE-In Thomasville & Tallahassee Our New Fresh Catch of The Day
Includes Grilled or Fried Gulf Grouper, Rainbow Trout, Mahi Mahi, and Mangrove Snapper $9.95
cooked to order-not included with buffet With choice of 3 sides.


NEW SANDWICH MENU-Available Daily At Seminole Wind Includes
Hamburgers, Pork Tender Loin, Chicken Breast Filet, Fish Sandwich


(includes beverage & your choice of onion rings or fries & salad)


$6.50


Crablegs All You Can Eat With Seafood Buffet $19.95
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday Night in Thomasville
Monday-Saturday in Tallahassee

Lunch Seafood Specials Also Available $7.95

Black Angus Aged Tender Handcut Ribeye Steaks 14oz $12.95
or with All You Can Eat Buffet $19.95


Downtown Plaza
Cairo, GA
229-377-8777
Mon. -Sat 10:30 3:00
Sun 10:30-5:00


Now In
2226 N. Monroe St.,
Tallahassee
850-385-8718
Sun.-Thurs. 10:30 9:00
Fri-Sat 10:30-10


Brickworks Shopping
Plaza
Thomasville, GA
229-227-0622
Mon.-Wed 10:30 3:00
Thurs-Sun 10:30-9:00


Dr


'I'' -- ----r---


60








Wednesday, April 7, 2010


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 11A


CHURCH


MLHuFUH


APRIL 11
Community Worship
Service 6 p.m. on
Sunday at Harvest
Christian Center,
Waukeenah Highway at
Spring Hollow.
APRIL 11
Annual Family and
Friends Day worship
program 3 p.m. Sunday
hosted by the officers
and members of
Springfield AME
Church, 1732 Piney
Woods Road in
Monticello. The speaker
of the hour is Rev.
Joseph Frances, along
with the Sweet' Home
Missionary Baptist
Church of Madison, FL.


It you can't attend this
program, yours prayers
would be greatly appre-
ciated. Greater love hath
no man than this, that a
man lay down his life for
a friend. John 15:13
Yours in Christ, Rev.
Lucille Graham, chair-
person and Stefon
McBride, pastor.
APRIL 11
Coach Bobby Bowden
will be guest speaker to
the 11 a.m. Sunday serv-
ice program at Capital
Heights Baptist Church.
For information contact
Pastor Derrick Burrus
at 850-345-0425.
APRIL 11 14
Revival with Richard


uwen Kooerts, ana nost-
ed by the Indian Springs
Baptist Church, will
begin Sunday at 11 a.m.
and 7 p.m., and continue
nightly through
Wednesday at 7 p.m.; a
nursery will be provided
for each service. Roberts
is the president and a
founding director of
International
Awakening Ministries,
and is a native of
Schenectady, NY.
APRIL 12
Missionary Society of
Greater Fellowship
MBC meets 5:30 p.m. on
the Monday after the
second Sunday. Call 997-
4742 for more informa-


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Agapegirls will
serve dinner at the
Tallahassee/Leon Hope
Community, a shelter
for homeless area fami-
lies, on Wednesday,
April 7 at 5 p.m.
Donations and vol-
unteers are always wel-
come, as the families
really enjoy the meals
prepared, and often tell
how they appreciate
the giving. Dinner will
be prepared for approx-
imately 60 people.
The menu will con-
sist of baked ham,
potato salad, garden


tion.
APRIL 24
Fourth Saturday Gospel
Sing will be held 7 p.m.
on Saturday, at Lamont
United Methodist
Church. Fellowship and
refreshments will follow
the evening of music.
Call the church at 997-
2527 for more informa-
tion.
MAY 3
Prayer for our country
and leaders 12 p.m. on
the first Monday at First
United Methodist
Church in Monticello,
use the Walnut Street
entrance. For more
information call the
church at 997-5545.


salad, rolls and a
d e s s e r t .
Volunteers are
needed to prepare pota-
to salad and desserts,
such as brownies, sheet
cakes, or cookies.
Servers will also be
heeded to serve the din-
n e r
If you cannot come
to help on this day but
would like to prepare a
dish, contact Paula at
850-567-1964 so arrange-
ments can be made to
'get it to the Hope
Community.
You will surely
receive a blessing if
you join with others,
and that's a guarantee!


124 St. Louis Street Lloyd 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.com
Pastor George L. Smith
Sunday
Sunday School............................9:15 AM
Praise & Worship....................10o:30.AM
AWANA....................................5:00 PM
Youth & College...........................5:30 PM
Adult Choir.................................7:00 PM
# Wednesday
Church-wide Supper.....................5:45 PM
W orship........................................ 7:00 PM
Joyful Sounds Children's Choir...7:oo PM
College / Career Celebration.......7:30 PM
1st & 3rd Monday
Ladies Bible Study........................6:30 PM
2nd Thursday
W .W Diners.................................5:30 PM
3rd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints.....................11:30 AM
3rd Saturday
Brotherhood..............................8:00 AM


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Emmanuel House of
Prayer FBC will hold its
annual Church Revival
Monday, April 12
through Friday, April
16, at 7:30 p.m. nightly.
Worship on Monday
evening with Elder J.
Randall; Tuesday and
Wednesday with
Prophetess D. Canada;


and on Thursday and
Friday with Evangelist
Rosa Lumpkin.
Come out and join
with others having a
great time serving the
Lord.
The church is locat-
ed at 685 South
Jefferson Street in
Monticello. For more
information contact
Elder Moses Cooper at
1-229-221-8830.


wvI^[dW a (XY


including Cedric the
Entertainer (Comedian),
Chris Berman (Sports
Broadcaster), Jackie
Joyner-Kersee (Olympic
Gold Medalist), Ray
Lewis (NFL
Linebacker), Alicia Keys
(Grammy Award
Winning Artist),
Shemar Moore (Actor),
Kurt Warner (NFL
Quarterback), and Brian
White (Actor) among
many others.
It is this unique
fusion of corporate,
celebrity and communi-
ty that inspired the
Weekend of Champions
title. Together, we can
make a difference.
So, join others at
this exciting event.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Weekend of
Champions is scheduled
for Thursday through
Saturday, May 13 to 15.
Anyone wanting to par-
ticipate will need to com-
plete an application and
return it to Paula
Grimes at
pjgrimes218@hotmail.co
m by April 15, with a $25
registration fee.
The Weekend of
Champions is an award-
winning charitable ini-
tiative that harnesses
the powerful influences
of sports, entertain-'
ment, and corporate
excellence to captivate,
empower, and connect
communities across the
nation.
The cornerstone of
the Weekend of
Champions program is
its 360-degree approach
to youth development
and community empow-
erment. With program
elements ranging from
an educational sports
camp for hundreds of
youth to an educational
health festival for thou-
sands, the Weekend of
Champions is able to
successfully, impact
diverse audiences inter-
ested in improving its
communities.
The Weekend of
Champions has not only
received support from
gracious corporate
underwriters, business
executives and commu-
nity leaders, but has also
forged powerful collabo-
rations with notable ath-
letes and entertainers


290 East Dogwood Street Monticello 850-997-2252
Rev. Sharon Schuler, Pastor
Sunday School............................................... 9:45 AM
Sunday W orship........................................... 11:oo AM
Wednesday:
Kids Kingdom (age 4-9)......................4:00-5:30 PM
Fellowship Dinner.....................................5:30 PM
'Bible Study.......................................6:00-7:00 PM
Tues. & Thurs.- Ladies Pilates Class....4:oo-5:oo PM

Don't See Your Church
Listed Here?
Call us at 850-997-3568!


1599 Springhollow Road Monticello 212-7669
Pastor Marvin Graham
Sunday Discipleship Class...........9:30 AM
Sunday Worship.........................10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study................7:00 PM
Wed. Young People Bible Study..7:oo PM
Wed. Counseling..........5:30 PM-8:30 PM
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study....................7:00 PM
Sunday Worship...........2:00 PM-4:oo PM
Thurs. Jail Ministry.....7:00 PM-9:oo PM
AA Tuesday.................................. 8:oo PM


Don't See Your Church
I Listed Here?
Call us at 850-997-3568!


415 E Palmer Mill Rd Monticello 997-1119
newhope415@yahoo
Pastors Ray and Angel Hill
Sunday School...........................10:oo AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Sunday Prayer.............................6:00 PM
Wed. Family Training Hour........7:00 PM




5593 Veterans Memoria Drive (Hyy 59
Tallahassee 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev. Greg Roberts
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Children's Worship...................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal.........................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting.............................7:45 PM


Hwy 27 Sout ( mie south of wy9)
Monticello 997-4226
Rev. J. W. Tisdale
Sunday Morning..........................9:30 AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible...............................7:00 PM


285 Magnolia St Monticello 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr. David E. Walker, Pastor
Sunday School..........................:45 AM
Sunday Morning.........................11:00 AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:30 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Wed. TRAC Club for teens...........7:00 PM



3862 Tram Rd. Monticelo 997-6774
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas
Sunday School.....................0...10:oo AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:00 PM
Wednesday Worship.................7:00 PM



Highway 259 Monticello 997-5018
Min. Tobbie Berrian III, Pastor
Sunday School............................:30 AM
Sunday Morning Worship..........11:oo AM
Wednesday Bible Study................7:30 PM



1206 Springfield Road Lloyd 997-TLC7 (8527)
Pastors Tim and Beverly Buchholtz
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com

Sunday.............................................. 10:30 AM
Sunday Morning Praise and Worship
Children's Church
Infants & Toddler Nursery
Wednesday.........................................7:00 PM
SPraise & Worship
Adult & Teen Bible Study
Young Explorers (K-5th Grade)



1287 South Jefferson Street 997-RGCC (7422)
www.restoredglory.org
Sunday Radio Show 8 a.m. 97.9 FM
Pastor Eddie and Elder Veronica Yon
Sunday Church Service.............10:oo AM
Thursday Church Service............7:oo PM
S M AR YBAP

11005 Miccosukee Rd. Tallahassee, Fl 32309
Rev. Dr. Jimmy Brookins, Sr. 850-668-2206
pastor/teacher
brookinsjimmy@yahoo.com
Sunday School..................................9:30 AM
Morning Worship..........................11:oo AM
Communion (on 1st Sunday)............ 6:00 PM
Tuesday Evening
Singles Ministry Meeting.................6:30 PM
(before 2nd Sunday)
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting, Bible Study... ....7:00 PM


81 Methodist Church Rd Waukeenah 997-2171
www.waukeenah-umc.org
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship...................11:oo AM
Youth Group.................................7:00 PM
Tuesday
Overeaters Anonymous ...........7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice........................7:00 PM
Youth Group.................................7:00 PM
Family Fellowship
2nd Thursday of each month


Thrift Store open every Saturday,
8:oo AM-12:OO PM
Every Monday AA Meets..............7:oo PM


Emmanuel House Of

Prayer Church Revival


TMH d* $^/
.rIf

Tallahassee Memorial
Heart & Vascular Center TMH.org


I


I


hcoye~ ~bmmurz~i~ l~)il2Na~:


'








12A Monticello News


www. ecbpu blishing. com


Wednesday, April 7, 2010


PORTS


isuIlts of U tru Clu 33f Annul Four-l Tourllame


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
On March 27 and 28
Jefferson Country Club
hosted its 31st Annual
Four-Ball Tournament,
which proved to be a
huge success.
Eighty players from
Jefferson County and the
surrounding counties
participated in the two-
day, two-man scramble.
Friday night, people
came out to watch past
champions compete in
the popular and well-
known annual shootout,
sponsored by Quail-Val-


This year, Clee
Collins and Bobby
Plaines took the prize in
the competition.
In addition, a putting
contest was set up on the
putting green to chal-
lenge any takers, on
what proved to be a
tricky and fun test of
their abilities. Approxi-
mately 20 golfers took
part in the putting chal-
lenge, with Van Collins
winning the two-day
competition with a score
of 10 on the par 12 set up.
Friday night, golfers
and friends were treated
to a great Brunswick
stew dinner, prepared by


Club members.
Saturday and Sun-
day's tournament format
consisted of a morning
and afternoon flight each
day, with breakfast and
lunch provided for the
golfers.
Saturday's weather
was outstanding and pro-
vided for a great round of
golf. After play on Satur-
day, the field was divided
into five flights: Champi-
onship, 1s' Flight, 2nd
Flight, 3rd Flight and Sen-
ior Flight.
The 3rd and Senior
Flights'teed off on Sun-
day at 9 a.m. While rain
threatened most of the


I~eadJ,


Ieuse


KecyLe L


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

A bote 0 bO wn&geen)

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water
bottles, laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food
cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans, etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All Cardboard Products grocery bag, cereal boxes, food
boxes, laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center
located at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at
any one of the collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of
our Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How
could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers,
washing machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not ac-
cepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be
turned into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello Offers Curbside pick-up for city res-
idents for recyclable items on each Wednesday Morning.
For further information on other items for disposal in the
City, please call Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.coiefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations
& hours of operation for each individual site.
For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


day, the golfers were able
to play without any de-
lays. The remaining
three flights teed off at 2
p.m. Scores from both
days were combined to
determine flight win-
ners, who received gift
certificates to the Club's
C&D Pro Shop.
As, usual, Sunday's
Championship Flight
consisted of some top
notch local golfers. At
the end of the round, two
teams were tied for first
place with the two-day
combined score of 129.
The four golfers com-
peted.in a playoff to de-
termine the ultimate
winner. Two Jefferson
Country Club members,
Clee Collins and David,
Jackson, won the playoff
to claim the overall tour-
nament championship.
Winners from all flights -
were as follows:
In the Champi-
onship Flight: first place
went to the team of
David Jackson and Clee
Collins; second place
went to the team of
Brandon Fletcher and
JB Wilson; third place
went to the team of
Marty Dickey and Mark
Wiggens; and LROM
(low round out of the
money), went to the
team of Clay Cantley
and Jason Harrell.
LROM teams received a
$50 gift certificate.
In the 1s' Flight, the
first place winners were
the team of Nick Prine
and Billy Schofield; and
second place went to the
team of Tom McCabe
and Jerald Johnson.
.In the 2nd Flight,
winning first place was
the team of Paul Boyd
and Doug Meyers; sec-
ond plce went to the
team of Dean Boatner
and Bob Davie; third
place went to the team of
Van Collins and Ben
Walton; and the LROM


team was Dustin Grubbs
and Bill Buckbridge.
In the 3r Flight, win-
ning first place was the
team of Chad Bass and
Heath Bass; second place
went to the team of
Johnny Harper and
Steve Rissman; third
place went to the team of
Tim swords and Roy Kin-
sey; and LROM went to
the team of Larry Snow
and John "Shoe" Hayes.
In the Senior Flight,
first place went to the

Tigers Fall T(
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson
County varsity Tigers
baseball team fell to
Taylor County, 13-5,
March 23, to now stand
1-9 on the season.
Jefferson was
outscored 4-1 in the first
inning; came back to
take the second inning,
2-0; was downed 2-0 in
the third inning; and 3-0
in the fourth inning; Jef-
ferson came back to take
the' fifth inning, 1-0;
dropped the sixth in-
ning, 4-1; and both
teams remained score-
less in the seventh in-
ning.
Taylor acquired 13
hits, while Jefferson col-
lected seven hits. Taylor
committed 2 errors and
Jefferson, bitten by the
error bug, committed 9
errors.
On the mound,
Ladarian Smiley
pitched all seven in-
nings, facing 42 batters,
giving up 13 hits, 13
runs, 6 of which, were
earned, 2 walks, 1 hit-by-
pitch, no wild pitches
and 1 balk. (In baseball,
a pitcher may commit a
number of illegal mo-
tions 'or actions, which
constitute a balk. A balk
results-in a delayed dead


team of Al Clemen and
Bill McRae; second place
went to the team of Fred
Golden and John
Mathis; third place went
to the team of Virgil
Brock and Ken Massey;
and LROM went to the
team of Ed Guy and Bill
George.
Many thanks go to
all club members and
employees who con-
tributed their time and
effort to make this year's
tournament a success.

)Taylor, 13-5
ball and nullification of
any pitch, and each run-
ner is awarded one base.
The batter generally re-
turns to bat with the
previous count.) Smiley
also struck out 5 batters.
At the plate, Smiley
had 3 at-bats with 2 hits,
2 runs and 1 walk.
Lenorris Footman
had 3 at-bats with no
hits, 2 runs, 1 stolen
base and 1 walk.
Devondrick Nealy
had 4 at-bats with 3 hits,
no runs, 2 RBI's, 2 stolen
bases and 1 strikeout.
Alphonso Footman
had 3 at-bats with 1 hit,
1 run, 1 stolen base and
1 strikeout.
Revonte Robinson
had 3 at-bats with no
hits, no runs, and 1
strikeout.
Gene Noel had 2 at-
bats with no hits, no
runs and 2 strikeouts.
David Crumity had
4 at-bats with 1 hit, no
runs, and 1 stolen base.
Garrett Treadway
had 2 at-bats with no
hits, no runs, 1 strikeout
and 1 walk.
Charkues Crumity
had 3 at-bats with no.
hits, no runs, and 1
strikeout.
Charles Ford and
Chalmer Geis, each had
1 at-bat with no hits and
no runs.


Warriors Chalk Up Two Wins To Stand 9-2-1


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy varsity
Warriors baseball team
chalked up two wins last
week, one of which was
a district game, to now
stand 9-2-1 on the regular
season and 5-1 in district
play.
The Warriors faced
off against Echols
County March 22 and
came out on top of the 7-
0 shutout.
On the mound, Kent
Jones pitched the entire
seven innings, giving up
1 walk, 7 hits and strik-
ing out 3 batters.


At the plate, Lane
Fraleigh went 2 for 2.
Kent Jones went 2
for 3 with 1 run.
Trent Roberts belted
a two-run homer and 2
runs.
Josh Wood had 1 hit
and 1 run.
Marcus Roberts had
1 hit and 1 run.
Jared Jackson had 1
hit.
Brandon Darnell
had 1 hit.
Casey Wheeler had 1
run.
Phillip Watt had 1
run.
In the district game
against FAMU, March
23, the Warriors


spanked FAMU for an
18-1 victory.
On the mound,
Trent Roberts pitched
five innings, giving up 2 ;
hits, 2 walks and strik-
ing out 10 batters.
At the plate,
Wheeler went 2 for 3
with 3 runs scored.
Wood went 1 for 1
with 2 runs.
Jones went 1 for 2
with 2 runs.
Brandon Darnell
went 1 for 1.
Tyler Jackson went
1 for 3.
Coach Ray Hughes
said the entire Warriors'
lineup scored at least 1
run each.


20 yrs
dR i Combined
SSiding, Inc. Experience


*Screen Rooms


* Re-modeling Decks
*Additios Soffit & Facia
replacementt Windows *Repairs
*
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Iicenmsed & Insred i


Rodney Roberts
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*newtolstrgl on


Mitchell Morgan
(850) 251-6505







Wednesday, April 7, 2010


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 13A


PORTS


Monticello News Photos by Emerald Greene, March 25, 2010
ACA JV softball player Emma Witmer scored a
total of 5 runs against the JV Lady Tigers.


JV Lady Warriors


Down JV Lady Tigers


ACA JV pitcher
Taylor Copeland pitched
4 2/3 innings, giving up 7
hits with 2 walks and
striking out 4 batters
against the Jefferson
JV's.
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Aucilla
Christian Academy
junior varsity Lady
Warriors softball team
downed the first-year
Jefferson Lady Tigers,
29-13, March 23, to now
stand 5-5 on the season.
Aucilla outscored
Jefferson 11-1 in the
first inning; 7-1 in the
second inning; 5-2 in
the third inning; but
Jefferson came back to
outscore ACA, 9-6 in
the fourth inning. Both
teams remained score-
less during the fifth
and final inning of the
game, called due to the
ten-run rule.
On the mound,
Taylor Copeland
pitched 4 2/3 innings,
giving up 7 hits with 2
walks and striking out


4 batters.
Maddie Everett
pitched 1/3 inning, giv-
ing up 5 hits and 2
walks.
At the plate, Emma
Witmer went 2 for 3
with 5 runs scored, 3
RBI's, 2 walks and 1 hit-
by-pitch.
Copeland went 3 for
3 with 3 runs scored, 3
RBI's, 2 triples, 2 walks
and 1 hit-by-pitch.
Kelli Evans went 2
for 2 with 3 runs
scored, 1 RBI and 1
walk.
Hadley Revell went
3 for 5 with 4 runs
scored and 2 RBI's.
Whitney McKnight
went 2 for 2 with 1 run
scored and 1 RBI.
Jessica Welch went
1 for 3 with 2 runs
scored, 1 walk and 1
strikeout.
Jessica Webb went 2
for 3 with 4 runs
scored, 1 RBI and 3
walks.
Everett went 2 for 3
with 2 runs scored, 1
RBI and 2 walks.
Julie High went 1
for 1 with 1 run scored,
1 double, 1 walk and 1
hit-by-pitch.
Taylor Barnes
went 1 for 3 with 1 RBI
and 1 walk.
Courtney Watts
went 1 for 1 with 1 run
scored and 1 walk.
Sarah Boland had 2
walks and 1 run
scored.
Kayla Knecht had
two RBI's.


etf it fa,


Lady Ti
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson var-
sity Lady Tigers soft-
ball team split the past
two games to now
stand 2-7 on the season.
When Jefferson
faced off against
Hamilton County,
March 19, the Lady
Tigers were skinned
for a 14-1 loss.
On the mound,
Alyssa Lewis was cred-
ited with the loss. She
pitched three innings,
giving up 10 hits, 9
runs, 1 walk and strik-
ing out 6 batters.
Taylor Clemons
pitched two innings,
giving up 3 hits, 5 runs,
6 walks and striking
out 1 batter.
At the plate,
Clemons, an eighth
grader who had been
batting .593, went 2 for
2 with 1 single, 1 triple
and 1 run.
Jana Barber went 1
for 2 with a double.
Sondral Macon
went 1 for 2 with a sin-
gle.
"Of all the teams I
have coached in the
past, coaching this
team is the most
rewarding," said
Coach Michael
Perkins. "What makes
it so great are the kids,
the school administra-
tors, the school super-
intendent, and espe-
cially, the .parents.
They have all opened
their arms and
embraced what I am
doing with the team,
pushing accountability,
good work ethics and
teaching the girls that
if they screw up in the
classroom, they are
going to pay for it on
the field.
"I have been told
that I run these girls
harder than they have
been run in the past
four or five years com-
bined and none of
them have quit the
team. They continual-
ly strive to correct any-
thing they are doing
wrong and improve. I
also tell the girls I am
very defensive minded,
but I also stress that if
we can't score, we can't
win. I also press that
what one does affects
the entire team. If one
messes up, we all do. If
one triumphs, we all
triumph," he added.
The Lady Tigers
squared off against
John Paul II, March 24
and came out on top of
a 10-0 blanking.
Perkins said the
Lady Tigers were up 4-
0 by the end of the first
inning and not want-
ing Jefferson to run the
score way up and
intentionally try to
humiliate John Pau,l
he ordered the girls not
to steal any bases and
he had them begin bat-
ting backwards in the
second inning. "If
they usually batted
right-handed, I had


:ers Split Two To Stand 2-7


them bat left-handed,
and vice-versa," said
Perkins. "This is the
fastest team I have ever
coached and with fast
players like Megan
McClellan Taylor
Clemons, Jana Barber,
and Sondral Norton, if
need be, I need them to
hit 'the ball down and
to the left." He added
that the 10-0 win
against John Paul,
even though batting
backwards, still felt
good when the girls
got home at night and
they had the satisfac-
tion of knowing that
they did the right
thing in displaying
good sportsmanship
in choosing not to beat
their opponents down
too badly
Though the Lady
Tigers began batting
backward during the
second, in which they
scored no runs,
Jefferson scored 4
more runs in the third
and 2 in the fourth
inning. And the added
bonus, during the
game, as a team, the
Lady Tigers batted
.545. "The message we
send out to other
teams is when we beat
you, we don't want to
beat you down," he
added.
On the mound,
Lewis pitched all five
innings of her first no-
hitter of the season,
giving up 1 walk, 1 hit-


by-pitch and striking
out 2 batters.
At the plate,
Clemons went 2 for 3
with 2 singles.
Lewis went 1 for 3
with 2 RBI's and a sin-
gle.
Barber went 2 for 3
with 1 inside-the-park
homerun and 1 double.
Mikayla Norton


went 2 for 3 with 3
RBI's, 2 singles and 1
strikeout.
Kaleigh Babb went
1 for 3 with 1 RBI, 1
single and 2 strike-
outs.
Carlie Barber went
1 for 2 with 1 RBI and 1
single.
Macon went 1 for 2
with a single.


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\Wednicsday, April 7, 2010


The Classifieds...


DEADLINE FOR WEDNESDAY PAPER 3:00 P.M. ON MONDAY

DEADLINE FOR FRIDAY PAPER 3:00 P.M. ON WEDNESDAY


measuring up to your expectations one ad at a time.


Australian Western saddle;
brand new with tags on it:
comes with blanket, two bri-
dles, two breastplates (one
custom made), and saddle
stand. Call 850-545-5764
10/21,rtn,nc.

HUNTING / BRUSH PANTS
(Nylon camouflage covering)
your-pants- My time + Mate-
rial $20 850-251-6993.
12/25,tfn,nc.


l^',---- II


WHAT A GREAT DEAL!
Don't Let This One Get Away!
Colonial Twin Bunk Bed with
headboard, footboard, stairstep
with rails, and 3 drawer under-
bed storage. 6 months old, paid
$800, asking $450 OBO
850-210-5928.
2/5, rtn,nc.

Rough Sawn- Kiln dried
Lumber in stock or, will cut
your logs. A number of woods
available. Four types of siding
also available. 850-997-9947 or
508-7071.
3/19,tfn,c.




REGISTERED ENGLISH
BULLDOG PUPPIES
13 wks old, health certificates,
shots up-to-date, $800.
850-766-2950
4/7,9,pd.


DOWNTOWN EFFICIENCY,
I or 2 BR. 997-2837
or monticL'lorealestate. in fo

CLASSIC HISTORIC HOME.
Spacious. Downtown. 251-0760.
4/2,tfn,c.
JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office
300, Monticcllo. I BR ($427) &
2BR ($465). HUD vouchers ac-
cepted, subsidy available at times.
850-997-6964. TTY711. This in-
stitution is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.
7/22,tfn,c.
Mobile Home- 3bd. 2bth, $500
month, $300 deposit,
352-359-2647 on Lonnie Road.

3/31,4/2.7,9,pd.





Outboard Motor- 25 hp- 35 hp
call 850-210-3137.
3/3,rtn,nc.
Hoop Skirts,
Crinoline, Southern Bell
dresses, for Jefferson County
Historical Association.

3/19,24,26,31,4/2,7,pd.




Old Fashion small-town prices
on Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep.
Also late model used cars. Call
229-220-4422.
3/24-4/9,pd.



*ISI1WI0


Beagle type dog- found 4/01 on
Georgia Line Road. Call J.C.
Humane Society at 342-0244.

4/7,9,14,16,nc.
Pomeranian dog- black female.
10 pounds, found 3-24-10 in city
limits call Humane Society at
342-0244.


Cellphone- in LI
to identify 510-0


M Hm

Fo ae1


Professional Proji
selling modular
homes. Get high
prices, excellent set
ing available. Ca
5024 before 6 p.m.
Brand New 5/br
home delivered to
the low price of
month. Call 386-62
NEW 3/2 MOBIL
land starting at $4
Call Nathan Welsh
at nathan.a.welsh@







OPEN HC
April 11-124
Greenville- 3br/2b
great lots, new HVA
windows, new vinyl
plete rehab. Move i
$89, 500 w/ 6 lots.
available. 850-599-
ble Owner Finance.
------------------
Near Lloyd Acres
D.W. 3bd/3 ba, Ca
room/ deck. Crown
+ Hardwood. Firep
1/2 beautiful wood
$138,500. $8,000
able. 850-599-512
Owner Finance.


ect Manager


I

Children's Dresses...
*Size 3 white long


and mobile dress, worn as flower girl
quality, fair dress, sequin/beadwork all on
vice. Financ- bodice, sequin/beadwork/ ap-
all 386-344- pliques on bottom; built in
crinoline. $50
3bth mobile *Size 4 off white dress,
your land for worn as flower girl dress, lace
491.00 per work around bodice, pretty
23-4218. lace work at bottom, cap
E HOME n sleeves $25
.50 a month. -Size 7-8 off white
or emailme dress, wornas a flower girl
)gmail.com dress, overlay of lace over en-
3/5,tfn,c. tire dress, probably
E knee to calf length $25
*Size 8 white, long
dress, lace around neck with
decorative bodice $25
**** *Size 16 white long
)USE pageant gown, cap sleeves,
Sp.m. white sequin work across en-
a home- 6 tire bodice and sleeves, but-
C, new vinyl tons around neck with
I siding, co- circular cut-out on back,
n ready. beautiful gown- $100
$8,000 credit Teen dresses..
-5121. Possi- *Size 7-8 Kelli green
gown, lace overlay $40
*Size 8 red gown, se-
;- 1800 sq ft quin/bead work around
report/ Screen bodice $50
molding, tile -Size 14 (child's size 14
lace, 5 Acres but dress is for a teen division
Is w/ stream, approximately 13-15) GOR-
credit avail- GEOUS lime green dress,
21. Possible strapless but with spaghetti
straps that criss cross across
4/7-4/23,pd. the back, sequins spotted
Across the entire gown, built
in crinoline absolutely gor-
geous. $300 (paid over $500
for it).


MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22,tfn.

-HANDYMAN-
VARGAS & SON
PLUMBING ELECTRICAL
CARPENTRY LANDSCAP-
ING We do it all! Call
Georordo at 997-5877.

4/7,9,14,16,21,23,28,30


Call 850-973-3497
and leave message.


4/7,9,14,16,nc. I BUILD SHED'S
DECKS & RAMPS
oyd Acres. Call Also exterior carpentry work
920. call Bob 850-242-9342 or 850-
948-2788.
4/9.13.nc.
4/7,tfn,c.


Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed.
Full-time advertising salesman needed: Must be a team player, able
to handle multiple tasks, and be able to get along with an entire of-
fice staff. Must have good personality and LOVE to talk on the
telephone. Apply in person only at the Monticello News newspaper
office, located at I80 W Washington St.. in Monticello.
3/3 ,tfn,nc.

Computer Accounting- two-days a week plus some flexible hours,
Grubbs Petroleum, 735 East Pearl Street. Call Connie at 850-997-
5632.
3/31,4/2,7,9,c.
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING
Jefferson County Board of County Commissioners is seeking appli-
cants for a Temporary Full Time Gate Attendant. Job description
and applications may be obtained at the Solid Waste Department
located at 1591 Waukccnah Street. Monticello. Florida. Minimum
qualifications are: Loads and unloads heavy material from trucks.
Moves equipment and large bulky objects. Performs custodial du-
ties. Maintains grounds. Rakes grass and waters plants. Weeds
Flower beds. Shapes hedges and trims trees. Cuts grass. Plants and
fertilizes flowers. May operate tractor-mowcr in mowing grass on
right-of-way on temporary or training basis. Loads trash on truck.
Unloads trash and other material. Picks up boxes and other materi-
als left by residents. Needs to get along well with people and be
able to direct and explain where the different types of materials are
to be disposed of. Provides direction to the public for disposal of re-
fuse and/or recyclable material. Answers routine question from the
public concerning recycling and solid waste laws. Education and
experience needed: One (1) year experience in manual labor. Appli-
cant must possess the minimum of a valid Florida Drivers License
and a valid Social Security Card. Applications will be accepted
until 2:00 P.M., April 9, 2010 at the Solid Waste Department.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Drug Free Work-
place. Drug testing is a required part of the pre-employment phys-
ical. Applicants with a disability should contact the above office for
accommodations. For additional information please call 342-0184
4/2,7,c.


Yl, l Ilol MU ll/'f I CY I lolul Irls



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$ Part!

Be sure our community
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It only takes 10 minutes to
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Announcements


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For Sale / Pools


Backyard Fun! Pools create
generations of memories
everyday, vacations never end!
Simple DIY pool kits and pool
accessories on sale. Visit Fam-
ilyPoolFun.com or call
(800)950-2210

Help Wanted

International Cultural Ex-
change Representative: Earn
supplemental income placing
and supervising high school
exchange students. Volunteer
host families also needed. Pro-
mote world peace! (866)GO-
AFICE or www.afice.org

Can You Dig It? Heavy
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ing program. Backhoes, Bull-
dozers, Trackhoes. Local job
placement asst. Start digging
dirt NOW. (866)362-6497

Drivers FOOD TANKER


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DRIVER- GREAT PAY!
Company Solos/Teams. New
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Call: (877)740-6262. Owner
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months experience. www.ptl-
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Homes For Sale

FORECLOSED HOME
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Auction: 4/17 Open House:
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CQ 1031187

Lots & Acreage

Developer Slashing Prices! 2
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financing. Call now (866)352-
2249, x 2532
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Misc. Items for Sale


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Miscellaneous

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA ap-
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if qualified Housing avail-
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of Maintenance (866)314-
3769.

Out of Area Real Estate

NEW LOG HOME AT THE
LAKE & 5 AC $69,900
w/FREE Boat Slips Gorgeous,
ready to finish 2100 sf log
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(478)987-9700 stregispa-
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Auction: 4/17 Open House:
4/3. 4/10. 4/11 REDC I View
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1 '



Asst MGR- Shift MGRS-Fast Food.
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costs, personnel management, and team
building, E-mail resume to

istreet@fasttrackstores.com or drop off at
store located at 5200 South Jefferson St at
1-10 & US 19


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Wednesday, April 7, 2010


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 15A


LEGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COLRT, SECOND JLiDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 2010-21-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SGRACIE MAE ALLEN, a/k/a
GRACIE H. ALLEN, a/k/a
GRACIE HARDY ALLEN,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of the Decedent,
GRACIE MAE ALLEN, deceased, whose date of death was
July 22, 2009; is pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida. Probate Division; File Number 2010-21-
CP ; the name and address of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Represenative's' attorney are set forth
below.
An creditors of the Decedent and other persons, who
have claims or demands against the Decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and
who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the Decedent and other persons
who have claims or demands against the Decedent's estate,
including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED TWO (2) YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS March 31, 2010.

Attorney for Personal Representative
CLAY A. SCflNITKER


Fla. BAK No.34Y143
Davis, Schnitker, Reeves & Browning, P.A.
Post Office Drawer 652
Madison, Florida 32341
(850) 973-4186

Personal Representative:
OWEN HARDY, Personal Representative


3/31,4/7/10,c.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON CO LN T ."
FLORIDA
PROBATE DI\ ISION
File Number: 20 1.1 IS -CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LYNN D. MILLER, JR.,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LYNN D. MIILLER.
JR., deceased, whose date of death was November 11. 2110. I;
pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson County. FlHrida.
Probate Division under probate file 2010-18-CP, the address o0f
which is 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, Florida 32 34. The
names and addresses of the personal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons ha ing
claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom j copl of
this notice is required to be served must file their claim, ii[th
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFT E R TH E
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY (OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other person hj\ -
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN TIE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORID I
PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DE ATH IS
BARRED.
Attorney for Personal Representative Personal Repreentauit e
Paula M. Sparkman, Esq. Christine McDcrmnott
P.O. Box 247 1080 Fairbank Lane
Monticello, Florida 32345 Chelsea, AL 3 5"41
(850) 997-3503



4/7. 14-11'1. c


NO0


Pursuant to Secti
following person(
registered voter:

Jamaal B. Brool
2510 St Augusti
Monticello, FL 3
And
Kelvin Tyrone Ji
790 Tung Street
Monticello, FI 32
And
Wallace Omar G
145 Georgia Str
Monticello, FL 3
And
Peter J O'Donne
687 Sheats Roai
Monticello, FL 3


I


TWICE OF INVALID VOTER REGISTRATION
AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE

on 98.075(7), Florida Statutes, notice is hereby given to the
s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a


ks
ne Rd
2344

ones

!344

reen
eet
2344

ell
d
2344


Theodore Lee Bautista
234 N Forest Rd
Monticello, Fl 32344
And
Derrick D Plummer
221 Avalon Side
Lamont, FL 32336
And
Dondrick S Eaves
390 Maple Street
Monticello, FL 32344
And
Lynn D Good
140 Hogan
Monticello, FL 32344


And
Ansel Norton Jr
85 E Glenn
Monticello, FL 32344


The above individual is notified to show cause why His/Her name should not be
removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days will
result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and removal of your name
from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instruction,
contact the Supervisor of Elections at 850-997-3348 within 30 days of publication of
this notice.

Marty Bishop
Supervisor of Elections
Jefferson County


L


NOTICE
The Jefferson Count) Board of Count) Commi;sioners \ ill
hold a Public Hearing on Thursday, April 15, 2010 at 6:00
p.m. at the Jefferson County Courthouse Annex located at
435 W. Walnut Street. The Board will be considering a land
exchange pursuant to ES. 125.37 as follows:
New River Holdings, LLC (Boland) will convey and
exchange two small parcels of land at the head of Wacissa
River Springs, plus unknown size of lands on Horse Head
Springs lying west ofSuwannee River Water Management
lands (Section 1 & 2, Township 2 South, Range 3East) with
the Jefferson County Board of County Commissioners, who
will convey and exchange a four (4) acre tract known as
the Mattie Hall lands (Section 36, Township 1 South,
Range 3 East) and a 30feet easement road or other lands
owned by the County.
A copy of the Letter of Intent to Exchange with attached
land descriptions may be inspected at the Clerk of Court's
Office, Jefferson County Courthouse, 1 Courthouse Circle,
Monticello, FL 32344.
This exchange is considered to be of land of equal value.

Kirk Reams,
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Jefferson County, Florida 4/2,7/2010,c.






14







/JDon't knoow? No problem.
e, i- /e acJ tcr for the answer to
thlit question and all of the latest sports news.
Get complete coverage delivered to
Amour door daily.

IONTICELLO NEWS

850-997-3568


STOP LEG CRAMPS
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU.


.


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a~wnwfl~


NOTICE
Requesting a maximum withdrawal of 2,050,000
gallons per day from St. Marks River for Industrial use by a
proposed facility.
Application number I 07110 filed 03/10/2010
Florida Gas Transmission Company, c/o Joe Kolb, 5444
Westheimer Road, Houston, TX 77056-5306
General withdrawal locations) in Jefferson County:
T01N, RO3W, Sec. 31; TOIS, R03E, Sec. 31
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR WATER USE PERMIT
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373,
Florida Statutes, the following applications) for water use
permits) has (have) been received by the Northwest Florida
Water Management District:
Interested persons may object to or comment upon the
applications or submit a written request for a copy of the
staff reports) containing proposed agency action regarding
the applications) by writing to the Division of Resource
Regulation of the Northwest Florida Water Management
District, attention Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management
Drive, Havana, Florida 32333-9700, but such comments or
requests must be received by 5 o'clock p.m. on April 26,
2010.
No further public notice will be provided regarding this
(these) applicationss. Publication of this notice constitutes
constructive notice of this permit application to all substan-
tially affected persons. A copy of the staff reports) must be
requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings
and any public hearing date.
Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an
administrative hearing regarding the proposed agency action
by submitting a written request according to the provisions of
28-601.201, Florida Administrative Code. Notices of
Proposed Agency Action will be mailed only to persons who
have filed such requests.

4/7/2010,c.


*MIM





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