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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00335
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 16, 2011
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
sobekcm - UF00028320_00335
System ID: UF00028320:00335
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text














ONTICELLO


NEWS


143rd Year No. 8 Wednesday, February 16, 2011 50 460 +4
H +


Possibly


Ahead F

Governor's Buds
Idea f LAZARO ALEMAN property
ECB Publishing and the
K Q I If Senior Staff Writer 8,700 statE
eqJust when local school offi- Initia
cials were beginning to think .cuts to P
FiPD that the district's financial sity edu(
Fie health was finally on the mend, (some est
Sthe new Governor ups and un- as $4.8 b:
Rolls a proposed state budget $1.75 bi]
pc) LIUIIu that signals significant reduc- schools ii
tions for education. ing, inclu
fRsgPSfa Gov. Scott Rick's proposed duction
Resurface budget of $65.9 billion, which funding.
he unveiled early last week, is The
Chief Asks reportedly $4.6 billion.less than the per-pi
the current year's budget and partially
For Clarity includes nearly $1!4 billion in other dist
On Issue Broadband CHI
LAZARO ALEMAN 0 H ip
ECB Publishing Services
Senior Staff Writer
Fire Rescue Chief Should Be A
Mark Matthews is asking
commissioners for clari- Available
fiction on the fire safety
inspections of buildings By rd FRAN HUNT
used by the public,, an ECBPublishing
issue that officials have StEaff Writer
purposely sidestepped for Quarter A chimney
yasA chimney
years. LAZARO ALEMAN local residence
The issue is one ECBPublishing morning resu
Matthews has mentioned ECB Publishing
Matthews has mentioned Senior Staff Writer major damage
previously, and that prior Other than for the home.
commissions have tried tht the North On Saturda
t adress,to one degree North
to address, to one degree Florda Broadband Aij. ary 12, shortly
or another. Past com t- thotrity (NFBA) expects to a.m., the homeov
sions, infect, dealt with have its system hp and Hunt, 78, had goi
the ticklish issue (offi- running by the latter part dosta, GA. to I
business owners) by in- of this year, and that groceries about 1
business owners) b"ma iny" some potential last-mile utes prior to the
in the n orda providers have been less His ex-wife Fran
in the county ordinance than enthusiastic about was inside the r
in terms o'the. fire joining the project, the on the Interne
ch iefs authority t con- public hearing on TueS- daughter, Alfa I
duct such specifically in- day evening, Feb.8, was who resides in t
structing him to conduc pretty much a rehash of located at 193 We
structing him to conductinfrmation pond Drive in
inspections only upon re- vious information, pond Drive in
quest. Denise, Collins, pro- Shores, was asle
One problem with gram manager for Gov- There was a
One problem with ernment Services Group bang, which sour
voluntary inspections (GSG), did the presenta- a log in the wood
that state law says tion. GSG is the private stove, falling as i
the county ordin, ance is entity that provides man- The sound awake
the county ordinance is a s t t and she came
based on state law. Typi- agement services to the and she came
ally, local requirements NFBA, essentially filling room where her
can be more stringent the role of general man- was. Her moth.
than state requirements, ager and providing the what that sound
but not less so.program management, she said it soun
Snother pobem is personnel, compliance burning log in t
The other problem is and accountability and she returned
Matthews' concern over and accountability andshereturne
his potential for liability Collins related that room. A few
ispen thl ordinance's the 15-county region that later, the bangir
given ts ordinga makes up the NFBA's continued, then t
y a citizen or an service area is designated a really loud ba
y t r an a critical rural area of asked her moth
employee gets hun't en economic concern, had happened a
bingsected, is th beoan Which explains why the thought Alfa ha
inspected, is the board NFBA was successful in how made the
Matthews asked getting a $30 million fed- Once they discov
He said he would pre- eral grant to expand ac- the sound was n(
He said he wouldefinitive Please See Broad- by one or the ot
stand on the issue from band Page 2A left the front b
the board.and on the issue from
Sthe isis a question COunty Officials T
that's been a gray area for
a long time and we need LAZARO ALEMAN
to hammer it out one way ECB Publishing
or the other," Matthews Senior Staff
said. County officials want to delve deeper
He said his depart- into an item in the latest five-year plan of
ment presently did in- the Florida Departrment of Transportation
spections on daycare (FDOT) that identifies a $132,000 appropria-
centers and nursing facil- tion for development of a bicycle and pedes-
Please See Inspec- trian network here.
tions Page 6A Officials, in fact, have scheduled a
workshop for 3:30 p.m. Monday, March 28,
nnhe viola,\ to further explore the idea.
I tions that In the interim, commissioners asked
we find now, we the county engineer to learn more about
have no avenue to the FDOT's intention for the funding, and
enforce them," also asked that county staff check with the
Matthews said. Capital Region Transportation Planning
Agency (CRTPA). Specifically, officials


More Hard Times


or School District


get Called Devastating


and corporate tax cuts
elimination of nearly
e positions.
al estimates put the
're-K through univer-'
cation at $3.3 billion
timates put it as high
million inclusive of a
llion cut to public
n local and state fund-
Lding a $300 to $700 re-
in per-pupil state
Governor's people say
upil funding cut Will be
offset by teachers and
trict personnel having


to contribute five percent of
their pay to their pensions, a
cost now borne by the state and
the individual districts. But
local school officials see it dif-
ferently.
"Devastating" is the word
that School Superintendent Bill
Brumfield used on Monday, Feb.
14, to describe the potential im-
pact on the Jefferson County
School District if the Legisla-
ture adopts the proposed
budget.
Brumfield said if the Gov-
ernor's budget is implemented,
Please See School Page 6A


MNEY FIRE CAUSES MAJOR


IAGE To LOCAL RESIDENCE


fire at a
Saturday
Cited in
to the
y, Febru-
After 9:15
owner, Alf
ne to Val-
)urchase
5-20 min-
incident.
Hunt, 51,
evidence
t. Their
lunt, 21,
he home,
est Duck-
Aucilla
ep.
a sudden
ended like
-burning
turned.
ened Alfa
into the
Smother
er asked
was and
led like a
he stove,
ed to her
minutes
ig sound
here was
ing. Alfa
ler what
nd Fran
ad some-
sound.
ered that
ot caused
her, Alfa
bedroom.


the chimney was on fire. der as Fran filled the


She approached the stove
and looked up between
the fire plate and ceiling
around the stove pipe and
saw fire.
She yelled, "Mom!
The house is on fire!"
They ran out the front
door and looked up and'


Fran ran back inside, un-
plugged the computer,
ran into the kitchen and
called 911. Luckily, Alf
had conducted recent re-
pairs on the roof and a
tall ladder was propped
up against the building,
Fran grabbed a bucket
and Alfa got up on the lad-


bucket from the kitchen
sink and began running
the water out to her to
throw on the fire.
The fire became so
extremely hot that at one
point, Alfa's hair caught
fire.


Please
Page 2A'


See Fire


o Explore Bicycle/Pedestrian Network
want CRTPA Executive Director Harry officials of the FDOT and CRTPA and both
Reed invited to the workshop to get his had assured him that the money was to be
input on the issue. used at Jefferson County officials' discre-
The CRTPA is the metropolitan plan- tion. But his colleagues essentially want to
ning organization (MPO) for the capital re- Please See Pedestrian Page 6A
gion, defined as Leon County and
urbanized portions of Gadsden, Wakulla
and Jefferson counties. MPOs are responsi-
ble for coordinating the transportation
planning within their assigned regions.
Local officials want to know if the
$132,000 is for planning or for actual con-
struction costs, and whether the money is
to be used at their discretion or that of the
FDOT or the CRTPA or both?
Commissioner Hines Boyd, who sits on '
the CRTPA board as Jefferson County's rep-
resentative, offered that he had spoken with


1 Section 14 Pages
Around Jeff. Co. 3-7A Legals 12A
Church 8A-9A Sports 10A-11A & 14A
Classifieds 12A Viewpoints 2A


Wed 68/48
2/16
Partly cloudy. High 68F, Winds
ESE at 5 to 10 mph,


Thu 737
2/17
Plenty of sun. Highs in the low 70s
and lows in the upper 40s.


Fri
2/18


73/50 .


Mostly sunny. Highs in the low 70s
and lows in the low 50s.


a


'







2A Monticello News www.ecbpublishing.com






VIEWPOINTS &


Wednesday, February 16, 2011






PINIONS


Broadband


cess to broadband serv-
ices in the area.
The grant specifical-
ly calls for the NFBA to
install the middle-mile
broadband infrastruc-
ture, which allows
access to the tremen-
dous capacity of the
Internet backbone
"superhighways". It will
then be up to last-mile
providers, such as
Centurylink and AT&T,
to connect the end users
to the middle-mile infra-
structure.
Collins compared
the broadband "super-

Fire


highways" to the inter-
states system; the mid-
dle mile to state and
county roads; and the
last mile to local and
side streets.
"We're going to
wholesale the access to
the last-mile providers,
who will bring it to the
consumers," she said.
"We're not a competitor
of last milers. We're a
provider."
tUnfortunately, some
potential last-mile
providers distrusted
that the NFBA wasn't a
competitor 'and were


declining to get involved
in the project at this
juncture, she said. It
was her belief, however,
that this reluctance
would be overcome once
the installation of the
system proceeded and
the now reluctant com-
panies saw that NFBA
indeed wasn't a competi-
tor, she said.
Meanwhile, other
companies from outside
the area were express-
ing interest in accessing
the system, she said.
Which was all to the
good, she said, adding


the caveat that promis-
ing as these discussions
were, they were yet very
preliminary. Still, they
showed the project's
potential viability, she
said. Moreover, if no
other last-mile provider
stepped forward to pro-
vide the service when
the infrastructure was
fully installed, the
NFBA would take up
that role as a last resort,
she said. So one way or
another, consumer
would get the service,
Collins said.
She said the expec-


Cont


station was that the sys-
tems would be fully
installed and opera-
tional by as early as the
third quarter of this
year.
SThe remainder of
the meeting was largely
taken up by questions
from members of the
audience, many of
which questions other
audience members
answered. Especially
given that attending the
hearing were Jefferson
County Commission
Chairman Stephen
Fulford, also chairman


Cont


:. From Page 1

of the NFBA board, and
Monticello City
Councilman Tom,
Vogelgesang, an NFBA
board member.
The NFBA is a gov-t
ernment entity made up
of 15 counties and eight
cities in the region.
Among the expected
economic benefits ofI
the project are the fos-1
tering of economic
opportunities; the cre-
ation of jobs; the,1
enhancement of public
safety; and the improve-.:
ment of emergency
services.

:. From Page 1


The first call to
Jefferson County Fire
Rescue was received at
the station at 9:32 a.m. as
volunteers from the
Ashville Area Volunteer


Fire Department
responded to the scene.
AAVFD Chief Butch
Staffieri and one other
volunteer were the first
on the scene and he


instructed Fran to stay
out of the house. Upon
their arrival, the fire-
fighters observed the sin-
gle-story wood-frame
house with fire showing


through the chimney and.
a potion of the roof.
Staffieri grabbed the
water hose at the front of
the house, but apparently
due to the cold the night
before, the pipe was bro-
ken. Staffieri called for
backup and requested
that Monticello volun-
teers bring their tanker
and engine to the scene.
Staffieri advised Fire
Rescue that all residents
were out of the structure
and the fire had spread to
the attic.
Shortly afterward, at
9:46 a.m. firefighters were
all on scene and immedi-
ately began to fight the
blaze,.which was quickly
spreading.
The power company
was contacted to respond
and cut the power to the
home and the State Fire
Marshal's Office was con-
tacted.
Carol Ellerbee of
Emergency Management
responded and after
observation of the home,
contacted the Red Cross
that assistance was need-


ed.
Upon investigation of
the scene, firefighters
determined the fire was
in the attic and they
made access through the
attic access and began to
fight the fire. On the out-
side of the structure, fire-
fighters cut an access
into ,the gable so they
could push the fire back
to the burned area and
keep it from spreading
any further. The blaze
was under control by
10:15 a.m. and totally
extinguished very short-
ly afterward.
After- the fire was
out, AAVFD volunteers
remained on the scene
and assisted Fire Rescue
with the salvage and sal-
vageable items and
debris from the fire, out
of the structure. The
damaged furniture was
all removed.
The State Fire
Marshal arrived on the
scene. After investiga-
tion, it was determined
that the fire had started
in the chimney and


spread to the attic area.
At 12:10 p.m., withy
the overhaul complete, ;
the last unit cleared the
scene.
JCFR estimated that
there was approximately
$15,000 damage to the
home and $5,000 damage
to the contents.
Following the fire,
Alfa became so stressed
by the situation that EMS
had to give her oxygen tc/
calm her down and to'
prevent the shock shec
was experiencing froirrtm
progressing any further.;'
They were able to pre-
vent her having to be
transported to the hospi-
tal for treatment.
Unfortunately, Alf
had no homeowners
insurance. Due to thd.
cost becoming much toof
high for him to afford to"
continue paying the pol i
cy so he had to cancel the.
policy
Since the fire, neigh-,
bors responded to help
Alf with any work that
was required. Their'
placed and secured a,
large tarp over the large,
hole in the roof to pre-
vent any further damage,,.
Other neighbors brought}
food and offered a place
to stay
JCFR Captain Dexter,
Walker advised while at,
the scene that the home
was inhabitable.


THEME: WILD
WEATHER


ACROSS
1. Bullying, e.g.
6. Greyhound, e.g.
9. Artist colony in New
Mexico
13. *Wind bursts
14. *Wildfire remains
15. Gold
16. Early stages
17. *Where storms can
lead to sickness
18. It sweeps a nation?
19. "The Quiet American"
author
21. *It leads to #15 Across?
23. July-August zodiac
24. Potato
25. A great distance
28. *Mild fog
30. Soldier's knapsack
35. Right to another's
property
37. *Mountain cap?
39. Roman Catholic
Church's central adminis-
tration


40. Largest city of Norway
41. Another spelling for
"icon"
43. April 1st victim
44. Branch of this tree
represents peace offering
46. Prefix denoting
"around"
.47. Southwestern flooring
48. Pour out
50. Great Barrier
52. Fleur-de-
53. It prevents objective
consideration
55. Prune
57. *Type of radar
61. Not dangerous to
health
64. Eskimo hut
65. Knot-tying vow
67. Nostrils
69. White, French
70. Roman sun god
71. Maria Remarque
72. E-mail command
73. Right coast time
74. Like many basketball
players


DOWN
1.. Gone by
2. A plug in a barrel or
flask
3. "Back in the _," song
4. It can be stainless
5. An attitude of admira-
tion
6. Headquarters, as in
military
7. Employ
8. Half step higher than
given note
9. U-
10. United .Emirates
11. Greek liquor
12..Eurasian duck
15. Of low pH
20. It can be loud or white
22. Black and white sea
bird
24. Fire-tenders
25. *Result of Katrina'
26. Bridal path
27. Indiana Jones' Lost
Ark, e.g.
29. The sound of Edward
Scissorhands? '
31. Bunch of hair
32. Cook from above
33. Garlic mayonnaise
34. *They move 45 to 90
knots
36. The brightest star
38. Donned
42. Sister's daughter
45. All together
49. Neither a win nor a
loss
51. *Ominous shape in
sky
54. Get up
56. Found on a queen
57. "I call first .!"
58. Stare amorously
59. of .attack"
60. "On Golden __,
movie
61. *Thunderstorm sight
62. Smile
63. Head holder
66. and don't
68. Timid or unsure


Ways
udo inthe Kno
The objective of the game is to fill all the blank squares
in a game with the correct numbers.
There are three very simple constraints to follow. .
In a 9 by 9 square Sudoku game:
Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9
in any order. Every column of 9 numbers must include all
digits 1 through 9 in any order. Every 3 by 3 subsection of .
the 9 by 9 square must include all digits 1 through 9. -T-_


4 25

S7317 26
-6 -



53

6
-_- -_6 - ___






9 2. 7 5

9 3 48

2 73
---- - MI- 6-----







A NIVi OIs aNEs 1 6 9 9 9 Z L Vt6C
H0 1 3 1 O S 31NIVI129
Hs a v3 No 1 0o1011 1i l 9 L 6 1 9 9 Z 9
NIO f3 MNS N311dd iii



S1- 9 Z 6 9 9 V

3 n O N o i 3I 8 9 9 6Z Z 6L


| lf he wants to run
Ifor senate, it
could be a Bennett."


MONTICELLO .0


NEWS ,

IEMERA EAdvertisement s Mon at 3 p.m. nday r a '
EMERALD GREENE Asr Wednesday's paper, and


Pullisher/Owner Wednesday at 3 p.m. for Friday's
paper.
LAZARO ALEMAN There will be a 10' charge forAffidavits.
Senior Staff Writer

CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Deadline for classified is Monday Subscription Rates:
at 3:00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper. Florida S45 per year
and Wednesday at 3:00 p.m. for Out-of-State S52 per year
Friday's paper. Deadline for Legal (Slate & local taxes included)


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, eInc.. 180 W Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This-newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
S All photos given to ECB Pub lihing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be pickbd up no later than
6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


L I I


P.O. Box 4284
180 W. Washington
Street's
Monticello, Florida
32345
5et
850-997-3568
07 -3]
) o 'I"
Fax 850-997-37748"to"
o 's
Email: nionticellonews
(Pembarq njail






Wednesday, February 16, 2011


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


F~~- II: ________________


TO MY LIVING

4IUSBANB KEN,

THERE IS NB GREATER dBY
THAN KNOWING THE LOVE


/47


HAPPY ANNIVERSARY TO

THIE LBVE OF MY LIFE.


P- TABLE PET
SOF TIE IWEEK







TNDESE SEVEM L PUPPESI, EX MALE
AROD Oti FEMALE, WRE ILFT S
OUT V4 A REC6VCLICG B3W Of A
20-DEGREE rG&IT. TNiEV ARE
APPROXIMATELY StX WEEKS OLD


AND RAWG&E Z COLOR FROM.
BLACK, BLACK AND BROWN
BLENDED FUR AND ONE RED:--
TO ADOPT CALL TIE 7'EFFEROt
COUNTY HL UMANE SOCElT
SNELTER AT 342-0244.


aa
C)ln8
(I~C~
at
clr*~E
r
---~---
:1


Salvation Army

Kettle Drive Wrap-up


DEBBIE SNAPP
EbB Publishing
Staff Writer
Georgiana Barker,
chairperson for the 2010
Salvation Army Kettle
Drive, extends her appre-
ciation to the community
for the donations collect-
ed during the holiday
season. She especially
thanks the bell ringing
volunteers who gracious-
ly gave of their time to
help raise funds for the
Salvation Army cause.
Those bell ringing
volunteers included: first
place winner George
King, for the most time


given to bell ringing; sec-
ond place winner Steve
Hall, for his bell ringing
time; and third place
winner O.E.S. Carolyn
Wade and personnel for
their totaled bell ringing
time.
A special thank you
goes out to Fred's
Department Store and to
Winn Dixie for allowing
the Salvation Army vol-
unteers to set up at the
front doorways. And, to
anyone wishing to con-
tribute to the Salvation
Army, send donations to
the Farmer's and
Merchants Bank c/o


.J -A -Iam: l -L...t ...- . .
* . liM4&nv.* 3S2nti Bh45 g 273 ln2i 4rlBS2n-415l
industrial and Commercial Handlers

n T.-mT -' ^I-'rn m- T-i .r3 r", rn-T-'-F--n-


Salvation
Monticello Unit.


Army,


Joan Linn was born and raised in
Jefferson County to Helen and Ed
West Davis, living in and around the
Monticello area, near the old Texas
Hill. She is married to Birey Linn
and they have four children, seven


grandchildren


and a great-great


grandchild. She is a homemaker to her husband and
children. She collects cookbooks and is "really into
genealogy" about the area and family history.


FLORIDA COOKING'


*Recipes
*Cleaning,
Preparing & Storing
Wild Game
*Curing & Smoking
*Making Sausage &
Bologna
*Microwave
Cooking
*Glossary
*Equivalents
*Substitutions


A


Wad 4t5ce


*Weights & Measures
*Can Sizes
*Herbs & Spices
*Helpful Cooking Hints
*Helpful Household Hints
*Detailed Drawing
On How To Build
& Use Your Own
Water Oven/Smoker
Historical Recipes and
Little Known Facts About
Florida's Wildlife


Augilahble at.
Jacksoa 's Drug Store
Mostieello, FL
MTe Moatielleo ews
180 West WaskMigto. St.
MonticeUel, FL
850-99 7-3568


Phone Discounts Available to CenturyLink customers

The Florida Public Service Commission designated CenturyLink
as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier or ETC within its service
area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service is
to provide all Florida citizens access to essential telecommunica-
tions services.

CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services
for rates from $16.40 to $17.00 per month for residential custom-
ers and $24.00 to $31.00 per month for business customers. This
includes access to long distance carriers, Emergency Services,
Operator Services, Directory Assistance and Toll Blocking. Use of
these services may result in added charges. Specific rates for your
areas will be provided upon request.

CenturyLink offers qualified customers Lifeline and Link-Up
Service if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements.
Lifeline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic
phone charges (including a waiver of the Federal Subscriber
Line Charge), as well as toll blocking at no charge and a waiver
of the deposit if toll blocking is selected by qualifying customers.
Link-Up Service provides a discount on installation charges and
charges to move service.
If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call CenturyLink at
1-800-201-4099 or visit www.centurylink.com/lifeline with questions
or to request an application for the Lifeline/Link-Up programs.




CenturyLink-
lifeline NON-SAU www.centurylink.com


By: Debbie Snapp
ECB Publishing
Staff Wriier


Meet Your


Neighbor


Joan Linn


cir
00
>


In 1111011114.


-- --------------


www. ecbpu blishing. corn


Monticello News 3A







4A Monticello News


OUND


www. ecbpublishing.cor


EFFERSON


Wednesday, February 16, 2011


COUNTY


Fndraisihg Dinners At 74e Woman'as ea46


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
During the January
meeting of the .

Club the Christmas "
Lights Contest Winners 4
were announced. And the' -
winners were... Teresa
Kelley, on West Madison. "
first place and $35; and
Elizabeth Robinson, East 4't 7 ,
Pearl, second place and $301. i-' ''
Next year the membership, "
hopes to offer an even bigger
award. 4P
The club members also
made a generous donation of
$500 to the Cops and Kids
Christmastime program, a
charity of the Jefferson .
County Sheriff's Department cane from


TEEN DATING VIOLENCE

AWARENESS AND

PREVENTION MONTH


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
In observance of
National Teen Dating
Viole nce e
Awareness and
Prevention Month,
the Jefferson
County Health
Department
encourages resi-
dents to increase
awareness and
education about
teen dating vio-
lence. Dating vio-
lence is control-
ling, abusive and
destructive behavior in a
romantic relationship. It
may include verbal, emo-
tional, physical and sex-
ual abuse. Both boys and
girls can be victims of
dating violence.
According to the
"Study On Teen Dating
Violence" (Teenage
Research Unlimited
2005,) one-in-five teens
reports having been hit,
pinched, slapped or
pushed by a dating part-
ner. Many studies indi-
cate that as dating rela-
tionships become more
serious, the potential for
and nature of violent
behavior esca-
lates. Patterns of dating
violence behavior often
start early and can carry
through into adult rela-
tionships. Dating vio-
lence may cause lasting
harmful health effects.
Studies indicate those
who experience dating
violence are more likely
to participate in binge
drinking, fighting or
smoking and are at an
increased risk of suffer-
ing from mental illness
(Seave & Lockyear, 2004.)
It's never too early to
talk to your teen about
healthy relationships
and dating violence.
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Do your own research on
teen dating violence to
get the facts before talk-
ing to your teen. Provide
your teen with examples












of healthy relationships,
pointing out unhealthy
behavior. Ask questions
and encourage open dis-
cussion. Make sure you
listen to your teen. Keep
it low key Don't push if
your teen is not ready to
talk. Try again another
time.
Remind your teen
that they have the right
to say no and must


respe
ers. I
relat
unco
ward



I


'ct the rights of oth-
[f your teen is in a
ionship that feels
mfortable, awk-
Sor frightening,
assure them
that they can
come to you.
F o r


more informa-
tion about teen
dating abuse or
to help find sup-
port for some-
one in need, con-
tact the
National Teen
Dating Abuse
Helpline at 1-
866-331-9474 or go to
www.lovelsrespect.org
or visit the Dating
Resource Center website
at www.nve.org To
learn more about DOH
programs, visit the DOH
Sexual Violence
Prevention Program
website at www.doh.
state.flus/famIly/svpp
or call 850-245-4455.


: i- fi \ r t .Zif a

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." r S'" ggjf S i 8il -iB"" BBS, 8BB .- ." '.'fl'
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that
provides local chil-
dren with bicycles.
The monies for this
particular charity
the MWC December
Christmas Auction.
The next fundraiser
for the MWC is the
"Country Dinner," to be
held on Thursday, Feb. 17,
beginning at 5 p.m. at the


member's clubhouse located at 975 East Pearl
Street.
The ladies will be serving chicken purlieu,
grilled sausage, potato salad, sweet potato
Ssouffl6, slaw, macaroni and cheese, butter
beans, greens, a variety of homemade
\a cakes and southern sweet tea and coffee.
S\ The ticket cost is $8, and tickets may
,be purchased in advance at The
Peddler's Marketplace, Milady's Shop,
S Monticello Opera House, or from any
/ Woman's Club member. You can also
P contact President Ethel Strickland at 850-
9 97-3382 or Dianne Braren at 850-997-3729
r fotr more information.
SFollow ing this fundraiser will be a "Spaghetti
Dinner and Gospel Sing," to be held on Thursday,
March 25 from 5 to 7 p.m. also at the clubhouse.
Tickets will be sold for an $8 donation, $5 for chil-
dren. Canned foods will be collected at this time to
be donated to the local food banks.
Monies collected for the MWC stays in Jefferson
County and is used for college scholarships, build-
ing upkeep and miscellaneous charities.
The club members meet at noon on the first
Tuesday of each month at the clubhouse. The
Executive Board meetings will be held from 9 to 10
a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the
home of Club President Ethel Strickland.


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Wednesday, February 16, 2011


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


EFFERSON


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


KUNNUN XI 1!


LALMN0AI


FEBRUARY 17
Country Dinner at the
Monticello Woman's
Club on Thursday begin-
ning at 5 p.m. 975 East
Pearl Street. Enjoy
Chicken, Purlieu, grilled
sausage, potato salad,
sweet potato souffle, slaw,
macaroni and cheese,
butter beans, greens, a
variety of homemade
cakes and southern sweet
Stea and coffee, for just $8.
Dine-in or Take-out.
Contact Club President
Ethel Strickland at 850-
997-3382 or Dianne
Braren at 850-997-3729 for
more information.
FEBRUARY 17
Jefferson County Title I
Parent Involvement
Committee School
District 2 Member
Sandra Saunders will
host an area "Pep Rally"
meeting, along with
School Superintendent
Bill Brumfield, 6 p.m. on
Thursday at Bethel AME
Church, 410 East York
Street, to provide infor-
Smation on parent involve-


concerns about the edu-
cation of your child.
FEBRUARY 17
The CHP Savvy'Senior
monthly outreach pro-
gram, sponsored by
Capital Health' Plan, will
begin at 12 p.m. on
Thursday at the
Monticello Opera House.
This free monthly pro-
gram is one in a series of
lunch and learn pro-
grams for older adults
who want to learn more
about creating and main-
taining healthy, happy,
and active lifestyles. The
program will be present-
ed by Melissa Dancer-
Brown, RD, LD/N. Bring
a bag lunch, drinks will
be provided. For more
information about this
program and to make
reservations call 850-523-
7333.
FEBRUARY 17
You may qualify for assis-
tance from Capital Area
Community Action
Agency Call Pat Hall or
Melissa Watson at 997-
8231 for additional infor-


ment and upcoming mation. They can tell you
activities to be held at what services are cur-
Jefferson Elementary rently being provided.
":School and the Jefferson CACAA will be working 9
County Middle/High a.m. to 2 p.m. on the third
School. Brumfield will Thursday at the First
|speak about district Baptist Church.of Lloyd.
indeavors and will The CACAA needs
address questions and homes in Jefferson






GEORGE WILLIAM

BISHOP
George William Bishop, age 91, died at Henry
* County Medical Hospital on February 11, 2011.
He was born June 13, 1919 in Aucilla, Florida,
,the son of George Thomas Bishop and Alice Eva
Anderson Bishop. Mr. Bishop was preceded in death
by his parents and a sister Vera Bishop Jones. He is
survived by his wife, Nancy Gaskins Bishop and his
daughter LuAnn Cowan, her husband Dean, and
grandchildren, Christopher Cowan and wife Katie
.and Ashley Cowan, and great granddaughter, Rylee
'Schell. Also surviving Mr. Bishop is a brother
Wilbur Hubert Bishop of Valdosta, GA. and a sister
Muriel Bishop Taylor of Monticello, Florida as well
as three nieces and one nephew.
Mr. Bishop was retired from Delta Airlines and
he had a septic tank business for many years in the
:Fayette County area. He was a veteran of World War
II serving in Okinawa. He was of Baptist faith.
Visitation was held Monday, February 14, 2011,
.from 4:00 6:00 p.m. at the C F Mowell Funeral Home
'in Fayetteville, Georgia and will.be held February
116, 2011 from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. at Beggs Funeral
IHome Monticello Chapel, 485 E. Dogwood Street,
'Monticello, Florida, with a graveside services to fol-
ilow the visitation at Bishop Cemetery in Aucilla,
Florida. Memorials may be sent to Georgia Baptist
!Children's Home, Central Office, P. O. Box 329,
.Palmetto, Georgia.



M& R

Co s tu i dS I dnI

Lic. # CBC 1256821


County for weatheriza-
tion. The Weatherization
Assistance Program
reduces heating and cool-
ing costs by improving
the energy efficiency of
the home. Call for an
appointment. This is free
to the client.
FEBRUARY 17
Magnolia Garden Circle
meets at 12 p.m. on the
third Thursday at a loca-
tion to be determined
each month. Contact
Circle Chairman Chantel
Romaine at 850-997-6716
for more information.
FEBRUARY 17
Jefferson County Lions
Club meets at 1 p.m. on
the first Tuesday and at 5
p.m. on the third
Thursday of each month
at the Rare Door
Restaurant, in the meet-
ing room on North
Cherry Street. For more
information contact Lion
Debbie at 850-997-0901,
leave message.
FEBRUARY 17
AA meetings are held
weekly at 8 p.m. on
Thursday at the Christ
Episcopal Church annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information
call 997-2129 or 997-1955.
FEBRUARY 17
Organic lunch at noon on
Thursday at One Heart
Earth Center;. free of
charge, donations most
welcome. Meat free,
wheat free, sugar free,
dairy free, pesticide free
and still delicious. Join
Sam, Sallie, Toni and
Cindy as they serve the
finest the Earth has to
offer in an elegant style.
Email to oneheartearth-
center@embarqmail.com
or call 850-997-7373 to
reserve. OHEC is a 501 c 3
non-profit.
FEBRUARY 18
Rotary meets at 12 p.m.
on Friday at the First
Presbyterian Church in
the fellowship hall for
lunch and a meeting with
a program and speaker.
Contact President Bill
Watson at 850-997-2591 or
member. Mary Frances
Gramling at 850-997-3657
for more information.
FEBRUARY 18
Monticello Jamboree is
held 7 to-11 p.m. every
Friday evening at 625
South Water Street, just
three blocks north of the
American Legion Otto
Walker Post 49. Enjoy the
evening with friends and


family for some good
clean fun and dancing to
a live band, great music
and a big dance floor. For
questions or concerns
contact Morgan at 850-
933-8138 or Bobby
Connell at 850-445-0049.
There will be doorprizes,
cold soft drinks and
snacks.
FEBRUARY 18,19,25,26,
27 AND MARCH 4,5.
Steel Magnolias on stage
at the Monticello Opera
House on Friday and
Saturday, Dinner will be
available by reservation
before the show. Carrie
Ann & Co will cater the
meal. For information
and reservations call the
Opera House at 850-997-
4242.
FEBRUARY 19
Jefferson County Title I
Parent Involvement
Committee School
District 5 Member
Charles Boland will host
an area "Pep Rally" meet-
ing, along with School
Superintendent Bill
Brumfield, at 5 pam. on
Saturday at Beth Paige
Missionary Baptist
Church, 379 Beth Page
Road, to provide informa-
tion on parent involve-
ment and upcoming
activities to be held at
Jefferson Elementary
School and the Jefferson
County Middle/High
School. Brumfield will
speak about district
endeavors and will
address questions and
concerns about the edu-
cation of your child.
. i FEBRUARY 19' '
Road CRU Car Club 5
p.m. every third Saturday
on North Cherry Street
in front of the Rare Door


restaurant, in downtown
Monticello. There will be
a 50/50 drawing and lots
of door prizes. Everyone
is welcome to join the
activities and see some
awesome cars. Contact
Ray Foskey at 997-0607 for
more information.
FEBRUARY 19
Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance program
aimed to maximize
refunds by claiming cred-
its and deductions to be
held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
every other Saturday
beginning today, at the
Jefferson County Bailar
Public Library Trained
IRS Volunteers and VITA
Service Clients will share
their experiences with
the free tax-prep-and-fil-
ing service.
FEBRUARY 19.
Your Ayurvedic Body
Type and The Best Foods
For You will be presented
by Leslie Hanks, founder
and director of Yoga
Unlimited, from 9:00 to
11:30 a.m. on Saturday at
One Heart Earth Center.
Learn how the foods you
love to eat can create and
maintain your ideal
body weight. Learn the
wisdom of Ayurveda,
the ancient yogic sci-
ence of radiant good
health and longevity.


Learn your body type:
Vata, Pitta, Kapha and
the best food for differ-
ent physiques. Call 850-
997-7373 to reserve or
email to oneheartearth-
c e n
ter@embarqmail.com
OHEC is a 501 c 3 non-
profit.
FEBRUARY 19
FCAT Blitz Camp is
held 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on
Saturday thru April at
the JCMHS Camp is
free of charge and is
designed to help stu-
dents achieve higher
levels on the new FCAT.
Transportation is avail-
able by calling School
Board Chairperson
Sandra Saunders at 850-
997-3555 or 850-567-0064.
The TCC Extended Day
Program sponsors
Camp.
THRU FEBRUARY
The works of artist Jeff
Whipple will be on dis-
play and for sale at the
Jefferson Arts Gallery
thru the month.
Located at 575 West
Washington Street in
downtown Monticello,
the Arts is open from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. on
Wednesday and
Saturday, or by calling
850-997-3311 for an
appointment.


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Jefferson County Sheriffs Office, Division of Emergency Management
is looking for Twenty (20)
Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Volunteers





CERT Is similar to the old Civil Defense organization from years ago; however It
concentrates on organlzlng and training volunteers to work together and respond to
emergencies and disasters. The program Is organized under the Jefferson County Sheif's
Office, Division of Emergency Management through a grant from the Federal Emergency
ManagementAgency (FEA)

The CERT team Is a valuable group In times of disaster The 21-hour program will
teach yoall aspects of disaster preparation and response forvolunteers. In order to be part
of team, It Is Imperative that you attend the full session. The classes will be held for six.
consecutive weeks every Thursday evening from 6:30 9:30 pm, starting on February
24, 2011 with a final drill on April 2, 2011 participating In a mock disaster that the newly
trained CERT members will work together and respond to.

The program concentrates on teaching individuals how to prepare for emergencies,
Work with local agencies, and work togetheron bringing aid to victims of a disaster.

No previous experience or physical fitness is required.

Participants must be at least 18 years of age.

Applications wil be taken on-site at the Emergency Operations Center, 169 Industrial Park
Blvd. until February 17, 2011. Please note a Background Check willbe conducted on all
applicants.













Call today (850) 342-0211 for more Information to be part of the CERT team!


KI-





YOUR
BUINESSk~nll







6A Monticello News


OUND


www.ecbpu blishing.com


EFFERSON


Wednesday, February 16, 2011'


COUNTY


School


Cont. From Page 1


Inspections


Cont. From Page 1


the district stands to lose
$489,099 in the coming
school year and another
$162,000 in the following
year from reduced prop-
erty taxes and per-pupil
funding.
Actually, the reduc-
tions would be higher,
according to Brumfield
and Chief Financial
Officer Marsha Willis.
That's because the
Governor's projected
cuts are based on
October's student
counts. Brumfield and
Willis say February's
local student count will
be lower because of the
recent closing of the
Department of Juvenile
Justice's New Life facili-
ty here.
What's more, the
Governor's proposed
cuts would come on top
of the loss of $130,000
from the local discre-
tionary quarter mill
levy, which runs out this
year (voters declined to
approve it for another
two years in the last elec-
tion), plus the loss of
$750,000 in federal stimu-
lus funding, which also
runs out this year.
Brumfield and Willis
credit the federal stimu-
lus money in particular
with helping the district
to retain nine to 11 posi-
tions that it would other-
wise have had to elimi-
nate during its recent
financial crisis.
"This is going to
plunge us into a deficit
again," Brumfield .said
of the proposed budget
cuts. "It will mean hav-
ing to cut jobs."
Willis added that the
district would likely be
able to absorb some of
the positions in the gen-
eral fund, but some
would definitely have to
be eliminated.
What's more, teach-
ers and district person-
nel who remain on the
payroll will experience a
salary reduction in
terms of the five percent
pension contribution,
Brumfield said.
He wasn't necessari-
ly slamming the
Governor; he under-
stood the latter had a job
to do, Brumfield said.
But he wanted the com-
munity to be prepared
for the likelihood of job
losses, he said.
"I was told at a
superintendents' meet-
ing last week that there
will be cuts," Brumfield
said. "I just want the
community to know


that. We're working on a
plan now. But we'll prob-
ably have to let some
people go. It will depend
on how much federal
funding we get."
And yes, even
though it was early in
the process and the
Legislature had yet to
weigh in on the issue,
the district had to plan
on the possibility of the
cuts, he said.
All the same, he
wanted to assure the
community and parents
in particular that the
students' education
would in no way be com-
promised, Brumfield
said.
"The children will
not suffer," he said,
adamant on the point.
Other school dis-
tricts across the state
face like challenge.
Indeed, the estimated
potential revenue losses
to districts range from
$133,000 and $450,000
respectively for smaller
ones such as Franklin
and Hamilton counties',
to $14.5 million and $36
million respectively for
larger ones such as
Pasco and Sarasota
counties'.
Brumfield said ini-
tial figures discussed at
the school superinten-
dents' meeting in
Tallahassee. last week
put the estimated job
losses statewide at 22,000
for teachers, 44,000 for
classroom aides, and
77,000 for bus drivers.
The Governor's pro-
posal also calls for a
reduction of local school
property taxes, called
the required local effort
(RLE), which percentage
the state sets. The RLE is
a local source of revenue
generation, as is the
additional optional prop-
erty taxes that local
school boards have the
discretion to set.
Others of the multi-
ple revenue sources that
fund school district
include state contribu-
tions from sales tax and
education trust funds,
and federal dollars. If
any one funding sources
is reduced and the oth-
ers remain static, the
overall effect is a reduc-
tion.
Other highlights of
the Governor's budget,
as reported in the media:
Slashing the budg-
et of the Department-of
Community Affairs, the'
state's growth manage-
ment agency, from $778


million to $110 million
and reducing its work-
force from 358 to 40
employees.
*Cutting the
Department of
Transportation by
$441.5 million; the
Agency for Persons with
Disabilities by $173.9
million; the Department
of Health by $170 mil-
lion; the Department of
Juvenile Justice by $108
million; and the
Department of Children
and Family Services by
$178.5 million.
The biggest job loss-
es would be the elimina-
tion of 1,849 positions in
the Department of
Children and Families,
representing the conver-
sion of three mental
health hospitals to pri-
vate facilities; and 1,690
positions in the
Department of
Corrections, from the
potential closing of two
state prisons.
Cutting five per-
cent from the rates that
the state pays to hospi-
tals, nursing homes and
other healthcare facili-
ties for the care of
patients on Medicaid,
the state-federal health
care program for the'
poor.
Forcing 655,000
public employees to
begin contributing five
percent of their pay to
the state pension fund.
The Governor's propos-
al also calls for cutting
some pension benefits,
including lowering the
amount that police offi-
cers and firefighters
receive for their years of
service.
*Implementing
more than $2 billion in
tax and fee cuts in the
next year, including a
$468 million cut in the
corporate income tax
and $508 million reduc-
tion in school property
taxes. Other cuts
include a reduction in
the. unemployment tax,
a cut in motor vehicle
fees, and a "tax holiday"
for a portion of the
taxes collected by the
water management dis-
tricts.
S* Nearly doubling
the Governor's office's
budget to $638 million in
order to bring the state's
economic development
efforts under his con-
trol.
The Legislature is
scheduled to begin in
2011 regular session on
March 8.


ities, because the state
required such annual
evaluations for certifica-
tion and licensing pur-
poses. But otherwise,
the department was
impotent to cite viola-
tions or effect correc-
tions.
"The violations that
we find now, we have no
avenue to enforce themr"
Matthews said.
His preference, he
said, was that inspec-
tions be required.
"These codes we cre-
ated because of the loss
of lives and property,"
Matthews said. "I
encourage you to let us
do these inspections."
By the same token,
such a course of action
raised questions, he
said. For example:
Would the inspections
apply within the city or
only in the county?
Would they apply to all
existing businesses or
only those with licens-
es? How would the
enforcement be done?
And how would the
funding be' handled,
given it would require a
full-time inspector?
County Attorney
Buck Bird noted that the
issue was one that had
come up a number of
times previously.
"It's always been
your position that you
don't have the money,
expertise or staff to con-
duct such inspections,"
Bird said. "That's how

Pedestrian


hear it straight from
the horse's mouth, as it
were.
Among the possible
uses of the $132,000 that
were briefly discussed
before deciding to
schedule the workshop
were the addition of a
bicycle lane to one of
the road resurfac-
ing/widening projects
identified on the
FDOT's five-year plan,
or using the money to
develop a countywide
bicycle/pedestrian net-
work.
But whether the
money can be combined
with an already identi-
fied resurfac-
ing/widening project or
the county network has
to be coordinated and
aligned with surround-
ing counties' networks
are among the several
unanswered questions.
David Hall was the
only member of the
public to address the
issue. He reminded
commissioners that the
county's comprehen-
sive plan also calls


the word 'may' came in."
So there was no
problem with the use of
the word 'may' in the
ordinance,
Commissioners
Betsy Barfield asked.
"There's no problem
that has surfaced yet
with may and shall,"
was Bird's lawyerly
response. "It's a matter
that's been in confusion
for a long time."
Commissioner John
Nelson, Whose back-
ground is in firefighting
and who is well versed
in the state law, said the
county indeed had a
responsibility under the
law to do the inspec-
tions.
"We may substitute
'may', but that's not
what the statute says,"
Nelson said. "My take is
that, however you look
at it, we adopted the
state statute and now the
responsibility is upon
us.''
What's more, the
state required that the
person doing the inspec-
tions had to be certified,
he said. And once an
inspection was initiated,
it opened the door to a
seek-and-search investi-
gation, he said.
Nelson disagreed
that the inspections
would be heavy-handed,
burdensome or unpleas-
ant. He said the process
could serve an educa-
tional purpose, helping
businesses to come up to


development of horse
trails.
"Our plan says
we're going to encour-
age bicycle, pedestrian
and horse trail," Hall
said. "Don't forget
horse owners."
Others of the proj-
ects identified on the
FDOT's five-year plan
that didn't generate
much discussion
included the resurfac-
ing and widening of the
Waukeenah Highway
(CR-259) from Gamble
Road (SR-59) to U.S. 27
in 2012, $1.4 million


code for the sake of pub-
lic safety
"The person doing
the inspections should
know how to enforce the
ordinance reasonably,"
Nelson said. "It's time
we move into the 21st
century"
He said all buildings
used or accessed by the
public should be inspect-
ed once a year, with the
exception of residential
structures. As for exist-
ing businesses, the rules
weren't as stringent as
they were for new struc-
tures, he said.
"You don't want to
shut down a business,
but you want it to come
up to standard," Nelson
said.
Matthews agreed.
"The way I look at
inspections, this is not
fault finding," he said.
"To me, it's a matter of
education and of point-
ing out potential haz-
ards that may seem
minor to the person.
Preventing property
damage and injury is
better than addressing
the problem after the
fact."
Nelson concurred.
"The key is not to
arm twist somebody but
to provide for safety and
prevent liability," he
said.
Commissioners
asked for time to digest
the proposal, for a more
thorough discussion ata
later date.

)nt. From Page 1


allocated for this proj-
ect; extension of the
sidewalk from Willow
to Holly streets on U.S.
90 West in Monticello in
2013, $418,000 allocated;
resurfacing and possi-
ble widening of
Whitehouse Road in the
Lloyd area during the
current year, $922,000
allocated; and paving of
a three-mile stretch of
Watermill Road in the
Lloyd area sometime
this year or next,
$500,000 allocated, with
the county to con-
tribute the balance.


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sifids.com


i







Wednesday, February 16, 2011


OUND


www. ecbpublishing. comr


EFFERSON


Monticello News 7A


COUNTY


Main Street Speakers Series Presents...


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Main Street Monticello presents
"Finding Black History," by Titus
Brown, Ph.D. The program will be
held at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 21 in
the Courthouse Annex on South
Water Street, between the old
Jefferson County High School and
the Jefferson County Bailar Public
Library.


Dr. Brown is a professor of histo-
ry at Florida Agricultural and
Mechanical University (FAMU) in
Tallahassee. He works with the Black
Archives, Riley House and historic
preservation organizations. He will
offer a short presentation on the chal-
lenges and rewards of researching
the history of African Americans,
and entertain questions from the
audience.
This program is free and open to


BoosC?&6 ; read "7a (aIw '
DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
IIRA A 3 The Library Club will meet on its
n RuH U i n usual third Monday, Feb. 21 this
month. The book will be "The Lacuna,"
Sby Barbara Kingsolver. A good discussion
.1 N 1 I .S was had last month on the reading of
S. "The Piano Teacher."
S7 H E L A CU,.NA : A list of three titles is to be consid-
ered for the March, 21 meeting. Two are
classics... "Rebecca," by duMaurier and
S"4 Tale Of Two Cities," by Charles
Dickens. The third is "The Patron Saint
Of Liars," by Patchett. (This title is not
,, available at the local library, so that may
be an issue for some.)
So, bring a few questions to discuss
for the February book. If anyone is hav-
ing difficulty getting a copy of the book,
P .- *. contact 'coordinator Abi Vandervest at
-.,-- i -.- -.-. r. douwahnadance @yahoo.com

Know Your


Ayurvedic


DEBBIE SNAPP
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
One Heart Earth
Center will offer a
workshop on "Your
Ayurvedic Body Type
And Best Foods For
You," 9:00 to 11:30 a.m.
on Saturday, Feb. 19.
It is the most natu-
ral thing in the world to
love what you eat.
These same foods cre-
ate and maintain your
ideal body weight. This
is the wisdom of
Ayurveda, the ancient
yogic science of
Radiant Good Health
and Longevity.


Leslie
founder and
Yoga Unli
explain how
and use this
The threat
t Vata, Pitta,
define our
and the bes
es for
physiques.
"If only I
what to eat
knows. Thi
is based'
Tastes of
Sweet, Si
Pungent, ar
Hanks
Yoga Unlin
in Tallaha


Body Type
Hanks, years. In 2004, it entered
d director of the National Registry of
mited, will Yoga Schools, with the
v to discover designation of RYS 200.
s knowledge. Students can enroll and
e energies: become registered yoga
and Kapha, inistrutctors.l' -
body type This will be an
t food choic- informative, enjoyable,
different and doable time for all
We often say, participating.
really knew Participants will also
:." Ayurveda have the opportunity to
s knowledge take the Ayurvedic
in "The 6 Cooking Class.
All Foods: Email to oneheart-


our, Salty,
id Bitter."
has had the
united Studio
ssee for 18


Kidsfest Celebrates
DEBBIE SNAPP The Kids
ECB Publishing a.m. to 4 p.]
Staff Writer Bring the w
It's hard to believe that it's worth of
already been 10 years since Kids fun! There w
Incorporated began throwing a com- pony rides, b
munitywide party for children and hands-on-act
families... 10 years since 1,500 people children. Th
attended the first Kidsfest held at the dler's area j
North Florida Fairgrounds. Live enterta:
Kidsfest has since grown to more and refresh
than 100 exhibitors drew more than General Ad]
4,000 attendees, exhibitors, entertain- donation of
ers and volunteers last year. activities are
To celebrate its tenth year of Sponsors
Kidsfest, Kids Inc is throwing two big as applicatii
events; from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, entertainers
May 6, there will be a dinner and www.kidsin
dance. Beer and wine will be avail- For more
able. jmiller@kids


e a r t h c e n -
ter@embarqmail.com
or call 850-997-7373 to
reserve. OHEC is a 501 c
3 non-profit.


10 Years
fest will be held from 10
m. on Saturday, May 7.
hole family for a day's
good old-fashioned
ill be a giant water slide,
bounce houses, plenty of
ivities and games for the
ere' will even be a tod-
just for the little ones.
inment will be provided
iments will be sold.
mission is a minimum
$2 per person and all
free.
ship applications as well
ons for exhibitors and
are available at
corporated.org/events
information email to
sincorporated.org


the public. For more information, call
.Anne Holt, project manager for
Main Street Monticello at 850-997-


5110 or leave a message at 850-445-1390
or go to www.mainstreetmonticel-
lo.org


p.! .1


L0I


Dining Out Guide
Dining Ou Gide


RESEIRVATiWMS RECOMMENDED
-i- (850)321-7102
S1370 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL


--


Midnight liuffle
Rich truffle pieces blended with dark, decadent
cocoa fudge and creamy vanilla soft serve.


-I-N ,;ju aI.l-llu .m" .UI .
850-997-1202
Located at the
BP Truckstop in Lloyd I-10 and
Hwy 59 (Exit 217)


v I


We, the family of the late' Shedrick Lopez
Hagan Sr, would like to express our sincere
appreciation to everyone for all the lobe and
concern shown to us during the illness and
passing of our beloved.Shedrick.
Thank you for the prayers, cards, flow-
ers, phone calls, visits, gifts, food and words of encouragement provided in
our time of bereavement.
A special thank you to the doctors and nurses who cared for Shedrick
during his stay at the Tallahassee Memorial MSICU, and to the Hagan &
Bradwell Funeral Service for a job well done.
May God continue to richly bless each of you and your family... is our
prayer a.inji


c he:at&S i ,
Fsr 4e llI

Str ea l, 1p
S d 1 -1 p


1874 Clubhouse Dr.
Valdosta, GA
229-242-7700


~----------------~-------~-~-


I


ragtosw'
uv'wo
wjottalal








8A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. com


Wednesday, February 16, 2011


HURCH


9472 South Jefferson Highway, Capps
U.S.19 @Highway 27
850-997-1066, 850-345-8623
revcharlesgsmith@aol.com
Pastor/Teacher Charles G. Smith, Sr.
Sunday School......................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship..........11:00 AM
2nd Sunday Youth......................11:oo AM
4th Sunday Service......................8:00 PM
Tuesday Prayer Meeting
and Bible Study..............................7:00 PM



325 W. Walnut Street Monticello
Pastor Wayne Cook 997-5545
Sunday Praise & Worship...........8:30 AM
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Traditional Worship...................11:oo AM
Youth Group................................5:30 PM
Wednesday
Bible Study................................... 4:15 PM
Music Academy...........................5:00 PM
Prayer Group Meeting.................5:15 PM




14492 V"au eenahw/.UP o 411
Wacissa 997-2179 or 997-1769
Pastor James Gamble
Sunday School...........................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning.........................10:55 AM
Sunday Bible Study.....................6:30 PM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting..........................6:30 PM
Youth Group:.............................6:oo PM
Choir Practice...............................7:30 PM.



7150 Apalachee Pkwy Tallahassee
www.chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick Burrus 850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash 850-459-6490
Sunday School........................o0:oo AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Children's Chapel........................11:oo AM
Sunday Evening...:....................6:00 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students


US 19 N 1590 N. Jefferson Street
Rev. Timothy Hildreth 997-3906
1285 Magnolia Ave.
Debra@monticellonaz@gmail.com

Sunday School.................................. 9:45 AM
Morning Worship..........................10:45 AM
Wednesday Evening
Supper.......................... .............. .....5:30 PM
Small Group Breakout...................6:30 PM
Bible Study & Prayer Meeting............6:30 PM
Saturday
Spanish Church Services...................7:30 PM




4124 Bassett Dairy Rd Monticello 997-8444
Email: ebcmonticello@hcsmail.com
Dr Dean Spivey, Pastor
Student Pastor, Don Self
Sunday,Worship Service.............8:30 AM
Sunday: Bible Study.......:.............9:45 AM
Worship Service......................11:oo AM
Choir Practice............................6:oo PM
Worship Service...........................7:00 PM
Wednesday
SChildren/Student Ministry...........3:30 PM
Senior Adult Choir Practice...........7:oo PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends & Youth.6:oo PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...........6:00 PM



425 North Cherry Street Monticello 997-4116
www.ChristChurchMonticello.com
Rev. Buzz Yarborough
Communicating the Good News of Jesus Christ since 1840
Sunday 9:00oo AM............Adult and Children Sunday School
10:00 AM ................................Holy Eucharist
Nursery provided for children under 5


780 Second Street Monticello 997-4947
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor
Worship Services 2nd and 4th Sundays
Sunday School (every Sunday)....9:3o AM
Sunday Worship.................. 11:00oo AM
Children's Worship............ 11:00oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study.......7:00oo PM


meii a


1565 East Washington Street
Monticello 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 90)
Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
Sunday Mass..............................11:ooAM
Wed. followed by Novena............7:00 PM
1st & 3rd Saturday
Spanish M ass................................7:00 PM


The Greatest Love Of All


PASTOR EDDIE YON
Restored Glory Christian
Center
Matthew 26 Chapter:
47 And while he yet
spake, 1o, Judas, one of
the twelve, came, and
with him a great multi-
tude with swords and
staves, from the chief
priests and elders of the
people. 48 Now he that
betrayed him gave them a
sign, saying,
Whomsoever I shall kiss,
that same is he: hold him
fast. 49 And forthwith he
came to Jesus, and said,
Hail, master; and kissed
him. 50 And Jesus said
unto him, Friend, where-
fore art thou come? Then
came they, and laid
hands on Jesus, and took
him.
As the world contin-
ues to "market love"
through the "holiday"
known as Valentine's
Day, I want us to stop for
a moment and meditate
on the:love God has for
us. It is, easy to denote
His love as uncondition-
al because Hebrews 13:5
tells us, "I (God) will
never leave us nor for-
sake us." In other words,
no matter what we do to
Him, He will always be
there for us. Now, as evi-
dence of being God,
Jesus had this same type
of love, which we see in
our text.
In verse 50 of
Matthew 26, Jesus, after
being betrayed, says to
Judas, "Friend, where-.
fore art thou come?" ...
can I reiterate that? He'
called Judas, the same
Judas who also kept the
treasury and stole from


it (John 12:6,) "Friend."
Why? Because, remem-
ber, Jesus is God, and as
God, He has to keep His
word: "I will never leave
you or forsake you."
Even though Judas had
forsaken Him, betrayed
Him, and stolen from
Him, God (Jesus) stayed
true to His promise by
still calling him
"Friend."
During the
Valentine's Day season,
this very promise is
something each
Christian should revisit,
for in its clarity, it
speaks volumes to say,
"Jesus loves me uncon-
.ditionally, and He will
never stop loving me." It
is the promise that
reminds us that we are
not alone, even though
we are single. It reminds
us that we are loved,
even when our spouse is
not that loving. He will
love us all the way
through life and straight
into eternity with Him.
He will still love us after
the clubbing, doing
drugs, having affairs,
stealing from our jobs,
and even stealing from
Him. Through anything
and everything, He still
calls us "friend."
John 15:13 tells us,
"Greater love hath no
man than this, that a
man lay down his life for
his friends." Who is this
man that would make
the greatest sacrifice
any man could make? He
is Jesus, The Greatest
Love of All! He died just
to spend an eternity
with us. He died to pay
the ultimate price for
our sin, so we wouldn't


Church of our Lord Jesus Christ, Inc
63 Tinnel Road
Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-0399
District Elder Tony Lane, Pastor.
Services:
Sunday
Bible School... ......................... .............:45AM
Morning Worship................................................11:o AM
Monday
Missionary Wings of Prayer.....................................5:00 PM
Wednesday
Noonday Prayer..................................................12:00 PM
Mid-Week Church Fasting Day
First Wednesday
Praise and Worship.............................................7:30 PM
Second and Third Wednesday
Prayer..................................................................7:00 PM
Bible Class .............................................................. 7:30 PM
Fourth Wednesday
Business Meeting........................ ............7:30 PM
1st, 3rd, 5th Saturday
Prayer.......................................................... ...............9:oo AM
* .Everyday
Morning Prayer................................................. 6:00 AM
(from home with deacon wives)




124 St. Louis Street .'Lloyd 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.com
Pastor George L. Smith
Sunday
Sunday School..............................9:15 AM
Praise & Worship.....................10:30 AM
AWANA (ages 3yr-6th grade).....5:oo PM
Impact 4Jesus (Grades 6th-College)5:30 PM
Praise & Worship.........................6:00 PM
Adult Choir...................................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Family Supper........................5:45 PM
W orship.....................................7:00 PM
Joyful Sounds Children's Choir...7:oo PM
5th quarter Youth........... ........7:00 PM
1st & 3rd Monday
Mighty Monday-Ladies Bible Study...6:3o PM
2nd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints.....................11:oo AM
3rd Thursday
W.W. Diners(Widows/Widowers outing)...5:30 PM
3rd Saturday
Brotherhood.................................8:00 AM


have to. He died to give
us abundant life and the
completed covenant of
God. No one could have
or would have done what
He did for us. And, He
did it all because He
loves us just that much.
If you would like to
have the Greatest Love
of All, Jesus Christ, as
your Savior, then pray
the following prayer:
God, I thank you for
loving me enough to
send Jesus to die for my
sins. I believe that His
death was for me, so I
accept Him as my Savior
right now. I thank you


Jesus for being my
Savior and loving me
enough to die for me.
Today, I welcome you
, into my life to be my
Lord and my Savior. And
this day I acknowledge
you as my Friend.
Restored Glory
Christian Center is
located at 1287 South
Jefferson Street, in the
Winn Dixie Plaza. For
more information about
the church and its vari-
ous ministries, visit
www.restoredglory.org
or call 850-997-RGCC
(7422,) or visit ,the
church.


Like as father
pitieth his children,
Sso the LORD pitieth them that fear
hink.
i..m .oss < .n -
Psrm 03:13 (KJV) -..
In a world wracked with conflict and disease, we -
may feel silly taking our personal problems to God.
Why shdotld we burden Him when He clearly has so
Much more on His plate? Why because He loves us,
listens to oui every prayer arid forever
stands ready to help.



7369 Boston Hwy.
850-997-1596
Bro. Art Beal, Interim Pastor

Sunday Bible Study:..........................10:oo AM
Sunday Worship...............................11:oo AM
Sunday Evening .............. 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Bible & Prayer Meeting....................... 7:00 PM


325 West Washington Street
Monticello 997-2349
Dr. Rick Kelley, Pastor
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:oo PM
Wednesday Bible Study.............6:30 PM
Children's Church Ages 4-6....11:30 AM
-Nursery for all services-



625 Tindell Road 3 Aucilla 997-2081
P.O. Box 163 Monticello
Pastor DarylAdams 850-251-0129
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship Service............11:oo AM
Choir Practice..............................5:00 PM
Worship Service..........................6:00 PM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study........7:oo PM


ANCIENT WTVISDOM FOR
MODERN LIFE ,
,- /???3 ./~-


I


-hlee


^^ *^^^


i^ipit








Wednesday, February 16, 2011


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 9A


CHURCH


World Of Life Brazil


Updates from Rick and Kim Parker


Word of Life BRAZIL


Dear Family and Friends: In two short weeks
we will be back in Brazil! We have had a wonderful
furlough visiting with family and friends and sup-
porting churches, butwe are anxious to get back
home.
We have some GREAT NEWS! Anne passed her
civics test with flying colors and is a sworn in U.S.
citizen! Thanks to all of you who prayed for her. An-
other blessing is that she and Greg were able to
raise about half of their support and will have
enough to live on until they can come back and
raise the remainder needed.
One of our goals this furlough was to raise the
funds needed to build a larger boat. Our present
boats have become too small to accommodate the
number of people we take on our trips, and many
times a year we have to search for a rental boat
when we have larger groups. This is both costly and
inconvenient, so please pray with us that these
funds will become available in His timing.


Speaking of groups coming -
down, two weeks after we arrive in
Brazil, we have 17 students from
Liberty University and five doctors
from Nehemiah Network coming to
do medical missions in about half
of our river villages. This trip is
one of the highlights of our year,.
and such a blessing to the river peo-
ple! Please pray, as the only rental
boat available isn't as large as we
would like it to be, so we will have a
lot of "close fellowship." Please re-
member to pray for them on March ,,-. ws,
10 as they go through customs with
so much medicine and supplies. Pray for the stu-
dents especially, that God will use this time in their
lives to open their hearts and eyes to missions.
As we think back over our time here in the
USA, we are truly blessed to have so many friends


who have made this furlough so amazing. Thanks
to all of you who have opened up your hearts and
homes to us. Words fall short in expressing our
gratitude. We count on your prayers.
Stay in touch at Kim32461@yahoo.com or 336-
553-7397.


^BlIrI


AL 13 A


lowship hall. Food items
will be distributed once
a month; the amount
will be on a per per-
son/family, based on a
family of four and ad-
justed to the family size.
To signup for this min-
istry, or for a list of items


Ancient Isdomi For Modern Life



ENTHUSIASM







n! AM


And whatsoever ye do, do it heartily, as to the
Lord, and not unto men.
Colossians 3:23 (KJV)


Life can be dull, and if we aren't careful, we can
get into the rut of carrying out our daily tasks
half-heartedly. When we have God in our lives,
we understand that everything we.do is for Him,
and when our fervor begins to fade, we can
remember God and recover our enthusiasm.




wy 27 South(1mile souh0twy 59)
Monticello 997-4226
Rev. J. W. Tisdale
Sunday Morning...................... :30 AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible..............................7:00 PM


13 Barrington Road Monticello 850-997-8747
Rev. James Mack, Pastor
Sunday School..................(Every Sunday)...9:45 AM
Morning Worship...........(1st & 3rd Sundays)nl:oo AM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting- ....................................
(Thursday before 1st & 3rd sunday)............. 7:30 PM.


290 East Dogwood Street Monticello 850-997-2252
Rev. Sharon Schuler, Pastor
Sunday School.............................................. 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship(except last Sunday of month)..11:00 AM
SonShine Worship(last Sunday of month).........9:00 AM
Ladies Pilates Class-Tues. & Thurs..........3:30-5:00 PM
Sept. April:
Adult Bible Study-Wednesday..................6:30-7:30 PM
Men's Breakfast.................8:00 a.m. on 2nd Saturday


needed to keep the
pantry stocked, or to be-
come involved with this
ministry contact John W
'Schuler at 850-228-8828,
or 850-997-2252, or email
to eagleswingsmonti-
cello@yahoo.com Send
monetary donations to:
PO Box 513, 290 East
Dogwood Street, Monti-
cello, FL 32345. Serving
the Monticello/Jeffers'on
County communities be-
cause "Hunger Never
Takes a Vacation."
FEBRUARY 18
"Be In Unity" program
at Restored Glory Chris-
tian Center 7:30 p.m. on
Friday. Purity of the
Heart Ministries,, under
the direction of Sis. Ti-
wana Mutch Miller, wel-
comes the community to
come out and support
the ministry as it en-
courages love and unity
through a personal rela-
tionship with Jesus and
fellowship with one an-
other. Dinner will be
served. Rev. Eddie L.
Yon, pastor 850-997-
RGCC.


FEBRUARY 25-26
USDA Commodities
Food Program and Sec-
ond Harvest Food Bank
have joined with New
Bethel AME, Elizabeth
MB, Hickory Hill MB, Mt
Pleasant AME and
Philadelphia MB
churches to provide food
to anyone needing assis-
tance including the
needy, infants and the
elderly This is done
monthly with distribu-
tion from 9 to 10 a.m.
usually on the fourth
Saturday at the New
Bethel AME Church lo-
cated at 6496 Ashville
Highway Volunteers are
also welcome to come on
Friday 'evening at 6:30
p.m. to help bag the food
packages. Contact Nellie
Randall at 850-997-5605 or
850-997-6929 to volunteer
or for more information
about the program.
FEBRUARY 27
Springfield AME
Church invites the com-
munity to its "Annual
Black History Program,"
at 4 p.m. Rev. Henry R.


NEWHiOPUEMI NISRIES

415 E Palmer Mill Rd Monticello 997-1119
newhope415@yahoo
Pastors Ray and Angel Hill
Sunday School.......................... :oo AM
Sunday Worship........................11:oo AM
Sunday Prayer.............................6:00 PM
Wed. Family Training Hour........7:00 PM




'5593 Veterans Memorial Drive (Hwy 59)
Tallahassee 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev. Greg Roberts
Sunday School..........................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship......................:oo AM
Children's Worship...............11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal...........................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting..............................745 PM



4543 Waukeenah Hwy Monticello -850-264-0802
Pastor Stephen Lenzo

Sunday School............................................ 9:45 AM
Sunday W orship........................................ : AM
Nursery Provided
Tues Bible Study............................. ........... 6:30PM
www.sardis.his-body.com
email-lenzos@his-body.com


1599 Springhollow Road Monticello 212-7669
Pastor Marvin Graham
Sunday Discipleship Class.....................9:30 AM
Sunday Worship......................................10:30 AM
Healing Service
Every 2nd & 4th Sunday........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study.............................7:00 PM
Wed. Young People Bible Study.............7:oo PM
Wed. Counseling.....................5:30 PM-8:30 PM
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study..............................7:00 PM
Sunday Worship....................2:00 PM-4:oo PM
Thurs. Jail Ministry...............7:00 PM-9:oo PM
AA Tuesday....................................... ...8:oo PM


Griffin will be speaker of
the hour, along with
the Ford Chapel AME
Church Choir, of Monti-
cello. For more informa-
tion about this 4th
Sunday program, con-
tact the church at 850-
997-5400. Rev. Stefon
McBride, pastor.
MARCH 6-12
National Week of Prayer.
Churches can partici-
pate individually or
through community cir-
cuits. This effort does


not exclude any
churches. Everyone is
invited and encouraged
to participate. This was
formerly the Black
Church Week of Prayer
and has been renamed
the National Week of
Prayer for the Healing of
HIV/AIDS, an effort
under the Balm of
Gilead. For more infor-
mation and ideas go to
DevedaBellamy@doh.st
ate.fl.us or call 850-606-
8268,or 850-210-9213


285 Magnolia St Monticello 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr. David E. Walker, Pastor
Sunday School......................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning.....:.:.. ...........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:30 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Wed. TRAC Club for teens...........7:oo PM



3862 Tram Rd. Monticello 997-6774
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas
Sunday School..........................10:o0 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........ll:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:oo PM
Wednesday Worship....................7:00 PM



Highway 259 Monticello 997-5018
Min. Tobbie Berrian III, Pastor
Sunday School.............................9:30 AM
Sunday Morning Worship..........11:oo AM
Wednesday Bible Study................7:30 PM



1206 Springfield Road Lloyd 997-TLC7 (8527)
Pastors Tim and Beverly Buchholtz
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com

Sunday.............................................. 10:30 AM
Sunday Morning Praise and Worship
Children's Church
Infants & Toddler Nursery
W ednesday..........................................7:00 PM
Praise & Worship
Adult & Teen Bible Study
Young Explorers (K-5th Grade)



1287 South Jefferson Street 997-RGCC (7422)
www.restoredglory.org
Pastor Eddie and Elder Veronica Yon
Sunday Church Service.............10:oo AM
Thursday Church Service............7:oo PM
Monday & Friday
Women's Fellowship/ Fitness- 6:30 PM-7:3o PM
Tuesday Night Tae Bo...............6:30 PM-7:30 PM
Wednesday with Pastor........10:oo AM 2:00 PM
Saturday For Realville for teens- 6:00 PM 8:00 PM


81 Methodist Church Rd Waukeenah 997-2171
www.waukeenah-umc.org
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone
Sunday School............. .......... :45 AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Youth Group................. ......... 7:00 PM
Tuesday
Overeaters Anonymous ...........7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice.............7................7:00 PM
Youth Group............................ 7: PM
Family Fellowship
2nd Thursday of each month
Thrift Store open every Saturday,
8:0ooAM-12:oo PM
Every Monday AA Meets..............7:oo PM


FEBRUARY 16
EagleqWings Food
Pantry Outreach Min-
istry will be open for do-
nations from 9 a.m. to 12
p.m. on the first and
third Wednesday of the
month at First Presbyte-
rian Church in the fel-


. .. ..








1OA Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, February 16, 2011


PORTS


Lady Warriors Begin Softball Season


FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
Due to the Aucilla
Christian Academy var-
sity Lady Warriors soft-
ball season already
beginning, Athletic
Director Mary Beth
Bishop wished to
inform parents and stu-
dents that the originally
released schedule had
to be updated due to
some schools dropping
their JV programs and


other arising problems.
Coach Edwin Kinsey
has also determined the
roster for the Lady
Warriors.
Continuing with the
season, Aucilla faces off
against Altha, February
18 at 5 p.m., away;
Florida High, February
21 at 7 p.m., away;
Malone, February 25 at
5 p.m., away; and John
Paul II, February 28 at 4
p.m., home.
March sees the


Lady Warriors squar-
ing off against FAMU,
March 3 at 4 p.m., home;
Lincoln, March 8 at 4:30
p.m., home; Altha,
March 10 at 3:30 p.m.,
home; Munroe, March
11 at 3:30 p.m., home;
Malone, March 14 at 4
p.m., home; Liberty
County, March 15 at 5:30
p.m., away; Madison
County, March 21 at 6
p.m., away; Wakulla,
March 29 at 6 p.m.,
away; and Lincoln,


March 31 at 6 p.m., away.
April has the ladies
going in against Liberty
County, April 1 at 4:30
p.m., home; Mayo, April
4 at 4:30 p.m., home;
Wakulla, April 5 at 4:30
p.m., home; Florida
High, April 8 at 4:30
p.m., home; Madison
County, April 11 at 4:30
p.m., home; Rickards,
April 14 at 6 p.m., away;
and wrapping up the
regular season, North
Florida Christian, April


15 at 4:30 p.m., home.
The District
Tournament will be
hosted at Altha this
year April 18 and 19,
times to be announced
and April 21 at 6 p.m.
An asterisk (*)
denotes players who
will be splitting playing
time between both the
varsity and JV teams.
Playing for the Lady
Warriors this year are
seniors Taryn
Copeland, Kaitlin


Jackson, Taylor
Pridgeon, Julie Ann
Schwab and Sarah
Sorensen; juniors
Stacie .Brock and
.Sunnie Sorensen; soph-
omores Brooke. Kinsey,
Whitney McKnight,
Ashley Schofill, Pamela
Watt and Hadley Revell;
freshmen *Elizabeth
Cone; seventh grader
Taylor Copeland; and
sixth graders *Kelly
Horne and *Natalie
Sorensen.


Middle School Lady Warriors Wrap Up Season


FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The Aucilla
Christian Academy mid-
dle school Lady
Warriors wrapped up
the basketball season on
a 5-8 record.
When the young
Lady Warriors faced off
against Brookwood,
January 21, Aucilla was
bounced for a 34-14 loss.
The young athletes were
outscored 10-0 in the
first quarter; outscored
6-2 during the second
quarter; inched 12-10 in
the third quarter; and
outscored 6-2 in the
fourth quarter.
As a team the young
Lady Warriors missed
four attempts from the
three-point zone, hit two
of eight attempts from
the free throw line and
bucketed six of 18
attempts from the field
for 14 points.
Taylor Copeland
netted for six points,
with two rebounds and
three steals.
Maddie Everett
bucketed for six points,
with five rebounds and
three steals.
Emma Witmer


scored two points and
-snagged one steal.
On January 25 ACA
faced off against
Community Christian
and the young Lady
Warriors was dropped
for a 31-19 loss: ACA was
zipped 7-0 in the first
quarter; was downed 8-4
in the second quarter;
came back and took the
third quarter, 10-6; and
was outscored in the
forth quarter,
The young Lady
Warriors netted one of
three attempts from the
free throw line,
bucke4ted nine of 36
attempts from the field
and missed seven
attempts from the three-
point zone for 19 points.
Kayla Knecht
snagged seven steals.
Everett targeted for
eight points, with five
rebounds and two steals.
Copeland bucketed for
five points, grabbed
seven steals and three
rebounds. 5pts,
Sarah Tharpe
scored two points with
three rebounds.
Kelsi Reams scored
two points and had two-
steals.
Kayla Fulford netted


for two points, came
down with two rebounds
and snagged five steals.
In the final game of
the season the 'young
Lady Warriors hit the
hardwood against
Georgia Christian
January 27 and Aucilla
was dropped for a 29-10
loss.
ACA was at the end
of a 14-2 scoreboard
after the first quarter,
was down, 20-2 after the
second quarter, ACA
was behind, 25-6 follow-
ing the third quarter
and the fourth quarter
concluded with the 29-10
loss.
The young Lady
Warriors netted two of
five attempts from the
free throw line, hit four
of 25 attempts from the
field and missed ten
attempts from the three-
point zone.
Kinzi Mattingly net-
ted for three points with
two rebounds and one
steal.
Copeland bucketed
for two points, snagged
ten steals and three
rebounds.
Tharpe scored two
points and had two
rebounds


Reams netted for
two points and grabbed
four rebounds.
Knecht scored one
point and had one steal.
"Our ladies
improved a great deal in
the fundamentals since
the first day of prac-
tice," said Coach
Derrick Burrus.
"Unfortunately,
while taking plenty of
shots, we didn't find
the net enough to win
the last eight
games. This was a fun
season for all of us and
we appreciate the sup-
port.
"These girls, are
going to practice shoot-
ing baskets in the off
season to be ready for
next year. Half of the
girls will graduate to
JV but will leave a very
talented squad for mid-


dle school, so we have
a lot of hope for next


season," Burrus con
cluded.


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Monticello News 11A


PORTS


Varsity Warriors Season Stats


FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
With the conclusion
of the season on the
hardwood for the Aucilla
Christian Academy var-
sity Warriors, the season
statistics for both the
team and the individual
players have been fully
tallied.
As a team, the War-
riors bucketed 217 of 576
attempts from the field
(38%), netted 77 of 290 at-
tempts from the three-
point zone (27%) and
targeted 135 of 287 at-
tempts from the free
throw line (47%) for a
total of 800 points. They
collected 196 assists, 196
offensive and 328 defen-
sive rebounds for a total


Varsity Warriors
FRAN HUNT
ECB Publishing
Staff Writer
The Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy Warriors
split the first two games
during the District Tour-
nament and the season
is officially at an end
with ACA on a 7-15
record.
The Warriors won
the first game of the Dis-
trict Tournament, 37-34,
when they squared off
against John Paul II on
February 7.
As a team, Aucilla
netted 16 of 30 attempts
from the field, bucketed
two of 17 attempts from
the three-point zone and
hit three of 11 attempts
from the free throw line
for 37 points. They col-
lected seven assists, 16
offensive and 17 defen-
sive rebounds for a total
of 33 rebounds, with five
block/steals and nine
turnovers.
Tyler Jackson hit
one of four attempts
from the field and
missed four attempts
from the free throw line
for two points. He had
two assists, one offensive
and two defensive re-
bounds for a total of
three rebounds, with one
block/steal and two
turnovers.
Marcus Roberts
sank one of two at-
tempts from the field
and bucketed two of
seven attempts from the
three-point zone for
eight points. He also had
one defensive rebound
and one turnover.
Timmy Burrus hit
one of three attempts
from the field for two
points, with one defen-
sive rebound.
Brandon Darnell
targeted three of four at-
tempts from the field
and.missed one attempt
from the free throw line
for six points. He had six
offensive and one defen-
sive rebound for a total
of seven rebounds. He
also had six offensive
and one defensive re-
bound for a total of
seven rebounds.
Jay Finlayson
missed two attempts
from the field and six at-
tempts from the three-
point zone. He had one
offensive and two defen-
sive rebounds for a total
of three rebounds, with
two turnovers.
Corey Burrus
missed two attempts
from the field, missed
three attempts from the
three-point zone and
bulls-eyed two attempts
from the free throw line
for two points. He col-
lected four assists, two


offensive and one defen-


of 524 rebounds, with 155
block/steals and 349
turnovers.
Tyler Jackson netted
11 of.49 attempts from
the field (22%), hit four
of 18 attempts from the
three-point zone (22%)
and bucketed 17 of 36 at-
tempts from the free
throw line (47%) for 51
points. He collected 56
assists, eight offensive
and 26 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 34
rebounds, with 19
block/steals and 60
turnovers.
Marcus Roberts
bucketed 13 of 49 at-
tempts from the field
(27%), netted 28 of 75 at-
tempts from the three-
point zone (37%) and
targeted ten of 19 at-


tempts from the free
throw line (53%) for 120
points. He collected 14
assists, 15 offensive and
13 defensive rebounds
for a total of 28 re-
bounds, with 28
block/steals and 40
turnovers.
Timmy Burrus net-
ted six of 17 attempts
from the field (35%),
bucketed three of eight
attempts from the three-
point zone (38 %) and tar-
geted two of three
attempts from the free
throw line (67%) for 23
points. He had one as-
sist, one offensive and
three defensive re-
bounds for a total of four
rebounds, with four
turnovers.
Brandon Darnell


Split Two In District, Season Over


sive rebound for a total
of three rebounds, with
two block/steals and one
turnover.
Clark Christy buck-
eted three of seven at-
tempts from the field,
missed one attempt from
the three-point zone and
netted one of two at-
tempts from the free
throw line for nine
points. He had one as-
sist, three offensive and
eight defensive rebounds
for a total of 11 re-
bounds, with one
block/steal and one
turnover.
Josh Funderburke
targeted four of six at-
tempts from the field
and missed two attempts
from the free throw line
for eight points. He had
three offensive and one
defensive rebound for a
total of four rebounds
with one block/steal and
one turnover.
The Warriors faced
off against Malone Feb-
ruary 8 and Aucilla was
walloped for a 55-20 loss
to end their season.
As a team the War-
riors bucketed seven of
17 attempts from the
field, hit one of five at-
tempts from the three-
point zone and netted
three of eight attempts
from the free throw line
for 20 points. They col-
lected seven assists,
three offensive and 15 de-
fensive rebounds for a
total of 18 rebounds,
with three
block/steal/blocks and
19 turnovers.
Jackson missed one
attempt from the field
and missed two attempts
from the three-point
zone. He had two assists,
one defensive rebound,
one block/steal and four
turnovers.
Roberts targeted one
attempt from the three-
point zone for three
points, with one
turnover.
Timmy Burrus hit
one attempt from the
field and missed one at-
tempt from the three-
point zone for two
points. He also had one
defensive rebound and
two turnovers.
Darnell targeted
three of four attempts
from the field and
missed two attempts
from the free throw line
for six points. He had
two offensive and three
defensive rebounds for a
total of five rebounds,
with one turnover.
Kent Jones missed
two attempts from the
field, with one assist,
two defensive rebounds
and one turnover.
Finlayson missed
one attempt from the


field and missed one at-
tempt from the three-
point zone. He had two
assists, four defensive
rebounds, with two
block/steals and two
turnovers.
Corey Burrus tar-
geted two of three at-
tempts from the field
and missed two attempts
from the free throw line
for four points. He also
had two assists and two
turnovers.
Christy netted one of
three attempts from the
field and targeted two at-
tempts from the free
throw line for four
points. He also had two
defensive rebounds and
two turnovers.
Funderburke missed
two attempts from the
field and hit one of two
attempts from the free
throw line for one point.
He had one offensive and
two defensive rebounds
for a total of three re-
bounds, with three
turnovers.


bucketed 34 of 68 at-
tempts from the field,
netted one attempt from
the three-point zone
(100%) and netted 15 of
39 attempts from the free
throw line (38%) for 86
points. He collected
seven assists, 33 offen-
sive and 49 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 82
rebounds, with 17
block/steals and 29
turnovers.
Kent Jones netted 31
of 69 attempts from the
field (45%), hit 13 of 64 at-
tempts from the three-
point zone (20%) and hit
four of 16 attempts from
the free throw line (25%)
for 64 points. He collected
eight assists, 11 offensive
and 39 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 50
rebounds, with eight
block/steals and 19
turnovers.


Jay Finlayson buck-
eted six of 19 attempts
from the field (32%), net-
ted 17 o f 70 attempts
from the three-point zone
(24%) and hit one of four
attempts from the free
throw line (25%) for 64
points. He collected 29 as-
sists, nine offensive and
36 defensive rebounds for
a total of 45 rebounds,
with 16 block/steals and
46 turnovers.
Corey Burrus hit 22
of 109 attempts from the
field (20%), netted seven
of 32 attempts from the
three-point zone (22%)
and targeted 42 of 79 at-
tempts from the free
throw line (53%) for 107
points. He collected 57 as-
sists, 25 offensive and 25
defensive rebounds for a
total of 50 rebounds,
with 35 block/steals
and 81 turnovers.


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Clark Christy tar-
geted 32 of 72 attempts
from the field (44%),
sunk four of 22 at-
tempts from the three-
point zone (18%) and
netted 16 of 38 attempts
from the free throw line
(42%) for 92 points. He
had 19 assists, 45 offen-
sive and 79 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 424
rebounds, with 17
block/steals and 40
turnovers.
Josh Funderburke
bucketed 62 of 124 at-
tempts from the field
(50%) and netted 28 of
53 attempts from the
free throw line (53%)
for 152 points. He col-
lected five assists, 49 of-
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rebounds for a total of
107 rebounds, with 15
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Wednesday, February 16, 2011


SPLIT SEASONED
FIREWOOD
$89.00 full truckload
$50.00 1/2 truckload
look for sign just north of
Sorensens Tire. Delivery
Available. Call 850-251-9540
2/9-18,pd.
HAY FOR SALE round and
square bales.
Call 850-894-9407.
12/22,tfn,nc.
1991 SKYLINE
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME. 1,620 square feet.
Includes appliances. $9,000
Buyer must move. 850-562-3246
2/11,16,c.
GOATS FOR SALE- All ages,
Billies, Does + Kids. Call 997-
5771.
2/16,18,pd.
STEEL BUILDINGS
(CLOSEOUT)
Hard to Believe Deals
Ex: 39x57
Reg $19,156 Now $14,735
60x87
Reg $42,379 Now $32,599
Limited Call to Reserve
www.sunwardsteel.com
Source# 1IU
352-353-4047
2/16, 2/23, pd


1 Br / 1 Ba Grove Apartments-
1400 N. Jefferson, Monticello.
For elderly 62+ and disabled.
(Equal Housing Opportunity)
850-997-5321

S10/20,tfn,c.
Cooper's Pond- 1/1 & 2/1
Apartments w/ attached car-
ports, utility rooms and w/d
hook up. Call 850-997-5007.
10/6,tfn,c.


Commercial/Indus
Property with state hi
frontage. Corner lots.
both Harvey Greene
Highway 53 South. Ent
Zone Natural gas line,
water main, access to cit
ties, fire hydrant, and
from two power comr
Property has easy access t
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will b
suit tenant or short or Ion
lease. Call Tommy Green
973-4141.

Country cottage- very ci
great setting. Close to
631-0577.
Charming spacious h
home, in town. 631-0577
2/1


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(850) 997-4340
Realtor@timpeary.com
Good Rentals
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8 inch BACKHOE
y utili- SERVICES AVAILABLE
service Driveways, roads, ditches,
paines. tree and shrub removal, mow-
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town. MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
------ 509-8530 Quick Responses.
historic 6/22, tfn.


MONTICELLO CHRISTIAN ACADEMY has an immediate
opening for a Middle/High School teacher. Faculty candidates must
possess the following: A personal relationship with Jesus Christ,
can keep a well-ordered classroom, positive attitude, capable of
supporting, and enforcing the policies and procedures of MCA,
professional appearance, and teachable spirit. For more information
please contact the school office at 997-6048. Must have strength
in subjects of Math and English.
2/16,18,c.
The City of Monticello is accepting applications for POLICE PA-
TROL OFFICER. Requires a minimum of high school diploma
and Florida Police Standards. The successful candidate must live
within 25 miles of Monticello Police Station. Must complete a
Dept. field training program within the first month. Background
check required. Salary and benefit information available upon re-
quest. Submit to City of Monticello 195 S. Mulberry St. Monti-
cello, FL 32344 by 5:00 pm on Friday 2/25/2011. EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace.
2/11, 2/16, 2/18, 2/23/2011,c.
SHOP MECHANIC or helper ASE Certified. Apply in person only
at 1500 N. Jefferson, St. (A-tech). Must have transportation with
valid drivers license.

2/16,18,c.


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ticello News 9973568
Monb'cello News' 997-3568


L EGALS


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON GRANT
APPLICATION FOR CITY OF MONTICELLO PARK
DEVELOPMENT

The Monticello City Council will conduct a public hearing
on Thursday, February 24, 2011 at 6:00 p.m. to hear public input
on a Florida Recreation and Trails grant application for develop-
ment of the Water Street Park. The public hearing will take place
at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida. For
more information, contact City Clerk Emily Anderson at 342-
0292.

2/16/11,c.


NOTICE
NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN THAT David Hall, desiring
to engage in business under the fictitious name of Greyhaven
Farm, located in the County of Jefferson, State of Florida, intends
to register the same name with the Florida Department of State,
Division of Corporations, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes, February 16, 2011.

2/16/1 l,c.


Natural Bri dge Road over a branch
of t he St. Ma rks Rive r
Bridge Repl acement
Financial Project ID N 0. 413491-1 -32-01
Public Informat ion Meeti ng
Date: Thursday, February 17, 2011
Tim e: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p. m.
Place: Woodville Community Center, LiveOak Room
8000 Old Woodville Road, Tallahassee, FL 32305

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will conduct a Public
Information Meeting on the proposed improvements to Natural Bridge Road
over a branch of the St. Marks River, in Leon County.
This Meeting is being held to provide interested citizens an opportunity to
preview the proposed dedgn, ask questions, and/or submit comments
concerning the upcoming project. Department representatives will be
available to informally discuss the project and answer questions. The informal
Meeting will be held between the hours of 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.


Public Participation is
solicited without regard to
race, color, national
origin, age, sex, religion,
disability or family status.
Persons with disabilities
who require special
accommodations under
the Americanswith
Disabilities Act or persons
who require translation
services (free
of charge) should contact
Alana Webb, E.I. at
(850) 415-9447 at least
seven days prior to
the Meeting.


NA MEeting
Location


I`-. *


Project
Location






'I
b Q


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TA\ DEED

NOTICE IS HEREB Gl\ EN. Ilh.a Gene B.-ficldJ he holder?
of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed.
The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of
the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as fol-
lows:I


Certificate 143


Year of Issuance 2006


Description of Property: 04-1N-3E-0000-0073-0000 1.00 Acre
In N 1/2 of NE 1/4 of SE 1/4
ORB 553 P424

Name in which assessed: Jeanette Jones

All of said property being in the County of Jefferson, State of
Florida. This property may be subject to current year taxes.
Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the
property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest
bidder at the Jefferson County Courthouse, north door on the 9th
day of March, 2011, at 11:00 AM.

Dated this 18th day of January, 2011.
Kirk B. Reams, Clerk of Court, Jefferson County, Florida.

2/2,9,16,23/11, c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 11-08-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EARL EARNEST VANGATES,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of EARL EARNEST VANG-
ATES, deceased, whose date of death was November 18, 2010,
is pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division under probate file # 11-08-CP, the address of which
is I Courthouse Circle, Room 10, Monticello, Florida 32344.
The names and addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is required to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF C
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
| SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is February 9, 2011.

Attorney for Personal Representative
T. Buckingham Bird, Esq. Personal Representative
P.O. Box 247 LaCheryl Redman
Monticello, Florida 32345 716 Millard Street
(850) 997-3503 Tallahassee, Florida 32301


2/9,16/1 ,c.


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Wednesday, February 16, 2011


PORTS


Lady Warriors Second In District, On To Regional
FRAN HUNT games on the hardwood Tournament, which was 1, the Lady Warriors and had four rebounds, seven rebounds, four
ECB Publishing during the District hosted in Packston, FL squared off against Kaitlin Jackson tar- steals and one blocked
Staff Writer Tournament to finish, and began last Thursday. Malone and came out on geted for 11 points, shot.
The Aucilla second in the District In the first round of top of a 44-36 score- snagged nine rebounds, Funderburke netted
Christian Academy and they traveled on to the District board. with nine assists, three for six points and had
Lady Warriors split two compete in the Regional Tournament, February Sarah Sorensen tar- steals and one blocked three rebounds.


Kiefer Classic Success,



Event Donates To Shands



rt i .P I


ECB Publishing photo by Gory Bueschel
Scott "Storm" Goodlin (center), celebrates with teammates Chase Evans
and Joe Gibbson, after winning the Grudge Match.
2011 Kiefer Classic Match Winners
DCFC won the Tournament to become the 2011 Kiefer Classic Champions &
retained their NWA Tag team Titles.
Vordell Walker defeated Bobby Sanford to become the New Florida Wrestling
Guild Heavyweight Champion.
Mackenzie York & Riot defeated the Monroe Twins
Grudge Match- Storm, Chase Evans & Joe Gibson defeated "Killer" Kyle
Blizzard, Eric the Red & JL Lightning.


Recent county resi-
dent Scott "Storm"
Goodlin took place in
participating for a ben-
efit wrestling charity
event. The 2011 Kiefer
Classic event was a
huge success raising a
total of .$500, all of
which was donated to
Shand's Children's
Hospital.
The event held a
large array of matches
and interviews
throughout the night.
There were a number
of wrestlers including
Society X, Capital
Punishment, Team
Elite and Dark City
Fight club, who also
participated in the
event.
"I would definitely
like to thank all the
sponsors and workers,
I need to thank the
National Wrestling
Alliance, Fairview
Middle School,
Tallahassee Big Dog
Rescue and Wilson
Family Medicine"
Goodlin, praised.


A f

Free Delivery For
Prescriptions
SJackson's Drug Store
166 E. Dogwood
Monticello
850-997-3553
af o Q


Care


Free Blood
Pressure
Check

Gifts
Medication
Counseling


geted for 18 points and
grabbed six rebounds.
Tiffany Funde-
rburke netted for six
points and had eight,
rebounds.
Nikki Hamrick
scored three points, with
two assists and two
steals.
Anna Finlayson
bucketed for two points


shot.
Cheltsie Kinsley net-
ted for four points, with
four rebounds and two
steals.
Aucilla hit the hard-
wood against FAMU
February 4 and the Lady
Warriors were routed
for a 55-25 loss.
Sorensen bucketed
for four points, with


Finlayson bucketed
for six points, with two
rebounds.
Jackson bucketed
for five points, snagged
five rebounds, with six
assists, two steals and
two blocked shots.
SKinsley scored four
points.
Hamrick had three
rebounds.


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

A gl a o t j a c. (c O r Ow&

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water
bottles, laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food
cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans; beer cans, etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All Cardboard Products grocery bag, cereal boxes, food
boxes, laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.


Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center
'located at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at
any one of the collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of
our Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How
could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers,
washing machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not ac-
cepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be
turned into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello Offers Curbside pick-up for city res-
idents for recyclable items on each Wednesday Morning.
For further information on other items for disposal in the
City, please call Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations
& hours of operation for each individual site.
For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


.C f I Home
THE PRESCRIPTION FOR Health


Chrorati


LAFAYETT
C M R R A CI C
CLINIC-


PERSONAL INJURY &

WRONGFUL DEATH








Jon D. Caminez Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney

CAMINEZ & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.